The Blue eagle

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The Blue eagle
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Newspaper
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United States -- National Recovery Administration
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National Recovery Administration ( Washington, D.C )
Publication Date:

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newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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*flI TT ?.T / .


..VoI. 11, NO.. 0


Issued Weekly by the National Recovery Administration, Washington


Febr~ar 8..


Y\uto Industry Is

SGranted Code

S Extension

Executive Order Calls for Overtime
SWage Rate for Work Done
Over 48 Hours a Week

.-Presidential approval of an amendment to
|he Code of fair competition for the automo-
bile manufacturing Industry was granted In
I6 Executive order, January 31, 1935.
The amendment provides for:
p'An extension of the Code until June 16,
41935, or until the emergency has ended;
Payment of time and a half overtime rates
-fr'all work done by employees over 48 hours
.a week;
:. Authorization of members of the industry
to agree among themselves to announce new
.automobile models in the fall of the year, as
.ta means of facilitating regularization of em-
*ployment ;
:. Confirmation and continuation of the auto-
mobile labor board, as a means for the settle-
mhent of labor controversies.
SText of the Executive order and the state-
'ment of the 'President in' connection there-
;with are as follows:
"An application having been duly made in
e'haif of the automobile manufacturing in-
dustrX, pursuant to and in full compliance
With the provisions of title I of the National
(Industrial Recovery Act, approved June 16,
1933, and the, provisions of the Code of fair
competition for the automobile manufactur-
gi.g' industry duly approved on August 26,
-1933, for my approval of an amendment to
iald Code of fair competition for the automo-
Ebile manufacturing industry, and It having
hbeen found that the said proposed amend-
iment complies in all respects with the perti-
nent provisions of title I of said act and that
tBie requirements of clauses 11) and '(2) of
:ubsection (a) of section 3 of said act have
.been met, and the National Industrial Recov-
:14 Board having made certain recommenda-
.tions to me:
;"Now, ThMUFOBa, 1, Franklin D. Roosevelt,
-President of the United States, pursuant to
bthe authority vested in mt by title I of the
.Naional Industrial Reqovery Act, approved
lAne 16, 1933, and otherwise, order that the
mid application be, and It is hereby, ap-
Proved, and that, effective immediately, the
mlid Code of fair competition for the auto-
'floblle manufacturing Industry be, and It is
iereby, amended as follows:
V.d
.' 1. In article I, the seventh paragraph,
.wlech has heretofore read as follows:
','"Thp term "expiration date" as used
btein means February 1, 1935, or the earll-
utdate .prior thereto on which the President
ball by proclamation or the Congress shall
by.:Joint resolution declare that the emer-
,ency recognized by section 1 of the National
idustrial Recovery Act has ended.'
93hiali be modified to read as follows:
!".'The term "expiration date" as used
lierein means June 16, 1935, or the earliest
6ate prior thereto on which the President
Pall by proclamation or the Congress shall
.y Joint resolution declare that the emer-
eacy recognized by section 1 of the National
Industrial Recovery Aqt has ended.'
,..2. Work by an employee in excess of 48
bpurs in any week shall be paid for at the
te-of time and one-half for such overtime.
-.provision of said Code inconsistent here-
th _is hereby modifiled to conform to this
.iarement. This requirement shall not. be
strued to authorize or permit work.in
qXcess of 48 hours when such work Is pro-
Wbited under any of the provisions of the
e.
i'.3. The members of the industry are re-
ilsted and authorized, to enter into agree-
ints with one another with respect to fall
announcements of new models of passenger
Btomobiles and the holding of automobile
bows in the fall of the year, as a means of
iililtating regularization of employment In
i-Industry.
.14. The members of the Industry will com-
with the provisions and requirements for
e,.settlement of labor controversies which
te established by the Government and have
in operation since March 1934, and
lch are hereby confirmed and continued.
n'(Slgned) FRANKLIN ROOSEVEILI/T.
ie White House,
.Jianuary 31, 1935."
connection with signing the foregoing
g.er, .the President issued the following

IgBenewal of the automobile manufactur-
(Code brings With it two distinct and im-
ant advances which are designed sub-
tially to Improve employment conditions
'ilts major industry. No backward steps
Inn-


the Code was renewed last Novem-



'l: :


Board Bans Use of "Shop"'
to Avoid Code Homework
Provisions Prohibitions

The National Industrial Recovery
Board has Issued an administrative In-
terpretation that use of ."shops" set
up Ln private apartments, rooms, or
living quarters is a violation of Indus-
try Codes having provisions for the
abolition of homework.
Although no complete stattstic are
available, It Is estimated that several
hundred thousand workers are affected
by the approximately 100 Codes with
prohibitions against homework.
In Administrative Order X-184, the
Board interpreted, the phrase "home
or living quarters" appearing in Codes
providing for the abolition of home-
work. It means "the private house,
private apartment, or private room,
whichever is the most extensive, occu-
pied as a home by the employee and/or
his family."
The administrative order stated that
the practice of processing articles, the
material for which has been furnished
by 'the employer, whether performed in
the home or living quarters of the em-
ployee, or the so-called shop, operated
within the home or living quarters of
the employees, as the term 'home or,
living quarters' is definedL. constitutes
a violation of Codes- which provide for
the abolition A homework, except as
provided in Scutiv.e Order 6711-A,
dated May 15,'T934."
That ExecutiVe order permits persons
'to engage'in homework at the same
rate of wages as Is paid for the same
type of work performed in the factory,
if an employment certificate is obtained
from the United States Department of
Labor, and provided the person Is phys-
ically Incapacitated, or is needed at
home for attendance upon an invalid,
or bedridden. It does not apply to Codes
covering food or allied products trades,
industries or subdivisions, which con-
tain -provisions prohibiting the manu-
facture and/or processing, of food prod-
ucts in homes.
The text of the interpretation order
is as follows:
INTERPRETATION.- Application
of homework provisions as contained
In various Codes.
FACTS.-Complaints have been re-
ceived that certain employees are en-
gaged In the practice of processing arti-
cles, the material for which has been
furnished by the employer, such proc-
essing being performed either In the
Some or living quarters of the em-
ployee, or in a so-called shop operated
within the home or living quarters of
the employee.
QUESTION.-1. What is meant by
home or living quarters as the term
Is used in Codes 6f fair competition
which provide'for the abolition of home.
work?-
2. Does the practice noted above
under "facts" constitute a violation
of such Codes of fair competition?
INTERPRETATION.-1. Th6 term
"home or living quarters" means the
private house, private apartment, or
private room, whichever Is the most
extensive, occupied as a home by the
employee and/or his family.
2. The practice of processing arti-
cles, -the material for which has been
furnished by the employer, whether
performed in the home or living quar-
ters of the employee, or the so-called
shop operated within the home or liv-
ing quarters of the employee, as the
term "home or living quarters Is de-
fined herein, constituftes a violation of
Codes which provide for the abolition
of homework; except as provided In
Executive Order 6711-A, dated May 15,
1934.


ber I expressed the desire that something be
done to regularize employment to the end
that the annual earnings of employees In the
automobile plants be increased as much as
possible by steadier 'and more continuous
work throughout the year. The manufactur-
ers had Indicated to me their serious purpose
to bring about a greater regularization and I
was Informed at that time that they were
already engaged in studies to accomplish it.
I also instituted an investigation by the Re-
search and Planning Division of NRA and
the Bureau of Labor Statistics to develop the
facts which might enable me to suggest rec-
ommendations looking toward greater sta-
bility of automobile employment and other
Improvements in labor conditions.
"This Investigation and accompanying
studies have been prosecuted diligently. In
line with recommendations already made and
with conclusions reached independently by
(Continued on page 3, column I)



S. .. .


Employment Provisions


Codes Discussed at Hearingsj

Organized Labor Presents Views Calling for a Reduction oi
the Basic Maximum Work Week Hours to 30; Industry4 .
Contends Move Would Not Absorb Unemployed 1
and Would Lower Living Standard of Those '

Millions Now Employed

Leaders of organized labor and industry and representatives of the Co='
sumer made oral statements and filed briefs during the National IndustriUa
Recovery Board's public 'hearings on employment provisions in Codes, wigii
began January 30, and continued through February 2. .
* A demand for a 80-hour week was presented basic and the more fundamental purposes oi ,
by William Green, president of 'the Ameridan the recovery program", and that the faultsI
Federation of Labor, and supported by John under the present administrative set-up were-
L. Lewis, president of the United Mine Work- due to the lack of benefit "of full particlpl.
era of America; the Reverend Father Francis tion of organized labor in Code making 4md'S
J. Hans, of the National Catholic School of in Code administration." '.aJ
Social Service; -Miss Rose Schaeiderman, "I need remind no one", Mr. Greec'.c"
president of. the National Women's Trade tinued,." that the National Industrial Recov,
Union League; David Dubinsky, president, of ery Act was, in a large sense, a substitdt.l
the International Ladies Garment Workers measure for the 30-hour bill, 'which. d..XY
Union; Arthur 0. Wharton, president of the already passed the Senate by an overwhelbi
International Association of Machinists; ing vote when the recovery bill was introdiucei
Francis J. Gorman,.' international first vice, In the House early in 1933. Nor do I n"ed&
president of the United Textile Workers of say that labor expected the * act.:
America, and others. accomplish substantially the same resulIts asl
Industry. was represented by Ralph E. those which would have been accomplished|
Flanders, machine manufacturer; W. R. Web- the 30-hour week bill, had that bill beciet
ster, brass manufacturer; Robert West, tex- law. l',"*f


tiles; H. H. Anderson, oil production; Noel
Sargent, economist; Hal B. Moore, woolen
mill; Frederick W: Aldred, retailer; Charles
R. Hook, steel; Roscoe'Edlund, consumer;
C. H. Janssen, foodstuffs; Prof. 0. 0. Saxon,
business administration, Yale University;
Peter Van Horn, silk Industry, and others.


Procedure is Outlined
In opening the hearings,.Chairman. S. Clay
Williams, of the Board, announced the pro-
eedure would be limited to consideration of
the general aspects of employment provisions,
not.lIcluding section 7 (a).o.theN.,1.L A.,
and there would be no consideration. of the
advisability, of amending or modifying any
particular Code.
The Board's present position, Mr. Williams
said, Is that a. minimum-wage structure is
socially beneficial not only as a safeguard to
the worker but also as a wage floor, for the
operation of the competitive system and there-
fore should be maintained.
He pointed out that it is important "to de-
termine the"effect which inequalities in wages
above the minimum have upon competitive
and other conditions and to ascertain what
the solution should be. * That geo-
graphic and population and other wage. dif-
ferentials, being concomitants 'of our Indus-
trial developments, are 'to be .treated as
significant realities of the present situation."
The chairman urged that these "call for
constructive treatment of a character which
will not violently disrupt productive and em-
ployment conditions." He declared that the
maximum-hour provisions of the Codes "have
made a definite contribution of reemployment
and that the principle of limitation of hours
should be upheld. The maximum hours limits
actually set in the various Codes may or may
not be the best or optimum limits. However,
any suggestion for change either in the direc-
tion of shortening or of lengthening the work
week should be supported by evidence."
"Speaking generally with respect to the
hours and wages provisions of the Codes," he
added, "greater simplicity, flexibility, and
uniformity are possible and desirable: These
should be secured under conditions which will
safeguard labor, facilitate the operations of
industry, stimulate compliance, and make for
fair competitive conditions as.amongzrelated
industries." *
"An increased volume of production Is now
the most important means of securing reem-
ployment, and it (the Board) will welcome
evidence with respect to appropriate measures
for the stimulation of. increased volume."
Green Is First Speaker
Leading off the list of speakers, William
Green, president of the American Federation
of Labor, said. "The achievements of the
NRA have been many. * It has dem-
onstrated the basic soundness of bringing
about reemployment through the shortening of
hours, of increasing the aggregate purchasing
power through minimum-wage provisions and
of eliminating some of the worse features of
cutthroat competition."
"More than a million and a half wage earn-
ers went back to work as a result of reduced
hours ", the labor leader added. "There has
been an appreciable Increase in pay rolls as a
result of the operation of the hours provisions
of the Codes. The NRA has abolished child
labor. It has largely eliminated home work
and set the sweatshop on its road to final
extinction."
The speaker asserted that the NRA, how-
ever, had failed "to make effective the more


Supports 30-Hour Bill '.
"The American Federation of Labor is this
year supporting with all strength at its com-
mand the Black-Coonery bill, providing foria-
30-hour week. It Is taking this action prima-
rily because the recovery program has not fulI
filled what labor considered Its two primary
purpbeoses-a reduction in the hours of- w0rt
sufficient to absorb at least a majority of.. tfi
unemployed, and an Increase In mass purchab,
ing power sufficient to create a market for t.
products of industry and to give the wbrkers
*of this country the minimum goods and serv-
ices to 1 which any human being Is entitled. :-.a
"I submit first of all that a drastic reduce
ftion In the hours of work fixed b/. the'06
must be made, If we are to meet our probleli
of unemployment, * Untl we 'ovivef'
we can hope for little in the .way.6f-'redQ
ery. * I believe sincereiy.that' C:
adoption of the 30-hour week in 'Codefs'offat1
competition would solve this problem, kwO\wQti
return to industry the major'.portio...of oB
unemployed, and would be the first step-ti tS
creation of the purchasing power*.whlch $
essential to recovery."' .
SAnswering a question by .BIackwel SmitU
counsel and ex-officio board member,' iF:fs-
how a drastic limitation of "ours,;wltl..&nji
pensating pay Increase, would effect unit'. .o0
of production, Mr. Green said: -,.'
"We have shifted from the 12-hour day.'
the 10-houi- day and from the 10-hour daf
the 8-hour day, and, strange.and contradit'dry
as it*may seem, we have reduced unit'c.6"
as we have shifted. * Because .of,.iA
efficiency of the worker developed'duringth4
shorter work week, and the tesourcefulhe4.'oi
management, we will find within a very shor'
time that the. unit cost of production w#1:bi
decreased rather than Increased." '
Again answering a question propounded'ibt
Mr. Smith. the labor leader asserted it was hIl
opinion that a basic shorter work week an
the shorter work day should be established iii
all lines of Industry.. '.i
"I do not mean that It should be applied 1I
a rigid way ", he explained, "because It ;p-.
pears to me In the establishment of the basic:
30-hour week that some flexible plan will haivU
to be developed so that It can be applied In a
fair, Just and equitable, and reasonable .wa "J
tfohbw Fo'brF'ng6a uA'VhIsfei i'Wf l,
Green suggested the creation of a natlona1
board with power to consider and pass ixpb.i
appeals for exemptions because of unusua.-
conditions. ,-


30-Hour Week Opposed :
Ralph E. Flanders, president of the Jones.,
& Lamson Machine Co., Springfield, Vt..asaldi9
In opposition to the 80-bbur week:."* *"t
A recovery, to be real, must be expressed {n.S
terms of an increase In the production >ani
distribution of goods and services. A "rut"
their reduction of hours cannot possibly pr
duce such an increase. A further short "iAt
would obviously produce a decrease. It wotld'1
be a death blow to recovery. ..
"At the peak of production in 1928 and 10ieem'.
with our normal' productive capacity 80 pei..
cent engaged, with our available labor supply't
more than 80 percent employed at an average :'.k
of hours per week at least 25 percent greatefiAj
than the hours set by the Codes, we were still:.
unable to provide a standard of living for theC
mass of the people which was up to our phT- .'
(Continued on page 3, column 3) '


.. .' W. ... : .' " .:.4'-

. A L .....".. ... .. ... .*. .,&=...L....


.-. -t"i .-. _' "a .- . I.


'. I:


w


February 8..r









te s^ !.o.,, ys ^ .-..^' .iw ^ te,,^ ^ ..*..,.. *,.', .,* ;* _ -,.:., ...." ,.,' ...-i *. .
SCHEDULE OF CODE HEARINGS, FEBRUARY 8 TO FEBRUARY 2


important Information Concerning Notices of Hearings and


Opportunity

N,.fearings are of two types: (1) Oral hearings,
eslgnated "hearing" on calendar; and (2) "op-
ortunity to be heard by the filing of written
saiementd of fact, briefs, or criticisms dealing
'h the subject matter of such notice.

b;e subject matter of these notices is abbre-
l.ated In the schedule published below. A com-
iete official copy of any notice may be obtained
on.request from the National Recovery Adminlstra-
gn, Room 3316, Department of Commerce Build-
akg; Washington, D. C.

lnmARING! (oral) : Those wishing to be heard
must file a written request with the proper Deputy
Ldmlrnlstrator at least 24 hours before the date
3. for the bearing, which request must state:
hi Name of Industry and date of bearing;
?2) names of persons wishing to testify and groups
resented; (3) definite alternative proposal or
peeific objections, without argument. Hearings
ir confined to factual presentation. Written
rebfs containing arguments as well as fact may
;e;ffled.

'I'""T OI TR PLACE AND DEPOT
st ':.osnvet oa Teunsg omwa
^IHD1B/ O T BS ADMINlSVrATOR


rFriday, Feb. 8,9 135
t..'.. ., i.,
tooing and Sheet Metal Room 14. Albee Building. OpI
Contracting Industry, Washington, D. 0., v,
2-4-H-tB (Division of Robt. N. Campbell. ot
'Construction Industry). Tote


ing Pipe Mnunlso-
TIng Industry, 225-23.




lrday Feb. 9, 1935
manufacturing Indus-
,'162-1i.


"M diar. Feb. 11,
1935
.k' and Barber Shop
feschan(aI Equipment
tanufakturing Indus-


t


\
1618 K Street NW., Wash-
uington, D. 0., W. L.
Schurx.


Room 510, 1518 K Street
NW.,Washinton, D.C.,
H. Fenis White.


1618 KStreet NW., Wakh-
ingtou, D. 0., D. C.
Gallag'er.I


Ing- and Boat- Room 4048, Commerce
Ig Industry, Building Washington,
D. 0., W. W. Rose.


'* .'t-*"

tlntal Goods and Equiip
i'T-m- at Industry and
-,Trade, 482-6.

^fr'i

.3/'.

6eathet Cloth and Lac-
rikquknd Fabrics, Window
'r hade Cloth and Roller,
fl nd Book Cloth and Im-
- !ixpregnated Fabrics In-
i.tdustres, 416-26.


Lather Cloth and .Lac-
ti'quered Fabrics, Window
"Shade Cloth and Roller,
li"sand Book Cloth and Im-
Sstiregnated Fabrics Indus-
i'trles; $16-25.
&acolned Waste MInn-
-facturing Industry, 1.19--




Micpkle Pack-lnto iauitry,




tetall Solid Fuel Industry
0 F.

*B'chfilli, The Hand Ma-
c'bhine Embrnidery and
Sthe Embroidery Thread,
'ald Scalop Culling In-
;.[du].stries, 2m6-84-B.
if.hflli. The Hand Mis-
/. chine Embroidery and
4he Embroidery Tnread.
,;id Scallop Cutting In-
'1,dustrles, 2I6-4-C
tile Ptoce-sling Indus-
by, 315-37
s-" I. ,.
fit~b=-&

rad Binding and Paper
Rinuling Industry, 287-130.
1..,"


1PA'

tcWhhejl and Rim Manufac-
i ^ tuning Industry, 105-D-2



1 :.
,: ." .


Room 400, 1618 K Street
NW.. Washlogton, D.
0.,W.L.Schurz




Rom 3024, Commerce
Buldine.. Washington,
D. C., Victor Sadd.




Room 3024, C'ommerce
Building, Wasrington,.
D.0., Victor ShM.



1320 G Street NW, Wash.
inRton, D. 0., Frank'HI.
Croekard.




Rdom 1107, Investment
Building, Washincgton.
D. C..WeldM. Stevens.



Room 138. Willard Hotel.
Washington. D. 0., 10
a. m., F. A. Hecht.
Room ?O'2-01. Commerce
BuLlling. 10 a. m,
vWahiuton. D 0.. M.
D Vincent.
Room -2042-04, Commerce
Building, 10 a. m .
Wshlincton, D. C., IM.
D. Vincent.
Room 3022. Commerce
Buildlnc. Washington,
D C., A. Henry Thurs-
ton.


Room 406A, Commerce
Building, Washington,
D.C., M D.1.Walsh.





Room 4319, Commerce
Building, Washington,
D. C., Jo 0. Roberts.


Ni
mc
an
to


vis

thi


to be Heard
OPPORTUNITY TO BE HEARD (In writing):
Facts, criticisms, objections, or suggestions con-
cerning the subject metier of such notices must
be submitted on or before the final date specified
In the notice, addressed to the proper Deputy Ad-
ministrator or other officlol Indicated. Such com-
munlctions must state: (1) Name of industry;
(2) name of correspondent and group represented;
(3) facts supporting criticisms, objections, or
suggestions.
The subject matter referred to In either type
of notice may be revised in any reasonably ger-
mane particular on the basis of such facts, critic.
cisms, and other considerations as sre properly
before the Administrator.
Calendar Is chronological, with alphabetical
arrangement by trade or Industry for each day.
NOTE& Since all notices must be In the printer's
hands by Friday evening next preceding the publi-
cation of The Blue Eagle, the calendar below does
not show notices posted on the Official Bulletin
Board after that date, nor does this calendar show
other hearings for the same dates which may have
appeared in prior issues of this publication.


PROPOSEDn ACTION



eortunlty to be heard on application submitted by the dl-
ionael Code Authority for approval of its budget and basis of
Mtrlbutlimb for the period from Jan 26 to Mar. 1C, 1935.
AJ budget is $156,100. Basis of assessment is H of I percent for
ctieans Code expenses asesed on the basis of the previous
months' gross business and a varying rate of assessment for State
d/or regional and/or local Coda expenses froth r e of I percent
Sofl percent in accordance with local rates as ast forth in
thib/t D of schedule A attached to the budget.
=esnity to be heard on appUiction submitted by Win.
Muth & Co., New York City for exemption from the lpro-
Ions of et. TV, sec. 1 (b) of the Code, for a period of 6 months
the pgroond that there Is no surplus of skilled labor experienced
the manufacture of pipes available in the location mIn which
sir plant is located


Opportunity te be head on application sbmirltted by the Code
Authority for the canned salmon industry, Seattle, Wash., on
behalf of the members of that Industry located in the Territory
of Alaska, for exemption from all of the provisions of the Code
for the can manufacturers industry Insofar as It applies to Aaskan
salmon packers, manufacturing cam for their own use as an Inol-
dent of their salmon canning operations. Exemption is asked
until June 16. 1035.


Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by thy John
Oster Manufacturing Co., and the Allover Manufacturing Co,
Reaine, Wis., for exemption from the wage and hour provisf ns
of the Code and for permission to operate under the wage and
hoar provisions of the Code for the machinery and allied products
Industry Insofar as all of their labor activities are concerned
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the north
Atlantic division Code Authority for approval of its budget and
basis of contribution for the following periods: Budgetary period
from Aug. 2,1934, to Jun e 16,1935, (10ft months), for this division
Code Authority. Budefpary period from May 4 to October 3,
1934 (5 months), for proporuon of adminktrative expense of the
temporary National Code Authority (accepted by the NaionalM
Code Authorfty). Budgetary period from Oct. I, 1M4. to Juae
16, 1938 (9 months), far due proportion of the estimated budget
expense of the National] Code Authority.
Total budget Mor said period is 132,471.10 Basis of assessment is
as followr Assessment Is based on average nrmboer dfemployes
over the 12-month period fram Sept. 1, 1933, to Aug. 3l, 1934,
estimated at 8,660 employees, making an assessment of 83.43 per
employee, including this divisionr's share of the admistrative
expense of the temporary National Code A tEority and the
National Code Authority budget.
Opportunity to be heard'on application submitted by the Code'
Authority for approval of its budget and basis of assessment for
the period from July16 1934, toJune 16, 1936.
Total budget is $25,000, the four general items of the budget era, (I)
salaries ant traveling expense $12,866 97; (2) rent,.and office ex-
pense. $4,033 03; (3) incidental expense; $2,100; and' (4- commIttee
expense 6d,00 Assessment shall' be made on the gross sales for
the year 1933, ranging from $10 for sales ,p to $10,000-Do $400 for
gross sales of 8?,500,000 or over.
Opportunity to be hoard on application submitted by ti tecontrol
committee for the book cloth and'itnpregnatred, rabrims Industry,
for approval of its budget and basis ofoontribution for theperiod
from Jan. I to June 18, 1935.
Total budget is $4,750. Basis of assessment shall be the relation
each member's sales hear to total sales-reported fbr thbe Irb srT
for the lIast preceding calendar year. Unit rae of sales Eactunit
representing sales of $100,000, the first unit alone being!divftble
by $55,500
Opportlunityto be heard on applUcaTon nsubmiLtedby the central
committee for the leather cloth and lacquered fabrics.lndlsatry,
for approval o( its budget and basis of contribution-for theperiod
from IJan to June 16, 1935.
Total budget is S8,950. Basis of assessment shall be the- rellsion
Saish member's sales bear to total sales reported for tbhe'lhdtsry
for thelast preceding calendar year.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the-Code
Authority for approval of its budget and basis of'oontribution
for the period from Dee. MIS 1N34, toJune 18,1935.
I Total budget is $7,167. Basis of assessment shall be at the-ram orf
4 cents per 100 pounds o machined waste and/or journal-boet
packing produced by member of the Industry. Ip.nooventshall
any member of the Industry pay less than $12.WNas a minimum
assessment for the 7-month period.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted:by.tIhe.ode
Authority for approval ofits budget and basis of contribution for
the 12-month'period ending Nov. 30, 1935.
Total budget is $20.000. Basis of assessment .hall be at- the rma of
io of percent of the value of each member's 1933 sales. A_ -
ment shall be payable quLinrtedy in advance to provide-fun s lor
the Code A.utbority's expenses.
Hearingon question of policy of treating Industrial employers as
members of this industry wha have made a practice ofseiling solld,
fuel to their own employees, and requiring them to comply with
this Code insofar as such sales are concerned.
Hearing on application submitted by the Schifflbi eombroidesry in-
dustry, through Its Code Authority, for approval of a design reels-
iration plan for the Code Authority's uo in osutiblishinga design
registrntion service for members of this Industry.
Hearing on application .nUmitLed by the Code Authority for
amendment to the-code by amending art. IV, aec. L (ai (hours of
labor).

Opportunity, to bI heard on application submitted by the Cpde
Authority for amenment to art n I by adding a new section to
be designated sec. 7 This proposed amendment would require
members of the LinJu'stry to file eisports relating to the number of
employees, their wages, hours worked, and occupational classifl-
crilon, and also report on the total units produced and sold, and
aggregate amounts chareed for such service andjor products.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Nar
lionel Code Authot'ty, division D-6 under the Code for the
graphic arts industry, for approval of the budget and basis of
contribution for the regional Code administrative agency, whose
jurisdiction covers all of western Pennsylvania, west of the 79th
merIdian except Beaver, Lawrence, Ere. and Mercer Counttes,
for the period from Mar. I, 1934, to Mar1. 1935.
Total budget Is $1000. Basis of assessment shall be $16.67 per year
for eachb $1,000 of annual mechanical pay roll for the calendar year
1933.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted through the
administrative committee for amendment to so. 1t, art. IV, of
the supplementary Code. The proposed amendment would
provide that the provisions with reCard to prices, discounts, de-
ductions, allowances, extras, or methods or terms of sale shall
not apply to direct export sales or to sales in course of export, or to
sales of materials used in the manufacture of products for export,
except as may otherwise be provided by the administrative com-
mittee subject to the approval of the National Industrial Recov-
ery Boards.


IrUOST&T On TanDE


Monday, Feb. 11,
1936-Colntd.
Wire Rope and Strand
Manufacturing Indus-
try, 84-H1-12 (Division
of the Fabricated Metal
Products ManufacturIng
and Metal FiniLshing and
ietal Coating Indus-
tryl.
Woolens and trimmings
Distributing Trade (Di-
vision of Wholesaling
and Distributing Trade).


Tuesday, Feb. 12, 1935
Coffee Industry, 265-29 -....-


Electrice and Neon Sign In-
dustry, 006-12.






Leather Industry, 21-.2--


Mew's Clothing Industry,
5-65.


Replacement Axle Shaft
Maniofacturing Indinua-
try, 1tw-"--.


PLACE ArD DPrurT
ADI uM131BA0Ba


Room 510io. 1518 K Street
NW.. Washington, D.
., H. Ferris WhiVte.




Sun parlor, Washington
Hotel, 10 a. m Frank
K. Crockard.


Room 606, Barr Building,
Washington, D. C.,
Weld M. Stevens.
Room 411, 1518 K Street,
W asbington,D. C.,
0. R. NIcklason.





Room 4036, Department
of Oommerce, Washing-
ten, D. 0., Harry S.
Berry.
Room 4007, Department
of Commerce, Washing-
ton, D. C., M. D. Vin-
cent.
Room 4310, Commerce
Building, Washington,
D. C., Jeo. Roberts.


Saddlery Manufacturing Room 435, Commerce
Industry, -11. Building. Washington,
I D. C., Harry S. Berry.


- -I 5


WedneaYP, Pet. 13,

Brush Manufacturinl' In-
dustry. 360-12.

Cold Storage Door Manu-
facturing Industry,
479-7.


Complete Wire and Iron
Fence Industry, 4-21-
20 (A Division of the
Fabrlated Matal Prod-
uots Manufaclurlng and
Metal faihig and
histew Ceetlng



PiabLtogFiaxe Indusa -
try, SI-N-O.



RefrigeratiDg Valves and
Fi tings M'anufacltuin
Industry, 84-Y I-4 (Divi-,
sion of the Fabricated
Metal Products Manu-
facturing and Metal Fin-
ishing and Metal Coat-
ing indusnryJ.
Stone Fmishing Maobhln-
ery and Equippment In-
dustry, 16-U..


Thursday Feb. 149,

Buffizg and Polishing
Composition industry,
97-ta.





BuildIng contractors In-
duasry, a subdivisL3on a
the GQneral Contractors
Industry, 344-A-18 (Divi-
sion of the Construcdon
Industry).

Earthenware Mannufactur-
ung. Industry, 322-3I.
Powder Puff Industry,
2L1-13.


rlddy, Feb. 1, 193a5
Air Transport Industry,
L15-12.

Beauty and Barber Shop
Mechanical Equipment
Manufacturing Indus-
Stry, 286-12
SBuurninous Road Mate-
rial Distributing Indus-
Stry, 530-64 B.


Book Publishing Industry,
523-10.







Cocoa and Choeolate
Mlaotuawturing Indus-
try, 464-509 0.
Lumber and TImber Prod.-
ucts Industries, 9-308.


V

Room 403, 1518 K Street
NW., Washington,
D. C., W. L. Scbhur.
Room 3XW, Commerce
Building, Washington,
D. C., BeC-vertyT. ir,.


Reotin 51L tl1' Street
MW., Wash-.fonyton,
D. C., H. Ferris White.








D. C, IQa. in., Beverly
B. Khm.

Roam 3076, Cosaserce
Build ng. Wasf igton,
DC._lBewverly a.ig.




Room 53,. traestment
Building, Fifteeoth and.
K. Staeets, Washington,
D 0.


Room 34. Dpmrment
of Commece Bdldng.
Washington, D. 0.,
ae W. Dahlberg.




mnis a aown. Office
Hlil ysznans,
B uJldla,, Hyas l ,
Mass., t 10 a. m., John J.
MoDonough, State
N RA, empllanae dreo-
tar.
tot'.


Poom 4327,. Commerce
Building, Washington,
D. C., Beverly Ober.
Room 4067, Commerce
Building Washington,
D. 0., A. D, V na"nl.


-I.L


Room 317, Dennike Build-
lug, Washington, D.,O.,
0. P. Clark.
Room 402, 1518 K Street
NW Washington. D..
t., W. L. Schurz.
Bed Room, Hamilton
Hotel, 19 a. m., Beaerly
Ober.


Room 4064, Commerce
Building, Washington,
D C., Mf. D. Walsh.






Bast Lounge, Ambassador
Hotel, Washington, D.
C., 1 a. m., 0. W.
Dumning.
907 Sixteonth Street, NW.,
Washington, D. C., A.
o. Dixonm


I I-


Opportunty to bo heard on application., o the Code Anthori
ler approval of its budget and bashis of contribution IF the pet'
July I to Dec 12, 1934. Amount of budget, 82,580. Basis
contributJ.on, ie of I peOrnt of gross sales in dollars.
Opportunity to be beard concerning this basis of assesment A
budget was afforded during the period between Jne 22 1&
Jul7, 1934. Since that date mandatory assessment amundine
has been approved. (amendment approved Aug. 9, 193L) esnd
appeals dshiable and proper that further opportunlt to
heard concetn ng said budget and basis of assessment be afterds
Harlms and epportunlty to be heard. on applications B
mitted by certain groups for approval of a p-ecead. aigreLa
*asLablishng standards of hours of labor raUs o1 pay, antil
condiLions of employment under art. ltR sec. I of thea .Codi
the construction Industry and sea. 7 (b) of the NaUonaL Inad
trialB Ren-very Act, affecting members of this division and O
lain of their employees in the region of Barnstable Cont
Mass.
pprtunity to bee heard on application submitied.by thet
Authority for approval of a list of haeardous owupauons m
which mnilnors under 18 years of age should be excluded. ,.
Opportunlty to be heard on application submitted bythe Ced
Authority or approval of its budget and basis of conutlbutioni
the period from ian. I to Dec. 31, 1935.
Total budget is 36.75 Basis of assessment is 28 cent sr PI
sales.


* OpportunIty to he heard on application submitted by thebW
Autbority ior amendment, to sec. 3, art. II, of the Code, .Ba
include the Territory of Hawaii Ina the territory included l.ta
section
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Od
Authority tor termination of the exemption conferred ia'P
III of Administrative Order X-36.
Hearing on application submitted by the Code A.tbori.
amennmont to art VI. par. A, sees. I and 2, the deletioatL
3 and renumbering of sees 4 and 6 of the said art. VI, 9..
(price filing); end for the interpretation of art 1I, sac. It(s
tioins), and for the termination of exemption conferred tendTrP
111 of Admtnistratlve Order X-36
Opportunity to be heard on application on behalf of the'i
tional Code Authority of the subscription and mail dordt
publishing industry, division E under this Code, for epprotl
of a budget and basis of contribution for the period from uWf
1934, to Sept. 30, 1935
Total budget is $10,600. Basis of assessment is calculateol OnB
total volume of gros receipts for the 12-month person 5,,
Dec. 31, 1933 'The proposed annual rate of a issesl i .
of 1 percent of the total gross receipts for the l-month ,
aforesaid, with a minimum annual assessment of $25 na nds
imum annual assessment of 11,500. .
Hearing on standard form of contract for sales of bulk cocoS PO
dur in barrels or bags, of chocolate coatings, and ohocolaOt lDll
submitted by the Code Authority. C.,
Opportunity to be hoard on application submitted by the.
Authority for amendment to the Code. The proposed
ment is as follows: "In schedule A, sec. 7, northern hat
subdivision, from the paragraph headed 'aubdivlsion' s t1ri
the last two words and Minnesota' and insert betLweB .
gan, Wisconsin., the word 'and'." ..


. j.A.". ;., .. ...'- ..: ..,: "... . .. .... ... :**^.... .. .. .. .,.., ', .. f... .., .I. \


PROPOSmD ACTION 4




Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by themani.'
elementary Code Authority, on ebahall of certain member otn daf
industry who sell direct in the oil country ina competition wi lla :t i
members or the American petroleum distributing trade, ,for.'
exemption from the provisions of sec. 4, art. VI, oflthe lsupple.:
mentary Code. ""i

Hearing on application of the divisional Code Authority o add. ".
tonal amendments to art. Ill and art. LV'. of the supplemental *
Code Reoonvened bearing, adjourned from January 28. It is
now proposed to consider amendment of sec. 4, art. I1 (admla.
istration) and amendments to sees. 1, 2. and 3 of art. IV (suppi.
meeting provisions of art. VI. of the general Code).


Opportunity to be heard on application of the Code Autharfty"
for the amendment of art. V of the Code by adding a new secto"
to be designated as sec. It, providing standards of safety and
health. '
Opportunity to be heard on application of Code Autberity I"
approval of its budget and basis of contribution for the peritd,
Sept. 3, 1034 to fMar. 31, 1935, and for termination ofesempdalk'
under per. ID of AdminiLstrautve Order X-30.
The total budget Is $58.166 00. Basis, Each member is assessed it
the rate of H of I percent of his total sales for 1933. Gross ats l *
defined to be gross dollar volume, i. e sales contract value ofrll
electric Neon signs sold, rented or leased, invoice value of .ll
tubing and accessories Sold as such, the invoice value for malnfe.
jience and repair work and/or other sales of the industry.
Opportunity to be heard on'application of the Code Authorit
for amendment of art XV par. 2, providing for modifications V
to add a new article to be designated as art. ID-A, cvecia .
aessmets ils.
Opportunity to be heard on application of the Code Autheoidt"
on budget and basis of contribalion for the period from JeaI to
June 30. 1935. ,
The total budget for the period aforesaid is Z21t,000.00. Basis a
contribution Labels sold at the rate of 93 and $5 per thousand.:,
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the
Code Authority for approval of ios budget and basis of ci. ,-
tribution for the period from Sept. 1, 1934, to Ang. 31. 1935 ..;
Total budget, is 16.000 Basis of contrbuinnioa is oe of 1 perceat eo
the gross sales volume. b
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by. 1h
Code Authority for approval of its budget and basis of st-
tributlon for the period from Jan. 1 to Junse d1, 1935.
Total budget is $7,333.33. Basis of assessment is as follows: Ai'
members shall be assessed Ia of I percent of their sales of thefit,1
own manufactured saddlery sold during the period belnng
Jan. 1 and ending June 15, 1635, but with the provision that.
when %o of I percent amounts to less than tll.41 for that paled
there shall be a minimum of $11.46, and when He of I prmet
amounts to more than $468.33, there shall be a maximum of
t5458 33



Opportunity to be herd o appHlication submitted .u
Code Authority for ameandifint to se. 7 t), art. VII., et.,1
Code (Powers and duties of Code Authorities relative 1 t4
gets and bases of assessments.) "
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by IWr
Coda Authority for approval of its budget and basis of .t
tnrbution for the period from Aug. 1, 1034, to Aug. 1, 1315.
Total budget is 3,000o. Basis of contribution on an estimated d dW
volume of 600,000 for the budgetary period will be H of I percet's
on the sales of the previous year (1088). '
Opportunity to be heard on applicacion- .of the uppianBstary..
Code Authority for the approvJ of its budget and basis of oonte-1
butlonforrheperiodchomJan. 13, 193, Wo'Ja .193. 10.
Tho total budgc for this period is 834,3W7.75. Basis of contributin:l
* is as followsE "Each member shall pay into O t frewsury of the
suppliemnatar Code Authority by the 13tb o' act month an
Amount aquar t % of I percent of the total invoiod sales valnorel;
complete wire and Irean fence businsm done by ea h member
within the Unuied Sanese during the second prsecding scalendr
month, less the purchase price paid tootbher memberseofUsaiist
try for materials used in oh o complete fences."
Hearing to determine whbetbher bthe provisions of arts. Vfle IX, In-
elulsive, of the Code, shall be open to amendments and/or amuy-V.
ficaltions and/or eliminatIons and/or Each other action as tthe
develop.
These sections embraceoadministration, trade practice rueIsaar
keting policies, and methods ofinmodificalion.
Opportunity to be heard on application submit ed by the Cede:
Authority for approval of Is budget and bashis of contributon lor
the period from Sept. 17, 1134, toJLnme 16, BI9.N
Total budget is 35,476. Basis of contribution On an estimated
ales volume of $1,100,000 for. the fLrsat 9 months of the ye ar tI1i
will be as follows: ofr percent on, to lesaleas of the previous Ya
q(1933) .

Opportunity to be heard oo. application of tha- Codi AutLhorIt
on pfetituon Lor termination of'eremption under par. III of AdtilS.
iscrativ e Order X-36. .


I F
















Friday, Feb. 12,
1935-Conld.
ommercial Relief Print- Room 4064, Commerce
iag industry, 287-434. Buldlng, Washington,
D. C., M. D. Walsh.


SSaturday, Feb. 16,
1935
frfger atlon Valves and Room 3080, Commerce Opportunity to be heard on application aubmilirted by the sup-
SFittings Manulacturing Building, Washington, plementary Code Authority for termination of the exemption
Industry, 84 1-5. D. .,Beverly S. King. conferred In par IL of Administrative Order X-36
.Sprocket Chain Industry, Room 4040, Commerce Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
S347-H I-. Buidlndg, Washington, Authority for approval or Its budget mand hbais of contriburion (or
D. C., W. W. Rose. the period from Jan. 1 to Jane 15, 1935
Total budget is $5,100. Basis of assessment Is Me of 1 percent of
the total sales volume of the employers in this industry, for the
).'., calendar year 1934 Assessment- are payvble monthly
.Monday, Feb, 18, 1935
:.Wet Mop Manufacturing Room 482. 151 K Street Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
SIndustry, 227-17. NW.. Washington, D. Authority for approval of Its budget and tbasds o contribution
C., W. L Schur. for the period from Jan. I so Jane Ilk 193.
Total budget Is 51,125. Basis of assesmenet is % of 1 percent of the
: ______________ net dollar sales as billed to apply to the period above stated.
STuesday, Feli. 19, 1935
"AntomaUetic Sprinkler in- Room 2062-66, Commerce Hearing on petition submitted by P. Nacey Co., Chicago, eI.;
dustry, 50-42.A. Building, Washington, C.S.B. Sprinkler e, Boston, Mess.; RaislerSprinkler Co New
D. C., 10a. m., Beverly York City, and RelIagle Automatnic Sprinkier Co ,NewYork City,
8. Kine. representing a minority of the masbers of this Industry, request-
ing that this Code be opened to amendment on the premise that
"experience indicates the Code tends to promote unfair com-
peti on and discriminates against certain groups in the Industry
inm favor of certain other groups contrary to the National Industrial
Recovery Act." Also, the Reliable Automatic Sprinkler Co.,
requests that the Code Authority "be adjudged without power
and that It be replaced by an Impartial Code Authority truly
______________ _______________ representative of the industry."

Thursday, Feb. 21,
i". 1936
Cap and Cloth Hat Indus- Rose Room, Washington Hearingon appidatiou submitted by the Code Authority for
i try, 457-32 A. Hotel I, Washington, amendment to the Coda to provide as follows; "Subject to rules
D. 0., 10 a. m., Burton and regulations approved by the Administrator no member of
E. Oppenheis. the industry shall be permitted to sell or distribute cap visors.
bands, brims, and sweat bands other than leather, to such mem-
bers of the Industry who have been found guilty of the violation
Sof anyone ofthe provisionsof the Code, after duenoticeand bear
tug in accordance with such rules and regulations."
Cap and Cloth Hat Indus- Rose Room, Washingn Hearing on recommendations for amendment to sees. 2, 3, and 4.
:: try, 457-32J. Hotel, Washington of art. v7, proposed by the special commissln created to study
D. C.. 1 a. m., Baton wage differentials between the eastern and western areas.
E. Oppenhalm.
.Trade Typesetting Indus. Room 4054, Commerce Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the
Story, 287-439. BnuldInr, Washington, National Code authority for this Industry. division D-I under
D. C., M. D. Walsh. the Code for the graphic arts industries, for approval of the budget
for the regional Code administrative agency, whose jurisdiction
~covers the following cities in the Stale of California: Fresno,
N. Modesto Berkeley, Oakland, San Francisco, Sacramento, Ban
i', *Jose, ani Stockton, and the county of San Francisco, and basis
of contribution for the period from May I, 1934, to Mar. 31, 1035.
:', Tot]al budget Is $1,955. Basis of contribution, exclusive of the
'.., amount requested by the National Code Authority is as follows.
Plants outside of San Francisco, of I percent of annual mechani-
ca] pay roll per establishment for the calendar year 1933. Plants
within the city and county of San Francisco, a basic dues of so per
.. month is computed plus % of I percent of annual mechanical pay
Tra per establishment for the calendar year 1933.
Tuesday, Feb. 26,1935
|Macaroni Industry, 234- North Room, Mayflower Hearing on application submitted by the Code Aulborlty for
. .'62 A Hotel, Washington, amendment to see. 8. art. VT7. of the Code. The proposed amend.
D.C., 10 a. m., Wald M. meant Is as follows: "No member of the Industry shall offer or give
S ltvenS any pvenee or premitums or gifts, directly or indirectly, to any
trade buyer or to any purchaser or to the consuming public.
This shall not be deemed to prohibit the giving of advertising
pictures, calendars, or articles of no possible intrinsic value."

We-dnesday, Feb. 27,
ii, 19-35
,Automotive Partq and Auditorium. Department Hearing on application or Automotive Parts and Equipment
Equipment Manufactur- of Commerce, Washing- Manufacturers. Incorporated. representing 80 percent of the In-
iS.ig Industry, 142-P. on, D. 0., 10 a. m., dusty for amendment of schedule A of the Code, clarifying defini
i' Jo. 0. Roberts. tions-


I Auto Industry Is Granted Code Extension
(Continued from page I) .


the manufacturers themselves, I have ob-
t.ained at this.time an expression of willing-
ness to go along with a plan for greater
regularization- from which benefits may be
confidentlyy expected to accrue to the workers.
A fullfilment of this understanding is pro-
vided for in the Executive order renewing
te Code.
" First, the plan Involves Introduction of
kew models of passenger cars In the fall in-
tead of the winter. This should result in n
eater regularity of work and in lessening
the'spread between the peaks and valleys of
employment .
;.:"The second advance which has come out
Wf conference Is the provision for payment of
ae and one-half for overtime in excess of
48 hours per week, which will benefit the em-
Ioyees through additional compensation for
,1y necessary overtime work and deter the


employment of workers in any unnecessary
overtime.
"It is true that today most employees can
work only 48 hours; this, however, has to be
averaged do"n to 40 hours average for the
year. However, certain groups have been
subject to being worked at such times as high
as 60 or 70 hours per week, without any limi-
tation of hours. The modification In tOis
Code extension establishes a principle of time
and a half if these groups work more than
48 hours.
"These are two substantial advances
toward regularizatlon of employment for this
large group of workers; and I believe that,
with the continuance of the pro-isions made
by the Government in the establishment and
functioning of the automobile labor board to
promote and maintain harmonious labor rela-
tions, progress of the industry in its service
to the general welfare will be maintained."


'. . .. .: : . .' .4 A
.S f .,. .: ...... .,:,., .%. :,:..... .. .- .


Opportunity to be heard on amendment to Administrative
Order No. 287-315 dated Oct. 26, 1934, by changing the proposed
annual rate or assessment to be paid by members of this industry
located within the fifteenth zone, whose jurisdiction covers the
States of California., Nevada, end Arizona1 for regional Code ad-
ministraloon espensae, covering the county or San Diego, Calif.,
from $16 for each $1,000 of annual mechanical pay roll to 118 for
each $1,000 of annual mechanical pay roll, and by changing the
proposed total annual rate of Bessment to be paid by members of
the industry located within saMid region for all Code administra-
tion expenses, from $21 for each $1,000 annual mechanical pay roll
to $2-4 for each $1,000 annual mechanical pay roll.
Hearing and opportunity to be heard on application submit-
ted by certain groups for approval of a proposed agreement estab-
tlistng tmdards of boarsn of labor rates of pay, and other condi-
tions of employment under art. U, see. I, of the Oode for the
construction industry, and seco. 7 (b) of the National Industrial
Recovery Act, affecting members of thief division and certain of
their employees in the region of Marion, Johnson. Hendrloks.
and Hancock Counties In the State of indiana
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for amendment to seec. 4, art. Ill, so es to provide that
this article shall not apply to outside salesmen and persons em-
ployed in a managerial or executive capacity, who receive more
than $36 per week, excepting those engaged In the production of
p hoto-engravings: or to emergency maintenane and repair men;
Janitors, drivers, delivery men, and errand boys: provided that
such employees shall not be permitted to work in excess of 44 hours
pea week.
Opportunity to be hoard an application submitted by the Code
Authority for approval of Its budget and basis of contribution for
the period from JanI 1 to June 18, 1935.
Total budget Is t7,871.84. Assessment to be based upon the dollar
volume of sales of the members of the Industry during the semi-
annual period last preceding the period for which the assessment
Is to be made, and shall be at the annual rate of approximately
N of I percent, payable quarterly
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for amendment to art. IV. sec. 8, of the Code (pricing
provisions).
Opportunity to be heard qn application of the Code Authority
for approval or budget and basis of coontribution for period from
Feb. I, 151, to Jan. 31, 1936 Amount of Budget 15,000. Basis
of contribution )t of I percent of all .ales and 'servicing pf wire.
rod, rod tube dies.


Mason Contractors Indus-
try, 4-0-19 (Division
oflb I Che Ofmtc es in.
..dustry).


t214 Castle Hall Building,
indIlanapol. l., 10
tLh., i Hoks hats
N'iA compliance direc-
tar. "


;CHEDULE OF HEARINGS, FEB. 8 TO 27-Con. Employment Provisn of Cod

___________ OB____ TRADE_____________m Iloy en I Pnpnqn n Provisions C ooT
PL~cxAND'c UT


photo-Engraving Indus- Room 4054, Commerce
Story, 180-46. Building, Washington,
D. C., Payson Irwin.




Rock and Slag Wool Man- Room 4327, Commerce
' ulacturing Industry, 321- Building, Washington,
17 D. C., Bevely Ober.


(Continued


sical possibilities or to-their deserts. By what
magic process can we hope even to equal that
unsatisfactory record, if we cut 40 percent
or more off the working week, as is now
proposed ?"
Flexibility Urged
Mr. Flanders defined recovery as follows:
"Recovery Is the production of a larger vol-
ume of goods and the furnulshing of a larger
volume and variety of services, the employ-
ment of a larger number of workers thereby,
and the distribution to those workers of a
larger volume of the goods produced and of
the services furnished."
The speaker declared the profit system has
served the American people well and has
"greater gifts In store for every worthy citi-
zen of this country, if we will but accept it
wholeheartedly, and learn to maintain it in
healthy activity. For further advances, a
wider spread of benefits and a steadier opera-
tion, three things are necessary. We must
understand the profit system, we must protect
it, and we must trust in it."
Mr. Flanders said the whole population
rises to a higher level if business profit is not
merely permitted but encouraged. "No paltry
5 or 6 percent ", the speaker continued, "is
sufficient as a basis for our needed expansion
of business enterprise. That will barely pay
the bank Interest-and enterprise is full nf
risk. It Is the prospect for 10, 20, and 50 per-
cent profit that makes the Justifiable risk,
opens the sluice gates of bank credit, expands
employment andjnultiplies the production and
distribution of goods. It is useless to scold
banks and business for not expanding credit
more rapidly. Unless the prospect for credit
is sufficient, it is wrong to lend and dangerous
to borrow."
Declaring he was making a concrete sug-
gestion for embodiment as an "improved
Code policy ", Mr. Flanders proposed that no
maximum hours be set in Codes short of 54
hours a week; that overtime above 40 hours
and less than 50 hours be set at time-and-a-
half-time, and that overtime for 50 hours or
more be made double time.
He argued that "this suggestion fits into
the normal operations of our economy, permits
the production of an expanded volume of
goods and services, distributes them more
equitably, tends to tone down the extremes of
speculative business expansion, and will effect
an automatic spreading of employment in dull
times."
Universal Work Week Proposed
Mr. Flanders was supported by W. R. Web-
ster, chairman of the Employment Relations
Committee of the National Association of
Manufacturers and chairman of the board of
the Bridgeport, Conn., Brass Co. He sub-
mitted recommendations for a universal work
week of not less than 40 hours, with the in-
dividual employee being allowed to work vol-
unt-rily for longer periods. Compensation for
overtime on a sliding scale under which the
payment would be proportionate to tCe rela-
tion of the overtime hours to the basic 40
hours was also recommended.
Real wages of all classifications should be
as high as Is economically possible, taking into
consideration such vital factors as scarcity of
the particular type of labor desired, capacity
of the individual employed, living costs in
communities, ability of the industry to pay,
and willingness and ability of the consumer to
buy ", this speaker asserted.
Opposition to further reduction of maxi-
mum hours and inclusion of above-minimum
wage scales was also expressed by Mr. West,
member of the cotton textile Code Authority
and president of textile mills in Danville, Va.
He said a general reduction of hours in
manufacturing Industries would retard in-
stead of increase employment, lower work-
ers' real wages, raise prices and, in the cotton
textile industry, deprive the domestic Industry
of any chance of regaining its export markets.
Likewise, Roscoe Edlund, representing the
consumers goods Industries committee, op-
posed the suggestion of labor for a reduction
in the work hour. Instead, lie advocated "a
continuation of policies already begun and a
moratorium against further general experi-
ments."
Present labor provisions developed in Codes
to fit the needs of each industry give protec-
tion that "it would be folly to sweep away ",
Mr. Edlund continued. We do not forget the
situation that called the Recovery Act into
being. Unregulated competition, under the
lash of depression, had created downward
pressures that were irresistible. Employers
who desired to maintain good wages and fair
working conditions were in many cases utterly
unable to do so. Hazards were created for
society as a whole. Serious injury was done
to employees and employers. The situation
cried for relief."
Added Thousands to Pay Rolls
NRA halted the downward trend of hourly
wages; wiped out child labor; built a "floor
under human labor" by establishing minimum
pay rates, and added hundreds of thousands of
workers to pay rolls, the speaker asserted.
"At the same time," Mr. Edlund continued,
"it helped to save America against the spread
of an uneconomic, impracticable, and danger-
ous idea. That was the idea that a fiat 30-
hour work week could help. There was, and
still Is, every reason to believe that the uni-
versal application of this Idea would have



.. ..--. .


.1 1 -_______ riscussea f


Undergarment end Neg-
ligee Industry, 408-29.

Wire, Rod, and Tube Die
Industry. 20-14.


Room 3016. Commerce
Building, Washington.
D. 0., Barton B Op-
penheim.
Room 4023, Department
of Commerce, Washing-
ton, D. C., Dexter A.
Tutcin .


it -nearmi gs
from page 1) "Y't

caused further stagnation and added 1 a4
mensely to the country's burdens." :'S
John L. Lewis, president of the U
Mine Workers, attacked the 40-hour Wbi
week provisions In Codes on the ground.ti4
hour rate was too great to effect any en*a
erable degree of reemployment. Industry hoi
resisted opening of Codes to reduce .-hoir
and as a result the National Recovery AtL;
ministration had ceased to be a factor- In the'
recovery program, he asserted, adding: P
he average hours per week in all ma-
facturing industry in October 1984 stoodf
at 34.5. * Fluctuations in employ-'.
went since the Codes have gone into effect
show that the 40-hour week has not only fa l ed
to reduce unemployment materially, but thnR...
far has failed to provide any incentive t s
employers to stabilize employment.*:'
Must Boost Employment ..:,.Li:
Recovery will not be permanent so Ic`
as employment is allowed to fluctuate wtth,,a'."
behind production. Restoration of 20 billil
dollars of mass purchasing power enjoyed.i
1929 by both labor and Industry, upon witS.|
recovery depends, can occur only when tletg'
unemployed are permanently returned :,
private employment. 'i'
We have no other alternative, other t....
remaining where we now stand, of aeliein
this end than by shortening weekly hours aid
maintaining weekly wages. ::
"This country needs what the Natin
Recovery Act calls for-the united action:,"
labor, industry, and Government to extriit
this country from the morass in which labI
certainly did not throw her." Vt
Francis J. German continued in support^|]
the theory propounded by Mr. Green and'.
Lewis. The textile union leader said.tht
unless the hours of work are materially ..4'
duced to balance * increase In pre-
dnctive efficiency, technological improvei
will bring our doom."
He cited statistics to show that in.rea"e
productivity in many industries has more. tha,
offset the influence of Code reduction ef hot?
toward bringing reemployment. ...
John P. Prey, present of the metal tra&e-
department of the American Federatioan 'i
Labor, recommended a reduced wirk wea'
and modification of minimum wage' T N-
ferentialas. ".-.
"If the hours of labor were reduced to.thEl?-
point where the volume of production eqs Iedm
that of 1928 and 1929, a 30-hour week coa.g
not be sufficient to give employment to "aai|
equal number as were employed during tse
years, for since 1929 there has been a mc
increase in per capital production in the manl
facturing industries." Il
He said the 40-hour week failed to provide
sufficient reemployment because the prevubg
week in industry, before and under the Codes".
an averaged less than 40 hours. ',
Southern wage differentials affecting neta
trades workers have increased and bate
"created a serious problem", the speaer
said. *,.^
Wage Differentials Assalelpd
"If there must be wage differentials in the |
South, based upon industrial conditions wtueb1 ,
have developed over many years", Mr. "Frej(
said, "then the differences should not be mor1t-';|
than the difference in freight rates souothbe
manufacturers must pay when shipping theift-
goods to northern markets. No ene sectlso otr>:
the United States is entitled to labor condifX
tons permitting it to have an unfair advaLn-,i
tige over other States.
"Any differentials based on population sets"
up an arbitrary instead of a flexible rule and -'
opens wide the door to unfair eompetitioii',
under Codes", the speaker declared. .-':
Mr. Dubinsky expressed himself as fully.'i
convinced that nothing short of a mandatoryz.:j:.
30-hour week will reemploy the present uneiu-'.1
ployed. He added that despite the 354-hits?
week in many of the apparel trades, thereareie'-
still thousands unemployed. He recom-,A
mended the absolute prohibition of ov"r-
time by Codes and that wage claaslfcationsVl d
above the minimum be the objective for fut'i|r
consideration.
Noel Sargent, an economist of New- York
City, held that increased employment through1.%-
a general reduction of hours to "30 per' ,wee.
obviously would not appreciably affect '..th.
unemployment situation. "On the contrary'.;.
he added, "It would greatly disturb the!cost,
and price structure of American Industry.:a" :"
The economist took the position that, al
though the shorter work week might beneflt-
the unemployed worker, the standard of Uvhg
of the millions now employed would be greatly.
reduced due to a decrease In purchasing powerit
of the worker as a whole. He declared the
net result ivould be only a small gain .in a-,
ployment, no real increase in demand for-!
goods, and no boost In purchasing power. '".'.i
Subsistence Level Cited
Charles R. Hook, president of the Americari.)
Rolling Mill Co., Middletown, Ohio, declared;:::
"increases in the hourly rates of pay and re--
duction of hours In industry have resulted in'.-
the spreading of work to a large number of::'
people, but the tendency has been.to place.
all workers on a subsistence level with 4o ".0
funds available for those Items that maintain
and increase our standard of living."
(Continued on page 7, column 1I
4..
.t. '*.7.`


.UI .. ,*.-- '"









IAP7''.


3U GETS APPROVED DURING 19i


P3 ,l.
1 .".'This is the sixth of a series of lists
VbVf:Code budgets approved during 1934.
V| Another list will appear in the February
WS1S issue of the Blue Eagle.


4-iASPHALT AND MASTIC TILE INDUS-
*RY.-Budget, $13,838.95, for calendar year
'934; assessment, one-tenth of 1 percentt per
pguare foot, payable monthly on total monthly
hipments made, but in noevent to exceed
otal amount of budget.
BITUMINOUSS COAL INDUSTRY
6'('6rthern West Virginia Subdivision of Di-
4ioh I).-Budget, $153,000, for May 1, 1934,
b1jlprl 30, 1935; assessment, seven-tenths of
tcent per ton.
I-CAP :AND' CLOTH HAT INDUSTRY-
uiget, $75,000, for June 18, 1934, to June
-is'.1935; assessment, one-half of 1 percent
b" -:the net dollar sales volume of the indus-
..., for the period from July 1, 1934, to June
6;:.'1935.
...AST IRON SOIL PIPE INDUSTRY.-
BuAdget, $26,942.50, for August .18, 1934, to'
ie '16 1935;s assessment, 23 cents per ton
o'.l.a shipments of pipe, fittings, valve, serv-
e;i.meter, and roadway boxes, by members
f the industry, to be collected monthly..
i i4OLLAPSIBLE TUBE INDUSTRY.--
udget, $6,000, for April 2, 1934, .to April
1101935; assessmentt, 2 mills per gross of
.fBes manufactured and delivered during the
H 'iou. 'calendar year.
COMMERCIAL AVIATION INDUS-
.'-Y:-Budget, $13,880.85, for September 10,
93.to September 9, 1935; assessment, 50
ts, per year for each person' employed, on
ezspay roll, or-actively engaged In the busl-
S s bf. that member in the commercial avia-,
n. Industry, including- executive officers and
em.i.bers of firms, associations, or other en-
ferprises so engaged or so employed. The
am'6unt of contribution shall be computed on
Tihhe basis, of the average number of persons
engaged during the calendar year 1934.
kfbiinumn contribution shall be $3 per year
.'.tbe .nade by' such members of the industry
engagee or.employ not more than six per-
nois; 'or who became members of the industry
rtter. january 1,'1935.'-
iCOMMERCIAL'VEHICLE BODYR-Budg-
,Itr$48,000, for 'July 1t0, 1934, to June 16,
935b';iasseesment, not in excess of two-tenths
.lf'.1 percent of net' sales of members of in-
ddty. for year July 1, 1933, to June 30,
34,'of which three-twentieths of 1 percent
K;the proposed assessment for first quarter
':f06udget'period. .
,4 RETAIL FARM EQUIPMENT TRADEr-
Budget, $60,000, for'period of 1934; assess-
[pent, 'one-tenth of 1 percent of total retail
sales for 1933.. .
` RETAIL SOLID FUEL INDUSTRY (Di-
viaso' 23).-Budget, $67,000, for February
26,. 1934 to February 28, 1935; assessment,
"'dents per ton based on ad estimated col-
.lectible 'tonnage on "1933 retail sales of
"2,000,000 tons.
l .._:RETAIL SOLID FUEL INDUSTRY.-
K'All for February 26, 1934, to February 28,
A'1935. Division No. 1.-Budget, $81,600; as-
('aessment, 2 cents per ton, based on retail
s!:ales for 1933; 1 cent per ton prior to Octo-
-,'eir 15, 1934; one-half cent per ton on October
.15,-and one-half cent per ton on January 15,
:a1935. '
".Division No. 2.-Budget, $38,750; assess-
"i'ent, $0.0155 per ton, based on 1933 sales.
'.Division No. 4.-Budget, $233,100; assess-
'S"ment, 2 cents per ton, based on 1933 sales.
AV Division No. 6.-Budget, $62,800; assess-
'Ament, 2 cents per ton based on 1933 retail
sales provided assessments not to exceed 1
.cent per ton may be made prior to October
."- 15,1934, and subsequent assessments not to
exceed a total of another cent per ton to
:bd determined by experience gained during
iflrst, half year of administration.
Division No. 7.-Budget, $76,390; assess-
: 'meat, 3 cents per year per ton, based on 1933
P Tetail tonnage, a 1-cent installment to be
due' immediately upon approval of this
j" budget, and the remaining 2 cents to be due
and payable one-half in 30 days and the
remaining half in 60 days from date of
'gSS,. approval of budget
.:'Division No. 9.-Budget, $96,500; assess-
ment, $0.028 per year based on 1933 retail
le$' sales estimated to be 4,000,000 tons, provided
,,>: assessments not to exceed 1 cents per ton
.ito be made prior to October 15, 1934, and
,subsequent assessments after October 15 to
''+be determined by experience gained first 6
Y-?. months of budget operations.
-;. Division No. 11.-Budget, $8,100; assess-
:ment, 3 cents per year per ton on 1933 retail
}1'tsales, an assessment of 1% cents per ton to
a."be levied upon :approval of budget and sub-
r, sequent assessments to be made after Octo-
:..'ber 15, 1934, as indicated to be necessary by
.:1-the experience gained in first 6 months of
5, budget operations.
.. Division No. 12.-Budget, $33,410; assess-
,i:.ment, to be levied annually at 2 cents per
I"t.-tog based on 1933 retail sales, an assessment
'.' not to exceed 1 cent per ton prior to October
0. 15, 1934, and an assessment not to exceed 1
:..' cent per ton after October 15, 1934.
,. Division No. 13.-Budget, $9,000; assess-
ment 1 cent per ton to be levied on an esti-
mated collectible tonnage of 1,222,670 tons,
.'.an assessment of one-half cent per ton to


be made prior to October 15, subsequent as-
sessment levied to be determined by experi-
ence gained from first 6 months of budget
operations.
Division No. 14.-Budget, $24,000; assess-
ment, 3 cents per ton based on 1933 retail
sales, to be levied monthly, first assessment
to include the-months from March 1, 1934,
until the month in which the budget is
approved.
Division No. 15.-Budget, $15,550; assess-
ment, 3 cents per ton based on 1933 retail
sales, an assessment of. 2 cents to be made
prior to October 15, and subsequent assess-
ment of 1 cent per ton to be made as indi-
cated to be necessary for the experience
gained in first 6 months budget operations.
Division No. 16.-Budget, .$17,407; assess-
ment, not to exceed 4 cents per ton, based on
estimated collectible 1933 retail sales tonnage
of 425,000, 2% cents per ton to be assessed
prior to October 15, 1934, subsequent assess-
ments to be determined by experience gained
in first'6 months of budget operations, but
in no event the total assessment for budg-
etary period, to exceed 4 cents per ton.
Division No. 17.-Budget, $10,980; assess-
ment, 2 cents per ton on an estimated col-
lectible tonnage amounting to 600,000 tons.
Division No. 18.-Budget, $21,570; assess-
'ment, 3 cents per ton based on 1933 retail
sales, an assessment of 1% cents per ton to
be made upon approval of budget and the
retraining assessment of 1'A cents per ton
to be levied after October 15, 1934.
Division No. 19.-Budget, $70;000; ,assess-
ment, for first 6 *months epdlbig August 31,
1934, to be levied at rate of three-tenths of a
cent per ton, per month, assessment after
September 1, 1934, to be made as indicated
to be necessary, the total not to exceed 3%
Scents per ton based on 1933 retail sales.
Division No. 20.-Budget, $50,465; assess-
Smeat, 3 cents per ton, based on 1933 retail
sales, an assessment of not more than 1%
cents per ton'to be made upon approval of
budget, remaining assessment of 1%. cents,
per ton to be made after October 15, 1934.
. Division No. 21.-Budget, $140,000; assess-
ment, 5 cents per fon to be levied upon cur-
rent monthly tonnage from beginning of
budgetary period through September 1934,
assessments to be made subsequent to Sep-
' tember to be determined by experience gained
through budget operations and, reports filed
prior to. October 15, 1934, but in no event to
exceed 3 cents per ton, based on current
monthly tonnage.
Division No. 22.-Budget; $65,710; assess-
ment, 4 cents per ton, based on 1933-retail
sales, an assessment of 2 cents per ton to be
'levied upon approval of budget, an assess-
ment of 1 cent per tdn to be'made prior to
October 1, 1934, and final assessment of 1 cent
per ton to be made after October 1, 1934.
Division Nb. 24.-Budget, $131,600;'assess-
ment, 3 cents per ton on an estimated col-
lectible tonnage of 4.000,000 tpns per annum,
an assessment of 2-cents per ton to be levied
upon approval of budget and an assessment
of 1'cent per ton to be made after October
15, 1934.
Division No. 25:-Budget, $00.995; assess-
ment, not to exceed 4 cents per ton, based on
1933 retail sales, assessments levied before
October 15, 1934, not to exceed 21A cents
per ton,. assessments levied after October 15,
1934, not to exceed 1, cents per ton.
Division No. 26.-Budget, $158,700; assess-
ment, not to exceed $0.026 per ton based on
7,500,000. tons of estimated collectible 1933
retail sales, an assessment of $0.013 "to be
levied prior to October 15, and subsequent
assessments to be determined by experience
gained the first 6 months of budget oper-
ations.
Division No. 27.-Budget, $70,000; assess-
ment, 26 cents per ton on an estimated col-
lectible tonnage of 3.000,000 tons based on
1933 retail sales, the first assessment to be
made upon approval of budget and equal
monthly assessments to be made thereafter
during budgetary period.
Division No. 28.-Budget, $23,000; assess-
ment, 1 cent per ton oti 2,600.000 tons esti-
mated collectible tonnage for 1933 retail sales,
assessments to be levied prior to October 15,
of one-half of a cent per ton and subsequent
assessments not to exceed a total of one-half
of a cent per ton to be determined by experi-
ence gained in the first 6 months.
Division No. 29.-Budget, $47,000; assess-
ment, 2%4 cents per ton based on 1933 retail
sales, 11, cents per ton upon approval of
budget, the remaining assessments to be made
after October 15, and not to exceed In total
three-fourths of a cent.
Division No. 30.-Budget, $23,760; assess-
ment, 2'A cents per ton on an estimated col-
lectible tonnage based on 1933 retail sales
of 938,630 tons, an assessment of 1 cents
per ton to be levied prior to October 15, 1934,
and subsequent assessments to be determined
by the experience gained in the first 6 months
of budget operations.
Division No. 31.-Budget, $41,180; assess-
ment, $0.021 per ton based on an estimated
collectible tonnage of 2,000,000 tons, 1933 re-
tail sales, assessments prior to October 15,
not to exceed 1 cents per ton, subsequent
assessments to be determined by experience
gained in first 6 months of budgetary period,
but In no event to exceed $0.006 per ton.
Division No. 32.-Budget, $77,000; assess-
ment, $0.026 per ton to be levied on an esti-
mated collectible tonnage of 1933 retail sales
of 3,000,000 tons, the first assessment to be
made upon approval of budget and to include


the period from March 1 to the first of the
month In which the budget Is approved, sub-
sequent assessments to be made up monthly
through. the remaining budgetary period.
Division No. 34.-Budget, $44,500; assess-
ment, 2 cents per ton on the estimated col-
lectible 1933 retail sales of 2,500,000 tons.
Division No. 35.-Budget, $27,420; assess-
ment, total assessment of 2 cents per ton,
based on 1933 retail sales, ssessmeut of $10
or less to be made on approval of budget
and payable within 15 days of date of billing.
Assessments exceeding $10, one-half payable
within 15 days of date of billing and balance
payable prior to November 15, 1934.
Division No. 38.-Budget, $23.000; assess-
ment, 2'1 cents per ton on an estimated col-
lectible tonnage of 1,000.000 tons ier year,
the first assessment to be made upon approval
of budget, to include the period from March
1, 1934, to the first of the month in which
approval Is granted, monthly installments to
be applied on the 10th of each month
thereafter.
Division No. 40.-Budget, $6.200; assess-
ment, 2 cents per ton on 310,000 tons of 1933
retail sales, assessments of 1 cent per ton
to be made prior to October 15, and subse-
quent assessments to be determined on basis
of experience gained by first 6 months of
budget operations.
Division No. 42.-Budget, $26,100; assess-'
ment, total of 4A cents per ton, based' on
1934 retail sales, the first assessment of 4
cents per ton on current monthly tonnage,
to be made upon approval of budget and sub-
sequent monthly assessments of 4L cents per
'ton on current monthly tonnage to be made
each month thereafter during budgetary
period. '. .1
Division No. 43.-Budget, $10,010;' assess-
ment, 1 cent per ton, based on 1933 retail
sales; this assessment'to be made In a lump'
sum, with the option on the part of the
dealer to make time payments to be com-
pleted before the expiration of the budgetary
period.
Division No. 45.-Budget, $9,920; assess-
ment, 1 cent per ton based on 1933 retail
sales to be levied upon approval of budget,
assessments of 3 cents per ton to be levied
on- current monthly business from March
1934, through September 1934, assessments
subsequent to October 15, to -be levied on
basis indicated to be necessary by experience
gained in first 6 months of budget operations.
Division No. 46.-Budget, $52.500; assess-
ment, 2 cents per ton to be levied on 1933
retail sales, assessments prior to October 15,
1934, not to exceed 1 -cent per ton, subsequent
assessments to be determined by the expert-,
ence gained in the first 6 months' operations
but not to exceed a total of 1 cent per ton.
Division No. 48.-Budget, $14,080.80; as-
sessment, 1 cent per ton to be made upon
an estimated collectible 1933 retail sales ton-
nage of 1,400.000 tons, assessments made
prior to October 15, not to exceed eight-tenths
'of a cent per ton, assessments subsequent to
SOctober 15, to be determined by experience
gained in first 6 months of budget opera-
tions, but not to exceed two-tenths of a cent
per ton.
ROBE AND ALLIED PRODUCTS IN-
DUSTRY.-Budget, $30,455.39, for January
29, 1934, to January 28, 1935; assessment, 1
percent of net dollar sales for calendar year
1934, plus actual cost of NRA labels used.
ROCK AND SLAG WOOL MANUFAC-
TURING INDUSTRY.-Budget, $4,293.58,
for October 1,. 1934, to December 31, 1934;
assessment, one-fourth of 1 percent upon
the dollar volume of sales by members of the
industry during the semiannual period last
preceding the period for which the assess-
ment is to be made.
SAW AND STEEL PRODUCTS MANU-
FACTURING INDUSTRY-Budget, $26,-
250, for 15 months ending May 31, 1935; as-
sessment, each member of industry shall con-
tribute a total sum equal to three-tenths of
1 percent of his 1933 sales volume, for the
12-month period and three-tenths of 1 per-
cent of his first quarter, of 1934 sales.
SCRAP IRON, NONFERROUS SCRAP
METALS AND WASTE MATERIALS
TRADE (Scrap Iron and Steel Trade; Non-
ferrous Scrap Metals Trade; Scrap Rubber
Trade; Waste Paper Trade; Cotton Rag
Trade).-Budget, $258,060, for March 26,
1934, to March 25, 1935; assessment, up to
$500,000 sales, one-twentieth of 1 percent;
$500,001 to $1,000,000 sales, one twenty-fifth
of 1 percent; $1,000,001 to $2.000,000 sales,
one-thirtieth of 1 percent; $2,000,001 to $3,-
000,000 sales, one-fortieth of 1 percent; over
$3,000,000 sales, one-fiftieth of 1 percent;
minimum, $10.
SECOND A R Y ALUMINUM-Budget,
$17,460, for July 1, 1934, to June 16, 1935;
assessment, 50 cents per net ton on ship-
ments of finished secondary aluminum, this
unit to be applied as an assessment each
month on shipments and/or deliveries made
during the next preceding month, payments
to be made in advance monthly.
STANDARD STEEL BARREL AND
DRUM MANUFACTURING.-Budget,
$6.750, for May 26, 1934, to November 26,
1934; assessment, collected in monthly in-
stallments in proportion to the dollar vol-
ume of yearly shipments for 1933, of the
products of the industry made by each of
the various companies covered by the sup-
plementary Code, which rate is computed to
be equivalent annually to one-tenth of 1 per-
cent of 1933 sales volume.


STEEL PACKAGE' MANUFAe"TJ,',t
ING.-Budget, $4,800, for May 26, 1934; :t
November 26, 1934; assessment, collectedli5
monthly installments in proportion to. ho'
dollar volume of yearly shipments for',19j.,
of the products of the industry made by eafi
of the various companies covered by the BI.]
elementary Code, which rate is computed
to be equivalent to the annual rate of;tjY-
tenths of I percent of 1933 volume of salq-
TRAIILER MANUFACTURING--Budgt, '
$12,600, for July 12, 1934, to June 16,.19356."
assessment, twenty-one one-hundredths. of .'
percent of dollar, volume of business, .The]
reported sales of first quarter of 1934 sabl'
be used as basis of assessment for thil:
quarter of 1934, a'nd thereafter each quarterai
sales will be used as basis of next succeedlngt
quarter's assessment, assessments shall:be
paid quarterly'in advance. Said budget ,
estimated on annual sales volume for'i934
of $6,000,000, on budget of only p0rtiailyj
complete statistical data for first half :o':
1934. ,
UNDERGARMENT AND,NEGLIGEER...
Budget, $167,526.10, for June 1, 1934, t6 Msay
31, 1935 ;. assessment, one-fourth of 1 .percent, :!
of the net dollar sales for calendar year
1934 (less returns, less discounts), pln'
actual cost of NRA labels used. .
UPHOLSTERY AND DECORATIVE"
FABRICS TRADE.-Budget, $13,000,. for'I
July 1, 1934, to June 30, 1935; assessment,
one-twelfth of 1 percent of pet .salespai-
able quarterly, based on net sales of previogIF'
quarter. .-
WATERPROOF PAPER.-Budjet, .$20i-
000, for March. 1, 1934, to February 28,19835
assessment, one-half of 1 percent of .total
dollar value of sales during the calendar
year 1933. :I
WET MOP MANUFACTURING INDU4i
TRY.-Budget, $3,850, for February 1, 193
to December 31, 1934; assessment, one-ftfl14
of 1 percent of net dollar sales as billed.cV'-
WHOLESALE FRESH FRUIT ANDi
VEGETABLE DISTRIBUTIVE .INDUSD'
TRY.--,Budget, $116,000, for July 16, 1934;:..ii
July 15, 1935; assessment, $10 "payable .'i
each member of industry whose principle
line of business Is wholesale fresh frult'"ii
vegetables. . '. ';i
WHOLESALE LOBSTER.-Budgdt, :2S2,i
028, for May 8, 1934, to March 31, 1935; a-
sessment, ohe-tenth of 1 percept of sales forj
the preceding business year, including iater]
company and Inter-departmehtal sales. fNmo
those subsidiaries or departments engaged.' I
production to those engaged in distribution,
Additional assessment, one-eighth of lcent
per pound on all sales of live lobsters ,for
preceding business year. ...
WHOLESALE MILLINERY TRADE-
Budget, $14,400, for April 16, 1934, to 0ct9
ber 16, 1934; assessment, 62 cents per
$1.000 of dollar sales.volume done by aespi
member of trade from May 1, 1933, toArl.
30, 1934. Minimum, $12.50.
WHOLESALE MONUMENTAL GIAIR
ITE.-Budget, $30,000, for June 11, 1934; '
July 1, 1935; assessment,1 fifteen one-bm.
dredths of 1 percent on dollar volume gr
annual sales for 1933. ...
WHOLESALE STATIONERY TRADE'
Budget, $70,000, for year ending April,2.
1935; assessment, one-fifth of 1 percent_,.
sales. .<:.B
WIRE,. ROD, AND TUBE DIE INDIU
TRY.-Budget, $5,000, for Februairy 11,193
to February 1, 1935; assessment, one-thitqp-
1 percent of sales for budgetary period., -
able in four installments. -4
WOOD TURNING AND SHAPING I.
DUSTRIES.-Budget, $35,610, for Aprilf.1.
1934, to April 16, 1935; assessment, unit].
1, 0.48 percent; No. 2, 0.45 percent; Noj
0.55 percent; No. 4, 0.55 percent; No. 5,,,1
percent; No. 6, 0.29 percent; No. 7, 0.6.:BP.
cent; No. 8, 0.60 percent; to be-billed mon:.
on previous month's sales.,':
WATERPROOFING, CAULKING .CO
POUNDS,.- AND CONCRETE FLO0J
TREATMENTS MANUFACTURING'
Budget, $10,000, for June 16, 1934, to 313
16, 1935; assessment, one-fourth of .IpeC..
of 1933 sales.
WHOLESALE TOBACCO TRADE
Budget, $410,150, for June 9, 1934,' to J.
15, 1935; assessment, on gross sales atR7i
of one-tenth of 1 percent on sales of
and one-twentieth of 1 percent on sale%
cigarettes, tobacco, and plug tobacco.. ;':
WRECKING AND SALVAGE UO
TRY.-Budget, $100,000, for May-1, 19.1
April 30, 1935; assessment, on first 10M
cubic feet or fraction thereof, 5 cents,.i
100 cubic feet; second 100,000 cubic fetd
fraction thereof, 2 cents per 100 cubldiC
thereafter 1 cent per 100 cubic feet; .WI
the structure of job cannot be readld..'
fairly measured, 1 percent of labor
Minimum assessment on any one Mball
shall be $5; minimum annual assesslmen:ft
member shall be,$10. '
WRENCH MANUFACTURING 1W,,
TRY-Budget, $25,000, for May 1, l!9
April 30, 1935; assessment, one-fourthl. N
percent of the sales of each member fat,
period May 1, 1934, to July 1, 1934,U
three-eighths of 1 percent of suqh slal.
the period July 1, 1934, to April 30,1.
to be computed on the sales of such. aJ
of industry products for the second',:a
preceding.




.: : <.-.^ a ^


- ".. .' ;'" .,.












INISTRATIVE


Official Orders of NRA Relating .
a. to Particular Codes

HE Blue Eagle prints in each issue summaries of administrative
.orders, interpretations, appointments, and 'bylaws approved by the
National Industrial Recovery Board.
Official orders are of two types, final and provisional. Where an order
is provisional, the time within which objections may be filed is indicated
below.
All protests against provisional orders should be addressed to Notional
Recovery Administration, Washington, D. C., attention Deputy Admin-
istrator for Code concerned; and such protests should be.'received before
final date indicated.
(For Code approvals, amendments, interpretations, budgets and,
assessments, bylaws, Code Authority members, and trade complaints and
other committees, see elsewhere.) '


V' AIR TRANSPORT INDUSTRY, Code No.
A'o
jI'll: Order 13, denying application of Branlff
P.--Airways, Inc., Oklahoma City, Okla., for ex-
V! 'emption from the provisions of article III,
section 3, and article IV, section 1, of the Code.
- AMERICAN MATCH INDUSTRY, Code
: No. 195: Order 8, granting a stay, for a period
- of 6 months from the date of this order, of the
;'. .peratiod of the provisions of'sectlon 1 (e) of
',/article VIII. Section 1 (e) provides that no
Sin"lamber of the Industry, shall guarantee prices
q "and floor stocks against decline prices. Order
:Ii dated January 25, 1935.
I AUTOMOTIVE PARTS ANI. EQUIP-
;-: .MENT MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY,
l; ,Code No. 105: Order 35. granting exemption
:'to the Ternstedt Manufadturing Co., Detroit,
SMich., from the provisions of article III, sec-
ition 1, of the Code, to the extent that. two
I.men may work not more than '42 hours In 1
week, nor 8 hours'In 1 day beyond the 2,181-
:hour provision of the Code, provided the rate
of pay shall be not less than one and one-half
Times the regular rate of pay for such employ-
?.ees. This exemption aIs for the period from
November 6'to nilduight, November 10, 1934.
.. Order 36, granting exemption to the Na-
.tional Stamping Co., Detroit, Mich., from the
f.-. provisions of article III, section 1, of the Code,
-.'to the.extent that five die makers.may work
,4. -not more than 42 hours In any 1 week and'not
P.'more than 8 hours in I day beyond the 2,184-
I hour provision of the Code, provided the rate
'of pay shall be not less than one and one-half
;. times the regular rate of pay for such em-
r"* ployees. This exemption is for. the period
."& from November 13 to midnight, November 18,
'19K4.
SOrder 37, granting exemption to the Tropic-.
r.; Aire Incorporated, Minneapolis, Minn., from
!..'the provisions of article III, section 1, of the
i.Code, to the extent that. three specialized ma-
'J'chine operators may work not more than 40
I .hours in any 1 week and not more titan 8
.'.:hours in any 1 day beyond tbhe 2,080-hour pro-
:. vision of the Code, provided the rate of pay
"shall be one and one-half times the regular
>.rate of pay for such employees. This exemp-
iona is for the period from November 2 to
November 13, 1934.
i" BAKING INDUSTRY, Code No. 445: Order
:31 denying application of Keamrn's Bakery.
Auburn, Nebr., for exemption from the provi-
-Wons of article IV, section 1 (h), of the Code.
,."'.Order 32, denying application of Williams
.Bakery. Scranton, Pa., and R. Z. Spaulding,
*.i"Inc., Binghamton, N. Y., for exemption from
the provisions of article VII, sections 3 and 4,
Sof the Code.
Order 33, denying application of the Quaker
i"..Baking Co., Council Bluffs, Iowa, fort exemp-
Iiton from the provisions of article VII, section
6, of the Code.
BARBER SHOP TRADE, Code No. 398:
: Order 7, denying application of the Sheraton
SBarber Shop, High Point, N. C., for exemption
from the provisions of article II, section 1, of
-the Code.
BREWING INDUSTRY, Code No. LP 10:
POrder 8, approving plan of procedure of labor
complaintss committee and regional boards.
CANDY MANUFACTURING I N D U S -
Zp-,TRY, Code No. 463: Order 29, granting exemp-
H'^tlon to the National Candy Co.. Inc., Chicago,
'Ill., from the provisions of article III, section
"4, of the Code, for a period of 3 weeks begin-
'ning January 7, 1935, provided that employees
..affected by this exemption shall not be per-
VInitted to work In excess of 56 hours in each
week or 10 hours in each day, and that time
""and one-half shall be paid for the 8 hours in
excess of 48 hours per week, that no employee
AIhall be permitted to work more than 6 days
in any 7-day period, and that this exemption
shall not Interfere with State labor laws. The
,BOrder denies application of this company for
pB-exemption from the provisions of article III,
section 6.
CELLULOID BUTTON, BUCKLE, AND
.NOVELTY MANUFACTURING I N D U S -
.TRY, Code No. 400: Order 11, staying for a
Speriodof 90 days from the date of this order,
o'.fr until such time as an amendment to article
|'.III, section 10, is approved, the operation of
B'4tthe provision of article III, section 10, of the
k,.';Code.


CLOTH REEL INDUSTRY, Code No. 289:
Order 8, terminating exemption conferred in
paragraph III of Administrative Order X-36,
Sso that all members are required to contribute
their proportionate share of the expenses of
admninisteringthe.Code. notwithstanding their
principal line of business is in some other
industry. .
COLD STORAGE DOOR MANUFAC-
TURING. INDUSTRY, Code No. 479: Order
6, terminating the exemption conferred In
paragraph [11I of Administrative Order X-36,
so that all members are required to contribute
their proportionate share of the expenses of
administering the Code notwithstanding their
principal line of .business is in some other
Industry.
CORRUGATED ROLLED-METAL CUL-
VERT PIPE INDUSTRY, Code No. 511:
Order 8, approving Code Authority budget and
basis of contribution for the period 'from Sep-
tember 1, 1934, to August 31, 1935.
COTTON GARMENT INDUSTRY, Code
'No. 118: Order 200, granting exemption to the.
Gerstman Manufacturing Co., Inc., Buffalo,
N. Y., from the provisions of article I1, sec-
tion A, and.article V, section A,.of the Code,
to the extent that-it is permitted to operate
Its stl.ching department and work the em-
ployees there6f 8 hours overtime weekly from
November 15'up.to and Including November
30,-.1934. provided such overtime Is paid for at
the rate of one an4 one-half times the pormal
rate of pay. The order requires that a copy
be posted In a conspicuous place in the com-
pany's plant or plants.
Order 202, granting exemption to the Oak
Brand Manufacturing Co.. Omaha, Nebr., from
the provisions of article [II, section A, and
article V, section A, of the Code, to the extent
that it may work its employees on the same
basis as provided in order 200, above quoted.
Order 204, appointing industry members to
represent the sectional or geographical dis-
tricts as follows: Pacific coast: Mr. H. Eloes-
ser, of San Francisco, Calif., as member and
Mr. Oscar Oroebl, of New York City. as alter-
nate.. Southeast: Mr. Evan McConnell, At-
lanra, Ga., as member. Midwest: Mr. Claytou
Smith, of St. Joseph; Mo., as member and Mr.
G. H. Norris, St. Paul. Minn., as alternate.
Order 205, granting exemption to the Crest
Shirt Corporation, Chicago, Ill., from the pro-
visions og article III, section A, and article
'V, section A, of the Code, to the extent that
it is permitted to operate its plant and work
the employees thereof 4 hours overtime on
Saturday, Dekember 15 and 22, 1934, pro-
vided such overtime in excess of 36 hours per
week shall be paid for at the rate of one and
- one-half times the normal rate of pay. The
order r-equires that a copy be posted In a con-
spicuous place In the corporation's plant or
plants.
Order 206, granting exemption to Robitshek,
Schneider Co., Minneapolis, Minn., from the
provisions of article Ill, section A, and arti-
cle V, section A. of the Code, to the extent
that it is permitted to operate Its plant and
work the employees thereof 8 hours overtime
during the week ending December 22, 1934,
provided all overtime worked in excess of 36
hours per week shall be paid for at the rate
of one and one-half times the normal rate of
pay. The order requires that a copy be posted
in a conspicuous place in the company's plant
or plants.
Order 207, granting exemption to R. & M.
Kaufmann, Aurora, Il., from the provisions
of article III, section A, to the extent that it
I& permitted to work its cutting department
for 4 hours overtime weekly for a period of
30 days from December 17,1934, provided such
overtime in excess of 36 hours per week shall
be paid for at the rate of one and one-half
times the normal rate of pay. The order
requires that a copy be posted in a conspicuous
place in their plant or plants.
Order 20S, granting exemption to J. P.
Goettel, Inc., Syracuse, N. Y., from the provi-
sions of article III, section A, and article V,
section A, of the Code, to the extent that it Is
permitted to work 3 stitchers and I button-
hole operator and the machinery necessary for
such operations 8 hours overtime weekly dur-
ing.the period from December 18 up to and
Including December 29, 1934, provided such
Overtime worked in excess of 36 hours per
week shall be paid for at the rate of one and


IADM


0









I


one-half times the normal rate o
order requires that a copy be post
spicuous place in the corporation
plants.
Order 212, granting exemption
Rainer Shirt Co., Cincinnati, Oh
provisions of article III, section
cle V, section A, of the Code, to the
It is permitted to operate its plat
the employees thereof 4 hours over
from December 11 up to and inclu
her 31, 1934, provided nil overtir
of 36 hours per week shall be pal
rate of one and one-half times the
of pay. The order requires tha
posted in a conspicuous place in th
plant or plants.
COTTON TEXTILE INDUSTI
1: Order 101, granting a stay for
S4 months from the date of this C
operation of the provisions of sect
section (c), of the Code, to the
Jacquard looms In each plant in
.as .of the date of this order. whei
are engaged In the production
woven bedspreads, provided the t
of loom hours per week of all Jac
In a plant making Jacquard wove:
shall not exceed the total num
hours per week permitted by th
the Code. ,
DOG FOOD INDUSTRY, Cc
Order 12, approving Code Auth
and basis of contribution for the
ning May 31, 1934, and ending J
FERTILIZER 'INDUSTRY, C
Order 44, approving lists of gra
lizer for the States of Virginia, W
Maryland, District of Columbia, a
Order 45, gran tlng. exemption to
Chemical Co., Baltimore, Md., fro
slons of article IV,. sectiofi'2, su
.3, of the. Code, to the extent
employ 10 accountants unlimited
the period from'January 10 Fo J
inclusive,, provided that during
from January 10 to February 1
employees shall. be paid .one a
times their regular rates of pay
worked In excess of 40 hours pi
that during the period from Fe
June 30, 1935, such employees s
one and one-half times, their reg
pay for all hours worked Iq excess
'per week. 'The order requires th
posted.'in' a.,.place readily acce
employees affected thereby.
rLEXITBLE MIWETAL HOSE
ING MANUFACTURING INDI
No. 84 G-1: Order 14, approving
ity budget and basis of contribr
period 'from'October 1, 1934, to M
FUR MANUFACTURINGG
Code No. 436: Order 1,7, denying
of exemption granted In parag
Administrative Order X-36.
FURNITURE MANUFACT
DUSTRY, Code No. 145:. Order
application of. Lewlttes & Sons,
N.'. I., for exemption from artici
2 (a), of the Code.
GALVANIZED WARE MAN
ING INDUSTRY, Code No. 84
10, approving plan for sale of pr
are classed as "seconds."
GASOLINE PUMP MANUF
INDUSTRY, Code No. 26: Ord
Ing exemption,; to. S. F. Bowser
Wayne, Ind., from the. provisions
of the Code, for 'the period frb
through February 16, 1935; ins
provisions apply to 110 e9peclall
ployees engaged In an urgent rus
vided that the additional work
said skilled employees shall note
per week in excess, of the 40 hoi
by the Code and that at least one
times the regular rate shall
skilled employees for such addl
and that If the work on this
order Is completed In less tba
specified, this exemption automa
nates on the date the work is cc
vided employment Is granted a
capable of performing the operate
GRAPHIC ARTS INDUSTRY
287: Order 433, denying applicant
bridge and Clothier, Philadelphit
emption from the provisions of tl
HAT MANUFACTURING
Code No. 259: Order 22, termirain
tion conferred in paragraph III
trative Order X-36, so that all
required to contribute, their
share of the expenses of admi
Code notwithstanding their prIi
business is in some other Indust
HOG RING AND RINGER
TURNING INDUSTRY, Code
Order 11, approving supplement
thorlty budget and basis of con
the period from September 10,
16, 1935.
IMPORTED DATE PACKI
TRY, Code No. 490: Order 9, a
meats of cost pursuant to artlcl
5 (a), of the Code.
INDUSTRIAL OIL BURN
MENT MANUFACTURING
Code No. 439: Order 7, approving


S .... ;.,. : ...:*::- : ,. ..:.:: .. .:! z ,.,,,,,.w ..-, o..y,6 m l

_______________* -' ***4

-* ,"iN


)f pay. The ardous occupations from which minors -mz
ed in a con- .18 years of age shall be excluded. "
W's plant or JOB GALVANIZING METAL COA'A
INDUSTRY, Code No. 84. B-l: Ordez%
to Brohard- granting a stay of the provisionsnof articl"
to, from the sectrbn 1, of the Code, insofar as these;$,iX
A, and artl- sBlonus required the election of a Code Autl'
e extent that Ity at the time of the annual meeting :diS
at and work National Galvanlzers Association held O"Ii
time weekly,. 25 934, and. ordering that the members
ding Decem- the supplementary Code Authority firstiale"
me in excess shall continue In their respective enpaclftis
Id for at the members of this Code Authority until J*ueS
normal rate 1935. ''
t A copy be "iii
he company's LEGITIMATE FULL LENGTH DP
MATIC' AND MUSICAL THEATRICS]
INDUSTRY, Code No. 8: Order 10, extendlii
tY, Code No. the time for the committee named in Adminii
Sa period of tratlve Order No. 8-6 to make a reiportta:i
order, of 'the recommendations to the board for the legiti
Lion III, sub- mate full length 'dramatic and musical thi
extent of 20 atrical industry. This extension Is'graiije
the Industry for a period of 15 days from January 20, 19 1
i such looms i -'A
of Jacquard LINSEED OIL MANUFACTURING',:
total number DUSTRY, Code No. LP 11: Order 6, 'apir
equard looms Ing list of occupations deemed hazardoduh.
n bedspreads persons under 18 yearslof age. i'
her of loom LUMBER AND TIMBER PRODU|o
is section of INDUSTRIES, Cede No. 9: Order 305;:,
proving Code Authority budget and basis:.!l

ority budget slon of 'the wooden package division of the
period begin- industries, for the period from August',Lil
une 16, 1935. December 31, 1934. : 'OSl
Order 306, granting exemption to En6'
Code No. 67: Lnmber & Manufacturing Co., Jackson,.Ms
ides of ferti- from the provisions of article VI,' section
Test Virginia, of the Code, to the extent necessary to .perm
nd Delaware. not more than 37 employees to, work notifbi,
o the Davlson than 48 hours in any 7-day period, for,'3a
m the'provi- riod of nob more than 4 weeks bpgtnn
section (a) Decembe- 29, 1934, on operations necesprjj
that It may prevent cancelation of millwork drders tlh
hour during on band, provided each such employee 'sb
une 30, 1935, be paid not less than one,and one-haltftimi
S1the period his normal rate of pay for all hours worked
5, 1935, such excess of 40 hours In any 1 week dr 8 houri9
Lad one-third any 1 day..' .., "'.:,,
fdr all hours a .d.y.' -'
er week, and MANUFACTURING AND WHOLES&
bruary 16 to. SURGICAL INDUSTRY, Code :.Nbo;j
Shall be paid Order 6, terminating exemption cbnfereedri
ular ratrs of paragraph III of Administrative bOrdeir"X.
is of 40 hours so that all members are required to contrib
iat a copy be their proportionate-share of.the costs.'..
asible to' all ministering 'the Code, notwithstansdi.iagti,
S principal line of business In, some'
AND TUB- industry. .. y. -
JSTRY,.Code MARBLE QUARRYING AND -eINISI
Code Author- ING INDUSTRY; Codd .No. 421: Ordii
ution for the recognizing the following as members oi-fl
arch 31,1935. Ndw York regional committee for' .tis i.iz
INDUSTRYT,. try: G. Gilbert Brown, president':Ge
g termination Brown' & Co., Newark, N. l.; Richardi
graph II of Miller, president. MilUer-Druck Co., NewiYpi
S City; Oscar Bauer, president, C.arle'1A
Gray Marble & Slate'Co.,.Ldng-Island,.3.'X
URING IN-' David Stein, vice president, P. Tasslnni&
S40, 'denying Brooklyn, N. Y.;' and Thomas P. Scia'
Inc., Beacon, executor, 3. Sclacca Marble Works,.New.-o"
le IV, section city. .,
T CT UR-T MILLINERY INDUSTRY, Code No. "
FACTUR K Order 34, approving temporary budget fori
1 A-1: Order Code Authority to cover the period from SJa
products which ary 1 to June .15, 1935. This order sh9al
minute automatically upon the final aiiifl
'ACTURING or disapproval-of a budget to cover.thea in
ler :16, 'grant-. period', or for any other period specifed'tj
S& Co., Fort the National Industrial Recovery Board,'/A
iof article III in no event later than February 15, 1935 i|
m January 8 MOTION PICTURE INDUSTRY,' 'G:
sofar as said No. '124: Order 44, confirming telegram
ly skilled em- order dated November 26, 1934, granting!
ib order; pro- emption to Radio City Music Hall, New* Q
uIg hours of City, from a provision of article IV, Pat
sceed 8 hours section 4, subsection (b)', of the Code,..io,
ars permitted as Thanksgiving morning,'November 29.1i
Sand one-half was concerned. This exemption permitted
e paid these Radlo City Music Hail, to call chorus perho
Itlonal hours,, for rehearsal at 8 a. m., Thursday morn
special rush November 29, 1935, provided time and'oI
n the period half be paid for such overtime. '
ically termi- Order 45, confirming letter order dated I
impieted, pro- member 17, 1934, granting exemption to.,Ra=c
available men City Music Hall, New York City, from a .$
ions specified. vision of article IV, part 2, section 4, subsN
IY' Code No. tion (b), of the Code. This exemptions. i"f
Ion of Straw- mitted the Radio City Music Hall to dalr1l'
a, Pa., for ex- rus persons for rehearsal at 8 a. m., Thursiid
ie Code. December 27,1934, provided time and ori.p-i
INDUSTRY be ald ,for such overtime. ,.
sating exemp- MOTOR BUS INDUSTRY, Code No.6C
1 of Adminis- Order 20, granting exemption to the MIj
members are land-Delaware Ptages, Inc., SelbyvlWe; Di
proportionate from certain of the provisions of subsecti
inistering. the (b) of section 1 of article VII, to the exte
ncipal line of that it is authorized to register Its operkati
.ry. from Pocomoke City, Md., to Milford, Del:ij
MANFC- way of Maryland-United States HighWi
MANUFAC- Route No. 113. with the Code Authority. *id
No. 84 F-: out being required to file with it a ceitiff
ary Code Au- copy of a certificate of convenience ahdida'
ntributlon for cessity from the State of Delaware authlori
1934, to June ing intrastate transportation on that por$j
of said operation lying within the State'.
NG INDUS- Delaware. : ,;
approving ele- MOTOR VEHICLE RETAILING TRAD
e VII, section Code No. 46: Order 57, denying applieatiol;'
the following dealers in Richmond, Kh.;'-
NG EQUIP- exemption from the wage anddhour provisic
INDUSTRY, of this Code: Canfield Motor Co., Johns
Ig list of haz- (Continued on page 6. column 1)


lk ',V
Dr. Y.'.4












DMINISTRATIVE ORDERS-Contu


:':.'' (Continued from page 5)
Motor Co, Witt Motor Co., Richmond Motor
go..Sturgil Motor Co., and Woods Motor Co.
:fINEEDLEWORK INDUSTRY IN PUER-
.TO RICO, Code No. 474: Order 13, supplement-
Administrative Order 474-11, relating to
iecework rates for Infants' and children's
.'essee, established by the piece-rates com-
,Alssion.

NOVELTY CURTAINS, DRAPERIES,
BEDSPREADS, AND NOVELTY PILLOWS
INDUSTRY, Code No. 79: Order 25, approv-
sing statistical forms for this industry.
PPER BOX MACHINERY INDUSTRY
TRADE. Code No. 72-B: Order 12,
'imting exemption to George W. Swift, Jr.,
in!., Bordentown, N. J, from the provisions of
rtlcle VIII, section 1, of the Code, for the pe-
.odfrom January 8 through March 9, 1935,
..ojfar as these provision apply to 45 skilled
lbly employees engaged in an urgent rush
''der, provided that the additional working
of said skilled assembly employees shall
bnot exceed 8 hours per week in excess of 40
buirs permitted by the Code, and that at least
one and one-half times the regular rate shall
.a ;paid said skilled assembly employees for
rsuch additional hours. The order also pro-
des that If the work on this special rush
irder is completed in less than the period from
Jaiuary 8 through March 9, 1985, this exemp-
ton automatically terminates on the date the
b0rk on the rush order is completed, provided
6ployment is granted available men capable
fi:jperforming the operations specified in this
?der..
iPERFORATING MANUFACTURING IN-
)USTRY, Code No. 84 V-1: Order 6, approv-
gcircumstances 'under which goods shall be
(lpped on consignment.
-.%PHOTOGRAPHIC AND PHOTO FIN-
ISHING INDUSTRY, Code No. 362: Order
S,: canceling order approving determination
of'itrade area, Dallas, Tex.
PICTURE MOULDING AND PICTURE
.ME INDUSTRY, Code No. 208: Order
-y,:denying application of Larsen Richter Co.,
i khart, Ind., for exemption from section 1
-f'articles III and IV, of the Code.
fl/'UMP MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY,
Cod.e No. 57: Order 17, denying-application of
tane & Bowler, Inc., Memphis, Tenn., for
iainption from the provisions of paragraph
)'.':,of article V qf the Code but granting it
aeniption from the provisions of article V,
Arraph (b) on condition that no employee
at.II be paid less than 32 cents per hour.
-.Order 18, terminating the stay granted to
stba Hardle-Tynes Manufacturing Co., Bir-
bngham, Ala., from the minimum wage pro-
Vions of the Code.
OrTder 19, granting exemption to the Hardie-
R.nes. Manufacturing Co., Birmingham, Ala.,
frSm the provisions of article V (b) of the
j',Qde, to the extent that no employee shall be
'Jaid less than 32 cents per hour.
sc-Order 20, terminating the stay granted to
|Iayne & Bowler, Inc., Memphis, Tenn.. from
rtbeimlnlmum wage provisions of the Code.
RADIO BROADCASTING INDUSTRY,
I e No. 129: Order 13, confirming telegraphic
.order dated December 19, 1934, granting
igexemption to Radio Broadcasting Station
WT.A'M of the National Broadcasting Co., lo-
fated In Cleveland, Ohio, from the provisions
,article VII, section 1, subsection (b), of
the Code, Insofar as the Christmas fund show
6 md radio broadcast of that station, which was
tdt be held in the month of December 1934,
concerned.
Rj RAW PEANUT MILLING INDUSTRY,
S e No. 203: Order 9, approving list of occu-
i tlons deemed hazardous in nature or detri-
Fi tal to the health of persons under 18 years
; age.
L RYON AND SILK DYEING AND
PRINTING INDUSTRY, Code No. 172:
0ider 13, certificate on the application of
Cromite Textile Printing Co., Inc., New York
Clty, for the Installation of 4 chromite print:
i,;ng machines and 2 flock and beading units.
.!Order 14, certificate on the application nf
Waverly Piece Dye Works, Inc., Elizabeth,
., for the installation of four 4-foot dye
boxes, one 5-foot dye box, two 8-foot dye boxes,
:cne 12-foot dye box, one 16-foot dye box, and
w' one slack washing machine.
{' REAL ESTATE BROKERAGE INDUS-
'TRY, Code No. 392: Order 8, approving state-
ym.nent of July 7, 1934, issued by the Executive
oSecretary of the National Association of Real
.VJIstate Boards, regarding the fact that work-
tersa employed by members of this industry are
4i rt engaged In any activities which could be
construeded to be involving risk to health or life.
00- REFRIGERATING MACHINERY IN-
..DUSTRY, Code No. 347 J-I: Order 11, grant-
EtI.ig a stay of the provisions of the supple-
R; 'mentary Code, as to all parties subject thereto
4biwhen manufacturing refrigerating machinery
Z!6equIpped with compressors designed to be
;'d'lven by motors of less than one horsepower,
p.provlded the manufacture and sale of such
,.refrigerating machinery shall be subject to
.'ithe provisions of the refrigeration subdivision
fib.the Code for the electrical manufacturing
;"'industry.
: REFRIGERATED WAREHOUSING IN-
A DUSTRY, Code No. 499: Order 8, granting
a.-application of J. R. Marks Produce C6., Colo-
'rado Springs, Col., to increase refrigerated
,:storage space from 1,200 cubic feet to approxl-
: mately 7,500 cubic feet.


RETAIL SOLID FUEL INDUSTRY, Code
No. 290: Order 150-A, modifying lowest rea-
sonable costs for division No. 17, for the
Atlanta trade area comprising Fulton and
DeKalb Counties, Ga.
Order 152-A, approving mine costs of an-
thracite coals and plant costs of coke and
petroleum carbon for division No. 32 for the
St. Louis, Mo., trade area.
Order 152-B, modifying lowest reasonable
costs for division No. 14 for the Roanoke, Vs.,
trade area.
Order 152-0, approving mine costs of an-
thracite coals and costs of coke and petroleum
carbon for division No. 26 for the Chicago
trade area.
Order 152-D, modifying lowest reasonable
costs for division No. 26 for the Chicago, Ill.,
trade area.
Order 153-B, approving lowest reasonable
costs for division No. 48 for the trade area of
Des Molnes, including all that area within the
city limits of Des Moines, Fort Des Moines,
Urbandale, and Valley Junction, Iowa.
Order 153-F, modifying lowest reasonable
costs for division No. 25, State of Illinois ex-
cept counties of St. Clair and Madison, and
areas included and defined as division No. 26.
Order 153-G, approving lowest reasonable
costs for division No. 38 for the trade area of
Denver, Colo.
Order 169, approving mine costs of anthra-
cite coals and plant costs of coke for division
No. 11 for the Wilmington trade area.
Order 176, modifying lowest reasonable
costs for division No. 26 for the trade area of
Chicago, Ill.
Order 177, modifying lowest reasonable
costs for division No. 22 for the Cleveland,
Ohio, trade area.
Order 178, modifying lowest reasonable
costs for division No. 3 for the trade areas
of Albany and Rensselaer Counties ; Onondaga
County; Westchester County; Dutchess and
Putnam Counties; Columbia County; Erie
County; Niagara County; Orange County;
Cayuga County; Chautauqua County; Gene-
see County; Oswego County; Jefferson and
Lewis Counties; Fulton, Warren, Washington,
and Saratoga Counties; and Broome, Cort-
land, Chenango, Otsego, Delaware, Sullivan,
Chemung, Tioga, Tompkins, and Schuyler
Counties, the southern part of Seneca County,
New York, and the townships of South Wav-
erly, Sayre, and Athens in Bradford County,
Pa.\
Order 179, approving lowest reasonable
costs for division No. 20 for the trade areas of
2, Knox County; 2-A, Blount County; 2-B,
Loudon County, Tenn.
Order 180, modifying .lowest reasonable
costs for division No. 42 for trade areaagxos.
1, 3, 6, and 8 of Washington.
Order 181, approving lowest reasonable
costs for division No. 3 for the combined trade
areas of Rensselaer and Albany Counties,
N.Y.
RESTAURANT INDUSTRY, Code No.
282: Order 108, denying application of the Bee
Bee Cafe, Omaha, Nebr., for exemption from
the provisions of article V, sectionI and 2,
and article VI, section 1 of the Code.
Order 104, denying application of Harlan &
Shelton Restaurant, Columbia, Tenn., for ex-
emption from the provisions of article V, sec-
tion 1, of the Code.
Order 105, denying application of the Bat-
tery Park Lunch Room, Inc., New York City,
for exemption from the provisions of articles
V and VI of the Code.
Order 106, denying application of Welch's
Cafe, Fremont, Nebr., for exempt ion from the
provisions of article V, section 1, and article
VI, section 1 (a) of the Code.
RETAIL FOOD AND GROCERY TRADE,
Code No. 182: Order 60, denying application
of Paul J. Fiedler, Marion, Iowa, for efemp-
tlon from the maximum hour provisions of the
Code.
RETAIL SOLID-FUEL INDUSTRY, Code
No. 280: Order 138-A, requiring that all future
orders by the Special Co mittee on Lowest
Cost Determinations, shall be signed for the
Special Committee bv F. A. Hecht, chairman,
provided that a record be kept of the individ-
ual votes of the members of the committee.
Order 153-A, approving lowest reasonable
costs as determined by Divisional Code Au-
thority No. 4,for the Trade Area No. 1, Man-
hattan and Bronx, New York.
Order 153-B, approving lowest reasonable
costs as determined for Division No. 4, Trade
Area No. 2. Erooklyn and that part of Queens
County lying north of Forest Park anid Union
Turnpike, New York.
Order 153-C, approving lowest reasonable
costs as determined for Division No. 4, Trade
Area No. 3, comprising that part of Queens
County lying south of Forest Park and Union
Turnpike, New York.
Order 153-D, approving lowest reasonable
costs as determined by Divisional Code Au-
thority No. 4 for Trade Area No. 4, comprising
Nassau County and that part of Suffolk
County west of a line drawn from Huntington
on the north and Isip on the south.
Order 168, approving mine cost of anthra-
cite coals; costs of coke and petroleum carbon,
and freight rates on products for Division No.
4 for Trade Areas Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4 in New
York.
RETAIL TRADE, Code No. 60: Order 337,
denying application of Mills Bros.. Carbon-
dale, Pu., for exemption from the provisions
of article V', section 5, of the Code.
Order,342, granting a stay of the provisions
of article V, section 1, of .the Code, as to all
parties subject thereto, to the extent that any


retail establishment Is permitted, for the pur-
pose of taking' the January or February 1936
inventories, to work employees who are es-
pecially skilled, any number of hours per day
for a period not to exceed one veek during
January or February, provided the maximum
weekly employees' hours prescribed in that
group of article V, section 1, shall not be ex-
ceeded ; that all hours In excess of the maxi-
mum daily hours specified In said article,
under which the employer has elected to op-
erate on December 31, shall be paid-on a time
and one-third basis and that in no case shall
any peak period allowance as permitted in
this article be used concurrently with the
overtime granted In this order. This stay
shall become effective on January 18, 1935,
and shall terminate February 28, 1935. The
order further provides that a copy shall be
posted in a conspicuous place accessible to all
employees affected thereby.
SAW AND STEEL PRODUCTS MANU-
FACTURING INDUSTRY, AND THE TOY
AND PLAYTHINGS INDUSTRY, Codes
Nos. 274. 86: Order 15, granting exemption to
the Pennsylvania Stamping Corporation, New
York City, from the provisions of articles III,
IV, and V of the Code for the Saw and Steel
Products Manufacturing Industry, and from
the provisions of articles III and IV of the
Code for the toy and playthings industry, on,
condition that it will comply In all of its labor
operations to the provisions of article Ill of
the Code for the fabricated metal products
manufacturing and metal finishing and metal
coating industry, and that it will comply with
all other applicable provisions of the above-
named Codes In the manufacture of its prod-
ucts which are subject to said Codes.
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS MANU-
FACTURING INDUSTRY, Code No. 84-R:
Order 8, granting exemption to the White Sew-
lIug Machine Corporation, Cleveland, Ohio,
from the provisions of article III of the Code,
provided in the operation of its entire plant it
will conform to the wage and hour provisions
of the Sewing Machine Industry Code.
SET-UP PAPER BOX, MANUFACTUR-
ING INDUSTRY, Code No. 167: Order 24,
denying application of the Erie Paper Box Co.,
of Erie, Pa., for exemption from the provisions
of article IV of the Code:
Order 25, denying application of Hoague-
Sprague Corporation of Lynn, Mass, for ex-
emruption from the provisions of article 111,
section l(b), of the Code.
SILK TEXTILE INDUSTRY, Code No. 48:
Order 25, approving Code Authority's revised
budget and basis of contribution for the period
from October 7, 1933, to December 81, 1934.
SLIT FABRIC MANUFACTURING IN-
DUSTRY, Code No. 214: Order 14, approving
Code Authority budget and basis of contribu-
tion for the period from February 1, 1934, to
January 31, 1935.
Order 15, terminating exemption conferred
in paragraph III of Administrative Order
X-36, so that all members shall be required to
contribute their proportionate share of the ex-
penses of administering the Cede notwith-
standing their principal line of business is in
some other industry.
SOAP AND GLYCERINE MANUFAC-
TURING INDUSTRY, Code No. 83: Order
48, granting exemption to the Sherwin-WIU-
liams Co, Cleveland, Ohio, from the provisions
of articles III and IV of the Code, on condi-
tion that its employees engaged in the manu-
facture of soap and/or glycerine and/or
cleansers made with soap and insoluble min-
erals as essential ingredients shall be paid not
less than a minimum wage equal to the mini-
mum wage provided in the Code for the Paint,
Varnish, and Lacquer -Industry; that the
maximum hours for such employees shall be
not more than the maximum hours provided
In the Code for the Paint, Varnish, and Lac-
quer Industry; that once each year it shall
submit to the Executive Secretary of the Code
Authority, a confidential report stating the net
sales of soap, soap products, and/or glycerine
for the preceding calendar year, the net sales
of cleansers made with soap and insoluble
minerals as essential ingredients for the pre-
ceding calendar year, whether such sales
amounted to more or less than 10 percent of
the total sales of all products and/or service
sold by it during'such calendar year, and the
total number of employees engaged by it in a
typical week during such calendar year in the
manufacture of soap and,'or glycerine and/or
such cleaners. The Order also provides that
a copy be posted in a place accessible to all
employees affected thereby.
Order 49, amending Order No. 83-33 grant-
ing application of the Capstone Manufactur-
Ilng Co., Inc., Newark, N. J., for exemption
from the provisions of articles III and IV of
the Code. This amended order provides that
the Capstone Manufacturing Co., Inc., shall
submit a confidential report to the Executive
Secretary of the Code Authority, giving the
same information as specified in Order 48
above quoted.
Order 50, amending Order 83-13; Order 51,
amending Order 83-37; Order 52, amending
Order 83-38. provides that the C. 0. Buchanan
Chemical Co., Cincinnati, Ohio, the Enterprise
Oil Co.. Inc., Buffalo, N. I., and the Eaton
Clark Co., Detroit, Mich., shall submit confi-
dential reports to the Executive Code Author-
ity, giving the same information as specified
In Order 48 above quoted.
Order 53, granting exemption to the Clifton
Chemical Co., Inc., New York City. from arti-
cle IV, paragraph A, subsection 4, of the Code,


to the extent that it be permitted to enij:i,
1 messenger or junior clerk at a salary of n6orit
less than $12 per week. The order requirqj1
that a copy be posted in a place accessible tai
all employees. */
Order 54. amending Order Nos. 83-36 an"
391-7, provides that the W. D. Carpenter W.,
Inc., manufacturing chemists, Syracuse, N. Y'
shall submit a confidential report to tWe Elx -'r
ecutlve Secretary of the Code Authority,:gi,:'
ing the same information as specifedQ 'm
order 48 above quoted.
Order 56, granting exemption to the Hart,
man-Leddon Co., Inc., Philadelphia, Pa.'
from the provisions of articles III and IV,ahad3
terminating Order No. 83-25, provided It huil
mit a confidential report to the Executive Sea,!3
retary of the Code Authority, giving the sangj
information as specified in Order 48-abovsi
quoted. ..
SOLID BRAIDED CORD INDUSTRY:~
Code No. 309: Order 14, terminating exemiaj-s
tlon conferred In paragraph III of Adminils.
trative Order X-36, so that all members shba..
be required to contribute their proportioaa&t.
share of the expenses of administering tthe
Code notwithstanding their principal llneo:f-
business is in some other industry. ::!
TEXTILE PRINT ROLLER ENGRAVI..
ING INDUSTRY, Code No. 324: Order 22,;3
approving Code Authority budget and basis 0at'
contribution for the period from April 1,1934,
to March 31, 1935.
TOLL BRIDGE INDUSTRY, Code. Na
431: Order 11, terminating exemption cona.
.ferred in paragraph III of Administrative,
Order X-36, so that all members shall be re
quired to contribute their proportionate shares
of the expenses of administering the Code fi5t;'
withstanding their principal line of business -
is in some other industry. ..
TRUCKING INDUSTRY, Code No.. 278iI
Order 147, denying application of the MerA-
chants Delivery Service, Raleigh, N. C., for'
exemption from the provisions of article ',
section A, subsection 3, and section B, subsee-
tlion 1 of the Code. i
Order 148, denying application of Girault'
Delivery Co., Inc., Little Rock, Ark., foray '
eruption from the provisions of article .V,
sections A, B, and C of the Code.
.Order 149, extending to February 1. 193
time for submission by the National Code'Au
thority of. report on S-bour day required byi
article V-A, section 4 of the Code. ,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL FOOD ANID'
GROCERY TRADE, Code No. 182: Order 57.
approving Code Authority interim budget.fr..o
the month of January 1935, pending approval.
of longer term budget. ':
WHOLESALE AUTOMOTIVE TRADe"
Code No. 163: Order 18, approving a disinter-rj
sated agency to examine relevant records of.
each member of this trade, as may, subject to'
the approval of the National Industrial Re-
covery Board, be necessary for the purpose f'
verifying the accuracy of reports submitted:
Sin accordance with article VIII, section D of:'
the Code. The choice of Mr. Daniel J. Ryan'
as the disinterested agency is approved awl
his appointment shall become effective 10 days
from the date of this order. Order is dated.
January 16, 1935..
WHOLESALE FOOD AND GROCERy
TRADE AND RETAIL FOOD AND GR60-
CERY TRADE, Codes Nos. 182 and 196'
Order 58, amending Administrative Orders,
Nos. 182-57 and 196-43, by striking out theltB
five lines of the order and inserting in lls'
thereof, the following: "be and it is herebyi
approved as of January 1, 1935, unless gooi
cause to the contrary is shown to the Nationa
Industrial Recovery Board, on or before Jan"i'
ary 31, 1935, and the said Board issues a sub
sequent order modifying or rescinding a8u
approval or modifying or disapproving sil.
interim budget."
WHOLESALING OR DISTRIBUTING
TRADE, Code No. 201: Order 32, denyifI
application of Smith & Herrick Co.. Alban?
N. Y., for exemption from the provisions:f-
article III, section 1, subsection (d) of th
Code."
Order 33, denying application of D..&"]
Musel Co., Watertown, Wis., for exenipti
from thie provisions of article Ill, sectiodn1
subsections (c) and (c) of the Code. .
WIRING SERVICE INDUSTRY,-Ord.
4-C, approving supplementary Code for
Industry which is a subdivision of the ElecST
cal Manufacturing Industry. This approV
is subject to the following conditions: (1
That the last sentence of section 2, article
be stayed for a period of 30 days trom.i.t
effective date of the Code, or until the-N..
tional Industrial Recovery Board shall, by.i
further order, otherwise direct; (2) that se,
tion 2 of article III he deleted; (3) that
tion 9 of article VI be stayed pending futril
study or until the National Industrial Reco
ery Board shall, by its further order, oth_
wise direct; (4) that article VII be stay.e
for a period of 15 days from the effectiveldli
of the Code, or until the National IndUt'
Recovery Board shall, by its further ord af,
otherwise direct. .
WOOL TEXTILE INDUSTRY, CodeY'
3: Order 40, granting exemption to the.G0
all Worsted Co., Sanford, Me., from the pr6d
sions of the first paragraph of article IIIs.
employees in the burling and mending deps
ments, to the extent that these employees
be employed 48 hours per week provided,
and one-third shall be paid for all houLO:.
excess of 40 hours per week. i"6M


"" .. . .'. .., .. "." .' i" U' :, 5 ".* v ." ., .. 'a,.".'s ^










54L1-J.LJAJIS |hAV JLA. m .&AJ Ja. '-j V AJIUAV.. mj

Sof Codes Discussed

v at Hearings
"* ~ (Continued from pagle 3)

^ The steel indu:tflallst declared the only
w:;tay to get real employment is to "unfreeze"
^.the capital goods securities market by modify-
:'ing restrictions placed upon the lending of
,, capital to exploit the durable goods industries,
'such as the securities and security exchange
,actB.
'; "We have to depend upon capital if we are
.to maintain the American standard of living ",
.hbe asserted.
Although the Iron and Steel Code estab-
lished a maximum 40-hour week, averaged
%.over a 6-month period, Mr. Hook said expert-
/.ence during the last 17 months has been that
.'it is not possible to give employees the maxi-
:mum hours of work permitted under the pres-
sat limitation."
: He said Last year our employees actually
Averaged only 32 hours a week. This Is pri-
marnly due to the fact that with better than
:average operations we must carry a large
.:number of men who are not normally required.
::Thus, In average or low periods of operation,
the available work must be spread over this
.-excess force as well as over the normal
.'permanent force. * *"
S"The 30-hour week would produce an aver-
!age 24-hour week in the steel industry. Be-
c'ause of the 40-hour limitation and the
[Jepressed state of the steel markets in 1934,
I average earnings of steel employees amounted
,to only $18.39 weekly, even with hourly rates
*.at s level higher than the average for all in-/-
dustrial workers. The 30-hour week would
'reeze this income at existing levels and de-
":')rive steel workers of the opportunity to
:Increase their earnings as business improved."
Sees Rise In Production
SProf. 0. G. Saxon, who said he was not rep-
resenting Yale University, but expressing his
*own opinion, charged a 30-hour week would
.. either bring about a great increase in prices
J ,to be passed on to the consumer or another
Downward "deflationary spiral."
SHe expressed the belief that already under
.way there are "natural" forces aided by de-
:' valuation of the dollar, which, barring infla-
.ptionary moves, would bring about a lower
t plateau of prices, and which, in turn, would
SInduce reemployment and increase production
'. jy reasserting a parity between all the ele-
|]nents of production.
SIn support of his contention against the
80....-bour week, Dr. Saxon criticized the use of
Figures in a pamphlet published by the Ameri-
can Federation of Labor. He asserted that
the author used a very selected group of in-
Sdustries in showing that the Income of the
wage earner dropped during the depression
.more than twice as much as property incomes.
: The speaker gave his support to the profit
.motive in industry, declaring there were
tendencies in some quarters to discredit it "on
the grounds it is unsocial and should be elimi-
Snated." While he said he would not quarrel
with those ,who wanted State socialism, he
said it would be impossible to maintain the
Scapitalistic system, without the profit motive,
-"' nd "we will never be able to come out of this
depression as a capitalistic Nation-the'result
Would be Fascism, Hitlerism, or Communism,
i-:between which there would be little choice."
'In commenting upon the desired revival in
: the producers goods field, Dr. Saxon said it Is
i: ,dependent upon profitable operations in the
\consumers goods field. "Without this profit,
p ,which, must be sufficiently large to have wiped
,_.put Impaired capital and set up adequate re-
[.i.rves against contingencies,' no manufac-
W.,Arer will feel justified in expanding plant
';l d equipment, or replacing obsolete plant
e'pn1 equipment", the speaker explained. I
"Conjuring", smuggling or kicking out of
r: Ror.ers from under NRA's big tent of maxi-
.. *mu hours", was the theme of the state-
;ment by Arthur 0. Wbarton. The official
'*.. of the machinists' association asserted 8,575,-
000 of all employees In codified industries are
- .under Codes in which the basic work week is
; more than 40 hours, and there are some 50
Industries uncodlfled.
SHe declared a maximum hour provision av-
eraged over a long period is worse than no
i' limitation upon hours at all and that peak pe-
i riod provisions are another factor used to
L' conjure" workers from under code benefits.
:., ~ Consumer Viewpoint
SThomas C. Blaisdell. Jr., executive director
of-the NRA Consumers Advisory Board, de-
clared the National Recovery Administration
,:- has taken only the first steps in the direction
.of recovery", and he Issued a call for In-
L .creased use of Code machinery for greater
6" Production.
S"More goods to be consumed, more services
to be enjoyed, higher standards of living for
Sthe masses of our people-these are the endnr--
ig Interests of the consumer ", Mr. Blaisdell
SBald.
:': He continued, the major interests of labor
i::s and the consumer are in harmony. The policy
!..e urge in behalf of the consumer is precisely
l1:1.1be policy which American labor should urge
Id.f Its own behalf. Both interests demand ia-

F 6ftsed output, expanded and regularized
iemloyment, enhanced efficiency, lowered
di;goo.e and prices which are low enough to
'jdve goods and services to their ultimate use.
Tahol)6r has no more to gain than does the con-
jrii tmnh from a wage or price policy which
i' tehits~n industrial stalemate."


-..&LuL I IULIJlIUILY 1V1C1i1U UC1-t-rip UVcU


The National Industrial Recovery Board
approved, during the past week, the following
selections and' appointments of Code Author-
ity members.
ANTIFRICTION BEARING INDUS-
TRY.-W. E. Umstattd, Canton, Ohio; F. G.
Hughes, Bristol, Conn.; A. C. Davis, James-
town, N. Y.; G. A. Strom, Cicero, Ill.; H. A.
Schatz, Poughkeepsie, N. Y.; and F. 0. Burk-
holder, Chicago, Ill.
CONSTRUCTION MACHINERY DIS-
TRIBUTING TRADE.-Oarli B. Baker, Los
Angeles, Calif., as chairman, vice E. K. Hurst,
Sioux Falls, S. Dak., resigned.
GRAPHIC ARTS INDUSTRIES.-J. F.
Wolter, Huntington, ind.; John F. Calhoon,
East Liverpool, Ohio; D. E. Rheutan, Rich-
mond, Va.; Cyril Taylor Chester, W. Va.;
A. M. Farnsworth, Camden, N. J.; J. A. Pid-
geon, Salem, Ohio; and H. W. Billiard, Buf-
falo, N. Y., as administrative agency for the
church envelope systems national product
group.
HAIR AND JUTE FELT INDUSTRY.-
Theodore Wilde. Chicago, Ill.; Sidney J.
Alien, Detroit Milch.; Charles Lachman and
Joseph Scholes, Jr., both of Philadelphia, Pa.;
and Jack Chapman, Chicago, 111.
MARKING D E V I C E S INDUSTRY.-
J. R. Swift, chairman, and Henry J. Hanson,
both of Chicago, Ill.; John Schweizer, St.
Louis, Mo.; Herman Anderson, Pittsburgh,
Pa.; Charles 0. Lee, Detroit, Mich.; Harry
Jonas, New 7ork, N. Y.; Homer E. Wlllard,
Toledo Ohio; J. M. Patrick, San Francisco,
Calif.; Herman Seefriled, Cleveland, Ohio;
Philip Sheridan, New York, N. Y.; and Frank
J. Spaeth, Boston, Mass., to serve as the tem-
porary Code Authority 90 days more, or until
their successors are elected and/or appointed.
MICA INDUSTRY.-Grover H. Wilsey, ad-
ministration member, vice Francis E. Lee,
resigned, to serve during the pleasure of the
National Industrial Recovery Board.
MOTOR V E HI C L E MAINTENANCE
TRADE.-Harold R. Pinkerton, Yakima,
Wash.; Manly S. Harris, San Francisco,
Calif.; Ben F. Englander, Denver, Colo.;
Louis H. Reamer, Willmar, Minn.; M. L. Clay-
ton, Dallas, Tex.; P. Harvey Reia, St. Louis,
Mo.; Alvin L. Belle Isle, Atlanta, Ga.; P. C.
Orr; Charlotte, N. C.; Joseph P. Werner,
Peoria, Ill.; Sam Frank, Newport, Ky.; Frank
C. Just, Akron, Ohio; John Lamberti, Scran-
ton, Pa.; A. Robert Perry, Syracuse. N. Y.;
and Lyman H. Johnson, New Haven, Conn.,
to serve as the temporary Code Authority.
PAPER BAG MANUFACTURING IN-
DUSTRY (Executive Authority for the
Coffee Bag Division).-Gordon H. Friend,
Philadelphia, Pa.; W. L. S. Alexander, New
York, N. Y.; S. N. Williams, Devon, Pa.;
B. W. McGrath, New York, N. Y.; and Sam
Kardon, Philadelphia, Pa. ,
PERFUME, COSMETIC, AND OTHER
TOILET PREPARATIONS INDUSTRY.-
Herman L. Brooks, New York, N. Y., vice
C. S. Welch. resigned.
RETAIL TRADE (Local Retail Code Au-
thority for Athens, Ohio).-Charles 0. Bur-
nett, as president.
REFRIGERATED WAREHOUSING IN-
DUSTRY:-George D. Liles, Buffalo, N. Y.,
vice J. R. Shoemaker, Elmira, N. Y., resigned.
RETAIL JEWELRY TRADE (Local Re-
tail Code Authority of Minneapolis).-Mau-
rice Adelshelm of S. Jacobs & Co., vice J. D.r


He said the Consumers Advisory Board
recommended the following policies:
(1) A maximum limit on hours, not on a
national basis but uniformity within each
grand division of related industries, with the
limit determined on Its merits for each
division:
(2) Certain rigidities in the control of em-
ployment conditions, with minimum use of
tolerance and peak periods in maximum hours
provisions; and wider and more general use of
the device of overtime payment.
(3) A minimum wage as a rock-bottom bul-
wark for good citizenship, fixed at the "decent
living" levels spoken of by President Roose-
velt when he signed the Recovery Act.
(4) Lengthening of the time period used as
a base in the minimum wage provisions of the
Codes. The usual Code provision is for an
hour minimum. Workers do not live, that
is to say, consume by the hoar." Wage min-
ima established in Codes, at first in the less
highly seasonal industries.
(5) Geographical differentials should be
narrowed, usually by leveling up the minimum
rates in low wage areas.
(6) Classified wage scales should not be
made a general feature of the present Code
structure. If the minimum wage tends to
become the maximum, the remedy is to be
found through collective bargaining-not
through Code machinery."
(7) Adequate representation of labor and
consumers on Code Authorities.
Unsatisfactory Incomes
Recommending a program to promote Ilgher
annual earnings by the development of mutual
cooperation which comes from the free organi-
zation of workers with employers, Father
Haas said labor wholeheartedly supports
other efforts looking toward social security,
but that "highly assured annual earnings as
the result of such cooperation is to be desired
above everything else."


Dougherty; and Lester Johantgen, vice chair-
man and Lawrence Cohen, chairman.
RETAIL JEWELRY TRADE (Local Re-
tail Code Authority of Mobile, Ala.).-
Heyman Gabriel, Mobile, Ala., as a representa-
tive.
RETAIL TRADE.-Rose Schneiderman,
vice Dr. Leo.Wolman, resigned, to serve dur-
ing the pleasure of the National Industrial
Recovery Board.
RETAIL TRADE (Local Retail Code Au-
thority of Longmont, Colo.).-R. D. Scott as
secretary, vice Fred W. Sager.
RETAIL TRADE (Local Retail Code Au-
thority of Tampa, Fla.).-Placing the local
retail Code Authority for Lake Wales, Fla.,
under this Jurisdiction.
RETAIL TRADE (Local Retail Code Au-
thority of Laconia, N. H.).-Edwin H.
Shannon, chairman and Mrs. Grace N. Maloon,
secretary-treasurer, to serve for a period of 1
year which began October 31, 1934.
RETAIL TRADE (Local Retail Code Au-
thority of Newburgh, N. Y.).-Frank E.
Forsyth, treasurer, vice Charles B. Forsyth,
deceased.
RETAIL TRADE (Local Retail Code Au-
thority of Oklahoma City, Okla.).-Ed. C.
Sturm, chairman, vice J. F. Harbour, resigned.
Mike Monroney as representative of the fur-
niture division to succeed Mr. Harbour. D. L.
Manley, executive secretary, vice H. G. Mit-
chell, resigned.
RETAIL TRADE (Local Retail Code Au-
thority of Dyersburg, Tenn.).-W. M. Fowler,
chairman, M. J. Rosenbloom, vice chairman,
M. W. Well, secretary-treasurer, W. M. Fow-
ler, C. H. Honeycutt, W. M. Helmer, W. J.
Inman, M. J. Rosenbloom, Win. Salenfriend,
and W. A. Sigman.
SAFETY RAZOR AND SAFETY RAZOR
BLADE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.-
S. C. Stampleman, Boston, Mass., vice G. B.
Lambert.
TOY AND PLAYTHINGS INDUSTRY.-
W. 0. Coleman, Chicago, Ill.; WV.. A. Coventry,
Mount Joy, Pa.; T. S. Dowst and H. H. Elliott,
both of Chicago, Ill.; B. B. Fleisechaker, New
York, N. Y.; A. C. Gilbert, New Haven, Conn.;
F. J. Hannon, Cleveland, Ohio; W. C. Leh-
man, Cannelton, Ind.; and H. C. White, North
Bennington, Vt
WAXED PAPER INDUSTRY.-Leo E.
Croy. Menasha, WIs.; R. B. Donneliey, Chi-
cago, Ill.; W. J. Eisner and Walker Hamilton,
both of New York, N. Y.; Leslie L. Jacobs,
Dalls, Tex.; H. 0. Nichols, New York, N. Y.;
V. E. Nunez. Nashua, N. H.; Homer M. Sin-
clair, Holyoke, Mass.; L. 0. Turner, River
Rouge, Mich.; and V. H. Wilshire, Dayton,
Ohio.
CANVAS GOODS INDUSTRY.-I. P.
Smith. Toledo. Ohio; H. B. Marbury, Atlanta,
Ga.; and J. J. Daus, Evansville, Ind.
WOOLENS AND TRIMMINGS DISTRIB-
,UTING TRADE.-Ross F. Bergh, Chicago,
I1.; F. F. Falkenbach, New York, N. Y.;
Samuel R. Lippincott, Jr., Philadelphia, Pa.;
Harold Milblank and Frederick Willis, both of
New York, N. Y., to represent the National
Woolens and Trimmings Association.
WOOLENS AND TRIMMINGS DISTRIB-
UTING TRADE (A Division of the Whole!
* saling or Distributing Trade).-Thomas E.
Ochiltree to represent nonassociation mem-
bers, vice R. Ellison Thompson, to serve dur-
ing the pleasure of the National Industrial
Recovery Board.


He said direct relationship between em-
ployer and employee should be supervised by
Government "to the extent that such supervi-
sion Is necessary."
In stressing the necessity of establishing
these assured annual earnings, Father Haas
said "the lot of the average worker, even
when employed, is today far from satisfactory.
Even in the year 1929, 05 percent of those
receiving incomes in this country received less
than $1,500 during the year. The sharp re-
duction In wage rates and in working time
that has occurred during the depression has
reduced the yearly income of many workers
below the level of subsistence."
Miss Rose Scbneiderman said the most Im-
portant step that can be taken in the direction
of establishing fair competition and beneficial
Code results, is by establishing fair wages In
competing industries. She recommended bas-
ing points for common, semiskilled, and skilled
labor as a step towards "clearing the present
morass of Code provisions for wages above the
minimum."
She further recommended that "loose
clauses" covering readjustment of wages
above the minimum be rewritten so that a
"real long pull balance" between labor and
management be permanently established.


Code Authority By-

laws Approved
Academic Costume Industry (with excep-
tions).
Book Publishing Industry (Trade Book Pub-
lishing Division).
Book Publishing Industry (Medical and
Allied Book).
Candlewick Bedspread Industry (with ex-
ception ).
Canvas Stitched Belt Manufacturing Indus-
try (with exception).


Modifications
The National Industrial Recovery Boasil
during,the past week, approved amendment
to Codes of fair competition as follows:- *.
Asbestos Industry (Brake Liningg "Dw
ston).-AnAmendment approved January'; 7
1935, 2 amendments to the merchandisl g'
plan designed to remove certain restrictioC
as to the sale of friction materials occurring
in the Industrial field; 2 amendments:-d
signed to remote restrictions which would'fi;2
terfere with the development of new prod-.
ucts; 1 amendment was changed to clarfy
the meaning; and the fifth amendment is fdto
the purpose of clarification and to prevent .t
use of subsidiaries to circumvent the purpose
of this provision. This amendment becomes
effective 15 days from the date of approval
unless good cause to the contrary is shown. .-
Bituminous Coal Industry.-Amendmetii
approved January 25,1935, amends article VI.
by adding a'preamble and modifying section
2, 3, and 4. Defines the fair market prices oxf
coal and the methods of administering tbe
Code provisions relating to such fair marke t
prices. The amendment also changes arficW.
VII, section 2, by providing an impartial
board of arbitration to settle disputes ant
controversies with respect to fair compeittle,
prices and practices relating thereto. .
Complete Wire and Iron Fence Industry :(4
Ditssion, of the Fabricated Metal Prodsitd
Manufacturing anid Metal Finishing ...._
Metal Coating Industry).-Amendment .'A
proved January. 22, 1935, incorporates .1
principles in office memorandum 228 relating
to the filing of prices.' ,. ,..i
Cotton Textile Indu/try.-Amesdmenti. %
proved January 22, 1935, amends the tria
practices governing the merchandlsingjuli
carded cotton yarn by removing 'the obUi;'9
tion, upon a selling agent to furnish the si
ning mill with the name of the prospect'd
customer where the selling agent guarantee
performing of a contract. Also liberali.zes -
discount and dating provisions. ..-
Dress Menufactwring Ind.ustry.-Aamenei
meat approved January 23, 1935,' grantsati
thority to the Code Authority and/or 't.
National Industrial Recovery Board: to;re|i
quire members of the industry to keep sucI
necessary records as may be required, `ani
provides that falsifying such records or wiitiY
holding information be a violation of -the
Code. :i
Earthenware Manufacturing Industry..
Amendment approved January 23, 1935, co'd
recta certain typographical errors; eliminates
the maintenance and repair employees from
the maximum hours provisions; changes-the
term "apprentices" to the word learners:!';-,
and redrafts Code-provisions relating. f0
handicapped persons, standards of safety'
and health, posting of labor provisions, ':and
dismissal of employees. U:'i
Household Ice Refrigerator Indlstry.=-
Amendment approved January 19; 195)
amends article III, section 1, to read as f6
lows: "No employee shall be permitted'to
work in excess of forty (40) hours in any.'.1
week or eight (8) hours in any twenty-foi
(24) hour period, except as otherwise, pr.
vided in this article III." Adds a new subset
don (c) to article III, section 1, permlttint,
plant and factory employees to work 48 hour
per week during S weeks In any year nndei.
certain conditions. Adds a new section :3tio
article III, limiting the work week to six (6)"
days. Amends article V, section 5, regarding
possible conflict with State or Federal laws'.
Amends article V, section 6, regarding reclas
sification of employees. Adds a new sectidiT
12 to article V, prohibiting the discharge'cfr
an employee for Code complaints. Amendi
article VI, section 3, regarding the powers addl
.duties of the Code Authority. Amends artp-
cle VI, section 10, substituting the woed
"prescribe for the word provide." Ame.ddV
article VI, section 11, giving the National .IiA'
dustrial Recovery Board the power of review;
after the Code Authority acts. Amends artli
cle VII, section 15, by permitting shlpmeii".
between October 1 and April 1 to be date
April 1. Deletes article VII, section .i18
Amends article VII, section 19, by adUig.
prohibition of subterfuge. Adds a new see
tion 20 to article VII, removing export traI
from Code provisions relating to prices':-%
terms of selling, shipping, or marketing;
Amends article VIII, section. 1. .relating "td
filing of prices. Amends article IX, sectlon2,
relating to the power of the Code Authority
to suggest changes in or mbtdiflcation .t-,th
Code. ,
Sanitary and Waterproof Specialties Manu'.
facturing Industry.-Amendment approved
January 18, 1935, permits the Code Authority
to incorporate. r .
Warm Air Register Induutry.-Amendment
approved January 7, 1935, permits the Code
Authority to incur reasonable obligations rie&'.:
essary to support the administration of thei
Code and to submit an Itemized budget ata
equitable basis of assessment Lpon member'
Sof the industry to the National Industriic l
Recovery Board for approval. !:..:




:'. .,..">-
\~~.. .,. . -*; . *.- i b,.=:..:"


! .. ,. ....






..... ,. -- I r a
d i the L ea.t her I nduistr '


: "^ INDEX OF PRODUCTION -
7, % .^ _/ -- -- t .. i------ ,


r0. INDEX OF MAN- _HOURS_ _- _------
'0 I "I ,.. .,


7" I 1 \ '- LEATHER STOCKS ''_ _
.7 ---- '-- ^ '^ ^ ^ ^ .' =.-=---1 ---------------



",. RAW HIDE AND SKIN STOCKS
"r ." ..-4 !- ."a.-, I" -1"1 I 4!% :.-,/ / % ;
I 0 --- .__ '1 '.e

.'_X_.._A_ .".LEATHER SHIPMENTS ________
v xvJ< <- L /, -.] ,*
, ., ,, -..... \ / .- ';.
xd.p.d"A'x \ ., !,i. n



,,' I - ,. NDEX OF'LE THE PRICES


____________________________\ ___________-__________ ____/go-c,_________________________


M A--I-m.--

INDEX OF HIDE AND SKIN PRICES ii______1 _________ _______ I
" II " 1I I ll ~ll il II lI II II I l I II III 1 .11 I I i IIIH 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I


-; M J S D M J S D M J S D M
S1929 1930 1931 I!
,: Sources: Bureau of Labor Statistics-Employment and pay roll indexes, NRA ad-
Aj;ustment to 1933 Census totals, and average weekly wages; average hours, and average
P,*hourly wages from 1932 to date; and price Indexes. National Industrial Conference
-Board-Average hours and average hourly wages through 1931, the latter multiplied by


This week's chart presents a picture of developments during the past 6 years In the
,.,idustry which manufactures finished leather from raw hides and skins. In most re-
piects the movements here indicated resemble the more moderate fluctuations which dis-
s'l. ulsh basic consumer goods in years of depression. And in those series suffering more
-ip.'nohnced declines, especially those for labor and production, there Is evident a marked
!Trcovewry since the middle of 1933.'.
'?: In the uppermost series of the graph three curves reflecting data for the individual
'.6rieir show first that the hourly wage, after some decrease, had by November of last year
a ly risen above the level of 1929. At the same time the usual scissors" movement
o ated with adoption of the Codes is apparent, as the curve of weekly hours crosses
at for the hourly wage. As for his total income, the wage earner, who has experi-
c--. e6c~d some decrease and then substantial increase In his pay envelop, is still receiving
'a Lbout 20 percent less than his predepresslon average. But in view of the lower cost of
'.'Lliering his wages have practically the same purchasing power as in 1929.
'In the next lower section of our chart, four curves of operation for the industry as a
unit indicate that employment and production figures have recovered almost all losses
.;of the worst depression years, while total pay rolls are about 15 percent below their 1929
.I"level. In these series one of the most significant features is the widening range between
:. production and man-hours, representing a clear increase in employee productivity.
(.4 4
W. GO.E.Eu I
7 4 ', ':-w '
A 4 ," L,-


J S D
932


M


1
1933


60
50


)


I10
30 "'
300'
goo

70O



o ...(f

.40
.-Z*


M D M J /-S M J
1934 1935


0.9574. Bureau of the 'Census-Production, shipments, and stocks through 1931.
Tanner's Council of America-Production, shipments, and stocks from 1932 to date
Chart prepared exclusively for the Blue Eagle by the Division of Research and
Planning, NRA.
'* 'I'
..-v
Another interesting relationship appears in the comparison between the curve for week
hours at the top of the chart and that for man-hours, which has varied very t
although the number of workers has Increased some 25 percent..
In passing to the lower half of the cart, we find more consistently pronounced mov'
ments In the series for stocks and prices. We see first that inventories of finished leader
which had leen accumulating earlier in the depression were reduced in the second quarter
of 1933 to a level lower than that even for 1928. During the past year they haVe
gradually increased but have not reached the average volume of 1929. Stocks of rai
hides and skins,- on the other hand, although showing a depletion during 1934 s9.0
remain considerably larger than the average supply of 1929.
Some correspondence between these movements and the fluctuation of wholesale
prices will be naturally assumed. For both finished leather and raw hides and skin,
prices rose rapidly in 1933 when inventories decreased, but have .since been falling..i
may be observed from the chart, fluctuations have been greater .in the prices of ra,
hides and skins. One cause for the decline last year was the creation of abnoaii
large stocks resulting from the slaughter of drought-stricken cattle on a large scale. .i
Whatever the future movements of prices In this Industry, we should expect stab.,,
at least In production, since 85 percent of all leather stocks are consumed in the mant
ture of footwear, for which, even at the worst period of depression, the demand (in t.*0
of quantity if not quality) maintained surprising uniformity.'i..


r PIRTlmN OFFiCEI rea


4 ., .-, x, =,


.4.'"


40'
.*. -,'.

30


20, ..


kGE HOURLY WAGE IN CENTS


-~41


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