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Metadata Information for Assignment 4 (for Course, Panama Silver, Asian Gold: Migration, Money, and the Making of the Mo...

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Material Information

Title:
Metadata Information for Assignment 4 (for Course, Panama Silver, Asian Gold: Migration, Money, and the Making of the Modern Caribbean )
Physical Description:
Assignment
Language:
English
Creator:
Rosenberg, Leah R.
Publisher:
Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC)
Place of Publication:
Miami, FL
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Course materials for Panama Silver, Asian Gold
Genre:
Spatial Coverage:

Notes

Abstract:
Assignment for "Panama Silver, Asian Gold: Migration, Money, and the Making of the Modern Caribbean", a distributed online collaborative course (DOCC)
Citation/Reference:
Course materials for: “Panama Silver, Asian Gold: Migration, Money, and the Making of the Modern Caribbean” an interdisciplinary Digital Humanities Course with the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC, www.dloc.com) Spring 2014, taught by Leah Rosenberg at the University of Florida

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:

This item is licensed with the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike License. This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon this work non-commercially, as long as they credit the author and license their new creations under the identical terms.
System ID:
AA00021177:00001

Full Text

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METADATA INFORMATION FOR ASSIGNMENT 4 1. METADATA WHAT IS IT AND WHAT DOES IT MATTER? Go over main ideas from the video/ppt What is the technical definition of metadata? What is the socio technical definition of metadata? How can thinking critically about metadata be powerful? Why does Metadata matter? 2. H OW TO DO THE METADATA SECTION OF ASSIGNMENT 4 Because many of the photographs you have chosen have not yet been fully catalogued, your work can directly contribute to their cataloguing. I will give your assignments, if you give me permission, to Rebecca F itzsimmons, so she can include your work in making the metadata for the photographs. This is an example of the role of teaching at research universities: it involves undergraduates directly in research. Steps 1. Check to see if your photograph is in www.dloc.com by typing in the accession number and/or key words from the title. 2. If you photograph is not there, it will be in the Panama Canal Museum Inventory, which houses information about archival materials from the collection that have not yet been fully catalogued. To do this, go to http://ufdc.ufl.edu/PCMI And type in the accession number. Considerations for Adding Metadata from Rebecca Fitzsimmons When making a reco rd, the cataloguer or archivist has the option of including many possible fields ( http://dloc.com/help/metadata ), but usually, has limited information and includes only those fields where there is sufficient in formation. Considering some of the types of information (fields) that can be included may help you to identify further types of information you would like to consider in enhancing the metadata for your photograph(s). Also, if a field is blank in the re cord it will not display when you view the public face of the database because not all fields are useful for every type of object and it clutters the record to see a bunch of empty fields. Example Item Record, Public View

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Item Record, Internal View (many empty fields) Record Additional Fields Example of photograph with relatively complete metadata http://dloc.com/AA00016121/00001/citation?search=2013.5.1 U.S. Dredge Sandpiper excavating in lock site at Myraflores, Panama Canal This is an example of a photograph that has been catalogued and digit i zed and that has relatively extensive metadata supplied by the son of one of the engineers featured in the photograph. While it does not address the segregation and racism that most likely explains the lack of names for the black workers, the metadata does record the absence of their names and provides the basis for the researcher to examine this question. Th e metadata, especially in the general notes section, provides useful information about the location, the spelling, and the work done and its relevance. Most useful available fields for object record metadata: Basic Information: Main Title Other Ti tles (often used for series title, alternative titles, translated titles, etc.) Resource Type (standardized from dropdown: choice of aerial, archival, artifact, audio, book, dataset, map, newspaper, photograph, serial, video; can also add specific inform ation EX. photograph; gelatin silver print) Language Name Authorities: Creator (can enter full name and birth/death dates, or birth date ; and creator role ; can also be a corporate creator EX. Smith, John 1904 1940 OR Smith, John, 1904 OR photographe r OR Smith, John, photographer)

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Publication Details: Publisher (Name and, if available publication location) Manufacturer Publication Date (date published, if it is published material; this is often the same as the copyright date) Copyright Year (associated with the creation of the resource, often the same as publication year) Subject: Subject Keywords (can use one or more that describe image; take from Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH), searchable here: http://authorities.loc.gov/ EX. Dredging Spoil (lcsh) and Panama Canal Company (1879 1889)(lcsh) Spatial Coverage (where the depicted item is, broad or specific ranging from continent down city section or area, depending on which information is most clear in identifying place EX. Panama Central America Panama Canal Zone OR Panama Colon) Notes: Abstract (choose heading from list, most useful choices being Abstract; Summary; Subject; and Scope and Content; describe the image and content or the subjects covered -EX.: Summary or abstract type note might read: Workers posing on the upper deck of the Sandpiper Dredge in Culebra Cut in December 1907. Subject type note might describe the content in non controlled vocabulary: dredgi ng, Sandpiper Dredge, dredging crew Scope and Content type note might read: Dredging crews were generally composed of both silver and gold roll employees, who lived and worked on the same dredging machinery, but maintained separate facilities such as sle eping and dining quarters. A general note might also retype a particular caption written on the photo: Caption written on photo reads Crew of the Sandpiper: 1. Joe, Smith, 2. Jack Smith 3. Jim Brown 4. Dan Forester 5. Alan Green. Rest of crew are blacks OR Caption on back of photo reads Proprietress. These notes can contain a lot of relevant information about the object itself, background, etc. and might even link to

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other related collection objects. These are the links to the digital library and the object inventory: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/pcm Panama and the Canal digital library http://ufdc.ufl.edu/l/pcmi Panama Canal Object Inventory (just remember that some item records in this inventory are only viewable on campus because they are restricted by IP address). Examples from the photographs examined in Special & Area Studies Collection in class 3/10: Example of photograph with relatively complete metadata http://dloc.com/AA00016121/00001/citation?search=2013.5.1 U.S. Dredge Sandpiper excavating in lock site at Myraflores, Panama Canal This is an example of a photograph that has been catalogued and digit i zed and that has relatively extensive metadata supplied by the son of one of the engineers featured in the photograph. While it does not address the segregation and racism that most likely explains the lack of names for the black workers, the metadata does record the absence of their names and provides the basis for the researcher to examine this question. The metadata, especially in the general notes section, provides useful information about the location, th e spelling, and the work done and its relevance. Examples of photographs not yet fully catalogued that lack this detail in the metadata: "Native on Back" http://ufdc. ufl.edu/PCMI003554/00001/citation?search=2000.038.003.008 Description of a photograph of what appears to be an Amerindian or West Indian family Panama. The title is actually a note indicating that there is the word is on the back of the image.


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