The Blue Eagle

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Title:
The Blue Eagle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
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United States -- National Recovery Administration
Publisher:
National Recovery Administration ( Washington, D.C )
Publication Date:

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Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 16917556
System ID:
AA00021018:00010

Full Text







(lb


- lUC?


'1934

^k~ttARV


I'


: Vol. 1, No. 10 Issued Weekly by the National Recovery Administration, Washington August 13, 1934, !


.Action-Keynote

of Appeals Board

..New NRA Admin istrative
: Procedure Will Speed
S' Action of Pctitioners '
g "' at Hearwgs
i.,- e Rules of Procedure just published by
$ Appeals Board makes possible
pntation of individual cases In the
-. o lla6sible manner. The object o? the'
.edri.es r is to cut red tape and dispose- of
iit.'Irnteestted parties may appear in person
, .sieby attorney. They may file a brief and
.I'ftroduce written evidence at any time. To
itAc""ltate transactions hearings may be held
4....Beore a full board or before any member of
k.':te board or by some person designated by
I'i.e board. The whole object of the Appeals
I Board is to have machinery that will tunc-
, '.ton quickly and expedite data to the hands
. of--the Administrator so that be may make
.tlick disposition of cases coming before him.
"The procedure follows:
L-B RULE 1. FORM OF PETITION.-A corn-
;: plaint should be set forth in a typewritten
n .or printed petition stating: (a) The name
|.and. address of the petitioner; (b) the de-
tails of the complaint; (c) the relief re-
ues{ted; (d) the disposition of the complaint
J';ide by each agency or official concerned;
s'.df (e) the final disposition made by the
appropriate division of the National Recovery
,w flmnistration. A signed original and at
k.lih four (4) copies of the petition should
'r belled.
Z', BOLE 2. NOTICE OF PETlITION-Notice
I: ofthefllng of a petition and a copy of the
" j.qtition will be sent to all interested parties,
-.."aXtIldermlned by the board.
,BRLE 3. ANSWERS.--The board may re-
'. Lst an answer or other Information from
syInterested person within a time specified
'bi the bard, and immediately upon receipt
...derf will send a copy of the -answer or
.e information to the petitioner.
1PRULE 4. NOTICE OF HEARING.-If the
d. decides to call the interested parties
hr for a' hearing, a notice thereof will
se-ent to the parties concerned, as de-
:Adiined by the board.
6;,RUM E 5. APPEARANCE, BRIEFS, AND'
V!TIDENCE.-Any petitioner or interested
'pty tomay: (a) Appear In person or by at-
.t"roiney, or both; (b) submit a brief at any
etlme subject to the discretion of the board;
.: ,() introduce written evidence at any time,
subject to the discretion of the board. Fail-
ure of any interested parties to appear in
Ir:' sron shall not deprive the board of the
: -right to hear other interested parties In
.person.
RULE 6. HEARINGS.-Hearings may be
S" had before the full board or any member or
members thereof or any other person or per-
a: ons designated by the board, as the board
may direct.
R By direction of the Administrator:
G. A. LYNCH,
Administrative Officer.


Codes Modified

for Cities,

Cities should have less difficulty in making
economical purchase of municipal supplies,
with their recent exemption from NRA Code,
provisions that conflict with their contracting
laws, says a communication' to members of
, the American Municipal Association and the
United States Conference of Mayors.
.The fire-hose manufacturer, lumber dealer,
or seller of paper drinking cups who makes a
bid for a municipal'contract may now:
1. Quote prices and terms of sale as favor-
able as those made to commercial buyers for
like quantities.
2. Quote definite prices or terms of sale
that are not subject to a boost in cost during
the life of the contract. Prices may be
quoted for definite quantities and for definite
periods, up to 3 months, or longer, if the par-
ticular Code permits it. -For indefinite quan-
tities, prices may be quoted for 6 months or
more
8. Quote prices and terms to apply on con-
tracts which will become effective not more
than 60 days from the date of the opening of
bids.
4. Quote prices f.o.b. point of origin and/or
f.o.b. destination.-From the American City,
August 1934.


iNRA Seeks Half Million


SNew Labor Pledges


SPost Office Distributes Application Cards to
Employers in Nine Service Trades Entitling
Display of Blue Jagle

S Within the next two weeks more than 500,000 employers in nine so-called
service trades throughout the country will receive from their postmen forms
which when filled out and returned to NRA will entitle them to the Blue Eagle
Sfor their particular trade.
S Under recent Executive and Administrative Orders, the fair trade practice
provisions of Codes covering barber shops, bowling alleys and billiard halls,
shoe repairers and rebuilders, cleaners and dyer, hotels, laundries, parking
:, garages, lots, and stations, advertising display installers and advertising litera-
ture distributors were suspended.
I: The labor provisions of these Codes. in- National Recovery Administrator but also
eluding maximum hours and minium-wage two return postal cards.
,standards, the ban on child labor and the One of the cards is a formal application
a Collective bargaining guarantees, are still for an official placard reproducing the labor
binding on employers in towns of 2,500) provisions of the appropriate Code which an
or greater population and such an employ.ver executive Order requires to hbe conspicuously
ole of the listed trades, complying with posted in every establishment operating
in; tOone of the listed trades, complying with unde an aproe Code.
these provisions is eligible to display and der an approved Code.
use t. A second card is an application for the
116e the individual Blue Eagle for his trade. Code Blue Eagle, display of which, it is em-
:. Arrangements for Distribution phasized in the Administrator's letter to em-
A.-rrangements have been completed by the plo.vers, will be evidence of your compli-
P st Office Department for distribution, be- ance with the labor provisions of your Code
: ginning the latter part of the current week, and with such trade practices as may be
.,to every employer in the affected trades, of agreed upon locally by members of your
'.n envelope containing not only a letter from trade after approval by NRA."


Resume of Court Cases
(See page 4, column 1)
NRA's Legal Research Section has
recently completed a risume of all
cases decided under the National In-
dustrial Redovery Act and State recov-
ery acts up to and including July 20,
1934.
This resume does not include cases
in which antitrust injunctions were
modified to permit defendants to
formulate and abide by an NRA Code.
It has been carefully checked for ac-
curacy and should be of interest to all
members pf industries and trades op-
, rating uraider. Codes. : : .
The rhsumh covers cases involving
labor disputes arising under the
N.I.R.A. and the President's Reem-
ployment Agreement, hours and
wages, control of production, trade
practices, jurisdiction and parties,
remedies, State laws- and Codes, and
miscellaneous actions since the Na-
tional Industrial Recovery Act be-
came effective.
Each week The Blue Eagle will
print substantial excerpts from these
decisions until the entire resume has
been printed, and thereafter as adali-
tional cases are decided by courts the
'decisions will be presented in a similar
form.
The first excerpt covers those eases
involving labor disputes arising under
N.I.R.A.


ings on canned food laoels we wish to go on
record favoring the plan, believing it to be
advantageous to the consuming public. Will
therefore proceed immediately to incorporate
necessary changes on new labels to conform
to various grade definitions laid down by the
Department of Agriculture."
At the same time the Administration was
informed by Libby, McNeil & Libby, Chicago,
that the can labels of that firm are being re-
designed to make them much more informa-
tive, and that pamphlets defining the grade
designations of the labels are being dis-
tributed to consumers at the rate of half
million a year.
These communications followed closely the
appointment of committees of chain food-
store operators and wholesale grocers to ad-
vise the Administration in formulating grades
and. standards provisions for the Canning
Code.
The committees are as follows:
Wholesale grocers.-Samuel B. Steele,
Steele, Wedeles Co., Chicago; Samuel Ran-
zoni, Sussman, Wormser Co., San Francisco;
August Janszen, Jr., the Janszen Co., Cin-
cinnati: J. W. Shugert, the Waples-Platter
Co., Fort Worth.
Chain-store operators.-Warren H. Clark,
assistant to the president of Kroger Grocery
and Baking Co., Cincinnati; F. H. Massmann,
president of the National Tea Co., Chicago;
Arthur O'Keefe, president of First National
Stores, Somervllle, Mass.
The appointment of these committees is a
result of a series of conferences called by the
Administration and attended by a number
of leading chain-store and wholesale grocery
representatives.
The President, by his Executive Order ap-
proving the Canning Industry Code, required
that a committee of canners be appointed to
submit, within 90 days, recommendations for
inclusion of consumer standards and grade
labels provisions in the Code. The commit-
tee submitted a preliminary report about a
month ago, and Government officials ap-
pointed to advise the administration on the
subject rermed the committee's report in-
adequate.
About half of the total canning pack is dis-
tributed under private-brand labels, mainly
by large wholesale grocers and by chain food
stores. Therefore, the administration asks
the advice of representatives of those types
of distribution before drafting standards pro-
visions for inclusion in the Code.


Multiple Code Coverage. -' 4:i t'7
The keys to the multiple Code cove'
-problem which Is disturbing some large 6"'
players are as follows! q
'First, simplification and standardlzatlon ot|
Code provisions covering kindred Industr
by amendment based on conference betIe
and recommendations from the Indusrleei
evolved looking toward making all provislo
for kindred industries simple and identical.:
Second, where possible segregation- of o
eraLions in fact or on the books of the.ei
ployer so as to conform to the separate 0oi
Is the course to be followed pending sfiUtE
fiction as suggested. "
Third, where segregation Is not feas'bll
the employer should comply with the sevqal
(Continued on page 2, column 2)


Silverware Trad
...
QualityStandardI

The National Recovery Admlnlstrator kn t'
nounced approval of certain quality stan3l
ards applying to plated flatware and hot1i
flatware under the Co'de of Fair Competdtoi*1
for the Silverware Manufacturing Indusatry
The Code provides that within 60 day%.,
after the effective date of its approval therS
shall be established a series of quality stand.
ards to mark the vYrious grades and quallties,
of the products of the industry, and it is in5
pursuance of the action of the CodA Autho$
Ity in this respect that the order of approvl.o
has been issued-by the Administrator. "-.2
The order further requires that within .SO:
days the Code Authority shall circularize al1'
known members of the industry,- and withii.1
60 days shall cause to be published In at least'
two trade Journals a notice of the standards i
and shall request that all manufacturers l
dealers, and retailers give full publicity .'toi
these standards &I order that the ultimate'
consumer may become familiar with the ei-'
notation of the various grade markings. ,
The Administrator in another order hat'
approved a cost accounting system for the;
same industry. : :


S....... .... ., -.. :.-..,a,^ wj-,.. ........


OVERLAPPING CODE


Exemptions Given for Hour Limitation, Overtime Flexibili
and Minimum Wages for Each Type of Common.'
Labor in Non-segregable Operations N
AX
[This Is the Second Discussion of the Administration's Policy Regarding Overlappigid
[.Codes. The First Story Appeared in the Issue of The Blue Eagle of July 2, 1931.
The National Recovery Administration recently moved to a solution of the
problems of overlapping Codes and multiple Code coverage. Conceding',
'there-is no. eure-al;-a-pohiy.was-outliied. to.,gov te,treaym -tf of ..gpr ..
in the nondistributive trades, with the ainouiicement thft.a separate t_.
of policy for the distributive trades will be issued in the near-future. "-::.
Two keys to the situation are provided, clear that an operation is an integral.
First, definitions are to be carefully delimited the principal operation of the partlciif
so as to confine the scope of the Code to thE dustry, the Administration wil...1"e,ilA*
industry actually represented by the appll- state with some assurance that sueh in
cants. This does not mean that Codes will part is within the Code -for the principal
not continue to cover minorities buhot it does eratlons and not underany other Code.
mean that the type of operations included -A.. beh Avoide
within the Code must be carefully defined In ComplicationsCannot be Aoided.
such fashion as to cover only the operations Complications cal&ai avoided invipW-
* performed by the sponsors of the Code. the variation in practices 'between dIffer-
The second key to the situation Is the ap- members of Industry manufacturingthd' i
plication of thd ".Integral part" test. This products. Some concerns speclalflre i niid
is not an infallible guide but wherever it Is neucts which are mere by-products for..'dt
----- _concerns. A higher degree of adminstrat
discretion will alwayshsave to be exerd-ds
C anner A drawing the line between portions ot0ii-iW
IC anner A 'op t dustry which are represented and .whfi
C anner A doU pt integral parts on the one hani and:iei'
which fall outside of the Code. Exanpla U
'Standard G rade the application of-th pflnclples otUlne
ad annexed to the Offlceg memorandum annofi
Ing this policy.. . ,.a
This policy announcement Is typica1'"tbi'
a d La el' current policy on policies., It ehdeaidtsi1
clearly ascertain the nature of thf probll
and to erect guides for its solution. 'The.hB
Atlantic'& Pacific Tea Company is that with a clearly outlined desiral.
and Others Cooperate Wih Ad- course to follow, the Administration, and4M
and Others Cooperate With Ad- Code authorities may be able jointl0y- to6:.l
ministration to Inform Public up serious difficulties,, proceeding as raldt
as possible but a't the same time in an. ordei"
of Package Contents and thorough fashion. .::'
_____The current announcement .analyzeJ h:
f a facts underlying tCie hi46i1on 6 s'nto''inl
Great impetus t .o .the Administration's Codes and finds: that there must. be,1-a.
efot pe to i d e oumerstraondds separation in treatment between cases w
effort to include consumer standards, two or more Codes.actually overlap .e::
grades, and label requirements in the other and to other type of case (referred
Canning industry Code was given by as multiple Code coverage), in which jherI
the complete cooperation of the Great no overlapping of the/Codes involved T
where a single concern may find its. ope
-Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co. tons covered by two or more Codes; .:-. lb
A telegram was sent to the Administration former type of case (overlapping Code). il
by John A. Hartford, president of the A. & P., completely curable but the latter-,'type
which reads as follows: Codes cannot be avoided so'long as unreiate
"Regard to the proposed Government grad- businesses are conducted by single con.e.il


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?._ .:i~ a'i,:,-^ :. ... ... .. L: U. J .. f. D L U



SWhat is a Complaint?


.How and Where It Should be Filed, and How NRA Follows
S, .. It Through

?U ,Pending the establishment of adequate machinery in each industry for the
litigation of complaints, the Compliance Division has provided 54: offices in
.i' field, one inm each State with branch offices in the States of New York, Penn-
lVania, Texas, and California. These offices, which are under the direction
'lf-State- NRA compliance directors, are fully equipped to make-speedy investi-
tions of complaints which are filed with them. Each complaint is given
ireful scrutiny upon its receipt in order to ascertain whether the facts stated
,it constitute a code violation. When the complaint does not do so, the coin-
lainant is given an explanation of the true meaning of the Code, and if he still
els that the code violation exists he may file a new complaint. It has been
-%e experiencee of the Compliance Division that most complaints made under
S Ies recently approved were caused by misunderstandings either on the part
Se complainant or of the person complained against, and these complaints
.. usually cleared up by explanation as to the meaning of the Code.
S..the complaint does state facts Which
S&bear to warrant an investigation, the mat- I __"i Codes
'eris then taken up with the person against UV rlappng
9tom the complaint has been made, the re-
4'odent. This may be done either by cor- (Continued from pae )
..fidence or personal contact, depending
Sthe'rcumstances of the case. In any Codes as to labor provisions by observing the
eilp which preliminary attempts to arrive shortest hours and highest wage provisions
ain understanding do not succeed, an ef- for the type of work as set forth in the Codes
it'is made .to contact the respondent per- in question. It is conceded that this is not
ially either through a field adjuster or in possible where provisions vary substantially.
Office of the State director. In a num- Finally, where a concern Is covered by
"-of the larger cities which are not con- several Codes as to some nonsegregable com-
efnentiy served by the principal field offices bination of operations and the labor provi-
ee .is a resident field adjuster. Other sins in those Codes are substantially diverse,
ieas are covered by adjusters attached to exemptions are to be granted if there is undue
e.office of the State director, hardship. Such exemptions are to be con-
. .n ditioned or compliance with simple hour and
1AdJustment Board Established* wage standards appropriate for groups of
*t kindred industries. Such simple standards
.q,: assist the State Director in the han- are now being evolved as an objective in sim-
.g of' complaints there has been estab- pllficatlon of the Code structure within groups
Jed for each field office,of the Compliance of kindred industries and to be available for
visionn a State Adjustment Board, corn- such uniform conditions in cases of hardship.
.od. of a representativee of employers, a h n o s o
ipresentative of employees, and a represent- Outlines New Policy
'itVof the public agreed upon by tile other The text of the Office Memorandum out-
o.and appointed by the President. These lining the new policy Is as follows:
aids hear cases referred to them by the A OVERLAPPING CODES
dte director, usually cases in which a hear-
giS necessary in order to arrive at the 1. We must avoid future overlapping be-
ets They also act on appeals taken from tween different Codes and to cure situations
ecisos of' the 'State director. Their func- in which that condition now exists.
ions therefore are not directly administra- 2. There is no cure-all, but the following
;-"They act only on cases referred to will govern the nondistributive trades in
.eim as a review body. Reports received in endeavoring to effectuate the above policy:
1ashington indicate that- the use of these (a) If definitions of industries, as included
a.rds has been of great assistance in the in Codes, are carefully delimited so as clearly
a lind g of -unadjusted complaints. There to confine the scope of the code in accordance
Wi l-:bso being organized-at the present time with the act, overlapping will be reduced to
ifThprincipal. cities of a number of States a minimum. Section 3 (a) of the act pro-
ame manner as the State Adjustment industry or subdivision thereof
i'.irds .These boards will ast on cases re- * represented by- the applicants", and
Befed to them by the -State director in a requires a.finding by the President that the
Haniiar manner to tke cases referred by him applicants are truly representative of such
'fthe State Board. * industries or subdivisions thereof."
veryy effort is made by the State direc- (b) It will frequently, but 'not always
i' officee to instruct the respondent in his prove helpful in drawing a definition of the
4bga'tions under the Code and to make an boundary line of an industry to consider
udlitrativd finding of fact as to whether whether doubtful operations are or are not
4olati ns have actually occurred. As stated an integral part of the principal operations
ghe,:-'In' most cases these efforts are sue- of the particular Industry. An "integral
sfnl in effecting the adjustment of a corn- part" of an industry, of. course, normally
I'laint: However, If this is not possible, the will be under its Code. (See "examples"
.se i4 referred to Washington for final attached.)
L .psition. B, MULTIPLE CODE COVERAGE
:Analy'A sesMade by Compliinc e 1. In many cases, although there Is no over-
Analyse$ Mlapping of the Codes involved, still a single
Division concern may find its operations covered by
LMBefore any action is taken In Washington While this type of case is unavoidable'where
,tli.fileis carefully analyzed by the Compll- unrelated businesses are conducted by a sin-
dxncA Division, the deputy administrator in gletconcern, still confusion and hardship may
ailrge. of the Code, and the legal division, arise where the operations carried on are not
Sd..,.thelr recommendations are obtained r cannot practicably be segregated. .
.e.. case is then set for hearing, before the 2. The following principles should be em-
"'mjliance Council, an advisory body to the 2 h ow p ie od m
inlef of the' Compliance Division, composed
0t"P -representative of Industry, a representa-
Ye, of'labor, and- an impartial member. The I pa I
spondent Is Invited -to be present at this I m pa I
.tig or to-be represented if he cares to.
iffei. ..de Authority for the Industry is also
-ied to. be represented. The Compliance From U.l
jacli makes an administrative finding of BANK DEBITS OUTI W YORK CITY
Stand makes recommendations to the Ad- O D OUTSIDE WYOKCITY.
astrator as to the disposition of the caSe.
.While most cases referred to Washington
,lfor.'action are adjusted, In the event that an
.adJusthent Is not secured, NRA may pursue --,,
!several courses of action. It may remove
the violator's Blue Eagle And refer the case
o:,. the enforcement agencies of the Odvern- 0 .. I ..... ., .
:pn 1930 1 19311 ,Z 93 93.
... .(Cpntinued on page 4, column 2)
; .... The index of bank debits outside of
: Ifr ^New York has long been regarded as
I, i erpretation one of the more important indexes of
!-,'; \ --business activity. This index for the
S Wheat Flour Miling year 1930 to date is shown in the chart
?:.Whvveat Flour Milling ^ ^^ ^ y^ ^
-, above taken from the Survey of Cur-
FACTS.-The Moundridge Milling Co., rent Business. The story which it tells
,:,F 'r.- ~aeMotdrme rllig C.,differs slightly from the story told by
':"Moundridge, Kans., have in the past and are ers slightly from the story tpd by
Ia t present employing school boys for odd jobs the index of production. The volume
around the"mill. They do all sorts of odd of production reached its low in the

-iQUESTION.-Is this employment per- checks (bank debits) 'reached their low
fYS~ttedIl by this Codein the spring of 1933 at the time of
:".II4T ERPRETATION.--It is ruled that the the closing of the banks in March.
I employment of school boys under the age of Sne that ti the ban k debits
4 ,15 years, for odd jobs around the mill is a Snce t time the trend of bak debits
M'toolaton of the labor provisions of this Code. has been slightly upward.



1 &'4* ,'.. :
., .. . ; -. . .. *
SK'a. ,* A IJ:.. *... . : *. ,


Costs for Book

Manufacturing

Approval of a cost determination schedule
for the book manufacturing Industry was an-
nounced by the National Recovery Adminis-
tration. 'The schedule was submitted by the
National Graphic Arts Coordinating Commit-
tee in accordance with provisions of the
Graphic Arts Code.
The order of approval becomes effective
August 14, and will remain in'effect for 00
days. or until further order by the Ad-
ministrator. It was given with the condi-
tion that it may be modified or revoked by
the Administrator at any time, and that he
may. whenever he deems It advisable or nec-
essary, impose further conditions.
It was further provided that no establish-
ment shall sell any product listed in the
schedule at a price lower than the minimum
costs specified, less differentials and dis-
counts, subject to the following exceptions:
An establishment using a cost-finding
method prescribed by the national Code Au-
tlhorlty, or another adequate cost-finding sys-
temn, and which can determine Its cost as
lower thnn those in the schedule, may sell at
the costs so determined, subject to the dis-
approval of the Code Authority whose de-
cision, In turn, shall be subject to review by
the National Graphic Arts Coordinating Com-
mittee and the Administrator.
It is also provided that an establishment
may, In defense of Its business, meet a bona
fide competitive bid of another establish-
mqnt. provided that the .acts of the bid shall
be immediately reported to the National
Code Authority.

ployed except where found to operate Inequi-
tably under particular circumstances:
(a) Amendment to make provisions iden-
tical: Hardship arising from multiple cover-
age may frequently be eliminated by simpli-
fying and standardizing Code provisions gov-
erning kindred industries by amendment on
the basis of conference between and recom-
mendations from the industries involved, so
that the provisions for kindred industries are,
so far as possible, simple and identical.
This course should afford sufficient relief
from multiple trade practice provisions, and
even frop multiple labor provisions, where
their requirements do not vary substantially.
Exemption will normally not be considered in
such cases until the possibilities of such.
amendment lave been explored.
(b) Maintenance of fair competition: In
order to maintain fair competition no con-
cern should be exempted from requirements
under which his competitors within the in-
dustry must operate, except to the extent
required by conditions of special hardship
under the peculiar circumstances.
(o) Where segregation of operations feasi-
ble: No exemption should be granted where
it is practicable for the employer to segregate
operations in fact or' on his books so as to
have each segregated operation conform to a
separate Code. It is believed that this rule
will dispose of most cases.
(d) Where segregation inot feasible: Al-
though segregation, as above, is impracticable,
there should still be no exemption in labor
provisions where the employer can comply
with the several Codes. This he can"do by
observing the shortest hours and highest wage
provisions for the type of work, as set forth
in the Codes in question. This Is possible
where such provisions do not vary substan-
tially. Amendment, as suggested should be
employed to simplify such related Codes., ,
(e) When exemptions are appropriate: In-
the final residue of cases' in which several
Codes, having substantially divergent labor
provisions, cover some nonsegregable combi-
nation of operations, properly conditioned ex-
emptions may be granted if undue hardship
is proved.


1'


Four Adverse


Decisions

Three Hundred Alleged Code
Violations Handled by Litigation
Division of NRA; Only Four
on Appeal

Announcement of the conviction of one
Code violator in New York and the Institu-
tion of proceedings against another in Penn-
sylvania was tmude by NRA sihultuneouNly
with announcement of an appeal from the
ruling of Federal District Judge Barnes in
Chicago in the Irma Hat Co. case.
Commenting on theU Chicago Jurist's ruling
restraining a'Code Authority. NRA officials
declared it Is out of line with what we be-
lieve to ba the overwhelming weight of au-
thority" as disclosed In records showing that
out of mote than 300 alleged Code violations
handled by the litigation division, only four
have resulted In adverse court decisions and
that appeals have been or will be taken in
all four of these cases.
Eight convictions, Including the ona in New
York today, have been obtained; 3 permanent
injunctions have been entered; 12 restraining
orders have been granted, and 30 cases hpve
been adjusted satisfactorily to NRA, accord-
'Ing to the record. -Of 20 suits against Code
Authorities, district attorneys bnd other com-
pliance agencies, to enjoin those agencies. 17
have been dismissed or otherwise disposed of
satisfactorily to NRA. In no case where
NRA has been the plaintiff has an unfavor-
able decision been rendered.
The latest conviction for violation of code
provisions Is that of Gordon S. Harris, New
York City discount dealer, found guilty in
the court of special sessions of violating the '
Motor Vehicle Retailing Trade Code ban on
sales of new cars at a discount Harris was
sentenced by Judge Kernochan td pay the
maximum fine of $500 or serve & months in
jail. Charges were lodged against Harris by
the Motor Vehicle Retailing Trade Code Au-
thority, and the case was regarded as an
important test.
Earlier in the day It was reported to NRA
that Federal Judge Oliver B. Dickinson, In
Allentown, Pa...hbad fixed ball at $2,500 each
for Morris Senderowilz, Marns H. Sendero-
witz, and Abraham M. Senderowitz, owners
of the Royal Manufacturing Co. of that city,
charged with violating the minimum wage
provisions of the Underwear and Allied
Products Industry Code.
*The information, containing 42 counts
against the company, which Is the largest
manufacturer of substandard size shorts in
the industry, was filed by Assistant United
States Attorney J. C. Ganey and Meyer Turin
of NRA's litigation division.

NOTE.-It should soon be possible, from
studies now being completed by the Research
and Planning Division under the supervision
of the Employment Policy Deputy, to provide
(for groups of kindred industries), conditions
for such exemptions setting forth for the
group, single' maximum hourly limitations
accompanied by overtime flexibility and single
minLmumn wages for each type of common
labor In the group. When this study is com-
Splete an exemption may be granted for such
nonsegregable operations on the condition
that they comply with such simple require-
ments. This course will promote both justice
and simplicity.
By direction of the Administrator:
G. A. LYNCH,
Administrative Officer.
Examples of the application of the policy
announced in the foregoing memorandum are:
(Continued on page 8, column 1)


idexes of Business Activity
iS. Chamber of Commerce, Survey of Current Buslnesu, August 1934


flF /fRSTe MONTHS


REMAINDER OF YE


__,_ BANK DEBITS OUTSIDE NEW YORK CITY- (BILULON OF DOLLARS)
0 50 100 IBo 200 250 3 00 350

vt 1934
1933m m m m

K 931
1930 ______________________

The above chart on bank debits taken from the same source shows in the
heavy black lines the total volume of debits the first 6 months of 1934 as com-
pared with the first 6 months of 1933. The total in the first half of 1934 was in
excess of that for the first half of 1933 and about equal to that in the first half
of 1932.
While the volume of production in the first half of 1932 was less than in the
first half of 1934, it will be noted that the volume of bank debits was larger in
the first half of 1932 than in the corresponding period of 1934. While business
activity is the chief cause of increasing bank debits, there was a very considerable
hoarding movement in 1932 which occasioned an increase in bank debits. In
1934, however, the hoarding movement had largely disappeared. The volume
of bank debits in the first half of 1932 would probably be less than that in the
first half of 1934 if debits or checks arising from hoarding- in 1932 could be
deducted. This deduction might also place 1932 lower than 1933.


\ *.;.











Stah Correlates


SCodes With NRA


I Agreement Provides Indus-
tries Operating Under State
SCodes Will Modify Them to
Conform to National Codes

E., NRA announced an agreement has been
reached with the State of Utah providing for
Correlation of NRA Codes and those approved
under the State's recovery act. As a result
Sof the agreement Industries now operating
under approved State Codes are to be asked
'to modify those Codes to conform to the NRA
S Code for the same industry or trade, and
pending State Codes will be approved only
when they have been made to conform "ver-
batim with the provisions of the National
o Code."
Conclusion of the agreement with the Utah
State Recovery Board, headed by Gus P.
Beckman as acting administrator, was re-
ported to NRA headquarters by R. S. Beach,,
NRA deputy administrator.
In a.letter to Mr. -Backman, recording de-
tills of the agreement, Mr. Beach empha-
sized the ".mutual expectation that the State
C: odes be made to conform with the National
Codes as rapidly as possible, so that the har-
mony of program can better be effectuated."
S The agreement was recommended to the
Governor of Utah by the State Recovery
/ Bosad In a resolution adopted on July 20,
suggested substantially as follows:
* that the industries operating
under all existing State Codes shall be re-
Squested to modify their Codes to conform In
all respects with National Codes, with the
Additional provision, however, that items par-
tieularly advantageous to the industries in
SUtah covering matters not covered by Na-
: tional Codes, may be carried as provisions of
the Codes approved as State Codes.
..' "* that the existing administrative
agencies administering the Utah State Codes
be qualified If possible as the representatives
of the National Code authority in addition
to. their responsibility as the State Code
authority. * *


Iolnu alet(Sile Codes
only). ,


Maximum 35,000
ud/or I yUear.


Nol in or affecling In- Mas. mm 3500 fe
lerstale. each day


* *
*


Minerals


T HE above chart shows the results of
operation in metalliferous mining, bi-
tuminous coal, anthracite coal, and
crude petroleum Industries for the month of
June In each year since 1929. The volume of
production in terms of physical output, the
number of employed persons, and the total
pay roll are each expressed as a percentage
of their respective magnitude in June 1929.
In June 1933 employment reached the de-
pression low at 54.8 percent of June 1929.
At the same time pay rolls were only 33.7
percent of pay rolls in June 1929--somewhat
above the low of 31.8 percent in May 1933.
Between June 1929 and June 1933 'average
money income per person' had declined about
39 percent, indicating the much more rapid
decline of total pay rolls as compared with
employment. During the same period the
volume of production had dropped to the'
depression low of 52.5 percent of 1929 and
rebounded to 70.7 percent in June 1933. The
relatively high level of production in June
1933, was largely the result of speculative


Disltric Allorney under doreclion
Attorney Ceneral: or any
trade aUscilion., lpop. no
persanon damaged.
Any person subject to and com-
plying wilh Code, or any
county and prosecuting al-
lorney


Courls f1 the


Diitria Courtsr
Stale.


Ihe No provision.


activities and was attained by increasing the
working time of employed workers.
Since June 1933 employment has increased
30.7 percent and total pay rolls 57.6 percent.
The more rapid increase in total pay rolls
than in employment shows the money Income
per employed person has increased by ap-
proximately 20.6 percent. This.picture of re-
covery may well be contrasted with that for
depression, even though employment and
money incomes are still considerably below
1929 levels. '
The recovery in production between June
1932 and June 1934 has been even more
marked, the increase being 44.8 percent as
compared with 27.6 percent for employment
and 50.0 percent for pay rolls. On the re-
covery from the depression low in 1932, how-
ever, productivity increased faster than em-
ployment, and hence productivity per person
increased. Consequently, in June 1934 pro-
ductivity per person was 13.4 percent higher
than in June 1932 and 6.1 percent higher
than In June 1929:


The chart reproduced below shows as 6f May 15, 1934, the several States, including Utah, which have legislation giving
additional legal effect to NIRA Codes and the principal features of those State laws.

STATE
CITATION SCOPE" PNIALfl WHO MAT APPLY FOR EQUITY JURIS- FILING NRA CODES PUBliC CONTRACTS STATE CODES- REMARKS
EFFECTIVE DATE INJUNCTION DICTION PREREQUISITE PUBI CONTRACTS STATE CODES REMARKS

CALIFORNIA: In and liffecti in- Ma imm 500 SU and/or Atlorey General or District Al.- Superior Courtl where win- No. NRA preference. Stale hiaso oan AAA
Still. 1933. stlte. oimouth. fney hr o ny i' or county. latio ofla0 itatute.
Opin 1039.
Ano. 4.1933.
SMtaik133. Intlra.- and interle (Sameenashove.) (Same as above.) (Same uas above.) No. Stale Codes (super-
lChp.I1037. whbnnonNRA Code. seeded by NRA
fA. 4, 133. Codes).
COLORADO: Not in. or affecting Maiuonm 5010 1f Any prone ajid to nd cmm- Disrict cort ofl the No. NRA duse required. No provision.
l. Lws 193 (2d extr sion. ilersltae. eachdiay. plyingl with Code. so ny Dis- Stale.
o. secBi l 0S7) Jan. 29,1934. trid Apsorey.'
,IWINOIS: Intra-uad inltetdale. Cod or oenenenl. Any parsambjectId l adm- Any ouwtl or compelenl No. NRA dame required. NHeproisieon. Anti-bod laws sred.
58h G.A. Muaimam $500 for plyi will Cod el. ora uy jurisdidion. Pros. on written can-
* se Bil 16- each day. License StIlu Attorney. el Attollrney Gen-
.' Jialy .1934. .same aend/o 6 erl and St. Comp.
m. oanlhs. Dir.
NEW JERSEY: (PnaDiintrastate; (eq- Muim u S500 per Allttorney Geaeral or anyr pern The Cort or Chncey. Certified copy with No provision. Yes. (Caocelatiu by
Laos 1933. tly)intro-andinler- day. or de aesociatien in inter- Guovanoe. inlduslnrtyolealahe-
OCp.37.L dale. 'a hod TL 37. Lans
spL 5. 9.133. 1934.)
Chap.369. In or affecting inter- A misdemeanor. None. No. False se NRA inig-
Ang.31.1933. state I ma: vilatieniofNRA
Code re child labor,
_b hours. wages.
NEW MEXICO: Not in or leing in- Muimum SOO for An peroun bijec to and comn- District Courts of tbe NRA clame required.
lth5 Lq. (pecil session), tcaite. enhday. plying with Code; District Al- Stale.
Hoesme Bill 12, May 1934. t loarne. or Allorney GeneraL


NEW 0ORI.
lows 1933.
Chap. ig1.
Aug.261. 33.
OHIO:
MILivs I9
HuB, 705.
OcL 18, 1933.
SOUTH CABROUNA:
Acts 1934L
No. S1135.
fApr. 16,19.l
UTAH!
S 31,i933.
Jul31, 1933.


nil






WIr

.1


WISCONSIN;
L 9 1331.
oa.476.
* 30., 1933.
WTOMINCo-
Chop. I6.
W62oZls".


Inltrasle (pe l); :in- Maimum S500
ra.- ud i textiles elubday.
equityy).


Inlra- and inlesntole.


Intr- and inlaodalet.


Masium $500 for
each day.


Any party whose loinaeesl ad-
ensly efeded.


Coriled cpy wilh NRA cIme reqoed. No poisio
Seeretay of Stole.


_________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________ I I I I-


Protecting Allttorney under di- The Comrti of Common Calieird copy
jectin of Alloney GeneraIL Pleas.. Governor.


The Cirelt CowlIo tIhe
Slate.


Catlied copay with
Sertry of Stale.
Fee $5-Clerk ol
Court each county,
(ee 25 cetils.


with No poieion.


Yes. Musl be consisl-
eat lwilh NRA Codes.


Nopo pviein, Nopipoise.



No provision. Yes. No reference
NRA Codes.


ct also embraces ,&AA
proeiwess.


Prolulions requ'e
prwodl of Stt
NRA Duedor aud
Code Aulthity.,

Stile Codes only.


No provision.


NRA d.o A required.


Yea. No releroce to
NRA Codes.


INo provision.


Stale Codes oily.


- _______ ( ______ ______


SScopel ii delioed by the peIal nd onqity section regmidles of recialoi appeinn elseihue in theo act.
S L 3 RESUMI OF OTHER STATE LEGISLATION SUPPLEMENTARY TO NIRA
SLRAM, Seion .Laws of 1933 House Bill No 17 (effective Aug. 18. 1933); Suapends blackliating and boycotting la..
I'cAC.HsETTsn- Acts 193 3 -Captr 37 (efl tivec July 22. 1933): suspends prohibitLion on employment of women in textile and leather trada after 6 clock p.m.
'VANSAS Ltws f Itr1933. Frst H BiNTlNo,2' (effective Nov 21. 1933). Suspends operation of antitrust lws a to acts in compliance with codes. etc.
SlG.Id Generallaw-e of 3 93. HonMe Bill No. 49 (effec ve Mar. 22. 1934): Su.spends operation. of antitrust lwe s a to .ts authorize ode. l Dee orded by yet ..Dlabir only when aithn

Io 1933. Special Seon. H ou e Bll No. 69(effctietee 15. 1934): Coopertes wth A .A.
F-F do proIl of code. certifed copy is filed with the Attorney General. ispa. al, In ...n)" anttutIw o iAain Ahrzd ycd.ec ems foddntaa
LA S 13. pecial Sesion. HouseeB133 dill No. 88 (,effe t eMr. 7'. ,934): ,o=pr= wth A,.A.A.


PRODUCTION (FEDERAL. RESERVE BOARD)I
E IMPLOYMENT(BUREAU Or LABOR STATISTICS)
PAYROLLS (BUREAU OF LABOR STAr'nrsIcS)


- ."-'.i . ". .: ::. .


.~ : ..y Vj1.. ~: .~d4 ~ A ~~*)~Aa~M.s.


Depression and Recovery Lumber Dealer


Chart Prepared Exclusively for the Blue Eagle by the Statistical Section of the
DivFinon nf Resenarh and Plannlni


The Speeme itrl .of
the Stale.


Moaum 3500 nud/or Any person bjecl to and nm-
S month per,day. plyi with, Code,r an) selic-
it of he Stete.


In or afecling ital- Violalion Stile Codesa Distrid Atorney in dietrirt Distri CoCrl of Uliah.
lete (Stale Codes misdemeanor. Each where violalion otcrs.
only). day en offense.


I Nol in or affecting in- Mauimum 500 for Any prison nbjecl to and com- Cinil Coarts ofcounties No provison. Bids mo) be rejected Na proiem. Stole has sih an AAA
d 1933. Inlate. etach day. plying with Code.'m attorney mnd Coa osf BRecord when bidders are sllte.
Ctp.S6. 1o commonweno lth of amy of cities having Chn- not complyinf.
pt. 14,1933. county or cidly. cery Jurisdictio.
ISHINGTON: Not in or affecting in- Meaimum 3500 for Any person. etc.. subject to and Suprme Courtl or Ithe No provide. NRA douse required. No provision.
sr UnesioL telaie. each day. coampling with Code; also by Sltel.
e"s 1133. Allorney General or Prose-
i mt 392. coi|Alon.
"AIs. 1934.
ST VIRCINIA: Not in o ffecting in- Masimumn M$500 for Any paseun object to and com- Circuil Courts ot Ihe No pooreisIn. NRA dne required. No preaision.
"..CO'" SaUL fr HonWe Bill tlerlate. each day. plying with Code, uor any prosn- SlILe.
S142. s lpeciasession, Laws e5taling llorne.
1 I4. 14
Fek 24.1934.


Message


Enthusiastic Letter Sent Wit
Code Eagle to Retail Mer.j
bers of Virginia Lumber!i.
,and Building Industry;; .

The following letter of July 16 from.thag
Virginia Lumber and Building Supply Deaiq1
-Association, Inc., Richmond, Va., offlqial.'le.i:
Sministrative agency of Code Authority,'th
Codes of FAir Competition for retailers of
builders supplies and lumber, lumber proad-
ucts, building materials, and building speeciale
ties, as approved by President Roosevelt-.oni
October 3, 1933, in Division No. 25, comprise"
Lug Virginia, was received by the NRA:
"To Retail Dealer: .-
enclosed Is your Code eagle. This is yut0
NRA badge of distinction. It definitely
stamps you as a member of the Rresident
army for industrial recovery. It signifies
yohir .Code compliance. *'.
Your Code eagle is a symbol of impoWb
conditions. To every citizen who sees'ltfi
played it should mean that you are one
those responsible for the vast lmprovemdn
that have been effected during theRooseyil
Administration. .'
The NRA, symbolized by the 'blue eagi
has been responsible for the reemploymentio
4,000,000 peoplle. That means (cons"p
tively assuming each worker has an average
of only two dependents) that 12,000,000..pe;
pie have a little more 'to eat, a little moreA
wear-a little iore to spend for everythiti
and are a lot'better citizens. If we had-"
economic Instrument similar to the seismn
graph used to register the slightest trembir
of the earth, it would obviously register
vast Improvement in the status of a major
of the people in the United States, and in t'
ultimate analysis that is In the' best 1nte4&
of ail. * .. .
"A few features in some of the Codes.(d readily commend themselves to the. c.elt,
who is too frequently prejudiced aii'&iv.il
just as frequently is not familiar with~vei-
thing about that which he critlcizds. If' ,'Syu
critic does not like some given feature a.lii61
your operations, which-you have inaugunite"
pursuant to a Code provision, don't get '"Co
fright", and holler "it's the Code; we h- e
to do it." If its nature Is such that you can.
offer a constructive reason for it, put your
imagination to work.; If the Code is the dronly
thing you can think of, tell your kicker. t is
one of the thousands of steps industries "ared,
taking, to .improve the economic .picture'-64
everybody,. and then weave a construetlvl
Code story for your critic. That will make9i
a better salesman out of you and It may make
a convert out of the scoffer. * ",.
Proudly display your Code eagle i.i41.
prominent position. Comply. with all the piroS
visions of your Code in order that you may'E4
be sure of its retention. Make it an honor
chevron that indicates a fair tradesman',a^
law abiding citizen, who is making a .coh-fl
button to economic and social recovery .i
HARRIS MITCHELL, ..",I
Secretary." '


Code, Steel Joisti

Industry .

Business Developed Frbro
Small Group of Specialists3I
Engineering Organization 4

The National Recovery Administration hai
announced approval of the Code of Fair Coin
petition for the Steel Joist Industry. ..
In his letter to the President the Adminisl6
trator points out that this industry Like the';:S
reinforcing materials fabricating industry':$
has grown up from a group of specIalIsts-'
engineering organizations developing nndK
promoting the use of various types of steel
joints. Its code is drafted along lines aimp-'l1
lar to the latter Industry. While the steel t,
Joint industry is small, the public has gratli.
benefited by Its activities in promoting new4o
products and types of construction. .'-,
Except in the case of executives, super-t,,
visors, and technicians receiving $35 a week&'
or more and those employed on emergency'
work Involving breakdowns or requiring pro-'.A
tection to life and property, employees of the
industry are limited to 40 hours per week::
during one-half of the calendar year, except'.
that during seasonable periods a maximum ofA
-8 hours per week for 6 weeks in any one-'.
half of the calendar year may be permitted."..
But not more ,than 8 hours in any one day, '
or more than 6 days in any one week. Watch- :.1
men are limited to 46 hours a week and der-.'-
cal employees to 40 hours. -.-:;
The order of approval eliminates the wage:'
districts in the Code which range from ,25,
cents to 40 cents in 21 districts and estab!.",
lishes minimum rates of 34 cents in the
South and 40 cents an hour elsewhere. : "'
The order also eliminates the provisions,
whereby the Code could have been terminated 'A;
at the will of 90 percent of the industry. "
The industry for the first 10 months ol.
1933 operated at about 10% percent of the
1929 peak volume when employees numbered X*
approximately 900. The present employment
is about 19 percent of that number, or 172..;
d.I


-1


- I-_- 1- 1 I .- --- -__ I-


I












aborDisputes
erred to In box on page 1, column 2)

The following resume d covers cases involv-
ilabor disputes arising under N.I.R.A.,
ours," wages, control of production, trade
AfMces, jurisdiction and parties, remedies,
-t laws, Codes, and miscellaneous actions
ice. the National Industrial Recovery Act
.came effective:
Zi.CASES UNDER N.RA.
4-I'.LA MODE GARMENT CO. v. IN-
S TERNATIONAL LADIES' GAR-
Y?., MENT WORKERS' UNION, Cir.
g .,Ct, Cook County, Ill., .No. B-272,
.. 112, Aug. 16, 1933. (Fisher, J.)
.. An employer who violates the spirit
'P:' of' the N.I.R.A. by Imposing low
wages, long hours, and sweatshop
t' conditions on his employees, is not
-i entitled to an Injunction to prevent
i" allegedly unlawful picketing as he
Sdoes'not come into court with clean
S"hiands. No employer today can in-
sist that It is his right to bargain
"' 'ifth each of his employees indlvid-
uially for the longest hours and low-
..* eat wages and then turn to the
ilS.." courts for aid when such insistence
brings labor troubles upon him.
5'3"BAYONNE TEXTILE CORP. v.
B AMERICAN FEDERATION OF
SILK WORKERS1 N.J. Ct. of
BS.;K' .Chancery, Oct. 26, 1933. (Heher,

S When a labor.jmunion attempts t
unionize nb'opeu shop by means of
S. threats and intimidatiops, the shop
owner is entitled to a preliminary
,.- injunction against the union. Sec-
: : tion 7 (a) of the N.I.R.A. does not
.: justify such me.thods. (This de-
cision has been' affirmed by the N.J.
".CL of Errors and Appeals. See
I-:A-1.) '-

.jt,, DRAKE BAKERIES, INC., v.
B -BOWLES .-T AL., C.P, Cuya-
:s.4ahoga Co, Ohio; No. 401197, Feb.
; .14, 1934. (McMahon, J.)
1 i.,eWhen an employer is operating
.,i'under a Code, a strike called by
'' ",the anion, w. ksz.in his plant for
''the, purpose ri-"Inducing the em-
i p' loyer to contract to hire only
unionoi workers is an unlawful at-
:' empt to. induce the employer to
-break an existing contract. Such
;,... action will hd strainede.
&S SHERMAN v. ABELES, Sup. Ct,
-'. : NewY aork Co, N.Y,..Jan. 2, 193A.
i;- '.(C6i.," J )' (Appeal pending.)
1.: -Company unions, that seek to cir-
c," eumvent Sectipn 7 (a) are con-
y '. trary to thi N.I.R.A.; where State
S |-. acts supplement the national act
li^-'::".State courts will take jurisdiction;
relief .from Code provisions must be
i; .obtained from the Administration;
.. the Code Is the law; it must be
5: obeyed.
5; J. LICHTMAN & SOkS v. LEATHER
.. WORKERS' INDUSTRIAL
S UNION, Ch. NJ., Dec. 13, 1933.
,-. (Berry,. V.C.)
4W .! Pending fnal hearing, an employer.
.;.. I..Is entitled to a temporary Injunc-
..: tion. restraining picketing by strik-
..I..' ing employees seeking to obtain a
'.. .dosed shop. Such. a strike is
l .::i: "- against public policy, especially in
'. the -light of the facilities for ad-
j ustlng' labor disputes under the
S ,., .1 'NI.R.A. Even peaceable picketing
"i. a 'isunlawful.
R2S KINGS COUNTY HABERDASHERS
-. ASS'N ET AL, v.'RETAIL HAT
,i AND FURNISHINGS SALES-
-.;,MEN'S UNION, N.Y. Sup. Ct.,
t, Kings Co, Jan. 10, 1934. (Ben-
..g. .e, J.) J.)
-. A labor union may spread the gos-
.fI'..'pel of unionism and picket the
"., places. of; business, of recalcitrant
et4?,p:.eiployers.' Tli% N.I.R.A. does not
c..-. crtall the rights previously en-
.* "" jded h labor; on the contrary, It
S strengthens them by stripping in-
S dustry of the company union and
the open shop.
,' BUCKINGHAM CAFETERIA, INC,
.- v. MESERVISH, Sup. Ct., New
1.' York, N.Y., Sept. 22, 1933. (Mc-
* Geehan, J.) .
S The N.I.R.A. does not prohibit
j.. workers from agitating peaceably
for a closed shop. Where no act
[;.. '." of violence has been committed a
union will .ot be ..restrained in Its
L;:,.::, effort to unionhize plaintiff's em-
: ployees.
S. BERNSTEIN v. RETAIL CLEAN-
if ERS' AND TAILORS' ASS'N,
.; C.P, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, Feb. 19,
S. 1934. (Harris, J.)
The Regional Code Authority for
i-; "Dry Cleaning Industry in Cleveland
., picketed plaintiff's establishment,
-v?, claiming he was .a Code violator.
', The court stated the picketing was
^. legal, as persons may be peacefully
;*...:. Invited not to patronize plaintiff,
..'. and the public might be thus In-
formed that plaintiff was violating
i: :''": :ithe Code. .. .-


The Code


* 0
*


-Advertisement from
The Inland Printer, August 1934


Your Plant-Our Plant

There exists quite a difference of opinion as to what the Code will or will not do.
It is our hope and belief that with the help of the NRA the printing industry will be
able to do away with most of the evils it has had with it before and during the depres-
sion. This hope prompted us to sign the President's Blanket Code last year, and we
havelone everything in our power to enforce it in our plant. We have worked con-
scientiously with our trade associations to prepare the way for the new Code anld
feel thai much constructive work has already been accomplished.
When we pause to inquire what it was that made the idea of the "New Deal"
so attractive to many, we can find the answer in the very meaning of its title "The
New Deal." It means what its name implies, a new kind of deal for everyone in the
industrial world. To us, the typesetters (a part of a service group of our industry)
it brought about the burying of old war hatchets, by turning over a new leaf and
meeting our customers and competitors on new grounds. The keynote was confidence
and trust. There is still competition and rivalry, but it is a clean-cut competition.
that is encountered now, a spirit of live and let live. Everyone subscribing to the new
practices set up has been benefited by it, and not in the least our customers. We
have unified our trade customs in regard to metal and credit, and a system of esti-
mate flung has led to the abolition of guesstimatingg" and its attending losses not
only to ourselves but our customers as well. They can be satisfied now of an even'
break, they do not have to fear the possibility of competitors receiving special favors
which could be used as a competitive weapon.
As in the case of many other governmental regulations, the advent of the Code
has raised the fear that from now on there will be no individuality, no possibility of
meeting special circumstances, no necessity and no use for personal relationship.
SThe Code is regarded as an impersonal thing, prescribing rules and regulations for
every contingency---and so it does.
But apart from all this, we maintain that the Code is much more than a new
law. We like to consider it mainly in the spirit of a new deal, and without wishing to
ever violate the letter of the law, we intend to consider the spirit behind it as para-
mount. To us it is'far from impersonal, it is on the contrary the most important,
persona] experience touching our private and business lives more closely than any
law ever has. We shall endeavor. to interpret all its many paragraphs in this
manner, and wish to assure our friends that our dealings, as before, will be per-
meated with the spirit of helpfulness and friendliness that has been the keynote of
this firm's policies since it was founded.
We shall not use the Code as a wall behind which to hide in selfishness, avarice,
and greed. Our firm has gone forward by leaps and bounds, and we attribute this
growth directly to our attitude of personal interestedness in the problems of our
friends. To us the Code is not just a set of cut and dried rules but a living means
to advance our personalities and the resources of our firm to the best advantage of
our customers.
Under the Code, more than ever before, we wish you to think of us not merely
as a place where composition and type is sold at so much per thousand ems or per
pound, but as of a plIce where all your problems will ever find a sympathetic under-
standing, friendly help and personal cooperation. As we have asked you in'the past
to consider our organization, equipment, and personnel as part of your own, wq now
wish to add 'the desire'to be regarded as your most considerate partners in your
business enterprise.


What is a Complaint?
(Continued from page 2)

meant. Legal action against Code violators
may be taken in one of two ways. The case
may be referred to the Department of Justice
for institution of either criminal prosecution
or injunction proceedings. This action is
taken through the litigation division of NRA,
which acts in cooperatlon' with the Depart-
ment of Justice. As an alternative the case
'may be referred to the Federal Trade Com-
mission with the request that that body issue
Sa. "cease and desist order ", which is similar
to an injunction.

Referred to U.S. District Attorney
While the normal course of P tion on un-
adjusted complaints Is as stated above, it is
not necessary for cases to come to Washington

Later plaintiff was enjoined from
charging less than code prices and,
'on violating the order, was fined
$50 with c9sts and ordered to jail
until same was paid. (State v.
Bernstein, Common Pleas Ct., Cleve-
land, Ohio, Apr. 1934.)
9 FULLER CLEANING & DYEING
CO. v. MORRIS BROCKNER ET
AL., C.P., Cuykhoga Co., Ohio,
No. 405091, Apr. 24, 1934. (Sil-
bert, J.)
The Fuller Company discharged one
Myers for representing the com-
pany's workmen In requesting a
wage Increase. Myers appealed to
the board set up under the Cleaning
and Dyeing Code, to handle such
matters, and on the company's re-
fusal to appear at Its hearing the
board ordered the employee rein-
stated. The company refused,
whereupon the Presser Union pro-
ceeded to picket the company's
plant. In a suit to enjoin this
picketing the court held that the
N.I.R.A. was justified In view of
economic conditions; the law takes
moral and social as well as legal
S features into consideration: the
plaintiff failed to exhaust his ad-
ministrative remedies by refusing
to appear before the board; a party
who accepts the benefits to be de-
rived from a code must also accept
the detriments.


in order that legal proceedings may be insti-
tuted. The State NRA compliance directors
are authorized to refer cases directly to the
United States District Attorney when they
have evidence of a deliberate violation which
Sthe respondent shows no intention of correct-
ing. 'Code Authorities may also refer cases
to the district attorneys through the office
of the appropriate State NRA compliance
director. This procedure makes it possible
to avoid a bottle-neck" in Washington on
cases which require no further administra-
tive action.
Field Organization of Compliance
Division -
The field organization of the Compliance
Division was conceived at least in part as a
temporary organization. It is the desire of
NRA that complaints of code violations be
Investigated and adjusted as fMr as possible
by industry itself in order to carry out to
the fullest extent the idea of industrial self-
government. At the time of the passage of
the National Industrial Recovery Act, trade
associations and other cooperative Industrial
organizations were not equipped to do this
type of work. The governmental compliance
organization was therefore set up to handle
complaints until industry Is fully equipped
to do so. Complianc field organization, sup-
plements Industrial organization by provid-
ing facilities of investigation In areas which
industry Is not able to cover. Whble Code
Authorities may attempt to adjust complaints
which are filed with them voluntarily by the
complainant, they are not regarded as com-
pletely set up to handle complaints until
they have been "officially authorized" by
NRA to do so. In order to obtain official
authorization, a Code Authority musk set up
an organization for handling complaints
which will insure adequate and rapid han-
dling of complaints and must submit to NRA
a detailed statement of procedure which will
provide a treatment of non-compliance prob-
lems equitable to all parties concerned.

Procedure of Code Authority
Complaints of Code violations handled by
Code" Authorities are treated in a manner
similar to those handled by field offices of
the NRA Compliance Division. The pro-
cedure under which the Code Authority op-
erates will provide such necessary variations
as the character or geographical distribution
of the industry may make necessary. Cases
which Code Authorities are unable to adjust
are referred to the Compliance Division in
Washington for further action in the same


:t
'4


2 : ;..;.". i. .. ,:.. .. -,r j .


State

1. Alabama.-------.---------
2. Arizona--------------------
8. Arkansas.------.-----------
California:
4. San Francisco office.----.-
6. Los Angeles office...-----
6. Colorado.--...------------
7. Connecticut...'..-------
8. Delaware-------..----------
9. Florida..... ...............
10. Georgia---------...............
11. Idaho----....-------------
12. Illinois........------.........
13. Indiana-.. --------------.............
14. Iowa--- ...............-------
16. Kansas.-- ---.. ----------
16. Kentucky--------------
17. Louisiana---------
18. Maine..-----................
19. Maryland...............-------
20. Massachusetta-----------..........
21. Michigan ----- ------------
22. Mississippi-L.......-- -------
23. Minnesota-------------
24. Missouri..-- ....----.......
26. Montana ----------..............
26. Nebraska ----. ---
27. Nevada...... .------
28. New Hampshire-...----..---
29. New Jersey--...."'-..--- --
30. New Mexico..---..........--
31. New York.t---- ----
32. Albany office ... ......
33. Buffalo office.--..- -------
34. North Carolina-----..----
35. North Dakota............-----
36. Ohio........---- .........----
37. Oklahoma-. ............---
38. Oregon........... .............
39. Pennsylvania.................
40. Pittsburgh office---.----.
41. Rhode Island... -- --
42. South Oarollna...----........
43. South Dakota.-....---.....
44. Tennessee -----------.............
Te.aq:
45. Houston office-.....--------
46. Dallas office.................
47. Utah..........................
48. Vermont---.....----...--.....
49. Virginia --..-------..
50. Weshinpgon-....---........-
61. West Virginia-----------
62. Wisconsin...................
63. Wyoming.....................-------
54. District of Columbia.---.
TOTAI, AL onICPES.........


Num-
ber of
em-
ploy-
eas
20
1

II
27
5
as
38
5
7
82
0
164
46
53
21
26
16
1
220
93
26
0
88
61
1
27
0.
5
113
1
282
2
67
77
14
1,008
47
16
244
362
7
66
4
33
221
74
2
0
74
148
35
17
0
8
3S-67


Amount of
Restita-
tion

$514.24
28.70
57.99
491.07
807.97
236.99
700. 79
93.99
347.85
1, 684.19
0
2,222.16
670.87
1,398. s
994.45
871.98
1,022.965
8.00

&O
4,109.20
1,697.26
971. 2.
0
2.02L.61
1,982.655
1.28
709.59
0
137.09
84561.1
13.40
2,943.15
39.90
1,637.51
877.73
887.61
15,222 52
1,329.83
515.52
3,123.10
8.829.44
161.24
713.18
66.50
793.63
6,701.18
1,317.96
800
0 1
1,285,80
1,317.05,
2.437.02
360.77
0
210.65
$75,393.93


Editorial
"NRA has made a Nation realize .that
prosperity of a nation depends upon the
well-being of its workers. It has taught in-
dustry that it has obligations to labor."-
Orapeland (Teax.) Messenger.


manner as unadjusted cases coming from
State NRA compliance directors. If either
the complainant or the respondent is dis-
satisfied with the decision of an industrial
agency, he may appeal to a higher agency in
the industry or to NRA itself. In any case
in which the complainant feels that his own
Interest or the public interest require gov-
ernmental rather than an industrial investi-
gation .pf the complaint, he has the right to
file his complaint directly with NRA, either
in Washington or with his State NRA com-
pliance director.
A large number of Code Authorities are
now being qualified for handling trade-prac-
tic complaints: that is, complaints made by
one member of the Industry or trade against
another. In a number of cases the procedure
is also being worked out covering the han-
dling of complaints of members of one in-
dustry against members of another. These
may be competing Industries or industries
which are functionally allied. An example
of the latter'case which may be cited is the
arbitration procedure which is being worked
out by the. Dress Manufacturing Code An-.
thorlty and the National Retail Code Author-
Ity for the handling of cases involving mer-
chnndlse returns by retailers to the manufac-
turer.
A number of industries hnve also set up
machinery for the adjustment of labor corn-
plaints nnd of'problems of employer-employee
relationship. In these cases, before NRA,
will give Its approval to the handling of
these matters by an Industrial agency, it
must be satisfied that the interest of em-f
ployees in the industry are adequately safe-':
guarded.




A... .:.. .:. ... :., .. *,i...,. t'^;


MoreBackWages


for Workers


State NRA Directors Adjust

928 Complaints Affecting

3,867 Employees in Two

Weeks' Period


Adjustment by State NRA directors of
some 928 complaints during the 2 weeks'
period ended August 4, netted 3.867 workers
throughout the country a total of $75,394 In
back wages,'according to a report of NRA's
compliance division.
A similar report for the.2 weeks ended
July 21 showed the restitution of $106,733 to
4,300 workers affected by the adjustments of
990 complaints by State directors-bringing
the total of restitutions made during the 4
weeks to $182,127, in 1,918 cases satisfactorily
settled by State directors on the spot and
without reference to Wayshington.
The detailed report of the NRA compliance
division for the last 2 weeks' period, showing
by States the number of cases adjusted, the
number of employees affected, and the amount
of restitution made, follows:


I
'5-














A ADMINISTRATIVE


ORDERS...


% OFFICIAL ORDERS OF NRA ^

The Blue Eagle prints in each issue administrative orders, inter-

pretations, appointments, and by-laws' approved by the Adminis-

trator. Texts of amendments, approved and summarized, herein, are
Available upon request through the NRA printing and publications
division.
{.;,* ____' __________


AUTOMOBILE MFG.
:.: 'ORDER
CODE OFI FAR COMPETITION FOR THE
.,WTOlMOBLE MANUFACTUR ING INDUS-

, ORDER NO. 17-S8
e Qriting application of the Nationall Automobile
SChamber of Commerce, fot an exemption from
the provisions of Article 1III.
S'WHEREAS, an application has been made by the
"above-named applicant for an exemption from the
povtisionsa of Article III of the Code of Fair Com-
,etition for the Automobile Manufacturing in-
ustry. and
WBkEREIAS, the Deputy Administrator has re-
ported and it appears to my satisfaction, that the
exemption bereinafter granted Is necessary and wil
.tend to effectuate the policies of Title 1 of the
National Industrial Recovery Act;
NOW' THEREFORE, pursuant to authority
"-vited In me, it Is hereby ordered that the above
"referred to application be granted and that the
SChrysler Corporation (Newcastle, Indiana) be and
Shereby is exempted from the said provisions of said
E Code'in the following particulars:
"That forty-four (44) die sinkers and twenty-
;five (25) toolmakers employed by said Chrysler
Corporation at Newcastle, Indiana, shall be per-
,mitted to work not more than forty-two (42) hours
per week for a period of three (3) weeks com-
I'. menacing June 15, 1934, provided that the average
time worked i by the employees hereby exempted
shall not exceed thirty-five (35) hours per week
for the full period of the life of this Code."
'C. E. ADAMS,
-" Division Admidnistrator.
; Order recommended:
D. EVEEaTT,
Assistant Deputy Aldtministrator.
Actingfor: K. J. AMu M.iAN,,
. Deputy Administrator.
S. July 8, 193j.


, BUSINESS FURNITURE,
STORAGE EQUIPMENT,

AND FILING SUPPLY
,." ... SS-14
'. .,ORDER
C''ODE OF FAIR COMPETITION FOR THE
.;..BUSINESS FURNITURE, STORAGE EQUIP-
":,MENT AND FILING SUPPLY INDUSTRY
'cApproval of Application of thd National Emer-
Sancy Committee of the Business Furniture,
S' storage Equipment and Filing Supply Industry,
for an exemption from the Provisions of Article
Y V, Section a, and Article VI of the various DIvi-
t. sflosal Supplemental Codes, Exhibits C.
An application having been duly made by the
SNational Emergency Committee of the Business
IFurniture, Storage Equipment and Filing Supply
S.ndustry for an Exemption from the Provisions
of Article V, Section a, and Article VI of Exhibits
",' of the Code of Fair Competition for the Busl-
C ea Furnulture, Storage Equipment and Filing
SSupply Industry to the extent only that when ap-
piled to purchases by the Procurement Division
'..of the United States maximum quantity discounts
Sbe permitted regardless of quantity Involved in
S..any one order, and the Division Administrator
Shaving recommended, and it appearing that Justice
requiress. that said application be granted to the
: extent hereinafter stated,-
'; 'NOW THEREFORE, I, Hugh S. Johnson, Ad-
f,. rlnlstrator for Industrial Recovery, pursuant to
Authority vested In me, do hereby
: ORDER, that said Application for exemption be
Sand the same Is hereby granted Insofar as the
provisions above referred to In any wise affect the
purchases and contracts by the Procurement Dlvi-
idon of the United States Government with any
S-'member of the Industry.
'Administrative Order No. 88-7, dated June 8,
1934, entitled "Approval of Application of the
SSteel Office Furniture Division of the Business
SFurniture, Storage Equipment- sand FIling Supply
SIdustry,, for an Exemption from the Pr'ovisions
Sot Article V. Section (al and Article VI, of the
..Divisional Supplemental Code for the Steel Office
.FurnIlture Industry-Exhlbit C" is hereby re-
Sscilnded.
"- HUGH S. JOHNSON,
Administrator for IndustrLal Recovery.
SApproval recommended:
S C.. ADaMS,
S Division Administrator.
i *-asingto, D.C,
' i u l e Ai 4 .


A CORRUGATED AND SOLID

FIBRE SHIPPING

V, CONTAINER
: 245-7
ORDER
CODIII OF FAIR COMPETITION FOR THE
S CORRUGATED AND SOLID FIBRE SHIP-
PING CONTAINER INDUSTRY
Denying Application for a Stay of the Provisions
S /of Article IV, Sections 1 (a) and 4 ia)
W- RBEAil an application has been made by
: engel Company of Louisvile. Kentucky, Balti-
ar Paper Box Company of Baltimore, Maryland,
SEastern. Box Company of Baltimore, Marvyland,
Mant 7arYland Container Company of Baltimore,
Masland for a stay of the operation of the pro-
visons o0 Article IV, Sections 1 la) and 4 (a)
:of the Code of Fair Competition for the Corru-
l Sed and Solid Fibre Shipping Container Indus-
C andrdhsbe
ILIWHEREAS opportunity to be heard has been
dil afforded to all Interested parties and the
S at a111t Deputy Administrator has reported, and
I. rears ".to my satisfaction, that the stay ap-
Spim' for Is not necessary and will not tend to
soffctuate the policies of Title I of the National Re-
"v:lOery Act;
W TMEREFOR pursuant to authority
gt. W*0, THEREFORE, pursuant to authority


vested in me, it Is hereby ordered that said ap-
plication be, and it is hereby denied.
HUGH S JOHNSON,
Administrator for Industrial Recovery.
By G. A. LYNCH,
Admniistrative Officer.
Order 'recommended
GEo. L. BEsaY,
Division Adminiatrator.
JOaN J. ROBINSON,
Legal Divitsion.
B. M. GATES,
Labor Advisory Board.
July 7, 1984.

DRAPERY AND UPHOL-
STERY TRIMMING
ORDER
CODE OF FAIR COMPETITION FOR THE
DRAPERY AND UPHOLSTERY TRIM-
MING INDUSTRY
ORDER NO. 212-14
EXTENSION OF THE CODE FiOR A PERIOD
OF THREE MONTHS
WHEREAS Article XI of the Code of Fair Com-
petition for the Drapery and Upholstery Trimming
Industry states:
"This Code shall become effective on the tenth
day aLfter date. It shall continue in effect for a
period of six (6) months after such effective date.
his time may be further extended or shortened
upon application of the Code Authority approved
by the Administrator."
and
WHEREAS, this Code became effective on Janu-
ary 26 1934, and continues in effect only until
July 26, 1934 ; and
WHEREAS, the Code Authority having made ap-
plication for the extension of this Code in accord-
ance with said Article:
NOW, THEREFORE. I Hugh S. Johnson, Ad-
ministrator for Industrial Recovery, pursuant to
authority vested in by Executive Orders of the
President, including Executive Order No. 6543-A,
dated December 30, 1938, and otherwise; do find
that the extension,of said Code will promote the
policy and purposes of Title I of the National In-
ustrial Recovery Act; and do hereby order that
said Code of Fair Competition be and it Is hereby
extended for a period of three (8) months from
July .26, 1984, provided, however, .that-a public
bearing may be called during this period to con-
sider combining this Code with a related Cede of
Fair CompetiUon.
HUGH S. JOHNSON,
Administrator for Indusatrial Recovery.
Approval recommended:
ROBEnRT L. HOUSTON,
Divtsion Administrator.
Washington. D.C.,
July 5s, 934.

ELECTRIC STORAGE AND
WET PRIMARY BATTERY
40-7 (Amend. No. 1)
ORDER
AMENDMENT TO CODE OF FAIR COMPE-
TITION FOR THE ELECTRIC STORAGE
AND WVET PRIMARY BATTERY INDUS-
TRY
An application having been duly made pursuant
to and In full compliance with the provision of
Title I of tbe National Industrial Recovery Act,
approved June 16, 1933. for approval of an amend-
ment to the Code of Fair Competition for the
Electric Storage and Wet Primary Battery Indus-
try la copy of said amendment is attached hereto
and denominated Exhibit "A"), and as contained
in a Published Notice of Opportunity to be Heard,
Administrative Order No. 40-5, dated June 27,
1934. and no objections having been filed as pro-
vided In said Published Notice, and the annexed
report on said amendment containing findings
with respect thereto, having been made and
directed to the President:
NOW THEREFORE on behalf of the .Presient
of the bUnited States, I, Hugh S. Johnson, A4min-
istrator for Industrial Recovery pursuant to au-
thority vested in me" by Executive Orders of the
President, including Executive Order 6543-A,
dated December 30, 1933, and otherwise, do hereby
incorporate, by reference, said annexed report and
do find that said amendment and the Code as con-
stituted after being amended comply In all re-
spects with the pertinent provisions and will pro-
mote tbe policy and purposes of said .Tile of said
Act, and do hereby order that said amendment be
and it is hereby approved, and that the previous
approval of said Code Is hereby amended to in-
clude an approval of said Code In Its entirety as
amended, such approval and such amendment to
take effect ten (101 days from the date hereof,
unless good cause to the contrary Is shown to the
Administrator before that time and the Adminis-
trator Issues a subsequent order to that effect.
HUGH S. JOHNSON,
Administrator for Industrial Recovery.
Approval recommended :
C. E ADAMS,
Div|,lon Atdmlnistrator.
Washington. ID.C.,
July 27, 193.

FABRICATED METAL PROD-
UCTS MANUFACTURING
AND METAL FINISHING
AND METAL COATING
No. 84--84
ORDER
CODE FOR FAIR COMPETITION FOR THE
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS MANU-
FACTURING AND METAL FINISHING
AND METAL COATING INDUSTRY
Approval of Termniation of Exemption
W.HIEREAS an application having been duly
made by the Code Authority for the Fabricated
Metal Products Manufacturing and Metal Finish-
ing and Metal Coating Industry for an exception
from the exemption conferred In paragraph 8 of


Administrative Order X-36, dated May 26, 1934
whereby such exemption would be terminated, and
WHIREAS opportunity to be heard having been
afforded all members of said Industry and any ob-
jections filed having been duly considered, and
WHEREAS It further appearing that termrains.
tion of said exemption is merited and will effectu-
ate the policy and provisions of the Act
NOW, THEREF ORI, pursuant to authority
vested in me, It is hereby ordered, subject to any
pertinent rules and regulations issued by the Ad-
ministrator that any exemption conferred by para-
graph 8 b of Administrative Order X-36 dated May
26, 1934, upon any member of this Industry be
and it is hereby terminated and that the Code
Authority for the Fabricated Metal Products Menu-
facturing and Metal Finishing and Metal Coating
Industry Is authorized to collect contributions
from all members of the Industry who manufacture
products of the Industry for sale as such, In pro-
portion to the dollar volume of sales of said prod-
ucts or such other equitable method of assessment
as may be approved by the Administrator, even
though said members of such Industry are operat-
ing the major part of their business under one
or more additional Codes.
HUGH S. JOHNSON,
Administrator for Industrial, Recovenry.
"By BAaox W. MunaA, '
Division Administrator.
' Approval recommended.
H. fRmnI8 WEITm,
Ao Deputy Administrator.
Washington, D.C.,
July 19, s4.

FIRE EXTINGUISHING
APPLIANCE MFG.
98-8 (Amend. No. 1)
ORDER
APPROVING AMENDMENT TO CODE OF
FAIRn COMPETITION FOR THE FIRE EX-
TINGUISHXING APPLIANCE MANUFAC-
TURING INDUSTRY
An application having been duly made pursuant
to and In full compliance with. the provisions of
Title I of the National Industrial Recovery Act,
approved June 16, 1933 for approval of an amend-
ment to a Code of Fair Competition for the Fire
Extinguishing Appliance Manufacturing Industry
and hearings having been duly held thereon and
the annexed report on said amendment, containing
findings with respect thereto, having been made
and directed to the President:
NOW, THEREFORE, on behalf of the President
of the United States I, Hugh S. Johnson, Ad-
ministrator for Industrial Recovery, pursuant to
authority vested in me by Executive Orders of the
President, Including Executive Order No. 6543-A,
dated December 80, 1933. and otherwise; do hereby
incorporate, by reference, said annexed report and
do find that said amendment and the Code as con-
stituted after being amended comply in all respects
with the pertinent provisions and will promote the
policy and purposes of said Title of said Act, and
do hereby order that sald amendment be and it is
hereby approved, and that the previous approval
of said Code Is hereby modified to include an ap-
proval of said Code In its entirety as amended,
such approval and such amendment to take effect
10 days from the date hereof, unless good cause
to the contrary Is shown to the Administrator be-
fore that time and the Administrator issues a sub-
sequent ordeCg tof that. effect.
H'UGH S: JOHNSON,
Administrator for Inlduatral Recovery.
Approval recommended:
C. H. EADAMS,
Division Administrotor.
Washington, D.C.,
July 217, 1984.

FUNERAL SERVICE
384-6 (Amend. No. 1)
ORDER
APPROVING AMENDMENT OF CODE, OF
FAIR COMPETITION FOR THE FU-
NERAL SERVICE INDUSTRY
An application having been duly made pursuant
to and in full compliance with, the provisions of
Title I of the National Industrial Recovery Act,
approved June 16 1933,for approval of an amend-
ment to a Code of Fair Competition for the
Funeral Service Industry and opportunity to be
heard having been duly given thereon and the an-
nexed report an said amendment, containing find-
ings with respect thereto, having been made and
directed to the President:
NOW, THEREFORIE, on behalf of the President
of the United States, I, Hugh S. Johnson Ad-
ministrator for industrial Recovery, pursuant to
authority vested in me by.Executive. Orders of the
President, Including Executive Order No. 6543-A,
dated December 30, 1933, and otherwise; do hereby
Incorporate, by reference, said annexed report and
do find that said amendment and the Code as con-
stituted after being amended comply In all respects
with the pertinent provisions and will promote the
policy and purposes of said Title of said Act, and
do hereby order that said amendment be and It Is
hereby approved and that the previous approval
of said Code is hereby modified to Include an ap-
proval of said Code In its entirety as amended.
HUGH S. JOHNSON,
Administrator for Indusltrf. Recovery.
Approval recommended:
GEO. L. BEnty,
Ditvi-ion Administrator.
Wasbington, D.C.,
Jully 4, 198t.
384-7 (Amend. No. 2)
ORDER
MODIFICATION OF% APPROVAL.. OF CODE
OF FAIR COMPETITION IOR THE
FUNERAL SERVICE INDUSTRY
An application having been duly made pursuant
to and In full compliance with the provisions of
Title I of the National Industrial Recovery Act,
approved June 16, 1938, for a modldcarion of my
Order of approval, dated April 4 1934 of the
Code of Fair Competition for the Funeral Service
Industry, and It having been shown that said ap-
plication should be granted and that said Order
should be modified:
NOW, THEREFORE, on behalf of the President
of the United States. I. Hugh S. Johnson. Admin-
istrator for Industrial Recovery, pursuant to the
authority rested in me by Executive Orders of the
President includlne Executive Order No. 6543-A,
dated December 30, 1933, and otherwise I do hereby
modify my Order of approval of the Code of Fair
Competition for the Funeral Service Industry,
dated April 4, 1934, In the following particular:
The last paragraph of said Order of approval,
dated April 4 1934, In the following particular:
to read as follows:
1" Provided, however, that nothing contained in
this section shall supersede any State law which
by Its terms expressly authorizes a member of ibis
Industry to organize, promote, participate in and
operate a form of enterprise prohibited herein."
HUGH S. JOHNSON,
Adnministrator for Induatrial Recovery.
Approval recommended:
GEO. L. BEaBrY,
,Division Administrator.
Washington, D.C.,
July. 5, 19M4.


FUR DRESSING AND FUR- ':
DYEING
161-20 (Amend. No...8"
ORDER ..:-
APPROVING MODIFICATIONS TO :TH1Bi
CODE OP FA, R COMPETITION FOR TB[
PFUR DRESSING AND FUR DYEING IN--.
DUSTRY .7'.i
An application having been duly made pursuant.
to and In full compliance with the provisions ,O3
Title I of the National Industrial Recovery Act,
approved June 16, 1933, for approval of modifca'
tlions to a Code of Fair Competition for the ,wu.
Dressing and Fur Dyeing ladustry, and hearing.
having been duly held thereon and the annexeau
report on said modifications, containing findings
with respect thereto, having been made .and.1
directed to the President:
NOW THEREFORE on behalf of thePresident.
of the United States. I. Hugh S. Johnson, Admln-'
Istrator for Industrial Recovery, pursuant to au.
thorlty vested In me by Executive Orders of thb:
President, including Executive Order No. 6543--3
dated December 80 1983, and otherwise; .do herebyi
Incorporate, by reference, said annexed.L reporta.'
do find that said modfications-and the Cqde. q
constituted after being modified cbmplyln allK.:.
epectse with the pertinent provisions and ,wlllp
mote the policy and purposes of said Title of's
Act, and do hereby order that said modlcaibn.
be end they are hereby approved and that.i
previous approval of ald Code is heribytmted
to Include an approal of said Code in bI odt&il
as modified. .
HUGH S. JOHNSON, "-
Adm4nistrator for Industrial Recveyi.
Approval recommended:-" '
GEO. L. Basr,
Division Administrator. ,".
Washington, D.C., ""'
July 5, 19 4 i


FURNITURE MFG..3
.145-iT|t
ORDER ...
CODE OF FAIB COMPETITION FOR T'
FURNITURE MANUFACTURING 0 INDUS,.
TRY
ORDER TERMINATING STAY '';-
Terminating a Stay of the Provisions of tc4
III, rV and V.as applicable to certain emplo ye,
or contract workers engaged in the weavingbiy
hand of chair seats and backs made of .ca.'a
rattan and other- materials, when the woi k a
done In the homes of such employees or con-
tract workers.' "
WHEREAS, the provisions of Articlese II, -.,
and V of the above Code as applied to certain eni.-
Sployees or contract workers engaged In the we.'-a.
Ing by hand of chair sears and backs made of' anq
rattan and other materials when the work is do
in the homes of such employees or contract work'
era, have been stayed by my Order of January 12,t
1934, and a Public Hearing thereon has been hleld"
on March 19, 1934; "."
NOW, THEREFORE, pursuant to authority-
vested in me. I hereby order that the above granted,'
Stay be hereby terminated, such termination,,how-'7
ever, not to become effective until Auguat' 20, 1984;..,
so as to give me Opportunity to cpnslder all peti;-
tions for Exemption from Articles Ill. IV and-:V,,
of the above Code as applied to such employees "o'".
contract workers, that may be presented by.metnS.1
bars of this Industry receiving the benefits of ,the0
above Stay. .'
HUGH S. JOHNSON. -.'.
Administrator for Industrial Recovery; 'Y'ij.
Approval recommended: 'i_
BARTON W. MusAy. '..I
Divion Administrator. -' '
July27, 1934. ,,- i


HAWAIIAN INDUSTRIES'.:!
ORDER ,. i':
STAYING ORDER OV JULY 2, 1934,,SO-F.I'A
AS CERTAIN HAWAIIAN INDU STRI]S:B
ARE AFFECTED :4:
ADMINISTRATIVE ORDER NO. 446-4 .
AND 152-8 ,..
A petition having been filed with me on behalf
of the Pineapple Producers Cooperative Assocla.j
lIon of- Hawaii and the Canning Code Authobt
for an exemption of the HawaiUan Canning Indtifs'
try from Administrative Order No. X-60 date".f
July 2, 1934, and a petition having been hied byW
the Board of Governors of tbe Can Manufacture-a'
Industry on behalf of that industry asking tha.'
the aforesaid Administrative Order be stayed t
far as the Hawaiian members of the Industry,.areq
affected thereby; and "
WHEREAS, it appears from the petition an'.d
the report of the Deputy Administrator that die'
Pineapple Producers Cooperative Association ofi
Hawai is truly representative of the Pineapple
canning Industry, in the territory, representing 0ea'1
of the Island Pineapple canning Industry, and:.It
also appearing that such members of the canningg;
industry are satisfied to.remaln and operate under'%.
the Code of Fair Competition for the canning 'In-.'
dustry heretofore approved on May 29. 1934;
AND, WHEREAS, it also appears that the men-'4
ber of the Can Manufacturers Industry located In."
the Territory Is satisfied to remain upder and.to
operate under the Code of Fair, Competition f..fbl
the Can Manufacturers Industry approved on'De "
cember 15 1933; ; "
NOW, THEREFORE being satisfied that where'.
the above mentioned situation erJxists in an indus-.'.
try competitive with such industry on the mainh.
land that Administrative Order No. X-60 houId,;
be stayed, It Is hereby ORDERED, pursuant, to
authority vested In me by Executive Orders of the
President of the United States, including Exeon'-
tive Order No. 8543-A, dated December 30, 1988,
that:
Administrative Order No. X-60 be and the same.
Is hereby stayed pending my further order so far.:,;
as all persons engaged in tbe canning of pine-'.;
apple In the Territory, who were but for the aforear.
said Order subject to the Code of Fair Compe.
titlon for the Canning Industry, are concerned;. '
And that the said Order be and the same 1i.s
hereby stayed pending m further order so far as'i
all persons engaged in the manufacture of carlm%,
in the Territory, who but for said Order were:
subject to the Code of Fair Competition for th..'
Can Manufacturers, are concerned. '".:
Provided, however, that the above ordered stays.;:
are subject to the action taken upon the recotm-.r,
mendations of the Deputy Administrator fli:.'A
Hawaii after a public hearing to determine',
whether the wages paid on July 15i, 1929, the,;.
minimum wage now prescribed in the reapecti@'-
Codes, Is the proper minimum. .;
HUGH S. JOHNSON,.
Adm4instrator for Industrial Reooery.:
Approval recommended : .4
LItTON M. CObLtNS, -'
Acting DtvtIsIton Administrator. ,
Washington, D.C.,
July u, 19m4..
(Continued on pate 6, column I) 1)


. .. .. .. ... . .,'i ., ii .-


I .








.,. - .* E. DL U L LF.U" .- '.: .EUa. .





\DMINtSTRATIVE ORDERS-Continued ]


: (Continued from pae 5)
ICE
ADDMINISTRATIVE ORDER NO. 48-30
IODE, OF' fAIR COMPETITION FOR THE
:'' ICE INDUSTRY
.Delaratlon of an emergency within the com-
etUtlive area consisting of Baear County. Texas,
E la'ncludInag the city of San Antonio, Texas, and
,i tablishment of minimum prices, etc.
"wHE MEAS, Article XII of the' Code of Fair
iompetitilon for the lee Industry as amended pro-
I vldeInart as-follows:
.When the Administrator, upon the recom-
undatflon of the Code Authority or any other
Hterested party, shall find that an emergency
.t within any competitive area and that the
ase thereof is that the prices, at which natural
tiarifllcal ice is being sold therein, have been
u -ede.through destructive price cutting, due to
alive over-production Increased supply, or for
f11.fother reason, to such extent as to render in-
ectlve the labor or other provisions of this
"d'-'or seriously endahger the maintenance there-
Cif'tbe Administrator may in such emergency
etercse the; following temporary and restricted
medal measures:
H "P He may establish a schedule of minimum prices
rqtziaturai and artificial Ice. based upon tile lowest
.eaonable cost of a representative operation lo-
cted within such competitive area as may be
elected by the'Code Authority or as shall other-
ls' be determined by the, Administrator to be a
-esentative operation, and direct that for a defi-
1I".erlod of time and within the competitive
i denned and designated by him, no member of
ice industry shaleUsell or offer to sell any lee In
qihto.such area, at a price or prices lower than
'..tabhibed by o uch schedule.
.'B8. The original order or orders of the Admin-
strator, -making effective the intent of this Article,
-hall include he date upon which such order, or
o ders shali become effective, and shall designate
Date by which a schedule of prices shall be filed
B 4d.*'posted with the appropriate Committee of
rghltration and Appeal and with the Code Author-
fy..,by each memberof the Industry selling Ice .-in
i;'nto the affected competitive area. and there.-
lffer, :for such' period ofr time as maybe ordered
.'.h-theAdministrator, no member of the Industry
salUsell or offer to sell Ice In or into such com_
petitive area at a price or prices lower than those
'prescriabed by the Administrator for such area,
wthout first obtaining his approval."
'.WWHlBREAS, pursuant to my Order of .May 11,
9iB (Adminstrative. Qrder No. 43-5) a public
H g was held on May 28, 1934. in the city of
Sani'Antonio, Texas, for the purpose of determin-
g1',-&.aschedule of minimum prices for tbe sale of
cein 'or into the competitive area selected and
etermlned in accordance with said Code and Order
s-'consisting of Bexar County, Texas, including
ciety of San Antonio, Texas.
NOW, THE1R FORE, 1. Hugh S. Johnson. Ad-
ilstitor for. Industrial Recovery, pursuant to
authority .vested in me, by Article XII of said
Ide of Fair Competition for the Ice Industry as
amended and by Executive Orders of the President
andotherwise, do hereby declare that an emergency
eilsts. within the competitive area consisting of
r' County, Texas, % 'including the' city of San
Atonio, .Texas, and that the cause thereof is that
e prices at which artificial ice has been sold
n herean hve been reduced through destructive
lice cutting due to excessive over-production,, in-
.eaed supply -and'othier, reasons .to such an ex-
'tnas" to render Ineffective the lbor and other
krovlslons .of the. said Code and to endanger seri-
uosly its maintenance in said area. and
IT *IS FURTHER ORDERED that on and after
M te.days from the date of this Order and continu-
n,, 'for a period of ninety days. no member of the
Indutry. shall directly or indirectly sell or offer
't.seIl or otherwise dispose of Ice in or Into said
BI npemtitlve area at a price lower than the appll-
cable price set -forth in the schedule of. minimum
ipcesi attached to this Order and made a part
hreofV and' "
i ':T'IS 1 FURTHER ORDERED that each member
b '.the, Industry directly or Indirectly selling' or
Z i5ng to sell or otherwise disposing of ice In or
itot.said competitive area shall within ten days
tom the date of this Order, file and post with the
.exas Committee of Arbitration and Appeal and
t.'. the Code Authority a schedule of prices' at
hlch he proposes to sell such Ice, which schedule
of 'prices shall be not lower than those prescribed
b'!,this Order; subject, however, to such revision
mazdYor cancellation thereof as during Ohe period
0th4s Order, I, by my further Orders may direct,.
T&.'- IS -FURTHER ORDERED that Marving T.
Jy.adford. 1815 North Houston Street,- San Antonio,
'Ils hereby designated as my special agent as
,lIrovfded in .Article' XII. Sectlin 5 of the Code of
C r "Competitilon far the Ice Industry as amended
&kpll 24, 1984, to make such inspections, con-
d"such investigations, demand or receive such
H Ibrts' and file such complaints as the Division
iKsdmninstrator for this Code may require and as
.ing'necessary.to', secure compliance with this
rer, ,and' -'
Orer i B'TI FURTHb R ORDERED that-the special
aget 'above mentioned shall cause to be made an
Betigation of. cost data in all Ice plants In San
tonlo, Texas, and that said special agent shall
wjliln sixty days after, the approval of this Order
,orton said' investigation to the Division of Re-
B sh and' Planning, and that within thirty days
-t.r receipt of such report; said Division of Re-
iereh and Planning shall submit its analysis and
al hgs to the Admlnistrator.
f;':": *'* HUGH 8. JOHNSON,
S : ." Am"insfrator orr f nI stdr l1oteOVWY.
Aproval recommended:
Gn. L. BEsay
Division A&,Mnestrator.
SWashington. D.C.,
''"-JHV M. last.
:"4 iz.'.. -; ^ --- ---

4I INLAND WATER CARRIER
.TRADE IN THE EASTERN
DIVISION OF THE UNITED
E .STATES, OPERATING

VIA THE NEW YORK
^.. CANAL SYSTEM
S..." 6-9 (Amend. No. 1)
S.' ORDER
APPROVING AMENDMENT TO CODE OF
PAIR COMPETITION FOR THE INLAND
WATER CARRIER TRADE IN THE
E ASTERN DIVISION OF THE UNITED
STATES. OPERATING VIA THE NEW
": YORK CANAL SYSTEM
An application having been duly made pursuant
to and in full compliance witb the provisions of
Title I of the National Industrial recovery Act,
,;" .approved June 16 1983, for approval of an amend-
,?' .''menit to a Code of Fair Competition for the Inland
Water Carrier Trade In the Eastern Division of
,' b .. the United States, operating via the New York
;.:'..'Canal System. and opportunity to be heard having
," been duly afforded all. interested parties and the


. .. . '


annexed report on said amendment, containing
findings with respect thereto, having been made
and directed to the President:
NOW THEREFORE on behalf of the President
of the United States, I, Hugh S. Johnson, Admin-
istrator for Industrial Recovery, pursuant to au-
thority vested in me by Executive Orders of the
President, Including Executive Order 6548-A. dated
December 80, 1983, and otherwise, do hereby In-
corporate by reference, said annexed report and do
find that said amendment and the Code as con-
stituted after being amended comply In all respects
with the pertinent provisions and will promote the
policy and purposes of said Title of said Act, and
do hereby order that said amendment be and it is
hereby approved, and that the previous approval of
said Code Is hereby modified to Include an approval
of said Code in Its entirety as amended such ap-
proval and such amendment to take effect ten (10)
days from the date hereof,' unless good cause to
the contrary is shown to the Administrator before
that time and the Administrator issues a sub-
sequent order to that effect.
HUGH S. JOHNSON,
Administrator for Industrial Reeoovery.
Approval recommended:
C. E. ADAMS, '
Divtision Administrator.
* Washington,. D.C.,
July t7, 19.


LEATHER AND WOOLEN
KNIT GLOVE
87-13
ORDER '
CODE OF FAIR COMPETITION FOR THE
LEATHER AND WOOLEN KNIT GLOVE
INDUSTRY
Approval of overtime period for the Reinhart
Mitten Company, 451 South Fourth St., Milwaukee,
Wisconsn, fixed* by the Code Authority pursuant
-to the provisions of Article II1, Section 1 of .the
Code.
WHEREAS. Article Ili, Section 1 of the Code
of Fair Competition for the above named Ijidustry
provides as follows:
"The Code Authority may, with the approval
of the Administrator, fix periods during the sea-
sons of peak production during which the work
week shall not exceed forty-four (44 hours, for
s total period not to exceed four (4) months in
any one (1) year.'
and
WHEREAS, the Code Authority has recom-
mended that the Relnhart Mitten Company, 451
South Fourth Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, be
permitted to work their employees not in excess
of forty-four (44) hours per week for a period
not to exceed eight (8) weeks from the date of
this Order, and the Deputy Administrator having
reported and it appearing 'to my satisfaction that
the overtime granted herein is necessary and will
tend to effectuate the policies of Title I of the
National. Industrial Recovery Act:;
NOW, THEREFORE, pursuant to authority
vested in me, It Is hereby ordered that the above-
named Member of the Industry, he and it hereby
Is granted the right to work its employees not in
excess of forty-four (44) hours per week for a
period not to exceed eight (8) weeks from the date
of this Order.
WILLIAM P. F&aN5WOSTH,
Acting Division Administrator.
Approval recommended:
DRANl 0. EDWABDS,-
Deputy Administraoor.
August 1, 19l34.


LIMESTONE
S118-1 7 (Amend. No. 2)
ORDER
APPROVING AMENDMENT OF CODE OF
FArR COMPETITION FOR THE LIME-
STONE INDUSTRY
An application having been duly made pursuant
Sto andd In full compliance with the provisions of
Title I of the National Industrial Recovery Act,
,approved JUne 16, 1933, for approval of an amend-
ment to a Code of Fair Competition for the Lime-
stone Industry, and a Notice of Opportunity to be
Heard having been duly given thereon and the an-
nexed report on said amendment, containing find-
ings with respect thereto, having'been made and
directed to the President:
NOW THEREFORE on behalf of the President
of the Ulnited States, I, Hugh S. Johnson, Admin-
istrator for Industrial Recovery, pursuant to au-
thority vested in me'by 'Executive Orders of the
President,. including Executive Order No.% 6543-A,
dated December 80, 1938, and otherwise; do
hereby incorporate, by reference, said annexed-re-
port and, do find that said amendment and' the
Code as constituted after being amended comply in
all respects with the pertinent provisions and will
promote the policy and purposes of said Title of
said Act, and do hereby order that said amend-
ment be and It Is hereby approved, and that tl'e
previous approval of said Code is hereby modified
to include an approval of said Code in Its entirety
as amended.
HUGH S. JOHNSON,
Administrator t fo Industrial Recovery..
Approval recommended :
BARroN W. Munsae,
Division Adminidtrator. ,
Washington, D.0.,
July E7, 198.

118-15
ORDER
CODE OF FAIR COMPETITION FOR THE
LIMESTONE INDUSTRY
Granting Application of the Shawnee Stone Com-
pony, of Bloomington, Indiana, for an lxemp-
ion from the Provisions of Article VI, Section
4 (a).
WHEREAS, an application has been made by the
above-named applicant for an exemption from the
provisions of Article VI, Section 4 (la) of the Code
of Fair Competition for the Limestone Industry.
WHEREAS, an opportunity to be heard has been
dbly afforded the Limestone Code Authority, and
the Assistant Deputy Administrator has reported,
and It appears to my satisfaction that the exemp-
tion hereinafter granted is necessaenry and will tend
to effectuate the policies of Title I of The National
Industrial Recovery Act;
NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to authority
vested in me. It Is hereby ordered that the above-
named applicant Pe and It hereby Is exempted from
said provision of said Code to the extent necessary
for the fulfillment of an offer to supply limestone
Sto the Consolidated Engineering Company. Inc.
for use on the Chemistry Building. Howard Uni-
versity, Washington, D.C.. provided-thbat this order
shall not exempt said applicant from full compli-
ance with the Code In all other respects.
BARTON W. MURRAY.
Division Administrator.
Order recommended:
NBAL W. FOSTER,
Deputy Administrator.
July J7, 198,


LUMBER AND TIMBER
PRODUCTS
9-58
ORDER
CODE OF FAIR COMPETITION FOR THE
LUMBER AND TIMBER PRODUCTS IN-
DUSTRIES
Reaffirming Declaration of Emergency and De-
termining Reasonable Coat of Further Items and
Classifications of Lumber and Timber Products
and Rules and Regulations for the Application
Thereof.
Whereas on the 16th day of July., 1984, pur-
euant to the provisions of Article IX of the Code
of Fair Competition for the Lumber and Timber
Products Industries and upon application of the
Code Authority for said Industries, I determined
that an emergency exists throughout said In-
dustries threatening to render Ineffective or to
seriously endanger the maintenance of the pur-
poses and provisions of said Code and of the Act,
and found that It is necessary to the maintenance
of the provisions of said Code and of the Act that
the reasonable cost of items and classifications of
lumber and timber products and rules and regula-
tions for the application thereof be determined and
established by me during the period of said
emergency, an
Whereas, pursuant to said determinations by me,
I determined the reasonable cost of certain Items
and classifications of lumber and timber products
and rules and regulations for the application
thereof, and
Whereas, it has been shown to me and I have
found that in order to effectuate the terms of said
Order and of Article IX of said Code, reasonable
costs of items and classifications of southern
rotary cut lumber, maple, beech and birch floor-
ing, broom and mop handles and Pacific coast
veneer packages and parts thereof, and rules and
regulations for the application thereof, should be
determined by me during the period of said
emergency, and
Whereas. I have found that the treasonable cost
of sald Items and classifications of southern
rotary cut lumber maple, beech and birch flooring,
broom and mop handles and Pacific coast veneer
packages and parts thereor. is s set, forth in Ex-
hibits Numbered 11. 13. 17 and 41 Inclusive filed
herewith, entitled Lumber Code Authority Bulle-
tin, Volume II, Numbers 13, 15, 19 and 48" re-
spectively, and hereby made a part hereof, which
I include the reasonable cost of said items or classfi-
cations of said products customarily sold or offered
for sale in competition with one another; that the
said reasonable costs for the respective grades and
items of any species are In reasonable proportion
to the market price of such grades and Items dur-
ing a representative period; that the said rules
and regulations lake provision for equitable dif-
ferentials for products below accepted standards
of quality, suchB as the products of some small
mills, and for the equitable application of said
reasonable costs; and that said reasonable costs
reflect due regard to the maintenance of free com-
petition among, species, divisions and subdivisions
and with the products or other industries and
other countries, and
Whereas, the Deputy Administrator has rendered
the annexed report on said reasonable costs and
rules and regulations for the application thereof,
containing findings with respect thereto,
NOW, THEREFORE, I, Hugh S. Johnson, Ad-
ministrator for Industrial Recovery, pursuant to
authority vested' in me by said Article IX, Section
(a) of the Code of Fair Competition for the Lum-
ber and Timber Products Industries, and by Ex-
ecutive Orders of the President, and otherwise, do
adopt and approve the said report, recommenda-
tions and findings of the Deputy Administrator,
and do hereby reaffirm my prior declaration that
an emergency exists in the Lumber and Timber
Products Industries threatening to render ineffec-
tive and to seriously endanger the maintenance of
the purposes and provisions of said Code and of
the Act, and do hereby determine that It is neces-
sary to the maintenance of the purposes and pro-
visions of said Code and of the Act and of my
prior Order in the above entitled matter dated
July 16, 1934, that reasonable costs of items and
classifications of southern rotary cut lumber,
maple, beech snd birch flooring, broom and mop
handles, Pacific coast veneer packages and parts
thereof, and rules and regulations for the ap-
pllcatlon thereof, be determined and established
during the period of said emergency; and do
hereby further determine that the reasonable cost
of said Items and classifications are as set forth
in Exhibits numbered 11, 13. 17 and 41 inclusive,
filed herewith, entitled Lumber Code Authority
Bulletin, Volume II, Numbers 13, 15, 19 and 43"
respectively, and hereby made a part hereof; and
do hereby further determine that the rules and.
regulations therein contained are reasonable and
necessary to the equitable application of said
reasonable costs: and do hereby further determine
that said reasonable costs for the respective grades
and items of any species are in reasonable pro-
portion to the market prices pf such grades and
Items during a representative period; and do
hereby further determine that said reasonable
costs include-the reasonable costs of all Items or
classificatlond of lumber and 'timber products
whicb are customarily sold or offered for sale in
competition with one another; that said rules and
regulations make provision for equitable differ-
en.isls for products below accepted standards of
quality, such as the products of some small mills,
and for the equitable application of said reason-
able costs and that said reasonable costs have
been determined with due regard to the main-
tenance of free competition among species, divi-
sions and subdivisions and- with the products of
other industries and other countries; and
Do hereby order that said determination of
reasonable costs of southern rotary cut lumber,
maple, beech and birch flooring, broom and mop
handles, Pacific coast veneer packages and parts
thereof, and rules and regtlantlons for the applica-
tion thereof be subject In all respects to the terms
and conditions of my prior Order In the above
entitled matter dated July 16, 1984; and
Do hereby order that subject to my direction
such determination of reasonable costs of southern
rotar cut lumber, maple, beech and birch floor-
Ing. broom and mop handles, Pacific coast veneer
packages and parts thereof, and rules and regula-
tions for ;the application thereof be announced
forthwith to persons subject to the Jurisdiction of
said Code, effective on the date hereof, subject
however to suspension or modification on good
cause shown by any Interested parties within
fifteen (15) days after the date hereof, and do
hereby direct the Research and Planning Division
of the Nntional Recovery Administration to make
full study of the reasonable cost of Items and
clussifictlons of southern rotary cut lumber,
maple, beech and birch flooring, broom and mop
handles, Pacific coast veneer packages add parts
thereof, and rules and regulations for the applica-
tion thereof, hereby approved by me, and to re-
sort to me within forty-five (45i days after the
ate hereof such modifications thereof as its fur-
ther investigation and fact finding may discover
to be necessary.
HUGH S. JOEINSON,
Administrator for Industrial Recovery.
Approved recommended : '
BARTON W. MURRAY,
Division Admnifnstraur.
Washington, D.C.,
July 25, 194.


0-01 (Amend. No. 16)
ORDER
APPROVING AMENDMENT OF CODE OF
FAIR COMPETITION FOR THE LUMBER
AND TIMBER PRODUCTS INDUSTRIES
An application having been duly made pursuant
to and In full compliance with provisions of Title
I of the National Industrial Recovery Act, ap-
proved June 16, 1938, for approval of an amend-
mtnt to the Code of FPair Competition for the Lum-
berT and Timber Products Industries, and an op-
portunity to file objections thereto having been
given, nnd the annexed report on said amendment,
containing findings with respect thereto, having
been made and directed to the President:
NOW, THEREFORE, on behalf of the President
of the United States. I, Hugh S. Johnson, Ad-
ministrator for Industrial Recovery, pursuant to
authority vested in me by Executive Orders of
the President. Including Executive Order Number
68543-A, dated December 80, 1988, and otherwise
do hereby incorporate by reference, said annexed
report and do find that said amendment and the
Code as constituted, after being amended comply
In all respects with the pertinent provisions and
will promote the policy and purposes of said Title
of said Act, and do hereby order that said amend-
ment be and It is hereby approved, and that the
previous approval of said Code is hereby modifid
to Include an approval of said Code in its entirety,
as amended.
HUGH 8. JOHNSON.
Administrator for Industrial Recovery.
Approval recommended:
BARTON'W. URTAY,
Division Admin4frator.
Washington, D.C.,
July 17, 1934.


MASON CONTRACTING
DIVISION OF

CONSTRUCTION
244G-6'(Amend. No. 1)
ORDER
APPROVING MODIFICATION OF SUPPLE-
MENTARY CODE OF FAIR COMPETITION
FOR THE MASON CONTRACTING DIVI-
SION OF THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY
An application having been duly made pursuant
to and in full compliance with the provisions of.
Title I of the National Recovery Act. approved
June 16, 1934 for approval of a modification to
Section 2, Article III, of the Code of Fair Comn-
petition for the Mason Contractors Division of the
Construction Industry, and due notice and op-
portunity to be beard having been given thereon
and the annexed report on said modification, con-
taining findings with respect thereto, having been
made and directed to the President:
NOW, THEREFORE, on behalf of the President
of the United States, I, Hugh S. Johnson. Ad-
ministrator for Industrial Recovery, pursuant to
authority vested in me by Executive Orders of the
President, including Executive Order No. 6548-A,
dated December 80 1933 and otherwise; do hereby
Incorporate, by reference, said annexed report and
do find that said modification and the Code as
constituted after being modified comply in all re-
spects with the pertinent provisions and will pro-
mote the policy and purposes of said Title of said
Act, ahd do hereby order that said modification be
and Is hereby approved, and that the previous 'ap-
proval of said Code is hereby modified to include
an approval of said Code in Its entirety as modified.
HUGH S. JOHNSON,
Administrator for Industrial Recov'eryg.
Approval recommended:
GEo. L. BEin,
Division Administrator.
Washington, D.C.,
Julyy J, 19S4.


MEN'S CLOTHING


15-17


ORDER
CODE OF FAIR COMPETITION FOR THE
MEN'S CLOTHING INDUSTRY
Denying Applieation of Sears-Roebuck Company,
Chicago, Illinois, for an Exemption from the
Provisions of Article XII Section (b).
WHEREAS, an applicsraion has been made by
the above-named applicant for sn exemption from
the provisions of Article XII, Section (b) of the
Code of Fair Competition for the. Men's Clothing
Industry; and
WHEREIAS, a hearing having been duly. held
thereon, and the Deputy Administrator having re-
ported, It appears to my satisfaction that the ex-
emption applied for is not necessary'and would
not tend to effectuate the policies of Title I of the'.
National Industrial Recovery Act;
NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to authority
vested In me. It Is hereby ordered that the said
application for aI exemption be and It Is hereby
denied.
SOL A. ROSzNaLATT,
Division Administrator. '
Order recommended:
DaN 0. EDWARDS,
Deputy Administrator.
July 1 198S.,

ORDER
CODE OF FAIR COMPETITION FOR THE.
MEN'S CLOTHING INDUSTRY
NO. 15-E1 .
Affirming findings of Committee established under',"
Article TI, Section (d) denying relief to L. Greif
& IBrothers, Inc. from the provisions of Article
II, Section (b).
WHEREAS, heretofore and on July 10, 1984, an
application wns made by L. Grelf & Bros. Inc., of
Baltimore. Maryland, to the Committee of the
Men's Clothing Code Authority provided for in
Article II, Section (d) of the Code of Fair Com-
petition for the Meln's Clothing Industry for re-
lIef from thle provisions of Article 11, Section (b)
of the Code of afir Competitiou for the' Men's
Clothlne Code; end
WITEREAS. the aforesaid Committee bhs denied
the application of the aforesaid L. Grelf & Bros.
Inc., of Baltimore, Maryland, demanding relief
thereunder: and
WHERIiAS. It appears to my satlsfnction that
tbe relief therein requested Is not necessary and
would not tend to effectuate the policy of Title I
of the National Recovery Act:
NOW THEREFORE, pursunnt to authority *
vested In me. it Is hereby ordered, that the find-
logs of the Men's Clothing Code' Authority deny-i ;
ing the application of L. Greif & Bros. Inc. pf
Baltimore, Maryland as herelnabove set forth be
and they are hereby affirmed.
WILLtSAM P. FARNSWORTfrT.
Acting Division Adminitlstrator.
Approval recommended:
DEAN 0. EDWARDS,
Deputy Administrator.
July i4, 19 4.











AD MINISTRATIVE


[ MOTION PICTURE
124-24 (Amend. No. 2)
ORDER
AppROVING AMENDMENT OF CODE OF
FAIR. COMPETITION FOR THE MOTION
PICTURE INDUSTRY
An application having been duly made pursuant
to and in full compliance with the provisions of
T ile I of the National Industrial Recovery Act,
a proved June 16, 1933, for approval of an amend-
Sment, to a Code of Fair Competition for the Motion
t't r Industry. and the aunexed report on said
amendment containing findings with respect
S; ereto, having been made and directed to the
president
NOWTHEREFORI, on behalf of the President
S te aUnlited States. I, Hugh S. lohnson, A0"
Sinistror tor Industrial Recovery, pursuant to
autiriy vested In me by Executive Orders of the
p resident, Including Executive Order 6543-A.
Stated December 30, 1983. and otherwise, do hereby
Sicorporate by reference, said annexed report and
de find that said amendment and the Code as con-
stiuted afler being amended comply In all respects
with the pertinent provisions and will promote the
policy an purposes of said Title of said Act, and
dohereby order that said amendment be and it Is
hereby approved, and that the previous approval of
said Code is hereby modified to include an approval
o said Code In its entirety as amended, such ap-
roland such amendment to-take effect ten days
arte tJhe 'date hereof, unless good cause to the
contrary Is shown to the Administrator before that
time 'and the Administrator issues a subsequent
order to that effect.
S- HUGH S. JOHNSON,
Administrator for Industrial Recovery.
ApprovaelI recommended :
SOL A. ROSENBLATr,
S Dtis(on Administrator.
Washington. D.C.,


I- MOTOR FIRE APPARATUS
; MANUFACTURING
ORDER 108-5
;.* ORDER
CODE OF FAIR COMPETITION FOR THE
MOTOR FIRE APPARATUS MANUTFAC-
S. TUNING INDUSTRY
Adaminlstrator's approval of a Uniform System of
S cost accounting, pursuant to provisions of Arti-
.l cle VII, Section 6(c) of Motor Fire Apparatus
SManufacturing Industry Code.
An application having been duly made by the
SCode Authority of the. Motor Fire Apparatus
SManafacturing Industry, for the Administrator's
approval of a Uniform System of Coet-Accoundting
aseprovided in Article VII, Section 6(c) of Cole
for said Industry and the Deputy Administrator
having recommended that said system be approved.
NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to authority
Svedated In me. it is hereby ordered that the said
system be and the same is hereby approved, such
approval to take effect fifteen k15) days from the
i date hereof, unless edod cause to the contrary is
shown to the Administrator before that time and
Sthe Administrator'issues a subsequent order to that
eBt. -HUGH S JOHNSON,
S Administrator for indutalrial Recocry.
Approval recommended :
C. S. ADAMS,
S Division Adminfstrator.
SWashington, D.C.,
July 14, 1J.


Code Approvals


Corn Cob Pipe Industry.
Approveil August 7, 1934.-Effective
August 19, 1934.
S Establisbhes a 40-hour work week, with the
exception of 1 period, not to exceed 4 weeks In
Each 6 months, during which rime employees may
Sbe permitted to work 48 flours per week provided
They are paid time and a half for all hours in
excess of maximum. Minimum wages established
Sby the Code are 27% cents an hour for males and
S22% cents an hour for females. The Code Author-
ity will consist of 3 members selected by the
iIndustry, and 3 Administration members, with.
'onut vote, may also be appointed. In the order of
approval It was provided that a further study or
W age rates should be made and a report filed with
the Administrator within 60 days irom the effect
S tive date for the purpose of determining the
advisability of Increasing them.

Industry of Collective MAanufactur-
ing for Door-to-Door Distribution.
Approved August 3, 1934.-Effective date
SAugust 13, 1934.
r .Establishes maximum work week of 40 hours, but
*"aws 4 hours per week overtime It paid at the
rate of time and one-half. Provides 37% cents
Per hour or $15.00 per week wage. Among the
.,trade practice rules Is one making It unfair ucompea
tiou tol sell oridffer for sale an Ineet-cide for
use against files which Is below the minimum
s standard That standard Is not less than 60
Percent kill, using the Peet-Grady test." The In
austry as defined Includes the manufacturing.
SPrtocesslng, converting, and/or distributing, except
retail distribution, of products for personal and/or
Sfarm consumption. Including household medicines;
-. medicinal preparations for domestic animals; tea,
tffee, and spices; food flavors and extracts, fill-
2' "i8, and soft drink concentrates; soaps and
ceansing preparations; perfumes, cosmetics, aud
tiet articles; Insecticides, fungicides, dislnfect-
A ants, dips and sprays for farm use; "and other
erinary blood and household produces. such prod-
Gcta being distributed exclusively by the house-
hola door-to-door method." The definition, how-
ever, is limited to include only those engaged in
the collective panufacturliig, processing, convert-
0, afnd distributing of at least five of these classes
01 products.

Steel Joist Industry.
Approved August 1, 1934.-Effective Au-
g'a"t 18, 1934.
Establishes a 40 hour maxiJmum work week. but
hPt? 48 hours per week for 6 weeks In any one-
hl o calendar year, but In no event more than
a oni n any one day nor more than 6 days In
a one week. Watchmen are limited to 46 hours
a'lekand clerical employees to 40 hours a week.
minimum we rates of 34 cents an hour in the
South and 41 cents an hour elsewhere are estab-
niShed The order of-approval eliminated the wage
t4 Icts the Code which ranged from 25 centsto
4cnts an.hour in 21 districts. The order also
S slhinated the provision whereby the Code could
:e bsaen,_ ermlnated at the will of O90 percent of


Hand Bag, Frame Manufacturing
Industry. (A division of the fab-
ricated metal products manufac-
turing and metal finishing and
metal coating industry.)
Approved August 1, 1034.-Effective Au-
gwant 11, 1934.
Adopts the wage, hour, and labor provisions of
the basic Code. A supplementary Code Autkority
of six is piovlded, to be elected as follows: Two
members of the Hand Bag Frame Manufacturing
Association, Inc., by a majority of all members of
. the Industry; 8 members of the association to
be elected by members of the Industry, by a
weighted vote, each member of the Industry to
Shave 1 vote, and 1 additional vote for each
$10,000 of annual sales for the previous calendar
year; and 1 member of tle Industry not a mem-
er of the association, to be elected by a majority
of all nonmembers of the association. A cost
finding and accounting system Is to be formulated
for the Industry, and open price lists are to be
biled and become immediately effective upon the
date of flnllug. Willfully destructive price cutting
Is forbidden.
Wholesale Paint, Varnish, Lacquer,
Allied and Kindred Products
Trade. (A division of the whole
saling or distributing trade:)
Approved August 4, 1934.-Effective Au-
gust 14, 1934.
Adopts wage, hour, and labor provisions of the
basic Code. Provides' a Divisional Code Authority
and certain trade praqtice rules to govern condl-
tiona peculiar to the divisional trade. Approval
was given with the statement that the provision
concerning the return of merchandise Is approved
only, so long as Article XX of the Code for the
paint, varnish, and lacquer manufacturing industry
Is effective. The article referred to relates to
"free deals."
Charcoal and Package 'Fuel Dis-
tributing Trade. (A 'division of
the wholesaling -division of the
trade.)
Approved Augusat 7, 1934.-Effective date
August 17, 1934.
Although the major provisions of the basic Code
are adopted by the trade, provision Is made in the
supplemental Code for maximum hours and mini-
mum wages. Between May Iland October 1 ne
employee will be permitted more than 32 hours a
week nor more than S hours a day. For the re-
mainder of the year, a 40-hour maximum week Is
provided. A minimum wage rate is fixed at 45
cents an hour. Overtime of not more than 8 hours
a week will be permitted, provided, time and one-
half is paid for all hours in excess of the maximum.
In case of an emergency Involving a break-down or
the protection of life or property, there ,is no limit
placed 'on overtime. Prpvision Is made for the
setting up of a Divisional Code Authority, and
fair trade practice rules to govern conditions- it
the trade have been Incorporated in the Code. The
Divisional Code Authority will be made up ol
seven members by the National Association of
Charcoal and Package Fuel Distributors, and twc
members to represent nonmembers of the associa
tion.
Hydraulic Machinery Industry. (A
subdivision of the machinery ana
allied products industry.)
Approved August 2.-Effective date Au-
gfust 13, 1934.
Adopts thd wage, hour., and labor provisions ol
the basic Code and sets up rules of fair trade
practice peculiar to the Industry. Approval was
granted subject to a stay, pending further order,
of article VIII, section 2 (a) which provides thai
proposals shall not specify eny discounts except
one to cover cash payment In 10 days, which dis
count must not exceed one-half of 1 percent.
Diesel Engine Manufacturing Divi-
Ssion of the Machinery and Allied
Products Industry.
Approved August 1, 1934-Effective date
August 12, 1034.
Adopts wage, hour, and labor provisions of the
basic Code. Approval was granted subject to
stay of the clause providing for a waiting period
between the date of filing and effective date of
price lists. The clause providing for a manufac-
turers' control of distribution was stayed pending
submission of satisfactory evidence covering the
distribution of the products of the Industry, to
the Administrator. Clauses designed to closely
restrict trade-in allowances and which would for-
bid pool buying", were stayed pending further
order. The proponent association was ordered to
amend Its constitution and bylaws, regarding
membership.
Textile Examining, Shrinking, and
Refinishing Industry.
Approved August 0, 19034.-Effective Ao-
Kngut 20, 1984.
Establishes a maximum work week of 40 hours
and a minimum wage of 45 cents per hour for
manufacturing employees and $14.00 a week for
nonmanufacturing employees. The industry is de-
fined as Including the services of examining
sponging, or shrinking, double spongingf or shrink-
ing, decating london or water shrinking, and re-
finishing of woolen and other woven fabrics owned
by others.'" The Code was approved with a pro-
v iso that members of the cotton textile Industry,
operating under the provisions of the Code govern
ing the shrinking, finishing, and similar processing
of cotton textiles. shall for Code purposes not be
considered members of the textile examining,
shrinking, and refinishing Industry. The approval
also provides that within 60 days the National
Textile Finishers Association shall amend Its by-
laws so that the only grounds for suspension or
expulsion of a member shall be conviction of a
Code violation in a court of competent Jurisdic-
tion, or nonpayment of dues, or ceasing to be a
member of the industry.
Jack Manufacturing Subdivision oj
Machinery and Allied Products
Industry.
Approved August 1, 1934.-Effeetive Au-
gust 42, 1934.
Adopts the wage. hour, and labor provisions of
the basic Codb Approval was granted subject to
a stay of the clause providing for a waiting period
between the date of filing and effective date of
price lists and the clause providing for manufac-
turers control of distribution was also stayed pend-
ing submission of satisfactory evidence covering


ORDERS-CContiuuee


the distribution of the products of the industry, Wash.; V. A. Frauck, Seattle, Wash.; ane WMl'U,
to the Administrator. A clause forbidding devia- 11am (olberg. Stockton, Calif. '- W
lions from price and discount lists in favor of cer- WIREB MACHINERY INDUSTRY.-P.
tain customers was stayed for 15 'dayp. A provi- Morgan. Worcester, Mass.; W. D. Pierson, Water.1
slon strictly limiting salEes through brokers and bury, Conn.; H. G. Wells,. Kenosha Win E '4, .:ll
another forbidding the acceptance of second-hand Shuster, New Haven, Conn.; and L. A. Vauglnit
equipment as part payment for new, were stayed Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio. : S
pending further order by the Administrator. CONTRACTORS PUMP MANUFACTURING I
INDUSTRY.-J. A. Abbott, Port Chester, N.Y.,"'
Railway Appliance Division of the B. F.DevineMl1waukeeuWis; -Lionardih=y;
Columbus, Ohio; S. M. Auntear, Lansing.' M ch3,;
Machinery and Allied Products and A. S.Marlo idgewood,1..
INSULATION bONTRACTOBS' DIVISION or
Industry. THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY.-H. NXe6o
Reifeltsnyder, Norristown, Pa.; L. RB. Harbaughb
Approved Annugust 1, 1934.--ffeettve An- Lancaster, Pa.; and L. J. Smith., Aurora, IL;tot
gumt 12, 1B34. represent nonmembers of the Association. ""
Adoptswage, hour. and labor provisions of the CORDAGE AND TWINE INDUSTRY-f
basic Code. Approval was granted subject to a Bryant New York, N.Y.: J. U. Barr. New Orlean
stay of the clause providing a waitin period be- La.; i. G. Metcalf Auburn, N.Y.; S. H. RTg.)
tween the date of filing and the effective date of Newark Ohlo; H Whtltock, New York, N'
price lists. The clause providing for manufac- W.C. 6raig, kenia, Ohio; R. C. Groendyke, .Chl-
turers' control of distribution was stayed, pend- cagoIi.; E. C. Heldrich, Jr.. Peoria, Ill.;";C. '.YI,
Ing submission of satisfactory evidence covering Leach, North Plymouth, Mass.; W. E. Worth.,,Ci.f
the distribution of products of the industry. to the cago, Ill.: N.- M. Fidler Philadelphia, Pa. .
Administrator. A fair-trade practice provision Holmes, North Plymouth, Mass.; and C. W. Jo-'
forbidding the supplying of partns, by a member deli. Orange, Calif. '*
of the Industry, other than the maker, of an Indus- CAP AND CLOTH HAT tNDUSTR .-la
try product bearing the maker's name or trade- ander Thomson, administration member, to ser6e
mark, so long as the maker is still manufacturing during the pleasure of the Administrator. "".
that article, was stayed for 15 days. Two other LEATHER AND WOOLEN KNIT GOV3E11"
-, provisions, one forbidding the acceptance 'of used DUSTRY.-Alexander Thomson vice. RalipW.Abi.
products of the industry as partial payment on cromble.. administration member, to serve,.brn..
new articles and the other limiting the furnishing the pleasure of the Adminiscrator. '
of detailed drawings of the products of the sub- COUNTRY GRAIN ELEVATOR INDUSTfl
division to Any prospective buyer by a member of Daniel F. Bull, administration member. toi'ia
the industry, were stayed, pending further order during the pleasure of the AdmLinistrato-...!
by the Administrator. DIAMOND CORE DRILL MANUFACTRIWR
INDUSTRY.-A. A. Ainsworth, administration
member, to serye during the pleasure of ther2:
Concrete Mixer Division of the E NnistrNator.N .US "
SMachinery and Allied Products WATERPOW'ER EQUIP&M'NT
M machinery aizd Allied Products R. H. Polk, administration member, to serve 'dli.,
jF b Ing the pleasure of the Administrator. 'i- a -
I Industry. HOG RING AND RINGER MANUFACTURING
S Approved AugustI 1, 1984.-ffeetive date .INDUSTRY.-Alan Jay Parrish, adminlstratfib--
S August 12, 15934. member, to serve during the pleasure of' tli
Administrator.
Adopts the wage, hour. and labor provisions of CYLINDER MOULD AND DANDY ROLL':,
the basic Code. Approval was granted subject to DUSTRY.-Mal. I..'H. Miles, Jr., adminlstratidli
S a stay of the clause providing for a waiting period member, to serve during the pleasure of the ..A4:
between the date of filing and effective date of ministrator. '
price lists. RETAaILSOLID FUEL INDUSTRY.-. Georgej
f j Doerr, as administration member of Dirtslohal
-------Code Authority 40; Curry W.Watson as adnlin
f- lltration member of Divisional Code Authority l
Code' A ut hority7 and Murray Hanson, as administration member 0.i
ode A ut ority Divisional Code Authority 86. All are to'.seriea
A approved during thu pleasure of the Administrator.
_wr A_ M members TANNING EXTRACT INDUSTRY.-.Martin-o
ivM em buers- A prove Waters, administration member,' to serve' durn I
the pleasure of the Administrator. '. .
EXPANDING AND SPECIALTY PAPER PRO9
The Administrator,' during the past week, p- UCTS INDUSTRY.-Owen Coogan, administration
proved the following selections and appoiutments member, to serve during the pleasure of thi
of Code Authority members: administrator t"*
PRESERVE, MARASCHINO CHERRY AND ATHLETIC GOODS DISTRIBUTING TR'ABT4.'a
GLACE FRUIT INDUSTRY.-R. R. Shawcross, James R. Hawkinson, administration member,- k1
Maiden, Mass ; J. N. Major, Front toyal, Va.; serve for a period of 6 months from Aug.s.C-'i.
J. T. Menzles, Baltimore, Md ; R. U. Delapenha, 1984. i E
New York, N.Y.; M. Blachemore, Pittsburgh Pa.; TRANSPARENT MATERIALS CONVRTERBS
0. P. Kline, Chicago, Ill.; Lloyd H. Smith, Kansas INDUSTRY.-Dr. Lee Galloway, administrations
City, Mo.; and C. Ashmead Fuller, as Adminlstra- member, to serve during the pleasure of the>A
lion member, to serve during the pleasure of the mluistrator. ID T i
S Administrator. CIGAR MANUFACTURING "INDUST .
SYEAST INDUSTRY.-Adolphus Busch, Ill, St. Robert EB. Rinehart, administration member, -'to'.
Louis, Mo.; B. A. Bergeuthal, Milwaukee, WIs.; serve during Jhe pleasure of the Administrator;'i
WUllam Klusmeyer, New York, N.Y.; Grant Ridg-
Sway, Chicago, Ill.; and Samuel Brass, Belleville, . ..
N.J.
S TOLL BRIDGE INDUSTRY.-Ailred C. Dent, Code A ulthotity yB'
New York., N.Y.:; S. K. Young, New York, N.Y.;
and A. S. Johnson, Smithfiel, Va.. to represent 1 A ;e S
nonmembers of the American Toil Bridge Associa- laws A prove
tion. 'i
DRY COLOR INDUSTRY.-A. F. Brown, Glen I .12
Falls, N.Y.; J. Allegaert. Newark, N.J.; Dr. Max Shoe and Leather Finish. Polish and Cemeutr
Mars, Irrtngton, N.J.; L. S. Kohnstamip, New Mfg. Industry (with exceptions); Retail uber'..
York. N.Y.; and Baron Isaacs Brooklyn, N Y. Tire and Battery Trade (with exceptions) ; Canried'
COMMERCIAL VEHICLE BODY INDUSTRY.- Salmon Industry (with exceptions).; Maoganeseg
W. J. Barry, Jr., Philadelphia, Pa.; William Industry (with exceptions) ; Loose Leaf and Blankj
B. Gibson San Francisco, Calif.; Al. Goldfarb, Book Industry (wtth exceptions) ; Carpet and-Ruggj
Memphis, Tenn. T. H. Monahban, Providence, R.TI.; Mfg. Industry (with exceptions) ; Wool Felt Man-,
f- F. B. Puntt, Chicago, Ill.; Henry G. Schaefer, ufacturing Industry (with exceptions); Beauty and-
Cleveland, Ohio; G. K. Specht, Evansville, Ind.; Barber Equipment and Soupplies Trade (with es-i
Henry Wlegers, Paterson, N.J.; and A. h. An- ceptions) ; Private Home Study School Industry' .
drews, Union City, N.J. i with exceptions) ; Novelty Curtain, Draperiesi
FEESD MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.-A. F. Bedspreads and Novelty Pillow Industry; Whole-
S Seay, St. Louis Mo. H. L. Hammond Boston. sale Wallpaper Trade (with excepdions)h1Wnol-"
'Mass; P. G. Kinzer, Milwaukee, Wis.; J. A. Me- sale Stationery -Trade (with exceptions' Com-in
Connell, Buffalo, N.Y.; H. L. McGeorge, Memphis, pressed Air Industry .(with exceptions); Gene i.T-
Tenn.; H. W. Young, Hutchlnson, Kans.; and Contractors Divisioln of the Consrthctlon Indus.try
Ed Crowe, Denver, Cqlo. .(with exceptions) ; Pump Manufacturing Industiyi'
COMMERCIAL STATIONERY AND OFFICE (with exceptions); Waste Paper Trade (with' .-
OUTFITTING TRADE.-Herman Cast and William ceptions) ; Wool Stock Trade (with exceptions).
H. Brooks, Jr., to represent distributors; Alvin R. Clay and Shale Roofing Tile Industry (with ea-
Skibbe and William F, Johnston, to represent ceptions) ; Roofing Granule Manufacturing and.DiR'J
wholesalers; and George M. Clark and W. C. tribouting Industry (with exceptions); Collapslehl
e Cleg, to represent office outfitters. Tube Industry (with exceptions) ; Newspap r.i
48%1 a ~~~~Indusr w xetos
NOVELTY CURTAIN, DRAPERIES, BED- Printing Pre Industry (with exceptions); Non'-
S SPREADS, AND NOVELTY PILLOW INDUS- ferrous and Steel Convector Industry (wit i b
TRY.-New York District, S. Brand, New York, captions); Electric Industrial Truck Manuactr-
N.Y.; Charles Bloom, New York, N.Y.; R. Loeb, 'ing Industry (with exceptions); Cast Iron Boli.
S Camden, N.J.; Joseph Lukashok, New York, N.Y.; and Cast Iron Radiator Industry (with tcep)"-
and Matthew J. Walsh New York N.Y. New tions) Plumbago Crucible Industry (with excep.-
England District, J. W. Powdreli, Danlelson. tons) Imported Date Packing Industry (wity
S Conn.; A. L. Gordon, Boston Mass.; and Sidney exceptions); Carbon Dioxide Industry (with ea
S. Gutlon, Boston, Mass. Midwest District. James captions) ; Quicksilver Industry (With except lons),'l;
V. Hupt, Chicago, ILI. and I. Ettlnger, Chicago, Motorcycle Manufacturing Industry .(with excep- 'lr
Ill. Southern District, M. J. Razovhky, St. Louis, tonss. .
Mo. Western District, 'Frank Hodapp, Los An-s Can Labeling and Can Casing Machinery Ind-
S geles; Calif. try and Trade (with exceptions) ; All Metal ini,.c'
DRY TRANSFER INDUSTRY.-T. H. Miller, sect Screen Industry fwlth exceptions) ; Valve aid:'
New York, N.Y.; H. B. Mclntire, Brooklyn; N.Y.; Fittings Industry; Wholesale Automotive Trade!W
and Benjamin Greenberger, New York, N.Y. (with exceptions) : Dental Laboratory Industry.":%:,
GRAVURE PRINTING INDUSTRY.-Alfre6 B. (with exceptions); Bankers Code Committee; In-'.
Geiger, Chicago, Ill.: Albert A. Cerre Detroit vestment Bankers Code Committee: Electrotyping'.f',;
Mich.; John F. Cuneo Chicago, I1.; George F. and Stereotyping Industry; Mason Contractors In-
Henneberry Chicago, Ill.; and Albert E. Winger, dustry (with exceptions) ; Bicycle Manufacturing
New York, N Y. Industry; Textile Bag Industry (with exceptions)';
TRADE BINDING AND PAPER RULING IN- Blouse and Skirt. Manufacturing Industry .(wIt4f-
S DUSTRY.-J. Howard Atkins, Boston, Mass.; exceptions) Used Textile Bag Industry (with'ex-"4
J. B. Balloon, New York, N.Y.; Arthur E. Barter, ceptdons) ; Photographic Mount Industry (with .. 1i
Norwood, Mass.;: Raymond E. Baylis, New York, ceptions) ; Wholesale Confectioners' I dust;ygi
N.Y.; P. M. Bland New York, N.Y.; Charles A. (with exceptions); Road Machinery Manufaetkr-.i
Braunworth, Brooklyn, N.Y.: Don C. Brock, Chi- ing Industry (with exceptions); Malleable Iron:
cego. Ill. ; John C. Burkhardt Detroit, Mich.;: Industry .(with exceptions), Alloy- Casting InduS-'
Harold Cadmus. New York, N.Y.; James Stewart try Iwith exceptions) ; Die Casting Industry (with:,
Cox. Norwood, Mass.; C. T. Dean, Dallas, Tex.; exceptions) ; Used Textile Machinery and Accep- 'V
J. R. Gilbert Lancaster Pa.; L. Howard Jenkins, sories Distributing Trade (with exceptions ;,
Richmond, Va.; Robert 0. Law, Chicago III.; Automatic Sprinkler Industry' (with exceptions).;.."7
C G. Littell, Chicago, III. E. W. Palmer. Kings- Marking Deviceli Industry (with exceptions
port, Tenn.; W. Elmo Reavis, Los Angeles. Calif.; Hand Chain Hoist Manufacturing Industry (with -
,Joseph Ruzlcka, Baltimore. Md. ; Sidney Saten- exceptions); Unit Heater and/or Ventilator In-'s'ia
stein. New York, N.Y.; Nathan H. Shrifte. New dustry (with exceptions); Nonferrous Foundry In-' .-
I York. N.Y.: Joseph S. Weshy, Worcester Mass.; dustry; Steel Tubular and Firebox Boiler Industry '
C. H. Wilhelm, Camden, N.J.; George J. Wilhelm, (with exceptions) ; Foundry Supply Industry (with ")
Garden City. N.Y.; Andrew L. Wunsch St. Louis exceptions) : Band Instrument Manufacturing In- ..:
Mo.: and J. Charles Ziegler, PhiladelphIa, Pa. dustry (wlth exceptions); Cloth Reel Industry. -
BOAT BUILDING AND BOAT REPAIRING (with exceptions); Hide and Leather Working .
INDUSTRY.-North Atlantic Division, H. B. Machinery Industry (with exceptions) ; Elevator "';
Nevins, City Island, N.Y.; A. E. Luders, Stan- Manufacturing Industry (with exceptions); CorP .r'.
ford, Conn.; J. R. Whitney, Boston, Mass.; H. F. rugated and Solid Fibre Shipping Container In..-
Morse. Noank, Conn.: and Herbert Psyson Port- dustry (with exceptions); Gummed Label and..
Island, Maine. South Atlantic Division. E. M. Embossed Seal Industry (with exceptions) Ssapl _'
Thomas, Norfolk, Va. Brad Saunders, Elizabeth Card Industry (with exceptions); Bulk Drinin .;
City. NC.C.; Ci F. Chance, Annapolis, Md.; Ken- Straw Industry (with exceptions); Copper and f.*':X
neth Smith, Newport News, Va.; and A. M. Balfe, Brass Mill Products Industry (with exceptions):*'...:.,;.,
Miami, Fla. Gulf Division, A. J. Higgins, New Mutual Savings Batks Code Committee (with ex- .
Orleans. La.: L. L. Walker, Hotston, Tex.; R. C. ceptions) ; Cap and Closure Industry; Gas Cock.' ,
Marshall. Pensacola, Fla.; : W. 0. Ray St. Peters- Industry (with exceptions); Nickel and Nickel':::
burg, Flai.; and Jesse Tibo, Harvey. La. Central Alloys Industry iWvth exceptions); Bank and 'i
and Great Lakes Division. Huibbard M. Hill, Jr., Security Vault Manufacturing Industry (with ex--'
S North Tonawanda, N.Y.; G. E. Robinson, Benton ceptions) ; Spray Painting and Finishing Equip- I."
Harbor, Mich.;-L. H. Thomson, Detroit, Mich.; ment Manufacturing Industry; Bleached Shella. '" ,
H. C. Burger, Manltowac, WIs.: and Charles Her- Manufacturing Industry (with exceptions); Metal ".:
mann, Pen Yan, N.Y. Pacific Division, George Treating Industry (with exceptions); Horseshoe .,-
Kneass. San Francisco. Calif.: V. B. Stewart, and Allied Products Manufacturing Industry (with .:!
Wilmlngton, Calif.; Frank Tregoniog, Seattle, exceptions). ,-


.: :. .
-.~~~~~~~~ ~ ..* :..': :< ^ ,^it .t~s^


-.-----------',. -' .. ,, '-, '. t5,._. :.-":. ". .- - .. ".











SoSt Schedule for


Stationery

.- Group


iank and Commercial Sta-
Stio ners' National Product
SGroup Get Ninety Days
in Which to Determine
Costs

..Approval .of a cost determination schedule
*ri.the Bank and Commercial Stationers' Na-
a Product Group was announced by the
tional Recovery Administration. The
S"ule was submitted by the National
erahlc Arts Coordinating Committee, in ac-
dance with provisions of the Graphic Arts
Th price determination schedule Is-to be
SSefd,,with certain exceptions, by all estab-
lite producing the product with which
,group is Identified; and by all dis-
utora acting in competition with the pro-

eorder becomes effective August 14. but
;.remain- in effect not more than. 90 days.
%w, be subject to termination when de-
tne.tal economic hourly cost rates and
'utionn standards and cost determination
e4ules .bave been declared, as provided In
'Graphic Arts Code.
H Zn' apjlrovIng the schedule, the condition
.it, made that no establishment shall sell-
any product listed at a price rower than 10
Sperbent below the price given; but this. pro-
Slfbitlon would be subject, to certain excep-
Ni as follows:
6e, prohibition would not apply to any
i.nfdlvldual order exceeding $500, nor to any
b cmbined or contract order exceeding $5,000
0en.
i..0An. establishment using a method of cost
Finding prescribed by the National Code An-
tlhity in accordance with the provisions of
lh'Oode, or, If such a method has not been
bed, an adequate cost-finding system,
fndcan thereby determine its costs for such
nroducts as lowei, by more than 10 percent,
those 'listed in the price determination
tule, may sell its products at not less
'the costs so determined.
0'1tx;s further provided that the National
4,e Authority may disapprove the cost-fld-
system of an establishment upon proper.
l epVstIgattoh and finding that the system is
d Wd. .--
t. is: 1 a lso .-prqvded. that an- establishment
& n.a.- defense of its1 btsinesv- meet ar bona
I competitivee bid of.another establishment.
.H'fe fcts of the bid, however, must be im-
b sdately reported to the National Code Au-
.rlty and the administrative agency of the
.H"nand Commercial Stationers' National
...duct Group.

4 ,Overlapping Codes
,-:' (Contined I p"e

"" "'.-MP L S
M:().)If all the manufacturers of a certain
ype of machinery normally sell the same
ciebpletely installed and themselves do all the
installation of such machinery and a Code Is
:N.approved' covering manufacture and installa-
on; of such machinery, an Installation Code
purporting to cover all machinery installation
0 woul4din terms overlap the Machinery Code.
tLsis obvious that the applicants for the In-
tion Code coul4 not possibly be truly
"representative of the Installers of such ma-
Shery, unless representatives of the partic-
l' machinery industry had joined in the
apli cation! fdr the Installation Code. The
tocble would be avoided by limiting the defl-
WI'ni 'of the Installation Code by a clause
f.exzepiang such operations where performed
t.Wthln' the terms of any other Code. It is
^ lear.'in such a case that installation Is an
S..ntegal -part"' of the operations' of the
lery industry. .
w'"t would clearly be impossible for any
applicants (short of representatives of all in-
dustries), to make valid application for a
"1Code governing all duplicating and mailing
|i operations in industry, such operations to a
.- greater or less extent being performed as an
Integral part" of all industries. The test
/. of true representation In this particular situ-
.f nation would no doubt 'limit the definition to
Q f.luch operations performed "for compensa-
'-lo.tn." The duplicating operations performed
'Sf% within an industry in instructing its own
g...esmen and staff are clearly an "Integral
/..t" of that Industry's operations and not
'D' part of any other Industry.
(o)'-An example of the more difficult ovec-
,.; lapping problems, requiring careful study to
,'ascertain what the Industry Is: Making of
some sort of castings may be a specialized In-
dustry In Itself; but It may be also an "in-
t.* tegral part" of the manufacture of certain
tyVpes of heavy machinery, as such man ufac-
i ture is conducted. In such a case all such
casting operations cannot be covered by the
;..-.Code applied for by the castings specialists.
.>.; Those casting operations which are an In-
__ili tegral part" of operations of another Industry
Mi; whose true representatives obtained a Code
4t.*. for such other Industry, fall within such Code
t'S and, to avoid overlap, such castings Code
. *should be delimited accordingly.


SCHEDULE OF HEARINGS, AUG. 13-SEPT. 5

Industry or trade Place Dep. Adm. Association


August 13,1934
Tile Contracting (3) (area agreement)..----
Wholesale confectioners (3) (8)------------
August 14,1934
Motion Picture Laboratory (2) (5)-..........
Earthenware Manufacturing (2)....--.....-
Wholesale Confectionery (lowest reasonable
cost).
Cordage and Twine---------------------

August 15,1934
Infants and Children's Wear (I) (adj. from
846-34).
Taxicab (adj. from S-9-34)..--------
Electrical Contracting (S)--------------
Gray Iron Foundry (6)----------. ------
New England Sardine Canning (9)...---.-
August 16,1984
Rubber Manufacturing (6)------.--------
Electrical Contracting (3) (area agreement)..
Advertise Agenc------.. ------------
Fur Dressing and Fur Dyeing (1I)-....----
M lca (2..---------------------------
August 17,1934
Optical Retail (complaints and petitions for
stays) (adi. from 8--34).
Electrical Contraotineg (3) (area agreement)..
Housbehold Ice Refrl. (2)---------------
Furnitura and Floor Wax and Polish (2).-.
Lobster Fishing (9)--------. ----------
August 20,1934
Hotel (1)-----------. ----------------
Restaurant (I)-----------------------
Rubber Tire Manufacturing (B)..-----..--.....
General Contrsotlng (3) (area agreement)...
Linen Importing (10)-.-----------------
Men's Clothing (6).-- --------------
Washing and Ironing Machine5y Manufac-
turing (2).
August 21, 1934
Cigarette, Sonuflf Chewing and Smoking To-
bacco Manufacturing.
August 22,1934
Painting, Paperhanging and Decorating (3):
Inland Water Petrolear. Ind. In the Eastern
Division of United States.
August 23,1984
Plumbing Contracting (3) (8-23-M)-..--.

August 24,1934
Paint, Paperhanging and Decorating (3),
SIowa and Vicinity.
Manufactured Gas (recessed from 8-10-34)_
Ind. Tele. Subdik. of the Tele. Ind. recessedd
fromS--34)..
Bell Sys. Saubv. qf the Tele. Ind. (recessed
from 8-10-34).
". heptembew5, 1934
_Piano Man gturn (4) (adj. from 8-3-34).


Washington Hotel-------
Mayflower Hotel--...------

Raleigh Hotel-------------


Doherty----- Repre. Croups in Philadel-
phia, Pa., and vicinity.
Molse..--------- Code Authority.


Farnsworth-.


uarlion nHoti------------ >--- ..-
Mayflower Hotel..--------..Molse----
Willard Hotel--...--------- Hookse-..----.


Motion Picture Labr. Assn.
of Amer., IuGo.
Code Authority.
Code Authority.
Code Authority and Manu-
facturers in Philippine
Islands.


Raleigh Hotel..------. --- Edwards----- ICode Authority.


Dept. Comm., Aud.--------
Roosevelt Hotel, Pitts-
burgh, Pa.
WLUlard Hotel--...-------
Fed. Bldg., Bangor, Maine-

Washington Hotel.-------
Fed. P.O. Bldg., Detroit,
MIchb.
Washington Hotel-..........
Mayflower Hotel....---........
Dept. Comm., 3321.-.------


Hughes.----.-
Doherty------
Cowling--.---
Fielder-------

Bransome-----
Doherty........
Farnsworth.
Berry--...----.
Janssen.......


Mayflower Hotel-./-- Dahlberg....


32 W. Randolph St., Chi-
cago, I1.
Dept. Comm., Anud..---..
Raleigh Hotel-.. ..
City Ball, Rekiandd, Maine.


Doherty.- .
Fqster..--.---
Battley-----.-
Fledler-..--.


Dept. Comm.. And---.-. Lamer ...
Dept. Comm., Aud..-. Larner...
Dept. Comm., 2062-644----- Bransomne....


Fed. Bldg., Louisville, Ky..
Washington Hotel.------.
Shoreham Hotel----.......


Doherty-----.-
Carr-..--------.
Edwards..


Wipard Hotel.--..------- CowlIn.--.-.I


Groups and Subdiv. of the
Ind.
Repre. Groups In Certain
Counties In Pa.
Ark. Met. Tr. Assn. of Little
Rock, Ark.
A group.

Beolfast Rubber Co.,'Atlanta,
GO.
Repre. Groups In Detroit
and vicinity.
Amer Assn. of Advertising
Agencies.
Code Authority Board.
Div. Code Authorlty Dry
Ground Mica Division.


Repre. Groups of Cook
County, Ill.
Code Authority.
Code Authority.
Maine Lobster Fisher. Assn.
and the Lob. Fish. Assn. of
Mass.

McClaren Rubber Co.,
Charlotte, N.C.
Repro. Groups In Kentucky
and Indiana.
Linen Association Trade.
Lee, MOClain & Scaelso Co.
Inc., Shelbyvllle, Ky.
Code Authority.


Mayflower Hotel.---------- Dnning----| Committee.


Fed. Bldg,, Topeka, Kans...
Mayflower Hotel...--- ---


Denver, Oolo-----........----


Doherty...
Weaver .-----


Doherty-.


P.O. Bldg., Omaha, Nebr...- Doherty-..


Dept. Comm.; 3309.....
Dept. Comm., 3309..----...
Dept. Comm., 3309.---.--


Peebles- .
Peebles


Reprte. Groups In h8bawns
County, KRDS.
Code Committee.
i
oere. Group of Certain
Counties In Colorado.

Repro. Groups of Certain
counties in Nebr. and Iowa
Mid. OGas Indus. Assn.
U.S. Ind. Tale. Assn.


Peebles----- 121 Companies.


Willard Hotel-.--------.....I Heoke------- -.Code Authority.


Interpretation


Fire Extinguishers

What is Manufacturer?
QUESTION.-What is the correct defini-
tion of manufacturer" as applied to article
I of the Code?
INTERPRETATION.-Everyone who man-
ufactures for sale fire extinguishing appli-
ances as defined' in article II, section 2, of
the Code (which definition Includes approved
and unapproved devices and charging units
and chemical compounds), and whether he
is engaged exclusively in the manufacture
of fire extinguishing appliances or is engaged
also in some other Industry, and whether so
engaged as an "employer" or "on his own
behalf ', and whether he actually makes the
Code, product in his own plant or has it
made for him to his own specifications or
formula, is subject to the provisions of ,the
Fire Extinguishing Appliance Code in con-
-nection with that. portion of his business
which is fire extinguishing appliances as
defined In the Code, except as this interpre-
tation may be In conflict with Administrative
Order X-36 and other Executive and ad-
ministrative orders.
Are Export Sales Exempt
QU'STION.-Does article IX, section 3.
exempt export sales from the provisions of
article VI, section 2 (e)?
INTERPRETATION.-Artlcle IX, section
3, exempts export sales from the provisions'
of article VI, section 2 (el. since article VI,
section 2 (e). Is excluded by iecessnry con-
struction of the Intent of article IX when ap-
plied to the exemptions contained in article
VII and article VIII.


Code Authority Budgets
Art Needlework Industry; Printing Ink
Manufacturing Industry; Buffing and Polish-
ing Composition Industry; Southern Sub-
division No. 2 of Division 1, Bituminoas Coal
Industry; Imported Date Packing ludustry:
Retail Jewelry Trade; Wholesale and Retail
Food and Grocery Trades; Valve and Fit-
tings Manufacturing Industry.


Interpretations


Dress Manufacturing

FACTS.-Article IX, section 13 (b) of the
Code of Fair Competition for the Dress
Manufacturing Code reads as follows:
"That no purchase order shall be-subject
to cancellation after the agreed upon ship-
ping date unless cancelation Is in writing,
and It permits the manufacturer 3 addi-
tional working days from the date of re-
ceipt of such cancelation, to complete and
ship any and all merchandise in work at that
time;"
The Fair Trade Practice Committee of the
Dress Code Authority has made the follow-
ing interpretation of this section of the
Code, and asks that It be approved by the
Administration.
QUESTION.-Are Saturdays and Sundays
Included in the 3 days allowed the manufac-
turer to complete the order (as provided in
article IX, section 18 (8) of the Dress Manu-
facturing Code)?
INTERPRETATION.- Saturdays and Sun-
days are not included In these 8 days
allowed the manufacturer to complete the
order (as provided In article IX, section 13
(M) of the Dress Manufacturing Code for the
reason that Saturday is not a working day
In the Dress Manufacturing Industry and-on
Sunday all factories are closed.

Bituminous Coal
FACTS.-Many producers and sales agents
are guaranteeing analyses and BTU values
far beyond the true analysis and BTU con-
tent of the coal. In these instances the pen-
alties assessed reduce the price to the pro-
ducer or sales agent below the fair minimum
Code price.
QUESTION.-Do sales of coal on a guar-
anteed analysis basis which result in a. pen-
nity and a subsequent price less than the fair
minimum price established by the Code Au-
thority constitute a violation of the Code?
INTERPRETATION.-Sales of coni made
in that manner and having the result indi-
cated would be a violation of the Code.


Interpretation


Grocery Trade


Wholesale and Retail Provisions

Wholesale Price Difference in
Packing

FACTS-It appears that "X" brand
sugar packed in 100-pound bags can be pur,
chased at one price and Y brand sugar,
which Is of the same quality as X brand
sugar but Is packed in smaller. size bag%
can be purchased only at a higher price than
" X brand sugar.
QUESTION.-If merchant A is selling
" X" brand sugar and conforming with the
provisions of paragraphs 1 and 2 of section
12 of article VII, Is It permissible for mer-
chant B to meet the price of his competitor,
merchant A. with Y" sugar, under the.
provision! of paragraph 5 of section 12 of
article VII?
INTERPRETATIONr-It Is held that, al-'-.
though both X" sugar and Y" sugar, I
may be of the same quality and grade, the
difference in price thereof being based upon
a difference in manner of packing, that
such sugars are not Identical or essentially.
the same" and merchant B cannot, under
the provisions of paragraph 5 of section 12 '
of article VII of the Code of Fair Competi- '
tion for the Wholesale Food and Grocery
Trade, sell Y sugar at a price as low asi
merchant B sells "X" sugar. .
Wholesale State Tax Not Included :-
FACTS-It appears that 'certain States i
Impose a sales tax upon all sales of merchan-'
dise to consumers. -
QUESTION.-Under the provisions of art.i-
cle VII of the Code of Fair Competition for.'
the Wholesale Food and Grocery Trade, is:
it required that such sales tax be added in.,
addition to the allowance for actual wages.
of store labor required under paragraph 1,.
section 12, of said article?
INTERPRETATION--It is held that un-|
der the provisions of article VII no foodA
and grocery wholesaler shall sell any article
at a price which does not include the in-i
voice or replacement cost, whichever is lower, i
after deduction of all legitimate trade dis-'
counts, exclusive of cash discounts, plus the
allowance for actual wages of store labor.1
fixed in accordance with paragraph 1 ot.
section 12 of said article, plus transportL-s
tion charge to the jeiler's warehouse and
transportation charges from the wholesaler::
to his customer when paid by the whole&
saler, and does pot require the addition of
other Items, including State sales taxep. -
Retail Wage Reduction A
FACTS.-It appears that a food and gro-
cery retailer employed a clerk at fourteen,
dollars ($14) a week during June 1933, and'
thereafter worked said clerk only part time..:
On July 1, 1933, said clerk left the employ.
of said food pnd grocery retailer and re-'
turned to the employment of said food and'
grocery retailer on November 16 at a wage`
of fourteen dollars ($14) per week.
QUESTION.-Can, said food and grocery
retailer reduce the wages of said clerk to!
the minimum provided in article 6, section 1,
of the Code of Fair Competition for the
Retail Food and Grocery Trade?
INTERPRETATION.-It is ruled that any
reduction in the wages of said employee be-
low that being paid him when he accepted'
employment in November 1933 would be a
violation of article 6, section 7, of Phe Code
of Fair Competition for the Retail Food and
Grocery Trade.

Retail Sale of Brands
FACTS--It appears that X" brand flour
Is being sold at a certain price in full con-.:
fortuity with the provisions of the Code of
Fair Competition for the Retail Food and
Grocery Trade. A competitor desires to sell
"Y" brand flour, which Is 'Wdentical or es-
sentially the same", including consumer de-
mand, at the same price as X" brand flou.r
is being sold, although It is possible for hilti:
to purchase Z" brand flour, which is also
"identical or essentially the same." "Z":
brand flour can be purchased at a price low.:
enough to permit selling at a price as low.
as the competitor is selling X" brand flout
after the addition of an allowance for actual
wages of store labor in conformity wjtbi
parhgrnph 1 of section 1 of article VIII. .'.
QUESTION.-Can this food and grocery.
retailer meet competition on "X" brand
flour with Y brandnil flour, or must he iput
chase Z" brand flour in order to conform:
with section 1 of article VIII?
INTERPRETATION.-It is held that both
SY brand flour and "Z" brand flour, being:
identical or essentially the same" as "V";
brand flour, the retailer may sell either "Y"
brand flour or "Z" brand flour at a price
as low as that at which his competitor ii.
selling X brand flour, provided that th%1
price set by such competitor on "X bran.
flour is set in conformity with the provisionlf%
in paragraphs 1, 2, and 3 of section 1, artlcl&|


U I GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE,1114


(I) Modification Proposal. (2) Amendments. (3) DivIlsion of the Construction Industry. (4) DivisIon of the Whole-
saling and Distributing Trade. (5) Code Authority Budget and Basis of Contribution. (6) Application for Exemption,
(7) Proposed Subdivision or Machinery and Allied Products. (8) AppliucationforTerminationof Exemptlon. (9) Division
of the Fishery Industry. (10) Division of Importing Trade.


L-