The Blue Eagle

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Title:
The Blue Eagle
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Newspaper
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United States -- National Recovery Administration
Publisher:
National Recovery Administration ( Washington, D.C )
Publication Date:

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Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 16917556
System ID:
AA00021018:00047

Full Text










Vol. II, No. 19


Issued Weekly by the National Recovery Administration, Washington


IPermissive Code

AuthorityExpense

Defined
: In a letter directed to all Code Authorl-
*'ties the National Industrial Recovery Board
Sharply differentiated between Code Adminis-
i.:tration and trade association activities, ad-
.vising Code Authorities that expenses or
.trade association functions, would not be ap-
,proved unless such activities are specifically
Authorized in the Code.
SThe text of the letter follows:
Due to the uncertainties which have
"arisen in the minds of some Code Authouty
.members and others with regard to the pur-
Sposes for which a Code Authority may expend
Code Authority funds and the amounts which
Smay be expended for these purposes, the fol-
.:plowing statement is made, designed to afford
"guidance to those charged with the responsi-
bility of spending Code Authority funds and
.of preparing budgets limiting the spending
of .'those funds.
S'"Code Authority funds may be expended
-for Code administration activities only, and
a- Code Authority budget will not be approved
.jf Its items cover the expense of other activi-
.ties, .Code administration activities are de- .
.'fined as those authorized by the provisions
oK!.f the applicable Code. Where the applicable
'.Code so authorizes, budget items providing.
for reasonable expenditures for the following
p purposes will ordinarily be approved: .
"1. Salaries: Compensation of qode Au-
thority executives, members, legal counsel,
"clerical and other employees.
:. '2. Office .expenses: Payments for rental,
. heat, water, light, office equipment, telephone
and telegraph, postage, stationery and sup-
I, plies, printing and mimeographing, and mis-
cellaneous office expenses.
S"3. Traveling expenses: Payments of ex-
Spenses of trips of member-, executives, and
Employees for Code administration purposes.
i' "4. General expenses: Payments for legal
Services not on a salary basis, accountants'
5 services, insurance premiums; and other gen-
Seral expenses properly chargeable to this
i- account, such as cost of labels or stamps
' sold, fees to trade associations for specific
p services in connection with Code adminis-
Stration functions.
"5. Committee and agency expenses: Pay-
ment of expenses, including compensation, of
Committees and agencies for Code adminis-
tration, including:
"(a) Trade-practice committee.
. "(b) Labor committees.
"(c) Jurisdictional disputes committees.
"(d) Special investigation committees.
"(e) Divisional administrative agencies.
"(f) Regional administrative agencies.
S "(g) Local administrative agencies.
S "No Item of expense, otherwise proper,
Swill be approved if unreasonable or exces-
sive in amount. The standard of reasonable-
Sness is that applicable to the economical op-
eration of an ordinary business enterprise.
i Items including exorbitant payments for com-
pensation, extravagant expenditures for office
equipment, expenditures for luxurious travel
and subsistence and .the like will not be
approved.
"Specific attention is directed to the fact
r that Code administration is entirely separate
Sand distinct from trade-association activities.
!F Unless a Code Authority is authorized by
Express terms in its Code to engage in such'
Activities. items providing for expenditures
.' for trade-association activities will not be
Approved. Among such activities are:
"1. Trade promotion, including education
1..' publicity and cooperative advertising.
"2. Research, including scientific or tech-
Snical, and market research.
S"3. Industrial education, including em-
Sployee and personnel training and the pro-
Smotion of proper industrial relations.
: 4. Development and promotion of cost and
fiscal accounting.
"5. Promotion of industry planning, In7
Seluding statistical and other informational
Services whereby each company in an indus-
,!.,'try may better shape its own program.
S' "6. Promotion of services to increase the
efficiency of management.
S "7. Public relations; Government rela-
tions; legislation.
:.- "8. Promotion of acquaintanceship among
mIe-mbers of an Industry, and discussion of all
common problems, including national policies
htiat affect business and the country.
'Whenever audits of accounts of Code An-
oritles ,show that improper expenditures
ae. been made it will be necessary to dis-
low those exp5endItures."


P-'V. W.4".htk'...'H.""."."
f' .: ". :L .'.:., : . "'


Revised Code For

'Cement Industry

Approved


A revised Code for the cement industry, to
become effective May 21, has been approved
by the National Industrial Recovery Board.
The Code, approved originally on Novem-
ber 27, 1933, has been changed to eliminate
the provisions for'allocation of output, con-
trol of new-plant construction or increases
in capacity, customer classification, and p6'-
hibition of sales below cost as determined by
a cost formula and a mandatory uniform ac-
counting- system. .... .
Hoiirs provisions have been revised to
tighten restrictions upon overtime and to
substitute a basic 40-hour, 6-day week for
the former provision permitting a 42-hour
week or averaging of a 36-hour week over a
6-month period. Standard labor provisions'
for the protection of employee welfare have
been added; Mlnim'um wage rates are un-
changed.
The open-price, filing system has been re-
vised to provide for filing with a confidential
agent instead of with the Code Authority
and to conform to NRA practice In wording
and procedure. -
The revised Code Is the result of 52
changes of varying importance made after
public hearing on amendments proposed by
the Code Authority, NRA, and the Con-
-umers' and Labor Advisory Boards.
In approving the revised Code the NIRB
deleted the !final article, 'which stated that
members of the Industry "assenting" to the
Code did not thereby assent to modifications.
The Board stayed section 8 of article X.
This section would permit members of the
industry to file with the Code Authority des-
tination costs based' upon land-grant or other
special freight rates applicable to shipments
to the Federal Government and to "meet des-
tination costs thus established." The NIRB
ordered further study of this provision.


Fish and Shellfish

SIndustry Code

Approved

To Have Supervision Over North-
west and Alaska Preparing and -
Wholesaling Group

The National Industrial Recovery Board
has approved a Code for the Northwest and
Alaska fish and shellfish preparing and/or
wholesaling industry, a division of the fishery
industry, to become effective on Monday,
May 20. '
The Code is sponsored by the Northwest
Wholesale Fish Dealers Association and by
the Commercial Fisheries Association of
Oregon. .
It' provide that accounting, clerical, and
other office employees shall be limited to a
44-hour, 6-da.V week and 8-hour day. Em-
ployees engaged in'picking and packing crab
meat or shrimp meat will be subject to the
same restrictions except that in order to pre-
vent spoilage they may work 48 hours a week
provided that time and one-third is paid for
all over 8 f6urs a day.v, but they may not
work more than 10 hours In any 1 day. All
other employees may work 48 hours per .week
or 8 hours in any 1 day.
A weekly minimum wage rate of $18 is
established for office employees, with a pro-
vision for a limited number of office boys at
$16 a week. Employees in the fresh, freez-
ing, smoking, salting, or mild-curing branches
of the industry engaged in gluing boxes,
making boxes, washing products or utensils,.
icing fish, stenciling, janitor work, wrapping,
or packaging cannot be paid less than 40
cents an hour, but not more than 25 percent
of nonoffice employees per plant shall be con-
sidered to be so engaged. Employees engaged
in picking crab meat in Alaska shall he paid
not less than 3 cents per pound or 35 cents
per hour. In Oregon and Washington the
rate will be 5 cents per pound br 40 cents
per hour. Those engaged in picking shrimp
In Alaska will not be paid less than 8 cents
a pound or 30 cents an hour, and in Washing-
ton and Oregon the rate will be 10 cents a
pound or 30 cents an hour.
Crab packers in Alaska will receive at least
38 cents an hour. Dock workers in the
Alaska crab or shrimp branches must be paid
not less than 50 cents an hour or $90 a month.
Employees handling Industry products in
places under 2,000 population in Washington
Sand Oregon, are to receive not less than 40
cents an hour. For all other employees in
the Industry the minimum wage rate.iIs 50
cents an hour.


President Approves Board"


.


NRA Extension


Two-year Period Held Necessary to Obtain Cooperation,.c
Industry in Code Formulation with Assurance to Man-. :"
agement and Labor of Reasonable Permanence -

At a conference on May 16-with the National Industrial Recovery BoartE
President approved the following recommendations, which had been unanimously
adopted by the Board and submitted to him.


Essentials of legislative action for the ex-
tension of the NRA:
1. Tiwo-year e-tension. This time is neces-
sary to obtain the cooperation of Industry in
the formulation of Codes, with assurances to
management and labor of, reasonably perma-
nent conditions. It is necessary to maintain
an adequate personnel in the NRA; to work


MarineEquipment

Code Exemption

SGranted
The National Industrial Recovery Board
has announced approval of an application by
the Code Authority for the marine equipment
manufacturing industry to stay until Jdne 16,
1935, article XI, section 17, subsection (a),
of the Code insofar as it applies to industry
members engaged in the. manufacture of
cushions, fenders, and life preservers.
Article XI, section 17, subsection (a), reads
as follows:,
"*Section ,1Y. To give more favorable dis-
counts and/or terms than the folloWing, ex-
cept boat oars and paddles:
"(a) No more favorable terms than 2-per-
cent discount shall be granted a customer on
invoices dated from the 1st to the 15th of
any month, if payment is mailed or otherwise
made by the 25th oi the same month; or on
invoices dated from the 16th to the end of
the month, if payment is mailed or otherwise
made by the 10th of the next succeeding
month."

Assembled Watch Code

Restrictions on Credit

Terms Stayed
Provisions of article VIII, section 17, of
the Code for the assembled watched industry
have been stayed until June 16. These provi-
sions restrict the credit terms which mem-
bers .of the industry may offer. The opera-
tion of the-provisions and the application by
the Cote Authority that they be stayed was
discussed at a public hearing in New York
on March 28, 1935. Evidence at that bearing
showed that 75 percent of the retail jewelry
sales of the country are made during the
last 3 months of the year and that because
of this seasonality any rigid restriction on
credit terms tends to discourage carrying
large stocks In the off season.
It is expected that granting the stay will
stabilize employment and production during
the slack season, not only in the assembled
watch industry but also in the retail jewelry
trade. _____________

Trucking Rate Clerks

and Dispatchers Get

Raise in Minimum

-Wages
A recently approved amendment to the
Code for the trucking industry establishes a
separate schedule of minimum wages for rate
clerks and dispatchers.
The minimum rates approved are $18 a
week in cities over 500,000 population, $17.-10
in cities between 250,000 and 500,000, and
$16.80 elsewhere. Rate clerks and dispatch-
ers are office workers, and the minimum wage
rates for office workers, $15, $14.50, and $14
a week according to population, have been
applicable to them up to now. Other office
workers, however, are limited to 40 hours a
week, while rate clerks and dispatchers may
work 48. The new rates, designed to correct
the wage inequalities which resulted, In effect.
extend the hourly minimum to cover the
longer week.


out problems of Code admiiistration;'.tOt
strengthen enforcement through judicial ap,
proval of methods; and to prevent the entire
break-down of labor and fair trade prapticdt'e
provisions by chiselers, who are already
work umderminlng the standards of fair cotL
petition. The extension of NRA for a ev
months will brig rapid deterioration anddil:
integration of' the whole industrial recovers
program. .
2. Adequate period for the, revision .'
Codes, 3 to 6 months. .
3. Improved statement of legislative" ppiP,
cies and standards to give additional guidan
and authority for administrative action:'p
4. Jurisdiotion of NRA limited to ind siff
engaged in or substantially a-fecting.. >it
state commerce. This will prevent -the NR.
from taking 1in tod much teri-ltory and .wi.
strengthen Its legal authority.' '
5. Provision for voluntary Codes a*d 4a"e1
quate'.authority for imposition of. Zimntite
Codes. Both are necessary. Voluntary Cob'd
to encourage improved business practice$/fn.
eluding appropriate labor provisions.' In '
Cited Codes to Insure minimum wages, maxi
mum hours, prohibition of child labor,. anl
section 7 (a). .
6. Definite authority and standards for the
NRA to prevent unfair competitive praatice"
especially those tending to monopoly and' d'.`
struction of small enterprises. ,'."
7. Methods of Code making and enforcJ
naent should be further defined; with enfor.r
meat primarily through injunction or cease-J
and-desist orders, and with provision for ade4
quate protection of individual rightsi'nfldli
small enterprises through oppdrtunlfy' '..i|
hearing and Judicial review,-rand public c60a'
trol of all compulsory processes. .


Quality Statemeni

On Cutlery

Approved
A standard statement of quality for us..in
sales of cutlery and manicure implements ias7
now in effect, having received the approval
of more than 75 percent of the makers 'o
Such goods as well as NRA sanction. '41t
The approved statement reads:
"This (merchandise) has been carefully 4
,inspected and is guaranteed against any de
fects in workmanship or material. If'foum9ip
unsatisfactory, it should be returned direil
to us, or through the dealer to us, for inspect
rion and adjustment of complaint. Distrib_
utors are not authorized by manufacturer.
to adjust complaints or make replacement;
'The standard statement of quality-wai
adopted 'in accordance with the provisions'.d
the Code for the cutlery;' manicure lmpl -e
meant, and. painters and paperhangers" tdq
manufacturing industry. That Code provides
that after a standard statement of qualiti
has been approved, goods ,may not be sol7
under a more favorable guarantee. -
Approval of the standard statement iwasi
voted by at least 75 percent of each of thai
following divisions of the Industry: Tabli
and trade knife, pocket knife, scissors anfli
shears, manicure implement, and straight
razor. As its terms are not applicable to.the9
painters and paperhangers tool division of
the industry, no vote was taken and'ith4
statement is not binding in that division."-


Amendment to Con-

struction Code Is,

Approved
Approval of an amendment to the Code'"'
Fair Competition for the Constructin Inft l
dustry giving the National Code Authority
'power to consider and examine any ameiid-
ments proposed to, the supplemental Codes has
been announced. The purpose of the amend:
meant is to bring about proper coordinator
within the industry and between its vari'tf1
divisions and suidivlsilons. .."
'..


etA,': t" .~L" 4Ss ii c$i"4S':&42~'kr.'.4..:~'t.a'-':, -. 1.


May 17, 193


Recommendations For


= R-A Y,


J ._


.. .











SCHEDULE OF CODE HEARINGS. MAY 20 TO 24


important Information Concerning 'Notices of Hearings and

.4 Opportunity to be Heard
B;i'Hearlng8 are of two types: (1) Oral hearings, OPPORTUNITY TO BE HEARD (In writing:
designatednated hearing on calendar; and (2) "op- Facts, criticisms, objections, or suggestions Lon-
r":pos'tunlty to be beard" by the filing of written cerning the subject matter of such notices must
atement of ft, brief, or criticisms dealing be submitted on or before the finl dote specified
. of ft, rief o deali n the notice, addressed to the proper Deputy Ad.
-wlth the subject matter of such notice. minlerrntor or other oflicls Indicated Such com]
', -.' Th s t t municeations must elate: (11 Name of Industry;
'.'.--The subject matter of these notices Is abbreviated (2 u nme of correspondent and group represented
:11'n the schedule published below. A complete offi. (3) fasi supporting criticisms, objections, or
S:.,cal copy of any notice may be obtained on request suggestions.
z' froan the Notional Recovery Administration, Room The subject master referred to ir either type
".SIS.g Department of Commerce Building. Wash- of notice may be revised in any reasonably ger-
;.ingtbn, D. C. manie particular on the basis of such farts, critl-
"'" clams, and other conaiderarions as are properly
i.HE'ARINGS (oral) : Those wishing to be heard before the Administrator.
moaut file a written request with the proper Deputy Calendar Is chronological, with alphabetical
S .Fdmlolstrator at least 24 hours before the date arrongement by trade or Industry for each day.
.aset for the hearing, which request must state: rrngeent by trade or Industry for ecdy.
N.U(.1). Name of Industry and date of hearing; NOTE: Since all notices must be In the printer's
:M2)- names of persona wishing to testify and groups hands by Friday evening next preceding the pitull-
r;epresented. :13 deflnlte alternative proposal or catorlon of The Blue Eagle. the calendar below does
"pCpeilflf objections, without argument. Hearings not show notices posted on the Official Bulletin
rare confined to factual presentation. Written Board after that date. nor does this calendar show
Sbrlefs containing arguments as well as fact may other hearings for the came dates which may have
x.be filed. appeared In prior Issues of this publicotlon.


.INDUsTRY oR TRADE


'Monday, May 20,
1935
itunmlnous Coal Indus-
t-y; 24-113.



X'ess manufacturing In-
danstry. 4-St.

osndry Bupply Indus-
201" -15.




tr. Manufacnuring In-
distry, 436-29

nam-', Exchanges and
i-Meadbers thereof,


Lim:stone Industry,
..007B.
F. -*** .
Xliddle Atlantic prepar-
'Ing and Wholesaling or
!iWholesaling Industry
g(Northern Area), 308-


I',





ronferrous Foundry In-
.dpsn'y, 165-37.

'hoto-Engraving Indus-
dustry, 180-68.

is5?

74.
I,:




Rayou and Slth Dyeing
siiand Printing Industry,
gi,7-25.
it,.









[Reinforctng Materials3
lng anda1Indutyen

T exabricating Industry,



iS'oy and Playthinga In'
dusfty1 B6-S6.


s/&xsaiday, May 21,
,i'''. 1935

Fiasng Tackleng Industry,
'118.-.'
rsraphn drts Industries,
i2s?-97.
.',ai...











rOl'nk Tecxtle Industry,
Siii Idte,







I'ruokng Industry, 278-
;" '' -"


PLACE AND DEPUtY
AD'INIaTEAt OR


Room 301, Albee Build-
ing, Washington, D. C
N. W. Roberta.



Room 3047, Commexe
Building, Washington,
D. C B. E. Oppen-
helm %
1300 Street NW. Wash-
ington, D. 0., W. W.
Rose.



Room 3071, Commerce
Building, Washington,
D C.. Walter Mangum.
Room 224, Barr Butlding,
Wasmngton, D C.,
George Carlson.
I
Room 605, Al bee Build ag,
Washington, D. C. 10
a. m W. A. Jans.en.
Room C01 Barr Build-
ing Washipgton, D. C.,
R 8. Hoilhgshead.









1320 0 Street NW., Was.h-
ingtoo, D. C., Dexter
SA. Tutein.
Room 1027. Barr Building,
Washington, D. C.,
J. U. Douglass.








Room 3022, Commerce
Building, Washington,
D C., A Henry Thurs-
ton.









Room 703, Albee Building,
Washington, D. C.,
Robt. N. Campbell.


Room 402, 1bIS K Street
NW., Washington,
D. C., W. L. Schusz.


Room 402, 1518 K Street
NW., Washington, D.
0., W. L Schurz.
Room 1016, Barr Building,
Washington, D. U.
Oeorge r. Ross.







Fairfax Room, Willard
Hotel. Washington, D.
C., 10 a. m, A. Henry
Thurston.

Room 802, Carry Build-
ing, Washington, D. 0.,
0. P. Clark.

Room 601, Barr Building,
Washington, D. C,
R. 8. BoUlingsbead.


PROPOSED ACilON


Opportunity to be heard on application of the Code Autbor;Uty
of Di -trict IX southernn WyomlnieJ of Division V. for approval
of its budget anl baris of contribution for the period from Apr.
1. t935, to Mar. 31, I13. both dates inclusive
The total amount of the budget is $).097. The conrrbution isL a
fraction of a mill when necessary, but not to exceed I mill per
ton for the year based on 1934 production of 3. million tons.
Opportunity to be heard on application of the Code Authority
for Amendment to art. IX, sec 3, of tle Code (terms of sale.

Opportunity to be heard on application of the Code Authority
for approval of its budget and baiof contribution for the period
from Mar 1. 1935, to Feb. 2, 1936.
The estimated amount of the budget to June 16i, 1935, is 13,500
The contribution Is M of I percent on total sales, as reported
monthly, for the second month previous to the date of billing and
payAble in 30 days
Opportunity to be heard on application of the Code Authority
for amendment to art. VI, sec. 8, of the Code (records and
reports).
Opportunity to be heard on application of the Code Authority
- for ameodmeot to atN Vsec 6, of the Code safety and health).
Administrative Order LP-8-10 approves such amendreotn to
become effective on May 20, 193., unless good cause to the con-
Irarv is shown prior thereto.
Hearing on application of the Code Authority for amendment to
art. 6, sen. 4, of the Code (price filing).
Opportunity to be heard on application of the executive com-
mittee for approval of its budgets and basis of contribution.
The total amount of the budget for the period from Mar 18 to
June 16. 1935 is $3,875, for thbe period from June 17,1935, to Mar 18,
936 is 1,625. In addition to the above amounts there are items
In the amount of S1,760 and $1,41095 representing expense in-
curred in connection with the preparation, adoption, and'approval
of the Fishery Industry Code and its Supplementary Code
The contribution is Mo or I percent of the total annual sales of
products of tbhe industry as determined by sales [or the preceding
year, and including intercompany or Interdepartmental sales
from those subsidiaries or departments engaged in production to
those engaged in distribution. Payments are to be made In equal
monthly installments on the first day of each month. Certain
-other provisions will oe furnished on request.
Opportunity to be heard on application of the Code Authority
for amendment to sec. 4 of the Aluminum Permanent Mold Cast-
ings DiVision
Opportunity to be heard on application of the National and
Fourteenth Dlistrict Code Authorities for approval of Its budgets
and basis of contribution.
The total amount of the National budget for the period from Jan. I
(o June 16, 1935, Is $25.,492.7b, for the period from June 17 to Dec
31, 1935, Is 30,061.25. The contribution i3s 1oo of I percent of
gross scale value of sales during the period of Jan. 1 to Dec. 31,
1934, payable in 12 monthly installments during 1935, each at the
rate of ,'i the yearly amount. Minimum yearly assessment is
$5 payable in 2 installments. The total amount orf the four-
teenthb district adminIstrative agency budget for the period Jan.
I to June 16, 1935, is $44.65, for the period June 17 to Den 31, 1935.
Is $55.45. The contribution Is s$ioo of I percent of gross scale
value of sales from Jan. 1, to Dec 31, 1934.
Opportunity to be heard on application of the Code Authority
for approval of Its budgets and baeis of contribution.
The total amount of the budget for the period from Jan. I to June 16,
1935 is $35,643.87,-for the period from June 17 to Dec. 31, 1935, is
$32,3-3 8b. The coptribution is % of I percent of the gross volume
of business done during the preceding year of 1934, in the ser viing
and dyeing, finishing, printing, and other processing of textiles
as described in men Code to be paid in 12 equal monthly install
meont. beginning January 1935, and shall be due and payable on
Feb. tI, 1935. The remaining installments shall fall due and
payable monthly thereafter. Certain provisions are made for
firms engaged in business for only a portion of 1934, stalling in
business alter Jan J, 1935, permanently discontinuing any in-
tegral'and separate plant In 1934, and to those firms who fail or
neglect upon request promptly to furnish trite and accurate
figures necessary. 'T hbes provisions ill be furnished on request.
Opportunity to be heard on application of the Code Authority
for exemption from the provisions of art. V, see. 10, of the Code,
insofar as they apply to wire mesh whbn sold in coonjunction with
reinforcing materials. Administrative Order 127-25, approves
such exemption to become effective on May 20, 1935, unless good
cause to the contrary Is shown prior thereto.
Opportunity to be heard on application of J. W. Aron'on, tem-
porary receiver of the Newton & Thompson Moanufacturiog Co.,
random, Vt., for exemption from the provisionsof art. IV, sac. I,
of the Code (handicapped workers).


Opportunity to be heard on application of the Code Authority
for amendment to art. II, sec. 3, par. (a), of the Code (wages and
horms).
Opportunity to be heard on application of the Code Authority,
for the Securities and Bank Note Engraving and Printing Indus.
try, Division C-3, for approval of its budget and basis of con-
tributnon for the period Irom Jan. I to June 16, 1915
The total amount of the budget Is $3,500. The contribution is 0
percent bytbe American Bank Note Co., 70 Broad Street, New
ork, N. Y., and 50 percent by all other establishmems in l the
industry in thebo proportion whicn the annual mechanical pay roll
for the calendar year 1934 bears to the total annual mechanical
pay roll for the calendar year 19J4 of said group, which is esti-
mated as approximately 35 cents for each $100 of annual mechanical
pay roll.
Hearing on amendments proposed by the Code Authonrily to
schedule A, art. I, sees I, 4. 5, and 9, art. tlt, secs. 2, 3, and 6,
art. IV, secs. 1 to 5, Inclusive. Schedule B. art. I. see I, art II,
sees. I to 13, Inclusive, art. 11, seos. 1 to 8, inclusive, art. IV,
sees I to 4., inclusive, and art. VI, see. I, of thbe Code.
Opportunity to be heard on application for extension until June
16, 1915, of exemption o( all mem bars of the drive yourself indus-
try from the prorVisions of arts. VI, Vll, and VII and sees. 1 and
2 of art. IX ol the Code, such exemption having been granted by
Administrative Order 2?8-170,'dated Mar. 8. 193h.
Opportunity to be heard on application of the executive com-
mittee for approval of Its budgets and basis of contribution.
The total amount of the budget for the period from Apr. I to June
16, 1935, is $2,657 28, which amount includes $212.u0 to be paid
to the National Code Authority. The total amount of the
budget for the period from June 17. 1935, to Mar 31, 1936, is
$9,917.72, which amount includes $617.50 to be paid to the Code
Authority tor the fls3ery industry. The contribution is 1,so
of I percent of total annual sales of products-ofl the industry
as determined by sales for the preceding business year, and
including Intercompany or interdepartmental sales lfom tho.e
subsidiaries or departments engaged in production to those
engaged in distribution. Payments shall be made in equal
monthly installments on the frst day of each monta commenc-
ing with the first day of the month following the approval of
the Code. Method of collection will be furnished on request


Interpretations


Air Valve Industry
No. 376-13
FACTS.-Tbere are certain companies and
individuals dealing in products of the air
valve industry, as defined in article II, sec-
tion 1,- of the Code. These companies and
individuals have said products manufactured
for tbdm by others to their own specifications
and/or formulae and 'or patents and said
products bear their name or brand, making it
appear to the user as if these companies and
individuals were in fact manufacturers.
These products are distributed through the
same channels of trade as are used by mem-
bers of the air valve industry.
QUESTION.-Are such companies and in-
dividuals classed as manufacturers as defined
in article II, section 1, and are such com-
panies and individuals subject to the provi-
sions of the Code'?
INTERPRETATION.-E very one who
manufactures for sale Code products as de-
fined in article II, section 1, of the Code
(which definition includes the manufacturing
and distributing by manufacturers under
their own trade names of air and vacuum
valves for venting steam radiators and pipe
lines and auxiliary equipment) ; and whether
he is engaged exclusively in the manufacture
of air valve Industry products or is engaged
also in some other industry; and whether
so engaged as an "employer" or "on his
own behalf"; and whether he actually makes
the Code products in his own plant or has
them made for him to his own specificatUons,
or his own designs or patterns; is subject


to the provisions of the, Air Valve Industry
Code in connection with that portion of his
business which is included under the defini-
tion in the Air Valve Industry Code, except
as this interpretation may be in conflict with
Administrative Order No. X-36 and other
Executive and Administrative orders.

I is
Soap and Glycerine Manu-
facturing Industry
No. 83-86
FACTS.-We hove approximately 27 em-
ployees in our soap factory, but do not know
what limits to place on the hours of the
following employees, described as "A" and
" B :
"A" is employed as an office, executive,
and receives $102.50 per month. He has
charge of approving the orders in the office,
does all the purchasing, and acts, under the
supervision of the manager, in directing both
office and factory employees.
"B" has complete charge of shipping and
also supervises the packing of all orders.
He is paid $88 per month, and is directly
responsible to the manager of our company.
Both employees act in the capacity of
assisting the manager in directing and super-
vising the work of others. .
QUESTION,-How many hours per week
are employees "A" and "B" permitted to
work?
INTERPRETATION.-In accordance with
the provisions of article III, section A-2, of
the Code, not in excess of 48 hours.


S" '., . ; .
". .': :;..:' ; :t;:iL'; ^....W&"^.i:: ^-,.Z. ^**.* ".,.,:' ,


. ....... . . . ... .., . ... .. .. ...... ";: .L'.-


I


Iwcnsr7 OR TRADE PLACE AND DEPUTY PROPOSED ACTiON
NDSrR OB RADE ADMINISTR&TOR

Wednesday, May 22,
1935
Inmecticide and Disin- Room 307, Denrike Build- Opportunity to be heard on application of the Code Authorit]
fectant Manufacturing ing. Washington, D. C., or termination of exemption conferred in par. Ill of Adminils
Industry, 391-20 Ovid E. Roberts, Jr. native Order X-30. dated May 26, 1934 AdministrotLIve Order
391-14, dated Mar 28, 1635, approved such exemption to become
effective on Apr 0, 1935, unless good cause to the contrary lI
shown. On May 22, 1935, Admini'trative Order 391-19 stayed
the effective dale of said order until May 22. 1935, unless good
cause to the contrary is shown prior thereto.
Marble Quarring and Room .02, Albee Build- Opportunity to he heard on application ol the Code Authority
Finishing Industry, Ing. Washington, D. C., for approval of its budget and basis of contribution for the period
421-14. Harry 8. Berry. from May 21, 1935. to May 21, 1936.
The iotal amount of the budget is $36.465 The contribution Is
51e of 1 percent on the total sales or every member, including
members in the New York metropolitan area, plus So of I per
cent additionally on the total sales of every member in the New
York metropolitan area. payable monthly on the basis ofr billing.
done for all work performed during the preceding month. A
registration fee of 25 cents for bins on projects from $I,000 Lc
$.,000 and 50 cents for bids on projects of $5,0W and over is also
provided for on the basis of contribution
Metal Safety Tread Room 410, HiS8 K Street Opportunity to be heard on application of the Code Autbhorit3
Manufacturing Indus- NW. Washington, of approval of irs, budget and bas-is of contritution for the period
try, 4/a7-4 (Subdivi D. C., C R. Nikason. Feb 15. 1935, to Feb. 1i, 1936
iion of the Fabricated The total amount of the budget is $1,500. The contribution is 1
Metal Products Manu- of 1 percent of h[be grosis invoiced value of industry products,
farcturing and Metal payable the 10th of each month on the-amounti ol gross sales of
Fmniihing and Metal the preceding calendar month
Coating Industry)._______________ ________
Thursday, May 23,
1935
Bituminous Coal Indus- Room 301. Albee Build- Opportunity to be heard on application of the. Code Authorit3
cry, 24-116. ing, Washington. D.C., of Northern Pan Handle of West Virginia Subdivisional Code
N. W Roberts. Authority of DiviL ion I for approval of its budget and basis ol
contribution.
The total amount of the budget for the period from May I. 1935,
to Apr. 30, 1936. Inclusive, is V5,'.20 The contrrtibution is 1 cent
per ton on total production of mine less tonnage used at mine
in power pl.nt, per month, until total amount ot budget is reached,
then contributions to cease
Fiber Wallboard Indus- Room 404. A1bee Build- Opportunity to be heard on application of the Code Authority
Lry, 326-10. ing. Fifteenth and 0 for approval of its budget and oasis of contribution for the period
Streets. Washington, from Mar. 19, 1935. to Mar i18, 1936
D. C., Beverly Ober. The total amount of toe budget is $2i,600. The contribution is
not to exceed 20 cents per thousand square feet per month on all
shipments made by each subscrioer to the Code
Portable Electric Lamp 1320 Street NW., Wash- Opportunity to be heard on application of the Code Authority
and Shade Industry, ingion. D. C., D. A. for approval of Its budgets and basis of contribution.
4B-7 (Subdivision of Tutein. The total amount of the budget for the perio.dl from June 1 to June
the Electrical Manufac. 16. 1935 Is $1,1640.39, for the period from June 17, 1935 to June I,
during Indu.try.) 1936 is $40,229.61. The conFributlon Is not to exceed us of I
percent on net sales of all manufacturing] industries, to be payable
monthly on sales of the previous month, provided any member
whose Fross sales on an annual basis are less than 5,001) shall be
exempt from any payment of contribution subject to certain
conditions
Structural Clay Products Room 605, Albee Build- Opportunity to be heard on application of the Code Authority
Industry, 123-23. ing, Washington, D. C., for approval of its budget and basis of contribution for certain
W.A. Janussen. regions.
Common Brick Regions Region 17, 8Southern Pacific; period
covered Jan I to Dec. 3t. 1935, budget in the amount of $7,2)0.
Contribution is 10.03 per 1,000 on all common brick sold; Region 20.
Tennessee- Kentucky. period covered Jan I to Dec 31, 1935,
budget in the amount of 12.115. Contribution is 10 05 per 1,000
brick delivered to Mar. 1, 1935. From Mar. I through Dec. 31,
1935, 10.81 per 1.000 brick delivered
Face Brick Regions: Region 8, Pacific Coast, period covered Dec.
7, 1933, to Den 31. 1935. budget o toe amount ofr $1.300. Contri-
bution Is 10.25 per 1,000 brick monthly with members who have
contributed on sales reported for period July I to Dec 31, 1933,
receiving credit for the full amount of such payments on their
1934 contributions.
Structural Clay Tile Regions: Region 8. Pacific Coast; period
covered Dec. 7, 1933, to Dec 31. 1935. budget in the total amount
of s1,300. Contrioution 1i $005 per ton monthly witn members
who have contributed on sale reported for the period of July 1
to Dee 31. 1933, receiving credit for the full amount of such pay-
ments on their 1934 contributions.
Joint Budgets Joint Southeaistern, period covered June 17 to Dec
31, 1935, budget in the amount of 14,460 Contribution is $002
per 1,000 common brick; 10.03 per 1,000 face brick, 1002 per ton
structural clay tile.
Upward Acting Door In- Red Room, Hamilton Hearing on application of the Frantz Manufacturing Co Sterling,
dusrry, 670-A. Hotel, Washington, Ill., for amendment to art 11, sec. 2 of the Code. by deleting
D. C., 10 a. m., C. R. from the products of the industry "operating hardware made for
NikJason or used in connection with sagle seeilon doors moving radially
__ _____________ upward to a horizontal position above the opseng "

Friday, May 24, 1935
Photo-Engraving Indus- Room 1027, Barr Build- Opportunity to be heard on application of the National Code
try, 180-69. ing. Washington, D. C0 Authority for approval of Its budget and basis of contribution
J.U. Douglass. and the budget and basis of contribution of its Ninth District
Administrative Agency.
The total amount of the National Budget for the period from Jan.
1 to June 16, 03%, is $21,492.75, for the period from June 17 to
Dec. 31, 1935, ;s 1,30,061 25. The contribution is i4Joo of 1 percent
of gross scale value of sales during the period of Jan I1 to Dee. 31,
1934, payable in 12 monthly istallments during 1935, at the rate
of Mx of the yearly amount. Minimum yearly contribution 15,
payable in two Inslallments.
The total amount of the budget for the Ninth District Administra-
tive Agency, for the period Jan. 1, 1935, to June 16, 1935 is $235.47,
for the period June 17 to Dec. 31, 1635 Is 1279.93. The contribu-
tion is 2nioo of 1 percent of gr. scale of sales from Jan 1 to
Der 31, 19.4








"~Cod
Interpretations Limestone Cost' Shipbuilding Co

I I~ 1 7 1 r f 5


Coat and Suit Industry
No. 5-30
FACTS.-Article VI, section 2 D, reads In
part as follows:
D. The confidential agency of the Code
Authority, which shall be composed of the
chief enforcement officer of the Code Author-
ity and such deputies and investigators work-
ing under his supervision as may be employed
by the Code Authority, shall have the right
to examine records of employers as far as
necessary to ascertain whether they are ob-
serving the provisions of this Code and all
employers shall submit their books and rec-
ords for such examination. To require from
time to time from members of the industry
such reports as it may deem necessary as to
wages, hours of labor, costs of production,
conditions of employment, number of em-
ployees, and other matters pertinent to the
purposes of this Code, and to require mem-
bers of the industry to submit periodical re-
ports to it in such form and at such times as
it may require."
A member of this industry who calculates
the wages for his employees on a so-called
"bonus and minus" system, which is a type
of piece-rate system, submits to the confi-
dential agency of the Code Authority a pay-
roll report, setting forth the number of hours
worked by each employee and the amount of
money paid to each such employee. Said
member of the industry also makes available
to the Code Authority his books and records
which show the number of hours worked by
. each employee and the amount paid each
week.
The member of industry in question claims
that he is not obligated by the Code to make
available to the confidential agency of the
Code Authority such other books and records
as may be necessary for a determination of
the -piece-rate or bonus system by which the
compensation of the employees is calculated.
Article IV, section 2, of said Code requires
members of the industry to employ the em-
ployees in certain named crafts on a piece-
rate basis, which piece-rate basis shall be cal-
culated so as to yield the employee of average
skill certain stated rates per hour.
In order to determine whether that provi-
sion is being observed it is necessary for the
'confidential agency of the Code Authority to
be apprised of the nature of the piece-rate
system in effect. a
'QUESTION.--Is this member of industry
and other members of industry in a like situ-
ation obligated by the Code to submit such
records as will enable the confidential @gency
to determine the nature of the piece-rate or
bonus system by which the wages of the em-
ployees are calculated?
INTERPRETATION.-It. is ruled that
members of the industry are required by ar-
tidcle VI, section 2 (d), of the Code to submit
for examination such books and records as
will enable the confidential agency to deter-
mine the nature of the piece-rate or bonus
system in effect. That provision requires
that members of the industry shall submit
such books and records as are necessary to
ascertain whether they are observing the
provisions of the Code.


Inland Water Carrier Trade
1 f- .- .1 1. -


in the Eastern Division ot
the United States Operating C ann edralm n
via the New York Canal nn amo


System
No. 266-17
FACTS.-A corporation owns and operates
one or mbre motorships which it uses to
,transport 'freight between the Atlantic sea-
board and the Great Lakes region by way of
the New York canal system. Only through
shipments are received, freight destined for
ports on the canal system itself not being
handled in any case.
The Code of fair competition for the inland
water carrier trade in the eastern division
of the United States operating via the New
SYork canal system provides in article II:
"'Eastern division of the United States'
includes all inland waters within the terri-
tory between Eastport, Maine, and Key West,
- Fla., westward to, but not including, the
Mississippi waterway system or the Great
Lakes, but including the St. Lawrence River.
"Inland water carrier trade' or trade',
Sas used herein, means the transporting of
freight or passengers by water via the New
SYork canal system or the St. Lawrence River
to or from ports in the eastern division of the
United States and the Great Lakes, including
intermediate ports on the New York canal
System, but excluding, however, the trade en-
gaged solely in the transportation of petro-
leurnm products.
"' Member of the trade' includes, but with-
out limitation, any individual, partnership,
association. corporation, or other form of en-
terprise operating owned or chartered vessels
in the trade either as an employer or on his
or Its behalf."
SQUESTION.-Does the definition of the
eastern division of the United States",
Which ex,:ludes the Great Lakes, limit the
definitions of the trade'" and "member of
Lthe trade" in such a way as to exclude from
'the operation of the Code a concern such as
the one described above?
INTERPRETATION.- Anyone operating
wned or chartered vessels in the transports-


Code Provision

Stayed
The provisions of article VII, rule 3. of the
Code for the canned salmon industry have
been stayed until October 16, 1935. The
stayed rule prohibits payment of brokerage
to anyone except sales representatives and is
intended to prevent buyers receiving broker-
age.
This stay, which becomes effective May 26
unless good cause to the contrary is shown,
was requested by the Code Authority for the
industry because the provision was found to
he unenforceable at the present time. It is
expected that some solution applicable to this
and other food Industries will be found be-
fore the expiration of the stay. The order Is
expressly subject to revocation at any time.


Nottingham Lace Cur-

tain Industry's Code

LabelAmendment

Approved
Approval of an amendment to the Notting-
ham Lace Curtain Industry Code which pro-
vides new label regulations for the industry
has been announced by the National Indus-
tril Recovery Board.
The regulations require all bundles or pack-
ages of material made in whole or in part on
Nottingham lace-curtain machines to beer nn
NRA lobel carrying a registration number
especially assigned to each member of the
industry. Other regulations require labels to
be uniform, excPptiug rpneistrntion numbers,
nnd to remain attached to packages when de-
livered to customers.


r ormula Uranted Hour provisions


tlon of freight by water between the Atlantic
seaboard and the Great Lakes via the New
York canal system is a member of the trade
and subject to the provisions of the Code,
and the facts that a large portion of the
whole passage may be In the Great Lakes and
that no shipments are made to ports on the
canal system are immaterial.

Soap and Glycerine Mfg.
Industry
No. 83-77
FACTS.-In the sale of our soap products
we employ a number of persons as coupon
distributors. Our practice is to send a crew
manager Into a town and he engages a num-
ber of local persons, usually women, to go
from house to house and distribute coupons
which are redeemable at local grocery stores
as part of the purchase price of our products.
These coupon distributors are then given a
territory in which to work and are left by
the crew manager to distribute the coupons.
The crew manager has very little opportunity
to check up on the time put in by these cou-
pon distributors. Generally speaking, how-
ever, they work from about 10 o'clock in the
morning until about 3: 30 o'clock in the after
noon, and, with t.me off for lunch, average.
about 5 hours per day.
QUESTION.-What is the minimum wage
coupon distributors must be paid? Do they
come under any of the special classes in the
Code, such as learners or apprentices, light
tasks, junior workers, etc.?
INTERPRETATION.-The minimum wage,
for such employees is 40 cents per hour, or in
Southern States 35 cents pier hour. Such em-
' ployees do not fall within the special classes
of learners, apprentices, junior workers, or
employees engaged in light tasks.

Flexible Metal Hose and
Tubing Manufacturing
Industry
No. 84G1-18
FACTS.-Article II, section 1, of the above
Code provides in part that "the term 'flex-
ible metal hose and tubing manufacturing
industry' means the manufacture fo.r sale of
flexible metal hose or flexible metal tubing
and/or American Gas Association flexible
gas (illuminating) tubing and/or gasoline
and oil feed lines having a flexible metal
tubing lining, together with couplings or con-
nections commonly used with any of the
above * *."
A company buys parts of products of this
industry, assembles, and/or reprocesses them,
and sells them in competition with members
of this industry.
QUESTION.-Is this company a manufac-
turer under the definition of the Flexible
Metal Hose and Tubing Manufacturing In-,.
dustry Supplementary Code?
RULING.-A company which buys parts of
products of this industry, assembles, and/or
reprocesses, and sells them in competition
with members of this Industry, is a manufac-
jurer under the definition of the above-named'
Code.


Extension
The' National Industrial Recovery Board
has extended the limestone industry's allow-
able cost formula to June 16, 1035, and has
called a public hearing on a proposal to re-
place the formula with an open-price filing
system.
The Code Authority, after consultation
with the NRA Research and Planning Divi-
sion, has proposed an amendment which
would establish an open-price system mod-
eled on that outhned in NRA Office Memo-
randum 228, with modifications designed by
the Code Authority to afford a measure of
cost protection. A public hearing will be con-
ducted May 20 to consider this amendment.
Under the proposed amendment, members
of the industry would file lists of prices and
terms in addition to individual operation
costs involved in the fabrication or cutting of
limestone. Original lists would be filed with
the Code Authority secretary within 10 days
of approval of the amendment. Later lists
and revisions would become effective upon
filing, provided that no sales were made at
revised terms within less than 144 hours of
filing. Members of the industry could revise
their terms to meet competition.- Their re-
visions would become effective "not sooner
than the price terms fled by the member of
the industry whose competition is being met."
One paragraph of the proposed amendment
reads: Members of the industry shall in-
clude in their selling prices for products of
the industry their out-of-pocket cost or their
invoice cost for such nonindustry products
or services as may be furnished by such
members of the industry in conjunction with
the sale of limestone."
The amendment would forbid destructive
price cutting, and would provide for e;.tnb-
lishment of minimum prices by the National
Industrial' Recovery Board during declared
emergencies.


Narrow Fabric

Code Amendment

Is Approved
Approval of an amendment to the Code for
the narrow fabrics industry incorporating
open-price filing provisions has been an-.
nounced.
The amendment would require each mem-
ber of a division or branch of the industry,
provided a majority of the members of that
division or branch voted to adopt open-price
filing, to file with the confidential agent of
the Code Authority identified lists of all
prices and terms. By a written vote of the
majority, a division or branch of the indus-
try may empower a committee to name prod-
ucts go which open-price provisions shall
apply.
After prices have been filed no member of
the industry would be permitted toisell at a
lo*er price or at a higher price, except In
payment "for additional services rendered."
The amendment also describes destructive
price-cutting as an unfair method of compe-
tion and forbids it. at the same time pro-
hibiting the fixing of a minimum basis for
prices.
Unfair trade practices listed in the orig-
lnal Code are continued in the amendment.


Interpretation


Pump Mfg. Industry
No. 57-21 .
FACTS.-On October 16, 1934, the super-
visory agency for the pump manufacturing
industry requested an interpretation of arti-
cle II of the Code of fair competition for
that industry, which provides, in part, as
follows:
"The term,.' pump manufacturing industry ',
as used herein is defined to mean the manu-
facture for sale of pumps, pumping equip-
ment, and/or parts thereof except as manu-
factured and sold as an original' or as a
replacement part of the product of another
industry as now or hereafter organized, and
except that there shall not be included therein
the manufacture for sale of hand pumps,
windmills, the domestic water supply systems,
and parts and accessories thereof."
QUESTION.-Is a manufacturer of pumps,
which are manufactured and,'or sold for use
solely either as an original part or as a re-
placenient part of the product of another in-
dustry, subject to the provisions of the Code
of Fair Competition for the pump manufac-
turing industry?
ANSWER.-No; except to the extent that
such manufacturer may manufacture for sale
pumps which are not for such use, and are
not otherwise excluded fromm-the definition
of the pump manufacturing industry or in-
cluded within the definition of another ap-
proved Code of Fair Competition.


- -.... ..-- ~
*..3.4i:.~ r.nys.!aiktJJ52,~-,i-5ndAiiCt,..t 4.. -,


;, = :, 40. :


S 4 '* .i - .. .-. .


Stay Continued I
Continuation until June 16, 1935, of t d ij4
order staying the maximum-hours provisionsl
of the Code for. the shipbuilding and Ship-;
repairing industry has been announced by.-.i
the National Industrial Recovery -Board.. '
The Code provides that employees must not..
work more than 8 hours a day or more thana
36 hours a week in the shipbuilding branchh."
or more than 40 hours In the shiprepairingt'.
branch, with a 6-month average'of 36 hourS ..
a week. The stay permits work beyond those..l
limits In emergency work involving danger).'..:
or menace to the safety of a vessel, to life, oyg.
to property, or when a delay would worl'aaiOT.
undue hardship on the owner or the shipperS.i"
or the passengers through loss of use of-a
vessel for prompt loading or discharge or
prompt and safe carriage-of cargo or paL'..:
sengers tb destination." or a
Time and one-half mus be paid for work
beyond S hours in any day or beyond -the|
weekly limitations. An 8-hour rest period:
is provided between the last hour worked
any one day and the first hour worked. t.i
next day; time worked during any shch i.||
period must be paid at time and one-hahf'-
The stay may not be used for, the purpose
of decreasing employment or for reclassiflcam'e
tion of employees at lower rates of pay."!t?.
Any overtime beyond Code limits must be.4.
reported to the Industrial Relations Cbm-i-
mittee of the industry within 5 days. ;:
The stay is subject to cancelation in- ttiei.
eve.t of "subsequent showing of a proper-,
cause therefore .


RailwayCarBuildj

ing Industry

Code Amended .;
Two amendments to the Code of Fair Corn,
petition for the railway car building indui-
try, designed to save industry members frol'!
losses frequently incurred in the past by us'i":
ing defective materials furnished by custom-:V.'
ers which resulted in rejection of their fibnr-
ished products, have been approved by th.e:j"C
National Industrial Recovery Administration.":"1
The amendment to section 1 of article VlIt'i
is designed to obviate the confusion which.i
has resulted from the present provision, since' l
one employer, in making a bid, was not ableiiS
to determine whether others were invited to :f
bid on. a project. "-f
A new section was added to article IX pro-'2P
hibiting the making of allowances in quotas?'.
tions for materials to be furnished by a cus-.)r
tomer, except those in his bona-fide inventory,,: |
or where the source of supply is specified by :
the customer, except in the case of specialties..:',

Shoe Polish and Cement !:

Code Amendments J

Are Approved
Two fair-trade-practice amendments to the.i
Code of Fair Competition for the shoe and':/ft
leather finish, polish" and cement manufac-:,
turing industry have been approved, effectiveI,'
May 26.*fs
The rule prohibiting dating in 'excess of .a
months from shipping date has been changed~.'a,
to forbid dating in excess of 30 days with':
the following exemptions: (1) Coast-to-coast.,-
shipments via the Panama Canal, an addl-F
tional 30 days may be allowed if desired','-
(2) on shipments made between September.
1 and December 1, for the purpose of supply'-;;
ing the customer with winter requirements."'
dating not later than February 1 may beflO
given; and (3) shipments of white-shoe:i
cleaner made between February 1 and June".r
1 may be dated not later than June 1. After.:I-
that date dating in excess of 60 days would-.;"
be prohibited. '
Consignment sales, heretofore limited bh'ri
the Code to 5 months from shipping date,.'.61
will be limited to 30 days under the approved 42
revision. '


Reinforcing Materials1'.

Fabricating Industry

Granted. Exemption
An' exemption of members of the reinforce. v'.
ing materials fabricating industry from thW'"
provisions of article V. section 10, of the Code:iq'
as they apply to wire mesh when sold In con-.
junction with reinforcing materials has.been" :
approved conditionally by the National In-,
dustrial Recovery Board.
The purpose of the exemption is to relieve
members of the industry manufacturing wire
mesh from paying more than one Code con-.
tribution. Previously these members of the'
industry have been paying contributions
under the Wire Mesh and Wire Reinforce.'
meat Industry Codes as well as under their
own Code. .
The exemption order becomes effective.
May 20, unless good cause to the contrary is:.;
shown. :









A'".^R E .. --'


ORDER!,


| Official Orders of NRA Relating

to Particular Codes
T'- HE Blue Eagle prints in each issue summaries of administrative
Orders, interpretations, appointments, and bylaws approved by the
;-.National Industrial Recovery Board.
Official orders are of two types, final and provisional. Where an order
Ais provisional, the time within which objections may be filed is indicated
below.
SAll protests against provisional orders should be addressed to National
"Recovery Administration, Washington, D. C.,. attention Deputy Admin-
istrator for Code concerned; and such protests should be received before
,final date indicated.
(For Code approvals, amendments, interpretations, budgets and
assessments, bylaws, Code Authority members, and trade complaints and
bother committees, see elsewhere.)
0..,


.-M ALLOY CASTING INDUSTRY, Code No.
2i7:. Order 21, amending Order 237-17,
Iewhich -approved the budget and basis of con-
lbution for the period of February 4, 1934.
o6:'June 16, 1935, by providing for contribu-
'Oitsa from members who have entered the
diastr'y since July 1, 1934.
'I'ASPHALT AND MASTIC TILE INDUS-
Ti Code No. 150: Order 26, approving
uIdget and basis of contribution for the pe-
Slod from January 1 to June 16, 1935.

I ,ATHLETIC GOODS MANUFACTURING
iDUSTRY, Code No..254: Order 25, grant-
i ito Athletic Shoe Co., Chicago, Ill., per-.
ifsion to work 15 operators not to exceed
.4 hours per week for a period of 10 days,
.diniencing April 22 and terminating May 1,
936.l, provided time and one-third is paid
pel employees for all hours worked in ex-
Has of 8 per day or 44 per week. Such em-
Tfrjyees shall not work more than h maximum
f 1.,,040 hours during the current six-month
e.lod. A copy of the order must be posted
si'.a conspicuous place in the applicant's
Saint.
,.AUTOMOTIVE CHEMICAL SPECIAL-
TIES MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY,
e'o'de No. 522: Order 9, approving lUst of occu-
H ations unsuited to persons under 18 years
f]: i age':.

BOOK PUBLISHING INDUSTRY, Code
o. 523: Order 19, approving budget and
bais of contribution for the period from Oc-
ober 1, 1934, to September 30, 1935.
CANNING INDUSTRY, Code No. 446:
.rd.er 58, denying to A. L. Stewart & Sons,
ijerryfleld, Maine, exemption from the pro-
psilons of article IV, section 3, of the Code.
PCi.AP AND CLOSURE INDUSTRY, Code
ib: 58: Order 13, granting to Closure Service
Cb., Toledo, Ohio, exemption from the provi-
umibns of article III, section 3, of the Code, to
e extent that it may work 25 electrical and
iia.ntenance departments employees in excess
;i:maxijmum hours provided in the Code dur-
-g) mndving of plant and equipment to a new
idation,. provided time and one-half is paid
ir5'all time worked in excess of 40 hours
-iir:. week averaged over a 6-month period.
o'iproduction is permitted during overtime
^ Dirs. Exemption Is effective April 11, and
otAnues through April 20. Copies of the
aoider must be posted In full in conspicuous
t'es' within the plant, accessible to all
3loyees.

:H'HINAWARE AND PORCELAIN MAN-
2'ACTURING INDUSTRY, Code No. 126:
dler 50, denying to CrooksviUlle China Co.,
CrOksville, Ohio, exemption from the provi-
axiis of article III, section 1 (a), of the
ode.'
CIGAR MANUFACTURING INDUS-
PRY, Code No. 467: Order 57, approving post-
onement until June 1, 1935. of review of
t.' provislonis of the Code relating to hours
of.labor and rates of pay.
;:.COCOA AND CHOCOLATE MANUFAC-
.NURING INDUSTRY, Code No. 464: Order
.16, amending Administrative Order No. 464-
g14', dated April 12, 1935. by 'extending its
Effective date to April 25, 1935. Said order
grants to Wilbur-Suchard Chocolate Co., Lit-
4;'itz, Pa., exemption from the provisions of
articlee IV, section 1, subsections (a) and (b),
E\[: of the Code, subject to certain conditions.
..:.,. Order 17. denying to E. J. Brach & Sons,
g,''.Chicago, Ill., exemption from the provisions
,fof' article IV' of the Code.
COFFEE INDUSTRY, Codle No. 265: Or-
i.d.1er 37, denying to EI B. Millar Co., Denver,
10"'.Coo.. exemption from the provisions of arti-
.cle VI, section 10, of the Code.
--CONCRETE PIPE MANUFACTURING
.INDUSTRY, Code No. 185: Order 29, ap-
Wi:. 'proving regional administrative committee
.:budget and basis of contribution for the pe-
Anod from January 15 to June 16, 1935.
;' COTTON CLOTH GLOVE MANUFAC-
,,- TURING INDUSTRY, Code No. 187: Order
.''. 83, approving budgets and basis of contribu-
'tion for the period from January 15 to June
80, 1935.
.:'.. COTTON GARMENT INDUSTRY, Code
-..No. 118: Order 362A, granting to Hirsch
'.;;-Shirt Corporation, 805 Merchandise Mart,




L........
.,.:"-?


...- . .
l. - s S. ::X.a i *..' ..-...= %. .." x ., .. ,.';.> .: .


Chicago, Ill exemption from the provisions
of article III, section A, of the Code, to the
extent that 72 employees in Its Hammond,
Ind., plant may work 4 hours overtime on
Friday, March 22, 1935, and 4 hours overtime
on Saturday, March 23, 1935, provided time
and one-half is paid for all such overtime.
Order 436, granting to M. C. Schrank Co.,
Bridgeton, N. 3J., exemption from the provi-
sions of article III, section A, of the Code,
to the extent that It may work pressers in Its
plant at Bridgeton, N. J., 4 hours overtime
during the week ending Saturday, March 16,
1935, provided time and one-half Is paid for
such overtime.
Order 437, granting to Freeland Overall
Manufacturing Co., Freeland, Pa., exemption
from the provisions of article IV, section A,
of tle Code, to the extent that it shall be
given credit for whatever increase was made
In wages by it to week workers and/or time
workers on and after May 14, 1934, to be
applied against any, increase required by
Order 118-111, provided'such credit shall not
decrease the present rates received by week-
workers and/or timeworkers. A copy of the
order must be posted in a conspicuous place
in the applicant's plant.
Order 438, granting to H. D. Bob Co., New
York, N. Y., exemption from the provisions
of article V, section A, of the Code, to the
extent that it may operate 3 shifts daily of
2 men each for a period not to exceed 12
weeks in the trubenized collar department of
their Sunbury, Pa., plant, provided addi-
tional operators are employed.'
Order 439, granting to Raritan Shirt Co.,
Inc., 1199 Bpoadway, New York, N. Y., ex-
emption from the provisions of article III,
section A, of the Code, to the extent that it
may work cutters and cutting-room employ-
ees, involving 11 workers, in its Perth Am-
boy, N. J., plant 8 hours overtime weekly
for a period not to exceed 4 weeks from
March 27, 1935, providing such overtime is
paid for at the rate of time and one-half.
Order 440, granting to M. Fine & Sons
Manufacturing Co., Inc., 93 Worth Street,
New York, N. Y., exemption from the provi-
sions of article IV, section A, of the Code,
- to the extent that it may readjust its piece-
rates for 56 operators in its lumberjack
department and its plant at New Albany,
Ind.; provided, that after this readjustment
no operator in this department shall receive
less than 40 cents per hour and that the
average earnings of the operators in this
department shall not be less than 44 cents
pdr hour. The firm must submit, affidavits
to the Industrial committee signed by each
employee affected by this readjustment, that
they voluntarily accept such readjustment.
Order 441, granting to Marlboro Shirt Co.,
Inc., Lombard and Paca Streets, Baltimore,
Md., exemption from the provisions of arti-
cle III, section A, of the Code, to the extent
that it may work Its cutters and cutting-room
employees, involving'16 people, 4 hours over-
time weekly for a period not to exceed 4
weeks'from March 27, 1935, provided time
and one-half is' paid.
Order 442, granting to Piedmont Shirt Co.,
P. 0. Box 592, Greenville, S. C., exemption
from the provisions of article V, section A,
of the Code, to the extent that it may operate
an extra shift on 12 starching machines for
a period not to exceed 2 months from March
27, 1935, provided additional operators are
employed.
Order 443, granting to A. U. Jewell & Co.,
154 Pront Street, Worcester, Mass., exemp-
tion from the provisions of article III, sec-
tion A, and article V, section A. of the Code,
to the extent that it may work 12 operators
in its plant 8 hours overtime weekly 'for a
period not to exceed 12 weeks from March 13,
1935, provided time and one-half is paid for
all such overtime.
Order 444, granting to Sweet-Orr & Co.,
Inc., 15 Union Square, New York, N. Y., ex-
emption from the provisions of article III,
section A, of the Code, to the extent that it
may work 34 cutters in its plant at New-
burgh, N. Y., 4 hours overtime weekly for 6
weeks from March 13, 1935; provided time
and one-half is paid for such overtime.
Order 445, granting to Lederer Manufac-
turing Co., Detroit, Mich., exemption from
the provisions of article III, section A, of the
Code, to the extent that it may work 4 em-
ployees in its cutting department 8 hours


overtime weekly for a period of 6 weeks
from March 18, 1935, provided time and one-
half is paid for all such overtime.
Order 446, granting to Cluett, Peabody &
Co., Inc., Troy, N. Y., exemption from the
provisions of article IV, section A, of the
Code, to the extent that it be given credit
for whatever increase was made in wages
by it to week workers and/or time workers
on and after May 21, 1934, to ote applied
against any increase required by Order lls-
111, provided such credit shall not decrease
the present rates received by the week work-
ers and/or time workers. Copy of the order
must be posted in a conspicuous place in the
applicant's plant or plants.
Order 447, granting to Kaynee Co., Broad-
%ay at Aetna Road, Cleveland, Ohio, exemp-
tion, from the provisions of article III, sec-
tion A, of the Code, to the extent that it may
work cutters and cutting-room employees 4
hours overtime weekly during the period
from March 27 up to and including April 1,
1935, and 8 hours overtime weekly during the
month of April, provided time and one-half is
paid for such overtime.
Order 448, granting to H. A. Satin & Co.,
Inc., 321-327 West Monroe Street, Chicago,
Ill., exemption from the provisions of article
III, section A, of the Code, to the extent that
it may work 150 single-needle operators 4
hours overtime weekly for a period not to
exceed 8 weeks from March 27, 1935, pro-
vided time and one-half is paid for such
overtime.
Order 449, granting to Pierson Manufac-
turing Co., 116 North Third Street, Quincy,
Ill., exemption from the provisions of arti-
cle V, section A, of the Code, to the extent
that It may operate an extra shift on fused
collar equipment for a period of 3 months
from March 27, 1935, involving 5 operators,
provided additional operators are employed.
Order 450, granting to" Keep Kleen Gar-
ment Co., Milwaukee, Wis., exemption from
the provisions of article IV, section A, of
the Code, to the extent that it sbaUll not be
increased 10 percent in piece rates, effective
December 1, 1934.
Order 451, 'granting to Hoosier Factories,
Inc., Michigan City, Ind., exemption from
the provisions of article IV, section C, of the
Code; to the extent that it may average its
learners in its two plants employing not
more than 10 percent of its total manufac-
turing employees In both plants as learners
on the basis of wages and training period for
learners, as provided in the Code, and no
person shall be classified as a learner who
has had 12 weeks' experience in the industry.
Order 453, granting to Seymour-Avery
Manufacturing Co., 527 South Wells Street,
Chicago, IUll., exemption from the provisions
of article IV, section C, of the Code, to the
extent that it may employ S learners in
addition to the 10 percent permitted under
the Code for a period of 12 weeks. Said
learners to be paid not less than $9.75 per
week, or more if earned on a piecework
basis, for the first 8 weeks of employment,
and 80 percent of the minimum for the bal-
ance of the 12-week period. Said firm may
employ as learners workers who have had
experience on power machines but who have
not had experience on the product manufac-1
tured by this firm.
Order 454, granting to Chippewa Falls
Woolen Mill Co., Chippewa Falls, Wis., ex-
emption from thb provisions of article III,
section A, and article V, section A, of the
Code, to the extent that it may work its
employees 7 hours overtime weekly and op-
erate its machinery 3 hours overtime weekly
for a period not to exceed 2 weeks from
March 27, 1935, provided time and one-half is
paid for such overtime.
Order 455, granting to Phillips-Jones Cor-
poration, 225 Broadway, New York, N. Y.,
exemption from the provisions of article III,
section A, and article V, section A, of the
Code, to the extent that it may work its
employees at its Bronx, N. Y., plant 8 hours
overtime weekly and operate its machinery 4
hours overtime weekly for a period not to
exceed 6 weeks from March 28, 1935, pro-
vided time and one-half is paid for such
overtime.
Order 456, granting to Columbus Garment
Co., Columbus, Miss., exemption from the
provisions of article III, section A, and
article V, section A, of the Code, to the ex-
tent that it may work 70 sewing-machine
operators, 2 inspectors, and 4 pressers in its
plant 8 hours overtime, 8 weeks from March
27, 1935, and to operate machinery necessary
for such operations 4 hours overtime weekly
for a period not to exceed 8 weeks from
March 27, 1935, provided time and one-half
is paid for such overtime.
Order 457, granting to the Cleveland Over-
all Co., 2000 Superior Avenue, Cleveland,
Ohio, exemption from the provisions of'
article III, section A, of the Code, to the
extent that it may wdrk its employees 4
hours overtime for the period of 1 week
from April 2, 1935, provided time and one-
half is paid for such overtime.
Order 458, granting to Henry C. Reusc-h &
Co., 418 Central Avenue, Newark, N. J., ex-
emption from the provisions of article III,
section A, of the Code, to the extent that
it may work employees in its plant 4 hours
overtime weekly for a period of 12 weeks
from March 27, 1935, provided time and one-
half is paid for such overtime.
Order 459, granting to the Gottfried Co.,


1150 West Third Street, Cleveland, Ohio, ex-,
qmption from the provisions of article V, .
section A, of the Code, to the extent that it-'i
may operate 1 extra shift in their stitching,1.
department, involving 125 employees In the-''
Cleveland, Ohio, plant for a period not to..;
exceed 12 weeks from March 20, 1935, pro-.'
vided additional operators are employed.
Order 460, granting to Phillips-Jones Cor-
poration, 1225 Broadway, New York, N. Y., '
exemption froni the provisions of article IV, ,
section C, of the Code, to the extent that it.v
may employ 25 percent of its manufacturing.:'.
employees in its Bronx plant as learners for.
a period of 12 weeks, provided they are paid :.:.
in accordance with wage provisions of the4
Code, or more if employed on a piece-rate .
basis, and provided no individual shall be
employed as a learner who has had more
than 12 weeks experience in the industry.
Order 461, granting to S. H. Rauneker, "
311 North Exeter Street, Baltimore, Md., ex-
emption from the provisions of article III, .
section A, of the Code, to the extent that it.'
may work its employees 4 hours overtime
weekly for a period of 6 weeks from March J:
27, 1935, provided time and one-half is paid:
for such overtime. .
Order 462, granting to National Leather
Coat Co., 9 Siegel Street, Brooklyn, N. Y;-
exemption from the 5-percent increase in
piece rates, effective March 1, 1935, to apply 'I
only on two Government contracts for the .
manufacture of leather coats for the Fed-'
eral Surplus Relief Corporation. .I
Order 463, granting to Trembly Manufac-
turing Co., Dallas, Tex., exemption from the :.
provisions of article,III, section A, of the
Code. to the extent that it work the enm-"'
ployees in its Dallas, Tex.,' plant 4 hours -.
overtime weekly for a period not to exceed
10 weeks from March 20, 1935, provided .,4
time and one-half is paid for all such over- .
time.
Order 464, granting to M. Fine & Sons
Manufacturing Co., Inc., 93 Worth Street, '
New York, N. Y., exemption from the pro- |
visions of article III, section A, of the Code, '
to the extent that it may work 22 male em-;,
ployees in its cutting department 4 hours ::]
overtime weekly from and including March .z
13 to March 31, 1935, and 8 hours overtime
weeIly during the months of Apr.il and May
1935 provided time and one-half is paid for "
all such overtime.
Order 465, granting to Lebanon Shirt Co, !
220 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y., exemp- ..':
tion Mom the provisions of article III, sec-
tion A, of the Code, to the extent that it may .j.
work its employees 4 hours overtime weekly
for a period not to exceed 8 weeks, provided
time and one-half is paid for all such over-
time.
Order 466, granting to Charles H. Sobel &
Co., Inc., 1647-1649 Winchester Avenue, Chl-
cago, Ill., exemption from the provisions of
article III, section A, of the Code, to the.i
extent that it may work the employees of its i
plant 4 hours overtime weekly for a period Th
not to exceed 6 weeks from April 10, provided .
time and one-half is paid for all such over- .
time. 4
Order 467, granting to Alpena Garment -
Co., 1350 Broadway, New York, N. Y., ex-
emption from the provisions of article V,
section A, of the Code, to the extent that it
may operate an extra shift on 25 button and .
buttonhole machines until June 15, 1935, pro-
vided additional operators are employed.
'Order 468, granting to Nirenberg & Salz-
man, Inc., Saratoga and Ontario Streets,
Cohoes, N. Y., exemption from the provi-
sions of article V, section A, of the Code, to
the extent that it may work 76 operators 7
hours overtime weekly and operate the neces-
sary machinery 3 hours overtime weekly dur-
ing the period from April 10 to May 15, inclu-
sive, provided time and one-half is paid for
such overtime.
Order 469, granting to Kaylon, Inc., 1107
Broadway, New York, N. Y., exemption from
the provisions of article III, section A, of
the Code, to the extent that it work 16
pressers 4 hours overtime on Saturday,
March 30, 1935, at its Baltimore, Md., plant,
provided time'and one-half is paid for such
overtime.
Order 470, granting to G. W. Eade & Co.
Aurora, IU., exemption from the provisions .
of article IV, section C, of the Code, to the
extent that it employ 20 learners in addi- '
tion to the 10 percent allowed in the Code -
for a period of 12 weeks, provided none
of the Individuals employed as learners shall
have had 12 weeks' experience in the indus-
try, and provided that they be paid In ac-
cordance with the Code provisions for learn-
ers, or more If earned on a piecerate basis, .
and be subject to 12 weeks' training period.
Order 471, granting to Iron King Overall -
Co.. 116-120 South Paca Street, Baltimore,
Md., exemption from the provisions of arti-
cle III, section A, of the Code, to the extent '
that it work its employees 4 hours overtime
weekly' for a period of 7 weeks from April 2,
1935, excluding Friday, April 19, at straight
time in order to male up for time which
will be lost. due to the Jewish holidays.
Order 472, granting to Bay State Manu-
facturing Co., Inc., 116 Harrison Avenue,
Boston, Mass., exemption from the provl-
sions of article III, section A. and article V,
section A, of the Code, to the extent that It
work 25 frontmakers S hours overtime weekly
and operate 25 stitching machines 4 hours
overtime weekly during the period from
(Continued on page 5, column I)








PWt E.,r rqg -T si -i 4 ;** -t v ^ S


ADMINISTRATI V ORDES-Continue


:, ~ (Continued from page 4)
April 8 up to and including June 15, 1935,
provided time and one-half is paid for all
such overtime.
SOrder 473, granting tb Portland Overall
SManufacturing Co., 127-129 Middle Street,
Portland, Maine, exemption from the provi-
sions of article III, section A, of the Code,
to the extent that it may work its pressing
and finishing departments 4 hours overtime
Weekly for a period not to exceed 6 weeks
froni April 10, provided time and one-half
Sis paid. for all such overtime.
S Order 4.74, granting to Matzil Bros., 564-
S566 Broadway, New York, N. I., exemption
from the provisions of article lII, section A,
of the Code, to the extent that it work the
""employees of its plant 4 hours 'overtime
weekly during the weeks ending April 5,
April 12, May 3, May 10, May 17, and May
24, at straight time, provided its piqnt is
. closed on Thursday, April 18, Friday, April
19, Wednesday, April 24, and Thursday,
April 25.
Order 475, granting to Hoosier Factories,
Sinc:, Michigan City, Ind., exemption from
the provisions of article V, section A, of the
Code, to the extent that It may operate an
extra shift for 4 hours daily on 3 buttonhole
. machines and 6 pressing machines for a pe-
riod not to exceed 60 days from April 2,
1935, provided additional operators are em-
ployed.
Order 476, granting to Kaylon, Inc., 1107
SBroadway, New York. N. Y., exemption from
the provisions of article III, section A, of
the Code, to the extent hat it work S em-
ployees in its shipping department and 1
operator, who attaches customers' labels on
merchandise, 4 hours overtime weekly dur-
ing the period from April 8 up to and includ-'
Ing May 15, 1935.
S Order 477, granting to S. L. Hoffman,
1350 Broadway, New York, N. Y., exemp-
tion from the provisions of article III, sec-
tion A, ,of the Code, to the extent that it. may
work the button, buttonhole, pressing, and
finishing departments of its Brooklyn, N. Y.,
plant 4 hours overtime weekly during the
period from April 10 up to and including.
June 15, provided time and one-half is paid
for all such overtime.
Order 478, granting to the Heller Co., 836-
83S Broadway, New York, N. Y., exemption.
From the provisions of article III, section A.
of the Code, to the extent that it may work
.14 operators, 8 finishers, 1 presser, and 3
shipping boys 4 hours overtime weekly dur-
I ng the period from April 10 to April 20;
Inclusive, provided time and one-half is paid
for all such overtime.
Order 479, granting to Tuchman & Tuch.-
ner, 419 Nineteenth Street, West New York,
N. J:, exemption from the 5 percent increase
in piece rates effective March 1, 1935, to
apply only on two Government contracts for
the manufacture of leather coats for the
Federal .Surplus Relief Corporation, which
contracts were obtained prior to March 1,
1935.
COTTON GARMENT INDUSTRY, Code
No. 118: Order 480, granting to Academy
SSportwear Co., New York, N. Y., exemption
-.from the provisions of article IV, section B,
of the Code, to the extent that it is exempted
from the 5-percent increase in piece rates,
effective March 1, 193-5, to apply only on 2
Government contracts for the manufacture of
leather coats for the Federal Surplus Relief
Corporation, which contracts were obtained
priot to March 1, 1935. Order is effective on
April '8, 1935.
Order 481, granting to New England'Over-
all Co., 144 Kingston Street, Boston, Mass.,
exemption from the provisions of article III.
section A. of the Code, to the extent that
employees in the finishing and pressing de-
partments may work 4 hours overtime weekly
for 6 weeks from March 27, 1935, provided
time and one-half is paid for such overtime.
Order 482, granting to Rhea Mauufacturing
Co., 203 North Water Street, Milwaukee,
Wis., exemption from the provisions of arti-
cle VI section A, of the Code, to the extent
that it may operate its machinery and an
extra shift during the period from April 2,
1935, up to and including June 15, 1935, pro-
vided additional operators are employed.
Order 484, granting to Enro Shirt Co.. Inc.,
Louisville, Ky., exemption from the provi-
sions of article III, section A, and article V,
section A, of the Code, so that it may work
employees of its laundry department 6 hours
overtime weekly and operate said laundry
machinery 2 hours overtime weekly f6r a
period of 10 weeks from April 8, 1935, pro-
Svided time and one-half is paid for such
overtime.
Order 4835, granting to Libman Manufac-
turing Co., 1744 North Damen Avenue, Chi-
Scago, Ill., exemption from the provisions of
article III, section A, of the Code, to the
y' extent that it may work 1 employee 40 hours
Weekly for a period of 12 weeks from April
8 S, 1935, at straight time.
Order 486. granting to Lamode Garment
Co., Chicago, Ill., exemption from the pro-
visions of article III, section A, of the Code,
to tie extent that it may work its cutters
8 hours overtime weekly for a period of 8
S' weeks from April 16, 1935, provided time and
Sone-half is paid for such overtime.
Order 487, granting to Barmon Bros. Co.,
Inc., Buffalo. N. Y., exemption from the pro-
i visions of article III, section A. and article
SV, section A. of the Code, to the extent that
i. it may work its operators 8 hours overtime


weekly and operate the machinery of its
plant 4 hours overtime weekly for a period
not to exceed 8 weeks from April 8, 1935,
provided time and one-half is paid for such
overtime. Applicant is also permitted to op-
erate its machinery 'an extra shift of 36
hours per week, involving 140 employees, for
a period not to exceed 8 weeks, from April 8,
1935, provided additional operators are en-
gaged.
. Order 488, granting to Chic Manufacturing
Co., 1001 South Adams Street, Peoria, Ill.,
exemption from the provisions of article III,
section A, of the Code, to the extent that it
may work 30 operators on special machines
4 hours overtime weekly .from'April .10 to
June 15, icpelusive, provided time and one-
half is paid for such overtime.
Order 489, granting to C.luett, Peabody &
Co., Inc., Troy, N. Y., exemption from the
provisions of article 111, section A, and arti-
cle V, section A, of the Code, to the extent
that it may work 3 collar trimmers 8 hours
overtime weekly and operate the necessary
machinery 4 hours overtime weekly during
*the period from April 9 up to and including
April 27, 1935, provided time and'one-half is
paid for such overtime.
Order 490, granting to the Goldman Co.,
32-34 South Paca Street, Baltimore, Md., ex-
emption from- the provisions of article IV,
section C, of the Code, to the extent that
it may work 42 operators 4 hours overtime
weekly from April 10 to June 15, inclusive,
provided time and one-half is paid for such
overtime.
Order 491, granting to Lacy-Ruhblnan, 2615
Fannin Street, Houston, Tex, exemption
from the provisions of article III, section A,
Sof the Code, to the extent that it may work
the employees of its plant 4 hours overtime
during the period from April 10. up to and
including June 15, provided time and one-half
is paid for such overtime.
Order 492, granting to Hirsch Shirt Corpo-
ration, 222 North Bank Drive, Chicago, ILL.,
exemption from the provisions of article III,
section A, and article V, section A, of the
Code, to the extent that it may work 75 ma-
chine, operators and 25 laundry operators 8
hours overtime weekly and operate the ma-
chinery necessary 4 hours overtime weekly
during the weeks ending April 13 and April
20', provided time and one-half is paid for
such overtime.
Order 493. granting to Michael Berkowitz
Co., Inc., 1107 Broadway, New York, N. Y.,
exemption from the provisions of article V,
section A, of the Code, to the extent that it
may operate an extra shift of 3 employees on
fused collar pressing machines foe a period
of 5 weeks from April 8, provided' additional
operators are employed.
Order 494, granting to Angelica Jacket
Co., 1419 Olikve Street. St. Louis, Mo., exemp-
tion from the provisions of article 11I, sec-
tion A, of the Code, to the extent *that it
may work 16 men in its cutting department
4 hours overtime weekly, from April 10.to
May 31, inclusive, provided time and one-
half is paid for such overtime.
Order 495, granting to B. & 0. Manufac-
turing Co., 16-20 South Eutaw Street, Bal-
timore, Md., exemption from the provisions
of article III, section A, of the Code, to the
extent that it may work employees 4 hours
overtime weekly during the weeks ending
April 12, May 3, May 10, and May 17, at
straight time, provided said plant is closed
Thursday, April 18. and Friday. April 19.
Order 496, granting to Silver Trouser Man-
ufacturing Co., Chicago. Ill.; exemption from
the provisions of article III, section A, of
the Code, to the extent that it may work
employees on 6 waistband sewing machines,
2 tackers, and 2' button sewers, involving a
total of 10 employees, 4 hours overtime
weekly for a period of S weeks from April
10, provided time and one-half is paid for
such overtime.
Order 497, granting to Sawyer-Barker Co.,
120 Center Street Portland, Maine, exemp-
tion from the provisions of article III, sec-
tion A. of thie Code. to the extent that it
work 3 girls S hours overtime weekly and
operate the necessary machinery 4 hours
overtime weekly for 4 weeks from April 18.
1935, to make samples, provided time and
one-half is paid for sur-h overtime.
Order 498. granting to Master White Goods
Co.. Nebraska City. Nebr., exemption from
the provisions of article IV, section C, of the
Code. to the extent that it may employ 10
percent learners in addition to the 10 per-
cent allowed under the Code for a period
of 12 weeks from April 8, 1935, provided
their pay is in accordance with the wage
provisions of the Code, or more if earned on
a piece-rate basis. None of the individuals
Employed as learners shall have had 12
weeks' experience in the industry.
Order 499, granting to I. Taitel & Son,
Knox, Ind exemption from the provisions
of article IV, section C, of the Code, to the
extent that It may compute learners for Its
Knox and Bremen. Ind., plants on the basis
of 10 percent of the manufacturing employ-
ees In both plants.
Order 500, granting to Superior Garment
Manufacturing Co., 307 West Van Buren
Street, Chicago, Ill., exernprion from the pro-
visions of article III, section A. of the Code,
to the extent that it may work its cutters
6 hours overtime during the week ending
April 6. 1935, provided time and one-half is
paid for such overtime.
Order 501, granting to F. Jacohson & Sons,
1115 Broadway, New York, N. Y., exemption


from the provisions of article IV, section C,
of the Code, to the extent that it may em-.
ploy 10 percent learners in addition to the
10 percent allowed under the Code, at its
Albany, Troy, and Cohoes, N. Y., plants, for
a period not to- exceed 12 weeks from
April 8. 1935, provided learners are paid in
accordance with the wage provisions of the
Code,- or more if earned on a piece-rate
basis, and provided none of the Individuals
employed as learners shall have had 12
weeks' experience In the industry. Exemp-
tion terminates on June 15, 1935.
.. Order 502, granting to Ely & Walker Dry
Goods Co., St. Louis, Mo., exemption from
the provisions of article IV, sectic i C, of
the Code, to the extent that it may employ
50 learners in addition to the 10 percent per-
mitted under the Code for a period of 12
weeks from .April 8, 1935, provided no per-
son shall be employed as a learner who has
had 1- weeks' experience in the industry,
and they be paid in accordance with the
Code provisions for learners, or more if on
a piecework basis.
Order 503, granting to the Fly Manufac-
turing Co., Shelbyville, Tenn., exemption
from the provisions of article V, section A,
of the Code, to the extent that it may op-
erate an extra shift in its pressing depart-
ment for a period not to exceed 2 weeks
from March 28, 1935, provided additional
pressers are employed.
Order 504, granting to Buffalo Shirt Co.,
Buffalo, N. Y., exemption from the provi-
sions of article V, section A, of the Code, to
the extent that it may operate an extra shift
on 2 laundry pressers for a period not to
exceed 6 weeks, provided additional opera-
tors are employed.
Order 505, granting to Enro Shirt Co., Inc.,
Louisville, Ky., exemption from the provi-
sions of article V, section A, of the Code, to
the extent that it may operate an extra
shift on 7 sets of presses for a period not
to exceed 90 days, provided additional opera-
tors are employed.
Order 506, granting to Commercial Shirt
Corporation, 1239 Broadway, New York,
N. Y., exemption from the provisions of arti-
cle V, section A, of the Code, to the extent
that it may operate an extra shift on fused-
collar equipment, involving.6 employees, for
a period not to exceed 12 weeks from April
10, 1935, provided additional operators are
employed.
Order 507, granting to Snowhite Garment
Manufacturing Co., 2880 North Thirtieth
Street, Milwaukee, Wis., exemption from the
provisions of article III, section A, of the
Code to the extent that it may work 2 cut-
terms 4 hours overtime weekly for a period
not to exceed 6 weeks from April 8. 1935,
provided time and one-half Is paid for such
overtime.
Order 508, granting to Blue Jay Manufac-
turing Co., Huntington, W. Va., exemption
from the provisions of article V, section A,
of the Code, to the extent that ip may oper-
ate an extra shift on the 7 pressing machines
for a period of 6 week's from April 8, 1935,
provided additional operators are employed.
Order 509, granting to Janalene, Inc., In-
dianapolis, Ind.. exemption froth the provi-
sions of article Ill. section A, of the Code.
to the extent that it may work 8 cutters &
hours overtime weekly for a period not to
exceed 8 weeks from March 27, 1935. pro-
vided time and one-half is paid for such
overtime.
Order 510, granting, to Globe Overall Co.,
335 West Fifth Street, Cincinnati. Ohio, ex-
emption from the provisions of article III,
section A, of'the Code, to the extent that it
may work the operators of Its plant 4 hours
overtime weekly for a period of 8 weeks
from April 8, 1935, provided time and one-
half is paid for such overtime.
Order 511, granting to the Jordap Manufac-
turing Co., Inc., 46 Seymour Street, Bridge-
port, Conn., exemption froni the provisions of
article III, section A, and article V, section
A, of the Code, to the extent that it may
work 100 employees 8 hours overtime weekly
and operate the necessary machinery 4 hours
overtime weekly for a period not to exceed
6 weeks from April 8, 1935, provided time
and one-half is paid for such overtime.
Order 512, granting to General Linen Sup-
ply & Laundry Co.. 835-853 Myrtle Avenue,
Brooklyn, N. Y., exemption from the pro-
visions of article III, section A, of the Code,
to the extent that it may work its operators
4 hours overtime weekly during the period
From April 8, 1935, up to and including May
1, 1935, provided time and one-half is paid
for such overtime.
CRUSHED STONE, SAND AND
GRAVEL, AND SLAG INDUSTRIES,
Order 109: Code 93A, denying to Alex M.
Davis, Max Meadows, Va., exemption from
the provisions of article IV of the Code.
Order 93B, denying to Eldred Crushed
Stone Co.. Eldred, Ill., exemption from thA
provisions of article IV, -section 1, of the
Code.
DOMESTIC FREIGHT FORWARDING
INDUSTRY, Code No. 162: Order 16, ap-
proving proposal for adjustment In wages
above minima.
DRESS MANUFACTURING INDUS-
TRY, Code No. 64: Order 79, denying to
Lorch Manufacturing Co., Dallas, Tex., ex-
emption from the provisions- of article III,
section 1, of the Code.
ELECTRICAL MANUFACTURING IN-
DUSTRY AND REFRIGERATING: MA-


CHINERY INDUSTRY, Code No. 4: OrdeiN|
91, granting to Servel, Inc., Evansville, Ind.Mg
exemption from the labor provisions of the0'
Codes, insofar as its electrical and refi'tg-3n
rating work is concerned, provided it corinfl
ply with and make report of labor data undex
the provisions of the Gas Appliances aii&
Apparatus Industry Code, and continue
comply with all other provisions of the eleC;
trical manufacturing and refrigerating min8A
chinery industries on products falling withfing
the scope of said Codes, and shall continue i:
to comply with provisions of the commerdia.lI
,vehicle body and the gas appliances an'di
apparatus industries. Copies of the ordetc-4
shall be posted in the same manner ai
according to the same rules that pertain .tl
the posting of labor provisions. ..
FAN AND BLOWER INDUSTRY....
Code No. 238: Order 21; HAND CHAIN
H O I ST MANUFACTURING INDUS-
TRY.-Code No. 84B: Order 10; ELECTRI;
HOIST AND MONORAIL MANJFAC.
TURNING I N D U ST R Y.-Code No. 488-
Order 14, rescinding Administrative Ordeba
Nos. 238-16, (84B-8), (483-10), dated-Jani3
ary 29, 1935, and granting to Robbins & Me
ers, Inc., Springfield, Ohlio, exemption fi'ro
the wage and hour provisions of the Codd
provided it comply with all provisions of tig..
Electrical Manufacturing Industry Code; aqmy
provided it shall report to the Code Authori.
ties for the above industries any increase.ih;..
the number of man-hours used in the proce
essing of products of each of the industrle4
If hours of labor applicable exclusively...':,
products of the hand chain hoist manufsl ',
during industry at any time exceed 40 ..per.
week per employee, the applicable overtime
limitations contained in that Code shall .':rb
main in full force and effect. The minllnuf
wage provisions of the Fan and Blowet-t
dustry Code shall apply in all operation$.-of
the company) with respect to the manufi
ture of products of the fan and blower.i.
dustry. .;
FULLER'S EARTH PRODUCING AN.'
MARKETING INDUSTRY, Code No. :356
Order 12, approving list of operations or'-4
cupations deemed hazardous or detrimenthi
to the health of persons under 18 years.,.
age. I
FURNITURE MANUFACTURING IN
DUSTRY, Code No. 145: Order 61, grantigl
to the National Woodpipe Co., Williamspor, .
Pa., exemption from the provisions of article
IV, section 5, of the Code, effective begiV*.
ning April 18 and ending April 27, 1935,!-
the extent that it may employ as manfl
shifts as are needed at any time during .thei-
day or night at regular wage rates. ^ Y
GAS APPLIANCES AND APPARATUS|
INDUSTRY, Code No. 134: Order 32, termlt'
nating appointment of'Zenas W. Carter,*i
administration member, effective April 2Oi,
1935.
GRAPHIC ARTS INDUSTRY, Code 1 '
287: Order 482, approving budget and basts
of contribution of the Regional Code Add;
ministrative Agency, whose jurisdiction coi'
ers the State of Indiana, with the exceptional
of Lake County, for the trade typesettiiing
industry, Division D-l, under the Graphoi
Artg Code, for the period from November'Vi
1934. to March 31, 1935.
Order 483, approving reallocation of funia's
for the nonmetropolltan newspaper publlsb
Ing and printing industry and the daif.2
newspaper publishing and printing indusltryI
Divisions A-2 and A-5, under the GraphAi
Arts Code. : .4
Order 486, terminating the exemption%'
granted to Tiffany & Co., Fifth Avenue aniql
Thirty-seventh Street, New York City, frdi|
the provisions of article II, section 23-B .1
subsection (b), paragraph 1, of the Code. ;
Order 496A, approving budget and basis 6is
contribution for the Thirteenth Zone Code-
Administrative Agency, for the Commercials!j
Relief Printing Industry. Division A-1 of the'
Code, for the period beginning October j1:'.
1934, to and including May 31, 1935. ',
HANDKERCHIEF INDUSTRY, Code NO'.
53: Order 25, granting a stay of the pro 53
sions of article VIII, section 6, of the Codie
Order 26. denying to Alfred Kohlberg, ifie>i
New York, N. Y., exemption from the' prf:i'
visions of section 6, article VII, of the Code.;
HAT MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.,
Code No. 259: Order 35, granting to Frank'
H. Lee Co., Danbury, Conn., exemption fromth
the provisions of article II, section 1, of the
Code, to the extent that it may work 4 em-rI
ployees 8 hours overtime each on April V9
20, and 21, 1935, provided time and one-halfl
is paid for such overtime. "_
ICE INDUSTRY, Code No. 43: Order 120
approving budget for the fiscal year begin.',y
ninti May 1, 1934. "
IMPORTED DATE PACKING INDU S ,
TRY, Code No. 490: Order 13, approvingIr
budget and basis of contribution for tbh6
period from January 1 to December 31, 1935.i'
INDUSTRIAL FURNACE MANUFAC.'!
TURNING INDUSTRY, Code No. 357: Ord r;:
20, approving budget and basis of contribhu-'i
tion for the period from January 1 to Deceni-,'
her 31, 1935.
INFANTS' AND CHILDREN'S WEAR
INDUSTRY, Code No. 373: Order 38k,-
granting to L. Wohi & Co., New York City.
(Continued on page 6, column 1) :"S


-, C.

*....'g

* .*.** * ~,' F ~ 4,',


I: * .. -











TMJiSTRATIVE ORDERS-Continue"


-A ... (Continued from page 5)
x.6emptlon from the provisions of article III
.vf0f;the Code to the extent that it may work
R6.;finishers 8 hours overtime on Sunday,
' March 3, 1935, to complete special promo-
Ltl$on0i line, provided time and one-half is paid
3or all such overtime.
A..Orddr 47A, granting to Royal Novelty Co..
New York City, exemption from the provi-
klbhs of article III of the Code to the extent
t it may work 6 cutters and 30 operators
r16?hburs overtime on Saturday, March 23,
r-and Saturday,' March 30, provided time and
Kne-balf is paid for such overtime.
`V-Order 47B, granting to L. Wohl & Co., New
4York City, exemption from the provisions of
bticle III of the Code to the extent that it
may work 4 pressers, 4 examiners, and 3
fishers for 4 hours overtime on Sunday,
March 24, provided time and one-half is paid
bfor:all such overtime.
Ierder 48C, granting to Jacobs, Grossman
,.ERosenberg, Philadelphia, Pa., exemption
from the provisions of article III of thle Code,
q the extent that it may work 40 operators,
.pressers, and 12 ribboners 2 hours over-
m.e each day, March 21, 22, 25 to 29, and
7p1i 1 to 3, pro-ided time and one-half is
laId for.all such overtime.
-rrder 48D, granting to Sandess Manufac-
'rng Co., Philadelphia, Pa., exemption
f.om the provisions of article Ill of the Code'
the extent that It may work 53 operators,
:.Ipressers, and 3 cutters 1 hour overtime
eah day from March 25 to and including
'rch 29, provided time and one-half is paid
r6all overtime.
Order 48E, granting to Sugarman Head-
ar 'Co., New York City, exemption from
Ie*provisions of article III of the Code to
a, extent that it may work 18 special mrua-
.:ine.operatois, 3 cutters, and 4 floor girls
it the baby-headwear division 1 hour over-
ie-each day from March 27 to and includ-
n 'March 29, 4 hours on Saturday, March
90vand 1 hour overtime on April 1, provided
"eand one-half is pidld for such overtime.
l:Order 51A, granting to Kewpie Dress Co.,
ev..,York City, exemption from the provi-
Oins.of article III of the Code to the extent
at. It may work 10 pressers 51,2 hours
Irrtime on Saturday, March 30, provided
ine and one-half Is paid for all such over-
)i'Oder 51B, granting to Dan Bauman, New
kork City, exemption from the provisions
article III of the Code to the extent that
jrtuaIy work 5 operators manufacturing in-
a -ntBs bonnets 5 hours overtime on Satur-
day March 30, provided time and one-half
paid for all such overtime.
p 5rder 52A, granting to Smolen -Manufac-
"iang Co.,. New York City, exemption from
provisionss of article III of the Code to
be.'extent that it may work 25 operators
manufacturing baby silk coats 5 hours over-
lie on Saturdays, March 30 and April 6,
provided time and one-half Is paid for all
mbch overt ime.
I 'Order 52B, granting to Samuel Schneider
Co., New York City, exemption from the
visionsios of article III of the Code to the
Ayexnt that it may work 10 special machine
ieiators, 7 pressers, and 12 handworkers
7hburs on Saturday, March 30, and 1 hour
vrtimnie each day from April 1 to and
Including April 4, and 4 hours on Saturday,
A"Jrll 6, provided time and one-half is paid
.Or :such overtime.
-O0rder 52C, granting to Ira G. Katz, New
j-ork.City, exemption from the provisions of
)Llcle III of the Code to the extent that it
"ay work 80 machine operators, working
bialsively on baby bonnets, 5 hours on Sat-
a. ay and 1 hour overtime each day for
&days, commencing March 30, provided time
.4 one-half is paid for all overtime.
Order 53E, granting to Central Wash Suit
", ''Haverstraw and Peekskill, N. Y., exemp-
.W.n from the provisions of article III of the
od'.td the extent that it may work 1 presser
t2Peekskill and 5 special machine operators
l d':5 pressers at Haverstraw 1 hour over-
ae'each day for 10 days,. commencing April
providedd time and one-half is paid for
overtime.
WOrder 53F. granting to Sandesso Manufac-
uI.ng Co., Philadelphia, Pa., exemption from
h.ieprovislons of article III of the Code to
e extent that It may work 4 pressers and1
&. utters "I hour overtime per day for 5
Hays, commencing April 3, provided time aud
oie-half is paid for all overtime. No over-
iie. is granted on Saturday and Sunday.
:.Order 53G, granting to Harry Sallman,
'c, New York City, exemption from the
provisionss of article III of the Code to the
eaFent that it may work 4 prescers, 3 finish-
|rs, and 3 cleaner.- one-half hour overtime
Hach day for 10 days, commencing April 4,
uiid 4 hours on Saturday, April 6, and Sat-
a urday, April 13, provided time and one-half
pie paid for all overtime.
Ir- .Or'der 53H, granting to I. Schneiersoli &
;ons, all River, Mass., exemption from the
I.provisions of article III of the Code to the
t'ertent that it may work 30 cuttersI 1 hour
overtime each day for 10 days, commencing
l'April 4, and 5 hours on Saturdays, April 6
:.naid 13, provided time and one-half is paid
l';for all overtime.
S.-" Order 531, granting to Park Dress House.
'-New York City. exemption from the ITrovi-
"4'sions of article III of the Code to the extent
That it may work 10 operators. 4 cleaners.
;,92pressers, and 3 floor girls 1 hour overtime
-eacbh day for 10 days, commencing April 4,
provided time and one-half is paid for all


overtime. No overtime Is granted for Sat-
urdays or Sundays. -
Order 53J, granting to Samuel Koplik,
Brooklyn, N. Y., exemption from the provi-
sions of article III of the Code to the extent
that it may work 4 pressers and 4 finishers
4 hours on Saturdays, April 6 and 13, pro-
vided time and one-half is paid for all over-
time.
Order 53K, granting to William Geller,
Freeport, N. Y., exemption from the provi-
sions of article III of the Code to the extent
that it may work 5 double-needle operators.
2 buttonhole makers,, 2 button sewers, 6
pressers, 2 bar tack operators, 1 collar set-
ter, and 1 floor girl 4 hours on Saturdays,
April 6 and 13, provided time and one-half
Is paid for all overtime.
Order 53L, granting to Weisman Bros. &
Cohlien, New York City, exemption from the
provisions of article III of the Code to the
extent that it may work 7 operators, 3 trim-
mers, 2 finishers, 1 hour overtime each day,
April 1 to 5, and 4 hours on Saturday, April
6, and 1 hour each day April 8, 9, and 10,
provided time and one-half is paid for all
overtime.
Order 53M, granting to I. Schnelerson &
Sons, Fall River, Mass., exemption from the
provisions of article III of the Code to the
extent that it may work 30 cutters overtime
1 hour daily and 5 hours Saturday for 10
days from March 30, provided time and one-
half is paid for all overtime.
Order 53N, granting to Eberly & Stoudt,
Obelisk, Pa., exemption from the provisions
of article III of the Code to the extent that
it may work 10 special hemstitching blind-
stitch yoke machines and ruffle-collar ma-
chines 1 hour overtime each day for 10 days,
beginning April 1, provided time and one-
half is paid for all overtime.
Order 530, granting to Flossie Dress Co.,
Stamford, Conn., exemption from the provi-
sions of article III of the Code to the extent
that it may work 50 operators, 8 trimmers,
and 6 pressers 1 hour overtime each day for
10 days, commencing April 4, and 4 hours on
Saturday, April 6, and Saturday, April 13,
provided time and one-half. Is paid for all
overtime.
Order 59, granting to Beatrice Callanora,
Brooklyn. N. Y., .exemption from the provi-
sions of article III of the Code to the extent
that it may work 16 operators, 3 pressers,
and 5 cleaners 4 hours on Saturdays, April
6, 13, and 20, 1935, provided, time and one-
half is paid for such overtime. A copy of
the order must be posted in a conspicuous
place In the applicant's plant.
LEATHER AND WOOLEN KNIT-.
GLOVE INDUSTRY, Code No. 87: Order
42, granting to Sager Glove Corporation,
2035-2049 Charleston Street, Chicago, Ill.,
exemption from the provisions of article Ill,'
section 1, of the Code to the extent that
employees may work 4 hours overtime per
week for a period beginning April 9 and
ending Jun'e 16, 1935, and shall be compen-
sated at not less than their normal rate of
pay. A copy of the order must be posted
in a conspicuous place in the applicant's
plant. All such overtime hours shall be
charged, against overtime period provided.
See article III, section 1, of the Code.
Order 43, granting to D. C. Haber Knitting
Co., 7540 Stanton Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio,
exemption from the provisions of article III,
section 1, of the Code to the same extent ai
Order 42 above.
LIGHT SEWING INDUSTRY, EXCEPT'
GARMENTS, Code No. 226: Order No. 57,
staying provisions of article XI insofar as
members of the mattress cover division are
concerned.
LINSEED OIL MANUFACTURING IN-
DUSTRY, Code No. LPII: Order 8, approv-
ing budget -and basis of contribution for the
period from May 1, 1934, to April 30, 1935.
SLUMBER AND TIMBER PRODUCTS
INDUSTRIES, Code No. 9: Order 334, de-
nying to Ohio Match Co., Spokane. Wash.,
exemption of match plank from the provi-
sions of article VIII of the Code.
Order 335, granting to Curtis Bros. & Co.,
Clinton, Iowa. exemption from the provisions
of article VI, section B, of the Code to the
extent that it may work' 25 yardmen, 121
machinemen, 102 machine-helpers, 39 bench-
men, 24 glazing crew, 40 foremen, clerks, and
shippers not more than 48 hours in any 7-
day period for the period starting April 23
and ending June 16, 1935, on operations nec-
essary to fulfill woodwork commitments
made prior to April 11, 1935, provided each
such employee shall be paid not less than
his hourly rate of pay in effect on April 11,
1935. for all hours worked.
Order 336, denying to Jno. F. Croom &
Bro., Magnolia. N. C., exemption from the
provisions of article VII of the Code.
MANUFACTURING AND WHOLE-
SALE SURGICAL INDUSTRY, Code No
501: Order 11. amending order of approval
of the budget and basis of contribution for
the period from August 22, 1934, to June 16,
93.5.
MEDIUM- AND LOW-PRICED JEW-
ELRY, Code No. 175: Order 57, approving
budget and basis of contribution for the
period from January 1 to June 16, 1935.
MEN'S CLOTHING INDUSTRY, Code
No. 15: Order 65. granting to all tailor-to-the
trade houses exemption from the provisions
of article IV of the Code to the extent that


they may work a total of 8 hours overtime
from April 6 to and including April 19, 1935,
with not more than 4 hours being used in
any 1 week, provided time and one-half
Is paid for all such overtime. A copy of the
order must be posted in a conspicuous place
in all plants Involved.
MEN'S NECKWEAR INDUSTRY, Code
No. 363: Order 31, granting to Rizzo Tailor-
ing Co., Pattersdn, La., exemption from the
provisions of article III, sections 1. 2, and
6 of the Code, up to and including June 16,
1935, providing it shall conform to the wage
rates established in article III, section 5, of
the Code, and a copy of the order is posted
in a conspicuous, place in the applicant's
plant.
Order 32, amending paragraph (a) of Ad-
ministrative Order No. 363-29, to provide In-
crease in contribution to Code Authority.
MILLINERY INDUSTRY, Code No. 151:
Order 59, granting to the Lord Hat Co., Los
Angeles, Calif.; Gottlieb Trimmed Hat Co.,
Kansas City, Mo.; Marion Vallee, New York
City; Nat Frank, Inc., New York City, ex-.
eruption from the provisions of article III,
section 2, of the Code, to the extent that they
are permitted to work their employees 71,
hours overtime per week for a period of 4
weeks during the spring' season 1935, but
prior to June 16, 1935, in addition to the
overtime permitted by the Cod"e for said
spring season, provided time and one-half is
paid for such overtime. A copy of the order
must be posted in a conspicuous place in the
applicant's plant.
Order 61, approving budget and basis of
contribution for the period from December
15, 1933, to December 31, 1934.
Order 63, extending Administrative Order
No. 151-7 to the members of the industry
situated in the market or area known as
Minneapolis and St. Paul for the period
from January 15 until June 16, 1935. A copy
of the order must be posted in a conspicuous
place in the applicants' plants.
Order 64, granting to members of the In-
dustry located in the Chicago, Milwaukee.
and St. Louis markets exemption frorp the
Provisions of article IV, section 3, of the
Code, for the period from April 1 to and in-
cluding June 16, 1935. Copies of the order
must be posted in conspicuous places in the
applicants' plants.
MOTION PICTURE INDUSTRY, Code
No. 124: Order 55, approving budget' and
basis of contribution for thfd periods from
January 1 to June 16, 1935, and from June
17 to December 31, 1935.
MOTOR-VEHICLE RETAILING TRADE,
Code 'No. 46: Order 92, granting to Peanuts
Service Station, St. Joseph, Mo., exemption
from the provisions of article IV, title B,
section 1, of thie Code, to the extent that it
may sell 2 specifically designated automo-
biles, bbth being 1935 Grahams. at less than
the list price, provided they are sold only in
the State of Missouri.
PAINTING, PAPERHANGING, AND
DECORATING DIVISION OF THE CON-
STRUCTION INDUSTRY, Code No. 24B:
Order A3-3, approving modification to agree-
ment between employer members of the divi-
sion and certain of their employees in the
region of Omaha, Nebr.,rCouncil Bluffs. Iowa,
and vicinity.
PAPER BAG MANUFACTURING IN-
DUSTRY, Code No. 230: Order 36, denying
to American Bag. & Paper Co., Philadelphia,
Pa., exemption from the provisions of arti-
cle V, sections 1 and 4, of the Code.
PAPER AND PULP INDUSTRY, Code
No. 120f Order 88, denying to Reading Paper
Mills, Reading, Pa., exemption from the pro-
visions of article V, sections 1 and 5, of the
Code.
Order 89, denying to the Walton Corpora-
tion, Lititz, Pa., exemption from the provi-
sions of article V, sections ,1 and 5, of the
Code.
Order 90, denying to the Miami Valley
Coated Paper Co., Franklin, Ohio, exemption
from the provisions of article V, sections 1
and 5, of the Code.
Order 91, denying to A. M. Collins Manu-
facturing Co., Philadelphia, Pa., exemption
from the provisions of article V, sections 1
and 5, of the Code.
Order 92. denying to Pepperell Card & Pa-
per Co., East Pepperell, Mass.. exemption
from the provisions of article V, sections 1
and.5, of the Code.
Order 93, denying to Consumers Box &
Board & Paper Co., Lititz, Pa., exemption
from the provisions of article V, sections 1
and 5, of the, Code.
Order 94, denying to Wheelwright Paper
Co., Leominster, Mass., exemption from the
provisions of article V, sections 1 and 5, of
the Code.
PERFUME. COSMETIC. AND OTHER
TOILET PREPARATIONS INDUSTRY,
Code No 361: Order 29,. denying to Premier
L-aboratories. Inc., Trenton. N. J., exemption
from the provisions of article IV, section 1,
of the Code.
PICKLE PACKING INDUSTRY. Code
No. 524: Order 8. approving standards of
safety and health effective on May 8, 1935.
PLUMBING CONTRACTING DIVISION
OF THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY,
Code No. 244-I1: Order 29, canceling Ad-
ministrative Order No. 244-I and denying to


the master plumbers of the city of Selma, :'
in the county of Dallas, Ala., exemption..:
from the provisions of article III, section 1
(6), of the supplementary Code relating to
unskilled labor rate of 40 cents per hour for
the southern zone. '
PRINTING EQUIPMENT INDUSTRY.
AND TRADE, Code No. 257: Order 28, ap-
proving budget and basis of contribution for
the period from February 17, 1935, to Feb-
ruary 16, 1936.
RAILWAY BRASS CAR AND LOCO-
MOTIVE JOURNAL BEARINGS AND.
CASTINGS MANUFACTURING INDUS-
TRY, Code No. 233: Order 13. granting to
J. F. Hodgkins Co., Gardiner, Maine, exemp-
tion from the provisions of article III, see--
Lon 1, of the Code for the period from
April 1 to June 16, 1935, to the extent that
it may work its employees not more than
48 hours per week and that wages at the
rate of time and one-half shall be paid for
all hours worked over 40 per week. The
applicant shall make reasonable efforts to
train new men and to rearrange its working
schedule so that it may not be necessary to
petition for a further extension of this
exemption.
TRANSPARENT MATERIALS CON-
VERTERS INDUSTRY, Code No. 382: Or-
der 14, acquisition of membership by mann- -
facturers of pouches and rubes in the trans-
parent materials converters Industry.
UNDERGARMENT AND NEGLIGEE
INDUSTRY, Code No. 408: Order 39. grant-
ing to H. J. Luebke & Sons, Chicago, Ill., ex-
emption from the provisions of article IV,
section 6, of the Code, to the extent that it
may employ 1 learner, provided all other
conditions of said section and article are
complied with. A copy of the order must be
posted in a conspicuous place In the appli-
cant's plant.
Order 41, denying to New Holland Gar-
ment Factory, New Holland, Pa., exemption
from the provisions of article IV, section 6,
Sof the Code.
UNDERWEAR AND ALLIED PROD-
UCTS 'MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY,
Code No. 23: Order 32, granting to warp lknit
fabrics group exemption from the provisions
of part III, section 2, of the Code, under ,cer-
tain conditions, for the period beginning
April 3 and ending May 11, 1935.
WALLPAPER INDUSTRY, Code No. 19:
Order 16A, granting to United Wall Paper
Factories, Inc., 46 Cedar Street, New York
City, exemption from the provisions of arti-
cle III, of the Code, to the extent that 215
employees bf Chicago plant are paid time
and one-half for all hours worked In excess
of S per day and 40 per week and double time
for all hours worked in excess of 48 .pjer week.
In no case shall weekly -hours exceed 56 per
employee. A copy of the order must be
posted in places conspicuous and accessible
to all employees.
Order 17, disapproving Commercial Rulling
No. 15.
WARM-AIR FURNACE MANUFAC-
TURING INDUSTRY, Code No. 137: Order
26, approving budgets and basis of contribu-
tion for the period of January 1 to De-
cember 31, 1935.
WHEEL AND RIM MANUFACTURING
INDUSTRY, Code No. 105d: Order 6, ap-
proving resolution adopted by the adminis-
trative committee as provided by article IV,
section 11, of the Supplementary Code.
WHOLESALE STATIONERY TRADE
(Division of the Wholesaling or Distributing
Trade), Code No. 201F: Order 24, approving
divisional budget and basis of contribution
for the period of April 21, 1934, to April 20,
1935.
WOOD TURNING AND SHAPING IN-
DUSTRIES, Code No. 383: Order 27, grant-
ing to the estate of Charles Forster, Strong,
Maine; Hardwood Products Co., Mayville,
Mich.; General Woodenware Corporation,
1602 Graybar Building, New York City;
Berst-Forster-Dixfield Co., Dixfleld, Maine,
the entire membership of the toothpick in-
dustry. exemption from the provisions of
part A, article III, section 1, of the Code, to
the extent necessary to permit employees of
said applicants to work 48 hours in any 1
week, but not in excess of 8 hours in any
24-hour period, or 6 days in any 7-day period,
provided each employee Is paid not less than
his normal rate of pay for all hours worked
Sin excess of 40 in. any 1 week, and not less
than twice his normal pay for all hours
worked on Sundays and legal holidays. The
order Is effective on May 13, 1935.
ZINC INDUSTRY, Code No. 555: Order 3,
granting to Eagle Picher Mining & Smelting
Co., Joplin. Mo.. exemption from the maxi-
mum weekly hour provisions of article III,
section 1, f6r its Montana Mine. Santa Cruz
County, Ariz.. for a period of 60 days; pro-
vided, that no employee of the applicant shall
work in excess of 48 hours per week, except
as otherwise provided in section 3 of article
III. Copies of the order must be posted in
accordance with the rules and regulations
prescribed by the administration respecting
the posting of Codes.
Granting to 58 industries a stay of the
provisions of paragraph 2 of Administrative
Order X-136 .for a period of 30 days from
April 18, 1935.


: '. .-
...." -' .*: .* ..:, .. : .;-,.\ w E'. :E'.









Code Authority M

The National Industrial Recovery Boar#l
approved the following selections and ap-
p. ointments of Code Authority members:
ANTI-HOG CHOLERA SERUM AND
r HOG CHOLERA VIRUS INDUSTRY.-
1. From group marketing their products
. principally through veterinarians: E. A. Ca-
Shill, Kansas City, 'Mo.; G. H. Williams,
SOmaha, Nebr.; Dean Corsa, White Hall, Ill.;
SR. M. Young, Omaha, Nebr.; and G. G. Gra-
ham, Kansas City, Mo. 2. From group mar-
,. keting their products principally through
Other channels: John E. Swain, Chicago, Ill.;
T B Huff. Sioux City, Iowa; W. J. Ken-
nedy, South St. Joseph, Mo.; Clyde Hevner,
SFranklin. Nebr.: and F. R. Jones, Fort
Worth, Tex.
S BANK AND SECURITY VAULTksMAN-
.UFACTURING INDUSTRY.-J. M. Swan-
son, New York City, vice W. F. Forepaugh,
Resigned. '
S COAL CUTTING MACHINE INDUS-
STRY (a Division of the Machinery, and Al-
lied Products Industry).-J. A. Noyes, Chi-
cago, Ill.; R. L. Cox, Columbus, Ohio; and
SWilliam E. Goodman, Chicago, IlL
: COAL MINE LOADING MACHINE IN-
SDUSTRY (a Division of the Machinery and
SAllied Products Industry).-W. 'E. Barrow,
Franklin, Pa.; R. L. Cox, Colurbus, -Ohio;
William Whaley, Knoxville, Tenn.; J. A.
Noyes, and William S. Goodman, Chicago,
Ill.
DIE CASTING MANUFACTURING IN-
DUSTRY.-F. P. Assmann, Syracuse, N. Y.;
H. H. Doehler, Toledo, Ohio; GA. M. Rolla-
i: son, Garwood, N. J.; H. H. Weiss, Cleve-
Sland, Ohio; and S. A. Hellings, Chicago, Ill.
ELECTRO PLATING AND METAL
POLISHING AND METAL' FINISHING
SINDUSTRY.-George F. Holtz as a member
Sof the District Code Committee for District
X to fill the',vacancy created by the death of
'0. D. Stuart.
I ELECTROO PLATING ANI4 METAL
POLISHING AND METAL FINISHING
I INDUSTRY.-A. R. Tonon, Cambridge,
Mass.; A. N. Garrepy, Worcester, Mass.;
SThomas J. Murray, Springfield, Mass.; F. F.
: Shane, Hartford, Conn.; and H. B. ,Wilson,
Plainville, Conn., as members of the District
Code Committee for District No.. VI.
FARM EQUIPMENT INDUSTRY.-W.
SKing White, Cleveland, Ohio;" N. C. Mac-
SFarlane, Minneapolis, Minn.; C. 'R. Messin-
Sger, Chicago, Ill.; H. C. Merrltt, Milwaukee,
SWis.; Charles T. Ray, Louisville, Ky.; H. L.
Dempster, Beatrice, Nebr.: W. L. Clark, Ra-
cine, Wis.; William H. Roberts, Jr., Philia-
delphia, Pa.; M. F. Holahan, Cl ica-go. Ill.;
Frank Silloway, Moline, Ill.; B. Heacock,
SPeoria, Ill.; W. D. James, Ft. Atk nson, Wis.;
B. C. Angster, Chicago, Ill.; and W. A. Za-
: loudek, Tipton, Ind.
S FISHERY INDUSTRY.-Extenslon of
term of office of temporary executive com-
Smittee of the processing and wholesaling di-
vision in the northern section of' the south-
Swest area to June 16, 1935.
S FOLDING PAPER BOX INDUSTRY.-
: L. W. Sutherland, Kalamazoo, Mich., vice
SH. L. Rauch, resigned.
S FOLDING PAPER BOX INDUSTRY.-
r Henry Tatnall Brown, Philadelphia, Pa.;
SColin Gardner, Middletown, Ohio; Arthur I.
SHarris, Atlanta, Ga.; William D. Lan'e,
; Omaha, Nebr.; Ralph R. Richardson, Chi-
cago, Ill.; C. S. Rutherford. San 'Francisco,
Calif.; Harry C. Stevenson, Rochestbr, N.'Y.;
and Francis S. Wakeman,,New York, N.-Y.
FRESH OYSTER INDUSTRY (a Divi-
sion of the Fishery Industry).-North At-
lantic section, J. N. Fowler, Bivalve, N., ,I.;'
W. H. Raye, New York, N. Y.; and, H. Gor-
don Sweet, New Haven, Conn. Middlb At'-
lantic section. A. L. Bonwell, Norfolk; Va.
Southern section, J. 0. Maggioni, Savannah,
Ga. Pacific Coast section, E. N.' Steele,
Olympia. Wash.
GENERAL NRA CODE AUTHORITY.-
teorge B. Haddock as alternate member,, to
attend the meetings of the Code Authority
at which Clair Wilcox is unable to be pres-
ent, and to act in his place at such meetings.
HAT MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.-
Nathan Davidson, New York, N. Y.; Abra-
..ham Elishewitz, New York, N. Y.; Louis R.
Goodman, Danbury, Conn.; Martin J. Kan-
ner, Fall River, Mass.; Frank H. Lee, Jr.,
Danbury, Conn.; George V. MacKinnon,
Philadelphia, Pa.; Harry McLachlan, Dan
bury, Conn.; Fletcher H. Montgomery, South
Norwalk, Conn.; Leslie WV. Moses, Baltimore,
Md.; Ralph K. Reynolds, Danbury, Conn.;
Benjamin F. Sargent, Jr.. Amesbury, Mass.;
Otto L. Swenzey, St. Louis, Mo.; and in addi-
tion James H. Birtton, Richmond, Va., is
recognized a member entitled to sit in all
meetings, without vote. Membership ex-
t tended to June 16, 1935.
LIFT TRUCK AND PORTABLE ELE-
VATOR MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.
-J. J. Simple, Irvington, N. J., as nonasso-
ciation member, vice Charles A. Morrow, re-
signed.
LIMESTONE INDUSTRY.-G H. Bar-
rett, Bloomington, Ind.; Kenneth Cline,
Bloomington, Ind.; John Davidson, Harrison,
N. J.; A. E. Dickinson, Chicago, Ill.; L. E.
Donaldson, Bedford, Ind.; John Edgeworth,
EKankakee, Il1.; J. P. Green, Charlestown,
.Mass.; Ernst Heldmaler, Chicago, Ill.; G.



.3'


...... .. .. ...,' .. .......7.. .." .. ""

embersApproved Amen'ments and Modifications'..

Ellis Hummell, Cincinnati, Oblp; J. F. Man- Rand Instrument Manufacturing Inrlus- of the provisions of an employment contract .
ning, Jr., New York, N. Y.; C. H. Owens, try.-Amendment approved April 13, 1935, to constitutes a violation of the Code. iv
Austin, Tex.; J. G. Ray, Bloomington, Ind.; be effective May 3, unless good cause to the Cigar Manufacturing Industry. -Amend-'i
John Hanert, chairman, Milwaukee, Wis. contrary is shown, clarifies certain provisions mn nnrnvd Anil 17. 1935. defining legal


MARKING DEVICES INDUSTRY.-J in the definitions; modifies and adds certain hol-days for purposes of overtime under the
Labor provisions; provides for more efficient Code. y f p
R. Swift, chairman, Chicago, Ill.; Henry J. administration organization; and adds cer- Cd
Hanson, Chicago. Ill.; John Schweizer, St. tamtrade practice provisions. Coffee Industry.- A-mendment approv-'l
Louis, Mo.; Herman Anderson, Pittsburgh, April 11,193trad, to be effective May 1, unles
Pa.; Charles 0. Lee, Detroit, Mich.; Harry Bank and Security Vault Manufacturing go cu t contrary e is s ruesS.
Jonas, New York, N. Y.; Homer E. Willard, Industry.- Amendment approved April 8, good cause to the contrary is shown, require'
Toledo, Ohio; J. M. Patrick, San Francisco, 1935, to be effective April 2S, provides for an stye ndhealthori mpoyesm ingswortda s f.
Calif.; Herman Seefried, Cleveland, Ohio; alternate for each member of the Code safety and health for employees uing wo
Philip Sheridan, New York, N. Y.; and Authority, g hours.
Frank J. Spaeth, Boston, Mass., temporary Beauty and Barber Shop Mechanical Eqiap- Corkl 3Indstry.- Amendment approved'-
Code Authority extended for a period of 58 ment Manufacturing Industry.-Amcnlment April 13, 1935, to be effective May 3, unless
days from the 19th day of April, 1935. approved April 15, 1935, clarifies the defin- good cause to the contrary is shown. revises1.
MOTOR VEHICLE RETAILING TRADE. tion of the industry and adds certain standard the child labor and hazardous occupatioS,
-Grant L. McFayden, chairman, B. F definitions; modifies certain labor provisions;, provisions of the Code, and permits the Codl-
Knuth, vice chairman, W. A. Russell, and Includes several standard administration pro- Authority to submit a budget and basis of
C. J. Campbell, of Omaha; John Monnich, visions; provides for more efficient adminis- contribution for NRA approval. ;:a
Fremont; Al Du Teau. Lincoln; A. H. Jones ration organization; and adds certain trade Cornet and Brassiere Industry.-Amend-?6i
Hastings; R. D. Smith, McCook; T. F. Kin- practice provisions and clarifies others, meat approved April 6. 1935, makes the
man, Grand Island; A. W. Breyer, Norfo'k; Beverage Dispensing Equipment Indus- charge for NRA labels subject to approval. H
W. L. Brorherton, North Platte; H. Born- try.-Amendment approved April 6, 1935, to of the National Industrial Recovery Boardo.. '"
gardner, Scottsbluff; G. B. Campbell, Atkin- be effective April 21, changes and amplifies Excelsior and Excelsior Products indid-sitS
son; and A. C. Nelsen, Omaha, to serve on the definition of the industry by including try.-Amendment approved April 3. 1935, P@'.
the StAte Advisory Committee of Nebraska. those engaged in the manufacturing and/or require manufacturer to mark industry Orod.J
MOTOR VEHICLE MAINTENANCE installing operations. ucts with his name and address or regiseetPrd'N
TRADE.-J. W. Brown, Anderson; Ben Canned Salmon Industry.-Amendment ap- symbol .'
Sherwood, Bedford; Noah Wagner, CoHitic; proved April 13, 1935, provides that violation Hosiery Industry-Amendment approvpedI.
C. A. Larson, Elkart; R. W. Baskett and April 6, 1935, prescribes uniform conditnio'ns
Ray A. Hartman, of Evansville; Stephen 'of sale; prohibits price guarantees; prohibltsa'
Murphy and Adrian Buo ckmaster, of Fort Rsigati
Muraph o hay and Adrian Buckmaster, of Fort i natin an ler- bonuses, rebates, honor, and credits, etc:. )
Wayne; Homer Hoffman, Columbia City.; Resignati s and T r- regulates customers' subsidies, return of mer-'
Ralph 0. Pohlplatz and John A. Widmer, of lim i ichaniise, special services, cooperative adver-i_.;
Hammond; Chas. F. Campbell, Don Herr, and mnflIat lons of Code tising, etc.; prohibits the sale of mierchandisq",'
Y. C. McCoy, of Indianapolis; Don F. Sharp below cost; deals with the billing of samples ,.:
and Claude C. Cruiksbank, of Gary; Gilbert A it- It y M/ bm rc prohibits consignment shipments; prohibit; S:
Apple, Bloomington; Mark C. Kerlin, Frank- AlLIU Lor y l lem lers commercial bribery; prohibits return of mer-:..
Uin; Carl C. Eikenberry, Kokomo; Clinton chnndise for refinishing ufiless the manufac 4\
Anderson, La Fayette; Beq Penniogton, to- American Petroleum Equipment Industry -
Anderson, La Fayette; Ben Pennington; and Trade--Stiles M. Decker. turer is compensated for actual cost; deals9H
Willigansport; Ernesy, Marion; Jo. C. Krebs, Michi Bedding Manufacturing Industry- Walter with classification of hosiery; prohibits hid-:^
Wiiam Dury, M; Park Gion; Joespie, MuG.cie; Oscar P. h Bedding Manufacturing Industry-Watiele. den substitutions; prohibits misbranding and.
gan City; Park Gillespie, Munce; Oscar P. ee. misrepresentation of materials; prohibits the,,^
Meyer, New Albany; Gleanb E. gnively, Peru; Blackboard and Blackboard Eraser Manu- imitation of competitors' marks; and provide,,i 4"
Clem McConaha, Richmond; W. A. 'Britton facturing Industry-Walter S. Giele. for arbitration. ''
and A. L. Fischer, of Terre Haute; Bert A. Boot and Shoe Manufacturing Industry- I a pie and achin Di
Dodd, Vincennes; Russ Gill, South Bend, to' Raymond V. McNamara. tributors' Trade-Amendment approved prI1'
serve on the temporary State committee of Coin-Operated Machine Manufacturing 17, 1935, tor be effective May 2, unles goodrl:
Indiana. Industry-Walter S. Giele. cause to the contrary is shown, Adds a stand-:i'
MOTOR VEHICLE MAINTENANCE Corn Cob Pipe Industry-- Walter S. Giele. ard clause on hazardous occupations. .i
TRADE.-F. A. Ford, Ada; 3. C. Murdock Corrugated and Solid Fibre Shipping Con-
TAE-F. A. Ford, Ada; J. G. Murdock, -^ ^'^ ^ ^18Kalinin Division of the Construction In.-aall
Elk City; F. C. Brown, Frederick; Ned Rem.- talner Industry-Shuford B. Marks. Kainy.-Andmnienisio of the ConAptrilctio 16, 193!n ;
inert, Hobart; L. B. Stanfleld, Ardmore; L. Fabricated Metal Products Manufacturing pedustry.-Amendmen approved April 16, 1935rJgtmii
E. Stites, Bartlesville; John M. Burkhalter, and Metal Finishing and Metal Coating In- permits the Code Authority to submit a budget.il
Anadarko; J. D. Albright, Clinton; Craw- dustry-Lt. Col. Carl C. Oakes. and basis of contribution for NRA approve.
ford H. Funk, Enid; Jack Kinser, Wodd- Forged Tool Manufacturing Industry (Di- Liohtning Rod Manufacturing ndstry,
ward; Fritz W. Weilmuenster, Stillwater; vision of Fabricated Metal Products MAnu- Amendment approved April 6, 1935, effective v
R. H. Gann, Lawton;. F. H. Zajic, Miami; facturing and Metal Finishing and Metal April 26, revises article VI by adding anew"^.
Henry F. Coffeen, Muskogee; Roscoe Moss, Coating Industry)-Wallace L. Clay. section 9 in accordance with Executive OrderS
J. W. Boulton, and Frank Smith, of .Okla- Fur Dressing and Fur Dyeing Industry- No. 6678 and Administrative Order No.X-36.
homa City; W. P. McGown, Okmulgee; Clair Joseph E. Brodinsky. Machine Tool and Equipment Distribntig.
A. Nickles, Ponca City; R. W. Bellmyer, Lightning Rod Manufacturing Industry- Trade.-Amendment approved April 17, 1935, j:".
Shawnee; Horner Hillis, Seminole; M. K. Walter S. Giele. to be effective May 2, unless good cause to.
McBride, Tulsa; Earl Keithly, Vinita; A. R. Optical Retail Trade-R. A. Stevens. the contrary is shown, adds a standard clause, : i
Getman, Drumright; Chester McElreath, Paper Bag Manufacturing Industry-E. R. on hazardous.occupations. ."
Durant, to serve on the temporary State Boylan. Metal Tank Industry.-Amendment aP- M.
committee of Oklahoma. Paper Disc Milk' Bottle Cap Industry- proved April 6, 1935. effective April 26, -ex-.
MOTOR VEHICLE MAINTENANCE E. R. Boylan. eludes from the definitions of the industry 4..1-
TRADE.--Armin B. Scheurle, Appleton; Plumbing Fixture Industry-Wallace L. hot-water storage tanks and hydropneumatic
Gust A. Larson, Ashland; L. C. Schilewe, Clay. tanks of 120-gal'.on capacity and over, which,.,
Beaver Dam; John Lawrence, Green Bay; Pulverizing Machinery and Equipment In- are made from nonferrous material.
Robert F. Buggs, Janesville; Carl H. Rueg- dustry (Division of Machinery and Allied Milk Filtering Materials and the Dairy.-'
ger, Belolt; E. T. Gascoigne and Harold A. Products)-C. J. Eastman. Products Cotton Wrappings Industry.--`'.
Stein, of Kenosha; James H. Brevik, La Punchboard Manufacturing Industry- Amendment approved April 6, 1935, substi--:i:i
Crosse; Thomas Butzen and Henry R. Rit- Walter S. Giele. tutes "open-price filing", "costs and price L
ter, Madison; Ray C. Gustafson, Marlnette; Retail Trade-Local Retail Code Author- cutting", and "emergency provisions.
R. J. Barbera, Paul 0. Schulz, and Walter ity of Pampa, Tex.-George WV. Briggs. Nonfermro Bot Watr Tank Manifactur-.I
Hackbarth, of Milwaukee; James S. Gilling- Rock and Ore Crusher Industry (Division in fr usrt.-Amendmenr approved April 6,'t
ham, Oshkosh: Roy F. Nelson, Racine; of Machinery and Allied Products)-C. J. g I to b e effectiven approved April 26, removes from.'
Clarence S. Gale, Sheboygan; F. R. Hoeller, Eastman. the definition of industry restrictions in re'
Stevens Point: A. E. Sampson, Superior; Rolling Steel Door Industry-Ralph C. the rd to workeinition of ing p pressure of over 50 pounds
Otto L. Effa, Wausau, to serve on the tern- Davis. pgr square inch and sizes not exceeding 1po -
porary State committee of Wisconsin. Specialty Accounting Supply Manufactur- per square inch and sizes not exceeding1-
ME ing dustry--Fred H. Clark. gallon capacity, in order to properly include."
MOTOR VEHICLE MAINTENANCE Vitrified Clay Sewer Pipe Manufacturing within the definition of the industry all non- R
TRADE.-,W. R. Jones, Atlantic; Tim Vahle, Industry-Bernard L. McNulty. ferrous bot-whter tanks, regardless 9f 'size. !
Burlington; C. P. Spencer, Cedar Rapids; Upholstery Spring and Accessories Manu- Package and Pasteurized-Blended and '
Grant Parady, and Glenn H. Osborn, Council facturing Industry-Fred E. Cldrk. Process Cheese Industrp.-Amendment ap- .'i
Bluffs; Chas. Feeley, Centerville; James E. Wall Paper Manufacturing Industry-Ed- proved April 6, 1935, adds a standard clause ..,:.
Green, Clinton; Carl A. Nord, Creston; W. win G. Farrell as technical advisor, for liquidated damages..",
B. Fisher, Orval Hinds, and R. W. Beattie, Wall Paper Manufacturing Industry-Van- Plumbing Contracting Division of. the Co-n-.-a
Des Moines; J. L. Dahl, Ames; Tom Wake, dever Curtis as economic advisor, structiori Industry.-Amendmient approved 4
Newton; Fred Elder, Chariton; Russell Mad- April 20, 1935. to become effective May 4,'.'
ison, Winterset; L. J. O'Herron, Carroll; ,1935, unless good cause to the contrary Is .*
Chas. R. Newkirk, Dubuque; W. 0. Arnold, C A hn it shown, establishes rules and regulations for
Fort'Dodge; V. W. Nail, Iowa City; F. Ben- O e u ori y y shown, establishes rules and regulations for
the establishment and maintenance of bid."'1%-1
son, Jr., Keokuk; Ross B. Hall. Marshall- A depositories. The order of approval empow-',
town; Lyle Pickford, Mason City; Ernest W. l awS approved ers the National Industrial Rec-overy Board .,
House, Muscatine; Paul E. Amsberry. Oska- ,, to reconsider the provisionQ of article V, sec- .;
loosa; B. D. Adams, Ottumwa; A. H. Nehl- Artificial Limb Manufacturing Industry ion () if it impose unde hardship.
sen, Davenport; W. A. Carlson. Sioux City; (with conditions). u h
R. R. Hinmon. Waterloo, to serve on the Fur Manufacturing Industry. Pyrotechnic Manufaclturing Industry.-..
temporary State committee of Iowa. Graphic Arts Industries (C-3 Securities Amendment approved April 10, 1935, to be ,:
MOTOR VEHICLE MAINTENANCE and Bank Note Engraving and Printing), effective July 6, 1935, provides for the dis- ;
MOTOR VEHICLE MAINTENANCE ADE.-C. MBee, Billings; Sam Malleable Iron Industry (amendments). continuance of manufacture and sale of cer-
TRADE.-C. S. MABee, Billingt; Sa] HoA Rock and Slag Wool Manufacturing Indus- tain fireworks considered more dangerous -":i
Iier, Bozeman: W. A. Kane, Butte; J. Anson (amendment) than others. -"^^
Baxter. Dillon'; James Stainsby, Great Falls; try (amendment). than others...
Bar. Stateam, Gle insby, Great Fallsv, Water Meter Manufacturing Industry Shovel, Dragline, and Crane Industry. '
R.dustrSththamDrGgene. aneCrWneC.duAtr. i
avre; H. A. Fabian, Helena;: Victor V. (with provisions). Amendment approved April 6, 1935, effective
Crokrec, Kalispell; H. A Traywick, Lewis- April 26, provides for inclusion of portable :'i,
town; Chas. C. Vincent, Missoula; J. P. T P drilLing machines in the definition of industry..:
Johnson, Miles City, to serve on the tempo- rade ractce L0ofi- Slit Fabric Maniufacturing Industry.-'i
rary State committee of Montana. P Amendment approved April 13, 1935, to be i3
MOTOR VEHICLE MAINTENANCE plaints Plans Appnroved effective May 3, provides for maintaining ac- .
TRADE.-Garland Burnham, George Dasch, curate and complete records of transactions ..o ::
Loy L. Mentzer. Joseph A. Vaeth, David A. Cigar Manufacturing Industry, in the industry; and for standardization of
Dannenfelser, Jr., James Grat, and Harry Crushed Stone, Sand and Gravel, and Slag cash discounts allowed. .
Winder, of Baltimore; G. W. Wolfe, Silver Industries, approval of District Adjustment Steel Package Manufacturing Industry (Ar-.'
Springs; Irvin Brown, Annapolis: Charles Agency for Second District of Missouri, Re- Division of the Fabricated Metal Prodiucts ,Zs
Bevard, Bel Air; Edward L. Meredith, Cam- glon 13. Manufacturing and Metal Finisaing and ..
bridge; Carl A. Sander and John P. Spoerl, Crushed Stone, Sand and Gravel, nnd Slag Metal Coating Industry).-Amendment ap- '.
of Cumberland Jesse W. Kolb, Frederick; Industries, approval of District Adjustment proved April 13, 1935, requires members of .:6
Charles W. Hoffman, Hagestown; B. T. Bro- Agency for District 7, Region 3. the industry to comply with their filed terms .:,g
sins, Rockville; Vaughn M. Richardson, Salis- Crushed Stone. Sand and Gravel, and Snlag of sale. The order of approval stays the "-*
bury, to serve on the temporary State corn- .Industries, approval of District Adjustment 10-day waiting period in article V, para- :t
mittee of Maryland. Agency for District 4, Region 9. graph A. j .-.
i'i

. .. ..',," . '









scent T.rends in the Electrical Manufacturing Indust


S100
t.'. 90
;..,.80


NEW ORDER!
GOODS I


-)6


5 OF ELECTRICAL
N $1,000,0007s-


\^p


"AL MAN-HOURS
WEEK IN 11000,000s


.' 50 1 I i' Il I I 1.j..j....j.....l...J. I I I I I I I I I I I I , i i i i I I . I i. i I I ii I I I i I I I i I II I, I
50,*. M J S D M J S D M J S D M" J S D M J S D M J4 D M, J S Q.
S1929 .1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935
ources-of Data: From Monthly Labor Review, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Indexes of employment and pay rolls adjusted by NRA to 1933 Cdnsus totals, average hours per week
| average hourly wage, average weekly wage, and man-hours computed from estimated employment and average hours per week by NIRA; these data are an NRA consolidation
Wof two classifications,. "Electrilcal Machinery, Apparatus and Supplies" and "Radios and Phonographs." From Electrical Goods, Buteau oI the Census, new orders of electrical
.goods. Chart prepared exclusively for the Blue Eagle by the Research and Planning. Division, NRA.


4'. Under the Electrical Manufacturing Code are included a variety of prod-
bt: Nenerators and motors, transformers, insulated wire and cables, incan-
mcent-filament lamps, radios, electrical cooking utensils, and other electrical
t buehold appliances. Even though far from complete, such a list indicates
,at 6 the products of the industry are largely items of capital equipment and
irable 'consumers' goods. The decline experienced by the electrical manu-
facturing industry, as evidenced in the 'accompanying chart, is not unduly
Avere when compared with thd'depression 'suffered by the durable goods indus-
ries as a whole. By 1932 activity had shrunk to about one-quarter of what
"t.d''beeri in 1929. The improvement which followed, though considerable,
has so far canceled but a small part of the earlier losses.
, Of the wage earners producing electrical machinery and appliances, more
ian three-qifarters work under the Electrical Manufacturing Code apd sup-
ements -thereto, the remainder working under sundry other Codes, chiefly
he Electric Storage Battery, the Vacuum Cleaner Manufacturing, and the
&utoinotive Parts and Equipment Codes. Although the labor, data in the
mc.companying chart applyto all wage earners in the electrical manufacturing&
industry as a whole, use of the data in an analysis of the electrical manufac-
.rinmg industry more narrowly delimited by the Code is not far amiss.
.' The downward movement in hourly wages from 1932 to the summer of
19.3 stands in contrast to the rise in the latter half of that year and the
Moderate advances that occurred thereafter. Meanwhile, rather wide fluctua-
tions characterized the length of the working week until the latter months
)f.1933, when it was stabilized at. about 34 hours. The sharp upward move-
Dent in hours worked per -week during the first half of 1933 and the decline
Intring the following 6 months, respectively, reflect the general pre-Code spurt
n" business and the limitation on the length of the working week imposed by
he. Codes.
In the third quarter of 1932, pfter receding for 2 years, weekly wages


reached their lowest point since 1929, averaging $17 per week in contrast to
the $29 'which the employed worker received before the depression. Although
the final part of the decline in weekly wages was recouped -immediately, addi-
tional gains did not materialize until the latter half of 1934. In the last 8
months moderate advances have brought the weekly wage'up to $22. This
wage, although amounting in dollars to but three-quarters of the 1929 wage,
is only 7 or 8 percent below the real income of that time.
The downward sweep in, employment and. pay rolls appearing in the
second-section of the chart finally ended in March 1933, with employment at
less than 40 percent and-pay rolls at less thdn 25 percent of their 1929 aver-
ages. Both series rose rapidly for 6 months during 1933. Thereafter employ-
* ment remained substantially unchanged, while pag rolls increased materially.
Currently the two series stand at 60 percent and 50 percent of their respective
1929 levels.
The curve representing man-hours may be used in lieu of a production
index to indicate changes in physical volume of production over short, periods.
This, as well as new orders of electrical goods, is shown in the third section
of the chart. It appears that man-hours have fluctuated less than new orders
of electrical goods, though the two series have reacted similarly in their
fundamental movements. Interestingly enough, the downward trend in new
orders of electrical goods from 1929 to 1933 ran parallel to the decline in pay-
rolls. During-the recovery of 1933, however, pay rolls gained more-than did
new orders, while in 1934 the two made parallel advances. It must be remem-
bered that pay rolls and new orders each reflect changes in price as well as
changes in quantity.
Of the improvement this far found in Ihe electrical manufacturing indus-
try, much can be attributed to the production of consumers' goods, particularly '
radios. To the extent that the industry produces capital goods it seems to
have shared the experience typical of other heavy industries. .


U. S GOVERNMENI PRINTING OFFICE


AW.


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AVERAGE HOURLY VWAGE IN CENTS I.._



AVERAGE HOURS WORKED PER WEEK _________





WAGE IN DOLLARS 7 "-
,AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGE IN
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150
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