Jackson, Andrew. Unsigned order to Richard K. Call regarding the translating of letters from Col. Jose Maria Callava, J...

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Material Information

Title:
Jackson, Andrew. Unsigned order to Richard K. Call regarding the translating of letters from Col. Jose Maria Callava, June 20, 1821. Correspondence concerning Florida, 1821-23.
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Language:
English
Creator:
Jackson, Andrew (1767-1845)
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Misc Manuscripts
Territorial Florida, 1821-1845
West Florida -- History -- 19th century
Genre:
Manuscript
Transcript
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States -- Florida

Notes

Abstract:
Andrew Jackson letters concerning Florida, 1821-23, including Richard K. Call, Jose Maria Callava, James Monroe, George Walton, James Gadsden, William Barnett, Henry M. Brackenridge, James C. Bronaugh. Includes transcriptions. Also, a manuscript letter to Andrew Jackson from Jose Maria Callava on the evacuation of Pensacola, May 16, 1821. 11 folders (10 letters with transcripts)

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
00,210
aleph - 28048108
System ID:
AA00021295:00001

Full Text


THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
P. K. YONGE LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA




February 6, 1964


None of these letters are listed in Bassett's CORRESPONDENCE OF
ANDREW JACKSON.

The following names are mentioned in the Jackson letters:

1. Barnett, William
2. Brackenridge, Henry M.
3. Bronaugh, James C.
4. Brooke, George M.
. Butler, Robert
6. Call, Richard Keith
7. Callava, Jose
8. Davidson, William
9. Dinkins, James E.
10. Donelson, John
11. Easter, Richard J.
12. Forbes, James G.
13. Fromentin, Eligius
14. Gadsden, James
15. Guillemard, Arnaldo
16. Miller, John
17. Monroe, James
18. Nicholas, Cary
19. Overton, Samuel
20. Vives, Francisco D.
21. Walton, George






II
Alabamai Dept. of Archives and Hittyryo




Andrew Jackson to James ackson
1814, August R4-.

r
M Ja&es Jackson

D

Sir

I have but a moment to wrije you -- ftom
d
information rec last evening direct from Pensacola and

which may be relied on, the British force has reached the

coast and -Pensacola destined to conquer this country,

you will see in the hands of Governor B&aunt an4 abridge- -

mEtt of the news -- io funds, or means of defence being in

the hands of the quartermaster here, and it becoming neces-

sary to call in the whol force authorized, I have dispatched

Capt Camp to Nashville for funds and hope the Bank will
r U'
accommodate M LeVis with$50,000 -- I shall want three hun-

dred dollars myself until I can draw from the paymaster, and '
r
if I have not that sum in Bank you and M Childress must
r
endorse for me, and M Anderson has my power in Bank--

you can know the atate of my funds by applying to the cashier
r
-- M John Anderson -- I have ordered every peaceable In-

dian to be enrolled, and brought into the field the British

hakhad Capt Woodbine at this, for some months, and has

about five hundred in ensacola, and the large British


force will unless counteracted, by the plan I have taken

draw a vast number to their standard -- I wish you to say to
o
col x Butler, when he sends an agent into the Chero-

kee country, let him sead George hayfield immediately

into the Creeks and collect all the warrants in the upper





A. Jackson to A. Jackson.
1814, Aug. 14.
(2 )

Creeks -- TTis mAst not be omited, George MayfAeld must

go immediately 4is presence with them will do a great

deal -- I beg of you as I have closed my letter to Colo

Butler, and we have not one moment to spare with respect

to all friends adieu -- Camp is on horse back -- I wish the

race was out of the way and Hutchings with me-


Andrew Jackson

Mobile August 28th kttxx 18140

Address:
r
M James ackson

Nashville

Tennessee --




LQ1- ..DAWM

W? ^Autograph letter, sign...
8, 1819, to Major Thomas McC
"Go' 4 Williams has been in"ve
n^it:aas me, doing all the injury he
mnu-der the rose I am happy t
eha the public, indignation higher
1ihite wicked, unjust and ungen
ept to persecute me unheard: i:
dei*be.. withholding the --eviI
-li" themselves have taken, whe
i... culated to d me justice" etc,
ijjkson's campaign in Florida- s
l yve been based on his fully:
_2i d belief that Monroe wanted
k take c:-omplete possession of.
V4t, y for the U. S. He did soa,-.
utihis customary vigor, in about t
fiths of whirlwind campaign. In.
ll^cess he hanged two Englishmen,
Cause for war with England asi
Spain. The cabinet, exceptJ
iintcy -Adams, supported Monroe--
.n' to repudiate Jackson's cti
ams stoutly defended Jackson,1
planations were acceptabl'abe. to ,,
land and Spain-arid Florida !was p
chased. The controversy started the. 'i
..i::.'-: ." : ........ %
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Pensacola
1st October 1821


The Commanding Officer
of the U. States Troops at
St. Augustine.
Sir,
You will comply with all

requisitions made upon you by Mr. G. D.
Worthington Esq. Secretary for East Florida
for the purpose of enforcing the laws and
enabling him to administer the Government
agreeably to his instructions. I confidently trust
that the utmost harmony will exist between
the military and civil departments of the
government.
I am __
with respect
s ob se
y m ob sev.
Andrew Jackson
Gov of the Floridas


This letter is not listed in Bassett's Correspondence of Andrew Jackson.







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To hi s Ltcellcncy


IT have rec ived wiLL t:ri-, s.tisfction yteray morning by
Capt Richard 11. Call .djutant of your Excellency your correspondence
dated the 11 b.h of the-.pm:revious month ree,. ing be my answer of the
4th inV s tan t.

I am convinced to have manifested Lawyer Brack.enridge Esq. in our
deliberation in order to delivered me tihe first correspondence of your
Excellency; that no objection appears to be in whJici- your Excellency
should not have in this place the deposit. of provisions refer: and I
have done it in this case to Capt Call. -
The wisdom of your ExcelLenc his so great now as well as necessary
The W S---iO .of -ru-;E% -ce -I nn'
and consequently the action declared by you to be your opinion about
transporting from St. hMark.s to this place the Espe--ni sh Tro ps and join
- together with the a.,I.--aIns to be exported under the convoy of the sloop
of war of the United States Army- the Hornet with safety; and I will with
great pl.eac:ure contributed So soon I will received the depending
Order from his Excellency the Capt General to avery thing concerning in
my power, and with. the activity and energy able to resist any difficulty
that could dedi.cted any Daley, and Angry not to be this day in my power
to Executed for such orders ar--e not 7ye- ar-rived.

I hope your Excellency will do me the honor to be convince great
a,.nd entirely that I am with your on conformity that ever thing should
be manage with kind, and feelings of friendship between us, and kindness
to your most interested desires towards me, and to- my officers; and tro.e'ps
under rm command. --

So soon I will be authori_.ze to convene in the evacuate on of this
province, I will i.ediiately send to your Excellency all the i.oru- ton
X. c l l e c ] h i .q:ii_ o r ,l.c Lt i-o n
requ.-est-.ed by you, and all those necessary also to cont'.i7.uted to the
best concerning upon t.hi.s subject. --

Capt Call, was considered and respected by me; not only by his
particular merits, but also -y the respectable and great that was to us
the recoLendation of your Excellency towards him: and with all, I so
L 'I _L -icn re ....er and also
answer to the Corresponde-nce of Vyour Excellency which I reer and also
understood. --

God Keep your -xcelbency many years. Pensacola May 16th 1821


Jos'e Cal .ava


To his Excellency Andrew Jackson, Esq. Major General of the 1.
Division of the Uliited SLtat's Amy.


A dressed, to Mon-tpeier








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Hermitage near Nashville

Novtbr 26th 1822

My Dear Co19

On my return from Alabama, where I had been for the last month

I had the pleasure to receive your letter of the 10th ult. It affords me

great pleasure to learn that you and your family have escaped from the

ravages of that dreadfUll fever that has vissitted your city, and has swept

from existance~so many valuable citizens. I rejoice that you and your

family are restored to health, & I pray god that you may long enjoy that

blessing. I sincerely thank you for the circumstantial account you have

given me of the death & sufferings of my ever to be lamented friend, Doctor

Bronaugh. How I wished to have been with him in his sufferings, to have

endeavoured to sooth & comfort him; and to have endeavoured to have saved

him) as Doctor Brosenham [?7 has well expressed, "Men of his noble spirit

ought not to diej" few men knew the worth of Doctor Bronaugh. I well

knew it and knew how to appreciate it.* He was my bosom friends H was every

way worthy of hhat confidence I reposed in him. He was incapable of

violating confidence, or departing from the true principles of friendship.

He was noble & brave, and his exit from life, v-eQ [?J what I always

expected, and what I thought of him. But he has gone the way of all the

earth, he has done his duty here below, and I have a fond hope that he is
i
changed to a better, & hapier clime wtere his spirit is blessed 04 is at

rest and by that Sacred Book that ought to be our guide, we are

commanded not to mourn for the dead, but tot the living. Peace to his


Mr. Rutledge delivered the negroes safely to me I intend

sending them on immediately bat find that Dick has become so much edicted
have ./
to drink that I could not trust him. I have-- ......go "- them here until







a
I hear from Maam Bron#ugh to whon I had written some time ago and again
A
on yesterday* On the subject of his wardrobe I have only to remark; that

I would advise you to pack them up in a trunk,& send them to his other it

would be hard so to divide them as to please, t would be difficult to
Xt/
Judge who was his friends and to prevent any feeling on the subject, I

would advise sending his ward robe to his mother. There are here some

debts due him for mory loaned, which I will endevour to collect & remit to

his mother, one debt will be lost, the Debtor being insolvant but I hope

to be able to collect the Ballance which will close all his business here,
LQU..doV\ y..._
& take the negroes to ECounty Virginia.

HFow I sincerely regret the loss of many of my friends taere, and

particularly my friend Major Dinken. He was the life & soul of his Regt.

and in him the army has lost one of its most worthy members. I hopei our

friend Gary Nicholas is still safe. May he survive the dreadfll calaraity.

I am fearfullyour police was lax, & not sufficiently attended to,

or the rotten fish could not have been introduced; to whicu is ascribedthe

introduction of that fatal fever and I fear many fell vice to its

ravages after introduce ect SmtY for the want of proper

arrangements, for their comfort 0M accommodation. It appears no arrauje-

ments were adopted to prevent it spreading, nor no hospital prepared for

the reception of the sick. I hope before this reaches you, the city will

be restored to perfect health, and that you will profit from experience, &

have a more vigilant police another season. Pensacola is a healthy place

with a proper police, and the present catastrophy is no evidence to my mind

of the contrary. I have the prosperity of the Floridas much at heart,

and its late dreadfullvisibation has filled my heart with woe.

Should Mr. Davidson who attended my deceased friend Doctor


* A^LC^ot .A- EUU1








Sronsugh in -h lost moments & followed him alone to his grave, be with
A
you, present to him Mrs. J. & my profound respects. This act .to my dying friend.,

has endeared him to me, and has left on my mindA lasting impressions of

gratitude, never to be forgotten.

Present me although unacquiAnted, respectfully to your Lady

& mother, and accept for yourself Mrs. J. and my kindest salutations.

Present me to Mr Saml Overton, Call & Easter & to all friends,

and belive me to be very respectfully your$ friend.


Andrew Jackson


Col? George Walton




A,,CQIAW a.U"- V C,""Ot.A MAWti.. CaL( ALlSISC,

Capt Ri. K. Call
Pens a c o Ia oGS
Lis. of

ountpei.i.er June llth 1821
11ii oclock A..



Dear Call
This moment Dick has arrived with a note fr-om Doctor
Brunough -- and I am still more gratified to find that the
Governor of Pensacola is the sole com-missioner wJith whom we
have to act-- andJ his assurancesL, to you that the order for the
delivery of St Marks should be given you on the morning of
y-esterday is a sure pledged thIat no delay is intended -" and I
have no doubt, but that the Governor of East F'lorida is appointed
to be commissioner for the delivery of East Florida and that Don
Anadondo is merely the agent to carry the order as Don Alva was here.

I enclose for your. perusal my letter to Col. Forbes, which
I wish you to seal & d,-eliver to hinm -- from which you will find
that the Col. agency has ceased, as soon as he delivers the
archives to me, if he has brought them.

I send Dick back immediately and I give him the letters
which Capt )onelson was to hand you, as the Capt is sick
I am fearful he cannot travel as fast as I wish him, I will
leave here on Thursday Morning with the
troops -

Page 2

troops, and I am prepared to set out sooner if it should be
necessary, but for the want of waggons which are sent for I cannot
move the troops before Thirsday Morning It is important I
should get possession of Pensacola as early as possible as I
can not send Col. Gadsden to St Augustine before I do -- and I
hope the Governor of Pensacola will consent to the removal of
his troops to the B1,arranka remain himself if he chooses in the
Go-ernment House, keep his own guard or be furnished with one
by me until his troops are paid and -t unitss him to embark, which
I am convinced from his character he is disposed to do as early
as he he can both on account of the season as well as to free the
U States from that demurrage on the- Transports you will therefore,
if it should be come necessary fro you to s'eak to him on this
subject before I receive further advice from you, or his commumi-
cation to me, which, from his promise in his letter to me I await;
you can suggest to him with the assurance of my real wish for
all things to be done with the greatest cordiallity1 and my full_
confidence in his assurances and that of RThe -Minseroopamn .... 3


to our Government that no unnecessary delay shall take place
Should the Governor not write me I shall address him by Col.
Gadsden when I reach Mr Manuels, which I suppose will be on
Saturday next --
Present me to Doctor r.runough & I:rackenridge & communicate to
them the substance of my letter to Col. Forbes confidentially
In haste yr friend
"t ,pi- -hrdK t. Call I' Andrew Jackson










Un-sg.ned order in ,Andrew Jackson.' r hand a:r.essed L Capit. R. K. Call
at P1ensacola




Geni Jackson wi-th compiments to Capt Call acknowledges the receipt
Gen! jac son w-fronic c: ......
of h Iss le ter of this ,ays date covering two from his Excellency Gov
Cavalla -- and has to request the favor of Capt. Call, to say to
Judge Brackonridge o r. Rutledge to core to the Geni as early tomorrow
as possible, as(the Genl)cannrot reply muntill he has the (letters)
translated Ju-Lme 20th 1821 Jack(son)








Huntsville Octbk 29th 1821


D Col9

I reached this place on the evening of the 26th Instant all in good
health and the ladies in good spirits a few little accidents such as

the breaking harnesses which with the aid of blacksmith shops
wh saea- the could be had, and hen not to be had, ,t. aid dfg good ropes

got on very well one of my carriage horses proving restive, and

failing to draw, and my old trusty carriage borse being much fatigued,

made it necessary at Tuskaloosa, to exchange my restive horse which I

accomplished, giving fifty dollars to boot. This horse proved faith-

or a few days, when it appeared ha had the glanders. I have left

him calmly to die, with my blessings on the honest man, who let me have

him- nrd my prayers that he may derive much benefit from the -

fifty dollars I gave him.

Being informed that the southern mail would arive here on this

day, I awaited its arrival, in hopes to near from you, but no southern

mail came in, & the Floridian of the 8th has not reached here except
wkev-e
by us. I proceed on to Nashville on tomorrow, I hope to hear

from you The road we travelled was out of the way of news, I see

from the Eastern papers, that Callava had reached the city, where he

met with a cool reception and proceeded on to New-York to overtake

Geni Vives, who has left the city for Madrid. I have seen the farewell

address of the Spanish officers, should any of them attempt to return,

have them forthwith imprisoned, and retained there until further

advised.




e 't


I see it is announced in the Federal republican, that Fromentine

was the only Individual at Pensacola who disapproved of the imprison-

ment of Callava on which there is a very pertinent remark in the

National intelligencer from which I prewaume the Executive disapproves

his conduct in that case Should it be necessary that I should re-

turn, disagreable as it may be to Me, I will unite with you in twelve

days from the receipt of your advice. I therefore trust you will

keep me advised by every mail. o s soon as I reach Nashville i shall

I shall again address you. Present me respectfully to all my friends,

and accept assurance of y sincere regard.

Andrew Jacksom


Co0l Walton








Hermitage August 27th 1822
Dr Bronaugh

I had the pleasure on last evening to receive your letter of

the 22nd ult.

It affords me great pleasure to be informed of your flattering

prospects of success on your election, I need not say what I am sure you

believe, the great anxiety I have that you should succeed. My mortifica-

tion is great to hear that my friends ( and what I always supposed yours)

Capta Gall and Bater should be luke warm on this subject. The letters I

have reed. from Capt Easter, induced me to believe he was your active

friend, and in all Capt Calls, he mentions you with friendship, from which

I did suppose that amonghst all our friends they would be union &

active union, on this subject.

I have reed Judge Brapkenridges letter, & sincerely regret

that there should exist any heart burnings between him, Call & Easter.
You know my good opinion of, pnd friendship for them all I have no

doubt from the Judges exLanation, but the whole has M originated

from a mistake otf the part of Capt Call & Easterand that when cool reflection

assumes its empire ( ?] they both will be satisfied with the Judges giving

the Clerkship to Col9 Miller. I am much pleased that Cole Walton S &

Shannon, are your active friends I knew Co19 Miller too well ever t6

doubt of him, he, you will find, is a man of sterling worth and under

all circumstances to be relied $on. I was a as I formerly named to

you of the duplicity of Col Barnett. Call and Capt Easter both know my

opinion of him, and every person who Azd% wishes for the prosperity

of Florida, & that Pensacola should bb L-te- 1?J ought to unite in

your uuppo as they must be convinced if they do not.4wA Barnett cannot,









& I hope will not be elected. It will be a candidate from the east, un-

less there is perfect union in the west in your support. If the soldiary

should be admitted to vote you are safes /he army will stick by you.

They certainly will not prove Traitors to their own selves --and altho

Col. Brooke may have some hostility toward you, he will be silent, and go

with the arf. Under existing circumstances, it would be impolitic &

unjust to make a property qualification. Residence alone, in justice to

all, should be required. This is the only republican rule that can be

established, until your land titles are adjudicated, and your vacant and

unapropriated land brought into market 4 and you come into the union as

a state. Then in your constitution you can adopt such qualifications as

you may think proper for the happiness, security, & prosperity of the state.

Until then all freemen of six months residence should be entitled to a

vote. All freemen residents will be bound by your laws, & subject to

punishment under them-- and of right, ought to be entitled to a voice in

making them.

I was much gratified on seeing you unanimously chosen president

of the council. So soon as your government is organized, and your laws

authorising the election of a delegate are passed I will be happy to see

the law, and to know the qualifications necessary to entitle an individual

to vote o o soon as I see this I can form a correct idea of your probable

success.
Doctor McCall is not off from Nashville yet. He will set out

in a day or two.

You will see from the Nashville papers the current news of our

country.

Mrs J. joins me in good wishes for your health & happiness,

and believe me sincerely your friend


Andrew Jackson










P.S. Present me to Mr. Overton, Col Miller, Walton and Shannon, & say to

Mr. Conner, I feel happy to see him noticed by the council. I think him

a excellent young man.


P.S. Since closing mny letter I have reed one from Lt Donelson in

which he remarks that Mr Rutledge in a postscript of a letter by him just

redS. mentions, that you had advised Mr. Rutledge that the sum od $240 had

been allowed him, and if he had not drawn that sum, that it must be in his

Lt Donelsons hands, & writes me for a copy of the account as rendered by me

to the Sec of State. I have sent it to him. I have allwaya been under the

impression, that this sum was paid Mr. Rutledge at Pensacola and his duplicate

receipts taken. If this is not the case I will regret it very much for on

the 24th of August 1821 I find his recpt and Judge Bratkenridges on file for

their services as interpreters and translators and as soon as Lt Donelson

arrived from orleanswith the funds, I requested you to pay these two gentle-

men and Capt Call, which you did as I believe5 I will recollect of your

naming to me that it was with great difficulty you could prevail upon Mr.

Kutledge to receive it and finding his receipt on file with Judge Bra ko-
&
enridgeo xu Capt Calls and all others I had no idea but that it was paid to

him as well as to the others when his reept was taken. If not I will like to

be advised how it has happened, that it was not paid to him when his recpt

was given that I may have the amount paid to him. Have the goodness to write

to me on the recpt of this letter. Yours A.J.








Hermitage near Nashville

Novkr 13th 1821 10 ocakck P.M.

DP Co19

This moment the anxiously waited for communication reached me, and

as the mail leaves Nashville tomorrow early I have but a moment to reply.

I am happy to find that peace order 4 tranquility raigns in Pensacola

and Florida. I knew so soon as the Spanish officers were taught to know

that respect due to the American Govt, peace and tranquility would pre*

vail; as it now does. I am just advised that Callava meeting with a

very cool climate to the Eastward, has returned to Charleston South

Carolina. This being not warm enough for his ill health he has sailed

for Cuba. Should heA Pensacola I trust whilst he stays (should h e
A Y
stay beyond your notice to departkj)J that you will have him for his

contemptuous conduct safely kept in the calaboos. I am gratified to

find from the letter of Mr. Monroe that my conduct as far as considered

is approved. This letter altho official is of a nature not to be copied

in your official record, altho you were right to preserve a copy least

the original on its passage might have been lost. The whole package

came to ueypt, and much abused, laut all legible; it is what I expected

to hear, that those Spanish officers would not be received in orleans

with much approbation *"- particularly as Gellmar one of them

pL (etet W the British arwhexjthey invaded the country and made the

advance on Neworleans, and I suppose from from that time to the present

he has not wissited Neworleans. I do suppose Judge Fromentine with all

his Jesuistical cunning begins to think that it would have been better
for
at his to have aided me in the administration of the government








agreable to his instructions than acting the fool for 40 Spanish
&
perfidy, and then, stating a wicked t willfl falshood, to relieve

him from his humbled situation that his rashness, ignorance & folly

had played him, however when those things are published to the world

he will U md that his secbetely circulating mutilated statement of the

facts will be unfolded to the world and his baseness in this exposed.

Please present me to my friend ap Call. Say to aim I have reed his

letters and will answer them as early as possible. I wrote him from

Judge Overton's on the 5th Instant which I hope will reach him by

due course of mal.
I have only time to add, that we arrived home on the evening of

the 5th the ladies in good health, and all the Gentlemrsn & s ervants

except Mrs. J. maid taken on the Journey & who is still ill. The

Ladies & Gentlemen join me in a tender of our respects and regard to

you, with a request that we be presented ta by you respectfully to

all our friends in Pensacola, /i due time you shall hear from me

again, ,i the mean time accept the assurance of my esteem & regard

& bel&&ve me to be yr n obt servt

Andrew Jackson



Col 0. Walton

Sec of West Florida

P S. I have the pleasure to say to you o friend Capt Easter is now
i~e
with me and requests to be affectionatly presented to you. He has

perfectly recovered his hefth. Col Butler is with me, desires to be

remember to you kindly ( and thanks you for not presenting to him your

respects in your letter) the latter part of his complement he means in










jest. A.J.


SWhat follows is in a different hand



The nil having retired to bed and left m his letter to copy I slip

in a how-d'y-do my old friends, I would be happy to hear from you.

GLad to find you identified with our old chief. I shall see you

early in Feby and hope ere then Mrs Walton will have joined you.

love to Call & Dinkins Jj?J and for yourself a long life and merry

one. Farewell.


Easter

Col. Waton
A









Hermitage October 28th 1823
my Dear co3

Your letter of 24th ult. is before me, and I take great pleasure
in acknowledging its receipt. Your remarks respecting the succession to

Mr. Duval had been anticipated and were sometime since substantially present-

ed to Mr. Monroe, with such considerations as were in my power in favor of your

claims. No doubt much sinister manoevure has been used; but opposed to the

evidences of integrity & talent furnished by your past services, I trust that

the President will not give the victory to inferior pretensions.

The favorable location of the Indians was necessary to the

establishment of Harmony between the two sections of your Territory. If this

be secured, the channels to improved government, agriculture & commerce are

unobstructed, and Floridas flourishing & powerful, will yet prove how

necessary she was to the best interests of the Union, especially to its

military protection.

You are aware of my appoititment to the Senate of thbe US by the

legislature of this state a measure adapted without mapprobation. I

accepted the appointment, because of the general obligation which binds

every citizen to the service of his country. For certainly, he who enjoys

the blessings of our free and happy institutions should not shrink from

the responsibilities of such service; when the citizens of other forms,
aristocratic & even despotic, recognize the principle accounting it the

sacred tie between the government & the governed. The only question with me,

after my name had been put in nomination, was, whether from my age & the

impaired state of my health, there were not others better qualified for the

station. These considerations however, not prevailing with the Legislature,
I am elected, and I comni$ myself to the same Providence that has directed










my past destinies.

I should write you more in detail, but that I am much hastened

with business, intending to leave this for Washington on the 10th proximo.

Mrs. Jackson unites with me in bes t wished to your aged mother & to Mrs.

Walton. We also beg to bG presented to Mr Overton.


yr. sincere friend

Andrew Jackson

Col George Walton




ody of the letter not in Jackson's hand, although the signature ishis






j ^r^yfzre^ /,





We insert readily the following nots-.c ;
respecting the affair of the Spanish Corn. .
missioner at Pensacola, They come iroin -
a highly respectable source,. At the sam' ..
time we would observe, that we can nei..
thier express nor form any positive opiniori
on the subject, until the facts alleged o :
the. side of Col. Callaba are proved by evi-
dence, and the explanations are received, "
which general Jackson may be able and. ''.
disposed to give. We are informed that "
the narrative which has been printed in '
the name of Colonel Callaba, is not a rA-.. .__
gular document, nor, exactly that which
he proposed to lay before the public. '
CaCe ofCol, Calaba. ..
.Col. Callaba is accused in the -Louisiana.
4dverti8er of having stolen certain docu-.
ments and papers from the Alcalde's of'..
fice. This charge is unfounded. It appears
Sby ,the summary proceedings of the court .. ,
that-, he was only charged with having .'
withheld the papers referred to, (which,
according to their opinion, ought to have
been delivered with the province) and 0, '"
beln' connected with individuals charged "
with being about to secrete such papers t'
carry them out of the country. Indeed, ',
the papers mentioned could not have been.
purloined or stolen from the alcalde's, be...
cause they never were delivered to, him ; ,, -
nor to any other person acting for tho "
United States, by th'e" Snanish commi,___
sioner, Callaba, as tlihey did not fall under :e -
the denomination of those' which, accord.'' "
ing to the terms of the treaty, ought t0*',
remain in the province. The fact is, that:-.
they belong to them..,ilitary archives, 'andl
consequently ought to follow the troops: .
sent to the Havana. They were actually,
put by Callaba under the care of tihe clerk"
of said archives, DomingoSousa, t6 have'
them packed 'up, and sent there at thei
proper time, when they were; demanded ,-
of him (Sousa) by three unknown persons.,
who called themselves commissioners, '.
from General Jackson. Sousa never in.-
tended to cdnceal the papers, for he al-
lowed the supposed 'commissioners to exc." "
amine them 'without reserve, and told;
them they might ask any they chose, of,.
Col. Callaba, who was their owner. ,
By the new Spanish Constitution th
Governor and Captains General are en-
tirely bereft of all ordinary judicial pow-
er.. By the Constitution of the United
States,'is not the judiciary independent ,
also of the.Governor's power'in the terri-....


tory?. .If so, General Jackson's proceed.. '
ings at Pensacol are unlawful, both by'-. '-'
the Spanish and the Federal Constitu-
tion. <,, : :; ,
However this may be, General Jackson"
haol no right to lay hands on the Spanis t"
Commissioner; and take possession of said
papers by main force which were sacred
by the law of Nations. They were never :" "
demanded 9f ,him officially. Callaba was:. '
still ignorant of the cause of his arrest,
when taken before General Jackson. ,
General Jackson corresponded with.
Colonel Callaba, as Commnissioner for the
Spanish Government, Many days after the
delivery of the Province had taken place; '
and'he only ceased to recognize him as: '
such, when he' thought proper to send -,
him to jail. .
SIn fact Col 'Callaba had notterminated, ,
his functions, as difficulties occurred as t'.
the delivery of the artillery. Both CornM- .
missioners, (Callaba and Jackson) had
agreed to suspend the delivery of it, until l
their respective Governments should de-.
cide finfially, whether it were to remain, or
be removed and sent to tihe Spanish do- '
minions. Col.'Callaba was therefore in
the Province waiting this decibiun, as .
Commissioner ).and according to the agrec- -'
ment he had made with General Jackson ." i
him self. / ,'







.N A .A N


AND


,~-


- I .'.
,- -
'.


:. ^


PRINCIPLES 'Af) MEN"


PHILADELPHIA, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31. 1821.


'. -- .

...; -"*' ,,o

. O.'165.
4 ,


S PRINTED AND PUBLISHED consequence ofrefusal on his part -'nu. Ec. and endi)?ig, "he /aid s,-e attenzon to evident to every man of comic
tIN merated, but in which refusal he still myreresentation."..-, His duties as commissioner c
V ENSDAYS AND SATURDAYS persisted-and we were about taking The reader may j'id, .what reliance the deliveryof the country:
BY IVILLIfAM FRY, t our leave to prepare for the final execu- s to be placed upon this p-mpousmani- that some minor points conn
N6. 63, SOUTH FIFTH STREET, tion ofyour order, when Col Callava festo, when e isinlomcd tlat no cnver- them hadbeen previously refer
r*. PH ILADELP-I A. __ desired that if we would furnish him station whatever, took place between Col. decision of the respective go
S with a copy oftlie memorandum setting Butler and myself,, with Cl. Cllva, buttheStyofcolCallavain t
wit C .- C ,l V a,at utt e s y ofc L C l v i U
From the Flordidn of September 29. forth the documents required, he'would the house of Col. Brooke, on that dlay) or at wa^ never known or even con
S: ...have sein a-publication in the New deliver them to us, to which we'assen- any other tiiihe! Col. Butler and nyself, governor Jackson to have beg
SOrleans pers signed CALLAVA," 'r- ted.' The Alcalde H. M. Brackenridge, in the execution of our comnMissin, ac- public purpose--uch a thing
porting to be a statement of facts in rela- accordingly waited on him with a copy companies by the alcalde antout five 'clock intimated either ver:::i0ly or in
..tion to the occurrences here, on the 22d of the memorandum' herewith accompa- in the evening, proceeded to the house was even supposed until the
of August which he attests to be true nied, and informed him that he would of Col. Callava, which is -ituatedi a, short delivered up the country, tha
S in every respect, under the oath which he call in two hours for the reception of distance from that of CI. Broke. On embark with the Spanish trie'
Stakes upon his honour, as solemnly as the the :document as promised.-We prbo- enquiryat his gate, we were informed most sincerely to be regretted
awe requires consenting o answer with ceecdedat the appointed time, and found that he was dining with tl. gentlema' just not, as his presence has had
-a requires, consening to answer with -.
hi,= head, for'the truth of. aid statement." the gate and front part- of the house mentioned. From unwivilngiieis to e.e- tendency to prevent that depe
clesedea, orth -theb oofw~v Etaide stye s-eov ctile IJ~ Ton I N~ ct atc~ai n-ad:tahin to tlL1;vc
S. This publication I fecl myself, from ca sed,-theformqr-%we ope-edby remoV-'e'.o Our coanmt--alorcti y.p-,lino n rtchmento tlt t -ovcrnn
sense of truth and justice, contained to ing a bar, and on reaching the latter, a ment, we continued to the street for United States by th Spanish
enseotru h an t s te o oostaind d considerable stir. seemed to be making in about half an hour; supp.inng that by this which was so much to be desire
: pronounce a tissue of falsehoods and dis- .% Yt
Stortion of acts fom the commencement t h se; we knocked several times with- time the company mit vc separated, be contended that although c
tortion of' facts from' the' commencement zue;wknc
to the end.-But, for the palpable untruth out receiving anyanswer, when admittance and feeling some dissaus:-ction with our- ad no right to diplomatic pri
of that part of Col. Callava's statement was demanded in the name of the Gover- elves for having suffered any circus' that he was entitled to a certa
which .relates to my personal agency in nor in three instances, still without reply, stance to interfere whh he discharge of from the olfcial character wit
the affair, I should not have appeared be- The guard was then ordered to advance the important duties a.Q;sined us, more had heretofore been clothed. B
bre the public, and now do so with ex- and form in front of the house, and part especially as the govervo. was sitting in lava ought to have been aware
treme reluctance The following i the detached to the rear, when it was disco- his judicial capacity anId cxpqtig our long before forfeited all clai
I comesnucnce Thc folli Buthe vered that. the back door was open, and report-we returned to tne house of Col. this courtesy. His conduct in
S commission under which Col. Butler* aiid
myself acted, on that occasion.and our of- several Spanish officers with Mr. Innera- Callava, and were infor.cd thathe had the points referred t the res
icialreot thereon.-. rity, who is one of your cabildo, were on not yet come home. It w.L ticn conciud- vernments) had rendered it ni
I' It being made known to Tmeby ihe the porch. We enquired for Col. Callava, ed to request the alcalie to go to Cbl. the governortothus addresshi
cofsso fD ioSsto which we were answered they did not Brooke's and inform Col. CIlava' tliat we these things shall be made kr
confession of Domingo Sousa) that the a
pc names d in thef peitinon Sof Hetnrh p. know where he was-lights were procur- wished to see himni at ii, house on bust- government and to yours, I
Sp-er-s named in the petition of Henry 1\M. .. ...1..
-Brackenridge, Alcalde for the city of Pen- ed, and the rooms searched, when Colo- ness of importance. Thi he accordingly what confidence can be place
sacola, and which were demar .4 under nel Callava was found in his bed divested did, while we wal words the gate xcellency, whatin out secret
m orders as the property of ii of his coat. Demand was then made of which is about I fAcis from the questing ime on ccont o
my orders alsithe property of ..reindi-
viduals, by Col. GeorgeWalton, Secretary the documents agreeably to his promise, house, and remained ihre until theal giving a pledge that the rec
f-or e'%st. Fluriidi, Col. J. Miller, Clerk of and to our astonishment they were still re- calde returnedi which was-.not more bgivenin manner satisa
atemt de on. hore bek t gvn!amne stsa
the County Court of Escambia, and Henry fused, and seveial attempts made onhis thai^^tpn that and afterwards, regardless of
the County Court of Fscambia, and Henryrwano
d Brackenride, alcalde for the city of Pen- part to show that he was not amenable to h C o coin- and ofvour express a.recmer
ratug to gve it. He vas
sacola were, after said demand in pursu- the Governor vin the eacuins of the pe..ci -h o
once of my orders as aforesaid was made, the Governor was in the execution of they o n. steet o.:t..pajers of his formed ', thatt hisU wilful- hr"
groapperu dnad to tem cthe pao er- as they onw of na. agree nt entered into, rende
ia: the said thDomings da to sthe ho use of the ined to he rights and.property of tions-and .ieclaredthate was not amen- void the receipt given for th
at re h Governor Don Jose Callava and eli individuals resident in Pensacola, and |l, ;i. ivt idi.i, l. After a thd onebeing the considerate
ter Governor Don Jos c aents and daeli- that formal complaint had been made that short consultation, Me ^ 'vbce- touv'rds the other was founded." The
veined (the said documents an'd piape they w-l wre imrprentdtoteg
into the psaia ocumeis P^ they were improperly withheld, and .that the house, and about hilf way met Col. ces werereportedto the -
t, ,e i.overnor knew no distinction between Catla dseet sansoffie in the United States, and Col."
Fullarat. ~~~. -
CooRul brlat" ; l '"-CICallava and any other man under his full humaiorfmithhthcit',iieaimrs, some formed that no further cor
Colonel Robert" B t!1er-ofW' Fri. ". 1,- e
the Uited States and Doctor C. Bro- government---we then proposed that Col. Spanis ..entlemeaf "-ho appSc^ would be held with him. JC
naugh, accompanied by Henry M. Brack- Callava would deliver the papers, and he to be retiring from the dinner party.' e this, he thought proper to r
enridge, Esq. accompanied byfor the nryCity of should have.our receipt for them, which followed Col. Callava almost immediately he certainlyhad no right to c
ensaca, will wait pool Don was also refused: we then again demand- to his own house, where we found him in he would be viewed in ad
Pnsacoala, will wait upon ole DuonlJaos ed them, reiterating our sententients that the porch surroundedby those gentlemen, from any other individual.
C allava dnand s steward named foulilarat, his refusal would be viewed as an open Col. Butler,who had no previous acquaint-there is no truth in his ass
and denatd from them the following pa- actof mutiny to the civil authority exer- ance, was introduced, .. after some ge- his stay, that of his secretary
pers this day delivered t the said ulla- isedin the Floridas, and that he must neral conversato,) the' iect of our officers, depended upon the d
ratbat tlhe houe oftbU- s-id Co^aU. a ova expect the consequences; he per-isted to commission wvas ftiuly explained to him, of the points referred' to ou
-, ..by he re fsme .... etd the^a .... o w rd through th oMe .ia zp^snce-orhi r ovctrm Int'' As a private i
say:-i-irst, the documents and paperuse,*adteuau" t fe:rrdUog i. ~ ~vnnn3"Asipive
ratin th e e f N s pars was ordered. to take him and Fulla- interpreter, his secretary and Mr. Innera- ly could he be known, and vie
relating to e th e e t oNicoas Maria t his steward into-custody, and bring rity, all of whom were well acquainted such it would have.been ccns
Vida,.-Second, then ocumenta s i the them before your excellency, which with .the Spanish amd English languages: governor to have made any di
S" Eugene Sierra.-.-.Third, the documents is now done.- We would add in con- and who occasionally assisted in the in- teen him and Domingo Sou
and papers in the case of Manuel Bonfay clusion, that Colonel Callava repeated- terpretation. A demand was then made of rat, the steward. Had the <
and Carlos de Ville.-Fourth, documents ly asserted that he would not be taken out the documents as sdt forihin our report, versed, and the papers dem
andpalerios on ther ocug~ aentof his house alive, but he seemed to act The utmost temperance and delicacy was instance of Col. Callava, fro

of rai TomaV wiffiut nmcbrdifflculty when the guard observed on our par too-adrds.Col. Cahv, scurte individual, justice wou
SPeter Gouilerainsd Toas Uar j .was.order.d.tp prime and load-A corpo- but on his part greatgvseheence of ge. 'sniedits course, and not a wvhi
all which documeii~its and. naners! art 'e ..... ... .. . .,;. -- ..., .. -,. ..


. know edgede to be the property of indivi- ratano uree were letacle to remain ana ture, ana apparently arri as we nave rnce pldint would! have been heard
duals, and. appertaining ,to their rights, guard the house of Col. Callavaandto pre- understood) more viGler;ce of exprcsion burden of his complaint appe
S. and which are securedto them by and vent the removal of the boxes which ..had than was interpreted to us. 'lThec coi vcr- disrespect shewn to one of
y t 2 Ie contained the documents, and which Mr. station occupied-at least an hour-every rik; he does noteven pret
S under the 2d article of the .. treaty with Brackenridge recognisedin his bed room. circumstance in rclatic,:I to the docu- any right to withhold the pap
Spain, concluded at the city of Washing-From the relation in which Mr.Innera- ments, was repeatedly s'ted to him. The they were asked with the
ton onthe 22d day of February, 1819, and
ratified On the corresponding day of 1821, rity stands in this business .together with first part of our comn:i.tion, containing modo, which he thought hi,
ranthd mus rhea forrtesprotecinga of th2 e interest taken on the-side of Col. Cal- a list of the documents, &c. was read and to; but this is a kind of ethi
and must remain tor telava, and at the same, time exercising the explained to him by the alcalde. The con- the people of the United Stai
rights and property of the said individu- functi of one o the Cabildo of this city, duct of Sousa in delivering them at Col. little respect. "The great
s, and no oicer of Spaican rg ly w em it an indispensable duty to re- Callava's house, af d formal demand can generally protect themFse
t-k- thelu away, o~r keep' them from the edta o
office of the duly appointed. Alealde for commend that your Ecellency will fill his by the authority ofi the governor, Was humble,and the poor, who re
-the city of Pensacola. It is further order- place in the Council with.a character who represented to him, and it appearing fenceand shelter of the law.
edthat if the said late.Governor Don will manifest a proper respect for the dig- from the declaration of Sousa, that ,That col. Callava should
Jose Callava or his steward Fullarat when nity of the laws andyou their executive. they were then in the house-we again was "unacquainted with th
......~ decrpto of forma paprst
We have the honor to be,&c. &c. &c. in consequence made a formal demand description of the papers, t
Sthe above described papers are demanded .. ROBERT BUTLER: He then declared tha Sousa in this which was thus demanded,
of them, should, fail or refuse to deliver Co. '4mYbsneswsntln u i
othe same, shouldatthe sai Don Joefuse Calto deliver ,: Col. U S. Army business was nothing but his ser- disregard of decency and tru
Sand his steward Fullarat be orthwithCallava : J.C. BRONAUGH. vant-.expressed his approbation: of his a piece with the rest of his
and his steward Fullarat be forthwith To his Excellency, -. h conduct---that he xwas acting -under his He had the fullest information
brought beone meaty office, then and ANDREW JACKSON, orders and that he himself was responsi- cie papers from Sousa the
there- to answer such interrogatories as I.1., A'-Ibnte MU1,up
there ptto t answer such interrogatories as .. ?Governor ofthe Floridas. ble. He insisted muchl upon, certain and on the twenty-second, in
may be put to them,-of, and concerning e e. .S
the premises; and to abide by and perform Agtrue copy from the original on file in rights which Ie ontendeaid he hadas come qo capt.Dade, the particul
such order and decree touching the said mny offiCe. GEO. WALTON,' rniissioner; at one time hesaid heheld the quired, wer- again made knc
documents and papers, secured to them a oi -crtaryof orida. papers as late governor, that he could I now proceed to anothei
as aforesaid, as the justice of the case "c Wh n-crt ^^ ot holdnthem as an individual; as if the Callava's narration which,
as a Memorandum of the Documents which mere possession of public documents deserves ho mooe credit, an
may demand. : have this day been demanded of Col. Jose conferred upon him diplomatic privi-, to no- more respect, than t
.: ...nfesred ':Utpon t
Given under my hand at Pensacola, Callava, agreeably to the order of his ex- leges. Hesaid ifthey were demanded of (The fiart of col. Callava's s
this 22d day of August, 1821. cellency, major gen. 'Andrew Jackson, him in writing by governor Jackson,-ei- commented on, is to be found
(Signed) ANDREW JACKSON, Gov. of the Floridas, and which on the de- other as commission or late governor, ensuing the part above quoted
.:.' : Governor of the Floridae,9 t.c. ''c. mand ofcol. Robert Butler, and J.C. Bro- he would reply. -' withthe words feedingg m
"To Colonel Robert Butler of the army naugh, accompanied byH. M. Bracken- Finding all efforts to induce a surrender attacked," and endingvith th
Sand Doctor J. C. Bronaugh in company ridge, ccl. Callava promised to deliver to of the papers, in vain, we requested the With his excuse for
with Upory W. Brackenridge,.t col. Butler, if theyshould be found in the alcalde to read the latter part of our corn- Brooke's I have nothing to
.and.*. -. delivered to him by'. s missionrequiring us, in case o his refu-. than to sa that he appeared
A ...t .....I. T':.1 rihe papers relating to the ese e of sal t'surrender the papers, to bring him health, as'h walked with g
.. sK Maria Tidal., -. -^ te g r Qr.. rej-^.wl^ a infox-med that
N...... ." 5 ..... ...1%. 2'a.. ..
-~ ~Y;~ ~ ~ Pocee~~dtngslflthe W manner in Whichqwe-1it pr .-! L.td.t o use or bed b(
.....: ..... '- lie, & Eugene Sierra. 'td4: ,- ..' out a
.... .' Proceedings in the e Will it not be naturallyakdi-what- bride' post haste to the city
,, : ..v" PENSACOLA, Aug. 22, 1821. Bonfay, & Carlos de Ville. confidence can be given to col. Callava's ton, is conclusive that the
SSIR-Pursuant to your official order, Documents in the case of Peter account of any conversation oroccurrence, health vas not suchas h
Giks Tomas Villaseca.. ; >. accou: whnt .w idhm iyof any 'his
bearing this date, we proceeded -to the %vonsV eai a The letter which he' -spea
house of Col. Callava, who was absent: The whole of the above papers having mistatement as that before dinner was written to the governor m
'':,,house of C ol. C allava, w ho was -abse nt writte 0h papernors,
but on again returning to his house relation to the rights of property in West over three gentlemen called at colonel penned ,some time after
shortly after, we found himaccompa- Florida, and in which private individuals Brooke'shouse, and stated that they were which shews, at least, ina
S, nied by a number of Spanish officers, are interested .' instructed to require the immediate de- relation of facts. There
.' clothed with their side arms, and Mr. H. M. BRACKENRIDGE, Alcalde. inveryuofthe papers, because the governor mere iona rascy i his
clte I- -it i thi lie'o -sid paper-anecause thel' goero mer -facrc f Ihis-
SJohn Innc'rarity on the porch. The de- nsacola, Aug. 22d 1821. T had no need to use towards me, any other "at 7 o'clock, P. M. the s
andwas formally made of the docu- te copy, from the original on file in aynorto shew me any more regard than sionerscalled at my house,
ments enumerated in 'your md order, d my Office. .' he would with respect 1o any other individ- ed me either to deliver up t
percmtorily refused; i hen ohe was in- AO..VALTON,-Sec. WV. Florida. ua" The fairness nd candor of this private individuor to folio
'peremtorily refused; .when he was in- -Tefares..,(I-o
formed that his refusal would be con- I w ill proceed to call the publicatten- mode of expression, and the word because governor's office." It as
s7 idered as setting at defiance the autho- tion to those passages in cel. Callava's may be readily estimated. He proceeds, that the alcalde called upon
S rity exercised by you as governor of the statement, which refer to occurrences through the greater partof the extract, to vcred the memorandum oft
Floridas in the execution of the laws: where I was personally' concerned, give a speech, which ht professes to have accompanying our eport,.7
and they were again demanded and the [The .art coruentcd u/ion is to be fowud recited to us on that occasion, on the na- formation that \e should cal
-:. -in second paragraph l23Sd line, commenc- ture of his rights and privileges as corn- to receive them agreeably tc
-1 Col. B. is at his farm in Tennessee, ing c-ilh the words tbut before the dinner," missioncr, the absurdity of which must be His excuse that tl'is nrurmn


-
mon sense documents was not translated is idle and
eased with ridiculous, as it containedtliut few lines of
It is true, English, with the Spanish names of per-
ected with sons interested in the papers, and could
rred to the lot have required more than two or three
vernmuents. minutes to translate. We returned about
his couLntry nine o'clock,- and from every appearance,
jectured by were perfectly satisfied that Col. Calla-
en for any va and his friei'ds expected us. No en-
was never closure. were torn down, as he states.
writing I hie guard was stationed at a distance
'cry dety he fromthe house, in the street, until ad-
t he would rnittancethad been three times refused.
:s, and it is A bustle, and what appeared to be a rat-
that he did tling of swords and fire arms, was heard
an evident in the house. The guard was then ordered
.1ndence on, up. When we got round to the other side
nent ot the of the house,atlwas q iet, and there wa ., ....
inhabitants, no light except a candle burning in one of
ed. It may the rooms.- We then' ascended a high
ol Callava flight of steps to the porch, while the
vilepes, yet guard remained at ordered arms below.
in courtesy After remaining some time, and making
.h which he frequent fruitless enquiries for Col. Cal-
ut col, Culi lava, whom we at first supposed had fled,
that he had we entered the hall. Upon entering the
m even to room where the candle wias burning, we
relation to found Col. Callava, but not as he states,
pective go sitting upon his bed.". He rose instantly,
ecessary for and advanced to the middle of the room)
min-" when with an expression oflgreat astonishment, -
aown to my which was evidently assumed. In fact a va-
must ask riety of circumstances had evidently been-
;ed in your studied and prepared on the occasion, for
tary, for re the-sake of dramatic effect. The means
your health, that were taken to procure the papers are
"eipt should detailed in -our report. 1.assert that it is
ctory to me, utterly False, tha tw4'-,-sadidto. ,Cp
that pledge Callava by us, '1'1. .an :gB
aesme~t~
it, positively Qo papers 6Ae i N.
likewise in- should be forcity .taker.t-&riS.a.It
each of the was distilictly stated. to him, thii if bhe
red null and would open the boxes, which weIrc then
e ordinance, in view, and had recently been coIercd
on on which with seals, we would select the papers,
; circumstan- and hlie might consider them as forcibly
yernment of taken from him, and a t'eceipt should be:,
"a'.tv .-'i.n givof:.fo^th' m,,. .I twasimpossible tliht: '.
r-ospoid4ence ,under flie circum-itance5-greatcr delicacy-,,
iiid aitf, aferi and.forbearance. could baye been obser'.. '
remain here, ed towards him. More than an hour had'
-onsider that elapsed, before the officer of the guard,
iffereRt light every effort to obtain .the papers froni m
I repeat, that him having been exhausted, was called
wrtion, "that upo to do 'his 'duty ,..
y, and of his .I have thus far confined ,myself in
etermtinatiori great measure :to the refutation of those
I' respeutie Ixirts oC. col. CalLiva'. s-tatcrp.i.ci in which
individual on- I an- pzrser.c7iy oacetr1-J. I ps r--
:wing him as self on some futui- occasion to shew that
unable in the the remainder of this extraordinary publi-
istinction be cation is--equally, at variance with truth
isa, or Fulla- and candor. And when a full exposition o
;ase been re- the whole affair shall be made, foundd
anded atthe upon evidence the most unquestionable
m some ob- it will then be seen with uhat propriet
Id havepui col. Calluva appeals to the sympathy an|
sper of corn- justice of the .public, and whether he ha


. the whole not )een: guilty ot a lamentable' rashnes
.ars to bc. he in staking hIis head upon the truth of hi
his elcvjtcl statement. It is true he exposes himself t
end to assert no real danger in making such pleg -
cis, provided however sounding and theatrical; buttrin
suaviter in dignity and conscious honorcall-forr
self entitled such extravagant asseverations. -
cs for which J.C. BRONAUGIL
les have very The foregoing, having been submit,
ind powerful t9 me by Dr. Bronaugh,j do hereby cert
Lives; it is the fy that the facts ,and. the circumstance
squire the' de therein related .-by himt:as. well hiisio
" i report with col. Butler, are strictly tj
state that he and, correct, having had a personal
e nature and quaintance with the whole transactions.
ie delivery of I H.M. BRACKENRIDGE,!
I" displays-a :. lcalde of Pensaco
th entirely of I certify that no conversation took pla
i publication, between col. Butter and Dr. Bronaui
)n of the spe- with col. Callava, at my house on the 2
' day before, of August, and that neither col. Butler
the presence Dr. Bronaugh were in my house on tl
ar. papers re- day." I
wn to him. GEO. M. BROOKE."
r_'part of 6ol. Pensacola, Sept. 28, 1821,
I will shew, '
d is etititled Td the Editors of the Floridian. '
ie foregoing. Having promised to -give in the la
tatemnent here number, a statement of facts relative
d inmmnzediatel' the arrest and imprisonment of'our wol
t, commencing thy and respected chief, col. Don Jos
ysetyf strontgly Callava, in order to correct a few mistat
it'1aragra/ih.) ments in a report inserted in the Louisian,
leaving Col Advertiser, of 28th of Aug. under the si'
offer, further nature of H. B.--we have been since ii
Sin ordinary formed that it is your intention to insert'
reat rapidity, the protest at length of the colonel again
he was con the proceedings, and shall there-ore onli
before or since; take notice of a few mistatements of thi
7s afterwards, said writer, as they particularly affect ouo,
of WVashing- selves, and in vindication of our horor d
State of his well as.that of our chief, which we thini
e represents, has been rather slightingly attacked.
ks of having The writer tells us that hlie is going td
ist have been relate an affair which will probably minakq
,ur departure, some noise, and more probably will b
curacy in his misrepresented he then goes on-1 al
is miorc 'than though I am not exactly acquainted wit
stating that all the facts, I think I can give as faithful
ame commis- an account of them as any other person, at
and summnon- this moment." He is not mistaken in bis
he papers as a first remark; but the public will doubt of
g eprsened the facts truly
WV them to the his having represened the cts truly
at that hour, since he confesses that hlie is not exactly,:
him and deli- acquainted with them.
he documents Further onwards, H. B. says, that a
ith positive in- message having been sent to Callava, de-
11 in two hours mending the papers, he prom iscd
) his promise- search for them and send forr hz
-andm of theJ',,d. Here the wrtter forget
'on ... .' ... .. ... -!?


. .' .ss .co...ditk, ti.at t l,
. . n.. .; u


n.ni2i com.--.;iss.ry and CX-o*vFCrnr of this
provi;cc. Itis true, he Says, that after
ty/o hours had cpelpeLd, the demand w's
reiterated, and (hen Col Callava refused
to deliver the papers, unless they were
asked for in the manner above stutcd. But
this is a very capital misstatement, inas-
much as it attribuites*to our chief an un-
vortIhy di' ,osition, to 'aiii ti-ne, which
Was .utterly foreign to Ils character.
We are ncxt told, that thc, ex-.governor.
Cala, at Pine o'cic-k, at ni.h't,'was :,-r-
rounded by several Spa.'ish oiucers in full
,mnifor)nr, with thcir swoivrd at their side.
And -we are, given to unl'', tand,, that theu
onjcer corninaidinm th g-uard which c'ime
to take Col Cmikava pviOsner, lIeinv alarma.
ed at this sight, 'd. ierh.:l his mcen to
pimie and load thcir':muh-skets; (hat this
operation changed Cj'Itiva's resolution,
an1: that he, as well as l1rs`6bt1ce:rs, ungird-
ed their, swords, an-d -11 itly suIhmiteid."
icrc it is necessary 1t, : tl.3 levity
with which a qIasi anonymous writer Caisms
a sdgima upon a body of nen ort........
4.nd in such a I mancr that the CotIory
reidAcr, regardless iof consequences, s!'ims
it over, and gives it a profporltion., pcc
-.i:l gst the mass of o..nous intl-.,
l.gcnec which a ncwsp)cr ;cccssari"y
coUS;':s. There was 0 ,1vo-
nary 1in our. having n o'Y.VU0'1,- and
swords, since we had bjee1-i.iu'cJ ta (ine,
in cou:.pary wiLli Col. C0Ail-ava latt day, by
Colonel .itoke, Icq
we should appear iIi .f '.'dres. But the
la.:i 1' .part "of tihe se nttI e, is cnti-Ciy
v-itho,'t foundICon; LineiTthr dd Colo-
rdl Callava s.1rrit t ', laat va-, asked of
him, nor did we un.rc ,-r., s',vodds as
c:n ble atesttcd by t.: Moi.s, \i o
cori'miaa:!ded the de t 'i 't. 0V cer-
I ainl ?ad ie ro opp .t .O n l.dj c acted
..as we ought tu hav'"]-dei;. '0r it would
^avc ,ecn a proof of rasl--cs, and mot 0f
courage, in a tamidful of r,.Hca to resist ,
mc-od force--which, in .,cdcicnce to the
orders it had.received, forcidly etitercd
t .'e ionse of our" respected conmmarcr
and chief- Coonel, lava thlireoo.c
ol". C 6U


yicin ed, but d&claet. tht ie limn i
-,ould, o" 1-: .-connt, dl.I :r tlhe apcr'
n 1 "ak .o 'O l]v's PPca"-
f.ce befocn' G.ncrl tC.eLn, 1. B ou
to have ata'cd, tl, t t n. t, ".-c oga-
tories and hi.'.ly o..!i accuXe "
the Gc:z-':' vwere Latltrully ',c""retc to
Col. Callava, ai;v raorel a- .hla c ... o-
ta.te. .r ....th.. Ifu te t v -is t ci c .,
c t Cfthc po er ofo t- l .-.. .... .- .
-Vhat w i -5d o linlt0 00e l-U'
a 1 t, ". ,, .- -- er t ,.-n
C.ait cf.:v o i tien' i e ws o-
^Vci^-^ whh wfetlrI llied:o


C.o ,.. '2. -~ endcavoured to b..: st=:.',:
,k on ta'c, s-tercnert{ -.

ope that 'hu and 1t1.- A
c' tcd '

G. .L;.
.,.. r:; ,: :.::ici is,' ,ie m ost r .t


I TE dt R 7YTE
Ja-^JS.~~ ~~~~~ JLjjj^ Ml' J rL L^ \ M 0J B Jl


I- ^ i 77 T Mi WW4 ^T & ~


*~~~ --. r ir Jn _* __ r, _j _^"ij j..^m m ^ a ^* 11i.an .i. .* .^ ^ ^ *^ "Im ,.,~i, i ^j^ ...^iii.~irfl.i ..., w


--m ...9 --. __ .. --__


VOL. II.


- I I % ..4





'jor rej".u thiois timec though his it er-
(fI. iL lie was', alone answerable to
hi's :-.r ,.} t- ti.... he (lid not care for
*the .c ''.':-I.cc; and t,,At I might protest
before G7od himself. I was in fact carried
to jai) .,t tie hour of midnight! In my de.
licat, state of health! My house left open
to f.he mercy of the soldiers! The Spanish
o''iAceirs and other persons of my confi-
-dfnce, who were there, or repaired thither,
v were ordered off, ahid none of them per-
mitecd to rernmain. My pcrounal vfru.t,t
and those of the government which were
Sunder my charge, were left without any
inventory or' account of the same: the
keys of my irunks were left; my property
and that belonging to the government for
the )purpose o the commission, were, in
like manner abandoned, without any ac-
olie the #3,wito6aea o
count or inventory; also all my other pcr-
sonal property. At 11 oil the following
71mornii of the 23d, a writ of Habeas Cor-.
pus wNs issued by the judge, Don' Elijeus
SFromentin, but Governor Jackson treat-
ed it with contempt, stating that he did
iiot think proper to allow it to be carried
.into cnftct.' '
At about five in the afternoon of the same
day) I was informed by the officer of the
Guard at the prison, of an order of the Go-
vernor, whicli stated I should be set at
i,,'ty, and accompanied by the officer of
t he day to ny Luac,1_ lO 19 C d "no'L ,
possession of the papers, and I might see
Sif the cases were closed and sealed. I told
Sthe officer who delivered the order, that 1
Should not enter my house, unless accom-
panied by. a judge. He said I might look
for one, and then I came out of prison.
The officer accompanied me, with many
other persons, and I went to the house of
Judo-e. l'romentin, as being the only one
-' in West Florida. I found him indisposed,
'' and before every one present I made a
succinct relation of all these factsand beg-,
ged that he would extend to my person
and house the protection of the law. He
informed me that his indisposition" pre-
I. ;ted him from accompanying me, and
that in his place I should take witnesses
to be present at the recognition.
S I then went to the house, accompanied
by ii.ny pcoplc, Und .tho office of.the day.
I found armed troops inside--my papers
scattered on the table, a case of papers,
.whAich had been nailed and sealed with
eighteen wax seals, with the impress of
the seal of my government, .was found
fr'uctured and re.closed and sealed with a
different seal. My state of health has not
permitted me to make the necessary ex
aminatibn of my private nor public papers,
nor the confidential ones of my govern-
rnent, during my administration, nor the
documents of my commission. The mo-
.:;ey was entire.
The foregoing relation cotoprehends
the outrages committed against my person


v'nd official character in Penscola on the
.,2d day of August, 1821,.by Governor
-Andrew Jackson. This narrative is the
.Most sacred truth. In it I have not'sup
pressed any previous circunislances--tho
history of the facts had no other origin.
The motive I am entirely ignorant of; and
that the whole is a true exposition I do
solemnly swear. I tender the proofs, and I
i protest with the same solemnity before
F God, before my government, before that
Sof the United States, and before all men,
' against the authors and perpetrators of
these deeds. I also swear, under the same
obligations, that I have always observed,
during my administration as Governor of
West Florida, indiscriminately to every
individual of the United States, whether
resident or 'ransient persons, the utmost
consideration-that I have respected and
caused to be respected their persons and
property. When any one has been guilty
oLf'ny delinquency, he has always been
treated with indulgence and a generous
'erait;--and so true is what I have mani-
festcd, that if public notice were to be fix-
ed throughout the whole States there
would not be a single individual, who could
show v the least cauMse of resentment-This
conduct emanates from'my own natural
disposition, and from the orders prescrib-
ed to mfe by my government-and this
my. -propensity so to act with all mankind
indiscriminately, cannot be impugned by
the strictest investigation into .my conduct
during my life, and the cornmands which
Have he!.-' ..... I
































































































SWe received by the Southern Mail of
Thursday, enclosed in the Pensacola Flori-
dian of the 29th September, the following
Proclamation of General Jackson, respect-
ing the Spanish officers remaining in Flo-
rida. The contest has grown warmer, and
we shall have at last all the facts of the
original affair. The Floridian contains a
long narrative of Dr. C. Bronaugh, one of
General Jackson's Commissioners, in re-
ply to Callava's protest. His narrative is
certified as strictly true and correct bt
Mr. Brackenridge, the Alcalde; and in th4
outset of it, he speaks thus of the protest
"This publication I feel myself, from
sense of truth and justice, constrained to
pronounce a tissue of falshoods and dis-
tortion of facts from beginning to end. But
for the palpable untruth of that part of Co-
lonel Callava's statement, which relates to
my personal agency in this affair, I should
not have appeared before the public."
.-Colonel Callava relates in his protest,
circumstantially, a conversation which he
alleges to have taken place at Col.Brookes,
where he dined, between him and Jack-
son's commissioners, Colonel Butler and
Dr. Bronaugh. Dr. Bronaugh affirms, that
no conversation whatever took place' be-
tween the said parties,/ at the house of
Col. Brooke, either on the day specified,
or at any other time. And Col. Brooke,
in a formal certificate, confirms this deni-
al, and attests that neither of the said Com-
missioners was in his house on the day of
the.dinner! We shall publish in our next
the whole of Btoaaugh's statement) as


well as that of the Spanish OfQcers, refer-
red to in the Proclamation.

PROCLAMATION,
By Major General ANDREW JACKSONVf
Governor of the Provinces of the.Flori-
das, exercising the powers of the Cap-
tain General and of the Intendant of
the Island of Cuba, over the said pro,
vinces, and of the Governors of said
provinces respectively:.
WVHERitEAs, by the seventh article of the
treaty concluded., between the United
States and Spain on the 22nd day of Feb-
ruary, 1819, and duly ratified, it was sti-
pulated that the "'Officers and troops of
His Catholic Majesty in the territories
hereby ceded to the United States, shall
be withdrawn, and possession of the places
occupied by them, shall be given within
six months after the ratification of the
treaty, or sooner if possible:"
And whereas, it has this day been made
known to me, that the following officers of
His Catholic Majesty, to wit:-Marcos de
Villiers, Bernardo Prieto, Louis Gayarre,
Civilo Lesassier, Arnaldo Guillimard,
Carlos de Villicrs, Pedro de Vegas and
Mariano Latady, and who according to the
said seventh article, ought have Withdrawn
from the said ceded territory with the
troops of His Catholic Majesty, have with-
out the permission of the existing autho;
rites. contrary to the said seventh article,
remained in th city and its vicinity; and
whereas it has been made known to mrne,
that the said officers acting in a distinct
body, independent of, and disowning even
a temporary allegiance to the governrrient
of the United States, as existing in the
Floridas, have been engaged in stirring up
disaffection thereto, and in sowing discon-
tent in the minds of the good people of
this'said province; and whereas it appears
that they are the aythlors .Af the following


1T|, fn nrr[C 16 Cilva's ap-
pea^ cb' t ere"lo H.B.
(otig Wp lve ataei -bi-th e'f" the iln-
terog&to6rice and highly offensive accuisa-
tions of the General were faithful inter-
preted to Colonel Callava, any more than
the replies of the latter to the former. It
was, therefore, out of the power of our
chief, not knowing what was said to him,
to make the auditory understand how in
nocent he was of the foul charges with
which his unsullied honour was endea-
voured to be stained. "
", Such, in sum, are the observations we
had to make on the statement of H. B. and
we hope that he and the public will be
convinced that we acted f,-om no principle
of pusillanimity; that if on the one hand,
we Shuddered at the violent proceedings ec.
ercised against cur sutlerior---we knew al-
so what was due to a government which
is on the most friendly footing with our
own. We are, kc.
* THE SPANISH OFFICERS,


Resident in this place."
SAnd, whereas, the said publication is
calculated to excite resistance to the exist'
ing government of the Floridas, and to
disturb the harmony, peace, and good or-
der of the same, as well as to weaken the
allegiance enjoined by my proclamation,
heretofore published, and entirely income
patible with any privileges which could
have been extended to the said officers,
even if permission had been expressly gi-
ven them to remain in the said province,
and under existing circumstances, a gross
abuse of the lenity and indulgence here-
tofore extended to them:
This is, therefore, to make known to
the said officers to withdraw themselves,
as they ought heretofore to have done,
from the Floridas, agreeably to the said
seventh article,on or before the third day
of October next; after which day, if they,
or any of then, $hall be found within the
Floridas, all officers, civil and military, are
hereby required to arrest and secure them,
so that they may be brought before, me, to
be dealt with according to law, for the con-
tempt and disobedience of this, my prla-
mation. .
Given at Pensacola, this 29th d r of
September, one thousand eight hurni'ed
and twenty-one, and of the 'Independence
of the. United States, the forty-sixth.
'ANDR EKW JACKSON,
Governor of the Floridas, *c, & c. Lc
By the Governor: .
GEORGE WALTON,
Secretary of West Florida.








I477_,
/13./


1


N),- 7f





















































' From the Cliarlestor, Coutrier, Oct. 19.
GOV. COPPINGER'S PROTEST.
SThe following is the statement 'and
Protest of Gov. Coppinger on the. sub-
ject of the late proceedings at St. Augus-
tine. '
.;Colonel tJosepht Coppinger, of t pe Spa-
nish army, late governor of East Florida,
and commissioned by his government to
deliver up the province to the U. States,
in conformity to the treaty concluded at
Washington on the 22d of February 1819,
feeling desirous to gratify the 'public ex-
pectation upon the fact of his having been
forcibly deprived of the government ar-
chives,'which .were- Vfde.:-tii charge, to-
gether with :his private papers, and the
archive of the Escribano, whicfi last, ac-
cording to the stipulations entered into
with Colonel Robert Butler, Commissio-
ner on the part of the United States, re-
mained subject to the future conventional
decision of the two cabinets, would -wish
to make known, that he will not be peri
mitted, by the short stay he intends to
make in this city, 'to lay before the world
a statement of facts in his own justificatdlion
suppo,:ted by proper documents, which
should convince all men of' the, outrage
committed by the 'immediate orders of
the secretary, acting as governor, of St.
Augustine, W G. D. Worthington, and
which orders. as he was informed, ema-
nate from General JAcKsoN. This expo-
sition, or manifesto he designs 10 make,
as soon as he reaches the pint for which
he will shortly set out; and in the inte-
rim, in order that some idea may be form-
ed of the above mentioned occurrence, he
publishes the solemn protest'-which he
made on the spot, hoping that if any
doubts should still be entertained bjr those
unacquainted with the particulars, they
will be cleared up and removed when his
manifesto shall appear.
: *-: (COPY.)
United States f America, -
S' .City of St. AIugustine.
By this public instrument of declaration
and protest, Be it known that on. this se-
cond day of October, in.the.artof our
Lord .on) to0.ti d e.JL i -0., i and
twecryt^n^bM&-iie- Ttoeas H. Penn,

ItC -.usoineb ner


the Un:)ited States of America, conformable
to the treat,- of cession concluded upon
between both nations, who, being duly
svor en the holy evangelists of Almighty
IGC dd .....pose and say, that this day at
four o'clock, P. Wi. there presented thenm-
1sc'v,-, at his dwelling house, the Mayter
Colonel Yo~bes, the Attorney General


0.Jo'.r. G Eh. and the .chei,.T John Han-
'.:-, .' made a (e1 a 6' t Ci the archives
nd papers, v.'ich e id in his posses-
ston t0cy beng, as they stated, coir.n'is-.
SiOn11(1 by their Gov;crnmI ntI ; aund t.7h,
they were ai', -;ve'ed that in no wise couLr,
the f :'... delivery be acceded to, be-
cause t -.chi.vcs rc 1a.na I 1. :on ii ci r e
':. ,' -"I,)' co Sta ir:' th cOi c .'.c5 '-Cenc
w !'z ..-.. !. ,'*".\ zvnm en^t, ,.',"ic> h- d be-en ca,_-
'*'ec J on b" 'in-seif "':.d tl:e pr'ce,^.!n? Gc-
Stvenor, relative to t.c e: -lo e 0licd by
the. re ,' iv, func'" :i.' .;i:l person ;
tth. t he '.Cd no docu'nenm '-- ,' d a::,
rc 'a-'n -'i-ct or iAn:` 1:.'. ti pro-
j epcn y =cn :,)', reif.,' c.'" t....: c. "'-..rio:;; and
pert-t c'wyrtg:-----
in one v-'o:'", that lthe said :'c '.. c'
--:.'----:.r .. .,. '-.. .'.'h he was bound
to t2l '!A r to his (Capt._.. '?-reli i, O-
siltivax- e:.-crc .'t';d --- the ".rcnty; t.-.t there
were -..r.!. :.* :: o:" i's own pape: s ar-ongst
ise co !d he .: .... s.' arci"es;

c n-.- ,
C .I to .- e :,'c .' -'c, ",, ofoc
717- ..-1...... -y i.: --..w \ n t.^ ac'zd it h


ledgment of the delivery, for which rea.
sons he ought to continue in thle same ca-
pacity he now holds, until the conclusion
of the aforesaid determination; and that
the aforesaid Colonel Forbc- listed upon
the delivery of the archives, as he had po-
sitive orders which he must inflexibly ful-
fil. The deponent again repeated, that he
would would not in any wise do so volun-
ta,'ly-and if the American Government,
contrary to the' rights of nations, against
the inviolability of his house, and the par-
ticular property of his nation and of -him-
self, should take by force, by which mode
alone could they obtain them, that he
protested solemnly against such an at-
tempt, contrary to the laws of nations, the
protection of individual security and pro-
perty, and more especially in the present
case, wherein the aggression was directed
against the rights of his person, in which
he represented his Government, by virtue
of his office, as commissioner for the ces.-
sion, which was nut yet even con:ld.ed;
and upon his persisting in this refusal and
firm determination, notwithstanding all
the arguments which were urged to himP,
te sheriff' went out, and in a very short.
time Capt. Bell with Mr. Gay, came in
and made similar representations, pro-
ducing a paper which they said containedl
the order of Gun. Jackson, to proceed min
that nanntier, on whiL.ih this deponent re-,
ferred them to what he had already stated,
and repeated that he protested against the
attempts which already appeared to havo
been begun: this protest was made in the
presence of the American Gen. John Ged-
des, his son Maj. John Geddes, and a re-
sident of this town, l)on Joseph Marian(>
Hernandez, who at this time were in his
house, and that after various altercations
which were reciprocally made betweenr-
the parties, the execution of the order o'C
Gen. Jackson 'being insisted on, by ona
party, and by this deponent the injustice
and violence which would be committed
by the performance thereof; he maintain-
ing always that by force alone, should the:
required archives be taken away;. they
then went to where the office w is,. and-.,
. finding the door locked with the key, they
forced it. open, and without any participa-
tion on his parr "proceeded to tafei aiWay-
all the papers and documents therein, car,.
trying them 6ut of his aforesaid house in.;
boxes, which had been placed in the said
office for the purpose of having them car-
ried to the Havana when his commission
should be completely fulfilled. That after
it had become dusk he went down from
the upper floor, where he had remained.
to the Office, accompanied by the, aforesaid
Gen. Geddes and his son, Don Joseph
Hernandez and other persons, and found
the do6r forced at the lock, and the papers
carried away; and this deponent further
alleges, that at the same time that this
outrage was committed in his house, he
was informed by Don Juan de Entralgo


that they had removed from his in the
same manner by order of the Government,
the. archives, his own property, an'.
amongst which were those of particular
individuals of East Florida, the same be-
ing denominated the Notary"s archives,
which had been left subject as is before
-stated to the mutual decision of both go-
Svernments; whereby the contract has
been violated which was made be-
tween C01oonel-Butler and this deponent.
-And he further saith that, without pre-
judice to the protest which the said Don
Juan de Entralgo has made, this deponent
likewise declares, in discharge of his re-
sponsibility, that he reserves to himself
the right of representing against each#
one and all the persons who are, and
ought to be, responsible for the violence
committed by the seizure of both archives,
that they may be adjudged con'formable to
the Constitution of the United States of
America, and other laws, protecting pri-.
vate property and the rights of dwciliagu
from being forcibly entered into, L..ckCn,
or any violence committed therein or upon.
the persons inhabiting the sarre, they iiv-
ing under the im g-ediate protction of tho
American Go- o ;4M. e'.th0. h ".
who, in a pu6lih ^^s|he., jp1... a
leges, or as pr, g1e 1 ..

pinger declar.ed o p.-
Notary aforesaid, at this sp.CI 0
and request, have protested, and by tl-,c-o
presents do most solemnly protest agaiZr:.-
all the consequences, damages =nd pro-.
judices, which have or may occur from the?
foregoin.. proceedings, and against all per-
sons concerned th-erein, andC against r1I
losses that may be sustained for or by rea-
son or means ofthe aforesaid proceeding.
or otherwise relating thereto. Allt ..ic-.
matter and things ern n ere declared-, alleged
and !uI r'imci as c'ibI c is *set 01r- 0,; ti';
pr)sc:ce of the said Notary; and therefore.
. :a-.Ve hcicreunto subscribed my name an:'.
r.C:cl my notarial seal, being requested
To -esify and certify the premises.
Thus dne and protested at St. Auguc-
tine aforcs:,i. the (-y nrCd yea"
[L. above \rittcn.
IL.S.] (Si gnd) TH03. H. PENN, -
.AvYobt rz P b .'ic fa r the C :!(T o f S t .. ,":z ':z
atine 'nPI Cou ('y of St. Jo A/:i .
United ,..c...s of. .Cr..: c
Cri., -/ !. iac.
John Gcdde-:, .... John Gccdds, u./'-
71' L os, -', .'ia" r n 1am cd r".
the fo,'-.i protest., bci: soverir .Crnd

,.uly sworn, upon t'e-c Holy _.van^ ei ::.ts c:"
Ai:tniyhly Gocd., co se-e-ally make c'.'i:.
dIc say, tiiat tie corn


setce, ar'e, to the b-est <-' Ie." know i -"
and belief, c I L:;... cr ct. .
,, -1 -I V "
"I- 'S, Jr. -
JO:S1.-?I-- .: --%1NADEZ
S,,-orn by a/i td i c v. cc.i d ... ::t", t;"*:.
5thi i .v of Oci-' e., i-21 b1, o rc ^12,
,.,. ,/-^ *. .
2 1",.




pers, requiring him to give his answer officers, but the governor refused to rc-
also in writing ; which he did., and conse, ceive it. At seven-at night, the s~rmne per-
quently came to inform me thereof, but sons came to my house demanded the pa-
did not find me at home.. On reflection, pers from me as a private individual, or to
next morning, he deterrffined on taking go with them before-the governor. I found
them to my house as a place of more se myself so unwell as to be unable to sit up,
curity than his-lhe did so ; but not finding and stated to them that my illness would
meat home left them in my house, whicii not admit of my going out, and that I did
was all he knew. I told him that he haId not clearly understand what papers they
done right. He further added, that having wanted, nor could I deliver them in any
just searched his house, and demanded the other way than as commissioner under the
papers, he replied that they were inImy treaty, if they were embraced in the same,
house, on which they conducted him as but if appertaining to my functions as mi-
a prisoner. litary governor, as such being packedup,.
I immediately sent my Aid, Capt. Don in the cases, (as it was said) they must in-
Barnado Proto, to inform the Governor dispensably- belong to the-- department of
'froni i n"e_ that Don Domingo Sousa wasan the military:government," or*that of the
officer under .".p0.. 0-ra o,-ail the--ivil -and' a rid -
the Commission; that as the :papers'd- minal archives, belonging to the ordinary
nianded could ,not be given by-him, he tribunals, had been delivered up by the
would have the goodness to address him- constitutional Alcade, as also. were the
self to me, and that if, they, were such as protocols to.the commission of the,
could be delivered, they would be furnish- United States --bfit nevertheless, I ro-
.ed through the regular chanuej; extend. qIO-ested them to furnish me with a note.
ing further my request, that he would of the description of-.papers, and I would
'be pleased to understand that they could r.-ply-....in about;- an -hour afterwards, a
only be delivered by me. The answer not-e,-written"in English, onha loose half
which my adjutant brought' me was, tha sheet of paper, was sent to me without
"the order 'bfr the imprisonment of any cover--.I answered the bearer that
Sousa will be continued," and that it would be translated and replied to'
the Governor further told him ,"Tell I sent it to the interpreter and went.
'Colonel Calla, a that I will put him along to bed, and some time after, while at!'.
with him." Under the impression that an rest, troops, commanded by an officer,
answer altogether so unaccountable, with--and under the, order of the abovemnen-
out the slightest provocation to rest on, tioned persons, broke down my fences,,
could only be attributed to an ext'raordi- called my house and entered my chain.-.
nary mistake in the interpretation which her with naked bayonets in their hands; I
had been made of my message to the addressed them. exclaiming that since my
Commissioner and Governor Andrew ho,,se did not afford me an asylum, nor
Jackson, I ordered my adjutant to return, my official character shelter me, nor the
accompanied by an another officer and immunity to which I wvas entitled under',
the public interpreter, in order more fully the government of the'United States, T,
toacquaint the Governor therewith. They threw myself on the protection of that go- .
fulfilled their mission, and brought me vernment, and protested in the most so..',
tem~n manner against such- extraordinary,
for answer, that the Governor 'ad replied, ou maner ans t sucuetr iry
with loud vociferations, and in the pre- outrages They answ.l red that,pIemust urn,
sence of several persons, that Col., Calla. endiathel deliverthe papers inendiuned ]
va should go to jail, in the note, or-that 1 should be conducted
w sn a by them as a prisoner, I replied, ihflat I.
owas lost in astoeishoeent, and my had sent the note to the interpreter for,
accrson co anOti e so exthan trIotranslationt; that I was indisposed, and re-
an occurrence to any other cause than quested that they would not force me
an entireprivatiiof'judgineit, o"to ,fioque my house at that our, (at half spast
ter interpretation; but having iro fouidaItenl at night,) that if it would bu e sr(tIhici-nst.
tion on which to rest such an opinion, to t ig, the tio of such oers,
oto void the'execution of such ordlers,-:
COL. CALLAVA'. PROTIEST. proposed to go in person to the governor, they might determine on forcibly opening
!, onJoe ::;.:.a.ExC.Governor of so seer) as d c a~vr but before 7
.~DnJs mro f5 ona ii~'wsoebtbfr my cases and trunks and carry off any' ..
WcVet F"!c-roa, -: -.." :: b)' she Spa- I could do so, tiu.r.e fier' ,s caine' to. the t)aDers, they pha: sed. or to., as' they
n-il ;3'cj "' i" ul n u :" "" tac~ "h u luy-wr thought proper,- as'I- was djisp,-,e to
complete eff'cot as Corn' nhsroner, all the authorised to 'demand of me immeduate-,yedt oc ari evn.esine tole
stipulations between h'. Catholic fvbjesty ly the papers, for the Gov'ernor Would not Yedtfoeatdenrsitdtol
and the President of the:Unizted States, in show" towards me any more consideration tnem assassinate tme,, as I placed every"
the cession made to them of the said Pro- or forms, than he would to any other .in-..
vince, under the Tlreamty.of friendship, ad- dividual,... "One of the deputation Ordered the offi-
justinent of differences e, limits, ratified -1 replied to them, requesting them to cci' Commanding to enter my; room, and-
by both nations on the 22d day of Februa- enquire ofthe Commissioner of the United at this time the citizen Don Juan Innerna-
ry of the present yecar, i$21-.-Do make States, Andrew Jackson, how "it was, rity wvis.hed'to intercede, as it appeared to:
the present, sworfl expositi:mn, with all the possible that he dhou~lt forget. in a mar. me, but in speaking he was. told to be"
force of law on my word of honour, gua- ner s'o uncountable my official ehaer-c siient, ,a"d. the ...officer was directed to take '


ranteeing the truth of my assertions on ter!" Did he not receive from me, as a me as tlus prisoner with his armed force.
the responsibility of mry lirad before a tri- commissioner on the part of Spain; the replied, that Iconsidered myself as such,
bunal, of the outrages which were corn- Province of West Florida, of which I was and in proof thereof, I delivered my !sword ,
mitted against my limst on the day and his predecessor in tle government, and that and case, but as to dragging me from my
night of Wednesday, th 22d of August, my stay with my secretary and officers, house they must take into consideration
1821, by the Governor ef khe said West was pending the decision of the points, my ill statetof health-they answered that ad
Florida and Commission:r on the part of submitted bv himself and me to our res they knew it, ordered Me to dress, and
the United States under t(:e same Treaty. pective governments, relative to the con. wth the armed troops onductd me t
The facts are as follows ... struction to be given"to the second article the presence of the Governor, who was ii
At about.four in thr.ftermioon I was in of the treaty? The artillery is still 'held a separate house from his own lodging'
the house of Geo. J i. Bfookc, Esq, colonel in deposit under the national safeguard. accompanied by a large con"ourie cof' peo,
me nube01'LCU.j~i.OSOKC; ,sq coinei i ^^c #._i l~ pe of all description of persons. The said 5)v
of the United S-ates 4tf Regiment, to din- he papers and documents under my pie of all description of persons. The said as
ner. The company u: table consisted of charge as governor, to be given by me Governor through a person who acted a
Col. Brooke, his lady, Ljus Fromentin, under the treaty, could not be delivered a Notary and Interpreter, orderedhim to
Esq. Judge of the United States, the com- by me in the character of a private indivi- extend an interrogaory which e himself
mnandor of the U. S' briy of war, Enter- dual, because they did not come into dictated, and required of me an answered
prize, ~ich~ael Ke:mrny: Esq. Lieut. Col.' my possession arid trust in that capacity. The questionwas insignificant, but' I re-
prize, liclaeeIKenr d.LeutColust in^^ that c ^
Don Marino de Villc.,, Liut. CL and 1 requested them to tell him t141t I wis 5l- quested to be permitted.to answer in my
commander of Artillery, r.cisco togeth bVideredat ci'e own idiom, and 0.ite it nwith my
Pa ti b a ~ ot-ie_ Rwas noW I .4 that the: .ai'ri own hand. It was'granted; ard Whil6
Pal m Vas thq .t ,'.~it ., ti ... .1. .... ...V
R ev. s $enDie rt. thean posses i"lb h:eld Scr4 a ^d writing my answer, the paper was snatch
Rm ....n vio b g edfrom me, land. i A'- uriou aness

ni, C4t^iied ofi- to be respected and protected agree let .
cer, I)t "S '.ru't, rny Secretary of the usages oi civilized nations, and every knocks on a table, o rd the most veo-.
the commission, icut. Don Carlos De other individual commissioned by his res- lent gestures Ordered me to deliver .
Villiers, and Don Ar'adnGuillimard~sub pective government That they would also the papers I was in the act o
aAswr~ Iuh.gvem n imsw.
101..to dsperate, ant heeeth heprer

Lieutenants, Don Nanan(. Laturday, and be pleased to tell him that I do not yet a b whengver e Inotier
Don Pedro De Aba,pilic interpreter, know what papers he demands of me to .o sp exaan he andwthe it pi
The Spanish sub Hicutenm Don Domingo deliver in this manner, and that he would begv n to explain my answers, in wh ich
Sousa, came and required for me, earnest- have the goodness fully to acquaint me had so often bee interrupted, he was
ly desiring to speak ih me. On enter- therewit in an official form, having duelnt permitted to interpret or did not
ing le was accompaniedby an officer of regard to the peace and harmony which interpret the same. With the dt. hgest .
the United States, who conducted him as subsists between Spain and the United demonstrations constantly intreited that
prisoner as he told me; having asked him States; that I have always acted towards shulde r t in thu e a rconsotation beofanswer-ie ,
for what reason, he replied, in the pre- him with the utmost distinguished consi- o f th reso and that I should be inter-,
sonce of the company, thA on the prece- deration, both as commissioner of the Un- innto nwing man tha t Iso uld re inte- A
r~dtath oulednth iemnfe;ta a.ftr



ding day three perscr.s made their ap- tea States and as governor; and in like s o l etnoe i nkm er;thtfeure t 'k
pearance at his house ho said, we are manner I have treated all the citizens of mfo e ravings of the Governor, tht I
authorized by the Governor, Don Andrew the United .States, indiscriminately with assassinated. navailint
Jackson, to order vii deliver up certain the greatest attention during my adm- wea aot to beqasasit every thinail isn
wee l m rqess ev earyhng w as 'X
papers waIicih he has ben informed arein nstration as governor of West, Florida; refused ti no coul I ea wy tat
your possession; andl rm the indications that I assure Gen. Jackson, both as comr dragged there. "e d sla as
which they made to hin, he comprehend- bmissioner nd governor, that whatever d e t .
ed that they wvere those which were pack- papers were to be delivered by me to him In the chaoslof misfortune es in which
ed up in cases belonging to the military this (lay, s!sould be immediately furnished I sawv myself enveloped, unprotectedl bF" c%\N
tribunal and that of Finance; he 'told them through the regular channel, as a proof uthe laws, the moment at length arnie ed
that certain cases existed h u his possession that they were aven i n a nanhecit bioen- whe Governor Jackson drew out am i
in which le believed they were; but that ing ny official character. oler papers, a writh ten or der w t hich
he was a subaltern ofi-cer subject to my, I found myself attacked with a violent agreeable to the interpretation -de t
orders and attached to the commission, pain, from a coplaint under which I me, contained the radate for my being '
and that the cases which he had mention- have been suffering for some time. 'This I sent to the jail. When informed thereof,'
ec were under his c.tre by my orders as imparted to colonel Brooke, and rqested I request the interpreterto ask him for
notary or clerk of those privileged tribu- him to let me retire to my house, chich I me if he did not shudder at the herl etra
nals under my authority s governor, and did, and tI e ordered my secetary ad- tion of such deeds? that I pressed be
could not dhismose of tho papers unless dress an official letter to thae governor, fore the government of the United States
by my command. The persons in pies- making the same stalerednt'to him -as against the author ofm those atrocious outi -
tion witcdarew and returned*again the same hlve done to the bearers of his messages iages committed against my per'on and
lay wvith a demand im writing, of the pa..-which official letter I snac t him by two she character I represented. The. goverc
in w ich he elieed (6hv' verc;-butthat A prtatin r-e t




/ rom the N.,I, .. I teli oer, Oct. 27.
STHE CLAIMS ON SPAIN.
Ve expected tit srooj .;fe- the ad-
jouornment ot '.hf rr".n, i's.nr. .ppointed
under the Flord';. trc3ty, .vc should have
becen able to lay b,;;re t, :-JuLic a corn-
cise abs'.rct of' I- .c i ceclrings during
their late session. But, little of !t conclu
sive nature having been determined on,
and great indulgence having been allow-
ed to the claimants who wished a suspen-
sion of cases involving the least doubt
until an argument was heard--it was im-
pogible for us to obta:ni or furnish much
satisfactory information. In fact, the prin-
cipal part of the time of the commission-
ers was employed in examining the me-
morialsfiled with ilhe' secretary of the
Board, previous to,.obr on tihe 10th ultimo,
which amounted to about three hundred in
number. Of these miremonials, many, we
understand, were.. so defective, in the
statement of-the particulars of the claim,
or in complying with the orders of the
Board as to require aneundmrient; and of
those suspended for argumrit, some in-
volvedcl very important and doubthiful prin-
ciples while others were suspended mere-
ly at the request of the claimants or their
agents.
Many'claimnis, as stated by the memo-
rialists themselves, ,ere so obviously out
of the pale of the tr'eaty,- that they were
at once rejected on thd claimant's own
showing. \Ve mention two or three of
these to show the kind of cases which
have assisted to constitute thle enormous
amount claimed by our citizens from the
Spanish government--heretofore stated,
we believe, at 'between thirty and forty
millions of dollars. For instance, a woman
presented a claim for damages sustained
by her in consequence of the detention of
,her husband by Spanish authority; another
for injury done to a- vessel accidentally
run afoul of by a Spanishl vessel; another
for a capture by a French privateer, which
dispached the capturec vessel to Cuba,
but before its arrival there,! a re-capture
by a British vessel occurring, a heavy de-
cree for salvage by a British court of ad-
miraltyfollowed, &c.
.Of th'e important points suspended for
argument, the foljowiiig,. among others,
may be enumerated: ,
1. Cases of American vessels captured
by privateers,' (bearing Trench commis-
sions and colors, but owned and manned,
in'whole or in part, by Spaniards) carried
into a Spanish colony, .under the sight, or
with the knowledge of Spanish authorities
-the American crew there dismissed, the
cargo plundered, distribution of the prize
made among the captors--no proceedings
ending in a condemnation instituted be-
fbre any court--and all application made
by the American owners to the Spanish
authorities for ,'otressi evaded or refused,


2. Cases of contracts made by American
citizens with the'Spanish government and
not complied with by the latte in other
words, whether any butts_"o torts are
embraced by tl 3 treaty. '*^. '
3. Clainrqs~ijiO' ,ioes--the
loss 9f co*() -. theioss of
probable P
4. Cases'" ,. ''1'v0essels by the
Ierenci" gtener mernt; in the ports of
Spain. :' -
Arguments in writing are required to
be made by the board on all the questions
that are thus suspended, at their next ses-
sion. A liberal construction will no doubt
be given itu the:' treatybu it is;the..duty
of the board, at fhe -same ime, to guard
the intt'est of those: claimants "' whose
rights are indisputable; for the admission
of a false claim will necessarily diminish
the amount received by. rightful claims,
should the sum quoted by the treaty fall
short. '
We would by'. no means suggest _to
claimants any step. that would incur un-
necessary expense;but, where they can-
not' attend, personally,: the meetings of
the board, it appears to us to be their in-
terest to have', counsel 'to .represent them.
We understand that thle number of me-
morials ,; filed with ,the Secretary of the
Board to this date, exceeds five hundred.
The. board, it will be remembered, has
adjourned to the first Monday in January.

PENsAcOLA,OCt. 1, 1821.
Several occurrences have taken place
llhere, 'which mpay make some noise abroad
from the dearth of news at present. I have
already mentioned something respecting
the case of Col. Callava. wvho has gone on
to, Washington to complain. It was with
great unwillingness that I could be in-
duced to think him so bad as appearances
would seem to justify. I rather felt dispos-
ed to attribute his conduct to bad advice
and a weak attachment to punctilio and
imaginary privileges. His conduct, I am
now satisfied, is not that of the plain, frank
soldier, which many of us thought him;
there is.o0o much littleness in his conduct
for thIis;,too many petty tricks to impose
false appearances upon the world. There
is no excuse for his not surrendering the
documents, and his intimacy with the man
who was interested to kt ep them out of
the way, justify every suspicion, although
he may be perfectly innocent. But, with-
out giving you a full view of the whole
affair:, it is impossible to enable you to
judge correctly. -'
,The Spanish officers here have been
,zuiity of great impropriety in their reflec-
tions upon the Governor, under the dis-
guise of an answer to a piece by H. Bige-
lIw. They were here without'permission,
,tnd, under the seventh article of the ta'a-
ty, ought to have gone with the troops; it
was, thcretorc, their duty to have been at
least decent in their aniniadversions on the


highest judicial tribunal of the country.
it was an act of great mildness to order
them out of the Floridas; in fact, they
Were h ,+' t any rate. This order is,
howc,.cr, cily confined to those who were
the iauthurb of the offensive publication;
therc are a number of others who still re-
main. They are abouL to set out to-day
tor New ()rlc-'ns. Cali.ava, in the Gover-
inr's place,. for such co:.duct on thIe part
of+ Anrcrican cffcersi, hul have scnt
tlicm to ,iv.rnu in irons. It is well they
arc going,- for, in all probability, if they
had rcnjaincd, we should have had some
very unpleasant personal rencontr.s. For
the sake of peace, and to avoid these un
pleasant occurrences, the course pursued
was an act of prudence. The Spaniards,
it appears to me, cannot be made to un-
dcrsiand that the government of Spain has
ceased here. ,
,P. S. General Jackson is about to take
his family to Tennessee, and will return
here as soon as possible." /.



































































EQ/ "I'll U ..O.t IDtA .

S...PENSACOLA, October 6.
Much has been said respecting the case
of Col. Callava, which ought, in fact, to
have been set clown as a proceeding in
the ordinary course of justice. The cir-
cumstance of his having been the former
governor and commissioner to surrender
the country, when the case is viewed with
attention and impartiality, alone render it
remarkable. His singular publication,
k' protwesting before God," is t gOvertfiment,
that of the United States and men in ge-
neral, against the authors and executors
of these horrid outrages,"'. will in all pro-
bability attract attention, and may possibly
deceive. Although its pompous stile and
deficiency in any real and substantial ac-
cusation of any other violence or coercion,
than such as must naturally be encounter-
ed by all those wlho do wrong, and resist
the authority of the government under
which they live, might suffice to render
it harmless; yet as the subject has come
before the public, it is proper that it
should have the means of pronouncing a
satisfactory judgment. The quintessence
of the whole affair may be embraced in a
few lines. By the second article of the
treaty, all archives and documents direct-
ly relating to the property of the country,
are to be left. That the papers in ques-
tion are of this character no one has pre-
tended to deny. It was the duty of Calla-
va to have made a fair and honest surren-
der of them all. His neglect to do so, in
any instance, was in itself highly censu-
rable, and could only be excused by plead-
ing mistake, accident on his part, or want
of design. If it should appear that they
were purposely withheld, the impropriety
of his conduct would be such, in the opi-
nion of reasonable men, and of those who
do not forget substance, and attach all
importance to the trifles of form and
etiquette, as to allow very little for any
treatment which may have resulted from
this conduct. He knew well that those'pa-
pers had not been surrendered, and this
long before they were demanded of him.-
He knew that they were such as ought to
have been delivered for the protection of
the inhabitants of the country, who had
certain rights to assert, and whose sole
dependence was upon those papers. The
only question in the case, is this, in what
way should they have been demanded ol
Col. Callava? How ought he to have? been
addressed on the subject? As late governor?
as commissioner? or simply as Col. Cahla-
va? Whether verbally or in writing?
Whether the letter should have been seal-
ed with a wafer or with sealing wax? and
such like important'preliminaries! But the
fact is, in this instance, the papers were
not in the actual possession of Col. Calla-
vo; they were in possession of an individu-
al, whom the governor was not bound to
i now as connected with him in any way.
'They had been ascertained by inspection,


to be in the possession of Sousa; they were
demanded of him, and.afterwards an order,
in the nature of a sequestration was issued.
Sousa, in contempt of the order, shifted
them into the hands of Callava, who on
this, in legal phrase, 'combined with Sou-
sa, to prevent the execution of the process.
The unavoidable consequences ol his con-
duct, are detailed and misrepresented in
his publication, and in like manner, any
offender against the laws might cry out, a
" horrid outrage." It will be seen however,
that Pvetv .rinssihlP" irliil'-r'nrne. was eitend-


ed to him, and tha with a persevering oh-
stinancy, he refund. 'every ll'cLr which
would have enabled hi 'i to have got out
of the affair witho: complete dishonour.
Such is the strange perversion of the
human mind uidr Spanish dominion,
in all things which relate to the adminis-
tration of justice,' hat I am credibly in-
formed, that amo-doi.-iAny of the old inha-
bitants here, the principal cause of aston-
ishment was, thgt an ex-.go'ernor could
be sent to prison, it the instance of two or
three females, in tie humblest walk of litel
At 'heir instance, .;hroutgh the alcalde, the
present governor vas called upon to inter-
fere in their behalf, and to compel the sur-
render of documen's indispensable to the
establishment of their rights, so long de-
ferred, and in whose, favor Callava himself
had repeatedly passed decrees, which were
never executed. Eveiy law, human and
divine, called for the interposition of the
governor--How, on such an appeal, by
what possible justificaii'on, could he have
withheld from then the aid of his author-
ity? If ne had, he would have been unde-
serving of the high esteem and considera-
tion in which he is held by his countrymen..
Having taken the ground, that colonel
Callava was not at this time a diplomatic
agent of Spain'and '.hat he tad forfeited
every claim to the privileges by courtesy,
that he had moreover illegally interposed
between the authority of the governor and
one who had not even the shadow of such
pretensions. I wouldaskany ration l man,
what other course was left him, but that
which he did actually pursue? and could
he have pursued that course with greater
temperance and forbearance? Is any one
prepared to say that he ought to have
turned a deaf ear to the'obscure, but much
injured, individuals who-cried to him for
justice? Was this-:call to be disregared to
gratify col. Callava's love of punctilio? to
"lay this flattering unctin to his soul," to
pamper his vain pride, or even that of his
nation, by so mean a condescension? To
address a letter to him as commissioner,
or late governor, beseeching him to deliver
the papers, and to 'vhich. letter hle has con-
descendingly told us, he would dfeign to re-
ply! He had already been informed by the
governor, twenty days before, that he would
hold no further correspondence with him,
and a man of true spirit, and honorable
feeling, woald have been at no loss to have
known what course to.:have purst&ed after


such intimation.
vreoo


J. C, BRONAUGH


IN HONOR OF OUR GOVERNOR.
It being understood that the Governor
,was about to leave us, the officers of the
military corps stationed at this place and
Barancas, uniteci with the citizens of Pen-
sacola, in tendering his excellency and fa-
mily, an entertainment consisting of ia
public dinner and b-ll, evincing tic u res-
pect and esteem. The invitation wa.a ac-
cete^i.. a Th ,.- .- !-..', e ;..d
the fete ua Austin s t.:'in A c..iiiny
of eighty gentlemen partook of an excel.
lent dinner provided ( ,o the occasion. Col.
Walton presiding-supported by Col.
Brooke as vice president.-..The following
toasts we drank.' "
: ^v-- ^'TO AST S. *..
1. The president of the United States
--Thewisdom of hisadmistration is pro-
ved by the property of :Ar country.
;Music-*-Preiident's March.
2. The Navy-In its youth, it humbled
the pride of Britain, laind halted our coun-
try among the nations-e.s maturity will
be worthy of it. Decatir and Victory.
3. Florida.--It has become free without
a revolution-its star, though but just ri-
sen from the the ocean, is -'swift to join
the glorious constellation The Union."
The Star Spangled Banner.
4. The memory of R3bertEmrnet and
Xavier Mina-Freemen of every nation,
shall weep the fate of Freedomr's martyrs.
Roslin Castle.
The state of Alabama-tVe love her as
a sister but we would not be wed.
1 canna, winna, inunrna marry yet.
6. Woman-Virtue and fidelity,-'con-
stancy and truth, are her legitimate attri-
butes-none but the vicious blaspheme
her name or decline her services, and
even Vice blushes at her presence.
Come haste to the wedding.
VOLUNTEER TOASTS.
By Governor JacksOan^.-The govern-
ment of the United States--Mlay its ad-
ministration always be as wise as its prin-
i ciples are pure.
By Dr. Bronaugh-J. C. Calhouh-dis-
I tinguished for his integrity, adniirecl for
.his talents and honoured as the zealous
and enlightened statesman.
By Lieut. Donelson-The Floridas.-A
grand acquisition, may they become unit-
ed as a state, and one of. the brightest
Stars of the union.
After the Governor had retired, was
given.
Our Governor-His glory is as the sun
in his meridian, and like his last rays, it
shall remain, when the hero has sunk to
rest. Hail to the Chief.
By the President of 'the day-The
Army--Avarice has' overcome gratitude
--the laurels won in the cause of freedom
are withered by the grasp of poverty, and
heroes are reduced to cry, Date obolum
Belisario! .' .'
By the Vice President--Com. William


Bainbridge.-The ornamert and pride of
his profession, both in war a.ndpeace ..
By Mr. Brunot--OurnIewly adopted
fellow citizens of the 1'lo'idas.:'-
By Mr. Rutledge.-The cause of Jus-
tice-May it flourish an Cevergeen in this
our favoured soil. Tihe best, feelings of
mankind are enlisted on its side, and
heart and hand should unite for its sup-
port.

On the evening of ec sae day, the
n qien ininpTd the otartVI atd! OUited in crnn- l


eluding the Fete with a ball; much more f
nunierously attended !han could have been I
anticipated, such was the unkindness of r
the weather-all gloom and rain. c
c
C
fO THE CITIZENS OF THE FLO- c
RIDAS.
The temporary organization of the U
government of, these Pro'inces, ac- N
cording to the act of Congress of
the last session, and to the powers confer. [
ed on me by the President of the U'.ited 1
States, I have the satisfactioni to announce I
is now complete. If it possess imperfec-
tions, or defects, the r.. actingg man will r
make due allowance, v'hen he considers
that its duration wiil be but short, and that E
it is the best that circumstances wo'lld
permit, taking into view the diticulties s
I have had to encounter. Where the rule, z
or law, is certain, 1 have considered it my i
duty to follow it strictly, but where this
has not been the case, I have endeavored
to make the best provisions in my power, t
believing that government of some kind, i
was absolutely necessary. It is my sincere I
hope that thle subject will attract the ear- I
liest attention of the Congress of the Uni-
ted States, and that. the inhabitants of I
these provinces will be relieved from the
state of uncertainty and doubt, whielh,
at this moment must necessarily prevail.
In the organization of the present tern-
porary government, and in its execution, I
have kept steadily in view the securing to
the inhabitants of the Floridas all the pri-
vileges and immunities guaranteed to
them by the treaty.-The principal of
these, is the protection of their persons,
property and religion, until they shall be
incorporated into the union, and become
entitled to all tile privileges and immuni-
ties of citizens of the U. States. In per-
forming this important: part of my func-
tions, i have endeavoured to pursue the
spirit of our political institutions. I have
made no discrimination of persons,--my
house has been surrounded by no guards,
no one has 6een kept at a distance by re-
pulsive formalities, all have had tree ad-
mittance, and found a ready ear, when
they required my aid for the pro
section of their rights. The Ameri-
can government, at the same time
that it is the freest, is perhaps the
strongest in the world; because, the most
healthyy and most powerful in society, are
as weak tn opposition to it, as the most
humble and obscure. It knows no dis-
tinction between an ex-governor and a
peasant. In the course o[ my short admi-
nistration, one case has unfortunately oc-
curred, which required the exertion of
that authority which is no respecter of
person s.-That the necessity should have
existed ha. occasioned me pain aid re-
gret; and c-''.p ,i.,ih .'. it m ad been oits-
understood by' .. ,m c ol the i-h! inaui.s of


this co:v,;',, fi'oi a want of a sufficient
acqUt.;nic6'. tl' thie ftsA of the Case--
as well as vhith the character and princi-
ples of our goveinoent. It was my duty
under the treaty, exercising the govern-
ment in the Floridas, to secure to the in-
habitants all the evidence of their right
of property. The iimpr',per conduct of
the captain general of Havanna, in vwith-
holding documents or archives of this na-
ture, from an agent expressly sent to re-
ceive them, increased the necessity of vi-
gilance on my part. It was made known
to me by satisfactory evidence, that there
were documents of ihis character in the
hands of an individual here, and that these
documents were necessary to establish the
right of property in this country. The fact
ascertained, my duty was clear, and no al-
ternative was left me. That individual
was ordered to surrender then, so that-in
pursuance of the second article'of the
treaty, and of my proclamation, the inha-
bitants might be secured in their right of
property. The individual thus ordered to
deliver them, instead of obeying as he
ought the commands of the government
tinder which he was protected, and which
could know no superior, excepting the
congress o' president of the United States,
shifted themin into the hands of the person
who lately administered the, government
of this province, and who had been au-
thorised by the captain general of Cuba
to surrender the country agreeably to the
stipulations of the treaty. This person,
whether from misapprehension, or from
worse motive, considered himself not res-
ponsible for any act of his to the government
of the Floridas, and appeared entirely in-
sensible to the impropriety of not having
made a delivery of these documents of his
own accord. Whatever diplomatic privi-
leges he might have been entitled to,
these privileges had ceased upon the sur-
render of this country, and he was then
not known to me, or recognized as
having any other rights than those of a
common individual. It was not enough
for him to consider himself public aecnt
of the king of Spain, and reside here lor
the purpose of transacting official business
with the agents of the United States, but
it was necessary that he should have made
known the object and purpose of his stay;
had he done so, he would have been in-
formed at once by me, that my own func-
tions having ceased as commissioner, no
one but the president of the United
States had any power to give him per
mission to remain here as a diplomatic
egnt enjoying the privileges of a foreignn
minster. the natural con-equeences'of his
conduct are too well known, and need not
be detailed. With the exception of thi.1
solitary instance I feel the utmost confi-
dence in saying, that nothing has occurred,
no.thwithstanding the numerous cases in
which I have been called upon to inter.
pose my authority, either in a judicial or
cxectitive capacity, to occasion any tiling
like distrust, discontent, or want of conifi-


/ '0 *loo


every good citizen and subject; and should
any of them under the influence of mo-
mentary passion, or feeling, be dissatisfied
with the measures I have pursued, on
a return of their sober judgment, I feel
confident they will be compelled to ap-
prove. ".
Con.idetatins of a per sonar nature an.d
the situation of my family, requiring my
absence from these provinces bfor a short
period, I make known that in the meani
time, the government of East Florida is
placed under the charge and direction of
J. W. D. Worthington, Esq. Secretary
for the same, and that of West Floridi.
under Col. George Walton, Secretary'
thereof. Each of these gentlemen.. are'
clothed with all the powers appertaining.
to the governors under the late govern-O
ment of Spain, and subject to such instruc-"
tions as they may respectively receive'
from the President of the United States'
through me. They are charged faithfully"
to protect and maintain all the citizens%
and inhabitants of whatsoever description.
in the said provinces, in the peaceful en-
joyment of all their rights, privileges and.
immunities, secured to then under the...;
late treaty with Spain, and under the con-
stitution of the United States so far as the'
same is applicable' I have instructed them
promptly to punish the violators of the
law, and to require of all, that allegiance
to the government, enjoined by my pro-
clamation issued on taking possession pf
the country.
ANDREW JACKSON,
Governor of Floridas, e fc. c.
Pensacola, Sept. 6, 1821.
_01


derce, andi I chee, illy take this occasion
tn Pv-nrpq, mir -,Miqf~art inn with thft n,-ft- I.I


Ir-A


.^ T .....




7l, obedient and orderly conduct of all
hose whose allegiance has been transfer-
ecl to the U States by the cession of the
country. It is true, a recent occurrence
:on-ected with the one rcLerrrd to, has
om polled mne to take rna _ures'I con-
:eived nect-,aVry for the chalcter, dig-
ity and harmony of the government I
-drmnister, and whiich at the same time
vere the mildest the circumstances Woould
idmit. I allude to the condutict ofa num-
)er of the Spanish officers remaining here
hfter the cession without tiy permissiono,
)ut which would certainly' not have been
withheld from them so long as they de-
neaned themselves respectfully totile
existing authorities, and refrained from
my improper interference ,ith the
measures of the government. This re-
spect is due from foreign officei.s in
F11 countries--.their situation"is mate-
'ially different from that of otlier aliens,
tnd their conduct ought thereforetto be
nore circumspect. In the United States
hose are severely punished, who are
Guilty of writing in a libellous manner oi
proceedings in courts of justice. ,For
what tends to bring the judiciary into disv..
repute, shakes the public confidence in
that part of the government, that is looked
upon as the most sacred depository of in-
dlividual rights. Hence in both these
points of view, without noticing the sin..
gular conduct of the Spanish officers.act-
ing as if they considered themselves a
distinct and separate body-.an imper'iuzn,
nimferio.-.they were guilty of great in-
diseretion and impropriety, in publishing
a most indecent libel against the judicial
proceedings of the highest tribunal in the
Floridas. Had I consulted my ipersob.nal
feelings, having entertained a favourable
opinion of some of them, and enmity to
none, I should have been disposed to have
suffered the act to sink into ohtlivi,. But
the dignity and honour of the govc:. .ent
forbade that conduct so outrageous shp.uld
pass unnoticed. I might appeal to those
very persons und ask what would be the
consequences if a band of American o E-
cers should offer such an insult to the. go-
vernment of a Spanish Province? But the
inhabitants of the Floridas mny rest assur,
ed, that whatever may be the impropiiety
or imprudence of some, it will have no ef-
fect upon mry feelings towards the rc-t*-~.
the innocent will not be confounded :eith
the guilty, and all will continue to exte-
rience the same protection .,nd respect
for their rights, which has heretofore been
extended, provided (hey demean them.-
selves with that propriety .which becomes