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Cuffy the Negro's doggrel description of the progress of sugar

Related URL ( Internet Archive )

Material Information

Title:
Cuffy the Negro's doggrel description of the progress of sugar
Alternate Title:
Doggrel description of the progress of sugar
Physical Description:
17 leaves, 2 p. : col. ill. ; 18 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Printed for E. Wallis
Place of Publication:
London
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Sugar -- Manufacture and refining -- Juvenile literature
Slavery -- West Indies, British -- Juvenile literature
Genre:

Notes

General Note:
Publication date based upon name and address of printer from verso of t.p. (S. and R. Bentley, Dorset Street ... London)--according to Brown, P.A.H. London publishers and printers c. 1800-1870, p. 15 and date inscribed on t.p. (January 1825). Illustrations hand colored.
General Note:
Publisher's ads 2 p. at end and p. 4 of wrappers.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
PDF from Internet Archive version from the John Carter Brown Library. Notes on the page on Internet Archive states "no copyright".
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 14367162
System ID:
AA00019779:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

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|| CUFFY* THE NEGRO'S w\ OF THE l m r t I PROGRESS of SUGAR. I ft tf L O N DON: PRINTED FORE, WALLJLS, 42, SKINNER STREET, SNOW HILL,. ANI> 1^ HI H STREET, PENTONVILLE. ,';

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71< CUFFY THE NEGRO'S mo^QVtl mmvWian OF THE PROGRESS OF SUGAR. ; LONDON: PRINTED FOR E. WALLIS, 42, SKIKNER SIMM, SNOW HILL, AND 12, HIGH STREET, PEKTONVILLEniiii"-"

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Printed by S. and R. BENTLEY orset-strec-t, Fleet-street, London-

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CUFFY THE NEGKo's O pity the poor Negro— cold the wind does blow No warm clothes defend him from the frost and snow. Born in burning Afric', Cuffy loves the sun ; Shiv 'ring, cold, and barefoot, Cuffy think no fun Once poor Cuffy 's massa doctor'd him when sick, Gave him food in plenty, clothes too, warm and thick. Sometimes Cuffy idle, then he catch fum-fum ; Sometimes Cuffy work hard, then he drink good rum! A flo gging.

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PROGRESS OF SUGAR. ^ Then he dance and caper to the shake-shake's sound ; Then the banjoe make him frisk de antic round Happy so lived Cuffy— slave— but, O poor me, ^ Cunning captain coax'd him to walk across de sea, /" Come," he said, to England, land of liberty.") CufFy ran away— went on board the ship, Cat-o nine-tails there made him hop and skip. Now discharged in England, hunger make him die, Beg he must or perish !— hapless CufFy cry Pity, white man,— pity the poor negro boy, Give him money to buy food, and make him jump for joy! So he '11 tell you quickly how we sugar make For de pie and pudding, de sweetmeat and cake ; Give him clothing warm too, chase away his ruth, And may cane still grow for buckra with sweet tooth ; And when little massas suck the lollypop, When they buy nice cake too at the pastry-shop, When the luscious sweetmeat make them feast like kings, Think, poor negro's labour all this comfort brings Then poor Cuffy's trouble will not be in vain To describe the Progress of the Sugar Cane. A calabash with pebbles to rattle.

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HOLEING. Early in the morn a shell de driver blow-ee, Negro he get up,— out to work he go-ee, Then he take a hoe, holes too many makee, Then he sing !— O la great big clods he breakee. negro's song. One cut for Massa, one cut for Missee, Massa's negroes work away like true boys."

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PROGRESS OF SUGAR. MANURING. Then the gang take baskets, carry on the head — so, And the rich manure we next into the holes throw ; When all holes be full then we wait for rain-ee, When that come— O la! then we work again-ee.

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CUFFY THE NEGlto's PLANTING. Then cane-tops be cut, into hole we poke-ee, All times three or four, Cuffy no will jokee ; Now den home we go, merry as we can be Merrier than negro ne'er can buckra-man be. Give him but banjoe, — keep him from de cowskin,* Never will you s£e black man sulky pouting. Whip.

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PROGRESS OF SUGAR. EARTHING AND WEEDING. Then we go again, hoe the earth at root-ee, That the cane may grow very fast, and shoot-ee : Little children, too, come along to weed him ; Weed, he be no good, planter never need him.

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CUFFY THE NEGRO 3 GUARDING. That thing call'd a hedge you no see in B'adoes ; Cow, and sheep, and pig, if not tied invade us ; When the cane be ripe some one steal too much-ee, So with lance and sword night and day we watch-ee. Barbadoes.

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ni l' I I PROGRESS OF SUGAR. CUTTING DOWN. Now comes merry time negroes all alivee! Down we cut the canes, suck the juice and thrivee ; Mule grow fat as hog, though much work he bear-ee ; Horse and cow grow fat, starving is no theree. — -^

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CUFFT THE NEGROS GRINDING. Then the mill goes round, whizzy, whizzy, .whizzy, Then to crush the canes all poor we are busy ; Cane-juice in a pipe run away for boiling ; All the broken trash little boys are piling.

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PROGRESS OF SUGAR. 11 BOILING. Then you see the coppers, all to boil the liquor; In we throw some lime, soon it grow much thicker ; When it thick and ropy, lade it out for cool-ee ; Then it hard like rock ha, ha I Black no fool-ee

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12 CUFFY THE NEGRO S BREAKING AND FILLING THE CASKS. Then we break with mallet, pickax, shovel, hoee; Nasty tale no true 'bout de negro's toee. Holes in cask we make, out melasses run-ee, This distill'd to rum make poor negro funny.

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PROGRESS OF SUGAR. 13 HEADING THE CASK. Then comes massa Cooper, work and smoke, no talk-ee ; Then we cart de sugar, off to town it walk-ee ; Time we no can lose, — all the ships be ready ; Work away, my boys, cheerily and steady.

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' ; \7 14 CUFFY THE NEGRO S SHIPPING SUGAR. Then on board the ship sailor captain takee, All for bring to England for the tea and cakee ; Christmas pie and pudding you could never havee, Did not fruit and sugar cross de briny wavee. Mk ^w

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PROGRESS OF SUGAR. 15 f Mi \iiii w w \i SUGAR BAKERS. To make sugar white (sure he be a ninny ) Blood, and nasty someting, baker now put in-ee; Then he pour in pot, — so one loaf he make it ; Then he sell in shop, dandy grocer take it. ^1

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GROCER'S SHOP. Grocer sometimes rogue—brown sugar he sand it Then it grit in tooth, Cuffy understand it. What though white man he ? God above him mark-ee White and black all one! God can see ir dark-ee.

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PROGRESS OF SUGAR. 17 CONFECTIONER. Then to make confection, sugar-plum or candy, All to tickle sweet-tooth, massa Cook be handy. So grand thank-ee all — may you be rewarded For your kind relief to poor black afforded ; And one oder time, if you no will scoffee, Me a tale will tell of Cotton and of Coffee.

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DISSECTED PUZZLES OF A SUPERIOR QUALITY, COMBINING INSTRUCTION WITH AMUSEMENT, TO BE HAD AT E. WALLXS'S, 42, SKINNER STREET, SNOW HILL, AND AT 12 HIGH STREET, PENTONVILLE. At 8s. each. Harvest Home Dissected, shewing the Progress of Wheat, in fifteen different progressive Designs, from Ploughing to the Completion of a Loaf. The Process of making China, familiarly explained and illustrated with 12 engravings descriptive of the Works of the Royal China Manufactory, Worcester. Scripture Geography, being a Dissected Map of the Holy Land, displaying all the remarkable Events recorded in the Holy Scriptures, with a description. The Life of Paul the Apostle. The Life of David, King of Israel. At 7s. 6cL each. Dulce Doraum, or Holidays at Home, 8 elegant Designs, with a descriptive Poem, in a neat Box. The Ladies' School, or the approach of the Holidays, 8 elegant Designs, with a Poem. The Hare and Many Friends, embellished with 8 beautiful Designs. The Old Man, his Son, and the *Ass, a Fabulous Tale, with beautiful Designs. Grand Juvenile Alphabet, with 25 plates from Popular Stories. At 6s. each. The Progress of Wool, from Sheep-Shearing to the Weaving of Cloth. immmmtm

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&££$ AT E. WALLIS'S INSTRUCTIVE REPOSITORY ty AND ORIGINAL .MANUFACTORY ^| BimttWn Mm% ittw*i att& <£ar0, || For tht A>id Instruction of Youth', fw..SUED # • '1 HE FOLLOWING BOOKS. j£ 0/*e Shilli?ig each, ?;iy Tales, line plates. (•*£ for Attentive Studies, by Mrs. Pilkington, ditto. y.h kl Man who bad Apples 'to sell, plate;;, coloured. ne i or Progress of Wheat, 16 plates. „„.. oi Wool, 8 plates, plain.— Progress of the Dairy, ditto. >2 'ess" of taking China, 16 plates, ditto. gf>i* and Mary ; or, The Generous Sisters. (vb Copper Plate Picture &ttK 9 coloured. Jfe; Gappv's Dialogues for Children, plain. v ,?ai! iro v 1 voucher Cap's Alphabet? coloured plates. fcj> O/-':8 'tilting and Sixpence each. ^Jt. the Bandy-legged Cobbler. fjR Widemouthed Waddling Frog, adapted to a ^J M-fetts, coloured plates, fjjfy \yfe The Pretty Young Playful Innocent Lamb, ditto ditto. ^,S fsl The House thatiack Built, ditto ditto. 3*| A Trip to Pan::, coloured plates.

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