The Miami herald

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Title:
The Miami herald
Physical Description:
Unknown
Publisher:
Herald Print. and Pub. Co. ( Miami, Fla )
Publication Date:

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Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 2733685
System ID:
AA00020300:00003

Full Text

Ill

~~'


* . **J.


AItI ONSHORS0 OI4SCAYAIE BAY. IS 1ONE OF AMERICA'S MOST BEAUTIFUL CITIES. AERIAL PHOTO BY HERALD PHOTOGRAPHER BILL KUENZEL EMPHASIZES CLEANLINESS IN SMOKE-FREE CITY. MIAMI BEACH IS ACROSS BAY


PICTURE-FRAME WINDOW OF PAN AMERICAN AIRWAYS CLIPPER LOUNGE SHOWS PASSENGERS BOARDING A SOUTH AMERICAN-BOUND PLANE-ONE OF MORE THAN 900 THAT TAKE OFF OR LAND IN MIAMI DAILY
1,4 A


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-$ TMX MIgMI NI~EALB mndav. Muvembe, II1 ISIS




Miami s Aviation Progress Considered Marvel Of Air Age



Passenger Traffic :-'"' C1 Airport Is


Will Soon Exceed i .. ^ Hl .Grea Sport
is' meS


2,000,000 Yearly


Cargo Shipments Soaring Towivard

One Half Billion Pounds Annually
-. ]By BERT COLLIER
S"Heraldl Staff WrIler
Va4 County's aviation progress in the last 10 years has
em th marvel of the Air Age.
'-.. ieords in passenger, mail and cargo traffic have been
-roken month by month, as steadily as they have been made.
S-'t bright as the picture has been for the last few years,
the .future looks even brighter. Leadership, initiative and im-
iglnmtion combine with sunshine and location to guarantee Ml-
iBttd continued growth.
l ; Loo king ahead, here are some expert predictions:
'Within 12 months, barring a major war, commercial jet
asruera ,will be in. regular service here, cutting flying time to
NwT York and other points in half.
Passtenger traffic, now averaging better than 4,000 daily, will
thbrtly pass the 2,000,000-a-year mark.
And cargo, increasing more rap-S--
Idy than any other classification, were 873,694 an increase of
wMill soon reach the fabulous total per cent in the past year.
of one half billion pounds each nt n the p


year.


With this expansion, aviation's
prt In the city's economy will
continue to grow. The $100.000,.
000 pumped into trade bhan-
me ever y 12 months is expected
to double by $55. So Il the
stmber of people employed in
aviation and aallied fields.
SLaEck t -vision might stagnate
t.h-w7z g and, giant industry, but
tah Dt.a county port authority,
wha jo> is to provide adequate
faefltttes. Is planning far ahead.
* Within the last year, it has tak-
enw final steps to remove the rail-
toad'tracks that bliedt Miami In-
terMatiunal Airport and present a
0n00tant' hazard.
it Itha, ecided to take over an
eAtin" Incorporated village to pro-
v4e for more and longer runways.
Zt. has launched a long-range
.*,tH rosram coating more
0001that will include
Sof theA'most modern terminaLs
t' ei p country, and an express
utr-hlghway from the. airport
t downtown Miami.
*
Sl1 BIGGEST development of
the -pat- year has- been Miami's
emsseat as an Atlantic port of
entry. Its position as a Latin.
Americatn gateway has been long
established.
But in a few short weeks, the
Civil Aeronautics Board author-
Ized Miami. as a terminal for
Freiech and Spanish trans-Atlan-
tic air lines and as a point on
the Mexican flag route linking
Mexico City and Madrid.
Milmi's nrintinn llederp hino


Miami now ;s linked by single- ..' ' .
plane routes to the west coast, as '7 '^ -_
well as to all the major cities of 74; ''' ,I
the east. and by interchange A '- .
agreements between airlines with .' ". t '
the middle west.
The development of Dade count. ,
ty's air facilities topped by the
monster Miami International Air-
port, has been a miracle of fl-I
dancing.
The county took over the old | Ml
Pan American air field a few
years ago. Issuing revenue certify
cates-repayable out of Income. The
federal government turned ov e r MIAMI INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT is one of the busiest tea
the old Army Air Field and the world where passenger and cargo planes arrive or leave on c
huge MIAD facilities. and addition- one every 30 seconds. The air view of the missive insta
al properly was acquired to be some of the huge Pan American Airways hangars and main
paid out of revenue. 9
Only within the last year have
tax funds been needed, and the D g
$40,000,000 has cost the taxpayersMia i Downtown ock Ga
nothing except the small village
that now goes Into maintenance.
An Internationally admired beau- in Miami outdoors under the sub-
P F T the coun ty spot in Miami's Bayfront Park tropical sun.
ON TOP OP THAT, the county Ia the rock garden, a park within The collection, valued at more
facilities are the only major air a park. than $1,o00n, comprises more than
port operations in the country that
are In the black. Here one sees orchids and other 100 varieties.
Figures change swiftly in the raie flowers blooming the vear A cascade of clear water turn-
aviation world particularly In around, palms and a wide variety bles from atop a clif-.like rock
Miami. At last count, 917 landings of other trees and shrub;. some formation Into a pool.
and takeoffs In one day were re- similar in vranretv to those in
corded at the International Air northern greenhouses. flourishing A lilv pool, 150 feet in length
port about one every 30 seconds,
day and noght. The number is n C Fu
hdyher now. TBeing Coast Wise i Free Lunches


Capt. Eddfe Rickenbacker,
president of Eastern Air Lines,
has bpen a believer in Miami and
its air future for many year%.
lHP ees the horizon as limitless.


hare plugged this port as the Receril. he [old a ginjp of a'.Ia-,
logical American terminal for tion official and r Ivir leaderr,
tnns-Atlantic fllehts. Biggest "A r, lor a; popr ple te aip go T.
argument has been thep ,eaiher. 'bhe p ;III ,' ,t iipI.P ". .rti p rrprr-,iin
,rlin ic,1 andl ritli i as raliin0 '.' illi
Good flying ltaTin l -i' l 1., 1 nIE TIll1, hrrI- im ia RI ; nlino.i '
here on an aerae-' f 'P" ,. 1 ; ; ,o ," flt% i,)rl ,1. t 1.n .,, ill '.,
year and Instrument anr'iin c air
have totaled lets than a r.-,ni N Yc.'i mI1L:t pI1WI.-a i fir "11ii
during the past 12 mnit'h, No irov'.,ih aid r j ,ri' i-. h-inrli i
other major airport r;,, arpi ,ar'- i apper- ri-af Dade raount. I
that record. Aviation _xpei, ;a'. ihprirg 1 ',,z .-i re
It contributes, rr, onl' ti e'nacc, ,__
rate scheduie. bui trconomir- a
line operation. not in inenti.i' '1370 Courses,
safety.
Weather and geogr3ph.'r "'-'51? Teachers
tlon have been ke', in Miami'_, T-
aviation growth Th"- eari iound acin i t 1 1
sunshine and mild tpnppratiire needd io ,'i, a i ii : 1T -. -.1', d :.
have led Pan American Alrr. a;..- f rop t c n^ o ii'I' i i 7lf i'C .i,
Eastern Air Lines and Natinnal1 .o Rti, ri i iririim
AJrilnes to establish i r nl m ri Silude li Lai:ine a .-.,n mii
overhaul and repair fa'Riliirs riF. co IIre i,,d r,-,Inil, ait.'..l ne,-
Planes from all parts of iih- or Id u, pi .irt, i, 1- I I. C ai- \..t1n-
are routed here for the rn.1i. t n i l-ji, 11 tic i .wi.r -"ur;Pe
checks that keep them f I I n g t F'. ,,r- i me attenrild
safely and speeeily. siini' i .-.;i.-r, nriii 'ear.
II \, .',I-. ,i hi Ft,' 1. :prF'ote 91i
MIAMI IS the clo'-e t port of P.ea I. ta l -''1 a ij 55o;es.


I entrin' to most of Latin American
and this. ha_ reulter i in rho a1t-
est volume of IntErnationnl a i r


UM Trails Texas


traffic in the anit'd Statf; -r Fr -Enro nim.t Onl-,
the first seven months of 19510,. 1
247.606 International travelers University of Miami's enroll-
passed through customs here--43 ment of 1l6'1-l is the second lar-
per cent of all who entered or left gest in the South. Only the Uni-
this country by air. versity of Texas is larger.
New York. closest rival, handled Students from 47 states and 29
180.520, or 31 per cent. and ir; f fwPipn ti runtries studied here last
third ranking port New Oil 'ear e, ,-r \inn itip foieign ('ot01,1111 r
-accounted for only 3 per cent i pe.p I-tnnL-ri % pie Kni'Fa. i-Irasi.l
i[ ,lan T a s ard and Nor'i .1',. -i'!t
Though Miami's reputation I1 ih.,ri-.; tu.tlr'rts come fi.,m Lain
for international travel, this ac- \n;etlif s -n. ftis.hmniL rtinl
counts for only a quarter of its ,'a,- taiihL P-rtirPi" in Spa-_r i ri
booming traffic. Total panen- ir,1 I-,nefit.
gers In the same seen month" ,


ln24.IDA'S YEAR-AROUND mild climate hbia led Pan Amer-
leen Airways, Eastern Air Lines and NI'Joticnal Airlines to
\ e-establish their main overhaul and reprir I(cilitiie- ar,?.
-tured is a plane qe ling a compile overhaul and fresh
wes. 4


For those v.ho prefer leisurelv No license c required for fil;h-
,o a M a ina in t a.lelt after at Miami, and
trips to or from a Miami nation, thousands of visitors dall catch
-:Fteamhips now have .,pasenger ar- their dinner by tossing handlines
comrmodrlatinns f r" nin Balrimore from bridges Into Bisca'.ne Bav.
FOiUth. and tin Bniinn noith. bound, ranals and )iv.'rr.
U I


BARRY COLLEGE

FOR WOMEN

IN MIAMI, FLA.

Fully accredited. Conducted by the Sisters of St. Dominic
and conferring degrees in arts and sciences, Music
Teacher Training, Home Economics, Social Service,
Laboratory Technic and Business,

Located at 11300 N.E. 2nd Avenue, in the exclusive resi-
dential section of Miami Shores, the campus is a place
of beauty with well placed buildings, an outdoor swim-
ming pool and other recreational facilities.

Clip, fill out and mail the coupon below. You are obli-
gated in no way.


THE DEAN. BARRY COLLEGE:
Please send me, without nbllgation, a catalogue that fur-
nishes in detail information regarding Batry Collage.
Name ...................... .............................
Street ....................................................
City .. .............. .. Slate .............


rmminals in the in the background. Eastern Air Lines shops and terminal are In the fore-
an average of around. National Airlines shops are located to the left and not in sight.
llation dwarfs Most of the cargo operation sla from installations in another section of the
enance shops vast airport.


I5mmmmw


-In JMianu

For each passenger who ar-
rives or leaves Miami's Inter-
national airport, there Is an
average of more than t h r e e
persons to welcome him or see
him off.
This conclusion %as reached
as the result of a survey on a.
recent Sunday which showed 14.-
724 persons entered the airport
terminals, 3,025 of whom were
passengers and the rest there to
say farewell or greet those de-
parting and arriving.
During the day there were
917 landings and take-offs.
The survey showed the rarmps
a nd observation platforms were
the most popular spaces In the
big terminal, which Is the air
gateway between North, uth
and Central America, Caribbean
points and Europe.
The peak hour of activity was
between noon and I p. m,i when
139 planes either arrived or de-
parted.

Take Your Choice
City of Miami parks have equip-
ment for archery, badminton,
checkers, chess, dominoes, quoits,
lawn bowling, roque. shuffleboard,
softball, table tennis and other
sports which either are free or
available to fall and winter visi-
tors for a small fee.

Warm Trip
It Is now possible to fly the
warm year-around southern route
to Europe from Miami via Bermu-
da, the Azores, Lisbon and Madrid.


DO YOU WISH TO KNOW MORE ABOUT
THE CITIES IN SOUTHEAST FLORIDA?
GET DOLPH'S ATLAS!
102 11" x 15" spiral bound pages of STREET MAPS OF ALL
CITIES from TItusville to Key WetL The Greater Miami area
covered in detail on twenty pages. Map of Cuba, Map of the
State. Map of The Florida Keys. and other information that will
keep you well Informed about the east coast at Florida.
PRICE RIDUCED TO ONLY $1.00 tax eand peotaoge paid,
Send S1.00 to Frank I. Delpk Co. Ft. Lauderdale, Pie.
lMoney refunded 1 fnot satisfied.


and 15 feet In width, flaunts the
yellow, blue and red blooms of a
dozen varieties of tropical water
.lilies, one the victoria regisa, which
has pads six to eight feet in diam-
eter. In the depths of the pool
flash more than 6n0O goldfish.
Stalagmites and stalactites
brought from northern Florida and


are employed in Interesting rock
formations and paths wind in and
out of It.
Opened In its full perfecdcoh to
the public Feh. 5, 194I. after more
than a year's work by the city's
park personnel, the Rock Garden
has since been visited and photo-
graphed by thousands of tourists.


/- --- t


With A New Face





the new modernized


. 0


BYRONS


Throughout our 53 years in Miami
many changes have taken place . today in addition to a
new face on Flagler Street, many other improvements have been
made . all designed to make your shopping more convenient . more
pleasant . to vastly improve our services to you in every way! It's our way
of saying "Thank You" for your confidence . for having made
DYRONS Miami's Busiest!
Still greater plans for the future will become

realities day by day, year after year . but whatever
the chances ... Byrons will remain Miami's Friendliest
and will continue to bring you high quality merchandise . .
greater savings and absolute satisfaction
as in the past 53 years!





BYRO N S Home Owned . Home Operated!

BYRONS .. Formerly Red Cross Department Store


5 4,


rden Real Beauty Spot


ll


Tear.


F









You Can Have Fun


On Limited Budget

Dollar Handline And Some Bait All
You Need For Fishing Off Bridges
You don't have to be a millionaire to enjoy the delights
of south Florida.
There's many a visitor making a sow's ear do for a silk
purse.
Tourists in the money think nothing of hiring a charter
boat at $50 to $65 a day to patrol the Gulf Stream for sail-


fish, bonito and barracuda.
But the tourist on a limited
budget can have nearly as much
fun with a $1 handline and fish-
ing for free off a bridge near
town.
The causeways leading from
Miami to Miami Beach are a
poor fisherman's paradise. His
daily outlay is about 15 cents
for some mullet bait.
Only other possible costs Is a
license for fre-h water fishing
which for non-residents for Flor-
Jda is' $2.25. This is necessary
If one fishes in canals, lakes or
rivers.
It's also possible to sight-see
In Greater Miami at a minimum
of cost.
Bus trips through Miami,
Everglades National Park, and
to Key West and other points
average about 50 cents an
hour; boat excursions through
Biscayne bay, up the Miami
river and through canals cost
on an average of 75 cents an
hour.
Sightseeing bus trips through-
out the city range from $1.73
to $3.38, tax included, depending
on the length of the tour.
A trip into Everglades Nation-
al Park, with all expenses in-
cluding lunch, comes to $7.95,
end buses go well into the park.
Sightseers are taken to Par-
adise Key and Palma Vista Ham-
mock in the federal preserve to
see tropical wildlife.
Most ambitious of all excur-
sions by bus are one and two-day
trips to Key West at $10.66 and
$18.26, tax and meals included.
One of several bus companies
featuring sightseeing tours em-
ploys only University of Miami
students as driver-guides.
Naturalists, however, accom-
pany National Audubon Soci-
ety wildlife tours by station-
wagon and boat through Ever-
glades National park and the
Okeechobee lake region.
Boat sight-seeing trips through
the bay, up the rivers and ca.
nals range from $1.50 to $3. while
an all-day excursion to F'rt
Lauderdale and along the Inland
Waterway comes to $4.60, tax
Included.
Some boat- are equipped %ithl
glass bottoms so visitors may
wee tropical fi.h and marine gar-
dens. Others feature night trips
on Blscavne bay, with dancing
under a Miami moon.
Entirely without cost are Mi-
ami's greatest assets-clear air,
bright sunshine, blue sea and
mild climate, winter or summer
-around which have been de-
veloped a tropical splendor \with-
In the means of everyone.


Who Is This?


This Jacksonville-born star is:


Zasu Pitts
Judy Canova


TAouD3 ipnf :8sAIuB


Popular Place
Metropolitan Miami has nearly
one third of all the tourist ac-
commodations In Florida. It is es-
timated that 3,000,000 of the 7,000,-
000 tourists who come to Florida
annually visit Miami.

Plenty Of Fish


There are 600 varieties of fish
in waters about Miami, and no li-
cense Is required to take salt-
water catches.


25


Florida Data


Is Available


For Asking

If you are interested in visit-
ing or settling In Florida, there
are plenty of sources for in-
formation. Most people forward
their inquiries to the chambers
of commerce.
You can't go wrong on that pro-
cedure for facts and figures on
individual communities.
If you %ant information on the
slate of Florida and its industrial
location possibilities, get in touch
with the Florida State Advertising
Commission at Tallahassee, or
with the Florida State Chamber
of Commerce in Jacksonville.
If you have eyes on the Greater
Miami area, you can write to the
Miami Chamber of Commerce, 141
NE Third ave.: the City of Miami
News Bureau, Courthouse; the Nl i-
ami Beach Chamber of Commerce,
1210 Fifth St.; the Coral Gables
Chamber of Commerce. 220 Ara-
gon ave.. and the South Florida
Motor Club, 2S98 Biscayne blvd..
Miami.
All the other communities in
the Miami area, such as Hialeah,
North Miami, South Miami, Surf-
side, etc.. have chambers of com-
merce which are ready to supply
Information.
The volume of inquiries lhat
pounds into the Miami area is ter-
rific.
The Miami and Miami Beach
Chambers of Commerce each an-
swer about 90.000 inquiries a year.
These range from requests on ho-
tel rates to information on what
to wear fh'en in south Florida.
The City of Miami News Bureau
gets some 30,000 requests a year.
Most of these Inquiries are the
result of advertising appearing
in newspapers and magazines
throughout the United Stales,
Canada and Latin America.
The South Florida Motor Club
estimates it supplies information
and serm ices to more than 200,0001)
visitors each year.
The local AAA affiliate is pre-
pared to make hotel reservations
and to arrange tours and expe-
dIte shipment of automobiles to
any point.
The club also sees that all AAA
affiliate aie supplied %imh Miami
travel information. This fall it en-
tertained 100 AAA travel counse-
lors so they will be able to answer
prospective visitors' with first-hand
knowledge.


Miami Port


For Animal


Shipments
Already the introduction center
for rare and exotic plants from
the tropical world, Miami is rapid-
ly becoming the chief port of en-
try as well for odd animals and
birds.
Such an Increasingly large num-
ber of animals and birds are ar-
riving at Miami International Air-
port and the port of Miami that
authorities are expanding meas-
ures for their care.
A quarantine station has been
established at one of s e v e r a l
local zoos which supplies ma-
caws, leopards, anteaters a n d
Australian cockatoos to zoologi-
cal gardens through the nation.
Besides checking on the health
of imported animals and birds, the
quarantine station permits them
to become acclimated following
long trips from the world's jun-
gles.
A serpentarium supported by a
research division of the University
of Maimi recently received a ship-
ment of 400 cobras.


Tallest South Of Atlanta


Dade Courthouse Looks


Down On All Of Florida

A*$4,2j0,000 huilring Baltiimore once decided It (ird not want
tod:y is ?Pr\ing Miami and Dade county as adlminitratine lhF-adrl-
quartel Plan?- for the -tructure wv.ere offeredi Balt'more othia]
in the early 20'". hit they selermed anothe-r rip.n as me-ite slit
able for their needs.
The tallest building south of At- .. ... ,._ ..y
lanta and reputed to be the high- .' :- .-
est in Its latitude, the Dade county _.- .
courthouse rises 336 feet in air .":
Similar In design to the court- .. _.. ,[
house in Los Angeles, it is of steel -J ." ,
and granite terra cotta construc- .',,. S|
tion and is situated in the city's . -. i,: .
principal business district. "T
A landmark for residents and "-.., "
visitors, the building is plainly IH r I
visible for miles by night, as well ,
as day, for it is Illumined by con- n
cealed floodlights.


When its construction was
started in the fall of 1925, it
was thought the hnilding would
be of adequate size to serve the
county and city for many years.
That was a time of highly op-
timistic predictions for the fu-
ture of the city.
It was the peak of an unprec-
edented building boom and real
estate investment activity. How-
ever, all of its 248,553 usable
square feet of floor space are now
being utilized, and city officials
are considering the construction of
a building to be used solely for
municipal purposes.
It also houses the city and
county jails, which are as nearly
escape-proof as jaifs can be. These
occupy from the 16th through the
25th floors.
The courthouse basement is
used for sheltering official cars,
for workshops and machinery.
City and county employes in the
building total 858. Jails have on


YEARS IN


an average of 500 county, city
and federal prisoners in custody.
Designed by the late A. Tom
Eych Brown of Atlanta, who also
planned the courthouse in his
home city and numerous o t h e r
business and public structures, the
building was completed early In
1929.

Parks Aplenty
There are more than 5,000 acres
of piLiiJi' parks in the Miami area.
In addition there are 1,250,000
acres in nearby Everglades Nation-
al Park.

Road Crazy
Travel authorities estimate that
75 to 80 per cent of all visitors to
Miami arrive by automobile.


MIAMI


d o r ARMORED TRUCK SERVICE, INC

Rolfe has always been a
(.EVER OO fAai jA, leader in introducng and
EVER GROWING accepting each new im.
T MTO THE provement. We own and
TO ME ETU AM ^B I li A IMrK LI operate our own radio sta-
MIAMI'S EED MIAM I HERALD fion and were the first
MIAMI'S NEED ...... I .... L .


dwofz ~ARMORED TRUCK SERVICE, INC.
CARL E. BEETZ CORNER NORTHWEST NINTH AVENUE AT THIRD STREET
President POST OFFICE BOX 102B3 .n...... -.-


P HONE _-17 U 1UA


"O" III persons.work for other local
Big Consumer Government Hires Them Here, Too trics. work for other local
One out of ever 21 Floridians. Federal civilian employes total ..
Although manufacturing In thil a total of 109,576 persons, holds 3?,794 within Florida, the state em- Faithful People
adea has more than doubled in'a p'iillon under the federal. .tate plove iiutinhr 23.6-)0: citlie cm- _
the laqt in years, the Miami mar- or local government, the Florida plov 22.551 persons, counties have Miami has 235 churches, repre-
ket Estill consumed five times a- Stai, Chambher of Commeice re- 6.S6 emploves, school districts sending virtually every religious
much as It produces. | port- have 23,5S7 on their payrolls, and denomination.


Salute to


Progress


SKAGSETH



STATIONERY Co., Inc.



takes this opportunity to salute the dynamic expansion and development
of South Florida and Greater Miami during the last half century. We
take pride in the fact that we were among the pioneers in Miami, starting
out with a small store in 1922, and growing with the city where we today
have four conveniently located stores in Miami, Miami Beach, Little
-River and Allapattah, and a centrally located warehouse to serve the
needs of our four stores.


Our slogan has been, and is "Quality and Service" and under this prin-
ciple we have strived to supply and satisfy the growing business life
of Greater Miami as well as the individual citizen.


All of our stores are completely stocked to serve your every need,
Whether it may be office supplies, school supplies, greeting cards, pens
and pencils, duplicating supplies, stationery supplies, to mention a few
of the general items, drop by any of our stores and you will be greeted
with courtesy and efficiency:


Miami


55 N.E. 1st Street


Phone 82-4611'


Miami Beach 1462 Washington Ave. Phone 5-0894


Little River
Allapattah


7936 N.E. 2nd Ave.
1468 N.W. 36th St.


Phone 78-0511
Phone 9-89111


SKAGSETH STATIONERY CO., INC.
(Established 1922)
"Everything for the Office".


Sunday, November 19, 1250 THE MIAMI HERALD 3-H


MIAMI' FRONT TARD, WHEIE HUNDRUKEDS Ul V


Martha Raye
Wanda Hendrix


On Its 40th Anniversary


ai v It U C s IIeurviK erl; in
the world to have two-way
radio facilities.


'1











Greater Miamis Phenomenal Growth Gains


Rise Of Industries


Aids Area Economy

Tourism Remains Leading Business
As City Entertains 3,000,000 A Year
Greater Miami's phenomenal growth in the past decade has
the entire world taking notice.
In that time, the city doubled its aviation facilities and swung
to diversified industries to take up the slack in its off-season
economy.


Miami's growth has been sound.
There was no boomtime specula.
tion this time.
Tourism Is sUll the city's No. 1
industry. Its miles of golden
beaches and the proximity of the
Gulf Stream. just three and a half
mniles offshore, combine to make
bathing and fishing conditions
ideal.
There are more than 60G varie-
ties of salt and fiesh water fish
In abundance in nearby waters.
With 370 square miles of shel-
tered water in Biscayne Bav, 3.'ifi
square miles of sheltered water
between the Florida Keys ahd the
mainland, 520 square miles of wa-
ter between the Florida reefs and
the keys, and 16.400 square miles
of sea between the Bahamas and
the Florida reefs, Miami boasts the
finest sailing, mototboating and
yachting in the world.
Nowhere will one find more
dtiersified sports available year
around under such conditions
as in Miami. Golf is played on
12 courses hi the area, seven of
which are open to the public.
There are 144 public tennis
courts, some equipped with
lights for night games.
"At. the same time, there are
counUeess -points of Interest. While
Everglades National Park is n1t
yet fully open to visitors, at least
one road in good weather permits
a 70-mile penetrationn into the vast


SWih'ss This?


This building famous because it is:
Oldest ;kbgI Litile White Housm
Ilibernmost Hourl Edison Home
'I'M1 If 17 P81P301
"S' Ut enoq IsomnutiqlnoS :jimsuV

Porgy's Oil Makes

It Valuable Fish
Menhaden. critmtinol krnsr, n
as porgy, is Flonrida' top rn:'n-.
food fish.
Thev' are edible but are.used
rata-ly as fio-. prin ir-all, iE-,
ca ,-ie of e' Cr-.-i'.e 0ill. In thih
factt, hov ev er. ir-' Ithe ,'. -. ift
menhaden to the naidnuf'atLi,,l.
Menhaden oil i U. ,d i i innili.t
l pes of soap. in the nti'inuiLdr-
ture of linoleumn. \iani,.hi an.l
paint, in the 'Lateil ,i nfing of
fabrics and in tempering steel.


area. And three different l,Vpes of
tours are available Into this coun-
tr%'s only preserve for tropical
birds and animal life.
Fairchild Tropical Garden is
known to botanists the world oer
for its magnificent collection of
rare plants and trees gathered
from the far corners of the globe.
IViiltors may see other gardens.
orchid jungle?, a tropical mat ne
I collection, rare bird exhibtt3. a
jungle where niorikes s run wild
and humans are caped and an In-
dian village where Seminoles live
in their "chkkees."

IT 1S NOT suipiising, therefore.
to learn that each year Greater
Miami entmeritains as many as
3,000.000 visitors. There are manr
resort cities all over the world,
for actionss In the winter, spring,
autmnin or 'Sminmer. but nowhere
is there such a resort city for any
season.
For Its visitors, the area offers
such facilities as 550 hotels, thou-
sands of apartment houses with
units available for transients, mo-
tels and rooming houses-lodgings
to fit the modest or fattest purses
And there are 3,200 establishments
licensed to sell fcod, offering the
wvidest variety of foods at varying
prices.
University of Miami, boasting
the nation's only completely
new postwar campus, is making
notable contributions in marine
research and studies to aid Latin
American agtl-Icnlture.
Free concerts t h ree nights
weekly In Bafront Park attract
more persons than the horse rac-
ing tracks, and church attendance
Is greater than at the horse racing
and greyhound racing tracks com-
bined.
While fashion, prodtict of the
report character of the city, re-
main Its chief indil.tr'. ith more
lhaq 100 plants doing better than
$40r,)o0,no00 w9rth of business an-
nually at wholesale prices, other
type MnaniLactuirers are moving In
at a quickening tempo.
Modem n economity suddenly Is
disoveiing that. pi'oximitv to mar-
'uets and nearne',s of raw mate-
rials no longer are the two vital
factors for indu.tiY +. New con-
qluests of space and time are mak-
ing lIving. ioiking. and playing
conditlonR lar mr.re important.
*I
1MIAMIAN.%S I e in mo.l i n
hI-in-n Th, ,. ],a' e lullI i, pp ,!thl'i"
i1 In ,', n )f,' ;lie ,'-" 1'" I IJ11'l I ,. '
I .1,-iln 1 I.I lllt. ". 'frit- 'Kcil .. iri
[)ll ll.' i: h ". lr 3s 'l '11 luili mh l iliinnu ,
or oil of' Io'ic .
Thie- large airli -.. for f\.
alhple. h,l\e l.":j ""It-,. 1lu i I, :'I1
,alil thp, an dlq i p7 ii, ,1 L-It IOf
Ii1 i, l.,\'h h.il nIl i ti rn.ur'e
11 t k 1c11 -.r uiig As a it -ii t it'i-
It i I til- e ',, ,,'i P- ii f.l -t base for
the overhaul and mairiteriance of
LcnirniLe.i t aircraft.
Time '.as when a great indus-
trial 1it.v ireqiiit-e a port, either
ons thie -ea or lake. or at least a
river. Miami, too, is a port city,
and at the mouth of a river. Its
port does a brisk business.


Yet it r niot tIe p,,''t bhu htiii-
pai poL %i t ilir ii tl oinrg .) irticli1
ProgressiVe LIV t.i,. l poi..-.n,,. ...n ,un .tol op
LI ,.jt M anii an n' Fl,- J.19.
Miami Reach. in tile lat 2"i ,faNs M i a II i lintI i v i C,(.Tirl ,Al p i
has averaged the opening of one sit 'l.. :,b- ite ltuo i tii,', tIl-i -.u1 ',
new' hIi-tel and foe r new apaIt- %r.iich pulnr -' ie a'.,-icim i i,
rnent bil!dinps es r-r, n month. In lernaJuonal trafl'ir tiii Ait,, W tlii
1Q21 the cityN liad lue liotel and in he I nitl Sian,:-. 3irc-e t, tie
a dozen apartment houses. Now it pcint. it also li;indIi- inr,,e p,,i .rd-
ha_ 3uil hotE1sI and l1.4;3 apart- ape In inteiratiornai air fi eprit
mr ent houses, tian ana other i ti 1 rolnii ,.

Modern Housewives Choose

Southeastern Bottled Gas

MONTHLY BILLING SERVICE
Dependable No Storm Special "All Gas
Economical Interruptions Kitchen" Rates


310'%&&E 1 dUSL adu ctWyiQL
BOTTLED GAS DISTRIBUTOR
Best Values In Fully Automatic Nationally Known

GAS APPLIANCES
RANGES-Caloric-Magic Chef-Real Host-Chambers
WATER HEATERS--Ruud Smithway
HEATERS-Dearborn Ray Glo
REFRIGERATORS-Servel

0 lUIouT"EADTELRI!
NATURAL GA CORP. |u


S698 W. FLAGLER ST.. MIAMI PHONE 3-5391
West Palm Beach Tampa Ft. Myers
OPEN ALL DAY SATURDAY


4-H THE MIAMI HERALD Sunday, November 19, 1950


RETAIL SALES:-
1 210


260


S328


WHOLESALE SALES:-
| 237


SELECTED SERVICE


TRADES RECEIPTS:-


I 88


HOTEL RECEIPTS:-

I 140


-Graph by Ben N. Critwell. Herald Buslnefs Analyst
THE 1948 CENSUS OF BUSINESS brings out the tremendous trade. Figures used for compiling this graph were the pre-
roale o growth in Florida's trade since ih, business census liminary reports of the 1948 census ol bu-ne s, now being
of 1939 co..mpared with the rate of increase in the nation's announced by the U. S. Department of Commerce, compared
trade, and the even greater percentage gain in Dade county with the linal figures of the 1939 census of business.
0
Surf Averages 70
I a de Ss The aif at Mlamrl emains at
I 1Iail a'average 70 dpfiees of temper-
LTradU e Se s Fas t- Pac .1. J'X atutire summer and w'inler.


B.v BEN N. CRISWELL
Herald Buslneis Analyst
The rate of increase in Florida's
tiade over the levels reported in
the 1939 census of business has


Petr Cent
1948 Increase


Retail Sales:
SUnited States
Finrida


been gteatl% In exce.s of the na- Dae Coumn
Dade Couniy
tion's rate of inic.as'e in trade since
that year. Buit gid a- the record is Wholesale Sale%:
for Florida, Dade coumni's Miami United States
Florida
percentage impirovement In tide Dade County
since the I.19'J c-nsus has far o'.er-
shadoued tlat of Florida. Selected ernice Trades
The relative coinpartsions stand United States
out c(ieatly in tilhe lql4s census of Floi ida
lAmiimteS.s. prelininar2' restilts of Dade Countv
wilch are now being announced Hotel Recelplt:
by the Unintd States Department nt S
of Commerce. United Stalts
Florida
Hcac is tIle record: Dade County
Final figures superseding the
preli'mina, data for 194S are nutl
yet availarle. hut it Is not ex ice?, and mnicellaneotts
pelted lhat they s Ill change the series.
clautve ct(lla ip-uns of the aluor e f
fight, S riuded from 1he


542.041.790.000
614.464,.000
137.605,000

54..RA5.490,000
52Jf.F,9.001)
96.102.000
Receipts:
2,973.51 .000
Br .3n0.0n00
11,900,000

1G5l.'.5.o)
,12i ,3ii(.iV]0
12,300,000


repair

servicee


t rad e r esantilnmenis (-Pnqus
urr uuclb ser'ite S as hotels,
toul Ist conrtp and i rani, amuse-
nentq and n,,limn m picillire ilea.
eiris radi, hi'road a-ling and If-le.
aiilon. medical and health, l.-eal.
ediirlall.llal. nmpi| olir, a. culnt-
ing and dnni.%-lic sriiiia -,.
" UPe ]I i ,-* -11 1 -,..-ii i 1] -.k.


Parks Popular
% .,, ilw rla ,1 [.1 m p i, i j ',w .,-n n- '. ];zit
parks in ti- Greater Miami area
each year, according to tabulations
by park officials. The parks have
full facilities for '.,iH;' boating
and fishing, besides such attrac-
tions as horse riding, zoos and nov-
elty rides.


$130.527.317.000
2.336.000,000
588,765,000

1 5 27P.96,n000r
'1 ,981.200.i10
427,590,000

8.567,394,000
152,200,000
50,806,000

2.072.h60.no0
P'.41ilO.noO
47,944,000


hotels In Florida and 645 in Dade
county. Of thiee, 43 were in Mi-
anmi Peach, 221 were in Miami.
six were in Coral Gables, and 19
%%ere in the remainder of Dade
count,'.
Tout i jt criii arid c amp' in
Floil ida in 1948 Liunrher'd 1,.597,
wlth 122 In Dade count.
Amn-,eniprl. e-lahli-h, enis in
the .;ttie Loitalpd 1.144 in 1]4q. 21,4
nf h 'thich \meie reported in Dade
''n uiI1t,,


Busv Harbor
S.,r licnm Clta an.t hannana-
from Ceritral American countries
form two of the principal imports
through Miami's bustling commer-
cial harbor. Thousands of tons of
fuel oil is also brought into Miami
from Mexico and other ports each
year.


25 YEARS


CONTINUED GROWTH


IS YOUR PROTECTION!




CHRISTOPHER MOTORS

1200 N.E. 2ND AVENUE


PHONE 3-3341





DE SOTO
.... Largest Dealers In The South




PLYMOUTH
.... Largest Plymouth Dealer In America

FACTORY

AUTHORIZED SERVICE


40 FACTORY TRAINED MEN


APPROVED


I^~j


ANNIERAR
W-1 1 1
I S


World Notice


A Major Exposition


Manufacturing Show


Planned For Miami
The -;econd annual Greater Miami Manufacturers Exposition,
nhirh lat Malich attracted .,0.On) persons-largest attendance
ever re(r.onilel at a Miami show--ill be staged Match 211.
A steering committee headed b, 0-
Thonias E. Grad' already is map. only Creater Miami. hbjt markets
ping plans foi the hugee s.hn. to10 all u\pr the nation and in foreign
be hneld'l in Dinner Key Exposition 'OItI 'I16-'7.
hall. The diopla, encoutaage purchase


PERCENTAGE


INCREASES IN


TRADE


1948 OVER 1939


of liami-nmade products both by
local and national buyers, and at-
tract nepw indu-.tles to the area
b' pointing up the success of es-
tablished firms hre.
The 1951J event, first ever at-
tempted in Miami and probably
in the? south-a'r, reported direct
'-.les of more than $1.000,000.dur-
ing tihe lIt-ca, showing.
The e' posi'ion lnst. ,'eatr was. un-
(l.-ir ritri b, lITp C11. of Miami
fi.r the purpose of pronioting the
gro'wing in(stsrial prograrn. here.
'lhi year, Dade count, nats Jolned
%%ith the city in the project.

4 Causeways Join
Miami And Beach
Four cai'ce?\a,s In Miami
have a total icngih of about
I1'2 miles. Three connect the
itv with neighboring Miami
Be-ach.
Rirkenhatker causeway, 3.9
miles in length, is the longest
and conne(te Miami with Vir-
inia and Bisca3 ne keys and
Ciandnn Park.


The WHITE BELT DAIRY

extends


CONGRATULATIONS and


Shown at left -
Dairy buildings In


Delicious

Low Fat Milk...


One of the White Belt
1906.


HI L0


HIGH IN NUTRITION . LOW IN
FAT CALORIES
Fortified with 2000 units Vitamin A
and 400 units Natural Vitamin D.

White Belt Dairy, Miami's oldest, is
also Miami's most progressive as provy.
en by its being Florida's first and only
producer of "A-D" LOW FAT HI-LO
MILK.


White Belt Dairy Farm Ph. 7-2411


tDO NOT IONFUII WITH SKJM MILK)


Enlailieel'it of rihe Dinner iN-v
building to 10ll.,001 squale feet of
exposition space at a co:, of $Sti),-
000, %ill enable the -how to nearly
double it ex-Miihits. Giady said.
The exposition i-lll be de-
signed to acquaint Miani and
thp nation with the aririey and
elrent of ileni< nmaniitactliird In
this urea.
"Mfianmia11iu ln w inter \ ir'il'Sr
mho flocked i.) thle 'hmn lstl 'min
li.r wre amazel to hind displays
of hundreds of itemi- ringing fticm
foods to fire engines" Grady. added.
More than '0 booIths v.'ill Le.
available to exhithihtors. Floor space
allortrnl ftu- disprlars ha- bceer in-
crc-asfd S) pFr .cent. Dinnm.r Key
Auriito, n101l h.ie a lofty ceiling
wihuth enables, -hibiinois to elect
to'. erinlg di:pla, h.
The Dinner Key hall now Is
nnly 2,010 sqlaare feet lers Ihan
Madison Sqaare Garden.
The exposition will show the 'sur-.
ptriinpl.' laige nmLITer of rrall
industries opeiatint in the Miamin
ared. Tliee Industries serve not


UNITED STATES

I FLORIDA

- DADE COUNTY


According to lhei piireliminnry
figiurrs iliire iere 35.2')9 retail
li-dse a*t:lhli-hhienp( in Finrida
in 1418- anFil fi.snl in Dade ,.uniy.
The (.,innll'i'i-llP-, (of c<.nr- r,
Mte in(Ildi, i Jn the sale i.,tiil.
TI. .,,,hr .r \i ln.i.-;aiP ti .de
/ab ,-i ,,,',,l~ .i n ; FI1 FJoiihj > 11 n l,14
" i- ,;I,'1 i. h'11. Ii ie .ounl ',' hao
A l..",. .M l ].al.,i.. im eentl rf t)OI1
Itjlill i '\, ,i., ole-ale [Fis t 5l. r,-i "
- i i| rj'.,.-l [' i ,I. d i n |th e [, .
1 ln :' lected service trade's e..-
tablishments included im th ')i.
ida census tiln',.r, d lu ".,. Dade
county's alt \,.a,: .',17. Those
included in the census were per-
sonal serviope. :',,,;-..s services,
autom o hi e repairs, aand serv-


BEST WISHES to the


MIAMI HERALD on its 40th ANNIVERSARY


This Year WHITE BELT,

Miami's Oldest Dairy, Will Celebrate


it's 52nd ANNIVERSARY


White Belt's Dairy was started in 1898 by Dr. John G. Du Puis.
In fact the business was started by the physician giving free milk
to some of his patients.
Although the White Belt herd includes, Guernseys, Holsteins, and
Jerseys, a large percentage is registered Dutch Belted stock.
The Du Puis family is proud of the White Belt Dairy's record and
progress in keeping with the growth of the City of Miami and
invite local residents and winter tourists to visit their dairy farm
and see for themselves the modern scientific equipment and meth-
ods used in the production of White Belt Dairy Certified Milk.









'La~T R~CLTT gAl *i IW


^ w
I... II "-
.. fii


_______ m - -


The White Belt Dairy is one of the largest
independently owned milk businesses in the
country.


I


I,-


1


I .--


,-'- E a a =


m m ,,,,,,,==


wm!- V T' 11 a, W", ff





Sunday, Novegaber 19, 190 T'E MIAMI95.t0D B-H


Parks In Dade County,


Covering 3,500 Acres,


Among Best In Nation.

Dade county's parks system became of voting age In 1950.
In the relatively shot space of 21 years the Dade county
commissioners have furnished Dade county residents and vis-
itors with more than $10,000,000 worth of recreational facilities
on more than 3,500 acres of ocean beaches and woodland parks.


MOST OF DADE COUNTY'S PARKS re on the ocean where youngsters acquire healthy
Strains and strong muscles from year-around swimming and romping on the beach. Picnic
'lunches disappear rapidly when the children answer call for chow.


Sugar Making

Big Business

In Florida
Florida's sugar cane produc-
tion, like moat other state Indus-
triUes,, is expected to set a record
this teason-nearly '1,500,000
tons.
.. Harvest already Is under way
of cane by the state's three sugar
producing firms.
Topping the field ts the
gfitaV$.: Sua1C, r.. at Clew-
Isto., which e*pelts tW A"rest
more. than 1,000,000 tons of
ca.e'romi 2,500 acres in the
rich Everglades peatnau abut
te,* hkores of 1Aak* =k Q -tc
be.&
The sugar cofporatldn big
miU'at Clewistdn, a tourist at-
traction for -several years, is
open to visitors once again. More
than 32,000 visitors saw the mill
In operation last season.
Two other plants, at Okeelanta
and at Fellsmere, are harvesting
more than 8,000 acres of cane
this season.


Peter Rabbit


This year the Dade county
parks department is spending
approximately $2,000,000 on the
major ocean and bay parks
which are located within a few
minutes front the most con-
gested areas of the county.
Parks Director A. D. Barnes
during 1950 has been charged
wltjh the responsibility of spend-
ing $2,000,000 for improvements
on three of the major parks
and beaches of the county.
Barnes is spending $1.000.000


0


By Vincent Fago


u-I t
--I RYI'L f


"'AVIING been a tour-year
resident of Miami, this almost
happened," writes Vincent
Fago, creator of the comic
strip, Peter Rabbit, which
appears in The Herald everl
Sunday. F.igo used a snap-
shot of himself as a design
for a. Herald anniversary
cartoon.


A Thirty-First Anniversary



That Can Mean Much To You




Like the Miami Herald, Ungar Buick also has
an anniversary this year-its 31st! Thirty-one years
of serving you and other Buick owners in this
county....and for this we are grateful.
We have learned a lot of things in these
31 years-experience which can mean much to
you today-experience which can save you time,
trouble and money. It is significant that our key
personnel, from the general manager to the shop
foreman, have been with us from 16 to 31 years.
No dealer will give you greater value than
Ungar nor more satisfactory, courteous and de-
pendable service. That has been our objective
for 31 years. It is responsible for the fact that the
Ungar company has grown and grown, until today
its buildings and facilities cover more than 3 acres.


SINCE 1919 UNEXCELLE


1201 N.


E. SECOND


AVE. e MIAMI


* I


4,. *


for improvements at Haulover
Beach, the county's latest ocean-
to-bay development. north of Mi-
ami Beach: T$70,000 for Cran.
don Park. five minutes across
Biacayne Bay over the Ricken-
backer Causeway from Miami,
and $250.000 on Homestead Bay-
front Park, eight miles east of
Homestead on lower Biscayne
Bay.
The popularity of Dade
county's parks Is attested by
the fact that daring 1949 a
total of 4.135.978 persons vis-
ited the major park areas.
Crandon Park with its two
and a half miles of ocean beach
was opened to the public just
three years ago and has devel-
oped into one of the most pop-
ular beaches in the Souhl.
Crandon Park originally was
a 1,000-acre palm-studded ocean-
to-bay tract, with a two-and-a-
half mile. inaccessible, ocean
beach. It was a gift to the
county from the heirs of Dr.
W. J. Matheaon, who before his
death, gave the county beauti-
ful Matheson Hammock beach
583 acres i-fF virgin Floi Ida for-
est. on Biscavne Bay, southh of
Miami.
The $6,000,000 Rickenbacker
Causeway made Crandon Park
accessible to the public and
work was started to make this
one of the most popular beach
parks.
** *
TODAY improvements are
continuing at Crandon Park and
under conSti.I,.lion at the pres-
erit tlne i- a iIo"ldernr marina
for the care, service and moor-
ing of small craft, and the con-
struction of an administration
building'.
Since it. completion thie ca-
bana colors has been one of
the l:'iz attractions and the
scenic, miniature railway miake_
all parts of th" beach accessible.
More than i,..',ii automobile' (an
park, % %hout rhwge. ithin
eas.N wall:lnE ,s.itan,-e to the
beach i.
In addition i i.'rll'' alel liar-
becie plsii under the i-im.In
much -tres l-ha lie ii ilared
on tile ainu-eiment of children
and one of th' lalr"l additions
Is the Crandon Paik ion. to
which strange anin.al, from
the Jungle, and trpii't are be-
ing oonstantllh added.
Haulover Beach is Ino,.aiel be-
tween Baker's Haijlo.er bridge
and Sunn-. Isles. where the
count% oinn i'tl'..1 t'ir; are coin-
pleting the 210.acie Itract which
extends \ % itw.'ai i from the
ocean to Bis.ca ne B:i,. Here
'iit,:.i v,. ill Ifnd tin-urpased
facilil;'e for 'worinriing. ion
bath.ire and ;urf aid deep z-I
fishing. Haulo\er Bath.i Is lo-
cated on ,i. e liighwa\. % .\
*
MA T H E sON H.%MMOCIK
beach. located 1:'P, cii lnzj'a-
ham hiiqa, aand Bia-' Jle Ba,,'
is on,? of thie I 't popular parks
In the L coitrint', '.stem. HEre ill
-be foi nd tlF biiJle path,
throiipligh -i ._ ir o p i cal
groirhl pi.ni.- e roni.inl. beach
facilitie ; anrl tie lac'-t man-
made atoll tor protected bath-
I ng.
Gie,' noi lPa' I, n \i S I-ligh.
wa'.' ], ri? mirle -utih of Oju-.
Is the old-it piI: i ea in the
system. It's !"I a rei; .If nai'.e
hammnock lands ammo trail- bor-
der on mte Oleta RJuc, and gises
the appearance of a well-k.-pt
northern summer park.
The county.v parks depart.
ment eat of Hnomestead Is
carving out of 1.200-acres of
bay lands a modern park to
take care of the residents and
visitors In tihe southern end o(
the county.


Vuirinia Beach. located on Vir-
ginia iF',, imiod ,'Jiat'l r,-,nh of
Crandon Park and connected to
the mainland by Rickenbacker
Causpwa'y has been developed
by the court,' commSinmners
a' an ex(liii'.le beach rer.rt for
Negroes.
Cormmisloner I. D. Ma Vi..ar,
II I C1 1 chairmann of mie count'.', park
comiinltee ha-. ei. all ultimate
goal of 441 berths for small
SIN UAIIT O SEIC~ E boats and 65 moorings in county
ED IN QUALITY OF SERVICE parks and beaches for 1950.
"The work of the parks de-
partment," MacVicar stated, "Is
a da.v-b\.da,' effo L to meet the
changing cimands of an appre-
ciatie public. It iL our hope that
Dade :oun', v's multi-mnillon dol-
SH 0 N E 9-45 6 1 lar park inme.tment will soon
he known aS one or the lost
ouL.Standing in the entire United
States."


A STRETCH OF BREEZE-SWEPT beach at Crandon Park, the city's largest and most popu-
lar public playground. In palm-shaded areas back from the ocean are picnic tables and
ovens, bathhouses and refreshment stands. You can rent umbrellas and deck chairs.
Some sections of the beach have cabanas.


Most stores and other business
establishments in Miami have at-
tendants who can speak Spanish
as well as English. This is be-
cause Miami has about a million
visitors each spring and summer
from Latin American countries
where Spanish is the prevailing
language.


Warmer Engines
Three airway systems Pan
American World Airways. Eastern
Air Lines and National Airlines-
have moved their maintenance
bases to Miami because it has
discovered 75 per cent of this type
of work can be done outdoors and
Sa minimum of hangar space Il
required.


Baking Big Spanish Spoken


Industry hi


Florida

Florida bakeries Droduce ap-
proximately $35,000,000 annual-
ly In breads, cakes, cookies,
crackers, pies and pastries, ac-
cording to the Florida State
Chamber of Commerce.
There are 91 commercial bak-
eryT establlshments in Florida.
These plants are reported as
having some 3,400 employes and
an annual payroll of about
$8,500.000.
The value of bakery and re-
laited goods produced in the
state has increased about 130
per cent since 1939.
At the same time, costs of
materials used In the manu.
facture of these goods are up
165 per cent.
The Florida, bakery plants in-
clude 46 which sell primarily
to grocers; 28 which sell most
of their products to hotels, res-
taurants and institutions; 11
plants which own their own
chain of retail outlets and six
plants of other types.


GET WELL. STAY" w,"'i
at Approved Sanitarium -. Medical Ho4sp1tal
for Rest, Convalescence, Acutfe and Chronic.-
Medical Cases; Elderly People and Invalids
,. .. . ... ....... **, ,,. .-. ...... '-.--, ] ., r. ,*'.^/ ,


Five acres tropical grounds. Comfortable rooms. Delicious meals. Complete diagnostic
facilities. Resident physician; Consultants. Graduate nurses. Dietitian. Baths, massage,
irrigations, diathermy, sun baths, etc. For Resident and Out-patients. Accommodations
for families. Reasonable Rates. Write or phone for Booklet.


SUN-RAY PARK HEALTH RIORT
125 S.W. 30th COURT MIAMI. FLORIDA PHONE 4-1659





When in Miami..
ANNIVERSARY

Visit the Only Grove in the City 0.


,d Buy With Confidence


36 Years of
Satisfied
Customers


=== ~Bring


Selecting Your Own

FANCY GIFT BOXES

FRUITS MARMALADES
PECANS CANDY HONEY JELLIES
AND TROPICAL GIFTS


Your Camera


Ralph J. Repp, owner, invites you to pay us a visit, see the
fruit on the trees, the packing house, the exotic flowers and

plants on the spacious grounds.
Catalog Mailed Upon Request.



FLOYD'S FRUIT CO.

OUR ONLY STORE AND PACKING HOUSE

521 S.W. 42nd AVE. PHMe4 -
(Between W. Raser J, J-fda. A.tof 6 .)
__ e^n fffyai-Sunday ... 9 A.M. to 6 P.M.


.- *,'. 'L -,, s- *, . ^ .-, *
.:"; : .** ( ;: ,.-.'*. -t .. .' l -* , .. ..
I... . ,* * ",I
.... .
A- ... . .'a.:




^NI % ^ ;*: ;
tog ^aM i^ .. A %

U IU Kuy. Niveabpw 1.0, 1M50

"< :? ^' ,1- .: i ^ -il'"".lf" ""- "'"! ... "-- ; ". ""*


4'tfi04v''WUPY AN' I
V'y A(. Fi W LT,0,PBPL.EO OWN i
M. .Vs.n ti. NOW W0" 70 5CENE
St f tarALL Aft AMAI nP TH T'I TAK
l B FI Ma IOLJuAY, OPF'
... .ASWLL A PD iRINO














mbo" (Ct y Fathi

ber. N 0TI. Isrbo wot rare air ^^
X wcs r WNSame Old

.o twch energy that they
ta'h butd to their home
o 5u' Iwlg with vigor By LUTHER VOLTZ
lad reomue. ffton Canif arnild Malff WrLer
bWtM to the creator of MI'f The setting and the faces may
Abaer the danh of goom. be different. But In December,
Swhie' b alt* aul over g10-the month of The Herald'o
lorida. 2.Unding Miami city council-


By Milton Caniff


KIN SE& WITI ME- /A, YES, TE WI
EVeS T6HET TI' NATURAL BEAUTImE
,'y 1ERE 1 E WNOWdO OFMIAMI AME
:* A FELLERS MINDP-FABULOUS)
I HIS MY$sRIES)

Lall


ers Were Wrestling With


Headaches 40 Years Ago


men were wrestling with exactly
the same problems facing them
today.
Minutes of council meetings 40
years ago show the city's early
fathers concerned over:


BONDS for a sewer system,
street and sidewalk paving.
INCONVENIENCE. 16 traffic
by the FEC railroad tracks.
MOVING of.-'i liquor store
from one location to another.
Except for the names and the
amounts Involved, the minutes
could very well be interchanged
with the record of a'city corn-
mission meeting today.
The only Incongruity would
be on the bTdis-of merchant for
city business.
Today the commissioners
usually are concerned with
prices on motorcycles, trucks
and automobiles. Minutes of
the meeting of Dec. 1, 1910,
show they were asking prices
on feed for the city's livestock.
Incidentally, E. L. Brady was
low bidder. He quoted oats at
$1.80 a bag. corn at $1.60 and
hay at 1.55 per 100 pounds.
Frank J. Wharton was mayor
back in 1910. Later he was to
become Miami's first city man-
ager when the new commission-
manager form of government
-as installed.
J, I. Wllson was president of
the eight-man council. Serving
with him at the council table
were T. N. Gautler, uncle of
State Sen. R. B. Gautier; J. E.
Lummus, uncle of Tax Assessor
J. N. Lummus, Jr.: Lester Gran-
ger, J. J. Holly. W. B. Moore,
C. J. Rose and J. A. Conrad.
A youngster by the name of
Henry R. Chase w as fire chief.
Then he was battling with the
commission over a 327.68
freight bill for some ladders
too long to fit In an ordinary
freight car.
Now the same Chase is em-
broiled with the city administra-
tion for his job.
Even in those days the city
fathers were scrapping with
Henry Flagler's railroad. They
weren't passing anvtning as
drastic as the dipLited train-
Qtopping ordinance of today. But
the city fatlhei of 191 vere try-
inrg to get some relief for the
citizens whose buggies bounced
horrihivy oier the raised tracks
crossing Avenue D.
The commission of 191n peti-
tioned FEC hesciqua' i-rs Inr Sr.
Augt-ltire to get the giade of
tie ltiacks lowered on the 'pur
to tle Iro\al Palm hotel.
Ar-niiae ), incidenitially. now
is ,Miami ate. The tra .ks In
quepMinn nare ihoe which cross
the streett lJut south ot The
Herald binllding.
Health an.d hih i at-r% \ie ee
gtave concern of' the city fath-
ers of ]Qln. The, called on the
people to appimtp a t.oi'0 oond
]isseP for a sewer s,'.tem.
Another $30nnnn \% s a;ked for


U I


D


R


street paving and sidewalks.
Commissioners today are beat-
ing the drums for the voters
to approve funds for the same
type of work. Only this time, the
storm sewers will cost $2,750,.
000 and street paving of a
$1.000,000 Item.
Like the present commission-
ers, the city fathers of 1910 also
had a liquor problem to wrestle
with.
Petitioning the commission on
Dec. 1, 1910, was James P. Paul-
sen for permission to move his
detail liquor establishment. The
approved on the motion of Coun-
cilman Lummus. seconded by
minutes show his request was
Councilman Gautier.
The councilmen had their
problems, too, In balancing the
budget. They were asking a
$40,000 bond Issue "for paying
the existing city debt."
'At the same meeting, Inciden-
tally, T. C. Hinton, who doubled
as city treasurer and tax asses-
sor, reported on the tax roll for
the year.
It showed.a total property val-
uation of $1,506,447. The tax rate
of $30 per S1,000 of property
value (30 mills) pounded a hand-
some $45,193.41 Into the city
treasury.


Sunny Clime


Cuts Number


Of Bad Boys

By WILLIAM H. ADAMS
Herald Staff Writer
Miami has deadendri kids, but
their number Is far less than those
in other cities of comparable size.
A case load of several hiindred
complaints a month-from bicycle
thefis to domestic battling-shows
ihe value of the juter.ile aid bu.
teau in the cit's police depart-
ment.
nipmi
Rut Capr. Loir. A %Alien and B
statf cof eight ". hose heits aie
rally In the hbti;ine of li.ing
kid a fair shake" ip prr.ud that
de-pite amazing pOpLalion gain-
hre, the-, manage to uhiltie
i l alui ', tie riLuiLnhF-r of corn
plaint ; ear aftcr .:.Er.
The hurl.r;u'S -i.i ord is co-lirilelid.
bleP bil theie aie ieaonn; in.
tl'i' IS s,) Miami hos-ls nui,. erou.
parks, playgrounds, swimirin j
poolS and tennis coi.it. for rhii-ld
LiP. L'r.indon Park'.; unrivdied
,hpach draws hundreips of them
:nPekl,. Fi'hing aenJ boating in
Ir'h', la, canal or ocean aie
Sa\ailahle.
Malefarltrs who 1iii.real ril. ii.
dren find -peedy Ju-tice In Capt.
Allen's police ep a r t ine n
"coirl." The bureau ihaa Riith.i-
ity In homes broken hb. drink
,ir dihnice And no day passes
that an attempt to rejr.in dl'-
gruntled parents qr not made.
A rePLernt r..j'i: fling at vandal.
i-liil. ind lPi-i In h,, two groups oc
,-hiilitii u ,lio wri(.ked a school
anrd Fr.ole .;*eial hundred doilati
-'.i'oi' of iinibitule aii plane-; and
r:rsir vas sternly suppressed
',.hr-n r -gPle. lfui parePih;is eie oh' I
Ii vi a. their responsibility to maht.
resitit iIon.
"As a re-ult of the ptiblicity
given that vandalism," Capt. Allen
r'Pinarked. "%\e do not expect an,,
recULrrtnre In MIamni."
MiNami's kid; gPit one break nor
oitfeied bv other cities. A piac-
ii.-alsl Inexhaistible supply of
cnic hnoks Is ditrlouted ever.j
reek hy Capt. Alien. \\arirhinr a
ii tie or Of.' i sv.KTC rdanart .ithk


tlee sotiv'enirs of a visit to hi;,
offlicp, he said recently :
"1'i'll find nn Juvpenile de.-
linquenls among thon.p children." I
A juvenile aid hIhlad iira aRit-
Thrlo izPJ titPIP Marih 2i 1941, v illi
Sgr. Mak Oakford in criaigp Capt
AIlPn ha, hadr c hareoe it I'lie
ar.n,-v for two years and 101
ninnth4.
"Arv iii 'PilolP ail r1in 1as a
it! piemie the impin'Pment nt
conldition- that %ill lbpnefit cmi-
dripn." Alien .said. "To that end. it
IC Our purpr.'e Ln patchl up hrokern
hOlni.. at Ipat until the tinie thar
children can make Lheir o\n %a%
In the t'rIrld after the,' are p old
enough to realize what Society e\-:
pectl of them.
"Miami is fnrLunatelv, situated.
for kid'. perhaps more fortunately.
situated than an' other cit' in
America hb% reason of 1i1 climate
Our aim is to make It a still bettPr
plare In which to ltie by mending
households and making parents
want to be more indulgent."


MAKE SOMEONE HAPPY!

SEND A FANCY FRUIT GIFT THAT'S SURE
TO BE A HIT!!
After the summer months of canned juices this FRESH FRUIT
will be a treat over the Holidays and a wonderful Christmas
present. So beautifully decorated everyone will be pleased!
JZsn. & j.A t . W L 4 o t manq 0Aud-if-ll P, -
MAhatd iachaqu. ewadahk ftwa. 9Ioubvz"A. 20& I.
6pAdl iS&/L e e .


VokJdaic C za


- I


For your Holidays' celebrations,
this wooden box, approximately
nO 111-- -.. -. _ 'I -..1


&M Ins., contains a r zonaa-grown
Pineapple (they are the best!);
sweet, tree-ripened Oranges, juici-
est Limes, and Holiday trimmings.


Pkg. No. I Express Prepaid: 450 I


&fidYaq jAiwaL
A wooden crate, approximately 45 lbs.. as illustrated, filled
with finest Oranges, Grapelfnit, Limes, lour 1-lb. jars assort-
ad Tropical Jellies and Marmalades, a Pecan Boll with fruit
aougot center. 2-lb. DeLuxe, deep, oval, hand-made tray of
asserted Tropical Crystallized Fruit: 1 lb. large, fancy Pecan
Puts; a Grapefruit Baonboniere (a wholly crystallized grape-
fruit filled with crystallized Orange and Grapefruit stripl,
1 lb. chocolate dipped Coconut Patties. beautifully decorated.
Pkg. No. 2 Express Prepaid: $15.50


Wop~


I
'I

'I


Wooden crate, approximately 90 lbs., filled with finet
Oranges.- Grapefruit, Limes, a Florida Growa Pineapple.
four l-lb. jars assorted Tropical Jellies and Marmalades,
a Pecan Roll with fruit nougat center, a Grapefruit Bonbon-
oiere (a whole crystallized grapefruit filled with crystallized
Orange and Grapefruit stips).In, 1 .Lies ourzte, dipped Coco-
nut Patties, I l. Orange ,BJpopu J;fAlyt' a attractive
crock. 1-lb. iaot lEe uat r go M tn.? l.Bdhdy. 2-lb.
I DeLuxe, deep, hand-made tray of Crystallized Tropi-
cal Fruit, I lb. large, Sancy Pecan Nut!. Attractively
Sadecorated, asn illustrated "
Pkg. No. 3 Express Prepaid: $25.00
This colorful, hand-woven Basket, approximately 50 lbs..
contains the finest Oranges, Grapefruit. Limes, four 1-lb. .
jars of Tropical Fruit Jellies or Marmalades, 1 lb. assorted
Crystallized Tropical Fruit packed -in a hand-made, re-
usable tray: a Pecan Roll with fruit nougat center, and
I lb. large, fancy Pecan Nuts. All these are packed in a
colorful, hand-made Mexican Basket with removable lid
and decorated for the Holidays with large red satin bow. ,
Kumquats and Holiday trimmings. as illustrated. Long
after the contents have been enjoyed. the attractive basket
will be a reminder of a thoughtiul gilt. Shipped in a h.
heavy cartoPnkb '" ad batx .
Pkg. No. 4 Express Prepaid: $16.00 F _s ) _
Same Basket as for MEXICANA. but contains fruit anly-
Oranges. Gri'pelruit. Limes, decorated with Kumquals
and Holiday trimmings. Shipped in heavy carton box.
Approximately 50 lbs.
Pkg. No. 4A Express Prepaid: $9.50

-4 '01
k ~5j~ A Basket, as illustrated, approximately 30 lbs..
filled with finest Oranges, Grapefruit, Limes, 1
lb. assorted Tropical Crystallized Fruit in hand-
made tray, I lb. large, fancy Pecan Nuts. 1 lb.
t t, jar Tropical Fruit Jelly or Marmalade. Decorated
.*' for the Holidays.
Pkg. No. 5 Express Prepaid: $7.25


CeiAt&nwma


Same basket as the FANCY HALF BUSHEL, ap-
%\ approximately 30 lbs. No delicacies. Decorated for
-A= the Holidays.
Pkg. No. 5A Express Prepaid: $4.40


This basket, as illustrated, approximately 55 lbs.. Is
filled with the finest Oranges, Grapefruit, Limes, two
1 Ib. jars of Tropical Fruit Jellies or Marmalades, 1 lb.
assorted Crystallized Tropical Fruit. 1 lb. large, fancy
Pecans in shell. This basket is exceptionally attractive,
decorated with kumquats and Holiday Trimmings.
Pkg. No. 6 Express Prepaid: $10.25
Special Basket, similar to above without the Jellies,
pecans and trimmings. FRUIT ONLY.
Pkg. No. 6A Express Prepaid: $6.00


All fruit hand-picked, individually wrapped. Safe arrival guaranteed, express prepaid.
Send check or money order with attached coupon below.
(Shipments West of Miss. or Canada add 10 0 extra.)
ORDER NOW FOR CHRISTMAS DELIVERY

01


GROWERS, PACKERS AND SHIPPERS
H. Posigian, Manager
Drive south on U.S. No. 1 to Bird Road, west on Bird Road to Tropical Park Race Track. Turn left
on Palmetto Road south two miles to our sign at Sunset Road. Groves are lust south of Sunset
Road at Palmetto.
--------------------------------------I
Guidara Groves
Box 667, South Miami, Fla. Phone 87.2033
(PLEASE PRINT)
Please send the following:
....... packages No. I ........packages No. 2 .........packages No. 3,
........packages No. 4 ........packages No. 4A .........packages No. 5,
....... packages No. SA ........ packages No. 6 ........ packages No. 6A.
I Enclosed please find $............ in check or Money Order.
DELIVER TO: Name ... ................................................
Street .......... .......... City ........... State ..
FRO M : Name ...............................................
Street ............ ........ City ............ State .....
-- ---


Th


RCO. U.S. PAt OPF


IN BOTTLES


Congratulations Miami Herald

on their


4th-Anniversary


Mirade-ch a ir makes you relax


Ial


I







Sunday, November 19, 1990 THE MIAMI HERALD 7-H


..... ... .....
--...o
iiM .! .... IN
IOCO!4.. R VE
.........
..........
. . . . . .

.. ... .... .
...... .......
.. ... .. ..
...............


By BEATRICE WASRBLURN
Herald Stitf Writer
Artistes, writers, invenlol ,
doctors and retlied mnidlionaites
form the chief population of
Coconut Grove, according to the
directories, which neglect to
mention returned vetierans. ccl-
lege students, fishermen, tiades
people. Pan Anepi can pilots.
postmen, policemen and mock-
Ing birds.
For Uthoughll It represents a
cross section of an,, small
American [own and boa-t- four
churches, tv.o school., four kin-
dergartens. two clinics, a acliht
cluh. an Anlci ia3n Legion hrjn-e.
a little main street, of it- \pry
own, anid its piiale lihbiaiv'
tucked away amonn the poin-
ciana trees. it is ; rite true lhatL
the Grove Is different.
This little sutiburb of Miami,
Just five Iniles from in cil\ hall.
has what the tourist call
charm. Its cv. n Inhliabitant call
character, and its critics call
Just plain queer.
In spite of the fact lthal the
GroTe ha. nearly as many
local residents in "Who's
Who." as that other town of
distinction. Westport, Cnnn.,
the place haa always put up
a passive resistance to what
It calls modernism.
Progress. it may bip said istcps
at LeJeune rd and takef- up
again just below tHiP Deering
estate. People '4-LIui l-iwr 'va'v \ee
so aversein th eine ton i lecoiling
i part of Miami In 19P29 that mnany
citizen, still call their port of-
fice Coconut Gi'oe instead of
Miami 33.
The town has lad an aititn.-
phere of it? o% n PeIer since I165,
when Edmund Bea-.iey. a iletirn-
Ing GI from the Civi War. ,.'as
given 1i'11 a:ies 'v the Irlr'il
government. Follow. ing'hirn ias
Commodore Ralph Middleton
Munroe who came do'.'. n fi om
his home In Snaiwn Island at
the Invitation of his old friend.
William Brickell.
The town of Coconut Grove
wasn't incorporated until lI1111
but the olde i woman's club In
the state I' Lhe' Housekeepers
Club founded in lSqr. A little
group of families including the


Frov'- and the Pent 'PetIled OuL
lith ie hpcau.p ihe v likprd Iiip rli-
mate. EKven then ir nmav he aid
that Ihe GIO'.p va, rFactiondai' .
It np.'er look lip itl lltie e
new angled idea. soIineliow. It
was that kind or a place and
still 1 .
*
IT WAS whi.pprid that illi'
GIotPe va. a lovely' place to get
a'v a'. f!olni ',our tl.Ouh!,-Z, l FT.-ie 1
to the mocking hird sing all
niliht. raie .,our r.%\n Iiianlgo's
ad- aoria% d ;on rd Iel lpP v' n Id
go h,. Even the-n flk I!kprl to
thllink of rCnronli[ Gir-lie ac an
erail' a pl', rrAilp ti,. n 'i ii)' a
namne of ltz cv. n like. ilia'. be,
Par', or Phiiardlplila.
'That is tIhe rra-on you will
find few ideltalks In the
GIroIe today, onl.% paths and
counlr.i road%. leadlneg through
a -ilderne.i. of pains and
pines and poinciana. Even a
blcnrle cannot find it'%r way in
'Utopia Court and there are
quiet street% where you neTer
nieel anyone butill yourself coui-
ina back.
V'e hzi e all krinds of honi-e-
In ihe Grore: great. ,tone nian-
slonn; doi n I,,' the Monring. and
on Ba' slihoire Dri'.P e !%%n their
ovir n -.v.iimniing pool; anid ir eir
o' n yacht hain'l: old Spanih
hou'eF v. ii, thelln fri nial ie'-
dens and their tiled patio-, Enlig-
hi-l'i manor ilotL es_ w ith finc\
thatv hed roof,f old Firridi
h.-li.es 'i)'lli reep '.', iidon'. an11
wide piorhes. CBS bungalows
jut like '.,Ol r ,u e 1'p Nawtli,
and rlvelrpinepnt hou-es that the
government ha; built.
*
WE HA.\E all kind- or pro:p!e.
too. toiJh g t nor ra' findring
thepm IlI1 fart. it's noi ,P% tindrl-
Ing CL'_-iiii.l[ o P rnn p of 111"
smart fernd; havp littlIP maps
printed oln their [ationply hilut
ve hate a regular telephone
I'OL II e.
"Conime up Pixie higlllia,,." 'vo.
IPl them rarefillv. "and turn
\,.est on Poinclana. and '.ol can't
nhiss it OurE i 'hat old !hoIUe
on ithe corner with the bike In
front."
Of course you know they
are g"Ing to call up In an


hour rr ino from ('Coral Ga-
hips, or Snoulh Miami or reven
Perrinr: "'%r miast have
nileted the direction% smer-
how. Where did iou say we
turn?"
A pioup of nutr ritiens ?uc-
(PPrid III almost itirninp bak ihe
pa.t. Between them and the Mi-
a111 Tial l_'i Co. ex tr.- a silent
fetid hPcaue? the c.lripar,\ per-
lodirall'. liitenz to Ihe pleas of
ti o.? or LI S 1 ho 10 live v'ihtI it
rihauf[eurs and put on an ?extia
Oli n 1 i w r', is the lonp ride to
I1 n D. The rpactionai Ies inoari-
all'' nin and the bushi is taken
off.
*
FOR SOME TfiME there was
ant ar'uilierlt .'AhetlPi Ino hate a
cop at thle circle \here Grand
ale. and Main hv. '. v.ting to-
.-ther' hut the town riompro-
niiled on a Inounted policemnian
%%ho has. heconte as familiar to
tlI, Grot'e as Ilie little lshop;
v.hPrp_ \ P knov.' all thPe -hop
lk-pers by name and they know
1";.
The Grove ha. Its own sncial


Boat Junkets

Are Popular

--And Cheap

Thousands of visitors in Miami
tl!ti ;\inter '.'ill go on sight-seeing
,O.at trip, through Biscay.ne Ba%.
Ithe Miami River. canals, inland
\vater'tas and lakes.
Fifteen such boats operate from
ihe (it" \a(ht ha-in., within a
clone's throne rf downtown hotels
One ha- a gla. bhottonm o paa-
'engert's na',av see tiopiral fih fll-
ting thrroupgl coral reefs on ilie
oc.an hr-
Two (,atIL sail up the Miait!
RitEr. past Seminole Indian vil-
lages aind tropical jungles.
T h r ee resel take visitors
pa-t tie $15.0on,000 Deering es-
tafe and other palaial shore-
front niansions at the south end
of Blscayne and Cape Florida.
T'.Ao cruise' thinuah man-made
il.ands, a tel! a ranal_ and other
P %ater'a ,,.s a4a it ,orks its \.ay
along the northern part of Lhe
ha' .
One alt-cday crui-e goes to Forl
Laiiderdalr.
Ainoiher hoat feature. moonlight
cruise_ oit B ca, no Ba,.. wiTh
Dancing and other entertainment.
Two firms earh operate five
spepedboais v.-hich g I v e visitors
inrilling dashes through blue
'.aler in the Miami area.
Mo-i of the _lehi.-;eeing cruises
rn.it $1 50 per pei son, including
tax.

Too Maniiv Fish

,Prove Good Ad
Five fresh water anglers were
Fined in Miami's court of crime
recently for exceeding the fishing
limit by hooking 308 fish in one
Hour. The state limit is 25 fish a
day for each person.
The anglers admitted their
catches respectively as 91, 65, 56,
51 and 45. The fish were taken in
the Tamiami Trail canal, a por-
Stion of which is within the city
limits.

Fun In The Sun
R;.r ne Ri which bounds Mi-
1"i1 onit tie east, has 370 square
miles of sheltered waters, making
it a fine ie f,' a ,, p .'-rnd andr
a favorite spot for *- T ri.,r, in fir.,
all over the world. Before the end
of 1950, the city expects to have
completed facilities for 250 yachts
at a new marina being constructed
I at Dinner Key.


season, so called, which opens
in November when winter vi1-
ilor' come down from New
England and Long I-land.
Thrn the hoards are taken rff
the big houses andi there en-
suca a routine of luncheons
and teas and cocktail parties.
(riven by people for friends
they hare known for years.
.There is a hotel iii the Grov"e
srO e.\rlLivie ihat \ou hate to
sign up a year ahead to ta,'
there for a e-ee,
The GroTe spiings to life for
these few month and %e feel
almost as though iie %%ere a
part of the gieat cities. of the


There's No Place Quite Like It


Nc'rih. But In Ar, l! the npazon
col!ap ep a- la- -u d -Il a-_. a l.,ijbi-
cu oer at _undown. th-E win-


tr" lrb-,irp aF'e hr.ial -led uip or they. u-rd to way of Nev," York
lei _id to "ouriz _tnarjt;. %-.e stop in Augu:t. "there's nobody in
earningn g hal and cEloe: and a. tov. n


thirty-eight


Cowen's 822 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach


OWEN'S opened its doors for the first time
in 1912 ... The City of Miami was a lusty
youth of sixteen . And The Herald a
toddler of two . Quality in Footwear,
and Service Unexcelled, the founding pol-
icy, has been the guidepost through the
years Cowen's has served South Florida!




I OWEN'S policy created confidence . .
and the confidence of our patrons built
Cowen's! From our humble beginning in
1912 Cowen's has now grown to three fine,
modern shoe stores. (Soon there will be a
fourth, The Florshelm Shop, on Lincoln Rd.)


Our firm hope is to continue to merit your confidence!



Cowen's Features These Nationally Famous Shoes:


The Florshelm Store, 245 E. Flagler, In Miami


PHONE
48.1587-4-0075
Ft. Myers
1015
Daytona Beach
2.2395
Hollywood
3857


For WOMEN
* Florshelm
* Peacock
* Zuckerman & Fox
* Johansen
* Valley
* Paradise
* Cowen's Deluxe
* Shenanigan
* Dickerson
* Red Cross


For MEN
* Florshelm
* Taylor
Wm, Joyce
G Cowen's
* Commandos

* Daniel Green and
L, B, Evans Slippers
* Hummingbird Hose
tfor Women
Interwoven Hose
for Men


".: 'k. '^^ '"t _j

And, Soon to Open, the latest addition to expanding Cowen's, The Florsheim Shop,
648 Lincoln Road, M.B,


By Quin Hall


To some of us thia is the love-
iiet time of all, the season that
the tourists never see.


-~ A. A A A. A A. A A. A. A. A. A. A. A. A. &.
'w -w ~y' w 'w-w w w 'v -w y' 'w w -w w w


JJV.LVJWLL ,"x vxw- 4 v"

) jlwjtt jL ]l yauL4



S"DEPENDABILITY" |

iA. 4sauw
dtc& j3ciuAk6L
4


4



3ODD5U|
4

PASSENGER CARS "JOB RATED" TRUCKS

SFactory Authorized Service Mopor Parts 4

WVhen You Thihnk of "Depieidabiliy" 4
Then You Think of 4




JOHN JONES, Inc.i
"YOUR DEPENDABLE DODGE-PLYMOUTH DEALER" 4

S2050 N. MIAMI AVE. Phone 82-7611
AT 4

"JOHN JONES' JUNCTION"


s


STRIDES FORWARD

WITH SOUTH FLORIDA...


-the leader for 24 years.


ANNIERAR
W,I"1 4WT-0Y
p *


2762 S.W. 10 ST., MIAMI
2762 S.W. 10th ST., MIAMI.


(
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Ak


An


Sunday, November 19, 1950


--sss-sg""
-*t"-',^
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"^ 71^11 '*'"'"-


THE MIAMI HERALD 7-H





U 8-H THI MIAMI HERALD Sunday, November 19 ,19S


No Smookeslaerl Bsinesses Need Apply


Power Needs Adequate For All New Industries


PARTNERS IN GHOWTH. Miami's skyscrapers merge wilh the Miami elec.:tric .iercr.Ilr,.
plant whose Maxim silencers shown abovemuffle its mighty roar. City in &.96 die'.' Is
electricity from a 40-kilowatt generator. Now the city is bracketed by t:.ur qeneralin.
plants with capacity of '298.000 kilowails.


Indicator Of Growth

Florida's '49 Electric Output

10 Pct. Over '48 Production
Electric production in Florida, a signiticanrt indicator of
the growth of the state, was up 10 per cent last year over
1948, the Florida State Chlamber of Commerce reports.


A total of 4.7M4.102,000h kilo-
watt-hours \%as produced by all
Florida plants. This total was
made up of 4.156,153,Q000 kilo-
wvatt-hours produced for public
consumption for all purposes
and 627,949,000 kilowatt-hours
manufactured by industrIal
plants for their own uses.
The plants which produced
their own current are principal-
ly pulp and paper nuills, lumber
and wood %%orklng eilabllsh-


ments, minerals, chemicals and
food products concerns.
Fuel used In Florida last year
to produce electric energy to-
taled 8.605,723 barrels f42 gal-
lon) of oil and 4.009,006,000
cubic feet of gas. Oil consump-
tion was up 5 per cent from
1948. The amount of gas used In
1949 was more than double the
194S volume.


CHANEY


ATHLETIC




CLUB


Here's the ideal headquarters serving the
vacationer in Miami . right in town . .
close to all the spots that are the delight
of visitors and residents alike.

* Salt Water Swimming Pool
* Steam Room
* Expert Masseurs
* A Complete, New and Modern Gymnasium
* Restaurant Cocktail Lounge


Swimi Relax!
Dine Comfortably!
Exercise! Livre
Gracefully!


Florida

at its

best ---- Miami

at its peak!

Arrange now

to enjoy the


/


WRITE TODAY
FOR COMPLETE
DETAILS
Fill Out and
Mail Coupon Below


In the Heart of
Downtown Miami
129 S.E. 4th ST.
446n 0 Phone 9-1681

CHANEY ATHLETIC CLUB
129 S.E. 4th St., Miami, Fla.
Please send me, without obligation, complete
details on the Chancy Athletic Club

NAME ... ......................................

STREET ...................................

CITY ........................ STATE ............


The slor. nf Mimi'.n iE. ui.' l 11. i n f i.F-liede the little I quantity thlin a consulItinrg enEinp-r andrl
fi,-.I n I ha IrI iL'il ot i f .i.dlP I- r IllI I i I e r-i pIlai in the hotel II),.' a di ettor cf tihe F nio ida
I )5. to a .n i'rd legR ,,-I an'l lrt l :i.,,.ili1 ii.ppl.v. Po,.er & Light Co v a roim ii-
a ITillliunii ir 1.i IIii ilI '. 1-. 11,t1' -I
-c.'. ofi i* ee IC' .;i L I'"f.,I the .. .Flagler inc1'eased the .ie -.irnpd bv Heri-t, NI. Flagler to
In"i, a. I i -I I jlr, A. t ,IL-'1, a i.l 1 of hp t R ,yal Palm'. enrlating h ild Miaii's t, tt circiric ..'-.'.r
Fi)n rlil. The additional |)oler %as
Iv rr. igobbled up. pil r Th- plant 'v a corntl UtItF'I
TlhiF ciht ir,:- 1 01,110 1 .l I, I. I-,11i. ( IIII | thi, AIt of Fr'L'; pre-enl MI-
i.r-ali d 1 tl,)i oii l''',-.,lih li.i'l, l .\lI tliu-_La ndi l; Of r i, ] .r-nli-, i liiarir on the M iam l river.
h '.-te a rrir+-iri- ci' t c ri l, u r, [lic p,',i ,'- i 'ih i 't.) tIi nI, h(- irl-nianin l Iont i"I'
.l al,.. H er '. F -h I1i, I F hI,r,,l ,. _-, O,| ,:r i iii. '| a ti nr ,lr.l For the lasl half' ientlr. the
Ea-t Cra-r i;i.'l. -d l',,,. t, ihe r, nI,,i f,-,1 t ir.ti ,, ,-i,.P.e E.D r. gro, fth of M ianit I ha- been %I.
fir.t ma-.s lr.i-n.r,,' l.h,-,n. I,-, (I ,rip. Flrl,'.-- ,nl I _p e. talI aided l hb. a conk" ant PMial"-
Th ui I v ,J.,r .-il ,, rai.. i l k the I-atiun1' H.- llj ,i if n or electric i 'Pr iarrililleh.
,"hi ,l i. t, 'VI',,, i., itO.-. l,.-ril i -teiiI Ke.mlak rie r T'here are no important waler
ha te ..E l ight -*,-.1 ), , l,, i ",, ii ric .. -iinm ent l-,i l I 'l < el 'e- l iii-r ie t -iP- in tile
-l e p. i iIi -i'i D IM.10 1, 'i,0i "-. c wiitl.l1 ta f l noi important nil depl .n.it
-1 iie-r l al i!,3 lii.. 1 :iL JecI tei 1 j.c i l,, i] ini .l n a; an., Oiner or co' al nilnes. F uel lor I10 er
gelr.'-iling pal ii, I plani; for igle ccum pli-.niert riof niii' nt"it be .hippied in.
thr. E c, .d r. l I [, ,i ii ]-''.. to
sel '-. I ihe hIt.I al-'nic a .- ijl hli rin, Il\ t ii -. rn e thite t1ii l're '." '% a r' Thae Th irn t IC,.'i-r.iniC.l f'icl i- n1il,
loa 'l eri ~ al,.' _- r l 'r ii l n i r C. riet I ie l, : h n drhi ,iil f t-| ,- i r t rr. i l.r n ; ,,'.,rr. i Il 'i ';:.I i r c.-:ari-
a-l:. if ([i -t.1r- hl id p littlee of li hI:. li.. p,- e i hFr iri pr oei 1 p.,,i lar,. ii l-'<.i la' Ailaitir
tle p ro.,,--r anr Fia lir ran Ihrmi u I l 'j it aInl,-' .ltrl r.. itJ thr .l- l i.'i p.-l,!;.. iL_,linair. foI
iiLi nIvirid of Ileorla. i l, nppi a31I', t- r' iitla. L IIIe i Of u 0' o i fi fliel ill
Sr(,,, ,l.n' .- i,,,-.i1, f i,- l i .. -. ca i, -: nupo-,n l'ii',:h a inm dern cit ,,
i'ii .h-i i '. i' p',.-ul l, *' in ice iiLaK- Ii 1'11. ,.i' .'il .__T,1_ I_.; n. _..l_
il


~~_____~~___A Florida IndusItry


Phosphate Deposits Rank Hilgh


FLORIDA PRODUCES 65 PER CENT OF U. S. PHOSPHATE USED


Forty fathoms deep in t li e
earth of souLhse!t Florida air
the bones of prehitnork(. four-
tusked mattidon. and other land
animals that retreated to Flor-.
Ida s lush Ijungle .it' million
-ears ago before the mrrenacing
glacier which covpieed thm entire
land mass of Ameirta.
It swept the bones of land and
sea animals, intei rmningled .v ilti
the rich Florida stiata of mlie-
stone. to a giant 30-mile ha-;in
along the Peace Rivc-r to f-rrin
the *.orlc's large.it bed of pho_-.
phate.
.'i-lntorr paz.ing th otlRpn t h r
%a.i phosphiate mining ar-'-a
LSUaalI a-e LriaiSaie that the
sanry inOindl.. and iluep lake iA -
t-is are tl1' landnlmadi-rk of Bone
VaIle;,, Floi i,:t '? d,' hi r IV h
i j, i th ri rii. N.-'I. 1 pi -
iltli i-' ri' lie i ,,I i l ir 1 : -
lint in h..: n i I Ilh :|r n-.','
re-.iplip!% in;i lhi"f- I, c, rkrdl nit
lI mrn l, il',il. a !,'".,in | rl', ,,",,- l,
fr-n d a !UI]Id I a i .' ,:,1 1h p,-,i-1- i.i.n.
.it llilli Ilii. ii llic' iin,-
idl-la Il a IfiI ni-hiii l| n li ll.r-.


Get set now for the be!
* Winiertime c.ian he ;uch a gay
time if Sou're a good dancer. \nd,
anyone c:n he a ,oughi-.ltter p.irt-
ner the Arthur \lurra \\ N\ '%ou
see Arthur lMuirri', hj an e.:.lu-
si\e method tI-hat mcile< l.irninC
lo dance c.isy ,% .--B-C. The
whole secret is in hi iKlagic Step
To Popul.iri'.". Th,,;s 1, the l.iv
step to .ll djnces .ind i. .uirplc to
learn. So come in no>;' ind rrcp ire
for thega' est winterr -LjonpOun'\e
ever had in our lie.


iniqu-rv fi r Fl,-i ida and
lliroinl h I1I1 uw a- I'fI lili r
lia. im rpa-ed hP rutl|itl if
Aineiria's farmis b onc-liltlh.
[ l l l. 0 1 0 1 1 iP ,, *h l -
C tl ii a I I iq Il 'i 'i i i I h r i: I l' i "l
n 'l-io- i l- f J I .; C I- l ,' l', l 'r-
pi-i'llr i.] M.I- r.,'lii.i -Celi -- ill \1i~l~r
i 'll r -r --:i, T i-.i r |.lit t l t l'-
tih i -i ju ] i i. 'ii' i 't I, .
Fic iiiap,.'1 p,7-[ i'i.l te i i u-i l'
I, El l ii i rI'iIaI .IC l-1 ll .irV ,I 'th ti
.li-riv li fir'n' -ilin ll I','.,,'..,lir, ll t,-[1I.
t iL L it I IW ill [ 01 ti-.. l ", [ Ii t
.li -c rnI riiru toib'.. nu | i *] .i r
r.i Iie riar iorl's Oultpl.t .n-l in m)
pe il ei[t of tie *,, I.-1 t.-'i. i c in-


S ii ihi
.' i ."ii' l .' ' f: [ 1h 7 i', 1 -Ih i i. I .
II 1 II ii' .ir, [ .r Iii ,P i 11 ,i r i i
l ill i l. .it l I h l l I
,,i l~ i,,, II, ,', ,,, Ii ,I r ,,


st time ever!


ARTHUR MURRAY
1415 BISCAYNE BLVD. BRANCH STUDIO
Phone 9-3679 1514 EAST LAS OLAS BLVD.
THOMAS SALINAS FORT LAUDERDALE. FLA.
Manoaing.Director Phone 2.0612



Columbia Chemical & Supply Co.


7430 N.E. 4th COURT

Columbia
Brand
Products
For:
Dairies
Dry Cleaners
Engravers
Exterminators
Hotels
Ice Plants
Institutions
Laundries
Photographers
Restaurants
Swimming Pools
Water Works


ma a


FHONE 78-2544



extend best

wishes and

congratulations


The

MIAMI HERALD

on the

occasion of its

40th ANNIVERSARY


Ol nlmi r'inc nit
l.ii-lrilthe; hc-
a lp. I -"i I I,- r r l' C. r I
ii, ii l tr i t brt



-ii Ic ,-" iS
I* 11 I r l ( q i't
: _.. :. -- A".S


2* '- '.,


, .} : <
C -,..





IN FERTILIZER!
I.-.
1 ..:,r _; al ],





* .
I-; .-

INFETIIZR
ic i ..[- ?L ifF ,


SHOVE M.OVES .' ABOT
__ ,"-- ",*.* ':ir _
SHOVEL MOVES ABOUT


U


generatingg plant_ and the appli-
cation of eIPctric power in its busi-
ne-s and industrial plants has pre-
served a cleanliness Important In
the lout, L1 t inonim',.
Re.ort (cri rs are free of the
smoke. s.ot anil smog that liala.-
ces man% Northern and Pacific
t:,.a;L >i:ommunitiez.
Florida Pot%%er & ILight Co
,lhich serve- the Greater Miami
area aird a large portion of the
cleioainder of thie sai.e, has Its
lieadqua ter', In Miami.
X mai.,r e\pan.ion program has
briitn in hih gRear ;lnce the enrid of
Wirld War II. Eight new power
plant, geieiailng tinil, have heen
ilaicedl iin npeaidion. Mole than 3,-
iii0ii llle:t of new liransmi- ion and
rli-ii.tr-Ation, lines, ha e been con-
-tructed ]S10611'l ness customer
ha' e ber rn supplied with elec-
it i. it',


Two new generating plant ad.
editions are under construction,
one for completion this year
the other scheduled for 1951.
Already some f80.000,000 has
been spent in this vast postwar
elpansion program. By the end
of 1951 It will reach S108,000,000.
What are the FPL economists
predicting todat ?
They say that the Miami area
%!ill double its population In the
next 10 \ears, neighborhoods now
considered "on the outskirts" will
be comparatively "near In." and
per capital Income %III show a
-teady rise.
Supportineg their advised opin-
ions ate miiirinns of dollars being
inmestei, and authorized forfuture
spending. to provide electric
pot er Ito assist In this phenomenal
growth.


___________________________________ _______________-- II


S Congratulations

1- o


The


Miami


Herald


On Their


40th


Anniversary


0


UNITED METALS

CORPORATION


Dealers in:

METALS 0 IRON

PAPER 0 RUBBER

Office and Yard at
N.W. North River Drive and 32nd Avenue

Phone 9-1861

Mailing Address
P.O. Box 1257
Miami Springs, Fla.


3.,UUU T N D AILT iY ** --. ..



Miami's Only Willys-Overland Distributor


Convenient Downtown Service'for All Makes of Cars . 333 West Flagler


Willys-Overland


SALES--SERVICE-PARTS


Immediate Delivery On Most Models


SEE US FOR LIBERAL TRADE BEFORE YOU BUY ANY WILLYS


Telephone:
3.2179


M O T O IL S, INo.


333 W. Flagler St.,
Miami T Tr
-----------------ISTJWBUTOR6


WILLYS DISTRIBUTORS FOR FLORIDA


aiL,-!PFAM


! ;;x











S *5 gord


ndav. Nov ember la 150 1


THE MIAMI UHRAL D


There's Not Much Twilight


Few Areas Can Boast


More Colorful Show

By JEANNE BELLAMY
Herald Staff Writer
Sunsets in Florida may not be more beautiful than other
sunsets. but you'll probably think the,,' are.
Maybe it's because you can see the whole dome of the
cky in sunset colors And the landscape seems designed to


chosen by the artist.


against uthite sand. perhaps
,tith round leaves of the sea
grape on a dune? The fronds
and curved bole of a coconut
palm? Claw-like roots of man-
groves In shining vatei?
* *
ALL THESE ri-;e ficom the
flat peninsula to lorm silhou-
ettes against the sunset.
Even skylines of ctlues and
towns, lone bungalotws or farm-
hou.es are transformed in the
brief glory of a Florida sunset.
You'll have to see the colors
toIn believe them, especially
when there are a lot of
clouds.
Even on a cloudless afternoon,
you can stand on Florida's west-
ern shore and watch the giant
sun dip into the Gulf of Mexi-
co in a blaze of crimson, pur-
ple or gold.
Of course. you'll discover
Florida sunrises, too. And oOu'll
probably say they're more beau-
tiful than sunrises in other
parts of America, too.


"', ._ >'. -''
'" : .,, ?,
.. _' 1 _.


*-' s, j.r-- -/ ,.,
-.


.. _.'' . . _'F ,'A .
.. . .. .- .

..-


set off the picture like a frame
Florida sun-ets don't lasl
long. The sun goes almost
straight down tov.aid the hon-
:on. There's hardly, an', twilight.
Stiddenl it's night, and stars
appear.
That's because Florida is
nearer than an-, other part cf
the country to the equator,
v here night falls like a curtain.
Farther north, the sun slants to
Sward the horizon, vanishing
slowly.
Clouds erie also are like those
in the tropics. Thunderheads,
the king; of clouds. are seldom
out of sight in Florida skies
from May to October.
You Wvon't see as much ra-
riety In clouds here as else-
where In the country.
Mackerel sky, formed In cold
air, is Liather tare in Florida.
So are the spectacular dlsplas
rauseil sometimes by cirro-
stratus clouds, which put haloes
around the sun and moon.
Cirrus clouds often can be
seen high over the peninsula.
They're like wisps of %eil. or
delicate %bhlte strokes from a
painter's brush.
*
LITTLE RAIN clouds are
plentiful in summer, sailing
overhead like blobs of hoppedd
cream on a pane of glass. So
are the massive thunderheads.
towering as much as 30.000 feet
from chase to peak.
When thunderheads stand
over the Gulf Stream. th, light
of the setting sun can turn them
rosy pink so that the brighte-t
part of the sunr:t is in the easti.
No mountains cut off Nour
viekw of Florida sun-iits.
The highest spot in the pen-
Insula is not quite 325 feet
abore Ihe sea. That's Iron
Mountain near Lake Wales,
site of the Bok Singing Tower.
Even there, the surrounding
land roll; genth to similar
height. Standing on the soil of
that low ridge. 'ou have a full
view of the sky, as everywhere
in Florida.
What kind of fIorceround do
you like for a sunset' Floridrla
offers a choice variety.
Mo...drapcd oaks? A lake or
unrippled r i cr ;s a iefletting
pool? Gnairi'l rinis; i, inc i. rcon
a bcd of r', lirin'Ett ,c ? Saa.tgras;
s.i1airnah; ilrtt..,l v. Il h (,aes of
cahhage paln-;? Siti foaming


These famous neighbors lived at:
Palm Beach Miami Beach
Fort Myers Orlando
selyi Ioj ;Tv uoirp3 iPo191 put poj aluaeg :1eAMuy

We Pay, Too
Federal intrrna! ievrc'nue col-
lecrion.; in Fiorida totaled $341.-
'Al,(.'._ in the fi.c'aI ,?ar erding
Jlily 1. .1'1n., tihp Firrida State
.'l' ,a n a, i,: r 0 1f C o rn n ',ei c e l p r l'i ,


Florida Has 17 Of Nation's

75 Heaviest-Flowing Springs
Florida's many springs are a strong summer tourist at-
traction and are one of the state'- most significant natural
resources, the Florida State Chamber of Commerce states.


There are 17 springs of fir.t
magnitude in Florida out of a
national total of 75. minore than
in an', ctherr state. The.e largest
of FloridJa's springs have nmaxl-
mum flou'. of from 65 million
to 522 million gallons a day.
In additin. FIorlidl has 49
iplii g of 'F- ,)ril magnitude,
IIat i_. pilrii'- v.'Ilh average a
fil''V Of lierin 7 to 6 i nillon
galons a da. _Crintieq othlier
'p.lincl ut '. h'l 1 c- l' .I oic ur
iuOuLIhrLit tLiieI -tate.
Till r-ecinrinic valualp ir lhP.e
%pring' is in. ail niahle. RrrPea-
ltin,. ar h nilture. inldu q'i'r and


navigation all benefit directly.
The spring areas which are
commercialized for recreation.
al purposes contribute appreci-
ably itn the economy of the
sale a it ell as to that of
the area.
Manry of the springs make
navigation of rivers po.sible.
Oirher- are u(Id for hydraulic
p,'-. i. Broad'l,,. the combined
flo'" s of the -iate' many .pringe
T.rort ide e -ntiaia I %ater for
hunian nemJ,., to agriCultural
crop.io, lr lhc-iock and for veg-
pt.ia ii ri.


!'
I,1


A PART OF FLORIDA


mt'e"* ____._A 'Al BOATMAN HAF O A l HO RUK 1 A E M r UiN rLAHIIS I113 LAS T ,JIvLJ


S20 YEARS WITH CHRYSLER.PLYMOUTH IN MIAMI!


_"* _, .-'.4 t: -


9


McGAHEY'S


offer the largest CHRYSLER-PLYMOUTH


Sales and Service in the South!

REMEMBER. IT'S



mMcGAHEYS


wR ER,

PL~YMO^


1930 N.E. SECOND AVE.


Phone:. 9-6516


":,




MVJOTORISTS. particularly tourists, must
have motor products and services, and on-
the-road conveniences available wherever
they choose to drive.
Since the first out-of-state car drove onto a
Florida highway, Standard Oil has been the
pioneer in providing these services, products
and conveniences. From Fernandina to Fort
Myers... from Pensacola to Palm Beach ...
the motorist is seldom out of sight of the
familiar Standard Oil sign.
In money and people . in plants and
equipment.. this Company has its largest
stake in Florida, because we have always be-
lieved in Florida's great future.
In 1949 alone, this Company's Florida sal-
aries and commissions.. additions to and
maintenance of Florida plants and equip.
ment .. licenses and taxes, including pro-
Sduct taxes which we collected and paid to
State of Florida authorities, amounted to
over seventeen million dollars.



STANDARD OIL COMPANY
(KENTUCKY)


-7&56" 4 5*14 5CU-;-,


, ~ij 'it


-.,'--'C- S


/


mounanyg Iovemnllerl iav dawlou i n i~RIIIi nr.KLIO u-n 0


I


I


z


CR?


SIP 7___ i ^" ^ v


WhoAreTheyI7'l
4W H H
Ida 3 A^l---






-10-H THE MIAMI HERALD Sunday. November 19, 1950

BIT/.!


Scars Of Hurricane


Are Rapidly Erased

Florida Has System For Putting

Things In Order Soon After Storm
By JEANNE BELLAMY
Herald starff Writer
If you're looking for hurricane wreckage in Florida, you'll
be disappointed.
"Vhy. you'd never knwo' a hurt i:an, hid been through hevI."
is the reaction of man', v r.tti-i, .


That's because Florida snapsl
back to rnornial _;'-n aftel-r the
big xinds ai ild-v. n.
There was plpnt,. of sriaim-
bled scener', a month ago inlda,'.
The ilorm ti at la r-l ami i",o
night of Oct. 17 %s a S R-niLne
hurricane. Ii 0iii.1iTiiP.Sal.hl-,u'
W ind eak ie'pd a _- l i? trCI'LII
ma;s%_ \liLiedi up the lengLli of
the peninsula into Georgia.
Greater Miami was a sight the
rnorniing after. Broken glass and
other debris littered downtown
sidewalks. Palm fronds, fallen
tree:, flattened utility poles
blocked many streets. Sand cov-
ered oceanfront pavements.
All day Oct. 18 the storm
rolled north toward the Georgia
line. It left grapefruit on the
ground, young vegetable plants
beaten down, shorelines pound-
ed by high tides.
While that was happening,
Miamians were busy. A crime.
son sunset Oct. IS glowed on
a near-normal city. Broken
glass had been swept up. Road
blocks in main thoroughfares
had been hauled away.
Sightseers I g n o r e d official
pleas to stay home and caused
traffic lams. They wanted to see


City Father

Is Woman
WEST PALM BEACH Na-
tional poi'i'.s have taken a
number of women into the fold
but this city still remains one
of the few municipalities in
the nation 'with a woman city
commissioner probably the
only city in Florida with a
feminine mernber of its govern-
ing body.
She is Mrs. Estelle Murer, a
longtime observer of public af.
fairs who served her appren-
ticeship by attending city and
county commission meetings
l.,ng before she ever ran for
office.
Mrs. Murer was elected to
the city board here two years
ago and since taking her seat
t- the commission has served
continuously as president pro-
terTn.

But No Sand
In Your Spinach!
Among the 50 public restaurants
to be found in Miami Beach are
several with unique dining facili
ties especially suited to the mild
evenings of this i -sort. Dining ter
races adioin the ocean, tables art
set in tropic patios and other din
ing rooms border lhe inland a[tpi
va, s along lilch ?ihl _e-ini
boats are in he een taking pa;ien
gers for moonlight ride:-.


tlhe \ 1r ir..aRP rf a i ail hii i i-
Calte---w lile i IT (.ilr|i 1 .r.rnl.
Thait va' 3;n'i Inna. W ithin 1

I .i 1, r -. t i iip ii IPi t 1 1 ,1li
l* df [,a'\ l ri|, l .1 1. l [g t land-,i h
C In[ 1.1 [,- ,ii i t f.-, l' i r | l n t
tI lP Iz a ll o, P lhF r it ', rp
lined W1 l liiie iirtlliti. r (i
greenery.
You may still find some ofI
ilie- brown by now. ( jiii'c
away tree limbs and shrubbery
pruned by a hurricane some-
times takes more than a [i,-,riii
in a city the size of Miami.
You may notice bare spots
in the skyline where trees
used to be.
You may see what's left of
flimsily built structures ripped
apart by. the wind.
You may see patches on roofs
and tiles missing where roofers
haven't had time to do their
work yet.
But if you're r *ii i,- to see
Southeast Florida a shambles,
you'll be very (l.rpi..,ir.-
More than 1,000,000 Floridians
felt that storm's force. The
1,000,000 worked fast to clean
up their damage.
Power and telephone com-
panies hurried to replace
broken poles. Oceanfront re-
sorts hastened repairs to get
ready for early-winter guests.
New crops have been planted
in vegetable fields hit by wind
and hurricane rain. Citrus
plucked by the storm-mostly
grapefruit-will i.iiil' be
missed in Florida's 100,000,000-
box crop this year.
Florida is ready to welcome
a record crowd of winter visi-
tors-as usual at this time of
year.


SWe Have A Limited
S Number of

BRAND NEW
1950
CHRYSLER
ROYALS
WINDSORS
S NEW WORKERS
and
ItPP.IAI
Imr ,uMBI t


| In Each
Body Style
Available for
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY

I MUNROE-ZEDER, INC.
On The Tamlaml Trail
I at 21st Avenue
Authorized
Chrysler Direct
S Factory Dealer
'I _____ __________


HURRICANE DAMAGE LOOKS LOT WORSE


THAN IT REALLY IS. THIS STREET RESPONDED RAPIDLY TO CLEANUP. VEGETATION MAKES


QUICK COMEBACK IN SUB.-TROPICS


Florida's Mild Climate Attracts Military Training Installations


By RICHARD RUNDELL
Herald Staff Writer
The same balmy climate that
has filled Florida's beaches with
millions of tourists has dotted
Its landscape with hundreds of
military installations.
Depending just as heavily on
a favorable climate for training
as the tourists do for relaxation,
the armed services have used the
state for e'.-,i' iiinc, from infan-
try training camps to a guided
missile base.
During the war, spacious Camp
B I a n d 1 n g near Jacksonville,


ANNIVERSARY


ground out thousands of replace-
ments for overseas divisions
from its Infantry Replacement
Training Center. And there were
other important installations at
Jacksonville, Orlando, Pensacola,
Vero Beach, Fort Pierce, Fort
Myers-In fact, in about every
sizable community.
Planes based at MacDill and
Eglin Fields and at the state's
several naval air stations fur-
nished anli.-ubmarilnr protec-
tion for vital Caribbean-bound
Allied shipping.
Top secret Air Force equip-


Congratulations
to

The Miami Herald
on Their

40th Anniversary
*


A & B PIPE and STEEL CO.

"22 Years in ;Wliui"

BLACK and GALVANIZED PIPE
Cut and Threaded Up to 8 Inches

STRUCTURAL STEEL

PLUMBING SUPPLIES
VALVES and FITTINGS

TAYLOR FORGE WELDING FITTINGS
GENERAL DETROIT FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
PROTO MECHANICS TOOLS
RIDGID PIPE TOOLS
TANKS OF ALL KINDS

Phone Pipe & Steel Dept.--3-6211
Plumbing Dept.-82-1434

500 N.W. 5th Street


ii


ment was, and still is, put
through its paces at Eglin Field
before being put into mass pro-
duction for use by the services.
,Key West provided a : 111r iing
and repair port for a large part
of American submarines based
in the Atlantic during the war,
and is still an important base
for the undersea craft.
Possibly one of the most im-
portant installations, from a
long range point of view, is the
guided missile testing range at
Banana River near Cocoa.
From this closely-g a r d e d


base, huge missiles have already
been sent soaring out over the
Atlantic, with their courses care-
fully charted by electrical hands.
A Marine reserve i" 'igirr
squadron is now based at Opa-
locka Naval Air Station, near
Miami and ground-f i g h t i n g
Leathernecks from training
camps in other states have
used Florida beaches for sev.
eral practice amphibious land-
ings.
When the end of World War
II saw the United States dras-


tically cut its active military
forces, it saw these forces re-
placed in part by reserve units.
Thes4 units, variously called
"citizen-soldiers" and "week-end
warriors," sprang up all over
Florida.
The climate that caused the1
Navy to organize air reserve
squadrons in several cities also
caused the Air Force to set up
part-time reserve units.
It is these units, trained in
peacetime under sunny Florida
skies, that are being called into
action now to back up the Unit-


COMBS
Established 1896

Congratulates




ohn iami neralb

on its 40th Anniversary


The Combs Family

is Proud of Their

Record of 54

Years of Service

in Greater Miami


ed Nations action in Korea and
other trouble spots.

ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS
WITH MAPS
Streel maps of any Florida City.
Map advertising PAYS-Testimonials
from hundreds of satisfied users.
Special maps compiled for any
requirement by experts.
Single Copy of Any
Florida City Map 250
Prices in quantity upon request
DOLPH MAP CO., INC.
Fort Lauderdale Florida


- DADE COUNTY'S PIONEER
FUNERAL SERVICE


Phone

3-2101

Aqui Se Habia Espanol


1539 N.E. 2nd Ave.


Everett S. Smith, D.D. Director of Public Relations
Walter H. Combs and Jack J. Combs



COMBS FUNERAL HOME


I


I


I


I


d




Sunday. November .19, 101 THE MIAMI ..HtALD S.-H


-20 YEARS OF SERVICE


,WITH SERVICEABLE


.:-' .. .
, ,.: .'.' -
.'..*' .-*o,
..*r,- i^'
*, .: "? '" *
^. .':i:","','
..- -'. *;*,'
- ;/:.-.,. 1.
. ,. ^ S ,

" ';. ,\


.... ,^ |1 i^ a | .i *g ., i A-.' ,.^^ ~

TOGREATER MIAl'


.,', : .,- .. :" i ;


:A FEW OF MANY USERS
FINDING CONTINUOUS
SATISFACTION WITH



PAINT PRODUCTS

Miami Herald
Roney Plaza Hotel
Atlantic Towers Hotel
White House Hotel
Cadillac Hotel
: Martinique Hotel
Lord Tarletob Hotel
:. Delmonico Hotel
Hollywool Beach Hotel
President Madison Hotel
Gulfstream Hotel
Food Fair Stores
of Florida
Promenade Hotel
,.. Raleigh Hotel
Robert Richter Hotel

Sht Wvir ede Hotel
Orange Blossom Hotel
Sarasota, Florida
McAlister Hotel
Marseilles Hotel
Fort Montague Beach Hotel
Nassau, B.W.I.
Saxony Hotel
Sagamore Hotel
Caribbean Hotel
Sands Hotel
Shore Club Hotel
Sans Souci Hotel
Royal Palm Hotel
Bel-Aire Hotel
Shelborne Hotel
Sorrento Hotel
Monte Carlo Hotel
Versailles Hotel
Belmar Hotel
Traymore Hotel
Vanderbilt Hotel
St. Moritz Hotel
West Flagler Kennel Club
Lake Tarlton Country Club
Pike, New Hampshire
Lake Court Hotel Apartments
West Palm Beach, Florida
Waverly Apartments
We are supplying hundreds of other
hotels, apartments, restaurants, night
clubs, homes, etc., continuously with


There is a MERKIN PRODUCT for every surface at the Silver Paint Co. Stores


CO


I PAINT PRODUCTS


Be Certain


.:- Use Merkin


1119 S.W.
MI
Phone


FIRST STREET
AMI
3-2718
3-1234


PAINT AND VARNISH PRODUCTS


653 COLLINS AVE.
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 5-3231
58-3740


, j


T WENTY YEARS ago, in the depth of Miami's depression, the Silver Paint Company was
founded. Our confidence and pride in Miami and its future has never faltered. Today we
are proud of our record as Metropolitan Miami's most progressive paint company. Today
we are still carrying many of the same accounts we did twenty years ago. Today, with
very few exceptions, we are carrying the same standard lines we carried then. Thirty-six
years of previous painting experience taught us that in order to build a business on a solid
foundation, we must sell only the best paints obtainable. No product sold by the Silver Paint
Company 'is recommended without exhaustive tests under local conditions. Today, as in 1931,
our firm stands squarely behind any and all sales. We were fortunate in obtaining the sale
of M. I. MERKIN Paint Co. products for this area. Unlimited manufacturers' co-operation and
strict laboratory control have enabled us to keep pace with Miami's striding progress with prod-
ucts of undisputable merit. Uniformity of quality --uniformity in color --uniformity in price have
enabled us to specialize and build up one of the finest maintenance paint businesses. Quality
for quality, we are never undersold.

MERKIN PAINT PRODUCTS HAVE UNDERGONE EXHAUSTIVE TESTS IN THIS CLIMATE,
FOR INTERIOR OR EXTERIOR, EACH FOR A SPECIFIC PURPOSE-ALL
GUARANTEED TO GIVE 100%0/ SATISFACTION

* MERKIN ENAMELS For walls and woodwork for furniture, wood
or metal-for floors, wood or concrete-in every color in every finish
in gloss, semi-gloss or eggshell.
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-in all colors to satisfy the most discriminating taste.
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In ALL colors withstand severest conditions for all type ex-
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MERKIN PRIMERS For all interior surfaces the finest Primer Sealer.
For all exterior surfaces, exterior primer and stucco sealer.
MERKIN VARNISHES In clear and in colors for floors and trim,
for exterior and interior for furniture and boats made of finest
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specified surface.


I',






S,'(: 'IFT' MIAMI HERALD Sunday. November 19, 1950




Vacation



Travel

By SYLVAN COX


A preview of winter vacations this season reveals im-
portant developments in the field of travel that favor the
tourist.
This ever increasing group whose vacation season is just
about getting under way, will enjoy and benefit from fair
prices for accommodations and entertainment, better transiiporta-
tion and'improved facilities.
A great many more people are quent flights to the Bahamas,
takIng winter vacations than West L lies, Central and South
ever before. ; nd the "second" America and Mexico.
vacation that use to be little Past planes bring Miami with-
more than a mid-winter week- In about four hours from
end Is now running Into weeks. Chicago or New York. Family
This Is true not only at tihe sun fare and coa i rates bring the
resorts but also In the snow and cost of this trip within the reach
skiing areas., of the veacatlonist who must
Although there has been a tre- budget Ils t i m e as well as
rrendous post-wur expansion of dollars.
the winter vacation plants In


.th~s country aW-i abroad, there
are still fewer places to holiday
In the winter than in the sum-
mrer vacatlor sea -i.
This cov' Ion, coupled with
the trend to 'more winter
travel, makes it adi;sable for
those expecting to take a win-
ter vacation to make their
arrangements for transporta-
tion and hotel accommodations
as early *a possible.
'The early traveler Is more
likely to get a room with a
better vlew and he has a choice
Of prices. With a current
emphasis on moderate-priced ac-
commodations, late comers who
d their planning at the peak of
the season, may find themselves
obliged to buy higher priced
transportation and hotel accom-
modations, which could spoil
the flavor of a vacation as well
as a budget.,
*k
DURING THE last two years
there has been a broad reshuf-
fling of traveling habits and
clientele. Transportation officials
and travel agents expect a con-
tinuance of this trend.,.
This necessitates rate reduc-
tions., where buyer resistance
Indcatea .they are necessary, arid
relocation of the b udget-
coensclbtus vapatlonlst In resorts
where he will mot ,Iave to spend'
so much.
The trend In last sumnier's
h6ldjying, when, medium and
loW* priced accommodations
were in demand, is already
being felt in Padvance reserva-
tion' qr -winter vacations.
Im1nproved' tratsportatlon wtll
play a large role in the develop-
ment of changed travel habits.
Mlar. is the terminal for a
broadeitlng network of fast, fre-


RIGrIT NOW there seems to
be no in(tication of domestic
travel restrictions due to federal
government regulations or rail
priorities required for military
and economic mobilization.
Therefore, for the present,
war considerations and defense
transportation requirements will
not curtail recreational ravel.
Inie only drawback, as far
as I can see, is the twin-
factors of inflation and in-
creased taxes, cutting into the
income of the average vaca-
tionist.
According to reports from re-
sort officials and hotel operators
in Sunlands of the Americas,
however, reservations for
November, December and Jan-
uary are slightly -head of last
year.
Ieporta on the twentieth an-
nual meeting of the American
Society of Travel Agents held
in Washington, Nov. 1-3 show a
remarkable comeback in book-
Ings that had been wiped out
after the Korean outbreak last
June.
Travel broadens and clarifies
one's viewpoint as to how folks
In other lands live. Some Euro-
pean countries and several In
Latin America are richer-not
only In much needed United
States dollars-because recrea-
tional travel by United States
citizens have made them far
richer tLrough contacts and re-
lationships of living with our
tourists.
I feel that travel Is not only
a most important economic stim-
ulant but a factor for. world
peace. There are many reasons
why tourism should be encour-
aged both in the United States
and in the field of foreign travel.


MORE FUN IN FLORIDA

wil a. s to !i


yen, think how convenient. bow much more
fen you will have on your Florida vacation
In i ti fine now car you rent from Hsrtz so
eaulily, so economicall)! You can igo mores
places, see more, truly vacation in stile. And
think, you can rent c nr trom Herti. beauti-
fully conditioned. by the boor, day, aeek, or
ns long is you wish, @ad the low rate includes
roper insurance, gais and oil. MAKE LIR
ESERVATION NOW. The car you rent -ill be
an private is your own. and you can drive
anywhere yon pleas. Act ltdat. Vtrile. wire
or phone.
Hertz Drivurself Stations
II I.W. Fourth Street 244 N.E. First Street
Phone 1-1476 Phone 2-1171
MIAMI BEACH
2311 Liberty Avenus
Phones 18 .722 58.17227


% RVTE EXAMPLE . The
SeeklF rate is 3i00 Inr 7
aa'.i p'lus c per milte. mn-lud-
ic t at onina in-uran(e.
Thu! Ine LOral COStF l,T a
r0n tmil iip ip nl' 549 00.
11Eardless or how manv ride.


Big Telescopes Draw



Swarms Of Tourists

Once remote grazing ground for cattle, Palomar mountain
today is a busy mecca for astronomers and tourists from all
o Ur-n ..orld.


FLORIDA IS ONE OF THE FEW PLACES you'll find ostrich racing. Bett
only professional ostrich driver, hustles her bird out to a commanding
Casper's Ostrich Form just north of St. Augustine.

A Land Of Mlany Atiraeiions


Dominican Republic Designs


Program For American Tastes


There's a country In the Carib- founded by Bartolome, the broth-
bean where many of the attrac- er of Christopher Columbus, In
tions are tailor-made to American 1496. It became the royal capital
finns are tailor-made to American ^ r,
of the Spanish Empire in the
tastes. Americas and today you can still
The Dominican Republic was see the oldest buildings in the
thinking of the typically Ameri- Western Hemisphere, many
can love of luxury when It built crumbling Into ruins but still
magnificent.
the lavish Hotel Jaragua at Ciu- Y h Dominican
dad Trujillo, added a casino and Yeuc n fe hou fr Ml
impoteda wie vriet oftopRepublic In five hours from Mi-
imported a wide variety of top ami by Pan American World Air-
North and Latin American talent
,. w\days
for nightly entertainment.
The Dominican Republic didn't In spite of Its fame as thl
forget that Americans also like oldest city In the Western Hem.
to hike and swim and ride horse- sphere, Cludad Trujillo Is rap-
back, with weather that goes with idly becoming the newest. Bliaz.
these sports. So the government ing white, modernistic buinfldings
turned the picturesque mountain -private and public-are every-
town of Jarabacoa Into a delight- where.
ful resort by building La Mon- waterfront s what
tana, an ultra-modern, 100-room Edging the waterfront is what
hotel. remains of the ancient Spanish
Located 2,500 feet above sea city. Here you will find narrow
level, and overlooking the mag- streets In the typical style of the
nificent, fertile Vega Real (Royal Spanish conquistadores. Here Is
Plain), La Montana has spacious the first stone church-St. Nich-
grounds and a spring-fed pool.
Throughout the year the days are olas'-now a haven for pigeons.
like spring, while nights are often In spile of its gleaming appear-
cool enough for a light blanket, anc.e of a growing metropolis, Ciu-
This mountain retreat is only dad Trujillo has something of the
a 21*hbour drive from Ciudad air of a country town-but a def-
Trujillo, the Dominican capital, initely Spanish one.
The Dominican Republic was a Country folk In wide-brimmed
tourist drawing card long before straw hats either jog along on
it set out to please American small Dominican horses or lead
tastes. Ciudail Trujillo, formerl, theirr dust-colored burros. Bright
known as Santo Domingo, wasl c o ik a
knownas Snto omino, yellow ice or milk carts, shoe


"A FLORIDA MUST"
No Duplicate Anywhere
You've Read About Them
In nersspavers and mnarazines all
of the L.S.. Canada, and Lurope.
You've Heard About Them
From radio's famous commenlators
and perbonalillee.
You've Seen Them
In motion pirLuceS and leleilslion.
NOW SEE THEM AT
CASPER'S
OSTRICH and
ALLIGATOR FARM
World s only racing ostriches being
trained at our one-eighth-mile os-
trich schooling race track-thou-
sands of live allIgators world's
largest collection American croco-
diles. Many rare birds.
2 Ml. North of St. Augustine
ON U. S. I
Member N. T. Zoolngical SolIeTV


UNITED STATES




SUGAR CORPORATION



Clewiston, Florida




Producers of:


RAW SUGAR


FLORIDA HIGH PROTEIN CANE FEEDING MOLASSES

FLOOR-KANE SUGAR CANE LITTER











1bt Miami N{eraLb


on its




401Oh wdwtiwhaA*


Eliw mml


shine bo,.s, flower vendors and
i.-iddIers of egg~. oranges and
oiner produce irake the street
i srene vivid and i\.:,.
You can tour the city by taxi
or "oches" -- surres naith Ino
fringe on top. 'ar from being
merely a prop for tourists, the
coche Is used constantly by the
unharrying Dominicans. You
ran alo do some sightseeing
I from the top of a Fif'lh Avenue-
tIpe bus.
lit Ciudad Trujillo, however,
these rubber-necking conveyance.
are not a sedate green biut are
siieared l with flashy red and
,. hite signs ad\erusing bottled
di inks.
You v il be glad to see that






CtCt





If you're looking for an at-
tractive, small, coastal com-
munity that is "GOING
PLACES," investigate



VERO BEACH

5,000 Population
$2 million in building
permits this year.

*****


OR. if you're just "GOING
PLACES" yourself, to find
reasonable accommodations,
good ocean beach, fine fish-
ing, first class golf courses,
and the right kind of people,
send for full information
about VERO BEACH AND
INDIAN RIVER COUNTY by
mailing this coupon.


Chamber of Commerce
Vero Beach, Fla.
Please send free book on Vero
Beach and Indian River County
to.
Name ..........................
Street ..........................
City ...........................


American tourists are not treated
by merchants as easy targets. If
you want to buy, "muy blen,"
they say. If you don't, that's all
right too. But you doubtedly
become an easy prey when you
see the exquisite mahogany work
-salad bowls, cigaret boxes, book-
ends, and paperweights--which
cost only a third as much as in the
United States.


A World's Fair of Natre, tIe
tropical wonders of six continonl,
50 acres of fascinating exotic
heaty along landscaped paths
through primitive joingl, rare
orchids growing on bees, large
collctiHon of hybrid kibiscus and
water illlies.
ISer ti Jonsgl'Mouse of Gialts,
baby alligators, World's largest
~Royal Palm
Grove. Guided
ici; tours lhaorly.
0 ok


POMPANO BEACH
MIDWAY BETWEEN PALM BEACH
AND MIAMI
One of the moat popular vacation
spot on the Gold Coalt.
Nature has indeed smiled on POM-
PANO BEACH, with its close proxim-
ity to the GULF STREAM which keeps
us so warm in mid winter.
Come by automobile, train, yacht or
airplane and enjoy our four miles of
unsurpassed beach; world famous
deep-sea, pier. bridge and surf fish-
ing; excellent yacht basin; fleet oi
charter boats; public recreation park;
shuffleboards; and tennis courts.
Golf... Polo,.., Race tracks nearby,.


Write for er List of line aceemmoditlons
Pompano each Ohainmber at ommeree
Popano Bleach, Florid@.


over the world.
The peak In Southern Califor-
nia is the home of two great
new telescopes so powerful that
discoveries with them may rev-
olutionize the concept of the uni-
verse.
There are two scientific at.
fractions the world fanious
200-inch telescope and its
working partner "Big
Schmidt," a 48-inch, wide-angle
telescope.
A sky survey is now being car-
ried out by the observatory in


co-operation with the National
Geographic Society. The four-
year program will provide tor
the mapping of vast areas of the
heavens never before photo-
graphed.
The mountain's isolated loca-
tion requires many miles of driv-
ing across desert and semi-desert
countryside, but this does not
keep away the swarms of visi-
tors. It lies about 65 miles north-
east of San Diego.
A small museum displaying
enlarged transparencies of photo-


. ^^ The newest ,
pictumique 0
wilt th tpi
fishing, bati


graphs of heavenly bodies under
study is open to visitors. Visitors
are also allowed within the sil-
ver-colored dome on the tele-
scope.

Firm Reopened
Re sort Services, Inc., an-
nounces the reorganization of
their resort travel company. The
firm will operate in the former
offices of Resort Airlines, 806
Biscayvne blvd. Col. R. Frazier
Potts" Is president of the reor.
ganized company.




su'[il d shmowr.,Dennis SlON*in


For Health and Fun


JACK TAR HOTEL and BATHS

y Herman, world's HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK, ARKANSAS
lead in a Orace at It's here that Mother Nature blesses her people when they rome for relIaslion. recreation and rebirth.
An unrivaled appeal in due to the mental and physiral benefits derived from euraLive and trevitiz ngs
hot sering nd climate. '
Your Choice a
HOTEL ROOMS: Luwsriouily furnished with


ultra-modern appointmeuts. American or
Enropean Plan.
HOTEL APARTMENTS: Same furnishings and
services as hotel ronmai kilchonetlte.
Hotel nd aparltmenits are in same bulldini
with bath floors, designed and operated
for the exclusivTe sii of guestls:- bealkt,
douches. sitz and vapor hiths, pack,
showers, cooling roams and marsafs.
MODERN INDIVIDUAL COURT COTrAGES:
Deluzx fsurniihi, kitchenottes; ipiacinei
-- .--:n-.......i. t ilnkI


renamsfor falmMilies ccsib le oI
and mait complete health and recreation hotel In the Ozark region, actnU lyyinl In the
Ouachilta Mountains. This area his a faveorable year 'round climate. Here o i cua sit
ing of pine, there's a lure to mountains rlimbig, bliking or riding on mosntuin traillls, to
ing, tennis and golf, or to simply sit and soak up sunshine.
Your health and happiness is my busineu /
Vance Bryan
Owner.Mana*gr


AT GREYHOgID'S v

LOW ONE-WAY FARES


AND


1IW


WITH A R1031 TRIP TICKET

ONLY GREYHOUND gives you so
much travel pleasure-at generous double- i L i
savings. Save on Greyhound's low one way
fares-and save again with a round trip
ticket. Right now Greyhound brings you a
wonderful selection of business and pleasure
trips, expense-paid tours and special excur-
sions to favorite Fall and Winter events. Just a few Examples of BIG Savings Oa
Make your travel dollar go farther go Greyhound Round-Trip Tickets
GREYHOUND! ow k."


THE FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH
WHERE PONCE DE LEON LANDED IN 1513


THE OLDEST WOODEN SCHOOL HOUSE
IN THE U. S. A.


S. m
I 9


FLORIDA'S MOST SIGNIFICANT HISTORICAL ATTRACTIONS

ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA


S


mug.


0'


m In = . .. .- -









Cool And Comfortable



Colorful Guatemala


Grows In PopularityI

Time-pressed, budgetbeset v'acationists seeking radically I
different sights, glorious scenery and Twentieth Century corn-
forts need look no farther than Guatemala.
Largest and most colorful of the Central American re-
publics. Guatemala's top attractions are in its famous high-.
lands, which have a spring-like climate the year-around.
Guatemala Is a harmonious 0
blend of the ancient glory of several excellent pensions where
Spain, the scenic beauty of a good room and tasty fare are
Switzerland and an Indian life available for only $4 to $5 a da%.
that is pure pageantry. Most of At the most popular spoLs in
ILs Inhabitants are Indians, de- the highlands-Panaachel, near P
scendants of the Mayans., who Lake ,titan, and Chichicam;iten- g
comprise one of the world's ango-tihe minimum rate for a ,
greatest cl ilizatlion %hen it room w'ith hath and meals is
flourished a f&ew entur'ies after $8 a da pet- pet on. -
the birth of Christ. Because of the high co-t of
By Pan American World Ail- cros-country transportation, the -
ways, this picturesque Central best way for lone travelers to .
American republic is only six see the country is by conducted
hours from New Orleans and asix tour. Private cars rent for $30 a L
hours from Miami. North Amerl- day. Bus fares are low, but dlf-
cans need onlv a tourist card to ferent lines ern e the tourtn
enter the country. spots and, because their sched.p
u1le q do not, cos n nect.t /t( ,InOUM 1


For less Ihan $2)) vatation-
ists can enjoy a top-notch two-
week vacation there. For this
sum they can travel around
Ihe country In comfort, stay at
first-class hotels, see Ihe ma-
jor sights and still have lime
to relax.
Hotels in Guatemala Ciiy
change from $7 to $10 a dav
per person for a room with bath
and meals. The capital also has


hack oier one's tracks is neiesa-
-a ry.
Condlucted tours in Glatemala
aie highly personalized. There
are several. agencies in Guate-
mniala City vhich wIill arrange
Lours. NlMaa Trails, for example.
offers a four-da'y, all expense
tour of the four most-vlsited
spots for $69.50.
II aln" features a two-week
four of the country., with plen-


SEE GAY FOREIGN Eta.mlhmd i.S* Ils12
NASSAU .. Season Special -. HAVANA I


Nassau Eponseme Pai.- ODya, I Nilght Ilmides
oona Re m l ath, lllhtllsaling City, Rui
Havana ainiller rrpioal ariies, Ba6ttl, Shepis.
5A nally Roundl Trip, Transtrl, FIrst-.Olas HNtel,
Ia Sloppy Joe's. t. Tax Extra
l Expense From Key West-2 Days. 1 S50
$43 u0UP Nighlt-Daily Via Air
Tax Extrs Round Trip $20.00 Plus Tax
CONSOLIDATED TOURS, I
It I.I. Ird Awl.-McAlistar Hotel idE.
_____ -___ ___ TIBKETI IVERTWHRE-------


3-DAT TOUI
I1 MOAT EVERT
MOIL
lBrlh md Minli
Ina1uldei-
153.M
[NC.
Phol 1-.111


HAVANA
ALL EXPENSES 2 DAYS. 1 NIGHT IN HAVANA
TRANSPORTATION TRANSFERS HOTEL SIGHTSEEING
VIA AIR VIA BOAT
$44.50 ............. HOTEL GRAN AMERICA ..........S54.50
S47.50 .............. HOTEL SEVILLA .................. $57.50
$49.50 ............. HOTEL NACIONAL .............$.. $59.50
From Key West Deduct $10.00 from Air Rates
Cruises to NASSAU, Bahamas DAILY
Descriptive Booklet en Request
U,,m j.PI-m1o 1 ,0 Emll ,.,. sh 81. (Tamlnil Treia
mII~AangE-L U n Highaway S. I a&Jet. IV. B. 41
MITCHELLS TOURS sE& b R"'.
IPb. 1(2-4706 MIAMI. FLi.
Free Parking in Rear of Building


C S flfl^^ S f~flBSS


FRM
ly Boat-Havana Only FYRWET By Air-Planes Dally
Duais l KEY WEST P.A.A. or litei, nlllrei
Nighis ..,553& DAYS AND I Days *4350
eals & Barth on Bnal ONE'NIGHT
Days & 65 laNa1lHnt l41.S0
N .. .'i.i35 nt. ,.z Na 18 4.
RATES INCLUDE: TRANSPORTATION. HOTEL ROOM WITH PRIVATE BATH, TRANSFERS
IN HAVANA. SIGHTSEEING. CITY TRIP. OLD AND NEW HAVANA, CUBAN CAPITOL,
TROPICAL GARDENS. RUM DISTILLERY, (FREE DRINKS), CIGAR FACTORY. SLOPPY
JOE'S, ALL THE MOST IMPORTANT TRIPS IN PRIVATE CARS.
Ask for Booklet on Longer Crulse--Conmpirte Tzavel Servlce


Jfl ~ ~ Jzi4 ?J aciak! A

STEA.MEB from MiamI
3 Day-Ha-mne $S0.00 up. S. S. "Finrid '.
3 Day.-Nass.u $40.00 up. 5. S. "Nuevo Dominicatno."
11 Dos--Nasnau. Jamanca or Dominican Republic and Haiti. S. S. "Nueva Domin.
icano."
From New Orleans
10 Days-Hondun'a S200 00 up. Standard Fruit & S. S. Co.
17T Dayi-West Indies and Venenueli. S.A S475.O0 up. Alcoa Steamship Lines.
11 A 18 IDa)I--GuatemaIla 52010.00 & 3340 00 up. United Fruit Co.
From NPu Vork
12 Diy-(Colombia, Veneutela and West Coast South America. $435.00 up. Grace
Line.
38 Days-Brazil & Argentina, S., A. $940.00 up. Moore McCormnck Lines. .
Sea & lAir ('omblnalion Arrang ed
AIR TOI'RH TO HAVANA, NASSAU, JAMAICA, HAITI,
DOMII'AN A KNEPI "lLIC, PI I.RTO RICO, VIRGIN
ILANDS. MEXI('O, GUATEMALA, SOUTH AMERICA
VISIT EUROPE THIS YEAR. . DON'T WAIT Low fares in effect
tk;is fall . tours and independent book;ngs arranged.
COSULT US REGARDING YOUR TRAVEL PLANS

TRANS-WORLD TOURS
82-6784 14 N.E. 3rd Ave. Eina K. Fahy
28-6461 Miami, Fla. Manager


S.n es fr..
".t~uoj ) : ,


S\It's only 60 minutes from

5iI' Miami to Nassau

Bo $3000o Speai 30-Day
S on -Rond Tnpi

l* ; ' Go to all the wonderful resorts you wish-Na.ssau,
Bermuda. lamaica, Havana on swift., dependable
B.O A C Speedbirds! And BO.A.C. is the direct a'-
o line south toavacation and business centers of South
.; America!


See your Travel Agenl for *xpert
Iravel service. Oxer 1,000 travel
agents in the U. S. A. join more
than 100 worldi-wide B.O.A.C:
offices in ervin you. B.O..AC.
rdes Soo4 car* of yomi!
BRITISH OVERSEAS AI
R=;.tr'.tonr. through you
B.O.A.C. at 309 E. Flagler


ONLY BOA'
GIVES YOU ALL THREE
* Traditional British service
* Frinmest Speedbird equipment
* 31 yeat s' flying experience

IRWAYS CORPORATION
ur Travel Agent or Call
SStreet. Phqne- 88-3416.


HERE IS THE 'GATEWAY of lithe lirst rmnorL.Lry lo be built
in Ihe new world, loccteidJ at Ciudad Truimllo. Dicrriiican R e-
public. When Sir Francis Drake raided Santit, DtDomirngo, as
the city was formerly known, he rncurled cannon on Ihe
monastery roof to fire on the caihedral nearby.


ty of lime allowed for leikare.,
for $19:1. These rate% cover
everything transportation,
sightseeing costs., fIrst-class ac-
commodations and meal.
The four places fit-ttrrime Jii-
tors almost always see are Gua-
temala City, Antiguia. Lake Ailt-
Ian and Chichicastenangn. a
highland village noted for its col.
orful markets on Sunidas andi
TnUr-fda% s
GuatPemala Cil\ (ail h -n cpi in
a day. It Iias none of the e\c-tic
quality of the ret of the roUll-


tr Ne-.I',' built-it-- i iA demol-
i.tiedl by earthiquakes in 1917-
it looks like a pio'vinnal to..n.
It. is the best place, hovrvei. to
buy Guatemala's exqiuiiie hand-
'itafli-teixtile. ntr. l Mankets,
siltpr', leather and basket woork.
(C'lose to Guatemiaia Citv i' An-
tigua, v which although it is al-
no.-t totall, in itm.n-, is uri-
\aileI a, the no.t nlagnificePntr.
Sl'ant'h colonial Oil. in all Latin
Atriet Ira. For ]more than it o
Cerrtuil(-. it ',a. thie capital of
.LidtieniaTa. th-n a co'lol',' of
Spain. Earthquaksa 'Jestrcoed it
in 177.3.


South To Miami


Sea Routes Now Open


To Bring Vacationers


Visitors to and front Miami va-
rations this fall have nppoitun,'
to travel the romantic route of
the sea.
This lI the fjist time since be-


Jacksonville a n d Georgetown,
S. C.
Including meals, fares are $75
in either direction, with federal
tax added.


Sunday, November 19, 1950 THE MIAMI HERALD 13-H


Resorts Line Jamaica's North Coast


Long tamed for Montego Bay, one of the Caribbean's lole-
]Lit lesort':, the scenic north coast of Jamaica is now lined


wivth a string of seaside soots.
The Briti-h colony's north e
coat is indented h', one natural
beach after another. TowiSts
flying to Kingsto-n. the Jamaican
capital, or to Monntego Ray. both
of t which are linked to Miami h'
three hour flights of Pan Amerli-
can 'Vo'ld Ai-r'\a;,. o'1li find a
\at ilt. of hotel relt'rt'-. each
\lith its own brand of attios-
pi era'p.
Tov.er Ile, a self-contained
re.ott facing the ('aribean tea,
i luxLirinOLi. At To er1- I.le tuiir-
i.is can pia'' tennis. sail, cycle,
ride hor-elat k. nr1' ptadil a aii trf
ho3rd out to the i-le-t. a few hUn-
tired %ardq off-hore. There i,
rlari .ing eiei .' night andl floor
shows ice a aeek. All enter-
tainment is included in the
rates.
Fifteen miles east of Tower
Isle is Castle Gordon. a new,
villa-style hotel overlooking
magnificent Sucumhus Bay. A


Seeing Haitian

Capital Easy

For Tourists
'Tourists can see the chief sight-
seeing goals in Port-au-P since. the
capital of Hati, without knocking
themselves out.
The oldest section of the city.;
which dates back to 17-fi, now 1
nudges the newest-the magnifl-
cent exposition Igtoind buiit laat
%% inter to celebrate the 200th an-
niteisaty ot the founding of the
('I' .
The Champ de Mats, a large
puhlic square where the glisten-
Ing %t ihre national rPalace is 15itu.t.
el, OTl S n'iarlkrd the cimV himnts
.iien Pr,'t.au-Prince %%as the cap
I.tl ot' tile French colony of Saint
Doniingue.
Oil toe Cliamp de Marsi are the
inio-t Importanit government build-
Ing-. tlieateir, re-taurant.s and a'
small iuseuni, storehouse of the
treasures of Haitian history. Fore-1
nOo-t among these treasures Is the
anchor of the Santa Maria. flag-
shtif. of Chi! topher CoIJnlumbus ho
di.coveied the land orn his fi'st
\'-\age and founded the list slian-
i-ri settlement in the Aimerica; on
Haiti notL them coast.
.AIm) in the old section of Ihe
ilty are the Notre Dante Cathe-
dral: the huge market place, con-
structed of iron sheets afler the
fashion of Parisian market,: and
Ihe enticing curio shops where
exquisite enmbroiderles and ma-
h.Raniy, sisal and torloise shell
nm.i p a-I .... ..d,


tore W iorldn ar L1 such el'vice Sncle iazt r-pll.i: Pan-.tlanilrlc iita re sold.
has been available, -hip. h lt p-,\ n,1tried pa05eneer at- The expo-ciion
otilllndatar, n; ron OnutJh- parallel to the
Pan.-tlantly isamn-hip Corp. r,,,ur, i ti MIM and Gu ItfPort-au-Pri nee's
offers weekly sailings front Nal. PO iI-, li, Oil' t':r c no northbound .wa- built b\, fil
'lmnorne to Miami and frm sel.le for tia' e er_ of ..\npaltl.
ami northbound to Boston. e ne .t c.dule is de-igned Oroad. palm.lined
Two If.00oton ships. the q priiiarii. for freight to suipplt me ile of a ne'.
Azalea City and the S. ,ate- rapidl,,-e.panding indunirtal es rnandonmt. Palace
wav 'iv, make the trips. OuiinP tahlisnfments on the South Alilni lecaions and em
staietooms with tMo heirth- andi "c coai. arr-pedited ti t)o Ha
private baths piotide luxur-u. T- I he pi tn:ip;l, I
L g 1 aofn[ tire, eip, -,,tin
atconnItodatlog coinparab! LarPest Crowd,-,f,,hlt a,;rta.
nlh la.te' i a where iriI-ianliri
So. Itlithotind hLip; ,p-i:i. I,.i l 'i. '"e.- t it -, d ci f '\ ,in \. itF.lc era are pt i .-prt
Iri,,'e Fi-" da, arld I.,."('11 Nh I. lida 't: ,11,4a l i.nl\Ei'o "r~f ,N.1_
Se ida.- ar, iart ,ai mglir ...a-ie Iu ri t casino, and sevel
tinle folha i M.'th dax: tlr l..tl t tt'ali ta111 ,,i. .p ft -i . [ d restaa na ts.
noundi 1a'.P i-I 'tnli Ti,-,-las, and n inn itr fr.i t- F"i.'rda faine j in door restaur
a'r ie in cr.rton t tihp M rnda,. \It ln]'i. .
I K77-r?77!7


a' "t'.5&Ot.IL. -.5
en - U ""',V//",r"t *." ~,~Yfrrc-r' ~


a


SThOat ioreiqn tav r... RRGED TOURS 0



arm.
... M' 1,+,,+ _,1,, A E .'

vet for o do, ors1etn pg so qol'oble" ts
fly 0xe *o t Ve best, ltl Ho onIt S 1 N

"lo w -ta s Steo ,ot t "vao3rto 1 0.









ALL EXPENSE TOURS AND CRUISES

Europe- Havana Nassau Wiest Indies
AUTHORIZED AGENTS ALL LINES
South America Round The World
For Reservations and Tickets
WRITE CALL PHONE



BROOKS TRAVEL SERVICE

Miami 300 N.E. 2nd St. Phone 9-2047
Hollywood 1845 Boulevard Phone 3531
W. Palm Beach 300 Datura St. Phone 2-0475


mm
- S


HAVANA

.BY AIR BI'BOAT
AROUND TRIW ROUND TRIP

I '30 Plus Tax 4000 Plus Tax

Write, phone or call in person for folders and information
on our all.expense tours to this gay Cuban capital.

Tours Arranged Daily By

CAR R E R O'S
INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL SERVICE


MIAMI
301 E. Flagler St.
Phone 2-2753


MIAMI BEACH
2409 Collins Ave.
Phone 58-4234


OVER 20 CONTINUOUS YEARS IN INTERNATIONAL TRAfEL


groLund running
olid section, face
cobalt narhot. It
ling ill f-i) acres
Todai., laced b%
I boulevard-. It is
v po.t office, the
of Totoi ism. and
i'as.ies of nations
clil i-S atlt'I (,_...lr
I grouild; alpe tie
[l', animpi iil-aitr
,g nati'e perform-
?ii. the gambling
ral attractive out-


swimming pool. sundeck, bar
and open-air terrace are fea-
tures of this new spot. Sea
bathing is available in front or
the hotel. Hor-eback riding
and tennis are other sports of-
fered.
West of Tower T;1e i ShIZ-w
Park. a 'rpoit that has been
doing r.iine-., almniost as long as
Montego Bav. Locatei in the
hills hut nnlv tireo nitles fir-il
the Cainhhearln s-a, .haw Park
off-ii "cool %-eather" -poitt at
well as sea haihing at it- ,pr,.ae
bear'It.
A .hoit flte firni Shan Palk
; Colui-mhu Inn. pitched on a
crest of a rangP of hill-, over-
looking Discover,' Bay where
Christopher Columbus landed on
his second voyage to the New
world. Pool swimming, horse-
back riding, and station wagon
ser ice to iti private beach. ju-t
below the hill. aipre included in
the hotcl's iatei;.
Thirty-iti n ile, frnim Mon-
leo Bay .. ISilver Sand,. Beach
Cluh. which opened late lart
toinler. Po-rs ,ing one of the

,tiwAMERICAN EiPRa nsmN


HAVANA
AIR EXCURSION $30
BOAT CRUISE $40
plus ax


NASSAU
EXCURSION $30
plusi leax


TOURS
TO HAVANA, NASSAU,
WEST INDIES,
MEXICO, EUROPE,
AROUND THE WORLD


AMERIAN EPRES


S 330 E. Flagler Sitree
Phone: 3.3178 ) \


Four UD,

\ 1. Unrx'elled Service






: 3. Complete Sightseeing


nio.t sipePrbh heaches on the
i-land, ithe Silver Sands. Club
tonn-iNt ,'f trin t hite rcotltages,
gail furnished and equipped
with ePery modern conven-
ience.
None cf this competition is
like'l'., however, tn rletract from
the poplialit. of NMorntego Ia\.
IhLrh has. catered for year- to
the ;ocial elile ri Efirpe arnd
A ir ai j- i In ad-d111 Ijoin Si perb


natural beaches. Montego Bay is
unrivaled in scenic beauty.
Slumming. aqua planing, wa-
ter' klilm" and sailing are the
leading sports of Montego Bay.
But tourlcis may also play golf
and tennis at the Fairfield Coun-
try Club.
Montego Bay has deluxe as
v.eili as moderate priced hotels.
In winter, two magnificent es-
tatpl. not far from the resort,
operate as hotel_.


SeveTme...Save Moneq!


SAND
CONVENIENT THRU SCHEDULES TO

ATLANTA* KNOXVILLE

CHICAGO
3 THRU NO CHANGE BUSES TO ATLANTA
DAILY AT 8130 A.M., Il30 P.M., 6P.M. only,,'12.50I Ony, '22.50 'ur'

2 THRU NO CHANGE BUSES TO KNOXVILLE
DAILY AT 8:30 AM., 1.30 P.M.ony, 15.60 :n"' on., '28.10 rn0p

2 THRU SCHEDULES TO CHICAGO One change of bus at Knoxville
DAILY AT 830 A.M., li30 P.M.,t y '23.25 ::; only '41.85- r'n;'
ALL FAPE PLUS I1" FEDERAL TAX
Air conditioned for your comfort. Newest equipment.
Connections at Atlanta for all points. Best way to Ashe-
ville and other Great Smoky Mountains vacation centers
TRAILWAYS TICKET OFFICE
301 N.E. sta Street Ph. 9.4736
UNION BUS STATION
276 N.E. 1st Street Ph. 3.4605


T R A W A Y


'alures


2. Dr Luxe Cadilac Cair;






4. Superior Hotel Rooms


By Steamer with two extra nights and meals aboard add $10.00
Phone 58-3841 For Free Ticket Deliver


11


11


I


I







14-H THE MIAMI HERALD Sunday. November 19, 1950


Nassau Peaceful Paradise


Despite Great Popularity


Few places can draw thou-
sands of visitors each year and
remain one of the most peace-
ful spots In the world. But if
you don't believe this can hap-
Spen, go to Nassau.
The capital of the Briti.h Ba-
hamas has long been a popular
winter resort. It i, rapidly be-
coming a wellknot n summer
playground. It has the satisfy-
lng comforts of modernity So-
cialites and celeh!brities lend it
an air of srophihsticaLion. Yet
somehow Nassau has retained
its leisurely va;'y of life and
quaint, appearance.
The British colon,' is sti l l
a perfect place to target your
cares and relax. It is a place
for sunning on powder-fine
beaches, and for swimming,
fishing and sailing on waters of
exquisitely %arying shades of
blue. Its year-round climate is
mild yet refreshing.
Nassau is also a place to sip
cocktails in cool patios amid
lush semi-tropical shrubs, or
on terraces facing the b l u e
Bahamian seas while listen.
ing to street musicians play-
ing uMamna Don' Want no
Peas. No Rice, No Coconut
Oil" and other native song%.
It takes more time to see a
motion picture than to travel
by Pan American World Air-
ways to Nassau. Domestic air-
lines connecting with. PAA's
daily schedules out of Miami.
put this restful holiday haven
within an ea-' da','s reacn of
leading United States c it i es.
The British Bahamas begin
about 60 miles off the south-
east coast of Florida. Thek con-
saist of more than 3,000 islands
or cavs. The largest settlement
Is on New Providence island
where Nassau is located. Here
is a population of 29.0170. with
most of it. centered in Nassau.
Nassau can be thoroughly
seen In five hours without any
hurry. But, of course, no one-
not even the visitor would dream
of hurrying in this slow-pared
town, so quickly effective is its
serene atmosphere.
Rawson Square, faring Prince
George's Wharf, is the pivot
around which revolves a large

"BRAEMIAR"
Cashmere Sweaters
for
Men and Women
It
THE OLD ENGLAND STORE
NASSAU BAHAMAS

"HOME INDUSTRIES"
Native Work a Specialty
also
European and Oriental Goods
Post Office Box 584
Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas


Treasure
Traders, Ltd.
Exclusive Agent for -.
Asprey's of London
Pinnigan's Leather Goods
Royal Copenhagen China
S:Minton
Royal Crown Derby
Royal Worcester
91 Rolex Watches
Ciro
"Ross Tropical
Binoculars
Stuart Crystalware
S European Jewelry
Thermos
9. African Batiks
90 Native Straw Work
Luncheon and Teas
S Patio Cocktail Bar
West and Marlborough Sts .
9 NASSAU


part of Nassau's business life.
Here surrevs and victories coni-
gregate and an unending pro-
cession of two-wheel d ravs,
drawn bv lackadaisical mules.
haul cargo to the steamers. Htire.
alo are bhoatrii-'n. ,. h' opf-iare
sniall launches to Paradi.e Bej.ch
or to the sea gardens.
The most thrilling of all
Nassau's outdoor sports is
railing. At little expense a
trim. 12-foot ;sailing boat, uilh
an expert seaman to handle
it. nimay be rented. This I'- a
superb nay to explore the
neighboring cays or sail to
the marine gardens lying be.
tween Hog and Atholl islands.
After a refreshing da'y under
the bright Banamian sun comes
the cocktail hour. All of the
hotel_ hate special terraces.
patios or bar., %here Nas.?auvi-


City Wants

Con mentions
SAN JUAN. Ptier o Rico-Thiz
Caribbean city Is being boomed
as the Crn'cntion Center of tile
Arinei icas "
A recent questionnaire dis-
tributed by a major Ameri-an
firm came tip wiLth dat3 to gi e
the drive extra stimulus-. Tire
questionnaire showed thaisL V!iFi-
to s pieterred the city becalu-e
ii. asi les comnmercialized than
the other Caribbean tout is spots.
Because it is a hi-lingual city,
San Juan isi considered ideal as
a convention center for groups
from both Latin America and
the L'nited States.
Improved ahi setivice has
placed the city within six hours
of New York and four hours of
Miami.


Dantzler's
DRY GOODS
P.O. BOX 142
NASSAU BAHAMAS


THE BAHAMIAN SHOP
Bahamian Products
rope soles: ESPADRILLES,
THONG SANDS, ESPATHONGS
STRAW HATS and BAGS
Cashmere sweaters, shell
bracelets, earrings, etc.
BAY STREET, NASSAU


wAm in mnssU

Be sure to visit the "P.G."

* HARBOURVIEW BAR

* DINING ROOM .in)

* HARBOUR DECK (her

* HOTEL OPEN
YEAR ROUND

"assurance of complete
enjoyment."



11Cl


JAS. P. SANDS CO.
ESTABLISHED 1882
GROCERIES
Corner Bay Street and Rawson Square
P.O. BOX 577 NASSAU, BAHAMAS DIAL 2891
QUALITY AND SERVICE


Robertson & Symonette Ltd.
Bay Street, Nassau
Wine and Spirit Merchants
Representing:
DEWAR'S "WHITE LABEL." BUCHANAN'S
"BLACK & WHITE." "GORDON'S" LONDON
GIN, "SEAGRAM'S" VO
TENNENT'S BEER AND STOUT



HAROLD G. CHRISTIE

BAHAMAS REAL ESTATE

Nassau Investments

*
Islands for Sale
Large Agricultural Estates
Rentals Estates Homes
Apartments

WRITE FOR BOOKLET

HAROLD G. CHRISTIE


390 Bay St.


Nassau, Bahamas


SCable Address "Chrislland" 4 J


an.s and touir-its gather to linger
o0er Planter's Punches before
dinner.
Na sai rniht life centeri-
m o .;t1,, in t 'i e inriIr. 'the
T.uneie Cliil, I f [rhe F ,F i
Mi'ltiac'ii HuitrIl, thle Gatrlen Ti-r
ldle Oif th.l Ru' al Vr:tr'id, Fidr
f!le Fla ,i, ', .- ; Gr il of theli Bi1t-
ih C'uliiial ar-' alone tile d ie -li.
piprila.r ,plat:e to n aine a n d
dan r-e.
Nda.'-3ii %' a oncIe l'- eXCIlI-
i 'e i'rn'-i' UJii- Li t hIe wFPI. tr-
ii ., But n'I.' iis h-cau' CNa1I i,
arnd ir.iniiilr,.' lre at %ihmi lihe
re'ach ,f tin : pre--:ed. b u ril g e t
mingled r \ dCationi-t.
ill summer hotel ratesi in Nas-
Su aite iazhid alir-5't 5, rEi'
cent below toe writer iv.!i.
Doirite roii.s ii. iv cath range
fioni V'$, a da. ''. iLhout irie, ilIs
to *22 a la', with l rlri,I1. RiilE-i
at guet;[ huLie(-. and p r' i \ a t e
homre-.; are conzidetabl., ]'r'ice.


Air Cruises

Announced
NEW YNORK-A 35irla %it cruise
of Sotlth ArlIerica wit % iiiovir oer-
in leading touInrjt centers Iha hcn
announced l.,v Ameriw'an Expite;
The cruise leates New VYork Jan.
2'7 and will u.e the .ervieos 01
Pan-Amrnerican World Ailt ay;. Pair-
agra and Fauceit Airlirnis.
The tour i; timed to rer-a(i Ri,
de Janeiro during cari-in.al season
Travelers will be routed through
Miami on March 2 to board an East-
ern Air Lines Constellation for
Net% York. Price of the tour i:
,St.r'19. pln. In',;.


Vanite
FRENCH PERFUMES
Children's Sweaters and
Hand Smocked Dresses
NASSAU SOUVENIRS
Next door to
Development Board


Bay Street


Nassau


Tropiclads
Manufacturers and
Wholesalers of


r SHIRTS


SPORT

ES


COTTON


PRINTS
OPICLADS
e of store
you.
ix 1297
BAHAMAS


* SILKS LINENS


I


A DISTINCT BRITISH atmosphere exists in Nassau, only cm
h-ur .: H ll',inq lirri r.r-.rn I liami. The '.'iclOrian carriaes add
cBolr to te quaim scaeaal c1 tlOe Bahamas.

Beach Hotel Plans Dec. M., Opening


Thr' Grin-lgier-P:i ncoz't 4Hotel
at 211" l omlirs ave. Mianmi Bea li,
V. iJl opf'n foir the -eaon [Dec. 11.
Manapirig DireCtoi. Paul Gros-
sirger. disclose,] a fill srhedUlie
of atiiitil s for glesits. featurilig
prominint speaker's., Brfs.aiway
andl HovIv.'ord entertainers.

THE

WINDSOR SHOP
English
and Scotch

SPORTSWEAR
0
For
Ladies & Gentlemen
0
Bay St. Nassau
Dial 2769


IIm


ASSAU
d TOURSi


Only 60 Minules by Air
*
Restful Relaxation
Incomparable Weather
Gaiety and Glamour
e
A Perfect Interlude in
Your Florida Holiday
0 0
One Day to Six Days
All-Expense Including
Plane Fare, Hotel and
Complete Sightseeing
$49.50 to $108 & up
* C

AMERICAN AUTOMOBILE
ASSOCIATION
132 Blscayne Blvd. Biscayne at 29th
Phone 9-3068 Phone 3-0614
MIAMI
512A S. Andrews Ave. . . 3-1963
FORT LAUDERDALE
George Washington Hotel .. .. 705S
WEST PALM BEACH


o COTTONS SILK SQUARES


a


Just two short- blocks from
busy Bay Street... yet out
of this world" in the lush
beauty of its garden setting!
Matchless hospitality and
truly personalized service
await you now at the Royal
Victoria.
By day you'll fish or sail .. play golf or tennis.. loll on
powdery pink sands and swim in iridescent blue surf.
You'll shop, too, for fine British china, crystal, woollens
... French perfumes.., famous brands of Scotch all at
devalued pound prices.
As dusk falls, you'll relax on the Starlight Terrace, with
delicious drinks mixed by master bartenders... and later,
you'll dine and dance on the Palm Terrace, beneath a
golden tropic moon.
Enjoy a .in jerfil winter vacation at the Royal Victoria!
All rooms have private bath. European or American plan.
See any travel agent, or write direct for reservations.
Frank A. McHugh, Manager.


NASSAU IN THE BAHAMAS
* *


book ri'tienls h', noted critirs
arid nightly after-dinner con-
c- .
C T' I z.






visit Britain's picturesque
colony where pound de-
valuation mokes your
money go so much furtherI
Only 55 minutes Overnight by
BY AIR STEAMER
$30 '..40.,:.

ROUND TRIP
ALL EXPENSE TOURS
from 54550 .....



,UNITED .TOUR


,I!


ENGLISH SILVERWARE & CHINAWARE
Sole Agents for LIBERTY of LONDON
THE ISLAND BOOKSHOP
The Gift Shop of Nassau


Nassau Grooms Hotels For Tourists


NASSAU. Bahamnas--Na;-au's
hotels and guePst houses are
being gioumed to pla% his-t to
vacationist,% who, accoridirig to
all indicationn, will ariti e in
record breaking numbers this
fall and winter.
Cumberland House. an attrac-
live colonial guest house on one
of Nassau's quaint, shaded side
streets, has been compleiel ren.
ovated with an entirc-l newv
nirtifi and will reopen in De-
cember.
Etxlenive chlianges have
been carried out at Sir Oliver
Simmonds' luxurious Balmoral
Club. 'Acrommodations bare
been augniented by 21 double
suites, each of which consists
of a double bedroom, bath-
room, and a palio.silting room.
Murray Delahey of the Prince
George is making extensive al-
terations to his hotel, overlook-
ing Nassau's picturesque har-
bour. The bar and cocktail


lounge are heing enlarged and
modernized and the decor of the
Coral dinirig room will be new.
lanes R Binghamrn of We-iport.
Conn.. \teli.knowtri magazine il-
lustrator, laid out the plans for
the alterations.
James .1. Carroll. new man-
ager of the Fort Montague Beach
Hotel, has announced that be
has planned extensive renova-
Lions for his hotel. All facilities
will be completely overhauled
and there will be complelpte
changes in the management of
the catering department.
In addition Ito annual ren-
oratlon%, the Rrilloh Colonial


Hotel Is augmenting Its facIll.-
ties by operating a surf club
on the hotel's private beach.
The club will include dining
and bar facilities, to be free
for hotel guest.. The hotel's
tennis courts and swimming
pool are being improved.
Frank A. McHugh, manager of
the Royal Victoria Hotel, re-
ports that all rooms are now
provided with private bathroom,
and the hotel has been refur-
nisheri. McHugh is now In New
York, where he is making ar-
rangemnienrs for a sizably im-
proved staff for the coming sea-
son.


DIRTY DICK'S BAR
Where Friends Meet


BAY STREET


NASSAU. BAHAMAS


GLORIOUS VACATION

...at Nassau's famed Fort Montagu Beach Hotel
Placed amid the lawns and gardens of a magnificent 50-acre estate... the sprawling
200-room Fort Montagu faces the lazy, blue Atlantic across a private, cloud-soft beach.
Within the Hotel lies a world of service and facilities for luxury-craving guests.
Superb food ... lovingly selected and expertly prepared by French chefs.
a Delightful social whirl... in the beautiful Hibiscus Bar and Lounge or
dancing under the stars in the Hotel's Jungle Club.
SComplete and flawless service... in the hands of a large and well-trained staff.
Varied and numerous sports.., golf, tennis, ping-pong, shuffleboard, badminton.
Swimming, fishing, sailing, water-skiing. Horse racing during the winter season, too.
e Excellent "foreign* shopping at devalued pound prices... British woollens,
cottons, china, silver... Scotch whisky.. French perfumes.
Add to nese the wonderful charm of Nassau and you'll know why you
should write now for reservations. James J. Carroll, Managing Director.

O

OPEN ALL YEAR fort Montaqu


N SA IN T3B H 7A O Y 0 -F


III


MEN'S SPOR
and

WOMEN'S

CLOTH
In

SEA ISLAND
and

AFRICAN P
Look for the TR
label for name
nearest to
Or Write Bo
NASSAU


SPEND


THANKSGIVING




IN




F NASSAU!M


FROM MIAMI


Only 30 by Air* '40 by Boatx

ROUND TRIP PLUS TAX
* via Pan American World Airways or British Overseas Airways Corp.
x via Eastern Shipping's S. S. Nuevo Dominicano


L veliest

in

all

Nassau...


[eai sta"Fort Mont'aguB'eachii l"R'oyal'Vict.ri



LUXURIOUS HOTELS FINE FOODS
DANCING UNDER THE STARS GLORIOUS BEACHES
ALlt SPORTS SIGHTSEEING OLD WORLD CHARM

INA ITI T






WONDERFUL BARGAINS... SHOP FOR CHRISTMAS!
British china, silver, woollens...fine French perfumes...famous brands of Scotch.
Bring back $200 worth of goods duty-free.
ALL AT DEVALUED POUND PRICES!








Easy Travel


Havana Is


Gay Mecca



For Tourist


Any day of the year In Ha
vana platoons of Americans can
be seen taking pictures of Mot ro
Castle. sitting happily in side-
walk cafes sipping tall, frosted
dalqulris, or experimenting %ith
the sinuous motions of the rum
ba In the gay night clubs.
You'll find them admiring the
Cuban capital's ancient church
es and forts, at the races, cock-
fights and jal alai games, and
sunbathing or swimming at Mar-
laniao Beach.
In fact, no matter where you
go you're bound to bump into
an American tourist. He has be.
come as much a pait of the
Cuban scene as the ubiquitous.


ENJOY YOURSELF


It's nearer than you think to
the friendly hospitality of
Puerto Rico where the days
are warm and fair and the
evenings pleasant and cool.
The Caribe Hilton offers the
utmost in modern comfort
300 delightfully air-condi-
tioned rooms, each with its
private balcony overlooking
pool, beach and ocedn.
ireoul Plan a Singli Ir $ 9 Daoubli hrem S12'
Isno llt y ir Itro l i ntl, writl dlireit
or an I Hilln Holl.s


son luan puerto rico
IANK G. wANGEMAN, GEN. MCGR.


stentorian-I\oiced lottery ticket
vendor.
You don't have to look far for
the reasons.
Havana offprm every sor of
entertainnient. It has a iima-
nificeni climate t he ear
around. It is only a 65-minnte
I'light from Mianmi hy Pan
Aiimerican World Airways' Clip-
lIer or overnight on the SS
Florida. United States citizens
need no documrent.s to enter the
counir 3. And almost every
Habanero knows some Engflish.
It is Havana' atminophere of
gaiet', hove'.er. radiated by
even mthe humblest of Its citizen..
and its humorou,-and t'. picamiy
Cuban-i -L.tolns that iaptisale
the Amerlican and send hon
home a voluble p're;- ae-ni
Havana i- a EuLiopean-ivpe
cit. -.Long ago someone called
it the Pari, of the Western Hem-
isphere bpe-ause of Its blithe.
debonair -pirlt. its continental
architecture and Its sidewalkk
cafes.
A white city of limestone
buildings with flat. red tile roofs,
Havana reveals Its colonial an-
cestrv hy Its Spanish-Moorlsh
structures with their heavy, sol-
id mahogany doors, studded with
bia.' nails, and wide, barred
I ndows.
*
THE NEWCOMER to Havana
soon learns that several weeks
in this vibrant, cosmopolitan city


5~


Cl r!Ith *utbernmelt
CiI,%latieu's Athe L


does not exhautist it possibilities
foi entertainment.
Srunie take rontLiiie i lours
whic h cost about $3 'O a pel son.
Others like to wander about by
th-ni-eeIsc. Regardilezt of ihov.
thev go, however, nearly, every-
one's sight-.'eing itinerar'V in-
cludes La Fuerza. Havana's flist
fotties.; the ciir, hall--once the
humne of Spanish governor,-: El
Templete, where the Spanish
conqui.tadores held their first
inas.. tile 7ITth rentur',' ,cathedral,
and. of coti_-e. Morro Castle.
tIeImouLIS entinel of the cmit's har-
bor.
The coh t of imeals at the bet.
Icr knni n restalirants range
from 2 to S:i rfor a substantial
hiunch, and front $3 up for
dinner.


No one-neither the H;
os nor the tourists-goes
early at night. There Is
mu(h to see and do. Th
taiwdr-, riotous saterfroc
ai't.-i and deluxe night c
In winter. Havana's lhot
lange from $8 to $15 for
rooi-mi \iith bhaLh. Euiope
Fiom M lav I thlotin I
ho\epier, OtI can enloy t
urious HFotel Nacional fo
tie as $6 a day, or stay at
excellent, centrally loca
liels for $4 a day.
Aside from all its
charms and attractions
cnie- a great deal of its p
nv to its people. Cuba
e-ad.-going, curious.
friendly and almost violet
piessive in tncir liking.


Girls Need A Chaperone


Puerto Rican Custom


Fascinate U.S. Touri

Spain's 400-odd years of rule over Puerto Rico left
quaint customs in the Caribbean island. For example,
a girl goes out with a young man, a chaperone accomr


them.
Before becoming engaged, a
outh will formally ask his
sweetheart's parents for her
hand and. If he Is accepted, It
1will usually be two or three
years before the wedding bells
ring.
Fifr, eai; under the United
States flag. hoswe er. have en-
abled the chaperonace to be
transformed from an elderly rel-
ative to a viine married couple,
made it -ccr-iJhllp fo r a pit to
drink ai a I.ain V. itl her Pe -ort.
or to hi-i',rne .-1 i-vii-iep without
inrii'rin _:r -nr.iio l rir;-ilrii
Tli rnilin1-it In otw lito cii-
tliiE .; io nors Of w i '.l' iit' i'r-a-nni
.1 hI .ljfi ii -I r .t1',P fin-linig
S 11 6 .r f li in '-i i II'i"l .fi-l i.o l,-,n '
a i'i->. i lilr p 111.- 1 It-I a \ aLa-
[i I',i.
T l e ,tii ... .. i.- i,.I.l iv. l ,," '
,' 1 1ii'ill i',, i- ill P r i 0I I
r~li--i.'r tll Al. ir -i ... li|, l li a n ic
hi' l t I ha ni, .,- l" ;n n E a r-
aoI'r' ,i r,.T iv'-' ari. i I \- i l ia ncp
1-4f iO-i1if,- 1 ,[.,,l i -- \ l Ie,| E I f il-
1' d e% p I r. p cr ".II.-%,r ,,I:- I T ni e% % -
and rn magazine z.li-ii I nilinoiton-
oin .l' a n!iizpd r. .i' Ir ie il':rnfl's
errnrimir pt ni Ici'- anrl IF po'.-ir
ih' rn cOri'il,,.ri. i 1 iti people.
Rrrepnil,v hii e' Pr. Anipii-
rans haie hepn letling a dir-
feiPrnt illtit e If Putii- o Rihn.
Thli.e liking a r i h I ra n
irlii es hree Ihli while Ithre
i, porpri' ,I. lo hi nr', iiillar
o n dil i o n i'l in "Ither


0


W RII. Rings In Noses 1 MiamSi i 1sl:,
-Sunday. November 19. 1*-H


East, West Blend In Trinidad Ba...m-m s

Imagine, If you can, a place colony's population traces Its an- downtown Port of Spain. It is an m n
where women wear graceful c'et'V to India. There are 126,000 ancient city with Spanish patios
veils on their heads and silver Hindus and 32,000n Moslems. They and French iron grllwoik. But its 1
tings in their nose: \'here began coming to Tclinidad in 1845 color comes from the melee of
under a s.' stem of indenture which people and vehicles. There are .
stark w h i t e temples and lasted until 1917. brawny Negroes loading mule-
mosques are around the cortier -a,. l ."^ ^ ^ 'O~~drge1'e ^ly ^ ^
mosque are around the rcers Slavery had been abolished drawn carts; Negro women In
from European stlIe churches and cheap labor was needed on large straw hats peddling Ku us
and ultra-modern apartments, the plantations. The imported Khus grass, noted for its cedar-like f
Picture, t, cs dw workers were free to return to scent: Indian -women wearing the
S Picture, too, carts drawn by wa- India once their contracts were graceful "orhni" (veill and laden
ter buffalo, sleek automobiles, completed. hutl most preferred Ircnm wrists to elbows \s ith heav'v
Smart restaurants and cocktail the New World with Its greater liver bracelets; clerical workers -"~
lounges, little old men in white opportunities, hill-ryi.ng about on bicycles; Brit- :
"absh colonials in short pants and
ff flowing robes cooking over Iron Although Trinidad has now been knee-length socks, and bobbies In OVERNIGHT TO
S pots in the streets, and people their home for more than a cen.- spotlessly white jackets and white VE IH
dressed in the latest United States turv, the Indians still preserve pith helmets. AAVA N A
fashions dancing to music made by Itheir racial'and religious identity. V -
beating on old oil drums and bis- Their cnlnorul cisulnes and theli VIA P&0 S.S. FLORIDA
cuit tins. temples and mosques lead an East-
It all adds up to Trinidad. er'n aspect to Port of Spain and itsHO E Make your visit to lorioaus

SAnd, for American vacation- outlying communities. I avana more glrioe % the
isis, It all adds up to a complete You'll enjoy sauntering around PRfeatures only P&O san give:
change which can be achieved, 0 Shipboard Romance
eight and a half honrs from Ml- fl 0 Foreign Glamor
aoti by Pan American World coo
andT~a~eca^ Mi Hotel fiar nal 9^^ Cofortand Gaiety
Airways' Clippers. 3 51 Prado Bvd. Comfort and Gaiety
Trinidad is the most spectacu- Cruiseship Pleasures
labaner- larly colorful island in the Carib- d u HAVANA a Bargain Fare
o d bean. If CCoulldn'c be otnerwise with 9 Wonderful Mea.ls
i o be conglomerate population of Ne- HAVANA
far too gtoes. Hindus. Nnloems, French. AE X PIUS
iere are Portuguese,, Venezuelans. Chinese. p '* Magnificent view Only t40 x"
ont cab- S; ians and Briti.h as well as "' overlooking the Morro Round trip including meals and
c!uh. tiniterl States r, Castle and ocean. emfortable berth at sea.
tel lates The grnfgiarhical position of tllii .-. r----- ---C-a-t-l-e-a
a single Bi ti-h colon', ha madlte ii a main'or! In the heart of the cIty. SCHEDULE
in plan. rin4ioali nf ithie Weitern l ni tclu -Lv MIAMI 6:00P.M.
Oct. t31, phere. maill and mottlntaiLli. It Mondayt-WedneedaysFridayI
tile lux- iq tile srjouth-rnnir., i'lan-Il i ih the Largest and finest hotel The CUBAN TOURIST onA Mene B
r as lit- Antillis chain and ie inhmi sighth[ in heo Caribbean set in itsl COMMISSION, an offl- I L. HAVANA 6:00 P.M.
se~erl ofVenezela.Ship'hom ll oer ITaesdayit.Th nrilda ys-StdaysI
several of Veinezuela. Ship. fom all over j own 13 flowering acres ... Cal government bureauTuedy ura naa
ted ho- the iorirf anrhori in the %t inrle bar .. Caban Sun tCub .. for the conveniencer of at-. rt.
bor of Port of Spain. itsi capital . two swimming poole . visitors, Is located next
physical Almost a Lhhd of this Britnihl . brilliant Arboleda Room .. to Packard lobby. Sao your travel agent far reserve-
SCuba anw popular priced, Soda-Grill. tions or call P&O Office, Miimi,
opular- 7 Sh ilduin g O AT I Municipal Pier No. 2. Phone
ans are 1 ip ul in LOW RATES 9-7882. Ask about Sea-Air Cruia
alhs a,. Summer Rates Effective Tickets.
ntlv ex. Plants In State NOW IN EFFECT
Plants In State YourT ravel Agent or unil Januqry 20, 1951.
------- 11 HOTEL NATIONAL 01 CUBA THE^ ^"J CARItmH WAY
Slip arid boat building and 737D.uPoni Budlding 00 CUAI
repairing in Fi ItIda is a 9-7612I
-5.~uin.0iii0 hu' i e;-i W
The 75 plants building and .4Willld
repairing ships and boats andRI I UOI
It operating repair services In the 1 I


WCP


sts

t many
, when
ipanles


Islands of the West Indies, and
In the United States too, for
that matter.
Since Puerto Rfco has desel-
oped Into an aerial crossroads
between North and South Amer-
ica, with Pan American World
Alrsa'.,s operating 156 arrival;
and rlepal-trie- weekl%. its ranv
attiartions are be,7ominR knor n
to travelers all over the henui-
phere.
lIpanwhile tio ilInrii I4 ,-i- e-i,-
p.ndedI iti hit-[i lar.litic-.. Trie
riw ,\ I~. l l i,,.l' I ",lIS il'e i- lit,- i
H .-t','1- a fi .e'i ,l'-' i i l i rio llia i- ll i, ri-i
[ li I *- ', N i l ili l 1 i o ni- tinlll l 1- i i l
i]r'il is rn i- if mile fi-t.l_ in
In." \\'p-[ InlhF.
"'i',p [',ptill ',,i. lidn [F-;.I, L
H-r'l Il no" i Sit,1 ar lili rinal
Isnnir1z. a t',t -_ .I .-'.p se'.r rI nc i,'
hOaoii SairI. 1. iri'.iin-jiIi
(-ana a. ano. I,.] k-ir Iroo.m, a".
crilrnimr'riinal 2 -'if0 people
The oinininim 1't in San
lN.,i foi a i ,oinl and pli' 1 ;f
;-Ath0. nn hp EiUrnpean plan.
aia"es iru-in z', I.-. ;'; a da'
San tLian. orl' ti.pe hrlli i
f,,inii Miaini I,. r,'.A Cllpp- iS .1 I;
a i'iipir iil ii niXl ile Olf pa0 el
, -',1,:, .I,' m(-ionQ mo'.eli n |.'nri -li
SIil i I ,in, F s a n, r il
u u triuii n q [ie n i a n ?i ) ; ,i- I % ,
l|iiSi ho,, in'. ai-.%


state employ somre a,000 work-
ers with an annual payroll of
more than $13,000,000.


Fly Now-to Sunny
4Mb ^^^''""*Blnt


---Visit---
Romantic
NASSAU
Behcinam
Colorful
KINGSTON
Jamaica
Attractive
CIUDAD TRUJILLO
Dominican Republic
Historic
PORT-au-PRINCE
Haiti

10dayv cuiqei to
Nassau, Kingston. Port-au-Prince
S1i day cruses to
Nassau, Ciudad Trujillo, Port-au-Prince
Only $169 up i ",
Sill on l. S S Nuevo Domianieran.
Wour floatlng hotel providing cool.
ill outside cabins. eacalIlent otend
and dancing aboard. 1200 foreign
purchases duty-free.
Also. -daiy weekend cruises to Nassau
$40 up. r..und rip




See your travel ogaent or

astern
SHIPPING CORP.
Pier 3, Miami, Florida
Phone 2-3454 or 2.7183


"EST./
F p


BIRMINGHAM


L$SdteO MWIC mr CITT<- "
* WISr 4/PWsA IRIACAPULCO





M M I FiLORIDA
PHONE Il 82-6 [5., s


THE/ROUE OF T H SUN
THE ROUTE OF THE SUN


vacalion. Pack our trip with variety., 4
Call sour Traick Aent or
Call our Tral Agent or ROMANTIC ,EST INDIES-15-day tow'
Miami 88-3611 Lakes \ou to Puerto Rico, the Dominican
Ticket Offlces: Miami, 2 Beiscayne Blvd. Republic, Haii, Jamaica, Cuba. All hotel rooms
Miomi Beach: 1632 Collins Avenue. are included, meals at several points, local sight-
8tr.d, M .X,,i u A P.a M r ,;,,, f seeing tnpi. Total cost $395 from Miami.



IvPA# f WffffVORrnt / AWYff41f
WORLD'S MOST EXPERIENCED AIRLINE

-


.- .1 Ifc p ,
'. *.;* ...; - :, "-"^-tilt.,


ELABORATE PRESIDENTIAL PALACE IN HAVANA


I


I


-1




_LH THE MIAMI HERALD Sunday, November 19, 1950


"I


1 k


A


Here's


hy


ATIO


L


s / / I \

America's Fastest-Growing


is



kirlin


THE FAMED(-r- '
Luxury DC-6 4


AT STANDARD FARES
Hours Non-Stop to


The CLUB COACH DC-4
5 HOURS NON-STOP to


* New DC-6 Luxury Liners


NEW YORK
3 HRS. 20 MIN. NON-STOP TO WASHINGTON
, Starlight Lounge Filet Mignon Dinners
SMusic Flowers Red Carpet on Departure
and Arrival Seats Just Two Abreast


* Two-Abreast Seat Comfort
* Smart 4-Engine Airliners
* Gracious Stewardess Service


* Certificated Scheduled
Airline standards of service
and reliability


THIS WINTER-THE THIRD...
LARGEST FLEET OFIlflf
LARGEST FLEET OF : w.*o:,


DC6's
IN AMERICA!


THE
MILLIONAIRE'SS VACATION"
on a^g^'tj'Bank'ucJ~ti!


* Low-cost luxury vacations which lead the way in
creating Florida's record-breaking summer season.


THE INDUSTRIAL INFORMATION
BUREAU
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Steamer Titanic Goes to Bottom

With.' teen Hundred Souls
dTu o Scene,; twa ii TWIlEER I SHES AND
I IRI K1O Mississippi fnil
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Miami


9paAneA.M


YAonL JbeACM j7(ofigboAo


By JACK TALE
eirald Stalff Writer
FJ .R''Y y eais of hot history have poured from
F The Miami Herald's Finging presses since the
first flimsy two-page issue was cranked off a flat
bed contraption on Dec. 5. 1910.
Deeds of derring-do and days of despair have
marched across nearly 15.000 front pages. Names
of the great and humble have splashed across
inky columns with equal prominence.
In one of the greatest news-producing areas
in the country, there has come to be magic In
the Miami dateline.
Over the years The Herald has reflected life
in a lively area that grew ao fast and had so
many things happen to it that It was practically
always breathless.
It gave Ihe world the stories that made read-
ers laugh and made them cry-and almost al-
ways feft them saying "Gee Whiz."
Lrke the three R's of school days, Miami's big
news over the past four decades has been largely
made by the three B's-boom, bust and blows.
One of the great newspaper feats of all time
%was The Herald's coverage of the mld-2?ns boom-
those gay weird and wonderful days %.hen every
rian had soaring plans and 1.000 per cent 'profit
on land deals t as standard operating procedure.
In 1924, when the boom started rolling. The
Herald was equipped to turn out a 24-page news-
paper on a couple of 2n-.ear-old. secondhand
presses. Then came the flood of people woo started
making news and buying advei tusements like mad.
FOR TWO YEARS. until nec pre4,es eotld hb
installed, those old relic' creaked and groaned and
slred bolts all over the place, grinding away on a
24-hour basis.
They told of a building boom that hit a peak
in October, 1925, when Greater Miami construction
permits totaled $15,7S7,539 for the month. They
mirrored a completely havwire real estate market
that saw $30,000,000 worth of Miami Shores lots
sold in a single day, $15nnn.000roo worth of property
'' sold in Coral Gables, and Flagler st. valuation'z
.h'a,' V rting $70,000 a front foot.
^^^fl 'They chronicled the arrival of 50 toin 73 Pll-
| mlan cars daily, loaded to the trucks with eager
buyers and sellers. They recorded the 971 new
subdivisions which were platted In 1925 and
the 39 in 1926.


Those weie the das when the song of the
pip es'e .as a paean of triumph. Then it slowed
to a dirge.
There were SN2 loaded box cais lammed into
the Miami rail lards and .scnn r more iting north-
ward towaid Liile River when The Herald flashed
the news on Aug. 17, 19I5, that the FEC had
clamped down a ban on shipments into Miaml on
anything but fuel, livestock and perishables.
A little later, new headlines announced that
steamship lines had joined the emhaigo. Herald
reporters found long lines of trucks wailing all
day in the hot sun and far" ir.o the night. waiting
to get de'petatel;.-nePded goods out of the holds
of ship' which jammed the small harbor.
*
SHIPPERS started chartering any hulk they
could get their hands on.
"Men conspired in the dead of right for a few
planks or beams, just enough to tide them over a
tight spot so they could throw a house together
somehow and get it on the market." reported a
historian of the period.
Then came Sept. IS. 19:6. People didn't know
it that day. but II was Miami's Black Friday
and the day that was to mark the beginning
of the fabulous city's Seven Lean Years.
The Herald told the siory that day in an in-
conspicuous one-line headline in the middle of
page one., which said simply. "Hurricane Re-
pol ted." A sub-head added conmfoiltngiy, "Storm
oft" eatl Intens.it off Turk's Island not expected
to tirn.h Florida .
Saturday mownings Herald ,'?nt In pwesA hclf ie
tlie big blow fastened its ripping fingers arinund
Ine rcit,,' throat. "Stoirm's edge beings strong %ind
to Miami." said that da"s. hr' ,inop.
But all (lay Satuidla.,, ionm 2 a. m. In mid
afternoon, Miami fought for Its life against 120.
mile-an-hour winds that clawed apart flimsy boom
lime construction.
*
ON MONDAY, by dint of moving staff member-
to relatively undamaged Palm Beach, The HIrald
save the country y the fii-t account of the disaster
that left the once proud and beautiful Gold Coast
shocked and stunned.
NMiami's trial h fur% was told in that da','
big. black headlines. "7.5 are dead In Miami storm,
60 lires are takpn in Hollywood; Property loss Ia
$13.iXr0.000 in Miami district .. IOli.tO homes are
unroofed or otherwise damaged as hurricane


strikes . Two relief trains are s-ent to Miami
area . Corps of doctors and nurses are sent
from Lake WVorth and West Palm Beach."
A proclamation byh City Manager F. H. Whar-
ton and Acting Ma.%or James H. Gilman told
citizens tiat ."A crisis Is at hand. In the pa't
we have overcome conditions which at first
seemed as bad and possibly worse. Why not
now? . Your loyalty is now being tested."
Ac the battering shock %' ore off. Miamians look
heart and wont optrmiistiraliv hack to work. A
Herald ediliorial dreilaied that most of the damage
could he qui'kiy o\ercnr-ie.
"Some of the handsome palms will be missed
v thoqe who have learned to loe individual
liees and particular drt-.s." it asserted, "but to
not<[ or those wh;io have been here before little
change illi be noticeable and to those who come
for the first time. Miami will be the beautiful
citv of their dreams, the incomparable city that
nothing can daunt .
*
THE NEWS during tihe next Seven Lean Years
until rpto\er.' began in 19.J.3. vas enough to daunt
any citvy, however. The columns of The Herald
irp(ordol',. one hy one. the failure of esery bank
in Dade coUniy except the First National and Its
affiibaips, and the Bank of Hialr-ah.
There \Pire otrier ctorm'. Lon. On Sept. 16.
i9_q. a I1ii ricane S'APpL. otith Florida. leaving a
fearful toll of some l.110 dead. Mnln of them were
drowned in the Lake Okeechobee area when the
pile-diming wind spilled lake waters over the
tnen-tnadeqliate levee .ystemn.
On Labor Day. 1935. the hig winds smothered
the Florida keys. It left some 300 dead, moit of
them veterans who had been working on gov-
prnmient projects. The Overseas railroad was
blown away.
The news wasn't all bad. The Seaboard Ani
Line pushed its jai!t to the city on Jan. q. 1927.
and the Tamnami trail westward was opened on
April 26. 192S. Both the projects had been vigor-
otui.y epouqed In Herald editorial campaigns.
Sometimes important. sometimes novel, a steady
stream of happenings has conspired to keep Miami
consistently in the headlines for nearly half a
'.entur'..
On a balmy night in Fehluary. 19.3., a little
Italian with "'pains in mit holly" splattered p fusi-
lade of shots at President-elect Franklin D. Roose-


veil as he finished a speech in Bayfront Park.
Giuseppe Zangara mi'sed the chief executive but
fatally wounded Chicago's Mayor Anion Cermak.
*
MIAMI ALWAYS has been a happy hunting
ground for big names.
The Duke of Windsor and "the woman I love"
held their first press conference after his abdica-
tion aboard the yacht of Internationalist, Axel
WVenner-Gren in the Miami Harbor.
The Duchess had a well-publicized operation
here. and the Duke once boarded a Coast Guard
plane here for a sea rendezvous with President
Roosevelt to work out details for U.S. defense
bases In the West Indies.
Out of Miami came the news of the deaths
of such diverse personages as J. P. Morgan. Al
Capone, Harry K. Thaw. Gerardo Machado, the
exiled Cuban dictator, and others.
Under the assiduous auspices of high-powered
press agents, the Miami Beach bathing beauty
became as familiar to the nation's editors as their
own Aunt Minnie.
"It could only happen In Miami." muttered
editors everywhere as they surveyed the captivat-
Ing stream of screwball stuff that keeps exploding
out of the Gold Coast.
There w'as, for Instance, the story of the aged
couple who left instructions that they were to be
hbried side by side in a standing position In a
block of concrete. Their obituary noted that serv-
i es were conducted by Combs funeral chapel
and the Ace Concrete Co.
Miami reporters also broke the story of Karl
Tanziler von Cosel, an aged German scientistL, who
for -even years kept in his bedroom the corpse
of a young woman with whom he had fallen In
rove. trying to bring her back to life.
The heir to the Spanish throne, the Count of
L'ovadonga. died spectacularly here after being In-
lured in an auto accident while taking a short
dive with a night club cigaret girl.
Pianist Jose Iturbl played a concert here under
police guard after he had been threatened with'a
ripe tomato barrage by a Miami Beach hostess
whose cocktail party he had spurned. Noveligt
li 'ula Parrott smuggled a young GI out of the
Officer Candidate School guardhouse at Miami
Beach during World War II, defying the rifle ftie
of sentries.
There's been lots of news In 40.ysam.

~ ''1'


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National Prominence Gained In 40 Years

By Florida's Most Widely Read Newspaper


By JACK THALT
eN.M 845aKf. Wrtter
FtOM a frontier Jurinal to
one of the nation's top
metropolitan newspapers in
40 years is the record written
by Tht Miami Herald.
On Dec. 5, 1910, a single
pressman sent a flat bed press
shuttling back and forth to
Ink out the first issue of the
new publication, that was to
be read by somnre 2,000 people.
Today, buttons pressed on a
complicated control panel send
two-story presses into a basso
profuBdo chorus that whipped
out this edition of The Herald
at a 60,000n-hoeur rate.
For these 1950 Herald presses,
It would only be a 30-econd Job
to whip out the' entire first edi-
tion of the 1910 Herald.
And today's Herald will be
read by more than 100 times
mt people than read Volume
1,plmber2 1.
It took Just ?IT employes--
foar editoriL, four business of.
flee and mine mechanical-to
get out the first Herald.

Today's Herald manpower
stands at 681 people. There are
98- editorial, staffers, 82 in the
advertising department 37 busi-
ness office employees, 272 in the
mkchtnical department. 132 in
the circulation and mall depart-
nints, while a building force of
60 people takes care of the
paper's ultra-modern home.
In addition, there are some B0
"Herald boys" throughout the
state, acting as independent car-
riers in delivering each morn-
ig's edition, to the homes of
subscribers.oe

IN BIWWEEN the piping'In-
fanst of 1910 and the lusty giant
of 1960 Is a story of progress
that leapfrogged all convention-
Ial bounds to keep pace with an
area that has developed wit h
phenomenal speed.
The Herald's destinies over
the four decades have been
guided by only two editors-
Frank B. Stoneman, the tall.,
grave, scholarly editor of the old
school who was editor in chief
from the founding of The Herald
until his death on Feb. 1. 1941,
and John S. Knight. present edi-
tor and publisher, International-
ly known newspaperman.
Actual forebearer of The
Herald was the Miami Eve-
ning Record, founded Jin 1903
by Stoneman as the first daily
newspaper in the community.
After some time it was shifted
to morning publication, and


still later the name was
S(hanged to The News-Record."
Through a chain of circum-
stances, the late Attorney Frank
B. Shutts was named receiver
for the News-Record. and late
In 1910 the company was re-
organized and the name changed
to The Miami Herald.
Shutts was president of the
-new.-company, with Stoneman
as vice president and managing
editor, Miss J. M. Carmen, sec-
retary, and Oscar T. Conklin,
general manager.
The first issue that came off
the old Miehle flat bed press
consisted of a single sheet,
printed on both-sides. It con-
tained only a couple of hundred
words of telegraph news, with
the remainder made up of local
Items or stories clipped from
other newspapers. Much of the
type was hand set.
** *
BUT MIAMI was on the
march, and so was The Herald.
By J1915 the circulation was
up to 3,600, and a Goss Comet
flat bed press, capable of print-
ing up to eight pages at a time,
had been installed. "
By Tbe Herald's eighth
birthday, Dec. 5, 1918, Miami's


JAMS8 L. KNIGHT-
. gsnetri manager


the mid-20a however. H r a I d
workers sometimes wondered
whether they were running a
newspaper or trapped on the In-
side of an egg beater.
*
CAUGHT as unaware aa any-
one else by the boom, The Her-
aid struggled along with a
couple of asthmatic, second-hand
presses. They clanked and
groaned and smoked in a man-
ful effort to keep pace with a
circulation and advertising vol-
ume that shot upward like a
man who sits on a scorpion.
For more than 13 months In
1925 and 1926 The Herald be-
came the largest newspaper in
volume of business In the world.
Por 16 consecutive months
the paper was able to print
an average of 96 pages a day,
for an all-time record of news.
paper display advertising. It
topped by 3IS million lines the
next highest newspaper line-
age i1 the country."
"I'd like to take the Sunday
Herald," one woman is reported
to have told a carrier boy dur-
ing that period, "But I'm afraid
it might fall on me."
Anguished space salesmen
sometimes had to turn down as


*** --Bl
JOHN 8. KNIGHT
. publisher


population had shot to O.o000
and The Herald's circulation
was up to T,001,
The paper's staff had been
more than doubled from the
original 17, with eight editorial
workers, six circulation, four
advertising, four business office,
14 typographical workers and
aix pressmen and stereotypes.
Four Linotype machine. had
been added to the single one
used by the first Herald, and a,
Goss Junior straighiline press
had been instaled.
Circulation cen o n i n u ed its
steady climb, and by 1920 it was
about 9.000. Tnen came the boom
and the roof fell In.
Up to that point The Herald
progress had been steady but not
apectacular. In the madness of


LEEI HILLS
-. miauaging editor


many as 15 full pages of ad-
vertising a day because of lack
of press facilities. On one Sun-
day during the boom The Her-
ald advertised for sale real es-
tate worth $17,650,000.
*
A NEW four-story printing
plant with a new battery of
presses finally got into opera-
tion In 1926, but by that time
the boom was over.
It was The Herald in 1926,
also, which gave the world the.
first accurate account of whu
the Sept. 18 hurricane had done
to the Gold Coast.
The big blow blacked out all
communications between Miami
and the rest of the country. Sun-
day's northern newspapers, with
only incomplete and often in-


accurate information to go on.
bannered "South Florida Wiped
Out" stories.
The Herald set up emergen.
cy quarters in West Palm
Beach, however, and in a spe-
cial edition on Monday morn-
lug told the world the fabnu.
Ions winter playground area
was grievously battered but
still there.
After the boom and blow
came the bust, and for seven
long years from 1926 Florida
wag going around with patched
pants and holes in its shoes.
Shutts refinanced The Herald
in 1927 for a long pull out of
the depression, but the old flush
times still had not returned
when he finally sold The Herald
to its present owners in 1937.
*
IN THE PRESENT company,
John S. Knight is editor and
publisher, w Ith his brother,
James L. Knight as actual op-
erating head of The Herald, as
secretary-treasurer and general
manager. John H. Barry, gener-
si manager of the Knight News-
papers, Inc., and a veteran of
40 years with the Knight organ-
ization, Is vice president.
Both the Knights have sunk
their roots deeply in Miami.
John S. Knight owns a
home here at 6645 PlIneirre
lane, Miami Beach, and al.
though he has business Inler-
efts in northern cities, spends
several months of each year
here. One of his sons, Frank
M. Knight, is now In his sec.
ond year at the University of
Miami.
James Knight established hr
permanent residence here 14
ears ago, and all three of his
daughters have been reared in
Miami. He has been active in
civic affairs here, particularly
the Communliv' Chest.
In the 10 years bet\teen 1593n
and 1940, Herakl circulation
limbedd from about 45,000 to top
the 100,000 mark, consuming
9,000 tons of newsprint a year.


MEANWHILE, on Nov. 16,
1941, The Herald moved into Its
new home, acclaimed unani-
mously by newspapermen and
builders as one of the most beau-
tiful newspaper plants in the
country and a triumph of archi-
tecture and efficient engineer-
ing..
Judge Stoneman had died In
February of that year, and at
the'wishl of his family his ashes
were placed in the cornerstone
of the new building, near the
roaring presses and clattering
typewriters he knew so In-
tlmately and loved so well.
A bronze plaque in the build-
ing lobby pays this tribute to
the man who spent his life re-
cording the triumphs and trag.
edies, of South Florida:
"No storm ever broke the
gentile strength of his toler-
ance or deflected him from
the tr.th as he saw it."
In 1948, a second line of
presses was installed, giving The
Herald facilities, to publish a
266-page, newspaper at the rate
of 50,000 an hour.
This lonth, workmen started
installing four more Hoe High
Speed units and one folder to the
towering bank of presses. The
new Installation will give The
Herald press loom a battery of
eignt Go Headliner units. tith
two folders, and 12 Hoe High
Speed unks itrth three folders.
With that line-up. The Herald
can print 'fatir S0-page newspa-
pers at once at the rate of 60.000
an hout. By' using different
combinations of presses. Itt will
be possible'to print 7 papers of
up to 32 pag'z -imiLitaneou-, six
paper; of up to 44' pacp. or
Int" paper' 1fi up to 64 page'.
One of tho major jonz so far
ltirndr out 'hj the presses in-
?tailed In )944 was the printing
of 25o.nno copies of s 12-section
special edition, using up 13
freight carloads of newsprint in
the process.
** *
DESPITE the war-imposed
leash of shortages In manpower,
I


equipment and supplies. The
Herald has written the most
brilliant chapter in its history
during the past decade.
From a circulation of about
100,000 ten years ago, it strode
boldly Iitto the big league of
metropolitan papers with a cir-
culation that reached a top of
260,000 last winter and has aver-
aged 181,808 daily and 209,348
Sunday over the past year.
In repeated months It has
topped the nation by publish-
nlug more advertising than any
other United States newspaper.
For nearly five years The Her-


J. I). PENNEKAMP
associate editor


Topping -the list is the Maria
Moors Cabot gold medal award-
ed to Managing Editor Lee Hills
in 1946 by Columbia university
for his "distinguished contrIbu-
tIon to Inter-American Rela-
tions." ,
"'
ASSOCIATE Editor John D.
Pennekanmp, a 25-vear-veteran
wiLh The Herald, :likewise has
wdxn national prominence-
principally for his years-long.,
successful fight to establish the
2,0.00,0-a c r e Everglades Na-
tional Park.
With tongue and pen,
Pennekamp waged an aon-


FRANK B. HUTTP
former ownsr


aid has been publishing a special
international Clipper edition
beamed toward Latin America
and the Caribbean.
It I% delivered on the date of
publication in cities as far dis-
tant a3 Buenos Aires. 5.000 miles
awash. The Clipper. t'nn ofull
market reports and other f'nan-
rial information and n peciall.y-
preparpd Latin American net. ,
ha' been Called "n'ti-t" reading
b' dipinmais and businesmen
in tirtuall9 all the lands south
of the Border.
Latin Aniprran leaders as
well as otri own State Depart-
minent officials have been unstint-
ing in their praise of the value
of The Herald Clipper in
strengthening cultural and eco-
nomic ties between the United
States and her Latin American
neighbors.
*
IN THE PAST decade, also,
Herald .tarf writers, editorial-
ists, cartoonists and photog-
raphers bav' piled up an Im-
pressive arra\ of national and
international hnno s.


F. BU.8TONEMAN
. editor 1910 to 104i


remitting fight for the land
and money needed to set up
the vast and beautiful tropical
park.
He also won wide acclaim for
his battle-all the way to the
Supreme court of the United
States-to uphold the American
principles of freedom of the
pres.
The high justices upheld Pen-
nekamp's decision to run an
editorial sand a cartoon in 1944
criticizing the official conduct of
Circuit Judges Marshall C. Wtse-
heart and Paul D. Barns. The
circuit Judges hsd cited him and
The Herald for contempt of
court.
Repeatedly. in state compe-
titions, The Herald has been
accorded the top honor as the
newspaper of outstanding ex.
cellence In Florida during the
past 10 years.
Under Its two editors. The
Herald has unswervingly during
its 40-year-history made respond.


sibility to its readers its prime
objective.
The Knights gave an unhesi-
tating example of that during
World War II, when zooming
e rculatten left Ths'ralil prac-
tically bare of tightly rattlte
newsprint at the beginning of
December, 1943.
In an .almost unprecsidated
step, the Knights ordered virtu-
ally' tall advertial U to be
dropped from the paper to make
room for news. That lasted for
more than a month.i until new..
rations of newsprint became
available,
4* 5 < .
DEPARTMENt st644''dva-
tisements, because they have a
high reader Interest, were ca;.
tried in condensed, su aisfty
form as a free public service..
"The Herald is faced with thi
same decision our British oe0W
temporaries had. to iak at-Ow
start ot the war and l1k,.the*'^
we have decided'the reasdir mut'
come -first?' The Herald' said, It
announcing the ad curstaHilmoenS
Even after the war, umtil
the newsprint shortage esed
in mld-146., Herald advertise
era were restricted, ina order
to conserve space for news.

No less conscious of his pub-
lic responsibility was Editor
Stoneman.
"His voice was mighty in the
people's oounclls of Miami short.
ly after the turn of the century
and his'influence was 'great In
the creation of those things that
marked the beginnings of this
community's expansion Into a
modern city." said one of his
contemporaries.
Their editorial pens were
lances turned to the defense of
the people.
Mant of the things they have'
fought for today are panrt and
parcel of the fabulous Gold.
Coast-such things as better
waterways, building of a rail-
road to the west coast, comple-
tion of the Tamlami trail. estab-
lishment of an Everglades Na-
tional park, flood control work
for South Florida, beautifliaes.
tlon of Miami's bayfront, more
and better sewer systems for
Miami. and, in general a Greater
Miami In fact as well as name.


SClipper Goes South DaliUly



Latin America Gets The Herald

A major newspaper "firrt" for rounded newspaper-avidly sought America. Folks who never visited
The Miami Herald Is a streamlined, after and for Latin American Miami have come to know. it so
air express version of Its dally government officials, newspapers well they consider it "a second
and Sunday papers that reaches and English-reading citizens it af- home town.'
large sections of Latin America fords a blow-by-blow account of That. In turn. has produced
on the date of publication, doings in the world's leading coun- more travel and more trading by
T''he aii.borne "Clipper Edilon" R'y. Latin Americans and North Amerl-
nnt oniyv won wide acclalm or Inetiahle result has been a cans abroad with the Greater Mi-
the Heprald but produced closer closer feeling and understanding ami businesses whose advertise-
tie hrti e"rn Grpater Miami and '. between Greater Miami and Latin ments they see in The Herald.
I ts neighbors to the south Iot
First Clipper Edition flew south-i
h N ward aboard a Pan American i iSl T
VWo, td A.irta.s plane on Jan. 9, Timid Soul H. T. W ebster
lq4t--just a2 potsitar expansion
', of commercial aviation hegan to
' move Miami Into its own as "Air
Gateway of the Americas." Et-H 4uIHAPPYI KfiiF-
Five scant months later, in the r Y15 Yu HAPPY
fir st prihllc announcement of the 5 IfTHDAY 16 'to-
pioneering v e n t u i e. Managing Hppy BIRT-AV
SEditor l*e ItHll could sa' of the j- .- D MWP I HIR ALID,
Idea he conncived and developed. C DEAR MIAMI HERALD-
"Throughout the L.atin-Ameri- t, A -PPY UITHP- A
c%; an countries, this new edition 0 ou. l -aB
r is forging a new link of cultural ?
a n d economic understanding
among all English-speaking peo- *,
plea."
S! And hfromrn Washington to Buenos
SAires newspaper executives and -
top government leaders agreed A P
with the appraisal by Herald Bust- \
ness Manag r James L. Knight:
"The Clipper Edition represents
one of the rnot ambitious postwar
pulling projects in the country
today."
For it-and for the contribution
to hemispheric under standing
which It made-the Miami Herald
and Hills were honored with the
coveted Maria Moors Cabot Award.
As the only United States MPi.. /MILqLJUETASTS NIrHTMA' e- ,
daily to hit large parts of Latin vflie, -fiTr A, ItANME. r oF DFLIVERINI',


li1cation, the Clipper edition has
lived up to its slogan, "The
Newspaper of The Americas."
For North Americans abroad It

A PATCHWORK AFFAIR WAS OLD HERALD PLANT. WHICH QUICKLY OUTGREW EVERY ADDITION. IT WAS LOCATED ON SAME SIE AS PRESENT ONE provides a daily, fresh, well-
PR I S D RL P T W U A
p 3 ; s -x


THE MIAMI HERALD'S PtISENT PLANT IS CONSIDERED ONE OF THE MOST EFFICIENT IN THE NATION. IT WAS OPENED NOV. 16, 1941


i








Sunday, November 19, 1950 THI MIAMI HERALD 3.J


1910 *


U


rhe


,Vatio ii Colgraitula tes


r*he herald


* 1950


%?At*" O--l*o
eiXlEcUTIVK OrTICE
"Ll.%"A.os


MUsLt% *e"S


May The Herald conthflU to berala t e
pvwth f d a F t usts.
S Cordially.,


GOVZ40R1


*! p
P 'I t P v I p$"LCE NT



.1



.. Jon tS. S lt
Ud"t, Mlid Kn.h
The shar
= Ploja.
NY d- ;r.l ght,
r have bean.r a lea t .
Ite,. 48 e,,- t0. learn ti~ The i4j
Th to --M-brat. St.at. a
af "low to the MY W431be
h -ap to P the Peoplre a ofPItt,
RW pa a"l a o f1 -" pl n& n S r
Ao V ai Saca r a, ed am
muec-s eelud ortlatfms and bn "
", i y Y.l. is
Sizole3. yours,


^^-^^^ -



I


I I


th" am haptoa-
4tth arezngr, hrf ter.ty d greet p8t

Naton reary. celebrwatlon ni its110"


-;-"t.-o, aa' ? -.s
Vitally he Depa .Mntof the Tte
v ita llyter~ested in thr1 L~*12
and it, inhetoo L
and a People.ie!its ae-rlfar fo I a
ag 8ricultu ral reationsind POrlda
,h&.Seminole po iaS tyi.s Eve rlaL
Rfuge and ,,. Ma N a I'S *a+ .-rgVadis
our Conti e-ractivties .dlfa
Your Statn.u e interest anrIn
,, ,n a d F. "c~loridaa ssue

Asa the
and Puerto orcg nize NJ
as a t he gRic o Eteay to the Vi1. fln lelgnds
tfor atr 7U stbouthern 2sea kor aai-,
A ricaa. anpor t 1-* fe -tsnC
cOnflde ay the &RLD contlifle to l'rant the
li fe. it has ach ieved -n Fe tlorida s da lly

Ilnerely your.,

e eta% ;#t 0 ;


M From Fourth Estate


An Outstanding Force In U.S.
I wish to extend my sincere felicitations to The Miami
Herald on its 40th anniversary.
The progressive growth of Florida is due
In a large part to the contributions of organiza-
S tons such as The Herald.
It has always fought for the true principles
of democracy, as It saw and believed them to
be. In so doing it has proven the validity of
our concept of a free press in a rree nation.
M I Life certainly will not begin at 40 for The
Herald-but with this two score years of ex-
perience the coming years of service will be even more full
and rewarding.
JUSTICE TOM C. CLARK
United States Supreme Court.
*
Navy Congratulates Herald
It Is a pleasure, on behalf of the United States Navy, to
extend to The Miami Herald our heartiest congratulations and
best wishes on the occasion of its 40th anniversary.
A free press dedicated to the truth is essential to the life
of a democracy. Toward this end, may The Miami Herald
continue to serve the people of Florida and our country.
SFRANCIS P. MATTHEWS
Secretary of the Navy


* *


Important Agency Ob)
I am happy to have this op- I
Sportunity which The Miami Her- Mian
C ald gives me to
S extend my
heartiest con-
gratulations to
S Lee Hills and.
his staff.
.j 4 ; Well-inform-
Sed people are a
basic requisite
of democratic
processes. In
the field of
d i s seminating
Information, The Herald is a tion
most inportant agency, serving new
the Miami area and the nation. n
Best wishes for continued cont
and increasing success.
STEPIEN EARLY
*


*
active Reporting
want to congratulate The
ni Herald on its 40th annl-
versary. Your
paper is per-
for'mirng an
o u ts t anrding
function, serv-
ing a growing
and prosperous
area. The peo-
Spie of Florida
are particu-
latly fortunate
In having such
a fine publics-
reporting objectively the
s as It appears. I wish you
inued success.
SEN. ESTES KEFAUVER,
Tennessee


Fromn Texas, Congratulations
I write this letter to congratulate The Herald on its long
career and to wish for many more years of service to the
country and mankind.
.... REP. SAM RAYBULRN, Texas
Speaker of the House of Representatives.
*- .* *,
Florida, Herald Grow Together
I' warmly congratulate The Miami Herald upon its 40th
anniversary. In this nearly half cen t u r y,
the phenomenal growth 'of Florida has
helped greatly to build a greater Miami
Herald, and The Miami Herald has helped
immensely to build a greater Florida.
I know that both Florida and The Miami
i Herald, each fittingly aiding the other and
both making a significant contribution to a
better nation and a nobler world, shall go
grandly on into the long line of the challeng-
ing future together.
SEN. CLAUDE PEPPER, Florida.
*..
:A Fine Service To Florida
On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of The Miami
Herald, I wish to extend my greetings and congratulations
to this publication and its staff for the fine service it has
rendered the people of Florida. I also wish to expi'ess the hope
that it will continue its successful operation for the benefit
of the entire state. *
S SEN. WALTER F. GEORGE, Georgia
Chairman Senate Finance Committee.
*
Rates High In United States
I would like to extend to John S. Knight and The Herald
my warmest congratulations. I consider The Herald one of the
outstanding papers of the country. The people of Florida are
to be congratulated on this publication.
I* hope The Herald circulation will continue to Increase
and that I may have the pleasure of reading it more often in
the future.
% LESLIE L. BIFFLE, Secretary
....-. .. United States Senate


Vital Role In Momentous Era .4 Word From A
On the "exchange
Forty years of outstanding and forthright journalistic serv- newspapers of Americ
ice and leadership to one of the fastest developing cities and It is perfectly na
states in the nation! Itss perfectandly a
I am glad to have this opportunity to congratulate Joihn S. spractia
SKnight and the members of the able staff leader
S of The Miami Herald on the 40th anniv.Arsary thru-is
of the founding of a great newspaper. Or
The Herald has played a vital pailt in a 40th
y momentous era during which Florida ha:g safely
survived a boom. a depression, several hurri- a dflmita
canes and two World Wars. for
Throughout its long and suc(essfutl career peror
your newspaper has highly discharged i s heavy 40 y.e
public responsibility. \\With kindest regain
It is my sincere hope and my confident belief tiiat The personal friend, and
Herald will continue to grow and prosper by contirlulng to generation.
render the same high quality of service to the peoplki of the
Miami area and the state.
SEN. SPESSARD L. HOLLAND Florida Service That Folio
x /Service That Follio
A Soldier Lauds The Herald My heartiest cong
Congratulations to The Miami Herald for 40 yeans s of signi- occasion of the 40th ai
ficant, contribution to the growth of a great state ;A1id to the The service you
free press of a great democracy. follows the tradition c
J. LAWTON COLLINS, Ch (1f of Staff have continued success
United St tes Army.
*. j
Prominence Is Country-wide
The Miami Herald is to be congratulated on Its 40th an- Herald Recognized
niversary. Its prominence is.greater than its attaini nent of the
largest circulation in the state of Florida. Its prominence ex- Congratulations and
tends beyond the boundaries of Florida to the f4)ur corners anniversary.
of our nation for The Miami Herald has earned genuine respect, The Herald is vei
for itself throughout the nation. newspaper to have ac
SEN. MARGARET CHASE SMITH, Maine. in the United States T
M i and truthful news cc
A Hard-Hitting Newspaper/ editorials.
I wish to congratulate Florida's largest newspaper on its
40th birthday.
As one who frequently visits Florida, I A4 Voice From The
have often read The Miami Hei ald and know
it to be a vigorous, hard-hitting:, independent As a member of t
newspaper, calling the shots as ii. sees them as, serving
for that matter, do all the neN[ spapers under find
the general direction of John S4. Knight. Heralc
I hope that 40 years from -fiow The Miami t enjoys
Herald will continue to be orppcrating in high Li
geai to provide news and edit d rial features to S, to stu]
an American republic which i. still free and in As
which private enterprise and political independence remain the' versar
bulwarks of our liberty. on its
SEN. KARL E. ML[ND, South Dakota. confidE
.' for many years to cor
President's Assistant Speaks GE(
It is good to hear that The Miami I-'1rald' is about to
celebrate its 40th birthday. Let me congratulate a fine news- Baillie Fondly Re
paper on reaching the age of 40. allied Fondly e
JO1) R. STEELMAN Hearty congratula
Assistant to the President. sonally. to join you in c
} it was I who installed
Serves Financial World Well 1924 when I was tra
Congratulations to a great newspaper which serves its my first contract.
financial community so well . giving information . ac- You have cover
curate . prompt . complete . wtich is all Important years, and: certainly tt
to finance. joint task-giving yoi
HARRY A. I q 'pONALD, Chairman reports of world happy
Securities and change Commission. We are proud of
S* I*i your distinguished nem
S* f To See K I join me in saluting '
wonderful T SKightIs Luded its fifth decade and in
Iti worldwide collaboration
It is a .pleasure to extend my I heairtily join in greetings to Hworldwide laborat
heartiest congratulations to the The M &ami Herald on the occa- .
entire staff of sion of its 40th *
lThe Miami a n n iv ersary. Outstanding Force
Herald on oc- Mr. John S.
casion of its Knight is one Here's hoping that
S40th anniver- of my cher- Miami Herald life begin


1 sary.
Thel growth
of Florida in
the last few
decades has
been a wonder.
ful thing to see,
and The Her-
ald may be justly proud of the
part it has played in this de-
velopment.
May Florida and The Herald
continue to grow and prosper
together in the future as they
have in the past.
SEN. TOM CONNALLY, Texas
Chairman Foreign Relations
Committee
Continued o


S 'y V- shed personal
S friends but I
a ls o consider
Rhim to be one
of the leading
journalists in
the United
States.
The record-which The Miami
Hi aid has made Is a great and
si:;nlflcant credit to itself and
e,'8ally to the tremendous
gflowth and expansion of the
gteat state which It spectacu-
larly serves.
S. N. ARTHUR VANDENBERG,
'Michigan
>nj Page 44


herald Admirer
table" in our office appear most of the
ca.
tural and human that a relatively few
out. They are the ones to which we, as
ring journalists, look in admiration for
?hip. for creative ideas and for forward
s so (haracteri;tic of great newspapers.
n the occasion of The Miami Herald's
anniversary may we, as professional
ers, join the legion of others who extend
nations and say "The first 40 years of
mance are a great promise for the next
ar'!"
rds to Mr. John S. Knight, my long time
one of the greatest publishers of our
LOUIS B. SELTZER. Editor
Cleveland Press.
*
ws Tradition
ratulations to you and your staff on the
anniversary of The Miami Herald.
are performing to the citizens of Miami
if great American newspapers. May you
s, and many more notable anniversaries.
WALTER ANNENBERG, Publisher
Philadelphia Inquirer.
*
As Fearless
best wishes to The Herald on its 40th

ry young in terms of the life span of a
achieved national distinction. Everywhere
'he Herald is recognized for its complete
overage and for its fearless, forthright

CHARLES B. McCABE, Publisher
New York Mirror.
*
e Deep South
he staff of a newspaper which has been
g the Deep South more than 113 years, I
it difficult to realize that The Miami
I has achieved the distinction which it
Sin its field in less than half a, century,.,
ke its city, The Herald has grown rapidly
rdy maturity. '
SThe Herald approaches its 40th ann-
y, I would like to offer congratulations
fine past performances and to express
ence that its growing pains will persist
ne.
)RGE W. HEALY, JR., Managing Editor
New Orleans Times-Picayune
*
calls Herald
tions to The Herald. I am happy per.
.ommemoraftng this happy event, because
d United Press service in your plant in
reling in Florida for the UP. That was

d a lot of big news in the last 40
he next 40-promise no diminution in our
ur readers clear, accurate and prompt
openings.
our long and friendly association with
vspaper. Our correspondents everywhere
The Miami Herald at the beginning of
Looking forward to continuance of our
in for many successful years to come.
UGH BAILLIE, President, United Press


for The
is at 40.


You have made
T he Herald
one of the out-
fstanding
S U forces in Amer-
i can journal-
& ism, and are
entitled to be
very proud of
y o u r handi-
work.
It. is with
pleasure and
sincerity that we in Scripps-
Howard extend to The Herald
and Its staff our heartiest birth-
day congratulations.
ROY W. HOWARD, President
Scripps-Howard Newspapers.


A Great Milestone
Heartiest congratulations to
The Miami Herald on its
40th anniver-
Hsary. This is a
great mile-
stone In the his-
S_ :tory.of a great
newspaper a
newspaper that
S, is serving its
S community
with the kind
of fearless In-
Stegrity and
t public' spirited
enterprise that has won it.' a
national reputation as one of
America's finest newspapers.
SEYMOUR BERKSON,
General Manager,
International News Service


Thrillingly Successful Newtspaper
I may not be on hand to help personally celebrate the 40th
anniversary of The Miami Herald, so I want to write now and
extend my hearty congratulations to John S.'
Knight on what I regard as one of the great
achievements of newspapering-hig thrillingly
successful development of The Herald into one
of the outstanding morning newspapers in the
hemisphere.
As you know, Miami Beach is second home
to me, so I have been a reader of the Miami
newspapers since even before Mr. Knight ac-'
quired The Herald.
I have watched The Herald grow and prosper and improve
in every way. John Knight has done wonders with it and I am
proud to join all of those who know about the anniversary,
in felicitating John Knight, his brother, Jimmy, Lee Hills and
all others of your fine staff.
FRANK GANNETT, President
Gannett Newspapers, Rochester, N.Y..
.* *,
Paper's Leaders Given Credit
May I add my congratulations on the'occasion of the 40th>
anniversary of The Miami Herald.
This fine newspaper owes its pre-eminencde to three men-
Jack Knight, Jim Knight and Lee Hills. Long may they wave!


*
A Good Future
'The Miami Herald has reason.
to look with pride on Its accom-
S plishments In
the 40 years
since its estab-
lishment. What
is even more'
important, the
virility and en-
ergy daily.
d e m onstrated
by The Her.
S ald's staff make
it eminent-
ly clear that It
can look forward to many more
years of constructive service to
Greater Miami and Florida.
All of us 'in' the Associated
Press are. proud' to have played
a part in The Herald's past; we
look forward with confidence to
the future., -N
FRANK J. STARZEL,
Gen. Mgr., Associated Press
; *


PAUL BELLAMY, Editor
Cleveland Plain Dealer.'

With High Ideals
The Miami Herald has long
exemplified the highest Ideals
i of a free press.
For 40 years it
has served the
interests of its
community un-
selfishly and
I | courageously.
Although It
S is a compara-
tive newcomer
to the journal-
: istic scene, it
ranks high among the leading
newspapers of the country. Con-
gratulations on your 40th birth-
day for such an outstanding
recoidl of accomplishment.
RCP0BERT' U. BROWN, Editor
Edlc*k and Publisher Magazine
*.


Brilliant Job On Crime Hear9ng ,
Here Is my warmest birthday greeting to John S. Knight
and all The Miami Herald staff.
Onri this anniversary, your fellow news-
papermen could .instance many outstanding
accomplishments by 'your fine paper. I
recall a recent one which, t4 my mind,
was newspapering in the finest tradition
of a free press-your extensive a~nd brilliantly
edited coverage'of the Miami hearings held by
the United' States Senate committee investi-
,gating crime.
1 wish The Herald many more years of successful act,
complishment. i
'PHILIP L. GRAHAM, Publisher
4 I Washington Post.
** *
Truly Great Aen's paper
Hearty congratulations to John S. Knight, his brother,
James, and your organization on the 40th anniversary of The
Miami Herald.
It is a truly-great newspaper of which you all have a right
to be very proud.
Bestwishes for many more successful and public-serving
years.
WILLIAM R. HEARST, JR., Publisher
New York Journal and American.
) *
Fine American Newupaper
Congratulations on The Miami Herald's birthday.
I am sure that life is only beginning at 40 for The Herald,
but I think it has been a wonderful beginning and I know that
newspapermen all over the United States share the sentiments
of those of us here at The Star who respect The Herald as a
fine American newspaper.
: B.M. McKELW'AY, Editor
Washington Evening Sta
C_,Uinued on Page 4-4,


moommum -


I


s]lut tio toThe MuIt letad oe thm
40th B M OIW it. rvited to Frid a'S f etet
s. ,h. i 40 t, ,TW O. gou rld h" WOO
- -- - 4 1 t l~ o m w s -
stsl gowtram a.',to" of 5,411 In 191 in, a V@
InetTopilis of 4,000 in1250. I'B imfl:en upon Dade
onty, ,iU .a ome t is beyond the
po o mam.
Thme h Scl meny fine people, Miami en-
W S ctime ~M e iP 4 P ORI" as Floridl's fir st city in
p1 ,op i l ea g o.lm d enj y othe p eutUDD 9am ott 's
fJO stm eeB I. !,.. tlo c u y tnd meePapl have
K eePmed, Abnd ad tohan..


1;


11


F


ot tte aft(feb btatd 8ftRVrAfty CW 719
00twe at W42NING"ft
milowo- IL C-


q


wi f th s o l ._eth ,.versary.
,,a's Ofr thegrowth and develOpmeet
wO too" bac" today .ei..... i sVranly
i South no~Tida durin$ the pa wt forty Lya t de hlo an 1?
o e -out aln Uoe tha *tahis ra .od OP e o @lt L'
L'noO or@ Goina press.
d tp by teP, the rovth and d roICrPdVAd'nO1ant Of

On Its G ""*w Inrdedn-Pat "" a th
otup]da somtrea thea
Ufa r, Herald- la tohe.th * O
U oit s togratifyig to 11oifW t the pel roft
'our nGOU I 01%yleook with uofidwase 0,oladerh t e
f r e e A oae?1O M 1 p r e s sll. t e r o r s n o
On its inrileth ,.,,nId ere l ity t e record' nd as-L
t@ lhi od f the liem Hrad R ar e tefYda'Sht
it oboupLea Positionof true 1as~i ntefne
neu~mpaLper rdtna&IOfyua s j Hal
UY very beat wishes ta llo f a tteMaiRrl
for your continud Use@&gu@-

sine 0 you i




. 0 9 4 - : .. I 9Tfl j


irom Mi a e TO iiwlu vUe


City hieftains Praise

S 'In. offering congratulations to The Miami Her- Pr
tld on attiatng Its" t41th birthday, both on behalf of
the citizensd of Miami and myself, I am mindful Congratul
of .the gteat' services rendered our city, the *tate anniversary. T
df Florida ind the nation by your great newspaper, an outatandlnj
'The .ho'him i t f'the City of Mkami and of The which has no
MlIWth'1Ksaid h-v been Intertwined almost since the abreast of th
f '-tt V-iast-In Ig9A. Each has kept pace with
thte Onr 1 growttiVThe City of Miami has advanced also has kep
the fastest g
az u the -dctes eF@ the'munity in the
coaitr.y n little more than Th ane ofThe
f century. as one of
-'. The Miami Heraldhas n newspaper pu
*ttined a high ranking 4: best attesl
'" th leading"nwide clrcu
apme o the nation. The public demar
tp of'*the .nation. The FMav The
trcthal It has now topped tinued growl
all .others In advertising l paper be trai
iinegt is proof of the con- its service to
qd~efreplaced In it by
thbaeMds of advertisers. "
The aid of The Miami 4- ),:.
srasld In telling the world H4
shout tte many'advan-
t _ee Mmanit has to offer the bomneowner and to in- The City
dultr and business Jas greatly helped the City of congratulatloi
.U i '84attn, the high position it holds today as a ant Herald
honcityl.and as a resort center. of yc
e also have obarwed that The Miami Heratld niversary.
S-lM-ormed a. rea'rtable service to our s ate Freedom
trUit =feature articles describing many points and
pteauqs of Interest througbont FlorId, thereby is one of the
wikg our people dcloMer together, bulwarks of
i ^ ^.t. cratic wav ofI
IAs *br the service rendered our nation by The critic way of
MWail Herald. in war and in peace, in loyal support ollary of th
of,tle democratic principles o? the republic,, this is too namely., the
wqll known to need discussion. of the press h
*a Wn of the great family of readers of The portant.
Miami Brald, may we extend to John S. Knight. on The MiLan
behalf of the citizens Of Miami and myself, our sincere exhibited gre
wishes for continuance of The Miami Herald and Its In both these
good work throughout the years. are proud of
WILLIAM M. WOLFARTH rating, natic
Mayor of Miami your fine nev


Continued from Page 3J

Exciting Opportunities Ahead
Dtrilig the past four decades the state of Florida has
developei beyond the fondest dreams of Its citizens and Its
well-wishers, and prominent In that progress
has been the leadership provided by The Miami
Herald.
As we move on into the second half of
the 20th century, there will be exciting new
opportunities for both Florida and The Herald
Sand we know from past experience that they
w be utilzed.
I, The years just ahead will call for journal-
SIsttc skill of the highest order and for the most
inspired de iatiaon to the ideal of public service.
Please accept my best wishes for all success in your ac-
teptanele of this challenge.
WAYNE COY, Chairman
S, \ Federal Communlcatio s Commission
.* t ,* t *

Jownalim (T i. Aggresuiv
; I woed like to record my congratulations on The Herald's
40th annVlrsary. The tremendous growth of Florida in recent
years has- denanded a sort of aggressive, virile journalism
tfiat Is typiealiof Knight Newspapers, and I know that The
Miami Herald deserves Its prominent place in the Florida
scene.
SEN. HOMER FERGUSON, Michigan
* *
Reflects State Growth
Heartiest congratulations to The Miami Herald on the oc-
casion of its 40th birthday. This great newspaper has reflect-
ed and paralleled in Its vigorous growth the remarkable devel-
opment of the great state which it serves.
FRANK PACE, JR.
Secretary of the Army
', *
Impressive Achievements
I am happy t0 *xtend to The Miami Herald congratulations
on its impressive achievements in the past, and to express the
hope that you will', continue to be an Important force in a
moat Important community.
!, W. STUART SYMINGTON,
National Security Resources Board
*'. '.!, '* !* *


Beneficial Influence
I congratulate The Miamli Her-
ald, Its publisher and its em-
ployes on the
40th anniver-
sary of the es-
S tablishment of
the newspaper.
It has groopn
oup withe pthe
,has tbee a
'mo stbet-efl-
c t a I influence
on the develop-
ment of public
opinion in one of 'the pioneer
sections of Vie United States. I
wish you many years of success-
fltd operation.
SEN, ROBERT A. TAFT,
Ohio


Byrd Likes Herald
Please accept my sincere con-
gratulations for'The Herald on
the occasion of




sibilie s to a vital and growing
vesection of our country.
I always en-
Joy reading



I know The Herald will albeways
guard e reputation It has builtregd
or Itself and In doing so It hasfi
example of on-,



my very best wishes for theg,
Americanjfuture.our-
malism meet-
Ing its respon-
sibihlies to a vital and growing
section of our country.
I know The Herald will always
guard the reputation It has built
,for Itself and In doing so it has
my very best wishes for the
future.


** ** *


SEN. HARRY F. BYRD,
Virginia


On This Happy Occasion
I wish to congratulate John S. Knight as well as all of
your organization on this happy occasion. I wish for The
Miami Herald continued success in the journalistic field.
SEN. SCOTT W. LUCAS, Illinois
Majority Leader, U. S. Senate

Only Part 01 Outlay


Florida Cities, Counties Spend

$1,338,315 For Advertising
Florida county commissioners during the last fiscal year
appropriated $381.643, and municipal governing bodies $879,030,
for advertising, a Florida State Chamber of Commerce survey
reveals.
6f this $1.260.673 total, county tising appropriations, $459,901
commissions themselves spent througn local chambers, $5,500
$230.299. They turned $106,319 over through junior chambers, and
to local chamber; of (omrnmerce. lS3'.5.47 through miscellaneous ad-
and $2.500 over to junior cham- 'ertising and publicity agencies.
bers. Tfn,, dir.- 001C-r nO) ..M .m-


' The sum of $42,525 Was
handed over to miscellaneous
agencies, such as: public rela.
Seis comNBlssious, traffic aso-
cilattonas, resource development
boards, and educational instita.
tjions.
Municipalities spent their adver-


i n ey CUJ Sk/urI ;i1A tuf^ triem-ll
selves,.
All told, $1,338,315 was spent ad-
vertising and publicizing Florida
communities, by the communities
themselves, during the year Ob-
viously, this totaL is only a part
of the amounts, both public and
private, spent for advertising Flor-
ida last year.


r(


4-J THE MIAMI HERALS Sunday, November 19, 1950


Herald Services To Florida

ase From Coral Gables we anticipate with a great deal of pride
o F fidene the tp tant part that The Miami He


atlons to The Miami Herald on its 40th
The Herald Is
g newspaper,
ot only kept
he times, but
t pace with
rowing com-
ie country.
ular accept- .
Miami Herald ,
the best
ublicatlons Is
ted by" Its 'l
lation and
nd.
Herald's con-
LI as a news-.
aditlonal and
the public unexcelled.
W. KEITH PHILLIPS
Mayor of Coral Gables

erald's Rating Is Lauded 7
of Miami Beach extends its most sincere
Pn to The Ml-
an the oc-
our 40th an-

fundamental
four demo-
Ilife. The cot-
a t freedom,
responsibility
as equally tin-
ni Herald has
at leadership
regards. We
the excellent
onally, that -
wspaper enjoys and so Justly earned.


shall continue to plty in the outstanding develop
of South Florida.
HAROLD 7


Mayor of Miami I


I


and
erald
ment

rURK
Reach


I* *

A Leading Florida Force
It Is a source cf pride with me, both as a citizen
and a public official( that .. *
Florida can boast of slev. -
eraL of the nation'.- out,
standing daily newsplapsr
among which The Ihin li
Herald has long been -we-
ognized as a leader. '
It Is, therefore sy y
pleasure to extend to u
and your cssoclate *ty ', '
helartet eBatulaltilyns l ...... .1
upon the completion 1f040 '
years of public uervlr Iby
The Mi aI Herald, not ?' -I
only to the people of 1i1- L ',t
ami bu to the people of
the entire state. rf B'-,
It is an axiom l;ta a community's growth and
progress can be greatqIylnfluenced by the local press.
And Miami's pbenomne growth within the past 40
years can unqwustion#.y be attributed. In part, to
the conesructive and +ell planned policies of your
newspaper, i
On behalf of the people of Jacksonville I extend
to you our best wish # f Ar itny more years of success-
ful and constructive serWce.to the people of our great
state.
1- HAYDON BURNS
S Mayor of Jacksonville


PFrom Fourth Estate

Continued from Pgi w.
International Reputation
My sincere congratulations to The Miami Herald on its
40th anniversary. .
The Herald long has had a reputatioifor be a one f
the foremost newspapers in the nation and I kndw it Is a
deserved reputation among the newspapers not only In the
United States but of the world.
The Denver Post, Its staff, and myselfIcongamtulSte you.
on achieving another milestone in a progressive newspaper
career.
PALMER HOYT, Editor and Publisher
Denver Post


*

tourageou, Vigorous, Honedt
It is a great pleasure for us at The SLt. Louis Star-Tinse
to offer our congratulations to The Miami Herald on the oa
casion of Its 40th anniversary.
The Miami Herald has come to be one of the gre
American newspapers. It is courageous, vigorous and hlmn
and in so many ways epitomizes the best in modern American
journalism.
Forty years of such distinguished service- deserves high
tribute. Let us add our compliments to the long list I am sure
you are receiving.
ELZEY M. ROBERTS, JR., Vice President
St. Louis Star-Tlmel
*

Herald's Operation Is Lauded
We on The Hartford Times extend our heartiest congrat-
-- r-r-, ulatiorns on your 40th anniversary.
"A Your newspaper has done a magnificent
7 'Job jn the 40 years of its life, and we feel that
Syou have had a major part in the great de-
l Development of your city during these years.
S-' | I don't believe that too many people realize
S the tremendously important part which news-'
S papers play in such development.
The Miami Herald is a fine newspaper,
splendidly edited, and with a very high stan-
dard of operation.
We send our very best at this happy ,time. ,
FRANK S. MURPHY. Publisher
Hartford Times
*

Maker Of Good Neighbors
Editor The Herald; The distribution of -The Miami Herald
'throughout the Western Hemisphere has been and Is one of
the most important daily contributing factors 'in themlda
of good neighbors. t h -
I congratulate Jack Knight who had th' faith and vision
to support the Clipper Edition. And I congratulate Lee Hills
for originating and promoting this dissemination of North
'American news in all of our neighboring countries.
CARLiW. ACKERMAN, Dean
Columbia Graduate School of Journalism
Newsmen Interested In* Herald*
Newsmen Interested In Herald '


My heartiest congratulations 'to The Miami Herald on its
40th anniversary.
The Herald's continued success and growth is watched with
interest and affection by newspapermen everywhere.
WALTER LISTER, Managing Editor
S- Philadelphia Bulletin
'* * '*, I
Cordial congratulations to The Miami Herald and to Mr.
John S. Knight, its able publisher, on the occasion of its 40th
anniversary. .
JOSEPH PULITZER, Publisher
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
' ** .
North Salutes The South
From the nation's northernmost state, the Minneapolis Star
and Tribune greet The Miami Herald on its 40th anniversary
and salute it for Its able, vigorous service to the nation's
southernmost state and a widening region 'round.
In four decades The Herald has earned the respect ,of news.-
papermen for its aggressive handling of the news, its typo-
graphical excellence, and its understanding of and contribution-
to the kinship of the Americas. V
there could be no better birthday wish for The Miami1
Herald than that it continue with undiminished zest and zeal
the progress which has made it, in a relatively brief span, one
of the nation's best.
GIDEON SEYMOUR, Executive Editor
Minneapolis Star and Tribune
s


A Greeting From California
Your years of service to the community and the state have
set a high standard for newspapers throughout America to meet.
I wish The Herald many more equally distinguished years.
PAUL C. SMITH, Editor
San Francisco Chronicle


Everglades

Forever

loida almost lost part of her
far.fed Everglades in 1922.
Tie Herald offered a '5100
O to someone who could sug-
gelia name to be used Instead
of 'IEverglades" In describing
the section south of Lake Okee-
dib'e.
"Its will be' worth millions of
dollar qs to change the mental at-
con y towrdthe sectionsnow
titud of the people of this
count y toward the section now
csie the Everglades of Flori.
da," berved an editorial.
RecOrds do not reveal the
winnblig name-but the Ever-
.sdeiaare still there.


MIAMI T


Abbie An' Slats


By Raeburn Van Buren


j.1


HERA LD


H


CO.


General Contractors



PA- JACKSONVILLE ORLANDO TALLAHASSEE



of successful operation in the United States and Latin America


I
a ~'- 'a


Ii


TO THE ,


^MIAM
1' *.


ANNIVERSARY


I PAUL SMITH





\
..ONS:TRUCTION.

i .'


-- -- i .... T- i IV [ I I BI I I I


. i


m m


-i -


o



































































































































AT NAVY BLIMP BASE FIRE NEAR MIAMI IN 1945 WAS $35,000,000


KEYS HURRICANE OF 1935 WHICH KILLED 300 PER-
SONS, BLEW THIS RELIEF TRAIN FROM THE TRACKS MIAMI BEACH HOTELS SERVED AS ARMY TRAINING


mashng Of Ashley Gang Ended F- rd ', oneer*
Agyoung army ofPoffierhiouofas


ress, however, he escaped-the
first demonstration of his vain
boast that he was too tough for
a Florida jail to hold.
In 1915, while John was lead-
ing his gang in a foray on the
Bank of Stuart, he was accident-
ally shot in the left eye. When
the pain of his wound drove him
to seek medical attention, he was
captured' and lodged in the Dade
county jail. "
.. .. ** *** *
IN MAD DOG'fashion, John's
brother flung himself against the
very walls of the jail in an at-
tempt to free John-and was
killed by an officer for his pains.
John' escaped later anyway.
He vanished into his old haunts
in the Everglades and for three
years pursued a somewhat bucolic
life as a bootlegger. The Ilaw
caught up with him in 1921.
With prohibition h a vi n g
allegedly dried up this country,
two of John's other brothers,
Ed and Frank, decided to de-
vote their talents to running
rum from Bimini.
Unfortunately, however,, one of
their trips turned out to be a
one-way ride. Both brothers van-
ished at sea and those in the know
whispered they had lost a decision


JOHN ASHLEY
. cold-blooded killer
By the simple expedient of
cracking their way out of various
jails, a beefed-up Ashley gang
was riding again. They signalled
their re-entry into the renegade
ring by having 19-year-old Han-
ford Mobley, a cousin of John,
and a companion holdup one of
their favorite targets, the Bank
of Stuart.


The law scored a point, too,
that year by raiding an Ever-
glades still and shooting Joe Ash-
ley, John's father, to death in
the process.
*. *\
IN SEPTEMBER, 1924, the Ash-
ley gang swooped down on the
Pompano bank and departed some
$9,000 richer. Before they sifted


back to their swamp hideout, how-
ever, they sent Sheriff Bob Baker
of Palm Beach county a bullet
with a jeering message that they
would meet him in the 'Glades.
The officer promptly took tp
the challenge. After 10 days of
slithering and slopping around in
the morass, the posse got close
enough to exchange shots with


the outlaw gang. The score, how-
ever, was three deputies wounded
and no bandits captured.
A month later, however, Sher-
iff Baker got a tip the gang
was preparing to flee north to.
Jacksonville. He prepared a
trap at Sebastian inlet bridge
that even the cese-hardened Ash.
ley gang couldn't beat.


A young army of officers, him out of a sp,
headed by Sheriff J. B. Merritt of his life," int
of St. Lucle county, stationed woman.
themselves around the bridgehead; Sheiff Ber
and stretched a chain across the Shi Ba
bridge approach. tokeep-'aprize.
When the car containing John Ashley', artlffici
Ashley and three other members had been made t
of his gang halted at the bridge, shot out in the
the outlaws, found themselves robbery in. 1915.
looking into the menacing John's light-o-
muzzles of a dozen guns. Upthegrove, som
The climax of Florida's lusty the "Queen of '
drama is cloudy. As the outlaws heard that? the e
faced the posse, a sudden rata- way into Sherif
plan of shots rang out. When the sion..
smoke cleared, John Ashley and From her Ca:
Hanford Mobley, Bob Middleton station, sh;e sent
and Ray (Shorty) Lynn, his -
henchmen, lay dead. -Iwant Joht
don't get it I
THE OFFICERS said the gang bands and kn
members had suddenly drawn guns to get YOU. I
as possenien approached to search ,I ew I'd I
them. There were other whispers, i f kept it,'s
However, that all four of the out- Sheriff Baker a
laws had been seen manacled be. years. ,
fore the first shot was fired. The embitter
At any rate, John Ashley was Everglades did'
verBy dead and his reign was over, memento of herI
Bitter memory lingered on, however. A feo
however. Weeping over the fresh John was s
graves of her son and Mobley, oison. w s
Mrs. Joe Ashley called down a a
bitter curse on Sheriff Baker: A ndopleti
ofhrFloridadt n:
"I hope he's paralyzed to-' JJohn's sister, D
mnorrwei ndu theyv have to feed beauty, also to(


onminwim 04


I .


MUJMvWUU&,WVY *MTV qw




i.J THE MIAMI HERALD Sunday. Nevmber 1I,.


hatta


I ., ewn. ,
,,',' = ".1 ti: t- .t I
'IIi SrSCK riAr

I I4WC urnts -in'mne to.
S*..#:,eta .. tahe Herald. It
* daim veitng Bnword, was
Stand a i 0by the.rtaunroh

d ke"!Kf~lka




ladled'it;Th Hrld villaged
'Wer e t enthu-
aiScet, .about
aying for nub-
d o rpttiono that
It went bank.
rupt In 1910.
Frank L
Shutta, a law-
s yer, was the
;e i ec._6releiver. H e
el'le '"it The Herald, retained
Stonanan as editor, one of the
ebWrtet moves abe :ade during
A 1441g career of public-spirited
Waix- for Miami-
And look at us now.
On the monS pg of Dec. 6. 1910,
`66 date Is dobly significant
bIgcause Dec. 6 Is my birthday,
tj the first Miami Herald was
released to a breathless populae.
tion of 2000, some of whom
-ou read. So far during 1905
ew've averaged 180,000 daily and
210X00 '-Sunday circulation.
In my early days around here
-4ktfall of '25--this was the
erdsest city the world ever
knew. You couldn't have per.
uaded even the heroes of such,
to read a little history of the
town Nobody talked about,
dreamed about or even had
heard of the word yesterday."
The Room was built on futures
-and how!
*
City Takes Setback
Bat i few years later the
Boom had blown, depression hit
us, a hurricane In 1926 darned
nearly swept us off the earth-
and as the old-tirmers sadly fin-
gered their millions of dollars
worth of worthless paper profits
they sighed for "the old days,
when a fellow could live like a
human."
ftakiy, weren'tt much of a
town Is the old days. Ed
omth was oar town banker
In toh days and was destined
to have the only bank that
withstood the crashes in de.
preoeam years. He loved to sit
"d tell me about the days
when Flagler at. was paved
with wooden blocks, and one
year terrific rains floated 'eam
all down to the east end of the
street.
Old Dad Perry, who owned
the West Flagler golf course un-
til shortly before he died; was
another who could gas by the
hour about the Seminoles, the
egret feather hunters, thieving
White settlers who brought on
killings by robbing the Indians.
Buck Leatherman Is another
who can hark 'way back. And
get Jack Cleary to tell you about
the early days when he came
down as a telegraph bug opera-
tor at Royal Palm Hotel.
Quite a few of them are
around, and I reckon this special
edition will bring them out. eath
with some criticism, saying,
"Now that's not the way it hap-
pened. Y'see it-" They always
show up AFTER you've beaten
your brains out trying to find
them and get them to talk.
*
Edging Key West
In 1910 the local folks had
high hopes for Miami. They
were sure that byh hard t ork
and careful planning they could
get the town second to Key VWest
In South Florida. Which reminds
me that during the recent Sigma
Delta Chi convention a delegate
told me a story of L. P. Artman,
owner of the Key West Citizen.
Artman returned from Par-
is where he had worked on
the old Paris Herald, with
enough money to buy a news-
paper. He was offered the Mi.
amli News-Record but decided
Key West was a belier spot.
News-Record also was a post-
1910 name of The Herald.
Wben I came here in the
Boom we had paving. Also \\e
had rains, mosquitoes, binder
boys and other pests. I as the
only man In town not a realtor.
*
Crazy Times
Nothing was too fantastic for
the Imaginative Boomtime ban-
tone. Buildings went up o\er-
night. We had the Oli mpic
Games booked here for 1.932. The
FEC raUway was to he run un-
derground. The Llniveri'ty of Mi-
ami was promised $25.Oii.OOil
"until we get around to making
a real contribution a week from
Thursday."
The only disappointed man
I met at that time uas Gene
Sarazen. He was hired to be
golf pro at Golf Park. Came a
rain, and another. He hired a
boat with a kicker, toured the
area by compass--and never
found a trace. It's now West-
view.
Sometimes I've thought the
1926 hurricane '\as a blessing


In disguise. The Boom had gone
phttt. We were flat broke. We
had been so cocky we had a
hurt, "they can't do this to us,"
attitude. Then the winds and the
rain hew the foolihment out
of our brains. And from then on
this town began to look ahead
again.
Yes, I know. 'twas slow look-
ing for a few years. We came to
expect crashing hanks, more
hurricanes. uncared-for c I t y
atreeLs and building. But there
came a feeling among those who
didn't sneak away. a "this time
let's be sensible" feeling.
So we dug deep, laid good
foundations. gradually expanded
and waited for business. The rest
Is before you. Look at this edi-
tion of The Herald and you've
gotta believe.


]


Could Wrap


Up Earth

Ink used In printing The Her-
aid for the past year would last
an av4rag.e family 3,048,000
years.
And the paper on which it
was pressed would have been
sufficient to wrap the world 10
times. .
BEsiness office records show
that The Herald's hungry
press gobbled up about 35,000
tons of newsprint during the
past 12 months, or about 50,000
rolls. Each roll stretches about
five miles when it Is unwrapped.
A total of 1.250 railroad box
cars would have been needed
to deliver the paper tonnage.
Most of The Herald's news-
print, however, comes Into Mi-
ami by boat and is trucked
from the docks to the news-
paper's warehouse.
During the year, records show
that tank cars brought about
127,000 gallons of Ink-equal to
about 1,500 tank cars-to be
poured into the big storage tanks
at The Herald.
Assuming the average family's
Ink consumption Is about three
regular sized bottles per year.
that would be enough to fill
family fountain pens for the
more-than a 3,000,000.year period.


II


Four Florida
Four Florida cities and fvly


Florida counties are rate
Musical Notes among the first 200 In the n,
Lion in respect to consumer bu
Some 32 concerts, featuring sym. ing power, the research and i
phonic and chamber music as well
as some of the world's top soloists, dustrlal division of the Florid
already have been booked In Mi- State Chamber of Commerce hi
amni Beach's new municipal audi- found.
torium between October and "Miami ranked 46th from th
mid-May. top among the 200 leading citle
S_____ Jacksonville 50; Tampa 89 an


IWhere's


This gate soac pzolsctsd
Kay West
lacksonvsille
'ne5la3ll1t1 i11
ABUli i'S *iL, 'S0111"


This?













the city ol:
P-asacala
St. Augustine
io l| :I s
isvfl 'it :z1aasvg


ve
d
la-
y-
n-
Ia
is
he
1C
s;
nd


Cities Among
St. Petersburg 110. The list of
200 counties shows Dade at 52nd
place; Duval 75; Hlllsborough
117; Pinellas 147 and Palm
Beach 186.
"Ranking of the leading
areas In the United States is
done on the basis of a
weighted index. This index Is
mode up of retail sale's, in-
come and population of each
city or county.


Top Buyers
"The importance of the index
lies principally in the fact that
It reflects the buying habits and
amount of money in a particular
locality. Statistical representa-
tion of these two factors by the
Index make It a guide to sales
quotas and to advertising pro-
grams."
The state chamber pointed out
that the index Is prepared and
copyrighted by Sales Manage-
inent maamzlne


Bohnert Sheet Metal and Roofing Company is one of

Miami's oldest firms established in 1912. We real-

ize, however, that you are not interested in how old

we are, but how well we can serve you, and how much

it will cost.



That is whetsre our years of experience come In. In 38

years of doing roofing and sheet metal work in South

Florida, we have learned WHAT TO DO and even

more important WHAT NOT TO DO. It all adds up

to our slogan. "In Roofing QUALITY is ECONOMY."



Yes, you can profit from our experience, for ROOFED

by BOHNERT means a DEPENDABLE ROOF at an

ECONOMICAL PRICE.










lTAN, I1a lilt
IITaILiIHII 111i


SHEET METAL & ROOFING CO.,


64 N.E. 12th St.


MIAMI


INC


Phone 3-777


HAPPY BIRTHDAY, HERALD


I I I


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a
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' t r.*{ ,,t-.' ; .J r- tA.' ",A, '.. ; ,--^ A -- Mai *.. ......
..... / li -- S A..~.n "i'nnuumaumda uumab Asvnma siame YA flsmaalem


He'll

Take

Miami
By JACK KOFOED
's see now. The Herald ii
* yMrs oldo ft was a t iuggIlnt
y. tw and Miami wm
Jt- ViIW to become some
thing mire
Than a sleepy
Sr town, when I
s started in the
newspapdi
Sgsme in Phila
del this.
Thepbusinese
was different
In tahoe days
Philly had a lot
of papers, the
Ledger, North
XOiPOND Amer ican.
Press, Item, Telegraph, Bulletin
Off hand I can't recall just how
.any, There were enough so
that, if you wanted to quit a job
or were fired, you put on you're
bat, walked a few blocks an
settled down in a new one. Only
the completely inept, or the per
ennial dunkard, was long or
Maen ot of work.
.There were no schools of jour
dnalsm to pour out thousands ol
*ager aspirants for reporters
jabes. I peddled some pieces to
the Baseball Magazsine and the
Ledger Sunday Sports Magazine
This sold Billy Rocap on the
idea that I knew somethlnj
about sports anrd could write a
little. Perhaps that was why hei
offered rue a job at 525 a week
which wans considered phenom
nal &or even slightly Immoral
in those days.

0, W HEN the Herald wail
two ylars old I was padding
around the Quaker City, cover
Iln whiktever no one else wanted
to hantile. There were no fine
lines drawn around departments
either. I might be sent to the Phil
Ils bill park or to pick up a
statement from E. T. Stotesbury
thp greatest financier in th,
Quaker City, or fill In for a police
-eporter taking his day off.
WIb ody ever heard of a 40
hout week. I sometimes put
in &at many in three days,
asm if I had suggested a buck
or two ia overtime pay there
mijit have been raucous
laughter, but, more likely. I
would have had my throat cut
rdm Rar to ear.
T be quite frenk. I had heard
only sketchily of Miami, and did
not know whether .or not th
Tvllhge even had a newspaper
MV eager eyes were fixed on
Nw York, and T finally made I
In 1923. The rush and bustle
pi;s the surge of ambition In
y iUng heart, made the town ex
cling, even In winter days whe
there was a lash of snow ani
btterness in wind off the riven
*
THEN, I BEGAN hearing
about Miami. Things. were boomr
big. I was doing a sportS column
ler the Post in 1925 when thi
faulous Mlzner offered me twic
wtat I was getting to do publicity
fai his grandiose Hollywood de
vqopment.
Could get a leave of absence
aid the Idea of spending th
writer in Florida seemed marvel
ous. The only hitch was that n
rzoms were available for err
poyes, and the Kofoed family]
was scheduled for billets in
tint.
8o. I turned down the bid
and didn't get here until 1929,
when Jack Sharkey and W. L.
(Young) Stribling fought the
battle of Flamingo Park.
We were sold on Miami their
We hated to return North, hu
It was another 10 years before
deal presented itself that marl
living in Miami the delightful
fact it has become. By the tra
ditlon and background and trail
ing I'm a darn Yankee at heart
but T've sold all that stuff dow
the river, and in my book there'
no place like this town and neve
will be.
I've been a student of new!
papers all my life from the Ne'
York Times to the Fork Rihe
Gazette, and I soon saw The Hei
aid was a paper that would hnl
front rank In any city in th
world. Working for a great jout
nal Is like playing baseball o
=the Yankees. There is a pride I
it. snd an Incentive to do belte
than your best.
*
THE REASON [ came to wor
here 'as not only because
wanted to. but because, while
serving with the Eighth Al
Force in England I met John l
Knight.
I had worked for three of tb
most noted publishers of thel
day, Cvrus H. K. Curti% Fran
Munsey and William Randolp
Hearst. Now what I have to sa
may sound like buttering th
boss, or the old apple-for-thb
teacher routine, but It isn't the
at all.
I came to know Jack Knight
well In England.' I had ad.


I











i






I'


Florida's

BT ARTHUR HDPEMRT
nemt Staff Writer
Weather has been defined
what many escape from to g
to-end that's true of most
' Florida's winter visitors.
In other words, northern
seek Florida's sunshine to
S cape from the frigid temper
Y tures of the winter months.
I Here are some of the fact
S from United States weath
r Bureau records which dra
hundreds of thousands to t
"Sunshine State" from Nove
s ber through April:
Florida Is a low-lying, s1
tropical peninsula lapped by t
t waters of the Atlantic Ocean an
the Gulf of Mexico. The
waters, route of the' Oi
* Stream, tend to temper the cc
. of the winter and the heat
S the summer, giving the state
0


helan





its


Sunny Weather Lures Chilled Tourists


as
get
of
ara
Ia-

:ts
ler
SW
he
mn-
ib-
he
nd
me
jif
ild
of
its


year-round temperature average
of 74 degrees.
Florida is called the "Sun-
shine State" because It has the
highest average of sunshine
hours in the nation. Weather
bureau records show that while
Detroit may expect an average
of less than three hours and
Pittsburgh and Cincinnati from
three to four hours. Miami and
St. Petersburg may look for-
ward to between six and seven
hours per day of sunshine.
Why do tourists spend so
much time comparing the win.
ter temperatures at their
Northern homes with those of
Florida?
In January, when the average
mean temperature in Detroit and
Chicago is 24.9, It is 70 In Key
West. The mercury averages
27.9 in Boston, while In Miami


Stores


40th


It is 68. While New Yorkers
shiver in 30.9 degree weather,
the average is 66 In Palm Beach.
Clevelanders bundle up to pro-
tect themselves against average
temperatures of 24.7. while in
St. Petersburg the average is
64 degrees.
Low and high temperature
comparisons In January find
Chicago, 17.9 and 31.8, against
St. Petersburg's 55.6 and 63.8;
New York, 24.5 and 37.4 com-
pared with 68.9 and 76.4 in il-
ami.
One of the principal causes
of head colds--drastic changes
li temperatures Is not pres-
ent In Miami and other parts
of South Florida.
'When It rains In Florida-on
an 'average of only once every
five or six days' during the win-
ter-It comes in quick showers of


* U


short duration. It isn't long until
the sun's drying infra-red rays
break through and permit almost
Immediate return to "fun in the
sun."
Winds, bringing in warmth in
the winter and fanning the state
in the summer, seldom reach

Enlarged Library
With the recent opening of a
new wing, the Miami Beach Pub-
lic Library in Collins Park is now
complete In accordance with orig-
inal plans. Including the new chil-
dren's room, the library now
accommodates about 20,000 vol-
umes. The building, which also
houses the Miami Beach Art Cen-
ter, is a memorial to the late John
S. Collins, Miami Beach's earliest
developer.


The


*n .y ewi m .e- ,' 'Ti, .lt.."1A ".'h.


hurricane force from November
through June and seldom strike
before August. And there is no
such thing as a Florida hur-
ricane-hurricanes are born in
the Caribbean Sea. the Atlantic
Ocean or the Gulf of Mexico.
Few hurricanes really visit
Florida. During the past 33 years,
the weather bureau has recorded
120 tropical storms In their
birthplaces. Of these, 12 struck
Miami, 11 hit Key West, nine
swept over Tampa and four
have hit or sideswiped Daytons
Beach.
Sufferers from rheumatism
and arthritis, asthma and other
respiratory ailments fin4 relief
In South Florida because of the
absence of excessively high hu-
midity and freedom from pollen.
Florida's weather may not be
perfect but it comes pretty
near.


Miami


Herald


Celebration!


-.
I a


1
lv


celebrate with The Miami Herald its 40th Anniver-

sary of reporting the growth and development of

South Florida and Greater Miami Area. Whelan's

sincerely feels that it is part and parcel of the suc-

cess and rapid growth of this section of the United

States.

In 1946 Whelan's acquired 9 Dade Pharmacy

Stores in Southern Florida and, today, the Whelan


COSMETIC DEPARTMENTS
Truly treasure islands to women seeking beauty. Up-to-the-
minute in appearance and merchandise, Whelan's Cosmetic
Departments include almost all the leading names in par-
fumes, toiletries and cosmetics. Trained cosmeticians are in
charge to offer beauty advice and suggestions to the ladieosp.


CANDY DEPARTMENTS
These modern departments are equipped with refrigerated
cases to keep candy fresh at all times. All 5c brand candies
are stocked . also all are kitchen-fresh and delicious,
Nationally-known brands are featured: Schrafft's, Whitman's,
Norris, eta.


PRESCRIPTION DEPARTMENTS
Last year. In the Miami area alone, over 2,500,000 prescriptions
were filled in Whelan's hospital-white Prescription Depart-
ments. Registered, licensed pharmacists are in attendance at
all times . only fresh drugs and chemicals are used . .
prescriptions are compounded with precision exactly as
doctors order.


mired his success as a pub,
Usher and an unutajstandinp
man of affairs before I ever
saw him. What was much
more Important to me, in our
get-togethers I came to like
him as a man.
In my book he Is one of th
grandest fellows I've e v e
known. Shy, soft spoken Curti
hard as a rock Munsey and th
gilded myth, Hearst, were fai
removed from their employee
None but the upper echelon evi
saw them to speak to. It's diffe
ent with The Herald's head man
Most of us around the shop ca
him by his first name.
So, a combination of a gre;
paper and a great guy mak<
working here the most pleas:
period of the almost four de
ades I've put into this business
When you add Miami's close I
heaven climate there Just tsrn
much of anything more . ex
cept elimination of income ta
social security, etc. from the pa
check ... a guy could want.


CIGAR AND PIPE DEPARTMENTS


Specializing in smokers' needs. Ihey answer many a gift prob- Here custom
lem, as well. Here, customers will find pipes galore at prices and remedies
to suit every purse. Trained personnel assist in choosing mer-
chandise which includes nationally advertised cigars, cigar- brand. These
ettes and fine tobaccos, plus lighters, holders, etc. tomers to cha



WHELAN URS STOES .FRIENDLY. ElVtCE WMI

......... " ..A.I ... .. M IA.I...
LTUrIVt MIAMI SORES,'.MAIHLY
. . .. .... ........ . ..-. . . . . . . .


DRUG AND PATENT MEDICINE DEPARTMENTS


SODA FOUNTAINS


ers not only find complete stocks of famous drugs /helan's gleaming Fountains are staffed by speedy, effi-
cient personnel who serve anything from a tasty sandwiechor
s. but also Whelan's own equally famous Whelco coke to a full dinner. The Miami Whelan Fountains have be-
streamlined departments make it possible for cus- come popular rendezvous . meccas for customs who want
cose the brands and sizes desired, quick refreshments.
.. ... .. .. : ... ..::..... .. .::: : ..:. :: .:.'::::::$:::::.:: ...:---:: ....- .:.:.: . ... ... .
....................... .. ................
...... ............ . ..... . . .v '.' : ; ..:... :..' '.
.. ... .. .:. ... : .:. ": .. ..' . .." .' :: ..:.... :...' ".... .-:..::. :...... ::v . vv. . ./ :


.- '.........:.........v.....V ......... . .......
S .. ... ...... ... ....... ... .


Anniversary


large, modern warehouse with its own Commissary

Department. Some of the Whelan Stores and

Whelan Drug Company Agencies are newly-con-

structed and others are completely remodeled

and departmentalized incorporating all the im-

provements known to present-day drug store man-

agement.


I -


II


HOURLY TEMPERATURES of the Miami s acm ,continu-
ously displayed on the world's largest neon Sign just
completed on the Palisadesu across the Hudsn River from
New York City. Here Eastern Air Lines' Preldent Eddie
Rickenbacker shows a model of the 52,500,000 sign to Samuel
A. Rivkind, president of the Miami Beach Hotel Association.


The Whelan Drug Stores are proud and happy to Chain includes 24 streamlined drug stores and a










C itaes nTh* u


ST. EDWARDS CATHOLIC CHURCH IN PALM BEACH GLISTENS IN SUNLIGHT FROM ARCHWAY ACROSS STREET
* "i "n i 1 11 I i a


Vero Beach


Gaining In


Pop la rity

'VERO BEACH Things are
happeningIn a big way to the
atitactiva little resort city of
Vero Beach.' 140 miles north of
Miami on the Atlantic coast.
Undole azn made a census this
Syear' and Insists the population
t-'only 4,750, but anyone's guess
.w mld be closer to 10,000 from
thle busy appearance of the
SNew' construction Is popping
iup.in.-whatever direction one
looks. The value of permits is
sure to top $2,000,000 this year.
At the end of the first six
months of the year Vero Beach
ranked 30th among all cities of
,Florida, of whatever size, in Its
building program, and the pace
has not slacked.
The municipality has let a
contract for dredging and fill-
ing of the first unit of an
extensive development that
wfll transform an unsightly
marsh area along the Indian
River front into a section of
waterfront home-sites.
The oceanfront area Is run-
ning into something of a
"boom," as the result of a mil-
lion dollar Improvement pro-
gram undertaken by the state
road department.
A new causeway across In-
dian River costing nearly $700.-
000, Is nearing completion, and
there Is a widening and paving
Job on the beach road running
south from Vero Beach to the
St. Lucie county line that will
set about $300,000.
This road is opening up some
of the finest beach property re-
maIning undeveloped on the
East coast of Florida. Several
new development projects are
tn the formative stages.
With the increase in capac-
ity of accommodations avail-
able, as well as with Improve-
ments made during the
eSmmer, Vero Beach has
wery reason to expect the
largest volume of tourist busi-
less in its history this winter.
The Brooklyn Dodgers Na-
tional baseball club holds a
lease on facilities at the former
naval air base where In recent
years the Dodger team with
players from 18 or 20 of the
affiliated clubs have carried on
their spri-ing training.
The city also gets the ad-
vantage of the national adver-
tising of Eastern Air Lines, be-
Ing one of the regular stations
on-Its southern route. These fac-
tors account for many people
dropping in to have a "look
-e" at Vero Beach. What they
are finding these days accounts
for the fact that so many de-
aide to stay.

Profits Good
For Wholesalers
Sales through Florida whole-
sale trade houses have amounted
to approximately two b i li o n
I dollars annually in recent years,
SFlorida State Chamber of Corn-
I Mrc researchers have found.
Wholesalers' total sales were
placed at $1,981,160,000 In 1948,
the latest available year. This
total was 277 per cent above
the dollar valub of wholesalers'
business in the state in 1939.
SDuring 1948 employment In
*a S,1 wholesale establish-
m=at in Florida numbered 49,-
20 person.


CONTRIBUTIONS HELPED BUILD GREEK CHURCH AT TARPON SPRINGS


MIAMI BEACH JEWISH COMMUNITY


CENTER IS FLORIDA'S NEWEST SYNAGOGUE


I
-s


No Strangers There


West Palm Beach Is A Fri(

WEST PALM BEACH-There pitching events, checker and
are no strangers In West Palm chess meets and a host of other
Beach. That could well be the events. .9-
motto of the various groups and The W t Pal acFih-
clubs which function here the ing tClub nenibership is open
year-around and open their to vrisiturs and the club spon.
membership and social activities__________
to residents and visitors alike. F B
Probably the most popular of Florida Boasts
these clubs are the Tourist
Clubs when visitors from many variety Of Sols
states organize their own groups
under the direction of the city Des-pite the flatness of Flor-
recreation department and hold ida, making It appear that its
their meetings in the city park soils are more or less uniform
club horses, in character, there are more than
Largest clubs are the Michi- 100 soil types.
gan and the Ohio. MNlember.s of These soils Include sands.
these groups organize their own ,
recreation schedule which in- cla-s, mucks and peas. mars
eludes card tournaments, shuf- and varying mixtures or gradu-
fleboard contests, horse shoe ations of these.


endly Place

sors a number of angling
tournaments during the year.
Ot r fishing events are spon-
sored by the Sailfish Conser-
vation Club. the Charter Boat-
men's Association and others.
All of the leading service
clubs such as Ktmanis, Rotaiv,
Civitans, Lions, Soroptimist and
others have large organizations
here and welcome visitors to
their me tings.
Cultural center of the com-
munity is the Norton Gallery
of Art where lectures, concerts,
stage plays and other activities
are scheduled during the entire
.ear. The Gallery also sponsors
a number of tla-ses which are
open to visitors and include
sculpturing, draining, photog-
rapny, modeling and other
classes.


Florida's


Churches


Unique

By MARION AITCHISON
H*ld Cibureh Editor
Florida's churches are many
and varied, affording houses of
worship for practically all de-
nominations and creeds In the
Western Hemisphere.
Baptists and Methodists are
particularly strong but many
other church groups are report-
ing substantial growth in mem-
bership. On the lower east coast,
for instance, the Lutherans are
engaged In active mission pro-
grams with extensive expansion
of activities.
Several impressive new syna-
gogues are among the constantly
increasing houses of worship
that dignify the Florida scene.
Catholic parishes are flourish-
ing with a number of new
churches and affiliated parochial
schools.
Because of the proximity of
Cuba and other Latin American
countries, the Spanish influence
is noted in many of Florida's
houses of worship, blending gra-
ciously with the tropical back-
ground.
But there are many other
architectural patterns, too,
ranging from the stately col-
umned Southern Colonial to
the ultra-modern of, for ex-
ample, Miami's Firet Unitarian
Church.
Whatever the style of con-
struction, the patio or enclosed
garden with flowers ever In
bloom Is a distinctive feature of
many of Florida's places of wor-
ship, providing a setting of
beauty for out-of.doors religious
or social gatherings.
During the winter tourist sea-
son, Identical double morning
services are conducted In a num-
ber of churches to accommodate
congregations enlarged by visi-
tors. Many sanctuaries, both old
and new, are air-conditloned and
equipped with amplifying sys-
tems.
Among Florida's multiple Col-
ored churches is one of the larg-
est Episcopal congregations of
Negroes In the United States.
Spanish services are held
regularly In South Florida
areas for benefit of the large
Lat in American population
and of the Increasing influx
of visitors from the Caribbean
and Central American coun-
tries.
Visitors to Florida's West
Coast find two churches of par-
ticular interest in Tarpon
Springs.
One of these is the large new
Greek Church, scene of the re-
ligious portion of the colorful
Epiphany ceremonies when the
sponge fishermen dive for the
golden cross which signifies
good luck during the coming
season for Its retriever.
The other Is the Protestant
Episcopal Church of the Good
Shepherd %thich opens its doors
daily so that visitors may view
the 10 magnificent religious
paintings by George Innes, Jr.,
which, cover Its walls.
The historic Shrine of La
Leche which stands on the
spot where the first Catholic
mass was held In this country
attracts a never-ending stream
of visitors in St. Augustine.
For many years, the Pasadena
Community Church in St.
Petersburg has been famed for
its overflow attendance, loud
speakers carrying the service to
members seated in cars which
suround the church.
In Miami. the sessions of the
Williams Jennings Bryan Bible
Class, which bears the name of
its founder, are an important
feature of the winter season's
religious program. This interde-
nomininational organization draws
large cro%%ds to Bayfront Park
each Sunday afternoon for meet-
ings led by Dr. George C. Wil-
liamrs. former president of Ithaca
College.

Government Has
114,000 Workers
All government employes In
Florida numbered 113,916 as of
October first last year, the Flor-
ida State Chamber of Commerce
reports.
A breakdown of this total num-
ber of employes is shown as
30,626 federal, 25.285 state and
58,005 local employes of all types
Nationally 40 persons out of
every 1.000 Americans are em-
ployed by government at some
level. The comparable Florida fig-
ure is 46 because of a greater pro-
portion of state and local em-
ployes than is general throughout
the nation.


\What's This? |


^9- ^


011


This stately silructure is:
Gov.'s Matsion Firestone Estate
Iai Alai Fionton Ringling Home
*sioSsis is smoq butlial :nLsauy


PLYMOUTH CONGREGATIONAL AT COCONUT GROVE IS OF EARLY SPANISH DESIGN


.. .Give Credit
Where Credit

.; Due, Please!?
Credit is due a lot of peopPiefor
the work that went into tWim mare-
moth anniversary mallasvay edl-
The entire Herald editcrlal and
photographic staffs contributed.
Staff photographers contribut-
ing tothisl Issue were Chief Photog-
rapher, Tony Garnet, William
Kuenzel, Fred'Brent, Robert Verlln,
Marvin Bloom, Stan Waynzanand
Steve Weaver.
f-News articles and pletuem also
came from The Herald bhums in
other Florida cities, and from the
City of Miami. City of Miami
Beach and City of West Palm
Beach news bureaus, ant the
Coral Gables Charmtber of Com-
merce.
Two of the largest couteibttoru
riof pictures and stories wer the
FloridacStaes Advertising e .he
mission's news bureau a4ld the
Pan American World Airways
news bureau.
Other photographic credits jo to
Mike Ackerman of Acme Ne1ws-
pictures; the Associated Press, In-
ternational News Photos, Chawles
J. Belden of St. Petersburg, Fkst-
ern Air Lines, Sanborn Photo Serv-
ice of Lakeland, the Florida Park
Service, Nan and Clint Glee of
Key vWest, Steinmetz and Wtlhem
Z. Harmon of Sarasota, HansHan-
nau of Mlaml, Ruhnke PhotoShop
of Stuart and Walter Gra.r of
TALLAHASSEE PRESBYTERIAN STILL HAS SLAVE GALLERY Hollywood.


ANNIERAR

-1'I 'I A 0


RAN RAILEY

HAS BEEN MANUFACTURING


UNION BATTERIES

IN MIAMI SINCE APRIL, 1927


BE SURE with a







B^^BBRBATTERYI
UNO





Here is a hand-made battery with
a guarantee that means something

to the owner. We never substitute any second rate mater-
ials in its manufacture and the finished product is of the
highest quality.


UNION Batteries are made with pure oxide plates ... that is
why they give Extra Long Service.
The Price is very reasonable. If you have a radio in your car
you need that extra reserve power and positive performance
of a Union Battery. SEE YOUR BATTERY MAN NOW.
Dependability and long life are the factors which have
made UNION Batteries so popular with the fishing fleet.


ALL BATTERIES GUARANTEED
For Autos 0 Boats & Marine Use
INDUSTRIAL $ TRUCKS




Union Battery Mfg. Co.
RAN RAILEY, Owner


847 S.W. Eighth Street
MIAMI


Phone 3-2240
FLORIDA


>,* ,
4'




. < ~~~. * ;*. i < *I ,* i
Sunday, Novenlir 29P 150 T90 MAI9AMI HIERALD .,
rr~
g* ********************************************************************I


A.


*o ;. 4


Spread this




carefully..
: ooo *


it's about








and 712,499
Y ou are the citizens of the Greater Miami area. If there weren't any
o te p "you's", there wouldn't be any Miami.
You are very important in the eyes of millions of your follow
h r p *e y Americans --for yours is one of'the fastest growing regions
in all. of the United States.
h In the past ten years, according to the 1950 Census Reports, you
have grown in numbers, in Dade County alone, by 83%. And you have
transformed your city from a winter resort for wealthy Yankees to
an all-year-round city with 850 industries... 250% more than in
prewar days. Last year alone, 143 new industries were established in
Miami... your swim suits are on sale in Alaska, and your silk shirts
are in demand on the French Riviera. You are here to stay.
But you are more than one of the nation's fastest growing cities. You
are a national institution whose progress points toward a great new
center of influence and culture. This, because you are the hub of a new era
of communications. The heaviest travelled airways in the world
meet and cross in Miami: those of the Old World to the New, and
from the South and North of the Americas.
You are a city of destiny.
We know. For it has been our rare privilege to carry to the biggest
advertisers of America the story of Miami's growth, and tell it again and
again on behalf of our friends and associates of "The Herald". Through our
nation-wide chain of offices, we have been SELLING advertising
space in "The Herald", and TELLING the story of Greater Miami,
An International Market.
From these contacts, we have learned how all of America respects and
admires you and "The Herald"-truly one of the nation's greatest
newspapers. Thus, on its Fortieth Anniversary we pay a respectful tribute
to two men whose vision and foresight has helped in building
the Miami of today and tomorrow: Mr. John S. Knight, the Herald's editor
and publisher and Mr. James L. Knight, the business manager of the
newspaper. We are proud to be associated with these gentlemen of
"The Herald", and with your city, in the greatest growth of both.


We have reported all of this to you because we thought
you might like to see your Miami as it is seen by the rest of the nation.
PUBLISHER'S REPRESENTATIVES Sr Bo & F Inc.
Story, Brooks & Finley, Inc.
New York
Chicago
Philadelphia
Boston
Cleveland
Atlanta
Los Angeles








Sunday, November 19, 1950


I 10 THE MIAMI HERALD


MIAMI EACH NEW YEAR'S EVE has its famed King Orange Jamboree parade, when sev- AN ANNUAL RITE during Bradenton's De-S.oto Pageant occurs
eral hundred thousand people crowd the line of march to thrill to miles of beaulilul at this memorial marker, as DeSoto r.acids a prcoclam.i.on in
floats, all displaying beautiful girls. Most every city in Florida has a float in the colorful the name of King Charles V c. S .in. prn,:.'Lncrnq DeSoto
procession. g'Aqverrio:r at Florida, while guards sloand at tcillerlion.


TAMPA'S ANNUAL GASPARILLA Fes'ival is inauguarated each February when
the three-masted Jose Gaspar sails down Tampa Bay to unload its 200-man crew
of "pirates" for invasion of the city. A week-long hiesla follows. Gaspanilla, a
famous pirate, once made his headquarters in Tampa Bay.

Fairs, Rodeos And Tobaeeo Jubilees



Thousands Thrill To State


Celebrations During Winter


BY JOHN OPPITZ
Hertild Staffll Writer
Festivals aq colorful as a
Northerner's Miantmi Beach sun-
burn and as varied as his lad%
fair's whims help to entertain
the thousands of tourists who
come to Florida annually.
Miami has its Orange Bowl
festival, Taminpa has Its Gaspa-
rllla carnival; Fort Myers, its
Edison Pageant of Light: Winter
!Haven, its Florida Citrus Expo-
mition; Tarpon Springs, its Epiph-
any observance, and Dania its
Tomato festival, to name just a
few.
'Other cities offer fairs. rodeos,
strawberry festivals and tobacco
jubtlees.
When It's Gasparilla time in
Tampa during eariv Ferruary,
the West Coast city Is Invaded
bV sEwarms of pirates sailing up
Tampa bay in a three-masted
schooner.
Their arrival is the signal fr
a parade through [he (it's
streets that features floats and
bands as well as the pirates.
Tampans and vimtors then
enjoy a round of halls, the
coronation of a kint and
queen and other events that
lend a Mardi Gras spirit to the
city.
The Gasparilla invasion diaws
a half million spectator. It i-
patterned after the e'-:picis of
the Spanish pirate Jose Ga-par.
who operated In tie aiea ar.outl
a century ago.
Tampa hold, its ,asrp:,rlla
carnival alone v.ith te FI.I Ija
state fair, the state larg-ft
show of this kind. Agi i.ultural
exhibits are feattmi ed along with
auto races and mi',%ia attrac-
tions.
*
THE STATE'S higfe--t (tiuR
show Is the festival hir-idl ai Win-
ter Haven in Fhi uail.' r.n
grounds overlooking one of the
city's 100 lakes. Tis offers inii-
way acts and liteialiv tori- of
citrus exhibit.
Radically different from iieze,
but also of Intere-t to % i rs'i'
Is the Epiphan\ rosleranc(e. held
In January, at Taipon Springs.
a west roast criommulnity of
sponge divers andt ire oniv
place out-ide of Gree- %,.here
thJs church festival may, be seen.
It marks the corning of the
Wise Men and the baptism of
Jesus by John the Baptist, ac-
cording to the calendar of the
Greek Orthodox Church.
Church ser ice;, beginnings at
dawn, are follotsed bv,. a proces-
sional through the raily d.-roiat-
ed streets to Spring ha, ou. Triinre
the archbishop casts a crc-s in-t


to the water to symbolize the
baptism.
A group of youths struggle to
retueve it. The one who is suc-
cessful Js granted a special bless-
ing from the church for the
coming year.
*
THE FORT MYERS pageant,
held in February. honors the
nu-mory of inventor Thomas A.
Edison. who maintained a ,,in-
ter home there.
Program for this celebration
ncItICrle4 parade-. an open house
at tie Edison home, dances and
a banquet.
Another of the more'unusual
events is the .Sanihel Seashell
Fair. held in March on Sanibel
iWland in Ihe Gulf off Fort
Nl.% er-.
E\pt-ril frnlm a. far away as
Ati'-i.lia ha e l-i0ie Lr see thle
,,I,,ll-, dh-plav-rl ,.n Lh .j- i land.
%%hih h ; far,,ou_ a' a plare for
gathr i ng their.
N'arh\ RradenLon eoep? all-out
e'.. _ri.lIi to nonor the mem-
l"' iof -jHeinanlo ieSeoio, % h o
landried at a point two nilie
tron the ci,. in l17", The De-
So-to .clebiation offer- a queen


Florida Has


Plenty Of


History Fans

Fi.-,i.i',an ale hitorv ian-. That
izi l sl pt iing when .oui ialize
th-\'ie able to look back o\er 3_S.
* o-' cf tinbtiokein hi-rr,. i n St.
A.iLil.-iine, oldest city in toe Unit-
ed State-.
The', have ni te thain al dripzen
hi; .pto i'aIl -O. iIIC-. made up of
amateur and pioffes-ional diggers
into the pa-t.
Larce-t1 i. the Florida HiMor.
ical So4cietly .ih headquarters at
-,..u gues-ed ilt-St. Augustine.
But its president is the head of
lhp hlilnry department at the
I'nlver'.ity of Miami, Dr. Charl-
ton Teheau.
Dr. Te-hcau also i- editor of
"Tcque;ta," journal of the Histor-
ical Associaticn of Southern Flor-
ida. This group conducts four pub-
lic programni each year in Greater
Miami. and is second only tn the
.tate-wide society in number of
1embir-.
Marlking hitoi ic spots in its ter-
rLtiol" it a proiecit if the Jackson-
'.I 1P "Hitil Ical Society in the
",ae,.a ctt',' on the St. Johns
i i fr.


contest and other carnival fea-
lures.
Both townspeople and tourists
don Spanish regalia for Sara-
sota's Sara de Solo pageant, also
held during February. This
West Coast city is believed to
have taken Its name from the
Spanish expression sarao so t a,
meaning a place of dancing.
*
ST. PETERSBURG salutes its
visitors %ith the Festival of
States in March or April.
A king-size parade Is the prin-
cipal attraction.
The Cential Florida Expo-
sition. at Orlando in February,
i, billed as the state's second
large t fair. Lakeland's b i g
e\Ent is the Polk Count, Fair
and Rodeo in late December and
earl January.
Practicaii,, eet' countIV seat
ofier; fairs during the % inter
ini hnih..
Ki-slimniep. Arcadia. Davie
and Indianinwn rodeos. Cocoa
hae an Indian River Orange
Jubilee, usually in February..
Plant Cit%. a center of %%in-
ier stra%%nerr.N protection, holds
a strawberry vfepstlal in MNarc(h.
Tonacco festivals are held in
Quincy, Live Oak and Lake City
in late simmnier or fall months.
Lake Worth offers its Fle-ta
del Sol [uuallv in JanUary. and
Holly\vood holds a Fieia Tropl-
cale a couple of months laier.
Summer erpnt- inc lude a
%%atermnelon fe-iival at Lees-
huig. a sumrrmer fiesia and
1-autly contest at New mrina
Beach. a mango forum at
Pradenion, pioneer day celehra-
tion at Holly%"ood and a Mi-s
Dixie contest at Da,.tona Reach.


No Floods,


No Drouth


In Future

A shallow lake twice as big
as Lake Okeechobee Is being
built in the Everglades.
It's part of a $208.000,000 proj-
ect to halt floods and drouths
in the heart of the peninsula.
The plan covers 15,000 square
miles in 17 countries from Or-
lando to Florida bay.
This is a flat domain of prai-
ries. pine.woods, lakes, swamps
and sluggish streams. Much of
it is still wilderness because It's
oft e n flooded in summer,
parched In winter.
Heavy rains and two hurrl-
cases left most of the region
under water in 1947. Damage
was estimated from $.50,000,000
to $ O0,01,0O00.
Then Congiess approved start-
ing work on the flood control
project. Floridians are providing
the sites and 15 per cent of con-
struction cost-.
Work began last Jan. 1 on 22
miles of levees west of Fort. Lau-
depdale. They'll bio'omie part of
the "%%all" around the trough
of the Everglades where 'sater
Will be Impounded.
The plan ralls for a network
of dikes. canal. c(l\ertis. pimips
and ,iher sti'uctuiIe ii't g et rid
of aler \\norien Lhie tuo nituc(h
and store It for drouth5. Army
engineers in charge of consliiir-
tion say" It -will take I0 to 1I
,eais to finish the vsliem.
It %ill help change the face
of a region larger than the states
of Connrcti(ut. D)ela\\are and
New Jersey combined.

Busy Waters
La-t f-ar 3.3.9J cialt pa.zed ihre
northeastern entrance of Floiida s
intracoa.tal waterwa\. Of the-e V31
pci- cent iete pleasure hoat- and
19 per cent fishing boats. Tugs.
barge. construciion boats and
government hnats accoutitt for th.
halanPce of the traffic


I A Florida Industry


Forests Provide 25,000 Jobs


Forests of Florida ield the
raw materials for the state's
second largest industry.'
The manufacture of forest
products provides jobs for 25,00o
persons in more than h50 plants
\\ith an annual pairoil of 50
million dollar-.
Half thi. payroll I? atiriliutedI
to eight latritlies vhich make
pulp. paper and paperboard.
Thev hire (.(0) workers, and
provide jobs for 12.00 more in
wood cutting and transport tauion.
A "fledgling" among FlObrida
industries, the manufacture of
pulp and paper began less than
24) years ago. Today it repre-
sents an investment of more
than 100 million dollars, and
Florida ranks ninth among the
36 states producing piulp and pa-
per.
Wooden crates and boxes
are needed for harvem-ting and
shipping the Sunshine State's
enormous Iruil and vegetable
crop,. About .it box planli em-
ploy more than 3.000 perm.nj
at a yearly payroll of nearly
$5,0014),I)0.
Eleven, other Florida plants
witn about 7(0 employes turn
out cigar boxe-, baskets, barrels
and keg-.
Heldes. Florida tref-e prodIiie
avounri 500 million board feet
of lumber annual. ani are ihe-




..'a w. sS I


SEASONING FLORIDA
LUMBER


Congratulations






From a







Friend


-w WV* VJill _________________i--,


basis of an extensive Indulstry Foreit pru',t-li.IT are ciit-
n-i3anufacituring mill'lo'k. fulini- rankk"] only, b, fuud ,pio -ing,
tiife and fixiiis'(Y. thle .tatc's No. I inilu-i.iy.


- - -- >~ -am K f ,

ENAO PAPE MILL ON F E



PENSACOLA PAPER MILL ONE OF EIGHT IN STATE


Commercial

Fish Catch

Shows Gains
The comnieici-i -lih catch in
Fli.i.. i .' alt-i s totaled 154,-
l4-',-2 pc.liunous of fism and 145.-
114 gallous of shell fisn l ast
\t-dr. the Ftlordai State Chamber
of (.'lnmilii 'ii srtaltes.
Fihidla lood f'i-h amounted to
Si.2.,.0!17 pounds of the t ot a l
catli: -li nimp. -.abs. e -. 21,.129.-
5,2 pounds anil non food fish
5ii,.'s,2-'17 potundl.
'h'ne food fi-h and sriell fish
takes show ilici-easc o.'er 1948.
Shrimp production was
Ionn 27 per cent, reflecting
the short supply prior to the
disrcoiery of tlhe new K e y
We'.t shrimping grounds. Flor-
ida', principal non-food fish is
menhaden (porg.%).
Moute intillet than any other
one foo'l fi]h are i-aiight in Flor-
I..I a s Fai.-r. In ],.14 m u lIletE
lulal-.,I :'4.14,. 5'" pounds. Other
I:a |I|II| -fi.,LIP' in ordt'.r of pro-
.it.,i'.I ri li--t ,,elr. ierie mackerel
11 1l':] '; ltoiilds, groupers 7,-
'j".i.,7 puundir, snapper 5.75Q,353
r lld ii 0lt 5.l t .I.h,'ih9 pohnd?.


Ii~- ____________-- -_____________ ___________ ii


WE CONGRATULATE
*


be liami ami eratb

ON



FORTY YEARS

OF



PROGRESS


*g


PLUMBING HEATING


OIL BURNERS


Residential Commercial Industrial

66 N.E. 39th St. Miami


00.


CONDITIONED AIR ORPORATION

i^amnzer AIu.t conditoning


AIR CONDITIONING *


REFRIGERATION


70 N.E. 39th St.


Miami


S..

REPAIR SERVICE IN ALL BRANCHES

Serving Miami Since 1915


A. A. A A. A. A. liiliiillllliiiii. A. A. A. A. A. A. A. A. A. A. A. A.AA.lliiill II II II III II IAWMA A


4
4
4
4

4





4
4


SFrom One Pioneer To Another


"WELL DONE"'

May The Next 40 Years
Far Outshine Your First 40









E IYIRUG CO.
I, 4






k Over 26 Years In Miami Under Same
r Ownership and Management
CORNER OF SOUTH MIAMI AVE. AT FIRST ST. 4
Phone 2.6101


I i I I


Ar


Pi


Cicarrie


I




Il f


suRday, Novembr I. 1M TH IAI Ii MW
I"


'1.-


I..


You're


invited!


Stop-in help us celebrate


SEE THE
NEW


'51 FORD


with FORDomatic Drive
and 43 new "Look Ahead" Features


V i~
~
/./


'7A~ .?*~


IINSPECT OUR SERVICE FACILITIES and MODERN PARTS DEPARTMENT
H -Yes, All-Miami Motors, Inc. is 4 years old today-November 19-and we want you
Hto help us celebrate our 4th anniversary!
Because the brand new'SI Ford-with the 43 new "Look Ahead" features-will be
announced Friday, November 24, we thought we'd have our birthday party on the
same day. Won't you join us?
e aiint h e-31And while you're here, we'd like you to see the fine new Fords for '51I which will be
'"on display. Take a "Test Drive". See for yourself why we say. "You can pay more,
I AI HERALD but you can't buy better" than the '51 Ford. Inspect our modern service facili-
ties. Meet our sales staff and factory-trained mechanics-all the people who
make All-Miami Motors, Inc. such an efficient and courteous Ford sales and service
organization.
'Annive sar Bring your family, too! You are all invited to join the 4th anniversary celebration
SI of Miami's most progressive Ford Dealer on November 24.
YOU CAN PAY MORE BUT YOU CAN'T BUY BETTER!


ALL


-MIAMI


MOTORS,


INC.


1550 NORTH MIAMI AVENUE PHONE 9-2711


J7.p


IJALLUMIAMI



































































400 teet
&poll.


A I
' 79,1


25
Ib.
Test,


Qwr ~*.TQ
~.AJ~TOM~C~


U.S. NAVY
SHIP'S BELL
All 95
brass$
7 In. diameter


METAL WORK


HEATERS


I VENTILATORS


S-MANVILLE

'AIN-TEED

RETT


A.A.F.
SUNGLASSES


7E ft.
NYLON ROPE


FOLDING
SEAT


all
floated
dial


HOLDING STOOL
Fore Bach Fishing @ Races
Hardwood frame, sturdy canvas.


U.S. ARMY
WHITE
WORK GLOVES


S INCH
PURE BRISTLE
WALL
BRUSH
TRULY A
PAINTERS
TOOL


U.S.NV.Y ,IFE. RING
KAPOK FILLED 24-n. Diameter
LIFE FiIM With
Baleesa.5
PRESERVER
ADULT SIZE
a *i *B1.95
..'-:~G VT J n T I .
AppvalCOST
*,* lln 4 O *. 0

USE THIS HANDY MAIL ORDER COUPON
Add 10%/ far mulailing and state tax.
Order must total 1.25 or more. No C.O.D.'s.
+ Yeteron Surplwu OQbln
1214 BIscaync 8ldA,d Mi FI
Pleose send nme +he 1kw.o',q




I TEM
I NAME
ADDRESS ....
SCITY ........... a

THREE GREAT STORES


I 0 O il.
All
atall


BOY SCOUT
AXE
WOODEN HANDLE,
FINE STEEL
BLADE


t I any
posi"In.,
J AM~n


iOGGLE SET
arald m A
far u
re lass, ,,


U.S.
MIltary Type
Wrist
Watch
I1 JEWEL
Shook praof,
liulmious dial,
ntl-manirtle


5-FOOT
SO'WESTER
GLASS
FISHING
ROD
STAR BRAND
Durel Guides
Cork Handle
Durel Reel Seat


A88


had I I, .'s"-'I




TH IS

IT IS TF

t, G n" E T E


1214 B ISCAYNE L
(1/2 BLOCK SOUTH OF SEARS) PH. 3.7048
6301 NW. 7 V
(IN EDISON CENTER) PH. 89-1422
a Se tINN'IALEA',. IALE
King Muidas Tr DR. & lee AvE.


RUBBER BASE
EAGLE-.PICHER
PORCH & DECK
PAINT
COLORS OF
WALNUT. OAK
DUSK
PINT SIZE. 9..

T. SIZE... ..49
GAL, SIZE...


20 Gal.
Sand fiva
dispaseros,


29c



EK FALR
i EAGLE


OF


00..
color,
01d:1k1


em a
:1


CO.


Ave.


HE















13


MO.iw j7
h_'" **


.4


4*'1 *w


It-..*/.


.4


**


I 71A >~~r~t


.1~

LMA~'


,61. -7


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4,
* k'9'~V -
* '4
-'I..


b.um
"/ '
, I, "*


MIAMI BEACH'S HOTEL ROW (TOP PHOTO) IS ONE OF WONDEROUS SIGHTS OF WORLD. NEW $1.750.000 BEACH AUDITORIUM FILLS LONG NEED FOR CONVENTION AND ENTERTAINMENT SITE. GALS ARE PART OF BEACH SCENI
r Aw


A


rar44


4.


ILA".





-i C .' . ., ..


nK j N.' MU I J11n # nuav. Poveisor aSe. W al
A '"." Beach O"ne Of'" Word' A : g S"i


Ho tel Row At Miami Beach One Of World's Amazing Sights
--------- *------------- 0---* -


Resort Now
Vs -, .'

R t"' o361



Luxury Inns

: Builness Groses
: 170,500,000 Yearly
V nique ambng the amazing
l eight of the world is Hotel
Row at Miami Beach. Nowhere
els is therq such a collection
in 0o small a space. Nowhere
Selae can be found a hotel for
each 126 permanent residents.
Miunmi Beach's 361 hotels, with
Stote thin 26,000 rooms, comprise
the largest single Industry in
southern Florida. Some 14,000 men
and women are employed full time
for'thtla bustiess that grosses $170,-
8 00,000 annually and caters to an
average of between 50.000 and 75,-
00o. guests weekly.
Miami Beach provides more
tthan a quarter of all the h o t el I
rooms in the entire state of Flor.
"Ida.
These hotels range from do
SIxu editions with all luxury
Scmiavnimeces, equipped w I t hI
gleaming chromium and plastics.
to "family-t4ype'" hotels of more
conservative design and (trn -
S hings. and down to modest
Shostelrles.
Most of the luxury hotels face
the ocean, spread -along Mi ami
Beach's eight-mile Atlantic shore.
anyW an architectural Innovation
started in these hotels, has been
adopted in other localities.
The vast majority of the hotels
Co- Uold be called brand new, as conm-
Spared with the average age of ho-
tel accommodations in other sec-
tions of the country. This Is be-
cause of the youth of the city of
Miami Beach, which this year
celebrated Its 388th birthday.
Only 29 yea's ago, In 1921, Mi.
Sami Beach had but five hotels and
S12 apartment buildings, as con-
trasted with 361 hotels and 1.473
Sapartment houses today. But Mi-
Sanil Beach Is still growing, with
a half dosen hotels now u n d e r
construction and more being
p:anped,
Indication pf this growth is
aen JIn building permits Issued.
The total for the first four years
After World War H was in ex.
eeas of 2,ooo.000.
Slnee the close of the last war
SMiami 'Beach's facilities for ac.
Scommodating visitors have been
expanded greatly. The number of
hotels has Increased more than 10
per cent, with an increase In the
number of rooms of more than 15
per cent.
Hotel rates cover as wide a
range as do the facilities and lo-
catilous offered. While unpreten-
tious, hotels removed from the
-ocean can fit Into budget vaca-
tions the year-'round. A room at
a luxury, oceanfront hostelry in
mid-wlnter. however, may run as
high as $50 a day. with meals and
room service additional. In sum-
mer this figure may be reduced
two-thirds.


Convention

Goers Like

Beach Best
If actions are any Indication,
convention-goers prefer Miami
Beach to any of the other ma-
jor convention cities In the
country.
A survey of 29 such cities con-
ducted by the International As-
sociation of Convention Bureaus
shows the average convention
delegate stays nearly two full
days longer at Miami Beach than
he does when he goes elsewhere.
Miami Beach lops the list
for length of visit. with an
average of 6.31 days per con-
vention delegate.
This Is contrasted with a na-
tional average of 39 day's Sec-
ond on this list, but well behind
Miami Beach. is Los Angeles
with an average convention stay
of 4.96 days.


[What's This?


Florida's only producing oil wells atre in:
Monroe County Hendry County
Collier County Leon County
1plZOhl ilneiqtsloe iu ripfieZOA3
oqt ui deep 'iunoa "1llO1 ul :ie8auv

AUTHENTIC
GUATEMALA
HANDICRAFT
o SKIRTS DRESSES
0 JACKETS

MEXICAN
OVENWARE
DISHES OADTI-OARDENS
IMPORTED
GIFTS CURIOS
O' a
GREETING. CARDS

MAYAN
HANDICRAFT SHOP
anW.&IIIstreet Miami leash
,4,} O O. ()


A TYPICAL MIAMI BEACH OCEANFRONT hotel swimming pool, surrounded bathers may sip cool drinks while gazing out over the blue Atlantic waters.
by cabanas-dressing and resting rooms-and an outdoor cafe where Those sundecks are popular gathering places, too.


Cabana Has Become
a

Beach Institution
The Spanish had a name for It. They called it "cabana,'
pronounced "cabanya." It's a comparatively new word in Eng-
lish, but the cabana iha become an integral part of Miami
Beach vacation and bathing habits.
During the time this irnstitu-
tion was becoming established in voge, guests having complete
this country, the Anglicized hotaJel service at their beck kand
meaning of the word travelled a call. well as comfortable
long way from the original Span- lounge hairs for their con
long wayvenience. Ovreheand a gaily
lsh, which meant "cabin" or striped awning or a poured
"hut." and was used to describe concrete apron provides shade.
a small rude, or rustic house, and also shelter from a pass-
IIn shower.


Today at Miami Beach a ca-
bana is an Important adjunct
to every oceanfront hotel. It
Is a center of social activities,
both day and night, and has
graduated from rudeness to
one with mny refinements
and comforts.
A Miami Beach cabana Is one
of a row of rooms in a struc-
ture facing the ocean or a swim-
ming pool, A cabana can be
leased and becomes the private
dressing and lounging room of
the lessee-a place where bath-
ing suits are donned, where
showers are taken after swim-
ming, where meals are eaten
and guests entertained.
The cabana has become even
more than this. It has become
a symbol of some swank for a
Miami Beach resic'ent or visitor
to speak of "my cabana." Owner-
ship of a cabana lease places a
person a bit apart and above
those without access to such
facilities.
Cabana parties are quite the


Harnessing Of Florida K


Sun Aim Of Scientist / .


Experiments now under way-In California. of all places-
may belatedly confirm the belief of Ponce de Leon that he had
stumbled on the fountain of perpetual youth when he pushed
the prow of his landing boat on the sands of Florida several cen-
turies ago. 0
The experiments are concerned oils and oth industrial by-pro-
with the sun, and it is not due ducts.
to idle boast that Florida is la- Although Miami scientists are
beled "The Sunshine State." reluctant to discuss the process
Nor Is it startling news that until experiments have progressed
further, there are some "'ho be-
the same sun I. considered the live It might offer a lead to the
prime element In the fact that "light industry" which the area
Miami Beach, and other South has sought as a supplement to
Florida resorts, this year played the business of tourism which is
|rapidly becoming an all-year "in.
host to more people than ever rapidly becoming an all-year "I.
before In the history of the tropi. -_ _--|
cal Gold Coast. e e
But this time the scientists. out The Beauitul
In the Stanford University re- IE" II
search laboratories in Palo Alto.
believe the, have uncovered a t G iE fl TVIEW
newer and more world-shattering, HOTE
chore for the sun. than attracting H TEL
tourists from the winter-bound L AT L OT
north. I LUXURY AT LOW COST


They have discovered a syn-
thetic method of producing food,
directly front the son's rays.
Within two ;years, it Is promised.
science will be able to show hun-
P- peoples around the world how
to produce nuiritiohis food cheaply'
and in great quanuTities through
the use of sunlight.
Briefly, what the Stanford pro.-
cess does is to speed up and in-I
crease sixfold nature' amn n air!
of solar utilization. u Ith the as-i
distance, of course of some tin'
one-cell plantilfe. too tin' to be
seen with the naked e'.e. pies a
pinch of mineral; per I nn gallon?
of water. It is predicted that the
process will not only produ.re
more nut it.lous food. but alo

Sandy Mecca
More men. women and children
than ever before have enjo'.ed Mi-
ami Beach's municipal sands ihis
year. accordlnR to the Miami
Beach patrol "'p 10 Aug .P31
nearly 1.600.1i1O persons had vi'ited
the citv s \lx -cean hPach pai-kc


* COSMETIC . .$22.00
*WEEKEND . 20.00
* 26" PULLMAN 30.00
"Plus Tax


GREENVIEW
. Centrally located one
block to the bech . adia-
c ir i t ihp l' ,;est syn.'.-o ,
in the South on-d renowned
educational l center ,
ocro.- the EtLreel Irc.m the
beoutilul new Miami Beach
Mlunicpal Audiic.r'um rn Je.r
all tim ,i Beach high spris
and tr yn .crf'ilion

"GREENVIEW
W,th b-aconul .-irium
'nv Esky,' terrd.-.e lpjn. .
r.c.anronI pnol on-I b, o-h
t,, ilie F, eraonriliz0e,
enieri ,r ment

"eGREENVIEW
1" er'e ihe mcn't 'en.
?]ble in 1'n. -Sl -] E r e
I nr full inl.rm. ,'- .n and re-
3ervations
Washington Ave. at
Lincoln Road
Phone 5-0371


FASHION LUGGAGE


Time now ro make a care-
ful, leisurely selection from
our fresh, newly styled
Skyva. patterns. They're
permanently matchable.
Ask about our convenient
lay-away budget plan.


LEE'S
421 LINCOLN ROAD
MIAMI BEACH


Cabana parties often take the
place of very small, Informal re.
ceptions, or luncheons, card par-
ties or what have you. They are
considered quite the proper
thing.
So important do some people
consider the value of a cabana
that at least two swank private
clubs with long waiting lists for
memberships have been evolved
around the desire of the more
wealthy to Integrate cabana fa-
cilities and life into their cur-
rent swimming, sunning and
resting habits.

Fresh Look
Visitors to Miami Beach this
winter will be greeted by the re-
suits of an extensive city "face
lifting" program. This Includes the
last word In white way street
lighting in addition to the usual
fresh coats of paint and fall land-
scaping.


EXTENDS AN INVI TA TION


TO THE NATION




EGARDLESS of whether you are a visitor or a local resident a trip to
Lincoln Road is a "must" on your schedule. For where else but LIN-
COLN ROAD will you find such a u'ide range of price and style?
Where else can you shop so leisurely and so confidently? LINCOLN
ROAD offers you the newest ... the most advanced styles.





TORES of every variety make LINCOLN ROAD a AMecca for shop-
per-s. Here you will find department stor-es, specialty stones fr,- men,
women and children, as u'ell as dozens and dozens of in,'inig places
to shop. In ourI 10 blocks of the World's most beawi'i'd modern shops
are concentrated the newest and most advanced ;-I';t styles of the na-
tion's lop noich designer-s and manufacturiis.


ALUE is a commodity you will fi:d i;i all LINCOLN ROAD stores.
Smart Shoppers have discovered that here HIGH quality does not come
HIGH. Shop on LINCOLN ROAD today and get tomorrow's top fash-
ions'at no more than )ou will pay in your own home town.



U



ARKING for LINCOLN ROAD is a model for shopping centers
throughout the nationn. LINCOLN ROAD offers you ample close-to-store
parking so that if need be you can shop and be home in a jiffy.





Easy, pleasant parking, fop styles, surprising values that's LINCOLN
ROAD. We invite you fo visit us at your earliest opportunity!


THE LINCOLN ROAD ASSOCIATION


Do your Xmas shopping.. now.


Layaway











Brand New Beach Auditorium Booked Solid


3,534 Seats Ready


For Top Programs

(Sea picture on cover)
By MARSHAL ROTHE
Herald Staff Writer
Miami Beach, capitol city of the Florida Gold Coast, grew
up too fast ever to worry about Atlantic City's competition in
climate, hotels or cheesecake. But it always was a little jealous
of the New Jersey city's auditorium.


The envy is gone now. for dom-
inating the Beach landscape Is a
trim, ultra-modern stage and con-
vention hall that cost $1,750,000.
It's air conditioned. Its stage is
as big In volume as the city hall.
It has enough electrical wiring to
serve a small [own. And as for
its schedule of events, the three-
month-old auditorium is loaded.
For conventions or concerts
3,534 persons can be seated under
its acoustically-excellent ceilings.
Small meeting places and commit-
tee rooms abound. Refreshment
facilities are located on main
floor and balcony levels. Patrons
can go from one level to another
by gently Inclined ramps. And to
transmit its happenings in a new
dimension, the building Is fitted
for telecasting.
A showpiece In itself, the au-
ditorium's stand-out feature is
the stage which when com-
pletely finished in mldrDecem-
her will be one of the best
equipped In America, electric-
ally, scenically, architecturally.
There are rooms for the press,
and for stars ofgthe shows already
booked into the hall. Chorus rooms,
wardrobe rooms and sewing rooms
are plentiful. Plans call for seven
dressing rooms. A special suite
for visiting maestros will have
itLs own kitchen.
The arch stands 32 feet high pnd
60 feet wide, while the stage it-
self is almost 50 feet deep and
111 feet wide.
The country's most expert stage-
craft designers helped Architects
Henry Hohauser and Russell T.
Pancoast and the contractors bring
the stage to realization. L. & H.
Miller Construction Co. were gen-
eral contractors of the job; Zaret
Construction Co. has the. stage
contract.
Manager of the new structure
Is Claude D. Ritter, veteran Bir.
mingham stage promotion man,
regarded as one of the South's
leading auditorium managers.
The roomy building was rushed
to open Aug. 21 for several thou-
sand of the nation's veterinarians.
There was hardly time for a de-
but. SeptL 20 another national con-
vention, the Brotherhood of Rail-
road Trainmen conclave, moved in.
It will be busy from here on
out.
Here Is the schedule of events,
through March 19:
Nov. 19-Erica Morlni, violin-
ist.
Nov. 20-Mahi Shrine Temple
assembly.
Dec. 10 Rudolf Firkusny,
pianist.
Dec. 14-Irving Nasslo.
SDec. 26-Orseo Hispanico.
Jan. T through Jan. 11 Na.
tonal Automobile Dealers
Association convention.
Jan. 12 through 18 United
Fresh Fruit and Vegetable As.
sociation.
Jan. 20 Doberman Pinscher
dog show.
Jan. 21-Ljuba Welitch, sopra-
no, and Jan Peerce, tenor.
Jan. '26, 27 and 28 Ballet
, Theater
Jan. 28-All Star Miami Beach
Elks' Show
Jan. 29-Norman Carol.
Feb. 3-Lily Pons, Andre Kos.
telanetz.


Feb. 4-Richard Tucker.
Feb. 5 through 9 "Briga.
doon."
Feb. 10-First Piano Quartet.
Feb. 11-Oscar Levant.
Feb. 17-Greater Miami Hadas- |
sab Dance.
Feb. 18-Cantor Kusewitsky.
Feb. 19-Lowell Thomas, Jr.,
lecturer.
Feb. 20-Charles Weidman.
and Co.. concert.
Feb. 21-Mount Sinai Hospital.
"Night of Stars" benefit.
Feb. 24-Jeaish Folk Chorus.
Feb. 26 "Carnmen." Greater
Miami Opera Guild.
Feb. 27 and 28-Eddie Cantor.
March 2-Beach city employes
social.
March 4--Jascha Heifetz. vio-
linist.
March 5 through 11 Miami
Beach Board of Realtors Home
Show.
March 17 Jeanette Mac-
Donald.
March 19 Percy Grainger,
pianist.
March 19 (afternoon) Grealer
Miami Hadassah "Fashions on
Display."
March. 22--Suzanne Danco.


-,June In Janu
,.


V


0. SI ~~,ll9
.1


A'7

-* <- i -



A'fe 4.
dip


~4*'
9
~pA

a.


I


A MID-JANUARY DAY" with he temperatures in the high 70s has brought this throng ol bathers to a section of Miami Beach.
Despite the hundreds of people, no one is crowded on thts spacious stretch of white sand.


By WALTER WINCHELL
EVERY STEP you take on
Lincoln Road is worth $15,000
S. (That's what a sq. foot is
worth) . Step into the shops
&and buy
T pocket comb
c for a dime
or a 'diamond
necklace for a
million bu ...
The shops are
as famous as
tey athe street .
S There's Saiks
Fifth, DePinna,
MilIgrIms, I
Miller, Eliza-
WINCHELL beth Arden,
Greenleaf & Crosby. Peck
& Peck. and manth more -
There aren't any bars but you
can get a quick drink at a table
in a smart Lincoln Road restau-
rant if it is served 75 feet from
the "widewalk" ... That's what
they are (100 feet wide) flanked
by palm trees plus double side-
walks . Shops on the south
side of this beautiful road have
no awnings.

LINCOLN ROAD stretches
only 10 blocks from the blue
Atlantic to the green of Bis-
cayne Bay . But its shops do
a gross volume of $50,000,000
. It's the street of dreams
for the little secretary, the glam-
our gal of the chorus 'and the
wealthy matron.
01' Abe would be proud of
the road that bears his name
... Because of the group of
men who emancipated a flock
of weed.grown lots into a Lux-
ury Lane that Is now called
The World's Most Beautiful
Shopping Street.
One cafeteria even freezes its
garbage . There no sky-
scrapers or garages ... Perhaps


because one out of every five
cars on the road are Cadllacs
and Calddv's, as you know. are
not allowed to break doun.
*
CARL FISHER and Rosie are
famous keywords In the 'Lin-
cbln Roadictionar,- . Fisher
as the visionary .promoter who
conceived and developed the
street . And Rosie, his pet
elephant, whose tootsies broke
the ground for what are how
pink sidewalks ... Pink to break
the glare of the fun-shine and
deep rose when wet with rain.
Even Lincoln Road lamp
posts are different . They
are Corinthian column type-
22 feet high ... They prevent
distortion of colors or casting
of shadows . Need a few
lamp posts for your driveway?
They're a bargain at only $13,-
540.
The first office building was
Fisherected. It still stands at
Jefferson and Washington as the
highest and will remain that
way . The law sez no build-
ing can point skyward more than
six stories.
*
FIRST HOTEL on the Beach
(the Lincoln) and first church
(the Community) were built on
Lincoln Road . The murals
and fixtures of one of the drug
stores were "taken bodily from
the 'Frisco Fair .'. Movies to-
night, Dahling? . The newest
theater will have 2,500 seats at
Lincoln and James mit an es-
calator to the balcony (glass-
roofed patio). A ceiling that rolls
back to Miami Beach's tropic
nights .. Oddly enough, money
had to be pooled to build the
first theater-since no, on e
thought a movie house would


Buz Sawyer By Roy Cranel


"pay" on the Road . There
soon will be five . The cli-
mate (geographically is matched
only by Cairo, Eg>pt tOh, I read
it someplace!)
*
FOUNDER Fisher also initi-
ated America's first transcontin-
ental highway... You can guess
what he called it . Lincoln
Highway Is krect . He once
planted a tree on Lincoln Road
to honor James Whitcomb
Riley. It was blown down by the
1926 hurricane . And the
hyper-publicniy-mlnded Fisher
hired men to plant one in its
place--during the night . He
a I ays den ied that the hurricane
uprooted "Riley" . Parking
facilities are geared for shoppers,
too. Two lanes behind the road
have two-hour meters for
quickee-shoppee . The next
four lanes have 9-hour meters
. . There also are 10-hour
meters for the longest legal
parking time in the country.
*
EVEN the hurricanes can't
hurt the road . The boys sew
up the shops with aluminum
shields and open for business
when the storm's over ... Then


they go to the movies to see
how it looked.
There are over a million
potential customers a year on
the road, . It was publicist
Steven Hannagan who trigger-
minded Ihe phrase, "It's lucky
for anyone who gets conked
by a coconut."
The new Arthur Murray
dance studio is the latest ad-
dition to the road . Dance-
master Murray plunked a mil-
lion-and-a-half on the line for
his building, leaving only one
lot for sale on the road west
of Collins ave ... 1e employs
300 teachers.
* *
DARWIN couldn't have found
a better home for your ancestors
than -the palms which are the
,road's trademark . And only
three years ago members asses-
sed themselves (on .a frontfoot
basis) to provide $15,000 'for
more landscaping . If you
think Christmas spirit melts
under a hot sun have a look at
Lincoln Road in December.
Visualize a street of living
Christmas trees-live Carolina
Spruces. In January-Flower-
ing plants. Easter-W h it e
lilies ... And all of this costs


SRobert Richter Hotel
FULL BLOCK of OCEAN FRONT
33rd 34th Streets on Collins Avenue
Under New Management
Air Conditioned and Newly Redecorated
0" Located in the Better Hotel Section
SPrivate Beach, Cabana Club and Swimming Pool.
I Dining in The feauftiful New
IMPERIAL ROOM
Cuisine by Tony
Phone 58-2776




HOUSE of PEASANT STYLES, inc.
805 LINCOLN ROAD

SPresents the Blouse-of-the-Year!


TWO' NEW BLOUSE

CREATIONS FOR 1951!


A. This blouse is made of
white broadcloth with' heavy
cluny type lace. Ribbon draw
string for neck and arms . .
fits anyone. Draw ribbons in
all colors.
B. This blouse had elastic at
neck and arms to fit anyone.
Made of line broadcloth in col-
ors listed below. These blouses
can be worn on or off the
shoulders.


B. f- USE MAIL ORDER

HOUSE of PEASANT STYLES, Inc.
805 LINCOLN ROAD, MIAMI BEACH
Send me the following blouses:

I QUANTITY I PRICE I STYLE COLOR
I I
INAME .....................................I
I ADDRESS ..................................I
I CITY .................... STATE ..........
IM.O. ( ) CHECK ( ) C.O.D. ( )
I Plus 25c parcelpost for shipping.
I_ _ __- _- - _ __- _- _ -


;R COUPON

CHOOSE FROM
THESE COLORSi
chartreuse
lime
k
Ut blue
royal blue
fuachia
raspberry
bittersweet
brown
black
dark grey
kelly green
honey
orchid
purple
laugage tan
aqua


-I.


you (the shopper) no more
than on any other reputable
shopping street in the land.
Tiley Still tell the story of the
man who walked into a real
estate office in the '30s when
land was cheap and money ex-
pensive . He consummated
a deal for several lots on Lin-
coln Road to the tune of $900,.
000 ... The buyer was extreme-
ly careful and took four days
to choose his sites . But the
deposit check bounced higher
than the Roney tower . It
was learned that the buyer wa.
mentally unbalanced ... But the
same lots he picked out some
20 years ago-are now worth
twenty million! .. Fisher, by
the way, was spending so much
money so fast between 1915-
20) that his Indianapolis bank
sent one of its veepees, James
A. Allison.to Lincoln Road to
take a looc at what "that crazy
man" was doing . Allison
took a look for a few days-and
then invested half a million of
his own.


Sunday, November 19, 1950 THE MIAMI HERALD 2-K


Miami Beach Is Now


Year-Around Resort


Miami Beach, established and de-
veloped as a place where well-to-
do Northerners could come for a
winter vacation, has become a
year-around playground for both
North and South America, as well
as the West Indies, and for persons
on budgets as well as those who
are financially above the average.
This trend toward a high-level
season 12 months a year is pro-
gressing rapidly as spring, sum-
mer and fall vacationers return
to their homes and spread tales
about Miami Beach that com-
pare favorably with those told
by winter visitors.
Speed of this change Is indicated
by Miami Beach Chamber of Com-
merce estimates that hotels last
summer were from 75 to 80 per
cent occupied, as against 60 to 65
per cent a year ago.
Another indication of this up-
turn is seen In the fact that
June set an all-time high record
for the number of mail inquiries
received by the chamber.
While winter still brings the
greatest number of visitors to Mi-
ami Beach, statistics show the "off
season," if any, now is confined
to a brief period in spring and
another in fall, as against more
than nine months a flew years ago.
Many reasons have been ad-
vanced for this change In Amner-
ira's vacation habits. Not the least
is the fact that Miami Beach in
the summer offers nearly all the
attractions that are provided In
winter, while the costs are a mere
fraction as much.
Low seasonal rentals, plus the
school vacation time, make possi-
ble family vacations in the sum-
mer, while in winter the same
group might be divided, the


adults heading south for a briefly
stay while the children remain In
school or college.
For the fisherman Miami Beach
is at Its best in summer. During
these months there is opportunity
to catch a wider variety of the
more than 600 species of fish
that inhabit these waters than In
any other season. The Miami
Beach Summer Fishing Tourna-
ment this year attracted more en-
tries than were made In a fishing
tourney last winter.
With an average summer tem-
perature of 81 degrees, Miami
Beach provides a moderate cl-l.
mate devoid of extremes. The
cily's eight miles of waterfront
alopg the ocean is swept by the
steady breezes of the trade
winds.
Also contributing to the develop-
ment of summer, spring and fall
activity is the increasing impor-
tance of Miami Beach as a con-
vention center. Records of. the
Miami Beach convention bureau
show that for the last fiscal year
winter conventions brought 2,826
persons here, as contrasted with
28.745 during the rest of the year.
In all, the convention business for
1949-50 was nearly double that re-
corded for 1946-47, the first full
year after the war.
In addition to fishing, recrea-
tions available at Miami Beach
during the summer include swim-
ming. golf, baseball, softball,
tennis, badminton, shuffleboard,
motoring, sight-seeing, boating,
dining, dancing and theaters. Mu-
nicipal supervised programs are
conducted at a half dozen play-
grounds for children of five and
older.


SA Resident & Day School

I Nursery Through Eighth Grade


Thle West End School believes that culture, knowledge,
manners, behavior and belief can be taught: and that
they are best taught to the young. It is therefore
important that each day be filled with careful guid-
ance by people capably trained and consciously
aware.

A modem school with every facility for the care
and training of your child . indoor and outdoor
classes ... attractively furnished playrooms ... social
activity.

WA(x&t 6^wL SchIw'L
1438 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach. Florida
Directors ... Ethel W. Stem Frances W. Schwartz
We invite your inquiries and visits.


W S4tyles with a





I-A'I future









Resortwear Of Tomorrow

at Miami Beach Today



._ .' ,.* j. --

If you would keep in step with fashion, take
a tip from America's style authorities. They'll
advise you to wait until you're at Miami Beach
to purchase your resort wardrobe. The men's
styles youll buy and wear at Miami Beach
today, are the styles you'll wear at
,A A .home six months in the future...


This Seal Is Your

Assurance Of Style.

Quality And Service


A & H BUOD'S
523 Lincoln Road
TONY BOWERS
2243 Collins Ave.
BRIGG'S MENS WEAR
533 Lincoln Road
CABANA
SPORTSWEAR
745 Washington Ave.
CY CLYDE
1661 Collins Ave.
CRIPPS
631 Lincoln Road
HERMAN FRANKEL
1019 Washington Ave.
JULES GILLETTE
411 Lincoln Road


HAYES, LTD.
325 Lincoln Road
Roney Pmlaza Hotel
MANNY KALISH
303 Lincoln Road
LARRY'S
438 41st Street
LEIGHTON'S Inc.
727 Lincoln Road
LORD'S
526 Lincoln Road
LORRY'S MIAMI
BEACH, Inc.
643 Lincoln Road
MARSHALL'S. Inc.
71st St. and Collins Ave.
NELSON'S. Inc.
6988 Collins Ave.


ROBERT-ALLAN
1908 Collins Ave.
SLACK BAR
511 Lincoln Road
STEPHENS'. INC.
438 Lincoln Rood
TARLYN'S, Inc.
1614 Washington Ave.
TODD & TODD
423 Lincoln Road
VANDERBILT
MEN'S SHOP
2009 Collins Ave.
WELLS
201 Lincoln Road
6650 Collins Avenue
Saxony Hotel
ZABLO'S
630 Lincoln Road


Linco n Rd SIVank Miami Beach Shopping Boulevard

Is Worth $15,000 For Every Square Foot


"Where the Sale does not End with the Purchase"










4t. 'f41 MIM l MKRALD Suiidty. Novemh, r 1, 1ogo


Wish For Anything


Under The Sun-


Miami Area Has It!

By.GEORGE.9UBRK.
ierals Amuaimuti Fdlor
i' f ITS anything new under the sun you want--Miami
Beach can iutiply it.'. '
A.d that goes for after-dark life under the Miami Beach
moon, too.
i Day or night, week In week out, in season
Sor out, first visitors to the fabulous peninsular-
* Island which is warmed by the Gulf Stream in
w winter and cooled by constant trade winds in
summer, almost invariably come up with the
same spontaneous appraisal.
V"Why there's just nothing like it in all
the world!"
And they are quite right. It's the
indisputable truth-and it is not a native speak-
ing, but an ice-country Yankee, six years re-
BOURKE moved, who is telling you that nowhere else
can you find such a completely make-believe and colorful
world as is Miami Beach-a city of 35,000 or so permanent
residitS, with no railroads, no airports, no factories, in faet
no Industry save that of playliig host to the world's most
gflaiorOus and'gilt-edged clientels.
I And all of It. within less than a half dozen hours of almost
anys ection of the snow and Ice-bound north.
Yes, whatever it is your little spoiled heart desires. Miami
Beach will serve it up to you. garnished with bright sun and
blue-greep surf, set to the background of unforgettable vistas of
fluffy thunderhead clouds and towering palmn trees, and perfumed
with the aroma of jasmine, orange blossoms, gardenias-and that
clean, warm smell that is born of the sun.
And lest you unfortunate hay and rose fever susceptible@ start
for the storm cellars at the mention of flowery scents let us
hasten to advise you that Miami Beach-arid Mitaml--are the most
pollen-free areas in all these United States.
*

This Climate Was Winner
BEFORE WE GET INTO the man-made lustness of Miami Beach.
let us Introduce you to its unchangeable geographic and meteoro-
logical aspects. Miami Beach is located on a latitudenous line
soinevhat south of that of Cairo, Egypt.
Ifts winter warmth averages 68 degrees, but even on tho'e
infrequent days when the mercury drops to a shivering 45. the
asurf which laps on lats Gold Coint shore registers in the seventies.
Summers average 81.5 degrees, bIt those tiade winds, with
an almost constant southeasterly breeze blowing In from the sea,
keep it comfortable even when the temperatures mount to the
mid-'90s. Official, UVnited States Weather Bureau records list an
all-time high thermometer reading of 96 for the Miamis-compared
with the 121 for Boise. Idaho; 104 for Pittsburgh; 109 for Los
Angelil; 104 for Atlantic City; and 103 for New York City.
Miami Beach Is the newe( of the Twin Cities of Miasni. and
dlamril Beach, connected by long causeway., spanning beautiful
Biscayvne Bay. .
It Is told that Andrew Carnegie, the steel tycoon of a generation
ago, once commissioned a scientist to travel the %%orld over, assa. Ing
Its climate, general living conditions, and its health-promoting
potentialities.
After two years of survey the seienilta came np iiith their
wlection-Miaml Beach and the area adjacent had-morp to offer
than any other place on the face of the very big world.
Miami Beach is the newer (incorporatEd in l4151i of the Tn;ti
Tropical Cities of Miami and Miami Beach. and has the peculiarity
of being north of the Pacific Ocean-a fact which will he -'. i-lren
by a glance at a map. That same glance %%ill g.te the alitir,..nil
and possibly sui priing. information that tin nnrthei n bondtlar.
of Florida Is souvh of the souLthern border of Califnrnia. cim hn"
further the Greater Miami's claim to the title of Tropical Paiari-ie
of the U.S.A.
** *

Vision, Courage Paid Off
THE SAND AND CORAL ROCK and vegetation from whence
Our Town grew was always a tropical paradise, but in the 1880's it
was a wilderness, too. It took vision, and courage, and fortitude,
and lots of hard work-and a bit of extravagant dreaming, too-to
hew it into the e,, e-widening resort of million-dollar country clubs;
elaborate octan and bay front homes where in the tycoons of
every Industrial endeavor spend their winters, and the almost
uninterrupted string of luxurious oceanfront hotels, where you'll
find the $50 a day room of the headline, as well as more reasonably
priced lodgings.
It was In 1882 that the Lums, father and son, and two young
men, Osborn and Field. had the first dream about Miami Beach.
They saw coconuts as the medium of greatness. So they chased
out the snake-, and the raccoons, and the olher poachers on what
was then hardly more than a narrow stretch of beach with
acres and acres of nuangarn e swamp, and started to set out their
coconut groves on land bought from the goiprn netnt for from 7.5
*cents to $1.25 an acre.
But fate planned a more important future fir tre little ledge
of land. The coconut dream burst, but not before a New Jerseylte,
John S. Collins, had gotten in on the project He switched crops to
include avocados and Irist potatoes, anti then dug a canal to
provide an outlet to the bay. Next he pioneered with a wooden
bridge across the bay, connecting the beach, called Ocean Beach,
with mainland" Miami.
Prior to that time, we are told by Jesse Weiss, the delectable
*tone crab king who was the first youth to register in Miami
Beach's first school, communication was maintained with Miami
through a ferry with its terminal on Bisra3 ne st.
It was the Lummus brothers, 3. E. and 3. N., who first saw
the real estate speculation potentialities of Miami Beach. In his
* books, "The Miracle of .iaml Beach," J. N. tells of the purchase
In October, 1912, of 500 acres of swamp lands on the beach for
$80,000-$30,000 of it in cash. Single oceanfront hotel sites bri.E
nearly that much in annual ground rentals today.
*

Beach Madte A Comeback
IT WAS THE I.I'MM'.SE.S w\ho gave the area the name of Ocean
Beach. One day In 1913 Can G. Fi-her. who was then living on
Brickell ave. in Miami, entered the beach picture. And lr, e beach
was on its merry way to international fame. Through Fisher the
Allisons and other automobile magnates became interested, money


was poured Into dredging and fill operations.
By 1924 Miami Beach was established. Fortunes were made
and lost overnight in Wild speculation. Camine 1926 and the dis.
astrous hurricane with its attendant bad publicity. Then, when
the hurricane scare had died--or rather had been eliminated
through stringent building laws and the building up of winrm
warning services which gave the area time to gird for the
approaching storms--ihe world depression- was upon the area.
Values dropped.
But the beach fought back-I-19 and 1940 saw a renascence
of hotel and home construction, .so mat by 1942, when the Air
Force was in 'vital need of facilities-and there was no time to
waste constructing them-Miami Beach had just what the Army
needed . hotel.
Into the swank foyers, elaborate rooms, and paln-ln'ol patios
moved the nations -ybuth-and a few months later dOi marched
Air Force personnel which carried the war right into the enemy's
front parlor. High government official' have credited the avail-
ability of the beach's facilities for "accelerating victory by six
months."
But the "barracks" of wartime have been back in civilian
life for several seasons now, and have been added at almost mush-
room growing speed. This pa;t summer alone, 12 new hotels
have been constructed and will provide 2,100 additional rooms,
the bulk of them of the oceanfront variety.
Miami Beach's 400 hotels concentrated- in an area about four
miles by two miles, represent. one-fourth of the hotel accommoda-
tions in the entire state of Florida. Such concentration of hotels
elists no where elselin the %orld.


IMoon Mullins


By Frank Willard


Fugitives From Frost



World Beats Path To Sun land


Because millions desire to es-
cape the North's winter cold, tie
torld ha_ beaten \ ell.trod paths
to the door of Miami, capital of the
only Sub-tropical region in conti-
nental Unit-td States.-
By land, sea and sky come
trains, buses, motor cars. yachts
anl plane", expected to bring
about 2,000,n00 persons to Mi-
ami this winter.
Six regular daily inter-state
trains are augmented by added
cai mnole sections and other
trains, yet travelers often, find
It nece~'arv to obtain tickets
well in adhance.
Twon hbus lines operate 36
regular interstate schedules
daily., adding more buses and
more sections as the traffic
requires.


Planfr' over four r.'gutlarl%
scheduled air lines and several
charter companies serving U. S.
points take off and arrive ev-
ery three minutes at Miaml's In-
ternatlonal Airport. and there


are dail' arrivals of private
planes at several airfields in the
at ea.
Motoists arrive by east, west
and central Florida highua.s,
and 6,000 ;achts annually sail
southward with the birds to Mi-
ami. tei minus of the Inland W\a-
terwa',s.
In Greater Miami are 5.i0
hotels. frnm the most lilxur.
lous in the world to modest
estahljbU.hmnents. In a d d It ion
there are scores of motor
counrts and motels, hundreds of
rooming houses 'f every de.
serlptmllon and thousands of
apartments and homes avail-
able.
To fe-.il vi-itors are 2.500 ef-i
tablishments licensed to serve


food.
One of the fastPet-groni ng
cities in the LUnited States, Mi-
ami's rapid expansion of facili-
ties and services is the gain for
its winter vacation guests.


II -


New . Delightful-
ly Cool... Beauti.
fully Modern




Invites you to stay In oen* of the
most beautiful hotels 1n Miami
Beech.

SPECIAL
INVITATION JIATES!

15 SINGLE PER
MO l WEEK
18 DOUBLE EK
Also Season Rates
From S1.000


* Coffee Shop
* Individual Air Conditioning
* Mezzanine Tolevislo* Room
* Dancing and Intrtaimemnt
In Garden Patio
MG'MT.-Parry and Motrris Beubis
William Sterling
Wr;t For Iformatfion & Rse.rvoafi;os
1120 Collins Av., M1B. Ph. 5-55i18


Park Plenty
A city whose area is only 17
square miles, of which nine square
mlles are water, Miami Beach has


New Businesses
Gain'In Florida
Incorporation of new busi-
nesses of all types in Florida
turned upward last year. the
Florida State Chamber of Com-
merce reports.
A five per cent lncreane int
new biiuine-seP Lhartered in the
state was shone n April through
October cf 1Q49. This increase
contract with a drop of eight
per cent for the nation during
the same period.
In 1946 the number of tnew"
husines chaitlers granted in
Florida reached its highest level,
a total of 4.3q.1.


10P.53 acres of public par'ka 'And
l#.4 miles of public beaches.


IN MIAMI BEACH. IT'S iME



ORSAI:tf
DIRECTLY ON OCEAN-PRIVATE BEACH
S AtL OUTSIDE ROOMS & BATHS
Maderlte Ralts
S101 OCEAN DRIVt TELE: 5-7441
OPEN ALL
SL YEAR


-I


Hae' YO red taet


CONTOURR CHAIR-


LOUNGE



l L People who try a Contour Chair-Lounge for the
firqt time are amazed by the sensation of "float-
ing" whichh its true relaxation creates. Orthopedi-
j cally-correct design and perfect "fit" tend to
release muscular strains and tensions created by .
even the best of conventional chairs. The result
is comfort such as you've never before thought
possible, and the wonderful "pick-up" of com-
plete relaation. fMade in sizes to fit you!
TRY a Contour Chair.Lounge yourself-
why not today?
Relax and Help Your Heart


, Lres. feet alolya
above body-
center
-Hlpl. th.phi
liven perfect
support


Shipments Prepaid Anywhere in U.S.A.


CONTOUR CHAIR SHOP
3921 ALTON ROAD AT 41st STREET
MIAMI BEACH, FLA. PHONE 58-0568
ALSO ON DISPLAY AT 10 MIRACLE MILE, OORAL TALES


altt(ed


0 1950 Marite Designer, Inc.


Trade Merk tlg.


rr0 h-r *"

The Miami Beach




First National Bank


Corner Lincoln and Alton Roads
The'OldestandLargest Bank in Miami Beach


ESTABLISHED 1921


wii
Growing 30 Year.




with Miami Beach



We congratulate the City of Miami Beach upon the opening of its new ,
Municipal Auditorium ... a step toward an even greater future .
another milestone in our progress. We congratulate too, those who
planned and took part in the construction of this fine building.


:OFFICERS:


EITEL E. STOCKWILL
Vice President
GLENN E. BAKER
Cashier


RONOLD N. AURSWALD
E. STANLEY DAVENPORT
HEWLETT C. DAVIS
JAMES I. DRURY


Banking Department
F. LOWRY WALL
President and Chairman of the Boatrd
CHARLES H. ALCOCK
Executive Vice President


Assistant Cashiers




Trust Department


FRANK SMATHERS, JR. I
Vice President and Trust Officer Vice Pru
THOMAS E. CAMP, III
Assistant Trust Officer

MEMBER
FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION
FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM


HARRY H. CULBERTSON
Vice President ,
EVELYN B. WIREBAUGH
Auditor


HOMER C. GROOVER
NORMAN W. HALVORSEN
FRANK A. REENEY
WILLIAM C. SPITZER.


E. PAUL SUTTON
ieident and Trust Officer


IF 7 r~j


When You Come To Miami Beach ...
Select the LEAR SCHOOL for your children
Nursery Through High School
I Established for over 1 8 years
" Ideal location n a two acre waterfront estate '
" A 75' swimming pool on premises ".-
" Enriched academic and recreational program.
" Credits accepted by Northern schools and colleges.
" Small classes .. Individual instruction
INQUIRIES INVITED. WRITE-1010 WEST AVL, M.S. OR PH. 5-0606


ii


'I


HOTEL LEONARDi
54 OCEAN DRIVE. M. 1.
LIxry tvinge i reitlly sesihbl rl ates
. . Direotly o thei alalln land of
Miami leah. A isaCii throw Irorm
thie Miami leac Kenael ailk.
7 PER WEEK 10 A WEEK
7 SINGLE 1 DOUBLE
Hoetl Roams and PuImaalttae
All Of Oar Rooms Are Reasonable!


I k


F-


IN


i i i ( !


. *' . '. ",


' \


.1 1
































































































Where the World Relaxes

in Luxurious Surroundings
... a step in the right direction with its grow-
ing pains . the expansion of the Saxony's
Shell-i-Mar room, one of the nation's finest
supper clubs, 'which now boasts 425 square
feet of dance space . the largest in all
Miami Beach . more space for the Ye-
Nosheryin the lower lobby, a complete shop-
ping center of its own ... more space for the
spacious card room . everything located
under one roof in this world renowned hotel..
The Saxony is always open ... yes the year around
borp D. Sax, Owner Myer Fried, Man Maging Director


We Salute
The Miami Herald on its 40th Anniver-
sary for its remarkable achievement
of becoming one of the Nation's
greatest newspapers in the short span
of a lw years. Its part in the growth
and development of this the "World's
finest playground" has been impor-


* 100% AIR CONDITIONED
e PRIyATE BEACH
CABANA BEACH CLUB
OCEAN VIEW DINING
BEAUTIFUL SWIMMING POOL
GIFTS FOR HONEYMOONERS
cwnership.monooemcnt
SAM KUPPERMAN
-- .+-. PHONE 86-6211


+ The Most Beautiful Pool on the Beach
PRIVATE BEACH CABANA CLUB
DELICIOUS CUISINE
Air Conditioned Cocktail Lounge
DANCING NIGHTLY


I st

gj.n


S0^ s


-^ast-


. i6^4


I


0


I


* bees^


*-,A

X V ^ .
sltO01 ros


ON THE OCEAN AT 26th ST. MiAMII BEACH


o +. -ev,



















































SunUght For KE Lights



Show lk Feel Right At Home In Miami


Perhaps because, In a maHw *-f
Jooularly speaking it oly
1,800 mUes from, Broadway, and
,000 from Hollywood, the Miami
area has long been a favorite. spot
for show people in search ot an-
other home,..
The Gold Coet-that ezpenadve
strip of real estate fronting the
ocean on lMiami Beach-as well as
the equally salubrious but isa
costly real estate areas inland are
bristling more than Over thi seat-
son with. mansions and bungalows
built with "show" Jack.
ichoUl Seheack's hodes Ow the
oeean strand-he'e the Metro.
GoBdwyn-Mayer executive has
long been showplace In a 'e-
asort tUhat abounds in glisteating
showplaeM. Hie Collins Avenue
estate is hardly a long close-up


SILENT FILM star Carlyle
Blackwell, above, Is another
of the top ranking show folks
who have selected Florida
for their home. Blackwell,
who originated the Bulldoq
Drummond role on both
stage and screen, has a home
in Suriside, just adjacent to
Miami Beach on the North.


shot "by i&n0f Sfrtjilu bust.
ase 2T4l, Eaes Jaek WV* .
Somewhalt iddly. Louis B. Mayer
-ha of the MGM trhumvtrate -
owns no honiae but has a lease on
Man oceanfront apartment and
speeda much time here with his
wife's family, the Eustace L.
Joneses.
Before his death, Al Jelson had
maintained several homes in the
area and owned a large oceanfront
lot on which he planned to build
an eight bedroom mansion wih
aome of those "Jolson Story" mll-
lion*.
Arthur Godhfrey, who flies his
owi plans to Miami between
radio and TV stints, likewise has
been on the verge of buying or
buildingb a home for some months
new.
Tommy Dorsey, to our best
knowledge, has never owned a
landlubber home in the area. but
makes Miami the home port of the
95-foot yacht he bought some sea-
sonw ago from Walter Chrysler.
Another bandleader, Art Mooney,
owns the Hampshire House hotel
Just north of Sunny Isles, and Ted
Shapiro. sonpgwtter and accompan-
taist for Sophie Tucker, has exten-
sive Income properties In Miami
city.
Many wil remember Polly Lux
Ziegfeld beauty on whom the for
mer term would not look Just right
Polly owns a Star Island home
and Is reputed to have made more
money than her famous boss ever
had. in Florida real estate manip
ulations.
Another Broadway glamour
girl, Eleanor Brown-now iMrs.
Jorge Sanchez-owns a manslon
which has a replica of Club 21
as a rumpus room.
Carlyle Blackwell, film star of
the silent era and creator of the
Bulldog Drummond role, lives Ir
a comfortable Bermuda bungalow
in Surfslde. His close friend of the
newer generation of performers
Dean Murphy, and his uife, the
former Dorothy Dey. showgirl ant
Broadway columnist, are frequent
visitors at the Sanchez and Black
I well home. They recently bull
their own comfortable waterfron
ranch-type house across the bay
In Miami.
Singer Jane Froman bought a
Coral Gables estate on uhich to
recuperate from her Lisbon
crash injuries. Gabriel Neatler
lives on one of the Venetian
Islands when cold winds blow In
his natlTe New York.
Lew Welch. who starred it


the winters) Include Leon Enken,
of Leon and Enken fame: Charlie
Carlisle, Detroit's favorite come-
dian; singer Jack Prince, formerly
with Shep Fields' band; Gus Van,
of Van and Schenck; Ralph Mau-
rice, of Rosa-Fenton Farm; the
Goldman brothers. Jack and Al,
who operated Castllaa Gardens a
Castilian Royal in New York: and
Sophie Tucker, who only recently
relinquished her lease on a beach
hotel.


many New York plays. Including
"Able's Irish Rose," now makes
his home not far from his place
of business, a brokerage office on
Lincoln Road.
Laureuce Schwab, producer of
at least a dozen sock Broadway
musical successes, spends his win-
ters in his Miami Beach home,
from which he spread out last
winter to sponsor a successful
season of music shows under
canvas, in conjunction -itb St.


Jobn Tewell. c
Other names familiar to the cafe I
and show worlds of Broadway, o4I- S u rrey I
lywood and interim points, now I
domiciled in Miami (at least forj 6ie6-'e Oce
rVw wwVw Vwwww' 1 44th end Colllns Avenue
Ar wM iamiw w 14each, Florida

r WMe PENN L0la. -=-----J
HOTEL l .,, for
Wnshington Avenue st 8th Street U9 From 2 Persons
S A sa NOW TO MAY l s t Attractive Season Rates
Per person
U& 2 Douleb 6 4 1 PRIVATE BEACH
0 Pn mr. 0 SWIMMING POOL
Planned Intrlainment l aPmP AI14llt '
: All Outide itoms0 A S COCKTAIL LOUNGE
P 4 t 'I's S COFFEE SHOP
Alo Delly RSae From 0 0 SOLARIUM
Phone -m81 Louis B ck Mgr.
NASH MANAGEMENT | A LouA c, g


EIs-


in3I


The state grew 44 per cent
during that time. Further, these
eight counties make up 60 per
rent of the total population of
the state today, a four point
gain over 1940.
Counties listed and populations
of each are Dade 489,838; Duval
294,388; Hillsborough 248,535; Pl-
nellas 157,539; Polj 122,801; Palm
Beach 114.144; Orange 114,134 and
Escambla 110,766. Next In order.
but not Included in the group, are
Broward 83,318 and Volusia 73,151.
Following the national trend,
Florida turned from a rural to
an urban state during the first
five years after 1920. Sixty-four
per cent of the state's population
was living in cities by 1945.


New Ownership
and Managementl

Our Hotel Has Been
Completely
Renovated


Early Reservslions
Suggestedl
Phone 1-0081


--- -- --- I


9Aipatinq. Iodaq....

AA_^ d~sUMA bL LAL AdutVlm

Your child deserves every possible chance to
get ready for those dreams of adulthood. The
chance he gets is only as good as the school
he attends. Select your choice wisely


I Resident & Day School-Nursery Thru 12th Grade


LEST.
SCHOOL 136
1021 BIARRITZ DRIVE
MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA


The total sales volume covered
all Items mold In retail drug es-
tablishments in 1949 and was
slightly above the 1948 sales vol.
urne.
There are about 1,300 drug
stores In Florida with a total
employment of 7,500 persons.
On a per family basis each
Florida family spent about $115
across drug store counters. This
Ismnore by $30 than the national
average.
Only four other slates have a
greater per family expenditure


MIAJESTICHOTEL A7Iiti:F
S A Friendly Hotel With A Friendly Atmosphere
Most Reasonable Rates Year Round
Every Room With Private Bath
Solarium Telephone Planned Entertainment
Write For Illustrated Brochure
MMILTON BERGLASS MNr.


Mercantile National Bank of Miami Beach


420 LINCOLN ROAD


MIAMI BEACH. FLORIDA


Another Edifice ...



IN KEEPING WITH OUR TIMES.


THE RAPID

EXPANSION


PROGRESS--AND

OF MIAMI BEACH


CoDn aUfLalina c! city of Miami Beach

upon the opening of your new Municipal Auditorium

. .. another edifice to spur good living and the

rapid progress of our city Congratulations too! to the city

officials and those responsible for the

planning and construction of this great Edifice.


Facilities Available to Corporations and Individuals


Commercial Banking


Personal Check Service


Savings Accounts


Safe Deposit Vaufts, Collection, Escrow and Foreign Departments

Members Federal Reserve System and Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.


...aaaaaaa .. .. '-~ot~&aLteat4a


it Academic a Music and Dancing
airds a Complete Sports Program
SEducation Horseback Riding
iques 0 Painting and Ceramics
Children Admitted to First Grade
On Basis of Readiness


NORMANDY
LEO HUBERMAN, Headmaster
PHONE 86-6811


,IF


n


* Highest
Stand
* Visual
Tochni




Sunday, November 19, 1950


*0


E


UR


TS


(EACH A SHOW PLACE)


to


SER


Consistent


r. .: . ..; *,' ,'' '* o: .- ..~ 1 -: ..'. ^ ^ (i.t
2 :.:,,. .^ ; T ;., . ,. ,
IMI
,


-j
._..f-- ,
..,- . ., ,,.


EYOU


Growth ..


Developed Through


GOOD FOOD AND GOOD SERVICE


LINCOLN ROAD AT THE ATLANTIC OCEAN


ON


ON


22ND


71ST


ST


ST


AT


AT


THE


THE


ATLANTIC


ATLANTIC


0


0


I'll
CEAN
Ill
CEAN
Rill u-


1ILED


FOR YOUR
COMFORT


OP


Fl


REST,


THE MIAMI HgXAL 7 -.K






AS-K THI MIAMI HERALD Sunday, Neovembker 1. 190


To Florida Can Choose From 514,000 Rooms


12,912 Restaurants


Can Feed 560,270

Greater Miami Has 546 Inns;
Florida Total Tops California
By RICHARD RUNDELL
Herald Staff Writer
Florida has more hotels than California, even though that
west coast state has almost four times as great a population.
That's the simplified yardstick O
the Florida State Hotel Commils- with 1,744 rooms. Total number
ion likes to use to measure the of rooms Is 35,939.
The tourists that come here to
comparative tourist-attracting ca- frolic also have to be fed. That's
pabili, les of the two vacation cen- the job tackled by the state's 12.-
ters. 912 restaurants, "lth a total seat.
Greater Miami has 546 hotels, Ing capacity of 560,270.
or more than ai third of the state's Greater Mlami's share of the r ,
total of 1,500. The whole state of restaurant is 2.670. with a e ca. -- -
California hae' 1.303. pacity of 156,165. Pinellas has .. ...
A theu h oels Ima 19, seating 41,612. while Duval ... I,
Joining the hotels In making ha s 91 restaurants. seating 32,- "
tourist accommodations one of the 99.
state's biggest Industries are f1.589
apartment houses. 13,302 rooming The accommodations are big and
houses, and 3.161 motor courts, small. The tourist can find a place
to sleep for 50 cents or $50 a day.
The hotels have a total of 88.990 He can eat In a ham 'n egg dinery
rooms: the rooming houses 108,521 or some of the nation's finest res-
the apartment houses 267,701 and taurants. ONE OF FLORIDA'S MOST UNIQUE motorr ,:.,urt-. i fi 7= Tepee 'Village near Orlando.
the motor courts 48,783. There's plenty of variety. The T scus a a at n i F rian c rt at
That's a total of 513,99 rooms famous Teepee village, near Or- TheineniorS are spa us and modern, as are mrt ol Flozjdaus hor courts. That Sa
available to tourists. as of the land, Is one of the most unusual Citrus grove in the background. -Photo by Chrles lo Belden
end of March, 1950. motels in the state. The roofs on
its 30 concrete cottages come to Bargains On Collins 'Ave.
Dade county's 546 hotels have a point, just like the Indian dwell- rg O o A e
37,580 rooms; Its 4,135 apartment lIngs they Itnltate.
houses. 126,899 room, its 2,585 Believed to be the country's larg-
rooming houses. 22,15 rooms: and est motor court i Ellinor Villageot .r F o
Its 192 motor courts, 4,277 rooms. on Route AA at Ormond Beach each lr o tu L o ts o a F o i t0
That's a total of 190.906 rt.ooms It has 625 units. The huge Ormond r
for persons visiting the Greater Beach hotel Is reputedly the larg-
Miami area. est hotel of wood frame construe er a
Although second in size, Jack- finn in the world. The Boca Raton
sonville's Duval county is out- Club is the largest hotel n Florida. G
ranked in tourist accommodations *
by Pinellas county, whoseleading STATE officials give much of
city is St. Petersburg. the credit for Florida's progres- Development that is unmatrhed by any area of the Dxie H l'. motorcade which was
Pinellas has 238 hotels with 11,- sive tourist accommodations pro- of this country has been chronicled by The Herald warmly ~co,,e1 here on Oct. 25, 1915, after a
115 rooms; 1,659 apartment houses gram to the state hotel commission, In 40 years of telling the story of Florida's fab- Chica:o.to-Mian, tnip.
A'ith 29,624 rooms: 1.670 rooming Jack Weatherford, chief commla- ulous Gold CoaEcz-from birth, through boom and
houses with 10,525 rooms, and 390 slon deputy', said Florida Is the bust. "Fifteen days were taken up in the trip of






;~~ite Hotelfe Georg Heral reported.^^S ^ ^ i^^S:
notor courts with 5,702 rooms, only state in the country with That relatiel:,' short span of less thin half d fifteen hundred ile" The Herald repo rted,
That's a total of 56966 rooms. It hotel commission, a century ha brought changes that are breath- "Wand .nt an unf rtunae accident of any kind
outranks even Dade county in the taking unhetiet able. marred the pleasures of the Journey."
number of motor courts. "Florida has the lowest per For instance, in April. 1913, ocean beach lots Housewives may find it ImpT lr.Ie to believe,
capital loss from hotel fires of were being strenLuOU' advertiseodfor $1,200 to but in 1922 Miami grocery V. &Ee aitprt'riing such
hany state, andI also lowest in $1,500 by .A. McDonald and JN. Lummus, of iteDa as sirloin task at .0 cents a pound, leg of
DIALcomesIn third. It has per capital cases of food poison, the Ocean Beach Real,' Co. You could even have la, for 38 (c1 i, l, -nt pot roast, butter, 41
49 hotels with 3,423 rooms; 1,030 Ing," Weatherford said. them for 10 per cent down and the balance on cent,a a ,,'ir .anid ,,ffee, 34 cents.
apartment houses with 19.595 the easy-payment plan. p,-,.c ..,. ,fro .,$ another side to that story.
rooms; 1.179 rooming houses with "Just as Florida depends heavily e his ance t tts
11,178 rooms; 125 motor courts on tourists for its financial John S. Collins and Thomas J. Pancoast were The Sc- jio! ri A., i1-o railroad at about that time
TEhealth," 'Weatherford said. "it must trying to lure people to buy some of their announced it was willing to pay 70-cents-an-hour
depend on a forward-looking oceanfront lots for $1,500 to $1,8175. wages for :,,-t-, boilermakers, blacksmiths,
group of men to see that suitable sheet metal Workers and engine carpenters. The
accommodations ate provided for If you could be satisfied with a lot on CoIlin rate was 63 cents for car inspectors and repairers.
the our visitors, ave.-now a miles-long canyon of plu-l, u. *
"If hhee're properly housed and hotels-it was yours for $550 and up, in ;h.-. ul... .
c of hToday, such prices would scarcely Pet a ft.L., OCCASIONALLY, however, among all the fren-.
NEW AND INTIMATE taken care of while they're here, of that gold-dusted real estate. zied notes of hectic change, some fainihai note
Air Conditioned they'll be back." With the cnun'ii gralualls gettinE car-crazy, shone through like a cheerful beacon.
J, K., Dorn ad',nertd tri Erie pEopI' of Miami ]Like this "society note" that appeared in the
Hotel George Land Sales risk thatKheDrwould edbe glad to deliver them a Maxwell
Oveiooking the Ocean 25 town catr for $5fo, or a roadst-r for .7'5, then %k-,,,nth.oid Herald. oi July 9, 191L.
S)lcoktOtance 'ri-k i; the teal As added hlar,ndhrnent. Mr'. Dolrn iachi4oit that "When Thomas F i.'. lle. ri.',,lent tf the
estate Industry in Miai Beach Ithe NTaX1.._ll CoUld tL1a',,th rtl.t[ hj1u4 in hilel, gear. so-called asbestos trust, reache- N,... 'ink on
It was, in fact, he said "a phenomenal hill July 8 aboard the Steamship Ame-ika, of the
FOB DISCNIIMINATING CLIENTELE that the %alue of sales in this clty climber." Hamburg America line after a round trip across
always amounts to more than half *heboceainapuinuiteo hs roun, thom asr.Mn
the total fo all sales In Dade the ocean in pursuit of his son, Thomas F. Man-
6760 COLLINS AVENUE county. according to the Miami HENRY FORD'S famous flivvers, a little later, ville, Jr., 19 years old, he will learn that the
Beach Board of Realtors. Through were on the market at prices ranging from $461 youthful heir to the Manville millions has taken
MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA August this 'ear. Miami lBeacrl to $701, delivered in Miami. advantage of his absence by twice getting
TELEPHONE 86-7336 real e'taLe sales amounted to ST. There must have been some hills in the way married."
1341. 111


FLORIDA CAN BOAST ol 1he world's largest tourist court. It's Ellinor Village, located
at Ormond Beach, just north of Daytona Beach. The village contains more than 650 in-
dividual units and has its own shoppin.g center, shown right center.


Above The National Average


W W HOTEL
POOL CABANAS PRIVATE BEACH
Five luimntis aeres of Oceanfront Privacy at the
areroade of Miami Beach
Dancing Nightly
Planned Entertainment and' Activities
Full Color Brochure on Request
COMPLETELY AIR CONDITIONED
and Steam Heated
Superb Year Round Service
MORTON KIRSCH, Manager
N. Y. OFPICE CY 9-6567 t


oto the


Wofford Beach
HOTEL
On The Ocean Front
At 24th Street Miami Beach


dqin, Vn2dRA O iwh Wz9aqamand

With New Furniture and
Equipment Throughout!

New home of the Niles "Know-
How" of Courtesy combine to
put the Wofford Beach back
among Miami Beach's outstand-
ing Hotels.


PETER L. NILES
General Manager


SEASON
RESERVATIONS
AVAILABLE

PHONE
5-6691 r


iFlorida Wages Keep Rising

Floridians were paid a total of Commerce r e s e a r c h e r s have Nationally, total wages and sal-
1 7R1 nnf0.nnn in wapes anrd sal!found. aries decreased one per cent, 1948


aries last year, up three per cent he 1949 wage-salary total inI
arises last year, up theree per cent Florida was the highest on rec-
from 1948, the State Chamber of ord.
IN THE SMART NORTH BEACH SECTION


U/I/k!7


ON THE OCEAN. AT 71st ST.
MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA


INAUGURAL SEASON

COMPLETELY AIR CONDITIONED
SWIMMING POOL
CABANA CLUB
PRIVATE BEACH
COCKTAIL LOUNGE
PHONE 86-6821
FREE "
PARKING


SOffu Re dkidi


MARINE TERRACE


Directly on the Ocean at 27

A FAMILY-TYPE HO
INTIMATE INFORMAL HOME

Where Courtesy and Service


OPEN YEAR "ROUND


to 1949. 1'
Wages and salaries paid to em-
ployes by all types of employers,
including government, normally
account for about 60 per cent of
the total income of Floridians.
The balance of Floridians' $2,948,-
000,000 total income in 1949 was
accounted for by the following
groups.
Proprietors' income (Income
of unincorporated businesses, in-
eluding farms) amounted to
$559,000,000 last year, a gain of
10 per cent over the 1948 earn-
ings of this group.
Floridians who derive income
from property (rents, interest,
dividends and royalties) received
a total of $415,000,000, better by
6 per cent than in 1948.
Earnings of all other groups
(, ii,.,i| ., those receiving gov-
ernment aids of various t y p e s)
amounted to $213,000.000, more by
7 per cent than in 1948.

UM Book Shelves
3 Miles Long
The University of Miami li-
brary is one of the fastest'grow-
ing in the South.
Records of 41 Southern uni-
versities during the last three
years show that the U of M
has rated no lower than third
in the number of volumes added
each year.
The local school has 230,000
books on three miles of shelves.

Boats Also Race
Moltorboat and sailing regattas
'and races are held almost every
weekend through the fall, winter
and spring in Miami.







:HOTEL
7th St.

TEL
IKE

SExcel

JOHN B. REID, Pres. & Mgr.


prg^ DIRE,'LrYoe the ola.' .Ot
7. TRULY D,..ele beach nnd ai -1 aler
SDIUCi WIth n T ali.nt dtersncq
Cf e.r) recurlatonvi at *


j"^ 'A ier


nned entela',n,,r
Please ma
your reser
tion ea


ike
va.
rly.


No Other Hotel
Offers So Much!
One Low Price Includes Everything
Needed For That Perfect Vacation!
UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT

Miami Beach's largest hotel offers a modified American Plan.
Breakfast and DINNER plus lodging for as low as
$45.50 per week, per person
Double occupancy until December 20ih. All rooms with bath,
Sun-time activities include Swimming in our delightful Pool,
Private fishing faciltes,. Boating. Golfing, Tennis, etc.
Planned nightly divertisement: Game Room, Cocktail Lounge,
Coffee Shop.
FREE PARKING on our own extensive grounds.


FLEETWOOD HOTEL


Come On Down! Live Happily On

Bay Harbor Islands m


Build your home on Beautiful Bay Harbor Islands, located
away from the bustle of traffic, and yet minutes away from
every convenience, in the heart of Miami Beach. Homesites
overlooking the world famous Biscayne Bay and Indian
Creek.
Waterfront Property from $5250, Inside Lets from $3500
Write today fo: information to:


Marqusee Associates, Inc. -James R. Dezell, Mg
105 Kane Concourse Miami Beach Phone 86-38


Visitors


p





I83
135


I! I


&S


,-MA .







Greatest Winter Season Is Anticipated



Florida Spends Millions On New Tourist


lorlida, poised for the greatest
winter tourist season in its his-
tory, is preparing the warmest
welcome 'Net for the millions who
trek annuiall to the Sunshine
State In search of rest, recreation
and relaxat ion.
Because of a widespread belief
that Florida's resort business will
continue to Increase, residents and
outsiders have invested millions
since the end of tme last winter
season In new accommodations for
visitors.
Thousands of new housing units
-hotels, apartments and motor
courts-have been added in all
parts of the state.
In additiolN, operators of the
states man-made attra.'tlons hav%
staked more millions on Florida's
future as the nation's vacation-
land. A general air of confidence
prevails and It'. haid to find an%-
one who doesn't believe the ,tate
will top this year Its previous high
total of 5.000.000 visitors in a 12-
mrnonth period.
But those who are boosting
Florida a% a tourist state have
shifted their emphasis- front the
state's more glamorous, better-
known spots to the general asug-
gestion that the visitor -See All
Florida This Year."
-It is undeniably true that
Florida contains a variety of things
to see and do that eien long-time
visitors do not suspect. There is.
literally speaking, entertainment
and recreation for every taste and
for every purse.
If the vishior likes gav crowds.
for example, he tan find them at
the race tracks and night clubs
of a dozen south Florida resort
cities. But if he wants only ie-
laxation and rest. he can find these
along miles of sunny beaches in
thd same communities.
Or, if he would like some quiet
fishing, he can find that anywwlere
In Florida. Besides the best salt
water fishing in the world, the



They Like


Imperfect
Florida

Florida


state has hundreds of lakes and
streams where fresh water fish
abound.
The state's rich historical heri-
tage also Ig proving of Interest
to increasing numbers of visitors
each year.
The visitor browsing through
the quiet streets of St. Angus.
time-the nation's oldest city-
will find numerous ancient rel-


les going back to the Spanish
conquistadors. There is, for ex-
ample, Castillo de San Marcos,
oldest fort In the United States.
Work on this quadrangular,
moated stronghold was begun in
1672 and for many ears the for-
tress was Spain's greatest bastion
In the New World. The outer walls,
12 feet thick at the bottom and
tapering to seven feet at the top,


were built of coquina rock. Never
captured by assault throughout
Its long history, the fort is now
a national monument administered
by the National Park Service.
Other sights In St. Augustine
Include the "Oldest House." the
"Oldest Wooden Schoolhouse," and
a shrine marking the site of the
first Catholic mass In North Amer-
ica.


Sunday. November 19, 1950O THE MIAMI HERALD .-K


Accommodations

To make certain that its tourist been entirely along materialistic
industry continues to grow, Flor- lines. The state has made a ire-
Ida is constantly adding enter- mendous effort to Improve Its pub-
talnment and recreational features. lie schools and a broad health
A single big attraction, for in- program has moved forward stead-
stance, spent a quarter of a mil- ly,
lion dollars last ear preparing to All these factors add up to con-
lion dollars last year prpa intotnued progress--a progress that
give visitors a better show for is symbolized by the state's phe-.
their money. nomenal growth in population and
But Florida's progress has not wealth.


AFt Croij0onAr iuA
~ ~LUXURY HOTEL
'2 0 NEW SWIMMING POOL
'-50 up Planned Entertainment
PIR PERSON Dining Room ,-
S2 IN A ROOM 0 Steamb le+ in every room
S A/ho Chwarming Apurfmints
S w;ith Kitfchenetts PHONE .
_.- 5-5723


COLLINS AVE. AT 38th ST.
'/ "M lB." ii. .,... ,. ,


Let's .face it-Florida Isn't
quite perfect.
For example, we have hurri-
canes.
Other parts of the country
have blizzards, tornadoes, earth-
quakes and dust storms. Florida
has nonrle of these. But now' and
then Florida has a hurricane.
There's no excuse for getting
hurt or killed in a hurricane.
All you have to do is get away
from the coast, get inside a
strong, building and stay there
until the hurricane Is over. The
weather bureau gives plenty of
advance warning.
Besides. Fioitda has no mono-
poly on hut'ricane;. Remember
the New England hurricane of
393..that caused damage of 40
million dollars? And the hurri-
canp that flooded Galveston.
Texas, killing 5.000 persons in
1900?
Like so many other slates,%
Florida has mosquitoes and
sandflies. When the wind
blows from the right dilrpection
-or you might 6ay the wrong
direction-It wafts these peists
into cities, and towns. Eferv-
body.gets stung and squawks
about it.
But our mosquito flightvsi
spray swamps and drain sait
marshes. They'e gradlually 1 ,p.
Ing out the breeding places of
mosquitoes.
Warm winter breezes srome-
times carry cloeidl. of smoke
from forest fire- or flaoie- smorl-
dering In the peat soCi- of tme
Everglades. That's in the div
season of clourlle'_ blue slkiepi
when most of tlie nation can't
see the sun for ria',_ ar a tirne.
In summer v.'e have sain-
lots of it. Flori(ld's rainfall mea;-
ures nearly f;'.e feet a %ear.
The moist wari th l Ottri-h.t-iS
Florida's palms, poinettia'. aza-
leas and grove- of tiing ti'ee..
oranges, grapefri,,. iimn.'., a\o-
cados and mangoes.
S It also nourishes weeds and
insects. For example. ue have
palmetto bugs. The. look like
giant armor-plated cork.
roaches, and they can fly.
Floridians aren't al mil lion-
aires, not by .a I,-ng s,-it. VWe
have slums. They're ci.:'.ied
and ugly, but they 'aren't laif
as crowded and utiv as slumS
elsewhere in the countryr.
You -could mention a Pod
many other fla.' ; in FIi.)!,,I.
Take hoodlums. ve hae oiriie
than our shaxe.
Big-time rackr.trevi and gain-
biers come to FloiIrla in ilro.r.z
Many want to pct richer n iThei
Nation's Pla.ogrund. Other; '
come here to "'en l ,i,." h,\
big homes, pose a i; phiianthrio-
pists, enjoy year-rourn grolfini
and swimming. But te a g-raep
person never 'see iheni. The,
stay pretty secludeld.
Trhey've tutllrd thpir ha' k.- on
livNn_ In places v'.here ile,, had
to buy coal, snott -horcis. nocr-.
shoes, overcoat. scarves, muff.
lers, gloves, tire chains and anti-
freeze.
So have several hundirnl thou,.
sand good citizens. The', prefer
Florida, with all It. faults., t n
any other spo'. In the v. world.

Outsiders Good
So many of the thousands. of
entrants In the second annual Mi.
ami Beach summer fishing tourna-
ment came from other parts ofI
the nation that onlI about one-
fifth of the 76 ria's leaders in'
the contest's fo.r dt'i-inn' cre,
local residents. Partiicpant- rep"e
sented 44 states, Ap cities and ;,x
foreign countries. Their ages
ranged from five to 78 years.


Wolfie's Newest


S==- LINVCOLN ROAD
a-..--m-


COLLINS AVE.


Wolf ies

21st Stl.

and Collins


"'olfle'd


VanderbUt

Specializing


in Fine

Dinners


SANDWICH SHOP


RESTAURANT


"LET'S GO TO


From Baker's Haulover to Government Cut you can
hear that phrase. Wolfie's three restaurants have
become a byword on Miami Beach. The thou-
sands of satisfied customers that pour through
the doors are the best indication of the
quality of the food that is served there.
Whether it is a luncheon, dinner or
snack just say "Let's Go To Wolfie's."


I - --"" --m-:PF -4.7-lm


i


yssasBK


J.







Our Breezes


KO Those


U. S. Sneezes

Miami Beach has long been
proud of its claim to being the
most pollen-free section of the
United States during the annual
"ST," or "sneezing Lime" period,
the months of August and
September.
The two months comprise the
peak point of torture for unfor-
tunates susceptible to the nasal
Irritation commonly called "ha%
fever."
Actually "hay fever" Is a cover-
all label, and can be caused by
polen of a liost any) sort, but more
usually bv pollen of the .wild-
growing ragweed.
Ragweed does not exlst in Mi-
ami Beach-and even If It did,
through some remote and freak-
ish happenstance. p r e V a I1 i t g
southeast breezes direct off the
ocean, clocking from 10 to 20
miles an hour, would sweep it
off the Island reef before
it could do any harm.
Likewise. Miami Beach Is free of
the secondary cause of "hay fever"
-smoke. There are no factories or
other smoke producing facilities
on the beach. For years now, word
of mouth advertising by sufferers
who have finally learned firt
hand of Miami Beach's qualities as
a haven for victims of the Sneez-
lng Time malady, has been respon-
uible for the Increasing popularity
of the area during August and
September.
A book. ""'onr Hay F'ever."
written by Oscar Durham, of the
Abbott Laboratories, of Chicago.
has also helped.
Almost every state, particularly
Texas and the mid-west farming
states, has its Hay Fever Sufferers
Association, and there was at one
time a Heart of America Hay Fe-
ver Club of S,000 members which
petitioned Congress for a nationaI
research foundation for combat-
ting the malad).
Miami Beach can do nothing to
combat It in other areas, hut it
can assure sufferers of a welcome
respite from its annoying and pain-
ful effects.
Statistics show that 10 per cent
of the population suffers from hay
fever, and that as low a content
as 25 pollen granules to the square


BILLY GILBERT
... I'm speechleses!


yard of atmosphere will provoke
an attack of 25 to 50 exhausting
sneezes. In one section of Texas
(of the southwest) the air con-
tains from 250 pounds to two tons
of minute pollen to the square
Mile. At the accepted standard of
a billion granules of pollen to the
tablespoon that's a'lot of pollen
to sneeze at.
The attacks last throughout
the 65 days of the pollen season.
The growing awareness of Mi-
amin Beach as a haven for hay
fever. sufferers has continued to
keep the summer peak flow of
visitors coming right through Sep-
temb'r in recent years.



::PARK
Invites You To Live At The
FINEST During Your Stay
On Miami Beach.
Modernm Rooms
Beautiful Patio on the Water
Near All Famous Night Spots
Catering To Theatrical Trade
In The Heart Of Miami Bleach
SENSIBLE RATES
DAY-WEEK-MONTH.SEASON
WRITE NOW FOR FULL
INFORMATION
22146 Park Ave., M.B.
1 Ph. 58.2366


10-K THE MIAMI HERALD Sunday, November 19, 1950


Summer Temperatures


Rarely Go Above 90


I


Siimmnier temperatures in Miami are mildr, and more corn :
fortahle, acco-rding to L'nited States \Weather Buieau records.
than most large cities in the East and Middle \et. :.t
,one highPr than W) deipees in six 0
%eais. antd in -S ear.' hate not blowing on the city act as na-
gone higher than 95 depge;. ture's glat air-conditioning plant
"'lo.o ,erdt ago a Miami hoel Dr. E. D. Hockenberr\'. cit. phy-
offered free lod-g1rig for guests an,, ilvian, adds thlat throughout Ml-
riav d(1ri tflip summer thI e i11p1". anti' hiC tn.tv there ha; been not
,ur', rea ned 90 degies. It 'as one reported case of heat prostra- ,
required to abide h% its terms but Lion.
tti,:e. He points nut that "\here there
Dr. J. Riley Staai-. head of the Is a breeze and shade there 1
Reograph dePpartnent. IiiVer. Comfort. Meamiirtnrs find s -hadet
of Miamlir. explainQ that surround- cunmfr tropical palm findris ,'
0i, 'Aaert; of the Atlantir Ocean


SONG WRITERS have found FloCida an ins.pirrilicnal area [or their -.,ork. Slairtq wi.vlh "S,'anrinee,'" Tin PFan Alley has
been perennially rhyming "moon" with June '-as witness a few of the examples ab.ove.


Florida Has Been A Very Inspiring Field


For Nation's Music And Song Writers


Byv GEORGE BOURKE
Herald Amusement EdiLor
Song and mu-ic have long been
twin by-products of the laissez
fate which Is supposedd to be a
governing modus viendrli in all
emrni-tropical areas such as Is Flor-
Ida.
But. paradoxically.. it app:airs to
have been a prolific lai.-.sez faii. in
Florida-one whicli has filled the
mnusic recoirdl of the nation ,.ithl
compositions which have ranged
from the fundamental tintinaoula-
tions which Tin Pan Alley has
drawn from the natural ear-teasing
nature of its geographical locations
such as "TaiIahamceF.". "Apalachi-
cola." and "Tamlamrni"-to te i'rre
classlcally thn'red compo-itions of
Frederick Delih.. Mana-Zuca. and
J. Ro-amnnd nlohnecon. % hose "Lift


contributions. tin the state-"On INow. 25 yeais later. Davi has
Miami Shore." In 1919. put ppn to miusir paper again 'wijdl
a nom1irFr called "Miami Beach
Top; of courieP. front a Miami Beautifui."
point of vier at ifast. and riiost And on arid nn the lit gnep
liwell fr"m IPre-rt music sai. a (':Ciff Friendi and Joe Santlv did
%iell. Is "Norn OBer Md,aii.' on '.Tanianil Trail" in 102A. Ring
hli a JOrp Buikr arInd E.,.4-r Le-. .Lariner and GeoriP Kaufman
lip leandrreIrn 1.135. BirI.P. ro tanfnd ri, "Julne Mowon- int 12,.
dprl cRni, a f.'r nii.-,tli! ago. once Ld- al' Hender-on and TPd Gron-
said tIhat noihodt v_,.e, -,.t i a ,'a ame up \%ith "Flamingo' in
1011O jlisl IIght \Cx pt I hlOlgh [0.1 1
a Miani palm tree.i
I 'g Caear, who -r 'Sru. rhat ir;. A. Ba' ii. who has been
v.anne" three teais, iefrie hP epr I turning out song hits since he
,aw Florida, ha. been a frequent iwd "Eve Cot Adam Ju-t One
%-itor sincee he helped Florenz Brnpe" in 1921. ha; been a prolific
ZipgfePild pl'IYtic, the "Pain Beach penman In writing Florida songs.
ReuP-- here and in Palm Beach "On Birlca ne Ba,- and I'd Rathler
in I12.5. Oui orf llt re-ue raie Bp in Miami ave In whlch come
Fhorira, The Mnon arnil rou." imrmediaiele, to mind.
iI.Ith Gene Buck and Rudolf Frin.l Cnluninlit ,lack Kofoed, who


Ever\ Voice" is on-idered a Negio cr.ilaih:raiine. previously' collaborated with
national anthem. CaeP-ar ha- b-r-i coni.li inO F!nr-. ronirdlan Jimmy )nrante In a
Although_ yit Is erioii mu c ic -al\- \nc. and nn!. hnok about nighl clubs, did like-
Although hasit i. InFloridian muic ,ast pn pner p a i,,,. -ri callpw- ,l a jith musician Irrilnr Pei.
hch haenlnri IIn Floridian I'I i ien it, the Sand.," ile track last winter and the resnlt
niule affairs-the Semlnole In. at the Saxon Hnit i. ,a Ithe muiical "Miami Square
dlan, had a musical culture
which dated hack to the mid.-l6th Sunny Sk.lar. or *Bep.are, Dance."
cenlury-lhe derpest Imprint on Miucho." penned to Inocalliv T" n onilhir local'. Fird F r'-rIIF'.
the pnpulatlon at large has un- sinng.s while uitlling at the Lnrd iI B,:,-l rra.t'. 'dil p,-lh)lPw l hli
douilltdl3 been made In the pir.p- Tarletoni Hotel-but they wiere ip *%-,w tifta." in l4I-i
ular field. "-Atlanta, (;a." and I"1 Wanna < R'-w r ||I ion amp fello" ,II.w-
Back In T pe\a." and he hasn 't R.,1i 1i,.11 g[ pe hi; a i nfe pliw a ri
Ask the man in the street to Bt gnten a',-,und to doing one l ,-te ir Fore anthipm ah1a inn
name a few Florida-inspired songs. aout i-lort-ida. e rigir bluForce anther ah-ih.l
-about Florida. h hiitbu .vdr"rgh
No Appalachia Suite, or Old Slave f ,n Fi lI ,zIl i hii tb, l" -n a i
Song of Delius' will you get as li1.ri F2 ;i 'k ig'E i lii pat hoip In Miami .
an answer. Probably not even -ir'd ae t, ,1 ,i1- s t-,-|tl ,n It i r.hv.w ni u. that sinr, tile iir l.
Stephen Foster's "Old Folks at .M -i P .ar i m "" 'i i n1w rlC lu century -'hri Henr
Home," which immortalized thera- ,o ,ip [ '..i l ie "'ia B,.-i \,hi ,ll r, -Nc MVI Lrf 1; l.,kp a
Suwanee River, although under F;hl1a-ii- \ir !le '"i- wiit ', r..;r .
the spelling of Swanee, will come ,rel eC., I,- K D'i '9 ,. !i ,a.i-. I
to mind. harnu-lr i rC [or t, r G.'ut i,,-ir I THE!
And certainly Delius' "Florida ,, Il n i ,; ., ,, K n ,t r. 1
an orchestral suite, wont be the ".- hr icra, 1" n nprd i it "n "n"1"r
answer. ., I s .T,,ile i M.I, t manirkr_, 0it l MIAMI BEACH
\'n. you'll probably be offered nfi r" tell ; ni "*u -* I .


"On Miami Shores," "Moon Over
Miami"-or If you are a Miami
Beach modern . ."Miami Beach
Rumba."
If you are to disqualify Foster's
"Old Folks at Home" as being in
the classical division, it would
seem that Charles McCarron, a
partner with winter Miamian Ray
Walker in the writing of "Poor
Pauline," hurled the first popular
clef for Old Florida in 1916 when
he came up with "Down Where
the Swanee River Flows," and
started, or rather continued, Fos-
ter's cycle which Irving Caesar
and George Gershwin kept going
when they created "Swanee" for
Al Jolson in 1919.
H. Pitman Clarke showed the
old river bed was not dry two
years later when he had a success
with "Swanee River Moon." It was
then five years before Sam Coslow,
now a film producer, came up
with "Hello, Swanee, Hello." Since
then it appears the Suwanee is
"old hat."
Coincidentally, it was a film
producer to be, Bill LeBaron,
who penned possibly the second
most popular of Tin Pan Alley's


(The f
BOULEVARD

Dade Boulevard at Meridian Ave. Hotel

RE-OPENS

DECEMBER 1st

ATTRACTIVE SEASON RATES

SINGLE from 350"

DOUBLE from 450oo
Now open for inspection Daily
from 9 AM. to 5 P.M.
J. J. LINDENFELD OWNER-OPERATED
Asst. Mgr. Thai. O'Hagen DuPree


The Beauliful New Conditoned

CATALINA SENSIBLE
HOTEL WINTER RATES
HOTEL
Collins Avenue Near 18th Street OWNERSHIP
Manapement
Invifes you fo spend your Mn m i
Vacaflon in fhe Finest Luxury The KOTLERS
SPrivate Beach & Pool Facilities
* Low Season Rates |<;s:s
100% AIR CONDITIONED O W T ClE OCEAN AT /5 SrT.


LIVE IN AN EXQUISITE BEACH HOTEL
OVERLOOKING THE OCEAN



MT. VERNON HOTEL
AND



MONTICELLO HOTEL
63rd STREET AND COLLINS AVE., M. B.

EXQUISITELY FURNISHED HOTEL ROOMS
0 PULLMANETTES AND BEDROOM
APARTMENTS
BATH SHOWER PHONE
0 PRIVATE SWIMMING POOL

Renting on Daily-Weekly-Monthly-Seasonal Basis


Pullmanettes for Season from
12 0 WITH COMPLETE
$1 20 HOTEL SERVICE

Hotel Rooms from

$1000

PHONE 86-6298
Your Hosts ... CHET MARKS AND JACK LYNN


-q a


Rore"-one line or Itili deicri bec
"Fnntpr;.nt.s In Tamipa's de-it
t.i and" up tro il" nl ire r-rEriri
"Florida. M\I Sun.' Fnlorida" -o'!
[ii.ing Sieel -and Geitrurip Huntm.
Florida ha; hPPe an inptailon to
lahpl it "Thp Songn.hiipe State."
A; Dcliii. the Bil'ltlher whMi
fru nd niUl'Cr faiare in Flori.la once
wrop-te' "In Flo,'Ida. thrlnugl Slj ing
and gazing, at NainLe .1 gra-3;ialit
earnnt the v.a;,, In whlcrh to find
1"!\ iel . ."


The New Air Conditionied


LONDON

HOUSE
Washington Ave. at 20th St.
Invites you to live in ci-m-
afort while enrc"i'.'r your sta,'
on Miami Beach lhi3 ',....'intoIer.
The London House is con-
'v'enienll, locaied in lthe '-'r
heart olt M irii B .-ch . .
A stone s thro"' t.o li ..-eor
S. Acros', ihLe slr.-'l Ifrom
Mi-,mii Beach'; lar-ort T-l-
course . Do'.-.'n ihe siree1r
from lhe ,r" best[ in ni-ht
club-' rn d rsi.iuro.'ri
Reatonable Monthly Seaeonal
- Yearly Rates! Pullmanete%,
Wth Complete Hotel Service.
Hopel Rooms.
* Private Beach Swimming Pool
Cabaina Club
W ri f Iill ifr ntrrl i tln saed BfRo..e ll.


II


and thp G.il nr M'ero r.omblred
\'i ith tlie n-nrhea1 trade mnd;

State's Vast

Acres Boast

Wide Usage
Florida's vast acres serve a
v. ird variety -of uses in accom-
mod rating the activities carried I
on in rthe state, the Florida State
Chamber of Commerce found in
a study of land use in Florida.
Of the state's 34,728,000 acres
of land area, 13,083,000 acres (or
38 per cent) are in farms. This
farm total is made up of 2,314,-
000 acres of crop lands, 4,569,000
acres of pasture lands, 4,527,000
acres of open woodlands pas-
tured, 1,274,000 acres of forested
land and 399,000 acres in roads,
farmsteads and unwooded areas.
"The land not'ln farms (21,.
645,000 acres) consists of 16,.
958,000 acres of forest lands,
3,008,000 acres of beaches,
marshes and similar area
having .value a. rerrearinnal
areas and for wildlife and wa-
tershed protection.
In addition. rl51.3,000 acres are
within tipe hirits of cities and
towns and 1,166,000 acres are in
parks, .game refuse, military
lands, airport-, hr h'.a.:, and
i ilirnad i i -ei' R ( a'.
1.II* --


COMPLETELY
SAIR CONDITIONED
Oo PER DAY
$2 UP 1: iI IROOM
Privatel Beach Swimming
SPool Facilities Solarium
FREE REFRESHMENTS '
SERVED NIGHTLY


P K 5' .,.5' ., .. ; '5339 '
SLfuNog
37T14S-ll


'ieCOBURN SCHOOL

Located on beautiful! Normandy Isle overlooking
Biscayne say, the Coburn School offers the very
best in schooling for your child from kindergarten
through senior high.


OUR 26 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE
has been characterized by SMALL CLASSES and
INDIVIDUAL INSTRUCTION.


MEMBER of i WE INVITE YOUR INQUIRIES
Seo.dary, Ed.-c-,io Board FOR F U L L INFORMATION.
IQNational Council of
0 National ls:N:: VISIT US AT YOUR CON-
I tducatilaHecrds ueo VENIENCE.

1000 Bay Dr., Normandy Isle, Miami Beach, Ph. 86-1011


Tropical Furniture

by




BEACH cdwio SHOP P


We Specialize In

BEACH LAWN-PORCH

PATIO FURNITURE

AND ACCESSORIES


BARGAINS,

EXTRAORDINARY
Hotel and Apartment Inquiries Invited.

W SHIP ANYWHERE-WE DELIVER IN GREATER MIAMI A
PHONE 86.4415

215 67th Street
JUST OFF COLLINS AVE., MIAMI BEACH


-- Established 1937 v ,,


*SEA FOOD 0

SRESTAURANTr


COCKTAIL LOUNGE






Aold Coast Hotels

rStarred In GI Role
Thousands Learned Art Of War,
B Fell In Love With Sunny Paradise
.''twe are no statistics on exactly what percentage of the
Sbette'tha oii-t million soldiera--Ur officers In training and
I ground fqre4 returned from combat areas for rehabilitation-who
Socm"pie tt a esort city a few years back, have returned for a
civilian lopQkee at their former barracks, but using ,-.L
the mo P celebrated -of the former. GIa as a 7,
yardst84 the number must be many. -'' -
:'- .The ^umber One rookie, Clark Gable, who
.!C.:, U the newsreele when he shed his famed
*mu" ehO and moved Into a double.decker berth
I the Lord Tarleton oceanfront hotel as an '"
OCS student, hasn't been back, but frequently on
,!- - ~the scene ae Metro-Goldwyn.Mayeris romantic ..
John Carroll and baseball's slugging Hank Green- ONE OF THE FAVORITE vac
berg expressed regret that London
S Movie Star Tony Martin pauses here regular- host, Col. Frank W. Clarke, d
Sly in season to sing at Club Bobeme and t h e he was found frequently pai
W Beachcomber, and to vacation. Martin not only
S MARTIN got sand in his shoes during the Great Occupa-
Stlon, but already had a case of it from his pre-war visits as sing-. o U- )
s U-tr of the old Royal Palm. Floridians
Anyone who has served In the Air Forces will know Bob
CmwJacnd or at least his lyrical lines anent the "bright blue yonder." P C e
SWeall, Bob came to like the Miamlans during his khaki days a C ck
here and now that he's swapped the khaki for mufti he's
bac here teaching music by day at the University of Miami
after a try at operating a restaurant. i In U S
Another film star. Bruce Cabot, hasn't yet made this season's T h. L I r In U .S
pilgrimage back to the area where he won his bars-but he's been
back every year since the war. Stan Fisher, who has since gained Last year the pay envelope
considerable professional fame with the same harmonica with of Floridians totaled $2,948,000,.
which he entertained his Air Force comrades here during the war, 000, the Florida State ?hambet
has been back doing the same thing for pay at of Commerce announces.
the Five O'Clock 'Club. The 1949 income of Floridians
But the celebrities tell only part of the story included earnings of all types
K -4 of the Irresistible claim army association devel- from all sources and was five per
oped In rookies who learned the military arts in cent greater than in 1948.
Miami Beach. A check of housing records would Only two states, New Mexico
show that one out of every four dwelling permits with 8 per cent and Texas with 6
taken out In the Dede county area Is in the name per cent, showed a greater per-
Sof a veteran nho saw at least some service here. centage gain In total income in
But these returning veterans will find no 1949 as compared with 1948. Mary-
trace of the "Occupation" here. The 20th street land, Louisiana and the District of
Mness hall, for Instance, has been occupied by Columbia had the same Increase
three civilian restaurants and two night clubs as Florida. National individual In'
S since Uncle Sam relinquished it. The 41st st. theater come declined two per cent.
iABLN, -. has been leveled and replaced with the Roosevelt,
'f ]'tpi'fllru house, and ai,-those obstacle course burdleS and Detailed and revised figures
9l4 4ding paraphernglI& have been removed long 'dnce and on incom e are now avalabler
: -.. ; ,from 1929. In that year Florlidl
..th-"ei.te., aees Vnly. ro%,A on raws oi beach chairs, an@ earned .84 per cent of the
SAnd the droning planes overhead are no longer war planes total national income of lndl-
;* 'nt on the grim task of learning how to down an enemy, but viduaJs. By 1940 Florida's per
-4a tf erdat craft-the majority manned by ex-service fliers-trailing cent was *1.19.
"Hyint billboards" behind them selling everything from sun-ian oil War activity brought a greater
to a night at a night club! portion of the national income te
S Up the beach farther in the 90's, several units of the disciplinary Floridlans, pushing this per cent
Barracks have been converted into temporary apartments. Across up to 1.60 in 1944, after which it
the beach road, where once was a half-mile long row of rifle swung downward to 1.39 in 1948.
.,ange pits there is a mulu-million dollar building boom in the Last year, however, Florldian's
making. Already these swank hotels, the Kenllworth. the Emerald, share of the national earnings
and the Sea View, built at a cost of more than $2,000,000 each. are went up again and stood at 1.49
In op~ain. per cent.
In 1929 Floridians earned a total
S Many. of Miami's current visitors, who now end their nightly of $695,000,000 and 324 per cent
Stoue of ,he niterles and gambling spots as the sun comes up out. of more than that in 1949. No other
the gulf.tream, learned to love Miami Beach on a diet of rising at state had so great a gain in total
-thue same = .t under mUltary auspices, earnings during the 20-year perl.
And it Is an equally safe bet that many now spend as much In a od. The comparable national In-
ainglte day as UncJle Sam paid them a month for dwelling amid the crease was 139 per cent.
atie hiuh surroundings. &---
Who called them "the good old days!" Ci ar-M ki

S -Big Business
The manufacture of Florida
S S "smokes." $4i,000,000 %orth of
,1. them annually in recent years,
Is one of the state's most lm-
S- portant Industries. the Florida
IState Chamber of Commerce
reports.
Long important in Florida,
"t-,. he manufacture of tobacco
fel products, principally cigars has
virtually doubled in number of
plants and value of products
II since 1940.
0H The number of concern man-
0l fracturing cigars IF placed at
ST 74 and the total value ol cigars
I a 945.901,000.
Deed,, Ri IlL Tile numrrer of emplo.%es ere
reported as ,Rna apptinximately
Pdivat Bemh, Swimming Pool & Cabana Club. Trmditional i, per cent or the total nurnber
LVoMNillM Cuiine, Air Conditioned Dining koom of prsons employed in anu-
S CedtlaH LoU-nge. Dancing Nightly By the See. racu, ing in ne Late.
ON MIAMI BEACH ONLY 3 Golf Tourneys
DANCE PATIO DIRECTLY ON THE OCEAN Late this fall Miami visniors will
o Y5 e anas 5 3e e 1 P a great concentrainlon of golf
ONTom cz L I 35t STEE [oui namnents in tthe Miami Open
S -fANov. 30-Dec. 3; the International
M I A AMIAhlbk0 e-"-A Four-Ball, Dec 4-In, and the Cu
ban Open following Immedi&teI.%
afieru. ard.


SPLENDIDLY


twd.y, November l. IOS TH MIAMI 1HMALD AK


FIRST-. .md


FIRST
oN MIAMI BEACH WITH


MODERNE


nation spots of Winslon Churchill is Florida. He often has
i is so far away. Here he is shown with Mrs. Churchill and
during a visit to Miami Beach several years ago. While here,
nting along Biscayne Bay.


Plenty Of Sun Clear Reason
An average of 1,700 hours of Hundreds of visitors fly personal
strong ultra-violet sun rays shine planes to Miami, where full visl- L
annually on Miami. bllity exists 97 pet. of the year.


We Invite The Eyes of America


to turn in Admiration to


ONE OF MI


* 0 0


AMI BEACH'S


CONSTRUCTED


No building in our experience as con-
tractors has presented such a wide va-
riety of unusual and intricate require-
ments as this of the new auditorium.
From the first, these many challenges
to the builders ability stimulated our
desire to meet them letter perfect.

We wish to congratulate the members
of the building committee of the City
of Miami Beach on the completion of
this building, knowingly as we do that 'it
means the realization of a dream. They
set their sights high, and attained their
splendid goal. We thank them for many
considerations, which we are deeply
- appreciative.
0
More than 40 of the finer Miami Beach
hotels were built by this firm ... Over
60 years of construction all over the
world.


LOUIS MILLER



L. &H.


HARRY A. MILLER


J. MILLER


COMPANY


GENERAL CONTRACTORS


1421 18th Street. Miami Beach


'U


FINEST BUILDINGS .....


.q~f ~:

D.


MILLER


'HARMACY

OS9tElICS GIFUS
OSP1TAL SUPPLIES
rOWACCOS PIPES
!TWAWNS EVERY
IAOVSEEOLD NEED


Il LENIENT |l

I 1141311 I


3 CON
AIR-CO
LOCA
* No. I IN 41st
Prairie Ave.
* No. 2 401 Re
Bird Read
* Noi. 3 Sre Sol
31s1 St. A M01liii


Phones 5-3307-08
















































rS EASY TO SL ORANGES WHEN PEOPLE KNOW THAT


Here's Trade Secret!


Pretty Girls Pose


To Sell State Goods
By LAWRENCE THOMPSON
,nerld Cheneesks lMter
Florida discovered a trade secret years ago. Put a pretty
girl in it and you can sell anything.
Fashion designers and manufacturers have proved it by
putting lovelies in their sweaters, bathing suits and other at-
tire that they want to sell.to other lovelies and even to women
who merely wish they were lovelies.
But what if you can't slip a girl into your product, if it's
a sweater or a bathing suit?
The answer is simple: Put the pretty girl in a picture
with the product.


They started doing that when communities first began to
sill themselves to the north.
The treatment is simple. Put an attractive young woman,
more or less covered, on a beach, under a palm tree, splagiing
inthe surf, or just plain standing, sitting or lying. Say the girl
Is shown enjoying the beauties of Miami, Miami Beach, West
Palm Beach, Tampa, Sarasota or any other place, and send it
to the papers.
The people who see it are sold
and first thing you know, here member you by. Of course
they are. It was partly through you have to have the dogs,
this that the tourist industry too.
was born and partly through Now take another gander at
this that it has continued to thaL luscious blonde sitting on
thrive. nhite sand and smiling at the
Naturally the product-the skv. Know uhat she's selling?
sun, the sand, the climate, the A bus ride. Yessir, and cross our
aecommodations-has to be heart, that's a Greyhound bus
good or even such effective lines photo. The Idea, In case it
sales tactics won't keep the cus- eludes y o u, Is to let people
tomiers coming, know that if they ride a Grey-


But if you think the same
technique can't be-and isn't
used-to sell other Florida
products, Just look over this
page, as If you hadn't already.
Well, look at It again. It's
easy an the eyes.
The pictures prove the theory
that a well-built sweater girl
can help sell anything from sun-
tan oil to furniture, railroad
tickets to beer.
Down below you'll see
Jeannette Dickson and Missy
Souther posing with a horte to
advertise the Lakeland rodeo.
Chances are that this picture
brought in more customers
than a dozen pictures of just
the horse.
Want to operate a dog
track? Okay, what's your ad-
vertising gimmick? A picture
of a dog? Don't be silly. To
the dogs add two pretty mod-
els and what do you have?
Something people will re-


hound to Florida they'll see
such sights as these and at no
extra cost for the ticket.
A picture of a girl % ith a fish
can mean only one thing. It's
promotion for the Lee county
tarpon tournament, or the Mi-
ami Beach summer fishing tour-
ney, or the Metropolitan Miami
Fishing Tourney, or. any other
kind of fishing tournament-al-
though It conceivably might he
used to advertise a fish house.
Even a goon can see why
thev took the picture of the two
cudies eating oranges. We can
see %&hy. To tell the world about
Florida oranges, naturally. Any-
how, that's a good enough ex-
cuse.
Florida is becoming more and
more of an Industrial state and
the time may come when ev-
erything from bulldozers to
buttons are made here.
But of one thing you can be
certain: Pretty girls will help
sell them to the world.


iSUtCESSFUL RFLORIDA RODEO NEEDS SEX APPEAL I


MIAMI BEACH


SIGHTSEEING BUS ASSOCIATION
OPERATED BY
WYLLYS TOURS- DAVIS TOURS STANLEY TOURS
___ ~Now at Our New Location
1629 WASHINGTON AVENUE


SSeeing

Miami Beach -- Miami

and vicinity
DECLARED TO BE THE FINEST IN THIS AREA
Acclaimed by travel executives throughout kth
world, Magazines, Nev.-spapers, Touring Coun-
sellors of the American Automobile Association,
world travellers and America's largest All-Expense
Tour Companies.
4 HR. EDUCATIONAL
LEAVES LECTURE TOUR I 2 T Plus
DAILY Tax
Miami Miami leash make
;; 10. 0 A.M. Mi r i ngs
HI n plinls
I.l30.2 P.M. Hilleak coconut reve Reservations
and Coral tables
SALL DAY TOURS -
Palm Beach 150P. T.x Everglades Ntl. Park 5 I. To.
DEi LUXINE MOTOR COACH


PHONES.
5-3351 -.5-3352
Conventlen Specialists


south of Lincoln Road. Both It and
the later field situated north of
41st street have long since lost
the fight against the demand for
building lots.
Now local polo activities cen-
ter at the Orange Bowl In Miami,


,, .' .




K GUESS THAT THIS PRETTY GIRL IS SELLING GREYHOUND BUS TRIPS TO FLORIDA
where high-ranking players per- PeUcan-Eye View Plenty To Eat
form weekly, and qt the Univer- Two blimps are available to take There are more than 3,200 es-
aity of Miami, which sponsors a visitors on flights over the city tablishments in Greater Miami La.
student team. of Miami Beach. ceased to serve food.





SHERRARD'S R1E0AR 1


6742 COLLINS AVE., M. B.
Opposite MacFadden Deauville


PHONE 86-3185


Growing With Miami Beach!



The Miami Herald today is picturing the
phenomenal growth of this wonderful city
during the past 40 years.
Summing it all up ....

It's Miami Beach for FUN and SUN

It's SHERRARD'S for FINE FOODS


20 Reasonably Priced Dinners to Choose From!


How's the Time to


Start your Winter Vacation with Sunshine



in MIAMI BEACH



^ This year why not by pass take your pick of accommo-
winter altogether, and enjoy dations, but you can take ad.
Miami Beach's brilliant winter vantage, too, of the special
sunshine and summery climate, season rates offered by many. of
its inviting beaches, exciting Miami Beach's superb hotels
deep-sea fishing, and all the rest and apartments.
of its colorful diversions right Remember, though, the t )
from the very start? start is now. Then yr oe
You'll benefit in every way sute of enjoying all th,. ,un and
by getting an early start on win- seeing all the colorful, spectac.
ter in Miami Beach. Just follow ular events scheduled for the
"-K the lead of the early comers, days and months ahead, this
1\ \, and you can not only winter in Miami Beach.


This Message Is Prepared and Published
By The City Government of Miami Beach


*... ........................... ...
SChamber of Commerce, Rm. 276, Miami Beach, Fla.
PleaMI seund FREE Cola Folw .d ndrate
ifomademoen O Hotels wr [APartWtS
(Please Check)
NJAMI

c CIT 20ZNE--
SSTATE
S Please Prin Naome and Address
S e......... t .....*.. ** e .* *ee


-- .1


*
s w








4*~


GALA


PREMIERE YEAR


1950-51


9kw24ItiiQ 91QW0


OPENING


DEC.


15


Lit, ff4 Jfy


-Iuae,


A Wide Wide World of comfort and luxury in re-
sort living.
Completely air conditioned and steam heated
with individual dial control in each of its 150 ex-
quisitely furnished rooms .. radio and circulat-
ing ice water in every room ... 200 feet of pri-
vate sandy beach ... a huge swimming pool.. .
cabana colony...
Every room of this magnificent hotel faces the
ocean, for the Sea Gull is unobstructed on all
sides ... more than fifty rooms have private bal-
conies . .
Turkish baths with steam rooms ... a completely
equipped gymnasium men's and women's
solaria . beauty salon and barber shop .
A beautiful cocktail lounge . a dining room
and coffee shop where popular prices prevail
. . a dining terrace where a well-known orches-
tra provides Latin and American music nightly ...
The Sea Gull is situated in the gay, happy heart
of Miami Beach . yet serene and secluded in
its perfect ocean front location .
Reservations are now being accepted starting
December 15th. Michael J. Kelley, Manager...
Phone Miami Beach 5-6061 . write direct for
rates, reservations and color brochure.


(k*'


9L 'Mitk AiceA&L a phAsiafwft 9t0LM WSL aWwwkldq#L


ji4Am .- hthL dseqnV
RUSSELL HOLMES- Interior Decorator- Miami
NATHAN STRAUSS Ouparquet Furnishings Miami
WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC CORP. Elevators Miami
AIRTEMP CONSTRUCTION CORP. Air Conditioning Miami
L. T. ODOM Plumbing and Heating Coral Gables
B. HASKELL CO. Electrical Contractor Miami Beach
MILONE PLASTERING CO. Plastering Miami
ALFRED DESTIN CO. Cement Miami Beach
CONSTRUCTION PRODUCTS CORP. Miami
TROPICAL GLASS & MIRROR CO.- Miami
LAWRENCE LUMBER CO.- Miami
ROSE-SAXON LUMBER CO.- Miami
TILECRAFT, INC.- Tile Miami


C... c&cotaudr& tandPa m
BAILEY-LEWIS CO.- Painting Miami
CLAUDE NEON Neon Miami
STEEL BY JAFRA Jafra, Inc. -Miami
MARKS BROS. Building Demolishing Miami Beach
SANITARY LINEN Linen Supply Miami
GRAY PRODUCTS CORP. Refrigeration Miami
LOTSPEICH FLOORING CO. Flooring Miami
FARREY'S Hardware Miami Beach
BELL PAPER CO. Paper Supplies Miami Beach
ZEIGLER DESK CO. Office Equipment N.Y.C.
ADVERTISING TRADES SERVICE Miami Beach
DONALD S. LAVIGNE, INC. Uniforms Miami
COLORGRAPHIC PRESS Brochures Miami
IDEAL RESTAURANT SUPPLY N.Y.C.


-qWo WA-


auL 1aI~


4


RICE PRINTING CO.- Printing- N.Y.C.
SABALOFF BROS. Hotel Supplies Liberty, N.Y.
SHOROFSKY & ORENLAND Linen Supplies N.Y.C.
RAILEY-MILAM, INC. Hardware Miami
THE LIQUID CARBONIC CORP. Miami Beach
TROPICAL ELECTRONICS Sound Equipment Miami
LYRIC MUSIC CO. Music Miami Beach
DIEBOLD, INC. Safes and Vaults Miami
FRANK LAPP Fabricating Steel Miami
METALLIC ENGINEERING Ornamental Metal Miami
THURMON MONUMENT CO. Marble Miami
GIFFEN ROOFING CO. Roofing Coral Gables
MAULE INDUSTRIES Cement Miami Beach


Si 41k
Sja^9uItM


ZARET CONSTRUCTION CO.
General Contractors
ALBERT ANIS
Architect
MILTON GROSSMAN
Associate Architect
SHINN-HUTCHESON-CLAGGETT
Consulting Engineers


ON THE


OCEAN


AT TWENTY FIRST


STREET


* MIAMI BEACH


4 I.


Sunday. November 19. 1950 THE MIAMI HErALD i3-K





......................................................................... .
V. : .


........... . ... ..


rm


ihttAkfL m o ,,'s:... JAi..


SWudA.








thle fiami x Berni ....1b.
14-K .Sund.y, Nov. 19. 1950 .


Sunset Strip


New Glamor


ShopperRow ,

Sunset Strip, Miami Beach's b'
newest glamor shopping district "
which brings New York and
Paris models to the tropics, is
ready for the 1950-51 season, trim '7:.-
and gay with a $25,000 beauty- ;
treatment. --/' A ,
The shopping area. \uhich lies '- :
along 41st si. from Allon Road to : .' '-
Meridian ave., already has made .,, ---.
Uts bid for recognition as one of -"
North America's outstanding fash. --
Ion centers. -'' .4
in easy walking distances of r '" .
oceanfront hotels are some of the KEY BISCAYNE'S HURRICANE HARBOR IS POPULAR SET
country's most chic apparel shops. . "Banfoot ... nilan" trotwe a l w(
Interior decorator's studio. beauty
salons and children's shop.,;.
eBut Sunset Srip's fame-Is Movie Makers Keep Florida Busy
But Sunset Strip's fame-Its1^0M kr ^0? P1 ^ 0D~
merchants say-stems equally
from Its beautiful selling of roy. B F S P l y
all palms, wide walkways and
ning and rigid zoning had
a hand, too, plus strict adher-
ence to quaUlry merchandising In common with California, But now the Miami area is e'\- da.s in Florida. Robert C
by the area's storekeepers. Florida has its "Hollywood," but pecred to get back into tie cin- nrinag. Terry Moore.
the Florida name-sake of" the ema making swim. The Hialeal .Jerome Courtland are feati
Sunset Strip originally was con- world's movie capital specializes Motion Picture and Television
ceived by Miami Beach pioneer not in movie- Company, after twvo %ears of Do, n in Ke, v W.t Ri
Carl Fisher, who constructed the making, but in negotiation, has taken pno.e-- WidnPirk i- due aimno-r an
area's first building in 193-4. tourism and d '"A."% sion on a 20 n .ner Irae.. the fi r a Nt t,1actoll in a Tw.e


JA/L

Collins Plaza
318 20th Street, Miami Beach
S All Outside Rooms
SOne Block from the Ocean
Close to Center of Activities
Shower Tub Phone In every
Room
Television
SPrivate Beach & Pool

ALL ROIMS llLL


genteel living. j
But though f
no whirring
movie cameras '4,.'^,."'l
disturb the
tranquillity of
Florida's Hol-
i1wood, j u s t
about every
other commun-
ity In the state DeMILLE
has at one time or another heard
the cries of "Lighti-Camera-Ac-
tion." as photopla\s were being
put on film for showing on the
nation's screens.
Jack.onville was a film cen-
ter when Hollywood was little
more than an orange grove-
the Kalmus family developed
technicolor film there. Coral
Gable., Just outside of Miami,
had a studio now a bank
building Just before the
war, and for many years Max
Flelscher made his "Out of the
Inkwell" cartoon comedies In
Miami proper.


I n recent years filming activ-
ity. In the main, has been
restricted to location jaunts by
crews and troupes of actors from
Sthe headquarters in .Hoilywvood.


Finest ITALIAN and
AMERICAN CUISINE
Delightfully .4ir Conditioned
Open All 'ear
Complete Dinners from 1.35
Featuring our famous appetizer table
included free with every complete dinner
TEhe only hllian Re-ln:urant
Ph. 86-5355 on Mi Beah wl ccm-
plele ,air cinilionhm_, m

Dire7419 Collins Ave. ctly
7419 Collins Ave. Opp. Surf Theatre-


former Amelia Earhart airport
hangars in Ilialewa and v. ill cnn-
\ert themrl into sound stagpe. for
the production of lot-lu.,dget
films.
And In the meantime, loca-
tion trips by major film com-
panies are expected to pour In-
to the state's payroll coffers
more than a million dollars
during the next few nionth'.
Top ; on the hit of pictures
to be filmed here i parat is
Cecil B. DeMNtle's rcad-how tech-
nicolor production of. "Tre
Greatel.t Show on Earin." The
Ringing Brothers. Barnum and
Bailey (circus show and winter
quart.irs at Sara.-ota till pro-
vide lthe background al at-
mo-plie e for thile pltLirp v .nlili,
according to tentative plans. ill
co-star B-ttv HuItton, Kirk Doug-
las or Jimmy Ste%%art.
Roaming the area helween
Palm Beach and the Keys has
been a camera crew from Co-
lumbia Studios, snapping back-
ground for "The Barefoot
Mailman" a story of early


ROBERT CUMMI


HORTEST... 0



most beautiful E



...picturesque r


Cunnt.
and
aured.
chard
v day
nntieth


C,'-ntur' -F.x nmerrioirna o tobe
caillid :.og MIn"' Further up
trie -latUe at ( WEPkiauchee
Sprirg-. ari a gm.rentl arei be-
ing male to) a-.i.t a KinR Broth-
=r-. unit lieahf,-il i, director Kurt
Nucniann. %,liich IiI bring to
lifP thle in.i, of '"Tu-ntv Thou-
Eani Le-aguE_ tiUnder the Sea."
Ted Tetl/laff jiust completed
"Under the Gun," starring Ri-
chard montee and Audrey Tot-
ter. sith action set around
Mianmi and Jacksonville, mhile
the MCGM melodrama. "Lady
Without Pas-port." with Hedy
LaMarr as the lady. required
mniuch horiting In Florida's air-
ports and the Everglades jun-
glh-.
In a.lition to10 these filning-
for-theatir acLtiVities e\e'eral tele-
'i-ion fliminL companies main-
tiii -[ui:iios here. Ball Pictures,
on Marmi's Coral Wa.'. nut onlv
makes television picture? hut re-
ce-ntl',' c.Implered a full-length
color film for shoving in
churches. a -well as a 13-chapter
televyijon ti-riller. starring Bob
Youimari--. a Miami 3outh.


AND UB YOUNt


NS
iot" double


HOTEL
Collins at o10th Sfreet-
Overlooking Ocean
FROM
0 Im 1 Now to May
WLL I 1st Per Per-
0I425 son Double
FREE PARKING DANCING
& ENTERTAINMENT
Also Daily Rates From
$2 Single, $3 Double
NASH MANAGEMENT Ph. 5-1137




Irbe cbtva


Distance Between Two Points


If perhaps, time saving is not of prime importance to you, you may,
absorb some of the magnetic, intoxicating beauty which
abounds all along The Beautiful VENETIAN WAY. The enchanting
man made tropical islands spanned by this roadway and
A bascule bridges are positively ablaze with color-drenched variety
of homes and villas designed for delightful living and happy adventure,
Truly the most beautiful public utility in the south, serving
the magic twin cities, Miami and Miami Beach...
A delightfully different drive ... that will fascinate you and live
long in your memory...

MIAMI BRIDGE CO.
George U. Robson, President


4
A


Miami Diver D..,, A.. T D.,


Doubles


ForFilmStar

When the Robert Silllman pro-
duction, "Queen For a Day," comes
to Miami, look closely at the high
diving scenes. If your eyesight Is
especially keen. could he you'll
recognize Capt. Sol Solomon,
familiar to patrons of the Sunday
living exhibitions at the Macfad-
den-Deauville Hotel.
For it will be Solomon and
not actor Adam Williams who
dives from the 110-foot ladder
Into the small tank of water be-
low.
When Producer Robert Stillman
was casting arout for a man to
double for Williams in John Ash-
worth's "High Direr." which is
one of the three chort stories in
"Queen For a Da%." Solomon wa
getting hi.s cruiser, Wahoo in
reading _-.- for a iong-a%'aited vaca-
tion in the Key_.
But Solomion packed up hi-
eiquipment-ladder, tank, canvas.


Most Florida Tourists


Are From. Southland

A suggestion as to future ad\?erti;ing placement, as %tell
as an indication of the success. o' pa't advertising programs
may lurk in a sample sui vey made hy the Florida State Chamber
of Commerce of the state- of origin of Florida hotel registrants.
The survey shows that 62 per 0
cent of Florida's hotel regis- Dakota. Nebraska, Kansas) came
trants came from the 12 South- r
ern states, including Florida. pet cent.
From the Middle Atlantic Latin American countries con-
states iNewv York, New Jersey, tribute 1.S5 per cent and the


'. Pennsvlvaniai came 16.5 percent
S- of toe registrants and 9.5 per
SOL SOLOMON cent came from the East North
,.. daredetil diver Central group (Ohio, Indiana, 1-
linois, MNichigan, Wisconsin.)
gii', wirec, pulled % ropes, electric
ligrL bulbs, trailer, and truck- The six New England States
and ,tarted for Hlollwtood when furnished 3 per cent as did the
Stillman called. Southwest (Arkansas, Louis-
He doubled for Adam WVilliams Iana. Oklahoma, Texas).
in tLo daring dives. The first one. From the West North Central"
from the t,0-foot ie'ei, %as a da3- group of states (Minnesota, Iowa,
time shot. The moStl spectacular Mi-ouri. North Dakota, South
one. filmed at night. \%as from the_________--
1lf0-foot level into a tank of water'v T iV4
I17 feet in diameter and less than The DELUXE
six feet deep.A T
For this, to photograph It from E 4T
above. Director Arthur Lubin and
the first camera crew v.ere hoisted HOTEL 4
on a wooden platform by an im-
mense crane to 120-foot elevation. Collins. Ave. 4
Tne cret. for this hazardous shot. At 12th St., MB.
weie given "flight" pay, an addi IFROMPA Now to May lst
tional .2353,0 for each ascent. l$ li Per Person 4
Solomon did this daring div- $W Double 4
twice-fir-t for tne down.hot an- Newly Renovated Sun Colony 4
gles and again fur the upihot" Club
angles. Despite this. three cameras Enlertainment Dancing Under
with Complete tcres in operation the Strsn Free Parking .7491
i-ite required to ft'e in oe rsatiene. Nash Management Ph. -.49 4
=t~e required to filmith ,sce e. .4 p.
















in


Far Western states 1.75 per.cent.
Comparisons of 194S ,ith 1947
regional totals show a slight in-
crease in 1948 in registrants from


the Middle Atlantic states, from
the Southwest, from the South,
from Latin America and from
the West North Central group
of states.


By Cliff Sterrett


SPREVATt EACH
DINING ROOM
COCKTAIL LOUNGE
SOLARIUM-
ENTERTAINMENT
1 AT THE
MOST REASONABLE RATES
OF ANY OCEAN FRONT HOTEL
Enjoy the refined, Ihomelike atmosphe e
of the friendliest hotel on the Beack.
We eordl lly Invite your
Inquiry fr reservatioln.
WM. 3J. COX MGK.


for fashions of tomorrow

... shop on


4I


1 to"e podl cab-ni t
^ O ,t^Qs eAA, atl7th street
4


PHONE 816-5631


THROUGH THE ARCH


for GOOD FOOD


and FINE LIVING


* COTTAGES
* APARTMENTS
* HOTEL ROOMS
* GENERAL STORE ON THE
PREMISES


500 FEET OF OCEAN-
FRONTAGE
AIR CONDITIONED
0 DINING ROOM OPEN TO
THE PUBLIC. SERVING FROM
8 A.M. TO 10 P.M.


PLAN COMFORT AND. CONVENIENCE INTO YOUR VACATION

ON THE OCEAN NORTH OF SUNNY ISLE PIER
16501 Collins Avenue, North Miami Beach.
John M. DuffL owner, operator
1 -A.


invitation to shopping
pleasure

N OW you can discover a new thrill in shopping.
Sunset Strip, Greater Miami's most fashionable shop
center, you'll find scenic beauty hand-in-hand with g
orous shops. The gracious, leisurely atmosphere extf
inside the, shops where the finest merchandise and c
teous personnel await your pleasure.
Whatever you may need, you'll be sure to find the
best on Sunset Strip ...

These Are The Shops . .


ADALAIOE FROCK
Ready to Wear, 816B West 41 it St.
BLUE ROSE BEAUTY SALON
tli W. 41st St.
ELIZABETH BRADLEY
Women's Apparel, 901 W. 41tt St.
FRANCES BREWSTER
Resort Fashiens, 817 W. 41st St.
CONTOUR CHAIR SHOP '
Posture chairs, 3921 Alton Roead
FAIRYLAND
Chlidren'n Wear, 131 W. 41dt St.
GEORGE PARKAS
Industrll Desilgner, 1154 W. 41st St.
MARY LILLIAN FOSTER
Fruit Shipper, 103 W. 41it St.
JULIA POWELL HARVEY
Interiors, a97 W. 41it St.
HOUSE OF EUGENE
Beauty Salon,1190 W. 41i1t 1St.
JIMMY
Restanrant, s11 W. 41it St.


LA FONTAINE
Riduoning Salon, I I W. 41st St.
LINCOLN RADIO CO..
Radios, i919 Alton Roead
MARCEL
Flowers, Of0 W. 41st St.
RHEA'S
Downs, 935 W. 41st St.
GERTRUDE REECE, INC.
torstliere, 005 W. 41st St.
STAUFFER SYSTEM
Reduolng Salon, 80T W. 41lt St
ANN STEWART
Women's Apparel, I6I W. 41at I
SMALLGREEN'S"
Wonmn's Wear, 1111 Alton Read
TUCKER GALLERIES
Art aellerles, I11 Alton Road
UMBERTO
Baety Sales, IIII Altoen Read


p









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On
ing

,ends
.our-
very














It,
I^


In MIAMI BEACH, fIt's...


M, mom I mII


I .-NIP Alk di&j


I


11


9'i-











State Colleges




Enroll 40,000


Higher Academic Standards Help

-Make Universities Attractive

By JACK ANDERSON
Heramld Staff Writer
Florida's colleges and universities are packed to the doors
again this year with almost 40,000 students from every state
*in the union and some 27 foreign countries.
Neither the decline in GI enrollment nor the threat of
Selective Service has had any appreciable effect on the popu-
lation volume of Florida's three state-supported schools and
nine private schools.
The success of the state's Institutions of higher learning
Is defineable in the simple equation: high academic standard
plus climate.
Not only are the schools drawing more and more out-of-
staters each year but more Florida youths who have decided
that schools good enough to attract Iowans, Texans and Ver-
monters must be good schools indeed.
The schools have been hard put to expand fast enough
to keep up with this Increasing popularity. It's a multi-
milUion dollar problem.
F'Jorida's three state-supported schools are the University
of Florida at Gainesville, the Florida State University and
tte Florida Agricuhltural and Mechanical College for Negroes
a,% Tallahassee.
Its nine private schools are Florida Southern College at
I Akeland; John B. Stetson University at Deland: Rollins College
it Winter Park: the University of Miami: the University of
Tampa, Barry College at Miami Shores and Webber College
at Babson Park, all for White students; Bethune-Cookman Col-
lege at Daytona Beach, and Florida Normal and Industrial
College at St. Augustine, both for Negroes.
*
THERE ARE, IN ADDITION, four state-supported junior
colleges and five private junior colleges, one of them for
Negroes.
Although not strictly classifiable as a college the Ringling
School of Art at Sarasota. one of the finest in the United
States, is another of Florida's galaxy of private schools.
The University of Miami and Ihe University of Florida
are running neck-in-neck for the enrollment lead in the slate.
The Miami school thus far has 10.160 students attending
classes this fall, which is a slight edge over its older, state-
supported rival at Gainesville. The University of Florida reports


an enrollment of 10.039.
The University of Miami is an
educational phenomenon which
even Miamlans still find hard to
believe. If ever the adage of the
little acorn had an application
to an actual situation, IL has
one in the development of the
Miami school.
From a tiny campus surround-
ing an abandoned hotel building
with only 372 students and 12
faculty members the university
In 24 years has spread over 265
acres, acquired 43 buildings. 1,0-
.000 students and a faculty of 512
members-most of this since the'
war.
This year the university is
completing construction of a
varsity field house with dre,,--
Ing rooms. shooters and lock-
ers, an armory, a campus
theater. Last year It completed
ias 1800.000 Merrick adminis-
tration building.
Equally as ambitious expan-
sion programs are under way aL
the University of Florida and its
companion state school. Florida
State University at Tallahassee
The University of Florida was
the Fstate's first land grant insti-
tution for men students. It was
founded in 1x,51. The Tallahassee
school tas founded, also as a
land grant college. In 1951 as a
seminar" for women.
Both schools became coeduca-
tional in 1Q47.
The Florida State Unmvpr-it.v
has an enrollment this 3ear of
6,21'.
*
THE GAINESVILLE school
has construction in progress or
nearing completion this 'ear
costing $8.475.315. It ,ill have a
new gymnasium, a library addi-
tion, the first of a series of
engineering buildings and a new
administration building.
The stale capital is also the
slipe of Florida'q Agricultural
and Mechanical College for
Negroes. It har an enrollment
of 2,000 and is badly over-
crowded. Major ePpaniion of
it. buildings and facilliiie will
be needed in meet the increas-
ing demands for enrollment.
lMiami's Barr'' Crillge For
Catholic women is onl, 10 Par,
old. Named for the Bishop Pat-


rick Barrn' of Florida. the col-
lege has an enrollment of about
250.
It now has seven buildings
and Is adding an eighth-a
science and library uing-this
}3 ear. Its students come from
every section of the nation and
se\eial Latin American coun-
tries.
Rollins College at Winter
Park is one of the first line
small colleges in the United
States. The 65-year-old school
pioneered, under the leadership
of famed Dr. Hamilton Holt. in
the conference system of educa-
tion which dispensed with the
old rigid clas.sroom.lecture-exam-
Ination philosophy.
The college which has an en-
rollment this year of ri0 stu-
dents has one of the io-)t beau-
tiful campuses in the state.
.
FLORIDA SOUTHERN College
at Lakeland is another of the
state's oultilanrine p ir i % a [
school Located on a 6i-a.'e
tract in tre rolling hills clrie
to Lakeland. the school Is famed
for its architecture. conrpi'ed
and executed b', famed Frank
Llod \'right. dean of ihe
world's pacesetting arlcnhiecs.
Founded in 1SS6 the sohoil
has sreadily groutn from a lin',
deep.-In-debt instillttion w ith a
handful of students and teachers
to a vigorous first rate rollg"?
with 1.800 students and 106 facul-
ty members. It has today some
2'o buildings and man 'more
planned before the school's total
expansion program Is completed.
John B. Stet.son University
at DeLand is another of the
state's p I o n e e r schools.
Founded In IR1fl6. the univer.
sily itandq on one of the
loveliest campuses In Florida.
This year I.P'I students are
attending the school which i'
famed for the high calibre nf us
scholar'ship. It has expanded
stradll, parirulat lv simne the
,ar'. aiid ha; a nilllon-drl iat
consruticilon program u iu d e r

The I'nmiti-t, of Tampa,
housfd in It famotis '.iiilding
of Moorisl airchitecri ti, i; onr
of the staie's '.oungs-;t chooi.
It nas founded In l'M3 and i.
cr.pdti'aionai Its enrollment
this r-ai i i o.s r


There's So Much More at the
air conditioned Sherry Frontenac

Largest of the newer hotels...featuring ihe world-
famed pool and eabana elub...superb cuisine and
a continual program of enlertainmenti. COLOR
BROCHURE AND Rt.4TES ON REQUEST

Wrijt, Wi e or Phene8 I-7711 Todayl



Sherrq rontenoc
ON THI OCEAN AT 651IN ST. MIAMI BEACH


rli
t

r.

I I
n
d
a
til

I

ai
a
n


Sunday, November 1, 1950 THE MIAMI HERALD i-K.


FLORIDA COLLEGE CAMPUSES are modern and bright. Here is part of the Universitly of Florida's law school at Gaines-
ville. The new addition at the right includes a practice court room where future lawyers "try" their cases.


I's Easier To Study In A Mild Climate



Florida Spending $40,000,000 Yearly



To Meet Expanding Needs Of Schools


Florida is striving mightily in
behalf of the sound mind while
Its sunny climate Is doing the
same for the body.
There Is no disputing the pen-
lnzula's health assets. And a
scrutiny of the facts and figures
will leave little doubt about Its
educational asseis.
Florida ii a pleasant place in
which to go to school. To a seri-
outis minded collegian in pursuit
of a degree the blizzard, fog or
smog he ma% have to grope his
%aY' through to attend claes at,
a northern institution of higher
learning Is probably a trivial an-
novance.
But ask the Bostonian. the
New Yorker or the Cincinnatlan
attending the UTniversity of Mi-
ami. for example, how he feels ,
about It.
He'll admlit there It nothing
like slipping off to a breach to
study Plato or economics,
propped against a palm tree
with the warm sand under his
toes and the murmur of surf
in his ears-in January.
This is not meant to niggeit
that getting a schooling in Flor-
ida is a sort of sensuous, South
Sea Island experience. It Is
meant to show how inexpensive
and delightful study can be, far
removed from the land of ga-
loshes and steam heat.
There Is nothing frivolous
about Florida schools. They rest

Heavenly

seventies
United Stites weather bureau
pecord.rl for the last .1 i -arc - hat Miami BpSiarh 1 hip-Pel viilh
illd temperatuir. areiagng Tn .1
eil diurtl-ing Decemher. Janu-
r" and FePhriai, 'hen most of
:e nation i h buiip.1 in -noni.

Big Reduction
Exercise clinics for women hich-
ght a city-wide fall program for
,ults now being planned bv the
liami Beach Recreation Depart-
ment. I


on a foundation of money liber-
ally and wisely spent and a high
academic standard.
*
AS IN OTHER states the
schools are having their diffi-
culties. Many are overcrowded
and there Is a shortage of teach-
ers. But, as educators anvywhere
will tell you. the' are not diffi-
culties that more money couldn't
overcome.
This Near Florida has enrolled
In its public and parochial
schools. colleges and universities
close to 600.000 students.
This sizable army Is spread
over some 1,600 public and pa-
rochial elementary and high
schools and 21 junior colleges,
colleges and universities.
The enrollmePnt at the college
level is close to A.0.00 and still
going up each \ear.
Thomas D. Bailey, Florida's
state superintendent of schools.
reports that enrollment in the
puLiblic elementary and high
r-hools is increasing b,. 30,000
annually.
To meet this gro%%th wihirh is
a reflection of Florida's phenom-
enal population expansion, the
state is dipping Into Its treasury
to spend some $40.000.000 a year
on schools.
It Is the largest single expend.
ture In the state budget.
*
ADDED to %hat the counties
are spending out of their own
tax revenues. education In Flor-
ida iQ costing. ex-lusive of mon-
e\ pent by private schools, more
than .slit.O0.OlO a 'ePar.
[)adl- cOltu',. the ? i'fhpt nf
i-'i rllda'. I h riin p.. I -p.'ndling
n.i, p ihion litl. Oiln 'l'nlli t -ll. a par.
.Anrl in addiIton ir hra- liid pit
a thrir c-ar houildinc proiarni
co-lin.t M 2; lii iii'0 t in be rai:pd
hb; the Il el of .'oi-iZ.
With tihe po-sihie eceplionn
of Tepa'.. no other state spends
more ler capital for education
than Florida. In a survey made
bh the National Education As-
sociatlon teo 3ears ago. Flor.
ida stood 29th among the states
in education expenditure%.


* Played Entertainment e Exclusive Private Bsch
Moonlight Dancing Beautiful Cocktail Lounge
Delicious Cuisine in the Raleigh Dining Room
0 Enchanting Tropical Gardens



~.A


S ON the OClq-
teCorner 18th Street
HOEL Miami Beach, Forida


I I U


Here In Dade county it has
been an uphill struggle to over-
come the civilian building ban
of the war years, and a popu-
lation growth greater than In
any) other area of the East.
The school board believes It
Is %%inning the struggle but a
6,000 Increase annually in school
enrollment Is not making the
going easy.
There are some 80 public
schools, many of them packed to
overflowing and others close to
it. Even the magnificent new
$1.500,000 Coral Gables High
school, opened this fall, has git-
en only temporary relief to one
area of the county.
The same problem Is besetting
Florida's other populous coastal


counties Hlllsborough, Brow-
ard, Palm Beach and Duval. All
of them have fine schools. They
simply need more of them.


TUCKER
GALLERIES

, Fine Paintings

S Sculpture :
SArt Instruction
S3917 Alton Rd. M.D.
PHONE 58.0189 .


THIS IS THE ANNIE PFEIFFER chapel, one of the modernistic
buildings designed by Architect Frank Lloyd Wright at
Florida Southern College at Lakeland. This campus Is set
among orange groves and lakes.


.1<.


(FORMIRLT MOCINSETOWE) lAM I EAC H

OPENING


ABOUT DECEMBER 15.


R




Ca
si


KAiLT
EBIRVATIONS
SUGGESTED.


XLLINS AVE.


A redecorailag and beautiyiang pro-
gram., startn from the here walls,
ia evolving into a NEW hotel whose
address you will be proud to call
YOURS: Now rugs, now furniture.
blending walls, and all modem
services. including a new bar, card
room, Coffee Shop. Solarium. Yes,
you will love the CAPRI, in it
sparkling newness.


AT 30th ST. MIAMI BEACH


64a" S9 L/ .





For Your Reading Pleasure



2 Great Features







F F. D. R.


," His Personal Letters


r.. !=Written in the critical period, 1928-1945.
j"'- ;-'. / The hitherto unpublished correspondence of

I a mind and personalil.y which stirred the

-- -,, world.



STARTING NEXT SUNDAY


"HOW TO GET A HUSBAND"



in 14 easy steps



Marriages may.v he made in

Heaven, but women know '

they are arranged by them-i

right here on earth. This Is

a ehuckle-filled series you
Uon't want to miss.



STARTING,

SUN DAY, DEC. 3 ----






IF YOU ARE NOT NOW SUBSCRIBING TO THE


lTWO GREAT FEATURES EXCLUSIVELY IN SOUTH

*ji- FLORIDA IN THE HERALD. CALL CIRCUlLATION
DEPARTMENT FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY!





Fb L OR tia'O IOeWSdPE
FLORIDA'S MOST COMPLETE NEWSPAPER
I__I__ ____---------


do-


r


- 11




" '" *; "'". : . ': .




Spanish Accent Flavors



1;.A Cosmopolitan Miami


WATER SHOWS ARE A POPULAR Florida enfertainmeni, with many hotels giving week-
ly programs In their pools. Here is a water ski act during a water show at the Macfadden-
Decaville Hotel on Miami Beach.


Turtleburger,

Key Lime Pie

Featured
Turtlebarger ,and key lii me
pie -Wll ,be featured dishes this
. wiatep for touptlats traveling the
overseas highway between this
eit'7 and Key West.
Greeap turtle soup will take a
back seat to turtleburgers this
winter, according to restaurant
owners on the keys.
OB owner said: ilt is a do-
lceous mandwieb, b a t actual.
ly, we get IS per cent of our
sales because of the name."
The turtleburger is made of
grqund steaks., taken from 500-
pound sea turtles captured off
the Florida Coast.
Key lime pie, always a big
ellar to tourists in the Florida
keys, ranks as the No. 1 dessert.
The pie Is made from tiny limes
which grow only in the keys
and sells at 25 cents a cut or
2 .for a single pie. Even at that
price, demand cannot be met.

Model Country
Despite the concentration of
residents and visitors In this
area, motorcar manufacturers se-
cretly bring new models to Miami
to photograph them In exoUc trop-
ical settings.


Second In Area


Fast-Growing Hialeah


Population Tops 19,642

Hialeah, home of the famed -Hialeah Race Course, is one
of the fastest growing communities in Dade county, according
to 1950 census figures 01


In area, it is the second largest
Incorporated In the county.
The census showed that Hialeah
now has a population of 19,642,
an increase of 15,684 since 1940.
The 1950 population figure does
not include four large subdivisions
adjoining the city on the east and
north. They would add an esti
mated 5,000 persons to the popula-
tion if and when they are annexed.
Hialeah. which observed the
silver anniversary of Its incor.
portion last January, is fast be-
coming the leading industrial
center of the county.
In addition to Its own Indus-
triek. there are others In the coutLity
adjoining th city lirrmits, mak-
ing IL possible for hundreds of
residents to find employment near
home.
One of these is Miami Inter-
national Airport, where approxi-
matel' 70 per cent of the city's
employed persons work. Hialeah
Rare Course also provides several
hundred Hiqleans tith seasonal
and 3ear-routnd employment.
.A new Industry being added


to the area Just north of Hialeah
is the Seaboard Air Line Rail-
road shops which are being
moved from the center of inter-
national Airport.
Hialeah is easily reached by
plane, train, bus or automobile
It is a regular slop for all Sea-
hoard passenger trains and U. S.
27 runs along the edge of the
city. A new $500.000 bridge Is now
under construction across the
canal between Hlaleah and neigh-
boring Miami Sptings.

Miami Strategic
Trading Point
A highly strategic position for
both national and International
commerce is held by Miami. It is
the southern terminal for Atlantic
seaboard commerce and the east-
ern terminal for trade along the
Gulf of Mexiro coastline.
The city al-n has quickest irc
rp.s to We'q I lilan and South
American market;, of any nimaior
clit In thp UInitprid Siate-.


I U


THE




City of





HIALEAH



Congratulates



THE


HERALD


Orchkds to South Florida's lead-

ing newspaper . for a job well

done and may many years of con-

tinued success be yours!


Fastest Growing


Cities


Latins Find


Mecca For


Vacations

Miami Is developing a Span-
ish accent. Far-famed as the win.
ter playground of America, this
section has taken on, in recent
years, a new role as a Mecca for
sun-hunting, fun-loving, shop-
ping-bound Latin Americans '
Cubans, especially, have found
the Greater Miami area an ideal
spot for their summer vacations.
bring the peak months of July
and August. ati estimated 10.000
a month visited here from the
Island republic.
But Miami's lure for the latins
has a universal appeal. Figures
compiled by the Miami Chamber
of Commerce show that for the
first eight months of this year,
6A.411 visitors from south of the
border have arrived here.
The total for 1919 was T7S.889.
according to chamber of com-
mirce officials.
Most of them stay for a while.
A recent survey showed that of
30.340 Latin American visitors who
ai rived here during a three-month
period, only 1,891 were trans-
ients." who headed on immedi.
ately for other parts.
They corme front all over the
hemisphere. In January, Febru-
ary and April, last year, the
chamber of commerce recorded
visitors during the months from
17 different Latin American and
Caribbean countries.
Cuba, only an hour asay by
air and with liberal entry regula-
tions, pro\ Ides the bulk of the
visitors. Sizable monthly contin-
gents also come from Colombia,
Venezuela,. Argentina, Brazil and
the republic of Panama and the
Panama canal zone.
Others came In from Chile, Costa
Rica. the Dominican republic.
Ecuador. Guatemala, Haiti, Hon-
duras, Mexico, Nicaragua Peru and
Uruguay.
Natural result of all the enter-
taining of Latin American visitors
that Miami has been doing has
been to Impart a dash of Castillian
flavor to these parts.
Scores of alert merchants In
'the Greater Miami area have
sent their staffs to special
language schools, and "Aqnl Se
Habla Espanol" signs are the
Srule now rather than the ex-
ception In s mart shops along
Flagler at, and Lincoln rd.
To help take care of the visitors,
the Miami police department has
just organized a special six-man
te;,ui of Spanish-speaking motor.
>-cie officers to answer-the Latins'
-lue-tinns and help sole any dif-
fICL tIPes.
Many officers at Miami Beach-
a favorite watering spot for the
Latin American visitors-a I so
have taken special courses In con-
sersational Spanish, to help them
win friends and Influence people
:a mon g the south-of-the-border
clientele.
Many of the Latin visitors com-
bine business with pleasure here,
Incai merchants have delightedly
discovered,


Because of price and tariff dif-
ferentlals, South Americans can
I 'ave shout one-third on many
Items bought here, while for
Cubans the saving runs up to
50 per cent.
One visitor foin a South Ameri-
can country established some sort
oc a record tiri, long ago when
he came to Miuml to buy corn-
,iele furnish tr'g.C for h-is new
house. He racked up a total bill
of around $l(ij.non.
To woo more and more Latin
viultors here, the cities of Miami
and Miami Beach are doing every-
tbing but singing serenades under
'triheir balconies.
Special Latin American depart-
:inents aie maintained by both
rile, anJ bV their chambers of
:cOnImeice. In addition, news stor-
ies and pjituri-s are ,ent weekly
lover thousands of miles to more
tmanr 1l Lain American news-
papers andl mdazines.

Keys Picnics

Are Easier
The grt id famous overseas
nigh,.ay rrhich spans 1.,7 miles of
tiny ke,,s heiteen Miami and
Ke.- W\'e-.t ',ill offer improved
picnicking farlititees. toting $300,-
0il0 i, in V, int "r I I.nitotl
I n an effort to ac'oinmodate
thousand ofr monriori-i' \ ho travel
the highia,, a lnih 'goe, to sea."
,the Florida -.taate r.ad department
nas built picnic rounds on many
of the large ke,.-
On Bahia Honda. five acres
of land hare been developed
for this purpose. All the land
%as pumped up from the bot-
tom of the sea.
Sixteen conriete picnic tables.
complete % ith canopies. grills,
fresh water and rest rooms, are
nearing completion for the win-
ter season.
The enthlie area ha- bhen land-
scaped with tropical foliage and
boasts parking facilities for more
tian 50f1 autos.

Style Setting
Acceptance of ret.ort fashion
by Miami visitors in December set
spring and summer styles
throughout the nation.


ANNIERAR


INVTAIO


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MIAMI


One of Florida's


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UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI BOASTS ONE OF MOST MODERN CAMPUSES IN WORLD. MERRICK BUILDING (TOP) NAMED FOR MAN WHO DONATED ACREAGE FOR COLLEGE. CORAL GABLES IS COMMUNITY OF HOMES LIKE ONE ABOVE.
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Coral Gables


Dream City's Destiny

AJv.ver c-ae Setbacks


** ;By (IABRLES FEIRNANDZ
sara tmsio writer
Coral Gables and the UniversEity of Miami, brightest star in
*thb'Clty Beauttful's crown, are dreams come true--the restless,
often nightmarish way.
As with all dreams thatlive
with the dawn, their fulfillment
within a scant quartercentury
tookk the tenacious will of strong
men undaunted by adversity.
The dream-the fabulous
.dream of a perfectly-planned
Mediterranean-style city with a
magnificent university to link
the cultures of the Americas--
Sswas that of 'George E. Merrick,
Spromoter and poet.
And It was Merrlck, the
preacher's son with unlimited
horizons, who. propelled h I s
ao e dream toward reality-reality
pconfieined today 4n.world acclaim
So for a city and ati institution
unique,in their fields.
With lavish hand during the
fabulous boom days of 1w25, Ater-
a o f men racIgasagrick laid out the town of Coral
O. U. h istleR ICKike trufGh bles on an expended site con-
ld his dram cei truetrod on what bad been his
Tahers original 160-anr thosmstead.
tro pain an d to Italyhe sent. craftsmen to ablorb the
Mediterranean style of architecture which was to characterize










~~~~* ----- ---
his. dream city.

"'TO ALL PARTS OF THE WORLD he sent emissaries-part
.. il "iormy of 3,000 super-.salesmen headed by William Jennings
'>yTan, the Old Commoner-to advertise the beauty and the ro-
#lin@e waiting for all In his piney-woods dreamland.
"And when a group of 15 citizens went to him with an idea
m a college to give cultural substance to the real estate boom,
rick pounced on theii idea and expanded It many-fold.
He donated s 100-acre tract which today Is the nucleus of
tue university's beautiful new campus. He Joined fellow boost.
a it pledging millions for the university.
Ad as Merrick's dream city began to unfold with the fever-
lsh haste of men racing as against time, the cornerstone of a
S1panish castle-like affair which was to be the first educational
building was laid with loud fanfare.
The mun shone bright, and the world was theirs.
But Coral Gables and the university were to sag to the
Opths of despair before their Inevitable date with destiny.
To A OOM visibly bursting verelty has mode even more
*as added thq destructive hurri. spectacular progriessa, with war
cane of 1928. The university's Ps- veteranf tioeketig; ea66ollment to
per millons blew away; It's 180- a peak of i0,0Wo students.
acre site shrunk to a fraction of
that size. No longer the laugh-provoking
When the infant school opened "Cardboard College." the univr-
Its doors in tie fall of 1921 to slty -ee developed an -ye-catch-
some 275 students, it was not in ing layout on the retrieved and
a Spanish grandee.'a silting byt in. enlarged Merrick site that has na-
an un iflashed Cbral G(b0is hotel tonal architects praising It as "the
building where pressed wood was only compirely new. completely
used so liberally for partitions modern university campus In the
that the university was dubbed country."
jaie "Cardboard Oollee." g Under Dr. Aehe's finaneial leg-
oral- -Gabsb1' deuvelopment erdemain, thie school baas eomplet-
pushed onward on the sheer me- ed the cycle by finishing the build-
meatum of Merrlck'a drive. But tng skeleton which had remained
it wasn't long before the "bust" from Merrick's palnimsit da-s -
brought the poet.promoser's fittingly named the Merrick Build-
"astles in Spain" crashing to Ing.
earth. And under his academic raid-


After the shambles, the unlver-
sity still had Dr. Bowman Foster
Ashe, a practical dreamer himself
who never lost faith In the uni-
versitv he had been brought here


ance, the university has moved
to fulfill Its desUtiny as the cnl-
tural link between the Ameri-
cas as well as to pioneer in
all phases of tropical research.


to organize and who aiost .-r In enrollment, In academic
gle-handedly nursed it to maturity. s the
SAnd Coral Gables had the MAer. standards ce-unwand, ed orpha. n athletics thrown
rick dream, with bullt-in planning onc m-uhandI o an% haes, ex-
and zoning to Insure gracious liv- t mac-a n m ce .'-
ng, and a militant citizenry jeal cel--the long-established and often
Ing', ana ...." J.[y *"1-rchl,-endowed LUnlver. itles of the
ously proud of its community her- richl'-endowed Univerites of the
Itage. i land.
Even through the despair of de- It now raies and gets fre.
pression that thwarted hs. come- quent national bouquets from ob.
back and plunged both city and sern ers 'hn explain its revolution-
university briefly Into bankrupt- ar' concept of educatJon in the
cy. Merrick himself never lost sub-tropics bv simply calling It
faith. "Sun-Tan U. or "Sunshine iT."
Out of the 'agaries of boom
AS LATE as 1940. when the and bust Coral Gables and the
population of the Dream City "as Unlversity of Miami have emerged
an unimpressive 8,250, the aging -as dreams come true.
Merrick told a Coral Gables as-
semblage: Marine
"We're Into another stride now. Ma n BiologV
It's not going to be wild. but .
steady this time. Coral Gables Is Offered At til
going to fill In to the bay, and O I A U 1
we will see an enormous expan.-
sion of the business section. When More courses In marine biology
Miami becomes a city of 1.000.000 are being offered at the Univer-
population. Coral Gables will have sit% of Miami's Marine laboratory
a shopping center for a quarter of than at an another school or col.-
a million people. Iege in the rountrN. The labors-
to, petaffed bl a grnup of
"Our university Is going to oustandini ; c'ientJits. headed by
be as large as any In Southern Dr. F. G. W'alton Smith.
Calforlaia. Thai university Is the I The laboratory doe_ 'oik for
heart pulse of onr community. 'Florida. the United State-s Nav.
With the university grows the the Bahanmas. Biiti.n Honduras.
city of Coral Gables." the American.Carihhean rommis.
Merrick died In 1942. shortly aft-Iltion. the Sponge Instrute of
r theoutbreak of a war whoseAmerica. and many other agen-;
afterma th pedhe unquali- s. One of the prolacts being



* For it has been onh" since 1945 !graphic Socielt,.
that Coral Gabl es and the Uni-
versity of Miaml haie fome un- resrla rhoe
questionable into their- heritage.t uly E Sre i
Todat Coral Gables has a popunN-i
latlon of some 20.000, motl' .n- Now Eyecatcher
erg of homes built and maintained


with unyielding devotion to the;
original Merrick plan.
One of every two business build-
ings In the cit3-and one of every
four structures of all tpes-hsave
been erected since 1945. and that
without yielding to the postwar
trend toward mass project build-
ing.
DOWNTOWN Coral Gables -
with glittering, four-year-old Mir-
acle Mile as the main artery-is
the shopping center for an es-
timated 100,000 persons In the
southwestern area of Greater MI-
ami.
Occupational licenses have
soared from the 503 of the city's
early years to the current 2.659-
and new businesses are opening
every month.
New construction continues at
the post-war average of $10.000.000
a year. Assessed real estate valua-
t4on have Jumped from 121.957..
011 In 1938 to $49.143,230 In 1950.
AMu the once-striuggling ani-
a


Venetian Pool. Coral Gables'
leading viltor attraction, was
the town's Pye.e-ore at one time.
Wnen the late George E. Mer.
rick was deir hoping Coral Ga
bles, he needed paying for his
streets so he took the rock from
what is now Venetian Pool.
Later he employed artist Den-
man Fink to design the ornate
and unusually shaped pool.
Today the pool attracts a ear-
round average of 10,000 swim-
mers per month and countless
camera fans.

Classy Place
The main classroom building of
the University of Miami has ac-
commodations for 2,100 students.
The building. hlch aas dedicat.
ed on Jan. 14. 1948. has attracted'
International architectural atten-
tion because of its functional de-
sign. It wa planned by Robert
La\%% Weed and Marion Manley.


.,!


Growth Far Exceeded Hopes Of Founder
.. .. :.. ,, -, .r O."%_Bank

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-." .'ABLE CT.. L T AND ATT.- HE.. ..M.... A' .., -,.. A, .RS H H N-F- MANB UE VARD. ""
CORAL GA'-- CIT ,H STANDS A=T..,,TH." HEAD OF M,'IRCE-L EANDFM':S-. T H U. F. :tF.... V. MAIN. BR' D
CORAL GABLES' CITY HALL STANDS AT THE HEAD OF MIRACLE MILE. AND FORMS THE HUB FOR FIVE MAIN BOULEVARDS. ____


157 Foreign

Foreign students registered at
the University of Miami for the
current semester top the last pre-
vious semester's enrollment by 18,
with a total of 157.
Of these, 123 come from Latin
America. the others from Europe
and Asia. Largest representations
are 55 from Puerto Rico. 25 from
Cuba and 16 from Colombia.
Farthest from their home
countrlei are four students from
Thailand, three from China and
one from Korea. One Russian-

Library Popular
Cora] Gables Public Library has
the largest registration and the
largest book circulation in the
state of Florida, according to a re-
cent statS survey. The library Is
a municipal project but also is
financially supported by the Coral
Gables Woman's Club, housed inI
the same building.
I i


Students Attending UM Matheson Beach Popular Resort
OIU-C111& A l lU[lig 1ea, .,two t n,mionpersonsuseds Opeated by the Dade County
bathing and picnicking facilities at parks department, the beach's
born co-ed came to the niver West Indies wacao. two: Matheson Hammock beach on Old bathing is free of charge. The
sitbfo m adied persona dr. tw o Frne two; Eua'-,Cutler road in Coral Gables dur. swimrming lagoon fronts on Bis-
sity from a displaced persons dor, two France two; Germany.,ng the year ending Sept..30 cayne ba.
camp in Poland. six: Great Britain. one. ,
Greece, six: Hawaii, two; Israel,
Following Is the list of count. one; ltaly. one; Korea, one: Mex-
tries from which the students ico. one; 'Netherlands, two; Nicara.
have come: gua. one; Panama, four; Peru. one:
Belgium, two; Brazil, four: Poland. one; Puerto Rico. 55; El
China. three; Colombia. f16. Cuba, Salvador, four; Thailand, four;
25; Czechoslovakia, tro. Dutch Turkey, one. Venezuela, three. -N[7) A 4 p 0" A 7 ) 11- C" 7 17


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4 -


Yes, The Miracle Mile, plus the other fine
streets in the business section of Coral Gables
provides an excellent and ready market for
every type of business under the sun! The Miracle
Mile has many of the finest rhopr to be found in
the country, with many advantages to be found no-
where else in this great land of ourv! This Year the po-
tential buying power of the area is close to twu'o hundred
and sixty million dollars . so look to The ,Miracle
Mile, it has the opportunity that you have been seeking!


f1LL


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OF CORAL GABLES


direct inquiries to Miracle Mile Association, Inc., 352 Aragon Ave., Coral Gabler, Fla.
i__ C-t"


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Deposits


Show Gains

Coral Gabies' three financial in.
ititutiona showed a combined gain
of more than $11,000.000 between
Tune 30. 1949 and June 80, 190.
rotal deposits were nearly 148,p
00.o000 at Coral Gables First Na.
tIonal Bank, Florida National
Bank at Coral Gable, an4 Coral
Gables Federal Savings Loan
Association.
The savings and loan assNciation
was founded only 15 years ago, at
which time it had $50,000 ia de-
posits. The oldest Institution, Cor-
al Gables First National, Jumped
during the last year from PStl,OOr-
300 to nearly $25,000.000.
Florida Natldnal, one of the
itate-wide group, opened only in
December. 1944, and now shows
deposited assets of $12,500,000.

City Got Name

From Homestead
Coral Gables obtained its name
from the coral rock, gable-roofed
homestead of the late Rev. Sol-
omon G. Merrick, father of the
city's founder. Built early in the
20th century, for many years thik
one house was surrounded for
miles by pineland and groves.
Today the original "Coral Ga-
bles" stands at 907 Coral Way
and iq operated by Miss Ethel
Merrick as an inn called Mer-
rick Manor. Today it. is gur-
rounded by thousands of homes,
each with its Individual architec-
tural design.
i .. . ,


4,vk *







sunday, November I1, 13i0 THE MIAMI HERALD -.L


DreamfComefTi


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i;-


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Miracle Mile Brings



Glamor To Shopping



Inside Coral Gables

Some'folks laughed when G. K. Zain came up with the
idea of developing the mile-long stretch of Coral Way in down-
town Coral Gables into a swank shopping street he would call
Miracle Mile.
"Mortgage Mile!" sneered the skeptics. They could see no
future for it. After all, the Gables is swell for
homes. they scoffed, but another Lincoln Road?
The dynamic business promotion wizard
S and his equally dynamic wife, Rebyl, were not
easily laughed off.
SIn the pine-dotted lots that spread'between
the handful of Coiral Vay buildings, most of
AV'Y." them as old as the boom Dream City itself,
They could see a glittering array of classy shops
that would befit the residential beauty of Coral
Gables.
ZAIN" Other Coral Way property owners, like Roy
Page, were quick to bring the same mipds-e.e
picture into focus.
They recalled that when George E. Merrick founded Coral
Gables in 1925 he had envisioned a major shopping center that
would serve not only his City Beautiful but the entire area
around it. And Zain's plan, 20 years later, gave soul and sub-
stance to that vision.
* ** *. *
THE NAME, MIRACLE MILE, came along as a natural
to supply glittering IndividualiLy to the mile stretch of a
thoroughfare known as Coral Way which reaches from SW
Third ave. near the heart of Miami to the far western reaches
of the county.
Sold on Its future, a group of Coral Way owners or-,
ganized in 1945 into an association to promote construction of
the buildings and occupancy of them by firms that would
lend--quality and dignity to the street.
The first new% shop opened its doors on Sept. 6, 1946, in
a store building erected by Zain himself. Many others followed
quickly. A major theater, a bank building, a variety of stores
large and small sprung up where the pine trees stood.
Today there are 118 new stores on Miracle Mile-all built
since 1946. And there's room for many more-1,305 feet to be


exact.
Miracle Mile is a breathing,
living actuality. The skeptics'
jeers have turned to cheers.
Chains which took branches
to the Mile have discovered that
the branches out-gross the home
business. Some have made the
Mile branch the main office.
And a couple of stores have
moved there from other loca-
tions-lock, stock and barrel.
*
UNDER THE impetus of the
Miracle Mile surge, the sister I
street of Ponce de Leon blvd.
and the entire Coral Gables
downtown section has moved to
the forefront of major South
Florida shopping centers.
Zain, slowly recovering from
Illness that forced him to cur-
- tail his role in the later de-
velopment of the Mile, says
there was "no guesswork" In
its founding.
Thf success formula, he
said, called for a natural pop-
ulation center, the cooperation
of property owners, merchants
and municipal officials, and a
newspaper that, could and
would help spread the word.
And he says it was all there-
in the Mile, in Coral Gables and
in Greater Miami.
Zain insists that Coral Gables
is- the "population center of
SGreater Miami," and surveys
prove that it, Indeed, is the cen-
ter of a shopping area of 100,000
persons. WLIh business moving
Toward decentralization-to es-
cape traffic jamming-the time
was right to develop Miracle
Mile.
*
ZAIN PRAISES the coopera-
tion of the property owners and
the merchants for making it pos-
sible by seeing the wisdom, of
orderly development on. a qual-
Ity, fair-play basis.
"And the city administration,"
he adds, "has been conscious of
Progress and not afraid to do
something for the general good
of the community simply be-
cause some one might be dis-
pleased."
Zain gives credit for spread-
uing the news of the Mile's de-
velopment and accessibility to
The Miami Herald.
The future of Miracle Mile
seems unquestionably assured
under the guiding hand of the
Miracle Mile Association, with
Page as president and Zain as


- 1.-m


UM Got Ivy On Its W,


By CHARMS NOLAND
Herald UniTerutIty Gorresponddni
Skyrocketing to prominence
with a speed that makes even Jts
nearby namesake city look on In
astonishment, the University of


chairman of the board of direc- versi
tors. s tituti
But the association wants fame
more than a profitable business ef sc
section. Says Zaln: on-g
S."Most 'of us will not be satis- Its
fled with just a busy .street. ,We teach
also want the most'beautiful water,
business street to be found any- journ
where. The Gables, a place of maric
beaut' itself, deserves such a The
street." lhe
Miracle Mile is well on Its %ith
way to just that. (cheqt
0 -inistm
tile te
Luxury Hotel p
the
Is Biggest .
99 er H

Gables Need pro
proxd
,it aa
Coral Gables has everything- onhl
except a luxury hotel. ls its
Since the famed and fabulous. On
Miami Biltmore was converted resea
into a government hospital dur- rine
ing the war, the. cv's hostelries ding
have been limited to less than a -
half-dozen modest hotels built in 10111ui
the town's earlier days.
SCity Beautiful boosters often
'express the need for a major
air- conditioned hotel offering
swimming pool, cabana colony
and the overall class that would
befit' Coral Gables.
Such a hotel has been talked
by some builders since postwar
construction began, but the talk
has led'to nothing.
The boosters are still hopeful.
With the thousands of -families
who might be attracted by the
University of Miami and the Vet-
erans Administration Hospital -
plus the normal tourist trade -
they see a class hotel as a profit-
able venture.

Gables Boasts
Industrial Area
Contrary to the popular belief
that Coral Gables is "the bedroom
of Greater Miami," and merely a
residential* suburb, the city has a
growing section zoned for "smoke-
less, odorless and noiseless indus-
try."
Nylon hosiery, ship-to-shore and
police radio equipment, plastic
novelties, and jalousie windows
and doors are among products
manufactured there.
The industrial section is isolated
completely from residential parts i
of Coral Gables. I


The Hispanic Institute accents
the university's close ties with
Latin American projects. It is not
strange that the law- school has
been hailed as the most advanced
in South American legal tuidies
of any United States institution.


Ii0 RJW-nl rm tlh IBM.-n wmltt


alls In A' Hurry

tures. The university's own film i throughout the nation to graduat-
production has been 4 hownlIing high school students.


I I
A,


THROUGH SATISFIED CUSTOMERS WE GROW


... iTROUP BROS., Inc. |

"Enaineerina Contractors"


Little Iodine By Jimmy Hatlo







4-L THIK MIAMI H[MALD Sunday. November 19. IMo



Gables Makes Habit Of Electing Successful Men To Office


Commission


Steers Clear


Of Bickering

Elections Termed
'Popularity Contest'
Coral Gables elections a r e
sometimes described as "popu-
larity contests," but the winners
Invariably prove tow have more
than just a friendly grin and a
ready handshake.
They usually are men who have
made a success of their own pri-.
vat. endeavors and who have
shown capacity and willingness for
civic service.
Only elective offices in the City
Beautiful are those of mayor and
his four fellow city commission-
ers, and you would hardly term
the posts political plums.
The mayor get S100 a month,
and the commissioners get $50.
Current mayor, serving a se&-
end two-year term he won with-
out opposition, is W. Keith Phil.
lips, a successful 5T.year-old in.
aurance broker and attorney.
A resident of Coral Gables for
23 of the city's 25 years and a city
commissioner for 13. Phillips has
long taken a prominent role in
civic activity not only of his home
town but of Greater Miami as a
whole.
He helped sponsor formation of
the Coral Gables Rotary Club.
served as president of the Coral
Gables Country Club and as chair-
man of.the State Council for the
Blind for nine years, and was first
president of the Orange Bowl Com-
mittee.
Sitting with Mayor Phillips
around the commission table twice
a month are Cojnmissloners Thom-
as C. Mayes, Dave Hendrlck. Jr.,
Andrew T. Healy and Fred B.
Hartnett. ONE OF AMERICA'S MOST M(
Mayes, a eomladsioner for
nine years and Phillips'predeces- A PIONEER RECALLS. A
sor as mayor for two terms, Is
a Coral Gables attorney and for-
mer municipal Judge active In M
the town's civic life. G eo rg e Iv
A resident of the city since 1931,
he has served as president of the
Coral Gables Kiwanis Club, as first
vice president of tihe Coral Gables A t F
War Memorial, as a director o the
Gables' Chamber of Commerce, asr
a steward of the.-Gables eilodist". "He was a dreamer. He could
Church and as a member of ihe. ee Coral Cables like it Is today.
Gables American Legion post. 3Me, I couldn't see it for the
Hendrick, serving his first four- woods out there."
year term as probably the young- L I ,i on el D.
eat Gables commissioner ever LIlewellyn, a
elected, is a Gables attorney who civil engineer
served three wartime years as a who hlpd a
Navy officer. hand in the
He has served as president of e a ea rIy laying-
the Coral Gables Junior Chamber out of what tco
of Commerce and is a member of day are fabu-
the Gables Rotary. American Le- lru. sections
glon and country club. of Greater MN-


Healy. serving his second two-
year term as commissioner, is
an attorney who has served as
assistant county solicitor. He has
lived In Coral Gables since 1927
and has served as president of
the Gables country club.
Hartnett, a newcomer to the
commission, is a successful insur-
ance and real estate broker.
It has not always been so. but
for the last decade at least Coral
Gables politics has been uncom-
monly devoid of the violence and
vitriol that harass many another
coinmunity.
And with top community men
turning out regularly for office,
elections may well turn on "pop-
ularity contests" with Coral Ga-
bles and its unique plan for gia-
cious living always the winner.

Grid Veteran
Ralph Fleler, co-captain of the
1950 University of Miami football
team. is the only four year regular
on the team. Fleler was on the
varsity squad as a freshman be-
cause of war time rules then in
effect.


f amli, was talk-
Ing about the
iae George
LLEWELLYN Merrick, found-
er of Coral Gables.
"Liew-lh n, nov.' the 67-year-old
head of a machinery company.
recalls that Merrick talked of
his dream city years before he
put It on the map In 1925 %%ith
boom-time promotion heard
round the world.
"Lew, I've got a dream." Mer-
rick told the engineer one dav.
Llewelvln savs he then put on
paper sketches'of Merrick's im-
aginative ideas for his planned
ci6.
It -as to be much later before
the ideas materialized, and W'hit-
nev C. Bliss. a one-time associate
of Lli-%eli,,n. carried through
ithn the actual surveyving and
laing-out of Coral Gable'.
Llewellyn first came to Miami
from Johnstown, Pa., in 1910 un-
der contract with the city of
Miami to "monument" the young
municipality meaning he was to
re-stake Its boundaries.
At that time Miami's city
limits extended between NE
lltb st. on the north and Ta-
miami Trail on the south, and


Good Neighbors...

since 1926!


Coral Gables and the First National grew up
together. The Bank, founded in 1926, has kept
pace with the City. Our total resources have
increased from $300,000 to more than
S23,000,00o0. And today, in our new air-
conditioned home, we are giving fast, friendly,
complete banking service to thousands of our .
neighbors in Coral Gables and the Southwest
Section. Won't you pay us a visit soon?


F TCORALC GABLES

FIRST NATIONAL BANK


100 MIRACLE MILE
Member Federol Reserve System aond
federol Deposit Insurance Corporation
-I


I


LleweUyn remembers he killed
wildcat ,wbers &e Pit Na-
ilonal Bank stasKU today.
In 1913, Crl Fisaher bought
300 acres for i300 In Miami
Beach, and Lleweilyn and his
crews maneuvered the boat ride
across Biscayne Bay to lay out
the swampy stretch which now
is the glirtering section around
14th Et.
*
LATER, he surveyed a tract
owned hv J.1Y,. and J. E. Lum-
mu tno the south of the Fisher
acreare and a section alone w hat
today i: the Venetian Cauwewa.a.
In 1915 LlewelNvn was laying
out lcit In Miami" for Mrs. \Vil.
liam Brickell and her daughter,
Edith---an assignment which led
him nto some fancy land swaps.


In spope etdon for his work,
Ueweftyu s hlys the Brickells
deeded himsqslx lots on 8. Mi-
ami aa. overlooking the press.
ent sate of Iarey Hospital-for
S dM down and 58,400 to pay
over fer yesrs at 8 per cent
interest.
Llewellyn a b's he was asking
$6,500 for the [cholce lots when
Merrick, then bead of a Miami
real estate company, approached
him with an ofter.
But instead cIf meeting the
price. Merrick olrfered any 10 of
his acres In Coral Gables In ex-
change fnr Llewellyvn's $100
equity in the six lots.
*1 *
THE ENGINEEIR accepted, ac-
quiring 10 acres (near the Bilt-
more Hotel site taclng Red rd.


"T sold the Utimber on the 10
acres for 180." Llewellyn recalls
with a chuckle. "So the 10 acres
actually cost me only $20."
That was the situation when
Merrick came along with one of
his planned boulevards w h I c h
bisected Llewellyn's land. Rather
than change his plan, Merrick
offered the engineer another
swap deal.
He took over the Llewellyn
acreage In exchange for $500
and another 10 acres across
Red rd. near the present et-
tate of former County Cornm.
mission Chairman Charles H.
Crandon.
"I sold those 10 acres for
$1,000," Llewelln recalls with
no small amount of satisfaction.


git 1


. eru 14


ON THE HALF SHELL...
V." ;,-=.; ;-3 -r 1j
1'1


v What could be
more delighiful than a festiLve
dinner with a South Sea Island flavor?"
It's easy to achieve ihis romantic atmosphere
if you use these gleaming whitd, aiant clam soup bowls irom S
shell salad bowls from M.ilay and the Lahala table matl
Both bowls are sunbleached, handdj polished.
The salad bowl has a pedestal.
SMake your servings "on the ho f shell."
For patio furnishings and accessories, it's The Patio Shop,
Florida's original "enchanted bazaar." W'hen in Miami treat yourself to
a shopper's delight-a viSit to The Patio Ehop is an unforgettable adve

Giant Clam Soup Bowl $3
Approx. 1" long Add 2
f ar
and hi
K'p-r o'tbe. ^ot lc^ Skhell Salad Bowl $
\,T.Approx. .6" long P0

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hclcC clIa D 06-prep


Don't Believe Rumors


About Gables Taxes

Rates Much Lower Than In Miami;

Other Sections Of Dade County
Coral Gables is out to disprove the story-circulated, city
officials believe, by building promoters elsewhere-that real
estate taxes in the City Beautiful are comparatively high.
Coral Gables officials say the story simply isn't so, and
Tax Assessor T. C. Blount has come up with figures irf an


LargestPTA XMOOR C H (
Coal Gables Elementary school
Par t-Teacher Association is the Kindergarten High
largest in the United iStates, hav-
ing a membership In 1949-50 of Est. 1926
2,034' It was founded in 1923, two CORAL GABLES F
yearL before the city was Incorpo- CORAL GABLES
ra ted"

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THIS IS TYPICAL OF THE MEDITERRANEAN-STYLE ARCHITECTURE REQUIRED IN


Coral Gables Demands That Hoi


Be Mediterranean-Style Architec


T'HEY know what they want
Sin Coral Gables-even to
the color of the rooftops-and
they lenow what they don't
want. And no amount of pres-
sure can change one whit of it.
'Th4y want homes of Medi-
terranean-style architecture,
and only in a couple of
clearly-defined areas have
they yielded to the trend to-
ward the "modern."
They want homes of individual
character land so, to prevent
monotonous repetition or "row
housing," they frown officially
on duplication of design or floor
.plan.
They want spacious yards,
mianic rl parkways, and get
them by fixing minimum build-
ing setbacks and spending
$163,000 a year to polish public
parkways.
They want liquor bars con-
fined to private clubs-
and proved it by going all the
way to the Florida Supreme
court to stop an operator de-
termlnedAte peddle whisky in
hits restaurant.
SThey wai no part of Illegal
; gambling, and a bookmaker
Sdumb enough to defy that Is
apt to find himself not in the
' Jallhouse but under It.
It'@ all written In the book,
this mroaster plan for gracious
community life, and Coral
Gables lives by the book.
There's none of the political
granting of zoning "variances,"
the stretching of the rules, that
has distorted the once-orderly
planning of many another city.
Sline: its founding in 1925 as
George'Merrick's "dream city,"
Coral Gables has proceeded on
the formula, "A place for every-
thing and everything In its
place."
*- *
MUNICIPAL administrators
uncommonly free from political
interference enforce the plan
with the wholehearted support
of a citizenry Jealously proud
of its heritage,
As it has been from the be-
ginning, every plot of ground
In the city Is fitted into a master
plan of "step-down" zoning de-
signed for overall community
harmony.
It's all there on the map-
the minimum size building
called for In each section, the
distances it must set back
from street and sides.
Depending on the section, a
home may range from a modest
bungalow of 990 square feet of
floor space-costing, at today's
estimated building rate of $10
a foot, $9,900-to a 4,000-foot
mansion costing $40,000.
An approved building site-
whilch, again depending on sec-

Congratulations to
The Miami Herald
on your 40th Anniversary
FOR YOUR
fflb PHUTOGRPHID I



Shop In
CORAL GABLES

Cameras, Photo

Supplies

Camera Repairs

Start Your Lay-away
Plan now.

A Small Deposit
Will Assure You
of Your Purchase
For The Holidays


MILE PHOTO SHOP
2105 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Across from the Gables
Theatre
Telephone 48-3669


tlon, may embrace one or more
lots---sells today for an average
of about $2,000.
But wherever the site, Coral
Gables retains a loud say over
what goes on It-and how.
*
THE BOOK says "all buildings
shall be of Spanish, Venetian,
Italian or other Mediterranean
or similar harmonious type arch-
itecture."
Major exceptions are the mile-
square Biltmore section, where
"modernistic type houses" also
are permitted, and business dis-
tricts, where the Board of Super-
vising Architects is charged with
the task simply of making the
architecture harmonize with the
neighborhood.
It is the city beard, coin-
posed of five architects, which
is the key watchdog in main-
taining the distinctive build-


1'.


Ing standards which Merrick
wrote Into many a lot deed
on his original city plat.
The board and the city's struc-
tural engineer must pass not
only on design but approve the
exterior color and see to it that
construction is of masonry, that
tile roofs are either red or white.
The sharply delineated arch-
itecture which the Coral Gables
book calls for has nob always
inspired unbounded Joy among
architects who feel the Mediter-
ranean style may be fine for
the Mediterranean but not for
South Florida.
*
IN PACT, in 1946, the archi-
tects' board as then composed
recommended mat the ctlkyv com-
mission relax the rules to permit
adoption of modern trends. Com-
plained one architect, "There is


/;


no
he

sti
'an
d


S-Gables Trade


.,i nHas 32,000


Households

., ACoral Gables has tIn 1950, an
estimated trade area of 110,000
Population living in 32,000 house-
holds, according to a survey
made by Southern Bell 'Tele-
phone Co.
Serving this trade area are 763
places of business wIlhin the city
limits of Coral Gables.
A Estimates claim that Coral Gab-
les stores draw from an area
roughly encompassing a radius of
three miles surrounding the cit y.
The city issued more than 2,300
occupational licenses during tf e
last year, the figures including
firms located in Miami but wish-
ing to do business in Coral Gables.

.Youth Center

War Memorial
Coral Gables Youth Center,
-r built during the last five years
as a permanent war memorial
.' occupies one city block in the
Coral Gables downtown area.
With an enrollment last year
CORAL GABLES of 1.300 school children, the
center offers instruction and
participation in almost every
type of healthful recreation, in-
11 S cluding the "socialgraces."
The Coral Gables center was
the first permanent war memo.
rial to take this form and was
widely copied throughout the
United States.
adventure In architecture 26,500 Alumni
?re."
But the populace rallied, Active alumni of the Univer-
rongly to the defense of the sity of Miami total 26,500, about
atus quo, and the Medlterrane- 9,000 of whom live in the Greater
won out over the modern. Miami area. The seven out-of-town
alumni clubs include those In
Chairman of the board to. New York, Chicago, Los Angeles
ay Is H. GeorgePink, a neph- and Philadelphia.
.i of -enmfln w mx,. 1errie-n


ew of Denuman Vtr, merrikirs
original planning architect.
The architects' decisions may
be appealed to the zoning board
and from there to the city com-
mission, but In Coral Gables ev-
erybody is pretty well briefed on
objectives and there isn't much
reciprocal upsetting of apple-
carts.
The zoning board, composed
of five prominent businessmen
headed by retired Henry Clay
Anderson, has proved a bulwark
against any pressures that might
break down the Coral Gables
plan.


~f0

11


V.-


For the Finest in Banking Service
CHECKING ACCOUNTS
0 LOANS
SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES
SAVINGS ACCOUNTS

COME IN AND PAY US A VISIT



Florida National Bank
at CORAL GABLES
169 Miracle Mile, Colonnade Building
Member Florida National Group
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
Member Federal Reserve System


Sunday, November 13, IO33


Popeye The Sailor


"HOME OF
PH. 48-5500


THE M,'IA-MI w m 0 t ,.


Sims And Zaliolyl


COaG ATULATIONS OAT4{AAI M AWLDp!S

A0flth AAN ERSARY- ftm

'9.KJ>. I&GANE AL60 1&M 1Q & 7o


Coral Gables Has 3,170 Home Owners


Tropical Garden
Fairchild Tropical Garden, lo-
cated In Coral Gables on Old Cut-
ler Road, Is the only tropical bo-
tanical garden within continental
United States.
Named for the famous botanist.
Dr. David Fairchild, tnM garden
boasts thousands of rare tropical
plants, growing in their natural
setting. Partly supported through
memberships, the organization
holds periodic "cutting days."
when members receive cuttings of
the plants for their own home use.


340 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables
FREE REAR-OF.STORE PARKING


CoAat9 abkiA.


Live In Gables


Of the 3,888 occupied, s i n g I e- Tax Assessor T. C. Blount.
family residences in Coral Gables At the same time there were
Sept. 1., 1950, .3,170 were occupied 1,803 apartment ."units,.238 efflcimn-
by their owners, according to cy units, and 104 duplex units oe
homestead exemption rolls of City cupied.


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FOR BEAUTIFUL HOMES FUK UBiTlTK E riuH i

R enowned the world over for its residential sections of beauty, Coral Gables can today
Sboast of a shopping area that is second to none in America ...


Shops, whose names have become synonymous with quality and economy, are found in
abundance...
Wide streets, ample parking areas and spacious sidewalks make the Coral Gables Business
Section the delight of the casual window shopper and consistent buyer alike ....
The next time you go shopping, try the Coral Gables area, and you, too, will find shopping
in comfort and quiet, a,delight that is already known to thousands ...
MERCHANTS DIVISION

CORAL GABLES CHAMBER OF COMMERCE


Sa


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*^"~~ ~ ~ - -- -* -- 1 *


Life
' i.. . .
?, *.... ," .( .. .


Sundsd. NIvanbar 15. 1530


- ..zz::4r: -


and Learning


at the


UNIVERSITY


of


The cub reporter, facing his first assignment, ticks off the questions

to which he must find the answers e

O? WHAT? WHEN? WHERE? WHY?



"ANDs" adds the city editor--"MAKE IT SHORT!"
The story of a great human institution can not be told in a column of type, not
fully told even in a whole Sunday edition. But given a clean white page, and
a few pictures to help out...


rW h o The University of Miami is a community of 11,066
men and women studying under 532 teachers.
Most of the students are of college age, and one out of
five is a girl. But more than 2,000 are adults carrying on
their education in evening classes.
It is a country-wide, even world-qide, student body,
hailing from all sections of the United States and from 27
foreign countries. The faculty adds to this cosmopolitan
atmosphere, they themselves having degrees from hun-
dreds of American and Old World universities.


MERRICK BUILDING


Learning Is what it's all about ... History to give understanding
of the complex modern world. Languages to interpret it. Science
to shape it. Business to manage it. Law to moderate it. Art to
re',eve it. Philosophy to soften its tantrums. Religion to rise above
them ... Learning, endless learning of the disciplines it takes to make a man
or woman fit for the fight ahead . The University divides the body of
learning into eight schools: the College of Liberal Arts and the Schools of
Education, Law, Business Administration, Music, Engineering, and the Grad-
uate School and Evening Division.
SGood health never hurt a scholar. There have been sallow geniuses who
discovered truth on a cheese diet in airless attics, but who is to. say truth
S would have evaded d sound meal in sunshine?
J South Florida is an all-season playground.. Most of the University student
i body, girls and boys, play in 15 competitive sports in the intramural pro-
gram. The gifted go on into varsity play. The University as a whole, it
might be said, has gone on from regional play into top national competition,
in football, polo, swimming, boxing and tennis.


TYPICAL DORMITORY UNIT


I


MEMORIAL CLASSROOM BUILDING


We are between the halves of a tough football game the 20th Century.
The first half was rough, with plenty of clipping and personal fouls by Hitler,
Mussolini, Tojo and a ringer named Joe lately put in the field by our opponents. We
face the second half, and we had better be in top form, or else . .

The setting for 20th Century training is appropriately modern at the University of Miami. Five years age
Sthe University outgrew its first buildings. The chance was presented to build a new campus from scratch,
0 scratch being a 260-acre tract of virgin pine and palmetto land on the edge of Coral Gables. And now
S. a Main Campus designed to serve the needs of study, recreation and living in South Florida . .
one-classroom-wide structures of concrete, steel and glass, set to catch the trade winds, electronically equipped
for the best reading light ... the long slim Memorial Classroom Building with a seating capacity of 2100, and the
towered Merrick Building . Around the Lake. the spacious Student Club. the unique functional Ring Theatre . .
Beyond it the 40-acre playing field with track, diamond, dressing rooms . And across the Lake the men's and
women's dormitories in which groups of students keep house in apartments having their own living rooms, bedrooms,
kitchens and baths ...
People in 1900 had queer ideas about South Florida. It took a quarter of a century for them to learn that the climate
was wholesome, another 25 years to embrace it as a homeland in a setting of tropical flowers on a coral-ribbed
land washed by the sea to the East and the green wave of the Everglades to the West. This is the setting to which
University architecture is adapted, in recognition that the tropics open a new way of life to Americans. as exciting
as the opening of the prairie frontier was to their forebears.


W y Why a University so far from Boston Common, so remote from the center of U.S. population density? Florida, now
i 0 nudging the 3.000,000 population mark. has its educational needs which the University of Miami helps fulfill by
47 enrolling 5.000 Floridians. But there are sound reasons-climate and recreation facilities aside-to draw the sons
and daughters of North and South America to this region for their education.
The founders of the University had definite ideas:
Miami, they agreed. is at the crossroads where the sea and air routes between North and South America converge with those from Europe and Africa.
Eventually this world bazaar must have traders of goods, interpreters of languages and cultures, experimenters of world vision . That destiny the
University founders anticipated by saying: "We will stress Latin-American affairs ..."
Today the Hispanic-American Institute of the University coordinates vast curricula of Latin languages, business courses and studies in Hispanic art,
history and science. Miami, the founders said, has the only semi-tropical climate within the borders of the United States. It must develop research In
tropical biology, medicine, agriculture ...
Today research units of the University are doing basic and applied scientific research on the life forms of the shallow tropic seas: on the breeding ef
tropical fruits and the salvage of the perishable varieties for world marketing: on the health problems of the tropics .. Research is long, and promises
of results are never made, but the dreams of the founders are being lollowed...


T F all the story of Who, What, When, Where and Why were further squeezed, hammered
and nailed down to one single word, it would be this one!

CAREERS America holds in its hands world responsibilities over an unknown
CARE ~ period ahead. For an infinite variety of useful careers in our coun-
try's future the present generation must be fully trained. Across the
land hundreds of universities and colleges are providing to two million young men and
women that training in special skills and scholarship needed to keep the United States fit
for its task. The University of Miami, young and in a young region, is proud to be of that
great company.


I a V. 4

C


MIAMI


What?


STUDENT CLUB


When n




Where


J31 UNIVERSITY of MIAMI
.. Received its charter in 1925 under the
laws of the State of Florida as a non-profit
institution of higher learning. It is non-sec-
tarian and co-educational.
The University is accredited by the South-
ern Association of Colleges and Secondary
Schools. It is a member of the Association
of American Colleges, the Association of
Urban Universities, the National Associa-
tion of Schools of Music,- the Association of
American Law Schools, the American As-
sociation of Colleges for Teacher Educa-
tion, the Florida Association of Colleges
and Universities and the Southern Inter-
Collegiate Athletic Association.


ADMISSION
^----------------------------.
FENING COl'RSS . Refresher and career skill studies are offered
to eltisens of Greater Miami and Fort Lauderdale in the taduiirial arts
In the Evening Division. Cultural courses clerical nursess. and reere-
alionoal hobby course earrvin no credit 'are also available. For infor-
mniation. send to Director of Lvening Dilislon. 'nlterslty of Miami.
University Branch. (Coral Gables 46, Florida.
Name ..... .............. ..... ... .................................. .......
Address ... ...................................... ................ ....
...... ........... ..... .. ................. . . .....

- --- -------- -- - ----- ----
11NDIERG.RADUATF. SCHOOLS . Hilh school gradne lkaand transfersi
from accredited colleges and unlveriiles aore eligible for admission. For
Information, send to DIrecLor of Admissions. l'nlversltv of Milami, Unl-
versity Branch. Coral Gables 46, Florida.
Name ...................................................................
Address .. ,. ...... ............. ... .......... ... .... ................. .
I. ........ ........ .. ..... ............. ... ............I
I----------------------- - - ---





U

S ___


WORLD-FAMED ORANGE BOWL. HOME OF FAST-RISING UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI HURRICANES SEATS 62000 FANS. SEEN HERE IS HALF-TIME PAGEANTRY OF ANNUAL NEW YEAR'S DAY FOOTBALL CLASSIC
WORLD-FAMED ORANGE 3OWL, HOME OF FAST-RISING UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI HURRICANES. SEATS 62,000 FANS. SEEN HERE IS HALFTIME PAGEANTRY OF ANNUAL NEW YEAR'S DAY FOOTBALL CLASSIC


Regattas By The Dozen



Boating Enthusiasts Ready


For Busy Season In Florida


Memo to everybody owning a
boat, be It a haughty yacht or
humble skiff:
A flood tide of marine events
will be offered boating enthu-
SiaMis in the Greater Miami area
this winter. .and you won't
want to miss the fun.
The rumor you've been hear.
ing up north that the biggest
and bestest program in history
has been arranged for our wa-
ters Is no mere scuttlebutt.
A year of concentrated team-
work by all local yacht clubs,
In conjunction with city ana
Dade county officials, assures
that the 1950-51 boating season
will be one to remember.


Beginning this afternoon
with sailing and outboard
races in Biscayne Bay. 76 ma-
rine features will be offered
before the seasonal curtain
drops on April 27.
Included In the variety-spiced
program are such headliners as
The Orange Bowl powerboat re-
gatta; MNiamni Sunshine sailing re-
gatta; Miami-to-Nassau ocean
yacht race; Miami Boat Show
and international cruises.
Boating in Miami got the boost
it needed with the organization
Of two progressive groups-the
City of Miami's Marine Advisory
committee and the Greater Mi-
ami" Regatta committee.


WHITE SAILS IN THE SUNSHINE are a thrilling winter sight
in Florida. Hundreds of the country's boating enthusiosis
flock to Florida waters to participate in scores of contests
scheduled from November through April.


Each oUfit includes key mem-
bers of the eight sailing and
po% erboat. clubs in the area . .
and all have worked together to
arrange a co-ordinated nautical
schedule.
*

WITHIN the last month, the
International Yacht Club re-
ceived its charter. Comprised of
outstanding civic, business and
boating figures, it will answer
a sore need.
That's certain, since the In-
ternational Yacht club will be
housed in the modern and spa-
cious former Pan 'Ameiican Air
Termninal building at Dinner
Key. Work is now under way
on a long-sought marina in Bis-
cayne Bay, ,hrectl, in front of
the new club.
With the club's opening on
January 1, first class facilities
will be available to visiting
yachtsmen.
Let's take a look at the major
events en the marine calendar.
December's first standout will
be the Miami-Nassau cruise,
Mlsarting on the 8th and ending
five days later.
Asi a colorful sideshow to the
annual Orange Bowl football
classic, the 0. B. inboard and
outboard regatta will be staged
on Saturday and Sunday, Dec.
30-31.
** *

SAILING skippers move Into
the spotlight Jan. 6-7 when the
second annual Miami Sunshine
regatta will be run off for more
tharr a dozen classes of small
sailboats.
The season's second crui-'p,
this time to nearby Bimlnl,
comes up Jan. 18-22.


AN ATTENDANCE of nearly 2,000,000 fans was recorded at
Greater Miami's four dog racing tracks last season, making
it one of the most popular of winter sports in this region. The
10 tracks operating in Florida -eturned more than $4,500,000
to the state treasury in taxes last year.


February is a peak month.
The highly interesting Miami
Boat Show will make its ap-
pearance on Feb. 9 and con-
tinue for 10 days.
On February 10, the Biscayne
Bay Yacht club offers its Lip-
ton Cup race, a 30-mile sprint
for sailing yachts off Miami
Beach. Three days later, the Mi-
ami-Nassau contest, a 184-mile
battle of men against the sea,
gets under way.
Powerboats take over again on
March 3-4 with the historic Bis.
cayne Bay regatta, sponsored by
Miami's Jaycees. A predicted I-,g
race to Havana arrives on
March 10. Twenty-four hours
later the Miami Yacht club puts


on Its Mid-Winter galling re-
gatta.
Among April's features will
be another cruise to Nassau,
starting April 14 and winding
up on April 26.
Race programs for sailors al-
so are staged at intervals by the
Miami Yacht club, Coconut
Grove Sailing club and Biscayne
Bay Yacht club.
Once each month the Pelican
Harbor Yacht club stages excit-
Ing inboard powerboat regattas.
The Miami Outboard club gives
"kickers" a chance to duel oncq
a month, also.
Yes, it will be a great winter.
So don't say we didn't warn you
to bring your boat.


Miami U. Topped South


In 1949 Attendance

By LUTHER EVANS
Herald Sporits Wriltr
When the talk gets around to football. Floridians have
something to say to you Monday Morning Quarterbacks.
Sunshine states can point with justifiable pride tn the
fact that the Univert-ity of Miami topped the entire South In
gridiron attendance last year.
If that doesn't Impress you with their ace-in-the-hole- the
sufficientl,, be prepared to hear two-year-old Shrine North-South
that Florida is the only state classic.
offering two major New Year's Last Dec. 27. the' North
Day Bowl games-the Orange trimmed the South. 20-44, be.
n Gr, fore 37,378 spectators at the
and Gator. Orange Bowl. Number three
Miamians, In particular, get It the Yank-Rebel rivalry Is
a kick out of their football. Con- expected to lure mere than
sequently. the U. of Miami never 50,000. so good have the IWo
has a kick coming about the tilts been.
gridiron gates it lures. Addition of attendance figures
In 1949. an impressive total for 18 high school contests at
of 319,449 saw the Big-time the 0. B. shoots the football-
Bound Hurricanes In eight viewing seasonal total in the
home games in the Orange Bov- I. Miami area above 600.000 mark.
How many colleges surpass that You say 36 games sounds like
figure? a lot for one stadium? You're
The state's largest athletic at- right. The Orange Bowl turf
tendance in history arrived last took such a beating In October
January 2 when 64,816 saw that a 10-day rest was ordered,
January 2 when 64,816 saw-^ tanfre
Santa Clara upset Kentucky in and prep contests transferred
the Orange Bowl classic, 21.13 to other ocal gridirons.
The only reason there weren't Besides the UM. the Univer-
twice as many fans, is that the Eity of Florida. Stetson, Florida
0. B. can accommodate no mo! State University and Tamipa
. field football teams.
Up at Jacksonville. the After the first two weeks of
Gator Bowl-fifth in size and this season all mere unbeaten
prestige nationally-is offered and fans were agog. That. of
each Jan. 1. This year 20,000 course, couldn't last-Florida
watched Maryland conquer tasting the first defeat, 16-13
Missouri 20.7 in the holiday against Georgia Tech.
special.
The L'nivrersity of Miami's
Throw in the 14,000 folks who surge to prominence is more
saw Florida State University remarkable when one realizes
master Wofford in Tampa's that football has been played
Cigar Bowl and 9,500 who sa' there only since 1926.
St. Vincent's shade Emory and
Henry In Orlando's Tangerine Since that date, the Hurri-
Bowl, and you realize a lot of canes won 112 varsity starts,
fans saw grid duels last Jan. 2. lost 85 and tied in 13. Under
An aggregate of 108,316, to he Andy Gustafson, formerly of
exact. Arm'. UMNI supporters believe
Just when you're about to get th, record will steadily get
a word in edgewise, Florida better
football fanatics will come up Florida, since 1906, has cap.


~IIE~


COACH ANDY GUTAMSON
.... A hiam as draw

tured 195 tilts, dropped 188 and
engaged in 23 deadlocks. The
Gators, now coached by Boo
Woodruff, are on the way up
In the Southeastern conference
after many lean years.
If you're not sold yet, lend
that battered ear one more mo-
ment.
It Is not unusual for the Mi-
amir Hig-Mlarrih Edison High
struggle to draw 30,000 fana to
the Orange Bowl.
Yet, in 25 years of trying,
Edison has never beaten Miami
High.
We just plain lice football
down here. Suh.

Not Enough
Miami has twice scored 2'
points In a game with Universi'-
of Georgia while losing on eat i,
occasion.


Poor Windup


Coach Andy Guataflen s out to
break a University of Miami ltirg.
record this fall. The IHrrieane.
have lost their last two gianM In,.
their last three uasom


0




-i iiOA AWIgML I.EM M AI


Baseball's Pennant Winners



Both Developed In Florida


l T. hhU T MBULL
.*pms Staff Wktth
Taerllts driving Into Florida
S .before Nov. 25 may believe
6stMunm s have landed and
'ful seals guerrilla action Is

.wfll be
; ogtth d. with
tg s fo d j of
oavily armed jb
nd roughly
: 'we4 citl-
%Ons dashing 'fi H
aong with pur. it th
miMa glint in sea-
ari eir eyes. s h
they'll be rid- -
bys in every- TBUMBULL
JhiHg ftrm deluxe jobs to bat-
redt o tulma with a sprinkling
S thosee oversized-tlre Jhobs
j i we eall "swamp bug-
SBut there Commies will have
Sdot g to do with this turn-
t of armament. It's the open-
o f the hunting season-and
taken Its hunting sea.
: right seriously, suh. It's the
ie on when many an em-
loy comeaus down with a
sagerlo Jus malady that yanks
the from the Job, and when
Ss.n otherwise truthful see-
c th forced to tell stupen-
Ido ls as to the whereabouts
: her boss.
SOnly Ia the small towns and
i'n the one-man business es-
i bUshmients do they have the
Ir.oge to Just np and lock
|'th dor and put up a sign-
jI tloaed until Wednesday."
F For the hunters who possibly
do it, the opening of the
S is a safari, not just a
d outing. Camps are
",:Ltahed for back in the Ever-
Wads or In other primitive
SMtt.W qu and they itay with it
week or longer.
-" Fi Florida's eamplng-hunt-
'lj Am and wild turkey are
*Jtp ftuef targets. Quail hunting
A n a described locally as
Wa' 'Ibtd hunting" draws
:I|ivoit from those who ran
Safied enly one day at a
jfttaM' With a good pointer dog
etwo, qaol can be found with-
a n hour's drive of virtually
30l Florida towns and cities.
i ftn they are right In the back

i CNUTMiG In good in Flor-
.4f Sda, fn spts It's better than
'^, R~a.Coleman Newtvan, head
I. game and fresh water



-I1




1 "
I


fish commission, has said that
-with just reasonable coniser-
vation methods-Florida could
be to turkey hunting what the
Dakotas are to pheasant hunt-
ing.
"Reasonable c o n s a r vatlon"
would not need to go beyond
4n effective enforcement of
existing game Jaws, experts be-
lieve.
Florida's vast back country
areas, with dense cover that
can scarcely be penetrated,
provide% a natural breeding
ground that produces far more
game than could be killed
legally. It's the illegal bunter
who provides the problem.
These same vast back country
areas also are Ideal for the
poacher. It would take an army
of game wardens to patrol It
properly. The illegal night hunt-
ers, the pre-season hunters and
-particularly In South Florida-
the air boat pre-season hunter,
are making fightful inroads.
In states such as Pennsylvania
and Michigan where conserva-


tion long has been the practice,
public education has reached the
point where game law violators
are unpopular. The average Joe
Citizen will help enforce the
law, knowing that he has an in-
terest In the game of his state.
that If it's slaughtered by the
Illegal hunters there will be
slim pickings when he goes out
legally on the opening day.
That Idea hasn't caught on yet
in Florida. Some of our so-called
"best people" are our worst
game law violators. Some of
them brag about it, openly.
*
ENTIRE droves of turkeys
are slaughtered when they are
"frying size"-months before the
season opens. Deer are run down
and killed from air boats in the
summer when the 'glades are
flooded and they have no chance.
On a recent fishing trip that
included a night's camping oe-
side a South Florida stream, this
reporter saw a totat of 15 wild
turkeys. It's doubtful If a third
survive for the legal hunting
dates. Too many oLher people
have seen them. It's within five
miles of a %ell traveled road.
-


MEET THE PELICAN, one of Florida's most entertaining
natives. These sad-faced personalities are familiar along
the Florida waterfronts, where they alten pause in ifliqht to
make a fast beak-dive into the sea to snare a fish. They
spend their summers around rookeries in the Indian river off
Brevard county on the east coast and on Indian Key in Tcrmpa
bay on the west coast.
B-------------------- -


Which is why you'll see so
ninny of those camping safaris
starting out along the high-
ways come opening day. They
know they have to get away
back from civilization-a long
way bark-to have a chance
with legal bunting.
Some of them will even go
far back Into the Everglades
bI light plane, landing on dry
prairies far beyond the reach of
even the "swamp buggies."
There'll be a lot of wild tur-
keys killed back In that area
legally. And the fellows who kill
them really will earn them.
*
THIS REPORTER makes this
last statement with some degree
of authority. I've hunted these
wary critters through four hunt-
ing seasons, and always in good
tui key territory. and with good
hunters. I've seen well over a
hundred, just slightly out of gun-
shot range. Even a novice can
call 'em. up-just that close. I've
had just three of 'em within
range, and killed just three. I've
seen no more than a dozen killed.
Which may bear out the state-
ment that juSt plain enforce-
ment of the season law is all
Brother Turkey needs for sur-
vival and multiplication at prac-
tically rabbit rate.
The general season opens this
year on Thanksgiving.
That date vwa a last minute
change. Originally: it was set for
Nov. 25, and a lot of wives
'were cheering in the belief they
finally would have the Oaid Man
home for the dining room tur-
key. Now those hopes are gone.
He'll be hack In the woods look-
ing for a ,ools turkey.
The "general iPa-un" means
deer, turkey, squirrel, bear and
panther the "panther" being
the same criLLter tmat's known
In the est as a mountain lion.
This season extends to Jan. 5.
The quail season sill be long-
er, Nov. 25 ro Feb. 5. The legal
bag on deer is one a day or itwo
a season. On turkey's It's two a
day, or three a season, wimi the
shooting of either hen turkeys
or gobblers legally approved.
Conervatlonists didn't like this
Inclusion of hen tu'kes, either,
hut that's the way it is.
The legal take probably will
be good this year. Few areas
have had flood problems. But
It would be a lot better if the
poachers hadn't been getting in
their licks throughout the late
summer.


ifU. S[ITI WORK THEIR POINTER through the sawqrass and palmettos in the Ev.erqlodes near Miami In search of bob
WhWt. .Florida's abundant vegetation provides excellent cover for game. That dog smells something.


By WHITEY KELLEY
sweld heori Wrtter
The place where baseball's
pennant winners are devel-
oped?
Mention that to any sports-
minded citizen and he will
immediately know you are
talking about Florida's Grape-
fruit League circuit
Ten of the 16 major league
teams take their early practice
licks In Florida. Add to this the
14 Triple A and six Double A or-
ganizations and you'll find that
Florida easily qualifies as the
spring baseball mecca.
The pennant winners of both
the American and National
Leagues-New York and Phila-
delphia-have been long-time
Florida visitors. This spring,
however, New York will train
at Phoenix, Ariz., home of Del
Webb, part owner of the World
Champions.
Filling in for the Yankees at
the St. Petersburg base they oc-
cupied since the early twenties
will be the New York Giants.
Under a one year agreement, the
clubs switched training sites.
Philadelphia's National League
champions have been going
through their spring exercises
at Clearwater for the last five
seasons.
Florida also boasts of the fol-
lowing spring tenants:
Brooklyn Dodgers at Vero
Beach.
Cincinnati at Tampa.
Detroit at Lakeland.
Boston Braves at Bradenton.
Philadelphia Athletics at
West Palm. Beach.
RnnnnHadSa a Mannt0


Washington Senators at Or.
land.
St. Louis Cardinals at St.
Petersburg.
These clubs-the Giants, Dod-
gers and Cleveland-run huge
"baseball factories" in the state.
Started several years ago by as-
tute Branch Rickey, the Dod-
gers were the first to group all
their minor league farm hands
in one camp.
Rickey utilized the former Na-
val Air Station at Vero Beach for
an experiment that has now be-
come a crowning success.
Hank Greenberg, upon be-


Florida's 20th annual racing
season got under way last Tues-
day at Biscayne Kennel Club,
where the racing greyhound will
entertain the "home folks" until
the winter visitors migrate to
Metropolitan Miami area.
The revenue from greyhound
racing netted the state $4,569,704
from the 13 dog tracks for the
1949-50 season, which ended In
September at Pensacola and
Daytona Beach.
According to the trend of rev-
enue from summer racing
throughout the country, it is
highly probable Florida will
again maintain the same pace
this year. The state take was
virtually the same last year as
against the 1948-49 session.
Dates released from the Flor-
Ida state racing commission:
Biscayne Kennel Club at MI-


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coming general manager of the
Cleveland Indians, opened a sim-
ilar training base at Daytona
Beach. The Giants even went so
far as to purchase a hotel at
Sanford to house players from
their farm system.
While Miami does not play
host to a major league team
during the training period, a
number of exhibition games
are played at Miami Stadium,
termed by baseball writers
as the TaJ Mahal of diamond
parks.
Eleven games, involving the
Dodgers, Yankees, Red Sox,


amil-Nov. 14 to Dec. 23. March
29 to June 1. Total 91 days.
Associated Outdoor Clubs, Inc.,
Tampa-Nov. 14 to Dec. 6, (20.
days). Dec. 7 is scholarship day.
Dec. 8 to Feb. 27 (70 days).
Total 91 days.
Jacksonvilie Kennel Club -
Nov. 15, to Dec. 16 (28 days.
Dec. 25 to March 7 (63 days).
Total 91 days.
West Flagler Kennel Club at
Miami-Dec. 25 to April 9. Total
91 days.
Broward County Kennel Club,
Hollywood-Dec. 25 to April 9
Total 91 days.
St. Petersburg Kennel Club-
Dec. 26 to April 10. Matinees on
Wednesday and Saturdays and
on closing day. Total 91 days.
Sanford.Orlando Kennel Club
-Dec. 27 to April 11. Closed
Jan. 1 in order not to conflict
with Tangerine Bowl football


Braves and Athletics were
played before king-sized crowds
last spring. As many as 17,000
fans witnessed the Dodgers and
Yankees play an exhibition.
This year H. B. Taber, Sr.,
president of Miami Stadium, has
another attractive spring schid-
ule lined up. Brooklyn acts, a
the host team in all 19 of the
games scheduled.
There also Is a possibility that
the Dodgers will remain at & ,i
ami Stadium for the latter a'e !,
of their spring training pezod'j
rather than return to their Vsro
Beach base after el .3tfh I
games here.


game in Orlando. Total 91 days.
Miami Beach Kennel Club -
Jan. 1 to April 16. Total 91 day. j
Palm Beach Kennel Club -1
Jan. 1 to April 16. Total 91 days.
Sarasota Kennel Club-March
1 to June 1. Total 80 days.
Orange Park Kennel Club,
Jacksonville March 10 to May
19 (61 days). Oct. 30 to Dee. 1,
1951. Total 90 days.
Pensacola Kennel Club-Dates
to be allotted.
Volusla County Kennel Club-
Dates to be allotted.

Musical Notes
More than 400 symphony con-
certs and recitals l ve been given
by the University of Miami during
the last 23 years, according to
Mrs. Marie Voipe, university sym-
phony orchestra manager.


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Season Opened Tuesday


13 Dog Tracks Net State $4,569,000


MOI STADIUM is considered by -baseball leaders as one of the finest plants in the nation. Seating
0, tiW iused during the spring by major league teams for exhibition games, while during the summer it is
.Miami Sun Sox of the Florida International League. The Sox drew 160,450 fans this season. The canti-
d oof eliminates obstructing pillars.


Could Rival The Dakotas' Bird



If It Weren't For Poachers


L


BosnIKe aIu O aS. naocununom


_e-












































A TENSE MOMENT during one of Greater Miami's maior golf Florida is the only section of the country where golf may be
tournaments which attract the world's top golfers. Of the played each of the 365 days of the year. And despite the
area's 11 golf courses, seven are open to the public. South flat terrain, the courses are sporty and beautiful.


365 Fair Days For Fairways





Makes For Golfers' Paradise


By JIMMY B'RNS
Herald nortsi Editor
For two weeks starting on
Nov. 27, Miami tkill truly
become the golfing capital of
the world.
That'a no idle boast. It Is a
provOcatIve condition resulting
from the twin $10.000 golf tourn-
amepts. There is the 25th Miami
Open (Nov. 27-Dec. 3i and the
revival pf the Tnternational Four
Ball,ona larger scale IDec. 4-101
This' 11me 32. instead of only 16
team "will compete.
Additional lure for the par-
wreckers is the $15.000 Havana
Invitational scheduled in Cuba,
Deo. 12-17. That means a $35.000
golfing melon which will lure
every able, bodied pro in the
county to this section in hope
of cubting himself a nice slice
of the prize money.
Thoje tournaments and others
to follow serve the double put-
poae pf providing entertainment
for viasltors, and gaining sports
page headlines throughout the
natUo. Only the bathing beau-
ties have done as much as golf
to publicize the Greater Mihami
area,.
TbHroililut the yrar golf
'raits high as one of this see-
tlok'i better recreations. Ex-
cusintg an occasional h'nr.
rieli", Soath Florida IS tlhe
only section in the country


where golf may be played
each of the 365 days in a year.
There are 11 courses sprawl-
ing o0er an aggregate of 2.000
picturesque aci es. Golfers pause
between shots to admire
the tropical setting of' lakes,
swaying palms and tropical flow-
ers. The colors make a striking
contrast with the fairways and
greens Which are greener than
an Irishman's necktie on St.
Patrick's Day.
* *
THERE ARE no grounds here
for the claim that golf is a rich
man's sport. The facilities are
varied, ranging from the tourna-
mrent-famed Miami Springs mu-
nicipal course where the winter
greens fees are only a modest
$1.50 to the ultra swanky Indian
Creek la 'out where exclusive-
ness Is the keynote. Admission
is gained there only with a mem-
ber.
LaGorce is only a trifle less
exclusive, and a member's In-
fluence is needed to play this
layout where Willie Klein has
been professional since the
course was started. West View,
a nine-hole layout, and Riviera
in Coral Gables are the only
other strictly private clubs. At
the other links one may play
for $2 50 and $3.
Miami has been the Jump-
ing off point to fame for more
than one golfer. It was here


Jacksonville Scores Again



Gator Bowl Rises Fast


Among Major Classics


JACKSONVILLE -A. dream of Jacksonville's citizenry
for many years resulted in the birth of the famed Gator
Bowl on New Year's day of 1946.


Today' the annual bowl game
here ranks among the big five
of the nation. 'with its 37,000-
capacity being overshadowed by
only the Rose. Sugar, Cotton and
Orange Bowls.
The early years of the local
classic were financiallv shaky,
The committee %as inexperi-
enced. The weather wasn't
favorable. And the attendance
failed to pay off the debts.
The original stadium seated
26,000. It was Inadequale from
the outset. Then the Florida
legislature came to the rescue.
It passed an act authorizing
the city- of Jacksonville to
build a new stadulnm.
Construction of the $500,000
arena started in the spring of
1948. It is a steel-deck type, built
so that it can be double-decked
when future expansion is con-
templated.
Promotion of the game has
Been removed from amateurish
hands. Ray McCarthy, a prom-
SInent New York promoter, was
named Gator B,).l direcrior this
year.


McCarthy and his assistant,
George Olsen, have started a vig-
orous campaign to recruit 6,000
Gator Bowl members from north
Florida, south Georgia and Ala-
bama.
He also has started, a public
relations program with the
Southeastern and S o u t h e r n
Conferences to acquaint coaches
with the new Gator Bowl pro-
gram.
He's hopeful bf attracting
top teams from those confer-
ences in future bowl classics.
Most of the first five games
have been well-matched and
thrillers.
The Gator Bowl came Into
being with Wake Forest defeat-
ing South Carolina. 26 to 14.
The re-tilts of the other four
games %% ere.


that Gene Sarazen made his
meleroric rise. Waller Hagen,
Ben Hogan. Sammy Snead,
Jimmy Demaret, Cary Middle.
coff and others have enhanced
their prestige with victories In
Miami's tournaments with rich
traditions and super back-
grounds.
The girls have done well here.
too. and a winter attraction will
be the 19th annual Doherty Chal-
lenge Cup tournament. Jan. 23-
2.A at the historic Miami Coun-
try club. One of the oldest golf


UMI Elevens

Directed By-

Eight Coaches

iUniverslity of Miami has had
eight men as head football coach
since the first team took the
field in 192A.
Howard Buck %as the first
Hurricane coach. His 1926 team
was undefeated In conrripetiUon
with other freshman teams and
his two varsity elevens won 7
and lost 10, tying twice. J. Bur-
ston Rix coached in 192c. win.
ning 3 and losing 2 while Erne-t
SE. Brett who followed him \on
3. lost 4 and ied 1.
Fourth Miami coach was
Tom McCann. who lost' eight
of 12 games In his first cam-
paign but had three winning
seasons thereafter to$win 18
and lose 15 as a Miami coach.
Irl Tubbs took over for two
good seasons in wt.lch he won
11 and lost 5. Jack Harding fol-
lowed for eight seasons, inter-
rupted by a two-.ear stint in
the Navy when Eddie Dunn
coached. Harding, with a num-
ber of outstanding teams and an
Orange Bowl winner, won 54,
lost 32 and tied two games for
Miami. Dunn won 6, lost 8 and
tied one.
Andy Gustaf_.on. now in his
third year at Miami, has 10 vic-
tories and 9 defeats in his first
two campaigns. Harding. Mc-
Cann and Tubbs are the only
Miami coaches who have won
more games than that.


Rollins Was First

Miami Grid Foe


First University of Miami foot-
ball game was played in October
of 1926 when the Hurricane fresh-
men defeated the Rollins college
freshmen, 7-0, on the old main
campus gridiron.
The following year when Miami
entered varsity play, Rollins was
adaln the first opponent and again
rilanit won. .q to 3. First loss was
to Spring Hi!l in the third game
of the season, -n,. v. hich aion was
the fir't time Mami had failed to
-core In a toothall game.,
C.


THE GATOR BOWL in ]acksonville seats 37.D000 spectators and has been the scene of
some of the most thrilling New Year's football classics in the nation during the five years
Sof Its existence.


courses In the country, It was
built hack In the days when
favorite transportation was a
boat up the Miami river, or a
tally-ho over the narrow streets.
It was in the Doherty that
Patty Berg began her climb to
fame to be followed by Louise
Suggs, Dorothy Kitbyv. Polly
Rile', and the great Babe Za-
haria.s. She was famous before
she won the Doherty, but that
victory enhanced her reputation.
*
REOPENING of the famed
Biltmore has brought ioy to golf-
ers' hearts, although the maze of
canals often saddens them when
they lose balls In the watery
hazards. The course was closed
during the war when the Army
Air Forces took over the fab-
ulous hotel for a hospital.
During winter weekends the
180 holes of the 11 courses often
afford pleasure for more than
2.500 players. who start their
scuffles with Old Man Par earl,
In the mornings, and finish them
late in the afternoon.
If these 180 holes were
stretched oat In a straight line
they nould extend for 36 miles,
or almost half the dlstlice
from Miami to West Palm
Beach.
With the cIty growing, and the
winter flock or visitors increas-
ing there is agitatnion for more
golf cnurses. The city has been
warne-d thatL utIIE';,, additional
goiflnf f.icilitli- are provided
the dav m3 come ihben hotels
%IllI have to warn t iflr guests
not to bring their golf' cluni.
But frr the mtomrint that Is
onl\ a fear for the future, and
again this winter thottands w ill
watch the stars of the eame
perform in the majrr tourna-
nlents, and tren go ou to tn'
their o.'- n land at the game
which the chainpionrs make look
Pas .


Jai


Alai:


By JACK KOFOED
Herald Columnlt
The first-time winner visitor
to Miami has a treat In store.
Only here is the game of jal
alal played In all America. and
jal 'alai Is one of the fastest,
most exciting games in the his-
tory of sport.
It had Its beginnings centu-
ries ago In the Basque country
of Spain. On Sundays, after
church, each village would
match its beet young athletes
against each other. They were
hard working people, the Ba-
ques, and the seventt day was
the only one on whichh they
could relax and enjoy them-
selves. So. this game came to be
called "jal ialai," which in their
tongue means "happy holiday."
The sport spread to many
lands. There are fronion. from
Shanghai to Brussel.?, one at
least In each big city in Spain.
AlmOst every Latin-American
country is enthusiastic about jai
alai. Even the Japanese. when
they captured Manila, delighted
in it, and made captured stars
play for them. Here in Miami
thousands of enthusiastic con-
verts to the game are made
every year.
It Is a basically simple game
which is one reason why It has
gained international attention.
The equipment consists of a
solid rubber ball covered with
kid skin, and a curved basket
attached to the right hand in
which the ball Is caught and
thrown.
The basket is called a "cesta."
Jal ialai is played on a three-
walled cement court that may
vary in length from 178 to
220 feet, and competition may
he either at single or don.
bles, as In tennis or hand-ball.
The ball Is served against the
front wall. and must be caught
in the cesta on one bounce, and
returned with a continuing one
motion. If it is dropped or fouled
out. the point is !ost. A brief
description like this gives no
hint of the pace, stamina, tInm-
ing and position play required.
The game Is crammed AIth thrill-
ing excitement from sTart to fin-
IAh.
Bets are made on Indihlduals
and teams just as on horses or
dogs. to win, place or show: the
number of points each acquires
deciding the finish. At Biscayne
Fronton the games are at five,
six or seven points.
In Havana and Mexico Cliv
doubles games at 3i) or 40 points
are In vogue. That the game has
caught on tiremendoutlv in Flor-
Ida is indicated not only In the


UM Played

Indoor Debut

University of Miami Is one of
the few football teams to play
a football game indoors.
Ir. happened back in 193n when
Atlantic (City' was demonstrating
the spaclOu'ness of its big n-%w
convention hall and auditoritlm.
The Hti ricanep traveled to the
New Jers'v c i( to play Temple
In the indoor battle.
Temple gained an easv 34-0 win
oe-.r Ihe then erv' small-time
Hurricanes The game was broad-
ca-t in pat on a national hook
up.
Ne't time Miami as on a na-
Linal broadcast u as for the
rangee Bouwl game of .Jan. I. 194t.
when Miamrni defeated Hoi, Cros,
13 A.


RA. H. Starks

now oilers you quick, courteous loan
service at

S Prudential Acceptance Corp.

S LOANS FROM $25 to $250 or more

on your signature, car or furniture. All loans made under Florida's
New Loan Law, which gives you rhe privilege of knowing:
Actual cost of loan before you borrow.
Amount of refund if paid in advance.
You pay no monthly interest charges.
Note our convenient location
2616 Coral Way (Avoid Downtown Traffic) Ph. 48-4453


success of the 1
in the fact that
approved for F
and will be bu
*
JAI ALAI ha
and its heroes'
plauded by Lati
and Ted Wllllai
leans. Covering
is rough on hew
strangely enou
last longer tha
era.
Erdoza, the
one of the a
dropped dead a
while still in c
If there are
wveaknesses, th
surface. V'Iscay
vorite in Mtam
Cuban court, a
half Erdoza's a


... .:. -- .. "-** .. . -_ ... .. .... .. .. . ..



Sunday November 19 1 50 THE MIAMI HERALD -9


Basque Sport Provides Big Thrills

For Winter Guests In South Florida

oal fronton, but went bankrupt. Once betting I have been. in the dreasit
another has been was approved, and the new room when a game was ovB
Fort Lauderdale, fronton. .one of the finest and seen a man howl with ra3
Ut this year. In the world , efgcted, jal i
* alat caumj on In a big way. and smash his cesta because
l....ng had booted an easy one that In
s a long history,, - As an enthusiastic follower ot a game. That a player can 1*
are as wildty ap. this game, let me stress not only a game. That a payer can ^
ns as Stan Musial its excitement and skill, but its hot as a bonfire one night aBr
ms are by Amer- honesty. Some bettors are in- cold as an ice cube the next
so long a court clinked to cock an incredulous also proven in any other gam
art and legs, but. eyebrow when a man makes a you can think of.
gh, many stars sensational recovery, and on the If you have seen jal lali b
n baseball play. very next play misses an easy fo, youllBenot atth o
shot. fore, you'll be out at the front
~again this winter. If you havel
elder, considered Do these people ever recall go out and have a look. u T
atl thime agre of 56 seeing Babe Ruth smash a home- guarantee you all the thrill ai
a t t h e a g e o f 5 6 g u r n eiou n l t e th i l r
competition. Yet, run over the fence and on his sport can offer. .with a lot
hidden physical next appearance at bat strike others you could never pos4ibi
ey come to the out? Did they ever watch Sam imagine ,
a, a popular fa- Snead drop a 40 foot putt on The Basques picked an appr',
i. fell dead on a priaie name for jal alal. YotU*
nd he was only one green and miss a two footer really. have a happy holiday
age. on the next? watching it.


It Is a dangerous game, ton,
this pastime of the Basques.
The pelola Is as hard as a
golf ball and about two thirds
the size of a baseball. It Is
hurled out of the resta with
terrific speed, and men have
been killed and seriously In-
jured when struck with it.
Each year Richard I. Beren-
Pon, president of the fronton,
and player manager and match-
maker Pedro Mir, comb Spain,
Mexico and Cuba for competi-
tors. Each iear the class of play
improves, in the 1949.50 season
the finest collection of stars ever
seen In Miami appeared here.
headed bv Echeverria, a Mexi-
can. who Is certain to he listed
as one of the finest of all time.
There were other magnificent
performers, like Gutierrez. Her-
nando, Arana, Saisamendl. and
others, many of whom will re-
turn this year.

THOUGH PLAYERS. do not
earn the fabulous amounts paid
bullfighters or heavyweight box-
ing champions. they are well
paid. and compare in earning
power with big league ball pla.%-
ers. There A III he 101 nights of
plav in Miami this season.
When these are finished the
men will scatter all over the
world to continue their efforts
against other background&.
Some play as much as 10 or 11
months of each year in differ-
ent countries.
Jal alal had Its start here
a quarter century ago when
a fronton was built In Hia-
leah. in those days parl-mu-.
fuel selling had not been le-
galized, and the promoters


ACTION ON TiK. JAI ALAI court is rough ana tougn and
thousands who visit the Miami fronton each winter are
thrilled with the game. Here a player jumps Into air to
catch pelota in his cesca.


pnin DEC. 12th



'7k7 tfljL LEGALIZED PARI-MUTUEL

WAGERING NIGHTLY EXCEPT SUNDAY...
POST TIME 8:00 P.M.



JAI-ALAI
(SAY "HI-LI")

THE WORLD'S FASTEST SPORT

THE ONLY PLACE IN THE UNITED STATES WHERE,
JAI-ALAI IS PLAYED ...




BISCAYNE FRONTON

N.W. 36th St. at 37th Ave.

-I Ph. 88-1666 for Reservations
Richard I. Berenson, Preos. & en. Mgr.




































































CANALS UN O FLUKIDA HAVE PLENTY OF BREAM, BASS AND


.... ,, :,: ,., o .-


&WI. I I-II MIAMI r .l iM'n.l, ImoV CIIIU.r isw, LUau



State Offers Best



Fishing In Country

By ALLEN CORSON
BHerald Fishing Editor
Describing Florida fishing is easy. It can be pictured In
but a single sentence: There's nothing in stateside waters to
match it. Another approach would he to stick to superlatives,
to forget the commonplace entirely; and thereby arrive at an


equally accurate portrayal.
Official government statistics
tell the story.
The state haS:
1-Tbe longest tidal shore line
(over S,000 milleps).
2-The greatest waier area i4.
298 of its total of 56.560 square
miles are comprised of lakes
and rivers, stream arid pono.)'
There are over 30.0u0 lakes. 166
frekh water rlner-. Okeechohee
is the-second iargei.t s%%erwattEr
lakewholly contained v.,thin the
continental United States.
Moving from ttattics to oth-
er known facts, these impres-
sive items are noted:
Florida's largemouth bass are
the nation's biggest. One nation-
al magazine, which for years has
conducted a fishing contest, di-
vides its largemouth bass into
three classes. The other 47 states
compete in two divisions. A third
is set aside exclusively for black
bass caughtin Florida waters.
In 1948, fresh water fisher-
men who bought licenses
caught 39% million pounds of
Inland fish, Including 22% mil-
lion pounds of black bass
bream, crappie, catfish and
other species made up the dif-
ferential. Since bass are the
only fish common to all 48
states, a weight point has Just
been made.
Florida has marvelous salt wa-
ter fishing. No combination of
coastal states can put together
enough species of game fish to
match the sunshine State's po-
tential bag. There are about 40
highly-respected varieties swim-
ming along our coastline.
True, miete have been a
couple of days when visitors
wentt fishing, but caught no fish.
It's said that every leap year
some of the hottest of local
hot rods venture forth, but slip
on a mullet scale and return
home filled with alibis.
That political football, t h e
state board of conservation, is
unable to stop inroads on the
salt water front. Yet, the non-
political state avnie and fre-h
water fish coninii,4ion hon
how bright the picture can be-
come with proper adminis-
tration and control. '
The point to remember is that
Florida exhibits Its greatest lus-
tre when compared to compara-
tively poor fishing offered else-
where. Only a mental midget
could sample Flotida'.; full
course fishing menu and think
he'd do as %eil back home.
F'r Instance.
Could you find- marlin In
Maine; African pompano in Ari-
zona: snapper in SouLu, Dakota;
or barracuda in Bcston? No wa-
hoo swish upstieamn in Minne-
mota, Michigan and Maryland; or
downstream in Oregon, Wash-
ington and W\'epst Virginia. The
northeast knou s rnot the permit,
pompano or snook: the zocuth-
west Is geographical delicient in
settings suitable LO capturing
the chary bonefish. There are
70 pounds difference between
the New Jersey and Florida ver-
sions of kingfish.
Of course, there are some
losy days afoot or afloat But
Obf good days are what people


come here to enjoy. And it's
fine to he ling where big fish-
ing news can be created at any
time.
*
SO GREAT are the prospir-ti.
n'io' \]'tois and natives isndl
up as sp-Lcialists. Caneprlers
nay 'tLick cio-e to lakes, riders
and canals, garnering the pan-
n'e-. hass and catfish which
fornt 75 per icm.nt of that great
"Cracker"' Inztttntion-the [isi
fry. The other 25. per cent, of
course, is the hushpuppy.
Others hold out for the hand-
line, Then there are the fly, plug
and spin casters; the surfmen;
and the trollers to whom line
classifications like 3, 6, 9, 15,
24 and 39-threads spell a lan-
guage and technique all their
own,
Yes, when you match Flor-
ida's fish, her distances and
angling techniques, a com-
plicated picture can develop.
An all-around Sunshine State
fisher is quite a guy. So mucb
time is Involved, it's natural to
expect specialists-people who
stick to one area, one kind of
fish, or one type of tackle.
The visitor has his own espe-
cial problems. Being entirely un-
familiar with the major ingre-
dients-the places, kinds of fish
and ways to get them-he can
wander amidst a wilderness of
plenty before becoming properly
orientated.
*
SHORTCUTS are hereby of-
fered. 1-Write to chambers of
commerce, giving this specific
information: How much you
plan to spend; how many are in
party; what special needs are
required; how tnany days you
plan to stay and exactly what
days you will be here.
Having arrived at a place of
your choosing, ask questions.
Nothing cuts a straighter,
more direct line to good fish-
ing than intelligent and per-
sistent inquiry. Ask questions.
Finally when you do make a
trip. be observant. If there are
,id when the fish struck; the same
for the stage of the moon, the
speed of the wind, etc.
Rich men have spent fortunes
fishing Florida waters. Moderate-
ly wealthy men have hired rich
men's accommodations in the form
of charter boats. Rich men also
have been content to fish from
rowboats. Poor men, here for the
winter in their trailers, often do
better than their more opulent
cousins. Why? They've all winter
to spend. The executive has the
moola, but not the time.
Therefore, any Income group
can find its fishful level. Every
individual can determine a finny
course that serves a single pock-
etbook or temperament. Proper
Investigation will put any
thoughtful Florida visitor or
native iuch closer to good. an-
gling than a haphazardly arrived
at trip.
And those who give a little
attention to where they're going
to fish will come to know what4
Florida fishing really can mean.


FLORIDA'S MANY BRIDGES PROVIDE ONE OF THE MOST CONVENIENT PLACES TO THROW OUT A LINE



,1 / / Ifo


UUI UTO LAKE OKEECHOBEE


-.. ".4 VIM -


A r m l

....ADS ARE BU.. ...I..
ALL HANDS ARE BUSY AS GIANT TU NA GIVES UP- FIGHT OFF CAT CAfi


LARGEMOUTH r'BASS TAKEN FROM CHIPOLA RIVER ^ ^jl^










Six Of Last 10 Derby Winners Were


Tropical Park Opens

This Season Nov. 30

Horses and horse racing have long been a part of the Flor-
ida scene.
History books record that Hernando de Soto and his party
,ed horses in Cuba for their amusement prior to the expedi.
departure for Florida in the winter of 1539, and history
book further record that the expedition included a goodly num-
ber bf the Royal Spanish stock. -
A character named Old Hickory Widener-and Introduced innova.
brought the first famous race dions %thich have changed the
Sirae to the state during his brief course of American racing his-
strvice as military governor of tory,v including the saliva test,
toe state in 1921. Ticonderoga's photo finish and totalisator. Un-
appearance In Pensacola was to der the leadership of John C.
be followed at century later by all Clark, since 1941, Hialeah has
Of the modern racing greats, carried on the traditions of the
Racig in Florida near the late Joseph E. Widener, and to-
turn of the ctintury was u* day is one of the nation's finest
-esanized, but by 1910-theL race tracks by any standard.
year of the founding of tbis Both Gulfatrearn and Tropical
great newspaper-trackn oer are now recognized as major
t onM rief Park tracks, and with Hisleah, gave
ioperaouville, West Tampa and Florida 122 days of high quality
PJamconia Later there were racing. starting Nov. 30 and con-
meetings at Keeney Park and tinning unti April 20.
St. JOhn's Park, near Jackson- Florida has achieved far fame-
fille. In big league racing as well as in
big league baseball-as the win-
Florida racing minoved into tne ter training grounds for chanm-
big leagues in 1932 on the lower pions. Six of the last 10 Kentucky
East Coast. with the state's legal- Derbies have been won by Hisa-
lastlon of parl-mutuels. and the leah horses and this year more
rebuilding of the Hialeah track, than one-third of the blue-ribbon
wrich had been in opegltion since stake races East of the Mississippi
1M25. Through the renmbdeling of went to racers wintered here.
Hialeah and elevating te stand- The Derby winners are Whirla-
ard of racing, the prejudice %as way in 1941, Shut Out In 1942,
overcome toward winter racing. Pensive in 1944, Hoop. Jr. In 1945.
and the leading stables induced to Citation In 1948 and Ponder in
race their stars in Florida. 1949. In addition. Lawrln in 1938,
The very first year of the Put in his practice licks in
Oflw" Htaleah William W,'ood- Florida.


ward's Falreno went on from
Inrida to win the classic Belmont
Stakes. T h e following spring,
Charley 0. from the R. M. East-
man stable finished third in the
Kentucky Derby after winning
the Florida Derby, now known as
the Flamingo Stakes.
The Derby was Inaugurated in
1912 at the Tampa Downs track.
one of four operated In the slate
during the boom days. The others
were St. John's, Pompano-and
Hialeah.


Stymie, Citation, Coallown,
Bewitch, Armed, Market Wise,
Requested, Alsab, Okapi, Seabis-
cultl Inlander and Olympia are
among other turf Immortals
produced at Hialeah, while such
greats as War Admiral Assault,
Challedon and First Fiddle have
appeared under colors in Flor-
ida racing.
Thoroughbred record has
proved an outstanding tourist at-
traction for Florida, and has been


ropical Park plant w con- a source of profitable revenue for
vetted from a dog twck, and the 67 counties of the state and
overted Decm bedorck.G the old people. M ore than one
opened n December, 191. Gulf in- hundred million dollars has been
stress arkwas uil In1= aid to the state from racing
n record time, and closed down p since 1931. fro
after three days of operation. s 13
the trek was revived by James This winter Florida tracks are
ION ju 194S. looking forward to another exrel-
Slent season of racing. In keeping
'Hialeah gave the state its first with national trends, there will
and only big-name races-the probably be a slight Increase in
80.000 Flaminhgo and the $50,000 pari-mutuels and attendance, and


a


THOUSANDS GATHER DAILY during the winter season.to watch the bangtailss" run at
three race tracks in the Greater Miami area. Ideal racing weather usually prevails
throughout the winter and millions of dollars are wagered. Horse racing is big business
in Florida and taxes from it help maintain the state school system.


the indications are that the qual- Big Stretch, Northern Star, Volt
ity of the sport also will reach a and Remove.
new high. Four of the top six riders are
The cream of the nation's booked to perform here. They are
horses and stables will be concen- Joe Culmone, Frankin Bone. Ken
Church and Ted Atkinson. AoJn to
traded In Florida, including Brook- ride here are Ovie Scurlock, ied-
meade, now America's leading ley Woodhouse, George Yettinger.
money-winner; Greentree, C. V. Sammy Bouzimeti, A. Caitsalano,
Whitney, George D. Widener, Jimmy Stout, Conn McCreary,
H. P. Headley, Mrs. E. duPont Doug Dodson and Logan Batch-
Weir, Dixlana. Coldatream Stud. eller.
,Cgln Ho., Addison, Fred W. -----
Hooper, Walter M. effortsds, Sam C
Riddle, Belair Stud. Wheailey, Cir- 3 Golf Courses
cie M., J. Graham Brown and
WAoodv.le. Operate In Gables
taulls have been assigned at
Rialeamh to such handicap stars Coral Gables, with a modest pop-
as Three Rings, Arise. Royal ulatlon of 20,000. has three golf
Governor, Oil Capital. Greek courses, two of which are munici-
8hip, Going Away. Dart By, pally operated.
Mr. Trouble, Lights Up. Insep- The city operates the nine-hole
arable, Piet and Rhy Guy. Granada course and the 18-hole
championship Biltmore course
It is likely that another Ken- which Is adjacent to the Veterans
tucky Derby will coma out of Administration hospital, formerly
Florida racing, and among the el- the Miami Biltmore hotel.
Iglbles to he here are Battlefield, ,
Uncle Miltle, Lord Putnam, Awav A third course. private and 18
Away, Imarellc. Count Turf, Bat. hole., is at Riviera Country club,
tie Morn. Sir Bee Bum, Liberty organized and built since the close
Rab. Bugledrums. Royal Mustang, of World War II.


Hurricanes

Have Booked

75 Grid Foes
The Citadel, Unlverslty of Pitts.
'burgh, University of Iowa and
Unlver.ity of Missouri are meet-
ing the University of Miami in
football for the first time this
year and they bring to 75 the:
number of colleges and univer-
sitles Miami has battled on the
gridiron over that period.
Hurricane schedules have pitted
Miami against all of the schools
In the state except Florida State
University and all members of
the Southeastern conference ex-
cept Georgia Tech, Tennessee, Tu-
lane and Mississippi State.
Purdue, Iowa and Michigan
State of the Big Ten; Missouri
of the Big Seven, Texas A f M.
Texas Chrlitian and Baylor of
the Southwestern conference
are other Miami foes, past and
present.
M1iami has an outstanding rec.I
ord in intersectional painy, winning
26 and losing to 7. Duquesne,
Michigan State, Boston U., George-

Best Defense
The University of Miami led the
nation in pass defense In 1949,


CONTINUED THU NOV. 30th BY POPULAR DEMAND
Becoas so many of youn were uMable to 9ake advantage of this offer
In October you have raked us for an extension. However, lInresed
costs will Met allow another extension. ACT NOWl
BUICK --
SPEC. & SUPERJi
PONTIAC 6 $ 7
OLDSMOBILE fer Par
PACKARD 110 Equally Low
Quick, Efficient { GUARANTEED }
Service by Experts I 111 miues or I yiar
Rglim 4 Wheels Complete with Pinest Qelillty Liningl Repaek
Prea Wkhl learings Complete Adustment Service and Imer-.
geauy Brake Beed and Reflll Hydraull System.
1i I


'iwn U.. Catholic U.. Texa. Tech. iHoly Cros., Vyaova and Pt0al
'eat Virginia. Texas Chratitan, all have fallen bfora .U10 .,
I m .. .....M


CHEVROLET



SERVICE


AT ITS




BEST!.


BILL COGGIN, MANAGER OF SOUTHLAND
CHEVROLET. INC. Invites you to come in and
inspect the facilities of the Southland Chev-
rolet Organization.


NEW CARS
TRUCKS
O.K. USED CARS
COMPLETE SERVICE SHOPS
,O GENUINE CHEVROLET PARTS


.0I01


L ASe^ kiC 1 n AI C DY U '3-0r,'70111I


We're the Boatman's



best friend

WE CARRY A FULL LINE OF QUALITY MARINE
HARDWARE, FITTINGS, ACCESSORIES


Coleman Kerosen Sitove.
No prIming 1491s
sees.ar, .


1 HOUR FREE PARKING AT MIAMI PARKING GARAGE
HAVE TICKET VALIDATED BY CLERK AT TIME OF PURCHASE


Marine Equipment and Supplies


HOPKINS- CARTER
HARDWARE CO.


Natleal harts
and Pblluetletns.


Phone 2.5195


Stores Also in Ff. Lauderdale and West Palm Boch


5.




-S



























-I


f 1.


. :.: .'

undgy. N.ev r Sg1, IM 1 ffl iM A A.",.


Trained In Florida
ji


, :'. j IE


~ ~*


GNBI. RACING NSS C. ORAL GAS -r0000


' !.


I-o


II


139 So. Miami Ave.


I .. J.. -- m i,

































































anywhere in the country
windows are also repaired


I Contributes


for You


aion. bun
along in


FOR NEW CARS
THAT DON'T NEED
STIAM-CLEANINS


See JOHNNIE & MACK First
for Any Top Quality
Automobile Service

INFRA RED RAY OVEN BAKED .
AUTO PAINTING... . 29


- -- *O-


CUSTOM MADE PLASTIC COATED
FIBRE SEAT COVERS
COUPE... 8.45


149 Seda


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CUSTOM MADE LEATHERETTE TRIM
PLASTIC SEAT COVERS. 12750
COUPE-... 14.95

CUSTOM MADE, THREE-PLY
CONVERTIBLE TOPS. .. 37


-


NEW TIRES ... RECAPPED TIRES ... RECAPPING . FRONT END REPAIRS
WHEEL BALANCE . ALIGNING . BRAKES . HEADLINERS FLOOR CARPET
FLOOR MATS. WRECKS REBUILT ... FENDER REPAIRS .. BODY REPAIRS,.
SPOT PAINT . DASHBOARD AND MOLDING REFINISHING .
WOOD STATION WAGON BODY REPAIRS AND VARNISHING BY EXPERTS .
SKILLED REPAIRS ON STUBBORN AUTOMATIC TOPS AND WINDOWS . .
NO OBLIGATION FOR ANY ESTIMATE, PROMPTLY GIVEN IN WRITTEN DETAIL.


Our Courtesy Bus Takes You to

Town, Returns You to Our Plant
Everythirty minutes, throughout the working day, our free courtesy
bus takes customers into theheart of the Miami shopping and
entertainment area: brings them back to the plant when work
is done on their cars. No need to wait for trolleys, or to find
your way about in strange territory.


AUTO GLASS INSTALLED


CRYSTAL SHEET...
DOOR 1 I .
VENTS i*V
DOOR
GLASS 4. 25 e
Labor on Hydraulics and Conv
Waons .n. .


SAFETY GLASS
DOOR I
VENTS LeV
DOOR L
GLASS O.S &
les, Tracks and Station


NO MONEY
ON BILLS TO


apartment.
























By Elizabeth Henney
Herald Fashion Editor


Fashions In Miami-Land Capture


The Look Of Bottled Sunshine


And Laughter.Of Vacation Days


'-.",,, '.- 1 / O N THE SEA.


6 ,, i!., ,o .,S soha 5 l
air-wherever y a ou
look you'll find col-
or, warmth and beau.
^ ty in this land of the
sun that is Miami.
All the colors
that Nature, at her
best, can produce are
i here In abundance.
And as if to. outdlo
/ Mother Nature her-
sei' those who man-
ufacture everything
from umbrellas and furniture to clothes, weave Into their
wares the sunshine, the bright tones, tht laughter, that is
Miami herself.
The clothes from this area have a bottled sunshine
touch.
Indeed the motto of the Miami Fa.hion Council, t)
which many of the nicinuracturers belong, is Falshions
From the Fountain of Youth,"
And v. hat are the clothes that are mozt worn in
Miami' WVhat d(o you w.ear when you xaca~ion in Miami'
To answer' that generally one would say-you c,in weear
anything andj sometinmei almost nothing here-and al;o
what you wear depends on why you are coming to Miami.
Here is a little story that may ans%%er the question
Of what to wear in the land of the Flamingo.


THE CLANGING BELL cut excitingly through the sun.
drenched air. Low. palm-shadowed houses flashed by the
windows of the sleek siler train as it slid m a stop.
Gaily clad people, red-caps, baggage carts, spilled across
lines of tracks to the incoming train, as Mr. and Mrs.
Honeymooner srepped into the perennial spring atmos-
-phere that is alx.3vays Miami.
Ahead of them, against a backdrop of modern sky-
scrapers stood the tiny, wooden Victorian station, called
"quaint" by visitors, an 'eye.ore" by the home folks.
But all was sunshine and loveliness and rosy-glow to
'them as they sped across the long cau.;eway, past the
oases of Islands that
dotBiscayne Bay and H
to the air-conditioned 1cIA
hotel on Miami
Beach that would be
their honeymoon
home.
There were lazy
days on the bright,
sandy beach, when
they sunned them-
selves to a copper
brown, or sat neathh
a big Utmbiella. and
ivatched the freight- w di r
er. nwo-e lowly and
majestically a c r o.ss
the horizon bound
for far away places.
Evenings they
s hopped along palm-lined fabulous LUncoln Road, where
the. great "name" shops of the world have their wonderful
wares.
Daytimes they shopped there too and along Miami's
Flagler Street and Coral tables' Msiracle Mile. Sometimes,
for Mr. H. (as bridegroomi will) had said "the sky's the
limit for my bride" so bits of antique silver, exquisite
linens, beautiful, crystals were added to the treasures to
take home.
The closets of their suite began to fill up too, with
sun.backed frocks, beach outfits. -such wearable cottons,"
exquisite cocktail and evening gon ns.
Even Mr., H's closet began to bulge, "Say. those bright.
colored shirts and beach outfits look awfully good to me."
*

IT WASN'T LONG before the telephone at their hotel
began to develop a constant tinkle. Friends. hom they'd
known up North, began to ask them to parties.
"Come out to the races with us this afternoon." "I'd
love to but what will
we wear?" Mrs. H.
would say.
"Well, we're go.
lug to be at the club-
house, so your hus-
hand will need a coat
with his suit, but he
can wear a sport
shirt if lie wishes and
no tie is needed. For
you, anything you'd
wear at homb for
spectator sports, a
light suit. a shantung
sports frock and a
small hat that the
/ wind won't blow
off."
So they went to -


the races, and it was wonderful.
Later they drove with friends
dinner, and sat in a Spanish patio,
play under a plrnm-haded arc.


-Herald Statf Photo by Fred Brent


'To Swim Or Not To Swim" is the problem of S. Upson (Bo) Jones, in his tug of war with Phil Kauper. Mary Lou Doinelly looks on.
Nature furnished backdrop of Sun, Sea and Palms while Miami firms manufactured all sun and sea outfits, chairs and umbrella.


to a'country club for
watching the orchestra


A few mornings later they were up before daybreak
to go deep-sea fishing. Mrs. H. was excited, not only at
the prospect of the fishing, but because It gave her a .
chance to try out another new outfit-a gal nubby cotton
in sunshiny yellow and blue, with a halter and shorts
and a shirt and skirt to button over them.
She'd found it at one of the big department stores
in downtown Miami.
She thought Mr. H. looked pretty spe,-iil In his T
shirt and tropical slacks on that trip, and lie pro ed to be
an excellent Sailor as the boat cut through the white-capped
blue waves of the Atlantic, and -rocked In the trough of
the sunny sea.
She was misty eyed the next evening when they went
to a formal dance. She herself looked like a wisp of a
princess in a floating gown of gold-threaded champagne
lace over billo'.ing skirts of tulle.*
She declared though, that Mr. H. looked just like a
movie hero in his new white dinner jacket with, a scotch
plaid tie and cummerbund sash at the waist of his mid-
night blue trousers.
*

THEY \WERE\'T the only ones who thought how
special they looked; as they danced under the stars to the
dreamy music of the hotel orchestra and the soft under- ;
tone of waves gently whishing against the sandy beach.
Other guests paused in their dancing to watch the
beautiful couple, so obviously very muck in love and "
whirling expertly through the intrilcate steps of a rhumba.
There were days uhen Mr. H. golfed and she lunched
with guests at the club, trimly outfitted in navy faille
with hat and gloves
to match and a gay
pocketbook and
shoes of fire e.iine
red.
There wete e t ie.
nings when thli ey
went to symphonies,
the theater or ito see
that amazing South
American game
called Jai Alai, where
men rushed around
a screened-in floor,
tossing a little ball --
back and forth from .
baskets that w%,ere| e e
fastened to their '' I/ \
wrists.
It was all too
soon that the M ,,imi '.' *. ci-. and they were
speeding to the plane that %tas to take them back to the
North.
As they watched the gSieat sil'er hiid13 skimming Into'
the big airport, waiting for the one to take them home,
Mrs. H. turned to her husband, her eyes brimming with"
mistiness.
"Darling, this Is the most wonderful honeymoon I've
ever had, even more gay and beautiful than our first one.
4.0 years ago."


-







1 .aE TiES MIAMI HERALD Sunday, November 19, 1950

PERSONALLY SPEAKING



.All Talk Turkey--


In Country Clubs


lAnd In Residences
By ETHEL TOMBRINK
Herald Stafl Writer
TALK of turkey predominates this week a. Miami.ins make
ans for family Thanksgiving Day gatherings. .Many will
lebrate the day at. home, others will meet at the Coral Gable..
viera, Miami or LaGorce Country Clubs where holiday din
I.^ r:W. winers v il be ei'ved. .Earl
^ya l.' i 'iz' w ~inter visitors will be cele
H brattng 'the day %itlli Miami
friends.
Added to the holiday week
end program will be a formal
dinner dance at Riviera Coun-
M Wtry Club and Miami Country
SClub's first dante or the sea
3on Saturday evening.
SFamily dinner at the Pmul
SOchiltree hone. 2'75 Pine
Sa. Tree dr. Nln oi Beach w% ll- i
(l, adei their hnoul:e gutai-, Nit
and Mrs. Carl Genuneg Mr
.i. Gediuneg, a nephew of .ei
l SOchiltree, and Nir (Genuneg
are het e fromni Ea:, ton. 0, fm-
two weeks. Also at the din
ner will he former Dayton rc-
idents, Mr. and Mirs. NI. S
Farrar, Coral Gables.

-Annual e a wAn OTHER early% winter 'i-
M$. S-CWEGM.IANN, JR. itor enjoying Miami's Novem-
-....Cerl Walden Photo bet- sunshine is Nirs. Genrge
i. Schwegmanr, Jr., of Washingtono... She and NMr. Schwegniann
ll return again after the New Year and take an apartment
bn Miami Beach. .For thi visit Mrs. Schwegnann i; staying
4t the MaefaddenDeauville Hotel where they had had a cabana






'1** *
for many years ... Mr. Sehoueg, ann is director of books for the
%rlind at the Library of Congress in the nation's capital.
THANKSGIVING 'DAY dinner marks the beginning of tile
lam Stubiblefields' winter series of parties... Carrying or, a
custom begun several years ago, the hosts will honor at the
thursday party, Mrs. J. Hunter Barton. Miami Beach ...The
annual December party will honor the James Marshall.;' %eI-
ring anniversary and in January, the Stubblefields w.kill enter-
sIn for Jrving Reuters, whoe ill be here at that time...Forntcr
jlaml Beach residents, the Reuters are building a winter honie
Orlando.


Austins Persuiladed To Stay On
HERE for last week's Ghil Scout conference. Mr. 4iNl Mrz.
rederick F. Austin were induced dto stay ol here for a whilee
erstead of going to Sea Island, Ca., as they had planned. It
'as his cousin, Richard L. Poor, and Mirs. Poor, .1 NE 7-
t., at whose home they are guert, who "i'helped" then chair.
aeir minds. Fihing and beaching have made tip ih.ir pro-
ram.
The Austins will leave Tuesday t spend Thanksgiving at
rbhome In BronxvJlle, N.C... Dr. Austin Is managing director
the Girl Scout magpiine, American Girl. -



l *
finio A her *Um-1it-10n! Yawallan, Xr, WIIIl~m F. Whit.
a*".41 a h, bill. return this week In tlm'e to celebrate
rhimkrovirng, with her famll),


For'her holeliay celebration, Mi-s Ann Simpsom chrse tin
go North. .Daughipr of thlie Harry E. Simpsonis., Coral Gahieq.
,Ann left Saturdday to be tie h,'ute guet of a former Harcum
Junior College classmate Mi'; Jean Eriwk?,:,n in Phiitmell. N I.
S She will a!ko spenrl t1.o or three dl,\.s li',.k at her al i,
inater, visiting her roommates. TauIn ('hew, Mi..mi Sl'ir'e-, and.I
$liss Joan Hunt, Miami.


Mrs. Horace Cordes-, Coral (;ahle-., will spend Thank%-
..liIng in New York . Her onii Ronald. a fIe-linan at
tDarnimoluth, ill join her there .. Mi.t' order leaver- Monday
a and her meek In New York %ill include some 'hopping fi
iCthe Cordes' new home hck-h the., plan on nioiing Inlt hiy
earlyy spring.
5* *
7B
.'Bolls Busv Meeting Trains


S MEETING TRAINS is. how Judge ani Nirh.. Geoige F
lolt will spend the holiday- . They'll be greeting guests
Irrlving for the Saturday wedding of their daughter, Christine.
ind Henry Kuriz . Their son, George E. Holt. II. Lill come
from Arden, N.C., here hlie attend' Chi it'. School, and Mr.
folt's brother and sister-in-law, thie James F Holi. will ai.
tive from Nashville . Three Georgian,, Mr-. Holt's teiCr'
Airs. Powell Cotter. Bainetille. MiS, Eloi-e Broc.ron, Adai'-
Yille, and Fitzhuigh Kn.':. .ir, Atlanta aie al-,) on ivi' ni.eting

? Through the week pntirtiinmenit intuiue f',r C'hrii-,iii
,nd Henry .. Todav M i. and Mrs. Rohert Pentlandl will tic
losts at a party abrhiaidlI their' yacht .. . Miss Jane.Thomas will
t.onor Chri-tine at a (1)1lie Tue-,l' at HIe hi.,me (fi h.:r
parents. Dr. and NMr'. Echiin Thomas, Eri,_Kell a.-- k.el'-
tecue supper hli-te-s \V\dnedl.y, Mit.' F;ilth Adnlims will eritrei-
ain for Christine and Henry'' and ne% l\ wed.l, Mi. andi Mrs. M.
Zewis Hall, Jr.
Miss Nornan 'ea-ter,. home from Duke Unlver-ilty. %ill
be hostess Friday at the bridesmaids luncheon . After
.,the wedding rehearsal later thai afternoon, NMr. and Mr-.
:Julian B. Frix, uncle and aunt of the hrlde-elert, %Ill Rive
a formal dinner for the wedding part In the Pan American
' room of the Columbus Hotel.
Aniotig the peddling attertl li wil [ill he th. Nih.-m.'- II',l!-i c
.-and Barhara Thinipinr., dntighters rof the .1.11.n G. Thr.rn.-ll,-.i-
'.at whnse wvF.liJg Cliiriaurie w.1c a lon.! tgi I.
** *
. THREE OTHER BRIDESELE-T, Mi'. Sa 1' 1 "iIme,
'li4s Mary Lou Donnelly aid Miss MtNIel iielo'kiLiai **. ill ht.'>.
lionors Tue'day . The party will he a toffee gien hy M I
Dudley Whuitman in the Whitman's Bal Harbour home.
The horjstAs is tlie sitr'r of Mi.-s Donnelly's fian.e, I.t.
.barry Lee Bonwit, and her husband i- a couiin of NlI. Pln-Iner.
.,bride-elect of Bob Kurtz ... Miss deYakimac'F fiance iq C. Carey
.4latthews.
Sisters %ill lie hoatle. and Iheir' i ter'-in-lav lionoiees
at a coffee planned for Nno. 30 . Mrs. Willaiam Roliins
'and Mrs. Erne-t Winton will enterlain that day in the later's
home, 1303 Sanlona at., Coral Gable'. or MrsI. Genir' H.
*Whitemide and Mrs. A. Frank While-Ide . The <;oigr
While'ides liae in Frnandina, billut Mrs. Whilt-ide nill be
Here i lsiling at ihatl (inie.
S* *
S INSTEAD Of cnlloing [nlth for lice winner, Mri' .lo',epli V.
,Sharip hea-led Nnithv ard Fri'hNy after c ri-l'd i iiii.-tl here
. . She will vacation in Wahington and New York for o-,,ie
h.ime before going on to her home in Cuba.
';* *
B BACK in Coconut Groave for thie winterr is Mir. ,Ni tion
K|Dall, 3981 Wood ave .... She spent the past six month- touring
SNew England and vl0iting relatives In Long Island . On her
Lway homeward she stopped In We,'hington to attend the 7Sth
jubilee of Mount Vernon Seminary.


New Florida State U. Pep Club Will Put -T BEAUTffSCOO'L
THAT OFFERS MORE
llIl II Fr lllWsI lllll srIll
S. nlls l i l h Ini li l Halir m* -
New Pep Into Cheers From Student Bod.y 1;_ 4 lAedieyo
Beauty Culture
By BEVERLY WARD arriong the frraerni Ie and ULu- v as lapped, repre.entIrig Phi Leslie* Ann Fagan ef Miami 14 1. 1i I! ll AwG
..-is d ,.St rf.f ,.ndn..t' alt y selects Its membnhers fromni' Delta Theta. -pleded Chi IOmeIea.


-i3eraiId Staft Phpto
BLUE SATIN jacket dress
with all-over, flowered em-
broiderw was .worn by Mrs.
George Barrett to LaGorce
Country Club's fashion show
luncheon. Black accessories
completed the ensemble,


Miss Holden

To Be Honored

By Woodmen
Ea;t Coast DIstrict 4. Supreme
l-Foii i:t Woodmen Circle., IIl en-
tPriain Mis Abble E. Holden of
Jd<:k-onville, t a te manager,
Wednesday
hen It ineetf
at 2 p. rn in
Redman Hall.
S. 3819 N. Miami
Oilther -tate
G irl C I a I i at-
j le n ding the
nmeetlng' will
be MNi-. Nina
Don Carlos of
Coconut
MISS H.tDI)EN G r o v e. state
ridnl di lticl president, and di-
tilci manager: Mrs. Pearl Davis
cof -' Lauderdale. state treastur-
Pi, Mrs Thoma Orr, Miami,
'l.ilte musician, and Mrs Walter
( mart, Miami. second state au-
d I I C.."
PRougaovillea Grove 310 is
-,,.r-. ..for the meeting. wlrhich
\ in Inrlude Initiation of candl-
itli- and Plectinr of nFflccr<.
r .-.i. r lf llh s pilpFir m ill be
'pi .d at R o fit net-i 'ler- aniI
li,:- fail ilP'-. aoll Ianr pen meet-
in,' is -tlh'edtleP l I -[i 7 ll i ll
S1. i..i th e a KaI i loiii l it l" thei
fl ,-i ^ nill 'pa-rlh-ipatea

Late Noted Poets
R'ili Be Honored
I .1 i i l .ii P ,K i' Piellt Gi1l41iLI1
I. ill I nIl iPr- i RWe d' at '.It I .
I i.r hilpt rf Nli M ai l ini H.
I .- .1111,11. 2'i M I ifIidian ate,
'if 1.....fI T d' Ih


I ll| fitf ilI II
[', 1, i .. I .- r I V i ia n
L,,inomre.Radc.r, poet laureate, -
irnr'lide electionss dedicated to
l.mia Si \ iicent Mila-i. Willlard
Wri'tiiesn and Clement. Wood. no-
I,.1 poets Q ho diedl during the
*,-,0r Prize winners in lithe
iitohlyN contest sponsored by
int. giotip t'ere Rulth Engle.
,rin..,n Oiler aind Michael Mc-
I 1?1111ii i

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-A A


Il. 5









Thanksgiving Tables


In Miami To Be Set


For Family Parties


First of the family holidays-
Thanksgiving-is fast approach-
S ing and many Miamtans are mak-
ing plans for reunl6n dinners in
their homes.
Dr. and Mrs. H. Willett Stubbs.
1781 Opeechee dr., will' be hosts
on turkey day to her parents,
the Rov A. Morrisops: lIer broth-
er-ln-law and Sistler, Mr. and Mrs.
James C. Dougherty. all of MNi-
ami. and her brother-in-law, Rob-
ert Stubbs. who is a student in
Emory Dental School, Atlanta.
Thanksgiving also will marlk
the llth birthday of the Stubbs'
son, Billy.
Mrs. Davis E. Sheehan, Ashe.
ylle, N. C., is expected to ar-
rive sox to spend two weeks
with the Morrisons. If she Is
Here In time for Thanksgiving,
she wilt Join the family party.
Mrs. Sheehan is a former Mi-
emian and she and her husband
once owned the Alhambra Hotel.
Turkey and trimmings will be
served to family gue' ls at the
home of Mr. and Mis. Homer E.
McCrillus. too. Their son and


daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs.
Robert M. McCrillu$, and their
young daughter. Janit, are drive.
ing In from Clearuater Wedne;-
day to be guests in their home,
5935 NE Fifth ave. They will
stay %er untill Sundav.
For yeari the Marion Owens,
270 SW, 25th rd and the R. G.
Buesipgs shared their Thanks-
giving dinners together since
thev were neighbors. This year,
hbwe~ef. the Buesings are in
Hendersonvllle. N.C.. where they
plan to make their permanent
home.
The Owenses are en route
home 'today from Gainesville,
where they went to see the-
Miami-Florida game. His broth-
er-In-law and %ister, the W. T.
Scotts. Ashburn. Ga., drove to
Williston to join them and
they attended the game to-
gether.
Thle Mitchell L. Gumbiners,
2550 Flamingo dir., l amli Beach,
are looking fcr% aid t. a Thanks-
giving visit from their son and
daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs.
Robert L. Mitchell, DeLand.


3546 Coral Way
Ph. 83-6112


1f


Bridal Gowns from 35.00 Evening Gowns from 25.00
OPEN 10 A.M. to 5:30 P.M. DAILY


OUR TOWN STORE
WILL BE OPEN
'TIL 9 P.M.
MONDAY


SANTA'S HELPERS, Cordl Gables Liorns Auxiliary, make
new toys Irom old to raise money to buy shoes Jor needy'
children. The toys will be iust a few c[ the items offered for
sale at the Auxiliary, s County Fair, to be qi'.'en Saiurday


Green, aqua or blue print. Sizes 9 to 15.



1261 WASHINGTON AVE., MIAMI BEACH


TU MIAMI&U UDAI L *.-K


Sun ar, numr .vmuises In S L rei n.I 9-M

Surprises In Store


A post office and country
store, featuring surprise pack-
ages from all sections of the
country, will be 'special attrac-
tion for the Kappa Alpha Theta
annual bazaar, Dec. 1 and 2. in
Coral Gables Woman's Club, 1001
E Ponce de Leon blvd.
Mrs. Robert M. Little, general
chairman, said the packages wilt
be sold just as they arrived
through the mail-in their'orig-
inal wrappings.
Christmas decorations;, includ-
ing centerpieces, as well as
han 'made linens, dolls and
white elephants will be sold.
Proceeds from the carnival


-Herald Staft Phoro
on the Coral Gables Elemenlary, School playqrcund starl-
ing at 4 p. m. Above, Kenny Charlton, whose mc.her i- on
ihe comrrmitlee, gives some expert help to I. Irs. Dorald F.
Peck, co-chairrmari, and M.lrS. Ray I. Weslcctt.


(THAT'S 'CALL ME MADAM' MESTA, AMERICA'S NEWEST LEGEND)


Hostess With Mostes' On Ball Gets The Drop First


By ELISE MORROW
WASHINGTON -The woman
who is rapidly becoming an
American legend, like Daniel
poone or Uncle Tom, sat at the
corner table usually reserved
for Princess Tawhida Halim of
Egypt; the Princess and her hus-
band were not lunching at their
usual spot in the Mayflower
Lounge.
From this royal seat, Mrs.
Perle Mesta, our minister to
Luxembourg, commanded t h e
room. It was a good, solid, de-
fensive position, with all flanks
covered. Like the venerable Ve-
nitian Gran Maestro in Ernest
Hemingway's new book, "Across
the River and into the Trees,"
Eric, the maitre d'hotel in the
lounge, would not think of seat-
ing Mrs. Mesta in the middle of
the room.
As Mrs. Mesta. ate her omelette
aux fines herbes, stewed toma-
toes, melba toast and melon, a
parade of friends, sightseers and
acquaintances streamed by. It
was wonderful to listen to the
variety of greetings which
ranged from "Perle, darling:" to
"Good day, Madame Minister,"
and included ''Mrs. Mesta," and
"Madame Mesta."
Madame Minister looked a lit-
tle tired, which is not surprising
since she had been up until six
that morning, and had had only
a few hours' sleep. Otherwise


she was precisely the same, with
her strong face, her firm nod
and brisk, shrewd wink, used to
emphasize Important statements.
I She takes excellent care of
herself, doesn't smoke or drink,
and is able to maintain a pace
that would wreck anyone half
her age. She was wearing a
splendid gray wool suit, wit h
black velvet on the collar -
from Balenciaga.
I thought as I watched her
now, like all strong personali-
ties, she has the quality of domi-
nating completely any atmos-
phere, without giving in to it
or becoming a part of it. Slhe
is always herself, and she domi-
nates in a relaxed and natural
sense, with no strain or effprt.
-ehe chic, rosy, gnosmlpy
Ionng makes most women
look the same the roomab-
sorbs what individuality they
have. But nothing can blot up
Perle Mesta.
"Oh, Perle. dear," a woman
rushed up, "do you mind if the
newspapers take pictures at
your party tonight?"
"No," said Perle. "I don't
mind. I don't mind anything."
A moment later I asked how
she felt about the elections, and
how she felt about Germany.
Mrs. Mesta said the elections
could have been better, but she


wasn't discouraged; one must ex-
pect setbacks. About Germany,
she felt very, optimistic. She
speaks, with an interpreter, to
groups of German women ap-
proximately once a week.
Someone came up and men-
tioned the enormous change in
the publicity Mrs. Mesta has
been getting lately, a much more
sober, non-frivolous approach,
showing great respect for the
job she is doing in Luxembourg.
Mrs. Mesta said she had noticed
it. She reads most stories about
herself. The woman said, "I sup-
pose you have a clipping serv-
ice."
"Indeed I don't have a clip.
ping service," the wealthy
Mrs. Mesta said briskly. "I
can't afford a clipping service.
They charge you 15 cents a


clipping and' I have better
things to do with my money."
The orchestral ensemble was
giving out with some genteel
luncheon music, and suddenly
Mrs. Mesta cocked her head. "I
think that tune is from 'Call Me
Madam'," she said. It wasn't, but
the first several bars sounded
like one of the songs from the
musical production that Is
haunting Madame Minister.
It was almost two o'clock, and
Mrs. Mesta had to get back to
the State Department. We went
out to get a cab. "Let me drop
you," I said. "No," said Mrs. Mes-
ta, "Let me drop you."
I "Oh, let me drop you," I pur-
sued.
"No!" said the Hostess with
the Mostes' on the Ball, firmly,
"I'll drop you."


will be used for aid to the South.-
eastern Florida Mental Health
Society, work with cerebral pal.-
sv children, and to furnish the
chapter house at Florida Sate
LUniversity.
Mothers of college members of
Kappa Alpha Tneta are assisting.


Maternity Fashions
AND ACCESSORIES
THE WOMAN'S SHOP
1815 Ponce do Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables Ph. 48-8877


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A* Iv







Sundav. Nnvmhetr 19. 1930


THE 1950 CHRISTMAS SEAL will come to, life in a television
I spot announcement in the Greater Miami area beginning
tomorrow. Inspiration for this year's seal were "small citi-
zens, of any American community," according to the seal
artist. Andrew Dugo, a children's books illustrator from Suf-
fren, N. Y. The trio above is from Minneapolis, I.inn.


SAKS


FIFTH


The climate in the Miami area
is like continual spring or sum-
mer. You need different cos-
metics in your home town dur-
ing the summer tiune and so dur-
ing your Miami vacation you
will need somewhat different
cosmetics.
First, you need to be sure that
your face is perfectly clean, even
cleaner than usual so that you
don't get skin irritations.
Second, you need to keep your
skin more thoroughly lubricated
than usual, so that the wind
and the sun don't dry you up
until you resemble a dried ap-
ple.
Third, our cosmetics need
to be more porous so your
skin can breathe freely and
you don't find yourself drip.
ping perspiration from the
forehead and utipper lip.
Fourth. .ou will find that
your perfume disappears more
rapidlv In warm weather, that
the "heavy"v and more exotic
perfumes must be reserved for
evening events, dinner-dancing,
etc., because even as early as
the cocktail hour they seem too
heady to wear.
How to get around the dis-
appearing perfume? Be sure to
geL the types with as much oil
base as possible, carry a small
purse container and refresh your
favorite scent a little oftener
than usual. You 'ill find floral
fragrances especially good for
datiIme use. and the light spicy
and citrus scents also.
Now for a beauty routine that
will help keep you looking fresh
a1 a dai'v and cool as a cucum-
ber. The first two measures are
what practically aty dermatolo,
gist will tell a patient with skin
blemishe? to dor. and to keep up
as a routine to prevent skin
eruptions.
These are. -rubbing with a
good soap (the dermatologist
usually recommends tincture
of green snap) and rinsing
with alcohol.


AVENUE


701 LINCOLN ROAD, MIAMI BEACH




Final




Cleara ne


Women's and Misses Dresses,

Blouses, Skirts, Bathing Suits

And Costume Jewelry


Last Few I

All Sales Final 0 No Exchanges o No C.0.D.'s No Mall or Phone Orders


*ays

* Store Hours; 9:30 to S:30


- -- "Remember, We Fit the Hard.to' -1it" -


Use Our Convenient Lay-Away Plan
Mail Orders Filled



(okahk&olU


Red, Brown, Navy Blue
Calf and Black Sued*


They'll head for the campus"
because they major in fashibn... and
strut to the office, too, since
they're such functional fashions!
Wonderful interpretations of the
new "covered-up" look that
are so casually elegant. All with
Risque's exclusive Airsol flexibility.


Tangerine, Red, Navy Blue,
Black and Green Calf.


30 N.E. FIRST ST.,
MIAMI


For a normal dally routine
however, any good, pure s o a p
that agrees with your skin is
all right. The trick is to lather
a rough wash cloth freely using
very warm water, and scrub
your face vigorously. Don't stop
with one scrubbing, (a doctor
will scrub his hands for many
minutes to clean all the dirt
out of the pores). At the first
scrubbing your. face will prob-
ably feel gritty under the cloth.
That is because the surface dustI
and cosmetics are being loosened I
up.
Then, rinse and clean the wash
cloth, re-lather with warm water
and soap and scrub again. Con-
tinue this until \our face feels
soft as satin under the wash
cloth.
Now, dry, your face, and pat
over it either rubbing alcohol,
witch ?azel or a good astringent
lotion. This process clois th e
pores and has a healing effect
on the skin.
Next comes the nourishing
part of the process. Using a good
brand of nourishing cream (the
kind usually recommended as an
overnight cream is best) work
it carefully and plentifully into
the skin of your face and neck,
particularly around the eyes.
Since scientists now tell us
that the skin will absorb in
20 minutes all the oily nourish-
ment it can use for 24 hours,
that is all the time you need
to let the nourishing cream
"set."
In the Miami area we have
iwo parnlctilarly good t',pes of
nourishing creams that are made
locally. Both use as base. tropi-
cal native plants which hae for
generations been used in their
raw states as beauty and me-
dicinal aids.
One is an aloe skin cream.
For years used as an ointment
to prevent and heal burning of
the skin and tissues, it has been
made into a beauty cream. The
base is the aloe plant, a species
of the lily family which has
been used for generations by the
Seminole Indians as a healing
herb. The cream is splendid as
a nourishing cream, helps pre-
vent sunburn and stimulates cir-
culation.
The other is a papaya cream.
The Empress Josephine is said
to have used the juice of. the
papaya plant as a beauty aid.
Now combined into a cream it
nouri'heF the complexion, and
encourages the growth of new
tissue by gently peellng the old
invisible flakes of dead tissue
from the skin.
If your skin has been quite
dry you may find that at the
end of 20 minutes your skin has
absorbed practically all the
cream. Pat a cleansing tissue
over your face to absorb any
excess, leaving just .a trace of
the cream to continue to nourish
your skin, to act as a sunburn
shield and as a foundation base.
Some women use a cream or
cake foundation tint, with or
without face powder over it.
Others apply face powder with-
out a foundation.
Whether you put face powder
over a foundation Or not, use
talcum or bath powder first.
Regular face powders are almost
universally too heavy for sum-
mer or tropical use, and will
cake on your face. This caking
can be eliminated by .i,-r1lv
dusting a light coating of talcum
or bath powder over your face
BEFORE you apply the face i
powder.
And there you are. Happy
holiday or happy living in
Miami!


PALM BEACH
PALM BEACH


d.r TUE MIAMI HERALD


.1


$895,o $1095
A Few at $11.95S


They have to hut a lifetime.., so what better-
reason for giving them the very beet of care! You
can depend on famed.for.-fit Exma JET'rcKS t
keep them happy, healthy, and eonstandy eusy
going.


ARNO SHOE STORES
151 N.E. 79th ST. 1646 S.W. 8th ST.
--AND AT -

FREDERICH'S SHOES
676 N.W. 62nd ST.


A TREAT FOR YOUR


* a


Howard Johnson's

FANCY ICE CREAM
INDIVIDUAL TURkEYS
Realistically Molded
HARVEST ROLL
Chocolate Ice Cream with a Center of Orange sherbet
rolled in Bisque crumbs. 8 servings.
THANKSGIVING PIE
A Flaky Pastry Shell filled with strawberry Ice cream
topped with luscious meringue. 8 servings.
TURKEY CENTER BRICK
Vanilla Ice Cream
with a Turkey Center of 'Chocolate.
Please Place Your Order Earlyl
Phone 9.6544


I 1631 W. FLAGLER ST.


Greenleaf & Crosby
Jewelers
1000 'LINCOLN ROAD
',IAMI BEACH
HOLLYWOOD BEACH HOTEL


Irresistible


gff M I-A M I rillwwmubw AnFnsw .... Fr ........... .. AW ....


SandaIs


/ 1


i
A. Flat heel sandal for tall gals with
short dates. Gold or Silver Kid.

B. Delicate high heel sandal with slender
ankle strap, Gold or Silver Kid. White Sat-
in (dyed any color free of charge).

C. Medium heel dressy sandal with com-
fortable instep strap. Gold Kid.

Richards Shoes, Third Floor


R All *ON SlIONCs




I CH4RlDS'
st"2. e 2414
N. MItAMI AV& A! FIST,( Phon* 241*1


t


Powder Your Face With


Sunshine--But Don't


Forget Cosmetic Care
By ELIZABETH HENNEY
Henral Beauty Editor


9 ^SHOE STORE


Look, Men, Here Is A New Excuse
CHICAGO -(INS)- Here's a cause lipstick has a protective
new one: value.
A doctor here Is recommend- The question Is: how many
Ing lipsilcl, for rmeh. -men can come out u ith red lips
Dr. Herbert Ratner believe It without being red-faced about
uill help prevent lip cancer be- it?


Minimum in *






Party








Influx Of Gold Coast Visitors


Heralds Not Too Distant Season


Sunday. November 19, 1950 THE MIAMI HERALD 5- -


TEXAN on a tropical tour is
Miss Margaret Bishop, who
Is with her parents, the I. H.
Bishops of Amarillo, ot the
Saxony Hotel, Miami Beach.


$10
No Sales Tax v

What our Comb Brush-
er Shaping is:

A wonderful shaping
that prunes away un-
becoming b u 1 k, but
doesn't change the
length of your hair.


What our Flexa-wave
Permanent does:

Gives you soft, silky
curls, yet long lasting,
too. Exactly right for
the new, slightly long-
er hair styles.


What a Comb Brusher
Shaping and Perma-
nent assures:

Dehiihted patrons tell
*ls their "sets" last
'longer . curls spring
info place with easy
c If-ehandlirn,
Richards Beauty Salon,
Second Floor


PFAFF


SEWING MACHINE


PFAFF


By HELEN VAN HOY SMITH
fleald Stafft WrLter
PALM BEXCH Early a'iv.
al of so marn' prominent col-
onists from the four corners of
the USA and Europe 6- proof
that, while the season isn't ac-
tually here, it's just around a
palm shaded corner. Many re-
sorters have been here quietly
for several weeks . More or
Jess quietlyha there hA'e been
numerous fmall parties and a
few ihar were reaUy of mid.
season proportion'.
Here for a brief stay this week
were Mr. and Mrs. Edward
James May, en route from their
Nassau honeymoon tn New Yojk
and J.ater to Pilttlhurh %here
thev %ll[ make their home. Mrs.
May Is the form-er Barbara Tut-


tie; daughter of+Mrs. Edward E.
Bartlett, Jr., of New York and
Palm Beach. Mr. and Mrs. Bart-
lett gave a cocktail party for the


Judge Townley Mrs. Townley


young couple at
on Jungle rd.


their villa here


Deep now In wedding plans


DOES ALL


FREE HOME DEMONSTRATION


Ph. 9-2727


134 SOUTH MIAMI AVENUE


Open Until 9


Monday Night


PLAN YULE PARTY
Miami Anna Miller Circle will
make final arrangements for the
Dec. 12 Christmas party when It
'meets Tuesday night at 8 in the
Elks Club, 9 NE Third ave. Pro-
ceeds will be used for gifts for
children in the Harry-Anna
Crippled Children's Hospital at
Umatilla.
SPRAY YOUR SCENT
Never put perfume directly
on the fabric of your dress or
suit. The sweet-smelling liquid
might spot the material or might
even injure the threads. Better
to spray perfume so that a fine
mist of scent clings to the fab-
ric.


FOR THE FIRST TIME


in Home Permanents




FOR SOFT

NATURAL

LOOKING

CURLY

HAIR...


!...Something New

0-O
V
*o 0 0


is Joan Halpine Smith, who
was a bridesmaid at the wed-
ding of Miss Tuttle and Mr.
May in New York on Oct. 28.
Miss Smith will become the
bride of Bowen Blair of Chi-
cago early in December, here
in Palm Beach.
The bride-elect is the daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. H. Halpine
Snmith,. Southampton and Palm
Beach. Her fiance is the son of
the William McCormick Blairs of
Chicago.
Mr. and Mrs. Frederick John-
son (Mary MacKinnon Johnson,
the artist) are again occupying
Lakeview House on the Ever-
glades Club grounds. The Mario
de Tullios who have spent the
summer in Europe are again at
their Via Marina villa. Gurnee
Munn came in late this week
from N. Y.. . Judge and Mrs.
Alfred H. Townley were other
arrivals of the week, opening
Casa del I4azial. They spent most
of the summer in Europe.
.
LOST OR STRAYED one
book, Fifty Fabulous Years, by
H. V. Kaltenborn. It's the prop-
erty of Mrs. Dcothv. Brine,
mother of Mrs. Rolf Kaltenborn,
H. VW's attrac-
tive daughter-
i n-i a w. Mrs.
,Brine read it
coming do w n
on the train
from New
York.
The o t h e r
night she and
Ethey Petit
Roche (M r s.
Arthur Somers
Roche) had a R. Haltenburn
cocktail party honorri the Wil-
liam Dickinsons of Philadvlplpia.
and the bool. n olteriau-Ie'.n*
appeared. Ni,:. B. .lia Pien on
the phone asking one and all if
they've seen it. Mr,. Dic kin.on
Is Joan Younger, Ladie s Home
Journal writer. Heor rothano
edits the Philadelphia Bulletin.
Dr. and Mrs. Rolf Kalten.
born will be down in Decem-
ber. Dr. K. has been assisting
his famous father in writing
the book, and mercilessly cut
it so much, that there is ma-
lerlal enough left for other
Tolunmes.
Word has been received here
of the ma' riaqe in Nashville on
Nov. ifnof Mr Ritchey Far-
rel Warren, daughter of Mrs.
Herbert Farrell, P. B. and Nash-
ville, Tenn., to A. Schuyler Clark
of New York, in which city the
couple will live. Mrs. Clark has
spent many seasons here. She is
the granddaughter of the late
Mr. and Mrs. Joel Cheek of
Nashville.

Sun Lotio 's

A Necessity

In Sunland
By ELIZABETH HENNEY
Herald Beauty Editor
Our Florida sunshine can
make or break your complexion.
A good sun lotion is a necessity
whether you're blessed With a
skin that bronzes easily or
cursed with a complexion that
blisters even after dark,
Three products made here in
Miami are just about tops in
their respective fields. One is a
tan stimulant, one a sun sub-
duer which allows you to tan
slowly and one a preventive.
To lubricate and soften the
skin while acquiring a good
healthy tan, use the stimulant.
It contains cocoa butter and lan,
olin and comes in an oil or
cream.
For a slow sunburn on a sen-
I sitiye skin there is a white
liquid lotion creamy, non-
greasy and slightly perfumed.
Incidentally, it's insured by
I Lloyd's of London against the
user's burning or blistering
(when used according to direc-
tions, of course).
Those whose nose turns lob-
ster red at the mere mention ot
sunshine will want the non-
greasy, nron-staining: preventive
liquid. Just spread it on and for-
get the sun. Happy holiday.
For further information aomul
the three products, call The
Miami Herald Shopping Service,
9-9433, between 9:30 a. m. and
1 p. m. Monday through Friday.
Written requests should include
a stamped, self-addressed enve-
lope.

When Are They
Wedding Rings?
MANCHESTER-(INS)-T he
question is not WHAT is a wed-
ding ring but WHEN is a wed-
ding ring.
A judge in Manchester court
who asked for a legal definition
of what a wedding ring is was
told by a jeweler's represen-
tative:
"A circlet of gold or plat-
inum."
But attorney Glynn Blackledge
had his own definition:
"A ring becomes a wed-
ding ring when it is placed on
the bride's finger at the wed-
ding."


. . a compact utility box for storing your Pin


Curl Clips.


SAVES TIME...

Less than 50% of the time normally required
for home permanents ...

* NO NEED TO SECTION HAIR
* NO NEED FOR CURLING RODS
* NO NEED FOR END PAPERS




$225

plus 9e Federal Tax
COSMETICS, FLAGLER OR FIRST


BYRONS..


SPECIAL
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OFFER...
GOODY Plastic "Squeeze" Bot-
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Flagler Street
Phone 9-3771


* PLASTIC BOX


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Helene Curtis Duchess FlexaWave


With Comb Brusher Hair -Cut


SCopyight 1950


It ''
i +'+,l


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S,. -'- ..-----:- ---- ---7, ,--7 ,


NO OTHER HOME PERMANENT
OFFERS YOU THESE EXCLUSIVE FEATURES


40A~L f METAL +
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* . made of Aluminum and STAINLESS STEEL . specially designed for use with
home permanent lotion. Rustproof Non-Corrosive.


* LANOLIZED CURL LOCK gives you a beautiful hairdo with-
out frizzed ends or Kinkiness.
'I-,


WITHOUT ATTACHMENTS


BYRONS ... Formerly Red Cross Department Store!


O N S T EP




ONE STEP


m m mm II





GA THE MIAMI HERALD Sunday. November 19. 1950


INTERESTED SPECTATORS rt walter sports events alt Maocfadden-Deauville Cabana Club
Include this trio, Miss Shirley Dyckes, h.1izs Patricia .''IcCord ard .1iss I .laTy Ann Srnith.
The girls are all seniors'-at Miss Harris' Florida School. Time off from studies frequently
finds them at Deauvile where they enjoy swimming and sunning. -Carl walden Photo


L.. /J,. ...Mo
S..OF FLORIDA
ANOTHER
M4INNA LEE
EXCLUSIVE
TO BE FEATURED IN THE ,
JANUARY ISSUE /
OF CHARM -.-


----------------1
SMINNA LEE SHOP
252 MIRACLE MILE, CORAL GABLES, FLA.
Nam ................................
Street ...... ... ...............
City & Stat. ........................
Color...... ........... Size ............
I CHECK ENCLOSED . MAIL PREPAID.
1 C.O.D. EXPRESS COLLECT
ADD 3% SALES TAX WITHIN FLA.


"SOUTH
SPECIFIC"
Our smartest cotfloQn
print, of perfect f;t
with velvet buttons
and belttrim . gives
perfection at a modest
'17.95
SSIZES 10-20
S BLACK ON BLUE
BLACK ON GOLD
IIBLACK ON COCOA






lip-


1--------------------------J
734.31 COI.LINS ArE.. MIAMI BEA4 H
252 MIRACLE MILE. (ORAL GABLE%
1.15 E. LAS OLA. FT. LAIUDERDALE
_______________ AIR CONDITIONED _____


BACK HOME
SMr's. LeiaidY M B,:aiw.rilht
ha I'uPIl ned onip. 25 NE
S.'vertlh st., alftr sper.iing tIhe
la.t five moriths.-in Columbia,
S.C.


Club World 40 Years Ago Was Round,

But Not So Round As It Is Today


By ROBERTA APPLEG.ATFr
Herald Club Editor
"Local civic projects will re-
ceive the attention of Miami's
women's clubs this week."
That story might have ap-
peared in the first issue Of The
Miami Herald, 40 years ago, or
it could appear next week. ac-
cording to pioneer Miami club-
women.
They agree that as far as their
activities were concerned, they
did practically the same kind of
work they do today, except to-
day it's on a much larger' scale.
The "larger scale" is the
key to change in the local
club world,- as it is for Miami
and The Miami Herald.
In 1910, there were only two
major woman's clubs in the area
-the Housekeepers' Club of Co-
conut Grove, with fewer than
50 members, and the Miami
Woman's Club with a "very
small" membership. Coco Plum
Woman's Club was organized
two years later. Everglades
Chapter of the DAR was a year
old, the Southern Cross Chapter,
UDC, was six years old.
That just about covered the
club world, with the exception
of organizations like the Four
Square Social Club on Miami
Beach, where women got to-
gether for an afternoon of visit-I
T,'Ir, thite are more than 800
w, omen's clubs, lodges, patriotic
groups covering every phase of


For
twenty-two
.,dr .
.1 Afiami';
excluoiv.e
inl'OetlC
"' .. pa,'!.,e ibop ...


ct-erM'l/ to e1
dic'criminating
clientele . .


/

~1'


11b he, Pink., B/,ak. Blue . 69.95
Huntington Bldg.q Momi. S E. fit St. end 2nd Arve.
Air Cond;tioned


activity of interest to women.
A majority of the.,e clubs con-
tribute to local uetfare or civic
projects.
The patriotic organizations,
although their programs have
expanded. were encouraging
the study of history and pro.
voting Americanism In 1910
as they are today.
In 9llO. the? Miami Woman'.
Club was building up the lihrary,
it sponsored. laying Tnon-v for
io charities lonly the mnemhers
crrved on'lstr jsuppers Instead of
sopnnsoring rana~ia pariiesi, and
barking orrldinanrc; f-or civic im.
r-rolEJreneu. Tcdai't, it. ill hacks
the librar, arid races pironre


every year for the area's great-
y-.expanded welfare programs.
Housekeepers' Club, too, was
engaged in charity work, today
it still raises funds for schools
and hospitals. Although Coco
Plum Club has t1%o years to go
before It celebrates Its 40th an.
nl'versary, It also had service
projects almost from the start.
One of Its first \,as a free clinic,
In the sparselv.settled South Mi-
ami section, to which mothers
could bring their children for
examination by Miami doctors.
Greatest contrast, members
aRtie. It in the tpe of program
pretentedl for the regular meet
ings. Earlier cliutbs depended en.


DRESSES s

You'll find -terrific values and
savings in this wonderful group
of brand new fall dresses. A
Complete selection of fabrics.
crepes, menswear, falles and
A many others, all sizes 10 to 44.


Special Purchase!
SHARKSKIN


SUITS

The suit that is made for Miami! So perfect
for wear throughout the season. Choose from
12 colors Including pastels, white, navy pond
black. Sizes 10 to 20, 14'/2 to 24'/2.


5


EXTRA SIZES- $14.95


GABARDINE


Everyone's wearing them . .
we lust received this big ship-
meet of the most popular casual
shirt we've ever had. Sizes 32
to 38.


TOPPERS
It's topper time and here is
absolutely the finest topper value
in all our history. A complete
selection of Pastels, navy and red.
Sizes 10 to 18. I


tirely on talent from within the
club to present papers, book re-
views, and music. There were
no outside speakers In those
days, and no guest artists.
The pendulum IF beginning to
s%-Lng back, some club leaders


H

,Pro

1e;


note-not because of any lack
of outside talent, as there was
40 years ago-but because they "
feel that too much emphasis on
spectator programs robs ipe.m-
bers of a chance to developtheir .g
own resources. .


air Stylist Re-Do Your Hair
0 Season Specia.
Complete
Permanent q
MishlnIs o rlerlelto I


* Contour Hair Cut
* Creme Conditioner
* Coiffure Setting Cemplet
S 188 SEYBOLD ARCADE


BEAUTY SALON14'
AIR CONDITIONED


BIG VALUE! Planned months ago! Beck's




hand sewn.


moccasins...our standard high quality...


still only


a. Cude loafse I tU. red or black.
lU Bridle bit in tan orred.


J4_imla veuUe BsnU0
PAY LTTE GT LT..THT' YURPUSATBEK


2 W. Flagler Street
(Cor. Miami Ave.)


450 Lfncol0 Road
Miami Beach


206 S. Andrews Ave.
Ft. Lauderdale


230 Clematis St.


39s


)9

S Selling so fast they must be
extraordinary! So get yours while
the quantity lasts. Genuine
moccasins of a quality you expect
at $6 and $7,..in styles for school,
sp ri or .us ta. ln i t .. v ,,


ssports or just taking it easy: Sizes
S to 10; slender or medium widihs.
"''- Miami Store Open Monday
~Evenings Till 9 O'Clock

: ] - -. m -



S TO SA% ER\ L MONEf, rend (heck or money order and
ve'll[ ,3v1 all .11 hr4l ni charge!
-'A. S. BECK. 2 West Flagler St., Miami, Fla.
P/Pos 'end m._--.-prs. Handewn Mrocca ins of 3.09
^ h S5W. P~i.- d SI ib |(.0-r


Name ..
Addre s s ...
City Zone---Stte______


West Palm Beach MnyOrd f- C.O.D. (.llte.. ell.ct)
West Paun Beach ___


TO ORDE% SY MAIL USE COUPON OR PHONE 82-6i1


Just Arrived!
STRAPLESS


It's new! It's wonderful!
You'll wont several of
these fine quality multi-
filament crepe strapless
slips with fagoted seams
and a smart eyelet as
sketched. Sizes 32 to 38.
Specially priced at only..


499


"SHOPS

|3 E. FLAGLER


| Se Habla
S | Espanol


Six Ways To Save At DIANA'S
New Fell "Colors '8
BLOUSES e ,o. 880
and Styles
B AG 5 All New Fall Shades $169
Reg. Values to 3.99
All Wool $199
SWEATERS ,wo s!
Cardigans .
BRUNCH COATSt*t,95
S L P Multi-Fiament Crepe $139
SIPS Reg. Valueeto 3.99
N YLO N S ofSlight Irregular 890
INYLONS of Reg. 1.29 Quality 0
,,~~ ,, ,l 1 .."'1 ;',
MONDAY MORNING SPECIAL

DRESSES '
Prints and solid colors in Cotton land Rayon
Sunbacks included. Sizes 10-52.
REG. VALUES TO 10.95


00D YOUR CHRISTMAS
SSHOPPING EARLY! ,

USE OUR CONVENIENT
LAY-AWAY PLAN!


D IA N A'S tksqWMq




Festival of Values


NEW FALL


-i


- I








w~, ***~L-~eV


%


TABLES on the promenade deck cl ihe Studentz' Club are
used for reading and stud'ying as w.,ell as -t..r luncheon ser'v-
ice. In this qroup are Mlanuel Rrmirez Irom 1.1-.ngua,
NIlcaragua: Alcy Berrinardes, Porto AlegrT. Brazil: Rclondo
Mcsvidal, Sagua La Grande, Cuba arind lTarta Lopez. Hava-
na, a freshman who Is taking anr English cc.urs? and lives in
one of the university dormitories.


BOATING ISA POPULAR DIVERSION for Latin American students at the University of
Miami, iricludini these Colombians who seem to be interested in sailing. Left to right are
Carlos Madrid, from Santa Marta; Alfonso Contreras, Gonzalo Pena and Nelly Galindo,
all from Bogota. Carlos and Gonzalo are studying civil engineering; Al.:.nzo is taking a
pre-med course, and Nelly is majoring in English. Small boats of various types may be
rented at the Studeints' Club.


DR. RALPH
tute of4he Ur
Mici Mriru(-,


iStudy Of English Engineerin '
ethe institute is
Ofnglisngineerigincludi


Lures. South-Of-Border Studentsf


:7


S. BOGGS, director of Hispanic-American Insti-
*i,'.'erjl', is pictured with Mrs. Boggs riqhOl and
conzaolz, secretary of the ristiut. Purpose of
s to aid Latin American students '..',lh -their prob-
ng language.
-Herald Staff Photos


I
I


the (Jiaml Xeratb
Sunday, November 19 7-E


Club Makes


Sick Room


Supplies

Club project, the loan closet
of the American Cancer Society,
will be discussed by the Credit
Women's Club of Miami when
members assemble at 6:30 p. n.
Tuesday for dinner in the Mc-
Allister Hotel.
Members are making supplies
at group meetings and raising
funds to purchase sick room
supplies essential to the home-
bound patient.
Next group meeting will be
feld at the home of Mrs. John
W. Kaiser, president, 2390 S Mi-
ami ave., Thursday night..
At the Tuesday dinner meet-
ing Mrs. Eleanor Shields, past
president, Will describe her trip
west this summiner. Miss Ruth
Coates, past Dixie Council presi.
dent, will present a skit on par-
liamentary procedure.
Plans also v.iI be made for
the Dec. 19 Cliitnias party. :
HOSTESS TO COUNCIL
West End Garden Club will
be hostess for the covered dish
luncheon when the Council of
Garden Club Presidents meets
at 10:30 a. min. Monday, in Simp-
son Garden Center.


CARRYING OUT her "good neighbor" policy, M.iss Peggy
Meyers (with book), an art student from New York, explains
ac English lesson to Itnacio Puiol (left) and Otto Ferndn-
dez, both from Havana,'-Cuba, who are studying engineering.
The other girl in the picture is Miss Marxine Michael, Bc.yn-
ton Beach, who is majoring in government.


color .
TO SPARK
YOUR NEW
COSTUME..


By AILEEN HAGERTY
Herald Soclehli Editor
SAlthough the University of Mi-
ami was founded only 25 years
ago the institution has won great
popular it%- with Latin .American
sctudenii from many different
countries. While the majority are
specializing in the study of Eng-
lish, others are majoring in en-
gineering, business administra-
tion and government.
Approximately 200 foreign stu-
dents at the university represent
26 nations.
For' the convenience of for-
eign students, the university has
established the Hispanic-Ameri-
can Institute, under the direc-
tion of Dr. Ralph S. Boggs with
Dr. Luis Rodriguez Molina "as
administrative assistant. Other
aides to Dr. Boggs are Edgar
Penick, Jr., an English profes-
sor, and' Miss Mary Gonzalez,
secretary. The institute was or-
ganizpd by Dr. J, Riis Owre,
now dean of the graduate school.
Puerto Rico has had the larg-
est number of students at the
university of the Latin Amer-
ican countries, with Venezuela
Cuba and Colombia next, in
the order named. Natives of
European and Asiatic countries
also are enrolled,
One of the university's out-
standing students Is the talented
Colombian singer, Cecilia Duen-
as. from Bngota. Prior to her
graduation this summer, Cecilia
was a voice sludent of Dr. Ar-
turo Di Fillppi, a former grand


opera singer who now heads the
university's department.
Cecilia came to the university
on scholarships provided by Ken-
neth S. Keyes and the Miami
Rotary Club, and during the four
years she remained here she was
aided by the Miami Opera Guild,
of which Dr. Di Filippi is execu-
tive director.
Through efforts of guild mem-
bers, Cecilia was able to go to
Italy this fall to study opera at
La Scala Conservatory. The Mi-
ami Opera Guild, founded ten
years ago by Dr. Di Filippi and
some of his musically minded
friends, now ranks third among
all the opera guilds of the coun-
try.
Outside of class hours, col-
legians of many nationalities
make a social center of the
attractive and spacious Stu-
dents' Club, one of the several
beautiful buildings on the new
campus.
The club has a huge cafeteria.
where wholesome meals are
served at moderate prices. The
cafeteria and the adjacent soda
shop have a seating capacity of
nearly-a thousand.
The club also has a.-imibl.
rooms, a library, reading rooms
and various facilities for recre-
ation. Nearby are tennis courts
and the club overlooks an arti-
ficial lake on which there are
a variety of small boats that
may be rented.
In talking with Carlo'- sIadrid.
civil engine-ering student from
Bogota. Colombia. he seemed to


0041 SHOES






Now you can wear those" wonderful, wonderful FOOT
SAVERS . fashioned for flattery, fitted for comfort
. featuring the one-and-only Shortback* Last that
hugs your heel so smoothly and snugly, yet allows ample
room at the toe.


If you're hard to fit . if you want a smart-looking
shoe that carries you tirelessly all day, all
places . if you appreciate fine construction, supple
leathers .. -here's the shoe that has everything


,. and here's the new shop that has every-
thing for your convenience, satisfaction and
good service: Air Conditioning, modern equipment,
attractive atmosphere . expert Fitters . and
a selection of styles and sizes to suit your needs
and delight your preferences.


4t14e


a u.1. PALt. Off.


SLICOL SHOES

821 LINCOLN ROAD


be very pleased with the living
arrangements that he and three
other boys had during the sum
mar school session. They occu-
pied one of the university apart-
ments, which they found to be
comfortable and convenient. '
This apartment has two dou-
ble bedrooms, a living room,
sunroom and ample closet
space. The rent for the six
weeks summer term was $33..75
and for the nine-months school
year Ihe price is $300, with
maid service once a week. ,
The university has 533 apart-
ments, providing living quar-
ters for approximately 3,000.
Some of the girls from Latin
American countries share these
apartments with other girls,
while others live in one of the
several dormitories on the cam-
pus The -'udent-' club solves
the mes- pr-oilem for many of
thpin
When I askd omine of the
Latin American students %n,"
they de'idrei ti attend (hie Uni-
vePI-i' of MNtNi"ni. tlhe i inrirv-
t,' ril me inat the in ttiri lOln had
trpn iecrnmmep.dd higllv bh'
f:-ierl I l.nI, hail r h n in iiari.
some of then Ii''nig been sru-
C'Fl'|I 1 f tho tlnj\f1: 1 -l ,.


W (JUionii OAIXL O~flVLOJXL ~AOIAf



...4OWdi9CYt4JJ9LO1WtO~VW44OVkt


MAYOR's takes, this opportunity
to Salute the Miami Herald on its
Fortieth Anniversary and Magic Miami
whose growth the Herald parallels.
Mayor's whose reputable career as

jewelers extends over a period 'of more
than forty years views the future with
hope and the determination to grow
with the community . and acknowl-
edge with appreciation the continu-

ing and ever-enlarging patronage so
vital to this growth.


IT A*Vs


REPUTABLE JEWELERS FOR OVER 40 YEARS


4-


Y' pe heard So o uch about them seen them pictured

in Vogue and in other leading publications .


* JOIN MAYOR'S GROW- A -DIAMOND CLUB

Start with an inexpensive but perfect
Mayor Diamond, then when you de-
sire a larger Diamond, trade your
first one in and Mayor's will allow
you exactly what you paid, plus 3%
interest per year, on your original
investment.

CONVENIENT, DIGNIFIED TERMS





, 8 ,THE MIAMI HERALD Sunday, November 19, 1950


Dazzling Costumes Designed For Beautiful Girls In. New


Year's Eve Event


HOMO AGAIN
Mr. and Mrs. Ernest R. Wil-
liams, 45 NE 45th st., have re-
turned from two weeks in Knox-
ville.

Chritmanas Special . .
25
ASS'T XMAS eARDS
WITH NAME IMPRINTED
TWO DAYS SERVICE
$1.29


Dan Ray's
DUPONT BUILDING


Inc.
MIAMI


* Russian


BERLITZ
838 duPont Bldg., Ph. 82-3686


QUEEN OF HEARTS AND SPIRIT OF CHRISTMAS
. you'll see them on floats in Orange


SCHOOL OF
LANGUAGES
350 Lincoln Road, Ph. 58-4132


THE H


Bowl Parade


Parade Gowns, Trappings To Outshine 1950 Glitter


From the standpoint of
original models and stylized
co6stumery, the King Orange
Jamboree parade Dec. 30 looms
as the most elaborate production
in the 17-year history of the
Oranw* Bowl Festival.
For the first time, the Orange

UNWANTED HAIR REMOVED FOREVER
bh Fleclrolil Sprcilalist.
* HI-SO* f si.nmria c al'tp maelilnr.
SM -prn--.u,1p iralfd PhSlilang rferpnnoes.
S. SIMON (Author of the book
"HU. IFIrE-"l
I110 Washington Av. Entll llt S..)
Miami Bench
HMrs. -1.12 I-I Events P'.
Ph. B.711 or 5.0T50l


Bowl Festival committee, head-
ed by W. Bruce Macintosh, has
gone all out with professionally
created gowns and other trap-
pings for the "American Holi-
day" phantasy on wheels.
- 'Never will an Orange Bowl
Queen have been so dazzlingly
garbed as the 1951 variety. The
bridal gown for the June Wed.
ding float practically steps out
or a Broad"a' musical honw.
No night club revue star has had
a more novel chapeau than the
firecracker mis in the Fourth
of Juhl display. Other co'tumnes


* French


*Portuguese *Spanish


5 Weeks


4 Hours Per Week


are just as sensationally differ-
ent.
After considerable research,
sampling and shopping, the
festival committee selected de-
signs dreamed up by Van
Horn & Son, Philadelphia cos-
tumers responsible for years
for many of the spectacular
outfits in the Quaker Cly's
half century of New Year's
Eve Mummers parades.
Although the costumes were
designed especially for the Or-
ange Bowl Festival, the commit-
tee has not been required to pur-
chase the finery. Besides, being
a non-profit, strictly civic pro-
ject, it hasn't money to buy such
elaborate outfits for two ap-
pearances-in the parade and its
re-enactment, along w I t h the
half-time show of the New Year's
day football game, at the
"Fourth of July in .lanuarv" fire-
works extravaganza the night of
Jan. 2 in the Orange Bowl.


TEMPTING WITCH
S. for October's float


Faced with the perennial chal-
lenge of producing a better show
each year, the committee de-
cided costumes on a more elab-
orate plane than ever before
were the answer. It worked out
a rental arrangement and be-
lieves It is the key to making
the parade one of the nation's
outstanding.
"We're also looking to the fu-
ture when nation-wide television
will bring the parade to shiver-
ing people up north as an addi-
tional lure to visit the Miami
area-a prime objective of the
Orange Bowl Festival," said Mr.
MacIntosb.
A preview of sketches by
Jenia MiL r Indicates that the
Orange Bowl Festival committee
has gone Ziegfeldian in its cos-
tumes. The millinery novelties,
alone, tlk'e the Orange Bowl pro-
duction out of the amateur class
and zoom it into the big time.
Reserved seats are selling like
bargains in a basement sale for
the parade and the fireworks
spl.tacle. Thev were told out In
1Pat^WPF),'$STear for the first
Sam Ti. McCornmik. Orange
Bowl ticket committee chair-
man. Saturday assured that
choice seat' %till are available;
warned though, that they
were gnIne fast; urged early
purchases to avoid disappoint-
ment.

Rabbi To Give
Review Of Book
1 Illi Iii vry Grauer will re-
',i, "I r ;- r 1 Revisited." by
H1,lpiI MNI.:;ii. when Congrega-
lini iPPII it' .isterhood observes
lepi ;h V.l.; Month at 8 p. m.
TrUrSlay.' ai .,,0 SW 17th ave.
NiMr. Sol Potash is bookmonth
chairmarTn. A display of books
nsa neon arranged, including
one nf ith earliest Hebrew pub-
lications printed In Russia,
which belongs to Rabbi Grauer.


I


PIX X

* JOYCE

* SELBY

* VITALITY


SHOES


* TOWN &COUNTRY


FOR


0 SANDLER


S0 NATURALIZER DE LISO DEB


* RED CROSS


* TWENTY-ONE


Pix Shoe Stores are truly proud of their record for 1950! Every single one of the above name brands and many others have been offered for sale at Pix
Stores during the year of 1950. We pledge to Continue these great money savers! Right now you can find several of the above brands in every Pix Store.
Remember not every size in every style, but always plenty. Pix record proves that you can save up to $15 a pair by serving yourself! At last Miami women
can shop in a real sample and cancellation store, and all at one price of $2.99.


VALUES TO 15
SAMPLES
CANCELLATIONS
SIZES 3 TO 10
AAA TO EEE


S


SHOES


SERVE YOURSELF AND SAVE/


23 W. FLAGLER ST.
53 N. EAST FIRST ST.
341 LINCOLN ROAD
1129 WASHINGTON (BeachY


IORSE BALLET OF CIRCUS DAY
S .. .. headgear to be spectacular
R e s e r v e d and grandstand purcha
seats for the parade on Biscayne or at
blvd. and reserved seats for the flee, (
repeat pageantry the night after
the Orange Bowl game can be


A, r Cooled For Your Comfort |


S. Is Flattering, Easy to Care
For, Made Smarter and More Care
Free.


PERMANENT WAVES
Our Solutions Are APPROVED,
TESTED %and GUARANTEED by
Good Housekeeping
500 .0 COLD WAVE
S* MAOHINELESS
e MACHINE
Oomplita
FORMERLY INCLUDES HAIRCUT,
10.00 SHAMPOO and STYLINO
POSITIVELY SELF-SETTING
GUARANTEED
OR
YOUR MONEY BACK

PRIMROSE
BEAUTY SALON
119 N.E. 2nd STREET
Off 1st Ave. and 2nd Street
PHONE 2-4613


1950!


ORANGE BOWL QUEEN'S COSTUME
. regal robes encrusted with gold
iased at Burdine's in Miami orders are accepted. Reserva-
the Orange Bowl box of- tions cannot be made by tele-
615 SW Second ave. Mall phone.
'1


21 WEST FLAGLER ST.
RIGHT OFF MIAMI AVENUE
STYLE and QUALITY without EXTRAVAGANCE

A T Sargent's these OPENING DOOR CRASH.
ERS GO ON SALE TOMORROW while quantity
lasts.
Sargent's never advertises unless he has terrific
bargains for his customers ...
MANY OF THESE ITEMS ARE BELOW WHOLE-
SALE COST.


NEW COTTON DRESSES


* FINE BROADCLOTH
* SPUN RAYONS
* 80 SQUARE PERCALES
COLORS
Pink, Aqua, Powder, Maize,
Grey and Prints.
STYLES
2 Pc. Sunbacks
with jackets
Buttoned to the
hem styles
Lace trimmed styles.
Sizes 46 to 52


REGULAR $1.29
RAYON SATIN

2 SLIPS
Lace trimmed . .
Whit*, pink, blue
Beautifully styled and cut


88C


SIZES
For Juniors, Misses,
women and extra sizes


88


REGULAR $3.95
100% VIRGIN WOOL
Original "Regina Gems"
SLOPPY JOE
SWEATERS
White, blue, black . long
sleeves . sizes 34 to 40
S. limited quantity.

$100


REG. 69c GOODYEAR REG. $1.98 PURE SILK
BATHING GAPS OMBRE SCARFS
WhIte, blue. aqua~a 36 Inches in 10 beau-88
wh,. ,.,'";34c "^o
ahirey, maize . t fulcolors . A
Asserted designs.:34, real buy . .


REGULAR $3.99
PIN WHEEL CORDUROY
SKIRTS
Smart tilored d
atyl with large 99
side pooket. Ju st
25 of these In
red 0osl., Sima
24 to I3


REGULAR $3.95
100% ALL NYLON
SWEATERS
All Nylon In malze,
whit, blIue, pink,
shry, izes small, 1 99
medium, larga a 99
Shert sleeves
round or square eoek
lines A real
buy.


REGULAR 69c
Lace Trimmed Rayon Knit
PANTIES
luse, pink, malte white with
OanBes wti( eler trim . Several
deslrabie styles.,

3 FOR 1


Regular $2.95
"Queen Mode" Plastic
RAINCOATS
WITH HOODS
Fall aut and full 0
length. Can be wore
3 ways with bel t.
Blui, grey, ruse,
a&s. Sizes 10 Ito 20
. . While liO sIt.


AIR OONDITIONIED FOR TOUR COMFORT


THE SPIRIT OF FOURTH OF JULY
.... red, white and blue with firecracker hat


.fT Short Courses


I


Membership Limited--ENROLL NOW!

Day or Evening


RECORD


* PENALJO

* CAPEZIO

* PEPPY STEP


mm


I






Sunday, November 19, 1950 THE MIAMI HERALD 9-E

















^y^^^^^".H^ -~ -- \
V ^^ /*^-.-....., ^ ,... *




.^ ^ ^ -*. ..?.* *



JI.


.5. -


-


THE HEART OF FASHION IN TROPICAL AMERICA ,

Fashions for the tropical way of life . charming, capricious Miami's own pattern for

living. . part sunlight. .. part shade. Fashions created for idyllic carefree days and Miami's

moon-filled nights .. Fashions for Miami this winter.., for all of America next summer

.. remember ... THE HEART Of FASHION IN TROPICAL AMERICA IS HARTiEY'S.








io SO1-Et Sunday. NovembrO
Miami Made Resort Cllothes Are High Fashion Miami Garment Business dyo
f^^ 1 I -~ UX C li l'i l'l'i1iIii(miirni inni irirririll'nlllillC


CHECK in navy with
navy tabs feature suit
a left by Fashion of
Florida. Garden apron
pocket for a handy
c a r r y a I I distinquishes
striped cotton sepa-
rate by Fashions In
Bloom, right.


HAREM PANTS, with wool
tasseled drawstring fea-
ture play costume upper
left. They're of yellow and
black print cotton and
-were designed by Ruth
Starling. Pullover beach-
coat, below, with smock-
like yoke treatment and
buttoned sleeves is by
Sodi. All outfits are Miami
designed and Miami made.
All are available in Miami.
To learn where, call the
Herald Shopping Service.
.9-9453, Monday through
Friday. 9:30 a. m. to 1
p. m.When writing enclose
stamped, self-addressed
aivelepe.


By WILLIAM BRADY, M. D.
: It is pretty well established, I
think, that the everyday diet of
,most American children, youths
and adults is deficient in from
three to six of these essentials
of good nutrition:
BTh a inm in e (Bl), riboflavin
(B, talcium, phosphorus, io-
,din, vitamin D.
Deficiencies of these vitamins
'and minerals through a period of
.ears account for a great many
minor ailments which in most
In-tance; do not come under the
care of a physician unless some
accident or acute illness requires
medical care.
Refined white flour in bread,
-cake, pastry, puddings, and re-
fined white sugar in cake, candy,
.sweet "desserts," ice cream, syr-


up and sweetened beverages sup-
ply more than half of the
calories in the everyday diet of
these children, youths and
adults.


available in the pamphlet Wheat The whole grain or cracked
to Eat-ask for it by name (no wheat meal or flour from which
clipping) and enclose stamped nothing has been removed sup-
envelope bearing your address, plies child or adult with 200
Wheat as it comes from the times more minerals than re-
thresher or cracked or ground fined white flour-minerals in-
to meal or flour from which dispensable foi ir..-. g',' -i.
nothing is -1' 1.-, v;1 ithe rich- development, rii..lri nal eficiun.
est natural !'....I i,' e of vi- cy, vite.
tamin B copir., 'x :riel ,i addition signed wii,.- n.'r rr..re fhan .re
a good source of vitamin A and page or I4,'.,,'.,- jong, pertaining to
personal neal nr.J hygiene, not to
vitamin E. Indeed wheat germ disease, diagnoi;. *.r .-.i.nvi will be
answered by Dr Fiuad :r a ,taftiped
oil is the richest source of vita- .cr addressed (,i,,i.. i. r..-],..a Write
min E. snir in care I ln Hu. .,-iia Allow
in E. m,, weeks for reply.


Over 21
CHICAGO -(INS)- A recent
survey conducted among 135,000
teen-age girls in Chicago shows
that just over 21 is the age at
whrch most girls wsnt to marry.


Graduates r rom uiapers


To Dazzling Diadems


Born in depression and nursed
as a war baby, Miami garment
manufacturing s u d d e n ly has
emerged from adolescence as an
estimated $22,000,000-a.year in-
dustry employing 2,500 persons
at $7,0q0,000 annually.
Ten firms alone are credited
with producing about $1,000,000
each, annually, in the growing
fashion industry.
As a result of such growth,
Miami now is accounted one of
the leading 19 garment centers
in the nation. Most of the
development came about within
the last five years.
In 1929, there were two small
needlework plants in the city.
By 1942, there were not more
than a dozen. Today there are
110, including three founded
since the first of the year.
Begun purely to serve local
resort fashion needs, the in-
dustry now has assumed a
year-round business, Including
fall and winter wear, furs and
accessories.
At the same time, the market
has widened to find outlets in
all 48 states, Hawaii, the Union
of South Africa and the French
Riviera.
Even merchants in near-Arctic
Alaska offer garments made in
sub-tropical Miami.
The Miami Fashion Council is
credited as being the generating
force for development of the in-
dustry.
Founded in 1942 with nine
members, then a majority of the
manufacturers in the city, it now
has 49 members and lays down
stringent rules for acceptance of
others.
The council offers November
and February showings in New
York, as well as October and
January showings in Miami for
buyers from all over the country.
In 1949, the Florida Apparel
Association was organized, It
claims 25 members.
Besides attracting bonafide


What Pop Says

Goes--Even

With Margaret

NEW YORK -(INS)- Presi-
dent Truman did his bit recent-
ly to make sure that his
daughter, so p r a no Margaret
Truman, stays on key with
those high notes.
The Chief Executive, while on
a one-day trip to New York to
address the United Nations,
stopped off at the hotel where
Margaret has been living for
the past few years.
Miss Truman was not at home
at the time because she had a
concert engagement in Hart-
ford, Connecticut, for the same
day.
The President was anxious to
see her apartment for the first
time anyway and made a father-
ly tour of inspection in her ab-
sence. He expressed himself as
being pleased with what he saw.
While in the living room,
however, the Chief Executive
tried out the piano that Mar.
garet uses for practicing her
scales. He immediately pro.
nounced it out of tune.
As soon as he got back to
Washington, the President
called his daughter and told her
all about it.
Margaret admitted she had
known all along that the piano
needed tuning but had put off
the job because she knew she'd
be away on tour for some time
and would not be needing it.
Mr. Truman, apparently, was
not much impressed by this line
of reasoning.
The piano was tuned immed-
iately by Margaret's order.


needlework manufacturers with
& better-than-average domestic
market, health and personnel fac-
tors in a Miami location, aerial
trade gateway for the Americas,
the industry has brought with
it a growing number of pro-
ducers of accessories, including
makers of jewelry, pocketbooks,
handkerchiefs and shoes.
The industry here currently
is being studied for records by
the Universities of Florida and
Miami.
More than 3,500 sewing ma-
chines in plants currently are
attempting to fill record orders
for summer garments contracted
during February showings to the
trade.
Industrial engfheers say that
because of what they call
"uniquely superior conditions,
production per man-hour is
raised as much as 30 per cent" in
Miami, while "climatic conditions
cut plant construction and main-
tenance more than 10 per cent."
"We are expanding so rapidly
in such a short time," says Mor-
ton Leon, ex-president of the Mi-
ami Fashion Council, "that for
the moment we have exhausted
the ordinarily adequate and ex-
panding local labor market."
Records of the Florida State
Industrial Commission s how
nearly 500 positions in the Miami
garment industry went begging
in January.
"We expect, however," a d d s
Leon, "that continued heavy pop-
ulation increases and the coming
slack period for our industry will
help bring the employment prob-
lem back on an even keel."


HARRIET[


A new and beautiful store
on Miami Beach for women
featuring flattering bathing
suits and beachwear by our
leading designers..
up to the minute coordinates
. . active and timely sports-
wear and accessories ...
beautiful lingerie , and
for glamorous legs .. .
sheer, dusty nylon hose.


STROKE

















You'll look so smart in our
exquisite fashions of dis-
tinction ... Stunning cock-
tail dresses .,. impeccably
designed suits., .exotic
evening Wear featuring
sweeping silhouettes ...
trim sleek lines. new
textures and startling
colors. Whatever your
choice for this season ..
you'll find rich and
e .-:.rri new fashions
at Harriett Stroke.

Air Conditioned


'3


Air Cgnditioned


for women


Plain Wheat Is Chock Full Of Vitamins; Use It In Diet


AILIR P
A~~~ L R/iE~
SHE 6T A


MMM9









































































































































Black, Brown
^r^*Red, Green
White Calf

BKLres


Sunday. November 19. 1950 THE MIAMI HERALD 11-9


Feathers And Fedoras


Are Smartest Hats Now;


Berets Loom For Spring

By PHYLLIS BATTELLE
InterusUmnal News Service Woman's Editor
NEW YORK New York's best milliners feature feathers,
fedoras tand folderol for fall.
And as If-f-f-f that weren't enough F's for fall fashion,
they've also got fluff!


.m'


-L

DRAPED APRON and bustle
bow feature this bolero strap-
less frock of cotton in checks
of lime and black. Made by
Miami Casuals, one of the
newest rtianufacturers in the
area, it combines style, prac-
ticality and moderate price.


Music Club

Asks Husbands

To Reception

Coral Gables Music Club will
honor its president, Mrs. Thurs-
ton Adams, at a reception in the
home of Mrs. George Pawley,
4412 Santa Maria sat., Coral Ga-
bles, Tuesday at 8 p. m.
Club officers will assist Mrs.
Adams, who is serving her se'-
ond year, in' the-receiving line.
Guests .will include husbands cr'
members.
The musical program will In-
clude two piano -select:ons.
played by Josephine Ritchie and
Mary Ellison, and vocal num-
bers sung by Irma Prosser.
Mrs. Claire Whitehurst is chair-
man of refreshments, and past,
presidents will pour.


It's true . the F's have it
in fall headgear, and the great-
est of them all is the feather.
Seldom before in any one
style season has a woman so
resembled a bird. The most
formal as well as the most
casual of hats are being
trimmed with plumery. Some-
times it's gay-colored with
dyes, but more qften the feath-
ers are in more subtle and
somber hues.
Burnt ostrich, for instance, is
the feather of the year for for-
mal wear.
It's being treated to, resemble
the swanky aigrette, and
splashed aJl over satin, velvet
and felt hat brims for after-five
wear. Often, the pseudo-aigrettes
even dangle over wide brims to
form a veil effect over a lady's
face. The tips of the feathers
just cover her eyes.
Second in importance to os-
trich plumes are quill-type feath-
ers which sail out in unveiled
flippancy from more casual '
headgear.
They're usually featured in
forestry brown, green and or-
ange hues, ala the pheasant and
quail set.
The fedora-and other ver-
sions of mannish hats-have
top billing in the "sporty
woman's" department. Millin-
ers quite frankly refer to this
trend toward masculine modes
as the only really new-look-
ing trend In headgear.
It stems, of course, from the
casual feeling that designers are
putting in tweed and fleece
coats and suits.
When a lady wears a fedora,
she needn't necessarily look like
a 1950 George Sand, because
most of the male-type millinery
is softened with denting or tuck-
ing of the crown, with little
pouf-feather trimming tucked
into the hat band, and with veil-
ing that covers the hat and the
face below it.
As fr folderol, hats take it
on in the form of colored
beads, pearls, silk braid, se-
quins and other versions of
feminine didoes.
Little jeweled hats are excel-
lent for ntheateret and dinner wear.
But they're plenty pleasing for
daytime.I
N.) i1oU- of the day is con-
. sidered too early to be be-
%jeweled this year:
Next spring, milliners are al-
ready predicting, the beret will
come Into Its ovun as the biggest
silhouette of 19.51. So there are
plenty of brets available now
which will be in higlh,-fashlon
within six months.
Watch especially for the for-
ward-posed beret which is stiff
enough to jut out over the fore-
head and stay there.


MILLINERY MASTERPIECES are these, straight from a Vogue luncheon at the Plaza
Hotel in New York. White glycerine feathers top the jewel tone hat in garnet lyons vel-
vet, worn with matching capelet, by Anita Andra, left. Huge knob of embroidered rhine-
stones, pearls and sapphires is the eye catcher on the evening hat of white hatter's plush,
shown by Stage Star Lina R6may. One teardrop pearl pendant hangs from the inverted
V of the hat. -International News Ptotos

BEACH FASHION GUILD SAYS



Men's Wear Will Grow Bolder


The Men's Fashion Guild of
Miami Beach has prepared the
following forecast of men's
styles which are expected to set
the pace for the 1950-51 season.
It also makes an ideal guide for
your Christmas shopping list.
CLOTHING: Bolder patterns
lead. Gabardin and trop-
ical worsted suits still re-
tain popularity, though shark-
skins, both in fancy and in salt-
and-pbpper effects, will become
increasingly popular.
CASUAL COATS: Lightweight
fabrics again stressed. Solid col-
ors predominate though hounds-
tooth and small checks are gain-
ing. Linens are being used
for the latest in this nonchal-
ant type jacket.
SLACKS: Gabardine leads


both in solid colors and patterns.
All-wool fabrics in lightweight
are popular in checks, stripes,
and solid colors.
DINNER SUITS: Midnight
blue is newest for the dinner
coat. White dinner-jacket re-
mains a favorite.
SPORT SHIRTS: Printed sport
shirts in washable fabrics will
be the biggest thing. Slipover
shirts, made to wear either
tucked in or out of the trousers,
are favorites. Plaid is again pop-
ular. Washable cottons should
increase in favor.
DRESS SHIRTS: Button-down
oxfords good, although the
round-cornered collar in oxford
and broadcloth is gaining.
TEE SHIRTS: The name
means little since these shirts


Two Miami Girls Tot-Lots Save
Plan Vacation Toting Tots


Making plans for a vacation
trip soon, are Miss Joanne Cow-
an, daughter .of the Fred Cowans,
and Miss Elsie Crane, daughter
of the J. D. Cranes. They will fly
to New York to see friends and
then go to the Buck Hill Falls
resort in Pennsylvania.
Joanne also plans to stop in
Lynchburg, Va., where she will
be attending Randolph Macon
College next year, and in Wash-
ington, D.C., to see Miss Dorothy
Doyle, a student at Mount Ver-
non Seminary.


CHICAGO (INS)- An in-
creasing number of cities are
providing neighborhood "t o t-
lots" for small children of pre-
primary and primary school age
making it unnecessary for par-
enis to send their young a long
distance to playgrounds.
A typical example of this play-
ground development is in Cam-
bridge, Mass., the American Pub-
lic Works Association reports,
where during the summer 12
"tot-lots" were acquired and
equipped.


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Open Monday
Evenings Until 9


$9.95


I


II


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VOGUE
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING


"The Store Reliability Builf"


p.


have become accepted in a va-
riety of styles bearing little re-
semblance to the original crew-
neck shirt. Open-vents with
either two or three buttons, col-
lar attached, are popular.
NYLON SHIRTS: While the
demand for plain nylon shirts
has diminished, men can look
for a boom in this type because
of planned variety in patterns.
CABANA SUITS & BEACH
WEAR: Terry-cloth is the big-
gest thing for the beach-jacket.
Trunks are mainly the boxer
type, and cotton i' being used
more due to its ability to with-
stand the salt-water.'
WALKING SHORTS: These
are becoming a "must" for the
style-conscious man, and they're
being patterned after the better-
made slacks.
NECKWEAR: Narrow shaped
ties head the field. Bolder pat-
terns are being shown.


I III I ~ ~~~I t "'H,.


Does Your Temper Grow Shorter


As Yule Gift List Grows Longer?


By JOHN ROBERT POWERS
As the shopping time before
Christmas grows shorter, most
women find that their gift list
grows longer.
But those who enjoy the sea-
son to the utmost are women
who reverse the situation. You
are just the girl to do it, too,
All it takes is the following
shopping wisdom.
1. Instead of waiting for in-
spiration, scan your newspaper,.
catalogs and magazines for gift
suggestions. When one seems to
go well with a name on your
list, clip it out. But double-check
before you pin it with finality
beside the intended recipient's
name. to make certain that it
jives with his or her tastes and
desires and will be enjoyed.
MAKE A LIST
2. After selecting all the gifts
you can from ads, make a classi-
fied list of their sources.
3. Then, sit down at once and
write a firm, clear order to all
the stores on your list. Presto!
The filled orders roll in-with-
out your even having to leave
the house!
4. Make a second list of the
unusual, selective ideas you
have for gifts. Classify them ac-
cording to store departments.
When you are ready to go to
town to visit your favorite
shops, you'll save many a step
and much confusion by having
a written itinerary of your ports
of call. You'll be amazed to find
how many you can cover in
just one shopping trip!
ELIMINATES FATIGUE
When you approach your
shopping problems in this busi-
ness-like fashion, you eliminate
most of the fatigue and frustra-


Here's a plan that takes the stress and strain out of buying
Christmas presents! Try it!


tion, and may even find them
a source of inspiration and en-
joyment.
P. S. From J. R. P.
"YOUR CROWNING GLORY"
This booklet shows six excit-
ing, exquisite individual hair-
do's .. . One each for the six
types of faces. Each hair-do is
designed exclusively for
John Robert Powers by world-
famous Hair Stylists. See them
modeled by Powers models of
various types and age groups.
Front and rear views of each


hair-do are shown so you'll find
it easy to adapt the one best
suited for your personality. It
tells you how to determine
your type-quickly, easily.
Write to me in care of The
Miami Herald and enclose 10'
cents in coin plus stamped, self-
addressed envelope.

BACK FROM ISRAEL
Mr. and Mrs. David Freedman,
1030 Washington ave., have re-
turned from a 10-week trip to
Israel.


BEAUTIFULLY RESTYLED by
VINCENT RENO
..%

Your hair cut and shaped in the most
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Plus the $A Restyle above ........ $12.00



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111 S.E. SECOND STREET DIAL 9-4783


For the Best Christmas -- Buy the Best Piano


The Baldwin-Built


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piano when you buy a Baldwin-built Acrosonic.
A demonstration of the Acrosonic's amazing tonal
q,iality and exclusive "full blow" active will con-
vince you.
A deposit now assures delivery of your Acrosonic
for Christmas (or before) on today's-prices and
terms.


priced from $73500


with bench


Only 10% Down 3 Years to Pay
Exclusive Representative


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OPEN EVENINGS
TILL 9
(Except. Sat.
Till 5:30)


Ph. 82-4616


Presenting the New Fall












Smarter Shoes for Natural Walking




Smarter Shoes -for Natural Walking






12-E THE MIAMI HERALD Sunday, November 19, 19350


(St. Joseph's Ceremony


Joins George A. Lyall,


Miss Evelyn Schutterle

: Miss Evelyn Charlotte Schutterle chose a white organdy
frock with chapel train for her marriage to George Albert Lyall
at 2 p. m. Saturday. The Rev. George Rockett officiated at the
double-ring service in St. Joseph's Catholic Church.


The bridal gown was made
Kith a deep, scalloped bertha
,, collar below the rounded neck-
line. Fullness was let into the
Skirt in tiers. Full e'piith gli%\r- a
were of matching ctgainlh'. T'ie
Sfingertip veil of illusion was
held to a bonnet. The bride car-
ried an orchid with chrysanthe-
,. mnums and stephanotis.
r The bride is daughter of Rein-
hold Schutterle, who gave her
\ In marriage, and Mrs. Schutterle
:t of 990 NE 171st st. The bride-
f, -groom is son of Mrs. Isabel
SLyall, Eagle Pass, Tex.. and Alex-
; ander Lyall.
Findley Howard of Guatemala
,.,City was best man. Ushers wtre
Les Brissette rnd Lester Cun-
ningham.
IN AQUA ORGANDY
Miss Evelyn Edwards was
maid of honorr in deep aqua or-
gandy over taffeta, made with a
brief cape. Miss Ruthe Lyall, the
bridegroom's sister, was brides-
maid in pale flamingo organdy
oter taffeta. Both carried white
and flamingo colored flowers.
John Doel was soloist for the
wedding and John Morrell, or-
ganist.
The briide's parents were hosts
at the irerptioin in tiitir hrnie
after tte ceiernony. MI.s Chaii'v.,
Danluck ept tie guie-r bok-. A,-
sisting the hosts were Misses
Dorothy Wells and Katheryn Mc-
Farland.
The bridegroom's mother and
sister came fiomn Eagle Pass for
the wedding anid Mr. and Mrs.
Cha,-JE4 Stunl:ei and daughter


and Mr. and Mrs. B. A. Bower,
from Jacksonville.
The couple will honeymoon in
Nevada, Mexico and Texas and
make their home in San Salva-
dor after Dec. 10. For traveling,
the former Miss Schutterle wore
a beige wool gabardine dress
with dark green cape and acces-
sories.

Miamians Busy

At Brenau
GAINESVILLE, Ga.-Miss El-
eanor Peterson, sophomore at
Brenau College, has been named
to head the negative morgue of
the college Public Relations
Board. This committee works in
co-operation with the photog-
raphy committee in connection
with the yearbook and the school
paper.
Miss Peterson is the daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Peterson,
2400 SW 13th st., Miami and is
a student of advanced photog-
raphy.
Miss Jean Seller, sophomore,
has been named student chair-
man of the college Public Re-
latiohs Board, which is made up
of members of the advanced
.joinU nljiim and photography.
classes.
Miss Seller, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. E. E. Seller, 147 SW
2rnd st., Miami, is also a head
of the committee to study the
improvement of the Alchemist,
the school paper.


Br-LIEsyancy Sasser
'BUY-LINES^Vb
S .-* ''"' .'* .*^ ;?; S^ L
S.... A Weekly Advertising Column of Thinpgs Nw and IntereUsting ,: :, ,

4New York, Nov. 19-The magazines and news-
J^ I^ papers are full of scrumptious holiday recipes
These ddys .. why not make your own file of
Sthe best ones? Just clip them out and tape them
on individual file cards with "Scotch" Cello.
Sphane Tape. Everyone in the family needs his
"o'n personal roll of this transparent, stick-at-a-
touch tape. It's handy for all sorts of sealing,
holding and mending jobs. Get several rolls
S next time you're shopping. Just be sure to look
for "Scotch" Brand Tape in the gay red-and-green plaid dispenser at
stores everywhere. .

( eaw start using TONI Creme Rinse to keep your hair shining soft and
beautiful. Not an ordinary rinse, but much more, TONI Creme Rinse
is a wonderful after-shampoo beauty treatment. Actually improves
the condition of your hair .. leaves it softer, easier to manage. The
very first time you use it, you'll see your hair "come alive" with
shining nmw radiarnce .. and you'll feel an inviting new softness in
your hair ... It's more tangle-free and oh-so-much easier to set. To
highlighl h cur hair for the coming holidays use TONI Creme Rinse
after e'ery shlianipoor, .. after every TONI Home Permanent, too.

Sunday is a day of rest for you... but while you're relaxing with a
book, driving in the country or visiting with friends,
your eyes are hard at work. Naturally, then, they i
must get tired . even though they seldom com -
plain. That's why I give mine the care they deserve
... by putting 2 drops of MURINE in each eye morn- \
Ings, evenings and in-between times, too. Almost
instantly they feel rested and refreshed . for
MURINE'S 7 ingredients blend perfectly with the
natural eye fluids . soothing delicate eye tissues
as gently as a tear. And I find that when my eyes feel better, I feel
better all over ... so why don't you use MURINE regularly, too?

Menu made out for Thanksgiving? Then let me suggest the perfect
,., finishing touch to your plans for a pleasant holi-
'I \A' // day ... put a smart, white pack of CAVALIERS
?.,.f;f i within easy reach of your family and guests. I
; Kg-' '" know they'll enjoy this distinctive, new king-
WtlS) '}' ~size cigarette . for there's extreme mildness
sBc and smooth, mellow flavor every delightful puff
f of the way. The secret, of course, is their special,
modern blend of fine, light Colonial type tobaccos
which are naturally mild and flavorsome. So don't put it off-you
might forget... get a carton of CAVALIERS first thing tomorrow.


The door to health and happi-
ness is easily opened
when you use the
right key . and,
if you're a caffein-
susceptible, I urge
you to make
P.OSTUM your
"key"! Many people
have found it works
perfectly .. as an
example: Mrs. Louise
Lewis of East Lynn,
Massachusetts,.
writes: "I drink Postum morn-
ing, noon and night and I sleep
all through the night. I feel like
a million dollars!" While many
people can drink coffee and tea
without ill-effect... others suffer
"coffee nerves", indigestion and
sleeplessness. But POSTUM is en-
tirely caffein-free. So be wise ...
drink POSTUM exclusively for
30 days and see if you don't find
better -sleep, better health and
better looks!

Company coming for Thanks-
g g, iving? Well, be
^Isi sure to get SANI-
? FLUSHtomorrow
V f. o . for it's the
extra-cbsy, extra-
pleasant way to
get toilet bowls
S sparkling clean
and bright. That's
because it's now perfumed with
a mild, fresh fragrance to leave
bathroom atmosphere pleasant
. and inviting .. yet it still works
chemically to disinfect as it
cleans. Just sprinkle in accord-
ing to directions on the can and
lo . it not only completely re-
moves unsightly hard water
stains, but that invisible film in
both hard and soft water where
germs and odors "hide". So al-
ways keep your home guest-ready
. by using freshly fragrant
SANI-FLUSH regularly!
4


Husbands are human . they
like to be greeted
with a happy
smile just like
everybody else.
But it's hard to
be cheerful when
you're the "vic- w
tim" of a painful
corn .. so let
me remind you
again to use BLUE-JAY Liquid
Corn Remover the minute one
appears. It's the complete corn
treatment . for the soft pads
instantly relieve pain from shoe
pressure . as well as center
liquid on the corn during applica-
tion. In a few days gentle medi-
cation loosens the hard corn ...-
you just lift it out and apply a
new pad to protect the sensitive
area. BLUE-JAY Liquid Corn Re-
mover relieves calluses, too o
try it and see!

I'm thankful for many things
. and not the
least of them is new
KREML Shampoo.
fWhy? Because not
X so long ago my hair
Bwas so dry, brittle
1 and unruly from
Using drying sham-
poos that I was at
my wit's end . .
out dhen I switched
to KREML .Shamoro uvni-;h. with
its natural ai b',t-, ,worKed real
miracles . nit ony lett my
hair wonderfully son ane' a iamb
to manage, but even encouraged
the natural curl. i'mn tnanktui for
the special cleansing qualities of
KREML Shampoo's magic new
ingredient "Folisan." too . for
they bring out all your hair's
natural sparkling highlights and
glossy, silken sheen. So profit by
my experience . use new
KREML Shampoo, too.


You're "flirting" with danger unless you use DRANO once a week.
For dangerous sewer germs lurk in every drain.
-SNo liquid disinfectant can budge the muck they
Shcbreed in. It takes DRANO's special churning,
boiling action to quickly scour out muck and
Sewer germs that collect in filthy clogged-up sink
-- 1- 7 .--drains. For that reason, it's easy to see why
l DRANO keeps drains fast-running and sanitary
.. and why it always leaves your sink a SAFE
place to wash vegetables and dishes in. So be
wise . put a tablespoon of DRANO in every
drain every week . fhen'you'll -know that your bathroom basin,
tuh and kitchen sink drains are clean and clear. And bear this in
Inind .. it's important to play safe wherever you live, but "impera-
tive" in crowded apartment houses where many, many people live.


MRS. GEORGE A. LYALL MRS. ROB
-LeMan Photo


Barbara Holland Wears


Sequin Trimmed Satin

Miss Barbara J. Holland, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Bernt
Clausen, 1901 SW 19th ave., became the bride of Robert Law-
rence Ford at 11 a. m. Saturday. The Rev. David J. Davis read
the service in Plyrmouth Congregational Church.
Miss Kathleen Norris, a friend
of the bride, and John Burr, green foliage. They carried gold
baritone, the bride's vocal coach, ChI' i,'al IOuIiiiI with greens.
were solosits. The bridegroom, who is son
The bride's gown of ivory of Herbert Ford of Miami and
satin was fashioned princess Mrs. Ford of Cleveland, had Les-
style, the skirt falling into deep ter Horn as his best man. Burt
pleats to the floor in front and Grace and Dawson Wilson were
forming a cathedral train at the ushers.
back. Pearls and ivory sequins Immediately after the cere-
on lace filled In the camisole mony, the newlyweds greeted
neckline and formed the short friends in the church garden.
cap sleeves and three quarter Members of the immediate fam-
mitts. 0 ily and wedding party were en-
The veil of illusion fell from tertained at a breakfast after-
The veil of illusion fell from ward. Mrs. Lester Horn was in
a juliet crown. The bride car- charge of the guest book.
ried white gardenias, nested in Among guests from out of
ivy and lilies of the valley. Her town was the bride's grhndmoth-
only jewelry was a strand of er, Mrs. Charles Gordon, of
pearls, gift of the bridegroom. Cleveland.


IN FOREST GREEN
The two attendants, Miss
Gloria Clausen, the bride's cous-
in, and Miss Evelyn Sykes wore
taffeta shaded from forest green
at the high rolled necklines to
chartreuse at the fitted waists,
and into forest green again at
the hemlines. Their headdresses
were juliet caps, adorned with


Dvorshocks

Are Married

In Gesu Rites

Miss Joyce Alene Wright and
Lawrence Paul Dvorshock were
married at 8 p. m. Saturday in
Gesu Catholic Church. The Rev.
F. G. Carbajal, S. J., performed
the double-ring rites.
The bride, given in marriage
by her grandfather, J. E. Mears,
is daughter of Mrs. Virgie A.
Wright, 2370 SW 26th st. The
bridegroom is son of Mrs. Helen
Dvorshock, McAdoo, Pa.
IN WHITE NET
The bride wore 'a ballerina
length frock of white nylon net.
Her iiitri'ii veil was held to a
tiara of orange blossoms. She
carried a white orchid sur-
rounded with carnations.
The bride's sister, Miss Shirley
\ibht was maid of honor. She
wore pink marquisette and car-
ried pink carnations.
The reception after the cere-
mony was held in the bride's
mother's home. 1.ui going away
the bride chose a black suit
with white accessories and white
orchid corsage.
A native of Miami, the bride
attended Miami Senior High
School. The bridegroom attended
Pennsylvania schools and is in
the Navy.


Time To Talk

Of Poinsettias

Poinsettias, gardenias and
roses vill be discussed at the
Miami i,',.. Garden Club
meeting Monday at 2 p. m. in
Miami Battle Creek., Speakere
will be Mrs. E. A. Anderson,
Mrs. Clark Chandler and Mrs.
H. W. Mehrling.
(Club members also will hear
plans to beautify the (canal bank
between the two bridges in
Miami Springs.
*
Daniel Beard, superintendent
of Everglades National Park,
will tell members of Tropical
Garden Club about park activi-
ties and plans when the group
meets Monday at 10:30 a. m. in
Miami Beach Woman's Club.


IF YOU CAN'T
'GAIN WEIGHT
0 If you are skinny, thin underweight,
due to no organic cause, read these facts.
To help you gain weight nature
usually requires two things. One-a good
hearty appetite. Second better diges-
tion to change food into flesh. Thousands
:who recognize these medical facts have
tried a great medicine developed by a
doctor often with amazing results.
It's Dr. Pierce's Golden Medical Dis-
*covery. Instantly, It starts its wonderful
stomachic tonic action. First, makes you
really want to eat. Second, helps you get
more good out of food . helps turn it
into pounds of added flesh. Try it. Get Dr.
Pierce's Golden Medical Discovery today.
Recommended by druggists everywhere.
(Cut this ad out-it means extra sounds.)


wnen tne couple lett for their
wedding trip to Key West and
Havana, the bride wore a tail-
ored chocolate brown suit with
matching accessories.


'.oW
I,, ,
~ g11~.
Se
.~ -~


ERT L. FORD
-Associated Photo


MRS. WILLIAM


Ballerina Gown Of Lace


Worn By Virginia Miller

Church of the Little FloWer was the scene of the Saturday
wedding of Miss Virginia Lee Miller, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Archibald J. Miller, 4025 SW Seventh st., and William Benjamin
Calhoun.
The Rev. Patrick Trainor of- Gibbs School in New York. The
ficiated at the 5 p.m. ceremony, bridegroom attended Savannah,
Given in n.ai,;'de- by her Ga., schools and was in the
brother, Paul .. Miii.i of Ha- Army three years. He is now
vana, the bride wore a chantilly with Florida Power and Light
lace ballerina type gown. Motif Co. He is son of Mrs. Mel Dean
of the sunburst tucked sheer Calhoun, Jacksonville, and the
yoke was repeated in a wide late Mr. Calhoun.
band in the skirt. The fingertip
veil of illusion was caught to C
a crown of seed pearls. The Cross-ountry
bride carried white orchids and
lilies of the valley, Tour Is Over
CARRIES DAISIES Cross-country tour is over for
The maid of honor, Miss Elsie Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Strang, 776
Hernandez, wore yellow or- NE 76th st., who have returned
gandy and carried Michaelmas home.
daisies. Her headpiece was of Their first stdp was Baltimore,
the same flowers. Md., where they visited their
Raymond Faudel was best daughter for two weeks, and
man. Charles Calhoun, the bride- next was Summit, N. J., for a
groom's brother, and Peter family reunion at the home of
Leroy were ushers. the junior J. R. Strangs. After
A reception was held in Jone- a few days in New York they
sy's restaurant, Coconut Grove. went on to Chicago to join a
After a trip i;,.,guI the Car- special train tour for the Wom-
olina mountain, ,, couple will men's Missionary Federation of the
olina mountain., l,_. couple w.ill American Lutheran Church, en
be at home at 3618 SW 16th ter. route to the athbiennial con-
The bride attended Katherine venion in Long Beach.


Miss Black


Is Married

'Thlip Rcv. Da liel I\ofr-.,-'. -ri.
e-mninzed the triaiiiage of Mhs
Marlha Juanita Black and Bill'
Eail Allison at 1 3l) p i,. 1 .,i-
day in S.l id-,a rid h Pie-l,. .i 'il
('1111 iii. TileU (OurlE-i Ing aer '\ ice
\%as ueid.
TlioI.Ia FgitI -.- t (l of -'1 n ,
(iI". \%l,., iam. c'.-t 'iari. Thie
hrM.-k'glor, n's ,',:tfy, MI-- Fat-
li, ii'i A Ih-,,ri \. ;m i l Ofr hli nr '.
MrI.. [Rill Hall i l n oeaeniz..
pl'r.-, lt ,| I1 ,P i'iii. i-i al pl'i-,)? ila ll
'lihe h, ir. i; ; l. ugh riC .il MI.
nI Mi .. M M. Blid' I:, ".-; i Ar.
TI a. v i, f .',),i t,.n ( -'i-il?. i_,i rii
In oiai i i.e, I.' I. hov fai 'i. -l Ie
V.:IT f 1 n ',lnll' e :il[ a cllli 'i til"
a.-:, aO nd oii' h ol l'id cor- g'-, t.
The i r ahl io'f lh:>ii,'.r \i ?0 0 A
DiA% tll][ aind ,i ', h l h a ll ('I-
Lt'ill ( 1l td 12 .
The la.,.epllO a:- lI',r ,l ill llie
linr. e Of ili i hliric'_ pai r-t .1. Mi-.
tChai. i W'. Ell. i nd M-:. Edia
A. Coilin- .:-isted.


311R'4. BILIA EARLA .,LLISON
-ordoy 'e Photo
TIch r i. I' u C,1_-. ,ill 1li e at
4" ,l N W -' S tin a v e a ttei N % 2 '.-, .
Thl. Iji ;ilgro',ii, ; su n I it ;.
Airin Ma'. Alison, 2.01 SWN
ELiglth st.


I. I


U


The Miami Fashion Council is proud to be one of the



outstanding Fashion Markets of the nation and a leader



in the industrial development of the City of Miami.


Halsem Sportswear Co., Inc.
Herbert Jordan Originals
Hillman Garment Mfg. Co.
B. S. Kahn & Co., Inc.
Madeleine Moore
Mal Marshall, Inc.
M. Newman Originals
Maxine Sportswear
Miami Guild
Miami Neckwear Co.
Muriel Sportswear, Inc.
Nancy Ann Fashions
Pinto Furs
Playtime Dress Corp.
Renee Marciel Originals, Inc.
Rex of Miami, Inc.






FASHION


Rodanna Fashion of Miami
Roth Dresses, Inc.
Ruth Ann Originals
Ruth Starling, Inc.
Shoreland Dress Co.
Sodi Sportswear, Inc.
Sommers-Herbert, Inc.
Stylecraft Bag Mfgrs.
Sun Brand Garment Co., Inc.
Sun and Fun Togs
Sussman Dress Corp.
Suzi-Belle
Virginia Blake Co.
Mel Warshaw, Inc.
Myron Warshaw, Inc.
Bess Wasserman Resortwear
Frank Williamson





COUNCIL


Chamber of Commerce Bldg.



Miami, Fla.


B. CALHOUN
-Pllklngton Photo


I ,0'



Addle Rose Frocks
Alma Fashions, Inc.
Anitra Fashions
Ann Bennett Originals
Best Mode Sportswear
Bunny's Casuals
Burger Specialty Co.
Caribbean Sportswear, Inc.
Egret Fashions of Miami
Fashions of Florida
Fashions in Bloom
Flair of Miami, Inc.
Flamingo Fashions of Miami
Florida Sunwear, Inc.
Floridian Half-Pints, Inc.
Furman Handbag Corp.






MIAMI


M-, 1. ILI"









Buchholtzes Reveal Engagement



Of Edna Jane At Dinner Party


Dr. and Mr1. Frederick 'H.
Buchholtz. 3110 SW 19th st.. an-
lounce the engagement of their
daughter. Edna Jane. to Vernon
E. Peeples. son of Mr. and Mrs.
Vasco E. Peeples. Punta Gorda.
Friends were told of the en-
gagement at an Informal dinner
arty,
Miss Buchholtz attended
schools In Puntma Gorda, where
the Buchholtzes formerly lived,
and is a graduate of liamri Sen-
lor High School. She7 Is a senior
in Jackson Memorial Hospital
school of nursing.
Mr. Peeples, a graduate of
Charlotte County High School,
Punta Gorda, is past moderator
of the Westminster Fellowship
of the Presbyterian Church,
, U. S. A. He attended Maryville
(Tenns) College, where he was
a member of Alpha Sigma fra-
ternity. He is a junior at Florida
State University and member of
the Athletic Council and Alpha
Phi Omega service fraternity,

SMary Bird Horner
SSelects Dec. 20

Miss Mary Bird. Hornier's be-
trothal to a MIamlan, Henry Bell
Harvey, Jr., is announced today.
The bride-to-be is daughter of
MIrs. Frank E. Horner, Thomas-
-ton, Ga., and Atlanta, and the
late Mr. Horner.
Mr. Harvey is son of Mrs.
Henry Bell tIa i'e,. 34 NW :7th
pl., and the late Mr. ,Harvey. A
graduate of Miami Senior High
School, he will be graduated in
June from Gpnrpia Te'h. He is
a member of Lambda Chl Alpha
fraternity.
The bride-elect attended Rob-
ert E. Lee Institute. Thomaston,
4nd is a senior In Wesleyan Col-
lege, Macon, CGa.
The wedding wiil take place
Dee. 20 in the First Methodist
Church of Thbmaston.

Mr. B' dner Fiance
Of Miss Gastfriend

The betrothal of Mi'v Marllvn
Gastfriend and Alvin Buiner is
told today. The brideelect Ig
daughter of Mrs. Ruth Gast-
friend, 2811 S\V 16th si., and the
late Morris Gasifriend.


Her fiance is son of Mr. and
Mrs. Sol Budner, 34A40 Garden
ave.; Miami Beach.
Miss Gastfriend was graduated


ii,


MISS JACQUELINE BORAH
S... plans winter nuptials

She'll Join

Winter Brides

Among rolirie planning early
winter ..ed'ldingv are Miss Jac-
quelyn C. Borah and Leonard F.
Hinds, Jr. Their betrothal is told
by her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
J. L. Jones, 2018 SW 57th ave.
Son of the senior Hindses, 811
NW 40th St., the bridegroom-
elect was graduated from Miami
High School and the University
of Florida. He is a member of
Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity.
Miss Borah was graduated
from St. Theresa's School and
attended the University of Mi-
ami.

NEW LIFE MEMBER
Newpest life member nf f Ih e
.Ipni-lil Hnme for the Ag,'1 -;
'11' Irsa \Ve'eil She eslahl,-liPd
the mpmhorship In nmemonry of
I i 1li.'r.z d Pain'. 'Vessel An-
noo. cement was made at a re-
cpni luncheon meeting of the
h-iom's auxiliary at the Saxony)
Hotel.


OOLOI?


f inn Miami Senior High School,
attended the .nivpr-iYv of Mi-
ail anld Lq a member of Gamma
Alpha Chii sorority.
Mr. Budner. a Miami Beach
Senior High graduate, also at-
tended the university. He is vice
president of Tropical Lodge,
B'nai B'rith. He was overseas
with the Coast Guard two years.

Renee Waldorf,
Mr. Levy To Wed

Betrothal of Miss Renee Wal-
'dorf and Albert Levy is an-
nounced by her parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Hyman Y. Waldorf, 3002
NW Seventh ave. Mr. Levy is
son of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Levy,
2312 N. Miami ave.
Both Miss Waldorf and her fi.
ance are Miami High graduates.


Feast Day



Keys Dance


Thiank;i'iinB will provide the
theme for the North Dade Jew-
ish Center dance Wednesday at
8:30 p. m. in the center, 13630
W. Dixie highway. Proceeds will
go to the building fund. Mrs.
Julius Klein Is general chairman.
*
Mizrachi Women of Miami
Beach will sponsor theater part-
ies at the Cameo Theater, 1445
Washington ave., starting Friday
night and continuing through
Nov. 29.
Proceeds will be used to help
new citizens in Israel.
*
SBazaar booths, and a games
party will be featured at the
Beth Sholom Sisterhood tea,
Wednesday at 1:30 p. m. in the
temple banquet hall.
Members and guests will bring
items suitable for booths at the
bazaar, to be held Dec. 4 and 5,
for the support of the temple's
religious school.


Girls Heading



For A Wedding


'. . '.. .




MISS MARY BIRD HORNER
S. fiancee of Miamian


MISS M.ARILYN GASTFRIEND
I -Alembert Photo


MISS RENEE WALDORF MISS EDNA JANE BUCHHOLTZ
... betrothal told -Tooley-Myron Photo


Sunday, November 19, 1950 THE MIAMI HERALD 13-K


Lynne Cleveland's Wedding Day



Follows Schools' Yule Recess


The wedding plans of 1Miss
Lynne Cleveland, 1310 Lisbon
ave., and Charles Stephen Kin-
near are told today. They will
be married at 10 a. m. Dec. 22
in the home of Mrs. Wilkie A.
Neighbors, 1310 Lisbon ave.
The bride-elect is daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Cleveland,
1905 SW 23rd ave. A graduate of
Miami Senior High School and
Florida State University, she is
a teacher in Sylvania Heights
Elementary School.
The bridegroom-to-be is son of
Mr. and Mrs. Claude Kinnear,
Urbana, Ill. His parents with
their daughter, Alice, will come
to Miami for the wedding,
Mr. Kinnear is a graduate of
Urbana High School, attended
the iVTni 'rsit1v of Illinois and
was graduated from the Univer-
sity of Miami. He lives at 39
Montllla ave. and Is an account-
ant.

Marilyn Franklin
Will Be Married

Engaged to Stanley A. Robins,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Rob-
ins of Warren, 0. and Miami
Beach is Miss Marilyn Barbara
F r a n k li n. Announcement is
made by her parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Sid Franklin, Miami Beach.
The bride-elect is a graduate
of Whitfield School and attended
the University of Miami, where
she belonged to Delta Phi Ep-
silon sorority.
Her fiance attended Ohio State
and UM, where he was president
of Phi Epsilon Pi fraternity.

Jacqueline Koop
Picks Dec. 2

Mr. and Mrs. William T. Koop,
54 NE 95th st. and St. Paul,
Minn., are announcing the ap-
proaching marriage of their
daughter, Jacqueline May. Miss
Koop and Kenwood S. White
will be married Dec. 2 in Miami
Shores Community Church. A
reception will follow in the
Koop home.
Miss Koop was graduated from


Thanksgiving Holiday Slows Up Club Activity


Personal affairs specifically
the preparation of Thanksgiving
dinners-take precedence over
club activities tle latter part of
the week for Miarmi's club-
women, although the first few
dafq are as busy as usual.
E.PiIt; for the week include:
SUNDAY, NOV. It
Tropical Chapter of B'nail B'rith
Women, dance, Sorrento Hotel, 8 p. m.
C.jr.,iaif r, Ber tii-, Il and Sisterhood.
irahliar n esourauev Dora August Me-
m.,rial Hall 4,lu EW 17th ave., 6 p. m.
MONDAY. NOV. !it
Miami EdiOo Sirlor and junior High
Sbchor.l PTA ninner and games party.
In ihe shoul dinner, 5:30 to 8 p. m.:
party, 8 p. m.
Downtown Optl-Mrs. Club, committee


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navy ... white. . balenciaga
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black . fuschia .. aqua
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In suede: shoes $14.95
bags $14.95*
Irr snake: shoes $16.95
bags $14.95*
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IIIAtKIWSj

S427 LINCOLN ROAD


meeting, home of Mrs. Edward Hobbli,.
1630 SW First ave., p. m.
Woman's Division, Miami Chamber of
Commerce, installation, dinner, Miami-
an restaurant, 7:30 p. m.
Eight and Forty, home of Mrs. Adolph
Better, 1866 SW 12th at., 8 p. inm.
Miami Springs Garden Club, Miami
Battle Creek, 2 p. inm.
Citrus Grove PTA. open house, school,
7:30 p. inm.
Miami Shores Optl-Mrs. Club, lunrh-
eon and bridge, Miami Shores Coun'ry
Club, 12:30 p. inm.
All States Card Club, 215 NW Fourth
st. 1 s.
Waneta Council, Degree of Pocahon-
tas, nomination of officers, Redman's
Hall, 3819 N. Miami ave., 8 p. m.
Little River Rebekah Lodge 79, regu-
lar meeting, 8 p. inm.
Tropical Garden Club. Miami Beach
% L Can .;. I" A m
.ri'iLi~.~iir, &a, i % *omea
f Ir ire Asej DohOlae aiarr., 150
NE 53id s I 10 p m
Biscavne Bay Chapter 75. stated
meeting, Biscayne Temple, 8 p. m.
Southern Cross Chapter, UDC. home
of Mrs. Taylor Lewis, 2130 SW Ninth
St., board meeting, 1:30 p. m.; regular
meeting, 2:30 p. m.
Young Adult's League, regular meet-
ing, Miami Jewish Center, 8:30 p. m.
Benjamin Franklin Elementary School
PTA carnival, at the school 7 p. m.
Council of Garden Club Presidents,
Simpson Garden Center, 10:30 a. m.
Barry College Auxiliary, college ro-
tunda, 2 p. m.
Nautilus School PTA, open house and
meeting 7:30 p. m.
Rebekah District 23. 7050 NW Fourth
ave., 8 p. m.`
Daughters of Scotia, lodge 171, Odd-
fellows Hall. 215 NW Fourth st.. 8 p. inm.
Hibiscus Grove 325, Woodmen Circle,
2800 Bird ave., Coconut Grove, inspec-
tion. 8 o. inm.
Jewish Consumptive Relief Society,
luncheon and card party, home of
Mrs. William Levine, 710 Lakeview dr.,
Miami Beach, noon.
TUESDAY, NOV. 21
Misml Springs Junior Woman's Club,
club house. 8 p. inm.


Earlington; Heights PTA, school cafe-
teria, 10 a. im.
St. Rose of Lima Guild, fashion show,
Miami Shores Country Club, p. m.
Miami Anna Miller Circle, Elks Club,
9 NE Third ave., 8 p. m.
Little River Chapter 172, O.S, 311
NE 78th sat,, 8 p. m.
Laramore-Rader Poetry Group, home
of Mrs. Martin H. Felnman, 2205 Mer-
idian ave., Miami Beach, 2:30 p. m.
Women of the Moose, library chap-
ter night, club house, 2744 W. Flagler
at.. 8 p. m.
Santa Clara PTA, school auditorium,
3 p. m.
Miami Alliance of Delta Delta Delta,
founders day banquet, Jonesy's Restau-
rant, 7 P. m.
Miami Temple 19, Pythian Sisters,
36 N';.' 24th st., 8 p. m.
Lindley DeGarmo Unit 70, American
Legion Auxiliary, business meeting and
Installation of juniors, Legion Home.
S p. m.
Miami Beach Optl-Mrs. Club, lunch-
eon, regular meeting and canasta party,
home of Mrs. Earl Over, 260 NE 51st
at., Miami, 12:30 p. m.
Estrellita Club of Coral Gables Chap-
ter 174, OES, desert bridge and games
party, Home Milk hostess room, Mrs.
ary Bickley, hostess, 12:30 p. m.
Coral Gables Music Club, president's
reception, home of Mrs. George Paw-
ley, 4412 Santa Maria ave.. Coral Ga-
bles. 8 P. m.
Little River PTA. regular meeting,
cafeteria, 8 p. m.
University of Miami Women's Club
book review group, home of Mrs. J.
Riley Staats, 5110 San Amaro st., 8
p. m.: home arts group one, home of
Mrs. Floyd Wright, 1700 Cortez sat.,
Coral Gables.
Congregation Beth El Sisterhood. 500
SW 17th ave., 8 p. .m.
Credit Women's Club of Miami, dinner
meeting, McAllister Hotel. 6:30 p. m.
Bowline Green Home Demonstration
Club, Forest Park Christian Church,
9:30 a. m.


Holy Comforter Episcopal Church,
bridge and canasta party, parish hall.
5 0. m.
Miami Women's Club, departmental
bridge and canasta party, club house
12:30 p. m.; executive board meeting,
10 a. m.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 21
East Coast District 4, Supreme Forest
Woodmen Circle, entertain state offi-
cers, Redman Hall, 38119 N, Miami ave..
2 m.
lKnIghtis of Columbus Auxiliary, K of
C club house, 3405 NW 27th ave., p. .
Beth Sholom Sisterhood tea, temple
banquet hall, 1:30 p. m.
South Miami Newcomers Club, Dixie
Belle Inn, S. Dixie highway, 12:30 p. m.
North Dade Jewish Center, Thanks-
giving dance. In the center, g;30 p. m.
Alpha Chapter, Delphian Society, Mi-
ami Shores city hall, 10 a. m.
FRIDAY, NOV. 24
Women of the Moose, P89. games
party, clubhouse, 2744 W. Hlaler at.,
9 p. m.
SATURDAY, NOV. S
Coral Gables Lions Auxiliary, country
fair, Coral Gables Elementary School
playground, starting at 4 %. m.
Miami Shores Woman's Club. fashion
.how. Miami Shores Country Club.
12:30 p. m.


Miami Edison High School and
attended Barry College.


MISS MARILYN FRANKLIN
-Kar* and Moldain Photo


Her fiance, son of Mr. and
Mrs. James H. White, 9001 NX
Second ave., also was graduated
from Miami Edison. Former stu.
dent at the University of Flor-
ida, he now is attending the Uni-
versity of Miami.
Margaret Watts
Reveals Plans

Miss Margaret Ruth Watts and
Alvin Phillip Fortini have set
their marriage for 6 p. m. Nov.
24 in First Nazarene Church.
Their engagement and the ap-
proaching wedding are an-
nounced by mother of the bride-
elect, Mrs. H. F. Watts, 1944 NW
30th st. Her fiance, who lives
at 7134 Byron ave., is son of
Mrs. E. J. Fortini, Chicago.,
The bride-elect will .be given
in marriage by her mother. Al
Conan will be best man and
Miss Dorothy Gunderlock will
attend the bride. A double-ring
ceremony will be read.


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PARKING FOR CUSTOMERS OF BURDIH''S MIAMI BEACM TXORg


TWENTY -THIRD SEASON .. 1950-1951









a


I;i


THE MI8M1 HERkLP



leisurely I



ormer Pn

y AILEEN HAGERTY
S Herald Socilety Editor
V\'ANA Cuba's former
prdent. Gen. Fulgencio Batilta
ha established two precedents
foformer chief executives of
th Island republic. He is living
th ife of a "gentleman farmer"
0 n attractive "finca" farm)
ne Havana. and Is being urged
bIt uhans in all parts of the
Iilid to be the pre-idential can-
dike again in 1952.
Sgenteral's love for coUntr'
lif ieems to he shared by the
gr ous Mrs. Batistla. the fto mrner
M a Fernanclez, who deeQles
Mi time to their three sons.
Jo 8. : Rorerto Frandiscn. 3.
a Carlos Manuel. 6 month.
H4 back hiding Is a favorite
re action of the general, Mrs.
B ta and Jorge. anr enthuI'Sia--
ti oung horseman.
en. Batlsia take. pride in
t faect that he learned practi.
farming ishen he was a
and had to quit school
r finishing the slxth grade,
help his father on their
I farm near Bane@, in
ate Province.
lng the elde-t of four chil-
he was called upon to help
a ort the family and in ad-
dl to helping his father dur-
I he farming seasons. he also
W ed for a steamship cem-
p and a railroad.
rough all his \eari of hard
V he continued to stud,.' and
date himself, and the excel-
lelt library that he now has on
hllk istate contains some of the
bos. for which he made great
aa[flces to buy in his earl-,
ye ls, when money "as scarce.
Is library also contains
b s of nma',' liberators and
o0 rs who worked d for their
e triea' freedom. Occupying
p s of honor are the busti of
ilngton and Lincoln. as %ell
* uba's apostles of freedom,
M i and Al aceo.
special section in the library
is served for books by and
a t Lincoln, 'whom the gener-
all insiders one of the greatest
S of history. Some nf these
b a are in English, which the
Sral has been studying for
y as, and he now speaks the
Ia uage fluently.
e library building Is a short
V from the house. In a rather
0 ded part of thp well land-
6 ed grounds. The former
C execulhe spends part of
e day in the library, reading
g working at a spacious desk
I 'e end of Ihe long roro. LUs-


Ir "V -".


*v, them' do, but I will give them
Sthe advantages of a good educa-
tion and a wholesome life, with
opportunities to develop men-
Stally and physically. Then they
can decide what they want to
do, but I hope they may become
interested in engineering or
other constructive work. In my
Opinion, a boy is handicapped
Sunless he can spend at least a
part of his childhood in the
country, and I am happy to
Know that my oldest boy
is really interested in the farm."-


0 Awi.* e-
THE VERANDA o l their home nearr Hv.'-ia. c.'.erloc.kinq an
atractive tropical qarden, is a favorite spot of the Batista
amilry. Pictlured here ore G-r,. and Mrs. Fulgencio Batista
with their ?-.rts, Jc.rqe and Roberto. -Louis Hamburg Photo


iidli, he italki- a honk to it
room, to that he ma iead for
a i. hue at night or earl', in the
mot ning.
Although rlie B t3il-ta;' hoItc-
is unprietenl nu. c.r:npar'er wi ll
many of ltre C(uhan hoie-. it
i- attractive and romfortahle.
ha? a saclous veranda, and a
garden.
Remembering his struggle
to gel an education. Gen. Ba-
tlsia made an outstanding rec-
ord to give Cuba more and
better schools while -he was
president. That Is one reason
for his popularity.
At the age when other hn. .
are attending college. Gen. Ba-
tista was working nraid to n hip
support his fainjv but he man.
aged to altend a hutlne, c rhorol
at night and became an expert
stenographer. When he eriterped
the aim, in his earlv tentieic
he Lon a stenographic cf.nif-1,
over 42 other enfranr. andl a


* U


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year later he was promoted to
sergeant first class and was
made regiment stenographer;
During the administration of
the late President Alfredo Za-
yas, one of the great scholars
of Cuba, Batista was made chief
of a post that permitted him to
continue his study and reading.
He recalls- that Dr. Zayas, while
on an early morning walk,
stopped to talk with him one
day and encouraged him to con-
tinue his education and reading.
"If you read good books and
educate yourself on as many
.subjects as you can, you -nay
find an opportunity to become
a great man some day," was the
advice of. his former chief and
president.
SWhen I asked Gen. Batista
if he had, an\ plans for the
careers of his sons, he replied:
"No, I will not tell them def-
initely what 1 would like to have


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In addition to their many
faclltilrs for recreation, the Ba-
tistas have a complete little
chapel on- their estate, where
their marriage was blessed,
their children were baptized
and where they can attend re-
ligious services without leav-
ing the premises.
The road to the Batista finca
leads through a beautiful section
of Havana's suburbs, past the
Havana Yacht Club and-the Ha-
vana Country Club, famed for
its attractive golf course. This
highway also passes Chateau Ma-
drid, a former fashionable gar-
den night club, which the pres-
ent owner, Maurice Habif, has
transformed into a perfume fac-
tory and experimental farm. In
the grounds surrounding the es-
tablishment are specimens of
nearly every kind of tree, shrub,
fruit and flower that grow in
Cuba.
Gen. and Mrs. Batista like to
travel and come to Florida oc-
casionally, en route to and from
New York and other northern
cities, as well as Daytona Beach,
where they spent part of sev-
eral summers. He is an ardent
advocate of maintaining neigh-
borly relations between Cuba
and Florida and is keenly in-
terested in the Pan American
Cultural and Trade Center that
is to be established in Miami.


MISS JANE ZIMMERMAN
. to wed in Peru

Daughter

Of Naval Chief

Is Bride-Elect

SCapt. and Mrs. Walter E. Zim-
merman of Lima, Peru, an-
nounce the engagement of their
daughter, J a ne, to Herbert
Wheatley Plimpton.
Mr. Plimpton is son of Mr. and
Mrs. Hollis Winslow Plimpton of
Sachem's Head, Guilford, Conn.,
and Miami Beach. He attended
the Asheville School in North
Carolina and is now a senior in
FPrinceton University, where he
is a member of the Cloister Inn
Club.
The bride-to-be _iirict.d at Han-
nah Gore Academy, Reilsters-
town, Md., and Miss Harris' Flor-
ida School here. Her father is
chief pf the United States Naval
Mission to Peru.
The wedding will take place
next month in Lima.


Goren On Canasta
By CHARLES H. GOREN


More often than not, in the
typical fireside game, freezing
the pack is done out of a spirit
of bravado, rather than a belief
that the condition will work to
the freezer's advantage. Gener-
ally speaking, it is unsound to
freeze the pack unless the play-
er parting with the wild card
believes he has the better chance
of obtaining the pile.
The following is a case in
point: Your side needs 90 and
on the second round, your part-
ner melds:
Joker.2-I10-10
Your right-hand opponent need-
ing only 50, immediately dis-
cards a deuce, freezing the dis-
card pile which contains 9 cards.
Your opponent's strategy is
undoubtedly sound. By making
the initial meld, your side has
gained the temporary advantage
of not needing a matching pair
to go in for the discard pile.
(One matching card and a deuce
will do.) When your opponent
freezes the pack, he wipes out


your advantage, for now you
will need a natural pair.
Freezing will impose no a
tonal burden lon their side,
inasmuch as they have not yet
melded, they would need a na-
tural pair anyhow. Furthermore,
since they need only 50, it is
highly probable that either or
both partners have the required
count in hand.
Bear in mind that you and
partner together hold 18 cards,
while the opponents' total is 22.
Therefore, with all other factors
being equal, your side is bound
to have somewhat the worst of
it in a prolonged battle for the
discard pile. :
It is not our Intention to
advocate the deliberate surren-
der of the discard pile, but
we do maintain that It would
be unwise to concentrate all
your resources in the effort to
protect the pile.
In this situation, for the next
few rounds, it .is.,well to avoid,
if possible, the discard of any
additional wild cards. It is more
important to build up your hand.

Mrs. Delaney Asked

To Address PTA

Mrs. Elsie Delaney, supervisor
of elementary instruction for
Dade County Schools, will dis-
cuss the county system at the
Nautilus School PTA open house
and meeting Monday night at
7:30. She will base her talk on
questions Included in a recent
article on education in Life mag-
azine.


Costa Ricans, Colombians Shop


SOn Beach's Famed Lincoln Road


D Sunday, November 19, 1950



?ole Of Gentleman Farmer Suits



resident Ba tista -.-At Present


By GWEN HARRISON
Herald Staff Writer
Wife of the former Costa Rican
ambassador to Washington, Mrs.
Carlos Manuel Escalante, is stay'-
ing at the Columbus Hotel
while she does her Christmas
shopping in Miami. She is ac-
companied by her sister and
brother-in-law, the MaxKobergs,
of San Jose. Mr. Koberg is the
Costa Rican coffee and electrical
equipment tycoon. They will re-
main here through the first of
next week.
*
Shopping along Miami Beach's
famed Lincoln ROad also is oc-
cupying the time of two Call,
Colombia, visitors at the Sans
Souci. They are Mrs. Mercede
Lloreda and Mrs. Luz 0 b e s o,
wives, respectively, of the Call
industrialist and manager of the
General Motors' Cali offices.
Representing Camaguey, Cuba,
at the McAllister are the Enri-
que Tomeus and the Benjamin
Cisneros. Mr. and Mrs. Tomeu
are returning from New York to
their vast ranch in Cuba next
week. Mr. and Mrs. Cisneros
have come here from their Cama-
guey ranch.
*
Planning to buy a home
here are Mr. and Mrs. benja-
min Sol Millet of El Salvador,
San Salvador. The coffee plant.
er, ils wife, and their two
daughters, Marta and Ana
(Cristina. have taken the pent.
house at the McAllister for an
extended stay until they find a
permanent "'vacation" home.
*V.
Secretary of State of the Do-
minican Republic Virgilio
DiaZ-Ordonez, after attending
sessions of the UN in New York,
-,, ieturhed home. During their
r.rief _tav in Miami he and. his
wife ', eip at the Columl,.i, Ho-
tel. *'
**, ** ** ~* -* ,*
En:'route from New York to
Maracaibo, Venezuela, :ie Mt-ii
uel Belloso and his son. \illiin
ThIev aroe in from Manhattan,
m ill sit', at the Sa-',niv thii igl
M.?nrlay. and fly hack to Vene-
zuella. '
*.* '
Miarri BE-iCit iiie. visitor,
Pedio Santriao of 9n Juan,
Fupito Rico. is making plans to
dock hi* boat, Catita ri, at the
Northsthore Hotel and Ya c h t
Club for the season,.
-*
Gulf 'and Caribbean Fisheries
Institute in session last week at
Miami Beach attracted a number
of %i-i1tm to the San Souci Ho-
tel. Amopng them were E. P. Tail-
lart of Martiniqise, and, repre-
senting Curacao, Phillip van
Gelderen, head of the depart-
ment of fisheries at the Nether-
lands' embassy in Washington.
Mr. van Gelderen remains here
for a brief vacation. He is ac-
companied by his wife.
*
Miami visitors who are re-
turning to their home In Gua-
temala are Mrs. Aginia de Pas-
sarelli, with her daughter, Ana
Maria, and her sons, Raphael
and Josi Moria.
**
Alianza Interamericana will
hold its annual beach party
on Dec. 3, at the Saxony Hotel.
Festivities will begin at 10 a. m.
E'er oi f rilf e rfi w\\0 iinliti.ple
the selection of a M51,, \ri
1951, to succeed Miss Mary Gon-
zales, 1950, and Miss Teresita An-
dreu, 1949. There also will be
prizes for the pre-luncheon
swimming contest and the after-
noon rumba competition.


Committee in charge of ar-
rangements includes Mrs. Vir-
ginia Torruella, Mrs. Nestor Mor-
ales, Miss Mary Gonzalez, Miss
Chichi Aloy, Miss Evelyn Eagle


and Miss Catherine Martin. Res-
ervations are being taken by
Mrs. Morales, or at the Chamber
of Commerce building Allanza
headquarters.


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Wedding Invitations Announcements Informals
Enclosure Cards Personal Stationery a Visiting'Cards
Monogrammed Note Paper Anniversary Invitations
Samples and prices submitted upon request

j-pSTCeV e n s e n G RAV InG Co.
1 10 PEACHTREE STREET, ATLANTA 3, GEORGIA


We also offer the very finest quality diamonds in all sizes. Round, emerald
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JEWELRY, STREET FLOOR

Prices Do Not Include 3% State Sales Tax


1300 ISCAYN OULVARD PH 9-411 PARKING l i l
1300 AISCAYNE BOULEVARD I'l. 9-6411 FREE PARKING


PING PONG contest participants are Mr. and Mrs. Marvin E.,
Black of Philadelphia, who are spending a two weeks'
honeymoon at the Saxony Hotel. They will visit Cuba before
returning home. % .


"t.J






1BI HERAl 1 'IMi


S LrOOK
o O YOUNGER
L BE MORE ATTRACTIVE


JI


SWILL MAKE YOU FEEL
S AND LOOK LOVELIER
THAN EVER
SRo'qer's method of Faeio-
Therapy, unique in Miami.
,v'ilI remove 10 TO 15 years from
," your face. Oily and dry skin
i recied
TRIAL TREATMENT $5.00


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FACE REJUVENATION
NO PLELIN. SURGERY OR CHEMICALS USED
3 J Lincoln d. .. Seond FloorA
83.16 Lilncoln Md.. %I.B.. Second Floor


A/


FABRIC




SALE


'I
/


-Herald Staff Photo by Robert Verlin
PARTY GUESTS. Mrs. R. F. Mikell, Mrs. Wahl Snyder and
Mrs. Stanley Whitman were snapped arriving at the Newton
Rowe Field home on Brickell ave. They were, among those
attending the Junior League's Thrift Shop Rummaqe coffee.

Edison Dinner Monday

Heads- PTA Calendar


Miami Edison Senior and Jun-
ior High School PTA members,
will present a dinner and game
party Mlonday night in the
school.
The Junior High group will
serve dinner from' 5:30 to 8, and
the Senior High PTA will pre-
sent the games party, starting
at 8 p. m. ,
-The Senior High School PTA
is planning a discussion group
on home and family life, led
by Mrs. Herman Heinlein and
Mrs. George 'Schofield." Parents
and T iends no.v -meet Tuesday
evenings at 7 3,, th student'
wo discuss teen-age problems
as part of the schoev' effective
living course.
Sylvania Heights
Sylvania Heights Elementary
PTA, first Dade County PTA to
set up a school blood reserve,
will' sponsor a blood donor day
Tuesday from 3:30 to 7 p. m.
at the school.
The mobile unit, Including a
doctor and his staff, will accept
donations from persons phys-
ically able to give blood, ac-
cording, to Mrs. Jack Raymond,
health chairman of the PTA

Boys' Clubs

Will Benefit
Do w n t o w Opti-Mrs. Club
members have decided to help
the sisters of the boys their hus-
bands sponsor in Boys' Clubs,
so they will
r t sponsor a fund-
raising games
party in the
Miami Home
Milk Producers
hostess r o o m
W J Nov. 27 at 8
p. m.
The club will
4 help furnish a
S club house for
the youngsters,
MftS. GORDON 'and will spon-
i-nr charm courses, entertainment
and oiher projects or .glrls who
join the "Bo'. -' Sisters" group.
Mrs. J, Fritz Gdrdon. club
president and Mrs.,. Edward
Hobbis, general chairman, have
called a committee meeting for
Monday night at 8 in Mrs. Hob-
bis' home, 1630 SW First ave.,
to complete party plans.
James Whitehead
Talks To Juniors
James W. Whitehead, regional
director of the National Confer.
ence of Christians and Jews, will
address the Miami Springs Jun-
ior Woman's Club at its meet-
ing Tuesday night, at 8 in the
clubhouse.
Nenbhers also will hear plans
for tie club's Christmas welfare
1" IS t
Nuneses To Live
Iin"Port Of Spain
Mrs. Manuel Nunes, Sabal
Palm -,* Court, left Saturday
to live in Port of Spain, Trinidad,
where her husband is employed
by a soft drink firm.
The Nuneses had visited Trini-
dad several times before decid-
ing to make. their hom6 there.
Home Preserves
NEW YORK-(INS)-If you
want to preserve your marriage,
buy your own home. That's the
conclusion drawn from a sur-
%i" (on-u'tLrFd among judges
across ithe nation, r.,': the Nation-
al Asioctation oif Real Estate
Boards. '*he survey showed that
home o\% ner-. are definitely mo a
Istable than those who do not
own their own homes.


who .itahli4hed the project two
year s aen.
Mr.. Raymond reports that the
schnnl now has a reserve of
nearly 100 pints of blnod In the
Dade County Blood Bank, for
use of teachers, students and
their families.
Citrus Grove
"Friendship and harmony in
the community" is tthe theme
for Citrus Grove PTA open
house program, to he held Mon-
da', night at 7'30 in the srhoor.
During the evening. parents % ,il
vi-it thelp home room to l aspect
the childrel' worK.
Santa Clara
Mrs. Sterling Hunter. ife of
the pastor of Si. .onii.s Presb\-
terian Church. uill address ihe
Santa Clara PTA meeting Tues-
day at 3 p. m. in the school
auditorium. School patrol boys
will lead the salute to the flag.


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fashion with
superb decor of
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for walking grace.
Sizes 18 to 45.


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Here are sifts that any one on
your gift list would appreciate
receiving and enjoy using for
many years. And . perhaps
you'll want to have one or more
of them for your own home. Our
complete showing of Gorham*
Sterling, solid silver that lasts
forevet-, awaits your selection.
Come in today, our silver coun-
seloriswill be glad to help you
choose a gift for each of the
names on your list.
Victorian Picture Frame, Height 5",
Width 3%,. .. .......$10.00
Victorian Baby Brush . $10.50
Comb, 4" Long ... . 4.50
2-Piee Set . . . $1500
Pin Cushion . ., . $5.50
Napkin Rings, Set in Box . $4.00
Victorian Clock, 7 Jewel, one-day
alarm, precision movement $30.00


Prices Include Fed. Tax


MORE THAN ONE HUNDRED OF AMERICA'S FINEST STERLING PAT-
TERNS TO SELECT FROM AT MAYNARD.PAGE GORHAM, TOWLE,
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Visit Our GIFT DEPARTMENT On the Mezzanine . Elegant Imported and Domestic CAino by LENOX, ROYAL
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Beautiful Art Objects to Suit Every Need and Budget.


OPEN
MONDAY
'Til 9 P.M.


121 E. FLAGLER ST


JEWELERS ,* SILVERSMITHS
Far A Half Century


OPEN
MONDAY
'TIL 9 P.M.
PH. 3-644


the FABRIC SHOP
1532 WASHINGTON AVE.
MIAMI BEACH


Has Bought Entire Stock of r \
Imported Dress Fabrics from


Polly Manning of Lincoln Road



YOU CAN'T AFFORD TO


MISS THIS TERRIFIC SALE!

SALE STARTS TOMORROW MORNING 10 A.M.

25,000 YARDS OF IMPORTED FABRICS

FROM VARIOUS TEXTILE MILLS OF EUROPE AND ASIA

PURE DYE SILKS... THE FINEST ACETATES AVAILABLE
...COTTONS...METALLICS ... EMBROIDERED ORGANDIES,
LACES AND NETS, PLAIN AND FANCY TAFFETAS. NO
TWO DESIGNS ARE ALIKE ... ALL ORIGINALS ... NO
DUPLICATES ANYWHERE!

ALSO A LARGE SELECTION OF IMPORTED EMBROIDERIES
AND LACES FOR TRIMMINGS


COMPARE these PRICES-


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CHANTILLY TYPE


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50"
Brocades


Reg.
4.00


FOR EVENING WE


. $198
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EAR 1


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ALL COLORS yd.
Print-Plaid-Plain 97


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S.unl.. NUav.mh ,.'


A THE







14, THE MIAMI HERALD Sunday. November 19. 1950


Greek King


To Bring


Queen Here
NEW YORK-(INS--Amer'i.
can' movie-created Ideas of
falry-taJe queens are lihKelv t o
come true when and if King
Paul and Queen Frederica of
Greece visit here next year.
Queen Frederlca. in her early
30's. has a pert face and a -ho'rr
cap of curls that mieht almost
be Irish. Her Inflections are Brit-
ish. Her wide-ey.ed expres.sions
ar@ of such whimsy and wonder
she might have stepped out of
"Peter Pan."
She has good reason to look
that way. She's the great.
granddaughter of British
Queen Victoria and she spent
much of her early life in Ire-
land.
She admits that %hen hle met
her husband. King Paul. at the
age of Ii i he wag 2,5. she
thought he %as Prince Charm-
Ing. She dreamed. in thoze days,
of being a queen. And Paul was
a hotnele.,s wandtrer. a prince
In exile %\ith the rest of the
Greek ro.al family.
In 1936. he became crown
prince of Greece. A year later,
they were married. They have
three children, two princesses
and a crown prince.
Greece had never seen such
princess as Frederlca-a 20-
year-old bride with the. look of
a pretty peasant. She recalls
that she had to "Hellenize" her-
self. to learn the Gieelz orthodox
faith. Greek affairs, even the
Greek language. .
"It was," she admits, "sheer
hard work. But every moment
of It was vorthwhlle."


V~b








1*


p r 1


-n,,,d Still Phoio by Mlarin Bloom
ELEGANTLY SIMPLE and
simply elegant, was the ef-
fect produced by Mrs. Hang
Heether at the opening fall
fashion luncheon at the La
Gorck? Country Club, where
she wore a muted sugar
pink woo! ierse;/ classic set
off by a white feathered felt
cloche and white accesso-
ries. She accented the out-
fit with pearls and a diamond
pin. -


The Added
-:.Attraction of
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MIAMI BEACH


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WEEK to NOVEMBER 26th
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Phontie 86-6109 Owner-Deli a. Lhild


SCONVERSAnT PIEp

By GWEN HARRISON
Former star of stage and screen, Carlyle Blackwell, and
his wife, Ann, are deserting Miami Beach. . returning from
their northern vacation they stopped in Daytona Beach, liked
it so well they went apartment hunting, and after this week
will be settled at 500 S Beach st., Daytona Beach, for the
season.
**
Conversation piece at Alfred I. Barton's recent cocktail
party mostly was the present builuming problem . Charlotte
and Bob Slater, of the Gulf Stream Villas, say they'll Jbe
surprised if they can get into their new LaGorce Island home
by February.
The Slaters' good friend, Lele Daly, erstwhile wife of
Copper King Marcus Daly, arrives here next week from her
two months' European sojourn, en route to her home in the
Virgin Islands.
*
Keyhole stuff . hear that Phil Gallagher, 650-51st ter.,
Miami Beach, may be the new president of the Bachelors ...
as present social director he's tip to here in plans for the
Bachelors' New Year's eve ball, most lavish the group has ever
given . color scheme will be silver and white . or just
platinum!
*
Annual visitor, at the Roney Plaza since it first opened
(was that a quarter of a century ago?) Oil Croesus M. L
Benedum of Pittshurgh, and his wife, are having their usual
ocean-front suite prepared for their arrival.
Lily Pdns and her husband, Andre Kostelanetz also will
stay at the Roney when they come here for their Feb. 3 concert
. since laTPons is a vice president of the "largest narrow
gauge scenic railroad in the south," the Biscayne Bay, At-
lantic and Gulf Railroad, the meeting of the veeps. a,:(or'linag
to Charlie Crarndon, honorary piecident, may be set at that time
S. included in the 50 vice presidents are Bing Crosby, Robert
Young (also of the C&O), Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., and Eddie
Rickenbacker . Lily Pons is vice president in charge of
''.'lii-t le: .. ,
' '* '
Robert Tepiaer of New.Orleans is in'Miami temporarily to
take charge of the local State Department offices whileWalter
Walters i- hr,.neyn,.-,,-inine in Barcelona .. Walter and his wife,
the former Mrs. Horace N. Taylor, Jr. of Coral Gables, left
New York late last week by plane . they'll be back in mid-
December . Tepper, director of the Orientation and Service
Center of the State Department in New Orleans, with-his wife,
is staying at the Rodney Apartments during his visit here.
*
The Sea View Hitel. Miami Beach, which openl 6of'lt ill.v
Dec. 1 with a cocktail party for summer cabana member nel
season hotel-and-apartment guests, unofficially, opens Monday
. .. in fact, a number of residents already have qrri\ed from
the North ...
Last week's arrivals at the hotel included Mr. and Mrs.
G. Henry Kraehenbuehl of Sv. jtzerlan.I . they plan to:visit
here for 10 days . Mr. Kraehenbuehl is owner and operator
of two hotels in Zurich and one in*Berne.
Due in here next week are the Thomas E. Braggs from the
Sherry Netherlands in NA YImork . the Glenn F. Warrens
from their Indianapolis home . and the Harvey Haii-ons
of Chicago.
*
President rif Seven Up. Tom Joyce and hi- wife, Georgette,
T7-..j4,th -i Miami B-ach, flew in last week from their Indian-
apolis home .. . llhey're penriimng the sun-time at their Mac-
fadden-Deauville cabana, with their guests, Blanche and Charles
I'MMr. RepulIlican"i Halleck . Halleck, minority leader in
('.iiinre". return o Washingion Nov. 27 .. at that time ihe
Joyces also %ill co hack Norith for an Indiana Chi!itmas. and
return here Jan. 1 .. during their brief vacation they'' also
been bonefishing, and successfully, at Craig's camp in the keys.
:. '
That was Richard Blase of Srhenearlyad who was host to
the dinner party of 60 at Maria Freyer'< Austrian Garden
restaurant this weekend . he was active in last week's
real estate convention at the Roney.
*
Wyoming's Senator James C. O'Mahoney (next majoi ity
leader?) is here from Cheyenne, % 3cationing brieflyy at the
Saxony.
*
First of the yachting contingent due in at the Northshore
Hotel and Yacht Club will be Chauncey and "Abe" (Charles A.)
Lincoln of Marian, Va.,. . others due in soon include Gene
Goebel of Mineola, N.Y., with his boat, Fishangri-la . the
Charles Gibsons of Greenwich, Mich., and their Sally-Forth .
and the John B. O'Connors and the Walter Mulladys, all four
of Chicago, with their boat, Sea Dot III.





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Sunday, November 19, 1950 THE MIAMI HERALD 17-K.


L I


GRAPEFRUIT AND ORANGES ROLLING TO MARKET


Citrus Fruits Basis Of Sensible, 1300 Calorie Diet

Time to trim down a bit? Take and no foods fit more perfettL' Here's a diet your doctor will Citrus Redurng Diet, and ex- BREAKFAST (309 CALORIES)
heart-it's also time for good into a slimming program than approve for Its inclusion of all a !rf the good, filling reel_ Six-ounce glass of orange juice
citrus fruits from Florida- the calcium, carbohydrates and
graefrit nd ranes re ow these I I i I gold mines of Vit- o yntiet eurd omi-~ ou cafi enjoy, all within 3010 Ono egg (no fat used in cooking)
grapefruit and oranges are now teehtegl ass rollg to ,market In quantity, amine C and flavor,: ai good health. It's the Florida calories per day! One slice of enriched or whole-
Swheat. toast
One teaspoon of butter
or margarine
One six-ounce glass of skim milk
Coffee (without cream or sugar)
LUNCH (441 CALORIES)
Orange and grapefruit salad
with low-calorie citrus
French dressing
One-third cup of cottage cheese
Two whole-wheat or rye crackers
One six-ounce glass of skim milk
,. DINNER (550 CALORIES)
Half grapefruit or grapefruit
.sections with salt or saccharine
One four-ounce ser% ing of broiled
liver, kidney, leai fish or lean
meat
4,.One medium baked potato or
one other vegetable (not fried)
One half-cup serving of spinach,
i: kale, broccoli or other green
Aw. leafy vegetable
-"--""-;'- One teaspoon of butter or
One six-ounce glass of skim milk
One orange, sliced or sectioned

BREIMF.%STr ,iEL-309 CALORIES LUNCHEON MENU WITH CITRUS Frozen Pies


~nTROD^0
THE PETITE BOUTIQUE
A Small Shop within a Shop
Where you find little gems in fash-on
occessories . the unusual/ in costume
jewelry the perfect bag . the
prettiest blouse . The pice do reiisftance
-t the heavenly fragrance atof Mource
S \ Rentner's Parfum ty" GHT-THIRTY.

Our copy of a
famous french "first"
SThe accordion bag
In Black-Navy.Red
Brown Calfskin
We know you'll be enchanted
with our collection of neow
and different, French and do-
mestic costumne-complemenfing
accessories for yourself and
for enviable gifts



Women's Specialty Shop
915 LINCOLN RD. MIAMI BEACH


1Ivout1,


CORV'ALIS. Or,. --' 1i-
T"'.i. % frozen pi4 iliat Cvnil be
quic-klv dr-froisteri and reaIlief
fnr .-erring have been developed
at the Oregon State College ex.
pepiment istinn. Fre:h apple
and frozen br, \i:nherrit'O have
been Ui-ed In le:ts to date.


18(
Fa-h
from 1

of I.,,
b l'iof
Curr
anri a
fhoni I
sho:t n.


MARSHA KAY offers


the same compact refrigerator


sold by the thousands


at MACY'S, New York,


and for the same low price!


995


DINNER MENU WITH LEAN MEAT
S. it's balanced and slittinnig

)5 Fashions Will Be Shown
ions for men and uowpn. Mrs. Fred Kalil i gEtneral
!i,5 to the present, wI l rhalrman for the ,artI,. assisted
,,n at the partv%-sonuor.,l h MrF. Matthew Younghvrg, cc-
night at 8 n% St. Rose
GI GL,,Ii ,n the Mi i a n chairnman. Proccedrls from tie
Country C( lub. pai w ,li be u-ed for trhe main
ent st-es tor (hlldr'vn Ialtar fund of the new Miait
dlipis,' of swimming suiv- Shorr. St. Rose r-f Lima Chrch.
-".' to1 150 also uH he f.-r which h ground %as broken
Nov. 5.


lifetime-silent refrigeration


for the modern small home *


NOMVIGPARS..0OE
NO VIRATIN ...NONE
mONIE OE

-O EA.-OE


IDEAL FOR Apartments 0 Small Hou
Dwellings e Trailer Homes 9 Recr
N ome Bars Hunting Camps 0 S
Mountain Lodges 0 Beach Cotti
Cruisers and Auxiliary Yachts 0 Doe
Sick Rooms e Executive Offices 0 Ha
M "h -a_-Kay
Marsha Kay,.,


For any small dwelling-apartment, cottage, trailer
home, bungalow or boat-here's really wonderful
refrigeration news! A fully automatic, forever
silent, superbly insulated refrigerator that weighs
only sixty pounds, measures about 2 x 2 x2 feet
and costs only about half the usual refrigerator
price!
Astral uses AC or DC current with no changes
or adjustments-less than a single 100-watt lamp.
Plug it in and you're all set! It easily maintains
a 50-degree temperature differential between the
inside of the cabinet and the room. Makes ice
cubes. CONTAINS NO MACHINERY. How
come?
Simply a modern, scientific application of age-
-1.3 1- -.- T- .t *" t ie


Your light, compact Astral unit
rests nicely ON TOP OF A
STANDARD KITCHEN CABINET


-or may be installed'conven-
tently BELOW your kitchen
WORKING TOP CABINET


le t 0 +"

*s *+ + i




Thermo Tumblersg
Keep Ice Cubes 4 Hours!
Exciting new tumblers keep ice cubes .
four (4) hours without melting. Two
layers of Lucite with a vacuum be-.
tween is what turns the trick. They
won't sweat, need no coasters, won't I
moisten hands. 10-oz, size, in festive '
shades of blue, red, green, amber, or n
clear. State colors desired.


Set of four $p 00


Featured in December Esquire -


Portable Bar
"The Oasis"


CARRIAGES
SAll styles and makes.
Special orders taken.
CRIBS
All makes. All styles.
You can order the color
of your choice.
ROBES
To match the cribs.
SHI-CHAIRS
Colors and styles made
to order. Order yours
nowl
Open Thursday
Nights-7 to 9


Ei


2
SWi


A drink when and where you want it! The Ideal
gift for the man who has etverythingl Hand-made
case of finest California saddle leather with Korq---
seal stain-proof lining: chrome rust-proof hard-
ware. Opens into a
Portable bar with corn-
partments for two
quarts and two pints of
S liquors, olives, cherries,
t .1 bitters, safety set in
sponge rubber case,
a Lucite shaker, ice tong.s,
.i stirrer; four tumblers,
S.~~ ., ,four jig ge rs, eight
":, spoons, spears: nap-
.. ,+,,.. kins, coasters. Weight
;' ,i ,.^ ". only 20 pounds, when
; '.... fully loaded.


$9500


Copper Chafing Dish

xplore the realm of exciting new recipes
with this copper beauty, well within
the reach of everyone's budget.
quart chafing dish
rith extra double boiler..... .... .16.95


Pagoda Lazy Susan
Popularly acclaimed-popularly priced,
this perfect -accessory is of modern
enameled green ceramic, with gold
trim. Individual dishes perfect for sweets
and nuts. On a highly polished wooden
base mounted on ball bearings. An ideal
gift!
Excellent centerpiece for .- ,
your modern or Chinese $1 j 9
modern home! -


[{ I DEEP SEA FISHERMEN
.4
New
wFor the Busy ExecutiveI
THERMOPLEX F
SERVER lr

2.95 For the


Coffee stays hot for hours In the
amazing double-wall insulated
Thermoplex Server. Takes boil.
ing beverages, yet outside stays
cool. Ideal for office lunches, for
sick-room tray, for every meal.
Sanitary, easy-to-clean, durable
Satin-smooth finish. Pewter-tone
or ivory. Capacity two cups.
4 Cup Server ........3.95
2 Cup Server ........ 2.95


im m ORDEREDI
Marsha Kay
Please *end me th


3 dimensional

Wall Plaques
YOUR CHOICE OF Boxers,
Jockeys, Chef, Tennis, Football,
Deer Hunter, Baseball, Basket-
ball and many others.





I





Strip-Tease Mugs/l
(6 Stages of Intoxication)
NOW $14.95 /
"The Life Of The Party" . the '
six stages of intoxication spec-
tacularly portrayedl Tour guests
will be delighted with this set of
six highly glazed mugs with the
young lady's disappearing dress
in contrasting colors. The perfect
Bar accessory that makes an
ideal giltl


BY MAIL-USE. THIS CONVENIENT COUPON ---- -- m m
S
Fq 947 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach, Fla.
le following items:
I
I
~i
I


0 o laws of pnysics. in Bnriain mure uau a v
hundred thousand are in constant use. Now made small-family needs U
in America, to serve our millions of folks who cVCw !ft '" U
I I
sen R Divided don't need and don't want, big, costly mechanical small-family budgets
cation Rooms C j n
Summer Cottages refrigerators. STORE HOURS:
Oage i Power Come in and see the Astral today. Lincoln Road Shop: Open daily and evenings. --
cpital Rooms, etc. Saxony Hotel Shop, Open 7 days and every evening. I NAME .
7-ra W.oms,77c. ,I
ADDRESS __________________________
947 Lincoln. Road & Saxony Hotel Miami Beach Money Back Guarantee Send Check or Money 4fedee
..* ...__ ________ In Fla. add 3% sales tax.
7' 7 N. '=M WNar..._ -__,-- I ......,., ......,, ___, ...._ I I n I I I I --II--W---- m m i -- q


Only


red& "


* Vtl







28-E THE MIAMI HERALD Sunday, November 19, 1950


Miami Clubwomen Join


Big Delegation Going


To Key West On Monday

A busload of Miami clubwomen will travel the Overseas
Highway to Key West Monday, where they will attend the
District 13 meeting-of Florida Federation of Women's Clubs.
Mrs. F. F. Ravlin will head
the list of Dade County dele. cipating in the program areMrs.
'gates to the ieetiir. which also Robert Rappaport, president of
will include representatives the Northeast, Miami Junior
ill from BrowarInc ud e representatives, Woman's Club; Mrs. H. Jack
from 'Broward and Munroeecur.-iri. oeapeieto h oa
ties. Presidents of all clubs in Coleman, president of the Coral
the Dade Federation, as well as Gables Juniors, and Mrs. Ray-
comnmitee chairmen, will be of- lin. Mrs. A. L. Rosenberg, of the
facial delegaipe. Coral Gables Woman's Club, Is
Mrs. H. A. Wayne of Fort time keeper.
Lauderdale, district director, re- State committee chairmen
ports that Dade County women from the district who will at-
will have an active part in-the tend are Mrs. J. Riley Staats of
day's sessions. Special guests Coral Gables, literature and po-
will be Mrs. L. J. McCaffrey, etry; Mrs. Leland Doggard,
recording secretary of the Gen- drama; Mrs. S. S. McCahill, leg-
eral Federation of Women's islation; Mrs. A. F. Arthur,
Clubs, aind Mrs. Raeburn C. Homestead, rural co-operation;
Hornet of Madison, president of Mrs. Ralph Thompson, Holly-
Sthe Florida Federation. wood, endowment fund, and Miss
T~~iimlC m-r-Ternrielis, XTy -f


I Mrs. Hornet will bring greet-
tings from the state federation,
and Mrs. E. D. Pearce of Mi-
ami, second vice president of
the Florida Federation, w I I
discuss the organization's ex-
tension program.
Mrs. Walter. S. Jones of Jack-
sonville, first vice president, is
scheduled to present the insti-
tute program, and Mrs. N. A.
Benevento of Fort Lauderdale,
state chairman of junior clubs,
will give an inspitmlonai talk.
Miami women who are parti-


MinnilePruterH arl-i, IKey Wes
Council of International Clubs.
Dade County Federation dele
gates are Mesdames A. W. Neeb
J. A. Morgan; F. N. Chaplir
J. B. Whitney; J. B. Davidsor
Ted Meares, D. R. Thurmar
Charles Boardman, Frank Adam
son and Henry 0. Shaw.

SALVAGE OLD SHEETS
A full, colorful skirt for you
vanity table can easily be mad
by salvaging the good parts c
torn bed sheets and dippin
them into the dye-bath.


SPANIfRS

Cordially invites you to inspect our lovely
collection of holiday and resort wear which
we have selected for the forthcoming
season ... afternoon and cocktail dresses,
suits and toppers for Junior, Misses and
half sizes.
1024 LINCOLN ROAD, MIAMI BEACH


Bringing Up Father


I Ur Jr r' if4i 31 r i7F lIT'?)?' ?LD"I35 D14


L(t'(,n .'-._. II ,V LIINUH fIEIte rE lI.i fiA.
By George McManus W
----- Yqnlcpp Pliti-inal Fln h Winter


L .t LAULJ k-.,"L' -L ..-J-L-JL%.-L.LJL .o JL -U ./,. TV J.JLJ.,k-J.


e'
b'
n;



le.

r Ig "-
Je -
g :*'---------


Showers Begin
First of pre-npptial parties
Miss Elaine Goldman, bride-e
of Anshel Rackoff, was a ki
en shower given recently
Miss Honey 3erott in her hc
2432 SW 23rd st.
Elaine's aunt, Mrs. Jean
- Fox, 2398 Coral Way, will
a luncheon and miscellane


For Miss Goldman
For Miss Goldman


shower for her Dec. 2. During
the Christmas holidays Mrs. Ber-
nard Rosenblum, 1836 SW 22nd
ter.. has planned a luncheon and
canasta party for the bride-elect.
Dinner following the rehears-
al for the Dec. 28 wedding will
be given by Mr. Rackoff's aunt,
Mrs. I. M. Cohei of Chicago, who
is coming for the wedding.


I -"I-


5 OFF
'U/








08






'M~iami



*teraltb






OMNGATULATIONS/











TO PLAN BIRTHDAY
Plans for a first birthday and,
Christmas party will be com-
pleted when Miami Beach Aux-
iliary to VFW Post 3559 meets
Tuesday night in the post home,
650 West ave. The auxiliary was
organized last Dec. 20. Party
this year will be fieldd Dec. 19..


1951 Fashions
Consisting Of
Fine Hand Tailored
Toppers, Suits,


Mr. Gannett fies to Miami
i ih the Holdermans aboard
the Gannett private plane to
open his beach home. He has
as his house guest for a week
Carl Hallauer, also of Roches-
ter. The three men are spend-
ing most of their time golfing
at LaGorce.
A week's trip to Havana will
highlight the vacation itinerary
for tWT> honeymoon couples. Mr.
and Mrs. James Irwin of Buffalo
are sojourning there now, a n d
will return to the Coronado i-,,t
week when Mr. and Mrs. Charles
R. Lamb of New York City de-
part for the Cuban resort.


Other annual winter visitors
arriving this week for an ex-
tended stay Include Mrs. J. B.
Flowers of Drewryville, Va., ac-
companying her sister and
brother-in-law, Dr. and Mrs. T. A.
Underhill, Richmond, Va.
Celebrating l.ii-F r.. i, here
are Dr. and Mrs. Chauncey M.
Bush from Hartford, Conn. Here
for a month's stay, ii,-' expect
to greet Mr. and Mrs. Frank
Olds, hometown friends, arriv-
ing in late November. The Olds
usually winter at the Surf Club,
but this season 7,1- will stay
in their new home on Miami
Beach.


Talk about parties, fishing,
golfing and jaunts to Havana
indicates that the winter social
season is in full swing at the
Coronado, year-round resort ho,
tel in Surfside. Many annual
winter visitors have returned
early this season-some to es-
cape wintry weather, others to
rest.
Among the latter are U. S.
Congressman James F. Lind
from York, Pa., and Mrs. Lind,
who early this week joined the
colony of victorious off i c e-
holders seeking relaxation in Mi-
ami Beach. They will be here
several weeks.
Gov.-elect Dennis J. Roberts of
Rhode Island arrived Friday and
will remain until Dec. 1st. He
is also mayor in Province, R. I.
Among other well known an-
nual visitors arriving at the
Coronado this week were Mr.
and Mrs. Russell Holderman of
Rochester, N. Y. Both are promi-
nent in the field of aviation,
h ing established a nr.umber of
flying records in the past. Mrs.
Holderman for five years held
the woi en's glider endurance
record. Currently Mr. Holder-
man is chief pilot for the Frank
Gannett newspaper chain.








For Fine

Feminine Fashions

We Cordially
Invite You To
Preview Our
Resplendent Collection


1001 L


DARK CREPES


BEACH


TAFFETAS


KNIT SPORTSWEAR.
EVENING WEAR
ACCESSORIES






Now Open


UNIFORMS Sport, Cocktail,
NURSES WAITRESSES, MAIDS Street And
DOCTORS WAITERS, HOUSEMEN -
MAIL PHONE ORDERS INVITED Dinner Dresses.
FREE DELIVERY ALTERATIONS

C "'i 0..' 0 b


iS


1026 LINCOLN RD.
MIAMI BEACH
Private Parking In Rear


OPEN FOR THE SEASON


Says Maurice. "The secret of the new coiffure
lies in the cutting of the hair" Consult
Maurice for your new coiffure.

Shampoo, reshaping, trim and styling $5.00
Permanent $20.00 up
'i


For Appointment Phone 5-4659 or S-4650
1655 MERIDIAN AVE.
CORNER LINCOLN ROAD, MIAMI BEACH






915 Lincoln Road


Sizes 32 to42 t' U,
Short Sleeve Long Sleeve C
Slipovers Slipovers Cardigans
FROM FROM FROM


10Q a125 1495


PR


PHONE
86-2338


MAIL ORDERS red or green
kid, black suede.
LARGE ACCOUNTS


8012
HARDING AVE.
MIAMI BEACH


Specializing in education for the child before
six-when he is most ready for team-work in
learning, playing, and social growth.
A year round program supervised by experienced edu-
cators in classes limited to ten. Surroundings so beautiful,
only a visit can do justice to the careful, healthful plan-
ning. Tuition by semester (four months). Also by the
month and week for whole days and half days-includ-
ing transportation.
Director: Ann Matz Tart
Activities Leader: Rave M. White "Miss Rave"


<1 A


FEATHERS AND

FLOWERS


Spectacular
red velvet coat.
The gown, pure
white silk chif-
fon and lace in
red velvet.
Exciting, yet
practical as the
coat, can be
worn day and
night.
$155


Featuring lovely new blouses for holiday and
resort wear.


breeze-cooled


-Smart Furnishings
and Fabrics
S for

Distinctive Homes


The kind of glamorous shoe that creates
a special occasion! Delman employs
his newest fabric-white nylon mesh: twines
it gracefully about the ankle, carefreely
appliques vari-colored discs on the vamp,


SMiami Beach Salon
51101 Lincoln Road
---" Palm Beach Salon, 259 Worth Ave.


For those, to whom fine quality and
good taste are of the utmost im-
portance.
Outstanding display of
fine furniture by leading
American designers.
Extensive collection of
exclusive fabrics in stock.

ANNE WRIGLEY
Interior:

925 West 41 it St. Near Alton Rd.
Miami Beach
Phone 5.3713


;/

j.. $45.00
'iJ


FOR THE YOUNG SET -

by JUNIOR LEAGUE
Sizes 9.15


INCOLN ROAD MIAMI I


A C,,r, I IIimitation

Sto View Our


New Collection

of

Women's Fine Apparel


SE HABLA CASTELLANO


1-1


I


II







... ... . .tin d y, K o ve m b er 1 9, 1 9 5 0 T H E M IA M I H E R A L D 1 9 -E



Swank Beach And Country Clubs Prepare For Another Fabulous Season


Bath, Indian Creek And Surf Clubs To Open

In December; Others Schedule Big Programs


Biscayne Bay Club Is Oldest

Yacht Club In All The South


By ETHEL TOMBRINK
Herald Staff Writer
Tile "season" begins in, Miami when tlie swank Miami
Beach clubs open their doors. There's dancing in outdoor
palm-lined patios and luncheons on ocean front terraces, while
wintry winds blow up North.
There are several year-round clubs in the area, but the
social pace heightens when the fabulous winter emicrtining
begin-.
And "see you at the club" is not just for dining or
dancing. It means golfing, sailing, fishing or swimming no


lo
!* !/ i


i 1 .1


4-'


SAILINGG; ON BISCAYNE BAY
t iff breeze, blue waters
GENTLY DOES IT
When the stopper of your
perfume bottle is hard to open,
gently tap it, first one s i d e
then the other, with glass. Then
"work" it back and forth until
It loosens. Do not use strong
arm methods.


matter what time of the year.
Celebrating its 20th anniver-
sary this winter will be the
Surf Club which will have its
formal opening Dec. 16, High-
lights of the season are the New
Year's Eve formal party, t h e
eight spectacular Saturday night
costume parties and the series
of 10 Wednesday fashion show
luncheons.
Sunday are popular gathering
days, too, for Surf Club mem-
bers and visitors, for the noon
luncheons and evening buffets.
Located along 1,000 feet of'
ocean frontage, the Surf Club
has besides its dozens of caban-
as, a large -imiiiiig pool for
those who prefer it.
A 34-unit apartment hii;liini.
which will be opened soon, takes
the place of the former Surf
Club villas for resident mem-
bers. Opened'a year ago was the
club within a club, the Night
Cap room, a popular gathering
spot for the younger set.
December will mark the
opening, too, of the exclusive
Bath Club where members
Join for weekly Saturday
dances and Sunday dinners.
New Year's Day egg nog par-
ties are a cIlub tradition.
Roundrobin t e n n is tourna.
ments highlight the sports ac-
tivities and there are ocean
and pool -winiming for the
whole family. .
Golfing activities at beautiful


\t ,, ., ,./' , .. .r ..'N "\.- .. , t .*'i- '^ '-. ."L' :< % *" :* '7',_
SMAJofhiers To Be...
? fMost Beautiful
'..
i.' "i Maternity Separates
J'. Such delightful decep-
tion. Exquisite lace
j ackets in black or
navy over rhinestone
,:"s studded flesh taflfeta
., camisole at 24.90
"' Pencil slim cutout crepe
y'l skirts at 7.90
Sizes 10-18

M o,/ Phone Orders Flled

00 S |


AfrT


S Maternity
747 41st St., I


^y T
Fashions
MIiami Beach *
4,


Indian Creek Country Club, lo-
cated in Indian Creek Island in
Biscayne Bay, began last week.
The club organized 25 years
ago, will be in full swing Dee. 1,
with the formal opening, a din-
ner dance, Dec. 10. Besides spe-
cial parties. Wednesday night
buffets and Sunday night dinner
dances are regularly scheduled
events.
Only club on the Beach side
open year around is LaGorce
Country Club. Built in 1923 by
the Fisher Corporation as a golf.
ing club for patrons of Fisher-
operated hotels, LaGorce became
a private club in .1945. Golfing
Is still the main activity, but
tennis has been added, and so-
cial gatherings include during
the season monthly fashion show
and bridge luncheons, S u nd ay
night dinners besides frequent
dances and holiday parties.
The men's grill, "the 19th hole,"
and a bar for ladies were added
to the building this year.
On the mainland side of Bis.
cayne Bay is one of the most
active year-round clubs, the
Country Club of Coral Ga-
bles. Wednesday and Saturday
night dinner dancing and pro.
ductions by Its Theatre Group
are summer and winter events.
Monthly costume parties and
traditional holiday parties add
special gaiety and fashion shows
through the season are written
produced and "modeled" by
members themselves. Civic
gatherings, too, make it a con-
tinually busy place.
For the sports mindtd, there
are golf, tennis and swimming in
Coral Gables' beautiful Venetian


Manly Art?
LONDON -(INS)- Both Hrr-
berl Stevens and his wife leahn-
ed the art of self defense during
World War II, but the wife ap-
parentIv benefited more. Stevers
39. iU i his wife, Darrine, 31.
for divorce on grouLnd$ of
(rlLell clamiinigg he ha'd beaten
hlinn and ri-hi ml. Tihe Divolle
Court Coinill l-iorcr. B 1 a ri -
W hliite. d'riieil the di' force v" iii
iii; la lc i i' t:
"It lii hu-I-banlld ,iil'fe ed P.i e
in Ihe mailper than tlip v. iie. it
lieielv EsI-| \ t that her ai mv
trainilig %%F 1 1- iI01'r, rLf lWii' tlinr
h14
hli- "

Doorknob !Subs
For Bit Handle
To borp a hole in a place too
inaccessible for a bi brace, use
a doorknob to drive the auger
into the wood. Most augerbll
sharks fit more or less snugly
Into any average sized door-
knob. To pieverint your h a n d
from n hpping on the smooth
uturface of the knob, cover It
S 1 the ltre


The Flame


Operas "


The Peter


BThat successful, wonderful fit-
ting opera ... The Flame. Black
or navy suede in lifted or low.
ered heels. Brown or white
suede; white satin high heel
only. l 95b. The Peter,... the flattering classic Interpretod In soft black nylon
velvet, 19.95.
Phone 5-4394


rALiM S.HIAlDEE ITRA nTO1TH l EiS n CL ShuIVEB ATH soLUsB
. when this and other beach clubs open the season's on


pool, the only fresh water pool
in the area.
One of the first buildings In
the City of Coral Gables, the
Country Club was built by
George Merrick, founder of the
city, as a hotel for prospective
property buyers. Later it be.
came a cilI club and was re-
incorporated a, a private club
in 19:19.
Olde-t country club in the
ti,. andt on or the six oldest
in inme SLouti iS. the Miami Coun-
tr-v Clu)b. opened in 1898 by
HeiirV Ftlagler. Boats took guests
ot ti le forier Royal [,'iii Hotel
hp illi ili.iiii River to the club
r..,,i goIirg. Tiir: course was tak-
,' ..ver in l '11 by a group of
i.,diiiians aiil i1 1945 was pur-
.'lid i,-,' and niindlernized.
Miamim Counne Club comes in-
tj ilit natioinai golfing news


when top golfers gather there
for such tournaments as the Do-
herty, Four-Ball and Miami
Open.
While golfing is still the main
activity, social gatiei ,rsi-, bridge
parties and fashion shows are
frequently on the program.
Newest of the clubs is West-
view Country Club with sea-
sonal activities including golf-
ing, swimming, and weekend
entertainment. Opening in De-
cember, Westview's first bhi g
gathering will be a fashion
show Dec. 5.
Other new clubs are Riviera
Country Club and Miami
Shores Country Club. Riviera, lo-
cated in Coral Gables was
founded before the war, but the
clubhouse was opened just four
years ago.


E(w' O1l~4,
SILMOUITTI SALON
020 LINCOLN R04D
We shall continue giving experienced
service with finest quality merchardise tofe
sour ftidious clientele.


II





a



I,


a


.7

p 'i ~


Riviera's golf,course is among
the best. No regular social pro-
gram is planned but special par,
ties are held frequently and the
club is a popular spot for pri-
vate luncheons and dances.


steeped in tradition is the Bis.
ca' ,iie Bay Yacht Club oldest
y aciht club in the South On Feb.
22nd of next year, the club will
cclebjralE its 64th anniversary at
its 65th chowder party, highlight
of the year's activities. After a
.ail along Biscayne Bay to Key
Biscayne, the picnic-type party
begins with the oli1 al chowder
testing.
Founded on Feb. 18, 1887, by
a group of 14 yachting enthu-
siasts, the club held its first
chowder, party, and the event
has been celebrated on Wash-
ington's Birthday from then on.
"Home" sites for the club
have been many through the
years, but the present club-
house edging Biscayne Bay in
Coconut Grove was built in
1932. Weekly races, special
handicap races, various rusises
to the Florida keys are held
and the club sponsors the
yearly Lipton Cup race in Feb-
ruary.
Besides Sunday night suppers
and Saturday noon chowder
luncheons, ti'aditioiiai gatiil'ing.
include a fall ILeP|eoi,. Jain. I1
flag raising ceremony at high
noon and an Easter Sunday tea.
The young "sailors" form a jun-
ior group.
Nearby in Coconut Grove is
another group of aihing enthu-
siasts, the Coconut Grove Sailing
Club organized in 1946. Growth
of the club calls for a new club-
house, now in the blue print
stage.
It's a family affair with that
:club, too, and they have not
only a junior group, but pre.
junior classes for youngsters
learning the ABC's of sailing.
Sunday races and monthly
parties are on their program.
For fishermen, there is the


Rod and Reel Club. whose gath-
ering spot is in their 14Hjbiscu
Island Clubhouse. Organized in
1929 by a group of men who
liked to tell fishing stories, the
club now has 500 members who
compete for the dubious honor
of Champion Liar on annual
L4rs night.
A Day Afloat and A Day Afoot
are twice yearly fishing compe-
titions. They compete with other
Florida fishing clubs, too, and
plan special trips to the keys.,
for fishing. Wives come along
for monthly dinner dances.


Medical Group"

To Turn Hobo

Pi Sigma Sigma Medical Soror-
ity will turn hobo at its party
sttiL'l.i', nigh It in the home of Mrs.
Max Kantor, 1325 Lenox ave., Mi-
ami Beach.
The ou,'riti"
Christmas w e I.
fare work will
receive the pro-
ceeds from the
party, which
will include 'a
barbecue dinner,
games and prizes I -
for the best hobo "
costumes.
"Mrs. Anthony -
Bryn is the new MRS. BRYN
president of the organization.
whose members are graduate med-
ical technicians. Other of fceri are
Mrs. John Ginn, vice president;
Miss Polly Hensley, secretaryN, and
Mrs. Nicholas Bader, treasurer.
The group recEnt'y pledged new
members from Miami, Hollywood
and Ochopee in dncalielighL rites. '


I-


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No other word better describes Of Yarns,, Bleads ,
MARJAY-LINCOLN, located in.the Trimmings ... Laces
heart of Miami Beach. .n osm '
EXCLUSIVE for our handknit fashions And Costume
designed to suit your individual taste. Jewelry.
EXCLUSIVE in our unexcelled service
including FREE DETAILED INSTRUCTION.
EXCLUSIVE in our "Know How" of knitting,
blocking and bead vwork.
EXCLOSIVE from start to finish. Visit our
air conditioned store while you're in Sunny
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fow.

i 1510 WASHINGTON AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH PHONE S-7631



















IS A 'MUST' IN LOVELY THINGS, and
Moseley's superb craftsmen are devoted exclusively to
the designing and making of lovely things for the home,
which stay lovelier, longer. Luxurious dream
satin beautifully quilted in a giant pansy pattern

on the self lined spread. Fine accordion *a' n
11 pleated French petticoat gracefully ,
L ' outlines the bed. :


Single s;ze, quilted throw .. $59.50
French petticoat ......... $39.50
Double -;:ze, quilted throw .. $75,00
French peftticoat ......... $49.50

th., sile cqn be mode for Oversize heds


mail and phone eders will cceiveo
our pvetnel ettentionI


Ao:lable Colors
Huni, Grim d F| hP,ll
Red 'I P.,e u..t
G"""r ''n/ lllm
G~rrniun Yrllow
Mnu'n Wine
Slone Grey frown
111e16 Blue o Almond
Aqua Croon
Dlety Pink G
Poach 4 C Gold
Biby Pink i Opel Ivory


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20- E THE MIAMI HERALD Sunday. November 19. 1950


Society


Turf Fans Again Look Forward To Season



* At Miami Tracks; New Names On Roster


The horses are raring to run-and the blue book set is
raring to watch them. Society leaders in the North and prom-
inent figures in the turf world are already here, or at Palm
Beach, waiting for the opening day bugle call to the post,
just one week following Thanksgiving festivities on Thursday,
Nov. 30, at Tropical Park.
r Tropical, second oldest of the
three tracks in this area, will
5% f' 1 echo to the thundering hooves
of the thoroughbreds till Jan. 16.


7FgW jff.w' M-IsmI *'' .12#LW~s
MRS. EUGENE CONSTANTIN
. Dallas socialite


MR., MRS. JOHN C. CLARK
.. he's Hialeah president


Hialeah's inaugural date is
Jan. 17 and its opening has for
years marked the peak of the
winter season in Greater Miami.
This track will end its run,
March 3.
Gulfstream will be the setting
for the final 40 days of racing,
March 5-April 20.
There will be several new
stables represented at the
tracks this year-particularly
at Hialeah. The famous Eton
blue and brown of C. V. Whit.
nep and the racing colors of
W. M. Peavy will be making
their first appearances at Hia-
leah.
Spectators % ill again be see-
ing the familiar pink and black
of Greentree Stables, owned by
John Hay Whitney and his sis-
ter, Mrs. Charles S. Payson.
Charles T. Fisher, Detroit, will
race his Dixiaha horses and Ken-
tuckian E. E. Dale Shafftter and
Walter M. Jeffords, Bel Air, Md.,
also have entries for the Hia-
leah meet.
The Russell A. Firestones, of
Akron, 0., who winter at the
Surf Club here, will be on hand
to give last minute instructions
to their jockeys. So will Mrs.
Isabel Dodge Sloane, who com-


Children Will Soon Learn Honesty


By RICHMOND BARBOUR
Guidance Counselor
Ts your child sometimes lack-
ing in honei.t,'? Tell fibs? Maybe
even get careless about whose
money he -pinds?
Dishonesty infuriates us par-
ents. If your toungeter has the
aforementioned bad habits
,oui've been mad and worried.
Rightly. too But here are a cou-
ple of reassuiIng thoi-,li.i for
you, and one suggestion.
HONESTY IS LEARNED.
That's itemn nutniter one. VWe
start lire timinoral. and unhonesi.
Not exacti!'' dishone.tr. hi.it sure-
ly not honest. We just naturally
take what we want %,hen %e
want it. Al.no-t evei child lea.
che-ars. tirals a little in thle r-ro-
ce_, or ai,:quiring--4onietl.'.
HONESTY IS VAARiAELE.
.gry few adulit aie completely
'.. tIiest. Psychologlt.s discovered


that 30 years ago. We have our
ho)neatiss and our dishonesties.
Your father wouldn't steal
money, but did he use a little
office stationery for private let-
ters sometimes? That sort of
ihine.
CHILDREN NEED GUID-
ANCE. In ile-arning honesty aHll
children n rd help. Someone has
to tloach ilent riglit finomn wrong.
r-he. nur-ed frequent ad' ice. TIc%'
may or may not need punl'h-
iTi-lit Some learn faster" than
others. though -liey all profit if
e- pali ent; i-t them a good. exam-
pie.

CHOWS RETURN
Mr. and Mrs. Jonce 0. Chlio
have rl-tiiriped to Cuial Gable-
+ afr pfendiid nig tlie ctjinlneiI ai
liiir i a3i.:li near t-trndeti mTiiiIiF.
N C T i n .'," ca e lins e I-? '.' '
of NI .1;neapolIs. MInn., Mrs.
Chow's former home.


So what? I suggest that you
do your darrne.ld- to be patient
and consistent as you teach hon-
esty.' Use rewards and praise
more often than punishment.
And be sure to avoid any de-
ceit or dishonesty on your part,
at least when you're near your
erring child!


4917
SIZES


W~tajbwjtA


I>

- ~


0J










hi


----1NOW & USE OUR

LAY-AWAY

vLAN /
LA.A. A. A.A. . /


VISIT OUR STORE
AND SEE THE MOST

CLOTHING FOR BOYS v .
AND GIRLS IN MIAMI
USE OUR LAY-AWAY PLAN


JONES JUVENILE SHOP
815 S.W. 8th ST. STO" OU"S PH. 9-7159
F':E WMN0 IN REAR CONDONED FREE DELIVERY


Gay as a' window-box! Wear
this glamour-apron when guesi
drop in, it's so decorative wili
its ruffle hemline, ricrac trim
Transfer included. Pattern 491:
small size 14-1:; tI ,i. 18-20; larq
40-42. Bib aproi, small si2z-.
takes 1 1 yds. 35-in fabric; -
yd. contrast.
This pattern, easy to use, sil'-
pie to sew, is tested i.." lfit, Ia-
com plete illustrated ,,-ti iu. .
SEND TWENTY-FIVE CENTS
in coins for this pattern to ANN E
ADAMS, care of The Miami He i -
ald, 104 Pattern Dept., 243 We-t
17th St., New York 11, N. Y.
Print plainly NAME, ADDRES.
with ZONE, SIZE and STYLE.
NUMBER.
Send Twenty Cents now (.n
coins) for our Fall and Winter
Pattern Book by Anne Adarr.
The best of the new-season fash-
ion in easy-to-sew patterns fc.r
all. Christmas gifts, too, plit
free a thr;ft.. pattern for mat
ing a liI I ,hr.ess from a mar .
shirt.


MRS.


mutes from Palm Beach when
her Brookmeade horses ar'e run-
ning at Hialeah.
George D. Widener, chairman
of Miami Jockey Club, is bring-
ing his horses here this winter,
too-including a Kentucky
Derby hopeful, Battlefield.
Two widely.known women
In the turf world, Mrs. Ethel
DuPont Weir and Mrs. Cooper
(Liz Whitney) Person will be
here to watch their horses--
win or lose.
,P. A. B. Widener, III, will
stable his horses again at Hia-
leah and Stephen (Laddie) San-
-ford will be making frequent
trips from Palm Beach to Hia-
leah when his Sanford Stud
horses are running.
Other stable owners who win-
ter in Miami Beach during the
racing season include Hialeah

SLEEP UNI)ER SHELF
Fast on the road to fame are
storage headboards. These range
from a simple, open shelf ar-
Srangement to large all-in-one
units with sliding doors and at-
tached nightstands. Such fea-
tures as plug outlets and indirect
lighrting are being incol poraird.


President and Mrs. John C. Clark,
Binghamton, N. Y.; Mrs. Edward
S. Moore, who brings her yacht,
Big Pebble, down each winter.
SMr. and Mrs. Frank Heller, Mr.
and Mrs. Benjamin O'Shea, ownm
ers of Lester Manor Stable, who
winter at the Sea View, and
the Tom Braggs, Noroton, Conn.,
will be among Hialeah specta-
tors.
The William Vennemans of
Louisville, Arnold Hanger, New
Yorli;. Mr.' and Mcr. Eugene Con-
. aninrh, Jr. Dalla-. a i-,d trif Lav.-
tFI-ni:| Le\L. --". \\W noak, \a ,
a'p -thet Il jl ii n ihi trie rae-
Il i Ci ril. d ti, n5 F i011i.


WE1 PLACE
I "? 47YOUR NAME
~~s. IN TM!E~
-s -._': MADlIN'S SKIRT
..- '':24 Notes S I
: -' '. ,* s 24 Envelopes I
'- <' *---- Note iW o s n 'It "
s .'* M ailed1 Ila Ems'
Arlilicnal Fl-e ers tof Rare Beauly
"G.IF- 5OF DISTINCTION '
FLORAL ARTCRAFTS
STUDIO
MINERVA ORIGINALS
1635 lelfeusoa Ave., Miami Beach
Near Lincoln Rd. Pb. 59-8385


Dade Clubs Combine With Park Departments


Flower Show Planned In March


One of Dade county's out.
standing spring events, the
annual Metropolitan / M i a m i
Flower Show, is scheduled for
Dinner Key Auditorium next
March 17, 18 and 19, show of-
ficials have announced.
Featured in the three-day
floral extravaganza, which will
be sponsored by more than a
dozen garden clubs, co-operating
with Coral Gables, Miami, Miami
Beach and Dade county parks
departments, will be compet-
itive entries, flower and plant
arrangements and landscaping
exhibits.
Mrs. Helen Cutten, Miami
Beach, 1951 show president, said
that entries are now being ac-
cepted. Competition will be In
both horticultural and display
excellence categories.


She pointed out that the
exhibits In the horticultural
category must be of superior
quality and grown by the ex-
hibitor at least three months
before ilie show.
Entries in the artistic arrange-
n'eris cia-iifi.aton must be the
work of the individual ex-
hibitor. However, in most cases
flowers need not have been
grown by the exhibitor.
E x h i b i t s by commercial
growers, municipal and county
park departments and junior
garden clubs will be featured
in addition to the competitive
entries. This year's show drew
entries from both North and
South America.
Hopes for a gigantic 1951
event, surpassing this year's
show, were expressed by the


show's directors. The floral
event drow mnore than 15 .000o


visitors to Dinner Key auditori-
um this nast sring.


I w^j1l-mind if we tell you

S- about our operation?
I T h 9 . i ... x..i . . _- _- __ -___ .....


?*>' ^W ,'Te way we opera . we s
", ,: foot and select a proper last th
i satisfaction.
ORTHOPEDIC SHOES

IL I _jFor The Entire Family
We would rather spend time and patience in lilting a customer
to the correct shoe than see an incorrect last sold in our store.
We have had 22 years in scientifically fitting orthopedic shoes,
13 successful years in Miami. Bring in your shoe trouble to us.
If your feet hurt, see your Foot Doctor . chances are he will
-recommend a fitting in our functional shoes.


We reserve the right to REFUSE TO SELL a pair of shoes
which in our judgment is not suited to YOUR FOOT
see your foot doctor then see us


suay your individual typI
hat will insure comfort and


FIX


Our Selection of "GIFTS SURE TO" for thisS0
we celebrate 16 years of making YOUR Christmas s


The Joy of Giving, the Thrill of Receiving a
Gala Gift of America's Finest Fruits and. Deli-
caccies in gaily decorated packages, will mark
you as most generous and thoughtful by
Friends, Business Associates and Loved Ones.
Make your selections from the Gifts shown ..
Send us the names'of those to whom you wish
Packages delivered. We will enclose your card
(or ours if, requested) and ship to arrive be-
fore Christmas. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED!
More than Two Million Gift Packages have


been enthusiastically received. -
ing Business Executives prefer COCI| eU
conveying Christmas Greetings . i ,
Delivery Charges.
No shipments to Foreign Countries with
exception of Canada. (For Canadian ship-
ments add 15o to printed prices.) Orders must
be accompanied by Check or Money Order. .
References Any Bank in the United States. WE
ARE THE WORLD'S LARGEST IN THIS TYPE OF
BUSINESS!


--- A GIFT OF GOOD CHEER THROUGHOUT THE YEAR
Orders may start any time. with any month, end each month designated yeaor r.jd
one, friends, or business associates will receive o gorgeous box of COBIS 1-.no l ru.
o "Fountain and delicacies from you. engraved Gift Certificate enclosed.
ida. Subscribe NOW. t o I COBBS YEAROUND FRUITCU
12-Box Club includes DECEMBER, _
Christmas Basket of Assorted Fruits; All 12 gill $,2.10
PONCE SAYS: "Let me be your Citrus Santa this JANUARY, luscious D'Aniou Pears; -.,- .t
year with Gifts everyone appreciates. Tree-ripen- FEBRUARY, honey-sweet Grope. O-Box Club, any 9 items and he
ed, luscious Fruits and Delicacies from the Sun- fruit; MARCH, Tropical Preserves, Decenbes Baset $3.95-
drenched Hs n)t of Florida."n 9 Jars; APRIL. Valencia Oranges; -SBox Club. any 7 months' giltls
..-t -O MAY, Sugar-loaf Pineapples; JUNE, c-th December Baslket -- 528.45
again Grapefruit; JULY, Tray 5-Bo Club, any 4 months' glts
of Fruit Confections; AUGUST, il,h December Baslet $19.20
Peachtes. SEPTEMBER,rae
slO BER.3-Box Club, any 2 months' gills
" .: w eedless Ribier Gropes; OCTOBre:'[
It'" enormous Red Apples; NOVeMBeR, 1 D 1
"OBBS famous Tropical Fruit Cake.


C'
C
6)t) '7.-'.
/ ~~0




b -
-I-.
C i'i'


* Free Demonstration Lesson
SCHOOL HOURS
8 A.M.-10 P.M.


SEE HOW FAST YOU CAN


Sauovw


Our i


Courses Taught by
a lamtrctas I mI


mwilre inwruc torns1romww
Speed As Well As Accuracy
G.I. Approved

* Air Conditioned Rooms
Classes Limited to 3 Persons


-'.?i M'I,-T No. 35* $7.60 GIFT No. 11 $12.20
"^,'~,~ 'i i 114h o ,,ren gaily-teutored Imported Meican Some as CG-ift No 35 obove except
I|.d;.'...t.9i-h,,. WAlw ,faBtOh,,, tir hamper of Asso,tr, TWICE the ,,zf and co.e.n.
r!t-' e: einoi'4 d Grapdull decorated with -.mquoat.
: Oersi lan'a" i d Tangerine
*" '* '.j: S i M


* Conversational Method

Native Teachers


0.


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PHONE 3-3737


AL


GIFT No. 20 $19.20
A Handwoven gaily colored Imported
Mexican Wicker Reusable Bushel size
Hamper of Assorted Fresh Frits, oa
large fresh Sugar-Looaf Pineapple, three
Jars of Tropical Fruit Preserves, a JOt
of Assorted Tropical Fruits mellowed
in Genuine Bvandy. Ilb BasLet atof
Fruit Candy, aloo a delicious Pecan Log


BOX MH, LITTLE RIVER (MIami), FLORIDA


.5| Box MH. Lttleu uiver IMitril. Fla.
E-nc.losed.% check or moneE
order for S ---for CGift
age, to be sh-pped 1a names on afaocked list Send
Fme REE, natural color Brochure picturing 24 pages ol
COBBS andeiul tfrut G." and YEAROUND FRUIT ClUB
iMr NAM-E

ST AND NO.
-N
CITY --ON(-- STA7E______
Doet lorgetl Io oltach list of names to whom glls are to be dellveredl
bi---------------- -------------,


M. H. CESPEDES, D., Dir.


I


f RAWFOPUS
S H n E S
1.11 T Mj,,Mf
OP-&ITE Fp KRFSS


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'77 I






22-l THE MIAMI HERALD Sunday, November 19. 1950


By GWEN HARRISON /'EE
(These uere Conversathon Pieces i-ms 40 years ago.)
Flash! Col. Theodore Roosevelt, hack from his African
hunt, was challenged by a woman to fight her in a duel with
bare fists or deadly weapons' . she's Mrs. Ida Van Clussen
who called the colonel a "scoundrel" and said "he and his agents
boycotted me" . Roosetelt is in Saratoga to secure the
office of the temporary chairman of the Republican party . .
hear that during his recent hiunt in Kampale., LUgdanu, he hail
In his party seven white hunters and scientists, seven tent
boys, six skinners, five bearers, two cooks, four grooms and
200 porters . .
^ ,
Those perennials at the January opening of the Royal
Palm Hotel, according to Manager GreaVes, who already have
made reservations include the John Kilgours. Mr. and Mrs.
M. B. Heine, and Admiral Tryon ..
.: ,.. * "t"
The new John Oliver LaGorce "Handbook of Florida" has
a paragraph which bears repeating . "It is possible," he
writes, "to weather, and even live through a summer in Mi-
Sami" .. Item of civic interest from another new publication,
a travel book, is that although Miami has a population of 5,200
now, its railroad station is nemi ely iidin.lequate . in checking
with those lespon-ible. learned tli.L the station probably won't
be changed for anuilier 40 years! . .
^ .* *
Ill health of Mrs, John D. Rockefeller in (lc'eldidi will
change the family's plan, to spend a few months here during
the winter . the oil kiig is among the 16 other millionaires
who recently subscribed more than a million and a half dollars
to the extension of Palisades Park, New York .
'; ' ''" '
Word from Count Jacques de Lessups, Paris, no stranger
here, is that he will enter the 1910 airship race at Belmont
Park, N. Y. .. my European correspondent also adds that Czar
Nicholas who attended the St. Petersburg funeral of the Grand
Duke Michael Nicholavitch In the rain, is feared to have con-
tracted pneumonia . tlhiat's in Ru;sia . and not to be
confused with St. Peteirsburg, Fla., where there were 36 new
cases of cholera and 13 deaths today . among those now
ll Is Herr Fels Elan, member of the staff of the German
embassy there . .
** *
S The Wednesday Night Club was entertained this week in
the home of Mr. and Mrs. George Romnfh . the group
played 500 until 10 o'clock . on the same evening Mrs.
Frank McDonough. 134 Tenth st., was hostess to the Stockiiig
Club . .
'* * '
Mrs. 8. F. Deisinger. daughter of J, P. McQuaide. lessee
and manager of the Gerile Reynolds' Lyceum here, arrives
from New York where during the social season "she is very
prominent" . she will reside at the McQualde residence on
the Boulevard . she planned a theater party for Saturday's
matinee of Bardon's "Divorcons" at the Lyceum, but her father
announced that because of "lack of attendance and interest in
thle theater" he will close It Saturday . .
i
Halley's Comet parties still are being given by the gay
set . over the weekend a well-known group chartered the
double deck boat, Lady Lou, which transported them to Miami
Beach where they went ocean bathing during the d.'ylight
hours .. hear there's a "scandal" connected with the loss of
that feather boa dui ing the return trip. n
*
Madison Burdine just completed an addition to his home
on Second Street . that gives him one of the prettiest and
"-most conveniently arranged residences in that part of the city.
** *
Ellen Terry writes from her Small Hythe, Tenderden, Eng-
land home (one of her seven country cottages) that she is
preparing for an American tour this fall . she says she
objects to the word "lecture" ,. wants reporters to call her
tour one of "discourses."
f
Ididor Cohen of 224 Eighth st. tells me that according to b
the manufacturers' records Miami has just closed the best i


summer in its history . he
was just coming out of Ximan.
lev and the Hill brothers cigar
factory . .
*
New York friends of the six
families, whose daughters will
make debuts this week at the
Woman's Club are making up
travel parties . for a lark
they plan, to make use of that
$35 round-trip ClI de Line excur-
sion which includes their state-
rooms and all meals.
'*
Of all places to bump into a
jeweler ... over at G. M. Dykes'
horseshoeing place on Avenue D
and Tenth st., ran into 0. W.
Maynard who tells me his new
advertising campaign will be
worded, "Why Send Out of This
Town to Shop?"
** *
As suggested by Glen C. Fris-
sell, presidentland general man-
ager of the Miami Telephone Co.,
I "saved a journey" by telephon-
ng steel magnate Charles M.
Schwab for a statement . he's
traveling in the Middle West
with Prince Tsai Hhun, uncle of
the baby emperor of China, In
Schwab's special train . the
Prince is inspecting steel plants
in preparation for giving a big
order for ships to rebuild his
navy . on the subject of pos-
sfble war with Japan Schwab
was silent . but added he
"saw no reason for anything
but continued prosperity."

To View Fashions
Miami Shores Woman's Club
members will view fashions for
'very hour of the day at their
fashion show Saturday in Miami
Shores Country Club.
Luncheon at 12:30 p. m. will
be followed by the show, and
bridge and. canasta.


We will ship anywhere in the world...

from factory direct to you


BEHUT FUL WROUIHI


RO


"THE ARISTOCRAT"

Wrought iron cast aluminum
beautiful 5 piece set in pastel
shades. Included are 3 side
chairs, one armchair and table
with plate glass top. Guaran-
teed lifetime construction. Re.
versible Seat Cushions in a
Selection of 24 Colors.





$169


------- ----- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
DaVinci
2164 N.W. let Ave.
MIAMI, FLORIDA
I I
I Please send me without any charge your illustrated I
Sfolder decciibhing DaVinei wrought Iron furniture.
INAM ........................................
I ADDRESS ......................................
nYA S TAT ...................................
w. W.. -. ,- - W. ,, mup-


Ba#ma


Phone 9.9068
2164 N.W. 1st Ave., Miami


- 11~~''~~'


HELP CHURCH FUND
Holy Comforter Episcopal
Church building fund will bene.
fit from the bridge and ca-


nasta party to be given In the
church parish hall Tuesday
night at 8. Mrs. W. J. Noblit will
be hostess.


Woman, 60, Once A Miamian,


Lauds Democracy To Mrs. FDR


I


Blondie By Chic Young


_0H,BOY CAN'T WAIT TO GET
MIAMI WEE THERE ANDP CONGRATULATE
WE COME! ITLL THE MIAMI IERALD ON ITS
8E SWELL 70 4OTN ANNIVERSARY!
6ET TO THOSE ., ,
5UNNY FLORIDA
BEACH ES.



















C ,pr. 19O0. King Features Syndicate. Inc.,


/

V


"Florida's


By ELEANOR ROO.E% ELT
HYDE PARK ,- I want to
quote today from a letter which,
I think, contains the best argu-
inent we can put forward for
the type of opportunity which
democracy can afford. It was
written to me by a woman, and
the portion which illustrates the
value of democracy is as fol-
lows:
"As I approach my 60th birth-
day this month, I write this let-
ter with thankful heart, firm in
the conviction that my Li-''
could have happened only In the
United States of America.
"In September, 1903, my dad,
a Baptist minister, brought his
family of five children to Amer-
ica to educate us in this 'Land
of thle Free,' because he had
heard so much about it' in our
native land, merrie Eiil-nl. I
am the oldest.
"I was almost 13 when we
arrived In hijhliie. Mich.,
where father became pastor of
the village Baptist Church. We
lived in A hiiigan until 1908,
quickly adding a picturesque
American slang to the rudi-
ments of our education.
"As a brief rest from pastoral
work, Dad accepted a position
as teacher in a business college
in Macon, Ga., ilin'lIc his two
oldest dauLghtear to join him
there ani n iibihe the (then) new
type of education. Fortified with
a business course, we qiickl','
secured good positions in offices.
"I met a young graduate of


Mercer University and married
him in 1917. He was invited to
serve as pastor's assistant at
First Baptist Churl.h. Chatta-
..'" ', i. v which city we moved
SDr, cit.pr of that year. World
War I was just over when our
first son was horn, and a pro-
motion was given to my. hus-
band in Oklahoma City.
"Two sons came to mess our
home in that city, when the
church in Miami beckoned aod
my husband accepted.. We
managed to survive several
hurricanes, lost the home we
had begun to purchase, and
our fourth son arrived to com-
plete our male quartet.
"A change in occupation on
the part of our breadwinner
providentially brought us to At-
lanta in 1931, with a good po-
sition in an established national
aie'eiliri, concern. But the de-
pression closed its doors and he
was forced-then past 50 years
old-to begin almost at the be-
ginning, as an independent ad-
vertising salesman, with no
specified salary, on a commis-
sion.
"So, with mighty little money
and plenty of ambition, we
reared our sons in a Christian
home. All four became Boy
Scouts, three of them Eagles.
We held up college as a goal
toward which we would like
them to work, and they eagerly
accepted the challenge. Selling
bread, cakes and pies, for a door-
to-door baking company, at the


Eli FN JU HE


Designed and made in our own

factory


ONLY


Furniture




Department




Store!"



We can furnish your entire home, from the "ground-to.roof.,"'
including all furniture, rugs, draperies, electrical, appliances,
linens, silver, etc. and you can pay for it on easy terms!
Conservative, budget.priced or most luxurious modern or
period furniture, easy to select on our well-stocked floors.




* 22 Northwest First Street, Miami, Florida

0 419 South Andrews, Fort Lauderdale, Florida

0 434 Clematis, West Palm Beach, Florida


iaEnificprnt wage of 10 cents an
Ihour. they each secured 'jobs.,'
working after school and all day
on Saturday.
"Soon the two oldest sons
found newspaper routes and
worked as carriers, early 'and
late, winning nice cash prizes
for their labor and resourceful-
ness, h-,Light their own clothes
and helped out mightily with
their huvli expenie.
'"Withk faith and a $5 bill,
one seo entered Georgia Tech,
signage note for the balance
of that first quarter's tuition,
thanks to the geod graces of
the presiet, brother of one
of my husband's former em-
ployers, fully acquainted with .
our financial disability and
our integrity.
"On the co-operative plan,
studying three months and
working three months, the three
older boys graduated from Geor-
gia Tech. Our youngest chose
the Unlveriitv of Georgia, from
which he was graduated Phi
Beta Kappa in 1949. He now
has his master's degree and is
at this moment working toward
his PH. D. degree."
Tomorrow I shall tell you the
sequel to this tale, the proof of
what a democratic country can
offer.
STOPS IN MIAMI
Virgilio Diaz Ordonez and his
wife spent the weekend in Mi-
ami en route to Dominican Re-
public.






Sunday, November 19, 1950 THE MIAMI HERALD 23-E


Women's C Of C To Hear


Mr. Hurst Of The Herald


Discuss Urban Planning


John Shirley Hurst, H e r a l d
real estate editor, will discuss
the Urban Planning Institute's
recommendations for Miami at
the dinner meeting of the
Women's Division, Miami Cham-
ber of Commerce, Monday night
at 7:30 In the Miamian restau-
rant.
Members also will hear George
Dooley, senior at Vocational
High School, read his e s say
which won the Jaycee Ameri-
canism essay contest.'
Mrs. Louis E. Natt, recently
re-elected president of the
division; Mrs. -E, N. Claughton,
first vice president, and Mrs.
Charles Enterline, second vice
president, will be installed. New
directors are Mrs. Anna Dranga,
Mrs. Esther Pop-r-l, Miss Pa-


quita Rabell and Mrs. HelIen
Letchworth, who will serve
three years.
Other departmental directors
are: Mrs. Dora Dean, city beau-
tification;, Mrs. Enterline, c i t y
government; Mrs. 'M rile T.
Bradford, culture; Mrs. Letch-
worth, hospitality and entertain-
ment; Mrs. George C. Estill,
county affairs; Mrs. T. V. Moore,
welfare, and Mrs. Arthur G.
Camfield, national government.
NOT EVERLASTING
Do you put on perfume in the
morning and expect it to last
all day? Few perfumes last
more than three or four hours,
so carry a purse size of scent
with you, to renew your frag-
rance whenever you retouch
your lipstick.


CRYSTAL


HURRICANE



LAMPS


Add charm to your home with 8
a pair of these attractive Crys-
the 12 sparkling crystal prisms$ 9 8
Each lamp has plus the colorful CASH
ruby chimney. &
AMAZING VALUE CARRY
*SPLENDID XMAS GIFT


I
7
7


Phones 7A9 0
R8.5551
T8.S5S9 i^


COMPETEHOUE FRN SHR


* El


Full Quality at Lowest Cost
0 Full-width Zero Zone Freezer
for frozen foods and ice cubes
Full-width Quick Chiller
for chilling foods storing
meats, etc.
Glass-covered Crisper for
vegetables, fruits, greens.
Full-size Super Power Sys-
tem for fast refrigeration at
low cost.

EASY TERMS


NOVEMBER IN MIAMI brings out many a dark frock and
suit, but you'll still find smartly dressed women who decide
in favor of comfort as well as fashion. For a recent luncheon
Mrs. William C. Gaither and Mrs. Riggs Mahony were
among the latter group. Mrs. Gaither chose a white frock
with large navy pol ;a dots, navy and white accessories.
Mrs. Mahony's shantung print of muted red was comple-
mented with a large straw hat and matching purse and shoes.

Polygamy? Too Expensive


LOS ANGELES (UP) -
Plural marriages are more com-
mon in the United States than
in nations where polygamy is
legal, although most Americans
wed only one spouse at a, time,
a research organization reported
today.
The American Institute of
Family Relations said the signif-
icant difference between Ameri-
can marital habits and those of
polygamous nations is that there
only the rich can support more
than one wife. Here multiple
marriages occur in all economic
strata.
In Mohammedan countries and
others that sanction plural mar-
;icr., the institute estimated,
akout one in every 20 husbands
has two or more wives. In the
United States, one in every six
persons has re-married after di-
vorce.
Dr. Paul H. Landis, an Insti-
tute regional consultant, said sta-
tistics show divorced persons
BEST RESULTS
To gain best value from a
bath softener-bath salts, bub-
bles, oil, etc.-place it in a dry
tub directly beneath faucet and
turn on the water full force.


!4/











/1 / ,/

,,1/' 1 1 / /





I -

4 ,,lo.. .- -
___











i '- .- ;---- .,,.


\.I *I._ '" ', ::. .... -



C\v ;,L ~"^- .,. ,..,
















the woman whose

home is

furnished from Plumer's!








SINCE 1015


RICHARD PLUMER
lss N.E. 40th Street
Phito 7-57T


W,


D

OPEN
Ved. & Sat.
to 9 P.M.


w viipid--






24.E THE MIAMI NERALD Sunday. November 9119,0'"


i


'Haste Makes WVaste


BEFORE YOU BUY furniture, decide whether
you want formal or informal rooms. The
modern dining room suite above will give
you an irifcrm.il look. The wrought iron
chairs below are rir.iritciic-n.il in style-be-
cause they fit into any setting.


Applies 7

Even if they have enough
cash on hand to completely fur-
nish a new house, newlyweds
should remember that the haste-
makes.waste rule also applies to
furniture buying.
It takes time and careful plan.
ning to furnish a house, if you
expect to enjoy it as much on
your fiftieth anniversary as you
Jo on your first.
The initial decision you
should make concerns the
type of rooms you want--for-
mal, informal or both. You
may keep all the furniture in
one room Chippendale, Hep-
plewhite, Duncan Phyfe or
any other 18th Century style.
Or, you may pIcK Individual
pieces from several periods. The
living room is the best place to
mix traditional furniture.
If you like an informal living
,heme, stick to the pieces which
have pleasing architectural lines
and are not radically different.
Make scaled floor plans of the
rooms you wish to furnish. This
,is easier than you think. Meas-
ure the length and width of
each room. Then use a scale of
mne-half or one inch to the,foot
o make the floor outline.
Next, determine the wall
height and add each wall to


o Furnitwu
your diagiam-not in perspec-
tive but do, n fiat. Estimate the
floor space you expect each
piece of furniture to occupy and
make movable cut-outs of each
piece. Now you're ready to plan
Your furniture arrangements.
Before you go s"Aopping,
study the local advertising.
Watch for furniture sales. Be-
member it's far better to buy
a good piece or a few pieces
at a time than to buy a three-
room "package" of junk.
Here's how you, yourself, can
judge quality craftsmanship in
furniture.
Smooth turnings and sharp,
clean carvings indicate good
cabinet-making. There is an old
saying that "well sanded is half
finished" and expert sanding
certainly shcn in the finished
piece. Joints should be tight fit-
ting. Glue and scre" rather
than nails, 4noicaie quality.
Get a siartiiin light on ve-
neered tops. If there are depres-
sions, it means defective
material or poor workmanship.
Examine drawers. N o t e
whether dove-tail joints are
tight, clean and smooth. See
if the drawer sides and
bottoms are smooth and well


IT PAYS TO TAKE YOUR TIME" WHEN Ft'RNITU RE SHOPPING
S. examine each piece carefully

'Nuts In May' Is Subject
Mrs. J. Riley Staa 5110 San guests of Mrs. Flovd Wright.
Amaro st.. Coral Gable-. %ill tbe 1700 Corez t st, Cural G a L I-
hostess to the book r c v I e w Tueslday. Lamp shades '\\il be
group. nii, eri-I, of Mi,,i ,i lie ( ip i.ip r'ol. [
W'Oman's ('Cluh., at S Tur-da,' DEi-ri'L t-.rilPfI pi olr \ Mill
night. Cornelia Oni i.1-n III '- Fi.itt- 1 1 i i, Tl'l ,rls..
"Nut In 'Ma-"' % ill he re\,ei ,-Id. '., il Mi R. Ipi. Rr..-. 1I S,,-
Homne arlts gioi[) one ill i:ie loi a a e, C'uidl Callf:


For your comfort, for your pleasurable hours in the Hand-crafted from East Indian Tohoti rattan and
game room . Whitecraft interprets the requirements accented with your fabric choice, Whitecraft is
of modern living to give you rattan furniture of dis- designed for your entertainment center . the
tinctive casualness, complete flexibility. game-TV room.
Send 2Sc for an Illustrated catalogue


MIAMI MIAMI BEACH FT. LAUDEROALE CORAL GABLES PALM BEACH
Factory and Showroom 1023 Lincoln Rd. 2432 E. Las Olas Blvd. 91 MIracle Mile 417 S. County Rd.
7350 NW. Miami ot.
Phone 1.2121 Phone 5.2506 Phone 5145 Phone 48.8843 Phone 5550


P~4


.4

/4


Miamian Enjoys
Freezing Weather
A Miami girl, Miss Mildred Lee
Henson, writes to her mother,
Mrs. M. L. Henson, that she is
"enjoying the freezing weather"
in Charlotte, N. C.
Miss Henson Is a student at
Queens College there. She will
rI-.Fnr Tiii, -.giving with a class-
r,,tp. Mi Colir-en Solomon of
V. in- i., iisaleil, N. C.
I =


SMART DECORATOR CHAIRS

COVERED IN TROPICAL PRINTS


Charm in the
Dining Room!


Adds Elegance
to the Foyer!


$


95


Each


81.25 Per Week


To celebrate our anniversary we are offering
a very special collection of decorator chairs.
Chairs of this type have been generally avail-
able only in high price brackets ... but at this
low price you can afford to enjoy their many
practical uses. All are covered in tropical
prints on the seats and backs, with correlating
solid covers on the remainder of the chair.
Come in and select your special chair while
this low, low price prevails. Easy terms will
,be quickly arranged for you.

RHODES IS AIR CONDITIONED


FREE PARKING


Practical for
the Den!


NEXT TO
BOTH STORES


Serving the South Since 1875


hioes

FURNITURE

400 NORTH MIAMI AVENUE
N.W. SECOND AVENUE AT FIFTH ST.
Stores Also At Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach


Ideal for the
Game Room!


Graceful for
the Boudoir!


Perfect for
Televisionl


jlfib A, Alk' ldlhh 'Ahk ldghh -
V
7 -pw
111" W:
"'A'AMNSRA


. A ....


K Slogan

e Buying++'
', J
finished. Pull out, drawers by
one handle. HIf they come out
and go back easily, thea are
well made and fitted. ,
Excess glue and dirty corners
indicate hasty construction. EX-
amine legs and see If uood Is
straight-grained. C r o s s-gra mned
legs are easily broken.
Chair bottoms usually are cov-
ered with black fabric but if
they are exposed, corner blocks
should be ample in size, well
fitted and fastened 'with glue
and screws.
What you cannot err for
yourself, ask the salesnman to
explain. If he Is ready and
willing to show you how the
furniture is constructed,
you'll know it's the piece to
purchase.
If you have a special ai range-
ment problem, take your floor
plan to a .store which gives dec-
orating advice. Teachers of in-
terior decorating in thle local
schools may help you gnt off to
a aood start.
If ourilde help Is not rradilv
available, visit the public II-
hiat'% and pick up some hooks
containing basic ii'fr.i iliatin on
furniture and interior decora-
tion.






Sunday, November 19, 1950 THE MIAMI HERALD 25-E


Latin Beauty And Husband Put


28


Doors


In Island Home, Inviting Nature Inside


HOME OF MR. AND MRS. JUAN SALLERAS-LLINARES IS COMPLETELY OPEN TO BREEZE ON WATERWAY SIDE
S.. 28 sliding doors provide light and air for their Florida living


tlyde Park's

Housekeeping

Hints Revealed
HYDE PARK A book of
hou-eiL.Ild i'rilis compiled by the
mother of the late President
RrO;F\etI. including an "essen-
tial layette" prepared just be-
fore he was born, was published
last week.
Mrs. Sara Delano Roosevelt
wrote the items in a 176-page
notebook covering a period from
1879 to 1931. Using a pen, she
wrote neatly and precisely, but
there were numerous misspell-
ings.
"She was a poor speller,"
Hard %Stecliolin of Clinton Corn-
ets said. fHe and his wife, Clare,
collaborated in pi er -'cinc the
notebook for piil.tiiioln aid in
t. i isrg a biography of the
Roo-"eelt and Delano families
v hi)i is part of the published
book.
The household items include
recipes, all sorts of 'IL:-'"
for keeping the house and farm,
and foi n'1tia., 'St -t' .Im said.
Most of ith ,e, '1'- :,rii formulas
were id]-nifirll by .names of per-
sons froit i t.)m she got them.

*b


EVEN CLOCK IN THIS BEDROOM IS MODERN IN DESIGN
S. wooden bolster to hide bed pillows, his idea


LIVING ROOM FURNITURE
-Herald Staff Photos by Stan Wayman


DAUGHTER SYLVIA PUTS BIRTHDAY PINATA TO BED
S. she pulled cord on toy later, gifts fell


The RATTAN and BAMBOO SHOP, INC.


5604 BISCAYNE BLVD.


PH. 84.1373


NOW YOU CAN BUY DIRECT AT WHOLESALE PRICES

THE MOST BEAUTIFUL


RATTAN


UP TO




3314


FURNITURE


IN THE WORLD


* Big, thick, massive strands of prime quality
rattan, hand crafted to last a lifetime.
* Colorful gay fabrics in your choice of tropical
patterns.
* No sag spring cushions, all with zipper covers.


OFF MANUFACTURERS All brass screws, the very finest of construc-
O PRICE 0 tion throughout.

THIS COMPLETE GROUP AT WHOLESALE PRICE
LIST PRICE
3.PIECE SECTIONAL SOFA. BEAUTIFUL MASSIVE STRANDS OF $31A AA
RATTAN. ALL CUSHIONS WITH ZIPPERS. ..... Gl,.Ug


BEAUTIFUL ARM CHAIR TO MATCH-BIG, THICK STRANDS
OF RATTAN. ZIPPER COVERS.
YOUR CHOICE OF CUSTOM MADE SMART BAMBOO PLANTER
FLOOR LAMP WITH SHADE.
YOUR CHOICE OF CUSTOM MADE BAMBOO TABLE LAMP
WITH SHADE.
YOUR CHOICE OF CUSTOM MADE GLASS TOP RATTAN
COFFEE TABLE OR GLASS TOP RATTAN END TABLE OR GLASS
TOP RATTAN STEP TABLE.


S114.50

..... 32.50

..... 20.00


S0..... 32.50


TOTAL LIST PRICE 518.50

WHOLESALE DISCOUNT '1,000

COMPLETE GROUP SPECIAL PRICE 348.50


A^NNVERSARY

5 0 a
^rjHHBH


This is positively the most beautiful rattan furniture in the world.. whole- qu11 oipty at Low Prices
sale savings on rattan dining room sets and rattan or bamboo furnishings Phonem EfoFREEsiEmate
custom made to order. I KING CO.
U3412 SWi8th St. Ph. 4-68121


By KAY MURPHY
Herald Staff Writer
"Let's bring as much of the
outside inside as we can." That
seems to be the first thought
expressed by newcomers to Flor-
ida when they begin building.
Even newcomers like Juan
Salleras-Llinares and his beauti-
ful wife were no exception. And
this seems surprising in two peo-
ple who have lived most of their
lives "steeped" in tradition -
mingling with the international
set in the old world cities of
Paris and Madrid and the new
world capital in Venezuela.
Their new home at 1530 W
28th st., Sunset Island I, Miami
Beach, was designed so that 28
disappearing doors open the
rooms completely on the south-
east side to the prevailing
breezes.
The doors fold up, like an
accordion, against the walls in
every room overlooking thl,.
island waterway.
Because of this exposure,
only six ordinary windows
were needed to supplement
the light and air let in by
the doors. A clerestory, above
the living.dining room, w i t h
louvred glass openings, adds to
the airiness of this area.
To insure privacy, the street
side of the Salleras' house is
hidden behind a high wall,
which encloses a patio and fish
pool.
The Sallerases chose furnish-
ings as modern as the house
which Robert Law Weed and
Associates blueprinted for them.
The Sallerases were intro-
duced to modern architecture
and furnishings in New York
where they lived just before
coming to Miami.
Mrs. Salleras says, "I was for
a modern home from the first.
Mr. Salleras was not too eager
about it. But he loves it now."
Mrs. Salleras' father, Dr. Di.
ogenes Escalante, was Venez-
uelan ambassador to London
and the family lived in Lon-
don and Paris for many years.
Dr. and Mrs. Escalante now
live in Miami Beach, too.
Mr. Salleras, who nu iibe-i.
Salvador Dali and, Don Juan,
Count of Ban:?loria. pretplinl'r
to the Spanish throne, among
his friends, is a native of Bar-
celona. He, too, lived, in Paris
for some time.
The Sallerases are to be laud-
ed for the fact that they're so
proud of buying nearly every-
ii,,.: for their house "right here
in Miami."
They 'collaborated on design-
ing several pieces of furniture-
like the custom made twin sofas
and chairs in the living room.
The sofas, upholstered in a
nubby chartreuse fabric, are al-
most free-form in their irregu-
lar curved lines. The chairs are
si;,-;Ia in structure, covered
with an abstract duck print, in
tul!trioise and chartreuse,
against a white ocean with
black waves.
An island of gray boucle car-
peting ties this conversational
grouping of furniture together
with a glass cocktail table, in
front of the fireplace.


nitur'e, which has been placed
on another island of gray car-
pet.
The dining chairs are uphol-
stered in chartreuse and drawer
pulls on cabinets in both the
dining and 1;,iv areas of the
room have been painted the
same color.
White scroll screen of wood
frames the server and also


marks off an entrance corri-
dor leading from the 4ront
door to the living part of the
room.
Walls in the master bedinoin
also are teal blue, forming a
contrasting background f o r
draperies striped in brown, beige
and gold a,. r*. t Ir.".le tiiOt
spreads of [ii ?sii'r' i'idIPI il1.
The bed r .i-'i:. i ilciv.-'lr


BIODOOM#*4


HERE'S BLUEPRINT OF SALLERAS FLORIDA MODERN HOME
S. rooms surround front patio and fish pool


will never lose Its shape, be-
cause it's made of wood and cov-
ered with fabric. This hides the
pillows in the daytime, Mrs, Sal.
leras explains. "It was my hus-
band's idea. Clever, don't you
think?"
Carpeting in this room is of
gold loop twist. Chests, lanr.w
even the clock are strictiiy
modern in design.
The children's bedronnom In
the Salleras house i prelul-
and i" arliral! For Mother. In
her knowing way, selected
washable, white quilted plas-
tic bedspreads and headboards.
EV.n the lamp stem is cov-
ied with plastic.
This means that the lnevnl
able smudges busy little fingers
make are easily removed. Mrs.
Salleras forgot about busy little
fingers and crayons, though, and
Daughter Sylvia has done her
own decorating on one bedroom
wall. Now, Mrs. Salleras wishes
she had papered the walls with
washable plastic, too.
With the plastic, she has com-
bined a bright chintz, using it
for bedspread flounces and dra-
pery cornices.
The children have their own
playroom furnished largely
with toys. Here they may do as
1i, like for storage chests and
other furniture are durable.


s^^^~^^ I-f ff


S. ICO1., -,( I.I.N Alllf ^r\MIH N SII. 'II1 *Ml'Hl-OIDiER: MOI|-.l{N DINING AnI,:.\
. silver from native land of her father, former Venezuelan ambassador


Alpha Delphians Install Officers
New officers are guiding Alpa "lip ti Dekl '.thii
Chapter of Delphian Society, thr M "II,-ii a ,; l.i.
which meets Wednesday mnorni- scI le .'' ''_. ri 'l
ing at 10 in the Miami Shores i-r''':pi city hall. tic,n l ,: .., .
Mrs. S. Gro-
ver Morrow
was ],, ,f',''i
i n s t a I I e (I
as president of
SS p the group. Hert
officers are
Mrs. Roland
Phillips, V iCe
president; Mrs.
John Wahl,
secretary, and
MRS. MORROW Mrs. Hlaygood
Lasseter; treasurer. Mrs. Charles
Cleveland is seminar chairman
for the chapter. .


a
'~''~1
I,, ii,'


VY:ul c,.i do a hetlur job Vilh
fiil'itItie 'r,,1 i if 3ou %armi It
lip Iii -t i0irt pl..e thei bottle
I,, mh,-,t v -iLr utll' l It'ip colitents
A A I' ,I In n. 'Oud I nic e quickly
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_-28-. THE MIAMI HERALD Sunday, November 19, 1950


Four Arts Announces


PALM BEACH Announce-
lmentl of the Society of the Four
Arts rev6l an ambitious pro-
gram of coming events. Dr. Mat-
thew T. Mellon, Four Arts
president, is expected Monday.
The Four Arts will pay trib-
ute to the past, the present and
certainly to futurism. First ex-
hibition will be Four Arts Mem-
bers' showing Dec, 16-Jan. 7,
with a preview tea Dec. 15 for
memberss. This will be followed


in mid-January by '"Portraits,
Figures, and Landscapes of the
Past," and "Futurism and Later
Italian Art," in February.
Paintings by the controversial
Paul Klee will climax the show-
ing in the spring. Mrs. PaulI
Moore, New York, is chairman
of the painting and sculpture
committee.
Col. Harold Fowler Is chair-
man of the lecture committee.
Speakers range from Andre


[7 / al 3 a.'-783


FROM KEY WEST TO WEST PALM BEACH
BY APPOINTMENT ONLY


Program
Maurois, Sumner Welles, David
Lilenthal, to Ogden Nash. Vin-
cent Sheean, writer and corre-
spondent, opens the series on
Jan. 9. Lowell Thomas, Jr.,
speaks Feb. 20.
A concert by Lily Pons sched-
uled for March 14 liei,-,.-r tle
musical events. Mrs. John S.
Pillsbury of Minneapolis is
music chairman. Many foreign
film showings have been an-
nounced by Mrs. James dePey-
star, chairman.


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Spinster, Mother Of, 3


Serve


New Congress


By MARTHA KEARNEY
International News Service Staff Correspondent
WASHINGTON-The eight women just elected to serve in
the 82nd Congress have above average records in the field of
public service.
Those of the six veteran congresswomen re-elected to the
House of Repre-retativei are well known and speak for them-
selves.
Less well known, but no less distinguished, are the rec-
ords of the two freshman congresswomen-elect-Ruth Thomp-
Son of Whitehall, Mich., and Mrs. Marguerite Church of Evans-
ton, Ill.
Both Republicans, the two women have completely dis-
similar backgrounds-but both have leng been interested in
public affairs and quick to translate their interest into practical
activity.
Ruth Thompson, the lone spinster among the ladies of
Congress, is a real career girl, while Marguerite Church has
for many years been a typical wife and mother.
Miss Thompson was graduated as a girl from Muskegon
High School in Muskegon County, Mich., and later went to
business college. Her first job was in a lawyer's office.
Later named probate r.ekiter, she attended law school at
night and won a law degree.
Miss Thompson was subsequently elected to three terms as
Muskegon County probate judge and served in'that capacity
from 1925 to 1937.
She also was the first woman from her county ever to be
elected to the state legislature, where she served several years.
In, 1941 she was attached to the legal section of the Social
Security Board in the capital and also worked for the Labor
Department for a short time.
During the war she held an important post in the person-
nel division of the adjutant general's office in the Pentagon.
After the war she went overseas to help organize the Army
of Occupation and later did specialized work for the Am,-i kian
government in (,,.tenhagen.
Since her leurrnt.-m Europe she has "'e-n practicing law
Miss Thompson i- a former chairman of the Michigan Women's
Prison Commission and of the governor's advisory committee.
Marguerite Stitt Church is the mother of two sons and
one daughter. The sons are World War II veterans and her
daughter is now a senior at Wellesley College, majoring in
political science and international law.
Mrs. Church is the widow of the late Rep. Ralph Church,
Illinois Republican, who died last spring. She was her husband's
active teammate during his 14 years in the Illinois State Legis-
lature apd his 14 years in the House in Washington.
irs. Church won a Phi Beta Kappa key in her junior year
at Wellesley, where she majored in economics, psychology and
sociology. She later taught at Wellesley for one year.
She received her master's degree at Columbia University
and interrupted her studies toward a PhD to become consulting
psychologist for the State Charities Aid Association of New
York City.
In 1949 Mrs. Church spent four months in Europe doing
special research into displaced persons' camps and German
youth activities under the supervision of the United States
Army.
She also made a study of tr.-illnh,,, in Great Britain with
particular attention to those rleuii6ig from changes made by
the labor government.
A member of many civic and welfare associations, Mrs.
Church is president of the Congressional Club, an association
of congressmen's wives.


Carnival Calls
For Costumes
Benjamin Franklin Ele-
mentary School PTA carni-
val, originally scheduled for
Oct. 30, will be held Monday
night at 7. Program will in-
clude a costume contest for
the children.
Thomas Kelly, new Dade
County sheriff and command-
er of the Harvey W. Seeds
Post of the American Legion,
recently presented the school
with flags for the pole and
for each class room.


Session To Have
Southern Air
Southern atmosphere will pre-
vail when Little River Chapter
172, OES, entertains Mrs. Harold
Hays, grand matron of the grand
chapter of Florida, Tuesday at
8 p. in. at 311 NE 78th st.
Drills will be presented by
members costumed in gowns of
the old South, and the chapter
room will have colonial decora-
tions for the evening. Mrs.
Estella Oldham. past maron and
grand representative to Missouri,
will be in charge of the examin-
ing committee.


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IMiami Homes Vary From Coral Rock To Modern


New Baptist Union Home


At Stetson Will Serve


All Religious Groups
By BETTY WALKER
Herald Correpondent
DELAND-The William Sims Allen Baptist Student Union
Building, gift of the Florida Baptist Convention to John IL
Stetson University, in honor of William Sims Allen, university
president from 1934 to 1947, was dedicated Thursday.
This building is red brick, _____________
trimmed in white, colonial in
architecture, with five huge col-
urns cross the front porch. It ni i
contains a small chapel, stage,
lounge, library, music room,
kitchen, conftrrrane rooms, pray-
er rooms, ,ofties for each reli-
gious group on campus, and a NOW-2 LOCATIONS
patio is to be added soon in the
rear of the building.
Dr. C. Roy Angell, pastor of
Central Baptist Church in Mi-
ami, presided at the dedicatory
service, and Dr. Thomas Hansen,
Fort Lauderdale, also took part
in the -rogram.


r MAfatmi Peralb
Sunday, November 49 27-.

Parents To Take
Part In Skit
The Little Riyer "Court of Jun-
ior Pleas" will be in session Tues-
day night at 8, .when the Little
River PTA meets in the school
cafeteria.
A skit, with a cast of students
and parents, will present the case
of Mary Snith against her moth-
er, in which the plaintiff corn-
plains that it is unreasonable
for her mother to require her
to go to bed at 8 each night.


S'ANISHl TXrE H0M WAS PViPULARK URIim. BUUMD IJAVS
... A. M. Tylers now own this one
By KAY MURPHY
You can build almost any kind of a house in the Greater Miami area-
as long as it's airy. The tropical setting lends itself well to modern architec-
ture but there are many homes of the traditional type-like the Virginia farm
house of the St. Julien Rosemonds in Coral Gables.
Some of the first houses here were built of coral rock because this native
building material was so plentiful. Typical of this type is the old Merrick
home, birthplace of George E. Merrick, developer of Coral Gables. It still
stands on Coral Way.
During the boom days, 25 years a ;o. Spanish styled homes, like that now
owned by the A. M. Tylers, 145 SE 25th rd., were popular with home build-
ers.
Indicative of a current trend in architecture is the streamlined r a nch
house which the developers of Town and Country Estates are building south
of Miami.


ONE OF CtRRENT ARCHir'EC('ItAL 'TRENDS IS TOWARD RAMBLING RANCH HOLSEs, 1I'I1H SCl


Mother Believed She Would Be Blissfully Happy


If Sister And Brother Spent Just One Night Out

By ELEANOR RATELLE less. By 7:30 I had to admit w a it i n g In anticipation for banged vociferously
neridsd Stff Writer defeat. It was quiet all right, Momie to come and take them greeted by a very slee
I have often thought how bat too quiet-too quiet for home. still in nightgown, who
q~.f~ sleei powaeut Ip., When I got to the neighbors, .
blissful it would be to wake up sleep When I got to the ne i ghbor, with complete surprise
in the morning when 'I got I dressed hurriedly and sallied the Hou sed strangely
ready. How wonderful it would quiet. "How peculiar," I thought. "What are you doin.
be to open one eye leisurely, forth for my little darlings, who "After all, it is 8:30 by now." this hour?" she de
take a quick peek at the clock, had probably been up for hours, So I clattered up to the door, "We aren't even dre,
which w6uld have already reg-
Iltered a very late 8:30 and ...."i ,,i iii-ii- -- -
quickly close that eye again.
The house would be such a
vale of quiet that I would sleep
on and on-perhaps as late as
9:30.
The patter of little feet would
be missing. There would be no
clomping about in the living
room at the misty hour of 5:30,
no emphatic statements like
"I'm going to color Hop-Along-
Cassidy's hat green" and "No,
you're not-it has to be red."
The clatter of a broken glass,
the thud of the cookie jar on
the kitchen floor would not take
place.
Well, I found out what it's
like to live for one night in
such absolute peace, and I
take it all back.
The tranquility of it all Is ter-
rifying.
I learned about the dubious
joys of peace and quiet when
the children spent the night at
one of the neighbors who has two !i
little girls same age as Sisters
age 6%, and Brother, almost 5.
The children were filled with
glee at the prospect of sleeping
In a strange house, away from
Momie and Daddy. My husband
and I also eyed the venture with
enthusiasm. For once, we could
go out on Saturday night and
stay as late as we pleased.
So what happens? We go
out and return home at 10:30,
being such novices at staying
out late that we have exhaust-
ed our entertainment reper.-
toire by that time.
We even went so far as to
sit up until midnight, guzzling
very black coffee and playing i
the radio at a very loud pitch. "i ''r
Our conversation, which should :
have been filled with anecdotes
about our gay evening at the
movies and the fine restaurant .-l .
dinner, centered entirely about
the children and wondering
"what they are doing now."
"I think," said my husband,
"you had better go get them
fairly early in the morning, and
we will all have breakfast to-
gether."
"Yes," I said, "after I wake up,
I certainly will,"' thinking all
the time that I wouldn't even
quiver an eyelash until at least
10.
But habit is a strange and
forceful thing. At 6:30 a. m.
ntot one eyelash, but all, had
quivered well beyond the
opening stage.
"This will never do," I told
myself. "I will sleep this morn-
ing if it's the last thing I do."
Whereupon I firmly closed my
eyes. After hours of this restful
slumber, I took a furtive look
at the clock and discovered that
10 whole minutes had elapsed.
"Ridiculous," I muttered. "Posi-
tively ridiculous. Of course, I
can sleep." And with that I got
up, put the offending clock in
the next room and retired again.
But it was completely hope.






U.S. Envoy's Wife


Says


i.
-'a
~c.


Are Most Beautiful
By ELIZABETH IIEMNNEY
Herald Fashion Editor


p,
JI


HONEYMOON TRIP brought this young Louisville couple to Miami Beach. They are
Mr. and M.rs. Raymond E. Montgomery, Jr., who will spend several weeks at the Coro-
nado H,':t-. From here they will motor to New Orleans before returning to their new
home in Kentucky. Mrs. Montgomery is the former Miss Barbara Meyer of Hardin, Mo.


Report- Due
Dtiegatf. 13. the national con-
ventiion of ilh United Daughters
of Con le,-h1i. '. will report at the
tponlhiC 1_ .lu-s Chapter meeting
Mondei% aa 230 p. m. in the
)ini nm f I,) .. Taylor Lewis, 2130
SWv N'h iii r. Board members
u i ll n ..t at 1:30.

'/ STARTS THURSDAY!
SEM B A S S VY
L' AT REGULAR PRICES!


Early Birds Will Eat Turkey

At North Miami Beach Resort


When the Golden Strand Hotel
in North Miami Beach opens its
doors for the winter season
Dec. 1, many former guests will
be exchanging prf- Ic.. .
A few are coming early to
spend the Thanksgiving holiday
at this sunshine resort, among
them Edward Love, vice presi-
dent of the Chase National Bank
in New York, and Mrs. Love.
They will be accompanied by
Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Clifford and
Mr. and Mrs. William C. Gilman,
also from New York City, for a
two weeks stay,
A number of horsebreeders
and owners also have made
reservations for villas during


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E C.O.D.


the Hialeahl racing season.
,Prominient among these will
be John Barry Ryan, a well
known winter visitor, and Chi.
cagoans Mr. and Mrs. Howard
Reineman who will divide
their time between the races
and cruising to their home in
the keys for weekends.
Other well known beach visi-
tors who will occupy Golden
Strand villas early in the season
are Mr. and Mrs. Walter Ritter
of Detroit and Mr. and Mrs. W.
H. Whiting, Cincinnati.
Chicagoans planning to spend
the Christmas holidays here are
Dr. and Mrs. George LeMire and
their friends, Mr. and Mrs. Tom
Carey. Both families will bring
their children.
Returning guess have a sur-
prise in store there's a brand
new pool and cabana club with
Si.;l playground for the



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"Cuban women are among the
most beautiful in the world,"
says Mrs. Robert Butler, wife of
the United States Ambassador to
Cuba. "They have a gentle gra-
ciousness of manner that is most
appealing."
Here at the Saxony Hotel with
her husband for a few days' visit
and rest, Mrs. Butler was full
of praise for the Cuban people
she has come to know, so well
in her three years as chatelaine
of the American Embassy there.
Cubans have a nicety of dress
that sets them off, she said, as
among the world's best dressed.
They have an ability to combine
simple, high-styled gowns with
lavish jewels in a manner that
is exquisite and not showy.
Mrs. Butler, who takes her
job as promoter of friendship
between the two countries very
seriously, doesn't have in her
wardrobe any frocks 'for "rou-
tin" appointments.
(Here Mrs. Butler miay have
been r'eferriiig to another am-
bassador's wife who was recently
quoted as having gowns for
"routine" meetings.")
"Nothing is routine. Every ip-
pointment. means a great deal to
the one coming for the appoint-
ment, so I always try to give
them my best attention and to
look xmy best for every occasion,"
she explained smilingly.
The medium tall Mrs. Butler,
with her steel gray hair, china
blue eyes, gentle smile and quiet
sense of humor, has a prefer-
ence for simply styled clothes
(navy' linen with diamond
brooch when I interveiwed her)
and an easy manner of meeting
people that makes her an ex-
cellent complement to her jovial
husband.
Leave your straw hat and
white shoes home when you


go to Cuba. unless you. want
to be marked as a "Tourista,"
says Mrs. Butler.
If you're planning a wardrobe
for Cuba, one lightweight suit
is a good starter. Make it gab-
ardine or very light wool, she
advises, because there are coinm-
paratively few brisk days.
Many women have a great
riany smarly cut cottons also
in their wardrobes, but Mrs.
Butler prefers the pure dye
silks, mainly, because they look
better on her than cottons.
The lightweight, hand knitted
boucle frocks that are done so
expertly in Havana are smart
additions to any one's wardrobe,
she says. Mrs. Butler divides her
shopping between the smart Cu-
ban stores and those in the Mi-
ami area.
Theo little cocktail frock is
really the piece de resistance to
any "social" wardrobe in Cuba,
particularly the kind that goes
so well from cocktail through
the dinner party hour.

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28-E THE MIAMI HERALD Sunday, November 19, 1950


Cuban Women


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S$1,785
MAN'S DIAMOND SOLITAIRE, a perfect stone weighing approximately 2 carats, ex-
cellent color and handsomely mounted. Owner must raise cash, will sacrifice for $1,400
S LADY'S HAMILTON DIAMOND PLATINUM WRISTWATCH, latest style, containing 2 large
perfectly matched blue-white round diamonds, 10 baguette diamonds and 44 round dia-
monds. In perfect condition and fully guaranteed, at a bargain, only................$985
DIAMOND ENGAGEMENT RING, a blue-white gem weighing 11/2 carats set in platinum
with 2 matched baguette diamonds, only........................................ $1,085 /
LADY'S EMERALD AND DIAMOND FINGER RING set with 3 large matched Oriental
emeralds in center, 6 small emeralds and 38 matched blue-white round diamonds,
platinum mounting. A very beautiful ring, from our Loan Department, only ...... $675
DIAMOND PLATINUM BROOCH set with I large marquise center diamond, 4 baguette
diamonds and 42 round diamonds. A charming pin, just out of Loan, only........ $395
LADY'S DIAMOND PLATINUM HAMILTON WRISTWATCH set with 18 round diamonds. \
Latest design and fully guaranteed, only ............. ............................$365

( FEDERAL TAX INCLUDED

SRICHTER JEWELRY CO., INC.
27 Years in Miami Miami, Florida Phone 3-2197


NAME .....................................................
CITY .............................. STATE .................


'SALE'!

2,000 YARDS

DECORATIVE FABRICS
PRINTED EVERGLAZE CHINTZES AND GLOSHEENS
A Beautiful Assortment l
To Choose From C 914
36" WIDE
REGULAR yd.
$1.29 VALUE

MONDAV ONLV!

CELANESE TAFFETAS
All Wanted Pastel Shades-
42" Wide.
Take Advantage reu Cc
Of This -
Tremendous U y
One Day Special! .

[ OPEN MONDAY EVENINGS UNTIL 9


PUBLICSE STORE
P U R B IAMI CE sAT FORTIC ST. 0R9 E
NORTH MIAMI AVE. AT FOURTH ST.-Ph. 2.5921


rOODili YEARI






BDtliiuHWliliIhllHhi pliIIIlIillIiiIilIiIJIiIiHhiSliIFIiEtiHthlItHHhhOlAillhIlllhIiIIHhi


Sunday, November 19. 1950 THE MIAMI HERALD .


A HANDY GUIDE TO GROWNUPS-NO. 1


I Girl Of 11 Tells How You Can Get Along With Adults, Says It's Their World


(These bright little ,gems are the work of an 11-year-old. Miss
Owsley wes thoroughly investigated by the editors of PARENTS
MAGAZINE, who established beyond a doubt that her writing
was original and authentic.
Jennifer lived with her mother in Columbus, 0. when she
wrote these chapters. She was -in the eighth grade at school. Her
activities are riding her bicycle, sewing, cooking and dancing.
Favorite pet: a cat. Hobby: collecting insects.
This series of five articles has just been published in book
form by RANDOM HOUSE, INC.)
By JENNIFER OWSLEY
AGE 11
Dear Kids:
This book is written for the
purpose of helping you to u-
derstand some of the ideas of
adults, and to help you know
and get along with them bet-
ter.
I think there are too many
books for adults about under-
standing children. Adults have
been children before, so they
should know something about
children and oughtn't to need
slews of books about us.
But we have never been
adults and don't know any-
thing about them except
what we can notice. That
is why I have decided to
try the brain-breaking job
Mof writing this book for you.
I am going to look in on
as many kinds of adults as I
AUTHOR JENNIFER OWSLEY can ask my friends and my
* . she tells what she thinks mother to help me, and tell
about adults you what I find out.
The world belongs to adults. They make it the way it is
and run It. If you want to know about the world, you have to
know about adults. Besides, we are going to be adults too


IfllIiNIIlIISIlflhlIUIDhi REEF I


Miss Wolpert To Return Home


Returning to Miami In Decem-
ber froM Bogota, Colombia, will
be Mies Judith Wolpert, daugh-
ter of the George Wolperts, 1776
.. ...W.... . 16th ave.
She plans to
spend a month
here.
Miss Wolpert
is associated
w I t h Centro
Americano,i a
cultural center
and community
.. be house setup
Sby the Urited
States State De-
MISSWOLPERT partrmentto
promote Inter-American goodwill
and understanding.
She has been In Bogota since
shortly after her gr iuation from
Wellesley College, where she was
chief Justice of the student gov-
ernment. A graduate of Miapilr
High School, she was a scholar-
ship student at Wellesley.
:""'
Miss Diane Baker, daughter of
the Charles. Bakers, 200 Tahti.


IUI


Beach rd., Coconut Grove, ap-
peared In the recent fall festival
presented by the juniors at
Kingswood School Cranbrook,
Bloomfield Hills, Mich.

5th

Anniversary
Special "

One of Henri's
Natural ..
Looking
Low Heat, Self Setting
Heavy Creme, Permanent
Waves and His Wave Induc-
ing Sculptured Wave Cut
For $650
nl i Complete

BEAUTY SAiON
1724 "W, tS St., -.87120
_Ar Oendltlsed Fir tou 0mfir_=.I


MARY M. BLACK
Resident and Day
SCHOOL
ESTABLISHED 1918

Co-ed 3 to 12 years. Full cooperation with Dade
County Public Schools. Classes small, rapid advance-
ment. Spanish in all grades. Bus outings and beach
trips. Best food, unlimited helpings.
C
Open for your inspection daily: 9:00 to 5 p.m.
Open all year. Illustrat ioeklt on request.

666 S.W. 4th Street, Miami, Fla.
Phone 2-5587


Flowers
Final touch for your
Thanksgiving Table
For unusual centerpieces
Flowers for your hostess
CALL TODAY




where the Prestige ol a Name is Assuring


Miami Beach Miami
6.291I 1-.416
2.0519
Send Flowers Bv W


Ft. Lauderdale
2.1562


.. . I- I I I I- I I


*I HAVE DECIDED TO TRY THE BRAIN-BREAKING JOB OF
WRITING THIS BOOK .'. IF YOU WANT TO KNOW ABOUT
THE WORLD, YOU HAVE TO KNOW ABOUT ADULTS.'
when we grow up and it would be a good thing to know what
we are getting into.
I hope you will like the book.
Jill
*
THE MORE ADULTS you get to know, the more you will
realize they are not alike. Each one is different, like -children.
Parents are the only ones that are important to babies,
but after that you have to branch out a little. If you think
they' are all like your mother, for instance, you will get
fooled. This is a good thing because children learn how to do
things from the way adults do them, and if you could only


learn from one or two parents you would not get to know
nearly as much.
Adults are not just big children. I suppose that you have
played that you are grownup. You have dressed up in your
mother's clothes and played going-visiting and train-engineer
and things like that. So you already know what it would
feel like to be a big child.
But as you already know, adults are not like that. They
think and act differently. They do not even understand what
you are doing when you play grownup, but they think you
are being "cute."
One of the reasons for this is that when you grow up you
get larger and can reach higher places, and so you can
do different things. For instance, when you were four you
probably couldn't see over the edge of the kitchen sink. When
you get older you get bigger, and .you can see right down
into it. So you know what washing dishes is like.
Also you can wash dishes. (Maybe this is not so good,
but it is fun at first.)
*
IF YOU WERE twice as high as you' are the world would
look different to you. Elevators would not frighten 'you be-
cause you would not have your head pressed between people's
stomachs, and you could see out, and breathe, too.
The furniture would fit you, and it wouldn't get you any-
where to climb up on it. Probably that's why adults don't climb.
Besides, they are too stiff.
Managing things, like stoves and hammers and pans and
shovels is not such a problem to them because the things
are the right size, and also they have had more practice.
They think differently because they have been in this
world longer and have had more time to learn about every-
thing and get used to it. So they aren't so surprised about the
world any more.
I think probably, there are other reasons why they are
different which I don't know about.
Every child knows a lot more about his own parents than
anyone else, so I will not try to tell you about any parents
except mine.
*MY PARENTS do not seem to be the ordinary kind. You
MY PARENTS do not seem to be the ordinary kind. You


Sudeue lkasu


c~w%^.1000,


YOUR





ICE


never can tell what my mother is going to say until she says it.
She is likely all of a sudden on Sunday afternoon to start
painting the living room pink.
When she stays up after midnight she might be having a
party or she might be doing the washing. This Is partly be-
cause she works, but some mothers who work are not like
that at all. When she is tired she gets cross and wants every-}
one to rush around doing housework, but she doesn't seem to
think housework is important when she is rested.
She doesn't tell me what to do, which some of my friends'
mothers are always doing. If I don't want to decide by my-
self, I have to call her up at the office and ask her what
she thinks. This is all right, but we have to do more thinking
for ourselves than children whose mothers aae willing to do
it for them.
I wish my mother didn't work because then when I'
come home from school she would be In the kitchen cooking
-things, and the way It Is, we have to be in the kitchen
when she comes home.
The reason we have so much fun is not any of these
things. It is because we always do everything interesting that
we think of, like writing this book, for instance, and making
all kinds of things. We talk about everything we want to, too,
not like some families where you can only talk about certain
things.
Next: About fathers, aunts, uncles, cousins and other relatives.


REDUCE
lliwssnlll~inprlilBs'lIIv~~~ ttxnhflh Tsa VgsIrIIImll



THE LAZY WAY
5 Gardner Rollers-Only Ones In Florida

1OFOR s10
AIR CONDITIONED ROLLER ROOM
Including Vapor lath and Shower
VITA-RAY CLINIC 211 SEYBOLD BLD.
Nancy Johnson, Mgr. Dr J. Martinez, N.D. Dial 3.7371


I p


FAVORITE


CRE


With No Artificial Flavors!


The Sealfest Ice Cream moulds listed in this advertisement are
only a part of the large assortment of fancy ice cream forms which
are available in a variety of flavors. We ask that you give us 48
hours advance notice on all special orders so that we may assure
you of timely service.

Remember.... ice cream is one of your most nourishing and eco-
nomical foods. Delicious Sealtest Ice Cream in these convenient,
easy-to-serve forms will keep your family healthy and happy.


GET THE BEST.... GET SEALTEST!


SOUTHERN DAIRIES, INC "


62 N. E. 27th STREET PHONE 9-6501 .


^^.







Tippy
JUST THINK, TH' MIAMI HERALD'S --AN'TH' NEiXT
CELEBRATION' ITS 40-ri-lO LOOKED OUT
ANNIVERSARY--! W WY, IT WAS FLOWERS /EI


The FRANCES CONSTANCE

RESTAURANT '
24th St. & Biscayne Blvd.
Guarantees you complete satisfaction and
enjoyment of its delicious full course dinner
priced as low as 11.15
Serving hours 5 to 9 P.M. weekdays
12 noon to 9 P.M. Sunday & Holidays


SPECIAL I
THANKSGIVING DINNER I
$1.50 I


-----------h'~ 4Bttinmi ;M raI&
ByV Ed'wil 30-E Sunday, November 19
By Edwina u.,oee.

r MORNIN' YOU
TN' WINDOWAN
RE BLOOMIN'
"TO GRAN'PA-.....
3-" W_'X/EE IN W e''"ON (in open "
AB--WEE1N.' NATIONAL AWARD in Oc O
&-i2AVENognitlon of good SEAFOO
Chickens, etc-
EATING. loSekCos


!04
0"

e


^just Try
1DOMNER a IQMarinique
/ ~Once...
YOU'LL UNDERSTANDr
WHY OUR REPUTATION L
IS SO EXCELLENT.
SDannyYates, his $Wo/in
I ensemble during dinner
COMPLETELY AIR CONDITIONED


For Reservations
Phone 9-.8003


EDITH a FRITZ
AIR CONDITIONED
NATIONALLY FAMOUS FOR SEA FOOD
STEAMED SHRIMP 50
or $ 5
ALL You
BROILED LOBSTER AN EAT.
Also Chicken, Steaks and Chops
Hours 12 Noon till 11 P.M.
Complete liquor service
Full Course Dinner Served All Day Sunday


e PAGODA ROOM
6TO1OPM.I10
MAYERSON y
STRING 'JS ,I


RONNIE'S
AIR CONDITIONED
2800 Ppnce de Leon Blvd. Coral Gables
Ph. 83-9108 Open 8 A.M. to 2 A.M.
* FOR THOSE EARLY BIRDS WHO DINE
BEFORE 6:00 P.M. WE OFFER
SIRLOIN STEAK


2
for

_1.
UU1-5n


On a Plank 0 With Seven Vegetables ...........
'/2 FRIED CHICKEN 1 50
In Basket 0 French Fries, Vegetables ............
BREADED VEAL CUTLET 150
Potatoes Vegetables ........................
Choice of Above Specials Daily to 2 Early Birds for Price of ......ONE
RONNIE'S SEAFOOD PLATTER *


Shrimp Scallops Snapper Fingers Oysters Fish Coke Fr. Fries, 7|
SAIR CONDITIONED O ICole Slw Rolls and Butter served with ill above orders. :...........

PI E D : --

PIPERS: HAVE YOU TRIED
A Family Place Run by 0 C D 4
Family People in the GEORGES
business 8-Years in the C N
Same Location. SOUTHERN COUNTRY FRIED
CHALLENGES & LI
MIAMI "CHICKEN?I
In Offering The 0 Wa
Finest... 0 What Are You Waiting For a.
FOOD! 91
LIQUoR!OD! it's Deliciously out of this World
LI(PUOR!. '0 ---111 4
SP.S. For the readers coming to sunny 4
ENTERTAINMENT! Miami Beach this winter wve Invite
CLRK : you to stop at 4
CLARK 1 GEORGE'S CHICKEN HOUSE FIRST!
p|FI R 4 Between Washington & Collins Avenues 4
FIERS ,,.oo.,,oo,,n ...-"
I fl R IO 1 S214 5th Street Miami Beach 4
WIOD RADIO STARm OAAAAAAA AAAAAAAAAAAAA 4


At The Hammond Organ
Starting at 5:45 P.M.
AND THE -
FILIPINO


CABALLEROS
41
RECORD BREAKING
WEEKS!
(Playing and Singing Tour
Request Numbers)

T-BONE
STEAK
Western Beef, Swift's Premium
Golden Brown Southern Fried
CHICKEN
JUMBOSHRIMP
LOBSTER
S-DIFFERENT RELISHES and
FRENCH FRIES SERVED
WITH EVERY ORDER.
POTATO SALAD
COLE SLAW
COTTAGE CHEESE
SLICED BEETS
BEAN SALAD
ROLLS & BUTTER

PIED

PIPERS
BAR LOUNGE RESTAURANT
2860 CORAL WAY
PH. 4-9414
5 OPEN 'TIL 5 A.M.0A


0r
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
S
0
0
2~


For A Wonderful Vacation ...


COCKTAIL LOUNGE

1 SUNDAY DINNER
SERVED NOON TO 11 P.M.


mrP Enjoy Greater Miami's Finest!
TRADITIONAL
Thanksgiving Dinner
With All The Trimmings!
SERVED FROM 12 NOON TO II P.M.
Pril'ae HRnnM
For Private Paries
Phone 4.04116
Food by
Walker-Skg,.eth RW I S 1 T 1 N IT
R RE S TAA UURRAN T)


PNety of Parkingl Spsm S.W. 8th St. (Twainmi Traill) at Mth Ave.


RESTAURANT AND COCKTAIL LOUNGE
FOR LEASE
Large Seating Capacity
The only location on the Beach where Inside and out-
side Dining Room is available on both the ocean and


the street.


Fully equipped-ready for immediate opening
Centrally located-within walking distance of the
popular section of the Beach.


most


Only high class operators considered.


No Phone Information.


Apply Manager for appointment.
128 23rd Street, Miami Beach.


HERE TO DINE
In Greater Miami


I/t I


tI taEa~a~ MIAMI laa taa


MIAMI BEACH SABATINO Italian Restaurant
SPECIAL SUNDAY DINNER OPEN EVERY DAY
FOR TASTY FOOD AND 2655 BISCAYNE BLVD. FREE PARKING PH. 34622
UNEXCELLED SERVICE ... AUTHENTIC CHINESE DISHES
AIR CONDITIONED DINNERS 5 to I
LUNCHES 11:0 to I A LA *ATE
THE FIAMOUSTl _' ^^^ *lHU
STEAKS. CHOPS AND ALLNOM
W ITTCKKEN AMERICAN STYLE
ITHl .FAUA ow ml Ordern Put U To Tak.e Out
T im f I 1Phone 3-9723 15 N.E. 3rd Ave.


RESTAURANT ROTUNDAu 3
DINING ROOM lff 35I
671 Washington Avenue BISCAYNE BLND. TURKEY DINNER *
5600 BISCAYNE BLVD.
Phone 7.0315 Served from 12 Noon to 8 P.M.
I_ FREE PARKING (Closed Mondays)


Dine In Air-Conditioned Comfort And See


What Made the FAMOUS-FAMOUS!


atA1'
ltot
rhone
r,.903
N-


2235 SW. 8th St.


"ON THE TRAIL"


Ph. 4.3155


FAMOUS FOR GOOD FOOD
RECOMMENDED BY DUNCAN HINES


,;r e Visit Our Patio


Mrs. Maria Fryer, Owner


-^ -- -- ^ --- -- I- Opsn
Ideal for Luncheons From
And Private Parties. 12 Noon


Alpine Lodge ud
Alpine Lodge rinn isenn


Belle Hop Restaurant
8301 N.E. 2nd AVENUE (7:00 A.M. to 1h00 A.M.) Air Conditioned
Complete Dinner Special
BLACKBERRY COCKTAIL
Choice 1of Appetizer or Cream of Chicken Soup
Tossed Green Salad Roquefort Dressing
2 Farm Fresh Vegetables, Home-made Rolls & Creamy Butter
ROAST TURKEY with Apple Dressing 1I
U.S. Choice17 l
Prime Rib of Beef AuJus...... .
Old Fashioned 11
CHICKEN POT PIE ....... 11
Strawberry Shortcake Beverage
CLAMS & OYSTERS ON '/2 SHELL
OPENED BEFORE YOUR EYES.


AL's 23rd. St.
RESTAURANT AND SANDWICH SHOP
238 23rd St., Miami Beach Ph. 5-7486
BREAKFAST-LUNCH-DINNER-AFTER THEATRE
COMPLETE DINNER 5
Roast Sirloin of Beef . I95
CHOICE OF: 8 APPETIZERS
CHOICE OF: SOUP OR CONSOMME
e CHEF'S MIXED GREEN SALAD
KOSHER PICKLES NEW SAUERKRAUT PICKLED BEETS
CHOICE OF: 6 VEGETABLES
CHOICE OF: 4 POTATOES
CHOICE OF: AL'S FAMOUS DESSERTS
CHOICE OF: COFFEE OR TEA, HOT OR ICED
20 OTHER REASONABLE PRICED DINNERS TO CHOOSE FROM
Hours: ,8 A.M. 2 A. M. Free Parking In Our Own Attended Lot


We've Got


News For You!
*
... and it's all good! Today, Howard Johnson
again serves that traditional Sunday-go-to-
meeting celebrity: - real, old-fashioned, home-style
Chicken Pie...bakedfresh for you and your family
to your own special order. In it, you'll enjoy a
bounty of plump and succulent chicken ,e'atr -.
simmered to a delectable tenderness in a fragrant
broth of natural essence... and, around it all, a
flaky pie crust of'heavenly texture and further-
more, it's an old-fashioned, fabulous portion, an
ample meal in itself. Imagine all that... and then
include garden-fresh peas, cranberry sauce and hot-
from-the-oven rolls. All for only $1.50 -- and for
Junior, we have special portions and prices, too.

hOWARDJOmniOn.
LANDMARK FOR HUNGRY AMERICANS
1100 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD


DINNER MUSIC PHONE 86.3988 AIR CONDITIONED
DAILY FAMOUS SEA FOOD HOUSE SUNDAYS
5 to 10 P.M. OPEN ALL YEAR Noon to 10 P.M.
FOUR WORDS that have made us famous:


is' Quality Service l Comfort


io Atmosphere!


Completely REMODELED and REDECORATED
Serving The Largest Variety of Sea Food in Greater Miami
Steaks-Chops-Southern Fried & Broiled Chicken
Roast Maryland 9
TURKEY Crestnut dressing, candied sweets, 1
TUR E cranberry sauce, chef's salad ....
Genuine Broiled
CALFS LIVERS- smothered mushrooms 195
or onions, Idaho shoestring potatoes .........
Genuine Spring
ROAST LEG 0' LAMB -mint jelly, 195
string beans, mashed potatoes .............
Braised Fresh
BRISKET OF BEEF Potato pan-1 95
cake, apple sauce, chef's salad .............
OUR FAMOUS SPECIALS
Florida Rock Lobster ALL You Can EAT
ALL You Can EAT
Broiled With Drawn Butter
or Broiled With Mayonnaise Your Choice
Served With French Fries & Cole Slaw 2
Shrimps-Steamed In Beer
With Horseradish Sauce, Bread & Bufftter 2 00

All Orders Served In Generous Portions
At Most Moderate Prices


il


w
bl%
v


OLD SCANDIA
Opp. Opa-locka City Hall
FAMOUS FOR SMORGASBORD
SOpn elly, I Sindayl, I
SPh. T.9741-H7. jenM, Prep.- Closed Tuesdays


TENT RESTAURANT
NOW OPEN
Serving Weekdays S to 9:15 P.M.
Sunday Noon to 9:15 P.M. Closed Fridays
1900 Biscayne Blvd. Phone 2-2712
KNOWN from COAST to COAST
for SUPERB CUISINE
9 'S DINNERS from $135
\tea 49 Also A La Carlo
\V/g11& Open Daily 130 A.M. to I 0P.M.
SBiscayne at 69th Bar 'til Midnight
yFE Phone 1-0481 In our Cocktail Bar you will fild tha
SFREE PARKING LOTS choicest liquors reasonably priced.


YOU CAN'T AFFORD A COOK AT HOME...
S ... But You Can Eat Delicious Home Cooked Foods At
n,--
FULL COURSE MEALS $1.00; Children's Half Price.
4218 N.E. Second Avenue
OPEN 8 A.M. TO 8 P.M. EVERY DAY PH. 84-16M
Air-Conditioned for Your Comfort *
OUR MOTTO "JUST GOOD FOOD"
OaB1B(3aBr MIAMI BEACh IBBBE BBlEBlC


Andrf L. Br6ns)rd


ARTHUR GODFREY
SAYS "Quote" you have to use a beaten cow path
to get to BROUSSARD'S but what FOOD. yum. yum.
Complete dinners from $1.50
BROUSSARD'S
of New Orleans


'Boakers Haulover


KOSHER p V


DINING ROOM
Now open to the pub-
lic. Enjoy a COMPLETE
FULL COURSE DINNER
hi air cooled comfort
for as low as
$1.75


Phone 86.1117


fCaterigT


i~i{liill "i'lCatering To
*, 5 O anquets-Wed dings.
l B .

^^f^-w -Afl1^B~Hi^-
*UsMIAMI


TRITON HOTEL DINING ROOM
2729 COLLINS AVE. M. B.
AM RE-OPENING THURSDAY
NOV. 23-4 P.M.
SPhone for Reservations-S-6651 S-4907
Air Conditioned Erwin and Louise PFrishnet


m


I -


mmmmmmmmmmmw
--- mw


rP -


I


I


VIP


n-!


11 j"4:g:2


4a AD a m s M Mm k dmm





Sunday, November 19, 1950 THE MIAMI HERALD .31.


IT'S BEEN PROVEN at Highest Score Robert Richter
AMost points ever scored by Urn- Announces the New
IXIE RI S CHICKEN versity of Miami in a football II
DIAIE R I B S & 1C KEgame was 71 against Piedmont in IMPERIAL
$100 17th AVE. & 20th ST., N.W. $100 1933. ROOM
...IS THE ONLY PRICE YOU PAY... -E
p ius ABSOLUTELY NO UPS Pius HR CONDITIONEDh u1
-o o+ I sNOW OPEN
Tax Bring The Kids And Share, No Extra Charge Tax NO Wh p u OPE
MIAMI'S GREATEST FOOD VALUE DinnerFomt nE
laternat ional d
DINNERS SERVED FROM 12 NOON THE BEST IN KOSHER FOODS Cuisine *
APPETIZERS: OUR OWN DELICIOUS CHICKEN NOODLE SOUP E bM. y ,Tony
OR CHOICE OF FRESH JUICES Reservations-Ph. 58-2776 .-S
CHEF'S SALAD BOWL I m Wnhmntfl -__ ___


have that soda. 4
late snack or
complete dinner at the
31 COFFEE SHOP
Casual Attire Encouraged
Open 8 AM to 2 AM

A NO taE
Lower Lobby
ENTRANCE ON 31st STREET


THE


HOTEL
proudly announces formal
opening of our
internationally famous
airconditionedi
GULFSTREAM DINING ROOM
for
THANKSGIVING
DINNER
Thursday, November 23, 6 P.M.
MICHAEL
SELKER
AND HIS ORCHESTRA
For Table & Party
Reservations
Phone Carl
5-6092
On The Ocean at 35th Street


,416
^ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ d cr LOT cI Ilirn1ciinrksniIN D (
_do_ _OTS_ d'oE L ia,,mons At The Keystone Restaurant 1
w*"""'**f ""iffl o 0^ do! E.-i with u*s. 41 "Home cii well Balanced Meals"\
eur Guests say! 2n ) Take Busses 2-4-14 Phn
f l f A 'Day after day we hove 6234 N.E. 2n'Hame at ellBalanced MealsPon .94

DINNER DATE 'Why'. This FOOD is (K SERVED FROM 12 TO 8 P.M.
of DISTINCTION wonderful!" 'You cer- 4 )ie l M EN U
mainly servv a good 4 III. Blue Plate Dnn_ Complete Dinners
SBREAKFAST" -' This is 11) 1.25 Broiled Filet Mignon Steak W,,, Mushrom uc .. 1.50 (
Sthe Best LUNCH we've 1.25 Whole Broiled Fresh Lobster Dr,.. li.,ter ,,. pao,.,l.50
Oa eaeen Since leaving 4 1.00 Half Golden Fried Chicken S..,en s,,ie. ..,ad .. 1.35
1 3htwts-me"--'Our DIIITER 4 1
was e:cellent ..)) 1.00 Roast Leg of Genuine Spring Lamb Wih .Min Jlly 1.35 (
0,o OtNaturally ,,e are Fufed- 4 ( 1.00 Pan Fried Western Loin Pork Chops (2).ndd ,am,1.35
\ up" about it. we realize. 4 1") 1.00 Roast Choice Sirloin of Beef ..,u Rre Whipped Pata1.35
11 ,o however that your opi- r i 1.00 Grilled Ham Steak W,,h candd ................. 1.35
,# m get go on is THE O NE that-, 4 '1 [
c %%l on is THE ONE hat v 4, 1.00 Barbecued Spareribs ..sty' .................. 1.35
\ O, n 6. e Soo1l 0 1.00 Roast Young Turkey Dressineg. Cra.nberry Saea.... 1.25 (i
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THE 1.00 Baked Sugar Cured Ham ,,im Ya,..... .... a1.25
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S-.E THE MIAMI HERALD Sunday, November 19, 1950


andU?,


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GERMAN


FOOD,


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ON FEDERAL HIGHWAY ACROSS FROM THE GULFSTREAM PARK'
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THE EDITOR'S NOTEBOOK




U.S. Press


AT THE recent convention of Sigma Delta
Chi, the journalistic fraternity, a panel
discussion was held on the responsibility of
the press.
The word "press" was interpreted broadly
to mean not only newspapers, but such other
media as radio, television, mnagazinc-s, the press
services and even painphlets of opinion.,
During the question' peririld. one Undergrad-
sate of SDX posed this pertinent question:
How can the average reader distinguish
between news and propaganda?
The reply was made that while it is often
Impossible to draw clear lines of definition
between the two, there are certain tests
which the reader or the radio-TV listener-
viewer may apply.
1. Does the newspaper which you read en-
joy a reputation for fairness and accuracy.in
the presentation of its news?
2. Do you make a distinction bett.een
straight news broadcasts and the commentators
who "interpret' the news?
3. Does your favorite magazine iarry edito-
rials, avoid editorial comment entirely or siniil. v
leave )ou with the impression that it is either
for or against a given issue by the tone of
its editorial content?
4. Does the public generally understand
that columnists, both syndicated and local, are
expressing their own opinions and do not
necessarily reflect the editorial policy of the
newspaper?

WHILE THERE are exceptions to the general
rule, most reputable newspapers strive to
do an Impartial and factual job of presenting
the news.
Since they serve readers whose personal
views differ widely on politics, religion and
a variety of timely subjects, It is to the news-
paper's otn self-interest to print the news
"straight."
That. does not mean theie is no room for
background or interpretatinoln.
In- fact, readers are hungry for the addi-
tional Information that Is not always carried
in a mere recitation of the evident facts.
For example, when the Schuman plan for
the integration of the coal and steel industries
in Europe was first proposed, our Washington
bureau and The Chicago Daily News Foreign
Service provided "sidebar" stories telling what
the plan meant; the method by which it would
be administered: how Washington, London,
Rome, Brussels and other national capitals re-
acted to it.


Largely Stresses


This method of. "backgrounding news sto-
ries was long neglected by United States news-
papers, the field being left almost entirely
to the weekly news magazines. Spurred by
competition from radio and television, the
newspaper is now more intelligently edited.
*
ON THE subject of radio and television com-
mentaries, it is important that the public
should know something of the commentator's
qualifauitin; for the role which he plays.
What are his political, social and economic
leanings? Is his education and experience such
as to justify your confidence in him?
There are very few analysts of the news
who remain completely objective. Edward R.
Murrow, Lowell Thomas and a few others fit
into this category.

On the whole, however, too many oracles
of the air waves tend to become hysterical
or so infatuated with the sound of their
own voices that facts are soon obscured by
emotion.


Truth


In


Repo


The television presentations of Douglas Ed- editorial lauding the welfare state in the of-
wards and John Cameron Swayze are popular ficial organ of the United States Chamber of
because they stick to news and credit their Commerce.


listeners with sufficient intelligence to make
their own appraisals of its significance.

IN THE magazine field, the purchaser or
subscriber is highly selective. With a wide
choice of periodicals available, he can satisfy
his own appetite for entertainment or infor-
mation.
The Saturday Evening Post, with its middle
class appeal, is as American as apple pie. No
one has ever had reason to charge the SEP
planted propaganda in its columns.

The Nation and The New Republic espouse
the leftishly liberal cause just as the Na. -
tion's Business and Business Week bespeak
the views of business and industry.
With each of these publications, the reader
knows precisely what he is buying. No one
expects to find a dispassionate estimate of
Senator Taft in the New Republic nor an


The propaganda danger looms mainly in
the weekly news magazines whose appeal is
general, Here, as in newspapers, a slanted
headline or the misuse of adjectives can leave
a distorted impression with the reader who
is prepared to accept the content as factual
and completely objective.

B Y THIS time, newspaper readers under-
stand that Westbrook Pegler and Fulton
Lewis, Jr., as disciples of the ultra-conserva-
tive school, are inclined to scold rather than
to reason.
They may know also that Tom Stokes and
Marquis Childs are liberals while David Law-
rence and George Sokolsky are essentially con-
servatives.
But where do they place Drew Pearson,
Dorothy Thompson or the Alsop brothers?
Wouldn't It be helpful if newspaper edi-
tors would classify the syndicated columnists


rating News


wt1h a dese'iptire line or two so that the
reader Would know just what he was getting?
This device might be especially helpful In
the case of Joe and Stewart Alsop. These two
journalists continually berate any suggestions
of economy in g,:.vernmv.,nt, particularly if
there is the slighte-i hint 1iht the United
States lhouIld review bur global spending.
They seem to derive an almost sadistic
pleasure from cutting up Senator Taft and
the Senator-elect from Illinois, Everett Dirk.
sen as irreconcilable '"i.solatiomnsts."
Following the recent election, the Alsops
maid that judging from Taft's post-election com-
mnient, "he Is returning to Washington pre-
par-ed to battle to the death for The Chicago
Tribune's brand of foreign policy,"
They said also that "Col. Robert B. Mc'
Cormick's pew friend, Dirksen of Illinoise,
Smay be counted upon to go much further
than Taft."
Ttic-.e -tateniriii are not only extreme, but
untrue.
They are on a par with'the Alsop's cam-
paign against Louis Johnson when he .wsa
secretary of defense and their published col-
umns on Taft and Dirksen prior to ;lie Nov. 7
elections.
Ironically, some credence will be given to
the writings of this brotherly journalistic team
because of Colonel McCormick's "modest" claim
that The Chicago Tribune "carried Ohio, Indi.
ana, Iowa, Colorado, California, Minnesota and
Wisconsin."
The individual columnist has every right to
express his opinions but does not the news.
paper editor have a continuing responsibility
to make the distinction between news and
opinion abundantly clear to his readers, so that
no one is fooled?

ACTUALLY, it could be said that all speeches
made by President Ttinman, his cabinet
members, military, business and labor leaders
contain an element of proidgaiilad.
But, at least, they are directly attributable
to a responsible source and the public at large
can form its own conclusions as to the truths,
half-truths and falsities contained therein.
This type of "propaganda" is quite different
from the purposely "angled" story, cynical
distortion of the truth or accepting government
'handouts'" without question.
Fortunately, there is greater emphasis upon
truth in news thtn ever before in the history
of American journalism.
And at no time have we needed it more.
JOHN S. KNIGHT.


Merry-Go-Round


German Farm Children Learn
Ways Of American Democracy

By DREW PEARSON
ITASHINGTON-FotiV German farm kids,-ar-
riving In this countryy one year ago to study
American farming, have just returned to Germany
with an important lesson in American democracy.
They didn't learn about democracy from fancy
college, but by rubbing shoulders with typical,
down-to-earn Americans. For they were adopted
for one year by rural families from such one-
horse towns as Wapato, Wash., Stuarts Draft, Va.,
Accident, Md., and Tippecanoe City, 0. Now they
are on their way home to such one-horse towns
as Bauberbischefsheim, Wionsheim, Oberspeltach
and Ludwigsburg-Gruenbuehl, Germany.
This experiment in people-to-people friendship
was sponsored jointly*' by the State Department
and the Brethren Service Commission, a church
group. Its success can be judged by the paltin.
reactions of the German youth who stopped
by the State Department en route home. In broken
English, they talked of their experiences and im-
pressions--and the story they will carry back
with them to the German people.

"WITHAT does freedom mean to you?" a State
Department spokesman asked the grpup.
Walter Rieth of Obesberken, Germany, who had
been staying on a farm at Denton, Md., i)1-m.rl
that freedom meant doing %,nat you please. But
Heinz Holder of Stuiltait. who had stayed at
Broadwa'., Va oic-niier added:
"It means iu can du, a you please under the
law if you show respect for others."
'Then the State Department spokesman asked
whether they found any advantages in going to
an American high school.
"A big advantage is that you can go to high
school here in most cases without paying a school
fie." explained Ingehorg Maihoefer of Wetzgan,
who had lived at Waterside, Pa,

HSINZ HILLIGARDT of Pforzheim. who had
spent his year at Mt. Solon, Va., pressed his
big hands against his forehead in thought, then,
groping for words, added: "The German high
school has a wider range of subjects, except for
such things as courses in secretary training and
the like. Our schools go deeper into mathematics,
history, chemistry and the like."
However, he thought the German schools con-
centrated too much on vocational training and
riot enough on getting along with people.
Rudolph Stahl of Westesbach, who lived on
a farm near Dayton, 0., remarked that he wouldn't
have a television set in his German home because
It took up too much time. Oskar Rebbman, whose
home is near Stuttgart but who spent a year at


ht laiami Netralb
PAGE 2-F SUNDAY, NOV. 19, 1950
.JOHMN a. KNIOT'. Editor and Publisher
JAMES L. KNGHT. Busllnesa Manager
J. H BARRY, Vice-President
JOHN D. PENNEKAMP .l Ma.n1LP
Alsmolate Editor ClassitledAdvertlinan Manager
L BILLS I N. N. ONOGR
ManDMlng Edior National Advertising Manager
J.T WAWEl R B. T. TROETSCBL
Adarlloing Manager 1 Circulation Manager
Office *ns Plant. Corner Miami Ase o dni B. W. SeeeNid
Street. Miami 50. Plirlda
SUBSCRIPTION BATS
IMonttatall and Snn. .6 1 Months Doll l 1.02
Month DalTy and Bun I I 1 Year l Only
Month Dally and Sun 6I 11Mont4qunday O ly
Yar Dally ond un. 3 Ioont snity 91
Month@ Da yO&1 .i 1 Year SundaY On -
dPetgl leulatilons require that all mail ubecrlptions be
Orraj-ateea
Naw T.w. Phladel.nhIa. Chictao. ClevlaBoston. AaC.

at olr Hign f nmo lepaOl D
omin are a re uev ateee o

Uitwda aseaemd-eon mditer 1ovembar. iSISat the
Setofficeoo Miand, Pia., mder tlae act ofM $ac luu.


Intercepted Letters

W. A. ]IAKKIMAN
Presidential Assistant
Waiiiritoii, D. C.
Dear Averell:
AMERICANS agree with you we
cannot win a third world war
alone. What worries them most is
whether we can do it with Allies
not too interested in self-help for
self-defense.
}:ij.\', NE BILL


Tippecanoe City, 0., admitted he was pop-eyed
at the American combine machines.
TWENTY-TWO months ago, when the triumph-
ant Democratic. 81st Congress roared into
Washington amid shouts of "happy days are here
again" a forlorn Sen. Robert Taft sat in his office.
Across the hall in the Republican policy cham-
ber, a band of GOP liberals determined to grab
away his control. "The election shows Taftism has
gone out of style," remarked their leader, Henry
Cabot Lodge of Massachusetts.
A bewildered and hurt Taft, hearing the re-
mark, told a friend: "I don't understand why
they say that about me."
The other day Bob Taft entered the same
)iii. chamber to meet a crowd of newsmen.
SThis Taft, winner by 430,000 in Ohio, was as jolly
as a professional Santa Claus.
Asked about a special session of Congress, the
senator chuckled. "I can't tell what's on tl-
President's mind," he said, and the reply brought
as much laughter as a F.i-Io Allen gag on tele-
vision.
This Taft was mellow about questions which
one year ago would have brought tart, rasping
replies. Asked about the Gray report recommend-
ing expanded foreign aid, the Senator said mildly,
"It goes further than I would."
But the climax, with a boyish Taft dissolving
in blushes, came when he was asked if he were
a candidate for President. Cautiously the Senator
read a statement saying he would not go after
the nomination.
A voice in the crowd called out, "What if they
give it to you?"
Robert Taft hung his head shyly for a minute,
looked up into the full glare, of the newsreel
floodlights and blurted, "I'd take it." Then he
blushed.
The crowd laughed with him, and everyone
had as good a time as at a Saturday night church
social.



40 Years Ago Today
From the files of The Miami News-Record (later The
Miami Herald) of Nov. 19, 191D)
LOCAL: A large party of homeseekers from
New York and New Jersey arrived in Miami en
route to Naranja, where they will settle .. Judge
-Atkinson adjourned the November term of the
criminal court ...The fire department was called
out yesterday to a trash fire that threatened a
stable on Fourth street. Onlookers, extinguished
the fire before the arrival of the department.
NATIONAL: Two international jewel thieves,
S whose loot is believed to amount to $1,000,000,
were seized in Philadelphia. Among their victims
were Piresident Fallieries of France, and Queen
Wilhelmina of Holland. Sen. Eugent W. Travis,
of Brooklyn, testified before the graft inquiry com-
mission in New York that a lobbyist offered him
$100,000 if he voted against the anti-race track
gambling measure in 1898. .Thousands of fans
are gathering in New Haven, Conn. for the annual
football game between Harvard and Yale tomor-
row . Rep. Champ Clark of Missouri is a possible
candidate for the speakership of the House.
FOREIGN: Over 100 militant suffragettes, who
marched on Parliament building, were arrested.
after a fight with London police. The women were
attempting to see Premier Asquith to insist on
the introduction of the Woman's Suffrage bill.


From Both Sides


FCC Expropriates A Power
Not Given To It By The Laws

By GEORGE E. SOKOLSKY
T HE broader implications of the controversy
over TV-color have been missed during the
excitement of the election campaign and the Ko-
rean war. But it is a very important matter be-
cause .the Federal Communications Commission
has assumed the right to establish a method of
production, to arrest research, to limit the nature
of scientific improvements and to force the public
to accept what the commission determines is good
enough.
Involved are the Columbia Broadcasting Sys-
tem and the Radio Corporation of America, but
neither of these is important, unless undue meth-
ods were employed to influence the FCC, and
about that I know nothing. Nor am I a physicist
who can judge between one method and another.
What is pertinent is that a government agency
has exceeded its authority under the law, has by-
passed Congress, and has asserted powers which
it cannot possess under our system of govern-
ment. The fact that one of its engineers is in-
volved to the extent of having developed the par-
ticular process which the FCC seeks to force on
the American people, is merely a complicating
factor. The principle at issue is that the FCC has
no rights in blie matter at all. -tj

ABOUT .'-it.') 1,,,, television sets are In use lii
the United States. Americans paid very high
prices for them and a manufacturing process
which makes all those sets obsolete is to the bene-
fit of neither the public nor the leading manu-
facturers. The latter do not want the public to
become antagonistic to television nor to have their
brand names harmed.
Manufacturers, therefore, have favored a "com-
patible" system-that is, one that will continue to
permit present TV set owners to receive black-
and-white telecasts without modification. Colum-
bia has a gadget which is not in line with broad
electronic developments, but which is a mechani-
cal device attachable to existing sets, if a black-
and-white telecast is still desired.

NVOLVED is a set with a bracket, which the
FCC desired that manufacturers install in fu.
ture sets. The FCC has no legal authority over
manufacturers; it was established to police the air
waves and to grant licenses to stations to use air
waves.
No such "'bracket" as they proposed had ever
been built commercially and no one knew, on
September 1, when the FCC made its announce-
ment, whether it could be built. Each owner of a
TV set would have to pay a premium to the man-
ufacturer of the new equipment if the scheme
went through.
The FCC gave the manufacturers of television
sets 30 days to agree to its plan and approximately
30 days more to revolutionize their assembly lines.
None of this is within FCC's authority. Also, it
is (ippptedil to me that it takes about six months
to revise an assembly line for even minor model
changes.

THEN the FCC, on its own, without any law,
on October 10 announced that the "non-coinm-
patible" system had been adopted. Then the FCC
does something which is beyond belief: it requested
the RCA to hand over to CBS its own researches
and studies for the three-color receiving tube
which it has been developing at great expense.
As Frank Folsom of RCA said:
"If this kind of thing goes in America, the
PhiHlies certainly missed a bet in the last World
Series. They should have asked the Yanks for Joe
DiMagglo."
The whole thing has been thrown into court,
but the FCC can utilize its licensing power and
Influence to force stations to obey its dicta.
This is an expansion of governmental authority
as close to Italian fascism as anything we have
yet witnessed in this country.


It May Be News


By Arthur Griffith


I HAVE just finished reading g, g.dt conductor as a reward forr ePsi.i.'s governors that they main,
"Arnold Volpe" by Marie Volpe. his signal establishment of a con- tamined, developed and enlarged the
Published by the University of M, cert series that is now a fixture in symphony as an integral part.of
ami Press, the volume is a credit New York's cultural life is highly its cultural program.
Wto the scholarly commendable reporting. I think that in its quarter cen-
S pursuits of our Tie chapters on the Stadium tury nothing has contributed more
Univkrsii\ and to to.r' eii are an illuminating rec- to making this community appre-
m tne out-tanding ord of the politics of music. They ciatively conscious of "our Uni-
thoied it. There authoritative finality, chestra.
a r e t o ro ---- Metropolitan Miami and all Flor-
.... n .... --s n this THERE is a lot of backdrop his- id