Report to Congress of the Department of Defense in accordance with section 2455, Title 10, U.S.C. of the Defense Catalog...

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Report to Congress of the Department of Defense in accordance with section 2455, Title 10, U.S.C. of the Defense Cataloging and Standardization Act of 1952
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United States -- Congress. -- House. -- Committee on Armed Services. -- Subcommittee on Investigations
United States -- Dept. of Defense
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FORTY-EIGHTH REPORT TO CONGRESS
(January 1 Through December 31, 1977)
OF THM

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE
In Accordance With Section 2455, Title 10, U.S.C.
(Formely Section 8 of Public Law 426, 82d Congress)
OF THE

DEFENSE CATALOGING AND
STANDARDIZATION ACT OF 1952


REPORT
OF THE
INVESTIGATIONS SUBCOMMITTEE
OF THE

COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES
UNITED STATES HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
NINETY-FIFTH CONGR
SECOND SESSION






0OCU N1
JUNE 30, 1977



U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
31-3160 WASHINGTON : 1978











HOUSE COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES
NINETY-FIFTH CONGRESS, SECOND SESSION
MELVIN PRICE, Illinois, Chairman


CHARLES E. BENNETT, Florida
SAMUEL S. STRATTON, New York
RICHARD H. ICHORD, Missouri
LUCIEN N. NEDZI, Michigan
CHARLES H. WILSON, California
ROBERT L. LEGGETT, California
RICHARD C. WHITE, Texas
BILL NICHOLS, Alabama
JACK BRINKLEY, Georgia
ROBERT H. (BOB) MOLLOHAN,
West Virginia
DAN DANIEL, Virginia
G. V. (SONNY) MONTGOMERY,
Mississippi
HAROLD RUNNELS, New Mexico
LES ASPIN, Wisconsin
RONALD V. DELLUMS, California
MENDEL 3. DAVIS, South Carolina
PATRICIA SCHROEDER, Colorado
ABRAHAM KAZEN, JR., Texas
ANTONIO B. WON PAT, Guam
BOB CARR, Michigan
JIM LLOYD, California
LARRY McDONALD, Gerogia
THOMAS J. DOWNEY, New York
GOODLOE E. BYRON, Maryland
CHARLES WHITLEY, North Carolina
JOHN B. BRECKINRIDGE, Kentucky
BOB STUMP, Arizona


BOB WILSON, California
WILLIAM L. DICKINSON, Alabama
G. WILLIAM WHITEHURST, Virginia
FLOYD SPENCE, South Carolina
DAVID C. TREEN, Louisiana
ROBIN L. BEARD, Tennessee
DONALD J. MITCHELL, New York
MARJORIE S. HOLT, Maryland
ROBERT W. DANIEL, JR., Virginia
ELWOOD H. (BUD) HILLIS, Indiana
DAVID F. EMERY, Maine
PAUL S. TRIBLE, JR., Virginia
ROBERT E. BADHAM, California


JOHN J. FORD, Staff Director



INVESTIGATIONS SUBCOMMITTEE
SAMUEL S. STRATTON, New York, Chairman


ROBERT L. LEGGETT, California
ROBERT H. (BOB) MOLLOHAN,
West Virginia
DAN DANIEL, Virginia
HAROLD RUNNELS, New Mexico
RONALD V. DELLUMS, California
LUCIEN N. NEDZI, Michigan
BILL NICHOLS, Alabama


ROBIN L. BEARD, Tennessee
DAVID C. TREEN, Louisiana
ROBERT W. DANIEL, JR., Virginia
ROBERT E. BADHAM, California


JOHN F. LALLY, Counsel


(II)








ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF DEFENSE
WASHINGTON. 0. C. 20101


MANPOWER.
RESERVE AFFAIRS 4 MAY 1978
AND LOGISTICS



Honorable Melvin Price
Chairman, Committee on Armed Services
House of Representatives
Washington, D. C. 20515

Dear Mr. Chairman:

As prescribed by Section 2455, Title 10, United States Code, we are
enclosing the Forty-eighth Annual Report on the Department of Defense
(DoD) Cataloging and Standardization Programs. This report covers the
period from January through December 1977.

Reports on these two programs have been combined in accordance with the
provisions of Section 2455. Inasmuch as the Congress in its legislation
directed that the Secretary of Defense report any other data which he
considers will best inform Congress on the status of the Cataloging and
Standardization Programs, there is included information concerning such
DoD Programs as Screening and Interrogation, North Atlantic Treaty
Organization Codification, Item Management Responsibilities and other
significant accomplishments. These plans and programs are directly
associated with the development and/or utilization of cataloging or
standardization data and have been initiated to provide additional means
of insuring more effective utilization of materiel resources.

Sincerely,

Enclosure
As stated

JOHN P. WHirTE
Assistant Secretary of Defese
(Manpowert Reserve Affairs & ogstiC)


(M)
















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48TH REPORT
DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE
CATALOGING AND STANDARDIZATION PROGRAMS
1 JANUARY 31 DECEMBER 1977

FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM
The Federal Catalog System is a Government-wide program established by
law, administered by the Department of Defense in conjunction with the
Administrator of the General Services Admin istration to provide a
uniform system of item identification and assign National Stock Numbers
to all items of personal property used by Government Departments and
Agencies. Through the operation of this system, duplicate items are
prevented from entering or are eliminated from the Government inventory,
interchangeability among items is revealed, data to accomplish
standardization is made available, logistics support throughout the
Government is facilitated and Government/industry relationships are
strengthened. All of these elements and products of the system improve
materiel management and military effectiveness and promote efficiency
and economy in logistics operations. The Defense Logistics Agency (DLA)
is responsible for management and administration of the operation of the
Federal Catalog System. North Atlantic Treaty Organization*(NATO)
countries and other foreign countries' participation in the Federal
Catalog System is by agreement or on an individual basis.

TRENDS IN THE FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM
Attached are two charts which depict Federal Catalog System Totals since
December 1970 and the Status of Integrated Materiel Management in DoD
for the same time period. These are provided to better- visualize the
changes in the Federal Catalog System over the past eight years. The
following paragraphs relate to these charts.

FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM TOTALS
As of 31 December 1977, the end of the reporting period, there was a
total of 5,277,651 items on file. Of these, 4,753,377 National Stock
Numbers (NSNs) represented active items of supply and 524,274 items were
in an inactive status (those with no recorded managers). The matching
of new item submittals (requests for NSN assignment) against inactive
item identifications makes possible the reactivation of some inactive
NSNs, thus avoiding the assignment of new NSNs. The number of active
items included 139,994 "seiniactive" items. A semiactive item of supply
is defined as an item which is not currently stocked at the wholesale
level nor is future wholesale stockage authorized. This potentially
inactive NSN must be retained in the system as an item of supply because
it is in-use or on-hand below the wholesale level.


(1)







2


ITEMS MANAGED BY THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT
During the reporting period, 218,877 items were added to and 158,261
items were deleted from the U.S. Government portion of the Federal
Catalog System files. This resulted in a Government-wide inventory of
4,199,264 items, a net increase of 60,616 during the period. This total
includes NSNs assigned to items managed by the civil agencies, as well
as to items managed by the Department of Defense.

ITEMS MANAGED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE
The ending inventory for this reporting period indicated 3,867,984
items, including 139,104 semiactive items, managed by DoD, a net
increase of 61,184. This was the result of 215,073 additions to and
153,889 deletions from the Federal Catalog System. 157,995 of the
215,073 additions were accounted for by assignment of NSNs to new item
identifications. The remaining were reactivations of inactive item
identifications and reinstatement of previously cancelled items.

As of the end of the reporting period, and within the total of 3,867,984
DoD item identifications, there were 3,122,239 which reflected items
centrally managed, stocked, stored and issued. Of this latter quantity,
125,035 were designated as having no requirement for future procurement
and should become inactive when existing wholesale stocks are exhausted.
ITEMS USED BY THE MILITARY SERVICES
The following table reflects the total quantities of items recorded in
the central files of the Federal Catalog System as being used by the
Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps on the 31st day of December for
the years 1974 through 1977. The figures include items for which the
Military Services operate as their own inventory managers and also those
items for which the Military Services operate only as retail managers,
Excluded from the U.S. Army figures are U.S. Army Tank Automotive
Readiness Command (TARCOM) items. These items have been included under
"Other Items Subject to Integrated Management".

Military
Service 31 Dec 1974 31 Dec 1975 31 Dec 1976 31 Dec 1977
Army 883,911 902,405 910,186 917,346
Navy 1,750,964 1,786,325 1,828,942 1,889,579
Air Force 1,751,893 1,791,519 1,807,485 1,869,974
Marine Corps 289,128 308,800 312,371 312,456

COMMONALITY OF ITEMS AMONG THE MILITARY SERVICES
The total shown for each Military Service includes many stock numbers
which are used also by one or more of the other three services and which
are, therefore, included in their totals as well. The degree to which










this commonality exists among the services is revealed by the following
table:

Used Also by One
Military or More of the Percentage
Service TOTAL Other Services Commonality
Army 917,346 493,445 53.8
Navy 1,889,579 636,103 33.7
Air Force 1,869,974 661,896 35.4
Marine Corps 312,456 236,522 75.7

ITEMS MANAGED BY THE DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY
Of the 3,867,984 items recorded in the central files- as being managed by
DoD, on 31 Dec 1977, 2,733,758 items, or 70.9 percent, were in the 331
commodity classes assigned to the general cognizance of the DLA for
integrated materiel management. Of these, 1,940,047 items, or 71.0
percent, were- designated for inventory management by DLA, including
66,909 items which were designated by DLA as authorized for local
procurement. The remaining 29.0 percent are retained for management by
the Military Services.

OTHER ITEMS SUBJECT TO INTEGRATED MANAGEMENT
On 31 Dec 1977, there were 2,204 items in the three Federal Supply
Classification (FSC) classes of tires and tubes assigned to the TARCOM;
of these TARCOM was recorded as integrated manager on 2,194 items.
TARCOM's mission includes integrated management of items peculiar to
combat and tactical vehicles of Army design in any FSC class. TARCOM is
presently recorded as the integrated manager for 47,633"items in other
FSC classes, making a total in all FSC classes of 49,827 items.

GSA has been assigned integrated materiel management for 69 FSC classes.
At the end of the reporting period, there were 108,721 DoD items in
these FSC classes and GSA was recorded as the integrated manager for
75,350 of these items.

ITEM MANAGEMENT RESPONSIBILITIES FOR DOD USED ITEMS
The following table displays the wholesale management responsibilities
of the 3.9 million items used by DoD. The Federal Catalog System is the
vehicle that collects, maintains and disseminates the management data
elements necessary to assist in making management assignments and to
achieve the overall DoD objective of "one-item/one-Manager" for all DoD
used items.

The DoD wholesale manager can take three forms:
1. The Commodity Integrated Materiel Manager (CIMM); i.e., DLA,
GSA, TARCOM, etc., which is defined as an activity designated to










exercise Integrated Materiel Management for a FSC group/class, commodity
or items on a DoD or Federal Government-wide basis.
2. The Weapons Integrated Materiel Manager (WIMM), which is the
Military Service Inventory Control Point that performs the DoD or
Federal Government-wide Integrated Materiel Manager functions.
3. The Military Lead Service (MLS) Inventory Manager is an
activity assigned the prime responsibility for the inventory management
of a reparable, investment or end item of supply within a particular
Military Service/Agency.

The figures in Columns One and Two of the following table are the total
number of items (3,392,845) currently under the single integrated
management concept regardless of the number of activities using the
items. The totals shown in the vertical columns are net DoD figures for
CMM, WIMM and Total DoD Managed Items.. The total for MLS are gross
registrations because a single item may be in the inventory of more than
one Service. The total DoD Managed Items column reflects net items
managed by Service.

TABLE OF ITEM MANAGEMENT RESPONSIBILITIES FOR DOD ITEMS
Activity CIMM WIMM MLS TOTAL DOD MANAGED ITEMS
Army 49,827 187,789 72,831 310,447
Navy -- 517,010 160,966 677,976
Air Force -- 586,294 230,226 816,520
Marine Corps -- 33,076 5,366 38,442
DLA 1,940,195 .... 1,940,195
Other DoD -- 38 20,192 20,230
*GSA 78,618 .... 78,618
TOTAL 2,068,640 1,324,205 489,581 3,867,984
*These items are managed by GSA, but used by DoD.

ITEMS MANAGED BY THE CIVIL AGENCIES
GSA prepares and submits catalog data on behalf of all civil agencies
except the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the Coast Guard,
which prepare and submit their own data. At the end of the reporting
period, the central files included 331,280 items -recorded as being
managed by civil agencies only, and an additional 247,915 items managed
in common with DoD or a total of 579,195 items. During the reporting
period, 49,385 items were reported as entering the civil agency supply
system and 46,726 as being deleted, resulting in a net increase of 2,659
items.

INTERNATIONAL USE OF THE FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM
During the reporting period, 145,178 screening requests of part numbers
and NSNs were processed against the central files; 279,479 user
registrations were effected; and 31,714 new item identifications were










prepared under the applicable international agreements, which resulted
in assignment of new NSN's.

As of 31 December 1977, a gross total of 3,647,517 user registrations
were recorded to 12 NATO countries, 13 other foreign countries and 3
NATO agencies. The quantity of user registrations by country or agency
was as follows:


Belgium
Canada
Denmark
France
Netherlands
Greece


231,112
305,882
118,097
330,428
245,662
214,605


NATO COUNTRIES
Germany
Italy
Norway
United Kingdom
Turkey
Portugal


OTHER FOREIGN COUNTRIES
Australia 465,830 South Africa 70,070
Japan 28,881 Iran 16,411
*Brazil 60 *Philippines 21
Israel 19,640 *Spain 254
*South Korea 93 New Zealand 66,520
*Egypt 155 *Saudi Arabia 4,602
Singapore 11,789
*Catalog Services are not furnished these foreign countries. User
registration in the central files was recorded by the U.S. Military
Services under the Foreign Military Sales Program.

NATO AGENCIES
NATO Supply Center 78,440
Logistics Working Group 107,254
NATO Inte. Comm. Sys. Mgt. Agency 178

The net total of NSNs with registered foreign managers was 1,635,649. Of
this total, 554,113 were used solely by foreign governments and the
remainder, 1,081,536, were used by one or more U.S. activities, as well
as by one or more foreign countries.

DESCRIPTIVE METHOD OF ITEM IDENTIFICATION
Within the Federal Catalog System there are three basic types of Item
Identifications: Full Descriptive, Partial Descriptive and Reference
Method. For designated commodity areas the Full Descriptive Method of
Item Identification is preferred and provides a data base defining the
physical and functional characteristics of items, permitting the
detection of duplicate items entering the system, the accurate
assignment of National Stock Numbers and providing data for use in


728,693
69,009
268,521
259,753
5,537
20











competitive procurement, item reduction studies, research and
development and other logistics purposes. The following chart reflects
the current and past percentages of Full Descriptive Item
Identifications managed:

31 December
Activity 1975 1976 1977
Army 23.6 23.6 24.3
Navy 16.7 16.1 15.8
Air Force 17.3 17.0 16.4
Marine Corps 33.7 32.6 30.6
DLA 46.9 50.7 55.8
DoD 33.3 35.0 37.6
System 31.3 32.8 36.7

SYSTEM TRANSACTION PROCESSING
During Calendar Year 1977, 36,334,127 Federal Catalog System
transactions were processed. Of these transactions, 267,093 were new
item submittals/reinstatements; 752,184 were cancellations of active or
inactive NSNs; 1,044,312 were users add/delete or changes; 717,059 were
standardization actions and 22,993,843 were file screening and
interrogations by NSN or reference number. The remaining transactions
concerned freight data, catalog management data, item identification
revisions, reference number data, system support records, data element
changes and multiple transactions.

MANUFACTURERS' DATA
As of 31 December 1977, there were 93,949 valid manufacturers' codes in
the Cataloging Handbook, Federal Supply Code for Manufacturers (FSCM).
The FSCM is a coding system of five digit numbers assigned to
establishments which are manufacturers of items of supply procured by
agencies of the Federal Government. Represented in the publications are
52,633 U.S. and Canadian manufacturers. The remaining 41,316 codes
identify manufacturers in other foreign countries.

PARTICIPANTS IN THE FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM
At the end of the period, the central cataloging files and processing
operations were serving the needs of 61 wholesale and retail materiel
managers in DoD and 83 in the civil agencies. In addition, cataloging
services were furnished to 12 NATO countries, seven other foreign
countries and three NATO agencies.

CHARACTERISTICS SEARCH
The Item Characteristics data base has long been a part of the Catalog
System, supporting such functions as National Stock Number assignment,
item reduction studies and the furtherance of competitive procurement.











Mechanized characteristic screening automatically compares proposed new
NSN requests and maintenance actions to the existing data base to detect
duplication or possible duplication. Due to the extensive nature of
this data base, data retrieval for design, research and development and
some standardization functions has been limited to individual
interrogation by NSN or mass data extracts by Federal Supply Class
and/or approved item name. A characteristics search capability
permitting rapid access to the data base to obtain item records based on
specific characteristics is now available for approximately 30% of the
descriptive items in the data base. Technical and professional
personnel working in design, research and development and standardi-
zation way query the data base citing the characteristics of the items
of their interest.

The automated characteristic search process will find and return to the
requestor all items resident in the data bace matching the
characteristics submitted. This process is designed to serve the
individual needs of a wide variety of logistics programs. The requestor
has the ability to tailor the search request to fit a specific need.
Broad groupings of items may be obtained by searching the file for all
items containing a few specified characteristics. Narrower groupings
are obtained by increasing the number of characteristics that must be
present in the file item to satisfy the match condition established by
the requestor. The utility of the catalog system characteristics data
base is therefore greatly increased and better serves the intent of the
law that established the Catalog System.

SCREENING AND INTERROGATION
During the reporting period, 5,579,468 manufacturers' reference numbers
were screened against the master files in support of provisioning
actions; 1,843,248 or 33.0 percent were matched to existing NSNs. There
were 508,101 NSNs screened for the same purpose. Additionally, there
were 2,293,563 manufacturers' reference numbers screened against the
master file, of which 472,648 or 20.6 percent matched existing NSNs for
purposes other than provisioning, i.e., to obtain management data
recorded in the master file, such as item user information, validation
of NSNs, standardization decisions, related manufacturers' codes and
reference numbers and to provide support to procurement. Also, there
were 2,003,672 NSNs screened for this purpose. In addition to the
above, provisioning screening also provides the capability (by matching
reference numbers to NSNs) for the screening of declared excess asset
files to ascertain the availability of assets for materiel utilization
purposes. During this reporting period, assets were found to exist for
2.0 percent of the NSNs matched.






8


CONSOLIDATED MANUFACTURERS/NONMANUFACTURERS FILE
The "Handbook for Nongovernment Organization Codes for Military Standard
Contract Administration Procedures (MILSCAP)" contains data from a
consolidated Federal Supply Code for Manufacturers/Federal Supply Code
for Nonmanufacturers (FSCM/FSCNI1) File.

This basic publication contains 132,724 coded facilities and is used in
the mechanical interchange of data required by MILSCAP and the
agencies/activities automated data processing system.

MASTER CROSS REFERENCE LIST
The Master Cross Reference (RL) Part One (Reference Number to National
Stock Number (NSN)/Permanent System Control Number (PSCN), Part Two
(NSN/PSCN to Reference Number), and a Marine Corps tailored Part One are
published and distributed by a Government Printing Office contractor on
DoD Standard 48:1 microfiche. Magnetic tapes of the MCRL Part One are
furnished to the Department of Commerce for sale to the general public.

IDENTIFICATION LISTS
DoD Identification Lists (ILs) are published on microfiche with a
reduction ratio of 48:1. All Federal Supply Classes published in ILs
under the Defense Integrated Data System (DIDS) are compiled from
mechanized characteristics data. Centralized mechanical production of
ILs was accomplished over a two-year period, ending December 1977. The
consolidated Identification Lists provide descriptive, reference and
illustrative data to identify or select items of supply. The
publications contain all active items which have a recorded user and are
included regardless of users' interest or how the items are managed.
During 1977, the IL microfiche distribution totaled 31,118,200
microfiche.

MANAGEMENT LIST
The first Military Service tailored Management Data Lists (MLs)
publication from the DIDS files were distributed in October 1975.
Distribution for 1977 was as follows:
Fiche
Service In Sets Sets
Army 6,880,036 105,535
Air Force 3,248,023 26,047
Marine Corps 327,752 27,454
Navy 3,583,147 37,182
Basic publications are produced quarterly for the Air Force, Navy, and
Marine Corps with monthly intervening change bulletins for the Marine
Corps. The Army ML publication is produced monthly.










FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION PUBLICATION
A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) tailored IL, on microfiche, was
compiled and initially distributed during July 1976. Basic editions are
published annually with no change bulletins.

NATIONAL SECURITY AGENCY PUBLICATION
A tailored hard copy IL has been compiled for the National Security
Agency. Basic editions are published annually in January with no change
bulletins.

SIGNIFICANT ACCOMPLISHMENTS/FUTURE PLANS
During this reporting period, DLA accomplished several objectives and
finalized plans to achieve increased responsiveness to customer
requirements. Among these were:
1. On I May 1978, it is expected that we will implement a
*.ignificant service-coordinated change to the Defense Integrated Data
System. This change basically will require wholesale manager concurrent
submittal of item identification and supply management data. It will
also improve compatibility between the source of supply and catalog
system files.
2. One study, to improve accessability of catalog data to the user,
included establishment of a remote terminal at the Aviation Supply
Office in Philadelphia linked to the Federal Catalog Data Base. This
live test provides a basis for future consideration of the feasibility,
cost and user satisfaction of developing Remote Terminal Access to the
Central Data Base by Federal Catalog System participants.
3. DoD is currently conducting a study on the adequacy of Federal
Catalog System publications. A series of visits to DoD/Civil Agency
activities has been made. Interviews with over 450 users of
publications were conducted as well as 4500 questionnaires to solicit
ideas for improvements. Analysis of information gained is now
in-process. A final report with recommendations will be forwarded to
OASD in 1978.
4. In their May 1977 meeting, the NATO Group of National Directors
on Codification appointed the United States as the Pilot Country for
assignment of NATO Standard Stock Numbers and selected the fuels area as
the first commodity to be covered. As a result, item identifications
were prepared for coordination with all NATO countries. Adoption of
this concept will result in one number for one item of supply in NATO,
thereby increasing inter-operability among NATO countries.
Additionally, the first procedures for international coordination of
changes to Federal Item Identification Guides/Item Identification Guides
(FIIGs/IIGs) were developed by the U.S. (DLA) and coordinated during FY
77. The implementation of these procedures will provide the means for
international exchange of coded characteristics data.
5. Effective January 1978)the U.S. will use other NATO countries'
Stock Numbers when the item is produced by a NATO country and used by
the U.S.






MILLIONS
5


4

3

2

1
0i


STATUS OF INTEGRATED MATERIEL MANAGEMENT IN THE DOD


:::::\\::::: WEAPONS INTEGRATED GRATED
MATER I EL MANAGER
SOTAL

.DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY

.... .... .- ........ C M
.. . . i.iii.iii.,..." II . .t . . . . ..! -


70 71 72


NON-INTEQ.
WIMM
DLA
CIMM GSA
TARCOM
TOTAL


INT.
MGT.


.76


1.939 1.778 0.573 0.567 0.479 0.461 0.463 ,0.475
0.040 0.059 1.257 1.221 1.292 1.311 1.318 1.324
1.747 1. I 753 1.732 1.735 13 .. 840 1.882 1.903 1.940
0.071 0.059 0.059 0. 066 0.063 0.071 0.075 0.079
0.052 0.052 0.049 0.048 0.047 0.048 0.048 0.050
3. 849 3.701 3.670 1 3.637 30726 3.773 3.807 3.868






FEDERAL CATALOGING SYSTEM TOTALS


NATO & OTHER GOV'T.
MGD. ITEMS 4
CIVIL AGENCY MGD.o
ITEMS 2


SYS.


1.S. GOV'I
)OD


FED. CAT. SYS.
ITEMS W/MGR.
U.S. GOV'T
DOD


70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77

6.261 6.474 5.983 5.948 -5.793 5.904 5.945 5.278
4.415 4.382 4.346 4.361 4.505 4.587 4.656 4.753
4. 156 4.072 3.974 3.941 4.037 4. 104 4. 139 4. 199
3.8473.726 .....773 3 368
387 3. 701 3. 670 13.6371 3. 726 3 7 .87 3 6


M ILLI ON S






12



STANDARDIZATION SECTION
ANNUAL REPORT


THE DEFENSE STANDARDIZATION PROGRAM:

The Defense Standardization Program has its genesis in Chapter 145,
Title 10, of the U. S. Code (Public Law 1028, 84th Congress). The
program requires the achievement of the highest practicable degree
in the standardization of items and practices applicable thereto used
throughout the Department of Defense. The program is implemented by
Department of Defense Directive 4120.3 and by Defense Standardization
Manual 4120.3-M. As a result of the recent reorganization of the
Office of the Secretary of Defense, the administration of this program
now rests with the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering.

SPECIFICATIONS AND STANDARDS APPLICATION AND TAILORING PRO"'RAM:

One of the major initiatives within the Defense Standardization Program
is the emphasis being placed on improving the development, preparation,
application and management of specifications and standards. The thrust
of this program is to tailor DoD requirements so as to encourage
technological advancement, make maximum use of commercial practices and
still maintain control over weapon system development. The last annual
report reviewed the background for this effort and identified several
actions initiated to ensure that standardization requirements applied to
defense acquisitiofis state only minimal, essential military needs. The
DoD "tailoring" efforts this past year expanded upon previous initiatives
and also broke ground in some related areas.

The overall approach towards improving the application and tailoring of
specifications and standards is two-directional. The initial direction
is focused on correcting the application of existing standardization
documents as used in defense acquisition. To establish the policies,
responsibilities and procedures governing the proper utilization of
specifications and standards, DoDD 4120.21, Specifications and Standards
Application, was issued in April 1977. In response to this directive, each
of the military departments developed implementing instructions for their
commands. The Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and
Engineering (OUSDR&E) is reviewing and assessing the. implementation of this
policy on major weapon systems. To date, these reviews have indicated -n
increasing improvement in the selective application of specification require-
ments. Difficulties still exist, however, in obtaining reco=endations
from contractors during the bidding process, in limiting specification
referencing and in extending the tailoring efforts from the prime contractor
to the subcontractors.

To guide program offices and contractors in effective specification
application and tailoring practicesq a DoD-wide handbook is being developed
for selecting, tailoring and applying specifications, standards and rei ted
requirements in the acquisition of military systems, subsystems and







13



equipment. Similarly$ DoD instructions regarding the preparation of the
Statement of Work provisions of a contracts including requirements
tailoring, are being developed and are scheduled for publication in 1978.

There has been considerable interest in the tailoring philosophy and
approach from program offices and defense suppliers. In response to this
interests four industry associations (American Defense Preparedness
Associations Aerospace Industries Association of America$ Electronics
Industries Associations and National Security Industrial Association) co-
sponsored two successful seminars on the "Selective Application and
Tailoring of Specifications and Standards for Defense Systems Acquisitions."
Several excellent recommendations for improving the acceptance and
effectiveness of the tailoring approach were generated from the
discussion groups. In addition, a DoD/Industry workshop was conducted
shortly after the seminars to develop application guidance and instructions
for ten specific standardization documents which are known to drive costs
when indiscriminately applied. The results from the seminars and workshops
are most promising and are currently being evaluated for implementation.

In conjunction with the effort to improve the application of specifications
and standards, a priority effort is underway to improve the content and
format of management and technology oriented specifications and standards
covering areas such as reliability, maintainability, quality assurance and
the like. Because of the potential for misinterpretation and misapplications
these non-product standardization documents have been identified as "cost
drivers" and singled out for specific attention. Consequently, program
management plans are being developed to organize each of the technology
areas, identify problem documents and requirements, define specific tasks to
correct the deficiencies and commit the necessary resources. Existing documents
within each of the technology disciplines are being evaluated for need,
technical and economic realism flexibility and tailorability, and compati-
bility with related (both government and industry) requirements. The final
outgrowth of these plans will be the elimination of excessively stringenL
requirements and the development of a new generation of.more flexible and
realistic specifications and standards.

To date, Reliability and the Packaging areas are covered by fully coordinrrted,
approved management plans. Similar plans for Configuration Management and
Human Factors are in the final stages of approval. Plans for other areas,
e.g., General Design Requirements, Environmental Requirements and Related
Test Methods$ Quality Control and Assurances Maintainability and Safety,
are undergoing similar development.

SCOPE OF THE DEFENSE STANDARDIZATION PROGRAM:

The Defense Standardization Program (DSP) encompasses the broad range of
equipments, parts, materials, processes and practices described in
specifications, standards, engineering drawings, and purchase description;
which are prepared and used by the Department of Defense activities. The






14


DoD Index of Specifications and Standards lists more than 439800 active
documents (37,700 in the military series and 4,800 in the Federal series
in addition to 1,676 industry standards which have been adopted for use by
DoD and have equal status.)

CONSOLIDATION OF DOCUMENTS:

Since passage of Public Law 436, 82nd Congress, 43,890 specifications and
standards have been consolidated into 1,830 specifications. During this
reporting period, 134 documents were consolidated into 72.

MAINTAINI1G DOCUMENTS CURRENT:

The program for reviewing and updating standardization documents continued
during the report period. Under this program, documents listed in the DoD
Index of Specifications and Standards which have not been acted upon for
five years or more are identified and reported to the proponent activity for
action. The proponent must either validate the document as currents
schedule a project to bring it up to date, or cancel the document, as
applicable.

During the year, a total of 4,414 documents were subjected to maintenance
review by the Services. Of these, 1,911 were validated as current and 477
were cancelled. A total of 1,748 have been or will be updated. through
revision or amendment. Disposition is pending on 278.

In all, there was a total of 3,880 documents processed in this period.
This included the preparation of news revised and amended specifications and
standards to implement standardization decisions to support new procurement,
or to bring about a general update of document coverage in accordance with
the maintenance program outlined above.

ITEM REDUCTION:

As a result of actions taken under the DSP to reduce the number of sizes$
kinds and types of items that are generally similar, there are now 149,143
stock numbered items which have been identified in the Federal Cataloging
records as "not to be procured." These items will eventually be cancelled by
cognizant supply managers. The number of items so identified increased
15,131 since the last report. A total of 6,211 were cancelled from the
system in the year.

COST REDUCTION THROUGH THE DOD PARTS CONTROL SYSTEM:

During CY 1977, the Military Departments and Defense Agencies published
instructions and regulations implementing the policies of DoD Instruction
4120.19, dated December 16, 1976s governing control of parts proliferation.
These implementing documents are mandatory on all program managers for use
on major weapon systems contracts where provisioning will occur and on any
other contract where life cycle benefits can be derived.







15



In this connection, MIL-STD-9651 dated 15 April 1977# establishing a single
integrated parts control procedure was approved and issued during this
reporting period. This military standard accomplished the following:
(I) consolidation of various unique parts control system procedures defined
in numerous documentsr (2) designation of the Military Parts Control Advisor'
Group (MPCAG) as a focal point for parts information and (3) formatting of
the document to permit tailoring of requirements for cost-effectiveness.

Another significant milestone achieved during the year was the development of
a MPCAG computerized data system at both the Defense Electronics Supply
Center and Defense Industrial Supply Center.. The system permits massive
parts control program data to be compiled and made accessible through
automated data control. This system also provides rapid interrogation
capability* automated item characteristic breakdown, management reports and
consistency of parts recommendations.

Due to the success of the program in the electronic and mechanical fastener
areas# the Parts Control Program has been extended to include other
categories of items such as gears and pulleys, bearings, pipe and tubing,
valves. seals and packing. Through this expansion, the DoD will control the
majority of the Federal Supply Classes where significant item growth has
been recorded.

The Department of Transportation has requested support from this program.
Expansion of this support to other goverruent agencies was recommended by
the Government Accounting Office in its report entitled, "Effective It=r
Entry Control Can Reduce Logistics Costs."

The Program has grown steadily in the past year and is now invoked in more
than 300 contracts. The electronics area remains the most active in the
program because of rapid technology advancement, with a reported cost
avoidance in the year of $121.7 million and a benefit to cost ratio ot 110
to 1. The second most active area, mechanical fasteners, achieved cost
avoidance of $11.4 million. Examples of programs receiving Parts Control
support are: XM-l Tankp F-16 and F-18 aircraft, and various electronic
systems and equipment contracts.

METRICATION:

Implementing documents were issued by the DoD Components promulgating the
policies in DoD Directive 4120.18, Use of the Metric System of Measurement.

Emphasis from the Congress to achieve greater standardization of equipment.,
components, and spare parts within NATO has resulted in consideration of the
use of metric units of measurement in many of our new weapon system prograimr..
For example, the Army has reported 12 programs that incorporate from 5 to lrJ)
percent metric design.

Two basic documents, DoD-STD-1476, Metric System, Application in New Systemic:,
and DoD-M-24680s Metric Machinery/Equipment, General Requirements fors wer:
developed and issued during CY 1977. These documents provide for newly d ,iTi
items to be metric, but allow components of those items to be in the custi. ry
measuremenl system when not economically available as metric designs.







16



To keep pace with the metric progress in the private sector, the Defense
Department participates in the technical committees of the American
National Metric Council.

Within the Federal Government, DoD has been an activeimember of the
metrication subcommittee of the Interagency Committee on Standards Policy
(ICSP). DoD Directive 4120.18 was used as the basis for a Guide developed
for use by other Federal Departments/Agencies in preparation of their policy
directives.

Approximately 100 design engineering specifications and standards are being
updated to include metric units of measurement. The Defense Industrial
Supply Center has been designated to manage a joint DoD/AIA/SAE log for
aerospace metric documentation needs. The DoD will prepare the required
specifications and standards for 56 of the 263 generic categories of
aerospace mechanical fasteners and hardware.

PARTICIPATION WITH INDUSTRY STANDARDIZATION ACTIVITIES:

The adoption and use of non-government specifications and standards has been
given continued emphasis. The DoD Instruction 4120.20 on Development and
Use of Non-Government Specifications and Standards was implemented within the
Services through the issuance of departmental regulations. These regulations
amplify the DoD policies emphasizing participation in the activities of non-
government standards producing bodies in the development of specifications and
standards. Participation during the development phase enhances the utility of
the document to the DoD. Existing industry documents that satisfy the
requirements of the DoD will be adopted to the maximum practical extent in lieu
of preparing or revising military documents. Department of Defense participa-
tion with industry has shown a significant increase with over 100 additional
documents adopted in the past year. The policy emphasis was reinforced through
publicity in major association periodicals and through participation in a
government/industry seminar specifically aimed at fostering greater participa-
tion., adoption, and use of non-government standards.

The seminar was originally suggested by the Department of Defense. It was
sponsored by the leading private standards producing organizations in the
U. S. Approximately 250 industry and government attendees participated in
panel discussions which centered around the goal of increased use of industry
standards by the DoD. and the solution of problems which will lead to such
use. The recommendations and suggestions generated were directed to both the
DoD and to private standards producing bodies.

INTERNATIONAL STANDARDIZATION EFFORTS:

The Defense Standardization Program continues in its efforts to support the
stated objectives of the Congress to improve standardization and inter-
operability within NATO. With respect to materiel standards, the Department
of Defense participates with NATO in their efforts to develop plans for the
development of needed NATO standards (STANAGS) in the areas of assemblies$







17



components, spare parts and materials (ACSM). The U. S. proposal to NATO
to form a Group of National Directors for Materiel Standardization as a
principal cadre planning group was approved early in 1977. This group,
identified as AC/301, has met three times and has accepted studies made by
the U. S. pertaining to materials$ hardware, electronic components and
engineering drafting practices. All of these studies identify a need for
STANAGS beyond the existing 300 which pertain to materiel. Consideration is
being given to the adoption by NATO of existing international non-government
standards which meet the need and requirements of the NATO alliance as a whole.
In the interim, the Department of Defense has recommended that a priority be
established for the development of STANAGS covering seven specific areas
proposed by the United States in 1975. These standards would cover (1) standard
electronic modules (2) metric screwthread forms (3) tires (metric sizes) for
ground vehicles, (4) slave receptacles for ground vehicles, (5) environmental
conditions and tests, (6) technical manual formats and (7) engineering
drafting practices.

The Army, Navy2 and Air Force continue to participate in standardization
agreements between America' Britain, Canada, and Australia (ABCA)
(including New Zealand for Air Force programs) in the long standing ABCA
programs of the English speaking nations. These programs have produced over
500 existing standards. These standards are routinely considered as a basis
for NATO STANAGS.

The Department of Defense is adopting private sector non-government standards
which conform to international standards as a means of conforming to incer-
nationally accepted materiel and engineering practices. Presently, 1,676 non-
government standards produced by U. S. technical and professional societies
have been adopted. Many, but not all$ of fhese adopted standards presently
conform to non-government international standards. This program will continue
to be given priority as a means of conforming to engineering and production
practices of the free world and to enhance the availability and exchange to
materiel through international trade.

RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND RECOVERY ACT:

The last annual report to the Congress explained in some detail the manner
in which the Defense Department has implemented that part of Section 6002 of
the Act which concerns the review of new and revised specifications for
conformance with the act. Specifically, the act requires that within eighteen
months from its date of enactments agencies will undertake a review of
specifications to identify and eliminate prohibitions in the use of recovered/
reclaimed material and to require the use of such materials to the maximum
extent possible without jeopardizing the intended use of the item. As was
explained in the earlier report, the Department of Defense has incorporated
the requirements of Section 6002 of the act into its existing Overage DocuL.ent
Review Program which prescribes that each specification or standard will Do
periodically reviewed for currency and continued need. An earlier section oF
this report reveals that 4,414 documents were reviewed tinder this pr 'grt in
the year. Of these, 1,911 were validated as current and in conformance wiLh
the act. In addition, 1S748 either have been or are scheduled for revision to







18



bring them current. including conformance with the act.

The following are representative examples of actions taken to further
the utilization of reclaimed/recovered materials:

Rebuilt Aircraft Tires. Rebuilt (retread) tires have been utilized by
the trucking industry and on low speed aircraft tires for many years. Rebuilt
tires have not previously been used on high speed/high performance type
aircraft due to relative inexperience in retreading procedures and actual
flight experience. All tire specifications and standards require dynamometer
testing, but very few actually require flight testing. In the year a military
standard was issued covering Service Suitability (Flight) Testing of Rebuilt
Navy Aircraft Tires$ which required designated high speed/high performance
aircraft tires to demonstrate actual flight capability prior to final
qualification approval. Flight testing the rebuilt F-4 MLG Tire (30x11.50
26 PR) in.accordance with this standard proved successful and led to the
issuance of Military Standard 14172 (AS) Tires Pneumatict Aircraft, Rebuilt$
30xli.50-14.50, Type III (Navy), Fabric Reinforced Tread. This tire when
purchased in lieu of the new tire should yield substantive percentage savings
per unit.

Specification MIL-W-003912 for Wood Parts and Wood Substitutes:
Fabricated for Transport Vehicle Bodies and Similar Applications. Revision C
has been completed to Military Specification MIL-W-003912 for wood parts and
wood substitutes. This revision was initiated as a result of a decision to
include a synthetic wood-like product into the specification.

MIL-P-46074B. Plastic Molding Material Cellulose Propionate. Revision
of this specification included modifying the requirements on inhibitor content,
clarifying wording on inspection of material and periodic lot check tests,
reducing number of test specimens required for some tests and improved control
of conditioning and test conditions. Reference to virgin material was deleted
in accordance with DoD policy and the paragraph expanded to allow use of
reclaimed material.

Procurement and Utilization of Remanufactured/Rebuilt Automotive
Truck Repair Comnonents and Assemblies (DCSC). Development of rebuild
standards and acceptance criteria for procurement of rebuilt remanufactured
vehicular components is active as reflected: Rebuild drawings have now been
prepared and approved to include vehicular engine water pumps, diesel
engine cylinder headss pressure plate assemblies# clutch discs$ gasoline
engines, transmissions, diesel engine cylinder heads (aluminum), non-powered
valves and torque converters. As of December 1977, 72 items have been procured
at a savings of $1,670,374. Approximately 793 have been selected for remanu-
factured/rebuilt procurements to date. There are four Canadian rebuild
manufacturers that have expressed interest in the rebuild program. Their
participation will be fully explored. A rebuild/remanufacture potential is
anticipated in the areas of engine governors and fuel injectors and this area
is now being investigated. Requests are being sent to those users for the
return of cores (reparable carcasses) for the rebuild program.







19



USE OF COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS:

In response to recent OFPP Policies dealing with the increased use of
commercial products by Federal agencies,9 the DoD has undertaken a number
of new programs to conform our acquisition practices to this objective.
One of the programs involves a series of test procurements in which new
methodology such as market research, acquisition strategy, alternative
technical descriptions and procurement methods will be explored and evaluated.
A significant goal in this program is the development of procedures and
practices which will avoid the preparation and use of Federal and Military
specifications wherever possible in the procurement of commercial products.
The program embraces a variety of test items including subsistence,
plumbing supplies, automotive gasoline threaded fasteners and selected
avionics equipment.

Coupled with this is a separate program that specifically addresses the
present body of military and federal specifications utilized by the Defense
Department. Under this program a review will be performed of all of those
specifications which are categorized in the Federal Supply Classes considered
to be predominantly commercial in nature. This review will involve the
analysis of approximately 8000 specifications to identify those that describe
a commercial item. Following that, action will be taken to revise the
specification to conform as nearly as possible to the commercial product and
commercial practice. Because of the magnitude of this review program,
it will be phased over several years with annual quantitative goals established.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


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