Dr. Watts's Hymns and moral songs for the use of children

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Material Information

Title:
Dr. Watts's Hymns and moral songs for the use of children
Physical Description:
xii, 66 (i.e. 69) p. : ; 15 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Watts, Isaac, 1674-1748
Publisher:
(s.n.)
Place of Publication:
London
Publication Date:
Edition:
3d ed. ...

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1791   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1791
Genre:
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
revised and altered by a Lady ; to which are added, Prayers for the use of children.
General Note:
Without music.
General Note:
Bound with: Hymns in prose for children / by the authors of Lessons for children, 1799; and Practical instructions for youth, 1791.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 027209177
oclc - 41924382
System ID:
AA00021454:00001


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Full Text

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MORAL SONGS.






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DR. W A T T S's






MORAL SONGS

FOR THE USE OF

C H I L D R E N,

3Ugbifte' ant' 2Itarbt,

B Y A L A D Y.

TO WHICH ARE ADDED,

P R A Y E R S

FOR THE USE OF

C H I L D R E N.

THE "THIRD EDITIOn.TRAIN UP A CHILD IN THE WAY HE SHOULD GO: AND WHEN HE IS OLD, HE WILL NOT DEPART FROM IT.
PROVERBS xxii. 6.


LONDON:

PRINTED MDCCXC-I














PR E F A C E.



DR. WATTS'S Divine Songs have been defervedly much admired for their eafy and familiar verfification; and have received an honourable testimony of their anfwering the design of the benevolent author, from the pleafure and avidity with which they are generally received by thofe children, into whole hands they have been put.

It is, however, the duty of parents and teachers to inform the mind and underfianding of children, as well as to pleafe their ears ; and, in certain exercifes of the memory, to inculcate religious truths, as well as moral virtues.
A 3 In





(vi)
In this view, Dr. Watts's little book has been confidered ap very defe&ive, or rather erroneous, by great numbers of ferious chriftians; for though it has been very credibly reported, and generally believed, that he changed many of his religious opinions before his death, neverthelefs, there are retained in his book fome particular do&rines and phrafes, which his better judgment would probably have corre6led, or expunged.

But, be this as it may, the prefent editor has judged it expedient to make many alterations in both thefe refpecls.

It has been her principal defign to confine all the afcriptions of praife and thankfgiving to the one only living and true God, to whom alone all praife and thankfgiving are due. In this the apprehends herfelf to be fupported by the religion of nature, and by the word of God.
In





( vii )
In the religious infiru&ion of children, efpecial care should be taken to inculcate upon their minds, the high importance and fupreme authority of the fcriptures in all the concerns of religion among chriftians; and that the written revealed will of God, fo interpreted as to be confiffent with itfelf, can alone determine any religious queftion or opinion. Nor is it oflefs confequence to their right underflanding the new Teftament, to have their minds deeply impreffed with the UNITY of Gon,-that he is one felf-exiftent and all-fufficient being, the firfi and only caufe of all things,
-the creator and governor of the world. And this should be done, not with a view to retain the child in any particular fe& or body of chriftians, but, becaufe from there confiderations he will fee the harmony and fufficiency of revelation, and become a chriftian and a proteftant from the rational conviction of his own mind, and not from





( viii )

from a blind or implicit confidence in others. Under the impreflion of thefe truths, he will be led, from his reverence of the deity, and his firm belief in the revelation of his will by Jefus Chriff, to exhibit that amiable and exemplary behaviour and conduct in his future life, which will refle& honour on his faith, make him an happy and ufeful chara&er in the world, and prepare and qualify him for the unfpeakable blifs of heaven.

Thefe principles, the editor has endeavoured to teach her own children, with all the folicitude and affedion of a parent committing the fuccefs of all her care and pains to the blefling of almighty God. It is for the further early advancement of TRUTH, and for the better accommodation of others in the fame fentiment with herfelf, that they are now committed to the prefs. In doing this, though fhe has exceeded her original






(ix)
original defign, which extended not beyond the infltruffion of her own children, fhe has alfo confulted the inclination and earned defire of him who mutually shares in the teaching the firft principles of the chriftian religion unto their common offspring. And, without seeking more than the approbation of a few private friends, fhe expeas no praife from the very humble, though fometimes, not unufeful province of an editor.

NOVEMBER 17, E. Y.
1785.









C 0 N T E N T S. xi

1. A GENERAL HYMN OF PRAISE TO GOD, I I.ON THE WORKS OF CREATION' AND PROV IDENCE, -. 3
Ill. ON THE MERCIES OF GOD, 1 IV. PRAISE FOR BIRTH AND EDUCATION
IIIN A CHRISTIAN LAND, 7
V. PRAISE FOR THE GOSPEL, -9 V1. THE EXCELLENCY OF THE BIBLE, 1O V1I. ON LEARNING TO READ, 11
ViII. THE ALL-SEEING GOD, 14 IX. SOLEMN& T14OUGHTS OF GOD AND DEATH 16 X. HEAVEN AND HELL, 8
XI.TIE ADVANTAGES OFEARLY RELIGIOIlg X11. THE DANGER OF DELAY, 21
XI11. EXAMPLES OF EARLY PIETY, 22 XIV. ON LYING, 24
XV. PEACF AND LOVE RECOMMENDED, 26 XVI. LOVE BaETWEEN i)ROTHERS AND SISTERS,. -'2
XVII. USING CROSS WORDS AND ANGRY
NA bE S, 29
XVIIL.AGAIN iT SWEAR ING,ANDCURSlNG,
AND TAKINGGOD'S NAME IN VAIN, 30 XIX. ON INDUSTRY, 32
XX. ON EVIL COITPANY, 33
XXI. ON THiE VANITY OF DRESS5, &C.






xii CONTENTS.

XXII. OBEDIENCE TO PARENTS, 37 XXIII. THE CHILD'S COMPLAINT, 38 XXiV. A MORNING HYMN, 40
XXV. AN EVENING HYMN, 41
XXVI. FoR THE LORD'S DAY MORNING, 42 XXVII. FOR THE LORD'S DAY EVENING, 44
THE TEN COMMANDMENTS~ 46
THE SUM OF THE COMMANDMENTS, 46 OUR SAVIOUR'S GOLDEN RULE, 47 DUTY TO GOD AND OUR NEIGHBOUR, 47 DOXOLOGIES, 4
SONG
I. THE SLUGGARD, 49
II. INNOCENT PLAY, 51I
III. THE ROSE, 53
IV. THE THIEF, 54 V. THE ANT OR EMMET, 56
VI. GOOD RESOLUTIONS, 58
VII. A SUMMER EVENING, 61
FIRST MORNING PRAYER, 63
FIRST EVENING PRAYER, 64
SECOND MORNING PRAYER, 6;
SECOND EVENING PRAYER, 67
THE LORD'S PRAYER, 69






H Y M N S


FOR THE USE OF


C H I L D R E N.




HTMN I.

A GENERAL HYMN OF PRAISE TO GOD.

I.

How glorious is our heavenly king,
Who reigns above the fky!
How flhall a child prefume to fing
His dreadful majeffy ?

If.
How great his pow'r is, none can tell,
Nor think how large his grace;
Not men below, nor faints that dwell
On high, before his face.
B III. Not






2 Da. WVATTSS HYMms FOR CHILDREN,

III.
Not CHRIST beloved of the Lord
Cou'd fearch his fecret will;
But he performed his heav'nly word,
And fpoke his praifes fill.

IV.
Then let me join this beft of men,
And my firft offrings bring; Th' eternal GOD will not difdain
To hear an infant fing.

V.
My heart refolves, my tongue obeys,
And angels hall rejoice,
To hear their mighty maker's praife
Sound from a feeble voice.








HYM N





REVISED AND ALTERED. 3


HYMN II.

0N THE WORKS OF CREATION AND

PROVIDENCE.

I.
I SIN th' almighty pow'r of GoD,
That made the mountains rife, That fpread the flowing feas abroad,
And built the lofty fkies.

II.
I fing the wifdom that ordain'd
The fun to rule the day;
The moon shines full at his command,
And all the liars obey.

III.
I fing the goodnefs of the LORD,
That fill'd the earth with food: He form'd the creatures by his word,
And then pronounc'd them good.
B 2 IV. LORI






4 DR. WATTS'S HYMNS FOR CHILDREN,

IV.
LORD, how thy wonders are difplay'd,
Where'er I turn mine eye! If I furvey the ground I tread,
Or gaze upon the fky

V.
Here's not a plant or flow'r below,
But makes thy glories known; And clouds arife and tempefts blow,
By order from thy throne.

VI.
Creatures (as nurm'rous as they be)
Are fubjet to thy care;
There's not a place where we can flee,
But GOD is prefent there.

VII.
In Heav'n he fhines with beams of love,
The fame in worlds beneath! 'Tis on his earth I fland or move,
And 'tis his air I breathe.
VIII. His






REVISED ANIS ALTERED.

14II.
His hand is my perpetual guard;
He keeps me.with his eye:
Why should I then forget the LORD,
Who is for ever nigh?



H Y M N IlL


ON THE MERCIES OF GOD.


I.
WHENE'ER I take my walks abroad,
How many poor I fee!
What hall I render to my GoD,
For all his gifts to me?

II.
Not more than others I deferve,
Yet GOD hath giv'n me more;
For I have food, while others flarve,
Or beg from door to door.
B 3 III. How






6 DR. WATTs's HYMNS FOR CHILDREN,

III.
How many children in the fireet,
Half naked I behold!
While I am clothed from head to feet,
And cover'd from the cold.

IV.
While fome poor creatures fcarce can tell
Where they may lay their head; I have a home wherein to dwell,
And reft upon my bed.

V.
While others early learn to fwear,
And curfe, and lie, and fteal;
LORD! I am taught thy name to fear,
And do thy holy will.

VI.
Are there thy favours day by day
To me above the reft ?
Then let me love thee more than they,
And try to ferve thee beft.
HYMN






REVISED AND ALTERED,


HI YMN IV.

PRAISE FOR BIRTH AND EDUCATION INi

A CHRISTIAN LAND.

I.
GREAT GOD, to thee my voice I raifek,
To thee my youngeft hours belong, I would begin my life with praife,
Till growing years improve the fong.

II.
'Tis to thy fov'reign grace I owe
That I was born on Britifh ground; Where fireams of heavenly mercy flow,
And words of fweet falvation found.

III.
I would not change my native land
For rich Peru with all her gold; A nobler prize lies in my hand,
Than eaft or western Indies hold.
IV. How






8 DR. WATTS'S HYMNS rOR CHILDRENp

IV.
How do I pity thofe who are,
Where ignorance and darknefs reign! They know no heav'n, no ill they fear,
Nor lafting joy, nor dreadful pain.

V.
Thy glorious promifes, O LORD!
Kindle my hopes, and warm my heart; While all the teachers of thy word
Forbid me from thy law to part.

VI.
Thy praise hall fRill employ my breath,
Since thou haft mark'd my way to heav'n; Nor will I run the road to death,
And wafte the bleflfings thou haft giv'n.








HYMN






REVISED AND ALTERED. 9


HYMN V.

PRAISE FOR THE GOSPEL.

I.
LORD I afcribe it to thy grace,
And not to chance as others do,
That I was born of CHRISTIAN race,
And not a heathen, or a jew.

II.
What would the ancient jewifh kings,
And jewifh prophets once have giv'n, Could they have heard thofe glorious things,
Which CHRIST reveal'd and taught from
heav'n !

III.

How glad the heathens would have been,
Who worthipp'd idols, wood, and Iot.e, If they the book of GOD had feen,
Or JEsus, and his gofpel known!
IVo Thcn,






IO DR. WATTS'S HYMNS FOR CHILDREN,

IV.
Then, if this Gofpel I refuse,
How hall I e'er lift up mine eyes ? For all the gentiles and the jews
Againft me will in judgment rife.



HYMN FI.


THE EXCELLENCY OF THE IBLE:.

I.
GREAT GOD! with wonder and with praife,
On all thy works I look;
But ftill thy wifdom, power and grace,
Shine brighteft in thy book.

II.
The liars, which in their courses roll,
Have much inftruffion giv'n;
But thy good word informs my foul
How I may get to heav'n.
Ill. The






REVISED AND ALTERED. II

IIL

The fields provide me food, and fhew
The goodnefs of the LORD; But fruits of life and glory grow,
In thy moft holy word.

IV.
There are my choiceft treafures hid,
There my beft comfort lies; There my defires are fatisfy'd,
And thence my hopes arife.

V.
LORD! make me underftand thy law;
She w what my faults have been; And from thy gofpel let me draw
A practice free from fin.

VI.
For there I learn how JmSs dy'd
To prove his gofpel true;
Not all the books on earth beside,
E'er fo much good can do.
VII. Then






I2 DR. WATTs's HYMNS FOR CHILDREN,

VII.
Then let me love my bible more,
And take a freih delight
By day to read thefe wonders o'er,
And meditate by night.



H T MN vIi.


ON LEARNING TO READ.


1.
'THE praifes of my tongue
I offer to the LORD,
That I am taught, and learn fo young,
To read his holy word.

II.

Thus I am brought to know
~'Tre danger 1 am in, By very early liabits made
The wretched flave to fin.
III. 0 GoD!


WLJ






REVISED AND ALTERED. 13

III.

O GOD! thy book fo good,
Informs me what to do;
Besides the knowledge of thy word,
It makes me holy too.

IV.
There I can read, and learn
How CHRIST, the fon of GOD, Has undertook our great concern,
And feal'd it with his blood:

V.
And that GoD reigns above,
And fends his fpirit down
To fhew the wonders of his love,
And make the gofpel known.

VI.
O let thy fpirit teach!
And may my heart receive
Thofe truths, thy faithful fervants preach,
And all wife men believe!
C VI. Thenr







14 DE. WATTS's HYMNS FOR CHILDREN,
VII.
Then hall I praife the LORD
In a more cheerful train,
That I was taught to read his word,
And have not learnt in vain.



H T M N VII.


THE ALL-SEEING GOD.

I.
ALMIGHTY GOD, thy piercing eye
Strikes thro' the shades of night, And my moft fecret acions lie
All open to thy fight.

II.
There's not a fault that I commit,
Nor wicked word I fay,
But i thy dreadful book 'tis writ,
Againft the judgment-day.
III. Ad





REVISED AND ALTERED.


And muft the crimes that I have done
Be read and publifhed there ? Be all expos'd before the fun,
While men and angels hear?

IV.

LORD! at thy foot alham'd I lie;
Upward I dare not look: Pardon my fins before I die,
And blot them from thy book.

V.
o may I then for ever fear
T'indulge a finfil thought,
Since the great GOD can fee and hear,
And writes down every fault.







C 2 HYMN






76 DR. WATTS'S HYMNS FOR CHILDREN,


HYMN IX.


SOLEMN THOUGHTS OF GOD AND DEATH.

I.
THERE is a GoD who reigns above,
LORD of the heavens and earth and feas I fear his wrath, I afk his love,
And with my lips I fing his praise.

II.
There is a law, which he hath writ,
To teach us all what we muff do: My life, to his commands submit,
For they are holy, juft, and true.

III.
There is a gofpel of rich grace,
Whence chriftians all their comforts draw: LORD, I repent, and feek thy face ;
For I have often broke thy law.
IV. There





REVISED AND ALTERED. I7
IV.
There is an hur when I miff die,
Nor do I know how foon 'twill come ; A thoufand children, young as I,
Are fleeping in the filent tomb.

V.
Let me improve the hours I have,
Before the days of youth are fled; There's no repentance in the grave,
Nor pardons offer'd to the dead.

VI.
Juf as a tree cut down does fall
To north or fouthward, there it lies; So man departeth at thy call,
Fix'd in the late wherein he dies.







C 3 HYMN





IS Da. WATTS'S HYMNS FOP CHILDREN,


HTMN X.


HEAVEN AND HELL.: I.

THERE is beyond the fky
A heaven of joy and love;
And all good children when they die
Go to that world above.

II.
There alfo is a fate,
Of mis'ry, grief, and pain;
Where wicked children long mufi wait,
And many years remain.

III.

Can fuch a child as I,
Efcape this wretched end?
And may I hope, whene'er I die, I hall to heav'n afcend?
IV. Then





RVIR'AXP A4TEE~D 19


Then will I read Wi pray,,
While I have life a'id brmagh Left I ffiou'4 be cut off to day,,
And fuffer after, 4et



H YM y-7(x1.


THE ADVANTAGES OF EARtY RE1J4lON.



HAPPY the child, whoe youngeft years,
Receive inftruion well;
Who hates th, finner's path, and fears
The road that leads to ill.

,if.
When we give up our youth to QOD,
'Tis pleafing in his eyes,:
A flower, when offer'd in the bu,
Is no vain facrifice.
III. 'Tis





20 DR. WATTS'S HYMNS FOR CHILDREN,

III.
'Tis eafy work, if we begin
To fear the LoaRD betimes;
While finners, who grow old in fin,
Are harden'din their crimes.

IV.
'Twill fave us from a thoufand fnares,
To mind RELIGION young;
It will preferve our following years,
And make our virtue firong.

V.
To thee, almighty GoD! to thee
Our childhood we refign;
'Twill pleafe us to look back and fee
That our whole lives were thine.

VI.
Let the fweet work of pray'r and praife
Employ our youngeft breath;
Thus we're prepared for longer days,
Or fit for early death.
HYMN





REVISED AND ALTERED .



H r MN XII


THE DANGER OF DELAY.

I.

WHY fhould I fay, 'Tis yet too foon
c To feek for heaven) or think of death?" A flow'r may fade before 'tis noon,
And I this day may l9fe my breath.

II.
If this rebellious heart of mine
Defpife the gracious calls of heav'nl, I may be harden'd in my fin,
And never have repentance giv'n.

IIL.
What, if GOD'S dreadful anger burn,
While I refuse his offer'd grace, And all his love to fury turn?
I never then hall fee his face!
IV. Tis






22 DR. WATTs's HyMus FOR CHILDREN,

Iv.
'Tis dang'rous to provoke a GOD !
Whole pow'r and justice none can wave: One froke of his almighty rod
May fend young finners to the grave.

V.
Then 'twill for ages be in vain
To cry for pardon and for peace: To wifh I had my time again,
Or hope his juftice to appeafe.



H Y MN XIII.


EXAMPLES OF EARLY PIETY.

I.
WHAT blefs'd examples do I find
Wrote in the word of truth, Of children, who began to mind
Religion, in their youth ?
II. JEStS,





REVISED AND ALTERED. 23

II.

JESUS, tho' now above the fky,
Beloved of his GOD;
Was once a child as young as I,
And kept his holy word.

III.
At twelve years old he talk'd with men,
(The jews all wondering fland) Yet he obey'd his parents then,
And came at their command.

IV.
Children a fweet hofanna fung,
And bleft their master's name;
They gave him honor with their tongue,
While fcribes and priefts defame.

V.
SAMUEL the child was wean'd and brought
To wait upon the LORD;
Young TIMo' Hyv betimes was :aught
To know his noly word.
VI. Then






4 DR. WATTS'S HYMNS FOR CHILDREN, VI.
T.9en why should I fo long delay
Vhat others learnt fo foon?
1 wili rnot pafs another day
Without this work begun.



H TMN XIV.


ON LYING.

I.

0 'tis a lovely thing for youth
To walk betimes in wifdom's way; To fear a lie, to fpeak the truth,
That we may truft to all they fay.

II.

But liars we can never trufl,
Tho' they should fpeakic the thing that's true; And he who does one fauIt at firft,
And lies to hide it, makes it two.
IIL Have





R'EVISED A1ND ALTERED. 25
Ill.
Have we not ~kown, or heard, or read,
How GoD abhors deceit and wrong ? How Ananias was firuck dead,
Catch'd with a lie upon his tongue?

IV.
So did his wifeSaphira die,
When fthe came in and grew fo bold, As to confirm that wicked lie,
Which, juft before, her husband told.

V.
The LORD delights in them who fpeak
The words of truth; but every liar Muff havehis portion in the lake,
That burns with brimftone and with fire.

VI.
Then letme always watch my lips,
And keep my tongue from fpetaking ill, Since GoD a book of reck'ning keeps
For wilful lies that children tell.
D HYMN






26% Da. WATTS'S HYMNS FOR CHILDREN,



H YMN XV.


PEACE AND LOVE RECOMMENDED.

1.
LET dogs delight to bark and bite,
For GOD hath made them fo;
Let bears and lions growl and fight,
For 'tis their nature too.

II.
But, children, you should never let
Such angry pafflons rife;
Your little hands were never made
To tear each others eyes.

III.
Let love thro' all your actions run,
And all your words be mild;
Live like GOD's well beloved fon, That fweet and lovely child.
IV. His





REVISED AND ALTERED. 27
IV.
His mind was gentle as a lamb;
And as in age he grew,
He grew in favour both with man,
And GOD his father too.

V.
That LORD of all, who reigns above,
Does, from his heavenly throne, Behold what children dwell in love,
And marks them for his own.



H MN XVL.


LOVE BETWEEN hROTHIERS AND SISTERS,

L
WHA'rEVER brawls diflurb the street,
There should be peace at home;
Where fifters dwell and brothers meet,
Quarrels should never come,
D 2 IL. Birds





28S DR.WATTS'S HYMNS FOR CILDRN~, II.

Birds in their little nefts agree;
And 'tis a shameful fight, When children of one family
Fall out, and fold, and fight, .

III.
Hard names at firfl, and threat'ning wort,
That are but noify breath,
May grow to clubs and naked fords,
To murder and to death.

IV.

Pafion and pride may tempt each one
To rage against another;
So wicked CAIN was hurry'd on
Till he had kill'd his brother.

V.
The wife will make their anger cool,
At leaft before 'tis night; But in the bofomrn of a fool
It burns till morning light.
VI. Pardon





REVISED AND ALTERED.
VI.
Pardon, 0 GoD! our childish rage, Our little brawls remove; That as we grow to riper age, Our hearts may all be love.



H Y MN XFII.


USINaCROSS WORDS, AND ANGRY NAMES.

I.
OuR tongues were made to blefs the LoRD,
And not peak ill of men;
When others give a railing word,
We muft not rail again.

II.
Crofs words and angry names are fure
To be chaflis'd at school;
For him they muff attempt to cure,
Who calls his brother, fool.
D 3 III. When





30 DR.WArTTS"S HYMw FOR CHILDREN,

II.
When 'lips hall dare be fo profane
To mock and jeer and fooff At holy things or holy men
The LORD will cut them offbE

IV.
Great GOb! howterrible art thou
To finners e'er fo young!
Grant me thy grace, and teach me how
To tame and rule my tongue.


H r TMN XFII.

AGAINST SWEARING, AND CURSING, AND TAKING GODb'S NAME IN VAIN.

I.
ANGELS, fhat high in glory are,
Adore thy name, almighty GOD! And fftners will be brought to fear
The dreadful terror of thy rod.
II. Still









Still then fhall, wicked children dare
-Abufi thy g'- t -,! gLrious, mneI And, when they're tanLgry, Ihall they fear, ~And, curfe their: fellows, and, blafphcuwe



How can~ they fand'.before thy face,
Who've treated thee with fuch difdain, While thou halt doom them to the place
Of forrow) mife"ry, "and pin?

IV.

Their wicked words thAll hurt them.; fore,.
For they muff lofe, the -ptirdon giv'n But I will praise -thee here, and hope
Thus to employ my' onguiv in heaV'n.

V.

My heart fliall be in paIn to hear
Wretches affront the LORD above'
'Tis- that great GOD whofe pow'r I fear;,
That heavenly father whom 1 love.
VI. if





32 DR.WA Ts's-HYMN FoR CHILDREN VI.
If my companions grow profane,
'll leave their friendship, when I hear Young finners take thy name in vain,
And learn to curfe, and learn to wear.



HY M N XIX.

ON INDUSTRY.


I.
Itow doth the little bury bee
Improve each shining hour, And gather honey all the day
From ev'ry op'ning flow'r!

II.
How fkilfully fhe builds her cell!
How neat the fpreads the wax! She labours hard to fore it well
With the fweet food the makes.
III. In






limv rsED AND ALITEXiID.


In works of labour or of (kiH,
I would be bufy too
We alwas find fomne mifchief ftill
For idle hands to do.

IV.

In books, or work, or healthful play,
Let my firfyears be pafs'd, That I may give for ev'ry day
Some good account 2t lf.







ON MVL -COMPAN~Y



WHY flmuld I joian with thofe in play,
In whom I've no deigkt;
Who curfe,.and fwear, but never pray .
Who call- ill .names' apA. fight?
II, I hate





34 DR.WATTS's HYMNS FOR CHILDREN, II.
I hate to hear a wanton fong,
Their words offend my years; I should not dare defile my tongue
With language fuch as theirs.

III.
Away from fools I'll turn mine eyes,
Nor with the fcoffers go;
I would be walking with the wife,
That wifer I.1 may grow.

IV.
Fromn one rude boy that ufed to mock,
They learn the wicked jefl;
One tainted fheep infe6&s the flock,
And poifons all the reft.

V.
My, GOD! I hate to live, or play
With wicked children here; Then let me not be fent away,
Where none but winners are.
HYMN





REVISED AND ALTERED.


H M N XXI.

ON THE VANITY OF DRESS, AND THE IMPORTANCE OF WISDOM AND VIRTUE.

I.
WHY should our garments, made to hide
Our parents' thame, provoke our pride? The art of drefs did ne'er begin,
Till EVE, our mother, learnt to fin.

II.
When firfi the put the covering on,
Her robe of innocence was gone; And yet her children vainly boat
In the fad marks of glory lof.

III.
How proud we are, how fond to fhew
Our clothes, and call them rich and new! When the poor fheep and filk--worm wore
That very clothing long before.
IV. The






DR. WATTS'S 11YmNS FOR CHILDREN,
IV.
The tulip and the butterfly I
Appear in gayer coats than I:
Let me be dreft Iine as I will, Flies, worms, and dflow'rs, exceed me fill.

V.
Then will I fet my heart to find
Inward adornings of the mind;
Knowledge and virtue, truth and grace,
Thefe are the robes of richeft drefs.

VL

No more hall worms with me compare;
This is the raiment angels wear; The fon of GoD, when here below,
Put on this bleft apparel too.

VII.
It never fades, it ne'er grows old,
Nor fears the rair, nor moth, nor mould; It tares no fpot, but fill refines;
The more 'tis worn, the more it shines.
VIII. In





SEVISED AND ALTERED. 37
VIII.

In this on earth would I appear;
Then go to heav'n and wear it there; GOD will approve it in his fight;
'Tis his own work, and his delight.



H Y M N XXIL


OBEDIENCE TO PARENTS.

I.

LET children that would fear the LORD#
Hear what their teachers fay;
With rev'rence meet their parents' word,
And with delight obey.

II.

Have you not heard what dreadful woes Are threaten'd by the LORD, To him that breaks his father's law, Or fcorns his mother's word?
E IL Vhat



I I I1 1






3 Da. WATTS's HYMNS FOR CHILDREN,

III.
What heavy guilt upon him lies!
How hateful is his name!
Who thus his parents hall defpife,
Will bring himfelf to fhame.

IV.
But they who worship GOD, and give
Their parents honour due,
Here on this earth they long hall live,
And live hereafter too.



H Y MN XXIII.


THE CHILD'S COMPLAINT.

I.
WHY fhould I love my fports fo well,
So conflant at my play,
And lofe the thoughts of heav'n and hell
And then forget to pray.
II. What





IEVISED AND ALTER D. 59

II.
What do I read my' bible for,
But, LORD! to learn thy will: And hall I daily know thee more,
And lefs obey thee fill?

III.
How fenfelefs is my heart, and wild I
How vain are all my thoughts Pity the weaknefs of a child,
And pardon all my faults.

IV.
Make me thy heav'nly voice to hear,
And let me love to pray ;
Since GOD will lend a gracious car
To what a child can fay.







E 2 HYMN






4o DR. WATTS'S HYMNS FOR CHILDREN,


H T N XXIp.


A MORNING HYMN.

I.
MY Gon, who mak'ft the fun to know
His proper hour to rife,
And to give light to all below,
Do'f fend him round tho fkies.

II.
When, from the chambers of the eaff,
His morning race begins,
He never tires, nor flops to reflt;
But round the world he flaincs.

'IT.

So, like the fun, would I fulfil
The bufinefs of the day:
Begin my work betimes, and flill
March on my heav'nly way.
IV. Give





REVISED AND ALTERED. 41

IV.

Give me, O LORD thy early grace,
Then hall I not complain
That the young morning of my days
Has all been fpent in vain.



HYMN XXV.


AN EVENING HYMN.

I.

As now another day is gone,
I'll fing my maker's praife;
My comforts ev'ry hour make known
His providence and grace.

-IT.

But how my childhood runs to wafe!
My faults, how great their fum! LORD! give me pardon for the paft, And firength for days to come.
E 3 III. I lay






42 DR. WATTS'S HYMNS FOR CHILDREN,
III.
I lay my body down to fleep;
Thy goodnefs guards my head,
And thro' the hours of darknefs keeps
A watch around my bed.

IV.
With cheerful heart I clofe my eyes,
Since GOD will not remove ; Then in the morning let me rife
Rejoicing in thy love.



H T M N XX'.


,'OR THE LORD'S-DAY MORNING.

I.
Tins is the day when CHRIST arofe,
So early from the dead;
Why should I keep my eyelids clos'd, And waffe my hours in bed?
II. This







II.
This is the day when JEsus broke
The pow'r of death and fin; And {hall I love the finaier's yoke,
-Nor heed the road I'm in?

III.
To-dayF with pleathre dhriftians meet
To pray, and heir the word: And I would go with willing feet
To learn thy will, 0 LORD.

tV.
I'll leave my port, to read and pray,
And fo prepare for heav'n:
0 may I love this holy day
The beft of all the feven!







HrMN?





44 DR. WATTS's HYMNS rox CHILDREN,



H Y MN XXYII.


FOR THE LORD'S-DAY EVENING.

I.
LORD, how delightful 'tis to fee A whole affembly worship thee! At once they fing, at once they pray; They hear of heav'n, and learn the way.

II.
I have been there, and fill will go: 'Tis like a little heav'n below: Not all my pleafure or my play Shall tempt me to forget this day.

III.
I'll fix upon my mem'ry, LORD! The texts and do6trines of thy word ; That I may break thy laws no more, But love thee better than before.
IV. With






lEjvISED AND A~TMERIED. 45
IV.

With thoughts of Cn nI sv and things divine Employ this youthful heart of mine; That hoping pardon thro' his word, I may lie down and wake with GoD.
























THlE






( 46 )


THE TEN COMMANDMENTS, OUT OF THE
OLD TESTAMENT, PUT INTO SHORT
RHYME FOR CHILDREN.

EXODUS, chap. xx.

I. THOU flialt have no more gods but me.
2. Before no idol bow thy knee.
3. Take not the name of GoD in vain.
4. Nor dare the Sabbath-day profane. 5. Give both thy parents honour due. 6. Take heed that thou no murder do.
7. Abftain from words and deeds unclean. 8. Nor fteal, tho' thou art poor and mean.
9. Nor make a wilful lie, nor love it. to. What is thy neighbour's, dare not cove


THE SUM OF THE COMMANDMENTS, OUT
OF THE NEW TESTAMENT.

MATT. XXii. 37.

WITH all thy heart love GOD above, And as thyfelf, thy neighbour love.
OUL






MORAL AND RELIGIOUS MAXIMS- 47


OUR SAVIOUR'S GOLDEN RULE.

MATT. vii. 12.
BE you to others kind and true) As you'd have others be to you; And neither do, nor fay, to men, What'er you would not take again.


DUTY TO GOD AND OUR NEIGHBOUR. LovE GOD with all your pow'r and strength,
With all your heart and mind:
And love your neighbour as yourfelf,
Be faithful, juff, and kind.
Deal with another, as you'd have
Another deal with you;
What you're unwilling to receive,
Be fare you never do.







DOX-






( 48 )


DOX OLO G I E S,

BY

DR. SAMUEL CLARKE.

AS PSALM 25.

To GOD, through CHRIST, his favor'd fon, Immortal glory be, As 'twas, and is, and fhall be fo, To all eternity.


AND,

AS PSALM 100.

To Gon, thro' Chrift, his fon, our LORD, All glory be therefore, As in beginning was, is now,
And fhall be evermore.




MORAL






(49)

MORAL SONGS.

SONG 1.

THE SLUGGARD.

I.

'Tis the voioe of the fluggard; I hear him
complain:
c You have wak'd me too foon, I muft
flumber again."
As the door on its hinges, fo he, on his bed, Turns his fides, and his fnoulders, and his
heavy head.

II:.

< A little more fleep, and a little more
flumber."
Thus he waftes half his days, and his hours
without number;
-And when he gets up, he fitsfolding his hands, Or walks about faunt'ring, or trifling he
fltands.






50so MORAL soNGS
III.

I pafs'd by his garden, and faw the wild
briar,
The thorn, and the thiftle grew broader and
higher:
The cloths that hang on him are turning to
rags;
And his money flRill waftres, till he ffarves or
he begs.

IV.

I made him a vifit, fill hoping to find He took better care for improving his mind: But he talk'd of his dreams, his eating and
drinking;
He farce reads his bible, and never loves thitumg.








V. Then





FOR THE USE OF CHILDREN. 51
V.

Then I faid to my heart, here's a leffon
for me:
That man's but a pi&ure of what now I
fhould be;
If my friends, whom I thank for their care in
my breeding,
Had not taught me betimes to love working
and reading."

SONG I.

INNOCENT PLAY.
I.

ABRtOAD in the fields, when we fee the
young lambs,
Run sporting about, by the fide of their dams, With fleeces fo clean and fo white; Or a neff of young doves in a large open
cage,
Where they play all in love, without anger
or rage,
How much may we learn from the fight!
F2 If. If






MORAL SONGS

IL.
If we had been ducks, we might dabble in
mud;
Or dogs, we might play till it ended in
blood;
So foul and fo fierce are their natures; But F**** and J****, and fuch pretty
names,
Should be cleanly and harmless as doves, or
as lambs,
Thofe lovely fweet innocent creatures.



By the things that we do, or the words that
we fay,
Let us ne'er hurt another, in jefting or play;
For he's ftill in earneft that's hurt.
How rude are the boys that throw pebbles
and mire!
There's none but bad children will meddle
with fire,
And tell you 'tis all but in portt"


0N G





FOR THE USE OF CHILDREN. 53

SO N G III.

THE ROSE.

I.

How fair is the rofe! what a beautiful flow'r!
The glory of April and May:
Yet the leaves are beginning to fade in an
hour;
They wither and die in a day.

II.

But therofe has one powerful virtue to boat,
Above all the flowers of the field;
When its leaves are all dead, and its fine
colours loil,
Still how fweet a perfume it will yield!

III.

Thus frail is the youth and the beautyofmen,
Tho'they bloomandlook gaylike therofe. So all our fond care to prefErve them is vain;
Time kills them as fail as he goes.
F 3 IV. Then





$ MORAL SONGS

IV.
Then I'll not be proud of my youth or my
beauty,
Since both of them wither and fade:
But gain a good name, by well doing my
duty;
This will fcent like a rofe when I'm dead.


ONG yIV.

THE THIEF.

I.
WHY fhoul I deprive my neighbour
Of his goods, against his will?
Hands were made for honeft labour,
Not to plunder or to fteal.

II.

'Tis a foolifh felf-deceiving
By fach tricks to hope for gain; All that's ever got by thieving
Turns to forrow, flame, ad pain.
III. Oft

6L.-





FOR THE USE OF CHILDREN,


Oft we fee a young beginner
Pra6life little pilfering ways,
Till grown up a harden'd firmer;
Then the gallows ends his days.

IV.
Theft will not be always hidden,
Tho' we fancy none can fpy: When we take a thing forbidden,
GOD beholds it from on high.

V.
Guard my heart, 0 GOD of heav'n!
Left I covet what's not mine; Left I fteal what is not giv'n.
Guard my heart and hands from fin!







SONG






56 MORAL SONGS

SONG .

THE ANT OR EMMET.

I.

THESE emmets, howlittletheyareinoureyes!
We tread them to duft, and a troop of
them dies
Without our regard or concern: Yet, as wife as we are, if we went to their
fchool,
We've many a fluggard, and many a fool,
Some leffons of wifdom might learn.

IL

They don't wear their time out in fleeping
or play,
But gather up corn in a fun-flhiny day,
And for winter they lay up their scores: They manage their work in fuch regular
forms,
One would think they forefaw a'! the frofts
and the forms,
And fo brought their food within doors.
III. But





FOR THE USE OF CTILDREN. 57
III.

But I have lefs fenfe than a poor creeping
ant,
If I take not due care of the things I hall
want,
Nor provide against dangers in time.
When death or old age fhall flare in my face, What a wretch hall I be in the end of my
days,
If 1 trifle away all their prime!

IV.
Now, then, while my firength and my youth
are in bloom,
Let me think what will ferve me when licknefs fhall come,
And pray that my fins be forgiv'n.
Let me read in good books, and believe,
and obey,
That when death hall defiroy this my cottage of clay,
I may dwell in a palace in heav'n.


SONG






5 MORAL SONGS


8ONG FL


GOOD RESOLUTION$.

1.
THOUGH I'm now in younger days,
Nor can tell what thall befall me, I'll prepare for ev'ry place
Where my growing age hall call me.

II.
Should I e'er be rich and great,
Others flhall partake my goodnels; I'll fupply the poor with meat,
Never chewing fcorn or rudenefs.

Il.
When I fee the blind or lame,
Deaf or dumb, I'll kindly treat them I deferve to feel the fame,
If I mock, or hurt, or cheat them.
IV. If






FOR THE USE OF CHIL REN. 59 IV.

If I meet with railing tongues,
Why should I return them railing ? Since I beft revenge my wrongs
By yy patience never failing.

V.
When I hear them telling lies,
Talking rudely, curfing, fwearing; Firif I'll try to make them wife,
Or I'll foon go out of hearing.

VI.
What tho' I be low and mean,
I'll engage the wife to love me, While I'm modeft, neat and clean,
And fubmit when they reprove me.

VII.
If I fhould be poor and fick,
I fhail meet, I hope, with pity, Since I love to help the weak,
Though they're neither fair nor witty.
VIIi. I'll





60 MORAL SONGS

VIII.
I'll not willingly offend,
Nor be eafily offended;
What's amifs I'll irive to mend,
And endure what can't be mended.

IX.
May I be fo watchful fill
O'er my humours and my pafflion, As to fpeak, and do, no ill,
Tho it should be all the fashion.

X.
Wicked fafhions lead to hell.
Never may I be found complying; But in life behave fo well,
As not to be afraid of dying.







SONG






FOR THE USE OF CHILDREN. 6t




8 0 N G FI.



A SUMMER EVENING .


T.

How fine has the day been, how bright
was the fun,
How lovelyand joyful the courfe that he run, Tho' he role in a miff when his race he
begun,
And there follow'd fome droppings of
rain!
But now the fair traveller's come to the
weft,
His rays are all gold, and in beauty he's dreff; He paints the fky gay, as he finks to his
reft,
And foretels a bright rifing again.

G II. Juff





BS MORAL SONGS*

II.
Juft fuch is the chriftian: his courfe he :
begins,
Like the fun in a mift, while he mourns for
his fins,
And melts into tears : then he breaks out
and tfhines,
And travels his heavenly way:
But when he comes nearer to finifh his race, Like a fine fetting fun, he looks richer in
grace,
And gives a full hope, at the end of his days,
Of rising in brighter array.












PRAYER.&





(63)



P R A Y E R S.




FIRST MORNING PRAYER.

ALMIGHTY God, the maker of every thing in heaven and earth! the darknefs goeth away, and the day-light cometh at thy command. Thou art good, and thou doeft good continually. I thank thee, that thou haft taken fuch care of me this night, and that I am alive and well this morning. Save me, 0 Lord, from evil, all this day long, and let me love and ferve thee for ever. Below upon me every thing that I have need of, both here and hereafter. Make me always afraid to offend thee, and let me live and die in thy favour. Hear the prayers of a child, 0 Lord, and pardon all my fins, according to the promifes of thy mercy, declared unto mankind by Jefus Chrift our Lord. Amen.
G 2 FIRST






64 P RAY E R S.




FIRST EVENING PRAYER.


0 LOD God, who knowefr all things, thou feeqt by night, as well as by day. I pray thee forgive me whatever I have done amifs this day, and keep me fafe all this !hight while I am afleep. I defire to lie down under thy care, and to abide for ever under thy bleffing; for thou art a God of all power and everlafting mercy. Blefs all my friends, my father and mother, &c. as well as myfelf ; do good to them at all times, and in all places ; help me always to ferve them in love: and, having done thy will, and enjoyed thy favour on earth, give me a place in heaven, to dwell with thee and with thy fon Jefus Chrift : for heaven and earth, and all things in them, are thine for ever and ever. Amen.



SECOND





P R A Y E RS. 6;




SECOND MORNING PRAYER.


0 ALMIGHTY God, who art my father .and friend, and the father and friend of all mankind; I thank thee for all the good things thou haft done for me. Thou haft made me what I am, and given me whatever I have: thou haft taken care of me, and provided for me, all the days of my life. Thou haft granted me quiet repofe through the paft night, and brought me in fafety to this morning. To thy goodnefs I am indebted for food and raiment; for a healthful body and a contented and cheerful mind; for affeffionate and faithful friends; for the op. portunities I enjoy of improving in knowledge and goodnefs ; and for all the bleffings of my life.

I defire to (hew, that I am truly thankful for all thy mercies, by b -'Lavin, at all
G 3 times,






.66 P R A Y E R S.

times, as a dutiful child unto thee my father in heaven. May I honour and obey my parents, and never forget the things which they have done for me. May I love my companions and friends, and be kind and obliging to all around me. incline me to pity the poor and needy, and to take pleafure in doing good. Teach me to feek after ufeful knowledge with diligence; and to receive the counfels and infitruaions of my friends with humility and thankfulnefs. Let my heart be free from malice and envy, and my tongue from falfehood and deceit. As I advance in years, may I increafe in wifdom and goodnefs; that I may be a comfort to my friends, and ufeful in the world; and that I may be happy both in this life and that which is to come, through Jefus Chrift our Lord. Amen.






SECOND





PRAYERS. 67



SECOND EVENING PRAYER.


0 GOD, the giver of life and of all good things, whole tender mercies are over all thy works; unto thee do I give thanks, for thou haftil been mindful of me, and haft bleffed me. I thank thee for all my powers of body and mind; for the continual prefervationofmylife; and, moreefpecially, for the mercies of the pafl day. I thank thee for the kindnefs of my parents and friends; for their useful inffru1ions and good examples; for all the bleffings of a virtuous education. Above all, L thank thee,that thou didft appoint thy chofen meffengerand fervant Jefus Chrift to infiruct mankind; and that by him I am taught to hope for the pardon of my fins, and everlaffing life.

Forgive, 0 merciful father, whatever I have done amifs. Affift me to avoid all fuch things





68 PRAY ERS.

things as are evil, and at all times to do that which is good. Keep me under the care of thy providence this night, and the remaining part of my life; beftow upon me fuch things as thou knoweft to be beft for me; secure me againLft the fares of the wicked, and the influence of evil examples'; enlighten my underflanding ; purify my heart; strengthen and confirm my good refoa lutions; and enable me to preferve my integrity as long as I live,


Blefs my parents and relations, and all my friends; reward the kindnefs of fuch as have done me good; fhew compaffion to thole who are in affli&ion and diftrefs; and have mercy upon all men.

Now unto thee, the father of all, be glory and praife for ever. Amen.



THE





R A Y E R S. 66



THE LORD'S PRAYER.


OuR father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name; thy kingdom come; thy will be done on earth, as it is in heaven : give us, day by day, our daily bread ; forgive us our
-trefpaffes, as we forgive them that trefpafs against us ; and lead us not into tempation, but deliver us from evil ; for thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever and ever. Amen.





THE END.















HYM N




P R 0 S E


FOR

C H I L D-R E N.


BY THE AUTHOR OF

'LESSONS FoR CHILDREN.



A NEW EDITION,



ILONDON, PRINTED.

1799.














P R E F A C E.


AMONG the number of Books compofed for the ufe of Children; though there are many, and fome on a very rational plan, which unfold the fyftem, and give a fummary of the do6trines of religion; it would be difficult to find one calculated to affift them in the devotional part of it,. except indeed Dr. W#'atts's Hymns for Children. There are in pretty general ufe, and the author is defervedly honoured for the condefcenfion of his mufe, which was very able to take a loftier flight. But it may well be doubted, whether poetry ought to be lowered to the capacities of children, or whether they should not rather be kept from reading verfe, till they are able to relifh good verfe: for the very effence of poetry is an elevation in thought and ftyle above the common flandard ; and if it wants A 2 this






IV PREFACE.
this charaaer, it wants all that renders it valuable.

The Author of thefe Hymns has therefore chofen to give them in profe. They are intended to be committed to memory, and recited. And it will probably be found, that the meafured profe in which fuch pieces are generally written, is nearly as agreeable to the ear as a more regular rhythmus. Many of there Hymns are compofed in alternate parts, which will give them fomething of the fpirit of focial worship.

The peculiar defign of this publication is, to impress devotional feelings as early as poffible on the infant mind; fully convinced as the author is, that they cannot be impreffed too foon, and that a child, to feel the full force of the idea of God, ought never to re.. member the time when he had no fuch idea
-to imprefs them by conneaing religion. with a variety of fcnfible4objecs; withall that be fees, all he hears, all that affeas his you mind






PREFAC E. V
mind with wonder or delight; and thus by deep, firong, and permanent afociations, to lay the beft foundation for practical devotion in future life. For he who has early been accustomed to fee the Creator in the vifible appearances of all around him, to feel his continual prefence, and lean upon his daily prote6tion-though his religious ideas may be mixed with many improprieties, which his corre&ter reafon will refine away-has made large advances towards that habitual piety, without which religion can fcarcely regulate the condu6l, and will never warm the heart.


L.B.









A 3 aYMs




i l l tItIl i - ... .....










The little birds fing praises to God, when they warble fweetly in the green thade.

The brooks and rivers praife God, when they murmur melodioufly amongfi the smooth pebbles.

I will praise God with my voice; for I may praise him, though I am but a little child.

A few years ago, and I was a little infant, and my tongue a dumb within nA mputh:

S And I did not know the great name of God, for my reafon was not come unto me.

But now I can peak, and my tongue hall praife him j I can think of all his kindnfs, and my heart hall love him,

Let him call me, and I will come unto him: let him command, and I will obey him.
When






[ o ]
The young goflings are running upon the' green, they arejuff hatched, their bodies are covered with yellow down; the old ones hifs with anger if any one comes near.

The hen fits upon her neft of firaw, fhe watches patiently the full time, then tflhe carefully breaks the hell, and the young chickens come out.

The lambs juif dropt are in the field, they totter by the fide of their dams, their young limbs can hardly fupport their weight.

If you fall, little lambs, you will not be hurt; there is fpread under you a carpet of foft grafs, it is fpread on purpofe to receive you.

The butterflies flutter from bufh to bufh, and open their wings to the warm fun.

The young animals ofeverykind are fporting about, they feel themfelves happy, they are glad to be alive,-they thank him that has made them alive.
They





[ t t ]

They may thank him in their hearts, but we can thank him with our tongues; we are better than they, and can praife him better.

The birds can warble, and the young lambs can bleat; but we can open our lips in his praise, we can peak of all his goodnefis.

Therefore we will thank him for ourfelves, and we will thank him for thofe that cannot fpeak.

Trees that bloffom, and little lambs that fkip about, if you could, you would fay how good he is; but you are dumb, we will fay it for you.

We will not offer you in facrifice but we will offer facrifice for you; on every hill, and in every green field, we will offer the facrifice ofthankfgiving, and the incenfe of praise.


A 6 HYIMN











fIrMN lil


BEHeOLD the Shepherd of the :flock, he taketh care for his fheep, he leadeth them among clear brooks, he guideth them to frefh pafture; if the jioungr lambs are weary, he carrieth them in his arms; if they, wajider, hie brircgeth themn back.

But who is, the fiephezd's Ifhepherd ? who taketh carc for him ? who guideth bim in the path he should go.- and, if. he wander, who fhaaU brimg hhtn back?

Gco is the flieplherd's Thepherd'. He is the Shepherd over all; he taketh care for all; the Vhoje earth is his -fold: we are all h is Ra~ck; tnd every hqrb 'and everygreen field is the- paflure which he bath prepared for us.

Thw








The mother loveth her little child; the bringeth it up on her knees; the nouritheth its body with food; the feedeth its mind with knowledge: if it is fick, the nurfeth it with tender love; the watcheth over it when afleep; the forgetteth it not for a moment; the teacheth it how to be good; the rejoiceth daily in its growth.

But who is the parent of the mother? who nouritheth her with good things, and watcheth over her with tender love, and remembereth her every moment? Whofe arms are about her to guard her from harm? and if the is fick, who hall heal her?

God is the parent of the mother; he is the parent of all, for he created all. All the men, and all the women who are alive in the wide world, are his children; he loveth all, he is good to all.

The king governeth his people he hathd a golden crown upon his head, and the royal fceptre






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fceptre is in his hand; he fitteth upon a throne, and fendeth forth his commands; his fubje&s fear before him; if they do well, he protea. eth them from danger; and if they do evil, he punifheth them.

But who is the fovereign of the king? who commandeth him what he muft do? whole hand is firetched out to prote( him from danger? and if he doeth evil, who fall punish him?

God is the fovereign of the king; his crown is of rays of light, and his throne is amongft the flars. He is King of kings, and Lord of lords: if he biddeth us live, we live; and if he biddeth us die, we die: his dominion is over all worlds, and the light of his countenance is upon all his works.

God is our Shepherd, therefore we will follow him: God is our Father, therefore we will love him: God is our King, therefore we will obey him.
HYMN