The Blue Eagle ( 1934- )

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Title:
The Blue Eagle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Creator:
United States -- National Recovery Administration
Publisher:
National Recovery Administration ( Washington, D.C )
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 16917556
System ID:
AA00021018:00044

Full Text







eo


Vol. 117 N o 6A H 2 ,1 3
|~Vol. II, No. 16_Issued Weekly by the National Recovery Administration, Washington April 22, 1935 .



HatMakersReach Safety of Employees New Code Contribution
Provision Inserted in s N ew des .
Agreement on Provinfee Industry oden Rules Designed for Relief


I Aarc ul vv a
YPuerto Rico and U. S. Manufac-
Sturers Now Virtually on Compet-
S itive Basis Through Accord
i.
i Wage differences between mainland and
.Puerto Rican hat manufacturers have been
ironed out in an agreement. approved by the
National Recovery Administration.
'The agreement was certified in a tele-
graphic order from Division Administrator
:KM. D. Vincent to William El. Ferry, execu-
dtive director of the hat manufacturers Code
"Authority.
SIt provides for workers in the island in-
dustry a minimum wage to be 60 percent of
.-the minimum established in the Code for the
Mainland trade.
SThe United States minimum average for
ithe hat-making industry under the Code is
:50 cents an hour, the minimuni hourly rate,
i35 cents. The Administration's order ex-
empting the island industry from wage pro-
visions of the Code thus would set the
EPuerto Rican minimum average at 30 cents,
the niinimum hourly rate at 21 cents.
The 'Administration expects the agree-
ment will put mainland and island manu-
facturers virtually on an equitable competi-
itive basis.
i Leading Puerto Rican manufacturers
'signed a Code compliance on the basis of
.today's agreement last December and at that
time were furnished NRA labels.
SUnder the agreement, the average hourly.
wage rate for Puerto Rican hat workers will
be increased approximately 33 percent.
Bearings of mainland and island wage dif-
ferences were held in March 1934. Subse
Squently the Code Authority and the Research
and Planning Division of NRA made an en-
:gineering study of island plants. The order
Sis an outgrowth of these activities.
SThe telegraphic notice to the Code Author-
Ity follows:
S"On recommendation of Code Authority
.and pending issuance of formal order it is
,hereby ordered that all members of hat man-
ufacturing industry who manufacture straw
hats in the Territory of Puerto Rico, be and
"they are hereby exempted from the operation
|of provisions of Article 3, sections 1 and 2
-,of Hat Code for a period of 10 days from
the date hereof, provided, that no employee
of such members of said industry shall be
paid at less than the rate of 21 cents per
.hour or 60 percent of minimum wage rate
c.eontained in article 3, section 1 of said Code,
and provided further, that the weighted aver-
|.age wage paid by any such member of said
A*dustry to his employees taken as a group
shall be not less than 30 cents per hour, pro-
i.rlded that in the employees group above re-
ferred to, there shall be excluded office em-
*ployees, salesmen, partners, executives, offli-
'cers, and foremen."


Used Road Machinery

Resale Regulations

Amended
An amendment to the regulations defining
the resale values of second-hand equipment,
approved under the Code for the road ma-
iehinery manufacturing industry, has been ap-
proved by the National Industrial Recovery'
Board. The amendment will permit such,
;equipment to be bought at other prices and
terms than the posted trade-in allowance, pro-
-1vided the purchase is not related to or used
In any manner as part payment for new
.equipment.
:' The amendment is effective immediately,
but members of the industry have the right
to file objections up to April 21.
At the same time the NRA 'refused to end
he stay which exempts track-type tractors
from the Code open-price provisions.


Hot Water Tank Code

Amendment Approved
The National Recovery Administration has
announced approval of an amendment to the
.ode for the nonferrous hot-water tank manu-
?Actnring industry, removing limitation as to
iSize and working pressure from the Code
'definition of the industry. This amendment
as the effect of Including all nonferrous hot-
Water tanks under the Code, regardless of
)ize or working pressure.
The amendment becomes effective April 26.
SA corresponding amendment to the Code for
.th metal tank industry, effective the same
ate,' removes nonferrous hot-water tanks
aom the definition of that industry.


An amendment to the Code for the coffee
industry has been approved requiring the
Code Authority, within 3 months, to submit
standards for safety and health for em-
ployees during working hours, such standards
being conducive to their general welfare
while not burdensome to the industry. On
approval by the NRA, such standards will be-
come binding on all members of the industry.
The amendment becomes effective May 1,
unless good cause to the contrary is shown.


Hosiery Industry

Code Amendment

Approved,
Fair Pactices Provisions Are Clar-
ified to Facilitate
Enforcement

Changes effected by approval of an amend-
ment revising provisions of the fair-practices
article of the "Hosiery Code are designed to
facilitate Code enforcement and to preclude
inequities. The amendment effected no prac-
tical changes in the Code, though 16 sections
and 3 subsections are deleted and new ones
substituted.
The principal revision concerned the sell-
ing-below-cost provision (art. VIII, sec. 4).
This will require all close-oits of discon-
tinued styles and broken assortments, if sold
below cost, to be visibly marked on each
hose with an indelible transfer to read : Dis-
continued ", or "discontinued pattern", or
"discontinued style", or "discontinued first
quality."
Markings will be required under the amend-.
ment to be in full-face type in letters not less
than one-eighth of an inch in height, with the
exception of infants' hose. Transfers for
marking may be ordered through the Code
Authority.
Hosiery of a sort upon which it is not de-
sirable to use indelible markings may be
marked in a manner prescribed by the Code
Authority. ______

Commission Named

to Study Dress

Classification
A commission of three to study a long-
standing controversy between the dress man-
ufacturing and the cotton garment industries
over certain classifications affecting wage
rates has been announced by the National
Recovery Administration.
Members of the new commission are: Leon
C. Marshall, executive secretary of the Na-
tional Industrial Recover& Board; Leon
Henderson, the Board's economic advisor,
and Prentiss L. Coonley, Code adminis-
tration director. Mr. Marshall will serve as
chairman.
The new commission has been directed to
examine the entire controversy between the
industries over classification of their prod-
ucts and to report to the Board. A hearing
on the commission's report will be held in
June.

Stay Granted Floor and

Wall Clay Tile

Code
An order staying for 60 days sections B and
C of paragraph 1, article XII, of the Floor
and Wall Clay Tile Manufacturing Industry
Code, defining wholesalers and merchant tile
contractors, has been approved by the Na-
tional Industrial Recovery Board.
In its request for a stay, the Code Authority
for the floor and wall clay tile manufacturing
industry stated that these sections contain
certain restrictl've features with respect to
the disposition of tile by dealers, and it was
desirous of "loosening" them. It was felt
by the Code Authority that the merchant tile
contractors and wholesalers would be better
able to handle competitive situations if they
were allowed some freedom in the handling
of tile.
The stay is effective until June 5, 1935.


of Small Firms


Require "Nuisance" Contribution Elimination,.

Permit Reduction in Rates and Extend

Small Town Exemption

The National Recovery Administration has announced new rules regarding
contributions from industry to the costs of code administration designed to
relieve small firms of an inequitable burden, lessen multiple assessments, simplify ;
collections and permit the rate of contribution to be reduced at any time.


One Administrative Order, No. X-139, re-
quires that budgets and bases of contribution
submitted hereafter must contain "recom-
mendations for reasonable classifications de-
signed to eliminate nuisance contributions"
(those very small in amount) "and for ex-
emptions designed to avoid inequitable con-
tributions on articles which are not marketed
per se."
This order is designed to provide a mini-
mum measured in sales volume, number of
employees, or some other equitable criterion
below which no contribution will be asked.
It Is also intended to prevent multiple assess-
ments on a product which Is handled for
processing and sold as a part of some other
product.


Operation Manual

For Used Car Sale

Approved
Approval of a manual of operations, pro-
vided for by the Automobile Dealers' Code,
for use by the National Automobile Dealers
Association' in the compilation, publication,
and distribution of the official used-car
guide, which establishes trade-in values for
used motor vehicles, has been 'announced by
the National Industrial Recovery Board.
In the approval order, the Board found
that the manual of operations does not
permit uniform deductions or additions
which are designed to bring about arbitrary
uniformity in the fair market value of used
motor vehicles."
The manual outlines procedure for the
establishment of trading areas to send pe-
riodical used car sales reports to the central
office for tabulation; methods of handling
such reports in the Coding Department of
the NADA and setting up the used-car prices
for publication.
The official guide is an identification book-
let, containing a detailed description of all
active used passenger and commercial motor
vehicles of three-quarters, ton. and less ca-
pacity that have been manufactured for the
approximate period, of the past 7 years; and
a price section booklet containing the fair
Market values and net maximum allowances
as established in accordance with the Code.
It is to be revised every 30 days.

Steel Package Code
Price Amendment

Approved
The Code of fair competition for the steel
package industry has been amended to in-
corporate a provision whereby members of
the industry are prohibited from quoting
prices or offering to sell on terms inconsist-
ent with their own open diled prices.
Approval was conditional, however, on the-
fact'that provisions of article V, paragraph
A, insofar as it provides for a 10-day filed
price waiting period, be stayed.

Hazardous Occupation

Amendment to Cork
Code Approved
The National Industrial Recovery Board'
has announced approval of an amendment to
the Code of fair competition for the cork in-
dustry, designed to make the Code conform.
to the standards requirement for child la-
bor and hazardous occupations in the in-
dustry; and carrying the usual mandatory
clauses for the basis of contribution by
members of the industry to the expenses of
Code administration.
Suggestions or objections, to' the approved
amendment must be filed before May 3, 1935.


It requires all orders approving budgets 'A
after April 30 to Include such classifications
and exemptions and gives Code Authorities- 2
operating under-budgets not now containing -'1
such safeguards until May 15 to submit rec- .
ommendatlons for the desired changes, to take -.
effect with the first contributions due after --v
May 31. If such recommendations are not' .'."
forthcoming by May 15 the order states that -
such classifications and exemptions "will be
established by the National Industrial Recov-
ery Board after due consideration, of all rele-. ..
vant facts."
Until classifications eliminating nuisance i
contributions have been established in Code "
budgets and bases of contributions, another
Administrative Order, No. X-A40, afinounced '..
at the same time, will protect retailers 'from,*,
liability for multiple assessments. That or- .'-
der exempts any establishment whose princi- "
pa'l line of business measured by dollar volume.- i
is retail distribution from contributing to the ..
Code budget of any nonretall trade or indus- -':
try into which a. minor part of its business'. -'i
falls, provided such minor line does jaot "re-.,
quire the-full-time services of two or more :.S
employees. It is effective until nuisance con.
tributions have been eliminated in the minor- *
line Code budgets. ::
A third order, X-72-2, extends the exemp- -"
tion from Code contributions which had pre- :k
viously been granted retail and local service '
trade establishments in towns under 2,500 .
population. If the principal business of such .;'
establishments is in.,an exempted retail or -,
local service trade, all departments of the'
business are exempted from any Code assess- i
ment, even though that part of the business ..
which is In an unexempted industry or trade '.
can easily be segregated. The previous ex- -
emption applied only in cases where the busi- i
ness in the unexempted line could not be ,I
readily segregated. .
The fourth announcement of policy, office
memorandum 351, permits any Code Author- ;'
ity to reduce the rate of assessments previ- ?L
ously approved or to suspend collections en-- '
tirely without notice to anyone except the
NRA. Such reduction or suspension of col- ''.',
elections, however, must be applied uniformly
throughout the industry and must be sub-
mitted to NRA. Requested changes in rates
of collection become effective if the NRA ap-
proves or falls to disapprove in 10 days. .
4
Public Safety Amend-

ment to Fireworks

CodeApproved
Manufacturers of fireworks, in the interest. *
of greater public safety, will be required to
limit the size of "salutes" and "firecrackers"
to 4 inches in length and to five-eighths of an. .
inch In diameter under an amendment just
approved by the National Industrial Recovery
Board.
The quantity of explosives in each piece of ::
fireworks also will be limited by the amend-
ment. It becomes effective July 6, 1935, pro- *
vided the Code is extended.
The pyrotechnic Code Authority proposed ^.'
the amendment. "
IZ
Tile Contracting Code
Stay Is Granted
An order staying rule 9, article IV, of the .:'
Tile Contracting Code, which prohibits mem- ;
bers of the industry from selling tile, mantels, -
or accessories until June 16, 1935, has been .
approved by the National Industrial Recov- .:
ery Board.
The Code Authority for this Industry, a .:
division of the construction industry, re- :
quested a stay of this provision as working a :
hardship on consumers and members of the
industry alike. It denied consumers the priv- ,'
iege of purchasing mantels, tile, and tile ac- :
cessories from members of the industry and "
prevented the latter from disposing of sur-
plus material or of accommodating their cus-
tomers by furnishing material without serv-
ice, it was stated.


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- SCHEDULE OF CODE HEAR

t Important Information Concerning Notices of Hearings and

Opportunity to be Heard

'' Hearinga are of two types: (1) Oral bearings. OPPORTUNITY TO BE HEARD (In writing):
'. "designated "hearing" on calendar; and M2) "op- Facts, critICLems, objections, or suggestions con-
portunlty to be heard" by the filing of written corning the subject matter of such notices must
'' statements of fact, briars, or criticisms dealing be submitted on or before the final date specified
In the notice.a dressed to the proper Deputy Ad.
with the subject matter of such notice, min-itrator or other official indicated. Such com-
S The. t m r t n I a munlcatllons must state: ili Name of industry;
SThe subject matter o these notice Is abbreviated o 2 name of correspondent and group represented;
In the schedule published below. A complete offi. 13) facts supporting criticisms, oojectLonu, or
.," cla copy of any notice may be obtained on request suggestIons.
from the National Recovery Administration, Room
3316, Departonent of Commerce Building. Wash- The subject matter referred to in either type
ington. D. C. of notice may be revlord in any reasonably ger.
: Ingt. D.C. mane particular on the basis of such facts, crit-
itc clams, and other considerations as are properly
( HEARINGS (oeral) : Those wishing to br heard before the Administrator.
.:.. must file a written request with the proper Deputy
S Administrator at leont 24 hours before the date Calendar Is chronological, with alphabetical
-, set for the hearing, which request must state: arrane.-ment by rrade or industry for each doy.
;.' (1) Name oi Industry and date of hearing; NOTE: Since all notices must be In the printer's
,- (2) names of persons wishing to testily and groups hands b.v Friday evening next preceding the pubill-
'. represented; (3) definite alternative proposal or cation of Tne Blue Eagle, the calendar below does
P`"' specific objections, without argument. Hearings not show notices posted on the Official Bulletin
are confined to factual presentation. Written Board after that date. nor does this calendar show
.,. briefs containing arguments as well as fact may other hearings for the same dates which may have
be filed. annnoarad In nPrinor Iams. f f this nihili-looen.


IDEnuTRYt O TwADE PLACE aND DEPUcrY PsOFOSED ACTION
AD INIs rRAI oR


Monday, Apr. 22, 1935
Air Transport Industry, Room 802, Carry Build- Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by Unitoed
111-19. inog, Washington, D. C., Air Lines. Inc Chicago, Ill] for e\empton from tne provisions
C. P. Clark ofsec 3. art III, of thbe Code. iHours of labor.. Adminisrrative
Order 111-18, approves such exempilon unl.s good cau'e to the
contrary be shown prior to the effective date of the order, Apr.
22, 1935
Road Machinery Manu- 1320 0 Street NW., Wash- Opportunity to he heard on application submitted by the coor-
fapturing Industry, 68- ingIron, D. C., W. W. dminating agency ('the Code Authority) for approval of an amend-
32. Rose. meut to regulations defining resale alues of ,5-.ond-hand or old
equipment. Order No. Ra-30 approves, this amendment, to
become effective Apr. 22 unless cause to the contrary be shown
______________ _______________ prior thereto.


.Wednesday, Apr. 24,
s.Tr. 1935
: Cap and Closure Indus-
; try, 56-12.
.,0-,

Farm Equipment Indus-
.. try, 39-26.


Room 510, 1518 K Street
NW Washin'ton,
D C.. H Ferris White.

City Club Buildmding, Wash-
ington, D. C., WV. W.
Rose.


Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the
Closure Service Co., Toledo, Ohio, for exemption from the provi-
sions of art. II, sec. 3, of the Code for a period of 30 daya Insofar
as they apply to 25 electrical and maintenance department em
ployees while engaged in moving operation';
Opportunity to be heard on application -ubmirtod by ibthe Code
Authority for an amendment to the Code extending termination
date from May I to June 16. 1935


Friday, Apr. 26, 1935
Metal Tank Industry, City Club Building, 1320 Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
"'164-20. 0 .Street NW., wash- Authority for amendment to schedule A (definition) and sched-
-, ington, D. C., 'ohn T. ule "X" of the Code. Order 154-19 approves such amendment
:.Chenay. to become effective Apr 26, 1935, unless good cause to the con-
trary Is shown prior thereto.
iShovel, Dragline, and 132o0 Street N-W., Wash- Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
* Crane Industry, 102-24. ingtoon. D. C., W. W. Authority for amendment to art. U (definitions). Order No.
SRose 102-33 approves ;uch amendment to become effective Apr. 26,
190..15 a il l,] saute i u iln e uh. uii em 1 .. ..u...J i urni..hiie tmu


Monday, Apr. 29, 1935
Advertising Typography
.: Industry, 287-476 (Dlvi-
,i' lon D-3 of the OraphicJo
SArts Industries).






.t Advertising Typography
Industry, 287-477 fDivi-
sio''. ln D-3 under the
". Graphic Arus Indusfrles
Code).




;. Bank and Security Vault
S Manufacturing Indus-
try, 411 -11.

-,,. Bituminous Coal Indus-
^';try, 24-110.



harlnete0) Metal Prod-
ts. ot Manufacturing and
SMetal Finlsbhing and
.; Metal Coating Indus-
,i try, 84-127

33lertillzar Industry, 67-55..




.'.Fur Manufacturing In-
Sdusltry, 436-25.

V.: Machine Knife and Allied
BSMW Steel Products Maenu.
facturing Industry, 263-,
:':. 12.


etail Jewelry Trade,
S142-72.








'';,. Wrench Manufacturing
.' Indnstry 84-0-17 ('Divi-
ilon of Fabricated Metal
J Products Mfanufactur.
i tng and Metal Finlsh-
*I- ing and Metal Coating
S Industry).
W.:,_Wrench Manufacturing
'I. Industry. 84-0-18

PI` Tuesday, Apr. 30,1935
Artificial Flower and
Feather Industry.'5&-C.

:. Building Contractors In.
dustry, 244A-2 I (Sub-
division or general Oon-
tractors).


Room 1016. Banrr Building,
Washington, D. C.,
Gemoge T.. Ro".







Room 1016, Barr Build-
ing. Washington, D. C.,
Oaorge T. Ross.






City Club Building. 1320
O Street NW., Wash-
ington. D C., J. T.
/ Cheney.

Room 301. Albee Build-
ing, Washington, D. C.,
N. W.'Roberts.


Room 510, 1t618 K Street
NW.,Washmgtoo.D C.,
SH. Ferris While.


Room 310, Denrike Build-
ing, Washington, D. C.,
Ovid E. Roberts, Jr.


Room 3071, Department
of Commerce Building,
Washington, D. C.,
Walter Mangum.
Room 509, 1618 K Street
NW.,Washlington,D 0.,
J. Reed Carpenter


604 Banrr Building. 910
Seventeenth Street NW,
Wasihinplgtoo, D. 0.,
A. S. Donaldson.







Room 5W9, 1518 K Street
N W.,Washington,D.C.,
J. Reed Carpenter.



Room 609, 1618 K Street
NW ,Washington.D.C.,
J. Reed Carpenter.


Room 2062-4 Commerce
Building, Washington,
D.C., Burton E. Oppen-
helm
Municipal Building, Au-
ditorium, Tulsa, Okla.,
10 a. m., B.J. Wilson.


Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the
National Code Authority for approval of its budget and basis of
contribution by establlishments within the Jurisdiction of the
New York City Regional Code Authority. I
The total amount of rhe said budget Is $2,041 95 for the period
from Mar. 1 to June 16, 1935. The contribution is 17 r cents for
each $100 of annual mechanical pay roll, calculated on the total
mechanical pay roll for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1934. 'The
total amount of the budget for the period from June 17. 1935, to
Feb. 29, 1936, I- $4,958.05. The contribution is 4246 cents for each
$100 of annual mechanical pay roll, calculated on the total mechan-
icteal pay roll for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1934
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the
National Code Authority for approval of its budget and basis of
contribution
The total amount of the National Budget for the period from
Mar. I to June 16, 1935, is $. 1130 20 The contribution is 17,6 cents
for each $100 of mechanical pay rod, calculated on the total mechan.
Ical payroll for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1936 The total
amount of the National Budget for tne period from June 17, 1935,
to Feb 29, 1936, is 19.42580 The ba.sts of contribution Is 42h
cents for each $100 of mechanical pay roll, calculated on the totai
mechanical pay roll for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1914.
Opportunity to be heard on applic-wation submitted by the Code
Authority for amendment to art. VI. sec. I, par. ib), of tiea Code
Administrative Order No. 411-10, approves such amendment,
efeotive Apr. 8, 1935. unless good cause to the contrary s shown
within 20 days thereafter, and a subsequent order is issued.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by tne
Southwestern Subdivislonal Code Authority of Divi-lon IV,
for approval of ats budget and basis of contribution for the period
from Apr I to June 30, 1935. both inclusive.
The total amount of the budget is 14,28E. The contribution is I
cent per ton flat rate on total tonnage produced.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Coqe
Authority for an additional as-seement of 40 cents per employee
to be paid on the average number of employers luring the period
from Jan 1 to Mar. 31, 1935, inclusive, previous application
having been withdrawn because the original basis of assessment
overestiLmated by approximately 140,000 the numberoi employees.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by theo Code
Authority for a partial stay of the provisions of art. VII. sec. I,
providing for standards of grading fertilizer, of the Code Ad-
ministrative Order No. 67-53 approves such .tay, to become
effective Apr. 28, 1935, unless good cause to the contrary 5is shown
prior thereto.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for amendments to arts VI, XII, and XITI, of the
Code to provide for Code Authority incorporation and for liqui-
dated damage agreements.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for approval of its budget and basis of contribution
for the period from Jan. 1, to Dec 31. 1936
The total amount of the budget is $8,785. The proposed contribu
tion is 4 16 mills (0 416 of 1%) on the basis of such member's net
sales during the year 1934, to be paid in quarterly installments
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Na-
tional Code Authority for approval of the St. Louis, MNo., Local
Retail Jewelry Code Authority's budget and basis of contribu-
tion for the period from June 16, 1934, to June 16, 1935
'The total amount of the budget Is tl,600 The basis of contribu-
rion is at the rate of $3 30 per member of personnel (employer and
employee), based on the average number of persons employed in
their respective establishments during the calendar year 1934.
such average to be arrived at by adding together the full-time
and part-time workers (including employer and employee', on
the first day of eacrb month of the year and dividing the total by
12. Part-time employees are those working 60 percent or more
of the workweek.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for approval of its bud et and basis of contribution for
the period from May 1, 1935, to Stay 1, 1936
The total amount of the budget is $25,000 The contribution is
of 1 percent of his sales for the above period, contribution for
each mouth to be computed on the sales of industry products for
the second month preceding
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Sup-
piementary Code Authority for amendment to art V, sec. 2. of
the Code price filing).


Hearing on application submitted by the Code Authority for
amendments to certain sections of art. III, R', and V, of bthe
Code (wages and hours).
Hearing and opportunity to be heard on application sub-
mitlled by the Code Authority for approval of an agreement
establishing standards of hours of labor, rates of pay and other
conditions of employment, under art. I1, sec. I of the Code for
the construction Industry and sac 7 (6) of the act, affecting mem-
bears and certain of their employees in the region of Tulsa, Okla.,
and vinilty.


INGS, APRIL 22 TO MAY 16


Saturday, May 4,1935
Plastering and Lathing
Contracting Indulry
244N-11 (Division of
the Construction. In-
dustry).

L'a


PaintingL. Paperhangine.
and Decoraning Indus
try, 244B-76 l i Division
of the Construction In-
dustry).


6

Labor Temple. 1637 West
Jeffer.on Streret, Phoe-
nil. Ari? 10a.m., Steve
A. Spear.





City Hall, Beaumont,
Tex., 10 a. m, J R.
Howell, Jr (Milam
Building, Houston,
Tex.j.


Hearing and opportunity to be heard on application sub-
miited Lby the Code Authority lor approval of agreement estab-
lishing standards of hours of labor, rates of pay. and other condi-
tions of employment, under art. II, sec. I of the Code for the
construction industry and sec 7 (b) of the act. affecting members
or the division and certain of their employees in the region of the
counties of Apaache. Yavapal, Mohave. Coconino, Navalo, Marl- :
cope. Oilt,a nd Pinal. except the territory south of the Southern -
Pacific Railroad In Pinal County, including the town of Caa
Orande, in the State of Arizona.
Hearing and opportunity to be heard on application sub- ..1
mieted by the Code Authority for approval of a proposed agree- 4
menor establishine standards of houri of labor, rates of pay, and
other conditions-of employment, under at. III, sec. 1, of the
Code and sec 7 (b) of the act, affeoting members of the dlvisiO
and certain of their employees In the region of Jefferson CoduntY .
Tg.


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at


I


1t 93.unless good CS uu UEO tuot1126.'UUtlery -.5 UUWmIprirthereto.l~U


nonsrae Ou TRADE P..P AND DEPoTY PROP':JsED ACTION
ADKINISTtaTOle


Tuesday, Apr. 30, 1935

Cylindrical Liquid Tight Room 209, National Sav- Opportunity to be heard on application submittedd by the Coda
Paper Container Indus- wings and Trust Build- Authority for approval of its budget and basis of contribution.
try, 252-11 mg, Washington, D C., The total amount of the budget for the period from Jan 1 nt
W. J. Brown. June 16. 193'., is $13,'15u; for the period trom June 17 to Dec. 31,
1JI., 1s $1S4,,5I The basis of contITibiion i the same for both
periods. 1 percent of 1936 net sales. killed monthly
Food Dish and Pulp and Room 209., National Sav- Opportunity to be heard on opplicatton submitted by the Code
Paper Plate Industry, Lags and Trust Build- Authority fur approval of its nuoget and basi' of contribution
247-14. ing, Washngton, D C., 'The total Fmount of the budget for the period from Jun Ito June
W. J. Brown. 16, 1931, is "12,500, ior the piiulu3 from June 17 to Dec. 31. 1 035, Is
$12,-,00. The contribution is tnoe -ame for both periods, p, of I
percent or less of total groi.s shipments for 1035, less [relghtand
trade discounts, payable monthly.
Ice Industry, 43-134....... Room 316, Barr Build Opportunity to be heard on application submittedd by the Code
ing. Washington, D C., Autinorit.y for approval of sit budget and basil of comtributioa.
Robert K. Straus. 'The total amourti of the budget for the period from May lto June
I i, 1935, l; i 9.075. The basis of contribution i$0 006 upon each
ton of ri'e sold by any member during the fiscal year ot May I to
June 16. 1935, regardl .a of whether or not such industry embraces
his or itV principal hue of busines-. A minimum advance pay.
ment of $-' lor each member wboe total annual production during
the fieal year immediat.lv preceding equalled or exceeded 314 -
ton.-, to become due immediately upon approval of Ibthis budget.
(Members are eiempied fron'the TO 006 basis whose total volume
of business for the t fiscal year mentioned i. less than 334 tons.).-
After payment by *uch member of said advance minimum, he or
it will make no further contribution until the tons of ice sold by
him or it subsequent to May 1 and prior to June It1, 1935, shell
hare exceeded j34 tons which number multiplied by SO006
equals approximately 12. The total amount of the budget for
the period from June 16, 1936, to Apr 30, 1936, is $203,625. The
be-ias of contribution Is the same for this period as the period
above.
Ovy-Acetylene Industry, Room 307, Denrike Build- Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
165-26. tUg, Washington, D 0.. Authority for approval of Its budget anti basisl of contribution for
Ovid E Roberts, Jr. the ririod from May 1, 1935, to Apr. 30. 1936.
'The total amount of the budget is $32,650 The contribution Is Hi
of I percent of the dollar volume ;ales of each member of the
industry for the year 1934, puable in total or quarterly in ad-
vance as the member may elect
Photo-Engravrng Indus- Room 1027. Barr Build- Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Na-
try. 180-d5. tng. Washington. D. C., tional Code Authority for permission tochrnge the total proposed
J U. Douglass. amount for the .ltb district for the period Irom ran. I to June 16,
1935, from $7,227.76 to $9,0%5 O8, and tine total amount for this dis-
trnc tor tre period June 17 to Dec. 31, 193t,, from $8,672.24 to
810.711 92.
Toll Bridge Industry, Room 80?, Carry Build- Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by Harris-
131-18 ing, Washington. D. C.. burg Bridge Co Harriburg, Pa for exemption from the pro-
C. P. Clark riuton- of sec (ai. art. "U, of the Code prohibiting issuance of
free passes).
Toll Bridge Industry, Room 802, Carry Buildl- Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by James
431-19. ing, Washington. D. C., W Smithber, recei-rer of New Orlcan. Ponrchartrain Bridge Co,
C. P. Clark. Npw Orlean;. La for exemptoOn from the provision of lees. (i),
(bI, ic), tid), Ithi. nd ii) of art 111 hours of labor), and seeam. (a,
tb), (ci, ili, i('apg. and t,) of art. IV, of the Code (wbeas).
Toll Bridge Industry, Room 802, Carry Build- Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by James
431-20 Ing, Washington, D C., River Bridge Corporation, Smithneld, Va for exemption from
C. P. Clark the provisions of iec iai, art. VI'. of the Code(pronibitng issue.
ance of free pases)
Toll Bridge Industry, Room 802, Carry Build- Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by Taseny
431-21 Ing., Washington. D C., Faiayra Bridge Co, Palmyra, N J for exemption from the
C. P. Clark. provii'jon' of rec. (a), art. VII, of the Code (prohibiting i -suanre
______________ _______________ of free pas.zes
Wednesday, May 1,
1935
Coffee Industry, 265-35... Room 511, Barr Build- Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
ing, Washington, D. C, Authority lor amendment to art. V, by adding a new sea. (11)
Weld M. Stevens. (Standards for safety and health ) Adminmt;tIrtlive Order 265-34
approved such amenoment on Apr. II, 1935, to become effetEle
2U days from the date of said order unless good cause to the con.
trary is shown prior thereto.
Electrical Contracting In- Auditorium, Labor Hearing and opportunity to be heard on application sub-
du'try, 244F-27 (Dirv- Temple, Dallas, 'te%., milfed ,' bythe Code Authority for approval of a proposed agree-
sion of the Construction 10 a. m Sherwood M. meri estatlisning standards ofl hours of labor, rates of pay, and
Industry) Avery. other conditions of employment, under art IIlI. sec. I of the Code
for tnh construction industry and sec. 7 (b) of the act, affecting
members of the dlc'ion and certain of their employees In the
region of Dallas County. 'Tex
Ice Cream Cone Industry, Room 505, Barr Building, Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
456-1l. Washington, D. C Authority for a stay of the provisions of art. VII, sec. I, of the
Weld Mf. Stevens. Code Copen price tlung).
Retail Jewelry Trade, Room 604, Barr Building. Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
142-73. 910 Seventeenth Street Authority for approval of seven budgeisand basesol contribution
NW., Washington, for tIbe period from Jan. 1. to June 16, 1935
D. C., A 'S. Donaldson. The budgets are for Detroit,. M.h District of Columbia; Fort
Wayne, tnd : Minneapolis, Miton Pontiac, Mhich.. St. Peaul.
Min and Tucson, Arn The total amounts of the budgets
range from $60 to $780. The contribution ranpes from 7b centato
2 0S per member of personnel (employer and employee). The
contribution is determined by the average number of persons
employed in each establishment during the calendar year 1934.
to be arrived at by adding together thio full-time and part-time
workers inmacuding employer and employee) on the firLst day of
each month of tne year and dividing the tosl by 12 Part-time
______________ _______________ employees are those working 60 percent or more of the workweek.

Thursday, May 2, 1935
Builders Supplies Trade, Banrr Building, 910 Seven- Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
37-24. teeth Street NW,. Authority for approval of its budget and boris of contribution for
Washington, D. C, the period Oct I, 1934i to Sept 30, 1935.
F. A. Hecin. The total amount of the budget is R;09,226 The Contribution.
P, of I percent of ross. volume of current sales of merchandise
under the jurisdiction of this Code, payable not later than the
lUth day .of the monin following the expration of each quarterly
period, becinninm -with the period Ocr. I to Dec. 31, 1934, boLh
dales inclusirve, and quarterly thereafter.
Iron and Steel Industry, Room502. AlbeeBuilding, Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by The
t11-15. Fifteenth and 0 Streets, Northwestern Barb Wire Co.. Inc. Eterlinc. III for seieption
Washington. D C., from the provisions 'f.-ec 2 of art Vofthe Code. (Increase Bbs.
R W Shannon. semer steel capacity)
Pickle Packing Industry, Room 501, Barr Buidinp, Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
524-7 Washington. D. C, Authority for a stay of the operation of the provisions ol art. VU]
Weld MI. Stevens. until June o16, 1935 price Sfiinog
Picture Moulding and 907 Sixteenth Street N W Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Picture Frame Indus- Washington, D.C., A. Authority for a conditional stay of the provisions of art. rVI, sec.
try, "08-21. C. Dinon 12. of the Code, insofar as they are applicable to the attachment
of label which may deface, mar, or injure the products of the In-
dustry
Silk Testile Industry 48- Room 3022. Department Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
36. of Commerce Building, Authority for amendment to art III of the Code by adding a new
Washinriton. D C A sec i :'. (PrnhiLitng stiockrooms or sales offices to be open on
Henry T"urston Srtur.lays and Sundays )

Friday, May 3, 1935
Book Publishune Indus- 1027 Barr Building, Wash. Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
try, 613-18 (Bible Pub. iogron, D. C., J. U. Authority for Dirsion A for approval of a budget and basia of
lishibmg Division). Douglass. conrributiun for the period from Oct I, 1934, to Sept. 30, 1936.
The total amount of the budget i. i$i,0 The crontribulibn is at the
rate of fit of I percent, calculated on rhe net sales of Bibles and
accessories for the 12-month period ending Dec 31, 1933.
Perfume, Cosmetic. and Sun Parlor, Washington Hearing on application submitted by the Code Authority for
Other 'oilet Prepare- Hotel, Wstihncrion. amendment to art VII. of the Code (definitions and amendment
rions Industry, 455-A. D. C 10 I a. m., Earle to art. [I, forbidding sale of products to industries from whom
WI Dahlberg Blue Eagle has been ithdrawo.
Soap and Glycerine Man- Sun Parlor, Washington Hearing on application submitted by the Code Authority for
ufacturing Industry, Hotel, Washington, amendment to Code dellmlion by elimination of certain ilams.
103-C. D. C 10a.m., Ovd E.
_______________ Roberts, Jr.


I











SCHEDULE OF CODE HEARINGS, APRIL 22
,ii
TO MAY 16-Continued

INnR 0 Tt PLACE AND DEPUIy
NDsiav Os TRADE A NIsRaIO PROPOSED AClON

Monday, May 6, 1935
Steel and Copper Plate Room 1016, Barr Build. Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Na.
Engraving and Print- n. Wsbhngton, D C, rlonal Code Authority for approval of its budget and basU ol
tog Industry, 2S7-474 Otorge T. Rosu contribution.
(Division C-2 under Toe total amount or the National budget for the period from Mar.
the Orephic Arts Indus. I to June 16, tl, Is $4,917 20. and for the period June 17, 1935, te
tries). Faeb. 29, 1936, is $11.91t 80. The contribution is the same for both
periods namely, i ol 1 percent per year or the annual sales volume
for the year 1934. apportioned to the stated budgetary period.
Tile Contracting ltdus. Room 115. Assembly Hall, Hearing and opportunity to be heard on appliet on sub
try, 4-tE-17 (Division Csllrornia State Build- mitred by the Code Authority for approval of a proposed agree
of the Coostruction In- ing, Los dingeles, Calif moat establishing standards of hours of labor, rates of payrand
S dusiry). 10 a. m., Charles H. other conditions of employment, underart. nl.sec. l,oftbeCode
Cunningham (751 South and see. 7 (0i of the act, affecting members of the industry and
SFigueroa Street., Los certain of their tile setter helper employees in the region of South.
Angeles, Oalit.:. ern Calitornia.


Tile Contracting Indus-
nry, 244E-1 (Di sion
of the Construction
Industry)


Room 11, Asembly Hall,
California State Build-
tog, Los Angeles, Calif.,
1Oa m., Charles H Cun-
ningbam i751 South
Figueroa Street, Los
An geles. Oalif ).


Hearing and opportunity to be heard on application sube
mitted by the Code Authority for approval of a proposed agree
meant establishIng standards of hours of labor, rates of pay, an
other conditions of employment, under art. III, sec I, of th
Code and sac. 7 ()hi of the act, atlffecting members of the division
and certain of their tile setter employees in the region of Souther!
Calirornia.


Tuesday, May 7, 1935
Painting, Paperhanging. Chamber of Commerce Hearing and opportunity to be heard on application sub-
and Decorating Indi.- Room, 100 Merrimack milteo by the Code Authority for approval of a proposed agree-
try, 24-1B-77 (Dirvi- Street, Lowell, Mss-, ment establishing standards of hours of labor, rates of pay, and
sionofrthe Consrruction 10 a m., John J. IMe- otherconditions ofemployment, underart. Il, sec. l,oftheCode
Industry). Donough (sO Federal and sec 7 (bj of the act, affecting members of the division and
Street, Boston, Ma-s.). crtain of their employees In the region of Lowell, Mass., and
______________ _______________ vicinity.
Saturday, May 11,
1935
Mason Contractors In- Bricklayers Hall, 903 Hearing and opportunity to be heard on application sub-
dustry, 244G-23 (Div- North Twenty-first mutted by the Code Authority for approval of a proposed agree-
sionofthe Construction Street, Omaha, Nobr, meant establishming standards of hours of labor, rate of pay, and
Industry). 10 a. m., H T. William- other conditions of employment. under art In, see. I, or the
son (511 Federal Build- Code and sec. 7 (b) of the act, affecting members of the division
mg, Omaha, Nebr.). and certain of their employees in the region of Omaha, Nebr.,
~_______________ and vicinity.
Monday, May 13, 1935
The Electrical Contract- 4249 Oibsor Avenue, St. Hearing and opportunity to be heard on application sub-
ing Industry, 244-F-8 Loauis, Mo., 10 a m., mited by the Code Aulthority for approval of a proposed agree-
(Division of the Con- C. L. Hodge (I82 Oibve ment e tablishing standards of hours ol Labor, rates of pay, and
struction Industry). Street, St. Lows, Mo.). otter conditions of employment, under art. Ill, sec. I o the Code
and sen 7 (b) of the act, affecting members of the division and cer-
tam of their employees in thbe region of the city of St. Louis and
________ St. Louis County., Mo.
Thursday, May 16,
1935
Cotton Textile Industry, Room 2062-41, Department Hearing on application submitted by the Code Authority for
I-F. of Commerce Building, amendment to the fair trade practices governing the merbchan-
Washington, D. C 10 a. disling of the products of the cotton thread manufacturing branch.
m., A. Henry Thurston.


Interpretations


Lumber and Timber Products

Industry
No. 9-34
SFACTS.-It appears that the Cherry
[ River Boom and Lumber Co., of Richwood,
W. Va., subject to the Appalachian and South-
ern Hardwood Subdivision of the Hardwood
Division of the above Code, maintains a boiler
plant consisting of nine 150-hp. pressure
boilers. That boiler plant is required to
Operate the establishment, and in addition
furnishes beat and light for the community
of Richwood, W. Va. That boiler plant is
capable of developing 1,350-hp. pressure, all
of which is required to operate the plant
fully and to' furnish heat and light to the
community. Seven of the boilers contained
in that plant had been in service for more
than 30 years on or about November 1933.
At that time an inspector. of the Hartford
Beiler Insurance Co., during a periodical in-
spection, discovered that a crack had de-
veloped in the sheets in one of the boilers
Sand instructed the above concern to replace
that boiler, and further instructed said con-
cern to replace all other boilers unless the
pressure thereof was reduced to 90 pounds
per square inch. The above concern imme-
diately proceeded to replace the boilers,
maintaining, wilh the approval of the said
inspector, 115 pounds pressure per square
inch in all of the boilers, except two, during
..the course of their replacement, the' plant
being kept in operation during the replace-
ment by the operation of the seven boilers
at the lowered pressure of 115 pounds per
square inch. The replacement was begun
during the month of November 1933 and
completed during the month of February
1934. During the course of the replacement
of these boilers, 2 crews of about 15 men.
each, were each permitted to work in excess
of forty (401 hours per week for a certain
P eriod.
QUESTION.-Does the employment of the
above workers in the replacement of' the
boilers under the above circumstances, in
excess of the maximum hours prescribed by
Sthe Code, constitute temporary employment
JIn case of emergency within the meaning of
'.:tartlcle VI, section (a), subsection 2, sub-
paragraph C, or repair work within the
-meaning of article VI, section (a), subsec-
tion 2, subparagraph B?
RULING.-It Is ruled that the necessity
for such replacement, to wit: For the re-
placement of nine boilers., the total number
of boilers in the boiler plant, does not con-
s titute an emergency within the meaning of
..article VI, section ia), subsection 2, para-
graph C. Such replacement constitutes re-
Spair work within the meaning of article
; VI, section (a), subsection 2, paragraph C.
:.Such replacement constitutes repair work
Within the meaning of article VI, section (a),
subsection 2. subparagraph B.


Carpet and Rug MIanufacturing
Industry
No. 202-16
FACTS.-Article VII, section 19 (a.) reads
as follows: "Retail stores are to be credited
or paid the volume allowances based only
on merchandise invoiced to an individual
company. No manufacturers shall pay or
allow credit for any cost of teshipping mer-
chandise shipped and invoiced to a retailer."
Purchases of the products of this industry
are made not only by single retail companies
but also by companies which control or own
two or more retail stores and by cooperative
buying groups representing retail stores
known as retail members of the group.
QUESTION.-Does article VII, section
19 (a)i allow members of the carpet and
rug manufacturing industry to credit or pay
volume allowances based on merchandise in-
voiced to a company owning or controlling
two or more retail stores, or to a cooperative
buying group representing retail members
as well as to individual companies?
INTERPRETATION.-The provisions of
article VII. section 19 (a) allow crediting
and paying of volume allowances based on
merchandise invoiced to an "' individual com-
pany interpreted as
(a) A single retail store or two or more
retail stores owned by the same individual
or under one capital control or partnership
or stock company, or
(b) A cooperative buying group repre-
senting retail stores provided that such buy-
ing group is a legal entity and is independ-
ent of any affiliation in any form with any
member of the industry, his agent, or his
distributor.

Soap and Glycerine Manu-
facturing Industry
No. 83-70
FACTS.-An- employee operates a filling
machine by feeding boxes into the machine,
which opens and forms the' box automati-
cally, then seals the bottoms and runs the
boxes over to the scales, where they are filled
with the product, and then through the top
sealer. The boxes are then ready for the
wrapping machine. This employee regularly
checks the weight and watches each opera-
t-ion, keeps glue supplied, and cleans, oils, ad-
justs, and cares for the machine. Usually
one employee operates 2 machines at the
same time.
QUESTION.-May the employee described
above be paid the minimum wage provided
by article IV, paragraph A, section 2. of the
Code of fair competition for the soap and
glycerine manufacturing industry, on the the-
ory that he is engaged in the light task of
wrapping, packaging, and filling?
INTERPRETATION-No.


Wholesale Confectioners'

Industry
No. 458-22
FACTS.-Article VII, sections 1 and 2, re-
quire a member of the industry to keep a
price list on file with the Code Authority or'
its designated agency, and to adhere strictly
to the prices and terms of his filed price
list.
Article VIII, rule 5 (a), of said Code
reads as follows: "Selling Below Cost. (a)
No member of the industry shall sell any
candy at a price below cost, as determined
pursuant to the provisions of article VI,
section 14 (kI) ; except that a member of the
Industry may meet the lower prices of a com-
petitor whose prices are not In violation of
this Code; provided, however, that such mem-
ber shall report immediately to the Code
Authority the name of such competitor, the
sales price of the article or articles of candy
involved and his own cost thereon."
Article VI, section 14, of said Code reads
in part as follows: "'Section 14. Subject to
such rules and regulations as may be issued
by the Administrator, the Code'Authority
shall have the following powers and duties,
in addition to those authorized by other
provisions of this Code.
"(k) To study the problem of improved
accounting and cost finding for the industry
and to submit to the Administrator its rec-
ommendations for elements of cost to be
used by the Code Authority to adm'lnister
and enforce the provisions of this Code.
Upon the approval of the Administrator, such
elements of cost and/or cost finding shall be
binding upon each member of the Industry."
The Code Authority studied such problem
and submitted to the Administrator of the
National Industrial Recovery Board "its
recommendations for elements of cost to be
used by the Code Authority to administer
and enforce the provisions of this Code",
but the same has not been approved by the
Administrator or said Board.
QUTESTION.-(1) Under such a state of
facts, does said Code prohibit a member of
the industry from filing a price which is be-
low cost figures either in accordance with
his own cost finding system or that recom-
mended by the Code Authority?
(2) Under such a state of facts, does said
Code prohibit such member of the industry.
from selling at such filed price even though
it is below cost?
INTERPRETATION.-(1) Under such a
state of facts, said Code. does not prohibit a
member of the industry from filing a price
which is below cost figured either in accord-
ance with his own cost finding system or
that recommended by the Code Authority.
(2) Under such a state of facts, said Code
does not prohibit a member of the industry
from selling below cost if he sells at his
filed price. Article VIII, rule 5 (a)i only
prohibits selling below cost as determined in
accordance with elements of cost (i. e., a cost
finding system) approved by the Adminis-
trator or the National Industrial Recovery
Board pursuant to article VI, section 14
(k), and no elements of cost or cost-finding
system has been so approved.


Coated Abrasives Industry
No. 189-8
FACTS.-Article IV, section 3 of the Code
of fair competition for the coated abrasives
industry reads as follows:
'" Except as hereinafter provided, the min-
imum wage that shall be paid to any ac-
countant, clerical, or office employee (not
including traveling salesmen), shall be fif-
teen ($15) dollars per week in any city of
over 500,000 population or in the Immediate
trade area of such city; not less than four-
teen dollars and fifty cents ($14.50) per week
in any city of between 250,000O and 500,000
population or in the immediate trade area
of such city; and not less than fourteen
($14) dollars per week in any city of between
2,500 and 250,000 population or in the im-
mediate trade area of such city. In towns
of less than 2,500 population, all wages of
such emplidyees shall be increased not less
than twenty (20) percent, provided that this
increase shall not require wages in excess
of twelve ($12) dollars per week."
According to the Code Authority, all of
the salesmen in the industry should be classi-
fied as traveling salesmenn. This is the
case even in large centers like New York.and
Chicago, .%here one man may cover the ter-
ritory. When operating in these centers the
salesmen are unable to return home each
night. The salesmen in the industry are not
supposed to spend any appreciable amount
of time daily or weekly in the office of their
employer, hut to travel constantly among the
trade, subject to the control and supervision
of their employer. They are generally paid
a monthly drawing account, plus extra com-
pensation based entirely upon the volume of
their individual sales. Industry products
are also sold in at least one large center
(Detroit) by so-called local outside or spe-
cialty salesmen, according to a report sub-
mitted by the office of the Michigan State
NRA Compliance Director. These men call
principally on the retail trade: they are paid
on a straight commission basis, and are not
subject to control or supervision by their
employer. Their work does not require them


to be away from their homes at night The ::.i
only contract they have with their employer's '
office is for the purpose of turning in orders .
and of getting their commission checks. :V
QUESTION.-(1) Does the term "traY.";
eling salesman in article IV, section 3, of;
the said Code include local outside sales-...
men? ;'
(2) If outside salesmen are not covered'-:|
by the minimum weekly wage requirementS.'p'.
and if they are given any weekly guarantee ,-,d
whatever, must this weekly guarantee equal :-'
the minimum weekly wage? ':
INTERPRETATION.-(1) There is no=)
authority in the Code for including "local;:`.|
outside salesmen" within the term "trav-.y
eling salesnien." .
(2) Such "local outside salesmen", er-:,
cept when they are commission salesmen who.""
have a contract with a member of the In-.'.
dustry, so worded as to constitute comiis'
sion salesmen independent contractors, are'
employees and subject to the minimum hour- ,':
ly wage provided in article IV, section 1I, ofu;:
the Code. '.

Perforating Manufacturing
Industry ,
No. 84V1-11 "
Rule 10 of article VIII of the supplemen-2j
tary Code provides that "no member of the .
industry shall, for the purpose of influencing: .
a sale, sell or offer to sell any commodity .S
other than a product of industry in combina- .-.
tion with any product of this industry at a ,i4.
price which will yield to the seller less than ..
the total cost to him.
No member of the Industry shall, for the :M
purpose of influencing a sale, sell or offer to.S
sell.commodities other than products of this:
industry without separately stating the price '1
of such commodities unless such commodities I
are incorporated as an Integral part of a '
complete unit." .
FACTS.-A member of the industry offers'..'
to sell or sells a product of the industry in V.t
combination with a product of another in- ,'-.
dustry, quoting a lump sum price therefore. :-
. QUESTION.-(1) If the price quoted' It.";
more than the total cost to the member-of'.ii
the industry, does the method of quoting.,";,'jj)
per se, imply the intent to influence the sale.`,',
(2) If separate prices are not quoted for %-.
each product, when such products are not ''
incorporated as an integral part of a cornm- '.
plete unit, does the method of quoting, per -
se, influence the sale? .
INTERPRETATION.-The quoting in "!
lump sum, under the above conditions, does '0
not imply the intent to influence a sale nor.'
does the method of quoting, per se, influence .',
a sale. ,:i.

Soap and Glycerine Manu-
facturing Industry -
No. 83-69
FACTS.-It has been necessary for us to '45
work some of our employees overtime on the ,:i:
installation of new'equipment, in dismantling '-
machinery for transfer to other locations in 'i
our plant, and also in making necessary re-
pairs to machinery which has broken down i
during operation. :
QUESTION.-In computing the hours 'N
worked by the employees engaged in the op- ''
rations mentioned, are we correct in re- .
garding them as being engaged in "emer- .
agency maintenance and repair work" within ::
the meaning of article III, A, 1, of the Code? i
INTERPRETATION.-The installation of "
new equipment and the dismantling of ma- ..'
chlnery for transfer to other locations in the ,;
plant are not emergency maintenance and
repair work within the meaning of the Soap
and Glycerine Code.


Paint, Varnish, and Lacquer

Manufacturing Industry ,
,No. 71-64
FACTS.-A member of the Industry de-
sires to inaugurate a plan whereby he sup- ,
plies numbered coupons to his dealers, who ...
in turn distribute the coupons to each retail .
purchaser of a specified quantity of the in- .
dustry member's products. Duplicate cou-. '
pons bearing the retail purchasers' names are' l
to be sent by the dealer to the industry mem- :
her who on a prearranged date is to conduct .
a public drawing. To the holder of the cou-
pon bearing the number drawn, the member '
of the industry is to award an automobile or '"
other prize.
QUESTION.-Is a plan so conducted in .
violation of article XX of the Code?
INTERPRETATION.-It Is ruled that the i
plan is such a marketing device as is pro-
hibited by article XX of the Code.


Interpretations


- . I -


'. "' -mw -, .;
-,u Z%,,442M-omk










| rBand Instrument


SCode Amendment


Approved
'' An amendment to the Code of fair competi-
:-.flon for the band instrument Industry, de-
signed to clarify certain provisions of the
i' definition for the industry; delete definitions
S'i ..of "jobber ", '" retailer ", and "agent ", which
..r. are unnecessary in the Code; modify and add
'H[ -certain standard labor provisions regarding
a .' = safety and health of employees and handi-
C. apped workers; provide more efficient Code
Administration and add certain trade-prac-
.rtice provisions relating to terms of sale and
-: ,'Interest, has beep approved by the-National
'fl.n,-' "dustrlal Recovery Board.
Suggestions or objections to the amend-
..' ment, which becomes effective May 3, must be
'".filed before that date.


Interpretations


SLeaf Spring Manufacturing
Industry
'. .. No. 105C-5
FACTS.-Spring manufacturers place upon
their springs a so-called part number. The
:"..manufacturers put out a catalog in which are
.W.;." listed their part numbers, together with a
.L .description of the springs, mechanical speci-
q. cationss, make, model, and the year of the
ar;'.,a on which such spring is used. These
%c..atalogs are furnished by the manufacturers
].''to their wholesalers and then generally dis-
*'. tribute among the trade, apparently for con-
ii .:saultatioa in the ordering of springs. Thus,
H 'these part numbers help identify the product
(:.' and its maker.
-.. It appears that some manufacturers have
g-'.'been placing a competitor's part number, as
..well astheir own, on springs which are being
.'_sold to the competitor's wholesale customers.
''-Since the wholesaler knows who has manu-
H5 .-factured the springs lie buys, no claim is
". made that he is misled by the double .marking.
'-:The wholesaler's customers and subsequent
purchaserser, not possessing such knowledge,
;,*might be misled by the presence of the com-
,ipetitor's part number.
M.'' Article IV, paragraph (4), of the supple-
imentary Code for the .leaf spring manufac-
i'fW1 thring industry provides that the following
.' '-shall constitute an unfair practice: "(4)
3*.4.-, -'Imitation of'. trade marks.----To imitate or
I.opy.-,a. competitor's trade mark, marking,
i- trada .name, or exclusive and established de-
si. 'gn which identifies the maker or vendor of
.'the product, with the purpose or effect of
k.mialeading or deceiving any purchaser or
l : prospective purchaser."
'," QUESTION.-Is the act of marking or
i.' identifying springs with competitor's mark-
H."d' angs:or identification an unfair trade practice
i"'and In violation of article IV, paragraph (4),
-..-of the supplementary Code of fair com-
i", petition for the leaf spring manufacturing
industry?
S INTERPRETATION.-The act of mark-
ing or identifying springs with a competitor's
marking or identification, when done -with
the purpose or effect of misleading or deceiv-
ing any purchaser from the manufacturer or
any subsequent purchaser of such product,
is prohibited by article IV, paragraph (4),
of said 'supplementary Code.

.Soap.and Glycerine Manu-
' facturing Industry
No. 83-72
4,' FACTS.-We have established the practice
'.. of giving our regular factory employees a
*, vacation of 1 week each sear with pay. We
are wondering just how we should treat this
M;" matter In computing the average hours
... worked over a 6 months' period. The pay
'. for the vacation week is figured on the basis
.'of .40 hours.
4f.[ 'QUESTIONS.-(a) If an employee works
":. 25 weeks of 40 hours each and the 26th week
M. is a vacation with pay, is his weekly average
38.4 or 40 hours?
.. (b) If be totals .1,016 hours for 25 weeks
'-- and the 26th week is a vacation with pay, is
'r his weekly average 40.6 or 39 hours?
*,*,". INTERPRETATION.-Vacation time Is
not work. With this in mind, the answer to
S- (a) Is 38.4 and to (b) is 39; time given as
-i4- vacation not to be included in hours worked.

SProvisions in Various Codes
Prescribing Term of Em-
ployment of Learners and
Apprentices
QUESTION.-What is the meaning of the
0. terms days", weeks", "months", or
M; "years" as used in Code provisions limiting
'the period during which an employee may
be classed as a learner or apprentice?
J INTERPRETATION.-The words quoted
S mean the respective calendar periods, with
S the addition'of any time lost from the normal
',": full-time work periods of the plant in which
i.". the employee is working, as, for example,
'v by reason of cessation of plant operation or
"P" inability or unwillingness of the employee tp
wor.k.-.i" or.



'- .- I-


-.,;-'. ..


Resilient Flooring Contract-
ing Division of the Con-
struction Industry
No. 244j-13
FACTS--Section 1, article II, provides:
"The term 'resilient flooring contracting di-
vision' or 'this division' as used herein
shall mean the business of furnishing and
Installing, or the installing, for compensa-
tion, of all types of resilient preformed floor-
ing materials in use at the present time and
such other materials, of similar character,
.as may be developed in the future, but shall
not include the furnishing and installing, for
compensation, of resilient flooring materials
ordinarily sold at retail by members of the
retail trade, when sold for home purposes at
established prices, but shall include such por-
tion of resilient flooring materials as may be
furnished and installed by members of the
retail trade on a competitive bidding basis."
Section 3, article II, provides: "The
terms resilient flooring contractors' or
'member of this division' as used in this
chapter shall mean, but without limitation,
any individual, partnership, firm, corpora-
tion, association, or other form of enterprise
engaged In work within this division."
A member of the retail trade contracts on
a competitive bidding basis with a general
consumer to furnish and install resilient pre-
formed flooring material in an office building.
The instant a member of the retail trade or-
dinarily subcontracts out the actual installa-
tion of the resilient flooring material and
such retail member claims that for this rea-
son he Is not covered by the definition of the
Code because be does not, himself, actually
install the flooring material.
The -member of the retail trade, as a party
to the contract, agrees to accept full respon-
sibility for the merchandise and the installa-
tion. On the completion of the job said mem-
ber will bill the purchaser for the full
amount of the furnishing and Installing of
the material.
QUESTION.-Does that part of the defi-
nition which covers the business of furnish-
ing and installing, or the Installing, for com-
pensation, of all types of resilient preformed
flooring materials" etc., cover an operation
Involving the mere contracting to furnish
and install such materials, and is a member
- of the retail trade engaged in such operation
engaged In work within the division within
the meaning of sections 1 and 3 of article II
*of this chapter.where the.material is 'not sold
for home purposes at established prices but
the contract is taken on a competitive bidding
basis.
INTERPRETATION.-The phrase "the
business of furnishing and installing, or the.
installing" as used in section 1, article II,
embraces the business of contracting to fur-
nish and install, or to install, for compensa-
tion, resilient preformed flooring materials
regardless of whether the individual, partner-
ship, firm, corporation, association, or other
form of enterprise so contracting, subse-
quently subcontracts out the furnishing and
installing, or installing, to another; provided,
the original contract intends that said indi-
vidual, etc., shall be responsible for the per-
formance of both the furnishing and the in-
stalling or the Installing.
Any individual, partnership, firm, corpora-
tion, association, or other form of enterprise
engaged In so contracting, although a mem-
ber of the retail trade, is engaged in work
within the division provided, as to such mem-
ber, such contract be entered into on a com-
petitive bidding basis.

Graphic Arts Industries
No. 287-474
FACTS.-The Code of fair competition
for the graphic arts Industries, by definition
In article I, section 1 (a), Includes (among
others and with certain exceptions) all per-
sons engaged in printing or who use all the
processes or partial processes used in print-
ing or who produce any printed matter of
whatsoever description. Section 1 (f) of ar-
ticle I defines the term "printing" to mean
the act or process of printing, impressing,
stamping, or transferring upon paper or pa-
per-like substances, of any ink, color: pig-
ment, mark, character, or delineation, includ-
ing any and all partial processes and services
used In printing." Section 1 (g) defines the
term "printed matter" to mean "the fin-
ished products of printing, and the products
of any and all partial processes and services
used in printing." The lithographic printing
Industry (ka division of said Code) is defined
in schedule A, No. B-1 of the Code to in-
clude "all establishments using lithographic,
planographic, or photo-lithographic printing
processes, and those producing transfers."
QUESTION.-Are photo-gelatin printing
operations when performed by the Collotype
process included in the definitions of the
Graphic Arts Code, and, If so, how are such
operations properly classified thereunder?
RULING.-The definitions of the Graphic
Art Code are construed to Include photo-gela-
tin printing operations when performed by
the Collotype process, and the provisions of
said Code are applicable thereto. Photo-
gelatin printing operations when performed
by the Collotype process are properly classi-
fied under the Graphic Arts Code as litho-
graphic processes.


Retail Trade
No. 60-397
FACTS.-A revision of the loss limitation
provision of the Retail Drug Code having
been approved September 21, 1934 (being
Amendment No. 6 to the Retail Trade Code),
it appears that certain questions have arisen
regarding the correct interpretation of this
provision.
The National Retail Drug Code Authority
has submitted the following questions and
asks for a ruling from the National Indus-
trial Recovery Board upon them.
QUESTION NO. 1.-Does the interpreta-
tion issued by the division administrator on
April 6, 1934, and released to the public on
April 7, 1934, apply to this loss limitation
provision?
INTERPRETATION.-It does not. The
interpretation of April 6, 1934, applies to the
former loss limitation provision which has
been amended. That interpretation should
henceforth be disregarded.
QUESTION NO. 2.-Does this loss limi-
tation provision apply to all items sold by
drug retailers?
INTERPRETATION.-It does not. It ap-
plies only to drugs, medicines, cosmetics,
toilet preparations, and drug sundries. These
are defined In the Code.
QUESTION NO. 3.-Does this loss limita-
tion provision apply to drugs, medicines, cos-
metics, toilet preparations, and drug sundiles
sold by stores other than drug stores?
INTERPRETATION.-It does. It does
not matter who sells any 'of the above-named
items. He cannot sell them below the price
determined by this lods limitation provision.
QUESTION NO. 4.-Where certain com-
modities are not available to the trade gen-
erally, and hence bear no manufacturers'
wholesale list price per dozen or comparable
unit quantity, does this loss limitation pro-
vision apply?
INTERPRETATION.-It does not. Items
of this type, such as, but without limitation,
private brand items put up by the producer
for a special retailer under such retailer's
own name, mark, or brand, may be -sold at
any price such retailer may care to set.
QUESTION NO. 5.-Do the provisions
of article VIII, section 1, of the Code of fair
competition for the retail trade apply to the
retail sale of drugs, medicines, cosmetics,
toilet preparations, and drug sundries?
. INTERPRETATION.-No. Article VIII.
section 1, has been superseded by this loss
Limitation provision as far as the sale of the
above-mentioned Items are concerned.
QUESTION NO. 6.-If a retailer is able
to purchase at less -than the manufacturers'
wholesale list price per dozen, or if he is able
to obtain goods absolutely free, can he sell
below the manufacturers' wholesale list price
per dozen?
INTERPRETATION.-He cannot sell
drugs, medicines, cosmetics, toilet prepara-
tions, or drug sundries below the manufac-
turers' wholesale list price per dozen regard-
less of what he has paid for the goods, and
regardless of whether he has gotten them
free.
QUESTION NO. 7.-When the price for a
unit or combination of units under this loss
limitation provision, figures out with a frac-
tional cent, what price shall prevail?
INTERPRETATION.-The minimum sell-
ing price shall be figured by dropping the
fraction and adding 1 cent, 'regardless of
whether the fraction is more or less than
one-half cent.
Where the minimum selling price of a com-
bination of these items is' to' be determined,
fractions shall be left intact until the total
price of the combination has been determined,
and then, if a fraction remains, it should be
dropped and 1 cent added.


Safety Razor and Safety Razor
Blade Manufacturing Industry
No. 489-24
FACTS.-Article VIII, section 12, of the
Code of fair competition for the safety razor
and safety razor blade manufacturing indus-
try provides:
No member of the industry shall market
or distribute goods on consignment or guar-
antee to any distributor the sale of any of
the products of the industry."
The applicant submits the following sales
plan: "Our salesmen sell to the retail dealer
a quantity of safety razors, which are to be
resold to the consumer at a special price
for the period of 30 (lays. We run news-
paper advertising during this period to help
the sale. At the end of this period our
salesmen return to make collection. We in-
sist all accounts be fully setlted and closed
at the expiration of the period of the deal.
Our past experience and records show that
collection is made In full In about 90 percent
of the cases. If the dealer should have some
razors still on hand, and which he feels Is
au overstock, the salesmen are permitted to
accept them for credit."
Our terms are 2 percent 10 days, 30 days
net."
I QUESTION.-Is the above sales plan in
violation of article VIII, section 12, of the
subject Code?
RULING.-No.


Interpretations


Agreement ReachedI,

Protection of Shoe

Patterns
A tentative agreement between the boot; -;
and shoe manufacturing and the shoe pet-J.
tern manufacturing industries intended to,'
prevent copying of shoe patterns has bee& .:
announced by the National Recovery Afd ,
ministration. -
The agreement would require outside shoe';,
pattern manufacturers to mark original pa-.:'
terns with the firm name. Boot and shoe':,
manufacturers at the same time agreed not.:'
to accept shoe patterns as original unless so'
Identified.
The plan was worked out in a conference
of members of both industries with NRA.-"
officials. Original shoe designs developed by..'
one pattern maker are expected to be safe-
guarded from infringement by a competitor.


Interpretations


Savings, Building and Loan
Associations
No. 169-12
FACTS.-Article III, section 1, of 1 *:
Code of fair competition for savings, build-
ing and loan associations provides: "
"On and after the effective date, and to '.
and until the expiration date, the minimum
wages of employees covered hereby shall be:
(a) $15 per week in any city of over 500,000"
population or in the immediate trade area
of such city; (b) $14.50 per week in any -
city of between 250,000 and 500,000; (c) $lt "
per week in any city of between 2,500 and '
250,000; (d) $12 per week in any town under
2,500 population."
A building and loan association has an em-
ployee who acts in the capacity of salesman
and district manager covering several of the
counties of a State. An agreement was en-
tered into between the employer and em-
ployee at the time of employment, by. the..
terms of which the employee was to receive ,
$30 a week in cash and $10 a week in the
form .of a credit toward a holding company's ..
stock. The association required that the em-
ployee travel, on an average of 5 days a
week, over an assigned territory of about '
600 miles and pay his traveling expenses oat
of the aforementioned salary.
QUESTION.-1. May an employer under -
the Code of fair competition for savings, '
building and loan associations credit as part
payment of the minimum wage of an emr-
ployee. an amount which the employer re--
quires to be regularly deducted from sah .
employee's salary for the purchase of stock
in a corporation In which the employer is
financially interested?
2. Does the Code of fair competition for
savings, building and loan associations re-
quire an employer to pay an employee a wage
which, after the deduction of traveling ex-.
penses that are essential to the position, is
equal to at least the minimum wage provided
in the Code?
INTERPRETATION.-1. An employer .
under the Code of fair competition for sav-
ings, .building and loan associations is re-,
qulred to pay an employee at least the mini-
mum wage provided In the Code and may
not credit as part payment of such minimum j
wage an amount which the employer requires 9
to be deducted from such employee's salary'
for the purchase of stock in a corporation In,
which the employer is financially Interested,
2. An employer under the Code of fair com-
petition for savings, building and loan as-
sociations Is required to pay an employee at .
least'the minimum wage provided in the Code.'I
over and above any traveling expenses which
are essential to the position and which the.:.
employer requires the employee to bear.

Fluid Milk Industry
FACTS.-The substitution for the fluid
milk industry for paragraph 7 of the Presi-
dent's Reemployment Agreement reads as
follows:
"7. Not to reduce the compensation for
employment now in excess of the minimum
wages hereby agreed to I notwithstandingI
that the hours worked in such employment
may be hereby reduced), subject to equitable.'
readjustments of higher rates of pay on the.::
basis of consideration of the varying cirtuinm-
stances and conditions as may obtain in the
various milk-marketing areas."
QUESTION.-Does this provision prohibits.
a downward readjustment of compensation
for employment in excess of the minimum
wages?
INTERPRETATION.-A downward read-
justment in compensation for employment in
excess of minimum wages is not prohibited
by the substitution for the fluid milk Indus-
try for paragraph 7 of the President's Reem-
ployment Agreement provided such down-
ward readjustment is in fact equitable on
the basis of the circumstances and conditions
which obtain In the employer's milk-market-
Ing area. -.,












ADMINIST'


Official Orders of NRA Relating w

to Particular Codes

T HE Blue Eagle prints in each issue summaries of administrative
orders, interpretations, appointments, and bylaws approved by the
National Industrial Recovery Board.
Official orders are of two types, final and provisional. Where an order
is provisional, the time within which objections may be filed is indicated
below.
AJl protests against provisional orders should be addressed to National
Recovery Administration, Washington, D. C., attention Deputy Admin-
istrator for Code concerned; and such protests should be received before
final date indicated.
(For Code approvals, amendments, interpretations, budgets and
assessments, bylaws, Code Authority members, and trade complaints and
other committees, see elsewhere.)


AMERICAN PETROLEUM EQUIP-
MENT INDUSTRY AND TRADE, Code No.
85: Order 19, approving Code Authority
budget and basis of contribution for the
-period from January 1 to December 31,
1935.
ART NEEDLEWORK INDUSTRY, Code
No. 335: Order 16, granting a stay of the
;operation of the provisions of article XIII
of the Code, until such time as the regula-
tlions covering the issuance and use of labels
is approved by the National Industrial Re-
covery Board, but for no longer period than
until June 16, 1935.
ARTIFICIAL FLOWER AND FEATHER
INDUSTRY, Code No. 29: Order 26, grant-
ing to Barney Sabel & Co., 15 West Thirty-
sixth Street, New York City, exemption from
the provisions of article III, section 1, of
the Code, to the extent that it may work
its employees 1 hour overtime per day from
March 5 to March 15, 1935, excluding Satur-
days and Sundays, provided time and one-
third is paid for all hours worked in excess
of those permitted in the Code.
Order 27, granting a qualified extension of
the 1934 budget and basis of contribution
through the months of March and April
S1935.
AUTOMATIC SPRINKLER INDUSTRY;
Code No. 50; Order 20, granting a stay of
the provisions of article VI, sections (b),
(e). and (fi of the Code, until June 16,
1935. Order becomes effective April 19, 1935.
BAKING INDUSTRY, Code No. 445: Or-
Sder 53, denying to South Side Bakery, Pitts-
burgh, Pa., exemption from the provisions of
article V, section 3, of the Code.
Order 54, granting exemption to the Purity
Baking Co., El Paso, Tex., from the pro-
visions of article VII, section 12, subsection
(d), of the Code, insofar as they prohibit
the sale of returns away from the point of
manufacture, and permitting the company to
open a store for the sale of its returns at
712 South Stanton Street in lieu of at its
plant. Order becomes effective on March 28,
1935.
Order 55, denying to Master Bakers As-
sociation, Louisville, Ky., exemption from
the provisions of article,II, section 13, and
article VII, section 7, of the Code.
BLOUSE AND SKIRT MANUFACTUR-
: ING INDUSTRIES, Code No. 194: Order
S27, granting exemption to the Eastern Cur-
Stain Co., Providence, R. I., from the pro-
: visions of article III, sections 2 and 3-A(2),
c of the Code, for the period from March 27 to
and including June 15, 1935, to the extent
That .it may pay its employees the wage
rates set forth in article III, section 3-A(3i,
on condition that no employee is paid at a
Rate less than $12 per week of 35 houms,.pro-
vided no emp-loyee now receiving in excess
of the minimum wage scales shall receive'a
less amount.
CARBON DIOXIDE INDUSTRY (Divi-
sion of the Chemical Industry), Code No.
S275 B: Order 25, amending the rates of con-
Stribution to the Code Authority budget, effec-
t live for the quarter ending January 31, 1935,
and until further order.
CARPET AND RUG MANUFACTUR-
ING INDUSTRY, Code No. 202: Order 17,
.. granting a stay of the provisions of article
VII, section 19 (al, of the Code, for a period
of 60 days from March 30 to May 29, 1935,
inclusive.
CHAIN MANUFACTURING INDUS-
STRY (Division of Fabricated Metal), Code
No. 84 C: Order 14, approving tire chain
consignment plan defining circumstances
under which tire chains may be shipped on
consignmeut.
CIGARETTE, SNUFF, CHEWING AND
SMOKING TOBACCO MANUFACTURING
INDUSTRY, Code No. 549: Order 2, grant-
ing exemption to the Taylor Bros., Inc.,
SWinston-Salem. N. C., from the provisions of
article III, section 1 (c), provided that their
watchmen shall not be required or permit-
ted to work in excess of the schedule of
hours as set forth in the order.
S Order 3, denying application of Ryan-
Hampton Tobacco Co., Inc., Louisville, Ky.,


exemption from the provisions of article IV,
section 1 (b), of the Code.
, CORK INDUSTRY, Code No. 199: Order
13, approving merchandising plan for the
Cork Marine Goods Manufacturers' Division.
CORSET AND BRASSIERE INDUSTRY,
Code No. 7: Order 36, granting exemption
to Weingarten Bros., Inc.. Newark. N. J.,
from the provisions of article IV', section 2,
of 'the Code, to the extent that the head
cutter may work on Saturday, June 1, and
Sunday, June 2, provided such work is lim-
ited to taking inventory, and that time and
one-half is paid for such overtime work.
COTTON GARMENT INDUSTRY, Code
N9. 118: Order 371, granting exemption to
White Swan Uniforms, Inc., New York City,
from the provisions of article III, section A,
of the Code, to the extent that they be per-
mitted to operate their plants in Brooklyn,
Yonkers, Union City, aud Bridgeport, and to
work the employees thereof 4 hours over-
time weekly for a period of 30 days from
December 14, 1934, provided all overtime
worked in excess of 36 hours per week is
paid for at the rate of time and one-half.
Exemption was effective as of December 14,
1934.
COTTON RAG TRADE, Code No. 330:
Order 51, approving list of occupations
and/or operations unsuited to minors under
IS years of age.
CURLED HAIR MANUFACTURING IN-
DUSTRY, Code No. 427: Order 11, approv-
ing list of occupations and/or operations
unsaluited to minors under IS years of age.
DRESS MANUFACTURING INDUS-
TRY, Code No. 64: Order 70, granting ex-
emption to Ottenheimer Bros., Little Rock,
Ark., from the provisions'of article III, sec-
tion 4, of the Code, from March 27, 1935,
up to and including April 30, 1935, to the
extent that they are permitted to operate
a double shift, provided in no event shall
the day and hour limitations as set forth In
sections 1 and 2'of article III, be exceeded
by any individual properly within the pro-
visions of these sections. A copy of the
order must be posted in a conspicuous place
in the applicant's plant.
Order 72, approving Code Authority bud-
get and basis of contribution for the period
from January 1 to June 30, 1935.
ENVELOPE INDUSTRY, Code No. 220:
Order 19, approving list of hazardous occu-
pations unsuited to persons under 18 years
of age.
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS
MANUFACTURING AND METAL FIN-
ISHING ANDYMETAL COATINGS INDUS-
TRY, Code No. 94: Order 125, denying to
Eagle Pencil Co.. New York City. exemption
from posting of labor provisions of the
Code. and for permission to pay less than
the minimum wage as provided in the Code,
to 6 employees in its steel pen department.
FURNITURE MANUFACTURING IN-
DUSTRY, Code No. 145: Order 57, denying
to The Smiths, Inc., Barnesville, Ga., ex-
emption from the provisions of article IV,
section 5, of the Code.
GAS APPLIANCES AND APPARATUS
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY, Code No.
134: Order 28A, approving budget and basis
of contribution for the period January 1 to
June 16, 1935.
GRAPHIC ARTS INDUSTRIES, Code No.
287: Order 465A, granting to Country Life
Press, Garden City, N. Y., exemption from
the provisions of article II, section 21, para-
graph 6 (d) of the Code for the period be-
ginning March 18 to March 30, 1935, in order
that 57 employees affected may work not in
excess of an average 11 hours overtime dur-
ing said period, provided time and one-half
is paid for all hours worked In excess of 8
within any 24-hour period.
Order 467, denying to Augustata Book Con-
cern, Rock Island, Ill., exemption from cer-
tain provisions of the Code.
Order 471, granting to Dominicana. 487
Michigan Avenue NE., Washington, D. C.,


exemption from tWie provisic
(e) of appendix A-3, of the i
Order 472, denying to Ge
ark, N. J., exemption from
paragraphs 2 and 3, section
the Code.
AI T TVnI rtnn'nIn IT T n r


zf
C .RDERS S
/
.'l-.
Ins of paragraph man & Co., New York, exemption from the ;
Code. provisions of article XII, section (a), of the :,.
iger Bros., New- Code, for a period from the expiration date.L:
the provisions of of Order 15-34 up to and including June 16, "-
21, article II, of 1935, to the extent that they may ship goods i:".
on consignment to the firm of W. B. Davis '
TQ'VDN' Co., Cleveland, Ohio. ,


HNDuKERCnIFj Ir UNIJUSiTI, uoue No.
53: Order 23, granting to Herrmann Hand-
kerchief Co., 2 Park Avenue, New York, N. Y.,
exemption from the provisions of article III,
section 2, of the Code, to the extent that it
may operate 2 tearing machines 2 shifts, for
the period from March 30 up to and includ-
ing May 15, 1985, provided that the em-
ployees working the first shift shall work not
more than 7",2 hours per day for 5 days per
week, and those working the second shift
work not more than 7 hours per day for .5
days per week. A copy of the order must be
posted in a conspicuous place in the applU-
cant's plant.
HEATING, PIPING, AND AIR CONDI-
TIONING CONTRACTORS DIVISION OF
THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY,. Code
No. 244P: Order 11, terminating automatic
exemptions granted to members in the States
of Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Ver-
mont, from the provisions of article II, sec-
tion 1, of the Code.
ICE INDUSTRY, Code No. 43: Order 116,
granting to I. H. Needham and H. M. Siva-
don, doing business as the Frigid Ice Co.,
permission to erect and operate a 35-ton ice
plant and 100-ton ice storage at Blackwell,
Okhla.
Order 117, granting to G. T. Ray permis-
sion to erect and operate a 20-ton ice-manu-
facturing plant and a 40-ton storage, in
Blackwell, Okla.
Order 118, granting to Karl L. Dabler,
Withee, Wis., permission to erect and op-
erate a 450-ton natural-ice storage.
Order 119, granting to Joseph Schlichting,
Little Falls, Minn., permission to erect and
operate a 2,000-ton natural ice storage plant.
INDUSTRIAL SAFETY EQUIPMENT
INDUSTRY AND TRADE, Code No. 315:
Order IS, granting authorization to expend
a portion from the surplus funds available
on February 12 for the months of January,
February, and March 1935.
INFANTS' AND CHILDREN'S WEAR
INDUSTRY, Code No. 373: Order 49, grant-
ing to Little & Martin, Ltd., Los Angeles,
Calif., exemption from the provisions of ar-
ticlt III of the Code, to the extent that it
may work its entire manufacturing force 8
hours overtime on Saturdays, March 16, 23,
and 30, April 6 and 13, 1935, provided time
and one-half is paid for all such overtime.
A copy of the order must be posted in a con-
spicuous place In the applicant's plant.
Order 50, granting to Sandess Manufactur-
ing Co., Philadelphia, Pa., exemption from
the provisions of article III, of the Code, to
the extent that it may work 53 operators, 11
pressers, 3 cutters, 1 hour overtime daily on
March 11. 12, 13; 14, and 15, and 4 hours
overtime on March 16, provided time and
one-half is paid for all such overtime.
Order 51, granting to Acme Headwear Co.,
New Brunswick, N. J., exemption from the
provisions of article IV b of the Code, to the
extent that it may employ 10 additional ap-
prentices commencing March 18, 1935, pro-
vided that rate of pay shall be at the regular
piecework rates and in no case shall they be
less than the Code minimum provided for
learners. A copy of the order must be posted
in a conspicuous place in applicant's plant.
Order 52, granting to H. Llnsk & Co.,
Philaddlphia, Pa., exemption from the provi-
sions of article III of the Code, to the ex-
tent that It may work 6 sample-makers 4
hours overtime on February 16 and 1 hour
overtime each day from February 18 to 22,
provided time and one-half is paid.
Order 53, granting to Jolly Kids Manufac-
turing Co., Belding, Mich., exemption from
the provisions of article III of the Code, to
the extent that it be permitted to employ 16
apprentices on sewing machines for a period
of 60 days. beginning March 18, 1935, to be
paid at regular piece rates now being paid
to experienced workers and to receive any
excess earned and not less than the Code
apprentice minimum wage; provided a copy
of the order is posted in a conspicuous place
in the applicant's plant.
INSECTICIDE AND DISINFECTANT
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY, Code No.
391: Order 14, terminating exemption granted
in paragraph II of Administrative Order
X-36.
INVESTMENT BANKERS CODE, Code
No. 141: Order 43, granting waiver to Alex
Brown & Sons on behalf of the Federal Land
Bank Group, of article V, section 7, of amend-
ment No. 2, of the Code.
LEATHER AND WOOLEN KNIT
GLOVE INDUSTRY, Code No. 87: Order 32,
approving minimum scale of wages for
skilled workers, submitted by the Code Au-
thority.
MEN'S CLOTHING INDUSTRY, Code
No. 15: Order 64, extends Order 15-34, grant-
ing to Hickey-Freeman Co. and Cohen, Gold-


MEN'S NECKWEAR INDUSTRY, Code, .
No. 363: Order 29, granting a qualified ex-,',:"
tension of the 1934 budget and basis of coni--)
tribution for the period from April 2 to 0.-
May 31, 1935.
MILLINERY INDUSTRY, Code No. 151 .
Order 54, authorizing the payment of legal :,
expenses Incident to pre-Code work.
Murder 55, granting to Northern Straw I
Works, Philadelphia, Pa., exemption from
the provisions of article IV, section 3, of the".'
Code, to the extent that it may employ 10..
milliners at a minimum wage of $10.50 per:'f
week to June 16, 1985. These employeesol-
shall not be included in calculating the ap-..
plicant's tolerance allowance, provided that;p
the operation at which these employees are.;
employed has a piecework rate, and* their
amount earned at the prevailing piecework.s
rate exceeds the minimum wage herein specdL4
fled, and shall 'be compensated on the basis -;
of such actual piecework earnings. A copy.'
of the order must be posted in a consplcu--i-t
ous place in the applicant's plant.
Order 56, granting to members of the in. .,
dustry located in the markets of San Fran-
cisco, Calif., Seattle, Wash., and Portland,.,.
Oreg., exemption from the provisions of ar-.-
tidle III, section 2, of the Code, to the extentJj
that said members are permitted, during their
spring season, 1935, to work the ovcrtime',j
provided for in said article III, section 2,',,
at the normal rates of pay, rather than the,4i'
overtime rates provided in the Code, provided'.id
that the overtime permitted by said article'.
III, section 2, Is confined to the months o'"'f
March, April, and May 1935 and a copy 'of -4'
the order is posted in a conspicuous place "
in the applicants' plants.
MOTOR VEHICLE RETAILING TRADE,:
Code No. 46: Order 75, granting to George,-f
W. Stem Motor Co., Inc., New Orleans, La.,
exemption from the provisions of article IV,
title B, section (1), of the Code, to the ex- '
tent that they may sell the automobiles de-' I
scribed in the Code at less than the list price,.-
provided that these automobiles are sold only" .*
in the State of Louisiana.
Order 78, granting Lemont Motors, Inc.,...,.'
Sarasota, Fla., exemption from the provisions U.*
of article IV, title B, section (1), of the,.:.
Code, to the extent that they may sell three"
Plymouth automobiles, Serial Nos. 2428694, ;
1050322, and' 2431126, at 20 percent less thae :i
the list price, provided these cars are sold.,hl
only in the State of Florida. .'.
NONFERROUS SCRAP METAL TRADE,.
Code No. 330: Order 52, approving list of i
hazardous occupations unsuited to minors'."
'under 18 years of age. ."('
PIPE TOOL MANUFACTURING IN.'
DUSTRY (Division of Fabricated metal "'.
Products Manufacturing and Metal Finish-'..'
ing and Metal Coating Industry), Code No. '*
84UI: Order 9, approving supplementary .;,'
Code Authority budget and basis of con- -::i
tribution for the period from September 3, .''
1934, to June 16, 1935. ..
PLUMBING CONTRACTING DIVISION
OF THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY,..I
Code No. 2441: Order 24, terminating auto-.',
maic. exemptions granted to members of the '4M
industry In the State of Massachusetts, from ".
the provisions of article II, section 1, of .1
the Code. .
PRINTING EQUIPMENT INDUSTRY "i
AND TRADE, Code No.' 257: Order 25',
granting to Harris-Seybold-Potter Co., 4510.
East Seventy-first St., Cleveland, Ohio, ex-'s
emption from article III, section 1 (a), of .'"
the Code from March 11 to April 20, 1935, to
the extent that it may employ 20 erectors,
10 assemblers, 4 Ingersoll milling machine
operators, 4 vertical milling machine opera"
tors, 3 grinders and 5 lather operators, pro- 't-4
vided they work not more than 56 hours' ."r
per week and are paid at the rate of at least
time and one-half for all hours worked in '
excess of 40 hours per week up to 48 hours per .-
week; provided that such employees be paid.-.b3
at twice their regular rate of pay for all
hours worked in excess of 48 hours per week, .a.
up to and including 56 hours per week. Said
company shall not deny employment to any :.
applicant qualified to do the work permitted
by this exemption and the rates of pay and;
wages paid for such overtime work must.i<'i
be reported promptly to the NRA at the ead.:-','
of each week. A copy of the order must be."
posted in a conspicuous place in the, appli- -
cant's plant.
RAILWAY CAR BUILDING INDUS. '
TRY, Code No. 285: Order 14, granting to '.
the Pressed Steel Car Co., McKees Rocks,.. ".
Pa., exemption from the provisions of article'A'
III, section (3), of the Code, to the extent
that it may employ such employees engaged .
only in the operation of its power plant not '%':.
to exceed such additional hours, which added 'i
to hours already worked, will not exceed a .I-,:-
total of 48 hours each per week.. This order '.
is effective March 27 and shaU terminate
June 16, 1935.
(Continued on page s, column 1)


.. ' "
.,. . .. -:..,.....:. a ...:-: ..-.t.4-g:<......s_'.I..IU.Ia,.-', ,.J.....4Ja_,









22%:>ADMINISTRATIVE ORDERS Code Authority Members Approv0


(Continued from page 5)


S READY-MIXED CONCRETE INDUS-
TRY, Code No. 311: Order 35, reapproving
budget and basis of contribution for the
.. period from March 1, 1934, to March 1, 1935.

S RETAIL FOOD AND GROCERY TRADE,
Code No. 182: Order 74, granting to Valley
Jitney Jungle, Brownsville, Tex., exemption
L*. from the provisions of article V, section 6,
;-.of the Code, as to one employee who is a
student at school. Said exemption is limited
S to the duration of the current school year of
*" the school attended by said employee.
Order 75, denying to E. C. Smith, Newton,
Iowa, exemption from the provisions of
Article V, section 2. of the Code.
S- Order 76, denying to Parra Bros. Browns-
y. ville, Tex., exemption from the provisions of
article V, section 2, and article VI, section
I1 (d), 5 and 6, of the Code.
S Order 77, denying to Glen Holm Stores,
SKansas City, Kans.. exemption from certain
of the provisions of article V, section 3 (c),
Sof the Code.
S Order 78. granting to Peter Gengler Co.,
/ Inc., Galveston, Tex, exemption from the
., provisions of article VI, section 7. of the
Code, provided not more than a 10 percent
S reduction is permitted and said reduction
shall be allowed only in the case of the em-
Sployees whose weekly wage is $20 or more
or whose monthly salary is $80 or more.
The order is dated March 30, 1935.
RETAIL JEWELRY TRADE, Code No.
S142: Order 71, extends the jurisdiction of
:.the local retail jewelry Code Authority of
Appleton, Wis., to cover the following coun-
ties: Adams. Brown, Calumet, Fond du Lac,
SGreen Lake, Marinette. Marquette, Oconto,
SOutagamie, Waupaca, Waushara. Winnebago.
RETAIL LUMBER, LUMBER PROD-
UCTS, BUILDING MATERIALS, AND
BUILDING SPECIALTIES TRADE, Code
No. 33: Order 55, extending approval of
minimum accounting requirements which ex-
.' pired March 1, 1935, until further order.
-I..... RETAIL MEAT TRADE, Code No. 540:
;. Order 14, denying to Aster Cash Markets Co.,
S Akron, Ohio, exemption from the provisions
of article III, section I (a), of the Code.
RETAIL SOLID FUEL INDUSTRY, Code
No. 280: Order 248, denying to United Coal
SBuyers, 19 South LaSalle Street, Chicago,
Ill., exemption from the provisions of article
T IV, section -4 (b), of the Code.
RETAIL TRADE, Code No. 60: Order 396,
.'postponing the effective date of Adminlstra-
:.,tive Order No. 60-365, dated February 19 to
a JuJne 11, 1935.
S ROCK AND SLAG WOOL INDUSTRY,
SCode No. 321: Order 20, approving budget
Sand basis of contribution for the period of
SJanuary 1 to June 16, 1935.
RUBBER MANUFACTURING INDUS-
TRY, Code No. 156: Order 74, granting to
Jenkins Bros., Bridgeport, Conn, a stay of
Sthe provisions of chapter VII, article V-A,
a section 3, of the Code.
SOAP AND GLYCERINE MANUFAC-
TURING INDUSTRY, Code No. 83: Order
73, denying to Max Huncke Chemical Co.,
626 Fourth Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y., exemp-
tion from the provisions of articles III and
IV of the Code.
"h- SCRAP IRON, NONFERROUS SCRAP
METALS, AND WASTE MATERIALS
STRADF, Code No. 330: Order 50, denying to
Ida Goldberg, Syracuse, N. Y., exemption
from the provisions of article III. section 1,
and article IV, section 1, of the Code.
SSHOVEL, DRAGLINE, AND CRANE
INDUSTRY, Code No. 102: Order 22, ap-
Sproving budget and basis of contribution for
Sthe period from January 1 to June 30, 1935.
SOLID BRAIDED CORD INDUSTRY,
Code No. 309: Order 20, approving labeling
regulation No. 1.
TEXTILE PROCESSING INDUSTRY,
..;r- Code No.--235: Order 31, approving budget
and basis of contribution for the period of
;.. February 1 to April 1,.1935.
S TRUCKING INDUSTRY, Code No. 278:
:' Order 184, reapproving cost formula, pre-
viously approved by Administrative Order
278-87.
: UNDERGARMENT AND NEGLIGEE
INDUSTRY, Code No. 408: Order 36, grant-
ing to Marathon Underwear Corporation, Los
.. Angeles, Calif., exemption from the provi-
I. sions of article III, section 1, of the Code,
S to the extent that it may employ its zigzag
operators 7k hours per week in excess of
?' the maximum designated in the Code for the
. period from March 18 up to and including
i' April 13, 1935, provided time and one-half
is paid for all overtime worked. A copy of
i the order must be posted in a conspicuous
place in the applicant's plant.
WHOLESALE TOBACCO TRADE, Code
S No. 462: Order 23, approving list of hazard-
ous occupations unsuited to minors under 18
... years of age, subject to an additional stand-
a rd.
: WHOLESALING PLUMBING PROD-
UCTS, HEATING PRODUCTS, AND'OR
DISTRIBUTING PIPE, FITTINGS, AND
VALVES, Code No. 50S: Order 6, extending


the period of time for submission of plan for
election of Code Authority.
WINDOW GLASS MANUFACTURING
INDUSTRY, Code No. 533: Order S. grant-
ing emergency stay from the provisions of
article X, section 2, effective Marih 25, 1935,
for a period of 10 days.
WOMEN'S BELT INDUSTRY, Code No.
41: Order 18, granting permission to work
S additional hours per week in any 6 weeks
prior to June 16, 1935, provided that not less
than time and one-hIalf is paid for such over-
time and not more than 1 hour overtime per
day shall be worked during 4 week days and
not more than 4 hours overtime shall be
worked on Saturday of the overtime week.
Any member taking advantage of the over-
time privilege shall file with the Code Au-
thority, at least 24 hours prior to the be-
ginning of the overtime week a written state-
ment setting forth the date of the beginning
of the week, and the same at the end of the
period. A copy of the order must be posted
in a conspicuous place in the plants of all
members of thei industry.
WOOL TEXTILE INDUSTRY, Code No.
3: Order 59. granting to Cleveland Worsted
*Mills Co.. Cleveland, Ohio, exemption from
the provisions of the first paragraph of ar-
ticle III for the period from March 20 up to
and including April 20, 1935, to the extent
that employees In the mending department
may be employed 48 hours per week, pro-
vided time and one-third is paid for all hours
in excess of 40 hours per week. Any quali-
fied menders shall be employed who may pre-
sent themselves. A copy of the order must
be posted in a conspicuous ilac-e in the ap-
plicant's plant.


Terminations and Resigna-
tions of Code Authority

Members
American Match Industry-John W. Kieck-
hefer.
Athletic Goods Manufacturing Industry-
Adolph 0. Goodwin.
Automatic Sprinkler Industry-Shepard
Barnes.
Buff and Polishing Wheel Industry-Rich-
ard L. Ahbearnm.
Olay Drain Tile Manufacturing Industry-
H. E. Nold.
Complete Wire and Iron Fence Industry-
C. L. Converse.
Concrete Pipe Industry-Bernard Li Mc-
Nulty.
Electric Storage and Wet Primary Battery
Industry-Shepard Barnes.
Floor and Wall Clay Tile Industry-
Shepard Barnes.
Foundry Equipment Industry-Lawrence
E. Connelly.
Gypsum Industry-F. D. Hansen.
Licorice Industry-William A. Ziegler.
Luggage and Fancy Leather Goods Indus-
try-SiShuford B. Marks.
Metal Treating Industry-F. D. Hansen.
Nonfer-ous Hot Water Tank Industry-
F. D. Barth.
Preformed Plastic Products Industry-H.
E. Nold.
Printing Ink Industry-August Rust-Op-
penheim.
Restaurant Industry-C. Sterry Long.
Road Machinery Manufacturing Industry-
Charles Allen Brantlngham.
Saddlery Manufacturing Industry-Shu-
ford B. Marks.
Saw M11i Machinery Industry-F. D.
Hansen.
Shoe Shank Manufacturing Industry-F.
E. Barth.
Standard Steel Barrel and Drum Manu-
facturing Industry-Lawrence E. Connelly.
Steel Package Manufacturing Industry-
Lawrence E. Connelly.
Transparent Materials Converters Indus-
try-Lee Galloway.
Umbrella Manufacturing Industry-Charles
B. Johnes.
Washing Machine Parts Manufacturing In-
dustry-Lawrence E. Connelly.
Wholesale Confectioners Industry-Wil-
liam A. Ziegler.


Trade Practice Com-

plaints Plans Approved

Canning Industry.
Fuller's Earth Producing and Marketing
Industry.
The Importing Trade.
Lightning Rod Manufacturing Industry.
Luggage and Fancy Leather Goods Indus-
try.
Mechanical Lubricator Industry (A Divi-
sion of MAPI).
Porcelain Breakfast Furniture Assembling
Industry.
Railroad Special Track Industry.
Railway Appliance Manufacturing Indus-
try.
Retail Solid Fuel Industry, Divisional Code
Authority No. 35.
Silverware Manufacturing Industry.
Stay Manufacturing Industry.


The National Industrial Recovery Board
approved the following selections and appoint-
ments of Code Authority members:
ALL-METAL INSECT SCREEN IN-
DUSTRY.-Myron L. Buck.
ALUMINUM INDUSTRY.-George Henry
Nolte, New York, N. Y., to serve as adminis-
tration member, without vote, until further
order.
AUTOMOTIVE SHOP EQUIPMENT
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.-J. Y.
Scott, chairman; C. F. Hodgson, Sprinrfield,
Mass.; G. L. Brunner. secretary, Utica. N. Y.;
VW. C. Hecker, treasurer, St. Louis, Mo.;
H. L. Faust, Lansing, Mich.; alternates are
T. M. Jones, Cedar Rapids, Iowa; J. F.
Weller, Rochester, N. Y.: C. A. Anderson,
York, Pa.; A. E. Feraaan, South Bend, Ind.;
E. W. Holmes, Chanttanoo)ga, Tenn.
BAKING INDUSTRY IN PUERTO
RICO.-Everett D. Brown to serve as the
representative of governmental interests on
the permanent standards committee and
Margaret Fix to serve as the representative
of consumer interests on said committee.
BEAUTY AND BARBER SHOP ME-
CHANICAL EQUIPMENT MANUFAC-
TURING INDUSTRY.-A. Edmond Pausser
and Carl C. Wirt.
BEDDING MANUFACTURING INDUS-
TRY.-Evans F. Stearns. Cincinnati, Ohio;
Robt. W. Schwab, Atlanta, Ga.; C. Francis
Pearce, Chicago, Ill.:; Arnold W. Becker, New
York, N. Y.: W. R. Salisbury, Minneapolis,
Minn.; J. L. Moore, Muncle. Ind.; J. L.
Novascone. Kenosha, Wis.; Harry E Wolf,
Pittsburgh, Pa.; A. 0. Foster, Utica. N. Y.:
A. G. Feldman, Chicago, Ill.; A. P. Brewer,
San Francisco, Calif.
BOOK PUBLISHING INDUSTRY.-Co-
ordinanting Board: W. K. Holmdn, W. D. Wat-
son, Philadelphia, Pa.; John O'Connor, New
York, N. Y.: W. Morgan Shuster, Frank J.
Shell. New York, N. Y.; alternate members;
W. R. Kohr, Frank C. Dodd, New York, N. Y.;
Harry C. Johnson, Chicago, Ill.; Horace G.
White, Philadelphia, Pa.; Theodore Johnson,
Boston, Mass.
BOOT AND SHOE MANUFACTURING
INDUSTRY.-William Ziegler.
BOTTLED SOFT DRINK INDUSTRY.-
Charles V. Rainwater, Atlanta, Ga.; W. B.
Hatfield, Brooklyn, N. Y.; James Vernor, Jr.,
Detroit, Mich.; and J. B. O'Hara, Dallas,
Tex., as association members, and Frank
Gruber, Philadelphia. Pa., as nonassociation
member, to serve for 1 year beginning Jan-
uary 1, 1935.
BROOM MANUFACTURING INDUS-
TRY.-Walter S. Giele, to serve as adminis-
tration member, without vote, until further
order.
BUFF AND POLISHING WHEEL IN-
DUSTRY.-L. W. MacFarland, Long Island
City, N. Y.; C. J Cahill, Chicago, Ill.;
Warren L. Neu, Matawan, N. J.; J. L. Mc-
Cormick. Elwood, Ind.
CIGAR CONTAINER INDUSTRY.-John
A. Campbell. Detroit, Mich.; Harry W.
Buckley, deceased.
CHINA CLAY PRODUCING INDUS-
TRY.-George Henry Nolte, New York, N. Y.,
to serve as administration member, without
vote, until further order.
CLOCK MANUFACTURING INDUS-
TRY.-Edward Ingraham, Smith F. Fergu-
son, New York City; C. H. Granger, Water-
bury, Conn.; I. H. Whitelflad, New Haven,
Conn.; C. B. Davis, Ashland, Mass.
CONCRETE PIPE 'MANUFACTURING
INDUSTRY.-H. A. Weigand, San Jose,
Calif.; Fred Spiekerman, Lodi, Cajif.; J. R.
Montigel, Redland, Calif.; Geo. R. Wells,
Santa Ana, Calif.; and John C. Crump, Ven-
tura, Calif., as members of the regional ad-
ministrative committee for the States of Cal-
ifornia, Nevada, and Arizona.
CONCRETE PIPE MANUFACTURING
INDUSTRY.-Hugh P. Ford, Eugene, Oreg.;
W. P. Hews, Yakima, Wash.; J. W. Ash, Cor-
vallis, Oreg.; W. F. Paddock, Seattle, Wash.;
and E. L. Warner, Tacoma, Wash., as mem-
bers of the regional administrative committee
for the States of Washington and Oregon.
CONCRETE PIPE MANUFACTURING
INDUSTRY.-W. F. Paddock, Seattle,
Wash.; H. W. Churter, Fresno, Calif.; W. 0.
Listen, Harlingen, Tex.; L. D. Bailey, Elk
River, Minn.; R. S. Lander, Little Rock,
Ark.; C. H. Bullen, Franklin Park, Ill.; J. A.
Dunn, Swampscott, Mass ; H. F. Ahrens,
Jr.. Ampere, N. J.: Tom Sherman, Knox-
ville, Tenn.; C. E. Edwards, Grand Rapids,
Mich.: G. H. Redding, Chicago, Ill.; F. W.
Paulin, Buffalo, N. Y.: C. F. Buente, Pitts-
burgh, Pa.; and H. E. Easterly, Richmond,
Va.
COPPER INDUSTRY.-George Henry
Nolte, New York, N. Y., to serve as adminis-
tration member, without vote, until further
order.
COPPER AND "BRASS MILL PROD-
UCTS INDUSTRY.-George Henry Nolte,
New York, N. Y., to serve as administration
member, without vote. until further order.
FIREPLACE FURNISHINGS MANU-
FACTURING INDUSTRY (Subdivision of
the Fabricated Metal Products Manufac-
turing and Metal Finishing and Metal Coat-
ing Industry).-BAlling Jones, Jr., Birming-
ham, Ala.; John J. Frenning. Charlestown.
Boston, Mass.; J. D. Kennedy, Chattanooga,


Tenn.; Jack Kraft, New York, N. Y.; a,
W. L. Sharpe. SteubenviUle. Ohio, to serve aaf
members of the subdivisional committee ..
FLOOR AND WALL CLAY TILE MANI '"
UFACTURING INDUSTRY.-George Henry
Nolte, New York, N. Y., to serve as admlnlW'
tration member, without vote, until further'
order.
FOOD AND GROCERY TRADE (RE-
TAIL AND WHOLESALE).-Local Fooid;
and Grocery Distributors' Code Authoritre I
have been appointed throughout the country."
Names of personnel will be furnished on'
request.
FUR DEALING TRADE.-Vladimir Bit.
ingon and Rudolph Edelson to serve the un.t
expired terms of Milton A. Herzig and Meyer',
Schechter, resigned.
"GAS APPLIANCES AND APPARATUS I
INDUSTRY.-F. P. Combier to serve as.
administration member, without vote, until.
further order.
GAS APPLIANCES AND APPARATUS'.
INDUSTRY.-Robert W. Trump, Philadel.
phia, Pa., vice F. H. Knapp, resigned.
GRAPHIC ARTS INDUSTRIES.-Payson1
Irwin to serve as administration member of
the coordinating committee without vote.
until further order. vt
GRAPHIC ARTS INDUSTRIES.-Albert
W. Finlay, Boston, Mass.; Frederick Secord,:
Chicago, Ill.; Frank J. Smith, Rochester,
N. Y.: Walter D. Alien, Brookline, Mass.5B;
Lea M. Nichols, Bristow, Okla.; Kenneth F.:
Baldridge, Bloomfield, Iowa; Stanley R
Latshaw, New York, N. Y.; Walter D. Fuller,:
Philadelphia, Pa.; B. W. Palmer, Kingsport,-.
Tenn.; Nathan H. Shrifte, New York, N. Y.;
Douglas T. Johnston, New York, N. Y.; Wal.
lace W. Kirby, Washington, D. C.; W. H..:
Merten. Cincinnati, Ohio; G. R. Meyercord,,
Chicago, Ill.; Theodore A. Isert, New York,.
N. Y.; Herman A. Fischer, Chicago, Ill.; Her-:
man L. Lewis, Detroit, Mich.; and Edgar W.,
Reutener, Cleveland, Ohio, to serve as mew-
hers of the Coordinating Committee.
GRAPHIC ARTS INDUSTRIES, (E-15
CHURCH ENVELOPE SYSTEM).-Mrs'
W. A. MacCalla, J. A. Pidgeon, resigned.
GRINDING WHEEL INDUSTRY.-W. I
LaCoste Nelson, Worcester, Mass.; F. J.
Tone, Niagara Falls, N. Y.; J. I. Baker,
George S. Emerson, Springfield, Mass.; H. R.E
Kohn, L. Leslie Byers, Philadelphia, Pa.;.
Dr. F. R. Henry, Dayton, Ohio.; W. R.
Haight, New York, N. Y.
HATTERS' FUR CUTTING INDUS-
TRY.-Marsh Asmar as labor representative.
INDUSTRIAL ALCOHOL INDUSTRYr-
Bruce Puffer, N. Y.; Harry E. Dunning, re-
signed. C. A. Lumb, California, as nonas.
sociation representative.
LEAD INDUSTRY.-George 'Henry Nolle,.
New York, N. Y., to serve as administration
member, without vote, until further order.
LIME INDUSTRY.-Leigh B. Ore, Trade
Relations Committee.
MALLEABLE IRON INDUSTRY.-Frank
E. Shumann., Easton, Pa., vice Philip R. Van-..
Duyne, resigned.
MEDIUM- AND LOW-PRICED JEW-
ELRY MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.--
Ralph H. Wales to serve as administration'
member, without vote, until further order.
METAL LATH MANUFACTURING IN-!
DUISTRY.-Walter S. Giele to serve as ad-
ministration member, without vote, until:
further order.
METAL SAFETY TREAD NfANUFAC-'i
TURNING INDUSTRY.-R. 0. Dawson to.:
serve as administration member, without.
vote, until further order.
MICA INDUSTRY.-George H. Nolte,:
New York, N. Y., to serve as administration1
member, without vote, until further order.
MINE TOOL MANUFACTURING IN:
DUSTRY (SUBDIVISION OF FABRI-
CATED METAL PRODUCTS MANUFAC-,
TURING AND METAL FINISHING ANDI
METAL COATING INDUSTRY).-Subdl-i
visional committee Fred R. Klein, C. R. An-
derson, Pittsburgh. Pa.; C. E. Holt, Leetonia,:
Ohio; H. B. Simmons, Ottumwa, Iowa, L. C
Hardsocg, Ottumwa, Iowa.
MOTOR VEHICLE MAINTENANCE
TRADE.-Philo N. Darnall. Blackfoot;:
Martin V. Scully, Boise; Ferdinand Sjodea.,
Clark Fork; J. C. Burke, Lewiston; R. B.R
BistlLne, Pocatello; John B. Dablstrom, Poca-
tello; Art Timmons, Twin Falls; C. T'i
Knight, Gooding; and Walter J. Frank,:;
Wallace, to serve as members on the tern-.:
porary State committee for the State of
Idaho.
MOTOR VEHICLE MAINTENANCE
TRADE.-Nel M.orfltt, Astoria; Leon Brown.'
Baker; H. C. Ornlston, Bend: J. L. Van.-
Alien. Bend; Samuel C. Bond, Eugene; Fred-
Quimby, North Bend; E. H. Balsiger Kla-
math Falls: L. 0. Arens, Klamath Falls;!
C. L Perkins, Enterprise; William A. Young,.:
Medford; Clyde Richey. PendLeton; Alex-
Kildahil, William Brown, and E. E. Alfrod of'
Portland; Russell Bonesteele. Salem; Bow.
ard Pratt, Corvallis; Harry E. Walther, The
Dalles: H. R. Fancber, The Dalles; and C. B.
Prosser, McMinnville, to serve as members
of the temporary State committee for the
State of Oregon.
(Continued on page 7, column 1)


.a r...' ..
-...... /.+ +: ; i : : iis







S.- -. ,- i -- ^ .; *f -_.XVf, :: --vi.. .i. .- .,* ..;:,._;- .^V' .'l i*'*


Code Authority Members Approved
(Continued from page 6)

MOTOR VEHICLE MAINTENANCE Watertown, Mass.; J T Callahan Milford,
.TRADE.-R. E. Champ, Hoquiam; Fred K. Mass.; R. N. Freydberg Brooklyn, N. Y.;
Kirk, Aberdeen; Guilford Moe, Bellingham; J. D. Lippmann, Toledo, Ohio; N Boynton,
:M. A. Schoolcraft, Everett; Fred Anderson, Jr., Bgston, Mass.; alternates are A. K. Dan-
Olympia; Clyde H. Madsen, Chehalis; K. T. nenbaum, Philadelphia, Pa.; C. Kenyon, Jr.,
Foster, Seattle; R. W. Garvin, Port Angeles; Brooklyn, N. Y.; F. N. Kite, South Boston,
Frank Johnson, Port Angeles: James H. Mass.; C. H. Davis. Detroit, Mich.; W. H.
Ray, Spokane; I. M. Smith, Fred B. Walker, Jenks, New York City.
and Ralph Jentoft, of Tacoma; Wallace
Hunt, Walla Walla; 0. B. Haynes, Wenat- RUBBER TIRE MANUFACTURING IN-
.hbee; Don Miller, Wenatchee; H. R. Pinker- DUSTRY.-F. B. Doavis, Jr.. New York City;
ton, Yakima; and Herman Parrott, Long- J. W. Thlomas, P. W. Litchfield, J. D. Tew.
view, to serve as members of the temporary F. A. Seiberling, William O'Neil, C. Borland,
State committee for the State of Washington. Akron, Ohio; I. Eisbrouch, Charlotte, N. C.;
alternates, E. D. Levy, Chicopee Falls, Mass.;
MOTOR VEHICLE RETAILING J. A. Walsh, West Haven, Conn.; G. W.
:TRADE.-Lewis S h a tt u c k, Vancouver, Stephens, Mansfield, Ohio; C. C. Gates, Den-
Wash.; R. C. Frisble, Baker, Oreg.; John ver, Colo.; H. C. McCreary, Indiana, Pa.;
Donovan, Portland, Oreg.; Ed Ostendorf, A. A. Garthwnite, Conshohocken, Pa.; Carl
Klamath Falls, Oreg.; M. P. Cady, Hillsboro, Pbaris, Newark, Ohio; J. A. MacMillan,
.Oreg.; H. C. Berg, Roy 0. Burnett, and Ar- Dayton, Ohio.
thur L. Field, of Portland, Oreg., to serve as SAND-LIME BRICK I N D U ST R Y.-
4members of the State advisory committee of George Henry Nolte, New York N. Y. to
Oregon. serve as administration member, without
NONFERROUS AND STEEL CONVEC- vote, until further ordei'.
TOR MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.- SALT PRODUCING INDUSTRY.-How-
. D. Mandell, Chicago, Ill.; Hugo F. Hutzel. ard J. Carey, Hutchinson, Kans.; Walter F.
rWaterbury, Conn.; W. M. Brown, Camden, Ince, Akron, Ohio; Lawrence Jones.' Jr.,
N. J.; L. A. Burch, Milwaukee, Wis. Louisville, Ky.; Frank J. Venning, Cleveland,
OIL FILTER MANUFACTURING IN- Ohio; P. Silas Walter, Scranton, Pa.; St.
DUSTRY.-J. A. Graham, Newark, N. J.: John Whiteny, San Francisco, Calif.; Daniel
-W. R. Sullivan, Michigan City, Ind.; A. A. Peterkin, Chicago, Ill.
Bull, Detroit, Mich.: W. S. Isherwood. Flint, SANITARY NAPKIN AND CLEANS-
Mich.; and Edward V. Oehler,. Milwaukee, ING TISSUE INDUSTRY.-W. W. Luecke,
Wis., to serve as members of the administra- Chicago, Ili.; L. V. Young, New York. N. Y.;
ftive committee. W. C. Marteus, New York, N. Y.; F. W.
OUTDOOR ADVERTISING TRADE.- Buckman, New York, N. Y.; H. C. Simon,
;:-Henry I. Posner, Pittsburgh, Pa., to succeed Brooklyn, N. Y.; Joseph Englander, New
K. H. Fulton. York, N. Y.: and Harr'y Preston, New York,
PERFUME, COSMETIC, AND OTHER N. Y.
TOILET PREPARATIONS INDUSTRY.- SET UP PAPER BOX MANUFACTUR-
George A. Wrisley, Chicago, Ill.; Charles A. ING INDUSTRY.-A. L. Bobriek, vice
Pennock New York, N. Y. Charles P. Light, administration member,
Pennock, without vote. to serve until further order.
PLUMBAGO CRUCIBLE INDUSTRY.- SHOE SHANK MANUFACTURING
George H. Nolte as administration member INDUSTRY.-R. H. Wales to serve as ad-
o supervisory agency. ministration member, without vote, until
LOCAL RETAIL DRUG CODE AU- further notice.
THORITY.-For the First Congressional SHOE SHANK MANUFACTURING IN-
District of Oregon, P. D. Quisenberry, Salem, DUSTRY.-A. J. Aronson, Lynn, Mass.; H.
to succeed Dan Fry; for Appleton. Wis., John G. Josephson, Saugus, Mass.; C. M. Moore,
"F. Konrad. chairman, Oshkosh, Wis.; A. W. Everett, Mass.: W. C. Martin, Rochester,
Anderson, Neenan, Wis., as secretary; Han- N. Y.; A. H. Johnson, Auburn. N. Y.: 'E. R.
over, Pa., H. N. Gilt to succeed M. W. My- Laird. Whitman, Mass.; and A. Lourie, Bos-
ers as chairman; Pittsburgh, Pa., W.. M. oun. Mass.
Burchfield, Hugh F. McKnight, Jerome Seder,.
James H. Greene, Leo Lehman, E. R. Clark- SHOE LAST INDUSTRY.-Ernest B.
son,'Jacques Blum. Albert J. Mansmann, Al- Southworth, Stoughton, Mass.; Edward J.
bert J. Schmidt, W. B. Hamilton, Raymond Baas, Rochester, N. Y.; A. M. Mercer, Ports-
Price, C. W. G(essier, A. C. Couch. J. C. Volk- mouth, Ohio.
vein, George H. Goff, P. Allyn Gnrber, David TALC AND SOAPSTONE INDUSTRY.-
P. Berman; P. L. Sample, McKeesport; Jos- George H. Nolle, New York, N. Y., to serve
eph W. Steele, Mt. Lebanon. as administration member, without vote,
SREADY-MIXED CONCRETE INDUS- until further order
TRY.-James A. C. Tait, representing the TEXTILE EXAMINING, -SHRINKAGE,
James A. C. Tait Co., to serve as an addi- AND REFINISHING INDUSTRY.-Dr.
tional member of the Portland, Oreg., Mar- Paul F. Brissenden to serve as administra-
.ketng Area Committee. tion member, without vote, until further
1 READY-MIXED CONCRETE INDUS- ,.rder.
i;.RY.-William Code. representing tbe Hun- TRUCKING INDUSTRY.-H. M. Suter as
terspoint Lumber & Supply Co., Long I- a member for the State area of Arizona, vice
land City, to serve as an additional member Milton G. Sanders, resigned.
of the New York Marketing Area Committee. USED MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT
RETAIL JEWELRY TRADE (Local Re- DISTRIBUTING TRADE.-M. D. Gal.
tail Code Authority of Butte, Mont.).- breath. Pittsburgh, Pa.; L. E. Emerman, Chi-
George I. NMartin to serve for 1 year as see- cago, Ill.; A. Goldman. Detroit, Mich.; J. E.
rtary-treasurer in the ,place of Joseph Ny- Middleton. Philadelphia, Pa.; C. A. Simmons,
'resiged. J -Albany, N. Y.: J. L. Lucas, Bridgeport,
man, resigned. Conn.; J. E. Launder. Kansas City, Mo.
RETAIL SOLID FUEL INDUSTRY.- WHEEL AND RIM MANUFACTURING
Harry Brandenburg, New York, N. Y.: John INDUSTRY.-George W. Kennedy, Detroit,
F'arbarik. Pittsburgh, Pa.; William MacMas- Mich.; Don F. Alexander. Detroit, Mich.; W.
tler, Philadelphia, Pa.; and Albert Silk. To- A. Baker. Akron, Ohio; D. P. Forbes, Rock-
peka, Kans., to serve until February 26. ford, Ill.; H. F. Harper, Lansing, Mich.;
:1936, or until their successors shall qualify. E. B. Ross, Buchanan, Mich.; as members of
RETAIL TRADE (Retail Code Authority the administrative committee.
for Chicago, 111.).-Meyer Dettelbach, vice WOMEN'S NECKWEAR AND SCARF
George P. Madigan. resigned (dry goods); MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.-Joseph
*aed Walter A. Gatzert, secretary, vice M. J. Tuvim and Charles H. Green, of New York
Spiegel. Jr., resigned (mail order), to serve city.
foraa term of 1 year from March 15, 1935. WOOD SCREW MANUFACTURING IN-
RETAIL TRADE (Local Retail Code Au- DUSTRY.-R. 0. Dawson.
thorlty for Trenton, N. J.).-Joseph B. WOOL TEXTILE INDUSTRY.-Arthur
Hottel, chairman; R. S. Voorhees, vice chair- Besse, New York, N Y.; Millard D. Brown,
:Man; C. A. Hutchings, secretary-treasurer;
.. W. Manning, 3. H. Sprague. W. MW. Grand- Philadelphia, Pa.: Ronald W. Cordingley,
af S. Barlow, BeJ Snjaminue M andelbaumad Boston, Mass.: Ames Stevens, Lowell, Mass.;
a. S. Josephson, WB N. Stewart., M. Tra- Frederic W. Tipper, Oakland, Maine; Harold
'D. S. Josephson, W; N. Stewart, Al. S*. Tra- J. Walter. Uxbridge, Mass.
ver, 3J. B. Hottel, F. W. Donnelly, D. L. SIlI- Walter Uxbridge, Mass.
vers, and John J. Hooper. All to serve for 1
?ear from February 26, 1935.
SRETAIL TRADE (Local Retail Code Au- Code Authority By-
lhority for Louisville, Ky.).-Phillip A
.Brecher, electrical division, to serve for 1 l.ws A provedd
year.
SRETAIL TRADE (Local Retail Code Au- The following Code Authority bylaws were
;.thority for Cleveland, Ohio).-George NI. approved:
.Comte, chairman: Sam Havre, first vice chair- Animal Glue Industry (with exceptions).
'man; J. H. Roberts, second vice chairman; Ant-Fri'tioD Bearing Industry (with con-
John Young, treasurer; and William H. Gray, ditionsi.
aecretary to serve for 1 year. Concrete Masonry Industry.
Flavoring Products Industry (with condi-
ROAD MACHINERY MANUFACTUR- tionsI.
ING INDUSTRY.-S. F. Beatty, Aurora, Fur Dealing Trade.
.1.; W. R. Adhms, Indianapolis, Ind.: J. L. The Garter, Suspender, and Belt Manufac-
Conanors, Gallon, Ohio: W. A. Rnberts, Mil- during Industry (with exceptions).
Wsakee, Wis.: C. 0. Wold, Peoria. III.; and Linen Importing Trade.
:ack B. Haile, Detroit, Mich., to serve as Merchandise Warehousing Trade (amend-
t nembers of the coordinating agency. ments).
i RUBBER MANUFACTURING INDUS- Optical Wholesale Industry and Trade.
TY.-Willinm H. Lichteustcin, vhaiirmann; Pickle Packing Industry.
Moe Sherman, vice chairman and alternate Welt Manufacturing Industry (with revi-
or tbe Rainwear Divisional Code Authority; sionsi.
Automobile Fabrics, Proofing and Backing Wood Cased Lead Pencil Manufacturing
DIvIsional Code Authority, A. A. Glidden, Industry.


Amendments and

Modifications
Academ ic Cotumne Industry.-Amendment
approved April 1, 1935, to become ef-
fective April 21, permits the Code Au-
thority to incur reasonable obligations nec-
essary to support the administration of the
Code and to submit an itemized -budget and
equitable basis of assessment upon members
of the Industry to the National Industrial
Recovery Board for approval.
Artificial Limb Manufacturing Industry.-
Amendment approved March 30, 1935, es-
tablishes a basic maximum hours week of
45 hours with a limit of 9 hours in any
24-hour period; exempts emergency em-
ployees from the maximum hours provisions,
also certain executives and outside sales-
men; permits apprentices to be employed at
a wage not less than 80 percent of the Code
minimum for 6 months, under certain conr
editions. The order of approval changes sec-
tion 2 of article VIII to prohibit filing a
higher price within 48 hours of .ny price
revision.
Bituminros Coal Industry.-Amendment
approved March 30, 1935, extends all the pro-
visions of the Code until June,16, 1935.
Blouse and Skirt MAanufacttu-ng Indus-
tries.-Amendment approved April 2, 1935,
to become effective April 22, adds a wage
differential for operators or Ironers cer-
tified to be of very low productive ca-
pacity; and defines the liability of a manu-
facturer or jobber for any underpayment
made to a contractor if claim for such un-
derpayment is filed within 3 weeks.
Electric Hoist and Monorail Manufactur-
ing Indu-stry.-Amendment approved March
30, 1935, enumerates.legal holidays on which
overtime shall be paid.
Leather and Woolen Knit Glove Induas-
ir/.--Amendment approved March 30, 1935,
to become effective April 19, prohibits in-
voicing less than three pairs of a style
and color without a service charge, un-
less said pair or pairs are not for resale;
or to grant free repair privileges or to re-
pair goods at less than cost, except when
such repairs are made necessary because of
faulty material or workmanship.
Needleicork Industry in %Piserto Rico.-
Amendment approved April 3, 1935, to become
effective April 23. brings within the juris-
diction of the industry needlework done on
articles which do not have drawn work or
embroidery.
Slit Fabric MAlanufacturing Industry.-
Amendment approved April 1, 1935, to become
effective April 21, Limltg the liability of the
members of the Code Authority.
Standard Steel Barrel and Drum -Manu-
facturing Industry.-Amendment approved
March 30, 1935, prohibits quoting prices or
selling or offering to sell on terms which are
inconsistent with open filed prices. The
order of approval stays the provisions of
article V, paragraph A, Insofar as they pro-
vide that any existing price list shall re-
main In effect for a period of 10 days fol-
lowing the filing of a revised price list.
Vitreous Enameled Ware Manufacturing
Industry.-Amendment approved March 30,
1935. eliminates rule A of article V relative
to pricing provisions.
Woodwvorking Machinery I n d u 8 t r y.-
Amendment approved March 30, 1985, pro-
vides for the collection of contributions and
submission of budget by the Code Authority.


Interpretation


Retail Trade
No. 60-395
FACTS.-Article IX, section 1 (f) of the
Code of fair competition for the retail trade
(as added by Amendment No. 3 approved
Aug. 23, 1934), provides the following:
No retailer shall sell or offer for sale any
merchandise upon a condition which involves
a lottery, gamble, or element of chance,
similar to what is commonly known as a
, Suit-Club-Plan ', provided, however, that
this subsection shall not apply to nonprofit
organizations not definitely constituted to
carry on retail trade."
Executive Order No. 6354, dated October
23, 1933. as amended by Executive Order No.
6710, dated May 15, 1934, provides, among
other things, that certain employers whose
places of business are located In towns of
less than 2,500 population are exempted from
the provisions of Codes of fair competition
" which relate to hours of employment, rates
of pay, the minimum prices at which mer-
chandise may be sold or services performed,
and the collection of assessments."
An uncertainty exists as to whether the
Executive order grants an exemption with
respect to this Code provision.
QUESTION.-Does the said article IX,
section 1 (fj) of the Code of fair competition
for the retail trade relate to the minimum
prices at which merchandise may be sold,
and are the employers mentioned in the
Executive order exempt therefrom?
INTERPRETATION.-The Code prorl- "
sion does not relate to the minimum prices at
which such merchandise may be sold, and
the Exe.:utive order does not exempt such
employers therefrom. Accordingly, the Ex-
ecutive order does not exempt any retailers
from observance of the provisions of the said
article IX, section 1 (j'D.


Interpretations

Fire ExtinguishingAppliance
Manufacturing Industry
No. 98-25
FACTS.-The Code Authority of the fire
extinguishing appliance manufacturing indus-
try has asked for an interpretation of article
II, section 2 of the Code of fair competition
for said industry, as follows :
"While It seems to us that the intent of'
article II, section 2 of the Code is clearly in-
dicated as meaning that this Code covers all
of the following separate items: Fire-extin-
guishing appliances; charging units for fire-
extinguishing appliances; chemical com-
pounds for fire-extinguishing appliances;
service parts for fire-extinguishing appliances,
and such other products, etc.,
in order that there may be no misunderstand-
ing as to the intent, the Code Authority re-
quests an Interpretation of article II, section
2, to cover the, fact that 'charging units',
'chemical compounds', 'service parts', and
'such other products' fall within the lan-
guage of 'and.or'."
QUESTION.-Article II, section 2 of the
Code of fair competition for the fire extin-
guishing appliance manufacturing industry
reads as follows:
"The term 'the Industry' as used in this
Code shall mean the manufacturing in the
United States and sale )by manufacturers of
fire-extinguishing appliances of all types, in-
cluding hand-portable, two-wheeled portable,
and stationary appliances, and devices there-'
for;. and charging units and chemical com-
pounds used therewith; and service parts;
and such other products as may from time to
time be included under this Code. This term
is not intended to include motor-fire appara-
tus or auLomatic-sprinkler systems."
Does the foregoing definition use the word
"and preceding the terms "charging
units", "chemical compounds". "service .
parts ", such other products in the conjunc-
tive sense or in the sense of "'and. or"'?
INTERPRETATION.-Article II, section 2
of the Code of fair competition for the fire-
extinguishing appliance manufacturing indus-
try is hereby interpreted to mean:
"The term 'the industry' as used in this
Code shahl mean the manufacturing in the
United States and sale by manufacturers of
fire-extinguishing appliances iof all types, in-
cluding hand-portable, two-wheeled portable,
and stationary appliances, and devices there-
for; and/or charging units used therewith
and/or chemical compounds used therewith;
and/or service parts; and'or such other
products as may from time to time be in-
cluded under this Code. This term is not
intended to include motor-fire apparatus or
automatic-sprinkler systems."

Automatic Sprinkler Industry
No. 50-18
FACTS.-The definition of the automatic
sprinkler industry in the Code of Fair Corn- ,
petition for that industry reads as follows:
"The term 'automatic sprinkler industry'
when used in this Code includes, but without
Umitation, a person, a partnership or corpora-
tion engaged in the business of the manufac-
ture of automatic sprinklers and devices and
the fabrication and installation of automatic
sprinkler equipment."
QUESTION.-If a person, partnership, or
corporation does not perform iall of the
following three functions, is said person, part-
nership, or corporation subject to the pro-
visions of the Code of Fair Competition for
the automatic sprinkler industry:
1. Manufacture automatic sprinklers and
devices: 2. Fabricate automatic sprinkler
equipment: 3. Install automatic sprinkler
equipment?
INTERPRETATION.-If a person, part-
nership, or corporation does not perform all
of the following three functions, said person,
partnership, or corporation is -not subject to
the provisions of the Code of Fair Competi-
tion for the automatic sprinkler industry:
1. Manufacture automatic sprinklers and
devices: 2. Fabricate automatic sprinkler
equipment; 3. Install automatic sprinkler
equipment.

Soap and Glycerine Manu-
facturing Industry
No. 83-71


,.., A


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NA


FACTS.-An employee attends a wrapping '.
machine, keeps the inside and outside wrap- .:
per bins and glue pots filled, inspects the fin-
ished product for imperfections, and adjusts, "i|."
oils, and cares for his machine, as well as .:
more or less supervises the entire process of .'.
pressing and wrapping. .-
QUESTION.-May the employee described ..J
above be paid the minimum wage provided .' i
by article IV, A, 2 of the Code of fair corn- "
-petition for the soap and glycerine manu-
facturing industry, on the theory that he is ."-
engaged in the light task of wrapping, pack-
aging, and filling? ;i
INTERPRETATION.-No. An employee .
who "adjusts, oils, and cares for his ma-
chine, as well as more or less supervises the .:
entire process of pressing anrti wrapping" Is '-
not engaged in the light tasks of wrapping, ..
packaging, and filling" within the meaning '.
of article IV, A, 2, of the Code The minimum .
wage allowable under the Code for such em- .i
ployee is 40 cents, an hour, except In the *
South where it Is 35 cents an hour. .-i




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Recent Trends in the Soap and Glycerine

Manufacturing Industry


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INDEX OF PAYROLLS 7C ~ 1
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TOTAL MAN-HOURS
IN. 1,000' s






INDEX OF WHOLESALE PRICES_______ _________ ________ _____
=----------------- MS D---0-EA-


f m- M J 95 D M 90J S D M 193DJ S D M J9 S1D M D 63 1
1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935
'VU
It Sources of Data: From Monthly Labor Review, Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment and pay-roll indexes, average weekly wage, average hours per week, and average hourly
wage; man hours computed from estimated employment and hours per week by NRA. From Wholesale Prices, Bureau of Labor Statistics-prices of soaps and glycerine
:, upon which index of wholesale prices is based. From Census of Manufactures, 1929-employment in 1929 reduced to index form. Chart prepared exclusively for the Blue:
*' Eagle by the Research and Planning Division, NRA.


S Household, industrial, and toilet soaps and soap products, as well as the
Sglycerine that is a byproduct of the saponification process, constitute the
1 articles which are made under the Soap and Glycerine Manufacturing Code.
Employing approximately 15,0006 wage earners as it does, soap and glycerine
Manufacturing is one of the smaller industries. In certain respects this indus-
., try is distinctive. The ratio of wages to value added by manufacture is low,
; 14'percent in 1933 after a decline from 25 percent in 1919. The industry can
derive its raw materials from a number of unrelated sources, chiefly animal
I fats and oils, nut and seed oils, and fish and whale oils. Further, soap is used
predominately for domestic purposes; this largely accounts for the moderation
Sof the recession experienced during depression and is in part the explanation
Sof the prevalence of branding of soaps. These conditions tended to protect
the wage earners from the more severe effects of the depression. They also
meant that in this instance industry was able to share the work among wage
earners without adversely affecting weekly earnings.
The working week was definitely curtailed in the second half of 1933 by
Sa reduction in hours per week from 43 to 38. Paralleling this decline in
S average hours worked per week, which can be observed in the first section of
the chart, is the increase in employment that is shown in the second section
Sof the chart. While the former series dropped off 12 percent, the latter gained
S.by approximately 20 percent. These changes, of course, imply some gains in
Employment over and above what the reduction in hours alone would require.
While hours per week were reduced, the average hourly wage moved upward.
The impetus given to hourly wages in the third quarter of 1933 served to
Accelerate for the time being the rate of increase of these wages. Early in


1933 hourly wages had strengthened, and during 1934 they showed continued .
gains. Under the conflicting influences of a higher hourly rate and a'.
shortened week, average weekly wages have changed only moderately since'
1932. Such changes as did take place appeared mostly in 1934, when the"i
continued increases in hourly wages, at a time when hours per week were-
fairly constant, carried the weekly wage upward.
Employment in the soap and glycerine industry, as evidenced by the'
employment index in the second section of the chart, held up well throughout
the depression. After the transition in 1933 the index has maintained a level.A
13 percent above the average for the predepression year. Pay rolls improved .
definitely in 1933 and subsequently have advanced until early in the current.)I
year they were less than 5 percent below their 1929 average. Man-hours have"|
maintained approximately the same level during. the 3 years the series covers..
The small increase witnessed during the latter half of the period covered 'is
consistent, and necessarily so, with the gains in employment above the addi-i
tions required to compensate for the shortened working week.
An index of wholesale prices of the products of the soap and glycerine
manufacturing industry is shown in the third section of the chart. The index'.?
takes into account various toilet and laundry soaps and glycerine. It appears
that a decline of nearly 30 percent had taken place by the spring of 1933. In ,
the second half of that year are shown moderate gains which proved tempo-;.:
rary. During the last several months processing taxes on certain oils have :
raised costs of raw materials, costs both of the oils upon which the taxes were":
applied and of competing oils and fats. Some effects of this appear in the
index of wholesale prices. !


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