The Blue Eagle

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Title:
The Blue Eagle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Creator:
United States -- National Recovery Administration
Publisher:
National Recovery Administration ( Washington, D.C )
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 16917556
System ID:
AA00021018:00012

Full Text







4i4x


"One Cent Sales"

Plan Violates

Retail Code

.NRA Code Amendments Apply
to "Element of Chance Sales"
S and Others: Drug Stores
F Are Excepted

c Oombinatiou sales of merchandise, typical
a ofwich Is the "one-cent sale", and the sale
: of0merchandise upon a condition involving the
',element of chance, similar to what is conm-
ruonly known as the "suit club plan", will.
after September 2, be regarded as violations
:' of the retail Code.
SProvisions covering such transactions were
Included In amendments to the Code approved
:.by the National Recovery Administration.
.unless good cause to the contrary is shown to
Bthe Administrator within the Intervening 10
days, the amendments approved will then
l ecome effective.
SThe prohibition of combination or group
,.ales is an addition to the Code's article on
Inss limitation. It provides that In group
offerings or sales of merchandise, the selling
.price of the group shall not be less than the
Ssum of the minimum selling prices of the In-
'dividuals Items of the groups", as determined
: in accordance with provisions already in the
I Code.
It is added that "In group offerings or sales
of merchandise, where the selling price of one
Sor more Items of the group is Indicated, the
"price Indicated for each item or items, ex
'rptemly or by inference, shall not be less than
ithe minimum price of each item or items."
o,...'.m Fide Premiums May Continue
.-Pmendment prqvldes that the added
H .hall not be construed to apply to the
: use ofb bona fide premiums.
Sales methods of drug stores will have to
:.'undergo a little revision, since it is stated that
Sthe addition to the Code shall not apply '" to
tie sale of drugs, medicines, cosmetics.
toilet preparations, drug sundries, and/or
allied items" described In the supplemental
provisions of the Code applicable to retail
drug establishments.
SFollowing is the added section regarding
the use of a lottery or similar element of
Chance as a sales-promotion device:
S "No retailer shall sell or offer for sale any
merchandise upon a condition which involved
a lottery, gamble, or element of chance, simi-
lar to what Is commonly known as a 'suit
club plan'; provided, however, that this sub-
section shall not apply to nonprofit organiza-
tions not definitely constituted to carry on
retail trade."
Temporary Reduction Store Hours
F Another of the approved amendments pro-
vides for the temporary reduction of store
hours for a period not to exceed 3 "consecu
ive" months. Before amendment, such re-
Sduction would have had to be made during
the summer months.
SA change in the labor provisions is the
filing of the allowable hours of work for a
watchman at 56 in any one week, and not
m ore than 13 days In any 14-day period.
:' That provision of the Code regarding the
llnitation upon the number of persons work-
Ing unrestricted hours was corrected, so that
the total number of persons who vwill be per
i.tted to work unrestricted hours shall not
"POeed a ratio to be computed on the average
number of employees during the preceding
12 months.


Fulfill Painting

Contracts

"Property owners have been victimized be-
Dad anyone's conception in the last 4 years
nbyl "scrupulous printing contractors, and the
'mehas COme to stop chiseling practices",
Charles W. S"uess, vice chairman of New
'ork State's regional Code agency for the
.Pltlug, Paperhanglng, and decorating indus-
try, asserted here.
The agency will function an n ailmlnistra-
the body for the industry's Code of fair com-
eion which has Just b'en authorized.
ICompliance with our Code of fair compe
:-,rion Is a-definlte pledge to the public that
detracts will be properly executed In strict
ataformlty with specifications and stagree-
eaiits"', he said. are


Cases
ISee page 4, column I1
NRA's Legal Research Section has
completed a resum6 of all cases de-
cided under the National Industrial
Recovery Act and State recovery acts
up to and including July 20, 1934.
The first installment was published
in the issue of the Blue Eagle of
August 13, 1934, and covered cases in-
volving Labor Disputes. The second
installment was published in the issue
of August 20, 1934, and included those
cases involving the President's Reem-
ployment Agreement and the N.I.R.A.
The section published in this issue
and to be found on page 4, column 1,
covers Hours and Wages.



Fifty Million

Dress Labels
The distribution of NRA labels in the dress
industry reached a total of 51,786 802 on July
31, according to figures compiled by the
Dress Code Authority and made known by
0. L. Elfelt, assistant chairman.
The most popular wholesale price during
the 7-month period covered in the Code Au-
thorlty's label distribution were for dresses
selling at $3.75, the demand at this level com-
prising 21.42 percent of the distribution, or
11,092,053 labels.
Thp $2.87% wholesale prices were next In
popularity, comprising 14.75 percent and
14.25 percent, respectively, of the label dis-
tribution. In each price over 7,000,000 labels
were sent out.
Dresses at $2.25 also accounted for more
than 7,000,000 labels, or 13.92 percent of the
demand.
The smalUest call for labels caine for
dresses priced at $49.50 and upward whole-
sale, but 8,000 labels being shipped for
dresses In this classification. Only 12.500
labels were called for to be placed In dresses
selling at $39.50.


roupings


NRA Announces as Part of General Prograi

of Improvement Complete Realignment of :4

Codes to New Classification of Business

The National Recovery Administration has announced as part of the geiin
program of improvement, a virtually complete realignment of its Code gr'
ings to conform to a new fundamental classification of all industries and tra'
This basic classification, completed after studies of many months; assigj
by the Administrator to a specially created economic unit, corresponds 81'-
to the groupings of the Census Bureau and of the international classifiatioj
but is more thoroughly developed than either.
Keynote of the classification is recognition of 22 classes within which eV'e.
known industry or trade has a definite place. ,


The effect of the classification on NRA's
administrative machinery will be:
1 Assembling of Codes into 22 industry
groupings under the existing industry di-
visions. The sections thus assembled have
been transferred among the divisions so that
each contains only the most closely allied
groups defined by the new classification.
2. Transfer of personnel In many cases so
as to keep experienced men with their Codes.
3. Two or three master Codes will have
their component supplements distributed
among several deputies, but always under
the direction of a single division head.
Reasons for Changes
The reasons for the changes are:
1. Assurance that allied lines receive
identical treatment on common problems.
2. Reduced administrative overhead by
eliminating duplication of functions and
studies.
3. Opportunity for many allied Codes to
merge by-,voluntary action of industry for
greater economy in the self-government
function.
4. Cleared perspective ou the several


NEW TIRE "FLOOR" PRICES


New Schedule Relieves Small Manufacturers, but Continues
to Recognize Necessity for Price Differentials
for Various Groups of Distributors

Made effective August 27, and continuing until October 1, thd retail floor
prices of rubber tires will be changed, mainly to allow those differentials in
selling prices which have prevailed in the trade in the past.
When minimum prices were, set in May, it was felt by tire manufacturers
that the retail market prices of well-known tires would be maintained above the
low levels and that the differentials previously existing would be maintained.
The intensity of competition, which came with declining volume brought all
prices to the lowest reasonable cost established in May. Investigation by
division I and the division of research and planning indicated that small manu-
facturers and independent distributors were not obtaining their customary
shares of the reduced volume of business. A public hearing was held on
August 3, at which time the retail trade presented a request for advanced prices
and differentials.
The range of new prices, while recognizing power has been reduced by the drought.
the necessity for different minimum prices Distributors in these areas have particularly
for different groups of distributors, has not pressed for price differentials, and mail-
been revised upward, despite the pronounced ori'er pri.es recognize ihe differentials which
rise in the cost of crude rubber since the experience has indicated as necessary in re-
original floor prices were determined, lation to prices of similar tires sold in store
The new prices established are not market outlets of mail-order houses. This differen-
or maximum prices, but are intended as trial proceeds partly from the costs of money
levels below which destructive price cutting orders, mounting, etc., which are met by the
will be recognized, customer direct.
Minimum prices were established in May, In the past, five main groups of retail tire
to extend until October 1. at the urgent re- distributors existed, and these divisions have
quest of thousands of retailers, and of small been re-ocnizel. n the basis for five divisions
manufacturers, following an extremely de- of the retail trade, namely:
strut-ive price .,r. It was recognizetl at Dn,'sioN I.-Tires and tubes bearing any
the time that a considerable shift in volume of the following names In any form: lire-
was goingI on. in wlich comp.iny -owned stone, Goodrich, General, Goodyear, and
stores, filling stations, and mass distributors United States
were gaining. Minimum prices were estab- Ut tae
listed to prevent violent and explosive DivisioN 11.-Tres and tubes bearing pri-
changes, and to provide a period for more rate brands only, sold by and.'or through out-
orierly adjustment. During a ruce in April lets whose principal line of business is the
differentials were recognized and agreed marketing of petroleum products.
upon at a conference of retailers and manu- DrisrON lIt.-I. Tires and tubes when sold.
facturers. The present differentials follow by Montgomery Ward & Co. and Sears. Roe-
in general the lines of the truce, and are Lbuck & Co. through their retail stores.
based upon additional experience. 2. Tires and tubes hearing any of the fol-


New Prices Relieve Small Retailers
Thie new prices relieve the strain on small
manufacturers-and retailers and yet permit
the economies of efficient distribution to be
passed on to consumers. The lower floor
prices are of particular advantage to cus-
tomers in farm areas, where purchasing


lowing namues in ainy form : Banger. Uilettes,
Brunswick. Hood. Diamond, Marathon, Fed-
eral, Miller, G. ind J.. and Yale.
3. Tires anid tubes bearing any of the fol-
lowing names in any form: Cooper, Kelly-
Springfield, Dayton, Lee, Dunlop. McClaren
Falls. Mansfleld, Fisk, Master, Gates, Mo.
(Continued on page 2, column I)


classes of Codes, with consequent great.
definition of the problems to be solved .eb$
both Government and industry in devel
meant of Code law and its application, s
elimination of overlapping definitions inA.'.
- dusty Codes. ;:U.
5. Simplicity of line-up for more acoara
statistics on industries and trades. "'-
22 Sections Into 10 Divisions :'.. P
The eventual expectation is that .thei; ,
sections will fit into 10 or 11 industryi.'
visions. Already, within the last few days
two new divisions have been created in lit
with the plan. '"
The first, covering public utilities, tr
portation and communication is under
Acting Divisiodal Administrator. AnothV
probably will include all 'Textile Produt
and Clothing Codes and the Leather and "i
Codes. '
Chief divergence from the census, and '..
ternational classifications is the total elimnat
tion of miscellaneous" groupings. NBI
students of the problem began with the ati
sumption that there was a proper statistics.
and administrative place for every slngl
industrial unit, and with the knowledge thaii
administration of "miscellaneous" unit
would present an unassimilable hodge-podge
of unrelated problems. The classiflcatidon
also departs from the indefinite terms su'cn
as "capital goods", which have heretofore!
caused confusion in statistical work by their'
vagueness. ..
Such Industries as have temporarily-l
adopted NRA's Baslc'Code all have an as-.-
signed place in the 22 sections to which they
may go when they are ready to assume fulll,
self-governing functions. '
Classification of Four Basic Groups 1,*'
The classification was based on recognitilon.l.
of four basic groups of enterprise:
1. Production of basic materials from the:.
soil. .
2. Fabrication of what emerges from the6l
first group Into finished products. '..a
3. Service-industries which do not pro |
ducee or fabricate definite products but which.i
render service-ranging from transportation...
through finance to amusements, professions, -:.
(Continued on page 2, column 3) 4i


Drought Exempts).

Package Machine

In order that they may not be prevented&1J
from doing their full part In the droughtij
relief program, manufacturers of packaging e
machinery have been temporarily exempted"-
from compliance with the maximum hours e
provision of their Code of fair competition, ::.."
NRA has announced. '
Called upon by the United States Govern-"I'
meant to process, and to package enormous :.
quantities of meat, packers of the country
have found themselves faced with a shortage A"F
of packaging machinery. Members of the,
packaging machinery industry directed the
attention of the administration to the situa- .'.
tion, and it was ordered that, until October AV*
13, they may work their employees engaged '*
in manufacturing products required for stor-. .
ing meats, fruits, and vegetables, a 15 per- 9
cent man-hour tolerance above the maximum.,
hours provided by the Code for the packaging .
machinery industry and trade. It was pro--'-.
vldeid. however, that for all time in excess ".:.
of -10 hours a week, or 8 hours a day, the
workers must be paid at not less than thed .
rate of time and one-half. '
In applying for this exemption, the Code".
Authority explained that all skilled em-/ "
ployees in the industry had been absorbed, "
and the provision for longer hours was neces- '
sary to avert delay in carrying out the Gov-
ernment's program.


* : -. . -.- .. **Ktc-. -, t~At'~ Ht' .* -.. L .~ S ~ L~ : -












plew Tire Floor


SPrices
(Continued from page 1)

Giant, Pennsylvania, Inland, Pharls,
|diSelberling.
1ini .V.-Tires and tubes not Included
ia-sions I, II, III, and V.
onz V.-Notwithstanding divisions I,
.rII, and IV, tires and tubes sold to the
i.tbmer through the medium of regularly
1ed catalogs, when orders are received
'imail or telegraph only and delivery is
le by mall, express, or freight only.
vision I Includes the five leading manu-
eras whose tires are nationally adver-
..and have wide consumer acceptance,
easily separates them from other
kr-nown tires. Floor prices of tires In
f.'dlilion have been increased 11 percent
?flrst-line tires, 6 percent for second-line
| No increases were made In third-line
Ftuck ti res.
IDit.vioen II Includes the tires sold by flll-
|getatlon outlets. These outlets sell only
stline tires, the floor prices of which are
a1(twced 4 percent.
sion ILl Includes stores operated by
known mail-order houses, the outlets of
edum-sized manufacturers, and 10 sub-
Iilres of division I manufacturers, Floor
jbes of first- and second-llne tires In this
[lilba remain the same, while third-line
'truck tires have been reduced 5 percent.
E visionn IV includes 22 small manufactur-
r and mainly chain automotive accessory
upply stores distributing private brands. In
.is division floor prices of first-line tires
lve been reduced 3% percent, second-line
i.ies 4 percent, third-line tires 5 percent, and
t'ank tires 8 percent.
liDivlsion V contains the tires sold through
atalogs by mail or telegraphic orders. Price
tducions, averaging 15 percent on popular-
u. tires, have been made on tires sold by
members of this division, with the largest
auctionss in third-line tires.
e;prie reductions occur In 11 Instances;
*ieetcrases in only 3.
S New Floor Prices
'The new floor prices for all lines of all
nakes of tires are set forth in Administra-
.e.Order 410-15 and were arrived at by ap-
'ying the above-mentioned percentages as
U atirenals on floor prices established in

tofreelat mange hi "flwr" an "Brat line", 4-ply 4:75 x 19,
I$atpeU.lsr eke tire.

.SP Percentage
,*.,. D *change
Present'"hag
l'.r s New floor from
:" present
.'. floor

3v oL..i___... 6.70 7.45 +11
lfvlsloanl --,.- 6.70 6.95 + 4
lvlslno L....... 6.70 6.70 0
Dfirlon rV ....... B.7a 6.45 -3.6
SlvlonyV......... 6.70 &.75 ....---_--
ti',"
.'ffeet of .chqne In "floor" on "second line", 4-ply,
.:75 19,tiree.


&tion I-_- .----
Ditmleno U..
Division ITL.....---
Division IV -..---..-
DIvsTon V ..--....


Present
floor


New floor


6.45
6.10
5.85
5.10


Parcen stage
change
from
present
floor

+6
--
------4
-4


E:. effect eftchafuge In "floor" on "third line", 4-ply, 4.75 z 19,

S. Percentage
1!!' rxuntcnange
Present New floor from
floor present
^ floor

Divfsliea L_.1.20 5.29 0
DiTlvsion _-. ......---- ...- -.---- .--
Dilvision [ ....-. & 20 4.95 -
Division IV_..... 5.20 4.70 -t10
D vlsIounV ...-- -- 5.20 4.20 ..-----------
' Effect af change in "foeern 6:z 2 first line pneumatic
(reck and bus esaings.


visiona L........
vision .....
Division -IV- -- ....
t vilan V. ... .


Present
floor


14.20
14.20
14.20
14.20
14. 20


New floor


14.20
13. 75
13. 50
13.05
1265


Percentage
change
from
present
floor

0
-3
-8
-8


Exempts Buck Creek

Cotton Mills

SNRA, acting on the recommendation of Its
...Industrial Appeals Board, exempted the
?Buck Creek Cotton Mills, Sllurnla, Ala., from
'.the 25-percent curtailment of productive ma-
. chine hours in the cotton textile Industry f9r
Sthe period from July 28 to August 25, expira-
dibtion date of the curtailment order.
", The recommendation was the second made
'.by the board since Its creation recently as
`;an agenpocy to which small businesses can asp-
- peal for relief from Code provisions which
L0'..may work hardships on them. In both cases
"*".the relief recommended by NRA has been
.'(made Immediately effective.


Trend of Department Store m


Newspaper Advertising

52 Cities, January 1928 to Date
*"N"" Ci, 0i **:- *i."- 2'"" "Io
-1 IS


WMWM 1928 1929 1930 191I 1912 1933 1934
J3.jRy 26.643.t73 26,0 9.457 25.71.137 23.815.09 21.m4,158 17.2u6.540 19.353.133
rFcmmy 4.370,410 23.67,1.94 23,591,' ,27 2,9Jjl.sa' 212,'6'9 16.333.194 18.91.;01i
21c : 2B.14,ie:5 29,%a24.l,3 8,.1B7',12 :.'1,9.,160 24.979.586 15.439.914 24.6)8,607
A..L 285,09,'176 26."96,,39 30.957.70, o 9.8B.520 221.1 22.,49,494 25.545.64;J
2,3 520 23, i:4SW?11
11- 2,11.1313 29,447,013 29,054,497 26,643 M.5 23,699,536 22 82322 26,051,41:
ju ,56,937 255231 26,35,24 26022,920' 21,840,il 2ii,3I 21I03,4
J 22,0I,142 2i,982.55 21.596,295 21,841i,'171 16.830,232 16,041,0467 17,3.6,957
113UUST 23'S'I:,429 23,650,773 22. 311,171 22.512.726 I. 16.,90 891,,9Ml84
..... &37..0.40,2., 75,,93,1 '265 Z1M
Sc m 26,S3,54-4 29,064,1 28,7,040 2,75,931 22.,16,36 23,243,03
OClOll 2'? 31,756,544 33.,597.2 32..64.817 30:664 341 25, 762',600 27,&4j5:383
NOV16,Bc: 31,704,27 32.227.3.M 30,32,721 29.256 .47 2,6699,614 25,377,86
DiCCMl Im 2.,?1j. 3;2 34.182.721 31.752.737 30.123.321 25.3aJ.69? 27.026.;63
329,773.902 337,804,790 331.,6.3,433 322,1592.565 269,468,965 256,688,204
This chart used by courtesy of Media Records, Inc.



Alcohol Industry "Free Trial" Point


NRA Approves Supplemental
Code Correcting Destructive
Price Competition

The National Recovery Administrator an-*
nounced his approval of a supplemental Code
of fair competition for the industrial alcohol
industry, a division of chemical manufactur-
ing.
In his letter to President Roosevelt giving
a resumd of the Code, the A'dmiLilstrator
states that the labor provisions of the parent
Code are included in the supplemental Code.
In the matter of trade practices, he points
out that some of the Code's provisions are
aimed at correcting destructive price com-
petition existing in this industry and were
given a great deal of consideration in order to
harmonize them with administration policy.
In the article relating to price filing, it is
provided that inasmuch as certain products
of the hardwood distillation industry, name-
ly, methyl alcohol for antifreeze, are used for
Identical antifreeze purposes, as ethyl, iso-
propyl, and various types of inmethyl alcohol as
covered by this Code, the tiling of prices on
the last named products * is not to
becoale effective until and unless a provision
for the filing of prices of the above named
products which are covered by the hardwood
distillation industry Code * are in-
corporated in that Code. When this is ac-
complished, price filing under each Code
shall be exch.,inged. * *"
Obviously ", said the Administrator. "' the
open filing of prices by the industrial alcohol
industry on products which are directly com-
petitive with almost identical products pro-
duced by the hardwood distillation industry
would not be any aid to them in reducing or
knowing about destructive price competition
unless the open filing of prices were adopted
also by-the hardwood distillation industry
for the products referred to. For the same
reason, the other fair trade practices are not
to become effective in respect to the products
of the Industrial alcohol industry which are
competitive with methyl alcohol sold for anti-
freeze by the hardwood distillation industry,
unless the other trade practice provisions
specified in the article are also adopted by
the hardwood distillation industry."


Ice Emergency
The National Recovery Administrator an-
nounced he had declared an emergency to
exist int the Ice industry In the competitive
area comprising the parishes of Orleans,
Jefferson, and St. Bernard, La. The cause
assigned was given as destructive price cut-
ting due to excessive overproduction.
It was ordered that for a period of 90
days from August 8, 1934, no member of the
Industry shall selIl or cause to be disposed of,
Ice at a price lower than the following appli-
cable rates:
CLASS A.-Wholesale and heavy commer-
cial (wholesale being defined as sales of ice
to be resold and heavy commercial as sales of
600 pounds or more to be delivered for use
In connection with the business of the buyer),
$3.60 per ton.
CLAss B.-Light commercial (sales of less
than 600 pounds), 28 cents per hundred
pounds.
CLASS O0.-Domestic, at platform, 36 cents
per hundred pounds, delivered, 40 cents per
hundred pounds.
Members of the industry are required,
within 10 days of the date of the order, to
file price lists not lower thnn the above prices,
with the Louisiana Committee of Arbitration
and Appeal and with the Code Authority.


Shipments
In the matter of an inquiry submitted to
the National Recovery Administration by the
Paint Industry Recovery Board, Inc., of
Washington, D.C., pertaining to advertised
" four-months-free trial sales In the paint,
varnish, and lacquer manufacturing industry,
the ruling was announced that such trans-
acrions, if beyond a period of 60 days, are a
violation of the Code for that industry.
The maximum period for which these "free
trial shipments may be made is 60 days.


Sardine Packers


Helped by Code


Monterey Sardine Industries, Inc.
Saved From Destructive -
Unfair Trade Practices, '
S Says Letter to NRA

The Code for California sprdlue processors
has been the salvation of that industry, as-.
cording to a letter received by the Nationsl
Recovery Administration from a member of
the industry.
The Monterey Sardine Industries, I.a, a
cooperative concern of sardine boat oper-
ators, was asked to furnish certain statistical
information to the NRA. In sending the re-
quested information the organization credited
the Code with stopping destructive price
cutting, chiseling, rebnLates, and other such
practices" which had brought the Industry
almost to the brink of ruin."
"An improved spirit of cooperation in all
branches of the industry "' was cited as a re.
suIlt of NRA operation.
Excerpts from the letter follow:
The sardine catching and processing In-
dustry of California, in our opinion, would,
be prostrate at this time, bad It not been foray'
the passage of the National Recovery Act
and the adoption of a Code by the processors
which has been followed by a more satils-
factory collective bargaining agreement be-
tween the processors, boat owners, and fisher-
men than has been formulated in the past '
history of the industry. Destructive price
cutting, chiseling, rebates, and other such
practices had brought the California sardine
industry almost to the brink of ruin, and the
outlook only 1 year ago seemed almost hope-
less. As indicated above, it is a different
picture today, and is our sincere hope that
the emergency legislation which has saved
our industry will be made permanent.
"The outlook is very much more hopeful
now, largely due to the NRA, the Sardine
Processors Code, and an improved spirit ofat
cooperation in all branches of the industry.
What is true of our organization ia true
also of the other sardine boat owners' or-
ganizations In California."


Assembles Codes Into 22 Industry

Groupings
(Continued from page I)


and such service trades as laundries, restau-
rants, etc.
4. Distribution of goods, wholesale and re-
tall.
The 22 sei'tions and the fundamental group
to which they lielong are as follows:
Producing Industries
1. Food. 7. Fuel. -
2. Textiles. 8. Lumber and rim-
3. Leather and fur. bher.
4. Ferrous metals. 9. Chemicals, paints,
5. Nonferrous metals. and drugs.
6. Nonmetallic prod- 10. Paper.
ucts. 11. Rubber.


Fabricating
12. Equifpmnent.
13. Manufacturing.


Service
16. Public utilities.
17. Transportation.
18. Communication.


Industries
14. Graphic arts.
15. Construction.


Industries
19. Finance.
20. Amusements.


Distributing Trades
21. Professions and 22. Wholesale and
services, retail trades.
The probable ultimate line-up of industry
divisions is as follows:
1. Food, farm products.
* 2. Textiles, furs, leather.
3. Basic materials steel, lumber, building
materials, fuels.
4. Chemicals, drugs, paints, paper, rubber.
5. Equipment, machinery, tools, fixtures, ve-
hicles.
6. MInnuifacturing of use goods-from house-
hold appliances to musical instruments.
7. Construction In all brinchns.
8. P'ulllc utilities (electric, gas, water).
transportation, communication.
9. Finance, graphic arts, ImILvenients.
10. Professonnl. service trades; lnil wholesale
anti retail codes (except foodrl).
Because of the relationship between food
Codes and the Agricultural Adjustment Ad-
minlstr, tlon programs, number one division
Is vertical from first manufacture through
retail sale. Coordilnating machinery, how-
ever. will be established for uniform trade
policies between divisions one and teu. nnd if
Inter found desirable the food distribution
Codes are arranged so that they can be
readily grouped with other distributing trade
groups.
The entire structure thus created Is re-
garded as sufficiently rationalized for both
Government and industry purposes at this

I-* Chart Illustrating a Typical Di


time, but It is not inflexible, and several
divisions, which adjoin in the classification,
may, if advisable, later be transferred with-
out dislocation to the whole plan.
'It Is not proposed by NRA that industries
consolidate their Codes into the 22 master
classifications, nor is It intended any direct
link or liaison within industry be created to
draw them together, but the whole plan is
based on natural definitions of industries and
trades as written by the industry and trade
group thereunder.
Mergers Between Identical Interests
The Code mergers which are expected to
result eventually will take place between
units of almost identical economic interest
whose separation at this time Is based on
arbitrary and personal rather than economic
reasons. A tentative objective has been an
over-all total of about 250 pacts instead of
the present 682.
Trade associations will be encouraged to
retain their separate identities even when the
Code group is merged. At present some Codes
actually embrace as many as 30 separate
trade associations, each collecting statistics
and carrying on technical work under the
general supervision of the master Code group.
To make possible the transfer now ordered,
without Interruption of administration, the
Codes were gone over one by one: the defini-
tions of ench were studied; the deputies in
charge were consulted; the Code authorities
of nimany were called in. As a result, every
completed or pending Code was moved indi-
vidually to a definite and acceptable place.
It Is expected that Industries will move
toward Code mergers as they gain admnilis-
trative experience, both to bring themselves
Into better coordination with kindred groups
and to reduce the unit cost of administration.
Studies of Code Expense
Studies of Code -rxT'enwr rto industry now
are being made both In NRA and outside to
reach the ilniniLum consistent with ,IT,.ctive
administration. Preliminary Indlcationa are
that there is room for very marked overhead
reduction, and the experience of the adminis-
tration in watching the operation of Codes
Indicated that nimarked saving to industry will
result In the groupings of smaller industries
into larger administrative units.
Until the present classification was under-
taken, the Codes had been nsslgned pertly by
relationship to one another, hut especially to
fit the special abilities of division admlnis-
trators. -This basis for assignment was essen-
tial in the early rush days of NRA.

vision Will Be Found on Page 8.





... . . . . ,.''












.Wine Growers Paper and Pulp Depression and Recovery Danger Is Takel

Get Labor Code -- POb.oobIN(SURVEY o uRREN.T nusIsd From Firecracker


Provisions


During Vintage Season Employees
Engaged in Actual Production
Allowed Leeway in Work-
*' ing Hours


abe National Recovery Administration has
announced its approval of a Code of labor
prevlsions for the wine industry. The fair
'* gds practices for the industry were ap-
: proved by the President on December 27,

Approval of the labor provisions was given
withI a proviso that they be stayed for 10
bay after the effective date, or until Septem-
ler 12, in order that any possible objections
might be considered.
A further proviso requires that, within 60
dayoS af the Code's effective date, the Wine
producers' Association and the Eastern Wine
Growers' Association shall each amend its
institution and bylaws to remove the in-
feitable restrictions they now contain.
The Code establishes a 40-hour maximum
work week of not more than 9 hours in any
I day, and a 6-day week. Executive, super-
visory, and technical employees receiving $35
Kr more a week, and junior technical em-
ployees receiving $25 or more a week, are
exempt from the limitation on hours of work.
Watchmen may work 56 hours a week but
Bt more than 13 days in a 14-day period.
Chauffeurs and delivery men are limited to
48 hours a week.
During the vintage season, which is de,
eribed as covering a period of 12 weeks each
year, employees engaged in actual produc-
tion and processing may work not to exceed
(0 hours per week, or 10 hours a day, or 6
ays a week. Checkers and clerical em-
ployees used primarily to compile necessary
records required by the Government also will
be limited to 60 hours during the vintage
season. They will be paid for time in exc-ss
of 40 hours at not less than an hourly rate
to he determined by dividing the weekly
mount regularly paid by 40.
The Code provides that until such time as
Itrained personnel is available to relieve the
shortage of champagne handlers, employees
Sclassified as disgorgers, shakers,.chuckers.
and members of finishing crews may work
lot more than 48 hours a week.
Employees may be worked also as long as
48 hours when it becomes necessary to oper-
msate a plant continuously to prevent spoilage.
A minimum wage of $16, with a differen-
IaI of $2 for office boys and messengers, is
established for office employees. Watchmen
will be paid $16 a week.
Employees engaged in such work as label-
lkg, wrapping, and finishing bottles will he
paid not less than 35 cents an hour. This
light work is usually done by women and
girls. All other employees, except office boys,
messengers, and those doing light work, will
be paid a minimum of 40 cents an hour.
In his letter to the President informing
him that the Code had been approved, the
Administrator said it has been estimated
there will be produced, in 1934, from 40,-
00.000 to 45,000,000 gallons of wine. Be-
fre prohibition, the annual production was
pprTorimately 52,000.000 gallons and during
the prohibition period the annual production
amonnnted to about 700,000 gallons.
Continuing his statistical information, the
Administrator said there are some 500
wineries In the country, the majority located
IN California. In that State there is made
90 percent of all the wine produced. There
are about 2,500 workers engaged in the in-
ustry.


...... EMPLOYMENT (BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTiCS)
/ PAYROLLS (BUREAU OF LABOR STArItSTICS)


1930 1931 1932 1933 1934

Chart Prepared Exclusively for thi Blue Eagle by the Statistical Section of the
Division of Research and Planning


THE production cycle in the paper and
pulp industry is similar to that found In
the average manufacturing industry.
There appears a rapid decline in production
from June 1929 to June 1932. There was a
speculative movement about the middle of
1933 and some reaction from this movement
in 1934. Production in June 1933 could
hardly be regarded as typical of the year
1933. The volume of production in manu-
facturing industry reached a peak in July
1933, and receded rather rapidly in the re-
mainder of the year. On the average, indus-
try has jeen on a higher level of production
In 1934 than in 1033.
The employment cycle is also in accordance
with that found in other industries, but dif.
fers materially from the production cycle.
In June 1932 employment had declined to
76 percent of its status in June 1933, whereas


Ice Warehousing
The National Recovery Administrator an-
nounced approval of a Code of Fair Competi-
tion for the refrigerated warehousing indus-
try, effective August 20, 1034.
In his statement to the President concern-
ing the Code, the Administrator calls atten-
tion to the fact that the industry "is vital
to the health and well-being of the American
public." It embraces 540 establishments,
with an aggregate capacity of 325,000,X000
cubic feet and approximately 10.0D) em-
ployees. It has a capital investment of
$250.(000,000.
Approximately 80 percent of the monimbers
of this industry fire also engaged in the ice
business, and use but one refrigerating and
engineering staff, with much other labor also
interchangeable. Notwithstanding, it is esti-
mated that employment will be increased ap-
proximately 25 percent, and that $210,(0)
annually will be added to the industry's pay
rolls.
The Code provides a 48-hour week of not'
more than 6 days nor more than 9 hours In
any 24-hour period, with an allowance for
overtime.
The proposed minimum hourly wage rate
vary from 275 cents to 37.5 cents, with dif-
ferentials established on the basis of size of
cities and regions. The minimum weekly
wage for clerical employees is $15.
The Code Authority is to consist of five
members of the industry, and. at the discre-
tion of the Administrator, three additional
members representing the Government.


Approved Budgets and Bases of Assessments
(Continued From Issue of Blue Eagle of Aufgust 20, 1934)


INDUSTRY


Daec
Approved


Ameriean petroleum equipment.
Bobin and spool --

teal service...............


1931
Aug. 17
Aug. 17

Aug. 9


hIr anefactluring............. Aag.
ile exchanages and members Aug.
hereof.


ailhlcarIs flthographlfc print.- Aug.
lg industry-Div. No. B-Ij.


aOBna ....alae .--.-


Aug. 17


BUDGET


$151,182.00
7,9601.00

21t ,775.D00


66,8q%. 00
13.400.00


169. 612.0i)


75.000.00


BASIS OF ASSESSMENT


One-tenth of I percent orf gross sales, minimum of rS2 per month.
maximum or Si.tfls per month.
To-ltenths of I percent of average annual sales of products of
industry. quch average to be based on total volume of sales
for years I"'2 to 1931. Inclusive.
Basic feeof $12 for each member operating one establihhnmeni
and conducting not to exceed l111 funerals in calendar icar
1931. Euira assessment of $12 far each separate or branch
establishment;: plus $2.50 for each 50 funerals in excess or
first I10
One-thirdi of I percent of net dollar sales volume. Pcccnt
Buffalo Corn Etchange..--......................----..........- 2'.
Chicago Board of rtrade.....................-....--........ I
Chicago Open Board of Trade-...........................
Duluth Boanrd of Trade.................................
Kansaq City Board of Trade............................ 17.
Merchants Exchange of St. Louis..................... .
Miliaukee Grain & Stock Eschnnae.................... -
Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce .................... I.'
Omaha Grain Exchange................................. 21.
New York Produce Exchange.................... .
Ii'lO
31 per oear for each s,00ijofannual mechanical pay rill. parioble
one.-weirfh monthi.calculated upon the annual mniech,nmic.l
pay roll fir the calendar year ending Dec. 11. I'lli.-a-t o Ihose
members engaged in the industry for al IcaLa-t one sear prier
to Jan. I. I91. nnd upon the available annual mechanical pa,
roll. ur fraction thereof proportioned for the full ,(ar. as to
those members not engaged in the industry al least one year
prior to Jan. I. 1934.
Based on 1I133 sales at rates ranging from $S3 for sale.. under
5010 o $512.010 for ales o.er S.000,000. Firms illing to dis.
close their exact dollar vlume may pay at the rate of one.
fourth of I percent of thal volume.


production had declined to 69 percent of the
1929) level. In June 1934 employment (num-
ber employed) was slightly greater than in
June 1929.
The pay-roll fluctuations since June 1929
are somewhat similar to those in other indus-
tries with the exception that percentage in-
creases in pay rolls exceed the percentage
increases in employment by a smaller
amount than in the case of the average for
manufacturing industries. The pay rolls
have not recovered as much of the total de-
cline as hns employment. In June 1930 pay
rolls were only 70 percent of those In June
1929, while employment had completely re-
covered its decline. Nevertheless, the per-
centage increase in pay rolls since June 1932
has been slightly greater than the percentage
increase in employment. Consequently, the
income per employee has increased slightly
during the recovery movement.


Interpretation


Railway Car Building
QUESTION.-1. Are nurses engaged in
plant dispensaries employed in technical
work'?
2. Are nurses exempt from the hour provi-
sions of article III. section I?
INTERPRETATION.-1. Nurses engaged
in plant dispensaries are technical employees.
2. Nurses are exempt from the hour provi-
sions of article III, section 1. if they are
conipensatedi at the rate of thirty-five (35)
dollars or more per week.


4th of JulyWill beCelebratedWit
Same Degree of Noise But Less
Danger Accordifig to Ne-wi
NRA Code Provisions ?:

SAmerican manufacturers of flrecracke
who operate under the Pyrotechnic Owdel
the NRA have entered Into an understand
Iag with officials of that organization,.si
the Code Authority, to produce hereafter.
brand of noise makers that shall be eel
paratively harmless. This does not mej
that the explosive coy wherewith ydut
America vociferously celebrates the ceuntr
natal day is to be wholly debunked;..bntu
does mean that the youth of the land w
henceforth be spared many painful to
dent, the frequent danger of blood polson
and a series of misfortunes and casnitl
that in past years have attended their.
nile patriotic demonstrations. .- .:
There will be plenty of pop and sonnd"
the American firecracker hereafter madrib7
the likelihood of serious consequences .-
its use will be largely eliminated. 'I..i*
In the days which the modern boy regar
as a long time ago, firecrackers were- ma
with ordinary black powder. .
Then came the World War-with its .Tl
and other high explosives. Youth wanted
thought it wanted, quick action; and tj
foreign manufacturers of firecrackers !we
the first to give it to them. They substitute
for the black powder a so-called "0ial
powder-highly combustible. [As sookiAs'
blaze was applied to it there would'- Wi
explosion, often before the celebraiti
could cast it from his hands. The resufltw
that Fourth of July casualties mounted wI
alarming proportions during the past 1
years.
Firecrackers Made in China
About 90 percent of these flash crack
was made in the Orient. .
Knowing the technique which the Ohligne
had for making firecrackers, and the cheb
ness of foreign labor, some manufactre
conceived the idea of sending the necessai
ingredients, including the flash ", powder1;
China and having their crackers made the
That is. they were partly made in hIL
There was just enough of the job left undo
on these crackers to enable them to.
shipped to the United States as unnflnial
products", evading payment of much otf.t
customs duties.
Thus ingenious foreign manufacturers.ALi
ious to promote American patriotism :j
profit would wrap each little salute crael
in a bit of red or yellow tissue paper a
place them on the American market justI.,
fore the Fourth of July in the Northi.a
immediately preceding Christmas in `.t
South. In Dixieland they are not so largli
(Continued on page 4, colurpn 4)


SCHEDULE OF HEARINGS, AUG. 27-SEPT. 17

INDUSr'tY OR TRADE PLACE DP. ADM. ASSOCIATION
August 27, 1934
Retail (7) (1) ............. Dept. Comm.. 200625.... .. Carr............. Code Authority.
August 29.1934
Infants' and children's wear (J) (adj. from 8- Raleigh HoteL-------.. ---- Edwards.....-- Cods Authority.
13-34)
l:l~erstRade161(7) ----------Dept. Comm., 2062-- Can"r------------
Mirror manufdcrne,(..- ----...... Hamilton Hotel-------- Dahlberg--- Mirror Manufactnuer A
elation.-..
Metallic: wall structure (0) (2)------------............... Carlton Hotel-...----------- Foster--....------- Sopplementary CofoAItl
Ity.
Locomotive manufacturing l01 (1l-.......... Washington Hotel..---- Cowling........ Code AuthoriLy.
August 30,1931
Harbor carritrr lndutry of port N.Y......... Mayflower Hotel...-- ...-------- Weaver......... Code committee.
August 31. 1934
Porcelain enomeling manufacturing i'unl- OCarlton Hotel ............... -----Foster....-------- SupplementCary CodeAnt]
form method of cast finding and cstlmotina- ity.
itol. _________________


September 5, 1931
FPiaO rremaufarturinc it (iad l from 8-3-34)..
Cttion cloth luo-e mrriijfi'.urlng..........
Cutilon clo ih lovemenaifcturirSg '(mlDinimum
pi. P-w-rl ruit-';
T['hr.t iil irrij-irv in iw.tfrre .ii l.Jion uf
IT.S ic.liimbl Rlvor dltrleicii.
Inland w,rr carrlc-r trailds in wmtern divi-
sion ol U.S
Brkionr i .................................
Morcal hat ii', rind wood hat block 'l......
September 6, 1934
Dre sim n nufc ltjuri ngp.......................
at mar ,i : t urin. M i li .. ..............
_Rubocr nsiildciu rLDn l ................
rtlli 'o-hI.l,-,m 1 il?) explanations of di-
vi:ionul 7oC'i. .\thuih tr y
September 7, 1934
I ilhar ry 11i ...............................
rl nrc'il,:rork il).........................
I rilioli. i i t'iJi.tO, bU'.Kl[." rLi.1 0OVcvty niurInU
LI'. tr ir." i i
lii, ', a ol- illnc 1 12' .. ............ .
September 12, 1934
nubbe-r manluful tirDi ir.:c from r -2-3t'...


WUlard Hotel..............
Dept. Comm, 2062-64.......
Dept. Comm 20102-64......
[nveitment Bldg., Room
bi0.
LrIvestment Bldg., Room
F.30.
Hamilton Hotel...........
Carlton Hotel...........


Hookoe..........
Edwards........
Edwards
Weaver.----.-
Weaverr-----.


Code Authorlty.
Nine companies.
Code Authority. '
Boat operators of s. l.D.
Boat operatorma G i*L RDSi


Stanley-... companies.
Dixon........... Code Authority.


NMatliow.-r Holel-............ Edwards.......
WE'hiuton Hoc -I......--- Edwards.......
Dept Comm 206 .......... Bransome...


Rak-lgh H .otl...--- -. ...


WLllard Htuel..............
PLp[. Comm. :fr,-l.......
%%uAhngton HotDol ..........
Rr'ltiL-1h H.otl5 !.....


Crockard........

Fdwards....
Cooriley.........
Edwards........
CrnokLrd.....


Dopt. Comm., 20tc2-G4....... BransomeI.


Dress Code A utheribt.':.
Code Authority. ..
Higer-.town Rabber Obi,
Inc ""
DivLional Code Anetio ,ty.:'


J. B. Stetson Co., Phll?&:.
Hat Corp of Americat., i
Code ALthority '
Code Autrority. '
Div isional Code A nthority.,'


M. A. Ferst, Ltd., Atld ti
Ga


September 17, 19 34
M-,oufa.-tur.. lcs iri-:-.d iran 5-i-1-1t... Dept. Comm., 3309........--.. Peeablea......... Mfgd Oas Indus. Asn.
in.l cteli .ao.e-:. ot [ti- ii\r Indt r ,: -.i:-cd Dept. C romm 3309.......... Peeblas----- U S. Inc. Tele. Assn. i
tr-ri *-Jt l- ii,
B:il l '4 -.it1,v 0l tio tiIele leid. i(reci.ied Dept Comm., 309.......... Peebles.......... 21 companies.
from -t-JII.
Tater supply 'rvce.i.ed from 8-2;7-31)........ Depl. Co.mm.. 3309........... bl........Pebes- .. Institutel or Water Stuppli
Utilitie, Inc.

f(I) Mordlficatirjo prtopoal. i'2. Ameodments iJ) Divliloo or the Construction Industry. (4) Application for termimna
tio ofeirmpuon '.I Di-iIOn iof the Fishers lodutry. ,, Dlvislon of the retLail tradid. (7) DIscotilson books for Lastlta
ijonal library purpoo'l.,. l Supplemr-ntal to Fabricated Metal Products Manufacturing and Mt.al Finishing and Meta
Co'.ting Indu.try. i% ) Sultm-iv-lon ol Machinery and Allied Products Industry. (11) Application for exemption. (12.
Division of wholesaling or distributing trade. "


I mmrpmm 1-1


-.-----------------------












.sume' Court


\edCases
| (feffrred to in box on page 1, col. 2)
hlle following r6sum6 covers cases
tiolvig HOURS AND WAGES
l i g under NRA:
,iHOURS AND WAGES.
S:,11. UNITED STATES v. HERCULES
: GAS STATION, INC., D.C. E.D.
e : N.Y., week ending Dec. 2, 1933.
-e (Galston, DJ.)
Defendants were indicted for work-
i, ng their employees in excess of the
-,. hours allowed by the Petroleum
-&. Code, but as they pleaded guilty
.. there was no decision on the merits.
,i.UNITED STATES v. LIETO, 6 Fed.
-' Snpp. 32, D.C. N.D. Texas, Feb. 16,
S1934. (Atwell, DJ.)
.....: Provisions of the Petroleum Code
";-prescribing maximum hours and min-
i mum wages for filling-station em-
*;'" ployees and the provisions of the
N" .I.R.A. making penal offenses of
Z the violations of the Code are un-
constitutional as to the owner of a
-- filling station in Texas who was en-
gaged in the sale, for consumption
.Bji within the State, of gasoline pro-
duced in the State. The operation
.4 of a filling station Is a strictly local
Z. business which does not affect inter-
*'f" state commerce.
,8. AETNA COAL CO. v. SMITH, U.S.
ATTY. ET AL., D.C. S.D. Ala.,
:- Apr. 6, 1934. (Kennamer, D.J.)
.: Enforcement of an order issued by
| .:2 the Administrator approving an
S amendment offered by the Code Au-
Sthority for the bituminous coal in-
"" dusty raising wages and shortening
,..,* hours in the Alabama area will he
restrained, temporarily at least,
since no notice or hearing was given
1'1i mine owners.
t4. SCAPELLATI v. BERGEN ET AL,
S D.C. D. Conn., Eq. No. 2328.
z|.| (Thomas, J.)
In sa suit for a restraining order pre-
venting the NRA and the Code Au-
t' hority for the Coat and Suit Indus-
:' try from enforcing the Code for that
| industry on the ground that its di-
S vision of the country into minimum-
wage areas was arbitrary, an injune-
-' tibo pendente life was obtained on
: January 2, 1934, which injunction
was discontinued on. February 10,
F4x "1934.

5. GARMENT MANUFACTURERS'
S '' ASS'N, INC., ET AL. v. HUGH S.
: JOHNSON, Sup. Ct. D.C., Feb. 8,
1934.
lk:: The plaintiff sought to enjoin the
.U.". Administrator. and others, Including
g: the Federal Trade Commission, from
'', enforcing the provisions of the Code
for the Coat and Suit Industry, the
gravamen of the complaint being
S that wage scales and classifications
| imposed by the Code placed the com-
.A plainants at a serious disadvantage
** in competing with manufacturers in
S other areas,'which would eventually
result in the confiscation of their
y property without due process of law.
The suit was dismissed without
prejudice.
6. BRODSKY v. SHARBU OPERAT-
ING CO, INC., Sup. Ct. N.Y. Co.,
N.Y., Feb. 8, 1934.
]; A pay reduction'for motion-picture
operators to a point below that pro-
*, vided in the NRA Code was restored
1-'. for the future; the plaintiffs were
S left to their action at law for
amounts past due.
7. LANEY v. MILNER HOTEL CO.,
3. P. Ct, Grand Rapids, Mich.,
: March,. 1934. (Creawell, J.P.)
The plaintiff, being paid wages
p -' .under the Code minimum, sued to re-
cover the difference between this
S minimum wage and the amount ac-
tally received. Held that Codes
are constitutional in view of the
emergency and bind nonassentors as
i well as assentors. Judgment for
plaintiff.



SGrocers, Year


After PRA

4f:.. The President's Reemployment Agreement
;e4went into effect in the food and grocery
.';yade 1 year ago. Since then our Codes
.have been approved. The trade has been
Vroperatng under the Codes for 8 months.
V,'What Is the general competitive condition of
;..the trade?
Figures just released In official sources
s, Show a decrease in bankruptcies in the re-
.'.tall field of 25 percent as against 1933 and
- 1 in the wholesale field a decrease in bank-
Sruptcles of 40 percent. Furthermore, the
' proportion of retail grocers in the $5.000 to
4;..25.000 class falling has likewise decreased,
..whereas there has been a sllht Increase In
ft'the failures among the larger establishments
, of over $100.000. -From National Food and
'^'Grooery Dietributors' Code Authority.
., -.: "


8. HYATT v. BOOKMAN SHOE CO.,
J. P. Ct., Tulsa, Okla., Jan. 26, 1934.
An apprentice is not within the
terms of the NRA Codes as regards
wages. He may make any contract
he sees fit with his employer, and
if the wage agreed upon Is less than
regular workers receive under the
Codes, the apprentice is still not en-
titled to more than he contracted
for. (No written opinion.)
9. HART COAL CORP. ET AL. v.
SPARKS ET AL., D.C. W.D. Ky,
May 19, 1934. (Dawson, J.)
The N.I.R.A. and the Administrator's
orders issued pursuant to the Bitu-
minous Coal Code fixing maximum
hours and nitlmum wages in the
western Kentucky field are unconsti-
tutional and void as not within the
commerce power of Congress. It is
axiomatic that Congress has no
power to regulate production.
The act and the orders cannot be
sustained for the additional reason
that there is an unconstitutional
delegation of authority to the Presi-
dent. No standards are set up to
guide him. Neither can they be sus-
tained under any alleged Federal
police power, nor under the Pream-
ble to the Constitution, which is not
a grant of power, nor under the
power to provide for the general wel-
fare since this power exists only In
connection with the taxing power.
Nor can the power to coin money
be relied upon to support the act.
Plaintiffs have no adequate remedy
at law. They are not stopped
merely because they have in the past
abided by the Code. The emergency
does not justify the act and the or-
ders. A preliminary injunction re-
straining their enforcement will issue.
10. UNITED STATES v. PERFECT
COAT & SUIT CO, D.C. N.J., May
11, 1934. (Avis, D.J.)
The defendant pleaded guilty to each
of the 10 counts of an indictment
charging it with paying employees
less than Code wages. The court
sentenced the defendant to pay a
total fine of $500 after the United
States district attorney recommend-
ed leniency due to the fact that the
firm had already paid the employees
through the Code Authority for the
Industry. (No written opinion.)
11. CLIFTON v. UNCLE SAM'S
STORES, INC.,,City Ct., Rochester,
N.Y., May 29, 1934. (Tompkins, J.)
Provisions of the Retail Food and
Grocery Code which allow executives
receiving $30 or more per week to
work In excess of the maximum
hours prescribed by the Code do not
require an employer to pay $30 per
week to all executives who work
overtime. As long as the executive
was paid at least $14, the minimum
wage for all employees, be is not
entitled to recover the difference be-
tween his salary and $80 a week.
The same reasoning applies to simi-
lar provisions of the President's Re-
employment Agreement.
12. UNITED STATES v. CLYDE
MILLS, INC., D.C. D. R.I., June 10,
1934. (Letts, D.J.)
A plea of guilty was entered to
counts of an information charging
failure to obey the hour and wage
provisions of the Cotton Textile
Code. Defendant was fined $100.
He also agreed to comply with the
Code In the future and to make resti-
tution of back wares.
13. STATE v. PATTON, Ct. Crim. Cor-
rection, St. Louis, Mo., May 21,
1934. (Butler, J.)
Defendant worked some of his em-
ployees longer than the Cleaning
and Dyeing Code permitted, al-
though he displayed a siguboard
stating that he continues and main-
talns wages and hours at Code stand-
ards." He was fined for false and
misleading advertising on the ground


Modify Code for Bank

Note Engraving

The National Recovery Administration has
announced its approval of modifications of
those provisions of the Code for the graphic
arts Industries applicable to the securities
and bank note engraving and printing in-
dustry.
Under the terms of the Code as amended,
unskilled mechanical employees will be paid
not less than 40 cents an hour. Skilled
mechanical employees shall have their hourly
or piece work rates raised within 80 days to
a point where (including raises since July 1,
1933) they are 10 percent higher than the
rates in the same establishment in effect July
1, 1933, for the same classes of skilled labor.
Standard working hours are fixed at 40
a week for all engaged on mechanical work,
incl-uding proprietors, supervisors, and fore-
men. Shifts are restricted to six a week, no
one of which may be more than 8 hours
unless overtime Is paid. This limitation does
not apply to engineers, firemen, janitors,
watchmen, or guards. The rate for overtime
is fixed at time and one-half, except for work
on holidays and Sundays, when double time
will be paid. No establishment shall In-
denture any new apprentices within one year.
No establishment may use or permit the use
of die stamping, photo-process work, or ma-
chine engraving for script or other lettering
in the preparation of any steel engraved
security. It is also provided that no estab-
lishment shall sell, or otherwise dispose of
any steel engraving, roll or die which has
been. or may be used, in whole or In part, in
the preparation of any bank note or security.
unless the assets of the establishment are
being liquidated or merged with some other
establishment operating in the same division
of the industry. The sale or delivery or
transfer, of any blank steel engraved borders,
unable for securities is prohibited. Steel en-
graved vignettes shall be hand lined engraved
without the use of any photo-process work.


that his advertising was deceiving
the public.
14. LAUX v. SMITH ET AL., Mun. Ct.,
Marion Co., Ind., No. 51647, June 6,
1934. (Bradshaw, J.)
A filling-station operator who re-
fused to sign the Petroleum Code,
but who displays the Blue Eagle and
accepts whatever benefits that brings,
Is bound by the terms of the Code
and stopped to deny liablUty there-
on. For paying less than the mini-
mum wage he Is liable to his em-
ployee In a, civil action for the dif-
ference between the Code minimum
and the actual amount paid.
15. MENGEL CO. v. SPARKS ET AL.,
D.C. W.D. Ky., May 19, 1934.
(Dawson, D.J.)
Complainant Is not entitled to a re-
straining order to prevent a United
States attorney from enforcing as
to It the provisions of the Corru-
gated and Solid Fibre Shipping Con-
tainer Code which place Kentucky In
the northern zone for the purpose of
determining minimum wages. Com-
plalnnnt's contention that enforce-
ment of the northern rates would
add $13,000 per year to Its overhead
was met by defendant's assertion
that complainant had recently In-
creased its general manager's salary
from $20,000 to $10,000 a year.
16. UNITED STATES v. MAUGANS-
VILLE ELEVATOR & LUMBER
CO., D.C. D. Md., July 12, 1934.
(Chesnut. D.J)
The dc-femlant pleaded guilty to an
information charging It with violat-
Ing the price-filing provisions of the
Code of fair conmetltion for the Re-
tail Lumber Trade. A fine of $100
and costs was imposed.
[ In the issue of the Blue Eagle oil,
September 4, 1934. will be printed|
those court cases involving CONTROL|
OF PRODUCTION. J


A Code Is An Opportunity


It Will Pay Us to Stick to Ours
From Photo-Engravers Bulletin, August 1934
Rocking the boat is fun only when the boat is in water so shallow that wading
out is a safe certainty; rocking the boat in deep water is sheer lunacy, even for
accomplished swimmers. All American industry is in deep water; deeper and
rougher in some respects than it was a year ago. This is no time to rock our NRA
boat. * After all, in there really anything incompatible between rugged
Individualism, that thinks and acts with vigor for individual interests, and reasoned
cooperation designed to serve the interests of the greatest number of individuals?
Isn't the photo-engraver who fondly thought that just the signing of our Code would
surrounds him with an effortless paradise due for an awakening? Didn't we warn,
long before the Code was approved, that "photo-engraving orders won't grow on
Codes"?
Photo-engravers seemed to be unanimous in their belief that destructive price
cutting was the besetting cancer that needed to be eradicated before industrial
health could prevail. We have known for years that chiseling was prevalent, and
that it made the going tough.
Now we can do something about it.. Now it is illegal to chisel-just the opposite
of when it was illegal to stop chiselingl The overwhelming majority of photo-
engravers do not choose to go back to the old model. To quote, "A Code is an
opportunity and "we must stick to the recovery job."


Office


Alabama --..............
Arizona...... .......----.
Arkansas.--.............
California
San Francisco.......
Los A ngeles---......
Colorado..............
Connecticut-....-----
Delaware..............
Florida ...............
Georgia...............
Idaho.................-------
Illinois-................
Indiana-..............
Iowa.................
Kansas................
Kentucky.............
Louisiana.............
Maine.................
Maryland.........-------
Massach usel t -.---
Michigan.- ... --......
Mississippi............
Minnesota.....------
Missouri--...--------
Montana- -......---
Nebraska-....-----....
Nevada--....--------
New Hampshie-...
New Jersey.. ..
New Mexico..--------
New York--_..--..-
Albany.------......---
Buffalo.--...-------..
North Carohlina..----
North Dakota.........
Ohio ..................
Oklhoma-------------
Oklahoma .........
Oregon--.....---------
Pennsyl vania..--....
Pittsburgh---.--...
Rhode Island -- ....--
South Carolina---..
South Dakota---....
Tennessee...------.-
Texas:
HoustOn-..-------.-
Dallas...............
U tah-....--..............
Vermont.............----.
Virginia..........
West Virginia.........
Wisconsin.............
Wyoming .............
District of Columbia--
Washlngton...........


TOTAL, 53 Orncn.s 1,312


Number of Number of
cases employees


28
0
17
31
47

0
10
25
0
27
20
13
9
7
24
3
44
27
30
2
124
33
'7
21

19
2
61
6
Is
22
23
8O
21
16
134
50
4
13
4
10
108
65
6
0
22
7
19
2
15
16


84
0
92
32
47


10
36
74
Sl
i18
9
12
28
79
241
228
3o
2
167
84
12
83
2
1
169
2
195
8
78
322
61
524
88
76
1,486
460
6
---------C
24
223
147
23
0
94
13
23
3
30
54
5.595


Amount

$510.f2
0
2,946.34
1,264.04
2,096.40
12L 287T
399. 44
1,477.14
0
1, 10L88
1, 61& 32
487.61
35&.47
180.28
1,213.18
591. M
6,052.77
3,013. 8
827.61 :
67.02
B.,572.56
3,495.31
39. 49M2
1,383.80
68.40
494.0
103. f5
3,334.10
197.75
I 639.07
7. 637.37
2,466.61
11,731.77
1, 798.90
51,34.5.06
9,415.40
106.84
1,110.02
227.12
617.74
5,163. 11I
S638.05
471.78
0
1,368.51
223.10
849. 33
93.34
632.57
1,9569.00
S140.873.23


Danger Is Taken

From Firecrackers
(Continued from page 3)

given to shooting crackers on Independence
Day as In the North; but how they do pop
'em during the Xmas holidays.

NRA and Pyrotechnic Code
Came the NRA and the Pyrotechnic Code.
The American manufacturers of fireworks
conferred with the Deputy Administrator in
charge of that Code of fair competition.
They showed that they had been forced
Into the manufacture of "salute" crackers
because a few had devised the Chinese plan
referred to; and the legitimate American
manufacturers had been compelled to resort
to similar production or go out of business.
The result was that they have proposed an
agreement with the NRA to declare produc-
tion and sale of fireworks containing magne-
slum or aluminum, which produces or assists
the explosion, as an unfair trade practice:
and the Code Authority and the NRA will see
that It Is enforced. Henceforth, the American
boy will have his noisy firecracker; but It
will be comparatively harmless.


Editorial
"4Since Its advent as the emblem of co-
operation The Blue Eagle has been the
strongest weapon of the Administration In
the enforcement of the provisions of the
various Codes now operating in American
business and industry. It Is still going
strong . and few who are engaged in
mercantile business are willing to operate In
such a manner that they will be deprived of
The Blue Eagle."-Paterson. N.J., Call.


.&.1
.k.J ..6.
,:,'.'YX,;


I


I I I


p 1 w-wvwff~


$140,873 Baci


Wages Restored


NRA Compliance Division
Secures Restitution of -Pay
to 5,595 Employees in First
Two Weeks of August.

Back wages totaling $323,000 were ob-
tained for 13,762 workers throughout the,
country during the 6 weeks ended August 18
as a result of adjustments by State NRA
directors of complaints based, on alleged vio-
lations of Code wages and hours provisions.
Reports tabulated by NRA's compliance dl-'
vision show that during the last 2 weeks of
the period State directors effected the resti-
tution of $140,873 in back wages to 5,595 em-
ployees, while in the preceding 4 weeks'
period employers agreed to pay $182,127 to
8,167 workers-a total of $323.000 returned
to the workers involved in 4,158 complaints.
In all of the 4,158 complaints State direc-
tors were able to achieve satisfactory adjust-
ments without reference to Washington, and
usually the employer willingly agreed to the
restitution when the application of the par-
ticular Code to his casewas clearly explained.
The compliance division's tabulation of
State directors' reports for the 2 weeks' pe-
riod ended August 18, showing the number
of cases adjusted, the number of employees
affected, and the amount of restitution made,
by States, follows:














ADMINISTRATIVE


ORDERi


ATLANTIC MACKEREL FISH-
INGINDUSTRY. DIVISIONN
OF THE FISHERY
INDUSTRY)
ORDER

fIBPLEMENTARY CODE OF FAIR COM-
PETITION FOR THE ATLANTIC MACK-
EREL FISHING INDUSTRY (A DIVISION
OFi THE FISHERY INDUSTRY)
ORDER NO. 308D-7
Approval of Plan of Curtailment of Production,
Article VIII, Title C, Section 1, Paragraphs to)
and (d).
WHEREAS. Article VIII, Title C, Section 1,
paragraph (o) and (dj of the Supplementary Code
t Fair Compeltiton for the Atlantic Mackerel Fish-
elag Industry ais Division of the Fishery Industry
provides:
to0 In order to conserve natural resources by
the elimination of conditions leading to gluts In
the mackerel market and consequent wastage
through dumping of mackerel at sea, and by the
development of the maximum usable yield com.
psatble with future pioductivlty through preven-
tion of the take of small mackerel during those
portions of the season wben larger sizes are avail-
able to supply the demand for mackerel and to
rehabilitate the mackerel fishery by malntalniug
a reasonable balance between the production of
mackerel and the consumption of mackerel, and
by assuring minimum prices for mackerel not
below the cost of production:
(11 The Executive Committee, with the ap-
proval of the Administrator, from time to time
may estimate consumer demand for mackerel.
When any such estimate shall have been approved
by the Administrator, the same shall be deemed to
he the net reasonable market demand for mackerel ;
and therefrom the Executive Committee, with the
approval of the Administrator, may determine (ac-
cording to the run of the fsh and o'ber conditions
nla the ocean) whether the exploitation of the
S mackerel fishery should be unrestricted, or whether
a'total or partial limitation on be take of small
;mackerel by purse seine boats should be effected.
-. (2 Any determinallon by the Executive Com-
milttee pursuant to the provisions of subdivision
"(1) of this paragraph shall be revised from time
to time to conform with the net reasonable market
demand for mackerel as found as aforesaid, and
all estimates and determinations by the Executive
Committee pursuant to the provisions of said sub-
diviMion shall be subject to the approval of the
Administrator, and shall be based upon a published
ending and statement of the reasons therefor
Any limitation on the take of small mackerel shall
accord due consideration to the effect of such limi-
tationa on the cost of production of mackerel larger
in ilze.
13) In estimating consumer demand for mack-
erel. due account shall be taken of probabler- with-
drawals from storage of frozen and salt mackerel,
of anticipated Imports of frozen end salt macRk-rel,
and of production and consumption of groundfish.
(d) In the event that any determination of the
IEecutive Commlittee pursuant to the provisions of
paragraph (0) of this Section falls to effectuate
the conservation and/or rehabilitation policies
hereinbefore stated, the Executive Committee, upon
due showing to the Admintistrator and with his
approval. may determine from the net reasonable
market demand for mackerel found as aforesaid
the poundage of mackerel with reasonable toler-
ance, that may be iqnded from any trip by purse
aelne boats engaged In the mackerel fishery. In
5lloeatln, trip poundage quotas to such boats due
contlderatlon shall be given to boat tonnage and
crew Bsie
WHEREAS, said Executive Committee (after
due consideration of probable withdrawals from
storage of frozen and salt mackerel, of anticipated
ImnorTS of frozen and salt mackerel, nnd of the
production and consumption of groundfislh) esti-
mates that consumer dhrmand for manikerel will be
approximately two million two hundred thousand
pounds per week for the balance of the mackerel
season;
WHEREAS. said Executive Committee has deter-
mined (from said estimate, and frr,m the run of
the flsh and other conditions In the ocean l that
there should be no lIlmiatlion on the take of small
mackerel by purse seine bonrat, but that the ex-
ploitation of the mackerel flshery should not be
wholly unrestricted ;
WHEREAS. said Executive Committee (from
aid estimate, and after due consideration of boat
tonnage and crew suiei has determined that The
poundage of mackerel that may be landed from
pnY trip by purse seine boats of twenty or less
gross tons shall be five thousand pounds, plus one
thousand pounds for each crew member Including
the captain: and that the poundage of mackerel
that mnv he landed from any trip by purse se-ilne
boats c.f more than twenty gr,'-s tons shall be
be thousand pounds, plus one thousand pounds
tor each crew member Includine the captain, plus
uftv pounds for earbch eross torn In excess of twenty
WHEREAS. said Executive Committee bhas de-
trmtinmd that snll restriction on the poundage
of maikerel that may beri.' landed from anyv trip by
Plurs seine boats engaged In the mnakeri fishery
bsould he extended to October 31. 1934 : nnd
'WEPREAS. justice requires that appropriate
helef be granted in ancordnnce with snl.d pro.
visions of said divisional i-od.,:
NOW. THEREFORE. 1. Hugh S. John-rofi. Ad-
minlstrator for Industrial Recovery, pursuant to
the S athorlty In me rested, do hereby npprnv-
eahl estimate of the Executive Commititre of c.,an-.
tamer demand for mackerel In the amount of ap-
Proximately twn million, two hundred ihoutnnd
ioUndas per week and the snm. shall be deemed
Se he net renasrninnble mari-et d,-mnr.i tnr mTn. l
erel; and do hereby approve said determination
Ofaild Executie C.mmitee limiting ti,- pundlae
Of mackerel that mny be Inndel from nrcr trip by
Pumrse selne boots engaged In the mackerel fishery.
said determination to remain In r-ffect until Cict.
anelr~er mno oato.
Ot St 1934, unless by tfrth.'r order I sholl direct
Sterwise and do hereby order that. to nvold vio-
aton ofr the letter rather than the spirit hereof.
Sslid Executlve Committee sbhall nilow reasonrible
I tolerance In the poundage of mnck.:rel landed from
'Vy trip by said boats; apd do herc-by order
ft that the provisions hereof shall not be-


come effective until said finding of said Executive
Committee as to consumer demand for mackerel
and as to restriction of the exploitation of the
mackerel fishery, together with a statement of the
reasons therefore, shall be published to the mem.
bears of the Atlantic mackerel fishing Industry; and
do hereby order further that said publication
may be effected by news items in the Uloucester
Daily Times, Boston Post, Boston Globe, Boston
Herald, and Portland Press Herald.
HUGH S JOHNSON,
Administrator for Industrial Reoovery.
Approval recommended:
ARMIN W. RILMY,
Division Administrator.
August 6, 8I4.


AGRICULTURAL INSECTI-
CIDE AND FUNGICIDE
275A-6
ORDER
CODE OF FAIR COMPETITION FOR THE
AGRICULTURAL INSECTICIDE AND
FUNGICIDE INDUSTRY, A DIVISION OF
THE CHEMICAL MANUFACTURING IN-
DUSTRY
Granting Application for a Stay of the Provisions
of Article V, Section l(k).
WHEREAS, an application has been made by
all the members of the Code Authority for the
Agricultural Insecticide and Fungicide Industry
pursuant to a resolution unanimously passed by
the members of the Agricultural Insecticide and
Fungicide Industry at its meeting held In Atlantic
City, N.J., on May 14, 1934. for a stay of the
operation of the price filing provisions of Article
V, Section l(k) of t e Code of Fair Competition
for the Agricultural Insecticide and Fungicide In-
dustry as to sales between members of the In-
dustry ; and
WHEREAS, upon due deliberation by the Assist-
ant Deputy Adminisirator and he being of the
opinion that objections to such stay on the part
of the members of the Industry being Improbable
and that this stay will tend to effectuate the
policy of Title I of the National Industrial Re-
covery Act, and It appearing to my satisfaction
that the stay hereinafter granted will tend to
effectuate the policy of Title I of the National
Industriani R u:overy Act;
NOW THEREFORE pursuant to authority
vested in me, It is hereby ordered that the opera-
tion of said provision of said Code be and It is
hereby stayed for a period of 60 days from the
date hereof as to sales of the products of the said
Industry between members of the Industry subject
thereto on the condition that:
1. Such members of the Industry shall abide by
all the other provisions of the said Code with
regard to the products of the Industry so pur-
chased by them to the same extent as If such
members were themselves manufacturers of such
products;
2. The Code Authority shall Immediately upon
the granting of this stay give notice of this stay
to all members of the Industry, and within a
reasonable time after such notice Is given, the Code
Authority shall certify to me that such notice was
duly given ;
3. The Code Authority shall file a brief within
the 60 day period of this Stay showing the extent
of the practice herein referred to over the last live
years and stating facts and arguments in support
of the granting of this Stay Order and of any
proposed modification of the Code In respect
thereto.
4. Providing further, that the period of this Stay
may be terminated earlier by me based on objec-
tions received by me and/or for other sufficient
reasons.
HUGH S. JOHNSON,
Administrator for Industrial Recovery.
By G. A. L NCH,
Administrative Officer.
Order recommended:
Gto. L. BBiRRY,
Division Administrator.
July 80, 1.954.


BANKS
47-13
ORDER
CODE OF FAIR COMPETITION FOR BANKS
Denilnl of application of the Citizens Nntionil Bank.
Triler Texas, for exemption from the provisions
o? Article IV, of the Code of Fair Competition
for Banks
An application bavine been duly made by H M.
Bell. Vice-President of the Cltlzpns Nrtional Bank,
TylIer, Texas. for an exemption from the provisions
of Article IV of the Code of 'ani Comr.etti,.',1n 1rr
B'-ink. nnd the Dr-putvy Adminlsrrot.r IIIit'Diz rec.
oinmt-nded, and It appearing that Justice requires.
that ,nid application Li denied.
NOW. THEREFORE. pursuiant to authorily
vested In me by the Administrator for Industrial
Recovery. and otherwise, it Is heieby ordered tba-
the- said application for exemption hbe and it Is
hereby denied. C. E. ADAMS,
Dip-iolon AIdoi-iiilsator.
By F. S. STeONO, JI.
Dteial recommended
K. J AMMEiMtAN.
Deputy dminlgsaiotr.
Auguetl 11, 1.15.


BARBER SHOP TRADE
395-5
ORDElH
CODE OF FAIR COMPETITION FOR THE
BARBER SHOP TRADE
Denying Application of Leo erscb. 37 Henne.
pin Avenue, Minneopolhs. Minnesota. for nn
Exemption from the [,rolsiLons of Article 1lt.
Sectin 1 and Article IV, Section 1 (s).
WHEREASt. en application has been made by
the above-named applicant for an exemption from


% OFFICIAL ORDERS OF NRA
I


The Blue Eagle prints in each issue administrative orders,
interpretations, appointments, and bylaws approved by the Ad-
ministrator. Texts of amendments, approved and summarized,
herein, are available upon request through the NRA printing and
.publications division.


the provisions of Article III, Section 1 and Article
IV, Section 1 (a) of the Code of Fair Competition
for the Barber Shop Trade; and
WHEREAS, the Deputy Administrator has re-
ported and It appears to my satisfaction, that the
exemption applied for Is not necessary and would
not tend to effectuate the policies of Title 1 of the
National Industrial Recovery Act;
NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to authority
vested In me. It is hereby ordered that the said
application for an exemption be and It Is hereby
denied.
WILLIAM P. FAaNSWOoarB,
Division Administrator.
Order recommended:
0. Da Fzmsar TiAiaun,
Deputy Administrator.
August 11, 19Sf.


CALIFORNIA SARDINE
PROCESSING
ORDER NO. 308C-B
SUPPLEMENTARY CODE OF FAIR COM-
PETITION FOR THE CALIFORNIA
SARDINE PROCESSING INDUSTRY-A
DIVISION OF THE FISHERY INDUSTRY
Approval of Cost Finding and/or Estimating
Methods.

WHEREAS. by the provisions of Article VIII
Title C, Section 1, paragraph (d) of the Code of
Fair Competition for the California Sardine Proc-
essing Industry, It is provided that the Executive
Committee is authorized to fat mulate an accounting
system and methods of cost finding and/or esti-
mating capable of use by all members of the
Califoinia sardine processing Indus'ry; and
WHEREAS the Temporary Executive Committee,
pursuant to the authority granted by Article VIii,
TItle F, Sect.on 1, of the Code of' Fair Competi-
tion for the Fishery Industry, and pursuant to
the authority granted by Article VIII, Title B, Sec-
tion 1. nnd by Article VIII, Title C, Section 1,
paragraph (di of the Code of Fair Competition
or the California Sardine Processing Industry
has submitted to the Administrator for approval
methods of cost finding and/or estimating, said
methods being on file with the Administrator:
NOW, THEREFORE, on the recommendation of
the Temporary Executive Committee, and pur-
suant to the authority vested in me by Article
VIII, Title C, Section 1, paragraph (dI of the
Code of Fair Competition for the California Sar-
dine Processing Industry, by the Executive Orders
of July 15, 1933 and the Executive Ordr-r of
December 30, 1933 and otherwise, it Is ordered
that the said methods be, and the same hereby
are approved. and shall be effective for a period
of ninety days from the date hereof, unless within
saiold period the Temporary Executive Committee
or the Executive Committee shrill submit, and there
shall be approved, other methods of cost finding
ana,or estimating: all subject, however, to my
further modification, extension, or cancellation of
this Order.
HUGH S. JOHNSON,
Administrator.
Approval recommended:
ARMIN W RILEY,
Division Administrator.
Washington, D.C.
July 81, 193Sf


CAN MANUFACTURING
84-42--152-9
ORDER
CODE OF FAIR COMPETITION FOR THE
CAN MANUFACTURERS INDUSTRY
Approval of Application of the Erie Can Company,
816 W. Erie Street, Chicago, Illlinols. for exemp-
tion from the wage and hour provisions only of
Article III.
An application having been duly made by the
Erie Can Company. 816 W. Erie Street. Chicago,
Illinois, for exemption from the wage and hour pro-
visions only of Article III of the Code of I-alr
Competition for the Can Manufacturers Industry,
and the Deputy Administrator having recom-
mended, and it appearing that Justice requires,
that said application be granted to the extent
her-inafter stated:
NOW. THEREFORE, pursuant to authority
vested In me by the Administrator for Industrial
Recovery, and otherwise, It is hereby ordered that
the said application for exemption be and It is
hereby granted from the wage and hour provisions
only of Article III of the Code of Fair Competition
for the Can Manufacturers Industry, upon condi-
tion, however, that with respect to those of Its
operations now subject to the wage and hour pro.
visions of Article III of the said Code for the Can
Manufacturers Industiy it shall fully comply with
Article III of the Code of Fair Competition tor the
Fabrlcented Metal Products Manufacturing and
Metal Finishing and Metal Coating Industry, and
any amendments to such Article
BARTON W. MURRAY.
Division Adnministrator.
Approval recommended
J G. COWLING.
Deputy Adminisftrator.
H. Faats WHITe,
Acting Deputy Administrator.
August 7, 1953.


CANDY MANUFACTURING
4(13-6
ORDER
CODE OF FAIR COMPETITION FOR THE
CANDY MANUFACTUiRING INDUSTRY
Denting Application of the Virginl Da[re Co:nfee-
Ilon, Itc.. 309-311 N Howard Street, Balti.
more. Maryland. for an Exemption from the
povilslons of Article IV
WHEREAS, an application has been made by the
abovenamc-d applicant for an exemption from the
provisions of Article IV of the Code of Fair Com.
petition for the Candy Manufacturing Industry;
and
WHEREAS. the Deputy Administrator has re
ported, and it appears to my satisfnctti.n. that the
exemption applied for Is not ne,:essary a.-nd would
not tend to effecruate th- pi.llrl cs of 1Title I of the
te,]iional Induetrlrd Rrcovery Act ;
NOW. THEtiE7ORE pursuant to authority
ve-'ted In me, it iS h-i-eebv ordi.red that eaid appli-
cation for an exemption bie and It is herby denied.
ARMIN W. RILEY.
Diri6ion Administrator.
Order recommended:
C. W DENNING.
Deputy Adminisirator
August 8, 193.


SX~


CIGAR MANUFACTURIN-
ORDER NO. 467-7 '"
CODE OF FAIR COMPETITION FOR'
CIGAR MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY
WHEREAS, the Code of Fair Competitlo
the Cigar Manufacturing Industry provides in
dlon 10 of Article IV, that .
"Upon application of any employer, at a nyti
a higher rate of exemption for slow workers't
Is established in Section 9 of this Article
established by the Code Authority with thi5
proval of the Administrator. -
and, ''
WHEREAS, It appears that an acute aitfa
has arisen In the manufacture by hand of'.2Io
cents cigars, particularly In the York Conuityij
trier of Peousylania ; and ,
WBHEREAS, the Code Authority for the Cig
Manufacturing Industry has adopted the followuI
resolution ; '.
RESOLVED, that on account of the exfst4
emergency, the Code Authority for the l
Manufacturing Industry recommends to thq1'
ministrator, when advised by the Labor AdsM
Board that It concurs In such recommend
such higher rate of exemption as may fe'sul'l.
the payment of the piece rate hereinafter'rd
to, to rollers of hand made cigars retail'
for 5 cents located in the York County Di
providing, however, that all such rollers are .i
a piece rate of not less than three dollars. ($
per thousand and all bunob-makers of 2v
cents cigars are paid not less than one dollO
twenty cents ($1.20) per thousand; and po
further, that such higher rate of exem tlolni
continue for a period not to exceed r
days, unless further extended by the."'
Authority." ..,
and,
WHEREAS, the resolution as setforthi
has received the approval of the Labor Ads
Board; `.1
NOW, THEREFORE, pursuant to autlfi
vested in me. it Is hereby ordered that the'
lution of the Code Authority for the Cigar 'Mi
facturing Industry, as hereinbefore set forWth
and the same hereby is approved, and sball.bec
effective as of the date of this Order. .
ARMIN W. RtrLay;U'a
DiMision Admint ratr
Approval recommended : ,'
leWI. S. MOISo, ,'.
Deputy Administrator.
August 10, 1934.


COCOA AND CHOCOLAT'1

ORDER 'I

CODE OF FAIR COMPETITION FOR2CB
COCOA AND CHOCOLATE MANUFACTUH
ING INDUSTRY
Denying Application of the Oswego Candy Wo
Inc., Oswego, New York. for an Exemption 'tf.)
the Provisions of the Code of Fair Competitlk
for the Cocoa and Chocolate Manufactnuti
Industry. ., ..,
WHEREAS, an application has been made by 't
above-named applicant for an exemption fromi
provisions of the Code of Fair Competition fot-
Cocoa and Chocolate Manufacturing Industry a
WHEREAS, the Deputy Administrator 'ha
ported, and it appears to my satisfactionn,:
he exemption applied for is not necessary.-J [
would not tend to effectuate the policies of.t'l:i
of the National IndustrrIal Recovery Act, "..-
NOW, THEREFORE, pursuant to antholt
vested In me, It Is hereby ordered that said app
catlion for an exemption be and It is hereby deniy
AtimIN W. RILBr, '31
Division Admin4strators
Order recommended : -".
C. W. DENNING.O
Deputy, Administrator
August 8, 9S4.


COTTON GARMENT '|
ORDER
CODE OF FAIR COMPETITION FOR TIB
COTTON GARMENT INDUSTRY -A,
No. 118-105 *AK
Granting Application of Kalamazoo Pants uCqOI
pany, Kalamazoo, Michigan. for an Exemptto
from the Provisions of Article Ill, Section',A
WHEREAS, an application has been made':. i
the above-named applicant for an exemption troit
the piovislons of Article III., Section A of t`
Code of Fair Competition for the Cotton Gambi
Industry; and
WHEREAS the Deputy Administrator has .4
ported, and It appears to my satisfaction, theN
the exemption hereinafter granted Is necessary an
will tend to effectuate the policies of Title I(t
the National Industrial Recovery Act; A;l
NOW. THEREFORE, pursuant to authority
vested in me, it Is hereby ordered that the abo7,
named applicant be nd It hereby Is exempted fr6m
said provisions of said Code to the extent that';:
be permitted to work 15 markers, cutters, -itn
spreaders and 5 operators who prepare cutsN f
serving operations eight f8) hours overtime week]
frr a period not to exceed eight (8) weeks troi
the date hereof, provided that such employees a,
paid at the rate of time and one-half for all sue
overtime 'A
This order may be revoked by me at any .t1i
upon proper cause shown by objections to be Bia
with me within ten (I0) days from the dat
bei euf. .
WILLIAM P. FARNSWORTH 2-
Acting Dhi-ision AdminitatroIor
Order recommended:
DEAN G. EDWARDS.
Deputy administratoro.
August 10, t15 "


CRUSHED STONE, SANI
AND GRAVEL, AND SLAG.::
109-8
ORDER :
CODE OF FAIR COMPETITION FOR THR
CRUSHED STONE. SAND AND GRAVE!
AND SLAG INDUSTRIES .
Approval of Uniform Terms of Sale and UnIforn
CrJedit Practices for District Number 3 of Mi'
souri of Region Number 13
ADMINISTRATIVE ORDER NO.- '
WHEREAS. Section 3 of Article Vll of the'Cod
of Fair Competition for the Crushed Stone, San
and Gravel, and Slag Industries provides as fol
lows :
Section 3. Uniform Terms of Sale.-tn eaci
region, district, or division, the regional' diatricl
(Continued on page 6, column 1)













ADMINISTRATIVE ORDERS-


-Continue49

NOW. THEREFORE, pursuan toth.utoit


i' (Continued From page 5
HlOa committee, as the case may be. may es-
sUh subject to the approval of the Admlnlstra-
'terms of sale uniform within each region, dies-
t.. or division. Such terms shall be binding
.isll producers stealing in that region, district,
division." ; and
DEREAd, Section 4 of the said Article of Sald
oprovldes as follows:
action 4. Uniform Credit Practlces.-In each
district, or division, the regional, district,
vison committee, as the case may be. may ea-
bhsubject to the approval of the Adminlstra-
redit practices uniform within such region,
Ilt. er division. Such practices shall be bind-
uirh all producers selling in that region, dis-
or division."; and
BREAS, pursuant to- and in full compliance
'the provisions of Title I of the National In-
1u IReeovery Act. approved June 16. 1938, and
h a Code, application has been duly made by the
SelMted District Committee of District Nom-
o Missouri of egion Number 18 for ap-
l:'eof certain uniform terms of sale and unr-
-radi.t practices for said District (the bound-
',%i5V which are fully described in the said uni-
'terms and practices, on file herewith), and a
having been duly held thereon, the Assist-
SDeputy Administrator has rendered the an-
l'meport on said uniform terms of sale and
'iform credit practices, containing findings with
ct thereto, and has recommended that the
.l/ppllcatlon be granted and that the said terms
lIpractices he approved:
OW, THEREFORE, I, Hukh S. Johnson. Ad-
siftrator for Industrial Recovery, pursuant to
fhorlty vested In me. do hereby adnpt and ap-
*iVe the said report and recommendation, and do
jbuy order that said uniform terms of sale and
ilform credit practices be and they hereby are
proved; such approval and such uniform terms
Haile and uniform credit practices to take effect
(lOe days from the date hereof, unless good
lue to the contrary Is shown to the Admlnistra-
tbefore that time and the Administrator Issues
b0beequent order to that effect.
I"- HUGH S. JOHNSON,
Administrator for Industrial Reovery.
val recommended:
"<.BARTON W. MUaRAY,
Ni.- Diihion Administrlator.
Iwaahington, D.C.
Aiugntsa ii, 1.94


DROP FORGING
,'.- 423-7
'" ORDER
DR OF FAIR COMPETITION FOR THE
DROP FORGING INDUSTRY
action of Exemption Granted in Admlnlstra-
:- tive Order SX-36
WEERtEAS an application has been made by
C-ia.ode Authority of the Drop Forging Industry
ogr, termination of the exemption conferred in
gPragraph IIt of Administrative Order X-86,
't'ed May 26, 1934; and
WHEREAS, an opportunity to be heard has been
4.ly. afforded to iall Interested parties, and no ob-
loane were filed and the Assistant Deputy Ad-
-latra'tor has reported, and it appears to my
tlsfaction that termination of said exemption Is
*ited and will tend to effectuate the policies of
of1 ef the National Industrial Recovery Act;
W THEREFORE, pursuant to authority
Sited In me, it is hereby ordered that any exemp-
|bt'enferred by Paragraph III of Administrative
der X-3G, dated May 26, 1934, upon any mem-
-of this industry be and it is hereby terminated,
ided, however, that such exemption be limited
those members of industry who produce drop
riags to the specifications of the user, with or
thout subsequent operations, for sale as drop
tings; and provided further, that the exemp-
a Bshall not apply to those members of Industry
)o produce drop forglngs all of which drop forg-
n are stocked and catalogued for general sale by
e maker, or to those members of industry who
hprodnce drop forglngs all of which drop forglngs
iare seld as parts or products covered by the deflni-
*lons of other codes of fair competition which are
.approved or may be approved.
Si' BARTON W. MUaRAT,
Sr m Division Administrator.
Approval recommended,
... J..O. COWLING,
Deputy Administrator.



I ELECTRICAL MFG.
4--8
.':". ORDER
- OD1 OP FWAIR COMPETITION FOR THZ
|;'ELECTRICAL MANUFACTURING INDUS-
.i' .TRY
tApproval of Application of Leltelt Brothers Corn-
ALf pany, Chicago. Illinois. for exemption from the
,. wage and hour provisions only of Articles III
.and IV of the Code of Fair Competition ?or the
S..-Electrlcal Manufacturing Industry.
'An application having been duly mnde by the
,Leitelt Brothers Company. Chicago, nilnois, for an
"qemptlion from the wage and hour povislons only
'ofArtlcles III and IV of the Code of Fair Compe-
ition for the Electrical MNnnofacturlne Induistry.
aid the Deputy Administrator having recommended,
and it appearing that Justice requires, thut said
application be granted to the extent hereinafter
ated :
1IKNOW THEREFORE, pursuant to authority
.Avgsted n me by the Admlnistrator for Industrial
'SM covery. and otherwise. It is hereby ordered that
etae said application for exemption firm the wage
Wisd hour provisions only of Articles Ill and IV of
Ithe Code of l"nir Crimpetitlon for the Electrical
4Mianufacrtoring Inlustry be and It Is hereby
MIp. hinted. upon condition, however, that with respect
orto'these of its operations now suhieci to the wage
K.sad hour provrisilons of Articl's III nnd IV of Ihe
m.1ald cole for the Elr-trical Maniufneturing Indus-
try, e' h applicant shall fully comply with Articles
,' 111 and IV of the C,.de if Fiilr Competition for the
k .opl-Ferrous Foundry Industry.
f.' :"BARTON W. MUnRAT.,
.'." Division Administrator, Div. t.
:-:Approval recommended :
S J. G. Cowl.iNG,
S Deputy Adminlistrator, Div. t.
X.. August S. /93..
:IV-.'Orders similar to the above granntlng exemptions
.''from thp ame artlclhs. %titiclc III arid IV. if the
."Code of Fair Cimpetilion foi the Electrical Mnanu-
if: factturing Imlustny wi r- made tu the following corn-
!5"' parties on AOuuIHt 7, 134:
SORDER 4-25 P. A. Geler Compnnv. Cieve-
aIninl, Ohio. * provided the "applicant
. shall full 'omplv with Articles Ill anil IV of the
,.2Code of Fair Comp'etition for the V'ncuum Cleaner
.y Manufacturing Industry. and any amendments
S therelo."
SORDER 4-20 The Griswold Mnnnfvetrnr-
"' Ina Co., Erie, Penn. * provided the
': "'applicant s'-all fully comply willt Art'.l' Ill It'
i.'the Code of Fair Competition fur the Fabricatid
.Metal Products Manufncturing and Metal Finish-
intg and Metal Coaning Industry,'aud any amend-
*:;* ments to such article."


).


GAS COCK
70-14


An.-. *': J1-''


t


ORDER 4-27 Tpokhelm Oil Tank & Pump
Co., Fort Wayne. Ind. provided the
" applicant shall fully comply with Articles II and
III of the Code of Fair Competition for the
Gasoline Pump Manufacturing Industry, and any
amendments to such articles.
ORDER 4-28 John Wood Mannufeturnirig
Co., Coonshohocken, Penn. 4 provided
the "applicant shall fully comply with Articles II
and Iltof the Code of Fair Competition for the
Gasoline Pump Manufacturingt Industry, and any
amendments to such articless'
ORDER 4-29 Duparquet Huot & Moneuse
Company New York, N.Y. pro-
vided [he "'applicant shall fully comply with Arti-
cle IIl of the Code of Fair Competition for the
Fabricated Metal Products Manufacturing and
Metal Finishing and Metal Coating Industry."
ORDER 4--0 Enlerprise Alnminnum Co.,
Massillon, Ohio. provided the ap-
plicant shall fully comply with Article II of the
Cede of Fair Competition for the Fabricated Metal
Products Manufacturing and Metal Finishing and
Metal CoatiFng Industry, and any amendments to
such Article.'
ORDER 4-32 Johnson Motor Company,
Waakeaan, Il. & provided the "ap-
plicant shall fully comply with Articles III and
IV of the Code of Fair Competition for the Auto-
motive Parts and Equipment Manufacturing Indus-
try, and any amendments to such Articles.


FABRICATED METAL PROD-

UCTS MANUFACTURING

AND METAL FINISHING,
AND METAL COATING
ORDER 84-45
ORDER
CODE OF FAIR COMPETITION FOR THE
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS MANU-
FACTURING AND METAL FINISHING AND
METAL COATING INDUSTRY
Denying petition of the Louisville Enameled Prod-
ucts Company, Louisville, Kentucky. for an Kx-
emption from the wage provisions of the Fabri-
sated Metal Products Munufacturing and Metal
Finishing and Metal Coating Industry.
WHEREAS, an application has been made by the
above-named applicant for an exemption from the
wage provisions of the Code of Fair Competition
for the Fabricated Metal Products Manufacturing
and Metal Finishing and Metal Coating Industry;
and
WHEREAS. It appears that such an exemption
would be likely to operate adversely against con-
cerns In the same business paying Code rates..and
would not tend to effectuate the policies of Title 1
of the National Industrial Recovery Act :
NOW, THEREFORE, pursuant to the authority
vested in me by the Administrator for Industrial
Recovery and otherwise, It is hereby ordered that
said petition for an exemption he and it Is hereby
denied.
BARTON W. MoURRAT.
Diitiaton Administrator, Ditvision I.
Recommended:
H. FERRIS WRITz,
Acting Deputy Adminisrator, Division II.
Washington, D.C.
August 7, 1934St.


FURNITURE MFG.
145-19
ORDER
CODE OF FAIR COMPETITION FOR THE
FURNITURE MANUFACTURING INDUS-
TRY GRANTING APPLICATION OF THE
WABASH SCREEN DOOR COMPANY, CHI-
CAGO, ILL., FOR AN EXEMPTION FROM
THE PROVISIONS OF ARTICLE IV, SEC-
TION 1
An application having been made by the above-
named applicant for an exrmptlon from the pro-
visions of Article IV, Section 1, of the Code of
Fair Competition for the Furniture Manufactur-
ing Industry, and the Assistant Deputy Admin-
istrator having reported ;
NOW THEREFORE. pursuant to authority
vested In me. It Is he eby ordered that the above
namrd applicant be and Is hereby exempted from
said provisions of said Code on the following
conditions:
1. That this exemption apply only to operations
Incidental to and to employees of the applicant
engaged In, the weaving by hand of double bottom
cane chairs,
2. That this exemption apply to such operations
and employees In the applicants' Memphis, Ten-
nessee factory, only;
3. That the following piece work rates be paid
all such employees:
(a) For herringbone weave, using regular mate-
rial not less than 5 m/m In width, not less thnn 8
cents per 100 square Inches of surface area. Ma-
terial less than 5 m/m In width shall not he used.
(b) For herringbone weave, using material not
less than 6 m/m In width for the warp strands
and not less than 71iA m/m In width for the weav-
Ing strands, not less than 6% cents per 100 square
Inches of surface area
(C) For basket weave, using the regular mate-
rial d'escrlhed In paragraph ln), not less than 7
cents' per 100 square Inches of surface area. Ma-
terial leqs than 5 in m In width shnll not be used.
Idi For basket weave, using the wider material
descrihri In pnr:.greph (b). nor loss than 6 cents
pert 110 square Inchr-s of surface area.
(e) The sitifaco area Is the aria of the top of
the seat or the front of the hnclk. The surface
area of "eat not square or rectn-'ulnr stharll he
determin.ri.. by using the average whIlthli and d.pth.
In det.-rilning tihe surface nrean of bent baricks the
concavef' imsrnemieilt 'nt shall hi usIl. All measuio-
meats shall be frrm the outer ed'-'res of tihe cnit or
batkfiamp. Any chair having a surface nic-a from
180 [o 200) square Inches shall e ligIured at 200
square In.-h.
4 That nffidnavliats, signed bv employen.r andl em-
ploy es. tii lie effect that nil lwiikers paidl the
abnve raes ale engaged only In thr caning by
hand r nf clihair seats and backs. be filed with th
Atlmln li iatnr I :
5 That all such employees hb segrecatcd from
all orhfr empirlotecs In the factory;
6 That dupllcaiFts of wetklv lma "rolls for these
workers be submitt'i to the Admlniit'iirir nit tlie
end of ench thre.d m.iiths p-.rind, rirjd b.? available
to him on rill nt any rilm.': and
7 'That thr-e provisions be posted at all factory
entrin-'es andn exits.
Such ,x'mpiln to be effctiv,? for six montlih
from the efT-,tlv i? dite here.f. which shii.ll he 10
Ilays 1iom the da.itei h 'reri.. unls 1 Fgond iauli' to
thep contrary is shown b'f,-re that lime. and a
subsequent order to that effrci t i- u',J.
BasruN W" MLutiHY.
Deputy .ldiniaitrator.
Order recommended
NEA.L W FoqTBn.
Dcputjv Alminii.trator.
August 9, 1934.


ORDER
CODE OF FAIR. COMPETITION FOR THE
GAS COCK INDUSTRY
Termination of Exemption Granted In Administra-
tive Order X-36
WHERMAS, an application has been made by
the Code Authority of ib.? Gas Cock Industry for
termination of the exemption conferred In i1aia-
graph III of Administrative Order X-30, dated
May 26. 1934 ; and
WHEREAS, an opportunity to he heard hns been
duly afforded to all Interested parties, and the
Assistant De-puty Administrator has reported, and
it appears to my satisfaction thliat termination of
said exemption Is melted and will tend to effectu-
ate the policies of Title I of the National Indus-
trial Recovery Act;
NOW. T. I EREFORI, pursuant to authority
vested In me. It Is hereby ordered that any exrmp-
tlon conferred by Paragraph Ill of Administrative
Order X-30, dated May 26 1934, upon any member
of this Industry be and It is hereby leimlonted
provided, however, that such termination shad
apply only to these who manufacture the products
in the Industry for sale as such. .
BARTON W. MUosAY,
Division Administrator.
Order recommended:
S Na.L W. FOSTre,
Deputy Adrainistrotor.
WALTaR MANoUM,
Assiastant Deputy Administrator.
August 9, 19S4.


GRAPHIC ARTS
ORDER
CODE OF FAIR COMPETITION FOR TEHI
GRAPHIC ARTS INDUSTRIES
287-B IA
It appearing that there has arisen some question
as to the classification of employees in the Photo-
Gelatine Printing Industry; and it appearing fur-
ther that this process is clearly subject to the Code
of Fair Competition for the Graphic Arts Indus-
tries; and It being necessary in the intei est of
justice and to effectuate policies of Title I of the
national Industrial Recovery Act to properly clas-
sify this prlntlng process:
NOW. TUHEREFORE. I George Buckley, pursuant
to the authority vented In me by the Administrator
for Industrirlal Recovery, and otlierwise. do hereby
designate the coiinceins engaged In the 1'hoto-
Gelatine Printing process as temporarily subject to
Section 22 (al I of the Code of Fair Comperhion for
the Graphic Arts Industries; and, furthermore, do
designate that Insolar as employers of the Consoll-
dated Film Industries. Incorprorated, are concerned,
those who are engaged In operations properly clas-
sified under the Commercial Relief I' luting Indus-
try. Section 21. of the Code of Fair Comperhtlon
for the Graphic Arts Industries receive the prevail-
ing wage scale for the Commercial Relief Printing
Industry ; those that may be classified under the
Intaglo OGravure Printing, Section 23 la) of the
Code of Fair Conmpetition for the Graphic Arts
Industries, receive the prevailing wage scale for
the Intaglio Gravure Printing Industry ; and others
that do not fall within these clacslfleations receive
the ptevniling wage for their particular work.
This Order is revocable by the Administrator at
any time.
GOsOsm BDutE i.cy,
Dictvision iI.
Approval recommended :
JOuiN E WILLIAMS.
Deputy Admniitstrator.
July 17, 1934.


GRAY IRON FOUNDRY
277-15
ORDER
CODE OF FAIR COMPETITION FOR THE
GRAY IRON FOUNDRY INDUSTRY
Approval of Uniform Cost and Estimating System.
Pursuant to the provisions of Section 1 (1) of
Article VI of the Coilde of Fnlair Competition for
the Gray Iron Foundry Industry the Code Au-
thority has recommended and submitted for my
approval n Uniform Cost nnd Estlmitine System
for the said Industry, the original of which Is on
file with the National Recovery Administration,
and opportunity to he heard concerning said Sys-
tem having been afforded all Interested parties at
a public hearing held Jiuiv 6, .11:14. and any ob-
jections thereto having been duly considered and
said Utniform Cost an lEstimaiinge System apt.er-
In to be reasonable and designed to effectuate
the purpo'ef-s of the Code and of the National In-
dustrial Reoverv Act.
NOW. THEREFORE. pursuant to the authority
vested In me by said Coile and l -y Executive Orders
of the I'rre'dent, and othrrwise, It Is hereby
ordered that said Uniform Cost and Estlmnatlng
System hlie, nd It is hereby approved for a perIhd
of ninety (90) days from this date, provided that
before the termination of said period lhe Code
Authority for sairl Industry shill furnish to the
National Rerovery Administration such reports
pertinent to the question wihetlier sinld I'nif'.rm
Cost and Estimatinc System will t 'rid to effectuate
the puiirpo-cT of FaMii Sectlon 1 l i of Article VI
of solaid Code and the policies of Title I of said
Act as I unmay require; :nnd provided further thint
after the termination of asll ninery-dav period
this Older of approval nf said Unliorm Cost nrid
Estimallng Systemin shall be naindrl remain In full
force and effort until my further order.
1111G011 S. .IOIINSON.
Adtuinastrator for Industriul Rccovcry.
Approval rectninmentilcd .
BIITI WV. MiinaAr,
nl ivan .lAdministrator.
August 17, 1Kiut.


LIMESTONE
11 :t-2i-
ORDER
CODE OF FAIR COMPETITION FOR TIlE
LIMESIt TONE INDILISTItY. EXI'TENSION OF
.rrt.(CTIVE PERIOD OF AI.LOWABLE
(4 r FORMULA
Puiiiannit to the pro'lsioin of Arilc: VI, Sc,':
ionl 4 Ia rl" tlc e -i,,,Ic f' i 'nii' L'oip,-til l.1n for
tihe .in.st.,n' Iri lu .ir- i ,ir appili l bv thit.-
It':sliI nit N.--.- mtLei 14 14 1.1.I. the ,.ilr- .AiItlth .r
Ity ftf said Indiistry sublimittei ;i C iotr F niiiiiilu
ontn whiulI a pui.li h.Uiii orrI S. a 1 l l1 i 1n iii w1. Lit I
apprc.-cd tUt May 12. Ifl fur ri p.iitd of' )0
dc.is fiLoir the VTfi:.-ctivel a dwe tiicre.i
Tlir- IT. cti'- ,lnirc c.plr .' s 3 uuspti r 1i. 1q34
Thle Code Authuority lianing submitlced a requ-st
for an ,xrvnsion if said pr-riod to Jute 111. 193f5.
togr'tlier wtlih firliorts hii'I tlg;utes 'nu lie Opcrltlort
of the formula and a Notice t tOpportuniry to be.
II'arJd hlavIng bien piullilished on August 8, 1934,
and expiring on August 30. 1934:


NOW. THEREFORE. pursuant to the authority "t
v.-std In me by Executive Orders of the President 'l -
by said artile and section of said Code. and other-
Snise. I do hereby make the following findings,
approvals and orders:
1. I do hereby rind that In the event of renewaih
the- lapse of the effective period of this formula
pending consideration of the said application for
extension would wolk an unreasonable hardship on
the Industry.
2. In order that I may duly consider any objec-
tions or data filed pursuant to said Notice of
Opportunity to ba Heard, and may further stndy
the operations of lthe formula I hereby order that
the effective period of the allowable cost formula
be extended for )0 1 rya until September 15. 193-.
8. The Code Authority shall continue to work
In conjunction with ti', Research and Planning
Division in making a i..udy of costs In the Indus-
try, and shall make pei lodic reports as required by
the Administrator.
4. This extension Is subject to my right at aoy
time to cancel or modify this cost formula or any
provisions thereof.
HUGH S. JOHNBON,
Administrator for Industrial Recoverg.
Approval recommended :
C. B. ADAMS,
Division A dministrator.
August 15, 1934.


LUMBER AND TIMBER
PRODUCTS
No. 9-44
ORDER
CODE OF FAIR COMPETITION FOR THBE
LUMBER AND TIMBER PRODUCTS IN-
DUSTRIES
Granting Application of Bloom and Btewart ot
Dayton, Ohio, for Exemption from Settlon 5,
Subsection iJ, of Schedule B."
WHEREAS, an application has been made by the
above-named applicant for an exemption fiom the
provisions of Section 5. Subsection 1j) of Sched-
ule "B of the Code of Fair Competition for tha
Lumber and Timber Products Industries, to the
extent but only tu the extent neccs-ary to permit
said applicant to place on consignment with Mr.
John M. Horn of Hamilton, Ohio. the stock of
lumber of the Horn and Kraus Lumber Company of
Hamilton, Ohio. purchased by said applicant at a
Receiver's sale; and
WHEREAS, the Code Authority for the Lumber
and Timber Products Industries nas recommended
thiai said application be granted and the Deputy
Administrator has reported and it appears to ml
satisacittlon that the 'ic mption hereinai[er granted
Is necessary and will tend to effectuate the policies
of Tit'e 1 of the National Industrial Recovery Act;
NOW. THEREFORE. pursuant to authority
vested In me, it Is her-by order.-d that the above-
named applicant be and hereby Is cxemptrd from
said provisions of said COde, to the extent bat
only to the extent necessary 10to permit said appil-
cant to place ron consignment with John M Horn
of Hamilton. Ohio. the stock of lumber of the
Horn and Kraus Lumber Company of Hamilton,
Olio, purchased by said applicant at a Recelvert
sale.
This order shall not become effective for a period
of fifteen 115) days after the date hereof In order' j
that consideration may be given to the objections
thereto, if any, of Interested parties. AT the ex-
piratLloo of said 15-day period this order shar-'
ecome effective unless I have by my further order
otherwise determined.
C. E. ADAMS,
Division Administrator.
Exemption recommended:
A. E. DixoN.
Dcputy Administrator.
August 15, 1934


MEN'S NECKWEAR
363-1S
ORDER
CODE OF FAIR COMPETITION FOR THE
MEN'S NECKWEAR INDUSTRY
Termination of Exemption Granted In Adminais-
trative Order X-36
WHEREAS an application has been made by
the Code Authority for the Men's Neckwear In-
dustrv for termination of the exemption conferred
In Paraicraph lit of Administrative Order X-36.
dated May 26, 1134 e and
WtI. tEEAS. an opportunity to be heard has been
duly afforderd to all interested parties, and the
Deputy Administrator has reported, and It appears
to my satihfictlon thatI termination of said e-
emption Is merited and will tend to effectuate the
policies of Title I of the National Industrial Re-
coiry Act ;
NOW, THEREFORE, pursuant to authority
rested in me. It is hereby ordered that any exemp-
tion conferred by Paragraph Ill of Administrative
Order X-36. dated Mav 26. 1934. uoon nny mem-
her of this industry be and It Is hereby terminated
WILLIAM P. FARNSWoraF
Acting Division Adminisltrwor.
Order recommended :
DeAN G. EDWARDS,
Denli v Administrator.
AuguSt .11, 193).


METAL TREATING
-367-1.1
ORDER
CODE OF FAIR COMPETITION FOR TKE
METAL. TREATING INDLUS'I'TRtY
'Termination of Fx'-ni'il,.n GiautId In AdminIstrsa-
tive Ord, r X-3
WITI"IiE.\S. an ii[ip lic.tll n ih lnien made by
ttl' C'ie Altltih ll 'y of tilt' Metil Tri-ntin; Intiu-
t y fo'r t riU'r li tli'ti i'f tOilh px ln.1 iiuiot ,.'t. r-r i Ih
l'iaiia .ipli III I.f Aduilnistratlve Order X-30.
datrnl Minv, "-'i. 19",-; alnl,
WVII IIE,7S, an bpiortunit' to be hcai i I-an bces
diul iitl rdi. il t.o nill itItl Ii Si l ] inIrtih'. iiinL the
A. -I'Ltirnt [ii llUily .\minili.tr.,t l 'ns rep ir, .i rind
It[ ai i']i 4 t-" a lt; 11 sfnctiu'i tii't t rilill.itui.t Of
sanld'M\cinlpton is riniteld anid %ill ternd to effectu-
it,: tih. ull II s r.s l' t lt. I l' f tl(. NatiinalI ludustllil
rile-,..v ry Ai t :
N)'W. TIIEREFORE. fplir.icirult utI) antliority
rrv:t,l in e.e, it is hvliu-?0t orlirhid 1' t a l nn exemrp-
tinn cr.fi, ri. l by t r ,; n-.h I1l i fl AlIminilstr.,tve
Order N-3i4, 'it.iled Mar 2.l, 1'.14, i p.-.n rn% mem-
l. i, of [l1i Ilnil si y 'Ic: aindl it i< ht r-i.v terml-
nated, pr.,vti'id. lIr'v,. -r. ilita i ,iiu'-h t i iniimtiolo
shaill ni.-.t iip'V to i;hi.,e tioi., t , l ttii l t',atln as
a p.rt cOt ibte mainui ictiuriing process of their
products .
BAnRTON W. MURnAY,
Dicisioa Admnialstrator.
Order recommendr-d :
Na..L W. FosiRn.
Deputy Adminiastratar.
WALrti MAnL,-il.
.1-,slarnl Deputy Administrator.
Augustt i, 193J. 41













ADMINISTRATIVE ORDERS-Continue


PRIVATE HOME STUDY
SCHOOL
No. 447-8
ORDER
1OB O1' FAIR COMPETITION FOR THE
PRIVATE HOME STUDY SCHOOL IN-
SDBSTRY
iermsnatlon of Exemption Granted in Admilntstra-
tive Oder S-36
WHEIRBAS, an application has been made by
I ie Code Authority of the Private Ilome Stuldy
001aol Industry 'lor ter'niinntion iut tihe r\enip inn
oxferred In Paragraph III of Administratlve
rdar X-36, dated May 26. 13-1 : and
WFEI EAS. an opportunity to b- h. nrd has been
dy afforded to all Initererteil parties, and the
Deputy Admlnlstraittrr bhas repnrtiid. anid It appears
ia my satlfaicti'n:' that teraina lion or :aid -.seupl-
o la Is merited and will tend to effectuaiit.e the
riclces of Title I of the National Industrial He-
Ngr, ACYTHEREFORE, pursuant to authority
veted in me it Is hereby ord,,eed that any esemp-
Has conferred by Paragraph II of Administrative
- ,dnr s-36' dated May 23. 1914. upon any member
aoliis Industry be and It Is hereby terminated.
WILLIAM P. FARNSWOrTH,
Acting Dit'cin AdminislraGor.
eWar recommended :
GsotOGE T. RosS,
Acting Deputy Administrator.
Asust 11, 194.


Code Approvals


Wholesale Jewelry Trade. (A divi-
sion of the wholesaling or distrib-
uting trade.)
Approved Angust 21, 1034.-Effective An-
gut 31, 1934.
Adopts the major provisions of the general Code
Including the labor provisions and establishes a
:0b-aor maximum werk and minimum wages rang-
Iag from $14 to $15 per week. A Divisional Code
Aithorlty. Is provided, as well as rules of fair
trade practice to govern conditions peculiar to te
kada The Administrator's approval was given
with the proviso that the sections dealing with
Selling below cost be deleted and that there be
idtirutetd for them the standard provision re-
pirding deafucrive price cutting and the fixing of
tmporary minimum prices by the Admlnistrator In
time case of an emergency resulting from price
rttng.

Fine Industry.
Labor Provisions approved by the Na-
.tionaal Recovery Adminslatrnaor August 18,
1934.-Effective September 2, 1934.-(Fair
Trade Practice Provislons were approved
by the President on Dee. 27, 1933.)
-' tabllshes a 40-hour maximum work week of
mat more than 9 hours In any 1 day nor more than
S 1dtiys In any week. Executive. supervisory and
chntlcal employees, receiving $35 or more a week
ud Junior technical employees receiving .$25 or
mEre a week are exempt from the limitation on
liers (If woik. Watchmen may work 56 hours a
week but not more than 13 days in a 14-day period.
Chauffeurs and deliverymen are limited to 4S hours
a week. During the vintage season, which is de-
Scribed Se coverlan a period of 12 we.'ks each year,
em: ployees engaged in actual production and proc-
sinagu may work 60 hours per week" or 10 hours
per day or 6 days a week. Checkers and clerical
s eployees used primarily to compile necessary rec-
ords required by the Government may also work
88 hours during the vintage season, but shall ba
elid for time In excess of 40 hours at not less
tan aa hourly rate to be determined by dviding
te weekly amount regularly paid by 40. The Code
provides that until such lime as trained personnel
Is available to relieve the shortage of champnaeir
Iamllers, employees classlfled as disgorgera, shakers,
atuckers. and members of finishing crews, these
employees may work not more than 48 hours per
Week. Employees may also be worked as long as
48 hours when It becomes necessary to operate a
plant continuously to prevent spoilage. A mini-
mum wage rate of 40 cents an hour is established,
crept for employees engaged In such work as label-
ung, wrapping, and finishing bottles. who shall re-
Celae ot less than 35 cenis an hour. Office
emploees snail r.ecelve a minimum of $16 per week
w Ith a differential of $2 for offiLe boys and messen-
rse. Watchmen shall be paid not less than $10
Ser week. Approval of the labor provisions was
ea with a proviso that they be stayed for ten
e afler the effective date. or'onttl Senitrmler 12,
O order that any possible objections might be con-
itered. The Caode will then become effective unless
Itietwise ordered by the Administrator. A further
riso requires that within 60 days after the
lodes effective date. the Wine Producers Assocla.
a nd the Eastern Wine Grnw-rs .ssociatloo
ball ampnd their constitutions and bylaws to re.
ave lthe Inequitable restrictions they now con
t, The set-up of the Code Authority Is substan-
Stialy thie same as that approved In D'-cember and
i under the Jurisdiction of the Federal Alcohol
patrol Administration

Dowel Industry. (A division of the

wood turning and shaping indus-
tries.)
Approved August 20, 1934.-Effective Sep-
Stahber 4, 1934.
Adopts the maximum hour and minimum wage
Prvsions tof the basic C d- but provides for Its
ant administrative agency-a board ,-it i members
to serve fr a I-year period-and rinciudes prnvi-
lio' utlining terms of payment, and rules of fair
,%r?,epr Ice. The order of approval stayed the
enr aprohlbltlng destructive price cutting until
,tber nonrce by the Administrator.

Building Granite Division of the
Construction Industry.
eAp"oved August "20, 193.-Effeetlive Sep-
-tlober 19, 1934.
L the building granite industry is In direct com-
ittia with the limestone industry, the hours of
bran I sg, are generr llv the same as provil-.l
hdte Cde aof fair competition for the Im.-atone
11r-y (40 hours per week and 30 cents per
u rle the S-outh and 38 cents in the North i ex-
rtire thatminimmwnages in the northern zone anre
I- L rips rn Co higher 140 cents per hour) than
Codn The hour and &are provl-
Ofr otIbher employees are generally the same
-msean ba i Coti6 A Code Auithrnrv of 7
Fame,'l- Amthorhrv nf7
1 provided, 5 of whom shall represent
? ofB a the association and 2 nonmembers
elate on. Rules of trade practice peculiar
de re Provided in the Code.


Code Authority

Members Approved

The Admianistrator. during the past week. ap-
proved the foli-'wirg selections and appointments
of Code Authority members.
RIVER AND HARBOR IMPROVEMENT IN-
DUS'IlIY-DeWItt D Barlc.. NNew Yolk, N.Y.;
John F. Cushing, Chicago, I11. MemLbeis-at-large,
Nirhan HFnywaid. PhI'lladelphia la.; Claude Cum-
mus, New Yirk. N Y.; Jospli V. Honin. Balti-
niore, MiI.; Georgi. Leary, Jr. New York, N.Y.;
Rlelmchrd II. Goole, Detroit, Mih ; A. F. Eberwine,
BiiTilo. N Y R MN Kniox. Miaiyslii. Mich.
Edward E. Glleno, Milwaultee. Yl'I. Divisional
.tu.berg. Frd i1- M1.,% Sun Frarncisco. Calif.;
P' N',.rft-lk, Va.: EDavild J. White. East Boston. Maens.;
Lee Met.,alf'c, I.ineoln. Nr.-br BHrt C. Tully, Mcm-
phis, Ten1 : Atillle Guluet, New Orleans. La.
I'ERFUME. OSMI-'TIC AND Olii0ilt TOILET
PItEI'ARAriONS INDUSTRY.-Charles S Welch,
New York. N Y.; Ralph I.. Aronson, New York,
N.Y.; Frcderltk N. Dodge New York, N Y ; t. A.
Clark, NLW York. N.Y.; H. S Lyon, Chlcaco, Ill.;
Jean aDespres. New York, N.Y.; Clyde Balsley,
Hollywood. Calif.
BURLESQUE THEATRICAL INDUSTRY.-
Warren B. Irons, Cleveland, Ohio: Jack Barger,
Chicawo. Ill ; Vie Tracers, Detroit. Mich.; Max
Rudnlck. New York, N.Y ; Isndore H. lleik, New
Yoik, N.Y.: Joseph Welnstock. New York, N.Y.,
to serve as the temporary Code authority.
SHOE LAST INDUSTRY.-C. H. Fitzpatrick,
East Wevmouth. Mass.; 0 C. Thomas Boston,
Mass : C.: L Sprlnz, Brooklyn. N.Y. l. 13. Canby,
Dayton, Ohio: E. B. Southworth, Stoughton,
Miass.; A. L. Mercer, Portsmouth, Ohio; Edward
Bas, Rochester, N Y.
HEATING. PIPING AND AIR CONDITIONING
CONTRACTORS' DIVISION OF THE CONSTRI'C-
lTION INDUSTRY.-M. J. Chagnard Louisville,
Ky .J. Lawrenrce DeNellle, St. Louis, Mo.; George
1-. DIckerson. Chicago, Ill.; Walter Klle. Cleve-
land, Ohio; Thomas O'Callashan, Boston, Mass.;
Robert D. Williams, New York, N.Y.; John H.
Zink. Baltimore. Mid., as association members.
Eugene H. Hattersley, Fort Wayne, Ind.; J I.
Lyle, Newark, N.J.; Archibald A. Marx. New
Orleans, La.; Wray M Scott, Omaha, Nebr., as
nonassoelailon members.
WARM AIR FJRNACE PIPE AND FITTINGS
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.-Carl Weyand,
Waterbury, Conn.; Ariron Coon, Philadelphia. Pa.;
George E. Hunt, Bt. ton, Mass.; R G. Harrison,
Dover, Ohio;: B. S Moncrlet, Cleveland, Ohio;
A. W. Glessner, Chicago, Ill.
SA.W MIi.L MACHINERY SUBDIVISION OF
THE MACHINERY AND ALLIED PRODUCTS
INDUSTRY.-J L. Monaghan. Milwaukee. Wis.;
Loren L. Prescott. Menomlnee. Mich.; A. E. Hall,
MiLlwaukee, Wis.; G. A Bingenhelmer, Minneapolis,
Minn.: J S. Reid. Clean, N.Y.; Z. W. Whi-land,
Chattanooga, Tenn.; George B. Sumner, Everett,
Wash.
RAILWAY AND INDUSTRIAL SPRING MAN-
UFACIURING SUBDIVISION OF THE MACHIN-
ERY AND ALLIED PRODUCTS INDUSTRY.-
A. S. Henry. New York. N.Y.; H. C. Bughman,
Jr., Kensington. Pa.; F. K. Metzger, Burnham,
Pa ; A. H. Peycke Chicago, Ill. Harry Wilsaon,
Pittsburgh, Pa.; Hi. A. Noble, Pittsburgh, Pa.;
H. S. Sherman. Cleveland, Onlo.
ANTI.FRICTION BEARING INDUSTRY.-Wm.
E. Umstnttd, Canton Ohio; H. A. Schatz, Pough-
keepsle, N.Y.; F. G. Hughes. Bristol. Conn.; A. C.
Davis, Jamestown, N.Y. PF. 0. Burkholder, Chi-
cano, Ill.; G. A. Strom. Chicago, III
WARM AIR REGISTER INDUSTRY.-R. W.
Blanchard. Cnicago, Ill.: C J. Pearson, Battle
Creek. Ml,-h.: E. C. Fox, Cleveland, Ohio.
FERTII.IZER INDUSTRY--(.;e:.rce V Savitz,
Boston, Mass.; W. T. Wright, Norfolk. Va.: J. S.
Coale, Philadelphia, Pa.; A. L Ivey, Rircmond,
Va.
REINFORCING MATERIALS FABRICATING
INDUSTRY.-H W. VanBenschoten, KnoxvilUe,
Tenn vi'ce W. J. Klller
PRESERVE. MARASCHINO CHERRY AND
GLACE FRUIT INDIUSTRY--E. L. French. Lan-
disrville. N.., and Wlilam A Prultt, Los Angeles,
Calif.. as nonnass.ciatlon members.
WIRE ROPE AND 'TRANDr M \NNFACTU[RING
INDUSTRY-A DIVISION OF THE FABRICATED
METAL PRODUCTS MANUFACTURING AND
METAL FINISHING AND METAL COATING IN-
DUSTRY.-George C. Moon, Wilkes-Barre, Pa.,
John May. Worcester. Mans- : H. W Bennett,
Belleville. N.J. ; i-. A. Wood, San Francisco Calif.;
C E. Bascom, St. Louis Mo. : Harry J. Leschen,
St. Louis. Mo.; Emerson Spenar. Los Angeles. Calif.;
J. H. Blanchard, Trent.-.n, N I ; MN. G. Enslnger,
Kansas Citv Mo ; R. H Cherry. New York, N.Y.;
G B. Gemmll. Settle. Wash.; W. B Sawyer. San
Piancisco. Calif.; George S. Whyte. Kenoshba, WIs.;
W. L. Rochester. New York. N.Y.: C. M Ballard,
Wllliamuport. Pa : H. Hnattrimnn. Muncle, Ind.
COMPLETE WIRE AND IRON FENCE INDUS-
TRY -W. H. Bleecker, Monessen. Pa.: W. F.
Brainnnu, Baltimore M1 : J. S Eskin. New York,
N Y : J. T. Harnley, Liber6.ville. Ill ; C. E. Kendall,
Pittsburgh. Pa. ; H. I. Raymond. Indianapolis, Ind.;
W. L. Rohertson. Cincinnati. Ohio: W. S. Rich,
Cincinnati. Ohio: M J Sayles. Brooklyn. N Y.:
and C. L Converse as administration member to
serve during the pleasure of the Administrator.
ART[.TIC IirIITING E _UIPMFINT MANtI.
FACTURING INDUSTRY.-M. D. Blitzer. New
York. N.Y : Edw F. Gutn, St. Louis, MoN : Walter
WI Kanntck. New York. N Y ; osepn hMarkel. Bf-
falo. N.Y .I: Jhn C Virdon, ('leveland Ohio: Tolin
W. Br-.,ohs, S.vracuse. N.Y ; L A. S. Wood, Cleve-
land. Olin
FURRIERS' SUPPI.IFS TRADE -Samuel Gnast,
New Yoik. N.Y.; Emil Kaufman, New York, NY.;
LIouis Herman. New York, N.Y.: Herman Bniier,
New York. N.Y.; Isaac Axenznw. New York, N.Y.;
Elmnr Strnras. Los Angeles. Calif. ; Henrv Felngold,
Chlaco. IIll. ; Harry Rutensteln. llnneapolls.
Minn.: Mniirice II. Glassman. Boston. Mass.
HATTERS' F'i R CUTTING INDTISTRY.-Carl
E Donner Newark, N J.: A Philip Giilinno. New-
rark. N.J Edward F. I-l'kev. Jr.. Winsted. Conn.;
Aii'tin E. Hodge, Danhury. Cr.nn. ; George E. Jonas,
WnIldon. N.Y.; ,Lorls N. i'csaing, New Yoik, N.Y.;
Ashr I'nnrih., D,n-,uiv 'vCan '
DRP'RY AND UPHOLSTERY TRIMMING
INriUSTRY--W. J Rnoaenherg. New York. N Y.;
E L M.insure. Chlrnzo, Ill.; Frank H Mouirer.
Phllarelpilia. Pn : William R Oehrle, Philadelphia.
Pa : H-. H. Rurbin. New York. N Y.. to represent
members of the auocliltion E T. Leanvy, New
York. N Y F I.. Krnehler. West New York. N I.:
H. S Rpilin, New York. NY.. H. Tas'iun. New
York. N Y., to represent nonmembers of the
ascneii tinn.
TEXTILE BAG INntISTRY-.I. S Remis. St.
Loils. Mo.: Beni. Elsas. Atlanta. Ga ; C. R.
Deck.'r, C hica o. Ill : V. E. Lewis. Chicago, Ill.
H. M. Newlin, Brooklyn. N.Y : M. R Perkins,
Horston. Tex.: Roger B Srepard. St. Paul, Iln-
ron M NI-lirman, New York. N.Y.; Joe Werthan,.
Nadh'Aille, ',onen.
fpSEr TEXTILE MACrTINFRY AND ACCE.-
SORIES DISTRIBUTING TRADE.-John Marshall,
Fall R,,er Mass : Leon Kimmel. Atl'nt-a. Ga.:
A. J..Ma.thes. New Y.rk. N Y ; John Rozenstela,
Patera-n. N.I : MIc ael Kerwin Philadelthia, Pa.
ICE CREAM CONE INDUSTRY -Irvine 0.
Idler. ndmlnitratlon member, to serve during the
pleTsur-ir. of i tne Admnistrator. n
IMPORTED DATE PACKING INDUSTRY.-
Clarence F. Alcott vice Edgar B. Walters as ad,


The Administrator for Industrial Recovery
during the past week approved amendments
and modifications to Codes of Fair Competi-
ti6n as follows:
Cotton Garment Industry-Amendments ap-
proved August 16, 1934, are drafted as a new
article, article XIX, of the Code of fair com-
petition and completes the Code inasmuch as
up to this time the Cotton Garment Code has
had no fair trade practices provisions. The
amendments become effe-tlve August 26, 1934.
Steel Casting Industry-Amendments ap-
proved August 11, 19341, amendment I affects
only schedule D of the Code which relates
only to unfair trade practices for miscellane-
ous castings. Amendment II affects only
schedule E of the Code which relates only
to unfair trade practices for specialties.
Amendment 111 provides for the addition of
a new schedule of unfair trade practices re-
lating only to draft gears, to be known as
schedule F. The amendments become effec-
tive 15 days from the date of approval.
End Grain Strip Wood Block Industry-
Modification approved August 16, 1934, en-
ables the Code Authority to incur such rea-
sonable obligations as are necessary to sup-
port the administration of the Code and to
maintain the standards of fair competition
established by it. It also permits the Code
Authority to submit an itemized budget and
an equitable basis upon which the funds nec-
essary to support such budget shall be con-
tributed by members of the industry. Such
contributions are made mandatory by this
modificat ion.
Pipe Nipple Manufacturing Tndustry-Mod-
ification approved August 13, 1934, permits
the Code Authority to incur reasonable obli-
gations necessary to administer the Code and
submit to the Administrator an itemized
budget and an equitable basis upon which the
funds necessary to support such budget shall
be contributed by members of the industry.
Such contributions are made mandatory by
this modification.
Foundry Equipment Industry-Modtfication
approved August 13, 1934, permits the Code
Authority to incur such reasonable obliga-
tions necessary to administer the Code and
submit to the Administrator an itemized
budget and an equitable basis upon which the
funds necessary to support such budget shall
be contributed by members of the industry.
Such contributions are made mandatory by
this modification.

ministration member, to serve during the pleasure
of the Administrator.
WHOLESALE STATIONERY TRADE.-Lionel
H Bailey, administration member, to serve for 6
months.
NONFERROUS AND STEEL CONNECTOR
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.-G. E. Putnam,
administration member, to serve during the pleas-
ure of the Administrator.:
METAL ETCHING INDUSTRY.-Danlel L.
Morris. administration member, to serve during the
pleasure of the Administrator.
MULTIPLE V-BELT DRIVE INDUSTRY.--. 0.
Vail, administration mr-mber, to serve during the
pleasure of the Administrator.
PUBLIC SEATING INDUSTRY.--F. C. Brown,
administration member, to serve during the pleas-
ure of the AdmInistrator.
HARDWOOD DIMENSION DIVISION OF THFE
LUMBER AND TIMBER PRODUCTS INDUS-
TRIES-Major David 0. Byars, deputy adminis-
tration member, to serve during the pleasure of
the Administrator.
NORTH CENTRAL HARDWOOD DIVISION OF
THE LUMBER AND TIMBER PRODUCTS IN-
DUSTRIES.-Ariltur H. Taylor, deputy adminis-
tration member, to seive during tae pleasure of
the Administrator.
CANDLEWICK BEDSPREAD INDUSTRY.-G.
n. Rauschenberg. B. J. Bandy, Mils Mary Joe
Wood, Blair Cannon, Fred Westcott, all of Dal-
ton, Ga.; and Hugh MN. Comer. dminiletrauinn
member, to serve during the pleasure of the
Adminlltritor
STEEL JOIST INDUSTRY.-Alan Jay Parrlsh,
administration member to serve during the pleas-
ure of the Administrator
SALT PRODUCING INDUSTRY.-MaJor A. B.
Quinton. Jr., administration member of the Code
committee, to serve during the pleasure of the
Admi list ra'or.
BRUSH MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.-Bruce
Revnoldg. administration member, to serve duillg
the pleanre of the Admlnistrrtor.
SCHOOL SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT
TRADE.-Jolin H. Cover, administration member,
to serve for (I months.
WHOLESALE DRY GOODS TRADE -R. S.
Alexatider, administration member, to serve for 6
months
WADDING INDUSTRY--Walter R. Peabody, ad.
mlnisrrarin wneiheir, 1to serve during the pleasure
of the Aimlnistrntor
S-\FETY RAZOR AND SAFETY RAZOR BLADE
MANUFACTURING INDIUSTRY.-Danlel L. Mar.
nrs. administration member, to serve during the
pihnseirp of tie Admlnl--trntr.
HYDRAULIC MACHINERY I N D U STRY.-
Dnrnlr-I L. AMorris. adminlStrrIlon member, to serve
durlna the pleasure of the Administrator
DOWEL PIN MNIANUFACTIiPIN'1 iNDUSTRY -
Prof. D. J. Duncan, n.rdminlistration n 'mber, to
Eeri'v,, rirrn t'e plese-r.'. of tire Adminlilstrator.
I.INSEED OIL MANUIFACTUIIRING INDUS.
TRY.-Edwnrd E. Ames. administration represen-
tative of the Code admiulitrntrlve committee, to
serve dnriurlne the pleasure of tne Administrator.
CALIFORNIA SARDINE PROCESSING INDUS-
TRY -Paul EliIel. administration member of the
executive committee, to serve for 1 year
INVESTMENT BANKERS.-Ralph T. Crane:
vice. Robert E Christie, Jr. av member oi the
Cod- committee
FISHERY INDUSTRY--H'oward J. Jones. Erie,
Pa. W E Srott. Hirorn. Ohio; W. P. Knvannugh,
Bov Citv. Mich Nelson LoClair. Two Rivers, Wis.;
Albert Shellswick. Waukegan, Ill.; Robert Ludwig,
MIchian City. Ind. as trio lenmponcry executive
committer-e In the Grent Lnkes territory.
HOUSEHOLD GOODS STORAGE AND MOVING
TRADE-C .1. Hamilton and Jos W. Glenn as
temporary members of the trade and Thomas P.
O'Brlen and John J. MeKenna as temporary repre-
setiatives of emplosee-. a members of the Trade's
National Industrial Relations Board


Industrial Furnace Manufacturing Inda"
try-Amendment approved August 13, 193.
permits the Code Authority to Incur .i.8n
reasonable obligations necessary to admlin
ter the Code and submit to the Adminlstrat6
an Itemized budget and an equitable baa
upon which the funds necessary to supp'.
such budget shall be contributed by member
of the Industry. Such contributions are
mandatory by this modification.
Cooking and Heating Appliance Manafai:
touring Industry-Amendment approved. Au
gust 13, 1934. permits the Code Authority to,:
Incur such reasonable obligations necessarysi
to administer the Code and submit to th.
Administrator an Itemized budget and:..i
equitable basis upon which the funds nec
sary to support such budget shall be cont'-
uted by members of the industry. Such't
tributlons are made mandatory by this m7b
fcation. i
Ornamental Molding, Caring, and Tuei,"
Industry-Modification approved August;.
1934, permits the Code Authority to int
such reasonable obligations necessary toa "dai
minister the Code and submit to the AdminW
trator an itemized budget and an equitable
basis upon which the funds necessary to sBup
port such budget shall be contributed by5
members of the industry. Such contributors
are made mandatory by this modification. '*^
Hosiery lndustry-Amendment- approtv,
August 14, 1934, defines conditions under
which all sales will be made in the industry,
and under which sales contracts should '.e
entered into.
Concrete Masonry Industry-Amendmen
approved August 13,1934, authorizes the Cde
Authority to submit a budget and methodi-'
assessment by which such funds shall be con
tribute by members of the Industry to m'ee
the expenses of the Code administration. "4^
Carbon Dioxide Industry.-Amendment.'
approved August 16, 1934. Amendment.NR.
I enables the Code Authority to incur reasbn-
able obligations and submit a budget and basis
of assessment by which funds shall be coni
tribute by members of the industry. Amenal
ment No. 2 deletes section 1, price lists; seq-4
tion 2, revised price lists; and section' 3,. ad'
herence to price lists, of article IV and sub-
stitutes therefore, with certain minor modlflt
cations, the open price filing provisions prot
posed by the administration. Amendment
No. 3 deletes section 4 of article IV and suBi
statutes therefore a provision prohibiting imfem-y.
bers of the Industry to enter Into any agre1'
ment to fix or maintain price terms, or can.
or attempt to cause, any member of the ii
dustry to change his price terms. Amends
ment No. 4 inserts a new section 9 in artid |
IV which is merely a revision of the old sea
tion 4 (deleted by amendment No. 3) in ord!
that it shall refer to the equivalent prow'
sins as renumbered by these amendment
Amendment No. 5 establishes a new articleH
to be known as article IV-A, trade practi .c
provisions-price cutting, which declares thUatL
wilfully destructive price cutting is an -an:
fair method of competition and is forbidden.
Amendment No. 6 deletes section 2 bf,ar.- ,
tidcle V and substitutes therefore a new section
2, the purpose of which is to clarify thWe
existing provisions because of compilaw.int
made in regard to them. .


Code Authority By-

laws Approved t

Soap and Glycerine Manufacturing Industry '1.
Hardwood Distillation Industry (with exceptions) ,
Reinforcing Materials Fabricating Industry (wlth':
exceptions) ; Waxed Paper Industry Iwlth excep..
tlons) : Paper Distributing Trade; Baters' B;i
Cutting Industry (with exceptions) ; Table O'P
Cloth Industry (with exceptions)a Print Eoll'e;
and Print Block Manufacturing Industry; ClIOt-
Machinery Industry, Porcelain Breakfast Furna
ture Assembling Industry; Artistic Lightin
Equipment Manufacturing Industry; Buffing an ij
Polishing Composition Industry; Inland Water Car.'
rier Trade in the Eastern Division of the U.S.,::.;
Wire Rope and Strand Manufacturing 'TIndustrp *
(with exceptions) : Washing and Ironing biachinavj
Manufacturing Industry; Fire Extinguishing A-.'.S
pilence Manufacturing Industry (with exceptionsi'1'q
California Sardine Processing Industry; Machine,
Applied Staple and Stapling Machine Industry
(lwth exceptions) : Textile Print Ro'ler Engrar'.
linog Industry: Locomotive Manufacturing Subdliv,
sirn of Machinery anrl Allied Products Industry,j
Mrcbandlse Warehousing Trade (with excep-
tions); Carbon Dioxide Industry with excep::-A
tlons) ; Readv Made Furniture Slip Corer Manufacn.'
turang industry ; Contractors Pump Subdivision of:.i
the Machinery anl Allied Products Industry (with':
exceptilonsi ; Tapioca Dry Products Industry; Vace,*
uum CiRaner Manitfacturlng Industry (with excep-,:-.
tionsi ), Insecticide and Dlsinfc-ctant Industry l4i
Commercial Stationery and Office Outfitting Trade'.'
(tith exceptions) : Slide Fastener Industry (with"
exceptional : Cnilled Car Wheel Industry Iwith ex- :J
ceptinnqI ; Yeast Indudtrv : Milk Filtering Materials ,.
and Dairy Products; Cotton Wrappings Industry 5
(with exceptions ; Canvas Stitched Belt Industry' :
(with exceptionsa.


Trade Complaints
The National Recovery Administration approvedd,.'*
during the past wer-k. plans of organization and .:
procedure for there handling of trade practice cor-'
plinlnats In the following industries: ".
Furniture and Floor Wax and Polish Industry;:.
Bankers, Trade Typesetting Industry. Division D-I'.::
of the Graphic Arts Industries; Mutual Savings'.
Banks; Textile Print Roller Eneraving Industry; ."
Canning Industry ; Buff and Polishing Wheel Indus-:.-i
try; Farm Equipment Industry; Imported Date..-,,;
Packing Industry; Snap Fastener Manufacturing...
Industry. .' :j


-- - -,,,,- - - - - - - -
i;u:-..s&i.d.x3,


Amendments and Modifications







E4
**I. " "* "- "- ." "* i ' :" ... .: -: :: :'
SEE CHART No.12 IL ..- - -- - -
.. .. ".. .. .. ... ... ... ..-------.. ..............""----.---- ... .. ... ....... ... .
-----------

f RAW MATERIALS -
". -.----.....-----.------- ----.--..---.--..---.----.. --..--------.--.---.. .---.. ......--
TEXTILES LEATHER FUR
-' ~I~ TEXTILE "
I TRADE I
Z; 11*'*
+"i l

-.S IIJ- ^
~LI





COTTON TEXTILES FLTEXTILES] & RAON-]SNDYPEXILSCESTING LEATHER INDUSTRIES


" .... .. ... n..............z...-._.. ..- '
- -- - - ---- - -I- - -
S WHOLESALE TRADES RETAIL TRADES
.. ..I . . . . .. . . . . . I
- - - - - -- -------- -------------------
u..... ...i...................-.- - - ----.-.-
IMPORT FABRICS :APPAREL 'LEATHER & FUR: R T i
W: ^" .... ................ ..BTo:^ - -DTC- j , :
--r--',-T- .,.,---- ..--.--- '-- ---,"..-- 4 '

W Y II m I W1T c a| -
I : | |n I |io1 |


,:. Ji ,l-Jl ,+ o + i i l ,. l J ,. 'j i ,: *,, a ,
..L. ,! ... J J % L L A'uI


NRA's grouping of 22 Codes in the textile industries is for coordinated administration.
These related industries, having similar problems, will be administered by one division
administrator with a staff of deputies. This textile industries division outlined in the.accom-
panying chart represents 111 separate industry units having 2,500,000 employees, $6,818,000,000
invested capital, and an annual volume of business of $8,970,000,000.
Each industry unit has elected a Code Authority from its own members to act as a Board
of Directors for directing its affairs on the industrial self-governing principle advocated by the
National Recovery Administrator. The public interest is safeguarded by representatives of the
NRA sitting on each Code Authority with power to call in representatives of labor, consumer,
or other interests.
Grouping of the indust-ry units is expected to bring closer harmony and effect amalgama-
tions of Codes. Some of the smaller Codes owe their existence merely to industry rivalries or
& personal ambitions.


TEXTILE ADMINISTRATION


GROUP CODE


Textile trade....-----.- ----..-.-----... --...----
Cotton textiles------..........-.....---------------------
Wool textiles--......----..--.--.. ----..------------
Silk and rayon----..........----........-------------..-..--
Sundry textiles-----..............---. ---.-. --------. -
Textile processing................-------------------
Apparel manufacturing.......-.......-----------. -
-ea r I 0---- -- -
Wearing accessories-...-.........- .....-----..---
SSundry accessories...---.. ----------------
SLeather and fur----...........--------------------
TOTALS-- ..----------------..------..------------.


EMPLOYEES


8,000
526,701
204,221
211,900
37, 136
44,400
1,036,537
65,143I
55,626
308,518
-9 fnn nfl


INVESTED CAPITAL


$2,000,000
2,085,042,159
1,179,135,000
610,555,400
590,654,000
84,005,000
1,200,511,000
42,166,170
124.,247,300
899. 583,000


fi 818,00.o 000


AGGREGATE ANNUAL
SALES
$250, 000,000
2,297,283,936
750,133,000
582,857,000
142,565,815
131,000,000
3,302,122, 730
147,641,000
200,137,000
1,163,380,000


4 - -V UA0-V. --


8.970.000,000.


II


I-


M.- I