Broward, John. Letter to Pulaski Broward. Tallahassee, Florida. November 29, 1858. Open letter concerning Pulaski Browa...

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Material Information

Title:
Broward, John. Letter to Pulaski Broward. Tallahassee, Florida. November 29, 1858. Open letter concerning Pulaski Broward. Cedar Creek, East Florida. April 20, 1854
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Creator:
Broward, John (1795-1865)
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Ante Bellum Florida, 1845-1861
Genre:
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States -- Florida

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00021303:00001

Full Text






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humans because 1) turtles nest on their natal beaches, 2) females are iteroparous, 3) most

species nest in relatively dense numbers, 4) nesting occurs seasonally (some species nest

year-around at some locations), and 5) several species can nest on the same beach during

different times of the year.

Unlike most other marine resources sea turtles can be kept alive, out of water, for

weeks and thus provide humans with a dependable source of fresh meat for prolonged

periods. Although nesting females and their eggs are more accessible for harvesting,

animals can also be captured in the water, however, more skill and equipment are

required. Some sea turtle species congregate on foraging grounds where they feed on

sessile prey, assemble offshore of their nesting beaches, or are predictable in their

migratory routes to and from the nesting beach. The concentration and predictability of

animals at known in-water locations during various times of the year or during their

lifespan makes them nearly as accessible to harvesting as nesting females and their eggs.


WorldwideStatusof Sea Turtles


The current status of sea turtle populations worldwide is indicated by the

threatened status of the seven extant species (IUCN 1996). Overharvest of animals and

their eggs for human use, incidental capture, and habitat loss and degradation due to

coastal development are some of the primary causes of worldwide population declines

(e.g., Bjomdal 1982; National Research Council 1990; Eckert 1995; IUCN 1997;

Lutcavage et al. 1997). Currently, the international sale of sea turtles and their products

is illegal among the 142 (as of September 1997, Anon. 1997) signatory nations of the















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