Interpretive labels for Haggadah: why is this book different?

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Title:
Interpretive labels for Haggadah: why is this book different?
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Language:
English
Creator:
Jefferson, Rebecca
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2014

Notes

Abstract:
On view from January 21 through March 18, 2014, Haggadah: why is this book different? tells the story of how a Jewish text compiled in antiquity was adapted and reproduced over time and around the world. The exhibition highlights the many ways in which the core Haggadah text, with its Passover rituals, blessings, prayers and Exodus narrative, was supplemented by songs, commentary and rich illuminations to reflect and respond to each unique period and circumstance in which the Jewish diaspora found itself.

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IUF
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All rights reserved by the source institution.
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AA00019432:00003


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Haggadah: why is this book different? January 21, 2014 March 18, 2014 Smathers Library Gallery, 2nd Floor Curated by Rebecca Jefferson Haggadah: Why is This Book Different? tells the story of how a Jewish text compiled in antiquity was adapted and reproduced over time and around the world. Featuring rare and scarce Haggadot (plural) from the Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica, this exhibition shows the many ways in which the c ore Haggadah text, with its Passover rituals, blessings, prayers and Exodus narrative, was supplemented by songs, commentary and rich illuminations to reflect and respond to each unique period and circumstance in which the Jewish diaspora found itself. O utstanding and unusual examples are included, such as a sumptuous facsimile of the Barcelona Haggadah from the 14th century, a 1918 Haggadah from Odessa, Ukraine, the last Haggadah produced before Soviet censorship, and a Haggadah recently produced by the Jewish community of Jacksonville in remembrance of the Holocaust. This exhibition charts the development of a fascinating text over 600 years and encourages you to compare the ways in which older copies of the Haggadah were illuminated in contrast with mo re recent artistic interpretations. It invites you to observe how the Exodus story with its essential message about freedom is interpreted in light of contemporary events and to notice the many ways in which the text is adapted to suit the audience and pre serve its relevance.

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What is this book ? During the first two nights of Passover, a ceremonial dinner and ritual service, known as a Seder, is conducted in Jewish homes around the world. The guide and narrative for this dinner and service is contained in a work known as a Haggadah. The word Haggadah means telling and refers to the commandment in Exodus 13:8 that each generation is told about the Jewish liberation from slavery in Egypt. The core text of the Haggadah was compiled in antiquity as a composite of biblical passages, rabbinical commentary and songs. The earliest surviving Haggadot (plural) were incorporated in early medieval prayer books. The Haggadah emerged as a complete text in its own right during the Middle Ages. Arthur Szyk (Polish, 18941951) Hagadah shel Pesa 1960 Jerusalem: Masadah; Tel Aviv: Alumot BM675.P4M64 1960 Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica Saul Raskin, Illustrator Haggadah shel Pesah 1941 Academy Photo Offset BM675.P4Z55667 1941 Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica A Haggadah Happening: an artistic Passover Haggadah Illustrated by students of the Ann Belsky Moranis School of Art 1998 Ohr Torah Stone Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica Gift of Rabbi Martin Sandberg Marc Chagall, Illustrator (Russian, 18871985) Chagalls Passover Haggadah 1987 Leon Amiel BM675.P4A3 1987 Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica

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How has this book been adapted? The traditional Haggadah text has been supplemented and adapted over the centuries to reflect the unique circumstances of Jewish communities in the Diaspora and the needs of distinct Jewish groups around the world. The majority of adaptations have occurred in the United States where it has become the most popularly published Jewish text. E. M. Broner, Editor (19272011) The Womens Haggadah 1994 HarperSanFrancisco Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica Originally authored by American Jewish feminist Esther M. Broner in 1977, it was first met with great opposition from publishers due to Broners placement of women in the central roles and recasting of the Exodus narrative from the womans point of view. The Union Haggadah: home service for the Passover 1923 (revised edition) The Central Conference of American Rabbis Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica First published in 1908, The American Reform Haggadah had many new features, including the reduction of the four questions to just one, the inclusion of music and the patriotic song My Country Tis of Thee and a final narrative charting the history of the Haggadah. Haggadah for Children 1952 Bloch Publishi ng Co., Inc. Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica Haggadah for the American Family English service written by Martin Berkowitz 1958 H. Levitt Publishing Co. Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica This Haggadah includes a complete separate section in English for an assimilated Jewish audience increasingly unfamiliar with the Hebrew text.

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Offenbacher Haggadah 1927 Offenbach am Main: Guggenheim Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica The Offenbacher Haggadah is sumptuously illustrated, contains musical notes, and ends with a prayer Next year in Worms on the Rhine, our home! This surprising addition reveals much about German Jewish attitudes towards their homeland prior to the Second World War. How has this b ook been used? Family Haggadot are much used books. Most copies betray signs of usage such as wine stains from the recital of the ten plagues and handwritten notes on the text. The rare Parisian Haggadah from the late 19th century (1) is a wellthumbed c opy and contains many wine stains, particularly on the page describing the fourth cup of wine. Formerly owned by the Price family, the Leonard Baskin illustrated Haggadah (2) is filled with notes and directions on the text reflecting their unique family pr actice. Also inserted in the book are pieces of paper containing additional songs to be sung during the Seder, further customizing the books reading. Seder Ha Hagadah shel Pesah 1884 (L. Blum edition) M. Lipschtz Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica Leonard Baskin, Illustrator (American, 19222000) A Passover Haggadah 1974 Grossman Publishers BM675.P4B76 1974a OVERSIZE Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica Gift of Jack and Miriam Price

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How is the Exodus interpreted in this book? The Holocaust Haggadah: from bondage to freedom 2013 Jewish Family & Community Services Gift of Barry and Eunice Zisser Recently produced by the Jacksonville Jewish community, this Haggadah recalls the Jewish liberation from Nazi persecution and includes the personal accounts of Holocaust survivors. Mark Podwal, Editor Let My People Go: a Haggadah 1973 Macmillan Company BM675.P4 Z555962 1973 Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica A Haggadah produced in 1973 to support Soviet Jewry its Exodus narrative and its illustrations were all designed to reflect the plight of the Jews trapped and oppressed in the Soviet Union. Passover Haggadah 2001 Jewish Labor Committee BM675.P4 J835 2001 Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica Although it was produced in 2001, the Passover Haggadah looks back in time, equating the struggles of Jewish American immigrant workers in the early 20th century to the plight of the Egyptian slaves. La Hagadah del Cuar to Mundo: por la Communa del Cuarto Mundo 1972 WUJS Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica La Hagadah del Cuarto Mundo was dedicated to the oppressed and unseen minorities of the Fourth World.

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In what ways is this book illustrated? The Haggadah a book intended for private use in the home, is the only ancient Jewish text which allowed and even invited illustration. Illustrations and embellishments are found in the earliest surviving manuscripts from the 14th century. The illustrations not only s erved an aesthetic purpose they were also instructional. In modern times, Haggadot have provided a vehicle for Jewish artists to express themselves. Among the most original Haggadah illustrations produced in recent times are those by Otto Geismar in 1920s Berlin (1). Geismar worked as an art teacher in the Berlin Jewish Community School and also produced works of expressionist art. His Haggadah illustrations are typified by Art Nouveau minimalism, with simple strong lines generating a unique impact. The visually arresting and large scale Moss Haggadah (2) was originally commissioned in 1980 by Richard and Beatrice Levy from artist David Moss. Intending to create an all encompassing visual commentary on Jewish history and experience, Moss used a wide varie ty of artistic media, including gouaches, gold leaf, acrylics and paper cuts. Otto Geismar (German, 18731957) Hagadah shel Pesach 1927 Hozaat Yalkut Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica David Moss (American, 1946) The Moss Haggadah 1990 Bet Alpha Editions BM675.P4Z5576 Smathers Libraries Special & Area Studies Collections, Rare Books Collection

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In what ways is this book produced around the world? Reproduced by Jewish communities around the world, many of these editions reveal the cultural influence of the wider community in which they were produced. The Haggadah from Mantua (1) is richly illustrated using letterpress and woodcuts on paper. The infl uence of Italian Renaissance art, to which Italian Jews were exposed, is clearly evident in the renderings of flying angels, flower bouquets, and in figures that recall Michelangelos paintings. Other editions show how the text was adapted linguistically to assist widely dispersed Jewish communities with members unable to read Hebrew. This rare Haggadah from Bombay (2) includes text reproduced in Marathi script for the Indian Jewish community. Likewise, the text of the Pablo Link illustrated Haggadah from Buenos Aires (3) is supplemented with a Spanish translation. Pablo Link, Illustrator Hagada: manual de Pesaj (signed copy) 1949 Imprenta Jorman BM675.P4 L5x Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica Seder Hagadot shel Pesah: Mantovah 320 1970 Facsimile of the 1560 Mantua edition Devir BM674.6.A3 1970 Oversize Smathers Libraries Special & Area Studies Collections Rare Books Collection [ Hagadah shel Pesah] 1865 Bombay Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica

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What is this books story? Sarajevo Haggadah 1983 F acsimile of the 14th century manuscript Beograd: Prosveta; Sarajevo; Svjetlost BM675.P4Z527 Smathers Libraries Special & Area Studies Collections, Rare Books Collection Originating in Barcelona in the 14th century, the tale of the Sarajevo Haggadah is extraordinary. It was most likely taken out of Spain by Spanish Jews during the expulsion in 1492. Marginal notes reveal that the manuscript re surfaced in Italy in the 16th century, and was sold to the National Museum in Sarajevo in 1894; where it is kept today. During the Second World War, the Museums head librarian kept the manuscript safe by smuggling it out of Sarajevo. He entrusted it to a Muslim cleric who hid it unde r the floorboards of a mosque or a Muslim home. The Haggadah survived a museum breakin during the Bosnian War; it was discovered on the floor together with other items discarded by thieves who were unaware of its value (approximately $7 million today). Du ring the siege of Sarajevo by Bosnian Serb forces, the manuscript was kept safely hidden in a subterranean bank vault. It was finally presented to the Jewish community by the President of Bosnia during a community Seder in 1995. Barcelona Haggadah 1992 F acsimile of 14th century manuscript from Catalonia Facsimile Editions Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica Named after its heraldic shield resembling the arms of Barcelona, the Barcelona Haggadah is one of the finest illuminated Hebrew manuscripts in t he British Library. The facsimile is widely regarded as one of the finest facsimiles in publishing history. With acute attention to detail, the publishers strove to produce not only the exact look of the manuscript but also its feel. The vellum of the orig inal manuscript was measured for its average weight and opacity, and a special uncoated, neutral pH paper was milled in Italy to simulate the feel of the original. The original scribe made minute pricking marks down the sides of each folio to rule the line s for his script; these tiny holes were painstakingly reproduced in the facsimile. In order to simulate the look and feel of the gold leaf, the metal leaf of the facsimile was laid by hand. Each leaf of the facsimile was cut to exactly the same size and sh ape as the original, and aged at the edges; wine stains and even Library markings were faithfully reproduced. A limited edition of 500 copies; the printing plates were destroyed so that no further reproductions can be made.

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Hagadah shel Pesah: be otyiot gedolot weim Ivri teitsh 1918 Bletnitski Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica This very rare and worn Hagadah shel Pesah from Odessa was the first Haggadah to be published in the Soviet Union. Just five years later, this edition was replaced by the Red Haggadah a communist dictated text in which the Exodus narrative was reinterpreted to represent the struggle against capitalism. E arly Haggadot Sefer Hagadah shel Pesah Copper engravings by Abraham ben Jacob 1712 Amsterdam BM674.P4A56 1712; oversize Smathers Libraries Special & Area Studies Collections, Rare Books Collection A rare second edition of a Passover Haggadah originally produced in 1695 following the Venetian prototype. This Amsterdam Haggadah was so popular that it had a lasting influence on the Haggadot produced in the Ashkenazi world. The included foldout map of the Land of Israel at the back of the book was the first map of its kind in a Jewish publication. The Kaufmann Haggadah 1990 F acsimile of 14th century manuscript from Catalonia Kultura International BM675.P3 K135; oversize Smathers Libraries Special & Area Studies Collections, Rare Books Collection Comprised two parts: an elaborately decorated text, and a 14 page section of miniatures depicting the Exodus story and the preparations for Passover, it is one of the finest examples of illuminated Haggadot. At some point during the volumes transmission, the miniatures were rearranged and they now appear out of order. The complete work was probably created by three artists. The Kaufmann Haggadah was intended for private, family use and as such shows great signs of wear and tear.

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Joel Ben Simeon Illustrator Eleazar Ben Judah, Editor The Ashkenazi Haggadah 1985 F acsimile of mid 15th century manuscript from Worms Harry N. Adams BM675.P4 Z5233 1985 Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica Illustrated by Joel Ben Simeon and held in the British Library, The Ashkenazi Haggadah was created in 15th century Germany. Ben Simeon was both a scribe and illuminator. There are 11 surviving manuscripts signed by him. Most of his illuminations are colo red pen drawings that are heavily influenced by the Florentine style. Yehuda Leib Ha Cohen, Illustrator Seder Hagadah shel Pessah (Codex Orientalis 7) 1989 F acsi mile of 1769 Copenhagen edition Akademische Druck u. Verlagsanstalt, Graz Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica The Copenhagen Haggadah was written and illustrated in the 18th century by Judah Leib Ha Cohen, whose artwork was heavily influenced by Christian art. The miniature of Balshazzars feast is highly reminiscent of Rembrandt s 1635 rendition of the same biblical scene. The Pessah Hagada 1951 F acsimile based on the 1609 Venetian Haggadah Hamadpis Liphshitz Press Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica Gift of Rabbi Martin I. Sandberg The original Venetian Haggadah contained a Judaeo Italian translation by the renowned Rabbi Leone de Modena, for which English has been substituted. The artist is unknown, but it is clear that he was also a great scholar of biblical and rabbinic literature. Many of his artistic interpr etations broke away from accepted conventions. In the scene of the departing Israelites carrying the remains of Joseph across the Red Sea, the artist adds details from verses in Genesis and Exodus explaining that Moses took Josephs bones in order to fulfi ll the Israelite vow to him.

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Die Pessach Haggadah des Gerschom Kohen 5287/1527 1926 F acsi mile of the 1527 Prague edition Joesf Altmann BM675.P4 C57 1926 Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica The Hebrew printer, Gershom Ha Cohen, together with his brother Gronem of Prague, recorded that they completed and printed the Haggadah on December 30, 1526; making it the earliest confirmed printing of an illustrated Haggadah in the 16th century. The Prague Haggadah outshone its pr edecessors in its extensive use of illustration in support of the printed text and continued the fine illumination of the manuscript tradition by using woodcut prints. The popular Passover song Adir Hu (Mighty is He) made its first appearance in this Hag gadah.