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Putnam County Courier Journal

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Title:
Putnam County Courier Journal
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Lake Street Publishing Company
Place of Publication:
Crescent City, FL
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Lake Street Publishing Company, Juliette Laurie- Publisher\Editor
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English

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newspaper ( marcgt )
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United States -- Florida -- Putnam -- Crescent City
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29.434441 x -81.510139

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright Putnam County Courier Journal, Lake Street Publishing Company, Juliette Laurie, publisher,. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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PAGE 1

On Wednesday March 21 Deputy Putnam Coun ty Sheriffs Ofce (PCSO) Deputy Justin Rich con ducted a trafc stop for a speeding violation on a Silver 2013 Nissan Alti ma near the intersection of South Palm Avenue and Campbell Street in Palatka. Upon approaching the vehicle, Deputy Rich de tected a strong odor of marijuana coming from the interior of the car. Af ter making contact with the occupants, the driver was identied as 23-yearold De Quan Wright and the two passengers were identied as 20-year-old Ladarron Devon Williams and 21-year-old Jimma ron Curry, all of Palatka. Rich determined Wil liams had an active warrant for violation of probation. Williams was removed from the vehicle and placed under arrest for the warrant. The vehi cle was searched in refer ence to the strong odor of marijuana. During the search 6.9 grams of crack co caine and 6.5 grams of Dilaudid, a schedule II controlled narcotic. Af ter further investigation, Wright and Curry were both arrested and trans ported to the Putnam County Jail where they were booked along with Williams. Wright, also known by the alias of Chubby Stacks, is heavily in volved in promoting gang related music videos spe cic to the Palatka area that emphasize a culture of drugs, guns and vio lence. In many of these videos, Chubby Stacks is shown displaying large stacks of money he claims to be the ill-gotten proceeds of illegal drug dealing and often uses the line, we some deal ers, no users in his lyr ics. Wright was charged with one count of the possession of cocaine with the intent to sell, one count of maintaining a drug vehicle, and one count of the possession of a controlled substance without a prescription. Wright has since bonded out on a $12,500 bond, but the investigation into his agrant drug dealing is ongoing. Curry was charged with one count of traf cking in opium and has since been released on a $25,000 bond. Williams was booked on his active warrant and has since been released on a bond of $276. Florida State Represen tative Bobby Payne and S enator Keith Perry, the Putnam County Legisla tive Delegation, secured $ 2,390,232 in appropria tions directly for Putnam C ounty Projects during the 2018 Legislative Ses sion. The funding allo cations are part of HB 5 001, the 2018-19 Gener al Appropriations Act, a b alanced state budget for the upcoming scal year, signed by Governor Scott on Friday, March 16. Representative Payne sponsored the following bills: HB3297 secured $850,000 for the East Palatka Fire Sta tion Water Expan sion. These funds will b e used to extend the Putnam County water lines to the new Fire Station in East Palatka. This will provide a po table water source to t he new re station and surrounding res idential sites. During l ast years budget cy cle, Putnam County r eceived $1 million to build the new Fire Sta tion in East Palatka. P utnam County Board of County Commission ers is currently working o n this project. HB3295 secured $790,232 for Communi cations Equipment Up grade. These funds will u pgrade the Putnam Safety Radio System, by procuring new dispatch consoles and integra tion services. H B3271 secured $250,000 for the Putnam County School District Advanced Manufacturing. These funds will assist in pre paring with technical a nd vocational skills for local industry jobs. The funds are to purchase equipment and to reno vate existing rooms. A dditionally, $500,000 was included in the De partment of Economic O pportunitys budget for the Putnam County Ani mal Shelter. These funds w ill replace an inadequate facility and will include spay and neutering and adoptions areas, all under one roof. Representative Payne made to following state ment with regards to the a ppropriations, We are extremely pleased to work with our colleagues in both the House and Sen ate to secure funding for t hese projects. Senator Perry and I have formed a strong relationship and will continue to press for appropriations each year in order to improve the quality of life for all in our District. The funds will be avail able at the beginning of t he scal year, July 1, 2018. Inside Church...................A5 Community............A3 Crossword.............B3 Faces & Places......B1 Opinion..................A2Public Notices.......B3-5Way Back When....A4 Lane and Road Closures YOUR ADDRESS HERE!For home delivery via the USPS Subscribe TodayOnly $24 a Year! Call 386-698-1644 The following is a list of road and lane closures that may impact trafc through Friday, March 23. State Road 19 State Road 100 to State Road 20: Daytime lane closures Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. for concrete work related to the resurfacing project. Georgetown United Methodist Church will be having their First Annual Fish Fry on Friday, March 30 from 4to 6 p.m. The cost is $8. There will be piano and guitar music. The church is located on 1448 CR 309 in Georgetown. Elder Options is hosting a Diabetes Self Management class. This six-week series of classes will be held at Haven Hospice located at 6400 St. Johns Avenue in Palatka starting Friday, March 30 at 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. This class is free to anyone with diabetes, their families, and caretakers. For more information or to register for either workshop series, contact Betty Flagg 352-692-5219. Space is limited. Full Moon PaddleThe Putnam Blueways and Trails Full Moon Paddle will be held on Saturday, March 31 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Hermits Cove in Satsuma. They will paddle around the Seven Sisters Islands with beer at Hermits Cove afterward. Hermits Cove is located on 482 Cove Drive in Satsuma.(2 sections) Crescent City, FL Join Ranger Jeff as he shows you how to build your very own birdhouse at the Ravine Gardens in Palatka. The ticket and fee is per birdhouse, not per person, so please purchase the number of birdhouses you would like to build. Due to the popularity of this event, they will be offering two sessions. The first will be 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. and the second will be 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, March 31. Participants will meet at the large pavilion. The $12 ticket include entry fee into the park. All materials will be supplied. Fish Fry Build Your Own Birdhouse Diabetes Self Management Class Special to theCourier Journal Whats HappeningWho are these two people and what are they doing?Page A3 Putnam Countys Favorite Weekly Community Newspaper Special to theCourier Journal Concerned Citizens of South Putnam is partnering with Wealth Watchers to host a Resource Fair on Friday, March 30 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Market Square (corner of Summit and Central) in Crescent City. There will be resources there that will take information and applications in the event that you need assistance with mortgage applications/ qualifications, home repairs, assistance with FEMA and / or other hurricane related damage. There will be food, a $50 gift card drawing and activities for the children, so please come out and support this event and find out what assistance may be available! If you have any questions, please contact Kiana Harper (Outreach Specialist) from Wealth Watchers Inc at 904-265-4736 extension # 4046. Wealth Watchers Local Rapper Chubby Stacks ArrestedScout ReportTroop 957 wins at Pinewood Derby.Page A4 $2.3 Million in Appropriations Putnam Funding secured by Rep. Bobby Payne and Senator Keith Perry Putnam County Crescent City Pierson Science Night Draws Crowd www.facebook.com/put namcountycourierjournal Photo special to the Courier Journal 23-year-old De Quan Wright (left), 20-year-old Ladarron Devon Williams (center) and 21-year-old Jimmaron Curry (right) arrested on Wednesday, March 21 for drug possession, trafcking and violation of probation after a trafc stop for a speeding violation, Touch a TruckTouch-A-Truck will be on Wednesday, March 28 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the John Theobold Sports Complex located at 120 Carter Road at the corner of SR 17 and SR19 in Palatka. All youth are invited to come and see dump trucks, graders, ambulances, fire trucks, police cars, helicopters and more. Hot dogs and water available to the first 150 participants. (2 sections) Crescent City, FL Quilts by the RiverFifth Annual Quilt Show and Contest a local success.Page B1 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 Photos by Laura BerardiOn Thursday, March 22 Middleton-Burney Elementary School hosted a science night in their school cafeteria. This was more than just a science fair as other organi zations outside the school came in to demonstrate their own niche of science. Pictured to the left is Scott and Logan Knowles Bee Keepers with their beehive. Upper right is Mithila Paul (left) and Anahi Lugo (right) with their science project on aquaponic tanks. Bottom right is the Putnam Blueways & Trails giving a demonstration on kayaks and kayak safety. Scout Report Troop 957 wins at Pinewood Derby. Page A4 Crescent City, FL Whats Happening Who are these two people and what are they doing? Whats Happening Who are these two Scout Report Troop 957 wins at Pinewood Derby. Page A4 Scout Report Troop 957 wins 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 Quilts by the River Happy Easter on Sunday, April 1!

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I was nineteen years old and living in New York when I first met Juan. His family had come to the United States from South America, and he was proud of his heritage. He was a pleasant young man and a jokester. But one thing he especially liked to do was to challenge the rest of us to see who could eat the hottest, spiciest foods. Juan would eat a hot pepper and say, Where I live, we eat chili peppers like you eat M&MS. Of course, living in Buffalo, New York, the most famous spicy food was Buffalo Chicken Wings. Juan issued a challenge to the rest of us, claiming he could eat hotter chicken wings than anyone, and he dared us to prove otherwise. In our group of a dozen young men, four decided to take the challenge. There were a few places in Buffalo, all of which claimed to be the restaurant that first made chicken wings. Juan told the challengers to choose whichever one they wanted. One of the challengers, Donaldson, chose the restaurant based on the hotness factor. This restaurant claimed to have chicken wings from super-super mild to what they called hot death. On a day off from work, the twelve of us went there to eat and watch the challenge. Though most of us didnt plan to be part of the competition we thought we would see how far up the hotness scale we could go. We started by ordering a platter of the super-super mild. We each ate one. They were barely spicy, and I liked them. We ordered a super mild next. This burned slightly for me, and some of our group went no hotter. Next was the mild. When I tried that, tears rolled from my eyes, and I decided I was happy to end there. Most of us quit at that level, but the four challengers and Juan kept going. But as the temperature increased, one by one the challengers, eyes watering, dropped out. There were still three heat levels left when the last challenger conceded victory to Juan. As each person reached their hottest level, there would be lots of gulping of pop or anything to try to wash away the burn, and Juan would point at the person and say, Gringo, and laugh. After the last challenger dropped out, all pitched in and bought a platter of hot death, and Juan, to our great admiration, ate every wing on it. Juans victory was the talk of our meetings for about a week. Then, one day, Donaldson received a package from home. In it was a note from his mother to share it with all of us. It was full of cookies and something else that Donaldson said was his favorite treat. There were twelve small vials of sweetened cinnamon and a package of toothpicks. Donaldson showed us that he loved to dip the toothpick into the cinnamon and then lick it. We each took our cinnamon and followed his lead. It was really good, and soon we were all licking our cinnamon toothpicks. But that was when something interesting happened. Juan licked his the first time, and his eyes grew wide, and he started to scream. He rushed to the kitchen sink and started gulping water and trying to rinse his mouth. Finally, he turned to us. You trick me! Its just cinnamon oil, Donaldson said, dipping a toothpick and licking it off. Juan walked over to Donaldson and jerked the bottle from his hand. He picked up a new toothpick, dipped it in the cinnamon, and licked it. Again, his eyes grew wide, and he screamed and ran to the kitchen sink. He still thought it was a trick, so after Donaldson showed him again, and licked off a toothpick, Juan grabbed the toothpick out of Donaldsons mouth, and to our disgust, licked it, too. Once more we watched Juan scream and run to the sink. It must just be a difference of spices that we are used to in our culture, I said. When Juan finally pulled his mouth away from the water faucet, Donaldson pointed at him and said, Non-Gringo, and we all laughed. So Donaldson had an extra container of cinnamon for himself, and Juan never teased us again. Government Watch A2 City of Crescent CityCity Commission Meeting April 12, 6 p.m.Planning & Zoning Meeting, April 10, 6 p.m.City Hall, 3 North Summit Street. Meets 2nd Thurs of the month. 386-698-2525 www.CrescentCity-FL.com Town Council of WelakaTown Council Meeting, April 10, 6:00 p.m.Zoning Board Meeting, Tuesday, April 12, 5:30 p.m.Town Hall, Fourth Ave. Meets 2nd Tues of the month. 386-467-9800. www.Welaka-FL.govTown Council of Pomona ParkTown Council Meeting, April 10, 6 p.m.Town Hall Council Chambers 1775 US Hwy 17 S.TownClerk@PomonaPark.com 386-649-4902 www.PomonaPark.comPutnam County Board of County CommissionersApril 10, 9 a.m. Regular MeetingMeets second and fourth Tuesday in the Commission chambers, 2509 Crill Ave, Suite 100, Palatka. 386-329-0205. www.putnam-fl.com/bocc/Putnam County School Board April 3, 3:30 p.m. Regular MeetingMeets the first and third Tuesday in the School Board Meeting Room, 200 Reid Street, Palatka. 386-3290545. www.putnamschools.org OPINION A Lake Street Publishing Company Newspaper POSTMASTER: Send Address Change To Putnam County Courier Journal 320 N. Summit Street Crescent City, FL 32112USPS No. 451-140 2018 Lake Street Publishing Co. Published Every Wednesday by Lake Street Publishing Company, Inc. Periodicals Postage Paid at Crescent City, Florida.All Emails: pccjnews@gmail.com Juliette Laurie Editor / Publisher Mike Jones General Manager / Ad Sales Laura Berardi Production Assistant Beth Carter Staff WriterG.A. Teske Staff Writer If you would like to write for the Courier Journal, please give us a call or send an email. One Year Florida Subscription $24 (incl. tax)One Year Out-Of-State $28 Office Hours: 9 am to 5 pm Monday through FridayAdvertising and Legal Deadline: 5 pm Friday Classified Deadline: 10 am Monday Editorial Deadline: Noon FridayPhone: 386-698-1644 Fax: 386-698-1994 Putnam County On line: www.cjnewsfl.com From Me to YouJuliette Laurie Editor/Publisher DISCLAIMER: Views expressed on this page do not necessarily reflect the editorial position of the Putnam County Courier Journal or its advertisers. The Putnam County Courier Journal does not knowingly publish false information and may not be held liable for the views of readers exercising their right to free expression.Wheres the Flag? National Pencil Day Each year, March 30 is National Pencil Day. Hymen Lipman received the first patent for attaching an eraser to the end of a pencil on this day in 1858. The majority of these writing utensils made in the United States are painted yellow. It is believed that this tradition began in 1890 when the L & C Hardtmuth Company of Austria-Hungary introduced their Koh-I-Noor brand, named after the famous diamond. This pencil was intended to be the worlds best and most expensive pencil. Other companies then began to copy the yellow color so that their pencils would be associated with the high-quality brand. Notable pencil users: Thomas Edison had his pencils specially made by Eagle Pencil. Each pencil was three inches long, was thicker than standard pencils and had softer graphite than was typically available. Vladimir Nabokov rewrote everything he had ever published, usually several times, by pencil. John Steinbeck was an obsessive pencil user and is said to have used as many as 60 a day. His novel East of Eden took more than 300 pencils to write. Vincent van Gogh used only Faber pencils as they were superior to Carpenters pencils, a capital black and most agreeable. Johnny Carson regularly played with pencils at his Tonight Show desk. These pencils were specially made with erasers at both ends to avoid on-set accidents. Roald Dahl used only pencils with yellow casing to write his books. He had six sharpened pencils ready at the beginning of each day and only when all six became unusable did he resharpen them. The Putnam County Courier Journal welcomes your letters to the Editor. Letters should be brief and legibly written. To be published, letters must include the writers signature, printed name, phone number, and hometown. We will NOT print any letters without this information. Address letters to: Editor 320 N. Summit St., Crescent City, FL 32112 or FAX to 386-698-1994, or E-mail to pccjnews@gmail.com Letters to the Editor A Difference in CultureDaris Howard Did that Come From?Take the Cake It is widely supposed that this phrase originated with cake-walk strutting competitions, which were commonplace in the community of the southern USA in the 19th and early 20th centuries. In those, couples would be judged on their style in the cake-walk. The winners were said to have taken the cake, which was often the prize. This is recorded in US newspapers from around the 1870 onwards; for example, The Indiana Progress, January 1874 has: The cake-walk, in which ten couple [sic] participated, came off on Fri day night, and the judges awarded the cake, which was a very beautiful and costly one, to Mrs Sarah and John Jackson. The phrase is much earlier than that though. As early as the fifth century BC the Greeks used take the cake as symbolic of a prize for a victory. In 420 BC the Greek Aristophanes wrote The Knights, which was a criticism of the powerful Athenian politician Cleon: If you surpass him in impudence the cake is ours. Clearly, that phrase would have entered into English in translation, and although it may have been long used in Greece, theres no evidence of any take up of it in English prior to the 19th century US usage. In the US the phrase is sometimes given as take the cakes, although the singular is used elsewhere in the English-speaking world. That version is the earliest citation in print in English. William Trotter Porters 1847 work A Quarter Race in Kentucky has: They got up a horse and fifty dollars in money a side, ... each one to start and ride his own horse, ... the winning horse take the cakes. The related phrase take the biscuit means virtually the same, although is more often associated with surprise at a particular outcome than with victory in some enterprise. From the Phase Finder: http:// www.phrases.org. uk/. Did that Did that Did that Come Come Come Come From? From? From? From? Dear Editor: I couldnt help but notice the American Flag in front of City Hall and the Police Department is still not up. To me this can only be incompetence and/or indifference. Last week I emailed the City Manager about this and I got a two word sarcastic response. Its broke! I am sorry Mr. Mayor, but thats no way to respond to a concerned citizen. The Governor asked that all flags throughout Florida be put at half-mast to honor the kids killed in Parkland but not here, ours is broken. For God sake, walk around the corner and buy two inexpensive temporary flags at Ace Hardware and put them up. Thousands died so we can have the privilege of flying our Countrys Flag. If someone cannot keep the American Flag up at City Hall Id think real hard about renewing his/her contract. I am a retired Police Commissioner from Long Island, and for the life of me, I cant figure how a City Government can let this continue. If the flag in front of my station house wasnt displayed for weeks Id be the X-Commissioner. This isnt right and there are no good excuses, Warren Kelly Crescent City

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Pomona Park First Baptist Garden of PrayerLast week pavers were put in place at the First Baptist Church of Pomona Park. A cross on a hill remembers the charter members of the church and the ministers who have led its congre gations since 1926. A curved paver walk commemorates many of the active members of 1927 and 1928 and their fam ilies who were faithful to the chur ch throughout the years. Current members of the church may have pavers engraved to show their dedication to the church. The commitment made the church outgrow its original building, and a newer beautiful sanctuary on West Main Street pro claims to all who pass the faithfulness and devotion of the people who strive to proclaim Gods glory. This final stage of the garden should be com pleted just after Easter and a dedication will be held in July. Carol Golden and Rock of Ages The Lor d was talking to everyone recently when Carol Golden visited the Pomona Park First Bap tist Church. The pastor, Br other Gary Munson, asked if she would sing and Carols aunt, Irene Hundley had wanted her to sing. All three had been thinking about the old hymn, Rock of Ages, and Carol gave a beau tiful tribute to the old song, starting fr om the back of the church singing acapella, then mov ing up the aisle accompa nied by Monica Sidney on the piano. When singing the thir d verse, When I rise to worlds unknown and behold Thee on Thy throne, she faced the au dience with the joy that one will have at that im mortal time. Car ol Alvers Golden is the great-granddaughter of William Edge Mew and his wife Serena McCor mick Mew. It was Wil liams dream to have a Baptist Chur ch in Pomona Park, and he made his dream a reality. With their sons, Talmage and Brewster Mew, and four other dedicated Baptists, Dan and Lizzie Thomas, Sarah Wells, and A.H. Bryant, the church was built and dedicated in 1926. Carols grandmother Natha Mew Alvers was as dedicated to the church as the rest of her family and the Alvers were always faithful mem bers of the church. The Gar den of Prayer will be dedicated to those char ter members, other active members fr om the 1920s and to Carols father, Phil ip Alvers, in July. Car ol attended Florida State University and received her Music Educa tion degree. She taught music in Palatka schools for many years until she r etired. She has sung with many groups and was a featured soloist with the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra and the Willis Bodine Chorale and the Gainesville Civic Orches tra. She starred in Jesus Christ Superstar under the direction of David and Patti Humphrey and in the Lake Area performances of Gilbert and Sullivan in Melrose. She loved being musical director of Trinity United Methodist Church and other organizations. Music is her love. Spring and St. Patricks Day Folks enjoyed a tradi tional St. Pattys dinner of cor ned beef, cabbage, po tatoes and carrots at the Cr escent City Womans Club. The club has regular fundraisers to support their activities in the com munity and the folks enjoy having a place for fellowship and compan ionship. The weather was per fect and everyone had a great time. Birthdays and the CCHS Class of On St. Patricks Day, John Olan Nettles, Don ald Davis, Nancy Cooley Alvers, Barbara Babbitt Banks, Pat Harris and Rose Marie Sargent met at Renegades to wish hap py birthday to five mem bers of their high school class on their birthdays. Gloria Str ozier Laird, now of Augusta, Georgia, cel ebrated her birthday on February 28. Classmates, Billy Register of Canton, Georgia and Mac Mal colm Owens of Prairev ille, Louisiana, had birth days on March 14 and 15 and Donald Davis and Pat Harris, now of W in chester, Tennessee, were both bor n on St. Patricks Day. For many years, classmate Dudley Sargent and his wife Rose Marie hosted the class reunions. Four members of the Class of were unable to attend. Nancy Alvers visited their high school friend, Geneva Snook ie Mew Gresham, who lives now at the Lakewood Nursing Home prior to the class r eunion. Gloria Strozier Laird recently moved into an assisted-living fa cility in Augusta, Georgia, bu t hopes she may be able to attend the next class dinner that is held at the same time as her family reunion. Billy Reg ister and his wife Tazuko of Canton, Geor gia, have attended many times, but he recently fell and could not make the trip this time. Malcolm Owens and his wife Betty have attended several times but could not attend this March. Malcolm lives in Prairieville, Louisiana. The class would love to have information on Hazel Waters Rounds and Bar bara Schieman Johnson. If you have infor mation on either of these ladies, please notify Nancy Alvers P.O. Box 368, San Mateo, FL 32187. Other people attending the dinner at Renegades were Carol Alvers Gold en, Terry Kraft and Patrick Harris. Patrick drove fr om Tennessee so his father could meet with high school friends fr om the 1950s. #SmileWithLays and Cherie Register Cherie Register gave a slideshow presentation on the history of Crescent City at the Crescent City Womans Club. They also talked about Operation Smile and have decided to take up a collection for our last three meetings to donate to sponsor a child. Lays bags were passed around and pictures tak en to post with #Smile WithLays. Pomona Park Neighborhood Watch County Commissioner Larry Harvey was guest speaker at the Pomona Park Neighborhood Watch meeting recently. He spoke on expanding busi nesses in the county and how Pr esident Trump has reached out to Rural Flor ida. He also commented on tours of solar far ms and about funding being received to build a fire department in Hastings. Lake Como Boosters Meeting County Commissioner Bill Pickens was the guest speaker for the Lake Como Boosters Club. He joined the group for a wonderful potluck din ner and then explained several things happening in Putnam County this year to improve employ ment and work. He spoke about the progress being made on the expansion of Hwy 17 between San Mateo and Dunns Creek. He also made an inspec tion of the club building and r ecommended that some more improvements be addressed as soon as the Parks and Recreation Budget can handle it. Afterwards, twelve mem bers demonstrated items they had made or worked on this year along with special hobbies. They in cluded Mary VanHouten, Eileen Daunt, Car olyn Dooley, Linda Barber, Jan McDiarmid, Carolyn Jackson, Norene Reigler, Jeanne Shockley, Joyce Hawkins, Karen Jelsma (visiting family from Mich igan), Phil Kenyon and W alt Perry. Items ranged from Christmas orna ments, gift tags, towels, table runners, pothold ers, jackets, wine holder, quilts and N gauge rail road items. We Shall Behold Him Pastor Gary Munson and the congregation of the First Baptist Church of Pomona Park received a blessing when Yolan da Steadman sang the beautiful classic song at a r ecent church service. The daughter of Dale and Awyan Walls, Yolanda was visiting her broth er Carlyle Walls during a r ecent trip she and her husband Jerry are cur rently making. She grew up in Kingsport, T ennes see, where she sang in the chur ch choirs. She was also the pianist-organist at the Kingsport Baptist Church. John and Freddie Ford John and Freddie Ford continue to make their home at the Kings Bridge Retirement Center. This March makes their sec ond year there, but John continues to r each out to CCHS friends in several classes from his class in 1941 forward. John and Freddie celebrated their 65th wedding anniversary on June 30 of last year. John wrote that Freddie is still teaching Women of Faith Life Group, a Sunday School class, at Briarlake Baptist Church. John continues to work through 20 to 30 boxes of old filessaving, shred ding or disposing of over 80 years of history. Much of that history took place her e in Crescent City. His father was Dr. Edward Ford and John attended grades 1 through 12 in Crescent City where he played basketball. A grad uate of CCHS Class of Fr eddie Tumlin was the class valedictorian. John got his Masters de gree in Forestry before he and Fr eddie were married in 1952. Freddie got her Bachelors degree in Education and Masters in A3 See Community on page A6 COMMUNITY Beth Carter 386-698-1644community.pccj@gmail.com r fnt rf bbb t bbbtt t A Garden, Class of 50, and Easter Garden of Prayer at the First Baptist Church of Pomona Park. Nancy Alvers, Beth Carter and Irene Hundley lis ten to Carol Golden sing Rock of Ages.Shirley Griffin with Commissioner Larry Harvey at a recent Neighborhood Watch meeting. County Commissioner Bill Pickens speaking at the Lake Como Boosters Club St. Patricks Day dinner at the Crescent City Wom ans Club. Left: Kathy Gillespie with Cherie doing #SmileWithLays. On right: Cherie giving a presentation on the history of Crescent City. 317 N. Summit St., 386-698-1313 Crescent City Flower Shopwww.crescentcityowershop.com Brighten Someones Easter with a Beautiful Arrangement or Bouquet We Cater To CowardsFULL SERVICE GENERAL DENTISTRY 325-8081 American Dental Center of Palatka American Dental Center of Palatka American Dental Center of Palatka The Class of 1950 at Renegades. Yolanda Steadman singing at the First Baptist Church of Pomona Park. Everyone enjoys an Easter egg hunt.

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This is Damion Sapp telling you about a won derful thing that hap pened when we went to the Timucua Districts Pinewood Derby! Two of us took home trophies from district! Alan Marti nez won 2nd place in his Division. Alan was so ex cited that he got to take his trophy to church to show some of the people that couldnt make it up the race! I won 3rd place in the Webelos division! They were at different times so we are sending both pictures! My Cubmaster asked me what I learned at the Derby. I told her that was awesome to win! It was so close. Several of the races were decided by 1/1000th of a second. I dont even really know what that means but I know it was close. Our Troop Scoutmaster was helping with the district race and he said it was super close. One of the things I no ticed at the race was that everyone had a good time. Even those that didnt take home trophies watched all the other boys and were happy for the winners. No one cried or carried on at the race and a lot of the boys con gratulated the winners. Like I said, it was really an awesome race! The sportsmanship was real ly great for so many boys that were competing. My dad was there sup porting us and he talked to our scoutmaster about it. Our scoutmaster said it was a good thing to see that not everyone takes a trophy home because the sooner we learn that lesson, the better we will do in life. He remembers when he was a scout and they had bike races and other stuff and he was on sports teams and not everyone can win all the time. Sometimes we learn more from not win ning. Hum, I guess thats right. I like that I worked really hard and was able to see my car go down the track really fast. There were faster cars than mine though. I know it was really close between third place and fourth place. I wonder how I would have felt if I had come in fourth instead of third. I learned that we need to follow instructions to build a good car and that we might not al ways win but we just do our best. Thats the Cub Scout motto. Anyway, it was a really great thing to be able to participate. I also learned that we should always say thank you to everyone that helped us. Thats for an other article but I just want to say thank you to our Troop Scoutmaster and his former scout from Wyoming, Isaac, that helped us so much. We also want to say thank you to our Cubmaster and to the other leaders that helped us and to the Older scouts that helped us too. Our Pinewood Derby had sponsors that helped us make the Pinewood Derby in our Pack be successful and purchase supplies for us. Thanks to Napa Store, Mammoth Grip Sprinkler Spacers, LaRues Quilt Kottage, and Elder and Sister Mullins. Elder and Sis ter Mullins had donat ed extra cars and sup plies last year and even though they werent here, their love is still felt every time we do anything with Pinewood Derby. Our Pack and Troop 957 is sponsored by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. We say thank you! If you would like to par ticipate in scouts, please come Wednesday night at 6 p.m. for boys age 11-18. The Cub Scouts meet at 4 p.m. on on the second and fourth week of each month. Hope to see yall there. You can also get more info at www.beas cout.org. Way Back When... A4 OUR TO WN 25 years agoApril 2, 1967 Bulldozer Burns A bulldozer, used for clearing land near Union Avenue in Crescent City caught fire. The Crescent City Fire Department arrived at the scene in time to save the piece of heavy equip ment. 50 years ago Years Ago...April 2, 1943 General John E. Lewis Rotary Speaker Brigadier General John E. Lewis spoke to 58 Rotarians about the reasons why we were in the war and the current state of the military. 75 years ago 10 years ago 5 years agoApril 3, 2013 17 Years on the Air WHIF 91.3 Hope FM celebrated their seventeenth year on the air. They be gan broadcasting in 1996. They have now been on the air for 22 years. April 2, 2008 Lakewood Nursing Home Fire Does Little Damage A grease fire broke out in the kitchen at Lakewood Nursing Home, but was contained to the stove area. The fire was quickly put out by an employee with a fire extinguisher before the fire department arrived. The only effect felt by the residents was the delay of dinner by a few minutes. Compiled from the Crescent City News, Crescent City Journal, Crescent City Courier Journal, Putnam County Courier Journal and other local news sources. March 31, 1993 New Miss Crowned Rachel Holland was crowned Miss Crescent City High School with Lisa Hogan the first Runner-up during an event that was sponsored by the schools Beta Club. Kendra Scott was named Junior Miss CCHS. Lovarnso WalkerSales Consultant256 Hwy. 17 N., Palatka, FL 32177 (386) 328-8863 Ext. 117 (800) 382-3692 Ext. 117 FAX (386) 328-7222 CELL (386) 559-3512 lovarnsowalker@beckchrysler.com Dr. Walker Curing All Your Automotive NeedsA legendary folk artist performed in Crescent City for the 1982 Cat sh Festival, as we see from the Courier Jour nal of March 17, 1982. Gamble Rogers/Popular guitarist, humorist headlines Catsh T rying to describe the style of entertainer Gam ble Rogers is difcult. When r eviewed by Play boy, they referred to Rog ers act as a country picker who interspers es songs with maniacal monologues in the style of a Souther n revivalist preacher. Says Billboard, Rogers stage performance is a blend of far -reaching, sophisticated humor, im peccable, sometimes astounding guitar playing and singingHis monologues are the most un usual aspect of his act, serving up lar ge doses of improbable storytelling, couched in language that combined the best efforts of Noah Webster and a good ole boy. And, the Rolling Stones Magazine says Gamble Rogers has been taking his own brand of songs and Southern Gothic sto ries to America He is just now about to hit it big. Another described Rog ers as a guitarist in the mold of Merle T ravis and storyteller from the frontporch school of Mark Twain. Gamble Rogers plays it all, including a 15 minute rambling recitation called the Commercial Fisher men of Big Lake George, which will be his featured number when he plays here April 3 as special en tertainment for the 1982 Catsh Festival. A r esident of St. Augustine, Rogers, who once played and sang with the famous Seren dipity Singers, was driving thr ough this area some years ago and happened onto a commercial sher man who was pulling his big black boat with a 200 horsepower black Mer cury motor out of the waters of Big Lake Geor ge. And, get ready for a 15 minute spiel of humor and guitar picking that is dif cult to match. While Rogers will appear for one concert only at 1 p.m., he is part of a daylong free musical program that features two of the souths nest bluegrass bands Red and Mur phy and Co., from Haw thorne and the Bluegrass Par dners, Orlando. Both bluegrass groups have ap peared at past festivals. The bluegrass bands will play alter nately beginning at 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. Described as the best American humorist since Will Rogers, a teller of tall tales, and a spinner of fantastic stories, Rogers is considered one of the orig inal good ole boys who has found his true r eward in what he calls Southern Gothic Art Songs. Besides playing the gui tar as well as Carter sells peanuts, his excursions into the noble art of sto rytelling bring the listener face to face with his hilar ious homegrown world of the South. W ith a urry of ten dollar words and the delivery of a southern tent preacher, Rogers gift of the narrative sets the room aglow with hardy laughter. Rogers has traveled throughout the country for the past seven years, appearing at major col leges and universities, plus night club and televi sion performances. His per formance in Crescent City will be taped by Gainesville television Channel 5 for a special concert to be aired at a later date. The Gable Rogers con cert will be held inside Eva L yon Park as part of the day-long Catsh Festi val activities. There is no admission char ge. Eleven Different Sizes from 5x5 to 12x20TWO LOCATIONSBehind Kangaroo on Paradise Shores Road, Crescent City(includes fenced outside storage area) and County Road 309, Fruitland386-698-2002P&FMINI WAREHOUSE STORAGE Troop 957 Wins at District Pinewood Derby Troop 957 Wins at District Pinewood Derby DamionTroop Scribe D.O.G Gets It! Do You? Subscribe today! Only $24 a year! 386-698-1644 Serving Putnam County Since 19631813 Reid St. (Hwy 17) Palatka 325.0440 325.0460 Alan Rameriz-Martinez receives the Second Place Trophy at District Pinewood Derby in Palatka. Damion Sapp is given third Place trophy in the Webelos Division at the Timucua Pinewood Derby.

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CRESCENT CITY Johanna Sharpe Born on July 18, 1912 Johanna Bertha Koban near Dresden, Germany. Her family immigrated to America when she was very young. The plan was to bring her to America after they were established, but before that happened World War I broke out. There were several years that there was no communication with the family. She lived with her grandmother, who taught her how to crochet. However her grandmother died when she was 10 and she was moved from one relative to another. When she was 12 her mother sent the money to send her to America. She boarded a ship in Bremer Hafen, Germany and spent seven days crossing the Atlantic. When she arrived at Ellis Island there was no one to pick her up and she thought she was going to be sent back to Germa ny. At the last moment an aunt who lived in Br ooklyn picked her up and kept her for two days and then she was put on a train and sent to Jacksonville. Unable to speak any English, and be ing by herself, she was given a shoe box filled with sand wiches and a purse with change so when the porter came by with a drink she would point to the drink and open her purse. Once in Jacksonville she was gr eeted by her moth er and sister. After four months she was admitted to the fourth grade, but she also worked seven days a week at St. V incents Hospi tal running the elevator for $3.50 a week. T he family relocated to Crescent City in 1939 where she worked at Happs Caf where she met Harry Sharpe. They were married April 26, 1941 at the Pres byterian Parsonage by Ref. Gr ess. She opened the Flow er Shop November 15, 1947, which she sold December 15, 1981. She had four children, nine grandchildren, 10 great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandson. She left Crescent City in 2010 and lived in a nursing home in Daytona Beach until her death on Sunday, March 25, 2018. She attributed her long life to walking, hard work and doing for others and her be lief in God. The family will welcome guests for visitation at the First Presbyterian Church at 10 a.m. Monday, April 2, 2018. Funeral services will follow at 11 a.m. with Rever end Deb Henning officiating. Burial will follow in Eden Cemetery. Anyone wishing to send messages of condolence for her family may do so at biggsfh.com. Arrangements were un der the direction of Clay ton Frank & Biggs Funeral Home in Cr escent City. HOLLISTER Mary L. Coleman Mary Lorraine Coleman, 93, of Hollister went to be with the Lord Thursday, March 22, 2018 at Palatka Health Care Center follow ing a brief but peaceful ill ness. Mary was bor n in Fitzger ald, Georgia and had been a r esident of Hollister for the past 68 years, coming from Miami. She was a graduate of Rochell High School in Rochell, Georgia. She had worked at the former Hud son Pulp and Paper Corp. in Palatka in the bag fac tory. She enjoyed cooking, canning, gar dening, going to auctions and reading her Bible every day. She was a Baptist. Preceding her in death were her husband, Ralph Coleman; a son, Donald Coleman; a brother, Vester Wisham; a sister-in-law, Mary Wisham; and a broth er-in-law, Steve Kintz. Surviving ar e a son and daughter-in-law, Ronald and Alice Coleman of Hollister; a daughter-in-law, Cathy Coleman of Hollister; four grandchildren and spouses, Timothy and Candace Cole man of Interlachen, Dan iel and Jennifer Coleman of Palatka, Bonita and Nick Colbert of Palatka, and Lisa and W ade Screen of Hollis ter; ten great grandchildren; two nephews, David W ish am and Todd Wisham, both of Hollister; a niece, Mary Elizabeth W isham of Winter Park; and a sister-in-law, Susie Kintz of Ohio. Funeral services were held at 1 p.m. Monday, March 26 at Masters Funeral Home in Palatka with Dr. L.D. Os teen officiating. The family r eceived friends at 12 p.m. at the funeral home. Burial followed in Hollister Sweet water Cemetery. Friends may sign the on line register at www.themastersfuneralhomes.com. Masters Funeral Home of P alatka was in charge of arrangements. PALATKA Kenny Johns Kenny Johns, 49, of Palatka, passed away Sunday, March 18, 2018 at Haven Hospice Roberts Care Cen ter in Palatka following a brief illness. He was a native of Palatka having been born at the former Putnam Memorial Hospital and was a lifelong resident of Putnam County having grown up in Bardin, where he lived most of his life, and had been a resi dent of the ARC in Palatka. Being bor n with Down Syn drome, he enjoyed the simpler things of life, like being near and in the water his swing and the sun. He loved the outdoors and getting in a car to blow the horn. Ken ny never met a stranger and was as lovable as he could be. He was pr eceded in death by his mother, Geneva Sweat; his maternal grand parents who helped raise him, Ebert and Lula Sweat; pater nal grandparents, Rev. A. O. Johns, Sr. and Doro thy Johns and uncle, Oliver W ilkinson. Surviving are a sister and brother-in-law, Teresa and Chris Jeter of Interlachen; an uncle and spouse, Rev. Phillip and Genice Wilkin son of Bardin; three aunts and spouse, Etta Sweat of Bardin, Vivian and Dee Williams of Wesley Chapel and Diane Horner of Lo cust Grove, Georgia; addi tional uncles and spouses, Thomas and Betty Johns of Palatka, Rev. A. O. Johns, Jr and Ann Johns of Palatka, Paul and Rhonda Johns of San Mateo, Clar ence Johns of Interlachen, Eugene and Deloris Johns of Bar din, Jerry and Joyce Johns of Bardin, Michael and Lori Johns of Locust Grove, Georgia and Mitchell and Jo Johns of Davenport; two nieces, Geneva Wilkin son and Jessica Jeter; two nephews, David James and W illiam James and numer ous cousins. Funeral services wer e held at 11 a.m. Saturday, March 24, 2018 at Provi dence Baptist Church with Pastors Rudy Howar d and Phillip Wilkinson officiating. In honor and celebration of Kennys life a video trib ute was shown during the service. Burial followed in the Providence Cemetery. Calling hours were Friday, March 23, 2018 at Masters Funeral Home in Palatka from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. The family would like to extend a special thank you to Haven Hospice Roberts Care Center. Messages of encourage ment or sympathy may be expr essed on his online guestbook at www.themas tersfuneralhomes.com. Masters Funeral Home of P alatka was in charge of arrangements. WELAKA Helen R. Maxwell Helen Rose Maxwell, 84, of Welaka, went to be with the Lord on Saturday, March 17, 2018 unexpectedly at her residence. Helen was born in Smith ville, Tennessee and had been a r esident of Welaka for the past 46 years, com ing from Marion, Alabama. She was an active and faith ful member of Welaka Unit ed Methodist Church where she had served in many ca pacities. She enjoyed quilting, sewing, cooking, bak ing, feeding others, gardening and watching the manatees from her dock. Her passion was her childr en, grandchildren and great grandchildren. She was a hardworking homemaker. Preceding her in death was the love of her life, her hus band of 67 years, James I. Maxwell; and three sisters, Jodie, Shirley and Ruby. Surviving are two sons and daughters-in-law, Doug las and Rosalou Maxwell of Spanish Fort, Alabama, and Dennis and L ynne Maxwell of Pomona Park; a sister, Wilma Staley of Smithville, Tennessee; five grandchil dren and spouses, Monica Maxwell, Michael and Lau ra Maxwell, James and AlvaGayle Maxwell, Jessica Maxwell, and Rebecca and J ohnny Phosavath; eleven great grandchildren; and numerous nieces and neph ews. A service celebrating Hel ens life and honoring her Lor d was held at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, March 20 with Pastor Erle Prevatt and Pas tor William Sparks offici ating. The family received friends at 1 p.m. Tuesday at the funeral home. Additional services and burial in Whorton Springs Cemetery in Smithville, Ten nesse will be under the di rection of DeKalb Funeral Home in Smithville. Memorial gifts may be sent to Welaka United Method ist Church, P.O. Box 217, W elaka, FL 32193. Friends may sign the online register at www.themastersfuneral homes.com. Masters Funeral Home of P alatka was in charge of local arrangements. PALATKA Susan M. Brown Myers Susan M. Brown Myers, 67, of Palatka, passed from this life on Friday, March 16, 2018 at Putnam Com munity Medical Center following an extended illness. A native and lifelong r esi dent of Palatka, she was a 1968 graduate of Palatka High school and a 1969 graduate of the Santa Fe College Nursing Program. Susan was a licensed practi cal nurse and had worked at numer ous healthcare facili ties over the years including, Glendale Hospital, Putnam Memorial Nursing Home, Palatka Health Care Center, Putnam Behavioral and with several area physicians. Su san was also a member of Saving Grace Ministries in Douglas, Geor gia. She was preceded in death by her husband, E.T. My ers, Jr., her mother, Reva Grace Skwara and her fa ther, Tommy Brown. Susan is survived by her two sons, Scott Myers (Mis sy) of Palatka and C.T. Myers of Los Angeles, Califor nia, two sisters, Glenda Alvarez of Palatka and Janice Kirk (Randy) of Sweet Home, Or egon, a brother, David Scott of Sweet Home, Or egon and four grandchildren, Evan, Tyler, Caleb and Brayden Myers. Services celebrating Su sans life were held at 2 p.m. Tuesday, Mar ch 20, 2018 at Johnson-Overturf Chapel in Palatka with Pas tor Cliff Kirkland officiating. Burial followed at Oak Hill E ast Cemetery. The fami ly received friends Tuesday fr om 1 p.m. until the time of services at 2 p.m. Flowers are gratefully ac cepted or memorial dona tions may be sent to Saving Grace Ministries, 145 Mock ingbird Lane, Douglas, GA 31535. Memories and condolences may be expr essed to the family at Susans Book of Memories page at www. johnsonoverturffunerals. com Arrangements were en trusted to Johnson-Overturf Funeral Home in Palatka. CHURCH A5 Crescent City First Baptist Church of Crescent City ...... 386-698-1578 101 S. Summit St.Episcopal Church of the Holy Comforter ... 386-698-1983 Howe Memorial United Methodist Church .... First Presbyterian Church ......................... St. John the Baptist Catholic Church ....... Georgetown Georgetown United Methodist Church ..... 386-467-8855 1448 CR 309 Pomona Park First Baptist Church of Pomona Park ....... Lake Como Word of Faith Bible Church ....................... 386-698-4643 Welaka Welaka United Methodist Church ............. Satsuma Hope Lutheran Church ............................... 386-649-0631 a.m. Lake Como Community United Methodist Church...386-649-8480 .... Karl N. Flagg Serenity Memorial Chapel Serving your Family with Dignity & Respect Serving All Faiths 2400 Madison Street Palatka, Florida 32177 Rev. Karl N. Flagg Karla N. Flagg-Wright LaShonda T. Simmons Mt. Tabor First Baptist Church South Putnam CampusPalatka Mt. Tabor First Baptist Church Main Campus Johnson-Overturf Funeral Home386-325-4521 All Saints Anglican Church When the weather is hot, theres this refreshing feeling that comes over you when a cool breeze blows in your direction. Winds are one of those basic elements of nature that cant be seen, touched or held, yet its effects can be seen everywhere. Just like no one can catch or hold the wind, as God fills you with His Spirit this season, no devil, demon, agent or force of darkness will be able to catch you and your loved ones. The Spirit of God that dwells in you will make you uncatchable, untouchable and unstoppable. Many sports and recre ational activities make use o f the wind. Children and young adults who enjoy play ing with kites, get excited as t he wind lifts their kites high into the sky. The wind keeps us cool, the wind helps dry our wet clothes we spread outside, the wind actually helps with our breathing. At the same time, a wind can be so strong it is dangerous to human life and property. An extreme wind can blow off the roof of a building, break windows, and bring down houses and trees. It was a great wind from the desert that struck the four corners of Jobs house mak ing the building collapse on a ll his children (Job 1:18-19). What happened to Job is still happening today. Violent, destructive winds like tor nadoes have rendered thou sands of people homeless. It c an be a very scary incident to wake up and discover that the doors in your house or even front gate have been brought down by a strong or ferocious wind. This season, the Wind of the Spirit will move with great power and speed to lift up and bring down all ancient gates and everlasting doors that have kept you down on one level for so many years. In Scripture, we come across different types of winds. Some of these winds include the strong East Wind God used to make a way for the Israelites where there seemed to be no way. It was the East Wind that parted the Red Sea thereby creating a passage in the middle of the sea for the Israelites to walk on dry land (Exodus 14:21-22). The West Wind was used by God to fill the land of Egypt with an un countable number of locusts t hat devoured everything growing in the fields and all the fruits on the trees. This same West Wind was used by God to clear the land of Egypt of the locusts (Exodus 10:19). We also have the South Wind (Luke 12:55) and the North Wind (Song of Solomon 4:16). In the Bible, the wind is illustrative of the presence and operation of the Holy Spirit. John 3:8 says The wind blows wherever it pleases. You hear its sound, but you cannot tell where it comes from or where it is going. So it is with everyone born of the Spirit. We are in an era when the Wind of the Spirit is blowing. Whenever the Wind of the Spirit blows, great things happen. May the Wind of the Spirit blow all over you and cause some sig nificant things to happen in yo ur life this year. When the wind blows, it picks up objects and moves them. Objects like leaves, pa per, plastic bottles, or empty t ins can be blown away; can be lifted or moved from one position to another by the wind. The wind can blow some of these objects so far away. Whatever you see any natural wind do, the Wind of the Holy Spirit can do much more. This is because it is stronger in force and inten sity that any natural wind. T he Wind of the Spirit will blow all your enemies; all those plotting and conniv ing evil far away from you. T he Wind of the Spirit will blow evil, pain and sorrow far away from your family. God gave the prophet Eze kiel a glimpse into how the S pirit of God operates when He moves like a wind. In several passages, he de scribed how the Spirit of God l ifted him. In Ezekiel 3:1415, he said The Spirit then lifted me up and took me awayI came to the exiles who lived at Tel Abib near the Kebar River. Again in Ezekiel 11:24 he stated that The Spirit lifted me up and brought me to the exiles in Babylonia in the vision giv en by the Spirit of God. In E zekiel 43:5, he also spoke about how he was lifted by the Spirit of the Living God. Then the Spirit lifted me up and brought me into the inner court, and the glory of the Lord filled the temple. Some versions of the Bible actually use Wind in these verses instead of Spirit. This is because both the Greek and Hebrew interpretation of Spirit have to do with a cur rent of air, breath, breeze or w ind. The Wind of the Spirit lifted Ezekiel from one place to another, from one revela tion to another. The Wind of t he Spirit will blow on you and bring about a lifting in your life this season. You will be lifted not brought down. Your head will be lift ed above those who rise up a gainst you. No matter the trouble that comes your way, the Wind of the Spirit will lift your eyes from those prob lems to the hills; to the Lord f rom whom your help comes and you will be strengthened and encouraged. The Wind of the Spirit will lift you out of the ash heap and miry pit of sin, failure, sickness, barrenness, stagnation, pov erty, shame and reproach. W hen men are cast down and brought low, your testi mony will be that the Wind of t he Spirit has lifted you and made a way for you where there seemed to be no way. The Wind of the Spirit will lift you from one level of glory to a higher level; from one big testimony to another bigger testimony. The lighter an object, the easier it is for the wind to carry. For us to experience a supernatural lifting in our lives, we need to lay aside ev ery weight, sin, and bad hab it that can make us heavy in t he realm of the Spirit. As we lay these unnecessary ob structions aside, we will be come lightweights that the W ind of the Spirit will blow to places, levels and heights we never imagined we could get to. Lifted by the Wind Tesh Njokanma WriterPastors Pen Clayton Frank & Biggs Funeral Home386-698-1621 Pilgrim Congregational Church of Pomona Park... 386-649-8467 Masters Funeral Home Palatka386-325-4564 South Putnam Church............................386-698-1054 Masters Funeral Home Palatka386-325-4564 Got Hope? Meet me at the Mount! Ev ery Friday is a good Friday, but next Friday is Good Friday. They will gather to worship and remember how Christ suffered, bled, and died to buy our pardon! Je sus paid it all and all to Him we owe! Friday, Mar ch 30 services will begin at 7 p.m. at Mt. Tabor First Baptist Church Palatka on 4909 St. Johns Avenue. Sunday, April 1 at the Mount, Resur rection Celebration contin ues at the Palatka Campus with an Early Mor ning Hour of Power & the Ordinance of Holy Communion at 7:45 a.m. and Morning Worship Experience 10:30 a.m. There will be a 10:30 a.m. Worship Encounter held at Mt. Tabor -South Campus on 608 Randolph Street in Crescent City. Please notice the earlier start time on the South Campus for the first Sunday worship will be at 10:30 a.m. not the usual 12 p.m. You are cordially invit ed to worship with them. Masters Funeral Home Palatka386-325-4564

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March 28, 2018 A6 Special to the Courier Journal There are many rea sons that termites have g ained the nickname silent destroyers. Five billion reasons, in fact. Termites cause more than $5 billion in prop erty damage in the U.S. e ach year. If left un checked, they can si lently chew through the s tructural stability of a home, eating away at wood, flooring and even wallpaper. To make matters worse, the dam age they leave behind is n ot typically covered by most homeowners in surance policies. H ow to Spot Termites Spring is prime time for termite populations as they emerge in search of new structures to in vade. Termite explorers, r eferred to as swarmers, will look for hospitable homes, and are particu larly attracted to struc tures that may have su stained damage from severe winter weather or have dead or decay ing wood on the proper ty. Once these swarm ers have determined a home to be a good fit, its likely that they will settle in and begin a new colony, growing into a full-blown termite infestation over time. Termite or Flying Ant? Many people will see termite swarmers in homes during the spring and mistake them for flying ants; this can end up being a costly mis take. Winged termites h ave a straight waist, straight antennae and their wings are equal in size. Flying ants, on the other hand, have waists that are pinched in the middle, bent antennae and two sets of wings, with the top set being larger than the lower. Termites are also most likely to swarm in the spring, while flying ants may swarm at various times of the year. It is not always possi ble for an untrained eye t o spot evidence of ter mites, but homeowners s hould keep a look-out for a few key signs that can help them identify a termite infestation. Other Signs of Infestation Mud tubes Subterra nean termites, the most d estructive termite spe cies, build mud tubes to p rovide moisture while they travel between their colony and food source. Mud tubes are most often found near the homes foundation. Wood damage Ter mites tend to eat wood f rom the inside out, so wood that sounds hol low when tapped often s ignifies a termite in festation. Homeowners s hould also look for blis tering pieces of wood. F rass Drywood ter mites produce wood-colored droppings as they e at through infested wood. If a homeown er finds a small pile of w hat looks like pellets inside or outside the home, it could be a sign of a drywood termite infestation. Its a good rule of thumb to have your home inspected for ter mites once every two to t hree years, and every year if you live in the south or in warmer cli mates. If termites are su spected, a pest con trol professional will be n eeded to eliminate the problem. Top 10 Termite Prevention Tips The good news is that there are plenty of ways homeowners can help protect against ter mites, while in turn, p rotecting their great est investment their h ome. The National Pest Management Associa tion (NPMA) offers this te rmite advice: Eliminate or reduce moisture in and around the home, which ter mites need in order to t hrive. Repair leaking fau cets, water pipes and e xterior AC units. Repair fascia, soffits and rotted roof shin gles. R eplace weather strip ping and loose mortar a round basement foun dation and windows. D ivert water away from the house through properly functioning downspouts, gutters and splash blocks. Routinely inspect the foundation of a home for signs of mud tubes (used by termites to reach a food source), and wood that sounds hollow when tapped. Monitor all exterior areas of wood, including windows, doorframes and skirting boards for any noticeable changes. Remove dead trees and replace rotting wood. Maintain an 18-inch gap between soil or mulch and any wood portions of your home. Consider scheduling a professional inspection annually. Wood-boring insect damage is not covered by homeowners insurance policies. Store firewood at least 20 feet away from the house. Termites cannot be controlled with do-ityourself measures. If you suspect a termite infestation, contact a li censed pest control pro fessional immediately to d etermine the extent of the problem and receive a recommendation of an appropriate course of treatment. To find a local, qualified pest professional, visit Pest World.org. Silent Destroyers: Tips to Spot Termites Librarianship before working as a school library media specialist in Georgia. John Collette and His Air Medal Back in March 1945, Flight Ofcer John W. Collette of Crescent City was awarded an Air Medal for Meritorious Achievement as bombardier on a B-17 Flying Fortress on six combat missions over Germany. After Pearl Harbor, like so many other young men in this country, John Collette enlisted in the U.S. Air Force at the age of 17, ying many missions as a bombardier. After the war, he returned to Crescent City to work with his father at Lakeview, his childhood home. He continued his education at Stetson and Emory before establishing a medical practice rst in DeLand and later in Seville to be closer to his home on Lake Crescent. He died in 2014, one of Americas Greatest Gener ation. Our country had been attacked and John Collette became one of her defenders. John grew up in Crescent City. Indeed, his great-grandfather was one of the rst settlers who came to Putnam County after serving in the Confederate Army. He brought a young woman and her two sons to an uncle living on the south side of Dunns Lake, as Lake Crescent was named at that time. They arrived at the little settlement on Dunns Hill on March 1, 1868. He continued to live at Dunns Hill, now known as Crescent City, for the rest of his life and was one of the city fathers who chartered the community. Pomona Park Baptist Sunrise Service Shirley and Jim Grifn are hosting a sunrise service at their home on Lake Broward in Pomona Park. Breakfast will be served. Easter Joy The joy of every boy and girl comes this time of year as churches and schools have egg hunts in the warm spring weather. Winter is over and the promise of spring is here. This is a time for choirs singing their anthems and for sunrise services and the many glories of the earth. Wishing you a Happy Easter! Correction: Last week we incorrectly said the sponsors of the Tuesday Senior Lunch were the Holy Redeemers. The correct sponsors were the Episcopal Church of the Holy Comforter. Community Cont. from A3 A BUSINESS WITH NO SIGN IS A SIGN OF NO BUSINESS! BUSINESS! Heres Your Sign!Advertise Today! Call Mike @ 386-336-6661 Longs Log Cabin Longs Log Cabin Longs Log Cabin Longs Log Cabin Longs Log Cabin Longs Log Cabin Fri. Mar. 16 Fri. Mar. 16 Fri. Mar. 16 Fri. Mar. 16 Fri. Mar. 16 7 p.m. to close 7 p.m. to close 7 p.m. to close 7 p.m. to close 7 p.m. to close Happy Hour Happy Hour Happy Hour Happy Hour Happy Hour 2 for 1 2 for 1 2 for 1 2 for 1 2 for 1 Well drinks Well drinks Well drinks Well drinks Well drinks 4-6 p.m. M-F 4-6 p.m. M-F 4-6 p.m. M-F 4-6 p.m. M-F 4-6 p.m. M-F Fri. Mar. 30 Fri. Mar. 30 Fri. Mar. 30 Fri. Mar. 30 Fri. Mar. 30 7-close 7-close 7-close 7-close 7-close Psycho Magnets Psycho Magnets Psycho Magnets Psycho Magnets Psycho Magnets Sat. April 7 Sat. April 7 Sat. April 7 Sat. April 7 Sat. April 7 Catsh Weekend Catsh Weekend Catsh Weekend Catsh Weekend Catsh Weekend 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. Evil Monkey Evil Monkey Evil Monkey Evil Monkey Evil Monkey Karaoke Karaoke Karaoke Karaoke Karaoke Wed. 7 p.m.-12 Wed. 7 p.m.-12 Wed. 7 p.m.-12 Wed. 7 p.m.-12 Wed. 7 p.m.-12 LIVE MUSIC LIVE MUSIC LIVE MUSIC LIVE MUSIC LIVE MUSIC Ever 1st urs. Ever 1st urs. Ever 1st urs. Ever 1st urs. Ever 1st urs. 7-10 p.m. 7-10 p.m. 7-10 p.m. 7-10 p.m. 7-10 p.m. Renegades Renegades Renegades Renegades Renegades Renegades Renegades Renegades Renegades LADIES & LADIES & LADIES & LADIES & LADIES & Gentlemen Gentlemen Gentlemen Gentlemen Gentlemen NIGHT NIGHT NIGHT NIGHT NIGHT Every urs. Every urs. Every urs. Every urs. Every urs. 8-10 p.m. 8-10 p.m. 8-10 p.m. 8-10 p.m. 8-10 p.m. $10 A-U-C-D $10 A-U-C-D $10 A-U-C-D $10 A-U-C-D $10 A-U-C-D Bud Light, Bud Light, Bud Light, Bud Light, Bud Light, Ultra and wells. Ultra and wells. Ultra and wells. Ultra and wells. Ultra and wells. Fri. Mar. 30 Fri. Mar. 30 Fri. Mar. 30 Fri. Mar. 30 Fri. Mar. 30 Fri. Mar. 30 Fri. Mar. 30 Fri. Mar. 30 Fri. Mar. 30 Fri. Mar. 30 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. Life Line Life Line Life Line Life Line Life Line Sat. Mar. 31 Sat. Mar. 31 Sat. Mar. 31 Sat. Mar. 31 Sat. Mar. 31 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 309C 309C 309C 309C 309C Fri. April 6 Fri. April 6 Fri. April 6 Fri. April 6 Fri. April 6 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. Joe Santana Joe Santana Joe Santana Joe Santana Joe Santana Sat. April 7 Sat. April 7 Sat. April 7 Sat. April 7 Sat. April 7 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. Wildre Rising Wildre Rising Wildre Rising Wildre Rising Wildre Rising Tue. & Sun. Tue. & Sun. Tue. & Sun. Tue. & Sun. Tue. & Sun. Karaoke Karaoke Karaoke Karaoke Karaoke 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. River Pub River Pub River Pub 1st Sun. of the 1st Sun. of the 1st Sun. of the 1st Sun. of the 1st Sun. of the month Bloody month Bloody month Bloody month Bloody month Bloody Mary Buet! Mary Buet! Mary Buet! Mary Buet! Mary Buet! Sun. 12-3 p.m. Sun. 12-3 p.m. Sun. 12-3 p.m. Sun. 12-3 p.m. Sun. 12-3 p.m. Karaoke Karaoke Karaoke Karaoke Karaoke urs. 4:30 9 urs. 4:30 9 urs. 4:30 9 urs. 4:30 9 urs. 4:30 9 p.m. & Sun. p.m. & Sun. p.m. & Sun. p.m. & Sun. p.m. & Sun. 4:30 p.m.till 4:30 p.m.till 4:30 p.m.till 4:30 p.m.till 4:30 p.m.till Bikers Welcome! Bikers Welcome! Bikers Welcome! Bikers Welcome! Bikers Welcome! ~At the intersection of County Road 309 and 308B~ og Cabin og Cabin og Cabin og Cabin og Cabin og Cabin og Cabin og Cabin og Cabin og Cabin og Cabin og Cabin og Cabin og Cabin og Cabin I I I V V V E E E M M M U U U S S S I I I C C C Saturday, April 7 from 7 p.m. to Close L L L I I I V V V E E E M M M U U U S S S I I I C C C 2 for 1 Well Drinks Mon.-Fri. 4 to 6 p.m.Karaoke Every Wed. 7-midnight. Live Music Every 1st Thur. 7-10 p.m. Friday, March 30 from 7 p.m. to Close 2 for 1 Well Drinks Mon.-Fri. 4 to 6 p.m. 2 for 1 Well Drinks Mon.-Fri. 4 to 6 p.m. W/ Guest Singer John Nickoloff of Nickoloff Serving Florida Since 1983 Lunch and Dinner Specials www.RIVERPUBITALIANGRILLE.COM Lunch and Dinner Specials PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME PRIME RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB RIB Monday-Thursday 11-9 FRUITLAND / GEORGETOWN CR 308 & 309 ON LEFT386-467-8666 Fri. & Sat. 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Peppers are highly appreciated in many cui sines for their many b enefits and uses. Theyre one of the most common cooking ingre dients used around the world, mainly because of the flavor they add to dishes. These spic es can be used fresh or dried, and come in powdered form one example of which is paprika. Whether its for seasoning or garnishing, paprika has cemented itself as one of todays most well-loved spices. Discover just what pa prika spice can offer for your health, plus get tips on how to use it for cooking. What Is Paprika? B asically, paprika is a spice made from grounding up differ ent varieties of Capsicum annuum peppers these can include sweet bell peppers, hot red and/or peppers, and other varieties in between. Its the fourth most-used spice ar ound the world. Paprika is widely used in different cuisines, such as Indian, Span ish, Turkish and Moroccan. However, Hungary stands out among all these cuisines in fact, their very own Hungarian paprika is believed to be one of the finest quality spices today. But is paprika spicy? It depends. Compared to extremely spicy cay enne and jalapeno pep pers, the bell peppers fr om which paprika is made is somewhat sweeter and more mel low. Thus, it makes sense that its milder in flavor, mainly because of its lower capsaicin levels. For this reason, paprika is not as spicy as cayenne or jalapeno powder. However, some mixes use chili pep pers, which add a kick to the spice. Paprika also come in various colors, rang ing from bright red to br own. Surprisingly, red paprika is said to be the mildest, while those that are tan or yellow are often the spiciest. There are several distinct types of paprika, which ar e differentiated below: Regular paprika is a blend of hot and sweet varieties. Because of its relatively neutral flavor, it works great as a gar nish. It can also add color to your dishes. Hot paprika, which is quite similar to cay enne, is made from dried chili peppers. However, its less spicy. Sweet paprika, or Hungarian sweet pa prika, is loved for its rich and fruity flavor it can be described to taste like a red bell pepper but without any spiciness. Sweet Hungarian paprika is more f lavorful than regular paprika, and is great as an all-around spice. Spanish smoked pa prika (also called Pi menton de la Vera) is pr oduced from dried chilies that are smoked over oak. This gives them a woody and smokey flavor (either sweet or spicy) that works great when add ed to stews and roast meats. Some people complain on occasion that the paprika they bought is tasteless. The secret to this spice actually lies in the cooking process you need to heat it to unlock its complex flavor. Add it at the end of the cooking process and youll get the deep, sweet/spicy and earthy aroma and taste. Health Benefits of Paprika Adding a dash (or two) of paprika to your meals can, surprisingly, offer advantages to your health. Its actual ly loaded with essential vitamins and minerals, car otenoids and antioxidants that can deliver many benefits to your body. Her e are some of the benefits you can get from paprika: tain eye health. There ar e four carotenoids in paprika, namely lutein, zeaxanthin, beta-cryp toxanthin and beta-car otene. All these func tion as antioxidants that may help pr event cellular damage. Lutein and zeaxan thin in particular are essential for pr event ing age-related macu lar degeneration and cataracts. Meanwhile, beta-cryptoxanthin and beta-carotene are con verted into vitamin A that is used in the eyes to tur n light into vi sion and is a necessary component to pr oduce the protein that makes skin. mote blood formation and healthy cir culation. The copper and iron in paprika are essential for the formation of new blood cells. This spice may also act as a vasodilator because of its high potassium levels, and may reduce the risk of heart attack, stroke and atherosclerosis. your sleep with papri ka. The vitamin B6 in paprika may have ef ficient psychological and neur ological effects. It also promotes melatonin production and enhances your levels of nor epinephrine and se rotonin, hormones that ar e linked to mood and happiness. help heal wounds. The vitamin E in paprika may aid in red blood cell production and even in forming clots to promote faster heal ing of cuts, scrapes and wounds. pain. Capsaicin, the ac tive ingredient in pep pers that gives them their spiciness, can r e lax blood vessels and r elieve pain. Its even used in topical creams. Growing Paprika: Tips to Remember If you want to have paprika on hand, you can opt to grow your own paprika instead of buying the ready to use paprika powders in gro ceries. Paprikas growing requirements are similar to other pepper varieties. They pr efer fertile, well-draining soil, and thrive best in a sunny area. from seed, directly in soil this is recom mended for warm climates. If you live in a cold place, plant them indoors in pots first. Peppers are sensitive to cold weather. When transferring pot ted peppers outdoors, make sur e to put 12 inches in between each plant, in rows that can harvest the pep pers anytime between summer and fall. When theyve tur ned a bright red, thats a sign that theyre ready for har vesting. T o dry the peppers, place them in a mesh bag and hang them in your attic or a heated room (around 130 to 150 degrees F). Once 85 percent of the pods weight has been lost, the paprika can be ground into a powder. How to Store Paprika and Prolong Its Shelf Life Like other ground spices, paprika loses its flavor and potency after some time. Ideally, use paprika within six months to maximize its taste and ar oma. Its also crucial to store it properly. Place the spice in an airtight container, in a cool or dark place. Instead of a clear glass contain er, place the spice in a dark tin container that will keep it away from direct light. Paprika Recipe Paprika goes well in many marinades and sauces, and it can certainly complement meats and different types of produce. Here is a delicious recipe you can try: Chicken With Paprika Sauce Ingredients: 4 boneless skinless chicken br easts 2 tablespoons sweet paprika 2 tablespoons coco nut oil 1 onion, finely chopped 4 plum tomatoes, diced 1/2 cup sour cr eam Salt and pepper Pr ocedure: 1. Cut chicken into strips (according to your preferred size). 2. In a medium bowl, toss the chicken with half the paprika, 1 1/2 teaspoons salt and a pinch of pepper. 3. Heat a tablespoon of coconut oil in a large skillet over medium high heat. 4. Add chicken, cook, tossing occasionally, until opaque throughout, about 4 to 5 min utes. Transfer to plate. 5. Heat the r emaining coconut oil and in the same skillet. 6. Add onion, cook un til browned and soft ened. Add remaining tablespoon paprika and stir cooking, about 30 seconds. 7. Add tomatoes and 3/4 cup water, and cook until saucy. 8. Return chicken to skillet. Add in sour cream and cook until just heated through, without boiling. 9. Season with salt and pepper, and serve. This recipe makes four servings. If you dont have pa prika powder on hand, dont worry: you can simply substitute with other spices. Cajun spice, made from a blend of cayenne, black and white peppers, is a wonderful paprika substitute, especially since its not as spicy as cay enne. Aleppo pepper, chili powder and even r ed pepper flakes can all work as substitute for paprika as well, but you have to take note of the quantities.Quilters from neighboring states and as far away as Canada will be traveling to Palatka for the fifth annual Quilts by the River judged show taking place on Friday, April 20 fr om 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Saturday, April 21 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sponsored by Miss Ds Quilts and Gem City Cottage, the contest will also in Quilter competition. I started the quilt sh ow five years ago because most of the ladies in our area had never entered their quilts in a contest, Dannise Kemp, owner of Miss Ds Quilts, said. I wanted to give them an opportunity to have their work judged so they could impr ove their technique and to get recognition for their talent. There are over two hundred quil ters in our area that I know about and oth ers that quilt that Ive never met. Acr oss the United States, quilting is a three to four billion dollar industry with thirty to forty fabric manufacturers who produce cloth almost exclusively for quilts. There are also twelve to fifteen different types of quilting ma chines manufactured and sold that ar e used throughout the country for creating quilts. Despite the size of this industry, fr om ten to fifteen percent of quilt stores in the United States closed last year. According to Kemp, quilting is a dying art. In order to help pro mote making quilts in our area, Kemp offers classes at her store for piecing fabric and quilting. The local area has at least two quilters who have been suc cessful winning and placing highly in con tests both local and in dif ferent parts of the U.S. Nikki Hill, of St. Augustine, has had her quilts shown na tionwide and on the other side of the Atlantic in France. Another, Kathy Czuprynski, is curr ently quilting at Miss Ds shop on St. Johns Avenue. The 2018 quilt contest will be divided i nto several different categories for judging purposes. Large, in termediate and small pieced quilts will be thr ee of the catego ries. Applique quilts, h and quilted quilts, miniature quilts and art quilts are other ar eas that will be judged separately. Other Techniques will be judged separately, as well. Some examples of this type of quilt include: whole cloth quilts, heavily embellished quilts, crazy quilts, and cathedral window quilts will be judged in this catego Quilter category in cludes quilts created by those sixteen or younger or in twelfth grade or below. The entry fee for each quilt entered is ten dollars. Appli cations are available fr om Miss Ds Quilts in Palatka. The entry fee also includes a one day pass to attend the quilt show. Regular price passes are $5. The Best of Show will win a $150 prize and there will be a first, second and third place quilt chosen in each category. State Representative Bobby Payne will judge and select a favorite quilt for the Representative Award. To see all the winners and beautiful work of local quilters and others from out of state, please plan to attend Quilts by the River on April 20 and 21. In addition to the dozens of quilts to be judged, there will also be many vendors set up inside the shop at 301 St. Johns Avenue, including: scissors sharpening, origami, a make-and-take area and several others. If you are a vendor and would like to be included, please call Miss Ds Quilts. And if you didnt get a chance to see the winners of the Any thing Azalea Art Show, please stop in and peruse the work of many of our local artists on display while visiting the quilting contest. For mor e informa tion or applications, please call 386385-5678, email at: MissD@MissDsQuilts. com, or visit their website: www.MissDsQuilts.com. G.A. Teske, author of four fantasy novels: www.dunnscreekfan tasy.com, ga.teske@ yahoo.com and on Facebook: Dunns Creek Fantasy Productions, LLC.Fifth Annual Quilts by the River March 28, 2018 COURIER JOURNAL Section B Dr. MercolaNatural Health News Add a Touch of Spice with Paprika G.A. Teske Staff Writer & FACES PLACES

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be forwarded to various veteran service agencies. Line dancing is on Tuesdays at the Pomona Park Community Center. Classes will be on Tuesday mornings from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. through April. Call Linda Armstrong at 386-649-5025 for more in formation or on Facebook at /pomona parklinedancingwithlindaarmstrong. R eiter Insurance Agency is having their Fourth Annual Community Appreciation Day on Friday, April 6 from 8 a.m. 4 p.m. This is a day where they show their appreciation for their wonderful community and the folks who live there. They will serve free breakfast from 8 a.m. 10 a.m. and lunch from 11 a.m. 3 p.m. They will be giving away lots of fun prizes and gift certicates to local businesses who are joining them in showing their appreciation. They will also have K and K Glass providing free windshield repair for vehicles that qualify, you do not need to be a client of Reiter Insurance Agency for this service. Join them for a day full of fun, food, music, prizes and socializing. Bring a friend. Come run, jog, or walk with us at the Spud Run Come out on Saturday, April 7 for this unique event, deep in the heart of the beautiful agricultural area of Hastings. Follow the certied road race courses through the farms, elds and woods. There are great amenities: nishers medals for all races, t-shirt, chip timing, live results, awards plaques for overall winners/top three age group winners, post race food, and one of the best goody bags ever. Potatoes and cabbage for all! Meet at the HHS Community Building on 6195 South Main Street in Hastings. For more information or to register, go to: http:// spudrun.net. The Crescent City Womans Club is inviting residents of all ages to participate in their First Annual Story Writing Contest. The deadline to enter is April 12. There are two categories, under 19 years old and over 18 years old. Write a folk story about an event that has occurred in the history of Putnam County. Bring a hard copy of your story to the womans club senior lunch on Tuesday by March 27 between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. or mail it to 25 North Lake Street, Crescent City, FL 32112. The 2018 Palatka Bicycle Weekend will be held on Saturday and Sunday, April 14-15 at 7 a.m. Meet at 249 Main Street in Palatka. For more details or to register for the event go to https://raceroster. com/events/2018/14542/palatka-bicycleweekend. The Putnam County Master Gardeners Annual Plant Festival will be on Saturday, April 21 from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Putnam County Fairgrounds on 111 Yelvington Road in East Palatka. Entry is free. Master Gardeners will be selling plants and offering gardening information. Money raised will go to their education programs. Cash or check only. Call 386329-0318 for more information. The annual Putnam County Earth Day Celebration will be on Saturday, April 21 and is hosted by the Friends of Dunns Creek State Park CSO. The nature-based groups of Putnam County are gathering at Dunns Creek State Park to celebrate the beautiful outdoors of Putnam County. This event has turned into an annual celebration of the countys natural resources. 14th Annual Northeast Florida Association of Realtors (NEFAR) Charity Bass Tournament will be on Saturday, April 28 One hundred percent of all proceeds pass directly to Haven Hospice via the NEFAR Charitable Foundation, Inc. Boats begin at safelight, weigh-in starts at 3 p.m. Family Fun Day will be from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.. There will be live music, a slide and other kid friendly events. All free to the public. If you would like to participate in the tournament go to www.NEFARbass. org. Freedom Fest will be on April 28 from 12-4 p.m. at the Putnam County Fairgrounds. Freedom Fest aims to honor military veterans and bring information about opportunities for services and benets to them. There will be food and music for veterans and their families with games and bounce houses for children. A group of car enthusiasts will have their cars and motorcycles on display. Meals for non-veterans will be $8 and proceeds will 1st & 3rd Mon. 7p.m. 318 Osceola St, Palatka 386-325-5295 PUTNAM COUNTY SHRINE CLUB Wed. 6 pm Darts/Hotdogs & Hamburgers Yelvington Rd, East Palatka 386-325-8020 PUTNAM COUNTY TEA PARTY Tues. 7 p.m.Interlachen Li brary 2 nd & 4th Mon. 6:30 p.m. American Legion off Crill Ave. SCHOOL ADVISORY COUNCIL 1st Tues. 2 p.m. CCJSHS, Media Center 386-698-1629 W E LA K A D U PLICATE B R ID G E F riday, 10 a.m. Welaka Womans Club 386-467-8472 Lessons Available SOUTH PUTNAM WOMANS CLUB 3rd Mon. 6:30 p.m. Culver Room Crescent City Public Library 386-698-3556 ST. JOHN CATHOLIC CHURCH CARD PARTY 3rd Thurs. 10 p.m. $4 Lunch Hwy 20 Interlachen SUNDAY DINNER 1st & 2nd Sun. 11:30 a.m. Bass Capital Shrine Club 386-467-3102 THE HEART OF PUTNAM COALITION 3rd Thurs. 11 a.m. Palatka Christian Service Center 820 Reid St Palatka 386-328-0984 US COAST G U ARD AUXILIARY MEETIN G 3 rd Thurs. 7 p.m. Men & Women needed to assist w/ homeland security & boating safety VFW Meeting Hall SR 100 & Palm Ave Palatka 684-6543 US VETERANS POST 104 Mon. One Pot Meal Tues. 6 p.m. Kitchen opens 7 p.m. Dart League Wed. All Day Free Pool Thurs. 5 p.m. Kitchen opens 6 p.m. Bingo State Rd 19 Palatka 386-328-9133 VFW POST 3349 Mon. & Wed. 10 am 1 pm Selling Sandwiches Tue. 6 p.m. Bingo Wed. 1 p.m. Veterans Rd Tbl 2nd Fri. 6 p.m. Steak Night 3201 Reid St, Palatka 386-328-2863 INTERLACHEN BABE RUTH LEA G UE MEETIN G S 3 rd Thurs. 7 p.m. Lions Club Interlachen BEE K E EPERS OF PUTNAM COUNTY 3rd Tues. 5:30 p.m. Putnam County Ag Center East Palatka Contact Mickie 684-0902 / 904-692-4238 Beekeepersofputnamcounty. org CRESCENT CITY YACHT CLUB At 3 Bananas 11 S Lake St, Crescent City 2nd Fri. 7 p.m. SOUTH PUTNAM ANIMAL NETWOR KFirst Tuesday Meeting location: Crescent City Government Building (rear entrance/parking) P.O. Box 425, Crescent City Time: 6pm 386-463-2077 spanfoster@aol.com 501CRIVER PAR K NEIG H BORHOOD WATCHMeets 2nd Tuesday at 9:30 a.m. at River Park Civic Center on 309, Fruitlandstruggling with drug addiction get them the help they need. Call for a free brochure on the signs of addiction for all drugs. Narconon also offers free screenings and referrals. 800-431-1754 or DrugAbuseSolution.com. Narconon can help y ou take steps to overcome addiction in your family. Call today f or free screenings or referrals 1-800-431-1754. Meetings:Mon. and Wed at 7 p.m. at Grace Fellowship in Palatka & Friday at 7 p.m. at the Church of the Holy Comforter in Crescent City.ASSISTANCE FOR FLORIDA SERVICES Tues. 10 a.m. Trinity Episcopal Church 204 State Rd 26 Melrose 24 Hr. Hot-line 352-475-2177 CELEBRATE RECOVERY at. 7:15 p.m. Dunns Creek Baptist Church 386-328-8650PALS(People Adjusting to Limited Sight) PALS is no longer holding meetings. LEE CONLEE HOUSE Victim Advocate available in Crescent City by appointment. To schedule an appointment please call 386-546-7675 24 hr hotline 386-325-3141 or 1-800-500-1119 QUIVANNO PROBIOTICS WOR K S HOP 3rd Mon. 5:30 p.m. Monahan Chiropractic Medical Clinic 905 St. Johns Ave, Palatka SENIOR FRIENDS CENTERMon. 11 a.m. Yoga Tues. 1 3 p.m. Bingo Wed. 12-3 p.m. Card Games Fri. 1 3 p.m. Bingo 3rd Thursday Covered Dinner First Friday Fun Day 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Butler Bldg Conf. Room Putnam Community Medical Center 611 Zeagler Dr Palatka 386-328-3986STRO K E S URVIVORS OF PALAT K A M on. & Fri. Mornings Free Exercise Classes Roger 386-916-9530 TAI CHI CLASS Tues. 6 p.m. Georgetown Community Center 386-467-7204 THE ED G A R JOHNSON SENIOR CENTER Tues. 10 a.m. Seniors vs Crime Wed .1:30 p.m. Cane Fu Les sons W ed. 12:30 Paint Class $7 mo. Call 386-329-0469 TOPS FLORIDA #435 Welaka Tues. 9 a.m. First Baptist Church of Welaka C. R. 309 -386-467-8935 VIOLENCE INTERVENTION & PREVENTION PRO G R AM Putnam County Health Department 2801 Kennedy St, Palatka 386-326-3200 24 Hour Helping for Sexual Violence/Abuse 386-983-1358 tial A L ADIES AROUND THE LA K E MEETIN G 1 st & 3rd Tues. 10 a.m. Crafts & Covered Dish Lunch Georges Lake Community Center 114 Saratoga St, Florahome AMERICAN LE G I ON POST 45 Sat. All you can eat breakfast 8 am 11 a.m. Cost is $7, Palatka AMERICAN LE G I ON POST 293 Sun. 5:30 p.m. Bingo 1st Mon. 6:30 p.m. Dinner Meeting 3rd Mon. 6:30 p.m. Bring dish or $2 Wed. 11 a.m. 12:30 p.m. Lunch Wed. 12:30 p.m. Bingo 4th Sat. 6:30 pm Aux. Scholar ship Dinner I nterlachen 386-684-2188 AZALEA CITY COMMUNITY THRIFT SHOP Tues. & Thurs. 9 a.m. 12 p.m. Corner Lemon and Main. be hind Howe Methodist Church C rescent City S.A.F.E. of Putnam County Adoptions by Appointment Only 112 Normal St. Hollister 904-325-0196 or 904-4600556 www.safe-pet-rescue-fl.com S.A.F.E. of Putnam County Thrift Store 819 S Moody Road Palatka Mon 12-5 p.m. Tues-Th 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat 9 a.m.-5 p.m. MT. CARMEL COMMUNITY RESOURCE CENTER INC. Mon. 10 a.m. 2 p.m. 400 East Oak St, Palatka 386-937-2447 / 916-9556 PALAT K A C HRISTIAN SERVICE CENTER Mon. Fri. 9 a.m. 1:30 p.m. 2600 Peters St. Palatka 386-328-0984 SECOND TIME AROUND SHOP Tues. 12-4, Thurs. 8-12 Community United Methodist Church 126 Highlands Ave, Lake Como SOUTH PUTNAM CHRISTIAN SERVICE CENTER Tues. & Thurs. 10 a.m. 1:30 p.m. 219 N. Summit St.Crescent City 386698-1944 THRIFT STORE Mon. & Thurs. 10 a.m. 4 p.m. Sat. 11 a.m. 3 p.m. 4th Mon. Bag Day St. Vincent DePaul 515 Central Avenue Downtown Crescent City PUTNAM COUNTY HOME COMMUNITY EDUCATORS (HCE) 2nd Wed. Ag. Building 111 Yelvington Rd., E. Pal. C all Mary Ellen Clifton 386-649-8856 PUTNAM COUNTY MEDICAL MISSION Free Medical Care for Uninsured1st Three Friday/mo 408Summit St. Crescent City 4th Wed. for Diabetics 114 Amos Rd-Crescent City 1st & 3rd Thurs College Park Baptist Church 386-269-9786 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Mon. 7 p.m. Church of the Holy Comforter 223 N. Summit St. Crescent City 24 Hr. Hot-line 1-904-399-8535 ALCOHOLICS ANONY MOUS A N EW LIFE G R OUP Tues. 7 p.m. Church of the Holy Comforter 223 N. Summit St. Crescent 24 Hr. Hot-line 1-904-399-8535ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS LIBERTY G R OUP Wed. 7 p.m. First Presbyterian Church 301 Cypress Ave. 24 Hr. Hot-line 1-904-399-8535 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS CELEBRATION G R OUP Thur. 7 p.m. Church of the Holy Comforter 223 N. Summit St. 24 Hr. Hot-line 1-904-399-8535 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Fri. 6 p.m. Lake Como Community Center, Highland Ave. 24 Hr. Hot-line 1-904-399-8535 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS C E LEBRATION G ROUP S at. 4 p.m. Howe Memorial Church 252 S. Summit St., 24 Hr. Hot-line 1-904-399-8535 ADDICTION COUNSELIN G I f you know anyone who is HEALTH AND SUPPORT CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONSCRUISERS Every 4th Sat. 5-8 p.m. 900 Block, St. Johns Ave Palatka B A SS C A PITAL VFW P O ST 10177 3rd Thursday, 6:30 p.m. Meets at F.O.E. Eagles 110Shrine Club Rd Lake ComoBOY SCOUTS TROOP #957 CUB SCOUTS PAC K 957 Boy Scouts Wed 6 p.m. Cub Scouts 2nd & 4th Wed 4 p.m. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 2376 S US Highway 17 Crescent City 307-413-7723CREATE! ARTISTS G U ILD OF NORTH FLORIDA 4th Sat. 10:30 a.m. Larimer Art Center 216 Reid St. Palatka CRESCENT CITY MOOSE LOD G E U S 17 South Crescent City 386-649-0745CRESCENT CITY ROTARY CLUB Tuesday mornings at 7:30 a.m. at the home of the Fraternal Order of the Eagles 110 Shrine Club Road Lake Como FRATERNAL ORDER OF EA G LES INTERLACHEN Weekdays 4 p.m. Social Room Happy Hr. Tues. 5 pm Hamburgers Tues. 7 p.m. Bingo State Rd 20 Interlachen 386-684-3252FRATERNAL ORDER OF EA G L ES 4355 Sat. 8 p.m. Band Sun. 4 p.m. Karaoke Mon. 7:30 p.m. Darts Tues. & Wed. 1 p.m. Pinochle Tues. & Thurs. 6:30 p.m. Bingo Wed. 5 p.m. Tacos Fri. 8 p.m. Karaoke 110 Shrine Club Rd, Lake ComoF R UITLAND P E NINSULA H ISTORICAL S O CIETY 3 rd Tues. 7 p.m. Culver Rm., Crescent City Library 386-698-1870 G IR L SCOUTS For girls grades 4-12 Bi-weekly on Tues Howe Memorial Church Crescent City 386-916-2176HISTORIC CENTRAL ACADEMY 3rd Mon. 5:30 p.m. Preservation & Community Development Inc. Supporters Meeting Palatka INTERLACHEN LIONS CLUB 1st & 3rd Tues. 7 p.m. 202 Prospect Ave Interlachen 386-684-2188 PUTNAM REPUBLICAN CLUB Meets 2nd Tues. at 6 p.m. at Beef O Bradys 386-643-2808 putnamrepublicanclub.weebly. com PALAT K A DUPLICATE BRID G E CLUB Wed. 10 a.m. Bring lunch 521 South 13th St Palatka 386-328-0263 CRESCENT CITY DUPLICATE BRID G E C LUB Wed. 9:30 a.m. 604 N. Summit St.-Crescent City Lessons Available 386-698-4496 PALAT K A K I WANIS CLUB Thurs. 11:45 a.m. Lunch Sleep Inn & Suites SR19 & Hwy 100 Palatka PALAT K A N EW VISION LIONS CLUB 2nd & 4th Tues. Noon Beef OBradys on the River Palatka P O MONA P A R K N EI G H BORHOOD W A TCH 2 nd Thurs. (exc. Aug. & Dec.) 200 East Main St. PALAT K A L IONS SOCIAL SPORTSB2 Our community. Our people. All local. MISCELLANEOUS Listen to WIYD 1260 AM and WPLK 800 AM and 98.3 FM or online at PutnamRadio.com SUDOKU SOLUTION CROSSWORD SOLUTION

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March 28, 2018 B3 CROSSWORD PUZZLE SUDOKUSolution is on B2. Solution is on B2. LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that NOMIS INVESTING, LLC the holder TIM SMITH (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that NOMIS INVESTING, LLC the holder TIM SMITH (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that NOMIS INVESTING, LLC the holder TIM SMITH (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that TIM SMITH (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that TIM SMITH (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that BETTY ANTOINE the holder of TIM SMITH (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that BETTY ANTOINE the holder of TIM SMITH (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that BETTY ANTOINE the holder of TIM SMITH (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that BETTY ANTOINE the holder of TIM SMITH (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that BETTY ANTOINE the holder of TIM SMITH (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that BETTY ANTOINE the holder of TIM SMITH (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that DEED INC the holder of the fol TIM SMITH (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that NOMIS INVESTING, LLC the holder TIM SMITH (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that TIM SMITH (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that TIM SMITH (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that TIM SMITH (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that TIM SMITH (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that TIM SMITH (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that NOMIS INVESTING, LLC the holder TIM SMITH (SEAL) Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices D.O.G Gets It! Do You? Subscribe today! Only $24 a year! 386-698-1644

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Iron Man from page A1 B4 LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that 5T WEALTH PARTNERS LP the holder of the following VI LLC. ida. com on the 11th day of April, TIM SMITH CLERK, CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that BUCKLES GARY L AND LLI EMILIO STEVEN SEMMEL ida. com on the 11th day of April, TIM SMITH CLERK, CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that 5T WEALTH PARTNERS LP the holder of the following GROVE LAKE ESTATES UNIT 1, MB5 P49 BLK 1 LOT 9 SON ANGIE IMELDA ELIE (JTROS) IMELDA ELIE. ida. com on the 11th day of April, TIM SMITH CLERK, CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that 5T WEALTH PARTNERS LP the holder of the following LOWAY JOHNNIE W. ida. com on the 11th day of April, TIM SMITH CLERK, CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that ROBINSON JACK M AND SHELBY A the holder of the fol PIERRE SAUVEUR PIERRE NADINE. ida. com on the 11th day of April, TIM SMITH CLERK, CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that 5T WEALTH PARTNERS LP the holder of the following (SUBJECT TO CONSERVA ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES LLC. ida. com on the 11th day of April, TIM SMITH CLERK, CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, JOHN HUERTAS GRT, (AMER ICAN GARDENS UNIT 1 UNBROWN KEITH W. ida. com on the 11th day of April, TIM SMITH CLERK, CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, MER JUANITA ET AL JT/RS JUANITA WIMMER. ida. com on the 11th day of April, TIM SMITH CLERK, CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, RALES RUBIN MORALES TE RESA. ida. com on the 11th day of April, TIM SMITH CLERK, CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that MAGNOLIA TC 15, LLC the LACHEN LAKES ESTATES, WEEKS DAVID J. ida. com on the 11th day of April, TIM SMITH CLERK, CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, LACHEN LAKES ESTATES, PERHAM MAURICE A DAVIS GRACE L JTRS. ida. com on the 11th day of April, TIM SMITH CLERK, CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that MAGNOLIA TC 15, LLC the NAT ACCEPTANCE ROLAND HUGHES. ida. com on the 11th day of April, TIM SMITH CLERK, CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, 1 LOT 13 RETT SHERRY L WENDELL P ALTMAN SHERRY L BAR RETT. ida. com on the 11th day of April, TIM SMITH CLERK, CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, SON SYLVESTER. ida. com on the 11th day of April, TIM SMITH CLERK, CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, PLANT ATION PINES II, WHIS MB5 P91 BLK DD LOTS 14 15 SON CHERYL JORDAN. ida. com on the 11th day of April, TIM SMITH CLERK, CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, DANIEL P. ida. com on the 11th day of April, TIM SMITH CLERK, CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, OW LAWN HEIGHTS MB3 BRENDA MILLER WILLIAMS. ida. com on the 11th day of April, TIM SMITH CLERK, CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, LEY WILLIAM M JR. ida. com on the 11th day of April, TIM SMITH CLERK, CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, TIN THOMAS OWEN. ida. com on the 11th day of April, TIM SMITH CLERK, CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, CAMPBELL BETTY. ida. com on the 11th day of April, TIM SMITH CLERK, CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that WEST PUTNAM CONSER VATION LLC the holder of the PP953 954) RONALD. ida. com on the 11th day of April, TIM SMITH CLERK, CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, SHAW LAURA CARL HYSON. ida. com on the 11th day of April, TIM SMITH CLERK, CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that BLAKEWOOD MORT GAGE LLC the holder of the fol WICK MICHAEL (S). ida. com on the 11th day of April, TIM SMITH CLERK, CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that ROBINSON JACK M AND SHELBY A the holder of the fol 194) SCHER AMY D. ida. com on the 11th day of April, TIM SMITH CLERK, CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices rf

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SCHULTZ Double Wide Mobile Home; I.D. Numbers: HIGA20K04479A and HiGA20K04479B, Title Numbers 100216533 and 100216687, which titles have been retired. DATED: March 12, 2018. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. KEY LAW OFFICES, P.A. By: /s/ John Key John Key, Esquire Florida Bar No. 0136425 415 St. Johns Avenue, Suite 2 Palatka, FL 32177 386-385-3646 386-385-3644 fax jk@johnkey.com email Attorney for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to participate in this proceed ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration, 125 E. Orange Ave., Ste 300, Daytona Beach, FL 32114, (386) 257-6096, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon time before the appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. THESE ARE NOT COURT INFORMATION NUMBERS. 3/21-3/28/18PUBLIC NOTICEFinal Notice and Public Explanation of a Proposed Activity in the 100-Year Floodplain and Wetland Date: March 28, 2018 Name of Responsible Entity: City of Crescent City Address: 3 North Summit Street Crescent City, FL 32112-2525Telephone Number: (386) 698-2525To: All interested Agencies, Groups and Individuals This is to give notice that the City of Crescent City has conducted an evaluation as required by Executive Orders 11988 and 11990 in accordance with HUD regulations at 24 CFR 55.20 to determine the potential affect that its activity in the floodplain and/or wetland will have on the environment. The City of Crescent City intends to undertake a project to be funded by a Florida Small Cities Community Development Block Grant (CDBG). The proposed project includes: In Service Area #1 the funding will be used to pave Clemons Lane and Cherry Street, in Service Area #2 the funding will be used to repave Bay Street, and in Service Area #3 the funding will be used to provide for the reclaiming/cleaning of a storm water retention pond in Harry Banks Park which will allow for the expansion of the existing baseball field and soccer field in the park. These activities will have no significant impact on the environment for the following reason: A portion of the project will be located in a floodplain and/or wetland. The City anticipates, no addi tional impervious surface within the floodplain and/or wetland will be created by the project. If additional impervious surface is created by the project, drainage improvements to compensate for the additional impervious surface that will be created will be included in the project. Although a portion of the project will be located in the 100-year floodplain and/or wetland, the improvements cannot be undertaken in any other location due to the scope of the project. There is, therefore no practicable alternative than to continue with the project. The proposed improvements conform to applicable floodplain and wet lands protection standards. The proposed action will not affect natural or beneficial floodplain and/ or wetland values, and residents of the community will benefit from the project. The proposed project involves the following Activities: Activities: Service Area #1 Clemons Lane and Cherry Street Service Area: 03K Street Improvements New Paving The Activity to be carried out in Service Area #1 is the paving of Clemons Lane and the unpaved portion of Cherry Street between Clemons Lane on the north and Huntington Road (CR308) on the south. Approxi mately one thousand seven hundred linear feet (1,700) of new asphalt roadway will be installed. Activity: 03K Street Improvements New Paving CDBG Cost: $170,400.00 Local Match: $0.00 Service Area #1 is bound on the north by the rear property line of the properties located on the north side of Clemons Lane, on the south by Huntington Road (CR 308), on the east by the rear property line of the properties located on the east side of Cherry Street, on the west by the Randolph Street rightof-way. None of the activities in Service Area #1 will be carried out within a flood zone and/or wetland. Service Area #2 Bay Street Resurfacing Service Area: 03K Street Improvements Repaving The Activity to be carried out in Service Area #2 is the Repaving of Bay Street between Grove Avenue on the north and Huntington Road (CR 308) on the south, a distance of approximately one thousand five hundred linear feet (1,500). Activity: 03K Street Improvements Repaving CDBG Cost: $160,00.00 Local Match: $0.00 Service Area # 2 is bound on the north by the Grove Avenue right-ofway, on the south by the Huntington Road (CR 308) right-of way, on the east by the rear property line of the properties located on the east side of Bay Street and on the west by the rear property lines of the properties located on the west side of Bay Street. A portion of the activity in Service Area #2 may be carried out within a flood zone and/or wetland. Approximately 0.2 acres of land located within a floodplain and/or wetland may be included in the STOLEN SCHWINN BIKE. Yellow and pink with white and plaid seat. Stolen from Gun by Court Area in Cres cent City. Call 386-5590 803 if you see it. TFN REPO DOUBLE WIDES & SINGLE WIDES. $18,500 (or best offer), delivered nancing available. 3 86-312-6363. TFN ESTATE SALE 110 Laurel Lane in Crescent City on Thursday, Fri day, & Saturday, March 2 9-31 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Furniture, tools, ing equipment. No cred it cards please. 3/28 B A RBER / H A IRSYL IST NEEDED E xp. necessary. Please call 386-559-1529 or 386-698-1151. 3/28 CRESCENT LAKE APTS now accepting applications for 1 & 2 bedroom apts. Rental Assistance available to those who qualify. call Gail at 386-6982205 840 Oakwood St. Crescent City. We are an Equal Housing Op portunity Provider and E mployer. TDD 711. This Institution is an Equal Oppor tunity Provider. O AKWOOD GROVE APTS -1 BR $576/ month, 2 BR $638/ month & 3 BR $672/ month apartments. Section 8 accepted. Central heat/air, car pet, blinds, laundry on s ite. Rental assistance available for those who qualify. Call Lu cretia 386-698-2513 T DD 1800-955-8771. 629 Gumby Court in Crescent City. Equal Housing Opportuni ty. This institution is an eq ual opportunity pro vider & employer. TFN N EW HOPE VILLAS APARTMENTS FARM WORKERS 100 New Hope Ave STE A, Se ville, FL 32190. 2BR $ 606/month, 3BR $666/month, 4BR $701/ month. Rental assis tance available for t hose who qualify. Now accepting Section 8 Call Patty at 386-7490075. Currently run ning rent special. This i nstitution is an equal opportunity provider & employer. EQUAL HOUSING OPPOR TUNITY TDD PHONE 1 -800-955-8771 TFN LAKEVIEW GROVE APTS. 62 or older, dis abled or handicapped r egardless of age, with or without children. 1 BR 502/month & 2 BR $612/month. Central heat/air, blinds. Section 8 accepted. Rental assis tance may be available f or those who qualify. Call Lucretia 386-6982513. TTD 1-800-9558771. 629 Gunby Court in Crescent City. Equal Housing Opportuni ty. This institution is an eq ual opportunity pro vider & employer. TFN LEGAL NOTICEIN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR PUTNAM COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.:2017-CA-422 DIVISION: 53 THE LESTER LEGACY, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. PHILLIP PAUL BRAGG, LAURA AMMIE BRAGG, PUTNAM COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, CREDIT ACCEPTANCE CORP., and any unknown heirs, devisees, creditors, grantees and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through or under PHILLIP PAUL BRAGG, LAURA AMMIE BRAGG, PUTNAM COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, or CREDIT ACCEPTANCE CORP., Defendants. ___________/ NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on March 12, 2018, in the above-styled civil action of the Circuit Court in and for Putnam County, Florida, in which PHILLIP PAUL BRAGG and LAURA AMMIE BRAGG, PUTNAM COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, and CREDIT ACCEPTANCE CORP are defendants and THE LESTER LEGACY LLC is the plaintiff, the Clerk of the Court of Putnam County, Florida will sell to the highest bidder for cash online via the Internet at www.Putnam. realforeclose.com, at 11:00 oclock a.m. on May 8, 2018, the following described real property set forth in the Final Judgment: Tract 7-B Part of the East 1/2 of Section 15, Township 6 South, Range 24 East, Putnam County, Florida, described as follows: COMMENCE at the Northwest corner of Lakeside Hills Section 4A, as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 156, of the Public Records of said county, also being the Northwest corner of the Southeast 1/4 of the Southeast 1/2 of said Section 15; thence South 89 degrees 30 minutes 38 seconds West along the South line of the Northwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 15, 572 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence continue South 89 degrees 30 minutes 38 seconds West on the last described line, 360 feet, thence North 0 degrees 32 minutes 40 seconds West, 603.95 feet; thence North 89 degrees 30 minutes 38 seconds East, parallel with the said South line of Northwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4, a distance of 361.25 feet; thence South 0 degrees 25 minutes 33 seconds East, parallel with the West line of Lakeside Hills Section 3, as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 128 of said public records, 603.95 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH an easement for ingress and egress across, a part of the East 1/2 of Section 15, Township 8 South Range 24 East, Putnam County, Florida, described as follows: COMMENCE at the Northwest corner of Lakeside Hills Section 4A as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 156 of the Public Records of said county, also being the Northwest corner of the Southeast 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 15, thence South 89 degrees 30 minutes 35 seconds West along the South line of the Northwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 15, 572 feet, thence run North 0 degrees 25 minutes 33 seconds West, 603.95 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence continue North 0 degrees 25 minutes 33 seconds West, to the Southerly Right-of-Way line of Bellamy Road as established for a width of 66 feet; thence South 79 degrees 25 minutes 38 seconds West, 30.48 feet; thence run South 00 degrees 25 minutes 33 seconds East, 671 97 feet; thence run North 89 degrees 30 minutes 38 seconds East, paral lel with the South line of Northwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 15, a distance of 30.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH a 2003 CLASSIFIEDS B5 Announcements Buildings For Sale/Rent Reduced Security Deposit Amounts!!!1&2 Bedroom Apartments Special Tax Credit Rent Quiet and Peaceful Community for Adults 62 years and Older or Disabled Persons Welcome Home to Sugar Mill Woods 1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments Reduced Security Deposits Special Tax Credit Rent Rental Assistance When Available One-Story Design Active Community Room On-site Laundry One-Story Design 570 3rd Avenue Welaka, FL 32193386-467-8444Office Open Tuesday and ThursdayCome join us and love where you live!This is an equal opportunity housing provider. EmploymentReal Estate For Rent Community Sales SERVICE & BUSINESS DIRECTORY AIR CONDITIONINGService In Hours Not Days.100% SATISFACTION GUARANTEED CHECK US ON THE WEB: WWW.SOUTHERNAIR.NET STATE LICENSE CAC058634 3849 Reid St. Palatka Recommended for Decades ANY TIME ANY KIND ANY SERVICEBefore You Fix It Or Buy It,Call 328-3212Mikes AluminumQuality Material and Installation Mike Bottelman, Owner386-649-5374 RX#0066577 CONSTRUCTION MEDICAL NORTH FLORIDA SERVICESPROPANE & NATURAL GAS PIPING AND APPLIANCE INSTALLATION35 Yrs Local Experience Specialties: Tankless Water Heaters and Gas Logs 386-559-0071 G AS APPLIANCES Pool & SPA PET SERVICES ELECTRICIAN HANDYMAN Trent Electric Inc.30+ Years ExperienceEC 0002532Commercial ResidentialLocated in Crescent City 386-698-4777 Cell: 321-229-1241jjhoffman@gmail.com Crescent City Located in Crescent City 386-698-4777 386-698-4777 386-698-4777 386-698-4777 WATCH REPAIR ANDPEST CONTROL, INC.(386) 698-BUGSKelvin L. HaireManagerP.O. Box 2 241 S. Summit St. Crescent City, FL 32112 PEST CONTROL CLEANING SERVICES Durable Medical EquipmentNEW LOCATION 120 N. 9th St. Palatka 386-325-2096 Fax: 386-326-0404 Free Local Delivery No Long Waits FENCING Advertise Here 1 in. Ad $5/weekWith a month commitmentCall 698-1644 Crescent City Kennel Inc. 1952 S. US Hwy 17 Crescent City www.cckennel.us386-698-2777Professional Water Treatment & Analysis Sparking Water Gone? 386-698-1112 Cert. # CPO-154081 Clock and Watch Repair30 Years ExperienceCall 561-222-9063 A&P / IA ServicesIRMT Fabric Floats Multiwing Sheet Metal, Antique Restorations, 337s AvionicsRussell White 386-698-1505 Fix-It ServicesWindows Screens-Pressure Washing Painting, Etc.904-540-2381 Business ID #100597 Lowman Fence CompanyFor all of your Fencing needs386-328-3778Residential & Commercial MiscellaneousAdvertise Here 2 in. Ad $10/weekWith a month commit mentCall 698-1644 HOME SERVICES Mathisen Services386-937-7984 Starting at $35* $0.45 per square footCarpet Cleaning Tile Cleaning*for 12 X 12 roomSpecial Offer 10% off when you mention this ad! Mathisen Services 386-937-7984 SPA John the Handyman 40 Years Experience No Job to Small 937-722-7880 CARPET Kens Carpet Wood, Vinyl, & Carpet Vertical & Wood Blinds386-325-4312 Advertise Here 3 in. Ad $15/weekWith a month commit mentCall 698-1644 Advertise Here 2 in. Ad $10/weekWith a month commit mentCall 698-1644 Advertise Here 2 in. Ad $10/weekWith a month commit mentCall 698-1644 Reduced Rent Amounts!!!2 Bedroom: $460!! 3 Bedroom: $500!! 4 Bedroom: $540!! Smith Thomas Court Apartments849 Bay Lane Crescent City, FL 321122, 3 and 4 BRs Move-in Special & Rental Assist. May Be Available 386-698-4300 Equal Housing Provider Legal Notices Real Estate For Rent Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices construction area. Service Area #3 Harry Banks Community Park Upgrades Service Area: 03F Parks, Playgrounds Harry Banks Community Park (Harry Banks Park) is located at 701 Grove Avenue, Crescent City, Florida. Harry Banks Park currently contains a soccer field, softball field, playground, basketball court and picnic facilities. The southwest section of the park currently contains a wooded area which is full of debris. The wooded area serves as the stormwater drainage retention area for Harry Banks Park. The project proposed in this application is reclaiming/cleaning the storm water retention area and the addition of landscaping along portions of the banks in the southwest section of the park. The reclaiming/cleaning of the stormwater retention area in the southwest section of the park will allow a portion of the wooded area to be used to expand the existing soccer field and existing softball field, while improving the drainage and stormwater treatment capabilities for Harry Banks Park. Activity: 03F Parks, Playground CDBG Cost: $175,000.00 Local Match: $0.00 Harry Banks Park Service Area is bound on the north by the City Limits and the centerline of Williams Lane, on the south by the centerline of Vernon Avenue (SR 308), on the east by the centerline of US Highway 301, and on the west by City Limits. Some of the activities in Service Area #3 will be carried out within a flood zone and/or wetland. Approximately 5.2 acres of land located within a floodplain and/or wetland will be included in the construction area. A total of 5.4 acres of the work to be carried out in the primary activities included in this project may be carried out within a flood zone and/ or wetland. No additional impervious area will be created in any of the Service Areas included in this project. Activity: 016 Engineering CDBG Cost: $92,600.00 Local Match: $0.00 Activity: 013 Administration CDBG Cost: $ 52,000.00 Local Match: $0.00 013 Administration T otal CDBG Cost $650,000.00 Total Citys Local Mach Claimed for Points $0.00 Total CDBG funding and Citys Local Match Claimed for Points $650,000.00 Failure to provide these improvements would result in the City of Crescent City not being able to carry out the activities in the project. Additional agencies involved in this project include the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, the City of Crescent City and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Written comments must be received by Patrick Kennedy, City Manager at the City of Crescent City, 3 North Summit Street, Crescent City, FL 32112-2505 on or before April 4, 2018. Comments may also be submitted by email at citymanager@crescentcity-fl.com. A more detailed description of the project and the Federal Insurance Administration (FIA) flood maps are available for citizen review by contacting the local government. Brett Peterson, Mayor Environmental Certifying Official City of Crescent City 3 North Summit Street Crescent City, FL 32112-2505 Telephone (386) 698-2525 3/28/18LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE SCRUGGS MOTOR COMPANY LLC gives Notice of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles on April 20, 2018, 10:00 am at 2407 REID ST. PALATKA, FL 32177-2803, pursuant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida Statutes. SCRUGGS MOTOR COMPANY LLC reserves the right to accept or reject any and/ or all bids.1FTRW07653KB62120 2003 FORD3/28/18LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE SCRUGGS MOTOR COMPANY LLC gives Notice of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles on April 20, 2018, 10:00 am at 2407 REID ST. PALATKA, FL 32177-2803, pursuant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida Statutes. SCRUGGS MOTOR COMPANY LLC reserves the right to accept or reject any and/ or all bids.2GCEC19C48110203 2008 CHEVROLET3/28/18PUBLIC NOTICETown of Pomona Parks, Florida Building Supplies SAWMILLS from only $4397.00MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own band millCut lumber any dimen sion. In stock ready to ship! FREE Info/DVD: www.Nor woodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N Education AVIATION Grads work with JetBlue, United, Delta and othersstart here with hands cation. Financial aid if qual Maintenance 888-242-2649. Legal Notices Legal NoticesFirst Public Hearing Notice The Town of Pomona Parks is considering applying to the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity for a FFY 2017 Small Cities Community Development Block Grant (CDBG). The Town is eligible to apply for up to $600,000 in the neighborhood revitalization, commercial revitalization and housing rehabilitation categories and up to $1.5 million in the economic development category. Construction activities funded through the CDBG Program must meet one of the following National Objectives: 1. Provide benefit to lowand moderate-income persons; 2. Prevent or eliminate slum or blight conditions; or 3. Meet a need of recent origin having a particular urgency. The types of activities that CDBG funds may be used for include constructing stormwater ponds, paving roads and sidewalks, installing sewer and water lines, build ing a community center or park, making improvements to a sewage treatment plant, and rehabilitating low-income homes. Additional information regarding the range of activities that could be funded will be provided at the public hearing. In developing a CDBG application, the Town of Pomona Parks must plan to minimize displacement of persons as a result of the activities. In addition, the Town of Pomona Parks is required to develop a plan to assist displaced persons. A public hearing to obtain cit izen comment concerning the Towns economic and community development needs will be held at Town Hall, 1775 US Hwy 17 South, Pomona Park, FL 32181, on April 10, 2018 at 6:00 p.m. For information concerning the public hearing, contact Joan OConnor, Town Clerk, at (386) 649-4902 or by e-mail at townclerk@pomonapark.com The public hearing is being conducted in a handicapped accessible location. Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring special accommodations to participate in the hearing is asked to advise the Town at least five days before the hearing by contacting Joan OConnor, Town Clerk, at (386) 649-4902. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact the Town using the Florida Relay Service, 1(800) 955-8771 (TDD) or 1(800) 955-8770 (Voice). Any non-English speaking person wishing to attend the public hearing should contact Joan OConnor, Town Clerk, at (386) 649-4902 at least five days prior to the hearing and an interpreter will be provided. A Fair Housing Workshop designed for the general public, property owners, housing professionals, and local elected officials will be conducted immediately after the public hearing on the same date and at the same location. THE TOWN OF POMONA PARKS IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYMENT, HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE AND FAIR HOUSING JURISDICTION AND SUPPORTS THE EMPLOYMENT OF SECTION 3 & W/MBE PERSONS. 3/28/18 Putnam County Courier Journal330 N. Summit St.The recycling bin is located behind the building. ACCEPTING ONLY NEWSPAPERS, WHITE PAPER, MAGAZINES & CATALOGS