DH Projects and Scholarship, Resources for Course: Panama Silver, Asian Gold: Migration, Money, & the Making of Modern C...

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Title:
DH Projects and Scholarship, Resources for Course: Panama Silver, Asian Gold: Migration, Money, & the Making of Modern Caribbean Literature
Physical Description:
Teaching guide and handout
Language:
English
Creator:
Thorat, Dhanashree
Publisher:
Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC)
Place of Publication:
Miami, FL
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Resource created for the wiki for course Panama Silver, Asian Gold: Migration, Money, and the Making of the Modern Caribbean (Fall 2013)
Citation/Reference:
Course materials for: “Panama Silver, Asian Gold: Migration, Money, and the Making of the Modern Caribbean” an interdisciplinary Digital Humanities Course with the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC, www.dloc.com) Spring 2014, taught by Leah Rosenberg at the University of Florida

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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This item is licensed with the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike License. This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon this work non-commercially, as long as they credit the author and license their new creations under the identical terms.
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AA00021181:00002


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Course: Panama Silver, Asian Gold: Migration, Money, & the Making of Modern Caribbean Literature DH Projects and Scholarship This section has links to DH projects that may help students brainstorm ideas for their own class project Haiti: An Island Luminous Online exhibit or edited collection: http://dloc.com/exhibits/islandluminous/partone Maryse Cond's Tree of Life and Mapping/Networking/Visualizing In our discussion of Tree of Life, we discussed how the novel maps the personal, political, and geographical side by side. Personal life histories and family events are connected to larger nati onal and international events. How could we represent this in a Digital Humanities project? 1) The Republic of Letters is a good example 2) A more user friendly approach to constructing such a spatial and temporal map is Viewshare The open access so ftware is provided by the Library of Congress. Here is a good example that illustrates its potential: SWAG Diplomacy: http://viewshare.org/views/drevans/swag diplomacy black travel memoirs/ 3) Another easy way to create a spatial map is Google Maps Google Maps may only allow you to create a geographical map (rather than a temporal one), but it is very user friendly What is the purpose of creating such a project? How did circulation of ideas occur? Mapping and visualizing personal and political Case studies of regions or events possible. This can be in the short accompanying essay(s) you write

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Course: Panama Silver, Asian Gold: Migration, Money, & the Making of Modern Caribbean Literature Writing for Wikipedia Dhanashree Thorat wrote two blog posts, with this class in mind, on why it is important to contribute to Wikipedia. One of the major issues is that Wikipedia's geographical coverage is inequitable, and there is more coverage on the 'First World.' So called 'Third World' w riters either have short entries, or no entries at all. For example, Victor Chang and Ramabai Espinet do not have an entry on Wikipedia. Most Caribbean writers, including Edgar Mittelholzer and Maryse Cond, do not have good entries. Blog Posts Post 1 : ab out these and other issues: http://www.dthorat.com/wikiknow/ Post 2 : how you can contribute to Wikipedia: http://www.dthorat.com/wikiknow2/ Some general links to get started: Article Wizard: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Article_wizard Welcome : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Welcoming_committee/Welcome_to_ Wikipedia New Contributors : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:New_co ntributors Curated Online Exhibit Context: Last week, after working on the assignment which asked us to juxtapose a historical and a literary source, the class discussion veered towards how a similar juxtaposition could be pursued through an online exhibit. The online exhibit would enable the fol lowing: The curator should be able to place multimedia (eg a historical photography or stereograph), a literary passage, or a historical source side by side The curator will write a short essay explaining why this juxtaposition is relevan t The exhibit space should allow the viewer to browse through and link to different juxtapositions The class discussed different technologies which could enable such an exhibit. We thought that Omeka or Prezi might offer some solutions. A good exhibit: Offers a new perspective/insight on the topic

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Course: Panama Silver, Asian Gold: Migration, Money, & the Making of Modern Caribbean Literature Synthesizes and presents knowledge in a provocative way Think about amount of text, placement of text, accessibility, compatible images let technology decide your exhibit but fit technology to your work. Method 1 of creating an exhibit: Omeka http://www.omeka.net/ Omeka.net is a hosted service, while Omeka.org is downloadable and self hosted. U se Omeka.net to start with because it will give you templates and space you need. Omeka.org also requires more technical expertise. Some examples of good exhibits: Deseronto (built with Omeka. Look at Photography Collection.): http://aboutdeseronto.omeka.net/items/show/3 Presidential Visits to Charlotte (built with Omeka. Look at Exhibits): http://thepresidentcomestotown.omeka.net/ Digital Archiving Resources (built with Omeka): http://www.dar.cah.ucf.edu/ Jacoulet: http://exhibits.uflib.ufl.edu/jacoulet/ AboutFace: http://exhibits.uflib.ufl.edu/aboutface/ Florida and the Civil War: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/wbts Method 2 of creating an exhibit: Wordpress Sign up for a Wordpress blog, but instead of activating the blog feature, you can use Pages to create Exhibit pages. Wordpress is very user friendly, and you will have many options for themes. Another advantage of using Wordpress is that you can embed powe rpoints, PDFs, Google Maps, etc into your exhibit. Here is a basic example I created: http://canalzone.wordpress.com/ (Please email me if you are interested in looking at the 'back end,' i.e. the interface where you edit content and layout. I will give you the username and password)

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Course: Panama Silver, Asian Gold: Migration, Money, & the Making of Modern Caribbean Literature Visualization and Misery Why Visualize: 1. different way of representing data, 2. showing relationships which are not as apparent in written content, 3. making information more easily available, 4. scholarship that appeals to a broader base 5. creating new scholarship General Examples: 1. Diplomatic Cables. Visualization invites reader to explore content. http://www.declassification engine.org/diploglobe/indexwithdrawn from to.html 2. Visualizing Twitter. Capture information more succinctly than written content would http://www.mapbox.com/blog/visualizing 3 billion tweets/ Challenge: Some knowledge of tools required. Solutions: 1) Focus on DH tools that are easy to use. Eg. Geocommons, Timeliner, Omeka Geocommons: http://geocommons.com/ Visualize the journey that the Allanshaw took. Timeliner: http://timeliner.okfnlabs.org/ Creating Online Exhibits with Omeka (use .net rather than .org): http://info.omeka.net/showcase/ UF Example 1: http://exhibits.uflib.ufl.edu/jacoulet/ UF Example 2: http://exhibits.uflib.ufl.edu/aboutface/ Creating new scholarship. 2) Storyboarding. Before you create big scale visualizations, you would have to draft the content, and organize it (placement, format, layout, etc). This is a project in itself, and one that you can create using Word, etc 3) Use traditional tools to prod uce innovative scholarship.

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Course: Panama Silver, Asian Gold: Migration, Money, & the Making of Modern Caribbean Literature Eg. Powerpoint or Prezi can be used to visualize the Allanshaw, pin point where witnesses were located, insert testimonies, etc The point of visualization is not just to create something Let the scholarly and pedagogic al value of the work drive you. Postcolonial Digital Humanities Adeline Koh and Roopika Risam created this website to discuss the intersection of Postcolonial Studies and Digital Humanities. The blog provides a good starting point to learn about contem porary issues in this field, and it may give you some ideas for your own class project. The Rewriting Wikipedia Project is also a relevant project. Link: http://dhpoco.org/