The Blue Eagle ( 1934- )

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Title:
The Blue Eagle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Creator:
United States -- National Recovery Administration
Publisher:
National Recovery Administration ( Washington, D.C )
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 16917556
System ID:
AA00021018:00041

Full Text










S Issued Weekly by the National Recov


Steps Taken to i, ,
Steps Taken to Silk Textile Industry

Adjust Productive Code Amendment

Capacity in Cotton Is Approved


Textile Industry
NIRB Acts on Recommendation of
Textile Planning Committee
Studying Problems of
Mill Groups

The National Industrial Recovery Board
on recommendation of its Textile Planning
Committee has taken steps to adjust avail-
able productive capacity in those groups of
the cotton textile industry where it may be
necessary to meet the present inadequate
consumer demand.
The Textile Planning Committee of the
Board was created when it had become ap-
parent that the textile industries of the coun-
try faced an emergency threatening seriously
to impede national recovery. The commit-
tee's members included Arthur D. Whiiteside,
and Sidney Hillman, members of NIRB, and
Leon Henderson, economic adviser to the
Board, who are particularly fitted by years
of experience to deal with the industrial labor
and economic problems of the textile indus-
tries. Prentiss Coonley, fourth member of
the committee has been administrator of
the Textile Division, in constant touch with
textile industries' problems since he joined
NRA early in July 1934.
The committee's task is, from a study of
the industries' problems, to formulate,a long-
time program for all the textile industries,
and, in the meantime, to recommend tempo-
rary or emergency steps necessary in laying
the groundwork of a constructive program.
The issuance of the order of March 26 is
such an emergency step.
It has been demonstrated to the Planning
SCommittee that there are branches of the
cotton textile industry which cannot continued
to run in the immediate future on their pres-
ent operating schedules. Some plants are
already being forced to close down with com-
plete unemployment and hardship to the com-
munities dependent on them. It is inevitable
that there be some reduction for a time in
operation and employment. The questions
are: Shall this reduction be made in an or-
derly and equal way, so as to spread the
Inadequate activity and employment reason-
ably equally over plants and communities de-
pendent on them? Or, shall these reductions
take place in a haphazard, unequal, and ex-
treme form, with prolonged uncertainty and
instability and with degree of hardship
wholly unnecessary?
The Board believes it preferable in this
situation to spread such work and employ-
mnient as is available as widely and equally
as-possible among the various communities
in the industry. Accordingly it has created
machinery by which this can be done in the
divisions of the industry where it may prove
necessary, by temporarily lowering the pres-
Sent maximum of hours of operation or num-
bher of machines operated.
Reductions, where necessary temporarily
in the emergency situation, will be limited to
not more than 25 percent in the maximum
hours of operation prescribed in the Code
or in the maximum number of machines oper-
ating in a particular branch or unit during
the preceding 6 months. This will not affect
Ssingle-shift mills which have operated within
6 months prior to any reduction of productive
Capacity. Production in many branches of
the industry is already in keeping with the
available demand.
f.- Ample safeguards in the interests of man-
i agemerit, labor, and the consuming public,
Shave been provided by the creation of a re-
search and planning committee consisting of
3: members to be appointed by the chairman
of the Code Authority and one by the NIRB,
none of the members to have any interests in
any unit of the industry. Under the pro-
cedure established action by the Code Au-
thoriry based on a recommendation of this
research and planning committee, will always
be subject to approval by the NIRB.
The approval of the order is an emer-
gency step leading toward a broad, long-time
planning relationship between this industry
and the administration which has been
organized.
From several causes demand has been ab-
Snormally restricted. The doubling of the
:'price of raw cotton and theadding of the
cotton processing tax has thrown cotton out
i`' of its usual price relationship to other tex-
Stiles. Exports have been steadily decreasing
for several years, while in thle last few
Months an unprecedented increase in im-
p. ports has made buyers so fearful of a price
collapse that they have minimized their pur-
cl hases. This has contributed to the accu-
i. mulatlon in mills' hands rf inventories for
r, which no reasonable market is available,
. throwing an added burden on the price level.
kr. (Continued on page 4, column 2)


The National Industrial Recovery Board
has approved an amendment to the Silk Tex-
tile ludustry Code inieurporating in it the
standard nonparimnerslhip, nonliability clause
for the protection of members of the Code
Authority.
The amendment adds a new section 6 to
Article VI which reads as follows:
Nothing contained in this Code shliall con-
stitute the members of the Code Authority
partners for any purpose. Nor shall any
member of the Code Authority be liable in
any manner to anyone for any act of any
other member, officer, agent, or employee of
the Code Authority. Nor shall any. member
of the Code Authority, exercising reasonable
diligence in the conduct of the duties here-
under, be liable to anyone for any action or
omission to act under this Code, except for
his own willful malfeasance or nonfeasance."


Used CarTrade-In

Amendment Is

Approved
The National Industrial Recovery Board
has announced approval of an amendment
to the Code of fair competition for the mo-
tor vehicle retailing trade relating to used
car allowances.
A public hearing on the amendment was
held March 7. At this time representatives
of the National Control Committee, thle gov-
erning body of the industry, urged adoption
of the amendment. They stated that the
amendment, together with the improved
methods of collecting and compiling statis-
tics for the official guide would afford a
sales value of used cars "equally fair to
consumers of such used cars, to the con-
sumer of new cars who uses the old car in
lieu of money, and the dealer who accepts
the used car instead of cash on the sale of
a new motor vehicle."
Approval of thle amendment is conditional
on the proviso that it is to be effective only
on official guides compiled and published in
accordance with the pertinent provisions of
the amendment, and further, that all offi-
cial guides effective on and after April 10,
1935, shall be compiled and published in con-
formity with the pertinent provisions of the
amendment.

Drapery-Upholstery

Trimming Code Is

Extended
The National Industrial Recovery Board
has extended the Drapery and Upholstery
Trimming Industry Code from its present ex-
piration date, March 31. 1935, to June 16,
1935, or until such time as the Textile Trim-
mings Code, which is planned to include the
industry, is approved.
The Code had been extended on three pre-
vious occasions. Meanwhile, -negotiations
have been conducted looking toward consoli-
dating it with the Narrow Fabrics Code and
the Millinery and Dress Trimming Braid
and Textile Code. Both the drapery and up-
holstery trimming industry and the narrow
fabrics industry opposed this move, which
was abandoned.
Instead, a tentative Code known as the
Textile Trimmings Code, was prepared. It
is intended to combine the Drapery anti Up-
holstery Trimming Code and the Millinery
and Dress Trimming Braid Code under it.

Amendment to Candy

Manufacturing Code

Is Approved
The National Industrial Recovery Board
has announced approval of an amendment
to the Code for the candy manufacturing in-
dustry, as requested by the Code Authority.
The effect of the amendment, which re-
designates subsection c, section 2, rule 17 of
article VIII, as- section 3, is to prohibit mem-
bers of the industry from granting credit or
other allowance or replacement beyond 6
months from the date of shipment when
.the candy is returned b-ecause of defects in
package, quality, or appearance. The Code
as originally written'prohibited a manufac-
turer from granting credit beyond 6 months
from the date of shipment when the candy is
returned because of manufacturing defects
but not when the candy is returned because
of defects in package, quality, or appearance.


4M


The President signed the following Executive order reconstituting the'
National Industrial Recovery Board on March 21: .'-2,
"By virtue of the authority vested in me by the National Industrial RecovertQ
Act, approved June 16, 1933, and to effectuate the purposes of said act: I hereby.
reconstitute the National Industrial Recovery Board created by Executive Order,
No. 6859 as follows: i
"1. I hereby continue as members of said Board: A. D. Whiteside, Sidney" g
Hillman, Leon C. Marshall, and Walton Hamilton. .
"'2. I hereby appoint William P. Witherow and Philip Murray as members !
of said Board. i
"3. Upon the retirement of S. Clay Williams as a member and chairman of0t
the Board on March 22, 1935, I hereby appoint Donald R. Richberg to serve"t
a member and acting chairman of said National Industrial Recovery Board. .:,
"4. Any previous orders concerning the subject matter hereof, are herebM.
modified and amended so far as necessary to make this order fully effective." .C
On taking office as chairman of the Na- tion that this will be approved by the Ooq-tf:-
tional Industrial Recovery Board, Mr. Rich- gress, and that the extension of the act willini
berg made the following statement: be authorized. .'-.
The NRA is moving into a new period For this purpose the administration ofn I
of its development. Pending the enactment the act will be concentrated in the admln--u.A
of legislation it would be unwise to put into Istrative officers and the Board itself willfV
effect new major policies which should re- serve two major functions. First, to deterz'B
ceive the sanction of the Congress. But it mine broad questions of administrative pol-9.
is also necessary to make clear that the icy. Second, as a supervisory body to recom-.:
fundamental policies of the NRA and its mend action, either by the President, or.byci,
activities, which have received overwhelming the acting chairman in behalf of the Board,, B
public support, should be vigorously adminis- in accordance with the authority retained by
tered. There should be no question of the the President, or delegated by him under the;'
whole-hearted determination of the adminis- law. :M i
tration to carry forward the industrial re- "When the Congress has laid down tti
cover program upon the reasonable assump- standards and requirements to be effective'ia'
After June 16, It will be possible very rapidly4
to put in effect a permanent organization,,.
conforming to the'. provisions of the ne*
law.
"I would point out that from the begin H
Code Approved
t ning of the NRA to the present time tfte'
f r problem of effective administration has been
for Zinc industry one of great difficulty. It has been necessary ,
to build a new machinery and keep It oper-
atlag during a period of continual remodel16k,.
The National Industrial Recovery Board sting durng a period of continual remdee i
Ing. It was like building a transportation'i
has approved a Code for the zinc industry, system in war time, with the necessity o
It will become effective Monday, April 8. continual reconstruction, while at the samle-.
The Code provides a basic maximum 40- time maintaining the transportation of paaz-.
hour week averaged over 3-month periods, at singers -and supplies. -
minimum wages varying between 30 and 47t. "Such an operation could be subjected to.:
cents an hour. The order of approval, how- many apparently valid criticisms. Such al.t
ever, limits the averaging provisions' opera- system could not. possibly be made to work,:..
weul according to peace-time standards ofl.
tion to 60 days, at the end of which time the wefcic. Bding to tpeace-time standards .s
avergin pr% isons" sallbe atomticlly efficiency. But to those who know what. basdl4
averaging provisions "shall be automatically been done, who appreciate the necessities, adi
stayed and the Code amended * -to, well as the difficulties, it must be evident4
eliminate the said averaging provisions, or that the NRA is making a great contributions'
the said averaging provisions shall be super- to the support of an industrial civilizatldf,
seded by appropriate provisions submitted by "Every agency of human progress fro
the Code Authority which shall conform to the wheelbarrow to the airplane and from 'i~
established Administration policy." tribal council to a' republican form of goy ,
An S-hour daily limitation is placed in the ernment has been opposed and scoffed at by
the tired old men and the young:-men-1n-a4.:
n aximum hours provisions of thle Code, and hurry of every generation. The tired old:-
the Board is empowered to name an impar- men are sure you can't remake human naE;i,
tial investigator "to review conditions in the tore. The young-men-in-a.hurry, think you-.!
mining division of the industry and specifi- can reform human activities by setting upi
call concerning the application of the S- new systems overnight. But the fact, :I~
hour provision in conformity with the State that aggressive, mature men and women.' o
laws." The order of approval requires the imagination, by steadily improving hum`iH |
impartial investigator to "review conditions mechanisms of cooperation, steadily advance;.
in the Mississippi Valley, southern and south- the level of civilization... ",.
The NRA has the greatest possibilitiesn.
western districts of the mining division of o' Th Nh st
ofohelping to develop an industrial civiliza- T
the industry for the purpose of reporting to tion that will not enslave, but will set free
the Board within 90 days from the effective the masses of the people from tyrannies thab
date of this Code, the amount of adjustment have oppressed them throughout history?
of Code wages (not in excess of the recom- The progress made in 2 years In building,"':
mendations of the Labor Advisory Board- better, safer, fairer, industrial structure has
35 cents per hour above ground and 40 cents been enormous. The man who would gIv4
per hour underground) possible in said dis- up the effort and smash the machine Is.th.
trit an that th Bord fr same type of man who 100 years ago want"
tricts* and that. the Board after to prohibit railroads, and 30 years ago wa: -
reviewing said report and consulting with all denouncing automobiles, as dangerous pand'
interests concerned, may modify the mini- destructive experiments contrary to the 'na B
mum Code wage provisions for said districts rural order of human existence.'" ,.
of said mining division, as it may deem nec- ______________ .
essary upon the basis of said report." The ..
Code rates are 30 and 35 cents an hour, re- Pl i F re C d
spectively, in all three districts. Plumbing F ixtures Code:
The Code is to be administered by a Code "
Authority of 6 voting members, 5 to be se- amendment Ap roved,
elected from the members of the executive Aproved
committee of the American Zinc Institute, The National Industrial Recovery Board': I
Inc.. and 1 elected by members of the indus- today announced approval of an amendmenf't.,
try not members of the institute, to the Plumbing Fixtures Code, deleting i
There are about 12,800 people employed in article VII, trade practices, and article VI SM
the industry, about two-thirds of them under- marking policies and oer provisions pe
ground. The mine production of recoverable policies and other provisions er
zinc declined from 775,000 tons in 1926 to taking to such policies. The wage and hourA I
285,000 in 1932. In the same period world provisions of the Code and the number of
production declined from 1,768,000 tons to workers employed are ,ln no way affected byIk
1,074,000 tons. this amendment. ...

X. ,...,
{t, . ". . . i ,


Vol. 11, No. 1i


XY I TV ILT 1 12 --- -


424


very Administration, Washington March 29, 1935 ...



National Industrial Recovery


Board is Reconstituted .


By Executive Order

Donald R. Richberg is Appointed Acting Chairman and
William P. Witherow and Philip Murray Are Named
As New Members of Administrative Group :









y -,,.: 'i : *- '" ..": -- .. .- ; *.. i ..."- .


? SCHEDULE OF CODE HEARII


, Important Information Concerning Notices of Hearings and


= Opportunity
:,.. Hearings are of two types: (I) Oral hearings,
designated hearing" on calendar; and (2) op-
'i,'portunlty to be heard" by the filing of written
.statements of fact. briefs, or criticisms dealing
i-;th the subject matter of such notice.

The subject matter of these notices Is abbreviated
",in the schedule published below. A complete offl-
,cilal copy of any notice may be obtained on request
from the National Recovery Administration, Room
3'3816, Department of Commerce Building. Wash-
itngton, D. C.
H' BEARINGS (oral) : Those wishing to be h-ard
:must file a written request with the proper Deputy
*-.Admtnlstrator at least 24 hoars before the date
..'.set for the bearing, which request must state:
W:(1) Name of Industry and date of bearing;
?i[:(2) names of persons wishing to testily and groups
, ',represented; (31 definite alternative proposal or
.jpeclflc objections, without argument. Hearings
,-are confined to factual presentation. Written
briefss containing arguments as well as fact may
file' fied.


INDUSTRYY OR TRADA


Sunday, Mar. 'q4, 1935
.I'Retali Solid Fuel Indus-
.t,. try, 280-38.




.4o0nday, Mar. 25, 1935
k'rtsrnlture Manufacturing
g,5: Induatry, 145-51.
e..ulrnit ure Manufacturlng
F Industry, 145-5b2.
gjjeedlework Industry in
g..Puerto Rico, 474-18.


PLACE AND DEPOIi
ADINlSTRA rOR


Room 717, Barr Buildding,
910 Seventeenth Street
NW Washington, D.
C., F. A. Hecht.




Room 411. I151S Street
,NW., Washington, D.
0 C. R. Niklason.
Room 411, 1518 K Street
NW., Washington, D.
C., C. R Niklason.
Room 1031, Barr Building,
Washington, D. C.,Bos:
Long. or offices of N RA,
San Juan, P. R.


to be Heard

OPPORTUNITY TO BE HEARD (In writing):
Pacts, criticisms, obje.tlons, or suggitions i:'Wn-
cerning the subject matter of such notices must
be submitted on ,)r before the final date spe-clued
in the notice, addrr-ssed to the proper Deputy Ad.
ministraitor or other official indicated. Such com.
munlcatlone must state: (Ii Name of industry;
W2) name of correspondent and group represented;
I3' facts supporting criticisms, objections, or
suggestions.
The subject matter referred to In either type
of notice may be revised in any reasonably ger-
mane particular on the basis of such facts, criti-
cisms, and other conslderations as are properly
before the Administrator.
Calendar Is chronological, with alphabetical
arrangement by trade or Industry for each day.
NOTE: Since all notices must be in the printer's
hands by Friday evening next preceding the pobli
cation of The Blue Eagle, the calendfir I-low does
not show notices posted on the Oticial Bulletin
Board after that date, nor does this calendar Ebhowi
other hearings for the same dntes whlcrh nmay have
appiearedl in prior Issues of this publication.


PROPOsED AcTiON


Opportunity to be heard on Order No. 2j0-2?36 issued mar 14,
10J5. canceiung the lowesm reasonable trucila ctOIs to. oa u'ed
within the trade area of Wesitchesteir County, D.vi_.ion 3. by
Order Zi(6-23. and wnich will beconimeuffet'.u within 0) da:i from
the date iasued unless object],:ns or sugge-ticona are uomittea
pitr tbereto.


Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the WaVlk-
ertown Chair Co or %Walkertown, N. C, for exemption from the
provisions of arts. IlI and IV ol the Code
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the
Smiths. Inc ., BarnVille. Oa., for exemption from the pro iions
of art iV. sec.5of theCc.de.
Opportunity to be heard on budget and beai- of contribution for
the period from July 19, 1B34. to June 10t, i., which was ap-
proved on Mar. ib,, 135, by Order No 4"4-17, and wiech wil
become effective within 10 dsys from that date unless good caLUe
to the contrary is shown prior thereto.
The total amount 0f the budget iLs1,0M00. The basis of coiributon
Is subject to any applicable executive and/or administrative order
at the rate of 1 V, pet cent of value added to goods b, virtue of t reir
procei.i. in Puerto Rico, a6 represented b- i nvoice price of goods
chiri.a dllrin fnzo naorilr.d rr,.m then rita hrc.i' rto Jtine 16. 1935


sesday, Mar. 26, 1935
re Exrtingumshing Ap- 13tia Street NW City Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
pliance Manufacturing Club Building, Wash. Authority lot permission toi espend from surplus fund aVailable
Industry, 98-24. ington, D. C., W. W. Dec. 31, 1934, and to a-tas and collect a portion sufficient to cover
Ru.e. expenses for the period from Jan. 1, through Mar 31, 1935, in a
total amount not to exceed 4i of the actual expenses incurred dur
ing the budgetary period which ended Dec. 31. 1934, pending sub-
milsion and approval ol the 1935 budget and basis of Contribution,
_____________ _______________ which was granted by Order No. 9.-23 dated Mar. 12. 1935.

Wednesday. Mar. 27,
* 1936
itaUl Solid Fuel Indus- 910 Seventeenth Street Opportunity to be heard crn Order No. 2f0-234 dated Mar. 12.
try, 280-237. NW Barr Building, 193t, revising the Code Autinotity budpret and basic of contribu.
Washington D. C F. non for Dtrison No 2I, and which will become effeeti-e within
A. Becht. 15 days from the date micued unless prior to tiat time ai subse
______________ ________________ qut order. is iauled

-.Thursday, Mar. 28,
: '1935
shmbled Watch Indus- Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, Hearing on application submitted by the Code Authority for
l.stry, 510-57A., New York City, N. Y., amendment to toe provisions of art. VIII of tha Code.
_'______________ 10 ai m.. W L. Schurz. ______ ____________

Iday, Mar. 29, 1935
sifted Outerwear In- Room 3016, Commerce Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Istry, 164-44. Building. Washinglon, Authority for approval of is buoFut and ba l of contribution for
SD. C., Burton E. Op- the pernodending June 1i6. Theotiginal noiceof this budJget
penheun. omitted reference to ta cost of making labels and for this reason
the budget was cunditionally -pproved by Order 144-42 dated
Mar. 1I, 1936 subject to certain provisions.
ce Manafactuiaing In- Room .-20d6, Commerce Supplemental Notice of Hearing on application submitted by
1latry, 6-12 E. Building, Washineton, William Sargent, of the frm of Sarvents Late Workx, North
SD C,, tO a. m F. 0. Scituate, R. I for a certificate to allow him to Import I Levers
.i Lee. lace machine from England in accordance with art. XII, eac 2.
ot the Code.
miberandTimberProd- Banquet Room, Carlton Hearing on application submitted by the Code Authority for
iols"industries, i-2Y. Hotel, Washington, D. approval of amendments establishing open price ling systems In
-' C., l0s m. and 2 p.m., the wirebound bo. s ubdivision of the wooden package division
" '_______ A. C. Dixon. and In thu manogany suodirision of te hardwood division.


fHisturday, Mar. 30,
1935
eAdlam and Low Priced
jewelry Manufarturing
,T.'dustry, 175-40.
eday, Apr. 2, 1935

6Ul- Solid Fuel Indus-
280-240.


N.,

Wednesday, Apr. 3,
1935
Mayonnaise Industry,







:;,.
t,'yater Shell Crushers
w Industry, 4 _-1U.


^. .Thursday, Apr. 4,
1'. 1935
a.'
'Canned Salmon Industry,
15.' .49 -5


p-Commereial Refrigerator
:IndustLry, 18Il-1

'.'lshlng Tackle"Industry,
'i2r ia--I.




h';Itlht Sewing Industry
lL' Except Garments, 226-
. 49.

L-' .umber and Timber
S Products Industsies, 9-
322 .




i : .
..;...-- .-i : .:, ,'.:"*i*; .


Room 406. 1518 K Street Opportunity to be heard on applicition ubmltted by Clark &
NW, Washington, D. CoombiCo Providencer. R I foit exemptionfrom the provisions
c W. L. Schumz. of art. I., secs I and li'oi. of the Code.


Room 717, 910 Se'enteeath
Street N\W Washing-
ton, D C., F. A. Hflecht.


Room L05, Barr Building,
Washiington, D. C.,
Weld MI. Steveos.







Room 532, Barr Building,
Washington, D C.,
R. S. Hollingshead.




Roam 605, Barr Building.
Washington, D. C.,
Weld MI. Stevens.

132) 0 Street NW., City
Club Building, Wash-
ington, D. C, W. I,'W.
Rose
Room 402, 1518 K Street
NW., Washinitob, D.
0., W. L. Schusz.



Room 4061, Commerce
Buildlna, Washington.
D. O.I M. D. Vincent
907 Sixteenth Street NW.,
Washington, D. C., A.
C. Dixon.


Opportunity to be heard on Order No 2.0-23- granting per-
mision to the National Code Authority to eapend from the sur-
gluo funds avadlabie on Feb .-,6 1935. andiot accounts receivable
y tbe various divisional Code Authorities, a portion sufficient
to cover eipeonses for a period ol 45 da ,;. namely, to Apr. 1Ib, 193-,5.
The order is dated Mar. I1, 1935 and will become effective within
b15 dais unless prior to trial time a subsequent order is issued.



Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for approval of budgets and bases of costrioution fur
the period from Apr 10 to June 16, 1935, and for the period from
June 17 to Oct. 10, 1935, provided the Code is extended by opera-
tion of law, or other i'e, for a period to or including Oct. 10., 1935
Total budget for theperiod from Apr. 10 to June 16, 1935, is 113,22 26).
Basis of a.sesiment is" of the annual rates of as.essmenls rang.
iog from $3 for 'ais of les. than i800 for tho year ended Dec 31,
1934, to $12.iilOj on sales ramounting to more tnan T4.00,00
Total budget for the period from Juneia 17 to Oct 10. 1935. is $23.977 74.
Basis of contribution Is at the rate of k of the annual rates of a,
seesments above cet fortb
Opportunity to be heard on amendments to art I., sec. 2, of
the Code, wnich were approved on Mar. 14 lU35, by Order No.
452-0 and which will become effective 20 days from that date
unless good cause to the conlrarty is shown prior theieto



Opportunity to be heard on application submItted by the Codo
Autnorily for amendment to art. VI, see 8i', of lthe Code, relat.
inc to the filing of standard provisions for employment contracts
for all persons employed in the Unuted States proper for work in
Alaska on a monthly ba.is.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for amendment to art II ideflinions), by striking out
the present Sec. 1 and inserting a new see. I.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the John
J Hldeibrandt Co. of Logansport, Ind., for exemption from the
provisions of art f. sec 3. subeclinrjn t ) of the Code. Insofar
as these provisions apply to 6 skilled employees, and for permis-
sion to pay tha.be employees tLme and one-half above the wage
rate as provided by the Code, for all hours in excess of 8 per day
or 40 per week, for a period of 90 days.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the com-
fortable dilvislon of this industry, for amendment to the Code
by addin. to art. II of the supplemental provisions for the com-
fortable division, a new see 5.
Opportunity to be heard on Order No. 9-321, dated Mar. 15,
1935, approving amendments to the Code, which will become
effective within 20 days from that date, or on Apr. 4, 1935, unless
good cause to the contrary is shown prior thereto.


NGS, MARCH 24 TO APRIL 15


INDUSTRY OR TRADE PL.lCE ANT') DEPUTY
AreINISIDaiOy PROPOSED AcTION


Thursday, Apr. 4,
19353-Conad.
Machine Tool and Equip-
ment Dl'triouting
Trade, 139-13.
Silk Teitilde Industry,
46-33.


Friday, Apr. 6, 1935
Film Manoufactluring In-
dustry, 84-B2-6





Ladles' Handbag Indus-
try, 332-22.


Men's NeckL-wear Indus-
try, 363-27.


Ready-Mixed Concrete
Industry, 311-31.





Solid Braided Cord In-
dustry. 309-19.


Room 721, 910I Seven-
ieenth Street NW.
Wisinrton, D. C., F.
A. Hechrt
Room 30i, Commerce
Buiidjng, Washmpnton,
D. 0., A. Henry Thurs-
ton.


Room 510, 1518 K Street
NW., Washington, D.
C., J. Reed Carpenter.




Room 40315, Commerce
BuJldidne, r ashington,
D.C Walter Mangum.

Room 4067. Commerce
Building. Washington,
D. C., M. D Vincent.

Room 704, Albee Build-
ing, Wasnilncton, D. 0.,
Robert N. Campbell.




Room 3024, Commerce
Building, Wastingtoo,
D. C Victor Sadd


Steel Package Manufac- Room ,10. 1519 K Street
curing Industry, 84 NW, Washinoton, D.
V--1. C., H. Ferri White


Saturday, Apr. 6,
1935
Automotive Chemical
Speilities SManufactur-
cng Industry, 522-7.

Pipe Organ Industry,
210-b15.


Room 318, 1010 Vermont
Avenue, Washincvion,
D C., Earle W'. Dahl-
berg.
Room 402, 151t K Strevt
N W.. Wabshingtoo, D.
C., W. L. Schurz.


Safety Razor and Safe.ty Room 0. 1518 K Street
Razor Blad-le Manufac- NW Washington, D.
touring Indu-try, 439-22. C., J. Reed Carpenter.


Monday, Apr. 8, 1935
California Sardine Pro-
ca.rMg Lndu.tty, 30u
C-12.




Cast Iron Soil 'Pipe In.
du'try, 18-20.

Fishery Industry, 308-l67..


Infants' and Children's
Wear Industry, 373-47.





Musical Merchandise
Manufacturing Indus-
try, 209-15


Scientific Apparatus In-
dustry, 114-17.









Wholesale Millinery
Trade, 201-E-16.


Tuesday, Apr. 9, 1935
Women's Belt Industry,
41-6a-C.


Room 532, Barr Building,
Washingtpon. D. C.,
R. S. Holingshead.




1320 0 Street NW.. City
Glib Building. Wash-
ington, D. C Dexter A.
Totein
Room 5b3,, Banrr Building,
Washington, D. C.,
R. S Holimgshead.










Room 4061, Commerce
Bwldina., Washincton,
D. C., MI. D. Vincent.




Room 402. 1518 K Street
NW, Washinpigton, D
C., W. L Schutz.


13?0 0 Street NW., City
Club Budlding, Wash-
Lngiton, D. C., W. W.
Rose.








910 Seventeenth Street
NW.. Barr Buildine,
Wahbiocion, D C-
Fiank H. Crockard.


Room 2062-64, Commerce
Building. Washinoton,
D 'C 10 a. m., M. D.
V'incent.


Opportunity to be heard on applilcatton submitted by the OCod
Authority for amendment to art. Ill, sea. 4 of the Code.

Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority [or approval oa budgets and basis of contribution faor
the period from Jan I, to June 1I. 1935t. and for the period from
Jane 17, to Des 31, 1935. provrlded the Code Is extended by opera.
tion of law, or otherwise, for a period to or including Dec at,
915
Total budget for the period from Jan. 1, to June Id, 1985 Is Sf W
Basis of assessment is at the rate of 2 cents for eaoh $ 100 oio e
sales for the calendar year 1933, for the period from Jan. I, to
June 16, 1935., except that commission weavers shall pay an assesm.
meant at the rate of 4 cents for each $100 of net billings of their
actual net billings for services for the calendar year 1933. The
assesmants to be made against each member of the industry
who.e principal line of business is governed by this Code.
Total budget for the period Itrom June 17, to Dec. 31, 1935 ish53, 6,
Ba.is of asseisment is the same as for the period from Jan. I, so
June 16, 1936. above quoted.


Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the
Code Authority for approval of its budget and basis of contrb-a.
tion for the period, from Den I, 1934, to Nov. 31, 1935.
Total budget is $l6,0ii. Assessment Is baed on the percentage of
each member's sales of the industry for the previous calendar
year, but In no case shall any one member's assessment be greater
than i, 005 of nI; own dollar sales and no member shall pay more
than 4S percent of the iolal budget, end the minimum for any
member snail be $25 per year.,
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the
Code Authority for approval of its budget and basis of rontribu.
tion for the period from Mar. 26. 1935. to Mar 25, 103d.
Total budget is $110,d11. Basis of contrinutlon is W of 1 percent of
th[be als of the members of the Industry.
Opportunity to be heard on amendment to art V, par A, see I
and sec. 2, of the Code, which has been approved by Order No.
363-2.i dated Mar. 16, 1035, and which will become effective 20"
days from that date unless good cause to the contrary is shown
prior thereto.
Opportunity to be heard on application .submitted by the
Code Authority for approval of Its budget and basis of contribu-
tion for me period from Mar 1, 1935. to Mar I, 19jIi.
'Iotal budget is $22,400. Bat, of contribution Is *. cent per cubic
yard monthly, efiective Mar. 1, 193i, based on a monthly average
of 1431l production for the remainder of the calendar year, sold
ba.eco on a monthly average of 1935 production for the months or
January and February 1938.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the
Code Autbority for approval of its budget and basis of contribu-
tlion for the period from Feb. 26, 193.,, to Feb. 25, 1936.
Total budget is M1.01A. Eadis of contribution Is that percentage ef
the foregoing budget, any addition Io or deductions. therelrom,
approved by the NIRB which a member'st-ales in pounds is ol
the lotal salesof the industry, such contributions shall be made In
quarterly In.tallments payable In advance and based on 1th)
ratio of the ;aluc of each member of the industry for theo precediag
13 weeks to thie iales of the industry during that period.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the
supplementary Code Authority for amendment to art V of the
supplemeotary Code by adding a new paragraph under rule A
to toeitent t hat no member of the Industry shall sell orexchange,
or offer to sell or exchange, any products of the Industry for which
pricesand other conditionsof sale have been fied b, him pursuit
to the provisions of this article, eXLept in accordance with such
pricea- and other conditions ol sale.



Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the
Code Authority fat termination of the exemption conferred in
par []I of Administrative Order No X-J36.

Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for approval of its budget and basis of contribution for
the petir.,d from Sept 1. 1931, to June 15, 1935.
Total budget i; S6,000 Basis of as.ssment shall be 4 of I percent
of gro s ale: for the year 1933.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for amendment to Adminm-trative Order No 489-15b
approving budget and Dasts of assessment for this indusi y, 0uch
amendmnri to allow an upward reviion ofr the basis of ae,'ment
for the period fiom Feb. 1 to June 16, 1935


Opportunity to be heardon application submitted by theexeracu-
tive committee for this industry, for approval of Its budget and
bazls ol contribution [or the expense of administering the supple-
menairy Code fot the period from Apt 1, 1934, to Mar 31, 193b5.
Total budget is. $25,040. Bases ofl contribution are provided in the
Code for the fishery Industry, art VILI, title E, sec. I. The
budget initially submitted by I he Code Authority has been with-
drawn, and the budget above stated Is submitted as a suostitLute.
Opportunity to be heard on application submiltled by the Code
Authority lot cancelation of the exemption conferred in par. IlU
of Adnitunirative Order X-36.

Opportunity to be heard on application submit ted by the tem.
porary executive commit[ca of the processing and Anoleaalig
dvi'ion, in the south Middle Atlantic area which comprises the
Ditricrlt of Columbia and the States of Delaware. Marylano, and
PennslIvama, except the Lake Erie pots, for approval of Its
budget and basis of contribul ion to cover the expeste of adminis-
tering the Code from month to month during the period -fromin
Jan. I to Apr 1, 1935. or to the effective date lof the proposed up-
plementary Code for this division. This application was ap-
proved by Administrative Order No 30i-63l dated Mar 1. 1935
and will become effective within 20 deys from that dale unless'
rood cause to the contrary is shown prior thereto
Tie budget provide:. Ior xvpendttures in the pro rate sum of 1540 62
pet monlb. The basis of coorntribution is provided in art VIl.],
title d sec I, to and including par (c), of the Code
Opportunity to be heard on application submitletId by the Coda
Authority for approval of its budget and oasis elof contribution fdr
the period, from Apr. 9, 1935, to Apr 8, 1936
The budget a divided into two peri tods, and Ithe first covering the
period from Apr. 9 to June If. 19151 s in the amount of .34,8&3,sand
for the second period, from June i17, 1935, to Apr a, 1916, isSIO.017.
Total budget is_ $194,91i Basis ofcontributlon is: 1 of I percent af
the net sales of manufacturers.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Autborily for approval of It, budget and basis of contribution
for the period fiom Jan 1 to Dec. 31, 1936.
Told budget is $.5,638 15 Each member shall be assessed on the
ba-is of trico of 1 percent ol the net sales, estimated at S4,000,(0
during Ihe calendar year 1934.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for approval of its budget and basis of contribute
for the period fom May I to and Including June 15, 1i935. and
from Junu 1id, 1935, to April 30, 1936., Inclusive Total budget
is $79,475
Each member is asses.sed 60 cents per $1,.90 net sales, and addl-
ioneal assessments for .ection Code administration as follows:
laboratory 'uppliers section. $1 per $1.000 net ,ales, optical is-
strument section. $1 60 per $1.00oo net sales: laboratory furniture
section, ,5 per S00) net sales, industrial Instrument sertlon,
84 cents per 1l.no10 net sales: surveying-drafting-coaters section,
50 cents per ,flOM net sales, 'team and fluld specialty 'ecllo.
$1S 0 per $i,CO) net sales, clinical thermometer section, $250 per
$1,0u0 net sal 6.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Cede
Authority for approval of its budget and basis of contribution
for the period from Apr. 16 to June 15, 1935, and from June 18
to Oct 15. 1935
Total budget for the first portion of said period is 3-1,600, and for
the second portion of said period Is $9.100 The basis of contri'
button provides tbat each member shall be assessed on the basis
of t2. cents per $t1.000 of the dollar sales volume for ihe fiscal
year, May I, 1934. to Apr 30, 1935. In no event shall any mein-
her pay a sum less than 54 17 as a minimum assessment for ibhe
first portion of theb budgetary period or less than $8.33 for the
second portion of the budeetary period.


:i
.
Hearing on applications submitted by the Code Authority and
George B. Martin, representing the Cbampion Belt Manua t
luring Co., Belt Modes, Inc., Queen Belts, Inc. Ben Slots Co.,
Charles Josephson Co.. S & 0 Leather Goods Co., all of NeW ..
York City, for amendments to anrt. VI of the Code. .,


- Sr-. ..


I I-


-1--i


,t





















Beauty and Barber Shop
Mechanical Equipment
tlanufacturilng lIndus-
try, 286-17.






Gotton Textlle Industry,
1-10]9.



I-tg







Wool Textile Industry,
8-57.


Wednesday, Apr. 10,
1935
Blouse and Sidrt Manu-
facturing Industries,
194-4IOD.
Oear Menufacturing in-
dustry, 117-10.









Indastry or Collective
manufacturing for
Duor-to-Door Distribu-
tion, 496-6d.


Room 402, 118 K Street
NW Washington, D.
0., W. L. Schur-.







Room 30.22, Commerce
Buiding, Washingtoo,
D. C., &. Henry Thurs-
tOn.










Room 3022, Commerce
Building, Washington,
D C., A. Henry Ihurs-
ton.


Room 2)62-64, Commerce
Bullilinw, Washington,
D. C., 10 a. m.. M. D.
ritnceot
1320 0 Street NW., Wash-
mgtoun, D. 0., Dexter
A. 'TiuLeLn.








910 Seventeenth Street
NW., Wa-hington, D.
0., Frank H. Crockard.


Investment Bankers, 141- Room 1102, Carry Build-
44. Ing, Waeshingion, D. 0.,
K. J. Ammerman.


Sltay Manufacturing In-
dustry, 307-152 A.

Carpet and Rug Manu-
facturing Industry, 202-
150 B.


Room 1851, Commerce
Building, Washington,
D. 0., 10 a. m., Walter
Mangum.
Room "2066, Commerce
Building. Washington,
D. C., &. Henry Tburs-
ton.


FACTS.-The definition of the electrical
manufacturing industry reads In part: "the
manufacture for sale of electrical apparatus,
appliances, material, or supplies, and such
other electrical or allied products as are nat-
ural affiliates."
The Hope Webbing Co., Inc., Providence,
It 1., manufactures various products pro-
duced from texttle materials, including fabric
tubing Impregfiated or otherwise treated or
, coated with a substance or compound, there-
Sby producing an Insulating product which
acts as a nonconductor of electricity, com-
monly known as varnished or lacquered sleev-
ing or tubing. This product is used exten-
sively in the electrical Industry. It would
appear that the methods and equipment em-
ploiyed to process such fabric tubing to pro-
duce such insulating product are distinct to
This particular processing, and such process-
S.-lng is not common to all enterprises engaged
i' n producing textile products in general. It
also appears that competitors of the said
SHope Webbing Co., Inc., manufacturing and
: processing such processed tubing recognize
that the product created is within the scope
of the Code for the electrical manufacturing
industry and not within the scope of any
Code covering the manufacture of distinct
textile products.
QUESTION.-Is the above-described insu-
.;lating product Included within the scope of


Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for approval of Its budget and basis of contribution
fur the period from Mar. 15. 1935, to Mar. 15. 19i36.
Total budget Is $40,302 For toe period from Mar. 15 to June to,
1935, each member shall be assseod 4 of 1 percent of net dollar
volume of current sales basedJ onr sale of labels. Should the pro-
poaed amendment covering thibe use of labels be approved, the
asis of asseisment for the period from June 16, 1935, to Mar.
15, 1936, shall be 14 of I percent or net dollar volume of current
sales based on sale of labels. Should this amendment not be
approved, the basis of assessment for she period from June I1,
l135. to1 Mar. 15, 1936, shall be a ofl I percent of net dollar volume
of 1931 sales not used as a oasi above, 1. e., total oet dollar volume
or 1934 ialesess period from Mar 1t to June 1., 193&.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for amendment to the trade practices governing the
metchannising of cotton carded yarn by deleting the present seo. 2
and icubstituting in lieu I hereof anew sec. 2 wnich reads as lollowes:
"Spinning mills shall furnish duly certified reports each week to
the Statistical Bureau of the Cotton-Textile Institute, Inc., 320
Broadway, New York Ocity, of all sales of carded cuiton yarn dar-
ing the week Immediately prior, lnrspectrve of the manner in
which -nch siles orer egotiate3. sLauing same by date of order,
quantity, and descriptions of yarn, delivery specifications, price
to he paid, and terms of sales, Indicating In the cas- of eachtsfle
negotiated through a selling agent, the name of the selling agent
who negotiated such s.ale. Selling egeonts snall file similar reports
as to alU sales made on bhhall of spinning mills. Spinning mills and
selling agents shall separately report to the Institute all export
asalas giving, as to eacn export sale, the name of the exporter.
Statitiiical report' shall be issued weeody by the Institute to all
spinners and selling agents summarizing such itatisilcal informs-
ti)On received "
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
iLthority for amendment to art. 1V of the rules of practice and
merchendlsing for the blanket division by deleting the words
"prior to Juy I" and "or beyond Sept. 1, whichever is earlier",
To that this article will,read as follows: "-Completely specified
firm orders may be taken with price guaranteed agaEin-t decline
such guarantee not to extend beyond the .pecled delivery date '
Also, to amend art. V by deletrg in Its entirety; toamendart. VI
by deleting par I and substituting in lieu thereiol a new par. I
which reads as follows. "1 Shipments shall ur f o. b mili or
established warehouse, and no charge need be made for delivery
within cty limits of null or warehouse "


Hearing on application submitted by the Coda Authority for
amendments to art V, sec. 1, sea. I (a), and art. VU, of the Code.

Opportunity to he heard on application submitted by the
Code Authority for approval of 11it budget and basis of contribu.
tion for the period from Apr. 1, 1034, to Mar. 31, 1035.
Total budget is $9,0w. Basis of assessment is: io of 1 percent of
the e.tlimated annual volume of shipments, obtained Lby multi-
plyiog the actual shipments tor the first quarter of 1934 by 4 and
uiing the resultant figure as the basis for assessing dues. Aiseis-
ments are to be payable monthly, or on such other basis as deier-
mined by the Code Authority Also, on application submitted
by the Code Autaiority for permission to eipend surplus funds
available Apr. 1, 1935, and for an extension of the budget and
basis of contribution from Apr. 1 to June 16, 1935, allowing ex-
pendilures of an amount not to exceed . of the actual expendi-
tures as disclosed In the statement of receipts and disbursements
under the proposed budget.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the
Code Autiorilty lor approval of its budget and basis of contribu-
non for the period [rom Aug. 3, 1934, to June 15, 1935.
Total budget is Sll,00u. Basis of contribution Is -a of 1 percent
for each dollar of gross sales, exclusive of carriage charges, for the
calendar year 1933. In trin'eevet a member of tle indusitrv shall
not have raan engaged in bmin&es during the entire calendar
year 1913, the 1933 monthly gross sales, ezcluaive of carriage
charges, for the period during which ne was so engaged, multi.
plied by 12, shall be used as the basis of contribution. UIa mem-
ber shall have entered the Industry subsequent to Dec. 31, 1913,
the average monthly gross sales, exclusive of carriage charges,
for the period subsequent thereto during which he ass been so
engaged, multiplied by 12, shall be used as the basis of contri-
bution
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
cummttee for approval of Its budget and basis of contribution
lor the period from Apr. 16 to June 16, 1935.
Total budget Is $36,225.48. The amount of assessment Is based on
the number of employees employed by each investment banker,
which amount ranges from $4 lor 5 or less employees, to $48 for
201 or more employees.
Hearing on application submitted by the Code Authority for
amendments to the Code.

Hearlhgon a proposed amendment to the Code, submitted by the
Code Authority, to amend art. VIi by the deletion of see. 19 (a)
which reads as follows "19 AlIowaoces.-(a) Retail stores are
to be credited or paid the volume allowances based only on mer-
chandise Invoiced to an Individual company. No manufacturer
shall pay or allow credit for any cost of resnipping mercaiandise
shinned and invoiced to a retailer."


the definition of the electrical manufacturing
industry as defined in paragraph I of the
Code for the electrical manufacturing indus-
try?
RULING.-The impregnation or coating
treatment of woven or braided fabric tubing
with a substance or compound, thereby pro-
ducing an insulating product which acts as
a nonconductor of electricity, is a manufac-
turing process not included under any textile
industry Code definition, and this process
creates a product which is defined within the
meaning of the definition embraced by para-
graph I of the Code for the electrical manu-
facturing Industry, and the said Code for
the electrical manufacturing Industry is
hereby interpreted to Include such product so
produced.

Fertilizer Industry
67-52
QUESTION.-Is a person, who operates a
plant for the purpose of manufacturing fer-
tilizer for his own consumption, a producer?
INTERPRETATION.-No. In order for
one to be a producer under the Code defini-
tion, he must be "engaged in the business
of manufacturing fer-
tilizer * for sale."


SCHEDULE OF HEARINGS, MARCH 24 TO

APRIL 15-Continued


INDUSTRY OR TRADE PLAC ANDDEr PoOSYE Ario
A DM lNa6TRA TUR PRoPosm) Acnom


Tuesday, Apr. 9,
1935-Coold.


Complete Wire and Iron

Fence Industry
No. 84L1-23
FACTS.-Article VII, section 1, provides
in part as follows:
"Each member of the industry shall
file identified lists of all of his
prices, discounts; rebates, allowances specifi-
cations, and all other terms of conditions of
sale, hereinafter in this article referred to
Sas price terms', which lists shall completely .
and accurately conform to and represent the
Individual pricing practices of said member.
Such lists shall contain the price terms for
all such standard products of the industry
as are sold or offered for sale by said mem-
ber and for such nonstandard products of
said member as shall be designated by the
Code Authority I *. Price terms and
revised price terms shall become effective
immediately upon receipt thereof by said
agent. Immediately upon receipt thereof,
said agent shall by telegraph or other equally
prompt means notify said member of tLhe
time of such receipt. Such lists and revi-
sions, together with the effective time thereof,
shall upon receipt be immediately and simul-
taneously distributed to all members of the
industry * 6. Such lists or revisions
or any part thereof shall not be made avail-
able to any person until released to all mem-
bers of the industry * *."
Article VII, section 2, provides:
"When auy member of the industry has
filed any revision, such member shall not file
a higher price within fotry-eight 1.4S) hours."
Article VII, section 3 provides:
"No member of the industry shall sell .or
offer to sell any products, service of the in-
dustry, for which price terms have been
filed pursuant to the provisions of this ar-
ticle, except In accordance with such price
terms."
This industry has always operated on the
basis of delivered prices, with the delivered
prices applicable to various States in which
delivery is made.
Members "A" and "B" have respectively
filed the following price revisions:
(a) "Effective immediately our prices for
State on material only are reduced
25 percent."
(b) Effective immediately our filed prices
for one project only are reduced 25 percent."
QUESTION.-Are the above price revi-
sions proper in accordance with the above
provisions?
2. What does constitute a proper price re-
vision in accordance with the above provi-
sions?
RULING.-1. No.
2. (a) To properly revise a filed price list
a member of Industry must recall that part
.of its former price-filing which he intends
to revise and substitute therefore a revision
which shall indicate clearly the effect of the
revision as to its previously filed price terms.
(b) The revision shall be effective not for
any one project only, but to the same extent
and for the same purposes as the original
price-filing.
(c) The revised terms shall be applicable
on all sales of or offers to sell the type of
product affected by said revision until price
terms are again fully and properly revised.


Retail Jewelry Trade
No. 142-66
FACTS.-Article V, section 1 (e), second
paragraph provides as follows:
"The minimum wages paid to professional
persons, outside salesmen, outside collectors,
watchmen, guards, store detectives, and
maintenance and outside service employees
shall be upon the basis of the basic employee
workweek upon which the establishment by
which they are employed has elected to
operate."
SQUESTION.-Ef any such employee works
more or less than the maximum number of
hours per week prescribed for his establish-
ment by article IV, section 1, how Is his
"minimum wage" to be determined?
INTERPRETATION.-Iln the case of any
of the employees mentioned, the minimum
wage of any such employee shall be the mini-
mum hourly wage (determined In accordance
with" the provisions of article V, section 1, by
dividing the minimum weekly wages by the
respective number of maximum hours per
week therein stated), multiplied by the num-
ber of hours per week the "employee shall
work; that is, In determining the minimum
hourly wage of any such employee, the varn-
ous minimum weekly rates of wages set forth
in article V, section 1, shall be divided by
the respective number of maximum hours
per week therein stated; provided, however,
that in a case where a Code provision specifi-
cally requires the payment of a higher wage
to any employee of any of the classes men-
tioned, the minimum weekly wage of any
such employee shall be determined by giving
effect to' such Code provision.
Illustration No. 1: A watchman who works"
56 hours per week for an establishment lo-
cated In a city of over 500,000 population,
which operates under group A of article IV,
section 1, shall be paid a minimum weekly
wage equal to 56 times the quotient of $14
(the minimum wage), divided by 40 (the
maximum hours), or at the rate of 56 times
35 cents, or $19.60 per week.
Illustration No. 2: A maintenance and
outside service employee who works a siml-


'.~-: -
S-. sr3:::. 5.4.


s~... -


lar number of hours for a similar establlsh'-
meat shall be paid, in accordance with article:
IV, section 4 (b), $14 (the minimum wage$
for a 40-hour week within cities of over.,,.-
500,000 population), for 40 hours, plus $2,1
(35 cents times 6), for 6 hours, plus $4.6-
(time and one-third), for 10 hours, or t
total minimum weekly wage of $20.77. "?


Manufacturing and Wholesale

Surgical Industry i
No. 501-8
FACTS.-Article IV, section 7, of the Cod
of fair competition for the manufacturing and'
wholesale surgical industry provides: ,
"Wages 'shall be paid weekly or. semiw
monthly In lawful money or by negotiable
check, payable on demand. Wages shall be
exempt from fines, charges, rebates, dedue-
tions, or any other form of withholding wag.
except for contributions voluntarily made
the employee or required by law. The ein-
ployer or his agent shall accept no rebate,'
rectly or indirectly on such wages, or gi
anything of value or extend favors to any pe.
son for the purpose of influencing rates'.
wages, hours, or the working conditions of hi
employees."
The complaint states that pieceworkers dok
over rejected work on the reopened original
job card and that no wages are paid for such,
work. .4 .1
QUESTION.-Is a manufacturer, who re:"*I
quires piece-rate Workers to do over rejected,--
work for no additional compensation, in vio-:'-
lation of article IV', section 7, of the Code Oti
fair competition for the manufacturing and.t._
wholesale surgical industry? "-
RULING.-The manufacturer who required%'
piece-rate workers to do over rejected or ua- 1y
satisfactory work, where the rejection or un
satisfactory work Is the fault of the worker
Without further compensation, Is not in violn-"'j
tion of section 7, of article IV of the Code of4
fair competition for the manufacturing afg
wholesale surgical industry. .


Electrical Manufacturing ..

Industry
4-80
FACTS.-Article III (b) of the Code prd-
vides, in part as follows: '. 9
On and after the effective date the mid-F
mum wage that shall be paid by anyem-.
ployer to any employee engaged in thle proc- -.`
essing of the products of the electrical manu;I'-4
facturing industry and in labor operationsli.
directly incident thereto shall be 40 cents:
per hour, unless the rate per hour for the-..
same class of labor was on July 15, 1929, Vj
less than 40 cents, in which case the rate'.
per hour paid shall be not less than the rated.:
per hour paid on July 15, 1929, but In no.',
event shall the rate per hour be less than.,j.
32 cents per hour, * '"
QUESTION.-Under article III (b) is an!4
employer who entered the electrical manu-
facturing industry subsequent to July 15,44
1929, entitled to pay to employees engaged Mfl.-
the processing of the products of the Industry"^
and in labor operations directly incident1jo
thereto wages less than at the rate of 40-: :
cents per hour? :,.
INTERPRETATION.-Employers who en-5
tered the industry subsequent to July 15,;
1929, are not entitled, under article III (ib)'.
to pay such employees less than at the rate' .6
of 40 cents per hour. .-i


The Men's Clothing Industry3
15-60 .*
FACTS.-Bushelmen repair or correct tn'
perfections in the manufacture of a garment
and as such perform work done by manufad-
turing employees In the shop. Final inspec-' 4
.tors or final examiners merely determine'si
whether the work has been properly done andq..j
Inspect same; they do no repairing or cor-'
recting of imperfections, and their work' is'^,
frequently done In the stock room and not In.
the factory. ''
QUESTION.-How shall bushelmen In.
manufacturing shops, final Inspectors, and1-,:,-
final examiners be classified? '
INTERPRETATION.-Bushelmen, not in-..
eluding final inspectors or final examlnerse.
are considered as manufacturing employeeesq-
except that bushelmen working on garmentosi
sold at retail direct to consumer and returned
for alterations by the consumers are non:'i
manufacturing employees when working in.
separate department wholly distinct from1i
manufacturing departments; final Inspectors
and final examiners are nonmannufacturing.
employees. '

Cigar Container Industry '
No. 135-20 ..
QUESTION.-May the wage rate of aif
piece worker be determined by averaging the ''./
wages earned during several pay periods, In'.'
order to comply with the minimum wage"'
rate provision of the Code?
INTERPRETATION.-The earnings of aR. -
piece worker for each pay period must be ,-
not less than the minimum hourly wage rate:A,-
prescribed by the Code multiplied by the'_.;
number of hours worked during such pay ..
period.


Interpretations


Monday, Apr. 15,
1935
lFurnlrure Manufacturing Patio Room, Carlton Ho- Hearing on conflicts and overlap; of the provisions of the Codes
InLdustry and Lumber tel, Washington, D. C., which obstruct the proper operation and administration of these
and Timber Products 10 a. m., John W. Opp. Codes.
Industry, 312-1-10, 313- \N
1-06. 2-Z.


Interpretations


,Electrical Manufacturing Industry
No. 4-77







f. ;x:''.i:." ;". : .- .... .. "," ":e.. c, 4 4

".~r i

Textile Processing Steps Taken to Adjust Productive ExtendExemption

SIndustry Code Capacity in Cotton Textile Industry for Sheep-Lined


ha Is Amended

:... The National Industrial Recovery Board
has approved an amendment to the Textile
-' Processing Industry Code which empowers
!.:the Code Authority to collect certain statis-
.'ticsal data from members of the industry.
.. The data includes:
'^./ 1. Reports listing the names of all employ-
7ees, the actual hours of employment, and the
gp'iactual wages paid each employee for the
i' week ended on, or on the nearest day to,
| May 1, 1933.
"&l' 2. Reports listing the names of all em-
t-ployees, with occupational classification,
rV hours of employment, and wages for each
!i-weekly period, or for such longer period as
the .Code Authority may require.
.:' 3. "Reports from each member of the in-
4-;dttry of the total units produced and, or
M.of services and/or products sold and the ag-
":gregate amount charged for such service
l^ ,and/or products sold for the period of such
"reports. Such reports shall be classified ac-
c'eording to the products produced and/or the
service and/or products sold and shall be
^'Thled at such times and for such periods as
t.shall be designated by the Code Authority."


Interpretations


-4Fabricated Metal Products
i Manufacturing and Metal
SFMinishing and Metal Coating
Industry
84-119
,2i Applicant: Metalmatch Corporation,
:. Warsaw, Ill.
5tFACTS.-Article II of the Code of fair
competition for the fabricated metal products
Imanufacruring and metal finishing and metal
.aobating industry provides in part as follows:
The term 'fabricated metal products
,Hmanufacturing and metal finishing and metal
goatming industry', hereafter referred to as
.tlhe industry is defined to mean the manufqc-
tlare for use or for sale of products in whole
tr.ln substantial part of metal. * "
.'.'The applicant corporation manufactures
6inetalmatches, composed of aluminum, steel,
"'wood, lint, asbestos wickiing, pyropheric
metal, and petrol.
^ QUESTION.-Under what Code should the
applicantt corporation operate?
l ,',RULING. The applicant corporation
M %lcpmes within the definition of the Code of
IfiBtr competition for the fabricated metal
kv.products manufacturing and metnl finishing
-and metal coating industry and is, therefore,
4aWSubject to and should operate under all of the
provisions of said Code.


i1Standard Steel Barrel and
Drum Manufacturing
Industry
84Z-15
,FACTS.-Article V, rule B, provides In
art as follows:
"The extension to certain purchasers of
Acrlces, services, or privileges not extended to
all purchasers under like conditions, are un-
hiair trade practices."
."-.'QUESTION.-Is it an unfair trade prac-
tice for a member of the industry to pay for
Se advertising of one of his customers' prod-
cts when such advertising payment is not
H extended to all purchasers under like con-
ditions?
K I'RULING.-Under rule B of article V of
the supplementary Code of fair competition
for this industry, it is an unfair trade prac-
tice for any member of the industry, directly
ogAI-ndirectly, to pay for all or any part of
?the advertising done by or for the benefit of
i-any purchaser in the interests of such pur-
;;chaser's products, unless the extension of the
9'.same payment is granted to all purchasers
...under like conditions.


Throwing Industry
i~i" >54-29
i,;.- FACTS.-It appears that in this industry
fi.learners may be employed for two 6-week
.:-a'-perlods at the end of which such employees
:.-.phall no longer be classified as leahrners and
sBhall receive not less than the minimum wage
-I'irate provided by the Code. It is claimed
:that a learner should be entitled to 240 hours
N ...for each of these periods, or a total of 480
:hours.
-: QUESTION.-Do the two 6-week periods
; .. mentioned in section 2, paragraph 3 (c), refer
t;::to two periods of 6 calendar weeks each or
."11 to two working periods of 2-10 hours each?
: ..INTERPRETATION.-It is ruled that the
two 6-week periods referred to in section 2,
"i paragraph 3 (o), mean two working periods
Sof 240 hours each, a total of 480 working
hours.




.._,.,_t.-.:... : '.


For many months mills have been offering
certain lines far below the lowest possible
cost of production, presenting a crisis which,
unless it is regulated, will inevitably bring
about chaos in production and employment.
It is believed that the action taken, show-
ing the' capability of the industry, and
of the Recovery Administration to meet such
a situation, should have a reassuring effect
on the market; check the further shrinking
of demand; hasten the time when it will be
practicable to resume those replacements and
improvements which are essential for reduc-
tions in cost; and enable the industry to re-
sume the normal contribution of business
which it makes to the durable-goods indus-
tries.
Present conditions with sales below cost
put a heavy strain on the ability of the in-
dustry to maintain the increased wage scales
which it has undertaken under the Code.
That pressure should be relieved.
The present destructive competition In this
industry presents an emergency problem
which requires immediate correction as a
first step toward measures of a permanent
nature.
Conditions should be hastened which will
make it possible to resume consideration by
all concerned In the practicability of adding
to the great gains in wage rates already
registered under the Code.
In connection with the order providing for
adjustment of certain branches of cotton tex-
tile production to meet the present demoral-
ized market condition, the National Indus-
trial Recovery Board also announced:
"The Board adopted a resolution that it
request the United Textile Workers of Amer-
ica and the Cotton Textile Industry Commit-
tee, the Code Authority for the cotton tex-
tile industry, each to appoint a small com-
mittee to confer with the Board immediately
as to appropriate action to be taken upon the
information presented in the reports from the
Federal Trade Commission and the Bureau
of Labor Statistics in conformity with pro-
visions of Executive Order No. 685S, and that
If it shall be found necessary or desirable in
the process of such conferences to call a pub-
lic hearing, such action shall be taken at an
early date."
The text, of the order is as follows:
ORDER
CODE OF FAIR COMPETITION
FOR THE
COTTON TEXTILE INDUSTRY
WHEREAS, the cotton textile industry Is
employing close to one-half million people
and is closely related to and affects the wel-
fare of the cotton farmers and allied indus-
tries and services, and
WHEREAS, the present excess of produc-
tive capacity over demand in the industry
endangers its ability to afford continuous
employment and reasonable wages to its em-
ployees and affects adversely the economic
well-being of all other persons related to the
industry, and
WHEREAS, the cost of cotton textile prod-
ucts has been materially raised by a con-
siderable increase in average hourly earn-
Ings of labor and the increase in the cost of
raw cotton and the cotton processing tax,
and
WHEREAS, the sudden unprecedented in-
crease in imports 6f certain cotton goods to-
gether with continuously declining exports
has intensified the demoralization of markets
and caused the liquidation of domestic goods
at prices below the cost of production, and
WHEREAS, inventories in certain products
of major importance have been accumulated
in anticipation of demand, which demand for
the foregoing reasons has been further re-
stricted and these inventories can find no
reasonable market, and
WHEREAS, there is a present choice be-
tween a disorderly reduction and disruption
of employment, bringing distress to many
mill communities, and an orderly effort to
adjust the operations of the industry to pres-
ent conditions, and
WHEREAS, it is provided by article VI
of the Code of Fair Competition for the cot-
ton textile industry that the Cotton Textile
Industry Committee, which acts as the Code
Authority fpr such industry, may from time
to time present to the National Industrial
Recovery Board recommendations relating.
among other things, to changes in, or ex-
emptions from, the provisions of the Code
relating to the working hours of machinery
which will tend to preserve a balance of
productive activity with consumption re-
quirements so that the interest of the indus-
Stry and the public may be properly served;
and
WHEREAS, said Cotton Textile Industry
Committee has made recommendations to the
National Industrial Recovery Board regard-
ing changes in, and exemptions from, Code
provisions relating to working hours of ma-
chinery nnd the manner of effecting adjust-
ments thereon, which recommendations as
far as approved are embodied in this order.
NOWV, THEREFORE, the National Indus-
trial Recovery Board, pursuant to the au-
thority vested in it by the National Indus-
trial Recovery Act and by Executive orders
of the President including Executive Order
No. 6859, dated September 27, 1934, and
otherwise, and by the Code of Fair Comn-


petition for the cotton textile industry, does
hereby find and declare that an emergency
exists in the cotton textile industry; that
action is necessary to effectuate an orderly
readjustment and rehabilitation of the in-
dustry to meet the needs of such emergency
during a period of 12 weeks from the date
of this order and thereafter, to the extent
authorized by law, until the National Indus-
trial Recovery Board shall declare either that
the needs of the emergency have been met or
that the emergency no longer exists;' and
does hereby order that:
1. The Cotton Textile Industry Commit-
tee, acting under the conditions and in ac-
cordance with the requirements hereinafter
set forth, is hereby authorized and directed
during the period of the emergency which
has been herein declared to exist, to deter-
mide on and to designate such temporary
adjustments, as may be found necessary to
effectuate the purpose of the act, in the max-
imum hours of operation of productive ma-
chinery otherwise provided for by the Code,
or in the number of operating units of such
productive machinery, in particular divisions
or groups of the industry producing products
or rendering services of a particular char-
acter, provided that such adjustments do
not require reductions exceeding 25 percent
in the hours of operation otherwise provided
for in the Code or in the maximum number
of such machines operating in such division
or group within 6 months prior to the period
of such reduction in the respective plants.
2. During the period of any such temporary
adjustment applicable to any particular divi-
sion or group no productive machinery which
has not been engaged within 6 months prior
to the beginning of such period in the pro-
duction of the type of product of the par-
ticular character produced by such division
or group, shall be transferred to or employed
in such operation. But the provisions of this
paragraph shall not be applicable to produc-
tive machinery contracted for at the begin-
ning of such period or installed in the course
thereof for use in such division or group
pursuant to the requirements of the National
Recovery Administration as to the installa-
tion of additional productive machinery un-
der section VI of the Code.
3. No such temporary adjustment shall be
made applicable by the Code Authority to
any plant which shall operate productive
machinery during such period on a single
shift schedule; provided that such plant shall
have been in operation within 6 months prior
to such period of temporary adjustment.
4. For the administration of the foregoing
provisions there shall be appointed by the
chairman of the Code Authority three mem-
bers of a research and planning committee
none of whom shall be specially interested, as
an owner, employee, or otherwise, in any unit
of the industry. The National Industrial Re-
covery Board shall select a technical adviser
who shall be in the employ of the Govern-
mnient and serve as a representative of the
National Recovery Administration, as a full
member of said research and planning com-
mittee. The committee shall investigate the
facts as to conditions in the industry and
formulate proposed action under the provi-
sions of this order, and whenever such action
has been authorized (as hereinafter pro-
vided) shall thereafter observe and be pre-
pared to report upon its effects.
The research and planning committee shall
transmit from time to time its recommenda-
tions simultaneously to the Code Authority
and to the National Industrial Recovery
Board. The Code Authority shall exercise
its powers under this order after and upon
the basis of recommendations made by the
committee and shall notify the National In-
dustrial Recovery Board of any proposed ac-
tion. which action shall become effective not
earlier than 5 days after such notification has
been received, unless the National Industrial
Rec-overy Board, through its chairman or
other duly authorized representative, shall
notify the Code Authority in the meantime
that such action is disapproved, or is dis-
approved unless modified, or is suspended.
The Board will create an agency to receive
and provide for the prompt hearing and de-
termination of any complaints filed charging
that any action taken under the authority of
this order is unfair or discriminatory to in-
dividuals or groups, or otherwise contrary
to the public Interest.
Any action taken by the Code Authority
under this order, or the exercise of authority
herein conferred, may at any time be re-
voked by the National Industrial Recovery
Board, or revoked unless modified, or sus-
pended.
This order shall become effective upon the
date hereof, but members of the industry and
any other interested parties may file objec-
tions to this order within 20 days from the
date hereof, and at the end of said period
this order may be modified or revoked or
suspended, on proper showing of cause
therefore.
National Industrial Recovery Board,
By: W. A. Harriman,
Administrative Officer.
Approval recommended:
PanENSs L. CooNimY,
Division Administrator.
Washington, D. C.
March 26, 1938.


(Continued from page 1)


Garment Trade
The National Industrial Recovery Board
has approved an order extending for a 60-
day period the exemption granted manufac.-
turers of sheep-lined and leather garments
from the Cotton Garment Code provision re-
quiring a 10-percent piece-rate increase, on
the condition that the rates be increased B
percent, instead.
The order dates from March 1, 1935. The
5-percent increase is based on rates being
paid on March 1, provided that no decrease
has been made since December 1, 1934.
This action confirms emergency extensions
granted the manufacturers in telegrams
dated March 1 and March 13, 1935.
The Board was informed that the 10-per-
cent increase at this time would cause an
increase in the price of.the product so that
the market would be "practically ruined."
Inasmuch as the cotton garment Code Au-
thority has adopted a resolution to propose
an amendment which would increase the
rates 5 percent instead of the 10 percent
provided for in the stayed Code provision,
the 10-percent Jump was deferred pending
action on such amendment.


Interpretations


Paint, Varnish, and Lacquer
Manufacturing Industry
No. 71-62
FACTS.-We have had inquiries from a
number of concerns requesting information
as to whether or not nitrocellulose base solu-
tions consisting of nitrocellulose dissolved In
solvents and diluents without plasticizers,
resins, or pigments were included under the
Code of this industry. Such solutions are
raw materials used by manufacturers of lac-
quer. When plasticizers, resins, or pigments
are added to the above raw-base solutions
they become lacquers.
QUESTION.-Are nitrocellulose base solu.
tions consisting of nitrocellulose dissolved in
solvents and diluents without plasticizers,
resins, or pigments covered by the Code of
fair competition for the paint, varnish, and
lacquer manufacturing industry?
INTERPRETATION.-Such solutions are
in fact raw materials and are not covered by
the Code of fair competition for the pint,
varnish, and lacquer manufacturing indus-
try. When such nitrocellulose base solution
has anything added to it, such as plasticizers,
resins, or pigments, and is packaged to be
used in such a manner that it shall be ap-
plied as a thinly spread coating for the pro-
tection and. or embellishment of any surface,
then it becomes a lacquer and becomes sub-
ject to all provisions of the Code of fair com-
petition for the paint, varnish, and lacquer
manufacturing industry.

Cotton Garment Industry
No. 118-326
FACTS.-As a result of an amendment
approved August 21, 1U34 article IV, section
A reads in part as follows:
Weekworkers and,,or timeworkers receiv-
ing above the minimum wage prior to this
amendment shall be paid at not less than the
same wage per 36-hour week than they were
paid per 40-hour week."
Prior to this amendment, which as a re-
sult of certain orders became effective on
December 1, 1934, many nor manufacturing
employees could he worked without any lim-
itation as to hours.
QUESTION.-Does this clause have ap-
plication to nonmanufacturing employees and
if it does, how is it.' to be applied?
INTERPRETATION.-It is ruled that
this clause has application to nonmanufactur-
ing as well as to manufacturing employees
and that such nonmanufacturing employees
employed on a week or timework basis who
received above the minimum prior to De-
cember 1, 1934, must be paid at least one and
one-ninth the hourly wage formerly received
by such employees. (If such employees were
employed on a weekly basis, the hourly rate I
is arrived at by dividing the weekly wage
by the number of hours customarily worked.)

Nonferrous FoundryIndustry
165-32-122-28
FACTS.-From the information submitted
it appears that the activities of the applicant
are subject to the Codes of fair competition
for the nonferrous foundry Industry and the
special tool. die. and machine shop industry.
RULING.-Now. TarEEFOsE, pursuant I1
authority vested in the National Industrial
Recovery Board, It is hereby ordered and
ruled that the Imperial Welding Co., Jellloe,
Tenn., operate under the Code of fair com-
petition for the nonferrous foundry industry
and the Code of fair competition for the spe-
cial tool, die, and machine shop industry,
such approval and such classification to take
effect fifteen (15) days from the date hereof,
unless good cause to the contrary Is shown
to the National Industrial Recovery Board
before that time, and said Board Issues an8
order to that effect. .













ADMINISTRA2

r -


'* ,"*
s J
:"
!:?*
i .
?.'


ASPHALT SHINGLE AND ROOFING
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY, Code No.
99: Order 19, granting to the American Tar
S& Chemical Co., Duluth, Minn., exemption
from compliance with all of the provisions
of the Code relating to and/or providing for
hours, wages, and other conditions relating
* to labor, provided that it comply with the
provisions of the Code for the chemical manu-
facturing industry relating to hours, wages,
and other conditions relating to labor. The
applicant shall post the order in accordance
with the rules and regulations respecting
-the posting of codes.
BLOUSE AND SKIRT MANUFACTUR-
SING INDUSTRIES, Code No. 194: Order 25,
extending temporary approval of budget and
basis of contribution for a period from and
Including January 1, 1935, to and including
December 31, 1935.'
BUFFING AND POLISHING COMIPOSI-
TION INDUSTRY, Code No. 97: Order 17,
reapproving budget and basis of contribu-
tion (or the period from July 1, 1934, to De-
cember 31, 1934.
CANDY MANUFACTURING INDUS-
TRY, Code No. 463, Order 37, denying to
Queen City Candy Co., Inc., Buffalo, N. Y.,
exemption from the provision of articles III
and IV, of the Code.
CIGAR CONTAINER INDUSTRY, Code
No. 135: Order 29, approving budget and
Basis of contribution for the period from
December 10, 1934, to June 16, 1935.
CORSET AND BRASSIERE INDUSTRY,
Code No. 7: Order 31. granting to Formfit
Co., Chicago, Ill., exemption from the pro-
visions of article IV, section A, of the Code,
to the extent that the applicant's plant may
operate 41. productive hours per week, pro-
vided, that no productive employee shall work
more than 40 hours per week. A copy of the
order must be posted in a conspicuous place
in the applicant's plant.
COSMETIC CONTAINER MANUFAC-
TURING INDUSTRY (Subdivision of Fab-
ricated Metal Products Manufacturing and
Metal Finishing and Metal Coating Indus-
dry), Code No. 84-A6: Order 3, granting ex-
tension of stay of the provisions of section
8 of the appendix, for a period of 20 days
from March 4, 1935.
COTTON GARMENT INDUSTRY, Code
SNo. 11S- Order 317, granting to Ely & Walker
Dry Goods Co., St. Louis, Mo., exemption
from the provisions of article V, section A,
Sof the Code, to the extent that it be permitted
to operate an eftra shift on seven pressing
machines in its plant in Belleville, Ill., for
12 weeks from February 28, 1935, provided
additional operators are employed.
Order 318, granting to D. C. Roger, 444
Post Street, San Francisco, Calif., exemp-
tion from the provisions of article III, sec-
tion A, of the Code, to the extent that he
is permitted to work his head cutter and
superintendent 4 hours overtime weekly for
Sa period not to exceed 12 weeks from Febru-
ary 28, 1935. This employee is to be paid
at straight time for the overtime work, which
overtime is necessary to adjust the plant to
new conditions.
Order 319, granting to Bedford Shirt Cor-
poration, 1140 Broadway, New York City,
exemption from the provisions of article V,
section A, of the Code, to the extent that It
be permitted to operate an extra shift for
2 men for 6 weeks on pressing machinery
In its plant at New Bedford, Mass., from
February 28, 1935, provided additional oper-
ators are employed.
Order 320, granting to Enro Shirt Co., Inc.,
Louisville, Ky., exemption from the provi-
sions of article V, section A, of the Code, to
the extent that It is permitted to operate an
extra shift for 2 men for 2 weeks and 3 men
for 10 weeks on trubenizing machinery, pro-
vided additional operators are employed.
Order 321, granting to Packard Shirt Man-
.ufacturing Co., Inc., Terre Haute, Ind., ex-
emption from the provisions of article III,
-.section A. of the Code, to the extent that It
;. be permitted to work the employees of. its
.plant 4 hours overtime weekly for a period


not to exceed 90 days from February 28,
provided such overtime is paid for at the
rate of time and one-half.
Order 322, granting to C. D. Williams Co.,
246 South Eleventh Street, Philadelphia. Pa.,
exemption from the provisions of article III,
section A, of the Code, to the extent that it
is permitted to work 50 percent of its em-
ployees'S hours overtime weekly for 2 weeks
from February 28, 1935, provided overtime
is paid for at the rate of time and one-half.
Order 323, granting to Albert Rosenblatt
& Sons, 1370 Broadway, New York City, ex-
emption from the provisions of article III,
section A, of the Code, to the extent that it
is permitted to work employees of its cutting
department 8 hours overtime weekly for a
period not to exceed 3 weeks from February
23, 1935, provided such overtime is paid for
at the rate of time and one-half.
Order 324, granting to F. Jacobson & Sons,
1115 Broadway, New York, N. Y., exemption
from the provisions of article V, section A.
of the Code, to the extent that it is permitted
to operate an extra shift for a period of
90 days from February 28 on its collar press-
ing machinery only at its Albany and Kings-
ton, N. Y., plants, provided additional oper-
ators are employed. a
Order 325, granting to SweebOrr & Co.,
Inc., 15 Union Square, New York City, ex
emption from the provisions of article V,
section A, of the Code, to the extent that it
be permitted to operate an extra shift on
one creasing machine at its Pottstown, Pa.,
plant for a period of 60 days from February
5, 1935. providing an additional operator is
engaged.
Order 327, granting to Columbus Garment
Co., Columbus, Miss., exemption from the pro-
visions of article IV, section C, of the Code,
to the extent that It is permitted to employ
up to 100 learners in excess of 10 percent
permitted by the Code, whose wages shall not
be less than the rates set forth in the sched-
ule of the amended Code and on a piece-rate
basis if earned wages are greater than those
set forth in the schedule, provided the piece
price per dozen garments be equal to or
greater than those previously paid. I Sched-
ule of such piece rates to be submitted to the
Code Authority.) The exemption shall not
waive the 12-week training period permitted
by the Code and credit must be given to each
employee for any period of time worked in
the Industry. Approximately S0 percent of
the 100 learners covered by this order are to
be used on the progressive lines, which are
being installed by the firm of Stevenson-
Jordan & Harrison, and reports shall be sub-
mitted to the office of the Code Authority
each week, giving the progress of each line.
The 100 learners shall be hired within 4
weeks from February 5, 1935. The order
shall be in operation until June 1, 1935 A
copy of the order must be posted in a con-
spicuous place in the applicant's plants.
Order 323, granting to Brohard-Rainer
Shirt Corporation, -Cincinnati, Ohio, exemp-
tion from the provisions of article III, sec-
tion A, of the Code to the extent that it is
permitted to work the employees of its plant
4 hours overtime weekly during the ,period
from February 28 up to and including April
30, provided such overtime is paid for at
the rate of time and one-half.
Order 329, granting to Laurnna Manufac-
turing Co., Tampico, Ill., exemption from the
provisions of article IV, section A, of the
Code, to the extent that not more than its
present number of employees be employed
at a wage rate of $9.75 weekly or more If
earned for 36-hour week.
Order 330, granting to the Carlisle Gar-
ment Co., Carlisle, Pa., exemption from the
provisions of article IV, section C, of the
Code, to the extent that It be permitted to
employ 10 learners, in addition to the 10
percent allowed under the Code, in accord-
ance with the wages and training period
prescribed in the Code. provided no employee
be classified as a learner who has had 12
weeks' experience in the industry.
Order 331, granting to Pollak Bros., Inc.,
Fort Wayne, Ind., exemption fiom the pro-
visions of article V, section A, of the Code,
to the extent that It be permitted to oper-


FIVE


* aOfficial Orders of NRA Relating

to Particular Codes

THE Blue Eagle prints in each issue summaries of administrative
orders, interpretations, appointments, and bylaws approved by the
National Industrial Recovery Board.
Official orders are of two types, final and provisional. Where an order
is provisional, the time within which objections may be filed is indicated
below.
All protests against provisional orders should be addressed to National
Recovery Admiiistration, Washington, D. C., attention Deputy Admin-
istrator for Code concerned; and such protests should be received before
final date indicated.
(For Code approvals, amendments, interpretations, budgets and
.assessments, bylaws, Code Authority members, and trade complaints and
other committees, see elsewhere.)


ORDERS


I


ate an extra shift in its pressing department,
involving about 20 operators, for a period
of 90 days from February 23, provided ad.
ditional operators are employed.
Order 832, granting to H. D. Bob Co., Inc.,
350 Broadway, New York City, exemption
from the provisions of article V, section A,
of the Code, to the extent that it be granted
permission to operate an extra shift on 1
creasing machine at Milton Pa., and 5 creas-
ing machines at Montgomery, Pa., for a
period not to exceed 12 weeks from February
23, 1935, provided additional operators are
employed.
Order 333, granting to Arotex Co., Inc.,
201 North Waco Avenue, Wichita, Kans.,
exemption from the provisions of article IV,
section C, of the Code, to the extent that it
be permitted to employ 8 learners, in addi-
tion to the 10 percent allowed under the
Code, for a period of 12 weeks, in accord-
ance with the wages and training period
prescribed in the Code, provided no employee
shall be classified as a learner who has had
12 weeks' experience in the Industry.
Order 334, granting to F. Jacobson & Sons,
1115 Broadway, New York City, exemption
from the provisions of article III, section A,
and article V, section A, of the Code, to the
extent that it be permitted to work employees
of its plants S hours overtime weekly, and
operate its machinery 4 hours overtime
weekly for 60 days from March 5, 1935, as
follows: Kingston, N. Y., plant, 50 people in
the collar department of the stitching room,
2 machinists, and 7 floor helpers; Troy, N. Y.,
plant, 50 people in the cutting department, 50
people in the assembling department of the
stitching room, 5 machinists, and 10 mainte-
nance helpers; Albany, N. Y., plant, 60 people
in the collar department of the stitching
room, 30 people in the boxing department, 12
people in the cleaning department, 10 people
in the shipping department, 2 machinists, and
5 maintenance helpers, provided all overtime
Is paid for at the rate of time and one-half.
DRESS MANUFACTURING INDUS-
TRY, Code No. 64: Order 66, granting to
Kanner Dress Co., Elizabeth, N. J., exemp-
tion from the provisions of article IV, sec-
tions 5 and 7, of the Code, to the extent that
it may pay its employees less than the mini-
mum wage rates as set forth in the provi-
sions of the Code on condition that it pay
them not less than $25.59 for cutters, $22.33
for machine cutters, $19.58 for sample makers,
$18.39 for stretchers, $17.38 for pressers,
$16.40 for operators, $14.58 for finishers,
S$14.39 for examiners. $13.58 for cleaners and
pinkers, and $13.18 for floor girls, provided
the exemption conferred in section 7 shall
not apply to any employee properly classified
under said article and section other than
floor girls. No more than 40 percent by unit
volume of applicant's production shall be of
dresses coming within the definition of the
Code, provided no employee in any craft as
herein set forth now receiving in excess of
the minimum wage scales prescribed shall
receive a less amount than said employee is
now receiving. A copy of the order must be
posted in a conspicuous place in the appli-
cant's plants.
ELECTRIC AND NEON SIGN INDUS-'
TRY, Code No. 506: Order 15, approving
budget and basis of contribution for the pe-
riod from September 3, 1934, to March 31,
1935.
ELECTRICAL MANUFACTURING IN-
DUSTRY, Code No. 4: Order 84, granting
to Fretz-Moon Tube Co., Inc., for its plant
at East Butler. Pa., exemption from the pro-
visions of articles III and IV, of the Code,
upon condition that it shall observe labor
provisions identical with those contained in
the Iron and Steel Industry Code, in all oper-
ations where the exemption applies.- The
applicant company shall report to the Code
Authority any material increase in the num-
ber of man-hours used in the processing of
products of the industry.
FISHING TACKLE INDUSTRY, Code
No. 13: Order 39, granting to Fish Net &
Twine Co., Jersey City, N. J., exemption from
the wage and hour provisions of the Code
and denying to them exemption from article
III, of the Code.
FUR DEALING TRADE, Code No. 381:
Order 17, approving extension of 1934 budget
and basis of contribution through the months
of January, February, and March 1935.
FUR MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY,
Code No. 436; Order 22, approving exten-
sion of budget approved by Order 436-16,
dated December 28, 1934, on a pro rata
basis from January 27, 1935, through April
27, 1935.
GARTER, SUSPENDER, AND BELT
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY, Code No.
94; Order 29, approving budget and basis of
contribution for the period from January 1
to December 31, 1935, upon certain condi-
tions.
HANDKERCHIEF INDUSTRY, Code No.
53: Order 19. granting to Newark Embroid-
ery Works. Newark, N. J., exemption from
the provisions of article VII, section 6, of


the Code, to the extent that it be permitted AN
to accept the return of merchandise, in the.:'.:!
amount of $135, from L. Epstein & Sons,.,?
Baltimore, Md. :
HARDWOOD DISTILLATION INDUS-...
TRY, Code No. 110: Order 21, denying to.
Delta Chemical & Iron Co., Wells, Delta ..
County, Mich., exemption from the provislons.kJ
of articles III and IV, of the Code. ..
HAT MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY,;i
Code No.' 259: Order 29, approving extensioft..
of budget approved by Order 259-17, dated.ya
December 20, 1934, on a pro rata basis up to ..
and including March 31, 1935. .
Order 80, approving payment of $416.61
from the contingent fund provided in ap-.
proved budget. -.-M
Order 32, granting to Merrimac Hat Co-r
portion, Amesbury, Mass., exemption from.
article II, section 5, of the Code, to the ex-,S|
tent that the pressing department of the4
plant of the applicant is permitted to ope1.S.'
ate three shifts, of 6 men on the first shift, i
5 men on tlle second shift, and 4 men on the'-4
third shift. A copy of the order must be::
posted in a conspicuous place i in the ap-'
plicant's plant. Order dated March 12, 1935';.:
ICE INDUSTRY, Code No. 43: Order 1Q0,.:'i
granting to Goetz Ice Co., Tolleson, Ariz.,..
permission to increase its daily ice manu- '
facturinrg capacity from 75 tons .to 150 tons,
and its ice storage from 6,000 to 8,000 tons;".a
In Tollison, Ariz. "
Order 101, granting to Grady Little, Cam-ifi
eron, Tex., permission to erect and operate'.,'-..
a 20-ton ice plant and 60-ton storage capac-
Ity in Cameron, Tex. .
Order 102, granting Acme Ice Co., WellsU-:';
ville, N. Y., permission to increase its ice;3
manufacturing capacity from 13 tons to 17..A:
tons, in Wellsville, N. Y. .
Order 103, granting to 0. J. McCotter, ..:
Vandemere, N. 0., permission to erect and :.i,
operate a 10-ton ice plant, at Vandemere,.1r:
N. C. ..
INFANTS' AND CHILDREN'S WEARi.;
INDUSTRY, Code No. 373: Order 40, exten.:l .'
sion of order dated August 21, 1934 approv-:'i
Ing and authorizing the Labor Complaints.
Committee in the infants' and children's wear:'-.;
industry for a period of 60 days from the-ex-
piration of Order 373-24. -
INSECTICIDE AND DISINFECTANTki,
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY, Code No. .,
391: Order 12, approving list of hazardous':;
occupations unsuited to persons under 1I.
years of age. :;
INSULATION CONTRACTORS DIVI-I?1'
SION OF THE CONSTRUCTION INDUS-a7i
TRY, Code No. 244L: Order 11, granting.
postponement of the effective date of Ad-
Sministrative Order 244-L-9 of approval of. ri
Surrey Bureau for territory embracing areas'".'U
In the States of New York and New Jersey,:,
including Greater New York, pursuant to the.
provisions of section 2 (c), article III, of:
the Code, to April 6, 1935.
LAUNDRY TRADE, Code No. 281: Order ..
45, extending termination date of Code as 4.
amended December 10, 1934, until further
order of NIRB. ..


I


LIMESTONE INDUSTRY, Code No. 113:..
Order 31, granting extension of the effective
period of allowable cost formula until April '1
29, 1935.
LUMBER AND TIMBER PRODUCTS 'I
INDUSTRIES, Code No. 9: Order 317 .
granting W. \V. Thompson & Co., Scottsvillq, :i
Ky., temporary exemption from the wage.,
provisions of the Code to the extent that the',.
minimum wage for common labor shall be '..i1
not less than 184S cents per hour and the..::-
present rates of pay for other classifications.,
above this minimum willWnot be reduced. ,.
MEDIUM- AND LOW-PRICED JEW."'U
ELRY MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY,;"!
Code No. 175: Order 48, denying to Mon- '.".
daine Products Corporation, Stroucdsburg,
Pa., exemption from the wage provisions of.';
the Code. ii
MEN'S CLOTHING INDUSTRY, Code.!::'
No. 15: Order 61, granting to all members..
of the industry, exclusive of tailor-to-the-f
trade houses and uniform manufacturers, a;
stay of the provisions of article IV of the|
Code to the extent that all members be..
granted permission to work 40 hours peri'
week for 5 consecutive pay roll weeks thatP
fall within the calendar period beginning' .!
March 4, 1935, and ending April 6, 1935, pro-:.:
vided that rate of pay for such overtime-.'-
shall be at piece and/or hourly rates now:
being paid in each respective establishment-?
to all workers who may be affected. A copy' .".
of the order must be posted in a conspicuous ..i
place in the various plants. '..
MERCHANDISE ,WAREHOUSING .
TRADE, Code No. 232: Order 17, approving '
budget and basis of contributloa-ffd'r the pe- :i
riod from February 10. 1935, to February 9,, .
1936, upon certain conditions. ..
THE MILLINERY INDUSTRY, Code No.'
151: Order 49, granting American Hat Co., i.
(Continued on page 6, column I) '"' "

b '* *

... .
.. ....,.', .:. .. :. !: o ,"O ? ..F .. .!..& A . - ...













ADMINISTRATIVE ORDERS-Continued"


.'l0. (Continued from page 5)
.: Atlanta, Ga., exemption from the provisions
k).f.article 111, section 5, of the Code, to the
bxtatent that they are permitted to employ
I.;thelr watchmen not more than 56 hours per
T-Wweek. A copy of the order is to be posted
;ln a conspicuous place in the applicant's
;-platnt.
1 THE OUTDOOR ADVERTISING TRADE,
C6ode No. 304: Order 16, modifying Adminis-
.traUtve Order 304-14, providing for exemp-
l6n of certain members of the trade from
contributions to defray budgetary expenses.
.',PAPER AND PULP INDUSTRY, Code
6N. 120: Order 49, denying Flambeau Paper
,io., Park Falls, WVis., exemption from the
rpovtisions of article IV, of the Code.
; PLUMBING CONTRACTING DIVISION
OF THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY,
Ilde No. 2441: Order 22, granting to mem-
btrs of thle division and their journeyman
$lumber employees, exemption from the pro-
illons of chapter X, article III, section 1,
paragraph (b) of the Code for that portion
fot Erie County, State of New York, not in-
ClUded in the following boundaries: West,
.JEake Erie and Niagara River; south, a Line
projected along the Wiilet Road from Lake
Erie to the New York Central Railroad
racks, near McKinely Parkway; east, north
Song the above railroad tracks to the Union
B Mqad, then north on the Onion Road to the
gWherele Drive, then northwest along au
Saginary line from Union Road and'Wlierele
iflrve to the Harlem Roade and Sheridan
Drive; north, west along Sheridan Drive to
.-he Two Mile Creek Road and then north-
l4ast and northwest along the Two Mile Creek
Road to the Niagara River, to the extent
H at, the hourly, rate of wages for skilled
lIabor of $1.20 per hour be reduced to 85
ts per hour.
H ,.PRINTING INK MANUFACTURING
INDUSTRY, Code No. 339: Order 11, ap-
9prolng list of hazardous occupations un-
siulited to persons under 18 years of age.
:'PRIVATE HOME STUDY SCHOOL IN-
D.USTRY, Code No. 447: Order 10, denying
Io"National Poultry, Institute, Inc., Adams
enter, N. Y., exemption from the provisions
of article IV, section 1, of the Code.
H READY-MADE FURNITURE SLIP
0.CVERS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY,.
bode No. 283: Order 17, approving budget
and basis of contribution for the period of
H Marcb 15, 1934, to March 14, 1935, subject to
:certain conditions.
*vRETAIL FOOD AND GROCERY TRADE,
odble No. 182: Order 69, denying G. M.
Mi0ster, Mineral Wells, Tex., exemption
from provisions of article V, section 2, of
Th Code.
RETAIL JEWELRY TRADE, Code No.
S!4: Order 63, approving certain local budg-
tsaand bases of contribution for the period
I .f January 1 to June 16, 1935, subject to
certain conditions.
H RETAIL KOSHER MEAT TRADE, Code
o. 540: Order 10, approving budget and
.al"sIs of contribution for the period of Jan-
-aHry 1 to June 16, '1935.
'R.RETAIL SOLID FUEL INDUSTRY, Code
[o.i 280: Prder 229, modifying lowest rea-
boniable colts of Division No. 3 for the Trade
'iea of Monroe County, N. Y.
-Order 230, canceling lowest reasonable
oast'determinations for Trade Area No. 7-A
',PDivision No. 21.
IHETAIL TRADE, Code No. 60: Order 376,
joitpoulng the effective date of Administra-
e 'Order No. 60-365 to April 5, 1935.
'ROCK AND SLAG WOOL MANUFAC-
TIURING, Code No. 321: Order 18, granting
tatay of the operation of the provisions of
article III, section 1 of the Code for a period
of .60 days from March 8, 1935, to the extent
ha.t -no employee be permitted to work in
excess of 40 hours per week or in excess of
8pl.ours in any 24-hour period except as
otherwisee provided in the Code, or for the
purpose of changing shifts, and in such cases
no employee be permitted to work in excess
Hf 16 hours in any 24-hour period, provided
ithat such change of shifts shall not occur
.,ore frequently than once in any 14-day
Apne'od and that the rate of pay on any such
Change day is exempt from the overtime pro-
,n.sions for hours worked in excess of the
daily maximum.
i RUBBER MANUFACTURING INDUS-
-TRY, Code No. 156: Order 69, modifying
S'Administrative Order No. 156-37 conditionally
tdapproving Uniform Accounting Manual by
:extending from December 24, 1934, to and
.|including March 25. 1935, the time within
,.which the Code Authority is required to re-
tlport the results of the use of the manual to
g"Ithe Division Administrator.
< Order 70, denylng to MN. Rudolph & Co..
.iTeKalb, Ill., exemption from the provisions
of chapter X, aiticle III-B, section 2, of the
Code.
i' SCRAP IRON, NONFERROUS SCRAP
-.-( METALS AND WASTE MATERIALS
-" TRADE, Code No. 330: Order 42, approving
"' budget and basis of contribution for the pe-
riod beginning July 1, 1934 and ending June
... 80, 1935, for the Wool Stock Trade Division.


". .. i,
, : "- <\';. ,. ; .' :,: . .. . .


SHOE AND LEATHER FINISH, POL-
ISH AND CEMENT MANUFACTURING
INDUSTRY, Code No. 184: Order 16, grant-
ing Standard Oil Co. (an Ohio corporation),
Cleveland, Ohio, exemption from the pro-
visions of articles III and IV of the Code,
to the extent that employees engaged in the
manufacture of products subject to this Code
be paid not less than the minimum wage
equal to that provided in the Code for the
petroleum industry and that the maximum
hours for such employees shall be not more
than the maximum hours provided in the
Code. for the petroleum industry. A copy
of the order must be posted in a place ac-
cessible to all employees affected thereby.
Order provides for filing of yearly coufiien-
tial reports with Code Authority as to vol-
ume of sales, number of employees, and other
pertinent data.
STAINED AND LEADED GLASS IN-
DUSTRY, Code No. 531: Order 6, denying
to Aurora Art Glass Co., 112 Boulevard of
the Allies, Pittsburgh, Pa., exemption from
the provisions of article IV, section 1, of the
Code.
TAPIOCA DRY PRODUCTS INDUS-
TRY, Code No. 328: Order 10. approving list
of occupations unsuited to persons under 13
years of age.
TRUCKING INDUSTRY, Code No. 278:
Order 172, ordering pursuant to article II,
section 1A of the Code anrd article II, sec-
tion 1, of the Code for the household goods
storage and moving trade, dated April 19,
1934, that vehicles and all persons employed
thereon or in services ordinarily incidental
thereto, engaged in the transportation of used
household goods or used office furniture and
equipment, are included wholly in the Code
for the household goods storage and moving
trade and are exempted from all provisions
of the Code for the trucking industry if the
revenue derived from such transportation of
used household'goods or used office furniture
and equipment is 90 percent or more of the
total revenue derived through each such ve-
hicle, and if either the person in whose serv-
ice such vehicles are employed has his place of
business within a metropolitan district, as de-
fined by the United States Census of 1930.
or such vehicles are being used to transport
used household goods or used office furniture
and equipment within such a district, or such
vehicles are vans doling long-distnnce moving,
as defined in article II, section 11, of the
Code for the household goods storage and
moving trade. The percentage of revenue
derived through each vehicle shall be deter-
mined as of the calendar year 1934, or If
the vehicle was not operated during that en-
tire year, during the 6 months of the opera-
tion of the vehicle, or -in the event that the
vehicle has been operated less than 6 months,
during the total period of its operation and
all other vehicles, and alnil persons employed
thereon or in services ordinarily incidental
thereto, are included wholly in the Code for
the trucking industry and are exempted from
all the provisions of the Code for the house-
hold goods storage and moving trade.
THE TRUCKING INDUSTRY, Code No.
278: Order 173, denying Victor Lynn Trans-
portation Co..'Salisbury, Md., exemption from
the provisions of article V, of the Code.
Order 174, approving budget and basis of
contribution for the period February 11, 1935,
to February 10, 1936, subject to certain con-
ditions.
UNDERGARMENT AND NEGLIGEE
INDUSTRY, Code No. 408: Order 35, deny-
ing the National Garment Co., Massillon,
Ohio, exemption from the provisions of ar-
ticle III, of the Code.
WALL PAPER MANUFACTURING IN-
DUSTRY, Code No. 19: Order 16, granting
Beaudry Wall Paper Corporation, and Cort-
land Wall Paper Co., Inc., exemption from
the provisions of article III (a) of the Code
to the extent that employees of the appli-
cants needed to work for the purposes set
forth In the application shall be -permitted to
work in excess of the maximum hours pro-
vided in the Code upon condition that hours
of such employment in excess of said maxi-
mum hours shall not exceed 16 hours in any
1 week for any 1 shift and any such em-
ployee who works in excess of 40 hours In
any 1 week or more than S hours in any
24-hour period shall be paid at the rate of
time and one-half. No employee shall be
laid off on account of or as incidental to
the exemption hereinafter granted. This or-
der shall be posted in a place conspicuous
and accessible to all employees.
THE WHOLESALE FRESH FRUIT
AND VEGETABLE DISTRIBUTIVE IN-
DUSTRY, Code No. LP18: Order 12, denying
United Fruit, Auction Co., Cincinnati, Ohio,
exemption from the provisions of article 1II,
section 1, of the Code.
WOOD FLOOR CONTRACTING DIVI-
SION OF THE CONSTRUCTION INDUS-
TRY, Code No. 244K: Order 7, approving
divisional Code Authority budget and basis
of contribution for the period of November
1, 1934, to June 15, 1935.
WOOL TEXTILE INDUSTRY, Code No.
3: Order 50, granting to Pacific Mills, Law-


rence, Mass., exemption from the provisions
of article IV, of the Code, to the extent that
2,496 spinning spindles used in the produc-
tion of a special platted yarn may be oper-
ated for a third shift of 40 hours per week
for a period of 30 days from March , 1035,
to and including April 3, 1935, for the pur-
pose of producing yarns used in the manu-
facture of fabrics for automobile upholstery
to fill actual orders for said fabrics upon the
conditions that all available spindles used
in the production of a special platted yarn
shall be operated two shifts of 40 hours each
per week before a third shift is put into oper-
ation and spindles engaged in the production
of a special platted yarn may operate on the
third shift only for the purpose of producing
yarn for use in the manufacture of fabrics
for automobile upholstery and shall not oper-
ate on a third shift fur use in any other
fabrics or for the purpose of manufacturing
stock for Inventory. The applicant shall not
allocate an undue proportion of the work to
be produced on a third shift to its plants
located in low-wage areas. The applicant
shall submit to the NIRB such reports as it
may request relating to total pounds of tlhe
special platted yarn produced during the next
30 days. Copies of the order must be posted
in a conspicuous place in the mills of the
applicant.
Order 51, granting to Botany Worsted
Mills, Passaic, N. J.: Brampton Woolen Co.,
Newport, N. H.; Edwin and Louis Bry, Nor-
ristown, Pa.; Forsrmann Woolen Co., Pas-
saic, N. J.; New Jersey Worsted Mills, Pas-
saic, N. J.; Oakland Worsted Co., Oakland,
R. I.; Princeton Worsted Mills. Princeton,
N. J.; Royal Worsted Mills, Lowell, Mass.;
Talbot Mills, North Bilierica, Mass.; United
States Bunting Co., Lowell, Mass.; Wans-
l;uclk Co. (Geneva Mill), Nasonville, R. I.;
Wanskuck Co. (Mohegan Mill), Providence,
R. I.; The Shirreffs Worsted Co. (division
of Aetna Mills), Fitchburg, Mass.; Yorkshire
Worsted Mills, Lenni Mills, Pa.; Faulkner &
Colony Manufacturing Co., Keene, N. H.;
Cowen Woolen Co., Lewiston, Maine; and the
Broad Brook Co., Broad Brook, Conn., exemp-
tion from the provisions of the first para-
graph of article III for employees in the
burning and mending departments, to the
extent hat they may be employed 48 hours
per week provided time and one-third is paid
for all hours worked in excess of 40 per
week and since this exemption is granted
because of lack of available workers, all duly
qualified hurlers and menders shall be em-
ployed who may present themselves to any
of the above-named applicants for employ-
ment. The order must be posted In a con-
spicuous place in said departments of ap-
plicant firms.
WRECKING AND SALVAGE INDUS-
TRY, Code No. 318: Order 13, denying Ham-
merly Wrecking Co., 2411 South 24th St.,
Omaha, Nebr., exemption from the provi-
sions of ,article IV, section 1, paragraph (d),
of the Code.


Interpretations


Motion Picture Industry
124---417
FACTS.-Article IV, division B, section 2,
of the Code of fair competition for the mo-
tion picture industry reads as follows:
No employee shall be paid: (a) Less than
fifteen dollars ($15) per week in any city
over 500,000 population or in the immediate
trade area of such city.
(b) Less than fourteen dollars and fifty
cents ($14.50) per week in any city between
250,000 and 500,000 population or in the Im-
mediate trade area of such city.
(c) Less than fourteen dollars ($14) per
week in any city or place up to 250,000 popu-
lation or in the immediate trade area of such
city or place."
QUESTION.--f an employee in the dis-
tribution division of the motion picture in-
dustry works less than the maximum hours
set forth in the Code. may he be paid less
than the minimum weekly wage provided for
therein?
INTERPRETATION.-No such employee
may be paid less than the minimum weekly
wage provided in the Code, even though he
works less than the maximum number of
hours per week provided for therein.


Soap and Glycerine Manu-
facturing Industry
83-61
QUESTION.-What is the minimum
-weekly wage for salesmen in the soap and
glycerine Industry excluding traveling ex-
penses?
INTERPRETATION.-Inslde sales em-
ployees must be paid at least $15 per week in
any city of 500,000 population, or in the Im-
mediate trade area of such city, and at least
$14 per week in any other part of the United
States.
Outside salesmen must be paid not less
than 40 cents an hour, or in southern States
not less than 35 cents an hour.


Amendments and

Modifications


The Bituminous Coal Industry.-Amend.
meat approved March 14 provides for the
selection of one member of the Code Au-
thority, divisional and subdivisional from
nominations submitted by the accredited
and recognized organization of employees.
Cordage and Tiine Ind-ustry.-Amend-
meat approved March 7 eliminates the fair
trade practice Iprovisions contained in sched-
ule A, in order that members of the cordage
and wrapping-twine industry division may
more equitably meet the competition offered
by the Philippine cordage and twine import-
ers and prison labor made cordage and twine,
and eliminates fair trade practices which
have been found to be impractical.
Cotton Garment industry.-Amendment
approved March 7 removes certain restrile-
tions on bonuses and allowances of free
goods.
The Hosiery Industry.-Amendment ap-
proved March S fixes the working hours and
minimum wages of those employees pre- '
viously excepted from the wage and hour
provisions of the Code such as repair shop
crews, engineers, electricians, etc.
Leather Industry.-Amendment approved
March 5 enables the Code Authority to pro-
pose amendments on behalf of the industry
or any division thereof without the neces-
sity of a three-quarters vote of the entire
Industry.
Liquid Fuel Appliance Manufacluring In-
dustry.-Amendment approved March 8 pro-
vides that rule L of article V be deleted and
certain provisions be inserted in lieu thereof
to provide for maximum terms of sale and
discount. Rule iM is amended to make the
provision against price decline to include the
period of post-dating on items.
Lumber and Timber Products.-Amend-
ment approved March 11 corrects a dupli-
cation of jurisdiction between the Northern
Pine Division and the Northern Hardwood
Subdivision over hardwood lumber produced
In Minnesota by removing the State of
Minnesota from the jurisdiction of the North-
ern Hardwood Subdivision.
Medium and Low-Priced Jewelry Manufac-
turing Indusity.-Amendment a p p roved
March 4 cancels certain Code provisions
Which tends toward monopoly by the dele-
ion of subsection 0, section 1 of schedule A
of the Code.
Metallic Wall Structure Ind.ustry.-Amend-
ment approved March 7 clarifies the defini-
tion of the metallic wall structure industry.
(A Division of the Fabricated Metal Prod-
ucts Manufacturing and Metal Finishing and
Metal Coating Industry.)
Motion Picture Industry.-Amendment ap-
proved March 11 exempts from the provi-
sions of the Code the T&Orrltory of Hawaii
and Puerto Rico and provides that exhibi-
tors in contracting for certain services must.,
require the contractor to agree in the con-
tract to pay the wages and observe the hours
set forth in the C6de, clarifies certain deflnl-
tions in article IV, division 0, part 2,'section
1. The amendment further makes changes
in the wage and hour provisions and working
conditions of various classes of employees.
Photographic and Photo Finishing Indus-
try.-Amendment approved March 4 makes
changes in the administrative organization
and modifies certain provisions to the end
that they are more equitable and capable of
administration.
I-
Powder Puff Ilndustry.-Amendment ap-
proved March 11, provides for the inspection
of records by the Code Authority.
Precious Jcwelry Producing Industry.-
Amendment approved March 7 cancels cer-
tain Code provisions which tends toward
monopoly by the deletion of subsection C,
section 1 of schedule A of the Code.
Rayon and Silk Dyeing and Printing In-
dustry.-Amendment approved March 6 pro-
vides for the insertion in the Code of the
standard clause providing for nonpnrtner-
ship and nonliability of Code Authority mem-
bers.
Umbrella Industry.-Amendment approved
March 6 provides for the collection of con-
tributions and submission of budget by the
Code Authority. L
Restaurant Industry. Amendment ap-
proved March 8 provides for the raising of
funds by an equitable method of conutribu-
tion and relieves members of the Code Au-
thority from liability for any action taken in
connection therewith, except for their own
willful malfeasance or nonfeasance.
.41
.it->~ve.ta~t












r Interpretations


1.

I





t
?
!*;
i-


Code Authority Members Approved

The National Industrial Recovery Board Robertson and Bryan Kemmer, Casper, Wyo.;
approved the following selections and ap- H. M. Symons, Cheyenne; John Engle, Sheri-
pointmnents of Code Authority members: dan; J. J. Carey, Greybull; Platt Wilson,
Kemmerer; Roy Sundin, Rawlins, Wyo.;
BLUE PRINT AND PHOTO PRINT IN- W. E. Bundschu, Chattanooga; S. F. Zbinder,
DUSTRY.-Ar-thur' Beiser, Chicago, Ul.; Chattanooga; N. C. Daniell, Cleveland; R. W.
Ewald Schuettner, St. Louis, Mo.: David T. Spiers, Knoxville; R. Lott Moore, Morris-
May, New York, N. Y.; George Warburton, town; Elbert E. Hill, LaFollette; R. C. Mc-
Philadelphia, Pa.; J. W. Dietrich, San Fran- Clure, Bristol; Harry G. Range, Johnson
cisco, Calif.; Harry J. Scxultz, New York, City; Jas. S. Frazer, W. 0. Brown, F. M.
N v Haber, Nashville; E. C. Walling, McMinn-


Heat Exchange Industry
No. 56-12
FACTS.-Article V: Wages" of the Code
of fair competition for the heat exchange in-
dustry provides in relevant part in section
(b) as to minimum wage that shall be paid
by any employer to any unskilled employee
- engaged in the production of the products of
the heat exchange industry and in labor op-
erations directly incident thereto shall be 40
cents per hour, unless the rate per hour for
the same class of labor on July 15, 1929, was
less than -10 cents * *
Section (c) provides as to minimum wage
that shall be paid by any employer to all em-
ployees other than those engaged in the pro-
duction of the products of the heat exchange
industry and in labor operations directly in-
cident thereto shall be at the rate of $15 per
week. whether calculated on an hourly,
weekly, monthly, piecework, or any other
basis in accordance with the usual custom of
the employer * *."
Article VI: "Hours" provides In relevant
part "on and after the effective date no em-
ployer shall employ any employee except ex-
ecutives, administrative, supetvWsory, and
technical employees and their respective staffs
who are paid at the rate of $35 or more per
week, traveling sales and service employees,
watchmen, and firemen, in excess of 40 hours
per week, provided, however, that these limi-
tations shall not apply to conditions of sea-
sonal or peak demand which create an un-
usual and temporary burden for production
or installation * *."
QUESTION.-Are firemen included under
section ib) or section (c) of article V of the
Code of fair competition for the heat exchange
Industry?
RULING.-Firemen are engaged In labor
operations directly incident to the production
of the products of the heat exchange industry
and come within the provision of section (b)
of article V of the Code of fair competition for
the heat exchange industry. Firemen are en-
Stitled to receive at least the unskilled mjni-
mum wage rate of section (b) of article V.
QUESTION.-If firemen are considered as
being under article V, section (c), may they
be worked unlimited hours for $15 per week,
unlimited hours being in accordance with
.article VI as to salaried employees?
RULING.-The provisions of section (c) of
article V do not apply to firemen.
S QUESTION.-Interpret article VI as to
maximum hours of firemen.
RULING.-Firemen are excepted from the
40-hour limitation of article VI.

Fabricated Metal Products
Manufacturing and Metal
Finishing and Metal Coating
Industry
FACTS.-The basic Code Authority of the
fabricated metal products manufacturing and
metal finishing and metal coating industry
has requested the Administration to properly
classify those engaged in the manufacture of
flexible shafting, which is used for various
purposes, such as speedometers, dental mo-
tors, meters, etc. Although metal flexible
shafting is included under the dednition of
the basic Code of fair coqnjpetiton for the
fabricated metal products manufacturing and
metal finishing and metal coating industry
Sthe Code Authority of the automotive parts.
and equipment manufacturing industry main-
tains that those companies, when manufac-
turing this product for use in connection with
speedometers, should operate under the Code
of fair competition, for the automotive parts
and equipment manufacturing industry. It
appears that it would be highly impracticable
for the manufacturers of flexible shafting
to be required to split down their production
between various used Codes, such as that for
automotive parts and equipment.
RULING.-It is ruled that those engaged
In the manufacture of flexible shifting for
use In connection with various products, such
as speedometers, dental motors, and meters,
shall operate under the basic Code of fair
competition for the fabricated metal products
manufacturing and metal finishing and metal
coating industry.

Electric and Neon Sign
Industry'
No. 506-10
FACTS.-Article IV, section 2 (a) and
(b), read as follows: (a) The term "skilled
:employee" as u~ed in this section shall mean
sign painters, iron workers, sheet-metal work-
ers, maintenance men, electricians, glass blow-
ers, and pumpers, expressly excepting there-
from helpers as hereinafter defined
(b) No member of the industry shall em-
Ploy more than 1 helper for each 3 journey-
m en. The term "helper" as used herein shall
mean all employees other than journemen
engaged in the skilled trades defined in para-
graph (o) of this section.
QUESTION.-May an employer employ 1
apprentice to each 3 journeymen and each
fraction thereof?
SINTERPRETATION.-An employer may
ploy 1 apprentice or helper for each 3 Jour-
c..eYlnen, but may not employ one additional
9alnentice or helper for any fraction thereof.


CANDLE MANUFACTURING INDUS-
TRY.-Harold Will, Syracuse, N. Y.; H. T.
Hawthorne, New York, N. Y.; H. E. Rounds,
Ozone Park, Long Island; A. ,N. Muench,
Syracuse, N. Y.; N. J. Baumer, Baltimore,
Md., for a period of 1 year beginning March
5, 1935.
BEESWAX BLEACHERS AND REFIN-
ERS INDUSTRY.-R. J. Mayer, Paterson,
N. J.; Howard C. Will, Syracuse, N. Y.;
George P. Dunn, New York, N.. Y.; for a pe-
riod of 1 year beginning March 5, 1935.
CONCRETE MASONRY INDUSTRY.-
F. J. Patchell.
COPPER, BRASS, BRONZE, AND RE-
LATED ALLOYS TRADE.-Wiiliam Loeb
as observer administration member.
COTTON GARMENT INDUSTRY.-H.
C. Fox, New York, N. Y.; as alternate to Ed-
ward W. Swan.
DENTAL LABORATORY INDUSTRY.-
Paul C. McGowan, Boston, Mass.; S. M.-Al-
lison, Pittsburgh, Pa.: V. D. Lee, Birming-
ham, Ala.; Joseph J. Saslow, Chicago, Ill.;
R. C. Brown, Davenport, Iowa; George Stern-
berg, New York. N. Y.; Robert J. Rothstein,
Washington, D. C.; I. J. Dresch, Toledo, Ohio;
Walter F. Kiess, St. Louis, Mo.; Max Scholl,
Houston, Tex.; 3. L. Manning, Oakland,
Calif ; W. S. Weed, Rochester, N. Y.; L. E.
Tatreau, Portland, Oreg.: Win. H. Sbchroll,
Chicago, Ill.; P. A. Kanouse, Los Angeles,
Calif.; for 1 year ending February 1, 1936.
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRY.-Edward H.
Huxley, Alvin Brown resigned.
FUNERAL SERVICE INDUSTRY.-
Clifford R. Wright.
INLAND WATER CARRIER TRADE IN
THE EASTERN DIVISION OF THE
UNITED STATES OPERATING VIA THE
NEW YORK CANAL SYSTEM.-Clarence
P. Hulst, William J. McCourt, Louis O'Don-
neUll, H. J. Davidge, R. F. Lenaban, J. F.
Doyle, all of New York, N. Y. 1
INSULATION BOARD INDUSTRY.-
P. B. Mossman, Pittsburgh, Pa.
INVESTMENT BANKERS.-Myron F.
Rat cliffe.
HAND BAG FRAME MANUFACTUR-
ING INDUSTRY.-Allan B. Underhill, New-
ark, N. J.; Harry Blacher, Providence, R. I.;
Harry Godden, Boston, Mass.; David Karron,
Jacob Tatelman, and Casper Lowenstein,
Brooklyn, N. Y.
METALLIC WALL STRUCTURE IN-
" DUSTRY (Division of the Fabricated Metal,
etc., Industry).-Approval of appointment
of WV. C. Connolly as impartial agent to de-
termine violations of supplementary Code by
assentors to a i-eement providing for the pay-
ment of liquidating damages.
FUR DRESSING AND FUR DYEING
INDUSTRY.-Henry G. Schlesinger, Ber-
tram J. Goolman, A. Allan Perry, Abraham
Flyer, Bronx, N. Y.; A. Joseph Geist, Spring-
field, L. I; Abe Estrin, Ben W. Hollander,
Louis Redlus, Newark, N. J.; Joseph Simon,
North Bergen, N. J.; Herman Basch, Max
Zucker, New York City; Isador Reiffel, Mount
Vernon, N. Y.; Michael C. Meseritz, Irving
Laiken, Philip Loeb, Harry Goodman, Julius'
Blank, Oscar Yeager, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Sam-
uel Mittelman, Ozone Park, L. I.; Benjamin
Schwartz, Bayonne, N. J.
MOTOR VEHICLE RETAILING
TRADE.-E. C. Bates, Jos. Buckingham,
Meyer Lasker, Bronx, N. Y.; W. Hl. Mc-
Naughton, A. R. Southworth, Jersey City,
N. J.; George Lnessig, Union City, N. J.;
L. LaBrasche, H. H. Donaldson, Brooklyn,
N. Y.; A. G. Rupp, Lynbrook, N. J.; Isaac.
Cohen, Glen Cove; Dan Gluck, Hempstead:
C. B. Warren, D. E. Ahrens, Ralph Horgan,
New York; Jos. L. Daly, Flushing; J. Klaess,
Far Rockiway; R. Nelson, Tompkinsville;
N. K. Mintz, Great Kills; S. G. Mathews.
New Brighton; Robert Fowkes, Spring Val-
ley; Alex Van Houten, Suffern; N. C. Law-
son, Nyack; R. Cornwell, Riverhead: E. R.
Carlsson, Huntington; J. C. Barrie, Pat-
chbogue; H. E. Laux, Mount Vernon : Jos. Kelly.
Ossining; T. G. Tracy, White Plains, N. Y.;
R. D. Lewis, St. Paul: F. C. O'Connell, Min-
neapolis; L. F. Carlson, Anoka: M. C. Swanby,
Duluth; A. Hawkiuson, Virginia; 0. Gilde-
meister, Grand Rapids; H. R. Connor, Be-
midji; J. A. Alderman, Crookston; W. A.
Skogmo. Fergus Falls; H. C. Mills. Brainerd;
J. C. Schlough. St. Cloud: A. Hartelt, Glen-
coe; R. M Neill, Willmar; C. W. Pickle,
Montevideo; Neal Van Dorin, Marshall; J. F.
Barnes, Blue Earth; R. S. Curran, Red
Wing; E G. Usem, Austin: H. J. Postier,
Rochester: W. M. Seifert, Winona; P. K.
Priest, Duluth: A. P. Nelson, St. Paul: V. T.
Mair, Minneapolis; Paul B. Luui, Stanley H.
Horner, Whitney Leary, Oscar Coolican.
Benjamin Ourisman, J. B. Barnes, and
J. M. Sanders, Washington, D. C.; M. E.


vlle.
LEATHER AND WOOLEN KNIT
GLOVE INDUSTRY.-Wm. C. Bliedung,
Milwaukee, Wis.; Louis Postman, Glovers-
vlle, N. Y.; for 2 years beginning January
1, 1935; Francis Sutton, Johnstown, N. Y.;
Samuel Fear, Gloversville, N. Y.; Richard
G. Fried, Milwaukee, Wis.. for 1 year be-
ginning January 1, 1935; alternates, Frank
J. Sellinger, Sheboygan, N. Y.; W. F.
Kuehne, New York, N. Y., for 2 years be-
ginning January 1, 1935; S. Park Hallen-
beck, Mayfleld, N. Y.; Jacob Zuckervar,
Gloversville, N. Y.; Claude Nathan, Chicago,
Ill., for 1 year beginning January 1, 1935.
MERCHANT AND CUSTOM TAILOR-
ING INDUSTRY.-Lionel H. Bailey.
MOTOR BUS INDUSTRY.-Arthur M.
Hill, Charleston, W. Va.; John M. Meighan,
Washington, D. C.; R. T. Whiting, Seattle,
Wash.; C. T. McConnell, Cleveland, Ohio;
0. S. Caesar, Chicago, Ill.; Charles M. Sears,
Jr., Newport, R. I.
OIL FIELD PUMPING ENGINE SUB-
DIVISION OF THE MACHINERY AND
ALLIED PRODUCTS INDUSTRY.-C. Paul
Clark, Olean. N. Y.; Arthur Clifford, Sr.,
Kansas City, Mo.; H. L. Hileman, Oil City,
Pa.; T. F. Hudgins, Mt. Vernon, Ohio; J. J.
McKinney, Butler, Pa.; H. J. HEencken, Chi-
cago. Ill.; C. G. Neely, Franklin, Pa.
OPTICAL RETAIL TRADE.-Walter P.
Spreckels.
RETAIL JEWELRY TRADE.-Walter P.
Spreckels.
RETAIL KOSHER MEAT TRADE.-Isi-
dor Escann (correcting typographical error
in spelling of name).
,RETAIL TRADE.-Leo Auth, Louisville,
Ky.; J. J. Curran and F. L. Reuter, Wil-
mington, Del.; Warren A. Ives, resigned.
LOCAL RETAIL CODE AUTHORITY
FOR OAKLAND, CALIF.-Charles F. Os-
good, E. B. Beach, and D. J. Gessler.
LOCAL RETAIL CODE AUTHORITY
OF LACONIA, N. H.-Edwin H. Shannon,
chairman; Grace N. Maloon, secretary; El-
win A. Doyle, Ralph G. Wiren. Earle E.
Bates, John A. Guay, A. S. Brazil, Fred
Maher, and Gershon Clevenson.
LOCAL RETAIL CODE AUTHORITY
OF ANN ARBOR, MICH.-W. F. Angell,
treasurer and assistant secretary.
SAFETY RAZOR AND SAFETY RAZOR
BLADE MANUFACTURING INDUS-
TRY.-Milton Damman, Leon Cooper, Brook-
lyn, N. Y.: Howard 0. Strauss, Louis Segal,
and Jean U. Koree, New York City;. P. H.
Unsinger. Newark, N. J.; A. J. Lindblad,
Maplewood, N. J.; S. C. Stampleman, Boston,
Mass.; Arthur Liebes, Jersey Cify, N. J.
SANDSTONE INDUSTRY.-Stanley D.
Knight (chairman), Chas. H. Heintel, Cleve-
land, Ohio; Harold T. Blum, Glenmont,
Ohio;.Harry Nicholl, Lorain, Ohio; Volney
S. Ta.ylor, McDermott, Ohio.
SOLID BRAIDED CORD INDUSTRY.-
R. 0. Arnold, Covington. Ga.; E. S. Pratt,
Boston, Mass.; B. B. Blackwelder, Hickory,
N. C.; Ernest Koella, Rockford, Tean.;
James E. Hooper, Baltimore, Md.
TRUCKING INDUSTRY.-Alvin 0. Eck-
ert, Belleville, Ill.; Robert C. Stockton,
Evanston, Ill.; George M. Fort, Morton, Ill.;
Chester C Moore, Chic-igo, Ill.; H. G. Fer-
guson, Fairfield, Ill.; Elhin Watson. Gales-
burg, Ill.: for the State area of Illinois;
Peter S. Peterson, Underwood, Iowa; Fred
C. Eslick, Mason City. Iowa; L. E. Stone,
David Liddle, Des Moines, Iowa: for the
State area of Iowa; Tlic-odore B. Plimpton
for Rhode Island, Counnecticut, New Hamp-
shire, Vermont, and Maine; Frank H. Phipps,
Nel York City; Frank Flanagan, West Rox-
bury, Mass.. Region 1; Fred 0. Nelson, Jr.,
New York City, Region 2; Ted V. Rodgers,
Scranton, Pa., Region 3; H. D. Ho'ton,
Charlotte. N. C., Region 4; William L. Stodg-
hill, Louisville, Ky., Region 5: Frank C.
Schmidt, Toledo, Ohio, Region 6; J. Henry
Alphin. El Dorado, Ark, Region 7: F. R.
Petty, El Dorado, Kans., Region 8; James
E. Murphy, St. Paul Minn., Region 9: Frank
Shufflebarger, Albuquerque, N. Mex., Region
10; Clinton S. Reynolds, Tacoma. Wash.,
Region 11; Roy B. Thompson, San Fran-
cisco, Calif, Region 12.
WHOLESALING OR DISTRIBUTING
TRADE.-Lester A. Coons.
WINDOW GLASS MANUFACTURING
INDUSTRY.-F. J. Patchell.
WOOD CASED LEAD PENCIL MANU-
FACTURING INDUSTRY.-John King
Reckford, Hoboken, N. J.; J. H. Schermer-
horn, Jersey City, N. J.; Herman Price,
New York, N. Y.; H. B. Elmer, Brooklyn,
N. Y.; Asa B. Wallace, St. Louis, Mo.; Al-
fred H. Best, Irvington, N. J.; John S. Furst,
Philadelphia, Pa.


Interpretations "
'*. ="'1


Cotton Cloth Glove Manu-I,
facturing Industry .
No. 187-25. Part: Article II, section 5; arti-_1'
cle IV, section 1, subsection (f); article.
V, section 8. "
FACTS.-The sections referred to above4 N
deal with the definition and classification d,
"beginners." The letter of transmittal whidh.' :
forwarded this Code to the President,state id:,
(p. 527) : "The lowest minimum in the Codfd..
(for beginners' and substandards') is S'7.S8J
for a week of forty (40) hours. BeginnerS6.
doing the work of glove sewers will receive -gi
at least $8.45 per week of forty (40) hours." .'.
This has been interpreted by some manufare
turers to mean that employees, other taia.
glove sewers or glove cutters, may be classl !
fled as beginners" and paid accordingly; 14
some Instances, $7.80 per week of forty (40)!
hours. On March 6, 1934, the Code Authorit`1
declared that the "beginners" provisions dt-j
this Code apply only to glove sewers and glove
cutters. ''
QUESTION.-Can employees, other thand
glove sewers or glove cutters, be classified ar'
"beginners"? -
INTERPRETATION.-O n 1 y employee`;i
performing the operations of glove cutting".
(other than scrap leather) or glove sewing; .
witif less than twenty-four 124) weeks experl-...
ence at such operations within the industry,,'.,t
may be classified as "beginners" for a total,"-.
period not to exceed twenty-four (24) weeks ;Pi-
during which time such employees must re-".1,
ceive at least the regular piecework rate cur=-.i
rently in effect with a guarantee of at leaslh,-.
65 percent of the minimum wage prescribed: l
in the Code for the operations of glove cutting-' .t#
(other than scrap leather) and glove sewingY.*
All other employees must be paid at least thes...
wage minima as provided in the Code. '

Graphic Arts Industries (Tradel4g
Binding and Paper Ruling'|
Industry)
No. 287-424 -*.
FACTS.-Article II, section 21, of the Code
of fair competition for the graphic arts int "
dustries, establishing labor standards fo.;
mechanical employees, states that its pro-'
visions shall govern all establishments enr,.-
gaged in any of the processes of partialr:,
processes of relief printing, and shall be ap-.-A.0
plicable to all the mechanical employees of .
such establishments engaged in calt-rying on'l
any of the operations of such processes. The "
schedule contained in section 21 sets forth"
minimum hourly wage rates for various-'
classes of mechanical employees, specifically':..j?
including those engaged in binding and ruling.':
operations. ",i
QUESTION.-Do the provisions of section':'--
21 apply to mechanical employees engaged in .tl
all binding and ruling operations, whether
or not such operations are performed in es-..-:
tablislihments engaged in commercial relief-'.
printing? .
RULING.-Binding and ruling operations j
are incidental to the processes of relief print-'-.
ing, whether or not such operations are per-H; .
formed in relief printing establishments' ;
The provisions of article II, section 21, of '
the Graphic Arts Code, apply to binding and .t,,
ruling operations whether performed in a '
relief printing establishment or independently
thereof, and include mechanical employees ..'?
engaged in all trade-binding and paper-ruling .
operations. "

Paper Bag Manufacturing .
Industry


No. 230-20 .;|?
QUESTION.-What is meant by "class of '
labor" in the following Code section (article"..'
V, section 1)? .-
."Provided, however, that in case the rate
per hour for any class of labor was, on July
15, 1929, less than the minimum rate above."
specified for the same class of libor, then the':':
minimum rate for such class of labor shall 1be14
the rate paid on July 15, 1929, but in no event!l,,
less than ninety (90) percent of the rate..'.
above specified."
FACTS.-A corporation is paying on the '
basis of this provision in its Philadelphia:-
plant, which was not in operation on July 15,.'.:'
1929, and justifies such payment on the ground1. "
that these rates are applicable to the same op-. i|
rations in its Milwaukee plant which was tIn..
operation on July 15. 1929.
INTERPRETATION.-The expression a
"class of labor" as used in article V, section .
1, of the Code means the identical kinds, -
types, or grades of work performed by em-
ployees in a plant engaged in the industry,
which plant was in actual operation on July '.s
15, 1929. The Code provision applies to any
plant in which, on July 15, 1929, less than the -
Code minimum rates were paid. It does not
apply to nny plant which, on July 15, 1929, .'T
did not pay less than the Code minimum rates. -,--
The Philadelphia plant of the corporation -..*
cannot take advantage of the fact that the
Code provision may be applicable to the Mil- .
waikee plant.


*- ~ -' - - d- .- ., .' : *-..:: '-. .. .,.i. .- -


V











Recent Trends in the Ravon and Synthetic Yarn


: Developments in the rayon industry
duringg recent years as seen in this
week'sks chart, are dominated by the
:'continued expansion that the industry
has experienced. Annual production
Shas increased from year to year almost
:;without interruption; deliveries have
YVbeen strong, and prices have fallen off
*'as the growing industry effected eco-
.,nomics in production and adopted
.."rew processes. With this background
.th'e expected increase in employment
Y.has materialized, and the individual
-i.worker has found his lot improving.
3:7. Hourly wages, receding before the
Rayon and Synthetic Yarn Code was
U:.adopted in the third quarter of 1933,
regained'd the 1929 level in a few months
a .nd in 1934 have approximated 50
951: cents (uppermost part of the chart).
*:.jIHours worked per week were reduced
Lw::with the introduction of the Code in
^"1933. The new weekly earnings, re-
isulting from the shortened working
& -week and the increased hourly wage,
-.netted a gain to the worker oven the
'-weekly wage of the pre-Code year. In
S1934 the weekly wage increased further
-'and, if allowance is made for the lower
cost of living in 1934, the weekly wage
-represented a gain of more than 10
Lt percent over that of 1929.
r": Only in 1932 did employment fall
n!i.oticeably below the 1929 average.
I .The rise in 1933 soon carried employ-
m.ent as much as one-third above that
P'of 1929, a level that has been main-
tained during most of 1934. In 1933
-pay rolls quickly regained their 1929
.average and during the last calendar
ILiyear were some 5 percent above the
.predepression figure.
In the third section of the chart
P. yearly production totals are shown in-
.icreasing by 75 percent during the 6-
iii year period. Despite the summer re-
' action in textiles in 1934, production
,,:for 'last year was slightly larger than
...in 1933. It is noteworthy that the 75-
,percent increase in production since
.t14929 has been attained with only a 33-
percent increase in employment.
Deliveries have moved in sympathy
.with production; in monthly form
(.they depict among other things, wide
Fluctuation in 1932 and 1933 and a
i.slow recession that began in 1933 and
.'terminated after the September strike
in 1934. IPrices of rayon (150 denier,
grade A, as drawn in tlie chart) have
Declined by one-half during the 6 years
that the chart covers. The decline re-
.flects technical improvements and
^: economies in production on a large
.:scale. At the same time lower prices
'54,


20


have been an influential factor in the
substitution of rayon for other fab-
rics. Indicative of this substitution is
the increased percent, of rayon recently
being used in making broad woven
goods.
In the lowest section of the chart
(on arithmetic scale) are shown rayon
imports for consumption and rayon


exports. The former dropped to neg-
ligible proportions after 1929 and 1930.
In marked contrast, exports have
tended upward with 1934 exports dou-
ble those for 1933. However, exports
in 1934 represent but one-tenth of 1
percent of total production in the
United States.
Judged by what has occurred in the


Industry



40
3: ------ 40

30


-- 20

15
- 2.0


1.5

- -0


200

150


100
90
80


past, further increases in rayon pro-
duction will require additions to the
number of laborers, though not propor-
tionally. Hourly and weekly wages.
may be well maintained, presumably:
to attract more workers to the indus-
try. Such wages in combination with
gains- in employment would indicate .
increasing pay rolls.


Code Authority

Members Resigned
The following Code Authority members
ki',resigned:
Bedding Manufacturing Industry-Flqr-
Sence Nesbitt.
SButton Jobbers' or Wholesalers' Trade-
L onel H. Bailey.
Carbon Dioxide Industry-Hubert B. Bram-
let.
Flexible Metal Hose and Tubing Manufac-
turing Industry-R. P. Barry.
SMerchandise Warehousing Trade-Fred E.
Clark.
SRailway Car Appliance Industry--E. M.
SNaylor.
S Power nnd Gang Lawn Mower Industry-
El. M. Nnylor.
Tackle Block Manufacturing Industry-
Robert P. Barry.
Umbrella Frame and Umbrella Hardware
SManufacturing Industry-H. D. Savage.
.' Wall Paper Manufacturing Industry-
Isador Etra.

Code Authority Bylaws
Denied
Pretzel Industry.


Grinding Wheel Industry
No. 170-18
FACTS.-Article III of the Code of fair
competition for the grinding wheel industry
provides in part (sec. 6) that kiln tenders
shall be permitted to work a maximum of
forty-eight (491 hours per week to meet the
demand of emergency peaks in production;
and (sec. 7) that employees engaged on ship-
ping crews, including truck drivers, shall be
permitted a tolerance of ten (10) percent
over the maximum hours provided in sections
1 and 2
QUESTION.-What provisions for over-
time payment apply to kiln tenders and ship-
ping crews whose working hours are referred
to in sections 6 and 7, respectively, of article
III of the Code of fair competition for the
grinding wheel industry?
INTERPRETATION.-The provisions of
the Code relating to extra payment for over-
time do not apply to kiln tenders; conse-
quently such employees, may be permitted to
work, on payment of the normal hourly rate,
a maximum of forty-eight (4S) hours a week
to mnieet the demand of emergency peaks in
production, without payment of overtime.
The provisions of the Code relating to
extra payment for overtime do not apply to
shipping crews, including truck drivers: con-


sequently such employees may be permitted
to woi k, on payment of the normal hourly
rate, a maximum of forty-four (441 hours
in any seven (7) day period, without pay-
ment of overtime.

Carbon Dioxide Industry
No. 275B-21
FACTS.-A member of this industry has
filed with this Code Authority a schedule of
prices. Below the listed prices there appears
the following notation:
"In view of competitive prices published
as low as 31- cents per pound, we reserve
the right to sell or offer to sell our carbon
dioxide under open market or contract at
this minimum."
QUESTION.-Is the filing of a price list
with a reservation clause, as noted in the
facts, in accord with section 1 of article IV
of the supplementary Code as amended Au-
gust 16, 1934?
INTERPRETATION.-No. The fling of
a price list with a reservation clause as noted
in the facts is not in accord with the intent
of section 1 of article IV. There is nothing
to prevent a member of the industry from
meeting competition by filing a new schedule
of prices.


Code Authority By-


laws Approved
The following Code Authority bylaws were
approved
Assembled Watch Industry.
Bituminous Road Material Distributing In-
dustry (with conditions).
Crushed Stone. Sand and Gravel, and Slag
Industries (with revisions).
Mayonnaise Industry.
Motor Vehicle Maintenance Trade.
Motor Vehicle Retailing Trade.
Package Pasteurized-Blended and Process,
Cheese Industry (with exceptions). :
Retail Solid Fuel Industry (with exceptions), .
Sanitary and Waterproof Specialtieg Manu,.
facturing Industry.
Toll, Bridge Industry (with conditions).
Wool Stock Trade (with exception).

Trade Practice Corn-
plaints Committees
SApproved
Bulk Drinking Straw, Wrapped Drinking
Straw, Wrapped Toothpick and Wrapped
Manicure Stick Industry.
Marble Quarrying and Finishing Industry-.
Pacific Coast Area.
Marine Equipment Manufacturing Industry I
(Amenlnments conditional) .
Retail Solid Fuel Industry--Divisional Cod S
Authority, Divisions 9 and 34.


la 5. GOVERNMEHr PRINTING OrFICI


.'.. ........ .


U. S. -IUUu- I IUN


T 1


Cl .. I -. I -I -1 1 -i. I


IN 1,000,000's OF POUNDS .- I


100 .* / W- 7o___. i -_ ,__
90 WHOLESALE PRICE_____
80 ISO DENIER, "W
80________ 4 1 IN CENTS PER POUND_

6 INDEX OF DELIVERIES V
50 |________


2000 -PR- I


SO _____IMPORTS'FOR CONSUMPTION________
N | 4IN Io000's OF POUNDS
(n
o
S100 0-"
2 EXPORTS
500 _____ IN. 1.000'5 OF POUNDS _____

0 -JJLJ. ,J. .J 6, -'L4 --L4-d -WI a t-j. -sr-n ,. I Pr~ $ 'II IIIII
SM J 0 M J S D M J J s M J s M U J S
1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935
Sources of data: Bureau of Labor Statistics-Employment and pay-roll indexes with NRA adjustment to 1933 Census totals; average
hours and average hourly wage from 1932 to date; price of rayon. United States Tariff Commission and United States Department
of Commerce-Imports for consumption and exports. National Industrial Conference Board: Average hourly wage 1929-1931
multiplied by .824. Textile organon-Production and Index of deliveries. Chart prepared exclusively for Blue Eagle by the Division
of Research and Planning, NRA.


Interpretations


.-I


I


AI