H.R. 12455

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Material Information

Title:
H.R. 12455 child care, social services eligibility, treatment of drug abuse and alcoholism : brief description of Senate amendments
Added title page title:
Child care, social services eligibility, treatment of drug abuse and alcoholism
Physical Description:
ii, 18 p. : ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Congress. -- Conference Committees, 1976
Publisher:
U.S. Govt. Print. Off.
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Public welfare -- Law and legislation -- United States   ( lcsh )
Alcoholism -- Treatment -- United States   ( lcsh )
Drug abuse -- Treatment -- United States   ( lcsh )
Public welfare -- Law -- United States   ( lcsh )
Day care centers -- Law and legislation -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
CIS Microfiche Accession Numbers: CIS 76 S362-29
General Note:
At head of title: 94th Congress, 2d session. Conference committee print.
General Note:
Caption title.
General Note:
Reuse of record except for individual research requires license from LexisNexis Academic & Library Solutions.
Statement of Responsibility:
prepared for the use of the conferees, June 1976.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 024531531
oclc - 02584632
Classification:
lcc - KF49
System ID:
AA00022523:00001

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
        Page ii
    H.R. 12455--Description of senate amendments
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Statistical material
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
Full Text
./ -I ~
9 1 J


94th Congress
2d Session


CONFERENCE COMMITTEE PRINT


H.R. 12455


CHILD CARE;


I>


SOCIAL


SERVICES ELIGIBILITY;


TREATMENT OF DRUG ABUSE

AND ALCOHOLISM


Brief Description of





Prepared for the U:


Senate Amendments





se of the Conferees


0\OA A/8,


JUNE 1976


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U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON : 1976


J
5'


71-870


















COMMITTEE ON FINANCE
RUSSELL B. LONG, Louisiana, Chairmnon


HERMAN E. TALMADGE, Georgia
VANCE HARTKE, Indiana
ABRAHAM RIBICOFF, Connecticut
HAR RY F. BYRD, JR., Virginia
GAYLORD N E LSON. Wisconsin
WALTER F. MONDALE, Minnesota
MIKE GRAVEL, Alaska
LLOYD BENTSEN, T,"xas
WILLIAM D. HATHAWAY, Maine
F LOYD K. HASKELL, Colorado


CARL T. CURTIS, Nebraska
PAUL J. FANNIN, Arizona
CLIFFORD P. HANSEN, Wyoming
ROBERT DOLE, Kansas
BOB PACKWOOD, Oregon
WILLIAM V. ROTH, JR., Delaware
BILL BROCK, Teneee


MICHAEL STERN, Staff Director
DONALD V. MOOREHEA&D, Chief Minority Counsel


COMMITTEE ON WAYS AND MEANS
AL ULLMAN, Oregon, Chairmnan


WILB U R D. MILLS, Arkansas
1AMES A. BURKE, Massachusetts
DAN ROSTENKOWSKI, Ilinois
PHIL M. LANDRUM. Georgia
CHARLES A. VANIK, Ohio
OMAR BURLESON, Texas
IAMES C. CORMAN, California
WILLIAM 1. GREEN, Pennsylvania
,AM M. GIBBONS, Florida
YOE D. WAG GONNER,JB., Louisiana
JOSEPH E. KARTH, Minnesota
OTIS G. PIKE. New York
RICHARD F. VANDE R VEEN, Mighigan
$. J. PICKLE. Texas
HENRY HELSTOSKI. New Jersey
CHARLES B. RANGEL, New York
WILLIAM R. COTTER, Connecticut
FORTNEY H. (PETE) STARK, California
IAMES R. SONES, Oklahoma
ANDY JACOBS, JR., Indiana
ABNER I. MIKVA, Illinois
MA RTHA KEYS. Kansas
JOSEPH L. FISHER, Virginia
IAROLD FORD, Tennessee


HERMAN T.SCHNEEBELI, Pennsylvania
BARBER B. CONABLE, JR., New York
JOHN J. DUNCAN, Tennessee
DONALD D. CLANCY, Ohio
BILL ARCHER, Texas
GUY VANDER JAGT, Michigan
WILLIAM A. STEIGER, Wisconsin
PHILIP M. CRANE, Illinois
BILL FRENZEL, Minnesota
JAMES G. MARTIN, North Carolina
L. A. (SKIP) BAFALIS, Florida
WILLIAM M. KETCHUM, California


JOHN M. MARTIN, Jr., Chief Counsel
J. P. BAKER, Assistant Chief Counsel
JOHN K. MEAGOHER, Minority Counsel
(n)









H.R. 12455-DESCRIPTION OF SENATE AMENDMENTS
(All Provisions of Senate Bill Are a Committee Amendment)

Siioate amendment
section Dezcript ion

El0;ibiliiy for social services.-The House bill per-
mitted States to determine eligibility for social
services on a group basis through October 1, 1976,
by extending an HEW regulation which per-
mitted noncompliance with the statutory require-
ment which otherwise necessitates individual
eligibility determinations. The House bill applies
only to those States which provided services on a
group eligibility basis prior to October 1, 1975.
The Senate amendment strikes the text of the
Houe bill and substitutes a provision deleting all
Federal eligibility requirements for social services.
The sections of present law which would be elimi-
nated now provide:
(1) that each State must spend an amount
equal to 50 percent of its Federal social services
funds on services to persons who receive Aid to
Families with Dependent Children, Supple-
mental Security Income (or State supplemen-
tary benefits), or Medicaid;
(2) that fees for services not be charged to
welfare recipients or persons with incomes
below 80 percent of State median income
except as allowed by regulation;
(3) that federally funded service., not be
provided to persons with incomes above 115
percent of State median income and that they
be provided to persons with incomes between
80 and 115 percent, of State median income
only if fees related to income are charged.
2 Deferral of child care staidards.-Federal staffing
standards for child care serving children aged 6
week-- to 6 years were suspended from October 1,
1975 to February 1, 1976 under prior legislation.
The Senate amendment extends this suspension
retroactive to February 1, 1976 and forward to
October 1, 1977. (State law requirements would
have to be met, and standards could not be
lowered from September 1975 levels.)
(1)








H.R. 12455-DESCRIPTION OF SENATE AMENDMENTS
(All Provisions of Senate Bill Are a Committee Amendment)

Senate amendment
section Description
3 (a) Increased social services funding for child care.-
Through September 30, 1977, the Senate amend-
ment, increases the existing $2.5 billion limit on
social services funding at a rate of $250 million
per year ($62.5 million is provided for the re-
mainder of fiscal year 1976; $62.5 million for the
July-September 1976 quarter; and $250 million
for fiscal year 1977). The additional funding can-
not exceed the Federal funding due a State for
child care expenditures. The additional funds
would be allocated among the States on a popula-
tion basis (as is the $2.5 billion available under
current law).
3(b) Emphasis on employing welfare recipients.-Requires
States, to the extent they determine feasible, to
use the added Federal funding in a way which
increases employment of welfare recipients and
other low-income persons in child care jobs.
3(c) State grants to aid employment of welfare recipients.-
Permits States, without regard to usual title XX
requirements, to use the added Federal funding
under the bill to make grants to child care pro-
viders to cover the cost of employing welfare
recipients. These grants would be limited to
$4,000 per year per employee in the case of
proprietary providers thus providing (in conjunc-
tion with the tax credit under section (4)) full
Federal funding of employment costs up to $5,000.
(For public and nonprofit providers, which are
ineligible for tax credits, the limit on grants under
this section would be $5,000.) Grants could be
made under this authority only if at least 20
percent of the children served by the child care
provider have their care paid for through the
title XX program.
3(d) Increased matching for child -care.-Increases the
Federal matching rate for child care expenditures
from 75 percent to 80 percent. The increased
rate would apply only to the additional amount
of Federal funding provided under the amend-
ment.







H.R. 12455-DESCRIPTION OF SENATE AMENDMENTS
(All Provisions of Senate Bill Are a Committee Amendment)

Senate amendment
section De-cript ion

4 Expiration of welfare recipient tax credit.-The pres-
ent law provision granting a tax credit equal to 20
percent of wages to employers who hire persons
who receive Aid to Families with Dependent
Children is scheduled to expire June 30, 1976. The
Senate amendment would continue this provision
in effect, in the case of child care employers only,
through September 30, 1977. This section would
also limit the tax credit, in the case of child care
jobs, to a maximum of $1,000 per employee per
year.
5 Wa ;rer provisions and mnodification of famiily day care
reqi.;ir(nren ts.-The Senate amendment permits
State welfare agencies to waive the Federal
staffing requirements in the case of child care
centers and group day care homes which meet
State standards if the children receiving federally
funded care represent no more than 20 percent
of the total number of children served (or, in the
case of a center, there are no more than 5 such
children), provided that it is infeasible to place
the children in a facility which does meet the
Federal requirements. T'he section would also
modify the limitations on the number of children
who may be cared for in a family day care home
by providing that the family day care mother's
own children not be counted unlehs they are under
age 6. This change would apply retroactive to
October 1, 1975. This entire section would be in-
applicable after September 30, 1977.
6 Addicts and alcoholics.-Makes permanent certain
modifications provided under P.L. 94-120 govern-
ing funding of services for addicts and alcoholics.
The provisions, which expired January 31, 1976,
require that special confidentiality requirements
of the comprehensive Alcohol Abuse Act be ob-
served with regard to addicts and alcoholics,
clarify that the entire rehabilitative process must
be considered in determining whether medical
services provided to addicts and alcoholics can be
funded as an integral part of a State social services
program, and provide for funding of a 7-day
detoxification period even though social services
funding is generally not available to persons in
institutions.








COMPARISON OF CHILD CARE PROVISIONS: H.R. 9803

(VETOED BILL) AND H.R. 12455 (SENATE BILL) i
1. Suspension of Staffing Standards~
Public Law 94-120 suspended the application of Federal day care
staffing standards for pre-school children (aged 6 weeks to 6 years)
from October 1, 1975 to February 1, 1976. Such care would have to
meet State standards and staffing levels would have to be at least as
high as in September 1975.
H.R. 9S03 would continue this H.R. 12455 would continue this
suspension through June 30, suspension through September
1976. 30, 1977.
2. Additional Child Care Funding
Both bills would provide additional Federal social services funding
for State child care programs. Both bills would provide that the new
money would be available at a Federal matching rate of 80 percent as
opposed to 75 percent under current law. Both bills would allow States
to use the added money (at a 100 percent Federal rate) to make grants
to child care providers to meet the cost of hiring welfare recipients.


H.R. 9803 provided $62.5 million
for the remainder of fiscal 1976
and $62.5 million for July-
September 1976. No funding
was provided beyond this point.
H.R. 9803 allocated 80 percent of
the additional Federal funds on
a population basis and 20 per-
cent on the basis of need for
child care funds to meet stand-
ards (as determined by HEW).


H.R. 12455 provides the same
funding plus $250 million for
fiscal year 1977.


H.R. 12455
additional
tion basis.


alloca t e
funds on


all of the
a popula-


3. Expiration of Welfare Recipient Tax Credit
Under existing law, employers who hire persons who are receiving
Aid to Families with Dependent Children receive a tax credit equal
to 20 percent of the wages paid. This credit (unlike a more limited,
but permanent tax credit applicable to the Work Incentive program)
expires June 30, 1976. Both bills would extend this credit in the case
of persons hired for child care jobs and would limit the maximum
annual tax credit per employee to $1,000.
H.R. 9803 would extend the tax H.R. 12455 would extend the tax
credit through September 30, credit through September 30,
1976. 1977.
SThe -provisions of the two bills with respect to social services for addicts and alcoholics
are identical. H.R. 9803 contained no provisions related to social services eligibility
generally.






5

4. Waiver Provisions
Both bills allow the Federal staffing standards to be waived in the
case of child care facilities serving relatively few children whose care
is financed through the social services prograni. Both bills also permit
family day care motherb- not to count thlieir school age children in
determining the maximum number of children they may care for.
H.R. 9803 would grant th,-c 1J.R. 12455 would grant these
waivers through September 30, waivers through September 30,
1976. 1977.




















Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2013














http://archive.org/details/hr12455chil00unit
































Statistical Material


71-870-76-----2





















1-CHILD CARE CENTER
UNDER LAW AND


STAFFING REQUIREMENTS
HEW REGULATION


Age of child


Maximum
number of
children
per staff
member


Under 6 weeks..........
6 weeks to 3 years......
3 to 4 years .............
4 to 6 years.............
6 to 9 years......
10to 14 years...........


Required
Required
Required
Required


15}
20J


by regulation.
by regulation.
by law.
by law.


Maximum number allowed by
law (though Secretary of
HEW may lower the maxi-
mum number of children
per staff member, thus in-
creasing the staff required).


(9)


TABLE








TABLE 2,.-CH!LD CARE CEN
REQUIREMENTS, BY AGE 01
LICENSING REGULATIONS


TERS: MINIMUM STAFFING
F CHILDREN, UNDER STATE


Maximum number of children per staff member t if age of
children is-
School
Under 2 2 to 3 3 to 4 4to 5 5 to 6 ane


Alabama...........
Alaska.............
Arizona............
Arkansas..........
California..........
Colorado...........
Connecticut........
Delaware 13........
District of
Columbia........
Florida 17...........
Georgia...........
Hawaii.............
Idaho..............
Illinois.............
Indiana ............
Iowa ....... ........
Kansas...........
Kentucky..........
Louisiana 30 ......
M aine 32 ...........
Maryland ..........
Massachusetts....
Michigan ..........
Minnesota.........
M ississippi........


5
5
10
16
12


75
4
11RC


Is7
20 X
216
6
4

4
23
6
-296
20 X

33 NS
34 10
20 X
40 4
NS


s7
4
12 8

154
12


10
10
8
8
5
6
26 5
8
12.
318

6
34 10
39 10
417
NS


10
10
15
12
12
10*
'5
15
8
15
15
15
10
10
10
8
10
10
14,
10
10
3C10
10
10
NS


20
10
20
15
12
12
97
20
10
20
18
20
10
23 10
12
12
2 10
12
-.16
15
10
3 10
12.
10
NS


See footnotes at end of table.


20
10
25
18
12
15
97
20
15
25
20
25
10
25
15
15
27 10
15
20
15
13
15
20
10
NS


222
10
25
NS
12
15
1010
25
15
25
1925
25
NS
25
20
15
16
2815
25
15
NS
8s 15
NS
'15
:20 X






11

TABLE 2.-CHILD CARE CENTERS: MINIMUM STAFFING
REQUIREMENTS, BY AGE OF CHILDREN, UNDER STATE
L!CENS!NG REGULATIONS-Continued

Maximum number of children per staff member I if age of
children is-
School
Under 2 2 to 3 3 to 4 4 to 5 5 to 6 age

Missouri........... 20X 5 10 10 15 15
Montana ........... NS NS NS NS NS NS
Nebraska.......... 4 5 7 7 7 12
Nevada 8...... 4 48 10 4 10 41 10 43 3
New Hampshire... 4 4 10 15 18 20
New Jersey........ -" X NS '- NS -7 NS 7NS 20 X
New Mexico........ 10 10 15 4 15 15 15
NewYork.......... 4.,d 4 5 5 7 7 10
North Carolina..... '-O S z 12 c- 15 3 20 25 25
North Dakota...... 4 4 10 10 12 1 12
Ohio ............... 5-8 10 15 15 20 20
Oklahoma 3 ....... 4 8 12 15 15 20
Oregon.......... ;.4 10 10 10 10 10
Pennsylvania...... X 2" X 8 10 10 13
Rhode Island...... -X 0 X 10 15 25 NS
South Carolina..... 6 8 10 14 15 15
South Dakota...... ; 4 5 7
Tennessee........ ,5 8 10 5 25 "30
Texas ............. 4" 8 12 15 1.3 f220
Utah.............. X 10 15 15 20 ,) 20
Vermont ........... 5 10 30 12 12
Virginia........... 3 10 10 0 10
Washington ....... 5 7 0 10 10
West Virania...... 4 8 1A0 1 16
Wisconsn ......... 0 6
Wyoming............ 5 10 15 20 25


Footnotes on following pages.







12

FOOTNOTES
S5 if.2 to 2./; 10 if 2. 2'to 3.
S22 if 6 to ; 25 if 8 and over.
Sif 0 to l5mo; 10 if 15 moto 2yr..
4 In infant-toddler centers.
3 6 in infant-toddler centers; 12 if 2' to 3 in other centers.
6 In infant centers.
7 If 6 weeks to 8 m in infant center; or if 12 mo to3 yr in toddlercenter.
S 7 if all 2-yr-olds in toddler center; 8 if 2>/. to 3 in large or small center.
*S Recommended FIDCR child/staff ratios.
J0 If under.tit#e XX funding; 15, if 6 to 10 yr of age; 20 if 10 to 14yrof ae (FIDOR
ratios).
'. 5 if0tolt 8 if l to 2.
12 8 if 2 to 2; 15 if 2!. to 3.
33 In Delaware, centers receiving Federal funds have the following mandated
ratios: Under2: 5; 2 to 3: 5; 3 to 4: 5; 4to 5:7; 5 to 6: 7; school ape: 10,O
J4 Pending issue of new infant center regulations.
3I4 if 2 to2: 8if 2', to 3.
5 6 if under 1 yr; 8 if 1 to 2.
"Mandated ratio for handicapped children: Under 2: 4: 2 to 3: 6; 3 to 4; 8;
4to 5: 10; 5 to 6 14: school age: 14.
s 7 if 0 to 18 moc; 10 if 18 mrno to 2 yr.
13 25 if 7 and over; 6 to 7 not specified.
0 Children in this age group generally not accepted.
21 6 if0 to 18 mo; 8 if 18 mo to 2 yr.
228 if2to2t,2; 10 if 21', to 3.
23 10 if full-day; 20 if half-day.
24 4 if 6 weeks-walking; 5 if walking-2.
:2 3 if2 weeks-nonw3lking under24 moonly; 5ifwalking-2yr.
26 5 if v.alking-2'.; 7 if 2.'., to 3.
27 10 if full-day; 12 if part-day.
,s 15 if 6 to 8; 20 if 8 and over.
29 6 if nonwalking; 8 if toddlers.
30 Centersserving 10 children with no more than 2 children under2yrof agehavo
rn ndated child/staff ratio of 10 to 1 in all age categories.
3.8 if 2 1 to 3 yr.
32 In Maine, separate before and after school programs have 10 to 1 fatioinschoot
age category.







13

FOOTNOTES-Continued
23 Admitted only upon approval of local health officer.
3 Admitted only upon prior approval.
3S 10 in care over 3 hr; 12 in care 3 hr cr less.
36 10 in care over 3 hr; 13 in care 3 hr or less.
37 15 in care over 3 hr; 25 in care 3 hr or less.
3S 15 if 6to 7 in care over 3 hr; 25 if 6to 7 in care 3 hror less.
39 10 if 21. to 3.
40 4 if 6 weeks to 16 mo; 7 if 16 mo to 2 yr.
417 if 2 yr to 31 mo; 10 if 31 mo to 3 yr.
42 4if 6weeksto9 mo; 6if9 to 18mo; 8 if 18 moto2yr.
8ininfant-toddlercenter; 10for 1st 20children; 15 for excessover20,
44 10 for 1st 20 children; 15 for excess over 20.
45 3 or 10 percent over licensed capacity, whichever is greater, if before or after
school care.
I0 4.8 if maximum of 24 children under 3 yr of age in care.
47 2 adults for any total group.
4S 20 if in care 3 hr or less.
494 if under 18 mo; 5 if over 18 mo.
50 If 30 or more in care; 10 if less than 30.
1 If 4 to 7 yr.
32 8 if 0 to 18 mo; 10 if 18 mo to 2 yr.
53 Recommended ratios.
s5 4 if 0 to 10 mo in cribs; 6 if 10 mo to 2 yr.
5 If 6 weeks to 30 mo.
56 If 6 yr; 15 if over 6 yr.
s7 1 if 0 to 6 mo; 3 if 6 to 18 mo; 4 if 18 mo to 2 yr.
15 if 6to 10 yr; 20 if 10 to 14.
69 5 if 6weeksto 1 yr; 6 if 1 to 2.
o If 6 to 7.
16 4 if 0 to 18 mo; 6 if 18 mo to 2 yr.
*2 20 if 6 to 8; 25 if 8 or over.
"20 if 6; 25 if 7 to 15.
64 5 if 1 moto 1 yr; 7 if 1 to 2.
7 if 2 to 2i; 10 if 212to3.
4 3 if 0 to 1; 4 if 1 to 3.
*7 6 if 2 to 2Y; B if 2' to 3.
Source: Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. Current as of October 21,
1975.
Note: NS indicates "not specified."






14

TABLE 3.-STATE ESTIMATES OF INCREASE IN COST AND STAFF-
ING FOR CHILD CARE FROM FISCAL 1975 TO FISCAL 1976


Increased
title XX
costs
(millions)


Increased staffing


For
title XX
children


For non-
title XX
children


Potential
employment
of welfare
recipients
as percent
of added
staffing


Total.. ........
Alabama... ..
Alaska.......
Arizona............
Arkansas..........
California.........
Colorado.........
Connecticut.......
Delaware..........
District of Colum-
bia .............
Florida...........


Georgia.......
Hawaii ........
Idaho..............
Illinois............
Indiana...........
Iowa ...............
Kansas... .......
Kentucky..........
Louisiana.........
M aine.............
Maryland.........
Massachusetts...
Michigan..........
Minnesota........
M ississippi........
M issouri..........
Montana..........
Nebraska..........
Nevada ............
New Hampshire...


$206.3 .................................. '.


0.6
1.4
2.6
0
20.7
2.4
(S)
.9
.4
12.1
3.8
.4
1.1
23.5
1.4
2.0
1.5
1.2
2.6
.1
0
5.3
7.0
11.0
1.0
2.5
.9
.3
.1
.2


122
150
548
0
0
400
0
99
56
766


600
60
(2)
700
215
167
202
400
509
0
0
600
959
1,760
0
1,246
1,000
155
5160
40


81
1,036


(1)
1,577
10 7,000
(2)
(1)
303
800
437
0
0
0
0
1,580
0
(2)
0
(1)
(2)
1160
50


See footnotes at end of table.


20-25
(3)
(3)


200
0
(1)


20
(2)
80
20
(2)
71
(2)


(2)
15
(2)
100
(3)
(3)
100
20
20
C)
5
7-10
100
I0
(2)
20








TABLE 3.--STATE ESTIMATES OF INCREASE IN COST AND STAFF-
ING FOR CHILD CARE FROM FISCAL 1975 TO FISCAL 1976-Cont.


Increased
title XX
costs
(millions)


Increased staffing
For For non-
tit!e XX title XX
children, children


Potential
employment
of welfare
recipients
as percent
of added
staffing


New Jersey........
New Mexico.......
New York 6........
North Carolina....
North Dakota......

Ohio..............
Oklahoma.........
Oregon............
Pennsylvania.....
Rhode Istand......

South Carolina....
South Dakota......
Tennessee........
Texas.............
U tah ..............

Vermont...........
V irginia ...........
Washington.......
West Virginia......
W isconsin.........

Wy ,oming..........


3.7
2.2
12.0
9.8
(7)

()
21.5
.2
8.2
.9

2.4
.6
1.7
16.2
1.4

.8
7.8
4.7
2.0
2.6


92
96
300
1,800
0

0
1,022
0
235
46

308
650
209
CL,.
1,720
199

428
436
1,300
216
234


10
0
0
400
0


0
2,366
0
171
138

0
150
(1)
1,514
739

(0)
1,000
(-)
84
750


100
50
67
60-70
(3)


(3)
93
(3)
96
(2)
25-50
23
5-8
20-30
70

75
50
(2)
80-100
50-100


75


1 Included in estimates for columns 1 and 2. Unable to show separate.
2 Unable to estimate.
3 Not applicable since State estimates no addition! staffing needs.
+ Additional employee- already hired.
SUnable to estimate on a man,-year basis; represents number of staff.
6 Estimates cover urban counties only.
SLess than $50.00 0.
SUnable to estimate. No increased staffing b:ut some increased cost to meet other
standards and/or monitoring and reporting requirements of title XX.
SUnable to estimate numbers; cost P-stimated t +$1,900,000.
0 Includes a need for 6,000 new family day care homes.
Source: Finance Ccmmiottee staff survey of CGover:ors.





16

TABLE 4.-FEDERAL FUNDING ALLOCATIONS FOR SOCIAL
SERVICES
[In thousands]

Full year
additional
Social services child care
allocation for allocation under
fiscal year 1977 Senate bill


Total...


Alabama.....
Alaska........
Arizona.......
Arkansas.....
California....
Colorado.....
Connecticut..
Delaware.....


District of Columbia.
Florida.. ...........


Georgia......
Hawaii.......
Idaho.........
Illinois .......
Indiana.......
Iowa..........
Kansas.......
Kentucky.....
Louisiana....
Maine........


Maryland .........................
Massachusetts.,...............
M ichigan ........................
Minnesota .............. .........
Mississippi ............... .......
See footnote at end of table.


$2,500,000


42,300
3,975
25,450
24,375
247,250
29,525
36,525
6,775
8,550
95,675
57,725
10,025
9,450
131,650
63,025
33,775
26,850
39,700
44,525
12,375
48,425
68,600
107,575
46,325
27,475


$250,000
4,230
398
2,545
2,438
24,725


2,952
3,652
678
855
9,568
5,772
1,002
945
13,165
6,302
3,378
2,685
3,970
4,452
1,233
4,842
6,860
10,758
4,632
2,748


O








TABLE 4.-FEDERAL FUNDING ALLOCATIONS FOR SOCIAL
SERVICES-Continued
[In thousands]


Social services
allocation for
fiscal year 1977


Full year
additional
child care
allocation under
Senate bill


:Missouri ...........
Montana ...........
'Nebraska...........
Nevada...... . ....
New Hampshire....


'New Jersey.......
New Mexico......
*New York........
North Carolina...
INorth Dakota.....

O hio..............
Oklahoma........
Oregon ...........
Pennsylvania.....
Rhode Island.....

South Carolina...
South Dakota.....
Tennessee.......
Texas............
U tah .............
Vermont ..........
V irginia..........
Washington......
West Virginia.....
W isconsin........


$56,500
8,700
18,250
6,775
9,550

86.700
13,275
214,200
63,425
7,525

126,975
32,050
26,800
139,975
11,075
32,925
8,075
48,825
142,500
13,875

5,550
58,050
41,100
21,175
54,000
4,250


Wyoming..........


$5,650
870
1,825
678
955

8,670
1,328
21,420
6,342
752

12,698
3,205
2,680
13,998
1,108
3,292
808
4,882
14,250
1,388
555
5,805
4,110
2,118
5,400


425


..............




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
1IIl HIii1 I III 1 1 Ili II1 HI HI ii H iiU1H11111 111 II iI
18 3 1262 09112 4973

TABLE 5.-BUDGETARY IMPACT OF SENATE BILL'

Increase in
budget authority Decrease
and outlays in revenues
Fiscal period (millions) (millions)

Fiscal year 1976 ..................... $42 0
July-September 1976 ................. 55 0
Fiscal year 1977...................... 218 $4

1 Estimates are net figures reflecting both the increased grants to the States for
child care and the offsetting reductions in welfare costs resulting from the hiring
of welfare recipients as child care staff.