Annual report

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Material Information

Title:
Annual report
Spine title:
Annual report of the Panama Canal Commission for the quarter ended December 31, 1999
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Panama Canal Commission
Publisher:
The Commission
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
annual

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Periodicals -- Panama Canal (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Fiscal year 1980-
General Note:
Title from cover.
Additional Physical Form:
This is the supplement to Panama Canal Commission, Quarter ended December 31, 1999.
Statement of Responsibility:
Panama Canal Commission.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 028794521
System ID:
AA00022290:00001

Related Items

Preceded by:
Annual report

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Letter from the editor
        Page i
    Table of Contents
        Page ii
        Page iii
    Organizational chart
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Chapter I. Canal traffic
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Chapter II. Canal operations
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Chapter III. Supporting operations
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Chapter IV. Administration and staff
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Chapter V. Treaty transition planning
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Chapter VI. Financial report
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    Chapter VII. Statistical tables
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
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        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
    Back Matter
        Back Matter 1
        Back Matter 2
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text












PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION




SUPPLEMENT







QUARTER ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1999




















Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2013











http://archive.org/details/an nua99u nit






















PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION





SUPPLEMENT





QUARTER ENDED DECEMBER 31 1999

QUARTER ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1999
















ETTER FROM THE EDITOR



On December 31, 1999, the Panama Canal Commission (PCC) ceased its operation of the Panama Canal, pursuant to the transfer of the waterway under the Panama Canal Treaty of 1977. The Commission, a U.S. corporation created for the purpose of operating and maintaining the Panama Canal during the Treaty period is succeeded by the Panama Canal Authority (ACP). This new Panama nian entity, founded upon the same principles of dedication and vision that characterized its predecessor, is charged with continuing to administrate the waterway with the efficiency and security that have become its trademark.

The following information is intended to serve as a supplement to the Panama Canal Commission Annual Report, Fiscal Year (FY) Ended September 30,1999. ne information here presented pertains to the period of October through December 1999. These three months make up the first quarter of the FY 2000, also the Canal's final period under United States Administration. Readers are asked to consult both the Annual Report, FY 1999, and this supplement for data corresponding to the final 15 months of U.S. administration. A report on FY 2000 will be forthcoming, this time presented by the ACP and including information on activities since the transfer of the Canal to Panamanian stewardship.



















I













TABLEOFCONTENTS
PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION


Page

ORGANIZATIONAL CHART .............................................................. VI

INTRODUCTION
ORGANIZATION ................................................................................ I
TH E CA N AL ....................................................................................... 2
MEASUREMENT RULES AND TOLL RATES ................................. 2
BOARD OF DIRECTORS ................................................................... 3
OFFICIALS IN THE REPUBLIC OF PANAMA ................................ 3
OFFICIALS IN WASHINGTON, D.C ................................................ 3

CHAPTER I-CANAL TRAFFIC
CANAL TRAFFIC ............................................................................... 5
COMPARATIVE HIGHLIGHTS OF OPERATIONS .......................... 6
COMMODITIES AND TRADE ROUTES .......................................... 7

CHAPTER Il--CANAL OPERATIONS
TRANSIT OPERATIONS .................................................................... 13
MAJOR MAINTENANCE AND CANAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAMS 19

CHAPTER M-SUPPORTING OPERATIONS
LOGISTICAL SERVICES ................................................................... 25
MOTOR TRANSPORTATION ............................................................ 26
LAND AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT ...................................... 26
ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT .............................................. 28
PUBLIC UTILITIES AND ENERGY .................................................. 30
LANGUAGE SERVICES ..................................................................... 30

CHAPTER IV-ADNHNISTRATION AND STAFF
EMPLOYED PERSONNEL FORCE AND PAYROLL ....................... 33
INSPECTOR GENERAL ..................................................................... 33
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY .................................................................... 34
OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND FITNESS ..................................... 35
TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT ................................................... 35
PUBLIC RELATIONS ......................................................................... 35
GENERAL COUNSEL ........................................................................ 38
INFORMATION MANAGEMENT ..................................................... 39

CHAPTER V-TREATY TRANSITION PLANNING ................................... 41

CHAPTER VI-FINANCIAL REPORT
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ............................................................... 43
RESULTS OF OPERATIONS .............................................................. 43
CAPITAL EXPENDITURES ............................................................... 43

ii








FINANCIALTABLES
TABLE 1. Statements of Financial Position .................... 4
TABLE 2. Statements of Operations .................................... 46
TABLE 3. Statements of Changes in Capital.......................... 47
TABLE 4. Statements of Cash Flows ................................... 48
TABLE 5. Forecasted Statements of Financial Viability ............. 49
Notes to Financial Statements.............................. 50

CHAPTER VII-STATISTCAL TABLES
SHIPPING STATISTICS

TABLE 1. Panama Canal Traffric-First Quarter, Fiscal Years 1995
through 2000 .................................................... 59
TABLE 2. Oceangoing Commercial Traffic by Months-First
Quarter, Fiscal Years 2000 and 1999 ........................... 61
TABLE 3. Canal Traffic by Flag of Vessel-First Quarter, Fiscal Year
2000............................................................... 62
TABLE 4. Classification of Canal Traffic by Type of Vessel-First
Quarter, Fiscal Year 2000....................................... 64
TABLE 5. Laden and Ballast Traffic by Flag of Vessel- First
Quarter, Fiscal Year 2000....................................... 67
TABLE 6. Segregation of Transits by Registered Gross Tonnage-First
Quarter, Fiscal Year 2000 ...................................... 70
TABLE 7. Principal Commodities Shipped Through The Panama
Canal during the First Quarter of Fiscal Years 1998 through 2000.............................................................. 74
TABLE 8. Origin and Destination of Commercial Cargo Through The
Panama Canal from Atlantic to Pacific during the First Quarter of Fiscal Year 2000 Segregated by Countries in Principal Trade Rue...... .......78
TABLE 9. Origin and Destination of Commercial Cargo Through The
Panama Canal from Pacific to Atlantic during the First Quarter of Fiscal Year 2000 Segregated by Countries in Principal Trade Routes.............84
TABLE 10. Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade
Routes-Atlantic to Pacific- First Quarter, Fiscal Years 1998,1999,2000 ............................................... 92
TABLE 11. Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade
Routes-Pacific to Atlantic- First Quarter, Fiscal Years 1998,19992000................................................ 116
TABLE 12. Principal Canal Commodities by Direction-First
Quarter, Fiscal Year200...........140
TABLE 13 Major Voyage Trade Routes in Canal Traffic ...................... 142

OTHER STATISTICS

TABLE 14. Water Supply and Usage ......................... 143
TABLE 15S. Electrical Power Generated ............................... 14-4

III













10PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES


I~I
SECRETARY OF DEFENSE


SECRETARY OF THE ARMY



I CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD

BOARD OF-DIRECTORS



ADMINISTRATOR
INSPECTOR GENERAL ---------------------------------------------------------------------- SECRETARY AND ASSISTANT
DEPUTY ADMINISTRATOR TO CHAIRMAN


CANAL EXPANSION PROJECT
OFFICEj



OFFIE OFEQUI OFICE OF GENERAL
OPPORUNITYCOUNSEL



DEPARTMENT OF DEPARTMENT OF DEPARTMENT OF I DEPARTMENT OF
EXECUTIVE I MARITIME j CORPORATE INFORMATION f
ADMINISTRATION I OPERTIONS PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT
I______________MARKETING Jj


I "I
DEPARTMENT OF DEPARTMENT OF DEPARTMENT OF DEPARTMENT OF
FINANCIAL 1I HUMAN ENGINEERING AND SAFETY f
ENVIRONMENTAL
MANAGEMENT L RESOURCES INDUSTRIAL SERVICES AND SECURITY







































(an 1l AdiIsT Iratol-AlbertO AIlman /ubIeta, at left, and Deputy Administrator Josepih WA. oreli'son pose atop (jold 111i11. with the (,aaIIlld Cut InI th background, The (laillard ('ut wideinllg is one of the most Important projects to increase the capacity of the












INTRODUCTION
ORGANIZATION

The Panama Canal Commission, in its pre-December 31, 1999 form,' was a wholly owned government corporation within the Executive Branch of the United States Government, provided for by the Panama Canal Treaty of 1977 and constituted by the Panama Canal Act of 1979, Public Law 96-70 (September 27,1979), as amended by Public Law 104-106 (February 10, 1996), 22 U.S.C. 3611. The authority of the President of the United States with respect to the Commission was exercised through the Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of the Army. Supervising the Commission was a nine-member Board comprised of five United States nationals, appointed by the President with the advice and consent of the Senate, and four Republic of Panama nationals, proposed by the Republic of Panama for appointment by the President. Daily operation of the Canal falls under the responsibility of the Panamanian Administrator. For the remaining life of the treaty, the Deputy Administrator was a United States citizen.

The Commission was established to carry out the responsibilities of the United States with respect to the Panama Canal under the Panama Canal Treaty of 1977. In fulfillment of these obligations, the Commission was to manage, operate, and maintain the Canal, its complementary works, installations and equipment, and provide for the orderly transit of vessels through the waterway. The Commission performed these functions until the treaty terminated at noon, on December 31, 1999, at which time the Republic of Panama assumed full responsibility for the Canal.

The operation of the waterway is conducted on a self-financing basis. The Commission was expected to recover, through tolls and other revenues, all Canal operation and maintenance costs, including interest, depreciation, capital for plant replacement, expansion and improvements and payments to the Republic of Panama for public services and annuities, in accordance with paragraph 5 of Article M and paragraphs 4(a) and (b) of Article XJH, respectively, of the Panama Canal Treaty of 1977. Revenues from tolls and all other sources were deposited in the U.S. Treasury in an account known as the Panama Canal Revolving Fund. The resources in this fund were available for continuous use and served to finance Canal operation and capital programs, which were annually reviewed by Congress.

1 The Panama Canal Corriffil'ssion as a technical matter conunues its legal existence for a limited titne as the Panama Canal Conunission Office of Transition Administration. or OTA. Its mission is to cloe out, venous legal, financial and administrative responsibilities of the United States Goverriment that by their nature could not be completed prior to the transfer of the Canal on December 31, 1999. The OTA is n4.x ill, any way concerned with the current operation of the Canal, which by Treaty is entirely the province of the Republic of Panama.








2 HY]MODUCTION

CANAL

The Panama Canal is a lock-type canal which runs approximately 51 miles from deep water to deep water. The minimum width of the navigable channel is 500 feet. Navigable channel depth can vary according to the amount of water available in Canal reservoirs, however, the normal permissible transit draft is 39 feet 6 inches tropical fresh water.

Vessels transiting the Canal are raised a total of 85 feet in three steps to the level of Gatun Lake, the principal source of Canal water, then lowered to sea level again in three steps. The three sets of Canal locks are paired so as to permit simultaneous lockage of two vessels in the same or opposite directions.

The Panama Canal has been serving world trade since its official opening on August 15, 1914.

MEASUREMENT RULES AND TOLL RATES

On October 1, 1994, a new system of vessel measurement rules was implemented in order to establish tonnage for Panama Canal tolls assessment. These rules established the Panama Canal Universal Measurement System (PC/UMS) Net Ton in lieu of the previous Panama Canal Net Ton. The change, was made to render the Panama Canal measurement system comparable to that established by the 1969 International Convention on Tonnage Measurement of Ships. Under PC/ UMS, a mathematical formula is applied to the total volume established to produce tonnage and hence, revenue, both of which in the aggregate are equal to those produced under the previous vessel measurement system. Practically all vessels that transited prior to October 1, 1994, retain the Panama Canal tonnage value computed under the previous system.

The Commission Board of Directors approved toll increases of 8.2 percent, effective January 1, 1997, and of 7.5 percent effective January 1, 1998. In addition, effective July 1, 1997, the rules of admeasurement were amended to permit the assessment of tolls for the on-deck container capacity of traiasiting vessels. The toll rates are as follows: (a) on merchant vessels, Army and Navy transports, hospital ships, and yachts, when carrying passengers. or cargo, $2.57 per PC/ UMS Net Ton; (b) on such vessels in ballast, without passengers or cargo, $2.04 per PC/UMS Net Ton and (c) on other floating craft, $1.43 per Ton of Displacement. A flat fee implemented on June 1, 1998, affects small vessels as follows: vessels up to 50 feet in length are subject to a flat fee of $500; vessels from 50 to 80 feet in length are assessed tolls of $750; vessels from 80 to 100 feet in length are assessed tolls of $ 1,000; and vessels over 100 feet in length or up to 583 PC/UMS net tons if laden, 735 PC/UMS net tons if ballast, or 1,048 displacement









PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION 3

tons, are assessed tolls of $1,500. By treaty, Colombia must be provided with free transit through the Canal for its troops, war materials and warships.



BOARD OF DIRECTORS
First Quarter of Fiscal Year 2000

United States Republic of Panama
The Honorable LOUIS B. CALDERA His Excellency JORGE E. RITTER
Chairman, Board of Directors Vice Chairman, Board of Directors
Secretary of the Army Panama, Republic of Panama
Washington, D. C.

The Honorable MARKOS K. MARINAKIS The Honorable FERNANDO CARDOZE New York, New York Panama, Republic of Panama

The Honorable ALBERT N. NAHMAD The Honorable EMANUEL
Coconut Grove, Florida GONZALEZ-REVILLA
Panama; Republic of Panama

Th Honorable CLIFFORD B. O'HARA The Honorable MOISES D. MIZRACHI
Greenwich, Connecticut Panama, Republic of Panama



OFFICIALS IN THE REPUBLIC OF PANAMA

Administrator .................................................. Honorable ALBERTO ALEMAN Z.
Deputy Administrator ....................................... Honorable JOSEPH W. CORNELISON

OFFICIALS IN WASHINGTON, D. C.

Assistant to the Chairman and Secretary .............................. WILLIAM J. CONNOLLY

Following the June 11, 1997 signing of the organic law for the establishment and regulation of the Panama Canal Authority (ACP), the Panama Canal Commission successor upon treaty end, former Panamanian President Ernesto Perez Balladares appointed the following individuals to serve on the first ACP board of directors: Messrs. Femando Cardoze, Emanuel Gonzalez-Revilla, Moises D. Mizrachi, Adolfo Ahumada, Eloy Alfaro, Luis Anders on, Samuel Lewis Navarro, Raul Montenegro V. and Roberto Roy. In September 1999, current Panamanian President Mireya Moscoso appointed Ricardo A. Martinelli as ACP Board Chairman and Minister for Canal Affairs.




















Lxapi I-er




CANAL TRAFFIC

CANALIMAMC

With this historic year, the Panama Canal completes 85 years under United States administration. The following report refers to the first quarter of fiscal year
(FY) 2000, that is, October, November and December 1999, also the final three months of Panama Canal operation under the U.S. federal corporation known as the Panama Canal Commission.

During the first quarter of FY 2000, most major elements of Canal traffic were below levels reported in the first quarter of FY 1999. The period of October through December 1999 was characterized by a surge in petroleum prices, following the March 1999 OPEC commitment to sustain production cuts. High energy prices resulted in increasing transportation costs, including freight rates, which to a certain degree affected cargo movements through the Panama Canal. The United States, the main origin and destination of cargo through the waterway, registered a growth of four percent during the first three months of FY 2000, while expectations for economic improvement in Japan increased. Despite a good performance on the part of these two countries, both of which dominate commercial routes through the Canal, cargo movements during the first quarter of FY 2000 were weak compared to the corresponding period for the previous year.

Tolls revenue fell 3.7 percent in the first quarter of FY 2000 to $144.6 million, compared to $150.1 million recorded in the corresponding quarter of FY 1999. The result was in part, due to the declining transits of dry bulk carriers, general cargo carriers, and reefers. Total PC/UMS net tons decreased 3.3 percent to 57.9 million tons relative to 60 million tons in the corresponding quarter of FY 1999, however, the average PCIUMS net tonnage per oceangoing commercial vessel rose 5.3 percent to 18,829 tons. Transit for vessels with beams 30.5 meters (100 feet) and larger decreased 1.2 percent to 1, 109 or 35.8 percent of total oceangoing transits, compared to 1, 123 and 3 3.4 percent in the first quarter of FY 1999.

Oceangoing transits totaled 3,095 or 33.6 daily, down 8.1 percent from 3,366 or 36.6 per day in the first quarter of FY 1999. Transits by oceangoing commercial vessels totaled 3,075, increasing slightly 0.6 percent from the 3,325 reached in FY 1999. Of that total, oceangoing transits by U.S. Government owned or
C%










6 CANAL TRAFFIC

operated vessels totaled 18 compared to 35 in FY 1999, while oceangoing toll-free vessels accounted for 2 compared to 6 registered the prior FY.

Oceangoing commercial cargo tonnage fell 7.9 percent to 48.1 million long tons relative to the 52.3 million long tons registered during first quarter FY 1999. Key commodities showing increases included containerized cargo, chemicals and petrochemicals, refrigerated products and automobiles. In contrast, cargo declines were registered in grains, petroleum and petroleum products, phosphates, coal, ores and metals, lumber and lumber products, and manufactures of iron and steel. A summary of the key elements of Canal traffic and tolls revenue during the first quarter of FYs 1999 and 2000 is shown in the table below, followed by a more detailed description of cargo movements by trade route.
I

COMIPARATWE 11IGHLIGHTS OF OPERATIONS
First Quarter First Quarter
Fiscal Year 2000 Fiscal Year 1999

Oceangoing Transits:
Commercial ...................................................... 3,075 3,325
U.S. Government ............................................. 18 35
Free .................................................................. 2 6
Total ............................................................ 3,095 3,366

Daily Average ........................................... 33 .6 36 .1

Small Transits:
Com m ercial ...................................................... 135 145
U.S. Government .............................................. 51 5
Free .......................................... ....................... 7 6
Total ............................................................ 147 166


Total Cargo:
Commercial ...................................................... 48,128,681 52,276,053
U.S. Government ............................................. 0 47,516
Free .................................................................. 0 0
Total .............................................. ............... 48,128,681 52,323,569

Total PC/UMS Net Tons and Reconstructed
Displacement Tonnage ..................................... 57,859,199 59,858,091


Transit Revenue:
Commercial Tolls .............................................. $144,534,788 $149,018,491
U.S. Government Tolls ........................................ $85,318 $1,126,075
Tolls Revenue ............................................... $144,620,106 $150,144,566

Harbor Pilotage, Tug, Launch and Other Services* $31,915,928 $35,304,648

Total Transit Revenue ..................................... ..... $176,536,034 $185,449,214

*includes booking fees








PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION 7

COMMODITIES AND TRADE ROUTES

During the first quarter of FY 2000, cargo movements of grains dropped 23 percent to 13.8 million long tons. The level of cargo during the period, although inferior to the amount registered in 1999, remained close to the five-year average. Tonnage for com, the main commodity within the grains category, decreased 1.7 million long tons as a result of weaker shipments from the East Coast United States with destination to Japan. According to official sources, bumper crops from previous years allowed China to increase export levels to Asia, which in turn affected the corn flow from the United States to Asia through the Canal. Cargo tonnage of soybeans fell by 674,000 long tons during the quarter, due partially to increased competition from Australian and Brazilian suppliers. Similarly, wheat shipments registered a fall of 516 billion tons because of shifting routes carrying shipments of humanitarian aid from the West Coast United States to Egypt through Texas.

Container loads transiting the Canal rose 7.7 percent to 7.9 million long tons during the first quarter of FY 2000, compared to 7.3 million long tons in the corresponding period of FY 1999. Container trade between Asia and the East Coast of the United States, sharing about the 40 percent of the total container flows through the Canal continued as the major trade route of this commodity Other important container trade routes include: The West Coast United States Europe, rising 9.6 percent to 912,000 long tons; the West Coast South America East Coast United States, rising 9.8 percent to 75 1,000 long tons; compared with th. e tonnage recorded during the same period in FY 1999. The excellent performance of container load transit through the Canal resulted primarily from the upturn in Asian economies, coupled with a strong economic performance on the part of the United States.

The transport of crude oil or petroleum through the Canal declined 12.2 percent to 2 million long tons during the first quarter of the FY 2000 compared to 2.3 million long tons in the corresponding period of the previous year. Principal trade routes with lower-than-average performance were East Coast South America West Coast United States, West Coast South America West Indies/South America Intercoastal, and East Coast South America West Coast Central America. In the short term, the Canal crude trade's weak performance reflected OPEC member agreements to keep the supply at low levels, along with a trend in rising prices. The plans being to keep the world crude oil stock at low levels during the low demand season. Venezuela, a major petroleum exporter in Canal routes, has made a commitment to comply with its annual production quota of 2.7 million barrels per day. During the week ending November 26, 1999, the United States reduced its refinery capacity to 86 percent from the previous 91 percent level.

Petroleum products shipments through the Panama Canal declined I I percent, totaling 4.2 million long tons. Declines in gasoline transport through the Canal were due, in part, to an absence of shipments between the Pacific and Atlantic coasts of Colombia in comparison with the previous period,the ship-








CANAL TRAMC

ments were possibly replaced by other means of transportation within that country. Similarly, shipments of petroleum coke decreased as a result of weaker cargo registered in the West Coast United States Europe route.

Coal and coke shipped through the Canal slipped 15.1 percent to 2.2 million long tons during the first quarter of FY 2000 from the 2.6 million long tons recorded during the corresponding period last year. Excluding the coal and coke traded between Asia and both East Coast United States and South America Intercoastal, all other important trade routes for this commodity group dropped. A sharp decline was observed in the West Coast Canada Europe route, which dropped 33.9 percent to 774,000 long tons from 1.2 million long tons registered during the first quarter of the FY 1999. Competition from other sources of coal for power generation, such as Colombian coal, explained in part the decline of this trade route. On the other hand, coal and coke traded in the East Coast United States Asia route was down 7 1.1 percent to 116,000 long tons, from the 400,000 long tons in the first quarter of FY 1999. The availability of cheaper sources of coal such as Australia in comparison to the United States explained in part the decline of the coal flows in this route. Coal and coke in the Asia East Coast, United States route rose 2 1. 1 percent to 8 14,000 long tons during the first quarter of FY 2000, compared with 673,000 long tons in the same period last year. The improvement of the coal trade in this route, especially metallurgic coal used as input in the processing of iron and steel manufactures, was favored by the U.S. economy's strong performance.

The Canal cargo flow of iron and steel manufactures for the first three months of the FY 2000 recorded a decline close to 16 percent with respect to the corresponding period last year. During the period of the FY 2000, 3.1 million long tons were transported while during the corresponding period of FY 1999, 3.7 million long tons were moved. The types of manufactures most affected within this category were those of iron and steel plates, sheets and coils, with a decrease of 297, 100 long tons. This represents close to 50.9 percent of the cargo decline.

Despite the weakening cargo for iron and steel manufactures reported during the first three months of FY 2000, an improvement was observed in December with cargo increasing 9 percent. The latter is indicative of a stabilization in cargo levels, after an apparent reduction of worldwide inventories that were accumulated at very low prices and in large quantities because of the excess supply from Asia in 1998. The cargo flows of iron and steel manufactures originating from Asia, for the first three months of FY 2000, totaled 1.4 million long, tons, all of which represented about 42.3 percent of the total for this type of merchandise. During this period, 95 1, 100 long tons were shipped to the U.S. East Coast, that is, about 70. 1 percent of the tonnage coming from Asia. These 95 1, 100 long tons represented 31 percent of the total tonnage of this type of merchandise passing through the Canal.

Lumber and lumber products transported through the Canal declined 3 percent to 2.3 million long tons in the first quarter of FY 2000, compared to the 2.4 million long tons observed during the corresponding period for the previous year.








PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION 9

Ile Canal pulpwood trade slipped 20.5 percent to 760,000 long tons from the 956,000 long tons in the first quarter of the FY 1999, 32.3 percent total tonnage of the lumber and product group in the first quarter of FY 2000, but a drop from the 39.4 percent recorded in the previous year. Lumber products, excluding pulpwood, were up 8.3 percent to 1.6 million long tons in the first quarter of FY 2000 compared to 1.5 million long tons in the previous year. The major Canal trade route for lumber and lumber products was the East Coast United States Asia route, accounting for approximately 66 percent of the total tonnage of the groups. For pulpwood, the West Coast Canada Europe route was the major Canal trade route. In general, this trade continues to decline as a result of forest preservation measures in most countries.

Cargo tonnage for the movement of chemicals and petrochemicals through the Canal registered a record for the first quarter of FY 2000, with 3.3 million long tons-an increase of 36.9 percent compared to last year. This group of products includes caustic soda, benzene, toluene, and other inputs used in various industrial processes. The most important route for this trade is the East Coast United States to Asia with 58.2 percent share of total cargo. The economic recovery of Asian countries has been an important factor in the expansion of this trade.

The movement of phosphates and feniiizers continues to indicate the declining trend that has prevailed for, over a year. A total of 2.4 million long tons were registered for these commodities, representing a decline of 29.1 percent compared to the first quarter of FY 1999. Shipments of phosphates from the East Coast United States to China show the most significant declines. Phosphate rock, which has been the traditional product moved through the Canal, has been substituted by more finished products such as phosphoric acid, ammonium phosphate and triple super phosphate. These products can also be provided from alternative producing areas that bypass the Canal, such as Morocco, which accounts for approximately 38 percent of world phosphoric acid exports.

Reeferproducts performed well during the first quarter of the FY 2000, rising 10 percent to 1.6 million long tons compared to the 1.5 million long tons registered during the corresponding period of the previous year. The banana trade rose 15.3 percent to 527,000 long tons during the period and, occupying approximately 33 percent of the reefer group, became the main commodity of this trade. The banana trade principal route includes West Coast South Amenca-primanly Ecuadorand Europe. Nearly 77 percent of the bananas shipped through the Canal duni ng this period are moved through this route. The banana trade improved duni ng the period as banana plantations recovered from the El Nifio weather phenomenon and low prices were observed in major international banana markets.

Automobile, truck, accessories and parts shipments for the first quarter of FY 2000 showed great dynamism, moving up 41 percent, that is, 616,300 long tons compared to 438,500 tons recorded in the same period of FY 1999. Of the 616,3(X.) long tons of autos,, trucks, accessories and parts that transited the Canal during the first three months of the FY, close to 96.4 percent represented automobiles and








10 CANAL TRAFFIC

trucks, that is, 594,200 long tons. The strong growth for automobiles during this period corresponded to a seasonal demand generated by the car manufacturers usual supply of new vehicle models for the incoming year and, in this special case, for the new millennium. The route with the largest concentration of trade for this category was the Asia/U.S. East Coast route, generating 52.2 percent of total cargo. About 16.2 percent represented the U.S. East Coast to Oceania route and about 12 percent represented the Europe to U.S. West Coast route.

The Canal cargo flow for ores and metals declined nearly 18 percent, decreasing from 2.7 million long tons to 2.2 million tons during the first three months of FY 2000, compared to the corresponding period for FY 1999. The decline of the category as a whole was mainly a result of declining shipments of the ores sub-category. The ores sub-category decreased approximately 30 percent from 1.6 million long tons posted during the first quarter of FY 1999 to 1. 18 million long tons registered during the same time period in FY 2000. Total cargo tonnage going to the U.S. East Coast declined 30 percent from 642,000 long tons to 446,000 tons. Ores destined to Europe dropped 31 percent from 448,000 long tons to 311,000 tons and ores destined to the East Coast of Canada fell 57 percent from 185,000 long tons to 79,000 long tons.







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I'M1innndn1r11d1,Iic11M11, poulydip1y the Palalm (an1al transfer document at the D)ecember 31, 1999, ceremiony on the
MOILf the PIm I" Ina AdminIaIonII iIIdIn ()n he lefIctt are the PanamII anian M Inistecr of' [ore Ign Relation, Jose Mi guel A lernan and
th I ha'iia oI Ih (allord of I) IIrC10Ito and Min)ister fbr CanalI Affirs R Icardo Ma riticelI I On hier right are I 'S. Ambassador to Panamia-




















Chapter I




CANAL OPERATIONS

TRANSIT OPERATIONS
The Canal registered a total of 3,095 oceangoing transits during the first quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2000 (October, November and December 1999).

The following table summarizes the transits of large oceangoing vessels (by beam and length) during the last ten fiscal years and the first quarter of fiscal year 200.
Vessels of Percent Vessels of Percent 182.9 meter of total 24.4 meter of total (600fi) oceangoing (80ft) oceangoing Fiscal Year length & over transits beam & over transits
2000 (First Quarter) 1230 37.9 1844 56.9
1999 4906 34.2 7348 51.3
1998 4630 35.6 7189 55.2
1997 4606 35.0 6916 52.5
1996 4948 36.1 7265 52.9
1995 4552 33.4 6668 48.9
1994 4066 32.6 5892 47.2
1993 4027 32.9 5568 45.4
1992 3982 31.5 5695 45.1
1991 4008 31.4 5825 45.6
1990 3772 31.3 5545 46.0

Fog restrictions: Gaillard Cut registered a total of 26 days of fog restrictions during the first quarter of FY 2000.

EnhacedVesel raf MaageentSystem (EVTMS): The EVTMS project entered its implementation phase on December 20"' 1999, after three weeks of parallel operation with the MTCS system. At the end of the year, the project was pending certain tasks from the first phase, including the improvement of response time and the addition of the new Pilot Contract to the new system.

13









14 CANAL OPERATIONS

With the implementation of the EVTMS system the following objectives were accomplished:
Eiiate Y2K glitch risk
" Modernize mainframe
" Provide internet communication, primarily for customers (only one way, initially) Unify databank
" Create platform for additional, high investment return applications

The following proposed additional improvements were under review at the end of the year:
" Increased dynamic maintenance of vessel schedule Automatic collection of "ship event reports" (SERs) Minimization of the portable CTAN equipment Integration of the Universal Automatic Identification System (VMIS) Programming of transits "JIT" (Just-in-Time) "Data Warehouse" / "Decision Support System" Migration to new WEB Technology

Canal Traffic and Navigationi System (CTAN): The original version, designed by the Volpe Transportation Center, was set for full deployment on January 301h, 2000. Implementation of the Pilot Contract, agreed upon for full deployment of the portable pilot carry-on units, was scheduled for the same date. Previously, permanently mounted units were installed on all Floating Equipment. A total of 55 permanent installations were completed and 37 more units were built for installation in additional equipment.

TRANSIT RESOURCES DIVISION

The following table summarizes tug jobs performed during the last three years and the first quarter of FY 2000.

First Quarter
Fiscal Year Fiscal Year Fiscal Year Fiscal Year 1997 1998 1999 2000

bgJohs:
Balboa SD 33,299 36,351 36,587 8,665
Cristobal ND 16,035 16,719 18,021 9,757
Total 49,334 53,070 54,608 13,422

bg Operating Hours 78,817 91,410 94,695 22,676

Linehandling Jobs
Balboa SD 208,613 212,173 214,014 45,925
Cristobal ND 205,577 206,456 200,455 43,722
Total 414,190 418,887 414,469 89,647








PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION is

Water Bus: The water bus service provided transportation for 1347 passengers and. carried out 390 trips during the first quarter of FY 2000.

Jason Cradle: The installation of the Jason Cradle man-over-board system initiated in FY 1998, was completed on all 28 pilot/passenger launches and on 18 of the 20 tugboats in FY 1999. By March 2000, installation of the cradle in remaining tugboats was due for completion. Tugboat and launch crew training material has already been prepared and the cradle has been used successfully on several occasions.

Spectra Line (for tugboats): The "Spectra 12" line was successfully tested on a tugboat before its use was adopted, and 18 of the 20 tugboats had the line installed by December 1999. The line was selected over the formerly used polyester lines because of its one-third lower weight, in addition to greater strength, smaller diameter and lower elasticity. Experiments with the use of this line produced a decrease in back complaints. The fact that the spectra line does not stretch as much as the polyester makes it safer to use if the line parts. The adoption of this line is also associated with the reduction of one out of three seamen, on 18 of the 20 tugboats. The configurations of two of the tugboats require three seamen; nevertheless, they will later be equipped with the line. The cost of the "Spectra 12" coils line is $8,291 (350 feet) versus $5,871 (600 feet) for the polyester line, however, the cost benefit analysis showed that the fife cycle cost of the Spectra 12 line is less, especially when, considering staffing reductions.

Launches: The fourth launch (ATUN) under the multiyear contract was awarded in November 1999 for a contract price of $793,000.

BOARD OF LOCAL INSPECI)ORS

A total of 44 Marine Licenses were issued and seven Marine Accident Investigations were conducted during the first quarter of FY 2000.

First Quarter
License Fiscal Year 1999 Fiscal Year 2000

Motorboat Operator 160 22
Pilot 47 11
Mate, Steam & Motor Vessel, 7 0
Master, Steam & Motor Vessel 14 4
Master-Mate Non-Self Propelled 8 1
Assistant Engineer 8 1
Chief Engineer 2!
TOW 270 44








16 CANAL OPERATIONS

USAMAA (US. Army Nianpower and Analysis Agency): In FY 1997 1998 USAMAA reviewed the Commission. manpower requirements and recommended adjustments in the tugboat crewing and line handling staffing. In FY 1999 and throughout the first quarter of FY 2000 the Division initiated plans to implement these staffing adjustments.

The staffing changes called a reduction from three to two seamen on 18 of the 20 tugboats, and one line handler from the stem of smaller vessel using four locomotives and six wires. This action represented a reduction of 83 positions (71 seamen and 12 line handlers). However, a freezing of positions and buyout cushioned the impact on the workforce, since no employees were terminated.

Relocation of Launch Line ----- in-Operations from the Balboa Port Area: Commission operating rights for the area now occupied by launch line handling operations were discontinued on December 31, 1999, as the Government of Panama granted a concession to the Panama Ports Company for the modernization, operation and expansion of the Port of Balboa.

During FY 1999 and the first quarter of FY 2000, considerable effort was put into exploring cost effective alternatives for both a permanent relocation and a temporary relocation until the permanent facilities could be built.

Ile former U.S. Army base just southeast of Miraflores, Locks (Corozal West) was selected as the permanent location for the launch and line handling operations now located in the Port of Balboa. As the new facility is not expected to be ready until mid-2001, arrangements were made to temporarily relocate the launch facilities in Balboa (Dock 19) to the pilot landing in Diablo.

OE Studies: During FY 1999, the Office of Organizational Effectiveness (OE) initiated a study to improve the effectiveness of tugboat warehousing facilitie's in Diablo (Building 6004). This study, conducted in full coordination with the Divisions staff, was well received in the first quarter of FY 2000.

Also during the first quarter of FY 2000, OE initiated a study to improve the effectiveness of Maintenance Branch processes for launch maintenance.

Projects Accounting: ORACLE Projects Accounting is a database management system that accounts for resources expended at various work levels and across operational functions, with the goal of tabulating labor and material costs for work performed. By the end of the first quarter of FY 2000, despite scant human resources, the Division had made good progress in identifying elements of the Projects Accounting structure for collecting cost data against projectshasks.

Considering the objective to become a more economically viable organization, the support the ORACLE tool provides in enabling the Division to function as a business by monitoring costs and facilitating the definition of corrective and proactive measures, is significant.








PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION 17

LOCKS

Cross-Under Cable Tray Replacement Project: Cross-under cable tray replacement reinitiated in October 1999, in Miraflores North, Center and South Cross-Unders. Thbe Center Cross-Under has since then been completed, while the North and South Cross-Unders were still in progress with completion at 80 and 20 percent, respectively. Miraflores and Pedro Miguel are scheduled for completion before the 2000 yearend.

Switchgear Project: Six 480 volts switchgears-two at each lock-were replaced at six Track Transformer Rooms. The project began in October 1999 and will continue until such time as all 48 switchgears are replaced. The project also includes remodeling and repair of track transformer rooms.

Caisson No. 2, Motor Control Center Replacement: The Electrical and Industrial Division initiated this project beginning December 1999. The Division aimed to replace Motor Control Centers originally installed in 1934. The project was scheduled for completion by March 2000.

Locks Overhaul: This overhaul encompassed the reconditioning of miter gates 118 and 119 at Miraflores Locks and the repair/replacement of ri sing stem, valves at Gatun Locks East and West sidewall culverts. Overhaul program cost was approximately $9 million.

Intermediate miter gates 1 10 and Ill which were never overhauled, were removed on October 7 and 8, 1997. Gate leaves were delivered to the Industrial, Division synchrolift to be reconditioned and painted for later installation in miter gates 118 and 119 in September 1998. Although installation of the gates was postponed due to the scope of the structural repairs required, ABS Marine Services was contracted to inspect and provide recommendations, and the gate: leaves are now reconditioned and painted. Undocking was scheduled for early January 2000. Miter gates 118 and 119 dry chamber work was completed during the period of September 18 through October 1, 1999. During that time miter gates 118 and 119 were relocated to the intermediate gate 1 10 and 111 positions. Miter gates 1 10 and 111 were rehung in miter gates 118 and 119 location on January 7, 2000. In August 1999, at Miraflores Locks, the painting of all intermediate gates in situ started with miter gates 104 and 105. Rehabilitation was held during the: period of August 16 through August 26, 1999, and the same continued with miter gates 106 and 107 in the West lane during the September 18 through October 1, 1999 outage. Overall cost for the project was $93,000. For FY 2000, painting continues at Gatun Locks intermediate miter gates 9,10,17 and 18.

Miter gates 100 and 10 1, last overhauled in 1977, were removed on March 15, 1999 and delivered to the Industrial Division synchrolift for reconditioning and, painting. The gates leaves were undocked in December 1999 to provide space at, the Industrial Division synchrolift for the miter gates to be overhauled during,








18 CANAL OPERATIONS

FY 2000. Due to delays with the Caisson repairs, miter gates 100 and 101 dry chamber work and rehanging at Miraflores Locks were postponed till July 2000.

At Gatun Locks, the east and west sidewall rising stem valves were repaired and replaced as necessary and repairs to the concrete culvert structures were performed. The east sidewall culvert outage was held from May 3 through May 18 while that of the west sidewall was held from June 7 through June 22, 1999. The work was based on a comprehensive inspection of Gatun Locks underwater equipment the previous year. During FY 2000, Gatun Locks centerwall, culvert is receiving similar repairs on rising stem valves in addition to replacement of the final ten cylindrical valves for a total of forty replaced in the middle and lower levels.

Structural repairs and painting of Caisson No. 2 at Balboa Dry Dock and Industrial Division were also completed this FY at an overhaul cost of approximately $3.5 million. Work performed included internal framing replacement, rivet and hull repair, painting of bilge, operating deck and exterior below waterline, and stability test by ABS Marine Service. Replacement of the electrical switchgear was also initiated.

The first phase of the three-year replacement bulkheads project was awarded in FY 1999 for 603 K. This phase included the replacement of twelve intake and discharge centerwall bulkheads for delivery by March, 2000 and scheduled for use at Gatun Locks centerwall culvert by April 2000.

New Locomotives Project: After the receipt of 8 prototypes in August, 1999, the operations trial period commenced with day shift work on November 10. The trial period was scheduled for completion by May of 2000. Upon acceptance of the prototypes, the Division was to reach an agreement on required modifications to production units in order for the Panama Canal Authority to then authorize the manufacture of 18 additional units.

Return Track Rehabilitation: Work carried out included the replacement of 700 ft of return track slab at Gatun locks, lower level centerwall, initiated in October 1999, and scheduled for completion by the end of January 2000. The replacement of 700 ft of return track slab at Gatun locks, lower level west sidewall, began in December 1999 and was completed by the end of March 2000.

Emergency & Contingency Division: The Emergency and Contingency Management Division and the Fire Department of the Republic of Panama, in accordance with the Panama Canal Treaty of 1977, is responsible for providing fire protection (fire fighting, rescue, handling of hazardous materials) in Canal operating areas, defense sites, and civilian/military areas of coordination, as well as shipboard fire fighting on all vessels in Canal area waters. Fire and emergency responses for the period October December 1999 amounted to 1,220.

The hazardous cargo stand-by program, which provides for Emergency and Contingency Management Division personnel at the locks, continued during this period as a marine safety measure. Emergency personnel kept foam apparatuses









PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION 19

on stand-by for vessels with cargos designated as inherently dangerous by the Marine Bureau. The critical period of transit for said vessels is upon entering the locks. Fire stand-bys at the locks totaled 924 for the period of October Decemrber 1999.

Responses to marine-related emergencies involving hazardous materials/incidents totaled only one for the period of October December 1999, while land based hazardous material incident responses totaled three. There were a total of seven fires during the period of October December 1999: three ship fires and four non-ship fires. There were also two false alarms and 183 responses to ambulance service. Marine medical-related emergencies administered by fire apparatuses and fire personnel amounted to 36.

Additional emergencies during the period of October December 1999, amounted to 63 as follows: 45 activated alarms; 10 motor vehicle accidents; two electrical malfunctions; and six helicopter stand-bys.

The Emergency and Contingency Management Division also responded to one bomb threat during the period of October December, 19 99.

MAJOR MAINTENANCE AND CANAL IMPROVEME NTS

Planned maintenance, scheduled overhauls, and general improvements to the Canal and appurtenant structures during the first quarter of FY 2000 were all completed according to schedule. The various divisions and units of the Department of Engineering and Industrial Services were responsible for overall physical maintenance and improvement of the waterway.

GAILLARD CUT WIDENING AND DREDGING

The accelerated Gaillard Cut Widening Program continues on schedule and will be completed by December 2002. Of the 23 million bank cubic meters (bcm) total dry excavation programmed, 21 million bcm, or 91 percent, was competed at the time of writing. The two-dredge operation program-Dipper Dredge Rialto M. Christensen and Cutter Suction Dredge Mindi-along with the land excavator Liebherr and the hydraulic clamshell bucket on tracked crane (King Crab) continue the wet excavation. The Clamshell operation began work on double shifts on November 18, 1999. In an effort to support Clamshell operations, two new, Caterpillar 773D Off-Road Hauling Trucks, each with 34-cubic meter capacity', were added to the Land Dredge. The contract for the purchase of the trucks included 12 months maintenance at a total cost of $1,099,880.00, with a buy,-back option for $609,150.00 upon completion of the 12-month period. Operations with the new trucks began on October 13, 1999. Of the 11I mill Ion bcm total wet excavation programmed, eight million bcm-or 73 percent-has been completed. Other levels of completion, at the time of writing, are as follows: subaqueous drilling and blasting, 94.2 percent; land drilling and blasting, 89.4 percent; overall drilling and blasting operations, 91.8 percent; entire Gaillard Cut project, 83 percent.











Table 1. STATUS OF GAILLARD CUT WIDENING PROGRAM FIRST QUARTER Fiscal Year 2000

ScoDrExaainDnhllin /Blasting Wet Excavation
Seto DyExavtinLand-Based Marine-Based Land-Based Marine-Based
Excavated Blasted Pret Blasted Pret Excavated Pret Excavated Pecn
CWP Name Volume Percent Volume completed Volume Pret Volume Pret Volume Pecn
No. M3X ) complete M3JQ0 _____ completem3x complete() complete
1 Mandinga 170 100 136 100 73 100 0 333 100
2 Obispo 297 100 215 100 116 100 0 ---302 100
3 Elliot 283 100 159 100 85 100 0 ---267 100
4 Eduardo 124 100 215 100 116 100 0 ---344 10
5 Tres Pesos 360 100 181 100 98 100 0 508 100...
6 Borinauen 345 100~ 226 100..~... 122 100 0 304 J.00L
7 .Las Cascadas 3,480.. 100... 1,560. 100.. 1*45.. 100.. 0 ---1,527 100.
8 North La Pita 63 100 292. 100... 66.. 100 56 10Q0.. 171 J100L
9 .South La Pita 561. 100Q.. 492 100 35 100Q 153 100 226 io
10 .Central La Pita 3-097 100 860 100 128 100 487 100 639 100..
11 Summit 166 100 440 100 59 100 234 100 45 18.....~a.
12 Empire 275 100 1,235 100 100 100 363 100 545 50
13 .Hodgjes 2,209" 100 627 100 84 100 81 29 481 0
14 Gold Hill 141 100 152 100 62 100 0 0 21 6
15 Contractor 181 100 643 100 50 100 123 63 330 0__16 Escobar 104 100 1,236 100 201 100 277 100 928 79
17 Cartagena 2,300 0 748 0 61 0 251 0 428 00
18 Tie-up Station 65 0 277 0 33 0 93 89 38 0
Total 20,363 91 8,669 91 1,540 89 1,774 74 6,198 70
__ Complete __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 0








PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION 21

LANDSLIDE CONTROL AND DAM SAFETY PROGRAMS

Drainage and Stabilization Projects: During the first quarter of this fiscal year, a slide began developing on the West Bank at West Lirio, between stations 57K+516 and 58K+e053. This slide was very likely a reactivation of the Old Lirio Slide, with a lateral extension toward the south. The Old Lirio Slide first developed in 1912 and enlarged in 1913. Intermittent movement occurred until 1932 and then ceased until FY 2000. Stabilization work was put under design. As movements at Model Slope were also detected, three horizontal drains with, average lengths of 214 meters (700 ft.) were installed to decrease the phreatic level and improve area stability and safety.

Site Investigation: The Geotechnical Branch prepared a geological map of La Pita Sector, covering Cut Widening Projects 8, 9 and 10.

MAINTENANCE SUPPORT

Maintenance Division activities during the first quarter of FY 2000 included the following:

1. Filling of area behind Morgan's Gardens, facilitating entry of core
sampler equipment so geological samples could be taken. The samples were to be used in analyses for the construction of a road joining Corozal
West and the Miratlores Locks area&
2 Maintenance work on Cerro Pelado Road.
3. Repairs to the dike area for fuel/oil pollution control in Gamboa.,
4. Removal and reinstallation of all kcnuckle-type fenders in the Locks
Division for the USS New Jersey Transit.
5. Turning of Miraflores Generating Station No. 4 generator for core
replace ment by contractor.
6. Sheet metal repairs to locks locomotives No.s 54 and 81.
7. Construction of transformer pedestals and viaduct for electrical cables
for the new Balboa Apprentice School.
8. Construction of viaducts so electrical cables could cross underground,
near Paraiso Tie-Up Station, and avoid interference with contractor
performing excavation project at Cartagena.
9. Commencement of sedimentation basin resurfacing at Mount Hope
Water Filtration Plant.
10. Commencement of repair and improvemnenrts of geotechnical informnation points at Gatun Earth Dams.
11. Participation in activities related to the Canal transfer ceremony.








22 CANAL OPERATIONS

LOCKS

Miter Gate and Other Locks Projects: Miter gates work performed and or contracted by the Industrial Division included the following: continuation of repair work on miter gates 100, 10 1, 118 and 119; bridge gate rollers; windlasses manifold (14 ea.); refurbishment of fair lead tubes; safety wheel ring; refurbishment of windlass bearing; traction unit shaft covers; and refurbishment of transaction unit base.

FLOATING EQUIPMENT

Tubg maintenance: The Industrial Division offices in Mount Hope and at Dock 45 in Gatun Lake provide maintenance and repair services for the Commnission tug fleet. During this quarter, work included major overhauls at Unidad (continuation) and Lider. Emergency repairs performed included damaged keel coolers on Guia and Haynes, a damaged starboard clutch on Paz and a damaged propeller on the Schley.

Maintenance for Dredges, Cranes, and Related Equipment: Work on dredges and related equipment involved the manufacture of ten 50-foot long and ten 100-foot long discharge pipes, along with major overhauls of tugs Gorgona and Chagres. On the PCC barge fleet and crane boat, the Industrial Division performed and/or contracted emergency repairs to barge 832 and the major overhaul of fuel barge 104.

Launch Maintenance: During this quarter, the Industrial Division overhauled four launches. Two launches were repaired due to emergencies.

Marine Accident Damage Inspection: The division carried out seven damage inspections due to marine accidents and reviewed two marine claims for General Counsel.

Commercial Projects: During the first quarter of FY 2000, the Industrial Division performed an ultrasonic test at Braswell Dry Dock and manufactured a shaft for Dragados Nacionales.








z







1102




















Panamanian President Mirea Mosoo. former UI.S. President Jimmy Carter, the King of Spain Juan Carlos 1, and presidents Miguel Angel Rodriguez of Costa Rica. Andres Pastrdna of ( 'olombia, Ernesto Zedillo of Mexico. Hugo Ban/er of Bolivia and Carlos Flores of Honduras wave from atop a locks locomotive during the s\mbtdic etent for the transfer of the ( anal to Panama. This ceremony was held on December 14, 1999, at Miraflores Locks.



















chapter HI




SUPPORTING OPERATIONS

Units supporting the Panama Canal have always provided essential services for the operation and maintenance of the waterway and its facilities. These include logistical and transportation services, envirom-nental management, sanitation and grounds management, public utilities, security, and health and safety services.
LOGISTICAL SERVICES

The Contracting Division, Department of Financial Management, acquired $24,102,178.84 in supplies, equipment, materials, civil works, architect and engineering, advisory, and assistance services during the first quarter of fiscal year
(FY) 2000. Acquisitions from Panamanian firms included: $748,379.00 to relocate Maintenance Division, $642,592.50 for ready-mixed concrete and $697,884. 00 for bus transportation. Major contracting obligations included- $1,725,865.00 for removal of unexploded ordnance in former range, $802,000.00 for pilot line handler launch, $748,379.00 to relocate Maintenance Division from Balboa, $697,884.00 for bus transportation, $642,592.50 for ready-mixed concrete, $577,562.16 for readymixed concrete for Locks Division, and $524,520.00 for metal clad switchgear.


The Inventory Management Branch of the Operations Support Division, Department of Maritime Operations, issued approximately $5,761,818.74 in inventory items for Commission use. A total of $6,477,352.77 was obligated for new inventory purchases during the first quarter of FY 2000. A total inventory of 28,231 line items, worth $24,508,849.89 was in stock on December 3 1, 1999.

This quarter, the Investment, Reutilization and Recovery Unit completed costfree transfers of excess equipment with a fair market value of $12,000.00 to other U.S. Government agencies. Sales to the Government of Panama totaled $19,041.00 while sales to others totaled $14,563.00.

The Logistics Assistance Unit in New Orleans expedited urgent purchases and coordinated all Commission cargo shipments from the United States to Panania. A total of 2,139 measurement tons of containerized and break-bulk cargo ",ere shipped from Louisiana ports to Panama during the first quarter of FY 2000,








,Ile
SUPPORTING OPERATIONS

MOTOR TRANSPORTATION

The Mobile Equipment Maintenance Branch maintained a consolidated motor pool of 977 vehicles and special equipment designed to meet Commission vehicular transportation requirements. The vehicle fleet in FY 1999 and the first quarter of FY 2000 included 660 trucks of various types, 141 passenger-carrying vehicles, 47 special equipment vehicles, 49 special vehicles, 64 forklift trucks and 16 sweeper machines from the Warehousing Branch. In addition, the Mobile Equipment Maintenance Branch serviced 181 pieces of equipment not included in the consolidated vehicle and equipment motor pool. Of this total, 60 pieces of equipment came from the Sanitation and Entomology Branch, 83 from the Locks Division and 38 from the Locks Track Maintenance Unit. Fleet mileage was at 1,304,688 at the end of this quarter.

Fully equipped shops including light- and heavy-duty repair shops, specialized transmission, diesel and machine shops, and the fork-truck repair shop, provided facilities for overhauls and general repairs to fleet vehicles and the equipment of other Commission units. With the consolidation of shops in the Southern District, there was a reduction in manpower. At the end of this quarter, the Transportation Operations Branch was staffed with a total of 187 motor vehicle operators in both districts, and managed a motor pool of 284 vehicles, consisting of 123 general pool, 71 replacement and 90 special purpose vehicles and equipment. This section performed an average of 4,429 monthly transportation trips during the first quarter of FY 2000 for services ranging from transisthmian pilot trips to heavy equipment operation.

LAND AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT

The Real Estate Management Division provides focused master planning and management oversight for Panama Canal lands and facilities use, and served until December 31, 1999 as the primary agency for the exchange of information between the Government of Panama, U.S. Forces, and private entities, with respect to long-term real estate and land use programs.

The Master Planning Unit completed the master plan for the Corozal West facilities which were transferred from U.S. Forces to the Panama Canal Commission on December 6,1999. The transfer included 522,969.23 square meters of land and 106 building, most of which were warehouses, industrial shops and office buildings (to include sheds, guard booths, latrines, and other obsolete buildings).

Implementation of the master plan for buildings renovations began in December 1999. The first phase consisted of minor modifications to buildings where activities then housed in the Panama Ports Company and the Panama Railway Company concession areas would be relocated.








PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION 27

The most pressing relocations were the Warehousing and Inventory activities, the Maintenance Division, and the Launch and Line-handlers Stations located in the Balboa Industrial area. These activities are scheduled to be functioning out of Corozal West by the end of the year 2000.

The Lands Management Unit supported the Commission in the coordination of documentation, reports, and studies prepared in response to the requests of private companies. According to Article IV of the Panama Canal Treaty implementing agreement, private companies required a Commission determination of compatibility for any commercial activities they wished to establish in C anal operating areas. On November 1999, the Unit was assigned full responsibility for the coordination of all ports and railroad matters. Significant projects handled by the Unit included land-use development proposals received by the Interoceanic Region Authority of Panama, The National Maritime Authority of Panama, and private entities wishing to establish maritime, commercial, tourism and eco-touri sm activities in areas bordering the Canal.

On December 30,1999, all Commission employee housing, with few exceptions, was transferred to the Government of Panama in accordance with the Panama Canal Treaty. The Office of Transition Administration (OTA) assumed responsibility for the reduced number of housing units that could not be transferred by December 1999.

The Buildings office completed renovation and space planning for Building 710, Balboa (former Balboa Elementary School), where Systems Division offices, the Contracting Division and other Financial Management units, would be relocated as per treaty implementation obligations. The renovation and use of Buildings 701, 702, 706, 704, 74, and 7 3 (former B alboa High S chool) began w ith an aim to vacate the Training Center in Balboa due to the expansion of the Gaillard Highway, and to relocate the Human Resources Department off-ices from Ancon. The results of space utilization studies led to the renovation of the Maritime Operations Director's office in Building 729, and several offices in Building 101. Building 761 was renovated for the use of the Office of Transition Administration and the Panama Canal Authority, while Building 37 was prepared for the Labor Relations Board and as a temporary facility for the Panama residential Transition Committee.

Complete support was provided for the various transition activities at Miraflores, the former Balboa High School, the Prado area and Goethals.%lemonial. including moving services, cleaning, repairs and renovation. The Buildings office continued to provide work order administration for Commission buildings. Substantial improvements were made in the cleaning services contract and in the development of the new air-conditioning maintenance contract.








28 SUPPORTING OPERATIONS

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

During the first quarter of FY 2000, the Environmental Policy and Programs Branch analyzed and evaluated approximately I I documents regarding environmental impact studies or proposals for projects in Canal compatibility or operating areas.

Numerous lectures, training seminars and awareness workshops were provided to employees with an aim to minimizing the possibility of pollutant release into the environment. Themes included product substitution and recovery, and the reuse and recycling of products such as solvents, oil, scrap metal and paper. A review of PCC oily waste generation, collection, treatment and disposal was coordinated by the Branch and carried out by the IESC (International Executive Service Corps) Executive Volunteer. The closing of the oil sump and the installation of new facilities for processing oily water were also reviewed.

Implementation of the ISO 14001 Environmental Management System continued during the first quarter of FY 2000. Fifteen persons received training on the identification of environmental impacts/aspects, developed system level procedures and reviewed environmental standards.

The Branch also developed contacts with regard to the management of the Panama Canal Watershed after 1999. National and international organizations such as ANAM, MIDA, USAID, TVA, IDB and various NGOs were contacted for their cooperation.

The Sanitation and Entomology Section determined that the effective control of disease vectors and pestiferous insects needed to be accomplished by methods posing the least possible hazard to man and the environment. Effective and economically feasible methods demonstrating greater compatibility with the environment become the control methods; reductions in pesticide use are favored when practicable.

New initiatives are continuously being developed to keep the employees and the general public informed on various vector-borne-related situations, thus contributing to significant progress in these cores.

Regarding pollution control, three new, portable oil-skimmer units, each with the capacity to recover 121 bbls of oil per hour, replaced older units. In addition, 1,700 feet of new oil containment barriers were purchased, increasing the Division's overall capacity to respond to oil spill emergencies.

Aquatic vegetation control activities increased in Canal waters during the months of November and December, 1999, due to unusually high levels in Gatun and Alhajuela lakes. As a result, water spilled from Madden dam, causing aquatic plants and debris to accumulate against the Chagres River floating barrier'near









PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION 29

Gamboa. Some vegetation reached the Canal through a section of the barrier which ruptured because of the increased weight. In order to keep Canal waters safe for navigation, vegetation control operations were increased in the Chagres River, Gatun Lake, Gaillard Cut and Pedro Miguel Locks during the last months of the year.

During the months of October, November and December 1999, the Environmental Education Unit visited 23 schools located in the Canal watershed. A total of 4,395 students, 246 teachers, and 276 parents, participated in the program. A seminar covering topics related to the operation and history of the Panama Canal, as well as the importance of the Canal Watershed and the protection of the environment, was provided at the Policy Academy of Panama.

The Environmental Education Program organized presentations for new PCC employees. During the first quarter of FY 2000, three presentations were held for a total of 144 employees. The Environmental Educational Program held two additional presentations for 52 Environmental Management Division employees.

Personnel and transportation assistance to other units included support to the Canal Capacity Projects-Office for the new watershed area; the Meteorological and Hydrographic Branch for site location, clearing, construction and instrument installation in the Chamon rainfall station; and the Water Quality Unit for water sampling in the Boqueron, Chagres, and Codle del Norte rivers.

From September to December 1999, the Division installed all required equipment (workstations, computers and software) for the period. The office also acquired and developed its own geographic databases to facilitate the production of maps on Canal Watershed environmental themes. In addition, satellite images were purchased and used to monitor and evaluate forest resources and changes in land use.

The water quality monitoring program was designed to include nine stations in the eastern region and six stations in the western region of the watershed, for a total of 15 permanent stations. Stations are located in the main tributaries of the traditional watershed (Gatun, Boqueron, Pequeni, Chagres, Ciri Grande y Trinidad rivers). Three stations along the Chilibre river (Chilibre y Chilibrillo sub-basin), just before it empties into the Chagres and to the east of the Gaillard Cut, determine bacterial and organic matter pollution levels in these rivers. Six stations on the Codle del Norte, Toabre, San Miguel and Indio rivers determine water quality in courses being evaluated for new water resource potential in Canal expansion region.

Water samples covering the three previously mentioned sectors were collected over the course of seven trips. Branch personnel performed on-site analyses and preserved samples before they were forwarded, via courier, to a certified laboratory in the United States for physical and chemical analyses. A total of 40 chemical analyses were performed on the 313 water samples forwarded for testing.








SUPPORTING OPERATIONS

PUBLIC UTILITIES AND ENERGY

Potable water: The Miraflores and Mount Hope water treatment plants produced and distributed potable water to the Commission, the U.S. Armed Forces and other Canal Area users on both sides of the Isthmus. The Pacific side system serves portions of Panama City and suburban areas while the Atlantic side system serves the Colon metropolitan area. During the first quarter of FY 2000, the systems supplied a total of 8573 million cubic feet of potable water to consumers. Water supplied to the Republic of Panama averaged approximately 71.3 million gallons per day (9.53 million cubic feet).

Energy: The Canal area energy demand during the first quarter of FY 2000 was 86 gigawatt hours. The peak hourly demand of 46.09 megawatts reached on October 15, 1999 shows a 31 percent reduction from the 67.82 megawatts recorded in the previous year. Electrical power consumed for Commission operation was 25 gigawatt hours, the same amount as the previous year.

LANGUAGE SERVICES

The Language Services Branch provides all major translation work and language interpretation services for the entire Panama Canal Commission. Since implementation of the Panama Canal Treaty of 1977, this office has been responsible for responding to an increasing level of requirements for translations and interpretations. During the final quarter leading to the transfer of the Panama Canal, the office translated into English regulations to govern the new Panama Canal Authority, including those for sanitation, admeasurement, navigation and the Board of Local Inspectors. The Division also translated into Spanish a significant amount of technical materials, such as the Lockage, the Enhanced Vessel Traffic Management System (EVTMS), and the Confined Space Safe Practices manuals. Other translations from English to Spanish included collective bargaining agreements, contract specifications, numerous legal contracts, and the new Panama Canal Authority website.

In preparation for the Canal transfer, the office also provided support by translating a myriad of medical documents due for submittal to the Office of Personnel Management prior to December 31, 1999. Along with these final transition efforts, interpretation services were provided during the final Binational Board of Directors meetings. Interpretation services were also required during the many courses on technical subjects, as well as for the labor-relations and partnership council to train members of the Spanish-speaking workforce. The transfer of the waterway to Panamanian stewardship was completed in a timely and orderly manner, culn-Anating in the official transfer ceremony at noon on December 31, 1999, at which the Language Services Branch provided interpretation services for the President of the Republic and foreign dignitaries.
























..... ...........












I I I, I I I I I( I [I it I AL I I I I OF It% I ioard of I )ircc Io I-,, poised to take c I I aruc upon Can it I transfei- an (I (he clawing of the nc\v n1i I I ennium. From Ow ]cit. 1-iTi io\ irc I manud (j(m/a1c/-Rc\ 111a. Chairman ot'dic Board and N11111stcr 1,01- Citilid Alf0irs Ricardo Martincill and Panarna 111 I] W1111111"ll, 11m Albert() AIC111,111 /uhleta. III tile "econd rm ilre 1'enlilildo Cardo/c, Hov Alf iro, Moises Mi/rachl and Satiluel k: i, \,i\m-T ) In the third r()\ lit-c Adolf() Almmada. Vui,, Ander,,on, Robcrlo Roy, Raul Montcilei-,ro and Abel RodrigUez.



















12
%,f taper IV




ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF

EMPLOYED PERSONNEL FORCE AND PAYROLL

By the end of the first quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2000, the total labor force of the Commission in the Republic of Panama was 9,078. Of this total, 7,861 were permanent and 1,217 were temporary employees. Of the permanent work force in Panama, 7,601 (96.7 percent) were Panamaruian citizens, 250 (3.2 percent) were U.S. citizens, and 12 (0.2 percent) were third-country nationals. At the end of FY 1999 and the first quarter of FY 2000, a total of eight U.S. citizens were working in the Commission offices in Washington, D.C. and New Orleans.

For the first quarter of FY 2000, the total Commission payroll (for both salaries and wages) was $82.8 million. Of this total, $75.8 million was paid to non-U.S. citizen employees while $7 million was paid to U.S. citizen employees.
INSPECTOR GENERAL

The Office of the Inspector General (OIG) was established on April 16, 1989, at the Panama Canal Commission in accordance with the Inspector General A ct of 1978 (P.L. 95-452), as amended by the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (PL. 100-504). The Board of Directors appoints the Inspector General (IG). The IG, under the general supervision of the Board, keeps the Administrator and the Deputy Administrator apprised of important auditing or investigative matters. In addition to conducting audits and investigations, the OIG recommends policies and corrective actions designed to promote economy, efficiency and effecfiveness, and to prevent and detect waste, fraud, abuse, and mismanagement in programs and operations.

The IG is independent from Canal management but not from the Board, nor from Federal laws and regulations. The OIG maintains the Board and Congress fully and constantly informed of any problems or deficiencies in the administration of programs and operations, as well as any corrective actions that may be necessary.

During the first three months of FY 2000, the OIG issued seven audit reports and one investigative report. In addition, three management letters w-ere drafted to raise issues of lesser concern that warranted management attentI011.
33








34 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF

During the period reported, questioned costs in audit reports totaled $17,390.00. It was determined that internal controls were adequate to safeguard Commission assets and prevent fraudulent transactions.

This period also saw a continued emphasis on the availability of the employee hotline for reporting possible fraud, waste, or abuse issues. Allegations received in the OIG are screened to determine whether they warrant acceptance for additional audit/investigative efforts, referral to Commission management for corrective action, or rejection due to lack of merit. This procedure has permitted timely response to claims.

The Organic Law of the Panama Canal Authority furnishes legislation for organization, operation, and modernization of the entity. The law guarantees the safe and efficient operation of the Panama Canal after 1999, and includes provisions for the Office of the Inspector General, whereby the Inspector General reports to and is appointed by the Board of Directors.

EQUALOPPORTUNITY

The Office of Equal Opportunity continued their efforts in preventing discrimination in the Panama Canal Commission and promoting the early and informal resolution of complaints, along with increased educational, advisory and counseling activities for employees. Coordination with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) accelerated the conduct of all pending hearings under U.S. statute so as to complete all procedures before the end of the year. The last hearing took place on December 21, 1999.

The Panamanian Preference Program monitoring revealed a steady increase in the participation of Republic of Panama nationals at all levels of the work force. The composition of the total work force by citizenship, gender, and minority group at the end of the first quarter of FY 2000 reflected the following:

CITIZENSHIP

Panama United States Third-Country

96.7% 3.2% 0.2%

GENDER

Male Female
87.1% 12.9%

MINORITYGROUPS
Hispanic Black White Oriental Indian
73.3% 18.6% 5.9% 1.7% .0.5%









PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION 35

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND FITNESS

The Occupational Health Division of the Department of Human Resources is responsible for planning, directing, and controffing, Panama Canal occupational health and fitness programs. The Clinical Services Branch, the Employee Assistance Branch, and the Employee Fitness Branch together are committed to ensuring conditions that will enhance the health and fitness of all employees, while placing special emphasis on prevention, wellness and early return to work after job injury.

During the first quarter of FY 2000, the Commission recorded 73 performanceof-duty injuries/illnesses resuming medical attention. ne Gatun Lake Recreational Center, also a part of the Occupational Health Division, provided recreational programs for cruise line visitors, Cornmission employees and dependents. During the first quarter of FY 2000, 5,811 cruise line passengers and 3,029 Commission employees and their dependents visited the Center.

TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT

The Training and Development Division is responsible for assessing all training needs and developing training plans. Division responsibilities include: coordinating, evaluating, and providing employee development programs; training pilots, towboat masters and other maritime field employees; producing new craftsmen for the institution; ensuring state-of-the-art technical training for on-board journeymen; operating and administering training facilities with appropriate equipment; evaluating and promoting the use of new technology for training; and providing advisory services to management. In addition, the division coordinates the succession planning effort and commercializes training services for the local market as part of the Canal growth strategy. Three branches provide for the training effort: the Mari time Training Branch, the Industrial and Safety Training Branch, and the Employee and Management Development Branch.

The Employee and Management Development Branch offered training to employees, supervisors, and managers through in-house and contracted instiructors, and by attendance of off-the-Isthmus courses, conferences, and seminars. In addition, 168 tuition-refund requests were approved during the first quarter of FY 2000, benefiting employees who took local courses directly related to their branch mission

The Managerial Candidate Development Opportunity Program (MCDOP) was recently implemented to provide management officials with a recruitment source for managerial positions subject to merit promotion procedures.

PUBLIC RELATION'S

The Public Relations Division (AEP) is responsible for all corporate communications, multimedia productions, printing, and tourism guide activities within









36 AD-MINISTRATION AND STAFF

the Panama Canal organization. During the first three months of FY 2000, which were also the last three months before the transfer of the Canal, AEP worked very closely with the government of Panama to ensure the success of transition-related events that culminated with the transfer ceremony on December 31, 1999.

In terms of public relations and corporate communications, many changes took place in the three months leading to the transfer. The internal newspaper The Spillway, for instance, would have to cease to be published in a bilingual format and become a Spanish-language publication as of January 2000. To this end, AEP held a contest to find a new name in Spanish and the winning entry was El Faro (The Lighthouse).

The Spillway began publishing a series on the Panama Canal Authority (ACP) directors that were ratified in their positions. A question-and-answer column was created to respond to employee concerns about imminent changes related to the Canal transfer.

On November 1, and for the second year in a row, AEP celebrated the Day of the Canal Child. During the event, 52 Panama Canal employee dependents represented each of the agency's directors and managers for a day. AEP also participated with a stand and exhibitions in several events. Other efforts during this period included the publication of a collection of Panamanian literary works titled Biblioteca de la Nacionalidad. This project was carried out jointly with the ACP, and the books were presented to public libraries, schools and civic groups throughout the Republic of Panama.

After a lengthy contracting, design and selection process, a new corporate logo for the ACP was adopted and by mid-December, the new logo was in use.

During this quarter, AEP also produced two special publications. One was an illustrated coffee-table book, The Panama CanalEl Canal de Panama, commissioned by contract from Ediciones Balboa, to be presented to dignitaries visiting Panama during the Canal transfer ceremonies. The other special publication, Chronicle of the Panama Canal Commission, 20 years, highlighted the 20 years of existence of the PCC and the agency's efforts for a smooth Canal transition. This book was used promotionally as well as distributed to each Canal employee.

In the months leading to the transfer, AEP also designed, contracted and distributed individually numbered commemorative medals and certificates for all employees, to honor the Panama Canal Commission and its workers.

On December 13, the Advisory Board of the Panama Canal Authority was installed and AEP organized a press conference at the Marriott Hotel, during which William O'Neil, secretary general of the International Maritime Organization and chairman of the ACP Advisory Board, addressed the media gathered in Panama for the ceremonial transfer the following day.









PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION 37

On December 14, Panamanian President Mireya Moscoso and former U.S. President Jimmy Carter signed ceremonial transfer documents at Miraflores Locks. Heads of state attending this event included the King of Spain, Juan Carlos 1, and presidents Miguel Angel Rodriguez of Costa Rica; Andres Pastrana of Colombia; Ernesto Zedillo of Mexico; Hugo Banzer of Bolivia; and Carlos Plores of Honduras. Approximately 1300 people attended the event.

The division was involved in the planning and execution of all aspects of the December 14 ceremony, including the installation and management of a Media Center, media relations and computer and television technical assistance duties. On the afternoon of December 30, a solemn ceremony was held in front of the Administration building as the U.S. flag was lowered there for the last time._Shortly after and at the doorstep of the new millennium, Panama received the Canal from the United States. The December 31 events included a religious ceremony at the Metropolitan Cathedral, and-at the stairway of the Administration Buildingmusic by the National Symphonic Orchestra, beautiful flower arrangements, and countless blue, red, and white balloons.

Under the heavy rain, Louis Caldera, chairman of the Panama Canal Commission Board of Directors and secretary of the Army, followed by President Moscoso, addressed the crowd. The efficient and seamless transfer of the Canal, between allies and as partners, was a key theme of the speeches. Thousands of Panamanians that attended the event to intone Panama's National Anthem, saluted the Panamanian flag, joined the countdown and as the clock marked noon, cheered as the balloons took to the sky, symbolizing the start of a new era for Panama.

During this period, the Audiovisual Services Branch continued supporting communication efforts by providing a broad range of photo and audiov,.isual coverage, illustration services and presentation support for Canal units. The branch provided technical support for all transition-related events. The focus of the weekly television program, "Panama: Un Canal en Transicio'n" was to increase awareness among the target audience of the Canal's importance and of its transfer to the Republic of Panama. The program highlighted Canal operations, the modernization program, historical anecdotes and various topics related to the waterway. Also during this fiscal year, the one-minute program, "Entrando al Canal," continued to be produced and was broadcast by Chan--el 2 during its morning and noon news, three times a week. The regular radio news release service continued to more effectively reach rural areas in Panama. By the end of calendar year 1999, approximately 28 radio stations wAere broadcasting the radio news releases, which were specifically designed to raise awareness and increase knowledge about Canal operations, the transition, and related topics.

The Canal Orientation Services Unit provided bilingual orientation lectures, tours and special presentations to more than 127,000 visitors this quarter, principally at the Miraflores Locks visitors' center. Palnma Canal orientationl Special









38 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF

ists also provided fee-based narration services aboard transiting passenger vessels, escorted official visitors, staffed exhibits, and gave briefings about Canal history and operations at various conferences and to schoolchildren of the Canal watershed area in connection with the watershed education program.

The division's Printing Plant continued providing printing services to the entire organization, and printed the final editions of The Spillway as well as the invitations for the transfer ceremonies. During this period, the Printing Plant processed a total of 245 printing requisitions.

GENERALCOUNSEL

The General Counsel Office insured that its systems and equipment were Y2K compliant. The Office also completed and submitted to the Risk Management Office the Division YX contingency plan, including procedures for failures in the communication system or the LAN, vessel accidents and Y2K contract claims. Arrangements were finalized for handling all claims still pending on December 31, 1999.

During the fiscal year, the Office hosted visiting contingents from both the Department of Justice and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The purpose was to ,provide in-depth discussions regarding the proposal that these entities assume responsibility for handling vessel accident and contract claims and appeals pending on December 31, 1999. Specific terms for interagency arrangements designed to govern said transfers were negotiated with Army and Justice officials. In September 1999, the General Counsel, Deputy General Counsel/Procurernent Executive and Assistant General Counsel traveled to Washington with the Deputy Administrator and met with attorneys and budget personnel from the Justice Department, the Corps of Engineers and the Management and Budget Office in order to reach an agreement on all relevant outstanding issues. Following that meeting, a Commission effort was led to finalize the terms of the two arrangements, and both documents were signed in Washington by the Canal Administrator and officials from the aforementioned agencies.

On October 25-26,1999, the Deputy General CounsebProcurernent Executive traveled to the Corps of Engineers Mobile District Office and briefed the district contracting personnel and attorneys on the terms of the post- 1999 agreement for contract dispute administration, in order to commence plans for its timely implementation. The Mobile District contracting personnel November 30 December 2 visit to PCC for project execution was also supervised by the Deputy General Counsel/Procurement Executive.

Finally, on December 17 19, 1999, the office hosted a final orientation visit from Deputy Assistant Attorney General Donald Remy, Specialized Torts Branch Chief John Euler and the Department of Justice budget official overseeing the fiscal aspects of the program.








PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION 39

The General Counsel developed special contract clauses designed to reduce misunderstandings to a minimum andto facilitate contract performance for Canal transition. This was accomplished primarily through the formulation of the "ACP Succession" contract clause, with variations for different types of contracts and license agreements. With ACP ratification, the clause permitted continuous, uninterrupted contract performance despite the December 31, 1999 transfer of Canal administration. Another contract clause was later introduced reducing the claim presentation period from six years to only one. In the closing months of 1999, the Deputy General Counsel/ Procurement Executive worked with the Contracting Division on a daily basis to overcome specific, unanticipated contract administration problems corresponding to Canal transfer, including the formulation and limited use of an "OTA Succession" strategy. Due to these efforts, there were few unresolved contract claims and appeals at the time of writing; significant increases in that area were not anticipated.

All pending general employee claims (involving issues such as loss or damage to property, incident to service and damage to household goods) were cleared prior to December 31, 1999. Approximately 40 additional claims by and against the institution arose from vehicular accidents. Most were minor in nature and those still pending were assigned to Panama Canal Authority attorneys working on a reimbursable basis for the Commission Office of Transition Administration (OTA).


INFORMATION MANAGEMENT

Extensive work in preparation of Canal systems and equipment for the year 2000 (Y2K) successfully eliminated the risks to key Canal operations posed by possible Y2K glitches. Operational areas reported zero incidents with regard to the Y2K transition. This included core business information systems for marine traffic control, payroll, human resource management, purchasing, financial controls, and corporate e-mail. Critical infrastructure systems, including power generation and distribution; voice, data, and video communication networks; central air conditioning plant; security systems; and potable water distributing systems operated by the Canal also functioned without failure. The transit operation and the transition period itself were without incidents involving transiting ships or Y2K failures of any kind.

The Canal continues to monitor for Y2K-related issues to ensure quafitv of service and safety for Canal customers,









40 TRANSITION PLANNING






























































A laden container vessel makes its way th rough (jailIlard or Culebra Cut, the narrowest stretch of the Canal. The Pedro Miguel anid Mirallores Locks can both be seen- in thle background.
















unapter V



TREATY TRANSITION PLANNING

As predicted, both Panama and the United States completed the Canal transfer in an orderly and timely fashion. On behalf of the United States, efforts continued during 1999 in support of all transition process aspects, particularly at the level of the Binational Board of Directors of the, Panama Canal Commission. The final quarter leading to the transfer of the Panama Canal Board saw an increased level of activity in terms of meetings and intensive coordination to deal with final aspens of the transition process.
The Milestone Plan for the Transition of the Panama Canal was successfully completed as a result of the final transition efforts. The plan, initiated in 1995, encompassed 200 different tasks and specific actions necessary for the successful transfer of the Canal to Panamanian stewardship. This five-year process included a wide variety of changes such as in the U.S. legislation, to transform the Canal into a business-oriented organization, special financial planning to ensure the transfer of all Canal assets, and special public relations and marketing efforts to promote long-term plans and modernization programs after 1999. Another area that received special attention in the Milestone Plan was the preparation of the new Panama Canal Authority, or ACP, Regulations. As established by law, the ACP was tasked with preparing its own regulations and internal administrative directives to replace all regulatory and legal framework based on U.S. legislation. To accomplish this, officials and union representatives from PCC worked very closely with the Panama Canal Authority Board of Directors and were able to establish regulations by October 1999. The successful completion of this essential task assured the local and international community that the Panama Canal Authority was fully prepared to continue management and operation.
Other important transition-related events that transpired during the -final months of the Canal transfer included: on October 28, the ACP Board of Directors appointment of the Panama Canal senior executives; on December 13, the first meeting of the International Advisory Board of the Panama Canal; and on December 14 and 31, 1999, the official ceremonies for the formal transfer of the Canal to the Republic of Panama.
Although some minor transition items remained pending, to be addressed by the new Canal administration, the transition process that began with the implementation of the Panama Canal Treaty in 1979 and ended on December 31, 1999, Is considered both a success and a lasting tribute to the outstanding level of commitment, planning and dedication demonstrated by the Governments of the United States and Panama, as well as the entire workforce of the Panama Canal CommissI011.

41




































k4

W4 hill
41

tall
lIP41 all I























Two luxurious cruise ships transit the Pedro Miguel Locks, one of two sets of locks in the Canal's Pacific sector.
















Chapter V1



FINANCIAL REPORT

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
FOR THE THREE MONTH PERIOD ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1999

The financial statements of the Panama Canal Commission, with accompanying notes, present the financial position of the Commission at December 31, 1999 and the results of its operations for the three months ended December 31, 1999.

The financial statements of the Commission for the three months ended December 31, 1999 have been audited and its Forecasted Statement of Financial Viability has been examined by the independent certified public accounting firm of Arthur Andersen LLP

Summary information concerning the operating results and capital expenditures followsRESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Net operating revenue from operations amounted to $6.7 million. This amount is payable to the Government of Panama pursuant to the provisions of paragraph 4(c) of Article XIII of the Panama Canal Treaty of 1977 subject to the limitations set forth in chapter 3, subchapter V, section 1341 (b) (2) of the Panama Canal Act of 1979 (Pubhc Law No. 96-70).

CAPITAL EXPENDITURES

Capital expenditures for the three months ended December 31, 1999 were $23.5 million. Major capital additions to plant from capital expenditures included the Gaillard Cut widening/straightening project, Enhanced Vessel Traffic Management System (EVTMS), tow track rehabilitation program, rehabilitation of towing locomotives, rehabilitation u'transformer room and switchgear replacement, replacement of the locks machinery control system at all locks, acquisition of a new steam turbine with rotor/blades for the Miraflores Generating Station's Steam Unit 4, modernization of the Commission's management information systems. In addition, during the three months ended December 3 1,1999, the Capital Program included other important pro-jects such as the Oracle Financial Analyzer, building tug/miter gate transfer table and the hydraulic operator miter gates.
43








'A AWIT RNANCL4L REPORT

Table 1 Statement of Financial Position as of December 31, 1999 (Dollars in Thousands) ASSETS

ASSETS

PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT
A tcost .......................................................................... $1,14505 81
Less accumulated depreciation and valuation allowances ......... 78,6,336
-664,245
CURRENT ASSETS:
Cash(Noie5) ................................................................... 3701W

Investments Office of Transition Administration, net of
unamortized premium and discount . ... .. .. ................................. 7t915

Accounts receivable ......................................................... 36)854
InventoriesStorehouse, less allowances for obsolete and excess
inventories of
$5,725 ........................................................................................... 21,949
F uel .............................................................................................. 11883
439,249



TOTAL ASSETS ...................................................................... $1,103,494














The accompanying notes are an integral part of this statement.








PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION 45

Table 1.- Statements of Financial Position as of December 31,1999
(DoHars in Thousands)

CAPITAL, LIABILITIES AND RESERVES

CANAL
c apital ...................................................................... $ 468,05 1
Restricted Capital:
W orldng capital .......................................................... 15,698
Capital expenditures, being amortized ............................. 380,364
Office of Transition Administration ............................... 14D49
410,111
878,162
LIABILITIES AND RESERVES: Accounts payable:
Commercial vendors and other .................................. 31,573
U.S. Government agencies ........................................ 1,059
Republic of Panama ................................................. 25,394
58,026

Accrued liabilities:
Em ployees'leave .................................................... 81,877
Salaries and w ages .................................................. 6,012
Employees' repatriation ........................................... 335
Marine accident claims ............................................. 39,051
Net operating revenue payable to Republic of Panama.. 6,666
O dIr ..................................................................... 12,295
1461236

Estimated liabilities:
Severance pay ........................................................ 10,000
Contracted cost of the Office of Transition Administration.... 72 470
17,470

Reserves:
Locks overhauls ...................................................... 1,700
Marine accidents and casualty losses ......................... 1,900
3,600
2251332


TOTAL CAPITAL, LIABILITIES AND RESERVES ............ $1,103.494



The accompanying notes are an integral part of this staterwrit








46 FINANCIAL REPORr

Table 2. Statements of Operations
for the Three Month Period Ended December 31, 1999 (Dollars in Thousands)

REVENUES AND EXPENSES
VENUES:
Tollsrevenue .......................................................................................... $144,425
Less contributions for:
Capital expenditures ......................................................................... (301,000)
Dissolution fund ............................................................................... (4,090)
Net tolls revenue ................................................................................ 1 10.J.335
Other revenues ...................................................................................... 43,288
Total revenues ................................................................................... 1537623


PENISES:
Payments to Republic of Panama:
Public services ....................................................................................... 2,500
Fixed annuity .......................................................................................... 2,500
Tonnage .................................................................................................. 22v579
27v579


M aintenance of channels, dams and spillways ................................ 11,239
Navigation service and control ........................................................... 33,837
Locks operation and maintenance ..................................................... 18,953
General repair, engineering and maintenance services ................... 13v661
Supply and transportation services ................................................... 5,344
Utilities ................................................................................................... 31575
Administrative and general ................................................................. 13,180
Depreciation ........................................................................................... 5,672
Fire and facility ...................................................................................... 31803
Other ........................................................................................................ 10,114

Total expenses .................................................................................. 146v957

NETINCOM E ........................................................................................... $6,666

The accompanying notes are an integral part of this statement.








PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION 47

Table 3. Statements of Changes in Capital
for the Three Month Period Ended December 31,19"
(Dollars mi Thousands)



Capital
Capital Contributions Total
BALANCE AT OC170BER 11 1999... $47502 $375,366 $851,168
CHANGES IN CAPITAL:
Cash transferred from unrestricted
to restricted working capital...... (331) (331)

Cash transferred from unrestricted
to restricted capital contributions ... (5,302) (5,302)

Working capital contributions transferred from unrestricted..... 331 331

Capital expenditure contributions
transferred from unrestricted..... 5,302 5,302

Capital expenditure contributions,
being amortized ................... 22,912 22,912

Property transferred to Republic of
Panama ......................... (3t991) (3t99 1)

Property transferred from other
U.S. Government agencies ...... 11873 1,873

Office of Transition
Administration ..................... 6,200 6,200
(7,751) 34,745 26,994

BALANCE AT DECEMBER 31,1999 $468,051 $410,111 $878,162










The accompanying notes are an integral part of this statement,








48 FINANCIAL REPORT

Table 4. Statements of Cash Flows For the Three Month Period Ended December 31,1999 (Dollars in Thousands)

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:
N etincom e .......................................................................................... $ 6,666

ADJUSTMENTS TO RECONCILE NET INCOME TO NET
CASH USED IN OPERATING ACTIVITIES:
D epreciation ............................................................................... 5,672
Net change in reserves and other ........................................... (50,380)
Changes in operating assets:
Increase in receivables ...................................................... (21,240)
Increase in inventories ...................................................... (331)
(21,571)

Changes in operating liabilities:
Increase in employees' leave ........................................... 912
Decrease in estimated liabilities ....................................... (7,375)
Increase. in all other liabilities ........................................... 47,690
41,227
Net change in operating assets and liabilities ....................... 19,656
Net cash used in operating activities ...................................... (18,386)
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:
C apital contributions ................................................................. 30,000
C apital expenditures ................................................................... (23,544)
Dissolution fund contributions ............................................... 6,090
Dissolution fund contributions redemption of investment 6,814
Investment dissolution fund ................................................. (7,100)
Investment interest revenue from dissolution fund .......... 143
Net cash provided by investing activities .......................... 12,403
N et decrease in cash .............................................................................. (5,983)
Cash, beginning of period ................................................................... 376v631
CASH, END OF PERIOD ....................................................................... $370,648.

SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURE OF CASH FLOW INFORMATION:

Cash paid for interest ........................................................... 43

The accompanying notes are an integral part of this statement.








PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION 49

Table 5. Forecasted Statements of Financial Viability as of December 31,1999
(Dollars m' Thousands)

AMOUNTS TO BE LIQUIDATED:
A ccounts payable ................................................................... $ 58,026
A ccrued liabilities ................................................................... 146,236
Estim ated liabilities ................................................................. 17,470
R eserves ............. ..................................................................... 3,600
Total liabilities and reserves .............................................. 225,332

RESOURCES AVAILABLE TO LIQUIDATE LIABILITIES AND RESERVES:
U nrestricted cash .................................................................... 364,514
Accounts receivable from operations ................................... 36,854
Less: Cash designated for capital improvements payable to ACP (176,036)
Total resources available to liquidate liabilities and reserves .... 225,332

LIABILITIES AND RESERVES TO BE FUNDED FROM FUTURE RESOURCES ............................................................ $























The accompanying notes are an integral part of this s'latcment








en
au FINANCIAL REPORT

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS As of December 31, 1999

The Panama Canal Commission (the "Commission") is a wholly owned government corporation in the Executive Branch of the U.S. government, provided for in the Panama Canal Treaty of 1977 (the "Treaty") and established by the Panama Canal Act of 1979 (the "Act"), as amended, enacted on September 27, 1979. The Commission was established to carry out the responsibilities of the United States with respect to the Panama Canal under the Treaty. In fulfilling these obligations, the Commission managed, operated and maintained the Canal, its complementary works, installations and equipment and provided for the orderly transit of vessels through the Canal. The Commission performed these functions until the Treaty ended at noon on December 31, 1999, at which time the Republic of Panama assumed full responsibility for the management, operation and maintenance of the Canal through the Panama Canal Authority (ACP).

The operation of the waterway was conducted on a self-financing basis. The Commission was expected to recover through tolls and other revenues all costs of operating and maintaining the Canal, including interest, depreciation, working capital, capital for plant replacement, expansion, improvements and payments to the Republic of Panama for use of its national resources, public services and annuities. Revenues from tolls and all other sources were deposited in the U.S. Department of the Treasury ("United States Treasury") in the Panama Canal Revolving Fund. The resources in this fund were available for continuous use and served to finance Canal operating and capital programs, which were reviewed annually by the United States Congress. Information on obligations and outlays of the Panama Canal Revolving Fund is included in the Budget of the U.S. government

1. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies:

a. Accounting and Reporting. The accounts of the Commission were maintained in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States ("GAAP"), including Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 7 1, "Accountingfor the Effects of Certain Types of Regulation".

Preparing the financial statements in accordance with GAAP required management to make estimates and assumptions that affected the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Future actual results could differ ftom those estimates.

b. Cost Recovery. The basis for tolls rates ("statutory tolls formula") was prescribed in section 1602(b) of the Act and provides that:








PANAMA CANA,,Y, COMMISSION 51

"Tolls shall be prescribed at rates calculated to produce revenues to cover as nearly as practicable all costs of maintaining and operating the Panama Canal (including costs authorized to be paid from the Panama Canal Dissolution Fund under section 1305(c)), together with the facilities and appurtenances related thereto, including unrecovered costs incurred on or after the effective date of this Act [October 1, 1979], interest, depreciation, working capital, payments to the Republic of Panama pursuant to paragraph 5 of Article III and paragraph 4(a) and
(b) of Article XHI of the Panama Canal Treaty of 1977, and capital for plant replacement, expansion, and improvements. Tolls shall not be prescribed at rates calculated to produce revenues sufficient to cover payments to the Republic of Panama pursuant to paragraph 4(c) of Article XIII of the Panama Canal Treaty of 1977."

Unrecovered costs for any year were to be recovered from revenues in subsequent years.

c. Property, Plant and Equipment. Property, plant and equipment greater than or equal to $5,000 were recorded at cost. The cost of minor items of property, plant and equipment was charged to expense as incurred.

Depreciation of Commission property, plant and equipment was provided using the straight-line method over the estimated service lives of the depreciable assets. Composite depreciation was provided for premature plant retirements and adjustments to service lives of certain assets.

Recurring costs of dredging the waterway were charged to expense. Nonrecurring dredging costs for substantial improvements and betterments to the waterway were capitalized and depreciated over their estimated service lives.

d. Contributions for Capital Expenditures. The Board of Directors may program a portion of tolls revenue to provide financing for plant replacement, expansion or improvements. Such funds received from Canal users were accounted for as contributions for capital expenditures. Upon utilization, these contributions were amortized by an offset to depreciation expense in an amount calculated to approximate the depreciation on assets acquired with such contributions. The Commission amortizes these capital contributions over 20 years. Contributions for capital expenditures for the three months ended December 3 1, 1999 were $30 million.

e. Contributionsfor Working Capital. The Board of Directors may program a portion of tolls revenue as contributions for working capital. Such funds were used primarily to finance the inventories for supplies, materials and fuel. As of September 30, 1999, the over funding of the storehouse and fuel inventories in the amount of $5.6 million was reclassified from the "Restricted Capital Working Capital" to "Capital" in the Statement of Financial Position. During the three months ended December 31, 1999, the inventory needs of the Commission increased by approximately $300,000 and were funded from the prior years' excess funding.








52 FINANCL4LL REPORT

f Contributionsfor Dissolution Fund Section 1305 of the Act authorizes the Commission to program a portion of tolls revenue to provide financing for an office, the Office of Transition Administration (OTA), to close out the affairs of the Commission that are pending at the termination of the Treaty. Contributions for the Dissolution Fund were $4.1 million for three months ended December 3 1, 1999.

g. Inventories. Operating materials and supplies were stated at average cost, plus cost of transportation. Allowances were provided for the estimated cost of obsolete and excess stock.

h. Reserves. Reserves are required to normalize expenses for incorporation in the tolls process. Historically, the Commission used these reserves for the irregular costs for lock overhauls; floating equipment overhauls; marine accidents, fire, damages other than fire, public liability and other casualties; and additional payroll costs. In March 1997, because historic data supported that expenditures for locks overhauls and floating equipment had normalized, the Board of Directors approved a change of the accounting policy for these two reserves from the reserve method to the direct expense method. In FY 1999, the Commission reevaluated this decision and recorded a $1.7 million reserve for locks overhauls, the effect of which is immaterial to the Commission's financial statements.

i. Operating Revenue Payable to the Republic of Panama. For the three months ended December 31, 1999, net operating revenue of $6.7 million is payable to the Republic of Panama in accordance with Article XIII, paragraph 4(c), of the Treaty. According to this article, an annual amount of up to $ 10 million will be paid out of Canal operating revenues to the extent that such revenues exceed expenditures of the Commission. This amount is subject to the limitations set forth in Chapter 3, Subchapter V, Section 1341 (d) of the Act.

j. Housing Use Rights. No monetary value is assigned to the rights granted to the U.S. government by the Republic of Panama to use Canal area housing transferred to the Republic of Panama under the terms of the Treaty. The costs to manage and maintain these quarters were charged to expense as incurred. Rental income was included in other revenues.

2. Other Revenues:

In addition to tolls revenues, the Commission had three other principal sources of revenues: transit-related services, electric power and water sales. Transitrelated services revenues for the three months ended December 31, 1999 were $31.8 million. These revenues resulted from towing and assisting ships, handling ships' lines, booking fees and transit and port pilotage. Electric power and water sales during the three months ended December 31, 1999 were $5.3 and $4.6 million, respectively. Principal customers were other U.S. government agencies and the Republic of Panama.








PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION 53

3. Property Plant and Equipment:
The following schedule identifies the major classes of the Commission's assets and their corresponding service lives as of December 31, 1999 (dollars in thousands): Esiae Depreciation Net
Service Life and Valuation Book Value
(in years) Cost Allowances

Titles and treaty
rights .....26-100 $15,095 $15,095 $
Buildings............. 25-75 83,039 4,835 38,204
Structures ............ 5-100 692,032 412,493 279,539
Equipment .......3-75 610,366 313,91.3 296,453
Plant additions in
progress ........ 50,049 -50tO49

$1,450,581 $786,336 $664,245
4. Budgetary Resources:
Cash, accounts receivable and the Commiission's borrowing authority were the resources used by the Commission to determine its solvency position. Incurring obligations in excess of the solvency position would have been a violation of the Antideficiency Act The Commission had authority to borrow funds from the U.S. Treasury up to $ 100 million. No funds were borrowed during the three months ended December 31, 1999, and no balances were outstanding from pri or years.

5. Cash:
The Commission's total cash consisted of cash deposited in the U.S. Treasury and commercial banks, cash on hand, agent cashier imprest funds and agent undeposited collections. All cash resources were available for general oper-ations, with the exception of funds deposited in the Panama Canal Dissolution Fund. The restricted cash balance represents the uninvested portion of the funds set aside by the Commission for the OTA. The restricted cash balance was $6.1 million as of December 3 1,t1999.

6. Investments:
Public Law 102-484 amended the Act by providing authority for the Comm-nission to invest the funds set aside for the OTA in public debt securities. As of December 31, 1999, the Commission had $14 million available for this purpose as follows (dollars in thousands):

Par value -U.S. Treasury Notes.............. 7,914
Unamortized premium -U.S. Treasury Notes ............................. 2
Unamotized discount -U.S. Treasuy Notes ................................. (1)


Total investrwrnt Office of Transition Administration ............. $ 14,049








54 FINANCIAL REPORT

7. Allowances for Obsolete and Excess Stock:

The allowances for obsolete and excess stock provided for: (1) the specific disposal of individual inventory items likely to occur; and (2) the systematic cost recognition for spare parts retained for possible use, but whose actual use most often does not occur. These allowances were evaluated on an annual basis. Based on the evaluations for the three months ended December 31,1999, the allowance for excess stock was adjusted to $4.7 million and the allowance for obsolete stock was adjusted to $1 million.

8. Office of Mransition Administration:

Section 1305 of the Act directs the Commission to establish an office to close out the affairs of the Commission that are still pending at the termination of the Treaty. Section 1305 further directed that the Commission conduct, for submission to the U.S. Congress, a study to determine the costs associated with this office, including its composition, location and time needed to complete its responsibilities. The study was completed and presented to Congress during FY 1996.

During the three months ended December 31,1999, the Commission recovered from tolls and set aside in the Dissolution Fund $4.1 million. To date, the Commission has reserved from tolls a total of $13.1 million, $6.1 million in excess of the originally estimated costs. These funds were necessary to provide for the estimated costs for the preliminary reimbursement that will be made to the U.S. Embassy in Panama for handling Federal Employees Compensation Act ("FECX') payments of former Commission employees.

As of December 31, 1999, the liability for estimated contract services required for OTA was $7.5 million. This amount corresponds to the estimated costs to settle disputes after December 31, 1999. The Commission has signed an agreement whereby the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Chief Counsel's Office will assume complete responsibility for the administration and settlement of all post1999 contract claims.

As of December 31, 1999, the marine accident claims liability was $39.1 million. As with the post- 1999 contract claims, the Commission has signed an agreement whereby the U.S. Department of Justice will assume complete responsibility for all post- 1999 vessel accident claims.

The agreements entered into by the Commission with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Chief Counsel's Office and the U.S. Department of Justice contemplate that after all settlements or payments of all pending claims are finalized, any remaining funds will be transferred to the ACP,

9. Severance Pay:

In FY 1995, the Commission recognized a $ 10 million liability for post-1999 severance pay. The calculation of this amount was based on a rule change to the








PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION 55

Office of Personnel Management's ("OPM") Severance Pay regulations, modifying the eligibility criteria to eliminate eligibility for Commission employees who were offered reasonably comparable employment by the ACR

On June 11, 1997, the Republic of Panama enacted the Organic Law, which established the legal fi-amwork under which the ACP will operate the Canal after December 31, 1999. Under the terms of that law, all Commission employees not eligible to retire were guaranteed continued comparable employment by the ACP. Consequently, the Commission had no additional severance pay liability as of December 31,1999.

The Commission was granted the necessary legal authority in the National Defense Authorization Act of 1998 to transfer to the ACP an amount of severance pay as computed by the Commission to be paid by the ACP to its employees who are involuntarily separated. This severance pay would take into account the periods of service performed with the Commission. On May 14,1999, the Board of Directors approved the transfer of $ 10 million to the ACP for this purpose.

10. Leases:

The Commission maintains operating leases for equipment such as printers and copiers. These leases carry varying terms, provisions and expiration dates. The majority of these leases have an initial term of one year. During the three months ended December 31, 1999, the Commission incurred lease expense of approximately $100,000.

11. Contingent Liabilities and Commitments:

The Commission is a defendant in certain legal actions related to personal injury, employment disputes and other matters related to the Commission's business. In the opinion of management, the settlement of these legal actions will not have a material adverse effect on the financial position of the Commission.

In November 1999, the Galapagos Discovery vessel sank in Canal waters. The vessel's owner filed a claim against the Commission in the amount of $27.8 million. In accordance with the agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice (see Note 8), the marine accident claims liability was increased by $27.8 million for the full claim amount.

The Commission has also recorded accounts receivable of $16.8 million to reflect the amount expected to be paid by the Commission's insurers. This amount is the total claim amount less the $11 million insurance deductible. The $11 mil lion deductible has been funded from the reserve for marine accidents. The CoMMI'ssion believes that the claim is without merit and will vigorously defend itself in the suit. The reserve for marine accidents was increased by $1.8 million for the estimated cost to raise the vessel from Canal waters.

The Treaty provides that an annual amount of up to $ 10 million per year be paid to the Republic of Panama out of operating revenues to the extent that such








FINANCIAL REPORT

revenues exceed expenditures. If the operating revenues in any year do not produce a surplus sufficient to cover this payment, the unpaid balance shall be paid from operating surpluses in future years. The balance contingently payable to the Republic of Panama amounted to $143.1 million as of December 31, 1999. However, as set forth in the Treaty and in th6 Act, nothing shall be construed as obligating the U.S. government to pay, after the date of termination of the Treaty, any unpaid balance accumulated before such date.

12. Subsequent Events:

TRANSFERSTX)ACP

At noon on December 31, 1999, the Commission transferred to ACP cash of $167.6 million. This transfer of cash included capital program contributions of $155.9 million, estimated liability for severance pay of $ 10 million and the reserve for locks overhauls of $1.7 million. In addition, the Commission transferred to ACP property, plant and equipment (net of depreciation and valuation allowances) with a value of $664.2 million, as well as the storehouse and fuel inventories less allowances for obsolete and excess items of $23.8 million.

After the transfers, the Commission had the following balance sheet items (dollars in millions):
C ash ..................................................................... $ 203.0
Investments of dissolution funds ...................................... 7.9
Accounts receivable .................................................... 36.9
Total assets ......................................................... $ 247.8

Accounts payable ....................................................... 58.0
Accrued liabilities ....................................................... 146.2
Estim ated liabilities ..................................................... 7.5
Capital program balance due to ACP ................................. 20.1
R eserves ...................................................... ............ 1.9
Capital Dissolution funds ........................ .................... 14.1
Total liabilities and capital ................................................... $ -8

ADDMONALPAYNIE M

On January 24,2000, approximately $84.3 million was paid to former Commission employees. Of this amount, $81.5 million was for employees' accumulated leave. Bonuses of $2.7 million were paid to 299 pilots in addition to their commuted leave, and compensatory time of approxianately $ 100,000 w as paid to 113 employees.











Chapter VII


STATISTICAL TABLES Shipping Statistics
















57



















01,






















pr Al















A locks locomotive assists a large container cargo ship. Containerized cargo is one of the principal commodities transported via the Panama Canal, and represents an important contribution to Canal traffic, both in terms of tonnage and number of transits.



........ ....












PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION 59




Table No. 1- Panama Canal Traffic-First Quarter Fiscal Years 1995 through 2000
Traffic Assessed Tolls
Traffic Assessed Tolls on Displacement
Total Traffic on Net Tonnage Basis Tonnage Basis
Number Longam Number Pnm DisplaceI f CanalU,'MS Nme
Period Of Tons F o: of ment
Transits Tolls of Cargo Transits Net Tonnage Transits Tonnage
OCEANGOING COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC (1)
1995 Q ................. 3,181 110,788,618 45,294,711 3,170 51,633,272 11 52,009
1996 Q .................. 3,311 120,461,315 49,090,155 3,303 56,445,594 8 39,876
1997 Q ................. 3,114 118,362,870 48,721,925 3,108 55,276,595 6 34,050
1998 Q .................. 3,331 136,886,882 51,648,867 3,324 59,162,937 7 29,427
1999 Q .................. 3,325 148,899,491 52,276,013 3,305 59,399,973 20 99,447
2000 Q ................. 3,075 144,437,038 48,128,679 3,068 57,841,982 7 70,071
OCEANGOING U.S. GOVERNMENT TRAFFIC (1)
1995 Q ......... 35 631,672 3,495 11 246,493 24 141,255
1996 Q .................. 40 842,398 135,862 17 330,509 23 121,891
1997 Q .................. 29 598,905 37,522 9 212,597 20 124,248
1998 Q .................. 16 419,992 5,496 7 172,459 9 52,264
1999 Q ................. 35 1,114,575 47,443 16 429,175 19 63,963
2000 Q ... 18 78,818 1 3,639 17 49,471
FREE OCEANGOING TRAFFIC (1X2)
1995 Q ................. 10 1,573 1 550 9 13,899
1996 Q .................. 3 3,409 2 1,112 1 1,180
1997 Q ................. 7 14,250 3 1 556 6 10,586
1998Q ...... 2 2 1,112
1999 Q .................. 6 2 1,112 4 6,408
2000Q .................. 2 2 3,159
TOTAL OCEANGOING TRAFFIC (1)
1995Q ................. 3,226 111,421,862 45,298,206 3,182 51,880,315 44 207,163
1996 Q .............. 3,354 121,307,122 49,226,017 3,322 56,777,215 32 162,947
1997 Q ........... 3,150 118,976,025 18,759,450 3,118 55,489,748 32 168,884
1998 Q ............... 3,349 137,306,874 51,654,363 3,333 59,336,508 16 81,691
1999 Q 3,366 150,014,066 52,323,456 3,323 59,830,260 43 169,818
2000 Q ................ 3,095 144,515,856 48,128,679 3,069 57,M5,621 26 122,701
SMALL COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC (3)
1995 Q ................ 277 37,057 316 277 19,335
1996 Q ............... 274 36,087 240 274 19,027
1997 Q ................. 277 38,678 494 276 20,053 1 60
1998 Q ....... ... 227 34,444 184 225 16,056 2 507
1999 Q ............ ... 145 117,500 40 145 27,299
2000Q ........... 135 97,750 2 135 13,479 -












60 STATISTICAL TABLES




Table No. I- Panama Canal Traffic-First Quarter Fiscal Years 1995 through 2000 (Continued)
Traffic Assessed Tolls
Traffic Assessed Tolls on Displacement
Total Traffic on Net Tonnage Basis Tonnage Basis
N emg[ r Panama I [T is l 7
Period I of Tos I of Canal/ S I ment
Transits Tolls of Cargo Transits Net Tonnage Transits Tonnage

SMALL U.S. GOVERNMENT TRAFFIC (3)
1995 Q .................. 60 5,166 2 198 58 3,917
1996 Q 38 3,965 2 198 36 2,940
1997 Q .................. 50 3,480 1 99 49 2,688
1998 Q ............... 13 1,466 1 99 12 924
1999 Q 15 11,500 73 4 396 11 748
2000 Q .................. 5 6,500 1 99 4 1,122
SMALL FREE TRAFFIC (2)(3)
1995 Q .... ...... 7 476 3 3 159 4 140
1996 Q 8 1,222 1 2 301 6 543
1997 Q ........... 5 719 1 134 4 344
1998 Q ................. 4 1 2 106 2 278
1999 Q ....... 6 1,500 1 136 5 295
2000 Q .......... 7 1 6 957
TOTAL PANAMA CANAL TRAFFIC
1995 Q ................. 3,570 111,464,561 45,298,525 3,464 51,900,007 106 211,220
1996 Q .................. 3,674 121,348,395 49,226,258 3,600 56,796,741 74 166,430
1997 Q ..... ....... 3,482 119,018,903 48,759,944 3,396 55,510,034 86 171,976
1998 Q .... ......... 3,593 137,342,783 51,654,548 3,561 59,352,769 32 83,400
1999 Q .................. 3,532 150,144,566 52,323,569 3,473 59,858,091 59 170,861
2000 Q ..... ....... 3,242 144,620,106 48,128,681 3,206 57,859,199 36 124,780

The new tonnage measuranat system for Panama Canal tolls assesumnt, the Panama Canal/Universal Measuremat
System (PC/MS). became effective October 1, 1994 (the start of Fiscal Yea 1995).
(1) Oceangoing traffic includes ships of 300 PC/M net tons and over, or of 500 displacemnt tos and over on vessels
paying tolls on displacanent basis (dredges. warships.etc.).
(2) Free traffic includes ships of the Colombian and Panamanian Governents and ships transiting for repairs by the Commission, (3) Includes vessels under 300 PC/VMS not tons (or under 500 displacemnt tons for vessels assessed on displacement tosmay).





Table No. 2--Oceangoing Commercial Traffic by Months First Quarter, Fiscal Years 2000 and 1999
z

Number of Transits PCIU S Net Tonnage Long Tons of Cargo Tolls
11999-0011998-9911 1999-00 11998-99 1 1999-00 1998-991 1999-00 I 1998-99 >

October 1,036 1,134 19,484,609 20,154,468 16,681,116 18,383,520 $ 48,630,142 $ 50,622,856 Z
November 980 1,077 18,465,533 19,581,779 15,481,602 17,260,883 46,202,769 48,983,384 >
December 1,059 1,114 19,891,840 19,663,726 15,965,961 16,631,610 49,604,127 49,293,251
Total 3,075 3,325 57,841,982 59,399,973 48,128,679 52,276,013 $ 144,437,038 $ 148,899,491 0


Average per month ..... 1,025 1,108 19,280,661 19,799,991 16,042,893 17,425,338 $ 48,145,679 $ 49,633,164
T
SThe ne" tonnage measurement system for Panama Canal tolls assessment, the Panama Canal/1Universal Measurement System (PC/IMS),z became effective October I, 1994 (the start of Fiscal Year 19"95) Included on deck cargo assessment, effective July 1, 1997

NOTE The above includes only commercial vessels s of 300 PC/-UMS net tons and over, or of 500 displacement tons and over on vessels paying tolls
on a displacement tonnage basis Statistics on these vessels, except as relates to displacement tonnage, have been included in the table above












62 STATISTICAL TABLES




Table No. 3-Canal Traffic (1) by Flag of Vessel,-First Quarter, Fiscal Year 2000

Number Measured Tonnage Long Tons
of IPanama Canall Documentedl Of
Flag Transits UAff Net Gross (2) Tolls Cargo
Algeria .................................... .................. 1 29,645 37,327 S 76,188 55,430
Antigua and Barbuda ................................. 36 486,431 549,953 1,243,202 355,333
Bahamas .................................................... 226 3,228,573 3,855,227 8,185,164 1,995,677
Barbados .................................................... 5 109,626 131,667 269,263 143,957
Belize ........................................................ 7 13,498 14,702 32,765 5,461
Bermuda .................................................... 6 94,636 107,900 243,218 45,809
Brazil ......................................................... I 4,653 5,148
Bulgaria ..................................................... 3 42,745 51,447 103,702 53,346
Cayman Islands ......................................... 44 346,327 409,144 836,755 279,497
Chile .......................................................... 14 185,910 218,317 477,799 182,192
Colombia ................................................... 38 42,597 45,641 110,415 22,164
Costa Rica ................................................. 2 2,974 3,432 7,643
Croatia ....................................................... 6 133,673 152,433 342,808 158,289
Cuba .......................................................... 3 18,148 22,445 '42,677 6,917
Cyprus ....................................................... 171 2,491,163 3,030,862 6,175,048 2,590,956
Denmark ................ .................................. 46 1,265,812 1,495,909 3,240,833 935,294
Ecuador ..................................................... 17 156,827 187,489 386,263 213,513
Egypt ......................................................... 3 92,001 111,431 236,443 146,381
Estonia ....................................................... 1 12,825 16,502 -32,960 20,480
Faroe Island ............................................... 2 728 3,000
Federal Republic of Germany .................... 41 850,698 970,750 2,183,127 692,221
France ........................................................ 12 178,780 217,490 466,276 142,005
Gibraltar .................................................... 4 62,304 73,080 141,767 45,544
Greece ....................................................... 134 2,888,990 3,539,734 7,121,787 3,299,570
Guatemala .................................................. 2 3,676 4,218 8,473 1,100
G uinea ....................................................... 2 1,166 793 3,000 114
Honduras ................................................... 3 1,705 1,497 4,500 490
India .......................................................... 9 218,500 264,028 561,545 385,951
Indonesia ................................................... 57,078 69,171 146,690 81,070
Isle of Man ................................................ 8 120,092 145,215 300,639 140,060
Israel .......................................................... 26 908,701 1,027,606 2,335,362 714,711
Italy ........................................................... 30 461,051 539,440 -1,141,047 467,018
Jam aica ............................................ ......... 2 778 92 2,000
Japan ......................................................... 36 1,043,939 1,070,792 2,494,333 165,426
Kuwait ....................................................... 3 -36,628 46,307 87,684 36,547
Latvia ........................................................ 6 36,517 44,024 93,849 29,541
Lebanon ..................................................... 1 23,161 26,718 59,524 29,060
Liberia .............. ........................................ 416 9,717,958 11,408,261 24,180,581 7,393,564
Lithuania ............................................ ..... 5 14,232 17,04-3 33,407 4,945
Luxembourg .............................................. 1 19,944 23,952 51,256 22,596
Malaysia .............................................. ..... 10 236,836 281,916 595,483 365,768
M alta ....................................................... 116 1,621,413 1,941,331 4,072,780 1,876,482
Marshall Islands ..................................... ... 15 288,031 332,545 680,967 189,947
M exico ...................................................... 4 34,768 43,568 81,401 24,010
Myanmar ........................................... -- .... 3 38,932 46,452 100,055 59,413
Netherlands ................ ....................... ....... 71 1,330,691 1,561,659 3,335,239 682,999
Netherlands Antilles ........ ......................... 22 245,777 282,445 604,322 38,262
Norway ........................................... ........ 98 2,432,924 2,828,652 6,122,987 1,990,867
Panama .................... ............... ...... .......... 793 15,853,158 17,889,369 39,183,500 12,909,599
People's Rep. of China.... ........................ 87 1,905,916 2,236,572 4,839,880 2,238,722
Philippines ................................................. 52 1,116,344 1,260,079 2,743,063 1,233,595












PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION 63




Table No. 3--Canal Traffic (1) by Flag of Vessel-First Quarter, Fiscal Year 2000 (Continued)

Number Measured Tonnage Long Tons
of [Panamai Canall Documentedj Of
Flag, Trans its UMS Net Gross (2) Tolls Cargo
Poad ................................3 19,491 26,691 46,645 13,696
Romania ........................................ 2 4.0,333 45,524 100,946 42,688
Russian Federation ............................. 12 123,794 144,691 304,396 100,804
Singapore....................................... 71 1,815,745 2,091,847 4,574,791 1,718,658
Slovakia......................................... 1 5,140 6,425 13,210 6,319
South Korea ................................... 16 432,561 483,157 1,082,270 416,381
Spain ........................................ 5 23,508 27,684 59,348 6,614
Sri Lanka ....................................... 2 17,518 20,596 45,021 8,083
St. Vincent and Grenadines ................... 30 327,896 401,344 815,060 364,085
Sweden......................................... 11 563,062 572,529 1,447,069 49,349
Switzerland .................................... 4 84,098 103,021 217,632 153,825
Taiwan ........................................... 17 573,154 648,910 1,473,392 430,681
Thailand......................................... 6 73,934 88,258 183,595 82,930
Turkey ........................................... 22 348,318 417,643 895,177 535,359
Ukraine.......................................... 3 36,314 44,063 87,357 20,668
United Kingdom .............................. 27 391,945 473,111 990,030 139,262
United States.. ................................ 139 2,074,932 2,392,274 5,303,451 1,352,462
Vanuatu......................................... 25 350,665 379,538 893,783 196,922
Venezuela ...................................... 31 35,186 34,211 85,058 18,000
N/A ............................................... 1 389 1,000 _____Totals ......................................... 3,075 57,841,982 67,043,525 S 144,437,038 48,128,679
The new. tonnage measw-ement system for Punma Canal tolls assessment. the Patnma CanalUnii ersal Mecasurement
S% stem (PCAJMS), became effective October 1, 1994 Ithc start of Fiscal Year 1995).
(1) Includes ouli commercial % vessels of 300 PCAJMS net tons and over, or of 500 displacement tons and oier on vessels pa.ijng tolls on displacement basis (dredges, %%arships, etc)
(2) Includes 14 transits hereee no regitered tonnage %xas reported

NOTE: In Canal traffic statistics. foreign naval vessels such as transports, supply ships. tankers, etc., with
a maueetf300 PCIUMS net tons and over, and vessels of war, dredges, etc. with a displacement of 500 tons and over, are classified as oceangoing commnercial vessels. Statistics on thewe vessels, except as related to displacement tonnage, have been included in the table above.
As displacement tonnage cannot be combined with net tonnage, the following table shows statistics covering?7 vessels which transited the Canal during the first quarter of fiscal year
2000 and paid toLls on dispacement tonnage.

Number Of D)isplacement
Fl7ag Type Truas ts onnage Tolls
Brazil..............-.......... -................. Other 1 3,600 5,148
France ..... ......... ......... Navy 2 5,328 7,619
Mexico .,... ......... ... ... .... ... ................ ~ Other 1 1,80)0 2,574
United States ... .................... ...... ... Dredge 2 14,125 20,199
United States- ................... ............. ... Navy 1 45,218 64,661
Total 7 70,071 100,201
















Table No. 4-Classification of Canal Traffic (1) by Type of Vessel First Quarter, Fiscal Year 2000

Laden B~allast
Atlantic' 1aci/ic j Atlantic' Pacific GRa (JAND)
J'acijic Atlantic- Iac:fic Atlantic

CARGO AND CARGO/PASSENGER SHIPS:
Bulk Carriers:
Dry Bulk Carriers:
Number of transits........................................... 417 322 739 5 81) 85 824
PC/UMS net tonnage (thousands) ........................... 9,29t 6,332 15,628 80 1,813 1,893 17,522
Tolls (thousands of dollars)t ............................. $ 23,892 S 16,273 S 40,165 $ 164 $ 3,699 S 3,863 $ 44,027
Cargo (thousands of long tons)t .......................... 15,389 9,628 25,017 23,017
Dry/Liquid Bulk Carriers:
Number of transits .................................... .......6 1 7 2 2 9
PC/UMS net tonnage (thousands) 1t..................... 165 42 207 53 53 261)
Tolls (thousands of dollars)t............................. $ 424 $ 109 $ 532 $ $ 109 S109 $ 641
Cargo (thousands of long tons) t ...... .................. 270) 59 328 329
Vehicle Carrers:
Number of transits ........................................... 49 79 128 58 58 186
PC/UMS net tonnage (thousands) *t..................... 2,245 3,477 5,722 2,351 2,551 9,273
Tolls (thousands of dollars)t ............................. S 5,768 S 8,937 $ 14,705 S 5,203 $ 5,203 S 19,9()9
Cargo (thousands of long tons)t............................ 116 407 523 -- 523
Vehicle/Dry Bulk Carriers:
Number of transits ........................................... 6 4 10 2 2 12
PC/UMS net tonnage (thousands) *t ....................... 1WI 11$ 219 23 23 242
Tolls (thousands of dollars)t ......-...................... $ 258 $ 305 $ 563 $ $ 47 S 47 $ 610
Cargo (thousands of long tons)f ........................... 132 64 196 -- 196H
Container Cargo Ships:H
Container/Breakbulk Ships:
Number of transits .............. ......................... 75 61 136 2 7 9 14
PC/UMS net tonnage (thousands) *t ...................... 1,282 983 2,265 18 113 131 2,396
Tolls (thousands of dollars)t ............................. $ 3,295 $ 2,526 S 3,821 $ 37 $ 230 S 267 $ 6,0)88
Cargo (thousands of long tons)t........................... 1,097 982 1,979 -- 1,979
Full Container Ships:H
Number of transits .......................................... 205 194 399 1 1 2 401
PC/UMS net tonnage (thousands) 1t..................... 5,912 5,594 11,506 6 4 10) 11,516
Tolls (thousands of dollars)t ............................. $ 15,193 $ 14,378 $ 29,570) $ 13 $ 8 $ 21 $ 29,591
Cargo (thousands of long tons)t........................... 4,051 3,841 7,992 -- 7,892





General Cargo Ships:
Number of transits 106 109 215 II 19 30 245
PC/UMS net tonnage (thousands) *t ..................... 11% 1,)19 1,87S 83 114 197 2,072 z
Tolls (thousands ofdollars)t .. ...... ....S..... S 2,201 S 2,619 S 4,320 S 170 $ 233 $ 403 S 5,223
Cargo (thousands of long tons)t ......... 946 967 1,913 1,913
Passenger Ships (2)
Number of transits ..8..*3 37 95 3 I 4 99
PC/UMS net tonnage (thousands) t .............. 2,192 1,523 3,714 48 17 65 3,779
Tolls (thousands of dollars)t ....... ............... $ 5,633 S 3,914 $ 9,546 s 911 S 34 $ 133 5 9,679 t
Cargo (thousands of long tons)t .. .... -Refrigerated Cargo Ships
Refrigerated Cargo Vessels
Number of transits ....... ...........91 197 273 101 2 103 381 0
PC/UMS net tonnage (thousands) *..........- ..... 741 1,400 2,141 723 13 736 2,877
Tolls (thousands ofdollars)t ......... .................. 1905 $ 3,609 S 5,515 s 1,475 S 26 S 1,501 S 7,016
Cargo (thousands of long tons)t s)...... .. 206 734 941) 940
FIshing Vessels
Number of transits .. .. ,,..... 13 5o 63 25 11 36 99
PC/UMS net tonnage (thousands) 12 55 66 32 4 36 103
Tolls (thousands of dollars)........... ........ 32 5 143 $ 175 $ 69 $ 16 $ 84 $ 259
Cargo (thousands of long tons) .. ..... 40 40 40
Tank Ships
Tankers
Number of transits .. 22 122 350 19 108 127 477
PC/UMS net tonnage (thousands) *t ...... 3,694 1,674 5,369 309 1,821 2,130 7,493
Tolls (thousands of dollars) t $ 9,493 s 4,312 $ 13,795 S 631 S 3,715 S 4,345 $ 18,140
Cargo (thousands of long tons)t-. 6.214 2,35 K,569 1,569
Liquid Gas Carners
Number of transits 31 2 33 18 IN SI
P( UMS net tonnage (thousands) *t 462 21 493 297 297 780
1tlls (thousands ofdollars)t $ 1,189 s 53 $ 1,241 S $ 606 s $on s 1,947
( argo (thousands of long tons)t 453 I 454 454
M MR IYPE SHIPS
Naval Vessels
lumber of tiansits ....- I 2 3 3
I)splacement tonnage (thousands)t . 3 48 5i 51
lolls (thousands of dollars)t s 5 ... 4 5 61 $ 72 S 72
( argo (thousands of long tons)t .
Iarges te)idgcs. [)rydoks,. I gs, etc
Number of transit" 29 49 78 21 36 65 143
P I. 11 net tonnage (thousands) *t 232 13 370 Nlo 104 154 524
(11
















Table No. 4-Classification of Canal Traffic (1) by Type of Vessel FIRST QUARTER, FISCAL YEAR 2000 (Continued)

Laden Ballast
IAlanti Pacic II Atlantic I'acific I GRAN
Type of* Vessel to Pacific to Atlantic Total t) Pac.ic to Atlantic Total TOTAL
Pacific Atlantic Pacific Atlantic

OTHER TYPE SHIPS-Continued
Barges, Dredges, Drydocks, Tugs, etc.-Continued
Displacement tonnage (thousands)t ............................. 5 14 20 20
Tolls (thousands of dollars)t ........................................ S 596 $ 371 S 967 $ 123 $ 244 $ 368 $ 1,335
Cargo (thousands of long tons)t .............................. 236 42 278 278
SUMMARY:
Total Cargo and Cargo/Passenger Ships:
N um ber of transits ...................................................... 1,285 1,168 2,453 225 251 476 2,929
PC/UMS net tonnage (thousands) *t ............................ 26,957 22,239 49,196 3,851 4,272 8,123 57,318
Tolls (thousands ofdollars)t ........................................ $ 69,282 $ 57,167 S 126,448 $ 7,858 $ 8,723 S 16,582 $ 143,030
Cargo (thousands of long tons)t .................................. 28,873 18,978 47,851 47,851
Total Other Type Ships:
Num ber of transits ........................................................ 29 49 78 30 38 68 146
PC/UMS net tonnage (thousands) *t ............................ 232 # 138 370 50 104 154 524
Displacement tonnage (thousands)t ............................. 8 62 70 70
Tolls (thousands of dollars)t ........................................ s 596 $ 371 $ 967 $ 127 $ 313 $ 440 $ 1,407
Cargo (thousands of long tons)t .................................. 236 42 278 278
Grand Total Ships:
Num ber of transits ........................................................ 1,314 1,217 2,531 255 289 544 3,075
PC/UMS net tonnage (thousands) *t ............................ 27,189 22,377 49,566 3,901 4,376 8,276 57,842
Displacement tonnage (thousands)t ............................ 8 62 70 70
Tolls (thousands of dollars)t ........................................ $ 69,878 $ 57,537 $ 127,416 S 7,985 $ 9,036 $ 17,021 $ 144,437
Cargo (thousands of long tons)t .................................. 29,109 19,()19 48,129 48,129



The new tonnage measurement system for Panama Canal tolls assessment, the Panama Canal/Universal Measurement System (PC/UMS), became effective
October 1, 1994 (the start of Fiscal Year 1995). t Data given in thousands is subject to rounding differences. w
[11 Includes only commercial vessels of 300 PC/UMS net tons and over for vessels paying tolls on net tonnage basis, or of 500 displacement tons and over for
vessels paying on displacement tonnage. (21 Vessels certified for more than 12 passengers.












PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION 67




Table No.5-Laden and Ballast Traffic by' Flag of Vessel First Quarter, Fiscal Year 2000

Laden Ba//wat
lNumber Panama F um her PananIa
of ('anal/UMSE of Canal UMks'
Flag Transits Net Tonnage* Tolls Transiils Net Tonnage T0o/N

Alei ...................1 29,645 76,188 -Antigua and Barbuda ............. 33 473,363 1,216,543 3 13,068 26,659
Baaa ................... 201 3,014,986 7,748,514 25 213,587 4_3 6,65;0
Babds.................. 4 86,086 221,241 1 23,540 4 8. 022
Beie.................... 3 8,693 22,341 4 4,805 10.424
Brua.................. 4 93,470 240,218 2 1,166 3.000
Bulgaria............................ 2 31,136 80,020 1 11,609 23, 689 2
Cayman Islands................... 22 238.119 611,966 22 108,208 224,78
Chile ............ .................. 14 185,910 477,789
Colombia.......................... 21 26,405 69,666 17 16,192 40,750
Costa Rica......................... 2 2,974 7,643
Crai ................... 5 132,292 339,990 1 1,381 2,817
Cuba ............................... 2 10,670 27,422 1 7,478 15, 2 55
Cyprus............................. 141 2,062,407 5,300,386 30 428,756 874,662
Denark ........................... 42 1,242,453 3,193,104 4 23,359 47.7 28
Ecuador............................ 14 124,573 320,154 3 .32,2 54 66,109
Egypt............................... 3 92,001 236,443
Estonia ............................. 1 12,825 3 2,9 6 0
Faroe Island ................-- 2 -3.000
Federal Republic of Germany .. 39 844,723 2,170,938 2 5,97; 12.189
France............................ 9 177,257 455,550 1 1,52 3,107Gbatr.................. 2 27,674 71,122 2 34.6310 70,645
Greece............................. 104 2,317,447 5,955,839 30 571.541 1,165.948
Gutml ................ 1 1,838 4,724 1 1883,750
Guinea ........... .................. 2 1,166 3,000
Hnua.................. 2 1,122 3,000 1 583 1,500
Ida.....................9 218,500 561,545
In o ei .................3 57,078 146,690
Isle of Man ........................ 7 105,002 269,855 1 15.090 3,8
Israel............................... 26 908,701 2,335,362
Italy-. ..................... 24 378,370 972,377 6 82,681 10 t86
J m ia...................-- 2 7 78 2,000)(
Jaa......... ........... 27 666,133 1.713,609 9 37'7,806 770,24
K w i....................2 24,459 62,860 1 12,1691)4,2
L ti..................6 36,517 93,849
Lebanon .......... ............. 1 23,161 59,524 -Lib i....... 341 8,218,768 21.122,234 75 1,499,190 ,S 88
Lithuania ..... ....... 3 8,253 21,210 2 59912,'It
Luxembourg .... .......... 1 19,944 51.256 -Malaysia.. .................. 9 211,957 544,729 1 .487
Mat .......... ........... 103 1,443,580 3,710,001 13 IW 83











00 STATISTICAL TABLES



Table No.5-Laden and Ballast Traffic by Flag of Vessel First Quarter, Fiscal Year 2000 (Continued)

Laden Ballast
lNumber Panama Fumber Panama
of CanallUAB of canallma J
I
Flag Transits Net Tonnage* T611S Tmnsits Net Tonnage* Tolls

Marshall Islands ....................... 10 176,195 452,821 5 111,836 228,145
Mexico ..................................... 1 14,907 38,311 2 19,861 40,516
Myanmar .................................. 31 38,932 100,055
Netherlands .............................. 60 1,170,998 3,009,465 11 159,693 325,774
Netherlands Antilles ................. 18 194,221 499,148 4 51,556 105,174
Norway ..................................... 87 2,188,343 5,624,042 11 244,581 498,945
Panama ..................................... 650 12,862,081 33,077,502 143 2,991,077 6,105,998
People's Rep. of China .............. 78 1,795,284 4,613,880 9 110,632 226,000
Philippines ................................ 44 878,720 2,258,310 8 237,624 484,753
Poland ...................................... 2 12,987 33,377 1 6,504 13,269
Romania ................................... 1 35,221 90,518 1 5,112 10,428
Russian Federation ................... 7 97,842 251,454 5 25,952 52,942
Singapore .................................. 64 1,642,776 4,221,934 7 172,969 352,857
Slovakia .................................... 1 5,140 13,210
South Korea .............................. 15 377,068 969,065 1 55,493 113,206
Spain ........................................ 4 21,494 55,240 1 2,014 4,109
Sri Lanka ...................... ........... 2 17,518 45,021
St. Vincent and Grenadines ...... 19 271,399 697,495 11 56,497 117,565
Sweden ..................................... 11 563,062 1,447,069
Switzerland ............................... 3 84,098 216,132 1 1,500
Taiwan ...................................... 16 572,571 1,471,892 1 583 1,500
Thailand ................................... 5 61,829 158,901 1 12,105 24,694
Turkey ...................................... 22 348,318 895,177
Ukraine ..................................... 2 25,050 64,379 1 11,264 22,979
United Kingdom ....................... 19 351,773 904,057 8 40,072 85,973
United States ............................ 109 1,836,972 4,727,205 27 237,960 491,386
Vanuatu .................................... 20 336,068 863,695 5 14,597 30,089
Venezuela ................................. 22 25,053 64,386 9 10,133 20,671
N /A ........................................... - 1 389 1,000
Total ..................................... 2,531 49,565,578 127,415,601 537 8,276,404 $ 16,921,236

The new tonnage measurement system for Panama Canal tolls assessment, the Panama Canal/Universal
Measurement System (PC/LJMS), became effective October 1, 1994 (the start of Fiscal Year 1995).

Above table involves only commercial vessels of 300 PC/UMS net tons and over.

















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Table No. 6--Segregation of Transits [I] by Registered Gross Tonnag- First Quarter, Fiscal Year 2000

2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 Documented Average Gross
Under to to to to to to to to and Gross Tonnage
Flag 2,000 3,999 5,999 7,999 9,999 14,999 19,999 29,999 39,999 Over Total [2] Tonnage Per Vessel

Algeria I 1 37,327 37,327
Antigua and Barbuda 5 7 4 2 18 36, 549,953 15,276
Bahamas 3 9 22 15 22 69 21 32 18 15 226 3,855,227 17,059
Barbados 5 5 131,667 26,333
Belize 2 3 1 --- 6 14,702 2,450
Bermuda 2 --2 2 6 107,900 17,983
Bulgaria 2 -1 3 51,447 17,149
Cayman Islands 9 1 5 4 5 14 -3 2 43 409,144 9,515
Chile 10 3 1 14 218,317 15,594
Colombia 28 10 38 45,641 1,201
Costa Rica 2 --- -- 2 3,432 1,716
Croatia I -- 4 1 6 152,433 25,406
Cuba -I 2 --- 3 22,445 7,482
Cyprus -5 9 10 20 31 33 41 21 1 171 3,030,862 17,724
Denmark I11 1 2 2 .-2 I 27 46 -1,495,909 32,520
Ecuador 9 1 --- 5 15 187,489 12,499
Egypt --- 3 3 111,431 37,144
Estonia -- I -- 1 16,502 16,502
Faroe Island 2 2 728 364
Fed. Rep. of Germany 2 4 -- 7 19 9 41 970,750 23,677
France 2 2 6 10 212,686 21,269
Gibraltar 3 1 4 73,080 18,270
Gre1---16 22 16 35 49 5 134 3,539,734 26,416
Guatemala 2 2 4,218 2,109
Guinea 2 ---2 793 397
Honduras 3 -- 3 1,497 499 w
India 6 2 1 9 264,028 29,336r
Indonesia -- 2 I 3 69,171 23,057





Isle of Man .... I 3 1 3 8 145,215 18,152
Israel .. 12 14 26 1,027,606 39,523
Italy 7 4 6 10 3 30 539,440 17,981
Jamaica 1- 1 92 92
Japan 10 2 1 22 36 1,070,792 29,744
Kuwait 3 3 46,307 15,436
Latvia 3 2 I 6 44,024 7,337
Lebanon 1 26,718 26,718 Z
Liberia 2 22 16 43 72 119 87 55 416 11,408,261 27,424
Lithuania 5 5 17,043 3,409
Luxembourg I 1 23,952 23,952
Malaysia 1 1 5 3 10 281,916 28,192
Malta 1 7 16 2 26 29 19 15 1 116 1,941,331 16,736
Marshall Islands 3 1 9 2 15 332,545 22,170
Mexico 2 3 42,168 14,056
Myanmar -. 2 1 3 46,452 15,484
Netherlands 1 12 1 11 7 20 13 6 71 1,561,659 21,995
Netherlands Antilles 3 2 5 2 6 1 2 21 282,445 13,450
Norway I 2 7 7 12 30 19 20 98 2,828,652 28,864
Panama 55 24 97 44 35 87 77 103 120 151 793 17,889,369 22,559
People's Rep of China I 2 14 14 28 18 10 87 2,236,572 25,708
Philippines 3 2 7 12 12 11 5 52 1,260,079 24,232
Poland 3 3 26,691 8,897
Romania I ..... 2 45,524 22,762
Russian Federation 3 6 2 1 12 144,691 12,058
Singapore 2 5 1 1 1 5 21 23 1i 70 2,091,847 29,884
Slovakia I 1 6,425 6,425
South Korea 2 1 6 5 2 16 483,157 30,197
Spain 2 1 2 5 27,684 5,537
Sri Lanka 2 2 20,596 10,298
St Vincent and Grenad 3 1 2 2 7 7 6 1 29 401,344 13,839
Sweden I 10 11 572,529 52,048
Switzerland 1 ..... 1 2 4 103,021 25,755
Taiwan 2 3 12 17 648,910 38,171
'Ihailand 5 1 6 88,258 14,710
-a














Table No. 6-Segregation of Transits Ill by Documented Gross Tonnage-First Quarter, Fiscal Year 2000 (Continued)

2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 Documented Average Gross
Under to to to to to to to to and Gross Tonnage
Flag 2,000 3,999 5,999 7,999 9,999 14,999 19,999 29,000 39,999 Over Total [2] Tonnage Per Vessel
Turkey 5 3 2 9 3 22 417,643 18,984
Ukraine 2 1 3 44,063 14,688
United Kingdom 6 5 5 5 1 2 3 27 473,111 17,5j3
United States 28 15 1 5 2 1 22 17 37 5 133 2,382,056 17,916
Vanuatu 10 1 4 1 3 2 3 24 379,538 15,814
31 34,211 JAN
Venezuela 31 nA
Total 228 96 195 142 151 400 366 599 494 384 67,022,450 21,939
Percent of Total 7.5% 3.1% 6,4% 4.6% 4.9% 13.1% 12.0% 19 6% 16.2% 12.6% 100%


[11 Includes only commercial vessels of 300 PC/UMS net tons and over. The new tonnage measurement system for Panama Canal tolls assessment, the
Panama Canal/Universal Measurement System (PC/UMS), became effective October 1, 1994 (the start of Fiscal Year 1995).
12] Excludes 7 vessels paying tolls on displacement tonnage basis and 13 transits where no registered tonnage was reported.









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Table No. 7-Principal Commodities Shipped through the Panama Canal During the First Quarter of Fiscal Years 1998 through 2000 -4
(Thousands of Long Tonst)

.5outh North
Atlantic to Pac fic Ilacific to Atlantic
FY 1998 FY 1999 FY 2000 Commodity IFY 2000 FY / 999 FY 1998

314 325 461 Canned and Refrigerated Foods ..................................... 1,174 1,151 1,129
1 10 5 Canned Foods ............................................................. 20 18 6
Fish ......................................................................... 9 3
1 4 3 Fruit ......................................................................... I I I
M ilk ......................................................................... 15 5
5 2 Other and unclassified ............................................. -
313 315 456 Refrigerated Foods ..................................................... 1,153 1,132 1,123
9 24 Bananas ................................................................. 4 433 513

3 Dairy products ......................................................... 32 24 35
59 43 43 Fish ........................................................................ 76 140 107
10 3 9 Fruit, excluding bananas .......................................... 45 79 112
4 3 14 M eat ........................................................................ 31 25 17
231 240 347 Other and unclassified ............................................. 483 432 339
2,121 1,917 2,722 Chem icals and Petroleum Chemicals .............................. 608 499 491
1,440 1,325 2,018 Chemicals ................................................................... 538 402 355
96 106 17T Caustic soda .......................................................... 18
1,344 1,219 1,843 Chemicals, m isc ..................................................... 538 402 338
681 591 704 Petroleum Chemicals .................................................. 71 97 135
46 T 78 Benzene ................................................................... 64 56 80
55 31 26 Toluene ................................................................... 5
581 559 600 Chemicals, petro, misc ............................................ 7 37 55
838 567 435 Coal and Coke (excluding petroleum coke) .................. 1,808 2,074 -4,585 >
6 017
91 556 435 Coal ............................................................................ 983 1,315 1,562
141 11 Coke ........................................................................... 825 759 1,023
9,961 12,550 10,160 Grains ............................................................................. 485 1,255 591
67 65 34' Barley ......................................................................... 30i 214,454 7,007 5,482 Com .......................................................................... 140 97
56 12 Oats ............................................................................ 5 5 2
100 85 40 Rice ............................................................................ 108 170 94 >
859 609 291 Sorghurn ................................................................... 22 16 to
3,789 4,235 3,551 Soybeans .................................................................... 23 11 18 t"
526 486 564 W heat ......................................................................... 303 889 327 M
110 64 186 Other and unclassified ............................................... 16 18 17

... ... ......... -






1,909 1,429 1,486 Lumber and Products.. ............... .............................. 870 998 969 IV
20 2 14 Boards and planks ...................................... ................ 177 125 194 >
I I Plywood, veneers, composition board ........................ 140 155 152 z
454 295 271 Pulpwood ................................................................... 491 661 561 >
1,424 1,133 1,201 Other and unclassified ............................................... 62 57 61
193 179 246 M achinery and Equipment ............................................. 465 409 384 >
17 7 10 Agricultural machinery and implements .................... 1 3 16 n
113 112 209 Automobiles, trucks, accessories and parts ................. 407 327 343 >
49 38 17 Construction machinery and equipment ...................... 34 67 23 z
2 4 5 Electrical machinery and apparatus ............................ 7 1 1 >
I I M otorcycles, bicycles and parts .................................. I. r
10 19 3 Other and unclassified ................................................. 14 9 1 n
1,241 809 961 M anufactures of Iron and Steel ..................................... 2,109 2,842 1,026 0
121 56 65' Angles, shapes, and sections .................. 11 ................. 221 189
10 Nails, tacks, and spikes .............................................. 1 4
519 366 427 Plates, sheets, and coils .............................................. 1,230 1,589 551 CA
98 42 49 Tubes, pipes, and fittings ............................................ 73 174 92 (A
149 141 87 W ire, bars, and rods ................................................... 57 160 115 0
.155 204 321 Other and unclassified ................................................ 527 730 242
20 16 11 M inerals, miscellaneous ................................................ 2,126 1,480 2,462
7 Asbestos .................................. ..................................
Borax ............................................... .......................... 88 88 85
Infusorial earth ........................................................... -
4 6 3 Salt .... ............................................................... ........ 1,470 770 1,456
5 11 5 Soda and sodium compounds ..................................... 143 151 89
4 2 Sulfur ............... ...................... ..... ............ .............. 425 471 832
3,531 3,791 2,523 Nitrates, Phosphates and Potash ..... ........ ................. 214 92 316
141 222 5F Ammonium compounds ............ ......... ............... Is 2 8
10 Fishineal ............. .................... ........ ......... ....... 82 38 131
33 7 Nitrate of soda ... ................................. ........... .......... 47 51 61
2,281 2,013 781 Phosphates ... ........... ............... ............. ...... -.- ..... I I 21
47 119 39 Potash ........ ........... .- ..... ...... ............................ .... 65 86
1,059 1,403 1,634 Fertilizers, miscellaneous ... ....................................... 5 9
()()2 543 600 Ores and M etals ..... ..................... .................... 1,673 2,227 2,712
118 252 2 19' ........ .............. ............... .......................... -- 97 0- 1,439 1,915
8.4 41 87 A I u in I na./bau x 1 te .............. ................ ............... 17 136 157
Chrome ......................... ....... ................................ 15
15 10 11 Copper ......... .................... ......... .......................... 247 301 255
lo 1 69 Iron .................... ................ .................. ... 23 284 205
15 Vead -... ................... ...... ........ 34 39 38
18 M illigifflese ............................ ................ ...... 46 12 10













Table No. 7-Principal Commodities Shipped through the Canal During the First Quarter -4
of Fiscal Years 1998 through 2000 (Continued) Ch
(Thousands of Long Tonst)

South North
Atlantic to Pacific Pacific to Atlantic
IFY 1998 FY 1999 FY 2000 ("0111111o(lily FY 2000 FY 1999 FY 1-9978

Ores and Metals -Continued
Ores-Continued
T in ............................................................. ............. -
7 7 Zinc ......................................................................... 182 174 216
93 131 119 Other and unclassified ............................................ 391 479 1,035
674 292 361 M etals ....................................................................... 733 789 797
181 43 154 Aluminum .............................................................. 80 16
10 2 Copper .................................................................... 489 416 335
55 47 73 Iron ........................................................................ 67 115 142
Lead ....................................................................... 55 35 24
416 201 117 Scrap ...................................................................... 44 3
3 1 3 Tin, including tinplate ............................................. 6 10 2
1 I Zinc ........................................................................ 103 76 230
8 I I Other and unclassified ............................................ 13 12 46
75 102 126 Other Agricultural Commodities ..................................... 573 960 895
40 2 Beans, edible .............................................................. 3 6
6 Cocoa and cacao beans .............................................. 16 16 4
Coffee, raw and processed ......................................... 3 3
Copra and coconuts ................................................... 2 3 33
2 Cotton, raw ................................................................ 3
19 5 4 M olasses .................................................................... 129 290 212
47 36 118 Oilseeds ..................................................................... 19 4
2 Peas, dry ..................................................................... 7 34 26 >
2 Rubber, raw ............................................................... 20 4
Skins and hides ...........................................................
7 12 Sugar .......................................................................... 371 606 613

W ool, raw ................................................................... -
4,920 4,551 4,227 Petroleum and Petroleurn Products ................................. 2,035 2,495 2,801 >
36 28 36 Asphalt ....................................................................... 8 t"
1,321 1,483 836 Crude oil ..................................................................... 1,162 796 1,918
1,310 728 639 Diesel oil ................................................................... 52 26 18
698 652 631 Fuel oil, residual ........................................................ 51 87 201
671 892 682 Gasoline ..................................................................... 184 381 109
256 52 305 Jet fuel ........................................................................ 16

.. .... .. .. .... .......... .. ......






3 2 Kerosene ...,................................................... 25 29
254 332 427 Liquefied gas ................................ 1 3 >
147 120 91 Lubricating oil ........... ................... 38 19 31z
--O rim ulsion .................................
70 133 153 Petroleum coke .............................. 496 1,062 494>
154 131 424 Other and unclassified ........................ 11 84 30
5.328 4.945 5.152 Miscellaneous .................................4,880 4,070 3,845
-- Bricks and tile ............................... 4>

343 69 7 Cement ...... .................................. .. 424 196 39
226 279 276 Clay, fire and china .........................
10 -16 Fibers, plant ................................
24 5 55 Flouir, wheat ...................... ..........3
I- Glass and glassware.......................................... 1 2
12 6 Groceries, miscellaneous ................................. 1I1 9
--Liquors and wines ........................................... 3 3 3
84 76 125 Marble and stone .............................. ............. 22 -C
3 2 011, coconut................................................... 13 52 27
7 4 011, fish --..,.............,...... ............................. 38 1 7Z
243 281 103 0il, vegetable ................................................. 50 54 80
285 146 172 Paper and paper products ....... ........ ............ 138 120 246
-- Porcelainware........ ................
6 3 3 Resin ..-... ............... ........... ................... 6
-- Rubber, manufactured .......... .......................... 7 5 4
-77 Seeds, excluding oilseeds ................... ....-68 17 27 Slag, clinkers, and dross......... ........... ..... ......... 40 35 37
4 31 19 Tallowk........... ................ ........ .......... 9 2 5
--Textiles ..-......... .... ...................
--Tobacco and mu fact ures ....... ........... ........- Wax, paraffin ................................... ....... 22 20 11
3883204.055 Containerized cargo............. .................. ..... 3,832 3,471 3,206
143 84 285 All other and unclassified... ......................... 248 107 168
-3,4 17429,109 Total ... ............ ................ 19,019 20,552 20,205





t Data F I %en Iin thousand s is, subhct to r ound Ing di ffer ences Note that commodities with tonnages less than 500 long tons are not shown, however, their tonnage is included in the totals,

















Table No. 8.-Origin and Destination of Commercial Cargo through the Panama Canal from Atlantic to Pacific during the First Quarter of Fiscal Year 2000 Segregated by Countries in Principal Trade Routes
(Long Tons)


To West ( Coast Unild Shl. ('anada lo W|e.st ( "n.1( 'enrl .Imeri ca


Costa El lnerica Balboa
Alaska Hawaii A mainland Ttal ('anada Rica .Sa'vador (iualtmala A lxico V:iraragua Panama Other (/ R. P (2) Tolal

East Coast North America:
United States:
North Atlantic ports.-............. 1.453 35.650 37.103 2.813 1.849 3.239 5,08x
South Atlantic pons ............... 510 12,070 12.580 98,070 8,965 148 117 9,230
Great Lakes ports ... ................
Gulf ports ........... .......... 57,740 455.390 513,130 203,893 198.710 259.994 67.281 113.652 55,516 90.338 989.384
United States (oiher) (I) 489 489 -55 5
Total United States ................... 59.703 503,599 563.302 100.883 203,893 207.675 259.994 69,333 113.652 55.516 93.694 1,003.757

East Coast Canada ........................ 20,116 20.116 166 879 134,856 135,735

East Coast Central America:
M exico .. ............... .... ........- 53,237 53.237 2.465 2,465
Panama............... ......... 996 133,176 134,172 49,903 6,436 50 143,372 199,761
Central America (other) (1) ............ 70X 700
Cristobal. R.P. (2) ... .......... 2,665 2,665 --191 2,707 12.557 5,936 21,391
Total Central America ............. 996 189,078 19.074 2.465 50.094 2,707 18,993 50 150,0)8 224,317

East Coast South America:
Brazil...........-............ 263.833 263.833 32,658 4,010 4,010
Colombia ....... 120,628 120,628 3,350 46,272 82.178 48,918 63,282 240,650)
Venezuela .---............ ........ 492,915 492,915 21,040 241,393 36,866 160l,364 6,474 466,137
South America (other)()............. 16.165 16,165
Total South America ........893,54......8.3.541 893,541 36,M08 21,040 287.665 123.054 160,364 48,918 69,756 710,797

West IndiesCuba ............ 69 69 11.319 19 2.578 13,916
Jamaica ........ 17,106 17,106 3,030 3,030
Netherlands West Indies .... 341,481 341,481 1,239 11,993 130.721 101,361 43.251 6,105 84,167 5.555 383,153
Trinidad/Tobago .79,332 79,332 11,621 23.720 21,814 107,436 17,590 2.556 18,724 203,461
West Indies (other) (I) -_- ........... ,572 100,572 24,648 2,650 27,298
Total West .ndis .. ...38,560 538,560 1,239 26,644 154.441 134.494 132,084 60,841 8,68) 105,469 8.205 630,858


Belgium ........................... 128,590 128,591 18,939 512 5,121 4 5,627
France ..... ................. 2.205 21,790 23,995 4,072 76 3,444 3,520
Italy ............. 136,666 136,66 8,587 4,624 6 4,630)
Netherlands ....... 499 117.518 118.017 863 1,767 1,645 286 2,359 6,057
Norway......... .............. 12.575 12,575 4,540
Spain-Portugal .......... 60,273 60,273 2.115 2.165 350 199 2,714
Sweden ....... ...... 2,344 2,344 -- -







U.Iisd Kingdom 65.5017 65,5o7 1,1 -- 133
Rusin Fcumlon 16.22- 6212 114 17,111)4 ll 1411.171 8,1, 1,6014 (111,712>
Foea R-tbi ofGnai 150,6101 150.,610)--11 --11
Eisuoc (olher) 4,91)7 269,7X12 274,779 1.954 X,61 1,1115 1 7.0191 5.114 1 K.010 72,HW7>
Total Euroc 5496 11417 965,655 9919,51W 4 1.17o 14,5919 46,121 44,252 17117 1731w)1 19,644 2,551 115,514

Afnci .. 46 51,471 51.517 911964 117,791 137.7931

Asia ikliddkc ELu) 261M04 26,1104 >

GR AND TOTAL 66 241 111,4 17 31 I'm124 1,275.5112 26 1.3A10 247.591 429.279 727.2114 919,1231 354.944 132,1017 125.161 3241221 3,1%X.140 zl!

Pe~rnofPcifc-bound E0 (1,21 0 1 11 Ill 1109 0V9 (5 25s 2IN 12 03 114 11 10,9

0





CA2

z-.


















Table No. 8.-Origin and Destination of Commercial Cargo through the Panama Canal from Atlantic to Pacific during the First Quarter of Fiscal 2000 (Continued) Segregated by Countries in Principal Trade Routes (Continued)
(Long Tons)

To Ji'evgaxt avuth .4nterica 'lo Oceania

F South FI
,Interica French Ne w Oceania
Chile Colombiia Ecuado~r Peru Other (J) Total Auxviralia Oceania ZealandI (other)(I) Dhtal

East Coast North America:
United States:
North Atlantic pOts-..... .......... .... ......... .... 49,141 26,052 25,905 40,420 6,180 147,698 46,354 1,304 12,567 2,933 63,258
South Atlantic poris-.......... 69,969 37,573 60,606 65,882 3,727 237,757 76.344 1,709 3,467 5,559 89,079
Great Lakes ports ....... ........ -- ................
Gulfrpots ..... -- ........... ........... ... .. 420.302 451,961 295,195 504,567 12,663 1,684,688 357,766 21,791 23,318 602,875
United States (other) (1)................. ........ ................ ....... ....... 3,073 916 6,926 34.715 3,761 49,391I 23,173 414 4,691 786 29,064
Total United States ......-........ ..................542,485 516,502 388,632 645.584 26.331I 2.119,534 703,637 3.627 44,516 32,496 784,276

East Coast Canada ............. .................... 13.449 18,9M0 821 33,170 3.384 -1,070 305 4,759

East Coast Central America:
Mexico--........... ......... ................ ...... ............ ......... 62,660 2,285 1,114 10,212 454 76,725Panatma,.... ........... --...... .......... --........ ............ .............. 50,540 27,704 21,874 21,955 16.077 138,150 3,282 2,116 2,437 7,835
Central America (other) (1)......... ....... ........... ........ ........--......- ..... ......
Cristobal, RP. (2) .......... --..... ......... ..... -.... .................. .... 1,829 1,608 6,955 1,704 12,0196
Total Central Amterica............. ....... .......... ....... ....... 115,029 31,597 29,943 33.871 16.531I 226.971 3,282 2,116 2.437 7,835

East Coast South America:
Brazil-...... .......-.......... ............ ....... ....... ............ 10.865 42 2,517 13,424 3,701 3,701
Colombia.. ................. ........ ............... ....... ............... 145.198 19,114 25,070 247.396 M.78 439,956
Venezuela ..... ........................................................... 309,665 30,686 178.793 322,955 8,234 850,333- --South America (other) (1).. ...... ...... ........ ... -............741 5.476 5,9(H) 8Mtt12 20.129 ---Total South America ........................ ........................ ...... 466.469 55,318 212.280 578.363 11,412 1.323,842 3,71 3,701

West Indies:
Cuba ..... .........-.... ...... ...... 3,2201 4018 -3,628
Jamaica.-.... --........ ...........-....-......... ............... ......... 1.514 1,1019 423 876 4,619 8.541 40 30 110 180 >
Netherlands West Indies .... ..................-..... ...... ...... 56 104 2,929 12,857 71,8901 95-- 95H
Trinidad/Tobago.,.................... ....... .........--- ... ......... .........- 18,253 11,221- 933 30,407 -- 3(03 3(03
West Indies (other) (1)........ ................ ... ................ ........ 43.827 11.321 111,974 30.9101 1,061 1(06,093 CA-TtlWsInis1(01,445 33,9013 33,955 3 1,786 19,470 2(. 41) 95 30 413 5780Europe: Belgium............ ............. .......... ....... .............. ..... 33,789 3,959 16,21(0 24.710 16,657 95,325 1,193 11,1101 2,692 3,682 18,677
France .....--........... .............................. .......... .... -...... 4,3013 1.0185 663 1,731 1,753 9,535 1(1,919 47.1014 2,665 3,393 64,081H
Italy ... ..... ...... ...... ........... ..... .................... 12.425 292 3,454 3,259 18 19,448 589 3,177 592 20 4,378
Netherlands................ -.... ........... ... ...-- ...... ....13,429 1,483 10.8201 6,692 4,3401 36.754 22.054 6,233 19,286 2,875 5(0,448>
Nonvay ... ... __............. ............ .. ......................___...... ......- to -Spa in- Portugal ...... ....... .............................36,812 2.2(1 5,081 17,235 5,219 66,546 153 89 133 2,461 2,836
Sneden --........................ ........ 6.883 -5,3015 571 12,759 22,762 101,184 769 33,715 (
United Kingdom .......................................... 7.932 2,345 35.063 4,186 6.0183 55.609 2.224 1,236 4.133 629 8,222
Russian Federation .... ...... ...... ....... .............. ........43,609 36,852 79.314 71.569 4.831 236. 175- -







Fcdkrul Rcpih of(Gcrmy 27.1)2 2,962 7,696 [4,941 18. 4,)2 7 1.063 5,765 614 1,857 1,575 9,911
Euop(other)(1) 8. .8409 41,549 21,225 61,4186 15.152 149,424 401 1,557 507 6.401 H,9
Total Europc .194,591 92,727 1111.528 210,700 71.8 752.640 65,699 71.450 42.049 21,865 201,0163Z

Africa 15.449 16,33 301,210) 62.194 36 29 118,098 1,706 119,868

As" (Middl E) ....... 1.361 481 204 521 2,569 -GR AND TOTAL ..... ....1414. K 1 730,528 50,591 1.515,139 177.,00 4,741.479 776.078 73,2(X) 207,879 62,923 1,122.080

Pa-rcn of Pacific4),urb ca 4 9 1,5 3. .2 0,6 16.3 2,7 0,3 0.7 1 3.9

















Table No. 8.-Origin and Destination of Commercial Cargo through the Panama Canal from Atlantic to Pacific during the First Quarter of Fiscal 2000 (Continued) b
Segregated by Countries in Principal Trade Routes (Continued)
(Long Tons)


%i (if ota
China Philip- PFi acific]I
(including Indo- pine Soauth Russxian Asia Grand boundi
thing Kong ToAian nesia Japan Islands Singapore Korea 7hazland F'ederation (6lher)(l) hol Tilal Cargo

East Coast North America:
United States,
North Atlantic ports-.. .~.. 347.799 187,534- 292.1 X8 49 6,081 408,677 6,143 35,2149 1,2K3,760 1,539,720 5.3
South Atlatic ports-.... .... 434,013 20H,278 518,984 1,567 1814,099 43.824 18.465 1,411,230 1,859,946 6A4
Great Lakes ponts .. ......... 18,748 463 19,211 19,211 0, 1
Gulf poris ..... .....-- 2,065.070 1,0182,350) 32,245 5,496.961 495,419 99,550 1,59X,462 60,079 8,151 745,715 11,674,002 15,464,079 53.1
United States (otlher) (1) ........ 81.972 103,751 90,703 260 1,40K 39,876 206 47.589 365,765 444,764 1.5
Total United States ........... 2,928,854 1,581,913 32,245 6.417,584 495,729 108.606 2,225,114 1101212 -8,151 847,521 -1475.98 l9327.720 66.4

East Coast Canada ... -............. 108,309 12,574 436,279- 72,865 5,016 58,215 693,258 887,204 3.0

East Coast Central AmericaMexico ........... .... 9,767 5,668 105,395 -- 54,326 4,930) 5.682 185.768 318,195 1,1
Panama ........... 40,641 38,272 441 45,562 1,320 16,78 18,2W8 161,224 641,142 2.2
Central America (other) (1) -- 9.986 -- 616 10,002 1 1,302 0.0
Cristobal, R.P. (2) ***' ...205 2,249 91 -14 529 -3,088 39,240 0,13
Total Central America ... 50,613 46,189 441 161,034 1,314 71,643 4,930 24,498 360.682 1,(X)9,879 3.5

East Coast South America.
Brlzi....-........ ............... ...... 183,092 11,277 194,369 511.995 1'8
Colombia ...........--......... ..... 41,538 ---- 283 8,256 50,077 854,661 2.9
Venezuela .. ................. .... --- 1,968 212,811 28.770 -- 243,549 2,052,934 7.1
South America (other) (l)- ... 13,248 -- 13,248 49,542 0,2
Total South America 43,5060 0.5 40,330 -- 8.256 501,243 3,469,132 11.97

West Indies:
Cuba... ............ ............. 638 --- 639 18.251 ). 1
Jamaica.....-- ...... .......... 16,404 1,915 3.718 -- 21,155 4.235 47,427 76.284 01.3 HNetherlands West Indies ........ 33,7860 33.786 831,644 2,9>
Trinidad/Tobago ... ........... 9,424 9,424 322,927 1.1H
West Indies (other) (1) ... .. 6,398 1.601 -1,948 13.242 10,622 33,811 267,774 0.9 J
Total West Indies.... 22,802 3,516 40,090 ----f4-,28 125,086 1,516,9980 5.2H

EuropeBelgium ...--....-..........638 755 1,583 -- 2.976 270,134 0.9>
France.................. ......1--- 2,302 106- 55 -- 1.463 106.006 0.4r
Italy -..,,.................. ....--- 2,030 2.0301 175,739 0.6H
Netherlands ..... ....-..... 2,159 992 1,082 21,412 75 -- 25,620 237,759 0.8
Norway....-. ....... ..... 30,914 -- 301,914 48,029 0.2>
Spain-Portugl ... ....... 3,9501- 3,9501 138,434 0.,5
Sweden ................ 48.818 (1.2
United Kingdom ..-...-........ 794 2,462 213 --3,469 164. 120 (1.6 t
Russian Federation ... --- 5...,458 5,458 446,597 1.5








Foeal Rcpic of Geaum 1,424 I 4.801 1.191 7,797 239,466 0.8
Euroc (cghr) (1) ......._______ 951 61 KO ______57 79 509,7381 1.5
Total Europc .... 47,157 61 21.412' 7.714 7Y 5,556 2,3 MW 9) ,2Z

Arnic 211 233 457,569 L

Asia (M iddle East)I.... 26, 16 We 42 26,225 55,6411 W,2

GRAND TOTAL 1,160.401 1.646,0120 12,686 7,537,914 495.759 111.152 2,4 52. 061 1211,195 9. 151 961 3650 16,545,254 29 M945

Pementof PaCiiC-bOUnd cargo 10.9 5,7 01 259 1705 8.4 04 (M) 13 56.A 10)%Z


I) I kk _A ,, w-.t.,g~gg- J, -t















Table No. 9-Origin and Destination of Commercial Cargo through the Panama Canal from Pacific to Atlantic during the First Quarter of Fiscal Year 2000 Segregated by Countries in Principal Trade Routes
(Long Tons)

To E. C.
7i) Eavi Coasxt 1Jnited States (Canada 7ii East Coast Central America

North South Great UInited iI-] (TCenral
Atlantic Atlantic Lakes Gulf( States America Cristohul
Parts Ports Ports Ports ('other(]) Thtal C~anada Mexico Panama f'other)(1) R. P. (2) Total

West Coast North America:
United States:
Alaska .............. .... ............... ......... ..... 5547 2,812X1 492 9 1.807 565 314 314
Hawaii... ....... ............. ...... ........ .........- 1.914 10 1.924 -... 3,2481 3,249
Mainland.... ............. --.......-........... ....... .043 .10.06~5 109,1817 20.567 162,802 111.7411 5,157 97.945. 766 IONA161
Total U.S. ........ --......... -..... ..... .......... 875 3-7i4.117 109,6819 20.567 173.653 109.313 5.157 9K1,259 4.014 107.4301

West Coast Canada ............ .. .-.......-................... 61.065 20.409 23.322 4.80 109,602 27,034.. 27,034

West Coast Central America.
Costa Rica ...... ....- -....... ........... ......... .....-.... 21.007 21,00)7
El Salvador ........-...-................................ ...... 19, 192. 19.192 16,599 16,599
Guatemala...... ........ .............. ............ 8,763 8 1,703 14.612 14,6 12
Honduras........... .......... ........ .........Mexico .-.... ......... ............... ...... .........561,382 844 360.135 231) 922,591 19.347 67,60)7 2,786 70,393
Nicaragua...............
Panama ................... ....... ..........--.... .... ... 37 5.424 .. 5.461 255 3.366. 3,621
Central America (other) (1) .... ....... ......... ....... .. -.. 1,260) 452 452
Balboa, R.P. (2) ................"* ..... ...... ....... ... 161 2.231I 4,416 6.908
Total Central America.. .......... ....... ............ 580,611 6,268 368,898 230 '96007 19.607 103.(A2 11,3113 452 21.015 133,492

West Coast South America:
Chile .............................. .90,36 8.580 363,413 47.299 1.409,1281 162,287 91,840 45.990 5.2581 7.914 140,902
Colombia... .. ............ ........ ...... 25.794 18,251 26.049 5,151 75.245 586 29,903 .4,860 35,349
Ecuador ........... .................. 29%)342 36,837- 236.491 04,235 636,8195 .9,604) 493.562 2 2,875 506,248
Peru .....-........... ....... .......... ......... .... 30.292 38,843 1 W1).621 57,413 5W),.169 16.463 39,717 36,060 3.906 9.744 89,487
South America (other) ( I) ....... ................12,747 539 16,301 124 29,710 25 19.014 45 19,059
Total South America ... .........-..... ...........I...... .5. 011oi 193,049 4,865 174,222 2 6 47 179,775 150,966 605.560 9,226 25,293 791,045H

Oceania:
Australia.......... .............. ............ ......114,044 14),398 31.713 155.845 21) 321,022 105,549 19 19
British Oceania........................ W
New Zealand ............ ................ ...... 58.692 13,758 1 6.610 64 111.124 1,808 2.417 2,417 H
Oceania (other) (1) ................ .......- 20 8,407 -8,487 16 1 .
Total Oceania.... ...... ........... ............ ... 172,736 157 i3 *75 -200-422 114 440.613 10r7 136 2.432 2.452

Asia:
China includingg Hong Kong)............ ............. 413.219 253.912 16.041 748.758 117,100 1.548,936 78.766 43.727 138,526 4,867 187,120H
Taiwan............................. ...... 216.456 129,223 18.179 32.587 45,740 441,185 102,054 5,574 83,696 2,712 91,982>
Indonesia........-.......... ......... ................ ....... 59,220 27.495 73.426 100.141 1,407 .
Japan.......... ....-.............-......... 476.054 321,646 1.706 671.199 76.000 1.547.464 66,720 24,990 70.802 12.144 107,996
Philippine Islands .... .....--..--......--- 10.531 10.531
Singapore ...........................-............ 10.437 28.921I 9,346 7.539 56.243 2.235 s0 2,295
South Korea ..........--....... ....... ...... .......... 217.290 124.951 13.528 417.511 40.528 913.700 34,069 22,866 46,789 J.307 15,970 88,232


...........L- ......: .... ..







Thauland 1195 19 1 K.2 1,24~ I
Ruusian Fedeatmon 1, 7 -22.Asia (other) ( 1 117 419 Sb.66 195 Ii 1 97 %96. Q0 12.M74 14,35S 42'(199 -9,3179 65.12
Total AiLS I 1.1 495 95 12kp 4 9 14 22 9 1 w,( 2043M 51W2.76 1 2 9.1d2 11 L512 384.207 A.37 44.971 544,0474d4



GRAND TOTAL ........49K 1 2 t I WN 11224 1 (Ml. 7311 5203w 4312,905 714.66. 199111, 10MAW,1. 11,035 95,29A 1,60,50t

Percent of Atlantic-bound cargo 21 f, (14 14 .17 49f, '19 58 01,1 0 194


(Also includes cargo not1 routed to permit segregation bc-teen definite countries, O
(2) Includes both local and transshipped cargo
0





















00,














Table No. 9--Origin and Destination of Commercial Cargo through the Panama Canal from Pacific to Atlantic during the First Quarter of 'Fiscal Year 2000 Segregated by Countries in Principal Trade Routes (Continued)
(Long Tons)

Tro East Coast South America To West Indies

ISouth IIHaitil Netherlandv West
America Dominican West Puerto Trinidad! Indies
Brazil Colombia Venezuela (other)i(1, Total Cuba Republic Jamaica Indies Rico Tobago (Woher)(4V Total

West Coast North America:
United States:
A laska .... -............ ....
H aw aii ..-........ ...-...........
Mainland. ...... .....--........... 52,633 -19.435 4 1,(&) 1,144 134.878 4,725 13324 0.202 9 ,804 .3.255
Total U.S,. ... ...... ....... 5..3 39,435 41.000 1.144 -- 3t4.878- 4.725 13,-IT524 6.202 9,804 33.255

West Coast Canada ... ..... 43,110 22.359 33.041 98,510 43,501 22 55,282 9.028 1 08,433

West Coast Central Amcrica:
Costa Rica......... .......... ...... ............ 1,689 937 2,526
El Salvador ........... ....... ...-- .........-- ........... 1,100 1 .100 8,858 5,905 14.763
Guatemala ... ... ................. ...... ......... 1, 160 13,605. 14.765 14,664 9.927 4.965 1.941 3.344 34,941
Honduras .. -- ......... .................999 3.187 5,386
Mexico ...... -.......... ...... ........ 4.829 623 5.451I 47,9989 6.730 7.9W6 62,634
Nicaragua ........ ..... 3089 308
Panama...- ......... ................. ........ 1,434 1 ,434 1 ,737 .- 6,658 -8,3195
Central America (other) (1) ......................... 14.100 30,657 24,823 --- 3.674 3,674
Balboa, R.P. (2)- .................................._____ .11-- -37 317
Total Central America ...... ................... 24,377 25.722- 50,099 49,997 16,401 30,452 30,885 9,847 12,836 130,419

West Coast South America:
Chile ... -.. ................ ... 89 73,592 63.,236 136,017 20,095 19,138 7,448 56,610 62,470 165,761
Colombia ...... -............ 8,859 38,600 337 27,794 7,854 19.227 10,810 -211 13,288 22,043 73,433
Ecuador............... ... 4.928 24,587 29,5315 5.467 769 5,705 6,573 105,741 13,779 136,034
Peru ............................41.378 17.827 39,205 1.949 8,209 56.200 49,275 26,052 141,690
South America (other) (1).. ... ............. 5.232 1,084 6,316 8 403.1 137 568
Total South America.. .................1,199 1.1-,9 9 323,334 33.7 3K8,849 33,424 41,083 32,171 56,206 56,462 175,639 122,501 537T486

Oceania:H Australia ..... .... ..... ............ .... 4.866 -- 4,966
British Oceania ..... ..-... 69 69)-New Zealand .........-....... .............. 7.622 7,622 1 35 8,782- 8,917
Oceania (othr) (1) ........... 3,64 8,872 30,536(
Total Oceania 7.......... -T72 9 ,693 1335 135,M9 -9 .872 0--4

Asia:> China (including Hong Kong) ............. 4.X62 7.983 30,337 45 23.227 70.819 17.2103 20.569 2,293 12.045 -5.099 129.0314
Taiwan..................... ....... ......3 88 403 75 602 3,268 475 8.77H 9.253
Indonesia. .. ............... ............ ......... 0-3 -..Japan...................... ......- 28,947 18.833 1.519 49,199 11.777 37,941 1,3(X) 22,916 577 5.926 60,437>
Philippine Islands ......... .......
Singapore ...... 333.. ........ ..... 31. 313
South Korea.............. .... --- ........ 5.950 3.2931 563 9.N06 2.059 1.7931 36,997 1,319 19,804 1.153 3,635 W6940
Thailand ...................... 28,234 -. 28,234
Russian Federation .......... ..........
Asia (other) (1).............................310,711 9,470 3.113 23,294 24,(4)5 2,475 13,637- 25,206 6S.921


L .....









Toali Asia- ....... ..........$A* 42005 1542 WIWI79 97 4XI K4043 97.921 3-126 79,971 1,730 Kw64 A59.114>

AnwtA

GR-AND TOTAL IM YR2 274054 27.1.393 7.392 ('%'X21 224 405 91.662 160,33 155,11 153,145 IX7,216, 09^'3 ,1,0

Pereen ofAiatic-boad cau&* us 1.4 1 A 00 3's 11 05s O's 0 IA IM ON

zol
















Table No. 9-Origin and Destination of Commercial Cargo through the Panama Canal from Pacific to Atlantic during the First Quarter of 71"ca Yeaw 2000 a Segregated by Countries in Principal Trade Routes (Continued)
(Long Tons)

To Europie

INether- Spain/ United Russ~ian Yugo- Fed. Rep. Europe
Belgium Denmark Finland France Italy land Portugal Sweden Kingthim Federation slavia of Germ any other (1l) Total

West Coast North America:
United States.
Alaska .. ....... ....2 -153 5,419 3.836 11.874 .4,225 2,569 28,078
1-lawaji....-... .... ..... ...... ...
Mainland ... ...........336,190 .- 79,054 56.839 21 .641 156.3.15 10)4 (15,583 736 1 05,400 146,296 1,157,168
Total U.S-.----..........1136,190 2 79.207 62,258 213,477 156.335 104 77.457 736 109,625 149,855 1,185,246

West Coast Canada---...........213.161. 81,103 359.328 194.005 186.567 56,887 99.806 69.004 121.477 1,381,339

West Coast Central America:
Costa Rica .......
El Salvador. ....
Guatemala ..................... 1 1.776 ---- 11.776
Honduras .......................
Mexico 127.118 -435 6,194 821 8,794 884 .- 1,745 145,991
Nicaragua ... ....... ........ 5.362 -5.362
Panama .... ...... -- ...... 950 313 --2,318 3321
Central America (other) (1) ...... 1,671 3.797 -5.468
Balboa, R.P. (2).-........_ _______Total Central America .... 2Ii7,11-8 435 6.194 7,133 22,554 884 -7,860 172,178

West Coast South America:
Chile -*.....- ...........*.. 99,397 4,971 15,550 73,477 108.071 39,143 66.736 30,718 44.461 -- 245,650 15,734 723,908
Colombia ................. ....... 3,4389 2,916 9,402 1,431 7,805 4.287 26.758 31,170 87,107
Ecuador .................... ....... 54.936 2.879 11 1.2(W 15,817 20.028 4.094 71.217 4,720 97.992 109.693 492.572
Peru .......--........ .... 107,157 4.922 2.1,4(A 24,693 38,490 42,198 18,102 -. 80,(A41 39,712 379,379
South America (other) 3I......900 1 ,656 739 7,463 14,192 3 ,611 -. 4,035 15,850 53.506
Total South America .......... 269,988 9,893 15,550 104292 2-4,0 110.315 144,385 10.738 80,063 75.504 -4.520 445.076 21 1,161 1.725,472

Oceania:C Australia .... ..................... 194 19 -34 0H
British Oceania ........ 45 19.192 49,106 67.343>
New Zealand ......... 4,997 -- 19,545 8,033 32,575 HOceania (other) (1) -...7.22 7-7 24,.10 31,537
Total Oceania ............ 7.272 24.189 72,60)0 19.543 8.033 131,639H

Asia:n China (including Hong Kong)- 1.315 2,010 1,991 7,0)25 [as 12,601>
Taiwan ......... -.......... .... 490. 20 ...-. 303 813
Indonesia ....................
Japan ........................I 402. 4,491 3.248 172 121 113.597 20.032
Philippine Islands ...... ..
Sinapore................... ..--..--.South Korea.............8 tax 2,589 3,020 16 13.244 2,779 1,520 23,956
Thailand ...... ............. --.
Russian Federation-..... ............ '
Asia (other) (1)......... ........438K 65 1 95 ..74 7.723 8.495