Sacred dramas, chiefly intended for young persons

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Material Information

Title:
Sacred dramas, chiefly intended for young persons the subjects taken from the Bible, to which are added, Reflections of King Hezekiah, Sensibility, a poem, and essays on various subjects, principally designed for young ladies
Physical Description:
vii, 1, 9-191, 1 p. : ; 16 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
More, Hannah, 1745-1833
Dobson, Thomas, 1751-1823
American Imprint Collection (Library of Congress)
Publisher:
Printed for Thomas Dobson ...
Place of Publication:
Philadelphia
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Religious drama -- Early works to 1800   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1787
Bldn -- 1787
Genre:
Publishers' advertisements
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
Evans
Statement of Responsibility:
by Hannah More.
General Note:
Signatures: A-2A⁴.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisements: p. 192 at end.
General Note:
Two states noted by Evans; one on fine and one on common paper.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 024802743
oclc - 40559634
lccn - 12027295 //r98
Classification:
lcc - PR3605 .M6A76 1787
System ID:
AA00021488:00001


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SACRED DRAMAS,

CHIEFLY INTENDED

TOR YOUNG PERSONS:

THE SUBJECTS TAKEN FROM THE BIBLE.

To which are added :

REFLECTIONS or KING HEZEKIAH,

AND

S EN S I B IL IT Y,

A P 0 E M.


r HANNAH MORE.



All the Books of the BIBLE are either moft admirable and exalted Pieces of Poetry, or are the beft materials in the world for it. COWLEY.




PH I E L P H I A:
PRINTED FOR THO OBSON, IN SECOND-STREET,
BETWEEN MARKET AND CHESNUT-STREET.
M?,DCCLXXXVII.























I- L-1









TO HER GRACE


THE DUCHESS OF BEAUFORT;


gg ] THESE SACRED DRAMAS ,4

ARE, WITH THE MOST PERFECT RESPECT,

INSCRIBED:


AS, AMONG THE MANY AMIABLE AND DISTINGUISHED QUALITIES

WHICH ADORN HER MIND,

AND ADD LUSTRE TO HER RANK,

ER EXCELLENCE IN THE MATERNAL CHARACTER

GIVES A PECULIAR PROPRIETY

TO HER PROTECTION OF THIS LITTLE WORK

WRITTEN WITH AN HUMBLE WISH

TO PROMOTE THE LOVE OF PIETY AND VIRTUE

IN YOUNG PERSONS;


]Y HER GRACE'S

MOST OBEDIENT,

MOST OBLIGED, AND,

ST HUMBLE SERVANT,


H. MORE.
'A2










V











A. DV E R T ISE NTE N T.



I 'AM as *A as the nm'a'rigid C Atic, ,to cohf,-fs,,tbat xothing-ca-i;i be nwmfituple and artificial than-the plang of the'following. Diram as. In the conftru&on "f i hem, I have seldom ventured introduce any persons of my own creation: -flilll;lefs did'I irnagine myself at liberiv to invent circuinitances.' I refle&ed, with awe,,thattbe plate vkere#nIjtoadwasho groztnd. Al1thelatitudeIperrnitttdnw.felf, was, to makefuch perfons as I fele6fed, a& under fuch circum(tancesas 1,fodnd; and exrref&fuch sentiments as,, in, ray humWe Judgment, appeared not unnatural their fituations-Some.of the fpceches are fo loag as to retard'the a&ion ;,for I rather afpired after Moral- lnftrucition, than the purity of Dramatic Compofition. The very Wrms of Aft and Scene are avoided; becatafe I -w0s OnN&,^ '-d, I in DAW IE L, and that of necrf,f ws the Bib 110 mor,--tban.tzw*,pefi)ns,' Damiel and Dariuj; and thefc -were. not _fwkc;ent to carg she bufintfs of the Piec-






wi ADVERTISEMENT.

willing to awaken the attention of the Reader to my deficiencies in critical exainefs.

It will be thought that I have chofen, perhaps, the eafl important paiTage in the eventful Life of David, for the foundation of the Drama which bears his name. Yet even in this, his firft exploit, the facced Hillorian reprefents him as exhibiting no mean lefon of modefty, humility, courage, and piety; virtues not only admirable, but imitable; and within the reach of every Reader. Many will think, that the introduction of Saul's daughter would have added to the effect of the piece: and I have no doubt, but that it would have made the intrigue more complicated, and more interefting, had this Drama been intended for the Stage. There, all that is tender, and all that is terrible in the paffions, find a proper place. But I write for the Young, in whom it will be always time enough to have them awakened; I write for a clafs of Readers, to whom it is not eafy to accommodate one fubje61*.

A very judicious and learned friend has remarked, that Refedaiox.s of King Hezekiah breathe rather too much of


It would not be eafy, I believe, to introduce Sacred T ragedies on the Engbh Stage. 'he scrupulous would hink it profane, while the profane tould think it dull. Yet the excellent RACINE, in a dipped cowity, and a ioluptuous court, 'ventured rto ad- o of Athaliah to the French Theatre i and it remao its a glorious monumes of its Author's courageous pi tqy, and qf the perfedio of t Dramatic Art.



5 , / '" "







ADVERTISEMENT. vir

,of the fpirit of Chriftianity; for that it is fearcely probable he had fo fettled a belief in the General Judgrinent. I feel the juftnefs of the obje&ion, without having been able to obviate it. I wifhed to convey a strongg idea of this great leading truth; and have, perhaps improperly, aferibed fentiments to a Jewifh monarch, merely becaufe I wished to imprefs them on the Chriffian Reader.

The Critic and the Scholar, if any fuch should honour there pages with their attention, will find ample matter on which to exercife their candor and charity; qualities fo natural to genius and to learning, that even the feeblenefs of my performance will not be able to obftrut the exettion of them in favour of my intention.

The amiable Poet from whom I have taken mny motto, after chewing the fuperiority of the Sacred, over the Profaine Hiftories (fome infiances of which I have noticed in my Introdution), concludes ?with the following ,remark, which I may apply to myself with more propriety than it was ufed by the Author :-" I am far from Saffiming to myfelf, to have fulfilled the duty of this Weighty undertaking; and I flhall be ambitious of no pther fruit from this weak and imperfect attempt of mine, but the opening of a way to the courage and inSdufiry of fome other perfons, who may be better able to perform it thoroughly and fuccefsfully."






1/


















IC -0 Ni E 'N' T 'S..


-'TUB INTRODWTIQN; MOSES,

DAVIJDANP QGLIAT-4. lq'RL$HAZ-ZARI, D*MBLI








tj








T H R.



IN T R DUCT ION.



40 F 0 R the facred energ,-y, which frc The harp of jeffie's fon !,or.for a fpark Of that celeffial flaine, which touchi'd the lips "Of hlefs'd Ifaiahi*; when the Seraph m With living fire dofrended, and his foul From fin's pollution purg'd I or one faint rav, (If human things to heavenly I m-ay Jin) Of that pure spirit, which inflani'd the biealt Of Milton, GOD's own poet! when, retired, In fair enrhufiaftic viflon rapt, The nigbiy 'viant deigned blefs his couch With infpiration, fitch as never flow 'd From Aganippe's fount, or Acidale Then, when the facred fire within him b-urnt, Hie fpake, as man or angecl in ,Jt have I' ke, ~When man was pure, and aDbels were h~sucfots.

B


If ~a ~ V;







e INTRODUCTION.

It will not be.-Nor prophet's burning zeal, Nor mufe of fire, nor yet to fweep the firings With facred energy to me belongs; Nor with Miltonic hand to touch the chords, That wake to ecftacy. From .me, alas! The fecret fource of harmony is hid; The magic powers which catch the ravifh'd foul In melody's fweet maze, and the clear fireams Which to pure Fancy's yet untafted fprings Enchanted lead. Of thefe I nothing know; Yet, all unknowing, dare thy aid invoke, Spirit of Truth who gracioufly haft faid, That none who afk in faith theuld alk in vain,

You I invoke not now, ye fabled Nine!
I not invoke you, though you well were fought In Greece and Latium, by immortal bards, Whole fVren fong enchants; and fthall enchant, Thro' Time's wide-circling round, tho' falfe their faith, And lefs than human were the gods they fing. Tho' falfe their faith, they taught the beft they knew And, blutfh, O Chriftians! liv'd above their faith. They won'd have blefs'd the beam, and hail'd the day, Which chafs'd the moral darknefs from their fouls. Oh! had their minds receiv'd the clearer ray Of true devotion; they had learn'd to iorn Theirdeities impure, their fenfelefs gods, And wild mythology's fantaflic maze.

Pure PLATO! how had thy chafte fpirit hail'd A faith fo fitted to thy moral fenfe! TVhat hadW' thou felt, to fee the fair romance ( high iiatinatio, the bright dream







INTRODUCTION. t

f thy pure fancy more than realiz'd!
0 fweet enthufiaft! thou hadfl bleft a scheme Fair, good, and perfet. How had thy rapt foul Caught fire, and burnt with a diviner flame! For ev'n thy fair idea ne'er conceiv'd Such plenitude of love, fitch boundless blifs, As Deity made vifible to fenfe. Unhappy BRUTUs! philosophic mind! Great 'midit the errors of the Stoic fchoel! How had his kindling fpirit joy'd to find That his lov'd virtue was no empty name: Nor had he met the vificn at Philippi; Nor had he fheath'd his bloody dagger's point, Or in the breaft he lov'd, or in his own.

The Pagan page how far more wife than ours!
They with the gods they worfhip'd grac'd their long; Our fong was grace with gods we dithelieve; The manners we adopt without the creed. Shall Fition only raife poetic flame, And hall no altars blaze, O TRUTH to thee? Shall falfehood only pleafe, and fable charm And fall eternal Truth neglefied lie? Becaufe immortal, flighted or profan'd? Tnruth has our rev'rence only, not our love Our praife, but not our heart. A deity, Confefs'd, but fhunn'd; acknowledged, not ador'ttShe comes too near us, and the things too bright' Her penetrating beam at once betrays What we would hide from others and ourfclves.

Why fitun to make our duty our delight Let pleafure be the motive (and allow B z "*t







S INTR 0 DUCTION.That immortality be quite forgot:) Where hall we trace, thro' all the page profane,. A livelier pleafuire, and a purer fource Of innocent delight, than the fair book Of holy Truth presents ? For ardent youth, The fprightly narrative; for years mature, i.he moral docurnmeat, in fober robe Of grave philofophy array'd : which all IIA 3 heard with admiration, had embrac'd lv iIh rapture; had the shades of Academe, Or the learn'd Porch produc'd it. Then, O then, Hlow Wifdtom's hidden treafures had beei couch'u Eeneath fair Allegory's graceful veil !

Do not the pow'rs of foul-enchanting fong, Strong imag'ry, bold figure, every charm Of eaftern flight fliblime, apt metaphor, And all the graces in thy lovely train, Divine Simplicity afTemble all In Sion's longs, and bold Ifaiah's train ?

Why thou'd the clafie eve delight to trace ifow Pyrrha and the faai'd TherFaliart king Redior'd the ruined race of loft mankind Yet turn, incurious, from the patriarch fav'd; The righteous remnant of a delug'd world. Whyaefc we taught, delighted, to recount, Alcides' labours, yet neglect to learn How rnigtdiy Samfon led a life of toil Herculean? Pain and peril mark'd them both;
A







IN TRODU CT ION.

A life eventful, and difaftrous death. Can all the tales, which Grecian records yield; Can all the names the stoman page re,'erds, Renown'd for friendship and furpalling love ; Can gallant Thefeus and his brave compeer ; Oreftes, and the partner of his toils Achates and his friend; Euryalus, And blootning Nifus, pleafant in their lives, And undivided by the Ilr.oke of death; Can each, can all, a lovelier pi 't! re yield SOf virtuous frlendfhip :can they all pref'ent A tenderncfs more touching than the lqve Of Jonathan and David ?-Spc!k, ye young I You %,tho are undebaiichi'd by faffhion's lore, And, unfophifticate, from nature judge, Say, is your quick attention fironger drmn, By w.alled Thebes, than Pharaoh's funteeu hofts Or do the vagrant Trojans yteid a there 'More gratef-iI to tfic eager appetite Of Voting impatience, than the wandering tribes, By Mofes thin' the thirdiv defci-t led? The beatiteous *Maid (tho' tender is thc tale), Whofk ,uiltleifs blood on Auilis' Liar iffieanm'd, Smaites not the bolon with a fofter parg Than jephthah's dauglater, doorn'd lilar her to die.

Stich are the lovely themes, wh iebn court theMue Scare yet cffay'd in verfe. 0 let m~e Mourn, That heav'ni-defcended fong fhoulil eer forget ITs fisered' dignity, and high defcent; Should e'er fa far its origin debale,


j pb.'genwa.







4 INTRODUCTION.

To fpread corruption's bane, to lull the bad With flattery's opiate firain; to taint the heart Of innocence, and filently infufe Delicious poifon, whofe insidious charm Feeds the fick mind, and fondly minifters Umnwholfome pleafire to the fever'd tafte; While its fell venom, with malignant pow'r, Strikes at the root of virtue, with'ring all Her vital energy. Oh! for fome balm Of fov'reign power, to raife the drooping Mufe To all the health of virtue! to infuife A gen'rous warrfnith, to roufe an holy pride, And give her high conceptions of herfelf !

For me, eternal Spirit! let thy word
My path illume! O thou compaffionate GOD! Thou know'ft our frame, thou know'ft we are but du(. From duft a Seraph's zeal thou wilt not alk, An Angel's purity. Oh as I firive, Tho' with a feeble voice and flagging win., A glowing heart, but pow'rlefs hand, to tell The faith of favour'd man to heav'n, to fing The ways inferutable of heav'n to man May I, by thy celeftial guidance led, Fix deeper in my heart the truths I fing I In my own life tranfcribe whate'er of good To others I propofe! and by thy rule Corre6 th' irregular *, reform the wrong, Exalt


What in me is dark
Illumine, what is low raffe and f#upprt.
PARADISE LOST.







INTRODUCTION.

Exilt the low, and brighten the obfcure Still may I note, how all th' agreeing parts Of this well-order'd fabric join to frame One fair, one finifh'd, one harmonious whole! Trace the clofe links, which form the perfect chain In beautiful connection; mark the fcale, Whofe nice gradations, with progreffion true, For ever riling, end in DFITY 1











PE R-















PERSON OF THE DRAMA.


HEBREW WOMEN.

0 C I-1 E B E D, Mother of MosEfi.
M I R I A M, his Sifter. i EG Y PT IA NS.

The PRINCESs, King PHARAOH's Daughter; MELIIr.&; and other Attendants.


S C E N E on the Banks of the NILE.








SThe Su'biet i. taken fromi the Second Chapter of the Book of Exoms








1 7 )






MOSES IN THE BULRUSHES


A

SACRED DRAMA.


P A R T 1.


I will afIert eternal Providence,
And joftify the ways of God to man.
Pj3RAD5sE Losr,





JOCHE13ED, MIRIAM.

JO0C HE B ED.

W~ H Y was my pray'r accepted ? v hy did heav'n In ang er hear me, when I atik'd a fon? Ye dames of Egypt!1 happy, hau.ppv mothers! No tyrant robs you of y xour Fon--'eft hores3 You are not doom'd to ffee the babes you iuore, The babes you nurture, Wleed. before your eyes You tat le the tranfmoris of' maternal Jove, And never know its an~uih happy mothers!
C How








1 7 )






-M-OSES IN THE BULRUSHES:

A

SACRED DRAMA.


P A R T 1.


I will affert eternal Providence,
And jssftify the ways of God to man.
Pj3RADISF LqsT,





JOCHEBED, MIRIAM.

JO0C H E BED.

W~ H Y was moy pray'r accepted? wh y did heav'n
In anger hear me, when I at-Ld a fun?
Ye dam.e; of Egypt! 1 hppy, happy mothers!
No tyrant robs you of y our FonX-let hoype
You are not dcongd to fee tihe babes xou Lore, The babes you nurture, bleed. before your eyes i
Yous tafte the traiifport, cf maternal ove,
And never know its anguifh Ihappy mothers!
C Ho0w





I,
s MOSES IN THE BULRUSHES:

How diff'rent is the lot of thy fad daughters,
O wretched Ifrael I Was it then for this?
Was it for this the righteous arm of GoD
Refcued his chosen people from the jaws
Of cruel want, by pious Jofeph's care ?
Jofeph I th' eleded infirument of heaven,
Decreed to fave illulfrious Abraham's race,
What time the famine rag'd in Canaan's land.
Irael, who then was fpar'd, muff perifh now !

Oh thou mysterious pow'rI who haft involv'd
-Thy wife decrees in darknefs, to perplex
The pride of human wifdom, to confound
'The daring fcrutiny, and prove the faith
Of thy prefuiming creatures! clear this doubt;
Teach me to trace this maze of Providence;
Why fave the fathers, if the fons mutt perith ?

CMIRIAM.
Alh me, my mother! whence thefe floods of grief

JOCHEBED.
My fon! my fon! I cannot fpeak the reft.
Ye who have fans can only know my fondnefs!
Ye who have loft1 them, or who fear to lofe,
Can only know my pangs! none elfe can guefs them,
A mother's forrows cannot he conce v'd, But by a mother-Wherefore am I one

M I R I A M.
With many pray'rs thou didft requeft this for,
And heav'n has granted him.

jOC HEBE






A SACRED DRAMA. 8

JOCHEBED.
O fad eflate
Of human wretchednefs fo weak is man, So ignorant and blind, that did not GoD Sometimes withhold in mercy what we ali, We thou'd be ruin'd at our own requeft.

Too well thou know'ft, my child, the flern decree Of Egypt's cruel king, hard-hearted Pharaoh; SThat ev'ry male, of Hebrew mother born, Muft die." Oh! do I live to tell it thee? Mufl die a bloody death My child, my fon, My youngefl born, my darling mufr be flain!

M I R I A M.
The helplefs innocent! and muft he die?

JOCHE BE D.
No: if a mother's tears, a mother's pray'rs, A mother's fond precautions can prevail, He hall not die. I have a thought, my Miriam ) And fure the GoD of mercies, who infpir'd, Will blefs the fecret purpose of my foul, To fave his precious life.

M I R I AM.
Hop'ft thou that PharaohJOCHEBED.
I have no hope in Pharaoh, much in GoD; V1uchin the RocK or AGES.

C MIRIAM,







zo MOSES IN THE BULRUSHES

MIRIAM.
Think, 0 th;nk,
What perils thou already haft incur'd And fhun the greater, which may yet remain. 'Three months, three dang'rous months thou hat preferv'd i hv infant's life, and in thy houfe conceal'd him! Shou'd Pharaoh know !

JOCHE BED.
Oh! let the tyrant know, And feel what he infliCts! Yes, hear me, Heav'n f Send the right aiming thunderbolts- But huli, My impious murmurs 1 Is it not thy will; T hou, infinite in mercy ? Thou yermitt'ft This feeming evil for fome latent good. Yes, i will laud thy grace, and blefs thy goodnefs For what I have, and not arraign thy wifdom For what I fear to lofe. O, I will blefs thee, That Aaron will be fpar'd! that my firft-born Lives fafe and undiffurb'd! that he was given me Before this impious perfecution rag'd!

M I R I A M.
And yet who knows, but the fell tyrant's rage May reach his precious life?

JOCHEBED.
I fear for him,
For thee, for all. A dating parent lives In many lives; throw' many a nerve fle feels; From child to child the quick afetions fpread, For ever wand'riIg, yet for ever fix'd.
Not







A SACRED DRAMTA..

,Nor does dix ilon weaken, nor thle force Ojz cunflant oi erato e0 C'er e.tl
prj~llove. Ali uvlher paxlluns change, w: ) chantmog circiumftences ;rife or fall,
_Dcr~cnoal (;i their object ; clim returns; 1ive on reci J' auction, and expire I. Pd bN 1)upe. A la. ,thwr's fondnefP reigns
_,ijout a ral, ant iiboiut an eiA

M i R LI AM.
]),Ut fay Mi at J-eav'n infpires, to fave thy fon

JOCHIE B ED.
Since the iear fatal morn which gave him birth, i bave rex ,iv'd in my difiraaed mnind LCI nucaim to fave his life: and many a thought, Wo'hchi fondnrefs p~romp ted, yrocence has oppose. ,As pet lots and rails. With thce poor hands I'v e tratni'd a little ark of fiender reeds; With pitch and I~s h ave tecur'd the fides. In tio f ail crad'f- I intend to lay
MlIt Px! in f Iaiint, and expofe him
Uintire Pinkda of Aie

M I R I A M.
"I is full of danger.

JO CIIEB ED.
'TneT to expofe, and death to keep him,

M I R I A M.
Yet, Ohl! refletP. Sli'd the fierce crocodile. The native 2nd the tyrant of tile NILE. Seize th e def,-Lcelefs infa!
JOCHEBED.,







as ,MOSES IN THE BULRiUSHESY

JOCHEBED.
Oh, forbear I
Spare my fond heart. Yet not the crocodile, Nor all the deadly monfiers of the deep, To me are half fo terrible as PHARAOH, That heathen king, that royal murderer 1

MIRIAM.
Shou'd he efcape, which yet I dare not hope, Each tea-born monster yet the winds and wava. He cannot 'fcape.

JOCHEBED.
Know, GOD is ev'ry where; Not to one narrow, partial fpot confin'd; No, not to chofen ISRAEL : He extends Thro' all the vail infinitude of fpace. At his command the furious tempefts rife, The blafling of the breath of his difpleafure: He tells the world of waters, when to roar; And at his bidding, winds and feas are calm. In HiM, not in an arm of fiefh, I treft; In HiM, whofe promife never yet has fail'd, I place my confidence.

MIRIAM.
What muff I do?
Command thy daughter, for thy words have wa An holy boldnefs in my youthful breaft. W

JOCHEBED.
Go then, my MIRIAM! go, and take the infant' Buried in harmless flumbers there he lies:







A 'AtRED DRAMA.-,~

Let me not fee him-fpare my heart that pang. Yet (tire, one little look may be indnlg'd, one kif's-perhaps the 141t. No more, my foul?1 That fondoefs wou'd be faal-I fhou'd keep him. I cou'd not doom to death the babe I clafp'd: PdJ ever mother kill her fleeping boy? I dlare not -hazard it-The talk be thine.
())I do not wake my child ; remove him foftly And gently lay him on the river's bi~uk.

M I R I A M.
Did thofe magicians, whomn the fons of Ec YPT &ontut, and think ai-i utent, join their kill, And, ivas it great as EG YP'S fons believe; yet all their fecret wizard arts combin'd, To fave thlis little ark of Bulrnfhes, ThuIs fearfully expos'd, con'd not effeiel it. Their fpells, their incantations, and dire charms Cou ,d not preferve it.

JOCHE BED.
Know, this ark is charmi'd VW~fh fpelis, which impious EGv PT never kncw; INith invocations to the living Goiu, I tiifted every ilender rced tieher, ,AndA with a fray'r did every czier weave.

IIR IA M.


Ve! e'er thoii ,ofi, cbferve mne well. When thenu hail laid himu in his Nvatry bed,
0 Leave








'2 MOSTSIN TUB BULRVISE S:

0 leave himn not; buit at~ a diftance wait,
And mark what Heav'n's high will determine for him.
lay hi m among the flags on yonder beach, jutt where the royal gardens meet the Nile,
I dare not follows him, Stifpicioi's eye
Wou'd note my wild demeanor; MIRIAM, Ye 5,
The mother's fond'nefs wou'd betray the child.
F~arew~ell! GOD of my fathers, Oh protect& him!







MOSES IN THE BULRUSI-IES.







SC N.T on the Banks of the NIL F.

;j 'Enter MIi R I A M, after having dep 1,fled the cb;1d.

YE S, I ha' e LiN him in Ns~ watry bed, Tlis watry grave, I fear I tremle till;
It was a cruel talk-ftill I muft weep!
Btut ab! my rmher, hJo ihlall footh thy griefsi
'Ih 'flags an eawed il ileif
Their prec-ious Ilad Ioit iiit f gnk ere long1
~SwCe Le ab e-, %ll! et think not I will leave tht-ey
v-ttIwil wui thee, till the grccedy waves







IA SACRED DR AMA. 2S

Devour thy little bark: IIlI fit me down, And fing- to thee, tweet babe!1 Thou can't not hear-, jtLWt twill aniufe me, while I watch thy fate.
-[Sbe fis do--am on a bank, and-fings.







SO0N G.

1.

T H 0 U, who canft make the feeble frong,
0 Go]> of Ifrael, hear soy fong!
'Not mnine ftsch notes as Egypt's daughters raife
isthee, 0 GOD of Hofis, I itrive to praife.

11.
Ye winds, the fervants of the LORD,
Ye waves, obedient to his word,
o fpare the babe committed to your truft .And Ifrae liall confefs, tise Lo RD is jUft 1

Ill.
Tho' doom'd to find an early grave,
This hclplefs infant thou canft hive ;
And he, whofe eath's decreed by Pharaph's hand, May riiie a prophet to redeem the land.
[She r~fes, and looks ant.

D Who







-26 MOSES IN THE BULRUSHES


Who Ymoves this way ? of royal port fhe feems;
Perhaps sent hitter by the hand of Heav 'n,
To prop tie fai~ing houife of Le-, i.-Sofi
I'll liften unperceiv'd, thee trees vill hide ine.
[She flands behind.

Enter the P RI NCE SS of EG YPT, -attended by a iraiij of Ladies.

P R INC ES SNo farther, Virgins ; here I mean to reft, To tafte the pleafant ceolnefs of the breeze; Perl-aps to bathe in this tranfilocent ftream. Did not our holy lawv enjoin th' ambition Fruiluent and regular'; it dlill v, ere necedfial, 1c, mitigate the fervors-of our clime. MELIrA, flay-the ref at diflance wait.
[They all go out, excep one,

The PRINCESS looks out.
Sure, or I much inifake, orJ1 perceive, Upon the lcdgy margin of the Nile A cheft -, entangled in the reeds it fees .Thccrn't thou ough t?

MlE L I T A.
Something, but what I know not..

P R J N CE S S.



e 2b ancratEgi uiamtl-ed to,'wcafb their k~dirsf 4,,mrs e'v, sy -eni;-four boa rs.






A SACRED DRAMA.

PRINCESS.
CGo and examine, what this fight may mean.
[ExitilMaid.
M IR IAM, behind.
0 bleff, beyond my ho,,e he is difcover'd; v.' b hr Il be fav'd! v h;. is this ffiran; er? Abvh 'tiS 'I Pr cuel Pharaoh's dat 0,hter.
If d'rt.lher ninllman Sire, She c be cruel too; yet fame repor-, her Mofi mnerciful anei in,!~ : -i'fl m ark th' e,,ent, And pray that Heav'n may promipt her to preserve .

Re-eater M E L IT A.

P R I N C E S S.
1lafli thou difcover'd what the veffel is?

MELITA.
Ohi, Princefs, I have feen the firangeft fight? withir: the vttfel lies a fleeping babe, 'A fairer infant have I never feen !

P R I NC ES S.
V~0knows, but fomae unlbq.py Hebrew wornzwHas tis cxpos'8 her infant, in evae The fern decree of my too cruel Sire. Uni~zppy mothers oft my heart has bled In fecre anguilh o'er your flaughter'd tons,

Tv E L I T A.
Shoui'd adhs be one, my Princefs knows the danger.P PRINCESS







21 MOSES IN THE BULRUSR5ESPRINCESS.
No danger thou'd deter from aas of mercy.

M I R I A M, behind.
A thoufand blefilings on her princely lead!

P R I N C E S S.
Too much the fons of Jacob have endur'd
From royal Pharaoh's unrelenting hate
Too much our houfe has crufh'd their alien race.
Is't not enough, that cruel talk-mafters
Grind them by hard oppreffion and flern bondage ?
Isn't not enough, my father owes his greatnefs,
'is palaces, his fanes magnificent;
Thofe ftruc'tures which the world with wonder views,
To the hard toils of much infulted Ifrael ?
To them his growing cities owe their fplendor, Their labours built fair Ramefes and Pythom
And now, at length, his fill increafing rage To iron bondage adds the guilt of murder.
And hall this little helplefs infant perifh ?
Forbid it, juftice; and forbid it, heav'n!

MELITA.
I know, thy royal father fears the flrength
Of this fill growing race, who flouriflth more
The more they are opprefs'd; he dreads their numbers..

PRINCESS.
Apis forbid Pharaoh afraid of Ifrael!
Yet thou'd this outcafl race, this hapless people
E'er grow to fuch a formidable greatnefs
(WhicIV

aii







A SACRED DRAMA. 29L

(Whi~ch all the gods avert, whom Egypt worfhips), This VIfvnt's life can never ferve their catife, Nor can his fingle death prevent their greatnefs.

NI E LI T A.
I know not that: by weakefi instruments
Somnetimnes are great events produc'd; this child pF rhaps may live to ferve his upifart race More th~n an hoft.

PR IN CE SS.
How ill does it befeem Thy tender years, and gentle womanhood, To fild thy breaft to Pity's facred touch! So weak, foa unprotedted is our fex, so cowfiantly expos'd, fo very helplefs; 1" : cid not Heav'n itfeif enjoin co mpaffion, Ythumean policy lhou'd make us kind, 1,1we Ihou'd need the pity we refuife.
'Yes, i will fat e him-lead me to the place; And from the feeble ruies we'll remove 'lie little ark, which cradles this poor babe.
[ The PRINcass and her Maidgo outs

NI I R I A M comes for-ward.
How poor were words, to fpeak lily boundlefs joy! The Prhqcefs will prote& him; blefs her, Heav'n I
[She looks out after the Princefs, and defcdibes her
adion.

With what impatient fteps, the fecks the fhore! Now the mppmoaches where the ark is laid! With x-, hat cumpaflion, with what angel-fwveetnefs, She







SMOSES IN THE BULRUSHES.

She bends to look upon the infant's face! She vkes his litte han! :n her's-he %vakes-She fmiles upon him-hark! alas, hie cries; Weep on, fweet bab-e! weer, on, tKI -hou hadt touched Each chard of pity, waken'd every fen(Of andling fynathy, and ftolen her foul! She takes him 'n hei'arms-O lovely Prin-ets!
I-lo ge,. iti heitens beauty now fhe clafps himu With fondnefs to her heart, fhie gives him now With tender caution to lher danfel's arms: She points her to rile palace, and again This way tae Princefa bends her gracious fleps; The virgin train retire, and bear the child.

Ae-enter the P R I N C E S S.

P R I N C E S S.
Did ever innocence and infant-beatuty
Plead with fuch dumb but poo eri. eloquence i If 1, a ftrjnger, fecl dhefe foft emotions, What railf the io'her who expos'd him feel! Go, fetch a woman of the Hebr,.., race, 'That ihe may nurfe the babe ; and, by her garb, Lo fuch a one is here!I

M IR I A M.
Princefs, all haiL!
Forgive the bold'intrufion of thy servant, Who flands ii charm'd fpet-ator of shy goodnef..

PRINCESS.
I have redeemi'd an infant from the waves, Whosu I itend to nuturte as iiswie own.
it4RI






A SACRED DRAMA. ~

MIRI AM.
my tranfports will betray me I [Afide.] Gen'rotts
}'iincefs!

P R I N C E S S.
Know'It thou a matron of the Hebrew race. To whom I may confide him?

M IR IA M.
Well I know
A prudent matron of the houfe ef Levi; I-Icr name is jochebed, the wife of Aimram-, Gentle flhe is, and famn'd throughout her tribe E~r foft humanity ; full wellI I know T~at fhe will rear him with a mother's love. [A/ide.] Oh truly fpoke! a mother's love indeed!1 To he r edefpairing arms 1 mean to give 'I his precious truil; the nurfe fhiaii be the mother!

P R I N C E S S.
With fpeed condua this matron to the palace. 'Yes, I will rtife hin up to princely greatness, And bh2 hall be my ton ; his name be 1')Ifes, 1For I have drawn hitn from the perilous flood.
I [ They go out. She .keehl.
Thoo Great IUnfeen I thou califeff gentle deeds. And 1rni'Ll on what thou caulfet ; thus I blefs the,
-'at thou didn't deign confult the tender make Of ldighuman hearts, when thou ordain'd'ft 141;snanit a virtue!I Didift incline '71'-a nas'ral bia of the foul to'niercv, '1llscu mad'ii that mercy duty! Gracious Powv'r I







Ia MOSES IN T HE BULR18HES.

Mad'fl the keen rapture exquifite as right: Beyond the joys of feafe; as pleafure fweet; As reafon conftant, and as initind firing!







MOSES IN THE BULRUSHES:.


P A R T III.






Enter JOCHEB E D.

'VE almoR reach'd the place-with cautious fleps I muff approach to where the ark is laid, Left from the royal gardens any fpy me.
-Poor babel ere this, the prefflling calls of hunger Have broke thy thort repofe; the chilling waves, Perhaps, have drench'd thy little fthiv'ring limbs. What-what muR he have fuffer'd !-No one fees me: But foft, does no one liften ?-Ah how hard, How very hard for fondnefs to be prudent! Now is the moment, to embrace and feed him.
[Sbe looks out
Where






A SACRED DRAMA. 33

Where's Miriam? fhe.has left her little charge, perhaps through fear, perhaps the was detected. How wild is thought! how terrible conjecture! A mother's fondnefs frames a thoufand fears, And shapes unreal evils into being.
[She looks to-wards the riv&.
Ah me! Nvhere ishe l? foul-diftrafting fight! Hle is not there-he's loft, he's gone, he's drown'd! Tofs'd by each beating forge my infant floats; Cold, cold and wat'ry is thy grave, may child! 'O no-I fee the ark-Tranfporting fight; [She goes towards it.
What do I fee? Alas, the ark is empty The calket's left, the precious gem is gone You fpar'd him, pitying fpirits of the deeply But vain your mercy; fome infatiate beat, Cruel as Pharaoh, took the life you fpar'dAnd I fthall never, never fee him more!

Enter M IR I A M.

JOCHEBED.
Come, and lament with me thy brother's lofs

MIRIAM.
Come, and adore with me the GOD of Jacob I

JOCHEBED.
tliriam-the child is dead!

M I R I A M.
He lives, he lives!

E JOCHEBED.









~~. ~ OC~SN HE BED.HES

Impolffibe: Oh! do not mnock toy grief!
-See'll thou that empty vetfel ?

All R I AM.
Fr~om tat VeffelTb' Egyp~n Princefa took im,.

-jOC -E B ED.
Pharaoh' s daugher? Then dill he will be Ilain.

Id I R I A K.
His life is fafe;
For know, fhe meas-to rear him as her own.

0H CE B E 1).

[Falls on her knees in rapturc.w
To GOD the LORD, the glory be -afcrib'd! Oh magnified for ever he thy might, Who mercy in* -a Heathen'9 heart can't plant, Arid from, the depth of evittring forth good!
[She rzjec.
III X. IA M.
0 bleft event, beyond~our warmeft hopes.

'J 0 1 EB F D.
Wlhait! ThaJIi y fon b- suzr (or'd in a courn, Tn Pr in1cely gandeur'- bred1 talt.4ht every art, A~i od very wodro cine gptknwi
Yet a! ~I tremnble, Mirim; flic,.L'd he learn,
E~ gypt's ppliffi'd orts, her baneful faith!
Q O 3






A SACRED DRAMA. 35

0 worfe exchange for death! Yes, fhou'd he learn In you' proud palace to difown his hand Wlo this has fav'd him: fhou'd he e'er embrace (As fare he will, if bred in Pharaoh's court) I he grfs idolatries which Egypt owns, Her ,r.yven images, her brutifhli gods: Then hall I with hlie had not been preferv'd, To lhame his fathers, and deny,his faith.

MIRIAM.
Then, to difFel thy fears, and crown thy joy,
1Hear farther wonders-Know, the generous Princefl To thine own care thy darling child commits.

J 0 C IA E B E D.
'peak, while my joy will give me time to lien!

MI R I A M.
By her commiftlien'd, thou behold'It me here, To feek a matron of the Hebrew race, To nurfe him; thou, my mother, art that matron.I flid, I knew thee well; that thou wou'd'(t rear him Ev'n with a mother's fondnefs ; fhie, who bare hmn, (I told the Princefs) could not love him more.

JOCHEBED.
Fountain of Mercy! whole pervading eye Beholds the heart, and fees what paiffes there, Accept my thoughts for thanks! I have no wordsHow poor v ere human language to exprefs My gratitak, my wonder, and my joy i

E I MIRIAM







gli MOSES IN THE BULRUSHES:

MIRIAM.
Yes, thou halt pour into ms infant mind. The pureft precepts of the pureft faith.

JOCHEBED.
O! I will fill his tender foui with virtue, And warm his bofom with devotion's flame! Aid me, eleftial Spirit! with thy grace, And be my labours with thy influence crown'd: Without it they were vain. Then, then, my Miriam,. When he is furnifh'd, 'gainft the evl day, With God's whole armour*, girt with facred truth, And as a breaft-plate, wearing righteoufnefs, Arm'd with the fpirit of God, the shield of Faith,And with the helmet of falvation crown'd, Inur'd to watching, and difpos'd to pray'r; Then may I fend him to a dangerous court, And fafely truft him in a perilous world, Too full of tempting fares and fond delufions I MIRIAM.
May bounteous Heav'n, thy pious cares reward ,

JOCH.EBED.
O Amram! O my husband! when thou cornit, Wearied at night, to raft thee from the toils Impos'd by haughty Pharaoh; what a tale Have I to tell thee! yes- thy darling fon Was loft, and is reftor'd; was ahead, and lives I




z VTY7t. dcha. v. Alfo, Epbef. chap vi.






A SACRED DRAMA. 0

MIRIAM.
Now joyful hall we fpend the live-long night In pralfes to J HOVAH; who thus mocks All human forefight, and converts the means Of seeming ruin into great deliverance!

JOCHEBED.
Had not my child been doomn'd to-fuch firauge perils As a fond mother trembles to recall; He had not been preferv'd.

MIRIAM.
And mark fill farther; Had he been fav'd by any other hand, lie had been fill expos'd to equal ruin.

JOCHEBED.
Then let us join to blefs the hand of Heaven, That this poor outcaft of the houfe of Ifrael, Condemn'd to die by Pharaoh, kept in fecret By my advent'rous fondnefs i then expos'd Ev'n by that very fondnefs which conceal'd him, Is now, to fill the wondrous round of mercy, Preferv'd from peri1ing by Pharaoh's daughter, Sav'd by the very hand which fought to cruthhimnL

Wife and unfearchable are all thy ways, Thou Goa of MERCIES -Lead me to my child


THR E N D.













PE R 3O-R8OF T1E D'R-AM X

S K ing of ISR A L. A B NER, his General. J E SE.
EL IAB,
A B IN A D A B, Sons of JESSE. DAVID, S
G0 L A T H, the PHILISTINE GiaRt.PHILISTINES, ISkAELITES, &C. &C.

CHoF.us OF HEBIEw- WOMEN.


The S C E N E lies. in the Camp, in the Valley
BLAmH and~ the adjacent. Plain




fT The Sn1jc& of the Drama is taken from the Seven
teeth Chapter of the Fitt Book of 'SamueL







39



DAVID AND GOLIATIL

A

SAC RE D DRAMA.

P A R T 1.

0 bienheureux m1le fbis
L'Enfant qUt 1C Seignein- aime,
Que de bonne heUre emend fa voix,
Ft que ce D"eu daigne indruire ltti-m6rne!
Loin du munde 61ev ; de tous. les dons des Cieux,
11 etturtI6 Us fa naitrance;
Ett du m6chant I'abord contagieux
Yaltere point fon innocence. -ATHA LIE.



S C E N E, a sbepbcT-ds Tent on a Plain.

IDAVI D, under aftreading tree, tlays on his harp, andjfngs.

1.
GR E' A T Lord of ail things Pow'r divine!
Breathe on this erring heart of mine
Thygrace serene and pur(
my fiai), my erttg outh,
11: d tc :ch me this t
The humble are ff, ure.







0 DAVID AND GOLIATIA


Teach me to-blers my lowly lot
Confin'd to this paternal cot, I
Remote from regal flate
-Content to court the cooling glade, Inhale the breeze, enjoy the fhade,
And love my humble fate.

III.
No anxious vigils here I keep,
No dreams of gold dittraa my fleep,
Nor lead my heart affray ;
Nor blasting Envy's tainted gale
Pollutes the pleasures of the vale,
ITo vex my harmlefs day.

Iv.
Yon' tow'r, which rears its head fo high,
And bids defiance to the fky,
Invites the hoftile winds:
Yon' branching oak extending wide,
-Provokes defIru~ion by its pride,
And courts the fall it finds.

V.
Then let me Thun th' ambitious deed,
And all the dangerous paths which lead
To honors falfely won:
Lord! in thy fure protection bleft,
.Submiffive will I ever reff,
And-mnay thy will be done!
JIHe ays down his harp, aDAV






A SACRED DRAMA. 4t

DAVID.
This Shepherd's life were dull and taffelefs all, Without tfe charm of foothing fong or harp: With it, not undelightful is the haunt Of wood, or lonely grove, or ruffet plain, Made vocal by the Mufe. With this lov'd harp, This daily folace of my cares, I footh'd The melancholy monarch, when he lay, Smit by the chill and fpirit-quenching hand Of blank despair. GOD of my fathers! hear rne: Here I devote my harp, my verfe, myself, To thy bleft fervice! gladly to pro y Glory to GOD on high, on earth To man; to pour my grateful fore thee;
To fing thy pow'r, thy wifdom, an thy love, And every gracious attribute: to paint The charms of heav'n-born virtue! So fall 1, (Tho with long interval of worth) afpire To imitate the work of faints above, Of Cherub and of Seraphim. My heart, Mv talents, all I an, and all IT have, Is thine, 0 Father! Gracious Lo 1e, accpt The humble dedication! Offer'd gifts Of iau.hter'd bulls, and goa's facrificial, Thou hat rafus'd: but lo! I come, 0 LORD, 'o do thy w ill! the living facrificee Of an obedient heart I lay before thee! This humble offering more hall pleafe thee, LORD Than horned bullocks, ceremonial rire, New moons, appointed palfovers, and fis Yet thole I too will keep; but not inftead Of hoiinefs fbftantial, inward worth; F As







4* DAVID AND GOLIATHrz

As commutation cheap for pious deeds, And purity of life. But as the types Of better things; as fair external figns Of inward holinefs and fecret truth.

But fee, my father, good old Jeffe comes To cheer the fetting evening of whofe life, Content, a fimple shepherd here I dwell, Tho' Ifrael is in arms, and royal Saul Encamp'd in yonder field, defies Philiftia.

J SSE, DAVID.

R ESS E.
Bleft be the gracious Pow'r, who gave my age To boat a fon like thee Thou art the flaff Which props my bending years, and makes me bear The heavy burthen of declining age With fond complacence. How unlike thy fate, O venerable Eli! But two fons, But only two, to gild the dim remains Of life's departing day, and blefs thy age, And both were curfesto thee Witnelsf, Heav'nj In all the tedious catalogue of pains Humanity turns o'er, if there be one So terrible to human tendernefs, As an unnatural dhild

DAVID.
O, my lov'd father! Long may' fhou live, in yeais and hlnours rich; To tate, and to communicate the joys, The thoafandfon4 endearing charities






A SACRED DRAMA. 4

Of tendernefs domeftic; Nature's beff And lovelieft gift, with which the well atones The niggard boon of fortune.

JESSE.
O, my fon r
Of all the graces which adorn thy youth, I, with a father's fondnefs, muff commend Thy tried humility. For tho' the Seer Pour'd on thy chofen head the sacred oil, In fign of future greatness, in fure pledge Of higheft dignity; yet here thou dwell'Tff, Content with toil, and carelefs of repofe; And (harder ftill for an ingenuous mind) Content to be obfcure : content to watch, With careful eve, thine humble father's flock L O, earthly emblem of celeftial things! So Ifrae's flhepherd watches o'er his fold: The weak ones in his foft'ring bofom bears ; And gently leads, in his fuftaining hand, The feeble ones with young.

DAVID.
Know'ft thou, my father, Ought from the field ? for tho' fo near the camp, Tho' war's proud enligns fiream on yonder plain, And all Philiftia's fwarming hotffs encamp, Oppos'd to royal Saul, beneath whofe banners My brothers lift the fpear; I have not left My fleecy charge, by thee commiitted to me, To learn the prefeat fortune of the wariv

Fa JESSE.







44 DAVID AND GOLIATI,.

JESSE.
And wifely haft thou done. Thrice happy realm,:. Who hall fubmit one day to his command
Who can fo well cbey I Obedience leads To certain honours. Not the tow'ring wing Of eagle-plum'd ambition mounts fo Iurely. To Fortune's highest summit, as odedience.
[ A dgiant fbwnd of trum pets.
But why that fudden ardour, 0 my fn? That trumpet's found (tho' fo remote its voice, We hardly catch the echo as it dies) Has rous'd the mantling crimfon in thy cheek : Kindled the martial spirit in thine eye, And my young shepherd fels an hero's fire I

DAVIR).
Thou haft not told the poflure of the war, And much my beating bofom pants to hear.

J E S S E.
Uncertain is the fortune of.the field. I tremble for thy brothers, thus expos'd To confidant peril., nor for them alone, Dpes the quick feeling agonize my heart. I too lament, that defolating war Hangs his fell banner o'er my native land, Belov'd Jernfidalem! O war, what art thou After the brightest conqueT, what remains Of all thy glories? For the va!tquih'd, chains! For the proud victor, what? Alas I! to reign O'er defolated nations! a drear wafte, By one man's crime, by one man's hilt of pow'r, U~peopledl Naked plains and ravag'd fields Succ







A SA C R ED D RAMNIA. 4.

Succeed to fmingv harvefis, and the fruits. Of peaceful oliveC, hsf1CIOUS fig and vine! Pere, rifled temnples are thec cavern'dI dens, Of favage heait 3, or haunt of bi rds obicerte. There, populous cities blacken in the: ifw, ZAnJd, in the gc'rl reck, proudi p'alaces Lie undiilbnfifli'd, fhive by the dun fmloke of recent conflagration. WVhen the fong C f dear-bought joy,, with many a triumph fvwel'd, Salutes the vidtor's ear, :and fooths his pride; How is the grateful harmony profaned With the fad diffonance of virg ins' crics,, Who mourn their brothers fs;i! Of matrons hoar,. Who clafp their wither'd hands, and fondly afk, With iteration thrill, their flaug,,hter'd fons! Hlow is the laurel's verdure ftain'd with blood, And foil'd with widows' tears!I

R A V I D.Thrice mournful truth I Yet when, our country's rights, her facred laws, Her holy faith are fcorn'd anid trampled on, '.Then, then religion calls; th en God himfeif Commands us to defend his injuir'd nanitWX

Tfo lie inaaive, Y.hen the frring voice Of the thrill trumpot' w~akes to defpi'rate deeds; Nor w.~ith heroic vallour boldly dare '1Il' idolatrous heathen hands), ev'n to the death.

J 1,SS F. 4
ODand thy countryv cLaini the lie they gave,

DAV I D.







46 DAV ID AND GOLIATIH~

DAVID.
Sure virtuous friendship is a noble cafe !
0 Aere the princely Jonathan in danger,
How wou'd I die, well-pleas'd, in his defence!
When ('twas long fince, then but a ftriplhn boy)
I made thort fojourn in his father's palace,
(At firft to footh his troubled mind with 8g,
His armour-bearer next;) I well remember The gracious bounties of the gallant prince.
How wou'd he fit, attentive to my Arain; While to my harp I fung the harmless joys,
Which crown a shepherd's life! How wou'd he cry,
Blefs'd youth, far happier in thy native worth, Far richer in the talent Heav'n has lent thee, Than if a crown hung o'er thy anxious brow.
The jealous monarch mark'd our growing friendship;
And as my favour grew with thofe about him,
His royal bounty leffen'd, till at length,
For Bethl'bemrn's fafer fades I left the court.
Nor wou'd thefe al4ter'd features now be known,
Grown into manly strength; nor this chang'd form,
Enlarg'd with age, and clad in ruflet weed.

JESSE.
I have employment for thee, my lov'd fon,
Will pleafe thy active fpirit. Go, my boy !
Hafte to the field of wat, to yonder camp, Where, in the vale of Elah, mighty Saul
Commands the hofis of Ifiael. Greet thy brothers:
Obferve their deeds; note their demeanor well;
And mark if wifdoam on their actions waits.
Bear to them too (for well the wafte of war
Will make it needful) fch pai.WI healthful viad ,

Aar







ASA CRED DRAMA. 47

,As forniffh out our frugal fbepherd's meal. And to the valiant captain of their holt, Vrefcflt fuch rural gifts ats fuit our for-tune. I-leap d on the board within my tent thou'lt find them.

DAVID.
With joy I'll bear thy prefents to my brothers; And to the valiant captain of their boat, The rural gifts thy gratitude affigns him. What tranfport to behold the tented field, The pointed (pear, the blaze of fiields and arms, And all the proud accoutrements of war Bi1t, oh! far dearer tranfptort would it yield me, Coin'd this right arm alone avenge the caufe 1)f injur'd Ifrael and preferve the lives Of guiltlefs thousands, dooni'd perhaps to bleed!

J ES S I
Let not thy youth be dazzled, 0 myv fort With deeds of bold emprize, as valour onldY were virtue ; and the g entle arts of peace, Of truth and juflice, were not worth thy care. When thou fkalt view the fplendors ec' the war, The g-ay capariron, the burnifhi'd (hield, The plume-crown'd helmect, and the glittfring fpear. Scorn not the humible virtues of Ilhe Iliade Not- think that Hleavna views-only %%ith applanfe The attive merit, and the bufy toil OI het~ oes, Oiatefmn, and the builing (ons
Of~ ~~' puliicre fT e have their tf reward In we-dhh, in h, notirs, and the well-earn'i! fame Their hiathie!vents br ing. 'Tiin this view, TLat virtue i he proper rcupne







4jDAVID AND GOLIATTE:

Wealth, as its natural confequence, will flow From induftry; toil with fuccefs is cfown'd:
-From fplendid -afonvs ligh renown will fpring.
Such is the ufaal courfe of human things. I For Wifdom Infiaite permits, that thus
Effeds to caufes be proportionate,
And nat'ral ends by nat'ral 'means atchiev'd,
Bktt in the future-eftimate, which Hpav'n
Will make of things terrfirial, know, my fon,
That no inferior blelling is referv'd
For the mild palrt-ue- virtues-; meek Content,
Heroic Self-d enial, nobler far
Than all th' atchievemients noify Fame reports,
When her fhrill trump prom)claims; the proud fuccefs
Whick defolates the nations. But, on earth,
Thefe are not alwNays fortunate; becatife
Eternal Julice keeps them for the blifs Of final recompen ce, for the dread (day
Of general retribution. 0 mny fon!V
The oftentat4-ius virtue5r, which Rill prefs
For notice, and for praife ; the brilliant deeds,
Wh~ih ie hut in -the eye Of 'obfervation,
Thefe have their meed at once. But there's a joy,
To the fond votaries of Fame smknowss
To hear the Ril1 fmnall voice of confcience fpeak
Its whifp'ring plaudit to the filent foul.
-Heav'at notes the figh aliuded Goodnefs heaves;
Hears the low plaint by human car unheard, Anid from the clseek 'f patient Sorrow wipies
The tear, by wiostal eye inifeen or korn'd.


DAVT







AS A CIR ED 'D R AMA.,

DA VID.
As Hermon's dews, their grateful frehnefs ed, .And cheer the herbage, and the flow'rs renew; so do thy.words a quick'ning balm infitfe, And grateful fink in my delighted fouL

J E SS SE.
Go then, my child!1 and may the Gracious Got, vWho blefs'd our fathers, blefs my much-lov'd fon I

D AN LD.
Farewell, my father! and of this be fur;, That not a precept from thy hortour'd lips Shall fail, by me -unnoticed; not one grace, Onc venerable virtue, which'adorns 'Thy daily-4ife, but 1,. with watchful care, And due obfervance, will in mine trnfnplant it.
[Exit D~vx.
JESSE.
File's -gone and ff11l my aching eyes puiriae, ,And firain their orbs~flill longer to behold him. Oh! who cmn tell, when I may next embrace himla Who can declare the counfels, of the LordI or when the moment pre-ordain'd by H4eav'n To fill his great defigna may come ? This fu,01 This bleffing of my age, is fe apartI For high exploilts; thec chofen infirumrent Of all-difpo'mng Uleav'n fr i",hty 4eeds. Still I reial the day, and to my mindl The fc ene is ever present, ; when the Seer, lllufiriott6 Samuel, to the humble fhades Of Bthileem ramie, preteniding fac-ice To 11rectt his erranid from the jealus- king.
Ile








~wDAVID AND GOLIATH;:

He fanffifV'd us firif, me, and my fons; For fandity increas'i fhould ll precedt Increafe of dignity. When he dear'd
'He came, connmiffion'd from on Hi.h, to fin,
Among the fons of JefI'e, Lfrae1's, king;
Aflonifhmnent entranc'd my wond'ring foul.
Yet was it not a wild tumultunti- blifs
Such ralh delight as promis'd honourg yield
To light', vain mains; no, 'twas a doubtful Joy
thaffid by tim'rous virtue, lett a gift
So splendid, and fo dang'rous, might defiroy Him it was meant to ralfe. My eldeft bomo~
Young Eliab, tall of flature, I presented;
But GO D, V-.ho1 judges not by outward form,4 But tries the heart, f'orbad the holy prophet
To chufe my eldeft born. For Saul, he faid,
Gave proof, that fair proportion, and the grace
Of limib or feature, ill repaid the want
Of virtu~e. All my other fons alike
By Samuel were rejected: till, at lift,
On my young boy, on David's choten head
The pro het roof d the contecrated all,
Yet ne'er did pride elate him, nie 'er did fcor
For hit; rejeaed elIders (elhis heart.
Not in fuch gentle charity to himn
His haughtier brothers live: bu till he -pardons.
To meditation, and to hutiie toill,
T o pray'r, and praise Ilevoted, here hei dwell&
0 may the Graces Awbjch aIdorn' retl t W ~One day delight a court! recordihi.- inem
With falts and prophets, dignif hiace,
Ififrutt manknd, and fan~lify a world!







P






DAVID AND GOLT14TH.

P A R T 11.






S C E N E, The Camp.

ELIAB, ABINADAB, ABNER,
ISRAELITES.

ELIAR.

ST I L L is the event of this long wAr uncertain Still do the adverk hoUs, on either fide, a protraa, with ling'rin- caution,,arrencounterv whichnniftbaouebe fatal.

ABINADAB.
'I'llis defeent,
Thns to the vcry confines of otil, land, Fllocla;m5 the sanguine hope that fires the foCIn Ephts-&.nmini boldly they eacamp: 'fjj'jjncircm-aci ,'d Philiflines pitch their tents on Judah's hJlQw'd earth. ELIA9.








'AVID AN4D GOLIATfH:

ELIA B.
Full forty days
Has the infiltinig giant, proud Goliath,
The champion of -Philifia, fiercely challeng'J1
Somne Lfraelitifh foe. But who fo vain
To dare fuch force unequaL? who fo bent On fure deftrudion, to accept his terms;
And rufh on death, beneath thq giant force,
iOf his e1aormous bulk?

A BIN ADAB.
'Tis. near the time,~
Whens, in tW adjacent valley which divides IT Th' opposing armies, he is wont to jisake
11is daily challenge.

E L IA RI.
much i marvel, brother I )Zo greetings from our father reach our cars..
With cafe and plenty blefs'4, helittle reeks The daily hardlfhips which his fosis enduree,
mat fe-! behold his darling fon approaches, I

A BRIN AD AB.
How, David here? whence this ualook'd-fdoca t<


'A fpy upon our aEkions ; knt no doubtt.
-To fean our deeds, with bcardlefas gravity Affe6ling iidom; to obferve each word,,
TJo magnify the vtenial faults of yout~h,









Erter DA V ID.

D A VID.
All hail,.my deareft brothers!

ELIAB.,
Means thy greeting, True love, or arrogainforn ?

DAVID.
Oh, Ymoft true love 1, Sweet as 4he precious ointment, .which bedew'd TIhe facred head of Aaron, and defieended Upon his hallowed veil; fo fwe-et, juy brothers, is fond fraternal amity; fuich love As my touch'd boforn feels at your approach.

Tl 1,I A B1.
Still that fine glozing, fpeeeh, thofe holy faws., And all that t~ik of studiedd fan~tity, of fmnooth-turn'd periods, and trii.-a eloquence, Which charms thy doating father. But confqfs,What doff thou hecre ?Is it to foothe thy pride,, And gratify thy vaini desire to roam, in quell-of pleafuires unallowig$? or com'T thou, A willing f-py, to Pote thsy brother's deeds? Where h-aft thouI left thofe few poor straggling flieep t More fuitod to thy ignorance and years The care of thofe, than here to wander~ idly. Why Cdm'd thOua hiter I

DAVIM*-








j4 UFAV I'D AN DU tk

D) AV VI D.
Is there not a caufe Why that difpleafure kincdling in thine eye, My angry. brother ? why thofle taunts Unkind Not idly bent on fport; not to delight Mine eye with all this gay parade of war;~ To grakify a roving appetite, Or fondly to indulge a curious ear With any tWe of runmour, am I come But to approve myfelf a loving brother. I bring the bleiling, of youir agpd fire. With gifts of fitch plain c3tes, atnd ral vlauds7 As fait his frugal fortune. Tell owi now,

Where the bold captain of your hod1 gncawips?
FL 1A B.
Wherefore enquire ? what boots it thee to know Behold him there: great Abner, famn'd in arm.

D A IVD.
I bring thee, vaighty Abner, fromn my father, (A fimple shepherd fwain in, yonder vae) Su6h. humble gifts as flsepherd fwains beftow.

A BNERK.
Thanks, gentle-youth!I w ith pleafurelI rec-eive The grateful offering. Why does thy quick eye Thus wander vrith uttitisfied delight

DAVID.
New asI amto all the tradeof war, Fachfiund ha nove each thing I fee AttraWt attention i every isoife I hear






5 A C R I D 'DR AM A.

va'Ims confits'd emotions; iudiftina,
yet full of charming tumult, iweet ciilTatlmv.
'Tis all delightful flurry 1 Oh! the joy
,of young ideas paimcd on The mind,
Iii0lie warraglowing colours faricy spreads
on objefts not yet known, when all is new, And all is lowly I Ah! w4at warlike found Salutes my ravith'd ear i [4oa*d of pumqef.

A RIN B R,
'Tis the philiffine,
,Proclaming,'by his herald, through the ranks,
Pis near appioacb. Eachmoraiog.he repeats
His challenge to o1w hands.

DAVID.
Ha what Plfdi lline t Who is he ?
E L I A U.
WITicrefore ufk,, f" ty raw youtI4
And rufficign6rance, 'tv crc fitter Icarn
,,ome rural art foule lecret to 1 Cvcnt
-Contagion in thy Ec0, ; fcn,, 1, ettzr means
To fave tficic ficcce invn4culat Tbefe. incan art,,,
Of foft i ijorious ycact, f; r better fait
Thy loy ubf,610y, thaa 0 11s to ieck
High things, pcrtaLnin.- to c )Ioit6 of aynis.

D AV IDT'Y 7Y -1F., I Will FICA -Tlf'Aer tlleC.
:io liis uw-n );jit, Q my brcithcf
Ile







56 DA'VlTYAND GOLIATII4

He is the only conqueror.-Again'
That (hou t yfteriens! Ntay you, tell me who
This proud Philiftivie is, who fends de~fiance
To Ifrael's, hardy chieftains,?

N ABNER.
Stranger youth:
So lovely and fo mild is thy demeanour, -So gentle, and -fo patient ; fuch the air
-Of candor and of courage, which adorns
Thy blooming features, -thou haft-won iny love;
And I 'will tell thee.

DA-VI D.
Mighty Abner thanks]

ABNER.
Thrice, and no more, he ftir~s his daily rule.
TIhis man pf war, this champion Philiftia,,
Is of the fons of Anak s giant-race.
-oitlis his name. His fearfidl nature,
Unparallel'd in lfirael, ineaflures more
Than twice three Cubits. on his towering head
A helm of buirniflu'd brafs the giant Awears,
~opond'rous, -it would criiih the fiouteft miai
.- h all our bsois. A coat of mailed armour
urshis capacious trunk ; comipar'd~withi which
The ampl)eft oak, that fyireads his Tugged'arnus
Itn Baihan's; groves, were finall. About his neck
A fbiniing corflet hangs. On his vwaft thigh
'The p)li-ed cuirafs firmly jointed Ranxis.
~Bt who~ thall tell the wo.nde~rs of his fpear,






A ACRED DRAMA.

And hope to gain belief I of maffive iron Its temper'd frame; not Jefs than the broad To which the bufy weaver hangs his loom; Not to be wielded by a mortal hand, I Save by his own. An armour-bearer walks Before this mighty champion, in his hand Bearing the giant's field. Thrice, every morn, His herald founds the trnmpet of deiauce; Off'ring at once to end the long-drawn war, In single combat, 'gainft that hardy foe Who dares encounter him.

DAV I D.
Say, mighty Abner I
What are the haughty terms of .his defiance

ABNER.
Proudly he Italks around th' extrerneft bounds Of Elah's valley. His herald founds the note Of offer'd battle. Then the furious giant, With fch a voice as from the troubled Iky, In vollied thunder, breaks, thus fends his challenge" Why do you fet your battle in array, Ye men of Ifrael? Wherefore watffe the lives Of needlefs thousands ? Why protrat a war, Which may at once be ended? Are not you Servants to Saul your king? and am not I, With triumph let me fpeak it, a Philiftine ? Chufe out a man from all your armed hofis, Of courage moll approv'd; and I will meet him,
-His ingle arm to mine. Th' event.of this Shall fix the fate of Ifrael and Philifia.
H 11







s s DAVID AND GOLTATH:.

If viffory favour him, then will we live
Your tributary flaves ; but if my arm
Be crown'd with conquett, you hall then live ours.
Give me a man, if your effeminate bands
Sman can boaft. Your armies 1 defy."

DAVID.
What (hall be done to him, who fall fubdue
This vile idolater

ABNER.
He hall receive
such ample bounties, fuch profufe rewards,
As might inflame chill age, or cowardice,
Were not the odds fo defperate.

DAVID.
Say, what are they?

A B N E R.'
The royal Saul has promised that bold hero,
Who Thall encounter and fubdue Goliath,
All dignity and favour; that his houfe
Shall be fet free from tribute, and ennobled
With the firft honours Ifrael has to give.
And for the gallant conqueror himfelf,
No lefs a recompence than the fair Princefs,
Our monarch's peerlefs daughter.

D A VI
Beauteous Michali
It is indeed a boon which kings might ilrive for.
And has none anfwer'd yet this bold defiance?
wh






A SACRED DRAMA.- 59,

What, all this goodly holt of Ifraelites, GOD'S own peculiar people! all afraid 'I.' afiert GOD's injured honour, and their own? The king himfelf, who in his early youth Wrought deeds of fame! the princely Jonathan I Not fo the gallant yomh Philiftia fear'd At Bozez and at Seneh *; when the earth Shook from her deep foundations, to behold The wond'rous carnage of his fingle hand On the uncircumcis'd. When he exclaimed, WVith glorious confidence-" Shall numbers awe me I o Go will protect his own: with him to fave, It boots not, friends, by many or by few." This was an heroe! Why does he delay To meet this boafler? For thy courtefy, Thrice noble Abner, I am bound to thank thee! Wou'd'ft thou complete thy gen'rous offices? I dare not afk it.
ABNER.
Speak thy wishes freely: My foul inclines to ferve thee.

DAVID.
Then, O Abner,.
Conduct me to the king.! There is a caufe Will juftify this boldnefs.

ELIAB.
Braggard, hold!

H, ABNE .


x Samnuel ziv.







-DAVIDi AND GOLTIATH:

ABN ER.I take thee at thy word; and will, with fpeed,, Condua thee to my. royal inafter's prefknce.. In yonder tent, the anxious mnonarcoh waits Th' event of this, day's challenge.

1) XV I 1
Noble Abner!I
Accept Tmy thanks. Now to thy private ear, If fo thy grace permit, I will unfold My fecret foul ; and eafe my lab'ring breafl, Which pants '.mith h1gh designs, and beats for glo ry.




IDAVID AND, GOLIATHJ

P A It T III.




SCENE, S~mi.'s Ten.,

SAUL.

V/H Y was I made a king ? *what I have gain& In envy'd greatnefs and uineafy pqw'r, I've loft in pe-ACCof mind~~, ip virtue loft I Why did deceitful tranrfports fire my foul, When Stimuel piseMd upon., may youthful brow 'The crown of Ifraci? I had 1nown content, Nay bpies if happiuclfa unix~d,







A T ACR B D fR A p4, #

'vo mortal man were known; kati flill livd Amon., the humle teats of Benjamin. A (hepherd's occupation was MY joy, And ev'ry gailtlets day~was crown'd with peaceB~ut now, a fuilen cloud for ever hangs O'er the faint Iinfihine of mty brighteft hours,, pDirk'ning the golden promife of thie morn. Ine'er fhail tafte the dear domeFlic -joys NMv nieanefl fiibjeas know. True, I have~ fons, Wliofe virtues would have charm'd a private mnau,. And drawn down bleflings on their humble fireI love their virtues too;, but 'tis a love, WNhich jealoufy has poifon!'d. -Jonathan is all a father's fondnefs cost'd conceive of amiable--and good ---Of that no- more!
-1Ie is too popular; the people doat Upion th' ingenuous graces of his youth. Curs'd popularity! which makes a father Deteft the merit of a fon he loves. H-ow did their fond idolatry perforce, Refctue his fentenc'd life, when doned by lot To perifll at Bethi-aveno, for the breach of ftri&i injunaiois, that of all my bands,. Not one that day Ihou'd tatle of food, andi live.. My fuabjeds clanaour at thijt tedious war, Yet of mny numerous armed chiefs, not one Has courage to enaethis mnan of Gath. O for a champion bold enough to face This giant.boAfter, whofe repeated threats Itrike thlnV my inioft foul I There was & tine~Of'


aSaMUCI, xiv.







S6 DAVID AND GOLIATE

Of that no more !- am not what I was.
Shou'd valiant Jonathan accept the challenge,
'Twcuzld but increase his favour with the people
And make the crown fit loofely on my brow.
Ill cou'd my wounded fpirit brook the voice
Of harth comparifon 'twixt fire and fon.

SAUL, ABNER.

ABNER.
T What meditation holds thee thus engag'd,S0 king! and keeps thine a&ive fpirit bound; When bufy war far other cares demands
Than ruminating thought, and pale defpair i

SAUL
Abner, draw near. My weary foul finks down:
Beneath the heavy preffure of misfortune.
O for that fpirit, which inflamed my breaft
With fudden fervor; when among the feers,
And holy fages, my prophetic voice
Was heard attentive, and th' aftonilh'd throng,
Wond'ring, exclaim'd, Is Saul among the prophets Where's that bold arm which quell'd th' Amalekite,
And nobly fpar'd fierce Agag and his flocks ?
'Tis pall ; the light of lfrael now is quench'd:
Shorn of his beams, my fun of glory lets 1 Rife Moab, Edom, angry Anmmon, rife!
Come Gaza, Athdod come! let Ekron boaft,
And Afkelon rejoice, for Saul- is nothing.

ABNER..
I bring thee news, O king !
8S






A $ A'CR ZD 'DR AMA.


SAUL.
My valiant umele!
NWhat can avail thy news? A foul opprefs'd, R~efufes ta:ii to hear the charmer's voice, ulowe'er enticingly he charmt. What news Can footh 'my fickly foul, while Gath's fell giailt, Repeats each morning to my frighteo'd hofts Hlis daring chaileisge-norie accepting it

A BN ER.
It is accepted.

SAUL.
Ha!1 by whom -' how-? when WVhat Prince, what gen'ral, what illuftrious hero, What vet'rax chief, what warrior of renown, Will dsre to meet the haughty foe's defiance ? Speak, my-brave gen'ral,! nole Abner, fpeiik 1

A B NER.
No prince, no warrior, no illuftrious chief, No vet'ran hero dares accept the chleg; But what will move thy wondoel, mig hry king! ,One train'd to peaceful deds-and niew to arms, A simple shepherd fwain.

5 AU L.
0 mokey
No more of this 17,4!t tale, it fuiis b)ut ill Thy be-;irc gra!; vity : or rather tell it To ci~u u i s age, ,r w.eak beliei ng women; w.hey love v4,ate'c.r is miar-vellu, andI doat







4 AVJD AND GOLIATH

On deeds prodgious, and incredible, Which fober fenfe rejeks. I laugh to think of thy extravagance. A shepherd's boy Encounter him, whom nations dread to meet!

ABNER.
Is valour, then, peculiar to high birth ?
If Heav'n had fo decreed, know, fcornful king, That Saul the BenjamPire had never reign'd. No:-Glory darts her foul-pervading ray, On thrones and cottages, regardlefs fill Of all the falfe, chimerical diftinttions Yain human cuftoms make.

SAUL.
Where is this youth?

ABNE R.
Without thy tent he waits. Such humble fweetnef, Fir'd with the fecret confcience of defert; Such manly bearing, tempered with fuch foftnef, And io adorned with every outward charm
-Of graceful form and feature, faw I never.

SAUL
-Bring me the youth.

ABNER.
J-Ie waits thy royal pleafure.
[Exit AsN
-SAUL.
~What muft I think ? Abner himfelf is brave, ..AndJki 'd inhuman kind: nor does he judge







,A -5 A CRED ) R WM A. .

-So lightly, to be caught by fipecious words,, And fraud's fmot artifice, without the mark ,of worth itrinfic. But behold he comes 1
-The youth too with him I juffly did he praife ,The candor, which adorns his open brow.

Re-enterAB NE R and DAVJ D).

bAVIfl.
-lail, mighty kin~g!

A BN ER.
Behold thy proffet'ddAmmpia.

SAUL
Art thou the -youth, whofe high heroic =al
_Afpires to meet the giant fon of Ainak

DAVID.
if fo the king Permit.

S AU L.
Impoflible
Why, -,what experience has thy youth of arms? Wheric didft thou learn the dreadful trade of war? Beneath what hoary vet'ran haft thou ferv'd? What feats atchiev'd, what deeds of bold emprize? What wdll-rang' d phalanx, and what charging hofis, 'What hard campaigns, what fleges hqa thou feeh ? ,Haft thou e'er fcal'd the city's rampir'd wall, zOr hurl'a the mniffile dart, or iearn'd to poik The warrior's dcathftsl fpear ? The ofe of targe, Of helw, and buckler, is tothee unsknown.
D DAV ID.








D AV-1D AN D GOLI IAT11-4

I) A V I D.
Arms I have feldom feen. I little know
Of w~ar's proud difeipline. The trumpet's clang,
The thock of cha rging hoffs, the rarnpir'd wall,
Th' embattled phalanx, and the warrior fpear,
The ufe of target and he] i to me is new.
My zeal for Go--, my patriot love Qef lfrael,
And reverence foe my king, thefe are my clainas.

S A V L.
But, gentle youth, thou, halt no fame in antis.
Renown, with her Thrill clarion, never boreThy honoured name to mnaiy a land remote.
From the fair regions, %vbere Euphrates laves
Atfyria's bord,-rs, to the diftent Nile.

1)A V 1D.
True, mighty king! I am indeed alike
Unbiefs'd by Fortune, and to Fame unknown;
A -lowly ffiepherd-fivain of judales tribe.
But g-reatnefs ever fprings from low beginnings.
That very Nile thout muentiun'ft, whofe broad ftreair>
Bears fruitfuincfs and health thro' many a clime,
From an unknown, penurious, Icanty fource,
Took its firft rife. The forefr oat-, which shades -Thy fultry troops in ma~ny a tailfowe march,
-Once 4n i needed acorn lay. 0 king-!
Who ne-er begins can never sought atchieve
'Of goisThoui thvfelf waft once iinknow n,
-'Till fair occaiilon broughtt thy worth to it Sublli3-,icr viewi, itifl.x mny yotithfJlieert, G, Thanl humnal prak: 6 Gek to vintliite"
t ~ Th infitettid 1heugtw r the GOIC thou ferv'R
A







A SA C-RE D DiR A MA.


ABNER.
'Tis nobly faid.

SAUL;
I love thy fpirit, youth I But dare not trufi thy ine xperienic'd arm Aogaifft a giant's wl~ght. The fight of blood, The' brave thou f~e'ft when peril is not nigh, W Ill pale thy ardent cheek.

D A VID.
Not fo, 0 king F
Thbis youthful arm has been imbru'd in blood, 'iho' yet no blood of man has ever flain'd it. Thy fervant's occupation is a (hepherd:I I with jealous care I watch'd my father's flock:A brindled lion, and a furious bear, Forth from the thicket ntfh'd upon the fold, Seiz'd a young lamb, and tore their bleating fpoil i Urg'd by co mpaffion for mny lie! lers charge,
1 eea new-born vig_;ur nerve MY arm,
And, eager, oin theoaniing mionflers ruf~d. The fainifhi'd lion by his grilly beard, Enrag'd, I caught, anid faote him to the airumd The panting mptnfler flruggling in my gripe Shook terribly his briffling ineand lafhi'd His own gaunt, goary fides; fier(ely he ground IP' 0nTiailing te-eth, anld roll'd lii Jte ring eyes, Bloodflot w ith agonly: thecn with a roan, That wA k' the echoes of the monandy'd. NIoi di his grim affibejate 'feape ily armn; Thy ftry' nta flew the lieni anp the betar, I kil'd themil both, UiJ bore their fha4~gy fpol

I z








u~DAVID AND GOL1-ATIF~t

In triumph home. And fliall I fear to meet
Th' uncircumcis'd Philifine? No: that GOD,
Who fav'd me from the bear's deftruaive fang,,
And hungry lion's jaw, wilt not he fave me
From this Idolater?

S AUL.
He will, he will!I
Go, noble youth! be valiant, an I be blefs'd!
The GOD thou ferv'ft will fhield thee in the fight,.
And nerve thy armn with more than mortal ftrength.

All N E R.
So the bold Naza rite*~ a iion flew,,
An earnefl of his victories o'er Philiffia.

S AU L.
.k Go, Abner. fee-the youth be well equipped
With shield and fpear. Be it thy care tW pgace him.~
With allt thec fit. accoutrements of, war..
'The choiceft mail from my rich armoury take,
i And gird un his thigh my own'try'd fword,
Of nobleft temrper'4 fteel.

A B N E R..
I thaUl obey..

b A V-1D.
'pardon,' 0 king!! the coat of p'litedA mail;.
Thefe limubs have Aever known; it'wou'd nut flielt,



S*"mfpf. $,cr isidges, chap. siv







A SA C RED DRAMA. '6*

rTwou'd but encumber one, who never felt
-T Ie weight of armour.
S AU L.
Take thy wifh, my fon'. Trhy fword then, and the GOD of Jacob Guard thee t







D)AVID AND GOLIATH.

P A RT IV.







S C E N E, another Part of the tampa.


DAVID.

ETERNAL juffice in whofe awful cl
Th' event of battle hangs!I Eternal Mercy, Whofe univerfal beam illumines all! If, by thy attributes 1 may, unliam'd, Addirfs thee Lord of glory, hear me now! I) teach thefie hands to 'Aar, tbA-, arms to fi,-ht1 Thoul ever' prefent help) in imie of ned 1 2Let thy) broad uettly, as a fbield,. defnd







7e DAVID ANI~ GOLIATH:

And let thine everlafling arms fupport me Then, tho' the heathen rage, I hall not fear. JEHOVAH! be my buckler. Mighty LORD! Thou, who haft deign'd by humble inffruments, To manifest the marvels of thy might, Be present with me now! 'tis thy own cafe Thy w ifdom will forefee, thy goodnes chufe, And thy omnipotence will execute Thy high designs, tho' by a feeble arm I I feel a fecret impulfe drive me on, And my foul fprings impatient for the fight. 'Tis not the heated fpirits, or warm blood Of fanguine youth; and yet I pant, I burn To meet th' infulting foe. I thirst for glory; Yet not the fading glory of renown, The periftable praife of mortal man.

DAVID, ELIAB, ISRAELITES

ELIAB.
What do I hear, thou truant? thou haft dar'd, Ev'n to the awful prefence of the king, Bear thy prefumption!

DAVID.
He, who fears the Lol, Shall boldly fland before the face of kings, And hall not be afham'd.

ELIAB.
But what wild dream
Has urg'd thee to this deed of defp'rate ralmefs I






Ai SA CRED DRAMA. ji

Thou mean'ft, fo have I learn'd, to meet Gtiliath,, 1-ia fingle arm to thine.

DAVID.
'Tis what I mean,
-Ev'n on this fpot; each moment I expeft Hjis wifh'd approach.
~E L -AB.
Go home; return, for thamel Nor madly pull deflru~tion on thy head. Thy doating father, when thy shepherd's coat, Drenceh'd in 'hy blood is brought him, will lament, And rend his furrow'd cheek, and fliver hair, As if fome mighty'lofs had touch'd his'age; And mourn, even as the partial patriarch mourn'd. When jofeph's bloody garment he receiv'd, From his lefs dear, not Iefs deferving, fons. But w hence that glitt'ring ornament, which hangs + lVfelefs upon thy thigh ?

D A I VD.
.'Tis thekidng's gift. But thou art right; it ftuits. not mne, my brother.
Nor fwvord I mean to wear, nor fpeasr to poize.
Left men fhou'd fay I pust my truft in ought, S~av~e an eternal field.

'E LI A B.
Then th1ou indeed Art bent to feek thy death,

D A V I D.
And1 -,hat is death? Jit fo) terrill to di(-, inybohe







~&DIV1D AND~ GOtLIATlh4r grant i terrible, fay is it not Inevitbl toe? if, by eluding death, Whens fqnie hiigh dut cails us forth to die, We cou'd? for ever fh'.n it, andfea -e le iiverfal lot; then fond feff-love, Thieo hsim prudence, boldly might produce Their fine-flau arguments, their learn'd barangues, Their cobweb arts, their phrafe fophiftical, 'Itheir fubtile dioubts, and'all the fpecious trick, Of eloquent cunninff lab'ring, for its end. But fince, however protradesl, death will come, Why fondly fludyt. with ingenious pains, To put it off ?-To breathe a little longer, Is to defer our fate, but not to Ifun it: Small gain 1 which Wifdom with indiff'rent eye Bleholds. Why wifh to drink the bitter dregs Of life's ex~haufted. chalice, whofe laft runnings, Ev'n at the beft, are vapid ? Why not die, O(f Heav'n fo will) in manhood's opening bloom9 When all the Rth of life is gay about us, When fprightly yogth, with many a new-born joy9 'Solicits every fe C So may we thetn Prefent a facrifice, unmeet, indeed,
Ahow unmeet!) but more acceptable
Than f4he'orld's leavings ; than a worn-out -heart, By vice enfeebled, and by vain deftees
-Sunk and exhaeafted!

ELIABHark 1 I'hear afon

~~~~I~~- A V~eaapoahsg







A "S A _C IZ,'T D D R A -NY L

D A-V I ID.
'Tis; Ovegiant I
fe6 him not but bew his: mraffurld pwe.

E L I AB,
Look, wltejx his pond:rows ffiield is borne.before b m*t

D A V 11).
Likt-. a broad moon its ample difk protrnds.
-But f0ft, 'What ""know n prodigy alTears A moving mountain cas'd in polifli'd brufs!
41'LIAD. jCviirgbrhindDAvjr).j
How's this ? thon doft not tremble. Thy firm joins Betray no fear-.- Thy accent-, are not broken Tliv cheek retains ks wd, thine eye its h4m. ,He comes more vear. Dufttha4.IIQt fearwm_4PwZ

,DA V I D.
'No.
The vaft c6Wal Itatue nor in-fpjres .Refl)eU nor fear. Mereirna nitudeof form, Without -proportion'd intellect and v46ur,, Strikes not my font *ith reverence nor with awe.

E -L I A PNear, 2fiA mwentar, lie conaes- I hold it ra% To flay fo near'him, and expose a life, Which may hereafter lerve the flate. Farewell


Orebearzl g bisJbield precedes bim. The"I,;, ai;nL5 zre.,'ecn &,t a (fiflance, dra-wn q o)v eaclifde of irhe zw1hyG () iJA 1)4, begins tofpeak, 15, /.ecrm s on. _DaviD lands in i1jefaw tiace, qvitb axi cir ff indff, n-wc.]
C 0 L I-




4


7q DAVID AND GOLIATHGOLIATH.
Where is the mighty man of war, who dares
Accept the challenge of Philiffia's chief?
What vitor-king, what gen'ral drench'd in blood,
Claims this high privilege? What are his rights? S What proud credentials does the boafter bring,
To prove his claim I What cities laid in afhes?
What ruin'd provinces ? What flauighter'd realms?
What heads of heroes, and what hearts of kings,
In battle kill'd, or at his altars flain,
Has he to boaft ?i Is his bright armoury
Thick fet with peas, and words, and coats of mail,
Of vanqnifh'd nations, by his fingle arm
Subdued? Where is the mortal man fo bold,
So much a wretch, fo out of love with life,
To dare the -eight of this uplifted fpear, Which nevar fell innoxious? Yet I fwear,
I grudge the glory to his parting foul
To fall by this right-hand. 'Twill sweeten death,
To know he had the honour to contend
With the dread fon of Anak. Lateft time From blank oblivion hall retrieve his name,
Who dar'd to perifh in unequal fight
With Gath's triumphant champion. Come, advance!,
Philifta s Gods to Ifrael's. Sound, my herald-;7Sound for the battle ftrait I
[Herald founds the tra

D A V I D.
Behold thy Foe


1 eehinAot






A S AC AE DD R AMA..A,'

DA V ID.
IMehold hm hereI

GO. L I ATI H.
Say, whereI
Dired my fight. I do Rot war with boys.

D A V I D.
I Ptandprepar'd, thy fingle arm to mine.

GOLIATH.
W%*hy, this is mockery, Mialon I it may chance To cofl thee dear. Sport not with things above thee. But tell me who, of all this msm'rous hofl, Ex-,21s his death from me? Which is the man, Whom Ifrael fends to m-aeet my bold defiance?

D AV ID.
Th' eleaion of my fov'reign falls on me.

GO01 LA T H.
On thee!1 on thee !by IDago 'tis too much 1 Thou curled Mlli in thou a nation's champion I 'Tw ou'd move my birth at any other time; Btr tr. fling's out of tune. Begonie, light boy! And tempt mie not too far.

~DAV ID.
10.~ defy thee;
Thoui foul idolklater!1 haft Lt, not1 fcorn'd Theli armies of the: li.g Govn fcrve? B ole hec Wji veog c k', l ty he-i Th aio' in's andtil .Ar' wt his name,:









lUnfhrinking, I dare meet theflouteft foe That ever baWksd his hoftila: 1pear- ini blpo.

G 0 L I1 A.T H-, .ironically.
Indeed! 'tis wondrns well 1 Now, by my Gods,. The 11ripling plays the orator! Vain boy! Keep clofe to that famne bloodlefs war of words, And thou halt (till be fafe. Tongue-valiant warrior 1. Where is thy fylvan crook, witgarLands hung,. Of idle field-flowers ? Where thy wanton harp, Thou dainty-finger'd hero. better firike its note Wacivioms,, or the lulling lute Touch loffly, thas forovoke the trumpet's rage. I- will not flain the honour-of my pear With thy inglorious blood. Shaill that fair cheek Be fcarr'd with wounels unfemily? Rather go,, And held fond dalliance with the Syrian maids; To wanton meafures dance, and let then braid The bright luxuriance of thy golden hair; They, for their, ba Adonis, may. riftike Thy dainty form.
D-A V I D.z
Peace, thou unhallow'd railer.i
0 tell it not in Gath, nor let the found Reach Alkebon, how once yoar flaughter'd Lords,
-By mighty Sam~on foundone common grave When his broad (hotilder the firm pillars heav'd, Anid to its bafe the tott'ring fabric lhook.,





a .7n4dges, chap. xvi..






SACRED DRM." 7

GOLI ATH.
bifolting boy!- perhaps thou halt not hear'd 'me infamy of that inglorious day, When your weak hofa at Eben-eczer pitch'd1 Their quick-abandon'd tent Thien, when your arkv yonr talisman, you charm, yo- boaffed pledge of safety and fuccefs, was tamnely loft! And yet not tamely, fince by me 'twas won. When with this good right-arm I thinn'd- your ranks, And bravely cruili'd, beneath a single blow, 'The chofen- guardians-of this vaunted lhrine, Jlophini t and Phineas. 'The fam'~d ark itfelf,
1 bore to Afhdod.
D A.VID.,
I ternernber too,
Since thou~pyxvok'ft th' unwelcome truth,. how allk Your bluffhing prieNi behield their idols fhame; When proffrate Dagon fell before the ark, And your frail God was ffiver'd. Then Philiftim, Idolatrous Philiffia flew for fuccour 'To Ifrael's help, and all hierflmitten nobles Co-nfcfs'd the LoRa3 -as GOD, a nd the blefs'd ark, Gladly, with reverentialawe. reftor'd

GOL I ATH.
By Afhdod's fane thou ly'ft. Now will I meet thee, 'Thou in fect. warrior! fince thou dair'ft me thus!
Already




G~,o a zji d killed ljiphi, andPjieas avd-;







73 DAVIOAND 0OLIAT!<

Already Ii behold thy mangled liimbs, Diflever'd each from each, ere Ic to fb cI The fierce, blood- fnuffing v-V c.Mrk ine well! Around my fpes: IT twift thy fkhiong locks, And tofs in air ty head all g'afh'd with wounds i Thy lips, yet quiv'ring with the dire cenv ulfion Of recent death! Art thou not terrified?

D A V I D.
No.
True courage is not mov'd by breath of words. But the ial4h bravery uoi boiling blood, Impetuou;, knows no fettled principleA fev'riflh tioe, it has its ebbs and flows, As spirits rife or fall, as wine inflames, Or circumftanres change. But inborn courage, The en'rous chil of Fortitude and Faith, Holds its firni enipire in the conflant foul; And, like the ftedfaft p-ole-lar, never once From the 1ioe flx'd and faithful point~ declines.

GOLIATH.
The curfes of Philiftia's gods be on thee I
This fine-drawn fpeech is meant to lengthen out, That little life thy words pretend to feori.

DAVID.
Hal fay'ft thou fo? comet on then iMark us well. Thoui corn ft to mne with fivorcl, and fpear, and 1Kild In the dread name of Ifraei's GoD), I come; The living LoRD Of HO0STS, whomn th,, defy'LtA Yet th&o no tbield I bring, no arias, extept Theke five f fiotvaoes& I gatbe'd from thebro$







A SACRED -DRAMA. ,

WV~ith fitch a fintple ing as 1hepheras Iu f yet all expoa'd, -defencelefs as I aui, The GOD I ferve Thall give thee up a prey To my vid-orious arm. This day, I mean Tro :iiake th' uncirctuncifed tribes confefs There is a GOD in Mfadi. I will give thee, Spi cf thy 'vaunted Ih-ength, and giant bulk, To. "It the carrion kites. Nor thee alone; 'f ji mangled carcafes of your thick hofts, shall fpread the plains of Ebbh: till Philiftia,
T 'all her trembling tents and filing bands, Shall own that Judah's GOD is GOD indeed! I dare thee to the trial 1

GOLIATH.
followv* Me.
this good fpear I truiL

DAVID.
U truft in heav;en!I
Thle GOD of battles ftimunites moy arm, And fires my foul with ard, Y, not itsow.






]DAVID-







So~







DAVID AND GOLIATH,


P A R~ T V.





s C EN E, The Tent of SAUL.

S A U rzfg from his Couch.

O il! that I 'knew the black and midnight artOf w izard forcery l that I cou'd call Thle flainb'ring fpirit froml the fhatdes of hell!l Or, like Chaldean faige5, cou'd forekmiw Th' event of thing-s Unaded! I rni~x then Anticipate mny forttine. How ilm rall'n 'tile fport of vain chinmeras, the weak flave Of Featr, and fickly Fancy; coveting 1o know the arts, w hich fool diviners life. Thick blood, anld mopiog meclancholv, ieA~ To balefful Superiiin ; that fell fiend, W~hofe with'rnz' ehal-mls blaff zhe fair bleom of virtue. 'Why Jidl mlly wotur~od pride iith'fczrn reefa 'Thle w' lefome trurhs, iwhkh holy Samuel tol. me? 17Vni drive him f, orn myv b-fnce ini h- nowV
-.Ralfe m-y funk fuoL, znd in) bNmi ted mind YXuight










4Fnhighten with religins cheering ray. oe dar'd t wrae ith 4ofs ofempire:;. And 1, for that bOld honefly, difinifsed him. At' Another (hall poffefs thy throne, he cry'd,
A franr Y" 'This uniwelcome prophecy
V-as lin'd my rrown, and *tew'4- my zcib, with th" 06. .,ach ray -of Aop'ning wwerit. I &ikern In friend or foe, 4Uia-r 's my troubledfoul, Left he fhou'd -prove my rival- But this aton, Ev'n my young champion, lovely -as -he look'd In blooining valour, Atmouck -me to the foul! with jealoufy's barb'd dart. 0 Jealoufy! Thou uglieft-flend of hell! thy deadly venom preys on my vitals, tuxstfie healthf l hue
-of my frelth cheek tolsaggard Ial~ownefs,
And drinks ;my fpirit xsp!
[ o~u~2#fzap~,jo~ig e.~c

What founds are thofe? 'The combat-is decided. HVtrk1;again,, 'Thofe fioits proclaim it! Now, 0 Go O f JACOB, If yet thou haft not, quite withdrawn from-Saul 'Usy light and favour, prot'per ine this once!I But Abner comes! I dread to hear- his tgle. Fair Hope, with flailing face, -but -ling'ring foote Ras long deceiv'd Inc.

AMBNE R.
King of lfrael, hai' Now thou art king in~ded. T11h,'onth s conquef4d .Uoliath's dead.
IS A U.
-Oh, ipa hrW g
,Itft my food cars deceive me!
L A N R








-zDAVID AND GOLIA-TII:

ABNER.'
Thy young chai
Has f1 in the giant.
SAUL.
Then Goo is gracious In fpite of ray offences! But, good Abner, Ho" --as it? tell me all! Where is mny champion? Q~fck let mne prefs him to my grateful heart, And pay Lin a king's thzirks. And yet, %%ho knows? This forward friend may prove an a~qive fije. No more of that.-Tell me the whole, brave Abner I And paint -the glorious ads of my young heroe I

ABNER.
Fall in the centre of the camp they flood Th' opposing armies rang'd on either fide, in proud array, The haughty giant fialk'd, Stately, acrofs the valley, Next the youth, Wi~h rnodelt confidence advanc'4. Nor ponrp, Nor gay paraic, nor martial ornament, His graceful form ado, n'd. Goliath flrait, With role ma fate, began the hufy work Of dreadful preparation. In one place, His clofely jointed mail an op'ning left, For air, ani only one: the watchful yoth Mlark'd that the be aver of hs helm was up,
_Jveanwhile the Giant fuch a~~lw devis'd.
-A woitd have crufhi'd himn; this the youth pcrcei jAd from his well direfted fling, lie hurl'd, 'Wth dextrous Ainm, frn which funk, deey og Zn the capacJius frorehead-of the foe. Then wit h a cry, ,is ind ani -terrphle,
L~J~biani lie roaring for their yotz)Z,

4P







A SACRED DRAIA. 21.

qite flunn'd, the furious Giant ftagger'd5 reel'd, And fell: the mighty rnafs of mian fell prone. Wvith its own weightz his fhatter'd bulk was bruis'd. Hlis clattering arm s rung dreadful thro' the field, And the firm bafis of the folid earth Shook. Chok'ditsblood an 'd duff, he cu~s~d his godsp And dy'd blafpheming Strait the viftor youth Drew from its fheath the Giant's pond'rous fword, And from th' enormous trunk, the goary head, Furious in death, he fevered. The grim vifage Look'd threat'ning flill, and ff11l frown'd horribly.

SAUL.
0 glorious deed!I 0 valiant, conqueror!

A B N ER.
The youth, -to catin appear'd, fo nobly firm ; So ccol, yet fo intrepid; that thefe eyes Ne'er fi~w fitch temperate valour, fo chaftiisd BY modefly.
S AUVLI
Thou dwell'ff upon, his praife With needlefs circhrmffance. 'Twas nobly done;' But others too have fought!'

A B N R.
Ntne, none fo bravely. (AkUL.What followi'd next?

La







D~ DA VI I AN'l'D G 0 1A T RA B NER.
The fhouting Ifraelites On the Philiffines rufh'd, and lfill p'irfue Their reoited remnants. In difmiay, their bands,. Di!forder'd fly. While fhotits of loud acclaim Purftue their brave deliverer. Lo, he comes!I Rearing the Giant's head, and Ihining fword, His well-earn'd trophies.

SAUL, AXBNE-R, DAVID.
[D)AvriD, bearing GO LIATH's bead and fword. He knlee
and lays botb at S~vL's fret.]

SA UL.
Welcome to my heart, IMy glorious champion!I my- deliverer, welcome!I How fhall I fpeak the fweing gratit-le Of my full heart? or give thee the high praifeThy gallant deeds deferve?

D AV ID-.
0 mighty king!I
Sweet is 'the breath of praife, when giv'n by thof6Whofe own high merit claims the praife they give.. But let not this one fortunate event, By Heav'a diredled, be aferib'd to me. I might have fought with equal fkill and courage, And not have gained this conqueft; then had fhaine,, 1Harffh obloquy,. and foul difgi (e befal'n me. But profp'rous fortune gains. tht praife of valour..

SAUL.
I like not th's. In every thiiag fuperior!
He fuars above' ie. (AfidJe.) Modeft youth, thourt6







,A 9ACAEDU DRtAMA. r

And fortune, as thou fav l, deferves the praife We give to hunan afvIour.

DAVID.X
Rather fay,
Thle Go-D- o H68 1 sv dkWees it.

SAUL.
Tell me, yotth! What is thy name, and what thy father's houfei'

D A V*1Y.
MY name is David, Jetre is my, fire, An humble Bethiemiteof Judah's tribe.SAUL..
David, the fon of Jfe t sure that nameHai been familiar to me! N~ay, thy voice,: Thy form and features, I remember too,. Tho, faint,. and, indiffinetly.

A-0NE .
Inv this HeroBehold thy fweet nuffician; he, whofe harp Rxpell'd the melancholy, fiend,, whole pow'r Xnflav'd thy fpirit.
S A IfL.
This the mnodeft You~th, Whom, for his 1 11l and virtues, I preferr'4. UI~ bear my armour

D A V I D..
I ain lie,0kingr


SA U







DAVID AND C-OLIATH.

SAUL.
WVhy thu3 concealmecnt ? tell me, valiant David f Why didit 61hou hide ihy b'rili and Paane till now

II'A V 1I D.
0 kin?,! I woiu'd not ooght from favour claim, Or on rememiber'd fervices prelutme: But on the ftrength of my own a~kions fland, Ungrac'd and unsupported.

"AB N ER.
WVell lie merits
The honouirs, which await him. Why, 0 king! Doff thou delay to blefis his doubting heart With his well earn',l rewards ? Th'y lovely daughter, 13y right of conqueft his!

S A UL,, to DAVID.
True-lion haft won her. She fball be thine-Yes, a king's word is paft.

D Ni V P-D.
o boundlefs blefi ng! What, fhall the be mine, For wshomn c~urending monarchs might reauunce Their fligluted crowns?

[Souinds of m'i/ical in rumenti heard at a d'flain
Shouting an.!jijng. 11 grand proct:jion.. CH
KISS Of ilsataW WOMEN.]

S AU L.
How's' ths? h fol'nds Of joy SAlute MY earS?, whsit eso thi"S V-eatlrY?







;A S A C'-'R'F D DR A M A. e*7

,Tj s merry- found of tab et and rf harp? What mean thefe'idle iriftnimenis of triumph? lybefe Women;'who in.fair &OCediOR MOVe, Nlakik r*fwect melckdy ?

ABI N F R.
ToTay Auelowmr To David, am thrycome.

SAUL. 1-4fide.
A rival%,praif
!s discord to the car of jealousy

[Martialfymphony.. Ifter whicb CHOiLus of WoM E N fing.

PREPARE! your fetal rites prepare!
Let your triumphs rend the air!
Idol gods thall reign no more,
We the living Lo im adore!
Let heathen botts on human helps repofe, Since Ifra& s Goo ba5 4outed Ifrael'si fgcsLet remoteff nations know,
Proud Goliath's overthrow: Fall'u, PbiliffiaJ is tfir trult, M-on's honour laid iza Oiuft!
Who fta,, the Lu R t) cd, fleeA not fear 'J*,he brazt:n armor, or vo 111'vcJ fpear.


Sce the rout,!d fqmiclrons fly!
liark! their clamours rend tht (ky) Blobd







$1 DAVID AND 4GOILATM.R

Blood aa&earnage flain the field!
See, the vanquith'd nations yield' Difmay and terror fill the frighten'd land; 'While conq'ring David routs the trembling -bandi.

IV_.
Lo! upon the tented field,
Royal Saul has thoufands kiHl'd'!
Lo! upon th' enfanguin'd plain,
'David has ten thousands flain!
Met mighty Saul his vanquifh'a thoufands tell, "Wihile tenfold triumphs David's viaories fivell











rU N E ND.












TERSO'gS' 6T Tl IW VA


BE L SH AZ Z AR, King of Babylon. N ITO0 C Rj S, -the teen-mother. COURTIERS, ASTROLOGERS, PARASITtES. D A N IEL, the'JEwisH Prophet. Captive j EWS, &C. &C.


SCZ.E., BA,&Yjov. Timc, Night.







The Subjea of lhis-Drama is, taken from te Ffffth
Chapter of the Prophet DANIEL.












B3 E L S H A Z Z A RA


S A CR ED D~ R A M A.

P A RT I.


How art thou fallen from Heaven, 0 Lucifer, Son oft
Morning! How art thou cut down to the ground, Ai
didif weaken the nations!
ISAIAH.





.SC-EN-E, near-the Palace of BABYLON.

DANIEL, and capficve JEWS.

DANIEL,

PA ARE NT of life and lipht! C ole fource of good! Whofe tender miercies thro' the tide of time, In long fucceffive order, have fufhbind, And fav'd the fons of Ifraei! Thou, whofe pow'r Deliver'd r'ghteoiis No..h from the flvu The wbLrliig flood, the grave of _humas kioid!







A S ACRWE D DR AMA. 91

Oh Thou! whofe guardian care, and out-flretch'd hand, pRefcu'd young Ifaac from the lifted arm, Rais'd, at thy bidding, to devote a fun, All only fon,.doorn'd by his fire to die. (Ch, faving Faith, by fLch obedience prov'd! oh hlell Obedience, hallow'd this by faith!) 'T hutu, wvho in mercy favd'it the chotfen race, in the v ld defert; and didif there fuftain them, 13y wonder-' orking love, tho' they rebell'd, And murmnur'd at the miracles that fav'd them! Oh, hear thy fervant Daniel!1 hear, and help! rIhiot! whofe'alrnighty-pow'r did after raife Succeffive leaders to, defend our race: Who 'entefi vailant Jofhua to the field, Thy people's champion, to the conq'ring field; Whi ~e the revolving planet of the night, sofvcnided in hier radiant round, was flay'd; A~nd the bright fun, arrefted in his courfe, StU1,C1dL1OUfly flood ftill!I

CHORUS ivfJ EWS.


WVhat aileth thee, that thou flood'ft fi l, O fun! nor, did thy flaming orb decline ? And thou, 0 moon in Ajlon's dark vale, Why did'ft thou long beyond thy period Lidna


~Was it at jofbona's'dread comi-and, !'ht headeruf- the Ifraelitith band ? N cs -at a moiL bidding Loth fod dil
'T sjoist ~Word, buit'twaIS JEt'AH'5 Will.







*rL SifTA ZZAR:What all-controuling hand had force To flop eternal Nature's conflant 'courf'e The wand'ring moon to one fix'd fpot confine, But He, whofe fiat bade the planets fhne?

D ANI EL.
0 Thou! who,. when thy difcontented hoft,, Tir'd of JEHOVAH'S rule,. detir'd a king, In anger gav'11 them Saul ; and then again Didfl wreft the reg al Ikeptre fromi his hand,, T& give it David-David, beft belov'd! Ilksiftrious David! Poet, prophet, king 1 Thou, who didfl- fuiffer Solomon his ton, To build a glorious temple to thy namne Oh hear thy fervants, and forgive them too, If7, by fevere neeceffity conipelI'd, We worfhip here-We have no temple now,. Altar or fanatrary, none is left.,

CHORUS of J E W S. 0 Judah! let thy captive fons deplore,
Thy fir- fat'd temple's now no more! Fall'n is thy facred fane, thy glory gone,
Fall'n is thy tetnple, Solomnon,

Ne'er did Barbaric, kings behold,
-With all their fluining gems,, their burnifh'd gold.
A Lane to, perfec-t, bright and fair;For. GOD iifelf was wont t' iahabit there-Btwe en the Chtrubim his glory flood,
fhlv tlrhg~retaltnc th- daizlng fpiendor i







A 8 A"CRWTMD ID R A A+ A..

gjow fondly did the. Tyrian artift flrive,
His name to lateft time should live!
Such wealth die ranger wonder'd to behold:
GolI were the tablets, and the vafes gold.
Of cedar fuch an ample fore,
Exhauffed Lebanon could yield no more.
Bending before the Ruler of the (Icy,
Well might the royal founder cry,
Fill'd with, anhisoy dread,,, a rev'rend fear,
Will Go D in very deed inhabit-here
The heav'is of hbeav'ns beneath his feet,
is for the bright inhabitant meet:
Archangels prostrate wait his hig-h commands,
And will he, deigrvto dwell is temples.sadewi& handst4

D AN IERL.
yes, thou art ever, prefertt,. Pow'r fuapreme Not circusufcrib'd by time, nor flx'd to fpace, Confined to altars, nor to temples bound. In weealth, in wan', its freedom,.or in, chains, in dungeons or on thrones, te faithfdLlrsd thee! Ev'n in the burnting cauldron, thou wait. near To Shadrach and the holy brotherhood; The unhurt martyrs blefi'd thee- in the flames; They fought, and fou n4-thsee, caIlld, and thoas waft there.7,


How chang'd our Ilate Jtsdah! thy glory's fall'ssa Thy joss for h-rd catrvitv exchsn'd; And thy fad fonts brathe the! polluted air Of Babylon, wh Iere duties ohicette 11lu [lie living', GOD; and to his evns







9CB 'EL S'HA' Z'A R~

ThLe priefls of wretched idols, made with hands,-, ShewvroftumeI14us icomn.

DANIEL.
'Tis Heav'n's high will.

Second J E W~.
If T forget thee, 0 J, rufalem!
if I not ficntIly cherifb thy Iov'd image, Ev'n in the fid~y hour of thuughtlefs mirth; If I not rather view thy prottrare walls Than haughty Babylon's imperial toW'rs; Then mnay my ton reftufe to frame the iftrains Of fNee-e armionv ; my rude right hand Forget, with founds fymnyhonious, to accord The harp of Jeffe's fon, -to Sion's fongs.

Firft J EW.
Oft, on Euphrates' ever verdant bank's,
\X hc-e d~ r.oping willoNN s form a mournful fhade XWiii all the pride which profp'rous fortunes give. And all th' unfeeling mirth of happy men, Th' nhltilfg Babylonians aka fong; Such forngs as edt, in better days, were ing By Korab's fons, or heav'n-taughit Afaph fet To loftieft meafures then our bnrfting hearts Feel all their woes afrefh; the galling chain Of boui lage crnffhes then the free-born foal With v ringig anhulfh; from the trembling lip Th' ipnfinifh't. c,,dence falls, and the big tear, Wliile it rt Veves, 1,c,,avs the woe-fraught liul. For whio can view Fuiphrates pleafai frea,, Ius drying willows, and its verdant banks, A







A SACRE-D-DRAM1A. 9S

Arid not to wounded memory recal ,f Ie piny groves of fertile Pahllfine, ,Thle vales of Solyma, and. Jordant's ftream?

DANIELFirm faith, and deep fubilifin to high Heav'i,
-Will teach us to endure, without a murmur, What feems to hard. Think 'What the holy hoft of patriarchs, faints, and prophets, have fiaftain'd 11n the bieff caufe of Truth l And fhall not we, o men of Judah! dare what thefe have dar'd, And boldly pafs thro' the refining fire, of fierce affliction ? Yes, be witncfs, Heav'u I old as I am, I will not shrink at death, Come in w hat fhape it. may, if GoD6 fo will, By Feril to confirm and prove my faith. Oh! I n ou'd dare yon' den of'hungry lions,, Rather than paufe to fill the talk afign'd, By wifdomn infinite. .Nor think I boaft, Not in tnyfelf, but in thy ftrength I truft,I Spirit of' Go DI
Fikf j EW.
'Prophet!1 thy words'fuppor:4 And raife our fiakinZ fouls.

D A NJIEL.
Behold yon' palace,
Where proud Belfha7zar keeps Ibis wanton court! I knew it onc b!leeath1 another lo, ,His grandfire A who tubdued jehokachiss,



"Nebcadnezza.