The most surprising adventures, and wonderful life of Robinson Crusoe, of York, mariner

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Material Information

Title:
The most surprising adventures, and wonderful life of Robinson Crusoe, of York, mariner Containing a full and particular account how his ship was lost in a storm, and all his companions were drowned, and he only was cast upon the shore by the wreck; and how he lived eight and twenty years in an uninhabited island, on the coast of America, &c. With a true relation how he was at last miraculously preserved by pirates, &c. &c. &c
Uniform Title:
Robinson Crusoe
Physical Description:
144 p. : ill. ; 15 cm. (12mo)
Language:
English
Creator:
Defoe, Daniel, 1661?-1731
Publisher:
by Isaiah Thomas and sold at the Worcester bookstore.
Place of Publication:
Printed at Worcester, Massachusetts
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Castaways -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Survival after airplane accidents, shipwrecks, etc -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Shipwrecks -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1795   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1795
Genre:
Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Worcester

Notes

Citation/Reference:
Evans
Citation/Reference:
Welch, d'A.A. Amer. children's books,
Citation/Reference:
Brigham, C.S. Robinson Crusoe,
General Note:
Ascribed to the press of Isaiah Thomas by Welch.
General Note:
Signatures: A-M⁶ (A1 recto blank).
General Note:
"Farther adventures of Robinson Crusoe."--p. 86-132. "Robinson Crusoe's vision of the angelick world."--p. 133-144.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 025067237
System ID:
AA00021429:00001

Full Text

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ROBINSON C RUSO0E,
After being call away was daffied againft Rocks to whic Ieheld fait until the wave wa3 ;jbat~j and then with gea~ adigIcilty xmbk, tke Land.





THE MOST SURPRISINC

D V EN TUVR ES,ANDP WONDERFUL


LIFE




ROBINSONGRUSOE,

Of YORK, MARINER.

CONTAINING

A full and particular Account how his ship
was loft in a Storm, and all his t ompanions were Drowned, and he only was cafE upon the Shore by the Wreck; and how he lived eight and twenty Years in an uninhabited Ifland, on the Coaft of America, &c.

WV I T H

A true Relation how, he was at WaE miracu..t
loufly preferved by Pirates., 4-c. &c. &c.




PRINTED 2 a [UCtftZ;, AtASSACHUSSTTS, At And SOLD at thdWORCESTER) BOOKSTORE.

(1795-1




PR EFA CE.

thsne rdineteof the f lifeand

I think myfeyf obliged to acquaint the r-eader-,
hat all poffikle care has beex taken to preferve the hiflory entire, to correHl fame tn!/lakes informer imp reffons, and to add a con #de rable number of fatis and material o/~fervations that have of Wae occurred, and were never pubV/hed but in this e~l. tion,
The general fucccfs and the juft applau'fe thi roork at large has met within, render 2t niedles for 2fe to _fay any thing in its commendationn; nor do
-think the weak exceptions that have been made a,gainfR tbe poffibility of thejory, derve any objervation. ,What if the'whole ias (as is~fuggSfted) a inere fiffion P Yet the defign isjo july carried en, and Jo interjperfed with curious observations and moral rqleffions, that allfierfons who have any :tafleor the xhetaphorical way of- writing, iMuJt saloz this a mnafter-piece, and I will venture tofoy, the firft and beft of the kind that ever appeared in the Engl~rk language.
But as I hope the performance rtillfpeak better
iits own favour than any body can pretend to do, Jiall not trouble, the reader, nor nzyfelfb with ufelefs apologies, or attemptt to pet/uade any one into an Apit Of a work Jo univerfaLly ejiened.
L!t this abridgement,' th ith is con t r47ed into as itarrow a compafs as po~le, be butI read over with that con!fideration and fidatenefs whic h the natzire of the de~zgn deroes, and thep there is no doubt to be made, but the candid redder wilifind a fuficient return both frr his trouble and expenfe; and with the cautions, and upon this prefumptio~I, Ifuhmzit thefollowingjeets to Ais perufal.










T H

E AND AD -VNTURES



ROBf iN CRUSOE.



HE that pretends to publifh to the world an
account of his own life and adions, is doubtlefs under the ftrongeft obligations to confine himfelf within the flri&eft rules of modetty and truth: And this, I can affurethe publick, I moft folemnly determine to do in the following narration.
I was born at York, in the year 1632, of a reputable family. My father was a merchant, born at Bremen ; his original name was Kreutznaer, which for the fake of the Englifh pronunciation, was afterwards changed into Crufoe. My mother's name was Robinfon, a native of the county of York; and for that reafon I was called Robinfon, after her maiden name.
I was the youngest of three brothers. The eldeft was an officer, and killed in the wars in the Low Countries; and the other I could never learn any thing of. My father intending me for the law, particular care was taken of my education : But all the pains and expenfe were to no purpofe; my inclinations
A were






6 IR B I VSS0%

were bent another way, mnd nothig would ferve my turn, but at all hazards, I muft g6 to fea.
My father and mother were both violdntlr against it, and ufed a thoufand arguments to diffuade me; but it was all to no Furpofe My resolutions were fo firmly fettled, that neither the intreaties of a moft teider father, nor the tears of an affectionate minoth er, 'culd make anyimpreffion upon me.
I was then about nineteen years old, when mrneetig with one of my fehoolfellows at Hull, who was going with his father, who was mrafter of a fhip, to London, I acquainted him with my refolutions, and he readily promifed me I should have a free paffage, and be pr(,vided with all other neceffaries fuitable to the voyage. Accordingly, without imploring a bleffing of my parents, I took shipping on the firft of September, .651.
Our fhip was hardly got clear of the Humher, when we were overtaken by a violent form; and, being extremely feafick, I began to reflect upon my father's good advice, and the happinefs of a middle fate of life which he propofed to me; refolving, if ever I should be fo happy as to fet my feet again upon dry land, that I would return to my parents, and beg their pardon, and bid a final adieu to my wandering inclinations.
There were my thoughts during the form: But that was no fooner over, but my good refolutions decreafed with the danger, particularly when my companion, coming to me, afked me if I was not a little frighted by the form, Ayhich as he expreffed it, was only a cap






CL U SO E.

-ap full~of win.- Come boys (fays he) turn out, fee what fine weather we have now, and a good bowl of pinch will drown all your paft forrows."
In thort, the punch was made, and I got fairly drunk, and then all my former refolutionsand notions of returning home vanifhed. I remained hotheaded feveral days, until I was roufed up by an accident, that had very near put a final end to my wandering refolutions.
Upon the fixth day, we came to an anchor in Yarmouth road where we lay windbound with feveral other veffels from Newcaftle but there being fafe anchorage, aLd our
ip being tight, and our cables good, the failors defpifed all dangers, and were as mnerry in this flation as if they had been on Ifhore. But on the eighth day there arofe fach a ftrong gale of wind as prevented our riding up the river, which till increafing, our fhip rode forecaftle in, having flipped feveral large feas.
It was not long before a general horror feized the feamen ; and I heard the master cry, Lord have mercyuponus, we hall all be lof 'or my part, I kept my cabin, very fick, till the dreadful apprehenfions of fudden death made me come upon deck, and there I was teriblv afrighted indeed.
The fea went mountains high, and nothing was to be expe&ed but unavoidable defiruction. Two of the hips had already cut their naftls by the board ; two more had loft their rnchors, and were forced out to the mercy of the tempeff ;,and we, to fave our lives, were forced






8 ROBINSON
R 0 A r N" SV Nforced to cut away both our foreinat and mainmaft.
It is eafy to judge the condition I was in, who being but a frefh water failor, was in a far worfe cafe than any of them. Our fhip was very ftrong, but, as I underflood by them, too heavy laden, which made the failors cry out, She would founder.
The ftorm continued extremely violent ; and in the middle of the night I could hear fome crying out, That the fhip had fprung a leak ;" others, That therewas four feet water in the hold." I was ready to give up the ghoft through fear, when on a fudden all hands were called to the pump, and I among the












Whilft we were all in this confufion and diffrefs, the malfter happened to efpy fome light colliers, and fired a gun asa fignal of our mifery. I was not then a failor good enough to know the meaning of the gun ; but I foon underflood it was a token of ourextreme danger, and I muff freely own it is impoflible for me to describe the agonies I laboured under.
J-lappy






Happy it was for u4 that in the form they regarded our final, and with a great deal of hazard put out their long boat, and by wonderful Providence faved our lives, butwith the greateft difficulty; for we had hardly geot into the boat, but we faw our fhip fink to the bottorn, and we had infallibly been every foul drowned if they had not come in that very nick of time to our affiflance.
It was not without a great deal of danger and difficulty that they recovered their own 1hip. However, they made a thift to land us at a place called Cromer, near Winterton lighthoufe; from whence we all walked in a moft miferable drowned condition to Yarmouth, where the good people furnifhed us withneceffaries either for London or Hull.
I have often thought fince, that it was very Range that after thefe great misfortunes at, fetting out, I did not (like the prodigal) return to my father, who having heard of the fhip's misfortune, had all the,reafon in the world to think I was loft. But my ill fate flill pulfhed me on in fpite of all the firong convi&ions of reafon, confcience and experience.
After three days flay at Yarmouth, I met the young man that invited me to go on board with his father. I found his face and his behaviour very much altered; and I found likewife he hl told his father who I was, aud that I had taken this voyage only for a trial, in order to proceed farther abroad hereafter.
When the old man law me, fays he," Young man, you ought never to attempt to go to fer any more; for, depend upon it, you never will be profiperous in a feafaring condition.
You





to R OB JNIVS N

You fee what ill fuccefs- Heaven has fet befor your eyes; and perhaps our misfortune may in fomrne meafure be owing to you. Pray (added he) tell me truly upon what motive you firft undertook this voyage." Upon this I* told him the whole; at the end of' which he broke out into the following exclamation:
"Oh, ye eternal powers what great offence have I committed, that I should take fuch a defperate, abandoned wretch into my thip, that has brought all thefe miferies and misfortune, upon me !" After his paffion was a little abated, proceeded-" Youg man, depend upon it, if you do not return, and fubmit to your parents, wherever you go, the anger of God will certainly purfue you, and you will meet with nothing but ruin and difafter, until your father's words are fulfilled upon you." And fo he left me.
And now again I had fome notion of returning home : But that was quickly overruled by a foolifh opinion, that if I did, my neighbours and acquaintance would laugh at me. So firange is the nature of youth, that though they often do foolih thing-s without either fhame or remorfe, yet at the fame time they are afhamed to own their folly, and repent.
In fhort, I made the beft of my way to London, being at all hazards refolved upon a voyage; and being acquainted with tire captain of a fhip, a voyage I foon heard of to the coat of Guinea. Having fome money, and appearing like a gentleman, I did not go on board like a common failor, but foon got fo far int the captain's favour, that he told me I should he his mneffmiate, and Ihould have full liberty to





CR U SO 2.

r to carry with me what merchandife I fhould ay think fit, and todifpofe of it to my own advand- tage.
>u I was wonderfully, pleafed with this kind
Offer, and concluded that now I had an op:h portunity of making my 'fortune; and in ordler to my voyage I fent to my friends for
:e fome money to fit me out ; who accordingly
a remitted me forty pounds, which I laid out in at goods according to his direions. He taught
a me to keep a journal, and feveral of the moft a- ufeful parts of navigation. And indeed, by S his affiftance and my own induffry, in. this
voyage I became both a failor and a merchant. d Part of this voyage I was exceflively fick of
a calenture, occafioned by the heat of the cliLr mate, being in the latitude of almost 15 ded grees north of the line. However, I recovered, and managed my little flock fo well, that
.. I brought over with me five pounds and nine
ounces of gold duft, which produced at Lons don near three hundred pounds fterling.
0 Soon after my return, my good friend the
l1 captain died. Although this was a very great
r grief to me, yet I refolved to go another voyage -. ith his mate, who had got the command of the fhip. This voyage proved a very u~nfaccefsful one. I carried with me about one hundred pounds, and left the reft with the captain's widow, and fo to fea we went. But as we were failing towards the Canary iflands, we found we were chafed by a Salee rover, who in fpite of all the fail we could make, rin a fhort time came up with us; and now there
:was no rem-ady but to fight or be taken.
They





12 0 ROBINSO N

They had i8 guns, and our fhip but 12. however, about three in the afternoon, w, came to an engagement. Many were killed on both fides ; but at length being overpowered by their numbers, we were forced to fubmit, and all carried into Salee. Our men were fent to the Emperour's court to be fold ; but the captain of the pirate, taking a particular liking to me, kept rme for his own flave,
It was in this miferable condition that my father's words came afrefh into my remem brance, and my thoughts were continually at work to make my efcape. My patron entruffed me with the management of his garden and houfe ; and indeed I was not without hopes but at fome time or other an opportunity might offer. The woril of it was, I had no mortal to communicate my thoughts to; and fo for two years, I could find nothing pra&icable.
In length of time, I found my patron was grown fo poor, that he could not fit out his fhip as ufual; and then he ufed conflantly once or twice a week to go out a filing, taking me and a Morifco boy to row the boat; and fo much pleafed was he with my dexterity in fifhing, that he would often fend me with a Moor, hlis kinfman, and the boy, to catch fiih for him.
One morning as we were at the fport; there arofe fo thick a fog that we loft our way, and rowing all night, when it was light we found ourfelves at leaft two league in the ocean; however, we made a fhift to get on fhore But, to prevent the like misfortune for the future) my patron. ordered a carpenter to build littIe





CR USO0 E.

little ftate room in the middle of the long 1C boat, with a place behind toi fleer, and other
S conveniences to keep out the weather.
r In this he wouldoftentake us out a fit ing
t, and one time particularly, he invited three or re four perfons of diftintlion to go along with ut him, and made extraordinary preparations for ar their entertainment : Providing alfo three fuzees, with a fufficient quantity of powder and y fhot, thattheymight have fome fport at fowling' a as they paffed along the fhore. The next mornat ing the boat being in readinefs, on a fudden
S their minds altered. However, my patron Ordered us to go and catch a dith of fifl ; for t that he was refolved his guests hold fup with
i him.
S And now it was that I began to think of my ; deliverance; and in order to it, I perfuaded
the Moor to. get fome provifions on board, and alfo fome powder and flot to fhoot curlJews, which were very plenty in thofe parts.
I took care to provide privately whatever elfe I could think was the moft neceffary for the prefent expedition, refolving to make my efcape, or perifh in the attempt.
When we were pail the caftle, we fell to
Sfifhing, and I flood farther into the fea ; and h when we were got at leaf a league, I gave the
boy the helm, and feized Muley by furprife,
and-tfhrew him overboard : Muley (faid yI) I never defigned you any harm, and feek Nothing but my redemption; I know you are able to fwimrn to fhore ; but if -you offer to
follow me, that very moment I will fhoot you
Through the head :" Upon which he inflantR Iy





14 1R 0 B I N SO0 NV

ly turned about, and I make no doubt but hbe got fafe to fhore.









f1


This a&ion frighted the poor boy exceedingly ; however, I loon eafed him of his fear, by telling him if he would be a good boy, and fwear by Mahomet, and the beard of his father to ferve me faithfully, I would be very kind to him." The poor child feemed wonderfully pleafed with my promise, and readily confented; and from that time I began to love him entirely.
WVe purfued our voyage, keeping fRill on the Barbary coaft; but in the dufk of the evening, I changed my courfe, steering direftly S. and by E. that we might always be near the fhore ; and having a pleafant gale, I found the next day, by three in the afternoon, we were 150 miles beyond the dominions of the emperor of Morocco ; yet fill I was under dreadful apprehenfions of being retaken.
I continued failing for five days together, until I concluded that if any veffel was in purfet of me; I was got fo far to the fourhward that





C R USOE. 15

that they would not think proper to follow
me any farther.
After all this fatigue, I anchored in the
mouth of a little river ; but where I knew not, neither could I fee any people to make the difcovery. What I chiefly wanted was frefh water, which I refolved to go on fhore to find out as foon as it grew dufkilh : But no foonerdid it begin to grow dark, but we heard fuoch howlings and yellings of wild beats and mor, fters, that I muft needs own I was exceedly terrified.
Poor Xury paffionately begged me not to
go on fhore that night. The boy had a great deal of wit; for which, and fome broken English which he had learned among the captives of our nation, I was mightily pleafed with him. Neverthelefs, the howlings, and bellowings were fo dreadful that we had but Y little reft that night ; and to add to our confufion, we difcovered one of the monfters
S making towards us ; upon which I took up
one of my guns and fhot at him, whether I hit him or not, I cannot fay-but be made towards the fhore, and the noife of my gun increafed
the fRupendous noife of other iponfters.
r The next morning I refolve4 to go on fhore,
Sand at all hazards get fomre frefh water.
The poor boy would have taken one of the j ars and fetched fome ; but I refufed, tellr iog him we would both go together and
take the fame fate; and accordingly we took our arms, and two jars for water, and away
we went.
d I did not go out of fight of the boat for fear
the favages fhould come down the river it their




6 0 B I N S N

their canoes, and take it away; but the boy feeing a vale a little farther, ventured to it, and returning with precipitation, I thought that he was either parfued by the favages or fome wild beat ; upon which I ran towards him, refoliving to perilh, or preferve him; but as he came nearer to me, I faw a creature hanging at his back, like one of our hares, but something larger, which proved to be good and wholefome meat, and what added moif to ourjoy, the boy affured me that there was plenty of freih water in the very creek where the boat lay.
In this place I began to confider that the Canary iflands and Cape de Verd could not be far off ; but having no iniftrument, I knew not in what latitude we were, or when to ftand off to fea for them. My hopes were to meet fome of the Englifh trading veffels, that would confequently take us in, and relieve us.
The place I was in was doubtlefs that wild uninhabited country that lies between the emperor of Morocco's dominions and the negroes it abounds with wild beafts of all forts, and the Moors ufe it for hunting. From this I thought I fav mount Teneriffe in the Canaries, and tried twice to feer my courfe that way, but was as )ften dritn back, and compelled to feek my fortune along the fhore. SOne morning vefIy early we came to an anchor at a fmatll point, and the tide beginning to flow, we were preparing to go farther in; but Xury, whole youthful and penetrating eyes faw farther than 1, defired me to keep out to fea, or we fh6uld be devoured. "For look yonder, mafter (faid he) and fee dat hug moniter





C RU8 OE. 1

i monfer fath alleep on de fide of de hill: He
pointed to the place, and I difcovered a lion of prodigious fize balking himfelf under the r fhade of a hill. "Xury (faid I) you hall go
s on fhore and kill him ;" the boy looked amazed ; Me kill him (faid he) he eat me at
Sone mouth," meaning mouthful. Upon which
I took my bigger gun, and charging it well,
Shot at him, and broke one of his legs ; and
then with a fhot from my other gun I killed
him.




!






But the flefh of this creature not being
good for food, I thought this was fpending our ammunition in vain ; indeedI thought the Ikin when it was dry, might be of fome ufe, and fo determined to flea it off, which took
up a whole day to effe&.
From thence we went to the fouthward, refolving to live fparingly on our provisions, and go on fhore as feldom as poffible, my defign being to reach Gambia or any other place about the Cape de Verd, in hopes to meet fome European fhip ; and if Providence did
B z 'ot





R8.! 0 B I -V S 0 Ar

not faVotnr~me ;n this, my next re-folution was to feek for the iflands. and venture myfeif aM-ong the 7Negroes ; ftr without one of thefe, 1 could liax-e no other proper& but flarving.
As we wete failing pretty near the lore, we could difcor'er feN-eral peopic upon : loofing after us. We could peieeive thty were blacks, naked and unarmecd, zall exet pt one, who had fomnething in his har0d like a flick, which Xury told me was a lane, witnr which they, could kill at a gteat diflance. I was snclinabic to ha-ve 'gone on [illore, but X--ury cried "4 No, no." However, I Grew as nrezs to the fhare as I could, -nd talked to them by figns. till I m-ade them ferifiblt I wanted fornething ; they mdc flgns to mne to flop my boat, whilfi two of then ran up into the country, anid in lefs than half an hour brought me two pieces of dry flei, and fame corn, which we kindly' ac eoted ; and to prevent any fears, they laid it down, and went and flood at a diftanie t'fl we hztd fetched it on board, and then can-e cio0fe up to us again.
But While we were returning thanks to thevi, being all we could afford, 0two mighty creatures came from the mountains in purfuit of each. other -, they paifed the nelgroes with great Fviftnefs,andjurnped direly into the fea, vvantonily fwimmi ng about, as if the water had put a?,o to their fury. At Ltat one of thein corrg nearer to the boat than I defired, I tock one of iny guns and let fly at him and killed

I cannot exprefs the conrflernation of the ge:Ncroes, Upon heariyng the report of the gun





CRUSOE. 1

gun ; nor their furprife at feeing the creature fiain by it. I made figns to them to draw it out of the water by a rope, which they accordingly did ; and then I perceived it to be a beautiful leopard, which made me defirous of the fkin ; and the Negroes being no lefs defirous of the fiefh, I freely gave it them. As for the other (which was likewife a leopard) it made hack to the mountains with prodigious fwiftnefs.
The Negroes having furnifned us with the beft provifions that the nature of the country ard circumftances would allow, I took my leave of them ; and in eleven days fail I came in eight of Cape de Verd, or thofe ilands that go by thatname; but could not by any means reach either of them. Upon which I grew extremely deje&ed ; when Xury (with a fort of terror) cried out, Maitro, Mafiro, a great 1hip with a fail !" I foon perceived 1he was a Portuguefe, and, as I conjedured, bound to Guinea for Negroes; upon which I frove all I1 could to come up with themrn; but all my itriving had been in vain, if they had not happened to efpy, and shortened their fail to flop for me.
Encouraged by this, I fet up my ancient, and fired a gun, -both as fignals of diftrefs; upon which they kindly lay to, till I came up with them. It happened there was a Scotch failor on board, to whom I made my cafe known ; and then, they took me into their Thip.
You may well imagine my joy was exceedinglygreat for this unexpected deliverance ofpecially when I found the captain of the 'hip





k'ROBINSON It 0 B I N 9 0 N

thip was very kind and compaffionate to me to whom, in return for his friendfhip, I offer ed all I had, which he generoufly refufed telling me, his Chriftian charity taught him better. There effe&s you have (fays he will be a means to fupport you when you some to the Brazils, and 'provide for you paffage home to your native country." An indeed he a&ced with ftri& juffice to me i all refpe&s.
He bought my boat of me, and gave me hi note to pay me eight pieces of eight for i when we came to the Brazils. He alfo gave Sme fixty for my boy Xury, from whom I part ed with great reluaance ; however, the ho, being willing, I agreed he should be fet a liberty after ten years fervice. We arrived at the bay of All Saints, afte 22 days fail. The good man would not tak any thing for my paffage. He gave me 2 ducats for thb leopard's fkin, and 40 forth lion's. Every thing he caused to be delivered, and what I would fell he bought. In thort I made zno pieces of my fmail cargo; al with this little Rock, I began as it were to en ter anew into the world.
HIe recommended me to an honeft planter with whom I lived till I had informed my felfin the manner of planting and makin fuigar ; and obferving the great advantages C that bufinefs, I refolved to get the money had left behind me in England remitted, an to buy a plantation.
In fhort, I purchafed a plantation adjoinin to an honeft- Portuguefe, born of Englil pla rents, whom upon all occasions I found a ve kind





C R U S 0 E.

kind and ufeful neighbour. Our flocks at r firfR were both very low ; neverthelefs, by our
Siduftry and care, it a fihort time we made confiderable improvements, and began to grow rich. And now it was I repented the lofs of my dear boy Xury ; having no mortal to affift me, nor any body to converfe with but Smy neighbour.
I was in foine meafure fettled, before the captain that took me up, left the Brazils. One i day I went to him and told him'what flock I
had left in London, and defired his affiftance in getting a remittance : To which the good gentleman readily confented, but would have me only fend for half, left it should mifcarry, and if it did the reft -would fupport me. So taking letters of procuration from me, he allured me he would ferve me to the utmoft of his power ; and in truth he kept his word, and
Swas extremely kind to me on all occafions.
And now my wealth began to increafe aA
pace; and in this fate I might have lived very happy, if my ambition and roving inclination had not had too great power over me.
I had now lived fome years in the Brazils; and I not only learnt the language, but contra&ed an acquaintance with feveral of the mofi eminent merchants at St. Salvadore, to whom relating the manner of my two voyages to Guinea, and the great advantage of trading in thofe parts, they gave fuch earrieflattention to what I faid, that there came one morning, and told me that they hid a mind to fit out a !hip to go to Guinea, and if I would go their fupercargo, and manage the trade, I should have







have an equal fare without putting in an'

This I took to be fo fair a proposal, that upon condition they would look after m plantation in my absence, I confented to it and accordingly, a thip being fitted out, and all things in readinefs, we let fail the firft o September, 1695, feering northward upon thb coaft of Africa. But many days we had not failed, before we were overtaken by a violent form, which lasted 12 days fucceffively When the weather cleared, we found our felves 11 degrees in the northern latitude, up on the coaft of Guinea; upon which the captamir gave reafons for returning, which I op pofed, counfelling him rather to fland awa for Barbadoes, where I judged we might ar rive in fifteen days. So altering our courf we fleered weftward, in order to reach th Leeward Iflands ; and here it' was we were o vertaken by a terrible tempest. In this great diffrefs, one of our men cried out, Land land !" When, looking ou that very moment, we found our fhip wa Rruck upon the fand, and expe&ed we should link, and that we should be all immediatel loft. Weknew not where we were driven, an what was worfe, were certain the thip coul not hold out many moment's longer.
Whilft we were looking upon one another expecting death every moment, the mate,affi ed by the crew, hauled out the long boat, an eleven of us committet ourfelves to the fury o the fea, 4nd God's mercy. We foon foundtha this laf effort was to no purpofe; for the temi peft was fo violent, and the fea ran fo very hig that





CRUSO g

That it was implffible for the boat to livie. When we had been driven about a leagues came a a prodigious wave aftern, and overfet us in-i a
infant, fo that we had hardly time to call upon
_God to receive our fouls.
S When men are fitruggling with the pangs of death they are commonly infenfible: But the cafe was quite different with me; for while I Swas overwhelmed with the water, I had the moft dreadful apprehenfions. and the joys of heaven and the torments of hell were alternater ]y ini'my thoughts, and yet fill I kept ftiving
on, while all my companions were loft, till the wave had fpent itfeif, and, retiring, had thrown me upon the thore, half dead with the. great quantity of water I had taken in during my r itruggiing ; however, I got upon my feet as faith as I could, left another wave should carry mr back: But notwithifanding I made all the fpeed I could, yet another wave came, which dafhed me againfl a piece of a rock in fuch a furious manner that it made me fenfelefs : However (recovering a little before the return of the next wave, which would doubtlefs have carried ume off) I held faft hold of the rock till the fucceeding wave abated, and then I made fhift to reach the main land ; where, tired and almoft fpent, I fat down contemplating the manner of my
prefent prefervation.
After I had returned my thanks to almighty
God for this wonderful preferwation, I began to look about me, to confider what. place I was in, and what was next to' be done in order to-my future fubfiftence. I could neither fee hlouf nor people; wet and hungry, and nothing to help me, not fo much as a weapon to defend me acamint





R? 0 2 1, X 3 0'2V

sgainji the wild bealls. In fhort, I had4 iothui in the world hut a knife, a fliort tobacco pip and a box half full of tobaco ; and what wworfe, night coming on, I was under very gte apprehenfions of being devoured by wild beal that I heard hiowling and roaring round abG, men; fo that I had noc profpeat but to expeda other kind of death more terrible than that had fo lately eflcaped. In this diftrefs, I walk about a furlong into the country to feek fr .water, which 1 luckily happened upon ; fo ta ing to a tree, I feated rnyfelf to, that I coAi n .fall, and there I flept till morning.
It was~ day light before I left nmy apartmentl the trea; when, coming down, and looking round, Iperceived that the terrpe ft was cafe and that the fhip was driven to the rock whe I efcaped ; and looking further, I faw thel'hip, ~boat lying about a mile to the right where t waves had caft her up.
I hoped to have got to the boat ; but the w ter between that and the fhore rendered that i prafficable. So I tued again tow-zrds the fbi in hopes -to get fomnethiisg from thence for Pref Lent fubfiiftence.
At all hazards f resolved to get to the fbip and fo, firipping, kcaped into the water, an fwimming round her, I had the good fortune efpy a rope hanging fo low down that I coul reh it:. By the help of Mhich., with forne di ficultI got into th~e forecafle. Here I fou that the fhip was bulged, her hiead lifltedl a4gainI ft a ank, and htr Itexr al~mefIt'in the ter. ; all her quarter, and what was therC, w fre and dry; and I fonui& the pruvils Is




,C U LT 0 E. 25

good order, and wanted nothing but a boat to carry what I had occafion for. I Neceffity, which is the mother of invention, put a proje& into my head. There were on board several fpare yards, a [pare topmaft or W wo, and three large fpars of wood. With the-f I fell to work, flinging as many of them overboard as I could manage, and tied them together that they might not drive away. When this was done, I tied them together in form of a raft, and laid three or four fhort pieces of plank on them croffways. I found it would bear ime, but very little weight befides .; and fo, to firengthen my raft, I cut a topmaft into three or four lengths, and added them to it; and then I confidered what was moTt proper to load it with, it being then capable of carrying a toleraable weight.




410 61!




e6 ROBINSON

At firit, I laid upon it all the boards I c6uld get, and then I lowered down three of the feamen's chefs, and filled them with provifions of all forts. I found clothes enough, but then I took no more than my prefent occafion re. quired.
My concern was chiefly upon tools to work with, and fire arms and ammunition; and accordingly I found in my fearch, the carpenter's cheft, and in the great cabin fome fire arms and ammunition, all which I put on board dy raft ; and lo, with two broken oars, &c. I put to fea.
Though every thing at firfI feemed to favour my defign, yet after I had failed about a mile, [ found on a fudden the forepart of my raft run aground, fo that it was with the greateft dilculty imaginable I kept my cargo tight together ; and indeed if I had not been extremely diligent and careful, all had been loft and funk into the fea : But after fome time, Providence fo ordered it, that at the rifing of the water my raft floated again, and fo I happily landed my effeas.
Not far from the place where I landed, which was at the mouth of a little cave, I discovered a very high hill, furrounded with a great many little ones and thither refolved tO. go and view the country, and fee what place was prop. er for me to fix my habitation in ; and accord: ingly, arming myfelf with a fowling piece, a piftol aud fome ammunition, I afcended the mountains, and there found I was in an ifland, being furrounded by the fea. It feemed to be a barren uncultivated country, and only inhabitcd by wild beafts~,





CR USOE.

Returning afterwards to my raft, I got my f goods on fhore; and being very much afraid of
S the wild beats, I made a fort of fence or barricade about it, which I thought might in fome meafure secure me against the dangers I was apprehenfive of and fo that night I fleptvery comfortably, and the next morning when I awaked, I refolved to go again to the fhip to get fuch other neceffaries in as 1 had molt occafion for, before another form came, when I
knew fhe mufft be dafhed to pieces.
In order to this fecond expedition, I mended
my raft where I found it defective, and brought away from the [hip a great many other tools, clothes, ammunition, and whatever elfe I thought moft neceflary for my future prefervation and fubfiftence. Then I made hafte to ihore, fearing the wild beats might come and
devour what I had already landed.
When I had landed all the fecond cargo, I
fell immediately to work to make me a little tent, and fortified it in the beft manner I could, to fecure myfelf as much as poffible against any fudden attempt either from man or beaft. After this, I charged my fire arms, blocked up the doors, and laid the bed I had brought from the fhip upon the ground, and flept as comfortably
as though I had been in my native country.
But fill the thoughts of my future fubfiftence
and prefervation were uppermoft in my mind ; and therefore I went to the fhip as often as poffible, and brought away every thing -I thought could be of any ufe ; and indeed had fo ftored myfelf, that I judged I was tolerably provided
for for a confiderable time.
I





28 B 0 B IN S 0 V

I had now been eleven days in the ifland, an as many times on board the fhip ; as I was go. ing the twelfth time, the wind began to rife ; however, I ventured at low water, and with fome difficulty reached the (hip, and rummaging the cabins I found feveral other neceffariec, and among other things above 361. fierling iI pieces of e ght; which, confidering my present circumfilances, I concluded was of fmall value to me ; however, I wrapped it up in a canvas rag; and perceiving the flormbegan to increafe, with all that I was able to carry with me I made the heft of my way to the fhore.
That night I flept very contentedly in my little fortification; but when I looked out in the mor"aing, I found that the ihip was loft. I was very mruch concerned at this circumfitance ; but when reflekied I had done every thing in my power to recover what was useful to me, I comforted myfelf in the beft manner I could, and fubmitted myfelif entirely to the will of Providence.
And now my thoughts were wholly takev up how to defend and preferve myfelf from the ravages and wild beAfts, which I was extremely apprehenfive might be in fome part or other of this island ; and at one time I thought to dig me a cave, at another to build me a tent ; at length I resolved todo both, and accordingly contrived in the following manner.
I confidered the ground where I was, was moorifhf, and that I Jad no conveniences for frelh water; and therefore I determined to find a place more healthful and convenient ; and, to my great comfort and-fatisfa&ion, I loon found one that answered my expe1fation. The The





CR U SO E.

a The place was a little plain near a rising hill;
Sthe front being as fleep as the fide of a houfe. S On the fide of this rock was a little hollow l piece, resembling the entrance of a cave; juft
before this place I refolved my tent should ftand. This plain was a hundred yards broad,
S and twice as long, with a pleafant defcent evtt ery way to the feafide.. After this I drew-a e femnicircle, containing about ten yards in thedia ameter ; and when that was done I drove a
row of takes not above fix inches from each I other ; and by the help of my cables which I
had bought from the fhip, and fuch other ma.
- terials as I made ufe of, I made a fort of regua lar fortification, which I concluded was in a S great meafure impregnable against any fudden ; attempts either of favages or wild beafts ; and, t for my better security, I would have no doors,
I but came in by the help of a ladder, which I
S made for that purpofe.
f Into this little garrifon I carried all my flore
and ammunition, and afterwards continued to
S work. I not only made me a little cellar, but i likewife made my fortification stronger by the
earth and ftones I dug out of the rock. One'
day a shower of rain falling, attended with
thunder and lightning, 1 was under terrible apS prehenfions:left my powder should take fire,
and not only hinder me from killing fowls, which were necellffary for my fubfiftence, but
l ikewife blow me up and my garaifon at once;
the quantity I had by me confifted of abolb.
Weight at leaft. Having thus efLablithed myfelf as a king of the ifland, I went every day with my gun to fee what I could kill that was fit to eat, and foon perceived there were great C 2 numbers





30 ROBI NSON

numbers of goats, but they were thy ; however watching them very narrowly, I happened t thoot a fle goat as fthe was fuckling her youn one; which, not thinking her dam killed, foL lowed me home to my enclofure. I lifted the kid over the pales, and would willingly ha e. kept it alive, but the poor creature refuliog tc eat, I was forced to kill it for my fubfiftence.
Thus, entering into as odd a fate of life as ever befel an unfortunate man, I was continually refle&ingupon the mifery of my conadition; till at length considering there was no remedy, and that I was obliged to make the belt of a bad market, and withal refleding upon the many turnsof Providence in myparticular pref. creation, I grew more fedate and temperate.
It was, by the account I kept, the 3oth of September when 1 irft landed on this island. About twelve days after, fearing I fhould lore my reckoning of time, nay even forget the Sabbath, for want of pea, ink and paper, I carved it with a knife upon a large poft, in large let. ters, fetting it up in the limilitude of a crofs on the fhore where I landed, viz. 'I came to fhore, September 3Q, 1650." Every day Icuta notch on the fides of this fquare poft, and that for the Sabbath was as long again as the reft, and every firfl day of the month I kept my calendar, in weekly, monthly and yearly reckoning of time. But had I made more firi& fearch (as I afterwards did) I need not have let up this mark; for I found among the parcels helonging to the gunner, carpenter, and captain'as mate, thofe very things I wanted, where I got not only pens and ink, but likewise fea compaffes, and other mathematicainiruments ;and,abovc all





C R USIOE. 3t,

all the refi three Englifh Bibles, with Several other good Englifh books, which I carefully
1 ju up, ia order to mnake ule of them at proper
intervals. But here I cannot but call to mind
Sour having a dog and two cats otn board,,whom
I made i nhabitants with me in my cattle, 'But, notwitbitanding I was thus plentifully fupplied,
I f~ill wanted feveral other neceffaries, 'as s psoedies and thread, and more, particularly a
P~ckaxe and,,fhovel for removing the earth, &c, ~it, was a full year before I had finished my
ittle fortification: And after 1, had done that It in the beftmatiner thse nature of the place and n my circumaances would allow, I began to grow.% a little more, familiar with my, [olitudeo, and to confided~ of th~e belt methods poffiblo to ren d er my dc 'folate fate as eay as I could. 'And heru
it was.,I began the following journal.




L





EPTEMBER ;go, 1.650, 1 was famced by
ISJfhipwreck upon this defolate ifland, which I calledthe Ifl0;nd of Defpair. The next daay 1 [pent in reflecting on the sniferablenefs of my condition, which prefented to me nothing but decath, and the worit of deaths too, viz. either, to be flarved for want of viCuals, or to be del.
yottt~d by wild bcafts.





R, 0 B I N S 0 -X

Oaober To my great comfort I difco ered the fhip driven to the fhore, from when I had fome hopes that when the form was bated I might recover fomething towards prefent fubfiftence ; especially confiderng abferved the fhip to lie in a great meafure u right, arid one fide of her perfealy dry ; up ivhich I fell immediately to wading over t fands, and with great difficulty and danger got on board. To the 14th of this month, pent in making voyages backwards and o wards to and from the flip, the weather bei all the while very wet and uncertain.
OL. 20. My raft with my goods was ov fet ; mof' of which however i recovered low water.
Of. 25. It blew a fort of A form, and ral ed hard, to that the fhip dashed to pieces,' a nothing of her was to be feen but the ve hull at low water; and this day I thoug it proper to fecure the effeas I had prefer from tb:e weather.
OLt. 26. I wandered about to try if I cou find a place proper to fix my abode ; and a cordingly towards the evening, I found ou rock, where I judged I might ere& a wall a fortify myself.
November i. I placed my tent by the fi of a rock. and took up my lodging in a ha mock, very contentedly, for that night.
Nov. 2. I madea fence about my tent timber, cheft and boards.
Nov 3. I fhot two wild fowls, which pr ed very good meat; and the afternoon I m me a fort of a tablt.
Nov,!





CRUSOE. 33

Nov. 4. I began to live regularly. In the Morning I walked out for an hour or two, and
fterwards worked till about two, then ate my
inner of fuch provifions as I had. After diner I commonly flept an hour or two; andthe &L eather being extremely hot, I could not go "o work till towards the evening. t Nov. 5. I went out with my gun and the r og I had\brought out of the Ihip. I fhot a
ild cat----but her flefh was good for nothng-only I preferved her kin. 1 faw a great ock of wild birds; and was wonderfully terified at the fight of fome monfirous feals hich I faw on the fand, but as they faw me hey madeoff to fea.
Nov. 9. 1I finished my table. From the 7th Sthe 12th, the weather being fair, I worked cery hard: Only I relied upon the a2th~ which according to my computation, I took go be Sunday.
Nov. 13. The weather was very wet and
ormy, with tjundes and lightning. On the
"4th, I made provifion to fecare my powderhich I perfeaed on the 14th and 15th. The ~7th, I began to dig upon the rock, but was a revented for want of proper implements:
nd on the i8th I found a tree, the wood of Flhich was very hard-and out of that with the
reateft difficulty I made me a fort of fpaden doing it, I almoft fpoiled my axe, which
uight have been of ill confequence.
Nov. 2,3. When I had got my tools into
e bell order I could, I fpent all my time to he ioth of December in finifhing my cave; nad lay in my tent every night, unlefs the
eather was fo wet that I could not lie dry---





S B B I N S 0 N

and withal I had fo well thatched it over wi flags and the leaves of trees, &c. that I thou 2nyfelf tolerably fecure.
Dec. to. I had no fooner finished my h itation, but a great part of the roof fell in on me, and it was a great mercy I had perished in the ruins: And indeed it-gave a great deal of trouble before I repaired it e&ually-and after I had done what I cou I fpent feveral days in putting my things order-and had variety of weather to the 27
Dec. 27. In my rounds I chanced to m fome goats. I fhot one of them, and lau( another, which I led home, and bound up leg-in a little time it grew well, and was tame and familiar that it followed me ev where like a dog, which put the notion i mny head to bring up there wild creatures as, ten as I could take them alive, that I m have flock to fubftf upon in cafe I should 1I afer my powder was exhaufted.
Dec. 28, 29, 3o. The weather was fo v hot, that I was forced to keep within shelter.
January i. Though the weather contina Very fultry, yet neceflity compelled me to abroad with my gun. In the valleys I fo great numbers of goats; but they were fo v fhy, I could by no means come at one them.
From Jan. 3, to the 13th, my bufinefs to fearch the ifland, and to finifh my wall. my fearch I found great ntulbes of fo much like our Englifh pigeons. I fitot f of them, Which proved excellent food.
no





1C ,R C E0

"w it wag i providential thing hippehedjhid' was this!
Whilft I *as rumntagingmy mioveables, what 0uld fall into my hands but a bag, which I uppofe might be made tife of to hold cocr for i fowls in the fhip. I purpofed vi make uto, f it to hold tomne of the powvdbr,,and fo hook ut the duft and loofe corn upon one fide of he rock, not in the leaft fufpefting the conf-uence. The rain had fallen in groat qluant,es a few dAys before And the month' after, o my great f urprife; I difcovcrid foinething ring up very green ajid flourifliing;, and as Ii ame daily to view it; I faw feveraI cars of reen barley of the very fame fize -and fhapei thofe in England.
Mfy thoughts were vreryr much Confiifed at, is unexpe&ed fight And I mnut (own I had vanity to imagine that Providence had orered this on purpofe for my fubfifience. great were my acknowledgwonts and thar~klnefs to almighty Godi for his inercies to me this defolatc place which were infinitely ightened, when,, at the fasie time, I obferv,. Sforne rice flalks, wonderfully green and Durifhing ; which made he conclude herc' uft consequently be more corn in the ifland daccoidingly I fpeit feveral days in searching r it;, when at length it came into niy mind at I had Thaken the big on the very fpo here thofe blades of corn were growing.. It was about the latter end of June before efe ears of cor-n grewv ripe ; and then I laid em up exceeding carefully, expeding I fhould e day reap the advantage of this little crophkhI ulfcd all my ir.dtliiy to Improve and Yut





36 ROBINSONV

yetit was four years before I could eat any b ley bread, and much longer before I had at benefit from my rice. After this, with indefa gable care and industry, I finished my wal ordering it fo that I had no way to go into a fortrefs but by a ladder.
April 16. I finished my ladder, and we> up it, and pulled it after me, as I always did and, in truth had fo well fortified myself, th. I was as I thought, indifferently well fecure againft any furprife ; neverthelefs as I was o1 day fitting in my cave, there happened fu a fudden earthquake, that the roof of my litt fortrefs, that I had finished with fo much labc came tumbling down upon my head ; up which, with the greateft amazement, I ran my ladder, and got out of my cave, and f the top of a vaft rock fall into the fea, a expected every moment the whole ifland wou be fwaliowed up.
In this affright I remained for fome moment till I perceived the fury of the motion began abate ; but it was not long before I was un new apprehenfions, on account of a violent t peft that attended it. This dreadful form c tinued for about three hours, and then follo fuch a heavy rain, that my tent was quite ov flowed; upon which I concluded my habitat was ill fituated, and determined, as foon as p fible, to build me one in a more convene place.
April 9, 30, were fpent in contriving h and in what manner, I should fix my new ab and here I was under the greatest conc having no tool fitting for fuch an undertaki however




C RU 3O0E. 3

hoeeI fpent federal days in whetting and
gj-i~d~ng rni tools.
i ~ As I 'was walking along the fea
ide, I found a barrel of gun powder and diVers other pieces of Whe iliio-, whtcki the viojence -of the late ftorin had thrown on the, fand. I faw likeix 'fe the- remaining part of
d the {hip, thrown by the teinpef very near h the fhore, and refolvcd to get to her as IfIoon as r I could ; buL at that tone I found it iinpracticable.
I continued to work upon the wreck till the tt 24,1h, and every day recovered fomnething that
%vould be Of uCC to m-, and got togc!ei-e fo many planks, and fo Tnuon' iron, lead and oth-er ne~ceffarie that, if I had had tool.6 and fit ii, I
nght have bud:t me a boat ; which wa6 a
thmnd I very much wanted.
June -16. As I was firoll i rg towards ttse feas,
.1 found a large turtL :The 170-n 1 fient in cooking it :I found in her 70 eggs, and the
n fi the moft. dehtacu meath:?t thaL ever I tafled.
~' Thet :th, I flayed within the wh-ole daY, there S-being a continual rain, with forms of wind
and b ghtning.
Fromn the i 9th tQ. the 27th of TJune, I war
very fick, anid i-ad g t aterrbie ague, which
Li often held -ne f,;- nine or ten hoors u-th extree kn-i~.On the i8tri, 1I begsn torcov.-r aliz- bu was r iti in ti-e
nigt, nd I wole asOftn a laid my
eyes together, iwas toirmnted with hideous dreams anii drea lfal aorat-tions. It is inipof.
:31ie for mec to exprefs the a::611es I was under
by thttfl! ecpeated admonitions, as 1. took thsem,
tw be, M\1y father's adivic n epofc
snito




8 R 0 I I N S 0 N

into my mind, whether I would or not, an hocked me exceedingly, and would ofte make me refle& that thejuflice of God follow ed me, and that fevere punifhment was juft ly owing to my difobedience and wicked life
June 28. I flept pretty well moft part o the night, which refrefhed me very much In the morning I ate a bifcuit and drank fome water mixed with rum ; I boiled a piece o goat's fleth for my dinner, but ate very little and at night I fupped upon three of my tur tale's eggs ; after fupper I attempted to walk out with my gan, but found myfelf too weak and fo returned to my habitation.
Here conscience flew in my face, reprehend 2ng me as a blafphemer and a reprobate for faying in my agonies, What have I done to be diftinguifhed in all this fcene o ,mifery."-Methought I heard a voice anfwcr ing me, Ungrateful wretch Dare you ak what you have done ? Look upon your pa itfe, and then alk thyfelf, why thou waft no drowned in Yarmouth road, or killed by thq Sallee Rovers ? Why not devoured by wi beats in the defarts of Africa, or drowned ,,ere with the reft of thy companions ?"
Struck dumb by thefe fevere refie&ions, and fearing the return of my ague, I began a length to confider what was moft proper to b done, to free myfelf from this diftemper ; and ]saving heard that the Brazilians ufe tobacco for moft of their difeafes, I refolved to try th experiment.
I tried feveral ways with the tobacco: Fir Took a leaf and chewed it, which made m very ick, and almost flupified me; then I fleep ed





C R U S 0 E.

eid it in rum, refolving to take a good dofe of it when I went to bed, and then 1 put fornme into a pan and burnt it, holding my nofe over the fmoke as long as I could endure it without fuffocating. After thefe feveral operations I fell into a fweat and flept quietly and well for thirteen or fourteen hours ; and when I got up in the morning I found my fpirits revived, my ftomach much better, and I grew exceedingly hungry, which I had not Leen for fome k ti:n pait : In fhort, I miffed my fit the next day, and found that I every day grew stronger
and better.
The goth I ventured out with my gun, and
killed a fowl not much unlike a braudgoofe, but did not eat of the flefh, choofing rather to Sdine upon two or three mote of rny turtle's Seggs. In the evening I renewed my medicine : Notwithftanding which, I had a little fpice of my fit the next day ; and therefore, on the 2d of July, I took my medicine as I did at firfit ; and on the 14th, which was the day I expected the return of my fit, the ague left
me, which was no mall joy to me; and indeed the goodnefs of God on this occafion, affe&6l
me to fenfibly that I fell on my knees and reSturned thanksina moft devout and folemnmanner.
SJuly 4. I walked out with my gun : But my
diftemper having reduced me very low, I could go but a little way at a time ; for, the eXperimnent having weakened me exceedingly, I was aSble to walk but a very fhort way at once. I had now been on the ifland about ten months-.
Sand all the while had not feen either man or woman.






R.0 B J NS 0, N

wo-nan. And fo, growing b tt,-r, I Iegah f 11, nk [n-,;f--If fole inon rch of t lie Ec ; and' gro,,: ng I -.i;iffleient y xve!!, I rei(AL--d. to tak a tGUI aooul the fle, ill oldt'l to wew th t .x tent of 'n" G )rl-,inwns, and to mak- whdL di cov Iies .1 c,)uld.
On 6 v i5t-n I began my Journey and a
Tno-,,; othcr things, I found a lude btook c Twirimg ,vai4, ; on the bMk; Of wh'ch uinany rnn-,(,j-,vs covered with graf : I fa ftAs of tobacco, ai-d ther plants kiicw nothing of ; a-r,jng the it! ft I fourild", f(rm fug., canr I-everal plant, of aloe-, wand,, &c 'WitO thc e difcovci cs I tetutf-ed wel 1, :i fi to my little cadll,-, and ti-iia m8hL ver
comfortably.
The nextdav ogoina the rame way, and fa tlier than before, I f, und the country f it
-wood, and cxcee inclv Ieafant and 6elightful The melon 19y upon the ground in great quan tiiieFand cluflersofgrapeshu-g uV.cnthctre,!,,; You may imagine I was glad (4 ih:s difcovery yet atc veiv ipatingly, left I fho,:lu tlir,,-)Wlry felf inti a flux or lover.
The nigInt corr-11n,, on. I clin-bed up into tire, and havirg fixci rnyIzJ as Iecutely 'Jlofflhl-n iq pt vctl; cwnfoo ably, though i wa tiie Ilt-11 t;,nt I )-. ,d cv, ) lai-'I Out of -rv von. hori the moin ng Carne, pl:cceeclc
-.w it the gicateft pleil' re c o jt jour milts fa th.r ; and at tle end (if a vai'c v, I fcund ing of exce"Icnt w aiei ; and now I reUve to lay in as rruch ofthe fi uit as puffib c.
July -,,% I-laving preFaied two baffs, I r tuned ti-1-1hrr agai:i, in c dcr to LlvinZ ho to






CR SOE.

to my caRftle as much of the feveral forts of fruits as I could, that I might have a flock by me against I should want it. And now I began to refltc& that this part of the ifland was infinitely the belt to inhabit in; but then I thought at the fame time, that if I remov i from my prefent place of abode I should lofe the profpeft of the ea ; and fo, if Providence tihould order a thip on that coat, I should lef all pofllibility of deliverance. however, the place was fo delightful, I refolved to build me a kind of bower, which took me up the remainder of July.
Here it was that I dried my grapes, which I z erwards carried to my old habitation, for a winter fupply. On the, 14th of Auguft the rain began to fall with great violence, which niede me judge it was proper to retire to my cattle for shelter. The rain continued to fall, more or lefs, till the niddlc f Oflober, arid fometimnes with that violence, that for feveral days .1 could not flir out of my cave, till I was confitrained to it by the pure want of food. I went out twice ;the first time I fihot a goat, and the fecond time I found another turtle, as large as the former.
September o. Caffti g up the notches on the poft which amounted to 365, 1 concluded this to be the anniverfary of my land.ing. And, after I had returned thanks for my wonderful prefervation in this ~defolate island I went to bed and flept very comforsably.
Before I proceed farther in my Journal5 I puft take the lberty to put the reader inm
-I nat-I






R 0 B- I N, S 0- N

mind or' tli baI y and, ricc: had raved bout Ciircy flilk, he fori-,icr arid twen
of he Lt!el ; a d c includingg the feafon be proper, 'i 6,.g uP lo-nc gr, und %vith wo'i- I fpadc, and fowcd ir, ; xvri ch at i popcr time g1tv, up, and arilweied a3y expe

I'lle vict wCailie--t- -,-.,as no footer gone, bi
b
my inclinaicirr Icil mc, L), a,-i to tile b u -v e z li, d buil en the whci fide o" the iflan
-.%,jjjCh j f,,Und WIIC',,C anCI entire as T 4,1d Ir it, a-"Id the I akes all afrer L!
D' tule of (Jur willow -xi"CII in tirne rna me a rio Ic ferice, as i :[Ii:Al bave occasion ub!,frve more parti(u arly hczt-,?ftei.
And now I co, ccived that tile fca!-cins the year m'ght Ifl divjd d into %,cL arid rh ar-d not into uairrcr and %Viiiter, a.9 in. E rope as thus :
1, cbru iry
M I c LI wet, One S'Iq coir:rig ne
A Pr- I the Equirlox.
A pril
INI'Iy
June dry, thr Sun getti
Half 1'3 foat
July cf Lhc line.

AiF 't
Palf stptul vet th S7in bcmg co
Offi),ber Lack.
f ( Wober

I N oven ber
itolf U z cerri 'er iry, the Su i runner g rout

1"Oltal y of the li.-ie.
e bruary I
And as thc wil' cant nucq to blow t Yet








et feao n s -would continue either loge or
Ihjortcr. Aiter I. had m~ace 6the anie tht obfercvati~S I5$ 1 lPVays took care to~ pwuviie necefljrie, that I bright Itay within dur Ing the WetCIO1f~ the -weathtr, and in that time I twok care to make me fuch tools, as I mao&t
wanted.
ttIThe ~fir1t thing I -atttvu1,tcd was to make I : r.0 a bid1ket, which after much labour i-d C r, iculty, I cff. &ed ; but the two thxigs ;
mDo)! wanted weic utterly ct of m~y powe !r,
vi.fome caiks [o hold mny liquors, and Imalt pot to hail anid flew my mea,, arid -silo a tobacco) pipe, for which I at laft found4 out a

After the wcather grew fair yv farther rcfsolojtion of viewing the whole ifland took place;
accoriitfgly, taic.ng my tiog zali -my gun, and other neceff~uiei proper, I let~ forward ; and
-baving paffcd the vale where my Liowetr Ifood, 1I came with fight 4f t he fea lying to tihe W.
and when~ it was c1c~r dy, I C"Uld 4iflcoxrer land, but could not tell whether it was 4an ifland or a conttrneni ; neither could I telli what 11 place this might be, only I though it, W2S in
Americ*, arid tosafequently that jart tof the country that lies beLvveen the Span;(h territories and the Brazils, which abound with~ can4 nibals/#ho devour hijmiau kind.~ In viwing
this part o 'f the )ifand,' I found it wanuc-h i more pleafanL and fruitful than whereI had
pitclled my tent. Hle-e were great numbers of parrots, arind with~ gret d*ificulty I go neof them which I carrie4 home~t with me, but was great while before I could tamne it ridyng it tv feakevcn fo much ab to call mueby name.






4 R O BINSO JV

In the low grounds I found great numb of goats, foxes, hares, and abundance of fowls different kinds, with great quantities of gra and other excellent fruits: In this expediti did not travel above two miles a day, bei defirous to make what difcoveries I coul When I came to the fea fhore, I was amaz to fee it exceedingly beautiful, and to .ull excellent fif. But though this journey was delightful to me yet my fecret inclinaton le me to my old habitation; fo, after I had fet a fort of land mark for my guide for the futur I concluded to return back by a different w





6 )R U, S O E.

SIcamtr; jand as I was making the beft of IIy Way, my d&g happened to ftirprife a kid, which I refcucd fromhim, and led it to mybhow er, in order to try if I conid raife a breed which would be Of great ufe to m'Aft er I had beeni about a mronth u;pot this exped'tiofl I returned to my little ca'ftie, and repofed myvfeif with great pleafUre in my hamw~ock. and continued a wet-k within to rceft aue, .-(b royfeif.
Anid no0w I began to think of the kid t'haJ'left 'a the bower, and refolved imnmediately t!, LEtch it home.. Wheni I arrived there I founda it almoft flarved ; when feeding it ithi bra ches of ftich shrubs as could findi, the poor
eraure in graltude for its 4elverarce, follow. ed mne as naturally as my dog quite hom~e to m caftie, which I afterwards kcpt as one qf my dolef Wck&.
The wet feafon~ being co-ne, I kept ittyfelf withn; and on the 3o-h of Septemnber, being the tbvrd year cfmy ibode 'in 'his island, I~ paid' myW folerrn acknowledgments to- Alighty God for rmy prtfervation, and entertained myfelf wi~th a world of Yellctions upon m~y prefent and for trer coniAitions ; and as I was one morning fadly pondering upon my jprefet flate, I happened to open my bible, when I fived my eyes on the-fe words, I zoil? never leave th~, -nor Jorfake thee; which I pre~ently took as dire~led to myfeif; and I rmuR own, the exprdEfii gave me a great dealrof fecit fati,,faaion.
The beginning o this ytr I fixed my~ daily employmelints x5 follow~ :The morning -1'I n in my devotions, and paying my dtyto Co~Gdt,
/ after





46 R 0 B INSON

after I had done that, I went out with my g to feek proyifion; which, after I had got' took me up fome time in dreffing and cookin in the middle of the day I was forced to lie b by reafon of the exceffive heat; and the reilthe time I fpent making and contriving fu( neceifaries as I flood moft in need of.
But now the time for my little harvest cot ing on, I had the defirable profpe& of a go crop, but my hopes were fadly difappointt
-by the goats and hares; who having taied tl fweetnels of my corn, had cropped it fo clo that it had no strength to thoot up into a itall To prevent this I was forced to make a hedy round it; but I had no fooner done this, thai was infected with vermin of another fort; back was no fooner turned but whole flocks i birds came and destroyed what the others hi left; I let fly at thefe, and killed three of their which I bung upon takes as a terror to tl reft; which projea had fo good an effe&, th they not only forfook the corn, but that part I the island for ever after.
My corn growing ripe and harveft coming or I cut-it down and carried home the ears: Am after I had rubbed them, and threhed them the beft manner I could, as near as I could co jeaure, the produce of the barley was abt two bufhels and a half, and that of the rice I bout the fame quantity; and now I plainly far by the providence of God, I should be fupp ed with corn, though at the fame time I want all manner of neceflaries for making it in t bread, which with the greatest labour and d ficulty I afterwards fupplied.
My




C RT/OE. 47

My feed being thus increafed, my next care was to prepare more land to fow it in; and accordingly I fixed upon two large plats on the back fide of my caftle, in which I fowed my fed, and fenced it with a good hedge, to defend it from the vermin. In fhort, my corn increased to that degree, that I thought I might now venture to eat lome of it ; but how to make it into bread was ftill the difficulty; and yet-even this found the means to furmount at laft; and fo, as in all other emergencies, I found a remedy beyond my expectation.
After I had procured every thing needfal for making my bread, which you may imagine was no mall fatisfadion, the profpe& of land which I had feen from the other lide of the ifland ran fill in my mind; but how I fthould come at it I was utterly at a lofs to know; I tried to recover the fhip's boat, and then to make me a canoe but all in vain; and here.I could not forbear refle&ing upon the folly of thole who undertake matters that they are not, able to go through with.
I was in the midit of my projeas, when my fourth year expired fince I had been caft on this ifland ; nor did I forget to keep my anniverfary with that folemnity and devotion that I had done the year before; I began to think myfelf feparated from the world, and from all opportunities of friendly converfation. I had nothing to covet, being, as it were, an emperor or king of a whole country, where I had no. body to control me, nor any body to govern but myfelf.
'Thefe






Thcfe- thou gh ts made moe look u Pon t' 1he t of this wo-rld with a fort of relgious contc and rendering ne. early in my dtfoiatc and ancholy condition;. for, having iade G
--nercies to me- matters of the highcf con tion. I Mly ink was quite gone, -and my hifeu mcofi exhauilcd ; m! linen was worn out, fame of the iailols' checked firra renal whic Mer of mighty ute to mie in hot w er clothes and hat were quitejwoi n,
toeI fuppiied by th~e help ot my goatI >of which I Ii-ft nade ma( a fort of a cap,' then a waificoat, aa'rd oipeo n eed bieeches the hair on the outfide-; and thuas being per ly ateafe in my mind. 1 fpt. mny tirr-e in teinplating the bktfiings of -hcavcn, and ravilhed todthink tha, one tirt or oth flsould be delivered fromx my p-refent mi turios, and pl-aced out of the -reach oft fo~rever.
For five years after this nothing worth 4tioning haipened, only atfipare time 1 had i h ed a fmnalI1 c ano e, w ith whi ch, w. all baa 'I refolved to' try to difcojvcr the circumfle of my doinos ; and in order to it,I provifions e;n board, with an.munition, a other ntca4farics fit for the expcditlon.
It was the 16,h of Novemrber-, in th year of my reian, tlwt-l I egan thnis vo which~ was much: longer than I eixpeUe reafotj I had -many- iiiulties to encou did not fufpc&t; and iindced the rg:Q-ksw




C I R U 8 0 E.

ihiFb, and ran fo far into thc, fca. that I often refolved to turn back; rather than ri-in.the riNue Of being GTiN en lo far out to tihe fea as by rio Ineans V) he able to get-back again.
In this corifnfion I came to an arxl- c)r as nrar to t"W fhote I's poffible, to which'I w adrd, and I clirphing up to the top of a bigh hill, I -,riewed
he extrtit of my dov onions, and at all fiazai TC'()Ived to purlue iny vc)Nage. It is endless to j clate wkat danger My Tafli nel expof 1-d mc i rt I was driv evi by the current lo far into tile Aca, that I ba.d.bardly anY profp_- of getting back ag-,jn ; not by All I could do wah my paddles, which I bad made to supply the pl. ce of fcu!ls
-to help -pe; and now had no prcil but perifhirig _at lea when rny provisions were fpept
-01"if ai ftor.n_ should arilc, before. 14owever, 'id, or rather bv
by the luckv chance of thi wi L
the particular providence of God, I was d ri ven back a gain to 'the island, and to my' unfuekajoy, I came on fhore ; where, bring exceedin i
,4,y fatigue -td with watching and haid la bou r I I-lid me down and took a little repoic. After I awoke, and had dief'T _d my o f as ufual, I laid up my boat in a Jmall couvcnient cieek fit for my wjrpo c, and takirig my -;iri, &c. I 11121de thc beil"of my way to my bbwL r, ',04cle I agaia ,laid nic down to reft ; but it ivas no-, long before was lurprifed with a vol ce, w h ich cal led, Cv -% R,) b i Crv6 : 71 IT'Acre haz'-C
,r,,7,t Lt. ? cor J, c'zn Cr
E Upon




S o ROBINSON










Upon which I flarted up in great confui and caring my eyes round, I faw my pa fitting upon the hedge; and then I kne was fihe that called me, but was firangely prifed how the creature came there, and it should fix upon that place above the r The bird came to me as foon as I called and perched upon my finger, as tilual, feemed to signify a great deaL of joy for return.
This voyage had cured me of a great d of my rambling inclination ; infomuch t I began to lay afide all hopes of deliver fo I led a retired life, and in a very contend manner paffed away near twelve months, fFr itig my time in making inftruments and doi fuch things as were moR absolutely nuctff both for my prefent'and future fubienc.
My next confideration was, my pow growing that, what I should do to kill t goats aid fowls to live upon : I had ab dance of contrivances in my head to try catch the goats alive, particularly the the g with youe and at length I had my defire, making pitfalls, and baiting them with fome My





CRUSO E 5.

corn, one morning I found in one of them a old he goat, and in the other three young 6es, one male and two females. The old ond was too ftrong for me, and I uld not tell. how to after him: But the ids I made thift to get to iy habitation. It as fome time before I could make them feed, ut after they had for fome titne been without food, and I threw them fome frefh corn, and gave them fome water, their ftomachs came to them. And now my next care was to find
em pafture, and fecure them o that they might not run away, all which I at laft effeled ; and withal, by my well ifing thefe poor areatures I had made them fo tame and familiar, that they would follow me and eat corn out of my hand. Thus having answered my ends, I think, in about eighteen months time, I got a flock of about twelve; and in lefs than two years forty three; and now I was not only provided with goat's flei, but with milk alfo, which was another blcffing I had little reafoa to expect.
Being thus happy, and having almoft forgot all hopes of liberty, I lived as well as the nasure of my condition could poffibly allow ; and indeed, it was a very diverting fight to fee me fit in Rate at my dinner, all alone by myfelf, like a king; and it would. have been a very pleafant objE& to have feen me in my goat &in drefs, and other fuitable habiliments.
My chief concern now was about my boat; which I was 'extremely unwilling to lok, it having co-ft me fo much bard labour: I went by land to the place where I left it, but found there






R O-'B I -N 'SO N 0

there wa no way to i f, witliklt
nngthe U-ne rif uec was fo lately epofed which I thought too dangerous for a feco eiiperimnr, iind ther~efore I reflvelc uponi not her expedint, which was to make rafot canoe, and leave icoi the other iideof the ilta
And here I think it may not beC imlpro, to informi the~ reader that I had two plan tions t itheillal-: The fidft was 111v littlf or cale where I had mrade feveral improve mnts; and the fecop4d was my bower, or co try feat, where were my grapes and thec clofures for mny goats, aiito feveral other con nienis that made it a very pfeafznt and ag
abercermnt.
To this pilce it was that I ulcd to go'cfteti vie w fny goI ts. And no~w I flhalI rejate a thii that gave me tshe moff diCquiet of any t h that Ihad nmet with fitrce my fit-11 corning i the island, 0
It m~ay well he fuppof-d.61hit, aftcr I been lo long in this -,,fofate pirt oali S no~thng~ Foudave be-en muzef arti to ave fernany hnunan creatric -. but oned as I as goingto rfy boat, as uful, I per ceiv on &l farcll tbe print of a -ins snakd fo
ardi4 1, ite an pparition could not ha bee tZlOrterrified I Ilofoccd round o fide~sibt. ccssld not bJhear or teo an thig obferved the trasnplings, and was cnv-,n from~ all igns, that forne fo~ot had bFe eri And isn he epeft confurLOD, I returned b to my hab taticn.
'Tha-t night.I never clofed mny. eyes. qnd full of the moft difinal appreh~nfions that ever had in all my life. Sometimes I hadt folly




CRAU SOE0

folly to think it muff be the devil ; at other times I thought it rather fonn favge that the cutrrenlt bad driven in, aixi not liking the place. wa fec~etly gone off to fe aai. Happy was 1, in-my thoughts that none of thefavages Iiad feen me ; and yet, at th ae'time, was excceedingl~y teriifled left they fhoul have feen Inv boat, andt fo come in great numbers, and find me out 4k dvour me, and all my little flock, tha 1 a*eenf long gthering. Tbefe
though aflfte m exreel ; ad yet, after
-mature confieratjon, I cocuded it was mny heft way to throw mtyfelf upon~ the fovereign Governor of the World, and to fubmit entirely to his mercy ndprovidence.
After a world of fear. and apprciieztloas, for three nighits and days, I ventur~ed out of
my fortress I milked my gats, and afterLI had put every tbi~g n rdr, no without the
gretet cnferna49fl,, I went again to the fhore to make my farther obtervations; and upon the whole concluded, that either the iflasi4 was inhaited, or that loine perf4n bad been~ on~ ffhre, an~d that I might, be furpied before I wasare
This put leveral frightful ntos int y head n6truch~ that ficep w-a n tire fia




ferviceable if I fhl have oc~ja omk nic of them. After this I en armedo o m4l
rr)3e tw guns,





R 0 R 1 21, S 0 V


E

1, INZ N







U






di vldcd iny paus into fevc-ral parcels
,.t an, t it into ond
WO he ones 1 mit into ond g- 4 1 t i wo ond
pari- Cof t island, and the Orhrr ten, Vlth, t,.v6,, 'e c nes, i n a n o t I i t r ; an d w Ii i 111 t xvas.in search" OT th-, 1' tier, Which was on the Weilern p a r r ,of thc island, I thought t dIfcovcrr-d a boat, but at, too redt a distance to'r7nak e ci-it, vhatl fhc -was. cometoth6 fficize, Ljpdn f46
S. W. 'p5r't 6f fh 111,nd, Ivv;Ys cori inced hat feein- the IAWI Cox eird
IOCY weri -. fdvage, 7
dver -W Q14- Lie Ikul Is and rLn I-M 'i jj)S of Man b-A iei- I "obLrVed 10 6 vif ac fb'r, of i,circle, i the midd of which I perceived ther" had bfcn a f e about this I cconjeffil!--ed thef6, wre tches fa and unnatarAy and
dcv-oured their fellow creates.
The





C R

The horror and 16ifif6rnerefs 04 thi drr,,-dtul fpcEacle co'nfou, ded int io, that, thotigh I was fItisfied the e I v-ag s neVer came into the part ,,f the island iii whcre I was, yet fu6h, An abhorjence. of tfic had f eized M,! t bat for i-Wo yeara I CODIIII-ed myself in tny caffic, my country Irat, and my enclofures and thub iny circuniqqauces rernai-ned for Jcme time un&ffillbed. put Iftill thy giard intentyOu remained, which ftA5 I() try if 1 could dtflroy f6me of tholefavages, and f ve a vi lim that I might afterw; ,ydsr make ivy levant.
Many were my py( j4fs and contrivances t6 by 'I-,g this abz)ut ; at le-;gth I can:2iE to this fatied resolution; t6 lie private ly in, ambug-, in forne convey ent place and let fly upon their tviah my guns firfil and then with -ny -iftols, Wra f vord iti' ha- .d. ; and. fri much d-A this prop al Pleafc rn fancy, that I fully resolved to rut it in vratlicc the fitil opportunity 2 ,d ccnrdiDgly, I f0en, found a place conveniefit for IT, y Flu] pofe ; but at the fame tirne,, I had 11cral cLcc'ks of cor-Aierice, and rwf'oning with t vfelf, coti iriih4 'the lawfulnefs arid jciftlce bf the atteri,pt'; 'and, after a long debate, I concluded to layafidef tbi design.
W-hild 1 -w"a's- cuibnd own fome Wobrd anz 64y; to -wkc c hirc6al to drefs mv meat ana do the farrilly rre&kIricli, I P&ceiv d a V&.Y jijg 6vity -, and &nk* -xard it, I could perceive two larg e es, RWn ti on mt. upon w-,hich made hafte out, extTemeil, teirified. hot i m a gining W;)at itrcu d be thirt looked ki ffightfuily lio vcver, after I bad r coveicd fro1h. my' iur 'fe, I vin&,
ii went aamn into 'the caviLV r fbl'-at all hazards, G fee what it was and when I CUMC





56 R 0 B I N S 0 N

came near enough to discern it perfe&ly, w should it be, after all, but a monfitrous he go lying on the ground, and gaping for lif through mere old age.
The creature was not able to fland, and I let him lie undifturbed, and employed m felf in viewing the place, and making obferv tions. At the farther fide of it I obferv a fort of an entrance, but fo low, as to obli' me to creep on my hands and knees to it :I had no candle, and the place was dark, a fo I fufpended my enterprife till the ne day, when I returned with two large ones uy own making.
After I had paiffed the ftrait paffage. found the roof role higher up ; and fun when I got farther in, no mortal ever faw more beautiful fight The walls and the r refleaed a thoufand lights from my two ca dies ; and indeed, it feemed to me the m delightful grotto I had ever heard of. thort, I could find no fault but in the entrance and which I thought would be very neceffa for my defence and fecurity ; therefore I termined to make the placemy principal ma azine ; and accordingly, I carried thith with the utmoft expedition, fome arms and a munition, judging it impoffible for inetobe f prifed by the favages in that faftnefs.
I think I was now in the s3d year of reign, and tolerably eafy in my condition By this time my parrot had learned to ta English very well, and many diverting ho we ufed to have together. My dog died old age ; and my cats increafed fo fal, t
I






C US O E. 57

I was often forced to delroy fome of them, left I should be overrun with their numbers. I always kept two or three domeffick goats about me, and had feveral fowls that built and bred about my caffle, fo as to make me happy as I could wifl : But alas what unforcfeen events deftroy the uncertain enjoyryents of human happinefs
It Was now December, the time of my harve?, ihen., going out one morning early, There appeared to me from the fhore, about two miles difance from me, a flaming Elight from that part of the island where I had before cbferved fome favages had been on my fide of the water.
Terrified with this unufual fpe&acle, and being under difmal apprehenflors that there favages would find me out, and deftroy me, I went dire&tlv home to my came, and fhut myfeif up as faft as I could, and put myfelf into
a ofture of defence ; trid afterwards I got up to the top of the rock, and viewing with my prcfrefive giafs, I could difeern no lefs than n~re naked favages fitting round a fire, and eatng (as I fuppofed) human flefh, with their two canoes hauled on fhore, waiting for the tide to carry them back again.
Nothing can exprefs my detellatioem of fo horrid a fight ; especially when I found they were gone, and I had been at the place of facrifEce and faw the limbs and flefh of human creatures lie torn and mangled upon the ground: In thort, my indignation againft them role fo high, that lkt the confequence be what it would, I determined to be revenged upon the flrft






58 R ()B-I N.S O.N

firft that should come thither, though I lo my life in the attempt. I found afterwards that they did not com over to this island very often; and as near can remember it was a year or more before faw any more of them. But before I procee farther, I have another account that will de ferve the reader's attention.
It was the s6th of May, according to m wooden calender, after a very terrible fto when I was alarmed with the noife of a gu as fired from a thip in dilftr.ls ; upon which immediately took my glaf. and went up t the top of the rock where I had not been moment but a flame of fire gave notice of an other gun ; and then I was confirmed in m opinion that it could be nothing lefs than hip in diftrefs; which, with my glafs I foo discovered to be true ; and that the wreck wa upon thofe hidden rocks where I was in grea danger of being loft in my boat.
I made a fire upon the hill by way of fig natl and they aw it, and answered it with fev eral guns. The weather was very hazy, an to I could not, at that time, discover either what diflance the thip lay, or what fhe was but the weather clearing up, I faw a lhip ca away fome diftance at fea. '
I had feveral notions concerning them, a is natural in fuch cales; but consideringg t rioufly the place where they were, and all or er circumftatces. I could not conceive an poffbility but that they muff be all loft; an indeed, to the laft year of my being in t ifland, I never knew of any that were fav out of this Ihip: I only law the body of boy





~RU, 80 E. 5

boy which was driven on fhore, but I couMc
nodifcoypr by him of what nation they were.
'the ftea was now very calm, which temnpted me to venture to the wreck, not. only III hocpes to get somethingg I wanted, but likewife, if there was any body left alive in the flip, to endeavour to fave their lives. This refotion00 fo far prevailed, that I went home immediately and got every thing ready for the voyage ; and accordingly after a great deal of labour, hazard and difficulty, I at length got to the wreck which I bebeld with the greatf pity and concein. By her built I fiound flhe was a Spaniard. and bad endu*red a terrible confl ir- before {he was loff.
When I was come near to 'her, I~ faw a &gon board, who no foonier faw me but e fell to yelping and howling, and I no foosner called to him, but the poor creature jumped into the fea and fwam to me, and I took hm joto the boat almnoft famiflied. 'When I came into the fhip, the firft fight that I beheld was two dr>~wned men in the armns of eaceh other ; I found fbe was a rich fhip, anid as I had re4fon to believe, bound home fromn the Spanlfh Weflindies. What became of the refL of the failors I could not~ tell, there being none o their bodies on board, befides the two beforementioned.
As I was rummaging about her, II found eye eral things I wanted, viz, a fire ;fhovel and tongs, two hrafs kettles, pot to make chco late, fomve horns of fine glazed powder a' giiron, and feveral otbier neceirarics. hfI puit




60 R O B',IN,,SliO IV

pii t on board my boaf, together witla two ac and a calL of iuln and after a gIL:at deal toll and difficulty, I got Lfc back to the i a.nd.
I repofcd vivfclf that n1glit in the boat- a the next day landed ni), czngo, which I cairl to my grotto ; and havr.I _g examined rny fefts, I found in th-c tNvo cbcf1s fc-veral thin' I wanted, particularly fome Fnirts and Ilan kerchief._ I found allothree of pieces
Cight ; all which I NVOLIM, Wiflinlj-,' hZNC g en for five or fix pairs of Englifli Rloes 2, rLockings.
After I had ftowcd all this Tv w car-o to my cave, I iiizide the bcfL of my way to Caft1b and founcl evcry thing a I lcft it, thatJ had nothiri- to do but to reuof_' T-ivf(! and to talre caie o" roy doinCRICS, And'r.
.4 that Was rcqu'fite for
licthin
support of lif :, I night have lived very qu liad not the apprelieni'on of the favalle ; turl4e.d nx ; upon w1iich account I f2ld went far abro;j-1, if 1 did, it was tu th caft part of the lfl ijid, I well knew t
-never came : And for two years I llvcd this anNious condition. illy head 1-Cing a1w full (A pr '(LCts "low I ln"' 'ht gctaviay froln clefOlatc place.
As I obf :rve(! bcfoi-,-, 0,c)-o-h I was t(A bly f Ccure agairift the rcach of want, and ,all the cliverfion thenatuie of the A would allow, yet tlhctlwugh tsof my cILIance were ftill uppermoiL as the rcmer calil P! rccive by the tc llk willg relatio whicli I fhall give a fhort -account of 1-chemcs aud pru cLls I uaaUl; for iny efcap




~CRU S 0E. -L

As I lay in my bed one night in March, the 24th year o~f my folitude, I ran tbroiugh ai1~thc accounts ofnmy life, from my very fir ft remembrances t~o the prefent time, arnd found all along th~t the providence of God had been exceedingly kind and m~erciful to me, and
whe I onfderdmore partiularly how miany dangersl Ihad palfed, it could not but make Me devoutly thankful to my great deliverer, without whofe aflifance L muft inevitably have Perifhted.
After khad thus briefly debated with miyfeif on mny preferzt and former condition, I began next to consider the natureof tefe fav-. ageCs, and the co~ntry~ that they inhabited iow far it was to the plae from whence they cam~e, and what boats they had to bring them_ oer hither, and at the fame: time had fotne notions to go over~ to~ their fide, to fee what difle-ieA I could make.
I had notions, that, if by. any method I
*could get upon the c~ontinent, I might in pine meet with a fhip to carry me to Lurope, forhere I looked upon zqyfelIf to be 'the mff ipiferable man living, and preferred even dat itfeif to m~y flay in this defolate island. Whilft my thoughts were thus. conftafed, I had nop notion of any~ thing elfe buit my voyage to the continenrt;- and indeed fo much was I Inflamned with the Ce notions, that I in a great lbeafueforgot my duty to God an~d was reduced
amftoa flate of dpcration ;and after many thoughts arid ft~ru gs n yfad I came at len~gth to this conclufion viz. TWhat the onl y pirobable w~ay I had to fcpe ws to get





'R 0 B I N' S N

get one of thefe favages ; which I ccpuld fi no other way to bring about, than by ventu ing my life to fave him from the Jaws of h devourers, which I thought m~uff infplir hi with gratitude to his prcferver.
Thcfe were mny fixed refolutions, but I thinI it was at leaf, a year and a half before I could find an opportunity of putting them in ee tion. To the bcft of my remembrance i..t w the 2 d day of Apr-il, early in the mornin when I was furprifed within the fight of fiv canoes, all on fhore together, on my fide the -Illand., aind the creatures that beloriged

At firft I thought all thefe boats m uff bri
tomnto be attacked by one person, an was'nia mighty confufiosi as to what was c Altob done ;, however, being imnpatient to f something o~f their managecii~t, I took guns, and w'ent fecretl~y to tire to p of the where b the help of my profpcaive glafs, observed. no lef than thirty, fitting round fire and feafting upon what meat they h drefed ; what it was I could not difingutff Afterwards they all danced around the flame N tifig many frightful and barbarous geftures.
Whilff I was looking earneftly on thej wretches, I could difcern them dragging t f m ifcrable creatures out of one of their hb a It wa not long before I faw one of tbf ,,knocked down, and three e orfour ofh C
fell to cutting and man~gling his body, in V
exto devour him as they had done the to er. 'Whilft the other wif'erable crature f expcfing every moment the fate of his co paniort





C RU SO0E. 3

panion, -infpircdchwih the hopes of life he. gave a fudderi flart ftro them, anid ran with great fwiftnefs towards my aftle.




















I was under gre-at apprehenfiins thatf lie would .~ to my grove for jfroteftion. I was glad to fee he had th~e heels of them, and from his fwIftnefs, conc~t~ed he would prefently lofe fight of them, and fave his life. There wajs a little creek jtafl before him, where I was afraid the poor vi6aim would be taken if he could not fwim ; but it happened he fwani very well and foon got' over, and fan again with his former ftrength and fwiftnefs. Two ~of the thrqe that followed him, fwam overaf ter





64 R 0 R B IA SO N

ter him, but the other, that could not fwim returnedback to hisv companions. And now or never, I thought it was my time to pro cure a favage for my companion. Accor ingly, with all the fpeed I could, I cam down from the, rck, took up my two guns refolving to fave the viimn if poffible ; an in order to it, came a nearer way, and pu myself between the purfuers and the purfued beckoning to the latter to Rand Rill, wh you muft imagine, was not a little furprifd at me. The firfR purfuer I knocked dow with the Rock -of my piece, and the othe who I perceived was preparing his bow an arrw to hoot me, I let fly at, and killed his dead on the fpot.
TM poor frighted Indian was amazed t f the fire and hear the noife of the gun however, I made figns to him to come to m which at length he id, but not without great deal of fear and trembling, being afraid I believe, I should kill him too. I did all could to convince him of his miflake, and length fo far convinced him, by the figns made him, that he came to me, ando three himfelf at my feet, and took one of my. fe and put it upon his head ; which was a to en, it feems, of his refolution to be my fla forever; upon which I took 'him up, ma much of him, and encouraged him in the be manner I could.

By





SC0RE. OE.














By this time I far t favage I had knck ed down, began to recover, and w~as fI tti n up right, Nibtch m~ade m~y new flave as muc afIrid as eoe but I foo& prevented. his fight by Pxr.fenttng m~y piece at him ; but m favage oppfed y- shooting hip, main fign to meto lend im y fiword,. whic

his requeft. but away he' rto nm an'd very dexteroufl-," at orre blow, cLit off his~ be-adi and as a tok(-r of triumph brought it to rne, t tether with miy fword, and laid it a1t mnyfeet.'
The gre .ateft tftolfnt my new fervant was in, was, how.], illed the fag at that diftance, 'with6oit a bow an~d arrow';~ and to fatisfy hIrrfbHf ini that mratter, he mnade figns to me to it m g4ft f-idvi'leWw hv*rn i And


rows, arnd ihcbc i gi,'ai





66 ROB IN SO0N

which with -my conifent, he performed wit wonderful dexterity,
Whent I perceived hie had done, I calle him away, and carried lirlm direly to i cave, where I gav~e him viduals, and the pointed~ to hint to lie down upon forte fra and take a little reff. lie 'was a very hand fomte well proportioned fellow~, and in all re peds the rmoft beautiful Indian I ever faxv.
I think he had. not flept above ho be-fore hie came. out of the cav-e to wa
wa ilking my goats, and again thre hi felf at imy feet and put mny other fo ot 11p his head, as a farther tok~en that he intendu to henmy flave forever,
That night we fayed Fi tihe cave ; b, early the ncfit m~orninig, 2I made figns to hi, to rife and go with ne ; and, xvithal, m"a hins to tirsdrland that his narti was, to h Friday, it being onz that day I faved. his life and that I iktenided. to give him fomne clo,-the ito) hide his nakednefs. As we patfed. by th" place where the favages, were> buried,h pointed. direcfly to tie 'graves,. and let in know by Is geftures that lie intendedt (at!; them up and devour. dicry, upon which I let him fee I jwas extremely difplectfe4 at i and4 mlade him come awray, which he did wi the greatcll reverene, e.
In our way~to the caec, Nv wecnt, tQ~4l

and findin~z thcy Nyce, we ou
felves for that nigh4 p ~v u u d


they
VN






C R U S 0 T. 6

they committed their barbarities, When we came upon the fpot, it is Iiipoflible to exprefs the hiorriblenefs of the fig ht Here lay the fiefl and entrails, anfd there tha ynangled 1*mibs of bf1 ad not refoued hinm, he had heen the fourth. I made him gather up th-e frag. rnents and lay them in a heap. an(! unade a fire upon tlicinand burnt them to afll 's And ffill I found nay mart had a hankeun1g after fome of the jlhb which I refente8 with. the utmol~ abhorrence, and made himn iunderflaud, that if ever I found him guilty o"
ayfLwCI inhnnisty, I would certainly {hoo him.
After this we- wont to my caftle, wherc I1 dothed Myi ma~n 2S pWell as the nature of the 'place and my circumf~afces WOni4 admit. Ileo feenied at firit a little isnezify arnd awkward in his new dref- ; but after lie had worn then four or live days, he grew~ familiar- with them, and 1femed extremely well fatisfied. Now my nc cncern was how I1 might ladge him weUe andyt be eafy rnyfel ;.-and in order to this, I ere-fted himn a little tentb~we~z~tw~o Jortifiations, Ieured mny Z.Uns evyjagt -and. ma e cythingf1-0
fafr, thti'w4sip~~ for mg obe fur-px~vd ;. thou 4 inuf attefme time O'wn



U4olity5 and o~ i ich c'ndanr4i. hir;.






68- R 0 B I N S 0 N

rnncxrcrnc1%, and imclucp(l we totlliiIi I!Ow I rn 1-,t bvlt acquit invicif to him.
1 ha4 uct been above two or three days -i
rny catlic, when I firf P-,(,!) ofca to bring hi n
-ff fi-oai his ba!barous inclination to huma h
fl-fli ; inoider to which I ufccl several in tic--n-writs ; till the poor creature who Ila a
tlc moll dutifid and tender reard to 9
thing I hilin and inclc ri dillC
-want li lod fmfc, w )s peifeffly wCalle f b
ills vicious a!id ha(I a-, dc I
fix(fd an abllm-rcn(e of anv fUch ba, proccedlfi s as rnvf -lf lie fc-Al upon his and mid,- all fi ,,ns of his avvrkun he Iw, could, pronounctn.,, many tbin,,s I ci- I fo
unclel-11and ; mly ir the maill. I foull"
d t
LIs ol-Av wele flom the f r
fw)Lll'l filoot hinl ; for the thoug'Its of t t]
2rid tlic marmer of the c-xcciitl0n it di b
C111 in his rnind, and Y.e. could b-,, 0
means he n:concll-d to it ; Ac woul i V
fo miich as touch it with.his fi ; i g f o at days, mid I believe, J-1 had not "'e.
c d it, bc would have pald it a fort of ;idor tion : Ile would go, as eften as my balk w lumcd, arid falk to it In his own dlialct' ; t intent of wl:ich w s, to eiefire it not to ki

I liarl 1,;Ilcd a kid. which we bmot g-lht 1-P aml the rcxi day I gave -hiht -46rh6 of t 'Ie oafted, *ffh which
1h, 1-wil bo IcA acd
- %,::S '6 Mich dci] Lte(!, that Y- lo-lvc Ine fi (1,01 i C 11 1 UPI(ItTP60d) that Whil
lve ilc would ne'O'cr,"More 'Cit vhw
fhi:J 'It h-,,h 6' c to fet my fervent to work,





CR-USOE. 69


Ifpe Cially confidcring I had now two ,mouths to feed inifead of one. I found him extraordinarily quick anid handy in cev'ery thing I fet himn abo t, and hie had the fenfe to makc Cu understand that I bad more labour in my ha nds on his account than I had for myfelf, and that he would fpare no pains~ nor diiigenlce in1 any- thing I fhouid command or dlirea ; and indeed; the fellow's honefly and tliple integrity grew fo con fpicUiouS, I really began to love him entirely ; and for~ his part, I Am well atfured there was no love loft. I bad a mind to know if he had any inclination to his own country ; and having taught ,him as m~uc~h E'ngllfh as poffible, I alked hin feveral queflhons, which he aifwvered very pertinezntly ; particularly, I ;afked concerning~ the nature and diflance of his. country, and their manner of fighting, &-c. The fellow bad! a very goodL natural genirits. arid would often anf-wcr my queflAns with very quiick and furpriffng turns and when I fpoke abouta religion, he heard me with the greatell reverence, arid attention, and would often furprife me with impo-rtant and iinexpeaed quecftions ; anid in truth, I fparcd no pains to in~ftrtA him according to the belL of my knowkedget. I aiked hi who made him and all the world ? As foont as hie unaderfood mne, hie ant-wered, 61dl Bhnimcke but all that be could lay~ of him-,vas, that he was very, old, much older thani the Iea and land, the afaon and Oiars, and that he lived a greatway beyond them all.
When* I had inq~uired into the -manner of' fervlng their God, i proceeded, according tatthe




B 0 B-1 N 8 0 'V

the b-,'t otmv knowledge, to InIftli-ija him the principles of the C litiftlan religion.. an, laid b4ore him fcveral ofthe chief trutupon which it was groundc.d ; to which h gave th c gr; !atcfl attention, and WOUICI afk v 3-Y.pci-tincia questions, by way of informationTa fhort, I ( )(-)n perceivtcl this Poor creator every (lay improved by my Iriftruffions an my encleavo-tirs to ri(lru f linn were a gre to inytelf, and biou, ht thofe till 11 fre into ITIV memorv which tile, len th of ti. ha aloft d,,1acqd fo I had the greatest rea on t blefs providence for fending hurl to me in th' Rate of folitude. Ills company allayed t th"Lights ef my m1fory, and made ilav habit
-tion more cwnfort, blc than it had been eve fince iny fiffl corning tothe ifland. It brought 4 intoinv mind dadynotlonsofheavcri and heav' crilv thin 11
g-,-anci 'lled me wikh'a fecretJoytha I was biou,-',t juto thiq place, which I onc thou ht the rnl)ft Tnifc-rable part of, the universe,
Ii" 'his time TrIday began to fpcak tolerabl F-Tj jlflr, thou XVC con
'gh a little broken. NVe con overfed with great farnillarity ; q.nd I took particular pleal-urc to relate to him th fc-vcral accidents and a1IVCntUlCS Of M I i I f( On rriacle h irll Unde rffand that wort fiCtfill myllciv. A he concclved it. of tile gun powder and I)JI. and taught 1-11m to fll(-,Ot
vbich lie f),)n learut in the greateff peifec' tion. I gaVe him a knif,, x0ilch he was ver iplid J, 1 -1
kewite a belt ard a hatc' ctwhic b,- hung to his girdle, which with the re Of his accoLitt-cments, made him look Jik D(,n QuIxote. when he went to engage th 'Wilid mUls. After this I particu
tar





C R U S 0. 71

1ar dcfcription of Europe, aind Old rngta~d, ,the plae of my' natIity;, above all the seti, I alfo gaVe him an account of my being fhli. wrecked, and carried hirn and Ihewed hi"m the ruins of the llhip'6 boat, which, though it was alinoff rotten >azd fallen to pAce s, yet 1 could Peeiye be tookc particular notice of -1which ,ade me alk.-ili the reafon why he_ piondet-M fo much, 0 mqfter (faid he) mne fee bie boat (cqme to Place, at mly natlwm. LIt efently came into my mind, that this mutt be foine Euroc :aaboat that wars fotrced in there- biy irefs of ea t h cr,. aftr the lofs of the fIhip, which put icupon inquiry, what. fort of a boat it was anid whatcame in it ?
Friday replied, with gratNarth -.n- ardlour, 0 nza/Ier, xcfave awhite7 7T~anS from droa'~n : Upon which I Aiked him if there were any White manqs (as hie ciallcd7 them) in the boat?

mansv: HoQw many, Friday P faid .1 : Wherr upon he ranbied hjs fingers, a-nd counted feventeen. Then I ;Ocd hizt, what became of them all, ansd whether tlicv lived or ubt. li-e replied, yns viqfter, lky all lve, they be 14ce 11170V MY nA~On. Upon hihit Came Into mnythoughts, tht tleeiull be the crew that beonged tothbe fh p tbat -was cafl away upo~n my ifland who,, iathi than be devoured in, thec ocean, had comte hmevst rv
idence, and w~edivno tfhemte vemo rwild 1ndins. The notion I ld of theix enMelfies inace mse ail Jriday hoWb it came~ to Pa, f they did riol Lill arnd c~athem. No, no, 'a( Friday,. they not hill 'em, th.e, mzike brother with'ear My naiin, Co~Aer nation, no ect-matte1 A t





72 .-0 1R IN SO NA

zokn? mans make warfhtk. As inuh as to tjiat neither his nor any other nation ec their fellow creatures, but fuch as the la arms allowed to be devoured, and they ,only thofe wbofe misfortunec it was to be prifoners of war.
Some time after this, upon a very decar mzy man aucd Ii went up to the top of at high hill, on the eaft fide of the ifland, whence I had once feen the Continenit i inerica ; I could not direftly tell whvlat wa Smatter, for Fr-iday fell to jumping and da
's f he were mad; I alked hinuthe reaf his Joy. 0q ~~! faid lie, glad 1 tkref country. there -y ration, there lives while C11 g(t ke. UponI which I could not thinking, but that, if he could -by anyget home, he would forget all I had don him, and perhaps bring his countrymen' my ifland to'deffroy me : But, to my fha fpeak it, my Jealoufy was very ill1 group for the poor fellow was of a quite di difpbfition, and as 1 pund afterwards, freely have loft his life, rather than hav me, or done mie the 1ef inju~ry.
Soon after this, I atked him if he I a defire to go intohi wn country ? 1e hte, me nratch 0 glad to be at m)y outt nto go if yeo, -me' Wx o go zf yoLP Ay. I faid 1, F~At! #all I do thee? Ile a we mafle#A, you do -great deal much good, yoza.
dl the zoild van to be good lava -mansyl thenfob 7,, law,,"o ife, to kno God, a God. ,Alas! poor~ Fridtay, faid 1, that's rny power, either will I. venzture.
th




C R USO 0E.

them :No, you hall go an~d leave me alone as I was before I fav'ed your life.
Never w~ias any creature~ iarc thunder ftru ck than Friday was sat thefe words, efpecially when~ I told him he would be at Iibi. erty togo as foon a.- the boat was ready to-carry him ; hieput one of his hatchets into my~ hand, fayving, on~ly hall Friday Friday wre not live long : Bu~t Vhat muift I kill You for ? (faAd J) Ak. ct~ a~z mwc lr avt mrady MaeFridayv
from ot ~ e npfo Aeep~ lokgFiaym, Fi
lov-,! God4 andy not Loe Beuiamuckec, asnd non? FridayfeSdfaway, neuer fee Friday more Wheni he fpocke this, the tears ran down fo plentifuly, that I had much ado to refrain from weepilig Ilnyfef ; I c In Mhort, the fellow's honefty and fincere behaviour foon co niinced me df the unreafoniablenef's of msy jcaloufy, and he became morc dear to me than ever* Indeed, I thught that if ever I could get to the( continent, a~dit thofe white inen Friday had nientioned, it might be the means to further iny efeape ; ini order to this, Fridazy and I went Into the woods to look out a large tree, to build a canloe, which we effe~fed in about fix week ,and with much trouble -and pains got Jier int~otile water. I GI




74 R0B I N SO 1N

T liked the fellowr's honieft propofal, but, the fame ytime, I thought if I could procure 3nagt and fail, it would be better ; which wit the greateft difficulty imaginable, in abo three months time, I made a fhift to patch t gether; and after that, I had mny ManEd to inftrudf in the art ol navigation, which be fore he knew nothing of.
I was now enitred in the )Vwentv fevent year of may reign, (-r rather of Vny' Captivit and kept the anniverlary df my land-ig wit greater folerinnity than ever, havng receive fuch repeated fignal-s of the divine favou in tmy deliverance, preffei-vation and profper :1ty.
now wanted for nothing, anid Yet MY imind was 11il1 Intent uponi ny deliver-anic and in truth, I h.ad a firung iMapreftion upo'I me that I Mhould not he a9no ther year in thi island ; but I fill continued my hufbandr r and made the neceffary preparations for in future fiubliftencc. The rain fe-afon Com
().U, we we re forced to continue for the mo rpart within~ d oors, having, firtl maide all nece, fary preparation for thc lemity and fafety :my new boat, till1 the Months of Novernic a nd Decemuber, at which time~ I fully deteirTI, ed to fail ove,-r to the continett tioi, nd n afortnight's time, 1 propofe operim littledock, arid e z
arati~m foJr my voyage Friday whom h fent tc4 the fcfii to look for zt turtlc







running rn~a erre WfrightSayslie,J IAwev
news u : )Y) dcr r e, fc ojur canoes vot ii oaftan t M cme zolok for poor Friday, elnd zzl e yyod as me; anid trre w rzil rlve tfi-,h for our lives.-ays F3--d~gty, tre'n!)bxng, me wi fgoh la Tel asi I ran Ib~t f tlm rIII1 -d teY dre 100 Ma nlYforU ;'but I wvill obeyr
yO ~r or imdfe th~e laft dop Pof my btooJfrye
NVithOu~t farter diIpUtC.S. we felt to~ loading our arms~, and ming every thing ready~ for the onf~t : When we hdoubleloadcd tln, and liut every, thing Ini the beit poi1ure that could be, I took my profpedive. glafs, a#nd went up) to the top Of a bill, to try what I could difeover ; anid I fooa perceived~ tbie wecre nineteeni favagk-s and three pr foners, which I concluded, by their anner of afhn3, were to be devoured.












-I9





Th11is3







Tliis-difmal arrd inhuman fpe&a-cle fil me1 with the nztioff horror anid deteftati andl the more fo, as I1 faw< a white 'Manp, wn by their aalons and preparations, I foun ws to he the next facrifice. This made m inake all Ohe fpeed I could, having fully> t~ eiine" to-'eliver him or perifh in tlxu a
;tmt;fo I gave Friday orders to followI
a d d every thing he faw me do.
When we came to a proper 'diflane undi c('Vred, I gave the word to Friday to ire,a I ddthe very fame smomcnt. We~ took o' was klel-ets gie col o i elranc

t~ esr!C, buit Ire% enr~ed i tellin hinm, IT11 2',I)7jd b ttere. another t"'e adfi] Laid








Sjiour, we will tall-eriars ~l

piece ofbra to rcfe(i- him, and tfienjga; him. a~word and pifl ,nard i1 do-what hie could ;anj4 to give the mnan hi~s du~e, pox~n
eo ~ ~ ~ I W*Iiy h,' wtgreater coulagl. n
ho we Io rnaed4 thiattur, that o Iy two favagsnrot above thro or four gtinto onie of t~eir canoes, and Ithiofe I irefQlve4- to dfiroy too if pollbte accordingly, I~ kcq)d intO one of their cainos, ,iid otdrer* Txzay to, foll~ow~ ine; but I was no fooner got ti than I< faw another poor Cletrle botindhai4 and foot for the fauohte4 ~I pref-citly belpce4 hi tip, ut he was Io0faint and wakthat lie could neither fland nor f-peak,~ but grpn"l I-AdI9 hinling lie was~ now to ho ficriito. bade Friday I'ecak to bi) and affure bila ticliverance 'Whcex lie was a little recoq'eyed, and fat up in the bot and had looked ujp, Jili more fuly, yo cannot imagine the po fellow's tranfport ; at length, when lie hat! a little recovered Jiitifelf, li told ine It was 13,& father and in tr~uth, legave fuels uncprumon01 t~linouies of his dutty ?n4 afrcffon', thatI mull need own I was very ihae within
In~~~~ Mot it reat tl ,a ofdficilty v got both my siew guft homne to my ~where~ I mae thm bsandoferlc ten'J atreated the 4iv tfhe bet matnner my ir, m flassees would allow~.
And thus, fitke an a1folu!te Kiu;; T~~
ed mny little dominioni1 an~d fuidin it~np new fubjekis were very wea, 1 6rd~e Frda bo id one vf my kids, and ftcvNed adbie Ga.h







trie- flefh arid made their fomei vcey,-ondbro and dined with tci5m' my eI' f.-After difiner ordered rzday to go to th- 'fil1d of hattk., fetch home teirc r- ; "and then I badeFr ~aflis father w'1iether he thoight1 it p6i' fb'tte'avrigev to 'btrijde t1,,, Lrm. or i got home, whether he thought they wo noqt return In great' numbc'rs, and' endeaivour deftroy us. is anfiver wa'-, that ii they d reach their own Co oItry which lie harc thought poffle, yet. thie rtrancefs of th
bfg atacked would& certainly make themt the peopic that iheyV wei'e t1fhoyd y der ant)ihtig and' that whoever 'ernt to the island would certainly be deflroyed th1e hanids of the Gods,~ and n~ot of rrenl ;-a; thbat the iflrai4 wvas ernchantcd ; ald that t Gods fentv fire fromn oboi e to deffioy alltho that Thould 111eftiMe to land in it.
This account having freed me fromn my picehenllkms, a1nd0no canoes appjeaiin, folved to purfue my' interi~d voyage, Fri father having affured mne th; .t 'I miight dp
-upor good if-age from the people' of- bi's ceou; !ry. As to the Spaniard, I ajfk, d him is~ pinion,; he told4 mie the-y were fourte.cn th Nweve caf away upon the i'fland, 'and that 011 had a good imdeqrflndli-ng with the India blit Were iti Want of nec&tihries~ for theft port of hurnan I~f4and thet if I 'doit' proper, he and the old f-avagc-woul4 o co Iiif; an~d lth'le matter,,, 'in' odr for ouir ception'; 'and at the farr* time he toldm they woud all fwcar Itfelity to T~e, arid ow
rna'their leader,
Upop





C U S v F.

Upon, thcfe affu rauxQs,_,I r6olveato fentl 1-'Cln Q 'er.; but Nyh nleyery thing w s ready, ii-w Splaniaidtftarteo this materi,01 oh j jffion,: Yol, Sir. f tld J)e, I ku)zv the lenS i4 Iyvzzr
i (: /'. an f though you' have. cn. I ,ugh for i j Mat arc 4ozo u4th Yomjet, z ,hcayozt enlarge yo tr'fwniI a??z canpg befu0cient to'1ubp,)rI-us
,'o7,,. and i1,w--j'rrc wy advice z s, to :vaz I I a iotker
hnd i the in ,an t t.)re/5ae s much n, u, n d a f,4& Vc, a hereb we may Aaw Irovi ams J 'fllnl lo c-,Ir?,y on our d fien. This ad'ice.l f, Cd e extreme t y, a nd froni thatraom ci-it I alway& C 11 the Spantardand wadchim my privy
couilficllor-on all occafions.
We all four wcnt to work, And prepared 2S much grQ1ind as would, few twenty two bufficls of barle I
y and fixwrnof rice, wh-ch 'W"S'all'Ibe J'C-_d we bad to fp4re : Aiid at Lhe 'farn timc I took- all the care. im%, inablc to ncreafc and prcfcrv-e rny goats by IbQOLITI;I, t?" wilid darns, and tal -Ing the young kWs, putting them i-ito, the inclofares, and toolk
lucl, Mcafoics, tbat, by theblcffingec God, arv! oUr industry, -after har-veff, w had proto v1(tual a fhIp for any part of Amcrica.
'I I hc principal occallon. being thus anfwcreO, I gave my two ambaffadqrs a mulka, each, with charges of powder and ball ; -orith proVilions fit for tho expedi.6on, and away I Terit thern ; they had no t beer; gQne a fortnight, hut I began to be impatient for their return. Whiliq ruy thoughts were perpetually talkelA up with theexpc-'fatlonof thema veryftral"ge cci -it happened, which was firft difcovered Ioy my man Frida),, who one morning came running g





go R 0 OB IN SON

running unto me, crying out. They are come, t t are come. Upon which I jumped from my beI and looked towards the fea. I perceived boat about a league and a half distance, ftan ing direlly in for the tfhore. I foon foun 1 that thefe were none of the company that t expe&ed ; for by the help of my glafs, I foun that this boat muft belong to fome fhip, whic by caffing my eyes about, I plainly dflcoverel lying at anchor at fome distance at fea; which by the fafhion of her long boat, &c. I conclud ed muff be an Englith veffel.
Great were myvtranfports upon this unex pe&ed fight, which brought into my min frefh notiohlis of deliverance and yet I 'ha fornme cautionary thoughts, which I confeF were of ufe to me afterwards. It was n long before I faw the boat approach the flor and then I was fully convinced thatthey wec Englifh. I faw four of them leap upon th Phore, and take three out with them, that look ed like priifners, who, I observed, mad pafficeate gestures of intreaty; and not know ing what the meaning might be, I beckoned to Friday to go to the top of the mountain and make what difeoveries he could ; whe in a little while returning back, 0 maJe (fal l he) you fee Englif& mans eat prifoners as well a t flavage mans / But of this I foo,n convince C him to the contrary ; and yet I could no t
:
help thinking but there muff be fomething v ry barbarous in hand. I could not percel that they had any fire arms, but rather th they were preparing to kill their three com panions with their fwords; and now it wa I lamented mry want of power to prefer t
them.








thnem. IloweveT, tqm gta f4ifioy I found. tha they tund thr up Into the def; Late lladas ~thy togtt.beeterfav ,or dvu-by ilbeafts and then ruahbthe tjt wks gn;adthe boat wasaground.



















In frior, Icoridered Wvatrt of nWn I had now to4 dal with, and therefore rfolved to a,' h l h~ato raiibe rdf

till igrew dark uttc:a'ben xfivQ,



a free, at Come fall difac from xmeImde n~o moqre to4 d(? bt went up to bzakg them, in the Spanif tongue, wa thy wr At1








At which they fahted tip anid being~ fur o
2itthe oddniefs of my~ drefs, they began to b void me but I called to the-i in Engli11i, d
7.,ot be afrgid,for you lave afriend -nearecr I t than you exp(,ed ; te'neyour condition, anid W, in my 1poer, I 11tfreo aihul.& onte of themn)the ]iory is too l1o g at Py~, t w~as mafler#I4 tiktip that lies yondr at akch p ?,y iten having inatiniied, it is a favour th-ey 0: put th s PalJenger, ?y irate, and mne, &n#0ore. on, iji a. d wit hout mivrdring us, tough e have iii pr~p~ ht t firjhher, for ioart of the nec.
rie f lyft.-Have theY anly _fire armns P fai C4
Onl tzofizees, replied hie, and one of thei I
vow Aft n the boat and, ftI&to defp r fe(
rogestha ae with them could lii taken, I 3 trtt el aued the iref suwuk return to~ t
du1t Wl, fad 1 let us retire.a littlefit
under te oering of the wood, and we c
takfarther, andthee it was I ma~de my c-..
dios with them, which they very gratef a]

It was nodt~ ogefrwe "mae to a ref in
itioin to~go'tand attack tihe villains the t
' men fired on therv and killed one of the ti
tain's greateft enemnics, and wiounded anlot Q
the reft cried out for mercy, which w as
ed them, upon condition they wo- I(e C, he true to him, in helping im~ o~ rec over cI
ihi hich they all promtid tod(o Ii a fol rmanketr; however, I- dvlifrd the cataz 0
keep them bound, arAherf our next car f(
to fecure the boat, without which -it was f
pofible reach the fhip. ~
To~ fliortef 'the rclation as me s vl, e xertc'd all our neufijrus fo ol




'CR US E0 8

at iafi, the~ lhip] Was recovered according to ouir w iflh; anA now therae remaiied nothing but the difpofal of the-prilfoners, the moll dangerous of 'which we refolved to leave on the- ifland. I gave the ars and rall the necefj ,ariesJ Ihad in my caftle ; and telling then all, mny whole fthrr, I charged them to be kind to the Spaiards that I had Lint for over. They prolnifed mne very faqjr. an~d fo 1.informed them of every thing neeffary for their fulififflcee; fo takitig with me my mnan Friday, my money, Imy parrot, &c. I went on board where the Captain treated me a-- his deliverer and behaved hianfeif to me with the uti-noft gratitude andi civ ility. Upon the i 2th of December, a(686, we 1 t fail, and landed in England the imth of jan1 1687, after I ha4 been. abfent fromt my n ative,c yuntry u~pwad ofthirty iveyears
After my arrival, and I bad a littlerefrfhedI mylialf, I began to inquire into the ftac of' my affairs fond my fi G aptain'$s widow alive, but in very mean circunaflances. Son alter I went into Yorkfhire, whcrbm I found fa Tmily in general either dlead1 or lofl, f) that I kneW' not where to find tlhen. I found thiat there was no provifion made for mc ; upon which I took my man Fridazy and weni: to Lifbon in~ order to find the Porttiguefe Captain wh ok me on board on the coafl: of Africa i ~ c kcaou, from~ 1him, what was become of my plantation atl h BaziIl Ac, cording to my wifb, after fomne little fearch I Ifounid him'4out, and liegave me a very Ifatisfaftory account of all matters, mno '- particularly of ray plantation in'the Brazils ; which had becu fo hoiflymaup~cd in ;wy abfepce, that




84 ,R B I N S 0 N

that beyond my expeaation, I found my worth 40001o. fierling ; with which, as fI as poffible, I refolved to make the beft ofa way to England; and by the' advice of -t Captain, I was perfuaded to go by lan which had like to have proved fatal to and all that were in my company ; for fnows being fallen, the wolves and be. were driven out of the woods, and thouj there were more than 2o of us together, thi fet upon us many times, and indeed, it not without the greateft hazard and difficult we preferved ourfelves from being devoured the particular relation of which would be t long to trouble the reader with.
In our farther patTffage through Franr we met with nothing uncommon or remark able ; we got fafe to Paris, and after a fh fray there, went to Calais and landed at Dov the 14th of January in a very cold fefon.
When I came to London, I found my b of exchange all arrived, and the money read to be paid at fight, which when I had rece ed, it came into my mind to return to Lifbo and from thence to the Bragils, to look aft my plantation ; but upon fecond though I concluded it beft to fell it, and on this a count I thought it proper to write to my c refpondent at Lifbon, and defire his advi and affiftance, who readily gave me his prop ife to do all he could for me; and in truth I afterwards found he acquitted himfelf to in every particular with the greateftjufti and integrity.
In ihort, he fold my eflate for me to beft advantage, and remitted to me for bills




CR USOE. 85

bills for three hundred and twenty pieces of eight, a fum much greater than I expeded. And now I began to think it high time to fettle myfelf, Providence having made fuch a plentiful provision for me that I wanted nothing to make myfelf as happy as I could wifh.
HIaving caft my anchor, and for the prefent bid adieu to all foreign adventures, I had no other care or concern upon me but the education of my brother's two fons. One of them I bred a gentleman, and the other I bred an able failor ; and foon afterwards I married a virtuous young gentlewoman, of a good family, by whom I had two fons and a daughter ; but. fhe dying, I grew difconfolate and melancholy, and at the inftigation of my nephew, refolved I would once more make a voyage to the Eaftindies, which I did in the year 1694, and in my paffage visited my Ifland. A full and particular account of which I intend hall be the fubje& of the fabfequent parts of my narrative.








H FARTHER-










A4D VE N T4J R E-S ROi,&IIVStN CA-US'O






m ind, and took up 0m tha d~ty1 t ita d ipldoften ak meu the~ refon of 3 tede and endearig erfiontoget my failyj t engtt tro uht~ tto rfthe advatage. In this rural retirement I began

tl.nk M~~l a hpp a CodW il, e.b
onaf de al y hapi''sw sd lt o e






R U, S 0

thoughts a d inclinations, My countryy life grew burthmfpme, to rae And in flidti, I left my farm, left of b.pufc keeping, and in,,'a, few months;4ftfr, i ettirned to-London ; hut'tbwe j could fittdnothit g to entertain me =d divert my inclian4oly. It was ibe beginning.of the, ear i6q3,,Whon my nephew, *bo;n Lhad bred up tqthefc, wa jetuj qed from Ais yoyap, Captain oft111aqjb1p 4e, we*,out in ; whorony-Bg M one mottling, told me, it wks proLT tG7 him by fopte mpophants to-make a voyage tothe Eaflindics and if I would go,:he would 4E!dArt4ke to land mc:,qpon my, iflanJo that I might 114'Ve aTi--.OPPqrtUnitYJo inquizeiftto the ftaf e ofmy new kingdom.
j 9 14 before he canic, to mop, itcamq into my' tbou&s., to get a -paterit, anA fill my I Qand with inbabitonts. W4t, 4e faid I,,fient-,youhitAer, S ad, -1hq
zath A- wJgge And t1tough I liked,
motion, ye-t I *rouW.)nqt,1et him know it at, fi1f1;:,hqWe-yffr, ;4ftqr #,Iit0e,paufr,,I told him if he woqld tot me-4own'an4 call Jor- mc at bis return,', I wou ceT ainly.go with him. As,. to Calling for in% as be came back he told xnx it was imjKaaicajie. But, Wid he,, I will till you what. we Aran do,;. zw 1711q, havc-, a jZwb ready, (ramed on boart4 alh ch. we, ),.,iqy eajdy puA, torctkratany ti m:7,-a#dyja may return at your pkaI was pot loipg, in forming my refolutions, but conqaxy to the advice of all my fr is, Fully determined to utWortake the vepp-,,
I
and, in ofoer to it,, lmade chy will, and ;ptA all my aff0ii.rs, in the beli pofturr I could, pof
and fo with my trulty ferventt Friday in the beginning of Yanuary, 1694, 1 went on board,






89 R 0 B I S S 0

bo!alaodd4ook wifth ine 4evvnd artificers wit "d cargo, for the better -flocking Ary AaWe had riot been long out at f6a, but '*c "" Qvexijkozi by a ftotrh which drove U, thimeoa(l of Ireland, as far as Galway' wh wowere obligodtof-ay twenty aysforavn On the 5thof Fohruary, the wind prefc iti and we bwl a 'very good gale for ftveral d Ozt the'210th in -the oveningi,,fhe mate cut,'thm he faw a flalh of fireiand-lyeard a upon, whieh, we all tan to the quarfe 46 fmm whe6ce ir a diftahce faw a 'e i
fi4v,-whic'N fycrto aur reckorting,--tyt-conclurtcoahl bo no, oxhia-r r1mw 44hip:,that had ta fire at fea, and that 4 cduld hot be ar off tht repiurrof the gun, which we beatd fe Vet times. We toade to it with all -our L61, a C foon perceived it was a great ffiip burning- t
of the fea ; I irrif"C&ately or C
cd five gun: to be fired, tliau ihe pobe peo xn ght pei celve that,,ther* w4s de4iveranre
IJAIM, WhO Corifequently mightrific flycir iv 'in their- boats 4ior was it Iong beforib the 1h a blew up.,
We hungou t our Janterrns, rnd about ti f in-ilm niorning wbon it began to be light, It faw two. boats making towards us, and It
made a-fignal for them to come on board t' took them all up, being me-n, worsen and c dkew -in all fixty four. It was a Frjftich of 8oo-tons, bound 'from-Canada, and by a
.xwgIjg"ec of the fteerfman it was Ieton iv t 1kerage;, f%) that in all probability' p; owc- nce bad not Tdntus to their #Fi Ra I t ey had every lotil ptr4licd. t
Ne erl





R U S 0 1 ,

Never were pedple, certainly fo 6verjoye(j as theft poor, c features we're. _AA"YIr paffengen- thtii* were; two priefi.% an old e &nd a -young onew; the old one was, a Rupid fJlow, b'At, the' )-rog one was a very niw*ft fine gentiezria'a. After theirA Url*rif&,WVprk#tr wail: ovrx:and they had"- hebm refireffied rib the ttd mantter- ouf -fhip wo4d afl6wi',the
c"in and, orm: of the pricfts defirc&totpeak with, me,-,und.offercd us the moncy.amd *tIs thny had, Caved, which 1, re Med,,telling du:4n,
ftwsrs was 'tofavethornw, tnlftotto )bh6oder
thr#4 They told us, what they had twdeffrt of uswasto fet thein on fhere lome- where -in ourpalfage. As to I mding,, we told, theoi that heirtg,,bound to the Ealtindirs, we couldn't di iliau*ithout changing;ou 'zourfe, irr dffiat we coul&:nor j"Itify'; but we wfoad carry then till *C nict with a fhip bound either to EnglAnd or France,- that would take -them ad board- bowbvet-, our provisions btgintIrzg jEq fall fficiW4 we refolved, i D 4and ihenrat NowfouncH"O., which was not :Ybuch ovit of'otar, way-z A*id accor4inglyj as we-propoted, Ji4i. About a weclA time we catne to the banks of Nww foundlaiid; W' hi ra they hireA, a ij ark to'carry them 4o;F-tance, allbut the young prieft',and two or 11tite of 'the faijors, who chofe to go w itIVAISO, j'41 _, I I "I '.: I r I
Ndw direffing our courfe to the S; S. -E. about tw"ty- days4fter -we met with WiW*r 2dvenlute4 that give us, ti ftefh 6pporkrzi4y to cx-cmifeour humanity. in latitude of, t!71 we faw a fail bearing tow;ttAs ti that had loit -idl her taad firing a gun in tokinn of diffirefr ;
the wind being X. WC f1613 c4tine'up"to' 4"peak
2 to





1?- UB I N'S 011N




They bad~i ben oled about fortdcytal da an __r lotf~re o ai fpotii ha-n~e nohn-freeve days


In thisi~k 4u*p were the pafntsuag




be imagnid Th woman ~ diAa t wih thzt gmtf'ifclyta ePe kh~on a n ad L whi-r at fe


tray afe:m ,hd-ypo h bp j 1 wht W Col aw I~ re wez~ took, unbad u wAf-hp ewr w i.lttd 79 t







five&-; and bridaly, Who faw his, faMer at, a 11&2110 j t"- iO'hf;B Witb 21] The J Y'IiWaginhble, and ealbrntcd,; him with extre-nia t&4crDefs.
it was the iothof Apvil th-At, I fet my, f0a C)n fhor e the Jecond time, when. my t-aithf-pi, iponiard, an te y onc more, carne up
to nil ; hof.-= k now, rne atfi rft ; but wheat I hAd hinted to him who I was, no man could C-,Cprcfs Or-hahaw'(- h6fai with, gre** r grratiude -flwiook trf-- by -the hand, in4 afk6d tat ifl oWdnotgo;, andtakepoffo-fhoti.ofmyol-d babiMtioa,,,mRcrc I fourrd-theyhad- made coft-n fidembleimpyovements. queAiuns, andht-- as, tcaAily "f*vrrtd, mejtelling we wah4f what ftxango confufwil th&y bad with, the Engliffirriefi, Wl*b dtfigoed to bave mwde=dthem: Whilewe were talkirj& the vwn -w hom -he 1:104UM't IrCttffned W3 thr CICVM, moire. Thcf( ,fAid he, are fowe of rhooft- tibar owe their -I Vft to I ycur gi .odnr-fs.--Andzftor
-he b'Ad M-w4e 6v7M: fenfibIx, who I was, thry all fallued, me in, a VCTY'61 "Cful and handfofug

Bcforel rckm vOtat happened in the Mold, 2s itwras velawd b) the Spaniard, *vy GiovarAorl I mt4L not omita 4hary -whkh; I "itt r in nly Rwfner aarra6vir% z Jdft btforo,,*a weigWd anby the' c are -Uftija eapt ivi wa5 tirAely 101-eVerikd though not WkkO1ItAbMedifRVulf-y : AhdirAdkgd, o far it, probl CdL*d' thatvwo frIJOWgi tbal -bad been
to gel tome ayms, aud,'4* flil):s boat amd Wx away to, the AaAd, wid joimd their h!t0h6ir were five E094i&:Iuthe





a 4R O B I N S ON

the ifland, which, as the Spaniard reports i the following narration, was the caufe ofgr ilforder and confufion amongst them.


The Spaniard's relation of what happen d in tt Island, from mny departure till myfecond landing.

Y OU may remember, fir, you fent me o
a voyage; and indeed, I was not a litti
furprifed to find, at my return, that you ha t left us. We had a very good paffage; and i deed, my countrymen were overjoyed to find I had fo miraculonfly elfcaped; and when I ha chewed the arms and ammunition which I ha brought, they were transported to the higher degree. After a little flay, we got what w J could from the favages, made bold with two their canoes, and fo came all of us over to t ifland; where we had no fooner landed, bu we found the Englifkmen had quarrelled with one another, and had attempted to murder an deftroy their fellows, and were often very n putting their wicked pra&ices in execution.
One day it happened, that as two of my Spaniards were in the woods, one of the fo bereft of the Englifhmen came up to them, and made heavy complaints how cruelly they were ufed by their countrymen, and that if we did not; take them under our protection and give them affiflance, they muft inevitably be ftarvc! and undone. When thby came to fupper, oc of the Spaniards, in a gentle and friendly man-' ner', began to reprimand the mutinous Englifhi men : That it was a great pity their countrymerr should





CR US 0 9

ihouaid iftil, and therefore intreated them to fuffer their countrymen to procure their fubfiftence without farther diflurbance ; to which they replied, Let them flarve and be damn'd, for the aifland is ours, and if they will not work for us, thyfiall have seo Jare in it. Come yack (faid Atkins) -cha all dare to build in our dominions without our confent ? And as we afterwards found out, they had certainly murdered them, if they had not been prevented : However, they pulled down their huts, and did them all the damage they poffibly could. When they had done this villany, they came back to the caflle, boafting of what they had done; when one taking hold of a Spaniard's hat, twirled it round, saying, And you Signior yack Spaniard Amez kave the famefntjauce if you do not mend your mannes. This quarrel in a fhort time grew fo
-high, that if we had not timely interpofed and taken away their arms, in all probability there had been murder.
Thefe wicked fellows, perceiving that they had made all of us their enemies, began to-relent, and to beg for their arms, but this we pof-. fitively refufed, which made them fo mad and defperate, that they left us in the greatest paffion imaginable. They were hardly gone but their two countrymen came to us with their complaints, telling us they were ruined ; and truly fir, we could not help thinking it very hard, that nineteen of us should, from time to time, be bullied and infulted by three fuch notorious villains.
It was with fome difficulty we perfuaded their two countrymen from pursuing and killing them with their fire arms, but upon our promifing





94 R 0 B I N S 0 N

promising that they Thould have juftice do them, they defifted. About five days after being almost ftarved, they came to us in a very fubmiflive manner, and begged heartily to hav their arms reftored, which upon certain con ditions we at laft granted. But to great was their villainy that there had not paft abow three days, but they began their old trade again.
And nowit was that an accident happened that not only obliged us to lay afide all private animosities, but hlikewife to provide for ou mutual fecurity.
One night, as I lay in my bed, I was difturb c ed with unufuial fears and apprehenfions. I got up, and related the matter to one of my Spanifh friends, who anfwered,fuch hints were C 'not to beflighted; and advised me to look out P carefully ; adding, that certainly there was fom nmifchief upon the flocks. Accordingly, we went up to the top of the mountain, where we dif- a covered a light, and heard the voices of feveral t men,7which terrified us exceedingly. W u could not tell what to conje&ure, and therefore tent out old Friday as a fpy, to try if hq cold learn who, and from whence they were t he returned in a very fhort time, and brought I us word, that they were two different parties, f different nations ; and that after a bloody battle, r they had landed there by mere chance, in order to t devour their prisoners; and that he believed as jaon as it was light, a bloody battle would enfue.w
Old Friday had hardly ended his relation, but an unufual noife gave us to understand that the M engagemerit was begun ; aud iiothing could be more bloody and obftinate, nor men of more invincible




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title The most surprising adventures, and wonderful life of Robinson Crusoe, of York, mariner
author The most surprising adventures, and wonderful life of Robinson Crusoe, of York, mariner
publicationStmt
date 2014
distributor University of Florida Digital Collections
email ufdc@uflib.ufl.edu
idno http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00021429/00001
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The most surprising adventures, and wonderful life of Robinson Crusoe, of York, mariner
Defoe, Daniel, 1661?-1731
extent 144 p. : ill. ; 15 cm. (12mo)
publisher [by Isaiah Thomas] and sold at the Worcester bookstore.
pubPlace Printed at Worcester, Massachusetts
type ALEPH 025067237
notesStmt
note anchored true Evans
Welch, d'A.A. Amer. children's books,
Brigham, C.S. Robinson Crusoe,
Ascribed to the press of Isaiah Thomas by Welch.
Signatures: A-M (A1 recto blank).
"Farther adventures of Robinson Crusoe."--p. 86-132. "Robinson Crusoe's vision of the angelick world."--p. 133-144.
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language ident eng English
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keywords scheme #LCSH
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item Castaways -- Juvenile fiction
Survival after airplane accidents, shipwrecks, etc -- Juvenile fiction
Shipwrecks -- Juvenile fiction
United States -- Massachusetts -- Worcester
Juvenile literature -- 1795
Bldn -- 1795
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pb n 1 facs img001.jpg
2 img002.jpg
The Baldwin Libray
Univtmit
~m UB of
RmB .
3 img003.jpg
ir
4 img004.jpg
"I
1i
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5 img005.jpg
F-
1~;2 (.
6 img006.jpg
7 img007.jpg
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8 img008.jpg
Fr o.NTIrSPIECE, See page 2,7.
ROBINSON CRUSOE,
After being caft away was dafhied again Rocks 1to l' Ii
le held falft until the wave was abICLd, and Lhcn ith ,aie.-.
di4cudty wSJdi the Land.
9 img009.jpg
rf .
THE MOST SUR P RI S I N
A D V E N T U R E S,
S :ANH WONDER FCJL
SL- I F E
o rF
SROBINSONCRUSOE,
Of YoRK, MARINER.
a 0Nx T A I N I I o'
A full and particular Account how his Ship
was loll in a Storm, and all his (Compar.-.
ions were Drowned, and he only was cdft
upon the Shore by the Wreck ; and how heo
lived eight and twcnty Years in an unin-
habiid Ifland, on the Cuaftl of America, &c.
.*.,w i1 I, ft, *
A true Relation how he was at lafl miracu.
luufly preferred by Pirlates, &c. &c. &c.
PRINTED at =Drtft, MASSACHUIUETTI,
And SOLD at theW'I)RCE trERj BOOksrOOE.
It 795.,
10 img010.jpg
PREFACE.
M thir new atridrnment of the ,,n'de-fil life and
7.0/t jurppl.ng adventure; eif v,, tz nj,' Cu/ie,
I think viivfi/f oUrged to acquaint tihe reader,
7k, et :,h p'*yle care has ken. taken I. p .:, .:A
hiflnry attiree, to curreS Jfime wnlaktr ina t,.rm,
ian. irfl.ons, and to add a cowUd-,abl, nuwit, eoJ
ladl and mat. ril ofe7rvatzons that h..te of t.e ,-
"urred, and were never publfked bat! in this cdi-
tion, ;
The general fucccfs and the jufil applaufc tIl
rVork at large haj met with, render I" netdt.'r /fr
we to Jay any ihsn in ts omnmendation ; nur do
J think the weak exceptions that haue bhrn made a-
gainf thbe pofMibiliiy of thetflory, de/rie any oh.
Jervation. lihiat if thewhole i'a (a is fiu tjq'tled)
a were fi&ion ? Yet the defign is /.fju/,li, carried
On, and Jo intrfperfed with curious obferiatscn
and moral refefliuons, that allperfn .-n, who have any
itafle Jr the metaphorical way sf writirg, v.ft
allow this a maflerpiece, and I rvillvetsure to.fy,
ithe lirfl and beft of the kind that ever aplc'ared pi
the Englyfk language.
But as I hope Ithe performance riillfpjk ietc'r
ig its own favour than any body can prer ,'J t? o di,
JJiall not trouble the reader, nor nyfelf, r.ai/ Li fle-
lefs apologies, or attempt to peijuade any oae into
an t/.mc-n ij a w'akft uruzserjally eitenad.
Let th: i tidIgmentl. I. huh ir crimiratled into ar
arrow a (vnipajs as pcfiMbe. he but read over w'th
thoft ernafi .,ratis and /* datenefi a.hth tMe n'sire
Cif the d-j'gn dt.'>,'s. and tiun there is iu dtibi to
A.- made, bit the .,:nalid radtjr 'dlijfnda fifficient
return both for his trouble and exper. Ic; and
zoitA thrft, camilions, avd tonl this prefiumptlion,
JIf/uhit te fil'!owzngjctas to si pcrufai.
11 img011.jpg
LL > .
:-T I i-] r '
t 1
K AN 1 ADV W4NTURES
ROB S Iq G' CRUSOE.
HE that pretends to publish to the world an
account of his own life and adions, is
doubtlefs under the ftrongeft obligations to
co-ifine himfelf within the ftriaeft rules of
modefty and truth : And this, I can aTffurethe
public, I moft folemnly determine to do in
the following narration.
I was born at York, in the year 1632, of a
reputable family. My father was a merchant,
born at Bremen ; his original name was
Kreutznaer, which for the fake of the Englifh
pronunciation, was afterwards changed into
Crufoe. My mother's name was Robinfon, a
native of the county of York ; and for that
reafon I was called Robinfon, after her maid-
en name.
I was the youngest of three brothers. The
eldeft was an officer, and killed in the wars in
the Low Countries ; and the other I could
never learn any thing of. My father intend-
ing me for the law, particular care was taken
of my education : But all the pains and ex-
penfe were to no purpose ; my inclinations
4. were
12 img012.jpg
6 'R 0 B I A SO
were bentann.:her wayi, wand r.,'tlhirn u o.u1
ferve myturn, but at all hazards, 1 mult co to
lea. ",
My father and mnrhclr were bF'h i(_!6ntl!,-
againft it, and ufed a thoufand arguments to
di;ffutade me ; but it was all to no Furpofe My
resolutions were fo firmly fettled, that neither
the intreatic .f 3 ni.,ft te r,. r father. nor the
tears of an afi.:ii'ima:e r.r)h ir, c'.iild make a-
nyimpreffior i1..' me.
I was then about nineteen years old, when
nmeetiag with one of my fehoolfellows at Hull,
who was going with his father, who was maf-
ter of a fhip, to London, I acquainted him
with my refolutions, and he readily promifed
me I should have a free paffage, and be pr;-
vided with all other neceffaries fuitable to the
voyage. Accordingly, without imploring a
bleffing of my parents, I took shipping on the
firft of September, 1651.
Our fhip was hardly got clear of the Hum-
ber, when we were overtaken by a violent
form ; and, being extremely feafick, I began
to reflect upon my father's good advice, and
the happinefs of a middle fate of life which
he propofed to me ; refolving, if ever I should
be fo happy as to fet my feet again upon dry
land, that I would return to my parents, and
beg their pardon, and bid a final adieu to my
wandering inclinations.
Thefe were my thoughts during the ftorm :
But that was no fooner over, but my good
refolutions decreafed with the danger, particu-
larly when my companion, coming' to me, afk-
ed me if I was not a little frighted by the
form, yhich as he expreffed it, was only a
cap
13 img013.jpg
C R U S, 0O%'.
cap L.il ,r wind. C..--in bv-ys fayss he)
turn out, fee what fine weather we have now,
and a good bowl of panch will drown all
your paft forrows."
in fhort, the punch was made, and I got
fairly drunk, and then all my former refolu-
tions and notions of returning home vanished.
I remained hotheaded federal days, until I
was roufed up by an accident, that had very near
put a final end to my wandering refolutions.
Upon the fixth day, we came to an anchor
in Yarmouth road where we lay windbound
with feveral other veffels from Newcaftle ;
but there being fafe anchorage, aLd cur
fip being tight, and our cables good,
the sailors defpifed all dangers, and were as
merry in this ftlation as if they had been on
fhore. But on the eighth day there arofe
fach a strong gale of wind as prevented our
riding up the river, which ftill increasing, our
fhip rode forecaftle in, having fliipped federal
large feas.
It was not long before a gefieral horror feiz-
ed the feamen ; and I heard the mailer ciy,
Lord have mercy upon us, we hall all be loft !
For my part, I kept my cabin, very fick, till
the dreadful apprehenfions of fudden death
made me come upon deck, and there I was ter-
ribly affrighted indeed.
The fea went mountains high, and nothing
was to be expected but unavoidable deftruc-
tion. Two of the hips had already cut their
mals by the board ; two more had loft their
anchors, and were forced out to the mercy of
the temper ; ,and we, to fave our lives, were
forced
14 img014.jpg
$ R o I S ON
forced to cut away both -oUir" forcmaft and
mainmaft.
It is eafv to judge the condition I was in,
who being but a frefh water failor, was in a far
worfe cafe than any of them. Our fhip was
very ftrong, but, as I underflood by them, too
heavy laden, which made the failors cry out,
She would founder.
The form continued extremely violent ;
and in the middle of the night I could hear
fome crying out, That the fhip had fprung a
leak ;" others, That therewas four feet water
in the hold." I was ready to give up the ghoft
through fear, when on a fudden all hands
were called to the pump, and I among the
)eiL.
wit __ __
Whilft we were all in this confufion and
diftrefs, the after happened to efpy fome
light colliers, and fired a gun asa final of our
nsifery. I was not then a failor good enough
to know the meaning of the gun ; but I fcon
understood it was a token of ourextreme dan-
ger, and I mufl freely own it is impoffible for
me to describe the agonies I laboured under.
Ha-lppy
15 img015.jpg
C R U S 0 E.
Happy it was for u% that in the Qora, they
regarded our signal, and with a great deal of
hjrard put nut zheir long boat, and by Won-
derful Providence faved our lives, bat with the
create difficulty ; fur we had hardly g.oL. into
the boat, but we faw our flip fii-k to the bot-
torn, and we had infallible been every foul
drowned if they had not come in that very
nick of time to our affififance.
It was not without a great deal of danger
and difficulty that they recovered their own
qlip. However, they made a fhik to land us
at a place (ailed Cromcr, near \%interton
lighrhoufe ; from whence we all walked in a
moltl miferable drowned condition to Yar-
meuth,'where the good people furnifhed us
with neceffaries either for London or Hull.
I haveoften thought linee, that it was very
Arrange that after thefe great misfortunes at
getting out, I did not (like the prodigal) return
to my' father, who having heard of the fhip's
misfortune, had all the reafon in the world to
ihink I was !ofR. Bnt my ill fate flill pushed
me on in fpite of all the firong convictions of
reafon, confcience and experience.
After three days flay at Yarmouth, I met
the young man that invited me to go on boaid
v.-with his father. I found his face and his be-
haviour very much altered ; and I found like-
wife he I*i told his father who I was, and
that 1 had taken this voyage only for a trial,
in order to proceed farther abroad hereafter.
When theold man faw me, lays he, '" Young
man, you ought never to ai tempt to go to fear
any more ; for, depend upon ii. you never
willbe prcfpcrousin a feafairing condition.
You,
16 img016.jpg
to I' 0 B 1 N S 0 .V
You fee what ill fuccef. Heaven has l"t beforL
your eves ; and perhaps our miL-uorune mn.i'
in C.mie meafure be owing to you. Plav, (add-
ed hel tell me truly upon what move VOU
firft undertook this voyage." Upon thls I
told him the whole; atthe end of' -vhich
ihe broke out into the following exclamani!on:
Oh, yeeternal powers wh:,t ,re:itt offence.
have I committed, ilit I Ihould take fuch a
defperate, ibniidoncd wretch intomv fhip, that.
ihas brought al; ihele tmileries and misf.'iiunei
upon me !" After his patffionr .S a little a-
bdtcd, priceeded--" Y-ung man, depend upt n
Jt, if you do rnot return, anrid submit to your
parents, wherever you go, the anger of God
will certainlypurfue you. and you will meet
with nothing but ruin and difalier, until you ri
father's words are fulfilled upon you." And
io he left me.
I And now again I had fome notion ofreturn-
ing home: But that was quickly overruled by,
a foolish opinion,that if I did, my neighbours
and acquaintance would laigh at me. So
firange is the nature of youth. that th.,ugh
theyoftendo foolifli things without either
fhiame or reminorfe, yet at th'- fami time they
are ashamed to own their folly, and repent.
In fhort, I made the heft of my w -y to Lon-
don, being at all hazards reful ved upon a \'oy-
age ; and being acquainted wh the captain,
of a Ihip, a voyage 1 foon heard of to the coalt
of Guinea. Having fame money, and appeat-
ing like a gentleman, I did not go on hb-oard
like a common failor, but foon got fo far into
the captain's Favour, that he told me I should
be his mcTffinatc, and should have full libeity
17 img017.jpg
C R U S 0 E. it
tn carry with rue what merchandi;fe I fhouid
think fit, and todifpofe of it to my own advan-
tage.
I was wonderfully pleaded with this kind
offer. and concluded that now I had an op-
prorturiity of making my fortune ; and in or-
der nvmy vci)age I lent to my friends for
fciric inonev to lit me out ; who accordingly
remitted me forty pounds, which I laid out in
goods according to hi' diretiuns. He taL.i.sht
ine to keep a journal, and fever'l of the mo:
ulefal parts of navigation. And indeed, by
his alillarnce and my own induftrv, in. this
.i ,agre I became both a ILill.'r and a merchant.
Part of this voyage I was exccffively fick of
a calenture, Occfiioned by the heat of the cli-
miite, being in the latitude of almost 1, de-
grees north or the line. However, I reco\cr-
ed, and managed my, little flock fo sttll, that
I brought over with me fiv'e pounds and nine
ounces of gold dull, which pr-.duced at Lon-
don near three hundred pound. flti "l.
Soon after inN return, may good. friend the
captain died. Although this Wa a very great
grief to nme, yet I reliAved to go another voy-
age % ith his mate, who had got the command
of the fhip. This voyage provWd a very un-
faccefsful one. 1 rarriid with me ai.iut one
hundred pounds, and left the reft with the
captain's widow, arid Fo to lea we i.cnt. but
as we were tailing towards the Canary fiands,
we found we were chafed h,'v a Salee rover,
who in fpiie of all the fllil uc could make, in
a fhont time came up with us ; anid now there
.as no icmidy but to fight or be taken.
They
18 img018.jpg
2 R. 0 B I N S 0 A
They had 18 guns, and our fhip but 12.
however, about three in the afternoon, w,
came to an engagement. Many were ..i!lc1
on both fides ; but at length being overp.vc-
ed by theirnumbers, we were forced tol .; c.mir.t,
and all carried into Salee. Our men wei :.
fent to the Emperour'a court to be fold ; but
the captain of the pirate, taking a particular
liking to me, kept me. for his own flave
It was in this miferable condition that mi'
father's words came afrefh into my rer-.r.'.
brance, and my thoughts were continually' a;
work to make my efcape. My pabt,. u
trusted me with the management of his :-,ji;
and houfe ; and -indeed I was not w,':11
hopes but at fome time or other an op'.:uri.-
tymight offer. The worft of it v.'a., I iail
no mortal to communicate my thought[ to ;
and fo for two years, I could find 1'.-.in
pra&icable.
In length of time, I found my p.'.. ''
grown fo poor, that he could not fit .c: '.,i
fhip as ufual ; and then he ufed c.-.a..
once or twice a week to go out a fifhnig, i.L-
ing me and a Morifco boy to row the boat:
and fo much pleaded was he with my dytr.r:t.
in :..i.;,, that he would often fend E; \\'i-!
Moor, his kinfman, and the boy, to ctch fK..
for him.
One morning as we were at the fpc-. ti-'.'-,
arofe fo thick a fog that we loft our w ;.-.A
rowing all night, when it was light we fc'.,-
ourfelves at leaft two league in the cre-n .
however, we made a fhift to get on ll.cr-.,
But, to prevent the like misfortune for t! e fu-
ture) my patron ordered g carpenter to L'.
_" I *. *-
19 img019.jpg
C R U S 0 E.
lUttle ftate room in the middle of the long
boat, with a place behind tk. fteer, and other
conveniences to keep out the weather.
In this he wouldoften take us out a filing ;
and one time particularly, he invited three or
four 1,erfons of diflintlon to go along with
him, and made extraordinary preparations for
their entertainment : Providing alfo three fu-
zees, with a fufEcient quantity of powder and
{hot, that they might have fome fport at fowlinq,
as they paffed along the more. The next morn-
ing the boat being in readinefs, on a fudden
their minds altered. However, my patron
ordered us to go and catch a dith of fifh ; for
that he was refolved his guefts should fup with
him.
And now it was that I began to think of my
deliverance ; and in order to it, I perfuaded
the Moor to. get fomre provisions on board,
and alfo fome powder and fhot to {hoot cur-
lews, which were very plenty in thofe parts.
I took care to provide privately whatever elfe
I could think was the moft neceffary for the
p-refent expedition, refolving to make my ef-
cape. or perim in the attempt.
When we were paft the castle, we fell to
7..-.., and I flood farther into the fea ; and
when we were got at leaft a league, I gave the
boy the helm, and feized Muley by furprife,
and-threw him overboard : Muley (faid I)
I never designed you any harm, and feek
nothing but my redemption ; I know you are
able to fwirn to fhore ; but if -you offer to
follow me, that very moment I will foot you
through the head :" Upon which he inflant-
B ty
20 img020.jpg
14 1 R O B I N S8O N
ly turned about, and I make no doubt but fit
got fafe to fhore.
J-- # ------------ '.
r k IN
,.-.-'-.
S _. V l.
This adion frighted the poor boy e'.c'ed-
ingly ; however, I foon eafed him of hi- feir,
by telling him if he would be a goc ,i I'',
and fwear by Mahomet, and the beard (.F his.
father to ferve me faithfully, I would be 'cry
kind to him." The poor child feemed '.1-
derfully pleafed with my promife, and re ., il.
consented ; and from that time 1 began to
love him entirely.
We purfued our voyage, keeping flUll en
the Barbary coaft ; but in the dufk -'F ii
evening, 1 changed my courfe, steering "',r t-
ly S. and by E. that we might always b-' n. -,
the Pfhore ; and having a-pleafant gale, I f.--indl
the next day, by three in the after Cor. ',
were 150 miles beyond the dominioni f 'c h
emperor of Morocco ; yet fill I w:u, u:-d.r
dreadful apprehensions of being reta.e.
I continued failing for five days .eete.,
until I concluded that if any veffel % a- .n 'pur-
.fuit f me; I was gotfo f ar to the Lih'wrd
thba1
21 img021.jpg
C RI U S 0 E.
that they would not think proper to follow
me any farther.
After all this fatigue, I anchored in the
mouth of a little river ; but where I knew
not, neither could I fee any people to make
the difcovery. What I chiefly wanted was
frefh water, which I refolved to go on fhore
to find out as foon as it grew dulkifh : But no
foonerdid it begin to grow dark, but we heard
fuch cowlings and yellings of wild beafts and
morfters, that I muft needs own I was exceed-
ly terrified.
Poor Xury paffionately begged me not teo
go on fhore that night. The boy had a great
deal of wit ; for which, and fome broken
English which he had learned among the cap-
tives of our nation, I was mightily pleafed
with him. Neverthelefs, the cowlings, and
bellowings were fo dreadful that we had but
little reft that night ; and to add to our confu-
fion, we discovered one of the monsters
making towards us ; upon which I took up
one of my guns and ihot at him, whether I hit
him or not, I cannot fay-but be made towards
the fhore, and the noife of my gun increased
the ftupendous noife of other Monfters.
The next morning I refolveA to go on fhore,
and at all hazard. get foine frefh water.
The poor boy would have taken one of the
jars and fetched fome ; but I refused, tell-
iong him we would both go together and
take the fame fate ; and accordingly we took
our arms, and two jars for water, and away
we went.
I did not go out of fight of the boat for fear
the favagea should come down the river inrt
their
22 img022.jpg
x6 R, Q B I A- S 0 .V1
their, canoes, and take it away ; buit the boy-
feeing a vale a little farther, ventured to it,
and returning with precipitation, I thoueri,
that he was either p; li uedi by the [a'..a!,*r
fome wild beat ; upon which I ran tuw.io''.'s
hint, refolving to perilfh, or preserve hin ;
lkut as he/came nearer to me, I faw a creatuie.
hanging at his back, like one.ol our har-;.
but fi,-etli;nr larger, which prove I I.-, h.; ,-.d
and wholefome meat, and what add -.1 m.u!t t
ourjoy, the boy affured ma that theie wai
plenty of frefi water in the very ,.ie-ik w hc.e
the boat lay.
In this place I began to eonfid.:r thit thic
Canary ;flandi and Cape deVeid cml! .not
be far off ; but having no inl I LIf I I, 1 1 1. iC
not in what latitude we were, or wh.-,i 1o
ftand off tn fea for them. My hop-, %,et.: t.3
meet rim- ,-rthe Englilli trading vc-d'Iis, that
would conri-queiitiv take us in, ard irl -ve us.
The place I was in was doibtli.is that wild
uninhabited country that lies between the em-
peror of Morocco's dominions -rnd the ne-
groes it ahoUndswith wild beat; of all lurt'.
and the MNo'rs ufe it for hunting. Fr,.,m this
I thought I fi' mount Teneriffe in tL,e Ca-
naries, and tried twice to fleer my co-,'jrf-' rlat
way, bit was as .t.-ii dtin bckl., and c.m-
pelled to feek rnm, Lrtune ahni tho h.,e.
- One moniing Nery early we c-iTme t., n an-
chor at a I'n.,l1 point, and the tid- b-L-nn ing
to flow, We were preparing to go fithrr i, ;
but Xury, whofe youthful and pcneirating
eyes faw farther than I, defired me to keeD
, t to fe-a. or we fh6ould be d--.:uicited. Forr
;jo0k yrnder, mnafter (faid hi. arid lce dat hjee
ri- onler
23 img023.jpg
C R U 8 0 E.
monftler faft afleep on de fide of de hill: He
pointed to the place, and I discovered a lion
of pr..d i,-.ua fize balking himself under the
fhade of a hill. "Xury (faid I) you hall go
on flinre and kill him ;" the boy looked a-
mazed ; Me kill him (faid he) he eat me at
one mouth," meaning mouthful. Upon which
I took mv higgelr gun, and charging it well,
Ihot at him, anid broke one of his legs ; and
then with a fhot from my other gun I killed
him.
But the flefh of this creature not being
good for food, I thought this xv ws pending
our ammunition invain ; indeed 1 thought the
Ikin when it was dry, might be of oin_"m ufe,
and fo determined to .ie a it off, which took
up a whole day to effef.
From thence we went to the fouthward, re-
folving to live fparinolv on our provisions,
and gq on fhore as feldom as poffible, my de-
fign being to reach Gambia or any other place
about the Cape de Verd, in hopes to meet
fame European f-ip ; and if Prjvidtice did
B 2 tot
24 img024.jpg
8 1 R 0 B I N S 0 A
not favourme in this, my next resolution was
to feek for the islands, and venture myfeif a-
mnong the Negroes ; for without one of thefe,
I could have no other profpe& but flarving.
As we wte failing pretty near the fhore,
we could difcover federal people upon :r,
lookmifg after us. We could perceive they
were blacks, naked and unarmed, all except
one, who had formething in his hand like a
flick, which Xury told me was a lance, with
which they could kill at a great dirlance. I
was incliaable to have gone on fhore, but Xu-
ry cried 44 No, no." IHowever, I drew as
ne3i to the fhore as I could, end talked to
them by figns. till I made them fenfible I
wanted fomnething ; they made figns to me to
flop my boat, whilI two of them ran up into
the country, and in lefs than half an hour
brought me two pieces of dry flefhi, and foame
corn, which we kindly accepted ; and to
prevent any fears, they laid it down, and
went and food at a diftancc t!il we had fetch-
ed it on board, and then came clofe up to us
again.
But while we were returning thanks to
them, being all we could afford, two mighty
creatures came from the mountains in purfuit
of each other ; they pafred the negroes with
great fwiftnefs,andjumped directly into the fea,
wan -tonly swimming about, as if the water had
put a 'top to their fury. At lad one of them
coming nearer to theboat than I desired, I took
one of my guns and let fly at him and killed
him.
I cannot exprefs the conflernation of the
,or Negroes, upor.n heariIg the report of the
gun ; ..
25 img025.jpg
C ,I U S 0 E. 19
gun ; nor their furprife at feeling the creature
flain by it. I m rn.. figns to them to draw it
out of the water by a rope, which they ac-
cordingly did ; and then I perceived it to be
a beautiful leopard, which made me defirous
of the fkin ; and the Negroes being no lefs
defirous of the flefh, I freely gave it them.
As for the other (which was iikewife a leop-
ard) it made back to the mountains with
.-" :'.: !, fw iftnefs.
'i; groes having furnifhed us with the
Left provisions that the nature of the country
ard circurnftances would -allow, I took my
leave of them ; and in eleven days fail I came
in fight of Cape de Verd, or thofe iflands that
go by that name ; but could not by any means
reach either of them. Upon which I grew ex-
tremely deje&ed ; when Xury (with a fort of
terror) cried out, Maitro, Mafiro, a great
fip with a fail !" I foon perceived fhe was
a Portuguefe, and, as 1 conjetured, bound to
Guinea for Negroes ; upon which I ftrove all
1 could to come up with them ; but all my
ftriving had been in vain, if they had not hap-
pened to efpy, and fnortened their fail to flop
for me.
Encouraged by this, I fet up my ancient,
and fired a gun, -both as fignals of diftrefs;
upon which they kindly lay to, till I came up
with them. It happened there was a Scotch
sailor on board, to whom I made my cafe
known ; and then they took me into their
fhip.
You may well imagine my joy was exceed-
ingly great for this unexpected deliverance .
ofpecially when I found the captain of the
1hip
26 img026.jpg
*o I 0 B I N S O N
fip was very kind and compaffionate to mf
to whom, in return for his Irridlllnp, I ofer.
ed all I had, which he gcri r.-.ily refusedi
telling me, his Chriftian charity tai-iht hi
better. Thefe effe&s you ha'e 'Ia. h
will be a means to support you w hen v.u
eome to the Brazils, and 'provi.l-' f-.r N,.tr
pji'i._ h,.me to your native counir." An,
indeed he aaed with ftri&t juflce to rne in
all refpe&ts.
He bought my boat of me, and m".-' m hi'
note to pay me eight pieces,of ;lIt for iL
when we came to the Brazils. He ji Io !av
, me fixty formy boy Xury, fromwhlm 1 prt'
ed with great relucance ; howe e:-. th.' bov
being willing, I agreed he fhould be fat Jt
liberty after ten years service.
SWe arrived at the bay of All Suini., after
22 days fail. The good man wolld n.ot take
any .hing for my paffage. He 3'.:e me '-o
ducats for thee leopard's fkin, and 4.' forlhe
lion's. Ei. :,v thinghe caufed to he dei ered'
and what I would fell he bought. In flort
I made 2o0 pieces of my fmall cargo ; t!ri
with this little flock, I began as it w ,:re to en.
ter anew into the world.
He iecommiended me to an honefIt r!anter,
with whom I lived till I had mfi'T med my,
felf in the manner of planting and in Linn
fugar ; and obferving the great auiv.irntae. cA
that bufinefs, I refolved to get 'he money |
had left behind me in Ernglind remiticd, dnd
to buy a plantation.
In fhort, I purchafeda plantation adjolninr
to an honeftPortu-,ucfe, born of Enrltfh pa
rents, whom upon all occasions I found a very
kL-nd
27 img027.jpg
C A U, S 0 Z.
kiad and ufeful neighbour. Our flocks at"
firflt were both very low ; nel erthelefs, by our
i'dufty andcare, in a fhort time -we made
confiderabTe impro'.cmtnts. and began to grow
rich. And now it was I repented the lols
of my dlear bov Xury ; having no mortal to
affiftl me, nor any body to converfe with but
my neighbour. ,
I was in fime ncafsire fettled, before the
captain that took me, up, left the Brd.,ils. One
4ay I went to him nd i,..idl him'what ftoek.I
had left in London, and defied his afiftance
ir. getting a remitldnce : To which the good
gentleman c:,div cornienited, but would havw
in' ,I .ly fend for l.]IC, t. Il it fhoild nmilcarry,
ard if it diJ the reft would fiipport me. So
taking letters ..f prccuraLicnii froin me. he af-
fjr.-d me he would I r.c me to tie uimull of his
power, and in truth he kept hiis word, and
C': c:tremelv kind to me on all occasions.
Ard n,'-,w my wealth began to increase aL
pce : and in this Itte I might have lived
very happy, if my ambition and roving Incli-
nation had not had too great power over me.
I had now lived fom.e years in the Braails ;
and I not only learnt the lanrIiiage, but con-
ra,'cd an aicquiintance -with several of the
Tr.oft ernrincii retchants at St. S.ilvadore, to
whom relating the manner of my two vOyages
to Guinea, arid the great ad'arta"c i*f trading
iin thofe part, they rave Lfuch earnefl.,;ittntioti
uto what I Iaid, that thiiee came one morning,
and told me that tl-ev hld a mind to fit out a
ihip to go to Guinea, and if I would Qo heir
fipecargro; and manage the trade, I fliould
Sha c
28 img028.jpg
lt R O B I S S. N
have'an equal fliare. wiKhout putting in and
Thisi.took to be fo fair a proposal, that
upon condition they would look after rnv
plantation in my abfence, I c-_nfented to it
and accordingly, a fhip being fitted out, and
all things in readinefs, we fet fail the: f. r of
S- ptc rnber. i 695,.ftcering northward up.-.n the
c, all of Afica. But many days we hAd not
fi!ed, before we were overtaken b< a vNilei
fl-rm, which lafted 12 days fItcceiI'-ivey7
When the weather cleared, we f-iu.ni nur.
felves 1i degrees in the northern Latiude, up-
on the coat of Guinea,; uponwhich i h,: cap.
lain rai e reafons for returning, wh-ch 1 op,
polcd, counfelling him rather to !t1iLid away
for barbid.-.cs, where I jldg,.:,' w.- mi,;ht ail:
rive in fifeen dav;. So altering ci, course
we lecicd wellward, in order to rraih the
Leeward Iflands ; and here it was we wrcie o-
vertaken by a terrible :emnpcl.
In this great diftrefs, one of our me,, cried
out, Land, land !" When, Io.-,1 Ing out
that very moment, we found ou, Ihp was
firLck up-n thlie fand, and expected we Cihoul.1
fit.k, and thait we should be all inimmtdiatclvi
loft. Weknew not.wherewewere di %ern. ind
what was Worfe, were certain the Ilimr cold
n.it hri,.1 out many moment's lor.,-vi.
\VWhillf we were looking upon one another,
exoetting death every moment, the mate, affi fl-
ed by the crews hauled out the Ir-.n boat, and
eleven of uw committed ourfelvCS 'o [he fury ol
the fea, ond God'i metcy. We foon found thai
this hlta effort wai to no purpose ; for the tem1
peff was fo violent, and the fri.i ran lo very hig
thar.
29 img029.jpg
C R U 0. .2
ihat it wasimpofftible for the boat to live. When
we bad been driven abou a league, came a
prodigy ous wave .fLern, arid ove.let us in an
inllanr, tlo lhat -e had hard y tLime 10to call upon
God to receive our loul.
Wbhcnr men aie firuggling with the pangs of
death. they are comrnmonlv infenfible : But the
cale %as qu.re different A ith mre ; for while I
,was .ve .r helmed with the water, I had the
maol dre4dfut appicherdlions. and the joys of
Jicaven and the torments of hel! were alicrnate-
lv, in my thought', and e( flli 1 kept lItriving
on, while all my. corn aniiona we've Itll, till the
wave had fpent nleif,and. tetiring, had thrown
me upon 'he fhboie, half dead with the great
quantityii of water I .ad taken in during rny
firuggling ; however. I got upon my feet a: fal
as I could, jell antihcr ,%asc itiould carry me
back : Biut notwithf(landing I made all the (peed
I could, yet another wave came, which doalhed
meagainll a piece or a rock in luch a furious
minanner that it made me lerilelef : However
(recovering a little bt fore the tleurn of the next
wave, which' would dotit-ilel' have carried me
off) I held faft hold of the rock tnilthe lucceed-
ing wave abated, and then I made l-,ifi to teach
the main land ; where. tired and almofi [pent,
I fat down cuntemplating the manner of my
prefer prefeivation.
At'fer I had iciurned my thanks to almighty
Cod for this a.cndcrful pitferation, I began :oa
Icok about me, to corniider A hat place I was in,
and % hat was next to be done in order to ny
future fublifence. I could neither lee huufe
nor people ; wet and hungry, and nothing to
help me, not lfo much as a weapon to defend ma
a~ainLt
30 img030.jpg
4 RO BI 0 S O .N'
again the wild beat. In fort, l had not o n
in the world but a knife, a nohrt tobacco pyp
and a box half full o.f tobacco ; and what wn
worle, night coming on, 1 was under very gie
apprehenli.hun' ol being devoured by wild bea
that 1 hera hrGwlinre and oaring round abc,
me; fo that I had no protpekt but to eYpec a
other kind of death more terrible than that
had lo lately elcaFed. In this diltrels, I walk-
about a furlong into the country to leek frefc
writer, which 1 luckily happened upon; lo, tal1
ing to a tree, I heated myle!f I; that I could no
fall, and there I flept ild morning.
It was day light before I left my apartment it
the tie; when, coming down, and looking
round, I perceived that the tempw f1 was ceafec
and that the fhip was driven io the rock when
I escaped ; and looking. further, I lav thefhip')
boat lying about a mile to the right, where th
waves had caf her up.
I hoped to have got to the boat ; but the wa
tar between tiat and the fbi-re ren-lered that inm
practicable. So i tIrued again tow.rds the hip
in hopes to get something from thence for ml
present fubfillence.
At all hazards I refolved to get to the fhip'
and fo, stripping, leaped into the water, anr
fwimming round her, I had the good fortune t
efPy a roe hanging .o lowv down that I couli
reach t : By the help of 'liiich. with Iomedif
ficuitv, I got into the Forecaftle. Here I founl
that the fthip was bulged, her head listed u
against a bank, and her flern almoft in their
icr ; all her quarter, and what was there, wet
free and dry ; and I found the pr:viifins n
loodI
31 img031.jpg
C R UL S 0 "F !5
good order, and wanted nothing but a boat to
LaTr',' what I had occasion for.
NecelTrtv, which is the mother of invention,
put a projed into my head. There were on
board several I'pare yalds., a Ipare topmaft or
tvso.and three large fparsof wood. \\Withh thefe
I fell 1o work, flinging as many of them over-
board as 1 could manage, and tied them to-
gether that they might not drive away. When
this was done, I tied them together in form of a
raf', and laid three or four fhort pieces of plaok
on them croliways. I found it would bear me,
but ,ery little weight besides ; and ro, to
tirieogthen my raft, I cut a topmaft into three
or four lengths, and added them to it ; and
then I considered what ws molt proper to load
it with, it being then capable of carrying a tol-
er.able weight.
-'a- ..___ _-___=.
-c
,a7
32 img032.jpg
26 ROB IN S O Nr
At firit, I laid upon it all the boards I co60I
get, and then I lowered down three of the fea-
men's chests, and filled them with provisions of
ail forts. I found clothes enough, but then I
took no more than my prefent occafion re-
quired.
My concern was chiefly upon tools to work
with, and fire arms and ammunition ; and ac-
cordingly I found in my fearch, the carpenter's
cheft, and in the great cabin fome fire arms and
ammunition, all which I put on board ity
raft ; and o, with two broken oars, &c. I put
to feast.
Though every thing at firft feemed to favour
my defign, yet after I had failed about a mile, [
found on a fudden the forepart of my raft run
aground, fo that it was with the greatest diffi-
culty imaginable I kept my cargo tight togeth-
er ; and indeed if I had not been extremely dil-
igent and careful, all had been loft and funk in-
to the fea : But after tome time, Providence fo
ordered it, that at the rifing of the water my
raft floated again, and fo I happily landed my
. effecs.
Not far from the place where I landed, which
was at the mouth of a little cave, I discovered a
very high hill, furrounded with a great many
little ones and thither refolved ta go and
view the country, and fee what place was prop.
er for me to fix my habitation in ; and accord-
ingly, arming myfelf with a fowling piece, a
piftol aud fome ammunition, I afcended the
mountains, and there found I was in an ifl-
and, being surrounded by the fea. It feemed to
be a barren uncultivated country, and only in-
habited by wild .:?..
Returning
33 img033.jpg
C R U S 0 E.
Returning afterwards to my raft, I got my
goods on fhore; and being very much afraid of
the wild beats, 1 made a fort of fence or barri-
cade about it, which I thought might in fome
meafure secure me against the dangers I was
apprehenfive of and fo that night I fleptvery
comfortably, and the next morning when I
awaked, I refolved to go again to the fhip to get
fuch other neceffaries in as 1 had molt occa-
fion for, before another form came, when I
knew fhe muff be dashed to pieces.
In order to this second expedition, I mended
my raft where I found it defective, and brought
away from the (hip a great many other tools,
clothes, ammunition, and whatever elfe I
thought moft neceffary for my future preferva-
tion and fubfiftence. Then I made hafte to
fhore, fearing the wild beats might come and
devour what I had already landed.
When I had landed all the second cargo, I
fell immediately to work to make me a little
tent, and fortified it in the beft manner I could,
to fecure myfelf as much as poflible against any
fudden attempt either from man orbeaft. Af-
ter this, I charged my fire arms, blocked up the
doors, and laid the bed I had brought from the
Phip upon the ground, and flept as comfortably
as though I had been in my native country.
But fill the thoughts of my future fubfiftence
and prefervation were uppermoft in my mind ;
and therefore I went to the fhip as often as pof-
fible, and brought away every thing I thought
could be of any ufe ; and indeed had fo t'ored
rnyfelf, that I judged I was tolerably provided
for for a confiderable time.
34 img034.jpg
a8 B B I .NS 0 N
I had now been eleven days in the ifland, an 4
as man"y time on board the [hip ; as I was go-i
oing the t.wvelfih time, the wind began to rile ;
however. I ventured at low water, and with
[one dilliculty reached the [hip, and rummag-
ing the cabins I found several other neceffaries,
and among other things above 6l. lcrling IM
pieces of e ght ; which, considering my present
circurnmflanc.--, 1 concluded % as of Imall value
to me ; however, I wrapped it up in a canvas
rag; and perce.v:ng the liorm began to mncreafe,
with all that I was able to cai-y with me I
made the belt of my way to the (hore.
That night I flept very contentedly in myllt-
ile fortification ; but when I looked o,,t in the
mor..ning, I found that the fhip was loll. i was
very much concerned at this circumltance ;
but when I retlelied I had done every thing in
my power to recover what was ufefui to me, I
comforted myfelf in the bel manner 1 could,
and submitted myfelf entirely to the wtll ol
Providence.
And now my thoughts were wholly takecu up
how to defend and preserve myfelf frmn the
ravages and wild befts, which I was extieme-
ly apprehsnlive might be in fome part or other
of tins island : and at one time I thought to
dig me a c-_e, at another to build me A ctent ;
at Icngxh I resolved todo both, and accordingly
contrived in the following manner.
I eonfidered the ground where I was, was
mooriltb, and that 1 had no conveniences for
ftelh, water ; and therefore I determined to lind
a place more healthful and convenient: and, to
my greatt comfort 'nd hitis attion, I loon found
one that answered my expektattun,
35 img035.jpg
C R U S 0 -E. P9
The place was a little plainneara rifirig hill ;
1he eiont being as fleep as the fide of a houte.
On the ride of this rock was a little hollow
piece, relembling the entrance of a cav'e; jut
belote this plice I relo:ved my tent fhould
ariand. This plain was a hundred yards broad,
and twice ai long, ith a pleasant deFcent ev-
ery wWay to the feafide.. After this I drew-a
femicircie, containing about ten yards in thedi-
ameter ; and when that was done I drove a
row of flakes not above fix inches from each
uther ; and by the help of my cables which I
bi-j bi,_.ughr from the hIip, and lach other ma.
ri icals as 1 made ulc of, 1 made a lort of requ-
l.I foilification, which I concluded was in a
gfeat mealure impregnable againil any sudden
i.tiempis either of lavages or wild beats and,
for my better [ecurily, I would have no doors,
but came in by the help of a ladder, which i
mnde for that purpose.
Ino this little garrilon I carried all my flore
End ammunition, and aftervwaids continued to
work. I I not only made me a little cellar, but
likewise made my fortificatir-.n fionger b' the
earth and ftones I dug out of the rock. One'
day a fliower of rain falling, attended with
thunder and lightning, 1 was under terrible ap-
prehenliuns lelt my powder fhouid take fiie,
and not only hinder me from killing fowlh,
which were necctlaiy for my fubfiflence, but
tkejvife blow me up and my garailon at once ;
the quantity I had by me confifled of tiotb.
weight at lcafL Having thus efLablilhed my-
fc.lf as a king or the island, I went every day
with my gun to fee what 1 could kill that was
,fit to ei, aud loon perceived thcre were grect
C2 numbers
36 img036.jpg
3,3 R 0 1 S 0 N
numbers of goats, hut they were fby ; however
watching tihe very narrowly, I happened Io
fhuoL a ?xe goat as ihe was fucklinag her young!
one ; which, not- thMiking her damn killed. fol-j
Slowed me home to my enclofure. I lifted thei
kid over the pales, and v.oild willingly ha.oa
kept it,alive, but the roor creature reCtuliMg tI
eat, I was forced to kill it for my lubliitence..
Thus, entering imo as odd a Itie cf life asi
cvr befel an unfortunate man, I was cnnu-'
ally reflitaing upor the miery of mi, condition ;
till at length conrlidcering there was no remed,
and that was obliged to make tihe bell of 'a
bad market, _and withal rellettin, upmn the
many turnsof Providence in -,' particular prel-I
Civation, I grew more ledale and tempeiale.
It was, by the account I keot, the .3o0h of,
September when I -firll landed on this illarn..
About twelve days after, feariag I Fhujuld lohe
my reckoning of time, n i eIcn forget the .Sab-
bath, for want of e.n, ink and paper, I coived
it with a knife upon a large pult, in large let-
ters, fetLiILg it up in the fimiltuile of a crofi on
the ffIore where landed, viz. I arne Io bhore,
September 8Q, 1650." Every day I cut a notch
on the fides of this fquare poll, and that for the
habbath was as long again as the rcft, and ev-
ery firftday of the monthli 1 kept my calendar,
in weekly, monthly and yearly teckonr.ing of
time. But had 1 made more lurift search (as I
afterwards did) I need not have fet up this,
mark ; for I found among the parcels belong-
ing to the gunner, carpenter, and captain's mate,.
thole very things 1 wanted, where I got not
only pens and ink, but likewife lea compares,
.n3 other mathemticalinftrum-ents ;tnd, above
a Il
37 img037.jpg
C RU-S 0 E. 3
all the reRf, three Englilfh Bibles, with Aeveral
other good Englif.h books, which I carefully
laid up, in older to naLe ule of them at proper
Intervals. But here I canont but call to mind
oar having a dog and two cats on board, whom,
1 made inhabitants wiLh me in my callie. But,
SnotwithilanJing I was thus plentifully fupplicd,
Sitll wanted several other neceffariCs, aS
nicdrics and thread, and more part'calarlv a
- p'cka.;e and thovi [fjr removing the earth, &c.
It was a lull year befot. I had finLflied my
Sllttle fuklica0ion : And ale, I had done that -
a jn i-.he bell manner tCe nature of the place and
n my circurnflarces would allow, I began to grow.
a little more familiar with my luolitade, and to
consider of the bell methods pofible to tender
ti' defolato date as eafy as I could. Anid here
iL was I began the following journal.
S,
J 0 U R N A L,
SEPITEMBER 0o, 165o, I was forced by
Shipwreck upon this defolate island, which
I called the lmand or De[pair. The nest day
I [pent in refleting on the milerablenefs of my
condition, which preflenited to me nothing but
Geath, and the worlt of deaths too, viz. either
to be flarved for want of vi'auals, or to be de.
vourecd by wild bealtis
Oaobe.
38 img038.jpg
3 R OB IN S 0 V
Oftoberr To my great comfoTt I di'coi
ered the Iiip driven to the Fnhore. from when
I had liome hopes that when the fl.oirm was i
stated I might iecov'er fornmething tuwaidi n
'relernt lIub'ilence : efpeciliv ci'n!iderng
thhrerved the fhip to10 lie in a g'eal inalure u
jih-t, a.d nne lide of her peifltt;v dry ; up(
vhch I fell inmmed,3Iely to wadingf; oer il
fands., and with great difirculiy and danger
got on board. 'Io thee ith of this month,
Jpent in making v'ovage- backwards and Co
-raids to arid from the Ip, Tip9 he weather keil
All the while vey \ tt and uncertain.
Oa. 20. NI raft with my goods was ovc
let ; miff' uf which however 'i recovered
low water.
Ott. .25. It blew a fort of lorrr, ind rai
ed hard, to that the ,'h'p daflied to p'eccs. ai
nothing of her was to be feen but the ve
hlull at low water ; and this dayv 1 though
it proper to fecure the effeas I ad prelerv
from tbe. caiher.
Ocl. -6. 1 wandered about to try if I coll
find a place proper to fix my abo'de and a
cordingly towards the evening, I iouid out
rock, where f judged I might ereti a wall an
ioitifyi m% (elf.
November i. I placed my tent by the fi
of a rock, and iook up my lodging in a hal
mr'ick, very contentedly, fur that night.
Nuov'. ,. I made a fence about my tent wi
timber cheftl and boards.
Nov. 2' I fliot tv.o wild fow,!. which pro
ed veiy good meat ; and th.- afternoon I ma
me t funt of a tabk.
Nov,
39 img039.jpg
C R USO E. 33
Nov. 4. I began to live regularly. In the
norni.g I walked cut for an hour or two, and
ifierwards wot ked till about two, then ate my
Itiner of fuch provisions as I had. After din-
ier I eornmoil' flept an hour or two; and th
leather being earemely hot, I could not go
o uork till tijuwrds the evening.
N'ov. I. went out, with my gun and the
Io[ I had brought out of the ihip. I Ihot a
vi',] ca'. --but her fleh was good for noth-
n-tjonly I p-eferved her fkin. I faw a great
luck of wild birds ; and was wonderfully ter-
ified at the fight of lome monflrous feals
vhich I faw on the fand, but as they faw mle
hey madecfl to fea.
Nov. q. I finished my table. From the 7th
a the i -'2th, the weather being fair, I worked
ery hard: Only I relied upon the t ith-
ihich according t may computation, I took
o be Sunday.
Nov. 13. The weather was very wet and
Lormnv, with tLhundej and lightning. Oa the
ith. I made provifiop to fecAre my powder--
.h'ch I per fetfled on the i4th and 15th. -The
7lh, 1 began to dig upon the rock, hbut was
Prevented lor want of proper implements:
\id on the i8th I found a tree, the wood of
vhich was very hard-and out of that with the
reatell alFicultv I made me a fort of fpade-
n doing it, I almoll foiled my axe, which
night have been of ill conlcqiuence.
Nov. 2?. When I had got my tools into
.he bell order I could, I I'pent a!l my time to
he ioih of December in hnifhing my cave ;
Lad lay in my tent every night, unless the
vcehtrc wi:. Io wet that I could not lie dry)---
40 img040.jpg
4 B o B I N S 0o N
Sand withal I had fo well ihatcr.ed it over wi
flags and til e lea'cis cf trees, &c. that I though
Tv-lelf lolelabi) secure.
-Dec. 10. I had no fooner finiffied mv h;
itation, hut a great part of the roof fell in u
or me, and it 'was a great mercy I had r
perifhled in the iuins : And indeed it gave i
a grgat deal of trouble before I repaired it
iettially-and after I had done what I could
I fpent several days in putting my things
order-and had variety of weather to the 271
Dec. 27. In my rounds I chanced to mt
foame goats. I fhot one of them. and IaoB
another, which I led home, and bound tip1
leg-in a little time it grew well, and was I
tame and familiar that it followed me cvl
where like a dog, which put the notion ii
msy head to bring upihele wild creatures as
ten as I could take them alive, that I ml
have flock to fubfift upon in cafe I should Il
after my powder was exhaufled.
SDec. 23, 29, 3o. The weather was Io ve
hot, that I was forced to keep within i
shelter.
January t. Though-the weather conlina
yery fultry, yet necel(ity compelled me :ol
abroad with my gun. In the valleys I fodi
great numbers of goats ; but they were fri v
fhy, I could by no means come at one
them. .
From jan. 9. to the 13th, my hufinefs
to search the ibind, and to finifh my wall.
my search I found great .nu -ztji ol fo4
much like o'ir Englifh pigeons. I Ihct Ca
of t.ein, whichh proveJ cxcllent food. A
nowi
41 img041.jpg
C R C ,S 0 C ,
,nw it was a providential Lhing h.ppened--
Shch was this
vr, dill I was rummaging my moveaLles, what
fmould fall into my hands but a bag, whch .
fuprofe might be made ule of to huld cinri fur
the Iowls in the (hip. I purpofcd to make u:o
oi it to hold lome oF the powder, and lo Ihook
but the duil and loole corn upon, one lide of
he rock, noi in the leafI lulpctting the conle-
uence. The rain had fallen in great quanti-
esa F ew days before And the month after,
o mv great lurprile, I discovered Iomeching
prior' up very green and flourtfhing and as I
:ame daily to view it, I faw several ears of
rteen b,rjev of the very famrne fize and Ihape
f t.ofe in England.
My thoughts were very much confused at
his unexpected fight : And I mull own I had
e vanity to imagine thai Providence had or-
ered this on purpofe for my fubfiflence.
greatt were my acknowledgments and Lhank-
inelks to almighty Cod, for his mercies to me
Sihis desolate place which were infiniielv
heightened, when, at ,he lame time. I oblerv-
Sl.orne rice tflalks, wonderfully green and
uu:ithing ; which made me conclude here
Iul[ conlequenily be more corn in the ifland ;
d accordingly I fpent several days in ledrching
r it ; when at length it came into my mind
lat I had shaken the bag on the vey Ipot
he.e thole blades of corn were glowing.
It was about the latte end of June before
efe ears of corn grew ripe ; and ihen I la'd
em up exceeding carefully, expeding I should
e day reap the advantage of this little ciop.-
hich I uifed all my injury to improve ; and
yet
42 img042.jpg
36 R O B I N S O V
yet it was four years before I could eat an.-,' bai
ley bread, and much longer before I hl.i an
benefit from my rice. Afier this, with ineifai
gable care and indufLrv, I finished m '.' %.I
ordering it fo that I had no way to go into Mn
fortrefs but by a ladder.
April 16. I finished my ladder, and wet.
up it, and pulled it after me, as I always d.d
and, in truth had fo well fortified myfeJf, hi
I was as I thought, indifferently well fecure
against any furprife ; nevertheless as I W. on
day fitting in my cave, there happened Luc
a ifudden earthquake, that the roof ofmv lt d
fortress, that I had finished with fo much I..ol
came tumbling down upon my head ; u;t
-which, with the greatest amazement, I n 1
ny ladder, and got out of my cave. and la
the top of a vaft rock fall into the le-i. at
expected every moment the whole if ar,, -. ou
be fwaliowed up.
In this affright I remained for fomrne r r. --n
till I perceived the fury of the motion L,.s'cn
abate ; but it was not long before I v.,. nir
2new a' prc- .r'F C-".:. on account ofa v r.il rt te
peft that attended it. This dreadful Cl.m co
tinued for about three hours, and the, -,.'-
fuch a heavy rain, that my tent was q)U!t_" v,
flowed; upon which I concluded my th-i i i
*was ill fituated, and determined, as fo in a- I
fible, to build me one in a more cor.-eni
place.
April 29,3o, were fpent in conirivvin; i o
and in what manner, I fbould fi x m\ re, ..
and here I was under the greateft conce
having no tools fitting forfuch anundertaki
- h u c \ r,
43 img043.jpg
C R U S 0 E.
a hcwever, I fpent federal days in whetting and
; ; .* : my tools.
May i. As I was walking along the fea
fide, I found a barrel of gun powder and di-
vers other pieces of ti-ie hiiY, which the vio-
lence of the late form had thrown on the
fand. I faw likewjfe the remaining part oF
the faip, thrown by the tempeff, very near
h the fhore, and refolved to get to her as icfoon as
I could ; but at that time i found it imprac-
ticable.
I continued to work upon the wreck till ths
L 4-h, and every day recovered fornmething that
would be of ufe to me, and got together fo ma-
ny planks, and fo much iron, lead and other
neceffaries, that, if I had had tools and fk.ii, I
r mght have bu'lt me a boat ; which was a
thing I very much wanted.
June .16. As 1 was firolling towards the fea4
.1 found a large turtle : The i7tn I ipent in
cooking it : I found in her 70 eggs, and the
fln the moft delicious mreat that ever I taftiled.
Thei8th, I flayed within the whole day, there
-being a continual rain, with forms of wind
and 1;ghtning.
Fro'n the i9th to the 27th of June, I was
very fick, and had g.t a terrible ague, which
often held ne for OniL or ten hours w-th ex-
tre nevio ,c On the i8t, 1'I began to re-
cover a litth-, bur was v ry retlrei' in the
night, and w.,s worfe ; as orlen as laid my
eyes together, iwas tormented with hideous
dreams ana dreaifa! aprarlions. It is irnpof-
faibe for me to exprefs the a40oi.es I was under
by the!r .repeated admonitions, as 1 took thetn
tq be, MyN father's advice and reprauof canne
X Mnao
44 img044.jpg
88 R O B I N S 0 N
into my mind, whether I would or not, ;;n4
Shocked me exceedingly, and would orfice
make me refle& that thejuflice of God follow.
ed me, and that fevere punishment wa' tuft,
ly owing to my disobedience and wicked life.
June 28. I flept pretty well moft patI of
the night, which refrefhed me very much :
In the morning I ate a bifcuit and drank fome
water mixed with rum ; I boiled a piece c.4
goat's fleta for my dinner, but ate very little,
and at night I flipped upon three of my tur-
tle's eggs ; after fupper I attempted to %alk
out with my gun, but found myfelf too weak,
and fo returned to my habitation.
Here conscience flew in my face, reprehend.
3ng me as a blafphemer and a reprobate ;
for faying in my agonies, What have I
done to he diftinguifhied in all this fcene of
,mifery."-Methought I heard a voice anfwcr.
ing me, Ungrateful wretch Dare you ark
*what you have done? Look upon your pal
.lafe, and then afk thyfelf, why thou wall not
drowned in Yarmouth road, or killed by th
Sallee Rovers ? Why not devoured by will
bears in the defarts of Africa, or drowned
,Aere with the reft of thy companions ?"
Struck dumb by thefe fevere reflections, and,
fearing the return of my ague, I began al
length to consider what was moft proper to b,
done, to free myfelf from this diftemper : and,
]having heard that the Brazilians ufe tobacco
for molft of their difeafes, I refolved to iryv thii
experiment.
I tried federal ways with the tobacco : FIrq
7 took a leaf and chewed it, which made ml
verylick, and almolft flupified me; then I icep.
ed
45 img045.jpg
C R U S 0 E.
ad it in rum, refolving to take a good dofe of
it when I went to bed, and then 1 put iome
into a pan and burnt it, holding my nofe over
the fmoke as long as I could endure it without
fuffocating. After thefe feveral operations I
fell into a fweat and flept quietly and well for
thirteen or fourteen hours ; and when I got
up in the morning I found my fpirits revived,
my stomach much better, and I grew exceed-
ingly hungry, which I had not Leen for fornme
ti:nv paft : In fhort, I miffed my fit the next
day, and found that I every day grew stronger
and better.
The Soth I ventured out with my gun, and
killed a fowl not much unlike a brandgoofe,
but did not eat of the flefh, choofing rather to
dine upon two or three mote of. mny turtle's
eggs. In the evening I renewed my medi-
cine : Notwithftanding which, I had a little
fpice of my fit the next day ; and therefore, on
the 2d of July, I took my medicine as I did at
firft ; and on the 14th, which was the day I
expected the return of my fit, the ague left
me, which was no mall joy to me; and indeed
the goodnefs of God on this occasion, affe&fli
me to fenfibly that I fell on my knees and re-
turned thanks in a molt devout and folemn man-
ner.
July 4. I walked out with my gun : But my
diftemper having reduced me very low, I could
go but a little way at a time ; for, the eNperi-
ment having weakened me exceedingly, I was a-
ble to walk but a very fhort way at once. I
had now been on the ifland about ten months--
and all the while had not feen either man or
Woman,
46 img046.jpg
* R C' B I N S 0 A
wonn. An' flo, p:owing belier, I began ts
li. h.k in..-if fole ir.on.,tch iA the ife ; and
S'.:,," n.- rii-lTcve,',,y t e!i. I rel(.! Ed, tn tjki
a ic(i-, a.;oult tFe ie, in oldri to v ew the 'ex
teit of ri&, d.-minions, and to rmaak'. whaL di.A
cove, es I cjehl.
On i-.e ijin 1 began my jourr.ev : and a-
Tr,-.~.oOthrt Lhn.gig, I lound d little book ui
Yulrrfng w.a.'4r ; on the biks of! wh ch weice
Imn\ m?!O.As' covered winth grul. : 1 la.v
;ee.:rfl [. k, of tobacco, ard i.ather plants I
kntrw nothing of; rr;,_,ngthe rell I toind f, mq
fl.', canr In'.cral p!a:it of jloe \w'and &c.
", .i. thele d'fco.'ertes I retu'r.ed we!. I,'i 6 d
to my hirre caal%, and hfizt that n'ght ;erj
comfortably.
The next dav, .going the fame way. and Far.
their than before, I fIund the country fall oa!
wood, and excecoinjlv flealant and delightfuL
The melon lavV upon the ground in greaz qu.an.
ities, and clusters oftrapeb hu-g upon :he trees
You may imagine I wa-. glId i.f ih.- dIlcnvety
vyrT a'c very ;'. in.l\', leIt1 i [lolC Lhrowmy
fel[ int.) a flox or fh-.':r.
The nihant con rnin on. I clir.hed up into
tire. and havul,,g fixed m',lelf as secure'!) a
"p.fi t.l. flept Lciv tro ,ab'i., though i wal!
i hrt r if I had cve. lI'n 7,i o! -r.y !..bira
tiOn. -"\ hen the mcrn-ng camr.e,' I ploceede<
W i' the -re 1 ill pieafure al:',it iour miles Fal
th.r ; and di( the end of a val'dv. I feurnd
fir'ingorf>:cellert atiet: and now I refblve%
to I:.', in as much of,tlhe ftiut a3 pc.ffb'ie.
jutl:- S. H-aving preFaied t u bags, I r(
tijttne-. tt.ici. avaiv, in cwdcr to li ing lihri
.'. ao
47 img047.jpg
, R U S 0 E.
to my cafle as much of the federal forts of
fruiti. as I could, that 1 might have a (lock by
me again1f I Ihould want it. Ad now I be-
gan to refl-Et that this part of the island was
irinihtely the belt to inhabit in ; hut then I
thought at the lame time, that if I removed
from my prefent place of abode I should lofc
the prolpett of the lea ; and lo, if Providence
jhluuld order a (hip on that coall, I should laic
all ponflibhlly of" deliverance. However, the
place was fo delightful, I resolved to build me
a kind of bower, which took me up the re-
moinder of July.
Here it was that I dried my grapes, which
I :. erwatds carried to my old habilation, for
a winter fupply. On the, i4th of Augult
the rain began to fall with great violence,
which nmde me judge it was proper to re-
urC to my cafe for Ihelter. The rain con-
tinucd to fall, more or lefs, till the middle ci
October, and sometimess with that violence,
that for several days 1 could not flir out of
my cave, till I was conflrained to it by the
puie want of food. I went out twice ; the
firiL time I fl(hot a goat, and the second time
I found another turtle, as large as the form-
er.
September 30. Cafthitg up the notches
on the pofl whith amounted to 365, I con-
tluded this to be the anniversary of my land-
ing. And, after I had retuined thanks for
my wonderful prefervation in this defolalc
illind I went to bed and flept %icry comfortn-
ably.
Before I proceed farther in my Journal4 I
mft t ake the dberty to put the leader i.
S-z mind
48 img048.jpg
Vt R 0 B, I 2N AS 0 -
nmind or the bhla'ry and rice : I had -ived
bout t.-;rv N ailk' u>f the formner an tj LWen
of 'he Il,'ei ; a -d 'cnchiiiriq the leaj-on
be provirr. I a1oi u !ine gri.unrd %%h 's
w >ie",i !'pai e, arcl b'jucd :t ; wr-och at t1
p'i1p,:r time grtl, up, and anilweied niy expet
II e vwet wrar her %-as po fooner gone. Et
iny inc'. na'.nn ;cd ne .gan tu tihe hu.,,er
]ld bul enr the j'heti ide o" the ,lann
'hic I f ] To v.'-,oe and cnt'ic as I Fid Ie
it, and ih.e IliA es J1 t!iO'. r r'.. ri a ."et ti
n'iuie of Our wrl':C.'-. w.h'ch ,in nine mad
Tne a nicble fence, a I i'.-. hai e iccailiuon i
c.D:erve more pirtru'arl, heremier. ,
Aind nov.' 1 I._,ceived t lat ihe lea!'ons
the year rr.h' be' di,'-ided into w.el and di
ar!d not in'o -ummer and \\'i.tiae a& in E
rope ai t;u. :
1r [Fethirr L
lia lf :_ rcl Ol S ,
ir ,' t-I' e, th.e S'.n eocrI ng nae
A :-- .1 I th, EL Jiwnu .
A .^-r:!
I aIy 1,
Half June dry, the Sijn gvc'ing ~o-at
I JIuly if the line.
H X uguil
(. i~uiut J
1 -\ R >[ -
alf Sept. wet, th S'n lbe;ng caon
(.t),t-he r back.
Q ttober
I N,,ve.r, ber
'l. ll cemher dry, the Sun runnirg round
Jajv | oi the line.
(ebruarv IJr
And as th- wind CI Linued teg blow, tio
49 img049.jpg
R 4- 5 0 2.
4)
% yet fearons would conlihue eitrher longer or
fihoiiter. AHer I had maune l-efe and Lhc 1-kce
oie vation4, I altiays took care to10 ptnvicc
nrecc-flires, that 1 m..ghit flay within duarrig the
we;clis of the weC.aLhtr. and in thai time I
toak care to make tme Lich tools as I muot
warned.
Ehe fiitl thing I alrttempted was to make
i.e a bnlket, which .aheii much labuodr and
S',iCultL, I efftT:tt-d ; but the two things .
trill wanted vei i- uUerl tut tf my poetnr,
SV.2. ic.me rafts to hild rmiy liquors, and inill
p.r-[ to boil and flew my mea,. arid allo a to-
bacco pipe, lor which I atZ lall found out a
rcrnedy.
ter the weather grew fair my farther refo.
I." un of viewing the whole island took place ;
atc:r'dingh, tak ng my dog end my gun, and
o.,h"r necell]ries prupet, 1 let Ltorward ; and
l *}.on g pdllkd the vale -*heje my bower Itood,
j icme w.th:in fig.h o(t if. Ih a ince g tl rIe \~.
3-td v.hen it was clcvt day, I c. uld dlci'cer
l.ad. but could not trll %Vlrher it was an i-
hi.d or a continent ; ne'heC o uld I tell %that
place this might be. only I thought it, was in
Americb, and ionfequently that part of thi-ic
co.urtry that lies bet .ve.en the Spanith terrio-
riea anid the Brazils, which abound with can-
nibals, 'who devour human kind. In virwving
thi;part of the ifland, I found it was muci
wire pleafani and fruitful than where]l had
pitched my tent. Here were gteat numbers of
parrouis. and with great difficult 1 got one of
them which I carried home with me, but it was
a great while before 1 could lame it and bring
it to peak1 evcn fo much a to call me by name.
In
50 img050.jpg
44 R O B I N S 0 N
In the low grounds I found great numbd
of goats, foxes, hares, and abundance of fowls 4
different kinds, with great quantities of grapt
and other excellent fruits: In this expedition
I did not travel above two miles a day, being
defirous to make what difcoveries I coull
When I came to the fea [hore, I was amazed
to fee it exceedingly beautiful, and to !full
excellent 6ilh. But though this journey was I
delightful to me yet my secret inclination lei
me to my old habitation ; fo, after I had fel u
a fort of land mark for my guide for the fulur<
1 concluded to return back bv a different wai
_- ____ -- -
51 img051.jpg
. R U,.S.O E.
than I came; and as I was making the bet oF
,v way, my dog happened 10to furprife a kid,
which I rescued from him, and led it to my bow-
er. in order to try if I could raie a breed which
9juld be of great ute to me.
After 1 had been about a month upon this ex-
pe-lon I returned to my little callie, and re-
poed rnyfelf with great pleasure in my ham-
B,,-A and continued a week within to rei. azd
ielt-(b myfelf.
A\nd now I began to think of the kid 1'had"
left 'n the bower, and refolted immediately
tu fetch it home. WVhen I arrived there I
fourd it al'nrift flarved ; when feeling it with
bis iches of fuch fhrubs as I could find, the poor
rr:l'ure in graiiude for iti.s deliverance, follow-
ed me as naturally as my dog quite home to my
caftle, which 1 afCtewaids kept as one 9f my
dornefl cks.
'1 he wet feafon being coma, 1 kept myself
within ; and on the 30'h of Septemrober, being
the ih rd year o my abode in rhis island, I paid
in- Inlemn acknowledgmenrts to Almighty
C.'d for my prefeevation, and entertained my-
fell wa .th a world of reflic-ftons upon my prcfent
and former conditions ; and as I wasone morn-
ing [idly pondering upon my prefent (laie, I
happened to open my bible, when 1 fixed my
ey, on ibefe words, willu nver at2ie t/ve, nor
'f.'i, 'k Ih'e; which I presently took as dircEed
o my )fell; and I mufl own. the exFreflipn gava
me a preat del of fevet fatisfaaion.
The beginning if this year I fixed my daily
employiments as foIllow: The morning I fpent
in my devotions, and paying my duty to God-
after
52 img052.jpg
46 R 0 B IN S 0 N
after I had done that, I went out with my g4
to leek proyilion; which, after I had got!
took me up Come time in dreffing and cooking
in the middle of the day I was forced to lie b
by reason of the excelTive heat ; and the rell
the time I fpent making and contriving luW
neceffaiies as I flood mol in need of.
But now the time for my little harvefl coi
ifg on, I had the deftrable prolpeft of a gwu
crop, but my hopes were ladly difappoimn
by the goaLs and hares; who having tailed tl
fweemnels of my corn, had cropped it fo clol
that it had no firength to lIhoot up into a IlAI
To prevent this I was forced to make a hed1
round it; but I had no fooner done this, thad
was infected with vermin of another fort; n
hack was no fooner turned but whole flocks i
birds came and deflroyed what the others hi
left ; I let fly at there, and killed three of thet
which I hung upon flakes as a terror to tl
rell; which project had lo good an effect th
they not only forlook the corn, but that part i
the island for ever after.
My corn growing rrpe and hatveft coming oi
I cut it down and carried horne the edari: An!
after I had rubbed them, and threfhed them I
the beft manner I could, as near as I could coi
jcdiure, the produce of the barley was aboi
two hufhels and a half, and that of the rice
bout the lame quantity ; and now I plainly lav
by the providence of God, 1 should be luppl
ed with corn, though at the fame time I want
all manner of neceflaries for making it ing
bread, which with the greatest labour and di
ficuLdIy I afterwards fuppiLed.
53 img053.jpg
C R U S 0 E.
MV feed being thus increased, my next care
was to prepare more land to fow it in; and ac-
cordingly I fixed upon two large plants on the
back ride of my cafltle, in which I owed my
feed, and lenced it with a good hedge, to de-
fend it from the vermin.
In fhort, my corn increased to that degree,
that I thought 1 might now venture to eat lome
of it ; but how to make it into bread was [till the
difficulty ; and yet even ihis I found the means
10to furmount at laft; and lo. as in all other e-
mergencies, I found a remedy beyond my expec-
tation.
After I had procured every thiing needful
for making my bread, which you may imagine
was no fmall fatisfat.ion, the profpefk of land
which I had feen from the other fide of the
ifland tan ftill in my mind ; but how I should
come at it I was utterly at a lofs to know I
tried to recover the fhip's boat, and then to
make me a canoe but all in vain; and here. I
could not forbear reffe&ing upon the folly of
thofe who undertake matters that they are not-
able to go through with.
I was in the midit of my projetsfi, when my
fourth year expired fince I had been caft on
this island ; nor did I forget to keep my anni-
verfary with that folemnity and devotion that
I had done the year before ; 1 began to think
myfelf feparated from the world, and from all
opportunities of friendly conversation. I had
nothing to covet, being, as it were, an emperor
or king of a whole country, where 1 bad no.
body to control me, nor any body to govern
but myfeMf.
Srinefe
54 img054.jpg
4 1R 0 B f N S O N
Th'efe thoughts made me look upon the thj
of thii world with a I..;rt of lel.gius conittr
and reondering mine ealyv in my act-fuia. and ci
anchovy co-dition; fur, having made (C1
*mercies to me matters of thie high, ft contl
tion: I relinqLlihed all penfive Lhou' ts
dilmAl appretenhions, and resigned myleliF
entirely to Goo'a pon iuence.
MV ink was quite gone, and my biicuit
molt exhaualted ; mv Inen was worn out. u
fome of the i.Lids' checked Ihbuta remrnai
which were (f mighiy ute to rne in hot we
er. My clothes anti hat were qite woj n.
thofe I supplied by the help ot my gost I
of which I i itl m mde ma a Irt ot a cap, i
then waillicoat, and open kneed breeches q
the hair on the outside and thus bi:r. peru
ly at eale in my mind. 1 Ipeut in)y ti'e in
temuplating the bleffing;_. ft hea.\tn, and
raviflhed to think tlha one tiim or ozhq
fhuuld be delivered from my prelent m1a
tunes, and placed out of the teach of L
i forever. I
l"io five years after this nothing worth i
tinoning happened, only at Spare lime:, I nadI
ibhed a Imail canoe, w:th whxc., B! all haz4
1 reloived to try to dilcx:ovei the rcrcirnfe
of my dominion' ; and in order l0 it, I
prov'lions cn hoard, with ammunition, an
otchir r.ecdfar;s Rit tao the expedition.
It w.i5 the itvh of Novcmber, in the
year of m;, reign, Ih.t I began tisis vco
which was much longer than I eyjeYfe4
reafon I had many diihculties to enroun4
did not fulott ; and ind:cd the recks we.
" h ii,
55 img055.jpg
Ac R' .U OP 0
v vf i ( s t A ^
1,;.,h rnd ran lb far into the ca. t'-iat I often
1liolvcd toturn back, father than run the rilque
of being driven fo far out to the lea 'as by no
wneains to be able to get back again.
In th's coblnfion 1 came toan anchor as near
to the fiote as poffible,. to which I waded, and
cimhrnbing up to the top of a high hill, 1 viewed
Ihe extent ofmv dominioas, and at all hsznids,
jc1hlved to pursue w.v voyage. It ik endleLs to
rjlate what danger my tralinefs expolcd me to;
I as driven by the cu rent Ib fat into ithe-lea,
that 1 had hardly any piofpe'l of geming bak
g ag in; not by sil I could do .Vhb mry paddle,
which I had made to supply the p!-ce of lculls
to help tpe; and now had noprolpelf but pert-
ifhingat fea when mv provifiuns were fpeyt,
or, itf a-flv-m flouJd art, bc for'irc. f-lowever,
by the lucky chance of the wiAd, or lathez bv
ihe particular pro'idence of Guod, I was driven
back ag-in to The illand, and to -nm unfpeika-
ible Joy, I came on fhore; whcre,.beng exceed-
inglv fatlguted with watching and haid labou.r,
1 lad:i me down and took a little refoie. A.f-
ier I awoke, and had drelfhd m) feif as ufual, 1
laid up my boat in a mall c.ijvenlent cicek fit
for mv purpo!c, and taking m,, gin. &r:. 1 rrmde
Ihe hell of my say to my bo)wer, he'e I again
'laid me d.,vwn to ref ; but it v'as not long be-
fore I was Srprifed with a voicc, which called,
R...t Ctri,/'-% p r RP..hii C ni ,I I'.t id,".:
E !,pon
E U~poan
56 img056.jpg
R 0 B I N S 0 N
Upon which I flared up in great confufi
and calling my eyes round, I law my par
fitting upon the hedge ; and then I knec
was fbhe that called me, but was flrangely
prifed bow the creature came there, and I
it Should fix upon that place above the rn
The bird came to me as loon as 1 called
and perched upon my finger, as tilual,a
feemed to fignify a great deal.of joy for
return.
This voyage had cured me of a great dJ
of my rambling inclination ; infomuch tlA
I began to lay aide all hopes of deliverance
fo I led a retired life, and in a very contena
manner palled away near twelve months, fpes
irig my Lime in making inliruments and doii
fuch things as were mof absolutely ne;efflai
both for my prefent'and future fubfiRftence.
My next consideration was, my powJ
growing fhlort, what I bfhould do io kill
goats and fowls to Live upon : I had abui
dance of contrivances in my head to try
catch the goats alive, particularly the (he go4
with young and at length I had my delfire, fi
making pitfalls, and baiting them with fome i
mY
57 img057.jpg
. R U S 0 E.
Sy corn, one morning I found in one of them
an old he goat, and 11 the other three young
peis, one male 'nd two females.
Tbe old one was too fisong for me, and I
ouldi not tell how to master him : But the
jLids 1 made shiftt to get to my habitation. It
wa fCome time before I could make them feed,
but after they had for tome time been without
food, and 1 threw them tome frefh corn, and
ave them fome water, their Rtomachs came to
them. And now my next care was to find
em paflture, and fecure them io that they
might not run away, all which 1 at laft effeled ;
and withal, by my well ufing thefe poor area-
tures, I had made them fo tame and familiar,
ihat they would follow me and eat corn out of
my hand. Thus having anfwercd my ends, I
think, in about eighteen months time, I got a
flock of about twelve; and in lefs than two
years forty three; and now I was not only
provided with goat's Dfelh, but with milk alfo,
which was another blefling I had little reafoa
to ex pee.
Being thus happy, and having almost forgot
all hopes of liberty, I lived as well as the na-
mare of my condition could poffibly allow ; and
indeed, it was a very diverting fight to fee me
fit in late at my dinner, all alone by myfelf,
like a king; and it would have been a very
pleafant objeft to have teen me in my goat Ikin
diefs, and other fuatable habiliments.
My chief concern now was about my boat;
which I was extremely unwili-ng to lofe, it
having coft me to much hard labour: r went
by laud to the place where I left it, but found
there
58 img058.jpg
5- R O B I NI S 0 N
there was no way to bring it off, without r
ning the fanme rifquc I was fo lately expofed
which I thought too dangerous for a feco
experiment, and therefore I relolvec" upon
noiher expedient, which was to make ,not
canoe, and leave i'oh the other fideof theillae
And here I think it may not be impro
to inform the reader that I had two p;an
tionD I theilldid : rhe fi.ft. was my little fo
or caflle, where I had made federal improve
menis ; and the second was my bower, or cog
try feat, where were my grapes and the
clofures for my g.,ati, and fevcrAl other caon
niencies, that made iL a very pleasant and agr
able re iremfnt.
To this place it was that I ured to go often
view mygoais. And now I fhal! relate a thi
that gave me thIe mofil dilquiet of any thi
that I had met with fince my Gir coming i
the island.
It may well be fuppofed.thatr, arLer I h
been fo long in this d!ofate pjrt of the wor
nothing could have been more amjzing th
to have feen any human creature : but one d
as I was going to my boat, as ufwal, I perceivq
on the farid, the print uf a man's naked fo
and had1 I, Iecn an apparition, I could not h
been more Lerr.fied. I -okcd round on
fidet but. could not hear or lea mny thing;
obferved the tramplirg%, and was convince
from all figns, that Come foot had been other
And in the d-'epefi confufon, I returnedd b.
to my habitaj.ion.
That night I never cdoted my eyes, and v
full of the mniq d'fmnal apprehnlions that
ever had in all my Ife, Sometimes I had th
folly
59 img059.jpg
C R U S 0 E.
folly to think it muft be the devil ; at other
tames I thought it rather fome favag8, that the
current had driven in, and not liking the place,
was fecrerly gone off .to fea tgamin. Happy
was I, inmy thoughts that none of the favages
had feen me ; and yet, at the Famo'time, I was
exceedingly terrified left they should have feen
my boai, and to come in gieat numbers, and
find me out, pnd devour me, and aJll my little
flock, that I had been fo longgathering. There
thoughts aflfiaed me extremely ; and yet, after
mature confideraton, I concluded it was my
beft way to throw myfelf upon the sovereign
Governor of the World, and to ifubmit entirely
to his mercy andprovidence.
After a world of fears and apprehenfions,
for three nights and days, I ventured out of
my fortrefs; I milked my goats, and after I
had put everything in order, not without the
greateCft co ernemation, I went again to the
Chore to make my farther obfcrvations; and
upon the whole, concluded, that either' the
illand was inhabited, or that fome perfon had
been on ffiore, and that I might be furpriced
before I was aware.
This put severall frightful notions into my
head, inf6much that ilcep was an en"the ftran-
ger to me, my whole thoughts being takdn up on
nothing 'but my .prefervatLion, I pui ny kaftle
into the heft fure of defence 1 was able,
an& plae.d all my guns fo that they might be
serviceable if .1 shouldd have occ4jior to make
ufe( of them. After this I went armed with
Dmy two guns.
2I
.t2
60 img060.jpg
*{ f, V 3l J : .; o A'
R 0 R I A \
if
I divided my goa.-s into several parce ;i
'tn Mhe g.ils and it m he ones I pat in o one
pjrt of It ;fldnd. and ihe otber icr,, ilth t.vd1
he one.%, in another ; and whilfll t was in search,
oT th- lflter, which was on the XVeflern part'
rf the island, I thought i difcovcred a b-,at,)
but at. too great a diitince to make ot vhat.
fhe \vas. BUerij come to th fhore, updn ihC
S. %V. pat of (he find, I'w'as co.rinred ihat'
ihiey were fVage.e, Iein; the plai" co'eredc
Cer"with the fkAlls and mran3',d Iifhs of lu-o
man botle 1 "ohbLrVed liikwifN a xfoi. o" a
circle, in the midit of which I perceived there.
had beena- fire about this I conj"tlured 0efe1
wretches fait, and unnaturally lacrifi:d and
d'.Ouced thcir follow creates.
61 img061.jpg
C R If S di t. "
The horror and lotifomenets of this dreadful
pitEiacle confotur ded rie io, that, though I was
IalIlied thefe Iveges nTcer came into the part
,f ti.c island where I war, $et futh. ani abhor-
fence of ithem had feized me, that for iwo years
1 ronfinrd myself in tmy called, my country
(rat, and my enclonfurs : anti thus my circuni-
flances vedtained for Ik-me time uriflifurbed.
Rut &1'll twy giavid intentiron remained, which
f6l to lIy if 'I could deflroy fome of thofe
(vageis, and ttve a vitiim that 1 mrriight after-
wardF. make miy fervdnt.
Many were Thy prfj.rts and contrivanices t6
bvrg this about ; at le:.gth I tame' to this fet-
tied relolutior' t6 lie privately in ambuf i, in
fmne conveni'edt place, arid let fly upon them
*-.th mnv guns W'rB and then with rnmv iflols,
n(i f(worj ini hamd ; and fo much d.d this po-
roa!i Fpea.c nit faocy, tHlat I fufly refolved to
pu t irn priicd the firfl opproitunty ard
accoldiag.ly, I fdon found a place convenient
for my puipoe ; but at the Idmd time, f had
feverat checks pf coxifciece, and ioafoning with
iylelf, coricirig the lawfutnels and juflice
bit the at:ermpt ; and, after a long debate, I con-
cluded to Iaya'Fide t[t dcfign.
\Vh-dt i "was cutting down fom'e woo'd 6 6n
ti.w, to naie ciarrdal ib drers my meat and do
ihe fam ly 6neCtfarin', I perceived a %vby \Wagi
tasiv ; a3f61 gin&bwtwrrfs it, I could perceive
two large eyt:esqi''ng tu'fon 'rie. upon which I
made hafte onut extremely terrified nof iriagiri-
ing what it coujd b that looked fo Irighlfully:
Ho.verer, dfter I had recovered frorh my fiur.-
prife, I went again intoth'e cavity, rbf&I0in,
at all hazard, to fee what it was ; and when I
;cdml
62 img062.jpg
R 0 B I N S 0 ,V
came near enough to discern it pet Feflylv, %h-
fhould it be, after all, bat a monftrou; he go4
lying on the ground, and gaping for hfi
through mere old age.
The creature was not able to fl.rad, and
I let him lie undifturbed, and empl-I>.d my
felf in viewing the place, and mak -r .:bf--; la
tions. At the farther fide of it I L.berre'
a fort of an entrance, but fo low, as to. ..blig
me to creep on my hands and knc I E it [ -
I had no candle, and the place wa dlirkl, :lir
fo I fufpended my enterprise till Ith n,;i
day, when I returned with two large ones
rny own making.
After I had paffed the trait pAlfj;:,|
found the roof rofe higher up; and .lrl
when I got farther in, no mortal cv.'er .law
more beautiful fight The walls and ihc ro<
reflected a thoufand lights from m two caL
dies ; and indeed, it seemed to mne thl Fi
del;,itf.,l grotto I had ever heard ot.
thort, I could find no fault but in the r, nri nc
and which I thought would be very i-cfl.i
for my defence and fccurity ; theticf-re I d
termrined to make the place my prince ip l mna1
azine ; and accordingly, I carri-d tF-ahe
with the utmoft expedition, fome arm:. aid ar
munition, ju. :.._ n-, impoffible for mnc Luobe fut
prifed by the favages in that faftn-1 -.
I think I was now in the --d ',,car .f
reign, and tolerably eafy in my c,-_rI:ion
By this time my parrot had learned t,' ta-
Englifh very well, and many divtrcng h,,
'we ufed to have together. My d,.., cl.cd
old age ; and my cats increased f..) fZI, ti
63 img063.jpg
C U S 0 E. tr
Swas often forced to deitroy fomer of them,'
left I should be overrun with their numbers.
I always keot two or three domeffick goats
about me, and had fevefal fowls that built
and bred about my cafftle, fo as to make me
1jappy as I could wvifh : But alas what un-
foreeen events deftroy the uncertain. enjoy-
ments of human happinefs !
It was now December, the time of my har-
veff, when. going out one morning early,
there appeared to me from the fhore, about
two miles distance from me, a flaming light
from that part of the island where I had be-
fore cbferved fronme favages had been on my
,ide of the water.
Terrified with this unufual fpeaacle, and
being under difmal apprehenfioifs that thefe
favages would find me out, and deftroy me, I
went direftly home io my caftle, and fhut my-
feli up as faft as I could, and put myfelf into
a .' e of defence ; lnd afterwards I got up
to the top of the rock, and viewing with my
profr e&ive giafs, I could difeern no lefs than
nire nr-ked fax'ages fitting round a fire, and
eating (as I fuppofed) human flefn, with their
two canoes hauled on fhore, waiting for the
tide to carry them back again.
Nothing can exprefs my deteflation of fo
horrid a fight ; especially when I found they
were gene, and I had been at the place of fac-
rifice and faw the limbs and flefhi of human
creatures lie torn and mangled upon the ground:
In fort, my indignation against them rofe fo
high, that let the confequence be what it
would, I determined to be revenged upon the
firft
64 img064.jpg
58 R 0 B I N S O N
firit that should come thither, though I lof4
my life in the attempt.
I found afterwards that they did not comic
over to this ifland very often ; and as near
&an remember it was a year or more before E
laW arny mr.rc of them. But before 1 proceed
farther, I havec another account that will Cde.
fene the reader's attention.
it was ihe ib.h of My, according to mY
wo dcn calender, after a very terrible flonu
when I was alarmed with the noife ,f a guf
as fired from a fl-hip in ditlrofs ; upon whicI
I immediately to,..k my gial- and wen' up tq
the top of the rock where I had not been
moment but a flame of fire gave notice of an.
other gun ; and then I was confirmed in my
opinion, that it could be nothing lefs than
[hip in diflrefs which, with my glafs 1 [oo0
difcovered to be truck ;, and that the wreck wa4
upon thofe bidden rocks where I was in great
danger of being loll in my boar.
I made a fire upon the hill bv way of figi
nal and thry raw it, and anf'wered it with fev
cral guns. The weather was Ye',y h-a.v.,, an<
to I could not, at that time, discover either a
what dillance the (hip lay, o0 1 hat fhe was
but the weather cleai ing up, 1 law a fhipca
away fome diflanLe at fea.
I had fei'eral notions concerning them, a
is natural in Fuch cafes ; but confidcring fC
riouflv the place where they) were, and all ot h
er circumfl.arices. I could not conceive an
polmbility but that they muff. be all loft an
indeed, to the laIl year of my being in tLi
inland. I never knew of any that were fave
Out of this (hip I only faw the bc.dv of
: boy
65 img065.jpg
,U S OE 69
bcv which was driven on fhore, but I could
not discover by him of what nation they
were.
the fee was now very calm., which tempt-
ed me to venture to the wreck. not only in
hopes to get fonething I wanted, but like-
1ile, if there was any body left alive in the
fl ip, to endeavour to fave their lives. IThis
resolution fo far prevailed, that I w'ent home
immediately and got every thing ready for
th voyage and accordingly alter a great
deal of labour, hazard and difficulty, I at
length got to the wreck which I beheld with
the greatefl pity and concern. By her built I
found ftie was a Spaniard. and had endured a
teruble conflict before fhe was lofl.
When 1 was come near to her, I faw a
drig cin board, who no sooner faw me but he
fell tn yelpirg and howling, and I no fooner
called to him, but the poor creature jumped
into the fea and fwam to me, and I took him,
into the boat almofl. famfhed. When 1 came
into the flip, the firfl fight that I beheld was
two drowned men in the arms of each other ;
I found fhe was a rich fhip. and as I had rea-
(ton to believe, bound home from the Spanifh
efltindies. What became of ihe rcfl of the
failurs I could not, tell, there being none of
their bodies on board, besides the two before-
ment ined.
As I was rummaging about her, I found fev-
eral things I wanted, viz. a fire shovel and
tongs, two brafs kettles, a pot to make choco-
late, I'Ome horns of hfine glazed powder a grid-
iron, and feveral other neceirfarics. Thqfi I
put
66 img066.jpg
,o R 0 B I N S 0 .V
i pIL ,,t-j b;.rj mr b,,t, t.-c:tlhecr \n ;lh two chef
z o < d a c.:fl, of i urn : jrid af[c-r a gizat deal I
toIl and dlIE:uliL, I got ilu bL.c.k to the i4
and. I ,
1 Trepofcd miflcIf that tigit in the boat. am
the netYL d.i landed my caIgo_, which I Cdrii
to my grotulto ; and h.\'irg c'.arnrid trw
feEt;, I found in the two chtll% l,\vecral thiri
I wanted, particularly for-c Iljrls and han,
kcrchicif- 1 found ;AliO'thrce b-.gs of pieces
right ; .,ll which I w> dU. wiillingly I.',: gF
en for nic or Lix pirs oF Englilh Ihos a1
fh'i-Lings. 1
After 1 had ('fiwcd aIll this rew cargo i
to my, cave, I nrde the bf-l of my wavt 1U
cafll and found every thir- a.s I left il.
that I had nothing to do but to repnl'.. rn.,'i,
and to take care of may riomcflict. And n.
wanting racthin that w.:s rcquifite for
Sfuppkott of lif., 1 might have lived ,cr'y qu
had n-ot the apprcl'heri-.ii of the fvge
turihed ne ; upon which aco'tint I flid
'vent Far abroad t 1 did, it we ,to the call,
part oF the ,lLtd, whclre 1 well knew tI
never came : And ior two years I lihcd
this anxious condition. iiinv head heirg alw
full of j'i'.j''. how 1 m'^i.t gat awy from
dclc,late pl.ce.
A.; I obl'ret, Lbefr'r., rtloi..'h I wnis tol
M bly Iccure ag,-ini- the rcch c.f % ant, ar, d
all the di ert.l'.n th, r.atuuic F i, e 1
would allow. ',ct the thiuhi: uofr m',' dmli
ance were fill tipperTn-fil. as the iri:r .
(.e:ill, p-rccv,;- by the f. lihwinr r,;I.Ltio
which I f-aIi :;ive a fhielt ,Cc.:.cUir of
Ichemes and prt.j.:cls I miade for my ecapiC
67 img067.jpg
C R U S 0 E.
As I lay in my bed one. night in March,
tibe ,-4th year of my folitude, 1 ran through
a:l,[li' accounts of my life, from my very fil t
Iim,.mbranci to the present time, and found
a!l along that the providence of God had been
exceedingly kind and merciful to me, and
% hen I considered, more particularly how ma-
nv dangers 1 had palfed, it could not but make
rn, devoutly thankful to my great deliverer,
richout whofe aliftance L muff inevitably
ha-ve pcriIlhed.
After Ithad thus briefly debated with my-
[elf on my prefent and former condition, I
be-gan next to consider the nature of there fav-
aecs, and the country that they inhabited,How
faji it was t,. the place from whence they came,
arid what boats they had to bring them over
hither, and at the la-me time had rome notions
to go over to their fide, to fee what dilcoverie&
I could make.
I had noliuns, that, if by any mcthqd I
could get upon the continent, 1 might in time
meet with a [hip to carry me to Euirope, fur
Shere I looked upon myself tobe the moll mif-
erable man living, and preferred even death it-
fclf to my Ray in this delolate ifland. Whill:1
my thoughts Were thus confused, I had no no-
tion of any thing elfe but my voyage to the
continent ; and indeed fo much was I inflam-
ed with thefe notions, that I in a great ineaf-
ure forgot my duty to God and was reduced
almolft to a Hflate of dcfpcration ; and after
many thoughts and ftrugglings in my mind,
I came at length to this conclusion, viz. That
the only probable way I had to efcape, was to
F get
. 61
68 img068.jpg
62 R 0 B 1 N\ S 0 1V
get one of thefe ravages ; which I could fin
no other way to bring about, than by ventui
ing my life to f4ve him from the jaws -of h
devourers, which I thought mufi min[pire hii
with gratitude to his preferver.
Thefe were my fixed resolutions, but I thin
it was at leaf a year and a half before I could
find an opportunity of putting them in exect
lion. To the bell of my remembrance it wi
the c3d day of April, eairy in the murninj
when I ,as fupltifed wlih the fight of fiv
canoes, all on fbore together, on mv fide (
the island, and the cretuie3 that bcloingd I
them all landed an.l out of fight.
At firfl I thought all there boats mull brie
too many lo be attacked by one perfon, an
wasin a mighty confafin as to what was be
to be done :. however, being impatient to Fi
something of their management, I took m
guns, and went secretly to the top of the hil
where by the help of my profpeclive glafs,
ribferved no lefs than thirny, fitting mound
fire and feafling upnn what meat they ha
dreffed ; what it was I could not diflingui(h
Afterwards they), all danced around the flame
uling many frightful and barbarous geflure>.
Whilil I was looking earnefily on thet
wretches, I could dil'cern them dragging tw
miferable creatures out of one of their boat
It was not long before I faw one of the,
.knocked down, and three or four of the
fell to cutting and mangling his body, in q
der to devour him as they had done the forn
er. WVhilft. the other miferable creature floe
expefling every moment the fate of his con
Ipaniota
69 img069.jpg
C R U S 0 Z6
panion, infpired with the hopes of life he
ga'e a 'udden flart fronm them, and ran with
gieat fwiftanefs towards my cafile.
, = ___-
I was under great apprehensions that he
would dt to my grove for proleflion. I was
glAd to fee he had the heels of them, and from
his rwiftner., concluded he would prefently lofe
fight tf them, and fave his life. There was
a while creek jul before hitn, where 1 was a-
fraid the poor viffim would he taken iF he
c-', d not fwim ; but it happened he fwam
veri well and foon got over, and Pan again
%ith his former flrength and fwiftners. Two
of the three that followed him, fwamn over af-
ter
. 63
70 img070.jpg
64 R 0 B 1 Ai S 0 N
ter him, but the other, that could not lwimq
returned back to his'companions. And now,
or never, I thought it was my time to pro:
cure a ravage for my companion. Accord.
ingly, with all the fpeed I could, I camq
down from the rock, look up my two guns
revolvingg to fave the viflim if poffible ; ant
in order to it, came a nearer way, and pu
myfelf between the purfuers and the pursued
beckoning to the later to land fill, who
you mull imagine, was not a little rurprire
at me. The hidl purfuer I knocked dowi
with the flock bf my piece, and the other
who I perceived was preparing his how ar4
arrow to {hoot me, I let Bly at, and killed
him dead on the fpot.
The poor frighted Indian was amazed t4
fee the fire and hear the noife of the gun i
however, I made ligns to him to come to mo
which at length he did, but not without
great deal of fear and trembling, being afraid
I believe, I should kill him too. I did all
could to convince him of his millake, and a
length fo far convinced him, by the tigns
made him, that he came to me, and' threi
himself at my feet, and took one of my fer
and put it upon his bead ; which was a tokl
en, it feems, of his resolution to be my fl-j
forever ; upon which I took him up, mad
much of him, and encouraged him in the be
manner 1 could.
By;
71 img071.jpg
C R U S 0 E.6
B\' this time I faw the Favage I had knock.
ej down, began to recover, and was lifting
upright, which made my new flave as much
,'rji-id as before, but I Coon' prevented his
Ff'.hi by prCfenting my piece at him : but my
favage oppofed my (hooting him, making a
fign to rme to lend him my word, which
hang by my fide, and no Cooner had I granted
-,, iequefi. but awlav he ran to hllis enemy arnd
ve!v dexteroully, at orre blow, cuLt off his
heal ; and as a token of triumph brought
it to me, together with my word, and laid
it it my feet.
The greatefl aftniifhment my new fervant
was in, was, how 1 I Rlled the favage at that
dillance, 'without a bow and arrow ; and to
fatisfy himilIf in that matter, he made figns
to me toilet Wim g ai.nd'view him. And
having'v?*3a the woutrid te bullet haa made'
in his Brift, he Iopk ip hii bow and ar-
rows, and bcai k b al t M't Vgain, 'making'
r.fgns to"ine:':it*e "itldvc 1o buryr6hm,
*'~~~~ ~ .C^ ~
72 img072.jpg
66 R 0 B I N S O N
which with my content, he pcrformeAd wiil
wonderful dexterity.
When I perceived hlie had done, I called
him away, and carried him directly to mj
cave, where I gave him vicualk, and their
pointed to him uto lie down upon lome flidW
and take a little relat. He was a very hand'
fornme well proportioned Iullow, and in all re.
peEts the rmofl beautiful Indian I ever faw.
1 think he had noi flept above an house
b-fore he cam- ouJt of the ca.e ito nme. as ,
wa milking my goats, aid again threw him.
felfat mY feet, and put myI) other foot upol
his head, a farther tuken that. hie Jitende4
to be my llave forever.
That noght we flayed i-, the rave ; bul
early the ne-.t m.irnting, 1 made ihuns to hid.
to rife ano go with i ne ; anid, _iih.dl, macit
him to undcrliand tl-at his name \ aa i,, hi
Frima,, it being on ;hat day 1 Lf-ed his lifqej
aud that I intended to give him Ionie til.iihei
to bide his nakednclfs. As we pdhi.d by thci
place v here the la% iges Lvere, buried, he
pointed direly to the grace-, and let tnq
know by his gellures th.it he intendedi t;
org them up and devour, themirn, upon which
I let him fee 1 Iwas extremely diplicaled at Ii
and made him come away. which he did with
the greateft reverence. I
In our way to the caljc, we went to dith
top of a hill to view if the favag.." ere w one
and finding they were, we ref-.mf cd ouri
elves [for that nig., anti. ,iV Lr\t mor iwa0
I reiclved to .anrn milnlf, .and .ke-.jy mnmap
with me, and go to view the. plaice 'where
they
73 img073.jpg
C R U S 0 E. 67
they committed their barbarities. WThen
we came upon thi fpit, it is impofible to
spriels the horriblenefs of the lighL Here
liv the Ilelh and entrails, andl theie the
rton-,led Iltnib of human creatitnies; in (hort,
1i hfled mewith the grealell horror and d1-
lirt.I ion. Friday gave inc to iindetfl.and
,hat here were hrtee theie i-criliced, and
I 1 had noti relc.ued him. he had hec n the
f.uitli. I n',.de him gailier up the ftag-
mni:nt- and lay them in a heap. and made a
fire upon thl.m, and burnt them to aOims:-
And flil I found my man had a harik.erng
after l'oime c-f the flelf, which 1 relented with
the uimoi'r abhorrFence, and made him un-
dcrftjand, that if ever 1 found him g'ai'tv ol
anv fuch inK tuman Ny, 1 would certaiuiy fhoo
him.
After this we. went. to my cafle, where I
lotihed my man a well as the nature of Ithe
place and my aircumnlainces wc-uld admit.
-e feeined at firil a little uneafy, auid awk-
\,ard tn his ne,, drcef; but after hlie had woin
them four or file days, he grew famiinar with
ihem, and Ieerned extremely well fatislicd.
Nov.w my nc't .concern was, how I might
lodge him. welU, and yet be cafy mylcf ; and
inr order to this, I etched him a little tent
bJiween. *say two .fortifications, fecured my
am.s every' ijglgt and made evciy thing Il
lafe, that-Jt.,,t s i.plpmi*c for =w to be l'ur-
pM-iied: though j. WAI. .at the fame time own.
there was ;ia need' of, thtfe cautions ; Foe-
raeYii.aOava bleJ-c-l,wiw tfervant that lov-
cd- at4-stbqvyd ,bin,6with gxe ter tendeTrnefs,
fidelity, and a _tion which eideaqd. hiit.
to
74 img074.jpg
68 R 0 B I .V ,S 0 N
in min cxrrerielv, and inducC'd me 10to tlinI
irow 1 m.,,lt be-lt -iacqdit my'',i: ili him.
I hIlAd lott bcei ,ib.ve twvo i three davs ia
my c, tcl-l-, when I hrfirli pr,:%pofed tL bring hin
,.ff Gt' irn hi-. b)rbarmus intlin-.tlin to humai
!l-f1h ; incler t) which I ufed federal in
ti4:-'m,:s ,; till the p'.or cieatu:e who hal
*tl. n.i!l dt ful and tender icy-rd to even
thing I Cr.nliiidct!.d him z.nd indertd did ni
'ara t _-,id len _it, itc's per lIttlv wraieJ frt
bl'i, ,cit ls ri. xed .arin ;.l,,>rrenr.ce (-f anv frh b[ibarotr
priceedit', .1 mrlfrilf : he fell upn',, his knee!
a0ti-d in all i i.n.; oif h;is avrrliun he nolhblj
could i, pronouicr,, many tbin,_s 1 ,ii- rna
underfland ; -'vlv ir thie rin.i, I f.ur d thb
Lis ritv apprr.h'li.-n, were fIIm the fear
ftji.ul^ lli..iti hm for the ihoughls o.i" it
gun. --nd rli- manner of he Cexeci.iton it did
were I,11 in his mind. and I-e could by r
umeanI be recr-Ici lid tI it e: 1c oU'lld reve
fo rntuch as :ouch it with hi, linefi, for level
a! d&y,, avd I believe. if'l bad r1ot preenc
ed it. hi- would have piid it a l'.rt o.f .dora
lion : He would go, as fir n a, r.v bat.k w
mTrncd, and !.,Ik lt) t it in his o'wn diaIt ; th
intent cf which was, to delire it not tL ki
hlim.' ,1
I bad killed a kid.whirhi ,we brno4-ht.tir,
andr! the rext day I .ga'.e hin -'oiiu&e of Il
t11-'lh .,ilh b,,lcd anrd itaf1d, Vflh which
-'. i; m M 1uch icl ighted, ihiat he kave me fi
iih 1 tc-rfd:tlN- underT/lo6od) that whilt
:,.'ed hr Mwoiuld iie *r'''mobc, eij irtl-.laa'm
.1- !I or ar".' ac,.In:t. 'And ho l4 'ber 0
!-.:.I; it -iPOh LiMte to let my fervent to sorkkj
Vr'aeclaly
75 img075.jpg
C R U S 0 L'. 69
e'pc" nll, confiderinig 1 had now Lwo months
io fcd inflead of one. 1 found him cxtra-
i-.r yi] qiti' ard handy in every thing I
iet him abnu,. and he had the fenie to make
,r underlRand that I had more labour in my
hii d .on hib account than I had for my'felf,
an3 tl'ait lI would Ipare no pain nor dili-
gence in ;'ny thing I should command or dci-
,at and indeed, the fellow's honefly and
Gmffple integrity grew fb conspicuous. I really
begin to love him entirely ; and for his part,
I am well aiTured there was no loI'e loft. I
had a mind to know if he had any inclina-
tin to his own country ; and having taught
,him as much Englilb as poffible, I alked him
fc'eral queflions, which he autwered very
pertinently ; particularly, I Afked coricemirng
the nature and diflance of his corntry. and
their manner of fighting. &c. The fellow
hda a very good natural genius, and would
,ikfen anfwrr my qeieLiqn, with very quick
and I'urpr;img turns and when 1 [puke a-
h-.ut reli.i(.n, he heard me with the greatel't
re.erience and atterion,. and wculd often
furprie me with important and unexpected
qnucII.Ins;m and in truth, I fpared no pains to
inilruit him according to the belt of my
kn.," pledge. I afked him who made him and
all the world ? As Ibon a.is he underflnod
ine, he anirwercfl, Ol fBeamn.,', ke'; hut all
that Ihe could liv of him Was, that he was
very o.ld, mTitch older than the fea and land,
the in-ou anid Itr5, and that he livcd a srcat
way' beyond rhemrn all. .
\VWhen I had inquired into the manner of
lerv:ng their Gd,- 1k proceeded, accuiding to
lie
76 img076.jpg
7- R O B I .N' S 0 O '
the b1 a r mym, kno.wledi'ge, to inllnrcft him i
the prcipilc:. iof tie Clilitian religion, ani
]-il brf'ore him fc,.eral of the chrif tIrutl
upon which 'it wvas grounded: to which hi
ait\- ile Frea.icl atienti'n, ail vwuuld allk 'i
ry.p>rtiinteit quc ilrori, by wav of information!
In fhorl, I fI,,'.n percc,.'ed ch i p.or cre.iturn
ev,;yv dl;y improved by rMV Inr uttorns ; an
my endearours in inliruct hinn w<:re a grei
hlil- tn mvlel'f, and br,,ulht tho're things frel
into m memi-rv which tlire length of time hac
MmiaI d.-il t.ae.l : fi I had the giccatel realon tr
blels provil.ience for lending him to me in tlhi
flate of filliude. -fli c..mpanri ,,llaved t h,
thIorghrs of myv miler\, and made rm habitat
tion more c.inforrable than it had ben eve'j
fince mv filfl coming t,.the island. It brought
into mv miniddailv notionsof heaven and heavr
enlv thing,.tand tilled me ribh a fecret joI thal
I wi:. broinght it.o thi place. whilich I oncO
thou ht 'the m .fl miferrabie p3it if the uni'erlfe
B1e' ih;s time f-iia.u be'gr, In peak tolc rabi
Enri.lifh. th.,ueh a little broken. \V e con;
'erfed with g.-air Lnii.iarirv : and I took s
T-'irtctilar plealute I: ieldie tu him hih
f'verJl accidents and a'e-ntures of inmy
lIr, I f, nn made him urndcrdrand that woai
detrful miller. "s he cnnce ved it, if ihe gun.
pow.lie and hill. ard taught hm ',- n i l- fnot
n which lie t',,n learnit in the greatell perfect2
lion. I give him a knifr, wivlich he wais ve-e
pi.-'id r.f; li.ewi'ec a belt and a h.,rhct, which
he hun vto hir !irdle, which wiih the rel
r1f hi aicc.-,Ltr.'mncits, made himn l,,k likj
-.,z (Qwiote., wl-,ht-n he went [-i., engage th<
wiril mills. After thi 1 ga ,.e him a partcuj-
lar
77 img077.jpg
C R U S 0 E. 71
jr d-rcr;ptlin of Eirope, and Old Englard,
ill.o pl.ce of try njta iry; above all the icf I
2,1j -I gvC him On account oF my being [hip-
% rocked, and carried him and [be%% ed h'm tIlie
uini of the flhp'- boit, which, though it was
l nifl oitten and failn i.) pitc-'., yet 1 cou!d
,erCeiyCe he iook i.;,ri cular nritice of : which
mi-,,dc me aalk-hin the r .con y why h- pi.ndertd
1. mniich. ) m0 r'r rfUid liC) ,'. fc i /i., "'u ,uie
. t. at m pwDill.ri. it yleindl' caTiC into
n,, mind, that this mul be fume lEurop;.t
b.-:,i that was f,..rced in th,:re by rtrefs if
weather, arfor the lols cf the fhip, which put
,.' uon inquiry, what F,;rt of a boat it was,
a,d whjt carnet in it ?
F, ida' reTplied, with ureat warmth arnd 'Zr-
d..ur, (/ -afl,'r, d,.'jz'e A: -'te tr.,.ofJi i, d,'r.-.. :
LiFp.:n which I diKed him if there weie any
ulhitie mans (as he called them) in the bo.t P
;, )cs i faid he) t/I boat bi.l, n;, fll ,J :J, :e
rr,.; i*: Ilow mar,% Frit aid I : V'hcre-
upc.n lie numbcied his finger,. ;.:d countired
le\cenlten. Then I Aif;cd him, vhat became
of uthcm all, and whether thiiy v vi or not.
i-ic replied, y's.i maj r, t.'-y l iI'.e, itCY be lite
", '. r; i.1 :'n. Lipon whiih it came into
mrri\ th, ughts, that thele munif be the crew that
b,:l._,nuged t,., the fip, that was caui aw y ijpon
rv itfl3nd : who, iathei th:in be Jtd oured in
ihe. ,ce:an, had committed thr.mlelve' o pro%-
id-nrce, and wiie driven on mhse amorg ihe
wild I;.dizn-. The rio olior I .*ad of their crii-
elItie mizde me alk. FrYzjy how it cIme to pafs
they did niot kill and eat them. A'N, n, faid
Fie:tds, th', nAiAl ktl! 'l,': thry Itak.e IrT',MlhI ani'A
." My 1 raRoni t' ih'tr nation, to C-C' mrans. t,;t
--/'ic
78 img078.jpg
72 R .0 B I N ..S 0 N
zatYu: nmans ovi'zrc ojr .pht. As much as to
that neither his nor any other nation eve.
their fell,,w creatures, but which as ihe L,4
armb allowed to be devouicd, and they 4
only thole ivl-uf misfoitune it was to be d
priloners of war.
Some time after this, upon a very clear 1
my man and i went up to the top of a
high hill, on the call fide of the illnd, I
whence I had once [ecn the contir.ent ir
erica ; 1 could not direitiv tell what \vai
matter, for biday fell to jumping and di
as if he were mad : 1 alfked himn the itx.f
his joy. 0 /'?, I laid he. r.d I there fd
cokitrv. tht', n.y ? tdi'rr, there lIes .,fiile'
a/t g.:'fit. Upon which I could not
thinking, but that. if he could by any ri
get hrme, he would forget all I had douF1
him, and perhaps bring his countrN men i
my island todeflroy me : But, to my fhaA
fpeak it, mv jealoufy was very ill grrul
for the pobr fellow was of a quite d7tB
difpofition, and as I ogund afietwards, ,
freely have loft hi lirfe, rather that. ha.ii
me, or done me the lcafl injui v. -
Soon after this, I alked him if he hl,
a desire to go into his own country ? }t'p
he, var kfith (0 f j :J &: at mir vi'n lt;: 4
g,, ij yot .;..', Me no g' f you Jfju.V. I go, Fi
laid I, wlt fall I o,' there ? He atnf[we
ma/l-, .a.. do great deal *mutih good. vI,
all tihe wild ,at, is to 'be goid tame mnans, yoi
thn Jib r, la goad life, to A s,.,.. Cof, JJj
Cud. Alas poor Fridav, (aid I, th &t'sJ
my power, neither will 1 vCnture
th,
79 img079.jpg
C R U S 0 E. 2
them : No. you Shall go and leave me alone,
, I was before I faved your life.
Never was any creature more thunder
fitiuck than Frdav was at thele wArds, eL-
pecially when I told him lie would be ;,t lib-
eri'i tugo as loon. a; the boat was ready I'. car-
rv him he put one .A his halchris into mV
.ard., I ly'ne, or/' k/li F iday)' Friday ar I. t
,',. /, : but wXhat nmuifl I kill v-.u for ? (1"ii1
IVA h iT,'-r m.il', ait ,i nd' 7 .; FrLdajvy Ja.
't, ata mre lip., k ,cp li, Fridaiv mat., e Frday
",',.. (',044 amd IL't I.OU Betiamurkee, and rw.o.
li -d'Iv f/r.dt arov, aeuer .;.t Friday more! \Vhcri
lie rFoke this, the tears ran down fo plentifully
ithat I had much ado to refrain from weep;ng
nlSclf ; I comforted h.im in the beft manner
I could; selling him, if he was wiillijg to
ll. y with me, I w-,,uld never past v.ith him as
long as I lived.
In fl.rt. the fellow's honeflvand fincerebe-
b-vio ur Coon convinced me of the unrealuna-
blenels of my jcaloufy, and he became moral
dear to me than ever, Indeed, I thtuiht that
if ever I could gel to the continent, a-id join
ih.ole while men F'r'id'y had mentioned, it
m,,ht be the means to Further nfiy escape ; in
orIler to thick. Frndpv and I went into the
woods to look out a large tree. to build a ca-
noe, which we effeded in about ix weekl-., and
\% th much trouble and pains gnt her irato the
water. 1 was very vwiell pleafed at the la .ch-
ing this littleman of war of mine, which i-'rn-
dILI managed with great dexterity, and affured
me it was in aH points large enough to carry
us over; and if I thought proper, he was read
to venture wAin me.
G I
80 img080.jpg
74 R 0 B 1 ,A S 0 A
I liked the fellow's honiieft pr.pr.fjl, bit, ,
the I'jme lime. 1 thought if I could procure
mail arnd I'dil, it would be better ; which will
ihe .reatLeft bificultly migingable, in zbjut
three months tame, 1 made a flift to, patch ron
gether and after that, I had mn mIIi f, iH
to intllrutt in the rt o'f na igatiLn, which [ei
fore he knew nothing, of.
1 wa now t'cratertd in the Vweniv feventlj
year of my icign, or rather of iny captiviryV
atid kept the annivorljry of mv landing U J4
greater fuilermity thin tever, having tecceived
fuchi repeated -IraJ's ,ft the divine favour
in my delverance, prlfeevatiun and profper-
ity.
I now wanted for nothling, arid vet my
mind was f'ill intent upon my deliverance' i
and in trktah, I h-*d a itron? rnpr"fT.or upoi
me that I lioiuld rint he ar.rher year ir" thi
illand ; but I Rill c.niinjed my hufbandr r
and made the neclfairy preparations f,.,r my
future lubtilenc.. The rain Ialon coming
on, we were forced I cunruntme tait the ino
part within doors, hIvini4 F, rt rmide all ncceli-
tary preparation fir the lecc,.,i' anrid fafeLy o
m% new boit, tll the nmor.tlh of NovenibeJ
and December, at which time I fully deteimini
ed to lail over to the continent. And n(
fooner didit begin t,. draw near, but 1 be.a
to make prepaiationan f,,r "my intended -:, [aed
tion. and in a forttiii ht's t1me, 1 proposed
open my little dock, ind let out the boat f
that purple.
One moving, as I was bury in making pre
arati.os for my voyage, Friajy whonm I h
fent to the fcafide to look fur a turtle, can
ruaLining
81 img081.jpg
C R S 0 L. 75
running in a terrible fright : Says he, I hare
t3J.ini Oj: itiri cre luh'ief. *I jol in ivt
I /, arid ,thy t'ine I., j Fr ,.)If r Fridav,
,.a -:!..'. ,'Z,/ Yv as Zeli as lnc ; and lI'rffore Wu
*i q rrv.t e rf ,hi' for c'. r ';c i.-Sayb fridrv.
tretiahling, w n ip ,i t ,s .;I i. I ..,n but I
; 'jra,:j fhe w r, ti., mastz t- ('r u ti ; ,, 1 ?-il/ ohbycv
i 'r ..I l.ir, nd/lf,. I t r 14c d "I'd I-- 'jij t'olo r 1'ov y.
Without farther dilpute:., we fell to ojiding
our arms, and making eveny thing ready for
the onfet : When we hid double loaded therm,
arid put every thin. g in the bell pollure that
could be, I took my proffp-tive glals, and
wenrt tip to the top of a hill, to try what [
could discover ; and I lfoon perceived there
* wcre nineteen favagues and three priloners,
which I concluded, by their manner of rifting,
were to be devoured.
.. ... _--- =__ _-_
3 his
82 img082.jpg
. R 0 B I A' ,S 0 1V
This difmil and inhuman fpcEntle fillce
me with the ujtmrjll horror and detcftatio
and the more fo, as I law a white mnan. w'i
by their aCi-ons arid preparations. I found
was to be the next facriFice. This made
make all 'he fpc.-d I could, having fully dt
termine 1 to. deliver him or perilh in lie a
tempt fo r gave Friday, orders to follow" in
arid to do every thing he C.w 'mc do.
When we came tu a proper difiance undil
coetred, I gave the word to /Titd.. to fir., A
1 did the very fame momrient. We took oul
aim fo well, that between us, we killed four
and wounded three or four mre.-Nu inal
can imagine the conflernation and coufu1io0
.leie ravages were in upon this uineXpeCte
.accidcrt : lHowever, not to give the.m LrL,
respite we took up omrie other arms, and I1
fly a second time, killed two more. and wound
ed fe'er'l others, which ,added fo to their con
fuion, that they ran veiling and howIrig a
boin like mad creatures. tridAY ITaid I) tr.-
a t-t... /'.t m'i'l- ai d lvt.Yr.a So, flcewini
ourlv'er to them. and at the fanime trmn 1'r,
a qreajt flirGiz. we went di rtcily to i!e vo ini]
and irnretdiatel' c.. th' l.aods fr,,nim l; fiatnd
ahrd Ieg... ami liftng !i.rn uip. I atll.cd him, rj
the Porzug'ierr -longiur, what he was H
tcl, me. in L; ,n. hc was a .'/'a'ird and-.
CThntHia ;. aid zifter returning the lhe' 3
l.:nrt-iledmienl., lie could fir his dclivrianc,
ie w, ;; thouz; to gi.e. an octnounrrof hic n-_i'-f.,
tuer.;, but I pre.-ntird him, telling him. Thi
w,:ij /I 1t!.'r a! atwnilh.r te ; and f-I tLr.
Laid,,
Siriowr
83 img083.jpg
C A U S 0 E.
^inrar, &. 1 7.i'l t al efter;.,ards, but n.i.;i 7*r
,';i,' i. .hjt:i. J gave him a draim and a
FtC.e of bread to refrefhi him, and then ga.yg
1.,in a word and pi ftol, and bKde him d -wlit
I,. ciuld ; and tigivc tOw mm in.s 'lue, IJO One
-.uld behave bhimlelf w b .uLvctr r.. riage, In
lth. %, Iiie E manj.,ed the m.,ter, that of 1w.ei-
i twvo i-r,geii, rit above lhr,!'O r four gotl inPritp
,ine of their canoes, and thole I ieliuL,.e, to
defri.,y hi.o if polliblc ; aetorihirilv, I lcaped
inito one of tliheir c riore, and ortitred. Fkicay
t.. fi,,ll.w nme ; but 1 \%as no f[c.oner got in,
than I faw ano'thei p,,or cit'.ture bound hand
;,nd foot for the Ilaught>-r. 1 piefeutly hel-.v-d
h,,rI up, but he \wa i. I- fiint and weak, that he
c. uld neither filnd C-:r peak. bill giianred
I-,dlv, thinking lie was now ti'f e lacrnilicd.
I Lbadec FriL.I)' i'pCeaik 0in him, and lrul, him.n of
deliverance. When he wasa little riocvercd,
a;r.d lIat up in the boat, and had looked up,-n.
Jiin more fully, you cannot imagine tlc p.,..'
iL Hlow's transport ; at length, when he hadi a
Itli," recovered hiimfelf, lie told me it U'a. hi..
father and in trulh. h g,,ave luch un iitC.
rn>,, teflimo.iies of hi duty and affetLi,.r. -.
I mull. nriteds own 1 %%as vei) WL.uh aid=-,. h
with it.
In fort, willi a greal dial of. difficui-. v -
got both my new gurfLs home l.:, n C,- .._..
where 1 wade them a hrndft i'.A t.,.t, .n11
Ireatcd them in the heft. rianncr m.v r.,
lances w- Arind thi-,, like an abfioltle Kiug4 .-*"ctn-
'd ir\ little diominions : ai.d f1,d11' t'tiii.'
nc > iiubjctl wet.' very ,i ak I ,;J..t.:d .1 P .-1'
W itl uone of my kil.;-., and fic%,.I ;,.,d b,-lIi
G a '.;
77
84 img084.jpg
73 R 1 B I A' S L,'.' :
ft. efl"h and made them fI'me %cry '%-:,d brn
and dined with t'-.r ni' f.-Atw r difiner
ordered Fr:i :v ti,_. ro to ih.- ficid of bat.iikc. a
fetch home th: arm.s ; and then I bide f,1-I
afl_ 'hi father 'hict her he thoug'lit it ,polibri
for the !a%\ ge to ouiride t i' il'ii. or if th
got hown,. mvhcthae he thuught they wcat
not return in great nrurnbers, and endeav'our
delrov u;. Ilis anfwer w.A,. tihat ii the; di
reach their ,\wn cuntiv, hich h-e Ihaid
h-ought p !ti(ic, vet ithe franectL- of th
being attacked .would c:, t3iiv makethiem tI
the pe.pir lthat th.v were d. lime',':d bV thul1
der and lii,,r, nt. amd that '.'%It'itr went i
to the ifland w.3,id certain, be dC< bttcd
th e h a id s of.f th e (,L i d ., a ,,I n -t c.f rrifi a ,
thit thl' .-ind isas cie chanteld ;aid tbat tI
(Uds -nrt fire fr.,,'n above to dcltro,, all thu
that should pinlIme u land in it.
This accuuit having freed me ficnm my a .
prLe'.er:mon'i. ind n.o canoies appealimg, I r
i..Ned to pursue my itenderd s 'yage, t',.i..'*
father ha in., ,laired me thit I m'.'.ht depLnti
upon g.-od uldae fiom the people of h Ci: u
:mTy. As to the Sp.nian.rd, I alkr-d i ira his
pilnio : he told i me the were foutirten th
were cos away- upon the island, and hiat rht
hjd a good underlrandinag with the Indian
lbut were i want of neceirar;es for the r.p!
port of himain ife and that if I thuugu
proper, he anrd the old fsv'ngr -would go ov'
firfi. and fe-tle tnarler', in rider fiur our r i
ctption ; arid at the famt time he told mi
they would all *wear fidlrly to r.-e, amid ow0
wc as their leader.
'Upon
85 img085.jpg
C R U S 0 E.
Upon thcfeIaff'aranges, vekIlIve4 to I-rd
ilh.-n vcr ; bttt when'evcry thing was ready.
,ii, Sp.iniaidiflarted ibis material objektion-
) ,, .." faid lie, kIow ias the n.h uf-y;.or
, I.,f ''Lt" gh I4u MI- h Aarfe. cnugh jhir g3 hate
,. dh* t VLW.J t..t .:oa enlarge *,.,ir/um,-
h., I am /a jti/ c 4 t,,1,i.," befjuffiient It ,pP-.rlta i
!,,.'.;,and tl hrrvr *ry advice is, to wiait aitla r
t,:.' 7fl, aid..an tke mean t7Mn prepare i Acbrs k
.., 6id f pVq !rksrtikr we may ha. 1 rouorvuwjiifii
, l,,:l h. -..rn' Rn oiur d-ign. This adv.ice. I
S'.c d Lex tr rme I aind ruom that.moment I ai%&ayc
lPeemed thbe Sp-rliard and aadehim my privy
t.)'inl ll',r .n all occasions.
We all four went t. work, and prepared
a; much gr.ijnr :as wruld, luw iweny two
bifhidls of barley and lixtenn,of rice. which
wis allI hb l.td we had to Ippre : And at lh.
dfame tirhc I took all the care inimginabic to
,nc:reare and prcfcrve my goats by Ihuooing
thl: ijld dams, and. taliiag th )oungt, kids,
putting then into the inclofures, and ti-ok.
I-ach m-arfujcs, that, by the blefing C C God,
an.! --u.r indu try, after harvetl, we had pru-
Si,.:.ns to vtictual a fhip for any paz.t of Anmer-
ic-i.
Tihe principal occafinix being thus Anfwered,
I ga-'e W)y two anmbiU'adujv- a muLkct. eadli,
wirth charges of powder and ball ; with. pro-
Silijns fit for the expedition, and away I lent
therm ; they had noc beoq gone a furtnight,
b-ut I began to be impatient for lhir return.
WVhilft my thoughts were Fprpetully ra.irp
lip with theespctlationof them,a very firange
accddcnt happened, which was firfl diicovered
by) my man Feida),, who crc morning care
runnin g
86 img086.jpg
go R 0 B I N S 0 A
running unto me, crying out. They a: '.
are come. Upon which I jumped frc.min n' bC'
and looked-towards the fea. I pr'-i -cd
boat about a league and a half difta-]C. ILii,
ing direly in for the fhore. I f,.'-n f.If
that thefe were none of the compa,. thb.t U
expe&ed ; for by the help of my glal:, I f.,in
that this boat muff belong to fome fhbp. '. liic
by caffing my eyes about, I plainly '-lic,. c-,
lying at anchor at fomrne distance at fia whrl4
by the fafhion of her longboat, &c. I conclid-
ed muft be an Englifl veffel.
Great were my tranfports upon tl; unc-.:
peded ,fight, which brought into mI
frelh notions of deliverance: and ,.. I hi
fome cautionary thoughts, which I c- rif-fi
were of ufe to me afterwards. IJ v. -, n
long before I faw the boat approach i',c i,-.re
and then I was fully convinced that 0 c. jr r
Englifh. I faw four of them leap 111ii hi
fliore, and take three out with them. il-t, 1. .,k
ed like priloners, 'who, I obfer il i..,d4
paffic'tate gestures of intreaty ; and r .A. k: n w
ing what the meaning might be, I k,'e
to Friday to go to the top of the -*,, .r. r.i -in
and make what difeoveries he could hfi
in a little while returning back, 0 ? i'A
he) you fee EnglI.A mans eat triftner ..'
fiavage mans I But of this I foo,n .-I,,IL-e(
him to the contrary ; and yet I 'c, Id nor
help thinking but there muft be forn .11in*, ve
ry barbarous in hand. I could nct [,-.iL e'tV
that they had any fire arms, but Y.il,-r Iia'
they were preparing to kill their "h'. c. n
panions with their fwords ; and n w t %%a
I lamented my want of pawer to piefCriI
L h 11'. !
87 img087.jpg
C Rx.L S 0 E.'
thei.. HTowever, Qto my great fati'fafioD, 1
kound tha. they turned Lhem up into the del-
olie illand, as they thought, t0 he either Ifarv-
rl or devoured by wild bcats. ar.d then mmb-
led abomt the wood to make obfervations, till
tho tide wks gone, and the boat was aground.
.4
~" ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ jS.----^^J^- l; ^
In rluort, I cotlidercd whvt fi->rl or onyn I
had now to dcal-with, and therefore refloled
I', act wilh all. the caution iniaginable, and to
'onrluded it was bell ntlto. make any attempt
0ll it grew dark :.But zhe'day being exceffiv,-
lv htt. I.coricluded ihe,a 4lors were of course
lild in the. Ihade to fleeW; and. perceiving Liht
three poqr dilconialae, ,eaturszs fitting unldr
a tre, at ore fInMall distance from me, 1 m-ade
ru more to do, but went up to ithcm, ailing
thcm, in the Spanilh tone, wh. at th were ?
AL
88 img088.jpg
82 R 0 B I A' S 0 N.
At which they flarted tip, and being furpri
void me but I called to them in Englilh,.
not /be ttjau.., for ,i Iwur a fnr'nd "e,,er ., .
th ,2 l'"u t.x iti ; /... v.'ur- .Af./ ;n1, a;id ,f it
in r.vy /'.'., r, I 'ii /t rr v,,tz Iaitl.iit '' Sir, ;l'
one of thc'm hfrv n .. /tl,' et 12! t Pn,;
,.'di mi/ler oj tha .' ti p / :atl lit's ..,/Rvr ,it an,' .h
Prji' ituri t /',u'i7.'7 u .ltl d. it i *I ta z Iur tri/V. /lf
, l E.inj.ipqi/rr'7,ir,! iar.at anil Mfir., ,JZi ore Cmt
S-lfand a a iz.'.,uf in '',.Jr'n. "' t i,.,h ; ha' r
Pro/,tl tntl ,n,,Ii ,..TI,, f"r ,n! IF '4 v,:,-
Js vf bltr.-H!a;,: tiv aiy, jfir, ar', "' faidj
Or/y tlzi fu.azfcc i, replied lie, *,:, ..i. ,./ ti'y
7.)aw lft in /,it boiat ; ah'/, if it t1 o .:fterj
rognt s that ae with ti/rt in uc,. e LAkLtn, I
ptrttty dell afkaud the reft ,,,'uln return to At
duly. Well. 1fid I, let us retire a little fa tl
under the covering of the wood, and we w
talk fartherj and there it was I made my c
ditions with them, which they) veiy graLlf1
anrid honeilly perroimed.
It was not louna before we came to a rtf
tion to go' and attack; the illlains i the r
men fired on therm;, and killed one ofthe cr
tain's greateflt enemies, and wjunfdtd ainoth
the reft cried out for mercy, which was grai
ed them. upon rtmdition they would fivcad
be true to him, in helping himn to recover'
ahip which they all piomifed todo in a fol4
maainer : however, ladvifcd the captain;
keep them bound, and then our next care',
to fecure the boat, without which -it was?
poffible to reach the rhip. a
To flhorten the relation as muph as .
bic, we cdricezed all our meafuris f1o wolt
89 img089.jpg
C R U 8 0 E.
,it ifl, the fhip was recovered according to
our w;fli and now tlieae remained nothing
but the difpol'al of the priloners, the molt.
da-,aeruls of which we rdlolved to leave on
ih,- illaud. I gave them arms, and all the nec-
e:jlies I had in my called: and telling them
aill my whole flor-, I charged them to be kind
to the Span;ards that 1 had fent forever. They
prcr mifed me very fair. and fo I.informned them
,.f every thing neceffary for their Ilubflrftencc ;
if takiftg with me my man Frida' my money,
mry parrot, &c. I went on board whey the
'.'ptain treated me as his deliverer and behav-
eCl himself to me with the utmolt gratitude and
c, ilitv. Uppin the is-th of De,.e'&r, 1686, we
I L fail. ind landed in England the iith of
';eH, 1687, after 1 had been abfenit from my
native-c'iuntry upwards of thirty five.years.
.\ after my arrival, and I had a litlLI-Tefrefi-
ed mvlclf,l'I be-ari to inquire into the Rawe of
in. affairs I fu-und my filll Captain's widow
alive. but in very mean circumllances. Soon
ailtcr I went into Yorkl'hire, wherb' I found
my, f-imily in general either dead or loft, to
ih.at 1 knew not where to find them. I found
liia t here was no provision made for me ;
upo.n which I took my man Friday and wenIL
to I.rlbon in order to find the Portiguefe
I ap Ftain who to9k me onr, board on the coaft.
i ol Afica : any'to leaso, from him, what was
become of my plantation at Lth'e Brazils. Ac.
cording to my wiflth, -after fome litilc fearrh I
ILfund him out. and he gave me a very laris-
latory account of all matters., more;particu-
larly .,f my plantation in the Brazik ; which
had bee Co honetilly maui3ged in way abfence,
that
90 img090.jpg
84 R 0 B I N S 0 A
that beyond my expeaation, I four.1 n'(i
worth 40001. fterling ; with which. f'uO
as poffible, I refolved to make the b. it .l r-4
way to England ; and by the' advice o t
Captain, I was perfuaded to go bv i!na
which had like to have proved fat,.l
and all that were in my company: f,-.: Ih
fnows being fallen, the wolves and bcai
were driven out of the woods, and hu
there were more than 20 of us togeth r. I Lh
fet upon us many times, and indeed. I wr
not without the greateft hazard and dii-,,:li
we preferred ourfelves from being d.'>.,re<
the particular relation of which would b,- tq
long to trouble the reader with.
In our farther paffage through i 3rnci
we met with nothing uncommon or r, in -r
able ; we got fafe to Paris, and after a flio
fray there, went to Calai' and landed -,t Dv
the 14th of January in a very cold fe. .,n.
When I came to London, I found rrn ,' bi
of exchange all arrived, and the mon- read
to be paid at fight, which when I had r-i
ed, it came into my mind to return tc. I. ibol
and from thence to the BraAils, to 1-. I ati
my plantation ; but upon second tI;,IC,.h4
I concluded it beft to fell it, and on ci-i ai
count I thought it proper to write to .mv c
refpondent at Lifbon, and defire hbs advid
and affiftance, who readily gave me hi. proa
ife to do all he could for me ; and i-, ir.,:h
I afterwards found he acquitted himi'-!f to c
in every particular with the greater ,.iit
and integrity.
In fhort, he fold my eflate for me 13 iN
beft advantage, and remitted to n-.c fc r i
bLil
91 img091.jpg
CR USO E. 85
bills for three hundred and twenty pieces of
eight, a fum much greater than I expected.
And now I began to think it high time to
fettle myfelf, Providence having'made fuch a
plentiful provifion for me that I wanted noth-
ing to make myfelf as happy as I could wifh.
Having caft my anchor, and for the pref-
ent bid adieu to all foreign adventures, I
had no other care or concern upon me but
the education of my brother's two fons. One
of them I bred a gentleman, and the other I
bred an able failor ; and foon afterwards I
married a virtuous young gentlewoman, of a
good family, by whom I had two fonrs and
a daughter ; but, The dying, I grew difconfo-
late and melancholy, and at the inftigation
of my nephew, refolved I would once more
make a voyage to the Eaftindies, which I did
in the year 1694, and in my paffage visited my
Ifland. A full and particular account of
which I intend fihall be the fubje& of the fab-
fequent parts of my narrative.
FAP.Tir IU'-
92 img092.jpg
86 R 0 B I N S N A
FA R T E I
ADVENTURES
o r
ROBINSON CRUSOi
Cratuamnin a full 'actmount if his travels and rewarA
able trarlf.,zonitfr boyh tYfea and land.
Y new kingdom ran continually in slt
mind, and took up my thoughts day al
eight, infomuch that my wife took notice
it, and wpuld often alk me the reafon of
exLraordinary tboughtiulnefs, fuppofing ti
marriage with hen might be the caule.
tender and endearing exprclfions, iocgelh
with the concern I had for the prefervanon V
my family at length brought me to a refolutij
.to fettle myfelf in Inme hxed way of living
accordingly, I bought a little farm in Bedforn
thiue, and (foon provided me a flock wilh
other implements hi to manage it to the b3
advantage. In this rural retirement I began
tl-ik t m(lelf as happy as could will, wht
on a fadden. all my happinels was dcfiroyed
the unexpefed dealh'of my wife.
Her death gave me a fort of contempt
the world, and filled me full of dilfrreA
thoughts'"
93 img093.jpg
C R U. S 0 E.
thoughts and .inclinations. My ,coxnwty life
giew burthcafome to me : And in iohrt, let
may farm, left of hboufe keeping, and in a. few
months4ftr, ltumoned. toeLoadoa ; but. there.
I could fipd nothing to entertain me and divert
my ..mlancwoly. It was the beginning of the
year 1693, when my nephew, whom IJiad bred
up to thbe .fea, w.a&i tetuned from Nhas voyage,
Captain of _the,,ip .be. wa.oput in ; who coCm
ing to~m~ ~ae boring, told me, it wau. prp-
poPkJ to him. by fnmc nmr:hawts to make a
voyage ao the Eafli4t wo 4l uqdirt4ke to laid mq, uon may. illand,
that I might have adi..oppqruwuty.jto inquiKc.ia-
to the lafeof mynew kingdomi. .
q.u(befi. .hp.caac. to me,.U cam uinte oy'
tbougfrs tQ get atpateot, anfill my IlIand withL
inhabitants. Whpi deaz4, aid I, fiet ,oxhuiAcrr
'z isus mjpe ? And -though I ltkcdsthei,
moliop, ye .*vout r Ot ,4t him know it at,
I fi It; 4weveri' aftqr Oltle pauf, .I told hipt
if he would fptwe'dowaand Call Iormnsc at f
return,, I wqnhl ceMrtainlty go with ahim, As
tW calling fhr m6 as he came back he told ainn
it was .s. &1lc.e. But, kid *he,. I itL tell
o& iohat i',e can da'.; We nay, #have- a flewp ready.
afrunedi on 69.zhrd., we pu emy raft4x, ptA. itie-
ir a: at tit'.i, .apd yft manay -rctni at your fica-
I was pot lorg .ia foring my rdol4udnusa
but ctontwry to the advice of alt my itndNs,
Fully desjmined lo.uqwlrtakc the voyage';.
and, in order to it,. I ,mBld ay will, and 4ut
all my a'airs in the.behl.ipoAure I could pou-
fibly. and fo with my tiruny fervant Fridat .in
the beginning of January, 16941, I went on
board,
94 img094.jpg
88 R 0 B I N S 0 N .
boadd,uakdaook with mae several artificers wift
good crgo, for the better -focking m.y ,flaa
We had #ot been longout at fea, but we wrl
oenijken by a fiorub which drove us up
bthnoaft" of Ireland, as far as Calway, w]6
we wera obliged toftay twenty days for a w;l4
On the 5lh of February, the wind prefelt4t
and we had a very good gala 'for several d4
On the olh in -the evenitg,'ti:rd mate calN4
outl that he taw a flalh of lire, and heard a .uJ
upa. :Wnbihcb. we all ran to the quarter detf
from wbawce, at a diftaace we' faw a terriE
fir, .whieh, t rsa out reckoning, wfr-roncludi
ceatdb.benm other Mo ag4hip -that bad tak4
fire at fea, and that it c6utld hot be far off 4
he reporttof the gun, which we heard fcvet
times. We made to it with all our fail, a
foote perceived it was a great bip burning
the middle or the (ea ; I immediately ourd4
ed five guns to be fired, tKat ttIe por peoTl
might petceite tbatthec* was dli-verance I
haWd, who codukqaootly mnight'Ti&- tteirlidj
' in their boats; nor was i long before the fai
btlew up. "
We hungsout our Jlanherrnsb and about ci#
in the aerrfiing:4 when it began to be light, -A
faw two boats making towards us, and id
made a signal for then to conre on beard ad
took them all up, being men, women and chi
dan-,ia atl lixry four. It was a Frtnch fi
of go. tons, bound -from Canada, and by t'
neg&igraetof the f[Leerfman it was fet on i
it tie' tearage; fo that in all probability,
povidenee had not Ieat us to their ffiftta1,
they had every foul periflied. -
; Neier'
95 img095.jpg
. C R U S 0 P.
Never. were peospc, certainly fo &nrjoycd;
as thrcf -#ar cruaures were. A.sfag v-ahc
paffcngew stbn 'were two priels, an M id to"e
and a young on.; the old one wasix Rupid
fkllow, bic the young one was a very m=*Kit
fine getmlcmat. After thdivrkr.Jw'W.sas pte.-
ty wti over and -they had hatn rcheffieed'
the t eft: manerL ou". flip woti allow, 'the
capain anadoue of the priefts defired-atotpeik
wirth- me, nmd.oflced us-the money .and jewels
thery had fawtd, which 1I refued,'leiing tieon,
ou r- daftifs- wias *lafave t"h, as4 nta to piusdn-
tIirt. They told us, what they -had todefrrht
of usw.m, .to fet thnm on tote fonic where -ia
OUT paffagc.. As to landing, we tolid them, ;bat
bcizgWmound to the Eadtidires, we could nat dn
tirat withoutchanging oir-4moaurie, aid .ift we
eoald .'q6r jflify,; but we wtiad carry thman
till *ect. with a fhip bound either to Ewgland
or Fran e .that would take tbem on boadt;
howner, our promifrons bgintinigt.p fall fbaR
wve stfaved to hland tlhet-at Newfonndiat,
which was not much oitr of-our, way-. Ad
aceoroing;y- as we proposed, I\i.. About a
week's time wr came to Ithe banks of New(-
foundland; *her& they hired .a bark to carry
themato-France, all but the young piefft'-and
two or Atine of'tfc failorn, who chofe to go
witlrAiSfr L r. 1
Now direfing our course to the S; S. "E.
about twenty- days after we mea with sbthlbr
advcnxlrtc that gdve us htfrefh bpporttmihy to
excrcifeour hwuanrty. '-in Jlaitude of 4e, wa"
faw a fai bearing towitds us that had loft t&
her IPaf4, add filing a ga in token of diLsre%:
the wind icing N. wt foaO carho up to fFeak
1 11 2 to
96 img096.jpg
1
9o R 0 B I N 6 0 N
to her, .and found her li he a .-liip of Briol6A
hound bometg 'iron aibadoee, thin had- bee
drw anBut of Lhe'road by a furiamns wicased
They bad bern tcwilefcd about, forfeveral days
ard werec almoll .larved for want of piroviiorsi
having eaten thing for eleven days. "1
In this Ihip were three paiTcngers, a gentile
wmaiaN, her lut and a maid ifervant : thele 'w-
foasd in a sol. milerabe conditioir that cas
be wagi'ned. The woman died, and it wat
with the gteatelQ 4dilulty tbat we prrfervedi
thc.Tyoing man and maid, whom, at their in.-
trear., ate.r 'we had uppedd the 4bip wlhj
what we could fpalre, we took on board ousd.
owa.nfihip. rWe were wow .in. latitude- 19 ; but.
paffing by Ionie liule imciAdents, I f(hall relatq
what as saofti remarkable relating to my btilq
kingdom to which I w as now drawing nigh.
It was with no Imall trouble 4hat we goi to tbh
fopih fide of my rlland : however, at lall wg
cametoan anchor attlie rnouLh of tha littl
crm,' and then I ioon law my old callUe, an 4
kqi parfclIHy where I was. -4
\Vhen I was certain of the place, I called tq
Friday and alked him if he knew. wheic h
was Ruint when be looked a little, he cJappc4
hip handar crying, U-,, ) 0 thire y-'i / 4
hrce W Me AL I *Alr vret Thkre mnich ai w
.t,.rC / and fell to jumping and dawriig as if b4
wtre ntad.' *
WWa*@ the Eoglilh andieiaL was spread. m4
wei'hd fiid-ehree guns, to lo thor know I4
were friends, I hung But the white h ag, an. Li
wviih the young pried, apnd my man Friday,
wenson lIhore. And who should be the Lid
man I law, but the Spaniard, whole life I ha.
Lived ;
97 img097.jpg
CA R U S 0 F. 1
fave&,; .andibriday, who feaw his fafier at a
difaLce, raw. to if m with Mal the jgy 'inagia-
bie, and enubmace, him With eatrende t2afe-
twes.
It was the ioth of Ap-wi-'t.t I fet my faot
on More ac second time, when. my {aithfyl
Spaniard, accompanied by one more, came tup
to mw ; be didnot knownme at firft ; but when
I had hinted to him who I was, no.man could
expiefs or. biehae hiomfOf wkhtt'grftlar- ati-
iude. --I-i'oek:it by -tOe hariad "d aflbd me
i( I'vwaold noe-g -and take-pffeion-.of my old
habitatiob svcrc four hey hads made con-
fidashle impiovemeni.s. 1-atrd -hir fekvrat
que&ivns, and he as Ieadiy "twered me, tell-
ing me withal what ftrangf colfufipu they.
had wnb the Engliffintb, wh$o defigwed -la
haveaumtdomd them: While we wet lalkiktg
the sa whom ho had4nm Teturned with eleven
more. Thel-faid ihe; are fome af thale that
owe their .1iV. to' your grodntfs. ,' -Atd matter
he had made blum'{enfib) '-wbo I was, they all
fahued me irt a. v-rygratefil and handfomy
Sat.ntnr. .
EkedoreI retaiM what happened in the ifltand,
a2 it was Teiald by the Spaniard, my (GoverwOr,
1 mtqp not omiva ftary which I rnnttt0' in tny
fofmtnt artratvuw ; jzift tufore w weig~fd an-
chor, the tA htpreTd U quarrel an boaf0rfwhich
by I'ecaier f rt captain was-inielyr7n*hied
though ntot withenutkaine difiefulry : Ahd.itdAtd,
Iofwar it pribedwithaPtwo ftlIWos, tin -had
been ithe :ingleid"e UMtd.-nealns in dhe ti'ft,
;o get hrme &704 aO-'te flfrtp's boa*, and rt
away toi tike ILan4s sad jatned their blA er
rogue' ; fo that Wo t 6t *re five v Euitrh im
the
98 img098.jpg
a O B I N S 0 XN
the ifland, which, as the Spaniard rep-,rts
the following narration, was the caute of gTe
d'forder and confufion amongtt then-.
The Spaniard's relation of what hap.p a i; t, t
Jjland,from ny departure timy feco?,.: t_ i,, -
YTOU may remember, fir, you fent mnie o i
A. a voyage ; and indeed, I was not i lirtl t
furorifed to find, at my return, that ycu ha
left us. We had a very good palfage ; aid in
deed, my countrymen were overjoyed If, find t
had fo miraculonfly escaped; and- vhrn I had
fhewed the arms and ammunition whi icr I had <
brought, they were tranfported to ihe h g .er
degree. After a little ftay, we gut whit we
could from the favages, made bold w i, I o o o
their canoes, and fo came all of us over to th
iftland; where we had no fooner landed, bu t
we found the Englifhmen had quarrelled wt ii
one another, and had attempted to minuider anrl
deftroy their fellows, and were often vety nea
putting their wicked pra&ices in execaL n,. 1
One day it happened, that as tuo of myn i
Spaniards were in the woods, one of the fo-:
bereft of the Englifihmen came up to them, and
made heavy complaints how cruelly they were
ufed by their countrymen, and that it we did.l
tnot take them under our protection and give'
them iTffilance, they muft inevitably be Ildtve
and undone. When they came to upper, on
of the Spaniards, in a gentle and friendly man--
ner, began to reprimand the mutinoLus Englil h-
men: That it was a great pity their countrymen
should
99 img099.jpg
C R U S 0 93
should feriflf, and therefore intreated them to
fuffer their countrymen to procure their fub-
fiftence without farther diflurbance ; to wh'ch
they replied, Let them flarve and be damn'd, for
e i?!.;,,' is oiurs, and if they will not work for us,
tey fijall have o jfhare in it. Come jack (fa:'d
Atkins) .haJntal dare to build in our dominions
zitihvt our confint ? And as we afterwards
found out, they had certainly murdered them,
if they had not been prevented : However,
they pulled down their huts, and did them all
the damage they poffibly could. When they
had done this villany, they came back to the
cafle, boafting of what they had done; when
one taking hold of a Spaniard's hat, twirled it
round, saying, And vou Signior yack Spaniard.
jfi.a, have the faanefauce if you do not mend your
manners. This quarrel in a fhort time grew fo
-high, that if we had not timely interpofed and
taken away their arms, in all probability there
had been murder.,
Thefe wicked fellows, perceiving that they
I had made all of us their enemies, began to-re-
lent, and to beg for their arms, but this we pof-
fitively refufed, which made them fo mad and
defpcrate, that they left us in the greateflt paf-
fion imaginable. They were hardly gone but
their two countrymen came to us with their
complaints, telling us they were ruined ; and
truly fir, we could not help thinking it very
hard, that nineteen of us should, from time to
time, be bullied and insulted by three fuch no-
torious villains.
It was with fome difficulty we perfuaded
their two. countrymen from purfuing and kil-
ling them with their fire arms, but upon our
promifing
100 img100.jpg
94 R O B I N S O N .
promising that they should have juflice don
them, they defifted. About five day a fteti,
being almost ftarved, they came to us in a %ery
fubmiffive manner, and begged heartil> to have r
their arms reftored, which upon certain con- J
editions we at laft granted. But 1o great was f
their villainy that there had not pall above I
three days, but they began their old trade t
again. f
And now it was that an accident happened, f
that not only obliged us to lay afide all private
animosities, but likewife to provide for ouI V
mutual security. 4
One night, as I lay inmybed, I wa diftlurh- c
ed with unufual fears and apprehensions. I V
got up, and related the matter to cne of my V
Spanifh friends, who anfwered,fuch '.:w', ;.,i' C
not to eflighted; and advifcd me to look out P
carefully ; adding, that certainly there z.js omne."
inifchief upon theflocks. Accordingly, we went ti
up to the top of the mountain, where \e dif- 0
covered a light, and heard the voices of federal t
men,'"which terrified us exceedin:gt!. \\'g u
could not tell what to conje&ure, and there- z
fore tent out old Friday as a fpy, to try ,f he,- iT
could learn who, and from whence the-. ,ve re ; t
he returned in a very fort time, and b,-,'jht F
us word, that t/ey a ere two i : t .' :.'. df
,.'" -'r. nations; and that after a blk..) *a'V'', mn
they had landed there by mere chance, I '.,. to tI
devour their p "." -*. ;.and that he ',e't'. vs, b
John as it was light, a bloody battle w .,', -n e. at
Old Friday had hardly ended his reaction, burt
an unufual noife gave us to understand thaI the I
engagemaerit was begun ; aud i.othing could bh ,-'!
-more bloody and obftinate, nor men of more
invincible
101 img101.jpg
C R US O E. 95
invincible fpirits, nor more a&ive and ready in
their way of fighting.
We were undoubtedly', fir, in a great con-
flernation, lef they should run into our grove,
and deftroy what we had, and fo refolved to
put ourfelves upon our defence, and fhoot the
firf that should approach ; and as we appre-
hended, fo it happened; for three of the army
that was vanquifhed, came directly to the place
for fhelter ; but thefe I would not fuffer to be
flain, but had them furprifed and taken alive:
And in truth, they all proved very e':.',elent
fervants, and were of great ufe to us afterwards.
The two parties being gone off, and the coat
clear, we went to the place of battle, where
we found two and thirty dead upon the fpot,
with feveral bows and arrows, and other forts
of weapons, which I ordered to be carefully
picked up and carried into oar armoury.
Tais difmal fpe&ftacle had that effe&: upon
the three troublesome Englifhmien, that much
of their turbulent temper began to abate, and
they began to be good friends, and tm think
unanimously what was belt to be done for our
mutual security and prefervation.-And, accord-
ingly, all hands were at work to strengthen
the fortifications of our Caftle, and provide a
proper security for all our provisions; and in-
deed, we did both with all the caution that the
nature of our circumstances would allow. And
thus for two years we lived in a very comforta-
ble retirement, having neither feen or heard
any thing of the favages for all that time.
But now there happened another quarrel,
which might have proved of very bad confe-
quence, if it had not been prevented in time.
The
102 img102.jpg
g R 0 B I N 0. ;V
The thrqy wicked EnglifhPen beir.g tia
greffors, I ordered them to be dilit.rued,,-
left rbe.cafe to be determLiaed by thle other..
JElaUfblrien, who feacrced, the, to he
. ed, alleging, ampng wohert things, that they,7
a design to murder us,, and oly de.eJred, it
Sa.proper opportunity; upop which I a
Altkins, who was the ringleader, what we,,
done io them to deserve .if be mnurd-.
Vwat he. bad to fay for bhiinfelf, whb we
not imusiqd'aIly k.ill him, wio Ia low
fucha vslainou dcfign to m -rder us i',I in
tpc Rgislhmen penffded' ery. hd to hang'
L thqafor an exainle tothe others; but
"1 "would by DnO means confent Jo, upon.
conidczatiw that i owed, my life to an
gIhma., to'yoau fir,-y or, nly prelerver;
aver, to put qt out of their powef to do u-%
farther milchif, e debe.crmiued, thAl for
utre, tey Thould have'no arms ofny f
and tht.if they did again a.temprt to give
$PciqLqy asy manner of difllAtbance, tite
woudc4nw'iedlaiely-dlioot theraJikk wild b
Ae; tfist J o'rdere4 them fame proviGo
their pr4fent lubfiClence,. and appointed t
5apl1e ji a,remote palt. of the ilzind. w
they Might. plant and mn4ake what );imrovem
they t.hougs proper.
SThey) tidlwi.d fixc montk ip this fep
ation, and. 4ad got iq their -ii 3 Ba
wbcb, tat teafuo, was but vety i-nl, as
weCrs naturally .pot .onl, very idle, but;i
every thing to begin 'arii_, and whbi w'a. w
wereGit very indzffqrent workpjen it the[
The)fe fellows growing depeeate and v.ra
itg, toik a new whimM into Lexr bI
IAS)
103 img103.jpg
C. af u 0.
which m .. .t .h.Avq be q.
ihfsm frj. s e ap '+ + r,,,+,r j+nigy i .+po
S, ," ", o+.; .* A. .; +, + i +, ,+.ib'=
,..,+UY .
m; T, 2, ,
ba 1e IF1 wfe w~e~ nfltaJittltlcB
^st~j~ i tboH^'u~s, y++a-
i u a
And i'n "lnjihdtlfcnI cotdhe diefr.o id'la tnr
ed 1i~t di* of ouri ig~~dipro lj&iig ^ lir as t
wad b'ihci.^e^S~davi'rs tichwa hJfi g 6 ato ring
our aig, d thepothir *p ,', ..
C.W In' 0 .A e ++eft
.fi--m" lo wh io.al
t.hbei'wy or; m 'rt /r ,rcely aittiogqth',ydpali
d, .... ,t h b'. ,,
wot ,'. .;.. ; tS t e ''Be -vp ae 'c ii ',p.
. s iapr. e-., lelia us, We 'Mr. ..,.l n+t ot'
A -i tthC Wf, 0wbrjw b
';. ~ ~ ~ ~ CA 4i,;" m,"" '"" p
104 img104.jpg
98 R 0 B I V S 0 A'
wonder ceased, Our 'next inquiry was ir
the nature and manner of their voyage, a
the Yeafon of their fo fpeedy return ; of .
which one orF them gave the following relati
Afier two day's fail, we reached land ; |'
finding the ihRbabicanls favages, and corm
with their bows and arrows to give us an
welcome reception, we thought 11 proper
make the bell of our way leering norihwar
in our paltage we discovered several lit
islands which seemed to be inhabited ; at if
of which we refolved to go on rhore at albit
ards; which accordingly we did, at one t
lay n3olt to the weft ; here we found
natives very courteous to us, giving us w
they could procure. Among ihefe bofpitab
Indians we (laid federal days, inquiring
figns what nations lay near them, and were 1
formed that there were feveral! nations ti
lay nigh to them, that weie accu[fomrd to
mankind, but for their parts, they were
accustomed to eat friuch I-ot of diet, except fu
as they took in battle. We' inquired hI o
long it was lince they had had a battle, aq
whether they had any prifoners ; to whii
they made anfwer, by their figns that it w
about two months, and their King had noi
two hundred priloners, which he refelrvod
the laughter. Mighty deliitouiwe were to
thore prilfoners ; which they miffook, a
thought we wanted rome for our own ufe,
made figns, that at the next riling of the Sri
we shouldd have fome ; and accordingly, at -
very time, they brought us eleven men and
women, juft as cows and oxen ate brought
a fea polt town; a fight 1hat gave us all .
great
ita :
105 img105.jpg
c k u S T.
gieat deal of horror, and what to do we could
not tell ; to refufe them we.knew would be an
unpardonable afliOnt, and I'd dilpofe of them
me knew not how. However, we rfclolved to
atcept of them, and gave them in retain a few
tihes'that we had in the canoe ; fo taking our
lea'e, we'failed to the next island, where we'
let eight of the men at liberty '. with 'the telt
we made the heft of our way to our island ;
and though w tre atcd them all ad well as we
could, we could by no means convince them,
but that they were to be 'killed and devoured.
This, fir, ended th qrarr.ltive 6f'he f three
defperadocs ; whereupon 1 afked him where
their new family was, choosing t6 fee them ;
ihey told nime they were at their huts ; fo we all
went to fee thewr.
When we caie ,tb' the huts, we found' thTee
well proportioned .peh,.and fiV.e women, all
naked and-boind, rouirof them might be from
vcr.ty four" to, (Orty, but, the othej was a
omtly maidh,6f a6hbout feventeen ; they. wrre
all very agree.ibl6, imn4 their behav;,i'ir feem-
oi to be very inndcQ. Their nak-d apfc.ar-
jrce, wit there mifery -of thtir counditioun, waS
., very agreeable light.
HBut now, fir, having women among us,
ulhich I ibtflujght '-ight pmetimes occasion
Tiarrels, I '"Iked the. three l'nglijlhman how
ilhey prdpoft- to' drrpolfc of tlhei famili&-. ;
adding, that I wis not going Ao lay any ri-
llrint on [hem; on'v I would desire, that
thev wolid each take one- and, after they
had chosen which they had a mind to, ro
orher man should prefumrc ii tduch her.-
X\Vell
106 img106.jpg
'1
* "do R C B I N S V A
'VeIl to this they all agreed and fo ithe
concluded to draw. lots for the choice.
And now, fir,. I lavy hefoeic you a fcei
quilte different from any thing that has be
related. One morning, very .early, tire
came Eve canoei of Inldians on flore, 0
their old acrountt of de'vouring their prifoa
ers ; all that we could do w.,i to lie conceal.
ed till their bloody ceremony was. over, an
to take proper meafitres to dc'fed ourfelv
in c.ec of nred. But, rotwiihflanding a
oir cautior,S there happened an unhappily
difafier. that had like to have occafioned t
utter defolation of the island .' for. .fier c
id'.age's were gone off, my Spaniards ard,
looking out to mAe observations, we fc-un
three lovages that hadi gorged themfelves I
irfg fill afleep upoo the ground.
V'hat to do with thcrm'we could not tell
to murder them we thought would nor.t b
juflihable according to the law of Chrillianj
ty, having no previous quarrel with them
at l-ift we thought it adviLible to fcecur
them a-live, and 'let them about forne wor
or other, till we could dilpofe of them :an
accordingly we took them pr"uoneis, and ct
tried tlheiin firl to our cafle, 'arid then
the two Englifih, who fnon found ihem tre
ployment but fur want of ke,.ing a (1ri
guard over them, one of themn"got away in%
the woods. and wais not heard of for fo1
time.
This unlucLy accident' gare- us grea am.
prehenfions thit, hbv fome way or other, t
faragr woull find means to get into his 614
,.u2lttrV, and i;;frm his countivimen li1oi
weatk !
107 img107.jpg
C R U 6q 0 F.
wveak we were, arnt conCiqiLer.Lly that they
%sould come over and deltlry u all ; nor Ji-
deed were our potions ill grounded ; for, in
elghL mcrrhi ,hier. ir,-rc cdrie fix canoes,
with ten menu iIL.eOcb,,and lazndcd % ithmin Ida
than a mile 'of he Enclliian's habitatior.,
x ho, with the greatell terror imaginable, let
their milch gQi.s looie into the woqdd, and
r-in to Lheir Ifecrat cave, rcliIlvrg to defend
tihemnilelves till we c.-uld come ;u their alE i1-
3aI-. c. -
.JIt was not long. bc'rtec they could fce their
haitatLon..',n flames, ad i h Livagis ia pur-
lait of 'them .in several fnoil parties ; upon
which they trok tlicir .fianl at a ci.nvciniert
place, and di+rimincd io defend ihem-ifties to
the very lai extremity.
While they were thlus expLEting them, llthe
rvagecs cane ,in ; one of them was ihe run-
away, who had been the caufc o-f this mil-
chief; and he they r-T'oiel f-iould be the
'irfit that suffered, let what would be the con-
Iequence : a;in',l a'iccordingly, as was CL.'riccrt-
ed, the fitft let fly ; and indr:-td he i,,k his
aim fo well thut he killed the F.)rn:ufrt nut-.
right, ihot the runaway through ithic body,
ard wounded Lhe third.
Sad and dreadful was tie outcry the
wounded Indians made, being quit.- intfcnliblc
from whence their sudden dctlirj torun came,
;,nd as w were informed, hel.ie'cd that they
were, deliroyed by- thunder rnd lightning,
having never hcfobe'beard or kcen any thing
like a &un. 'hilflt tley iv were in this con-
flernation, the Englihmen had time to new
.oad their gui.s, and, firirjg both together up-
I a Uon
lot
108 img108.jpg
.02 A' U B I 0 .. 0 A
.in another party of five, who were" fandin!
bv the two ticy had wounded, thc fell t12
the ground as if they had been killed -. upoAi
vhich the two Englifhrnen went to themE
without charging their gnus. which wa S
very wrong flep : for, when' they "we,-. corn m-'
lip, they found four of ihemM alive, two !l.;ht
iv wounded, and one nriot at all. LUpnon'
which they werei f.'ri:ed to [.j-e the but ends"
of their orulkeI-, and knock fltem on thel
head, and toi.k him that w,; nt \ w,,rdnirdr.
and bound him at the font if a trxe hard lv,4
Qnd 4.hn n.ide all the hanile ithlv c.iild to-l
ards ihe ca e to fice i'f all wis w,-llthii' r::I
ar.d firidini7 every ihing l ffr. they came I.ck"
to the tree where they ieft the Indian bor,'l,
.ii'd fonirl. to th.-ir great lurpi!!e, he a''
gone. Now the' wr',E in ..rc-t-r fe-.r and
canfthui'm than be'fore- b'it vt.,le IliL wvere
c 3ni'J':ring whitt wi3s proper to d,,. Ic(v'e
Sr)anriard c-;mp uLp to tlr.:m. brinjngi, w!;hI
liom tha.[ vcry Irndian the Enri;liltim~r 1.1d!
1.'t1 b.:,un,] uni.cr the tree. whom ihe Span- i
iard; h.id relef..J. in their w .'.
* This ofeat reinforrcrment 11o mu"Inch er:cou.ir-
-'ed the t'i L -ri.fh'inen, anid l.I greit was'
their ni:'girri. ,i n foi ahe l l* of tIF-,err hi,.i,;
Thit :|Ie co lid, ti-.v no lorr;'r, ; '-. ne.
the Spaniarid' with them. -aIl i w"eli".11 md,
away the% went ,n pirfuii cof the retl of the.J
ravages ; b.'A. fTo.rn a ri-ing ground licthey per- J
ceived that thev' wer. got oil board -f tFweir'J
canoe, and were cgmne our to lea, too far to'j
be come at, which gare them a new mte.I'r.
for fear and apprehension. lelt they fhb.uldJ
go h'omr dircefly. and inform their brethren
109 img109.jpg
C R U ,' t E. 163
F all that hid f.ajnprned, and incite f.cm -to
c., me over w'Ith e1eatr 'power, ard d"tr- *
die whole island. And as 'we judged. f> it'
1',-.ppe'ned ; for in Itfs than even u rtbrhs,
'2,y: camne Mcr with twenty five canoes., alnd
I.'nded upon us wit'hi two hundred and fity
'r,.n. all %, ;1 .arrnrd w.lh bows'. and' arrows,
rin rfin r fli nrid bl ,'e.'p,:.,'_.
Yo)uJ m-,in i rng-Iiie'. fir, we were in no l'ma1ll
n. i'trr'.arinont,'pcen the approat ii of thefe
i.mne!cime inr- *f r *, eie vve wantinm to
ni-ke the bert dircp-iratliun we r'1il. tod-
iend oar'el':. ; ;-'.c armed or fdaithfui fla'v's
[in the belt manner w' could, inrw'would nor
IV'omen be ptrtiaded from lighting along wi.h'
LCS, asthev rei'jved to conqi r rr die with
h .ir hathands, whom th'-, r,_.w !ved with
gnlie -r'ireS tendernek1' anr.d panioni.
Of this l;trle armnv I w.i.; conmannder in
hief ; and, Will. A:;.ins, whom I knew to be
SfcIl,'w of invincible c'r.a'e. I appointed
f.ir rrIvy LictVteniritene:.al, a2 ga'.e himi lix
_tioice m.l-_r, well armedL, ro command as a fiep-
.-jtc hody. In a l}ioh[ time the fight began
,Atkirs'b quarter, who rirdcred'his 'men to
!.re into the thickretil of them. Never were.
-e'tures in ,greatr t. rror ind coonlernr.'tiin, "
imagiinrg their dci'ru-,t1orn to come from
,;ie Gods and if Atkins had obe'-vcti' mv 'or
.Lars.and retreated tnperceived, they h!d fled
their canrioc;, without any fart h'-r attempt ;
L it feen," him and his fmall party, thev-
O-ane oil ''airn with thegreazeft fuls.
In hl 01rt, we were force to interpofe with
:*r whole body, to Fave Atkins and his par-
Swho va3 precild ve.ry -bard, ad had on,-
c't
110 img110.jpg
104 A B I NV ) 0 A
ofthe Englifhmen k.Ill-. by his fide. and -aW
ahinftf. wounded. 'V.' gavet' three \crhleqj
'but they were gr.;%wn lo desperate that noj
WLt.hlar.d7eg nui fire-, asev came up in thi
very teaih of U.s, infortjuch that we wec
frirged to retire. and in truth, I mufd OwhV
tha, if niqht Ia, not yi.cn u, a little refpil
we rnu 1 have bc-n in : .ircdt de1l of linger
-4s ,on as pofliblc I .1ew my ltl1 arorny
upon a riing ground. wbh-re, bv the li..,ht e
the moor, me cou'il ,ble, c thie 1 i.., in
real ileal 4l diloii .r ; ur.in whirlnli xSe C.to j
ciud-d it o.'ldj be beli t.i tLf'I up.on lthe
now, and, if p,-.ilhte. [t g. undil-jfcvtre.i whichli x.., jdd, by tle ;uidanc
of the two Er, djft-tern. who knewv the grc.uni
perfr,-&tly ; after this wvc '3J.'L them three oll
Jieq rnc mre, arid then ,idzcd in upun them wit i
our lAords wvLh I.ch irrefilhtbl' fui.r.', tina
the. 'ave w \, and,, m1in ing a diri'al Icream.r
rig a. id lh-owi i.c,, tlIev hcto,-'k th. rnll. es d
IhIcir hi!:. Mar,,' of themn w'ire 1l.led iri
the fihbi but indeed we wsrr fo ::xcecdingl
tiwel %vith fighting lihele two blEdcs. that P we,'
did rnot then pirfue thm:n to their ..an s, iri
wh\ci(h we cimcluded tl,-iat they would imme4
Adi3lei' a;-t to fea ; biut there h.appering
dr. dful fl.-.rm. thtev wcrc prevented in thai
and manv ,f their cinoCes Atcre lA, il,.) tha|
badrain. I
After we hai! tamj.erl fc'mc rcftelunmen&e
and a little rep,...',- we rtfolved, as f an ts iS
was li',ht, to go t, the pl.,ce of battle, in oi-
der t.o nrke ,'hat observations we could&;'I
;inrd coming at length tc a full view of the_,
eamaindcr Of their army, Vc C found them ly.
irg
111 img111.jpg
C R U .
n-,. in a mi_'3blk pnoflure ; and when we
i Cne within nmket Thct, I ordared two g,-irs
iE be hr.:d, in oldt.r to tr if rthy had any-.
Tit;io:1 .-f Irornin.g to another engagement ,
'rnd the pr.'j,& aifwNcred to c.ffdt.ually, dthat
,hey no.o loner hard the report of the TrIl
.Iun, tlha thit-y liartedi up, and in a nio'l
.'l;,-niling manner, ran Av..a nlto. the toun-
.aln.. TIhcugh I cornf,. I had much rather
thir weather would lhavc fuffcred tlerq i, have.
pone off, without giving u fakrth.er trouble ;
foi row the cafe was, what mul bfe done
W-.ihli this great riumibac of lavage cfeaturek.
Great were our debates on this point, bowct
er, after mr.-itue cni-Gidcrauon, it waA deter-
ruined tu dellroy their canaca ; wbcb. Wlhen
the Indians faw, they made the moft Iideros
outcries ; hut to no purpose, for we either
b4rnt or difahled them all,, .fier winch they,
ran about .;i king time, and, as they had nio
arrus. nor mattrnaLs1 to male an-., f.,, not% ith-
[and;nr their ourribtrs, w.'. wcre the k1s.ap-
prehenfive .F being furodil b-y then.
Indeed our IbiLck of prov',;on %*3i fo very
frn.al, tbat. wLe cale to .i ref2u iron tp drive
then up into fome rcm',tc c_-irucr of the ill-
and. and to kill as .anauy of (hern as weccould.
carth, in ordtr t., leleu their number, and
then gi,,e thrin a ome coin to plant. I'urlj-
ant t,, this rei ,l1itin, we pin-rrfred them wi.ti.
ouir guns kiltiig every dv o,ci: ,.r rftora till
at kinsih their number wa. f-3 reduced. that
we contlided. -f poflill-.! to ',ke ,'nic o:f hl-eia
aliv.'e, whti-ch at 1 11, wirh fim, d.ffit'.;'-I- we%
clct-ted ; and :I;lrig him I. in],dly, we brcu it
,!.m to old Friday, ho told him if thf-,
't v.woulu
112 img112.jpg
,06 R 0 B .V S 0 N'
would fubmit and do what thev were corn-'
mnnded thev fhc.ul'I he uled well. other.'
wife ihcv flboul ali be fliin, and bade him goi
and -ifruie hi. c.'mprinions fo. who were in
mulal inileTiblIc (fa living r.ondttiin."
Th, p-or ciejtiu1es, who were now reddceLC
to thiity even, rycei' ed thii offer witlh all
the jy imagqinable, f.u we lent them fome
food, which they a:z. with grealti:nkulnefs,'
and made all the promil't we o~ilddelire, and.
to give them thcir dur, they have nievlr brc.k&'
any of them tr tl:is dyiv. '
" And thus, [(r, according to the be ft of my
ability, I have given n you an account of w% hat
ifnateriiil, that has, lhappencd in the ilandnd
finc your departure, to this d-v ; by which
vnu mTy perceive the v.'.anderful works of
Provider' ce.
When v'"u inl'peFt ir-t.-' the island, you will
Eind it fimelhing ima i.-ed in geneil1, your'
crn and fiock:; ,rcreal'e'J, and the number of
y,)utr lubl-jLts, 1--, far agmniented. that f(om 4
lelo.tue !inrd, as it wa'; btfoif vour deliver-,
an -:. hre is 1 profpeCtt. with a Hittc indnuflrv'
;in.l .oocim tBana.-mrht, rhat it niaYV it lenth..
bc'c"r,-.a' populous and plcntifil lirrle kirg-
doni '
d pz
71.' End of th. Sban:ard' RJati'. "i
it7
.i
,., >
A "'
_,
;:
113 img113.jpg
C R L'U 5 0 L. io07
A CONTINUATION
0r TiT n
L I F E
k'Z.OBINSON C RUSO E.
T -IERE i$ no doubt to be made but that
the Spaniard gave meca faiLhiul account,
which was exceedingly agreeable to me, and
nc lefs furprifing to the young priest and to
all the redl who heard at: Nor .were thcfc
people lefs .pledfed with the necefaries I
brought them,, which were a great 'heip to
th1em in perfecting their habitation. Will.
Atlkins was growrsa very Ibber man, and had
built his hut with greitt ingenuity. The En-
glihimerin's wives were all fruitful enough, and
bore each 4 child once a year.
When I inquired.uf he bpabilaird concerr-
ing their manner of living among the fs-ages,
they gave me a very deplorable relation of it.
adding that they had hardly any hqpes of
fuipport or delive-rarnce..
Many ivre tll4e methods they rok to in-
lruEt the fivage bih to no purpolc; f .ihcv,
ignorant as they were, would give no car 'o
the inflruttions of chofe to wI.onra thcv "wei
;hc-.r
114 img114.jpg
a8'a R 0 B I N S, 0 '
their lives. At the return ofthei: friend, % ha,_
they iih.o1i 'j hjd b en dei :,ured, their ',y was-.%^
great, efpociblhv when thev faw tlie Io i.e.. of' i
bread which I.fent them r but v. lier, Ihcyr-3
heard the errand, and perceived the b-,ac, .:
* their tranfportswere- iir-:, p t il-bi. Tin % Mji
the account I had from then, awd nuw It fol.
lows that I should inform the reader in whaf.;
condition I left them, A
As it was generally'agreed that tl.' R-,oulI(d
have no more difturbance from the lIvaees
fo I told them I had made thi. %..y.i-gt 'hi.-Jy
forthe r fakes, and thai I came" rit in ren ov
them, but rather to eftablifh and h%. theri.
-upon the ifland; and foi that end, I h.4'
'brought them all forts of necefTarie an4d ar3.
tificers, with other perfons that v.oi.ld no
only add to their lumberr, and crnnl,.Qucnti
to their defence, but would lihewie be a
mutual help and support to them. i hey
were all together whea I t3al.cd t.) the- ih
this manner. I afked them, one Lby *..ne, iF
they lad entirely forgot their f-,rmt r aniiof-.
ities, and would eronage in the l-.f
friendfilhip ? To which Alkins rF[?I!,. they
had had affliaions enough to male tl-' r alib
fober, and enemies enough to mnk ethein ai
friends ; adding, that head mori Jii!. de-
ferved the treatment hte had received "iftm
the Spaniards,'and that he was onl to bo
blamed. Upon which the Spaniards reiuied.
thatfinee Will. Atkins had. upon al! occa-
Lions, behaved himfelf fo valiantly in th,_r de-
fence, all that was pafi should be fu-,g.L.ten
lhat-he holdd have his arms, arnd be ma&4A
the next commander to the gpverz 7r,
Up; r
115 img115.jpg
C R. U S 0 E. 109
Uporn thefe kind declarations of mutual love
and friendship, we concluded to dine :c'tethcr
on the morrow ; which we did in: the belt or-
der and formality that the nature of the place
would permit; and after that, I dillr.l,':r i to
every one of them his portion of the necedlaries
I had brought over, and then divided the island,
into three diftint colonies, making my old.
habitation the metropolis, which the Spaniards
inhabited.
The a, i'g man, whofe mother was ftarvd |
todeath, as. before mentioned, "and the maid,
who was indeed a pious, virtuous young wo-
man, feeing the good difpo~ition of affairs, drop-
ped their refolution of going to the Eaftindies,:
and both desired I would permit them to ftay
on the ifland and enter them among my fub-
jeas, which 1 readily agreed to; and the x :).in,
woman was afterwards married, as will appear
by the fequel of the flory.
And now I come in courfe to fpeak of the
young French prieft, whofe pious behaviour,
and excellent difcourfes were extremely agree-
able, and deferve a particular obfervation.
Said he to me one day, fince, under God, I
Owe you my life, I hall take care to employ it
to do as much good, and you as much honour,
asl can ; andthis I conceivemay be belt done in
my attempt to fave as many of thefe poor peo-
ple's fouls as I can ; but at the fame time I fall
take care not to advance any poins in ieligion
but what you fhall.approve of.
I was mightily pleaded with the modefly of
his expreffions, and told him he flIu.'d nut
Wanit my afliftance to farther hi -oit iniez -
K, ton,
116 img116.jpg
R 0 B I N S 0 A
tion. By his advice the :. "fii'men a,;d f-..-
agewomen were married; which was r,.t mo.e
to my fatisfaaion than to that of the F.,;lifh-
xmen thernmives, and indeed, it was .'.irendr.d
with' all the, good confequerices that could be
SexpeLed.
The affairs of the ifland being thu. re :ied,'
I was preparing every tiring for goingc.n t.,)itd,
when a match was proposed between (he I'.n-
gliffiman w%'om 1 cRlleci Jack of all trades ,'id
the maid Sufan. He was a very afivc.rI,.
trious man, and the woman a difcrcei, nea, '
cleanly houfewife ; fot'ie match was .orclu.
ed, and they wete married the famhe d.'..
As to the fhariig out the land, I leUFr. io r.)
"Wilil. Atkins, who d:fcharged his tr.; A ::hI
great fidelity. As to their laws and ern-
ment, I advifed them earneftly to 1,..:-- ,re ,e
another, and to make what farther byla .. ei
should think proper for their general E...'-a i,!d
benefit,.
During my ftay en the ifland, as I w.j: 01'rg .
one morning to vifit that part that v.-.s ,,ccu-
piedhby the r K-., I heard the report f ..,,
I hafleried my pace, and rifing a hi i .i,',
them engaged with a number of fava':.r.- I lu
hadlanded-the Engl.fhmen bad killed; i;. .rr.._er .
of them. and the remainder were fleeing i a ia
:aft as poffible.--I defcended the hill on tr, c r.,
fite fide to that on which I went up, and i ;-,e'
I found five favages, who had fled th:iF.-er in
the greateft conflernation---they were -.:. tir--
prifed that they did not attempt making an ef.'
cape, but fell on their knees, and appeal ed to
fupplicate xny favour, which I granr.--l jIhe' ,
and
117 img117.jpg
S C R U S 0 E. lit
and thay proved to be good and faithful fer-
rants to my little government.
Haviag difpofed every thing in the ifland
in the beft manner poffifale a'nd giving the
People affurance that I would always have
them in my thoughts, and would be fure to
IA .- 1
fend them sufficient fuppliw, q- often as I had
an Opportunity. On the fir,. of May, 1605, I1-
fet fail for the Brazils, but the next day was
becalmed ; and looking towards the N. N. E-
of island, we could perceive fonething cut
at fea looking very black, upon which the mate
going up the fnriouds~and taking a view with ,a ^
" -I
profpettiv g] afs, he cried out, It rzurs an armly 1,
.-In ary, youf.c", faid I, VI'hat do yo- .-wan ? Nay |
Sir, faid he, do not be angry ; for I affure you, |
it is not, only an army, but a fleet too ; for I
towards us with all fped. As they came nearer
I -- _-.. .. . .
Havtowards us, thedifpeeofed to be very mucthin in the fur-land
in the heft; manner poflb~le and giving the
people at thurance figthat ofI would always haven't kig
them in m ake of us ; And would be iure to
fend the fuldcient fupplinear, made often as toI hadem
to
an opportunity. On the firif of May, 1695, I
fet l-ad for the Brazils, but the next day was
becalmed ; and looking towards the N. N. F.
of the Bfland, we could perceive something out
at fca looking very black, upon which the mate
going up the fnrouds,'and taking a view with a
profpea~ive giats, he cried out, It rc~as an army .I
An army, )youjfcl, faid I, ff hat do you re~an 9 Nay
Sir, laid he, do not be angry ; for I allure you,
it is not only an army, but a fleet too ; for I
believe there are a thoufand canoes making
towards us with allifpeed. As they came nearer
towards us, .they teemed to he very much fur-
prifed at the fight of our Ihip, not knowitig
what to make of uas : nd we being t.n,:,ln ,
they fhouidjcome too near, made figna to them
to J
118 img118.jpg
3 0 B I N S 0 V
to keep off, which they did ; but as they._
tired, they let fly feverai arrows, by which:'
of our men was wounded.
In a little time they had the courage to ag
Io near us, that they could hear us Ipcak ; u
which I ordered Friday to call to then,.
know what they would have; 1e reupond
poured a whole cloud of arrows -upon h!j
several of which went quite through his bojf
and fo I loft my faithful fervant and mol I
feftionate companion in all my afflicies r,
lolitudo,. I was fo enraged attnie death of i4
Friday, that I ordered the gunner ro load
fmall fhot, and immediately give ihtm a br
fide ; which he did fo effeAually, rha thirt
or fourteen of their canoes tere ovetfetx
the reft fo frighted, -that away they flew
all the fpeed they could.
Soon after, we took up one poor wrel
he was fwimming for his-life; who let us
that they were going with their kings to
a great battle ; and when we dfked him ,
made them come to us and fhoot at us ?
anfwered, to'mnake de great WIond, I. .A.
Poor Friday was buried with all the pj
and decency our circumstances would a116l
And now, having a fair' wind, we made '
beft of our way to the Brazils.-.-\Ve floppedl
All Saints, and having fitted t.ut a veffel wA
fovifions for my ifland, fet fail ?or the EA
Indies. '
Whilft we were failing alorr,g ihe coad'
Coromandel we efpied, one 'n-.ririg the wu'i
of large 1hp, whichhad the d av beforenlrit
upon a rock, and could not be rtiven off-.
crew had cut off all her malts io Ighten h
bult
119 img119.jpg
C R U 8 0 E. 13
,ut to no purpofe, and finding1 a large hole in
her bottom, which they wereunable to flop, and
that the fhip mul foon go down, they iock to
their boat, arid were making for the land, ju4t
as we hove in fight---they then dire&ed tneir
course to our fhip,'and we took them all on
board.
Al~
"F 7-: -*- --_:- 7: i .---.. ~_ --. { -- r"'g--.
Ic '-- -- T. T: "_-- -: '' ..- .'.- ."" : ..- ;' .i ^ -.
-- 'r/-Su ti< 2-
'?*** ---. .... -. -... ._.....-
W e made dir.ii.- for tte (.i-. !'n'' I
Hope, and to-nct for th-z co o. crf LCorrhmanc;n
The firift place we Ao.'chid at \s the if) -,d il':'
Madagafcar ; wheie trhouzh the pc-.:ie aie -
firce and treacheious. vet for lome tiine Eh,--
treated us well, and gave us commodities;I and
indeed they traded with us, with fo much -
vility, that [ome of the men resolved one iY.
K 2 -,
120 img120.jpg
-14 R '0 B I N S 0 V
to flay on fhore in a tent, which they had made ,-1
ror that purpose. 4 ii
Abwot two o'clh-ck ix f;he mn,)orrini. we were e r
alarmed with the firing of g',n, and .u. men' i
ory)ing for help, or 'hey Ihould be murdered. 4
'The occafiori of this fray as we afterward
unaerfo,,,d from them that cfCaped. was this.'
An old woman, that fold milk, brc.ught with col
her a young woman that fold hcrbLs, whom r
When the fail6rs faw, they laid hold on her, 3
and ra ried her in arn,:.ng the trees ; ujpon n
v-hich the old woman made fuch a prod;g..,us fr
outcry, that both men and women cam-e to
their affilftance. At the beginning, the fMlhkw r
that began the fray, was killed wth a lance,
;;-oiiu t Fi t f., we did not know m hat was be-
,: rn him.
A night or two after we resolved to go on
filoie. and 'ry if we could find cut the man th(
.P)A W" ,ii, fing, An hour b!rf.re midnight
,;e land.-:d at tlh place where the attirin began;
-.u' it %.',s fu da. ., we could difcov'er nothing, i
t:! ih:- bo:'..l.ain fell over or.e of the dead n
b.,.J1.. V\'e conclud-d t, lar thlire till the ,ch
:i1,3'n'rg. %hen we d'lovere4 r-wo n-i ihiity k r.
-dead bodies lying osn the ground, whereof two
were n,.t qu'te dead. H-a'.'nr made this dif- i
..'*r, I '-.oughi I had iL ceri rough, arnd f up.
-.ris ptearir'g to return r.n board. But the h.
j oa'.mtai and- the reft. whrch were about twen- th(
'v, rcfolved tn go to t-,e Indian town, to try if an
ihe;, co.j]d find w-.at Va, bcomc e of Tom Jf- rar
freys, their companion.
It ia. no i without diffculIty that they found biu
the town, which conlifled of about two hun- I
drcd hc.'ufr:, where the people being all in a d
pI,-f, u1od
121 img121.jpg
rrofoutid fleep, the Walors concluded to divide
themfelvcs into three bhodiea. and to fet the
town on fire in three places at once, to kil all
that fbould attempt to icaf e, and to plurjder
the reft.
leaving made this resolution Io work they
went; they had not gone far before thq firfR
company found, their companion TOm Jeffreys,
,ripped flark naked, with his thojAt cut from
ear to car. hanging b'- one armr upon a tree.
In a hnulc adjoining to this tree they fouud
.lkeen or fi-teen Ind;an..
They im-mediately let lire io t;-e hboule, and
at the fame Ltime to levcr.. others in the towa;
f-) that. in a very little t.ine, the wrhle place
,.'as all in names ; and no io.-,cr did i he aF-)
[r.':;.h'ted creatures tun out to fave, Jtimfehlves
,.,rr, the hiry of the lfhrnes, but the Idilors ei-
iher dro-.e them back again into the fire, or
i. ledthem without rper:v.
By. thio time the town wa.s ail in lnarnes, and
ihe llgit of iie conflagtrition made me very
,inealy. and likewise furprifed the ciptiamin and
,'h.e men that v.ere with him on board, who
kr.ew r.uhing (f the matter.-Buat when ihe
liw the Imoke, and heard the un'; g,? ofi, he
c(r.,iludid his men mufi he in great danger,
upon wi-ich he took the either boat. and with
ihrteen men refolved to go to irte allilfiance of
them, let the cornfcquence he wbh'.at it would ;
anrid, though I was fenfible of the dcinger we
ran, yet 1 had rno power to fta; behind.
\\We went drreftl,, as the flamncs guided ur,
,at I mnuflt own, hiren I came to the place, I
never beheld greater horror, nor herd mnioe
dreadful outcries: In flhort, th.e whuole fpef'a-
ce
n z-
C R U S 0 .E.
122 img122.jpg
116 R 0 B I N S 0 S V
cle was too dreadful to be dercribcd, and tl
miferies and aftoniffliment of the people not t al
be uttered. I got into the center in order ifi
put a ftop totheir farther barbai.:v, and order,
ed fomeofthe men to f.llowv rr. ; but 1 hai
haidkv Ipoke the. word, before th- Boa;(wai a
with four of the men after him, came up to u.
all cvvered with blood arnd dull. When the'
law us, they gave a great halloo, !n token thi C
more help was come. N.,.i. L ..., Iad n
thkfe hell hounds have a'....,,; ".' ,
e d T o n a n d L : b.. k
^ ,,,J .- .,' ,nf : ..... ,: .' li h
them all; and according .o all :;e,; acconUl tl
they destroyed one hun,'.red .And tit", me
womenn arid chldrern, ar.d ourn, the wto
town to allies into the bai-.a n ", v:-iie not o
cil -.n ie:t.ved any pJ.it Cu I r hrt, tht poc 'o
ln.i3ia, bei;- unprepared, aed d a-d coB 0
fc uro.i---H.3veverour men ,n-nt \M'ue Ih th
fel"--s upon this bi.d e':piot. \c: I 41%a I
l,9 -..fii uoon it %ilL d' ltnlAton. and g..,.e c
ti e ,.*'r ofthe :.* ,.- .., ..L .: ; .*.. .
%t- h', -we were und-; tlii. ilict .l'> iva
w,,uld b,-- oI:en ma-nF'.n a ,nd dif:nionr tH
l-d'' d ,- tAl n, wi'.cLi I j- ot.en d:lFriil,:d a f
cordtmned ; bidrg ihkia aepeId upon i f
(:,o(d would never bir t'-eir c. ,,'ae alter t
uripa iallelei. iarbar.,. A'nd a 1 fore,.:ld, f
it hp'c-ed for v he'-i wc came uFon lE
Pl'crian fh %*e. -,e i;'I. \fiv' et cur rren. i
'ertur.ng to,. far on th-e Ihr'e \ere eith a
kdileji, ot taken and- made tlav.-; bv. he Arabia a
tpon tjlis mSf'jr'.une I .i'- rep.rehend'
tnem, adviiii. them nt to e.n. LiUpon this
bnailf'a,.n f--d, you are o'.' vs dllli:itu rg "s
and as you are but a pa'.i." ..er; we ale
c bl.ged l
123 img123.jpg
C R U S 0, .
1,17
c.1liged to bear it; and therefore if vou do not
iorbeat for the future, I fhIl leave the flip,
and no: fail with fuch dangerous and tingrutc-
lul company.
All this 1 heard very patientlv, being fen-,
fible, as cales then flood, 1 had no remedy ;
,md indeed. I thought all had been over and
forgtten : But, fo it happened, we were now
in the road of Bengal, where, going one day"
on f-ore with the Supercaigo. one of the
men came and told me, 1 need rnot trouble
ryfelf to come on board any more, for that he
had orders from the boatlwain, and the reld of
the officers, not to bring me on board any
mo0re."
This infolerit melTage much furpt;ied ma ;
however, I made the fellow no anfwer, but
went to the fupercargo, and desired him to go
on board immediately, and acquaint the Cap-
lain, that he might prevent the mui-tiny which
1 had reafon to apprehend: But, before this
could he done, the matter was efLtled : for I
was hardly gone out of the boat, but the boat-
fw'ain, gunner, carpenter, with all the inferior
officers, ran to ihe quarter deck, defining to
fpeak with the Captain; and then the boat-
fwain began to rail againll me exceedingly,
selling him. Thait If I ;,.! -.I: .4L'4: f,,fi., n r':v-
j t /.i.w rI/-. .., t.. t 0 '1/.... .ld ,1 .. t.'' :t.
And farther, he had the inlblence to add, That
if I had not quitted the fhip, though they had
all the reipeft imaginable for their Captain,
and would ferve him with their lives ; yet they
would all have left the fhip immediately."-
Upon which the refit cried out, (' .-,;id all, 're
and all. I
Though
124 img124.jpg
si 9 0 B I N S 0 V
Though my nephew" was a man that want.
ed neither courage nor refolution, vet th;3 un-
expeced behaviour shocked him e:%cc,-1n.ly
he expoftuiated with thtm, tellirl tlem diLe
danger and injustice of fuch proc-ee.,ire; tIut
all would net do; they had ful'. l.;.1 ed,
that if I came on board, they wou.' a'[ lejve,
the fhip ; upon which faid he, 'I If lr, bh.- ,our,.
resolution, I will go and acquaint 'A A'lc(h i.'
And fo he came up to me, and told t,.- al that
hadpaffed. I am very glalto fee you. Neph-,.
faid I, and am glad it is no worfe ; t t.r 'r1 iruth
I expe&ed they would have rebelled againflt!
you. I only defire you to fend rim,' reelLry.-,
things on fhore, and I will find m;' vVv L%?.
England as well as I can. Though th. .. extd ir.!
nephew to the heart, yet, finding thr- wvs no,',
remedy, he took his leave of me arid went on
board, and fent me my neceflaries a nad lo ihii
matter was over in a very few hours. And
now I think I was at leaft a thoufarnd legun-
fdrther distant from England, that I us at,
my little kingdom. My nephew Ie-f me r'.'oQ,
fervanrs to attend me, whoengaged if be 'VIib..
me till my return. I took lodging in r'e houf,
of an Englifh woman, where were rae\;-! mr. r
chants; and indeed I liked the comnpanv znd,
entertainment fo well, that I cont ..ed here I.
federal months, considering what -c:L.-'..: I had-?:
beft take. I had fome valuable Ei,,rflh g.ocIds,
a thoufand dollars in cafl, and a Ie- e: -l trud-i
it for more, if I fhPuld have occI,..,n.-.-The.I
goods I foon difpofed of to advaj- ia.'r, and
bought here federal good diamonds, wn:ch [
could eafily carry about with me.
One
125 img125.jpg
C 1R U S 0 E. 1,9
One morning, a merchant, with-whom I
was very intimate, came to me, and faid, coun-
trymen, I have a proposal to make to you,
which 1 do not queffion will be to both our
advantages. To be fort, Sir, we are both in a
remote part of the world, and far removed
from our native country, and yet we are in a
place where men that understand bufinefs,
may get money. Now if yol will put a thou-
fand pounds to my thoufand pounds, we will
buy a good lfhip, you [hall be the Captain and
I the merchant, and we will go upon a trading
voyage.
This proposal foon gained upon me, fulting
exalftly with my rambling inclination ; but it
required fome time before we could get a vef-
fel to our mind, or sailors fit to man her cut.
Ina little time we procured both,; zi! fo we
failed away for China, and had-a very Profper- !
ous voyage, having not only gained a large
fum of money, but withal got a good infight
into the traffic of thofe countries.
Our next voyage was to the Sice islands
which proved likewife very fuccefstfut ; and
not long after, the merchant and I made up our
accounts to our mutual fatisfaaion. We found
ourfelves very rich ; and now our only con-
cern was how to difpofe of our money. Wh*ilft
we were considering what was beft. to be done,
it happened that a Dutch ihip of about 20c
tons came into port.' The men peeiei--d th,,;
were fo ill, that there were not ,aiulds !!.. -'i:;ur. t
to manage the veffel, and the Captain being de-
firous of ;1, to Europe, publick notice was
given that the fhip was to be fold; whicli no
soonerr came to our ears but we bc ,;:: hI-r and
would
126 img126.jpg
1-20 O B 'I 'N S 0 N
would h.ave entertained fome of her men, bj/
thaev 'were not to be fciurd, !or as f[an a's t14
hadd ece.'.'c their dividend, they a:l wel
privately to. the Nlogul'a country : as in ir f
they had real.:.n enough; for [hii preLcndl 1
Capta:r was only the.ginner (the real Ca
Lain an.d three uf hi., m:in being killed by tJ
Mialagans) who ran away vith the Chip 10 to
bay or Bengal, leaving the mate anrd ive z>;. a
more on ff[ire, of which you will hear more
the leqcuel of the flor). t
After ve had b-ught the lFl p, and fitted h-,
with all neceli[aries lor her yvPy.age, with orn -
dilficulty ard expi-nfo we picked up I'-ur
fdialost of d.ll-re.t courtrits. and manned hei
iolerably %-.el l, lelu 'ving u pon another vw JoUa
to the Spice iflinds. in this manner we trad 1
ed backward and fjraid lfQrhve cr kx i year-
with vecy goi-d luccel;, aad were now jin tLh
fevenih year goingtoCh:n.d : But .n this voya:
we met witn contrary winds, which beat -
up and down : and n a foonner had we gct! ci
of thefe iugg.d 1'as, but we fund our thp h.
fprung a lcdk, which obliged us to put into t
giver Camrnbodia, which go-s to Siam.
O.ne d'.; aI was on lilure, refieihFng my'
(elf, there cjme tome an Engli lT. man, tha: w
mate to an E.allt nrid aman, th.'t lode in the F_ f
river; Sir, faid he. vou may erv well w.nd
a: my bult.iei:, \vwo am a perletl (f1ianger
you, but nctwilhltanding tha:, I have lmo
thing to irnmp:t to %ou that concern, you ve
nearly, and it is the tr-nuinent danger ynou are i
that has brought me to.y.qu. Danger laid
I know of nib danger, ,unlers that our fhip isG
litile leaky, and tha; i azlcnd lh4ll bk rttifie
as A
127 img127.jpg
C P U S O :17'
a4 fdon as ptfF.blec. I believe, faid he, you wilt
fiffl 6ther efaployment. The L wn of Carm-
btdia is abbdt 1o leagues higF'er, and thriiee
Leagues on this fe lie three Dutch and two
EAgligih iips. and, \Vill you veniu're up farther
iilo the river, without Cnnfudering wlhether
you liave" force eocgh to fight them Aill ?
1 knew ihot what he meant by this difcou'ffe,
aYfd Trrning- fh,-rt upoa him, Sir, [aid I, I
-'nov r.o reason I have to be afraid eilher of
the Dutch or Enghfl'h : Lam no interloper, and.
Wbat bulifiefs then can they hae with me r
Well, lays the man, if my advice is of rno
weight wir'i vou, voi may take your own way :
however. I am vecy ferry ),u should be to
mrirclh an ernemy ro yourself; 1 widlI be plain
wth you : unLefl you put to feaimnmediatel you
Will'bf, attacked by five long boat. s full 4,f armed
mci, and ,ousletf hanged for a pirate if you
afe taken"; and, Sir, I thought fuch a piece of
intiel'.igence deferred b-tter treatment. Sir,
laid I, you flihall not find n.e ungrateful ret
me big you therefore to explain youl|-lf, and
I will put to lea imrmeda'ely. \W'hy then, in
Fort, the matt is this: Yuu kno\* very well
that Vtot Cqpnain. with 'hree of hia men, wtre
killed by the MNflalagans, and that you, or lc.,oe
rahers that were on board, ian away with the I
fli-p, an] are turned pirate;. Niw, Sir, this
is rhe tfubltance of what I ha'ave to fav, I cabn
only, father allure you. that iF they canlay
their hand', on you, they iatIl execute you
wi thr.; ccei rr:ry.
Sir. nid I. t'"'u!t no m.n came more haon-
elliy b, thi: 1i';p thati I Cid. t a; \vou epre-
IcnL the m -.'tr, I think I )ui.i1t Lo b, upo.n my
t guard,
/
128 img128.jpg
a122 R B I N S O N
guard, and I heartily thank you for your in.
formation. Come faid he, it is no matter for.
ceremonies; if you value your own lie and
the lives of your men, get out to fea as filt as,
you can. I am very well fatisfied faid I, it
your fincerity and the fervice you have dona
me, Pray therefore tell me what recompence I
hall make you ? Only take me with you, fEid
he, and if you find what I have told you t.. be
true, I refer myfelf for a recompence tu your t
generofity. (.
So reafonable did this appear in every par- f.
ticular, that we went immediately on ioard-
together, where we were no fooner entered, :
but my partner welcomed mre with th joyNful
news that they had flopped the leak. I am
glad of th4,;faid I ; but come let us make all
the hafte we can to weigh anchor ; but whilft
we were buiv in that, a failor called to the I
Captaitx, and told him there were floops cum- i
ing after us ; upon which the Captain taking
,his profpefive glafs, and looking out, Lw fih e
floops full of armed men, in full chafe after. l
us; upon which he immediately fert ,one of v
the sailors to give us notice. Very wclH, faid t
1, I am fully convinced there is fom-eting in '
it : and fo I went upon the deck, and tLI1. thc.k 6
men they were in danger of having the flhip
feized, and being executed as pirate and r..
afked them if they would faithfully I.I,.d by t"
us, and by one another? To which rh-v' u-
nanimoufly replied, they would fland bh' us,- 0
and fight for us to the laft drop of the, r bl.Id. '
Then I afked the Captain, which -', he 0
thought was the heft to defend ouriel'.es ;
who replied, he believed it was ;he l tel to' a
Le.") ,
129 img129.jpg
C R U 3 0 .9. 123 i
ceep them off with our great guns ; and ac-
cordingly the gunner was ordered to load the
guns with fall flhot, and to bring them to
bear before and aft : And thus the deck being
cleared, we were in all points prepared for am
engagement.
We food out to fea, but fill the boats fol-
lowed us very clofe. We could perceive the
two foremost were Englifh, which were ahead
of the Dutch by two leagues : Hereupon we
fired a gun, and hung out a flag of truce, in or-
der for a parley ; but finding they bore down
upon us with all the fail they could, we fired
'upon them with' balls, and then bade them
keep off at their peril. But all this fignified
nothing ; for, depending upon their numbers,
they were abfolutely bent upon mifchief. We
made federal fhots at them as they came for.
ward, killed federal of their men, and funk
one of thzir boats, and manning out our pin-
nace, we faved three of their men from drown-
ing, who were brought on board. After a
very hot action, we goout fo far to fea that-
they could not purfue us without danger ; and
fo, changing our courfe to the eaftward, we
got quite out of the courfe of European fhips.
When we were got out to fea, inquiring
more particularly into the meaning of all this,
the Dutchmen let us into the whole fecret,
telling us, that the fellow we bought the fhip
of, was an arrant thief, and that he ran away
with the Ihip ; that the Captain was treacher-
oufly murdered, and that he and four more
were forced to the woods for fafety ; and that,
at length, by means of a Dutch veffel in its
way to China, that came in accidentally to
take
130 img130.jpg
124 R 0 B I N S 0 N
take in frefh water, they were prefe-ved. Ile
farther told us, that they were informed that
the fellow fold the ihip at Bengal,ar d 1h1 was
turned pirate and had taken feveral pr.: s.
After mature consideration, we c.:.ncludted
it bent for us to return to Bengal,' -, here. b,'-
ing known, we might beff prove how' we carne
by the fhip, and where we wer. lur.- to
meet with fome justice, and not be hinged
firft and judged afterwards : But, up.-n rtecond
and more deliberate thoughts, we 1il ,ilcd..
that, by pa ,Ti. by Batavia, we ran ", gre at
hazard, and therefore we determined t,.. Ch ` 2g, ;
our course, and fail towards the coat of C ulina,"
and there difpofe of the fhip, and th',rt r t an,
other, and make the beft of our w..' ,. Eu-'f
rope. This being generally agreed to, iv:.
ftleered away N. N. E. but, meeting ,.a il; E|I..-.
trjrv winds, which blew hard agaiifl ua, our
voyage grew very troublefome and fed!.-Is
and our prcvifions were almost e :i,.lled ;
and Wihat was fill worfe, we were a.*'len
five, that the fhips, whofe boats we 1La In.d d
led fo rudely, might be in the road bef, re u,
which in confequence muft hb faor! to us,'
Upon.thefe melancholy confiderati.-r we a- .
gain refolved-to change our courfe, i.n n Ly if
P-, fibl'.,' we could not make fo-ne hbi,.. ur be.r
longing to the P. Wt.,''f. With thi, rt.Jl.r
tion we fet forward for the bay of To-'quiu.J
in order to fail from thence to Mac.-, a towq..:
oncepoffeffed by the Portugtucfe, and P hie'
there are fill many European familic'.
We came in fight of this place e.,rlv nerJ
morning ; but t.. ri.rilet '.r,!, our former circii,..-
.'.nic, we put into a final, river, l e veh
inqrliird
131 img131.jpg
C R U S 0 E.
inquired what fhips were in the road, and how
matters food ; and indeed this prudent ftep
was the occafi6n of our happy deliverance ;
for the next morning there came in two Dutch
fthips, and a third without any colours ; and
in the evening two Englifh ones.
The river where we lay was but fmall, and
the country wild and barbarous, and the in-
habitants, all robbers, having no correfpond-
ence with any other nation ; and among oth-
er barbarous cufloms, they have this particu-
larly ; when any fhip is driven on their coaft,
they immediately feize her, and make all her
mnen flames ; fo that here we fund ourfelves
surrounded with enemies, both by fea and
land.
As we found our fhip was very foul and
leaky, we thought to cleanfe her in this place ;
but while this was doing, the inhabitants, who
I believe, had never feen a fhip upon the ca-
reen before, and not perceiving our men, who
were at work, prefently imagined that the fhip
had been caf( away, and lay upon the ground ;
and accordingly they surrounded us with five
er fix large boats full of armed men, with a
resolution to plunder, the (hip, and carry the
men away flaves to their king : But, when
they faw our men at work upon the outside of
the fhip they looked upon us with the greateft
confusion imagiable ; neither could we im-
agine what their design was : However to
prevent the worfl, we handed down fome
arms, and indeed it was well we did, for in
lefs than a quarter of an hour, they came
fcearing upoz us with all their force.
i. C Indeed,
132 img132.jpg
129 R 0 0 ,v
Indeed, we lay but i; zn Ill p.flure to receive j
thtn. in jd b.:f.re ithemen ..,uldh c.,ic onf b,-ard,
lih(. had Ietzed one. tf tie fdiloiis but the ,
f:llow Ioon dln ^a-cd hin clc --,d lillcid the .,
J?:j.j ri that i :l I f1J huld uUi h]im h [ rIt. ver, .
this was little to tI-.- purpolt. utillde, ir,. tilir
numbers, and I really" [,tlie c, if i had not .
been for a lucky accidernt, wc li-..Id .:en J1l '
loft:. The thing Ias ti is : 1he caroctnci, V,
who %,.s fl,.pping lh, hid., in thr fi'p. h.,d
two kcitle-r, th >imc 1'ull of bo&lini pitch, and
lie ,'titr with refi iiaid tali-,w. t,. Ad as
two or three, infid-lr I cie citer'ng the b,'art
the carpcnter'i nalc ahjItacild HtlY: v. i1b a liade
lill if Loiirg .jr,-r, which h.,d IUch at, if-
[LO thl t., i-,.rg 1...11 r, l.J ,, it r:.ad,." lh,:m IL t
and leap into tinc i.'-. t i- h tl.. arcpenticr
perceiving. I-. ic<.'c I,:- inrp, rnd cpp ,; ii Ir- -
tot he p:t5i Le!tle, f.-, lp trkl:ed it am'.,, them,
that tl, y all rtn I-i hied a a,, ci) ;ig ard
..I-nli.', ih a mnoft .-.L, m;ini:bl.
1 muft own I wX'i i.;lrtlmLi, F-h.1f,.d at the
,didners c(f this ed,.,:n,!il e ; h.. ., r. c lull t
3(1o iihll to put the ,,i;p in la ,ihiuie of dicence, '
and as loon as we t.,utd, wc [ui 10 f.-a ,i iavirig ielolvcd to put 0.i vi ith It iiding
port we came pear. Aici lurre d.i. tail. ne j
caime wihiu'i f lat of lir.re, a. I Iiiardig in, |
a boa L C Rme 1it l, i '. IJ th a, ,.Irid l-,.t'i iic(le
pilot on board, hu ITe-red- u:. h; i.-cr' ice ;
we very gladly acccricul it. and I-nit Ite boat
back again: In flurt the AId n, n \wc-ni ,th
us, and as we failed .aln.r. 1 alkid hTm, if
there were no pirates in hlfe I-s. lie told
me,,he hatl only hcail or inrc, thai was feen in
the bay ef Siami about a MIt h i,, r..;.r w.,
fre
133 img133.jpg
i*.C RU O 0 E. 27
1'Ce built for a atinmr neither, but. imly a fhip
I'lat tihc m-nl halj run awi' i v0ith, t!ic Captain
ha;\ iv, bee. r:inuidcied b\ th,: Mal iAns ; and
1 ca iitll you ihi.., f tome Di:c-.iTIcn, tl-iat
c.-,re pretli na ar thini the c-tnet day in.-the
rincr hainb.d;a, lad laid theTir hand's upoa
thcm, tl-t:, wou Id havc hio, ge ev'ciy one of
the rogues ungin the yard armn, waih-1i0 arny
fallher cL- tin, ,y'.
Bing fcilibkle tL ht lis old pl-,t couIl5 do
us no. haiim, I told him how tiecaic ft,.,od with
us and deil'red hilm tn carv 1- ito Nanquin
s h. re rneiit hr Enruii, (l or Dutch iLip.s came.
Said the ol-t m.tn. you lha ie tLaken the aglht
ccurfe to. Iccr t t[-.e north ; aL...i if 1 night
;advie 1 'oA IAJ lid 11 c nO fell the ffip it Chi-
na : Fut 1.,;d 1, in dt hIg that. 1 betray i;rno-
cent people. N"., repli.Ld Ie. I know' the
Dutch cominrnandcr', and will tA.iJ care thev
fbh.ll be ri t!ly irfi ,med C.f tLie v ho- matter.
\Vh:ii1 th, rc thii~gs were under debate,
we ijiled dliit,.ilv t,.r Nanfljin, and in about
13 ia. s tlr \"Me t-jrlie toi ai- :' iLhot in the en-
tra.te in:,:O tht giulph. whei ,t were inform-
e.d that two aIyic lDutch flips wt-re gore he-
fire u., anid thit %%e tifould certainly fall into
Lheli hands.
\W hac to do we couMd not tell ; bat the old
mtarn tolld us there was a little hbi-uhui about
40 lcjujct tL tlhe Touthw:.rd. and i' we could
get tlhither, no Dutch ot 'nghl'th [hips ever
came thithcr. and ihere we might. be fafre.
This ad' iac was generally approve ed, and
tlilther by the hlionell pilot's dia.t:6un,' we ar-
i-.c.'l 1 tl'ety, aijtr L i day s Jailing ; we
Sent.
134 img134.jpg
iig R 0 B I V X V
%vent directly into the port, and landed to o0t
unfpe.iakabe joy anrid ftisfdtion.
Being now fife on Ihore, our pilot foouw
got us a lorling an] a %virehoufe for our.
goods, arid then brouihlt ui acquainted wiRt
three milrioniry Pricf.,, that were there cont
averting the people to Uhiiflianity. After wo
had fettled a fort of a corre-fpondence wiith
them, our next concern was to difr,:.f of our-
g.uc.-l which we did fime time after, to omr"
fill f f:,.ifalion, to an eminent merchant of
Japan. We were 1oi leagues farther frontt
home than we were at Bengal, and having
difpofed of our Chip, all tie hopes ue had,-
were, that at the next fair, we m',ht perhaps'
purchase another Veffel that wotild carry us,
and our goods whete we plcifl,. U.puioa
thefe hopes we relied to continue hee ;e
and to divert ourfelves, we took erv.-ral litle
journies into the co.jn' r, and Iprnt terx.
days t,. Ice the city of Nanc,.ln, which was'
regularly built, and tolerably 'well fortiliied;
At going to Peqiri, who lolilcited us with great;.i
earneanef -to bear h'm company thither,
which we both agreed to do. W\e were -
daysin our journey through that miferabta
country, and had an opportunity in our paF-I
,Iage to fey two or three of the Chinca P
Efquirc, *'ith their mamner of travelling
there, which was the moll ridiculous fight
1 ever faw, and rather merited our Icorn and
contempt than admiration. -
At length we arrived at the great city ofi
Pequin, where %ve had -carcely been a week ,
before tke old Portuguefe brought us word,
that ,|
135 img135.jpg
C R U S 0 .
.tjn ibejPe .,X.s a great caravan, and r-vcral
Pilit tuAlhk nisti, ip a honE time, preparing
to g by ILd i.u Mul'cu.vy, and th.it if \we
pkeakcd We might 1take tIhe opportunity.-
This was % IY v go-v d nve s f ,r.u- ; ,rid fo wev
went to Wsl.- IS t A l we c L..o!d lo difpnl'e
ofwhat g.r.d w'c had at th- pi:rt. and to
buy fuc.h others aS vc ih. li'.)lh. t.lul lirn
o the m,.,'ft ad.yr.l.ge. MVe h i-.t for Pe-
,tiin, in coriipanv \viihi alnut fi xc htindre.
.f f.'eral riatl.ns, the be,,..inn;ng of Februa-
,ry ; and in two da,- wie palled through a
g;ilc in the great wall, li:..d tii be one thou-
[and Fr -lifh riok-s in len:;lth. \'e then en-
t;rr, a Conuily ur,,lei -he pcwir of the poor
bitzvhig 1'.frtirf, ,.f whir m we .perceied fev-
c a! f(majl trtici ,,t a ~la\anrce ficm 1s. One
d(Ly o.urcdJler l.'e us ISac t.1 go -a hunting,
.wic-n U;ias our chance to ircct with about
# rt'v C'ffi'-,fc rtar'. wrirlics in a body ;
w'fi; no. ,,.rcr p'-ri-ived iS1, but one or
t!em bhl.z a horn. at. the ,itnid cf xwhkich for-
-ty or f.f;v mi.re Ca.s fp im.:.ci-tiy. eUcre-
uOC.n, -_'ie cf tLhe Sco"tCh merLle.i lts ordered
.us to advance arl ,i.ick tin,-mn 'igthbul dela',..
The-' lc tl- a fs'w r-,drm riiows at is, th t
did us it mn'a'.ri'r i F lhi.narm and when we
came near enicbh lV, fite IpCn them with
our pillol., the, ran a wi'y 'tth the gieatp(l
conur iin. So mi' bilzle with ih,'fc thievilh
Tarars endxd wiLhour at v, bloodfhcd rCn our
fide. W'e fl;Il linvelled at leafll a minth
.more thiouijg h t.lhe enmper.r if China's coun-
ry, tiU at len gth we rcaine to thle civ c-f
Naurn, %%e i s. a flrong ,Fr ntior of 4hr
MCh.e q..n.jpirc, hein ofit.n dili'.hber 'n our
paf'ahe
136 img136.jpg
130 o 0 h I N SO 0 A'
paffage by ftraggling Tartars. We fl.aye4 .
Naum but one day, and then continued our i
journe', pafling federal defers and great nriv-
ers ; and on the 131h of April, we came toe,
the Frontier of Mufcovy; and as we palTed,
We found the garrifun was filled with Chrift.
ian folders, for the benefit of travellers and
commerce ; but the common people were all
Pagans, the moll m:fcrable wretches I ev.
er beheld. Whilfl we flopped to refrefh
at one of thefe towns, I had an opportunity
to obferve them at the worship of one of
their idols, which was the molT ugly reprefent-
ation that ever I beheld in mry life. I can-
not defcribe it to you without horror : flow-
ever, we found means to defiroy it before
we left the place, for which we had like to-
have paid very dear ; for the ne.t day they
came to the Governor tod demand fatiafac-
Lion for-tt e lofs of their idol; and if we had
riot deceived them, and got off by a firat-
agem, we had been all defl rayed.
The next place we came to was the city of
Jaravena, where'we flopped for fvc days.
and then we entered into a difmal defzrr
which lafted us twenty five days march, be-
Fore we could pats over it, and were all the
way infected with fminall troops of roLers,
but they never had the courage to attack us.
Afler we had palled this place we had fever-
al garrifons to defend the caravans from the
Tartars.
Through all this country happened noth-
ing worth informing the reader: The in-
habitants were generally Pagans ; and a 1.
obfervedi
137 img137.jpg
C.4.US G*0E. 3
obfced the Ctar chofe lather to convert
them by his soldiers than by his priefl.s.
From this ciiy, to the river Obt we trav-
elled over a very pleasant country, but un-
cultivated, till we came to the capital of Ti-
beria. And now, having been [even months
upon our journey and winter coming on,
my partner and I began to consider what
course we had bel take to fecure and dif-
pole of our goods and ourselves I conclud-
ed to proceed to Archangel, where it was
impoffble to want a ihip either for England,
Holland, or Ilamburgh.
One night 1 happened to falJ into the comn-
pany of an exiled prince, but a vary fine
gentleman, whofe virtue flruck me into fuch a
deep refpcd, that I proposed a method for
his enlargement. He refused the offer, and
gave me feveral reafons for fo doing : But,
laid he, 1 have a fon, and if you will be af-
fiftant to him, 1 fall take it kinder than if
I done to me. This I very readily complied
I with'; and fo the young prince was fent for,
who brought with him a noble equipage,
and a considerable quantity of furs and other
valuable merchandize.
When we had fetiled all our other affairs,
the next thing to be eonfidered was, the meth-
od of travelling, which we concluded
would be belt and fafeft to avoid the great
towns, and take the bye roads. After we had
paflcd'the river Cama, as we were obliged to
Jo we came to a little city on the European
flide, but the people were molt of them Pagans
as in the more remote part of the country.-
From this place wc were to pais a defert 2oo
miles
138 img138.jpg
132 R0 B I N S 0 N
miles in breadth, and wee fet upon in ouii,
paffage, by a large troop of Calmuck Trtaas,
from whom we did make a fhift to efcape,
but not without the greatest difficulty andc
danger. In fliort we were forced to makeA-
ourrelves a fort of fortification of ti- '.:.,' is
of trees, which flood us in fuch lteadi, that
though we were fercral times attacked with
mll the fury imaginable, yet they could nevet
break in upon our little compa& body ; and
fo, by the ftraiagemn of a fire, we got off ii'
the night, and faved the camels and all the
reft of the mtrchandize.
After we had paired the' river Kitza, we
came to a larue town. named Ofmoys, where:
we beard thai feveral troops of Tartars had
been abroad, but that we wcsre now paft dan-
ger. We came next to Lawrenfkoy, whez ,
we hired boats to carry our luggage ; fo we
arrived at Archangel on the 13th day of Ju-
ly, after a year, five months and three days
journey. We failed from Archangel on the
2oth of April, and came into the Elbe, Sep-
tember following. Here my partner and I
fold our goods, and divided the money;
and my fhare after all ou.r loffes, came to
34751. 17s. 3d. At Hamburgh my .'i.,
lord took his leave, in ord-r to go to Vied-
na, not only for prote&io.i, but for the fake
of correfponding with his father, and the
reft of his friends. I came to the Hague,
where I embarked for England, and arrived
at London on the 10th of January, 1705, after
ten years and nine months absence.
ROBINSON
1J
139 img139.jpg
C R U S 0 1.
ROBINSON CRUSO's VISION
0O THE
ANGELICK WORLD.
CHAP. 1.
Of Solitude.
OWEVER folitude is looked upon as a
restraint to the pleafures of the world,
in company and conversation ; yet it is a hap-
py fate of exemption from a fea of trouble, an
inundation of vanity, vexation and difappoint-
ment. While we enjoy ourfelves, neither the
joy nor forrow of other men affect us : We are
then at liberty, with the voice of our foul, to
fpeak to God. By this we fhun fuch frequent
trivial difcourfe, as ever becomes an obfTruc-
tion to virtue : And how often do we find we
had reafon to wifh we had not been in com-
pany, or faid nothing when we were there :
For either we offend God by the impiety of
our difcourfe, or lay ourfelves open to the vio-
lence of defigning people by unguarded ex-
preflions, and confequently perceive the
coldnefs and treachery of pretended friends,
when once involved in trouble and affli&tion :-
And fuch unfaithful intimates (I should fay
enemies) who rather by faife inuendoes would
accumulate minferies upon us, than honeftly af-
fift us when fufferinz under the moft artful
M .. and
140 img140.jpg
134 ROB NS 0
dcti.rning men. But in a fiale of I'olitude,
when our tongues cannot be' helaid except by .
the o, R:t MLIefly of I-Ieaven. h'.w happy are
we, in the bl lie' edij,\ memn of c.)ivrer Ic t'aih
our Maker! It is then we mke him i.tir Ifriend,
which makes us .bj.c the cn..y rd tor-aiernpr.
of %% icl.ed men. And when a mnn iion' erlei
-vith himfelf, he is fure that he d,,ces ni,t con-
verfe with an enemy: At leaft, we Ihold re-
treat to good company, and good b ,oki : 1 I
mean not by solitude that a man flC,:uld ret ire
into a cell, a defert, or a rnoni t'.rv, which
would be altogether an ufelefs and unprofita-
ble flr.lirn't : For as men are formed for l.ioci-
ety, and have an ahfolute neceffity and dep ence oneuponanother; fothere is a retirem.rrt E
of the foul,-in which it converfcs wit h heay-
en even in the midftf of men : And indeed no
man is more it to fpeak freely, than he, who
canwithout any violence to hirulflf, refrain
.his tongue, or keep filent altogether. Ai to J
religion, it is by this the foul cets acqoa!nted
with the hidden mysteries of the olv1 w rings .
Here Uie finds thofe floods of tearr., irn which
g ...d men wafh themifelves day and night ;
.and only make a vifit to God, amd his hlioly
angels. In this con\ erf.ition, the trucit p ace
anr inoft folidjoy are to be found ; I ii a con-
tinual feafi ofcontentment on earth, and the
means, of attaining euvelafing happiutfs in
hCavenA.
h La r "r_ C A --
.' ..... ". C If A P. '
141 img141.jpg
-C R U S 0 F. 1 35
S C -IHAP. II.
Of HonSzy.
IH ONESTY is a virtue beloved by good
men, and pretended to by all pcrl-ns
In this there are several degrees : To pay eve-
ry man his own, is the., *mr'."' law 1 huritf ;
but to do good to all r-iti kmnd. i., the .C/'l,,it,-ry
law of lionefty ; and [his chancerv coirt i; in
every man's bieill, where his Ci' t."-., A ., d
Clzan't',i. Hence it is that a, mier, though
he pav'i ever'. one their twn. cannot "be nt
honell man, when he does n't difcharg.- il-ie
good offices that are incumbent on a fiendlv,
kind. generous perl;.,i : For the pipih,-t l,:ia!;
faith, chl. xxx IL 7 8. 1&h: ,,'iir.irn -, f a .hurj '
are n.i7 : Htodu, t.:iz ack' d dt'i .'., dJr'i'y ,hr p,,r
wati /ineg ;,ij,'./h, .' 't '. n th.: a i', v ]/;c.,ih r: i', .
Bu'! ih h,'r ad J,.,i lb/ra' I t,'.r. a. P.: 1- tiecr,'
th ,i fit.lI i'lz:nl. IL is c<-rtiiin"ly hr nefty. to
do ever,; thing the law require; : But fLouH-
we throw ever prior debtor in T.r;fon till he
has paid the titmoft farthii,. hang e, cry marl-
fatti.r without mercy'. c .;,-t the penaliv of
ever, bond, and the foif-fitirer of eery inden-
tuie: t'I, this would be ..wrinright c ,iJclt.'.
and n't hont -i ; and is c,'ntrai v t1 that ze.-
eral rule, ,C .i a-',.*", r. Aa .' A v,, :,.'. /
h iAyC do" ua i .. -v. Sm-,mei;nes necefllay in ke4
an h':nelt n'jn a k iave, when a rich man i" an
honelt mmn, biut no thinks to hiri foi it. The
trial 't honcef) is this : Did you ever 'vwanit
bread, and had your neighlib.-,jr' loaf in keep-
ing, and would [La[ve, rather than eat it ?
Were you qver arrested, having in your cufto-
dy
142 img142.jpg
;36 R 0 B I N S O N
dy another man's ralh, and would rather go to
goal than bieak it ? If fo, then indeed this
may be reckoned honefty. For Kigg l ..'/g wn
tells us, that a good name is better than life, a,.d
ia-a precious ointment, and w*ichd when a man bas
once loft e has n ot.i.j left worth keeping.
CHAP. III.
Of Immorality of Converfation, and the vulai Er-
rors of Behaviour.
AS conversation isa great part of human hap-
.I pinefs, fo it is a pleafant fight to behold a
fweet tempered man, who is always fit for it
to fee an air of humour and pleafantne!s fit
Hpon every brow, and even something argel-
ick upon every countenance : Whereas if we
obFer,'e a defigriing man, we hall find a mark
of involuntary fadnelfs breaks in on his joy,
and a certain infurre&ion in the foul against
ti-.e tyranny of profligate principles.
They err very much, who think religion,
or a ftrio morality.difcomnpofes the mind, and
renders it unfit for conversation ; for it is
rather that which infoires us to innocent
mirth, indeed, without a counterfeit jov, at
vicious men appear with : And ,ndJed wit is
as conr.Q-nt with religion, as religion is with
good manners ; nor i. there any thing in the
limitatio# of virtue and religion, that fhould
abate the pleafure of it, but on the contra ry in-
creafe it.
But on the other hand, many men by their
own vice and intemperance, disqualify th-m-
felves for converfation, in being of ci nical,
"urly
143 img143.jpg
CR U S E.
fatrly and rude tempers. though they boaft'
themnfelves otherwise. Converfati.nr is' Im-
moral, where rild;u rle is indecernt, immodest,
fcandalous, slanderous or abufive. How great
is their folly, and how mnch;it is expofed, by
affronting their bellft friend, even G.'d himlelf,
before men, whofe notions are uncertain, and
yet who laugh at the fool vhtn his fear co.izilh
The great fcandal atheiftical .nd immoral
dilcourfe gh\cs to virtue, ought, mcthinks, to
be punifhlcd by the judges : Make a man once:
ceafe to believe a God, and he his nothing
left to limit his foul but mere philofophy.
And how incongruous is this to government,
thatea manr Ihould be punilhcd 1',] druikcr;-
n efs or wearing, and ye. have 1iberry to al-
fron." and even deny' the Mjt. flv of Heiaven '
If a man gives the lie to a grniltrnan in com-
pany. or perhaps fpeak; a wotd without any
offe,,ive meaning, he flitc into a palTion. quar-
rels, fights, and perhaps murleis him ; or af-
tei wards profecutes him at Ihw with the ut-
rnoll villanv and opprlcflio.n.
The next thing to be refrained from ; ob-
fcene dilcourfe, whnch is the largu.ge on!yv ol
the proficient in deb.auclier, %% ho never r,!-
pent but inr a gaol or a holpiial and %hofe
carcaffes link as bad as their dikfcourle, till tI.e
body becomes too mafy for the foUul to IkZy a-
ny longer 1n it.
Nor is ralfe talking Icfs to be avoided : For
lying is the Ibeep's clothing hun.g upon the
wolf's back ; 'tis the Ph'arqi/c's prayer, the
whore's blufh, the hypocitie's paint, the mur-
derer's file, the thief's cloAk. 'Lis yJab's em-
brace, and Judaa's kils ; in a word, 'tis man-
M 2-n kird's
144 img144.jpg
138 R 0 B I N S 0 N
kind's darling fin, and the devil's diflinguifi-
ing character. Some add lies to lies, till it not
only comes to be improbable, but even'impof- '
fible too : Others lie for gain, to deceive, de-
lude and betray: And a third fort lie for
fort, or forfun. There are other liars, who
are personal and malicious : who foment dif-
ferences, and carry tales from one houfe to
another, in order to gratify their own envious
tempers, without any regard or reverence for
truth. -
C H A P. IV.
Of the pr.fnt State of Religion in t4 ,World.
I DOUBT, indeed, there is much more devo-
tion than religion in the world, more ado-
3 ,tion than fupplication. and more hypocrify
than fincerity : And it is very melancholy to
consider, what numbers of people there are
furn ifhed with the powers of reafou and the
gifts of nature, andi yet abandoned to the groff-
eft ignorance and depravity. But it would
be uncharitable for us to imagine, (as fome Pa-
pifts abounding with too much ill! nature, the
only fcandal to religion, do) that they will
certainly be in the fRate of damnation after
this hfie For how can we think it confiftent
with the mercy and goodnefs of an infinite be-
ing, to damn thofe creatures, when he has not.
farnifhlied them with the light of his gofpel ? J
Or how can fuch proud, conceited and cruel
bigots prefcriba rules to the justice and mercy
of God ?
We
145 img145.jpg
C R U S 0 E. 39
We are told by fome people, that the great
image which King A'ebuchadnezzar fet up to be
adored by his people, held the representation
of the fun in his right hand, as thie principal
objet of adoration. But to wave this difcourfe
of Heathens, How many felfcontradi&ing
principles are held amorg ChfriftLans 1 And
how do we doom one another to the devil,
while all profcfs to worship the fame Deity,
and to expea the fame falvation !
VWhen I was at Portugal there was held at
that time the court of juftice of the inquifition.
All the criminals were carried in proceffion to
the great church ; where eight of them were
habited in gowns and caps of canvas, whereon
the torments of hell were displayed, and they
were condemned and burnt for crimes againfl
the Catholick faith and Bleffed Virgin.
I am forry to make any refle Lions upon
Chriftians ; but indeed in Itao, the Ro-mijh re-
ligion fees the moft cruel and mercenary up-
on earth : And a very judicious person, who
travelled through Italy from Turkey, tells us,
" That there is only the face, and outward
pomp of religion there : that the church pro-
tets murderers and affaffins, and then delivers
the civil magifirates over to Satan for doing juf-
tic6; interdias whole kingdoms, and fihuts up the
churches for want of paying a few ecclefiaftick
dues, and fo puts a flop to religion for -ant of
their money : That the Court of Inquifition
burnt two men for fpeaking difhonourably of
the Bleffed Virgin, and the miffionaries of
China tolerated the worfhipping the devil by
their new concerts : That Ital;, was the thea-
tre. where religion was the graRtd opera ; and
that
146 img146.jpg
140 R 0 B I N S 0 N
that the Po-piih clergy were no other than the
ft a g e p ra iz r F.-. "
As to teli.onn in P,-.,i W, thelicv deny Chrift to
be the Meffiah, or that the Mcltih was cone
in the fltlh. And as.'u their Proieftant;, they
a.ii tne fa.lowers of Lehus Sociv,,,, who denied
our Saviour's divinity ; and hiv.e no concern
about the divine inspiration of the Hol, Ghoft.
Ln Ahtfcvy their chuiches are huilt of wood,
andindeed they havebutwooden piefls, lhou.uh
of the Greek church: They pra. as much to
Strov. *V :, as Papifts do to the Vi'rgln AIl,,
ui o.t.i.i.on itr ail theirdifficulir- or Titon?.
As to ,Latherans, they only d lijr frrm the
-.?.r 'n le i- cving (',nlubfl--n:& lion, infleaci
,.f i'!,niubtt. ntiaiior-. but, lik'e them, they ale
mnuci jit-.lJed tth tile external gallantry and '
p.m,-. rmje tharn Lih 1r1e and leal prattice ot "r
e;1 .,f 7O1.
in ii :, I Found 'worid of prell., the
*iet's e.'!v uwJeie cti.,ded with them, and
tpe chutinhes full of women butl furey never
SrS :ti;C'. I'n1 o full o: blind -- tdes, li ignnitant
r. r-:iii'o0 a:ld even oS void oft moial, as thofe '
eole whocori"ffs their (ins to thcm.
N.'w it leems lIrange, that while all men
own theDivine B:.-Ink,. tiete should be lo many
dJflerent (ent mrnt, about paying him obeji-
tnce in the Chnrillian chuiiti : 1 know not what
sekit- l-Tin for ;his, except it be their dif-
ferent tpaEtCles an:ld facuiles.
Anl indeed upon this accoujot, we have per-
ceiv.d in all Chrillhan countries what mobtall
J.,ids have been about Telig;on: What wars
and blooillhed hava molefled Iurtve, till the '
general paic.hiiat;oa of hU WG. Luai doubles at
01. P
]*
147 img147.jpg
R U S 0 E.
the treaty of 1.., *'i, :.' z ; and fince, between
the Lutheran churche, And should I lake a
profped at home, iv liar unhappy divisions are
between Chrilian; in th-s kingdom about Epif-
copacv, F reffbtecr,, the Cr.nrca of .,.;nl men
and thle DUenie,' and where they withiland
one another like St. P'aul and St. Pe'ei, event
to the face ; a minuch as to fay, cairy on the
dilpute to the utrroill etremit\.
It might be a quellion. Why there are fruch
dilferences in religious points, and why thele
breaches [ihould be fo hot and irreconcilable ?
All the aiifwer I can give to this; is, that we
ir.q'jire more concerning the truth of religion,
than any other nation in the world; and the
anxious concern we have about it, make us
jealou; of every opinion-; and tenacious oF our
own: And th iss not because we ate more
furious and ralh than other people ; but the
truth is, we are moreconcerned about then,
and being tnnfible that thie fc-ipture ;. the great
rule of faith, the fliandird tor i,:e ancd d<-iiine,
we have rccouiie t.i u CLirlVeS, witIliouLt lub-
mitting to the peicen.4ed inallib!l judge upon
earth. .
There -; another q.ir'tion pciiinent to the
fotrner. \\'iat i-medy can we apply to this'. nai-
ady ?' And to this i in.ll rnegatively answer,
not to, have tvs be lets relgic.ii that we might
differ lefs about it :- A -d ths is 1irking at tho
very root of all rig 6a; dilffcrencc ; for cer-
iainly, ',ere they to t-e carried on with a peace-
able Ipirit, willing lobe info, med. our variety
of op;nior.s wouid not have tle name of differ-
rices; nor should we leparate in communion
148 img148.jpg
R- 0 B I X S C' V
Let us, for a while, w'e i 'r',:. Ih, pi, :T m .i,-
part of his conversation !In i i:i,,- I,- r,. t i,, i, .
fpent hours, sad the n.taI r I! *! i ,r p. -'. ,i to
the great centre andgt1 G 1%r c liZ.;,. .- ki :'
how to put a r vaiuC,.f .. I ,, ,. ,i I,. i,', bIqoe
of his foul, as it really. r. r III ..' ,.
asone that m ut acco- ,. tr t].!, i-"tI 1:, i.s ti
form an equality bet,,t, -..;i hF .: n 3 ., ,6d .s.h.:[ 1I
flhall receive; lefs caii if. t- ..'nd.-d .c:f ii'b-) e
virtue, or what he fort._re' i d .r I. ".'',r h er q-
ative or positive piety .-. hL ,.,, t -e j.d. .-d ,. .
the eternity that reward ':. It i f',, hvir [hrn ,' tI. be-
some of the Pha'rifee, sit-.-, he Lo i,1].. d .b', Ltc In-
cerityofhis repentao:t, i..a -f jidJ, ,.ordi',' tio the
infinitegrace of God; ['.a a I!1 ,t A b.I.l.r Ul tn rnd-
tfs eternity a
When te negativ- m)n ,_'i v iiI h r i: ,Lie
world, he is filled ..h A. rroi. I:.r.r aid d[.-: iT is
.Fealix when St. Paltti r i(..nr n:. i,.m .' i.r rfl i.h-
coufnefs, and of judgir e, .i :, : .: r .I t I r i.F.-h a
great philofopher of great I'- '.'. i .i ir i i f ... ... "
ativeman; and he was nr.,J: kn b-,LlI, A', 'wi i,.,itle, iin
asa life ofvirtue aad LiDp, rnci ,r .I rf i ,id ..,
giving a healthy hods. a ikr t., M .r. 1 .1 ctip.t.'J ldIt;
to eternal happiness rn *i" 1,**-id f,. m an...,h-i _., ;
naimely, theinfinite ur.:i u:dird r1'- .-It I pr.1 .i. i ,.d,
"who having Cre&ed a I, Ut' iiL, I. JrAlui ('hrit ,r.ildi
fe-piIJate fuch as by L r1 'rid rt;riQ ,rin.-e Il' N t'' Iiru-iihr
home and united t.i -ni't l. r. c ,: .' i .e,.rcq : _, 5_
on-the foot of his h:,. i, Id It -.e i e a I r' .rn '.lr
them, had-appointed t!in ro "I j, A.,I lie'n .a'l ithe ,1-
Jofophv,ternperance and ri,'ir-ii if -I- Lu the % -ild I et'idt..
-was inteffetual ; andthib, i I,.>, it '., lhaL nade .X.,i
s ajri. 4j ro, tmeinb:n.
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