The Blue Eagle ( 1934- )

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Title:
The Blue Eagle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
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United States -- National Recovery Administration
Publisher:
National Recovery Administration ( Washington, D.C )
Publication Date:

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Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 16917556
System ID:
AA00021018:00042

Full Text








tMug


Vol. II, No. 14


April 5, 1935
April 5, 1935 ';


SIssued Weekly by the National Recovery Administration, Washington


Coal Code Order CottonTextile Research Justice Department Wil

Continues Wage and PlanningCommitteetice Department
Coniniues Wage A ,__ ij A -,1- I. -1 C X TTT- A


Agreement


NIRB Chairman Expresses Appre-
ciation to Operators and United
Mine Workers for Cooperation

The National Industrial Recovery Board
has approved the following order affecting
the bituminous coal Industry :
"An application having been duly made
pursuant to and in full compliance with the
provisions of title I of the National Indus-
trial Recovery Act, approved June 16, 1933,
for approval of an amendment to a Code of
fair competition for thle bituminous coal
industry and annexed report on said amend-
meat, containing findings with respect
thereto, having been made and directed to
the President:
.."Now, THEREFORE, on behalf of the Presi-
dent of the United States, the National
Industrial Recovery Board, pursuant to
authority vested in it by Executive orders
of the President, including Executive Order
No. 6543-A, Executive Order No. 6S59, and
Executive Order No. 6903, and otherwise,
does hereby incorporate by reference said
annexed report and does find that said
amendment and said Code as constituted
'after being so amended complies in -all
respects with the pertinent provisions and
will promote the policy and the purposes of
said title' of said act, and does hereby order
that said amendment be and is hereby
approved, and that the previous approval of
said Code is hereby amended to include
approval of said Code in its entirety as
amended,
FURTHER ORDEaRED, That the order of this
Board hereinabove recited be and hereby is
made without prejudice to the Board's con-
sideration of an appropriate action upon any
application for amendment to or modifica-
tion of said Code now pending in or with
the National Recovery Administration and
subject to the power especially reserved in
and by said Board to order the amendment
or modification of any provision of said
Code in conformity with any agreement
affecting such provision which may be
reached between employers and employees in
said industry and presented to said Board
!at any time between AIprd 1 and June 16,
1935. both dates inclusive for its considera-
tion thereof and action thereon."
Text of the amendment follows: '
"Add a new sentence to, immediately to
follow the present provision of. and to be-
.come a part of, article XI to read as follows:
"This Code and all the provisions thereof.
despite any provisions to the contrary con-
tained therein and especially, but without
limitation to. those provisions of articles IV,
VI, and VII providing for a time limitation
..upon the effect of such provisions or any of
them, which may provide that the effect of
such provisions or any of them shall ter-
minate prior to June 16, 1935, shall remain
effective to and including June 16, 1935."
After the representatives of the Coal
Operators and the United Mine Workers had
Informed the National Industrial Recovery
Board that they would agree to its proposal
to-amend the Bituminous Coal Code so as to
extend the operation of all of its provisions
to June 16, 1935, the chairman of the Board
made the following statement to those
present:
"In behalf, and by direction, of the Board
i.I wish to express our deep appreciation of the
' service which both parties have now rendered
!to their industry and to the people of the
United States.
"We understand that the selfish interests
of many involved might have dictated a
refusal to agree, or at least an effort to
- attach conditioils or qualifications to an
aeeptance. But you hnve both given a
Prompt. unqualified, and generous assent. We
$clheve that a consideration of the public
.interest has been dominant in your action
Paor this you are entitled to public gratitude.
"We feel that the committee of the coal
operatorss can speak with c,-,silerable assur-
ance the wishes of their group: and that we
can rely upon their agreement being carried
ut byr all the responsible members of the
industry.
"We are glad to know from Mr. Lewis that
he policy committee of the United Mine
Workers has unanimously approved their
Agreement. We wish to express our particu-
lar appreciation of the responsibility which
they have accepted in Qpenking for some
400000 workers. It is difficult to ascertain
or to follow the individual wishes of so many
Men; and their leaders must accept a serious
anid bbrdenome obligation of maintaining
.4ialted action in a matter of such vital im-
P(Iortance to each' individual member. The
(Continued on page 4, column 4)


n-ppuintea
Members of the research and planning com-
mittee for the cotton textile industry, au-
thorized by the National Industrial Recovery
Board on March 20, have been appointed.
The committee will consist of 3 members
appointed by the chairman of the Code
Authority and 1 appointed by thile National
Industrial Recovery Board.
It is directed to investigate the facts as to
conditions in the industry and formulate
proposed action toward adjusting available
productive capacity 'in those groups of the
industry where it may be necessary to meet
the present inadequate consumer demand.
The members of the committee appointed
by the Code Authority are: Goldthwalte H.
Dorr, president of the Cotton Textile Insti-
tute; Paul B. Halstead, secretary of the Code
Authority and statistician of the institute;
and Ray Bell, president and secretary, of the
Association of Cotton Textile Merchants, and
an expert on market conditions. The tech-
nical advisor appointed by the Board is
James P.. Davis. chief of the textile unit of
the Research and Planning Division of NRA


Automobile Code

For Hawaii

Approved


Wage Increases Approximate 35
Percent; Hours Curtailment
Estimated at 20 Percent

The National Industrial Recovery Board
has announced the approval of a Code for
the wholesale and retail sales, supply, repair,
maintenance, and service industry for the
Territory of Hawaii. The adoption is ex-
pected to bring about wage increases of about
35 percent and a curtailment in hours of ap-
proximately 20 percent, compared with July
1, 1933.
The Automobile Sales and Service Asso-
ciation, claiming to represent more than 50
percent of the industry and SO ber,.ent of
the business volume, sponsored the Code.
The Code is approved on condition that
article VIII, price filing, be stayed pending
submission by the Territorial Code Authority
of evidence to show thle ueed for such pro-
vision; and provided that all industry mem-
bers be exempt from other present and future
Codes, and thliat the Code becomes effective
April 25, unless good cause to the contrary
is shown before April -'0, and the NRA is-ues
a modifying order
A member of the above industry is de-
fined in the Code as '" any person who whole-
sales or retails new and or used automobiieQ,
parts, accessories, tires, batteries, or other
replacement supplies therefore; or who re-
I1uilds, assembles, reniovates, repairs, paints,
or trims automobiles, or any pailt thereof;
or who retails petroleum products or other
supplies for use in automobiles. ri who
engage-- in parking or storing of automobiles;
or who in any other manner engages in any
phase of the automobile industry."
The Code establishes a basic 44-.hour maxi-
mum workweek, with stated exceptions, and
a $12 minimum weekly wage, except execu-
tives, $30 weekly: chauffeurs. $14 weekly;
watchmen, 20 cents an hour; artisans, mIe-
chanics, nmac-lhinists, electricians, paiutt.rs,
trimnimers, carpenter., r.idi tormeii. tinsmiths.
and blacksmiths. 40 cents an hour. A scale
for apprentices and beginners is established.
and the Code carries the general labor pro-
visions regarding safety and health if em-
ployees arrd other labor standards.
A Territorial Code Authority is provided
for by the Code, to he set up within 60 days,
and to consist of eight members, equitably
selected to represent various interests in tlhe
industry. Rules and regulations governing
the Code Aurhority, and dc-scriptions of its
powers and duties, are established.
Article VII, trade pra-dctices, forbids in-
accurate advertising: false billing; inacu-
rate labeling: defamation : unjustified threats
of lawsuits: secret rebates; bribing em-
ployees: inducing breach of contract; coer-
cion: lotteries: absorption of taxes: coupon
books and scrips: f:ilse claims of membership
in the trade association; selling a car as a
demonstrator which has travelled under 3.50(0
miles.
A report on consignment selling is to be
made by May '25. Failure to keep adequate
records is to be cla-sed as an unfair trade
practice, and no member of the industry shall
extend to anl employee or any other person
the advantage of his buying power."
No marketing provision of the Code is
applicable to export sales.


ISK 1 CS It 01 IIKA
..:
Constitutionality .

NIRB Chairman Views Circuit Cdurt of Appeals

Decision in Schechter Case as Most

Important Judicial Opinion

on NRA.


The Department of Justice has announced it will cooperate in a prompfi
presentation of the case of United States of America v. A. L. A. Schechter Pdul6 -
try Corporation, Schechter Live Poultry Market, Joseph Schechter, Martin:;i
Schechter, Alex Schechter, and Aaron Schechter, involving the constitutionality
of the National Industrial Recovery Act, to the Supreme Court of the United:"
States. i
This case was decided by the Circuit Court of Appeals for the Second Cir.."
cuit on April 1, 1935, by Judges Martin T. Manton, Learned Hand, and Harriej
Brigham Chase, having theretofore been tried before Judge Marcus B. Campbe'l
and k jury in-the FederaL District Court for the Eastern District of New York'.'.
in the fall of 1934.


It 1is understood that counsel for the de-
fendants, Scheechter nnd others, will imme-
diately file petition for writ of certiorari in
the Supreme Court of tihe United States in
respect to the 17 counts decided against them.
The Department of Justice will cooperate in
expediting consideration of this petition. The
Department will itself make immediate ap-
p1lication for writ of certiorari' with respect
to the two provisions of the Code in respect
to which the Government did not prevail.
The Schechter case wa-is fully tried on the
facts in the Federal District Court, and the
-1 therefore adequately presents all of the
utlonal questions involved.
lie Supreme .Court grants the writs, the
ayh be reached for argument in the
iM..' term.
The decision of the United States Circuit
Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in



Industrial Appeals

Board Affirms


NRA Order

The Industrial Appeals Board announced
it has affirmed the NRA order denying
Whitley Tailleurs, Inc.. Springfield, Mass.,
exemption from the Coat aud Suit Industry
Code minimum wage provisions.
The company, a new organization, set up
a factory in Springfield during the latter part
of 1934. Qn December 24 application was
made for Code exemption, on the ground that
there were no skilled workers available in
Spriugfield-confirmed by reports from the
LaborAdvisory Board and the Massachusetts
State Employment Servic--andl that the
Code contains no provisions for employment
of learners or apprentices in the eastern
area. To pay full Code minimum wages
while training new worLtkers. thle Cunmpany
contended, woulI place it at a disadvantage
and work undue hard-hip. It proposed to
employ such learners at the rates established
in the Code for the western zone.
After a hearing, the Industrial Appeals
Botird dismissed the company's appeal from
the Administration order denying exemption.
"It must ble remembered", the Appeals
Board s-.id in its findings, "that members of
the appellant firm were both experienced in
the business and fully cognizant of the pro-
vision- of tihe Code respecting employment of
apprentices when they decided to establish
this plant in Springfield."
"The appellant has failed to establish that
it is suffering undue hardship the Board's
opinion continues, beyond those usually
experienced by n firm just starting in busi-
ness, 1-y bein" forced to pay full Code wages
to its unskilled employees. We cannot grant
an exemption where only inference or pre-
sumption establishes hards-hip. In the ab-
sence of a clear showing of hardship no indi-
vidual member of an industry should be
granted an exemption from any Code pro-
vision. Laws must be administered equally
toward all."


this case has been described by the ChalrmanmA
of the National Industrial Recovery Board':!'
as the most important judicial opinion ren>:.';
dered on the NRA. .l
MAir. Ric-hberg said: "The court unani-.-
mously sustained the constitutionality of the"'.
National Industrial Recovery Act. The de-!."
fendants were convicted by a jury of con-*'
spiracy, violation of the NIRA, and of the2
Code of fair competition for the live poultry.:5'
industry. The Court of Appeals sustained-'.
the convictions except violations of minimumm.^
wages and maximum hours, which were not-A-
sustained by two of the judges for reasons
expressly confined to this particular case.
"In .accordance with the opinion in this
case, the Federal authority to regulate wages,.
and hours in purely intrastate operations de- -.
pends upon the degree of necessity for such- s:
regulation in order to exercise effectively the
Federal power of regulating interstate corn-
merce. Only by a series of decisions can all .
of the problems involved in Codes of fair,:
competition be judicially determined. It is
clear, however, that If the reasoning of the"
court is followed carefully in thile formula- "I
tion of Codes, minimum wages and maximum '
hours can'be legally enforced for the pro-.
tect-ion of thie vast majority of employees".
now covered by the Codes.
Until the Supreme Court has ruled, this
opinion of the Circuit Court of .Appeals will
be accepted as the most authoritative state-
ment of the law, which Is, in brief, that the :
National Industrial Recovery Act and is 'i
administration are fundamentally constitu-.
tional." -
Excerpts from the opinion of the court.
follow : .
'Congress had the power, under the corn-'i
merce clause, to regulate transactions in In- :
terstate commerce, and its power also extends ',7
to all transactions which substantially bur-
den or affect such commerce * And"
whenever an intrastate activity substantially
and directly burdens or interferes with the-':"
free flow of Interstate commerce, under the'
commerce clause. Congress had the power to
remove the obstruction.
"* ,The power to legislate as to gen- .
eral trade practices merely affecting inter-
state commerce, though never so broadly ex- .:
ercised. was recognized in the'earlier cases.
* Transactions or violations which ,I
amount to more or less constant practice, and
(Continued on page 3, column I)


Prentiss L. Coonley

Named Administration

Director
The National Recovery Administration has -
announced the appointment of Premntiss L.
Coonley as Code Administration Director, '
succeeding D. M. Nelson. Mr. Nelson will
continue his duties as assistant to the chair-
man of the National Industrial Recovery
Board. 1
M. D. Vincent has been appointed acting
division administrator for the textile divi-
sion, in place of Mr. Coonleyv.


. 1 '

.. ..... ..... . .... . . . .... ............ .
.. ,... : ........ .......... v.4...+-..,.-..- ,..'.. ..-, ,.,.."...


''. ..-


up


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SCHEDULE OF CODE HEARINGS, APRIL 5 TO 25


-iImportant Information Concerning Notices of Hearings and
Opportunity to be Heard


;.. Hearings are of two types: 11) Oral hearings.
" designated hearing'" on calendar; and (2) op-
:,portunity to be heard" by the filing of written
statements of fact, briefs, or criticisms dealing
with the subject matter of such notice.
i: The subject matter of these notices is abbreviated
:ln the schedule published below. A complete offl.
,.:clal copy of any notice may be obtained on request
..from the National Recovery Administration, Room
3316, Department of Commerce Building. Wash.
Ington, D. C.
HEARINGS (oral) : Those wishing to be heard
.must file a written request with the proper Deputy
Administrator at least 24 hours before tbe date
.set for the hearing, which request must state
1 2 Name of industry and date of hearing;
*.2 names of persons wishlne tQ testify and groups
represented; (3) definite alternative proposal or
e.'.speciflec objections, without argument. Hearings
Ti.are confined to factual presentation. Written
F.-bclefs containing arguments as well as fact may
..:be filed.


I. IDCSTRYv OR TBA6


j. Friday, Apr. 5, 1935
'Cotton Cloth Glove Man-
'ufacturing Industry,
187-32



'-etal Solid Fuel Indus-
.try, 280-242


0fetail Solid Fuel Indus-
try, 260-246.
I,;



;'Retal] Solid Fuel Indus-
.: try, 280-246.


PLACE AlsD DEPeiv
ADMINISTRRATIOR


Room 4067, Department
of Commerce Building,
Washington, D. C.,
NM. D. Vincent


Room 717, Barr Building,
010 Seventeenth Street
NW., Washington, D.
C F. A. Hecht.
Room 721, Barr Building,
P910 Seventeenth Street
NW., Washington,
D. C., F. A. Hecht.



Room 721, Barr Building.
910 Seventeenth Street
NW, Washington,
D. C., F. A. Heohl.


OPPORTUNITY TO BE HEARD (In writing):
Facts, criticisms, objections, or suggestions con-
cerning the subject matter of such notices must
be submitted on or before the final date specified
in the notice, addressed to the proper Deputy Ad.
mlnistrator or other official indicated Such com-
municatlons must state: il) Name of industry;
(2) name of correspondent and group represented;
(31 facts supporting criticisms, objections, or
suggest ions
The subject matter referred to in either type
of notice may be revised in any reasonably ger-
mane particular on the basis of such facts. criti-
cisams, and other considerations as are properly
before the Administrator.
Calendar Is chronological, with alphabetical
arrangement by trade or Industry for each day.
NOTE: Since all notices must be in the printer's
hands by Friday evening next preceding the public.
cation of The Blue Eagle, the calendar below does
not show notices posted on the Official Bulletin
Board after that date. nor does this calendar show
other hearings for the same dates whicti may have
appeared In prior Issues cf this publication.


PaOPoBec, ACTION


Opportunity to be heard on application submitted to the Code
Authority for temporary approval of its budget for the period
from Jan. 16 to June 30, 1936 Administrative Order 187-31 ap-
proves this budget to extend on a pro rata basis from Mar t to
Apr. 1, 1935, inclusive, unless good cause be shown to the NIRB
wJithin 16 days from the date of said order and %aid Board issues
a sub..sequent order modifying or rescilnding said approval.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Amer-
ican Bridge Co Chicago, l11., for exemption from all the pro-
visions of the Code, except art IV, Administrative Order 280-
241 grant; Ithlis exemption effective Apr 6, unless good cause to
tooe contrary be shown prior thereto
Opportunity to be heard on modification of reasonable cots to
be uzed within the Cleveland trade area of Division No. 22. ap-
proved by Administrarive Order 2.1)80-215, dated MNar. 26. 1135
bald modification providing that yard workings of smokeless coals
produced during customary preparation to be eliminated from
said cost determinations Said administrative order to become
Effective Apr. 6, 1935, unle-s good cause to the contrary be shown
prior thereto.
Opportunity to be heard on modification of cost determination
within the Cleveland rrede area of DivisIon No. 22. The Na-
tional Industrial Recovery Board by Administrative Order No
280-245, dated Mar. 26, approved modification of such cost deter-
mination. such modilctlion and such order to become effective
Apr 6, 1936, unless good cause to the contrary be shown prior
thereto.'


I'Saturday, Apr. 6, 1935
:,'Fishing Tackle Industry, Room 402, 1t18 K Street Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the
S13--13. NW., Washington, Union Hardware Co., Terrilngton, Conn, for exemption from
0. D. W. L. Schurz art [], sec 3, subsec. (a) of the Code.
"Sanitary and Waterproof Room 4067, Department Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
SpecilaltieM taaufactur- of Commerce Building, Authority for ertenslon of its budget for the period ending Dec
Slag Industry, 342-25 Washington, D. C., 31, 1934. Adminimtraidve Order 342-24 approves such extension
N. '. M. D. Vincent. on a pro rats basis to become effective Jan. 1, 1936, unless good
a')' .cause to the contrary be shown within 15 days from the date of
/ +said order and said Board issues a subsequent order modifying or
f.= rescinding such approval, or modifying or disapproving such
_"________.________ extension.
N. Monday Apr. 8, 1935
* !&Motor Bas Industry, Brooks Hotel, Brattleboro, Hearing on application submitted by the Bee Line. Springfield,
Wi 4-D. Vt., tOa. m C. P. Clark. Mass, for exemption from the provisions of subsec. kb), sec. 1,
art VIr, of the Code extensionn of bus line)
.'.Vegetable Ivory Button Room 4087, Department Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
':" Manufacturing Indus- of Commerce Building, Authority for a stay of Ihe provisions of art. VTII ee. 14 of the
; try, 461-8. Washington, D. C., Code. Administrative Order 461-7 approves said stay to be-
M. D. Vincent. come effective 20 days from Mar. 19,1935, unles. good cause to the
_:_____________ ___ contrary is shown prior thereto.
Tuesday, Apr. 9, 1935 4
.:*Nottingham Lace Curtain Room 20066, Department Hearing on application submitted by the National Association of
SIndustry, Os-A. of Commerce Building, Lace Curtain NIanufacturers for amendment to art. XIII, sees.
Washington, D C., 10 1, 2, and 3, of the Code.
. a._m., F C. Lee. _____________________________________

SWednesday, Apr. 10,
1935

,'Asphalt Shingle and Roof- Room 406, Albee Build- Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
lag M anufacruring In- ing, Washington, D.C., Authority for amendment to art XIV (liquidated damage agree-
:''dustry, 9-2I1. Beverly Ober. meant) of the Code Administrative Order 99-20, approves this
amendment to become effective Apr 10, 1935, unless good cause
to toe contrary is shown prior thereto.
'-.'Cigar Container Industry, Room 510, 1518 K Street, Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
135-33. Washington, D. C0 H. Authority for amendment to art VI of the Code by adding a new
Ferris Wnite. see 3, permitting Incorporation of the Code Authority under
certain conditions.
'Lace Manufacturing In- Room 127, Willard Hotel. Hearingon appllcarion ofWilliam Dalby, offirm of Wiliam Dalby
Sdustry, 12-E. Washington, D. C., 10 & Son, 11 Van Houten Street. Paterson, N. J., and William Sar-
a. m., F. C. Lee. gent of the firm of Sargent's Lace Works North Scidruate, R. I,
; for permission to import additional machinery. This is the
hearing scheduled to be held on Friday. MNar 29, 1913, ito the
Department of Commerce Building. Washington, and on that
T day adjourned until Wednesday, Apr. 10.
Leather Cloth and Lac- Green Room, Raleigh Ho-, Hearing on application submitted by the Window Shade Institute
uered Fabrics, Window tel, Washington D C., for amendments to the Code.
SShade Cloth and Roller, 10 a. inm, Victor Sadd.
; and Book Cloth and [m-
regnated Fabrics, 237-
.Lighing Rod Manufar- Boom 411, 1618 K Street Opportunity to hbe heard on application submitted by the Code
touring Industry, 3W4-7. NW. Washington, D. Authrnority for approval of its budget and basis of contribution
S0., 0 R Niklason. from Jan. I to June 16, 1935
The total amount orf the budget is $760. The basis of contribution
i I percent of each member's net sales per month, due and pay-
able monthly.
Motor Vehicle Retailing Carlton Room, Carltona Hearing on amendment proposed by National Control Committee
STrade, W9-C. Hotel, Washington, D and Emergency National Committee to arti.. 111, IV, V. A, par.
C O10a. m,JoO Rob- 2, sec. (Il of art. V-S. sac.\4, title B ofari. IV, art IV, title A, see
enrts 6, of the Code
Preformed Plastico Prod- Room 404, Albee Building, Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
acts Industry, 369-1B. 14-6 0 Street, Washing- Authority for an amendment to art. XItI, sec. 4, of the Code
ton, D. C Beverly (liquidated damages).
Ober
Pyrotechnic Manufactur- Room 2066, Department Hearing on application submitted by the Code Authority for
ing Industry, 217-C. of Commerce, Washing. amendments to the Code
ton, D. C 10 a m.,
Ovid E Roberts, Jr.
Robe and Allied Prod- Room 4087, Department Opportunity to be heard on application of the Code Authrrity
ucts Industry, 211-32 of Commerce Building, for exten-ion of its budget and basis of contribution. The N1RB
Wasbhincton, D C., by Administrative Order No. 211-13 approved such extension,
MNI. D. Vincent. such order and such extension to become effective on Apr. 10.
1936, unless good cause to the contrary be shown prior thereto.
Safety Razor and Safety Room 510, 1518 K Street Opportunity to be heard on application submntiedl by Cooper
Razor Blade MNanufac- NW.. Washington, D. and Cooper, Inc Brooklyn, N Y for exemption from tue pro-
turing Industry, 489-23. C., H. Frerrls White. rlsionseofart tVI. sec. 10 (b), of the Code
Schiffll, the Hand Ma. Room 40A7, Department Opportunity to be heard on application subrmited by the Code
chine Embroidery. and of Commerce Buildlnr, Authority for amendment of [bthe first sentence of Amendment
the Embroidery Thread Washington, D. C., Mi. No. 1, approved July 31, 193l, by the delertion of sub'ec () and
and Scallop Cutting In- D. Vincent reletteringe of the remaining subeeos The NIRB. by A-minis-.
dustrles, 266-19. tradtive Order No 2,6-18, dated Mar. 21, 1935, approved such
'amendment, said order and -aid amendment to become effective
on Apr. 10, 1935, unless good cause to the contrary be shown prior
bthereto
Wholesale Tobacco Trade, Room u30, Barr Building, Opportunity to be heard on application .suibmittled by the Code
462-L22. Washington, D. C., It- Authority aor reallocation of Certain budgetary funds.
~______________ win S. lose. ________


Thursday, Apr. 11,
S1935
Fabricated Metal Prod. Room 610, 1618 K Street
a''. cts Manufacturing and NW.. Washington, D.
.:.. etal Finishing and C, Ferris White.
":" Metal Coating Indus-
try 84-123.
S. Fabricated Melal Prod- Rolm 610, 1618 K Street,
nctsManufacturIngand Washington, D. C., H.
Metal Finishing and Ferris White.
Metal Coating Indus-
try, 84-124.




...i ..c :-:,, :.... .. -. *"


O portunlty to be hear8 on application of the United States
Lhruomium Co Pittsburgh, Pa for exemption from the mini-
mum wage provisions oftbe Codeand for permission to pay ap-
prentices received from educational institutions at the rate of 20
cents per hour.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority Ior approval of an additional assessment of 1/10 of I
percent of gross sales of each member of the industry for the
period from Feb. 16 to May 15, 1935, to be collected in monthly
installments on previous month's sales.


IDOSTRY OR TRADE


Thursday, Apr. 11,
1935-Contd.
Example Card Industry,
301-12.








Friday, Apr. 12, 1935
Auto Rebuilding and Re-
finishing Trade, 632-A.




Construction Industry,
244-58.
Leather Industry, 21-18..


Mayonnaise Industry,
662-A.

Men's Neckwear Indus-
try, 363-2B.


PLACe AND DEPUTY
ADUiLNLSTRATOR


Room 200, National Sav-
ingi and Trust Buildne,
Washington, D. C., W.
J. Brown.


Room 127, Willard Hotel,
Washington, D. C., 10
a. m., Jo 0. Roberts.



Room 702, Albee Build-
ing. WashIngton, D. C ,
John B. Smiley.
Room 4035, Department
of.Commerce Building,
Washingtron, D. C.,
Walter Mangum.
Red Room, Hamilton Ho-
tel. Washington, D. 0C.,
10 a m.
Room 4067, Department
of Commerce Building,
Washington, D. C., M.
D. Vincent.


Motor Vehicle Retailing 135. 0 Street NW., Wash-
Trade, 46-74. ingion, D. C., Jo C.
Roberts.


Pa-er Dis.: Milk Bottle
Cap Industry, 246-16d.




Sanitary Milk Bottle Clo-
sure Industry, 371-14




Shoe Rebuilding Trade,
372-12.



Waxed Paper Industry,
166-19.


Rathrd,_f. AnD. 13


Room 209, National Say.
mrs end Trust Build-
inj, Washington, D. C.,
W. J. Brown.


Room 209, National Sav-
ings and Trust Build-
ing, Washington, D. C.,
W.J. Brown.


Room 628, Barr Building,
910 Seventeenthb Street
NW., Washington,
D. C, C. deFreest
Lamer.
Room 209, National Sav-
ings and Trust Build-
ting, Washington, D. C.,
W.J. Brown.


PROPOSaKD ACTION


Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code.
Authority tor approval of Its budget and basis of contribuuoe
for the period from Mar. 4 to June 16,1935. and for the period from -
June 16. 1936, to Mar. 4, 1936.
Total amount of budget for the first period Is $2,209.14. The baaef
of contribution is, 3/10 of I percent of hbe gross sales of the current
year, payable monthly by each member on grosssales of preceding
calendar month, but no member shall be required to pay more
than itOu for any calendar year The total budget for the second
period is $s,6r0.86. The basis of contribution is the same as for
the first period.


Hearing on application submitted by the Code Authority for
approval of its budget and basis of contribution for the period
from Feb. 4 to June 16, 1935.
The total amount of the budget Is $67,600. The basis of contribu.
tion is 50 cents per employee per month, based on the first pay
roll of each cadendar month, dating Irom Feb. 4,1935, theeffective
date of the Code
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for amendment to art. IV, B, sec 2 (r) of the Code,
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Autbhoity for amendment of the Code by adding a new artile to
be designated as art. XV11, covering trade practice rules for the
industry
Opportunity to be heard on application of the Code Authority
tor amendments to arts. II, VIII, X, XI, the addition of a new
article to be designated as art X1, providing for liquidated dam.
ages agreements, and tbe renumberinmg of the present art. XII.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority lor approval of its budget and basis of contributla for
the period from Apr. 2, 1935, to Apr. 1, 1936
The total amount of the budget is $178.769. The basis of rontrilba.
tion is baed on the value of tbe merchandise sold ranging Irom
Is of a cent per dozen on ties up to $1.25, and 6 cents perdozen on
ties selling at $12.01 and higher.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Na-
tional Control Committee, for amendment to that part of the
Code Authority basis of assessment that covers the basis of as-
ses.ment of the Slate advisory committee of Metropolitan
Chicago.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for approval of its budget and basis of contribution for
the periods from Jan. I to June 16, 1935, and June 17 to Dec. 31,
11356.
The total amount of tbe budget for the first period Is $19,226, for the
latter period $18.625. The basis of contribution for both periods
,ithe same, namely 1 percent of net sales billed monthly.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for approval of its budget and basis of contribution for
the periods from Jan. I to June 16, 1935, and from June 17 to De,
31, 1936.
The total amount of the budget for each period Is $4,500. The basis
of onitributlon for each period is: ;I of I percent of the net sals,
billed monthly.
Opportunity to be heard on proposal of the National Industrial
Recovery Board that application of the provisions relative te
compensation of part-time workers as contained In art IV, se. 6
of the Code be stayed until further order, in order to remove the
existing difficulty in the application of this particular section
The stay, If made effective, will apply to all members of the trade,
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for approval of its budget and basis of contribution,
for the periods from Feb. 1 to June 16, 1935, and from June 17,1936,
to Jan 31, 1Q38.
The total amount of the budge, for first period is $21,462.50. The
basis of contribution is at the rate ol H'Moo of t percent of net sales
for calendar year 1934 The total amount of the budget for
the later period is $33,637.50. The basis of contribution Is the
same as for the first period.


1935
Wire Rope and Strand Room 610, 1818 K Street Opportunity to be heard on application submItted by the Code
Manufacturing Indus- NW., Washington, Authority for amendment of arts. IV, VIII, and IX and thesddl.
try, M4-HI-14. D.C., H. Ferris White. tion of new arts to be designated as arts. X (providing far tlq.
nidated damages aeceements'i and XI (export trade provisions,
_______________ __ ~and the renumbering of the remaining articles.


Monday, Apr. 15,
1935
Bituminous Coal Indus-
try, 24-106.


Room 301, Albee Build-
ing, Washington, D. 9,
N. W. Roberts.


Olay Machinery Indus- 1320 G Street, Washing-
try, 313-13. ton, D. 0., Wi. W. Rose


Concrete Pipe Manufac-
turing Industry, 186-23.


Expanding and Specialty
Paper Products Indus-
try, 369-14.



Fur Dressing and Fur
Dyeing Industry,
161-38.
Leather and Woolen Knit
Clove Industry, 87-30.


Malt Products Industry,
468-7.

Optical Retal Trade,
464-J16



Photo-Engraving Indus-
try, 180-49.













Plumbing Fixtures In-
dustry. 204-28.

Sand-Lime Brick Indus-
try, 366-19.


Room 403, Albes Build-
ing, 16tb and 0 Streets,
Washington, D. C.,
Bevenry Ober.
Room 209, National Sav-
ings and Trust Building,
Washington, D. C.,
W. J. Brown.


Room 4035, Department
of Commerce Building,
Wasbineoton, D. C.,
Walter Mangum.
Room 4067, Department
of Commerce Building,
Washington, D. C
NI D Vincent.
Room 323,910 Seventeenth
Street NW, Barr Build-
ing, Wasbhington, D.CO.,
C. W. Dunning.
Room 605, Barr Building,
910 Seventeenth street
NW., Washington,
D. C., A. S. Donaldson.

Room 1027, Barr Build-
ing, Washington, D. C.,
J. U. Douglass












City Club Building, 1320
0 Street, NW, Wash-
ington, D. C., Barton
W. Murray.
Room 605, Albee Building,
Washington, D C,
W. A. Janssen.


Valve and Fitting Mann- Room 129, Willard Hotel.
featuring Industry, Washington, D. C., I
101-A. Ia m.


Opportunity to be heard on application of the divisional Code
Authority for Division M11 for approval of Its subdivislonsalbdg'et
and basLs of contribution for the period from Apr. I. 1936 to Jase
d16, 193, both inclusive. The total budget Is 613,362.60 Con-
tribhution is prorated on the basis of tonnage of each producer
based on total 1934 tonnage; total assessments will not exeed
total amount of budget.
Opportunity to be heard on application of the Code Authority
for approval of its budget and basis of contribution for the period
from June 1i. 1936 to Apr. 1. 1936. The tolal budget for thli
period Is $1,600. The basis of contribution Is Me of I percent (13
per 1,000). of monthly sales of the products of the industry
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for approval of its budget and basis of contribution for
the period from Feb. 16,. 1936 to Feb. 16, 1936. The total amonasl
of the budget Is $19,800 The basis of contribution Is not mo
than o$002 per ton.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by tbe Coda
Autorily for approval of Its budget and bads of contribution s0
the period from May 1, 1934, to Apr 30, 1936. The total budget
Is $7,86 63 The basis of contribution from May I, 193q, Io DeM
31, 1934, is k of I percent of net sales based on sales of the previJm
month, payable monthly; from Jan. I, to Apr.30. 1935, 3 of IP 'r
cent, based on previous month's sales, payable monthly.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Cod
Authority for termination of exemprlon conferred in par. mI 0f
Administrative Order No. X-36, dated May 26, 1934.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for approval of Its budget and basis of contribution fr
the period from Jan 1 to Dec. 31, 19365. The total amount of ti
budget Is $40,000 The basis of contribution shall not exceed 4 Of
1 percent of 1934 dollar sales;.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for amendment to art. II by adding a new sectio-,10
be designated as sec. 4 (hours).
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for approval of standards of health. The National ".
dustrial Recovery Board by Administrative Order, No. 4W-L
dated Mar 25, approved such standards of safety and healthtscB
order and standards to become effective on Apr 16., 1935, nail
good cause to the contrary be shown prior thereto. .,
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the uC
Authority for approval of its budget and basis of contrihbudti
the period from Jan. I to June 16, 1935, and from June 17 toBD
31, 1936, for its several district adminLsLrt irve agencies and bodlM
and basis for the St. Louis Instirule of Photo-ECraving, C'de
Administrative Aeency for St Louis, Mo. and suburban Wll
within a radius of 60 miles The total amount of the Naloi..-
budget for the first period Is $25,492 75 and for tbe latter pein
$30.061.26. The basis of assessment is l too of 1 percent orgw
scale value of sales during the period of Jad. I to Dec. 31,1 l9%
payable in 12 monthly installments during 1936, each ea thertae
of ii of the yearly amount Ninimnm yearly assessment hist
payable in 2 installments, for members within the jurisdiction.
the National Code Authority. For members within theJ ,,
diction of the St. Louis district, the budget for the first Pet
T.,336 62 and for the second period $3,956 88. The basis of e&st
ment is 0 vioo of I percent of gross scale value of sales from lJ.,
to Dec. 31. 11934.. ,
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for amendments to arts. VI, I, VIII, antdIX oall
Code.

Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Cal,
Authority for approval of Its budget and basiseofcottrlo tonton
the period from Apr. 1 to Dec. 31, 1935. The Intoal biidg
$1.,395 The basis of contribution is 5 (ens per 1.000 or sead
size brick f8" x 2,t'" x 3.,' approximately) invoiced, anauttd
per 10t0 for 8" x 18" block invoiced. For brick iove
other than standard size, assessments are to be made in proWrt
that the plant selling price per ItXO bears to the plant sellitte
1,000 for such standard size brick. For block of other t!han ,.
x 16", assessment on the proportion that the unit seligpr'iCed
such block bears to the unit plant selling price of the 8 x _,
sire. Assessment is to be made on the basis of each men1,
sales of the preceding month, beginning Apr. I, 1935. .
Hearing on application submitted by the Code AUtborilT.Y'!w
amendment of art. IV of the Code. .'-


I I


--^











SCHEDULE OF HEARINGS, APRIL 5 TO

r C25-Continued

I. NDOTR O B TR DE PLACE AND DEAUTO
TRO R E A Di LNIIR OR PROPOSED AcrioN


tuesday, Apr. 16, 1935
Asbestos Industry, 80-27..


Room 403, Fifteenth and
0 Streets NW Albee
Building, Washington,
D. C., Beverly Ooer.


China Clay Producing Room 801, Albee Build-
Industry, 620-8. ing, Washington. D. C.,
Harry S. Berry.


- Commercial Stationery
and Office Ouifiting
Trade. 201-C-10 (a divi-
sion of toe Wholesaling
or Distributing Trade).
Copper industry, 401-11..

Domesrtio Freight For-
warding Industry, 162-
S15.


Insulation Board
try, 353-15.


Indus-


Painting, Paperhanging,
and Decorating Indus-
try, 2.4B-69 (Division
of the ConSeiruOtion
Industry'.
Talc and Soapstone In-
' dstry, 350-1l.

Toll Bridge Industry,
431-14.


Wednesday, Apr. 17,
1935
Graphic Arts Industries,
287-469 (National Prod-
uct Oroup No E-ti,
standardized starionery
and business forms.
Notice of Cancelation
Stereotype Dry Mat In-
dustry, 628-A.


Thursday, Apr. 25,
1935
Painting, Paperhanging
and Decorating Indus-
try, 24-B-70 (Division
of the Construction In-
dustry).


010 Seventeenth Street
NW, Barr Building.
Washington, D. C ,
Frank H. Crockard.
Room 605, Albee Build-
ing, Washington, D. C,
W. A. Janssen.
Room 606, Carry Build-
Ing, Washington, D.C ,
C P Clark.
Room 403, Albee Build-
ing. Fifteenth and G
Streets NW., WasLhing-
ton, D. 0.





Small Ball Room, 4tatler
Hotel, Detroit, Mich.,
10 g. m., Abner E
Larned.
Room 801. Albee Build-
ing, Washington, D 0.,
Harry S Berry.

Room S06, Carry Build-
ing, Washington, D. C.,
0. P. Clark.


Room 1025, Barr Build-
Ing, Washington, D. 0,
George T. Ross.



Room 2062-6 Depart-
ment of Commerce
Building, Washington,
D.C., 10a. m.


Public Service Building,
9"0 SW. Sixth Street,
Portland, Oreg., 10a. m.,
R. E. Doherty.


Justice Depart-


ment Will Ask


Test of NIRA


Constitutionality

(Continued from page I)


which threaten to obstruct or to unduly bur-
den the freedom of interstate commerce, are
Within the. regulatory powers of Congress
under the commerce clause.
S "* * The prohibition of the sale of
unfit poultry in the State of destination when
that State is the major market of the Nation
'is an especially direct and appropriate menns
to protect Interstate commerce from decep-
tion or spread of disease affecting it. * *
'"Section 3(a)(b) provides for Codes of
fair competition, and their approval by the
President, their conditions, restrictions, and
.exemptions. and for the approval of the Codes
to have the effect of establishing standards
of fair competition, as found in the margin.
"We think this was a lawful exercise of a
lawfully delegated power. * *
"The principle of these decisions is that
without delegation the powers conferred upon
Congress by the Constitution would often be
incapable of exercise. Congress would be
factually impotent. To deny the right to
delegate would be to stop the wheels of gov-
ernment and bring about confusion, if not
paralysis, in the conduct of the public busi-
Bess.' * *
"I * Looking to the statute to see
whether Congress had declared a policy with
respect to the subject, nnd whether it has
set up a standard for the President's action,
'and whether Congress has required any find-
ing by the President in the exercise of the
authority, we find that section 3 (a) and (b)
discloses all the requirements demanded by
Sthe principle expounded in the Panama Re-
Sfining Co. case. supra. A policy is declared,
standards set up, and the findings of fact re-
qulred. The authorization to approve Codes
Isl dependent upon a finding that they will


Opportbnlty to be heard on applIcation submitted by the Code
Authority for approval of Its budget and basis of contribution
for the period from Jan I to June 30, 1935. The total amount of
said budget is S29,376. Basis of contribution Is Not more than
an average of io of I percent of 1934 sales in each division, with
exception of the Textile Division, where the bass of contribution
shall not exteend do of t percent
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for approval of its budget ant basis of contribution
for the period from Jan I to Dec. 31, 1936 The total budget Is
$3,(Wu. Contribution is on the basis of I cent per ton, based on
tonnage of toe preceding quarter, payable quarterly. Minimum
is $11 per annum: $S2 u per quarter.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for amendment to art. V of the Suppletdentary Code
by adding a section to be designated as sec. 6, providing for
liquidated damage agreements
Opportunity to be heard on proposed changes In sales quotas as
provided m se 6 1.5b) of art. VII of the Code.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority to sec. 4, art V. by adding a new paragraph to be
dalemnated as (a) providing standards of safety and health for
employees
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for approval of its budget and basis of contribution for
the period from Mar 31, 1935, to Mar 31, 1936. Total amount of
the budget Is $36,f.0 Basis of contribution Is on the basis of not
more than 5o of t percent of the aggregate billing orn .,ries for
consumption in the United States and Its possessions and terri-
torie for the preceding 6 months of all Industry products sold by
members of the Industry Billing Is to be based on actual sales
price, but where board is sold at $30 or more per 1.000 square feet
surface measurement it shall be fivuredl as $30 and were sold at
$16 or less per 1,000 square feet surface measurement, it shall be
figured as of $16.
Hearing and opportunity to be beard on appUlication for approval
of a proposed agreement establishing standards of hours of labor,
rates of pay, and other conditions of employment under art Ill,
sec 1, of the Code and sec 7 (o) of the act affecting members of
the induitry in the region of Wayne County. MIch
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for approval of its budget and basis of contribution for
the period Ifrom Jan. I to June Id, 1035 Total budget Is Ul.u6.A0
and surplus of about T3,300 from former budgetary period will
cover entire expen.e
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for approval of its budget and basis of contribution for
the period from Feb. 10, 1935, to Feb 9, 1936.
Total budget is $8,997. Basis of contribution is a percentage of one-
half mill (arty cents (50ot) per one thousand (11,000) dollars) on
gross toll collections of members of the industry for the calendar
year 1933.


Opportunity to be heard on application of the National Coordi-
nating Committee for amendment of appendix of National Prod-
uct Group No. E-It, standardized 'tatloneit y and business forms.
The provisions, of this appendix are applicable only to National
Product Group E-lI.

Hearing scheduled on this date re Uniform Sales Contract Forms,
is hereby canceled.


Hearing and opportunity to be heard on application wnb-
mitied establishing standards of bour: of labor, rates of pay, and
other conditions o[ employment, under arts LL, sec. I of the Code
and sec. 7 (b) of the act, affecting members of the division In the
region of Portland, Greg., Metropolitan District, and certain of
their employees.


tend to effectuate the policy declared by the
act."
"The concurring opinion of Judge L.
Hand", Mr. Richberg continued, "explained
the reasons for the majority opinion (2 out
of 3) that Congress could not regulate mini-
mum wages and maximum hours In this par-
ticular case, since the right to regulate de-
pended upon the close connection between
intrastate transactions and interstate com-
merce."
Extracts from this opinion follow:
In an Industrial society bound together
by means of transport and communication as
ripid and certain as ours, It is Idle to seek
for any transaction, however apparently iso-
lated, which may not have an effect else-
where; such a society is an elastic medium
which transmits all tremors throughout its
territory; the only question is of their size.
* * No one can indeed deny the prosecu-
tion's argument that hours and wages will in
fact influence the import of the fowls into
the State; and there are instances In which
purely intrastate activiues are so enmeshed
with Interstate that they must be included in
interstate regulation, else none at all is possi-
ble. * Finally, there are decisions
like Stafford v. Wallace, 258 U. S. 495. and
Chicago Board of Trade v.. Olsen, 262 U. S. 1,
of which all that can be said is that the con-
nection between the Intrastate transactions
regulated and interstate commerce was found
to be close enough to serve. It would he, I
think, disingenuous to pretend that the ratio
decidendl of such decisions is susceptible of
statement in general principles. * The
truth really is that where the border shrll be
fixed is a question of degree, dependent upon
the consequences in each rise.
*0 There conies a time when im-
ported material. like any other goods, loses
its interstate character andt melts into the
domestic stocks of the State, which are be-
yon.l the powers of Congress. So. too, there
must come a place where the services oif those
who within the State work it up into a fin-
ished product are to be regarded ns domestic
activities. * But labor done to work
up materials begins only after the transit is
completed in law as well as in fact, and It is
not directed toward the importation of fu-
ture materials; it is a part of the general
domestic activities of the State and is as
immune as they from congressional regula-
tion."


Interpretations Slit Fabric Trade..


Valve and Fittings Mfg.

Industry
No. 153-18
FACTS.-Paragraph i1l, section 1, article
IV of the Code of Fair Competition for the
valve and fittings manufacturing industry
provides:
Each member of the industry shall pub-
lish the prices current on those of his prod-
ucts which are normally available to the
trade. Within 5 days after receipt of notice
of the effective date of tils Code, he shall
file with the Code Authority his prices to
each of the trade factors defined in article
II, provided that the lowest prices that may
be filed shall be the prices at which he shall
sell his products to his distributors. In all
practicable instances, a niember of the indus-
try shall employ the pricing system of 'list-
price subject to discount or plus percentage',
and where this system is found impracticable,
the member of the industry shall file his
equivalent net prices with the Code
Authority."
The Code Authority for the valve and fit-
tings manufacturing industry has requested
an official interpretation of the following pro-
visions contained in paragraph (1). section 1,
article IV of the Code of. Fair Competition
for said Industry.
"* * provided that the lowest prices
that may be filed shall be the prices at which
he shall sell his products to his dis-
tributors, * *"
QUBSTION-(a) Do these provisions
mean that each member of the industry may
file prices to any or all trade fa.:tors as low
as prices filed by him for distributors?
S(b) Do these provisions mean that prices
filed by all memnibert of the Industry for their
distributors must be lower- than prices filed
for all other trade factors?
(e) Does the term "his distributors"
mean that each member of the industry must
differentiate between distributors whom he
has sold or regularly sells and other dis-
tributors?
INTERPRETATION.- (a) These provi-
sions do mean that any member of the indus-
try may file prices to any or all trade factors
of the industry as low as prices filed by him
for his distributors if he so elects.
(b) These provisions do not mean that
prices filed by all members of the industry.
for their distributors must be lower than
prices filed by them for all other trade
factors.
(o) The term '"his distributors" does not
mean that each member of the industry must
differentiate between distributors whom he
has sold or regularly sells and other
distributors.


Fabricated Metal Products

Manufacturing and Metal

Finishing and Metal Coat-
ing Industry
No. 84-122
FACTS.-Article II of the Code of Fair
Competition For the fabricated metal prod-
ucts manufacturing and metal finishing and
metal coating industry provides in part as
follows:
The term fabricated metal products
manufacturing and metal finishing and metal
coating industry', hereafter referred to as
the industry, is defined to mean the manu-
facture for use or for sale of products in
whole or in substantial part of metal "
The Plate Manufacturing Co., Detroit,
Mich., assembles hair curlers, composed of
covered wire, aluminum and rubber.
QUESTION.-Under what Code should
the Plate Manufacturing Co. operate?
RULING.-The Plate Manufacturing Co.
conies within the definition of the Code of
Fair Competition for the fabricated metal
products manufacturing and metal finishing
and metal coating industry and is, therefore,
subject to and should operate under all of the
provisions of said Code.


Motor Fire A

ufacturing
No. 1
QUESTION.-What
term '" manufacturers'
tion I of article II?
FACTS.-Section 1
part: "The term I
used herein shall men
the United States and
of motor-propeUled fir
and equipment for sa
tectin puipoe.es *
RULING.-Tlie tern
contained in ce.tion 1
but without limitation
fractures for Qale inmot)
fined in section 1. of
actually manufactures
his own plant or has
him to his own specify
with that portion of
motor fire apparatus s


if---


Code Amendment I


SApproved


The National Industrial Recovery Board
has announced approval of an amendment to"
the Code of fair competition for the sli...
fabric manufacturing industry, amending,G
article VI, by adding a new section proved.,
ing that nothing in the Code shall constitu1 ...
the members of the Code Authority partnerdC
for any purpose, nor make Code Authoriti.
officers liable for acts of agents. :
Suggestions or objections to the approved''
amendment must be filed with Deputy Admin- I.
istrator M. D. Vincent, Room 4067, Depnart-,
menr of Commerce Building, Washington, :;`
D. C., before April 22, 1935. ..


Overtime Exemption Is,?

Granted Millinery :;

Code Members
The National Industrial Recovery Board..l
has approved an exemption to the Millinery'1
Code, granting members of that industry,:
located in the markets of San Francisco,.,
Seattle, and Portland permission to operate:
overtime during the spring season, 1935,'-atj
the normal rates of pay, rather than at the.:
overtime rates. ., ..
The members filed application for exem....
tion from the provisions of article III, sc-7Z
Stion- 2, of the Code, which limits officeli
employees, members of shipping and rece.rj
ing crews, and engineers and firemen to45'r.
hours a week." :
The overtime exemption is limited by the4t
Board to the months of March, April, and''f
May 1935.
NRA was informed that the general flnan-' ij
cial position of the markets are not good,
and the payment of time and one-third for'":,..
the overtime work permitted by the Oode:'
would cause an undue hardship. -;,A



Interpretations


Bankers
No. 47-19 ..
FACTS.-Article VI, section 1, of the Code ',
of fair competition for bankers provides In *
part as follows: ..
In towns of less than 2,500 population, .'....
the wages of all classes of employees shall ,
be increased by not less than 20 percent, .
provided that this shall not require an in-'i
crease in wagbs to more than the rate of
$12 per week." I
A bank in a town of less than 2,500 popu-
lation proposed to reduce the compensation .
of certain of its employees, for the year 1935,
below that which such employees were re-
ceiving during the year 1934. .14Z
QUESTION.-Does article VI, section 1 of
the Code establish for employees in towns..,
of less than 2,500 population a minimum .
wage which an employer under the Code ia s
required to pay to such employees and which
may not be subsequently reduced? .
INTERPRETATION.-Article VI, section ,
1 of the Code of Fair Competition for bankers
establishes for employees In towns of less
than 2,500 population a minimum wage which'
an employer under the Code is required to i
pay to such employees and which may not :.i
be subsequently reduced. The minimum i
wage so established Is at the rate of eJther: ,I
1. The employer's wage on the effective
date of the Code, plus 20 percent, if such '
resultant wage does not exceed the rate of-'
$12 per week, or :
2. Twelve dollars per week, if the em-
ployee's wage on the effective date of the
Code, plus 20 percent, would result in an
amount greater than the rate'of $12 per
week.


pparatus Man- __:
7 Industry Adhesive and Ink Industry
08-25 No. 521-5 '
is the scope of the FACTS.-Chemist No. 1 being paid more ..'
as contained in sec- than $35 per week and working over 40 hours '.
per week is promoted to a supervisory or '
of article II states in managerial position. Chemist No. 2 is em- ":.
* 'industry' as played at less than $35 per week to replace
an the manufacture in chemist No. 1. Chemist No. 2 is employed
sale by manufacturers for only 40 hours per week. however, and i
re apparatus chemist No. I finishes up Incomplete work of S
me, used for fire pro- chemist No. 2.
QUESTION.-Is It contrary to the pro- '*
n "manufacturers" as visions 01'of article V. section 3 of the Code
of Article II includes, for chemist No. 1 to complete chemist No. 2's iA
, everyone who manu- work after the latter's time for the day is up? "
r fire apparatus as de- INTERPRETATION.-No: there has not "
article II, whether lie bhen a reclassification of duties as contem- .i
the Code product in plated in section 3 of article V. Chemist No. :
Sit manufactured for 1 coming within the provisions of section :
fications, in connection 2 (a) of article III may work unlimited s-",
his business which is hours, whether such work is in a supervisory .M
.s defined in the Code. or technical capacity, or both. *





. .. ::_-.x i w _


1 1







0
Cork Insulation

> Code Approved
i The National Industrial Recovery Board
...aa announced approval of a Code of fair
competition for the cork Insulation contrac-
4'tors' division of the construction Industry.
'Itt becomes effective April 11.
The Code carries the same maximum hours
And minimum wages provisions as in the
,aster Construction Code, i. e., the basic
A.40-hour workweek and 40-cents-an-hour mini-
4'mum wage, with tlie exception of the in-
clusion of a time and a half overtime pro-
viaWon for all employees engaged in emergency
A..work involving breakdown or protection of
".life or property.
A divisional Code Authority is provided,
.:wti h representation for members of the cork
yiCn'sulation trade association and also non-
iasoeiation members, together with rules and
.regulations governing its general powers and
duties.
-, The industry is defined by the Code as
meaningg "the contracting for hire, either by
.iredt or subcontract, to furnish and erect
"eotk and/or rock cork insulation to the
mterior and/or exterior surfaces of build-
ing.'s In which it is intended to maintain pre-
B/determined temperatures, including the in-
j.sulation with incidental construction of all
| separate rooms within the building in which
c'a. predetermined temperature is to be main-
I.t'ta.ied, and including also all other surfaces,
except where such work on 'such other sur-
.R.daces is by established custom performed as
h-part of the work of another division of the
instruction industry." This division does
_not "include the Insulation of residential
buildings to prevent the transfer of heat."
.. j The Code lists certain practices it defines
.'1h.s unfair trade practices and carries the
.:-tandard labor provisions.

Volume Allowances for
^Retail Carpet and Rug
S:Code Provisions Stayed
-i'The National Industrial Recovery Board
-b'as announced a 60-day stay, until May 29,
".of the retail volume allowances provision of
,the Code of fair competition for the carpet
i'and rug industry.
.: The stay was granted at the request of the
.industry's Code Authority and applies to
articlee VII, section -19 (a), of the Code which
-'-provides that retail stores are not to be
.:credited or paid the volume allowances based
i"-only on merchandise invoiced to an indi-
vidual company. No manufacturer shall pay
z. ..pr allow credit for any cost of reshipping
..merchandise shipped and invoiced to a
vretailer."

Interpretations

Bankers
No. 47-20
:' FACTS.-Article VI, Section 3, of the Code
of fair competition for bankers, provides as
4foliowa:
I' "Employers shall not reduce the compen-
.'sation for employment now in excess of the
Ig^ minimum wages provided for herein, not-
.,':Withstandlng that the hours worked in such
'employment may be hereby reduced."
;. A bank proposes to reduce the compensa-
1tion of all Its employees for the year 1935
'.below that which the employees were receiv-
,luhg during the year 1934.
..-. :QUESTION.-Dues article VI, section 3
4ecuire that employers shall not reduce em-
H...ployees' compensation for any reason below
`]that which the employee was receiving on
ghe' effective date of the Code, even though
tifhe employee's compensation was in excess
"of the minimum provided in the Code, or does
thls section merely require that employers
'z'shall not reduce an employee's compensation
-.'below that which the employee was re-
1 ceiving on the effective date of the Code
because of a reduction In 'hours, brought
i'about by the Code, even though the em-
-' -ployee's compensation was in excess of the
'jAinimum provided in the Code?
'- INTERPRETATION.-Employers under
Sthe Code of fair competition for bankers are
required not to reduce the compensation of
an employee who is receiving In excess of the
-'- minimum wage provided in the Code, below
,;. that which the employee was receiving on the
,...effective date of the Code.
Soap and Glycerine Mfg.
Industry
No. 83-64
i FACTS.-We buy soap flakes from a regu-
*, lar soap manufacturer, then mill it and per-
fume the soap before re-elling it.
QUESTION.-Is milling and perfuming of
soap considered as "manufacturing" which
--' would make such operation subject to the
". Code of Fair Competition for the soap and
glycerine manufacturing industry?
KINTERPRETATION.-Yes; milling and
n:perfuming of soap for resale is manufacturing
*^ within the meaning of the Code of Fair
:, :.1 Competetion for the soap and glycerine
..- manufacturing Industry.
F -'. k :..





C.v-.,: :. :'"'. "
...... ..:..".:.... ... -


State committees on apprentice train-
ing, beina established under President
Roosevelts Executive Order No. 6750-
C to promote broad training of young
persons in skilled occupations, have
been set up in all but five States.
Twenty-eight of the forty-three com-
mittees have had the procedure they
propose to follow approved. The com-
mittees in these 28 States are now in a
position to approve apprentice con-
tracts submitted to them by employers.
To these employers will be issued cer-
tificates exempting them from the pay-
ment of Code minimum wages to the
apprentice during the early stages of
his training period.
The Federal Conunmmittee on Appren-
tice Training, which has been estab-
lished to aid the States in promoting
the apprentice training program, is
especially desirous of cooperating with
National Code Authorities in setting
up model training plans for each in-
dustry. Such model plans will, on the


FACTS.-Section 1 of article II of the
Code of Fair Competition for the furniture
manufacturing industry defines the industry
and its products as follows:
The term ,"industry" as used herein
means the manufacture or production for
sale of products, other than mattresses, pil-
lows, and box springs, commonly known as
" household furniture':, whether used in the
home or elsewhere; wood office chairs, wood
office desks, and wood office tables, parlor
frames, chairs in the white, furniture parts
made of wood, and other unfinished house-
hold furniture; provided, however, that or-
ganizations or groups of manufacturers rep-
resenting kinds or types of furniture or fur-
uiturc parts not specifically namcd herein
may become parties to or be exempted from
this Code upon approval by the adiniinitrator.
Certain h in place in residences and other livable
structures and commonly known as "kitclien
or pantry cabinets" are manufactured pre-
dominantly of wood by enterprises wholly or
partially engaged in the manufacture of
various products, including products em-
braced by the collective definition of the
Industry and products set forth in the said
section 1 of article II of the Code of Fair
Competition for the furniture manufacturing
industry.
QUESTION.-Is a "kitchen or pantry
cabinet ", which is designed as a product that
is movable at will by the owner or user, and
manufactured (' fabricated and or acsemibled),
predominantly of w',od at the establishment
of the manufacturer, as a complete unit,
ready for use when set in place, a product
within the scope of the Code for the said
furniture manufacturing industry?
RULING.-A "kitchen or pantry cabinet"
as described in the foregoing question Is
construed to be a product of household fur-


one hand, be practical and satisfactory
from the point of view of employers
and will, on the other hand, meet the
standards for apprenticeship set up in
the President's Executive order in the
rules issued pursuant to the Executive
order. These model plans may then be
publicized through trade papers and
will be supplied by the Federal Com-
mittee to all State committees on ap-
prentice training for their guidance in
approving apprentice contracts in the
industry for which the plan was drawn
up.
The 28 States completely authorized
to approve apprentice contracts are:
Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colo-
rado, Delaware, Georgia, Idaho, Iowa,
Louisiana, Maine, Maryla-nd, Massa-
chusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, North
Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Okla-
hornma, Oregon, Rhode Island, South
Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vir-
ginoa, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and
Woming.


nature" within the scope of section 1 of
article JI of the'Code of Fair Competition
for the furniture manufacturing Industry.

Macaroni Industry
No. 234-26
FACTS.-Article V, section 4, of the Code
of Fair Competition for the macaroni indus-
try, provides as follows:
It is agreed that equitable adjustments
will be made in the cases of those employees
now receiving more than the minimum, to
maintain fair differentials now existing be-
tween employees. In no cases shall hourly
wages be reduced. It shall be the function of
the Code Authority to supervise the observ-
ance oif these provisions, and to make recom-
mendations to the administrator for further
provisions appropriate to carry out the pur-
poses of tins section."
The President's Reemployment Agreement,
after August 1, 1933, was signed by a ma-
jority of'the members o:f the industry. Sub-
sequently on or nuout August, 1933. rhe
macaroni association, which had made appli-
cation to the Agricultural Adjustment Ad-
ministration f',r a Code, signed a request for
substitutions of paragraphs 2, 3, and 6 of the
President's Reempljoyment Agreement. Such
substitutions were allowed by the administra-
tion and can be found in bulletin No. 6. on
page 116.
The macaroni Code "was approved January
29. 1934, and became effective FeLruary 8,
1934
QUESTION.-To what date does the sen-
tence In no case shliall hourly wages be
reduced apply?
INTERPRETATION.-The sentence here-
inabove mentioned applies to February 8,
1934. the effective date of the Code.


State committees have been estab-
lished in Illinois, Missouri, and Wash-
ington since the list of State committee
secretaries was published in the Feb-
ruary 15 issue of the BLUE EAGLE.
Persons desiring to get in touch with
the committees in those States should
communicate with: Illinois, Dr. A. H.
R. Atwood, director, State Employ-
ment Service, 205 West Wacker Drive,
Chicago, Ill.; Missouri Dr. Charles L.
Hodge, State NRA compliance Di-
rector, Suit 1216, 506 Olive Street, St.
Louis, Mo.; Washington, Mr. J. W.
Kelly, supervisor, industrial education,
State Board for Vocational Education,
Olympia, Wash.
The office of the Federal Committee
on Apprentice Training, Department
of Labor Building, Washington, D. C.,
will be glad to supply all interested
persons with complete information
about the program and to refer them
to the committee in their State.


Coal Code Order Con-
tinues Wage Agreement
(Continued from page I)
representatives of the United Mine Worker
demonstrate courage and leadership when
they accept the need of disappointing the
expectations of thousands of workers in order
to do that which will serve the public inter- .
est, even though in the long run it should
alsq serve the interest of their members. All
of the members of the National Industrial
Recovery Board, and I am sure the coal
operators also, appreciate the value of this
public service rendered by the representative
of the United Mine Workers.
May I say also that, in the ability of all
parties to get together and In their wiling'-
ness to aid the representatives of the Govern-
ment, we see a hope for further improvement
in the conditions of this industry through
carrying forward this effective cooperatiOa ,
From the work done today there should be
a renewed confidence throughout trade sad
industry in a steady improvement of busi-
ness conditions and labor relations through-
out the country."

Vitreous Enameled Ware
Industry Code
Amended
The National Industrial Recovery Board
has announced approval of an amendment to
the Code of fair competition for the vitreou..
enameled ware manufacturing industry,.sub
division of the fabricated metal prodUct
manufacturing and metal coating and mieutfl
finishing industry, eliminating rule A "
article V, providing for price filing, emer_
agency price control, and banning sales bel0W
cost. ,


- - ^-:-
... - *..'.


Progress in Apprentice Training Program


Apprentice Contracts Issued.


Interpretations


Furniture Manufacturing Industry
No. 145-53













ADMINISTRATIVE


w Official Orders of NRA Relating

to Particular Codes
'T HE Blue Eagle prints in each issue summaries of administrative
Orders, interpretations, appointments, and bylaws approved by the
National Industrial Recovery Board.
Official orders are of two types, final and provisional. Where an order
is provisional, the time within which objections may be filed is indicated
below.
All protests against provisional orders should be addressed to National
Recovery Administration, Washington, D. C., attention Deputy Admin-
istrator for Code concerned; and such protests should be received before
final date indicated.
(For Code approvals, amendments, interpretations, budgets and
assessments, bylaws, Code Authority members, and trade complaints and
other committees, see elsewhere.)


ALUMINUM INDUSTRY, Code No. 470:
Order 13, suspending operation of article IX
of the Code, effective ou March 25, 1035.
AMERICAN MATCH INDUSTRY, Code
No. 195: Order 10. approving list of hazardous
occupations unsuited to persons under 18
years of age.
ARTIFICIAL FLOWER AND FEATHER
INDUSTRY, Code No. 29: Order 21, grant-
ing to Zunino Meehan Co., 12 East Thirty-
seventh Street, New York City, exemption
from the provisions of article III, section 1,
to the extent that it may be permitted to
work Its employees 1 hour overtime per day
from February 25 to March 1, 1935, inclusive,
provided that time and one-third is paid for
all such overtime.
Order 22, granting to Zunino-Altman, 120
East Sixteenth Street, New York City, exemp-
tion from the provisions of article' III, sec-
tion 1, of the Code to the extent that it may
be permitted to work its employees 1 hour
overtime pert day from March 4 to March 8,
1935, inclusive, provided time and one-third
is paid for all such overtime.
Qrder 23. granting to L. J. Charrot Co.,
36 West Thirty-seventh Street, New York
City, exemption from the hours provisions
of article III, section 1. of the Code, to the
extent that it may be permitted to work its
employees overtime from S a. m. to 1 p. m..
Saturday, Marchi 2, 1935, provided time and
one-third is paid.
AUTOMOTIVE PARTS AND 'EQUIP-
MENT MANUFACTURING ,INDUSTRY,
@ode No. 105: Order 48, granting to Oakes
Products Corporation, North Chicago, Ill., ex-
emption from the provisions of article 111,
section 1, of the Code, to the extent that 45
assemblers or silver solderers may be per-
mitted to work not to exceed a total of 56
hours per week; provided, that the rate of
pay shall be not less than twice the regular
rate of pay for such employees for all time
worked In excess of 48 hours. A copy of
this exemption must be posted In the same
manner as the labor provisions of the Code.
The period for which this exemption Is rati-
fied and approved is the interval commencing .
on March 2, and terminating at midnight,
on the same date.
Order 49, granting to the above corporation
exemption from the same provisions of the
Code for 40 assemblers under the same con-
dirions as above, commencing on February 22,
S1935. and terminating at midnight, February
24, 1935.
Order 50 Is precisely the same as order
48, except that the period for which the
exemption Is approved is the interval com-
mencing on March 9, 1935, and terminating
at midnight, on the same day.
BEAUTY AND BARBER SHOP ME-
CHANICAL EQUIPMENT MLANUFAC-
TURING INDUSTRY, Code No. '286: Order
16, approving list of hazardous occupations
on March 8, 1935, from which minors under
18 years of age should be excluded.
BITUMINOUS ROAD MATERIAL DIS-
TRIBUTING INDUSTRY, Code No. 530;
Order 9, approving extension of time in which
to submit standards for safety and health to
May 25, 1935.
BOATBUILDING AND BOATREPAIR-
ING INDUSTRY, Code No. 401- Order 27,
approving budget and basis of contribution
for the period from May. 4. 19314. to June 16,
1935.
Order 28, approving divisional budget and
basis of contribution for the period from
SAugust 22. 1934, to June 16, 1935. for the Gulf
Coast division.
Order 29. approving divisional tnrdget and
basis of contribution for the period from
August 22. 1934, to June 16, 1935, for the
South Atlantic division.
Order 30, approving divisional hudget and
basis of contribution for the period frmnt,
August 15. 1934. to June 16. 1935, for the
Central and Great Lakes division.
BOOK PUBLISHING INDUSTRY, Code
SNo. 523: Order 13. approving budget and
basis nf contribution f,'r the medical and
Sallied book publishing division for the period
| from October 1, 1934, through September 30,
V 1935.


Order 14, approving budget and basis of
contribution for the trade book publishing
division for the period from October 1, 1934,
to September 30, 1935.
BURLESQUE THEATRICAL INDUS-
TRY, Code No. 348: Order 16, denying
approval of budget and basis of contribution
for the period June 16, 1934, to June 16, 1935.
CANNED SALMON INDUSTRY, Code
No. 429: Order 16, approving list of occupa-
tions deemed hazardous for minors under
18 years of age.
CHEWING GUM MANUFACTURING
INDUSTRY, Code No. 241: Order 11, deny-
Ing to American Chewing Guam Co., Inc.,
Nashville, Tenn., exemption from' the pro-
visions of article IV of the Code.
CIGAR CONTAINER INDUSTRY, Code
No. 135: Order 29A, granting Autokraft Box
Corporation. Detroit, Mich., exemption from
March 21 to March 31, 1935, from the provi-
sions of article III, of the Code, to the extent
that it may be permitted the use of all neces-
sary employees during removal of plant and
equipment to new location; provided, that
time and one-half is paid for all time worked
in excess of 8 hours per day or 40 hours per
week during that period, and no production
is permitted on overtime hours. Copies of
this exemption shall be posted In full In con-
spicuous places within the plant accessible to
all employees.
CIGAR MANUFACTURING INDUS-
TRY, Code No. 467: Order 48, extending
stay of the minimum hourly rates of pay
provisions of article IV, of the Code, from
March 15 to June 16, 1935, upon the condition
that bunchmaker employees engaged in the
production by hand of 2-for-5 cents cigars
(exclusive of stogies, cheroots, and little
cigars), shall be paid not less than a piece-
rate of $1.920 per thousand and roller em-
ployees engaged In the production by hand of
2-for-5 cents cigars (exclusive of stogies,
cheroots, and little cigars), shall be paid not
less than a piecerate of $3 per thousand.
Order 49, granting H. B. House, Batesville,
Ohio, exemption from the minimum hourly
rates of pay provisions of article IV of the
Code, to the extent that bunchmaker em-
ployees shall be, paid a piecerate of not less
than 75 cents pier thousand, and roller em-
ployees shall be paid a piecerate of not less
than $1.75 per thousand for the production
by hand of 3-for-5 cents stogies and 5-for-10
cents stogies. Report of hours and wages of
such exempted employees must be made to
Code Authority within 60 days.
Order 50, granting to ValRoma Cigar Co.,
Evansville, Ind., exemption from the mini-
mum hourly rates of pay provisions of article
IV, of the Code insofar as 50 percent of Its
rollers engaged in the production by hand of
5-cent cigars (exclusive of stogies, cheroots,
and little cigars), are concerned, provided
that roller employees shall be paid a piece-
rate of not less than $5 per thousand and
bunchmaker employees shall be paid a piece-
rate of not less than $2.50 per thousand for
the production by hand of 5-cent cigars.
Bunclimaker employees engaged in the pro-
duction by rmaihine of 5-cent cigars shall be
paid a piecerate of not less than 90 cents per
1,000. These piecerates are exclusive of
stogies, cheroots, and little cigars.
Order 51, granting Lancaster Cigars, Inc,
Lanciaster, Pa., exemption from the minimum
hourly rates of pay provisions of article IV of
the Cole insofar as hunchmaker and roller
employees working as learners in the produc-
tion by 1ma-chine of 2-for5 cents cigars (ex-
clusive of stogies, cheroots, and little cigars)
nre -oncerne'l provided that a learner shall
ibe an employee assignn'd iat the time of
installation i to anid working on a machine
installed for the manufacture of 2-for-5 cents
cigars exclusivee of stogies, chieroot", and
little cigars'i ; he shall cease to be a learner
6 weels from the date .f so-h assignment
and installation. Le-arner;s -hall not exceed
2 per machine per shift anti hall be paid not
le-s than a piecerate of 75 cents per 1,000
fo-r lhuonIine and rolling, and in no event
less than at the rate of $6 per 40-hour
week during the first 2 of said 6 weeks and
not less than a piecerate of 75 cents per
thousand for bunching and rolling, and in no


=


event less than at the rate of $10 per 40-hour
week for the last 2 weeks of said 6-week
period and $8 per 40-hour week for the
second 2 of said week. The applicant shall
extend to hand cigar makers employed by it
and displaced by machines installed for the
manufacture of 2-for-5 cents cigars (exclusive
of stogies, cheroots, and little cigars) the
privilege of priority to employment as oper-
ators of said machines.
Order 52, granting Orrisou Cigar Co.,
Bethesda, Ohio, exemption from the mini-
mum hourly rates of pay provisions of
article IV, of the Code as applied to bunch-
maker and roller employees of the applicant
engaged in the production of 3-for-5 cents
hand-made stogies, who shall be paid piece-
rates of not less than 75 :ents per 1,000 and
$1.75 per 1,000 respectively. Report of hours
and wages of employees covered by the ex-
emption shall be made to the Code Authority
withinn 60 days from March 21, 1935.
COAT AND SUIT INDUSTRY, Code No.
5: Order -z, approving payment by the Code
Authority of certain unpaid obligations of
the New Jersey State Code Authority for
the industry.
CORSET AND BRASSIERE INDUS-
TRY, Code No. 7: Order 35, granting Nuihfe
Corset Co., Inc., 912 Broadway, New York,
N. Y., exemption from the provisions of
article IX, section (o), subsection 1, of the
Code insofar as Mr. and Mrs. Charles
Munter (Prof. Charles Munter and Madame
Florence Dupont). are concerned.
COTTON GARMENT INDUSTRY, Code
No. 118: Order 335, granting Northwestern
Garment Factory, 1480 Milwaukee Avenue,
Chicago, Ill., exemption from the provisions
of article III, section A, of the Code, to the
extent that applicant shall be permitted to
work its cutting-room foreman 4 hours over-
time weekly for a period not to exceed 12
weeks, provided that all such overtime is
paid'for at the-rate of time and one-half.
Order 336, granting Arenes Apparel Co.,
Inc., 450 Market Street, Perth Amboy, N. J.,
exemption from the provisions of article V,
section A, of the Code, to 'the extent that the
applicant mhy operate an extra shift on 7
pressing machines and 4 buttonhole machines
for a period of not to exceed 12 weeks from
March 5, 1935, provided additional operators
are employed.
Order 337, granting Cary & Co., Inc., 119
Cbenango Street, Binghamton, N. Y., exemp-
tion from the provisions of article IV, section
C, of the Code to the extent that the applicant
may employ 10 learners, in addition to the
10 percent allowed under the Code, in accord-
ance with the wages and training period
prescribed in the Code; provided no employee
shall be classified as a learner who has had
12-weeks experience in the industry.
Order 338, granting temporary approval of
budget and basis of contribution for. the
period from January 12, 1935, to Jaiuary 11,
1936.
Order 340. granting Hirsch Shirt Corpora-
tion, Chicago, Ill., exemption from the pro-
visions of article III, section A and article V,
section A, of the Code, to the extent that the
applicant may work 40 operators 8 hours
overtime during the week ending March 2,
1935, provided that all such overtime is paid
for at the rate of time and one-half.
Order 341, granting Wirk Garment Indus-
tries, Inc., Ligonler, Ind., exemption from the
provisions of article IV, section C, of the
Code, to the extent that It may employ 15
learners, in addition to the 10 percent allowed
under the Code, for a period of 12 weeks, in
accordance with the wages and training
period prescribed in the Code, provided no
employee be classified as a learner who has
had 12 weeks' experience In the Industry.
COTTON GARMENT INDUSTRY, Code
No. 118: Order 342, granting D. and B. Uni-
form Co., New York, exemption from the
provisions of article III, section A and article
V. section A, of the Code, to the extent that
it may be permitted to work the employees
of its plant 9 hours overtime weekly for a
period of 2 weeks from February 27, 1935.
and operate its machinery 5 hours overtime
weekly during said period of 2 weeks, pro-
vided all such overtime is paid for at the
rate of time and one-half.
Order 343. granting P. K. Browning Manu-
facturing Co., Texarkana, Ark.. exemption
from the provisions of article V, section A,
of thie Code, to the extent that it may operate
an extra shift on 2 bar-tacking machines for
a period not to exceed 4 weeks, provided ad-
ditional operators are employed.
Order 344, granting Hall, Hartwell & Co.,
Troy, N. Y exemption from the provisions
of nrtl':le IV. section C, of the Code, to the
extent that it is permitted to compute learners
for its Albany plant on the basis of 10 per-
cent of the manufacturing employees in both
its Albany and Troy factories.
Ordr 345, granting the Parker Shirt Co.,
New Britain. Conn exemption from the pro-
visions of article III, section A, of the Code,
to the extent that it be permitted to operate
.its cutting department 4 hqurs overtime dur-
Ing the week ending February 16. 1935, pro-
vided time and one-half is pni'd.
Order 346. granting thie Parker Shirt Co.,
New Britain, Conn.. exemption from the pro-
visions of article III, section A, of the Code,
to khe extent that it may work its cutters
and cutting-room employees 4 hours overtime
during the week ending March 2, 1935, pro-


N.
w-t I. . .....',... .. ..


.'.. ,
..,: .... ',,i .: -,


. .


'RDERS,


vided that all overtime Is paid for at the rate'
of time and one-half. ,,
Order 347, conferring additional duties and.'l
powers upon the commission created by Ad:-
ministrative Order No. 118-273 and 64-65.-. '
Order 348, granting Lebanon Shirt Co., 220.'
Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y., exemption
from the provisions of article V, section A.
of the Code, to the extent that it is permit'
to operate an extra shift on coilar-pressin'g
machines for a period not to exceed 6 weekt.1
from March 5, 1935, provided ndditit6ian'
operators are employed.
Order 349, granting Belvidere Garmedit
Manufacturing Co., Chicago, 11l., exemptioQn;,
from thie provisions of article V, section A'.
of the Code, to the extent that it is permnittd4
to operate an extra shift on 12 special .ma9
chines until March 15, 1935, provided addi,
tional employees are engaged.
Order 350, granting H. Lang & Co., In i, .
River Falls, Wis., exemption from the prb--.
visions of article V, section A, of the Code'-
to the extent that it is permitted to operate'
an extra shift on one pressing machine for0
a period not to exceed 12 weeks, provide'..
an additional operator is employed. '.
Order 351, granting Sigmund Eisner OCQ.-.?
Red Bank, N. J., exemption from the prov.-I
sionris of article V, section A, of the Codel
to the extent that it is permitted to orperat.6,
an extra shift on 15 bar-tacking machines f6r3
a period not to exceed 10 weeks from Marcb2i;
5, 1935, provided additional operators are
employed. .,
Order 352, granting Practical Frocks, Inc,,1
66 West Grant Avenue, Elizabeth, JN. Ji
exemption from the provisions of article IIF,
section A, and article V, section A, of the i
Code, to the extent that it is permitted tc
operate the machinery in its pressing andi
finishing departments 4 hours overtime'
weekly and work the employees of its pressT'
ing and finishing department 8 hours over
time weekly during the weeks ending Febf
ruary 23 and March 2, 1935, provided suchlU
overtime is paid for at the rate of time and.
one-half. ,.
Order 353, granting the Parker Shirt Co.;j
New Britain, Conn., exemption from the pro- 4.i
visions of article III, section A, of the Code .A
to the extent that it may work the employees'.'
of its cutting department 4 hours overt imet'
during the week ending February 23, 1935,0
provided such overtime Is paid for at the rate .
of time and one-half..-..j
Order 354, granting Patrician Tailore.dtl
Uniform Co., 935-7 North Water Street, MUf
waukee, Wis., exemption from the provisions
of article III, section A, of the Code, to the'-j,
extent that it is permitted to work the em:;i
ployees of Its plant 4 hours overtime weekiyj '.
for a period not to exceed 2 months fromlv
March 5, 1935, provided all such overtime Ils':=
paid for at the rate of time and one-half. ."
Order 35-5, granting the Drybak Corpora-:;
tLion. Binghamton, N. Y., exemption from the-
provisions of article V, section A, of the Code,.'.
to the extent that it is permitted to' operate.-.
an extra shift on three pressing machines forA
a period not to exceed 12 weeks from March ..'
5, 1935, provided additional operators are, i
employed. .-
SOrder 356, granting S9tyleeraft Frocks, Inc..'
Philadelphia, Pa., exemption from the pro- ,
visions of article V, section A, of the Code,'i"
to the extent that it Is permitted to operate'P
an extra shift on one Merrow machine for. -,
a period not to exceed 12 weeks from March-,|
5, 1935, provided an additional operator la.:M.
employed. .
Order 357, granting Oorliss, Coon & Co.;
Inc., Cohoes, N. Y., exemption from the pro- ,
visions of article IV, section A, of the Code,..-
to the extent that It Is-exempted from the'.
10-percent increase in piecerates effective -
December 1, 1934.
Order 358, granting Howell's Frock Shop,'::
Tulsa, Okla.. exemption from the provisions a'K
of article IV, section A, of the Code, to the "
extent that it Is permitted to employ not more.-
than 5 workers on home sewing machines .4''
only, provided such workers are paid ndt .3.
less than $0.75 per week. ''f
Order 359, granting Cluett, Peabody & OC.,-`
Troy, N. Y., exemption from the provisions bfo'-s
article III, section A, and article V, section "
A, to the extent it is permitted to work 15
pipefitters' machinists and electricians -8.'
hours overtime on Saturday, March 2, 1935,,14
provided such overtime is paid for at their,
rate of time and one-half, and operate anhi-
extra shift on its Trubenizing machines forI
a pl-riod not to exceed 90 days from March 5,
1935, provided 20 additional operators are!:
employed. ''''!
Order 360, granting Aida -Shirt Co., 8,--
Mesernoic Street. Brooklyn, N. Y., exemption'".
from the provisions of article III, section A;-T'j'
of the Codile, to thIe extent that it is permitted.'1
to wopk 2 buttonhole operators 4 hours over-"
time during the week ending March 2, 1935,.'LH
provided all such overtime is paid for at the ",1
rate of time and one-half. .
Order 301. granting the Western Garment :
Co.. Milwaukee, Wis.. exemption from the "1
provisions of article III, section A, and article "
V, section A, of the Code, to the extent that "
it is permitted to operate its plant and work ,4
the employees thereof 8 hours overtime during-.'
the week ending January 26. 1935, provided."
all overtime in excess of 36 hours per week .
is paid for at thie rate of time and one-half. .'
COIINTER TYPE ICE-CREAM 'i
FREEZER INDUSTRY, Code No. 418: ',1
Order 12. approving list of hazardous occu- '"
(Continued on pacie 6. column I) ".';













ADMINISTRATIVE ORDERS--Continue


::; (Continued from page 5)
nationsons unsuitable for minors under 18 years
.; of age.
i: DRESS MANUFACTURING INDUS-
|- ,TRY, Code No. 64: Order 68, extending
K Order 64-39, dated December 14, 1934, to
.7kand including June 16, 1935.
14 ELECTRICAL MANUFACTURING IN-
t).DUSTRY, Code No. 4: Order 85, denying to
.W. F. Curlee Manufacturing Co., Houston,
,,i`Tex., exemption from the provisions of article
Ri.V, section (a) of the Code.
; FIBRE CAN AND TUBE INDUSTRY,
'-'Code No. 305: Order 16, denying to Sonoco
OisProducts Co.. Hartsville, S. C., exemption
,';from the provisions of article III, section 1
.:(d), of the Code.
-:FIRE EXTINGUISHING APPLIANCE
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY, Code No.
9. Order 23. granting a qualified extension
of'the 1936 budget and basis of contribution
fitbrough tBe months of January, February,
March, 1935.
%...FISHING TACKLE INDUSTRY, Code
ino. 13: Order 40, granting to Union Hard-
Iware Co., Torrington, Conn., exemption from
.rthe provisions of article II, section 3, sub-
section (a), of the Code, insofar as said pro-
l -sion applies to 21 winders and 1 super-
4Nlglsor in applicant's bamboo rod department
-'and extending said exemption until April 13,
P935, provided time and one-half the regular
Jrate of pay for all hours in excess of 40 per
I week and 8 per day, but in no case shall
$hn of said employees work in excess of 54
I.ours in any 1 week.
j-.FISHERY INDUSTRY, Code No. 308:
,,Order 66, amending Administrative Order
8308-63, dated March 4, 1935, to the extent
-necessary to provide that the approval of the
budget and basis of contribution covered
-tbhereby shall take effect 20 days from March
.1A8, 1935.
17.
.FOLDING PAPER BOX INDUSTRY,
'|Code No. 193: Order 17, approving list of
jbccupations unsuited to persons under 18
yearss of age.
I-.'FUNERAL SERVICE INDUSTRY, Code
No. 384: Order 15, granting to Holman &
Lu z, Inc., East Fourteenth and Sandy
!Boulevard, Portland, Oreg., exemption from
?;the provisions of article II, section 1, of
-the Code, to the extent that it is permitted
.'to continue.-the employment of Carl Aker-
a.nd without reduction in wages, in his
lPresent capacity, in excess of the maximum
lhours provided for in said section during the
,period beginning April 1 and ending October
.1, 1935, provided that said employee is neither
...permiltted to work In excess of 52 hours In
Iany 1 week during such period nor that he be
A;jrpermitted to work in excess of a total of
P'2,080 hours during the period beginning April
1, 1935. and ending March 31, 1936.
FUN-ERAL SUPPLY INDUSTRY, Code
f..No. 90: Order 23A, granting Inland Casket
Co., 2320 Atlantic Street, Spokane, Wash.,
q permission to work its skilled employees more
H than the maximum permitted by the Code for
jUa period of 10 days commencing March 18 and
f. terminating March 28, provided time and
|.one-half the regular rate is paid to each
:.employee for all hours over the maximum
r.Ypermitted by the Code.
P FUR DRESSING AND FUR DYEING
.F INDUSTRY, Code No. 161: Order 35, grant-
SIng temporary approval of the budget and
,' basis of contribution submitted for the first
i', 6 months of 1935, covering the period from
f;"'January 1 to April 30, 1935, inclusive.
|. GLASS CONTAINER INDUSTRY, Code
'.tNo. 36: Order 13, granting Carr-Lowrey
-,Glass Co., Baltimore, Md., exemption from
the provisions of article III, section 3, subsec-
tion A, as to stopper grinders only. Overtime
r.,must be paid as provided in article III, sec-
d:,ion 8. The order Is effective from November
r 27, to not later than December 20, 1934.
i" ',GRAPHIC ARTS INDUSTRIES, Code
'.,No. 287: Order 445A, granting to National
':..Process Co., 75 Varlck Street, New York City,
: temporary exemption from the maximum
.'i. hour provisions of section 22-A (c) (1) of
--".the Code to the extent overtime must be paid
SIn accordance with the Code provisions, such
.. exemptions to continue until March 1, 1935,
-'. with leave to renew the application if the
:. emergency continues, and with the further
:. understanding that whenever possible during
period of exexhption any competent men who
t- may be available will be engaged.
i. Order 458A, granting further extension of
S30 days from March 2, 1935, to the same com-
:..pany and the same conditions as in Order
S445A, above.
Order 460A. granting to Chicago Card-
i! board Co., Chicago, Ill., exemption from sec-
Stion 22-A (c) (1) of the Code, for 10 days,
provided time and one-half is paid to every-
: one working in excess of 8 hours in any one
Sday or 40 hours in any one week during this
* period, and that a list of classification and
number of employees for which exemption is
!:. requested is furnished and that such addi-
tional employees of various classifications as
'K become available be employed.
Order 461, denying to W. H. Shirk & Sons,
Lebanon, Pa., exemption from article II, sec-
tion -1 (b) of the Code.


Order 463, denying Concordia Publishing
House, St. Louis, Mo., exemption from
certain provisions of the Code.
Order 464, denying Allison Coupon Co.,
Indianapolis, Ind., exemption from certain
provisions of the Code.
Order 465, granting Austin Print Works,
26-36 Cherry Street, Akron, Ohio, exemption
from the provisions of article II, section 21,
paragraph 6 (d) of the Code, provided that
overtime be paid for at the rate of time and
one-half for typesetting machine operators.
This exemption terminates on April 15, 1935.
HANDKERCHIEF INDUSTRY, Code No.
53: Order 20, denying to New York Hand-
kerchief Co., Chicago, ll., exemption from
the provisions of article IV, section 1, arti-
cle IV, section 4, and article IX, section 9,
of the Code.
Order 22. extending to May 10, 1935, the
time in which the special commission ap-
pointed by Administrative Order No. 53-14
dated February 4, 1935, shall make a report
of its findings.
HARDWOOD DISTILLATION INDUS-
TRY, Code No. 110: Order 22, approving
rules of forest practice for the western divi-
sion of the industry.
HOSIERY INDUSTRY, Code No. 16:
Order 24, extending Order No. 16-19 for a
period from February 25 to June 16. 1935,
provided a copy of the order is posted in a
conspicuous place in the applicant's plant,
namely Forest City Knitting Co., Rock-
ford, Ill.
ICE INDUSTRY, Code No. 43: Order 104,
granting to Great Barrington Ice Co., Great
Barrington, Mass., permission to increase its
ice manufacturing capacity from 10 tons to
20 tons and to erect and operate a 95-ton
storage plant.
Order 105, granting to Alvah H. Ward,
Wanchese, N. C., permission to increase exist-
ing daily Ice manufacturing capacity from
15 to 25 tons.
Order 106, granting to G. M. Ross, Jasper,
Fla., permission to erect and operate a 5-ton
ice manufacturing plant near Fargo, Ga.
Order 107, granting to E. T. Miller, Trinity,
N. C., permission to erect and operate a
5-ton ice manufacturing plant 7 miles south-
west of Trinity, N. C.
INFANTS' AND CHILDREN'S WEAR
INDUSTRY, Code No. 373: Order 41, grant-
ing Agood Novelty Co., North Bergen, N. J.,
exemption from the provisions of article III
of the Code, to the extent that it may work
2 pressers 1 hour overtime per day for a
period of 10 working days from November 22,
1934, provided time and one-half is paid for
all such overtime and that a copy of the
order is posted in a-conspicuous place in the
applicant's plant.
Order 42. granting to Party Girl Frocks,
Inc., New York, N. Y., exemption from the
provisions of article III of the Code, to the
extent that it may work 2 cutters and 3
finishers 5 hours overtime on Saturdays,
March 2, 9, and 16, provided time and one-
half Is paid for all such overtime and a copy
of the order is posted in a conspicuous place
in the applicant's plant.
Order 43, granting to Joseph Love, Inc.,
New York City, exemption from the provi-
sions of article III of the Code, to the extent
that it be permitted to work 20 cutters, 6
hours overtime on Saturdays, March 2, 9, 16,
and 23, provided time and one-half is paid
for all overtime and a copy of the order Is
posted in a conspicuous place in the appli-
cant's plant.
Order 44, granting 0. L. Hinds Co., Bur-
lington, Vt., exemption from the provisions
of article IV, section 1, paragraph (b) of the
Code for a period of 8 weeks from March 8,
1935, to the extent that it may employ a total
of 20 learners, on a piecerate basis only, pro-
vided that this apply only to new employees
and those employed since February 1, 1935.
No learner shall be paid at less than 75 per-
cent of the minimum wage established by the
Code. Learners shall operate on a piecerate
basis only, and if the amount earned is more
than the minimum learner wage herein
established they shall be paid not less than
the actual amount earned. Learner shall be
paid not less than the piecerates established
for other employees working on like or simi-
lar operations, and the basis for establishing
piecerates for learners shall be the same as
for other employees working in the plant.
A copy of the order must be posted in a con-
spicuous place in the applicant's plant.
Order 45, granting to Goldman Ruby Co.,
New York City, exemption from the pro-
visions of article III of the Code, to the
extent that it be permitted to work 2 special
needle operators 4 hours overtime Saturday,
October 27; 1 ruffler and 1 buttonholer 4
hours overtime for the week of October 27;
1 button sewer 4 hours overtime Saturday,
November 3, 1934, provided that this com-
pany did not use emergency exemption pre-
viously granted and time and one-half is paid
for nil such overtime. A copy of the order
must be posted in a conspicuous place in the
applicant's plant..
. Order 46. granting to Ideal Bathrobe Co.,
Brooklyn, N. Y., exemption from the pro-
visions of article III of the Code, to the
extent that it may work 16 operators and 6
finishers 1 hour overtime per day starting
October 29 and expiring November 7, 1034;
6 cutters 1 hour per day and 4 hours Satur-


day starting October 27 and expiring Sat-
urday, November 5, 1934; 5 cutters 1 hour
per day and 4 hours Saturday from November
14 through Saturday, November 24, provided
time and one-half is paid for all such over-
time and a copy of the order is posted in a
conspicuous place in the applicant's plant.
INVESTMENT BANKERS, Code No. 141:
Order 42, approving budget for the period
from January 1 to April 15, 1935.
KNITTED OUTERWEAR INDUSTRY,
Code No. 164: Order 42, approving budget
and basis of contribution for the period from
October 1, 1934, to June 1, 1935.
HOM'EWORKERS BUREAU OF THE
KNITTED OUTERWEAR INDUSTRY,
Code No. 164: Order 43, approving supple-
mentary Code Authority budget and basis of
contribution for the Hand Knit Division of
the industry for the period from February 1
to April 30, 1935.
LEATHER AND WOOLEN KNIT
GLOVE INDUSTRY, Code No. 87: Order 29,
granting authorization to expend a portion of
the Surplus funds on hand December 31, 1934.
LIGHT SEWING INDUSTRY EXCEPT
GARMENTS, Code No. 226: Order 50, ex-
tending tenure of office of members of the
divisional committee for the Mattress Cover
division to June 16, 1935.
LITHOGRAPHIC PRINTING INDUS-
TRY-DIVISION B-i, UNDER THE CODE
FOR GRAPHIC ARTS INDUSTRY, Code
No. 287: Order 462, approving the use of
surplus funds during the month of March
1935.
LUMBER AND TIMBER PRODUCTS
INDUSTRIES, Code No. 9: Order 323, deny-
ing to Indianapolis Wirebound Box Co., In-
dianapolis, Ind., exemption from the wage
and hour provisions of the Code.
MACARONI INDUSTRY, Code No. 234:
Order 25, approving list of hazardous occu-
pations unsuited to minors under 18 years
of age.
MALLEABLE IRON INDUSTRY, Code
No. 132: Order 24, extending the duration of
the trial period provided for In Order No.
132-7, Order No. 132-13, Order No. 132-19,
and Order No. 132-21, until further order of
N. I. R. B.
MEDIUM AND LOW PRICED JEW-
ELRY MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY,
Code No. 175: Order 51, granting to Trifari,
Krussman & Fishel, Inc., New York City,
exemption from the provisions of article III,
section 1 of the Code as it applies to tool-
makers and hub cutters, provided no em-
ployee shall be permitted to work in excess
of 54 hours per week and that time and
one-half is paid for all hours worked In
excess of 40 per week. Exemption is to
cover period from March 20 to April 13,
1935.
MEN'S CLOTHING INDUSTRY, Code
No. 15: Order 62, granting DeMoulin Bros. &
Co., Greenville, Ill., exemption from the pro-
visions of article IV of the Code, to the
extent that it may work 1 cutter, 1 inspector,
1 buttonsewer, 1 underpresser, 1 sleevesetter,
2 handworkers, 3 pocketmakers, 4 seamers and
assemblers, 2 edgestitchers and 7 trouser-
makers, 40 hours per week for a period of 3
weeks, commencing March 4, 1935, provided
time and one-half is paid for all such over-
time, and a copy of the order is posted in
*a conspicuous place in the applicant's plant.
Order 63, granting to Mclntosh Studio
Clothes Manufacturers, Los Angeles, Calif..
exemption from the provisions of article IV
of the Code, to the extent that it be per-
mitted to work its wardrobe department
either 4 hours overtime weekly at time and
one-half for all such overtime or it may
work its wardrobe department an extra shift
at standard time, for a period of 10 working
days from December 15, 1934, provided a
copy of the order is posted in a conspicuous
place in the applicant's plant.
MILLINERY INDUSTRY, Code No. 151:
Order 50, granting to Mexican American Hat
Co., Breese, Ill., exemption from the mini-
mum wage provisions of article IV, section
3 of the Code, for members located in area
B, provided employees of the applicant shall
be compensated at not less than the wage
rates provided in sections 2 and 3 of article
IV for area D. A copy of the order must
be posted in a conspicuous place in the
applicant's plant..
MOTOR VEHICLE RETAILING TRADE
CODE, Code No. 46: Order 70, approving
amendments to the budget and basis of con-
tribution of the State advisory committees
of Kansas, Iowa, Pennsylvania, and Metro-
politan New York.
MOTOR VEHICLE RETAILING TRADE,
Code No. 46: Order 72, granting exemption
to the members of the trade in Pennsylvania
from the provisions of article III, title B,
section (21 of the Code upon condition that
they be permitted to employ employees under
this exemption exclusively on the inspection
of motor vehicles or on work necessary for
and incidental to the issuance of certificates
of inspection required by the State and they
shall be paid not less than time and one-


half for all time worked in excess of 44 Per
week during the period of this exemption.
No applicant qualified to perform the work
shall he denied employment by members of
the trade during this period. A copy of the '
order must be posted in the establishment
of each member of said trade who employs .
employees overtime under this exemption, in
the same manner as the labor provisions of
the Code are required to be posted. The pe-
riod for this exemption begins on March 25,.
and terminates at midnight on March 31,
1935.
NARROW FABRICS INDUSTRY, Code
No. 312: Order 23, denying to General Shoe
Lace Co., Louisville, Ky., exemption from
the provisions of article III, section 4, of the
Code.
NEEDLEWORK INDUSTRY IN'
PUERTO RICO, Code No. 474: Order 17;'
approving budget and basis of contribution I
for the period from July 19, 1934 to June 16,
1935.
PAINTING, PAPERHANGING, AND
DECORATING DIVISION OF THE CON-
STRUCTION INDUSTRY, Code No. 244B-4:
Order 15, approving agreement between ew-
ployer members of the division and their
painter, paperhanger, and decorator em.
ployees in the region of Cascade County,
Mont.
Order 16, approving agreement between
employer members of the division and cer-
tain of their employees in the region of
Erie County, including the city of North
Tonawanda in -Niagara County and the vil-
lages of Gowanda and Perrysburg in Catta-
raugus County, N. Y.
Order 17, approving agreement between
employer members of the division and cer-
tain of their employees in the region of Hiltl
County, Mont.
PAPER MAKERS FELT INDUSTRY,
Code No. 426: Order 7, approving list of
hazardous occupations considered unsuitable
for minors under S1 years of age.
PERFUME, COSMETIC, AND OTHER
TOILET PREPARATIONS INDUSTRY,.
Code No. 361: Order 24, denying to Puritan
Cosmetics Inc., 6310-20 Bartmer Avenue,
St. Louis, Mo., exemption from the provisions
of articles III, IV, and V of the Code.'
PETROLEUM INDUSTRY, Code No. 10: .
Order 3, granting administrator for the indus-
try limited authority to determine whether
organizations are bona fide and legitimate'
cooperatives within the meaning of Executive
Order No. 6G06-A, provided any determiaa.
tion made be limited to the above industry :
as defined in the approved Code. ,
PLUMBING CONTRACTING DIVISION
OF THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY,
Code No. 2441: Order 23, denying to Master
Plumbers of Selma County, Ala., zone 7,
exemption from the provisions of article III,
section 1 (b) relating to unskilled labor
rates of 40 cents per hour for the southern
zone.
REFRIGERATED WAREHOUSING IN-
DUSTRY, Code No. 499: Order 14, denying
to City Ice & Cold Storage Co., Seattle,
Wash., exemption from that portion of article
VII, section 1 (a) of the Code which refers
to extra labor or service and special clerical "
work."
RESTAURANT INDUSTRY, Code No.
282: Order 128, approving budget and basis
of contribution for the period from Feb-
ruary 26, 1934, to June 16, 1935.
Order 129, denying to Falls Restaurant,
1521 Clinton Street, Buffalo, N. Y.. exemption
from the provisions of article VI, section
1 (a) of the Code.
RETAIL LUMBER, LUMBER PROD-I
UCTS, BUILDING MATERIALS, AND '
BUILDING SPECIALTIES TRADE, Code
No. 33: Order 52, reducing,the basis of con-
tribution for Division No. 17.
RETAIL SOLID FUEL INDUSTRY,,
Code No. 280: Order 236, canceling west .
reasonable trucking costs for the Westchester A
County Trade Area of Division No. 3.
Order 239, granting permission to expend
a portion of the surplus fund on hand Feb-
ruary.28, 1935, and/or accounts receivable z
by the Code Authorities.
Order 241, granting to American Bridge
Co., Chicago, Ill., exemption from the pro-
visions of articles I, II, III, V, VI, VII,
VIII, and IX of the Code to the extent that
it sells coke, exclusively to its employees,
such exemption to take effect 15 days from
March 20. 1935. unless good cause to the
contrary be shown prior thereto, and the
Board issues a subsequent order.
RETAIL TRADE, Code No. 60: Order 375,
denying to the Tog Shop. Greenville, Miss,
exemption from the provisions of article I,
section 1 (f) of the Code.
RETAIL SOLID FUEL INDUSTRY, Code
No. 280: Order 232. nmodifying lowest reason"
able costs for Division No. 20 for Trade Areas
2, Knox County; '-A, Blount County; and
2-B, Loudon County, Tenn.
RETAIL SOLID FUEL INDUSTRY,
Order 234, modifying Administrative Order
No. 280-68 approving the budget and basis of
(Continued on page 7, column 1) ..












ADMINISTRATIVE ORDERS Code Authority Members Approved ,::
(Continued from page 6)


contribution for Divisional Code Authority
No. 21, of the industry for the period from
February -26, 1934, to February 28, 1935.
ROBE AND ALLIED PRODUCTS IN-
DUSTRY, Code No. 211: Order 30, granting
to this industry in New York City, a stay of
the provisions of article III of the Code to
the extent that the entire iniJustry be per-
mitted to work S hours overtime Saturday,
SNovember 3; S hours weekly for a period
of 10 days from November 5 and 8 hours
overtime weekly from November 15 up to
and Including November 21, 1934, provided
time and one-half is paid for all such over-
time and a copy of the order is posted in a
conspicuous place in the various plants.
SCHIFFLI, THE HAND MACHINE EM-
SBROIDERY AND THE EMBROIDERY
; THREAD AND SCALLOP CUTTING IN-
S.DUSTRIES, Code No. 256: Order 17, grant-
inag to Peerless Embroidery Co., 2341-43
Wolfram Street, Chicago, Ill., exemption
From the provisions of article IV, section
1 (a) of the Code to the extent that em-
ployees may be worked on 4 machines while
used in the manufacture of mattress em-
broidery in the applicant's plant, 5 hours
overtime per week for a period from March
11 to May 6, 1935, provided that all such
overtime shall be worked between the hours
from 8 a. m. to 12 o'clock noon, and from
12: 30 p. m. to 5:30 p. m., from Monday to
Friday, inclusive, and they shall be paid at
the rate of time and one-haltf for all hours
worked in excess of the hours permitted in
above article and section. A copy of the
order must be posted in a conspicuous place
In the applicant's plant.
SCRAP IRON, NONFERROUS SCRAP
METALS AND WASTE MATERIALS
TRADE, Code No. 330: Order 413, denying to
Buffalo Sash Weight and Foundry Co., Inc.,
Buffalo, N. Y., exemption from the provisions
Sof article 111, section 1 of the Code.
Order 44, denying to John Robinson, trad-
ing as Norfolk Hide & Metal Co.,' Norfolk,
Nebr., exemption from the provisions of
article IV, section 1 of the Code.
Order 45, denying to D. DeStetfano Co.,
Inc., South Boston, Mass., exemption from
the provisions of article III, section 1 and
article IV, section 1 of the Code.

SET UP PAPER BOX MANUFACTUR-
ING INDUSTRY, Code No. 167: Order 31,
terminating exemption conferred by para-
graph III, Administrative Order X-36, dated
May 26, 1934, insofar as it applies to obliga-
tions to contribute to the expense of ad-
ministering the Code. This does not apply to
any member of the industry who manufac-
tures products of the industry for his own
consumption or whose net sales of products
Sof the industry were less than $25,000 for
the 12 months' period immediately preceding
the date of approval of each budget for the
industry.
SHIPBUILDING AND SHIPREPAIR-
ING INDUSTRY, Code No. 2: Order 32,
denying to the Industry Committee permis-
sion for deletion of provisions in exemptions
and partial stays granted, pertaining to the
requirement that at least time and one-half
is paid for all hours worked in excess of the
maximum weekly hours of the Code incor-
porated In Administrative Orders Nos. 2-6,
2-16, 2-19, 2-25, 2-28, 2-29, and 2-31.
SILK TEXTILE INDUSTRY, Code No.
S48: Order 34, denying to Jaunty Silk Co.,
300 Brook Street, Scranton, Pa., exemption
from the provisions of article III, section 1
of the Code.
SMOKING PIPE MANUFACTURING
INDUSTRY, Code No. 225: Order 30, ap-
proving extension of standard cost account-
ing system upon the same conditions pre-
Sscribed in the original order.
SOFT FIBRE MANUFACTURING IN-
DUSTRY, Code No. 393: Order 15, granting
to levonah Spinning Mills, Hanover, Pa.,
exemption from the provisions of article III,
section 4 of the Code for a period of 6 weeks
Commencing March 2 and ending April 12,
1935, to the extent that they be allowed to
operate their productive machinery 88 hours
each week for this period. A copy of the
order must be posted in a conspicuous place
in the applicant's plant.
SPROCKET CHAIN INDUSTRY, Code
No. 347H1: Order 10, approving budget and
basis of contribution for the period from
January 1 to June 16. 1935.
STEEL CASTING INDUSTRY, Code No.
82: Order 17, granting to George Bros.
Foundry, Grass Valley, Calif., exemption
f" rom the provisions of article VI, section
: 2 (a) of the Code provided time and one-half
is paid for all hours worked in excess of 40
Per week averaged over an S weeks' period.
All hours worked in any 1 week shall not
exceed 4Q.
TOOL AND IMPLEMENT MANUFAC-
TURING INDUSTRY, Code No. 84G: Order
15, approving budget and basis of contribu-
!,- tIon for the period from April 1. 1934 to
March 31, 1935.
TRUCKING INDUSTRY, Code No. 278:
SOrder 175, denying to McNally Bros., Inc.,
SBrooklyn, N. Y., partial exemption from the


provisions of article VII, section 1, of the
Code.
UNDERWEAR AND ALLIED PROD-
UCTS INDUSTRY, Code No. 23: Order 27,
granting Morgan Cotton Mills, Inc., Laurel,
N. C.. exemption from the provisions of part
III, section 2 (a) of the Code to the extent
that it is permitted to operate 6 knitting
machines for 3 shifts of 40 hours each, for
the production of knitted dish-cloth fabrics,
for a period of 28 days beginning March 4,
1935, provided that a copy of the order is
posted in a conspicuous place In the appli-
cant's plant.
UNDERWEAR AND ALLIED PROD-
UCTS INDUSTRY, Code No. 23: Order 28,
granting to Germantown Knitted Fabrics
Co., Philadelphia, Pa., exemption from the
provisions of part III, section 2 (a) of the
Code to the extent that it be permitted to
operate knitting machines for 3 shifts of 40
hours each, for the production of knitted
dish-cloth fabrics, for a period of 28 days
beginning March 4, 1935, provided a copy of
the order is posted in a conspicuous place in
the applicant's plant.
VEGETABLE IVORY BUTTON MANU-
FACTURING INDUSTRY, Code No. 461:
Order 7, granting a stay of the provisions of
article VII, section 14, until June 16, 1935, to
be effective 20 days from March 19, 1935.

WHEAT FLOUR MILLING INDUSTRY,
Code No. LP17: Order 23, approving list of
hazardous occupations unsuitable for minors
under 18 years of age.
Order 24, granting to Pillsbury Flour Mills
Co., Minneapolis, Minn., exemption from the
provisions of article III, section 3 (a) of the
Code to the extent that employees in the
Buffalo mill of the company be permitted to
work 10 hours in one 24-hour period per
week only when said mill is in continuous
operation for 7 days per week provided said
employees be paid at least time and one-third
for all time worked in excess of 8 per day.
WHOLESALE FRESH FRUIT AND
VEGETABLE DISTRIBUTING INDUS-
TRY, Code No. LP18: Order 13, denying to
Consolidated Fruit Auction Co., Cleveland,
Ohio, exemption from the provisions of
article III, section 1 of the Code.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL AUTOMO-
BILE SALES, SUPPLY, REPAIR, MAIN-
TENANCE, AND SERVICE INDUSTRY
OF THE TERRITORY OF HAWAII, Code
No. 556: Approving the Code of Fair Com-
petition for the industry In the Territory of
Hawaii.
WIRING DEVICE SUBDIVISION OF
ELECTRICAL MANUFACTURING IN-
DUSTRY, Code No. 4C: Order 2. continuing
stay of the last sentence of article II, section
2 of the supplementary Code.
WOOL TEXTILE INDUSTRY, Code No.
3: Order 53, granting to Selden Worsted
Mills, Methuen, Mass., exemption from the
provisions of the first paragraph of article
III for employees in the burling and mending
departments to the extent that they may be
employed 48 hours per week, provided that
time and one-third is paid for all hours in
excess of 40 per week and since this exemp-
tion is granted because of lack of avaLlable
workers, all duly qualified burlers and mend-
ers shall be employed who may present them-
selves to the applicant for employment. The
order must be posted in a conspicuous place
in said departments.
Order 54, granting to Atlantic Mills, Provi-
dence, R. I., and'the Cleveland Worsted Co.,
Cleveland, Ohio, exemption from the pro-
visions of the first paragraph of article Ill
for employees in the drawing-in department
to the same extent and conditions as In Order
53, above.
Order 55, granting to Limerick Yarn Mills,
Limerick, Maine, exemption from the pro-
visions of the first paragraph of article III
for employees in the winding department to
the same extent and under the same condi-
tions and provisions as in Order 53.
Order 56, granting to Faulkner & Colony,
Keene, N. H., and Cleveland Worsted Co.,
Cleveland, Ohio, exemption from the pro-
visions of the first paragraph of article III
for employees in the dressing departments to
the snme extent and provisions as in Order
53, above.


Code Authority By-

laws Approved

Machine Screw Nut Manufacturing Industry
(with exceptions).
-The Oriental Rug Importing Trade (amend-
ment).
Pleating. Stitching, and Bonnaz and Hand
Embroidery Industry.
Textile Bag Industry.


Code Authority Suspension
Albert Sehlstedt is suspended as an alter-
nate member of the Code Authority for the
Retail Monument Industry and as a member
of the Regional Committee, Regional Division
No. 6, pending action on removal.


The following Code Authority members
were selected and appointed:
ALLOYS INDUSTRY.-A. A. Cbrey, Jr.,
J. M. Price, W. F. Meredith, F. P. Gormely,
Max Schott, Mars Hirsch of New York,
N. Y.; Paul Kruesi, Chattanooga, Tenn.;
-L. G. Pritz, Canton, Ohio, all on the execu-
tive committee, the alternates are Ward
A. Miller, W. J. Priestley, E. L. Lasier, F. B.
Morgan, A. F. Plock, Jas. B. Thorpe, and
V. R. Lansingh, of New York, N. Y., and
George Starr, of Canton, Ohio. Nonassocia-
dlon member representative is Fred W.
Cohen, New York, N. Y., with Ralph B..
Williams, New York, N. Y., as alternate.
ARCHITECTURAL, ORNAMENTAL,
AND MISCELLANEOUS IRON, BRONZE,
WIRE, AND METAL SPECIALTIES IN-
DUSTRY.-R. A. Stevens (supplementary)..
BAKERY EQUIPMENT MANUFAC-
TURING.-W. P. Cook, Jr.
BAKING INDUSTRY.-Edwin Newdick.
BAND INSTRUMENT MANUFACTUR-
ING INDUSTRY.-R, 0. Dawson.
BLUEPRINT AND PHOTOPRINT IN-
DUSTRY.-Walter S. Giele.
BOTTLING MACHINERY AND EQUIP-
MENT MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.-
W. P. Cook, Jr.
CANDLEWICK BEDSPREAD INDUS-
TRY.-Fred R. Westcott, S. B. Hurowitz,
B. J. Bandy, Dalton, Ga.; Jack Strain, Hill
City, Ga.; A. R. McDanlel, Jr., Calhoun, Ga.
CARD CLOTHING INDUSTRY.-W. P.
Cook, Jr.
CHILLED CAR WHEEL INDUSTRY.-
D. H. Sherwood, Baltimore, Md.; W. F.
Cutler, N. Y.; E.. P. Waud, Chicago, 1U.;
J. A. Kilpatrick, Albany, N. Y.; J. M. Keller,
St. Louis, Mo.
CIGAR CONTAINER INDUSTRY.-E. G.
Merz replacing Geo. H. Snyder.
CLOCK MANUFACTURING INDUS-
TRY.-Robert 51. Darvis.
CORN COB PIPE MANUFACTURING
INDUSTRY.-Walter S. Giele.
COTTON GARMENT INDUSTRY.-S. L.
Hoffman, A. T. Davenport, and L. Rosensweig.
DOMESTIC FREIGHT FORWARDING
INDUSTRY.-Thomas 0. Connett..
ENVELOPE MACHINE MANUFAC-
TURING INDUSTRY.-W. P. Cook, Jr.
FELDSPAR INDUSTRY.-H. P. Mar-
gerum, Herreld D. Tliropp. Trenton, N. J.;
Henry N. Hanna, Baltimore, Md.; W. H.
Hipps. Asheville, N. C.; Harry Bailey, Pen-
land, N. C.; P. B. Verplanck, Gilsum, N. H.
FOUNDRY SUPPLY INDUSTRY.-W. P.
p Cook, Jr.
FUR MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.-
Samuel Weiss (temporary Code Authority).
GARTER, SUSPENDER, AND BELT
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.-M. M.
Beskind, J. V. Penn, H. Schiller, Sigmund
Stein, and A. Susseles, New York City; D. A.
Chase, Boston, Mass.; A. J. Donahue, Milford,
Conn.; Leo H. Heimerdinger, Philadelphia,"
Pa.; A. Rae Hickok, Rochester, N. Y.
GAS COCK INDUSTRY.-E. W. Roberts,
R. L. O'Brien, D. M. Hamilton, Detroit,
Mich.; 0. J. Leins, Milwaukee, Wis.
GYPSUM INDUSTRY.-L. M. Jenks.
HANDKERCHIEF INDUSTRY.-Wirt -A.
Gill, member of special commission.
HOUSEHOLD GOODS STORAGE AND
MOVING TRADE.-Thomas 0. Connett.
INDUSTRIAL WIRE CLOTH MANU-
FACTURING INDUSTRY.-R. 0. Dawson.
KNITTING, BRAIDING AND WIRE
COVERING MACHINE INDUSTRY.-
W. P. Cook, Jr.
LAUNDRY AND DRY CLEANING MA-
CHINERY MANUFACTURING INDUS-
TRY.-W. P. Cook, Jr.
LIGHTNING ROD MANUFACTURING
INDUSTRY.-Walter S. Giele.
LIQUEFIED GAS INDUSTRY.-J. G.
McLean, Detroit, Mich.; J. J. Callahan, New
York, N. Y.; A. N. Korr, Los Angeles, Calif.;
R. W. Thomas, Detroit, Mich.; Howard S.
Bunn, E. G. Richardson, St. Louis. Mo.;
Mark Anton, Verona, N. J.; V. G. Oliver, San
Francisco, Calif.; W. F. Verkamp, Cincin-
nati, Ohio; G. W. Bach. Kansas City, Mo.;
Dr. R. M. Miller, Pittsburgh, Pa. The fore-
going are members of the Emergency Na-
tional Committee, to serve as temporary Code
Authority.
LINEN IMPORTING TRADE.-Lionel H.
Bailey (nonassociation member).
MALT INDUSTRY.-Oscar J. Rub, Chi-
cago, Ill.; C. Kurth, Jr., W. A. Teipel, Mil-
waukee, Wis.; Eugene J. Meyer, Buffalo,
N. Y.; F. A. Miller, Manitowoc, Wis.
MARKING DEVICES INDUSTRY.-
Walter S. Giele.
MERCHANDISE WARE-OUSING
TRADE.-Thomas 0. Connett.
METAL TANK INDUSTRY.-W. i.
Jones, Joliet, Ill.; A. N. Crawford, Gonsho-
hocken, Pa.; C. C. Crouch, Kansas City, Mo.;
I. B. Merriam, Chattanooga, Tenn.; J. P.
Keene, Alliance. Ohio; J. R. Travis, Denver,
Colo.; E. E. Boardman, Oklahoma City, Okla.


METAL TREATING INDUSTRY.- --%
Walter S. Giele, R. A. Stevens.
MOTOR VEHICLE RETAILING TRADE
COD'E.-Harry Sommers, chairman; John..
E. Smith, vice chairman, as members of the. .-:
State advisory committee of Georgia': 1. E.',
Nolan, member of State advisory committee
of Indiana; J. A. Baker, State advisory corn-
mittee of Utah. Emergency National Cornm'-"
mittee, Carson W. Ide, Los Angeles, Calif.';-!;.
Robert Schoonmaker, Julius Weiss, New--'--
York, N. Y.; C. E. BayUss, Glendale, Calif.;
J. N. Freed, Schenectady, N. Y. i
MUSICAL MERCHANDISE MANUFAC-l
TURNING INDUSTRY.-R. 0. Dawson.
NEWSPAPER PRINTING PRESS IN-' |
DUSTRY.-W. P. Cook, Jr.
PACKAGING MACHINERY INDUSTRWS
AND TRADE.-W. P. Cook, Jr. "Y
PIANO MANUFACTURING INDU$l8
TRY.-R. 0. DAWSON.
PIPE ORGAN INDUS T R Y.-R. O0
Dawson.
PLUMBING FIXTURES INDUSTRY%"
Walter J. Kohler, Kohler, Wis.; W. G. Lan~-
.ford, New York City; Arthur J. Burgn1i',
Trenton, N. J.; George E. Hoffman, Chi,
cago, II. ."
PRINT ROLLER AND PRINT BLOCK
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.-W. P.
Cook, Jr. ..,,I
PRINTING EQUIPMENT INDUSTRY-H
AND TRADE.-W. P. Cook, Jr. -
PULP AND PAPER MILL WIRE
CLOTH MANUFACTURING INDU..,:
TRY.-R. A. Stevens.
RETAIL JEWELRY FOR MINNEAP B
OLIS, MINN.-Quade Weld to succeed MOR
Adelsheim; W. A. LaLone to succeed Let!
Kvaale. :
RETAIL MEAT TRADE.-AI Hameie,.
Albany, N. Y.; B. C. Currin, Greenville, Tex:"',
George Kramer, New York, N. Y.; Adolph
Kaiser, Chicago, Iii.; George H. Bubel, Cleve-
land, Ohio; Elmer T. Wright, Baltimore,.1
Md.; William B. Margerum, Philadelphia';."
Pa.; Irving W. Ringer, Portland, Oreg.;-,7
Emil Schwartz, Detroit, Mich.; David S.':
Andron, New York City. ..,
RETAIL CODE AUTHORITY OF1ki
BUTTE, MONT.-George I. Martin to suc-:.
ceed J. S. Cohen. 4'l
LOCAL RETAIL DRUG CODE AU J'
THORITY for the Third Congressional Dis-,
trict of Connecticut, Raymond Regal to':.
succeed R. F. Graham; Sixteenth ,Congres- .
slonal District of Ohio, W. P. Smith in place ii
of L. E. Putmann; Third Congressional DIs- .
trict of Kentucky, Noah A. Bash to succeed p'"
Frank Schweitzer, resigned; Fred Kluth to .,:;
succeed Noah Bash. ..
SCRAP IRON AND STEEL TRADE; -i
NONFERROUS SCRAP METAL TRADE; ':.j
WOOL STOCK TRADE; SCRAP RUBBER
TRADE; WASTE PAPER TRADE, AND .'
THE COTTON RAG TRADE.-Abraham.1,
Shohan and Raymond Wilmotte. ...
SEWING MACHINE I ND USTRY. t
W. P. Cook, Jr. ".4|
.g..
SOCKET SCREW PRODUCTS MANU- '
FACTURING INDUSTRY.-R. 0. Dawson.
STEEL CASTING INDUSTRY.-j. 0..
Houze. :-
STEEL WQOL I N D U S T R Y.-R. 0. !
Dawson. '.
TANK CAR SERVICE INDUSTRY.- .
Thomas 0. Connett. ':
TEXTILE EXAMINING, SHRINKING, '
AND REFINISHING INDUSTRY.-Eouls :
Lufrano. /
TEXTILE PRINT ROLLER ENGRAV-.,:
ING INDUSTRY.-W. P. Cook, Jr. .
TRUCKING INDUSTRY.-Matthews Ard !-`!
for the State areas of Nebraska, Missouri, .
Kansas, Iowa, and Minnesota:; John T. Boyd :'LM
for the State areas of Colorado, Montana,'91
North Dakota, and South Dakota; Wefllng-.
ton McNichols for the State areas of Call- -
fornia, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Utah, .
Nevada, and Arizona; Thomas 0. Connett for
the State areas of Illinois. Ohio, Indiana, ,.;
Michigan, and Wisconsin; Hubert Holloway.:ji
for the State areas of Georgia, North Caro-..
lina, South Carolina, Florida, Alabama,.g
Kentucky, Mississippi, and Tennessee; W.-D. -
Fletcher's term expired. '
WHOLESALE MONUMENTAL GRAN- cA
ITE INDUSTRY.-Ralph H. Wales. ..
WHOLESALE STATIONERY TRADE.- .
Lester A. Coons. :
WOMEN'S NECKWEAR AND SCARF -
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.-Arnold :
W. Engel, Charles Harris, Samuel L. Kurtz, ,'.:%
Irving B. Levi, Edwin H. Levin, Nathan i'".
Lobel, Edwin Rosenberg, Jack Rothenberg, '
and Simon Durlacher, New York City;
H. C. Burnham, Chicago, Ill.; Rulon Smoot, :
San Francisco, Calif., as nonassoclation.;D
members. i
WOOL FELT INDUSTRY.-J. T. Law- .
less, New York, N. Y.; W. C. King, Boston,
Mass.; H. Faurot, Jr., and A. J. Roth, Chl- i :
cago, Ill.; H. S. Cook, Alhambra. Calif.; as .
alternates, G. W. Gay.v, New York, N. Y.; -
L. H. Hansel, Boston, Mass.: W. S. Faurot, 4
Chicago, Ill.; E. W. Booth, Brooklyn, N. Y. 1.
T. J. Donnelly, Sr., Winchester, Mass. ".


..... ,..y. ,.:,.. .


,:. .: ." . .
.:9 vo.....,.









RECENT ..TRENDS IN SILK TEXTILES.
:.RECENT.TRENDS IN SILK TEXTILtS.


* This week's chart portrays recent
.trends in silk manufacturing. Though
the labor data apply mainly to the silk
I'textile, industry and the throwing in-
sxdustry, they also include reports of,
s:osbme rayon manufacturers who work
underr the Cotton Textile Code. Never-
itheless the data are of considerable
value in depicting the experiences of
4.labor in the silk textile and throwing
"industries. The chart indicates that the
recession which had begun in silk
mFinanufacturing in 1929 was checked by
1932 or early 1933. Thereafter im-
provement has taken place.
tlourly wages reached their low point
-.leveled off iti the last half of 1932.
material change appeared until the
id quarter of 1933 when the hourly
ge rose from 30 cents in June 1933
earlyry 43 cents by September 1933.
small advance over the latter wage
witnessedsd in 1934. The reduction
ours of work, which occurred with
qcodification of industry, was more
'. counterbalanced by increased
A~. wages. In consequence, weekly
-es were bettered during 1933 by ap-
imately $3. This brought the 1934
e.ly wage up to $15. Despite the
nce, the silk textile laborer was
living a 9 percent smaller rdal in-
e .in 1934 than in the year preced-
nhe depression.
employmentt reached the 1929 level
,porarily in the third quarter of
5". Thereafter employment, receded,
S.'except for the period during the
V e, September 1934, the number of
lployees has been .maintained well
ve the number working in the 2
rs ending June 1933. Total weekly
y.rolls, in reflecting both gains in eni-
oyment and gains in weekly wages,
phroved-with the, pick-tip in business
after the drop in 1932, and moved
h'mhler in 1933 with the advent of the


t'oaes.
. Ih the third section of the chart are
two measures of activity in the silk in-
,dustry, namely, man-hours and de-




troduced, has made a slightly better
showing than man-hours in 1934. The
general weakness of these series since
. 1929 may be taken as evidence of re-
p:-llacement of silk goods by rayon
S.products.
1'. Stocks of broad goods beld by stock-
.;scarrying mills, expressed in yards per
Sloong have been cut in half in the years
i1-since 1929. This can be seen in the
fourthh section of thle chart. The reduc-
I- tion was a reversal from the increases
^,that took place between 1926 and 1929
when stocks of broad goods, as meas-
rr ured in yards per loom, rose from 1,00
Yards to 1,600 yards. Production and
' shipments have experienced h vide fluc-
,tuation in the period since 1929, mov-
;;ing together generally; shipments have
been the more variable of the two.
th Raw silk prices declined drastically
After 1929, even more than did the price
:,of rayon. In 1934 silk prices were ap-
'f..proximately one-fourth their 19,29
'ya prices while rayon was selling for half
'.:.of its 1929 price. In marked contrast,
..is the small recession in wholesale
1. prices of silk goods; 1934 saw this in-
{ dex still at 82 percent of its 1929 aver-
,'agae. Rapid improvement in raw silk
prices occurred in 1932 and again in
S1933. These gains, which took place at
o.rtimes when silk deliveries were strong,
,:..'.were not maintained more than a few
" months.
i",.The silk industry has felt the com-
. petition of rayon keenly in recent years
due to improvement in the quality of
;synthetic fibers, and reduction in the
prices of these fibers. This competition
has had the effects of weakening raw
silk prices and prices of silk goods, of
reducing consumption of raw silk, and
of inducing silk weavers to turn to pro-
duction of rayon goods.


F.**. '


. ..-'...
", .. .'- % :. : . -. .-. .- .. .


5.0


D- "04


U0 I
I WHOLESALE PRICE OF RAW SILK,
________ ________ JAPANESE DOUBLE EXTRA CRACK. _____
00 R 13-15, N.Y. IN DOLLARS PER LB.


.-_r_____ _____ btt\ i 1-r---I


.4


(2).


1i 1.50
0
C


WHOLESALE
COMPOSITE
\_I


PRICE OF
, IN DOLLAR'


)ILK GOODS,
5 PER YARD
I \I


a b '


I
/



6\
%


,->


ooi- --- i -- -i-- --.- i--;=A


WHOLESALE PRICE OF RAYON, 150 DENIER\
"A'; N.Y.,IN DOLLARS PER LB. \,--


II Lf Ti~iii


. 1 6' 1 W I'' I I 1 1.. ...... .. . ._ -'_ .. .. . .. .. .'-.


M J S D M J S
1929 1930


D M J S D M J 5
1931 1932


D M J S D9
1933


193 J4
1934


I I I I -I i i I


1935D M J U
1935


50 .

40 I

30
.!,

l."
20

15 ,


10
-o. ii

*S
.. ..,;i.'.._'



,. "|

7
6
6 :?

5
4

3 IT


2

1500


1000
:ooo 5
9002
800 0
70039
600 -'
5000.
400 0 "

300>o


200 !


Sources of Data: From Monthly Labor Review, Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment and pay-roll indexes adjusted by NRA to 1930
Census totals, average weekly wage, average hours per week 1932 to date, and average hourly wage 1932 to date; man-hour coWli-:l
puted from employment and hours per week by NRA. From Wholesale Prices, Bureau of Labor Statistics-wholesale price of ra2j
silk, Japanese double extra crack, 13-15, N. Y., wholesale price of rayon, 150 denier, grade A, N. Y. From Conference Board Servcl '
Letters, National Industrial Conference Board, Inc.-average hours per week and average hourly wages (multiplied by .8579), for
1929-31. From Production and Distribution of Silk and Rayon Broad Goods, The Textile Foundation, Inc. and The Nation.'
Federation of Textiles, lnc.-production, shipments, and stocks, end of month, of broad goods in yards per loom for stock-carryin7i
mills, for 1929-October 1934. From Survey of Current Business-current data on production, shipments, and stocks of broad'
goods, silk deliveries as compiled by National Federation of Textiles, and wholesale price of silk goods, composite, as compiled by'
Fairchild News Service. Chart prepared exclusively for the Blue Eagle by the Research and Planning Division, NRA.
-^l


Code Authority

Members Resigned

The following Code Authority members
resigned :
Baking Industry-Karl Hauck. -
Domestic Freight Forwarding Industry-
Vincent A. Hughes.


Hack Saw Blade Manufacturing Industry-
R. A Stevens.
I'pler iMalkt.rs Felt Industry-C. G. Spencer.
Rubler Tre Manufatturiug Indu-try-
0 cur G',tbhe.
I Tank Cart Srrvie- Industry-Vincent A.
riugihe'.
\Wre'nh Manufacturing Industry-R. A.
SteveCls.


Trade Practice Com-

plaints Plans Approved.:

Corset and Brassiere Industry. ,'j
Crushed Stone. Sand and Gravel, and AiMI
Inildust tlies
Handkerchief Industry. ,;


UL S COVEP'MEhl R IMhINIIG Orr


TOTAL I IAN-HOURS

AA A- IN )"o-. 0'000 i1




SILK DELIVERIES (CONSUMPTION) V
IN 0,oO0( YO BALES \
I/ _ _ _ _ _ _ _


_________I I


I


I ZYOI ----n-4


,vr-


.."..w .."^ ..". ". ".' *.'"" :" ':" ".


It. Di.Ur- Er./UL.-


,., 1 1.p.r


v


4.


Tlll


+0---