The periodical cicada in 1914

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Title:
The periodical cicada in 1914
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Entomology
Marlatt, C. L
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture
United States -- Bureau of Entomology
Publisher:
Govt. Print. Off. ( Washington )
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 29367029
oclc - 28176079
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AA00020662:00001

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L_ U S DEPOSITORY

Iwued May 27,1914.

United States Department of Agriculture,
BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY.


THE PERIODICAL CICADA IN 1914.

Information is desired on the subject of the occurrence of Brood V
of the periodical cicada (Tibicen stptendecim L.) (fig. 1.) to supple-
ment and complete our knowledge of the distribution of this brood.
The known distribution of thi4 brood is indicated in the accom-
panying map (fig. 2). The brood occupies, ina the main, a rather
compact territory, lying clhicfly in Ohio anti West Virginia, with a few














Pia. L.-The periodical ckI ada ( Tibiccn scpt ndithi): a, Adult; b, same, side view; c, shed pupal skin.
Natural size. (Author's illustration.)

- scattering colonies in Pennsylvania and Virginia. Some of the south-
ern West Virginia records are open to doubt, as are also some of the
records in Virginia. The distribution of this brood by States and
counties, as listed below, is based on records running back more than
100 years and particularly on studies in 1897 in Ohio by Prof. F. M.[.
Webster and in West Virginia by Dr. A. D. Hopkins, together with
numerous records obtained by this bureau.
DISTRIBUTION BY STATES AND COUNTIES.
Urmo.-Aahland, Athena, Belmont, Carroll, Columbiana, Cowhocton, Crawford,
Cuyahoga, Delaware, Erie, Fairfield, Franklin, Gallia, Geauga, Guernsey, IIarrLon,
Hocking, Holmes, Huron, Jacksonu, Jefferson, Knox, Lake, Licking, Lorain, Mahoning,
42862--14







Medina, Meigt, Monrox, Morgan, Muskingum. Noble, Perry, Pickaway, Pike, Portage,
Richandri, Rri,, Sarnduky, Scioto, St'nre-a, Stark, Summit, Tuscarawas, Vinton,
Washington, Wayne.
PENNSYLVAN1A.-Fayette, Greene, Wamhington.
VIROINiA.-A.%uguYta, C'ar(line, Ilighliand (?,i, Shenandoah.
W.ST ViHoLNL%.-Barl,,,ur, Doune, Braxtn, Brooke, Calhoun, Clay, Doddridge
Fayett e, (iilmer, Gr-ait, (; retiibrier I? i, IIancock, Hardy, Harrison, Jackson, Kanawha,
Le-wis, Marion, Marhhall, Mid,,,n, Mincral, Monongalia, Nicholas, Ohio, Pleasants,
Pocahonu.s, Pre.ton, Putnam, Randolph, Ritchie, Roane, Summers(?), Taylor,
Tucker, Tyler, U'pshur, Wayne, Webster, Wetzel, Wirt, Wood.


Fit. 2.-Map sh.wuiLg diinrLbutuun n Bruod V, 1914.
GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS.

The peri,,dical cicada is so well kno-wn that a general account of it
in tins place is unnecessary. W'hin it app)j)ears in great numbers it
naturally causes considerable alarm and arusLs fears for the safety
of shade trees anml un bJards. ThIe actual damngc, however, is usually
slight, except in the case of newly pli ni ed orchards, and even here, by
\igrirus pruiuing back after the cicada has disappeared, much of the:
injury citl.usd >y the egg punctures (fig. 3) can be obviated.
Ordinary repellent substances, such as kerosene emulsion or car
bolic-acid solutions, seem to have very little effect in preventing th
oviposition of these insects. Some recent experience, however, indi
caftes that trees thoroughly sprayed with Bordeaux mixture or a l
wash are apt to be avoided by the cicada, especially if there are o





3 1


trees or woods in the neighborhood on which they can oviposit. The
most reliable means of protecting nurseries and young orchards is by
collecting the insects in bags or umbrellas t
from the trees in early morning or late
evening, when they are somewhat torpid.
Such collections should be undertaken at
the first appearance of the cicada an&
repeated each day.
The recipient of this notice is urgently
requested to report, about June 10, on the
inclosed postal card, any occurrences of
this insect. The cicadas may be expected
to emerge from the middle to the end of
May, and scattering individuals may be
found up to the middle of June. Any
cicadas collected later than June will
S probably belong to other species, and
wherever the observer is in doubt it will
be well to send specimens for determi- ,
nation. A negative record is often quite
as valuable as one of actual occurrence.
The card should be filled out with the
name of the locality, including the State,
county, and town, the name of the
observer, and the date. Space is left at
the bottom of the card for a note on any
features of interest, and the information
given should include the date of first
appearance or emergence of the cicada, o. 3Eg punctures of the periodical
S the date of its general disappearance, and cicada: a, Twig showing recent punc-
the ndubers--in other words, whether tures, from front and side, and illus-
Sthe numbers-in other words, whether ST e^
treating manner of breaking; b, twig
very numerous or scattering, or whether showing older punctures, with retrac-
only a few individuals occur. No postage tion of bar k and more fuly displaying
Z5 the arrangement of fibers. Natural
is necessary on this card. size. (tierRiley.)
C. L. KA-LATT,
Entomologist and Acting Chief in Absence of Ohief.
Approved:
L. 0. HOWARD,
Entomologist and Chief of Bureau.
WASHINGTON, D. C., May 12, 1914.


WASHINGTON : GOVERNMmN;jP1NTI NQ OVVlICH : 1914


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