Rev Herman Doych Biography

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Title:
Rev Herman Doych Biography
Physical Description:
Typescript
Language:
English
Creator:
Beatrice Doych Schemer
Publisher:
Unpublished
Publication Date:

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Source Institution:
Judaica Collections at UF
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID:
AA00022364:00001


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REV. HERMAN DOYCH 1896 1973 biography which he wrote in 1972 about one year before his death at age 77. Herman n Deutsch was born June 15, 1896 in Nagy Szecseny, Comitat Nograd Hungary, to Emanuel and Hermine Deutsch. He was the youngest of four siblings, two brothers and one sister. At the age of four, family moved to Paks on the Danube, Comitat Tolna where Herman n s education began. His brother Salomon, three ye taught me how to write num In addition a yeshiva student was engaged almost daily to teach Herman n to read Hebrew. At age six, he started elementary school and Talmud Torah and between ages seven and eight he was learning the weekly Torah portion along with the Rashi Commentary. By age ten, Herman was learning Mishna and Gemara. When Herman n was eight years old, his father passed away and his mother was forced to ear n a living to support herself and her four children. The two older boys were sent to Yeshivas and Herman n went to live with his maternal grandmother Sarah Rieder in Satoralja Ujhely, Hungary. other Hermine and his sister Frieda traveled to Heid elberg, Germany to establish a koshe r boarding h ouse for students and opened Marzgasse 20 In 1908, when Herman n was 12, he and his brother Salomon joined their mother and sister in Heidelberg Herman n was no celebration; just being called up to the Torah. Mother sent me a package with all kin ds of For vacation that year, Herman n returned to Heidelberg. In August, 1909, mother Hermine passed away suddenly at age 40 In September, Herman n returned to Schwabach to continue his stud ie s at the Realschule Frieda continued management of Pension Deutsch until her marriage and move to Sweden in 1920. At the end of the school year in June, 1910, Herman n returned to Heidelberg Instead of continuing his academic education, he was sent to work in Gunzenhausen as an apprentice at a wholesale glass and porcelain business, followed by employment at a wholesale carp s supply business. This work proved to be an asset in later years when Herman n used the expertise he learned during this per iod to support his family.

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2 In March 1915, at the age of 19, Herman n was drafted into the Hungarian army where he was trained in telephone communications and received a commission as crew leader of Telephone Commu ni cations for the Regiment. At one point, he was awarded a medal for bravery on the battlefront with the Russians. Shortly before the end of World War I, Herman n became a prisoner of war and was interned at the prisoner of war camp in Codogno, Province of Milano. In November, 1919, he was among 360 men who were part of a prisoner exchange between Italy and Hungary. He was discharged in December, 1919 obtained a Hungarian passport for travel in Germany and returned to Heidelberg in January, 1920. Food and jobs were scarce in Germany after World War I After a period of unemployment and small business attempts, Herman n continued his education earning credentials in teaching and schechitah. In the spring of 1928, he applied and was accepted as teacher and schochet in Leutershausen near Anspach. Meanwhile, Herman n had received credentials from the Jewish Theological Seminary in Wurzburg. In the spring of 1929, Herman n met Rita Gallinger of Wittelshofen O n September 1 of that year, they were marri ed and st arted their lives in Leutershausen. Their first daughter Hermine was born June 10, 1931 in Wurzburg. In 1932, Herman n was reassig ned as religious teacher and sch ochet with rabbinical duties at Congregation Cronheim where daughter Beate was born on May 7 1933. The Cronhe im congregation consisted of Jewish residents living in the town and in surrounding villages In October, 1936, Hermann was teaching in Heidenhei m when a woman arrived at the site and asked him to slaughter a few chickens. The Nurnberg Laws of 193 5 depriving Jews of their German citizenship were in effect along with a numb er of decrees and ord i nances enacted between 1933 and 1935 boycotting Jewish businesses and making certain elements of religious practice illegal Among them was shechi tah. While Hermann and the woma n were in conversation, Hermann explaining that it would be illegal for him to slaughter her chickens, two Nazi policemen and a Gestapo agent stormed in. They accused Herman of violating the law and attempted to arrest him. Herman showed them the sack of live chic kens indicating he had not broken the law. He showed his Hungarian passport. The Nazis left without making the arrest, but o ne week later, He rmann was summoned to the Nazi district office in Gunzenhausen where his passport was confiscated and he was told he was being deported to Hungary The following month, Hermann received his passport and orders to be out of Germany in four weeks. After c ontacting several government offices, Hermann was successful in obtaining a four month extension. Immediately he began the search for a country off the European continent which would accept him and his family. At the Council of Emigration in Munich, he saw a brochure

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3 which advertised possible refugee acceptance in Colombia, South America The Council officer wrote the Refugee Organization in Cali ithin two weeks, word came that they wo uld provide assistance to the family upon their arrival in Cali, Colombia. On April 24, 1937, a Saturday, the SS Caribia of the HAPAG line left Hamburg, Germany with the Deutsch family on board. According to Jewish law, in order for an observant Jew to travel by ship on the Sabbath, some p ossessions must be placed on board before the Sabbath. On the Friday before the departure, Hermann placed an umbrella and a briefcase into the stateroom reserved for his family. After services in the hotel synagogue the next day, Hermann, Rita, Hermine a nd Beate walked to the port and boarded the ship. There they were met by Nazi departure. Suspecting smuggling of foreign currency, g old and other valuables, they opene d every trunk, suitcase and hand luggage that had been delivered to the cabin and dumped the contents on the floor. They found nothing. At 6 :00 PM, the ship sailed. With sighs of relief, Rev. Hermann Deutsch and his immediate family watched the German l and d isappear in the distance. There were feelings of sadness, however, to have left family and friends in the face of current difficulties and a trocities that would later be known as the Holocaust. On May 20, 1937, the SS Caribia docked in Buenaventura, Colombia. The voyage had taken 27 days, and Rev. Deutsch took that time to teach himself Spanish which helped adjust to the new surroundings. During the two years the Deutsch family lived in Cali the number of Jewish refugees inc reased from 50 to approximately 400. Rev. Deutsch organized them into a functioning congregation using his teaching and rabbinical skills. The Jewish community had no funds to pay him and there were few other jobs available. The carpentry skills he acqu ired as a young man in Germany allowed him to perform odd jobs and build furniture for sale to help who had im migrate d to the US from Germany with his family, helped obtain a non quota visa for the Deutsch family. In March, 1939, Rev. Hermann Deutsch and family arrived at the Port of New York. In October, Rev. Deutsch accepted the position of s chochet Florida. He held that position for 13 years, moving to Miami in July, 1952, where he also worked as a schochet and teacher p reparing boys for Bar Mit z vah. In 1944, upon satisfying the five year US immigrant residence require ment, the Deutsch family became American citizens Because of the difficulty encountered in pronunciation and spelling of their German names, Deutsch was officially changed to Doych, Hermann dropped the extra Hermine became Hermina and Beate was renamed Beatrice. During his 13 years in Jacksonville, Rev. Doych used his skills in many areas of Jewish life. He was one of the founding members of Etz Chaim Synagogue in 1947 and often conducted services

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4 for this new orthodox congreg ation. His precise manuscript skills were often in demand to provide Hebrew lettering for Jewish gravestones and he regularly partic ipated in Talmudic studies. The scholarly book collection that was rescu ed from Germany during the Holocaust is appropriate ly named the Rev. Herman Doych Collection It consists of 177 titles of a Hebrew rabbinical working library. These books were used in teaching and learning over all the years of They are a living legacy that now resides in the Isser an d Rae Price Library of Judaica, Uni versity of Florida, Gainesville. Beatrice Doych Schemer May 14, 2014 After World War II, deported to Hungary and perished in the Holocaust. Their children were sent to Sweden and Israel before the deportation. in law, Selma and Sigmund Sundheimer together with their daughter Therese and an aunt Paula Adler sought to escape Nazi persecution by fleeing to Hollan d from Germany. When the Nazis overran the Netherlands, the Sundheimer family was deported first to Theresienstadt (Terezin) then to Sobibor where they were executed. Of a fairly large family on the Gallinger side, most were lost in the Holocaust.



PAGE 1

REV. HERMAN DOYCH 1896 1973 biography which he wrote in 1972 about one year before his death at age 77. Herman n Deutsch was born June 15, 1896 in Nagy Szecseny, Comitat Nograd Hungary, to Emanuel and Hermine Deutsch. He was the youngest of four siblings, two brothers and one sister. At the age of four, family moved to Paks on the Danube, Comitat Tolna where Herman n s education began. His brother Salomon, three ye taught me how to write num In addition a yeshiva student was engaged almost daily to teach Herman n to read Hebrew. At age six, he started elementary school and Talmud Torah and between ages seven and eight he was learning the weekly Torah portion along with the Rashi Commentary. By age ten, Herman was learning Mishna and Gemara. When Herman n was eight years old, his father passed away and his mother was forced to ear n a living to support herself and her four children. The two older boys were sent to Yeshivas and Herman n went to live with his maternal grandmother Sarah Rieder in Satoralja Ujhely, Hungary. other Hermine and his sister Frieda traveled to Heid elberg, Germany to establish a koshe r boarding h ouse for students and opened Marzgasse 20 In 1908, when Herman n was 12, he and his brother Salomon joined their mother and sister in Heidelberg Herman n was no celebration; just being called up to the Torah. Mother sent me a package with all kin ds For vacation that year, Herman n returned to Heidelberg. In August, 1909, mother Hermine passed away suddenly at age 40 In September, Herman n returned to Schwabach to continue his stud ie s at the Realschule Frieda continued management of Pension Deutsch until her marriage and move to Sweden in 1920. At the end of the school year in June, 1910, Herman n returned to Heidelberg Instead of continuing his academic education, he was sent to work in Gunzenhausen as an apprentice at a wholesale glass and porcelain business, followed by employment at a wholesale carp s supply business. This work proved to be an asset in later years when Herman n used the expertise he learned during this per iod to support his family.