The world described in easy verse.

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Material Information

Title:
The world described in easy verse. Illustrative of the situation, manners, and produce of all nations : for use of young persons by W.R. Lynch ; with coloured engravings and a map.
Physical Description:
viii, 195, 1, 6 i.e. 36 p., 13 leaves of plates : ill. (some col.), map (folded) ; 16 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Lynch, W. R
Lewis, W ( William )
Richard Phillips and Co
Publisher:
Sir Richard Phillips and Co.
Place of Publication:
London
Manufacturer:
W. Lewis
Publication Date:
Edition:
New ed., illustrated by notes.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Natural history -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Natural products -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Manners and customs -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Geography -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1820   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1820   ( local )
Bldn -- 1820
Genre:
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London

Notes

Citation/Reference:
Gumuchian,
Citation/Reference:
BM,
Citation/Reference:
NUC pre-1956,
General Note:
One plate hand-colored.
General Note:
Map on folded plate facing t.p.
General Note:
Publisher's ads 36 p. at end, last p. misnumbered 6.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 027237498
oclc - 12279382
System ID:
AA00021460:00001

Full Text



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THE


WORLD DESCRIBED,

IN EASY VERSE.

ILLU'rUATIVE OFt

The Situation, Maunwri, and Produce, of all Nations.
On TRlE

USE OF YOUNG PERSONS.
Wry,

COLOURED ENGRAVINGS AND A MAP.



By W. R. LYNCH, Esq.

AUTHOR OF THE POETICAL HISTORIES OF ENGLAND,.
OGREECE, AND ROME.


A NEW EDITION, ILLUSTRArED BY NOrES.

LonDon:
Printed by W. Lmis, Finch-lae ;
FOR SIR RICHARD PHILLIPS AND CO.
BRIDE-COURT, BRIDGE-STREET;
AND MAT Bi BAD OP ALL BOOKSLJLZBS.
1820.
Price 5s. half-bound.













PREFACE.


TO impart an easy and harmonious ver-
sification to such a subject as the Geogra-
phy of the World, it must be allowed was
not an easy task; and nothing but the
very flattering reception which the other
little poetical productions of the Author
have met with from the Public, and in
particular from teachers of eminence,
could induce him to undertake it.

He offers it now to his Juvenile Friends,
with the hope of affording them entertain-
minent, and with a full conviction that, if
read with attention, and occasionally corn-






PREFACE.


mitted to memory, it will smooth the
study, and lay a permanent foundation
for the knowledge of the useful science of
Geography,
When the student has read each chap-
ter with attention, a reference to maps
will tend, in a material degree, to
strengthen the impression which his
mind will receive, for which purpose
Goldsmith's School Atlas, and his very
useful Copy Books, are particularly re-
commended, and by tracing with his eye
the different countries as they appear on
the map, and comparing them with this
poetical outline, the Author trusts that
the fidelity of the latter will be fully
proved.











CONTENTS



C HjprER I.-Geographical Definitions Page 1
Chapter II.-Ofthe Earthin general 5
Chapter UI I.-Of Europe - - -. -. 8
Chapter I V.-Of Lapland - - - - 10
Chapter V.-Manners of the Laplanders, &e. - 13
Chapter VI.-Of Denmark and its Dependencies 18
Chapter V U.-Of Norway - - - -. 2
Chapter V 11I.-Of Iceland - - - - 26
Chapter I X.-Of Greenland - - -. 30
Chapter X.-Of Sweden- - - - 34
Chapter XI.-Of Russia - - - -. 38
Chapter X 1.-Ofsome of the Tartar Tribes subject
to Russia: the Barchkirians, Bratski, and Czuwa-
chians - - - - - - - 43
Chapter XIii.-Of some other Tartar Tribes sub-
jrct to Russia: the Kalmucs, Cossacks, Ischorti,
Taknthians, and Mordwans - - - 46
Chapter XIV.-Of more Tartar Tribes subject to
RusSia: the Ostiaks, Theleuti, Tshulimzians, Tun-
gusian, Wogulians, and Samoides ---- 49
Chapter XV.-Of Prussia - - - - 53
Chapter XVI.-Of Holland- - - - 56
Chapter XVIL--Of Germany - 59







CONTENTS.


Ch.ipLer XVIIT.-Of the Austrian Dominions Page 61
Chapter XIX.-Of Turkey in Europe - - 61
Ch-.pt-r XX.-Of the Government, Religion, and
M!n tiers of the Turks -- - - - - 68
Clfpt, r XXI.-Of France - - - - 71
Ch ,I.-r XXIL.-Of Switzerland - - - 7
(lhi, t,: c-XXIIL-Of Italy - - - - 77.
Chapter XXIV.-Of Spain - - - - 8t
Chaiptkr XXV.-Of Portugal - - - 84
Chapter XXVI.-Ofthe U'jiil.-d Kingdiom of Great
Brifiiiin aul Irelaind - - - - - 87
Chapti r XXVII.-Of that part of the United King-
doui called Ireland - - - - - 93
Chapter XXVIII.-Of Asia - - - 97
(Chapter XXIX.-Of Turkey in Asia - - 99
Cliapicr XXX.-Of Russia in Asia - - 1 '3
Chapler XXXI.-Of the Seven Caucasian Na-
tin; -- - - - - - - .106
Chanter XXXII.-Of the Chinese Empire - 10o
Cliapi.r XXXIIL.-Of the Chinese Government
ani, Ilanners - - - - - -112
b 'ihpt-r XXXIV.-Of Corea, and some Islands
a.Ijla#- it to China - - - - - 116
S L irtlt,-r XXXV.-Ofthe Birman Empire, and ad-
ar.' i.t Countries of Assam, Laos, Tonquin, Co-.
>hin-China, Ciampa, Cambodia, and Malacca 119
Chal.l-:' r XXXVI.-Of Hindoostan including Bri-
th India - - - - - .3
o ia,ip-i. XXXVII.-Of the Government, Reli-
iamn. and Manners of the Hindoos - 127







COti aNTS. -tjj

Chapter XXXVI[II-Of Independent Tartary
and Persia - - - - - Page 131
Chapter XXXIX.-Of Arabia - - - 134
Chapter XL.-or the East I ndian, and other Asi-
atic Islands - - - - - - 137
Chapter XLI.-Of Africa - -- - - 141
-Chapter XLII.-Of Egypt - - - - 144
Chapter XLIII.-Of the eastern Coast of Africa,
from Egypt to the Cape ol Good Hope - 148
Chapter XLIV.-Of the eastern Coast of Africa,
from the Cape of Good Hope to the great Desert
of Zahara - - - - - - 161
Chapter XLV.-Orf the Barbary States, extending
from the Atlantic on the West, along the Shores
of the Mediterranean. to the Confines of Egypt,
on the East - - - - - - 156
Chapter XLUI.-Of thp Inlerior of Africa, from
the Stales of Barban on ih- North, to the Cape of
Good Hope on the South - - - - 160
Chapter XLVII.-Of the African Islands 163
Chapter XLVIII.-Of America - - - 167
Chapter XLIX.-Of British America - - 171
Chapter L.-Of the United States of America- 176
Chapter LI.-Of the -spanish Dominions in North
1 America, and a Sketch uf the Western Coast,
from the Bay of Panama to Bhering's Straits 179
Chapter LJ1.-OIf South America, following the
Western Shores along the Pacific Ocean from the
Isthmus of Darien on the North, to the Straits of
Magellan on the South - - - - 183







viii CONTENTS.

Chapter LIl.-Of South America, following the
Easlern ShIurcs aloig the Atlantic Ocean, from
thle Straits of Maaglhlan on the South, to the Isllth-
inmus of Darien ,il the North Page 18
C4,nclusion.-Of lithe West Indies, from the Bahama
IWdauds oni the North, to Tobago and Trinidad on
tlht South - - - - - 192











twO YnD ,DESC R I B E D
2
IN EASY VERSE.


CHAPTER I.


#.fOGRtAPNJCAL DEFINITIO.NS.


OV rbtsi intensive surface all we know,
Daaf Qd Goraphy's researches flow:
: O55pa&RdWaterJnAm'u, that surface lies,
Yb=eb5sm ae. -has ezpior'd with woad'ring
.;" "eye&. '
Tietlia id'knowan:.by various fornps and tapes,
[A p ~Peninsulas, and Capes,
*, I-4uu mes extending wide,
AQP IMmtorie. bold, which cut the tide.
: '






THE WORID DESCRIBED,


The Continents are two ;*-in one behold'
Those three large portions called the Worl
Sof old;
Where still fair science wid) success explore
S Rich Asia, fertile Europe, Afric's shores.
The other continent Columbus fam'd
S Discover'd, but America 'is namni'd.

An Island ev'ry where the %aves surround
As our own sea-girl British Isles are found;
While a Peninsulaf Ibhe waves inclose
On ev'ry side but one; where length'niiuggrov
An Isthmus, like an arm, or outstretch'd han
Connecting it with continental land;
And isthmuses, in oilier parlsk we find.
S Ev'n continents immense connect and bind;

'* Thmughb there are, in reality, but Iwo great con
I nenls, each of the tr great quarter of tih globe a
gemnrally t.stecnied separate (continents.
i As the Morca in Grrc I "The Isthmus of Siuez join., Africa to _Asia, and U
S Isithmruus of Darien, or Panama, tounect-- North and Sou
I Amtrkia.


IL
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IN EASV TERSE.


-3


Wbile Capes," or Promonlories, next display
Their points extending far into the sea.

By geographic terms we next divide
The world of waters and its whelmniii_- tide.
Four Oceans, stretching forth their airm,, em-
brace
The earth's wide confines Aith their wat'ry
space;
Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific narm'd,
And Northern, where stern winter roars un-
tam'd.
A Sea a smaller wat'ry space display,,
As do the Irish, Black, and Baltic Seas.
A Gulf, t or Bay, runs up into the lands,
At entrance small, but when ,itlihin expands.
A Creek denotes an inlet of the dide:
AkJtoad, where ships.at anchor safely ride.
tAiStmit, a narrow pass is always Ibund,
Connecting'seas, dividing points of ground,

Such a te Lizard Point in England, Cape HIrn
,in South Amrica, and the Cape of Guod Hope in Africa.
St As the Gllfof Mexico. Bay of Bliscay, Bay or ,.n-
gal, and the Arabian Gulf, or Red Sea, &c.


.'. nfl,'L. -> -. .


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V
41


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4 THE WORLD DESCRIBED,

Just like Gibraltar,* Dover, and the Soun(
A Lakef an inland wat'ry space implies,
And Rivers chiefly in the mountains rise,
Thence urge their course in many a windi
way,
Until they join, and mingle with the sea.


6 The Straits of Gibraltar connect the Mediterran
Sea with the Atlantic, and the Sound joins the Balti
the German Ocean.
t Such ik the Carpian Sea. the ILake of Marava,
Lake of Gcneia, Lake of Killarney., &c.






''"IB F.AST %VB RSE. .



CHAP. II.



OP THE EARTH IN GENERAL.



THE Earth, a globe immeuseor sphere ia found,
Full five-and-twenty thousand miles* around.
Its surface, calculators sage declare,
Contains two hundred million miles, cali'd
square.
Its distance from the sun the learned i6x,
In miles, at least, of millions niuety-six. '
On its own axis turning ev'ry day,"
Hence light and darkness bear alternate swvay, I


he earth's diameter is 7,9n0 mils. its ecumle-
zlncs about 25,038 miles, and Ihe square miles, it 'ii-u-
Wins 196,613,664 ; but round number, art- mort- ea'-ily
comprehended by young persons, so we hae given flipI
circumfereame at 28,000, and One square miles a.t Iw '
millions. '
B3


S i . '".
r,,:. : :.',, ."i

.. AL.






6 THE WORLD DESCRIBED,


And day and night successively appear ;
But round thie sun its course consumes a yea
This course iQ cali'd its Orbit, and iLs range
Contributes much to make the Seasons* ciangi

On this large globe, of all the surface round,
Two-thirds coimpos'd of wat'ry space i- foun,
One thousand million souls the land contains
Besides the brute-creation it sustains.
The world, of'old, three great divisions claim'4
Which Europe, Asia. Africa, were nani'd. .
A fourth, Columbus,t crowi'd with deathleA
fame,
Discovered, but it bears another's name-


'. iThe earth's axis is inclined t(l: the plane of its orl
in an angle ,f-23 degrt',s andl a halft; and this, togeth
with the earili's annual mution, produces the variety
the scastitis.
t America was firsl discovered hy Christopher (
Jumbus, a G,-no-sc, in the ernice of Spain, in I14
But AwBfrieas Vespucius, a florentine, pretended..1
a I'alse narrative which fie wrote, to he- the discover!
iind Ie accordilily had Ithe honour ofgiving his nawe
lhat quaiter of the viuhli.





1T"t t EASY VERSE. 7
Unjustly bears, that meed to him war due,
Whose enterprisAing minTd, to science true,
First on its coast the Spanish flag unrfurl'd.
And-open'd to our view another world !








*1.
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TII-. WORiLn nDr.sCRBED,


CHAP. III.
i


OF EUROPE.


Or these four quarters which the world ct
taias,
Europe* the least extends her rich duirnainusi
But, though coniaiuing least of all in space,
Is far superior in its manly race,
In arms and arts above the rest renowu'd ;
[ The Frozen Ocean is its northern bound.
dbhe east connects with Asiatic shores.
rAgainst the wesi the loud Atlantic roars;
SAnd, passing through Gibraltar's narrow moul
SAledilerranean- waves inclose the south.


I Its lengLh, rrom Cape St. 1'ineent. in l'orlugal,i
SItie nmioth of the oI.,y, in Siberia, is near 3,(6j nuil
*. and il, 'htlih, [rom Cape Matapan in I;e Moria.
the North ('apr in Lapland, abouL '2.214).
4 A s ea bepTeen Eun-pe, Asia, and Africa, cinc,



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7"Irt .


Pag 132.






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r


M EASY VERSE.


Amidst its various nations known to fame,
Each in succession shall attention claim.

ing with the Atlantic by the Strait or Gibraltar. through
which a constant current aets in, but it has no tide. It
contains many islands, of which hereafer.
i


'." di







10 THE WOLD DESCRIBED, 1

4
I ClHAP. IV. 11



j OF LAPLAND.


FAR in the north, amidst horrific snows,
The hardy Laplander undaunted goes;
Dran on his humble sledge, devoid of fea
Swift as an arrow, by his fleet rein-deer.
Three great divisions' subdivide this land,
Which the three greatest northern pow'rs con
mand.
The Northf is Danish, from the Northern S
SAs far as En'rack and the river Pais.


i The Ilh idl o" Lapland exteuds fruni North Cape
latitude 71 depiees ald a half, to tih- "|Iile Sea, uh
* lh( arctic circle. Its surlac'e ounlawn' secoenly or eig
thuiisand sqlart! milrs. Its [I,.iulati.,n raun.i he asi
lained.
t This parl is incIlude ilnl the DPajish govr.nMCn
Waidlumy. U






IN EASY VN11SEF.


The South* the Swedes possess, extending
wide
From Norway's mountains to the Baltic tide.
In Lapland Eastt the Russians bear the sway,
Between Lake Enarack and the White Sea.
The While and Northern Seas, both north and


east,
Compose its bounds, while, on the south and
west,
Sweden and Norway's mountains form a lie,
Its various pits and limits to confine.
Of towns, possessing none deserving fame,
The chief they Kola and Tornea name.
Forests immense of pines extend around,
And frozen snows invest the mossy ground,
While winter yields whole dreary weeks of


night,
The.isummer glares an equal length of li1


rhl.


'ni'xIstUdivited into six districts, which take their
na s frm ivers, as Una, Peta, Torna, &c.
t1 Thin i divided into three districts, or lpories, called
Molmanikoi, Terskoi, and Bellamoreskoi.
I In mine parts of Lapland, the sun is absent fur


11


A


J


I






THE WORLD DISCR1BED.


These wretched ils, inl winter shield their
hea d.s,
In suinuntr, tents; and skins compose their
beds.
In their rein-deer5 consist their valued riches;
The chase and fishing crown their other
w ishe's.
But should their industry or zeal provide
Or irold or silver, ihey securely hide
The precious store, and Ihink the secret hoard
Will pleasure in the world to come- afford.



Evcri part <-f this valual-ahle animal is or i)aricilar
use i. llt. Lapland,-r.
t Tlih, chan'se siipplics them willth ln ar-skins, ithile.
Ilark, and gr--" I\'-. -kins. grte-y siquirrels. anI sIall'.
wloch IhP-v ex'lhaiai' I',r eiothLb. i..ia'., and 'iilictlus
liqui.i-s 'Ihe l-.h fsiio the.-,'ar tijc' elfeenu a Zreat lnilrv ;
a.n.I ihey are <'\perp ti]herneu.
SThe. not ounly think tlit) sliall have tic aitju ii 'lr
s1I(h l hinjvq in a iourtrr sltalIe. jut ilugin'. Iheir chie'tili-
oyin-, n\ hrre:flt:r will couisl in drinking braudiv. mno-
king tiba heir e-nj'n rients.





^ J






IHIN EA.V VERSL. 15
r Their f'dith* is honoured with the Christian

name,
r But Pagan rites and forms their minds inflame.
Thlie Deil hlinsell'ihey worship, beat his drum.
To learn, by its decrees, events to come.
r While sorcerers abuse their bigot minds, -
Pretendin- to command the very winds ;t
They sway the Laplander with hope and Iear,
Who, irav'Iling, whispers- to his Iov'd rein-
deer,


Tli.ir laillh i inomunnall Lullbran bIll the-v 1ur-
Il lp ,i,, r .ll nil, aunI i'ril slirits. Their sore'rretrs make
um,. ol a sort oi'drum, which i tl. malk with lisurn and
I.-at \th brazen rings uptu it, to di-Cui r ruliUrce t-ll.
Thei alIr., in Dani!li Lapland. have a black (au, Mlhi'h
Ihe, ci.ni.ult in all heir dillicullie.-, and to hliich they
Confide lb-their setcrts.

The simple: n.irthern eaman sosmctinie puirlhas'.
Irom these sorcerers a cord will kLJ.,i,, t1 hilLti ig any
oune i.tf iich. ti.. tillI haim Ih mit ha\lt- ani itid lie
piE-a-e' Io ,lir, t hl ,. r;ge.

STihe' customw .."t' hi'.p.:riin to ih..ir rtin-detr :r |.--ars
ridt uilous ; 3del tra ell.-r', as.,rt, thal, It,. iomEul itL is






S16 TIIE WORLD DESCRIBED,
And marks liwi course through tra>ckless wastes
o o'-,noMo,
Where, kLenly edg'd, the northern tempests
r ~blov,.
Ol. wheni descending flakes obscure the sun,,
I The hopeless hunter finds his course is run ;
S His lani-luark seeks in vain, with aching eyes,
S And, 'midst the desolating tempest, dies!
p. For nuptial hliss the lover long* contends,
Till numerous brandy-hottllies gain his ends;
t With these the fair one's father he requires
S For leave to solemnize the marriage-rites.
Dark superstition's gloom is always spread
Around the cheerless relics of the dead;
S The priest directs in form a holy scroll
To good St. Peter, to admit the soul.
S A purse of money to the corpse is given,
o: To fee the porter at the gate of heaven;

S one. lihe animnial wtLs of! with speed 'ur ithe place of rdcs-
*: tin atiu.
T I'li. conrtship -sonietim -s la.t, lire.- -r rI'_r u. irq.
until iJ. Iatihcr-inI-law i ais tsfit.i ittl tihe [rt.e--il ,111' If t
I. \h.er, Hth nillv" ,.nsislIt -A b,,ill,.s *t' braid .


W.'






I4 EASY VCER'V. 17

And meat and drink are in the coffin si,-w'd,
To cheer the trav'ller on so onh a road.'


Bt-furc their cun'mrsiorn to ChriiliauJmly. hll- u.liid i,
lii a i- h\ O lie sild of th- m;au, to cul d i, the
hi.i u'i h I m.l i i gi ht l %,,rli. aill a tindr-b,., kl t lie sho.ul d ill.] hiimsll 11il
It.. dark at thil. ,:i ( .liidgmnieilt I 1 a wr inam. sih \%V .1
Iujriilh,(.i with l,:r ncet-dl.-s aud sCL'( ar.-


(i
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(,3l






THE WORLD DESCRIBED,


CHAP. VI.



Ot DENMARK AND ITS DDEPFNDENCIES.




THEo .ean bounds tlhis kingdom niiorlh and west,
The Baltic varvrs inclose if on lile east ;
Arid on the southh the DaniIln land, extend,
Until Ihe Gtri;an Stale.; define their end.
What Dennim.irk Proper" ev'ry author styleQ,
C'onsi',t I, .t'u:laid* and tine Baltic isles,
('ailed Zeal:And, ('which contains the nation's
head)
Funen and Lalland, which around it spread,


SA ptnins.ul:a 21l njile in Icinilih. anl frrim 311 Io 6t1
il bi-adthi tlin *r irncipal parl tof tti. kLin;don m i .11, in-
mark. anieninlts cali-d ihe Cinilimrira 'lnerT..ui.-.l "'hi
capilail it) i tailled lVilurg. SouLIth Julland is called
thn DuIfchy orStc-wit k.
Zealand. an island at thie entrane ol" tire Baltic,.






IN EASY TBRSL. 19

And other little isles, which there are found,
To ormn ihose straits, ie call the Bell- and
Sound.
To these add Holktein,t Iceland,4 Green-
landdr_. shores,
And Farro.jj where the Northern Ocean roars,


70t mil-is in cein-nfi:renc'i-. which contains ('opcn hagen,
1t:. capital Iof Denniai k, and. i ilh tIh oIliehr is lauds v1 hiieh
siirrjounl it. of is liii l uene is thc largesi, liermis a prin-
cipal part ,f ihe kiLngdlm.
The G;real Belt lits btvi-en lltnhe i-larnd< il'Zi-nland
and Fun. ii., at Ih enlranre .f ihe PBallie ; and thlie Lillcle
Belt lI.l- ceri [llne-i and Northli Jutlauid. 1 he Souinl is
a larger strain. and le.s blw-eeu SwcJle-n andl Zealand.
and the Danm's takf a tmll from all an'r'-hanilnin liith
pass thrnughli ial .cliannil tee O from the Baltic.
t A duchn oIf Loiwt-r Saxonm, 100 mihs' loug aud .50
brand. Its chie-f flanish tun is Allotua. abut it culntains
Hatiabergh. Lunlb. ek, and olher free cities.
; Se Icelanid.

See Creeuland.

AI A cliehier ifislaitch in the- Nortlicn Oc.ean, rfl'%vlIich
' -\entfpn are Iahhilab!l-. c.:inpoecd inr general of mo1an-
lain' and lircc '[-ii es.






TI E WORLD) DS(RlRE1D.


Witi Laplaud" North and lately Norway's
lands,
(Compoe tihe whole which Denmniark's power
coniilani ds-
The D Ines are comely, hardy, brave and kind,
The higher ranks to pomp- and shew inclined.
Thie lower order. with indu'strious zeal
Attend their laboinr-; but t hen they regale,
Iniemip'rance marks their course, and drink-
ing deep
Lull, rea'sou, guardian sentinel! to sleep.
Thie coi-itinitiin of the realm was free,
Till Dane-at themselves re-igned their liberty,
And hli' their lives dependent on the will
(I'i kinx-, whio rule with moderation still.


N.'e Laplantl andi Nur"a\.
'- i 1 u .I;

I';iliinuit l inll tie fnineratls II' tlih ,i ;L
"" u i niLken riain.," 'a pr<'mt rl.
vi L? ilonnaretly wa-, In lnld ain ii. d :li\f. 1.il in t1W.Ij
%i3, iii''le abt- lnt:I and htrcillt arn bLi a ii nllt arcit 'if
,c t,,. ,, h *i


"WT





IN EASY VERSF.
Their %Iedyge; oft in wint'ry tfioy
The Danes across somne braucies
ofhee, t
fll idieni Lot summer in it, lurn
Then all tie vegetable w uorld re% i
The country nowlly flit and saindi
An d fi'gS' from seas and lakes ob-cm


*2 I

convey
o)f ike ,e~a

res.1
VeIi.. J
ire ilie .kies.





I



A
*1





I


I-







iHE WORLD DESCRIBL[.D,


CHAP. VIL



OF NORWAY.



T r. NorthernOcean, spreading north and wfcst,
The Swedes and Swedish Lapland on the east,
Invest ibis land, while on [ie south is found
The Categale," extending to the Sound.
To Siweden's" king this land allegiance owes
Wh ose stately mountains, crowned with pines
and snows,+.


A gnli'rf die lfranan Ocean, thllruili Wlich lIe Dal-
L,,. "ia is entered by thiee snaiits, called tdr- Siund,. and
tlih -;r.-at and Lllttl Belts.

t Nor"tva' asunitled 1o Denuiark hy O1li'V. in 13SI.,
iil,. d.ying without iusue, his .niUhirr Maa ZIrLt narinfdI
to Ibe throne ; anl, '.n liher deall, tlh's-, loug tlii.ai ill
S"clden, t'ell Io her nepli-.:- Eric. Swk.lt. wa, afi waidbs .lparats-d hv llie ali.,unr 4I' G;utau i% Va~a. N.r-
ut av is l' uiniit.d iu wedt in.

SNrtway is the iilst munitaiuius c'uuitr 111in] thie


4.






IN ESV VF ti-F. -; I

Send rapid .treans,* in many a nma/p to trace
This northern region, ,l'a warliketf racp.i
Here. though to Sweden sulbject, freedom
reigns.
No peasants' bands are botind with vassal
cbaini-
A hardy race. to toils of danger prone;
S Tilje chase or fishing make the spoils iheir o, ii.



aorhlI. It- chief mo ainiain is called Dai'refilI. t', Ial -
mat'., i- vari,.,u ; till. in iit casltcrn parls. tlljt- a.itl ii i-
iL.S ca hnmtn.n! si a'.ri, anti the o'lInlrv rai'-\rip tl i i ll 1.1 .
In 1l 9i. imr.,' I than 2T .il Sn-. S,t itia'ainl; h aillack
Drn lh'-im, t,-rilil 11 n the 'novi .
The titCr', litakt-. an al ataiatsanr. nuitprtulis. Tiu-
id er liit DrL 'e w tinds ;t..',n ttir % id.- ut' It [lar, r.liltil,
nUninlali in a serpentine c uast.,., tana is mn:{ ly Ihbu-e
h,, tra :t thie winie-r raad it th,. ailtjr sid, url'li. t haii.
> a I,-. than nine limes.

d' t E'Fr3n peasant iit born in a Ias n. ar upon a niobta
t.Lalt i b3i hirll a atliie n. and t.ur'.ll'd al tlie age l' 16.
SThe Na.-rw'eians maintain an arm) of -24.1_,K, toi, andt
ri 60111 cavalry.

Se B [hi Nor"a\ lawir. ihe rasail ate lice, ca -hia

............1 e



f [ *






-1 li4 T1' UOULD LEM.tRIBED,

This nation tour' great governments divide,
Through hich ilipy drive their numerous herdl
B t ilhb pride;
But aizriculuIre they esteem disgrace;
S Hence wild and savage is the tractless space. J
Here Iioresist vat their lordly pines display,.
There low'rs the mountain, and there roars thd
sea ;
Here on the coast. rou'h fishermen appear, I
Y '"Iidst rucks and floating ice, devoid of fear;
There dauntless hunters pierce the growling,
Sbear.i
S Or lay heir snares to catch the tim'rous hare, i


a If-w -n crert-in n,.lile estales near Frederickstait; anD
F u h:It.- the lr | riethr resides on his ceLate, tht,,- bereomt

[ \,z. A.Ierli13, Bergen. Dronthem., and Wailhuya
t Tlicir fisheries s,,ppl, good -,tam-n. and the shoals
herrings % hich sormemimes surround tilhr coast of Norway
consist of culwuns -e% eral aile long The Maplstnwrn.
this tCio.as, is a larse %Whirpool, which li draius any a
pr.jaching objects, even large ships, into its vortex, am
dashes Ithem to pieces.




L




I Wflfl~~r


IN EASY VERSIF.


While woodimen ply the axe with nmi'rous
strikes.
Fellili ri-antic pines.' and inriii,,tain oak-.
The pacants, honest, frank, obedient, huld,
Enjoy wanrm clothes to shield them Ifrom the
cold,
And, blest with competence, their lands are
found
With fish. cheese, milk, and butler, lo abound.
Their Inaliiier- simple, and titeir morals goo'd,
And alh<-l ev'ry house is made of %olod.t
While equil laws preside in ev'ry part.,
A manly spirit reigns in e"rv'ry heart.


The chie-fmraltli of Ni.rvwa crniNiL% in limbtr, with
ihich it supplies l.treign nati'nus.

t The whole country is almost one rock, and wel tl-'y
build witli timber, which occasions dreadfiul aiiuid rctineiint
fires. The chief towns are Christiana anI Bergeii.





D


h. *__







IiE WORLD DCt- IiliL.D,


(' HAP. VII !.




(IF ICrNI).




AROuNDi bllWak [reland's frost-encircled
-.hore.s
i' Ti" lTlanilti:',- tiurlern surge ine.tslnt rnr..
i From Norway. ie-I, this dreary i-I.,,id lie.,
Is Where Hecla'st liervce volcano storms the
skies,


Is 1 [ ,i S lilt'- i- 41ll th. 15d 1.711 ill brEa illh. 131,1g
.I', .. n i63 ,ii'I #;S .lr,,-ir oi prrth latiullIt. It. ppin-
la Wlii is o.tiiat al it ,t r .-tiv it I -i.,usa dl.

t M.,unt H l a I%- about lv(.i t ,.-'t higli. Tihe, arn
i-tr;l i.h.r %.,ll* ..; and. in 17;:1. liit- i 1.115li,,
1, 't ,l \, h ita m.- ..drta-:uill'id. iat It i 1.1- :i[. i(.laIl i d
III, ilan,] ciiild rAll l..i piece-. 1H-ni M o| iml N!:lipli>'
1.;! I i i .n l a wil,.1lt ,,l'aiva- \%lli' iII ~! 1\ m llilk s IL'
the w a1 if IL.r I-r,: ii, h 11*' ncarl\ ti -lt i il,.b .






IN FAi V VERSl. -27

S Anvid. croWn'd vith snow. emits a fiery lid:-
otf laia. ruuinhir down its ruzgf.d side ;
W Ihile Geyser's* boiling waters sometimes rear
A scealding- column roaring' in the air.
'el. in this land of earthqudkeQ, ice, and snow,
Content can her celestial charms bestow.
The simple race prefers its native coast
To each luxurious clime the world can boast.
To tend their herds the men attention pay,
Or with their nets explore the stormy sea;
At household labours next the woman toils,
And cures the fisherman's abundant spoils.
Their diet, butter, fish, and milk supply.
Their dresse- in clean and pleasing to the eye.
Their huts are poor. and of the -simplest kind,
But szill their actions shew a generous mind.
With some, superior rank in him appeared
Who had exclusive right to wear his beard ;
I-

'.4A
Thlis I)oiliiizi.'iolunmn ol'wal,:r wvas nkinr.hen lI'-u.l Ind ia- .-
in-It. anil rjsit -mtilmL-n"t I l, heit ln iInrl'rnin,.t-li., Itl.
Si1 ci.,nsil- .1' hIm.u, -kills, and ,ri'l,.h
Ili T i In.. in g,' ncrral "car no bef.ards, though otn the







TrHE WORLD DESCRIBED,


And u hIen the lover hails his nuptial morn, i
Chains arind a splendid crown die bride adorn.
The Luth'rani ('lirisiman creed thibis race profests
I'ult Paranu principles their minds po-.,ess. I
Their cbhiefl" amusement and extreme deliglt
Is their forefathers' actions to recipe ;
For learning once posses'd ibis dreary land,
And now revives at Denmark'st high com.
mand.


northern side I' [he islandd siije families lhn- ibeLn.
About halfa veitury ag,.. two brotlih-rs, di hiding between
thlemtielvres the iubhtril:an'e left theinm by Ih.ir fallitr, tlie
oue ave the tbit.hr Ibuli rLx-dollars Imtr hi: -e\t'inive right
to wear a beard, which in their faInamil was thi. sole ire-,o-
galive otl'thcir late fattier.

Th worship idols. Wx-hich rhit r.onreal frorn the Lu-
theran imni-.er-. They pilet-nd to witcheraft. andi wor-
ship tht UDeil under there naint ot K'*;iald. Tl'hiy believe
he s*.Isuls f --, .lie iumneil tilici X., i ,l th,- aca nic moun-
tain-, ur to the tee Island-. ae ordini; Il. the nature of
lIh.ir crime-.

t Thr Kmng iolf lD-i.mmrk bas est:ilii-hed sehliii ; and
se :.ra;il similnts fr..,m It,-laid arc aLt C i. t, iil, ag-el. Their
lami uaga. is tlio old TetlonIC.






IN EASY VERSE.


Thle siiniei's eun two mounlhs ilhueiies Ibe
skies,

And for m o months in wituler slIun, tieir eyes.


[ Th- .\ir>ra Bl mr-alis alrnr.sl con-lamNllt -nliiltini
ihrir Ir, n' nifighls. I Thuir turnnercF withlli lt Daone-
i, ill tliind allow. Irain-oil. whale-bijc, anil dl
it" H i i .'a-ht, r.;,?.























D3






,I I'tM WORI.D DrSCRIiE',


C(HAP. IX.



OF GREENLAND.



WHInE Greenland'.* cheerless coast extended
lie.
Beneath ithe rou'h control of northern skipe,
In 'ain as yet brightI enterprise explores
The full exteni of ilt unniea-tred shlore-.
Here tyrant witier reigris % ibh all his p-'i ,,
His -now,,. hii iry chains, and sleel'y sbo'is ;
Here tegelalion dies, ithe human race
Assume a pigmy form and tawtny lace.



t*-*st (I ,rfiIl'rl wfH di .ir, -r.,I b3 ih,: Nojrss ri.ina
in tllh 1inth 1 ern tlil. andl iiiu tuJ c i.i-, il wi, s -t s l i .r-,ba-
lihy ha. a ,,nim iuniialion -i ll Aruris :., and that the
U_ rteniand,-r, andl Fsquinaux Indiani- res,.nli' .ash
other in laiisiiag, l-dres, and apipearIance. 'Ihe psii la.
ttu is slimantlt at W000.






IN ESY Vr.Rst. {

Yet here contentment dnellq. with native pride
While iiriuni'rois families at once reside
In one poor hutl. where winier's* dreary night,

Surroundus them with a faint and cheerless light,
Till -uniner sheids around a lenuihet'd day,
And all exultingly their lenis display.
Then in hik Kajqak,t with unwearied zeal.
The hardy Greenlander pur ,ues ihe seal.
And darlts lI,, light harpoon, and ee-ks his prey
Through floating. isle, of ice, % which crowd thbe
sea ;



S l" ir 'Ii it iei inult hat. e ni-liTier di.-r n I ii lnn'.in .in l
a 'adllJ'-I |Iav'sr ihl'u.ilgin wliih th.' er : l l, tini ih, mid-
,itp. lIpli. lie il ,i t 'A' tnjilli. it .ili, r. LhIFir night.
la bi Sho t r 6 i il" i uili' : 1 hi n' l. 1 i-a. in'',,rai: i iliF.!ini ;
nlie in'' 'ii' i. iiinui a Innig lni nl Io'i .- l I!.' I 'riz.ni, andl
ihr- iifirli-l n lihtI Ls i r1 v' r po- nert'il |.- rn til : tir.[ .I.

t The Kajiak is ai Caio'nu ir blnaL. al. h iii i\. ar.' hIiit.n
.iarr. atl Iad and itcrn lik -.i -hutlle : 'li%-u iII, (Ir.-- -
in't..r *it iii a evI.i c tll in the .kiln hi..li i 1'. i 1 ii, *i t
f\. la iii~ l I. I% i r. i i i n .i!.:.s'l,.e |I, -inki ii. aidnl i'O.t,-
tit ti ;i ii a 'il. i.. t t'ls ,ar i i nd,:r ih.' Baler. In- reeu.-i ri
hlnrte 'i a :gain, hut 41' h h is oar lin is sire Ir, i. ri lJ.







3-2 THE % OtRL-D DE93CRInrD.


Wliii. nminier' liil impelk him to explore
Tlir- Ioil'rou. ocean for his ninth r sorc.
Thbi., s-imple, social. honest, ohica-t race.
Are still attacli'd to this their native place.
Their youtl.H through hardy scenes of toil ar
led.
And thu- at early age procure their bread.
There Monien. chaste, altenliely prepare
The house and household goods with aniixiou
care, I
'lisle skins or supply
(armnrts which all the northern blasts defy.
And k hen the; die. they think their souls re
court
Where happy hunting yields thenm ceaeles!
sport.
Bold fishermen frqurit these shores with zeal
And round Spiihergen4 chase the monstrou
whale,


This iaountry, tall.,i Lt't 1;r.- iil:iad. b. :ir ih,
\Villuu.-ib., in I%:} 3. 'a- .iijipn'.,d I. I.. p r:rl olf Vt
GC- ri i i :i I ; it k ii, f,1i 1 ,, I" 1. an ll ;.,.i lii 'l ,







IN F\S VERas. 3:3 3

%%hose bone, anil fis, amind lal-exi ra ItFd oil,
Convey'd to Euiope, mell repay their toil.*


i,- nri s. "lIhidi ha'.' ni set tle, ihIi.blili]]ia Iln 1 ;.j it
ia MLit.d b. t' ., [)Uelllilullt luh pr-t-lldr,- is, his llll? li
do-,'"it r(-, an- thr\ call' d it Spitzbergeii, fii,.m its 4iharj
i i,. tlcil ~1anit rin k,; niiiiUiin.ll .

I 'l l ,e E u- ; i i l i m n ,I h ,w r n a t i i, r c I [ q u e n l h ,: I'[w j zml ;' '
v=as i, kill what,. The fi.-,ir t.c zn4 in IMar. aud cni-
lilln':6 :ll|.1ilil. alnd. .lUl.% ; bill till: hips m ust tunrl aw:a ,
I,. *; lt dtear f lic'e, i -el.rt- ti..' enl t of .A\niII t. St
Iltnzh a ill,,. ;ltil is 1 i hti.s l and I1.q k.-:l iq. U h,; i :C
I it l -M3. w"', n lie and all his Cr,:,v |i-i.li-h l. Ti. m Ilh- t-t
of tilhe Alialc: v rf:Lrk-.,'d a great ,l;a by Ih; fii n ,a rnl'atii- .
er-,. ul: h tlink il a Itbrunai c.'% t iti it lt.cad ,rue is iti II
thtir,:, i t ur\-r int| Ili-- [i.). [ll liue near it until tile%
l,:. our ii; bul the.',-:l aJ,.,rds lthi:r ,. hief sub-isLeriec.






iMLE '%ORI.D DFrsIIcIR),


CHAP. X.



C 'F S4 ED&N.



Tiis northern kingdom* spreads ius confine
ide.
From Diuish Lapland lo the Baltic tide,
Which, % lih the Sound and Categate invest
rhe south, %hile Norway's mountains houn
the west.
The Russian borders, on the eastern side,
Those two rouAgh nations of ihe norlh divide.
Five grand dirisiuon subldivide the lands,
And, first distinguished. Si eden Proper lands;


S'FIi, lenrtlL SX r., n. I'ri.iiI thi. ;,nlthtern prrm-iT
It',I (1 S. I ., ir iirlhIrri xirrmhiiila ,.,l'S St i'thi Lap.
laind. *.- cim, tip.l I, l hunitr, il Ery l-liIt iI LS : Unt iH
hr,..adlll. Irrm t'i. Nr r : ian mi uulaiuns tu th Il urdt rs o
It ii', al.ul .h..i\ Ii...h .. i .il-. .




V *.^ :!. **^ ..i, .. ..., ,,.*S






IN CAY 1TRnAI. 35

,Jdd. (Gothland, Nordland. Lapland, Fiilui d's
^H shoire-. *
_Ad rotind the Swedish isle.> the Baltic roars.
Th- capialt is built on rocky ih-
By bridges joiin'd, and crow%'d i ith % onden
piles;:
While %ie'vs romantic spread on ev'rY side.
Aloiiz the borders of the Baltic tide :
Fu.r here, beneath a rouzh and ri"'rons cliine.
Nature will (ofi assume a look sublime.


[ hw S'e'li,.h i ldalut, in ii,: !.ltit. ari ,.rTs nunm .-
ilou., andl s%-,eral art-r inliaitud; ilir prinr i|il are (-,,Ili-
Inilaul aUd OCland. W lt IitilI luni 1i t tili ie ,li -lii ,,' i niil-
land., uLe of lle I1%c .ranul di]iinus.
"t Slickhulnm. Il. ia.itlul, is built in a r.miiiatlit %ilia-
li.on, un -ightl r.s-kt ibland-, w..tf-r,.l in th AlMa. k!.'. in
I lisireanm, %hich issue fronm Ihat laki. atit in a Iai% .-"
Ih, Ballie. Thle oilier a hief tnns are Upii:i. U .i l -
burgh, Tornea in ..-t Bullitnia, aid .Abu in 1 il.it..

I Tie iuuse' ;iall ,.,t r St-ed.-n ai rc a thlnsl mnirv.lk ri,, -
1 |uikJ ,.,11 wuod.
it The iinlter la-;t abutllt nine nionlt .I at SLkohiitii,
:,j-I is extreincly e ,ld the -l ,ort tlsulin ui is -,jii:ilt t.:11,.
and Ivgetaloui lei) jiutllk.




S:. .'. ,*.






3(' TirHF VORIII Drf CRIBFlD.


And hid lie paiilttr' hr,'il wiih ardour glowi
To caiclh lak--,* I'urtals, rocks, and muoitI o
tno.-
While Lonif ml I'are and simple manners ra(cel
This, Lonp.-r. poor, relia'iou"-,t martial race,
The hither raiks, impelled by native lire,
To deeds of valour and of fame aspire.
Their manner, grave, their dress. i.& grave like
tis e.
Hence vain luxuri(,ue lasle from Sneden fliesi
But inore -tbsraniHal %-orih remains Ijbehimi,
The loyal. brave, and hospitable nmiid.



01' lht-s,- tile larrI ar Ihi. lakes 1 :nc r aInd VWeI
ler, each ahi-ml icn hudred il<. 11 leni lli ; iie I.rmnf
li,rtv, and lice lanhr it enlty-fime cilks rn hn-.,lh. l1
Swedih riktrs aUe numerouis, but not riamiabl,..

f r['i "mfd_.: are ern reliiois, and the Lulheran
the ,o'aldIlsh-d .l huir.

4 An order I') rrpr(css liuxur, in 1777. di.licceniihe
the Swed-l liby a nationiil ,'i, ii: lh, t i-iij l (oluliir i Iblaci
e\'f[ipl i,1 z.Ia-(das 'lmiclJe the mnj>n appear ml blue sati
lineI 'AItll hiilu-. and tlhe Uon1 1-n11 a a Ah [lite slatin rol
and cujloured rilhlands.






IN EASY VERStr.


The S.edish wonlen, with laborious toil,
Or ply thle oar, or cultivate the soil.
Here game almost ofev'ry kind abounds.
And herdsof cattle graze their paslure-grounds.
Their mines' are rich, and to inquiring eyes
Present a scene of wonder and surprise;
For there a subterranean world affords
A place of residence for numerous hordes,
Who from the mine extract the useful ore,
From whence it visits almost ev'ry shore.


The nioIle. are Lhe chief proprietors ul' those miinps ouf
silver. copper, lead, and iron; lhe Enmli.b af;rdi [lieh bst
mniarket for the- iron. It alo exp.urLs tlimbr, leather
skin.;, taUow, pitrh, rosin, &e. The population if about
three millions.






S 38


i


THE WORLD DESCRIBED,


CHAP. XI.



OF RUSSI .


IMMENSEL.Y spread beneath the northern skies
The great colossal Russian empire' lies:
('onmpos'd ofvarious nations, tongues, and climes
Made subject by the wars at dff'renl limes.
STo him, tile Autoeralt ol' Rus,'.ia's throne,
By title Czar, or name imperial known;


SThe Ru.sinn i., perhaps, the mosi et-enr-I enipil
Ilhal ever exis ,J ; about nine thouuanlI miiles ill lengl
and i ran thiusand kIur lnmdred in I.r-.adth ig yin ill E
tope and Asia. Eur.i|tan Russia cttLndd rromi Imrt
four I,, nearly sixtx-nine degrL-i;- u-,rtll l.litiu e. and froi
!-L\t%-lhrfe In, si-\ly .ight degr,-e w-it l ,tigilnd,'. "hi
xtIen-ive empire was dilided Ny Catherine tit Secon
iitI t.i *' His tiles aie Emperur and Autoi.it. (--r sole rule


I\





















Swedes.


English.


S. I ,







S






IN EAVSY VERSE.


Whose sway is with despotic rigour spread
O'er all the Russias. Black, and While, and
Red:
While northern Europe owns his high coin-
ma nds,
His power presides o'er Asiatic lands,
far as Siberia's" dreary coast extends,
Or where Kamtschatka'st desert region ends;


of all the Rus;ias. Red Russia fI.rmed a part of Polandil;
%I hilte lussia connpiehlindedil the eat parl of Lithuania;
auid Black Russia inelindeli tlie g'n ermrilm s of Kaluna,
MNic,,a. Tula, Rezaun, VdIodfinir, and Yaroslal.

A counir) of Asia, cmprlJchii-ling th in' iIlt ea't lrn
p.irt- it the Ri sian Eri]iiuir. \ i..tniliin :3),0i inils I'rmn
t~nsl -) iesl. anil 12inmo Ir' Mn iillih 1t) 'O i ; it i! [lih pla'c
i, I hinclh iriimninuls, andll tins' dikguaci t at (; l .ii ale ''-
itrrall Ianin.hed. '1'lie inhaliiilaiut.;-re c'niii ,-1u d orRu.H -
.anis, native Silbi riau., and Tailar tribhr. t'h climnate
- exlremel 'e-I.ld.

t A p'iiinsui la In.ii Illit i .it'.a tl ol"Asia, 2-4ti mili- in
ilN gr-,lee.l breadthill, and gradual tI.-ntriac.tiig Io its e%-
tr-illitirs. It is a cohnli anli lairon regi ui ; the iiihabilt-
ants art uatihr KamInlsnadIal.-N, Rns.-.4iai.-, and C.',nack-
alt.,* elnt:r a i'arrii race of beingsg.






40 TiUr VORLD DESCR nIBFD.


Or the fierce Koriacs" with their rein-deer nr4
And swear in mniadness to destroy the sun 4
Through this extent what rapid rivers flow,
And lakes, for months enchaia'd with fro
and snow.
The climate makes the peasants fierce ami
bold,
Inur'd to hardships and excessive cold:
A servile homage to their lords they yield,
And at the sovereign's mandate lake the Gfield
Unaw'd by dangers, mix in conflicts dire,
Atliack their Ibes, and conquer or expire.
Their sports and pastime mark- a lively race)
For merriment presides in ev'ry place;


2 A In]liI'ii I ,r Ihi; u- urrl of Kanilmihallka.: .onrie a1
cdl',i lictd K .riat .. tlhl is rF ii. l-J.ur *,r ,-1iinl. riing K
%;,:I. \ I [I har]j I"n w'ld by their t i Linije, thei swe
/. tit., I, e .ini : n %I. hi iali Ihe.v ti i.Sit h c, accorlif
I tljrir h'.,rid nllirjon lit culliun lhit i lir.,ais of IhN
nm.- and (bihircim btiiing lheir pu-c~'isoni, Lint] r u
ing in tllv iulj the nuidsl of ilicir enemies.
t Tht- ptuinipal rit,:rs are thie W olga, the Donu o r
nai%, Ilit Dnriepr. and Duine.%ir. the Dvhina. and 1Ie OIt
d -: hi. lakers a.' LaI.ga and int ga.


'/






IN EASYV RSE,.


While shews, and comic dance, and son,- pre-
vail,
\ilth copious draughts of brandy they regale
Their dress is simple, forni'd of cloth and
skin,
The flesh side oul, the furry side within.
Their marriage riles* a vast command be-
slfo s,
And hapless vives are oft inur'd to blows.
Tihe merchants rich. luxurious, are allowed ;
The noble Russians are both brave and proud.
The slate religion, aA pre,.crib'd by law,
Is Greek ; but idols t siill their vot'ries draw.
In sledges drawn, o'er plains- of frozen snois,
1Vilh woud'rous speedl the hardy Russian goes;
Or drives in cities, like an arrow fl-el,
Through ev'ry narrow lane or crowded street.



The huisland had Ibrinerly Ilihe right fl' ,.iiM. ji.
ifv- to death : Lhl- barbar,.us pi% ilfe- ik. now gli-i, I.'.l
araminst by the lavs anild marriage-e(ttntracL.
i ThI principal idol is eaile i (bross.
; T icre is 'I-,r, 1Y a hill fr'min Petrd ;urgh to CLhiia
E :}




f I-" W 'S. in


THE WORLD DES'RIlED,


Slfurl'd,
S The Neva, with the produce of the world.


Tins LII. seated no thle Neva,. near the GuolloF Fin,
Lind. was forunj..d l.% Plcer the ir.-al, in 1703; and, i
171''. Ihr Irl trit:k Llouw. was built by (C'nut GColuvkin,
It a.- u l'irr .,ecanh', the capital 1f tht Rsi.-,ian empire,
The ,twli'r prinvilal ailic' are Moscow. Astracau, Arch-
angel, personon, amd Tubrlk.

t Russia pirrlduc,-u Furs, leather, linen, timber, tallow,
musL. copper, iron. and thlier commudities, whicb she
eixcbanEe, t.o ad'antago niith olhc-r nations.
* ;*


42


Their ancientt capital was Moscow Tiaru'd,
And warlike MIscovites were justly fain'd;
But now St. Pezersbnrgh" that rank demand
Which on the Gulf of Finland nobly stands, '
Wlile conmmercef "'ilts, with her sails un!








Spanish. Swiss, and Norwegian Dresses.


'ft


Russian. Dutch, and English Dresses.








IN EMSV IERSE.


CHAP. XII.


o(F SOME OF THE TARTAR TRIBES SUBJECT TO
RUSSIA; THE BARCHKIRIANS, BRATSKI,
AND CZUWA(-IIANS.


AMONG those tribes Mhich own the Russian
sway,
The rough Barchkirians curious trails dis-play;
To sloth and dirt, and indolence consign'd,
They yet are hospitable, brane, and kind ;
1'iih merry hearts, avCer-e to gtin or sorrow,
('ontent to-day, they think not of to-morrow ;
In soung, or dance, or drinking mead, delight,
And, arni'd % ith darts and lances, fiercely fight ;
On horseback chiefly they conduct the wtrife,
And each seem- forward to expose his life.
Their faith Mahometan, but lacking zeal.
For Pagan rites and sorceries' prevail.

% \len they aru attacked tIY dl'ease, f.[ their calle
di bi tihe stiveritl or the stasoin, the misfortune i, amin-




*t






44 rilE 1ORLD DESCRIBED,

Two meni ol'aze o'er all thlie Iribhe preside.
For war to tit ihein, or in peace to 2iide.
In juris, or lauis of ielt, the Bralski Ii.,
And keep as man, liaes as each (an buy;
The prchla'-e, w lhen in herds of'calle padnI
The briiluroo, I'romi her friend, rectiwe., 1b9
Sinmaid ;
* Tliree public days in revelry expire,
Btefore the neil)y-mniarried pair retire. 4
But .liould the liu'hand die, Ilie elder Lpou.
Vho bore him children, still cumnini.,l- tzh
The house,
I The rest contented in the jur t remain.
Or % ith their preenls seek heir friends a-rai


|i*l,'i d I.., lip D[ 'il ; ;i&.lt lie srcce tr, wil., i' %i I nl figf
himi. ai[.ar.- n-\t[ dai villi \xtrriinal mirk. 4, i% l no
d ,* l.r.- a. Ih lj akei \ir .. ng i" tie i-I, r llN. .ilt ri ( ivi
a r.,'ai.l Ir'.mi Ui li ir -dijiiis 'Fariar. r lId a," k Irn';l
Sill *_rvat irts'p,:' h1 % I1hi; '" pl''.
S' A. ,iiig fli'l.,in I. ;itiard;iu ti_ tie-r b,.aul arn charaid
1m.i. t aill l'. hi' li h t r he f urt ias. i i r a l hur t..r I h..irsn
iiel ntY faicls. fil3't !i'-iriit <, t.'-, 1J.* buiiidrci -'lifjf
ill[ 11 a m "ii.,y gu', It
I '[piiinvs a 11111 .-u ill iin. -AI felt.







IN rASV VTR-r. 4:3

In rude Czuwachians one great God adore,
And Tor's greaL temple is some forest hoar,
'Midst whose recesses, by the Zuniack's
knives
IBlack lambs in sacrifice resign their lives.


-..,-...^






16 -It THE WORLI DE%-CRIBELI,


(-HAP. XI I.



. OF %OME OTHER TARTAR TRIBES StTBJEcr TO
1 I'USIA; THE KALMLICS, COS'ACKS, ISCHIORTI,
I"TAKUTHIANS, AND MIORDWANS.



THE Kalmuc huts are forinu'd of felt, and hides
Are often spread to dry on their outsides,
Which yields a sordid and disgusting sight.
S This tribe in wandering, vith their herds, de-
light,
Where'er the herbage of the plains appear
S Invriling to their horses, cois. and dleer.
SThey never plough the land, nor reap, nor mow,
But are expert in war, to bend the bo".
S The flesh ot' horses, deer, ani sheep they prize#
The milk of mares, their ti'jv'rile drink sup-
plies;


o" 1" Jii.. Ih,. rmiiake a strlil; I rrl. i l:l u id I li.




!% 5 *4






IN,rAV" VERSE. 47

ndAd. time and trouble much inclined to spare,
A little windmill wafts the Kalmuc's prayer.'
The hi-rdy Cossacks are a warlike race,
|, ..iature wanly, and of comely face;
Expert in war the fiery steed to guide,
And harass hostile hosts on ev'ry side;
The post of danger always prompt to seek:
And their profess'd religion is the Greek.
The rude I-chorti next attention claim,
KnoWn al.o by the ancient Ingrian name,
Who wilh their dead deposit store of meat,
For tlieir helov'd departed friends to eat;
Their nioney too they cautiously secrete,
To yield them comforts in another state.
The wild Takuthians in their hovels dwell,
And with Itheir cattle mix'd beneath one shell.


'They haie little wooden windmill-wings fixed to lithe
entrLnnce of their huts, on which the priests write certain
prayer; fir the owner, which being put in motion by the
wind, saves him the trouble of praying; they have als,.
otijr ,rai ing machines in the form of a box, in whilih
ih'r. shake written prayers; for they think nothing nec.i-
-ar. 1"..r I'rayer, but putting it in'motion in any way.





THE wi, LD Dr.'CRIII.D.,


With fat and blood those wretched Pagani
smear
The rag-ed idols" they adore with fear.
S More wise, bthe Mordw ans cultivate tile ground
S Andil worship one great God with awe pro
ibund;
Their women love in dress such gingling toyl
S As corals, bells, and rings, which make a noise,

Their idil-., are made ',iags. for they despise wooudei
idols.





F?




L
,I.






IN F"4 A I .I!.


(CHAP. XI V.
4


OF MORE TARrAP. TRIBES SUBJECT TO RUSi! ;
THE O)TIAKS, TIIELEUrTI, THIiLIMZIAN%, TrUN-
GUClSIANS, WOGULIANS. AND SAMOIEDES.




TuE Omtiaks, faiihilhul, honemf, kind, are knot n,
To indiuslry and ie-s of frieud.-hipl prone.
Bul timid, dii ti, simple to exce-s.
While Pagan prie-ts the iniaric art proufe-ts
They credit e'ry super.tliious charm
Which these di-pense to sht-ller them front
harm.
And think the very bear* which they destroy.
A future slate of happiness enjoy.


W 'henever the O'tiak kill' a hear, lie sing-o oer it,
asks its pardanm, and hangp up lie .,kin, Ito which he pays
man% tine compliments. In induce it nlt to ;ake ven-
gean e hlien tie) mn'et in tIhfL abol'de o spirits.






.4





I.
~
I'-













7


50


Thei Theleuti believe in God, 'is said;
Their only prayer is Do not strike me dead.!
The tribe of Tscrhouwasche adore the sup.*
The rude T-lIUIIflziains t are but partly won.
To oun the Christian creed, For till the
pay
Respect to Satan in their Pagan way. ;
The bold Tung'usian tribe is frank anid fr1
Detesting fraud and low duplicity:
The rich, %ho can atflord. take many wires,
But filthy habits mark their savage lives.
Of deities thiu' people reckon crowds.
Their clhitt. nain'd Boa, rules above the cloud


The I'atlui ol' a iunr 'V woimat g'inr;z t., I.. niitTie
u.ifffr, brvid and hl.in-i- i t Lhe sin. %lith a pira), r.i
.i,-r ing lhnijliic I6.r llt- 3.'iitig t .im le.-.

t T iy m,' tuajiti7,id, but "il tleir iea i.r Chr'limianj
c-ni.'tb- in being ie t .:. i.itk' theli t l. l' lii n (i,:.-,, a1
iicIIingl_ I; i %ihili gn I'[ruiif i-r-_.-i] 1. ihi.l i mgr o1
wi and ,kI r ir g tig li, I'l_ t it'-l, G r:t.k i hurt: h.

; Tih ir Huom. nn airt i.t- pr tic-l in sil-,eriif nilim I I
theI le.L :trclh-rs.
a '


r ,


THE WORI-D DECRiItED,






IN EASY ERSr. 51

The tribe of the Wogulians next we mark,
IWith savage minds emerging from the dark :
Their notions reach the God who'rules the skies;
'Tis also their belief the dead will rise,.
Where each shall meet return for good or evil;
Hut strenuously they all deny the Devil.
The heads of beasts they consecrate with care
To God, but never say a word of pra. 'r!
Then, farther north, which bounds the Russian
shore,
Bleak Samoieda's race their bears adore;
And passing Weygats Strait, to Zembla's.
coast,
There prostrate nature lies enchain'd in frost,


This tribe pJ.scsse4 the neaxmt idea ti ratiiiil
worship o' an% or those savage hordc hiich arc tiioo nu-
inerous to be particularized here.
t This peopic haic no id>aol'a Sulpremine Being ; the
i all their newi -born iulails b ihi- iam: ul tin:- firt animal
tli.:y m-et. Their marriagre-cinlra..i.- are %erbal. amd
li.htitv strictly obi ,.trv.d. Thtir euuulr. I'urm i ti e n,..i-
tlie.rni estreinilN or' lu..-ia, anid i., sc[..rated froni Nuia
Zembla. b thit Stint., ur 1,'e3gatI.
I This dsulattc regi-:n is as prt Uancl.)lored, -u far mt






5'2 TIlE WORLD DE:(.BIBFP,

And desolation spreads her boundless sway
O'er lands where no ad veti'roue. step % ill'sira)


to dilrn-ijine %' lii-lher it i. an island .r part of a grej
conl;ic ut. It i iincerlaiii whether there be any oninti
S IIIAil.anII oIfr not. Thie .anini.dei, when thle strait.
Ir-,zrn. pi.a'ss ovcrli hunL tIheelk anddeer. Souic pcopm
sent lte texTplore the couIi,%, relate, Lthat thbe caugllht luf
native Zemiblians, clothed in seal-kjuis and the sLins
S penguins, A ith the feathers outwards ; but nothing moi
is know n of this people, whose numbers must be vrry few



| =





IN EASY VERSE.


n s~ ~ n


(HIA P. XV.




0I" PRIU-IIA.*




''ri Prussian kingdom., from contracted bounds,
By Fred'rick's t genius gaiu'd coiinlignous
grounds:
Silesia's province: paid his iarlke toils.
And large his share became o' PLIlaud's spoils.


Prussia wa .,iiimlid-. nIorli 1h1% ib' Baltln : *-i: .iIIl
.,iJLb .v Ru'l-,ia and Austria. ;aiil tii lii, SS '*t I.% tlie
term ian ital Sreaf- d iLt lemt.r'n.

t 'redl rick the Set oild. cmnrmnio.ul callrd th.i ;rr:tt.
; i'hui duchyK 1742.
I B the -ii.tral prli;tiini r' PitX ,dil. IP'ru-ia aqimlr l
lI1. i titlc or (;rtcil I',lanii ; \ilit iiOl, Uf eS-il P -.-ia.,


53






S 54 THE WIRLD DoESCIUBED.

S When vain %ere virtue's, honour's, freedom.
cries,
And erotned robbers shared the bleedi
prize.
f Where roll the Vistula its far-fanm'd tide,
There royal Prusia guards the western sid
And where lie ea-tern hank the shore defend
There ducal Prussia ils domain extends.
Anpach and Bayreuth have increased t
sizp
S Of this proud kingdom; and the sacred ties,
By nlu nch 'omipalriols are bound heart to hea
Were counted ligbt as the wind-driven dart.
When Pruia'., standard floated in the hreez
O'er S-axnny's disimember'd provinces.
4 Ber.nt its capital of late is deein'd.
For such ntf'old was Koninilgler4 esteemed.

mri lii.lmg l6i. rihti (d' Danlilzit and TlI.rn; 1and tle p
% inr,. of M1 a, mtnd Pila.liia, nowi dent.minijalcid -'
PTru%,ia.
T hewe principalitit-, -,_r uuari aa,.t, ., wer, abdicate
lj the late .Margravi of Au 'l.avh, in t1l' ,.'1' Ihti Ki.
f l' n h u or.f,
t B''rlin, tlic raiiIl of t .h 'le"rt.oagl of Brindrl bub





r ,. -*.., ....
IN FASVY A r.R 65

The population of these states amount
To eitht full millions, (as most authors count.)
The Prerel, Memnel, Vibtlula. ard Spree.,
And Oder, through its bounds their streams'
display.
Of dlitri'rent slates compta'd a native zeal
For their own custItoms ev'ry where preiail ;
O'hile industry, with persevering toil,
Improves ithe arts and cultivatcs the soil;
Beligiun here, by laW's protection %ike,
To ev'ry man's conviction open lies.


scaldid on tht: nmi-r .Sirct, and m hir- thlie kings (of Puisuia
r,:side-, has bten ltur smit Iin,, i *jnsidi.r.-d as Ibhf railt A
1f Pruiesia : ihnu..h in reality KoniugJl-.-rg. :.n tihe rl(
Pr.g.tl. is the ancir .nl and true capital. TI'-: alher Inn-
cipal town., are. Brclitwv, NVarias. uno girn I-)Saxaoi ; I
Dantzie, not dt.,iaieil. a t'Ie Iswn ; Pi,".iu, Potsdanm, &c.






IH LIE ORL) DESCRIBLEI),


C'HAP. XVI.




of ItiE KINGDOM OF THE NETHERLANDS.



THLr Seven United Provin ce,. so lon-
Admired in hi-,tory, and retiowin'd in soUC,
Hate, troin a great republic, dwindled down
Itlo a )peiI kingdom, and a cro% n ;
For Iho' hb-fore ol'small extent ihi, state,
Freedom, iminorial freedont made it great.
Holland' and Belgium hare united hands,
Now called the kingdom of ibe Netherlands.


Tn.it part I* tliis kii d,,im ni hichli. eallhd Illl.iind
i, bulindeitrdi *n thel iortli L, I hie 4.; rinani -r.dri; w,'em t
th, Irili-i. i e ann.I c;.t b. the.. _i'uai ','eat; amrid -%ulu(
I.n Ii,.'l un. Ii MI l,.l i i im ii-.w 1uil-l.,. The pripulalihI
k about tlrn m1l1ii-iI Illl'tilt I i,- thIr : I;;.,-i ii' tLh4
s.\% ii l nlli-d t'lu, i Ji'nt tliat inani_' i.N> n. nr! lli ;applit(
to 1he il,,ile.





IN EASY VERSE.


H[ere art erects her dams and dikes, and braves
The threat'ning fury of the outcast wases.*
The Dutch are heavy, prudent, prone to save,
phlegmatic, slow, industrious, and brave;
Their country seems compos'd of various isles,f
And Amsterdam is built on wooden piles;
In er'ry point of view canals are made,
For pleasure, trav'lling, intercourse, and trade,
u'er which their boats and bargesswifily glide;
The Rhine, the Maese, and Scheldt, ihe lands
divide.
The seat of government the Hague is nam'd,
And Leyden's colleges are justly fam'd ;
While Rotterdam, and other towns, command
Commercial stations both for sea and land.
The soil is fertile, and the produce good,
In cattle, butter, cheese, and madder-,ood.


Anlmost thie -hole of these provinces seem to liae
been won by indistr) from the octau, and the sea is uow
kept out bi irimtc-tie dams and dikes.
t The Rhine, and other ir.ers ahich intersect the
country. gies Ilulland all the adauiages of an insular
situation. There are u.ot less iall three hundred bridges
in Amsttrdam, wbic it i th. capital.






THE WORLD DL.SCRIBFD.


In BeIria. loItr o France'!. empire joined,
A strong resemblance to [he French we find!
In manners ea-y. and in conduct light,
Gay. niirhliCul, social, anm'rous, and polite.
Bruiels is iis chi-f town, itl clime and soil.
Like Hollauds" temperate, rich without mul
toil.









it





r
IN Fr'S 1FE.IN W.


(CHAP. XVII.



OF CUERrbAN'.



BFNE, Tti %ihat various. print'es, clinie.. nmd
skie-,
This greatt tMe:ieive part* of Furope lies,
11lhiclh lif"renti citicst kinrldohnl.. nates, coim-
pose,
So Ions( convul"'d 1)y war's internal m1e.
At lenltli, ii' .tatntv miseilileIl-undelin'id.
We in no modi rn map correctly find.

I' Ac,',.irdligi l, its n ,,,l,.rn lirh nt-, (_-.ruaw T. i.% I n.,ii h-.,]
)on the nn:,h th1 hliV G<'rmn 1]. i-i:. 1 ruinrirk, il, BaIti,'.
mltI part ri" Pru-.ia: it ii,.lil.-- Ti..,slvla\ ]ia. cn m l.,
auil td Iiuu,] iit iin i, ii. ., l.t -,,'t -. tlhe Ihe'n.' It i..-
,anit itint.'. It i. aI.,,,it fithl im h iln lhrnu li, nI .1 .',u ,'
t irlt k an H ni ji i l Sl,.
t t -,u.cl, 'n hut i unI: -h1 LII :1 t* I, '*ilh u




r
p 60 1HE WORLD .DEWRIBED.
' Such new-created kings and powers arise,
Like imiaic work, before our wond'rin.g eyes:
At present ix crown'i head-, ruling- we see
The greater part of min rtial Germany.
The Ausirian Emperor and the Prus'ian King
,. Two in-ility states into subjection brinuZ :
i Bavaria's realm extends a smaller space:
S The Saxon monarch next in rank we trace:
Then Hanover. throne i n Great Britain's scal
S Like a lin-kettle at a mastifl"f'. tail;
And Wirternberg. renowned for strugg ling Ion
To s-ave her Iights from a vain despot's wron
The German people, honest, proud, and brave
4 Are learned, religious, hiospliable, grave:
But various creeds in diti"reut states prevail,
S And native customs they preserve with zeal.
Their riders large and nuin'rous, and liei&
SIn produce rich, ,-epays the rmer's toil. ,
In produce rich, repays the farzner'i toil.






IN FtS- IER'E. til



(HAP. XV11T.



OF THE AuISTRIAN DOMINIONS.*




FRIou Aulriat -prung, her ivarlike monarch
reilns,
First &'er his rerile, Iow'd. and native plains.
This martial slate the river Ens di, ides
liio its tipper and its lower sides :
The Danube. Ens, the Inn, the Drave, and
Save,
With fertiliing screams the country lave


SThe Austrian duminiion. prtevious to tlic late eMetls
LB ( Gerniany, were e'Uimaltd at mire than oun? inilred
3id zil-lit)-fiour Ihiwaiil=l square: mile ; arnd ili popula-
ltju i .-i, ty llilions.
t Thei circle of Aiislria cunlatied ibh archrldachy of'
Autrt;: Ibh7 duchies of StLria. Carialita. and Carniula ;
th, T.rol, now ceded to Baal\ia ; and the principaiburs
uf Bi vrn and Trent.
G






t 2 rl"r worii. Drsui'lrllr.

And fanm'd Vienna in this circle Alarnds.
Tle capital of all the Austrian land-.
The rouaih Bolhemiau's kin.hdoi i neit i
Itrace.
'Whose diadem adorns ithe Austrian race.
The Malda, Elbe, aind Odler's ell-knowin lii
In varioiius parts this friile land divide ;
While in its mountains iiInlnes iiimmense
found
Its capital is Prague, in war reno Ii'd.
Tlie brave Hungarianit next al ltlion claii
SWell kno'iu in all tIe fi'.lhiin fields or fa'm
In this a'reai kingd'iln tio fm'd parts %e g
Nanim'd Ulpper and the Lovner Hungarvy;
Preshbur. the lUppei. boasts its tairesit lowf,
i The Lower, Budai. c(|iiul in renuwvD,

A kin d,,lin l'*., huii'.lrtd nilt'->, i:,.. a1il,, InC
nirt, i ljl'mi, vi r i I,, iii n ld 4.u (I.ii;, n.,i tI I .- i
SanIl L imalii : t r~i' I,) Sii,. '1:1 aiii'%lM.,rn iai : s,-iltlli \,\ :
teia and il, 'l I\ a l :nli.'. rjh, iau'uaw,_ iN-SI .' ji
. :' t T hns kill_.l'.lin i l.h.0lll]>l:,l Jill h, hl'l h I ,%ll li Io(
t iil, ie'-i -1- t-% I-) M t.,ravi:, An.tiri'ir. :lutil tfier i
te; S. ta.iniia aind 'Tulrke ; i iin ,..141 1Y U':illl.ii:ili
ITr'riui. lit.e 1.m. ,l I l iii -nrI i',. r i, t l eIaii.






K


IN EASY A[InI'.


I


Of fihhiing men, this martial state can yield
One hundred thousand,' ready for the field;
WVhilef'eraileplainsand pastutre spread ig wide,
Their crops and herds display with conscious
pride;
No penal laws to check their mirlh is found,
Where lands with ev'ry sort of game abound.
To these, add Austria's-, part of Poland's spoil.t
And her rich share of Italy'", fair soil.
The church is Roman, but, in ev'ry place,
Sweet toleration whispers love and peace.

SFur Huitgarx alu.
t In thi. sci ral pairlitiu sor Puland. Aiistria aticuirtdl
LitLhl- P'land, awiil the reati st part r tf LReld Rusia and
I'ld,,ja, uow called the kiugdoni of -alcia.
B


1 11 1 ". I I -.11-1 1, I--






6- TMr WORLD DE MRIBIED,



CHAP. XIX.



OF TURKEY" IN EUROPI:.



THs empire spreads o'er Europe's fairl
parsa,
O'er lands and cities fam'd for arms and arto

O'er Greecet aud all her islands, knaukiu
yore,
The haunts and sweet retreats oIf learnedI lore
The seats from whence the sciences profouum
Refin'd and bngbhten'd all the nations round
Mi


S Turkt-n is b,.uud.,. on ih inirtlh by Ri-ia a
.An-l*ri ; -ui llw *a.l, 6n Ili, BI.1 k S(ta aud "a tf" la
.,ir'; oin ill.- .,nlth. t ill.'- .A\r hiii .lag,', and ii h' Alit
r-rriautL-:tn ; aml tin I tli im't, ih,- l i li i v t-J T -ll.Iw e an
D-.Ial a ,tila It Ihir, lu ,: llc. uI-ll-a f EurIope.
3 Green i tiw *,)n ini (I, Malt-1nma, Allhnia, Liuadi
i the Morea. the .Aru'h iah,-lhjt, and O'india.






r
IN 1,SY NURSF. 65

4,hetie Allis, 'ii dus. and Olyi)mnpus rise.
And HvmrnuN and Parnassus scale the tkies ;
All cla--ic mounlaints, dear to sons of song.
While streaims poetic glide their vales anionsg.
I'fr that hLeroic land, lair freedoi'ts pride,
The fierce and haughty MILLsselinen preside;
While barbarism spreads its influence round,
And ignorance usurps this classic ground.
jeside the Grecian provinces and isles,
The Turkish sway these fruitful lands defiles.
Mulla' ia's' rich and far-exlendin, plains,
O'tr lhich a hospodar as vassal reins:
While Bcssarahia's Tartarsi" roi e about
WTallaclia's4 fields are fertile, natives 'tout;


N Molda'ia is 2.o miles tull., atitl "21o Lr.aad. Tlhie
|4'iniripal riva:r- dre. thi Llneistcr. Dauube. Pintlti, Mol-
dau, and BaalAtLdk. Tiae g vtrn,'r is alli-.d lhatidar ;
the ahabilaintls are *.f tir n rt(-k chuntl ; anid lhi priatni-
pal lo' n ik 'ra.'v.
t AMlsj called Budziac Tartlanr, silanat .J btwen th1
Dtiruiile and D[uit' ,i. aTi ,TpIltla i- Berudl.r.
I th ati i[c.n tl-r i. '.- i-- til. l _n' atld 1-.5 -l ,dl :I
Ih,- h i i. _'l >. k 'i'u t capital.
<; :3


d.


- Axa'ud&k






66 1IH. WORLD DESCRIBED,


Rouih Bosnia's* mountains ras'd aloft.
see.
And warlike Serria.t sfriuiglinr lo he free.
Part of Dilmalia.i awIl 'roatiC.'s land,
Are subject to alie Nulian's high coinin,'lnt:
Ail iI here Blul-dria's ruL2ed mominraii
risge,
And fair Romuania.'i seat of empire, lies.
Where rear'd sublime, Conslanltinopl sand
The capital of all the Turk islt land. ;
k tl fl-n ihe ,il'iniora and the Black -e:ic,
lis gllteringn crescetil. to the sun dispIla-



B,.isuia is 1-ni miles long, and til broad. S-.rajo
the icapitlal.
t Ser ia is 190 mrils long. and 2.5 broad : it in in a mla
cf i.t (.lli:tn agailniit the Turks. B-r-Igrrad,' i i i- capila

I ltre-/Pioviua is ihe capital ,-f Turkiih Dlalmatia
pail (-'ruaLia btlIiiig' al..' I., Turkcj.
SA liiliulaiu iU.. ipr j incr. Solla is lit- capital.

II The ancient Thrare ; 21li) niil'.s long and Il.I brati
-I'onstanunople is thet capital if tlin* proi'iv.a, and (
all I rrl .






IN EAST VERSE.


67


So nobly placed, this city well might claim
-The sublime Porte" as its distingui-h'd
name.


It is called the Porte, by way of eminence.






'i1' THL WOOIii .D1( 11RIBF D,



CHAP. XX.




oF 11E GO rLRNMrCNt, RELIGIrON. AND MANNFr
' (OF TIlE I URKS,




'tir liurhau'd M3 e.c-Inen aIniust adore
Their Sullan, Emperor. or GramJ Signor;
For he. Ai1b a dfspotic s&ay, commands;
Their properly awd lice- are in his bands.
In his seraglio, hidden from die crowd,
Surrounded hy bashal-, and pachas proud,
'Midst eunuch vruards and female slaves
ease.
He spends hi' indolent luxurious days; ;



r l'h.. .u-,'- LtiI'-iiit'I lli m. Iild'>n ,i, CI hriliai pdenj
l,.rlnSlnl ;l.- slaut- Ir III ll'.irl~l,_ll-:, Kill I,_:ll -l 14, 111 lIhe
r:.'hIJ. "Ihlic al'i, riLrdj, 'i.'1 lli i iniizn.ttaid ul P ivince
ili e'L,. awli :m'rn '.


a4M.Aw






IN EAS.TY VERSE. 69

gut fell commotion," or rebellion's breath,
Too o01 cont-ign their Grand Sig-nor to death.
In divant met, the Grand Vizier presides,
.Anti, ill the field of war, the army iruides.
The faith Mahometan established stands,
Vith bigot zeal thruugh all the Turkish lands.
predestinaltion is their tix'd belief,
From which no caution can afford relitf;
Hence with surprisiting apathy they die,
Or patiently beneath misfortunes lie.
Their nittfli bids tbem visit AMecca's 1 shrine
To fast in Raniazan, abstain from wine,


The"- ditlurbanc's, which nfi- i eli] in Ilh: dfath .'r
depo-hi4iun of the sullan, oliginalte genlrallv % ittli the Ja-
ni,4arieS, a licentious solIdierv., or Iir :I' i iij,'ril-gua. &,
I,] on bY disaBlec ed habha3.
t The diaan is a Lind 4 senate.
STher aleoran contains the prineiplc-s iI Mor ow .rue-
LII. ra.ili, as laid down by Ihrir Iku.i pr,,p l'- c 1-ii.riin i.
The inulfli, or high-pjriest.l, iIus ,.tS gi- at m i'iljueii :
am.jng th'-m.
1i Meeca is a town in Artibia Dtserla, FaRnous ,r b':-
inz. the hirtlh-i-plare '' N alinel : ani nd-,. as thde Tinks
iri lend, c.-nlmming the. svpulchtr ol br-ihain.






70) iHIr itt'klD DFI'HRIIBED,

AnIl, as .iI dI tlies ol'ift-Ir I'ailhi declares,
Ablulirt..' aliiis, and pilgriiiage, and pray'r
JThe tneit irv. hIandi-nite'. haulity,. pierce, a
^- i~ira;i t
STheir beards are long. heads shav'd, and a
& pees 'rave;
But i nhen vindictive pa.,.sioris bear the sway,
S To rage resistless, ev'ry thing gives way.
S The Turks chew opium to extreme excess;
S The lurbanu their distinguished part ofdrers.
S Polygamy is by their laws allowed;
TIhe rich of'% iives, and concubines a crowd,
Retain in barams, fromn the iorld retired.
S Their females are for beaut) much admir'd
And ('hristiant slaves are often doom'd to f
These prisJ.ns, subject to a tyrantt, will. i


'I l' I-Turrl.-l, I aill- ar dl agnitil Ill. n itnd IjltiJ
prartivular it,-r ln .m ., ,'u I rtlJi. *i., .
t Th Tiurkilj li:r,mini antl ,r;ai].'., an filled i
u rTuig, (;i..ri. i aiti t tra-i'itt rinal>:-, ,lhildi. in ot cl
lill |:irruts. A







i-






IN E,-Y VERs. 78



CHAP. XXI



OF FRANCE.'



PrnHAP-. in all the world eitendinQ' round,
No rIuirer country could be ever found;
Fruiiful in corn and cattle, frult and wine.
From [he hiah Pyreneest unto lth Rhine


SFrance i4 bounded 1>y tiic Briti.I inann, I :o iii I-.!-
iindl on tii. iniilth : (-ninany, Sn% l'7. i1.iii, an1l |,11rt '.f
lt' ilo ith ieast; line M.diitrrancman annii ''.ai on th,:i
south; anti the Atlaintii: on lihe \%c-t. I romi Iltnkiik.
in.tihe north, tIo ihf P rceinpt In tit s,-iutlh, il.s c \1t i-
6i'2j 1111,? ; anti s,.,tu. thini; mniur i fruil i i. in';t I 'ii- ri
airl ol' Alsace. iw h t -the r.--t:iI ,.,il ii Brt't. nitil. whIi iti
prn I c.' e'ttii-ils 1111. m ilh s l'irllrlr i an, :iil1 ,.llt r |. il'
,i. tltin iiean-n: h iu the ai.hliti.,n .X1 new ilia.irtumnt i,-,n-
li[ ,iall% inrr'alstC. it. anti l,... il i hilni. uinei.'riii!
!1- |i.iiilati,:,n ik ab,,ntl lliirtt -li\, million .
t I h1 P.renee4. di.hlil it Irir Spin. aintd ill, .\11,
lin lhui : indl tht rinr Rhiniiis ,%Is.Itne it, I)..IInd.IIr
li, 'intl G-rnninn.




111ir -F s V i f SW
1111111111 a, .26.,. ,


72 1HEI WORLD DQISfRICrD.

Or Iroil the Alpine mountains so the tides
Which wash ils north, its south, and west
I.dFt( .
The Rhone. the Somme, the Loire, and (
ronue sport
Through plains where nature seems to bh
her court :
O'er France. the Bourbon rule-, but who C
view
The n inner, nor think ofthe Ioser too 4
Or rather of the man, by fortune crost,
Froin li hon she snatch'd the prize he neverlou
Discardirqr hliin who had her fav'rile been, 'j
For one who wiears the crown he could not I
So clouds usurp the sun's bright post divine
And reign Iriumniphant, tho' they cannot shiu,
What noble towns and spleudid cities' slam8
Within the limii.s of this fertile land !
While its proud capital, fam'd Paris, smiles
UTpon the riier Seine's united islt's, .


SThe principal towi'u, nelt to Pari. ate Lyons, M
-.-ill' s.Bonrdt aux, Liskc, V aleucienncs, Amiens.Touloi
and G ncva ; thl, last 1'lrmcly an independent slatale.
t Faran. i situated on mo little isles in the Side, eatl

















French Peasants after the Vintage.


-, --- f- *'. -, ^ i
i'J ., ... . I ....__ __
L ., .


Spanish Bull Fight.









IN EASY VERSE. 73

Where nll the sculptor's art. the painter's
clihrm<
FiTre been Iran.rerr'd by their nmaraudmn" arms.
Th' French are 'itt.y, gay. fanta-tic. lihlit,
Brilt, aclivfe, cinninz, firkle. and pulte.
A- r;i .,S pi% ,onl I1 tlIeir Iulrtirir- astail.
The i.gr's rane. or rnonke.'s trick- preiail.
]I dan'-inz. fentiii !peclacle-. and pl.iys,
The French could spend c-c-;atic nights and

In dress ne't fashion-. ev'ry d6y tike place.
And e'ry week they seem a difl'rent race.
ThIe ren'tles grcat vivacity display,
Delighlit, in frolic mood. to romp and play,
Are graceful, prelltty, witty, and polite,
Are clhaste, though free, and sensible, though
Higbt.


I-l, dii Palai, -in. ls Nonir Dameii. I ik about 17)
mili- rul: il. m li ii t ing ie -ubliirhs ; and i *.l'n ,is :-i,,,tn
547,11i.11.1 iilt ,l) ll s.
Drr in'. thdi" -'in,uin l ir hirr. ; .irr l r'i>llrr. i-,.
'r..ich] r-i'n-.-'s di-jpl. .id siriLkin, Iraiil- (..,' lvrui ni. 'i-
0liil y, cunslancy. anl rorlitLud-, even on the swf.ifi.''l.






THE WOBEIRD DESCRIBED,


CHAP. XXII.




OP SWITZERLAND.




OBSERVnE where wild aspiring Alps' inclos
The land, whoe summits bear eternal suo
There Switzerland,t to Freedomn ever de-
Displays her rural tribes, her frugal cheer,


The highest innunlains in Euirope. s. pajating I
from Franc( and Gernian;.
t Switzerland is a small romantic ouiintry. situ
beluwen a number ol" the Alpine mr.i.iijins,. lInui
norlli by Gtrinnny. w-il by France. and Oi tie .uulh
ea't by Ilal3 ; the .lil 'afe about 15.,000 %quart miles,
the population two mnilion.

C t The Su i5s bave aliaNas retaiued the strongest pas
for liberlN ; nor is Ihtre so mui:h simuplhcit) or maw
nor seeming equality, to be round in any other pai
Europe.






IN EASY VERSE. 75

Her simple manners, and her manly race,
fearless, in war,* the hostile shock to face;
Or, in heir lov'd luxuriant valleys found,
Content to cultivate their native ground;
Through verdant pastures drive their herds
wilh pride,
Or bid the vine ascend the mountain's side ;
Or hunt the bounding chamoist as they go,
(VO't'r rocks, glaciers.' or pinnacles of snow.
Amtidst these mountain piles and valleys green,
01f Canton,, Switzerland contains thirteen,
Sch% eilz, Ulnderwalden, Uri. Zug, Luceru,
VWith Fribourg, and Soleure, ve first discern:
Tht-e seven with zeal prole.-s tile Romish
creed.
To Zurich, Bern, and Basil uiitx proceed-


STh(% are will-aiade, hard, aund hIne al"a%, I-reu
e- ,,n-:,l .i1iii.n4 ih,: bI : t I.tihers 1 in l wI .rlt .
STh,:. cain.'mi k a kin] o"ii uinUlaiin goat. ceatr-mely
fleet, and difficoit ito Le .caught.
SThe tGlai.-r' are c\lt.-i',o fields of ice', bel'Aeenaiid
CIn ilbo ida.s of the UPS.
tt 2







S 76 THE n'ORLD DESCRIBED,

These cantons, with Schaffhausen, nunab'ri
fouLnr,

S Their God by (C'al iniitic rules adore:
1 bhile (laris and .\ppeuzei next Ae see,
.is VWhere both religions Equally are free.
^ *-. But nho can trace ,ild nature inb her freaks
|| Through all these mountains and romaia
4- { lakes!P
... Whose winding shorEs such charms subli
display,
SWbile each is in itselfau inland sea.
'. Inelos'd by m-ountainst clad itbh bnow
pine,
', ,While tlhrou-gh the mallEys roll lthe Rhone
' *Rhine.!;


ma .' "1 i l'ii llr, I.nlIr. ilni. l,:ainnh.' ii| li, L: kki. -

ii'IL It., 11 ?Lm' '1111
"-i, I. Ia n :li .ll [..,a llr -n :i l i Il Ilit ll lll III ic, l
.01



,r ti' I :L'h. h t ,, li ti'tr. Aar. Ar c. I-t u ., and
ii
i nli i>-. rat iii Irnur .J 11th.


El f





IN EASY vrRSE. 77



CHAP. XXIII.



OF I1ALY.




FiR IItaly's" luxuriant clime displays
Attractive lieatiies in such various ways,
T,'-it e'ry step arresis the ravish'd eye
W'ith sninihng iVdilles, or ith i moutnlain-t higl-.


l hl.d,, jutlt utlr'-mid it. lnardcn of Liurmipe, m an
usJill ,% i.,iilerJ ,mii l-r hlrcr. dthiS.,I lie noilthern,
.nlral, airily siutl ru. T'lie first, kniiit n lati 13 as the
7tialpinu Iiuhlmic, wasli. the au client Cisaliiine Gaul, and,
in lie middle ages, the kingiliinm .f .Lombard.. "111
cenrilral oun tans the dom ini ,ns tif the churliri nil lha kin-
,i-oi of Etrrira, and adi the antnt s-at oil" Rminiani aulni
Etiuriau pinrr. .tmil, in the midi.l i. a.. f the c t -i-
a.,tl ;l anl Tut.i.an 'tatc. ; and llf- .illh-rnI 'Mas calli-d
N:1'agtma Gra'cia, 1iiW thc- kingdom of N.ipk's.

t T'rtf A!ps ''parat,:l it froin 1'rance, Germany. arnd
Suiltzrlandl; and it% olljer b-iitnd, are tho Adriatic anl
t3]





7 THEB WORLD DF.SRIBr.b,

S Here;hiu e. ihesplendid citel', littermng tow'
There. froin the nantliing vilt li,, rtiuln Iw'r
liter' fli.i it!'- tide- i,:.lli. in n tio r i.r -u li'r
There .L it:,e C -,C l Iil. th 1-c ti,.i i -n 'l- t1 o 1 (>Xloi
P ) lit,.' fro il Ill it tie: tic:i .]e hiuri'd,
W ic!h oliite adorn'd the 31 i-jI r-- ut il 1 Vurl
Tile .r i,-i or arn anti cic-ie,- nrprolouind.
Who-e ra illumitinM'd all ithe "orll around.
11With grief the plilo-ophbic e)e s-urve\s
Its fallen slate in our dezen'rale da's"
lt I eeb)le race., unlike their 'zire, so brave,
riWho scorn'd Ihe name of cun aid and ul 'ial

n M ei 'l u,:ri i .-ii < -'s. "[h,_ .\l|il[ ll. ], Ii li ll t r,..ighi
nj,r.I. Il,." Il", h,, I, l ,: f.hll l, [l' ,, % ld,.l I: .,b-,ut 6.,70 m i
l]ong, andl hi. b -adJld :r in. lit l r I,.l t'- ,in ,: .-'ulp.,
hih.:_e and Il!.- AtClit-rl.!i. ;il.i. it k i- t. i ) mi
S l.ioa'. 'I he prinii|d ri'-' e t [', '.. l I ilr,
Var. andJ iII.: .di.:t.
R,:, 'I I. ,.'tb:i" l'l-, t1 "u.i- r,-. Naipe 'lire
A l.iii t f'.,':ir- r wit l railtrn,. M suia, arid m ra.tise
Sit ily.
T ". nL.IJ>:ru Itali.ir In';, ,:.|p'- civ< rounlict ancj
a I t We-i -p 'p-uriirrtd. aiild hC IIt il,.,iarh gramc in Ui





i L