The Panama canal and its ports

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Title:
The Panama canal and its ports
Physical Description:
Book
Creator:
United States -- Board of Engineers for Rivers and Harbors
United States -- War Dept
United States -- Army. -- Corps of Engineers
United States -- Army. -- Office of the Chief of Engineers
Publisher:
U.S. Govt. Print. Off. ( Washington, D.C )
Publication Date:

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 20604869
oclc - 761850
System ID:
AA00022193:00001

Full Text
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THE PANAMA CANAL

SAND ITS PORTS
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PORT SERIES No. 40
2.-.. REVISED 1946

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CORPS OF ENGINEERS
UNITED STATES ARMY









CORPS OF ENGIEEq5, U S ARMY


WAR DEPARTMENT
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BOARD OF ENGINEER
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LOCATION MAP OF
PANAMA CANAL ZONE
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WAR DEPARTMENT


CORPS OF ENGINEERSUNITED STATES ARMY



PORT SERIES No. 40
(REVISED 1946)





THE PANAMA CANAL

AND ITS PORTS





PREPARED BY
THE BOARD OF ENGINEERS FOR RIVERS AND HARBORS
WAR DEPARTMENT


UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON: 1946









CONTENTS


Page


Port and harbor conditions:
Brief history -- - ---
General description --
Ports-- --- ------
Tides and tidal currents - -
Weather conditions ------
Anchorep- ------ - -
Port customs and regulations:
A 3.1-1 -J.__A. L_


Adm~uiis tra. LJ
Arriving anc
Documents
Quarantine r
Immigration
Exclusior
Exclusion
Customs -
Admeasuremer
Navigation c
General
Requireme
pass
Navigatic
Accidents
Radio com
Miscellar
Transportati
Explosive
Hazardous
Port services a
Quarantine


.on ---- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
departing vessels ------ ----
required -------------------------
*egulations ------------ -----

of undesirables----- ---------
of Chinese ---------------- ---

it of vessels -- -- -- -- -- -
f the Canal and adjacent waters-- --- - -

;nts concerning officers, crew, equipment and
;engers --- -------------- ----- --
n in Canal and harbors ---------
Sand claims ---------------
imunication ---------------------- -
leous
on of hazardous cargoes in Canal Zone waters
s g -- -- -- - ^H- u --- - .*- - w -- -
cargoes in bulk, other than explosives - -
nd charges:


Customs fees - -
Tolls --- --
Handlirng lines -
Fire protection -
Pilotage----
Dockage or wharfage
Cha-ges for mooring
Right of basin -
Towage - - -
Lighterage - -
Storage --------
Handling - -


to buoys -


Stevedoring and transferring cai
Labor ---------
Miscellaneous charges-- --


'go -


- - 63










C 0 N T E N T S Continued


Fuel and supplies:
Electric current -----------
Provisions --- ------------
Water supply --- -----------
Coal bunkering ------------
Oil bunkering --- ----------
Port and harbor facilities:
Piers, wharves, and docks at Cri
Piers, wharves, and docks at Ball
Freight-4randling machinery -- -
Storage warehouses ---------


65
65
66
66
69


0- 1. -


wouaeu ----------
oa ------------


DBu.k ireLgnh i a urg--- - - -- --- --
Dry docks and marine railways --- ----------
Marine repair plants ----- ----------------
Floating equipment ----- -----------------
Salvage equipment ----- -----------------
Conmmunicati ons:
Railroads- ------ --------------------
Panama Railroad Company freight classification al
Switching ------- --------------------
Storage ------------------
Car demurrage ------ ------------------
Steamship services ----- ---------------
Air lines ------- --------------------
Cables -------- ----------------------
Radio -------- ---------------------
Commerce:
Canal traffic ------ ------------------
Principal commodities transported ---------
The Panama Canal as a route for United States tr


------ 73
------ 80
------ 86
------ 88
------ 88
------ 88
------ 91
------ 93
------ 95


ad tariff


List of piers, wharves, and docks at Cristobal-----
List of piers, wharves, and docks at Balboa ----------


99
99
103
105
105
106
108
108
108


- -- 111
114
- -- 126
- -- 129
131


LIST OF I L U S T R A T IONS


Location map of Panama Canal Zone -----------
Atlantic entrance and Cristobal Harbor --- -----------
Gatun Locks ---------- -------------------------
Gaillard Cut, general view ------------------------
Gold Hill, Gaillard Cut ---------------
Pedro Miguel Locks -------- ---------------------
Panama Canal at entrance to Miraflores Lake -----------
Anchorage area and entrance channel at Atlantic entrance -
Anchorage area and entrance channel at Pacific entrance -
Piers Nos. 6, 7, and 8, Cristobal --------- -
General view of Cristobal terminals ---- -------------
Interior of shed on Pier No. 18, Balboa --- -----------
Dry dock at Cristobal ------- ---------------------
Floating crane "Hercules" at Gatun Locks -- -----------
Port facilities map of Cristobal- ---- ---------------
Port facilities map of Balboa -------------


- - Frontispiece.
2
2
2
2
2
2
8
9
72
- 72
- - 88
- 88
- 94
- 130
- 132


Page


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WAR DEPARTMENT
THE BOARD OF ENGINEERS FOR RIVERS AND HARBORS
WASHINGTON

11 September 1946

SIT3JEC1O: Report on the Panaza Canal and its Ports

TO: The Chief of Znrineers, United States Army

1. There is transmitted herewith a revised report on the Panama
Canal and its ports, prepared by the Board in furtherance of the objects
entrusted to the War Department by section 500 of the Transportation Act
of 1920.

2. The present report is published as 1o. 40 of the Port Series and
supersedes Port Series Io. 22, published in 1938. The information contained
in this report relative to the Canal and its two important terminals was
made available to this office largely through the courtesy of the Governor
of the Panama Canal. The report was compiled in this office under the super-
vision of MIr. Warren E. Graves, chief statistician, and was then reviewed
by the Governor of the Panama Canal.

3. On account of the value of the information contained in this re-
port to commerce and shipping, and to the successful operation of the mer-
chant marine, it is recormmended that it be published, with the accompanying
illustrations.

MOR THE BOARD:





Colonel, Corps of Engineer
Resident MIember


O.MICE OF THE CHIEF OF 1ITGINESS
11 September 1946

TO: The Board of Engineers for Rivers and Harbors, Washington, D, 0.

Approved.




R. A* VfflEuim
Lieutenant General
Chief of Engineers






IN T PRODUCT ION

This report on The Panama Canal and its Ports, published as No. 40 of the

Port Series, supersedes Port Series No. 22, issued in 1938. The reports of the

Port Series cover the principal ports of the United States and are prepared to

meet the needs of the War Department in its study and development of harbors

and it encouragement of port facilities and to furnish information needed by

commercial and shipping interests in the promotion and expansion of trade.

The Panama Canal is a route from one ocean to the other, some 10,000

nautical miles shorter than the distance around South American, through which

vessels may, with a maximum of safety and a minimum of delay, transport the

cargo offered. The ports of Cristolal and Balboa are adjuncts o" the Canal and

their functions are different in many respects from the functions of ports in

continental United States. They provide facilities for bunkering end repair of

vessels transiting the Canal, for the unloading and reloading of cargoes trans-

shipped from one vessel to another, and for the receipt of supplies and pro-

visions for the maintenance of the Canal or for use by Canal personnel.

While this report necessarily differs somewhat in scope and outline from

others in the Port Series, it is believed that shipping interests, importers,

exporters, and others having occasion to use the route either for through busi-

ness or for cargo to be transshipped at the Canal terminals will find it a

convenient source of reference. The report contains information relative to

the Canal and its traffic, the rules, regulations, and charges governing transit

of the Canal, and the facilities available, the services offered, and the

charges assessed at the two terminal ports.

Much of the information for the report was obtained from current tariffs

and publications of The Panama Canal, which also supplied data regarding the

facilities at the ports. The final report has been reviewed by the Governor,

The Panama Canal.















Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2013










http://archive.org/details/alitspo00u nit








THE PANAMA CANAL AND ITS PORTS



PORT AND HARBOR CONDITIONS

BRIEF HISTORY

As early as 1550 the nations of Europe had considered a passageway through

the Isthmus of Panama as a short cut to the Orient. Portugal, Spain, Holland,

and France all made plans to cut a canal, but all were forced through circum-

stances to relinquish their hopes. The French, under Count Ferdinand de Lesseps

actually started operations but, on account of insufficient funds and the ravage

of tropical fevers, were obliged to desist. Finally, in 1902, the United States

upon the advice of the Isthmian Canal Commission, offered the French $40,000,000C

for their concession and equipment. This offer was accepted and, after having

made treaties first with Colombia and subsequently with Panama, work on the

Canal was finally started in 1904. It was opened to commercial vessels on Au-

gust 15, 1914 and in 1920 President Wilson declared the work formally completed.

Up to that time a total of 240,000,000 cubic yards of earth had been excavated

and a total of $366,650,000, exclusive of appropriations for defense, had been

expended.

GENERAL DESCRIPTION

The Canal Zone is a strip of land and water extending a distance of ap-

proximately five miles on either side of the center line of the Panama Canal.

The Canal Zone begins in the Caribbean Sea three marine miles from the mean low

water mark and extends to and across the Isthmus of Panama into the Pacific

Ocean to a distance of three marine miles from the mean low water mark. In ad-

dition to the above area, the Canal Zone includes Gatun Lake and all its shore

line up to the 100-foot contour, an extension of the Fort Sherman Military Re-








servation at the mouth of the Chagres River, and the Madden Lake area in the

upper Chagres Valley including its shore line up to the 260-foot contour and

the land in the vicinity of Madden Dam. The treaties exclude from the Canal

Zone the city of Colon and its harbor on the Atlantic side and, on the Pacific

side, the city of Panama and its harbor and the "Sabanas Land" (located north-

east of Panama City) excepting Paitilla Point Military Reservation. The total

area of the Canal Zone is approximately 553 square miles, composed as follows:

Square Miles-
Land area- - -- -- -- --- -------------- --- 362.18
Water area (excluding water within the 3-mile limits)- 190.94

Total area of the Canal Zone --- -------------- --553.12

The noncontiguous Canal Zone area comprising Paitilla Point Military

Reservation is included in the above area. There are several small noncontig-

uous areas used for various outlying lighthouses, radio stations, etc., includ-

ing Fort de Lesseps in the city of Colon, which are not part of the Canal Zone

or included in the above area.

In transiting the Canal from the Atlantic to the Pacific a vessel passes

through a dredged channel 500 feet wide, 41.6 feet deep at mean low water, and

6.36 nautical miles long, leading to the Gatun Locks, the first of a series of

three locks. The Gatun Locks, which consist of three flights of chambers, raise

the vessel from sea level to Gatun Lake, a lift of 85 feet. These locks are

double, being 1.01 miles long and 110 feet wide. Each chamber is 1,000 feet

long, with intermediary gates which can shorten the length for smaller vessels

and thus conserve water. All operations are performed from a central control
I
station. The ship is moored to electrically-operated towing locomotives which

run on tracks on both sides, pulling the ship through and keeping it in position

so that it will not injure itself or the mechanism of the locks.

Once out of the Gatun Locks, the vessel proceeds under its own power


































Atlantic Entrance and Cristobal Harbor.


Gatun Locks.












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Photo by U. S. Army Air Service


Gaillard Cut, General View.


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Photo by U. S. Amy Air Service Pedro Miguel Lock.
Pedro Miguel Locks.


Photo by U. S Army Air Service
Panama Canal at Entrance to Miraflores Lake.












through a channel in Gatun Lake. This channel varies in width from 1,000 to

500 feet and from 85 to 45 feet in depth. It does not run in a straight line

through the lake, but follows the former valley of the Chagres River, the

waters of which have been impounded to form Gatun Lake. Having passed through

the lake, the vessel enters Gaillard Cut (Culebra Cut), a distance of 20.58

nautical miles from Gatun Locks. This cut is 300 feet wide, 45 feet deep, and

6.96 miles long.

At the Pacific end of Gaillard Cut the ship passes through Pedro Miguel

Locks, a single flight of double chambers. This flight of locks is 0.72 mile

long, with a drop of 31 feet to the level of Miraflores Lake.

After passing through Miraflores Lake in a channel 750 feet wide, 45 feet

deep, and 0.91 mile long, the ship enters Miraflores Locks, consisting of two

flights of double locks 0.90 mile long, with a drop of 54 feet, more or less,

depending upon the state of the tide, to the level of the Pacific Ocean.

The channel from Miraflores Locks to the Pacific is 500 feet wide, 42.4

feet deep at mean low water springs, and 6.99 nautical miles long. The total

length of the Canal from entrance to entrance is 44.42 nautical miles, and the

limiting depth at mean low tide is 41.6 feet.

PORTS

There are two ports of entry in the Canal Zone Cristobal on the Atlantic

side and Balboa on the Pacific. Cristobal is part of the harbor of Colon but

is under the Jurisdiction of the United States. Both ports are equipped with

piers, drydocks, and fueling facilities. A detailed description of these ports

will be found elsewhere in this volume.

TIDES AND TIDAL CURRENTS

The tides at the Atlantic and Pacific terminals of the Panama Canal pre-

sent decided contrast in both character and range. At Cristobal at the Atlantic
714755 0-46--2









terminal, the tides are very irregular and of the mixed type, diurnal for part

of each month and semidiurnal for the rest of the time, with a comparatively

small range, averaging less than one foot and seldom exceeding two feet. At

Balboa at the Pacific terminal, the tides are of the regular semidiurnal type,

with a mean range of 12.8 feet and with extreme spring ranges occasionally ex-

ceeding 21 feet.

The contrast in tidal ranges is reflected in the strength of tidal cur-

rents in the sea level stretches of the Canal but, unless the normal tidal cur-

rents are reinforced by wind and storm influences, they are not strong enough

to seriously interfere with navigation. At the Atlantic entrance, the tidal

flow extends to Gatun Locks, but currents due to tidal influences alone are

slight. Fresh northwest winds sometimes cause some current in Limon Bay setting

toward the docks, and spilling at Gatun Locks causes strong currents in the

channel immediately below the locks for a short time.

At the Pacific entrance, the tidal flow extends to Miraflores Locks and

currents of one knot or more are frequently observed but as they usually parallel

the Canal channel their importance in regard to navigation is minimized. The

maximum current observed in the Pacific entrance channel has been near the en-

trance to Balboa Harbor with a velocity of one and one-half knots at mean tide

for both the incoming and outgoing tides. Tidal currents are particularly

troublesome to ships docking at Docks 4, 6, 7, and 8 on account of the outline

of the channel and inner harbor basin. An outgoing or falling tide causes a

steady set directly toward the face of these docks, which during the dry season

months is reinforced by the effect of northerly trade winds. On the other hand,

an incoming or rising tide causes a steady set away from the docks. A strong

westerly set across the dredged channel to the southward of Flamenco Island,

particularly at spring tide, is also a frequent occurrence. Spilling at Mira-










flores Locks produces a strong current in the channel immediately below the locks

similar to the one experienced at Gatun.

Currents in the Gatun Lake section of the Panama Canal are not due to

tidal influences but may be caused by winds and flood inflow. They are seldom

strong enough to occasion any inconvenience to shipping. Currents in Gaillard

Cut are produced by drawing water at Pedro Miguel Locks and may attain a

strength of one and one-half knots. Minor currents are produced in Miraflores

Lake by several influences, including spilling at Pedro Miguel Locks, drawing

water at Miraflores Locks, and the operation of Miraflores spillway.

WEATHER CONDITIONS

The location of the Canal Zone less than 10 degrees from the Equator and

surrounded by warm tropical seas insures a warm, moist climate throughout the

year, with little variation in temperature. The northeast trades blow with

great regularity for the four-month period from January to April, averaging 15

miles per hour on the Atlantic side of the Isthmus and 10 miles per hour on the

Pacific side. This is the dry season with clear skies and only an occasional

rain shower. The weather for the remaining eight months of the year from May

to December is dominated by the Equatorial calms, with light variable winds

averaging eight miles per hour on the Atlantic side and six miles per hour on

the Pacific side. This is the rainy season with increased cloudiness and hu-

midity and copious rains.

The only general storms in the Canal Zone area are the flooding rain-

storms of the late rainy season and an occasional norther extending as far south

as the north coast of the Isthmus of Panama. Northers were a menace to sail-

ing vessels in Colon harbor for many years but, with the completion of the

breakwaters protecting Limon Bay in 1915, damage by these storms in the Canal

Zone has become negligible.








Climatological data covering annual values and including all available

records up to the year 1945 for Cristobal at the Atlantic terminal of the Canal

and for Balboa Heights at the Pacific terminal are given in the following tab-

ul&tion:

CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR THE CANAL ZONE

Cristobal Balboa Heights
(Atlantic coast) (Pacific coast)
Air temperature (degrees Fahrenheit)
Annual bihourly mean 80.1 78.8
Annual mean daily maximum 85.4 87.4
Annual mean daily mimimum 76.2 73.2
Annual mean daily range 9.2 14.2
Absolute highest on record 95 97
Absolute lowest on record 66 63
Relative humidity (percent)
Annual bihourly mean 82.3 83.1
Rainfall (inches)
Annual average 130.42 69.82
Annual maximum for calendar year 183.41 91.42
Annual minimum for calendar year 86.54 45.58
Wind velocity (miles per hour)
Annual average wind velocity 10.0 7.0
Maximum velocity on record (true) 38 NW 46 S
Average annual prevailing direction North Northwest
Sunshine (percentage of possible amount)
Annual average sunshine 53 49
Number of days
Annual average of days with rain 241 174
Annual average of clear days 39 31
Annual average of partly cloudy days 148 186
Annual average of cloudy days 179 148
Annual average of days with thunderstorms 96 84

ANCHuK/.GES

Except at design ited localities in Gatun Lake, no vessel is permitted to

anchor in any part of the Canal except in an emergency. The following areas for

merchant ship anchorage are designated:

Atlantic end.- Area immediately west of Canal channel line, bounded
on the south by line joining gas buoy No. 4 and a point A, 1,600 yards
due west of gas buoy No. 4; on the west by line extending 1,800 yards due
north of point A to point B; and on the north by line extending fro point
B to C0nal channel and parallel to west breakwater.

Gatun Lake anchorage basin.- Area immediately east of Canal channel







line, bounded by a line extending southeasterly from the east wing wall
at south end of Gatun Locks to spar buoy A, thence to spar buoy No. 1
and to spar buoy No. 3, thence southwesterly to the Canal channel line
at gas buoy No. 9.

Pacific end.- Area immediately northeast of Canal prism extension
and southeast of a line joining gas buoy No. 4 to Flamenco Island Light.

A vessel under 150 feet in length when at anchor shall carry forward where

it can best be seen a white light at a height not exceeding 20 feet aoove the

hull; and a vessel of 150 feet or upwards in length shall carry forward at a

height between 20 and 40 feet above the hull a white light and another at or near

the stern of the vessel not less than 15 feet lower than the forward light. These

white lights shall be of such power and so placed as to be visible all around the

horizon for a distance of at least 1 mile. A self-propelled vessel at anchor

must display by day, forward where it can best be seen, one black ball not less

than 2 feet in diameter.

Anchorages for vessels carrying explosives.- Vessels carrying explosive

cargoes, or highly volatile products, are required to anchor in the following

areas, and there await instructions:

Atlantic end.- Area included in rectangle 1,000 yards wide imimne-
diately south of west breakwater, starting at a point on west breakwater
1,000 yards from west breakwater light and thence extending westward 2,000
yards along breakwater.

Pacific end.- Area south of Naos Island bounded on the east by a
line drawn south (true) from entrance gas buoy No. 1; on the south by a
line drawn east (true) from Tortolita Island; and on the north and west
by the curve of 30-foot depth.

Such vessels are allowed alongside wharves of the Canal Zone only as pres-

cribed in regulations, and each case will be handled individually by the port cap-

tain concerned.

The merchant ship anchorage area in Gatun Lake is shown on the location map

of the Panama Canal Zone facing page 1. The merchant ship anchorage areas and

anchorages for vessels carrying explosives at the Atlantic and Pacific entrances

to the Canal are shown on the following charts:












ANCHORAGE AREA AND ENTRANCE CHANNEL

AT ATLANTIC ENTRANCE TO PANAMA CANAL
SCALE IN FEET
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50uNDING5 IN FEET AT MEAN LOW WATER


ANCHORAGE 39

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ANCHORAGE AREA AND ENTRANCE CHANNEL

AT PACIFIC ENTRANCE TO PANAMA CANAL

SCALE IN FEET
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SOUNDINGS IN FEET REDUCED TO MEAN LOW WATER SPRINGS


ANCHORAGE


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4 42
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40
32 42
42
3 EXPLOSIVES
35 537 4
ANCHORAGE
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PORT CUSTOMS AND REGULATIONS

ADMINISTRATION

Responsibility and control of the Canal organization are centered in the

Governor of The Panama Canal who is also President of the Panama Railroad Co.,

an adjunct of the Canal enterprise, organized as a Government-owned corpora-

tion. By Executive Order of 5 September 1939 the provisions of Section 13 of

the Panama Canal Act, approved 24 August 1912, were invoked as an emergency

measure, and since that date the Commanding General, Panama Canal Department,

United States Army, has exercised final authority over the operation of The

Panama Canal and all its adjuncts, appendants and appurtenances, including

control and government of the Canal Zone; and the Governor of The Panama Canal

has been subject to that authority and the orders issued under it.

The terminal ports of the Canal are administered for the Governor by the

marine superintendent, who is an officer of the line, United States Navy. He

is the chairman of the Board of Admeasurement, which consists of four members

and one recorder and is also in charge of the subdivision responsible for the

efficient functioning of all aids to navigation.

Under the marine superintendent are the captains of the ports of Cristobal

and Balboa, both officers of the line, United States Navy. They have under

their jurisdiction all pilots, crews of towboats, a harbor master, admeasurers,

signalmen, and dispatchers and are charged with the enforcement of regulations

relating to the navigation of the Canal, the terminal ports, and the waters ad-

jacent thereto and of harbor regulations pertaining to the berthing, mooring,

inspection, and admeasurement of vessels. They supervise the entrance and clear-

ance of all vessels at the terminal ports of the Canal Zone, denying entrance or

departure until all laws and regulations concerning quarantine, customs, immigra-

tion, navigation, tolls, and dues are complied with. They are required to keep

on hand a set of charts, a light list, sailing directions, and other usual data









needed for navigation; to be prepared to give information to masters and others

in relation to the navigation of the Canal waters and the usual steamship

routes; to assist in protection against fire in the harbors and along the water

fronts; to investigate all accidents or damages to vessels, floating equipment,

wharves, aids to navigation, etc., and as members of the local board of inspec-

tors, to report their findings to the Governor.

The Panama Railroad Co., through its receiving and forwarding agent, loads

and discharges all vessels using the ports of Cristobal or Balboa, except the

vessels of lines which have been granted permission to use their own stevedores

for this purpose.

ARRIVING AND DEPARTING VESSELS

Incoming vessels are boarded inside the Atlantic breakwater or off the sea-

ward edge of the dredged channel at the Pacific entrance by a boarding party

consisting of the pilot, the quarantine officer, the customs officer, and the

admeasurer. All members of the boarding party comply strictly with instruc-

tions from the quarantine officer until free pratique has been granted and

pilots are not permitted to bring ships to the pier until this has been done.

Vessels arriving between sunrise and 10 p.m. will be boarded on arrival

and those arriving after 10 p.m. will be boarded at sunrise the following morn-

ing. For a vessel boarded between sunset and 10 p.m. a charge will be made for

quarantine inspection at rates fixed by the Governor, and such boarding and

inspection will be made unless specific request to the contrary is made by the

vessel or its agents prior to its being sighted. For a vessel which is arriv-

ing for the first time in Canal Zone waters the night boarding and inspection

may be declined subsequently to its being sighted, provided such vessel has no

designated agent in the Canal Zone or the Republic of Panama. The final dis-

position of vessels inspected after sunset may be deferred in the discretion of





13


the quarantine officer. A vessel from a port subject to yellow-fever quaran-

tine will not be released from quarantine until the vessel and all persons on

board have been inspected by daylight.

Every vessel must hoist its- designation signal when approaching and enter-

ing a terminal port, and those arriving at night shall signal promptly their

names by flashlight to the signal station. When a vessel is not boarded im-

mediately on arrival it shall anchor and await the boarding party in the board-

ing area designated by the Governor.

Documents required.- Regulation 12.1 of the Rules and Regulations Govern-

ing Navigation of the Panama Canal requires ships to have the following documents

ready for immediate delivery to the boarding party.

Ships transit- Ships taking
ing Canal with- on or discharg-
out taking on ing passengers
or discharging or cargo at
passengers or Canal ports
~~~~____~~~____________________cargo.
(a) Ship's information sheet (Panama Canal Form) 1 1
(b) Clearance from last port 1 (1) 1 ()
(d) Quarantine declaration (International Stand-
ard Form) 3 3
(e) All other certificates of a sanitary nature 1 (1) 1 (1)
(f) Passenger list (on Panama Canal Form) 4 4
(g) Chinese descriptive list, passengers and
crew 1 (3) 2 (3)
(h) Crew list 2 2
(i) Store list 1 (4) 1
(j) Cargo declaration (Panama Canal Form) 1 1 (5)
(k) Manifest of local cargo 0 4
(1) Declaration of explosive cargo carried 1 (3) 1 (3)
(m) Declaration of inflammable or combustible
liquids in bulk carried as cargo 1 (3) 1 (3)
(n) Statement of fuel account (for vessels in
ballast only) 1 1(5)
(o) Panama Canal tonnage certificate 1 1 (5)
(p) National register 1 (1) 1 (1)
(q) General arrangement plan of vessel 1 (6) 1 (5)
(r) Report of structural alterations and of
changes in use of tanks or other spaces
since last transit 1 1 (5)
(a) Information cards for disembarking passen-
gers as provided in Regulation 12.3








Footnotes and notes to preceding table:
(1) For examination only.
(3) Not required unless such persons or cargo are carried.
(4) Required if ship during transit is laid up for repairs, regard-
lesu of whether passengers or cargo are taken on or discharged.
(5) Not required unless ship transits Canal.
(6) For taking up and subsequent return through agent or otherwise.

NOTE 1.- In case a vessel takes on or discharges passengers or
cargo at only one Canal Zone port and does not transit the Canal, the doc-
uments to the number indicated in the second column are required. In
case a ship docks or takes on or discharges passengers or cargo at both
Cristobal and Balboa, or at a port other than the port of entry, all doc-
uments to the number indicated in the second column will be required at
the first port and, in addition, four copies of document (f), three copies
of document (h), and documents (g), (i), and (k) to the number indicated
in the second column will be required at the second port.

NOTE 2.- Crew list; copy for American consular officer.- Under the
regulations governing the control of persons entering and leaving the
United States issued by the Secretary of State on November 19, 1941, pur-
suant to authority contained in the Act of May 22, 1918 (40 Stat. 559) as
amended by the Act of June 21, 1941 (55 Stat. 252) and Proclamation No.
2523 issued by the President of the United States on November 14, 1941,
no alien may enter the Canal Zone unless he is in possession of a valid
unexpired "permit to enter;'," or is exempted under such regulations from
presenting a "permit to enter," which term includes an immigration visa,
a reentry permit, a passport visa, a transit certificate, a border cross-
ing identification card, a crew list visa, or any other document which
may be re uired under authority of law for entry into the United States.
When it is contemplated that entrance of alien seamen into the Canal Zone
is to be authorized by a crew list visa, an additional copy of the crew
list should be prepared for retention by the consular officer by whom the
crew list is visaed.

NOTE 3.- Crew list to include identification numbers of seamen.-
For purposes of additional identification of crew members, all copies of
the crew list required by Regulations 12.1 and 12.4 should include for
each seaman to whom a certificate of identification or a continuous dis-
charge book has been issued as provided by law (46 U.S.C. 643), the serial
number of such certificate of identification ("Z" number) or continuous
discharge book.

NOTE 4.- Entry of alien seamen into Canal Zone.- Executive Order
No. 9352 of June 15, 1943 (8 F.R. 8209), the provisions of which are appli-
cable to the entry of alien seamen into the Canal Zone, is here published
for the information and guidance of all concerned.

Part I.- Requirements of Crew-List Visas and Seamen Documentation
Masters of maritime vessels (except government vessels and such other
vessels as the Secretary of State, in his discretion, may indicate) of all
nationalities sailing for a port of the United States must submit for visa
a list of all the alien members of the vessel's crew to the American consular










officer at the port from which the vessel commences its voyage. If there
is no consular officer stationed at that port, but if there is one sta-
tioned at a nearby place to whom the list may be submitted by mail for visa
without delaying the vessel's departure, the list must be so submitted for
visa. If there is no American consular officer stationed nearby the list
must be submitted for visa at the first port of call where an American con-
sular officer is stationed, but if the vessel does not call at any such
port, no visa of the crew list will be required. The visa of a shipping
commissioner in the Canal Zone shall be equivalent to the visa of an Ameri-
can consular officer, but a consular agent is not authorized to visa crew
lists. The visaed crew list must be delivered to the immigration authori-
ties or, where there is no representative of the Immigration and Naturali-
zation Service of the Department of Justice, to the appropriate officer of
the boarding rarty at the vessel's first port of call in the United States.

Alien seamen whose names are not on a visaed crew list when a visaed
crew list is required of the vessel on which they arrive at a port of the
United States shall not be allowed to land without the permission of the
Secretary of State, except that for such seamen arriving at a port in the
Virgin Islands the Governor thereof is authorized to grant temporary landing
privileges and for such seamen arriving at a port in the Canal Zone the
Governor of The Panama Canal is authorized to grant temporary landing priv-
ileges.

An alien seaman who is not exempt from the passport and visa require-
ments under Part II hereof shall be required to present an identifying travel
document in the nature of a passport, showing his nationality and identity
and bearing his photograph, before he may be granted shore leave for any
purpose, unless the possession of such an identifying travel document is
waived by the Secretary of State, except that for such a seaman arriving at
a port in the Virgin Islands the Governor thereof may grant such waiver and
for such a seaman arriving at a port of the Canal Zone the Governor of The
Panama Canal may grant such waiver. The disposition o" such documents after
presentation shall be subject to regulations.

Part II. Seamen Entering Other than as Crew Members

Alien seamen whose occupational status as such is found to be bona
fide, entering the United States as passengers or workaways solely in pur-
suit of their calling as seamen, shall be exempt from the crew-list visa or
other non-immigrant visa requirements for such period and under such condi-
tions as the Secretary of State, in his discretion, may prescribe if they
arrive in the United States under the following circumstances:
(a) Shipwrecked or castaway seamen rescued by, or transferred
at sea to, a vessel bound for an American port:
(b) Seamen who are American consular passengers or who are
repatriated without ex-oense to the Government of the Unitea States follow-
ing, and in accordance with the terms of their discharge In a foreign port
before an American consular officer;
(c) Seamen who were members of the crew of an American vessel
which has been sold or delivered abroad when the contract of their employ-*
ment provides for the return of the crew or when the laws of the United
States provide for their return to an American port.









Part III. Returning Immigrant Seamen


Alien seamen who, previously, have been lawfully admitted into the
United States for permanent residence, who are returning to an unrelinquished
domicile in the United States an(. who are not inadmissible into the United
States under the immigration laws, may be permitted to land as returning
residents without re-entry permits or non-quota immigration visas issued
under section 4 (b) of the Immigration Act of 1924, notwithstanding the fact
that they may be included in crew-list visas.

Part IV. Provisions for Additional Rules and Regulations

The Secretary of State and the Attorney General are hereby authorized
to make such additional rules and regulations, not inconsistent with this
order, as they may deem necessary for carrying out the provisions of this
order and the statutes mentioned herein, within their respective jurisdic-
tions.
Part V.



As used in this order, the term "United States" includes all territory
and waters, continental or insular, subject to the jurisdiction of the
United States.

Regulation 12.2. Incoming passenger list. The four copies of the
incoming passenger list, required by Regulation 12.1, shall be accurate are
legible and shall be delivered to the customs officer in the boarding narty.
In the event that any passengers destined to local ports fail to disembark,
or that passengers in transit do disembark at local ports, notice thereof
shall be given promptly to the chief of customs and the quarantine officer
at the port, and four copies of a supplementary passenger list showing the
names of such passengers shall be furnished promptly to the chier of customs.

Regulation 12.3. Information cards for disembarking passengers. -
One copy of an information card (Panama Canal form) is required for each
p renger proposing to disembark at a Canal Zone port, except that no such
card is required for a Panamanian citizen. This card shall be filled in
on the typewriter before arrival at the Canal, shall be signed by the
passenger in the presence of the quarantine officer and be presented to
that officer.

Outgoing vessels are cleared by the port captain, or by such other officer

of The Panama Canal as may be designated by the Governor, after he has ascer-

tained that all documents and statistical data required by the Canal authorities

in regard to vessel, cargo, and passengers have been furnished; that all tolls

qnd other bills for services and suoplies furnished by The Panama Canal or

the Panama Rnilroad Co. have been oaid, or their payment has been secured;









and that the vessel has complied with the quarantine, customs and exclusion

laws, rules, and regulations of the Canal, and the laws, rules, and regulations

governing the shipping, discharging, and protection of seamen. In this connec-

tion, Regulation 13.1 is quoted below:

Regulation 13.1 Outgoing passenger list.- Four accurate and legible
copies of the outgoing passenger list must be furnished to the chief of cus-
toms before clearance will be issued. Four copies of a supplementary pas-
senger list shall be furnished for passengers embarking at the second Canal
port after a vessel has sailed from the other port. Notice shall be given
promptly to the chief o" customs of any outgoing passengers who fail to de-
part on the vessel, and a list of such passengers shall be furnished in
quadruplicate. In the event the failure of a passenger or passengers to
depart on the vessel is not discovered until the vessel has left port the
notice provided for herein shall be given by radio if possible, and if it is
impossible to give such notice by radio then it shall be given by mail from
the first port of call.

QUARANTINE REGULATIONS

The Division of Quarantine of the Health Department, which is administered

by a chief quarantine officer and quarantine officers appointed by the Governor,

is charged with the enforcement of quarantine rules and regulations in Canal Zone

waters and in the harbors o' Panama and Colon, Republic of Panama, and on vessels

present in those waters and harbors. It is authorized to adopt such measures in

regard to vessels, crews, passengers, and cargoes as may be necessary to protect
the Canal Zone and the cities of Panama and Colon, Republic of Panama, from quar-

antinable diseases of men and animals, to grant pratique, to certify bills of

health, to carry out at the request of the interest controlling a vessel any san-

itary measures necessary to put the vessel in such condition that it may leave

port with a clean bill o" health, and to perform such other duties as may be

assigned to it by proper authority.

Detailed rules and regulations governing quarantine are published by The

Panama Canal in "Rules and Regulations Governing Navigation of the Canal and

Adjacent Waters." A digest of some of the more important rules and regulations










is presented below:

All vessels and their passengers and crews arriving at the ports of
the Canal Zone or of the cities of Panama and Colon, Republic of Panama,
except those clearing from ports of the Republic of Panama which are known
by the quarantine officers to be free from quarantinable disease, shall be
in quarantine until released by the quarantine officer. A yellow flag
shall be flown at the foremast or a vessel in quarantine until the quar-
antine officer gives permission to lower it. Any of the ship's records
considered necessary, including cargo manifests, clinical records, certifi-
cates of a sanitary nature, crew and passenger lists, and the ship's log,
may be examined by the quarantine officer. The crew and passengers may
be inspected and checked with the lists.

Except with the permission of the quarantine officer, no floating
craft may be brought within 200 yards of a vessel in quarantine, no vessel
in quarantine shall be docked, no person or article shall be allowed to go
aboard or leave a vessel in quarantine, and vessels in quarantine shall not
be moved.

Masters of vessels shall arrange for inspection of the vessel, cargo,
crew, and passengers by the quarantine officer and shall comply with in-
structions from him regarding detention of crew and passengers, disinfec-
tion, fumigation, and other sanitary matters.

When quarantine inspection has been completed, the quarantine officer
shall grant either free pratique or provisional pratique, or shall detain
the vessel in quarantine. Free pratique authorizes the vessel to transit
the canal, to dock, to communicate with the shore, to take on and discharge
passengers and cargo, and to do such other things as are legal and custom-
ary. Provisional pratique authorizes the vessel to do or requires it to
abstain from doing certain specified things. Supplementary inspections
are made by the quarantine officer or his assistant to see that instructions
issued in the provisional pratique are carried out.

Every case of illness on any vessel in Canal Zone waters or in the
ports of Panama or Colon, Republic of Panama, must be reported immediately
to the quarantine officer whether the ship is in quarantine or not. The
quarantine officer is authorized to place quarantine guards on any vessel
in Canal Zone waters or in the ports of Panama or Colon. The master of a
vessel is strictly responsible for the observation of quarantine rules
and regulations affecting his vessel, cargo, crew, or passengers, even
though there are quarantine officers or guards on board.

Vessels of the naval service of any nation may, at the discretion
of the chief quarantine officer, be granted free pratique without quaran-
tine inspection under conditions set forth in the published rules and
regulations. Provisional pratique may be granted to vessels other than
naval vessels, at the discretion of the quarantine officer, when a request
therefore reaches him between the hours of 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. on the day
before pratique is desired, giving the names of the ports visited in the
last 10 days and containing a statement to the effect that there is no
sickness on board and that the vessel intends to transit the Canal without











taking on or landing either cargo or passengers. Provisional pratique
shall not be considered granted until reply to that effect has been
received by the master from the chief quarantine officer.

Before a vessel is allowed to proceed through the Panama Canal or
to leave a port of the Canal Zone, the quarantine officer shall furnish
to the master a certificate of pratique or its equivalent in the form of
a radio message.

A vessel may be detained in quarantine if there is or has been dur-
ing the voyage a quarantinable disease on board; if the quarantine officer
believes the vessel or its crew, passengers, or cargo to be infected with
quarantinable disease; if the vessel has received on board any person or
article from another vessel subject to quarantine; or if the quarantine
officer considers that the conditions on the vessel in any other respects
are such as to endanger the health of persons or animals in the Canal Zone
or in the cities of Panama and Colon, Republic o" Panama.

The quarantine officer is authorized to detain in quarantine any or
all of the crew and passengers of a vessel, or any other person, considered
to have been exposed to infection, and any or all cargo infected with a
quarantinable disease. Persons in quarantine infected with a communicable
disease not specified as quarantinable, and those exposed to infection from
such persons, may be detained until disposition is directed by the chief
health officer. The chief quarantine officer is authorized to remove
persons sick in quarantine to any hospital and to direct that they be held
in strict isolation. No one shall be released from detention until the
prescribed period has expired, unless such release is directed by the chief
quarantine officer.

Subsistence, lodging, and hospital care of crews or passengers de-
tained in quarantine shall be at the interest of those controlling the vessel.

The quarantine officer is authorized to cause the removal of all
cargo from a vessel to effect fumigation or disinfection of either the
cargo or the vessel.

The quarantinable diseases of oersons and the prescribed detention
period for each are as follows: Cholera, 5 days; yellow fever, 6 days;
bubonic plague, 7 days; smallpox, 14 days; typhus fever, 12 days; leprosy
and anthrax, indefinite. The quarantinable diseases o' animals are gland-
ers, anthrax, tuberculosis, 1'oot-and-mouth disease, contagious pluero-
pneumonia, rinderpest, and surra. Other diseases may be declared quaran-
tinable by the Governor from time to time.

Detailed provisions regarding the vessels to be considered infected
or free from infection of the quarantinable diseases ol persons are published
in "Rules and Regulations Governing the Na-igation of the Canal and Adjacent
Waters."
714755 0--46--:






20


Vessels, except those from ports of the Republic of Panama which
are known by the quarantine officer to be free from quarantinable disease,
shall exercise precautions to prevent the coming ashore of rats or other
rodents, as follows,- Thc vessel shall be breasted off in such manner
that no part of it is nearer than 4 feet to the wharf or to any other ves-
sel; irmmediately after docking, rat guards in good condition and of anoroved
design shall be placed on all mooring lines and shall be secured so as to
prevent rats from naEsinr along the lines and shall be so Located as not
to overhang the wharf or another vessel or be nearer thereto than 3 feet.
Such rat guards shall be maintained on the lines as long as the vessel
remains at the vharf. All freight gangways, save-alls, catch-alls, cargo
chutes, hose and other gear which might serve as a route of passage for
rats from the vessel shall be hoisted when not in use to render nass .pe
o4' rats impossible. Such gear may remain unhoisted for short intervals
during the daytime if watchmen are stationed to prevent rats from leaving
;lonr it. When it is necessary to leave gangways down after nightfall,
they must be continuously guarded by watchmen.

Vessels will be fumigated for the destruction of rodents, as follows:
(a) A vessel which calls at a l:--:-ue-infected port and there takes on cargo
and which has as its terminal port a port of the Canal Zone or the port of
Panama or Colon, Republic of Panama, will be fumigated every trip. If no
cirgpo is taken on at the plague-infected port, fumigation will not be
required more than every three months. (b) A vessel which calls at a
plague-infected port and which does not have as its terminal Dort a port
of the Cinal Zone or the port of Panama or Colon, and which takes on or
discharges cargo in the Canal Zone or in the oort of Panama or Colon,
will be fumigated every 6 months unless the master produces a certificate
showing that fumigation has been performed within 6 months. (c) A vessel,
irrespective of ports of call, will be fumigated at least once a year
unless the master produces a certificate showing that fumigation has
been performed within a year. Unless the quarantine officer certifies
that it is not necessary, no vessel shall be placed in a dry dock with-
out a fumigation for the destruction of rodents subsequent to its arrival
in Panama Canal waters.

The Governor is authorized to prescribe regulations concerning quar-
antine inspection and detention or aircraft entering the Canal Zone or the
cities of Panama and Colon, Reoublic of Panama, and of persons carried
thereon.

Aircraft arriving at the Canal Zone or the cities of Panama or Colon
from territory beyond the borders of the Republic of Panama shall be con-
sidered to be in quarantine until given pratique by the quarantine officer.
Such aircraft shall remain in the section of the landin1f field on which they
alight until inspected, and no person or cargo shall be allowed to enter
or leave the immediate area of landing until pratique has been granted.












The port captains will deny the entrance or departure of vessels until all

laws and regulations concerning im-igration are complied with. Detailed rules

and regulations governing the exclusion of undesirables and of Chinese are pub-

lished in "Rules and Regulations Governing Navigation of the Canal" which should

be consulted for complete information.

Exclusion of Undesirables

The rules and regulations governing the exclusion of undesirables are ad-

ministered under the direction of the Chief Health Officer by the Division of

Quarantine and Immigration of the Health Department. The rules and regulations

governing deportation of persons are administered under the direction of the Ex-

ecutive Secretary by the Police and Fire Division. Some of the more important

provisions are as follows:

The following classes of persons are forbidden to enter, remain upon
or pass over any part of the Canal Zone, and the Governor is authorized to
deport such persons found within the Zone:- Insane persons, idiots, feeble-
minded persons, epileptics, those afflicted with a loathsome or contagious
disease, persons convicted of or who admit having committed a felony, crime
or misdemeanor involving moral turpitude, professional beggars, paupers,
anarchists, persons who engage in strikes against the Government or in any
strike which will interfere with or obstruct the operation or government of
the Canal or Canal Zone, and any person whose presence would be a menace to
the public health or to the welfare of the Canal Zone, or who would obstruct
the operation, sanitation, government, or protection of the Pana.aa Canal or
the Canal Zone.

The owner or interest controlling a vessel bringing into the Canal
Zone a person of any of the classes forbidden to enter shall return such
person to his port of embarkation. The cost of excluding or deporting is a
charge against the person or interest responsible for bringing the undesir-
able person into the Canal Zone. Such cost includes expenoi' incident to
detention, maintenance, transportation, and transportation of baggage, as
well as the actual cost of deportation. Clearance niay be withheld from a
vessel until such costs have been paid.

The master of a vessel ovnea or controlled by the same interests as
a vessel which has brought to the Canal Zone a person subject to exclusion
shall be required to receive such person on board at such time prior to the
date of sailing of his vessel as may be decided by the Canal authorities.


iiIGl.TlLu









It is the duty of the owner, agent, and officers of any vessel bring-
ing to the Canal Zone any person of the classes forbidden to enter to adopt
the necessary precautions to prevent the landing of such person other than
as permitted and designated by the Canal authorities.

All vessels arriving at ports of the Canal Zone or of the cities of
Panama and Colon, Republic of Panama, shall specifically declare all per-
sons on their passenger or crew lists who are being deportef-d from or re-
patriated to any country.

Exclusion of Chinese

Rules governing the exclusion of Chinese are administered by the Bureau of

Customs. The purpose of the rules is to prevent the entry through the Canal Zone

into the Republic of Panama of Chinese persons who are forbidden by the laws of

the Republic of Panama to enter that country. The following digest of the rules

and regulations contains some of the important provisions.

No Chinese person, without regard to his nationality, is allowed to
enter into or remain in the Canal Zone, with the following exceptions:-
Diplomatic and consular agents of the Chinese Government, upon showing
proof of their official character; Chinese persons legally residents of the
Canal Zone, or of the Republic of Panama; domestic servants employed by
personnel of the United States Army and Navy stationed in the Canal Zone,
when such employment has the approvLl of the Governor; those whose serv-
ices have been contracted for by the United States, The Panama Canal, or
the Panama Railroad Company; any Chinese person coming into the Canal Zone
by specific authority of the Governor.

The owner or interest controlling a vessel bringing into the Canal
Zone a Chinese person of the excluded class shall return such person to
his port of embarkation and, when re uired by the Canal authorities, such
owner or interest shall return a certificate to said authorities certify-
ing that the excluded person has been landed at said port. The cost of
excluding or deporting Chinese is a charge against the person or interest
responsible for bringing such Chinese into the Canal Zone. Such costs in-
clude expenses incident to detention, maintenance, transportation, and
transportation of baggage, as well as actual cost of deportation. Clear-
ance may be withheld from the vessel until such costs have been paid or
their payment has been secured. The master of a vessel owned or controlled
by the same interests as a vessel which has brought to the Canal Zone any
Chinese person subject to exclusion shall be required to receive such Chi-
nese person on board prior to the date of sailing of his vessel as may be
decided upon by the Canal authorities.

The master of a vessel from a foreign port, with one .) more Chinese
person., on board, shall deliver to the designated officia-L of The Panama
Canal a descriptive list of all Chinese persons on board his vosbel at the
tinie of its arrival in the Canal Zone. Such list shall contain the names
of all Chinese persons on board as shown by the ship's papers, and shall









be subscribed and sworn to by the master.


The master of a vessel carrying Chinese as members of its crew shall
have in his possession passports or other identification papers covering
each Chinese seaman, giving the name of the seaman as shown on the articles,
the date and place of birth, specifying the town and province, height, any
distinguishing marks or characteristics, occupation, and signature of the
seaman in Chinese, also a photograph and the right thumb print of the seaman.

Identification papers or passports of Chinese seamen shall be avail-
able for inspection upon arrival of a vessel at a Canal Zone port and when
the vessel remains in port 24 hours or more all Chinese identification papers
shall be delivered to the chief of customs for custody, to be returned to the
master after his crew has been checked and found to be aboard prior to the
sailing of the vessel. Chinese members of crews for whom proper passports
or other identification papers are not available may be removed from the ves-
sel and detained at the expense of the vessel in the local jail or quarantine
station until the vessel is ready to depart or the master has prepared and
presented suitable identification papers.

Chinese persons from foreign ports may be allowed to enter the Canal
Zone in transit to other countries under regulations established by the
Governor. Such transients destined for the Republic of Panama shall not
be released in the Canal Zone unless the consent of the authorities of the
Republic of Panama is first obtained for their entry into that Republic.

Chinese persons entering the Canal Zone for transit and Chinese mem-
bers of a vessel's crew discharged in the Canal Zone under authority of
the Governor may remain temporarily in the Canal Zone until a reshipment
is obtained for them, provided a satisfactory bond, not to exceed OO, is
executed by or in behalf of such Chinese person, conditioned that the prin-
cipal in the bond will obtain a reshipment and leave the Canal Zone at the
date fixed by the Canal authorities.

Vessels or interests responsible for the temporary entry of Chinese
persons into the Canal Zone in transit may be required to give bond that
such Chinese will continue their journey within such reasonable time as
the proper authorities determine, or will return to their port of embarka-
tion in case their journey is not continued. The vessel upon which Chinese
in transit depart shall be held responsible for the maintenance and return
to the port of embarkation of any Chinese refused admission at port of des-
tination and for that or any other- reason returned to the Canal Zone.

It is the duty or owners, agents and officers o" vessels bringing to
the Canal Zone any Chinese person of the excluded class to adopt the neces-
sary precautions to prevent the landing of such persons at any +ime or
place other than as permitted and designated by the Canal authorities; and
any such owner, agent, or officer who shall land, or through negligence per-
mit to land, any Chinese person contrary to the provisions in the governing
rules and regulations shall be subject to a fine not to exceed $500 or to im-
prisonment not to exceed one year, or to both such fine and imprisonment.






24


.-U L .1 ,13

The ports of the Panama Canal have certain characteristics of both Amer-

ican and foreign port.. So far as the United States customs is concerned, the

Canal ports are considered foreign and invoices are issued by the Canal customs

authorities. Customs fees are shown on page 36.

The following is a digest of the rules and regulations for the administra-

tion of the customs service at the ports of the Canal Zone as published in "Riles

and Regulations Governing Navigation of the Canal and Adjacent Waters."

Vessels may enter the ports of Balboa and Cristobal on the report
of the customs boarding officer and it is not necessary for the master to
come ashore for this purpose. A transiting ship entering at Balboa is re-
quired to clear from the port of Cristobal, and vice versa.

The ports of Balboa and Cristobal are entirely under the jurisdic-
tion of the United States Government, and no vessels discharging cargo at
these ports, even when a part of the cargo is consigned to the Republic of
Panama need produce a "sobordo" or manifest certified by the Panamanian
consul at the port of shipment. Masters must certify four copies of mani-
fest of local cargo.

Two copies of the manifest of all cargo exported are required to be
furnished the customs; however, with the consent of the customs previously
obtained, thoy may be furnished through an agency on the Isthmus within 48
hours after the clearance of the vessel.

Passengers and baggage are not permitted to land at any place other
than the regular piers at Cristobal or at Pier 18 at Balboa, except with
the consent of the customs previously obtained. They are permitted to land
only in the presence and under the supervision of a customs officer. Two
copies of the list of outgoing passengers are required by the customs before
clearance.

Regular customs hours are from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Customs inspection of
passengers' ba.igage between 6 p.m. and 7 a.m. and on Sundays and holidays
will be performed only upon re uest of the master or authorized agent of a
vessel and will be charged at rates stated in the Panama Canal Tariff.

Public or chartered vessels of foreign governments, other than men-
of-war, may be required to certify as to the passengers or troops on board,
the character Lnd kind of cargo, and manifests and lists of passengers em-
barked or discharged in the Canal Zone.

General powers of search, seizure and arrest are conferred on customs
offices, including deputy shipping commissioners and boarding officers,
when performing customs duties. Any articles brought into or obtained in





25



the Canal Zone in violation of customs regulations may be seized and held
by a customs officer; and, unless the duty is waived or the articles are
proved to be entitled to free entry within a period of 30 days from date
of seizure, such articles may be forfeited.

If a vessel arriving from a foreign port is found to have on board
merchandise not manifested, the master is liable to a penalty equal to
the value of the merchandise not manifested, and all such merchandise be-
longing to or consigned to or for the officers or crew of the vessel shall
be forfeited. If no part of the cargo has been unloaded, except as ac-
counted for in the master's report and it is shown that errors and omis-
sions in the manifest were made without fraud or collusion, the master may
be allowed to correct his manifest by means of a post-entry without the
imposition of such penalty.

If sea stores are found on board a vessel which are not specified in
the list furnished the boarding officer, or a greater quantity is found
than is specified, or if any such articles are landed without a permit be-
ing first obtained from the customs officer, all of such articles will be
seized and forfeited and the master of the vessel will be liable to a pen-
alty treble the value of the articles.

Customs officers who certify invoices, landing certificates, or othw
similar documents, register marine notes of protest, or perform any nota-
rial services are authorized to collect fees equivalent to those pre -
scribed by United States consular regulations for the same acts or services
performed by consular officials.

Canal Zone customs inspectors are authorized to act as deputy
shipping commissioners for the purpose of carrying out the provisions of
the laws relating to merchant seamen. In their capacity as deputy shipping
commissioners they are authorized to visa alien crew lists. Masters of
American vessels are required by law to discharge and ship seamen at Canal
Zone ports before deputy shipping commissioners. The chiefs of customs at
Balboa and Cristobal are also deputy shipping commissioners in charge of
their respective ports. The shipping commissioner is located in Room 309,
Administration Building, Balboa Heights.

In the case of the discharge of American seamen by mutual consent,
provision must be made either by the seaman or the master of the vessel
from which such seamen are discharged for their maintenance and return to
the United States. Sick or injured American seamen may be discharged for
treatment by the United States Public Health Service on a master's cer-
tificate, but except in cases of emergency such discharge must be before
a deputy shipping commissioner. In no case will such discharge be al-
lowed until the seaman has been examined and accepted by the proper med-
ical authorities.

After discharge from the hospital, American seamen shall be main-
tained and returned to the United States at the expense of the vessel or
line by which they are employed. American seamen discharged without the
consent of the shipping commissioner or a deputy shall be maintained and
returned at the expense of the vessel, and will be deported by the im-
migration authorities of the Canal Zone.









Masters of American vessels are required to report all cases of de-
sertion of American seamen. If vessels have left port before the desertion
is discovered, the report must be made by wire or by letter from the first
port at which the vessel calls.

AbDIAkSUhEiENiT OF VESSELS

The rules, regulations, and laws which govern the admeasuring of vessels

transiting the Canal are fixed by proclamation of the President of the United

States in accordance with law. Rules were proclaimed on August 25, 1937 effect-

ive on March 1, 1938, as the sole means of determining the tonnage of vessels for

tolls for the use of the Panama Canal.

Vessels of commerce, Army and Navy transports, colliers, supply ships,
and hospital ships applying for passage through the Panama Canal must pre-
sent a duly authenticated certificate stating the vessel's gross and net
tonziLe as determined by these rule<, and if without such certificate must
be measured before passing through or being allowed to clear from the Canal.
All warships, American and foreign, other than transports, colliers, sup-
ply and hospital ships, must present duly authenticated displacement scale
and curves stating accurately the tonnage of displacement at each possible
mean draft.

Only such officials as are authorized in the several foreign coun-
tries and in the United States to measure vessels and to issue tonnage
certificates for purposes of national registry, -nd such other officials
as are authorized by the President of the United States, or by those act-
ing for him, to administer the measurement rules, insofar as may be nec-
essary to make the certificates conform to the rules.

There is no charge for admeasurement. Toils are based on net tonrnage,
and the rates and rules governing the assessment of toils are shown on pge 37.


NAVIGATION OF THE CANAL hND ADJACENT VATEIS

The following are extracts from the "Rules ana Regulations Governing Nav-

i'-.tion of the Panama Canal and Adjacent Waters" promulgated by the Governor,

Panama Canal Zone:

General

The Canal authorities may deny any vessel passage through the Canal
when the character or condition of the cargo, hull, or machinery is such
as to endanger the structures pertaining to the Canal, or which might
render the vessel liable to obstruct the Canal.








All vessels must be properly trimmed before entering the Canal. Any
vessel with a list between 3 and 10, or that is down by the bow to such
an extent as to affect its maneuverability, or that is so loaded as to make
it unwieldy in the Canal, will be denied transit until the master, in the
presence of the pilot, has signed a certificate relieving the Panama Canal
of all responsibility for any damage that may be sustained by said vessel
or by Panama Canal structures or equipment as a result of such condition.
A vessel with a list of more than 100 will be denied transit.

A vessel carrying a deck load shall have it so arranged that it will
be clear of all chocks, bitts, and other gear used in locking. No vessel
shall unload lumber, timber, or piles into the waters of a harbor, nor tow
a raft in the channel or harbors of the Canal without permission of the
port captain.

The Canal authorities may hold a vessel for the purpose of investi-
gating any claims or disputes that may arise or any charge of violation of
the laws of the Canal Zone or the United States, or of the rules or regu-
lations prescribed by the Governor of the Panama Canal. A vessel may also
be held until it has been put into condition to make it safe for the pass-
age through the Canal. No claim for damages shall be admitted because of
such temporary holding of vessels.

The Canal authorities may dispatch vessels through the Canal in any
order and at any time they may see fit. Priority of arrival at a terminal
does not give any vessel the right to pass through the Canal ahead of
another that may arrive later, although this will be a consideration in
determining the order of pas3age.

Regular passenger steamers with accommodations for 50 or more passen-
gers, when carrying mail and running on fixed published schedules, will be
given preference over other vessels in transiting, regardless of the number
of passengers actually on board. Special consideration will be given to
vessels which are actually ready for transit at regular fixed hours.
Requirements Concerning Officers, Crew, Fjuijment, and Passengers
Each vessel navigating the waters of the Canal Zone shall be suf-
ficiently manned in officers and crew for the safe handling of the vessel.
No member of the crew of any vessel shall be discharged in the Canal Zone
except with the permission of the Canal authorities. Masters of vessels
departing from the Canal Zone shall promptly report to the quarantine of-
ficer at the port any member of the crew who fails to depart on the ves-
sel and who was not discharged in accordance with regulations, if the
vessel is of foreign registry, and to the deputy shipping commissioners,
if the vessel is of American registry.

The number of locomotives to be used for the lockage of any vessel
is dependent upon its length, weight, list, trim, bnd special construc-
tion; and the number required will be determined by the port captain of
the terminal at which the ship enters.

Except when specifically authorized by the Canal authorities, no
vessel at any dock or mooring within Canal Zone waters shall have its
engines disabled or otherwise be rendered inoperative. A vessel at a
fuel berth shall keep up steam and be ready to move on short notice unless
special authority to the contrary has been obtained from the Canal author-
ities.





28

Navigation in Canal and Harbors

Except in designated localities in Gatun Lake, no vessel shall anchor in
any Dart o' the Canal except in an emergency.

All vessels entering port must take the berth or dock assigned to +hem by
the Dort captain.

No warp or line shall be passed across any channel or dock so as to obstruct
the passage of vessels or cause any interference with the discharging of cargoes.

'.Thenever it is deemed advisable by the receiving and forwarding agent or port
captain to shift the berth of any vessel, shifting will be made by the direction
of the nort captain, and the towing and other expenses incurred thereby will be
charged against the vessel so shifted, unless such shift vill be made for the
benefit of the Canal.

The movement of vessels in Gaillard Cut will be regulated by the oort can-
tain, Balboa, through the signal stations and Pedro Miguel Locks.

A vessel v.hose machinery is disabled, or a vessel without motive power, irust
be towed through the Canal, for which the tug service is chargeable to the ves-
sel. Such vessels, upon arrival, shall anchor in the anchorage area designated
by the Governor, and there wait for a tug.

The Canal authorities may require any vessel to take a tug through the Cut,
in the approaches to the locks, cr in any other part of the Canal, when, in
their opinion, it mey be necessary to insure the safety of the vessel or of the
Canal. The tug service in any of these cases is chargeable to the vessel.

Vessels passing through the locks shall habitually be handled by electric
towing locomotives; except that a small vessel may nass through under its own
motive power under the direction o' +he pilot or of the lockmaster, if there
is no pilot on board.

Vessels in Canal Zone waters shall not exceed the needs designated below:

Knots
Atlantic Entrance to Gatun Locks ----- - - - 10
Gatun Lake in the 1,000-foot channels --- - -- 15
Gatun Lake in the 8OO-foot channels -- - - - 12
Gatun La'-e in the 500--Poot channels -- - - 10
Rounding Bohio or Darien Bend- ------- - -- 10
Gaillard Cut In the straight reaches:
Vessels under 250 feet in length -- - - - 8
Vessels 250 feet or over in length -- - -- 6
(Or as near thereto as possible while maintaining
steerage way).
In or near a lock- ----- - -------- ------ 2
MiraClores Locks to Buoy 4 -- -------- -- -- 6
Buoy 14 to Pacific Entrance - - ----- - - 10
Mira'lores Lake:
Vessels under 300-foot length ---------- -- 6
Vessels 300 feet or over in length shall proceed as
slowly as possible consistent with maneuverability.










Vessels meeting in the Canal shall pass to the port side of each other
unless there be some special reason to the contrary and passing to the star-
board is authorized by the canal pilots. They shall not pass each other in
the turn of a bend and the vessel which has the convex bend on its port
shall have the right to first proceed and mn.-e the turn. Over+tkinr vessels,
other than canal craft, are permitted to pass each other only in Go+un Lake
between Buoys 17 and 78.

The rules and regulations prescribed for transiting the Canal are in
accordance with the International Rules of the Road; and when any condition
of navigation arises that is not covered therein, the International Rules of
the Road shall apnly.

Accidents and Claims

Damages for injuries to vessels, or to the cargo, crew, or passengers
of vessels, by reason of the passage of such vessels through the locks of
the Canal under the control of officers or employees of The Pananm Canal
will be adjusted and paid by the Governor of The Panamrra Canal, unless such
injury was caused by the negligence or fault of the vessel, master, crew,
or passenger. No clEim will be allowed for injuries to any profusion
beyond the side of a vessel, whether such profusion is permanent or temnor-
ary in character. Damages will also be oaid for injuries to vessels, or
to the cargo, crew, or passengers of vessels which may arise by reason of
the presence of such vessels in the waters of the Canal Zone, other than
the locks, when the injuries are caused by negligence or fault on the part
of any officer or employee of The Panama Canal acting within the scope of
his employment.

A vessel, or its owner or operator, shall be held liable for any injury
to any structure, plant, or equipment of or pertaining to The Panama Canal
when such injury is proximately caused by the negligence or fault of the ves-
sel or its master or crew. No vessel shall make fast, or run any line, to
any marker, buoy, beacon, or other aid to navigation; and a vessel shall so
navigate as not to strike such aids in passing. While within Canal Zone
waters, vessels will be held liable for injuries caused by the issuance
therefrom of sparks or excessive quantities of smoke.

Radio Communication

As soon as radio communication can be established, vessels shall report
via the local Government shore radio stations to the port captain, their
names, whether or not they desire to pass through the Canal, requirements,
probable time of arrival, draft, and any other matters of importance and
interest. If this information has been previously communicated to the Dort
captain, through agents or otherwise, it will not be necessary to report by
radio anything but the probable time of arrival and this shall always be
sent to the port captain by radio via the local Government shore stations
at least 24 hours in advance of arrival. Vessels approaching the Canal from
the Pacific, in addition to the above, shall report time of passing Cape
Mala and the speed being made.










Except as authorized by authority o0 the Governor, and except as regards
vessels operated by the United States Army or the United States N-.-;, all
radio communication between vessels in the Canal Zone and other -essels or
places whether within or without the Canal Zone shall be carried on by
forwarding through the shore station which shall be designated; and, v.ith
such exceptions, no vessel in the Canpl Zone, or person on board any such
vessels, shall do any radio broadcasting, or shall, other-ise than by 'or-
riarding through the designated shore station, transmit many radio comnmuni-
cation.

Desnatches will be sent to Colon Rad(io Station, call letters "NAX," ihen
in Catun Locks and to northward thereof; Balboa Station, call letters "NBA,"
when in Mira'lores Locks and to southward thereof; between these two points
ships may work either station, preferably the nearer one. Shins in the
Pacific vhen more than 50 miles from Balboa will communicate with Cape
Mala, call letters "NCR," from which station despatches are relayed to the
Canal Zone or Republic of Panama by telegraph.

Except as authorized by autLhority of the Governor, vessels within the
15-mile limit of the Canal Zone shall transmit only with low power and shall
do no testing or tuning. Loiv power, ,Nhen using a tube set, is defined as
not more than 100 watts.

All vessels equipped ,vith raCio, except those whose radio equipment has
been sealed in Canal Zone v-aters in accordance with orders issued by competent
authority, shall, after leaving the terminal harbor to nass through the Canal,
keep a radio operator on Aatch, on such frequency as the shore stations shall
direct, until arrival at the farther terminal harbor; Provided, that in
cases where the vessel has only one radio operator serving on board, the
radio watch shall be required only while the vessel is under way between
Gatun Locks and Pedro iiguel Locks.

The pilot on a vessel passing through the Canal shall be afforded free
use of the vessel's radio for the transaction of Canal business. Under the
direction of the pilot, ships shall report by radio to the local Government
shore stations any accident, either to themselves, or to anything else that
may delay them or require assistance, any sickness or casualties that require
medical attendance, or any other matter of importance that may arise.

No receiving charges, either Government coast station or forwardinF, will
be imposed on radiograms transmitted by ships on Canal business nor in cases
of desnatches involving medical assistance to shios. There will be no send-
inW charge made against The Panama Canal by Government land lines or radio
stations, 'or the transmission of despatches to shins on Canal business.

Miscellaneous

Vessel wastes. No vessel shall discharge or throw into the waters o' the
Canal Zone any ballast, ashes, cinders, boxes, barrels, straw, pr'Per, or other
soli matter, nor discharge heavy slops, engine- or fire-room bilge water, oil,









or any other matter that will tend to deface or make the waters of the canal
Zone insanitary. This requirement shall not apply to water closet chutes,
nor to the water used in cooking or in cleaning tableware. Before arrival
from the sea at either of the terminal ports vessels should get rid of all
waste forbidden to be discharged in the Canal Zone waters.

Handling ballast.- Vessels wishing to unload or load ballast must have
proper chutes, so arranged as to prevent ballast from falling overboard.

No vessel lying at a wharf in the Canal Zone shall place any wastes upon
such wharf, but garbage may be placed in the covered galvanized iron cans
supplied upon the wharf for that purpose by the Canal authorities. Vessels
desiring to remove dry wastes, such as boxes, trash, paper, etc., should make
request to the Canal authorities, who will place a dump car alongside to
receive such matter. This service is chargeable to the vessel.

Nets and other obstructions.- No fishing nets or other obstructions shall
be placed in any of the navigable waters of the Canal Zone.

TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS CARGOES IN CANAL ZONE WATERS

Regulations 88.A-1 to 88.A-25, 88.B-1 to 88.B-7, and 88.C-1 to 88.C-5 of

"Rules and Regulations Governing Navigation of the Panama Canal" give detailed

instructions relative to the transportation, handling, loading and unloading of

explosives and other hazardous cargoes in bulk through the Canal and at Canal

Zone ports. Some of the important provisions of these regulations are discussed

below but for complete information reference should be made to the published rules

and regulations.

Explosives

All vessels, except ships of war, carrying explosives are required to fur-
nish a statement of the amounts and character of the explosives carried. On
arrival at a Canal port, the master of a vessel carrying explosives must de-
liver to the inspecting officer at the port a loading certificate issued by a
recognized authority, showing where and how the explosives are stowed and the
manner of parking. If no loading certificate is available a standard declara-
tion form must be executed by the master giving the required information.

Anchorage areas for vessels carrying explosives are defined on page 7 of
this report. Vessels carrying explosive cargoes are required to anchor in
the defined anchorage area on arrival at the Canal Zone and there await orders.
Such vessels are allowed alongside wharves in the Canal Zone only as prescribed
by regulations, each such case being handled individually by the port captain
concerned. The explosive dock at Mindi is designated for discharging explo-
sives, and such cargoes consigned to the Panama Canal or to the military or naval
units or to private consignees will be discharged at that dock or in the pre-










scribed anchorage areas, except that ships may discharge explosives at Coco
Solo if approval iz given by the coiumandant of the Fifteenth Naval District,
and except that the Governor will consider applications to discharge explo-
sives at Panama Canal doc.Ks in an emergency or when the character or packing
justifies.

Shipments of ammunition for small arms (in cartridge or shell, fully as-
sembled) not exceeding in the aggregate ten tons weight or measurement and
pyrotechnic suplie. not exceedirg in the agregtg te one ton weight or meas-
urement may be landed at either Cristobal or Balboa docks upon observance of
special precautions to insure safe handling. If it becomes necessary to re-
move any especially inflaminable cargo from a ship to a public wharf, the port
captain should be notified at least two hours before such cargo is to be dis-
charged so that the iieLns c'jn be provided to dispose of such material.

The regulations for handling, loading and unloading explosives in Canal
Zone ports apply to all vessels, domestic oind foreign, except tankers, and
except to the transportation of military and naval forceL with their accompany-
ing munitions of war or stores. Explosives are class ified as Class A danger-
ous, Class B le6. dangerous, and Clash C relatively safe. Vessels carry-
ing explosives or other dangerous articles must be inspected by the master or
by some one delegated by nim before entering Canal ports -nd if fire or other
hazardous conditions are found on board, immediate report must be made to the
captain of tue port, wno will then is.ue instructions governing procedure in
entering.

Authority rdust be obtained from the port captain concerned before Class A
explosives in an amount exceeding 50u pounds are loaded or unloaded, or before
loading or unloading explosives while other cargo is being handled. In no case
are drtmus or other containers permitted to be loaded or unloaded at the same
time with explosives.

DecKs, gangways, and hatches over which or through which explosives are to
be handled must be freed of all loose materials nd swept broom clean both be-
fore and after loading or -unloading. hatches and cargo ports opening into
compartments in which explosives are stored must be kept closed at all times,
except during loading and unloading of the compartment. '.hen closed, the
hatches must be covered with tarpaulins securely battened.

Explosives must be carefully handled, without throwing, dropping, rolling,
dragging, or sliding them over each other or over the decks. The maximum load
n.nuleU in crates, rope-net lizg. or baskets per draft shall not exceed 2,400
pounds. Crates or baskets shall not be loaded above the sides and rope sling-
nets must be so loaded as to prevent the sling from rncomypyr!ng the entire
load on its top since. Explosives must be noisted ana lowered carefully and
only deposited or lowered onto a mattress. "Can" hooks are not permitted to
be used for raising or lowering barrel, drum, or other containers. Metal bale
hooks must not be used for handling packaged explosives. Trucks with electric
motor means of propulsion must not be used in nanaling any nigh explosive, low
explo. ive, black powder or smokeles,. powder.

Chute. ubea in oauciin n.nd unloading explosive. ,.ust be inclined to a degree
to prevent violent shocz. ihen packages come in contact witn ecica otner or with
the bottom of uie chnute; otherwise men must be stationed alongside to retard





33


and control the velocity of the packages. Cargo-working e uipment, including
all the vessel's equipment and the stevedore nd contractor's equipment must
be carefully watched during the transfer of explosives and any damaged or de-
fective equipment must be replaced or repaired before operations are continued.

No artificial lights except electric lights or flood lights are permitted
to be used while loading or unloading explosives. Persons required to enter
vessel holds in which explosives are stored must be provided with non-spark
type flashlights. No, member of the crew or person aiding in loading or un-
loading explosives is allowed to have or carry firearms, matches, cigarette
lighters, bale hooks, oily rags, or metallic tool. Persons engaged in load-
ing or unloading Class A or Class B explosives (except fireworks) must not wear
boots or shoes with iron nails or metal unless such boots or shoes are covered
with rubber, leather, felt, or some such non-sparking material.

Necessary fires on docks, lighters or vessels while loading or unloading
explosives must be in constant charge of a competent person assigned by the
master during the entire period of the transfer. A line of fire hose covering
the area of loading or unloading operations and connected with an ade uate water
supply must be laid ready for use.

Smoking is prohibited on or near a vessel loading or unloading explosives.
Persons under the influence of liquor or drugs are not permitted on board a
vessel while loading, unloading, or transporting explosives. Damaged or leaky
containers of liquid ingredients must be segregated and held for inspection and
disposition. Such containers are not accepted for transportation.

Hazardous cargo in bulk, other than explosives

Inflammable and conbustible liquids are classified, in accordance with their
vapor pressures and flash points, into grades established by the Bureau of Ma-
rine Inspection and Navigation, United States Department of Commerce, as follows:
Grade A Inflammable liquids having a Reid Vapor Pressure of 14 pounds
per square inch or more.
Grade B Inflammable li uids having a Reid Vapor Pressure of under
14 pounds and over 8- pounds per square inch.
Grade C Inflammable liquids having a vKeid Vapor Pressure of 8- pounds
per square inch or less and a flash point of &0 F. or below.
Grade D Combustible liquids having a flash point below 150 F. and
over 800 F.
Grade E Combustible liquids having a flash point of 150 or above. For
Grade E products the requirements prescribed for bunker fuel tanks and
cofferdams apply.

Vessels transporting Grades A, B, C, or D products in bulk, or which are in
ballast and have on previous voyage transported products of thee grades and
whose tanxs are not free of explosive gases, will be dealt with as Grade A,
Grade B, Grade C, and Grade D vessels, respectively. Vessels carrying two
grades of hazardous cargo are treated as of the grade corresponding to that of
the more volatile product. A vessel in ballast, whose tanks are kept charged
with an inert gas during transit, is classed as a Grade D vessel. Tanks bal-
lasted full to the level of the expansion hatch deck coaming will be accepted
as the equivalent of tanks which nave been gasfreed since transporting hazardous
cargoes.











Grades A, B, C, rnd D ves-els desiring to transit the C-nMl are
required to be classified in the highest rating for crrying hazardous
carlo in bulk in any recognized classification society or, if not so
cls: ed, they mu-t obtain from the Board or Local Insoectors of The
Panama Canal a certificate of inspection stating, their fitness for carry-
inr hazardous crrgo in bulk. Vessels of these grades must furnish the
follovwing information:

(a) Classification rating.
(b) Amount and name of each grade of cargo carried having a
flsh noint below 150F.
(c) The actual vaoor pressure of Grade A products, certi'ica-
tion that the vapor pressures of Grade B products are less than 14.
'nd more then 8- pounds oer square inch and or Grade C products 8-
pounds per square inch or less, and the flash points or Grade D
products.

Detailed safety requirements are set forth in the "Rules and Regula-
tions Governing Navigation of the Panama Canal" .chich all Grade A, B, C,
and D vessels are required 4o observe. Grade A, B, and C vessels will
start transit of the Canal at the discretion or the nort captain concerned.
So "ar as practicable, they will be dispatched through Gaillard Cu+ so as
not to meet iny traffic therein. They may be brought into either terminal
day or night except ,.hen overdraft, when they will be handled only during
dc.ylight. They are not permitted to shift cargoes from shin +o shiu whilee
in Canal .,a+ers without social permission o' the nort cantain concerned.
,'hen it i7 necessary to moor such vessels at ; oier ;lonsFide another vessel
or vessels of this grade already handling bulk ctrroes, n1l loadinu or
unloading operations must cease until the vessel is securely moored.









PORT SERVICES AND CHARGES

QUARANTINE

Charges for quarantine service are published in Tariff 14, The Panama

Canal, as follows:

Subsistence, lodging, etc., in quarantine or detention,
per day:
For cabin passengers- ----- ------------------$ 3.00
For steerage passengers, seamen, etc. ------------ --1.50
For children between the ages of 5 and 12 years - - Half rate
For children under 5 years- ---- -------------- Free
The period for which charge will be made will in-
clude the date of admission and exclude the date of discharge.
A fractional part of a day will be charged for at the full
daily rate.
Guards for ships passing through the Canal in quarantine:
For each quarantine guard ---- -------------- --$40.00
For each quarantine officer ---- -------------- -50.00
Fumigation of vessels:
Actual cost of labor and materials, plus 20 percent
surcharge, to which will be added a charge for supervision
and depreciation of equipment, as follows:
For vessels under 1,000 tons- ---- ------------ -$10.00
For vessels between 1,000 and 3,000 tons- ---------15.00
For vessels over 3,000 tons ----- -------------- -20.00
(Net United States registered tonnage)
When fumigation service is rendered at the request
of the vessel on Sundays or holidays the total charge will
be increased 50 percent.
Deratization exemption inspection of vessels:
For vessels which are docked- ---- ------------ -$10.00
For vessels in Balboa or Cristobal Basin or in
quarantine anchorage ----- ----------------- --15.00
For vessels in transit through the Canal (if con-
venient to the quarantine division)- ----------- --25.00
Night and special demand quarantine and immigration
service:
(a) For quarantine inspection between sunset and
10 p.m. on night of arrival, and for special
demand inspection at any time, of vessels or
aircraft arriving for ports not subject to
yellow fever quarantine: -
Passenger vessels- ---- -------------- -$25.00
Other vessels- ----- ----------------- -15.00
Aircraft ------- -------------------- --5.00
(b) For inspection between sunset and sunrise
where overtime immigration service is required: -
Additional charge against each vessel or
aircraft- ------ ------------------- --5.00


714755 0(-4( 4






36


Special demand quarantine and immigration inspection is an additional

service offered by The Panama Canal and does not affect or change procedure

already in force.

Additional information regarding quarantine is given under the subject

"Arriving and departing vessels", page 12. quarantine regulations are given

on page 17.

CUSTOM' FEES

Fees will be collected by Canal Zone customs officers for certification

of the following documents:

Invoice of returned American goods, in triplicate or
quadruplicate- -------- ----------------------- 1.00
Certificate of goods purchased by importer, in trip-
licate or quadruplicate- ------ ---------------- --2.50
Certificate of goods not purchased by importer, in
triplicate or quadruplicate- ----- -------------- --2.50
Landing certificate, including oaths of master and
mate ----------- -------------------------- --2.50
Declaration of inspected household goods, in trip-
licate or quadruplicate- ------ ---------------- 1.00
Certificate to extra copies of invoice or other doc-
ument (except certificate of inspection), each -------1.00

Services of customs inspectors will be furnished outside of regular work-

ing hours at the terminal ports of the Panama Canal, upon request of the master

or an authorized agent of a vessel; the number of customs inspectors required

will be determined by the Chiefs of Customs, or designated subordinate officers,

based on their information and knowledge of the requirements and will be charged

as follows:

Customs inspectors engaged on a work day for the peri-
od, 6 p.m. to 11 p.m., or any part thereof, each - -$ 5.00
Customs inspectors engaged on a work day for the peri-
od, 11 p.m. to 7 a.m., or on Sundays or holidays, or
any part thereof, each ---------- ------------- --10.00


Authority, Tariff 14, The Panama Canal.





37


TOLLS

Rates of toll.- The following rates of toll to be paid by vessels using

the Canal are prescribed in Presidential proclamations, effective March 1,1938:

For a complete one-way transit of the Canal, merchant vessels,
yachts, Army and Navy transports, colliers, hospital ships, and supply
ships, when carrying passengers or cargo, are assessed 90 cents per net
vessel-ton of 100 cubic feet each of actual earning capacity, that is,
the net tonnage determined in accordance with the rules for measurement
of vessels for the Panama Canal.

Under the act approved August 24, 1937 (50 Stat. 750, U.S.C. title
48, sec. 1315), the rate of tolls on laden vessels shall not exceed $1
nor be less than 75 cents per net vessel-ton determined in accordance
with the rules for measurement for the Panama Canal.

Vessels in ballast without passengers or cargo pay 72 cents per
net vessel-ton for a complete one-way transit but other floating craft,
including warships, other than transports, colliers, hospital ships, and
supply ships, pay 50 cents per ton of displacement.

Rules and regulations for assessment and collection of tolls.- The fol-

lowing rules and regulations have been prescribed by the Governor, The Panama

Canal, in Rules and Regulations Governing Navigation of the Panama Canal and

effective supplements thereto:

Rule 16. Tolls for vessels in ballast.- In order for a vessel to
secure the reduced rate of tolls for vessels in ballast without passengers
or cargo, the volume of fuel on board for its own consumption must not
exceed 125 percentum of the volume of its engine room as measured and as
shown on its Panama Canal Tonnage Certificate.

Rule 17. Tolls exemption for vessels transition for repairs.- Ves-
sels transiting and retransiting the Panama Canal by prearrangement with
the Canal authorities for the sole purpose of having repairs made at the
dry-docks or shops operated by The Panama Canal shall be exempt from the
payment of tolls, but shall pay charges for pilotage, towage, and other
services incidental to such transits, at rates to be determined from time
to time by the Governor of the Panama Canal: Provided, however, that in
case a vessel, after having made a transit for repairs as hereinbefore
provided in this section, shall fail to retransit the Canal to the point
of beginning, or shall, at the point of termination of the original
transit, receive or discharge cargo, passengers, mail, or baggage, or
accomplish any other purpose, other than to obtain repairs, for which ves-
sels usually transit the Canal, tolls shall be collected for the transit
at the prescribed rates before such vessels shall be given a clearance
and be permitted to proceed.









Rule 18. Tolls for vessels making partial transit and return.-
Vessels passing through the locks at either end of the Panama Canal and
returning to the original point of entry without pasir.g through the locks
at the other end of the Canal, shall pay the tolls prescribed for a single
passage through the Canal. In case such vessels carry cargo or passengers
either in passing or returning through the locks, the rate of tolls on
laden vessels shall apply.

Regulation 18.1, Rule 18 shall not be interpreted as authorizing
vessels less than 65 feet in length, or barges, or rafts of any size not
on regular transit schedules and not paying tolls, to navigate the waters
of any locks, or of Gaillard Cut to or from Gatun Lake in partial transit
of the Canal; specific authority of the Governor must be obtained through
the marine superintendent for each such partial transit.

Rule 19. To whom tolls are to be paid.- Payment for tolls shall be
made to the collector or deputy collector of The Panama Canal, or by deposit
with the Treasurer of the United States, any Federal Reserve Bank, or other
United States depositories designated by the Secretary of the Treasury,
such deposits to be made to the official credit of the collector of The
Panama Canal.

Rule 20. Payment before transit.- Payment of tolls in full shall
be made, or secured as provided in rules 23 and 24, before a vessel is
allowed to enter a lock.

Rule 21. Commercial vessels operated by the United States.- The
rule for payment of tolls prior to transit shall not apply to vessels
operated by the Government of the United States; and bills for tolls and
other charges against such vessels shall be settled as are other bills
between departments of the Federal Government.

Rule 22. Tolls payment in cash.- All payments shall be made in
lawful money of the United States, except as provided by rules 23 and 24.

Rule 23. Tolls payment by drafts secured by bonds.- Drafts upon
banks of the United States which are supervised by the Comptroller of the
Currency, and which are otherwise known to be satisfactory to the Canal
authorities, will be accepted when covered by high-grade bonds deposited
with the collector of The Panama Canal, and under the following conditions:
(a) bonds will be accepted only from steamship companies having frequent
sailings through the Canal, or from agents representing several vessels or
steamship companies; (b) bonds of the United States, the Philippine Islands,
Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia will be accepted at par value;
(c) unless otherwise prescribed by the Governor, bonds of the Territory of
Hawaii, the Philippine Railway Co., and those States, municipalities, and
high-grade railroads, such as are legal investments for savings banks in
the States of New York, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and New Jersey, will
be accepted at 90 percent of their market value, but not exceeding 90 per-
cent of their par value; (d) the Canal authorities may refuse to accept
coupon bonds, to limit the exchange of bonds by depositors, and to pre-
scribe the total value of the bonds to be deposited by any one agent or
company.





39


Rule 24. Lumpi sum deposits.- Steamship companies or agencies may
make deposits, to the official credit of the Collector of The Panama Canal,
with- the Treasurer of the United States, any Federal Reserve bank, or
other United States depository designated by the Secretary of the Treasury,
to cover payment of tolls and other charges. The Treasurer, Federal
Reserve bank, or depository receiving such deposits will forward a copy
of the receipt direct to the Collector of The Panama Canal, and such
receipt will specify the vessel or vessels for which the deposit is made.
When requested by the depositor, cable notice will be sent to the Canal
authorities. If the depositor desires, the Canal authorities will cable
an acknowledgement of the receipt of the notice of deposit. An amount
sufficient to cover the cost of sending cable notices will be charged
against the deposit.

Regulation 24.1. Use of deposits.- As soon as possible after the
ship has passed through the Canal the total amount chargeable against the
vessel is deducted from the amount of the deposit and a statement of the
account is sent to the depositor. Any unexpended balance is refunded to
the depositor with the statement, except where the owners or agents desire
to apply the balance on charges against other vessels.

Rule 25. Payment of other charges.- All charges for services and
supplies furnished by The Panama Canal or Panama R-ilroad Co. shall be
paid, or the payment thereof fully secured, before clearance is given to
a vessel at the port of departure from the Canal Zone.

HANDLING LIKES

Tariff 14, The Panama Canal, prescribes the following charges for handling

lines:

1. For each man furnished by The Panama Canal on board vessels for
the purpose of handling lines and locomotive wires on board such vessels,
to promote their safety while being passed through the locks, charge will
be made as follows:


(a) Complete transit of Canal:
24 hours or less- ---- --------------
Each additional 12-hour period or
fraction thereof ---- ----- ------ --
(b) Partial transit of Canal:
Cristobal to Gatun Lake, or vice versa- -
Cristobal to Gamboa Moorings, or vice
versa- ------- ---------- - -----
Balboa to Gamboa Moorings, or vice versa- -
Balboa to Gatun Lake, or vice versa - -
Cristobal to Gatun Lake, remain aboard
vessel, and return to Cristobal- - - -
(c) Boarding vessels and debarking without mak-
ing transit on account of vessel failing
to start through Canal for reasons other
than the fault of the Panama Canal- -----


$ 5.00

2.50

2.50

3.50
3.50
3.50

5.00


2.00





40


2. For each man furnished by The Panama Canal on board vessels, to
provide a sufficient number to handle lines when necessary to shift ves-
sels from one dock or berth to another, per job- -------- ------ 2.00

3. No charge will be made for hndiizig lines on the arrival or departure
of a vessel at docks owned by The Panama Canal or Panama R.ilroad Company,
but, whenever launch service is used in connection with tying up a vessel,
charge will be made for the launch service at rates fixed in tnis tariff.

FIRE t -.uTECTION

Vessels lying at the wharves in the Canal Zone are required to keep a sat-

isfactory watch for fire and to have suitable fire-fighting apparatus ready for

immediate use. In cases of fires aboard vessels, the port captain has complete

charge for the purpose of coordinating various Panama Canal or Panama Railroad

functions engaged or concerned.

The terminal at Balboa has two tugs and the terminal at Cristobal has three

tugs in commission that are equipped for fire fighting. These craft are regular

harbor equipment of The Panama Canal Marine Division and were not designed for

fireboats but special fire pumps of approximately 1,000 gallons per minute and

designed fur fighting marine fires are installed in each.

All piers at each terminal are piped their full length and a pressure of

from 9U to lOu pounds can be obtained by means of special fire pumps. Modern land

fire-fighting equipment is available near the water front at both ports.

PILOTAGE

Incoming vessels are boarded inside the Atlantic breakwater or off the sea-

ward edge of the dredged channel at the Pacific entrance by a boarding party con-

sisting of the pilot, -uarantine officer, customs ofi'icer, admeasurer and commis-

sary representative. Except when exempted by the Governor, no vessel is allowed

to pass through the Canal, enter or leave a terminal port, or maneuver within Canal

Zone waters without having a Panama Canal pilot on board. The following vessels

are exempt from compulsory pilotage, except vwien the port captain considers a

pilot necessary or vien a pilot is requested:
(a) Vessels of the Urnited States Special Service Squadron, except '.;hen








transiting the Canal.
(b) Local small craft, such as United States Army and United States Navy
mine sweepers and tugs, Panama Canal tugs and equipment. When these vessels
transit the Canal without pilots, they will be assigned with larger vessels
carrying a pilot and lock through t.ith that vessel, and the lock superin-
tendents will decide whether locomotives are to be used.
(c) At least one pilot must be assigned to every two destroyers or zub-
chasers, and to e rir, three submarines, thee being the types that can be
lashed together and locked as one ship.
(d) Small craft under 65 feet in length and drawing not over 6 feet of
water visiting terminal ports without transiting the Canal. For Canal trans-
its, when pilots are not available, port capt.-ins may dispatch such craft in
the same manner as provided in subparagraph (b) above. In this connection
see Regulation 18.1, page 38.

Pilotage for vessels in transit through the Canal is free; but should any

vessel, while in Canal waters, discharge or receive freight or passengers, or

remain for the purpose of effecting repairs, or make either terminal a port of

call, such vessel is liable for the port pilotage charge. A vessel in danger or

distress is not prohibited from entering a terminal port at any tiL e; but such

vessel should, when practicable, give due notice in advance, by radio or other-

wise, and obtain a pilot if possible. Such vessel shall, except in emergency,

anchor in the anchorage area designated by the Governor. Should a vessel desire

a pilot to meet it outside the Atlantic breakwaters, such vessel will remain

there and make signal to that effect. Tne pilot assigned to a vessel shall have

control of the navigation and movement of such vessel.

The following charges and regulations are quoted from Tariff 14, The Panama

Canal:

1. Pilotage is furnished under three general classes, viz: (a) transit
pilotage, (b) port pilotage, and (c) offshore and other special pilotage.

2. Transit pilotage applies only to vessels actually passing through the
Canal, and is exclusive of the use of port facilities at either terminal. No
charge will be made for transit pilotage.

3. Port pilotage applies to all visiting or transiting vessels which make
use of the port facilities at either terminal. Rates per foot, or fraction
thereof of six inches or over, based upon maximum draft, as follows:






42


Under 15-foot draft- --- - - --------- per foot 43.00
15-foot and under 20-foot draft--- --- - - 3.50
20-foot hnd under 25-foot draft - - - -- 4.00
25-foot and under 30-foot draft- - -"- - 4.50
3U-foo- draft and over - --- -- - --- 5.00

Pilotage at above rates will be charged both on entering and leaving each
or either port, except as follows:
(a) Tr;-tniting vessels ccmiiii to dock to secure repairs, fuel, or
supplies, or to allow through passengers to land or transit the Isthmus
by other facilities, will be charge in-pilotage only, when using the
port of entry, and out-pilotage only, when using the port of departure.
Such vessels, while at the dioci, may receive or discharge less than three
full-fare pas engers and/or less tnan one ton of freight without being
reouirad to pay pilotage both ways.
(b) No pilotage, in or out, will be charged against transiting ves-
sels stoijping in the stream at eacih or either terminal solely to await
supplies.
(c) No pilotage, in or out, will be charged against transiting ves-
sels stopping in the stream at each or either terminal to receive or dis-
charge freight or passengers and their baggage, when such transaction in-
volves less than three full-fare passengers and/or less than one ton of
freight and/or less than ten sacks of through mail, otherwise pilotage
will be charge(, for both entering and leaving port.
(d) No pilotage will be charged against any vessel solely on account
of acceptance or delivery of m:.il originating in or destined for the
Canal Zone or Rtepublic of Panama, or through mail amounting to less than
ten bags.
(e) No pilotage will be charged against any vessels brought to a dock
for the convenience of the iviarine Division in making survey or investiga-
tion.
(f) No pilotage will be charged against local vessels under 65 feet in
length and drawing not over 6 feet of water when such vessels are regis-
tered in the Canal Zone or in the Republic of Panama, are plying only
between ports of the Hepublic of Panama and the Canal Zone, and are in
charge of persons licensed to operate such vessels in Canal Zone waters.
(g) No pilotage will be charged when a vessel is shifted from one
berth to another between docks or permanent moorings for the convenience
of The Panama Canal or of the Panama Rfilroad Company, but this exemp-
tion will not apply when a vessel is shifted between .ncnorage and a
doci or permanentt mooring, or vfhen a vessel is shifted from one berth to
another between docks or permanent moorings upon re uest of the vessel
or its Agent. Vessels assigned temporarily to anchorage on arrival,
pending availability of berth at dock, will not be assessed an addition-
al pilotage charge by reason of such double maneuver; and the same prin-
ciple will govern in case of outgoing vessels.
(h) Transiting vessels which allow a substantial reduction to Panama
Canal and Panama Railroad Company employees from regular passenger rates
charged by such vessels between the Isthmus and United States ports, will
not be charged pilotage solely by reason of handling such passengers and
their b&\,a ge.
(i) No pilotage will be charged against a vessel stopping in the
stream solely for the purpose of handling local passengers traveling only
from one terminal of the Canal to the other.
(j) Pilotage will be charged for pilot furnished during compass ad-





43


justment in any case where vessel is required to be under way for this
purpose.

4. Offshore pilotage applies to vessels tu.ing pilots outside
Atlantic breakwaters. For this service a charge will be made in
addition to port pilotage, in cases where the latter is also ap-
plicable. Rate per vessel- ---- ------ ---- -- ----- ------- $25.00

5. Vessels transiting .nd retransiting the Panama Canal by
prearrangement with the Canal authorities for the sole purpose
of having repairs made at the drydocks or shops operated by The
Panama Ca-nal will be charged for pilotage. Rate per foot, or
fraction thereof of six inches or over, based upon maximum draft
in salt water, for each complete transit- ----- - ------- -- 10.00

6. Transiting vessels which anchor in Gatun Lake to take on
fresh water, or for other purposes involving no charge against
the vessel under other provisions of this tariff, will be charged
for pilotage at flat rates, as follows:
Anchorage for one hour or more, but not exceeding
twelve hours- ------------- ----- ------------ 80.00
Anchorage in excess of twelve hours- --------------- 100.00

NOTE.- No pilotage will be charged vessels anchored in
Gatun Lake, under paragraph 6, when vessels are anchored
for the convenience of The Panama Canal.

DOC"AGE OR WHARFAGE

The charge know as "dockage" in the United States is termed "wharfage" in

the Canal Zone. The following provisions and charges are published in Tariff

14, The Panama Canal.

1. The following rates apply to vessels using the wharves for the pur-
pose of transacting their commercial business, such as discharging and/or
receiving cargo, passengers, or mail.

2. Sailing vessels, barges, lighters, rafts, and si.nilar cr.ft without
power: (a) whose greatest registered length does not exceed 100o feet (per
lineal foot, per day), 5 cents; (b) when clearing from wharf within 5 hours
after berthing, two-thirds of the regulihr daily wharfage rate, with a min-
imum charge of $1.00; (c) whose greatest registered length exceeds 0l0 feet
(per lineal foot, per day), lU cents.

3. Steam or power-driven vessels, including all auxiliary vessels: On
greatest registered length (per lineal foot, per day), 15 cents.

4. "Per day" is interpreted to mean a period of 24 hours from the time
of the berthing.

5. All sailing vessels whose greatest registered length exceeds 100
feet, and all steam or power-driven vessels, including auxiliary vessels,
clearing from wharves within 5 hours after berthing, two-thirds of the reg-





44


ular wharfage rate.

6. The full daily rate to be charged for any pzrt of a day that wharves
are occupied after the first day, except that when a vessel occupies a
berth all or any part of 3 hours after the termination of a 24-hour period,
one-fourth of the aaily rate will be charged for that time.

7. All vessels using the wharves, except those hereinafter specifically
exempted on account of receiving coal, supplies, fuel, repairs, or for
transferring cargo alongside another vessel, or for fumigation, will be
charged the full wharfage rates.

8. Vessels comirig to the wharves for the purpose of receiving supplies
from The Panama Canal or Panama Railroad Co., such as water, commissary sup-
plies, and stores, or fuel oil from co iip .nies maintaining stocks of fuel oil
in the Canal Zone, or for fumigation at their own request, will be granted a
50-percent reduction from the regular wharfage rates, unless they transact
business in excess of the exemption allowed in paragraph 11, when full wharf-
age rates will be charged.

9. No wharfage charge will be made against vessels using the coal wharves
for the purpose of securing coal. During the coaling period such vessels may
take water and other supplies, permit their through passengers to go ashore,
or receive fu.iLgation without a charge for wharfage being made.

10. No wharfage charge will be made against a vessel remaining at the coal
wharf for the purpose of completing or accomplishing services allowed during
the period of co .ling, as noted in the preceding paragraph, or for the con-
venience of The Panama Canal or the Panama Railroad, when in the discretion
of these interests, the holding of the berth is not detrimental to the best
interests of The Panama Canal or the Panama Railroad, as judged by their rep-
resentatives. If a vessel, after coaling is completed, desires to hold the
berth to the detrimLent or inconvenience of The Panama Canal or Panama Rail-
road, a wharfage charge will be made at half the regular rates for the full
time docked, but under no circumstances will a vessel be allowed to occupy
a berth beyond the coaling period when another vessel is waiting for a berth
to secure coal.

11. If a vessel occupying a coal wharf, and taking coal, transacts com-
mercial business to the extent of receiving or discharging a total of one
or more tons of c.rgo, or ten or more bags of mail, or three or more pas-
sengers, a wharfage charge will be made at the regular rates.

12. No wharfage charge will be made against vessels docked at any wharf
for the sole purpose of having rep irs made by the Mechanical Division of
the Canal, or for the convenience of the Marine Division in making survey
or investigation of accidents. During the period of receiving repairs,
survey, or investigation of accidents, such vessels may take on supplies
and allow their passengers shore privileges or receive fumigation without
charge for wharfage.






45


13. If vessels remain at wharves after completion of repairs,
survey, or investigation,wharfage charges will be assessed under the
same conditions applied to vessels at the coal wharves, as provided
in paragraphs 10 and 11 above.

14. When one ocean-going vessel is allowed to lie alongside
another vessel at the piers, the wharfage charge for the outer vessel
shall be one-half of the regular tariff. When small floating equipment
such as banana boats and barges delivering bananas or other raw native
products, lie alongside a vessel at the wharf, the full wharfage charge
will be made. (See par. 24, Item 32, covering rates and regulations for
transferring cargo between vessels, page 61, this volume).

15. When a vessel does not come to a wharf, but transfers passen-
gers or their baggage, cargo, or through mail amounting to 10 bags or
more, between ship and shore in lighters or other floating equipment,
charge will be made against the vessel for wharfage on the equipment e&t
the regular rates provided in this tariff.

CHARGES FOR MOORING TO BUOYS

Tariff 14, The Panama Canal contains the following provisions and charges

governing mooring:

1. No mooring charge will be made if moorings are occupied solely
for taking coal, water, or supplies purchased from The Panama Canal, or
for the convenience of the Canal.

2. No mooring charge will be made against vessels transiting
the Canal that are permitted to occupy moorings at the discretion of
the port captains, to land or embark passengers, baggage, mail, or
small packages of freight, for the time they are so engaged, provided
that such transaction involves less than 3 full-fare passengers and/or
less than 1 ton of freight and/or less than 10 sacks of through mail;
otherwise moorings will be charged for as provided in this tariff.

3. Vessels at mooring buoys for less than 5 hours will be charged
two-thirds of the daily rate.

4. Vessels at mooring buoys for 5 hours and not more than
24 hours:
Per day- -------- ---- -------- -- - - -- ---$25.00
Each succeeding day or fraction thereof- --- --------- - 10.00
EXCEPTION: If the mooring charge for any vessel is in
excess of the charge for wharfage at a dock, the rates
for wharfage, Item 10, shall apply.

5. Local owners of small boats may obtain permission to use as
"tie-up stations," such available space at docks and moorings, Balboa,
as may be designated by the port captain. Charge for this service will
be made at the rate of 50 cents per lineal foot per month, for craft









whose overall length is under 65 feet and $1.00 per linev'l foot per month,
for craft from 65 feet to 125 feet, inclusive. When handling cargo or
passengers for hire, the regular vharfge rate,; will apply for the per-
iod of such activity.

6. Under no circumstances will vessels be permitted to transfer
cargo direct from one to the other at mooring buoys, unless there is no
berthing space avwilabie at any of the piers. (See par. 24, Stevedoring
and Transferring Cargo).

RIGHT OF BASIN

Any craft of over 10 Panama Canal gross tons, except vessels owned and

operated by the United States, Panamanian, and Colombian governments, anchoring

or tying up and remaining in Canal Zone waters, inactive, for a period of more

than 30 consecutive days at any location where the regular mooring or wharfage

charges published ii this tariff are not applicablc, will be subject to right-

of-basin cha-rge. No charge will be made if the craft is removed within 30 days

for a consecutive period of 5 days beyond the three-mile limit of Canal Zone

waters, but, if it remains in Canal Zone waters for more than 30 days, the

charge will be made for all time from the tiiLe of arrival in Canal Zone waters,

provided the right-of-basin charge shall not exceed the published mooring or

wharfage charge for the same period of time.

For private or commercial self-propelling and/or sea-
goirng craft (including sailing vessels), the charge will be per
Panama Canal gross ton per day or fraction thereof- ------ --- -- .005

For ell other craft not in the foregoing class, such
as house boats, lighters, bargeL, and similar floating eqiuip-
ment, the charge will be per Panama Canal gross ton per day or
fraction thereof- - - - - - - - - -- - - - - .005
(Not exceeding, per vessel per day or fraction thereof, 20 cents)

The Marine Superintendent of The Panama Canal shall determine the status

of the craft and the charge applicable thereto. Bills against craft in Canal

Zone waters north of Gamboa will be prepared by the Port Captain, Cristobal.

Bills against craft in Canal Zone waters south of Gamnboa will be prepared by

the Port Capt, in, Balboa. Authority, Tariff No. 14, The Panama Canal.








TOWAGE


Towage rates, as shown by Tariff 14, The Panama Canal, are as follows:

First hour Each succeeding
Service or fraction quarter-hour or
thereof fraction thereof

LARGE TUGS:
(a) For harbor work, shifting berth, work
around piers or locks, and towage through
Canal -- - ----- ------ ---- -- -- 40.00 $10.00
(b) For tug service involving trip to sea
beyond the breakwater, Cristobal, or more
than 1 hour beyond the sea buoy, Balboa - 45.00 11.25
When the U.S.S. FAVORITE is used for
such service the minimum charge will
be for 5 hours- -- - --$ 225.UO.
(c) U.S.S. FAVORITE:- For such service as
would ordinarily be performed by a tugboat-
same rate as for large tugs.
(d) Overdraft vessels:- Any vessel arriv-
ing at a terminal port of the Panama Canal
for transit, with a mean draft in excess
of that allowed under the New International
Loadline Regulations for the tropical zone,
as determined by American Bureau of Ship-
ping, Lloyd's Register, or other certified
credential, will be re..uired to take the
services of a Panama Canal towboat from
Balboa sea buoys to Gamboa Reach and from
North end of Atlantic Locks to Buoy No. 3
in Cristobal harbor, or vice versa. The
Panama Canal, however, reserves the right
to assign a tug to any vessel when con-
ditions exist that make it advisable in the
interest of safety, regardless of draft.
The charge for this service will be at the
tariff rate of $40.00 per hour per tug.
SMALL TUGS:
(a) MIRAFLORES- ------ - ------- -25.00 6.25
(b) CHAME, CONCOLI, DIABLO, AND INDIO - 15.00 3.75
Per day First day of 24 hours or frac-
tion thereof, $150.00. Time in excess
of any 24-hour period to be charged for
at the rate of $15.00 per hour but not
to exceed $150.00 for such excess over
a 24-hour period.
(c) SIRI- -- -- -- - - - -- - 10.00 2.50

Whenever, in the judgement of the receiving and forwarding agent or the

captain of the port, it is deemed advisable to shift any vessel in order to accom-

modate other vessels, or for any other reason, shifting will be made by direction









of the capt-in of the port, and the towing expenses thereby incurred will be

charged against the vessel so shifted.

LI'hTEihA.GE

The charge for use of oil barge No. 37 and cargo lighters Nos. 15 and 206

is 20 for the first day or fraction thereof and $l0 for each succeeding half

day or fraction thereof. The charge for the 25-ton capacity utility barge No.33

is (- per hour, with a minimum charge for one hour and each succeeding half-hour

or fraction thereof at one-half this rate. Rates for the 3,560-barrel capacity

self-propeiled oil barge and the 79,006-gallon capacity self-propelled water

barge, when available, for uaii,,g deliveries to ships at anchor are 425 for the

first hour or fraction thereof atnd a.1,.50 for each succeeding half-hour or frac-

tion thereof.

Charges will be made at tle hbove rate. from the time the e:uip ent leaves

its official station until it return, based upon 24 hours per day. When light-

ers are furnished to a ship at a berth at the request of the ship, solely to ex-

pedite the discharge and lo,.iding of same, or to a ship discharging explosives

in the bay, the regular charge for lighters will be made, including the usual

charges for wharfage, stevedoring, transferring, cna towage, except that if the

receiving and forwarding agent, to reduce the cost of transferring cz rgo, uses

lighters to discharge or load ships at berth, no charge will be made for the

lighters, or the wharfage thereon.

STORAGE

Since the commerce of the two Canal Zone ports i- either in transit or

for local consumption, warehouses are not in demand. Cargo consigned to the

Canal Zone for orders will be stored in the transit sheds of the il nama Railroad

piers. The following rates and rules governing storage on piers at Cinal Zone

port; are published in Tariff 14, The Panama Canal. Item 32 of this tiriff,to









which several references are made, deals with the subject "Stevedoring and

Transferring of Cargo,' which is a separate section of this report.

1. Transit and/or Transfer Cargo:
For first 30 days after delivery on pier- ---- -- -Free
For succeeding 60bO days, per ton per day, or frac-
tion thereof- -- - - - - - - - - -- j0.03
For all days thereafter, per ton per day, or
fraction thereof----- - - - - - - -- .05
2. Transit Baggige:
For first 72 hours U days) after delivery on
pier - - - - - - - - - - - - Free
All days thereafter, per piece per week or frac-
tion thereof - - - - - - - - - - .25
3. "Canal Zone for Orders" Cargo:
(a) By prior definite arrangement with the receiving
and forwarding agent of the Panama Railroad Company, general
merchandise which is actually received from water-borne commerce
for reconsignment to points beyond the Isthmus, or merchandise
originating locally for shipment in water-borne commerce, may be
warehoused "for orders" at the terminal ports of the Panama Canal
by the Panama Railroad Company, subject to the rates and regula-
tions hereinafter specified.
(b) The essential working of this system is that goods
are stored, without free time allowance, at the storage rates
hereinafter specified, in the custody of the Panama Railroad Com-
pany, which issues a negotiable receipt to the consignor, owner,
or consignee, in exchange for negotiable bill of lading, or for-
wards goods on presentation of the receipt and form order, "Au-
thority to deliver cargo from storage on piers." Goods so re-
ceived and stored may be reforwarded by the consignor, owner, or
consignee, in any quantity desired, as he directs, subject to the
conditions printed on the warehouse receipt.
(c) The charges for handling and storing goods con-
signed to and forwarded from Canal Zone "for orders" are as fol-
lows -
(1) For handling from ship's side to storage
place, or to cars, 4, a ton on general cargo, and
on other commodities, the rates provided in para-
graph 2, (b) to (i) inclusive, of Item 32 of this
tariff.
(2) For handling from stor;,ge place to ship's
side, or to cars, the same rates as for receiving,
as indicated in (1) above. The minimum charge for
handling gcod., withdrawn from storage place is $1.
(3) Storage rates, 5 cents per ton of 2,000 pounds,
or 2-, cents per ton of 40 cubic feet, per day or
fraction thereof; without free tine allowance.
(4) Special rates on special corniiodities in large
quantities may be obtLined on request.
(d) The charge for receiving the goods will be made
against delivering vessel; the charge for taking the good,, from
storage and delivering to vessels will be made against the re-






50


ceivingvessel. The charge for storLage wijl be made against the
owner f the goods and will be collected monthly.
(e) Any rehunridlirg of goods for fmunigztion or other
puri.oses, or labor for repairirg of pwckager, will be charged for
in iccordance with the rules .nd r ttes for reh ndling, repairing,
etc., provided elsewhere in tlis tariff.
(f) The Receiving and Forvarding Agent is authorized
to decide in all cases whether ori not gcods may be stored under
the "C-,nal Zone for Orders" arrangement, nd shipment, should not
be con:r-sig ed "Canal Zone for Orders" uitil definite arrangements
for their acceptance have been muade.
(g) The Panamia Railroad Company does not insure goods
stored in "Canal Zone for Orders" waiehcuses. Arrangements for
insurance will have to be made by the consigrnor, consignee, or
owner of the goods.
i h) As a general policy, various lines operating out
of CristobUl and Balboa to the west coast of South and Central
Americe accept their proportion of the through rate from port of
origin to port of ultimate destination for the haul beycrnd the
Isthmus, as explained in the following paragraph.
(i) In connection with the "Cantil Zone for Orders"
arrangement, certain steamship lines agree to through billing
arrangements by which shippers are enabled to consign goods to
the Isthmus and subsequently to reccnsign them to any port
beyond the Isthmus to which there is a thi'ough rate from port
of origin, without sacrificing their right to the through rate.
This means when goods move from New York to the Canal Zone,
usual local rates will be charged to Cristobal or balboa, as
the case may be; but when the owner reforwards by water to another
port to which there is a through rate from port of origin, he will
be charged the receiving carrier's proportion of the through rate
from port of origin to port of ultimate destination, plus handling
charges from storage place to slings of receiving vessel; and
upon evidence that the shipment, or any part of it, has moved
beyond the Istuhmus, the initial carrier will refund the difference
between its proportion of the through rate applicable and the
local rate.
(j) Under through billing arrangements agreed to by
certain steamship lines, goods ccn.igned to either terminal for
orders may be reconsigned to points beyond the Isthmus and re-
forwtrded vi& the Panama Railroad for transshipment at the op-
posite tern-inal upon payment of the receiving ocean carriier's
proportion of the through freight rate from port of origin to
port of ultimate destination, plus handling charge: from storage
place to cars. The handling charges from cars to ship's side
will be absorbed by the Panama Railroad Company. In this case
the Panai.a Railroad Coimpany's freight charges will be those spec-
ified in paragraph 22 ka), Item 32 of this tariff.
(k) Goods deposited in "Hold for Orders" warehouse,
Cristobal, which consignees desire transferred to "Hold for
Orders" warehouse, Balboa, will be assessed a handling charge,
computed at the rates (,uoted in paragraph 2 of Item 32, for han-
dlinig from warehoc se into cars at Cristobal, and a second charge
in the same amount for handling from cars to warehouses at Balboa.









The same charge will again aiply when the goods are reforwarded
from Balboa. The same handling charges will apply, vice versa,
on goods "for orders" discharged from vessels at Balboa.
(1) Goods consigned "Balboa for Orders" via Cristobal,
and/or goods consigned "Cristobal for Orders" on which the des-
tination has been changed to "Balboa for Orders" prior to arrival
of the vessel, will be assessed a single handling charge, computed
at the rates quoted in paragraph 2 of Item 3-, for handling from
shipside across piers and into cars at Cristobal, and from cars
into "hold for Orders" warehouse at Balboa. The same charge will
apply when the good& are reforwarded from Balboa. The same han-
dling charges will apply, vice versa, on goods moving under the
same conditions in the opposite direction.
(m) Goods to be warehoused for orders should be con-
signed "Cristobal for Orders" or "Balboa for Orders." If the
consigned named is not resident on the Isthmus, the Panama Rail-
road Company will receipt for the goods delivered on its piers
and transfer such goods to its warehouses but will not assume
any liability except as warehouseman. The Panama Railroad Com-
pany will act as agent for the owner, consignor, or consignee
in forwarding goods, if desired. The fee for these services is
as follows:
Reforwarding goods for eaich outward bill
of lading- -------------- --- - ----$2.50
(n) There are no special forms for use in reshipping
except the warehouseman's order to release the goods ("Au-
thority to deliver cargo from storage on piers"). The shipper
takes out his bill of lading and consular invoice and the c.rgo
moves as regulEr outward local. Samples of the forms used,
"Negotiable warehouse receipt" and "Authority to deliver cargo
from storage piers," will be supplied on request to the Pan.ima
Railroad Company, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 24. State Street,
New York City.

hANDLING

Inward dutiable cargo.- The tariff laws of the United Stv.tes are not

applicable to shipments to the Canal Zone. Under the treaty of 1903 merchan-

dise arriving in the Canal Zone destined to the Republic of P..nama is subject

to charges imposed by the Republic of Panama. In actual practice, merch.t-ndise

destined for delivery ii. or through the city of Panama is not detained in the

Canal Zone, but is forwarded to Panamia, where it enters the custody of the

Panama Customs Service. Merchandise destined to or through the city of Colon
9
remains in the Panama Railroad warehouse at Cristobal, Canal Zone, under the

control of the Canal Zone customs official, until such shipments have been
714755 0-446--5






52


released by the Panama customs authorities in Colon.

Transit caro.- As has been previously stated, there are no facilities

for storage of commodities other than in the transit sheds of piers. Intransit

cargo, therefore, after being unloaded from the ship, is stored in these trans-

it sheds until the forwarding ship is ready to pick it up.

Cargo for order.- Goods for ultimate delivery beyond the Isthmus of

Panama may be consigned to the Canal Zone for order, that is, the ultimate des-

tiration of such cargo being unknown, it is sent to the Canal Zone in antici-

pation of future consignment orders. Cargo under this ciasrification, through

the cooperation of several lines, takes a through rate, each carrier taking out

of the freight it share in proportion to the distance carried. See items (h),

(i), and (j), under "Storage."

STEVLuRII'.G AND TRANSFERhRIG CARGO

Practically ail of the stevedorirg is done by the Panai;a Railroad. There

are, however, several lines which have been granted the privilege of stevedoring

their own ships, but these companies do not comete with the organization of

the Panama Railroad for the stevedoring of other ships.

The following definitions of terms and rates, rules, and provisions gov-

erning stevedoring and transferring cargo are quoted from Item 32 of Tariff 14,

The Panama Canal:

Ton.- Unless otherwise stated, a ton in this tariff is 2,000 pounds
or 40 cubic feet, at the option of the Panama Railroad Company.
Transferring.- Removing of cargo from the cleared slings of deliver-
ing vessels to within reach of receiving vessel's tackle, either directly
or with an interval of storage on piers, in cars, or lighters.
Stevedoring.- (a) Removing cargo from ship's hold (including winch-
men), landing on piers, lighters, or cars, at the option of the Panama
Railroad, and clearing slings. (b) Receiving at ship's tackle on piers,
lighters, or cars, at the option of the Panama Railroad, making up slings,
and stowing cargo in ship'b hold includingg wincilmen).
H .r.dlirLi.- The removal of cargo from cleared slit g- of delivering
carrier to cars, freight house or storage, or delivery of cargo from cars,
freight house or storage to within reach of tackle of receiving, vessel.





53


Rehandling.- Any picking up, sorting, separitiiig, or other han-
dlii.g of cargo made necessary by any cause, not the fault of the Panama
Railroad Company.
Wharfage.- Charges made against vessel for occupying berths along-
side wharves or piers, based on length of vessel. Has no relation to
cargo.
Transportation.- The charge for hauling cargo to a point beyond
that of steamer discharge.
Demurrage.- Charge made for use of Panama Railroad Company equip-
ment beyond the time limits specified in thi.. tariff.
Overtime.- The time for which hourly dock employees are paid at
prevailing authorized overtime rates for work on Sundays and holidays,
or in excess of eight hours during a period of 24 hours, beginning at
7 a.m. The cost of overtime is chargeable to the interest furnished
the overtime work.
Transit cargo.- Cargo consigned to the Isthmus, but whose cover-
ing documents clearly indicate a destination beyond the Canal Zone.
Transfer cargo.- That covered by through bills of lading to points
beyond the Isthmus.
Local cargo.- That for delivery at point where discharged from
steamer, or originating at point of embarKation.
Routed cargo.- Cargo covered by biLls of lading in which the on-
carrier is designated.
Unrouted cargo (or first line cargo).- Cargo covered by bills of
lading in which no mention i made regarding the on-carrier from the
Canal Zone.
Explosives.- Includes black powder, dynamite, blasting powder,
blasting caps, cartridges, detonating fuses, detonators, gun cotton,
gun powder, nitroglycerin, trinitrotoluol and similar explosives, as
distinguished from materials which are merely highly inflammable.
"Hold for Orders" cargo.- Cargo so designated on shipping papers,
billed to, or originating at a Canal Zone port for ultimate consignment
beyond the Isthmus. Such cargo is stored on the piers at Cristobal or
Balboa, original negotiable bills of lading exchanged for negotiable
warehouse receipts, and may be shipped or reshipped in such quantities
and at such times as the owner thereof may desire.
CARGO
1. 'Stevedoring: Ex Per
(a) General cargo- -------------- per ton- -$0.25 $0.30
(b) Cotton, wool, hemp, bark, leather,kapok,
hides, hay, straw, and other com-
modities of a light and bulky
nature- ----------------- - per ton- .40 .50
(NOTE If accepted on measurement
basis, general cargo rates will apply.)
(c) Boilers, locomotive parts, machinery,
railroad cars, etc., scrap machinery,
scrap boilers, etc., and other heavy
weights of over two tons -- --- -per ton- .40 .45
(d) Structural steel, iron pipe, etc.- per ton- .40 .45
(e) Loose brick, conduit, sewer pipe, terra
cotta, and tile - -- - -- per ton- .40 .45
(f) Loose scrap iron of irregular shape,
pieces not over two tons ----- --per ton- .40 .50










Lumber, switch and cross ties- -per la feet Bi4-
Rough timber and logs- -------- --per ton-
Piling -- - ----- - -per linear foot-
Horses, mules, and donkeys -- ---- -per head-
Cattle ----- --------------- --per heed-
Calves, goats, dogs, hogs, and sheep-per head-
Livestock, crated- ----------- -per ton-
Mail, baggage, and specie- -- -- -per ton-
Explosives ----- ------------- -per ton-
Nitrates -------------------- -per ton-
Bananas- -------------------- -per ton-
Cement ------ -------------- -per ton-


CARGO
Ex Per
-40.75 0O.b5
- .45 .55
- .04l .02
- .70 .85
- .50 .60
- .35 .40
- .70 .85
- 1.00 1.25
- 2.00 2.00
- .40 .45
- .55 .55
- .30 .35


2.
slings of


Transferring cargo between vessels from cleared
the receiving carrier:-
(a) General cargo, including rubber- - -per ton-
(b) Cotton, wool, kapok, hemp, bark,
leather, hides, hay, straw, and other
commodities of a light and bulky
nature- - ------ --------- -per ton-
(NOTE If accepted on measurement
basis, the general cargo rate will
apply.)
(c) Mail, baggage, specie, valuable goods,
and goods freighted on ad valorem
basis -- - ---- - -- -- -per ton-
(NOTE When actual weight of mail, or
baggage (including container) is not
shown on ships' papers, ordinary mail
(letters and prints) will be handled
at an average weight of 40 pounds per
sack; U.S. parcel post mail at an av-
erage of 60 pounds; other parcel post
at an average of 100 pounds and baggage
at 75 pounds per piece.)
An additional charge of one-sixteenth of
one percent of its value will be made
for the safekeeping of specie, valuable
goods, or other commodities on which
freight is charged on an ad valorem
basis as per bill of lading, or on ac-
count of which the Panama Railroad Com-
pany assumes a liability greater than
the maximum specified in paragraphs 20
and 22 below. Minimum charge on
specie- -- - ---- - - per shipment-
(d) Explosives --- --- - ------ -per ton-
(e) Horses, mules, and donkeys -- --- --per head-
(f) Cattle ----- --------------- --per head-
(g) Calves, sheep, goats, hogs, and dogs-per head-


54


(g)
(h)
(i)
(j)
(k)
(1)
(m)
(n)
(o)
(p)
(q)
(r)


42.00


- 3.50





- 3.00



















- 2.50
- 4.00
- 2.00
- 1.50
- 1.00






55


(NOTE The rates on animals listed in (e),
(f), and (g), above, apply on the first 25
animals or less; on all over 25 in a ship-
ment, the charge for handling will be one-
half the rates quoted.)
(h) Live animals, crated - - -- -- - -per ton- $2.00
(NOTE Live animals in transit will not be
received before the connecting steamer has
berthed unless the delivering carrier has
made arrangements for their care, pending
the arrival of connecting steamer.)
(i) Automobiles, tractors (except caterpillar,
crawler, or track-type tractors), trucks
and trailers, set up, movable on own wheels,
unpacked, owner's risk -
Weighing 5 tons or less- ------------ --each- 10.00
Weighing more than 5 tons -- -- ------ -each- 25.00
3. Isthmian cargo:
(a) For handling inward and outward local cargo
across docks and piers at Crostobal and
Balboa -
(1) General cargo, including rubber- - -per ton- 1.80
(2) Cotton, wook, kapok, hemp, bark, leather,
hides, hay, straw, and other commodities
of a light and bulky nature:
If accepted on weight basis- - - -per ton- 3.15
If accepted on measurement basis - -per ton- 1.80
(3) Explosives----- - -- -- - -per ton- 3.60
(4) On other commodities, the rates specified
in subparagraph (c) and subparagraphs (e)
to (i), inclusive, of pare graph 2, "Trans-
ferring Cargo Between Vessels."
(NOTE Bills will be made against the
delivering or receiving line, as the case
may be, and in case of shipments con-
signed to The Panama Canal or Panama Rail-
road Company, which are purchased delivered
on dock at Cristobal or Balboa, such charges
will not be accepted by the consignee.)
(b) Ocean cargo consigned Colon or Cristobal, dis-
charged on the docks at Cristobal, and ocean
cargo consigned Balboa, discharged on the
docks at Balboa, will be delivered at the
option of the Panama Railroad Company either
from the warehouses on the docks or elsewhere
in cars. When delivery in cars at points
within the terminal yards is requested by
consignee, a charge will be made for switch-
ing from ship's side to designated point at
$7.50 per car. Arrangement for delivery in
cars must be made prior to commencement of dis-
charge of cargo, otherwise a charge will be
made for rehandling ------- ------- -per ton-- 1.50
(NOTE Forty-eight hours free time will be






56


allowed for unloading cars of cargo, and 72
hours free time will be allowed for removing
cargo from the freight houses. After the ex-
piration of free time allowed, demurrage or
storage charges, as the case may be, will be
assessed as provided in Item 40 of this tariff.)
(c) Cargo from Colon will be received only at the local freight
house or in cars on designated tracks. Arrangements must
be made with the receiving and forwarding agent regarding
the time outward cargo will be received by him.
(d) Cargo for Panama landed on the docks at Balboa will be de-
livered at Panama at the option of the Panama Railroad
Company either through the local freight house or from
cars on team track. In addition to the handling charges
specified in section (a) of this paragraph, a charge of
75 cents per ton on general cargo and one-half the trans-
fer rates on special commodities, except hay and straw,
will be made against the delivering line for transport-
ing the cargo from Balboa to Panama. If in cars, delivery
must be taken within 48 hours after cars are placed for
unloading; if housed in freight houses, delivery must
be taken within 72 hours after cargo is ready for removal;
otherwise demurrage or storage charges, as the case may
be, will be assessed as provided in Item 40 of this tariff.
The minimum charge for transport-tion for each shipment
will be the basic rate per ton or per heud, with the ex-
ception of specie, on which the minimum charge will be,
per shi2, $5.00.
(e) Cargo from Panama for delivery to vessels at Balboa docks
will be received only at the local freight house, Panama,
or in cars on designated tracks. The rates for transporta-
tion from Panama to Balboa, :and for handling across docks
to ship's side will be the same as those fixed for inward
cargo in paragraphs (a) and (d). The minimum charge for
transportation for each shipment will be the basic rate
per ton or per head, with the exception of specie, on
which the minimum charge will be, per ship, $5.00.
(f) By prior arrangements, inward and outward local shipments
may be received and delivered at Balboa docks, when, in
the opinion of the receiving and forwarding agent, such
procedure seems desirable. In such cases, the charges
provided by subparagraphs (d) or (e), above, will be
assessed.
(g) The above rates apply on shipmnent3 for The Panama Canal,
Panama Railroad Company, and United States Government.
4. The Panama Railroad Company reserves the right to refuse all ex-
plosives, highly inflammable or other dangerous cargo. Gasoline, oil and
gr-,e, acid, explosives, and other inflammable or dangerous cargo accepted
for transshipment in quantities deemed unsafe for storage on the piers may,
in the discretion of the receiving and forwarding agent, be stored in cars
in the open yard, while awaiting the arrival of the on-carrying vessel. All
"in transit" gasoline in cases will be stored in cars until reforwarded. A









charge at the rate of $1 per car per day, or fraction of a day, will be
made against the delivering vessel for the period the cars remain under
load in this service. Cargu stored under the provisions of this rule
will not be subject to the regulations and charges of paragraph 1 of Item
33 Storage on Piers.

5. Explosives.- Shipments of ammunition for small arms (in car-
tridge or shell fully assembled) not exceeding in the aggregate ten (10)
tons weight or measurement, and pyrotechnic supplies not exceeding in the
aggregate one (1) ton weight or measurement, may be landed at either the
Cristobal or Balboa terminal docks upon observance of special precautions
to insure safe handling.

The stevedoring, handling, or transferring of explosives will be
subject to the regulations governing the conduct of vessels carrying this
class of cargo as provided in Rules and Regulations Governing Navigation
of the Panama Canal and Adjacent waters.

6. For extra labor used in the following:
(a) Stevedoring cargo at request of receiving carrier so as
to permit of its discharge at more than one port, or to
expedite discharge or loading of vessel at port beyond.
(b) Shifting cargo in hold in oraer to secure proper working
room, or from one hatch to another, cost of service, plus
15 percent.
(c) For rehandling, weighing, or sorting cargo on piers, for
the convenience of shippers, consignees, or vessels, per
ton, $1.50.

7. Cargo will be delivered to or received from vessels in port dur-
ing the following working hours, wnich will not be deviated from except
upon authority of the receiving and forwarding agent in cases of emergency.-
From 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. and from 5 p.m. to 1 a.m. LaDor will be checked on
for work beginning at 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. and will be paid a minimum of 4
hours for each of the takeons. Time of laborers unemployed for any portion
of the minimum hours paid, as specified, will be charged to vessels order-
irgthe labor unless covered by delay time for rain applied in accordance
with paragraph following.

When work is prevented by rain, Panama Railroad laborers will be
held 30 minutes for account of the Panama Railroad Company, and at the ex-
piration of this tiae, unless the representative of the vessel requests
that they be held longer at vessel's expense, will be dismissed for the
balance of the shift. The free allowance of 30 minutes will be made only
once during a regular shift. Labor waiting for vessel to dock or to be
rigged, or delayed on account of broken or faulty gear, of lack of power,
or for any other cause not the responsibility of the Panama Railroad Com-
pany which prevents the handling of cargo, will be billed against the ves-
sel at actual cost plus 15 percent.

When ocean carriers request it or it becomes necessary to work hourly
dock employees on Sundays or holidays or in excess of 8 hours during a period










of 24 hours, beginning at 7 a.m. in order to provide adequate dock labor
for working cargo, the additional expense to the Panama Railroad Company for
overtime paid its employees will be charged to the vessel involved at pre-
vailing authorized overtime rates,in addition to the regular per ton rates
for stevedoring, transferring or handling cargo.

Orders for outward cargo must be presented by receiving carriers in
writing between 7 a.m. and 4 p.m., at least 6 hours prior to the time vessel
is ready to receive cargo, in order that there may be ample time to properly
prepare papers and cargo check books. In case orders for outward cargo are
not presented as stipulated in the foregoing, and are accepted by the Panama
Railroad Company as a matter of emergency, any delay time for labor waiting
pending receipt of completed cargo order or check books will be charged the
vessel involved.

8. Vihen a receiving carrier orders cargo and fails to lift it, charges
will be made as follows:
(a) If in cars, switching- -- - - -- -per car- -lO.OO
(b) If on pier-, rehandling- -- - -- -- -per ton- 1.50

9. For the use of any additional appliances, machinery, wrecking
cranes, etc., necessary to discharge or deliver cargo due to the fact that
cargo cannot be handled by ship's gear, regular rates provided for such
service will apply.

A vessel taking sand or gravel, from cars, for ballast will be charged
25 cents a ton for the use of the pier, in addition to regular switching and
wharfage charges.

10. The minimum charge per ship for stevedoring and handling, or trans-
ferring cargo will be 25 cents.

11. All handling of cargo on docks operated by the Panama Railroad
Company will be done by forces of the Panama Railroad Company. Vessels
desiring to stevedore their own cargo will be permitted to do so only on
condition that such vessel or the owners or agents operating the same shall
be responsible for damage to property or injury to employees of The Panama
Canal or the Panama Railroad Company as a result of the fault or negligence
of the stevedoring force, other than that of the Panama Railroad Company,
employed by or for such vessel.

A written acknowledgement from the agents of steamship lines or from
the master of the individual vessel desiring to employ their own stevedor-
ing force will be required to the effect that the liability, as indicated
above, is assumed by the vessel or the owner thereof.

12. The Panama Railroad Comipany will not accept delivery of transfer
cargo unless payment is made, or assured, for storage and other charges
that may accrue to the Panama Railroad Company upon such cargo.

13. All charges against vessels must be paid or guaranteed before
vessel's departure. The receiving and forwarding agent will inform receiv-





59


ing carriers regarding storage charges that have accrued on cargo, before
it is delivered to then.

14. For use of electric winches, industrial trucks and tractors,
including operators, per hour or fraction thereof, $1.50. For use of
cargo trailers, without motive power, per hour or fraction thereof, 25
cents. For use of flood or cluster lights furnished a vessel, per shift
of eight hours or fraction thereof, each 50 cents.

15. Bills of lading, check books, :.nd other shipping documents, must
be delivered to the receiving and forwarding agent in time to permit an
examination of such papers before vessels begin to discharge cargo. Papers
must plainly show weights and/or measurements of cargo to be handled. If
cargo is delivered on the docks without necessary shipping documents to
insure prompt delivery, a charge of 10 cents per ton per day of 24 hours
or fraction thereof or 5 cents per package per day of 24 hours or fraction
thereof, at the option of the Panama Railroad Company, will be made against
the delivering carrier from the time such cargo is landed on the docks until
the shipping documents are delivered to the receiving and forwarding agent.

16. No change in routing shown on bills of lading will be recognized
or followed after check books and papers have been compared by the forces
of the receiving and forwarding agent, covering cargo to be discharged at
the Atlantic or Pacific terminals. If delivering carriers desire to
change routing on such cargo, it will be necessary for them to re uest the
receiving and forwarding agent, in writing, prior to commencement of dis-
charge to make such changes if they desire to avoid rehandling charges. In
the event such deviation from the original routing necessitates rehandling
of the cargo, a charge of $1.50 per ton will be made against the deliver-
ing carrier.

17. Bills will be rendered on the tonnage (either weight or measure-
ment) most advantageous to the Panama Railroad Company. In determining
tonnage of lumber, 500 feet, board measurement, will constitute a ton, based
on the measurement on which ocean freight is charged, commonly known as
"freight" measurement.

18. In handling transfer cargo and making local deliveries in Colon
and Panama, the Panama Railroad Company acts as the agent of the deliver-
ing steamship line and its liability is limited by any provisions of the
bill of lading.

19. The Panama Railroad Company shall not be liable for losses on
account of fire, unless due to the negligence of its employees.

20. The Panama Railroad Company shall in no case assume liability
for loss or damages to commodities received on the piers in excess of $500
per package lawful money of the United States, or, in case of goods not
shipped in packages, per customary freight unit, unless a higher valuation
is declared and the higher rates for the handling or transferring of val-
uable goods are paid to the Panama Railroad Company in accordance with the
terms of this tariff; provided, that this paragraph shall have no application





60


to coLmunodities received for local rail transportation only.

21. Valuable goods and cargo freighted on an ad valorem basis should
be plainly indicated as such on bills of lading.

22. Transportation:
(a) Transfer cargo between terminals Through cargo in trans-
it across the Isthmus of Panama will be accepted for
transfer across piers and for transportation over the
Panama Railroad from the slings of tne delivering carrier
at one ter;iiinal to the slings of the receiving carrier at
the other terminal, under the conditions of through bills
of lIding, and subject to the rules and regulations and to
the additional charge. for storage after the expiration of
the free period specified for through cargo, under Item 33
of this tariff or as sane may be modified from time to time,
at the following net rates (without benefit of drawback)
per ton -
(1) General cargo- - - - - - -per ton- -$ 8.00
(2) Coffee, cocoa, beans, guano, ivory nuts,
nitrates, and similar bagged commodities
---------- - ---- - - --per ton- 7.00
(3) Live stock (including domestic and wild
animals), live poultry and birds- - - - 16.00
(4) Explosives, acids, gas, fireworks, fuses,
detonators, and similar articles- - - - 24.00
(5) Specie and treasure Gold, silver, cur-
rency (vilue U.S.C.), articles freighted
ad volorem, -nd articles valued at '500
or more per ton: In addition to the
rate shown in subparagraph (1), 1/3 of 1
percent up to a valuation of 450,000 and
for all value above .50,000 1/16 of 1
percent. .,ini-um charge-- -per shipment- 5.00
(6) .,liri-u charge for transfer of cargo be-
tween terminals - - - - - - -- - 1.00
(b) Isthmian cargo -
(1) Cargo landed onr tne piers at Cristobal under through
bills of lading for shipment over the Panama Rail-
road for delivery at line points or Balboa-Panama
City; and cLrgo landed on the piers at Balboa under
through bills of lading for shipment over the Pana-
ma hiilroad for delivery at jine points or Cristobal-
Colon, will be delivered at the option of the Pana-
ma Railroad Company either through freight houses
or from cars on public team tracKs. On such cargo,
the Panama Railroad Company will assess the local
picr handling charge, as indicated by paragraph 3
of this item, !nd take, for the rail haul, 33 1/3%
of the through freight charge.
(2) Vvien charges, other than the local pier handling
charge, are shown on the bills of lading, which are
or should be a part of the through freight charge,









the Panama Railroad Company will add such charges
to tiie basic through freight and take 33 1/3% of
the total as its proportion of the through freight
charge.
(NOTE When the through freight rates shown on
the bills of lading are less than the regular "con-
ference" rates between the port of origin and des-
tination, the regular "conference" rates will be
used in determining the amount due the Panama
Railroad for it6 rail haul.
(3) Cargo landed on the piers at Balboa for shipment over
the Panama Railroad for delivery in Panama City will
be subject to the rules, regulations, and rates
specified in subpar-graphs (d) and (f) of paragraph
3, of this item.

23. Bananas or other unmanufactured native produce may be
delivered to ocean-going vessels by small coastal craft upon pay-
ment of a charge at rates of $1 a ton for such cargo delivered
in the terminal harbors, and $0.50 a ton for such cargo delivered
in Gatun Lake. Vessels receiving cargo in this manner shall notify
the receiving and forwarding agent, Panama Railroad Company, of
amount so handled, either by copy of manifest, or letter. Under no
circumstances, however, will vessel be permitted to transfer cargo
direct from one to the other away from the piers, unless there is
no berthing space available at the piers.

24. When one vessel is allowed to lie alongside another ves-
sel at the piers or away from the piers when no berthing space is
available, requests to transfer cargo from one directly into the
other, will be acted upon in each case by the Governor, The Panama
Canal, and each request will be considered solely on its merits.
The decision in any one case, in no way sets a precedent for future
cases. For cargo transferred directly from one vessel to another
where no work is performed by the Panama Railroad Company:
(a) Bananas or other unmanufactured native produce,
per ton- -$ 1.00
(b) Other cargo ------ -------- - --- per ton-- 2.00
(c) Small boats, launches, etc- - -per weight ton-- 2.00
(NOTE V.hen craft of this kind are discharged
from a vessel to the water or loaded on a ves-
sel from the water, where no service is per-
formed by the Panama Railroad Company, a charge
will be made, on a weight basis, at the rate
of j2 per ton, subject to minimum charge of
$10 on craft weighing less than 5 tons.)

Ocean-going vessels transferring cargo under the provisions of
this paragraph, shall furnish the Panama Railroad Company with com-
plete manifests covering all cargo transferred, in order that com-
plete statistical records may be kept as to cargo transshipped at
the Isthmus, and permit a Panama Railroad Company representative to
be present during such transfer.










25. Cargo consigned to the Isthmus for reshipment beyond, when so
indicated on bills of lading turned over to the receiving and forwarding
agent prior to the commencement of discharge, will be classed as "'Trnsit
Cargo" and subject to charges under "Storage," pr;rLraph 1, if forwarded
complete as originally billed and the origin-l bills of' l'idinF are surren-
dered to the receiving and forwarding agent prior to reshipment.

LABOR

The Panama Canal usually supplies the laborers necessary in handling cargo

to and from ships, although a few steamship companies have been authorized to

stevedore their own vessels. The force employed by The Panama Canal is composed

of two classes which, for local convenience, are designated "gold" and "silver"

employees. These terms originated during the construction period of' the Canal

from the practice of paying common laborers and other unskilled or semi-skilled

workers, which were recruited largely from the Tropics, in silver coin while the

skilled craftsmen and those occupying executive and professional positions, re-

cruited largely from the United States, were paid in gold. Although all employees

are now paid in United States currency, the terms are still used in designating

the two classes of employees. ages of employees on the silver roll bear no

direct relationship to wages of corresponding classes of workers in the United

States. As silver-roll employees are, for the most part, natives of the Tropics,

their wage scales are established at levels based on wages prevailing for trop-

ical lnbor in the Caribbean area.

On account of the heavy program o' construction work during the war emer-

gency, The Panama Canal found it necessary to recruit many contract laborers from

the Republic of Colombia, Jamaica, Costa Rica, and El Salvador. All recruitment

o"fices, except the one at El Salvador, were closed in September 1943. The El

Salvador office was closed at the end of the fiscal year 1944 but it was re-

opened in April 1945.






63


MISCELLANEOUS CHARGES

Bills of health.- For obtaining consular bill o' health at the request

of the vessel, a charge of $5 is made in addition to the consular fees.

Rat guards.- Rat guards will not be sold to vessels. They may be rented

for 50 cents each per day or fraction thereof from the recei-"ving and forwarding

agent at Cristobal or Balboa.

Telephone service to vessels. Connections to vessels at Balboa and

Cristobal are made for 85 for the first week or fraction thereof, and '2 for

each succeeding week or fraction thereof.

Annual inspection of vessels.- Fees 'or the annual inspection or vessels,

including the cost of the certificate as well as the cost of inspection and

examination of the vessels, are charged as follows:

For each row or sail''o-.t or panga equipped with detachable motor 1 1.00
For each vessel under 15 gross tons --- -- --5.00
For each vessel o0 15 grosi +ons o- over and not exceeding
100 gross tons ---------------------------- 10.00
For each gross ton in excess of 100 gross tons ----------- .05

Agency fees.- The Panama Railroad Co., through the receiving and forward-

ing agent, is prepared to act as agent for any vessel using Panama Canal facil-

ities when it has no other local agent to look after its interests. The agency

fee is 150 per vessel. This ree covers the services ordinarily performed by a

local agent, such as boarding the vessel to ascertain its requirements, arr9ng-

ing for purchasing fuel and other supplies, sending cablegrams and mails, secur-

ing bills of health, having consular documents visaed and similar services.

The handling of agency work for vessels stopping at Canal ports for handling

cargo requiring soliciting cargo or passengers, handling claims, etc., is sub-

ject to special arrangement.












Launch hire. The followingg charges are assessed for the use of

launches o;ned by The Panama Canal:

First hour Each succeeding
Launches or fraction half-hour or
thereof fraction thereof

Pilot Fish and Sail'ish $-------- --20.00 10.00
Corbina, Diana II, Gar, Gp-iota, ana hoaman 10.00 5.00
Albacore, Ambwrjack, Bass, Barracuda, Cat-
fish, Cormorant, Cotinga, Empire, Grouper,
Heron, Hibiscus No. 2, Jacana, Kingbird,
King'isher, Loro, Mackerel, Margarita,
Marlin. Mirlo, Owl, Pato Real, Perico, Pike,
Pompino, Porpoise, Ray, Sawfish, Sea Devil,
Shad, Shark, Shearwater, Skate, Snapper,
Snook, Toucan, Toucan II, and Trout- -- 7.00 .O
Bobo, Bonito, Dolphin, Egret, Gull, Hawk,
Helen Louise, Hyacinth No. 2, Mary B,
Jack, Tarpon, Teal, Tuna, and ;ahoo - 5.00 2.0
Garza and Motor Sailer No. ll763 - - 4.00 2.00











FUEL AND SUPPLIES

ELECTRIC CURRENT

Electric current is supplied to the entire Canal Zone by the hydro-

electric plants at Gatun Dam and at Madden Dam. The majority of the piers and

wharves at Cristobal and Balboa are able to supply electric current to vessels

for both power and lighting purposes. For information as to the type of

current available at the individual piers, see the tables describing piers,

wharves, and docks.

The following schedule of prices is quoted for electric current:

For metered current consumed by individuals (nonemployees) and
companies in the Canal Zone and by employees of The Panama Canal and
the Panama Railroad Company for commercial use:

First 150 kilowatt-hours per month - - $0.04 per kilowatt-hour.
Next 99,850 -- .02 "
Over 100,000 - .01 "
Minimum charge for any one user, $1.00 per month.

All services are required to be metered. If two or more meter connec-

tions are made for one user for different classes of service or "or his conven-

ience, the above sliding scale and minimum charge is applied separately for

each meter. The rates shown do not include lamp renewals or repairs to wiring

systems or appliances.

P PO"IS'TIONS

Prices will be quoted on lubricants, cordage, ships' chandlery, standard

articles for ships' use; and price lists will be furnished on meats, cold-storage

products, groceries, bakery products, fruits, vegetables, etc., on request by

the boarding officer, the captain of the port, or the department concerned.

Medical supplies may be purchased in unbroken lots from the general store-

keeper, Balboa, C. Z., at reasonable rates based on current invoice prices.










A flat rate of ,"5 for lunch service will be made for e.-Ich delivery to ves-

sels in the harbor at Balboa. Tne full tariff r-te will be charge for each del-

ivery to vessels at the outer ancnriorage at Balboa. At Cristob i. a flat charge

of V7 for launch service wiii be made for each delivery to a vessel in the harbor,

provided the vessel is reaLdy to receive the supplies when the launch pulls along-

side. M.ien del.y in delivery occurs due to the fault of the vessel, extra charge,

covering the actual cost of launch service, will be made.

ViATLR SUPPLY

Water, suitable for both boilers -nd drinking, is available at either Bal-

boa or Cristobal. The following shows the prices charged for water supplied to

vessels:

Canal Zone:
To vessels, alongside of uock, through hose, per 1,000
g.llon>- - - - - - - - - - - - - - 0.50
,lIiniiui charge, regardless of quantity ---------- 3.00
Delivered to ships at anchor by floating e ui-ment:
Per 1,000 gallons- - - --- - - - --- - - .50
Plus regular charge at hourly rates for the tug, or
other equipment used.
Charges are based upon even l,ou0 gallons, 5uO gallons
or over being charged as 1,000 gallons.
Delivered to ship by tug while engaged in towing ship,
per l,OUU gallons --- --------- - - --- -- - .00
;Linimum charge for l,00u gallons.

Colon:
Alongsiue of dock, per l,00u gallons- ---- --------- .50
minimum charge ------- ------------- ------------- .50
Charges are based upon even 1,000 gallons, 500 gal-
lons or over being charged as 1,000 ga-Lons.

Gatun Lake;
Vessels crossing Gatun Lake may take feed water without
charge, but permission therefore must have previously
been obtained from the captain of the port.

COAL BuI.JI4hIG

The two coaling plants operated by the Panama Iailroad Co. at the termini

the Panama Canal have a normi1 storage capacity of approximately 25j,000 tons.
The Ciitob:.i plant natL open storage space for 15u,Ou0 tons of bunker coal dnd










maintains a normal stock of about 15,0uO tons. The Balboz plant has a capacity

of about 100,000 tons but no stock is maintained as it is operated only occasior-

ally, the plant being held in stand-by status for possible emergency use. Berm

cranes at the Balboa plant are available by ;aeans of which coal can be delivered
to tram c rs, which deliver to reloaders from which the coal is carried by end-

less belt conveyors to sidps at the rate of approximately 250 tons per hour.

The Cristobal plant comprises two long wharves, one on each side of the

storage area, one of which is known as the unloader wharf and the other as the

reloader wharf. They are connected by what i6 known as the end wharf. The un-

loader wharf is 1,170 feet long, the reloader wharf is 1,156 feet long, ind the

end wharf 456 feet long. Depths in all berths at these wharves are sufficient to

accommodate vessels drawing 42 feet. The storage space for coal between the two

longer wharves has an area of approximately 315,OOU square feet. It is spanned

by two movable steel bridges, known as the stocking 1nd reclaiming bridges, which

travel the entire length of the coal pile and, by means of traveling buckets trav-

ersing the bridges, can reach any part of the storage pile.

The unloader wharf is equipped with four movable unloaaers which travel the

entire length of the wharf. These unloaders are equipped with 2 1/2-ton buckets

with a capacity of 250 tons per hour each. The coal is delivered to tram cirs,

electrically operated, running on an overhead trestle which circuits the entire

plant. These cars hold 10 tons and dump their loads onto the stock pile through

stocking and reclaiming bridges. The unloaders are operated by steam, all of the

rest of the plant being operated by electricity.

The reloader side of the plant also has four movable machines which can

traverse the entire length of the wharf. Coal is reclaimed from storage by four

bridge diggers, equipped with 5-ton buckets, which deliver coal to the tram cars,

which in turn deliver to the reloaders or to any other place desired. The reload-
714755 0-46-- 1









ers are fed by endless-belt conveyors which convey the coal from hodper to ship.

Ships can be bunkered at the rate of about 600 tons per hour with these fa cili-

ties.

The Panama Rhilroad 6o. will supply coal to vessels, including warships of

all nations. The coal carried in stock is the quality Pool No. 1, United States

Navy standard, Pocahontas or New River, run of mine, and can be supplied in any

quantity desired for bunkers.

Vessels desiring to purchase coal should comT.unicate their reuirejents to

the captain of the port, either at Cristobal or Balboa (preferably before arrival

so as to allow the coaling plant time to prepare itself to make prompt delivery),

stating quantity of coal desiredsexpected ti.e of arrival, etc. The port captain

receiving the order will transmit it to the office of the receiving and forward-

ing agent at Cristobal. Every effort will be made to expedite the coaling of all

vessels, but agents and masters of vessels will facilitate prompt delivery by

furnishing full information of service's desired as much in advance as possible.

Such services cannot be assured after regular working hours, i.e., 7 a.m. to

4 p.m.

The prices of coal, regardless of quantity, and the rates for services in

connection with its delivery, quoted from Tariff 14, as amended, are as follows:

Per ton of 2.240 lbs
Colon-
Cristobal Balboa
Delivered to vessels at coaling plants, trimmed
in bunkers- ----- ------ --------- 18.0 $-21.00
Delivered to vessels by lighters from Cristobal
coaling plant, trimmed in bunkers ---------- 18.50 -
For sacking lump coal for galley use, or other
grades of co?-l, in addition to the basic price
per ton:-
Labor, etc.-- - - - -- - -- -- - 3.00 3.00
Sacks, when furnished by the coaling plant - 5.00 5.00

If delivery is made at points other than the coaling plant, an extra charge

will be made covering the cost of delivery.






69



When request is made by vessel for trimiiing on deck, between decks, or for

special trimming in bunkers for the convenience of the vessel, the cost of such

services will be charged in addition to the basic price per ton.

OIL BUNKERING

Following the general policy outlined by Congress, all fuel oil tanks, with

their loading and unloading facilities, are controlled by the Government. Tank

sites and tanks are leased by the Government to private companies and all oils

are handled to and from storage through The Panama Canal's pumping plant, the

charge for handling being 2 cents per barrel of 42 gallons, each way. Fuel and

Diesel oil can be delivered to vessels at either Cristobal or Balboa, and prices

will be quoted on application. Ships requiring fuel oil and not having contracts

with any oil company should request bids by radio to expedite fueling.

Cristobal.- At or near the oil-tank farm at Mount Hope there are 39 tanks

with a total working capacity of 1,530,830 barrels. The average amount of fuel

oil available is about 500,000 barrels. Bunker C fuel oil is obtained from South

America.

The following table shows the number of tanks at the tank farm at Mount
e
Hope, or in that vicinity, with their capacities and the names of the lessees:

Mount Hope Oil-handling Plant

Name of lessee No. of Tanks Capacity (bbls)

Fuel oil:
Arrow Oil Company 3 163,700
Asiatic Petroleum Company 1 80,100
Panama Canal 1 80,900
Standard Oil Company 5 26b,800
Texas Petroleum Company 2 109,700
Union Oil Company 1 58,200
United Fruit Company 2 110,500
Total fuel oil 15 871190










Mount hope Oil-handling Plant (cont'a)


N,.ire of lessee


Nio. of Tanks Capacity (bbls)


Diesel oil:
Asiatic Petroleum Company
Panama Canal
Stan ard Oil Company
Texas Petroleum Company
Union Oil Company
Total Diesel oil

Gasoline:
Panama Canal
Shell Company
Standard Oil Company
Texas Petroleum Company
Union Oil Company
Total gasoline

Kerosene:
Panama Canal
Standard Oil Company
Texas Petroleum Company
Total kerosene


2
1
1 1/2
2
1 1/2
8
=i


1
12


2
1
1


GRAND TOTAL


133,300
41,700
80,000
108,600
66,700
430,300



79,300
8,900
20,000
8b,300
230
196,730


25,300
2,600
4,000


530,830
1,530,830


Notes: Above list includes 3 tanks at Gatun which are being placed
in service. Fractional tanks indicate joint occupancy.

Pipe-line e uipment at Cristobal consists of the following:

Fuel-oil pipe lines:
wu 12-inch lines to end of and encircling DocK 6; branches to and
around Docks 7 and o. Docks are provided with stop valves permitting the
oiling of two vessels at .ny dock. Dock 6 has 13 outlets which will soon
be increased to 21 outlets; Dock 7 has 24 outlets; and Dock 8, 24 outlets.
Two 16-inch and one lb-inch (0. D.) lines to Dock 16. Six double outlets
for the receipt of cargoes. These lines are connected to an 8-inch line
which encircles the dock with 15 outlets.

Diez-el-uil pidt liec:
One 10-inch and one l1-inch line to Dock 16. The two lines are
connected to three double outlets for the receipt of cargoes. One 8-inch
line to berths A, B, and E for bunkering purposes, 15 outlets. One line
(part 12-inch and part 10-inch) to the south aide and ends of Piers 6, 7,
rnd b and one 1u-inch line to the north sides of Piers 6, 7, and 8. Pier
6 has 21 outlets; Pier 7 has 25 outlets; ard Pier 6 has 24 outlets. Two
vessels rmay be bunkered through these lines at a tiae, with light and heavy
Diesel, respectively.









Kerosene pipe line;
One 6-inch line to berths A, B, ana C at Dock 16.

Gasoline pipe lines;
One 8-inch line Zor motor grade gasoline and one 6-inch line for avia-
tion grade gasoline to berths A, B, and C at Dock 16.

Balboa.- The oil tank farm at the Pacific terminus is located near Fort

Amador. It contains 43 tanks with a total capacity of approximately i,692,,CO

barrels including nearby tanks for Panama Canal or conmercial use. The average

supply of fuel oil kept on hand is approximately 500,000 barrels and the main

source of supply is South America. The grade of oil is Bunker C.

The following table shows the number of tanks, their capacities, and the

name of the lessees:


Name of lessee

Fuel oil:
Arrow Oil Company
Asiatic Petroleum Company
Panama Canal
Standard Oil Company
Texas Petroleum Company
Union Oil Company
Total fuel oil

Diesel oil:
Asiatic Petroleum Company
-Panama Canal
Standard Oil Company
Texas Petroleum Company
Union Oil Company
Total Diesel oil

Gasoline:
Panama Canal
Shell Company
Standard Oil Company
Texas Petroleum Company
Union Oil Company
Total gasoline


a Oil-handling Plant

ho. of Tanks


2
1
4
3
2
3


2
2
3
1/2
1 1/2
9


4
1
2
4
2


Capacity (bbls)


103,600
79,200
150,900
208,200
130,000
195,500
867.600


108,600
61,700
195,600
25,000
91,700
4b3, 000


94,000
20,000
47,500
67,000
e4,700
253,200





72


Balboa Oil-handling Plant (cont'd)

Name of lessee No. of Tanks Capacity (bbls)

Kerosene:
Panama Canal 3 14,200
Standard Oil Company 1 34,300
Total kerosene __4_ 481.500

Cleaning solvent:
Union Oil Company 1 2,900

Asphalt:
Union Oil Company 1 37,200

GRAD TOTAL 43 1,692,400

Notes: Above list includes 3 tanks at West Bank at Balboa and 3 tanks
at Gamboa which are being placed in service.

Fractional tanks include joint occupancy.

Pipe lines available at Balboa are as follows:

Fuel-oil pipe lines:
From the plant to the docks, one 18-inch, four 12-inch and one 10-
inci. fuel oil lines; at Dock 4, two 12-inch fuel-oil lines with 6 outlets;
at Dock 6, one 16-inch line and one 12-inch line with 10 outlets; at Dock
7, two 12-inch lines with 9 outlets; at Dock 15, one 12-inch line with 13
outlets; at Dock 16, two 12-inch lines with 10 outlets; at Dock 18, two 10-
inch lines with 25 outlets.

Diesel-oil pipe lines:
From the plant to the docks, four 10-inch lines; at Dock 4, one 10-
inch line with 5 outlets; at Dock 6, three 10-inch lines and one line
(part 10-inch and part 8-inch) with 14 outlets; at Dock 7, two 8-inch lines
with 13 outlets; at Dock 15 one 10-inch line with 11 outlets; at Dock 16,
two 10-inch lines with 7 outlets; at Dock 18 two 8-inch lines with 19 out-
lets.

Gasoline pipe lines:
At Dock 4, from the plant, one 8-inch line with one outlet.

Kerosene pipe lines;
At Dock 4, from the plant, one 6-inch line with one outlet.










-it
." *.,' l
"* 4


*
-. *~vu-.
-~ I -~
zpw~
-


Piers Nos. 6, 7, and 8, Cristobal.


rsz_..


V.4


9,
-- '~ 'IL
9,~~~
\Nr
Sb
'4,


Photo by U. S.. Army Air Setvlce


General View of Cristobal Terminals.


k

a


2%t
-I'
'tie


k :

































































































I












PORT AND HARBOR FACILITIES

PIERS., WHARVES, AND DOCKS AT CRISTOBAL

The Panama Railroad operates 8 piers and docks at Cristobal, including one

in Colon Harbor and one 3 miles up the canal channel from the Cristobal terminals.

The Mechanical Division of The Panama Canal operates 4 docks and the Army one,

making a total of 13 terminal facilities at Cristobal.

The terminals operated by the Panama Rilroad Co. include Piers 6, 7, and

8, and Docks 9 and 10, which are used for handling general cargo. This company

also operates the coaling plant at Pier 16, as well as a small pier in Colon Har-

bor used by small vessels in the coastwise trade, and the gindi Explosive Dock.

The general cargo piers and docks are constructed of concrete and steel and

most of their area is covered by concrete and steel transit sheds. Piers 6, 7, and

8 have pipe lines for supplying bunker oil to vessels; Pier 6 hi-s b dog cranes,

4 on each side, which can be moved along the pier as desired for handling general

cargo. Piers 7 and 8 and Docks 9 and 10 have 4-ton cargo masts on the roofs of

the sheds for use in handling cargo. More than 8,000 lineal feet of berthing

space is available at these facilities all of which has sufficient depth of water

to accommodate vessels drawing 42 feet.

Pier 16 is a modern plant for unloading coal and oil from vessels and for

bunkering vessels with both coal and oil. It comprises two long wharves known

as the "Unloader" and "Reloader" wharves, which are connected at the outer end

by the "End Wharf." Between the two long wharves there is a storage area of ap-

proximately 315,000 square feet for coal. This area is spanned by two movable

steel bridges, known as the stocking and reclaiming bridges, which are equipped

with traveling buckets by which any part of the storage pile can be reached. Four

steaji-operated unloaders, equipped with 2 1/2-ton buckets having a capacity of









250 tons per hour each, travel the entire length of the "Unloader" wharf. Coal

is delivered to electrically-operated tram ccrs running on an overhead trestle

which encircles the plant. These c,,rs hold 10 tons of coal ,nd they dump their

loads onto the stock pile through the stocking and reclaiming bridges. The "Re-

loader" wharf also has four machines which are movable along its entire length.

Coal is picked up from storage by four bridge diggers equipped with 5-ton buckets

which deliver it to the tram cars. The tram oars, in turn, transfer the coal to

the reloaders or to any other place desired. The reloaders are fed by endless-

belt conveyors which carry the co-l from hopper to ship. Further information

pertaining to this plant is given under the subject "Coal Bunkering" and in the

table on piers, wharves, and docks, Ref. No. 8.

The ivechanical Division of The Panama Canal operates Docks 13, 14, 15, and

17 in connection with repair work being done at Cristobal. The docks are used in

conjunction with the marine railways, the dry dock, and the various marine repair

shops.

Further details concerning the piers and docks at Cristobal are given in

the following table:









PIERS, WHARVES, AND DOCKS


PORT Cr:-b. Z.


REFERENCE NUMBER Ord MAP
NAME


LOCATION ON WATER FRONT



OWNED aI


OPERATED BY

PURPOSE FOR WHICH USED i




r-PE OF CONSrRuCTON







DESCRIPTION: I (te e)
--- i.


iipT- ii',r at. .. in Lr _




L.lTLtJ a" ILI1LV7L.
TRANSIT SHEDS :,e
TYPE OF CONSTRUCTION 4
LI. i11: witu.? T IFT "
TOTAL FLOOR AREA FOR CARGO(Si.F i
..NUMBER OF FLOORS
HEIGHT BETWEEN FLOORS (FT.)
ALLOWABLE LOAD PER Sp. FT. (LOS.)
_LIGHTED OR UNLIGOTEO
__MECHANCAL HANDLING FACILITIESi ,:z.


i Doci 3.


SArmy Pier.


0 C.loo E.rbor.


,olon Harbor, south of Arcy Pier


We^t side, Cid CrO oal.



7 he 7'n~ -;al.


.. .. .. ... .To. The Panama Sallroaii Co.


I RSndling coastwisc freightt from a.d oSAAlian gas.ral carg; ll ol r-
'll, U 1,4a1a& 9O..e.


t
7!:- r sr,1 -oncrete piles, c nor-e Steel and concrete.
_decK..


(feet) (eel)


27
250


feet1

63
42
63
23.


(feet)

Ise


118
1.5


feell


14 ......
63
1.5


250



Steel and cnarug.ted Iroa.
it: b'y '-
- 3.900.



250.


i ons.


1 (feet)
230


1.. 230
i l60 to 0


r' f I & ? -f a P I t i

i 1,330 1,030
-2 L2
t.. .. ..... 22 ..22
i 1,030 l ..-..._
S22 221Z? ..


Steel and concrete.
145 by 159.
- 150.200. .- .
i One.. ....


- 750.


Eiiht movtle dog craee, 4 oan each
side of pier. Portable ezulpezt
as lieted on PaoE 56.


RAILWAY CONNECTIONS


4. I Cf


1 COne 150-foot surface tract in rvar
of transit isheA........


SOne 1,025-foot surface tract on each
Sapron.......


WATER SUPPLY
tavsi t atle f, .j u< i.i



-FIRE PROTECTION



ELECTRIC CURRENT
(avail table to vessels)


REMARKS'


- Dy hoae ftroz cityo..in at rate of

__50 center per 1,000 ge.llons.


r.*.. C1'. J.'.Sif r *n J l- ".
jliil ... 1 .- 1 .; r. "


t ...l P e T.. .


By Lose from city =aims at rate f _
,,'eC tc 33.fi00 feletn oer hionetc;
-C cents .r.lOQ galltna.6

-IL .- aI.' r2,0 feE.tr o ho
l.:.-atB, anji 200 feet of hose. _


A.C., 110-volt. single-phase, 25-
cycle at 10% amperes for lighting;
A.C.. 220-volt. 3-phase. 25-cycle at
200 armperes for power.
Two 12-inch fuel oil lines encircle
pier 6 with branches to Piers 7 and
P. Stop valves permit delivery to
two vessels at any pier. Pier 6 has
13 outlets, soon to have 21.
SOne Diesel line, part 12-Inch and
part 10-Inch, to south side and one
10-inch Diesel line to e.rth aide
Pier 6 with 21 outlets. Heavy oil
can be delivered to one vessel and
light to another, but two vessels
cannot take same grade at one time.
--L________---








PIERS, WHARVES, AND DOCKS


PORT Ciitn 2


REFE PENCE NUMBER Ord ,AP
NAME

LOCATION ON *ATER FRONT



OWNED BY

OPERATED BY_, '

PURPOSE FOR WHICH USED




TYPE OF CONSTRUCTION


Pie ..r .... 5.
I Pier .


; ... r 7,


peck 9.


SaI'. s lde, Ol Cristobal. West siLde, Old. Cristobal. West side. Cla. Crftoba.;

If I

TLe I .l... "T- t i .. Tle i aisa 2&ailrad. Co-.

. ............... .... ... ... ... .. .. ... .. ..... ... ............ . ..... . .. .. . . .. .. .


oil.. bunc.rin.. .an.li i general eargo.; oil .l..ri.n. ndli.g ge.erz.- C.Xro.




St-' .- I 2:: .: ".r .:ncrete., teel ad concrete. b. :





VT


DESCRIPTION .
01 IHENSIONS 0 9 N
^Aju ^r..fL ai-1ul.5JaEEied ^
-r-TO --C rhrr YNI i Apl F - -


.Ai. .', w .. i 0 % ''.

L ,uI .' 'K ULN IirTLL'
TRANSIT SHEDS, -
T~i'P- ,,O*.F'. -T i.- T,rV,-. -* 2:^t' ,l
L,-'T. .' w, r.T. (rT.' .I
T ~ ~ ~ .: -, I" L A IA.

NUMBER OF FLOORS 4 Oe.
HEIGHT BETWEEN FLOORS (FT.)
ALLOWABLE LOAD PER Sq. FT. (LBS, ,
LIGHTED OR UNILIGHTFD ,.. t-*r. *
MECHANICAL HANOL,ING ACLITIES' -: :r.


I.

977
42?


1.000 250
-. ".. -.--------
7,0o 50 ,

.... 2 .... LO S . .....




..teel Ad Co
-L. L; 1
l .. t .. .. . ..


st oz each side of


shed roof. Portable eqa1ament as per
J list on page 96.


.... r .:e '-r side Foce Lo.er sde
A. A 2 Ct? I) iBrtlA B I (feet)

930 1.010 ,06g

y. 1 1 1Q. . _ltoE __ ...._
1 25 25

. . ~750.. .. .
. .._ ..... .... ..... .. ...... Hl it s ^ - ^ -.
._. .. __ . ._ Co n. . .
ierete. Steel and, concrete.
1.122 by BO.
,3.200.
CMe.


750.

Four-I Aon c.Tr0 amast on each B sie of
I shed roof. OnUe electric crauewith
9Q-fcot reach. IFingle l t caacit-y
5O tind at B.rth A. PFoXita 4le. -
Scent a p.or liet an ate L6.


Upper side
(feet)


'llL~iA COrNIEC7,ION'.









COATER SIJPPLV




FRE PROT-EC CION



ELECTRIC CURRENT
(available to vessel,

REMARKS:


'i.. -I E rface track on each
ap ron.... ....









1.210Q' AwllQai per ALLU.i~a~
5. cents pur 1.00D 04a.iA(o.


i' a. -200 feet ofllier. isatcr
.1oliA.l.a.. -1.200 feeL of hoaa.


SOne 95-f.ct surface tc. .n..cai One 106g-foot surface tracK on aprej-
SaprE; two depresse.d tratci irsi e oI l.QCO-:ct depressed track i- .-
... tr.. L -Iose. l _tjatfal .len a a. side trbn it shed. ._







By hose from city mains at 11,90- t, Ill hoese fror city mn t 11,300.tO to
* j 5rx'C. a&Al..oe per minute; charge 5 C ga.Qoa. cr aml.te* cbarPrn
. 5 cents per 1000O gallons. 5 50 cats B er 1,00 1all .9.......

. Ton ext'-!rlaLerv. 10 water bicirets., Vine .xtlnguisher's, 9 water buccets,_
. f231 feet as 1a..... .. .. .. l teeth of '-cse. ..


A. *-' I,. --rRi- 25-cycle same an at Re, Vo. 4 ier L. .... .......... .e SB at ief. No. ., er 7.
.'* 1 t-r i I ',',_,. A.C. .
'* -,-,- IT 5-p, har. ,-- ?-y-ctr le at 200.. .... ....
Samperes for power,.. .. ... ... ... .. -
BratAiche frta the two 12-ir.Ic fIel oil Ici6s. epClxciQa Pier. a..A'.ta s Afl -
Sr., T and 8. Pi.ers are provided with stop valves penoltting the delivery .......
f 11 to two veasle lat any pier F.ier 7 oas 24 outlets and Pier 6 ha. 21.
I outlets. On1 Dieel oil lite. part 12-inch and part 10-inch, to south side .. .........
1.-.i !. ..:- Qo1 line oo north sides of Piers 7 and .,
wi ith 25 outlets Qa Fier 7 aas 24 outlets on Pier 8. Only one vessel can be
fiericed. thrug thtse lines at t& tt If one type Diesel oil Is requlre"
1 t ;.i, ibi- .LI 1. 1 : ll T, It one n r eaeal and m. A vy Diesel lil to
j I 1, Lt BUl tlme.


1750. ..... .
-{ligihted. .__.
Four-ton cartco masti or hed. roof.
Portable -a1i.uent as lur lAe.-r
page 6.


,,L


r







PIERS, WHARVES, AND DOCKS


PORT Brlatobal. C. Z.


REFERENCE NUMBER ON MAP
NAME

LOCATION ON WATER FRONT



OWNED BY

OPERATED BY

PURPOSE FOR WHICH USED


TYPE OF CONSTRUCTION


DESCRIPTION:
DIHEN SI ONS

BERTHING SPACE AVAILABLE_____
WIDTH OF APRON
DECK ABOVE M.IL.W.
CAPACITY PER SOQARE FOOT (LBS.)


7-



-east aide. Old. Cristohal.



fl.rg..-ihC~r.a :k L. Ir .i .


R


(feet)


8
Pier 16 Coaling Plant.

Telfers Island.



I It- fi>JlfLa I.zol.~


.. ............ .... ]_......3hT .ffll.a_ .U '.BiL~a _. .

. .Era. c .... i i '. rec o. . ....
__i rieiaEm prnOucmiA.... .


cL.i '. fi- e %tbar-- -....... Concrete and ateel. "End "harf c
_B.na~io Wharf" on lower eide
_.._a Uloa~e~r. bWbarf! ociSBuper side-
______________loa CfaiQ~.eaL itflraego araL


S I eet I ,- -
I (feet) I (feet)


7:IF

7rO


LIGHTED OR UNLIGHTED j Lighted.
TRANSIT SHEDS: ne_
TYPE OF CON!TRtICTIO S Al M. kNKi.
C_ *LC 55J wlT. [.l 111 .1 u.Q i_ LO:

TOT AL _TLO09 ARE(I 0-) P A,&1' .0 6 (- T.1I ..
0URB Of LOORS .
SL T_____ r BiTfE fl'i 1 .. ....
ALLOWABLE LOAD PER SQ. FT. IL6S. 11
LIGHTED OR UNL I H ILi4te.


Doce 13.

At Mt. Hope, adjacent to repair ..
wharf ea ndry dock-Li.... ..___..

The Panama Canal...........

_M<
In Coazt cInn wIth marine repair wor x




Tinber pile. timber-deiaed. sh .......r
wharf... .....


Face i L.-wer sle '*',r side Face lower side Upper side
I er er s Ef iee, re S & DI
ertth J jerns A & 5, rr C & (fet) ( e) (feet)






.1 750 .. .............. 750 .. 750" 25 ...
"g 1-179 -1-!.-- 1158--- rlei..... .-75-Q _.... ..... ,

j o n ._____________. .. 4 -^- -- -------- - --------


MECHANICAL HANDLING FACILITIES CraJ.a. JMaL. On roIf .f a"O. rrilP .I _t< .OhB -.EtliO.

eC__qOA_______ _eO e e o-- ..L .. .... -- --.......... .... .. .


RAILWAY CONNECTIONS


WATER SUPPLY I
(a.a.lable to isse-ls
(j *a *1 db l 10 *f 11* 'i 1ii


FIRE PROTECTION
(other t cir ;ity se, -.i


ELECTRIC CURRENT
(available to vessels)


REMARKS:


______________________________________________________________ I _________


P...rtahle equipiant. as per lis. on
Page S6.


T-c. eurfase ir&Cb '.r& ,ai je ,Lr.I One 7.5-foot strfece track on wharf..
t 5oti 1.egth l.^i ItEI..


. --- ..------------------1 -


Dh LnomA 1Xi J" m&Lns at ra-i of .51 lnne fl=m it~y ELLI&B at rate .1 d '.-Be ;'r:i cry z'mCi a. rf.E i
i1.9,,1 .1. %,1,^.v fc ljnt Par L-nr_ i ,r t. 'i,',a ; "..h
50 cents per 1.000 gallons. __ 50 cent8 er 1.000 L gfl .. .. 50 ienrs 1per lt .. allon.


SlE aaLUnJ.hr. oio __wa.l r LC&... .. I'LtL vaAt A'nere. "IU-Ir .
A-nA' -h Lc I 1-zke.ltal. anrd X--- furi .;e,


IM Amp.-r' '1 -vnolt A.c., sin~de- None.


._S6BS an a~t Ooc lV and 1l5. Sef.
| oe. 10 and 11.


One 18-inch and two 16-inch fuel oil r
liies with 6 double outlets for re-
ceiving oil, connected to 8-inch ...
line with 15 outlets vhich.encircleel
Sdock. One 12-inch and one 10-inch
S iesel line connected to three dotAh
cutlets for receiving cargo. One 8-
inch Diesel line to Berths A. B, and
1, with 15 outlets for buakering.
SOneG 6-Inc. kerosene line to B~rths A,
B, and C.
One 8-inch and sne 6-inch gaeollne
-lns--to Berths A. B. anALe.. -----L


#-


0


1 a I - ';.


---_-__-











REFERENCE NUMBER ON MAP
NAME


LOCATION ON WATER FRONT



OWNED BY


OPERATED BY


PURPOSE FOR WHICH USED




r .. E . ..... ... .








DESCRIPTION :
OS MA N Sl ON S

MI lxi s;f draflt af-fc=T:ido tdi
BERTHINGC SPACE A *AILAA LF
WIDTH Of APRON
C ABOVL 1.L.W.
CAPACITY PER SQUARE, i ,l '.

.r" L N.- L-.I


PIERS, WHARVES, AND DOCKS
PORT Critqti, c. z.,

10 11 12
[lS c 1. .I Doce 15, Dock t7.


North slde of *clp at Cristobal Dr-j South eIdc of llp at Cristti l r5 e rar mIrI .e Pj'llway So. N M. zmt.


ttz-..~. t.LLII.;. .. ..a, ...o.C wjiCe..~ C11. Sci |h ~nc ajJ ~h~cp tt~z.. rh _________ CL.A
"QM .~e Mt !%po.-*

P i;Lu~j lle.. ;( Lah ~a i^CbuL"lCC. ^lyllrt. '0e Itafia CaLAl*| Mech*aiCal- DIVISlnn. ThA ? rAnMA CAnMl -


RTaIr wbhra.


* IL-. i '........;--.. ed shore





I1 -


i; 675

3-.


.{ -~
". -- rte .


Lower Sde I tpper slde
('eet) (feet)


i Bepalr what-f.


b 5teel ao.4 coacrete *iore whrf.


Fare
feetf

900



Open vaxf. I


n750.
.4l..ilted,.
.NcHna.


!TPEOE LONSTRU0UON :
L I I'r I,- I -- )


TOTAL FLOOR AREA FOR CARGO ,
NUMBER Of fLOORS
HEIGHT BETWEEN FLOORS (FT.)
ALLONWABLE LOAD PER S. FT. (LBS.
LIGHTED OR UNLIGHTED
MEC A"tI.L ArLLir.GLI FACnLITIE:. ; i 1, at listed 01 pat


?6. .



..I .. .


Lower 5sde I opoer s$ e
(feet) (feet)


TitBer pile.
Swhaarf.






950
( t)


950 I

Open whurf.


tLfbher-LecLed Ashora_. .






Lower sde Upper Nde
fet) (feet)


Lihted.
i, Sat.


5-.tn steam dry doctk crtae portable Portable equip-nt as listed on page
equipment a iiasted oan age E6. g 6. ..... ....


RAIL n 4a C-'rrNEC T IONS


w. ..- ..-if c.rface Ijac on open
Ci .Mhari.


One 3CO-fAct AuIfauce tzp-a on opaen L's.
wharf,


Ir. Lf ti -, .L.. r6 late .,f
1 ,L.j'.'. L. t ..-L 4 .tri.Oc per ..-l I.
'. .L~i~e- r-L i p-r 1.0 C. gailoarL. .i


FiRE PROTECTInN
(other than city service


ELECTP,C rjFRPENT
(a ai table to ve,,elsl


REMARKS.


.i1... .r. a. rL.e i'. ..*6 lr. .11., Z.r. L &L revie 'A
';- -? ;crt p r p-i r gl rls. .. ;. chre '.'' h'L.l e tr gs ..Z.
ehiQ T0 uete per 1,0CC gploos. ,ch-arge 50 centR per 1.i000 gallon.n


4I 3)O5 feset. of _hose.


11. car-, .i',-. .:t. h '. -1e-pbae, 25-c'cle and 100 am-ewcs. )lO-22t--olt. A.C., ,*j ae, 62."-ycle for
-LightIng. 23C, padres. .0-vo-t) A.a C.. 1p7aoe, 25-c-cleand.60Qczperea, 220-oa0 ti A.C.* 3-pTase, 62?.-5cycle
A wr r.i e ; *' a jE l .- '* .*1 I L r '' '' i [ ''*.- .. .... ..


WATER SLIPPLV


I








PIERS, WHARVES, AND DOCKS


PORT _risat.ohal. C. Z.


REFERENCE NUMBER ON MAP
N A M E' .... --. - -.


LOCATION ON wATER FRONT



OWNED BY


OPERATED BY

PURPOSE FOR WHICH USED




TYPE OF CONSTRUCTION







DESCRIPTION:


DIMENSIONS
Moxlimim A-r.a t:


BERTHING SPACE AVAILABLE
WIDTH OF APRON
DECK ABOVE M.L.W.
CAPACITY PER SQUARE FOOT (LS.)
L"ij" DRt jUIALimIfU! -_ -__
TRANSIT SHEDS.
TYPE Or COfTTuCT, O
L____ EGIrT AL .[,TC 1I.I
TOTAL FLOOP AREA ro C1RGO (%Q.rT.
NUMBER OF FLOORS
h lGHT 6i T.E l'' iL 5 If I
ALLONABLIi LOAD PEA ..T. iE.I
L. PI LI l Lr LV if." OR
MECHANICAL HANDLING FACILITIES


RAILWAY CONNECTIONS:










WATER SUPPLY
(available io .esispi



FIRE PROTECTION



ELECTRIC CURRENT
(available to vessels)


REMARKS


Three ilLes up Canal channel froro.
Crl.taho.l piers.

-Te lam.a &_iLr11.1 r .,.




kn.L aalin" ArlwilvS t.


~lLf~re2 ~..r


(t eet)

200

200
Qponi wh f



UltilALuiii






lkn,. __


icrle.






(feet)



























It

^--------


a2QafridiaA iera8 A Aln.ead.......
sida,


(feet) (feet) (feet)





- - --- ---- --- ---- -


haika.


LaLIQaLaj l I., L Kataar Lampla. Z
* ar if~,jlahfiro. h~.L ^Ll.U fa&&. 1. Jzs_


_____________________________ 1~-


. L
(feet)



... : '-


A mmoQA R


R


(f et), ( et)





80


PIERS, WHARVES, AND DOCKS AT BALBOA

Twelve of the 13 piers, wharves, and docks owned by The Panama Canal in Bal-

boa are of concrete dnd steel construction. They are operated by The Panama Canal

or by the Panama Railroad Co. and provide more than 8,600 feet of berthing space,

over '7,700 feet of which can accoiIimodate vessels drawing 30 feet or over. Pier

1, Ref. No. 1 on the map, is a timber pile, timber decked T-head structure and

is operated by the United States Navy Department as a landing for private and Gov-

ernment launches, including those used by the Quarantine Service.

Dock 4 is operated by the Supply Department of The Panama Canal in connec-

tion with the oil handling nd bunkering plant. Fuel oil, Navy standard fuel oil,

heavy and light Diesel oil, kerosene, motor grade and aviation gasoline, and as-

phalt are discharged at this dock and vessels are bunkered.

The Panama Railroad Co. operates Docks 6 and 7, the east half of Dock 15,

Dock 16 and 17, and Pier 18. Dock 6 is used for receiving fuel oil, heavy and

light Diesel oil, gasoline, and kerosene, for bunkering vessels with oil or coal,

and as a passenger terminal. Dock 7 is used for oil bunkering and for unloading

sand and coal barges. The east half of Dock 15 is used for passengers and cargo,

Dock 16 is used for handling general cargo, _nd Dock 17 is a public landing for

passengers and small stores. Pier 18 is the only facility in Balboa having a

transit shed. It is used for handling general cargo and as a passenger terminal.

Docks 8, 12, 13, and 14, and the west half of Dock 15, are operated by the

.Aech:-nic-il Division of The Panama Canal and are used by ships undergoing repairs

or waiting to enter the dry docks. Dock 19 is used by the Marine Division of The

Panama Canal for h~idling small stores and pa_.engers and in connection with the

repair of launches.

Further details are shown in the following table of "Piers, '.'harves, and

Docks."








PIERS, WHARVES, AND DOCKS


PORT lboC


REFERENCE NUMBER ON MAP
__NAME .

LOCATION ON WATER FRONT


OWNED BY


OPERATED BY

PURPOSE FOR *HICH USED_


TYPE OF CONSrRUCT-ON


DESCRIPTION:
DIMENSIONS
O__axinaB draft accomodated
BERTHING SPACE AVAILABLE
WIDTH OF APRON


DECK ABOVE M.L.W.
LAPAC,1T iEk UNALGE FDOT
LIAMTRED Ol 11.1HTEFD


1
Pier i ar..tlipe Wharf,





The Pannam C-nal


U. S. Nav&.


II,
~kd.LL.,~L*.z .e~5*.IL~A~J~L .a(A ~ *
naenen~~r 1n~,nrhen


Doc" 4.


2he PanAmaO ........

Sllrunl DeV -tmeont The Pftnnmn Cnnel


Ii '-r,.,, -Qs:w.rIL


i .-I- L-c.r TininriiAi -m.ci LfA.XrLt ALii SLeeL p.lr.


Docki 6.






1 he rana Canal.. ........


t-- hsanmmn Bailrad. Co.



I pa'enger terminal.i _.-,



IC.:Eicretes&r.: a'.ee. sLLra .n2aufi.


Upper side
(feet)


r,.


TRANSIT SHEDS: I.pj -


TYPE OF CONSTRUCTION
L[GT" a.D mirT. I| T.I
T,)I4L FLOOR LA h i* RA C I APGO Si .iT.
NUMBER Of FLOORS
)i._ r;"T bil'IfF.i FLOL14 L i .i
ALLONABLE .LOA PUk Sq.FT. tLB'.
LIGHTED OR UNLIGHTED
MECHANICAL HANDLING FACILITIES


lI-~


t ,.,e. W, ,Te


RAILWAY CONNECTIONS: None, _______-None_...........


WATER SUPPLY
(available to vessels)


.Birm crauji diel~l :,&I L, .roa cd-rL
v_ t ichLAellver It to raloaders, thenac
. coal is. cerid-a-n~8sbl..o -
Iveyors to ship at a deliTer' rate of_

Portabp e soximtely t 2 plted o n proau
____ Partaba nl nmll sHf- nn


None.


4 4-


-fr 1-


FIREPROTECTION ____________________________


FIRE PROTECTION 1aone.
(other than city service)


By hose from city mains at rate of_
1 5 OniI *o KO R!Tin eeilvs 1,a, toe u.


50 cents per _WQ0 gal lone.


11.900 to 59M.OOgGllonz per hour:
5a pri 1,.000along. f--


One foma engine. fire etinguishers. Seven fire extinguishers.
and nOO feet of hos-.


ELECTRIC CURRENT None. N|ne
(available to vessels) ____________________


REMARKS:-


it


Two 12-inch fuel oil lines. 6 outlets.


nea 10-Inch Die1 ,'line. 5-l s .
One S-lnch gasoline iue. I outlet.


714755 0-46--7


One ig-inch and one 12-inch fuel oil
line with 10 outlets.
Three 10-inch Diesel oil lines and
one an 1 n 1,et i + n


part 8-Inch wlth li4 outlets._


_______ I cot~e&


Su-l Denar -t. The Ems- 0"..'


I r QQQ rQ r- -I'-- hour:


No 12-inch fuel oil 1Lnes 6 outieta.


-! 1;_<--1.








PIERS, WHARVES, AND DOCKS


REFERENCE NUMBER ON MAP
NAME

LOCATION ON WATER FRONT



OWNED BY .. ..

OPERATED BY

PURPOSE FOR WHICH USED


c& 7,


TYPE OF CONSTRUCTION . e wharf.



- - -- -- . . . . . . .


DESCRIPTION : (f eet) (feet) f
DIMENSI O1 S 1,05Z
&.axiouA draft a tad.
p o. I .,imu Spr fc Avo~i-al ii t '.... 1 5 .-f- .. 7-


PORT B_-l.l . C Z..... .

| 5 . 6 ..... .
Doc& 8. Dock 12,





- ... .. ..na a Caa&l.
.1 .... .. . . .
.... ..... .....I a .a~a~.L. I.~ . ......L.~1


ai..r..




I St l and cncr.rets wharf, with 1.20-_
1"I-t teel c ia a .AifO .... --


epa,.- xbar .




_Si;>i O :oncrete wharf.j


- ,-. I L .-.. -. ; i, I I
(feet) t |(feel) ( Iel (feet)


S..470. 4 200
3 4* _ . I . ....... l5 ...........
-i' ZIf ; A 9 ._ .. [ . 2 0 _


- .ide Upper s-de
(feet) (feet)


1-- .. .. .r.,:;. ... . i. ..
. _...... .O EC K__t 0. J. ,w .. .. . .. ..... 1 .......... ..... .. .............
--- ECKABOff E 14.L,.W`

Ll J. '.LU 0 ," L rL..TLL' . .i..
T.RANSIT SH DtS: o .n.. ... ..
TYPE OF COST RUCTION |
_ _L.ENG T H-t Ap TII (FT.)
T O T A L F L O O R A R E A '- ,4'' 6. .
NUMBER OF FLOORS .
EIOT HT BETWEEN FLOORS (FT.)
ALLOWABLE LOAD PER S FT. (LB.
LIGHTEO OR UNLIGHTED
MECHANICAL mArdDLiNG FACILiTIES: ... ta't as iite i. #aee | ortale eRuiment as lsted o
86.
..... .....


Open wharf.

..5. 750 .

t Ae.


.. ........ ..... ... .... .. ... .. ..
1Portable eqialate.t a8_listed onjpage
p 6. -


RAILA, CONNEC TONS


WATER SUPPLY




FIRE PROTECT ION
(othe. tha. Clt. ser'"v ce.)


.- ,u--foot surfarno tracK on opa en One 470-foot surface irack- -na npn
S ............. ........ ..harf ... .... ...


By si rom za ikt ealans at rate of 2;' Asa fr.n city manla at rate of
*. ..- 1 .. *. 'r'.,- J r r ti, ' ge r ,'' : : -- r ?.- .r ,
; ch B p er c.- '- -iL.. ^. .. pn' er 1,000 gallons. _.......


One 200-foot surface track on OTen
W harf. ... ....








, By 'T6e fro= cit wins nt rteof
i5.0 .' e .t pe .;r Ai.C OO i-; n hc-. r.
5,Q -0 seauS- .plr. 1.000 Ca-oaiB.-__


. e .


ELECTRIC ,IJRRENiT


-M-31US;-


A...... UL liJLi ..tl --t.L l..*.Vr tl.rI
,.L fl &.. ^ - i A e a ... 1. ; .. t AJ .
amiperes .iL/-7uiL f1- -&' LI.
A.a.. a 1.. amp.er-. 2-J-'?it. 3-

.', I1-- >~:.L '.oi LL IL j ovttl.i.... ..t -
L Ut-6 .......- .. eul.... ..t. .-. ....
'atb.


feet)!