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Ian Parker Collection of East African Wildlife Conservation: The Ivory Trade

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Title:
Ian Parker Collection of East African Wildlife Conservation: The Ivory Trade
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Parker, Ian.S.C.
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University of Florida
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Ga me Office
Kilifi
20/2/59.

RE TRANSFER



Dear Sir
Tbeg to forward my complaints regarding the abeve subject
Ihave been working in this Department for along tim
with different people, anddefferent please,
and ihope that iwos doing well where ever Iwent.
But lam very sorry to tell you that it seems to me that
lam not in goodterms with these staff here at Kilifi
since Iwos sent down here which icanot explain the really
reason.
lolweys quarrel with themstaff, Dne day our Copiol
told me to let't:him drive the vehicle with non license
and when refused then he had toquarrel. Therefor
IwouLbe glad if you could transfer me to Nairobi
Aruwa66 if not (Discharge)

Your Obedient Servant


Omar bin Alii





NIGHT CLAIM ALLOWANCE.

July From Kilfi to Voi 51days out 1958.
August t toTaita 16 out 1958
,"Kilfi to Voi 18 out 1958
January Kilifi to Mwahera 16 days 1959.
%is-1is it is the Folowing days which iwos out Sir
Form Kilifi to safari

Driver Omar Bin Alii









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Telegrams: "DISTRmCrER" OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT COMM SIONER
Telephone No. 3 KILIFI
Telephone No. 3 ^^ / P 20th. FEBRUARY: 9 58
In reply please quote KENYA, ................. ........ 58*
GA: 22/1/1/10 U*-
Ref. No. .............
and date



The Game Warden, 1
Game Departmtnet,
KILIFI.


WALIANGULU GAME MANAGEENT SCHEME.

I have read this paper with interest. It would be a help
if the proposed are could be shown superimposed on a map shewing
the district boundaries.

I agree that something must be done to control and stabilise
the Waliangulu. The Scheme proposed is novel and assuming it can be
made a viable proposition I can see that a number of teething
troubles will arise. Subject to my comments below however I favour
the scheme being given a trial.

General.

(a) No doubt you will be getting the comments of the Provincial
Commissioner, the Provincial Agricultural Officer and the
Grazing Control Officer, Kilifi;

(b) The main general difficulty I see is to get a nomadic, shy
tribe to accept the discipline and "settlement" proposed.
In my experience these sort of people are often like gypsies,
resentful of authority however beneficent. How would you
prevent "settlers" from "going walk about !!! ?;

(c) You envisage a strict hierarchy in each settlement and it is
essential to the scheme. Granted that the Wasanya are
chameleons where tribal customs are concerned adopting those
of their neighbours, can you tie your hierarchy to any tribal
....structure ?. There is nothing of this in the Mijikenda groups
now.
It will make it much easier if your hierarchical
system is not totally alien and imposed.

PARTICULABj.

(a) Status of Land,
I do not think that all land to the north of the Galana
river is Crown Land" although most is and possibly all the
land you want is. For your purposes I hope it is for it
would be hard to get Native Land Unit for the purpose of a
game reserve;

(b) Administration of a Settleqent.

Page 11. The headman should be responsible to the Officer-in -
Charge of the Scheme who in turn is responsible to the
Committee. The Committee should be policy-making only and will
meet but occasionally. It cannot cope with routine detail.

(a) Finance:
I am afraid I cannot agree with your estimates.

(i) Including passage, pension contributions and the like
your two officers will cost you a good deal more than
1200 per annum;
2-







Telegrams: "DISTRICTER" / OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT COMMISSIONER
Telephone No. 3 KILIFI
In'reply please quote KENYA, .. .20th. .Eeb.eary,,....... 1 9.58..
GA: 22/1/l/1.
Ref. No ..............
and date

2-


(ii) Housing ?

(iii) Lorries. A 3 ton Fordson cheap and nasty through
the Supplies and Transport Department cost 817 with
wooden body in 1957. No doubt it is more now. But do
you need three?.

(iv) Land Rovers.

The Supplies and Transport Department price up toqX
3Oth.June, 1958 for the 88" petrol model ( the cheapest)
is 690 Mombasa;

(v) Running costs ?. These will be heavy over the terrain
in question;

(vi) Incidentals, statonery, tentage, stores etc.

(vii) I think your item for drivers clerks and labour to
e an underestimate but this could be proved by a
break down of the figures;

(viii) You will need a few Game Scouts or similar as a
nuolefus for control.
ka




DISTRICT COMMIS IONER,
KIIJI. !

(Copy to:- le l-
The Chief Game Warden,
(Game Dept,
Nairobi.

The Provincial Commissioner,
Coast Province,
Mombasa.


DWH/MP.










15th Maroh, 58
GA. 22/1/1/%28





Chief Game Warden, /
Game Department,
P.O. Box 241,
NAIROBI


WALIAMGULU

Ref. your GA.3/2/3/8 of the 16th Maroh.1958


I have not seen Mr. Parker for some time and he has
gone off with what I understood was mry copy of the paper on the
gam management scheme, although 1 have since heard that there is
not one for me at present.

2. My information is that the food shortage in the area
oonoerned is nothing exceptional, and the food situation in the
distr'iot as a whole is good.

3. I have no funds to pay Waliangulu to collect Mboes
and sell them to the Veterinary Department, nor an officer to
supervise such an operation.

4. If Mr. Parker thinks this is a working proposition X
suggest that he gets a buyer into the area and let the law of supply
and demand take its natural course.



D. W. HALL
DISTRICT COMISSIONER,

Copy to t- inGamne Warden,
P.0. Box 34,
KIl.TF


NWH/PJH.




a-* V. *^ -* 1K _- _. _






IAD.1/20/1I *t March 4M


The Seeretary, inisetry of "
Forest ievelaopment, Game


I iaJfflMmg:tep IIf1






I have read the memoranuam, propping e
Geme M'snagemet Schem in the Kilifl and Tana Rlive
distriaotes, Lwith the grLatest interest. My first
reacticas a" that a siheMae C this nature is well
worth a trial beeaun, if it lU successful it will
go a long way to presw ome of the Colony= s moet
valuable assets and because it doe make a constructive
attempt to sclve the problem of the ;aliangulu knmtenr
On the other bhnd It tis bound to cost a Certain moatM
of sn=y id th.Ls fast must be accepted and appreciated.
2* At this stage I have the following ccmr-entstt-
(a) The exa-uple, liitch Ur. Parkzer gives, of
succOseful game mangement scims in other
parts of the T.orld ame most interesting, am
is lim estimate on pege 5 of the mmaoraudum
that 150 elephant might be shot in the area
each year and Still pzvvide for n increase.
I find tlW estimated of the way in wThich game
will increase, If properly managed, difficult
to believe, but the Garme ardns ard .,ardens
tof the National Parks accept the figures as
reasonable.
(b) The memorandum sugMets that about 500
kaliangzulu n= are accustomed to support
thasolVelS and their framilies by hunting. If
this estimate Is correct, the problem should
net be too difficult to tackle. 3 asara that
the .alingulu in the Tans .-iver district
have been Included in this estimate*
(s) 1W far the most difficult problem to be
tackled Is how to got thee rather wilj
ncuadie people to accept dieoipline ant life
in a settlement.
(d) It will probably be neceusay to declare the
area eventually selected a closed ar*ea t M&
to provide that, apart fr bone fioe trsvleers e ,
using the main read or Otoak route, no peais
should be allowed ia the ar exept n peuit
with strict ocndiitlontj raidence, Zt win
be neOOajy to provide smfl i one sgiasft
pe aones fouA In the a ill U legl
(0) 1 am unable to &d&L at t&ies stage uatber










-a-


there should be as many as five settlements.
I tUink it will probably be desirable that these
Waliangulu families should be persuaded to
cultivate land as their main means of livelihood,
or at least they should be settled in areas where
water in available and cultivation is practicable.
(f) One of the first steps must be to have a count
=ad of all people at present living in the
proposed area and then to uee whether It ls
praoticeable to remove all those who are not
Wallangulu or Oalla herding cattle.

(g) I think Mr. Parker's estimates of income to
be obtained from the scheme are on the high
side and his expenditure estimates will need
considerable revision.* He has made no
provision for LeT. & To recurrent costs, which
will be very heavy if all meat has to be
transported by lorry. Camp equipment will be
required and there must be provision for Game
Scouts to ensure that poaching does not take
place.
(h) It might be possible for Mr. Parker to rnm
this scheme on his own If he is given the
necessary money and a suitable clerks He
would, of course# be assisted by the Distriet
Officer, Malindi aMn the ".agricultural Officer*

(i) I think it may be desirable to provide in
the scheme for a Central Committee, with the
District Camnimioner, t.lifi, as Chairman,
to decide policy and be in overall control.
The officer in charge of the scheme (MreParker)
might be in charge of tlhe area and manage the
schem and the Dittrict Officer, Malindi
might manage the accounts of the scheme on
behalf of the schlieae manager.

B. I think the next stop should be for your
Minister and the Miniater for African Affairs to
approve the scheme in principle and for your Minister
to indicate that he would be prepared to go to the
Treasury for money if a satisfactory scheme can bu
worked out.
4. Copies of the memorandum the sketch map,
this letter, and other relevant notes should be sent
to the District Commnissioner9 Kilifl' Tana Rivermand
Teita, to the UistrtletOfficerp Mallndij-to the Senior
Crown Counsel3 Mcnbasa, and to Mr. Sheldrickbof the
National Parks.
5. When this has been done, I suggest we should
appoint a Committee consisting of the Districot GOcmissioner,
Rilifi (Chairma), the District Officer, Malindi, the
Senior Crown Counsel9 Mombasa9 Mr. Parker (secretary),
and Mr. Sheldriek, with the following terms of
reference:-
(a) To examine the memorandum on the
establishment of a Game management
szone in the .ISLtI district.

(b) If the proposal is considered
practicable, to draw up a workable


,../ shdiSl




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Mew-


seahie, together with estimteia,
bearing in mind the need for Oconcy
at the present timse.


(e) To advice what legislation will be
necessary, if mnyp to give legal effect
to the a sehme and in order to ensure that
the Wallangulu, who are allowed to live
in the zone are brought under control
and dIs*eipline.




DES.'.i)D ("'HAGAN


DO'n/JB.


PROVINCIAL COMUISJ3 CHER
n n Acsw o


Copy to:-

The Permanent .lcoretry,
Ministry of .rican Alftairasp
P.0.BL&.50060
NAIROBI.

The Chief OGenm ardlen,
Game Department,
YA3!KOBI.
The District Cuaiasioner,
KILIFI.

The Distriet Coeuisionimr
KIPINI.


The district Officer,
MALIDI.

The Oame ...rdi, /
aKILIPI.


" -. : -r "- .







Telephone: Mwatate 6 TEITA D TRIl
When replying please quote ( WU IANY P.O. VOI
Ref. No. GA.. / ......
and date .0.th..Mar.ch, ....... 195..8

The Game Warden,
KILIFIC 2)


GGAE MANAGEMENT SCHEME.

Thank you for showing me your proposed
ame management scheme which I read with great
interest, Such a scheme in my opinion will be
the only means of safeguarding game in the futu-
re. The persons who obtain their livelihood from
it will require careful management and good deal
of control but if handled properly will help
to reduce poaching by reporting those who poach
and thereby safeguarding their own interests. It
is also the only suggestion I have seen which
may make the African realise the benefit of having
game.
2. Your scheme deals mainly with the Wali-
ungulu but I believe thatiit is proved success-
ful it could be adapted to other areas and I defi-
nitely feel it should be given a trial because
it might succeed and if it didn't one would be no
worse off than we are now.




DISTRICT COMMISSIONER ,
AFHW/AFPV. TEl TA.
Copy to:-
The Provincial Commissioner,
Coast Province,
MOMBASA.


Telegrams: "DISIRICTER", Wundanyi, P.O. Voi


DISTRICT COM1





DISTRICT OFFICE,
MA.LINDI,

..19th.Apri


Ref. No.. 9/5.

The Game Warden,
KILIFI.


Thank you for your note of the 16th April
enclosing a dopy of the scheme.

2. In general I support it, but in some points
of detail I think it may have to be revised and I also
think it will be necessary to go more deeply into some
of the administrative, legal and financial implications.

5. I offer the following comments on points
mentioned on various pages of the scheme:-


Page 5.










Page 6.




Page 7.






Page 10.


It would probably be quite diffi-
cult for the organization to
establish its own 'factory' for
converting game trophies into
curios and it might be unwise to
rely on this. It would, however,
be worth trying to encourage one
or two.craftsmen, possibly Akamba,
to live at the administrative head-
quarters of the scheme, and use
some of the trophies on the spot.

I think it might be better to use
the zone North of the Sabaki only,
and avoid the problems which must
arise if you try to exclude an
area from the Native Land Unit.

The proposed land exchange is not
really acceptable since the Adu
area does not seem to be capable
of accepting any additional popula-
tion. I have in fact already re-
commended action designed to reduce
the population of Adu.

One of the two officers detailed
to administer the scheme would have
to accept general responsibility
for it, and the other would have
to be his assistant, even if in
practice they divided their duties
as you suggest. The officer in
charge would have responsibilities
similar to those of a Settlement
Officer.


19Pq.









-2-

He would require cofipeter.t\L
clerical assistance, ana adequate
housing and office accommodation
would have to be provided at the
headquarters.
The headmen would have to be res-
ponsible to the officer in charge
rather than to the Management
Committee.

Page 12. At the time of the annual pay-out
action should be taken to collect
the Personal Tax due from each
participant. If the pay-out took
place in January it would be easy
to assess the income for the pre-
vious year and collect the appro-
priate tax.
As the area of the scheme could
not easily be served by the Kilifi
or Tana River African District
Councils the participants might
be allowed to form a Council of
their own, and the central fund
of the scheme might contribute a
sum to this Council directly instead
of paying it to individuals and re-
quiring the Council to collect Rates.

Page 15. I presume that a large part of the
meat would be eaten by the partici-
pants. Would they be required to
pay for it? Could they in fact pay
for it in the first year?


4. Other points which occur to me are:-
(a) The Eastern boundary of the scheme area
should be demarcated by a motorable
track from the North bank of the Sabaki
right through to the main Lamu road.
Link roads should be made to enable
this track to be reached from Dakacha
and from Adu.

(b) There should be limited facilities for /
subsistence agriculture at the head- t*"
quarters and at the four settlements..

(c) It might be desirable to appoint an
Msanye elder to the Marafa African Court
and give that Court jurisdiction over
the whole area of the scheme. Similarly
it might be desirable to give the Magi-
strates at Malindi jurisdiction over







- 5 -


Copy to:


the whole area of the scheme.
(d) Provided that action is taken on the
suggestions above for the establishment
of a special African District Council
and the extension of Court jurisdictions,
the fact that the area lies in two Dis-
tricts may be unimportant, but it may
still be better to arrange for it to be
wholly included in one District.
(e) It will be desirable to provide a road
to the headquarters and to each of the
four settlements and to provide facili-
ties for the establishment of shops at
these five places.
(f) I hope that it will be possible to open
up the existing road on the North bank
of the Sabaki river as a tourist route
between Malindi and Nairobi via the
Tsavo National Park.




District Officer,
v Malindi.

The Provincial Commissioner, Mombasa.
The Permanent Secretary for African Affairs,
Nairobi.
The Secretary for Forest Development, Game
A Fisheries, Nairobi.
The District Commissioner, Kilifi.
The District Commissioner, Kipini.
The Chief Game Warden, N airobi.


10






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When replying please quote TANA RIVER S ICT,
Ref. No. .GA,22/l/2/Q69. K I KENYA.
and date D.......... 2 M.May,..... ..., 195a.

The Game Wa&dan,\
Game Department,
P.O. Box 54,
4*- KI L IF I. ,


GAME MANAGEMENT SCHEME GALMA RIVER-
Ref: Your letter dated 16.4.58

As pu know, my Provincial Commissioner has already
commented on this proposed scheme and I am in complete
aginement with his views.

I welcome the idea behind it and I regard it as a step
in the right direction. As a person who cannot agree that
an animal is more important than man, this scheme seems to me
to be a highly intelligent attempt to balance the forces.

At this early stage I only have three points to make:

(1) The Scheme is too enthusiastic when it comes to finance
and I believe that the expenditure has been grossly
underestimated. In view of the fact that the degree of
co-operation to be expected from the African is still
an unknown quantity, much more investigation is also needed
O into the revenue side.
(2) There are considerable difficulties ahead in the
O marrying-up of two districts into one zone and any thought
ofa"private empire"run by enthusiasts is to be resisted. The
Orma rights will have to be protected, a complete tie-up
with the Provincial Administration made sure, and a revision
of Local Government responsibilities secured. The Tana River
African District Council has authority over all land within
the boundaries of the present administrative district.

(5) I must be represented on any Committee which discusses
any part of this district or it's peoples.






'-T DISTRICT COMMISSIONER.
TANA RIVER DISTRICT.


OrMISSIONER,


WHT/JMI.


Telegrams: "DISTRICTER", KIPINI


OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT





Telegrams: "SCHOOLING" DISTRICT EDUC I OFFICE
Telephone:.......... P.O. Box 42, IL I
When replying please quoae I \'
Ref. No. ...a...... d..9.......
and date \\











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COPY.


AA/27/2/II/62.
MINISTRY OP AFRICAN APPAIEB,
P.*0Box 30050,
NAIROBI, Kenya.
19th. November, 1958.



The Proyncial Commissionsu ^to
Coast Province, / / /
Mombasa.


WALLIANGUT S ITTM (GAME MANAGEM )

Would you please refer to letter No. 22/4/1/8
of the 14th.November from the Permanent Secretary for
Forest Development, Game and Fisheries, on which I would
like to comment as follows: -
As a general observation I would say that the
various points raised by the Professional Hunters Assoniatio
merely serve to emphasi sethat they have entirely missed or
ignored the principles underlying the Walliangu Scheme,
and the reasons why it is so important for Kenya's wild
life that pilot project be attempted.
To saswer the various points raised by the
Professional Hunters Associations -
(1) The total population of the Walllangulu tribe is
estimated at approximately 2,000 men ,women and children.
The number of notorious poachers, by which I mean leaders
of poacher gangs, my naot exceed 50 but each gang consists
of numerous followers who assist with the general work of
the gang and must therefore also be oalassified as poascher
although naturally they are not of the same calibre as the
gang leaders. However, it should be borne in a nd that even
the ordinary members of the gangs are skilled hunters and
bushmen, and could function quite effectively on their own
if need be.
(2) Naturfly the scheme would create a precedent, and if
successful other tribes should be encouraged to follow suit,
Surely this is precisely what is required. If other tribes
pressed for similar scheme, this could only be regarded as
very healthy sign that the African at least appreciates the
value of wild life conservation. If the Africans can bi
persuaded to exchange his present system of indiscriminate
and wasteful salaghter on a huge scale for controlled
culling under proper flU:FvAsieon, there is at
last some vestige of hope that wd life will net be
entirely exterminated in may parts of Kenya.
The essence of the Waliangulu Scheme is to bU g
the African into active partnership in game onhitp*on
measures. Without the co-operation of the African ten is
no long-tomerm hope either for the African or the brofPal
profe a ssional hunter.
If only the professional hunters would realiSt tb
schemes along these lines are very neh in their own
interests. At the moment game is going poached out, of
existence in many so-called hunting areas, and- i;tt44 '
process is allowed to eoutimie indefinitely there 'i
nothing left for the professional white hunter or
professional black poacher.







2-


On the other hand, if the Waliangulu Scheme is successful,
I can see no reason why the Waliangulu themselves should
not invite theprofessional hunters to hunt in the area,
providing licence fees, meat, and so on go towards benefitting
the scheme. But in my view the invitation mast come from the
Waliangulu themselves. If they are eemzietteA- compelled to
allow European hunters into the area against their will, they
may well regard the scheme merely as a camouflage for esta -
blibUshing Luropean interests in the region.

(3) In fact, the biggest tuskers are reputed to in habit
the Marsabit region. However, there are undoubtedly big
eleph;-ants in the area proposed for thepilot game management
scheme, because the area lies athwarf the principal elephant
migratory route in Kenya, extending from the hinterland north-
west of Lamu down to and beyond the Tanganyika border.

(4) This statement is entirely misleading and inaccurate.
Elephants migrate in and out of the region and breed along the
length of the migratory route. There is no recognized elephant
breeding ground. Other species also are known to breed there.
No area, not even a Natinnal Park, can be regarded as a self-
contained" area. The majority of species of wild animals
constantly move in and out of any region you care to name.

(5) Again this statement is inaccurate. A small number
of detribalised Waliangulu have associated themselves with the
Giriaman and possibly other tribes in the Coast Province, and
have cultivated shambas in Giriama country, but it shouldbe
emphasized that the area proposed for the game management
scheme is entirely unsuited for agricultural development in
the normally accepted sense, except along thebanks of the
Galana and Tana Rivers. The best form of land usage for this
semi-desert country is quite definitely not cultivation.
Quite apart from this, the majority of the Waliangulu
tribesmen w would be unable or unwilling to adopt a wpy of life
based on agriculture. I belive that attempts to start agrioul -
tural schemes were made in the past, but were entirely
unsuccessful The Coast Province Administration should be able
to provide full information an this subject.
(6) This merely emphasizes that the professional hunters
have failed to grasp the underlying principles of the game
management scheme. These can be sunmarised as follows: -
(a) Basically the scheme amounts to a system of cropping
wild animals on a sustained yield basis in areas where the
land is unsuited to normally accepted methods of animal husban-
dry. In other words, it is a new approach to the question of
protein production in regiousn where domestic livestock will
not thrive. It is my contention that the production of protein
per acre will be far higher under this system than under
scrub cattle;
(b) Ranohing of domestic livestock in this semi-desert
type of country would inevitably lead to large scale dessica-
tion of soil and vegetation, whereas under Wild fauna the
habitat would be preserved. A system of Game Management would,
therefore, be the most suitable trm of land used for this
type of country,.
(o) The proposed scheme will go a long wa y towards obtaining
the co-operation of the African in the conservation of wild
life, without which there is little hope for long term wild
life conservation in areas outside established National Parkas


- 3-







- 3.


(dO If successful, the scheme will prove the enonomic
value of wild animals and will thus strengthen the case for
their retention in many parts of Kenya outside National Parks,
(e) Through obtaining the active coO-operation of the
Walliangulu poaching will be considerably reduced, if not
entirely eliminated, in the Game Management zone.
(f) The scheme also has oonsierable sociological signifi -
canoe. It will enable tribesmen who have long been a thorn in
the side of the Administration to take up useful and profitable
employment, based on their tradional way of life, in a region
where no legal employment previously existed. Such a scheme
will undoubtedly have a very marked and beneficial effect on
African opinion.
(7) Again, the professional hunters have completely
distorted the main object of the exercise. This is not, as they
suggest, to kill game, but the conservation of natural resources
through proper land usage.
(8) Some of the game meat derived from the Game MH.age-
ment Scheme will be consumed by the Walianguli on the spot.
The remainder will be dried and sold as biltong. It is fallaci-
cus and ridiculous to suggest that the sale of biltong will
affect the Colony's offtake of scrub cattle.
(9) Finally, may I quote the resolution passed at the
recent I.U.C.N. Conference in Athens, which wqs drafted by
Dr. Fraser+Darling, and which is a first rate summary of the
advantages of the sohem,written by a distinguished world
authority on the subjects -
"This Assembly of the I.UNC. N. notes with approval
the pilot Game Management Scheme being plaxned for the Walian-glta
tribe in Kenya whereby the economic welfare and cultural pattern
of the tribe will be sustained, andrecords its full support of
this attempt to show that protein production is possibly by game
management from areas of low or non- existent agricultural vaine
The scheme pro-ides an opportunity of obtaining valuable
scientific and sociological data on this form of land use".




(Sgd) Hardy
for PEMA ENT SECRETARY FOR
AFRICAN AFFAIRS.










S3rd December, 58
GA. 22/1/1/47/58



The Provincial Commissioner1
Coast Province,
MOMBASA (2)
GAME MANAGEMENT : WAL SETTLEMENT
sc=L
Ref. the Permanent Secretary for Forest
Development, Game and Fisheries letters
22/4/1/8 of 14/11/58 addressed to the
Chief Game Warden, copied to you, and
22/4/1/8 bf 18/11/58 addressed to you,

I find it difficult to understand the complete
'volte face' expressed in the Permanent Secretary for Forest
Development, Game and Fisheries letter. In his letter 22/4/1/8
of 19th September,1958 para,3 he suggested that a pilot scheme
be instituted under the Game Warden Kilifi with the assistance
of the Administration.
2. You approved of his proposition (ref.your ADM.1/20/54
of 27/10/58) and I have since written to the Commissioner for
Local Government for his advice reference accounting, and have
also put the plan to the African District Council who gave their
unanimous approval to it.

3. On receiving your approval the Ministry for Forest
Development, Game and Fishereies approached the Treasury for
permission to start the sheme's funds on the proceeds of
elephant shot on control at the coast. The Treasury agreed to
the sale of meat, but not ivory. However their ruling is of no
consequence and the approach by the Ministry was unnecessary, as
Sec.14(2) of the Wild Animals' Protection Ordinance (No.18 of 1951)
states :- "A Game Warden's Permit shall be subject to whatever
conditions the Game Warden may impose in his absolute discretion".
_ The elephant, naturally, would be shot on a Game Warden's Permit.
Further to the Treasury's ruling, there is no difference in
/principle in selling meat to the selling of ivory to start the
scheme. With respect I would maintain legally the Treasury have
no jurisdiction in the matter at all.

4. The scheme is a Game Conservation Measure. The first
and foremost object is the survival of wild animals. That the
scheme offers a very practicable solution to the civilization of
the Waliangulu is purely incidental though very fortunate. The
term W47aliangulu Scheme" is not correct though it has inadvertently
been applied to the Galara River Game Management Scheme since the
letters inception. How can an Administrative Officer supervise
the hunting, know what to hunt; when to hunt it, and. how to treat
the products etc.? A Game Management Scheme must be run by a
specialist in that field. Should the Ministry of Forests, Game and
Fisheries refuse to accept the responsibility of the scheme, then
the Game Warden Kilifi should be seconded to the Administration for
the task. He is quite willing to do this to get the scheme going.
5. The White Hunters points in the Permanent Secretary's
letter 22/4/1/8 of 14/11/58 are all easily answered. None of the
three White Hunters who saw the Ministry had read the Game
Management Scheme. White Hunters in general oppose the scheme on
two misapprehensions i
(i) That they are to be refused admittance to the
scheme area


(ii) That it is a scheme especially desigae2for the
so**.c







-2-


(ii) Africans.

Neither could be further from the truth. Professional
Hunters would not be excluded from the Scheme, Again the
scheme is such that the poor hunting African has a place in it
though this is incidental. The scheme was not designed to
appease the Africans.

6. I feel that when next thedelegation of hunters see
the Minister for Forest Development, Game and Fisheries, myself
the Game Warden Kilifi and Mr. David Sheldrick or Mr. Noel
Simon should be present. Would it be possible to arrange this?

*.. 7* I attach herewith lIr. Parkerts answers to the questions
posed by the White Hunters Association,

8, Finally I would like to reiterate that I am very
keen to start a small pilot scheme under the Game Warden Kilifi
with all possible help from the Administration.




DISTRICT COMMISSIONER,
KILIFI

Copy to :-/The Game Warden, KILIFI
\ '

\ENCL:
\ GLVH/PJH.





*4





/ a 2Lt/oS 0--^th UeoouheP 6Ed




The Pirmnaet. wry
ZiLnistry of .Vroist- Avia/ t Gu; a and
riebeeleOie
P BiOX tOOS7


G/IJA IVRWb IajltaLl. {s^fif :*sc.a^

1ef yoopur 1.l1/ ae t O 14I fthoibvBl 19i


'iurthcw to my letter rtefWOesin.e yi3/*
of 1tA December, 1968, i now undclone a copyO of a
letter refrnwc nMIer A,,2WVV4r?/&C of 31-d
Dsom wbr, w9 fora the District Gmxstaimor
K-iflfl Xf0,Vt agge with twe vi s he has
exprkeed end I think that the objection raft by1
teo roft lcnal haIters' Aseoclation bao be=a
eatisfsatorily anaerared I hope tho ?Inieteu
will be able to accept the reoorandatUton mate in
ti'graph G of the Distriot Ccriionet ,a letter*
I thinlk porhipe it is rneosB uvi to nijaew it
quite clear once again what the main purposes of
tile pilot asceno arti
(a) to carry out a giam oonaervatin
measure,
(b) to incease the amount of gafe.
STempecoially elephant in tn Galaona
arson by an experiment in 1,1=
ma cagemet and
(a) to reduce poaohini, tv usiing thonso
who would otherwise b enagaed in
poaching, bsioficially in the Vonw

B. Az I hua. stated on sovorai owcmasions pro-
vlouxufy believe thick pilot sobesa of Care aom-
cervation i mxt nanaecuacnt in waIl IjorZth a trials
I ea itpreocsd by the fact that it to strongly
supported by uach authorities in Gaam Catter as
the Chief uew ', arden, the Director of the "oyul
National t'ars, Zr. Nloel uilon iad Mr. David

4.@ This is not an Afriean Settlent Schome.
It is primarily a highly technical sobers of mea
management BM cam oanl be operated u -ess.u- j
by an experienot oaffier of the Owns Epir
tho not only has a detailed knowledo of gusB but
also of thwe V all myuau hunters who has no f l20d
abodf* Thves hters ae naw mow by off omrs
of the Adnfistraticn esept when te ora brom~t
et frc the Coutt ftor guns offtWso-s




I
I 2



5. I believe this in a far better way of
preventing poaching, if It can be success-
fully operated, than the maintenance of a
large and extensive anti-poaohing unit. I
also believe that an officer of Mr0 Parker's
experience and calibre has a good chance of
obtaining the confidence of the Waliangulu
hunters. He believes he can gain their
confidence and I consider he should be given
the ful"ot support and encouragement, only
in th1cii thl lieritu atd success of the
soheiae be judged*

6, 1 am surprised that your Ministry now
has second thoughts about this scheme and I
think a firm decision must be taken by your
Ministry whether or not the sacheo i likely
to conserve gase and to discourage poaching.
If your Mf4inistry no longer supports the
scheme despite the technical advice, it
ohoula be clearly stated. If on the other
hand your Minister feels that the pilot
scheme is well worth adopting then I hope
you will go ahead with the soheme and give
the fullest support and encouragement to
your Game garden in the fielci who has to
manage it. As previously stated he can
count on support frcm the Administration&
1 and the Kilifl African District Council has
greed to aclpt the scheme as suggested in
paragraph 3 of your predecessor'se letter
reference 22/4/1/8 of 19th Eetpeibor, 1958,
provided that it is managed by the Game
Department *


i),',:,<''" > 0 "; o



PL.uViEiCjAL CXIXIZ.ISIoiflim,
CO1WT

c.o: The Poemanent Seoretary,
iinictry of African Affairs,

The Chief Game Warden,


The District CoLmitsioner

The District OffiAerp


.NC'IIsEJS
,.-C S









/

I
7,. 2/:74
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i ri ht f .vi :. :.; L.... V I i r hy
t

















,,i,:~ ~~~ -: -e -,. ,,; .-.-- 2
Ref. No]GA. 22/1/i/52A.


%/The Game V.'.ardlen,

Copy above forwarded to you for
information. G. HARDY


ILIFI, DI( R. j












2nd January, 1959.
C C
'.'i1. '. J; .. "': : *


:% Z.--i ; n r, u ..'j tVj

h r~vi;.,i;..l ; i3si1-ri12r%

a. It.'-_



Ref.Io G&A. "22/1/1/52A.
VThe Game V'.'arden,
Kilifi.

Copy above forwarded tbo you for
into rmat ion. ^



KIMIFI, D^I^~^Ofi
2nd January, 1959.






tielrams: "DrsrRiCTER" OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT COMMISSIONER
Telephone: 3 P.O. Box 29, KILIFI, KENYA
When replying please quote ..12t ,....,a ary..., 19.59.,
Ref. No. g ..... /.2/1 ./54.
and date



V The Game Warden,
Game Dept, \
Kilifi.



GAME MANAGEMENT SCHEME : WALIANGULU.
I enclose herewith a copy of a letter Ref 22/4/1/8
dated 8th. January, 1959, together with a copy of the
draft scheme for game management in the Galana River area
of the Kilifi District, which I have received from the
Permanent Secretary, Ministry for Forest Development,
Game and Fisheries, for your information and any comment
that you may wish to make.
2. Kindly return the enclosure since this has to be
returned to the Ministry concerned.


Ens: 2. DISTORT COSSINER, KILIFI.
Ens .DISTR T C LSSIONER, KILIFI.






Telegrams: "DISTRICTER"
Telephone: 3
When replying please quote
CER. 2/3/45.
Ref. No ..................
and date


I


OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT COMMISSIONER
P.O. Box 29, KILIFI, KENYA
... 14th...Januarx,., 19.. 59.


The Game Warden,
Game Dept,
KILIFI.


MINISTER'S VISIT.


The Minister for Forest Development, Game and
Fisheries, is visiting Kilifi on Thursday, 29th.
January, 1959. I shall be grateful if you will arrange
to be in the boma on that day so that we can discuss
the Game Management Scheme with him.




DISICT COMMISSIONER,
GIVJH/MP KI jIFI.


0 0 if "







'B
t .-~


GA226t/h January, 59
GA. 22/1,'1/56





The Provincial Commissioner,
Coast Province,
MOMK3ASA

GAME MANAGEMENT SCHEME WALIANGULU
Ref. 22/4/1/8 of 8/1/1959 from the
Permanent Secretary for Forest
Development, Game and Fisheries
addressed to me, copied to you.
*** ~ I forward herewith one map of the area in which
Phase One will take place, and our redraft of the Permanent
Secretary's rules embodying certain suggestions.

2. With reference to the second paragraph of the
Permanent Secretary's letter those Waliangulu who cannot
be employed in Phase One will have to remain where they
are to-day, It is envisaged that 50 can be employed in
SPhase One and the remaining 100 mast wait until Phase Two
is initiated.

3. I would like to record that I hope the Permanent
Secretary will be able to arrange a really simple form of
accounting with the Treasury, since anything complicated
would be impossible to manage.



DISTRICT COMMISSIONER,
KILIZI

ENOCLS I

GMJpH/PJH.

copy to S- : 4e Game Warden,
XILIFI









GAME MANAGEMENT : COAST PROVINCE


PHASE I

l1 The Game Warden Kilifi will continue normal control
measures in Kilifi District. However, at the same time
certain Waliangulu would be employed to prepare the
meat and other products obtained from the animals shot
for sale. This would be done with the supervision and
advice of the District Commissioner Kilifi ( A management
committee is for Game Management Phase II only),.

2o The animals shot in Phase I would be those which will have
to be destroyed in the course of normal control work in
Kilifi District. The meat and products from these animals
would be marketed by the Game Warden Kilifi and the proceeds
credited to an account now being arranged by the Permanent
Secretary for Forest Development, Game and Fisheries and
the Treasury. This account could be supervised by the
District Revenue Officer Kilifi, details of revenue having
been recorded on the spot by the Game Warden in a suitable
account book.

3. Payments to the Waliangulu employed would be made as and
when funds permitted. Monthly payments would not be
guaranteed. They would also be made partly in kind
i.e. meat. The amounts paid would be subject to the
District Commissioner's agreement. Payments would be
made by the Game Warden Kilifi in the field, and recorded
in a suitable fashion. Payments would never exceed the
balance available in the account.

4. During Phase I. The Game Warden Kilifi would continue his
present duties in Kilifi and Kwale. The presence of the
anti-poaching team and several very competent Hon. Game
Wardens in Teita would lessen his responsibilities in that
District.

5, During Phase I the Game Warden Kilifi would use Departmental
transport, rifles and ammunition, and no financial burden
for these items need fall on the Game Management account.

6. The District Commissioner and Game Warden will carry out
a census of Waliangulu. Efforts will be made to devise
employment for those who are unlikely even to be used in
Game Management.

7. Phase I of Game Management will affect Professional Hunters
in no way at all.
Phase II. It will be a principle of the scheme that
Professional Hunters, or any valid Game licence holder
would be able to hunt in the area through normal channels.

8. The inception of Phase II of the Game Management Scheme will
be dependent on the success of Phase I and the funds
accumulated through it, or the immediate availability of
capital from Government or other sources such as the
Nuffield Foundation,


OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT COMr04ISSIONER,
KILIFI


28th January, 1959










CA/lW. AA/27/2/g/122.





"he Assistant Secreta (F.2 (Y



GALAA RIVER GAM AA LAtnACMM&g .

I have discussed this with Mr. Js.P.
Alsop of the Exchequer and Audit Department and also
with our senior Internal Auditor, Mr. O.H. Simpson*
We are all agreed that the accounting system must be
kept as simple as possible but nevertheless there are
certain financial Implications which necessitate the
maintenance of accurate records for control of
receipts and payments*
2. We agree that certainly for Phase I of
the scheme the control of receipts should be based on
< actual saleable products derived from animals killed
and we should disregard such things as raw meat given
to the walian ulu. Unless we do this the accounting
for wages due to the walianvlu would be somewha-t
complicated.
3. The saleable products, it would appear,
will be derived from:-
(1 elephant,
(i buffalo,
(iv leopard
and (v) lion.
Since each hunt will be under the super-vision of the
<-4l Game Warden we should rely on a return from him on
,' the lines of the attached specimen of the products
^ produced for sale. From these returns a suitable stores
01 "9 >ledger would be posted at Kllifi to record products
S/ received and their disposal. The pro-forma referred
to was drawn up by us on what we thought would be the
saleable products and it may have to be revised in
the light of technical advice.
4. The management committee would have to
fix prices at which the products may be sold and in
doing so it would no doubt seek the advice of the
Game Warden. Dried meat and fat would be sold at a
general price per pound but in respect of the other
products the price for each item would depend on its
). j-csize and quality. To avoid complicated stores aceount-
I ing records no values would be recorded but the price
/^ ^ for each item would be marked on it by affixing a
L"B^ ]label. The stores ledger would, therefore, only record
S L~fuantities.

,< ,,. #
,/,p'






I4






B. Proceeds of sales would be acknowledged by
means of e normal Government type miscellaneous receipt
which would specify:-

a the name of the purchaser,,
b the amount received,
and a the products bought (if more than one
they should be listed),

The triplica-fte copy of the receipt would then be the
Stores ledger posting medium for sales of products. All
sales should be for cash only.x ??
6. To keep the stores in order it will be necessary
from time to time to write off unsaleable items or any
which have deteriorated (e.g. old fat). The management
'committee should be the responsible authority for this.
A I\ Articles written off would be covered by a normal destruct-
I on certificate which, coupled with the authorization
From the cozmmttee, would form the posting medium for
entries in the stores ledgers.
7. A decision should be made as to there the
products will be stored and who will be responsible for
their custody. Also, it should be clearly defined tho
may effect sales and, therefore, hold receipt books. The
number of such persons should be kept to a minimum
ocaMatible with requirements.
8. The proceeds of sales and also expenditure
paid for from those proceeds will be accountable through
two special deposit accounts under the control of the
District Comaissioner. we will advise the District
Commissioner of the account numbers and descriptions to
be used as soon as we know that the scheme is to commenee.
This office will furnish the District Coomlsesioner with
statements in respect of each of these accounts for
reconciliation with his deposit ledger record in the
normal way. At the end of each year an account of revenue
and expenditure aMnd an abstract showing products in hand
will be required from the District Commissioner. As the
District Commissioner will have control of the stores and
deposit lodgers the accounts of the scheme will be subject
to audit by our own Internal Audit as well as by Exchequer
and Audit.

A 9. I would like to know whether the District
,v f Commissioner alone or in conjunction with some other person
V or persons may decide what expenditure may be incurred.
SSome form of control will be required and that control
) V should rest with the committee but subject to the over-
"\ *riding authority of the Permanent Secretary for African
^\^y.Affairs, who Is the Accounting Officer answerable for
f.} the finances and accounts of the scheme. Once the
r scheme has got going expenditure should be controlled / i
through the medium of a simple type of annual estimate,/ le /u

100 The only expenditure which the scheme will
have to meet is the wages of the wallangulu and the
expenses of preparing and selling the products from gam
\ killed. The wages should be a pro-determined cash amount
and for the first year, until revenue from the sale of
products is in hand, should be financed by a grant-in-aid.
After all thabA expenditure will produce revenue from
ivory and rhino horn and is, therefore, a legitimate
charge to the exchequer.





f--b


11. There is a contingent liability which I
consider ought to be borne in mind and that is the
possibility of claims for death or injury. In a hunt
S someone someday will be injured or killed and there
S would be a claim for compensation. In so far as the
\ Wallengulu employed on the scheme are concerned the
liability mould be covered by a Workmene Compensation
/\ Insurance Policy,

12. I have a serious criticism arising out
of paragraph 12(a) of C.M.(59) 139 (at folio 116/1 in
this file). Such a Joint scheme connotes dual res-
ponsibility and Government has just been taken to task
over the Vasey Housing Scheme for permitting dual
responsibility with resultant indecision as to who
is actually responsible for matters that have gone
wrong* The Treasury and our Accounting Officer agreed
to guard against such a situation in the future. There-
fore from the financial and accounting aspect of the
Galana scheme the Permanent Secretary for African
Affairs must be the sole authority with the management
committee and the District Commissioner acting in an
Advisory capacity.



SG. WATKINS




H. G. WATKINS
H.G. WATKIN8
CHIEF ACCOUNTANT
AFRICAN AFFAIRS.

11th Hau, 1959.


C.c. (1) Chief Accountant's file (new) for District
Commissioner, Kilifi Galana River Manage-
ment Scheme.

(ii) The Controller and Auditor General, .
P.O.Box 30084,
Nairobi (for attention Mr. J.W.P.Alsop).

(ill) Senior Internal Auditor,
Ministry of African Affairs,
Nlalrobi.


HGW/tC.




--'5


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28th March, 59


SFP.F/4/47


CONFIDENTIAL


CONFIDENTIAL
The Provincial Commissioner,
Coast Province,
MOMBASA


WALIANGULU GAME MANAGEMENT
| ..0


Ref. your SF.107/108 of 18th Maroh.1959


We have no further comments to make except for
Para. 6 of the memorandum, which appears to be the crux
of the whole argument whioh has arisen over ivory.
2. Ref. Para. 6: which states The meat and
trophies other than ivory, from the game shot (especially
elephant) would be properly marketed".
Both the Game Warden and I still consider that
Phase II cannot be run without the ivory, and we do not
wish to give up the fight to obtain it. This statement would
appear to surrender the ivory to the Treasury for at least
three years. It would also appear that in Phase II of the
scheme that Government will sit back and receive greatly
increased revenue from ivory through the use of Nuffield
Funds, which seems blatantly dishonest*


G. M. OHS L

DISTRICT COMMISSIONER,
KILIFI A

Copy to/l- he Game Warden,
/J KILIFICA

GMJH/PJrfT^ CONFIDENTIAL







Telegraphic address: "Natives" ( MINISTRY OF AFRICAN AFFAIRS,
Telephone No.: 24221 P.O. Box No. 30050
When replying please quote l NAIROBI, KENYA
No. .. AA./27/2/.2/132 .. July...-8.th......... 1959..
and date

District Commissioner,
Kilif i.


GALANA RIVER GAME BANAGET T


Would you please refer to letter No.
OW. AA/27/2/2/131 of 7th July from the Chief
Accountant, African Affairs, in which he has
set out a very simple accounting procedure for
the scheme which may now go ahead.
2. When Mir.Parker was in Nairobi recently
*I was under the impression that I would be able
to open the account with a deposit of about 100.
Unfortunately there are serious accounting
objections to this procedure and Mr.Parker will
Snow have to obtain some revenue. I suggest
that he should start with one or two elephants,
selling as much meat as he can on the local
market and arranging for the front feet and
ears to be rough cured and then forwarded to
YAr.Zimmerman,to whom he should now write and
ask how many feet and ears he is prepared to
take and at what price. I do not think
that there will be any difficulty in disposing
of these trophies at this time of the year when
there are several tourists who are prepared to
pay good prices for souvenirs of their hunting
trips If Mr.Parker will send me a copy of
his letter I will get in touch with Mr.Zimmerman.

3. I had a long discussion vith I6r.Peter
King, the Chairman of the Kenya Meat Commission,
lwho is most interested in conducting experiments
^- for turning elephants into bone and meat meal for
the stock trade, and also mentioned that he would
like to investigate the possibilities of producing
"Canned Jumbo" for the pet food trade in the
United Kingdom, which is north some 8J million
pounds per annum. I have mentioned this to the
Chief Game Warden who has agreed that Mr.Parker
should attend a meeting which I will try and
arrange with Mr.King as soon as he returns from
a business trip to Southern Rhodesia.

4. Do please keep me informed of progress
and call on me for any assistance which may be
necessary.
SbG. G.HARDY
(N .G .H/.H)Y)
for REL.rANiNT SECRETARY
c.c. J.Webster,Esq., Permanent Secretary to the
Ministry of ForestsGame and Finheries,
NAfIOBI. /
c.o. Game Warden, Kilifi./

/cm










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- '- -.x --~**-* I -- -
.4 .- -.


GAL/22g/ 78/69.



Tbi Chief Accountannt (2),
Ministry or AXrican Affairs,
p.A0. ox No.12480, /
,airobi.


2 Ist. July,


re: Galana Aver (O:au :JaangM.meat scheme .
Rei. zour 'I~o^i ^s/aIg
D"ated 7t., J4y, 19B90

Thank you very muoh for your letter under
reerence .a a b. nve discussed the arratgemiacts rs suggested
.ith tha Game .ardean, i'.llif )Istrict, and confirm that they
nrc saticfactory.





district 'Onriissiorter,
Kilifi.


coc. i'he 'rovincial uoriaLssionur,
Gonst,
7.. ^ox No. 510,


The 'ermancat cocretary to the Treasury,
*. 3ox No. 50007,


ri .'2..aa.-nt -%'.ecTtnry :tor orest .ev.ilo-nent,
'a'.-e and Fisheries,
f). Uo.3"fl27,
,_ irabi,



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'"' i. +: :o.'!1/I

3 7th ..jin.b.;.', I'19


I3. ,h; .tir t hi c I hVL. -. *n Up '' %IL a .r t L'.-1 to

where I have wt idooi. ]tm 11 "'piLch,...e o rz" ,or", thi:; is ;PLrol.j
an '..t .at,.. cost and the corroct rice of the .. ro.:'iit :.C:..co
d ^.;..,.,-.- .. hol b acc: 'tained. Li'k.i,-ao, in ItonE, 1 an'i 12,
where "II L.'ic of diosol lorr',:" is a,',,o,, it ,i,.ht ;orha,--. be
b,.inti' to -Q say just "puroLas,, of lorrg'-" ,i. ,.. only ...it-ilu.
j:UiIobto"l,%r howevery, those D "sti.iat.:-; will be called for to eui.itantia.t
L ..,l~l'ldn.;, '8 [niior.nd'iu. It should be noted tl. L'tu t.he
ond of the third ',,r t; esti oe budc 0 a suzplus of appro:.ir:attlY
^*, a v.'e.r hich is Considered an ado(,nate 1i-,r to Con.tinu the
njcoxz.-ry ca;itrl ovI.lo:.rint siti'; as wat up:licn etcc

9. -'inM.,,7 the ei it in .1the 'tiua.ut+ on which to
*.-nr.;O A oYi, -:i'L.b!,l r ,'.ic.h is vital to tioia interaEts o2'
the ichemne is tiv land unit (ti..: ,.;',h -..:*l'. :,jiv.n,, iI Unit)
and no neooti.tion ha,- yet ben undejrt:-en .:ith tl Lji iJoa'rd of
the ili African District 'Touicil to obtain thu US oi thi:- l'-nc.
It has avay. .beeon unocu::ied. wtrrloos I-n ,Jut joenotration tby.
oharcozl bwnmerio .:ith all tYe cColation *h'.ich ithey 'inL, is al:ody
b-inn::.,. I do not hin it 6.o.. 1. ,.\ly to the
ic.. Dii t .oun.cil to Qo-i z1.::u to ue the 1 -.J. withoutou t
.i-vi;-,. thf C moil azny :z"t v':-1 boii-'it, I have theFi iore,
in.cludid in h-- e..ti.,--: a i -'5 : I;15.' bei- t rent ot this
1...1, ?hi.u i a tent'-tiv-. _'i,.r ;'..'I ay o Se have to b- th-
ubj-.ct of !-.,, .i.t-in, ',it iou.i I! tlivJ.-, a f' i-W ront'

1. 2o cunL3luce, the :-xcheni3 h'.u an ense iotntil value anci 7ou.l
be a c':. l-itol;/ niov3l 1oncetion o .:.. uz.r0 CL re ;. t.lor.
-ij*-xi a now- b'OS i:--n1, it I t t t weak td totV-I-r,'' but
chouli the LS.iuta.oe ou ;^e d in "[i, :.:c'lluc'y'S rSi-.of-iiid'i. be
ra_.iIly obtu.ined, thcnre in no r!reaon h-t.vn,.' 'A it hiul "i.)l;:i to .;.Ja, to pro .. :' :-nd tto i2o.c.Jto'i t,









I'. 1* 1 -, '* 7
;.' .. ':. d.H .'I'. .r 2.'J ..
IgLIPI




/ /A /0-0
Si p~0Sn /
+~.L a i -.;r ... .. i" n. ..t] *
v '.. v a i a l C o ,- .i ,. ; ? O L2 o -" ^ ~ t i '' ." / '








DISTRICT OFFICE
P.O. Box 1, MALINDI
KENYA
24th Augst,.., 19.5 9.


Telegrams: "ADISCOM", Malindi
Telephone: Malindi 3
When replying please quote
Ref. No....A....9 9
and date

The Game Warden,
Kilifi.


GAME MANAGEMENT SCBHM PHASE 1.
REF- YOOUR ETTER O Q21-L 8.59

I will have mch pleasure in attending your
meeting on 27th August.





DISTRICT OFFICER
DGCM/SPGm. mALINDI.













S 4 a 25th August, 59
POPA/3/4/344/530 and
GA/I2L)Yl/l/


Divisional Forest ..iwf.cer,
P.O. lJox 73,
L1UL1BA3A.


L.a.' I r. in'. you tha he -mi.r grj" ient Scheme has
t;one into mL'eoct since ti:. 1st Jul, 3' and tiiat it will be
important that all concession holders in the district realise that
their concessions will not be valid within the limits of the Game
\. nen-int Area. .'.-. are in the -rocezs at the moment of -i-finrzL'
accurately the uounduries of the area and as soon as this has been
done you will be noti'iaLi.-








;. ^-;'^I'. :T C^ I'-. Iu3i i'i, 'i i


T.HLL/'U:L
il~,'I;Tl




c.c. a,. e ,,rden,al
Kilifi.













AA/27/2/2/137 | ,---- p6thJ August, 59


T:11 District CommissiLier, j


GALAI:A RIV- .-.i,.. _?T SC Z.

I am C.irected to '.-ier to letter
o.22/4/1/8/133 of the 21st August, 1959
frw',-j the e:c."ra.aient secret;.rj for .r'or'st
.- velopment, Game and '.-hris, and
si-,uld be gratufui if you -.ould, in conjunction
with your Gamie arden, supply the Chief fGame
aruei,, fanairika with the information
which he requires on t-. r. '.rketing of elephant
,.ut from the Galana .iv.r scheme.







(. /:,:: rua' )

..,r I. :.'-i.. i 2 ." 'AiRY.

Tef.No. GA: 22/1/1.
I/The Game Warden, Kilifi.
Copy above forwarded to you. Could you please
do this direct, copy to me, as you know the details.



Kilifi, f. DISTRICT COMMISSIONER.
8/9/59. (Draft by DC).








THE DISTRICT COMMISSIONER,


HOLA,

PRIVATE BAG, P.O. MALINDI.
9th ber, 1959.

The Game Warden,
P.O. Box 34, / 0 I
KILIFI.


WATTA (WASANYE) F -
REF: YOUR LETTER OF 2D SEPTEMBER 1959.
The Watta, in their complete laziness, always complain
of famine. Last year the Watta Bilissa were given free
seed, free jembes, free posho and 25 head of cattle, and
what did they do with it all?
They eat the seed, flogged the posho, complained
about the weight of the jembes, and very nearly killed
the cattle!

{ Upstream the Watta Mulile have been working hard,
and turning away from poaching, and I only wish the
Bilissa were the same.

As for "starving" the answer is no more than
usual! I suggest you harden your heart and refuse
advances.




WHT/RNK. DISTRICT COMMISSIONER,
TANA RIVER DISTRICT, HOLA.


REP: NO. GA.o22/1/61.
















ADM.1/20/99 3 1I / ovember, 59



The Permanont ."ecretanrY
Forest Devalopmaent, Game & Fisheries,
P.O. Box 30027#
N1,IRCBI.

.,ALAKA R-..V GA, ;-- j..G;."T _.,TE.

I refr .o th irt-r-.-- -ort on .h^. I of thia Scheme
s.ibm.ttod by the -e den, Kilifi en,] di-.ted 27th October, 1959.

2. It woil.- aopear that the operation of i'hlso I of this
*chewe up to date shows th, i is Justifirible to pa-.s on to
Phnse 2. Tf you 'r.re '.it' this con~cusion, I hope- that
_rnrn'nor-Ants wi be mwdP to tohi, enT as SOOn a: possible so that
thbe-e can b3 no hiatus b-.;weeyi +he two h.B.ses of tho scheme .
A...:r such hi.Ttuis voi 1,. be mooL urf'ortun..tc as 4'-. Pruker has
pointc d out because -he '-aliangulu woild lose faith in the
Scheme and in ''ovc.rnme-.t's 't3.-, ionB. Th.. ,%.ining of the
confidence of t:,e-te n opic is one of the mot important pre-
reqilsites or the Sc'.erre whi(i, without it, will- be doomed to
failure.

3. I have *eprd rnothing further on this mubject since Mr.
FPrker, the District Commirsioner, Kilifi -,nd I discussed it
with Sir Zvulyn caring et Malindi rnni I would be grateful if
yaa would therefWore serid me a pro.iress recort as soon as
possible.
D. 7. I-IALL

Ag. P0OV IRMAL OOM'-LSTIiOiR
COAST

DWH/HJF.
Copy to District Commissioner, AJllfi
The Game Warden, KilU .
/







\

telegrams: "DISTRIcTER" OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT COMMISSIONER
Telephone: 3 P.O. Box 29, KILIFI, KENYA
When replying please quote 2ndA December, ....... 19.
Ref. No. 22/ / /95/59. ..................
arid date



D.L. V. Sheldriek, Esq., M.B.ZB
P.O. Box 14,
Vundanyi, (
.0. YOI.
.S.O, Parker Esq.,
/0/ The Game *ardez (Headquarters),
Nairobi.

GALUA IB GAXE AAGM SCH .

I forward herewith a copy of a ,0%ter reference
No. 22/4/M/8 dated 21st November, 1959, which I have
received from the Ag. Permanent Secretary, Forest
Development, Game and Fisheries. I should be grateful if
you would reply direct, with a copy to this office.




knolt 1, DI CT CO SSIOR EILIFI.














flt Nabver


- n^


- C C "


f "_


The District omiLsasioner,
rruli


GLAFA 9 UM W!v & MtA:AtWI T &flE"


With regard to the easo submitted bVy me to the Treasury
abovemantioned sohes, thfe reasury have Inquired i* it is that
S yieldiAt 4,o000 lbs. of meat yields only 400 lb.. of dry meet and
ge station period of an elephant and how old it should be when it
shot.


2. The purpose of these questions
involved as, for example, if 10% of the
that as the scheme progrese elephants
ivory estimated.


on thn
an elephant
what is tihe
could be


is to consider the eoonoami factors
hard is to be called it may mean
will be shot which will not yield thi


3. 1 am sending three copies of this letter to enable Messrs. Sheldrih
and Parker to comment, if possible, without any undue delay, as I shall cleeo
these queries with the Treastury as soon as possible.


#. JTLVNSOc v


for AG. i-K-4MEiT SEC1iEA.: FOt FOMEST
DELQflib1iT, yGAM & PFISHR4


Cop to; The Provtnoial Cemmaiiomaer,


Ministry of African Affairs9
NAitOB:I.


22/4A/8


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VI


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GA. 9/26


The District Commissioner,


GALENA GAMEKilif. /AGET S
GAL.AHA GAME HAENAGEMENT SCHEME.


If you have not already read may I draw your attention to
Hansard page 338 December 9th where the Minster of Finance speaks
about Game trophy revenue.

2. Also page 339 where '-e says "If, as we believe, the first
phase is a success, then the money will be found for phase 2 to go
on and for the scheme to continue."



t, <(. VSkISTWrAM!lLEO


DGO4/SPG.
Copy to 2-
The Game Warden,
SKilifia


DISTRICT OFFICER
MAL ..D I.
















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'I1 je ye,_- s t' ',. :n:'-rounO t' :is re -iest
in 7ura .
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he a; k'nW.Gr t'ia ciori.u4 and thr art viti. roA to
tie CLi sadmae has developedd considerably.

iLOe people iriLe ested in he sc:.e az:-

1) io4y Lyal of othe o &aitedyp.aa'rri lubi

2) C. iUil a bi^ raa;ii.er of i5 o isu; interested oinly in
piecing some .onay in con jtanctioa r-trAt Pwt.,

I Gilfred Pwims.

4) an P:Aer.

5) yselef.

I .i1o0 o tioned b:c- :-C: .c-.!.'t t3+ -ialy Vitr. pxiof oarse
"Sine qu-oa'*

It is :ro'f,-lu to hoLd R jr'nce.,tcc: i, 'iro--i -..irn Ilep.nidece
on ,ec& bor 12+th on a -zat&' all u'v convew nie c to you.

',IC oi.uJCC+t of Us QnU e_-.io&- '.ill UoG to aalio :m' dr1eci e an
various Im'pects a: the pxv5.,ect, "Vw.e5.Wit iJo'triia. aw- "-irne
'o dotide *-nia' anj -se on:pi;anjiii r." e ni., to lay some ttetaule
.'-o 'evelo. ijrt..'. ''"o .locide O .'i!J io i 0 ?.~1 ,'i1%.. V-10n. R t 8+st I
a1, the L;oLIt.,;y
The .-i,7 object of01 Jotie o ere'- ,i. ill be to o-'fer to the
.ovornnwi- a naica. e dofil r' n ,rvrtr.;e il "-i of 'i'ia'i
there y be i-a ciliaptoly afterI J 'iF !Pe, nce. j.ee;. ia iJa aind tlLha









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the ,.,vemient. 'ill be ,;--v.vn to ow to 't.oI.i Jho,
co.,'idewco is .tivb.10.. t G0 to e Cou itry.

Trterv) is ,-ip.t hopo tio-t -.h rt- ms o mootbly rLd that the
leans on this 2,`5'WiAX, acre vril; be rto, inal.

'J'o le; in ,itll :..'..,I ouuts rout the uSege lGiri, e onory'lAc
Oat With Eirthe thonii t I 9eli ve teat vit: t -i:old e-ItcrpZri 3e
nv--.i-lail(-., it colAd be u'ie into 1so.et'0.'v, o -.'.- v1l,t.

!o :ese..t .i-"' coisidcr ti1i leter s ".i.'iF!e,'tl.'l

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,n--' FOR REMOTE INJECTION OF ANY LIQUID DRUG t-

SPALMER CHEMICAL & EQUIPMENT CO., INC.

KING DRIVE, R.R.4, DOUGLASVILLE, GEORGIA, U.S.A.

"CAP-CHUR" EQUIPMENT Telephone 942-4397 Area Code 404
ED" i s I' -. EP, I'rr-$d nl
J. H. "JEFF" TUCKER, Vice- President



July 23, 1963 ..



Mr. Ian Parker
Galana River Game Management Schem
0 p. O. VoI
Kenya, East Africa

Reference GRS/XXVI

Dear Mr. Parker:

As Mr. Palmer is currently in Australia, I am answering your letter
of July 3, 1963. Unfortunately, I am not personally familiar with your
problems, but I believe we have syringes which will work, particularly in
the 5/8" (63 caliber size). The needle is now set all the way through the
nose plug and is brazed to a stainless steel washer on either side of the
nose plug. This method of construction keeps the needle in the nose plug.
We will send to you a few of these nose plugs to try out.

A copy of your letter will be sent to Mr. Palmer. We expect him back
in the office in September, 1963.

If we may be of any service to you in Mr. Palmer's absence, do not
hesitate to contact us.

Very truly yours,

PALMER CHEMICAL & EQUIPMENT CO., INC.



Jeff2ey H. Tucker,
Vice President

JHT:fh

cc: Harold C. Palmer

p. s. KINDLY NOTE OUR NEW ADDRESS.





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Full Text

PAGE 1

FIG 2. S HILL; -DAKADIMAHILL \_--- \ SEASONAL DERA WATERHOLE KOROMI WATERHOLE SCHEME BOUNDARY FIG 3. ANNUAL N SCALE: I INCH.16 MILES _.-SCHEME BOUNDAR'1 RE '" '" GRASSLAND SCALE ... COMMIPHORA I INCH=16 __ __ __ __ __ -L ________

PAGE 2

\ \ \ I = w-..Q.. .. : ME. y -----= """t.l X: .:

PAGE 3

UF Smathers Libraries Special Collections Separation Sheet Type ofitem(s): photo, document,G)v, newspaper, monograph serial realia other. of item(s): Item originally filed: ON. Collection and/or Series: Box: Folder: f7 \ 1'11Item now filed in: Collection and/or Series: Box: ct> Folder: Ji. 4-OR Temporarily removed for (exhibit loan, copying, conservation, etc.): Date of removal: Removed by:

PAGE 4

___ K;/';b': 4/-7-I'iJ'"? /fisr _ K ,jUf.-eAA'l Z ft 07/ ;/__ #.' __ /ki.r t..rru 1J-.& rC7 aA -----A-. "fA: _ -----'l,f"/;/J tZ401 .. -__ le4.wl&: __ __ /I;/-ItYi-kuc;& a _____ vrr-/ /6.,. _ q-....... pfIv< &.""J'"-"-';J .,y, c.. ':";fA /1./",/ It If A../;'"" aA "-},j);J tJI{ :---iJuee.J ---r ____ tL'4-/ 1 __ _ ----------------

PAGE 5

I/J-tA-;2 JI J ?n;I'..tL -}7'-.../;-ahC-;( __ --------------------------------------------------------------------------------_._--

PAGE 6

""---\-0 V \lr' ( 4 \ s--J{ 0<> Meat G \ \ 'or""/' / \r" 4321 224 9 Intest" Heart (Less cont Liver ents) Lungs Spleen Gonads Kidne;t'ys Tusks 1326 632 43 134 11 9 25 12 52 116 9,029 1bs. AI ----Iltr.. 11bfJ ,v;'" 11f1. I f{ P \ --:i /.

PAGE 7

" ... . : \ . \ ot-,IA.L S .:A .. 5, \ \ FIG, No; 1 o L '. 3j :GAlANA SCHEME NATIONAL " '. 'PARK M t. S o-G ; 0""'10.. "Po.,j;t"o'LO.!.ists ce: : '"POR0tl10 CUI/-;Vc.../-01S @. :Gi11(Uy)Cl. (vlti VCl.t01.S : Tait4v Cvll-iva.to\.s Cho.: \c,oC(,L 5u'l.IIf.tS : G iL i a.I'l1ct. stoc..kll1eJl. 15 ----.... __ -___ !: -__ : ({,vel :Koo..J. N D I A N o G E A

PAGE 10

!l-IZCI!///U I, 1e;, J}, d ft.v .f'7 "-"-" F ft.!. C/ vv ""--...... ... /;' Gw-; /',4 til--16 /lL/J,-/-e I / v// .:.. Ibi:-, iff, /.1 I Iff (Y-4 I I / . e i{f. p,p,--II, 1:. gL v lit S" 8h'WtA f}: 4-7, v v '-' -..... --""I. ""'-J f-2{ 'J-/(. '-'-""-. v 4-7 ..... t..., , Jo6c. 05'"7 J 'c.., lA '"' .., '-L ... ""---... -r/ -s"'/ 17 /", /.{ ,.--7 d'e.o. C''5-/-(f. .;, '
PAGE 12

/(J,

PAGE 13

10? J5 ___ I

PAGE 14

1/-1-elf/ tllU b-I+L. I .l) . 1;Lr' /(J, A /jJ tf A-1. It;. A Lv Iif-. ... .... ..... ""-Ill. IY-, I; flz,J 2e: I J 1, fY I. f', r'", .' e/ P 11..4 .... /1] (y ///l$ / sl!-It;. I' ellc8 h /:1'2. "t ... {If r-. 11( "--c........ (J( '-0 .. "? '-""-'t 'L ...... "" I'!i S"? ,fA, s-!e4. IIi {?{-tJ 7 /'11 (7. 'Ie/rUt /1. r : lit-:z I;:;' It> ;"h n ... Iv-j r5 /(J /f,('? 4nJltA .. c?/ y, I {7. jiJ AIofu M A'< 1.-,<----r-'.'-e/;, teA-/. b L:A /JJ-___ A 1C{4 .-.r:,. J'i J'L :l76.{'? /1[6. r1 &;A . ,. 7k O/-fYH//K IV-I I /-Cu....' -L-'., ( ') I / t..nJlI /fI-R' jf /f'J -[JLt. II ft-r J C r-l
PAGE 16

-/ -./ j I f tI-vJh// ;If/CAl. r ;.. C&-/4 A., r __ _______ __________________ CrY-) f)2/t...J. J..... A.t /// -I. / Jr.? J, If>-fl-. 2c. .L:z-.:-I--_--+-lilf. II II? '-'-"-I {j -1Ue v f?f'o _ __ --+--.:. / _fr6.-.:....j' /f/ v tf0.R . j {J Jf /V7/-, t / / if ,11,'v-J-<... .. 6r. /jJ ,yJ ",/..!-..:/ 1--_---+_--I-__ uJ; 1-0 J. -15 /t7 bJ (/ ;t/-/'10, {If: }4/ ';A 1/1vJ. .,

PAGE 17

_ ,206 iif_ I/!/1. i'eAJi>ht.. 6./,/;;} F8'lPt'tb7; W,VI::e . : 207 ('I; I (J C -buivz >-1ft tJ J ;4--1--/;;, i-)ors -II. I 7..-cl 67 )10. bf,/1/ t If. I-J-o-rr-d/f h IV? / GaAIh' CJA /fr7J II-If} aJ/r !:;'J/.--GJA '*-aJU-ib-/ /iJ Ok 4 he II il-!4!drA.. -/fJ --Lbi4Id-; /'f (t>0 2/2. 67-/fJ.-1o f -",g. k"/, .. r e. fll'c-k.? A II? ei'7"-.J-/..jo, -_ ,fo r 21'f Pf /;1",,-A (,pi f If -/ 1/----T I ;J P rtf /J--e/1re.-J-:.. /,-J// fD 4J1,/ 'b" PJk/ (.WlV.,j-,"-. .. > Yo; f},J t:ki.e, d-Jj lutef l 4 JPl-X-ei i.lfl r-1 (/'L /iu/ all ;;{ I.? --z, r'7 ).21 (') I;;;-W ,,/4 {?7vtu-tI'/k. --k W(6%( 2kcl exe( Pjr;:/GHA. t1IItJ-0 'I 'i-Jt1:J...f7 IW I e/'l-LJ -UW I't,. III cp.-J. l(M) J..2t r cf [u/;/feJ;"1 &..-.,#

PAGE 18

2C{1f Sf

PAGE 19

tV: ). {It I ;t If. 21o bf :2'I .lr ;262. {'l (.5 (12ff 63 {3 267 {; --

PAGE 20

, ;kc/II f/li hi.1L G)[}-Li-. :Vi bl. .rR 6s '-1... ........ -:J 61 '-1/ '-<..-I --I ...-I -----+ ------I --. : r-_ I -. -I ----! I j -I .-----! -----J ---------------------I -------------. -----------I I .-. .r ----J I --_. I I --. -,-

PAGE 21

I .. / r Dear Sir RE TRANSFER Ga me Office Kilifi 2 0 /2/59. I beg to forwad my complints regarding the abeve subject lhave been working in this D epartment for along tim with defferent pepple, anddefferent please, and ihop e t ha t i w os doing well where ever But lam verr sorry to tell you that it seems to m e that lam not in goodterms with these staff here at lilifi since Iwos sent down here which Icanot explain the realy reason. Iolweys quarrel with IDne day our Coptol told me to let:him drive the vehicle with non licene and ; .lWhen. refused then he had toquarrel. Therefor Iwou1lbe glad if you could transfer me to Nairobi Aruwa66 i f not ( ischarg e) Your Obedient Servant Omar bin Alii

PAGE 22

NIGHT CLAIM ALL O W!NCE. July From Kilfi to Voi 31days out 1958 August toTa:ita 16 'f out 1958 to Voi 1 8 tout 1958 January Kilifi to Mwahera 1 6 days 1 959. it is the Folowing days which iwo& out Sir Form Kilifi to safari Driver Omar Bin Alii

PAGE 23

2 .1 f t t .. 1 1 1 f! t t 2 1 1 1.5 .1. 1 t 1 1 \ 17.1 11' to -19 1 -G .. 12. 6 -G 2 12 .00 1 1 s 11 1 r1v r 11 1'1 1 .,' "-.

PAGE 24

. . . A H, J J(tl-n I\J'." I ,. .. TA. Y, F II.. AFR I . , ,'!1PFA A.. / -. '"

PAGE 25

T e le"g ra ms: "DISTRICT ER" T e lephon e No. 3 OFFICE OF THE DISTR ICT COMMI SIONER KILlFl 20th. FEBRUARY, KENYA, .......................... I r e ply p l ease quote GA: 22/1/1/1. R ef. No .............. a nd date The Game Warden, Game Departmtnet, KILIFI. WALIANGULU GAME) MANAGEMENT SCHEME. I have read this paper with interest. It would be a help if the proposed are could be shovm superimposed on a map shewing the district boundaries. I agree that something must be done to control and stabilise the Waliangulu. The Scheme proposed is novel and assuming it can be made a viable proposition I can see that a number of teething troubles will arise. Subject to my comments below however I favour the scheme being given a trial. General. (a) No doubt you will be getting the comments of the Provincial Commissioner, the Provincial Officer and the Grazing Control Officer, Kilifi; (b) The main general I see is to get a nomadic, shy tribe to accept the discipline and "settlement" proposed. In my experience these sort of people are often like gypsies, resentful of authority however beneficent. How would you prevent "settlers" from "going walk abouts 11! ?; (c) You envisage a strict hierarchy in each settlement and it is essential to the scheme. Granted that the Wasanya are chameleons where tribal customs are concerned adopting those of their neighbours, can you tie your to any tribal structure 1. There is nothing of this in the Mijikenda groups now. It will make it much easier if your hierarchical system is not totally alien and imposed. PARTICU!.ARJ. (a) Status of Lando I do not think that all land to the north of the Galana river is Crown Land" although most is and possibly all the land you want is. For your purposes I hope it is for it would be hard to get Native Land Unit for the purpose of a game reserve; (b) Administration of a (c) Page 11. The headman should be responsible to the Officer-in Charge of the Scheme who in turn is responsible to the Committeeo The Committee should be only and will meet but occaSionally. It cannot cope with routine detail. Finance: I am afraid I cannot agree with your estimates. (i) Including passage, pension contributions and the like your two officers will cost you a good deal more than 1200 per annum; 2 -

PAGE 26

( Telegrams : "DISTRICTER" T e lephone No. 3 I n '' reply ple ase quote OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT COMMISSIONER KIUFI GA: 22/1/1/1. R ef. No .............. KENYA, ... 20th . Febr.uary. ....... 19.58 . a nd d a te (ii) (iii) ( iV) 2 -Housing 1 Lorries. A 3 ton Fordson cheap and nasty through the Supplies and Transport Department cost 817 with wooden body in 1957. No doubt it is more now. But do you need three 1. Land Rovers. The Supplies and Transport Department price up 3Oth.June, 1958 for the 88" petrol model ( the cheapest) M ombasa; (v) Running costs 1. These will be heavy over the terrain in question; (vi) Incidentals, statonery, tentage, stores etc. ( vii) I think your item for drivers clerks and labour to .pe an but this could be proved by a break down of the figures; (viii) You will need a few Game Scouts or similar as a nuclefUs for control. Copy to: The Chief Game Warden, Game Dept, Nairobi. The Provincial Commissioner, Coast Province, Mombasa. DWH/MP. DISTRICT COMMI1I01TER, KILIFI. I 11 I

PAGE 27

I } Chief Game Warden, Game Department, P.O. "Box 241, NAIRO"BI WALIAlTGULU \ 15th Maroh, v Ref. your GA.3!2!3!S of the 16th Maroh,1958 I have not seen Parker for some time and he has gone off with what I understood was my oopy of the paper on the game management scheme, although I since heard that there is not one for me at present. 2 0 My information is that the food shortage in the are a concerned is nothing exceptional, 'and the food situation in the district as a whole is good. 3. I have no funds to pay Waliangulu to c olleot bon ,es and sell them to the Veterinary Department, nor an officer to supervise such an operationo 4 If Mr. Parker thinks this is a working p ropositi o n "1 suggest that he gets a buyer into the area and let the law of sup ply and demand take its natural course. Copy to:Game Warden, P.O. Box 34, KILIFI JJRH/PJH. D. W. HALL DISTRICT COMMISSIONER, KlLIn 5 8

PAGE 28

58 41. :-) (b ., ( ) (0) I < lc t( v1 t t1

PAGE 29

(t) (g) (h) (1) (a) (b) \ tl i vc ot 10m nta bly be OE o.blo tho.t Ithe' e d be to j in moans of livo11hoQ /1 be aet'-l d in areas Jhere cUltivation is .raot:le 1e. er ide-red l' ike.ble / 0 erne

PAGE 30

I (e) DES;\ O'HAGAN 0: t c .1

PAGE 31

Telegrams : "DISTRICTER", Wundanyi, P.O Voi Telephone: Mwatate 6 When replying please quote R ef. No.GA . l!:>v ..... and d a te . 20 tho Mar-ch, .... The Garoo Warden, KILIFI(2) MANAGEMENT SCHEME. Thank you for showing me your proposed game management scheme which I read with great Interest, Such a scheme in my opinion will be the only means of safeguarding game in the future. The persons who obtain their livelihood from it will require careful management and good deal of control but if will help to reduce poaching by reportIng those who poach and thereby safeguarding their own interests. It is also the only suggestion I have seen which may make the African realise the benefit of having game. 2. Your scheme deals mainly with the Waliungulu but I believe that\it is proved successful it could be adapted to other areas and I definitely feel it should be given a trial because it might succeed and if it didn't one would be no worse off than we are now. AFHW/AFPV. Copy to:DISTRICT COMMISSIONER, TEITA. The Provincial Commissioner, Coast Province, MOMBASA.

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The Game Warden, KILIFI. DISTR ICT OFFICE MALlND!, ... .. ... ,19R?. PROPOSED G Thank you for your note of the 16th April enclosing a fopy of the scheme. 2. In general I support it, but in some points of detail I think it may have to be revised and I also think it will be necessary to go more deeply into some of the administrative, legal and financial 3. I offer the following comments on points mentioned on various pages of the scheme:Page 5. Page 6. Page 7. Page 10. It would probably be quite difficult for the organization to establish its own .factory' for converting game trophies into curios and it might be unwise to rely on this. It would, howeler, be worth trying to encourage one or possibly Akamba, to live at the administrative headquarters of the scheme, and use some of the trophies on the spot. I think it might be better to use the zone North of the Sabaki only, and avoid the problems which must arise if you try to exclude an area from the Native Land Unit. The proposed land exchange is not really acceptable since the Adu area does not seem to be capable of accepting any additional population. I have in fact already recommended action designed to reduce the population of Adu. One of the two officers detailed to administer the scheme would have to accept general responsibility for it and the other would have to be his assistant, even if in practice they divided their duties as you suggest. The charge would have responslbllltles similar to those of a Settlement Officer.

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-2 tie would require \ c1 r!cal aSSistance, and ad 6quate housIng and office accommodation would have to be provided at the beadquarters. The would have to be res ponsIble to the officer in charge rather than to the Management Commi ttee. Page 12. At the time of the annual pay-out action should be taken to collect the Personal Tax due from each participant. If the pay-out took place in January it would be easy t? assess the income for the pre V1?US year and collect the appro prIate tax. As the area of the scheme c ould not easily be served by' the Kilifi or Tana River African District Councils the participants might be allowed to form a Council of their own, and the central fund of the scheme might contribute a sum to this Council directly instead of paying it to individuals and requiring the Council to collect Rates. Page 15. I presume that a large part of the meat would be eaten by the participants. Would they be required to pay for it? Could they in fact pay for it in the first year? 4. Other points which occur to me are:(a) (b) (c) The Eastern boundary of the scheme area should be by a motorable traclc from the North bank of the Sabaki right through to the main Lamu road Link roads should be made to enable this track to be reached from Dakacha and from Adu. There should be limited facilities / subsistance agriculture at the headquarters and at the four settlements . It be desirable to appoint an elder to the Marafa African Court and give that Court jurisd iction over the whole area of the scheme. Similarly it might be desirable to give the Magistrates at Malindi jurisdiction over

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\ 3 -the whole area of the scheme. (d) Provided that action is taken on the suggestions above for the es tablishment of a special African District Council and the extension of Court jurisdictions, the fact that the area lies in two Districts may be unimportant, but it may still be better to arrange for it to be wholly included in one District. (e) It will be desirable to provide a road to the headquarters and to each of the four settlements and to provide facilities for the establishment of shops at these five places. (f) I hope that it will be possible to open up the existing road on the North bank of the Sabaki river as a tourist route between Malindi and Nairobi via the Tsavo National Park -' District Officer, Malindi. Copy to: The Provincial Commissioner, Mombasa. The Permanent Secretary for African Affairs, Nairobi. The Secretary for Forest Development, Game & Fisheries, Nairobi. The District Commissioner, Kili!i. The District Commissioner, Kipini. The Chief Game Warden, Nairobi.

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KENYA ...... Dept L ..... It. A o

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T e l e grams: hDISTRIC TER", KIPINI OFFICE OF THE DIS T RI C T @ O TANA RI VE R Wh e n r e ply i n g p lease quot e R ef. No . a nd da te '.I1he G ,ame Warden. Game Department. P.O. Box 34ts K I L I F I. .......... .. May, .... ...... ,1958.. GAME MANAGEMENT SCHEME GAL'ANA RIVER Ref: Yiour letter dated 16.4 58 As u know" my Provincial Commissioner has already commented n this proposed scheme and I am in complete agnement with his views. I welcame the idea behind it and I regard it as a step in the right direction. As a person who cannot a2ree that an animal is more important than man. this scheme seems to me to be a highly intelligent attempt ts balance the forces. At this early stage I only have three points ta make: (1) '.I1he Scheme is too enthusiastic when it comes to finance and I believe that the expenditure has been grossly underestimated. In view of the fact that the of co-operation t be expected from the African is still an unknown much more investigation is alsa needed int. the revenue side. (2) There are considerable difficulties ahead in the marrying-up f two districts into one zone and any thought (f A private empire" run by enthusiasts is to be resisted. 11be Orma rights will have to be a complete tie-up with the Provincial Administration made and a revision f L cal GOvernment responsibilities secured. 11be River African District Council has authority. over all land within the baundaries of the present administrative district. (3) I must be represented on any C ommittee which discusses any part f this district r it's peoples. WRT/.oo!. TANA RIVER DIS11RIa.R.

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Telegrams: "SCHOOLING" Telephone: When 'quote Ref. No ... and date DISTRICT EDUCAvrO OFFICE P.O. Box 42, KIL I . . . . .. .... .. 19 .... 5/ ....

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.. -i',,, -e

PAGE 39



PAGE 40

D. W. HALL I [,

PAGE 41

\ (]J I JO I I .' \ l I ) )

PAGE 42

--( ( -

PAGE 43

.-... _-, ( (

PAGE 44

( ( I 1 -) ( ( ) ) ( ) ( ( ;) -

PAGE 46

( ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ( ) ( ) 7 -

PAGE 47

( { ) ( (, .

PAGE 48

l I a

PAGE 49

(1 ( ) ( ) ( : ) l ( ) f)/ /

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( 2 (f') 1 8 ( .. er;ally t e Tsna 'niver A D C has no Co Copy to: G J:/rJB: E lluL ) : jUj,"'i dicticln i 1 the P!' OE) cd 8che1.'1 area, vide te chedule 0 1). 026 of' i 01. V I.G.WS of' Kenya (sl ... b3idi ary to the Ia.tive Authority OrdirLnce). .i.'he Int.i ve Lf.t."ld Un! t in the Tana. i intrict doe not on the scheme n..reL, l10 r does th Ul'ea include <:.i-L"'1y N u ..... 1 ve Settleme n t r s In fact, the A D .C does exercise certain !,O e r s O1XG:::':':. e the H atlvt:. Lnnd U n i t and 1 u.,,:: curr r tly n o god ... n C01.-1"esTJondcnce w j th tee m.: i s':cr..or :.'0"" Lo(; a l 07C1Y1-'1lellt on .: lE) _.oiY't. I thir. 110 iGVe).:, 'he strictly legal p o s i o n i s .... u f f'icient for the present pur .. o e c crc AG.:r av.: G A.L CO 'I en, .. :r'r .. T. ::!:. L U KI I.! D 1 I. 00C1 etd l ';Y f'or versus v n "'.,:- .u .20110, = I J:I,OBI

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( \ ( /' .Ji \ '2t/ NW: ....

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'" ,) 2 -XXLD'l.

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1 COPY. AA/27/2/II/62. MINISTRY OF AFRICAN AFFAIRS, P.O.Box 30050, NAIROBI, Kenya. 19th. November, 1958. The Provncial Commissi on, Coas t Provinoe, n I Mombasa. \(joY T (GAME MANAGEMENT) SCHEME. Would you please refer to letter No. 22/4/1/8 of t he 14th. Novembe r from the P ermanent Secre t ary for Forest Development, Game and Fisheries, on whioh I would like to comment as follows: -As a general observation I would say that the various points raised by the Professional Hunters AssOCiatio merely serve to emphasieethat they have entirely missed or ignored the principles underlying the Walliangulu Scheme, and the reasons why it is so omportant for Kenya's wild life that a pilot project be attempted. To answe r the various points raised by the Professional Hunters A ssocintion: 1) The toal. populativ n of the V'alliangulu tribe is estimated at a pp roxima tely 2,000 men women and children. The number of notorious poaohers, by which I mean leaders of poacher gangs, my not exceed 50, but e a ch gang consists of numerous fol_ owers who assist with the gensral wor k of the g ang and must therefore also b a calassified as poachers although naturally they a r e not of the same cali bre as the g ang leaders. However, it sho u l d be borne in m nd that even the ordinary members of the gangs are skill ed hun ters and bushmen, and could function quite effectively on their own if, need be. (2) Naturlly the soheme would create a precedent, and if suc cessful othe r tribes should be enc ouraged to follow suit Surely this is p r ecisely w h a t is required. If other tribes pressed for similar scheme, this could only be regarded as very healthy sign t h a t the A frican at least a ppreciates t he v alue o f wild life con s eLv ation. If the Africans can be persuaded t o exchan ' e his p resent system of indiscriminate and wasteful salaughter on a hu g e scale for c ontrolled culling under p roper European supvervision, there is at last some vestig e of h op e tha t wild life will not be entirely exterminated in many parts of Kenya. The essence of the Waliangulu Scheme is to bring the African into active partnership in game consiervatio n measures. Without the co-operation of the A frican there is no long-term ho p e either for the or the European professional hunter. If only the professional hunters would realise that schemes along these lines a r e very muoh in own interests. At the moment game is out of existence in many so-called hunting a reas, and if this process is allowed to continue indefinitely there nothing left for the professional white hunter or professional black poacher.

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i e -2 On the other hand, if the Scheme is successful, I can see n o reason why the Waliangulu themselves should not invite theprofessional hunters to hunt in the area, providing licence fees, meat, and so on go towards the scheme. But in my view the inviatation must come from the Waliangulu themselves. If they are cempe:t.teacom.pelled to al. low hunters into the area against their will, they may well regard "Gh'3 scheme merely as a camouflage for establishing European interests in the region. (3) I f act 1 t h e biggest tusk'Jrs are reputed to in habit the Marsabit reglon. However, there are undoubtedly big eleph,-.ants in the area prorosed for thepilot game management scheme, "because the area lies !.thvTari the principal elephant mi gratory route i n Kenya, extending from the hinterland northwest of Lamu down to and beyond the Tanganyika border. (4) This statement is entirely misleading and inaccurate. Elephants migrate in and out of the region and breed along the length of the migratory route. The r e is no recognised elephant breeding ground. Other species also are known to breed there. N o area, not even a Nati.nnal Park, can be r agarded as a selfcontained" area. The majority of s pecies of wild animals constantly move in and out of any region y ou care to name. (5) Again this statement is inaccurate. small n umber of detribalised .e..liangn.lu have associated themselves with the Giriaman and possibly otho;;r tri-IJes in the Coast Province, and have culti ted shambas in Giriama country, but it shouldbe emphasized that the a A e proposed for the game mana g ement scheme is entirely unsuited for agricultural development in the normally accepted sensef except along thebanks of the Galana and Tana Rivers. The form of land usag e for this semi-desert co untry is quite definitely not cultivation. apart from this, the majority of the Waliangulu tribesmen w o vId be unable or unwilling to adopt a qf life basea. 0n al:,Ticulture. I belive that a ttempts to start agricul -tura l schemes were made in the past, but were entirely unsuccessfuli The Coast Province Administration should be able to provide full infomation on this subject. (6) This merely emphasizes that the pfofessional hunters have failed to gra.sp the unde rlying principles of the game scheme. These can be summarised as follows: ( a ) BaSically the scheme amounts to a system of crvpping wi l d animals on a sustamned yield basi s in areas where the land is unsuited t o normally accepted methods of animal husban dry. In other words it i s a new approach to the quetion of prOGeill production in rugiousn where domestic livestock will not thrive. It is my contention that the production of protein per acre will be far higher under this system than under scrub cattle; (b) of domestic livestock in this semi-desert tYi-e of country w o nld inevi tal1ly lea d to large scale dessication of soil and vegetation, whareas under Wild fauna the habitat would be p r eserved. A system of Game Managemen t would, therefore, be the most suitable fr.m of land used for this type of country. (0) The proposed scheme will go a long wa y towards the co-operation of the African in the co nservation of wild life, without which there is little hope for long term wild life in areas outside established National Parks. 3 -

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-3 -(dO If successful, the scheme will prove the enonomic value of wild animals a n d will thus strengthen the c ase for their retention in many parts of Kenya outside Natiunal Parks. (e) Through obtaining the active coO-operation of the Walliangulu,poaching will be considerably reduced, if not entirely eliminated, in the Game Management zone. ( f ) The scheme also has consierable sociological signif1 -cance. It wilk enable tribesmen who have long been a thorn in the side of the Administratio n to tak e. up useful and profitable employment, based on their tradional way of life, in a region wher e no legal employment previously existed. Such a scheme will undoubtedly ha-re a very lllar.n:ed and beneficial effect on African opinion (7) Again, the professi onal have completely dis-torted the main object of the excecise. This is not. as they suggest, to kill game, bat the c onselvatio n of natural reSOllrCeS through proper land usage. (8) Some of the game meat d erived f rom the Game N n age-ment Scheme will be consumed by the on the spot. The remainder will be dried and sold as biltong. It is fallacious and ridiculous to sugoest that the sale of biltong will affect the Colony's offtak e of scrub cattle. (9) Finally, may I the resolution paosed at the recent I.U.C.N Confe rence in Athens, whic h drafted by Dr. Fraser+Darling, and which is a first rate summary of the adve.ntages of the 1 .vri tten by a distinghished world authority on the subject: "This A s sembly of the I.UNC N notes with approval the pilot Game Mana.gement Scheme being pla_med for the tribe in Kenya whvreby the economic welfare and cultural patte of the t ribe v7ill be sustained, andrecords its full support of this attempJtj to s how that protein prOduction is possibly by game mana g ement from areas of low o r non-existent agricultural value. The scheme pro1ndes an o pportunity of obtaining -valuable scientific and sociological data on this form of land use". (S gd) Hardy for PERMANENT SECRETARY FOR AFRICAN AFFAIRS.

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--} .. I GA. 2 2 /1/1/47/58 3rd December The Provincial COmmissioner Coast Province, MO ffiASA (2) GAME MAHAGEMENT : VI ALI _UA".I SETTLEMENT SOHEME Ref the Permanent Secretary for Forest Development, Game and Fisheries letters 22/4/178 of 14/11/58 addressed to the Chief Game Varden, copied to you, and 22/4/1/8 of 18/11/58 ad essed to you 58 r find it difficult to understand the complete 'volte face' expressed in the Permanent Secretary for Forest Development, Game and isheries letter. In his letter 22/ 4 /11 8 of 19th September 1958 para.3 he suggested that a pilot scheme be instituted under the Game a.rden Kilifi with the assistance of the Administration 2 You approved of his proposition (ref.your ADM.1/20/54 of 27/10/58) and I have since to the COmmissioner for Local Government for his advice reference accounting, and have also put the plan to the District Council who gave their unanimous approval to it. 3 o-il receiving your approval the Ministry for Forest Development Game and Fishereies approached the Treasury for permission to start the funds on the proceeds of elephant sho-Ii on control at the coast. The Treasury agreed to the sale of meat, but not ivory. However their i s ofno consequence and the ap roach by the Ministry was unnecessary, as Sec.14( 2) of the V ild Animals Protection Ordinance (No.18 of 1951) states :UA Game arden' s Permit shall be subject to whatever conditions the Game Warden may impose in his absolute discretion". The elephant, naturally, ould be shot on a Game Warden f s Permit. Further to the Treasury' s ruling, there is no difference i n principle in selling meat to the selling of ivory to start the scheme I would maintain legally the have no jurisdiction in the matter at all4 4 The scheme is a Ga.lD.e Conservation Measure The first and forem.ost object is the survival of wild animals" That the scheme offers a very practicable solution to the civilization of the Waliangulu i s purely incidental though very fortunat e The term "V'laliangulu Scheme" is not correct though it has inadvertently been applied to -the Galara River Game Management S cheme sinco -I:;he latters inception. How can an Administrative supervise -the hunting, know what to hunt; when to hunt it, and how to treat t h e products etc. ? A Game laanagement Scheme must be run by a s pecialist in that field. Should the of Forest s Game and F i s heries refu s e t o accept the responsi bili t y of the scheme, then the Game Warde n Kilif i should be secon ded t o the Administration for the task. He is quite willing to do thi s to get the scheme go i ng 5. The White Hunters pOints i n the Permanent Se cretary' s letter 2 2 / 4/1/8 of 14/11/ 58 are all easily N o ne o f the three White Hunters who saw the TiIil'listq had read the Game Management Schemeo Vnute Hunters i n general qppose t h e s c h eme o n two misapprehensi ons : (i) That they are to be refused admi ttance to the scheme are a : (ii) That it i s a scheme especially desi gne d 2for the T

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.'.' ./ --. 2 -(ii) Africans. Neither could be from the truth. Professional Hunters would not be excluded from the Again the scheme is such that the poor African has a place in it thPough this is incidental, The scheme was not designed to appease the Africans. 6t' I feel that when next the' delegation of hunters see the Minister for Forest Development Game and Fisheries, the Game Warden filii! and Mr. David Sheldrick or Mr. Noel Simon should be present, it be possible to arrange this? 7. I attach herewith Parker's answers to the questions posed by the White Hunters Association. 8. Finally I would like to reiterate that I am very keen to start a small pilot scheme under the Game Warden lCilifi with all possible help from the Administration ,; .. DISTRICT KILIFI COblY to : v/'The Game Warden, KILIFI ENOL: GMJH!PJH.

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) ( )

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(' t I I .. < G ... -0' c .c: The an I ) J oJ. c inictry of' u1Ii 0 ur n iet C o iooioner (13 t:ci.ct 1c r GAN

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! / / ..::. . Ref.No. GA. 22/1/1 / 5 2A. 11a r d en, Ki1ifi. ( Copy a b ove forwarded to you for inf orm ation. KILIFI, 2nd January, 1959 .

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T eleg ram s : DISTRICTER T e l e p h one: 3 OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT COMMISSIONER P O Box 29, KlLIFI, KENYA When r e plying p l e ase quot e .. 12th ... . .. 19.59. R ef. N o. .. 22/1/l/54. an d d a l e The Game Warden, Game Dept, Kilifi. GAME MAlTAGEMENT SCHEME : W ALIANGULU. I enclose herewith a copy o f a letter Ref 22/4/1/8 dated 8th. January, 1959, together with a copy of the draft s c heme for game mana g ement in the Galana River area of the Kilifi District, whi c h I have received from the Permanent Secreta r y Ministry for Forest Development, Game and Fisheries, for your information and any comment that you ,"{la y wish to make. 2. Kindly return the enclosure since this has to be returned to the [inistry concerned. Encls: 2.

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Telegrams : "DISTRICTER" T elep hone: 3 OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT COMMISSIONER P .O. Box 29, KILIFI, KENYA When reply ing please quote .... .. ,., 19 . .59. CER. 2/3/45. R ef. No ................. . and date The G ame Warden, Game Dept, KILIFI. M I N IST ER'S VISIT. The Minister for Forest Development, Game and Fisheries, is visiting Kilifi on Thursday, 29th. January, 1959. I shall be grateful if you will arrange to be in the boma on that day so that we can discuss the Game Manag e ment Schem e with him G MJH/MP

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... tt '$:....:... ...... GA. 2 2 / 1 / 1 /56 26th January, ( The Commissioner. Coast Province, PlIOThTI3ASA GAIaE r AGEMEIiT SCHEME WALIANGULU Ref 22/4/1/8 of 8/1/1959 from the Permanent uecretary for Forest Development, Game and Fisheries ad essed to met copied to you.. r forward herewith one of the area in w'hich Phase One will take place, and our redraft of the rules embodyicertain suggestions. 2 With reference to the second paragraph of the Pernanent Secretary' s letter those Waliangu1u who cannot be employed in Phase One have to wh re they are today It is envisaged that 50 oan 'be employed in Phase One and the remaining 100 must wait U11til Phase Two i s 1 m tiated. 3 I would lize to record that I hope the Permanent Secretary will be able to arrange a really simple form of accounting with the Treasury, since anything complicated ,auld be impossible to manage ElITCLS: G .. JrJH/ PJH Copy to : .. he Game Warden KILIFI I' I f tI', t.. , .J DISTRICT cm SSImffiR KILI!I 5 9

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, -n' GAME MANAGEMENT COAST PROVINCE PHASE I 10 The Game Warden Kilifi will continue normal control measures in Kilifi District. However, at the same time certain Waliangulu would be employed to prepare the meat and other products obtained from the animals shot for sale. This would be done with the supervision and advice of the District Commissioner Kilifi ( A management co mmittee i s for Game Management Phase II only)o 20 The animals shot in Phase I would be those which will have to be destroyed in the course of normal control work in Kilifi Districto The meat and products from these animals would be marketed b y the Game Warden Kilifi and the proceeds credited to a n account now being arranged by the Permanent S e cret a r y for Forest Develop ment, Game and F isheries and the Treasury. This account could be supervised by the District Revenue Officer Kilifi, de t ails of revenue having been recorded o n the spot by the Game Warden i n a suitable accou:.r'lt book. 3. Payments to t he Waliangulu employed would be made as and whe n funds permitted. Monthly payments would not be guaranteed They would also be made p artly i n k ind meat. The amounts paid would be s ubject to the District Commissioner's P ayments would be made by the Game Ward e n Kilifi i n the field, and recorded i n a suitable fashion Payments never exceed the balance a v ailable i n the accounto 4. Dur ing Phase I. The Game Warden Kilifi would continue his present duties in Kilifi and Kwale. The presence of the antip o aching team and several very competent Honq Game Wardens i n Te ita would lessen his responsibilities in tha t Districto 5. During PhaooI the Game Warden Kilifi would use Departmental transport, rifles and ammunition, and no financial burden for these items need fallon the Game Management accountq 60 Th e D istrict Commissioner and Game Warden will carry Olit a census of Waliangulu. Efforts will be made to devise employment for those who are unlikely even to be u sed in Game Management. 7. Phase I of Game Management will affect Professional Hunters i n no way at all. Phase II. It will be a prinCiple of the scheme that Professional Hunters, or any valid Game licence holder vlould be abl e to hunt i n the area through normal channels. 8. The inception of Phase II of the Game Manag e ment Sc hem e will be dependent on the success of Phase I and the funds through it, or the immediate availability of c apital from Governmen t or othe r sources such as the Nuffield Foundationo OFFICE O F THE DISTRICT COWdISSIONER, KILIFI 28th January, 1959

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7 1 fI' '7/ cAl m r / { 'Ph ssistant I have discuss d this with Mr. J / P Alnop 01' th Exchequ rand Aud.1 t Depal .. tment and also ''lith C nior Int mal uditor, Mr O B Simpson. e e.1' all d th t tb ncc Junting system must be IteJ;lt as simp 0 a.s possible but neVGPtheles th
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I: / -2 5. I r'oaoeds of salas ,ould be aemo 1e ad b meano of a norm 1 Government type misoellaneous reoe1pt ,hlah the rome oi' the pure laser. the amount r caived, the products bou It (1f more t an one they should be Listed). Th trlplice.-te oJ'S oi' the l"eeeipt '/ould than be t_le stores ledge" postin, fo .... aJ.oo of PIO uot. All so.1e should be i'or c ah only.){ 6 mo keep the stores in order it 1111 be ncae sa rrom time to time to vrite off unsaleable items or any Which have deter10rated ( e old fat). uanagoment [ eooml ttee should be the responsible authori ty for th1 \-Articles wrl tten off' lould bo covered by t normal destruct, ion cert. fic te v1hich coupled v:i. ththe authorisation (from the co:'m tteet oul<.l '<:Orr:l the ponting mcdiUt1 for entries in the stores Ie -era. 7 A deci si on should b t de as to here t."'e prod:!ctc 11 be stored and 1ho "!ill be for their custody. lao, it ho l'" be clearly defined 0 may sand, thereore, hold ruoelpt books. The number of suc p reons b kept to minimum comp .:.. le th rer;uire ants. 8 filhe proc ada 0 sales and alGa paid for :trom proc ads 11 be account<.ble throll.h t 0 spec! 1 e oeit accounts under the control of the District GOJillBissloner . 11 advise the District sioner of the C.count'l mbers and "escrintions to be used as soon as e mo that the scheme is to cO ence. _his office "111 furnish the District Commissioner' i th statements in res ect of of these reconciliation '1th hie ooit ledger record in the normal "lay. .: t the en of each year an ac ount of' revenue and expenM ture and on bstr ct 1 o"/ing products in hand will be required fro the District Oommissioner. s the Distric t Col:lIll1.osioner ill ha.ve control of' the stores ana deposit 10 e1' the account of the scheme ill be to sua t by our om Inte!'1'Ul.l.u t as "Jell 0 b xchea c and Audit. 9 '.ould like to kno I the District t--00 i cioner lone or in conjunotlon lVi th BOL10 oth'r orson ""-J or persons ooy decide 111at e}..-;)endi may be inc rl"'ed r /0 orne form of' oontrol :7111 be required and that control n ).-0 shou1.d 1 th the cOLtmi t;tco but. subject to the o v e V-J'\. v a thor! ty of' the "erm"nent .... y i'or Ai'rican /.')!\)YAffEJ..i:.rS. thO is the Accountin O.Lficer anSrler ble for \" Jf' . . the finanoes and cconts of the scheme Once the J scheme has got going expendi turo shoul d be controlled Y Iii throu the medium of a simple type of' annusl es+imate. No -:;:::;== 10. The only expend! tura Which tl e "oheme will to meet i s the "'ages of the and the expenses of preparln and sell i n the _10m gamo \ l"..il1ed The 1&g6S shoul d be a pre-determiIl .d oaeh amount o/\) and for tIle :first year, until r>evenue from the sale of produc t is in hand, should bo nano-d by n After all thaA expend! ture -lil1 'produoe revenue i'rom iVOry and rhino h o m and is, .. herof()re, a legitImate ch rge to thO excheouor.

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I ) 11 There is contingent 1i bi11ty I conaJ.dep ou t to be borne in mind and that is the pOGsibi11 ty of' 01 1 for death or j.njury. In a hunt someone omcday dll be injured or killed and there be a claim for compensat10n. In 80 far as the aliangulu employed on the scheme arc concer.ned the liabil1't7 uld be co-vered by a workmens Compensation Insurance Policy. 12. I hav 8 rious crt tic ism arising out p ra rnph 12(a) C (59) 139 (at folio 116 / 1 in t e file). Such a joint scheme connote dual respon ibillty and over.nment has just been taken to task over t e V sey Housi Scheme for permitting dual responsibJ.llty rrith resultant indecision as to ho is actu l1y rcsponsibl for mat t rs that have wrong. The Treasury and our Accountin Of'fic r to gu rd ag in t sue si tu tion in the future. Therefore f om the financial and accauntine aspeot o f the Galan Scheme tb nt S cretary for frican Aff irs at b the sole authority ith the management co ttee and the i tric corn issioner acting i n an advisory capacity. c c (i) C of Account nt' s file (ne ) for District Commissioner, i1if1 Galana iver -mont l':toheme. (ii) T e qontrol1e1" and uditor Gener 1, P O. Box '70084 ------airobi -(for att ntion r. J.W. P A1S0p) (ii1 ) enior Internal Auditor, of African Affairs !iairobi. HOI/LC.

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. .. D l,SCRIP1.'ION' OF AND!AL WJMBER IllCATIOI'f '." 11 ........ .................... 11 ,'" .. Dfi! F:RaJ TO lOS I -Dat .... ................ --

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).

PAGE 70

( \ .\

PAGE 71

/ I t. S F F / 4 /47 co CONFIDENTIAL The Provincial Commissioner, Coast Province, MOMBASA ENTiAL WALIANGULU GAME NAGENIENT SCHOO 28th March, Ref. your SF.I07/108 of 18th March, 1 959 We have no further comments to make except for Para. 6 of the memorandum, which appears to be the crux of the whole argument which has arisen over ivory. 2. Ref Para. 6: which states rt The meat and trophiest other than ivoFi' from the game shot (especially elephant) would be proper y marketedu Both the Game arden and I still consider that Phase II cannot be run without the ivory, and we do not 59 wish to give up the fight to obtain it. This statement would appear to surrender the ivory to the Treasury for at least three years. It would also appear that in Phase II o the scheme that Government dll sit back and receive greatly increased revenue from ivory through the use of Nuffield Funds, which seems blatantly dishonest. G. M. JOHNSON.! Lt DISTRICT CO KILIFI Copy he Game KILIFI arden, GMJH/ P F E T At SSIONER, )

PAGE 72

Telegraphic address : "Natives" Telephone No. : 24221 MINISTRY OF AFRICAN AFFAIRS, P.O. Box No. 30050 NAIROBI, KENYA When replying please quote No ....... 7./2/.2/.1.32 f.. ... . t ........ 19SJ .. and date -District Commissioner Kilifi. ould $OU please reer to letter No. o l. A/27/2/2/131 of 7th July from the Chief Accountant, African ffairs, in which he has sat out n very aim Ie accounting for the scheme hich may go ahead. 2 en r arker ss in Fairobi rece 'J.tly I "/as under the impreC! :.Lon that I would be able to open the ccount ith a de oBit of .bout Unfortun tely 't' ar. erious a.ccounting ob jections -GO t i J procedure and r Parker w ill no "I have to obta..i. some revenue. I suggest that he should start ith one or tlO elephants, selling as much meat as he can on the local market and arr nging for the front feet and to be rough cured nd then to I r Zimmerman to hom he hould no rite and 1 10 many feet and ears he is repared to nd a hat I do not think that there ill be any difficulty in dis osing of these trophies at this time of the year hen there are several tourist 10 are I,rep ed to pay goo rices for C!ouvenirs .of their huntir.g trips! If arker ill send me a co y of his letter I ill get in touch ii th Zj.mmerman. 3 I had a _ong di cussion iIi th L Peter King, the Ch irrnan of the Kenya eat Commission ho is most interestGd in conducting experiments for tvrning elephants into bone and meat meal for the stock trade, and also mentioned that he like to investigate the possibilities of roducing "Canned Jumbo for the pet food tr de in the United Kingdom 'hich is orth some million pounds per annum I have mentioned this to "he Chief Game arden ho has agreed ,hat Ir. arker should attend a me ting ich I {ill -try and arr nge ith x .King C'! soon as he returl1G from a trip to Southern ho oSia. 4 Do keen me informed of rc ess d call ')n me for any a sistance '/hich may be necessa BJ" G. c c J ebster,E q., Socretary t the of 'Drest ,Game nd Fisheries, n OBI o c Game ilifi. lent

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JUl20 1959 .. I .ll' 1'1 '.

PAGE 74

1.1./22/1/11..7 t1 9 ';b.e <.;h 0'" !LCCOtlr'ltnn t : inist r.v t l"ric n ::r lira ) Jo.{ o' 124 n iT ...... 001 11." .. ... ,0'1 t ..... a July, n 1 t "1' t. ..;J, .;a ... 1. i' l11fl. c .. c. to ttl T usury / / 59 a e.., od t .. cy

PAGE 75

I' C, I ( ) ( )

PAGE 76

(' ;C-/f r 6 0 A "-. .-6 S'o { /0" (; to 0 Ie 30 If."'s-(.<. II Ul) jJk /!3u / I 0 (J (0 l. 1..$ (; -fi-I j.. Ao .... 6, (., I /s"',;4-r.: /.-D ? tfccw. / 1 -0 ... 10 f 1? 2'XI5/t1,{ r_ I (.( t:tl' \ .. \ /

PAGE 77

/. 22/ /1 -2 -7th pt m r, ( ) n ( ) ( \

PAGE 78

( , / '. "..-1 \ G 22/1/1 -3It} ember, 1959 8 Th astirat' toa \Vh c h' v C1.rClim up and hi 11 n", to thi, memo:' dum, b n ha.stily dram e.nd n od tidyina 0 g whor 1. 1a.v. put clor It m 11 "puroh oe of oro. rtf th1" is mol' -ly an ntima ci c at an h oorl"'oct price of th nppropri,.t IJractor ani ora.) r s1 oulet bu <.l certained L kewj.oo, in Iter.tn land 12, "l)\lroluwe of diosel lorry" ill ahoYil1, j. t 1: ie}lt }erht: pa be t 1I :r to say juat "purcha.so of lOrI'".ftl But theso arc:: only 'eta1lo Ul d :btodly hO'l"1 val', thoae oGtimatefJ "11 be cal10d '!or to s'ibstantiata His UlCoollency 6 It ahould bo lloted that attor Jlih ond of tho third year the oatinatcs bud at for a surlllull of p rox.1 ately 5 00 a year .hien is conaid r d an o.do,!uate figure to continu th neo asar,y canital day 10 ent ouch 8S water supplies etc. 9 !ina11y ther mlO itom in th estimate, on _thich to c nt. A onsiuerabl 1 ell is v:" tal to th interasto of thl') chomo 1Q nativ 1 d "t (the north yU"a !1a.tiv l,ar>.d Unit) and no no otiation has yot 00 n undort. can Ii th tho Land Board f th i J, frioaJ1 Ili tl'ict Counoil to obtain the us of thiB lond. It hilS al myo JOon unocupiecl, atarleoG land but ponctration "y cht.;,:,coal l.d ... ""l10r i th 11 th sola. '. hioh they hri g, is a.u a.y beginni.. I do not "hink 1 t 0 (1 bright T (-troly to aak t f'rlc n 10t Council to a 1 th scheme to usa the 11l.d i thout givin th C unoil any t x'i 1 neN:'.;. I lUl.ve, therefore, includod in th 0 ti tOB 0 1500 boing th la. d is tent .. v and rr.a;y of course huvs to sub" ot 'ion, but I think, a fair nt. DIS? tIC"" CO BR KILIJt'I .ard n ) ... ovinc 1 Co ili sian r (for info tion

PAGE 79

\ Telegrams: "ADISCOM", Malindi Telephone: Malindi 3 When replying pl ease quote DISTRICT OFFICE P.O. Box I, MAUND! XENYA Ref. No ... . .. . 19. pee I and date The Game Warden, Kilifi. GAME MANAGEMENT SCHEME -PHASE 1. REF. YOUR LETTER OF 21 8.59 I will have much pleasure in attending your meeting on 27th August. OOCW'SFG. DISTRICT OFFICER MALINDI.

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\ I r FOR/13/4/344/59 and GA/22/1/1/ Divisional Forest Office P O Box 713, 01lBASA 25th August, ay I re\.ind you thai; a e "anu.gement Scheme has gone into effect sine the 1st July, ) 95;, 3..10. .... tit will be important that all c3nc9ssion holders in the district realise that thei:!' concessions iill not -De valid within the limits of the Game anagement Area W e are in the process at the moment of defining accurately the ooundaries o f the area and as soon as this has been done you oe notified. c c Garee \' arden, ./ Kilifi. _I>JTRICT CO USSIOlI ':.R KILn'I 59

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\ 'I, 1 AA/27/2/2/137 T ) istrict COIl.rnissioner, I am. airected to refer to letter 0 .22/4/1/8/133 of the 1st ugust, 1959 from the ..!erruanent uclcret ry for .rorest velopment, Game and and sh uld be 6r&teful if ou would, in conjunction ./i tb. Jour Game araen, supply the Chief Game arden, ... arganyika 'Nith t e information he requir s on -:he m rKetint: of elephant at from th Galana iver 0cheme. (.. G. Hardy) kef.No. GA: 22/1/1. V 1he Game Warden, Kilifi. Copy above forwarded to you. Could yon please do this direct, copy to me, as you know the details. Kilifi, 8/9/59. f. DISTRTCT COMMISSIONER. (Draft by DC). u 5 9

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( \ REF: NO. GA.22/1/61. The Game Warden, P.O. Box 34, KILIFI. THE DISTRICT COMMISSIONER, HOLA, PRIVATE BAG, P.O. MALINDI. 1959. WATTA F REF: YOUR LET ER OF 2ND SEPTEMBER 1959. The Watta, in their complete lazinessp always complain of famine. Last year the Watta Bilissa were given free seed, free jembes, free posho and 25 head of cattle, and what did they do with it all? They eat the seed, flogged the posho, complained about the weight of the jembes, and very nearly killed the cattle! Upstream the Watta MUlile have been working hard, and turning away from poaching, and I only wish the Bilissa were the same. As for "starving" the answer is no more than usual! I suggest you harden your heart and refuse advances. WHT/RNK. DISTRICT COMMISSIONER, TANA RIVER DISTRICT, HOLA.

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I ADM 1/20/99 The S ecretar."J .rr'" '70 en'" S the!' C',.11 bs no 3rd November I of chem.e 27th October 1959. J.r .y:::>l lhi+u.s iO1 '>e o .... i.uforb.i.,.-r. as Hr.. Pr1Xkcrhas" po;_nt.cd.
PAGE 84

' J."elegrams : "DISTRICTER" Telephone: 3 OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT C O MMISSIONER P.O Box 29, KILlFI, KpNY A Whe n replying please quote 2nd December, 59. ......................... .. 19 .... GA. Ref N o .................. an d d a t e D.L. W. Sheldrick, Esq., M.B.E., P,O. Box 14, Wundanyi, P.O. VOl. l .S.Ce Parker, Esq.,. The Game Warden (Headquarters), Nairobi. GALANA RIVER GAME MANAGEMENT SCHEME. I forward herewith a copy of a letter reference No. d ated 21st Nov mber, 1959, whioh I have from the Permanent Secretary, Forest Development, Game and Fisheries. I should be grateful if you would reply direct, with a copy to thi8 office. Encl: 1. CT KILIFI.

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f ( \. ( 1 1 \ 22/4I1/g T"" Off CE. 3. re. Shaldrieh I clear :;. r' ENS Ministry ot Atria 1

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-{\{ ----

PAGE 87

GA. 9 /26 The District C O mmissioner Kilifi. If you have not already read may I drmf your attention t o Hansard page 338 December 9th where the l1inster of Finan c e speaks about Game tro phy revenue 2. Also page 339 ,mere h e says "If as \ole beli eve the first phase is a success then the money 'fill be found for phase 2 to g o on and fo r the a c he e to continue DGCl-f/SPG. C o py to : / The Game Warden, 11(('-b. (;. DISTRICT OFFICER MALI IDI. 9.

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/ t ) { .1//.10 ic \ 0 D' o Teas, ...... .I. '0 ,. $ 4 t. ,. t c his .7ill as G. \ L 5' D '"

PAGE 89

" x 50. i I t 1 ./ :1 i. Oil ( ... / 2

PAGE 90

l r 2 the GOvel ant _-1111 bo very 1 to 0'1 to the w:cld. hO't-r to the Countr,y. T sz is ere:i; hopa t t all "0 tbly ld th t the Ie e 0 thi 2 500 . ac_ '1111 be nominal .. c o Ie it could 1)9 co dcr thi letter cokuide ,.,1. mo i.s typil'J.g t.hi Ue I t yo/.\ 0.' e t ful if YOil oou1 d po tit c

PAGE 91

22/1/1/9 /59 8th D cem1er, 1959. G o on r e) \ /!V i .. asio o. 1 0 .... 1959/60 It 01 ;.cy or nyc" ., on 6 (V) j' \. \

PAGE 92

\ \ t ( 2 -(Th tu 1 th 356 I t t t but t t ']' lID c c 42 16 2 II o

PAGE 93

A ....... .x-s b A-L JOINT SERVICES STAeOLLECE LATIMER CHESHAM BUCKS TEL. LITTLE CHALFONT 2761 !3. -t .... "-4 ,---< / t.. cvN"'-1""'-1' k .. F.:... / 1.-"'1r c,.. u-'-'-I 0

PAGE 94

2-, e. -__ -
PAGE 95

JOINT SERVICES STeCOLLECE LATIMER CHESHAM BUCKS TEL. LITTLE CHALFONT 2761 l-v.""It-"(J-t--w_ "6-_ -c.. .1... J -. ... '1-J-..., c h ,JU. I..:...J, -t '---,

PAGE 96

... __ Jk., S .. U-,," ___ l t...u.. t...:-.. -'-J <1' ..u" .... j "" -'-__ It. _.!o' ..lh IV'\... --.b -... 6-c........ J:,.,.. ........ --<.L 1 .... ILc... t--",g-S 1"''' .... -.. ... :::\ .b. f;II<... N....... '1 ........ CO> -lkM-It. 6-""'0 .........

PAGE 97

F O R REMOTE INJECTION OF ANY LIQUID DRUG I .. PALMER CHEMICAL & EQUIPMENT CO ./INC. CD KING D R I VE, R. R.4, DOUGLASVILLE, GEORGIA, U S A. "CAP -CHUR" EQUIPMENT T e l e p h on e 942-4397 -Area Code 404 H. C. RED PALMER, P r esi d e nt J. H. "JEFF" TUCKER, VicePresident July 23, 1963 "...-:1'.,. Mr. Ian Parker Galana River Game Management Schem P. O. Val Kenya, East Africa Reference G RS /XXV 1 Dear Mr. Parker: As Mr. Palmer is currently in Australia, I am answering your letter of July 3, 1963. Unfortunately, I am not personally familiar with your problems, but I believe we hav e syringes which will work, particularly in the 5/8 (63 caliber size). The needle is now set all the way through the nose plug and is brazed to a stainless steel washer on either side of the nose plug. This method of construction keeps the needle in the nose plug. We will send to you a few of these nose plugs to tryout. A copy of your letter will be sent to Mr. Palmer. We expect him back in the office in September, 1963. If we may be of any service to you in Mr. Palmer's absence, do not hesitate to contact us. Very truly yours, PALMER CHEMICAL & EQUIPMENT CO. J INC. Vice President JHT:fh cc: Harold C. Palmer p. s. KINDL Y NOTE OUR NEW ADDRESS. '. 0 (be-(8UR F=

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': Telephone : .-, BARNET 7421 (6 lines) : -)(, .1L< r-'Ik ..,:JA c:r "f--.sw-k "\l:: v, O\,J. th. r-u-e -'--"1 . .' . . .

PAGE 100

Telephone : BARNET 7421 (6 lines) 13atnet Barnet Group Hospital Management Committee !June(-, u..r Wit CALJ U '< 11 C4 (s....d... Cr1<)rlh c\.Y V, a.. 0'\.. '" &l. ct::. (). -A. t" f:;-

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.. Telephone : BARNET 7421 (6 lines) llarnet @eneraI J)os:spital Barne! Group Hospital Management Committee !JJcund

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12, HYDE PARK PLACE, LONDON, W 2.

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12, HYDE PARK PLACE, LONDON, W 2 AMBASSADOR 9756. bl-\;. r...J "" f.. cI f-tJtA,..( lu-r. lJ"t Clue" cr-'t
PAGE 108

Telegrams: "PROVMEO" Telephone: 20132/5 22971/3 When replying please quote I Ref. No ................. and date I /

PAGE 110

.. C C o 0 P P Y My dear Ian, Barnet General Hospital. Barnet LONDO N . 8 .59. I telephoned the Institute ( R I & H.) this afternoon having received their letter this morning -If they were to undertake the work they vlOuld a) analyse, b) FIN D AN OUTLET & 1ARKET (or advise I'Jhere to go) for all products and advise ref. marketing by-products as uell. This would cost many golden guineas but their undertakings vlOuld be a g uarantee of success -put bluntly they kno"l you have a Nuffield grant and suggest you approach these donors -"'li th your suggestions about this and ask them to grant the Institute (which as you knovl is a National Body and non-profit making) further funds to cover their fees 1tThich 1tJould be arounr1.... I.lvn'"G faint, 750 guineas which seemed to me a lot of money but then they said that they would not even undertake the "Hork unless they were sure of success and that their client will get his back from their findings etc. In other vlords hp",.... 5 a fairly concrete cut and dried offer:.. c.c indi?ate that there are others e g the '" uman a:f1d the senlor anlmal endocrime inves,tigators in H:ngland I'Tho are interested. What about the Kenya l' eat Corporation? I have not heard from you ref this -can you keen me riposted" wi th information? or far better C YOU KrWLY -mITE TO THE SECRETARY OF THE INSTITUTE an.d let him know your plans? would be far more if you corespond directly rather an through me. (as lor Prof. Amorose and Bishop, you can leave them to me, but please send further information ref supplies of elephants etc. ) (Peter Copeman)

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?f-1
PAGE 113

KENYA NATIONAL PARKS Telegrams: PARKS" NAIROBI Telephone: LANGATA 493 and 494 Alr Ref: TSE/GRGMS. Ian Parker, Esq., Nairobi. Dear Ian, {}/ \ OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR. LANGATA ROAD. P O. BOX 2076. NAIROBI. KENYA 16th March, 1964. CONFIDENTIAL Thank you for allowing me to see your memorandum on the G alana Game Management Scheme. As f a r as the T savo P ark is concerned I must repeat the first impression I forme d when we discussed this Sche m e last Friday namely tha t t h e culling operations,in order'to fit in with t he Game Management policy of the Tsavo P ark, will not be of great benefit t o us as I can not see how an y p articular requirements could be enforced. With possible c h an g es in personnel, and of objectives, I ould rule out t h e chances of the Scheme acting as an agent to t ak e off surplus popul ations from the Tsavo Par k I grant, h o w e ver, tha t t h e Scheme managed as a Game Farm w o u l d be i nfinitely better on our borders than if left t o the whtms of loca l Africans, and in that w ay it would be of g r eat a dvantage. I can well un derstand t h e Game Departments misgivings in granting freed o m of activity but in any event I cannot see h o w you coul d ensure tha t a licence to hunt, kill or capture coul d not be withd rawn a t any time. E ve n if this were written into the Agreement the Government, it could be chan g e d and I CruLDOt see how you will achieve the guarantees you require. I also think t here coul d be impossible arguments about the r ate of take-off, an d it is a mat ter of opinion rather than f act whether the yield c an be sustained. In general t e rms, h o wever, I h a ve a l w ays felt tha t certain areas in Kenya should be set aside for tota l and proper protectio n of wil dlife, whereas in other areas it may have to go. If tha t p attern formed the game preservation policy of Kenya the n I personally w ould not oppose the grmt of a concession to any responsible group of people to make the best use of any particular area. MC/JF. Yours Sincerely, Mervyn Cowi e, DIRECTOR.

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P.O. BOX 30456 NAIROBI, KENYA My dear From: Anthony Cullen, KENYA BROADCASTING Telephone: I J Offices : 27081: 2665 P n .. Studios : 26977 (? c;Jt Hang on for a bit __ if you Telearams '" Cable. RADNEWS NAIROBI honestly -bless your heart -you cannot come and dump a problem of this magnitude in lap and tell me that it has to be in 48 hours or else. But what you have succeeded in doing, with the clarity of conviction and the wisdom of frankness, is to give me e full portraya, l of the sweep and deta il of this proj ect. For whatever it be worth, I am sold on this basic idea, and would like to see it happen. Although this implies action, there can obviously be no guarantee of results, although you may comfortably rest assured that I bloody well try. The only sane opening gambit is for me to find out exactly where all this has got to in the minds o f uClgini and Achieng. This I am taking steps to discover. I think there might be room for a few trifling qualifica.tions or compromises on the project as outlined, though without in any way destroying the fundamental idea. So keep your fingers crossed, and ask your respected father-in-la. w to send me a prescription for a la.rge Pilsener. I'll conta.ct you ",hen there is something to say, a.nd while I'm due to be at the Coast (Ja,dini) with the family from MBrch 31 to April 9, correspondence and telephones will permit life to g o on. Yours Q / --\ :::

PAGE 115

P .O BOX 30456 NAIROBI, KENYA My dear From: Anthony Cullen, KENYA BROADCASTING Telephone: Offices : 27081: 26653 Studios: 26977 Telegrams '" Cables RADNEWS NAIROBI 25.3.64 I hs.ve been pursuing your problem, and will now give you some completely frank comments. At Government level, and at Department level, there is a _genuine wish to put this project through -in its fundamentals a .n<1 to see it working. But at both the mentioned levels, there is a great deal of hostility snd resentment about the way this whole ma.tter ha s been presented snd pushed. You (a nd presuma.bly others involved) are sa id to have over-stated your case, to hsve treated Ministers and officiaJ.s and the whole Government machine with discourtesy and impatience, and to have made -in certain of the paper submissions a series of wild or irrelevant or even insulting statements. Furthermore, it is felt that a resource-management project on this scale is entirely desirable, at the same time it is futile to embark on it in a rosy-tinted glow of doubtful or even objectives. it is held that while certain compromises could be reached to satisfy both administrative and commercial objectives, there are still one or two elements of lay, snd precedent which make Company "demands II unreasonable and which should not be said to inhibit s commercial endeavour. You brought me into this thing at a stage when its design and presentation had been completed, and when deadlocK had been reached. Conceivably, this is a pity. Although you convinced me (and a further study of the pa.pers has strengthened this conviction) that here is a scheme founded on such enterprise and enthusiasm, and such useful

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P.O BOX 30456 NAIROBI KENYA KENYA BROADCASTING CORPORATION Telephone: Offic es : 27081: 26653 Studios: 26977 T e lear a m & '" Cables RADNEWS N A IROBI principle. that it ought to be encouraged, yet I wa s in n o wa, y c o n cerned with its negotiation, and am therefore unable to comment sensibly on Government feelings. But I might just remark that while the comprehensive technical content of the pa.pers you left with me is admirable -with any exaggeration gladly excused as a driving force -yet some of the sweeping assertions and urgings with '''hich y o u have sought to clothe this content are fatheaded. I am with you in this, Ian, in terms of purpose, and will take any opportunity to help this along. But I rather wish y o u had learnt as much as I have had to learn, the hard way, a .bout dealing with people, including politicians and officials. The intention now (on the parts of Grimwood and Achieng) is to see Ray Rya. n again, to try and work out with him a final blueprint of something that both sides can regard as practical and satisfying, and to deal -through the mechanics of intelligent compromise -with the various II demands II for the scrapping of legal and administrative requirements. I told you of my belief that Grimw o od in this had been inflexible. I still hold to this view. But y o u w ould now be well advised to be a bit flexible in your turn, and feel able to deal with the world as it is, and not as it bloody well ought t o be. If we k eep calm, this can happen. If it would help, I would gladly have a talk with Ray Ryan any time after April 9. Yours

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, -P O BOX 304$6 NAIROBI KENYA From: Anthony Cullen, KENYA BROADCASTING Telepho n e : Office s: 27081: 266 5 3 St u dio s: 26977 elearam l '" Cabl es RADNEWS NAIROBI My 15.6.64 I em sending this to it might follow round and catch up with you i n Tanganyika or wherever you might now be. Our recent and some\',hat fleeting conta.ct -in reference to Ryan' s ill-fated project wes broken off at a point "There you nearly bit the bloody telephone in sheer frustrated rag e . it was made pparent that, after ffi8ny months of galling effort, the last and final straw had been provided by some of my remarks. I'm sorry about that, reflectively speaking because my intentions for once \-Jere fairly pure. Bu t I'm not going to waste time now crawling ov e r old ground. Since you s t alked off into the night, muttering and understandably sore, I've seen the treatment of your essential case in The R e porter'. This vias good, and I duly slappe d Henry Reuter on the back for giving it t his much space. I really h ope, mon ami, is that this is a s ignal that you haven't given up. Because I haven't, a n d don't intend to. It i s of the highest a nd utmost importance that we bring into bearing a number of resource-management projects, based on game-cropping end backed by significant investment. "l i thout all the implications of this approach, the whole physical future of Kenya seems to me pretty bleak There has been a setback. You bore the brunt of it, since I didn't even appear until you were clinging with despairing fingers to the edg e of a precipice, and it was really too l ate to stop t his temporary tumble. But in t h e rough-and-tumble of getting thing s done

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P O BOX 30456 NAIROBI, KENYA KENYA BROADCASTING CORPORATION Telephone : Office s: 27081: 26653 Studios : 26977 Telearams &. Cabl .. NAIROBI in contemporary KenY8, a boot up the aree is just routine. What you have to embark on then i s a flanking movement, getting to the same place from nother way round, nd probebly persuading the dignitaries en route that t h i s is really their idee. Hell, it's taken me two y e ars s ometimes to g e t final action on s ome bit of policy or some new tt approach. And this one (coupled with another Yank-supported idea in another District altmgether) is too b i g to let slide. Grimvlood \vas fundament lly v Tron g on t w o counts. But don It kid yourself that he is criticised for t his by a 11 the field vlardens. A t least two of them support h i m I am personally getting a frigid reception from Grimwood ( 8 n d from Don stev18rt, wh o i s an old woman) for embarking on a "crash progr8mme" to arouse public interest in game-cropping via radio, in a lecture to the East African A cademy, end b y other means. It is useful in these cases to set the stage. I have a lso having some talks vlith poli ticians, which will be stepped up this week when Legco gets into its stride again. Americans 8nd conEer c ial chaps h8ve 21so come into the picture in the hope that they v!ill be helpful later on. I may g o down to G81ana myself shortl y to have 2 look or to sta y for a while. Can y o u let me have another look a t all t h e papers (including geme counts ?nd commercial ideas) that I sent back to you? Then sit back, and let me g o o n working for a while. Yours (]v) /'

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I / VOX:'fICl1()n. r of eleubatrt ...

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" I 1 lope G :t UOl!1.cmc to 1 25- t .. 00 t 10 ... 0 .-. 3 947/70 I

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I -I 1fl I .., t E M I p pn .. tlill I! '" TN -, I -tl .. t 5 i \ ,J ( 359

PAGE 122

r r .-. 2 .1 ( .8.lat + + 15 b 147 t D 10 t 13

PAGE 123

wi it lat Y' r. r o 'b tho mint Voh101 36 n' y tho 011. t hun 1. 1 69 20 ... ab ttl to Shs 4 0/-per montb 1 171 1 ., 15

PAGE 124

(' I T L At 1'1 would be n 1 g1v 45 1, Sf .> bull in t i DllLli1 . :':/ li,

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Cr. tam t '13 Ole 0' 2 9 eout 747 nt 136 Z'l 2.1 50 1 Q t': ion 117 10 1 150 1, 450 2,0' 23 7,222 2 ,178 t 5 i*t 579 2,199 C T to ( )

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c rrt. torv (

PAGE 129

:no 2\lO S 1 23 15 ( ) 2 2,000 7 56 t2'SO U, 11,71") '. ( 15 ,441 ". i

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51 (ho 2 /0\ :5 Cl 2 1 t) 50 Wo \ 150 A 2 2, 7 I 3 L 2, 115::> II .:)3 I (

PAGE 131

ur. tt 'Dr. I' _-. Ii 2!t285 Brought I, :5:L 351> ClG 236 outs 1,0!39 Ut'11'f 92 270 001 :;00 Inctd 100 50 2;S tioll 1 00 150 :t 2 2 ()O 50 72D lote: t 23' nt 'Of oan -1-;) l 1:i I'),.):{.'i 1':,C'2 11., 56 II I L, b l) t .. as ( 1.829 C carrie tt01'\J (, 0\0 I L

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c. c h 'i '(:(,I'r! Item Brought Fo-rw iCrlVGro Cl rkS couts Uniforms Allo'''''''ct't->ft OI'lUS i1dl ybae of \itle OJchec of l 369 00 0 {)..d Jed f I Ilv Ih( 6'}'LU' be ,!-""W"",. t".'1i fI 356 236 92 m roo 500 1 1 50 1 150 3G:JO 2 '0 50 goo 1 2.280

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Revenue Balances for 1st Year Deduct Total Capital & RecUMnent for 1st Year E stimated Balance 1n Scheme at end of first year Revenue Balances for 2nd Year Deduct T tal Espenditure & Recurrent E xp. for 2nd ,year Estimated Balance in Scheme at end of 2nd year ,-/ ro ; ;f nue Balances for 3ro y e r \ -ransfer of halance in Nuffield Foundati n t evenue Fund e d u t -do-Dedu t T tal Capital & Recurrent Exp. for Brd Year Revenue Fund WItH Ivory'" 10,000 10,000 10,000 2O,OO()... 7,180 12,820 10,000 2 2,820 3,761 26, 581 14,670 ,911 I Revenue Fund wihtout Ivory I 7,000 7,000 7,000 1 4,000 7,180 6 ,820 7,000 1 3 ,820 I 3,7G 1 17,1:;81 14,670 2,911 I 1 Nuffie1d Foundation 10,000 6,259 B,761 -3 ,761 -3,761 5,761 == I Scheme Balances with Ivory Without Ivory I , 20,000 17,000 6,239 6.239 J l I 13,761 10,761 I i I J --'}-J . I I I I f 10,0001 7.,000 I 1 < 17,761 I '-7,180 I 7,180 I .. 16,581 /10,581 / 10,000 7,000 \ I 26,581 17.581 I -I l I I I 2 6 ,581 17,581 I 1 4 ,670 14,6,(0 !. I 11,911 I 2,911 1

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...

PAGE 136

. Revenue Balan c es for 1st Year Deduct T tal Capital & Rocumment for 1st Year end of first year Revonue Balanoes for 2nd Year Deduct Total Espendlture & Recurr n t for 2nd ye.r Estimated Balance in S cheme a t end f 2nd year Revenle Balan c e s tor 3rd Add transfer of aslance in Nuffield Fo nd ti n t evenue Fund Deduct -0 -Deduct Total Capital & Recurren t Exp. for Brd Year Revenue ];"'und Reve e Fund Uuffie1d F unda t ion '\VIm IVorY /'. / 10,000 6 259 / 7,00t \ 3,761 .. \ 10,000 7 00 0 Scheme Balance s I t Ivory \' ithout I v ry 00 000 I 6,259 17,000 6 .239 1 0 ,761 7.000 .\ 1 I I I __ 80 ____ ____ 7_,1_OO ______ __ _____________ __ ______ I 12,800 6 020 ),761 1 6 8 1 10 000 3,76 1 26 581 I 14,670 I I 7 000 5 ,'1(31 17,H81 14,670 2,911 . : 'OIl I ) I I I I l ,/ I \ r t76 1 26 58 1 5 J 6 1 2 ,581 14,G70 11,911 I 1 I 1 1 10,581 17,581 2 ,9.11 1 I

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/ < l .J \ I' 1. S 1 of T phi a GRAND TOTAL .' -. .! 'I !/ r , I t I' \ 1. I .J to' '. f .1 \ ;;/ \ It ..... ,. \ -1\ / I I I I f .; It \ I \ \ 1 10,000. 7,000 10,000. \ I \ \ ,000. 7,000 to ,000. GALAliA 1UV 7,0 0 t E 10,000 7 I 1 I l I I ... 3. 4. I 5 I 6. 7. I .. I 9. 10 i 1. ,000 lO,ooo\ 7 a \ ) I I, f I / I I I I I I. and Reven I .ms Sal ry' -penn officer Salary orr,y Driver Salaries Participants Jedical e enses lnci d uta expenses rkr.Jn.n S l mpensat i n 'I' Purchase runmun1t1on Tranep rt Cd travelling nnun1 b nm or Dividend '0. Salary T tal ell mated reCUIT nt CAPITAL 16PIDIDlTURE Purch se Diac1 Purchnso -L eol Bas Lam Rover fiquipnent f r s Purchase Fi ItS Purchase II mc Au ury Tent ge rch se Field eot Deve1 pment Resources T tal E stlma 'GR m TOTAL I I I \ d C pit \ \ \ \ \ \ 1 La ear 1,000 1,000 105 217 720 1,6m 50 100 150 200 4 6 00 75 75 1,000 1,500 150 fro 105 3 296 5,007 I I I I I 1,-1-00 11 ,400 965 65 50 263 265 10 GO 60 180 200 1,975 239 7,180 j f I 1 i , 1 t t I I 1,200 534 2,540 150 225 136 80 2,000 450 111 7,026 1,400 -50 100 100 6,000 7,650 1 4 ,670 -. I ./

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OF REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE F O R RIVER G1lME SCHENE : RECURRENT REVENUE ., BE CURRENT ============-=-=====================--= '\ (-) Items of' Revenue 1. Sale of' Elephant meat and Trophies 2. Proceeds from sale of' Ivory 3. Sale of trophies from other game Items of' Capital Expenditure: (aj Ftom Fund Ba.1anahces 1. 2 3. 4. 5 6. 7. B. 9. Purchase of Diesel Lorr,r Purchace of' L.B.B Land Rover Equipment for vehicles Purchase of tentage Purchase of Field Equipment Oontraction of tracks (@. per mile) Building of H.Q. and Godown at l-fa.cldnon Road. Construction o f Camps 1st year 4,00 0 9,000t--" 14,050/ 750 V" 500 2 n d yeax 6,000 1l,250 250 17,500 1,000 1,000 10. 6,000 3rd yea:r 6,000 li,250 250 17,500 50 100 100 1,250 -li. Survey of River Crossing Construction of River Crossing Purchase of Road Scraper (b) From Nuffield Donation, 1,000-0--8,000 2,900 12. 13. 14 -15. 16. 17. 18, 19. Purchase of Diesel Lorr,r Purchase of' L. H .B. Land Rover Equipment for v:;es Purchase of' fire Purchase of Home our" Purchase of Tentage Purchase of Field Equipment DeveloIlllent of water supplies At end of first year, Funds ava.Ua.ble. Deficit At end of 2nd year. Funds available Deficit Plus deficit from 1st year At the end of 3rd year. Funds ava.ilab1e Less dtri'fcit for 1st and 2nd yea:r /IXJ '2--> 1,400 965 65 V'" 50 263 --263 10 (;JJ 60 la:l 200 1,9'7.3 Statement of Balances: General 26 512 26 -5.084 5,084 Nuffield 7,057 7,057 5,084 -Items of Expenditure 1. Salary Manager 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. &a1ar.y -Assistant Manager Salar,r Lorr,r Driver Salaries Participants Medical Expenses Inc:i. dental l" VTorkmans Purchase of Ammunition Transport and TraveJ+ing -Jt.nnua.l 1.-81JQD; bOxn1s cn} U:vtClend Sala...ry-Clerk Rental of Native Land Unit i Running Costs of h>ads unit -' Salaries Tracks driver and turnboy Transfer to Renewals fund ntenance of H. Q and Camps. TOTAL. Add Capital Expend! ture f'rom Fund Balances. TQtal Expenditure against Scheme. Deduct Deficit Add Surplns Renewals 1,000 1,000 2,200 2,200 EXPEtTDITURE 1st yea:r 1,000 750 05 '-:::' 720 50 150 46,-75..-1,309 150 -'I.. 1,500 165 7,sn I4,076 26 :,056 -2nd year 3rd year 1,000 1,206 750 soo 334 1,620 2,340 100 150 200 225 90 136 75 00 1,000 2,300 300 450 105 III 1,500 1,500 400 400 175 185 1,200 19560 400 400 IO,OI2 I2,I7I 8,000 2,900 IS,OI2 I5,07I .. 512 2,429 17,500

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--...;.=-I -;:0: 1 <"'Ie -r ... '" .... I o r .. r u_ r 1" i ,. to .... '-. -,

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t, ( ( ---------------------------------------------------The folI o ling items of ex nre additional t o the original dratt stimatos submitted -( A) Ite m 2 : It is c nsidered tha t an ssistant tanager is o 'senti a l if the schene is t be properly run. Item 12 : Since I ative Land b e ask d to the e .... ea. tem. 13: I tem 14: ental 01 ative Land Unit .. art o f the area for the scheme i s in the Unit, th :'lif' African Distric t COtn c i l vlil1 acce t an annua rental of ",,1,500 for use of oads Unit. Sa _aries Driver and If the g e it the se e e is to b e properly controlled and ,. tar holes and [..te r su Ii s are t J be acce""sable for inspection it is c r d roads s ou l d be bui t is the c of maintaining th' roads once they 1 va been bu'i.l t Item 15 : Annual paym nt s ar to b made int () a enewt..ls I'und Lor re"lacing equiIJ ent and ve icles pu for t:e sc .. ene. Item 16: r a'ntenance of : 9 and l'his is the co"'t of intainLng the buildings and cam s built in th con rol a rea. (13) C Item 2 : Land Bover. Th s is t be u r c la.;;ed for use by the l .3sist nt ?:?or:: g :;:''' 'Ih o will be l t do conside ., bl:l tr veIling. Item 6 : It is essntial that trac-s .... re buil t in thv urea and it is eFtim 'ted that 20 miles of "trucks will be req,uired. These w ill be built o ver a ,period of thr e year's at a f proxim: t ely .cl0 Jer ,Ji l e Ite m 7 : (;onstructi n 01 R Q and Godown. It i s cLtim tbd that about 3 000 w ill be r e qu ixed for building housing nd stores for the schemo -2

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I ( 2 It 16. w 16 int nded t b I JJ:o:drnat ly '10 e .ch n th tam 9. ':500 for SCClts a t a:L' rl, 250. It i'" int nded to bui d n ".us. lay oVJ:t:' "'l: 0 G e.n.a rivur ';hich oeD through th' sch me a rea Thio is the v otim t d C Sli of su:r fey _ng 81 th \.irossin::>" I" m 10: Construction of River r hi stimat d coat to build a Causeway c OSS the Galana Riv r 'or ill be built in the second year of the Scheme !t m 11: Purchas_ of Road SCI This is th Unit 0 b s d purchase v Road Scraper von me Ax

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. .-\ 1. Sale of dried meat. 2. Grant from Treasury in lieu oj Ivory. 3. Income from other game. NUFFIELD. Nuffield Gr-ant. Nuffield Capital. 1. Purchase of 2 diesel lories. 2 Purchase L.W B Land R over, 3 Equipment for vehicles. 4 Purchase of rifles. 5 Constructmon of Temporary H Q 6 Tools 7 Purchase of Tentage 8. Construction of T racks. 9 Tractor and Equipment I, .... / ;". AMENDMENTS TO MR. RISLEY' S ES'IMATES FOR THE GAL RIVER GAME MANAGEMENT SCHEME AS A RESULT OF TIIE COMMI'ITEE MEETING OF 21th. SEPTEJ.mER 1 59 1st. Year 2nd. Year ear EXPENDITURE. 4,800 6,000 6,000 1. Participants salary. 9 ,000 11,250 11,250 2 Drivers Salary. 250 200 250 5. Managers Salary. 4. Asst. Managers Salary. 5. L.T.& T 6. Medical Expenses '(. Incidental Expenses. 8 Workmens Compensation. .. 9 Rewards "and Rations 10. Transfer to Renewals 1st. Year 2nd. Year, Brd. Year 540 1,620 2,540 157.10 315 427 750 1,000 1,200 612.10 700 800 651 1,700 2,300 100 150 200 225 -90 156 500 450 1,300 1,770 2 ,270 11. Maintenance of Trucks&Roads9 500 500 500 12. Maint. of 17aterholes. 500 500 500 15. Scientific 3 000 3 ,000 5 ,000 14. Purchase of ammunitions 75 80 15. Clerks. 105 111 16. Maint. of H C .&-..Bulldings. 100 100 14,050 17,500 8,011 12,125 14,489 = = =-7,500 1,500 1, 0 Nuffield -Recurrent \ \,w 2 ,800 --1. Participants salary. 180 965 965 2. Drivers salary. 52.10 108 50 3 Managers salary. 250 557 -4 Asst. Managers salary. 137.10 000 5. L T & T 649 180 200 -6. Expenses 50 350 80 7. Incidental Expenses. 150 200 205 8 Workmens 46 1,000 9 Purchase of ammunitions 75 10. Rewards and Rations. 150 1,700 1,500 1 .. 000 1,740 == = ----

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. r ') t ) \. f t J

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_.r-.'., GALA.NA !UVER GAIIfE AGEllfEN! SCHEME Page 1 ID..1? ld les-h' Jrd. Year BEVENUE IHMS I' = 'nonl 1 Sal. of Iried eat 4 .800 6 ,000 6 000 2 Grarrt J.l"om !l!r a\lX11:1 1nl lieu of Ivory 9,000 1'1,250 l1.,250 3 Income f. other game 250 250 250 ==-= = 2 s .... _===__=========_:= ...... = ( 7,50 1,500 1,000 ===::::Z:it;==: .. = .:=-====;::n:=:: =---;-.

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....... I, c '( 11. f ( ,/ EXPENDITURE ITEMS: ==:----------------1. Participants salaries 2; Drivers salaries 3. Managers salary 4. Assistant Manager's salary 5. L.T. & T. 6. 1!ed1cal EA-penses 7. Inoidental Expenses 80 Workmen's Oompensation 9. Rewards end RI?t. j, one 10. Tradfer to Renewals ll. Maintenance of Trucks &: Roads 12. Maintenance-of WaterhoJl.es ]3. Research ]A.. Purchase OT anmnmi-t1on W. CJLerks 1st Year i. 540 157.10 750 612.10 651 1,300 500 SOG 3,000 -Page 2. 2nd Year lrdYear. t. 2,340 '427 1,200 800 2,300 150 225 136 ll.6. Maintenance of H and :Buildings -1,620 315 1,000 '750 1,700 100 200 90 1,770 500 -500 3,OOOl 75 ]L05 100 450 2,270 500 -50OJ 3,000 80 111 100 / 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. '22. 23. I ( Ii I I I Tractor Road ing Equipment Tentage Tools Road Construction Construction of C onstruction of Perman ent H.Q Water Supply to H 8,om 12,125 14,489 ----500 80 200 2,000 6,000 4,000. 1,000 13,780 ==========================

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.... \ l ( "1 l. ) I lRJFPIELD RECURREN! ==================== .1Q Participants SaJ.aries .20 Dr i vet-s Salaries ,30 Manager's Salary ,4. Assistant IYIanager's Salary ,50 L.T. & !f 16. Medical Expenses 7. Incidental Expenses 8. W o rkmen s Compensation 9. Purchase of ammunition 100 Rewards and Rations NUF],IELD-CAPI!AL 10 Purchase of 2 diesel lorries 2; Purchase LoW B Land Rover .3. Equipment for vehicles 4; Purchase of rifles 1st Year 180 52010 250 137010 649 50 150 46 75 150 L,740 2nd Year -3rd,Year. ... -------------------------.--2,800 965 965 108 50 -557 50 Construction of Temporary H.Q. 600 6. Tools 180 200 70 Purchase of 350 80 80 Construction of Tracks 200 205 90 Tractor and Equipment 1,000 3,760 1,500 1,000 ==============================

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1ft ( , GALANA RIVER GAME MANAGEM1
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EXPENDITURE ITEMS ================= 1. Participants salaries 2. Drivers Salaries 3. Manager's Salary Manager's Salary 5 L T. & T. 6. ,Medical Expenses 7. Incid ental Expenses 8. 'lorkmen's Compensation 9 Rewards and Rations 10. Transfer to R en e wals 11. Maintenance of Tru c ks & R oads 12. Maintenan ce of Waterholes 13. Scientific Research 14. o f ammunition 15. Clerks 16. Maintenance of H Q and Buildings CAPITAL -------------17. Tractor R o a d l-1.aking Equipm e n t 1 8/" Tentag e 1 9 Tools 20. R oad C onstr uction 21. C ons t r uction of Bridg e /Causewey 2 2 C ons truction o f Permanent H .Q. 2 3 Water Sun ly to H .Q. 1st Year 540 157 10 750 612.10 651 1 3 00 500 5 00 3,000 8,01 1 Pag e 2. 2n d Y e a r 1,620 315 1,000 750 1,700 1 00 2 00 90 3 00 1,770 5 00 5 00 3,000 75 1 0 5 1 00 12,125 3rd Year 2,340 427 1,200 800 2,300 150 225 136 450 2,270 50 0 5 00 3,000 80 111 1 00 14,489 ============= = === = ============= = 500 80 2 00 2 000 6,000 4,000 1 ,000 13 780 ==== ======= = ====== ==== ==========

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I !. NUFFIELD REC URRENT ======== = =========== 1. Participants Salaries 2. Drivers Salaries 3 Manager's Salar y 4 Assistant Manager's Salary 5. L T &. T 6 Medical E xpenses 7 Incidental Expen ses 8 W orkmen's Compensation 9 Pu r c hase o f ammuniti o n 10. Rewards and Ratio ns NUFFIEL ================ l. Purchase o f 2 diesel lorries 2. Purchas e L.'!I.B Land Rover 3. Equipment for v ehicles 4 Purchase o f rifles 5 C onstruction of Temoorary H.Q. 6 T ools 7 Purchase of Tentage 8 Construction of Tracks 9 Tractor and Equipment Pag e 3 1st Y e a r 2nd Y e a r 180 52.10 250 137 10 649 50 150 46 75 150 1,740 3rd Year fl = ========================='====== 2,800 965 965 108 50 557 600 180 200 350 80 2 00 2 0 5 1,000 3,760 1,500 1,000 ====.======================-======

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! ( \. > EXPLANATORY NOTES -EXPENDITURE 1. Two diese l Bedfords 5 ton @ ,400 in first year One L.W.B. Land Rover @ i965 in first year One Land Rover @ 965 in second year One tractor & equ1pmen IJ) ,500 in third year It is considered that this will be sufficient transport for the first three 2. Equipment for vehicles. A cost of per vehicle covering Tanganyika jacks, Tarpaulins, chains. Figures obtained from of 9.6.58 for scheme. 3. Five German .404s. Exact price not yet known but an allowance of approx. each is made. 40 Construction of Temporary H.Q. Mud and wattle houses, offices, stores -with makuti roof. Temporary armoury An annual maintenance figure of .100 is considered adequate. 6 Tools, pangas, jembies, saws, wei hing machines, typewriter, garage equipment etc. Tentage. Initially 10 ex-army 14' x 14' x 8' tents from Asman Yacub @ 4007each = 4,000/first year. These are for participants X2. Second year a further two tents 14' x 14' x 8' and also in third year to cater for increase in participants. Two senior officer type tents at Shs 1,500/each for scheme's officers, conSidered correct a s they will be living under cqnVQS for the P'3.rt of their time. 70 Track construction -1st and 2nd years when this will largely be done by hand approx. p.a. Third year with of tractor for the job road construction greatly increased ,000 is estimated. MRintenance of existing roads and tracks especially the .alindi-Tsavo road will be expensive and recurrently for is estimqted. 3. PartiCipants x 25 x 50 x 75 salaries:average wage 1st y e'lr 2nd year 3rd year will be Shs 45/ -per month = f., 720 = ,620 allowin g for increments = ,340 " Each p RTti c i ant will also have a small shamba which he may cultiVRte. Drivers salaries estimated at 2 in 1st 1 in 2nd Driver tractor 1 in 3rd p.a. scq1e similar to Government C.6-5 I year year year. 1 0 Manager ,000 p.a. approx. 110 Assistant t:750 p.a. Slpprox N o exact terms yet settled. L.T. & T. slightly over 2 lorries, 1 Land Rover 2" 2 s 2 2 each por 1st 2nd 3rd vehiole. year year year + traotor nd equipmento 12. Medical. The scheme would be liable to p ay medicql expenses as in the m in partiCipants e arn less than 100/p.m. 13. Incidental. Licenoing vehicles, Insurance etc. 14. Workmen's Compensation. The scheme would be to the compensa tion to any p artiCipants in the event o f injury sustained while w orking. For details refer to estimates of. 6 58

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// I ( 15. Reward 8: Rations. The sch e m e w ould rely to a very large degree on s t opping poa c h i ng w i t h h andsome r e ward s for convictions etc. 16. Maintenance o f Waterholes. Each year the anim'llB using the lliaterholes b reak d own tanks etc. and the holes need a considerable amount of mai ntenance. 17. Transfer t o Renewals. Approx o n e third of each vehicle's value is put into a fund f o r t he purchase of new vehicles after the third 1 8 Faunal Res e arch. A m o s t i mportant p oint hitherto missed out, but obviously o f en ormous importano e to the scheme. As no enct kno\rlledge i s availabl e as to costs, a rough figure of ,000 pea. is given. 1 9 C onstruct i o n o f Bridge. An essentia l but very costly item. ,000 20. C o ns truction of permanent H.Q. and water supplies thereto. 3rd 000 = = ======== =======:= = = = = = NUFFIELD SCHb"'ME Credit balances end of First year 2,500 I: 6,039 It " S econd y ear I: 1,000 1,414 " " Third y e a r 645 It will be noted that revenue has been accumulated in the first tvlO y ears and spent on capital projects such as a Bridge or Causeway, and H.Q. in the Third year. Should the scheme do well there is no reason \'lhy these permanent projects should not be started in the second or even first year. Thi s would eliminate the build-up of c apital.

PAGE 152

' , , -f ()/J CJ.lf 30th-dUf".e, I q (Po I-t .. fxu 4-:v.> e..:to t. CTL i S;. cb. ACc.OUNT ...... F1XG.1 -.NurJfJA 0 00 --.. h,-.(4'rJ. k t}vy eAm. lJ.,ooo 0 "V i r 0, ()() tJ 0 o-v LMA a-:, I 3 lLt 55 (,,7 fa 5 45 uk .1 30 j "1 o.-c ;4.-c. c. l 1 'to I I I k t,7LtS O &':>-Po Cl) lOrg ).A;& 3 % h 3 . fie AI) u.-,..db{;' IIt-n.s .L S % 1-is i LLS,t {TO 1---fo..y -11 fvr 3 7NIL Ir
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200r-A313 2-(;7 T BE I.S.C. Parker Esq., Galaaa River Gam e cherne, P O VOl. KEN Y A Dear Mr. Parker, In reply please qUQte GAM. 20. No .......... ............... . ..... . ............. ...... ..... DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND Fld HERIES, O. BOX 7, LUNDAZI. 16th October, 1963. While attending the mammal s ymposium in Salisbury last month Dr. Short advised m e of your scheme, and also that you have produced an unpub l ished report o n it. I am myself involved in a similar sche m e t hough only in the pilot stage, and would be most g rateful for a c opy of your report. I am sending you a c opy of my paper to the symposium and m y report on our s mall 1 9 62 scheme. l i e have only been c r opping elephant, your main target I believe, and would be interested to comp are your findings w ith my own. If there is a n y further dope on wha t w e have d one h e e which y o u m i ght wan t let m e know and I'll send it on (if I h ave the answer). Yours sincerely, ZI. JMF/RTC.

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\ :; 1. Friends of AFRICA In America M r 0 Ian Parker" c/o P o 0 0 Voi K enya, East Africa D ear Mro Parker: ARRYTOWN, NEW YORK August 25, 196 Xnold Fletcher writes that he has worked gures with you in connection proposed cropping enterprise we hav-e !lad under consideration, and has r e ferred me to you. I am in touch with two prospective associates who are interested with me, and w e believe we can attract enough additional capital to make the plan a realityo W e do, h owever, need as reliable estimates from as competent sources as possible e s pecially in view of the fact that this is a new field without dependable guide s 0 It would be helpful, therefore, if you would be kind enough to write, giving your own independent figures -broken down into the components, as detailed as possible. There are a number of questions which you might be good enough to answer: 1 What is the basis for calculating meat sale At one shilling per pound? (I was told a year ago that there was a glut in Kenya of Dro Mann's beef and that 8 pence was the likely price). Is elephant, zebra or buffalo meat selling for this in a ready market within reach (from the standpoint of preserving thaf product and transporting it at low cost) or is this a figure taken from a distant area where demand for the products may be quite different? What is the wholesale price of Do you know what poached meat is selling for in the Tanganyika, wholesale, and is this meat not mostly antelope or other preferred meat? 20 As for hunting parties: I had been told that they were not really suitable for game harvestingo Won't they prove more nuisance than they're worth -apart from income -and possibly spook the game? are your views on this? Fletcher mentioned $2,0000 as an average income from this sourceo Don't you think it likely that when a hunter spends this much, plus transportation and incidentals, he'll pay a bit more to patronize a well-known white-hunter organizatio and be free to move about?

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Page 2 30 Granting that zebra hides will bring 100 shillings -can one get that much wholesale for buffalo hides? 4. What is the average number of pounds of meat to be gleaned from: zebra buffalo elephant such antelepes as may be taken i n numbers from the "3000 square mile area" 0 ...---, 50 Fletcher at one point gives the income from captured elephant young in dollars, and at another, about the same figures in pounds. rmat is your opinion of a reasonable income from this source? 6. Are your es-timates for income for "trophies" based on wholesale disposal, -and what are they? (as ivory -also elephant's ears and feet.) 70 Are you acquainted with figures on canning under the circumstances which would prevail? John Blower at Kampala would be one of the best sources for this information, but he's inaccessible to uS o If need be, would you be good enou gh to query him? We are endeavoring to get,here/such figures as original cost of plant, and operation. Naturally, no one at our end understands the conditions under which a plant would have to be delivered, set up and operated, much less its requisite capacity, so we're handicapped in this regard. Some detailed information on this score would certainly help. has given us estimates on capital investments -as roads, housing, etc 0, equipment and personnel. It 'would be helpful to have your own estimates, directly. Arnold may feel that the figures he sends should be accepted without question. This is understandable, for he has been in the field talking this through with men like youo To sources of capital in thi& country, however, to whom whole idea is novel and strange, confirmation -almost to the last detail -must come from sources considered expert. There's a good deal of speculative money here, but it toward familiar ventures, the outcome of which -if all goes well -can be calculatedo Lastly, Fletcher scorns the mention of an option or some tangible indication that if the capttal is raised, the land will be available. Here, a promoter approaches money, he must show that he can produce the proposition he's trying to finance -in other word, that he's not just "romancing". What can possibly be done to arm us in some way with a reasonable answer to this reasonable expectancy?

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Page 3 I am aware, }tro Parker, that in asking for answers to so many questions, I may be putting you to a considerable amount of trouble of the kind which may be distasteful to youo Please forgive me, if this is the caseo To move further, in this matter, we must have the opinion of an experienced specialist -as yourself; your cooperation in providing it should go a long way toward making possible the realization of this enterprise. Appreciative of your interest and aido /J CElvr/mew Clement E. Merowit for FRIENDS OF AFRICA IN AMERICA PoSe I am superficially friendly with l1ajor and Colonel Cowie 0 Information stemming from their offices would, of course, reenforce our efforts with authority. I am refraining from writing them on this subject, until I hear from you /Whether this should be done. I

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?RIENDS O? AFRICA IN N1ERICA Mr. Ian Parker, Galana River Game Management Scheme, P.Oo VOl, Kenya Africa. Dear Mr. Parker, February 27, 1 9 6 3. Many thanks for your highly informative letter of December 22. Our apologies for having taken so long to answer. It is discouraging, of course, to believe that there is great need for placing the marginal lands of East. frica under the protection afforded by husbandry, and yet to find the political and that includes politics within individual ministries -so unfavourable. money could be raised here for investment in t1is potential industry, but there must be some disposition on the part 0 the government to encourage its investment. In any event, we are calling attention to the logic of private investment in this form of resource development in the hope that with evident American interest in such enterprise, opportunities will be Sound the application of the cash and knmo1-how which wi 11 be avai lab e. Your letter is most clear, except for the last three sentences in Par. 2 "Hunting Parties" bottom of Page 1. ould you be kind enough to elaborate on or clarify your thoug1ts eypressed in? Appreciative of your helpfulness, and with assurance as to our discretion. Since""elf, /''/. {r. L,tu-e.v-LV. fj C lerrlent E. tvierowit for :"RIENDS OF ArRICA IN ANERI::A.. CE Ira Dictated by Mr. Merowit -signed by his secretary in his absence from t1e office.

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\ I ( G G Al,U "kLlTAGEM3NT SCH&1E, P O VOl, K ""i\fYA. 1,11'. Clemen t Mer ovJi t" Friends of Af1' ic& in Ta1'ryto\.m, & ''III YO {K .. Dear r11' ... t erowi t, 21st March, 1963. you or your letter of Fe u ry Regarding my para 2 "Hunting P tiesll I \'lill elaborate : Game 1anagement as ie e'ivis8,;,e it is an eXLension of i,he meat industry. Any based on processine or sale of a ra\'1 mater ial .:nus t for efficiency, hdve reg11lar ::m' reliable supplies of th, c GaTIe cropping thus becomes a routine job COT.'l0 rain or and is arduous to say the least. 'lhe Sport Lunter to i s a man of leisure a"ld gener'ally c::dvaJlccc. in &ee 1s [.lot, the person to undertake a s rem101S rout.lne ob cLllling alimals. Being on holiday he ,\,1ill :-est \vL1en e "'lants and not vThen convenient t o a He i s interested in slaying "trophy" acinals 'rhich \loulu constitute but a small percentl:..ge of the gar.1e rope .. rence y state ent Jh(.. t sport hu.'I1ters carmor, be regarded as an efficient. :l .. ans of utilising the ga1!le a vailabl e for exploi t!-1tion. ::o\:ever a smt.ll percentage "he IItrophy" ani, als (old :nales 'ith large horns e c) m ight be made available for spo t providing i..hi)t the llunters maKG it s fficiently Llcrative 0 the illanage"lOnt authority or company I believe t:.1 erefo e tha'C so e hunting parties could b8 incl ued ina a harvesting progr amme, tho.gh they. \-fOl l d not b e the b:3!"is of cat proora;m:ne and th::J.L one could expect a vel'agc i'1.C0 10 of $ 2,000 pcr party. Jntil tl e onl 1 .10 medII or leaze( .. by t'3 Hun ting fir s "as tha' c on "ih'b their offices stood in rIairobi. 'lhey ope r 8vea their safaris over vast tracts of uninhabited Africa. these "'re.:1S are eoing 1,;0 OCt; Ipied '.,ri th ranching and game m a nagement.. SCfleme. Loca.L a.lthoriti_s and the private enverprises tvhich co-ne i volvo nre '1.ot going r,o toleraLe hu ting fir to drif hlnt cheir land ana hen ''''ove on. if there the possilJili ties of making money by spo t, h nting the gaIle, they '.,ill -;ish to exploit this 8110. I'l...'1. saf3rls on t.r : .. ir l2.nc the selves. T h e -/h i 1:.e Hunters will no longer be f ree t o r orun ''1here 'they \vish. game lands w i l l be run by priva e or l ocnl authorities \'Tho \vill nai.,urally aL a t taking any profit availabl e r hus JIllnting Fir s as hey are nO'1 ar
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NATIONAL ADVISORY COMMlTIEB: Dr. Madison S. Briscoe, Howard University Dr. James P. Chapin, American Museum of Narural History Prof. Raymond F. Dasmann, Humboldt State College Prof. E. B Edney, University of California Dr. Jerome H. Holland, President, Ha ,..--ton Instirute P .ayford W. Logan, Howard University Dr. Harry Most, N Y.U. School of Medicine Prof. George A. Petrides, Michigan State University Prof. Horace F. Quick, Seville, Spain Dr. Arnold E. &haefer, National Instirute of Health INTERNATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITIEB: Sir Julian Huxley, London J. S. Annan, World Food Program, Rome Col. Mervyn Cowie, Director National Parks, Kenya R. A. Critchley, President, Wildlife Conservation Soc., No. Rhodesia Kai Cutry-Lindahl, N Museet and Skansen, Stockholm H.E. -..flief A. S. Funclikira, Minister, Ministry of Justice, Tanganyika Dr. P. E. Glover, Dept. of Veterinary Services, Kenya Maj. Ian Grimwood, Chief Warden, Game Department, Kenya Prof. Bernhard Grzimek, Director, Zoological Gardens, Frankfurt Rocco Knobel, Director, National Parks, So. Africa Dr. H. P. Ledger, E.A.A. & F. Research Org., Kenya Capt. Chas R. S. Pitman, V. Pres., Fauna Preservation Society, London M. K. Shawki, Director, Forests Dept., Khartoum Abdul Ghafur Sheikh, Nairobi Reay H. N. Smithers, National Museum, So. Rhodesia Dr. Victor W. Turner, University of Manchester, England Dr. Jacques Verschuren, Serengeti Research Project, Tanganyika Dr. David P. S. Wasawo, Makerere Univ. College, Kampala 1 end s o f AFRICA 1 n AmerIca TARRYTOWN, NEW YOR It September 9, 1963 Mro IoS.C. Parker Galana Game Management Sc VOl, Kenya Africa Dear Mro Parker: Please forgive me for ha "ng tak so long to answer your informative letter of c 2lsto Certain problems primarily personal, have obliged me to keep postponing / this lettero We were grateful to get the information you supplied 0 We have not heard, in the meantime, either from Arnold Fletcher or Robert Me Grath/who was going to visit Fletcher and discuss with him the cropping enterprise possibilitieso Since Mro Me Grath, in a sense, was acting as our courier and was to have shared with us upon his return, his observations and suggestions affecting our plan to sponsor a private cropping scheme/we find oursevles as much in the dark as when he left in the late Wintero I would be most grateful if you would find the time to bring us not only with the cropping scheme possibilities but because I am doing an article on the present conservation situation in East Africa and would like to have as much current dope as possibleo Your personal views and the outlook for Kenya would be greatly appreciated as a supplement to what we hope to hear from Colonel Cowie and Major Grimwood 0 CEM/mew Clement Eo Merowit for FRIENDS OF AFRICA IN AMERICA

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I MINIS ,AY '0' FoMS/ bl V 1.0 .... un; 'lJ F I -, /'

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Tel egra ms: G AME", Nai r obi GAME DEPARTMENT ,/fel e phone : No. .1 J Ref. No GA ... ) P.O. Box 241, NAIROBI I 11t h October, 1 9 57 Lt.Co l.R.A.Hurt, D.S.O. / Gam e Department, I 0 P.O.Box 34, {I KILIFI. WALIANGULU GAlrE lAANAGE 1ENT SCHEME M r .I.S.C.Parker has been left at Kilifi to investigate the practicability of this scheme which he will explain to you and make a detailed report t o this office. While engaged o n this task, he can also assist in other routine w ork. I enclose co p y of his letter addressed to me. Henceforth he will work under your directio n and general supervision. W ill you kindly discuss the o peration with him and advise-m e on these points 1 How l ong should the operation take -it will not be necessary for Parker to visit every no o k and cranny? 2. Staff. I cannot provide s pecial scouts for this purpose unless you are completel y stuck. I have in another letter authorised you to replace t h e t w o scouts transferred u p here. Perhaps the replacements could be attached to Parker. 3. T. & T Vote. By co p y o f this letter I a m requesting the Secretary to allocate Parker three quarters of the allocation formerly he l d by Mr.J .A.Hunter. 4. Lorry. The Chevrolet lorry referred to is being repaired and I have a driver but it may take one or t w o weeks. If the matter is urgent, perhap s Mr.Morris-Smith might lend his lorry, while he cou l d hire temporarily. Perhap s you w ould discuss with Morris-Smith. When the" Chevrolet lorry is ready it w ill be sent to Kilifi for Parker's use. 5. Tents. Parker s h ou l d indent o n the Storekeeper at the stry 6. Porters. If these are required for carrying loads, they can be hired and paid from Parker's allocation from the T & T.Vote. 'to CHIEF GAill 1 ARDEN Copies to The Secretary ( Hr.Barnwell) Ministry of Forest Deve l opment, Game and Fisheries, NAIROBI -Please allocate i of Mr.J.A.Hunter's a llocation of the T & T .Vot e to Mr.I.S.C. Parker i to Hr.J. Barrah f o r the extra amount o f travelling he will have to do while in charge of Makindu Area. -J. Barrah, Esq., Game Department, KAJI ADO I.S.C.Parker, Esq., Game Department, P.O.Box 34, K I L IFI

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Telegrams: "GAME". Nairobi Telephone: No 2?6??-t Ref. No. GA .. l l br : 7 .. GAME DEPARTMENT .p.O;--Box> 2+t,:=NJlrI1teBr f.o "'-1. 1.. Lt. 0 vY S-7 \. iN,. i[ O\C t:, \)\' 'l tt\t\ l :s t' fr \'.)h t to' L . :vtA. t; J.v crt '1I 'C r .(;..\).; ... {. 0 4 1\ \Jl.. t\ '( '-'{? "-k ,..c tlf' -h _' crt.; 't', -;"" f\,,,,r.\. '\! h'Y 1\ .. t I u 1 V ,I,./-1;k' -1...." In.. "-1M Itu, '. f) t; V\. flu d 0 _Iv-V \:.JMII".. (\ IV: \ u..V lAQ \. lI'l tVv-.Jl.tX .t;.\.-.t., 1-'\. \ I ru \--.

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Telegrams: "GAME", Nairobi GAME DEPARTMENT Telephone: No. 20672-3 P.O. Box 241, NAIROBI Ref. No. GA ... 'rhe Game Ylarden, P.O.Box 34, KILIFI. h October, 1957 (1) Transport. The old Chevrolet Lorry is being repaired and snouId be available in about two_ weeks time, when it will be sent down to you. Mr.Parker can borrow Mr.Morris-Smith's Lorry. '" (2) T.& T.Vote. Parker is being sent He must try and make this last for at least six weeks. M oney is very short. (3) Scouts Tents -Porters. Noted. (4) Your para(6). Agreed. If parker does not consider this Scheme practicable, then he should recommend some alternative either as a modification of the present scheme or some completely new idea. Frankly, I do not think this sc heme will work. I consider that the correct so lution is to attempt to convert the Waliangulu to Agriculture and get them in places such as Hola. The Provincial Commissioner, Coast Province, has already m ade some such suggestion and I would be grateful if you and Mr.parker would g o and discuss this matter with the Provincial CommissIoner. CHIEF GAME WARDEN Copy to -The Provincial Commissioner, Coast Province, MOMBASA

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r A EAST AFRICAN POSTS AND TELECOMMUNJCATIONS ADMINISTRATION T.A. 3 2 Telegram No._._ .... .... ......... C HARGES Sh. eta Ccl. No .... ___ .. _ __ OFFICIAL TELEGRA M Sent 10 ___ ... ___ _ __ Prefix T.R.1. Office of o rigin and service IllStruetioDs Wo rds Al. .. _. __ ............ ADDRESS (PLEASE WRITE IN BLOCK L ETTERS) TO:-C f-\ \EF G A:ME.. D tLt FI Non:The certificate of authority OD the back o f thiJ; form must be properly c om pleted be fore lUis telegram will be accepted.

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I certif y t hat t his tele gr am is sent on the <;ervice of... .... .......... .......... ........ .. ........... . ........ ................... . ....... ...... . S ign atu r e .............. . . ..... ............. ........ . .... ........... . .......... . ............ ................ ... Rank . . ....... ... . .... ___ .. ... ......... _ ..... ........... ... __ .................. . Seal or stamp of sending a u t hori ty The P ost m as ter Gen e r a l i s not liabl e for any l oss or damag e w hi ch m ay be inc :urre d 0 EUst ain e d by reaso n o f or o n acco u m ot any mlStake or defau l t in t h e t r ans missio n of a tel e gram G. P K 3 417-40 0CY-J Pads-3/54

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The Seer taI'l, The La.n{;\: ago P O .Box 340, NAIROBI. 58 ,., ; I certify that .I.S.C.Perter, crdon haD passed the oral in me today Copy tOI-Tho Chief GQJj)9 ardon, Game :Department P.O.Box 241, NAIROBI. The Game arden, Joame Department, KILIFI . W. HALL DISTRIOT CO SSIonEP., KILl]?I

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" tff:J J OF THIS REPORT ON THE PROPOSEDr.' VER GAME MANAGEMENT SCHEME -==--====-==-===-==-= 0t \ry \ \ \ 1. I BTROOOCTIOlf 2. DEl!'INITION 0-' A GAME MABAGl!.MENT ZONE AND EXAMPLES 3. PROPOSED BOUNDARIES :FOR A PILOT GAME MANAGEMENT SClmm IN KILI!'I AND TAKA RIVER DISTRICTS 4. DESCRIPTION OF THE AREA 5. GAME 6. ORGANISATION OF THE SCHEME 7. Ull'ECT OF THE AllTI-POACHIliG CAMPAIGN ON THE VALIANGULU AND ITS POLITICAL IMPLICATIONS 8. BENEPITS WICR WOULD ACCRUE FROM THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE PROFOSED SCHEME 9. FINANCE AND ROUGH ESTIMATES 10. APPENDICm

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. IJlTRO:OOCfiON In some ot the more remote areas of Kenya, there are certain types of land unsuited to any form ot agricul:tural development in the normally accepted sense. Any attempt at agricultural exploitation ot, or stook keeping in these arid typel! of land would aerely result in large scale erosion and dessioation of the soil. Some of these waterless semidesert zones at present have few, if any human inhabitants and could more properly be classified as wilderness or waste lands. In these areas wild animals have lived tor countless generatiOns without in any way damaging or endangering the so11 or vegetatian. In view of the nature of these zones it is considered that the wisest form of land use in these areas of sub-economic value v111 be in undertaking some fom of "tarm1ngll of vild animals. In these areas it wU1 be essential to accept the faot that an annual crop or harvest ot vild fauna can be taken in precisely the same way as a farmer markets his excess stooke At the same time there exists in the country lying between the Eastern boundary of the Royal. faavo National Park and the settled coastal strip a number ot African tribesmen who, for many generations, have supported themselves and their families entirely by hunting wild animals. During the last few years these vily and skilful h1l1lters have ertended their activities beyond the scope ot merely hunting for the pot, and their own immediate needs, and have taken to large scale poaChing for monetary gain. In the process they have tended, unwittingly, to destroy their own means ot livelihood. The recent successful drive against the poachers has had the dual effect of saving the remnants of the once prolific wild fauna of this zone, and at the same time preserving something of the traditional means ot livelihood ot the Waliangulu, without whioh, (as they have no other acoeptab1e methad of livelihood), they wOUld surely starve. The successful outcome of the anti-poaching campaign can therefore be seen to have largely

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2. saved the Waliangalu from themselves. As hUllting is the traditional, and . ill the case of most individuals, the only means of subsistance, it therefore appears logical to attempt to rebuild the scattered remnants of the herds of wild animals in certain selected areas, and then allow the Waliangulu to continue to enjoy (in so far as is possible) their traditional way of life, and at the same time became useful citiZens. But with this great difference. The traditional methods used by the Waliangulu are not only illegal, but extremely wasteful and if left to their own devices, the wild fauna on which they depend for ex1.stence, would within a comparatively brief time, be largely wiped out. It therefore is necessary to devise a suitable scheme under the strictest European supervision which would ensure :-a) that the Waliangulu do not annihilate the game, and that rather by means of careful selection and control, foster and build up afresh the herds of game, culling only a predetermined number of wild animals, and b) that by means of a proper marketing system and through avoidance of any form of waste, obtain the best possible remuneration and return for this produce. It should be noted that at present, although large numbers of animals are annually destroyed by poachers, their wasteful methods, their lack of legalised marketing facilities and the fact that they invariably have to sel1 their trophies at a ridiculously low price to unscrupulous traders and middlemen, means that they themselves gain but little from these illicit transactions. In other words the Waliangulu would derive far greater benefit from a comparatively small number of legally slaughtered wild an1mals properly marketed, than they gain by their present il1egal practices. The conclusion to be drawn is that not only wpuld it be to the advantage of the Waliangulu to enter into a Game Management Scheme, but also to the a dvantage of the fast diminishing wild animals, and lastly, but by no means least, to the advantage of the country as a whole through the el1mination of the need for poaching and its consequent huge loss of annual revenue to the Colony. A Game Management System would be a practicable means of securing the

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, eo-operation of the African in preserving Kenya's fauna It is realised that a small number of Giriama, and possibly other tribes, have adopted Valiangulu methods of bunting, and for the purposes of this report these Africans could well be accepted into the scheme under the same terms and conditione as the Valiangulu themselves. ========-=

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, DEFINITION OF A GAME MANAGEMENT ZONE AND EXAMPLES ==::==c== A broad definition of a Game Management Zone would be an area. 4. wherein the wisest form of land use would be the conservation of wild life. A Game Management Zone is also considered to be an area. wherein wild fauna is preserved for the direot benefit of as many Afrioan tribesmen as possible. The Game proving itself of obVious economic value thus assures its own continuity. Such a system of li temlly farming wild life is perhaps a new conception in Kenya. However, similar schemes have long been established in both Europe and America. In one area of approximately seven hundred square miles in the Uni ted States, deer were on the verge of extinotion. Game Management was instituted and now, twenty years later, an annual crop of over forty thousand deer are shot by licensed hunters. !he revenue received is considerable and the scheme financially self supporting. In northern Canada the muskrat population was nearly wiped out by indiscriminate trap.ping. The muskl'at, a valuable fur-bearing rodent, was" the basis of a large industry and the means of livelihood for many Canadian Indians. Timely intervention on behalf of the Government and the institution of a Management System, saved the muskrat. Now by selective oulling they are once again a pillar in the economy of the region. Canada has proved that even with a primitive people, as the northern Indians are, Game Management is entirely feasible. Sweden and Denmark are alao pioneers in successful Game Management. An interesting example of how game increases With selective culling comes from South Africa. In Zu1uland it was believed that Impala were the carriers of Tsetse borne diseases. It was therefore decided to exterminate Impala in the region. Before eradication began a census was taken and some eight thousand Impala were counted. During eight years many thousands of Impala were shot, before the scheme was abandoned. The estimated population of Impala in the area is now forty" thousand. This fabulous increase is due to the fact that

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, e the hunters employed did not wholly agree with the principle of liquidation and so only shot a lim ted number. In so doing, however (perhaps unwi ) they continually split the herds thus allowing more rams to breed. (Off the point, but of interest:-it would appear that though one Impala ram in his prime can isolate a large herd of females from other rams, he is incapable of serving them all himself.) Tackled with foresigkt and boldness Game Management in Kenya has every chance of success. As providers of meat, hides and bone many of the larger varieties of game far exceed the capabilities of the average African scrub cow. Wild animals are immune to most of the diseases which afflict cattle, do not require continual attention and are not detrimental in any way to their natural habitats. All initial benefits from Game Management would be monetary, and an advantage over tbe Africans' present inability to convert tbeir stock into ready casb, a situation that will long remain a bindrance to progress. As with a cow, there are few parts of a game animal wbich cannot be utilised. A short list appears below indicating the value of only a few game products. Elephant ivory = She 15/-per lb Rhino horn = She 90/per lb Leopard Skin She 600/-eacb forefoot for making stools etc from 75/-to 125/-each 11 bindf-oot II II trays :8 approx. Shs 50/-each Rhino's foot for making cigerette boxes etc. = She 75/each booves made into Cigarette boxes are sold by Messrs. Rowland Ward for each Buffalo hide All dried game meat Bone Ostrich featbers = -lao cts per lb (a normal hide weighs dried 60 lbs.) = -/50 cte per lb cts per lb Shs 3/-each There is no reason why tbe Game Management organisation should not cut and polish its own ivory, or make tbe elephant feet into stools etc., and thus be able to sell these commodities at three times tbe prices sbown above. In addition to the extra money that would be made, fresh employment would be created.

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, -PROPOSED BOUNDARIES FOR A PILOT GAME MANAGEMmT IN TANA RIVER DISTRICTS 6. Commencing at the point where the Eastern Boundary of the Royal Tsavo Park intersects the T1 va river the proposed boundary shall run southwards to the La1i then southwards again to the intersection of the Park boundary and the Voi river. Thence along the Voi river to the point where the river meets Long.3g032' E; Thence northwards to the trig. point known as JANJANI. Thence to the trig. point shown as KOROMODI. Thence in a. north-ea.sterly direction to the interseotien of Leng.400oo' E and Lat. 2' S. hom this point the boundary shall run due east along Lat. 2' S to its intersection with the Malindi-Hola road. Thence northwards along this road until its junction with the track to Assa, a little past the GarBen turn-ott. Thence along the !saa track to the point where it meets the Tiva river. Thence westwards along the river to its intersection with the National Park boundary, the point of commencement. These boundaries have been suggested for a number of reasons. 1. Tbey enclose an area of unused land for which no better usage has yet been devised. 2. With the exception of the Tiva river Valley, the area within the proposed boundaries is fly oountry, and as such useless for domestic cattle without an extremely expensive bush clearance scheme which even it it could be undertaken, would be undesirable as it would inert tably result in letting in the desert. 3. The great bulk ot the suggested Game Management Zone, with the exception of the Ga.lana river, Garbit1 watel'-hole and the Assa wells, is entirely devoid of permanent water.

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7. 4. Bearing in mind Julian Huxleyt s axiom that land must be used ttaccordicg to its varying capacity and that this capacity must not be reduced (or totally lost) through short sighted or faulty exploitation," it is considered that any normal form of agricultural development or exploitation would only achieve extensive desiccation of the land, resulting in new deserts being created within a comparatively brief period of time, whereas, under a system of Game Management the soil and vegetative cover would remain fully protected. The photographs on page show susceptibility of the region to erosion. 5. Within these boundaries there are few lawful inhabitants. The exceptions being a few Galla tribesmen who graze their livestock in the Tiva river valley and a few Giriama and Waliangulu who live by burning charcoal and cultivating small shambas when conditions permit Status of the Land in the Proposed Game Management Zone: All the land to the north 0-[ the Galana river is Crown Land. All to the south of the river is included in the North Ny1ka Native Land Unit Land Exchange : (i) It should be noted that it is not proposed to interfere with the existing grazing rights the Galla in any way. (ii) As already stated, there are a few Gir1ama. charcoal burners on the north bank of the Voi river. These people also cultiVate small shambas when conditions permit. The country being of such an arid nature, charcoal burning and shifting agriculture can only be harmful to the vegetative cover with a consequent danger of sheet erosion. It will be noticed from the map that there is an area of Crown Land north of the existing Native Land Unit boundary in the region of Hadu. This tract of land has been excluded from the proposed Management Zone because it is more suited to agricultural

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, e 8. devel-opment and it also already holds manY' Giriame. famUies. It is suggested that the Giriama charcoal burners could be moved from the Voi river area to this Crown Land to the benefit of both the people and the land itself. It must be stressed that it would be highly undesirable to have any agrieulturalists in the Game Management Zone. ============ DESCRIPTION Oli' fHE AREA =::::a::====_= == The area proposed little emeeds two thousand, two hundred square miles in extent. ]lor the greater part the land is fiat and low-lying with occasional rocky hills. However, there is some land around the Da.ka.cha and Hadu which is a rolling hUly nature. Three large rivers flow rom west to east through the proposed zone. In the north is the seasonal Tiva river which is dependant on the rain falling in Kitui district. Through the centre of the zone flows the Ga.lana.. This is a permanent river of considerable size. Lastly, in the south there is the Voi river, this again is a seasonal river with its source in the Teita Hills. There are water holes widely distributed throughout the area, all of which, with the exception of Garbiti, dry up in dry weather. The vegetation throughout the area, with the exception of the hilly eountry around Hadu and Dakacha, is composed of varying types of thorn scrub, generally tending to be thioker in the east than the west. A dry type of forest (referred to as light forest on the map) exists in the hilly country. Open grassland is found along the Tiva river, in the Lak Buns. (a narrow flood plain running west to east between the Tiva and the Galana) and in patches between the Galana and the Voi. RaiDfall tJU.oughout the area is low and the region seems particularly subjeGt to droughts. A good year of rain is invariably: followed by several bad years, (this factor alone makes agriculture precarious). -====-====

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, e 9. GAME Within the proposed Game Management Zone there is a wide variety of fauna. Those whioh will be of major importanoe to the soheme are I;;' Elephant Buffalo nand Giraffe Topi Lion Rhino Leopard Or,rx Lesser Kudu Gerenuk Grant's Gazelle. Some of these will have to be afforded total proteotion until they have reo overed from the onslaught of the poachers. Elephant w111 undoubtedly be the mainstay of the whole scheme. Where elephant are ooncerned the management zone is only part of an ecological unit, and as such is subject to periodiC fluotuations in the number of elephants therein. In estimating the number of elephant that may be shot annually, it has been necessary to base calculations on the elephant population of the ecological unit as a whole and not of the Game Management Zone alone. (This ecological unit may be said to include the whole of the Tsavo Park (East) and the proposed Game Management Zone). From incomplete censuses, carried out by the National Parks service, both from the air and on the ground, it is known that there is a minimum of three thousand elephant in the area in question. The population, however, might well be double this figure but until further data can be acoumulated, it is suggested that three thousand be taken as the critical number. On the basis of Simpson and Kinloch's paper (Re Appendix 1 of the Annual Report of the Game and Fisheries Department of the Uganda Protectorate for 195;) which in turn is based on Dr. Perry's work ''Reproduction of the African Elephant" (Re Perry J .5. 195;, The Reproduction of the Mrican Elephant, Loxodonta Africana, Phil. Trans.R. Soc. Lond. No. 643, Vol.2;7 p.p. 93 149), it is estimated that a hundred and fifty elephant might be shot annua.lly in the Game Management Zone and yet allow an increase in the total population. Giraffe, buffalo and the larger antelope will be a steady soarce of Ileat and hides.

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10. The question might well be asked "if the area is so devoid of water, how does the game exist?"; the answer being that there is a certain type of euphorbia found in the driest areas which provides the animals with sufficient moisture to enable them to exist. (Photographs on page .) ======== ORGANISATION OF THE SCHEME =========---:= .== It is recommended that a Management Committee be set up to formulate policy and that two suitable officers be detailed to administer the scheme, one officer being responsible for all field and development work and the other responsible for the marketing, general administration and finance. The Management Committee shall consist of ten members :Two representatives from the Administration; one from each district concerned. A representative from the National Parks, e The two officers running the scheme and five Waliangulu elders. The headquarters of the scheme shall be established on the Galana river. It is further suggested that the Management Zone be split up into five subdivisions. In each subdivision a settlement of thirty family units shall be formed, the number of family units might be increased as the scheme gets under way. Naturally, each settlement will have to have a permanent water supply. It is therefore suggested that the settlements be established at Garbiti, on the Galana, at Assa, at Hoshingo and opposite Karawa. The latter two places do not have permanent water at the moment, but with the construction of dams and catchment tanks water could be laid on fairly cheaply. Each settlement will be under the control of a headman who will be directly responsible to the Management Committee for the day to day running

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I e 11. of the community and enforcement of the Committee's instructions. Under him, the settlement would be responsible for policing its subdivision and carrying out any developments or work ordered by the Committee. A rigid hierarchy shall be established in each community, the most senior grades being of hunters, the lowest those of labourers. As vacancies occur suitable candidates will be promoted to more senior grades, although it is suggested that promotion be by selection and not automatic. Strict standards will have to be laid dow n and adhered to. An individual will have to earn his advancemen t by proving his ability and suitability. In the event of a 'hunter proving incompetant or otherwise unsuitable, the Committee will be empowered t o down-grade him or, in serious cases, expel him the scheme. The Management Committee will decide the number and species animals to be shot each year. On deciding that a hunt will take place in a subdivision, the field will notify the headman of that area who will set up a hunting camp in the region to be hunted. Firearms shall be issued to the traine d h unters and t h e quota of animals killed. The entire settlement will be expected to assist with the operation. The products, namely hides, dried meat, tusks or any other trophies would be taken to the central headquarters for processing an d marketing at the best possible prices. The field officer will be present throughout the operations to ensure that the correct number and sex of each species are shot and that all carcases are effiCiently utilised with the minimum wastage. Once the quota for a given subdivision has been taken no further hunting will be permitted until the Management Committee so authorises. The field will then move into the next subdivision where the process will be repeated. In the event a large scale hunt being authorised for any reason, the office r shall be entitled to calIon a neighbouring subdiviSion for assistance. Likewise, the field officer will be empowered to calIon the tribesmen all or any subdivision to help him with control work outSide the boundaries of the Game Management Zone, such as driving herds of wild animals back from the settled areas into the zone and so on.

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12. Between hunts the tribesmen will be employed on development projects such as enlarging water holes, constructing dams and cutting tracks. Also there will be a considerable amount of routine and maintenance work, such as keeping cut lines clear; policing the area; counting and observing the movements of game. Remuneration: All income received from the sale of trophies, meat and other by-products will be paid into a central fund. Each African participating in the scheme will then be entitled to an annual payout, the precise amount depending on the position, status or grade he holds in the organisation. It is suggested that a system of cash advances be devised whereby individuals can obtain a small monthly income to cover their immediate needs and that money so advanced be deducted from the annual payout. The sum of money available for this annual payout will be decided by the Management Committee, bearing in mind that cash have to be set aside or reserved for a variety of purposes. This sum will then be allocated to all partiCipants in the scheme, the size of each share to be worked out on a sliding scale commensurate with the status of the partiCipant. Again no payment will be automatic and if, in the opinion of the Committee, any member of the scheme has not pulled his weight, or in any other way shown himself unworthy of his share, the C ommittee shall be entitled to reduce his payout Firearms : For obvious reasons it is undesirable to allow individual posseSSion of firearms in the scheme. The organisation will therefore have to purchase a suitable number of firearms which will be held in an armoury at the central headquarters. These would be issued to trained hunters for the duration of a hunt and returned on conclusion of the hunt

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, e HUNTING PARTIES : Should outsiders wish to hunt in the area they would first have to obtain permission from the Management Committee and abide by the Committee's conditions. ===== -= AFFECT OF THE ANTI-POACHING CAMPAIGN ON THE WALIANGULU AND ITS POLITICAL IMPLICATIONS = __ ____ ==::::r=== ============= Prior to the Anti-Poaching Campaign approximately three hundred Waliangulu men supported themselves and their families by hunting. From censuses taken (Re Appendix 2) each man has two dependants. The successes achieved in the Anti-Poaching Campaign have resulted in disruption of the Waliangulu way of life, and the tribe now finds itself in s o mething of a vacuum, the men can no longer hunt without risking a gaol sentence and yet they are unwilling to adopt any other form of livelihood. The more fortunate among them have found employment wi thin the safari industry or the National Parks. These number in the region of one hundred. A few others have taken to charcoal burning, as previously stated, an undesirable occupation in the area in which the Waliangulu live. But, for the most part the ground has been cut from under their feet, and the Government is morally obliged to these tribesmen with an alternative occupation. It is considered by those who know them best that these ex-poachers are only too willing to 'go straight' provided they are given the opportunity to do so, but merely to forbid their former practices and yet fail to put any other alternatives in their place, is going to result in many of these people resuming their nefarious activities at the first opportunity, largely because with all the will in the world they will have little alternative. It should be added that the successes achieved and the money and effort spent on the Anti-Poaching drive will largely be nullified unless suitable occupations can be found for the ex-poachers. This is another strong reason why a pilot Game Management scheme should be started

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14. and the Waliangulu invited to participate. Their peculiar amenability to varying conditions makes them a particularly suitable people with whom to start such a scheme. ======= BENEFITS WHICH WOULD ACCRUE FROM THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE PROPOSED SCHEME ========--======--= ===== 1. The Waliangulu and other tribesmen at present unemployed and in many cases unemployable, will be given an opportunity to partiCipate in earning a and livelihood in keeping with their traditional tribal way 2. By gaining the co-operation the so-called hunting tribes large scale poaching, at present a direct cause a very substantial loss revenue, would be considerably reduced. 3. A new type industry an ever increasing number tribesmen, by both direct and indirect means, will be created. 4. The neceSSity of extensive ga m e control work, in the areas adjacent to the zone, will undoubtedly be reduced the reasons :-(a) Such control work as is necessary could be undertaken by the staff of the Game Management Zone. (b) The elimination of poaching in the hinterland, as well as the development of the Game M anagement Zone, will very probably result in elephant having little cause to invade the settled areas where in the past they have been driven to seek refuge from the activities the poachers. It is of great interest to note that in 1957 only three elephant were shot in Kilifi district and that these were residents of the Arabuko-S koke forest and not marauders from the hinterland. In preceding years fifty or more were shot annually. Concurrently in 1957 the poaching of elephant in the area between the Tsavo Park and the coastal strlp dropped -to nil. This area is a dry weather resort for the Nyika elephant. In previous years they were denied this tract of land by the poachers, and rather

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. I than face starvation and thirst in the hinterland they resorted to the thicker vegetation of the coastal strip, and its agriculture. Furthermore, elephant depredation in the coastal strip was negligible forty years ago. At this time the Waliangulu hunted mainly for food. The increase in elephant damage to crops at the coast seems parallel with the rapid commercialisation of poaching, and it would therefore seem that there is a direct relationship between them. It would appear that without poaching, the area between the Park and the coastal strip, which is included in the proposed Game Management Zone, will act as an adequate buffer between the hinterland and the coast as regards game. 5. The retention of the proposed area for wild life is important to the Tsavo National Park (East) as the latter is not ecologically complete without the former. Also with the cessation of poaching the fauna of the Park, especially elephant, will increase in numbers. It will perhaps even exceed pre-poaching limits, with this difference, it will be in a confined area. This situation will result in the animals damaging their habitat, thus necessitating controlled shooting in the National Park, thiS, as itis against the whole prinCiple of National Parks, would be highly undesirable. e However, such a situation would be averted if the Game Management Zone is established adjacent to the Park as the surplus of animals would be killed in the Zone. =====--= FINANCE AND ROUGH ESTIMATES ====-:--.========== One initial loan from Government would be necessary to start the scheme. As the scheme will be financially self supporting within the first year, repayment of this loan, with interest, would commence almost immediately. Income: (approximate annual) As previously estimated one hundred and fifty elephant could be shot during the SCheme's first year. The average weight of ivory per elephant is estimated at forty pounds this cut and polished would be worth approximately 60. There should be worth of meat per beast, and the feet and ears are

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. -, 16. worth Therefore it may be seen that an elephant is worth The revenue derived from elephant alone in the first year should be in the region of ,000. Expendi ture: (Approximate per annum) Two Europeans Three lorries @ each Two Land Rovers @ each Three drivers, clerks and Headquarters labour Payout to settlers (approx. 70/each per month) ... TOTAL : ,400 per annum ,500 ,000 ,400 per annum ,500 per annum ,800 Thus elephant alone should support the scheme within the first few years of its existence, bearing in mind that the number of elephants that can be shot will increase periodically. It will be noted that the revenue which would come from all other game animals, and this too would be a considerable sum, has not been taken into account or assessed. The initial grant from Government will have to be adequate to the extent of covering the cost of buildings, transport and the first year's payout and salaries, and the establishment of permanent water supplies at Karawa and Hoshingo. Also firearms and various other equipment will have to be purchased. Should doubt be felt over the possible profits from elephant the following plan is suggested:-In the Arabuko-Sokoke forest there are a number of elephant who are a continual menace to the surrounding shambas. Unless a very large sum of money is made available it will be impossible to confine these elephant

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, e 17. to the and unless they are either confined or annihilated they will continue to be a nuisance and a loss revenue to both the local African and the Government. It is suggested that as the number elephant is not large they be liquidated. An should be detailed to carry out this job, and sell all the meat, ears and ivory with as little wastage as possible and thus give a concrete example what can be made elephB.nt. Ian S. C. Parker GAME WAImEN

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, e APPENDIX 1 THE WALIANGULU ========= The Waliangulu are a small tribe of hunters inhabiting the hinterland of the Coast Province south of the Tana river. They own no land, practise no and keep no stock. Their sole means of existence until the recent anti-poaching campaign, was hunting. As hunters they are unequalled elsewhere in East Africa. As far as can be ascertained the Waliangulu were the original pre-Bantu people of the Tana river valley. The first Bantu tp settle in the riverine strip were the Pokomo who were seeking refuge from the Galla. "'aliangulu and Pokomo lived in harmony and a certain amount of interbreeding between the two tribes took place. Indeed the Katsae clan of the Pokomo claim a Mliangulu named Mitsotsozini as their direct ancestor. Later, the Galla invading from the north subjugated both Pokomo and Waliangulu. Perhaps the word subjugated in regard to the latter tribe, is not quite correct. The relationship formed between Waliangulu and Galla was akin to that knoNn to exist between the Ituri Pygmies and their Bantu masters. A Mliangulu and his fanily was adopted by a Galla family which afforded the Mliangulu a home and protection in return for all the ivory the hunter obtained. vith the establishment of this system, it was inevi table that as the Galla conquered southwards, so the "'aliangulu went with them. The association between the hunters and warlike pastoralists existed over a lengthy period, possibly more than two hundred years. During this time the Waliangulu forsook their original language in favour of the Galla tongue which they speak today. They adopted Galla customs and many became Muslims. During the latter part of the last century the Galla suffered a series of disastrous defeats at the hands of the Somalis from the north east. From this time on, the power and influence of the Galla waned rapidly, and they withdrew to the areas where they live today. (At one period the Galla territory extended as far south as Mombasa.) When the Galla started retreating, many Waliangulu, realising that their overlords were no longer

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, al1-powerful1, remained behind. These men were the ancestors of the present Waliangulu communities in Ki1ifi, Kwale and Teita Districts. Because the tribe is so small, (-estimated at under 2,000), and 'because they are so widely distributed, there is little, if any, tribal organisation among the Waliangulu. They are an amenable people to whom tribal tradition in the accepted sense, means little. The saying "vThen in Rome do as Rome does" most adequately depicts the vTaliangulu attitude toward life. Those living in a Giriama locality dress as Gi riama use Giriama words in their own speech and adopt Giriama customs (especially when the latter entail drinking). There is a certain amount of inter-marriage between Waliangulu women and Giriama men. However, the Waliangulu men, possessing no stock, cannot afford the bride price demanded by Giriama, thus there is no marriage of outsiders into the tribe. Where still in contact with the Galla many Waliangulu are still followers of the Prophet, and retain Galla ways. However, the old feudal relationship no longer exists. Perhaps the flexibility of aliangulu behaviour is best illustrated by this example. Abakuna s/o Gumundi, a very well known elephant hunter, dwel t at Kasikini (a little north of Dakacha). Abakuna and his family wore Giriama clothing and modelled their huts Giriama fashion. Abakuna decided to move to Ba1issa near Garsen. This is a Galla area and the family immediately adopted Galla dress, built Galla type dwellings and the women grew their hair long. Some time later the Abakunas were returned to Kasikini. Within three days of returning they again dressed as Giriama and were building Giriama huts. The physical appearance of the Waliangulu is not easily described as there is much variation in features and shades of colour. Many are tall and lithe with aquiline features indicating Galla blood. Some are small and wiry with small delicate features, perhaps having the appearance of the original 'people. Others are identical in appearance with the WaNyika Bantu. The Waliangulu practice of copying the tribal scars and cicatrises of their neighbours also renders identification difficult. Skin shades vary from

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light yellowish-brown to almost coal black. The name Waliangulu, is apparently of recent origin. An older name still widely used is WaSanye. This term is often applied to both the vlaliangulu and the Waboni" The latter are a similar hunting tribe living in the area north of the Tana mouth. It is stated by some that the two tribes were originally one known as the Wata. The coming of the Galla divided the Wata into two factions ; one becoming the present Waliangulu, the other remaining Wata until the advent of the Somalis to their area. The name laboni is derived from the Somali word "Bon", a name applied to certain small hunting tribes found north of the Juba, and later applied to the vlata. Today, though the Waboni are similar in many ways to the Waliangulu, they speak a Somali dialect which the latter do not understand. From this point alone it would appear that if the two tribes were once one, the division in that tribe must have happened a very long time a go. Lastly, it is worth noting that there are a few shamba 01Nners in the Coastal strip vlho claim ancestry. T hese people are looked dO\m on and regarded as different to themselves by the Waliangulu proper. Ian S.C. Parker GAME vlARDEN

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.... '::. CENSUS OF EIGHT SETTLEMENTS =========================== MEN 135 WOMEN 126 vlomen. and Children = 291 291 Each man has 135 dependants Each man has 2.2 dependants. CHILDREN 165 APPENDIX 2 It is known that the number of Waliangulu who made their living by hunting was approximately 300. Taking the figure 2.2 as average for the 300 men, the approximate Waliangulu population who were dependent on hunting = 300 x 2.2 + 300 = 960 men, women and children. To allow for errors the figure of 1,000 is quoted as the \'laliangulu population dependant on game. Ian S.C. Parker GAME WARDEN

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I \ l' 3 / 2 / 3 / 8 lOth March 195 8 The D i strict Commission r I enclose copy of l e t ter received from the Game Warden, Kilifi. Mr.Parker ha s my full a nnroval t o render all help poss i b l e with i n the limits of availa b l e finance Per ha ps you "woul d disC l.lsS the to c olect b ones i t h h i m 2. Ie YOll \ ill note fro arother letter th<;t T a m urging the p ;ors that be to nold a meet ing as s oon a s possible to d isc"ilsS a long policy for the 'tali angulu. to -The la r den, P O .Box 34, K l tIFI.

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5 / 2 / 5 / 8 'l.'he Permanent ')ocrctary -l.. .l 1 t t .1nlSLr J 01 lores ('a"'!lC and 'i.s'ler i es r AIROBI I enclose c JPV oi16tier receive ':0 ic c.:i.on r, I it: "1., "'ic-I shf):J.ld be iC !lold t e pr JPos d I ct I' ops Sl')()' [S po s as .. un ld t' at :'0 1u.re of .!'op in th'. [; area ar. t occoQin rcssinR. l o t h 1 958 from ulsirici c')nsidcrl"' i{1"'1cn t ,is be a s tlwrc has bee a all ngulu problem is C'Ir,F GAME 'i:AJ DEN Copie s to -The D istrict C o mmissioner raTJIFI -lhe Game a r den P O .Box 34, KILIF'I

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Telegrams: "GAME Nairobi Telephone: No. 20672-3 Ref. No. GA ... .. e e The l1ame Warden, P O B o x 5 4 KILIFI am requesting the Hn istry to requ es t the Prov i nc ial Commissioner, Coast Province to call the eeting as s o o n as p ossi b e as T note that certain officers who n a v e spe cial know edge are going on leave short l y CHIEF GAME \;ARDEN

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1 ) ( ( \ \ \ /4/ /8 rovine It . . . . t t......... (v) 1 e 011 r or rican (8)". Jth ro t s Y t 58. of the o thel

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\ I -" .I. v 11 00 i oj ')( ) ... 'l 4 .I c..: c.( rlJ4d 7 /-t--{ VICc...1&t ih I ..4.' .J _.I.. U v r 1 ic J a e ( ) )/

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(1)) (c) Cd) ( ) \' ,.----: lr e o .) to onrume me t 0 tro 1 { i a hide, horn d I.l1 er t e upo 'Yi: ( ; 0 "h \ \ ,\\ of t ;> :i./e-, Y c ub L d

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\ 'Ref. 22/ 4/1/8 J-'1 Ministry of ForGst D evelopment, F isheries, r 'V //\ Qv P.O. Box 30027, 31s t July, 1958. The Permanent Secreta r y for Africa n A f f airs NAIRO BI. 1,1 t IJ . Wl-,.1IANGULU SZTTLEIH E F T SC IJett e r N o ,ADM .I/20/38 of the 24th July, 1958 8.ddressed t o you m e by the hg.Provincia l Comrnissioner, CO.:1st Province. I hev e the enclosed with the Dis t rict C ommissione r Kilifi' s l etter to the Provinci::..,l Coa st, No. GA/22/1/1/27/58 of the 8 t h J u ly, I find it v e r y difficult, hovvever, t o s e to whu.t extent they ere r e l ted to NIr. P.:1rker' s report, which 72.S enclosed l i t h m y letter No. GD/ 6/177 of the 13th F ebru<...ry, 1958 / to you c:.nd the Provincial Commissioner? CO.:1st. I t is, for e x 2.mple not cle....:.r to me hOIi m'-'ny s e ttle-nents el1vis<:ged, what their siz e w ould be, where they woulcl 1.)e loc . ted, .:m d wh::.t buildings, both pcrm-,
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., 2 (ii) this scheme would enabl e the tribesmen c o n cerned to c ontinu e thei r tradi tj. o n a l way o f life by hunting, the emphc;,sis l<:1id by the Ooun cil o f Minister s wc.s on the finding of some me.:1ns o f livelihood for them Ile v e n i f it must b e accepted thZt.t t h e proces s w : s likely to be c., leng t h y oneil. The rJ.:.;.in a ltec ll2.tive t o h-unting i s cultiv.:::.tion. It seems to me, therefore, hovev e r a v e rse from cultivation these tribeSDen mc;,y b e a t p::ccsent, Ctny scheme for their settl emen t should b e on wh o tever kind of a g Ti-culture i s possible on t h e l a n d e-vt1,iL-..b l e ':'11 thc:::.t every e li'oTt should b e m -:.de to overcome th2ir c..version 'The f.:.<,ct th.:lt not .:::.11 L ,li..:mgulu g ,J.in their livelihoo d by hunting indiccl.tes they tl., .... rn their h.:lnds to othe r lJUrsui ts. (iii) Should 'the scheme e v entuc:::.te, I consider that i t should be in the che;;"rge of c.ln officer of the Administrc,tion, not of the Department. The G:::"''l1e Depe.. tment would, however, g i VG ,II assist.:::.nc e possible on Ghe G.:::.me side. 4 I note ps..r::.grc. h 2 6 o f the recor d th::::,t G system o f flS L f ari Clubsll ..., s suggested in p .. rc..graph 7 of my l ette r No. 22/4/1/ 8 of the 9tl May, 1958, is not onsid ered d esir able Gven a s i n t e rim 5'. In the light o f :pc..r ':1Sr...:.phs 3 and 4 8.bove no furthr ,,:,,::tion OIl t hE; schene r;ill b e t aken by this '.jOy? to: P SECR.:: T l:.RY T h e Provincio'l C o.!!.mi ss":"onE.r C 0 2.s t Province; ncub-.s.].. T11": Ch ief Gt:...:.:.l Yh;y c...el1, li l .. i.robi. T h e G""m c ; i, :-:.r d cn, Kilifi. V The District Co -,lission ',r, Y_ilifi. T ::. District C O:..illn.i s sion'<::r, T L e COInm issione r K i p i Li. The TIi. t rict Commissio n er? : M<11indi.

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--.... [ 22/4/JI 5 to it 1 0 ov n e, 9 h t ber, 5 10

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I ,. C-.I ..... oJ ". . .. 9 .. ).

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1//8 1 58. t ..... [ ( .. ,0 y 0 'ff ... 1" (2,

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' .. COP Y -Ref. CFN. 309 / 02 The Treasury, Nairobi. 7th 8 Th e P ermanen t Secretary for Forest Develop Game and Fisheries, NAIROBI .. 'A IA 1GULU S::TTL::::'::::J.-T S CREME. Ref.your 22/4/1/8 of 31/10 /58 It is regretted tnat it cannot be agreed that the Game Department be allowed to run a settlement s cheme financed from the sale of ivory and I am of tIe opinion that should any settlement s c heme be necessary it is for the Provincial to sucl duties. 2 Vfuile the Treasury calnot agree to waive the revenue accruing from tne sale of ivory there is no objection as far as we are concerned to the Game arden stationed a t Kilifi organising hunting parties for the 'laliangulu and allowing any profit from the of eat to go to the Kilifi frican District Council. It would appear that the Game 'arden alrea.dy n:.s power to .!?ermit this without reference to tne Treasury un der Section 38(3 ) of the Yfild Animals Ordinance. Sgd CU'rHBERT.

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rr /i to 0... ga<.d r ;lJti:Z; (!) tU#tLd 4F..j "'-"'-Jtd-. rD ....:-

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e v j.hi" I I / a 9a-.L /rt)).. cr ab f; 9 ,di: 3 a tJ-@ 1-t,. /' Y., ')a, Jr o.J' /h;, s1-a-ttL \ c:.: .. t AJ-Cf) -!;, /k;:r (A...\. caA ,y I' 7 2 I{ /-1M,t:! 11M.

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0 / COp y 2 2/4/1 / 8 18th October, Dear Mr. Farrer-Brown, Thank you for your letter No. C oVIll of the 2nd October, 1958. 58. As you have kindly undertaken to study the outline of the proposed Waliangulu Game Management Scheme you may be interested to see the enclosed copy of a letter, dated the 11th October, 1958, addressed to me by the Chairman of the Kenya Wild Life Society, which is an unofficial organisation. Encl: Yours sincerely, (Sgd) J.J. Adie, PERMAN' T SEXJRETARY. Leslie Farrer-Brown, The Nuffield Foundation, Nuffield Lodge, Regen ts Park, LONDON, N W.I. Copy to: The Chairman, Kenya Wild Life Society, Nairobi.

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T e l e g ra ms: GAME". Nairobi T e l e phone : No. 20672-3 R ef. No. GA .. ... I.S.C.Parker, Esq., Game Department, P .O. Box 34, KILIFI Dear 4",GAME DEPARTMENT P.O Box 241, NAIROBI 1 7th December, 1958 GAME MANAGEMENT I don't know as yet whether or when the Minister intends to meet the Professional Hunters again. Personally, I do not greatly care for the Scheme as orlginally it seems to me to be more of a Waliangulu Co-operatlve Society than anything else. However, in a recent letter, Provincial Commissioner Coast, described it as a Game M ana g e m ent Scheme ln which the of a number of W a l iangulu was only incidental. ThlS, to me anyway, seems to lndicate a chan g e of outlook. T here is n o question of scuttling the scheme but I think we must have some assessment of the actual 1aliangulu problem as it is today as opposed to what it was when the Scheme was first proposed ana also, because the Scheme is so important and may have such far reaching the pattern must be one of which the new Chief Game W araen will approve. W e should know before very who he will be and he can then be given the file and aecide how he wants the Scheme to operate. So long as we know his ideas we can start working on them before he actually takes over. If you are coming to Nairobi over Christmas we might have a talk about the Scheme in general. Ag. CHIEF GAME WARDEN

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and r. 10/1/2/28 27th Hove mber 58. u aG arden, () I am. rr nging t follo inP.' tour in the Province in Dec ber:-T ursday, 18th ber. orning fternoon Friday, 19th camber un day 21st Dec ber. onday, 22nd Dece ber. Tuesd If 23rd Dec ber. rrive by train. iscussions ith rne d ssistant linister. th Game arden. ith 1 Forest Officer. To "i1ifi. To nlindi. scussions lit strict Officer (if ava"lable), Provinc' 1 is ri s Officer a d Ga rdcn. tur fairobi. 2 I ou1d b fal f t h e arden, 0 base, of Thursday, before I go to he clso leep could et off t on t h e or 18th Dece b r,/ t ve nor it the Provi cial Co issioner' s off:ce. t l.... I ole of t hat afternoon free 3 v Co Could you Ie S6 sk t Garden, i1if1, to be ble to eet e t about I at the Di trict 4 I be "lad 0 r s office on S tu day, 20th ece ber onday 22rl Dece .ber, nd. ill 'ons ith the G e arden. Inr rSTRY OF FOREST DEVELOPMENT, GAME Lin FISHERIES.

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( Ref No. 22/ 4/1/8 COPY. M I NISTRY O F FOREST DEVELOPMENT, G A M E AND FISHEER I 1 S P.O.BOX 337, NAIROBI. 8 t h January The District Commissi oner (?A I )1LP Kilifi. Vt" GAlYIE MANAGEMENT SCHEME WALIANGULU. I attach a draft s c heme for game mana g ement in t h e Galana R iver area of t h e Kilifi Distric t and will be grateful i f y ou will send m e as s o on as possible, t hroug h t h e Provincial Commissioner, any additions or amendments yo u m a y Vlish to m a k e With y our r e p l y could yo u please let m e have a m a p or plan showing the area in w hich Ph ase I i s likely to take place 7. Also co uld you let m e know how you are going to d e a l w ith t h ose Vialiangulu w h o cannot be employed duri n g Phase I 7 H o w m a ny lalia n gulu is t h e Game Warden likely to need duri n g Phase I 7 V\..-""{-.( I t-'J'o. At the same time I a m asking the Ministry of Local Government t o arrange a simple method of accounting throug h the Af r i can District Council a cccount and will get t hem to write t o y o u about it. When w e hav e had y o u r r e ply, my Minister intends to put t h e sch e m e to the Council of Ministers for their a pproval. ( Sgd) J. 110 H WEBSTE R PERMAN ENT SECRETARY FOR FOREST DEVELOPMENT, GAME & F I SHE R I ES. c .c.The Provincial Commissioner, C oast, The Permanent Secretarytfor African A f fair s Nairobi, Ii enc osures.

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( r r Ref. No. 22/4/1/8. MINISTRY OF FOREST DEVELOPMENT, AND FISHEERIES, P O .BOX 337, NAIROBI. 8th. January, 1959. The District C ommissi oner, Kilifi. GAME MANAGEMENT SCHEME: WALIANGULU. I atta c h a draft scheme for game management in the Galana Rive r area of the Kilifi District, and will be grateful i f you will s end me as soon as possible, through the Provincial Commissioner, any additions or amendments you may wish to make With your reply could you p l e ase let me have a map or plan s h owin g the area in whi c h Phase I i s likely to take place ? Also could you let me know how you are going to deal with t ho s e Waliangulu who cannot be employed during Phase I ? How many Waliangulu is the Game Warden like l y to need during Phase I ? At the same time I am asking the Ministry of Local Government to arrange a simp l e meth od of accounting through the African District Counci l a cccount, and will get them to write to you about it. When we have had y our repl y my Minister intends to put the scheme to the Council o f Ministers for their approval. (Sgd) J.L.H. WEBSTER PERMANENT SECRETARY FOR FOREST DEVELOPMENT, GAME & FISHE R IES. c.c.The Provincial Commissioner, Coast, The Permanen t Secretary for African A ffairs, Nairobi, with enclosures.

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/ on 1950, bet to ache the aC.
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-( ) nt tc: cantro 00 ont 1 t - ( ) t o :) b con (8) .. Q e le The 1> h G.

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----..-----... (l \' the 0 jCC' 1V$' net. rnrnent or

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/ ( f Tel e grams : "MINTREE". N a irobi Telephone : 20,4S4 When repl y ing please quole R ef. Np. . 2 21.4/:Ll.e and date Please addres s your r eply laThe Secretary for Forest Development Game and Fisheries The Game {{arden, KILIFI. MINISTRY O F FOREST D EVELOPMENT, GAME AND FISHERIES P.O. Box 30027, NAIROBI . 3:r. d .. ........ 19.5 9 GAME ... I forward for your a copy of the record of a meeting held in this ministry on the 24th February, 1959. Copy to: Encl: P ..... SECR'0TARY FOR FOREST D:WVELOP1.1ENT, GA]\JE AND FISHERIES. The Secretary for African Affairs. The Provincial Commissioner, lVIombasa. The District Commissioner Kilifi. The Chief Game ,arden Nairobi. The Game 'dar den Kilifi. The Permanent Secretary to the Treasury.

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e e MINUTES OF A MEETING HELD' AT THE MINISTRY OF FOREST DEVELOPMENT, GAME AND FISHERIES O N THE 24TH FEBRUARY, 1959, IN CONNECTION WITH THE WALIANGULU GAME . 1{1ANAGENiJ!:NT SCHEME PRESENT: Mr. J.L.H Webster, Perman ent Secretary for Forest Development, Game and li'isherieso NoS. Sandeman, Acting Chief Game Wardeno Mro I.S.C. Parker, Game War den, Kilifi. Mr. A.F.Co Barnwell, Assista n t Secretary (Finance), Ministry o f Forest Development. The P e rmanent Secretary explained that he had called the meeting to conside r the draft estimates of expenditure and revenue for the Waliangulu Game Management Scheme, which had been prepared by the District CommisSioner, Kilifi, and Mr. Parker. 2. As this was an experimental scheme the Minister for Forest Development, Game and Fisheries wanted the scheme to start with limited objectives only, so that the scheme could be developed along sound linea based on the experience which would be gained in the early stages. In these circumstances. the Minister acoepted, pro tem? the Treasury ruling rgarding the proceeds of the sale of ivory, although h e might wish to raise the matter again at a later date. 3. The first application for funds to the Nuffield Foundation was made before the Treasury gave their ruling about ivory sales, and it is accepted that the Nuffield Foundation must be advised of this change in the schemes' finances. The point was also made that the estimates as at present framed would produce a surplus of revenue over expenditure of about at the end of the third year. If those estimates were be submitted to the Nuffield Foundation, then they might well argue that, as the scheme would produce a surplus balance which would be greater than their total contribution of ,000, the scheme. could, in fact, proceed wi thout any financial assistance. 4. It was, therefore, agreed that the estimate for the scheme for the first three years would have to be recast to take into account the following factors:-(a) that none o f the revenue from ivory would be available for the scheme during the first three years; (b) that as i n the first phase of the scheme all the elephants to be shot would b e those which would normally be shot for control purposes, then the salaries and other charges expenditure of the Game Department's staff a t Ki1.ifi would continu e to be paid as a t present and that none of that expenditure would be met from r evenue accruing from the sale of meat; (c) that when it had been shO\'YIl during the first phase of the scheme that it was viable and that there were no unsurmountable difficulties, then the second phase should start which would involve the cropping of game animals and moving the area of activities inland from the coast; (d) that while the scheme could start, subject always to final Treasury approval? in the very near future, no atte mpt should b e made to use any of the Nuffield Foundation grant until some time in 1960. /For

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" r -2-For planning p u rposes it should be assumed that the g r2nt would avail a b l e the 1 s t J anuary 9 1 96 09 but i t was apprecia t e d that i f ther e w e r e any c onsiderable de l ays in s tarting the f i rst phase of the sch eme t h r::;n i t mi ght be necessary to del a y u sing the N uffiel d g rant; ( e ) that as i t had bee n hel d that an Africa n Dis t rict Councj. l h a d no legal a uthor i t y to a c count for? o r become involved i n a Game Management Sche m e1 then this Ministry would t ake urge n t action to asc ertain from the Treasury the manner i n which the accounts were to b e k ept. M i n i stry o f Forest Development, Game ane. Nairobi 0 3rd March,. 19590

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V I l ( ( Telegrams: "MINTREE", Nairobi Telephone: 20484 When replying lease quote ?2 4/1/0 Ref. No ..... ...... ...... and date Please address your repl y 10The Secretary for Forest Development, Game and Fisheries / "ou '"ill be .Jle .... "'ed t I )" oroved the Galana I l' described t.1e dministracio 'take the sc e!lle jo' ulLi ztely respoasible f( :: 'iean l' ffairs is to be I You wil l therefo u'le linistry 0: ...... frica the for the scheme; t. I to (' J t. v ." t . -v C I V I. '" C. .. rl e '1c.!. (j P. .t 1 (l, I .!.. ) --:1 -MINISTRY OF FOREST DEVELOPMENT, , GAME AND FISHERIES P.O. Box 30027, NAIROBI :rov J l'!lLlen t he. v e J t, S chene in ,.L. lJ \J C {, .0J. eCl' L ,r,./ fOI' -rt ,.,. J. LC,. to 8.1' L Ju C t i 0(1"') J. _'OIT. ) Lc 1 ) 1 2 1" v t >1 v e non 8 L ( N j 1 v r III t b I:.. t "CO: .t1",' Jh ie.f Gal.t;: ., C1 i (.' .L. Inl :

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, t-:C.M.(59) 139 COONCIL OF MINISTERS. GAL,ANA RIVER GAME, lVIANAGEMENT SCHEME. Memorandum by the, for Forest ,Development, Game and Fisheries. , When the Council of Ministers considered the First Interim Report of the 1956 Game Policy Committee, they advised tha t it was impracticable to arrange for the hunting tribes like the Haliangulu and Boni to turn to some other way of life within a short period, but that every effort must be made to reduce poaching to a min imumj and that the Adminis tration should assist the hunting tribes to begin to find an alternative method of livelihood? even if it must be accepted that the process was likely to be a lengthy one. (Minute 79 (8) of the 5th December, 1956, r efers). 2. Game Policy Committee. In paragraph 44 of their final report the Game Policy Committee referred to the Waliangulu problem in the following "44. In our Interim Report we drew attention to the need to find some alternative form of livelihood for the smaller tribes, particularly the Waliangulu whose customary and only occupation for generations has been hunting In the Note on Proper Land Usage in Relation to Wild Life ( Appendix IV, Part I) we have pointed out that in many of the semi-arid areas of Kenya w here any form of agricultural development would be uneconomic, wild animals, if properly managed, would produce a reasonable return in mea t and other products. Such an area is the zone lying between the coastal strip at Kilifi and the eastern boundary of the Tsavo Royal National This is the traditional hunting ground of the Wali8,ngulu' and, at the suggestion of the Kenya Wild Life Society, a scheme has been prepared by the Game Department for the introduction of a Game Manage ment Proj o ,ct covering some 2,000 square miles of this country north of the Galana River. This scheme, if successful? would be self-supporting and would not only provide a reasonable livelihood for about 1,000 Waliangulu and so lessen the chances of their return to a life of professional poaching, but should also have the beneficia l effect o f reducing the amount of elephant control at present necessary in the coastal b elt. We therefore recommend that some such scheme be given a trial. If rcsults should prove of value it might lead to the introduction of similar schemes elsewhere". 3. The Problem of the Waliangulu. During recent years the Waliangulu have extended their hunting activities beyond the mere supplying of their own immediate needs and have taken to l arge-scale poaching for monetary gain; in so doing they have unwittingly endangered' the survival of the game which was their means of livelihood, with the result tha t over the last two years an intensive anti-poaching/

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2. anti-poaching campaign has had to be mounted by the Gove rnm en t and the National Parks in order to h alt the process of destruction. 4. Before this campaign about 300 Waliangulu men supported themselves a nd their families (a total of about 1,000 people ) by hunting. As a result of i t however, the Walia ngulu way of life has been disrupted as the men can no longer hunt without risking a heavy sentence of imprisonment and they have no alternative means of livelihood. The more fortunate among them, numbering about 100, have found employment within the safari industry or the National Parks; a few others h ave taken to charcoal burning; but, for the' majority of them, the ground has bee n from under their feet, and there i s now the problem of f inding some remunerative occupation for them which is suited to the area they inhabit a nd is congeni a l to them Unless employment is found for them, the 'Valiangulu will inevitabl y revert to poaching? despite the threat of fines and i mpr isonment. 5. Suggested Solution Participation in a Game i1anagement Scheme As a solution to this problem a Game Management Scheme has been proposed, which woul d enable the Walia n gulu to continue their traditional hunting in a legal manner and would obviate the danger of game becoming decimated through uncontrolled killing. this scheme an area of some 2,200 sqQare miles would be as a Game Management Zone; there is a wide variety of game in it including lion, elephant, buffalo,' rhinoceros cnd leopard, and three large rivers (the Tana, Galana and Voi Rivers) flow from west to east through it. It i s proposed tha t the Zone should be split up into five subdivisions, and that in 9ach subdivision a number of families should be settled at a suitable place -the men being paid employees o f the s c heme. The object of the scheme would b e to control hunting i n the area; a. Management Committee, representative of a1 1 interested parties, would decide the number and species of animals to be shot e ach year, a nd the men woul d be issued with firearms and ammunition to enable them to take part in the hunting. T h e animals shot would consist of those killed lion control" and those which the Committee considered could be "cropped" e?ch year. On the Committee' s deciding that a hunt should take plac e in a subdivision the Gam e Warden administering the s c heme would notify the headman of the settlement concerned, who would s e t up a hunting camp in the best locality. The Game Warden would take charge of the hunt in order to ensure that no more than the correct number of each species of animal was shot, and, once the quota for a subdivision had been killed, no further hunting in it would be permitted until the Committee authorised it. The Game Warden would then move into another subdivision and the process would be repeated. In between hunts the people in the settlements would be required to patrol their subdivision and to' carry out any development works required by the' Committee, such'as constructing dams, enl arging dams, cutting tracks, etc. 6. Th e meat and trophies, other than ivory, from the game shot (especially elephant) would be properly marketed -there is a ready sale for them -and the proceeds woul d be used for meeting the recurrent costs of the scheme. 7/

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.... e e 3. 7. The scheme would be spread over two Phases and only in Phase II is it proposed to c arry out game IIcroppingll in various Zones on the lines'suggested i n p a ragr aph 5 above. 8. Phase I of the S cheme. As a preliminary to Phase II it i s considered that, in Phase I a pilot scheme should be undertaken as follows: -(i) Th e Game Warden, Kilifi, would c ontinue with normal game control on the Kilifi District. A t the same time about 25 Waliangulu woul d be e mployed to prepare for sale the mea t and other products (except ivory) obtained from the animals shot. This '!vork would be carried out under the direction of a Game Management Committee un de r the chairmanship of the District Commissioner, Kilifi. (ii) The animals shot in Ph a s e I would be those which h ave to be killed in the course of normal control work in Kilifi District. The meat and products f rom these animals woul d be marketed by the Game Managemen t Committee, and the proceeds credited to a special account. (iii) P ayments to the Waliangulu would be made as and' when funds permjtted. They would also be made partly in kind, i.e. meat. Monthly payments would not be guaran teed. The amounts paid would be subject to the District Commissioner's agreement. P a yments would never exceed the balance available in the account. (iv) S j nce, during Phase I, the Game Warden would be c arrying o u t his normal control work, he would use departnental transport, rifle s and aIDillunition, and no financia l b urden these items would fallon the Game Managemen t account. (v) The District Commissione r and the Game Warden would carry out census of Waliangulu. Every effort will be mDde by the Admlnistration to find employmen t for the Walia ngulu who are unl i ke l y to be uS8d on game management. (vi) P hase I of the scherre would not affect professional hunting in any way. Even during Phase II professional hunters5 or any game licenc e holders, would be able to hunt in the in the normal way. 9. Financ e for Phase 1.. DuriJ g Phase I the only financ e needed, othe r than expenditure from the normal department a l votes, would be m oneJ for payments to the Waliangulu. This IllOney would be found from the p roceeds of the mea t and oth r products (othe r than ivory) of animals shot during control work Th e main revenue would come from the control of elephants. The Game Warden, Kilifi, has estimated tha t about 30 could be ob tained f rom the dried meat, fat, front feet and cars of a small bull e lephant. If 100 elephant were shot in one year (the num b e r varies betwee n 100 and 200 per annum), the r e venue would be ,000. As during Phase I the scheme would be l a rgely experimental, only 25 Waliangulu would be engaged in the first instance. Fund s permitting a m inimum monthly sum of Shs.40/would b e paid to each man. Including some l arger payments to a few more experienCed men, about woul d be required. 10/

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-e 4 10. Pqase II (Assistanc e from Nuffi eld Foundation). ) Based on experienc e gained in Phase I, Phase II of the scheme would b e prepared with the object of employing 25 more Walia ngul u in the second year, and a furthe r 25 in the third year. Phdse II vyould b e b ased on the general pla n described in paragraph 5 o f this memorandum Th e Game Warden, Kilifi, would no longer be able to c arry out the ocheme in addition to his normal duties, and an officer would have to be engaged for the purpose. H e would need funds to cover the cost of transport, camping equipment, stores, firearms and ammun ition as well as paYlllents to the1 fvaliangulu. To meet this cost, revenue woul d b e forthco ming, as i n Phase I, from the sale of m e a t and otho r products from the animals shot during control and the "cropping" of game In addition, the Trustees of the Nuffield Foundation have generously offered a sum of ,000 sprea d ov e r three years in support of the scheme. 11. The proposals in this memorandum have been approved by the Treasury. 12. The Council o f Ministers are no w invited (a) to advise that the Administration and the G ame Dep artment should jointly undertake Phase I of a game management scheme in the Kilifi D istrict, employing Waliangulu, on the l ines indica ted in 8 of the memorandum; (b) to advise that the Nuffi e l d F oundation b e informed of the a ction that the Governmen t 'proposes to take during Phase I of the scheme, and tha t their generous offer of 10,000 spread over three yea r s will be most Nelcome during Phase II of the scheme, starting probably earl y in 1 960 D.L.B . . . 000 .... Nairobi. 18th April, 1959.

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/ r. ./ ...

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, 1 ( I C 1. -J. L. H. W 1 bn '. f

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GkL-1 [11 The Chief' Game WardeJi., c/o i nistry of Natural P.O. B ox 241, Resources, NAI R O BI, Kenya Private Bag, Dar es Salaam. 13/1/108 7th August, 59 I attach a copy of a letter, NO.19/l6/129 of' the 3rd July, 1959, fro m the District Moshi, i n which he refers to an e nquiry from the Game arden, Coast Province, regardinb the supply cf meat certain areas in the Province for s a l e i n Tan ganyika. I will be gratef'nl if' you 'Nill give me more inf'or ,1"atj.on regarding ... e proposal. The only sche1T..e tbat I have lG: ('wledge o f' is the cropping of elephants in land and the disposal "by sal e of' the I a m, of course, ver y averse to the sale of' Game L'1eat wIess i t ic r i gorously controlled since allY commercialisation of g-ame products will undouoteuly lead to an early extermination of' the ani.rnals. Am" ini'or'l1ation irou can give m e will b e apprec ia ted. c.c. GM WARDEN. Garre Varden Coast Province, P.O. Kili!'i, Kenya.

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-Ref. 0: DeEI' Sir, P.O. !SOl( 300-rf', airo l.. 9th i)ctot)""r, 19[)9. Tel,.::1< 'yOIl fot> YO' I' Ip.tt r ef .OJ /'i.". of the "ttl ctobel', 1955,. I hay alresdy i scu sed the ,.J ,Sil111ity of: in .. a Fulbl'l schol r for thi3 6cheme 'ith r. H rdy. lae a 11 1s eono'pnpd we would 1n ... J1'1, .. Jle wplcomo any a C 'lh",ch 'rJi,fht be given t.hroll a Fnlbr i :Ttit 8Wf 1'0. r t I, nOw yly for a Fultri ht scnoler or thio e. Co y to: fa i tl fully, ( i nf d) r. K BHI'nwell Hardy, sq. inl try of A1. I H'ot i.

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Telegrams: "MINTREE", Nairobi Telephone : When replying plea se quote Ref. No .. and date Pleas e addr es s yo ur reply la-The Secretary for Forest Development Game and Fisheries MINISTRY OF FOREST DEVELOPMENT, GAME AND FISHERIES P.O. Box 30027, NAIROBI ... .ll th. 195.9 The Game Warden, KILIFI. I GAUNA RIVER GAlill MANAGEMENT SCHEME Reference your letter dated 3rd December, 1959. I attach a copy of a letter from the Treasury, from vrhich you ,viII see that it has been agreed that this should embark on Phase II of the Galana River Management Scheme. 2. details have first to be worked out but I can assure you that the highest priority is being given to this scheme. 3. You are naturally not expected to help the Waliangulu from your ovm pocket. You should therefore consult the District Commissioner, Kilifi, how best to explain to t e Jaliangulu that further funds for payment to them ,viII not be available for a ",hile. 4. The remaining paraeraphs of your letter I propose to discuss ,vi th the Game Warden (Headquarters). AG.CHIEF GAME WARDEN Copy to: The Provincial Commissioner, Coast Province, Mombasa. The istrict Commissioner, Kilifi. reference their information copies of letter under reply.

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/, The Treasury, NAIROBI. CFN.309/03 7th December, 1959. Dear Arthur, GALANA RIVER GAME MANAGEMENT SCHffi1E Will you please refer to yo u r Ministry1s letter No.22/4/1/8 of the 5th November in which you seek agreement to the continuation of the Galru1a River Management Scheme. As I told you on the telephone the other day, we agree that you should embark on Phase 2 of the Scheme on the 1st January, 1960, and that from then on it should be the responsibility of your l-1inistry and not of the Ministry of African Affairs, as at present. ill you, therefore, please let us have a detailed estimate of expenditure and revenue for the second half of the financial year 1959/60 so that we can see what sum must be made available by vlay of Supplementary Estimate. You vrill also no doubt Hish to apply immediately to the ffuffield Trust for the issue of the first instalment of the ,000 grant. After due considerajion we feel that the Scheme shoul be run throuO'h a fund aJld it "li+1 be necessary to deciie precisely those items expenditure which will qualify for a Government grant and those items which wi 1 fall to be covered by revenue. For the purpose of the estimate which you -rill be pI'eparing, I think you should regard the sale of meat, bones, ears and feet, etc. as being the revenue of the und 1hereas the proceeds of the sale of i ory Till e Government revenue. You "Till appreciate that rules will have to e ravffi up for the operation of the fund and I would ask you therefore to give some thought to what is required and to let us have draft rules as soon as possible. Yours sincerely, (Signed) DAVID. (Eo ehrens) A.F.Co Barnwell, Esq., Ninistry of Forest Development, Game and Fisheries, NAIROBI. Copy to: 0 Hardy Esq., Ministry of African Affairs, AIROBI.

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No EST/ 1818/69 Ministry of Fores t D e v e lopm ent, Game and Fisheries, P.O.Box 30027, NAIROBI ..... ....... 19 60 Mr. I.S .C. Parker, Thro t The Chief Game, \Varden, "' NAIROBI. {; -0 ",< \ I Sir, CONFIRMATION OF APPOINTMENT. I have the honour to inform y ou that having completed the requisite period of service on probation, and having fulfille d the conditions precedent to your confirmation, you are he reby confirmed in your appointment as a Game liTarden, wi th effect from 1st January, 1958 Y our service for retiring benefit s will, however, count from the 1st January, 1956. /v Copy to:-EST/1818/A I have the honour to be Sir, Your obedient servant, for PERMANENT SECRETARY.

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Telegrams: "GAME Nairobi Telephone: No. 20672-3 Ref. No. GA .. ... I. S 8. Par er "sq., Ga ana River Geme E' t P .O. oi. D ar T saw D S 1 j-ear rs r.c} rna S8Y he was very compli"1entarv !''''o''" GAME DEPARTMENT P.O. Box 241, NAIROBI 29 A .:Just 960 in i.ro i and I He as been 10"'1"';1"'::: ,.., .... n one rf h s reference Rnd found some1:hing t, .... hp ef' Q .... '!; h",'!;"1 0 '1"'nt havp." G!'> T' .s(!(,1or"' I p .... o' a rI !-p "'0 ., c,..ted dpbbis '1 0 GA St'mes, lJ.A -W') d hp :: :-0'1 \OTOuld send hiIJ'l a Sa e "";1 t 1",.,1' ",!;h "\-'.--:h to conf'ound. ,!;be 1.-.0 .. .,..:'.1..p .1..1 e bool1 v.., '" tJl .L\. J" d -0' .1..'3.;:e ::0 ..... ,.;.9'} f)? "r>r-T ""f P i .... rs ci urs

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\ I 1r Ed. ...Iagru .0_ 527 Aidlan ... '0 rer') IDLAND, 1 S A .. -----------Dear Ed: Galan<.:. Gm e anage-wnt Schepo, P 0 .. V Ol, Keilya, t 0 27 h October 1962 backo I see Ian :ful for iany t.hanks f' 01 going P to airobi Grip-l\Tood about ani aJ..s f(JJ. the contact. Iv"tc rec ivod sO'ao '\.."eeks o. this mont.h rill ... achris. I I 1 v e Y' grato Yes I et Bill and Anne .. lee ere Anne got quite a heavy elephant rlth one t sk j st under he hundred mark.. I 01' t think tha.' Bill $ S Tas as heavy. think hat they eli.joyed th ....... 1 uhi1e Lo e. A s I tol Bobbie tU"1lS a rhile back, the biggest thing on thei r safari laS liei camp be. Accor _one to John he had little fo: anything else on the back of his truck. lie r ve one .. 0 te a bi of flying sine.., YOt! rr>re O n one co t in JLme TO very e j"ly sa'I.T the last of' -he 1iId Life Society Cr ser he joker \ 11.0 -las flying i t S"'U.n.g he p_ op !d h all md ches 0 L, thrO\:t.... open anc. brakes off . Io 0 e laS sittin i vhe .r1b-n at e ti d.i..t uar only by the of God that he "'0 catch t lit'l" as it ran off dO\m the stri p nt entione in the cutting you sent 0 t '\fe c.lid lith of the .-li -::;h my Ai Corps out here. i'le used tHO Alloue te el c pt rs tl'l..Iee Beavers. It took i1 .... :_'='1{ tv cover the ark and Scheme thoro'lghly and our end t.otal '\.Tas 15,603. As 0 h' ving 0 l:ill 5,000 this is so etbing the press ave COOKca up is just -hat the eleph have not been prop.rly counted. before. aybe a fe 1 "ill ave to be thi1'1.ned ot'!.t i the Park, but his 'Hill 0 Y be decided af er 0 present intensive esearch pI'ograLI e is co pIe ted in J llY next yeax .. brio sends her regards and same frof1 S _0 All he Yours,

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GliS V \ 1 confir tha t I have chec red the fol l o'ring Ie 'gers: Fuel Dcr W1cnt & da Ie Cons' lable ..... t '") ock .... hey a'e tho._ ero!' ... no", tak 6th Jul.,r 63.

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IVORY STOCKS HANDED FROM I.S.C. PARKER TO J.G.L. POWYS ON GRS 29/63 to 58/63 GRS 508/63 509/63 511/63 512163 519/63 520/63 522/63 525/63 545/63 to 603/63 2 sacks bits and pcs, wts 88 and 75 I b RHIN O HORN GRS 10 R 63 grs 11 R 63 12 & 13 14 & 15 16 R 63 17 & 18 19 & 20 21 & 22 23 & 24 25 & 26 Signed i " : I I ,../

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Telegrams: "MINTREE", Nairobi Telephone: Nairobi 20484 When replying please quote Ref. No . E T/27.21/8 and date Please address your reply la The Permanent Secretary for Tourism, Forests and Wild Life Mrs P arker, Gal,qn Game Nanagement Scheme, P e VOT De,qr Madam, Mjnistry of Natural Resoutces. AbiD_WlLD-I..lf"R P .O. Box 30027, NAIROBI KENYA .. .. .. .......... 13th July., ... 19 .. 63. ,./ .----. Your resignation i s a c cepted 1 th regret. PleA-se let me knOlll bOlt! many d ays Ie .ve you hA..ve ta en since you joine the service. IP T Cop to:-Yours faithfully, for PSPJ1A 'lE l T 3 XR"';'" \r.y ..... 0-{!;SOUB The Chief Game {\ AlP-OBI '\ R A L

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Telegr ams: MIN TREE" Nairobi Telephone: Nairobi 20484 When replying plea se quote Ref. No ..... and date Ple as e addr es s your reply 10The Permanent Secretary for Tourism, Forests and Wild Life M iss A.C. Parker, P .O. Box 861, NAKURU Dear Ma.dam, iinistry of Natural Resourceso P.O. Box 30027, NAIROBI KENYA .. ............... . . .... 630 19 .... Thank you for your letter dated 31st July, 19630 You were due 30 days l eave and you will be paid lea ve salary up to anrl including 11th August, 1963. /PG for Yours faithfully, S ECRETARY FOR N. TU r-w:. OURCESo

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T e legr a ms: "MIN T R EE". N a irobi T e lephone: N a i r obi 2 0484 When r eply ing please quote Ref No ... ES. T/.27.21/14. a nd d a t e Please a d d ress YOllr r e pl y 10The Permanent Secret a ry for Tourism, Forests and W ild Life Mrs. A.C. Parker, P.O. Box 861, NAKURU. Dear Madam, Ministry Of :Natural lle sources. M'ffits P.O Box 30027 NAIROBI KENYA .. ... .... ...... .. 19.9), / / (J*i-I Thank you for your letter dated 12th August, 1963. You were due 56 days leave as at 30th June, 1963. Arrangements have been made for payment of your terminal leave up to and including 7th September, 1963. las Yours faithfully '\J" ;;;? for SECRETARY FOR NATURAL RESOURCES.

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e T elegrams: G AME", Nairobi GAME DEPARTMENT Telephone : No. 20672-3 P.o. Box 241, NAIROBI Ref. No. GA ... .............. (

PAGE 244

,f c -.) 4-f. .er "'7 j"'" Z c..rJl..k (j z v...r c4. --tt 7-c( J> ( w r c ei -/-.-r f... c......I I-fo ct t'i .!ff... z.( r <;.. ,q ;0 (rtfi/O Ir/ eI ... c4.-L.J d ft..-r ...a-....... -/.-n a... "JT "..... .e. --<." r-J. I .;. a.. r CN <4C (t.rz of... -{ "-d. <.../..,. 1

PAGE 245

Telegrams: "GAME" Nairobi GAME DEPARTMENT Telephone : No 20672 3 P .o. Box 241, NAIROBI Ref. No. GA .................

PAGE 246

..

PAGE 247

I J.H.Kerteli Esq., ",'-Managing Director,. ../' 1 Ryan Inv stments Ltd. // /' \ P.O.Box / / a I\Y fAIRO:BI. r Dec ber let 1963 Dear Sir, an Par t 0 your 0 po d 1 Cirl S cretary to tb. oast Rag! n at ng 0 and olved j at z follo / st dB. ltw ) SlVt .=: '> .J.r k v I =-/A. .... L '. to th egion. g charged th 1 G p en. , e by t .... .L s r egi 0 aJ. Government coul akinga that yo o ne 0 a th R g onal. Govermn nt o n alr aged ( b) leas d th 1 c:: re no such s 1 purposes of th .P.O the g property of the s at th ov soh to a s au h your atte n yo a and in 01 ed d the ion the und d ntr is en thoug land for o on wl e cr'ivate .a on it lando oul d rC.&U.:l!o4" e r game are 1 ed 0 to destloy in de no of his life 0 prop r in Moo ca e the aaroase rem ns the property of the at If he shes 0 11 1 for other reason he has to be in ossession of the up!'> pri liceno. To xploit game in e ay I you to nvisag ould ta.! e a <.>eries of' 1 "Ji() s whioh, for eon--...

PAGE 248

< "..., I Jt 11 2 venieno' s sake I will deal with separa ely. (c) Licence 0 crop game on a commercial scale. A normal G e Licence would not be applicable as this ,en titles the holder to kill only one or two 0 each speoies in a y ar d attnc e hign individual fees. I 0 us a Ohief Game arden's P rm1 animals ill any t ted umb 0 or on er tion n d to in n of ooul. numbers the C ntr a fr va.lu e.tely 5 con tiona [ licence h ) or t, ing the ris wounded el t t only be carried out by p mons pprov men t and nomina.ted 0 the emit. 1th r 'fr the 0 an iving th a .. ephant or pped by n f proportion. d vo h ;'VI e publio by 113--t the killing could d by t G D part (d) Hunting by a ort hunters (your olaus 9.).

PAGE 249

3 -regret that the prinoiple and law applying to hunting n all private land could not be deviated Ir'om i.e. that. th landowner has the right to or forbid on his land, and. to charge .what he U s for th pri:vilege., but that all must be in of appro priat Game Licence. ( 0 land other iJhat!.i pr1;vate land are charg d a Game L c .nee .fee and a Controlled Area fee. the revenu' from th 1e. ter gofulg to the local. au nori 'bias. This means that tLc 0 r of urivate land can oompetitive charge comparable to th Controlled Area fee Unfortunately Controlled Area fees a presen 'repr sen less than hal t combil d chnrc,. lOugh I tmst that they wi 1 be pe... i tted to ino!'e&. r rtion) ( e) Found. T:!'ophie . The ivory of elep1,lall ts from poachers, _as e revenu. of he a -'_ em.e up to d te i,vory t"eant part, S c I h right ar in specifio to in. .. v')ur 0 "omp troph s fear it Qui unf'avou:r aloe, in 11.:r. R rves. 1110 gr .. mean ranting i Governm nt 0 out tll count:ry the tua favour o oun.ty Cou.:ncil run psion t one landoW11.er \I'm e Jply to 0 ther 8U. ort nt w a monopoly re righ .... l ohary o action .. ( .J. Di po s eJ. 0 y Ie; Parmi t issued by th we have In pro. t10e I 0 no objection to b :til t. cover d by a Sal .. A of al.erst armi 'bs t n p duct uon as hQrn and skin are totally :roh1b1 ted. and ;he sale \. t within ny D ng o oert n antelope hides is not :permi ttq. ,. 'thin Kenya. .z.... /

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/ -4The purpose of this control s to prevent an outlet for poached pro ncts and the Ohief Game Warden muat retain the power to va:ry the procedure to fit current condi tiona It may b diffi.cult, there ore, to write in1;o I an agreem nt ooverinr 35 year a 'antee to you that the oompany oill be able to diapo e of aJ.J. product (g) Diaposal o:f .6 t. of, gnme meat, ike other. i to Permit by the Game D p ment r ov outl t .DOl' "own d shoo ing would Ther he object 0 o i1.1egal sellil"..g an .., .:. ly ... iil it. e b trictly OOll-t". laed. in eam in g I.l I for h:v to ii d on Governme no I can foresee no i sort out ide Kenya ( xcept e only is ued for h to oruel e Ira r pialy lead to heir be no incentive for A. t be o t ing text down r 1 s onal) most countri will only I admit meat in ster11i e of d g r of r pest). ithin m t in 1 ntifi bl or.m ould

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.( -5-be equally free from objeotion and that would cover tinned .meat, meat extraot, carcase meal and k wrapped high quality biltong. 0 Some formula could probably be devised t o cover the sale of dried t meat in bul but the dried eat of other .speoies and fTe h meat of 1 sorts would present a definite proble d I would 1ik" to know mor 0 your. proposed operations, before considering what termo could be written into the pro olVec agree .nt. ( ,,) Li v animals. s 1e 0 liv a.nim. .0 for zoo ... he. forme part of revenue of the present and I see no difficulty i thi' oontinUing und,r lJrivate ant rpr:L Th cOJ1lpany ould, ot to the sam regul tiona as apply to 1 would h :ve to qu i y for and (Liv. ala ), the holdi ved and op n to i be produ .. captur have to ho ev r, ouJ. a prove 0'; be cnt .... ol r I ho yo li11 or iva ne le_.th of OJ ,,9 r edin nate numb though I wrong not favour 0 ignor dt to an 01 in' I you for going oin time. J. his _roj c'b com t t OU1ino,. re tin!? xpe l,. ant, ould 1-e f'urt e1" wo d be elig te ,ard as t inar ',. em.. k in-o ould b la can. b bent but it annot b n irely nform tion on any f the to i a a th at any :B fore ending a I e on 0 La in t whi h only indirectly affect me, that i the financial si e. Under the Game Departmen .the Galana Scheme ex-ploiting wild animals only, has, des ite certain hidden

PAGE 252

I -6subsidies from Government produced a return of just under ,000 for a capital investment of ,000 over three years. As its vehicles are now oompletely it may be regarded as having It broken even" and, as a oompany. would therefor have been to, pay a d1 vidend. (JU -On this basi it that a 1O'A yield might be the most you could expeot from your proposed .000 investment over fi va years and hat Government a rent valu of ,000 ould give the Regional r ye The Ooun ty Oouncils cono d in th t R at present draWing in the neighbourhood of from hunting in th Cham fro Oontrolled Area fee ais likely to be at 1e t ou 1 d rasult f incr ages oming into _196 it he a1 'no of -the 1 a the.t, r venue c and the Reeione.l Lrover:r.an nt may ... tu ly re eiv 1 aa in return. Ie it 11k ly to re to uch proposi ion? Your a.i tb.:fully I. a

PAGE 253

f Telegrams: "MINTREE", Nairobi Telephone : Nairobi 20484 MINISTRY OF NATURAL RESOURCES P.O. Box 30027, NAIROBI When replying please quote KENYA EST/1878/10 7 Ref .No ................ ... ............................ and date .............................. ?.H.P.: ..... ..... ........ .. .. .. .... 9.4 Please address your reply 10The Permanent Secretary for Natural Resources //. I.S.C. Parker Esq., Thro' The Chief Game Nairobi. Sir, Warden, I I am directed to refer to your letter dated 23rd Hanuary, 1964, and to state that your resignation has been accepted with regret. It is noted that in lieu of notice you wish to forfeit the leave salary due to you up to and including 27th February, 1964 and, as requested/your resignation will take effect from the 23rd January, 1964. I am to thank you for the services rendered to this Ministry. --:- ...,..., .. : . ::": \_...: .. 3> -' .... -,I . U 20.. L! .: F ;. 4 jrrn. for I have the h onour t o be, Sir, Your obedient servant, PERMANENT SECRETARY FOR NATURAL RESOURCES

PAGE 254

Telegrams: "GAME Nairobi GAME DEPARTMENT Te l ephone : No. 20672-3 P.p. Box 241, NAIROBI Ref No. GA ... J/15/8 ..... 6th May, 1964. I.S.C. Parker Esq., c/o P.O.Box 861, NAKURO Dear 1. FUture of Gala.na. 1. With reference to your letter of the 28th April the for attempting to interest private enterprise in leasing the scheme area,and in taking over the game management scheme were, as you will remember, twofold ie:-(a) Because only under proper tenure can inimical practises such as charcoal burning, haphazard grazing or patch cultivation be excluded. (This could be achieved equally well by a lease in the name of the Game Management Scheme) (b) Because it was thought that under mixed domestic and wild animals the land could be made to yield a greater return. (Stock raising could :scarcely be undertaken by the Game Management Scheme). Any therefore have to bind himself to exploit the cattle potential to the full. 2. With regard to the points you list:-1. The duration of the lease and the rent to be paid are matters for the Regional authorities. From the conservation point of view I favour a long lease, though that would necessitate wri ting in adequate sai'eguards on both sides. 2. Agreed. 3. "Invest" will require careful definition Recurrent costs paid by Government at the present rate would amount to approximately ,000 over 5 years. Any sum named as an investment should be over and above that. 4. See first paragraph above. 5 -11 These show a complete misconception of the position. The lessee will be subject to all the provisions of the Wild Animals Protection Act (and all other ordinances) in the same way as is any other landowner. There can be no question of bargaining over the proviSions of the law, or how the lessee would like to alter them to suit his own purposes. All that can be discusse d is what concessions or previledges can be conferred where the la\OT allows discretion. Thus game j& state owned (your p ara 5); t h e Chief Game Warden IS Permit, which is the authority for commercial cropping, is issued by the Chief Game Warden, with the approval of the Minister, on whatever coruU tions he may impose "in his discretion" (your para b); Dealers Penni ts are also granted by the Chief Game Warden lIin his discretion II (your para 7); Game Licence fees for hunting on private land are laid down in the Act and cannot be altered to suit one mans convenience (your para 9); the trophies of all animals found dead are the property of the Government (your para. 10) and the methods by which game animals may be killed are governed by the Wild Animals Protection Act as the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act. t.. 2

PAGE 255

3. (a) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g) CI4C1$'" L cbal:l.QQS I would wish to see included in any agreement wouldPr:-Bind the lessee to utilize and manage the land it leases with the object of maintaining as wide a variety of wild animal species, in the greatest possible numbers, having regard to the carrying capacity of the land. In general that mean no reduction in existing popula.tions, with the possible exception of elephants. In return Government would undertake to encourage and assist the lessee to exploit wild life on a sustained yield basis. To that end the Chief Game Warden's Permit (cropping permit for short) authorizing the lessee to hunt and kill a stated number of each species of game animal on the land. The quota for each species would be arrived at by the Chief Game Warden in consulation with the lessee. As a safeguard for the lessee, and any disagreement could be referred to the Minister or to a scientific arbitration committee. The lessee would be required to pay a fee for its annual cropping permit in accordance with the number of to be cropped. The initial fee would be per elephant, with the fees for other animals being the same proportion of the appropriate Game Licence fee, ie one fifteenth Thi s proportion would remain fixed in the event of chan ges in Game Licence fees. Methods by which animals on the cropping permit could be hunted and killed would be specified b y the Chief Game Warden, as would the persons permitted to do t h e hunting and killing. The lessee woul d be required t o render an animal return showing all animals killed or c aptured during the course of the year. The Chief Game l"arden w ould b e bound, in so far as the issue of such permits did not conflict with current policy regarding the suppression o f i llegal h un t ing, to allow the lessee to dispose of t h e p roce eds o f its croppi n g p e rmits by issueing the necessary Sale and Export P ermits. In this respec t n o o b j e c tion c an b e forseen to the export and sale outside East Africa o f any Ilhard trophies/ (ie ivory, horns, skulls, feet, bone, hides skin s ) nor to t h e sale of hard trophies to the holders of the appropriate Dealer's Permit in Kenya, except that no part of a rhinoceros m a y b e sold anywhere, and the hides of certain antelopes may not be sold in K enya. No objection can be forseen to the export and sale outside East Africa of game meat i n any f orm, nor to the sale wi thin Kenya of meat extract, tinned meat, or meat or bone meal. Permits for the internal sale of other forms of meat be dependant in the discovery of a way such of rendering such meat identifiable at all times. (h) Breac hes o f the condition s o f the cropping permit by employees of the lessee, or of the provisions of the W.A.P.O. would render the cropping licence and consequ entia l sale and export permits liable to cancellation .. (i) All trophies of dead animals found on the land would belong to Government (Sec.26 of the Act) but Government's of property in trophies other then ivory and rhino horn could be waived under Sec. 39(3). Ivory and rhino horn would remain the property of Government, but the lessee would be paid a handling charge for collecting it and delivering it to the Ivory Room. (j) The lessee would have the same right of allowing and charging for sport hunting on his land as other land m-rners ... 2.00.0 ..


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