Legislating for the Nation's Capital

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Legislating for the Nation's Capital report on the activities of the Committee on the District of Columbia, United States Senate, in the first session of the Ninety-fourth Congress, 1975, pursuant to Senate Resolutions 30 and 316
Physical Description:
iii, 45 p. : ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Congress. -- Senate. -- Committee on the District of Columbia
Publisher:
U.S. Govt. Print. Off.
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Legislation -- Washington (D.C.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Reuse of record except for individual research requires license from Congressional Information Service, Inc.
General Note:
Reuse of record except for individual research requires license from LexisNexis Academic & Library Solutions.
General Note:
At head of title: 94th Congress, 2d session. Committee print.
General Note:
CIS Microfiche Accession Numbers: CIS 76 S302-1

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 024436782
oclc - 02126465
Classification:
lcc - KF49
System ID:
AA00022516:00001

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Public laws
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Senate concurrent resolution reported
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    District of Columbia government acts referred to committee
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Presidential nominations referred
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Back Cover
        Page 47
        Page 48
Full Text

f
j


~1


COMMITTEE PRINT


LEGISLATING FOR THE N
CAPITAL


REPORT ON THE ACTIVITIES OF THE
COMMITTEE ON THE DISTRICT
OF COLUMBIA
UNITED STATES SENATE
IN TIHE

FIRST SESSION
OF TILE

NINETY-FOURTH CONGRESS
19T75
[Pursuant to Senate Resolutions 30 and 316]


Printed for the use of the Comnmittee on the District of Columbia

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE


WASHINGTON : 1976


'1


Congress
Session I


94th
2d


65-396





































COMMITTEE ON THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
THOMAS F. EAGLETON, Missouri, Chairman


DANIEL K. INOUYE, Hawaii
ADLAI E. STEVENSON, Illinois
JOHN GLENN, Ohio


CHARLES McC. MATHIAS, JR., Maryland
DEWEY F. BARTLETT, Oklahoma
JAKE GARN, Utah


ROBERT HARRIS, Staff Director and General Counsel
ANDREW E. MANATOS, Associate Staff Director
COLBERT I. KING, Minority Staff Director

(II)










CONTENTS


Page
INTRODUCTION --------------------------------------------------- 1
Statistical summary-- -------------------------------------------- 3
PUBLIC LAWS-------------------------------------------- 5------
Additional law clerks for D.C. Court of Appeals judges (Public Law
94-191) ------------------------------------------------------- 5
Establish the judicial conference of the District of Columbia (Public
Law 94-193)------------------------------------------------ 5
SENATE CONCURRENT RESOLUTION REPORTED------------------ 7
,S. Con. Res. 78 disapproving the act of the District of Columbia Coun-
cil (1-57) entitled the Refunding Bond Authorization Act--------. 7
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA GOVERNMENT ACTS REFERRED TO
COMMITTEE ----------------------------------------------------- 11
PRESIDENTIAL NOMINATIONS REFERRED----------------------- 45
(1ii)













LEGISLATING FOR THE NATION'S CAPITAL




REPORT ON THE ACTIVITIES OF THE COMMIT-
TEE ON THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, UNITED
STATES SENATE, IN THE FIRST SESSION OF
THE NINETY-FOURTH CONGRESS



INTRODUCTION

Article 1. section 8. of the Constitution of the United States vests
in Congress. the power:
To exercise exclusive Legislation in all Cases whatsoever, over such District
(not exceeding ten Miles square) as may, by cession of particular States, and the
acceptance of Congress. become the Seat of the Government of the United States,
and to exercise like Authority over all Places purchased by the Consi-nt of tlhe
Legislature of the State in which the Same shall be. for the Erectiin of Forts,
Magazines, Arsenal'N, dock-Yards, and other needful Buildings ;-
Standing rules of the Senate provide that whenhn nominations
shall be made by the Pre.-ident of the United States to the Senate, they
shall, unless otherwise ordered, be referred to appropriate commnit-
tees . ." and authorize the Committee on the District of Columbia
to receive and consider:
All proposed legislation, messages, petitions, memorials, and other matters
relating to:
1. * [T]he municipal affairs of the District of Columbia in general, other
than appropriatiiis therefore, i-cluding-
2. Public health and safety, sanitation, and quarantine regulations.
3. Regulation of sale of intoxicating liquors.
4. Adulteration of food anud drugs.
5. Taxes and tax sales.
0. TInsnra nce, executors, administrators, wills, and divorce.
7. Municipal and juvenile courts.
8. Incorporation and organization of societies.
9. Municipal code and amendmnients to the criminal and corporation laws.
Further, the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946 provides that:
To assist the Congress in appraising the administration of the lawx and in
developing such amendments or related legislation as it may deem necessary,
each stand(ling committee of the Senate and the House of Representatives shall
exercise continuous watclfifllness of the execution by the administrative aeren.ies
concerned of any laws, the subject matter of which is within the jurisdiction
of suc1h committee: and. for that purpose, shall study all pertinent reliorts and
d.ta submitted to the Congres. by the agencies in the executive branch of the
Government.
(1)






2
This repI)ort, prepared pursuant to Senate Resolutions 30 and 316,
sunmiarizes the comiiiiittee's execution of its responsibilities in the first
seV--ion of the Ninety-Fourth Congrtess.
With the advent of home rule in the District of Columbia the role of
the committee has changed from that of being primarily legislative
to that of inve-tigating and overseeing the legislation passed by the
governlnent of the District of Columbia. Under Public Law 93-198,
the District of Columbia Self-Government and Governmental Reor-
ganization Act (coiiimmonly known as the Home Rule Act), the Con-
gre-s. has 30 legislative days (days when both Houses are in session)
to veto an act of the District of Columbia government. If a resolu-
tion to dil)-approve is not passed by 1)both Houses tlhe act automatically
becomes law. During this session of Congress 57 District of Columbia
government acts were referred to the committee. Each one of these
acts was considered and reviewed by the committee staff. The conm-
iimittee. of course, is reluctant in this first year of home rule to initiate
action of disapproval and only one such resolution was passed by the
committee. This action was taken after hearings were held on the
subject and the Senate concurred on a rollcall vote of 80 to 3. The
[ouise District Comiimittee did not concur in the action of the Senate
so thle resolution was never reported to the House.
The committee continues to initiate and report legislation and to
make investigations and examinations of District affairs as mandated
by tlhe Constitution and the rules of the Senate.
This session of the Congress 7 Senate bills and 6 House acts were
referred to the committee. Two bills and two resolut ions were reported
to the Senate and two of these became public law. Three nominations
were referred to the committee. Two have been confirmed by the Senate
while one. at the time of the preparation of this report, remains under
inve-tigation and consideration.
The two public laws resulting from committee activities: (1) pro-
vided an additional law clerk for each of the judges of the District of
Columbia Court of Appeals; and (2) established a judicial conference
of the District of Columbia.
Following is a statistical summary of the committee's activities dur-
ing the first session of the 94th Congress.














STATISTICAL SUMMARY

ACTIVITIES OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
94TH CONGRESS

I'lj.7, 1st sess. 1976, 2d sess. Total


REFEREED BY THE SENATE


Presidential messages -----------------
D.C. government acts----------------
Senate bills -------------------------
Hou-e acts--------------------------
Senate re",lutions-------------------
N omiinations -___ _ _ _ _
Petitions ---------------------------
Repi ,rts ----------------------------

Total_--------------------


57 ---------57
7 ------------ 7
6 ------------ 6
1 ------------ 1
3 ------------ 3
1 ------------ 1
27 ------------ 27


104


104


REPORTED TO THE SENATE

Senate bills----------------------------------------------------------
House acts.------------------------ 2 --------2 2
Senate rc-,ulutiouns------------------- 3 ------------ 3
Nominations------------------------ 2-2 2


Total-----------------------

SENATE AND HOUSE ACTS WHICH HAVE
BECOME LAW
Public-------- --------------
Private -------- -------

Total------------------------


2 ------------ 2


HEARINGS HELD


Senate bills -- - - - - -
H out:e acts_ _ _ _ _ _ _
Senate res )lutions_----------------
Nomninations------------------------
0\er-ight investigation --------------


Total------------------------ -10 10


MEETINGS
Hearings
Executive sessions -------------------
Conference sessions ------------------

Total-----------------------


(8)


------------
------------
------------
------------
------------


------------
------------
------------


















Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2013












http://archive.org/details/legina00unit









PUBLIC LAWS

PROVIDE FOR AkDDITIONAL LAW CLERKS FOR THIE JUDGES OF THE DISTRICT
OF COLUMBIBA COItRT OF APPEALS

(Public Law 91-191)
The House of Representatives passed H.R. 4287 on November 10,
1975. and the committee held a hearing on the measure on December 3;
it w;t considered and amended by the committee and reported to the
Senate (S. Rept. 94-523) on December 10. The Senate passed H.R.
42.7, as aiiiended, on December 12. On December 19 the House agreed
to the Senate amendment and it was approved by the President on
December 31.
Tlhe law amends tlie District of Columbia Code in order to authorize
an additional law clerk for each of the nine judges of the District of
Columbia Court of Appeals. This additional law clerk brings the total
number of law clerks for each associate judLre to two and brings the
total for the chief judge to threo. The general purpo-e of the legisla-
tion is to increase the analysis and research capability of the Court,
thereby enhancing its casQ disposition capa.ity. The reason for Federal
legislation in this otherwise local administrative matter is that law
clerks are provi(lded for by section 708 of the D.C. Code which the City
Council is prohibited from amending. by section 602(a) (4) of the Dis-
trict of Columbia Self-Government and Governmental Reoriganization
Act. Tlhe Senate amendment amends the District of Columbia Law Re-
vi.-ion Commission Act so as to allow the appointment of the staff of
the Commission from outside the competitive service, as is the case
with most District of Columbia employees employed in similar posi-
tions.

ESTABLISH Tll.: JUDICIAL CONI.'I:l:NCE OF TIHE DfIsTRICT OF COLUMBIA

(Public Law 94-193)
The purpose of this law is to authorize and direct the chief judge of
the D)istrict of Columibia Court of Appeils to convene an annual jludi-
cial conference designed to improve the operation of the civil and crim-
inal justice system in the District of Columbia. It provides a mecha-
nizsm whereby the local bench and bar are brouiglit together periodically
on a regular b)a-is to discuss major problems incident to the adminis-
trlation and enforcement of the laws of the Dist rict of Columbia, and
(5)


f.,-.396-76-- 2




6

to make recommendations for solutions to such problems. The House
bill was amended by the Senate to correct an error in the final version
of the Education Amendments of 1974, which omitted the District of
Columbia from eligibility for funding under title IV of those Amend-
ments.
H.R. 10035 passed the House on November 10, 1975; a hearing was
held by the committee on December 3; reported to the Senate on De-
cember 9, with an amendment (S. Rept. 94-524); passed the Senate,
as amended, on December 12; the House agreed to the Senate amend-
ment on December 19; and the President approved on December 31,
1975.











SENATE CONCURRENT RESOLUTION
REPORTED
DISA.PPiOVING THE ACT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA COUNCIL (1-57)
ENTITLED, THIE REFUNDING BOND A.kUTHORIZATION ACT
The purpose of S. Con. Res. 78 was to disapprove the action of the
Council of the District of Columbia in authorizing the issuance of
-50,000,000 General Obligation bonds of the District of Columbia. It
was the Committee's view that the issaiiice of such bonds was ill-
advised and untimely.
The announced reason for the issuance of the bonds would be to
refinaince certain borrowing, f'rom the U.S. Treasury which were
undertaken during 1975 and which borrowings are repayabl e in 30
years with interest at 8 per centum per annum. The act aiithorizing
the bonls requires that the bonds lie sold at a face rate of interest
of no imore than s per cenitim per annum, also for a period of 80 years.
The District gover nment st:ited that if the bonds could be sold at a rate
of 7 per centumin interest, a savings in interest payments on the '.)0.000,-
000 in bonds of about $400,000 per year might be realized. Secondly,
the I)istrict hlias stated that it wish(-es' to issue the bonds so that it may
test the acceptabilityv of its debt offerings in the market place. Were
the Distrit to receive a favorable response, however, it intends to
borrow an additional $100,000,000 to s150,000,000 in the coming ve'ar
both to finance new capital projects and to refinance T'reasury debt.
The District is required to m1:1intain a balan ((ed budget. Yet in Fi-.,'a I
Year 1975. the ID)istrict's ex)penditur(.s excelededl receil)ts by $45.5 mil-
lion. In addition, the District availed itself of its entire line of short-
term credit from the Treasury ly borrowing .40 million. Had that
borrowing not occurred,. the cash shortfall would have b1een in ex--
of .s million.
At the sanie time its cash position was wakening, the Dis-trict
government was also taking an additional step which was very rTemi-
nis.ent of New York City. It capitalized .25 million in short-teirm
debt stating that it believed that this amount had previously been
miistakeiflvy charged to operating expenses when the work really in-
volved capital improvements.
The foregoing are merely signals of more basic problems, which
are not unique to the District, but beset many, if not all, center cities.
They may be sutnmiarized as an overly large work force (one in every
12 District residents is on the D.C. payroll), unbudgeted wage de-
mandls which are granted without the necessary revenues to pay for the
increases. unfunded pension liabilities (which are over $1 billion for
(7)






the :16 per cent of the work force which is covered by District-operated
pension plans), declining population, and a diminishing revenue base
(which is exacerbated in the District by a stringent rent control law).
When the foregoing facts were brought out at the hearings, the
District government maintained that its financial problems were being
exaggerated and that it will very shortly be able to work its way out
of its problems. It indicated that it believes that the best test of its
fiscal condition would be to allow the bonds to go to market and see
liow they were accepted.
Vinfortunately, the Committee could not agree. The Committee felt
that it was in the best long-range interests of the city and the Federal
taxp)aver to insure that the District receive the highest possible rating
in its first venture into the municipal bond market. This rating will
lave a significant impact on the interest rate the city will have to pay
for its future borrowing.
T1e pre(-ent system for maintaininQ" financial records in the Dis-trict
of (Coliumbia is a complex mixture of Federal and local procedures due
to the unique character of the Dist'ict as a Federal city. The Commit-
tee believed that there is a need for substantial improvements in the
city's accounting and financial reportin- procedures. If these im-
p)rovements are made before the city makes its first venture into the
municipal bond market, the public will have an opportunity to get a
clear picture of the District's financial status and be better able to
evaluate the bond issue. The Federal taxpayers will be assured that
their contributions to the Nation's capital will be used to protect
Federal interests rather than to support unnecessarily high debt serv-
ice costs. Furthermore, the Committee feels that it has an obligation
not only to the District of Columbia but also to the potential pur-
chasers of the bonds who might not be aware of the financial condition
of the District and the U.S. taxpayers who are making a substantial
financial commitment to the Nation's capital through the Federal
payment.
I& attempting to obtain information about the financial condition
of the District, the Committee has found that the books of the District
are not kept in accordance with generally accepted accounting prin-
ciples and that there has never been an outside independent audit of
the Di)strict's books. The Committee believes that these two conditions
should be met before the public is offered D)i-trict bonds. It intends to
act through its oversight functions to ensure that these conditions are
met. However, since in the interim the District will continue to be able
to borrow from the Treasury, the Committee believes that the District
should refrain from going to the public market in order to finance its
capital improvements.
Tlhe Senate concurred in the resolution of disapproval of the bond
i- oe on a rollcall vote of 80 to 3. but the HTouse District Committee
dis-!pproved by a vote of 19-1, and so the Council act became D.C. Law
1-41.






S. Con. Res. 78 Nov. 20. 1975
Mr. Eagleton. Mr. Bartlett. Mr. Garn, Mr. Glenn, Mr. Inouye. Mr.
Mathias, and Mr. Stevenson
Disapproving the Act of the District of Columbia Council (1-5)7)
entitled "An Act to authorize the i-uance of $50,000,000 General
Obligation Bonds of the District of Columbia to refund certain
loans made to the District from the United States Treasury".
Dec. 2, 1975.-Hearing. (Printed.)
Dec. 3,1975 .-Ord(ered reported favorably.
Dec. 4, 1975.-Reported favorably to Senate, without amendment (S.
Rept. 94-507).
Dec. 5 1975).-C(onsi.dered by Senate.
Dec. 6, 1975.-Considered and pa -zcd by Senate, without amendment,
by a roll'all vote of 80-3.
Dec. q, 1975.-Referred to H-ouse District Committee.
Dec. 11, 1975.-House District Committee considered and disapproved
by a vote of 19-1.













ACTS OF THE GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT
OF COLUMBIA REFERRED TO THE COMMITTEE
[*Indicates number of days both Senate and House met this session]
1-2 To SET THE RATE OF PAY FOR MEMBERS OF THE ZONING Co3M-
MISSION AND TIHE BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS AT $100 PER DAY
Effect of legislation: Legrislation would allow the payment of $100
wper day to members of the Zoning Co('imiis.ion and Board of Zoning
Appeals. These members alre appointed by the Mayor with the ad-
vice and consent of the City Council and are not otherwise employed
by the District of Columbia government or by the United States.
Reported cost of legislation is 5e)00 per member, with a total ex-
I)ected. cost for both bodies of .30.000 per year.
Action by City Coicil: There were no public comments on tliis
legislation received by the Council and no one asked to testify. It
was adopted on Second roeadling by a 12-0 vote. with one menmbler
abl7-('it.
o(g',,rs' Isional/lublic interest exp)ressed: None.
Tminct onI F*de(ral interest in tlhe District: None.
Adopted by Council: Miar. 4. 1975.
Apl)proved by Mayor: Mar. 10, 1975.
Received by Senate: Mar. 17.1975 (legislative day 30*).
Referred to committee: Mar. 18. 1975.
Congressional review period expired: May 15, 1975, D.C. Law 1-1.

1-3 To PRO(VID)E A FEDERA\I.Y-FINANEI P))(R.\.RM OF SUTPLEMIFENTAL
UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS FOR THosE WHO HAVE EXHAUSTEDI
THEIR ENTITLEMENTS TO BOTHi REGULAR AND EXTENDED UNEM-
PLOYMENT COMPENSATION; EFFECTIVE THROU;GII 1975-76
Effect of legislation: Legislatioii wotild permit uneiniploved workers
covered by unemployment coml)ensation system to draw benefits for
a ilnaximm. overall period of 52 weeks. Same national and state
triggers governing District's payment of extended benefits would
apply: condition- under which extended benefits may be paid by
states and tlie District would be liberalized. Full reimbursement for
the payments by federal government would result in savings to Dis-
trict of Columbia's imneinployment insurance benefits fund.
Action by City Council: Measure was first adopted as an emer-
gency resolution in January, 1975. Act 1-3-to amend the District
of Columbia Unemployment Compensation Act-was adopted by
the Council on second reading with a 12-0 vote (one member ab-ent).
Congressional/public interest expressed: None.
Impact on Federal interest in the District: None.
(11)






12


Adopted by Council: Mar. 4,197).
Approved by Mayor: Mar. 4,1975.
Received by Senate: Mar. 17, 1975 (legislative day 30*).
Referred to committee: Mar. 18, 1975.
Congressional review period expired: May 15, 1975, District of
Columbia Law 1-2.

1-5 To CLARIFY STATUTORY DEFINITION OF CONDOMINIUM1 PROJECT"
IN THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Effect of legislation: Legislation would broaden definition of "con-
dominium project" to eliminate confusion as to its meaning and to
conform with definition used in 1964 Housing Act. It would permit
development of condominiums in the District consisting of five or
more apartments, rooms, office spaces, buildings and other units, which
may be either contiguous or detached, in existing or proposed build-
ings or structures offered or proposed to be offered for sale. It would
not allow for conversion of multifamily units prior to expiration of
existing law on condominium conversions. Since existing law provides
only for moratorium on conversion of rental unit properties, there
would be no fiscal effect.
Action by City Council: Measure supported by District of Columbia
Housing and Commiunity D)evelopment Office. There were no other
public comments received by the Council and no one asked to testify.
Legislation was adopted on second reading by an 11-0 vote, with two
members absent.
Congre.ssional/public interest expressed: None.
Impact on Federal interest in the District: None.
Adopted by Council: Mar. 11, 1975.
Approved by Mayor: Mar. 27. 1975.
Received by Senate: Apr. 8,1975 (legislative day 38*).
Referred to committee: Apr. 8, 1975.
Congressional review period expired: June 5, 1975, District of Co-
umnbia Law 1-3.

1-6 To AUTHORIZE TIHE MAYOR TO LEASE OR GRANT REVOCABLE PER-
MITS FOR I)o:'TLOPrENT OF TIHE ABANDONED TROLLEY CAR TUNNELS
UNDER DUPONT CIRCLE
Effect of legislation: Voiild( authorize the Mayor to lease or gr;int
permits for' use of publllic space under I)upont Circle as commercial
tinnd entertainment mall areas and to set rents or fees for that use.
Project is intended as bicentennial effort. Legislation would require
no expend(litulre of District funds while generating revenue, increasing
the cityvs tax base.
Action )by City Council: No public comments were received by the
Council: no one asked to testify. NLegislation was adopted on second
reading by a vote of 10-0, with two members absent and one member
l)resent b)lt not voting.
Congressioial/public interest expressed: None.
Impact on Federal interest in the District: None.
Adopted by Council: Mar. 11, 1975.







Approved by Mayor: Ma r. 27, 1975.
Received by Senate: Apr. 8,1975 (legislative day 38*).
Referred to committee: Apr. 8. 19T75.
Congressional review period expired: June 5, 1975, District of Co-
lumbia Law 1-4.

1-7 To REPEAL MAYOR'S AUTHORITY To WVITTIIHOLD REXT PAYMENTS
FROM PUBLIC ASSISTANCE CHECKS
Effect of legislation: Legislation would repeal District of Columbia
Public Assistance Act provisions authorizing Mayor to pay shelter
allowances directly to landlords when welfare recipients fail, without
legal basis, to make rental payments within 10 days of due date. It
would return to the judicial system its role as arbiter of rental agree-
ments between tenants who are public assistance recipients and their
landlords, and, to the Department of Human Resources, its responsi-
bility for administering District of Columbia public assistance pro-
grams. (There are more than 34,000 public assistance cases in the
District of Columbia, the great majority of them involving use of
rental dwelling units.)
Passage of measure has no fiscal implications for the District of
Columbia.
Action by City Council: Neighborhood Legal Services staff was
asked for comment, and recommended legislation's enactment. Legis-
lation was adopted on second reading by a 12-0 vote, with one member
absent.
Congressional/public interest. expressed: None.
Impact on Federal interest in District: None.
Adopted by Council: Mar. 18, 1975.
Approved by Mayor: Mar. 27, 1975.
Received by Senate: Apr. 8,1975 (legislative day 38*).
Referred to committee: Apr. 8, 1975.
Congressional review period expired: June 5, 1975, District of Co-
lumbia Law 1-5.

1-9 To EL1hINA.TE LIMIT ON A rI'PP.i )qIATIONS FOR DISTRICT'S RENT
CONTROL PROGRA3r
Effect of legislation: Would permit appropriation of additional
funds for operation of Rent Commission and administration of rent
control program. Original appropriation limit of $85,000 already has
been exhausted; maintenance of services dependent upon further
funding.
Action by City Council: Rent control program's need of funds cited
at. rent control hearings in January, 1975, and at more recent supple-
mental budget hearings. Legislation adopted on second reading by
vote of 13-0.
Congressional/public interest expressed: None.
Impact on Federal interest in the District: None.
Adopted by Council: Apr. 1, 1975.
Approved by Mayor: Apr. 18, 1975.
Received by Senate: May 1, 1975 (legislative day 52*).


65-396-76-3






14


Referred to committee: May 1, 1975.
Congressional review period expired: June 25, 1975, District of
Columbia Law 1-6.
1-10 To RI;GULATE SECURITY DEPOSITS ON RENTALS
Effect of Legislation: Legislation would require: deposit of all secu-
rity deposits by landlord in separate, interest-bearing accounts held in
trust for that purpose; payment to tenant, upon termination of rental,
interest on his deposit at rate no less than 5 percent; limit on amount
of security deposit to equivalent of one month's rent; annual filing by
landlords of reports on status and location of deposits held; penalties
for non-compliance. Further provisions would regulate issuing of re-
ceipts, itemizing of repairs made with deposit funds and refund of
excess, other procedural matters. Legislation would have little or no
financial impact, although possibly some administrative costs may be
required.
Action by City Council: Concern over inadequacy of regulations
protecting tenants' interests regarding security deposits was voiced by
several witnesses in two sets of rent control hearings in January, 1974,
and at least one member of the Advisory Panel on Rent Control in the
District. Previous Council deferred action to new Council, which
adopted legislation on second reading by a 13-0 vote.
Congressional/public interest expressed: Correspondence was re-
ceived from a tenant group representative and one landlord. Both sup-
ported the legislation. Landlord also expressed concern about account-
ing and administrative costs of compliance; problem of damage
exceeding amount of deposit or of tenant relocating prior to payment of
his last month's rent, requiring use of deposit to defray that loss at
least in part.
Impact on Federal interest in the District: None.
Adopted by Council: Apr. 1, 1975.
Approved by Mayor: Apr. 21,1975.
Received by Senate: May 1, 1975 (legislative day 52*).
Referred to committee: May 1, 1975.
Congressional review period expired: June 25, 1975, District of
Columbia Law 1-7.
1-11 To IDENTIFY ORGAN DONORS BY NOTATION ON DRIVERS' LICENSES
AND ID CARDS ISSUED BY THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBrA DEPARTMENT
OF MOTOR VEHICLES
Effect of legislation: Would authorize Department of Motor Vehi-
cles to establish an organ donor identification program under which a
person would: sign an anatomical gifts card signifying willingness to
donate body organs for research/transplant; have words "organ donor'"
printed on driver's license or ID card. The notation would not con-
stitute legal authority permitting removal of organs, but simply alert
doctor that gift card has been signed. Legislation is aimed primarily
at increasing number of kidneys available for transplant in the Dis-
trict of Columbia. No costs are expected. Kidney Foundation has vol-
unteered to supply gift cards and information packets; additional
printing by Department of Motor Vehicles costs nothing.








Action by City Council: Hearings were held in October, 1974. Cited
were several highly successful, similar programs in 15 states, includ-
ing Maryland and Virginia. The District of Columbia's comparatively
high rate of kidney failure and low number of organs available for
transplant also were noted. Legislation was adopted by the Council on
second reading with a 13-0 vote.
Congressional/public interest expre-sed: Active support from the
Kidney Foundation, as noted above.
Impact on Federal interest in District: None.
Adopted by Council: Apr. 1, 1975.
Approved by Mayor: Apr. 21, 1975.
Received by Senate: May 1, 1975 (legislative d(lay 52*).
Referred to committee: May 1, 1975.
Congressional review period expired: June 25, 1975, District of
Columbia Law 1-8.
1-14 To PI:IMIiT CONTINUED U-I: OF DRY IT AS REFR;:.,!.\xINGAGENT
BY \ ENDO!.t, OF ICE CREAM AND RE:LA.TEID PRODUCTS WHIO SELL FROM
TiRU(:i AND STANDS
Effect of legislation: Legislation would waive, for truck and stand
vendors of prepackaged frozen novelties, regulation passed in Decem-
ber, 1974, to require their use of certain equipment to refrigerate such
products. Vendors have successfully and safely used dry ice for that
purpose for some years; the substance keeps frozen items at tempera-
ture well below 45 level prescribed by health regulations and, accord-
ing to EPA, creates no adverse health effects. Installation of freezing
systems required by the 1974 regulation-costing in excess of $2,000,
according to Council findings-would place an unnecessary as well as
unmanageable financial burden on small vendors, forcing many out of
business and thus depriving District of Columbia residents and tourists
of their services.
Action by City Council: As noted above, Council was assured by
EPA that legislation is in conformance with the agency's health stand-
ards and that dry ice is an acceptable substitute for mechanical refrig-
eration. The measure was adopted on emergency basis February 25,
1975. Introduced again for consideration as a permanent act, it was
adopted by the Council on second reading with a 12-0 vote, one member
absent.
Congressional/public interest expressed: NXone.
Impact on Federal interest in the District: None.
Adopted by Council: Apr. 22,1975.
Approved by Mayor: May 6,1975.
Received by Senate: May 22,1975 (legislative day 64*).
Referred to committee: May 22,1975.
Congressional review period expired: July 22, 1975, District of
Columbia Law 1-9.
1-15 To EXTEND MORATORIUM ON CONVERSIOxN OF RENTAL UNIT PROP-
ERTIES IN THE DISTRICT OF COLUWBIA INTO HORIZONTAL PROPERTY
REGIMES (CONDOMINIUMS)
Effect of legislation: Legislation would extend through December
31,1975, the existing moratorium imposed on conversion of rental units








to condominiums in the District. Extension would permit the City
Council sufficient time to study and hold hearings on new condominium
legislation to be proposed by the Mayor on or before July 1 of this
year. (Original moratorium was imposed in measure setting forth
various regulations and standards for horizontal property regimes,
which passed in October of 1974 and was effective through May 31,
1975. It prohibited the District of Columbia government's acceptance
of applications for conversion of residential units into condominiums;
voided previously served notices to quit; permitted appeals for exemp-
tion by owners.)
Action by City Council: The City Council passed Act 1-15 on second
reading by a vote of 13-0. No hearings had been held.
Congressional/public interest expressed: None.
Impact on Federal interest in the District: None.
Adopted by Council: May 6,1975.
Approved by Mayor: May 27,1975.
Received by Senate: June 4,1975 (legislative day 67*).
Referred to committee: June 4, 1975.
Congressional review period expired: July 25, 1975, District of
Columbia Law 1-10.

1-16 To MAKE JANUARY 15-THE BIRTHtDAY OF DR. MARTIN LUTHER
KING--AN OFFICIAL, LEGAL BUSINESS HOLIDAY IN THiE DISTRICT OF
COLUMBIA
Effect of legislation: Legislation would declare the birthday of Dr.
King an official holiday in the District of Columbia, to be celebrated on
his actual birth date-January 15-rather than as a Monday holiday.
The District's Office of Budget and Management Systems estimates
cost to the city of $360,000 in overtime and premium wages for its
employees and approximately $2.5 million in loss of production. There
is currently no holiday in the District of Columbia to commemorate
t he achievements of a black citizen.
Action by City Council: After obtaining assurances from its general
counsel re. its statutory authority to enact such a measure, the City
Council passed Act 1-16 on second reading by a 10-0 vote, with three
members absent.
Congressional/public interest expressed: House Black Caucus mem-
bers introduced H.R. 1810-to make Dr. King's birthday a Federal
holiday-earlier in this session; committee with jurisdiction feels it
unlikely that the bill will pass this year. City Council notes that
Congressional staff members have expressed support for the District
of Columbia measure in hopes that its passage might encourage similar
Federal action.
Impact on Federal interest in District: None.
Adopted by Council: Apr. 29,1975.
Approved by Mayor: May 28,1975.
Received by Senate: June 11, 1975 (legislative day 72*).
Referred to committee: June 11, 1975.
Congressional review period expired: Aug. 1, 1975, District of
Columbia Law 1-11.







1-18 To EXTEND EFFECTIVE DATES OF TIHE DISTRICT OF COLvM1BIA
PUBLIC POSTSECONDARY REORGANIZATION ACT, WHICHi AUTHOR-
IZES CREATION OF A PUBLIC LAND GRANT UNIVERSITY THROUGHt CON-
SOLIDATION OF EXISTING PUBLIC POSTSECONDARY INSTITUTIONS IN
THIE DISTRICT
Effect of legislation: Legislation would delay until October 31,
1975, the effective date of Public Law 93-471-enacted by Congress to
consolidate District of Columbia's public postsecondary schools into a
single university-and extend for 90 days all other dates included in
that measure. Congress passed Public Law 93-471 in October. 1974,
with an effective date of July 1, 1975; in response to concern whether
such action was appropriate on the eve of home rule. Congress also
provided that, if the new City Council chose to repeal or amend tlihe
legislation, its provisions as amended or modified should take effect
on that date. The Council now feels additional time is required for
further study and reworking, of the bill, as well as to allow for tli(,
30-day CongressioImal review period. Legislation also amends lan-
guage in the measure's statement of purpose to express the intent
of the City Council rather than the intent of Congress. and speci-
ties courses of study which the new university should offer the "widest
possible number of citizens and residents" of the District.
Action by City Council: IHearings were held March 7-8, 1975, with
witnesses equally divided between support and opposition for ex-
tending the effective d(late. City Council passed Act 1-18 on second
lreadiig, May 27 by a vote of 11-0 (two members absent).
Congressional/public interest expressed: None.
Impact on Federal interest in District: None.
Adopted by Council: May 27, 1975.
Approved by Mayor: June 13, 1975.
Received by Senate: June 18, 1975 (legislative day 78*).
Referred to committee: June 19,1975.
Congressional review period expired: Sept. 10, 1975, District of
Columbia Law 1-12.

1-19 To Pi'I.-MIT CONTINUE) OPIl'R.VAI(NX OF INCINI:'IATOR AT TIHE
DISTRICT OF)1,O C(OL)UM BIA'S S(O)LID WASTE REDUCTION (CENTER N(). 1 Aks
INT'I'1:I.M MlASUIRE PENI)NDIN( DEVELOPMENT OF A LTEIRNATIVEI V W.STE
DISPOSAL PLAN
Effect of legislation: Legislation would amend District of Columb)ia
Health Regulations by removing provision setting closure date for
operation of incinerator at SWRC No. 1; instruct I)istrict of Cotlum-
bia Department of Environmental Resources to produce by October 1.
1975, a plan for the facility's plia -e-out; require completion of that
p)hlase-out by January 1, 1977. Amendment removing cloure d(late also
would be submitted to EPA as proposed revision in District's Air
Quality Implementation plan. Tests indicate the District of Columbia
is currently meeting EPA ambient air quality standards for particu-
lates; continued operation of incinerator will not prevent maintenance
of those standards. No ready, economically feasible alternative to in-







cinerator exists to handle disposal of 1,000 tons of trash daily; short-
range methods available depend on landfills, for which cost would be
prohibitive. Pilot projects and studies to develop alternative are
tinderway.,
Action by City Council: Hearings were conducted April 15, 1975.
Council passed Act 1-19 on second reading, by a vote of 11-0 with
two members absent.
(Congressional/public interest expressed: Witnesses at hearings rep-
re-sented Metropolitan Coalition for Clean Air and Mt. Pleasant
Neighborhood Recycling Center. Opponents of removing closure date
fe:ired potential damage to air quality, but offered no supporting data.
DEA t-sts indicated no ill effects to be expected for continued incin-
erator use, as noted above.
Impact on Federal interest in District: None.
Adopted by Council: May 13, 1975.
Approved by Mayor: June 19, 1975.
Received by Senate: July 8, 1975 (legislative day 84*).
Referred to committee: July 9, 1975.
Congressional review period expired: Sept. 22, 1975, District of
Columbia Law 1-13.

1-20 To END COMPULSORY PARTICIPATION BY MALE PUBLIC HIGH
SCHOOL STUDENTS IN THIE CADET CORPS OF TIlE DISTRICT OF COLUM-
BIIA PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM
Effect of legislation: Legislation would repeal provision of the Act
of March 2, 1907, requiring every male high school student to partici-
pate in the Cadet Corps of the senior high schools in District of Colum-
bia. It would not necessarily terminate the Corps' existence.
Action by City Council: Measure was approved by the District's
Board of Education in February, 1975. No public hearings were held,
and no adverse comments received. Council passed legislation on sec-
ond reading by a vote of 11-0, with two members absent.
Congressional/public interest expressed: None.
Impact on Federal interest in the District: None.
Adopted by Council: May 13, 1975.
Approved by Mayor: June 19, 1975.
Received by Senate: July 8, 1975 (legislative day 84*).
Referred to committee: July 9, 1975.
Congressional review period expired: Sept. 22, 1975, District of
Columbia Law 1-14.

1-21 To REPEAL THE AUTHORITY OF TIHE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
BOARD OF EDUCATION To ACCREDIT JUNIOR COLLEGES
Effect of legislation: Legislation would repeal what the Board of
Education considers obsolete law empowering it to accredit junior
colleges operating in the District; any accreditation previously con-
ferred and still in force would stand for five years from enactment
of Act 1-21 or until the institution is otherwise accredited. Legislation
resulted from recommendation by Board of Education. No adverse
comments were received. The measure would have no fiscal effect.







Action by City Council: City Council passed the legislation on sec-
ond reading by an 11-0 vote in the absence of two members.
Congressional/public interest expressed: None.
Impact on Federal interest in District: None.
Adopted by Council: May 13,1975.
Approved by Mayor: June 19,1975.
Received by Senate: July 8, 1975 (legislative day 84*).
Referred to committee: July 9,1975.
Congressional review period expired: Sept. 22, 1975, District of
Columbia Law 1-15.
1-22 To EXTEND EXISTING PROvISIONS OF ELECTION LAW REGULAT-
ING CAMPAIGN CONTRIBUTIONS BY UNIONS AND CORPORATIONS
Effect of legislation: Legislation would extend election law provi-
sions regarding corporate and union contributions until July 1, 1976,
or until repealed/amended/further extended by City Council. Purpose
is to comply with sections of Public Law 93-376-in which Congress
specified that provisions in question would expire July 1, 1975, unless
action were taken by Council-while permitting additional time for
hearings on subject scheduled to be held this summer. The legislation
to be extended sets ceilings on permissable amounts of contributions
by corporations and unions to candidates for city offices. No fiscal im-
pact is anticipated as result of extension.
Action by City Council: No hearings were held concerning exten-
sion of the provisions. City Council passed Act 1-22 on second read-
ing by an 11-0 vote, with two members absent.
Congressional/puiblic interest expressed: None.
Impact on Federal interest in District: None.
Adopted by Council: May 27,1975.
Approved by Mayor: June 19,1975.
Received by Senate: July 8, 1975 (legislative day 84*).
Referred to committee: July 9,1975.
Congressional review period expired: Sept. 22, 1975, District of
Columbia Law 1-16.
1-23 To DEFINE TERMIN-%OLOGY To BE USED IN ALL ACTS AND RESO-
LUTIONS OF THE CITY COUNCIL
Effect of legislation: Legislation-the General Legislative Proce-
dures Act of 1975-would provide specific definitions of various terms
to be used in all acts and resolutions of the City Council, as well as
enacting clauses for such legislation.
Action by City Council: The City Council passed Act 1-23 on
second reading by a vote of 9-0, with one member present but not vot-
ing and three members absent.
Congressional/public interest expressed: None.
Impact on Federanl interest in District: None.
Adopted by Council: May 13,1975.
Approved by Mayor: June 19, 1975.
Received by Senate: July 8,1975 (legislative day 84*).
Referred to committee: July 9, 1975.
Congressional review period expired: Sept. 22, 1975, District of
Columbia Law 1-17.






20


1-26 To REGULATE PUBLIC CONDUCT ON PUBLIC PASSENGER VEHICLES
SEATING 12 OR MORE PASSENGERS
Effect of legislation: Learislation would establish regulations gov-
erning the conduct of passengers while aboard public passenger vehi-
cles in the District and set penalties for infractions. It would prohibit:
smoking; eating or drinking; spitting; littering; ca trying combustible
or flammable materials, or animals other than seeing eye dogs properly
harnessed or small animals "properly packaged"; standing in front
of white line; boarding through rear exit door. Drivers would be per-
mitted to refuse transport to anyone whoe immediately observable be-
havior constituted a violation of those regulations. Effective date
would be September 30. 1975, rather than upon completion of Con-
gressional review, allowing additional time for driver training and
public notice of new rules.
Action by City Council: Public hearings were conducted April 7,
1975. and the bill adopted on final reading by a vote of 13-0. No action
was taken by Mayor.
Congressional/public interest expressed: None.
Impact on Federal interest in District: None.
Adopted by Council: June 3, 1975.
Enacted without Mayor's signature: June 24, 1975.
Received by Senate: July 8, 1975 (legislative day 84*).
Referred to committee: July 9, 1975.
Congressional review period expired: Sept. 22, 1975, District of
Columbia Law 1-18.
1-27 To ESTABLISH COMMIS.S IsON ON TIHE ARTS AND TUMANITIES
Effect of legislation: Legislation would create commission in office
of the Mayor to promote and develop programs in the arts and humani-
ties for the District. Eighteen-member commission would serve as des-
ignated state agency for District of Columbia with regard to 1965
Foundation on the Arts and Humanities Act; prepare annual plan of
artistic projects and productions according to 1973 National Founda-
tion on the Arts and Humanities Act provisions; make grants for
such projects; initiate programs to encourage participate on/ apprecia-
tion of cultural activities. Members-to be appointed by Mayor on
basis of special interest/activity/ability in arts and humanities-must
be District of Columbia residents, geographically representative of
the city's neighborhoods. Bill permits reimbursement of expenses, but
no salaries, for Commission members.
Action by City Council: Hearings were held April 1, 1975. on
Act 1-27, which passed on second reading by an 11-0 Council vote
(two members absent). Legislation was subsequently disapproved by
Acting Mayor Julian Dugas in absence of Mayor Washington, but
forwarded to Congress nevertheless by Council on assumption that
veto function may not be delegated.
Congressional/public interest expressed: None.
Impact on Federal intere-st in District: None.
Adopted by Council: June 10, 1975.
Enacted without Mayors signature: June 24, 1975.
Received by Senate: July 28, 1975 (legislative day 98*).







Congressional review period expired: Oct. 20. 1975, District of
Columbia Law 1-22.
1-29 To RAI.XlSE MONTIIIY RATE OF PAYMENT FOR ADULT FOSTER HOME
(1' :E--INCLUDING DRUG AND ALCOHOLI.3M HALFWAY HOUSES--FROM
$170 TO $200
Effect of legislation: Legilation would increase to S200 per month
payment to public assistance recipients living in adult foster homes.
residential placement facilities or lialfway ho1iI-es for alcoholics or
drum addicts: of tlhe S200. S180 would be designated for room, board
and care, and .20 for clothing and personal needs. Act 1-29 also de-
fines "adult foster home" as a residence for 6 or fewer unrelated per-
sons. 18 or above, including a resident director, which provide- special
services in addition to room & board for individuals able to perfoiit
daily living activities with little or no assistance but desiring/requir-
ing "protective, home-like environment be'.ause of physical. 1liental.
familial or social circumstance:." Council a-erts increase in monthly
rate-set at $150 per month ('170. including s'0 for personal nii,-is)
in 1972-is modest and overdue. Suffirient fund- to cover mincreai-es are
included in fi.-,al year 1975 and fi-.a1 year 1976) budgets.
Action by City Council: Council approved Act 1-29 on second read-
ing May 13, 1975, 1)v an 11-0 vote. with two members al-,-iit.
Congres-ional public intere4 expie-ed: Ndnw.
Impact on Federal interest in District. None.
Adopt ed by Council: May 13, 1975.
Approved by Mayor: July 7, 1975.
received by Senate: Sept. 5. 1975 (legri-lative day 105*).
Referred to committee: Sept. 9, 1975.
Congressional review period expired: Nov. 3, 1975, District of Co-
lumbia Law 1-28.
1-3'1 Tho lrFrovE CITY ci Fi* CO VERGI ,E OF 19iM NDM ADMINIsTA -
TIVE II1P)CEDUIRE ACT; ESTABI.II A DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA MXUNICI-
PAL CODE ANI) STATUTIE-.-AT-LARGE; SET PROCEDURES FOR CONDUCT OF
Co N-I TESTEI DI CASES
Et'eert of legi-lation: Legislation would amend language of 196-S
Administrative Procedures Act by eliminating references in its pro-
vi-ions to now-defunict Dib-trict of Colunibia Council and reassigning
to Mayor respon-ibilities previously delegated by mea-iire to Com-
missioner and Council. Purpose is to remove ambiguity concernin."
application of Admiiiistrative Procedure Act to current City Council,
leaving that elected body subject only to Home Rule Act and any
self-iniposed rules it might establish. Act 1-30 would in effect clarify
exiL-tiiig Council's function as legislative agency of government rather
than administrative as was its predecessor. Title II of measure would
furl her remove Council from Administrative Procedure Act coverage
]V relpealing Section 7(d) of the 1968 measure, which provided for
creation of a District. of Columbia Municipal Code. and substituting
for it new language (Title II) to provide for compilation and pub-
lication of Municipal Code and Statutes-at-Large. Act would require
Mavor's submission of proposed Code-Council acts in nature of mu-
nicipal ordinances. District of Columbia government rules and regula-


65-396,-7r,--4





22


tions-to Council by January 10, 1976, and Council approval by Feb-
ruary 27,1976; compilation and publication of Statutes-at-Large with-
in 45 days of end of each Council year. Cost of bound copies of Code
and regular publication of supplements estimated at $47,469 over a
five-year period. Title III would set Council procedures for contested
cases.
Action by City Council: Hearings held January 29, 1975, included
testimony by eight witnesses; consensus reached as to need for estab-
lishing City Council identity as legislative agency, free from Adminis-
trative Procedure Act coverage. Council passed Act 1-30 on second
reading June 20 by 11-0 vote, with two members absent.
Impact on Federal interest in District: None.
Congressional/public interest expressed: None.
Adopted by Council: June 20,1975.
Approved by Mayor: July 10. 1975.
Received by Senate: July 23. 1975 (legislative day 95*).
Referred to committee: July 26, 1975.
Congressional review period expired: Oct. 7, 1975, District of
Columbia Law 1-19.

1-31 To ESTABLISH DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA BOXING AND WRESTLING
CO.rMIS.SION, AND TO PER MI ITUNDERTAKERS LICENSED FOR FIVE YEARS
IN STATES NOT HAVING RECIPROCITY AGREEMENTS WITH THE DIS-
TRICT TO BE LICENSED IN DISTRICT OF COLUMhBIA WITHOUT TAKING AN
EXA MINATION
Effect of legislation: Legislation would create three-member com-
minssion with jurisdiction over all professional and amateur wrestling,
1)oxing and martial arts events held in the District. Jurisdiction would
extend to setting and enforcement of regulations governing such
events: issuance of licenses and permits to hold/participate in them;
collection of fees. Measure estabishes fees equal to five percent of gross
receipts realized for events conducted in the District, 10 percent of
gross receipts for presentation of closed-circuit or subscription tele-
vision broadcasts of events originating elsewhere. All Commission
revenues in excess of $50.000 at end of fiscal year would revert to Gen-
eral Fund of District of Columbia. Bill would also allow undertakers
licensed at least five years in states not having reciprocity agreements
with District of Columbia to be licensed in the District without under-
going the examination otherwise required.
Action by City Council: Committee on Government Operations con-
sulted chairman and secretary of present Boxing Commission and re-
viewed relevant regulations in New York. Maryland, Indiana and
Ohio. Information recardinQ" fiscal impact of bill solicited from
Mayor's office but not received. Council passed Act 1-30 on second read-
ing by an 11-0 vote, in the absence of two members.
Congressional /public interest expressed:Coverage in Post and Star-
News critical of undertakers' provision and its ramifications for Chair-
man Diggs. Letter from Mayor Washington quoted in Post story called
provision's passage as amendment "objectionable on the grounds that
the public is denied notice of the amendment and the opportunity to
express its views."
Impact on Federal interest in District: None.
A adopted by Council : June 17, 1975.





23


Approved by M3ayor: July 11, 1975.
Received by Senate: July 23, 1975 (legislative day 95*).
Referred to committee: July 26. 1975.
Congres-sional review period expired: Oct. 7, 1975, District of
Coliumbia Law 1-20.
1-33 To IMPLEMENT SECTION 738 OF HOME RtILE: ACT BY DIVIDIXG
DisTicT INTO NEIGHBORHOOD COUNCIL AREAS AND PROVIDING MECH-
ANISM FOR ESTA BLISI MENT OF ADVISORY NE'IIII Il)RII4OOD COUNCILS
Effect of legislation: Legislation would set boundaries for Advisory
Neighborhood Comncil areas and require Council to subdivide those
areas into single-member districts. each of compara-ble size and includ-
ing approximately 2,000 persons, by July 31, 1975; Council would then
establish an ANC for area upon sublii.:-ion of petition signed by five
pre(cent of its registered voters. Election of repre-.iitatives for zinrle-
member districts scheduled for Februmary 3, 1976, siibsequent elections
to be held in November of )odd-mijibJil'd yeal.- together with tlio-, for
Boaird of Edu nation. Candidate for membership would be nominated
by petition signed by 25 registered voters in his, lier district. (Quali-
fled candidate must be registered voter; reside in his district 60 days
prior to filing; hold no other elected otlice in District of Col1libia
government t or representinga District.) Bill would limit campaign
spendii(ina to .-200. an individual s contributions to own campaign to 950,
and exempt candidates f ron finan cial disclosure provisions of District
of Columbi:i Campaiiirn Finance Reform aind Conflict of Interest Act.
ANC neiimber would be elected to two-year term, and could serve no
more than two full terms coi-,.-utively. Estimated r.)st of separate
ANC elections is s2.s153.
Action )by City Council: Council held hearings May 14, 1975, which
included testimony from 37 witnesse-. and passed bill on second read-
ing June 24 by 12-0 vote (one member absent).
Congressional/public interest expressed: None.
Impact on Federal intere-t in District: None.
Adopted by Council: June 24, 1975.
Approved by Mayor: July 22.1975.
Received by Senate: July 25, 1975 (legislative day 97*).
Referred to committee: July 28, 1975.
Congressional review period expired: Oct. 9, 1975, District of Co-
lumbia Law 1-21.

1-34 To PROVIDE ADDITIONAL REVENIE: FO)I TIlE I)ISrIuCT OF COLUMIBIA
Effect of legi-lation : Legislation would raise District revenues by
approxim!aitely $0.9 million via numerous cliange- in tax re.:iflations
;ii(d rate-. Key measures include: eliminating the exclusion of pro-
fess.ionals from unincorporated bu-iiess tax; 'vvi-ig a one-year in-
creai-e in corporate and unincorporated bu-iness income tax: incrc as-
ing motor vehicle registration tax. fuel and exci-e levied cigarette tax.
public utilities gross receipts tax; creating an 8 percent parking ales
tax. Act 1-34 aliso would repeal the 2 percent food and drug alies tax.
the 2 percent laundry and dry cleaning sal-s tax. and the 5 pe(rc1nt
sales tax on utility bills. Of the new revenues, City Council estimates






24


that approximately $33-million (65%) would be borne by District of
Columbia businesses, the remaining $17.9-million by citizens.
Congressional/public interest expressed: Public attention focusing
oni provision which would remove professional's exclusion from un-
incorporated business tax, drawing substantial media coverage; criti-
cism of measure expressed strongly by various professional associa-
tions/organizations in District.
Impact on Federal interest in District: Measure may have unknown
effect on city's tax base, which might affect District's need for Federal
payment.
Adopted by Council: July 11, 1975.
Apl)ro\ved by Mayor: July 23,1975.
Received by Senate: July 28, 1975 (legislative day 98*).
Referred to committee : July 29,1975.
Concurrent resolution disapproving: July 30,1975, H. Con. Res. 370
introduced b)y Mr. Ilarsha and referred to House District Committee.
Hearings-Senate District Committee: Sept. 8-11, 1975, (printed);
House D)istrict Committee, Subcommittee on Fiscal Affairs: Sept. 17,
19, 1975.
Hoii-e' I)istrict Committee Subcommittee on Fiscal Affairs approved
((;-5) for Full Committee action. H. Con. Res. 370: Sept. 19, 1975;
Full House Committee disapproved (9-13) Sept. 26, 1975.
Senate concurrent resolution disapproving: Sept. 26, 1975, S. Con.
Res. 67 introduced by Mr. Mathias and Mr. Beall and referred to Sen-
ate I)istrict Committee.
(Congllorssional review period expired: Oct. 20, 1975. District of Col-
um)bia Law 1-23.

143 To TAIS A OFFICE ON AGING AND A (COMMIsSION ON
AGING IN THE DISTRICT
Effect of legislation: Legislation would create Office on Aging, re-
sp)onsible to Mayor, to administer Older Americans Act and other
programs for aged in District. Office would be headed by executive
director selected by Mayor, with advice and consent of City Council,
from among three candidates recommended by Commission on Aging
(see below). Director would serve as advocate of elderly and ad-
minister programs for them; provide information, technical assist-
ance re. programs, services; prepare annual state plan required by
O.A.A.; publish directory of services for aged; analyze impact of pro-
grams/policies on elderly prior to implementation. Salary to be at
least GS-15, step 1. Act 1-36 also would create Commission on Aging
to advise District of Columbia government regarding views, needs of
District's aged; Commission to consist of 15 voting members, at least
one-half of them actual consumers of services under aging program,
including those of low-income, and minority persons at least in pro-
portion to their numbers in District of Columbia population as a
whole. Members, appointed by Mayor with Council approval, would
serve three-year, mnsalaried terms. Commission would: approve an-
nual O.A.A. state plan prior to its submission to Mayor; recommend
to Mayor candidates for post of Office on Aging director; submit an-
nual report on needs of aged in District of Columbia; review and make
recommendations on proposed District of Columbia and Federal legis-





25


lation affecting elderly; conduct hearings on relevant matters; call'
attention to incidents of neglect, abuse, bias against aged in adminis-
tration of District of Columbia laws.
Action by City Council: Hearings were held and Mayor's comments
solicited; Mayor's suggestion that prior approval of annual state plan
for O.A.A. by Commission might be inappropriate was rejected by
Council, which passed Act 1-36 on second reading by vote of 12-0 (one
member absent).
Impact on Federal interest in D)istrict: None.
Congressional/public interest expressed: None.
Adopted by Council: July 1, 197 15.
Approved by Mayor: July 25,1975.
Received by Senate: Aug. 1, 1975 (legislative day 102*).
Referred to committee: Sept. 3. 1975 .
Congressional review period expi red: Oct. 28, 1975), District of Co-
lumbia Law 1-24.

1-37 To EXEMPT STEP-PARENT ADOPTION C.\srs FRo5r REQUIRMrENT
TIHIAT ADOPTION PETITION INCLUI)E STATE MENTS SPE'CIIFYING rACE
AND RELIGION
Effect of legislation: Legislation would aminend District of Columbia
Code to facilitate step-parent adoptions-in which petitioner is spouse
of prospective adoptee s natural parent-by exemp)ting them from re-
quiren ent that petition include specified information on race and
religion.
Action by City Council: Council adopted Act 1-37--te Step-Par-
ent Adoption Facilitation Act-on second reading July 15, 1975, by a
vote of 11-0 (two inembers absent).
Congressional/public interest expres-ed : Xone.
Impact on Federal interest in District: None.
Adopted by Council: July 23, 1975.
Approved by Mayor: Aug. 4,1975.
Received by Senate: Aug. 11, 1975 (legislative d(lay 103*).
Referred to committee: Sept. 3, 1975.
Congressional review period expired: Oct. 29, 197), District of Co-
lumbia Law 1-25.
1-38 To ELIMiNATE ETHNIC REFEr:Pnv NCES IN DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
LA.ws RELATING TO EDUCATION
Effect of legislation: Legislation would repeal provisions of the
District of Columbia Code dealing with maintenance, administration
and financing of separate schools for black children in the District
(sec. 31-110; 31-115; 31-1110; 31-1111; 31-1112; 31-1113) and
amend sec. 31-1109, authorizing the Board of Education to accept
donations for betterment of such separate facilities by persons "dis-
posed to aid in the elevation of the colored population," by deleting
that description of donors' motivations.
Action by City Council: No hearings were held. Council passed
Act 1-38 on second reading July 15, 1975, by a vote of 11-0, in the
absence of two members.
Impact on Federal interest in District: None.
Congressional/public interest expressed: None.





26


Adopted by Council: July 15, 1975.
Approved by Mayor: Aug. 4, 1975.
Received by Senate: Aug. 11, 1975 (legislative day 103").
Referred to committee: Sept. 3, 1975.
Congressional review period expired: Oct. 29, 1975, District of
Columbia Law 1-26.
1-39 To CHANGE THIE NAME OF THIE ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD CoUN-
CILS TO "ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD CO-MMISSIONS"
Effect of legislation: Legislation would amend Home Rule Act
and District of Columbia Campaign Finance Reform and Conflict
of Interest Act to delete references to "Advisory Neighborhood
Councils" and substitute for them "Advisory Neighborhood Com-
missions."
Action by City Council: No hearings were held. Council passed
Act 1-39 on second reading July 1, 1975, by a 9-0 vote (four mem-
bers absent).
Impact on Federal interest in District: None.
Congressional/public interest expressed: None.
Adopted by Council: July 1, 1975.
Approved by Mayor: Aug. 4,1975.
Received by Senate: Aug. 11, 1975 (legislative day 103*).
Referred to committee: Sept. 3, 1975.
Congressional review period expired: Oct. 29, 1975, District of
Columbia Law 1-27.

1-40 To EXPAND DISTRICT OF COLUMIBIA LAW REVISION COMrMISSIOx
BY ADDITION OF FOUR MEM31BERS
Effect of legislation: Legislation would enlarge Law Revision Com-
mission membership by authorizing appointment of three members-
one a non-lawyer and one a law school faculty member-by City
Council; one by director of District of Columbia Public Defender
Service director; one additional member by Joint Committee on Judi-
cial Administration in the District of Columbia (previously allotted
two appointments). Measure also provides that, if incumbent ap-
pointed by City Council Chairman satisfies aforementioned criteria,
he would continue serving and be counted as one of City Council's
three appointees. As this is in fact the case. Act 1-40 would effect a
net gain in Commission membership of four persons, bringing its total
size to nineteen. Bill's primary objective is to give City Council power
to select members equal to that of the Mayor; additionally, the ap-
pointment allotted to Public Defender Service director would balance
that afforded District of Columbia Corporation Council by original
Law Revision Commission legislation. City Council Committee on the
Judiciary and Criminal Law estimates that fiscal impact would be
limited to cost of extending authorized $100 per diem to four new
members. Committee does not anticipate an appreciable increase in
staffing needs as result of Commission expansion.
Action by City Council: No hearings were held. Council passed
Act 1-40 on second reading by a vote of 11-0. in the absence of two
members.
Congressional/ !public interest expressed: None.
Impact on Federal interest in the District: None.





27


Adopted by Council: July 15, 1975.
Approved by Mayor: Aug. 8, 1975.
Received by Senate: Sept. 5, 1975 (legislative day 105*).
Referred to committee: Sept. 10, 1975.
Congressional review period expired: Nov. 3. 1975, District of
Columbia Law 1-29.
1-42 To PROVIDE M"[01: EFFICIENT AND EFFE TIVE MEANS FOR COLLE'C-
TION OF TA\XES FRJOM BANKS. SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS AND
PUBLIC UTILITIES
Effect of legislation: Leaislation would permit bailkirng institt io1-.
savings and loa1 as-,ociations. and )public utilities, to declare estimated
taxes and make payments toward them according to rules to be pro-
mulgated by Mayor. Pulrp)ose is to provide more efficient method for
collection of gross receipt )ts/( -.s earnings tax.
Action by City Council: What Council describes as "mini-hearing"
held July 11 and attended by representatives of banks, savings and
loan associations and utilities. All favored the measure. Council passed
Act 1-42-the ID)istrict of Columbia Supplementary Revenue Act-
on second reading July 29. by vote of 12-0 (one member abent).
Congressional/public interest expres-ed: None.
Impact on Fedeial interest in the District: None.
Adopted bv Council: July 29, 1975.
Approved by Mayor: Aug. 13, 1975.
Received by Seniate: Sept. 5.,1975) (legislative day 105.*).
Referred to committee : Sept. 10, 1975.
Congress ional rex-view period expired : Nov. 3. 1975, District of
Columbia Law 1-30.
1-43 To INCREASE PEI:MISSIBLE SALARY ALLOWANCE .EOI, THOSE
CONDUICTINo ININCG RPl' RATED) B I NE.L.. IN DISTRICT
Effect of legislation: Legislation would increase from 20 percent to
55 percent the salary allowance permitted for purposes of deduction
for those covered by the unincorporated biisiness tax. Council rationale
for change in allowance level is that measure would answer charges
from various quarters alleging existing allowance, in light of removal
of professionals' exclusion from unincorporated business tax. would
produce overtaxationn" of professional sector, notable .:iiburbanites
affected. With allowance 'change, unincorporated business tax still is
expected to yield approximately Ss-million above previous year's S4.3-
million in revenues (when professionals were not included).
Action by City Council: Council passed Act 1-43-the District of
Columbia Unincorporated Business Franchise Tax Revision Act of
1975-on second reading August 5, 1975. by an 11-0 vote (two mem-
bers al)sent).
Impact on Federal interest in District: Unknown effect on city's
tax base. which might affect the District's need for Federal payment.
Congressional/public interest expressed: Interest in over-all issue
of professionals' tax and in this modification of original legislation
shown by media and by professionals' associations.
Adopted by Council :'Aug. 5. 1975.
Approved by Mayor: Aug. 13, 1975.








Received by Senate: Sept. 5, 1975 (legislative day 105*).
Referred to committee: Sept. 9,1975.
Hearings: Senate Committee-Sept. 8-11, 1975 (printed).
S. Con. Res. 67 disapproving introduced by Senator Mathias:
Sept. 26,1975.
Congressional review period expired: Nov. 3, 1975, District of
Columbia Law 1-31.

1-45 To EXTEND MINIMUM WAGE AND OVERTIME COMPENSATION
COVERAGE TO PRIVATE HOUSEHOLD WORKERS
Effect of legislation: Legislation would amend District of Columbia
Minimum Wage Act to domestic/household workers both its wage and
overtime compensation coverage. Such workers would be guaranteed
either a $2.50 per hour minimum or a rate to be specified by the Mayor
via wage order, whichever is higher. Wage order-to be issued within
120 days of Act 1-45's effective date-would provide for payment of
minimum wage and overtime, and set regulations to preclude circum-
vention of new rates and coverage. Public hearings on the wage order
would be required.
Action by City Council: No hearings were held. Legislation was
passed by Council on second reading by a vote of 12-0, with one
member absent.
Congressional/public interest expre:-sed: Council reports that Act
1-45 has strong support of National Council on Household Employ-
ment as well as D.C. Minimum WVage Boa rd.
Impact on Federal interest in District: None.
Adopted by Council : July 29, 1975.
Approved by Mayor: Aug. 15, 1975.
Received by Senate: Sept. 5, 1975 (legislative d(lay 105*).
Referred to committee: Sept. 10. 1975.
Congressional review period expired: Nov. 3, 1975, District of
Columbia Law 1-32.

1-46 To PROVIDE FOR RENT STABILIZATION PROGRAM IN D.VI.nIcT
Effect of legislation: Legislation would establish rent control pro-
gram and an agency-the Rental Accommodations Office, headed by a
Rent Administrator-responsible for its administration. Would set
ceiling on permissible rent levels, based on landlord's allowable rate of
return (generally 8 percent maximum), and establish complex formula
for determining rate of return for individual accommodations. Data
would be pr'ovi(led by owners of rental accommiodations in registration
forms required to be filed with Office. Measure also sets forth proced-
ures for appeal, hearings, hardship petitions, adjustment procedures
related to rent levels so determined; regulations governing landlord-
to-tenant notifications, rent increases. evictions, retaliatory action,
penalties, et al.





29


Action by City Council: Council passed Act 1-35-the Rent Stabili-
zation Program Transition Act-July 29, 1975, on second reading, by
a vote of 9-3, in the absence of 1 member.
Impact on Federal interest in District: None.
Congressional/public interest expre-sed: Much criticism of rent con-
trol concept, complexity of formulae for determining rates of return,
volume of paperwork required, voiced by landlords' organizations and
real estate management interest; support for measure expressed by
tenants' organizations.
Adopted by Council: July 29, 1975.
Approved by Mayor: Aug. 15, 1975.
Received by Senate: Sept. 5, 1975 (legislative d(lay 105*).
Referred to committee: Sept. 9, 1975.
H. Con. Res. 399 (disapproving introduced by Mr. Stuckey: Sept. 17,
1975.
Hearing before Ho -.e District Committee Subcommittee on Com-
merce. Houising. and Transportation: Oct. 1. 1975.
Full House Committee voted to table the resolution: Oct. 6, 1975.
Congres-ional review period expired: Nov. 3, 1975. District of Co-
lumbia Law 1-33.
1-48 To ELIMINATE DISCRIMINATION AGAINST IP:j:(;.NANT OR RE-
CENTLY PRE(;NANT WV(OIMEN IN ADMINISTRATION OF 1NEMPLOYMIENT
INSURANCE BENEFITS
Effect of legislation: Legislation would repeal. law excluding preg-
nant women from unemployment benefits for six weeks before and
after work. It would provide tli;t pregnancy should not create any
as-umption of inability to work-the b;I.sis oni which similar Mtaryland
and Virginia laws were struck down in piat 5 v'ars-while requiring
pregnant or recently pregnant wom,,in, to meet r'VlIhular eligibility stand-
ards for benefits. Department of Labor ci. toma rily bears admninistra-
tive costs of ulineployment compernisation progr'iii; as Department
has twice. urged states to repeal regulations discriiiiiiiating against
pregnant women (currently only 21 state- retain such laws), it will
likely absorb cost increases occasioned by this trieasure. (Case-by-case
analysis to determine individual extent of di:labilitv is expected to
raise costs in qu st .ion.) District Unemployment Compensation Board
estimates minimum ,,st of benefits for period from November 1, 1975.
to end of fi-cal year 1976 at .10.5)00, and, for fiscal 1977, at $18.000. No
statistics regarding number of employers whose experience ratings
iiig"lit be affected were offered.
Action by City Council: Council passed Act 1-48 on second reading
July 29, 1975. by vote of 12-0, in alb-ence of one member.
Congressional/public interest expressed: Measure supported by De-
partment of Labor, as noted above, and Commission on the Status of
Women.
Impact on Federal intere-t in District: None.
Adopted by Council: July 29,1975.








Approved by Mayor: Aug. 15, 1975.
Received by Senate: Sept. 5, 1975 (legislative day 105*).
Referred to committee: Sept. 10, 1975.
Congressional review period expired: Nov. 3, 1975. District of Co-
umbia Law 1-34.
1-49 To AurEN-D ACT 1-29-PROVIDING ANX INCREASE IN MONTHLY
PAYMENT RATE FOR ADULT FOSTEr HOME CARE-BY DELETING COV-
ERAGE OF ALCOIIOLIC/DRUG ADDICTION HALFWAY HOUSES; FURTHER
DEFINING ACCEPTABLE RECIPIENTS; OTHER
Effect of legislation: Legislation would amend Act 1-29, which
raises to $200 the monthly payment to public assistance recipients for
adult foster home care, by: (1) removing drug addiction/alcoholism
halfway house residents from coverage, as their inclusion would re-
quire contract renegotiation at the present time; (2) clarifying lan-
guage describing those eligible for such payments by specifying that
they be recipients of "supplemental security income and general pub-
lic assistance"; (3) deleting Council's definition of adult foster homes
due to technical problems. Cost of amended bill through June 30,
1976. is estimated at approximately $1 million. Funds have been made
available for period from January 1-June 30, 1975), in the amount
of $355,482; balance is included in Mayor's 1976 budget request for
Department of Human Resources.
Action by City Council: Council passed measure on second reading
by a 12-0 vote, in absence of one member. It was neither approved
nor disapproved by the Mayor in 10-day period following passage,
and forwarded to Congress without his signature. (Act 1-49 was,
however, introduced by Council Chairman Tucker at Mayor Wash-
ington's request.)
Congressional/public interest expressed: None.
Impact on Federal interest in District: None.
Adopted by Council: July 29,1975.
Enacted without Mayor's signature: Aug. 22, 1975.
Received by Senate: Sept. 5,1975 (legislative day 105*).
Referred to committee: Sept. 9, 1975.
Congressional review period expired: Nov. 3, 1975, District of Co-
lumbia Law 1-35.

1-50 To PROVIDE FOR ESTA\BLIShIMENT, ORGANIZATION AND OPERA-
TION OF A UNIVERSITY OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMIBIA
Effect of legislation: Legislation would consolidate public post-
secondary educational institutions in the District of Columbia to
create single university governed by a Board of Trustees. Measure
details Board membership's composition, qualification requirements,
appointment procedures and responsibilities; latter includes long-
range planning of university's development, policies, funding and op-
erating procedures. Board is charged to establish within five years a
comprehensive personnel system setting minimum standards for all
matters relating to university employees; produce annual report on
state of university; establish and maintain control over D.C. Post-






31


secondary Education Fund, to consist of all funds other than tuition
and Congressional grants contributed to university. Act 1-50 also
authorizes Board of Education to transfer any appropriation balance
from one appropriation item to another or to a new program, in
amount not exceeding $50,000.
Action by City Council: Council passed Act 1-50-the District of
Columbia Public Post-secondary Education Reorganization Act
Amendments-on second reading July 29, 1975, by a 12-0 vote, in the
absence of one member.
Congressional/public interest expressed: None.
Impact on Federal interest in District: None.
Adopted by Council: July 29, 1975.
Approved by Mayor: Aug. 25,1975.
Received by Senate: Sept. 5, 1975 (legislative day 105*).
Referred to committee: Sept. 9, 1975.
Congressional review period expired: Nov. 3, 1975, District of Co.
lumbia Law 1-36.
1-51 To PROVIDE FOR POSTCARD) REGISTRATION OF VOTERS
Effect of legislation: Legislation would (-tablish system of post(Nrd
registration for voters in the District of Columbia. to be administelim
by the District of Columbia Board of Elections and Ethics according
to procedlre.s specified in measure. Act provide- for distribution of
registration applications, challenge procedures and recouir tv permitted
applicant whose eligibility is challenged. It also increases maximum
plenalties for commission of fraud related to voting/re-istration from
.500 to -1000 in fine.; and from existing 90 day- to as much as five
years. Council cites studies by Ford Foundation, actual use of s\stei
in several states and other sources which indicate major theoretical
danger of postcard registration-potential vulnerability to fraud has
not materialized in practice elsewhere. Fiscal estimates vary: Board
of Elections and Ethics suggests probable total of $53,178.25, includ-
ing $36.000 to pay 15 temporary's for four months' application card
processing: Council's Committee on Government Operations disagrees
with Board, alleging underestimate of postage and overestimate of
pay (above), and, based on costs for similar systems in other areas as
well as input from consulting and printing firms. expects total cost.
ranging from $45.690 up to $54.850.
Congressional/public interest expressed: Hearinzs held May 9, 20
and 21 included, in support of postcard registration, such witnesses as
Richard Scammon; representatives of Common Cause. the Bar Asso-
ciation of the District of Columbia. Citizens Commission on Election
Ethics for the District of Columbia, District of Columbia League of
Women Voters, others. Two private citizens and the Chillum Heights
Citizens Association opposed the act.
Action by City Council: After May hearings, Council passed the
Voter Registration Act of 1975 on second reading by a vote of 12 to 1
(IHobson against).
Impact on Federal interest in District: None.
Adopted by Council: Sept. 9,1975.
Approved by Mayor: Oct. 6,1975.






32


Received by Senate: Oct. 14,1975 (legislative day 128*).
Referred to committee: Oct. 20, 1975.
Congressional review period expired: Dec. 16, 1975, District of
Columbia Law 1-37.

1-52 To TRANSFER To CITY COUNCIL AUTHORITY To DRAW ELECTION
WARD BOUNDARIES AND REALIGN CITY SER:IVICE DELIVERY AREAS To
C(ONFOI3I WITH NEW BOUNDAPRES
Effect of legislation: Legislation would transfer to City Council
from Board of Elections and Ethics authority to establish boundaries
of the District of Columbia election wards. (Board would retain power
to draw precinct lines within wards, subject to Council approval.)
Measure provides for creation of eight contiguous wards approxi-
mately equal in population, and reapportionment following each de-
cennial census. Mayor would develop plan for development of uni-
form. coterminus delivery system for city services, and service de-
livery areas would be adjusted to coincide with ward boundaries;
effect would be to simplify now-varied geographical district systems
used by different agencies and to improve accountability of govern-
ment regarding services. Elimination of one service area in nine-area
system extant (which does not cover all city services) would produce
approximately $90,000 in savings. Further determination of fiscal
impact depends upon details of Mayor's realignment plan.
Action by City Council: Council held hearings May 7-8, and passed
Act 1-52-the Boundaries Act of 1975-on second reading by a vote
of 13-0.
Congressional/public interest expressed: Supporting bill at hear-
ings were representatives of Woodley Park Community Assn.; Capitol
East Voter Information League: Kalorama Citizens Assn; Southwest
House Board: District of Columbia League of Women Voters and
others. Opposed were Citizens Commission on Election Ethics for the
District of Columbia, and Neighbors United to Save Our Homes.
Others testified/submitted statements against specific boundary
changes no longer included in the Act.
Impact on Federal interest in District: None.
Adopted by Council: Sept. 9,1975.
Approved by Mayor: Oct. 6. 1975.
Received by Senate: Oct. 14,1975 (legislative day 128*).
Referred to committee: Oct. 20, 1975.
Congressional review period expired: Dec. 16, 1975, District of
Columbia Law 1-38.
1-54 To ESTABLISH COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM IN
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Effect of legislation: Legislation would provide requisite statutory
authority to enable the District to participate fully in a Community
Development Program under the 1974 Housing and Community De-
velopment Act. Title I of 1974 measure consolidated previously cate-
gorical programs-Urban Renewal, Open Space, et al.-and instituted
block grant system for funding. Presently, District of Columbia can
perform all activities eligible for assistance under Community De-
velopment Program outlined in Title I, but only for geographic areas






33


of city specified in the various urban renewal plans, and can continue
certain activities previously funded by Model Cities grants. Act 1-54
would allow Community Development Program activities to be car-
ried out on city-wide basis, after approval of a community develop-
ment plan. Measure directs Mayor to develop and hold public hear-
ings on such plan which, following its passage by City Council, would
be submitted to HUD for approval. It also empowers Mayor to ad-
minister resultant community development program: acquire real
property in its interest; establish and administer low-interest Rehab-
ilitation Loan and Grant Fund and Rehabilitation Loan Insurance
Fund. Act would not produce major fiscal impact on District of
Columbia, as administrative and program activities would be funded
largely through federally-assisted grants.
Action by City Council: No hearings were held, due to coverage of
housing needs in hearings on FY '"70 budget. Mayor's Reorganization
Plan No. 3 establishingg a Department of Housing and Community
Development), Community Block Grant Application of 1975, all held
previously. Council passed Act 1-54 on second reading by an 11-0 vote,
two members absent.
Congressional/public interest expressed: None.
Impact on Federal interest in District: None.
Adopted by Council: Sept. 9,1975.
Approved by Mayor: Oct. 9, 1975.
Received by Senate: Oct. 17, 1975 (legislative day 128*).
Referred to committee: Oct. 20, 1975.
Congressional review period expired: Dec. 16, 1975, District of Co-
lumbia Law 1-39.
1-56 To EXTVxN) DISTRICT'S CUINT-,:', MORATORIM. ON CONDOMINIUM
CONVERSIONS TO APRIL 30, 1976
Effect of legislation: Lei.islation would extend current moratorium
on condominium conversions-previously scheduled to expire Decem-
ber 31-to April 30, 1976. Council has recently begun to consider two
pieces of comprehensive condominium legislation as well as two major
studies of the national and loc-.l impact of conversions, all received in
September; hearings on former are to be held in November. and Coiin-
cil feels thorough evaluation of all aforementioned materials will re-
quire more time than original December deadline would allow. Cer-
tainly. no new legislation to regulate condominiums could be enacted
by that date. Extension would produce no fi- Action by City Council: Council pa--ed Act 1-56-the Second Hor-
izontal Property Regime Regulation Extension Act-on t-rond read-
in October 21 by a vote of 10-0, in the ab:-ence of three members.
('ongre-sional/public interest express-ed: None.
Impact on Federal interest in District: None.
Adopted by Council: Oct. 21,1975.
Approved by Mayor: Oct. 22. 1975.
Received by Senate: Oct. 23,1975 (legislative day 131*).
Referred to coiiwniittee: Oct. 28. 1975.
Congressional review period expired: Dec. 19. 1975, District of Co-
lumbia Law 1-40.






34


1-57 To AUTHORIZE ISSUANCE OF $50,000,000.00 IN GENERAL
OBLIGATION BONDS OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Effect of legislation: Legislation would authorize issuance of $50
million in General Obligation bonds to refinance identical amount in
1975 loans made to District of Columbia by U.S. Treasury. Maximum
interest rate would be set at eight percent, maximum allowable matu-
rity f'or bonds at 30 years and ceiling for maximum debt service at
$5,00.000. Measure also creates sinking fund-to contain rev-enues
from special tax authorized in Act 1-57, and additional revenues-
for payment of interest, principal and premium. Aforementioned spe-
cial tax would be levied annually on taxable real property in Dis-
trict in amount sufficient to pay principal, interest and prenuitmiu;
no specific rate is set in bill. Act authorizes Mayor to market and pub-
lish all notices regarding sale of bonds, subject to Council approval.
Legislation is aimed at refinancing two 1975 Treasury loans to District
of Columbia totalling $50,000.000, borrowed at eight percent interest
rate. Annual debt service is $4,441,372. If bonds were sold at seven
percent. I)strict would save $400,000-plus per year; at 6.5 percent.
more than $600.600: at six percent, more than $800,000. (Total princi-
pal now owed Treasury by I)istrict of Columbia is approximately one
billion dollars. Annual debt service for fiscal year 1976 is about $65) mil-
lio,) :mi. for rscal vear 1977, a projecte! 84 million. Council at-
tributes growth of debt to expanding public works program.)
Action by City Council: Bond issue planned in consultation with
professional bond counselors and the First Boston Corporation. Coun-
cil passed Act 1-57-the Refunding Bond Authorization Act-on
second reading by a 12-0 vote (one member absent).
Adopted by Council: Oct. 21, 1975.
Approved by Mayor: Oct. 22, 1975.
Received by Senate: Oct. 24. 1975 (legislative day 132*).
Referred to committee: Oct 28. 1975.
S. Con. Res. 78 disapproving introduced by Mr. Eagleton, with all
committee members cosigning: Nov. 20, 1975.
Hearing on S. Con. Res. 78 and D.C. fiscal affairs: Dec. 2, 1975.
(Printed.)
S. Con. Res. 78 considered and ordered reported favorably to Senate
by a vote of 7-0: Dec. 3, 1975.
Reported favorably to Senate (S. Con. Res. 78) without amend-
ment (S. Rept. 94-507) : Dec. 4,1975.
Resolution considered by Senate: Dec. 5-6.1975.
Resolution passed by Senate, without amendment, by a rollcall vote
of 80-3: Dec. 6, 1975.
S. Con. Res. 78 referred to House District Committee: Dec. 8,1975.
Oversight hearing on act 1-57 by House Committee: Dec. 9, 1975.
House District Committee considered S. Con. Res. 78 and dis-
approved by a vote of 19-1: Dec. 11, 1975.
Congressional review period expired: Dec. 20, 1975, District of Co-
luiimbia Law 1-41.






35


1-59 To REMOVE REQUIREMENT THAT TtlE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIAL
REVENUES BE COLLECTED INTO AND EXPENDED FROM VARIOUS SPE-
CIAL FUNDS, AND TO SUBSTITUTE FOR SPECIFIC FUNDS A GENERAL
FUND
Effect of legislation: Legislation would replace various special
funds, currently used for collection and expenditure of District monies
in certain budget areas, with single General Fund consisting of reve-
nues from taxes, fees, charges, federal payments, loans. Funds to be
abolished are: Highway; Motor Vehicle Parking; Metrobus; Water;
Sanitary Sewage Works; Alcoholic Rehabilitation. Those not specified,
including RFK Stadium bonds, are not affected. Measure would per-
mit Council to create special accounts within the General Fund for
reporting purposes, without limiting transfer of funds among them.
and establishes three such accounts immediately, pertaining to: water
service and operation of Washington Aqueduct: .ewer .-ervice, includ-
ing the District of Columbia costs for Potomac interceptor; highway
fa ilities. traffic control and public transportation. Purpose of Act
1-59 is to simplify and increase flexibility of mnanagemnent to city
funds. No fiscal impact is expected, other than possible savings in
accounting and management, costs and in opportunity for additional
investment earnings via pooling larger umni of idle funds.
Action by City Council: No hearings were held. Council approved
Act 1-59-the Revenue Funds Availability Act of 1975-on second
reading October 7 by a vote of 12-0, in absence of one member.
Con1rre.sional/public interest expressed: None.
Impact on Federal interest in District: None.
Adopted by Council: Oct. 7, 1975.
Approved by Mayor: Oct. 24. 1975.
Received by Senate: Nov. 3, 1975 (legislative day 135*).
Referred to committee: Nov. 4,1975.
Congressional review period expired: Jan. 22, 1976.
1-Q;1 To PROVIDE THAT PROFESSIONAL CORPORATIONS BE TREAkTED AS
UNINCORPORATED BUSINESSES FOR TAX PURPOSES
Effect of legislation: Legislation would provide that professional
corporations in District be treated as unincorporated businesses for
purpose of imposition of franchise tax; be permitted whatever exemp-
tion may be allowed unincorporated businesses (current level: $5000) :
and be subject to 20 percent-of-net-income limit on aggregate deduc-
tion for services rendered professional corporation, for compensation.
by a stockholder. According to Council Committee on Finance and
Revenue, objective is to close "loophole which would enable profes-
sionals to avoid the unincorporated business franchise tax by incorpo-
rating and paying out all (or nearly all) their net income in the own-
ers or partners' salaries." District of Columbia Director of Finance &
Revenue Kenneth Back estimates legislation would prevent possible
los., of $7.4 million in revenues to be realized by unincorporated busi-
ness tax. Effective date: January 1, 1975.
Action by City Council: Public roundtable discussion held Septem-
ber 22. attended by representatives of District of Columbia Bar; Dis-
trict of Columbia Dental Society; Bar Association of District of Co-






36


lumbia; District of Columbia Institute of CPAs; Medical Society of
District of Columbia; Board of Trade, others. Council passed Act
1-61-the District of Columbia Professional Corporation Revision
Act-on second reading by vote of 11-2. Opposed were Council mem-
bers Clarke and Douglas Moore; latter submitted statement of dissent,
citing legislation's potential for causing higher taxes on professional
corporations than are levied on simple business corporations, among
other reasons, for vote against.
Congressional/public interest expressed: Original legislation to tax
professionals provoked controversy, press coverage, hearings; Act
1-61 has attracted no such heated interest.
Impact on Federal interest in District: None.
Adopted by Council: Oct. 7, 1975.
Approved by Mayor: Oct 29, 1975.
Received by Senate: Nov. 3,1975 (legislative day 135").
Referred to committee: Nov. 4, 1975.
Congressional review period expired: Jan. 22,1976.

1-62 To REPEAL U-NINCORPORATED BUSINESS FRANCHISE TAX REVI-
SION ACT, AND TO AMEND EXTANT UNINCORPORATED BuSINE-SS FRAN-
CILISE TAX'S SALARY ALLOWANCE AND STANDARD EXE-MiPTION
PROVISIONS
Effect of legislation: Legislation would establish salary allowance
of 70 perceiient for professionals and other "personal service' businesses.
with a standard exemption of $2,500. For "capital intensive" busi-
niesses, a salary allowance of 30 percent would be established, with a
standard exemption of $5,000. Objective is to raise amount of net in-
come excluded from franchise tax, as net tax on professionals and per-
sonal service businesses is heavier, as percentage of gross income, than
that on capital intensive firms. Unincorporated business franchise tax,
as amended by the Revenue Act of 1975 (Act 1-34) and Act 1-62,
would yield approximately $8 million in additional revenues for the
District. (Revenue Act of 1975 proposed to remove exclusion of pro-
fessional and personal service businesses from unincorporated(l business
franchise tax adopted in 1947, retaining 20 percent salary allowance
and $5,000 exemption level for all unincorporated businesses. The
IUnmcorporated Business Franchi e Tax Revision Act of 1975. l.i-9, ed
one month after the Revenue Act, would have increased salary allovw-
ance for all unincorporated businesses from 20 percent to 55 percent.
Act 1-62 further revises the tax design via above-mentioned changes.)
Action by City Council: Public hearing October 1 was attended by
repr-esentatives of the District of Coluimbia Bar. Op)toimetric Society,
League of Women Voters. Podiatric Society, District or Columbia
Institute of CPAs. District of Columbia Medical Society and Bar
Assn. of the District of Columbia. Council passed Act 1-62 October 21
on second reading by 12-0 vote (one member absent).
Conia'ressioilnl/public interest expressed: Hearings held pctem-
her 8-10 by Senate D)istrict Committee and Septeniber 17 and 19 lv
House District Committee focused on the two initial CounciIl ;,'kts
(iealino with taxation of professionals. Witnes:-,s of the several pro-







fessional organizations represented at Council's October 1 hearing
te-stified in favor of moderating tax provisions as in Act 1-62.
Impact on Federal interest in District: None.
Adopted by Council: Oct. 21, 1975.
Approved by Mayor: Nov. 5, 1975.
Received by Senate: Nov. 11,1975 (legislative day 140*).
Referred to committee: Nov. 12, 1975.

1-64 To PwR)VIDE DIRECT ACCESS TO CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGISTS AND
OP'rTOMI:TRISTS IN PRIVATE HEALTH PLANS
Effect of legislation: Lezislation would require that private health/
ac, ,id iit insurance policyholder INe permitted direct access to duly
licensed psy)chOlogrsts and optometrists without prior referral by phy-
sicians. Measure is consistent with Public Law 93-36. 3, which imposes
same reqiuirelmenit on Civil Service Commission contracts with health
insir ance carriers providing federal employees' hle;1th benefits pro-
g,,ranm. Act 1-64 would not expand benefits to which policyholder is
entitled. but only eliminate prior referral requirements. The bill will
not have any fiscal impact for the District.
Action by City Council: No hearings were held; Council solicited
comments on measure from representatives of medie.al insi;rance and
optoiiitr-ic communities, and received favorable reports from all but
the W\asli-in'.,ton Psyvchiatric Society. Council pa.-edl Act 1-64 (the
Ac'e-..- to Psychologists and Optometrists Act) on second reading Octo-
ber21 bv a 12-0 vote (one member absent).
Conuessionaal /public interest expr.s.ed : None,.
Imp;ict on Federal interest in D)ist rict : Nonee.
Adopted by Council: Oct. 21, 1975.
Approved bv Mayor: Nov. 7,1975.
Received byv Senate: Nov. 20, 1975 (legislative day 147").
Referred to committee : I)ec. 1, 1975.

1-,. To EI MI..\IE R.'! rl :XT T.T SAMPLE 1 BALL-1 E I B-
LISIEI) PmRII: T(O ELEIO'r)NS WITH REI:ARD TO ADVISOIRY NEI(;IIIBOIR-
11 if i) (CO3[SS10( )N ( ONTES'TS
Et'ff.tvt of legislation: Legislation would render inapplicable, with
rea. d to Advi-orv Neighbolrhood Commission elections only. 1955
districtt of (Columbia Election Act provision mandating public:i.tion
of s:1inp1e ballots prior to any election administered by Board of Elec-
lions and Ethics. Board proposed cl]ange dutie to fact that ANC elec-
tioln-, will involve approximately 370 ballots: anticipated cost of
p'i"t in i ll 1 one oi more neiw-p;tpel" of general circulation,
as r juired by 1)55) statute, would be s159,000. As nature of ANC
contt-t- is fundamentally local. Board feels use of community new--
pIapers. broadcast media public Service time. 1,osters and mass-mailing
of information pamphlets would be both more to the point and
ecolnomiiial.
City Council action: Council passed Act 1-65-the Public-ation of
Sample Ballots Act of 1975-on second reading by a vote of 12-0. in
the al,-ence of one member. No hearing"-z were held.
Congm-msional/public interest expni-'ed : None.
Iilp)act on Federal interest in District: None.







Adopted by Council: Oct. 21. 1975.
Approved by Mayor: Nov. 7,1975.
Received by Senate: Nov. 17, 1975 (legislative day 144*).
Referred to committee: Nov. 18, 1975.

1-67 To PERrI'r I)ISTRICT OF COrLU3IBIA EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM IS
(CLASs 15 TEMrPORARY EMPLOYEES To BE ELIGIBLE FOR ADDITIONAL
ADVANCED LEAVE WITH PxAY
Effect of legislation: Legislation would authorize Superintendent of
Schools to advance additional leave, with pay. to temporary teac-hers
and attendance officers in the event of serious disability or emerrenev.
(Such leave would not exceed maximum amount which teacher/officer
would otherwise earn during his/her period of appointment.) Like
coverage already is available to permanent and probationary school
system employees of that salary class. Board of Education asserts
legislation would not affect either total amount of leave now being
taken or amount of payment for that leave time; District of Colurm-
bia Office of Budget and Management Systems concurs, feeling no fiscal
impact should be anticipated. Board approved proposal as one which
would eliminate necessary discrimination among employees of same
salary class, all of whom are equally susceptible to serious ailments
and personal emergencies. (Note: Class 15) temporary employees are
those in the process of earning accreditation for probationary status
in tile system.)
Action by City Council: No hearings were held. Council passed
Act 1-67-the Advanced Additional Leave Act-on second reading
October 21 by a vote of 12-0 (one member absent).
Congressional '/public interest expressed: None.
Impact on Fedoral interest in District: None.
Adopted by Council : Oct. 21. 1975.
!ppvoved -\ay or: Nov. 13.1975.
Receivedby Senate: Nov. 20. 1975 (legislative day 147*).
Referred to committee: Dec. 1, 1975.
1-68 To REGULATE SECURITY DEPOSITS FOR RENTED DWELLINGS
Effect of legislation: Legislation would repeal City Council Act
1-10. which set regulations concerning security deposits, and substi-
tuite essentially similar provisions in new language. Three substanItive
changes were made. Original measure required landlords to place
security deposits in interest-bearing escrow accounts: new bill specifies
that those accounts be held in financial institutions in District, and
permits per annum simple interest rather than quarterly computa-
tion previously reonuired. Earlier act also made owner's inspection of
dwelling within three days before/after termination of tenancy to
determine condition of accommodations mandatory, and required
tenant to provide written notice to landlord of any desire to be present
at such inspection: ,-ew leorislition removes both reouiremepts. The
bill is not expected to have any fiscal impact on the District
government.





39


Action by City Council: No hearings were held. Council passed Act
1-68--the Security Deposit Act-October 21, 1975, by a vote of 10-0,
in the absence of three members.
Congressional/public interest expressed: None.
Impact on Federal interest in District: None.
Adopted by Council: Oct. 21,1975.
ApI)proved by Mayor: Nov. 14, 1975.
Received by Senate: Nov. 24. 1975 (legislative day 148*).
Referred to committee: Dec. 5, 1975.

1-69 To ISSUE SPECIAL AUTO LICENSE TAGS AND REGISTRATION
CERTIFICATES FOR MEMJ1-RS OF THE D.A.V.
Effect of legislation: Legislation would provide for issuance of
li,-.-nse t,;'-s 1 earin r iiiti i; "i).\.V." and spec(:l re!ri-t'ition (' .iifi-
cates to bona fide members of I)istrict of Columbia Disabled Ameri-
can Veterans. No individual would be permitted to register more than
one vehicle under this act: fees would be set at levels identical to
those for regular pasnLgrer iiiotor vehicles. Fi-cal impact estimated
at '2)() co-t of initial plate and die., nec(,e;iry to prinlt thle tags.
Action by City Council: No 1!earings were held. Council ,:-ied Act
1-69-the D.A.V. MIotor Vehicle Registration Certificate and Iden-
tification Tag Act-by a 1)-0 vote November 4. 1975.
Conigiessional/public intere-t expressed : None.
Impact on Federil interest in District: None.
Adopted by Council: Nov. 4.1975.
Apl)rov\edl by Mayor: ov. 20, 1975.
Received lby Senate: Dec. 1, 1975 (legi-lative day 141S').
Referred to committee: Dec. 5,1975.
1-70 TO Exi.EMPT MARTIAL Ai`T., FRIor JuRISD)ICTION OF I)ISTRICT OF
COLUMBIA BOXING AND WRE.:STLING COMMIIuON AND TO RvPEi.\L
MEASURE PERn.ri.,NG LICENSING OF NE. K. I DISTRICTT OF
_G, ()F U ,NlER'.Rl KE, l.l IN" ~.- (T O
COLU]MBIA WITHOUT EXAMINATIONS
Effect of letrislation: Legislation would strike provision of 1)revi-
ous City Council act which would have allowed licenicin in District
of Col nmbl)ia, witliout examination, of undertakers liceisei el-ewhere.
It would also remove martial arts from coverage of the District of
Columbia Boxing- and Wrestling Commission Act, which created a
com'011ission and regulations to govern various forms of athletic corn-
petition. Council ass mnes that repealing licensing law will produce
some savings in administrative costs; fiscal impact of martial arts
provision is unknown.
Action by City Council: Council Committee on Governenwiit Op-
erations heard testimony from Jhoon Rhee of the Committee to Or-
ganize the World Blackbelt Leag'ue and others in support of ex-
empting martial arts from regulation, and from Di-trict of Colum-
bia Board of Funeral Directors and Embalmers and other members
of public regarding licensing of undertakers. Council pa-sed Act
1-70 (District of Columbia Boxing and Wrestling Commission Act
Amendment Act) Nov. 4 by a 13-0 vote.





40


Congressional/public interest expressed: District of Columbia
Board of Funeral Directors and Embalmers requested repeal of under-
takers' licensing provision following numerous inquiries from pro-
spective licensees and out-of-state media; Board cited fiscal implica-
tions for District of Columbia undertakers already licensed, fact
that they would be subject to more stringent licensing requirements
than non-District residents and threatened termination of existing
courtesy card agreements between District of Columbia, Maryland
and Virginia. Much media attention was drawn by original legisla-
tion. Regarding martial arts, Mr. Rhee and others expressed concern
to Council as noted above.
Impact on Federal interest in District: None.
Adopted by Council: Nov. 4, 1975.
Approved by Mayor: Nov. 20, 19,75.
Received by Senate: Dec. 3. 1975 (legislative day 150").
Referred to committee: Dec. 5, 1975.

1-71 To AUTHORIZE DISTRICT To ENTER INTO TIHE INTERSTATE
PAROLE AND PROBATION COMPACT
Effect of legislation: Legislation would allow District of Colum-
bia to join Interstate Parole and Probation Compact, in which all
fifty states are members and District of Columbia currently operat-
ing within its confines on courtesy basis. Compact permits parolees
and probationers to reside in other states if they or their families
are residents there and employment can be obtained, and if receiving
state is willing" to accept their residence: receiving states then as-
sutine responsibility for visitation and supervision. As District al-
ready operates within Compact's guidelines, measure would involve
neither procedural changes nor additional costs; it would, however,
allow District of Columbia voting membership in Compact and pro-
vide formal statutory authority for actions taken under the Compact.
Action by City Council : Roundtable discussion held July 16, 1975.
Comments in support of legislation received from Deputy Secretary
of Md. Dept. of Public Safety and Corr'ctional Services; Chief
Judge Greene of D.C. Superior Court; Judge Belson of District of
Columbia Superior Court. Council p)a-sed Act 1-71-the Interstate Pa-
role and Probation Compact Act-on second reading November 18,
1075 ), bv a 12-0 vote. in absence of one member.
Congressional/public interest expressed: None.
Impact on Federal interest in District: None.
Adopted bv Council: Nov. 18. 1975.
Approved by Mayor: Dec. 4, 1975.
Received by Senate: Dec. 15, 1975 (legislative day 157*).
Referred to committee: Dec. 17 197 5.

1-72 To EXTEND- DEADLINE FOR APPEALING, PROPImIn-Y TAx ASXssM.xTS
TO SUPERIOR COURT
Effect of legislation: Legislation would extend deadline for appeal-
ing property tax assessments to Tax Division of Superior Court
from October 15 to April 1 of following year (latter date having boen
deadline until 1974). Although October 15 date is only 15 days after






41


first half taxes are due and six months prior to second half due date,
recent rulings have required that entire tax subject to appeal must be
paid in advance before appeal may be accepted by Superior Court.
Proposed measure would restore April 1 deadline, which had been
changed by 1974 District of Columbia Real Property Tax Revision
Act (Public Law 93-407), and thus correct substantial hardship cre-
ated by October 15 date for both large and small taxpayers. Taxpayer
would thereby be permitted to pay first and second half (September
and March) taxes in normal manner and file appeal with Superior
Court by April 1. Anticipated fiscal impact on District of Columbia
governiment would be negligible: amount of funds generally involved
is approximately $100,000 or le-s. and interest to be gained at 7 per-
cent in area of "".500 for six-month period.
Action by City Council: Council passed(l similar measure as emer-
geiicy legislation October 7, 1975. Act 1-72-the Real Property Tax
Appellate Provisions Act of 1975-was passed on second reading by
Council November 18 by 12-0 vote, in absence of one member.
Congressional/public interest expressed: None.
Impact on Federal interest in the District: None.
Adopted by Couincil : Nov. 18, 1975.
AIpproved by Mayor: Dec. 4. 1975.
Received by Senate: Dec. 15.1975 (legislative day 157*).
Referred to committee: Dec. 17, 19075.

1-73 To ALLOW ADMiINISTRATIVE/SUI'rpIRViSORY SCIIOOL OFFICSFI.
W ro A_ .E GP.RAN.TED SABBATICAL LEAVE To RECEIVE tiUP TO ONE-HALF
THEIR SALARIIES DURING SUCH LEAVE
Effect of legislation: Legislation would authorize payment to ad-
ministrative or supervisory school officers of up to one-half their
regular salaries while on sabbatical leave, a payment level already
permitted teachers in such cireiicmstances. Salbbaticatl leave is available
only to permanent school svsteii employees with six years' service, on
approval of )both Superintendent and Board of Education; proof of
acceptance into graduate school and planned course of study are re-
quired(; number of employees on leave is limited to one-percent of
total District of Columbia educational staff. FY '76 budget allotment
for sabbatical pay totals ?450.000; there is no indication in bill or
Council reports that amount would be increased. Board of Education
indicates legislation would not impose any mandatory increase in its
allotment of funds for sabbatical compensation grants, and higher
payments may simply cause reduction in number of employees granted
]peave. Board approved similar propos-nil February 19. 1975.
Action by City Council: Council approved Act 1-73-the School
Officers' Sabbl)atical Leave Act-on second reading November 18,1975,
by a 12-0 vote (one member absent).
Congressional/public interest expressed: None.
Impact on Federal interest in the District: None.
Adopted bv Council: Nov. 18, 1975.
Approved by Mayor: Dec. 4. 1975.
Received by Senate: Dec. 15.1975 (legislative day 157').
Referred to committee: Dec. 17,1975.






42


1-74 To PERMIT CONTINUED 1 PERCENT LIMIT ON SULFUR CONTENT
IN COAL AND FUEL OILS
Effect of legislation: Legislation would allow sale and use of coal
and fuel oils containing up to 1 percent by weight in District until
July 1, 1978. 1972 Air Quality Control Regulations had provided that
acceptable sulfur level be reduced from 1 percent to 0.05 percent as
of July, 1975, on assumption that reduction would be necessary if
District of Columbia were to meet federally mandated air quality
standard for sulfur dioxide. Current studies show that District has
been meeting those standards while maintaining the 1 percent per-
missible level, however, and a change to the 0.05 percent limit would
pose high expense modification of existing storage and delivery facili-
ties as well as in cost of higher-grade fuels. Estimates place savings to
District of Columbia government and residents at approximately
$9.4 million if 1 percent standard is retained. (Maryland and Vir-
ginia are keeping 1 percent limit as well.)
Action by City Council: Public hea ring was held July 3,1975. Testi-
fying in support of the proposed legislation were representatives of
the District of Columbia Department of Environmental Services;
Steuart Petroleum; Pepco: the Oil Heat Association of Greater Wash-
ington. Opposed were representatives of the National Capital Inter-
state Air Quality Planning Committee and the Metropolitan Wash-
inogton Coalition for Clean Air. Council passed Act 1-74-the Air
Quality Amendment No. II relating to the sulfur content of fuels-
on second reading November 18 by a vote of 12-0 (one member absent).
Congressional/public interest expressed: See above.
Impact on Federal interest in District: None.
Adopted by Council: Nov. 18,1975.
Approved by Mayor: Dec. 5,1975.
Received by Senate: Dec. 15,1975 (legislative day 157*).
Referred to committee: Dec. 17, 1975.

1-75 To INCREASE TAXI LIABILITY INSURANCE RATES
Effect of legislation: Legislation would authorize 20 percent in-
crease in rates charged taxicabs for liability insurance for bodily
injury and property damage, hiking yearly premium for liability in-
surance from $396.50 to $475.80; two weeks' premium for such cover-
age from $15.25 to $18.30; two weeks' premium extraterritorial excess
limits from $0.75 to $0.90. Increase is designed to cover inflation from
July. 1974. through October, 1976; auto repair and medical care costs,
main components of auto insurance claims, have risen approximately
20 percent in recent years. Measure poses no fiscal impact on District
government.
Action by City Council: No hearings were held. Council passed Act
1-75--the Taxicab Insurance Premium Act of 1975-on second read-
ing December 2 by a vote of 10-0, in the absence of three members.
Congressional/public interest expressed: None.
Impact on Federal interest in District: None.
Adopted by Council: Dec. 2,1975.
Approved by Mayor: Dec. 15,1975.
Received by Senate: Dec. 18, 1975 (legislative day 160*).
Referred to committee: Jan. 20, 1976.






43


1-81 To PROVIDE RELIEF FOR SOUTHEAST PROPERTY OWNERS IN AREA
SEVEPIELY AFFECTED BY SOIL EROSION
Effect of legislation: Legislation would authorize Mayor to under-
take permanent improvements necessa ry to prevent further deteriora-
tion by soi dl erosion of properties in Square S-5542 of District. Proper-
ty owners would be assessed for fair share of costs at rate determined
by Mayor; they could defer payment for maximum period of 10 yea rs,
with interest on unpaid balance not to exceed seven percent. Measure
also directs Mayor to submit to Council within one year a report on
similar conditions elsewhere in District. Fiscal aspects uncertain, pend-
ing Mayor's determination of remedies required in Square S-5542 and
st dy o,", needs inii othlier areas.
Action by City Council: (Council's committee e on Transportation and
Environmental Affairs visited five sites suffering erosion-sedimenta-
tion control problems and found situation in Sqilare S-5542 critical.
Public. hearing held April 29, 1975). at which no opposition to measure
was expres,-ed. Council passed Act 1-81-the Soil Erosion and Sedi-
mentation Control Act of 1975-on second reading December 2 by a
vote of 9-0) (four meniiibers absent).
Congressional/pulblic interest expressed: Concern over conditions
voiced at hearings by residents of Square S-5542 (Southeast area
bounded by 0 Street, Branch Avenue, Highwood Drive and Carpenter
Street) and other areas.
Imlpa,'t on Federal interest in D)istrict: None.
Adopted by Council : D)ec. 2, 1975.
Approved by Mayor: Dec. 23.1975.
Received by Senate: Jan. 5,1976 (legislative day 162*).
Referred to committee: Jan. 20, 1976.












PRESIDENTIAL NOMINATIONS REFERRED
Associate Jude of the, Stperior Court of the DfstrYict of Columbia,
JULIA P. COOPER, confirmed August 1,1975.
BRUCE S. MENCHER. confirmed August 1, 1975.
CHARLES W. tIALLECK, pending before comm ittee.
(45)
0










UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
11 1 1 1 I I I il f ll II l Hi ll JG 1 ii 0 111 4701111111i B I1 i1 I
3 1262 09113 4709