The Blue Eagle ( 1934- )

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Title:
The Blue Eagle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
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United States -- National Recovery Administration
Publisher:
National Recovery Administration ( Washington, D.C )
Publication Date:

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Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 16917556
System ID:
AA00021018:00025

Full Text










V i, No. 25


Issued Weekly by the National


November 26, 1934 -
.. .


-RA Appoints

New Retail Fuel
Code Authority


Membership of Committee In-
"created and Provides for
Representation of Labor
S and Consumers

I'*A new National Code Authority for
'jreetail sojid fuel industry has been
lgneed by the Naliddal Industrial
ecovery Board.
SThe new body is the result of the ac-
tip of the National Industrial Recov-
Ij-.Board, following a meeting of
representative of the industry, in in-
!.creasing the maximum voting member-
ship of the Code Authority From 7 to 9
iand in providing for representation of
.labor and consumers on the authority.
,"The National Retail Coal MeI'chants Asso-.
:lation has named 4 of its 5 representatives,
.;sad has asked additional time for selecting
tie fifth. The National Industrial Recovery
0Bard has appointed 4 voting members and
BsioDvotng administration members to rep-
meat labor, consumers, and the NRA, bring-
lg.'the total membership to 12.
.Personnel of the new Code Authority, nomi-
nated by the executive committee of the
National Retail Coal Merchants Association
.611ows:
;'H. J. Dane, Iowa City, Iowa, president of
"the Northwestern 'Retail Coal Dealers Asso-
idation of Minneapolis and vice president' bof
region 6 of the Retail Coal Merchants Asso-
cdabaon; Martin F. Shea, vice president of
Barns Brothers, New York; 0. C. Young,
Worcester, Mlass., vice president for Massa-
eChusetta of the New' England Coal Dealers
"Association and a director of the Retail Coal
Merchants Association; J. A. Woodcock Jr.,
bienlle, N. C., secretary-treasurer of Citi-
Tl. Transfer and Coal Co., Asheville, N. C.
*,.ppointpd by the National Industrial Re-
*covery Board: John Farbarich, Pittsburgh,
m'-ember of the United Truck Distributors of
0enasylvania; Albert Silk, Topeka, Kans.,
6"n Independent coal-yard operator; ,Harry
'andenbtlrg, Brooklyn, N. Y.. a director of
tle Brooklyn Coal Yard Owners Association,
c.; -and William McMaster, Philadelphia,
memberber of the Independent Coal Truckers
':Association of Philadelphia.
.-.All of the above members receive voting
.power on the new Code Authority. Because
. of. technicalities relating to the bylaws of the
.Retail Coal Merchants Association, appoint-
..pmeat.of a member from Chicago will be an-
b.oanced at a later date.
... In addition to the above members, non-
*voting representatives of the National Re-
!.0covery Administration are as follows:
S*. PFrank A. Hecht, chairman of the NRA spe-
i:'cialr committee on lowest reasonable retail
Scoal. costs and deputy administrator in
chargege of the industry's Code: W. L. Chan-
dler, Washington, representing the NRA Con-
,' P'lers' Advisory Board, and Fred Tobin, Jr.,
-'Washington, representing the NRA Labor
! Aft-sory Board.
h.e National Industrial Recovery Board's
.actionH in increasing the Code Authority's
.niemberqhlp wias motivated by concern for
e pif public interest in desiring the Code Au-
j;thorlty to he truly representative of the
| industry which reported $1.000,0,000,000 sales
I.a:;1983 and to function alike for Industry,
',labor and consumers.
1'The National Code Authority resigned in a
-body September 4. though Divisional Code
SAqthoritles remained intact. The National
'.o...teovery Adminlst'ration on September 7
5SOtlIed the latter that a temporary agency
F'..; ,Continued on page 3, column I)


Car Advertising

Trade Code

SApproved
2- 'ie National Industrial Recovery Board
i lia approved a Code for the car-advertising
trade to be effective December 3.
r tpe Code provides a minimum wage of
Pei, r week, a basic work week of 40 hours
..4r,,Ployvees outside the employer's shop,
a. an a basic work week of 37L. hours for
er employees.
Managerial or executive employees receiv-
lag $35 weekly or more, and outside sales-
....L_ are excted from the hours provisions.
our hours weekly overtime, to be paid at
.:one and One-half the regular rate, is allowed
for emergency requirements for changes in
*car displays.
Oployees now receiving $50 or more per


The President Asks NRA to
Haie Study Made of Labor
Conditions in Automobile
Industry
The National Ind-ustrlal Recovery
Board at the direction of the President
has undertaken a study of the pos-
sibilities -of regularizing employment
and otherwise improving the conditions
of labor in the automobile manufac-
turing industry.
The study will be conducted by a
group of Impartial public officials and
opportunity will be given representa-
tives of the interests involved, includ-
ing labor, management, and consumers,
to present their opinions and any sup-
porting factual data.
When the President signed the Ex-
ecutive Order extending the Code of
fair competition for the automobile
manufacturing industry to February 1,
1935, lie stated that a study would be
Institute which might contribute to-
ward improvements in stabilizing em-
ployment in the industry and reducing
further the effects of seasonal factors.
On November 21 the board was re-
quiested to organize the study through
its Research and Planning Division in
collaboration with the Bureau of Labor
Statistics of the Department of Labor
and other Federal agencies.
The test of the letter from the Presi-
dent to the chairman of the board
follows:
WARM SPREINGs, GA.,
November 21, 193.;.
Dear Msa. WILLIAMS:
In connection with the recent exten-
sion of the Automobile Code I said
that I wouMld cause a study to be made
of the possibilities of regularizing em-
ployment and otherwise improving the
conditions of labor in this industry.
Such a srudy should be made by a
group of impartial public officials who
should utilize all existing sources of
information and the cooperation of
all Government departments and agen-
cies concerned with the problem pre-
sented. 'Also, an opportunity should be
given to representatives of the various
economic interests involved, including
labor, management, and consumers, to
present orally, or in writing, their
opinions and any supporting factual
data.
Because of the relation of this study
to the formulation of Codes of fair
competition under the National Indus-
trial Recovery Act, it should be under-
taken in connection with the work
of the Nationhl Industrial Recovery
Board, which should supply the neces-
sary facilities.
Accordingly, I am now requesting
the National Industrial Recovery Board
to organize this study through its Re-
search and Planning Division, in col-
laboration with Bureau of Labor Sta-
tistics of the Department of Labor
and such other Federal agencies as it
may be found desirable to call upon
for assistance.
When a report of this study has been
prepared, it should be reviewed by the
National Industrial Recovery Board
and transmitted to me with a sum-
mary statement of the views of the
National Industrial Recovery Board
upon the feasibility and methods of
effectuating any improvements in the
conditions and operations of the in-
dustry along the lines suggested in the
report. Perhaps I should add thqt no
other action by the National Indus-
trial Recovery Board will be expected
until ample opportunity has been given
to interested parties to review the re-
sults of this study and to present their
views on the questions involved.
Very truly yours,
FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT.
Hon. S. CLAY WILLIAMs,
Chirman, National Industrial
Recovery Board,
Washington, 'D. 0.


week are to receive at least the same wage
for the shorter work week. Wage increases
under the President's Reemployment Agree-
ment are to be "at least maintained."
The Code defines the trade as the produc-
tion for others of display advertising and
the services incidental thereto in or upon
street cars, trucks, busses, cars, and stations
of elevated railways, subway, and steam or
electric railways, and such related subdivi-
sions as may from time to time be included
under the provisions of this Code."
Trade-practice rules prohibit false billing,
defamation of competitors, threats of law-
suits, bribing of employees, and Inducing
/ breach of contracts between competitors and
their customers.
The Code will be administered by a Code
Authority to consist of not more than five
Industry members plus as many additional
administration members as the NRA may
specify.


Proposal Made for Revision-


of NRA Compliance and


Enforcement Methods .

William H. Davis, Former Director of Compliance, in New::
Position of Adviser, Makes Report Recommending
SSeparate Treatment of Labor and Trade-
: Practice Provisions

Proposals for basic revision bSf NRA compliance and enforcement methods6.;
have been made to the National Industrial Recovery Board by William H.;
Davis, former director of compliance. Mr. Davis was persuaded to return to.
NRA on a part-time basis, as far as his private business permits, in a new'
assignment as special adviser on compliance and enforcement problems.
The report, which is still utinder consideration by the board, was made public
in the belief that discussion of its proposals would aid in determination of NRA :
policies.


Mr. Davis recommends separate treatment
of labor and trade practice provisions.
Under this plan he proposed that the ex-
isting field organization of NRA be trans-
formed into a Code labor enforcement service
and that there be created separately under



Machinery Allied

Products Code.

Subdivisions
A coal-cutting machine subdivision and a
-coal-mine loading machine subdivision have
* beep set up under the Code for the machinery
and allied products industry by approval of
two amendments by the National Industrial
Recovery Board, it has been announced.. The
amendments defining the two' subdivisions,
which will be known as paragraphs 48 and
49 of article II of the approved Code,. follow:
S Coal-mine loading subdivision means the
manufacturing and, or assembling for sale
and selling by the manufacturer and/or as-
sembler, for use' in loading coal or other
material underground in coal mines, mobile
types of loading machines; including spare,
repair, and replacement parts thereof and
supplies and,'or equipment incident thereto
when manufactured and, 'or sold by a manu-
facturer of such mobile types df loading
machines.
"Coal-cutting machine subdivision means
the manufacturing and/or assembling for
sale and selling by the mantifactlrer and/or
assembler, of coal-cutting machines most com-
monly used underground in coal mines, but
which may be used in the production of other
minerals such .as rock salt, potash, and gyp-
sum. Included in the manufacturing and/or
assembling for sale and selling of coal-cut-
ting machines are spare, repair, and replace-
ment parts thereof and supplies and or
equipment incident thereto when manufac-
tured and'or sold by a manufacturer of such
coal-cutting machines."
/


NRA Interprets

Fertilizer "Agent"


Purchasers of fertilizer do not come under
the fertilizer Industry Code's classification of
"agent" unless they devote their attention,
time, effort, and labor to the distribution of
fertilizer products "regularly and continu-
ously during each fertilizer season", the
NRA held In an official interpretation re-
quested by the Fertilizer Recovery Commit-
tee (Code Authority).
That body asked a clarification of the
Code's definition of "agents" to curb the
practice of granting agency contracts to Indi-
vidual consumers. The application said that
many so-called "agents", even though their
purchases did not cover more than their own
requirements, were able to enjoy rates below
the price schedule.
In order to be engaged in the business, the
Interpretation stated, an agent should (1)
have a regular place of business; (2) have
a regular stock of merchandise for resale;
(3) have regular and continuous but not iso-
lated or casual transactions; and (4) be
looked to by the trade or community for the
distribution of the products. At least one
of these factors is essential, the interpreta-
tion said.


and within the administrative divisions, of.
NRA, a Code administrative service for as-AL
sistAnce to and administration of Code Au-
thorities. The Code Authorities gradually
would be given initiation of "and primary.. :p
responsibility for enforcement of fair trade;-1
practices. ,.
In the labor field, while NRA'would, ot
course, leave all questions arising under sec-.
tion 7 (a) wholly to the National Labor Re-..f
lations Board, Mr. Davis suggested that the'':
labor enforcement service might be available,..:
to the board for investigatory work .
Thd report urged bringing violators to..
court for punishment where offenses are will-fi
ful-and repeated instead of being satisfied:
with restitution of back wages due. "It,?
should be affirmed at once and unmistakably ',-
that in such cases restitution is not enough." ;
"It seems clear", be added, "that if the.:A
labor provisions of the Codes can be thus-.
enforced, such enforcement will greatly sta-;
bilize -competitive conditions." "
In his proposal for separating labor corin-
pliance questions, he defined the National Re-'
covery Administration's functions in this field.
as follows: '
1. To detect all violations of Code wage
and hour provisions. .:
2. To determine the amount of back wages'.
Involved. ,
3. To secure restitution, to the workers of
back wages so determined. .
4. To put the names of offenders and the.:
evidence (in cases of willful offense) before
Federal district attorneys for court action.'.::
leading to imposition of fines under section
3 (f) of the NRA, or for civil action for..
injunctions under section 3 (c) of the act.
Mr. Davis proposed separation of trade-;:
practice provisions into three classes:
1. Those which by public acceptance, In-",
dustry practice, and court decisions have
already become established, such as prohibi-.'!4
lIons of misrepresentation, bribery, hidden
rebates, etc. These should be enforced di-
rectly in the courts.
2. Those which prohibit practices not corn-*.
monly established and recognized as unfair,
or on which there is neither common agree-
ment nor court precedent. They should not.:
be so enforced as to arrest public support'
of the Code program until and unless their,-:4
merit and public acceptance is developed, and ''i
their legal and economic justificationals es-. 'i
tablished by the Federal Trade Commission' /:;
or court decisions. .'
3. Those which experience has yhown to- :*
be unenforceable or economically unwise..
'They should be dropped by Code revision ,;
It is Mr. Davis' conception that all class 2-
provisions would gradually pass Into either .'.
class 1 or class 3, but he did not undertake -
to specify which groups of Code provisIons ,'
now fall into clas-es 2-nnd 3. He will sopnu'
begin a study of specific Code groups. .'



Hiram S. Browni,..

Adviser on Code

Budgets
Hiram S. Brown has been appointed special i
assistant to the administrative officer, to act .
on all matters pertaining to Code Authority '2
budgets. The Division of Research and Plan"'
ning will continue to act In an advisor- .
capacity. i


I .


... ....... .,.'.i :;.":'-.:*_ .:l.:*.*,,


Recovery Adn


- I ---







... .."....- "-< ,: :. ". ." .':7 "' ""2"


_________________ .1 1


SISCHEDULE OF CODE HEARINGS, NOVEMBER

L.3Important Information Cdncerning Notices of Hearings and
NDUSTET on TaADZ LCEA
rfwtye:Opportunity to be Heard ___
V:,.' Hearings am of two types: (1) Oral. hearings. OPPORTUNITY TO'Bi HEARD (In writing):
:signated "hearing" on calendar; and (2) "op- Facts, criticisms, objections, or suggestions con- Wednesday, Dec. 4.
portuonity to be heard" by the filing of written cerning the subject matter of ench notices must 3-Cn.
ttatements of fact. briefs, or criticlsms dealing be submitted on or before the final date specifled Photographic Mount In- Room 209,
with the subject matter of auch notice. In the notice, addressed to the proper Deputy Ad- dustry, 290-4. ings and
: ministrator or other offlclal Indicated. Such corn-!tog. Iraz
The subject matter of these notices abbre- munlcation, must state' It) Name of industry; throp.
:elated in the schedule published below. A corn- 12) name of correspondent end group represented;
'J:plete official copy of any notice may be obtained (3) 'facts supporting criticisms, objections, or _____________________
S'm request from the National Recovery Adminlstra- suggestions.
S11on, Room 8316, Department of .Commerce Build- The subject matter referred to In either type Thursday, Dec. 6,1934
ing, Washington, D. C. of notice may be revised In any reasonably gi-r-
N l T w t mane particuier on the basis of such facts, crlti- Flag Manufacturing In- Room 4061
HEARFGS (ral): Thoe wihingto bebear mandustry, 352-4.ulig
ARrNGS (oral): hse wishing to be heard clams, and other considerations as are properly dutry, 32-. Building.
Must file a written request with the proper Deputory before the Administrator cent.
Administrator at least 24 hours before the-date Calendar is chronological, with elphebetical
S'et for the hearing, which request must state: arrangement by trade or Industry for each day. 287-raphi Industry, ommerd1
1'.1)l Name of Industry and date of hearing; NOTEls Since all notices must be In the printepr's
:'Z1(2) names of persona wishing to testify and groups hands by Wednesday evening next preceding the
represented; (3) definite alternative proposal or pubIlicarlon of The Blue Eagle, the calendar below
A:'pecflcn objections, without argument. Hearings does nor show notices posed on the Official Bulle-
idre confined to factual presentation. Written tin Board after that date, nor does 'this calendar
.:briefs containing argument as well as fact may show 9thep hearings for the same dates which may
ibe filed have aDpeab-d In prior issues of this publication.
.. Rayon Silk Dyeing and Room 302Z
oinic : c A nPrinting Industry, 172-9. Building.
Thurston
':tr oUv' y OI T z.. PLAPCz AimD DrP"TT 0-PoroPsnEii ACTION o Rubber Manufacturing In- Room 1861
ADiL NlSThATO s dustry, 207-N. Building.
/',. ; aerta.


Room 3208. Commerce
BunIlding P. Olark.


Opportunity to be heard on correction of Administrative Order
No. 6-13, concerning the budget and basis of c'ntriutlon to the
Code Authority. The proposed basis of contribution should
read: ''Assessment at the rate of 0.0S1 percent of the gross receipts
for the 12 months' period ending June 30, 1933, of members of the
IndnQt-v rwhn hnava senred tn ohA CCodA "


FTuesday, Nov. 27, 1934
Carbon Dioxide Industry, Room 4309. Commerce Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
.276-B-B. 6. Building. Ovid E. Authority for extension of the provisions of art IV, sec. 9, of the
.' Roberts, Yr. Code, as amended, for a period of 6 months from Nov. 3, 1934.
... This article relates to contractual relationship with Jobbers and
distributors.
''tle Processing Indus- Red Room, Hotel Hamil- Hearing on a recommendation submitted bythe Code Authority
273-0. ton, 10a.m. A. He1ry dealing with emergency in rayon yarn dyemng branch of be textile
,7 Thurston. processing industry, resulting from the competition of spun-dyed
: ,.rayon.
Friday, Nov. 30, 1934
Retail Farm Equipment 13200 Street NW. Frank Opportsnity to be heard on application submitted by the cen-
,1 Trade, 197-18. A Heohl. trial Code authority for suspension of the exemption conferred
,' ~In par. IM of Administrative Order X-36, whereby members of
':t', trade whose principal line of business is in some other industry
S, subject to a node other than the Code for the retell farm equip-
meantt industry, were exempted from obligation to contribute to
.. ________________ -the Code administration expenses.
11'Saturday, Dec. 1, 1934 I
'Wholesale Monumenlal Room 3323, Commerce Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
- Granite Industry, 449-26. eBuilding. W. A. Jaens- Authority for approval of Its budget and basis of contribution
..i;.,. ef. for the period from June 11, 1934., to July 31, 1936. ToW.J amount
of budget is $30,000. Basis of assessment Is as follows: (a) Mem-
*' bers of the Industry shall be assessed on a basis of dollar volume
." -*.gross annual sales of all monumental goods sold during I bhe year
'..rending Dec. 21 of the year prior to which assessment is to be
"' made; (b) assessments shall be paid in 12 equal installments at
the rate of one half of the total assessment for the year and shall
be paid mopthly In advance to the treasurer of the Code Author-
ity on or before the 10th of each month; (c) assessment for tne
12-month period ending July 31, 1935, hhall be at the rate of fifteen
one-hundredths of 1 percent on dollar volume gross annual sales
_______________ ______________ for 1933.


Room 1119, Investment
Building. B. S. Hol-
ingahead.




Room 3076, Commerce
Building. Beverly S.
King.


Room 5t11, J518 K Street
NW. H.Ferris White.
Room 4327, Commerce
Building. Beverly
Ober.



Tetherland Plaza Hotel.
Cincinnati, Ohio 10
a.m. Benedict Crow-
ell, State N. R. A.
Compliance Director.


Room El6 1618 K Street
NW. H. Ferris White.



Room 710, Albee Buld-
ting Robt. N. Camp-
bell.
Room 710, Albee Build-
ing. Robt. N. Camp-
bM~.


Room 109, Raleigh Hotel,
10 a. m. A. Henry
Thurston.
Rose Room, Washington
Hotel, 10a.m. Payson
Irwin.
Room A, Ambassador
Hotel, 10 a. m. John
0. Connolly.
Room o8044, Commerce
Building. Earl W.
Dalbelrg.


Opportunity to be 'heard on application,submitted by the
Code Authority for approval of Its budget and basis of contrlbu-
tion to the expense of administering the supplementary Code for
the period from Apr. 1., 1934, ito May 6, 19M5.
Total amount of budget is $36,327.21. Additional assessments
levied pursuant to the provisions of the'supplementary Code
are to be baled upon the business of the members of this Industry
In the 1933-34 and 1934-36 seasons, and levied as of the date of
any Administrative Order approving the budget.
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the
Code Authority for approval of Its budget and basis of contrlbu-
don ufor the period from Oct. 23, 1934, to June 16, 19365.. Total
amount of budget is $3,600. Basis of assessment on an estimated
sales' volume of $1.000,000 for the budgetary period will be as
follows:
On Dec. I, 1934 or approval of budget and termination of exemp-
tion if later than Dec. 1, 1934, an assessment of thirrvty-six one-
hundredths of 1 percent of sales made during September and
October 1934. '
On Feb. 1, 1936, an sassessment of thirty-six one-hundredths of I
Percent of sales madp during November and December 1031.
On Apr. I, 1935, an assessment 9f thirty-six one-bundredths of I1
percent of sales made during JAnuary and February 1936
On June 1, 1936, an assessment of thirty-six one.hundredth's of 1
percent of sales made during March and April 1935
Also, on application for termination of exemption conferred In par.
Ill of'Administrative Ordet X-30, so that all members shall be
required to contribute their proportionate share for Code ad-
minIstratIon e.pene norwilthstanding their principal line of
business Is in hope other industry.


Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for amendment of the Code to provide a budget to
cover the costs of administering the Code.
Opportunity to be hear on application submitted by the Cbde
Authority for approval oiths budget and basis of contribution for
the perio-l from Apr 3, 1931, to Apr. 3, 19J5. Total budget Is
$8,001. Basis or contribution Is 6 cents per ton, with a minimum
charge par month per plant of si, for all drain rile sold and de-
livered from Apr. 3, 1034. and throughout the Code year. Pay.
ments to be made erery 3 months upon notice seut out .by the
secretary.
Hearing and opportunityto be heard on application sub-
mitted by certain groups for approval of a proposed agreement
establishing standard of hours of labor, rates of pay and other
conditions of employment under art. Il1, sec. I, of the Code for
'the coinstruorion Industry, and sec. 7 (M of the National Industrial
Recovery Act, aflercting members of this 'division and certain of
their employees In the region of Bamilton County, Ohio, and
Kenton and Campbell Counties, Ky.
Opportunity to be heard on application suhmitted by tho i ole-
AuLth.rilty for approval of Its budget and basis of contriburlon for
the period from Aig 20, 1931, to Aug. 20, 19365.' Total amount of
budget is $7.,500 Basis of contribution Is nne-htir of I percent of
gross Invoice value of all products of the Industry Invoiced during
the preceding month
Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
Authority for amentlment of sec ,I, art. VI, by changing the
amount of the bids l,) be filed with independent agencies to be
designated by the diilslonal Code Authority from 500 td $ 0io
Opportunity to be heard on application submit ted bv the Code
Authority for approval of lie budget and hb;sis of eontribuildn for
the period from Nov I, 1934, to June 15, 1036.
Total budget Is $8-1880 Doisis of assessment is 1% of all contracts
exceeding $100 registered during the period covered by the budget
and payable upon registration of such contract.


Hearing on application submitted by The Drrvt Damask Mill,
Oaffney, S. 0., and toe.Shamrock Mill. Landrum, S C, for
exemption from the provisnlds of art. Ill, sec i'c), of Ibe Code,
relating to hours of operation.
Hearing on applicatlop submitted by the Code Authority for
amendment io the provisions of the Code relating to hours of
labor and wages of employees
Hearing on application submitted by the Code Autbority for
amendment ofr the Code by defining the terms "TIndustry"
"Member of Industry", "Employee", andt by amending ert'.
VI, sen. 2, and r1. VTI, relating into trade pro'1silons.
Opportunity to be heard on aptilicatlona submitted by (he Code
Authorities for stay of the provisions of arts V and XIX of the
Code for the paint, varnish, and lacquer manufacturing industry
and art. VT, sec. 11, and art. VIII, sees I and 17 of the Code for
the bleached shellac manufacturing Industry.


] Monday, Dec. 3,1934
.;.' Cpalifornla Sardine Process-
rnr lug Industry (Division
`-7- i.; of fishery Industry), 308-

7t..;.08

k:. .bdustral Oil Burner
't.:. Equipment Manufactur-
ug" 'i Industry, 4.3-.



J; 4:
5.,,'











esday. Dec. 4,193
E''*anManufacturing In-
S ustry, 12-10.
.Clay Drain Tile Manu
ringg Industry, 34-7.




'.Pantmg, Paperhangingn
HL and Donrating Industry




't ll WiFod of construction
.Industry), 244 -3.
^. i.. .'
." iw ~ voo' n.

. t'.r ...d-stry, 44 .-3.




,"Wood Floor Contracting
Yj.' Industry, 244 K-4.
..


.:.-Wednesday, Dec. 5,1934
:%'AOottom tTextile Industry,
f- :l-E.

:" Daily newspaper Publish-
ing Business, 288-98 B. -
Ml .achined Waste Mann-
facturing Industry,
NO6-A.
:Paint, Varnsh and 'La&-
Squer bManufacturing In-
*, dustry and Bleaches
Shellac Manufacturing
Industry, 71-60.


Woven Wood Fabroic
Shade Industry, 473-2.


Friday, Dec. -7, 1934
Trucking Industry, 278-
260-H.


SD





Tr
ud




e.


e
ILV


2,
J[


Vii bULK't(-5Ot
A. 0. DioeLn
,A. C. Dum


Red Room,
Hotel, 10 a.
Clark.


Salphonated O0i Manufao- Room 4057,
turning Industry, 469-B. Building.
Roberta, Jr.

Ii


Monday, Dee. 10, 1934
Alloys Industry, 516-5,

Can Manufacturlng Indus-
Stry, 162-I L





Fishery Industry, 308-46
productionn division in
d the Great Lakes area).









Painting, Paperhanging,
and Decorating Industry,
683-2.



Retail Lumber, Lumber
Products, Buiding MAa-
terials and Building Spe-
cialties Trade, 33-40.


Room 3323, (
Budding. W
sen.
I18 K St-e
H. Ferris Whi


Room 1119, I
Budding. R
Uiigsheaas


Municdial Buil
onta, N. Y.,
E. Rice,
Assistant Star
Compliance I

1 320 0 Stir
Frank'A. Hec


Tuesday, Dec. 11, 1934
Lumber and Timber Prod- Auditorium,
ducts Inoustries, 9-2 U. Budding, 10
0. Dicon.

Friday, Dec. 14, 1934
Electrical Contracting In- Room 418,'Nem
dustry, ?+I4-F-17. Building, Tol
J10i.m. Bened
eUl, State NI
pUlance Direct



Monday, Dec. 17,1934
Lumber and Timber Prod- 907 Sixteenth St
ucla Industries, 9-240. A. 0. Dixon..


26 TO DECEMBER 17 A


DrAwRu PROPOsED Ac0not




itfonal Sae- Opportunity to be heard on application Submitted by the Ool,
rsUt Build- Authority for terminLnation of the exemption coferred in"
a O..Low- 1I1 of Administrative Order X-36, so that all menhmbems s '"i'
required to contribute their proportionate share oa the'cltl
administering the Code, notwithstanding their prinip ba. -
______ ness is in some ot her Industry. riipal bu. '


Commerce Opportunity to be heard on appllcallton ubmitted by thed. J
M. D. Vin- Authority for amendment to the Code to provide a budgetnd;
basis of contribution by main nemers of the industry, to cover U
cost of administering the Code.
Building. Opportunity to be heard on application submitted bythe ip,
Warren. ional Oraphic Arts Coordinating Committee on behailf'brt
administrative agency of the bank and commercial Mtstid..*
national product group of the Graphic eArats industrial or M
approval of Its price determination schedue, wdu whc np ro
on Aug 14,934 ((or a period of not more than i0 daweaih0re-
riod of 60 days' or until the cost of determination &Cedil *
been declared as provided in art. Ill, sec. 26 () o[h,cs Ort am
Arts Cone. .
Commerce Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by thu Ced
A. Henry Authority, for amendment to the Code.
Commerce Hearing on sec. 3, art. V-A, of ch. VI of the Code, insofar.i lisp.
y H. Len- plles to the sale of Jar rings.
Street NW. Opportunity to be heard on apllication submltled by the CO&
Authurty for approval of its buget and basisofonttnbutionS i
the period from Aug. 1, 1934, to June It, 19356. '
Total budget is $-,il6. Basis of contributions lI percent na[ sea
member's gross sales for the year ending July 31, 1934. AuS*.
ments to be paid as follows: One-fourth upon approalfi et
budget, one-fourth on Dec. 16. 1934, one-fourth on Mar l 6
and one-fourth on June I, 19316.
,.............. ..... .

Hamilton Hearing on application for exemption from the provilon of i g
m. 0. P. Code, submitted by the Metropolitan Distribuntors,' In Np
York City; Hertz Dnvr-ur-sel Stations, Inc t iCeantral tars*i
Cleveland, Ohio; Louisville, Ky.; St. Louis, MG; Mlfl ai
Wis., Kansas City, Mo.: and Cincinnati. Ohio HertzO D v.
sell Stations, Inc. (Eastern Stales), Philadelphia, Pa; pit
burgh, Pa.; Akron and Toledo Ohio: Detroit and P lint iC .
Atlanta, Oa.; Pittston, Pa.; ilminols Benrz Dnv-ur-self ,ta
Inc., Chicago, III., Hertz Dritv-ur-self Stations. Inc (Padni) Los,
Angeles and Hollywood, Calif.; San Francisco, Oklan. m
Diego, Calif., Portland, Oreg.: Seattle and T iaof eOa.;
Pasadena and Del Monte, Cali; Hertz Drivnr.ef Sbtatisn o
Florida, Inc.; Miami and Miami Beach, Fla.: ; aterrett Opera11
Service. 'Inc., Washington, D. C.; Balnmore, Md.; and Rich.
mond, Va.; Dryvit Auto Rental Co., Inc., Beton, Ian, and
New York City.
Commerce Opportunity to be heard on application of Code Authority f
Ovid E. approval of Its budget and basis of contribution for the ped.d
from July 4, 1934, to June 16, 1936.
Total budget Is $20,000. Basis of assessment shall be determined
by dividing the total number or pounds of oils, ais and fatty
acids submitted to the process of sulphonstion during the I
months' period, Jan. I, 1933, to June 30, 1934, into the total ofish
budget, this rate then to be applied against tho qunanlties reported
by individual members of mte industry.


Commerce Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Code
N. A. Jans- Authority foramendment to sec. 1 of art. VI ofr the Code, relstij
to organization and constitution. .
set NW. Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Cod
il.e. Authority for approval of Its budget and basis of contributions sf '
the period from Jan. I, 1934, to Dec. 31, 1934. Total smontiout
budget is $42,800. Basis of contribution is as follows: Eachm api-*
her shall be assessed such part of 542,150 as the average nambel '
employees employed by im shall bear to ithe average aggreg
number of employees in the entire Industry. Also, oChappa-
don for terminprron of exemption conferred in par. LW of Adini-
trati;ve Order X-36.. .
investment Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by thew i.
E. B. Hot- porary executive committee of the production division of Lh I
industry, for approval of Its budget and basis of coresibutihisnf
the period from Aug.. 9, 1934, to Dec. 31, 1934, incluole, and.
from month to month during the period from Jan. I, IJ9,1. *
Mar. 31, 1936, inclusive, pending approval of the propose esode
for this division of the fishery industry. "
Estimated.budget for the period from Aug. 9, 1934, to Den .31, I,
is $3,777.60, and for the period Jan. I, 1935, to Mar. 31, lil in
$419.72 per month. In addition to the sums to be expended ih.
temporary executive committee is to collect 11,259.16 during tlii
period Aug. 9, 1934, to Dec 31, 1934, and $139.91 per month dnrisg
the period Jan. 1, 1936, to Mar. 31, 1935, for its contribhuon t o
the Code Administration expense of the Code Authority for 1i
fishery industry.
ding, One- Hearing and opportunity.to be heard on applications aroetnli
10 a. m. groups for approval of a proposed agreement establishing stand-o
Executive ards of hours of labor, rates of pay and other conditions orm
teN. R.A. ployment under artn. hi, en. I, of the Code for the construrion
Director. Industry, and sec. 7.(b) ofthe National industrial RecevoryAct
affecting members of the division and certain of their emplois '
in the region of Otsego County, New York.
met NW. Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Cea
shbt. AUthority for amendment to the Code by striking out the wC:
"two" in art. VII, sec..l, par I, line 9, and substiltutliitngeelf i
the word "three", and by striking out the word "five' I si
VU, sec. 6, par. 1, line 2 and substituting the word "saven." '
"' ::

Commerce Hearing on application submitted by the administrative agenexd ue
a. m. A. the West Coast logging and lumber division for the suspernsdi n :
S the reasonable costs and rules and regulaUtions heretoisre el."- :
Used. ..


s Federal Hearing and opportunity to be heard on application of aerta e
edo, Ohio, groups for approval of a proposed agreement establishing l tiA .
lint Crow- yards of hours of labor, rates of pay and other coodJuom ofa ea-
RA Corn- ployment under art. lU, sec 1, of the ConstrucLtia Indllisi. .
Uor, Code, and sec. 7 (b) of the National Industrial Recovery Ad,'
aflecting members of the division and certain of their emp loeY-
in the region of Lucas, Wood, Ottawa, and Sandusky COalOiW
In Ohio, and part of Monroe County in Michigan. _


reet NW. Opportunity to be heard on application submitted by the Ced.
Authority for amendment of the Code by adding AlRAGiko 10ie
territory under the jurisdiction of the Red Cedar shiglediidi ,
6ec. 31, art. LU (c) of schedule "A." '


0,,


Interpretation


Motion Picture 'Industry
No. 124-39
FACTS.-TiThe Code of fair competition for
the motion picture industry provides in part
5, division D, article V, as follows:
"No distributor shall require as a condi-
tion of entering into a contract for the Licens-
ing of the exhibition of feature motion pic-
tures that the exhibitor contract also for the
licensing of the exhibition of a greater num-
ber of short subjects (excepting news reels),
in proportion to the total number of short
subjects required by such exhibitor, than the
proportion of the feature pictures for which
a contract Is negotiated bears to the total
number of feature pictures required by the
exhibitor."


Some motion-picture companies make short,
subjects, feature pictures, and serial picture-
The exhibitors have asked If the teirm "short
subjects" may be interpreted to mean keril.,
pictures in computing the number of sboTt.
subjects which they may be required Wt'Por
chase under the contract referred to In the
above provision of the Code. ,
QUESTION.-Are installments of serls
pictures short subjects within the meaning
of the provisions 'of article V div'lsionD .
part 5, of the Code of fair comspeitli o.for
the motion picture industry? .

INTERPRETATION.-It is ruled that tlt.
term "short subjects" as used 'in article V,
division D, part 5, does not include nlast-
ments of serial motion pictures..


"*''Monday, Nov. 26, 1934
,'"Motor Bus Industry, 66-1.


r./


rI

Ii


i


i


l I-


1 -*:


S, -.. .... ".,


..-^*i^










lw Reta

. (Continued from page 1)
*" adl take over the National Code Author-
4 finetionS until tLhe industry selected its
Snew*.gverning UniL The Code has re-
Y'.'din full force.
U.*sSeptember 11 the administration placed
,e'ntly created NRA General Code Au-
y in charge of the operation of the
eall solid fuel industry's Code, which body
applanted by the new national authority
.U kie retail solid fuel industry. which has
bg been, announced.


y 'Coal Costs

eThe special committee on lowest rea-
,onable costs under the. Retail Solid
Fuel Industry Code announced ap-
-.proval of the following schedules:
j.:ne, Howard, Bartholomew, and ElkhairC
S- Counties, Ind.
'Domestic: Per ton
-.'Antliracite ..-.--... ...----- $2.00
.', Bituminous.---..------- ---- 1.85
Steam..-..---.----------- 1.40
.Belief coal ...----.--..-..---- 1.75
Tbese costs are c. o. d. curb delivery. The
.glUowing minimum service charges must be
added:
,,ded: .Per ton
,.!srrying into bins in bags...-..........$0.50
Trmmingn in ns.. .15
"Credit sales: ,
",fi"Domestic coaL..-....------ .25
t'Seam coal...-......--......-----. .15
"'. /: .ce
SFor Ileliveries in less than 4-ton lots 50
Scents per'delivery must be, added.
"..These are minimum cost figures which
auasi be added to the mine pride plus freight
Ia all saJes of coal in those counties during
ithe present emergency.
S.lThe Indiana counties include ,the Iltles of
I lkhart, Goshen, Richmond,- Columbus, and
Kokomo, whose total population is nearly
,200,000 and the annual consumption of coal
S.about 380,000 tons.
'. The committee notified the Bbston Divi-
.idnal Code Authority that evidence sub-
m itted In support of a request for a similar
Sdetermnination for Haverhill, Mass., does not.
prove the existence there of an" emergency,
yWlch must be' shown before establishment
atb afsot schedules will be considered.
Iadianapolis and Marion County, Ind.
:JLowest reasonable costs are not minimum
...ies. The minimum retail sales price per-
i'.issible with these schedules Is the sum of
thes and other essential costs.
i as approved for equipped dealers, the cost
seliedale follows:
'Steam coal ...... $1.40 a ton
: Screenings.......-_ 1.25 a ton
ji.,'..Anthracite and briquets__ 2.00 a ton
, Bituminous................. ..... 1.85 a ton
SCoke........ .... 2.40 a ton
Relief coal........... 1.75 a ton
SLowest reasonable costs on coal. trucked
Sfrosi mine to consumer are as follows, on
.mal not subject to the Indiana law relating
t contract carriers:
.Add. the net mine cost, as approved in ac-
."Ordaice with procedure established- in the
!,lproval order, to the approximate figure
'"sured from the following based on distance
::.f;m mine to consumer:
-'60 tb 65 miles........ $2.75 a ton
"ib'to 76 mUa._ '3.10 a, ton
,.1,8 to 87 miles... _. ___ 3.50 a ton
:. 88 to DD mllesg. _. 3.90 a ton
100to 10112 miles-.4.. ._ 4.0 a ton
. 4e following service charges must be
Idded to the above tosts:- For deliveries, in
les than 4+ton lots 50 cents a' load; for
,'heeliag Into bins, 35 cents a ton; for trim-
Silig, 15 eents a ton; for carrying into bins
I bags, 50 cents a ton; for credit charge on
Stam sales, 15 cents a ton, and 25 cents a
to on0 domestic sales.
Manhattan and Bronx, New York
Dames lej anthracite, $2.60 a ton; pea coal,
0-i a ton; and steam coal, $1.60 a ton.
on a all 5-ton loads or more in one deliv-
'iy of. egg, stove, nut, grate, and pea sizes
1 der are to deduct 25 cents a ton as quan-
' utscounts.
ese lowest reasonable costs are not minl-
Sretail prices. The minimum retaU price
,tl lowest reasonable cost plus the net
a cost plus freight. '
.rTe 'net mine cost is to be determined as
tUed In. the foiloving official statement
eo the method for computing the minimum
-tthll Price'
ue average net mine cost of coal secured
'e-. invoices of dealers for 1 month from
"t_ em day of a month to fhe 15th day of
:lri_ ert month, to be effective, after ap-
by the National Recovery Administra-
*ad'-n. .s8t of the month following the sec-
Piouth above mentioned, plus freight and
w .e determinations set by this action."
S Brooklyn and Queens Area
.nllthe approval for Brooklyn is a con-
fo.'3u days rr at for Queen Is limited to
^;aapproved schedule for equipped dealers


il Coal


follows (all determinations based on c. o. d.
and curb delivery) :
Domestic anthracite: Per ton
Large size.__... $2.50
Small size. .-2.30
Steam cbal ___________ 1.90
The following service charges must be
Added to the above: (1) For credit, 25 cents
per ton on domestic coal sales and 15 cents
on steam coal; (2) for carrying into bins,
50 cents a ton; (3) for trimming in bins, 15
tents a ton; (4) for wheeling in, 35 cents a
ton.
Nassau and Suffolk'Counties, New York
As approved by the committee for equipped
dealers, the costs are as foUllows:
Domestic anthracite:
Large slze. --:' -- $2.35 a ton
Small size --- -_ 2.15 a ton
Steam coal.._.- 1.50 a ton
The following service charges must be
added to the above:
For credit, 25 cents a ton.on domestic and
15 cents a ton on steam sales; for carrying
into bins, 50 cents a ton; for trimming in
bins, 15 cents a ton; for wheeling In, 35
cents a ton.
The cost figures represent only the com-
mittee-determined lowest reasonable cast of
the actual handling of coil by retail dealers.
As broken down by the committee for
equipped! dealers they include yard, selling,
delivery, and administrative costs, plus deg-
radation. They do not include any element
of profit or return on capital.
Fuel Costs Disapproved for Several New
York and Delaware Areas
Disapproval of lowest reasonable fuel-cost
petitions submitted by Divisional Code. Au-
thorities in several New York. and Delaware
trade areas has been announced by the NRA
special committee on lowest reasonable costs
in the retail solid fuel industry.
New York and Delaware areas are as fol-
lows:
rerkimer, Madison, Oneida, Steuben, Yates,
Oditario, and' St.' Lawrence Counties in New
York State, and trade 'areas Nos. 2 and 3 in
Delaware. .
In Delaware, trade, area No. 2 includes
all that territory .lying south of the southerly
boundary of the city of Wilmington to an
Imaginary line across the State extending
from the Delaware River 'to the Maryland
line, including the tdwns" of Leipsic, Dela-
ware,' and Brenford. Trade area No. 3 is de-
scribed as including all that territory, lying
south of the southerly boundary of trade'
area No. 2 to the Maryland State line, in-
cluding the remainder, of Kent County not
included In area No.- 2 and all of Sussex
County. .
Wilmington, Del. (including the city of Wil-
mington and up, to a line 6 miles north'
and 12 miles south-of .the city limits)
Earlier schedules are now In effect in WI]-
mington. They will remain effective until
the divisional Code Authority issues new
schedules based on this order. ,
As determined by the committee, and based
on c. o. d. curb and chute delivery, the sched-
ule for equipped dealers as announced today
follows: 'er ton
Steam coal ------- $1.40
Screenings.- 1.25
Domestic anthracite and briquets.- 2.00.
Bituminous... 1.85
Coke ..-....... 2.40
Coal trucked from mine to consumer- 4.35
Relief coal_ ---- -- 1.75
The following service charges must be
added to the above: For deliveries ltb less
than 4-ton lots, 50 cents a load; for wheeling
in, 35 cents a ton; for.carrying into bins in
bags, 50 cents a ton; for trimming into bins,
15 cents a ton; for credit charge on steam
sales, 15 cents a ton, and 25 cents a .ton on
domestic.
To obtain the minimum retail price per-
missible under 'the schedule of trucked coal,
add to the above prices mine cost of coal only.
Maryland counties of Washington, Freder-
ick, Kent, Dorchester, Wicomico, Carroll,
and Cecil, and in Anne Arupdel County
outside Baltimore
The schedules are the same in each county,
except that there are different costs for coal
trucked from mine to consumer in each
county. The Carroll County schedule an-
nounced on November 6, with another sched-
ule for Baltimore, was included In this group.
The approved schedule for equipped deal-
ers follows: Perto'
Steam coal, c. o. d. curb delivery...-.- $1 30
Screen in gs -- . . . . 1. 15
Domestic coal, c. o. d. curb or chute
delivery:
Anthracite and briquets..--'-.... 1.90
Bituminous .-------------- 1. 7.5
CokeBit .... s........ .......... 2.30
The following service charges must be
added to the above: For deliveries in less
than 4-toi lots, add 60 cents per load; for
carrying into bins in bags, add 50 cents per
ton; for trimming in bins, add 15 cents per
ton; for credit sales of steam coal, add 15
cents per ton; ani for credit *ales of do-
mestic coal. add 25 cents per ton.
The approved schedules of lowest reason-
able costs of handling coal trucked from mine
to consumer in each county follows:
,Washington, $3.30 a ton; Frederick, $3.80;


T r, . .-. '*..'S C h- d. ru.,.e '. s"-- .. .'.#
... } "A. '.:, C :-.; .v y .~%.t. -.....,x.4r. .j..~..., r, 4'SIr.
-!. .-c i 'r ~c f ... .. ... .. :,..n., l.:.. .: c...'
Trad Cos SchdUl^s OLIUI'


Kent, $4.80; Dorchester and Wicomico, $6.15;
Carroll County, $4; Cecil, $4.55; and Anne
4rundel, except Paltlmore,. $5.30. (To ob-
tain minimum retail price of trucked coal
permissible under the schedule, add these
figures to mine costs only.)'
The cost figures represent only the com-
mittee-determined lowest reasonable cost of
the actual handling of the coal by retail
dealers. As broken down by tle committee
foi equipped dealers, they include yard, sell-
ing, delivery, and 'administrative costs, plus
degradation. They do not Include any ele-
ment of profit or return on capital invest-
ment. This also applies to trucked coal.
In order to obtain the minimum retail price
permissible under the schedules for the dif-.
ferent types of coal-bitu.minous, anthracite,
and coke-the following are presented in the
committee's order of cost approval:
Bituminous: Total the current prevailing
Code-authorized mine price, plus freight, plus
the committee-determined lowest reasonable
handling cost.
Anthracite: Total the committee-deter-
.mined lowest'-reasonable' handling cost, plus
freight, plus the cost, of coal as found from
time to time by the special committee, tlP
latter findings to be based upon. the net mine
costs of a list o'f'representattve dealers and
such other information as the special com-
mittee may deem necessary.-J
The Divisional Code Authority is charged
...with the dyty to collect through the facilities
of an approved impartial agent or agency
and present monthly to the special committee-
copies of invoices or tabulations secured from'
the list of representative dealers and such
other information as it or the special com-
mlttee deems necessary.
SCoke: Total the'cost secured in the same
manner as for anthracite, .plus'freight, plus
the committee-determined lowest reasonable
handling cost.
Roanoke, Va.
The cost schedule follows:
'For equipped dealers......__._ $1.60 a ton
For truckers and teamsters haul-
ing coal from railroad yard to
consumer ... ..........._. 1.25 a ton
The following service charges must be
added to the above: For deliveries in less
than 4-ton lots, 50 cents a load; for carrying
in bags, 50 cents a ton; for trimming, 15 cents
a' ton; for steam sales credit, 15 cents a ton,
and for domestic sales credit, 25 cents a ton.
The cost schedules represent only the com-
mittee-determined-lowest reasonable costs of
Sthe actual handling of coal by retail dealers.
As. broken down by the committee for
equipped dealers, they include yard, selling,
.delivery, and administrative costs,, plus deg-
radation. They do not include any element
of profit or return on capital investment.
S Anthracite: Total the 'committee-deter-
mined lowest reasonable handUfig cost, plus
freight, plus the cost of coal as found from
time to tinie by the special committee, the
'latter findings to be bsaed upon the net mine
costs of a list of representative dealers and
p atch other information as the special com-
mittee may deem necessary.
Bituminous: Total' the current prevailing
* Code-auihorized mine price plus freight, plus
the committee-determined lowest reasonable
handling cost..
S Coke: Total the cost secured in the same
manner as for anthracite, plus freight, plus
the committee-determined lowest reasonable
handling cost.
Lynchhurg, Va.
As approved by the committee the costs are
as follows: Lowest reasonable retail ban-
dfipgcosts'for equipped dealers, ,$1.75 a ton;
for teamsters and truckers hauling coal from
.railroad car to consumers, $1.25 a ton.
The following service charges must be
added to the above: Deliveries in less than
4-ton lots, 50 cents a load; carrying In
bags, 50 cents a ton; trimming, 15 cents a
Stone; credit charge on steam sales, .15 cents;
on domestic sales, 25 cents.
Springfield and St. Joseph, Mo.

As approved by the committee, the sched-
ules for equipped dealers In the two cities .
follow:
Class A (domestic) customers: Per ton
Coke ............... .- $2.20
Semianthraclte ..... .. -- 1.95
Bituminous.................- -.-.-- 1.70
Class B (commercial) customers....-. 1.50
Class-C (public Institutions) customers.. 1.10
Class D (relief coal) customers....-...... 1.75
The following service charges must be
added to the above: For deliveries of less
than 4 tons, 50 cents a load; for carrying
Into bins in bags, 50 cents a ton; for trim-
ming In bins, 15 cents & ton ; for oil or chemi-
cal treatment, 12 cents a ton; for sales In
bags, $1 n. ton: for credit on steam sales in
classes B ahd C, 15 cents a ton; for domestic
sales credit in class A, 25 cents a ton.
Topeka and Ottawa, Kans.
As approved by the committee,' the sched-
ules for equipped dealers in the two cities
'follow:
Class A (domestic) customers: Ton
Coke-...... ..-----.---- $2.20
Semianthracite .- ------ 1.95
Bituminous......- -........ 1.70
Class B (commercial) customers.-.-..- 1.50
Class C (public institutions) customers.. 1.10
Class D (relief coal) customers.- L.75


The following service charges must .l
aded to the above: For delivdries of-le:.ss
than 4 tons, 50 cents a load; for carrying ,
into bins in bags, 50 cents, a ton; for tri-.
ming in bins, .15 cents a ton;.for oil or cJeml.uni l
c. al treatment, 12 cents a ton; for salde s In"'.'.'
bags, $1 a ton; for credit'on steam sales -In' .i
classes B and C, 15 cents a ton; for domestic .'
sales credit in class A, 25 cents a iron. !
The cost figures represent only the com- .i'
miJttee-determined lowest reasonable cost of
the actual handling of the coal by retail '..
dealers. As broken down by the committee ;:
for equipped dealers, they include yard, sell- .
ing, delivery, and administrative costs, plum .;:,
degradation. They do not-include any ele '
meant of profit or return on capital investment.
Ohio Areas
The following counties in Ohio: Williams,
Fulton, Defiance, Henry, Panulding, Lucas,
part of Ottawa, Sandusky, Seneca, Erie, -.!
Huroqn, Lorain, Wyandot, Crawford, Putnan ,'-
Wood, Hancock, Allen, Hardin, Logan, Union, -'.
Warren, Clinton, most of Butler', Preble, part',.i-
of Montgomery, Darke, Shelby, Miami, Van i
Wert, Mercer, and Auglaize.'.
The schedule of costs is the same for alln'..
of the above counties, largely making up the'A:'
western part ou the State. As approved by'
the committee for equipped dealers, the cost '"
schedule, which provides for customer classl-.i
ficadon, follows: :
Domestic: ..
Low volatile.-- $2.25'a ton.
High volatile. ... .. 2.00 a to."'
Commercial A--. 1.75 a tonw..
Commercial B-...-. 1.60 a ton.'...
Industrial A ., .. 1.25 a ton:.::
Industrial B-____ 1.00 a tonii_
Customer class'itcations above are defined '-kA
as follows: :
SCommercial A: This classification shall in- "-%M
elude a contract sale of 50 to 250 tons of,"..
coal or 25 to 125 tons of cokd where deUl-aY
series are made in full truck-load lots to on's;'
location during the calendar year endingt'. "-.
March 3L
Commercial B: This classification shall Inl-'.4
elude a sale of 50 tons of coal or 25 tons or ".
more of coke, delivered 'within 72 hours t .
one location, or a contract sale if movie thane::
one speh delivery is made daring the calendar-41
year -ending March 31. '1
Industrial A: This business shall consfi- '"S..
tute a sale of 250 to 1,000 tons. of coal .o,',
125 to 500 tons of coke to any one consume.r'.)i
if delivered in full truck-load lots to one loca.,
tion during the calendar year ending March'Z.:
31. .
Industrial B: This business shall constlj.1-'
tute the contract sale of 1,000 tons of coal .-
or 500 tons of'coke or more to any one con-.--
sumeT if delivered in full truck-load lotsa 'in
one location during the calecIdar year ending,-
March 31. '
Yard sales where no delivery expense -A"!i.
Involved shall be at the regular per-ton rate, -.I::
less 50 cents a ton. -
The following service- charges must bh.:' '
added to the above costs: For deliveries of.
1 to 4 tons, 50 cents a delivery; carrying in.to. 1'.
bins in bags, 50 cents a deliver'; wheellnk` ".''.
into bins, 35 cents a ton; trimming into bins, .1';
15 cents; for credit on steam sales, 15 cents;
for credit on domestic sales, 25.cents. 'i
Cleveland ..
Cleveland's cost schedules were provision-.'
ally approved some time ago and are now In "L'
effect. They are classified in customer group- '.
wings. For example, all sales to customers Ina..:.
the 'commercial classification must includ:.ie
the costs determined for that classificatl.'
They follow:
Domestic customers, $2.35 a ton; coummer=- '?:
cial customers, $1.35 a ton; Industrial cu..;-
tomers, $1.10 a ton; and relief coal, $1.75 a ''
ton. 0.
The following service charges must be
added to the above: ..
For wheeling in, 35 cents a ton; carrying .,."
Into bins, 50 cents a ton; for trimming in
bins, 15 cents a ton; for.credit on sales of
steam coal, 15 cents a ton; .and for credit' O:n
sales of domestic coal, 25 cents a too. '...M
The/cost figures represent only the
mittee-dletermlned lowest reasonable cost'e
the actual handling of the coal' by re ,
dealers. As broken down by the commlt4T
for equipped dealers they Include yard, sell
ing, delivery, and administrative costs, pl.u
degradation. They do not Include any ele-"'"
ment of profit or return on capital investment.un-*..
In order to obtain the minimum retail price.
permissible under the schedules for the 4l-. t
ferent types of coal-bituminous, anthraclt, *
and coke-the following methods are pre-. "
seated In the committee's order of cost ap-"'-
proval:
Bituminous: Total the current prevailti:ng
Code-authorized mine price, plus freight, pluig__
the committee-determined- lowest reasonable.:..
handling cost. ".
Anthracite: Total the commlttee-det".ii
mined lowest reasonable handling cost, pf
freight, plus the cost of coal as found from
time to time by the special committee, the
latter findings to be based upon the net mnnh "'.'
costs of a list of representative dealers mair"
(Continued on page 7, column 4)'i'


:A.
.... Ir










i River and Lake Construction Industry Planning
ll .f-,,':-;: ''="

.,.Pollution is Being and Adjustment Board

Studied by NRA Applications to Work Employees More Than 40 Hours

'XPreliminary StepsTaken by Recov- since May -14 the construction industry's Ed. H. Honnen Construction Co., Colorado
s.--ery-Adrministration at Request of bipartisan Planning and Adjustment Board,, Springs, Colo. Application to work em-
charged under the Code with furthering ema- ployecs 48 hours per week on Public Works
."' Izaak Walton League to Clean ployer-employee interests, has considered 46 Administration project comprising excava-
P.,, Up tindustria l Pollution of applications from industry members to work tion for irrigation canal and pipe line to-
SUp ndstral olltion o employees more than -10 but not in excess of cated 30 miles west of Creede, Colo. Inas-
Sg Waterways 48 hours per week. Of this number 22 have much as this is a P. W. A. project the
____ been granted, 10 denied, and 3 received no Board hhs no jurisdiction and could take
.. action of the hoard, no action.
4: .-.The National Recovery Administration is Under provisions of the Code's working- Chernus Construction Co, Caruthersville,
*::. making a study of the possibility of eliminatL- conditions article, an employee may work 48 Md. Application Jfor permission to work
I tling the industrial pollution of rivers and hours in any 1 WIeek if on projects located at employees 48 hours per week on War De-
,.:lakes. points so remote and inaccessible that camps apartment Contract W-1092 Engineers 4200.
a.: Preliminary steps were token recently or boating plants are necessary ior the hous- This job is located on thd Mississippi River
'when a letter was sent to 400 Gode AuLthoril- ing or boarding of a majority of the labor 22 miles west of Dyersburg, Tenn. Because
ties asking for information on the subject, employed; when working time on such remote c of transportation to the site em-
employetrd;rid ih t a p f es .Of lack Of transportation to the site em-
T:.he letter carried with it a copy of a reso. projects has been lost because of inclement ployees are housed on a quarterboat. Ap-
.lution passed by the Izaak Walton League weather or unavoidable delays in any 1 week, plication granted October 2.
"P'.of America at its twelfth annual convention, time lost may be made up in thb following "
,:'. urging that provision he made in all Codes 4 weeks; if on projects in localities where Minneapolis Steel Construction Co., Salt
for the elimination of industrial pollution of a suffic'i-nt amount of qualified labor is not Lake City, Utah. Application to work em-
ys:. public waters, available in the immediate vicinity of the ployees 4S hours per week on ,Dustln
; The resolution was first sent to the divi- work. Bridge, located on Forest Road approxi-
'.: sional administrator whose division includes T o w e mately 65 miles north of McCall, Idaho.
.--the fishery section of the NRA. The move- The applications which were either pend- Because it was impossible to secure quall-
ment is one which -has received the opproba- ing at the tlme of the Board's inauguration fled men in the locality of the job. workers
.:tion of sportsmen everywhere and is one or have been received by it since its estab- must be boarded near the project. Appli-
-.'which economists have studied with a great lishmiqnt have been considered and decided cation granted October 2.
deal of interest, it being generally conceded as follows: The Pitt Construction Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.
i that both fresh- and salt-water fish are a Keno Rosa Co., Louisville, Ky. ,Application. Application to work gasoline-engine me-
.":greatly neglected food supply for the country to work 1 terrazzo mechanic and helpers chanics and crane operators 48 hours per
'I at large, and 2 terrazzo grinding-machine operators week on the construction of a viaduct over
.Researches by the Department of Com- and 1 helper -4S hours per week on the the Juniata River, located I1' mile-, from
Smerce, Bureau of Fisheries, have shown that Burkesville (Ky.) Courthouse. On August Bedford, Pa., on the Lincoln Highway.
Ig-.the pollution which seriously interferes with 31 the application was denied on the Permission was requested because of lack
f? f lsh generally and their eggs in particular is ground Phat the problem might be solved of available employees in the locality. Ap-
p .almost entirely industrial, by. employing additional workers, plication denied October 2 on the ground
S "Ourexperiments hate shown ", said one
report, at fish tend to avoid watersbadly C. G. Kershaw Contracting Co., Birming- that employees could be obtained from
fish.ted s e avoid bl ham, Ala. Application for a 4S-hour week Altoona or Johnstown.
I, olute by household wastes, keeping out ofk
cf them or escaping from them where possible, for employees engaged on the construction Cole & Moore, Paducah, Ky. Application to
-::.so that this kind of se/vage is rarely im- of a railroad bridge' over the Tonibigbee work employees 48 hours per week on the
'Aemidiately fatal to them; but there are cer- River at Naheola Lauding, Ala., for the construction of a building for the United
M:.-taln chemical wastes which fish do not recog- Meridian & Bigbee Rivert Railway Co. Per- States Government at Lock No. 5 on Green
..=ilze as dangerous and in which they remain mission was asked beeinuse of the remote- River, located at Naker, Ky. Because of
F,,with no apparent effort to escape until they ness of the work, which made necessary the the remote location of this job and the
..are first stulefled and then killed In fact housing of employees in a camp; lack of lack of transportation facilities, a majority
I:.our experiments show that fish exhibit a kind qualified labor, which was certified by the of the employees will be housed in camp.
:-.-of preference for some of those deadly pollu- State reemploment-director of Alabama; Application granted October 2.
:-''tions and remain in them, when. they have and the necessity forcomletion before the W. A. Bechtel Co. and Henry J. Kaiser Co.,
p.:.fresh water open to them, until they die." fall rainy 'eason. The Bosard granted the an Francisco, Calif. Application to work
|:.One of the most interesting replies was re- application on August 31. employees 48 hours per week on pipe line
c["eived from the secretary of bne of the Code Boxley Brothers Co., railroad contractors, of. for the Standa-d Oil Co. of California in
,:-.Authorities Orange, Va. Permission was asked to' San Joaquin Valley. Employees will have
"i- "This being a textile industry", his letter work employees 48 hours per week ou the to be boarded long the route, neceSsitat-
: read, "wastes from its manufacturing opera- Big Bend Tunnel of the C. & 0. Railway ing their moving every 10 or 12 -days. Ap-
ti..bttns are not of a character to pollute at Talcott, W. Va. Because of the limited plication granted October 2.
-.-streams. On the other band, .this industry is boarding accommodations it is necessary W. Hotace Williams Co., Inc., New Orleans,
greatly Interested in preventing the pollution to house employees in railway camp cars, La. Application fo permission to work
So our waters. In many instances the textile an i order to speed the job two shifts employees 48 hours'per week on pile-dike
Villages and mills are dependent upon the are being worked. Application was granted job in the Mississippi River located be-
streams for their water supply. The writer, on August 31. jbineenMemphssiand Helena. ctees
Sa few years ago, was connected with a chemi- cween Memphis and Helena. Three shifts
?cal industry in which aciduous waste waters ConnecticutoRiver Development Co., Boston, were being worked and all available men
3.were discharged into a stream. The situs- Mass. 'Application for permission to work employed who were qualified for the work
btion was corrected by the erection of a employees 48 hours per week on the con- in an effort to complete the jbb before the
"wooden tower. filled with broken marble in struction of a dam at Second Connecticut high-water season. Application was granted
,',size ranging from 2 to 12 inches in-diameter, Lake, in Coos'County, N. H., for the Cpon- on October 11.
and the aciduous water was passed through necricut River Power Co. Because this S. H. Palmer Co. and A. J. Grier, San Fran-
-.this tower and rendered alkaline. The cost work is located In a.. heavily wooded, iso- cisco, Calif. Application for permission to
a'',of such a tower, about 12 feet square and 15 lated section of northern New H-mpshire work employees 4S hours per week on the
':to 20 feet high, packed with marble and 14 miles from the nearest village, where installation of outfall gates at Butte
;...ihemically treated to prevent rotting, was there is sery little available labor, it will Slough, Sutter County, Calif., in order to
f'about $2,000. One charge of marble will last be necessary to house the employees in complete the work before the rainy season.
:about 2 years." camp. The Board granted the application It was stated that only a limited number
.; Many Code Authorities wrote that they on August 31. of men could be employed at one time and
I were already bound i by strict State or local Clarke Bros. & Co., Maysrille, Ky. Applica. that three shifts would be worked. Appli-
laws which entirely covered the situation; tion, to work 1 shovel operator, 1 grader cation granted October 2.
'i;"'others asked for additional copies of the reso- operator, and 1 roller operator 4S hours The Koppers Construction Co., Pittsburgh,
members of that their might ciry tularize the per week.on highway work on State Route Pa. Application to work employees 48
-.-'futumembers of tudy eir industry wit a view to 125 in Brown County. Ohio. It was stated hours per week on the construction of a
future study embersand action, thaindustry"t two of these men had to brought coal-washing plant for the United Electric
Many members of thisa industry", i a from distant points because the local em- Coal Cos., at DuQuoin, Ill., because of
st her letter read, "have install ed disposal ployment office ceuld not furnish this type lack of skilled employees. Investigation
::"systeir former systems ro preventir the- changepos- of labor. The Board on August 31 denied showed that skilled employees were avail-
5 their f m stem o e t os the application on the ground that the able, and the application was denied on
'fibity of stream pollution. Then total dsof problem could be solved by an adjustment October 2.
:.. f t e e c a g s runs into m any thousands of in h u s o w rk a d at of p y
of dollars. r sa in hours or work and rate of pay. Hillyer & Reynolds, Jacksonville, Fla. Ap-
S. Incidentally, we have heard of instances Badgett -Construction Co., Memphis, Tenn. plication to work employees 48 hours per
1.-Ain the past where, as a result of changing Application to work employees 48 hours per week on bridge piers in the Nassau River
l and improving the disposal system, not only week on the building and sinking of lumber for the Seaboard Air Line Railway. Re-
EiLi hsthe stream-pollution evil been corrected, mattress In the Mississippi River about 31 quest was made In order to complete the
'ba.lt., actual economies 'have resulted in that miles above Memphis on Islands 34 and 35. job in a shorter length of time. Inasmuch
vf.aluable byproducts, which were formerly Because of the isolation of the job and the as the Information at hand disclosed that
s'wasted, are now recovered and reused. unavailability of labor in the immediate this was 6n emergency case, the Board was
T i. Is subject is such a live one with the vicinity of the work, employees are to be without jurisdiction to act.
.:.. individual members of this industry that we housed on a quarterbont. The Board on Lindgren & Swinerton, Inc., San Francisco,
S..believe it can be said that they have already August 31 granted the application. Caif A in to work employees 48
s.''slved this problem with respect to existing hor Applierteon to work eouiployees 48
i .mills, and recognized engineers conversant hours per week on the construction of a
'with ml construction give Particular otten The following applications have been acted pipe line for the Standard Oil Co. of Cali-
': don to its Importance In connection with new Upon by the Board: fornia from Estero Bay to Shandon, Calif.
This ilne passes over the coast range
:oI.'construction." The Sturm & Dillard Co., Columbus, Ohio. through difficult territorye a nd the menge
...Application to work employees 48 hour hog ifcl erioy n h e
App Ia ton theowokemnlto thes os must be boarded along the route and moved
per week on the widening of the Lewis as the job progresses. Application granted
Tunnel for the 0. & 0. Railway in Alle-
SInterpretation ghany County, Va. The work is located ctoe .
;. :,:,;: __about 25 miles from Covlqgton. Va., and The Walton Flooring Co., Miami, Fla. Ap-
vp about 10 miles from White Sulphur. W. Va. plication to work employees 40 hours per
V;aint, Varnish, and Lacquer Because of lack of transportation facilities week averaged over a 6-month period be-
I the employees must be housed in camp. cause of a shortage of experienced men,
S Manufacturing Industry Application granted September 14. Application was denied on the ground that
"..No. 71--47the Board has no authority to grant a
,i- .. No. 71-47 Codell Construction Co., Winchester, Ky. blanket exemption.
FACS.-The Paint Industry Recovery Application to work skilled employees 4S8
IBoard. Inc., has received a request for a spe- hour pert week on State Highway Project Boxley Brothers Co., Orange, Va. Appllca-
di.efl Interpretation of the word "enamels" FR 59-B-G in Morgan County, Ky., on the tion to work employees 48 hours per week
I::n section 8 of schedule A. West Liberty-Sandy Hook Road. This on work for the C. & 0. Railway at Eng-
UE:. 'USTION.-What type of enamels are work is located 22 miles from Morehead, land Hill, Ky., a siding on the Big Sandy
!.. referred to by the word "enamels" as spect- Ky., and 15 miles'ftom West Liberty, Ky Division mof the C. & 0. Railway. Two
in sctio 8 f scedul Ashifts are to be worked, and the men are
led In section of schedule A? Skldled labor is not available in the local- sifts ae to be orked, nnd the men are
J.,NTERPRETATION.-The word "enam- ity, and because of Inadequate transporta- to be boarded in camp. Application granted
' els" as mentioned above, when not modified .tion facilities employees must be boarded October 30.
by other descriptive word or phrase, refers near the job either in boarding house or Youdall Construction Co., San Francisco,
to household and furniture enamels only. camps. Application granted September 14. Calif. Application to work employees 48


Grocery and Foo -

Codes Amended

Transportation Charges Must.,e "
Included in Computing ,,:
Costs .
____ *i;

Approval of amendments revising pro.
sions of the Wholesale and Retail Food ani;:
Grocery Trade Codes, especially the so-cale.
"transportation charge" clauses, has been],-
announced by the National Industrial Betan-
ery Board. '
Both Codes contain loss-limitation iirorvi,4
sons. The amendments approved reiqnwr:
that transportation charges, which muat':.'
included In computing cost,' must be not leas:.
than a given schedule, on a percentage basia ,
according to distance from determined "sao
points" to the retail store. ,.
In a 20-mile radius the charge may not be"
less than 1 percent of the net purchase price,.]
in the next 20 miles ; .., percent, anid beyonail
40 miles 2 percent. Distances are to lecb wm
puted from a common "zero point" given oni
an American Automobile Association mapi
if available, or set by the local Code Author"
ity. If any part of a city or town is'withl
one zone and other parts in another, the ia.
tire city or town may be considered to be'*
within the first zone. ,-
An amendment to the Wholesale Food and."
Grocery Trade Code would permit sales B.
tween wholesalers to be made without indni?'
sion of charges for direct labor, required by, 2
thce Code in all other sales, but this amend.'.i
meant will not be effective for 30 daw,1y
"'during which interim the desirability ahdi.
advisability" of the amendment is to-:el'
"further considered." V ,.
Both Codes are changed to limit-.tlheil.f.
ability of the Code Authority, which dminals-
ters both Codes, and to permit it tb tncorpo. '
rate. The use of prizes and premiums I..'
placed under strict regulation, being pr..
hibited in cases where it would nullify the:?
lossAlimitation clauses, or where it involves
lottery, misrepresentation, or fraud, or is not::
available to all customers of the same class.
in the same trade area. "
-Safeuarding provisions are added to the..,
labor section of each Code. A demonBtr&.:,
toi" in any grocery establishment must be"
"clearly identified as the representative'of
the party from whom he receives his owim '
pensation." Overtime provisions are consid .
erably revised. Outside salesmen, executives,
watchmen, and other classes of employees.
are not to work more than 6 days out of7;
even though they may be exempt from "any'.
weekly hour limitation. A limit of 66 *orht-'
ing hours a week is established forwatchiW-
Amendments to the definitions of'tble'
Wholesale Grocery Code are Intended td ellmb 'n
inate a discrepancy which'has beretofor'
existed between the definition of "food and;
grocery wholesaler and that of "wholesale
food and grocery trade." There is also-ellal-
ated from the definition of "food and gro-b'
cery wholesaler" that part which requfires:
that distribution be "principally through 8.:
privately controlled warehouse" on the
grounds that a small portion of the trade,
is handled by desk Jobbers' and wagon dils-
tributors, and it is desired to -bring them :
clearly within the limits of the Code.-
Another amendment to the Wholesale
Grocery Code permits establishment of maxi:.:
mum cash discounts in any area where there '
are eight establishments of the trade, aid:
where 85 percent of tile wholesalers pettion:i'
for such a rule and secure the approval .0.
the Code Authority and the National Indi.'
trial Recovery Board. Such agreements aMi1
to run 3 months originally, but may be.re,
need for 6-month periods. .i'
Other amendments to the wholesale Ode
would exempt sales to Government ains-ti:4.)
lions from the lqss-limitation rules, regaqui-
wholesalers to keen records 'of purchase. In".T
voices and itemized sales, nnd prohibit .- '
acceptance or allowance of any service IpY ':i
ment except under specified conditions. -,.i

hours per week on a pipe line for the,.
Standard Oil Co. through a desert area.
west of Bakersfield, Calif. Employees st
to be housed in camp. Because of the-6'&;:
mote location of the job, the appilCaod-.'-j
ans granted Qctober 30. .'
C. W. Greeson, Baton Rouge, La. Aplili'
tion to work employees 48 hours per wee8 -
on levee construction R-343A, R-34?3B..a.d.
R-367, in the vicinity of Countias.an d
Knowlton, Ark-. Employees are housed,.
camp. Because of the remote iocat.Olb
the job, the application was granted p:
tober 30. 1";
Cement Gun Co., Inc., Allentown, Pa. ,"
plication to work two cement-gun operate..*
48 hours per week on a drawbridge leading
to Long Beach, Long Island, N. V. l
labor on the job, with the excepton f.;!
these two operators, are from the rm .
rolls. The work is conducted by the corny jl
engineer of Nassau County, N. '. APP,.'
cation was granted October 20. \4
New Haven Road Construction Co., be.i
New Haven, Conn. Application to wo" .
employees 48 hours per week on road c ,
struction in the State of Connecticut In 1
towns of I'-alrfield and Saybrook on 0a l
States Route No. 1. Request was wade .
order to complete the work before the 01'J
season. Insmuch as this was an emn...
gc:cy the Board had no authority to "-.


* ^"-l.ii:











ADMINISTRATIVE


ORDERS:!
. . . i. . ,


% Official Orders of NRA Relating

to Particular Codes

', HE Blue Eagle prints in each issue summaries qf administrative
1 T orders, interpretations, appointments, and bylaws approved by the
National Industrial Recovery Board.,
U; Official orders are of two types, final and provisional. Where an order
K is provisional, the time within which objections may be filed is indicated
.b. below.
All protests against provisional orders should be addressed to National
. Recovery"Admninistration, Washington, D. C., attention Deputy Admin-
istrator for Code concerned; and such protests should be received before
. final date indicated.
S(For Code approvals,, amendments, interpretations, budgets and
!':.assessments, bylaws, Code Auth6rity members, and trade complaints and
otlier committees, see elsewhere.)


.l7AGRICULTURAL INSECTICIDE AND
FUNGICIDE INDUSTRY, Code No. 275 A:
Order 13, terminating exemption conferred in
t'.jagraph III of Administrative Order X-36
,ianaing all members of the industry to pay
their'proportionate share of the cost of ad-
mnaistering the Code. This termination does .
,nat .apply to any member whose net sales in
:the calendar year 1933 of products covered
,;by the Code..are less than $2,500, which net
sIales are less than'10 percent of such mem-
'ates total net sales in the same year of all
his products and/or services.
AUTOMOTIVE PARTS AND EQUIP-
MENT MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY,
Code No. .105: Order 21, granting request
of.the Bundy Tubing Co., Detroit, Miclh., for
.,xeiption from the provisions of article III,
:eeetloa (1), of the Code from the date of
tihe approval of the order up to and including
N november 18, 1934, for the one employee
-samed in its petition, providing that time
and one-half is paid for overtime, rates are
: ot to be reduced, and hours are to be
"reckoned continuously .from starting time ex-
Sept for a meal period of not more than 1
hoar. Date of the order is October 29, 1934.
BAKERY EQUIPMENT MANUFAC-
'.TURING INDUSTRY, Code No. 347 C-1:
0t Order,3, granting exemption to the Reynolds
Electric,Co., of Chicago, Ill., from the wage-
i nd ..ur provisions and the labor-reporting
Provisions of the Code insofar as these pro-
'viisions apply to the supplementary Code,
Provided this company shall comply with and
Report under the' provisions of the Code for
'the electrical manufacturing industry. The
order also provides that the Reynolds Elec-
'tric Co. shall report to the Bakery Equip-
ment Manufacturing Industry Code Author-
:ity any mnate'rial increase in the number of
-nan-hours used in the processing of products
..Of the bakery equipment manufacturing in-
duistry. Order is dated November 3, 1934.
CAN LABELING AND CAN CASING
.,MACHINERY INDUSTRY AND TRADE,
Code No. 72 A: Order 8, approving hazard-
.n0s occupations from which minors shall be
Sxdluded in this industry and trade.
-CANNING INDUSTRY, Code No. 446:
Order 29, approving application of the Bal-
"timore Canned Foods Exchange, Baltimore,
Md., for exemption of spinach canners from
!the provisions 'of article IV, sections 2. 3,
:i:d 4, of the Code, provided the effective
date of this order shall be 1 week from the
Sedate of the signing thereof; that the appli-
;,anata will 'Install and have in operation, not
later than the effective date of this order,
.the Proper records determining the hourly"s
Pay received by employees, which hourly rate
hIrom,and after the effective date of this
order shall conform to article IV, sections
,, 3, and 4, of the Code, and that from
",-ctober 15 to the effective date of this order
"the applicants will have paid a fiat piece rate
.Ot 12 cents for a 20-pound basket of spinach.
S'Effective date of the order is November 14,

"CIGAR CONTAINER MANUFACTUR-
.:.MG INDUSTRY, Code No. 135: Order 17,
eyingg application of G. A. Bisler, Inc.,
ith and Brown Streets, Philadelphia. Pa.;
.rge H. Snyder, Inc., 3631 North Smedley
tret.'Philadelphia, Pa.; Shoup-Owens. Inc.,
,0 Adams Avenue, Hoboken, N. J.; and the
P.latoalI Paper Box Manufacturing Associa-
A1O, for exemption from nil the provisions
of the Code.
S-AGRICULTURAL INSECTICIDE AND
P UNGICIDE INDUSTRY, Code No. 275 A:
Order Ii, declaring that an emergency exists
In the industry in the sale of lead arsenate
Sand Calcium arsenate because of destructive
ce cutting, and determining the lowest
f reasonable costs below which members of the
Industry may not sell during the emergency
SPerol of.90 days from the date of the order.
Older i dated November 9. 1934. and Is
object to suspension or modification and to
bar ier termination of the emergency period
bY farther order.

I "RGAR MANUFACTURING INDUS-
,' N,Code N6 467: Order 28, denying applt-
c ation of John B. Swisher & Son, Inc., Jpak-
L P. ville, Fla., for a higher tolerance for slaXW


workers than granted by Administrative Or-
der 467-20.
'Order 30, approving list of occupations
considered hazardous in nature or detrimen-
tal to the health of persons under 18 years
of age.
COTTON CLOTH GLOVE MANUFAC-
TURING INDUSTRY, Code No. 187: Order
18, approving minimum piecework rates in
accordance with article IV, section 4, of the
Code. Order is dated November 14, 1934,
and becomes effective 15 days thereafter.
COTTON GARMENT INDUSTRY, Code
No. 118: Order '153, granting exemption 'to
Jacobs Brothers, Inc., Baltimore, Md., from
the provisions of article 111, section A, of
the Code so that. it is permitted to employ
its, cutting' department 8 hours overtime
weekly for a period not to exceed 4 .weeks
from the date of the .order, provided such
overtime is paid for at the rate of one and
one-half times the normal rate of pay. Order
is dated November 10, 1934.
CRUSHED STONE, SAND AND
GRAVEL, AND SLAG INDUSTRY, 'Code
No. 109: Order '52, granting application of
the Bureau of'Public Roads, Department of
Agriculture, for exemption for a period of
90 days from the provisions of the Code for
all contractor, producers producing sand,
gravel, and/'or stone for public-hlghway-con-
struction purposes for use on projects where
such contractor producers have bona fide
construction, contracts in their own names
and where the production of sand, gravel,
and/or stone by. the contractor producers is
from lands either .owned in fee simple or
controlled by license ,with right of profit At
preudre, easement, or by a bona fide pub-
licized lease with rights of profit i1 prendre
by the Federal Government, a State govern-
ment, or a political subdivision thereof. Pro-
vided, that in the production of sand, gravel,
and/or stone under these conditions the said
contractor producers shall in no event' em-
ploy labor under wage-and-hour schedules
inferior to those provided for in either the
Code for the crushed stone, sand and gravel,
and slag industries or the applicable provi-
sions of the Code for the construction indus-
try, whichever wage-and-hour provisions are
superior.
DRY AND POLISHING MTOP MANU-
FACTURILNG INDUSTRY, Code No. 159:
Order 12, terminating exemption conferred
. in paragraph III of Administrative Order
X-36 so that all members are required to
contribute their proportionate share of Code
administration expenses, notwithstanding
their principal line of business-is in some
other industry.
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS
MANUFACTURING AND METAL FIN-
ISHING AND METAL COATING INDUS-
TRY, Code No. S4: Order 75, denying appli-
cation of the Brunswick Manufacturing Co.,
Brunswic'k. Maine, for exemption from the
labor provisions of the Code.
Order 76, denying application of the Mer-
rill Manufacturing Co., Merrill, Wis., for
exemption from the labor provisions of the
Code.
FIRE RESISTIVE SAFE INDUSTRY,
Code No. 88 A: Order 3, granting a stay of
the provisions of article IY, section 6, para-
graph (i), of the Code for a period of 6
montLiis from August 29, 1934.
FISHERY INDUSTRY, Code No. 308:
Order 40, granting petition filed by the Maine
Clam Packers' Association for exclusion of
the Maine clam packing industry from the
terms of the Code, and excluding the clam
packing industry in the States of New Hamnp-
shire, Massachusetts, Rhiode Island, Connecti-
cut, New York, New Jersey. Pennsylvania,
Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Caro-
lina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Ala-
bama. Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas from
the terms of the Code. The order further
provides that the clam packing industry in
these States is subject to the Code for the
canning industry.
GRAPHIC ARTS INDUSTRIES, Code No.
287: Order 368, granting application of Wil-
liam Reinhart, Johnstown, N. Y., for exemp-
tion from the provisions of the Code.


HEAT EXCHANGE INDUSTRY, Code
No. 66: Order 9, denying application of Fed-
ders Manufacturing Co., Inc., Buffalo, N. Y.,
for exemption from the provisions of articles.
V and VI of the Code.
ICE INDUSTRY, Code No. 43: Order 50,
extending Administrative Order No. 43-22
until February 13, 1935. Administrative Or-
der No. 43-22 fixes the minimum prices at
which ice may be sold within the competi-
tive area consisting of the parishes of Or-
leans, Jefferson, and St. Bernard, Louisiana.
INDUSTRIAL ALCOHOL INDUSTRY,
Code No. 275C; Order 7, terminating exemp-
tion conferred in paragraph III of Adminis-
trative Order X-36 requiring all members to
contribute their proportionate share of Code
administration expenses, notwithstanding
their principal line of business is in some
other industry.
INDUSTRIAL SAFETY EQUIPMENT
INDUSTRY AND TRADE, Code No. 315:
Order 11, terminating exemption conferred in
paragraph IIj of Administrative Order X-36
requiring all members to contribute their
proportionate share of Code administration
expenses. This termination shall apply only
to the part of the business of a member of
the industry devoted to the manufacture of
the products of the industry for sale as such.
JOB GALVANIZING METAL COATING
INDUSTRY, Code No. 84 B 1: Order 7, ter-
minating exemption conferred in paragraph
III of Administrative Order X-36, with the
understanding that assessments will only be
levied against those who sell their products
in the form in which they are defined in the
supplementary Code and not against those
who use their products in their own opera-
tions or for the manufacture of some other
products not covered by the supplementary
Code definitions.
LUMBER AND TIMBER PRODUCTS
INDUSTRIES, Code No. 9: Order 224, estab-
lishing revisions and corrections in the rea-
sonable costs set forth in Lumber Code Au-
thority Bulletin, volume I], No. 14. Order
is dated November 8, 1934, and becomes ef-
fective 20 days thereafter in order that con-
sideration may be given objections thereto
of any interested parties.
Order 227, granting application of Wheeler
& Dusenbury, Endeavor, Pa., for exemption
from the reasonable costs established by Ad-
ministrative Order 9-46 to the extent neces-
sary to sell or offer to sell or otherwise dis-
pose of 800,000 feet of 6/4, 84,000 feet of 5,'4
and 6/4, and 300,000 feet of 5/4 No. 3 com-
mon beech, birch, and maple lumber, sub-
standard in quality by reason of bad sticker
stain and decayed ends, at not more than
$2 per 1,000 feet below the established rea-
sonable cost for undamaged beech, birch, and
maple lumber of like grades; and 295,000
feet of 6,,4 lot-run soft maple lumber, sub-
standard in quality by reason of sticker stain
and decay, at not.more than $4 per 1,000
feet below the established reasonable cost
for undamaged soft maple lumber of like
grade; and that portion of approximately
48,000 feet of 6/4-run birch lumber which
will grade FAS and No. 1 0 and S, substand-
ard in quality by reason of narrow widths
and coarse grain, at not more 'than $4 per
1,000 feet below the established reasonable
cost for standard lumber of like grades;
f. o. b. the yard of Wheeler & Dusenbury,
Endeavor, Pa.
Order 228,; granting application of the
Inglewood Screen Co., of Inglewood, Calif.,
for exemption from the reasonable costs es-
tablished by Administrative Order 9-46 for
a 10-day period, from November 3 to Novem-
ber 12, 1934, Inclusive, to the extent neces-
sary to sell or offer to sell or otherwise dis-
pose of its screens, substandard in quality
by reason of hand manufacture, at f0 per-
cent below the established reasonable cost
for machine-made screens of like dimensions,
f. o. b. the plant of the'Inglewood Screen Co.,
Inglewood, Calif.
Order 230, establishing revisions and cor-
rections in the reasonable costs and rules and
regulations for the application thereof set
forth in Lumber Code Authority Bdulletin,
volume II, No. 32. Order is dated November
10, 1934, and becomes effective 20 days there-
after.
Order 231, establishing revisions and cor-
rections in the reasonable costs set forth in
Lumber Code Authority Bulletin, volume II,
No. 33. Order is dated November 10, 1934,
and becomes effective 20 days thereafter.
Order 232, establishing revisions and cor-
rections in the reasonable costs set forth in
Lumber Code Authority Bulletin, volume 11,
No. 42. Order is dated November 10, 1934,
and becomes effective 20 days thereafter.
Order 234, establishing revisions and cor-
rections in the reasonable costs set forth In
Lumber Code Authority Bulletin, volume II,
No. 43. Order is dated November 10, 1934,
and becomes effective 20 'days thereafter.
MALLEABLE IRON INDUSTRY, Code
No. 132: Order 19, 'extending the duration of
the trial period for the cost-accounting sys-
tem established by Administrative Order
132-7 for a further period of 60 days from
November 12, 1934, provided the Code Au-
thority shall submit a new procedure before
the expiration of the 60-day period.


MEN'S CLOTHING INDUSTRY, Code ...'
No. 15: Order 37, denying application of the .I.t
Neptune Manufacturing Co., Inc., for exemp- .
tion from the provisions of article IV of the '"
Code.
MOTION PICTURE INDUSTRY, Code
No. 124: Order 40, dismissing appeal made
by the Eastown Theatre, of Detroit, Mich,
pursuant to the provisions of article IV, divi-
sion C, part 1, section 11, of the Code from
a decision reached pursuant to the provisions
of article IV, division 0, part 1, section ?
6 (b), subsection (1).
MOTOR VEHICLE RETAILING TRADE,
Code No. 46: Order 47, granting application.
of the State Advisory Committee for Mary-
land for those dealers who ore officially ap-
pointed by the commissioner of motor ve-
hicles for the State of Maryland to inspect
and certify motor vehicles prior to the issu-
ance of new license plates for exemption ::j
from' the provisions of article III, title B, 7jJ
section 2, of the Code. Period of exemption
is from November 21, 1934, to November 30,
1934, inclusive. The order also provides that- '*-^
all employees of dealers to whom the exemp-
tion applies shall be. paid not less than one 4
and one-half times their regular hourly rate
for all hours worked in excess of 44 hours ..
in any one week.
PAINT, VARNISH, AND LACQUER
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY, Code No.
71: Order 48, denying application of the .
Frazer Paint Co., Detroit, Mich., for exemp- .
tion from the provisions of article XXII of i:
the Code.
PAPER AND PULP INDUSTRY, Code ,
No. 120: Order 33, granting exemption to the "'-
Lowe'Paper Co., Ridgefield, N. J., from the. :
provisions of article IV, section 1 (d), of-.
the Code. :
PLUMBAGO CRUCIBLE INDUSTRY,
Code No. 63: Order 9, granting exemption to .:-"
the supervisory agency of the plumbago :.
crucible industry from establishing a labor.'.:3
complaints committee to handle labor cornm i
plaints. Such complaints, until further notice, .'-,
will be handled by the compliance division
of the NRA.
PLUMBING FIXTURES INDUSTRY,
Code No. 204: Order 18, denying application :<
of Mueller Co., Decatur, 111., for exemption .
from the provisions of article IV, section 3, '
of the Code. .
RADIO WHOLESALING TRADE, Code.Al|
No. 201 G: Order 16, terminating exemption .
conferred in Administrative Orders X-36 and ,
S-78 insofar as such exemption applies to .{N
obligations to contribute to the expenses of '-'
administering the supplementary Code ".
REFRIGERATED WAREHOUSING IN
DUSTRY, Code No. 499: Order 4 A, termi- .A
nating exemption conferred in paragraph III ---
of Administrative Order X-36 so that all
members shall be required to contribute their o
proportionate share of Code administration
expenses, notwithstanding their principal line 4
of business is in some other industry.
RESTAURANT INDUSTRY, Code No_-''
282: Order 91, granting exemption to W. M
Lasley Co., 119 North Second Street, Minne- "
apolis, Minn., from the provisions of article '
V, sections 1, 2, 5, 6, and 7, and article V, '
sections 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, and 8, of the Code.
RETAIL SOLID FUEL INDUSTRY, Code
No. 280: Order 95 B, approving lowest rea- :
sonable costs as determined by divisional -
Code Authority No. 27 for the sent County ..
(Grand Rapids), Mich., trade area. .
Order 97, approving lowest reasonable costs .
as determined by divisional Code Authority
No. 3 for Niagara County trade area, New
York.
Order 98, approving lowest reasonable costs.
as determined by divisional Code Authority.i
No. 3 for the Erie County trade area, New
York.
Order 102 A, approving lowest reasonable.'. i
costs as determined by divisional Code An-..
thority No.'4 for the trade area No. 1, Man-:i:
battan and Bronx, New York. ,'
Order 104, approving lowest reasonable 'w
costs as determined by divisional Code Au-
thority No. 27 for the Flint, Mich., trade.."
area.
RETAIL TRADE, Code No. 60: Order 240,: '
granting application of C. Haase & Sons, Ei
Karl Beckh & Co., Malson Levin, Inc., and
Henry R. Haase, Inc., of Richmond, Va., for,
exemption from the provisions of article V,.'
section 1, of the Code. The order provides
that this exemption shall terminate Decem-
her 31, 1934, and that It shall only apply to/;d
fur workers. It further provides that in the ii
event qualified fur workers bearing the ere- .
dentials of the United States Employment .,5
Service should apply for work to any of -.i
these firms requiring extra work during the a
said period, the employer shall be required |-
to give them at least 3 days' trial employ- J-i
meat at not less than the prevailing Rich-'.....
mend rate of wage for the type of work .7);
required. Should such workers prove unsat-.'
isfactory after the 3 days' trial, the employer.'. ^
shall be permitted to work any of his regular t'-".
employees (fur workers) in excess of the:
rrenlar maximum daily and weekly hours'..
otherwise specified in the retail Code. Onei:
and one-half times the normal rate perhonri
shall be paid for all overtime without regard
to the provisions of article V, section 4 (d), '.s
(Continued on page 6, column 1)


.:..











ADMINISTRATIVE


(Continued from page 5)

g: .Ig the name of each worker and the daily
:'ad weekly hours worked by each during
siad period, shall be furnished to the local The National Industrial Recover? Boar
r'..,.:etail Code Authority, which shall furnish a approved, during the past week, the follow
copy to the Labor Advisory Board of the Ing selections and appointments, of Code At
KNRA not later than January 15, 1935. thorlty members.
RUBBER MANUFACTURING INDUS- THE ALLOYS INDUSTRY-A. A. Corey
.:.-TRY, Code No. 156: Order 50, granting ap- Jr., New York: N. Y.; W. F. Meredith, Ne
B :, plicationn of the Youngs Rubber Corporation, York, N. Y.; J. M. Price, New York, N. Y.
f.'New York City; Julius Schmind, Inc., New F. P. Gormely, New York, N. Y.; Paul Krues
::,.York City; and other manufacturers of pro- Chnttanooga, Ternn.; L. G. Pritz, Cantor
i :.'phylactic rubber goods similarly situated, for Ohio; Max Schott, New York, N. Y.; an
.:'exemption from the provisions of chapter IX, Fred W. Cohen, New York City. Mr. Cohe
article IV-A, section 5, of the Code. was chosen to represent the members of th
V It'..rL Industry not members of the American Allo
SB SHIPBUILDING AND SHIPREPAIR- Producers Association.
"ING INDUSTRY, Code' No. 2:,Order ARTIFICIAL LIMB MANUFACTURIN
1iipprovlng plan for adjustment of labor corn- INDUSTRY.-McCarthy Hanger, Plade
-_.,plait ,s and disputes.
plants and disputes.phla, Pa.; F. Buchstein, Minneapolis, Minn.
,-.:" SOAP AND GLYCERINE MANUFAC- C. H. Hittenberger, San Francisco, Calif.
'. TURING INDUSTRY, Codrle No. 83: Order Martin J. Nowak, Chicago, Ill.; and D. .
9 88, granting application or (the Eaton Clark Hedgecock, Dallas, Tex.
: Co., Detroit, Mich., for exemption from the ASBESTOS INDUSTRY.-W. C. Dodge
'., wage-and-hour provisions of the Code. Jr., Ambler, Pa., representing the brake Un
'.,-STEEL CASTING INDUSTRY, Code No. Ing division, and G. R. Weber. Manbeim, Pa
'1. 82: Order 13, granting application of United representing the textile divisin.
-iEngineering and Foundry Co., of Pittsburgh, BOILER MANUFACTURING INDUS
Pa., for its plants located at Vandergrift and TRY.-Starr H. Barnum, New Haven, Conn.
Pittsburgh, Pa., and at Canton and Youngs- Owsley Brown, Springfield, Ill.; M. E. Findc
is town, Ohio, for exemption from the provl- Burlington, Iowa: E. C. Hutehinson, Edg
sfions of article VI of the Code on condition Moor, Del.; W. F. Keenan, Jr., New Yort
Y.Athat this company comply with all labor N. Y.; H. B. Kendall, New York, N. ..; Ri
si' 'provisions of the Code for the machinery B. Mildon, Philadelphia, Pa.; A. G. Prati
,and allied products industry and shall report New York.. N. Y.; A. W. Strong, Minneapoli,
,,.tp the Code Authority for the steel casting Minn.; and A. C. Weigel, New York, N. Yi
g industry any material increase in the-'process- BUSINESS FURNITURE, STORAGI
,lng'of products of this industry. EQUIPMENT, AND FILING SUPPLYtIN
.'STEEL TUBULAR AND FIBREBOX DUSTRY.-L. C. Walker, Muskegon, Mich
SBOILER INDUSTRY, Code No. 154: Order representing the filing supply industry.
i'12, granting exemption to L. 0. Koven & BUTTON JOBBERItS' OR WHOLE
..Brother, Inc., and Waterfllm Boilers, Inc., SALERS' TRADE (a Division of th
I,'-from the 'hour-and-wage provisions of the Wholesaling or Distributing Trade).-Womrn
'..-'Code on condition that these firms shall fully men's Wear Division: Morris L. Aaronsor
:comply with the wage-and-hour provisions of Otto Boschen, Jeremiah P. Gulton, Harry
'.the Metal Tank Industry Code and any Heindenreich, Louis Hirsch, Samuel Lidi
Amendments thereto. The order further pro- David Rabinowitz, Arthur Singer, and Benja
,'Hvides that these firms shall conform to the min Stern, all of New York City. (Men'
|l falr-trade-l5ractice rules of both Codes and Wear Division). Alfred Feinberg, Fran]
.that they shall report to the Steel. Tubular Liberman, Saul Neuman. Samuel Statslingez
:- and Firebox Boiler Industry Code Authority and 'Max Stavish, all of New York City.
:any material increase in the number of man- COPPER, BRASS, BRONZE, AND RE
|?;,hours used in the processing of products of LATED ALLOYS TRADE.-C. H. Krueger
.i: the steel tubular and boiler industry. New York, N. Y.; Joseph Stelwagon, Phila
1%'` TOY AND PLAYTHING INDUTSTRY, delphia, Pa.; and J. J. Whitehead, New York
,',', "ToY AN LAYTHING INDUSTRY, N .Y., to represent members of the Coppe
4,-tCode No. 86: Order 21, granting exemption and Brass Warehouse Distributors Assocla
.to the Rushton Co., of Atlanta, Ga., from the lion. J. P. Lally, Pittsburgh, Pa., and H. V
-provisions *of article I-V, section 1, of the Stelnkraus, Bridgeport, Conn., to represent
0(ode only to the extent that it is granted nonmembers of theassociation.
wage miate not to pay employexeed 5 cents per hour. COUNTRY GRAIN ELEVATOR INDUS
-ls.ess than the Code provisions, and provided TRY.-Montana State Code Authority:
4", T. Cowan, Box Elder; Frank SchabeLPut-
"-,-no apprentice or learner shall be paid less T owa Box Elde Frank chabel. Dt
than the minimum wage rate herein granted ton; T. J. Larson, Dutton; John McVay
.-This order i effective as of October 17, 1934, Great Falls; and W. T.. Greeley, Great Falls
.'and will expire December.31, 1934. DAILY NEWSPAPER PUBLISHING IN
',",N I R DUSTRY.-John S. Parks, Fort Smith, Ark,
THROWING INDUSTRY, Code No. 54: vice John Stewart Bryan, resigned.
bOrder 18, certifying the proposed installation ELECTRIC HOIST AND MONORAIl
"!.:by Mock, Judson, Voebringer Co. Inc., of MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY (a Divi
Greensboro, N. C., of 6 skein winders, 12 sion of the Machinery and AUied Producti
N.5-B machines, 8 spinners, and 20 combers Indnstry).-A. F. Anjesky, Wickllffe; Ohio
!'::-Itn.ts plant.,Lodn
g. iIt plant. J. P. Lawrence, Cleveland, Ohio; Roy Loudon
S TRUCKING INDUSTRY, Code No. 278: Fairfield, Iowa; N. A. Hall, New York, N. Y.
r Order 127, granting exemption from the pro- F. F. Seaman, Springfield, Ohio; R. T
Visions of articles VI and VII and section 1i Turner, Montour Falls, N. Y.; and J. .G
f; of article IX of the Code to members of the Worker, Philadelphia, Pa:
I industry if and so long as they receive corn- ELECTRO-PLATING A N D M E T A'l
pensation (in the form of relief) from the POLISHING AND METAL FINISHING
6, Federal Emergency Relief Administration or INDUSTRY.-Jolln E. Esposito, Oakland
Sfrom any State or other public emergency Calif.; W. E. Carr, San Antonio,. Tex.; WI
.'relief agency for leasing to and personally lam Shephard, Racine, Wis.; E. A. Rott
',operating a vehicle owned by them for any man, Sr. Louis, Mo.; H. 0. Simmons, Atlanta
r. such administration or agency, but only In Ga.; R. T. Marshall, Worcester, Mass.; Phi
: respect of any vehicle so leased and per- Sievering, New York, N. Y.; F. F. Plerdon
'.. sohaUy operated and on condition that they Washington, D. C.; Albert Kriese, Indian
-`.shall sign a certificate of such relief employ- apolis, Ind.; H. M. Karet, Buffalo, N. Y.
meant to be filed with the Code Authority James E. Nagle, Toledo, Ohio; Leo D. Jen
.:."for the State area in whichh they operate, sen, Shicago, Ill.; Edward Hodeker, Newark
T-,,The order is dated November 10, 1934, and N..J.; and Arthur Lyons. Lansing,.Mich.
becomess effective 14 days thereafter. FILING SUPPLY INDUSTRY (A Divi
J-:'' UNIDERWEAR AND ALLTED PROD- sion of the Business Furniture, Storagi
B WCTS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY, Equipment, and Filing Supply Industry).-
l'!Oodp No. 23: Order 22, granting exemption J. S. Sprott, CiniMnati, Ohio:. Philip Zal
H',i~'to/he knit elastic fabric group of the under- kind, New York, 1. Y.; A.-.Jonas, Jr.,
y'.wear and allied products manufacturing in- Brooklyn, N. Y.; A. R. Rumbles, Buffalo
Sdustry from the provisions of part 2, section N. Y.; E. L. Little, Wabash, Ind.; H. C. Me
8 (a), and part 3, section 2, of the Code to Pike, Monroe, Mich.; and G. W. Schulz
the extent that it may work its knitting- Rochester. N. Y.
Machine operators producing hand-knit elan- FISHERY INDUSTRY (Temporary Ex.
Y tie fabrics known in the trade as No. 100, ecutive Committee for the Processing and
S;9 hours' overtime weekly for a perl6d of 7' Wholesaling Division in the Oregon Area).-
.; weeks within the next 6 months from the' Charles Feller, Mnrshfleld; Henry Goodrich
B .date of the order. The order also provides Kalam; Dudley Turnacllff, Portland; Rich
;:,jihat time and one-third the normal wage ard Anderson, Waldport; and .W. S, Fitts
-'r'te shall be paid for all such overtime. Salem. These members shall serve until
a:iOrder Is dated November 10, 1934. January 31, 1935, unless a Code of fair com
.-WALL PAPER MANUFACTURING IN- petition for said division of the fishery in
'',DUSTRY, Code No. 19: Order 9, granting dusty is earlier approved, in which even
mpton toBeket Smith e ., the executive committee provided for In saic
..reption to Becker, Smith & Page, Inc., of dvs~a oesalspreesl ep
|."Ma d elpbla, Pa., from the provisions of divisibnal Code shall supersede said tempo
P~la elphia P.,fo m hnrviin f rary executive committee.
article III, section (a), of the Code to the ay executive committee.
extent that the limit of hours of labor for GRASS AND FIBRE RUG MANUFAC.
a employees, excepting outside salesmen, TURING INDUSTRY.-Carl E. Steiger, Osh
employeese, excepting otieslsmen, ko
.'emergency repair crews, superintendents, and kosh, Wis.; G. Everett Clitter, Indian
Their foremen, shall be 56 hours in each Orchard, Mass.; Philip C. Waite, Oshkosh
..week during the 60-day period immediately Wis.; Robert B. Brown, Brooklyn, N. Y.;-anc
following the date of this order, provided M. I. D. Einstein, Lawrence, Mass.
That time and one-half shall be paid for all JACK MANUFACTURING SUBDIVI.
^.p 'time worked in excess of 40 hours per week. SION OF THE MACHINERY ANE
." The order also provides that it may be modi- ALLIED PRODUCTS INDUSTRY.-P. W
%fled, extended, or terminated at any time as Rauschert, Carpentersvllle, I11.
P4crcumstances or condltions may require. MARINE AUXILIARY MACHINERi
Order Is dated November 9, 1934. INDUSTRY.-Robert W. Morrell, as admin

":
,',i \. :


ORDERS-


members Approved.

d istration member, to serve during the pleas-
r- ,ure of the National Industrial Recovery
1- Board.
MARINE EQUIPMENT MANUFAC-
TURNING INDUSTRX.-Robert W. Morrell,
. as administration member, to serve during
the pleasure, of the National Industrial Re-
I, cover Board.
i, MARKING DEqVICES INDUSTRY.-The
d order of November 19, 1933, approving a Code
n Authority is canceled. In their place a tem-
e porary'Code Authority to serve for 90 days
y from October 19, 1934, is appointed as fol-
lows: J. R. Swift, Chicago, Ill.; Henry J.
G Hanson, Chicago, Ill.; John Schweizer, St.
l- Louis, Mo.; Herman Anderson, Pittsburgh,
S Pa.; Charles 0. Wee, Detroit, Mich.; Harry
K Jonas, New York, N. Y.; Homer E. Willard,
E' Toledo, Ohio; J. M. Patrick, Snn Francisco.
Calif.; Herman Seefried. Cleveland. Ohio;
Philip Sheridan, New York, N. Y.; and Frank
.e, J.' Spaeth, Boston, Mass. The temporary
n- Code Authority is to cooperate in holding an
EL election within,90 days for a permanent Code
Authority,- and the members of the said Code
i. Authority shall serve until June 16, 1934,-or
; until their successors are elected and/or ap-
k, pointed, and qualified.
e MECHANICAL PACKING INDUSTRY-
r, George L. Abbott, Palmyra, N. Y.; Frank J.
. Wakemn, New York, N. Y.; H. S. Fitz Gibbon,
t, New York, N. Y.; 'and A. W. Swartz; Phlla-
s, delphia, Pa. B. Franklin Connor, ,Hartford,
'. Conn., is appointed to- represent those mem-.
E bers of the industry who are hot members
Sof the Mechanical Packing Association. '
MECHANICAL PRESS' INDUSTRY (Di-
vision of the Machinery and Allied Prod-
E. ucts Industry).-W. Rt. Beatty, Hammond,
e Ind.; L. H. Carter, Toledo, Ohio; R. W. Clas-
ner, Chicago, Ill.; J. F. Herkenhoff, Minster,
Oh, Oiio; H. U. Herrick, Hudson, N. Y.; G. R.
y Munschauer, Buffalo, N. Y.; W. C. Sifyle,
z, Cleveland, Ohio; F. K. Simmoris, Hartford,
a Conn.; and C. T. Ziegler, Hamilton, Ohio.
s NEW -ENGLAND FISH AND SHELL-
k FISH PREPARING AND. WHOLESALING
, OR WHOLESALING INDUSTRY (A Divi-
sion of the. Fishery Industry).-Executive
Committee 'in the States .of Massachusetts,
Rhode Island, and' Connecticut: Alfred
:. Henry, F. McG. Bundy, Joel.'-Lamere, Patrick
S J. O'Hara, Francis J. O'Hara, Jr., Fred
r Grant, John Eagle, David F. Choate, and
S B. 0. Collins. is
V. PAINT, VANISHS, AND LACQUER
t MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.-H. 0.
Gibson, Cleveland, Ohio, representing -the
Sroof-coating and roof-cement division.
V. PLUMBING FIXTURES INDUSTRY.-
t- J. S. Randall, Rockford, Ill., vice Louis J.
y, Laroche, resigned.
A. PRISON EQUIPMtNT MANUFACTUR-
- ING INDUSTRY.-Hull Youngblood, San
,' Antonio, Tex.; Judson Manly, Dalton, Ga.;
J. P. Pohrer, St. Louis, Mo,; C. L. Costello,
L Covington, Ky.; and Folger Adam, Joliet, Ill.
REDUCTION M'A C H I N E R Y INDUS-
s TRY.-Charles P. Melton,'St., Louis, Mo., as
; administration member, to serve daring the
D, pleasure of the National Industrial Recbv-
; ery Board.
'. SCIENTIFIC APPARATUS INDUS-
I. TRY.-Carl S. Hallauer, Rochester, N. Y.;
R. E. Gillmor, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Morris B.
., Leeds, Philadelphia, Pa.; Henry W. Kimmel,
G Rochester, N. Y.; 'W.' Huff, Minneapolis,
M, inn.; I. L. Nixon, Rochester, N. Y.; Carl
I- Amend, New York, N. Y.; C. d. Campbell,
t- Kewaunee, Wis.; Karl Keller, Hoboken, N.J.;
and Verner F. Davis, Newark, N. J.
I1 THROWING INDUSTRY.-A.. Bosshard,
1 New York, N. Y.; A. Coradi, New York, N. Y.;.
G. R. Diehl, Bethlehem, Pa.; Charles Epstein,,
; Kingston, Pa.; George Friedlander, New
- York, N. Y.; Val P. Hattinler, Alpha. N. Y.;
, R. K. Laros, Bethlehem, Pa.; Henry Leon,
New York, N. Y.; William' R. Rossmassler,
. New York, N. Y.; H. *'. W. Scott, Paterson,
e N. J.: and Henry J. Tynan,'Paterson, N. J.o.
- TROUT FARMING INDUSTRY,-EATr-
- ERN SECTION (A Division of the Fishery
., Industry).-Chester A. Pitney, Eastport, N.
, Y.; Walter 0. Cook, East Freetown, Mass.;
T. P. Hazard, Crc-s'-o, Pa.; (Jeorge F. Stack,
Z, Cresco, Pa.; and Gordon Volland, DeBruce,
N.Y.
UPWARD ACTING DOOR INDUSTRY.-
I F 0. Crawford, Detroit, Mich.; E. H. Mc-
- Cloud, Columbus, Ohio; Forest E. McKee, .
Hartford City, Ind.; P. F. King, New Britain',
Conn.; and A. V. Rowe, Galesburg, Ill.
WATER-POWER EQUIPMENT INDUS-
1l TRY (Subdivision of Machinery and Allied
- Products-Industry).-J. Robert Groff, Spring-
- field, Ohio; J. S. Casey, New Yort, N. Y.;
t H. R. Hortenstine, Pittsburgh, Pn.; 0. V.
A Kruse, Philadelphia. Pa.; D. J. McCormack,
- York, Pa.; W. M. White, Milwaukee, Wis.;
and D. H. Moorhead, Newport News, Va.
WET MOP MANUFACTURING INDUS-
TRY.-E. H. Bohlmann, St. Louis, Mo.: H. I.
SKlawanS, Chicago, IlL: W. T. Whitaker,
Philadelphia, Pa.; John Foley, Fall River,
i Mass.; and A. B. Semple, Louisville, Ky. Mr.
Bohlmaun and Mr. Klawans are elected to
serve until June 16, 1935. Mr. Whitaker,
A Mr. Foley, and Mr. Semple are elected for a
S period of 6 months from September 24. 1934.
WOOD SCREW MANUFACTURiNG IN-
F DUSTRY.-Theodore B.- Smith, Brooklyn,
N. Y., vice'Swan Hlllman, resigned.
-.N.Y.


-COn tni ml.


'I

Trade Practice Com.:1

plaints Plans Approved:
The National Industrial Reeovery, Board-
approved, during the past week, plans r.r
the organization of agencies and Prcedfr'.
for the handling of trade-practice comnplalit'
arising within the following industries:
Antifriction Bearing Industry. -
Athletic Goods Distributing Trade (Diljai'
of the WholesaUlng or Distributing Trade).
Candle Manufacturing Industry and the.
wax Bleachers and Refiners Industry.
Celluloid Button, Buckle, and Noveltn
featuring Industry.
Chinaware and Porcelain Mau factuj ..-
Sdustry.-- -
Cigar Manufacturing Industry. .:
Commercial Vehicle Body Industry, .
Drapery and Upholstery Trimmings dustr,'
Electrical Wholesale Trade (Division bf the
Wholesaling or Distributing Traide).
Forged Tool Manufacturing Industry.
Graphic Arts Industries (National" Servi:
Appeal Board). .
Hand Chain Hoist Manufacturing I.Adfti.
Industrial Alcohol Industry. ".'
Lime Industry. -
Nonferrous Hot Water Tank Industry.. ,
Paper Makers' Felt Industry. -
Private Home Study School Industry.:../
Processed and Refined Fish Oil Indust*:..
Retail Solid Fuel Industry (Division No: 48j.
Salt Producing Industry. :.,
Sctap Iron, Nonferrous Scrap Metals,' and
Waste Materials Trade.,,
Sewing Machine Industry. ..'"
Smelting and Refining Industry engaged I .
smelting and refining of Secondary Metala:s'
Into :Brass and Brdnze Alloys in Ingot ,
Form.
Textile Processing Industry,
Wire, Rod, and Tube Die Industry. .

Code Authority By-.

laws Approved, '
Cotton Garment Industry.
Cold Storage Door Manufacturing Industry
(with exceptions)." 'I
Cutlery, Manicure Implement, and Paintera.
and Paperhangers' To6l Manufacturing and
Assembling:Industry (with exceptions).
,Graphic Arts Industries National Llto.'
graphic Printing Division (with excep-'
tions). '
Hoisting Engine Manufacturing Inldutry,'j,'i
Locomotive Appliance -Subdivision of Ma.
-dhinery and Allied Products Industry.
Mechanical Press Industry-Division of .the.
Machinery and Allied Products Industry
(with exceptions). .
.Ol Field Pumping Engine Industry-Dvi-.
Ssion of the Machinery and Allied Producta
SIndustry (with exceptions).
Retail Solid. Fuel Industry-Division No. 17,
Atlanta, Ga. (with exceptions). '
Retail Solid.Fuel Industry-Division No. 2 '
' Cincinnati, Ohio (with exceptions).
Retail Solid Fuel Industry-Division No, 1,7!
Boston, Mass. (with exceptions). ''
Retail Solid Fuel Industry--Division NO. 29,
Madlson,.Wis. (with exceptions. '
Retail Solid Fuel Industry-Division No. 1,
Reno, Nev. (with exceptions).
Small Locomotive Manufacturing-Subdl"-...'
sion of Machinery and Allied Producets'I-.:
dustry'(with exceptions). A3
Trucking Industry., .
Tubular Split and Outsid Pronged myaet
Manufacturing Industry (with exceptions).;t
Wiping Cloth Industry. -'.


Interpretation


Household Goods Storagell
and Moving Trade
No. 399-13
FACTS.-gA'rticle IV, section 2, of the ode
of fair competition for the household god ..-.
storage and moving trade contains the follow 4
iug'provisionl : .
"No other employee,except long-dlsW50'
drivers and helpers shall be paid less tW
the following minimum rates per hour: C.i
...................... ....... .. ............. ...
Regions 4 (except that in cities of 00,.
or more and the immediate trade areas th1'-
of the rate shall be 45 cents), 9, 10, 12,.
and 14 zone B), 40 cents."
The Code Authority has requested an l1n,1
terpretation as to whether the rate of
cents prescribed in the parenthetical clAw. ,
contained in this provision is applicable 6W7.
to region 4 or only to region 9 or to all
regions set forth in this provision. ...,
QUESTION.-In what regions does .
rate, of -15 cents apply in cities of 2100,
or more and the immediate trade '
thereof?
INTERPRETATION. The rate of.. "
cents prescribed in the parenthetical clia
contained in the above-quoted provisions."
article IV, section 2, is restricted in its AP
plicatlon to cities in region 4 having a pw ..j,
latioh of 200.000 or more and the immediat"
trade areas thereof, and the rate of 40 C-
applies to the remainder of region4," :,,
regions 9. 10, 12, and 13 in their resec
entireties, and to zone B of region 14. -










M.iterpretatiOns

Macaroni Industry
No. 234-21
FBACfTS.-It is alleged that the giving of
jminan the manner as hereinafter set
^hisa ,violation of article VII, section 8,
f the Code of fair competition for the
i:t anro industry. The premiums are given
ibe following manner:'
J-JV LaRosa & Sons, Inc., Brooklyn, N.
Sfory offering a 10-quart aluminum pot for
}'i r iirge roses cut out of the carton and a
440a1r1 aluminum pot for 200 large roses
'nt ot of the cartons. .
'."2 Atlantice Macaroni Co., Long Island
,. qy. Y., for offering 2 cans of imported
tomatoese for 100 pictures of the Atlantic facr
-d, cutout of the 1-pound carton.
S"3 Roonzonli Macaroni .Co., Inc., Long
jaliland City, N. Y., for offering various premi-
s' oa.t of a list of premiums for coupons
*t from the cartons.
-"4. National Macaroni Co., known as B.
,lp pone & Co., Passaic, N. J., for offering
.'lVous premiums out of a list of premiums'
ftr couons cut from the cartons.
'. Campanella, Favaro, Glavriano Corpora-
ono Jersey City, N. J., for offering $1 cash
exchange for 200 pictures of General Diaz
cat out of their 1-pound cartons."
.QU.STION.-Is the giving of premiums,
a lllustrated by the examples hereinabove set
,ort violations of article VII, section 8, bf
"ti Cqde of fair competition for thb macaroni
odoasfrI 7
INTERPRETATION.-It Is ruled that the
.'inag of premiums in the manner as illus-
.ated by the examples hereinabove set forth,
;nader the caption Facts ', is not- a violation
'of article VII, section 8, of the Code of fair
c.e'mpetitlon for the macaroni industry.

Special Tool, Die and Ma-

chine Shop Industry
No. 122-22

Machinery and Allied Pro-
ducts Industry
No. 347-29

Gray Iron Foundry Industry
No. 277-28A

SNonferrous Foundry
Industry
No. 165-19
Unit Heater and/or Ventila-
tor Manufacturing Industry
No. 272-12-.
FACTS.-Applicption having been made on
behalf of the D. J. Murray Co., Wausau, Wis.,
for classifleatlon of its products under Codes
Sof fair competition and it appearing that
said company manufactures unit heaters, ma-
Sdinery .for sawmills, hoisting equipment for
power dams, and machinery for pulp mills,
produces gray iron and nonferrous castings,
antd operates a jobbing machine shop.
SRULING.-Now, therefore, pursuant to the
S.tuthority vested in the National Industrial
Rlcvery Board, and otherwise, it is ordered
that In the manufacture of unit heaters said
company is subject to the Code of fair com-
*: petition for the unit beater and/or ventilator
.. imUfascturing Industry; that-in the produc-
.' iOn of gray iron castings said company Is
.u"bject to the Code of fair competition for
the gray Iron foundry Industry'; that In the
V Production of nonferrous castings said com-
I ls subject to the Code of fair competi-
bun for, the ponferrous foundry industry;
.that in'.the manufacture of saw-mill ma-
Sinery said company is'subject to the Code
or fair competition for the machinery and
L tlled products Industry; that in the mann-
Sfleture of machinery of a special nature for
v. various Industrial purposes, in the manufac-
'ture of machinery to order, and in the opera-
t'Hon of a job machine shop said company. Isl
,objet tp the Code of fair competition for.
the special tool, die: and machine shop Indus-
try; and further provided, however, that. If
le applicant shall so elect, It may conduct all
Of Its labor operations under the labor pro-
aOns of, the Code of fair competition for
te machinery and allied products Industry.

Fabricated Metal Products
I Manufacturing and Metal
U Finishing and Metal Coating
Industry No. 84-73
APPLICANT.-H. K. Porter Co.,' Inc.,
Slvrett, Mass.
ro the Information submitted by the
.t company it appears that bolt clippers,
I* tn tters' chain cutters, shear cutters, and
Sliifters, which said products are manu-
"Cted by said company, are rightfully sub-
Jdt the basic Code of fair competiirlon for
fo buciated metal products manufacturing
astryetal finishing and metal coating' in-
ItIs 18 bereby ordered and ruled that the
S "nnfacutaP1o y' which is engaged In the
*.,nture of' bolt clippers, wire cutters,
Cltt shear cutters, and nut splitters.
,. 5u n bject to the provisions of the basic
t" e of fair competition for the fabricated
L' Products manufacturing and metal
j ,.ig ad metal coating Industry.


Amendments and Modifications


The National Industrial Recovery Board,
during the past week, approved amendments
and modifications to Cpdes of fair competi-
tion as follows:
Cutlery, Manioure Implement, and Painters
and Paperhangers' Tool Manufacturing -and
Assem bling Industry.-Amendment approved
November 12, 1934, permits the Code Author-
ity to Incur reasonable obligations necessary
to support the administration of, the Code
and to submit an4temlzed budget and equita-
ble basis of assessment upon members of the
industry to the National Industrial Recovery
Board for approval.
Bog Ring and Rbinger Manufacturing In-
dustry.-Amendment approved November 6,
1934, permits tihe Code Authority to incur
reasonable obligations necessary to sdpgort
the administration of the Code and to submit
an itemized budget and equitable basis of
assessment upon members of the industry to
the National Industrial Recovery Board for
approval. *
Milk Filtering Materials ana Dairy Prod-
uc/s Ootton 'Wrappings lndustry.-Amend.
meant approved November 9, 1934, permits the
Code Authority to Incur reasonable' oblga-
tions necessary to support the administration
of the Code and to submit an Itemized
budget and equitable basis 'of assessment
upon members of the .industry to the Na-
tional Industrial Recovery Board for ap-
proval.
Millinery Industry.-Amendment approved
November 9, 1934, completely revises the for-
mer Code in accordance with'the findings and
recommendations of the Special MilUlinery
Board created by Executive order of Decem-
ber 15, 1933.' The amendment greatly In-
creases the functions of the special' board.-
The amended Code reduces the basic maWI-
mum work-week to 35 hours,'increases wages
approximately .6 percent, and recognizes, the'
importance of regional autonomy- and creates
regional Code. Authorities. Other changes
relate to apprenticeship end utilization of
overtime. By excluding certain knitted hats
from the Millinery Code, an effort is made
to correct an overlapping between', thBis and
the Knitted Outerwear Code. As a whole
the amended Code is much more flexible.
The order of approval continues the three
members who have served under- the old
Code.as the Special Millinery Board in the
same capacity under the new Code. It also
stays the administration clauses of the Code
and provides that the present Code Authority
be constituted d Temporary Millinery Code
Authority until this stay be terminated and
a permanent Code Authority elected. ,
Outdoor Advertising Trade. Amegdment
approved November 12, 1934, permits the
Code Authority to incur reasonable obliga-
tions necessary to support the administration
of' the Code and to submit1 an Itemized
budget, and equitable basis of assessment
upon members of the Industry to the Na-
tional Industrial Redovery', Board, for ap-


proval. his amendment was approved to
become effective 10 days from the date of
approval unless good cause to the contrary
Is shown.
Re'ady.-Made Furniture Slip Covers Manu-
facturing Industry.-Amendment approved
November 12, 1934, permits the Code Author-
ity to, incur reasonable obligations necessary
to 'support the administration of the Code
and to submit an itemized budget and equita-
ble basis of 'assessment upon members of the
industry to the National Industrial Recovery
Board for approval.
Sanitary and Waterproof Specialties Manu-
facturing Industry.- Amendment approved
November 12, 1934, permits the Code Author-
ity to incur reasonable obligations necessary
to support the administration of the Code
and to submit an itemized budget and equita-
ble basis of assessment upon members of the
Industry to the National Industrial Recovery
Board for approval.
Slit Fabric Manufacturing Industry.
Amendment approved November 9, 1934, per-
mits the Code Authority to incur reasonable
obligations necessary to support the adminis-
tration df the Code and to submit an Itemized
budget and equitable basis of assessment
upon members of the industry to the Na-
tional Industrial Recovery Board for ap-
proval.
Wholesale Lobster Industry (a Ditvision of
the Fishery Industry).-Amendment approved
November 9, 1934, permits the Code Author-
ity to incur reasonable-obligations necessary
to support the administration of the Code and
to submit an itemized budget and equitable
basis of assessment upon members of the
Industry to the National Industrial Recovery
Board for approval.
Wooden Insulator Pin and Bracket Manu-
facturing lndustry.-Amendment approved
November 12, 1934, permits the Code Author-
Ity to incur reasonable obligations necessary
to support the administration of the Code and
to submit an Itemized budget and equitable
basis of assessment upon members of thle in-
dustry to 'the National Industrial Recovery
Board for approval. This amendment was
approved to become effective 10 days from
the date of approval unless good cause to the
contrary is shown.
Wood Plug Industry.- Amendment ap-
proved November 7, 1934, changes the defini-
tion of "member of the industry "; provides
a limit of. 6 working days in any calendar
week; requires the employer to provide for
'the safety and health of his employees;
permits the Code Authority to recommend
changes In the Code; permits the Code Au-
thority to, use trade associations and other
agencies ti Code activities; specifies'the right
of the National Industrial Recovery Board
to suspend any action of the Code Authority;
and revises the provisions relative to price
cutting, uniform cost accounting, emergencies,
and price filing.


Canning and Packing Ma-
chinery and Equipment
Industry No. 75-22
FACTS.-Article XI, section (e), of'the
Code of fair competition for the canning and
packing machinery and equipment .industry
provides that thefollowing shall constitute
an act of unfair competition within the mean-
ing of and penalties set forth in paragraph
(b) of section 3 of the National Industrial
Recovery Act: "Granting the secret payment
or' allowance of rebates, refunds, coimmlis-
sions, credits, or unearned discounts, whether
id the form of money or otherwise, or the
secret extension to certain purchasers of spe-
cial services or privileges not 'extended to
all purchasers.on like terms and conditions."
- QUESTION.-Would it be .a vlolintloa of'
article XI, section (e). for a member of the
canning and packing machinery and equip-
ment industry to place on trial with one of
his customers a product of .the industry?
. RULING.-Article XI, section, (e)g does
not prohibit a member of the Industry from
placing on trial with one of his customers a
product of the Industry. providing that offers
to place such products on trial shall be made
openly and extended to all purchasers on
like terms and'conditions.
Order No. 75-18 (an'earlier interpretation
of art. XI, sec. (e)) is hereby rescinded.

Trucking Industry 244-40
and 27,-123
FACTS.-It appearing that trucks used by
the Fitzgerald Construction Co. are owned
and operated exclusively by that company
and are dot offered for hire, and it further
appearing that the operations -of that com-
pany are subject to the Construction Code.
QUESTION.-Should the trucking opera-
tions of this company be classified under the
Construction Industry Code or under the
Truckine Code?
INTERPRETATION.-Inasmuch as the
subject company has shown that Its trucks
are used exclusively in its.own business and


are not rented, the trucking operations of the
company should be classified under the Con-
struction Industry' Code.' (Approved Code
No. 244.) ____

Fabricated Metal Prodticts
Manufacturing and Metal
Finishing and Metal Coating
Industry No. 84-69
FACTS.-The Code Authority for the basic
Code of fair competition for the fabricated
metal products manufacturing sanid metal
finishing and metal coating industry has re-
quested that those engaged in the manufac-
ture of the product termed as wood hames
be included under the definition of the basic
Code.
From the information submitted it appears
that-wood hames must necessarily be com-
pleted by the use of considerable metal fit-
tings and in many cases are manufactured
In the same plant.
It further appears that wood hames are not
specifically included In the definition of any
other Code and as this product Is a part
incidental to and closely related and requir-
ing the'same class of labor to manufacture
as the metal fittings, trimmings, or parts that
"'are required to complete said product and as
the deflnition\for the basic Code in part
reads-" * defined to mean the manu-
facture for use or for sale of products in
whole or in substantial part of metal
* it appears that the'definition of
the above Code can be properly interpreted to
include those engaged in the manufacture
of wood lanames as metal is a substantial part
of the completed product.
QUESTION.-Are those engaged In the
manufacture of wood hames Included- under
the definition of the basiq Code of fair com-
petition for the fabricated metal products
madiufacturing and metal finishing and metal
coatinr industry?
INTERPRETATION.-Those engaged In
the manufacture of wood hamnes are included
under the definition of the basic Code of fair
competition for the fabricated metal products
manufacturing and metal finishing and metal
coating industry.


.,.- .. ,w".l :.a "..,': *", *, '' ,,.:. m .r"-j^ ,*** '.-.: 'f.*' M, -: :, ,.. 'am ;{',Tagj

New Retail Coal Trade'|

Cost Schedules ..
(Continued from page, 3 a .

such other information as the special comn- i
mittee may deem necessary. ';
Coke: Total the cost secured In the same '
manner as for anthracite, plus freight, plus "-.
the committee-determined lowest reasonable
handling cost. '
S. Chattanooga, Tertn.'
As approved for equipped dealers by the '.
committee, the cost schedules follow:
Class 1. Consutimer buying from 1 .'
to 15 tons-...- $2.20 a ton "
Class 2. Consumer buying from ..
16 to 45 tons..__...____ 1.90 a ton '
Class 3. Consumer buying over 45
tons for continuous delivery
from railroad car to consumer,
railroad rates governing settle-
ment-_ ___ 1.00 a ton
Yard sales where no delivery ex-
pense is' involved shall be at ';
the regular rate per ton less.- .75 a ton
For credit charges on commercial .
sales add.... .15 a ton ';q,
For credit on domestic sales add.. .25 a ton .
Lowest reasonable costs for coal trucked.'!
from mine to consumer is as follows: .
Add the net mine cost, as approved in ae- 'S
cordance with procedure established in the
approval order, to the appropriate figure se- W
cured from the following, based oil distance .
from mine to consumer: 'o ti
Distance from mine Tnwzingf and luungf .W't.
to (WIns 11r C costa per ton s ki
0 to 5 miles $0.66,
6 to 10 miles.-______ L 04 A
11 to 15 miles-_. -- L 24=.-__ L2
16 to 20 miles______- L 44,
,21 to 30 miles._____ L 70.'_-_.
31 to' 40 miles 2. 08 '
41 to 50 miles_______ 2.46
1 to 60 miles 2.74 "
1 to 80 miles __8 .41 -:,
81 to 100 milcsI 4.21


Interpretation

Retail Tobacco Trade 5
No. 466-16 ,
FACTS.-Applicant states that a cigarette t:
manufacturer proposes to offer to certain to--.'I.
bacco retailers a clgirette lighter at a low "*''.
price to be-offered to consumers in combina- k
tion with the manufacturer's cigarettes at am
price which is stated to be in excess of the'
minimum price for such cigarettes, pursuant .'
to the Code of fair competition for the retail. i.n i
tobacco trade, plus the cost of the lighter ...
to the retailer. 'The Code Authority has ex- -,
pressed its belief by the following resolution,' '"i'
that all combination sales are prohibited by .
the Code where tobacco products are In- ':
evolved, for which a minimum price has been -..
established pursuant to said Code:
"Resolved, That where a minimum price m "
on any tobacco product has been established .
under the Retail Tobacco Code it shall be'i
a violation of article VI, section 4, of saud "'.1
Code for this product to be offered or sold 1
in combination with any other article or corn- .
modity. No device or subterfuge may be .'
employed to evade this prohibition of cqmbi- ,.(4
nation saless" / i' ..
The Code contains the following provisions:.,,
Article VI, part II, section 4.-".Except as .-
In this part In otherwise expressly provided, '
wherever, under any of the provisions of the .
article VI, any tobacco product Is required *'
to be sold at retail at a minimum price, such ..4
minimum retail price shall not be reduced.
directly or indirectly or by any device or '
subterfuge such as the giving of any trading '..
or merchandise coupons, prizes or premiums,-.'.:...
or any other thing of value or any discount, 'd
rebate, refund, commission, credit, or allow- .
ance, whether in the form of money or other- .:R
wise; nor shall any retailer offer or extend ..'
any special service or privilege to any cus- ,.
tomer which is not available to all cus-
tomers."
Article VTI, section 9.-"No tobacco re-
taller shall require that a purchase of any ."i
tobacco products or other goods be a pre-...'
requisite to the purchase of any other tobacco. rI
products." .
QUESTION.-Under the Code of fair cohn-':"
petition for the retail tobacco trade, Ias. the .'
sale of tobacco products, for which a mini. ,
mum price has been fixed, In combination .....i
with other merchandise a violation of section i
4 of article VI or section 9 of article V1I? .i
INTERPRETATION.-It is held that such
combination sales are not in violation of '
said section 4, part II, article VI, unless -::
such fixed minimum price Is thereby reduced
by charging a price for the combination which i'
Is less than the fixed minimum price of the .
tobacco product plus the reasonable value of sj
the other merchandise. Such reasonable ';ij
value shall be deemed to be the minimum.
price at which such merchandise may be sold
pursuant to any Code of fair competition gyov-..
erning the normal sale thereof, but shall U% A
no event be less than the cost of such mew-' .
chandise to the tobacco retailer. ..
It Is further held that section 9 of artle'.
VTI wIll not be violated if the tobacco retailer "I
does not make the purchase of such other
merchandise a condition to the pmurhasei of :'
the tobacco product.


. .. . .. ..... .. ... ..'... :


Interpretations









i.Recent Trends in Chemical Manufacturing


--.t-- i..--....


AVERAGE


70

60

50

40


30



20


INDEX

^ "A


HOURLY
I I


WAGE IN CENTS


4 t ; 1-


-i-I -i I I


A-
AVE


. . . ..I I_ 1


j.r
~ 4


Wo A


AVERAGE


.RAG O- W.EEKL,0
RAGE WEEKLY


I I I i. .. . . . .


OF


PRODUCTION
!^1


-INDE:;X OF El


HOURS PER WEEK
I I L


( WAGE IN DOI


VIPLOYMENT


L-c
LL


Industry














ARS)...
.AR5 *I


-^I


m.J
____________INDEX OF PAYROLLS __________


I.


I


--EX OF
)EX OF.


IAN-HOURS


/ INDEX OF WHOLESALE PRICES I




zi iiz z----uzzzz-t


M J
1929


D M J
1930


S U M J
1931


U M J
1932


?U M 1J 5
1933


D M 99 5
1934


Chart Prlpared Exclusively for the Blue Eagle by the Research and Planning Division


A picture of the basic trends in the chemical manufacturing industry
is given by the four series in the center of the chart. These operating
Indexes are expressed as percentages of their respective averages in 1929.
SThe employment and pay-roll indexes were obtained by combining the Bureau
Spf Labor Statistics indexes for chemicals and explosives weighted in accord-
ance with their importance in the industry. The man-hours index was com-
puted by multiplying the estimated number employed by the average hours
worked per week and reducing the result to an index number, or relative,
with 1929 as the bMse year. Data compiled by the Bureau of the Census and
the Survey of Current Business were used for the construction of the Pro-
Sduction Index.
U
The average number employed in the chemical manufacturing industry
during the last 6 months has been approximately the same as the average
number employed in 1929, and about 60 percent greater than at the depression
low of August 1932. Man-hours during the last few months have been
approximately 90 percent of the 1929 average and about 50 percent above the
1932 low. Beginning in April 1933, the index of man-hours rose as rapidly
as the index of employment until August 1933, after which the employment
index outstripped the index of man-hours, because of the reduction in the
number of hours. Currently the spread between the two indexes is about
10 percent, and indicates the extent to which work has been distributed in
accordance with the policies of the President's Reemployment Agreement and
the Code for the industry.
The pay-roll index is still around 20 percent below 1929 although it has
shown the same remarkable improvement displayed by the employment and
man-hour indexes. It should be noted that the aggregate purchasing power
of labor in the chemical manufacturing industry, as represented by total pay
rolls is approximately the same as the purchasing power of 1929 pay rolls,
since the cost of living declined somewhat over 20 percent.
The index of production shown on the chart is a composite which covers
less than 10 percent of the value of production under the Code and is heavily


0.I GOVERNMENT PRINT


weighted with alcohols, sulphuric acids, and explosives. Some of the defects
in the index have been eliminated by an adjustment to the total production
of chemicals in 1931 as obtained from census data. The items included in',
the index have a seasonal movement different from total chemical production
largely because of thle fall expansion in production of sulphuric acids for'
fertilizers, in alcohols for "antifreeze solutions" and in explosives for coal
mining. Production, as indicated by the index, is participating in the usual v
fall upswing, and in September 1934 was not only higher than in any other.
September since 1930, but also higher than any month since then with the A
exception of October 1933. In the absence of more complete and diversified
data for the various branches of the chemical manufacturing industry,.the.,i
index of man-hours should be considered as the closest available estimate of .
the trend of production fo short-term periods. .
The upper section of the chart shows the average hourly wage, the average i*:
hours per week, and the average weekly wage. Currently these are obtained
by combining Bureau of Labor Statistics data for chemicals and explosives-'C
Before 1932, National Industrial Conference Board data were used (in the ::
absence of Bureau of Labor Statistics' figures) after some minor adjustments.
Thle average hours worked per week were derived by dividing the average. :2
weekly wage by the average hourly wage. The hourly wage rate declined '
steadily until February 1933 when it reached the low of 52 cents per hour.
This movement was then reversed as average hourly wages began a more or
-less steady increase to 62 cents-only 3- cents below the 1929 average. I.
spite of the drop in average hours per week the average weekly wage increased
from less than $22.50 in the early spring of 1933 to $24 in August 1934. ,
An index of wholesale prices of 52 chemicals which is compiled by the A
Bureau of Labor Statisticd is shown in the lower section of the chart. For; :
the period of 4 or 5 years ending with 1929, chemical prices were remarkably.
stable at approximately the 1929 levels. After a slow decline ending in the
autumn of 1931, prices reached a level about 20 percent below 1929. This
level has been maintained until the present time. .:
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