Leveraging Digital & Analog Collection Development Expertise to Create Scholarly Cyberinfrastructure for the Digital...

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Material Information

Title:
Leveraging Digital & Analog Collection Development Expertise to Create Scholarly Cyberinfrastructure for the Digital Humanities ( Proposal for Book Chapter )
Physical Description:
Book chapter proposal
Language:
English
Creator:
Taylor, Laurie N.
Alteri, Suzan
Minson, Val
Walker, Benjamin
Jefferson, Rebecca
Publisher:
George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, FL
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Digital Humanities
Data Management
Genre:
Spatial Coverage:

Notes

Abstract:
Book chapter proposal for inclusion in a book in development with call for proposals in 2013, book title from call for proposals: "Digital Humanities in the Library: Challenges and Opportunities for Subject Specialists". PROPOSAL TEXT: Academic libraries and teaching departments sometimes treat Digital Humanities (DH) as radically new. While DH is radically new, it is also fundamentally rooted in the humanities and directly and intricately connected to core activities by subject specialist librarians, including collection development and collaboration with teaching faculty. In this chapter, we explain how the University of Florida Smathers Libraries leveraged the library digital collections—with rich technical features and content, and a robust underlying infrastructure—to create the necessary scholarly cyberinfrastructure for DH and simultaneously leveraged DH for library needs. To do so, we show how Subject Specialist Librarians leveraged the new DH opportunities to fundamentally enrich and improve existing, seemingly more traditional work, including collection development, library scholarly councils, collaboration among libraries for print and digital collections, outreach and instruction, and more. The overall chapter shows how return on investment can be maximized for DH activities through integrating DH with existing operations, aligning DH with existing needs, and also using DH to extend and build into new areas specifically by working with and from Subject Specialist Librarians’ existing skills and expertise. In doing so, we show how Subject Specialist Librarians are critically important to DH activities, and the reverse. DH activities are critically important for Subject Specialist Librarians for growing skills and other specific activities, but most importantly for opportunities in DH activities that are directly relevant to all academic library concerns in the digital age, and for coming needs with the age of big data. By focusing on specific projects, we show how Subject Specialist Librarians are clearly needed for DH and the measurable benefits from their involvement. For the different projects covered, we review different ways of setting up collaborative team activities for best capitalizing on all expertise for project success, and as part of the longer-term needs associated with transforming positions, roles, and ways of working. The end of the chapter concludes with a set of recommendations and considerations for undertaking DH successful for specific projects, longer-term success with changed roles for Subject Specialist Librarian and changed ways of working, and how DH can inform and support data management needs, with Subject Specialist Librarians in the humanities having critical and vital information and expertise to share in developing sustainable data management programs. The chapter begins with a brief overview of digital collection development in the UF Libraries to show how the infrastructure developed with and for librarians, scholars, archivists, and many others. The UF Libraries began digitizing for preservation in the early 1990s, building to today with over 500 digital collections representing over 30 million files for UF and partner institutions, and numerous digital scholarship and DH projects. UF’s digital collection development success was made possible through the close collaboration among subject, functional, and technical specialist librarians, along with partners from many fields. By 2010, the UF Libraries had centralized servers in UF’s state of the art data center, gaining all the benefits of cloud computing without the risks associated with external agencies. The UF Libraries continue to build on this robust core, developing full socio-technical supports (people, policies, technologies, etc.) for digital scholarship and DH. UF Subject Specialist Librarians built from this foundation, developing innovative new projects and services, all the while working to further innovate and extend, especially through new opportunities with DH. In providing an overview of this process, we show the importance of contributions from and collaboration with Subject Specialist Librarians for individual DH projects and for DH at scale, as part of the overall scholarly cyberinfrastructure in the age of big data. To do so, we focus on several specific projects which are DH projects and are also simultaneously part of the programmatic work in developing scholarly cyberinfrastructure. Using specific examples, this chapter shows how DH activities can support: faculty development and upskilling for librarians as they share expertise and blend roles (blending subject, functional, and technical expertise) while on collaborative DH teams; closer collaborative relationships with librarians and scholars for the shared subject area; opportunities for multi-institutional collaboration on analog and digital collection development that support core, traditional work and enables new opportunities; and more. Specific projects to be covered include: an internal grant project to create a Scholar’s Council for the Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature, developing the responsibilities and roles using a DH project for application and testing; the Centers of Excellence model for collaborative analog and digital collection development which further emphasizes excellence and expertise with specific subject librarians; and other examples.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
System ID:
AA00019313:00001


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Proposed Chapter, Titl e: Leveraging Digital & Analog Collection Development Expertise to Create Scholarly Cyberinfrastructure for the Digital Humanities (Proposed for: Digital Humanities in the Library: Challenges and Opportunities for Subject Specialists ) Academic libraries and teaching departments sometimes treat Digital Humanities (DH) as radically new. While DH is radically new, it is also fundamentally rooted in the humanities and directly and intricately connected to core activities by subject specialist librarians, including collection development and collaboration with teaching faculty. In this chapter, we explain how the University of Florida Smathers Libraries leveraged th e library digital collections with rich technical features and content, and a robust underlying infrastructure to create the necessary scholarly cyberinfrastructure for DH and simultaneously leveraged DH for library needs To do so, we show how Subject Sp ecialist Librarians leveraged the new DH opportunities to fundame ntally enrich and improve existing seemingly more traditional work including collection development, library scholarly councils, collaboration among libraries for print and digital collections outreach and instruction, and more The overall chapter shows how return on investment can be maximized for DH activities through integrating DH with existing operations, aligning DH with existing needs, and also usin g DH to extend and build into new areas specifically by working with and from Subject Specialist In doing so, we show how Subject Specialist Librarians are critically important to DH activities, and the reverse. DH activities are critically important for Subject Specialist Libr arians for growing skills and other specific activities, but most importantly for opportunities in DH activities that are directly relevant to all academic library concerns in the digital ag e, and for coming needs with the age of big data. By focusing on specific projects, we show how Subject Specialist Librarians are clearly needed for DH and the measurable benefits from their involvement. For the different projects covered, we review diffe rent ways of setting up collaborative team activities for best capitalizing on all expertise for project success, and as part of the longer term needs associated with transforming positions, roles, and ways of working. The end of the chapter concludes with a set of recommendations and considerations for undertaking DH successful for specific projects, longer term success with changed roles for Subject Specialist Librarian and changed ways of working, and how DH can inform and support data management needs, with Subject Specialist Librarians in the humanities having critical and vital information and expertise to share in developing sustainable data management programs. The chapter begins with a brief overview of digital collection development in the UF Lib raries to show how the infrastructure developed with and for librarians, scholars, archivists, and many others. The UF Libraries began digitizing for preservation in the early 1990s, building to today with over 500 digital collections represent ing over 30 million files for UF and partner institutions and numerous digital scholarship and DH projects 1 development success was made possible through the close collaboration among subject, functional, and technical specialist librarians, along with partners from many fields. By 2010, the all the benefits of cloud computing without the risks associated with external agencies. 1 See the UF Digital Collections ( http://ufdc.ufl.edu/ ), SobekCM Open Source Software by UF and partners ( http://sobekrepository.org/ ), and Digital Humanities Projects at UF ( http://libraru.ufl.edu/digitalhumanities ).

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The UF Libraries c ont inue to build on this robu st core, developing full socio technical supports (people, policies, technologies, etc.) for digital scholarship and DH UF Subject Specialist Librarians built from this foundation, developing innovative new projects and services, all the while working to further innovate and extend, especially through new opportunities with DH. In providing an overview of this process we show the importance of contributions from and collaboration with Subject Specialist Librarians for individual DH projects and for DH at scale, as part of the overall scholarly cyberinfrastructure in the age of big data. To do so, we focus on several s pecific projects which are DH projects and are also simultaneously part of the programmatic work in developing scholarly cyberinfrastructure Using specific examples, this chapter shows how DH activities can support : faculty development and upskilling for librarians as they share expertise and blend roles (blending subject, functional, and technical expertise) while on collaborative DH teams; closer collaborative relationships with librarians and scholars for the shared subject area; opportunities for multi institutional collaboration on analog and digital collection development that support core, traditional work and enables new opportunities; Council for the responsibilities and roles using a DH project for application a nd testing ; the Centers of Excellence model for collaborative analog and digital collection development which further emphasi zes excellence and expertise with specific subject librarians; and other examples. Authors: Contact : Laurie N. Taylor, Digital Humanities & Data Librarian, Laurien@ufl.edu Suzan Alteri, Curator of the Baldwin Library of Histori c salteri@ufl.edu Val Minson, Agricultural Sciences & Academic Reporting Librarian, vdavis@ufl.edu Ben Walker, Chair of the Shared Col lections Department & Subject Specialist for Collaborative Analog Collection Development, benwalk@uflib.ufl.edu Chelsea Dinsmore, Government Documents Analog & Digital Collections Librarian and Specialist for Center of Excellence Consolidated Collections chedins@uflib.ufl.edu Rebecca Jefferson, Curator of the Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica & Affiliate Teaching Faculty for the Center for Jewish Studies rjefferson@ufl.edu Brief description of your academic institution: 2 The University of Florida is a major, public, comprehensive, land grant, research intensive colleges and more than 200 research, service and education centers, burea us and institutes. and are one the h umanities are served from several physical libraries (e.g., Library West, the largest library building; r are unique holdings in Special & Area Studies Collections ; etc.) H umanities support includes S ubject S pecialist L ibrarians, various blended functional, technical, and subject specialists teams (e.g., Data Management/Curation Task Force, Digital D evelopment & Web Services, etc.) and more and comparably lower funding demand collaborative and innovative approaches, as well as approaches that leverage capacity whenever possible 2 For more, see: http://www.ufl.edu/about uf/ and http://www.ufl.edu/academics/