The Blue Eagle ( 1934- )

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Title:
The Blue Eagle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
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United States -- National Recovery Administration
Publisher:
National Recovery Administration ( Washington, D.C )
Publication Date:

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Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 16917556
System ID:
AA00021018:00040

Full Text








- Vol. II, No. 12


i Board Rules On

| Bases for Code

SContributions

SWill Not Approve Fixed
I Minimum, Maximum, or
S Sliding-Scale Plans '

.Two rulings on Code contributions have
:been announced by the National Industrial
Recovery Board.
,.In one, the Board ruled that In the future
an bases of Code contribution will be approved
,w-iicth provide for certain fixed minimum or
maximum contributions, flat assessments of
uniform amounts for all members of an in-
dustry, or sliding-scale contributions provid-
lIng variations by brackets.
: This ruling will not affect budgets and
cases of contribution already approved which
.will remain in effect until the end of the
budgetary period.
The intention of the ruling, it was ex-
plained, is to provide a spread of Code ad-
ministration expenses as nearly parallel with
the spread of the Industry's business as possl-
.'ie, Except in Isolated cases fixed minimum
and maximum contributions, fiat rates per es-
tablishment and sliding scales have been, to
s:ome extent Inequitable in operation. The
substitution of a uniform sales percentage
or per-employee rate, for example, will result,
it is believed, in eliminating such inequities
sand will in most eases be less burdensome on
ie smaller establishments.
TJ he ruling follows:
"Hereafter budgets and bases of contribu-
tion will not be approved which provide for:
"(1) Fixed minimum contributions estab-
lshing a minimum amount which each mem-
ber sabilp pay regardless of the application
.of the basis of contributions to him;
S"(2) Fixed maximum contributions estab-
Ilihlng a maximum amount greater than
which no member shall pay regardless of the
'a location of the basis of contribution to
dm;
'"3) Flt contributions which are uniform
amount for all members of an industry or
Trade;
: "(4) Siding-scale contributions which pro-
Tide for Increased or decreased payments in
accordance with specified brackets of the
astla of contribution:
"Exceptions. to this ruling will be made
only on the showing of unusual circumstances
Jaatliting the exception and Involving the
Practical impossibility of establishing a more
equitable basit.
"Budgets already approved containing pro-
yisions as above described will remain In
effectt until the end of the budgetary period."
:. At the same time the Board issued new
regulations governing applications for exemp-
lion from paragraph III of Administrative
Order S-36, which now provides that a firm
seed contribute only to the Code budget of
iLe industry in which the major portion of
is business Is concluded.
:The new regulations require, among other
ings, that any Code Authority requesting
eiemption from that clause must submit de-
led statistical evidence that such an ex-
IPflMon is necessary and will not be burden-
tie on a great number of establishments;
ELt a minimum volume of business or other
sls be established below which no contribu-
U:uwil be asked; that provision be made
tvoid contributions on articles not mar-
,ted per se.
in addition, the Board announced that such
(Continued on page4, column 1)


?abo r Renresentation


Issued Weekly



Labor Co

Commit

Exten


;7- %.Px % r-Jj
For Bituminous Code ApprenticeC

Authorities A ,- Intpr


lie National Industrial Recovery Board
6 approved an amendment to the Bitumi-
Us Coal Industry Code, providing labor
Presentation on divisional and subdivisional
de Authorities.
Te amendment was proposed by the Na-
01 Bituminous Coal Industrial Board.
Each Code Authority, divisional or sub-
*Sional shall have one member thereon
0 shall be selected from nominations sub-
tted by the accredited and recognized or-
4..ltion of employees", the amendment
.bor members already have been chosen
"three subdivisional Code Authorities,
N.G for Ohio, western Pennsylvania, and
northern panhandle of West Virginia.


iI 1 !ILLS
The National Industri
has issued an interpretati
in various Code provision
employment of learners a
Defining the words
"months ", or "years" a
limit the period during
may be classed as a let
the Board ruled:
The words quoted m
calendar periods, with t
time lost from the nor
periods of the plant in w
working, as, for example,
tion of plant operation
willingness of the employ


i':


The National Industr
has extended for a furth
life of the Labor Compli
the infants' and childr
which group was create
tive order dated August
tinued In existence by tm
sion orders.
On January 11, 1935,
plied, ,through the Code
manent approval and aut
labor complaints in the
At that time, the Con
viewed the material sut
Authority and suggested
more complete investigate
signed extending approve
of the committee for 45
period now has expired
Division recommended ti
because its recommend
manent approval are not


Ruling U1

Appeals
The Industrial Appea
cislon rejecting the' appe
Express and Truck Owl
upheld an NRA ruling t
apply even though tern
labor are contained In ax
by collective bargaining.
The association is co
owners and operators in
There are about. 1,500.
county, but the assoclat
least half of the total (
The Code for the tru
rides that weekly wages(
17, 1933, may not be rE
were reduced 15 percent
agreement signed on Ap
for $38 weekly wages for
meat, it was reported, m
for 24,0 men and lower fc
provision would give tI
asked for exemption fr
sions where they were i
agreement.
The National Recovery
nled the exemption, hol
provisions must govern
other agreement. With
trial Appeals Board, aft
pany's appeal from thE
investigating the case, al
Citing the language c
which the appeal was
Board points out in.its
rides for the inclusion
each Code "'that empl
ivith the maximum hour
rates of pay, and other c
meant approved or presc
deot." The Appeals Bo
the case, said: '" If the
are effective they must
purposes, and the right
lively' does not include
away restrictions upon h
other conditions of emp
gress by the same secti(
specified that employers
to observe."
To the association's
Code provision would be
peals Board commented:
elation members) were
June 17, 1933) than the
provision of the Code ha
injured them. There is
that there has been any
relative situations which
members of this associa
petitors on June 17, 193:
situations today."


"~~~ s"'Ad stra.I ) Ma
by the National Recovery Administration, on March 22 1935



mplaint Summary oB's Report.

teee I On Steel Basing Point

lal Recovery Board System
ier 60-day period the y s
aints Committee for.":
"en's wear industy
dy wadindst Recommends to President Transformation 69
d by an administra-
S21, 1934, and con- T 1 -..,
vo subsequent exten- Existing Plan in Industry Into a Group

the committee ap- N111 Base '
Authority, for per-
tborization to handle '
first instance. The National Industrial Recovery Board has submitted a report to h
ipliance Division re- President in which it recommends transformation of the existing multiple b"Z
miitted by the Code
extension pending a ing point system in the iron and steel industry into a group-mill base system
Lion. An order was as a more practicable means of improving the marketing practices of the ian-
al and authorization dustry in public interest than by allowing it to revert to the status existing
days. This 45-day prior to the Code.
heand furthe Coextnlance While suggesting that this change, be made by revision of the Iron and
ie further extension,.
tons regarding per- Steel Code, the Board urges the importance of avoiding violent disruption ilt
yet completed. proposes application of the principle as rapidly as is consistent with a due re'
gard for the interests affected.":.
1 '^1 ByD T The report was submitted to the President required that there be a group-mill base fbr
)hCld B pursuant to an Executive order approving the which base prices abshall be filled for each
Iron and Steel Code when it was revised on product produced at any plant-located nearer
oMay 30, 1934. 'In the order the President thereto In terms of all-rail freight than' i
o rd directed the Federal Trade Coinmmission and any other group-mill base; (b) all erxlstln.
the NationaL Recovery Administration to basing points other than those which may b%
Is Board, in Its de- study further and jointly the operation of the designate as group-mill bases In a) above
?al of the Associated basing point system and its effects, and In- shall become grup-mill bases for which bas
iers of New Jersey, vited "'recommendations for the revision of prices s hall be filed for any product noal
that Code provisions the Code, In accordance with the conclusions based at such points which is produced at a-ny
ms less favorable to reached." More specifically, the order stated plant located nearer therto in tears of al
n agreement reached "the desirability of working toward the end rail freight than to any other group-nll$
of having prices quoted on the basis of areas b ase."
'The report said that the plan would neces,.?:'
imposed of 29 truck of production and the eventual establishment The reporthesdtlat thenplan woud n eclev
Essex County, N J. of basing points coincident with all such areas state the establishmenta of t19 entirely new
operators in that as well as the elimination of artificial trans- group-mill bases and the expansion to i.P
tion members do at portation charges in price quotations." The eludeadditional products of l0 existing ba
operations, proposed group-mill base system is directly Ing points for such products. This methoa
picking industry pro- responsive to this statement of the order, the report pointed out, would leave only ap
proximately 1% percent of rolling mill capae..!.
of drivers as of June The NRA study was made by Dr. J. M. ity more than 50 miles frroma up-mill base.
educed unless hours Clark of Columbia University; Dr. M. P. The fmreightha5 mrged-would be approximately
Sor more. A union Sharp, of the University of Chicago; Deputy actual freight rather than arbitrary o relgh
wii 1, 1934, provided Administrator R. W. Shannon and Burr ac l f reight rathcteting rinta freig
drivers. This agree- Tracy Ansell, of the NRA Legal Division. The features of the group-base plan, the
eant higher earnings Pointing out'that data on the extent to Te fetus o thegd op-b pl ,
report said, would Include: base
or 260 than the Code which so-called artificial freight charges in- "1. An approximation to a mill-baSh sYs
hem. The company crease'the price of steel are being assembled tem while avoiding the impracticablties of
om the Code provi- by the Code Authority at the request of NRA, the latter. Freight charged' to customers
consistent with the the report recommends limiting the wastes 'would be approximately actual freight, rather
of competitive cross-hauting. To this end, than arbitrary freight from distant competing.'.
y Administration de- as supplemental to the recommendation of the Points. freight fro distant ing
Hiding that the Code group-mill base system, it "Is proposed that p Compact group-mill base districts, iolnn
regardless of any any revised Code carry a provision limiting
hidingg with all districts producing even rela-4
this view the Indus- freight bsorptions, the underlying purpose tively small amounts of'primary Iron or steel -,
er hearing the com- of which would be to limit the wastes of 3. All pig-iron capacity would be within-,
e NRA ruling and cross-hauling, to reinforce the effect of the 50 miles of a group-miL base. e "
greed. group-mill base system, and to Increase price 4. Onlys a percent of rolling mill capac'-i
of section 7(a), on competition. Specifically, It is recommended Ity would be more than 50 miles from a group-
based, the Appeals that this be accomplished by adding a provi- mill base. o
findings that it pro- sion to the Code section covering sales on "5. The rolling capacity referred to In
of a provision In foreignn basing points "-that is. basing be p hrov l ln g ceea l cy refesed o in 4


a rghtto argin ivn t~e ltenatvepos~bity f 4)n ab~eove wak e~ nceralonistrpof rso-
oyers shalnl comply points for which a seller does not file prices. lated, imall rolling mills without et asteel-mak-
o of labor,'minimum This provision would prohibit a manufacturer Ing capacity, whosemi costs would naturally re-
onditions of employ- from absorbing more than $5 per ton on sales le capacity wos e costs wo u natralyre-t
flect the cost of transporting the steel to tbnrs''...
r ibed by the Presi- based on a "foreign basing point." works and consequently would, in general, be':;
ard, commenting on I6 the event it is found Impossible to se- based upon the steelmaking group-mill bases:
provisions of 7(a) cure the acceptance of such a program or to from which they purchased semifinished steel.
be effective for all make reasonably rapid progress toward it, "6. Plants making steel for castings or. '.
to 'bargain collec- the report recommends that consideration be products not covered by the Steel Code, but
a right to bargain given to the alternative possibility of aban- able to make ingots incidentally, are properly .
iours and wages and doing the price features of the Code en- disregarded by the requirement in the group-
loymvent which Con- tirely. But it is proposed if there appears mill base definition for rolling or other facill-
on of the same act a reasonable prospect of such acceptance and ties for producing semifnished products.
should be required satisfactory progress toward the goal desig- 7. Plants representing over 98 percent of
rget h ated these features of the Code should be the capacity of the industry as covered by the,
argument that the retained as affording a better means of trans- Code would file base prices at a group-mill.i
Inequitable the Ap- forming the basing point into a sound and base in their immediate vicinities, and thus"
"If they (the asso- satisfactory one than by allowing this sys- be able to take any advantage of their eco-
paying more (on tem to revert to the status existing prior to lu 2
dir competitors, this the adoption of the oCode. (Continued on pae 4. column 2) .
is neither aided nor At the same time, the Board informed the
no evidence offered President, efforts will be -continued to deal
change between the with specific l complaints and abuses and to
existed between the gather additional data on the operation ono r ir pr
i-ion and their com- the present basing point system, especially on r er n ar n-
3, and their relative the wastes of competitive cross-hauling. t
The report treats the organization of the v rl Hea r
Iron and steel industry from its incipiency to
Its present vast proportions, and the techno- C le
d Tlogical and geographical developments lead-
,odeAerr s 1 Ing up to the present basing point system,
which Is described in detail. It discusses sev- Conflicts and overlaps of the Codes for the
r rete eral alternatives to the existing system, con- furniture manufacturing industry and the
ceding that the present system is far from lumber and timber products industries will be
,jl Recovery Board perfect ", and reaches the conclusion that the discussed at a public hearing, April 15, at the
ion of the terms used group-mill base system Is the most satisfac- Carlton Hotel, the NRA has announced.
s governing terms of tory practical substitute.
and apprentices. The report defines the group-mill base sy- D and
"day", "weeks", tem which it proposes for the sale of all Acting Division Administrator John W. Upp
as used in Codes-to products except pig iron, wrought iron, and will conduct the hearing.
which an employee rails, the latter being treated somewhat dif- The Industries' Code Authorities disagree
irner or apprentice, ferently: as to whether production of furniture parts
"Group-mill bases shall be established as on job orders by manufacturers of kiln-dried
mean the respective follows: (a) Within 50 miles of each town at dimension should be subject to the labor pro-
the addition of any any time containing a total capacity for pro- visions of the Flrniture or the Lumber Code.
rmal full-time work during 20.000 tons per year or more of Iron The furniture Code Authority complains
which the employee is or steel ingots and also containing facilities that complete sets of knockdown furniture
by reason of cesea- for rolling or otherwise shaping such ingota now being made under the Lumber Code Ia-
or Inability or un- into blooms, billets, slabs, sheet bars, or other bor provisions should be subject to the Furni-
- ee to work." primary or semifinished forms it would be ture Code labor provisions.


A. -.' ..... -. :-Z' .^; r^a'e^ :f '^


I.




"2"











SSCHEDULE OF CODE HEARINGS, MARCH 21 TO APRIL 4


OPPORTUNITY TO BE HEARD (In wrltlngi :
Facits, criticlime, obiectlons, or suggestions con-
ceornig tne subject matter of su'.h notices must
be submitted on or before the innl ante speciled
In the notice. oddres5"dJ to the proper Deputy Ad-
ministrator or othi-r officlial Indicated. Such com-
munitationa must ctrte: (1) Name of industry;
(2) name of correspondent and group represented;
13) 'acts supporting criticism, objections. or
suggestions.
The subject matter referred to In either type
of notice may be revised In any reasonably ger-
mane particular on the bnsls of such facts, critl-
clims. and other considcrctionB Oas are properly
before the Adminleiritrir.
Calendar Is chionolocrial. with alphanbc-tical
arrangement by; trade ur Industry for eich day.
NOTE: Since all notices must be in the printer's
hands by Friday evening next preceding the publi-
cation of The Blue EBgle, the calendar below does
not ahoiv notices posted on the Offliciol Bulletin
Board after that date, nor does this calendar chow
othi-r bearings for the same dates which may have
appeared In prior issues of this publUcation.


PROPOSED AcioN


IlRoom 406, 1I18 K Street Opportunity to be heard on ap, icotlons submitted by the A.
NW Washington, D. Wittoauer Co., Bulora Watch Co., ana the Benrus Watch Co.,
C W. L. Scoutz. Nc" YorK, ior exemplion from the proisionsi of art. V.III, Eecs.
17 and I, of the Code, .or a period of 3 months.


Room 4327, Department Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
of Commerce Building, Authority for approval ofan interim budget for the period between
Washington, D. C., January I to Apr. 1, 1935 On Mar 7. Order No 123-41 approved
Beverly Ooer. tis budget efeclive az-, of that iate, unless cause to the contrary
be Ahown priokr to Mar 322. 193
Room 402, 1.18 K Street Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the
NW., Washington, D. Montague Rod and Reel Co., Mlontague City Mass., for esemp-
C., W. L. Schurz. tion from art. I, -Iec 3. subsec. lai,, oi the Code.
Room 4217, Commerce Opportunity to be heard on applicamon submitted by the Code
Bulldigp, Washington, Authority for approval of 1its budget and barea of assessment for
D. C., Wm. P. Farns- exhinitori' division and producers' and distributors' division for
worth. the period Jan. I to Dec 31, 1931.
The total amount of the budget is S203,569 12. Contribution is
based on 3 factors-population, theater capacity, and the run
which the theater enjoy: (i. e Ist. 2nd, etc.).


Room 3016, Department
of Commerce Buliding,
Washington, D C.,
Burton E. Oppenheim.
Room 529, Banrr BuIlding,
Washington, D. 0., [r-
win a. Moise.


Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Autnority fur extension on a prorata basis the budget and basis of
contribution for the period ending Feb. 18. 1935 On Mar. 8,
1935, Order 269-20 approved this extension effective as of Feb. 19,
1935, unless good cause to tbe contrary be shown prior thereto.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for approval of Its budget and basis of contribution
for the period from Jan. I to June 16. 1935.
Total amount of budget for said period is $4711,600. Basis of con-
rribution for the said period is f5 50 for each establishment and
$275 for eahob person working in such establishment in eses of
one suob working person, whether owner, partner, officer of
corporation, or other person. Contribution is due and payable
In advance.


I!" Monday Mar. 25,
K 1435
Medium and Low Priced Room 406, 1518 K Street Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by Mono-
: Jewelry Manufacturing NW Washington, D. craft Products Co., Providence, R. I., for exemption from art.
Industry, 175-49. C., W. L. Schurz 11l, sec I, of the Code.
Retail Tobacco Trade, Jefferson Room. May- Hearing on application submitted by the Code Authority for
468-690. flower Hotel, Washing- amendment to pt. If of art. VI ol the Code, and adding a new
ton, D. C., 10 a. m., sec. 3, relating to loss limitation provisions.
._________________ Irwin S. Molse. _________________________

rTuesday Mar. 26,
135
Wholesale Tobacco Trade. Jefferson Room, May- Hearing on application submitted by the Code Aniuthority for
462-691. flower Hotel, Washing- amendment to pt. 11 of art. VI of the Code, by adding a new
ton, D. C 10 a. m., see. 3 relating to loss limitation provision.
-, Irwin S. Moire.
WholesaleTobacco Trade, leferrson Room, May- Hearing on proposal of the N. I. R board that the operation of
692. flower Hotel, Washing- the provisions of art. VII, sec. 3, of the Code be stayed perma-
ton, D. C 10 a. m., neatly as to all persons or enterprises subject thereto, unless
Irwin S. Moise. substitute provisions looking to the solution of problems which
have arisen under said article and section are offered at the public
______________ b_______________ hearing on the proposed amendments.


' Wednesday, Mar. 27,
,.. 1935
* Bituminous Road Ma-
-' terlal Distributing In-
.' dustry, 830-7.


Oi"tu Dealing Trade, 381-18.


Room 4327, Department
of Commerce Building,
Washington, D. C,
Beverly Ober.

Room 4035, Department
of Commerce Building,
Washington, D. C.,
Waller Mangum.


Metallo Wall Structure Room 411, 11518 K Street
Industry, 84 A-16. NW, Washbincton, D.
C., C. R. Niklason.


..Paoksgage and Pasteurlzed
Blended and Process
Cheese Industry. 46&-4.


Thursday. Mar. 28,
1933
Antilriction Bariang In-
du: ttslry. 13S-17.


HI: Blouse and Skirt Manu-
i" turaciun Industri-,
8 194-28.


Room 504. Barr Bullding,
Washngton. D. 0,
Ocorge Carlion.


City Club Bullding. 1320
0 Street NW., Wab.
ington, D. C., Dester
A. Tuteim
Room 10f.7. Department
of Coniinerco BuldinDs,
Wnhin totn, D. C., M.
D Vin[sot.


Cement oGun Contrclors Rorm 7Ill, cl.-1 Ruiidlne,
Industry, 244 D-It. 'V. "hgicn., D. C., Ira
L L V.sls.


Chain P.ftanu[actung In-
Sdustry, 84-C12.


Chinaware and Porcelain
Manufacturing Indu..
try, 126-42 (Semivri-
fled China Brauchj.

Corset and Brassiere In-
dustry, 7-32.


Room 511. I .1IS K SErtCen.
WatnL cioo, D C-
J. liReed Carpenite-r

Room ,32;, Department
ol CoinJinler.u, 13u1lndoc,
WVashi.nyutpn. D. C.,
Brveril Obcr

Room 40fliil, Depariment
of Commerce Bulding.
Wasnington, D. C M.
D. 'Lintni


Opportunity to be heard on appllcat ion submitted by the Code
Authority for approval of its budet and basis of contribution
for the period of Jan. I to Dec 31, 1935. Order 530-6 dated Mar.
7, 1935, approves said budget and basis of contribution. Said
order and approval to become effective Mar. 27, 1935, unless good
cause to the contrary be shown prior thereto.
Opportunity to be hoard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for approval of eiten-ion of its budget for the period
ending Dec. 31. 1931l. Order No. 351-17 approves this extension
on a pro rata basis, effective as of ran I, 36.5, which approval
and extension will become effective on Mar. 2?, 1915, unless
good cause to the contrarTy be shown prior thereto.
Opportunity to be heard on amendment to art h, sec. 1, of
the supplementary Code which aas approved on Mar. 7, 1935.
by Order No. 81 A-l4, and which will become eti.tlive 20 days
Irom that date untl-as good cause to the contrary is shown prior
thereto
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by th, Code
Authority for approval of its -udgilt sod basis of contribution
for the period from Feb. 15 1to June It)16, 1935.
Total budget Is $44,315. Basis ei 6 (ar.sment is es follows: All
manufacturers and specialtv manufacturers arc afssesled in an
amount equal to 40 cents per Iton for cach ion of products of toe
industry sold by them durng ihe calendar year of 10,34. '-cepting
increl'om sales to national distributors and "national distribu.-
rotsr" as defined in the Code are .-.'eszed in a sum equal to is
cent; per ton of all proJULts of thbo indu-tTry purcbis-d by them
durin-: th calendar ,car'r l134 irom manufacturer; and/or specialty
manufacturer'


Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authc-.rity lot approval of is budcLet and Onasis of contribution
lour tihe period [ruin Jan. I to Dec. 31, luJj5
The totinil mounti of tine budget is $4'.050. The basisL of cootrtibu-
tie is h, o ol I tert.nl t of uros sales
Opportunity to be heard on applicadton .uomitted by the Code
Autnority ior c\mtnsion oi the temporary approval grnnred by
Order No. 104-19 dated F-L.. a, 193.., of it budget and basls of
coniriLul.iiin Oruer No. 101-2S approves the esr-osion to Apr.
311, (I uni.r:'i good causeI to the contrary be shown prior to Mar.
Opportunity to be heard on applh-:rition submitted hv the Code
.\utllno)rity for amendment to th1e Cidi. Tne amendment pro-
pos.d it in change 1i" nDame A Ch \' from "c!me-nt gun contrac-
,rs di iion of the construction industrvy" to read "air applied
?onireate cortractioc di', siun o f tie consiruelion industry."
Opportunity to be heard on appl.ication sutmiltted y thie cup.
pfi.riciary Codc .Autihorl. on behalf of those members who
in jiiJfrcitLur tire c-hain, for approval oi a consi.gnment plan in
,roi-r.Jance with art Vs, e,. 4, sub.ec. if), of the supplementary
Opportunity to be heard on appisortion submit ted by the Code
Autliri,' ]r prpl.ro vl of its budget and basis of conInoution for
[tie prri i ,.ii,[i Juiti I t'. Dec 31, 1'.35.
The ull nitnoint c-[ iof .- bualcet is ISs.'. The bisis of contribu-
ion n I.-s of I prl:L ot ot cr-S ales of o ,ea mtmrioe for trnc
rmi.ri,,1,r -,,.ir 1i3l
Opportunity to be heard on ,ipplicinon submitted by the Code
.uihutorii. for aoendmeni Lo art 9i, sec itll of the Code labeling
chirgeI


.tant Information Concerning Notices of Hearings and

Opportunity to be Heard


Monday, Apr. 1, 1935
Automotive Chemical
Spcialties Manufactur-
ing IndJautry, 04&-A.
Baking Industry, 445-48..


Bituminous Coal Indus-
try, 21-104.





Commercial and Breeder
Hatchery Industry,
LPG-S.
Fibre Can and Tube
Industry, 305-15.





Flavorino Products In-
dustry, 516-4




Flrvoring Products In-
dustry, Ih-5.


Sun Parlor, Washington
Hotel, Washlngton,
D. C., 10 a. m., Earle
W Dahlberg.
Room .05 Barr Building,
Washington, D. C ,
WNeid M. Stevens.

Room 3325, Depirrment
of Commr-rce UuIloing,
WIAE'hinctin, D. C,
N. W. Rtotruts



Room 218. Barr Building.
i'sthiocton, D. C..
Ocorge Carlson.
Room -., National Sav-
,o' :, in Trust Build-
agS, .nainogton, D. C.,
%% j. Brown.




Room 5nS5. Barr Budding.
S\Vasiionprun, .) C,
WVel-N M Stecnto.



Room 505. Barr Building,
Washington, D C .
WeldJ M. Strevens


Hearing on application submitted by the Code AuLhority for
amendment of i ee. 2, art VIII.

.Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by theCode
Authority for proposed amendment to art. IX, by addition 515
now sectlion providing for payment of liquidated damages u1ind
?erTeino 3pec iLiLed condlition.
Opportunity to be heard on npplkatioo submitted by Divisoa
I II of the inJdutry for approval of a supplemental budget and
bWa: of continution.
Toe total amount of ihe budget for the period from Apr. 1, 934, tL
[rtr 31. lI3. ; i.'i.,66 St 2 T he ba.-_, of contribution Is AsMss-
miintS to) roer irtlo. s uplemenal budget to be made onealtounBe
bhick agiiit each producer ctased on the total 19i3 tonnage is
to101 i ri:sc,.ienrse will not ectcod tio total amount of the budget.
Opportunity to be heard on proposal cl depurvty adminlsttrelo
jeirgi:. _'asri.on [.r amendment to -ec 1 it.), art. 'l[I1, oftbeCOId
i oembur :hip of coordinating committee.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the CIde
Authority for approval of its buncet nd basis o corributollofOr
the period from M[ar. I. 1935, to Feb. 9. 19l6. .
The total amount ofl thbe budget is i30,uiA) The barls of rcontrih
iron is i of I pertcot of the gross -ales of erch member of the
in.ui.Irv effective as of Mar I. 1935, payable monthly On the
i1th nayof each month, beenning g Mar.I,. 1t"63 Thbt- asessaliL
for the current moninth shaiJ b bared upon the gross sales the
pr.ceding month
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Cd e
Autocrily for thie termination ,I ciernplion confene in Par.
III. A.dminitrntive Order No X-3i. d.ited May 20.l34,Iw".hreb"
members of iis ,ndusttiY whoe principal line of business Is eM
brtaced in a trade or industry .uibjcct to a Code otler than thi
Codle for the above industry ,were exempted from the eobllgatI1
to cuntnribute to the -\pense of administering the Code.
Opportunity to be heard on a application submitted by the Code
.utnurit) four approval of its budget and basis of concribul5n
for period Sept. 7, 1911, to June 16, 19l5 -l
The total amount of toe budget is $10,000 The basis Oft Mati
butionis M Nombers whose net sales are less t ban $2, I' peranf "ne
shall be exempted from payment of Code assessmentemibe'l
whose net sales are over $2,500 and less [bthen $7,500 shall pay
fat rate of $5 per annum; members who.e net sales are $7'0lo
more shall pay at the rate of 0o cents per thousand. Neleels
means. gross sales minus customary trade allowances ann d60
charges.


Re Hearings are of two types: (1) Oral hearings,
deslsgnated "hearing" on calendar; and (2) op-
* portinlty to be heard" by the filing of writte-n
statements of fact, briefs, or criticisms dialing
with the subject matter of euch notice.
f.'The subject matter of these notices Is abbre-
.*vlated In the schedule published below. A cornm-
"plete official copy of oany notice may be obtained
-Gon'request from the National Recovery Admlnlstra-
41.ion, Room 3316, Department of Cummerce Build-
i hg, Washington, D. C.

"HEARINGS (oral) : Those wishing to be heard
(.5Snust file a written request with the proper Deputy
rAdminlstrator at least -4b hours before the date
'Siet for the bearing, which request must state:
(1) Name of Industry und date of hearing:
.2) names of persona wishing to teialify and groups
Ieepresented; (3) definite alternative proposal or
'g3eciflc objections, without argument. -learings
r:are confined to factual presentation. Written
briefs containing arguments as well as fact may
pibe filed.


INDUSTRY OR TRAnh PLACE ND DEFlrr PReossOED AC rtION
NDSr OR 1TBADE ADM 115srRAtuO


Thursday, Mar. 28,
1935---Contd.
Fabricated Metal Prod- Room 610. 1519 K Street Opportunity to be heard on application submitted 'by ti
ucts Manufacturinog ad NW.. Washington, D Fiugo Plating Co., Fargo, N. Dak., for exemption from thewage
Metal Finibshing and C H Fernris W'ile. and'i hour provisions of the Code. ant for permi.ston to operate by
Metal C [)a rjg Indus- dividing its grojs receipts as 3 to overhead, 3 to owners, and
try, 84-1C1. to each of its tMo employees
Feldspar Industry, 206-15. Room 3319, Commerce Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
BuJding, W,&Shlng[on, Authority for opprovat of its budget and basis of contributiona for
D. C., Harry S. Barry. the period from 1-eb 1, 1935, to Jan. 31, 1936.
Total budget is $28.000 Ase sments are to be made on the bas
ol t percent of the value of all sales of hoth crude and ground
feldspar.
Funeral Service Industry, Room 128, Witlard Hotel. Hearing on applIcation submitted by the Code Authority for
331-B. Wasrningtun. D C 10 amendments to art [11, see. I art VI see. 6 par. (d), art. VI,
a m C. deFreit sec. 7 of schedule A and art. IV, art. v, sees. 4, 6, and 6, and art.
Larger. Vi orf schedule B, of the Code
Fur Manufacturing In- Room 4035. Department Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
dus try, 436-23. of Commerce Budlding, Authority for extension of its budget and basis of codntrlbtlon
Washingion, D. C., for the period ending Jan. 27, 1635 Order No. 13T-23 approves
W'alter Mangunta. the extension on a pro ratsa a,s. effective Jan. Ze, 1935, said order
and' approval to become effective Mar. 28 unless cause 10 tEa
conorrry be shomn prior thereto.
Open Steel Flooring Room 411, I518 K Street Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
tOratinmg ManufaClur- N\W., Washongton. AuthOrity flor the cancelation ol the exemption conferred in par.
ing Indumtry, E-01-1I. D C C R. Niklison. Ill of Admiristrative Order X-36
Painntne, Paperhanging. Chamber of CorLncrce, Opportunity to be heard on application for approval or a pro.-
and Decorating Indus- Beatrice, Nebr .' I0 a. posad agreement estabiishing Standards of bours of labor, rates
try, 24B-66 iDlvitilon m., R. E. Dontrry. of pay and oiner conditions of employment under art. [III, sec t,
of the Construction In- o(.i the Codeand see. 7 (b)i of theact, in theregionofOGageCounty,
dusrry). Ncbr
Stained anil Leaded Room 4327, Commerce Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by theCode
Glass Industry, 31-5. Buildinig, Waihington, Autoority for approval of iLs burPget and basis of contribution
1 D. C., Beverly bthr. for the period from Nov. 12, 19(34, to June 16, 1936,
rital budget is $5,923.3'3. Bais of as-.e.ment is: I percent or billed
.ales. payable monthly, rito a minimum of st per month
Undercarment and Neg- Room 301h, Commerce Opportunity to be heard on application suqbmitLed by theo Code
ligeelbdusrry, 408-34. Building, Waseington, Au.thoriy for amendments to the Code.
D C Barton E Op-
peoiveim.
Upholstery Spring and Room 11I. 1518 K Street Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Codis
Acces.sories Manufactur- NW., Washington, Authority for amendment of seo. 1, art. IX, of the Code terms of
Ing Industry, 3;9-t. D. 0C.. C. R. Nikilason. sale)
Wood Heal [nduiutry, Room eul, 007 Sixteenth Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the
270-16. Street NW., Washing- Code Authority for approval of its budget and bals of contrlba-
too, D. C., A. C. D.ion tin
The total amount of the budget is $1l,3i1. The basis monthly of
contribution is: M4 of I percent of gro4s sales of blocks for the
second previous month, and of I percent of gross sales of finished
heels for tne second previous month.

Friday, Mar. 29, 1935
Batting and Padding In- Room 3024, Department Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
dusty, 417-11l. of Commerce Building, Authority [or approval of its rercision of basis of contribution 1o
Washington, D. C., the expense of administering the Code for th. period from May6,
F. 0. Lee. 1934, to May 1, 1935.
The total amount of the budget is 128,CW0 The basis ofcontributlas
is -io of I percent of the total sales or the year ending Dec 31,
1933, for 11 members manufacturing pads and baiLs for the auto.-
mobile trade; lio of I percent of total sales for all other members
of the industry. This constitutes a reductlop of assessment for
thote members making automobile pads and baits tof ia of I
percent.
Complete Wire and IrO6n East Lounge, Ambassa- Hearing on application submitted by the supplementary Code
Fence Industry, 131-X2 dor Hotel, Washington, Authority for approval of amendmentD to art. UI of the supple-
(subdivision of the D.C. 10 a. m., H. mentary Code.
Fabricated Metal Prod- Ferris While.
ucts Manufacturing
and Metal Finishling
and Metal Coating In-
dustry).
Cotton armnent Manu- Room 3016, Commerce Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
facturing Industry, 118- Building, Washington, Authority for temporary approval of its budget and basis of acon-
339. D. C, Burton E. Op- tribunron. Order No. 118-338 approves the extension on a pmro
penheim. rata basis from Jan. 12 to May 11, 1935, said order and ap-
proval to become effective Mar. 29, 1935, unless cause Io the con-
trary be shown prior thereto.
Lace Manufacturing In. Room 2066, Department Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by William
dustry, 12-E. of Commerce Building, Dalby, It Van Houten Street, Paterson, N. J., for a certificate
Washington, D. C 10 to allow him to Import one Levers lace machine from England
a. m., F. 0 Lee. In accordance with art. XII, sec. 2, of the Code.
Painting, Paperhanging, Oonvention Room, Occl- Hearing on application for approval of a proposed agreement
and Decorating Indus- dental Hotel, Muske- establishing standards of hours and labor, rates of pay. and other
try, 244B-67. gon, MIoh., 10 a. m., conditions of employment, under art IU, see I of the Code and
Abner E. Lamed sec. 7 (b) of the act, in the region of Muskegon County, Mich.
Velvet Industry, 188-15.. Room 3022, Departmint Opportunity to he heard on application submitted by the
of Commerce Building, ,Code Authority for approval of its budget and basis of contribu.-
Washington, D. C., A. Lion for the period from July 1, 1934, to June 16,1935.
Henry Thurston. The total amount of the budget is S16,000. The basis of coatribs.
lion is: Assessment to be levied on the basis of the percentage of
each firm's weavers' wages paid during 1933, to the total paid
by the industry, and each firm to be billed for that percentage
of the total assessment.

Saturday, Mar. 30,
1935

Cold Storage Door Manu- Room 3076, Department Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
facturing Industry, of Commerce Building, Authority for approval of its budget and basis of contribution for
479-8. Washington, D. C., W. the period from Aug. 1, 1934, to Aug I, 1935.
W. Rose. The total amount of the budget Is $3,000. The basis orcontributlson
Is 13 of I percent of the current sales of products of the industry
payable monthly on an estimated sales volume of 1600,000 for the
budgetary period.
Packaging Machinery In- Room 639, Investment Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Codea
dustryandTrade.72-25. Building, Washington, Authority for approval of its budget and basis of contributllon
D. C., Neal W. Foster. for the period from Jan. 1. 1935, to Mar. 31. 1936.
The total amount of the budget is 10,093.75. The basis of contri-
bution is: 114 mills of gross sales for calendar year, 1934.
Porcelain Breakfast Fur- Room 411, 151iS Srreet Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
nirure Assembling In- NW Washington. D. Authority for amendment of sec. 2, pt. A, art. VI% of the Cede.
dustry, 2i6-?1. C., d. R. Niklas,,n.
Refrigeration 'Valveas and Room 3070. Department Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the suP-
Fittings Manufact'Jrng of Commerce Buildine, plimentary Code Authority for amendment to art. IV, Bee. I,
Industry, -6'l-6 iDivi- Washington, D. C., WIV. pars. (a), (b), and (c) and sec. 3 of art. Vu, of the Code
0ion of roe Fabricated W. Rose.
Metal Products Manu-
facturing and Metal
Finihinm and -Metal
Coaling oIdustry). __________ ______ __________


PLACe aND DEFcurY
ADMriNIsIATaoa


:' INDUSTRY O TRaSADE


SThursday, Mar. 21,
1935
asembled Watch Indus-
' try, 510-7-8-9.


7Friday, Mar. 22, 1935
K2*.,
'hinaware and Porca-
M/'lain Manufacturinig In-
.. dustry, 126-12.

V singg Tackle Industry,
5', 18-38.
aMotion Plicture Industry,
S124-50.





.: Saturday, Mar. 3,
1935
ilHat Manufacturiog In-
:dustry, 259-31.
e'

*I.etan Meat Trade, &10-11.








HEDULE OF HEARINGS. ARCH 21 TO

APRIL 4-Continued Interpretations


INDUSTRY OB TRADE


Monday Apr. 1,
1935-Contd.
poneral Supply Indus-
try, 90-23.

Sindastrial Supplies and
Mahoinery Distribu-
tores' Trade. 61-17.
goeor Bus Industry,
20-3.
Nonrferrous and Steel Con-
vector Manufacturing
Industry, 271-11.


pyrotechnic Manufactur-
lng Industry, 148-16.


Tuesday, Apr. 2, 1935
Beauty and Barber Shop
Mechanical Equipment
M:nufscturing Indus-
try, 29d-15.
Boot and Shoe Manufac-
thring industry, 44-12.


BMattlce Cloth Manufac-
Luring Industry, 635-7.

Construction Machinery
Distributing Trade,
22-1u.

=Cork Industry, 199-12....

CorsvEr and Breaslere In-
dustry, 7-33.


PLACE AND DEPL'TT
ADMINISTRATOR



Room 18, 1518 K Street
NW Washington. D.
C., H Ferris White.
Banrr Building, 910 Seven-
teenth Street NW.,
Washington, D. C., F.
A. Hecht.
Room 317, Denrlke Build-
Log Washington, D. C.,
C. P. Clark.
City Club Washington,
D. 0., W. W. Rose



Room 4057, Department
of Commerce Building
Washington, D. U.,
Ovid E. Roberts, Jr.


1518 K Street, NW Wash-
ington, D. 0., W. L.
Schurz.
Room 4035, Department of
Commerce Building,
Washington, D. 0.,
Walter Mangum.
Room 3022. Department of
Commerce Building,
Washington, D. C.,
Victor Sadd.
Banrr Building, 910 Seven-
teenth Street NW.
Washinaton, D. C.,
F. A. Hecht.
Room 703, Albee Building,
Washinmton. D. C.,
Robert N Campbell.
Room 4061, Department
of Commerce BuMildng
WM higt,,, D. n .
M! D ViLncent.


Flexible Metal Hose and Room Sl 1518 K Street
Tabing Manufacturing NW.,Waslrhgton, D.C.
Industry, 64-01-it. H. Fen1s Waute.


Oraln Exchanges and
Members Thereof
LP"-6.
Logagoe and Fancy
Leather Goods Indus-
try, 42-13
Eteel Casting Industry,
Iu-B


Upholstery Spring and
Ace&sories Manufac-
turing Industry, 329-16.


Room 21IS, Barr BuIldine,
Washington, D. C..
George Carlson
Room 40105. Department
of Commerce BuJildinF.
Wasincron, D. C,
Walter Mangum.
Room 2i062-4, Depert-
ment of Commerce
Buidling. Wasingirgron,
D C., 10 a. m., Dexter
A. Tutein.
Room 409. 1518 K Street
NW.,Wasnineton, D.C.,
0. R. NkJlason.


PROPOSED AcrtoN



Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by Cham-
pion Co., Springfieid, Ohio, for exemption from art. II, sec 2
of the Code and for permision to operate three shifts for a period
of 60 days.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the
Code Authority, for amendment to art. iM, sec. 4, of the Code.

Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by Buckeye
Stages, Inc]. Columbus, Ohio, for exemption from the provisions
of subsec. (b), of ee. I of art. VIi, of the Code
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the
Code Authority for approval of Its budget and basis of contrilbu-
tion for the calendar year 1935.
The total amount of the budget Is $2,315. The basis of contribu-
tion Is: %.of I percent on dollar volume of business shipped
adurtIng each quarter of the year 1936 as soon after the close of
each q quarter as practicable.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the
code Authority for approval of Its budget and basis of contribu-
tion for the period from MItar. to June 16. 1935.
The bas of aessment is: Is of I percent of the gross sales volume
for the year 1933.


Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the A&ndls
Chipper Co., Racine, WIs, for permissiLon to operate Its entire
plant under the wage and hour provislons of the Machinery and
Allied Products Endustry Code.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for approval of Its budget and basis of contribution for
le period from Oct. I4. 1934, toJune I16, 1035. The total amount
of the ,budget is 63.000. The basis of contribution Is eoo of I
percent of gross sales for 1934 or for fiscal year ending 1934
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
SAutnority for proposed amendment to art. Irv, of the Code (ad-
minL.-uatioo).
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for approval of Its budget and-basis of coarntribution.
The total amount of the budget for the period from Jan. I, to Dec.
31. 1935, lsq 55,6'.5 The basis of contribution Is lo of 1 percent of
greto-- sales for the calendar year 1934.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for amendments to the Code
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for approval of Its budget and basis of contrioutlon for
the frlod from Nov. 1, 1934, to Oct 31. 1935.
The total amount of the budget is b $93,760. The basis of contribu-
tion is through the sale of labels to members of the Industry based
on the 'elJlong price of garment..
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the sup-
plementary Code Autnoriry for approval of Its budget and basls
rof contribution.
The total amount of the budget from Apr. 1 to Dec. 31, 1935 is
17,C50. The basis of contribution LIs" Approdmaitely 1 of I Der-
cent per annum; based on annual net sales in the year 1K33, and
payatble by each member at the rate of k1i of of I percent on or
before the 10th day of each month.
Opportunity to be heard on nppiicarion submitted by the Code
Authority i'jr amendment of art V', see 6, of the Code.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the
Code Aubority for amendments to the Code of art I, subsec.
(b1, art. vriI, sees. 3, 1. and 5
Hearing on application submitted by the Code Authority for
interpretaion of sec 3, art El, of the Code.


Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the
SCoda Authborit for approval of Its budget and basis of contribu.
tion,. from Apr. I, 1935, to Mar. 31, 1936
The total amount of the budget i? $30,650. The basis of ciotribu-
tion is, of I percent or less per month. payable monthly, on
the total annual net sales of the products ol the industry for the
veir of Apr. I. 1935. to Mar. 31i. 1916.


Wednesday, Apr. 3,
1935
Cigar Container Indu.- Room 510, ISIS K Street Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the
try, 135-30. NW., Washinctin, Mengel Co, Loulsi-lle, Ky., for exemption from paying the
D C., H. Ferrns White latipr half of its Code assessment for the fiscal year Dic I1, 1933,
to Dec 16. 1934
Electrical Manufacruring City Clubit. Building, 1320 Opportunity to be heardon application submitted by the board
Industry. 4-6i6. Street NW., Wash- ofrgoveroorsof the National Electrical Manulactuiers Association
Ingion, D. C, Dexter for'amendment of art. X of the Code (price fllming).
A. Tutein.
Painting, Paperhanging, Room A24. AJbee Buildj- Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the dirvl-
and Decorating Indus- Ing. Washington, D C., sionial Code Authority for amendments to he Code.
try, 244B-6t (Division Ira L. Wales.
of the Construction In-
dastry).
Paper and flp Indus- Room 209, National Sav- Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
try, 120-50 tlgs and Trust Baild- Authority for amendments to the Code.
mg, Washington, D. C,
.._____________ J. Brown ____________________
Thursday, Apr. 4,
1935

Cellnulold Button, Buckle, Room 4061, Department Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
and Novelty Manufac- of Commerce Buildine, Authority fur approval of Its budget and basis of contribution for
thring Industry, 400-13. Washinnton, D. C, the period from May 1, 1934, to Apr. 30. 1935.
M. D. Vincent. The total amount of the budget Is $7,000 The basis of contribution:
Each member of the Indusntry shall be assessed quarterly In
proportion to his dollar volume of sales I.e., heashall bear the same
proportion to the quarterly budget, viz., S1,750, as bis sales In that
quarter bear to the total sales of all members of the Industry.
"Eletrical Contracting Room 218, Delaware Truit Hearing on application for approval of a proposed agreement
Industry, 244F-24 (Di- Building. Wilmington, establishing standards of hours of labor, rates of pay and other
hiloen of the Construe- Del., R. E. Doberty. conditions of employment, under art. 11, aec I, of the Code for
iso nladustry), the construction Industry and see 7 f(b) of the act In the region of
Wilmington, Det.. and vicinity.
PIating, Stitching and Room 4001, Commerce Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the
B0noai, and Hand Em- Building. Washington, Code Authority for approval; of its budget and basis of contrlbu-
,broidery Industry, 276- D. C M D. Vincent. tion for the period of Nov. 1, 1934, to June 16, 1935
15 J The total amount of the budget Is $24.894 09. The basis of contri-
bution is a graduated percentage of the gross annual business
for the year 1933
hntary and Waterproof Room 1067. Department Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Ipedialties Manufactur- of Commerce BuJdinp, Authornty for approval of its budget and basis of contribution for
ig Industry, 342-s3. Washineton. D. C., the period from Jan 1. to June 1., .1935
M. D Vincent. The r total amount of ihe budget is 5,i7S. The basis of contribution
Is -i of I percent of net dollar volume of sales in the months of
December 134 to May 1935


Interpretation


Transit I
No. 28-61


* FACTS.-Members of the transit industry,
k Ce October 31, 1933 (the effective date of
the Motor Bus Code) have established new
'bug routes or bus lines, or extensions to exist-
1 hgbus routes or bus lines either in interstate
commerce or in both intrastate and interstate
COmmerce. Such uew routes or new lines or
.'.tensions to existing routes or lines are lo-
Ciated entirely within a single metropolitan
.rea,1 a in a group of municipalities, the trans-
DOrtation service so rendered being essentially
Urban or suburban in character.
QUESTION.--Must such members of the

InAe and bu-s routes are concerned, the re-
Airemeats of article VII', section 1, subsec
1.Uos (b) ndl (c), of the Code of fair compe-


Industry
and 66-21
tition for the motor bus industry in order to
comply with the provisions of article II, sec-
tion i A l, subsection 4, paragraph (a), of the
Code of fair competition for the transit
industry?
INTERPRETATION.-Where such mem-
bers of the transit industry have established
such new bus routes or bus lines, or such ex-
tensions to existing bus routes or bu,; lines
subsi'equint to October 31, 1933, they must ohb.
serve the requirements of article VII, sec-
tion 1, subsections (bl) and (c)i, of the Code
4-f fair competition forsthe motor bus Indus.
try in order to comply with the provisions of
paragraph (a) of subsection 4 of section (A)
of article II of the Code of fair competition
for the transit industry.


Rainwear Division of the

Rubber Manufacturing

SIndustry
No. 156-53

Coat and Suit Industry
No. 5-17


Industry
No. 373-19
FACTS.-The applicant claims that cer-
tain garments manufactured of fabrics
known as Cravenette, Scotch Mist, Mist
Proof, or similarly treated fabrics which
have been chemically processed so as to be
water-repellent belong to the Rainwear Divi-
sion of the Rubber Manufacturing Code. The
Industries involved as enumerated above,
other than the rainwear division of the rub-
ber manufacturing industry, claim that gar-
ments manufactured of fabrics which have
beeu rendered water-repellent by chemical
processes which do not include coating, back-
ing, impregnating, or combining fabrics with
rubber, or guttapercha, paste, or glue should
not be classed as rainwear. The cliemical
treatment of clothing materials by crasenet-
ting and similar cheUmical processes does not
alter the texture or appearance of the mate-
rial to any perceptible degree.
It should also be noted that labor stand-
ards, both as to wages and hours, are not
as stringent under the Ilainwear Division
Code as under the Codes of the other enu-
merated industries.
QUESTION.-Under what Code or Codes
should be classified the manufacture of
clothing made of woven mriterinls treated by
chemical processes to produce n water-repel-
lent fabric such as that commonly kuown as
Cravenette, Scotch Mist. Mist Proof, or other
similar term?
RULING.-Clothing when made of woveun
fabrics and sewn in the regular nianner used
in manufacturing cIothing rieinitely belongs
under the wenringa apparel Codes. The fact
thilt the material is treated in such a man-
ner as to make it -wnter-repellent by such
methods as cravenetting or other similar
processes is not sufficient to classify the com-
pleted garment as rainwear. In accordance
with the definitions of the several Codes
hereinahove listed and on the basis of the
facts submitted, it is held that a member of
an industry who manufactures 'garments
made of fabrics known as Cravenete, Scotch
Mist, Mist Proof, or of other similar fabrics
which have been treated by chemical proc-
esses which do not include coating, backing,
impregnating, or combining with rubber in
any form or with guttapercha, paste, or
glue Is not subject to the provisions of chap-
ter X rainwearr division) of the Code for
the rubber manufacturing industry but that
such, a member of an industry Is subject to
the pertinent Code governing the manufac-
ture of the particular type of wearing
\ apparel.


Infants' and Children's Wear

Industry
No. 373-22

Underwear and Allied Prod-

ucts Manufacturing Industry
SNo. 23-24
FACTS.-The cited paragraphs of the Ex-
ecutive order approving the Infants' and
Children's Wear Code give various members
of industry whose operations come both with-
in the definition of that Code and within
the definition of other Codes of fair competi-
tion a right of election as between that Code
and as between the other Codes. Article II,
section 7, of the Infants' and Children's Wear
Code defines members of the industry to in-
elude those who exercise such right of election
so as to become bound by the Code of fair
competition for the infants' and children's
wear industry.
Part I, section 1. subsection (i), of the
Underwear and Allied Products Code provides
that members of industry coming within the
definition of that Code who manufacture in-
fants' and children's leggings and a certain
specified type of underwear for infants- and
children shall have a right of election as be-
tween that Code and the Infants' and Chil-
dren's Wear Code, such right to be exercised
after the approval of the Code of fair com-
petition for the infants' and children's wear
industry.
It appears that various members of indus-
try have exercised a right of election within
the uLeaning of the cited provisions. Some
members have attempted to and are desirous
of c.i neeing such election to operate under the
Code of fair competition for the infants' and
children's wear industry and reelecting so as
to be bound by another Code.
QUESTION.-May a member of industry
who has elected to be bound by the Infants'


Industry
No. 84-96 "
FACTS.-From the information submitted;
it appears that the subject company is en-
gaged in the manufacture of steel road forms,
such as base road forms, rocker base guard'
rail post forms, expansion joint caps, highs
way culvert header forms, shoulder and alley
forms, highway gutter forms; sidewalk, curb
and gutter forms, such as E-Z curb iandp
gutter forms, E-Z curb form with key-lock''
face form, integral curb suspended face formii
precase curb forms, E-Z flexible forms; steel1
forms for concrete manholes; guard rail post',
forms such as fence post forms, anchor post1Y
forms, right-of-way marker forms; key-lock
type of sidewalk forms and highway guard f.
roil post forms. It further appears that:.
there are no more than 5 or 6 companies In:.i':
the United States manufacturing the above'L
mentioned products including such com-
panies as the Blaw-Knox Co., Plttsburghb,
Pa.; Truscon Steel Co., Youngstown, Ohio":
Heltzel Steel Form and Iron Co., Warren,
Ohio; and Metal Forms Corporation, Milwau-
kee, Wis. It seems that this type of articles
does not come under the definition of anyd
Code other than that of the basic Code ofi
fair competitionn for the fabricated metal
products manufacturing and metal finishing.
and metal coating industry.
QUESTION.-Under what Code or Codesq
should the manufacture of the above men-i
tioneid articles be classified? '.t
INTERPRETATION.-The definition ofVi
the basic Code of fair competition for their?
fabricated metal products manufacturing and;
metal finishing and metal coating Industryj
is interpreted to include the manufacture of!:
the above-named products. :,


Photo-Engraving Industry n
No. 180-16 j
FACTS.-Article III, section 1, of the Code:"l
of fair competition for the photo-engraving:
industry provides for maximum hours not4to:,I.
exceed forty (40) hours in any one week or .
eight (8) hours in any twenty-four (24) hour
period, except as provided in the Code. Arti- .*
cle III, section 2, reads as follows: .
When necessary, overtime shall be per"')
mitted, but no person 'shall work more than a :-..
total of 520 hours In any consecutive 13 r
weeks; provided, that when, due to the spe-:.
clal character of the work, or when suitable .'
help is unavailable, overtime shall be per-
mitted in excess of the maximum hours herein ,
provided. Overtime shall consist of all work "^
performed In excess of the current dally'[I,
schedule of working hours and maximum.:,
weekly hours and shall be paid for at not less.'^.
than time and one-half of the employee's regu-.1..
lar rate; for work on Sundays and custom--
arlly observed holidays, at not less than ...s
double time." ..i
QUESTIONS.-Do the provisions of article .t.
III, section 2, require the payment of time .j
and one-half for work on Sundays and cus-'
tomarily observed holidays when such work .;4
exceeds the maximum hour provisions of sec- i
lion 1 of article III, or do tlt provisions of.
article III, section 2, require the payment of.4'.
double time for all work on Sundays and
customarily observed holidays? "
RULING.-The words "for work on Sun-
days and customarily observed holidays, at .
not less than double time" mean that all
work on Sundays and customarily observed
holidays shall be paid for at double time, .
regardless whether such work constitutes )
overtime. -

Window Glass Mfg. Industry *
533-5 .
FACTS.-Confusion has arisen in the ".'
minds of members of the industry and em-'
ployees as to the meaning of the provisions *..
of the Code covering maximum hours for .
employees not otherwise excepted as to hours
under the provisions of article III, section 2
and section 3.
QUESTION.-What is the meaning of the
maximum hours and overtime provision of
article III, section 1?
INTERPRETATION.-It is interpreted
that the section establishes 72 hours averaged .
over 14 days ias a standard. It further per. .-
mits an additional 6 hours in any 7 days,
The effect is to fix a maximum of 84 hours In'
any 14-day period. But. every employee must 'A
be given one full period of 24 hours off In 1
each 7-day period. ,i
A^


a'


and Children's Wear Code In accordance wthg!1
the cited provisions cancel his election and4-,
elect to be bound by some other Code? :
INTERPRETATION.-It Is ruled to oper-"
ate under the Code of fair competition for thb#A
Infants' and children's wear industry a mem.:"ri
her of Industry cannot so cancel his electlon.9
The election once made is final and Irrevoc-[.l
able In the abscence of affirmative action by'
the National Industrial Recovery Board. .;'


Men's Clothing Industry Fabricated Metal Producf
No.15-38 Manufacturing and Meta

Infants' and Children's Wear Finishing and Metal Coating









Rules -On-Bae'. On
ard Rules n Bases Summary of NIRB's Report On
S ln Pt -.'..
I Code Contributions Steel Basing Point System
(Continued from page 1)


exemptions, If granted, will not be retro-
five.
itThe text of the ruling follows:
'| ". The following procedure is prescribed
t'. govern terminations of thi exemption
panted in paragraph II of Administrative
..der No. X-36:
'.'(a) The Code Authority shall request ter-
patlon, and the approval of such request
hai11 be recommended by the deputy adminis-
ator and the division administrator after
Msultation with proper advisers.
g"(b) The Code Authority shall present suffi-
ent factual evidence to warrant the ap-
pval of the application, including (1) total
umber of.members of industry and number
affected by proposed termination; (2) total
.olume of Industry and volume uf members
Effected by proposed termination (or the
'tme Information respecting employees If
gt is to be the basis of contribution) ; (3)
basis of budget that is to be proposed, the
I'tal amount of contributions anticipated
m all members and the amount anticipated
om those affected by the termination.
i"'(o) The Code Authority shall specify, for
g[clusion in the requested order of approval,
1) a provision for establishing a minimum
olume of business or other basis below
.lhlch contributions will not be levied; (2)
taovislons, where necessary, designed to avoid
.ntribution on articles which are not mar-
ted per se; (3) any other provision which
hay be essential to prevent the imposition
overlappingg contributions.
(if"d') Proper and adequate notice of the
quest for termination of the exemption
Ia]l be given to industry members affected
y the proposed cancelation.
'."(e) Th6 notice of hearing or opportunity
"be heard shall be submitted to the Code
uthorities whose industries will be affected
|y the proposed termination, and their com-
.ients shall be duly considered.
4K""(I) All objections received shall be fully
considered, and evidence of satisfactory ad-
juistment thereof shall be submitted.
A,. "(g) The order of approval shall be pre-
X v:" --..n
.pared for the signature of the assistant to
`the administrative officer and shall be ac-
lcompanied by adequate documentary evidence
of compliance ,ith the procedure herein
outlinedd.
S"2. Terminations will not be made effec-
five for a period prior to the date of the
4pearing or. of the expiration of the oppor-
tunilty to be heard respecting such termina-
r.on. No other retroactive effect will here-
after be given either by termination or
S^'ancelation.
."'"3. Terminations are effective only as of
.Qthe date of the approval unless otherwise
apecfied In the order of approval. The obli-
jgation of members of Industry affected there-
'by to pay contributions runs only from such
effective date."


SInterpretation

SFabricated Metal Products
pManufacturing and Metal
^k Finishing and Metal
tdoating Industry
p,' ..No. 84-110
.' FACTS.-Artlicle II provides in part as fol-
,lows: '"The term 'employee' as used herein
includes anyone engaged in the industry in
:ainy capacity receiving compensation for his
'.services, irrespective of the nature or method
q.f payment of such compensation."
.0i Article III, section 3. provides in part as
.follows: "On and after the effective date the
sznilmum wage which shall be paid by any
employer' to any employee engaged in the
processingg of products and any labor incident
thereto * *."
"' QUESTIONS.-1. May an owner of a busi-
;.ness engage in'the processing of his product
tofor a greater number of hours per week than
t.would be permitted an employee under the
:.Code, or must he conform to the maximum of
I.;.forty (40) hours per week provided under
|article III?
2. May this same owner if he is in a posi-
tion to pay himself time and one-half for all
hours worked in excess of forty (40) hours
I; per week work unlimited hours and not be in
violation of the Code by not paying the over-
?'time?
S" 3. In cases where three or foir men form a
.-.partuership or corporation and all of them
*'engage in the processing of products, the ques-
t.lon arises as to whether these men who are
the owners of the business can be considered
*.as employees of the firm or corporation which
'&they have formed.
INTERPRETATION-1. An owner of the
.business is not deemed to be an employee,
within the meaning of the Code. as used in
*' ,this Code. There Is, therefore, no restriction
-.-on the number of hours he may work.
S 2. Since an owner is not an employee, the
]'..,wge provisions do not apply to him either.
3. Members of a partnership are employers
.", and not employees, for the same reason thai
San individual owner Is not an employee
SWhere the business is owned by a corporation
employees of that corporation, even thought
they be substantial stockholders, nevertheless
they are deemed to be employees under the
SCode.


nomic situation, as they might choose, and
would not have to maintain a price on a dis-
tant group-mill base.
"S. As 'plant towns' containing rolling
facilities increase steelmaking capacities
from negligible amounts to amounts greater
than 20,000 tons annually, it would auto-
matically be required that a group-mill base
within 50 miles be established, if none al-
ready existed. Conversely, the group-mill
bases would automatically be abandoned in
cases where sufficient decrease in capacities
took place. This would provide a flexibility
for the designation of group-mill bases, in-
suring sufficiency of these without the neces-
sity for any amendments to the language of
the Code. -
"9. Elimination of basing points at non-
producing points, such as certain Gulf and
Pacific ports, which are open to abuse and
inequality. The last feature is open to ad-
justment, including possible exceptions to the
provision for limiting freight absorption
which it Is here proposed to combine with
the group-mill base system. Such exceptions,
possibly temporary in character, might be re-
quired to avoid undue disturbance to the
marketing areas now reached by existing pro-
ducing centers which ship via these ports
to distant markets."
The report asserts that not all of the criti-
cisms of the basing point system are justified
In the terms in which they are made. At
the same time that system, It states, does not
tend to as serviceable a form of competition
as a system in which there is more incentive
for a producer to directly lower his base
prices as a means of extending his sales area,
rather than doing this indirectly by merely
absorbing freight.
"We have seen ", the report added, "that
there are wastes of competitive cross-hauling,
which .must ultimately be charged to the
consumers, and that certain purchasers are
burdened with artificial freights. Piece-
meal change will not avoid the existing hos-
tility which, whether fully justified or not,
is attached to the principle of artificial
freights which characterizes the basing point
system. This hostility may be avoided if
such changes as are made are parts of a com-
prehensive program having as its goal the
establishment of a system based upon a dif-
ferent principle."
The report brought out, however, that the
number of basing points has expanded under
codification. The tendency under the basing
point system has been to Increase the num-
ber of basing points gradually as new points
of production gained in importance.
"And there can be little doubt or no doubt
that, if the system is to continue, this process
should go on as rapidly as may be without
doing undue harm to producers whose in-
terests are bound up with the existing price
structure", the report said.
The multiple basing point system in use
today is explained as a "system whereby
prices are named for products at specific
points, not necessarily mills, and billed to
include freight from those points to points
where the products are taken and used by
Purchaserss"
The report includes comprehensive data on
the distribution of production of different
classes of products relative to existing bas-
ing points, which shows, what percentage of
productive capacity Is now located (a) at
basing points; (b) not at, but within 50
miles; and (c) at greater distances. It fur-
ther shows that different classes of products
vary considerably in the sufficiency of basing
points located near to existing productive
capacity. The most sufficient situation in this
respect is found in the case of "structural
shapes", 92 percent of productive capacity
being within 50 miles of existing basing
points. Perhaps the greatest., inadequacy Is
found in the case of "sheets", where only
6 percent is at basing points, 44 percent at
or within 50 miles, and approximately 56
percent more than 50 miles.
The substantial objections to a basing-point
'system commonly urged, the report declared,
involve the distance of producing plants from
basing points. A detailed study of the rela-
tionship of producing capacity to basing
points for principal products has been in
preparation through the life of the Code, the
report stated.
The report added that it is conceivable that
the emergency justified giving indJustry tem-
porarily greater power to protect itself
against the excesses of competition than
would be justified in the long run and under
conditions in which demand bears a more
normal relation to productive capacity.
"The basing point system involves dis-
crimination in the sense of accepting different
net yields at the mills on sales to different
3 localities", the report declared. '"Where
, such discrimination is found, it is often ar-
S gued that one or the other price must depart
S from a competitive standard. This assumes
that there is one level and only one, relative
L to cost of production, to which competition
tends to bring prices. The fact Is that there
s is no such level representing the natural re-
t suits of any and all kinds of competition.
Competition under certain conditions can
Drive prices to a level which would fail to
h cover all the operating expenses of an effl-
, cient concern; under other conditions genu-
e Inely independent rivals selling without col-
lusion may tend to bring about a price hardly


distinguishable from that of a monopoly or
both types of rivalry may be practiced by the
same concern at the same time in different
parts of its market area."
The report points out as interesting the
fact that the larger steel producers in gen-
eral, and the United States Steel Corporation,
in particular, have over a long term of years
shown a declining percentage of the total
steel business of the country.
"This may be taken as evidence pointing
toward the conclusion that they have ad-
hered more closely to published prices than
their competitors have doue; or it may be
due to other causes", the report said. "In
the former case, it still does not prove that
prices have been fixed at levels above that
supposed to result from competition, even if
it were admitted that the methods of arriv-
ing at these prices had departed from those
supposed to be employed In the (nonexistent)
'perfectly competitive' market."
The Board explained in the report that
there Is no intention to assert that agree-
ments have no power to fix prices higher
than they would be in the absence of agree-
ment, or that agreements are desirable:
"The point is merely that there is not one
level to which rivalry without collusion al-
ways tends to bring prices, and another and
higher level to which noncompetitive agree-
ments tend to bring them. Rivalry without
collusion is not always accompanied by the
competitive price of pure theory, nor collusion
or agreement by the theoretical monopoly
price.
For the purpose in hand, the basing-point
system is to 'be regarded as a system fixing-
the character of the geographical price struc-
ture (relations of prices to each other in dif-
ferent localities) whichh does not directly con-
trol the levels of prices but may indirectly
result in modifying them through modifying
.the character of competition carried on under
it, or modifying the results of attempts at
noncompetitive price-fixing by understanding
or otherwise. Or by modifying the effects of
competition it may modify the likelihood of
agreements being resorted to-as for in-
stance, if it minimizes the danger of extreme
cut-throat competition, It may make it pos-
sible for an industry to get on without re-
sorting to outright agreements, to which it
would otherwise be forced.- Or, on the other
hand, the system may tend to make agree-
ments or arrangements of similar effect more
easily workable and enforceable, as is fre-
quently charged."
The various criticisms directed at the bas-
ing-point system and the numerous alterna-
tives suggested are discussed fully in the
'report. But in arriving at the proposed
group-mill base point it says the formula sug-
gested deserves to be classed as a group-mill
base rather than a basing-point system, in
that the element of arbitrary freights would
no longer be dominant, although not entirely
eliminated.
The report found that If a change caused
relaxation or abandonment of the formal
recognition of the basing-point system the
industry would unquestionably continue to
use the basing-point system, even though the
present absolute conformance therewith might
be somewhat weakened on that account. If
conformance were weakened, the report
pointed out, this would presumably weaken
also the effectiveness of the 'open-prlce sys-
tem, since it is upon faithful compliance with
the terms of the basing-point system that
producers rely for knowledge of the prices
that their competitors are actually charging
at the various points of consumption.
"If producers want to reach understand-
ings as to price, they will not be prevented
from doing so by abolishing the price system
which they now find convenient for their
purpose. They would learn to bring about
the same result with any other system, so
long as it is an open and orderly one, andl
any other kind would be hard to defend. The
abolishing of the basing-point system would
temporarily make such understanding more
difficult to reach and make effective, but by
Itself would in all probability have no lasting
effect in preventing them."
The report explains that the comparison
between the basing-point system and the va-
lious other possible systems Is a somewhat
difficult one, with advantages and disadvan-
tages on each side.
It rejects the proposal for an f. o. b. mill-
base system, whose disturbing features are
listed. Likewise it expresses the view that
compulsory adoption of such a system, which
would call for positive legislation, would be
of extremely questionable constitutionality.
The report demonstrated that "with freight
absorptions abolished, competition under
either a basing-point system or a mill-base
system would almost certainly act with more
force to lower prices to consumers. With
unlimited freight absorption, the mill-base
system would probably be less effective than
the basing-point system from this point of
view and might not be much less objection-
able from the standpoint of the high prices
charged to customers near the present non-
basing-point mills, since there is no guarantee
that these high prices would be materially
lowered and the discrimination they repre-
sent materially reduced.
"The individual mill-base system", the
report added, "with abolition or serious limi-
tation of freight absorption, is too disturbing


(L~nn ua ro pgea


~L


Overtime Per?

Granted Men's

Clothiers
The National Industrial Recovery Board
has granted permission to all metnbers of the
men s clothing Industry, except tailor-to-the-
trade houses and uniform manufacturers, to .
work 40 hours a week for 5 consecutive pay-
roll weeks falling within the calendar period
beginning March 4, and ending April 6, 1935.
The Code restricts work to 36 hours.
.Thls stay was granted on representation
by the Code Authority that production of
spring merchandise has been delayed by in-
ability of woolen textile mills to deliver raw
materials to clothing manufacturers on time.
The Code Authority also stated that certain.
fancy models have been started for the spring
season which have unbalanced the highly
skilled sections of the industry, thus causing
more delay.
In granting the overtime permission, the '2'
NIRB confirmed a telegraphic emergency
exemption granted February 27, and effective
March 4, 1935.
Provision Is made that overtime for the 5
weeks must be compensated at the regular
piece or hourly rates.



Interpretation
-.]


-Baking Industry
445-45A :
FACTS.-A baker conducts a contest, open
to the public, whereby each contestant shall
submit a letter to the bakery within a defi-
nite period of time, staring Why I Like
-- Bread ", or for suggestions for a new s
name for his product, etc. The suggested
plan for the contest is as follows:.
A proposed publicity plan by a baker. .
Public asked: 1. To suggest a name for a
new bakery product; nnd
2. To write a letter stating why they chose
this particular name.
Cash awards to be made on adaptability
of name and reasons given In letter. No
purchase of bread or any bakery product Is
necessary to engage in this contest or to win
a prize.
QUESTION.-Is the awarding of prizes
through such contests in violation of article
VII, section 5, of the Code?
INTERPRETATION.-It is ruled that the
contest hereinabove described is a violation
of article VII, section 5, of the Code.

a change to undertake at this time, if ever.
With full liberty of freight absorption, the
individual mill-base system might bring about
substantial changes, or It might produce no
more than a nominal effect on prices and
leave things much as they are now, except
for the potentiality of change whenever a
single producer sees fit to initiate It.
"The basing-point system puts a maximum.
of producers in competition with each other
over any given area, but only those quoting
prices on the home-basing point are com-
peting in a way tending very directly to re-
duce the price.
"The individual mill-base system In its
literal form would wipe out the competitions
of a number of producers scattered over a
moderate area, meeting each other on equal
terms over the whole of the area and all-
equally free to Initiate cuts In prices. What
it would substitute would depend '
on what was done by way of limiting freight
absorption.
"The group mill-base system with limited
freight absorption would combine the equal
competition of a group of mills over their
natural common market area (though. In
smaller groups and areas than at present)
with the competition of producers'outside the
group, seeking to expand their sales Into this
market area, but with their power to expand
in this way dependent on their own base
prices, so that to expand their marketing
area beyond Its existing limits they .must
reduce their base prices.
This seems to be the most promising com-
bination of elements, from the standpoint of
giving competition reasonable scope and effec-
tiveness in protecting the consumer, without
radically disrupting existing interests or
methods and channels of trade."
Additional material, which has been in tle
course of preparation since September 1934,
was submitted by the American Iron and
Steel Institute on March 2, 1935. The mate-
rial was assembled at the request of the Na-
tlonal Recovery Administration as the first
.of a series of surveys to collect accurate data.
relating to this problem. The Division of
Research and Planning has not yet had time
to analyze the material submitted nor to
determine Its significance.
The survey covered a total distribution of
1.534,000 net tons of Steel Code products, or
approximately 20 percent of the national
total for Steel Code products for the 3-month
period. The mills from which the data were
secured represent 85 percent of the capacitY
for finishing rolled-steel products within a
50-mile radius of Pittsburgh.
For a total invoiced delivered value of
$92,072,000. the actual freight paid from the
producing mill to the point of consumipflmo
was $8,312,000. This actual freight paid 0.
ceeded the freight charges added to badie"
point prices by $1,639,000.











ADMINISTRATIVE _


Official Orders of NRA Relating

to Particular Codes

.T HE Blue Eagle prints in each issue, summaries of administrative
I orders, interpretations, appointments, and bylaws approved by the
National Industrial Recovery Board.
Official orders are of two types, final and provisional. Where an order
is provisional, the time within which objections may be filed is indicated
below.
All protests against provisional orders should be addressed to National
Recovery Administration, Washington, D. C., attention Deputy Admin-
istrator for Code concerned; and such protests should be received before
final date indicated.
(For Code approvals, amendments, interpretations, budgets and
assessments, bylaws, Code Authority members, and trade complaints and
other committees, see elsewhere.)


AIR FILTER INDUSTRY (National Elec-
trical Manufacturing Industry-A Division
of the Machinery and Allied Products Man-
unfacturing). Code No. 79: Order 4, granting
Sto Coppus Engineering Corporation, Worces-
ter, Mass., exemption from the labor provi-
sions of the Codes for the air filter and elec-
trical manufacturing industry provided it
comply with labor provisions of fan and
"blower industry.
ASSEMBLED WATCH INDUSTRY, Code
No. 510: Order 6, denying a stay of the pro-
visions of article VIII, section 17 (a), of the
Code.
AUTOMOTIVE CHEMICAL SPECIAL-
TIES MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY,
Code No. 522: Order 6, denying to Radiator
Specialty Co., Charlotte, N. C., exemption
from the provisions of article IV, section 1
(a), of the Code.
BEDDING MANUFACTURING INDUS-
TRY, Code No. 219: Order 18, denying to An
SFrancisco Bedding Co.,'San Francisco, Calif.,
exemption from the provisions of article VII,
part,., section 1, of the Code.
BITUMINOUS ROAD MATERIAL DIS-
TRIBUTING INDUSTRY, Code No. 530:
Order 6, approving budget and basis of con-
tribtion for the period from January 1 to
December 31, 1935, upon certain conditions.
i- -CAP AND CLOTH HAT INDUSTRY,
SCode No. 457: Order 22, and Code No. 259,
order 28, granting to Hat Corporation of
America, 417 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y.;
John B. Stetson Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; and
S'Etchlson Hat Corporation, Richmond, Va.,
exemption from the provisions of articles III
and IV of the Code, insofar as the articles
Prescribe maximum hours and minimum
Swages for employees other than cutters,
-blockers, operators, and lining makers; pro-
,-vided that the maximum hours and minimum
Swages for employees other than mentioned
-shall be those prescribed by articles II and
fli. of the Code for the hat manufacturing
industry and a copy of the order be posted
in a conspicuous place in the applicants'
plants.
CHINAWARE AND PORCELAIN MAN-
UFACTURING INDUSTRY, Code No. 126:
SOrder 39, granting to the semivitrifled china
;,branch of the chinaware and porcelain man-
Sufaeturing industry In Mlahoning, Columbl-
A na, Carroll, Perry, Guernsey, and Jefferson
.Counties, Ohio, and in Wetzel and Hancock
.Counties. W. Va., the C. C. Thompson Co.,
and Taylor, Smith, and Taylor of East Liver-
Pool, Ohio, exemption from the provisions of
',article III, section 1 (a), of the Code to the
;.'Sateat that they may employ casters, mould
!:Imakers and liners not in excess of 54 hours
Z:par week and 9 hours per day without the
'Payment of overtime rates up to and includ-
.i' ng March 15, 1935. The C. C. Thompson Co.,
Is exempted as of March 1, 1935, to the extent
,-that it may employ 6 men in the Slip House
and 6 men on oval' dish and baking machine,
:Dot in excess of 54 hours per week and 9
t.ours per day without the payment of over-
..time rates, up to and including March 15,
1935; and that the Taylor, Smith & Taylor
C.o. is exempted to the extent that It may
:employ 8 dish makers and 92 printers and
':.:U7nder-glaze decal transferrers in the under-
".'rlaze department, not in excess of 54 hours
Per week and 9 hours per day without the
Payment of overtime rates up to and includ-
I: ig March 15, 1935; provided all employers
affecteded by the order shall post or display
th.e terms and provisions of this order, or
iOtberwlse bring such terms and provisions to
th me attention of any and all interested em-
SPloyeesd.
;-,' Order 40, granting a stay of the provisions
6.Of article XI for a period of 90 days from
, March 2, .1935.
.: Order 41. granting authorization to expand
a Portion of the surplus funds on hand De-
,e.mber 21, 1934, to cover expenses for the
)i.0ith of January, February, and March,
suc6, such expendRure not to exceed $1,647.20.
.COPPEE INDUSTRY, Code No. 265: Or-
or 32, granting a qualified extension of the
A budget and basis of contribution through
e.eMnontis of February 16, 1935, to and in-
|.lbdlng April 15, 1935.


COMMERCIAL A.ND BREEDER HATCH-
ERY INDUSTRY, Code No. LP6: Order 7,
approving budget and basis of contribution
for the period from December 1, 1934, to June
16, 1935.
CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY, Code No.
244: Order 57, granting on behalf of the Pro-
curement Division of the Treasury Depart-
ment, Washington,jD. C., exemption of mem-
bers of the Industry bidding on Parcel Post
Building, Boston, Mass., from certain provi-
sions of section 10, article VII, chapter I, of
the Code where an extension of time has
been requested from the bidders and has been
consented to by two or more bidders."
COTTON GARMENT INDUSTRY, Code
No. 118: Order 293, granting to Hinson Man-
ufacturing Co., Waterloo, Iowa, exemption
from the provisions of articles III and IV and
terminating exemption granted by the indus-
trial committee, effective on January 19, 1935,
provided that it complies with the wage and
hour provisions of the Light Sewing Indus-
try Except Garments Code.
Order 297, granting to S. Kantor Co., Leba-
non, Pa., exemption from the provisions of
article V, section A, of the Code to the extent
that it is permitted to operate an extra shift
on 3 pressing machines for a period not to
exceed 8 weeks from February 20, 1935, pro-
vided additional operators are employed.
Order 298, granting to Lee-Wald Garment
Co., 302 West Ninth Street, Kansas City, Mo.,
exemption from the provisions of article III,
section A, of the Code to the extent that it
be permitted to work 4 sergers, 4 hemmers,
4 buttonhole, 3 button, 3 tacking, and 9 press-
ing machines 4 hours overtime weekly from
February 20 up to and including March 15,
1935, provided that such overtime Is paid for
at the rate of time and one-half.
COTTON GARMENT INDUSTRY AND
THE DRESS MANUFACTURING INDUS-
TRY, Code No. 118: Order 296, granting to
108 applicants exemption from certain pro-
visions of the dress manufacturing industry.
Order 299, granting to Southland Manu-
facturing Co., Front and Hanover Streets,
Wilmington, N. C., exemption from the pro-
visions of article III, section A, of the Code,
to the extent that it is permitted to work Its
employees 4 hours overtime for 8 weeks at
straight time from February 20, 1935, in view
of the emergency caused by a fire In its plant.
Order 300, granting to Sterling Shirt Co.,
294-298 Graham Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y.,
exemption from the provisions of article III,
section A, of the Code, to the extent that It Is
permitted to work the employees of its plant
4 hours overtime weekly for a period not to
exceed 8 weeks provided such overtime is
paid for at the rate of time and one-half.
Order 301, granting to Cape Ann Manu-
facturing Co., Gloucester, Mass., exemption
from the provisions of article V, section A,
of the Code, to the extent that it is permitted
to operate an extra shift on three pressing
machines for a period not to exceed 2 weeks
from February 20, 1935, provided additional
operators are employed.
Order 302, granting to Strauber Bros.,
483-4S5 Broadway, New York City, exemp-
tion from the provisions of article III, section
A, of the Code, to the extent that the appli-
cant shall be permitted to work the employees
of its plant 4 hours overtime weekly for a
period not to exceed 4 weeks from February
21, 1935, provided all such overtime Is paid.
for at the rate of time and one-half.
Order 303, granting to Jobbers Pants Co.,
subsidiary of Standard Overall Co., Martins-
viyle, Va., exemption from the provisions of
article IV, section C, of the Code, to the ex-
tent that it is permitted to classify a maxi-
mum of 240 employees as learners, provided
that any such employees so classified have
not worked more than 12 weeks In any capac-
ity In the cotton garment industry and all
employees so .classified are paid what they
may earn on'a piecework basis, but, in no
event, shall such basis be less than the scale
of learners minimum described in section C,
article IV. of the Code, and that no employee
who has at any time earned the minimum of
$12 or more shall be classified as a learner.
The total number of learners is to be de-
creased by 10 percent of 240 every 2-week
period from March 4, 1985, until the company


is classifying as learners no more than 10
percent of the total number of manufactur-
ing employees. A copy of the order must be
posted in a conspicuous place In the appli-
cant's plants.
Order 304, granting to Salant & Salant,
56 Worth SL, New York City, exemption
from the provisions of article III, section A,
of the Code, to the extent that it is permitted
to work two operators on samples in its
Brooklyn plant 8 hours overtime weekly for
a period not to exceed 2 weeks from Febru-
ary 20, 1935, provided all such overtime is
paid for at the rate of time and one-half.
Order 305, granting to Smith-McCord-
Townsend Co., Broadway, Eighth and May
Streets, Kansas City, Mo., exemption from
the provisions of article V, section A, of the
Code, to the extent that it is permitted to
operate an extra shift on 10 pressing irons
for a period not to exceed 8 weeks from Feb-
ruary 20, 1935, provided additional operators
are employed.
Order 306, granting to Barmon Bros. Co.,
Inc., Flllmore-Broadway-Wilsons Streets,
Buffalo, N. Y., exemption from the provisions
of article III, section A, of the Code, to the
extent that the applicant shall be permitted
to work 4 hours overtime weekly from Feb-
ruary 20, 1935, up to and including June 1,
1935, 7 zigzag machines, and 4 hours oQver-
time weekly for a period of 4 weeks from
February 20, 1935, 18 operators on samples,
provided that all such overtime is paid for
at the rate of time and one-half.
Order 307, granting to Improved Manu-
facturing Co., Ashland, Ohio, exemption from
the provisions of article V, section A, of the
Code, to the extent that It Is permitted to
operate an extra shift on 1 pressing and 1
overedging machine for a period not to ex-
ceed 8 weeks from February 20, 1935, pso-
vided additional operators are employed.
Order 308, granting to Pacific Overall Co.,
Inc., 20 Third Avenue, Long Branch, N. J.,
exemption from the provisions of article III,
section A, of the Code, to the extent that it is
permitted to work five operators 4 hours
overtime for 5 weeks from February 20, 1935,
on Union Special and Singer Two-Needle Ma-
chines, provided that all such overtime is
paid for at the rate of time bnd one-half.
Order 309, granting to P. K. Browning
Manufacturing Co., Texarkana, Tex., exemp-
tion from the provisions of article V, section
A, of the Code, to the extent that it is per-
mitted to operate an extra shift on onq bar-
tacking machine for 30 days from February
20, 1935, provided an additional operator is
employed.
SOrder 310, granting to Missouri Garment
Co., 2617 Grand Avenue, Kansas City, Mo.,
exemption from the provisions of article V,
section A, of the Code, to she extent that it
is permitted to operate an extra shift on 3
button, 2 buttonhole, 2 snaps, 5 hemming,
2 serging. 4 hemstitching, 6 pressing, and '4
folding machines for a period not to exceed
8 weeks from February 20, 1935, provided
additional operators are employed.
Order 311, granting to Mrs. Jack Dimond,
Edwardsville, Ill., exemption from the pro-
visions of article IV, section A, of the Code,
to the extent that the applicant shall be per-
mitted to employ not more than five home
sewers on home sewing machines only and
such workers shall be paid not less than
$9.75 per week, provided the maximum Code
hours and the other provisions of the Code
are observed.
Order 313, granting to Wide Awake Shirt
Co., Reading, Pa., exemption from the pro-
visions of article V, section A, of the Code,
to the extent that it is permitted to operate
an extra shift on five pressing machines for
a period not to exceed 8 weeks, from Febru-
ary 20, 1935, provided additional operators
are employed.
Order 314. granting to Samuel Nirenburg,
Inc.. 220 Fifth Avenue, New York City, ex-
emptinn from the provisions of article III,
section A and article V, section A, of the
Code to the extent that It is permitted to
work the employees'of its pressing depart-
ment 6 hours overtime during the week end-
ing February 23, 1935, provided all such over-
time is paid for at the rate of time and one-
half.
COUNTER TYPE ICE-CREAM FREEZ-
ER INDUSTRY, Code No. 418: Order 11,
approving budget and basis of contribution
for the period from June 8, 1934, to June 8,
1935.
DRAPERY AND UPHOLSTERY TRIM-
MING INDUSTRY, Code No. 212: Order 22,
approving budget and basis of contribution
from January 1 to December 31, 1934, sup-
plementing approval dated June 7, 1934.
DRESS MANUFACTURING INDUS-
TRY, Code No. 64: Order 64, extending Order
64-44 dated January 9, 1935, granting tem-
porary approval of budget and basis of as-
sessment up to and Including February 15,
1936.
DROP FORGING INDUSTRY, Code No.
423: Order 18, approving budget and basis of
contribution for the period of September 1,
1934, to June 16, 1935, subject to revision
upon review of audit report covering Code
Authority operations through September 30,
1934, and interim statement of receipts and
expenditures of Code Authority through Jan-
uary 31, 1935.


.:. ., _. .. '." '...:,k-,..,'..:


ELECTRICAL MANUFACTURING IN,
DUSTRY, Code No. 4: Order 81, granting.td
Washburn Wire Co., for its plant at Phllipas
dale, R. I., exemption from the wage ,iand
hours provisions only of articles III and T
of the Code, upon condition that the appll
cant shall observe labor provisions identical
with those contained in the Code of fair corni
petition for the iron and steel industry In a.l
operations where the said exemption ap6
plies and report to the Code Authority any
material increase in the number of ma
hours used in the processing of products-o.'
the industry. '
Order 82, granting to Anaconda Wire and,
Cable Co., for its plant at Great Falls, Mon...W
exemption from the maximum hours provLi
sion of article IV (a) of the Code to the.-e'
tent that it may employ employees engagg4
in processing of products of the industry "i
in labor operations directly incident there io
not to exceed 82 hours and 40 hours in alt..
nate weeks, thus averaging 36 hours over'
2-week period; provided,, that In no evet
shall the operation of such working schediu
be permitted to exceed the alternating weelj
maximum hours."""
ELECTROPLATING AND METAL PO'
FISHING AND METAL FINISHING I|
DUSTRY (Supplementary), Code No. 84T14
Order 19, approving selection William Bfli
and Carl Heussner as consumer represents:
tives on the committee on standards of qt't4
ity, in accordance with the provisions of .
tide IV, section 7, subsection (o),.o fiSS
supplementary Code. .
iELECTROTYPING AND STEREOTYPE'
ING INDUSTRY, Code No. 179: Order 27
approving the use of surplus funds on hand
December 31, 1934, in an amount sufflcie'ni
to cover expenses for the months of Januars
February, and March, 1935.
Order 29, reapprovlng budget and basis .6o0
contribution for the period January 1 to D'.
cember 31, 1934. :,
FISHERY-INDUSTRY, Code No. 308: OiA
der 63 (Processing and Wholesaling Div'i
slon-South Middle Atlantic Area), amend,
Ing Administrative Order No. 308-54, dated
December 11, 1934, and approving tempora.,
executive committee budget and basis of conmA
tribution in the pro rata sum of $540.62 per'
month to April 1, 1935, or to the effective.
date of the proposed supplementary Oodei
whichever first occurs. '4i.
FLOOR MACHINERY INDUSTRY, Cod
No. 526: Order 6, approving list of hazardqou
occupations and/or operations unsuited 'to
persons under 18 years of age.
FRESH OYSTER INDUSTRY Code 1No'
308A: Order 14, terminating exemption.
granted in paragraph III of Adminlstrativfel
Order X-36, dated May 26, 1934, insofar a-
such exemption applies to obligations to coini
tribute to the expenses of administering their
supplementary, Code. :A
FUNERAL SERVICE INDUSTRY, Code"
No. 384: Order 13, denying to Strode Fanera1l
Home, Stillwater, Okla., exemption from the)i
provisions of article IV, of the Code.
FUNERAL SUPPLY INDUSTRY, CodA
No. 90: Order 21, granting to Gallon Metallic
Vault Co., Gallon, Ohio, exemption from the..
provisions of article II, section 2, of tiedi
Code, for a period of 45 days from March Z'C
1935.
FURNITURE MANUFACTURING IN^x
DUSTRY, Code No. 145: Order 49, granting'
to Wabash Screen Door Co., Chicago, I]:i..
exemption from article IV, section 1, of th
Code, to the extent that this exemption shaf1
apply only to employees of the applicant com-A
pany engaged in the weaving by hand' of
double bottomed cane chairs, and abshall appl.0
to no other operations and only to the em'-
ployees and operations in the applicant'&.
Memphis, Tenn., factory and If the crew o*
group method of chair caning is used, no sucj
crew shall consist of more than 20 member.'
For each crew, the warping operation, if he.
ringbone weave is used, shall be performed'
by at least two members, and, if basket weavei
is used, by at least three members. The wage
for all crew members engaged in the warp-
ing operation shall be at least 30 cents per.1
hour. The dally wage all other emptoyeesA
engaged as members of chair caning crews"'
shall be determined for each crew by apply_
ing at least the piecework wage rates speclV
fled to the total number of chairs caned by|
the crew per day and dividing by the numbeid
of members of crew, including those per.3'
forming the warping operations. Minimum?
piece-work rates are provided by the order.-'i
FURNITURE MANUFACTURING IN
DUSTRY, Code No. 145: Order 50, granting'v
to Rodgers-Wade Furniture Co., Paris, Tex."
exemption from the provisions of article Ii:'-
of the Code, to the extent that this exemptionff;
shall apply only to the applicant's skilled faca'.
tory employees who shall not be permitted'
to work more than 45 hours in any 1 weeksl
nor more than 8 hours in any 1 day and !eq
paid time and one-half for all hours in excesse
of 40 per week. All hours, of all employees;'
worked at regular wage rates, are to bei-:
averaged down to 40 per week (or, In tk:i:
cases of employees to whom hourly tolerance.
are permitted by subsctions (b), (e), and 1
(Continued on pae 6, column I) i





S '. : '.. "" ik .. ""'-"
.. ,. . : :: .',. '


g"










kDINISTRATIVE ORDERS-Continue-


(Continued from page 5)
') of section I of article III, down to the
average number of hours permitted them) for
-"e 8-month period, October 1, 1934, to May
31&; 1935; and that the next averaging period,
Instead of the 6-month period following
.. ch 31, 1935, required by the Code, be for
e 4-month period following May 31, 1935.
The applicant must furnish the Administra-
-ion a transcript of its pay roll for a sample
dlod prior to this exemption period and
.fc' the entire period of exemption. A copy
'f this order must be posted with the Code
[bor provisions in the factory.
%GRAPHIC ARTS INDUSTRIES, Code No.
72: Order 457A, approving budget and basis
..'eontrlbution of the regional Code admin-
fratlve agency, whose jurisdiction covers
h city of Milwaukee, Wis., and its metro-
oltan area, for the Trade Typesetting In-
istry, Division D-l, for the period from
A.ril 1, 1934, to March 31, 1935. Order 458,
approving the budget and basis of contribu-
on, of the regional Code administrative
Wtency, whose Jurisdiction covers the City
ptCleveland, Ohio, and its metropolitan area,
*or the Trade Typesetting Industry, Division
.4..1, for the period from April 1, 1934, to
a3rch 81, 1935.
HOrder 460, approving on behalf of the Na-
onal Code Authority for the Steel and Cop-
jrPlate Engraving and Printing Industry,
jllislon 0C-2 under the Code for the graphic
itS Industries, the termination of exemption
lj'ated in Administrative Order X-36, dated
yi 26, 1934.
HARDWOOD DISTILLATION INDUS-
*RY, Code No. 110: Order 20, approving
'dget and basis of contribution for the pe-
(,d from January 1 to December 31, 1935.
THE HOSIERY INDUSTRY, Code No. 16:
'rder 22, staying the provisions of article V,
i"don 5, of the Code, to the extent that,
jjdbject to certain conditions, members of the
Undustry may shift employees from one pro-
ratktive operation to another, and that em-
ployees so shifted may, for a period not to
$ceed three months, be regarded as learners.
iuch stay is designed to permit employees
killed in one'operation to learn other skilled
|erations, assuring thereby more continuous
.$.'ployment to the employee and a smaller
labor turnover to the employer.
I*THE HOSIERY INDUSTRY, Code No.
16: Order 21, granting to Washington Ho-
ary Mills, Nashville, Tenn., extension of ex-
emption from the provisions of article IV,
eitlon 6, which exemption expired February
14, 1935, extending It to February 28, 1935.
ICE INDUSTRY, Code No. 43: Order 97,
grnting to Pismo Oceano Ice Co.. Pismo
Beach, 'Calif., permission to increase its ice
ragee capacity from approximately 90 tons
t.540 tons.
i.Order 98, granting to Overton Ice Co., Over-
ton Tex., permission to increase its daily
manufacturing capacity from 20 tons to 35
tpns.
Order 99, granting to Thomas J. Mulgrew
Dubuque, Iowa, permission to increase
Its ce storage capacity from 500 tons to
1200 tons.
flTHE INFANTS' AND CHILDREN'S
*WEAR INDUSTRY, Code No. 373: Order 37,
granting to Gem Baby Wear Co., New York
City, exemption from the provisions of article
III of the Code, to the extent that It be
granted permission to work .two cutters 4
Bours overtime Saturday, November 17, and
Saturday, November 24, 1934, provided time
nd one-half is paid for all such overtime
d that a copy of the order is posted in a
conppicuous place in the applicant's plant.
-',rder 38, granting to the Little Duchess
Undergarment Co., exemption from the pro-
u ons of article III of the Code, to the ex-
it that it is granted permission to work
hours overtime on Saturday, November 17,
94, provided time and one-half is paid for
11such overtime and a copy of the order is
Lted In a conspicuous place In the appli-
nt's plant.
LOrder 39, extending Order 373-5 signed
ay 17, 1934, granting Jos. Love, Inc., San
tonio, Tex.; Juvenile Mfg. Co., San An-
E6nlo Laredo, and Eagle Pass, Tex.; Kewpie
press Co., Inc., Corpus Christi, Laredo, and
Brownsville, Tex.; Cobrin & Son, Inc.,
Laredo, Tex.; Better Infants' Wear, San An-
tonio and Eagle Pass, Tex.; Texas Infants'
'Weat, San Antonio, Tex.; exemption from
Abe provisions of article IV, subsection (a),
F.sectton 1, of the Code, to the extent that Mrs.
J Gurnsey, Laredo, Tex., be included In
Itbe exemption. The order shall not apply to
employees engaged In the manufacture of
Products which are wholly machine made
(.except for hand embellishment and hand
[Embroldery), and no employee engaged by the
toresald members of the industry shall be
aild at less than the rate of 20 cents per hour
o r $8 per week of 40 hours). Homeworkers
n.n their employ shall be compensated at
ilece rates computed on the basis of a mini-
num rate or the above rates. A copy of the
ibrder must be posted in a conspicuous place
1in, the applicant's plant.
WiLIGHT SEWING INDUSTRY EXCEPT
_ARMENTS, Code No. 226: Order 48, ter-
minating exemption granted in Administra-
itive Order X-36 for the comfortable division
Ito the extent that members whose net sales
Products during the year 1934 amounted


to $10,000 or more are no longer exempted
from paying their proportionate share of the
costs of administering the Code.
LUMBER AND TIMBER PRODUCTS IN-
DUSTRIES, Code No. 9: Order 315, provi-
sional approval of budget and bases of con-
tribution for the period of March 2 to May 1,
1935, or until further ordered by the NIRB.
IASON CONTRACTORS DIVISION OF
THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY, Code
No. 244G: Order A3, approving agreement
between members of the mason contractors
division and bricklayer, stonemason, brick-
layers' tender, and stonemasons' helper em-
ployees In the region of St. Louis and vicinity,
all in' the State of Missouri.
MAYONNAISE INDUSTRY,Code No.349:
Order 25, denying Francis H. Leggett & Co.,
New York, exemption from the provisions of
article IX, sections 1 and 2, of the Code.
MEDIUM- AND LOW-PRICED JEW-
ELRY MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY,
Code No. 176: Order 46, granting to Kesten-
man Bros. Manufacturing Co., Providence,
R. I., exemption from the provisions of ar-
ticle III, sections 1, 1 (a), and 2, of the Code
to the extent that no employee shall be per-
mitted to work In excess of 54 hours per
week, and that time and one-third is paid
for all hours worked in excess of 40 per
week which shall apply only to 37 of appli-
cant's employees who are polishers, electro-
platers, assemblymen, and stocLmen.
MILLINERY INDUSTRY, Code No. 151:
Order 47, denying to Southern Millinery Man-
ufacturers Association, exemption from cer-
tain of the provisions of articles II, III, IV,
and VII of the Code.
Order 48, granting to Lederer, Strauss &
Co'. Des Moines, Iowa, exemption from the
provisions of article IV, section 3, of the
Code, for the period from February 25 up to
June 16, 1935, to the extent that they are per-
mitted to employ Marie Wenzel, Belle East-
void, Margaret Wilcox, and Emma Mills, all
of Des Moines, Iowa, at a minimum wage of
$9.75 per week .and said employees shall not
be included in calculating the tolerance allow-
ance o(if the applicant; provided that if the
operations at which any of them are em-
ployed has a piecework rate and the Uam:unt
earned at the prevailing piecework rate ex-
ceeds the miinmum wage specified for such
persons, thle workers shall be compensated
on tho basis of actual piece-rate earnings. A
copy of the order must be posted in a con-
spicuous place in the applicant's plant.
MOTION PICTURE INDUSTRY, Code
No. 124: Order 49, approving budget and
bases of contribution for the period from
January 1 to December 31, 1934.
THE NOVELTY CURTAINS, DRAPER-
IES, BEDSPREADS, AND NOVELTY PIL-
LOWS INDUSTRY, Code No. 79: Order 26,
granting to Puerto Rican contractors of the
domestic decorative linens branch of the in-
dustry exemption from the provisions of the
Code.
PHOTO-ENGRAVING INDUSTRY, Code
No. 180: Order 48, granting permission to the
Code Authority to expend a portion of the
surplus funds on hand December 31, 1934,
to cover expenses for January, February, and
March.
RESTAURANT INDUSTRY, Code No.
282: Order 125, denying to Ellis Cafe, 1911
Ninth Street, NW., Washington, D. C., for
Retroactive exemption from provisions of ar-
ticle VI, section 1 (a), of the Code.
Order 126, denying to The Russian House
Inc., 379 Minnesota St., St. Paul, Minn., ex-
emption from the provisions of article V,
section 7, of the Code.
RESTAURANT TRADE IN THE TER-
RITORY OF HAWAII, Code No. 553: Ap-
proving Code upon condition that all mem-
bers of the trade as defined under article II,
sections 1 and 2 thereof, shall be exempt from
the provisions of the Code for the restaurant
Industry, as approved on February 16. 1934,
provided that the exemption granted does
not extend to operators of "hotel restau-
rants."
RETAIL FOOD AND GROCERY TRADE,
Code No. 182: Order 67, withdrawing ap-
proval given by Administrative Order No.
182-39 to a uniform store operating hour
agreement for Portland, Oreg., retail food
and grocery establishments, and terminating
said agreement.
RETAIL RUBBER TIRE AND BAT-
TERY TRADE, Code No. 410: Order 21,
denying to the tire and battery dealers and
the filling station operators, Selma. Ala., ex-
emption from the provisions of article V-A,
section 1, of the Code.
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL CON-
TRACTING DIVISION OF THE CON-
STRUCTION INDUSTRY. Code No. 244-H:
Order 21, terminating exemption granted un-
der paragraph III of Administrative Older
X-36, dated May 26, 1934, insofar as it ap-
plies to members of the industry whose gross
business is valued at less than $300 during
any quarter in which assessment falls. Quar-
ters run from January 1 of each year. The
exemption does not apply to members of the
division whose principal line of business is in
another division of the construction indus-


try. The order provides that within 90 days
of the effective date of the termination the
Code Authority shall furnish to the NIRB
certain pertinent information.
SADDLERY MANUFACTURING IN-
DUSTRY, Code No. 45: Order 12, granting
to Bona Alien. Inc., Buford. Ga.; Central
Saddlery Co., Louisville, Ky.; Merchants Sup-
ply Co., Fort Wayne, Ind.; Sears Saddlery
Co., Davenport, Iowa; Benjamin T. Crump
Co., Richmond, Va.; and Harris-Kahn Sad-
dlery Co., Cairo, Ill., exemption from the
provisions of article III, section -1, of the
Code, to the extent that the applicants may
work their employees 48 hours per week for
a period of 8 weeks, beginning February 18,
1935, without averaging over a 4-month pe-
riod, provided all time In excess of 8 hours
per day or 40 hours per week be paid at the
rate of time and one-third on condition that
the applicants shall promote at least 5 per-
cent of their total employees who are skilled
employees to the next higher paid operation
at the prevailing wage scale for such opera-
tion, and shall engage an equal number of
new employees. Each manufacturer shall
promote at least two employees. The appli-
cants shall furnish the Code Authority evi-
dence of compliance with this exemption
within 10 days of the date of this order. A
copy of the order must be posted in a con-
spicuous place In the applicants' plant. Or-
der is dated February 28, 1935.
SANITARY AND WATERPROOF SPE-
CIALTIES MANUFACTURING INDUS-
TRY, Code No. 342: Order 21, approving list
of hazardous occupations from which minors
under IS years of age are excluded.
SCIENTIFIC APPARATUS INDUSTRY,
Code No. 114: Order 16, granting to the Hays
Corporation, Michigan City, Ind., exemption
from the provisions of article III, section 6,
of the Code, to the extent that each employee
shall be paid at the rate of not less than time
and one-half for all hours worked in excess
of 8 hours per day or 40 hours per week and
no coimpeteut prospective employee shall be
refused employment during the exemption
period, from March 2 up to and Including May
1. 1935.
SCRAP IRON, NONFERROUS SCRAP
METALS, AND WASTE MATERIALS
TRADE, Code No. 330: Order 40, denying to
S. Friedman & Son, Denver, Colo., exemption
front the provisions of article III, section 1,
and article IV, section 1, of the Code.
SILK TEXTILE INDUSTRY, Code No.
4S: Orde-r 31., extending budget approved by
Order No. 4--25 dated January 4, 1935, on a
pro rata basis for the period January 1 to
April 1, 1935.
SMOKING PIPE MANUFACTURING
INDUSTRY, Code No. 225: Order 29, grant-
ing to the Briarwood Corporation, 7016
Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio, exemption
from a portion of the provisions of article IV,
section 1 (b) of the Code for a period of 6
months from March 4, 1935, provided all ap-
prentices be paid at not less than 80 percent
of the minimum wage rate for 6 weeks in
accordance with article IV, section 1 (b).
The applicant shall not discharge or lay off
any of its present employees and replace
them with apprentices or former apprentices
for the purpose of reducing the pay roll. Tlhe
order must be conspicuously posted in the
same manner as is required for the posting
of the labor provisions of the Code.
STONE FINISHING MACHINERY AND
EQUIPMENT INDUSTRY, Code No. 158:
Order 13, terminating exemption granted in
Administrative Order X-36, dated May 26,
1934, such termination to apply only to those
who manufacture the products of the in-
dustry for sale as such.
TERRAZZO AND MOSAIC CONTRACT-
ING DIVISION OF THE CONSTRUCTION
INDUSTRY. Code No. 244: Order 7, approv-
ing budget and basis of contribution for tlhe
period from October 15, 1934, to June 15,
1935, subject to certain conditions.
TEXTILE BAG INDUSTRY, Code No. 27:
Order 14, granting to Selma Manufacturing
Co., Selma, Ala., exemption from the provi-
sions of article IV, of the Code, from March
4 to April 20, 1935, or until the date when
the Industrial Appeals Board shall have an-
nounced its decision on the appeal now pend-
ing before it, whichever date shall come first.
THROWING INDUSTRY, Code No. 54:
Order 31, approving budget and basis of con-
tribution for the period from January 1 to
June 15, 1935.
TOLL BRIDGE INDUSTRY, Code No.
431: Order 12, granting authorization to'Code
Authority to expend a portion of the surplus
funds available on February 9, 1935, to cover
expenses for the period from February 9 to
May 9, 1935, under certain conditions.
TRANSIT INDUSTRY, Code No. 23:
Order 62. denying to Peoples C-'Ntral Transit
Lines, Inc., Co\ington, Ky., exemption from
the provisions of subsection (b) of section
1, article VII, of the Code.
Order 63. terminating stay of the provisions
of i-rticles III and IV granted by Adminis-
trative Order No. 28-23. dated June 12, 1934,
to Texas Bus Lines, Inc., Houston, Tex., in-
sofar as its motor-bus operations were con-
cerne-d.


THE TRUCKING INDUSTRY, Code No. '
278: Order .159, approving Registration In-
signia. Registration Forms, and certain other
items concerning registration.
THE TRUCKING INDUSTRY, Code No
278: Order 161, denying to Brink's Inc., and
Brink's Inc. of Wisconsin, exemption frdm
the provisions of article VII and of section I
of article IX, of the Code.
Order 170, granting to all members of the
Drive-It-Yourself industry exemption from
certain provisions, namely article VI; sec-
tions 1 and 3 and the last sentence of section
2 of article VII; article VIII; and sections 1i
and 2 of article L-, of the Code, for a period#
of 60 days from March 8, 1935, and denying
exemption from all the other provisions of
the Code.
UNDERWEAR AND ALLIED PROD.
UCTS INDUSTRY, Code No. 23: Order 26,
denying to Richland Knitting Mills, Robeso-
nia, Pa.. exemption from the provisions of
articles III and IV of the Code.
UPHOLSTERY AND DRAPERY TEX-
TILE INDUSTRY, Code No. 125: Order 18,
denying to United States Pile Fabric Oor-
poration, Adams Avenue and Lelper Street,
Philadelphia, Pa., exemption from the pro-
visions of article IU, section 4, of the Code.
WARM AIR REGISTER INDUSTRY
Code No. 472: Order 15, approving list, of
hazardous occupations from which minors
under 18 years of age shall be excluded.
WATCHCASE MANUFACTURING IN.
DUSTRY, Code No. 178: Order 24, granting
to Star Watch Case Co., Ludingtoi, Mich., e x.
emption from the provisions of article Ill,
section 1, of the Code to the extent that no
employee shall be permitted to work In ex-
cess of 50 hours per weelkand time nd one-
third shall be paid for all hours worked in
excess of 40 per week. This exemption ap-
plies only to tool and die workers .ind is for
a period not to exceed 90 days from February
25, 1935.
WATCH CASE MANUFACTURING IN-
D1fSTRY, Code No. 178: Order 25, granting"
to Illinois Watch Case Co., extension of time
under article VIII, section.4, and Adminis-
trative Order 178-7 for a period of 3 months
from February 25, 1935.
WHOLESALE FOOD AND GROCERY
TRADE AND FOR THE RETAIL FOOD
AND GROCERY TRADE, Code No. 182: Or-
der 68, approving budget and basis of con-.
tribution for the period of January 1 to De-
cember 31, 1935.
WHOLESALE FOOD AND GROCERY
TRADE, Code No. 196: Order 53, granting a
further 60-day stay of the taking effect of
an amendment to the first paragraph of ar-
tidcle VII, section 12, of the Code. Order is
dated March 8, 1935.
WHOLESALE FRESH FRUIT AND.
VEGETABLE DISTRIBUTIVE INDUS-
TRY, Code No. LP18:' Order 11, granting to
Lakeland Fruit & Produce Co., Minneapolis,
Minn., extension of an exemption from the
provisions of article III, section 1, of the
Code. The extension Is for a period of 20
days from the date of the order. Order is
dated March 6, 1935.
THE WHOLESALE PAINT, VARNISH,
LACQUER, ALLIED, AND KINDRED
PRODUCTS TRADE (A Division of the
Wholesaling or Distributing Trade), Code
No. 201R: Order 8, approving divisional Code
Authority budget and basis of contrIbutiou
for the period of August 15, 1934, to June 15,
1935.
WIRE ROPE AND STRAND MANU-
FACTURING INDUSTRY, Code No. 84H1:
Order 13, granting a stay of the provisions of
section 4, article VI, of the supplementary
Code for a period of 90 days, to members of
the Industry who sell direct to those pur-
chasers whose business is that of drilling,
producing, pipe-line transporting, refining or
storing petroleum, or of producing or pipe-.
line transporting natural gas, in the United
States, in competition with members of the
Code of fair competition for the American
Petroleum Equipment Industry and Trade
WOMEN'S NECKWEAR AND SCARF
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY, Code No.
538: Order 3, granting stay of the provisions
of article III, section 3. of the Code for aIl
additional period of 60 days from February
7, 1.35.
Mr. W. A. Gill was appointed to the com-
mission for the .women's neckwear and sarf i
manufacturing industry, as of January 7.
1935.
WOOL TEXTILE INDUSTRY, Code No
3:, Order 45, granting to Pacific Mills, 140
Federal Street, Boston, Mass., exemption
from the provisions of article IV of the Code
to the extent that looms available for the
production of fabrics for automobile uphol-
stery may he operated for a third shift of 40
hours per week for a period of 90 days from
February 18 to and including May 18. 13s,
for the purpose of filling actnal orders for
fabri's for automobile -upholstery, upon the
conditions that all available looms used in
the manufacture of fabrics for automobile
upholstery purchases be operated two shifts -
of 40 hours each before a third shift is pnt
(Continued on page 7, column 1) '








Smnistrative Cos Authority Members Approved Interpetatir

Orders "


(Continued from page 6)
into operation. Looms engaged in the manu-
Sfaeture of fabrics for automobile upholstery
may operate on the third shift only for the
purpose of filling actual orders and shall not
operate a third shift for the purpose of man-
ufacturing.stock for inventory and shall not
allocate an undue proportion of the work to
be produced on a third shift to 'ts plants lo-
'cated in low-wage areas and not sell in the
furniture upholstery market any seconds re-
suiting from the manufacture of fabrics for
.automobile upholstery manufactured during
: the period of said exemption. A copy cof the
order must be posted in a conspicuous place
in the applicant's plant.
SOrder -16, granting to Rock River Woolen
:. Mills, Janesville, Wis., exemption from the
provisions of article IV of the Code to the
same extent and upon the same conditions as
S. in Order 45, above.
WOOD CASED LEAD PENCIL MANU-
FACTURING INDUSTRY, Code No. 291:
Order 16, granting extension of Administra-
live Order 291-14, dated November 23, 1934,
i staying the provisions of sections 3, 4, 5, and
the first sentence of section 6, sections 16 and
17 of article X, and section S of article VII
for a further period of 90 days from Febru-
ary 23, 1935.
WOOL FELT INDUSTRY, Code No. 143,
Order 14, granting exemption from the pro-
visions of article VIII, section 7, of the Code,
i nsofar as they apply to sales made by mem-
Sbers of the Wool Felt Manufacturing Indus-
try in export markets.
: WOOL TEXTILE INDUSTRY, Code No.
3: Order 48, granting to Wilton Woolen Co.,
Wilton, Maine, exemption from the provisions
Sof article IV of the Code to the extent that
Slooms available for the production of fabrics
for automobile upholstery may be operated
.for a third shift of 40 hours per week for a
period of 90 days from February 28 to and
i including May 28, 1935, for the purpose of
Spilling actual orders for fabrics for automo-
Sbile upholstery upon the condition that all
available looms used in the manufacture of
Fabrics for automobile upholstery purchases
I .shall be operated two shifts of 40 hours each
Before a third shift is put into operation.
SLooms engaged in the manufacture of fabrics
Sfor automobile upholstery may operate on the
Third shift only for the purpose of filling ac-
tual orders and shall not operate on a third
Whihft for the purpose of manufacturing stock
Sfor inventory. The applicant shall not sell
SIn the furniture upholstery market any sec-
onds resulting from the manufacture of fab-
rics for automobile upholstery manufactured
during the period of said exemption. The
applicant shall submit to the National Indus-
trial Recovery Board such reports as said
Board may request relating to total yardage
of fabrics for automobile upholstery now on
order for delivery during the next 3 months
and delivery schedules. Copies of the order
shall be posted in a conspicuous place in the
mill of the applicant.
Order 49, granting to Cleveland Worsted
Mills Co., Cleveland, Ohio, exemption from
the provisions of the first paragraph of ar-
ticle III for employees in the mending de-
partment until March 20, 1935, to the extent
that employees in the mending department
Smay be employed 4S hours per week provided
that time and one-third is paid for all hours
In excess of 40 per week and that the order
be posted in a conspicuous place in said
department.



Interpretations


Complete Wire and Iron
Fence Industry
No. 84 Ll-18
FACTS.-In article II, section 1, of the
above Code, the word catalogue frequently
.appears. Large operators in the industry
PbLish printed catalogs containing com-
plete descriptions with illustrations and file
such catalogs with their current prices.
Small operators in the industry file prices
.and specifications in sufficient particulars to
Permnit orf (eitain identification.
QUESTION.-Does the filing of speciflea-
ti: ons constitute a cataloging of the products
of a member of the complete wire and iron
Fence industry?
INTERPRE'rATION.-Filing with the sup-
Iplementary Code Authority specifications of
"the product of the industry is construed to be
cataloging such produce dut.


Fertilizer Industry
67-49
SQUESTION.-TliLhu- Fertilizer Code pro-
vides for the payment, witli certain cxcep
i.Uos, of "overtime for all work
.,in excess of .S lliiDrs : day." What is m2aun
byj "day"?
..INTERPRETATION.-The word "day",
.in the absence of qualifying language, means
o1e space of time which elapses between two
l.sccepsive midnights.


The National Industrial Recovery Board
approved the following selections and ap-
pointments of Code Authority members:
BLOUSE AND SKIRT MANUFACTUR-
ING INDUSTRIES.-S. M. Elowsky, Henry
Perahia, A. Sloat, Mack Sepler, Alfred Kolod-
ijey.v, Lou Brecher, Marcus Helitzer, and Wil-
liam Lerner.
BOOK PUBLISHING INDUSTRY.-
Harry Scherman and R. G. Smith. New York;
Harry C. Johnson, Chicago, Ill.; Fred P.
Murphy, Kansas City, Mo.; Fred Dolan, New
Turk; James G. Ferguson, Garden City,
N. Y.; John O'Connor, -New York; Frank
J. Mackey and Warren T. Davis, Chicago, Ill.
BOOKSELLERS' TRADE.-Walter P
Spreckels.
CORSET AND BRASSIERE INDUS-
TRY.-D. Spencer Berger, New Haven, Conn.,
as alternate for Ralph B. James; William
Rosenthal,' New York City, as alternate for
George A. Kaufmann; Benjamin Strouse,
New Haven, Conn., as alternate for E. E.
Conover; H. C. Usher, New Haven, Conn., as
alternate for L. T. Warner; John I. Seplowin,
New York City, as alternate for Waldemar
Kops; and J. T. Hart, Chicago, Ill., as alter-
nate for S. W. Kunstadter.
FERTILIZER INDUSTRY.-Ovid E. Rob-
orts, Jr.
FUR DRESSING AND FUR DYEING
INDUSTRY.-Henry G. Schlesinger, Bronx,
N. Y.; A. Joseph Geist, Springfield, L. I.; Abe
Estrin and Ben W. Hollander, Newark, N. J.;
Joseph Simon, Bergen, N. J.: Bertram J.
Goodman, Bronx, N. Y.: Herman Basch, New
York City; Isadore Reiffel, Mlt. Vernon. N. Y.;
A. Allan Perry, Bronx, N. Y.; Michael C.
Meseritz, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Samuel Mittel-
man, Ozone Park, L. I.; Oscar Yeager and
Julius Blank, Brooklyn, N. Y.. for a period
of 1 year from January 15, 1935.
HOUSEHOLD GOODS STORAGE AND
MOVING TRADE.-Julian F. Greeley, Bos-
ton, Mass.; John G. Neeser, New York City;
J. F. Keenan, Pittsburgh, Pa.; C. A. Aspln-
wall, Washington, D. C.; B. T. Chadwall,
Nashville, Tenn.; George C. Harris, Birming-
ham, Ala.; H. G. Beebe. Jackson, Mich.:
Ralph J. Wood, Chicago, Ill.; Edward J.
Brugger, Minneapolis, Minn.; M. W. Nied-
ringhaus, St. Louis, Mo.; 0. E. Latimer, San
Antonio, Tex.; J. M. Oakey, Denver, Colo.;
W. G. Dickinson, Seattle, Wash.; H. B. Holt,
San Francisco, Calif.
LIQUID FUEL APPLIANCE MANU-
FACTURING INDUSTRY.-T. M. Sour-
beck, manager, Cleveland, Ohio; Charles E.
'Parr, general manager, Wichita, Kans.; W. L.
Cooper, vice president. Kankakee, Ill.; A. L.
Lindemann, vice president and general man-
ager, Milwaukee, Wis.; T. W. Gulley, vice
president and charge of sales, Milwaukee,


Wis.; S. J. Roby, president, Meriden, Conn.;
A. W. Fischer, vice president and charge of
sales, Newark, Ohio; F. H. Van Blarcom. vice
president and general manager, Lynn, UMass.;
A. T. Atwill, vice president and general man-
ager, Chicago, Ill.; M. F. Slapp, vice presi-
dent anmi general manager, Akron, Ohio.
MOTION PICTURE INDUSTRY.-Wil-
liam P. Farnsworth.
OUTDOOR ADVERTISING TRADE.-
G. deFreest Lamrner.
PIPE ORGAN MANUFACTURING IN-
DUSTRY.-Arthur Marks, New York City:
Basil G. Austin, Hartford, Conn.; Adolph
Wangerin., Milwaukee, Wi.; C. B. Floyd,
West Haven,.Conn.; Lewis C. Odell, New
York City.
PORCELAIN BREAKFAST FURNI-
TURE ASSEMBLING INDUSTRY.-J.
Goldman, Brooklyn, N. Y.; W. S. Hurt and
Max Lustig, New York City; Dan Nessler,
Long Island City, N. Y.; Joseph Perloft,
Brookliyn. N Y.: Alex Rosen, New York City;
Sidney Segal, Long Island City, N. Y., to
serve as temporary Code Authority.
PROCESSED OR REFINED FISH OIL
INDUSTRY.-WVerner G. Smith, Cleveland,
Ohio; Fred E. Loud. Philadelphia, Pa.; Louis
J. Reizenstein, Pittsburgh, Pa.; S. R. Kaas,
Newark, N. J.; C. A. Quintrell, Cleveland,
Ohio.
RETAIL CUSTOM MILLINERY
TRADE.-Walter P. Spreckels.
RETAIL DRUG.-Charles F. Gilson, chair-
man; Win. D. Strachan, vice chairman;
Joseph L. McDonald, treasurer; Alfred J.
Coelho, secretary; Arthur Hien, Ame Rich-
ards, Raymond C. Vars, Joseph E. Mahoney,
and David J. Byrne, Rhode Island.
RETAIL JEWELRY TRADE.-Walter P.
Spreckels.
RETAIL TRADE.-Harry C. Carr, non-
voting member of the National Retail Code.
RETAIL TRADE (Drug)--Walter P.
Spreckeis.
ROLLER AND SILENT CHAIN INDUS-
TRY.-J. S. Watson, chairman, Indianapolis,
Ind.; F. J. Weschler, vice chairman, Spring-
field, Mass.; Brinton Welser, Milwaukee,
Wis.; F. C. Thompson, Ithaca, N. Y.; G. A.
Wainwright, secretary, Indianapolis, Ind.;
A. S. Basten, treasurer, Hartford, Conn.;
A. G. Gabriels, Albany, N. Y.; E. F. Emmons,
Sandusky, Ohio.
TRUCKING INDUSTRY.-C. E. Jackson,
0. C. Anthony, W. H. Riske, Clyde L. Sheets,
Henry W. Jensen, and Al Myers, California.
WATERPROOFING, DAMPPROOFING,
CAULKING COMPOUNDS, AND CON-
CRETE FLOOR TREATMENTS MANU-
FACTURING INDUSTRY.-John W. Power.


Automotive Parts and Equijp
meant Mfg. Industry
No. 105-34 '1
FACTS.-Article IV, wages (1), provides::
"The minimum wage that shall bh paid .by.
any employer to any employee engaged in the'
processing of products of this industry and In
any labor operations directly incident thereoto'
shall be at the rate of 40 cents per hour for
male employees and at the rate of 35 cents per||
hour for female employees, subject to the folt
lowing ext-nptions: .'Vi
"(a) If the rate per hour paid for the samej
class of work on July 15, 1929, was less than
the above specified minimums, the rate per.
hour paid shall be not less than the rate per
hour paid on July 15, 1929, but in no event:
shall the minimum rate per hour paid -t
either male .or female employees he less than
87k,2 percent of the above specified minimum
rates." ''
QUESTION.-Can a member of this Code',
not performing the same class of work on
July 15, 19"29, avail himself of article IV, see
tion (1) (a), and pay his employees at thie
rate of 87_ percent of the minimum rate-of
pay under article IV. section (1), of the Aut'
motive Parts and Equipment Manufacturingi
Industry Code? r!
INTERPRETATION.-In order that :
member of the Code of fair competition f6r.
the automotive parts had equipment manufac.
turning industry may aval himself of the pro0l|
visions of section (1) (a) of article IV, ofi-
such Code he must have been employing perSi
sons engaged in the same class of work o 0
July 15, 1929. .i

Business Furniture, Storage.
Equipment and Filing Suppi|
Industry *
Nos. 88-32, 88A-5,and 88B-5
FACTS.-The Code of fair competition for4
the business furniture, storage equipment,"
and filing supply Industry, approved Novem-'i
ber 4, 1933, provides:
Article II, paragraph 4: "The terms 'mem 1
ber' and/or 'member of the industry' means'
and includes any person, firm, association, 0i.
corporation engaged in the business of the5'
industry as defined herein."
Article II. paragraph 9: "The term 'ln .
dustry products' means and includes all
products as hereinafter enumerated and de"'.
fined under 'divisions', and such other prod t
ucts as may be enumerated and defined lin'!f
divisional supplemental Codes which are orl4-
may be attached to and made a part of thlis.
Code as provided in article XII hereof.' ",
Article XV: "This Code and amendments.',
thereto shall be In effect beginning 10 days,
after their approval by the President." !':l
On June 15, said Code was amended as.i
follows: "Article II of the basic Code Is
amended by the addition of the following..
2 divisions, with their respective industry?-
products, to the 4 already Included under the'i
heading, 'The divisions hereby established.
are as follows: Fire resistive safe division,
* *filing supply division' '." 1
The supplemental Codes for the fire re-:'.
sistive safe and the filing supply divisions
were approved July 30, 1934. 1'
QUESTIONi-On what date did the man-'
datory assessment provision of the Buslinessi
Furniture, Storage Equipment, and Fillnig4
Supply Industry Code become effective in its'q
application upon the members of the flre t..
resistive safe and the filing supply divisions.-,
of said Code? t' l
RULING.-The mandatory assessment pro....
vision of the Code of fair competition for:ie
the business furniture, storage equipment.
and filing supply industry became effective"-'
in its application upon the members of their
fire resistive safe and the filing supply divr-;.1'.
sons of said Code on June 15, 1934. '


The Soap and Glycerine
Manufacturing' Industry ..
83-59 .
FACTS.-An employee called a bin opera-:ji{
tor stands beside a conveyor belt and as soap/..
powder moves to him on the belt he drops ag.
plow or s,'raper across the belt, which de;:-
fleets the powder i4o 1 of the 4 hoppers or. I
bins, vihieh in turn feed the filling machines::j
on the floor below. He is required to keep:'i,
the powder in such agitation with a scoop ..
as to make it run freely to the four outlets .i^
Hie also keeps the bins or hoppers from clog-"'
going. He is constantly in motion if he de-
votes himself to his job properly. ,
QUESTION.-ilMay the employee described i,-
above be paid the minimum -wage provided'.;.
by article IV, A, 2, of the Code of fair corn-m,'
petition for the soap and glycerine manufac- e
turinug industry on the theory that he Is en-:11
gaged in the light task of wrapping, packag-<
aing. and filling?
INTERPRETATION.-No; the employee ',
whose duties are described is not engaged-&;.
in the light task of wrapping, packaging, and:'.
filling and, therefore, must be paid not less:s
than 40 cents an hour, or in the Southern,.!
States not less than 35 cents an hour. M M.

:'1


Electric and Neon Sign
Industry
No. 506-11
FACTS.-(1) A firm acts as a sales agent
or broker in the sale of electric and Neon
signs, taking no title to the signs but merely
securing orders which are filled by direct sale
from the manufacturer to the consumer.
(2i An agent or broker in the sale of elec-
tric and Neon signs takes title from the manu-
facturer to the sign and passes title to the
consumer or, in addition to performing the
function of agent or broker, installs, main-
tains, or services such signs.
QUESTION.-1Is such a broker a member
of the electric and Neon sign industry for the
operations as above indicated?
INTERPRETATION.-(1) An agent or
broker in the sale of electric and Neon signs
not taking title to the sign in any stage of a
transaction and neither installing, maintain-
ing. or servicing the sign is not a member of
tho industry.
(2) If the agent or broker in the sale of
electric and Ne6n signs takes title or installs
or maintains or services he is a member of the
industry. Anyone selling electric or Neon
signs for his own account is, therefore, deemed
to be a member of the industry.


Dental Laboratory Industry
No. 217-25
FACTS.-Article VIII, section 2 and 2 (a),
of the Code of fair competition for the dental
laboratory industry provides:
2. Pri'ce Lists.-Each member of the in-
dustry shall within fifteen (15) days after the
effective date of this Code file with the Code
Authority and otherwise as it shall direct,
and with his Regional Sub-Code Authority,
his net current price lists to become effective
on the date filed.
(a) No member of the industry shall there-
after sell, or offer to sell, at prices other than
the prices contained in his price list so filed."
A member of the dental laboratory industry
filed the following as his price list: Crowns,


labor $1; Plates, labor, $6.50, teeth extra;
Castings, labor. $5 per unit, material extra."
QUESTION.-Does the above filing consti-
tute net current price lists within the provi-
sions of article VIII, sections 2 and 2 (a) of
the Code.
RULING.-The filing of the above price
lists does not constitute a filing of net current
price lists within the meaning of the above
provisions of the aforesaid Code. To consti-
tute a filing of net current price lists, a mem-
ber of the above industry must file a list set-
ting forth all the services which he performs,
the articles which he manufactures and the
quoted prices for such services and manu-
factured articles.

Nonferrous Foundry
Industry
No. 165-22
FACTS.-It appearing that question hav-
ing been raised in the industry with regard
to the necessity of showing on an invoice, as
a separate item, the cost of chemical analyses
and or physical tests specified by the cus-
tomer, the question was submitted to the
Code Authority for an interpretation.
QUESTION.-Does paragraph (o) of sec-
tion 3 of the supplement to the Code of the
nonferrous foundry industry for the miscel-
laneous sand castings division require a
member of the industry to show, as a sepa-
rate item on an invoice, thp amount charged
for ,lienjical analyses and,.or physical tests
specified by customer?
RULING.-Paragraph (a) of section 3 of
the miscellaneous sand castings supplement
to the Code for the nonferrous foundry in-
dustry provides that it is an unfair trade
practice for a member of the industry to
absorb the cost of patterns, pattern altera-
tions, tools, gauges, core drivers, chemical
analyses, and.'or physical tests specified by
the customer, or any special equipment in
the cost price and,'or charge for such equip-
ment at less than its cost as determined as
provided in paragraph (1). This does not
require the billing for any of those services
as a separate item on an invoice so long as
the expense thereof is included as an item
of cost of the product.


'a ~ .: .. 'i-.. -\:~a~Jsj.$.


Interpretations








'"RECENT


E 'Rdenet events in certain fields of re-
il trade are portrayed in this week's
..rt. In general, the data show that
".e gradual decline from the 1929 level
was chbcked in the early summer of
.933, .although the movements are
pgmewhat obscured by the character-
Igtically strong seasonal variation.
Ae series shown in the chart exclude
'h groups as food, autbmotives, lum-
r, and tobacco that do not come
under the Basic Retail Code.
4Department, variety, and general
erchandise stores and mail order
uses are covered in ,the two upper
tions. The first pertains to the aver-
employee. In August and Septem-
r of 1933, his hourly wages and
4oiirs worked per week underwent, a
changee typical of the majority of
manufacturing industries-a decline in
ile average hours .worked per week ac-
b.mpanied by an increased hourly
age. The new relationship has been
well maintained. Average weekly
aiges have failed to improve mate-
pilly during the last 2 years. The
practice of hiring a large number of
row-paid extra sales clerks to assist
during the holiday season results in a
drop'in wages each December; there is
an" accompanying rise in the number of
ihours worked.
kt'A considerable portion of the decline
m employment subsequent to'1929 has
|en recovered during the last year
&hd a half. Weekly pay rolls, reflect-
Jig the decliniQg price level, dropped
lower than did the number of em-
ployees and have not returned to as
favorablee a 'position.
& An interesting comparison between
'gales of department stores, variety
res, and rural general merchandise
may be seen in the third section of
the chart. Seasonal variation is most
Conspicuous in department store sales.
Variety store sales proved the most
kfble.of the group, the average of 1932
ailingg 'to 75 percent of te dollar
volume of 1929. In rural communities
purchasing power apparently suffered
brmore severe decline and made a more
rapid recovery than did that of urban
communities. Dollar volume of rural
sales had fallen to one-half its 1929
average by 1932; recovery places them
in a position as favorable, relative to
1929, as that of department stores.
SChianges in wholesale and retail
prices of goods handled by stores of
this type may be observed in the fourth
section. The upswing in wholesale
prices occurred earlier and attained a
higher level than did retail prices but
the spread between the two has nar-
rowed gradually during 1934. Depart-
minent stores carry much lower stocks
tin they did in 1929.
f Failures in retail establishments
dropped off phenomenally in 1933 and
1934. The decline has been rapid and
At a fairly constant rate, so that the
tyerages in 1934 of both number of
Lures and total liabilities of failures
were less than half the averages of any
year since 1926.


RENDS IN RETAIL TRADE


--------- I __ ~Z ^ 0 Cf 't i -O O-a .

AVERAGE .HOURLY WAGE IN CENTS
A_______________________INDOLLARS____
AVERAGE HOURS WORKED PER WEEK
AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGE IN DOLLARS I
-__-.o0 --oo.._ .Qo.-O-. -O. -_...o__. rQO 'o
'- --oi^ o.o=. -.- -o-'-,- -^e


1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935
Sources of Data: Bureau of Labor Statistics-Labor data, NRA estimate of average weekly wages from indexes of employment and
pay roll; index of wholesale prices, NRA composite of boot and shoe, textiles, and housefurnishings groups. Federal Reserve
I Bulletin-Indexes of department store sales and stocks. Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce-Index of variety store sales;
index o'f rural sales of general merchandise. Fairchild Publications-Index of retail prices. Chart prepared exclusively for the
Blue Eagle by the Research and Planning Division, NRA.


Code Authority
SMembers Resigned
.' The following Code Authority members re-
,,signed :
j..Robert M. Davis-Musical Merchandise
'.Manufacturing Industry Trade, Pipe Organ
-Manufacturing Industry, Band Instrument
-Manufacturing Industry, Piano Manufactur-
a iag Industry.
1.. Robert P. Barry-Bright Wire Goods In-
*dustry, Hand Bag Frame Industry, Snap
Fastener Manufacturing Industry.
: Bruce Reynolds-Brush Manufacturing In-
Odustry.
SJames E. Ainsalle-Busluness Furniture,
.'Storage Equipment and Filing Supply In-
z'dustry, Slide Fastener Manufacturing In-
;:dustry.
R. Jarvis Williams, Jr.-Oan Manufacturing
*Industry.
SHerbert R. Moody-Fibre Can and Tube
S'Industry.
L. P. A ford-Waterproofing, Dampproof-
-ing, Caulking Compounds and Concrete Floor
T.. treatments Manufacturing Industry, Laun-


FACTS.-Confusion has arisen in the
minds of members of the industry and em-
ployees as to the meaning of the provisions
of the Code covering maximum hours for
employees not otherwise excepted as to hours
under the provisions of article III, section 2.
and section 3.
QUESTION.-What is the meaning of the
maximum hours and overtime provisions of
article Ill, section 177
INTERPRETATION.-It is interpreted

dry and Dry Cleaning Machinery Manufac-
turing Industry.
Grover H. Wilsey-Liquefied Gas Industry.
Frederick D. Hansen-Marking Devices In-
dustry.
Tom Bateman-Precious Jewelry Produc-
ing Industry.


that the section establishes 72 hours averaged
over 14 days as a standard. It further per-
mits an additional 6 hours in any 7 days.
The effect is to fix a maximum of 84- hours in
any 14-day period. But every employee must
be given one full period of 24 hours off In
each 7-day period.
Overtime must be paid for any hours in
excess of S worked in any 24-hour period.
However, an exception is made in the case of
an employee engaged in the noncontinuous
processes of the industry which operate 24
hours per day of whom hours additional to
his regular shift are required by reason of
the failure of another to report for or remain
at work. In such case, the employee need, be
paid overtime only for such additional hours
as exceed 4 In any 24, or for such additional
hours as, when added to his regular shift,
exceed 42 in any 7-day period.


Code Authority By-.

laws Approved
The Cotton Garment Industry (amendment).
Electric and Neon Sign Industry (with ex-
ceptions).
Funeral Supply Industry.
Metal Hospital Furniture Manufacturing In-
dustry (with conditions).
Optical Retail Trade.
Perforating Manufacturing Industry.


Trade Practice Com-

plaints Plans Approved
Carbon Dioxide Industry.
Marble Contracting Division.
Metallic Wall Structure Industry.
Rayon and Silk Dyeing and Printing InduS-:
try.
The Retail Solid Fuel Industry.


U S. GOVEANMENI PRINTING OFFICE


.I.
50 "'

40

30 .


20

15


120 "
I oo cn(4
90r2! .
go
80 .
70F vw
Mlx
60 w I
so z
50 Z

30


20

15


10
9
8


7
6
50
4 ;

3


2 "


TOTAL LIABILITIES OF FAILURES ________ _________
IN $l,o000),000? 1---A

SI I

I \F .aV \
'I __,_ _



vA
_._,,__,._,,,,I, V t

___V"_"I__..,__II ,J I ______. 1\ \
___IIv \_._,.__I_\ / _ __ _ __ _I I,__ _ __ _ _ ',,/__ __ __ I N.


TOTAL FAILURES,IN O0's 10






LhsU WWf lLiJsM -CD-


Interpretation

Flat Glass Manufacturing Industry
541-3


I