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Lake Region Monitor

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Title:
Lake Region Monitor
Place of Publication:
Keystone Heights, FL
Publisher:
John M. Miller - Publisher, Dan Hildebran - Editor
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Language:
English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Clay -- Keystone Heights
Coordinates:
29.793269 x -82.025841

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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All rights reserved by the source institution.

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Florida Digital Newspaper Library

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PAGE 1

USPS 114-170 Keystone Heights, Florida Thursday, May 3, 2018 44 th Year 52 nd Issue 75 CENTS Lake Region Monitor Deadline Monday 5 p.m. before publication 904-964-6305 904-964-8628 Suspect arrested for 6 Keystone burglaries BY TRACY LEE TATE Telegraph-Times-Monitor Clay County deputies arrested a suspect in six Keystone Heights-area burglaries. Cirocco David Fox, 26, of Keystone Heights was arrested April 15 on unrelated charges but was interviewed as a person of interest in a number of break-ins which occurred over the last few months in the Lake Region. by photograph in all of the cases. incident took place at a residence on Appomattox Avenue on Feb. 14. According to the arrest report, Fox entered the dwelling while it was unoccupied and stole items from the inside. Fox is also accused of a Feb. 16 burglary, at a home on Silver Sands Circle. In this incident, the arrest report states that Fox entered the unoccupied dwelling and stole a tablet, a laptop, paper currency and a box of condoms. There was no forced entry and it is believed that the suspect entered the residence through an unlocked door. The third break-in occurred on Feb. 25, about a block away from the Silver Sands Circle burglary. A house-sitter told investigators that she noticed items missing and reported the burglary. Missing are guns, a four-wheeler, two book bags, a variety of ammunition and other small items. Deputies also linked Fox to a Feb. 25 theft on Hillridge Road. According to an arrest report, early on Feb. 26, the owner of a backyard shed noticed the door open and a motorcycle stored in the structure missing. Deputies found the bike nearby, leaning against a utility pole. However, they did not recover other items missing from the shed, including woodworking tools. Another break-in occurred on Silver Sands Circle on March 7. In that incident, the resident noticed his back gate open the next day and informed law enforcement. The victim was in the process of moving and noticed several boxes of items missing from the home, including one marked electronics and another containing several bottles of liquor. Also missing was a tool set and some laundry soap. March 18 on Rollins Street. The victim reported that he had been out grocery shopping with his disabled mother and left his 2007 Hyundai running at the curb in front of the residence while he walked her inside. When he tried to return to the vehicle a short time later, he found it missing. Charged this time with grand by the victim as a former friend. The victim added that he never gave Fox permission to drive the car. BY DAN HILDEBRAN Managing Editor Bradford deputies arrested a Keystone Heights woman after the 32-year-old 21 Saturday night. Samantha Lumpkins was arrested for hitand run and DUI. Bradford deputies took Lumpkins into custody at Chiappinis Gulf Station in Melrose. But the collision occurred four miles away, just south of Trinity Baptist Church in Bradford County. There, Johnny Austin of Keystone Heights said he was driving toward Keystone Heights when he saw an oncoming car cross the centerline and head straight for him. I tried to go in the ditch, but she still clipped me, Austin said. She caught my side and then spun my back end around. Austins car wound up in the Melrose-bound ditch facing Melrose. Auston added that the driver of the other car, a female, lost her left, front tire in the collision, but kept going. Austin said the other driver then drove by the crash scene twice before leaving for good. Neither driver was injured. Ryan and Theida Tusher said they were following behind Austin when they saw the crash occur. We saw the whole thing, said Ryan Tusher, We had to swerve off the road too, added Theida Tusher. the hit-and-run suspect. It wasnt hard. Without a tire, Lumpkins rim and wheel left a trail on S.R. 21 that the Tushers followed to the Melrose convenience store. We pulled up behind her but kept our distance, Ryan said, called 911 and waited for the police to arrive. crash Saturday night. Austin was hit by an oncoming car on S.R. 21 and the Tushers Under the watch of Putnam deputies, Samantha Lunpkins browses four miles away. Inset: Lumpkins mug shot. Witnesses trail hit-and-run suspect until deputies arrive Repeat accounting highlighted in audit BY MARK J. CRAWFORD Telegraph Editor prior years audits were reported in Keystone Heights audit for well internal accounting is being performed. According to Brad Million of Reddish and White CPAs, there was a similar issue with both the Keystone Heights Airpark as inter-fund transactions and balances between the general fund, community redevelopment agency, cemetery, etc. He described the balances as offkilter prior to the audit. Million said they had to make material adjustments that should be made upon review by the citys CPA. Prior to the audit, balances need to be scrutinized and adjustments made so it is not left up to the auditor. The issues have been noted in the past and were not corrected for the 2016-17 audit. Aside from that, the news was all good. Million said the city is staying well within its budget and there were no new internal Providing a snapshot of the general fund, the city had budgeted a decline in fund balance to make up for a revenue shortfall. But the city actually took in more and spent less than anticipated, allowing the fund balance in the general fund to climb above $1 million, an increase of nearly $200,000. Thats the key component in our thinking, Million said of underestimating income and controlling expenditures. Youre being conservative with your budget, and so youre actually coming in above your budget. Thats always a good sign. You dont want to be forecasting revenues that you dont have and then trying to spend money that may not be coming in. Keystone Heights had more than $1 million in general fund assets compared to just $11,000 in liabilities at the end of the of that amount is restricted or assigned to a particular purpose like infrastructure or debt service. This includes its roadway recapitalization plan and its lake replenishment and restoration project. The citys community redevelopment agency fund spent more than $43,000 of its beginning fund balance along with its $41,000 income, leaving an ending fund balance of just over $23,000. This was not unanticipated and went toward projects that had been planned for a while, Million said. Council members couldnt remember where the money had been spent, however. According to City Manager Scott Kornegay, the money covered engineering services related to a streetscape project. As for the cemetery fund, it had an operating income of nearly $12,000 after expenditures, raising the fund balance above $336,000. Hope appoints director of education Terry Denmark, Hope Christian Academy director of operations, said he is pleased to announce the appointment of Michelle Lawson to the position of director of education. She joined the HCA administrative staff effective April 30. Lawson earned her magna cum laude bachelors degree in criminology from the University of Florida and her magna cum laude Masters of Divinity from Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary. She has knowledge of the Abeka curriculum used at Hope Christian Academy and also brings nearly 20 years of leadership, educational, counseling and team-building experience to the academy. Abeka uses a traditional approach to education focusing on teacher-directed learning. The course of study is rigorous, requiring independent, higher level thinking that acclimates college-bound students to the demands of higher education. Lawsons other training and experience include: instructor/counselor for Florida Youth Challenge Academy. law enforcement Community College. sexual assault victim advocate for the Florida National Guard. leadership award, Warrior Leader Course at the Utah Regional Training Institute. human resources specialist for the U.S. Army. deputy sheriff (reserve) for Bradford County Sheriffs -H/Army Youth Program consultant for the state of Florida. Lawson has served as a chaplain in the Florida Army National Guard on Camp Blanding, but she has been hired by Hope Christian Academy in a non-ordained position in ministry with Hope Baptist Church. She and her family live in Melrose and attend Community Church of Keystone Heights. Hope Christian Academy is accredited with excellence with the International League of Christian Schools/Florida League of Christian Schools and is an educational ministry of Hope Baptist Church near Starke. Michelle Lawson County approves $1.8 million for patrol cars, more for school security operations BY MARK J. CRAWFORD Telegraph Editor Clay County Commissioners are looking for more leadership from the school board but have tentatively agreed to purchase patrols cars for nearly four dozen new deputies to protect public schools. School board members were looking for more cooperation from the county commission when they sat down last month to talk about school security, and by cooperation they meant They want what they call the gold standard for school security a Clay County sheriffs deputy on every campus even if they dont know how to pay for it. While the county has helped staff high schools with school believe the responsibility for funding school security aside from capital costs like patrol cars belongs to the school board, and they think its time to streamline the funding. Because it is further from its millage cap and immune to several tax exemptions, the school board has a greater ability to seek a tax increase, and everyone seems paying a mill more for armed schools. But instead of solidifying their intention to pursue a tax increase via referendum, the school board used its special meeting on April 23 to try and whittle down the sheriffs $4.5 million price tag to get the program off the ground. The sheriff took a moment during that meeting and did trim four positions, three relief but that $225,000 savings was a drop in the bucket. To cover every school not currently assigned a school resource positions, including supervisors to train, equip and put them in vehicles. From his perspective, this is not a wish list. He has repeatedly invoked the imagery of himself as a vendor of law enforcement services, saying you can purchase the services but not decide what they are or how they are delivered. There are two scenarios, as far as he in every school, or a resource school with trained school personnel acting as volunteer Guardians in the elementary schools. Since the school board is against arming personnel, that would seem to leave only one option. However, Superintendent Addison Davis put for the option of using offfrom neighboring counties, cities, even highway patrol Daniels found it insulting and said it wouldnt happen if he had other jurisdictions working second jobs would have no vested interest in Clay schools them nomads who would chase higher paychecks. Without the money to hire, train and equip them, Clay County deputies wont be manning the schools either. Daniels told the county commission that the date to are in every school when the next school year begins has come and gone. I cant hire that many people on this years budget when I was not prepared to, he said. His budget was not built with an expansion of the resource See CARS, 2A

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2A Lake Region Monitor Thursday, May 3, 2018 Night www.gatorbaitmelrose.com USPS 114-170 Published each Thursday and entered as Periodical Postage Paid at Keystone Heights, Florida under Act of March 3, 1879.POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Lake Region MonitorP.O. Drawer A Starke, FL 32091 131 W. Call Street Starke, FL 32091Phone: (904)964-6305 Fax: (904)964-8628 Daniel Hildebran, General Manager Subscription Rate in Trade Area $39.00 per year: $20.00 six months Outside Trade Area: $39.00 per year: $20.00 six monthsEditor: Dan Hildebran Sports Editor: Cliff Smelley Advertising: John R. Tillman Typesetting: Eileen Gilmore Advertising & Newspaper Prod: Beth Tillman Bookkeeping & Classified Adverts: Heather Wheeler Bookkeeping Asst: Linda Lacombe Front office Asst: Jenny Starnes Publisher: John M. Miller Lake Region Monitor Audubon hosts leadership academy College students and Audubon chapter leaders from Northeast Florida met together at Melroses Trinity Episcopal parish hall on Saturday, April 7 to foster communications between generations of conservation advocates. The Audubon Conservation Leadership Academy provided an opportunity for both chapter from a joint collaboration of uppreservation of natural systems. Students from these colleges and universities attended: University of Florida, Flagler College, Santa Fe College, University of North Florida, University of Central Florida, and the College of Central Florida. Audubon chapter leaders from Alachua, Duval, St. Johns, Flagler, Marion, 4 Rivers (Columbia County), and Santa Fe Audubon attended. Attendance totaled 48 people, roughly half were Audubon leaders; half were students. A planning team of chapter leaders and students worked together to design the academy. Activities began at 6:30 a.m. with bird-banding at Ordway Preserve with Dr. Katie Sieving of UF. Birds were caught using mist nets; then weighed and measured before placing a US Fish & Wildlife band on the birds leg. Cardinals, Gray Catbirds, and Carolina Wrens were netted. Mike Manetz from bird songs and calls. Cross-generation groups worked together throughout the day to learn more about their interests and opportunities to participate in various outdoor activities. Many students are currently volunteering in nature-based organizations, involved in internships, and studies. Audubon chapters trips, wildlife monitoring, and leadership positions by serving on chapter boards. is something that came out of nowhere. While they might not be on the same page about how to get the job done, Daniels said all of the leaders involved are of the same mind when it comes to the mission of keeping students, teachers and administrators safe. Commission Chairman Gavin Rollins pointed out that each of the county commissioners has ties to education whether it was being a teacher like him, or being a former school board member, or being a grandparent with students in Clay County schools. I just wanted to be clear: We all care deeply about student safety and its very personal for all of us, he said. Commissioner Wayne Bolla said the responsibility is the school districts but regardless, taxpayers are going to wind up funding the mandate. The school board has got to step up and suggest that there be the one-mill increase if thats what its going to take, and then the citizens of Clay County will decide one way or the other whether they support that or not, Bolla said. In addition to the nearly $900,000 it provides to put Clay County does something a lot of other counties dont do, Commissioner Diane Hutchings pointed out share a portion of its 1-cent infrastructure sales tax revenue with the school board. That 10 percent amounted to $2.2 million this year. If it werent so close to its own millage cap, Hutchings said she would suggest the county commission raise property taxes and fund the school resource important, she said. Unlike the school board, which must go to the voters to approve the tax increase, the county commission need not. That doesnt mean its in the countys best interests. Based on where were at, I think we would be undercutting the things that were responsible for if we were to do that, she said. Commissioner Mike Cella agreed, pointing out that an additional homestead exemption up for vote this year could erode its property tax revenue by $5 million to $6 million. The school board would be protected from the impact of that exemption. Understanding that some county capital projects would be delayed, Cella moved to spend $1.8 million to purchase the patrol vehicles for the resource that motion contingent on the school board acting to fund the personnel costs of the program. Obviously we cant let the sheriff go out and buy a bunch of cars if were not going to be able to put bodies in them, he said. Cella also proposed spending around $300,000 from the fund on operational costs to help the school board out. That would leave around $575,000 above the money the school district is receiving from the state to cover the startup costs of the program. I think the school board needs to step up and show political courage, said Cella, of the boards need to act to raise taxes. I know they were looking for us to pay the whole thing. It would be irresponsible for us to put out much more money and put us in a situation where next year were looking to borrow money just to be able to put our budget together. Commissioner Gayward Hendry said the money now being committed to the school board had been collected from taxpayers and assigned to other purposes. Life-threatening projects, probably not, but stuff that the money was given to us in good faith, he said. Hendry wanted the money paid back to the county sometime in the next few years and said he could only support the motion with that condition. Bolla said rather than a loan, as Rollins had initially suggested, they consider it an advance on money the school board would receive from the county in the future from the sales tax and other sources. Rollins said the boards would be revisiting their interlocal agreement on that revenue again next year and could address it then. requesting the $1.8 million for patrol cars to be repaid. The cars would be county property and used for other law enforcement purposes when school is out. A resolution to allocate that funding contingent on the school board acting to raise revenue to support the additional costs of the program passed unanimously. A motion to allocate $300,000 to fund additional program operational costs passed 4-1, with Hendry dissenting. CARS Continued from 1B LRM Legals 5/3/18 The City Council of the City of Keystone Heights will hold a PUBLIC HEARING on May 7th, 2018, at 6:00 p.m., or soon thereafter, to consider with the City. The use by exception, if approved, will allow on premise consumption of alcohol or alcoholic beverages within a restaurant at 195 S. Lawrence Blvd, Keystone Heights FL. The meetings will be held at City Hall, 555 South Lawrence Boulevard, Keystone Heights, FL 32656 in the Council Meeting Room. Interested parties may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed use by exception. Pursuant to Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes, a person deciding to appeal any decision made by the Board with respect to any matter considered at the meeting or at any subsequent meeting to which the Board has continued its deliberations is advised that such person will need a record of all proceedings and may need to ensure that a verbatim record of all proceedings is made, which must include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, any person needing a special accommodation to participate in this matter should contact the City of Keystone Heights Box 420, Keystone Heights, Florida 32656, or by telephone at number (352) 473-4807. 5/3 1tchg-LRM The Keystone Heights City Council will hold a PUBLIC HEARING on May 7th, 2018, at 6:00 PM, or as soon thereafter as can be heard, to consider Ordinance 2017-575. The PUBLIC HEARINGS will be held at City Hall, 555 South Lawrence Boulevard, Keystone Heights, FL 32656 in the Council Meeting Room. Ordinance 2016-575 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF KEYSTONE HEIGHTS, FLORIDA, SETTING THE COMPENSATION FOR MAYOR AND COUNCIL MEMBERS PURSUANT TO SECTION 3-1 OF THE KEYSTONE HEIGHTS CODE OF ORDINANCES; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICT; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. Interested parties may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. Please be advised that if a person decides to appeal any decision made to any matter considered at such hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceeding for such purpose. He or she will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Pursuant to Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes, a person deciding to appeal any decision made by the Board with respect to any matter considered at the meeting or at any subsequent meeting to which the Board has continued its deliberations is advised that such person will need a record of all proceedings and may need to ensure that a verbatim record of all proceedings is made, which must include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, any person needing a special accommodation to participate in this matter should contact the City of Keystone Heights Box 420, Keystone Heights, Florida 32656, or by telephone at number (5) days prior to the hearing or proceeding for which this notice has been given. 5/3 1tchg-LRM Legals Long list of constitutional amendments headed to ballot BY MARK J. CRAWFORD Telegraph Editor From environmental protection to victims rights, the state constitution is up for revision with no fewer than 13 amendments currently headed to the ballot this fall. The amendments have been proposed by citizen initiative, referral by the Legislature or a vote of the 37-member Florida Constitutional Revision Committee, which is convened every 20 years to submit amendments directly to voters. The majority of the proposals eight come from the Constitutional Revision Committee, and some combine several revisions in a single amendment, including one removing language on aliens owning property and deleting the requirement for high-speed ground transportation system from the constitution. by the Legislature, is dreaded by local governments as it increases homestead exemption and reduces property taxes. Typically, such amendments win easy approval, even if they cut locally generated See VOTE, 5A State historic marker unveiled at Melrose church at Melrose United Methodist Church. Photograph by Cornelius Clayton. Over 100 people gathered on the lawn of the Melrose United Methodist Church for the unveiling of a new historic marker, April 14. The marker was unveiled by Rachel Stortz and Chris Rocks, who will be married in the church later this year. The marker designates the church as a Florida Heritage Site. It is sponsored by the church and the Florida Department of State. Ruth Berkelman, who chaired the event, shared the history of the church and its congregation. In 1877, a man by the name of Alex Goodson platted this new town of Melrose. It was a 30-block area on abandoned A year after mapping out the town, Goodson gave this plot of land we are standing on to the Methodist Episcopal church. The congregation that had been organized in 1868 wasted no time, completing the construction of the church in 1879, making it the oldest church built in the original plat of Melrose. Angelina Amato, a member of the churchs youth group, gave a synopsis of the markers of the bell. The bell was used not just to call people to worship (as it still does today), arrival of the steamboat from Waldo at Melrose Bay. Jimmy Price, whose members of the congregation, shared his familys long association with the church. Among those recognized for their contributions to the approval and placement of the marker were Kathleen Pagan of the Alachua County Historical Commission; commission members Bonita Dewilby Moore, Tina Sessions, and Melanie Barr; Keith Bollum: president of Historic Melrose; Rosemary Daurer: board member for Historic Melrose; and Doris and Harry Widener, who assisted with obtaining some of the information required by the State of Florida. After the event, dozens of people toured the church sanctuary. They viewed the historic building and also a series of pictures that Diana Reynolds had prepared and See CHURCH, 4A Even if the school board requests to place a tax referendum on the ballot and voters do support it, it will be late next year before the board begins receiving any of that revenue. The county commission is asking the the additional $575,000 in its own budget to complete the startup costs for the program. The startup money, however, only funds the program through Sept. 30. From Oct. 1 to Sept. 30, 2019, Sheriff Daniels said the program will cost an additional $5.6 million.

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Thursday, May 3, 2018 Lake Region Monitor 3A McRae Elementary holds Bingo for Books BY ATHIE SANDERS Special to the Monitor McRae Elementary School hosted an afternoon of Title 1 fun playing Bingo for Books April 19 in the school cafeteria to encourage family involvement, provide reading strategies parents could use at home and student ownership of books. Debbie Taylor, Title 1 lead teacher, organized and led the Jessica Bettey Christina Beetey, Joey Winfree and Bingo for Books with a pile of new books to read. (L-r) Debbie Taylor, Title 1 lead teacher and Jen Cumbus Bingo ticket. the help of her dad, John Thomas. Zac Taylor (Key Club, 10th grade) and Cinthya Hernandez (Honors Society 10th grade). See BOOKS, 5A Garden Club Celebrates Arbor Day The Garden Club of the Lakes produced their annual hall Saturday morning. Club members sold plants, hosted exhibits and capped the day off with a tree planting in Natural Park. Planting a tree in Natural Park are (l-r) Andrew Usina, Jon Johnson, Scott Kornegay, Sue Hamerstrom, Karen Lake, Lynda Carter, Jackie Host and Karen Hahn. Andi Blount shows off the clubs Fairy Garden display. The Florida Forestry talks to residents about trees. Garden Club members (lr) Brenda Schroll, Cyndi Dunn and Lynda Carter sell plants.

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4A Lake Region Monitor Thursday, May 3, 2018 $500 TrAnE GiFt CaRd ReBaTe!To hE lP t HoSe i Mp A c TeD bY rEc EnT hUrRiCaN e S, T rAnE i S oF f ErI nG a G iFt C aRd rEb AtE uP t O $500 oN qUa L iFyInG e QuIpMe N t !O f FeR ExPiReS: 11-30-17 Heating & Air Conditioning, LLCLicense # CAC058522 Employee of the Month Matt Fehley $500 TrAnE GiFt CaRd ReBaTe!To hE lP t HoSe i Mp A c TeD bY rEc EnT hUrRiCaN e S, T rAnE i S oF f ErI nG a G iFt C aRd rEb AtE uP t O $500 oN qUa L iFyInG e QuIpMe N t !O f FeR ExPiReS: 11-30-17 Heating & Air Conditioning, LLCLicense # CAC058522 Employee of the Month Matt Fehley Employee of the MonthNick Bertie BY ATHIE SANDERS Special to the Monitor Wings of Dreams Aviation and Space Museum hosted breakfast at the Keystone Airpark on Saturday, April share historical information about the development of local airports. Guest speaker Bill Dampier grew up in Starke during the time Camp Blanding was growing rapidly. Starke was a military town, recalled Dampier. Mama ran the draft board. Everyone knew my mama. She would call and tell them their number was about to come up and if they wanted to make a choice, now is the time to do it. Dampier, a 39-year veteran of the military, shared his personal background and his history as it relates to the Keystone Airpark. Dampier was a military paratrooper and instructor. He has made 514 jumps, many made at the Keystone Airport. Dampier said that when he was a kid it was popular for parents to buy ponies for their children. They bought their kids ponies. Kids got bored with them, so they sold real cheap. When I was 14 years old I bought ponies, said Dampier. The needs for pasture lead to the 14-year-old purchasing land. His father helped him get a loan from the bank. He cleared the land, sharecropped and had the loan paid off in three years. Still to this day I have the ranch, it boarders the airport. Paratroopers still jump into my pastures, said Dampier. Once Dampier had the farm, he wanted an airplane. Unable lessons. In 1958 he joined the National Guard and served 19 years active duty. I wore lots of hats while on the farm and then in the military, he said. I was always trying to learn my job and someone elses job. I got lots of promotions. More rank comes with more responsibility. Dampier separated from the National Guard, returned home and went to college. I taught school for a while then went back into the service, he recalled. I went and was sent to Special Forces Command in Atlanta. I became a paratrooper, and I am proud to have trained a lot of other paratroopers. a homemade breakfast. Charlie Bridgham (L) stands with Elijah Cook in front of a picture display board Hall is Hope Volunteer of the Year Pam Hall was presented with the Hope Christian Academy answer phones, help students and parents, and assist staff and the Lord. HCA sports and the Volunteer of the Year. brought to life through her descriptions. Outside on the lawn, Old Florida music was provided by Blue Skies, with Mack and Paula Tyner. While Berkelman devoted most of her remarks to the 150year history of the church, she noted it still serves its members and the community. We are a small but active congregation, she said. The church has continued its outreach: helping support the Methodist childrens home; helping to found and provide support to Lake Area Ministries; hosting a Valentines Day party each year for disabled adults in Holstun Hall; and starting the Pak-A-Sak program at the Melrose Elementary School: a program to provide food for children on the weekends during the school year, who may not have enough food at home. Melrose United Methodist Church is located at 5802 Hampton Street in Melrose. Its pastor is Pastor Louis Tremblay. CHURCH Continued from 2A

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Thursday, May 3, 2018 Lake Region Monitor 5A parent involvement activity. The whole family was encouraged to attend. Dads and moms played Bingo with their children and enjoyed food and drinks from the concession table. Winning Bingo cards were rewarded with a choice of a book. Books were displayed along two long tables and were available at reading levels from pre-reading picture books to full chapter books. Children had the opportunity to win several times throughout the afternoon. Students also depended upon their parents to win games which then offered them more books. Jessica Thomas manned the concession table while husband John Thomas sat nearby and played a Bingo card with his The concession table was also staffed with Key Club and Honors Society volunteers from Keystone Heights High School. Brandon Taylor, Wyatt Hopkins, Zac Taylor and Cinthya Hernandez assisted Debbie Taylor in the set-up of the event, worked the welcome desk and concession stand, cleaned up spills, passed out Bingo cards and helped break down and clean up at the end. Students gain community service points when volunteering. We have a good partnership with our high school Key Club. They have been really wonderful with all the kids, said Principal Tammy Winkler. We are a Title 1 school, Winkler added. The funding requires we have parent involvement events. We wanted to use this opportunity to help provide reading materials and reading strategies to be used at home, so we can truly partner with parents to help their student. page pack of information highlighting reading strategies and interventions, reading games to play that strengthen reading skills and on-line references for resources and information to BOOKS Continued from 3A tax revenue. Only school boards are protected from the additional exemption. Number two, also from the VOTE Continued from 2A help guide their child to become a better reader. out survey sheets for feedback. Assistant Principal Tracy Burt collected the sheets and will use the information to assist in planning for future parent involvement events. At the end of the day students left the cafeteria with arm loads of books. Thank you so much, it was so much fun, said parent Dawn Cullingford as she was leaving. Eighth grader Madison Bettey attended with her sixth-grade sister, fourth-grade cousin and her mom. I love this kind of stuff. Ive probably read pretty much the entire McRae library, said Bettey. Legislature, makes permanent the 10 percent cap on annual nonhomestead parcel assessment increases. The cap is currently set to expire in January. Number three, a citizen initiative, gives voters the exclusive right to approve casino gambling in the state. The Legislature could not do it by statute or by referring a constitutional amendment to the ballot. Only a citizen initiative could place the matter on the ballot for voters to approve or deny. Amendment 4, another citizen initiative, restores voting rights to most convicted felons upon completion of their sentences, replacing a clemency process requiring action by the governor. The Legislature referred the require a two-thirds vote of the Legislature to impose or increase taxes or fees. The remaining eight amendments were approved by the Constitutional Revision adds a Marsys Law to the state constitution, increases the judicial retirement age to 75 and prohibits judges from deferring to administrative agencies in interpreting law. A Marsys Law recognizing that many of the rights enshrined in law protect the accused adds a list of rights that protects victims. These rights include the right to due process; the right to be treated with fairness and respect; the right to be free from intimidation, harassment and abuse; the right to have the victims welfare considered when bail is set; and the right to proceedings free from unreasonable delay. and members of the military. It also requires a supermajority vote of a universitys board of trustees and the Florida Board of Governors to raise college fees. It would also add the current structure of the state college system to the constitution. Another amendment imposes a two-term limit on school board seats. It also limits school board oversight to public schools they have established and not privately organized charter schools. This amendment requires the Legislature to ensure schools provide literacy in civics as well. The fourth bans offshore oil and gas drilling as well as vaping in enclosed indoor work spaces. The next one requires the state to retain a department of veterans affairs and requires counties, including charter counties, to ensure the election of a sheriff, property appraiser, elections supervisor, tax collector and clerk of courts. It creates a state Counter-Terrorism in the Florida Constitution. It also amends the start dates of each years legislative session. Sixth, the proposed amendment deletes some obsolete language. It removes language prohibiting foreign-born residents ineligible for citizenship from owning, inheriting or possessing real property, and it deletes the requirement for a high-speed ground transportation system. It also prohibits changes in criminal statutes from affecting the prosecution of crimes that took place prior to the amendment. The next amendment prohibits compensation for others while in races.

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6A Lake Region Monitor Thursday, May 3, 2018 Keystone United Methodist Church hosts beach party COPY PAPER SALEQuick Copy White, 20LB 5000 Sheets per caseSale Price$3700/caseReg. Price $41.99Now through May 31, 2018The Office Shop 110 W. Call Street StarkeAcross from Call Street Caf (904) 964-5764 theofficeshopofstarke.com theofficeshopofstarke@gmail.com Ace Hardware American Gutter Inc. Angela's Restaurant Supplies Atomic Lightwave BBVA Compass Bank Bradley Sheet Metal and Welding Fabrication Deca Design, Inc. Hamilton Company J and T Reichert Services, LLC Jackson Building Supply Jim R. Jernigan, Studio Keystone Plumbing Inc. Lake Area Glass and Mirror Inc. Law Office of Sven W. Hanson Lucian's Heating and Air Matchett Gas & Appliance mybrand Norton Telecom, Inc. Paul D. Newell, P.A. Regional Electric Inc. Roaster Dynamics, LLC Roberts Insurance Showcase Advertising, Inc. Toast Point of Sale Marshalls awarded yard of the month BY TONI DAVIS Garden Club of the Lakes The Garden Club of the Lakes, FFGC, has awarded the Yard of the Month to Dr. and Mrs. Marshall at 6232 Wynnwood St. in Melrose. Their home is the Bingham-Remmel house that was built in 1897 by Dr. Russell Bingham. The Marshalls have lived there 22 years and have done a beautiful restoration. They have a 40foot Lord and Burnham cypress framed greenhouse that was erected in the 1940s to grow orchids. It now houses a water garden and hot tub. It also has several sculptures done by Dr. Marshalls father and a water feature made from coquina rock from St. Augustine. Mrs. Marshall and her friend and master gardener, Missy Barton, walked us around the grounds pointing out all the trees, herb garden, citrus and annual beds. Almost every plant had an interesting family story to go with it. Some of the trees and plants are sasanqua camellia, Palatka holly, red maple, tea olive, sago palms, crepe myrtle, Confederate jasmine, day lilies, a large fern garden, boxwoods, plumbago, silver bell tree, an herb garden with rosemary, mint, and sage, Myers lemon, sour orange, mustard, dinosaur kale, and lettuce. The annual bed was blooming with bright yellow snap dragons, a knockout rose, yesterday, today and tomorrow, mums, and pansies. The Garden Club of the Lakes invited men and women who enjoy gardening or want to learn more about gardening to join us. We meet the second Thursday of each month September through May at 10:00 am at Faith Presbyterian Church in Midway, between Keystone Heights and Melrose on the corner of S.R. 21 and C.R. 21B. For more information, please call Jackie Host at 473-8095 or Pat Lorenzo at 478-8187. Marshall Jacob Montague and Mom Dee Dee. Enjoying a few hotdogs: Jaiden Hall, Loretta McLeod and Mia McLeod. included a Jeans-for-Jesus music, bounce houses, and Greeters Bonnie Wright, Joyce Wester and April Dalton. Volunteering for the jeans Fishley and Michelle Hallberg. Glenn Calcote leads the crowd in gospel songs and hymns.

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Regional News Regional News B Section Thursday, May 3, 2018 News from Bradford County, Union County and the Lake Region FEATURES CRIME SOCIALS OBITUARIES EDITORIAL BY CLIFF SMELLEY Bradford County Superintendent of Schools Stacey Creighton visited the Kiwanis Club of Starke on April 17 to talk about some of the noteworthy things taking place in the schools, including how Bradford County students have more opportunities in career technical education (CTE) than the general public may realize. Creighton said Bradford students, because of district career academies and industry North Florida Technical College (formerly Bradford-Union Technical Center), have more from. She provided a handout to Kiwanis members that showed that Clay County students dont receive as many opportunities, noting that Middleburg and Oakleaf high schools offer 15 and 14 CTE areas of study, respectively. Orange Park High School is the only other high school in Clay to offer more than 10 such opportunities. We have more opportunities right here in little, old Bradford County than they do at the bigger schools in Clay, Creighton said. Creighton said many are aware that Bradford High School students have dual-enrollment opportunities through Santa Fe College, but added such opportunities also exist with North Florida Technical College as well as the University of Florida. Kiwanis member Cheryl Canova, who is the director of the Santa Fe College Andrews Center as well as a school board member, took the opportunity to share the news that in working with Creighton, the Stump Center, which is close to the high school (adjacent to the Bradford County Public Library), would had been envisioned offering dual-enrollment opportunities during the day. Creighton said thats a huge plus for students who, because of their involvement in after-school activities like athletics and band, have been unable to take dualenrollment classes later in the day or in the evenings. The kids will be either bussed or escorted, or somehow they will get to the Stump Building and be able to take dual-enroll classes during the day, Canova said. That will help students that dont have transportation after school to be able to take dualenrollment classes. Were really excited about that. Helping students achieve at high levels Creighton passed out a highlighted, through photos, some of the accomplishments this school year. One photo was of a teacher using technology in the classroom, while another was of the new versatile student stations in one of the BHS chemistry classrooms. The stations act as traditional classroom seating, but can be transformed into laboratory work tables. The goal is to place state-ofthe-art technology in all schools classrooms. Were doing it slowly along and along, but it is coming, Creighton said. gifted curriculum Cubit that will be implemented next year for students in grades 2-8. It is designed to adhere to the STEAM (science, technology, engineering, the arts and mathematics) educational approach. Were doing a pilot program right now with our middle school, Creighton said. This will expose our kids to coding, robotics and engineering. Currently, our middle-schoolers in the sixth grade class are designing buildings that can withstand earthquakes. We have an earthquake table to test out their designs. of the BHS football team, which won a regional championship, and band directors Zachary Sullivan (BHS) and Michael Loffredo (BMS). The BHS and BMS concert bands and the BMS intermediate band all earned straight-superior ratings at their performance assessments. To our knowledge, we dont know of another county thats had that, Creighton said in regard to three bands accomplishing the feat. Creighton said business partners and supporters from throughout the community are instrumental in helping Bradford students excel and helping schools provide the best opportunities for students. Supporters, for example, would thats continuing to grow. Creighton said shes love to see a 200-member marching band at BHS, but more band students need more instruments, which cost money. Giving another example, Creighton said BHS has received a digital classroom grant that will provide for most classrooms technological needs. However, people need to be hired to maintain that technology. Those salaries would have to come out of the districts general fund, which must also cover the expense of 12 new teaching positions next year. Creighton said business partners also help prepare students for careers by offering on-the-job training opportunities. Please know and take comfort our students have tremendous opportunities to achieve and excel right here in Bradford County, Creighton said. We want to provide students that are ready to jump into employment opportunities right here in our community. This is where we need your help. School safety Creighton also talked about safety, saying school personnel have met with Sheriff Gordon Smith in regard to satisfying a new state law that requires on every campus. Shaun Burgin will act as the school security coordinator. Shaun Burgin is in charge of all of the (school resource) will ensure that when one is out, there will be a replacement. We will have familiarity will all nine campuses. I include the district alternative ed classrooms. (Burgin) will also be responsible for our school safety plans and the trainings. Kiwanis member Bob Milner, whos also the Starke city manager, asked fellow Kiwanis member Brad Smith, who is Bradford Countys undersheriff, campus. Smith said the annual cost would be approximately $200,000, but added the startup cost is what the big kicker is. Thats going to be about $425,000 to $450,000. Were working with Creighton talks school achievement, safety at Kiwanis meeting Bradford County Superintendent of Schools Stacey Creighton discusses career technical education 17 talk to the Kiwanis Club of Starke. See SCHOOLS, 2B

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2B Telegraph, Times and Monitor B Section the county commission right now somewhere. Creighton said the district would be participating in the Coach Aaron Feis Guardian Program, which would appoint certain volunteer school employees as guardians and The Guardian Program requires appointed guardians to complete 132 hours of training, but Smith said the state hasnt We are waiting on the state to produce training criteria and guidelines, Creighton said. SCHOOLS Continued from 1B Santa Fe registering now for College for Kids, summer programs Registration is underway for the Santa Fe College Andrews Centers annual College for Kids programs and camps. Junior College for Kids, which is for ages 6-10 entering the June 4-8, while College for Kids, which is for children entering the sixth-10th grades, takes place June 18-22. Each session consists of four classes, starting at 8 a.m. and ending at noon. The cost to attend is $80. Exploring Science camps are offered the same dates as Junior College for Kids and College for Kids, beginning at 12:30 p.m. and ending at 4:30 p.m. The cost is also $80. Additional camps will be offered for sports, art and LEGO Robotics. The Basketball Fundamentals Camp is offered June 11-15, with an 8-10 a.m. session for ages 6-10 and a 10 a.m.-noon session for ages 11-15. Each session costs $40. The Sports Performance Game Camp teaches participants how to perform under adverse conditions and complete tasks by providing a sense of empowerment and personal achievement. A June 11-15 session is offered for ages 8-14, while a June 18-22 session is offered for ages 6-10. Each session runs from 12:30 p.m. until 4:30 p.m. and costs $80. The Sports Performance Competition Camp is for children ages 8-14 who want to learn the mechanics of running and transfer it to their sport of choice. Two sessions are offered: June 4-8 and June 25-29. Each session runs from 12:30 p.m. until 4:30 p.m. and costs $80. A 2D Art Camp for ages 8-14 will be offered June 11-15 from 12:30 p.m. until 2:30 p.m., while a 3D Art Camp for the same age group and during the same dates will be offered from 2:30 p.m. until 4:30 p.m. Each camp is $40. LEGO Robotics, for ages 8-14, takes place June 25-29 from 9 a.m. until noon. The cost is $80. For more information, please visit the Andrews Center at 209 W. Call St. (8 a.m.-* p.m. MondaysThursdays, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Fridays) or call 904-964-5382. You may also visit sfcollege.edu and click on the Community Ed and College for Kids links for more information or to register. Stamp Out Hunger Food Drive is May 12 The 26th annual Letter Carriers Stamp Out Hunger Food Drive is scheduled for Saturday, May 12. To participate, leave a bag of non-perishable food items near your mailbox. Your letter carrier will pick it up. Feeding Northeast Florida staff and volunteers will help distribute donations to families in need. chapter to present scholarship recipient The Col. Samuel Elbert C hapter of the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution will present its annual Betty Warren Memorial Scholarship recipient at its May meeting at 10:30 a.m. on Monday, May 7, at IHOP in Starke. Do you have a Revolutionary War-era Patriot in your family tree? If you would like to DARs amazing genealogical resources. Any woman 18 years or older, regardless of race, religion or ethnic background, who can prove direct descent from a person who aided in achieving American independence between April 19, 1775, and Nov. 26, 1783, is eligible for membership in DAR. Please contact Leslie Harper (352-475-5090) or June Keefe (386-431-1830) for more information. 4-H youth collecting cereal donations for Bradford Food Pantry Bradford County 4-H member Ella Dinkins is collecting donations of cereal and other related items as part of a community service Food Pantry. Dinkins, who is accepting donations through Friday, May 25, was motivated by the fact that one in four children suffer from hunger, with the problem becoming more critical during the summer when children arent receiving meals at school. She is accepting boxes or bags of dry cereal (think nutritious), cereal/breakfast bars, toaster pastries and oatmeal. Donations may be dropped off at the Bradford County Church of Starke and Hope Christian Academy. You may also contact Dinkins at 904966-6224 to arrange for pickup or for more information. receives grant for veteran dental health ACORN Clinic is pleased to announce it has received a $30,000 grant from the Disabled American Veterans Charitable Service Trust. These funds will be used to provide preventive and restorative oral health care for low-income disabled veterans with substantial dental needs and who do not have veterans With this grant, ACORN Clinic

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Thursday, May 3, 2018 Telegraph, Times and Monitor B Section 3B Dr. Virgil A. BerryCHIROPRACTIC PHYSICIANServing the area for 29 years. Modern methods with old-fashioned concern. Auto Accidents Work Injuries Headaches Neck and Back Pain Back & Neck Pain Clinic Roof Leaks Re-Roofs Shingles Metal Low Slope Mobile Home Commercial Lifetime Roofs Siding Rotten Wood Replacement FREE ESTIMATES Locally Owned www.LewisWalkerRoofing.comGuaranteed Best Service Guaranteed Best Warranties Guaranteed Best Prices Toll Free 866-959-7663 Starke Rotary would like to thank the sponsors who made our 11th Annual Beast Feast A GREAT SUCCESSFlorida Pest Control. Event Sponsor The Downtown Grill Florida Twin Theater Ferreira Funeral Services VINYL Bradford Eye Center Southern Roots Hair Studio Bradford County Sheriffs Ofce The Bradford Telegraph Bradford Sportsmans Farm Vystar Credit Union Noegels Auto Sales Jones Funeral Home Hampton Lake Bed and Breakfast The Ofce Shop Clay Electric And the many volunteers who gave of their time and talents to allow your Rotary Club to continue to fund the community projects that make the Starke area a great place to live. THANK YOU! BY CLIFF SMELLEY Cotton Malone, the creation of New York Times bestselling author Steve Berry, has been all over the world. In Berrys latest novel, The Bishops Pawn, Malone makes a brief stop in Starke in his travels throughout the Sunshine State. You can thank Starke resident Wanda Smith for that. In fact, Berry, himself, does just that in the acknowledgements section of The Bishops Pawn. Smith has been on several trips Berry takes with his fans, visiting locales he writes about. She and her husband, John, have since become friends with Berry and his wife, Elizabeth, who live in St. Augustine. In fact, it was because of the Smiths that Berry visited the Bradford County Public Library in 2016 for a talk. When Smith found out Berry was writing a book in which the action took place throughout Florida, she told him he needed to include Starke. put Starke in it, Id kill him, Smith said with a laugh. She also suggested Berry include Micanopy, which he did after making a visit to the town and learning that is where one of his favorite movies, Though she knew prior to its publication that The Bishops Pawn would include Starke, Smith never expected to receive thanks in the book. I was really surprised, Smith said. Hes never done that before. Hes never used someone whos traveled with him in the acknowledgements. Thats not to say those who go on Berrys trips dont get in his books. They do as hes used some of their names for characters hes created. Thats how Smith expected to see her name used. He told me I wasnt in this book, that he didnt use my name, Smith said. I thought, OK. Fine. There are other books coming. However, Smith said Berry gave her a smile when he told her that, knowing that he was going to include her in the acknowledgements. chapter 38 of the 61-chapter novel. He describes Starke driving down 301, fast food and things like that. John Smith said, Its not a big thing, but one of the characters supposedly lives here. The Cotton Malone character doesnt stay long as Starke is one of many stops he makes in Florida. He starts out in Dry Tortugas and comes up the coastline, John Smith said. Actually, before making his way up from Dry Tortugas, Cotton Malones journey begins in Jacksonville. One chapter reads, I as cruising on Southside Boulevard in Jacksonville, Florida, listening to the radio. That was a thrill for Wanda Smith to read. I lived off of Southside Boulevard, she said. My childhood home was a block off of Southside Boulevard. I used to catch the bus on Southside Boulevard. Historical thrillers The plots of Berrys novels 13 in the Cotton Malone series and four stand-alones are based upon legends or conspiracy theories involving historical events. Berry worked the rumor of the FBIs involvement in the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. into his plot for The Bishops Pawn. history he can make into some kind of conspiracy thriller, Wanda Smith said. At the end of each book, Berry writes a lengthy authors note, telling readers which parts unproven theory. Being a history major, whenever I read thrillers or something, Id think, Is that true or not? Before Google and the internet, I used to have to go out, Smith said. What I like book I read, is he does it all at the back of the book. You dont have to go to the internet. You dont have to go to a history book. Cotton Malone is a former member of the Magellan Billet, a division of the Justice Department. Malone is retired and runs a bookstore in Copenhagen, but he always winds up being drawn into some international incident, usually by his former boss, Stephanie Nelle. The Bishops Pawn, story, recounting Malones Magellan Billet. The story is perspective. Smith said Berrys plots are fast-moving and added, If you like James Rollins or David Balducci or Lee Child or Karin Slaughter, you would like Steve Berry, too. Enhancing the reading experience to her enjoyment of Berrys novels now that she knows him personally and has been on several of his fan trips. In 2015, she accompanied him on a trip to France, visiting locales featured in The Templar Legacy. Last December, she accompanied him on a trip to Germany, visiting locales featured in The Third Secret and The Charlemagne Pursuit. On the trips, Berry discusses how certain places inspired his ideas. Its interesting to see how a book comes about, Smith said. As one of Berrys fan travelers, Smiths name could be used for a character in an upcoming book. The author is currently working on a novel that takes place in Poland. That, Smith said, would create an ideal opportunity for her name to be used. During the trip Germany, she told Berry to research the name Wanda. The next day, he asked her, Oh, did you want me to do research on the name Wanda because its the most popular female name in Poland? Whenever Berry does include a Wanda in one of his books, what kind of character would Smith like her to be? I dont know, she said, adding, I just would want it to be somebody totally different from what I am so people wont really think its me. If youd like to learn more about Berry, please visit steveberry.org. Author Berry uses Starke in latest Malone thriller Wanda Smith is pictured with author Steve Berry at a which includes Starke as one of the places visited by recurring character Cotton Malone. Malone series. North American wolf packs can feast on bison or elk and then go two weeks before the next kill. But the wolves bodies and brains still perform at high levels as they hunt for their next meal, researchers say. Humans, too, appear welladapted to periods of hunger. This is likely a trait evolved from early human huntergatherers who, like wolves, alternated between periods of feast and famine. The answer as to how the body manages this, University of Florida researchers said, provides insight into an increasingly popular dieting strategy intermittent fasting. UF Health researchers said in a recent study published in the journal Obesity that emerging show intermittent fasting can be a reliable means of weight loss and may optimize physiological functioning, enhance performance, and slow the aging and disease process. To understand why, researchers said, one must look a metabolic switch during fasting. This means the body moves from burning glucose, or sugar, for energy to fatty acids and their byproduct, ketones. During fasting, the body converts fat into fatty acids, which can be absorbed by the blood. Stephen Anton, the division chief of clinical research for the UF College of Medicines department of aging and geriatric research and the papers lead author, said research indicates ketones are the preferred fuel for the brain and body during periods of fasting and extended exercise. Ketones, he said, are a cleaner source of energy than glucose, protein or carbohydrates, the bodys other sources of energy. That is because ketones produce fewer metabolic disrupters, or molecules that can harm cells. This switch can happen after a certain period of time fasting, with the UF Institute on Aging. Its a gradation in which your metabolism over time shifts to use higher and higher amounts of ketones for energy. Typically, he said, after eight to 12 hours of fasting, the levels of ketones in the blood Antons paper looked at two popular forms of intermittent restricted feeding, when the dieter eats during discrete windows during the day. For example, they might fast up to 16 hours a day, eating during the other eight hours. And in that window, the dieter isnt restricted to what they eat. Of course, we recommend healthy food, Anton said. The second approach is called alternate-day fasting. In the more common model of this fasting regimen, people limit their meals on one day, usually 500 calories. On the next day, they can eat anything at all. It can be truly called a feasting day, Anton said. A second version of this fasting method is to eat nothing at all on one day while feasting the next. literature, Anton and his colleagues found that people of 10 clinical trials involving alternate-day fasts. So in my mind, its not a question of whether it works for producing fat loss, Anton said. Three of four time-restricted feeding studies demonstrated In most studies, participants tissue, which is tissue other than fat that includes the bodys organs, muscles and skeleton. An adequate amount of lean tissue, Anton said, is necessary to help maintain good physiological function as people age, among Other forms of dieting, however, often lead to a reduction in both fat and lean tissue, he said. Anton said research in rodents and other nonhuman species points to the possibility that food restriction, and the turning of that metabolic switch, can lengthen lifespan, improve metabolic health, cognitive and physical performance, lower superior cardiovascular health. An important takeaway is that we all have the ability to switch our metabolism from glucose to ketone utilization, said Anton. And that switch has the potential to have profound to the positive changes in body composition. Anton urges anyone considering a new diet to consult with a physician, noting fasting may not be the right for everyone. Co-authors of the paper include William T. Donahoo, an associate professor in the UF College of Medicines division of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism; Stephanie A. Lee, a doctoral student in the UF College of Medicines department of aging and geriatric research and the department of clinical and health psychology in the UF College of Public Health and Health Professions;

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4B Telegraph, Times and Monitor B Section Socials Obituaries 340 E. Walker Drive(SR 100)Keystone Heights 352.473.3176jonesgallagherfh.com P. Steven Futch Funeral DirectorJoe Gallagher Owner/Funeral DirectorWere here for youTo help celebrate a lifeto help say goodbye.Whether your loved one wanted a traditional funeral or a more casual way to bring family and friends together, well help your remembrance be something special. Let us ease the burden and help you celebrate a life in a wonderful way.Complete Funeral Arrangements Pre-planning Assistance Cremation Services Monuments Out of Town Arrangements Spacious and Intimate Facilities O Street Parking Kelli Parks Moreland Funeral Director620 East Nona Street(corner of SR 100)Starke 904.964.6200 620 East Nona Street(corner of SR 100)Starke 904.964.6200 340 E. Walker Drive(SR 100)Keystone Heights 352.473.3176 Cora Carroll LAKE BUTLERCora Reatha Carroll, Dec. 14, 1920 April 26, 2018 Those hands have seen a lot of life, the shiny-eyed nurse said as she looked at Cora Reatha Carroll, called Granny by most, who looked impossibly small in the grip of a hospital bed. Her hands, wrinkled with time and dotted with sunspots, do indeed have a story to tell. In 1920, when Granny was a baby, she reached for the warm embrace of her papa, James Larramore, a good man who wouldnt speak bad about nobody and her mama, Cora Larramore, who didnt always stay out of gossip, but who was a Godly woman nonetheless. With shiny blue eyes and a mop of red hair, she was surely the cutest baby who ever lived. Born into abject poverty, she had to work hard from the start, but her parents taught her to always lend a helping hand. During the Great Depression, they would offer plates of food to stragglers looking for sustenance. During Grannys life, she was always willing to offer help to family, friends, and neighbors. From a young age, little Granny kept her hands busy by helping mama in the kitchen, papa on the farm, and playing cards with her brothers. With eight siblings, she learned if you want to do something the right way, you have to do it yourself. Despite growing up in a time and into a family in which survival took precedence over formal education, Granny always enjoyed learning and reading. As a child, she read the bible with her mama and, though she had to drop out of school after the eighth grade to help at home, Granny remained through millions of pages during her lifetime. In 1938, she gave her hand in marriage to James Carroll, who preceded her in death. They had four amazing children: Frances, Wayne, Sherron, and Kathy. Eventually, she gained three more beloved children: sons-in-law Tom and Donnie and daughter-in-law Shelley. Much to Grannys delight, Tommy, Leeann, EJ, Craig, and Jamie. Then she was blessed with four greatgrandchildren: Lane, TJ, Ryan, and Drew. Grannys absolute love of babies and children kept her spirit young and her heart open. Her family know they are the luckiest people in the world to have known and been loved by such a dynamic woman. When some of her grandchildren were small, theyd stay the night at her house and she would thoroughly spoil them by buying toys and candy, such she woke the children by gently placing her hands on their faces and saying, Babe, huddle cakes are readytheres plenty of syrup. Throughout her life, Granny used her hands to create clothes and quilts. As a child, she learned to sew by piecing newspaper clippings together and by making dresses for her handful of dolls. The dolls were the recipients of her careful attention since she only acquired one a year, for Christmas, and would treat them like her babies. After mastering doll clothes, Granny made dresses for herself, then her mama, then her sisters, and she eventually created and sold clothes within the community. At age 96, when staying in the hospital and sharing stories, she said, I dont want to brag, but Id shoulders swelled with pride and her eyes were bright as she recalled a time when some girls from school found out she was the one who made the dresses, as they thought they were from the store. Ever resourceful, when years, she couldnt sew due to unsteady hands and diminishing eyesight, but needlework was so ingrained in her that towards the end of her life, when she was in the hospital bed and her mind was affected by medication, she thought she was sewing. Her hands, much larger and sturdier than her small but wiry body, would weave the air as she pulled an imaginary needle and thread. Granny kept her hands busy weeding, watering, and nurturing plants. inherited her green thumb from her mama, who also adored gardening. Her longer able to tend to a garden. When she was given indoor plants for gifts, she was a skilled nursing facility and she couldnt water them herself, the plants seemed to bloom and prosper in her presence. She wrapped her hands around many mugs of steaming coffee during her life. When she was a child, they used to know how to make real coffee, as they roasted and ground the beans at home and boiled water on the stove to let them percolate perfectly. Her papa always said, if God made anything better than coffee, he kept it for himself. She judged the quality of a restaurant by its coffeeHeaven forbid they should serve it weak or lukewarmand her family knew to put the pot on before her visits, as she had to have a cup at all times. After she retired and as she aged, she stopped drinking an entire pot a day, but she continued to enjoy her morning cup for the remainder of her life. Despite her petite frame and small appetite for food, she was happiest when making sure her loved ones were fed. Granny used her hands to shuck corn, shell peas, dice potatoes into perfect cubes, salt and stir multiple pots of veggies and meat, slice pies, and serve others. The family would squeeze into her tiny kitchen in her modest house and load plates full of Southern comfort food. She always made enough for an army, whether she was physically unable to produce such massive meals, but her family would recreate the mass feedings and overeating. Granny would sit and observe them as they went back for second and third helpings. She would smile as they laughed and playfully poked fun at one another, perfectly content to be surrounded by her big, crazy family. Grannys hands were always petting and feeding an animal of some kind. Over the years, she had an array of dogs and cats of varying sizes and personalities. Her cat Scott, also known as Pokey, was truly a companion animal who gave her purpose during her Golden years. Thankfully, her daughter, Sherron loves Pokey too; she derived comfort knowing he would be well cared for once she parted this realm. The only animals she truly despised were snakes, so it wasnt unusual for her to take a shotgun or a garden hoe to scare off or decapitate a rogue rattlesnake or two, who were likely sorry theyd slithered into her yard. The same regret was shared by those who underestimated her by thinking she was just a folksy, sugar-sweet little lady who didnt know much. Granny, who didnt suffer fools, and would put people in their place using sharp wit and feisty indignation. Granny used humor to bond with people and deal with lifes challenges. She enjoyed keeping people of their toes and delighted in knowing they thought she was funny. She would use her hands to jokingly point at someone while giving them the stink eye, or to essentially play chicken to see who this little game. A couple months before her passing, she asked to hold a mirror to check sarcastically said, Arent I pretty. In reality, whether as a young, svelte woman with dewy skin and bright red hair, or an elderly woman with coarse grey hair and wrinkled skin, her compassion for others, her intelligence, her kindness, her humility, and her resilient spirit made her one of the most beautiful women to ever exist. She frequently held her hands together to pray to a God she believed in wholeheartedly. Her foundation in her faith enabled her to be the amazing and unique Granny to all, daughter, sister, cousin, aunt, wife, mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, and friend during her time on Earth. She worked tirelessly. She gave love freely. After nearly hundred years of living life to its fullest, it was time for her to let her hands rest. Now she is cradled in the loving hands of God. Arrangements are under the care of Archer Funeral Home, Lake Butler. For more information, please call (386)496-2008. PAID OBITUARY Kenneth Fanton KEYSTONE HEIGHTSKenneth Henry Fanton, 76, of Keystone Heights died suddenly in his home Tuesday, April 24, 2018. He was born in New York State to Raymond G. and Mildred (Perry) Fanton and grew up on a dairy farm. He worked at a car dealership and owned an auto repair shop. He was predeceased by his parents and his brother, Robert G. Fanton. Survivors include: his wife of 52 years, Cyndi; two daughters, Patti (Brian Collins) Tritt of North Carolina and Kathy (David) VanEtten of New York; son, Ken Jr. (Carrie) of Keystone Heights; seven grandchildren; seven greatgrandchildren; brothers, Lester R. (Joan) Fanton and James (Barbara) Fanton of Wellsville. At the request of Fanton his services will be private and the interment will be in Stannards Cemetery at a later date. Arrangements are under the care of Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home, Keystone Heights. KEYSTONE HEIGHTSRuth Naomi (Hokanson) Gawley, age 100, of Keystone Heights passed away Tuesday, April 17, 2018 at Haven Hospice in Gainesville after a brief illness. Ruth was born at home in Porter, Indiana on July 7, 1917, and was the sixth of eight children born to Victor and Anna (Lindblade) Hokanson. As a teenager, Ruth worked in the family grocery store then moved to Chicago, living with her sister, Edith, to attend business college. Following college, Ruth was employed at Armour Meats in Chicago as the secretary in their personnel department. While attending a Lawrence Welk Show, Ruth met Jack Gawley. He was recently discharged from the Navy and worked in his fathers construction company. They were married on June 8, 1947 and set up housekeeping in Chicago. Jack and Ruth moved to Keystone Heights in 1973 when Jack received a job offer at Park of the Palms. Following Jacks death in July of 1982, Ruth continued to be a part of the Park of the Palms community, volunteering in the dining hall into her 90s. She enjoyed the friends and when housekeeping became too much, she moved into the Manor (ALF) at Park of the Palms. She was able to have Paul and his two sons, Rich, Lorie, Jean, Jack and their youngest son and his wife visit in her last days. Ruth is survived by: her and Jacks three children, Jean Gawley (Jack) Strating, Paul (Jill) Gawley, and Richard (Lorie) Gawley. Also left behind family and friends. A memorial service will be held at 3:00 p.m., Thursday, May 10 in the Manor at Park of the Palms. Private family graveside services for Ruth were be made to Stewards Ministries, 1101 Perimeter Dr. Suite 600, Schaumburg, IL 60173. Arrangements are by Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home, Keystone Heights. (352) 473-3176.www.jonesgallagherfh.com PAID OBITUARY Johnny Johnson STARKE Johnny Mitchel Johnson, age 71, of Starke passed away on Monday, April 30, 2018 at his residence with his loving wife by his side. He was born in West Florida in 1946 to the late Frank W. Johnson and Dorthey Lockhart Johnson. Johnny relocated to Bradford County as a teenager. After he was saved by his Lord and Savior, Johnny met the love of his life, Arbutus Pearsall, while attending a church event. They were happily married soon after on Nov. 14, 1975. Johnny was a devoted husband and loving father. He loved his family more than anything and enjoyed spending time with them, especially his grandchildren. He also enjoyed his longtime career as a truck driver for W.S. Saunders Hauling where he worked for over 20 years until retirement. When Johnny wasnt working, he was using his mechanic skills to repair automobiles. He also enjoyed attending Bradford Baptist Church, where he was a member for many years. Johnny was preceded in death by: his parents; his brother, Wayne Johnson; and his sister, Jane Johnson. Johnny is survived by: his loving wife of 42 years, Arbutus Johnson of Starke; his daughter, Jenny (Joseph) Davis of Starke; his brothers, Franklin Irving (Ingrid) Johnson of Green Cove Springs, and Frederick Johnson of Hampton; his grandchildren, Bryan, Shawn, and Erika Davis; and many nieces and nephews. A Going Home Celebration will be held on Thursday, May 3 at 5:00 pm at Arrangements are under the care and direction of V. Todd Ferreira Funeral Services and Archie Tanner Memorial Chapel, Starke. Visit www. ferreirafuneralservices.com to sign the familys guest book. 904-964-5757. PAID OBITUARY Jose SanchezWALDO Jose Alfredo SanchezGutierrez, age 60, of Waldo passed away April 15, 2018 at Shands Hospital in Gainesville. He was born Oct. 28, 1957 in Santa Rosa de Lima Guanajuato Gto, Mexico to Gregorio Sanchez and Maria Peidad Gutierrez Mendez. Jose moved to the area over 45 years ago and was a caretaker at Cypress Grove Farms. He enjoyed tinkering with cars and loved animals especially goats, horses and geese. His favorite pastime was gardening. More than anything Jose loved his family and spending time with them. Jose is predeceased by his parents. Jose is survived by his children, Jennifer (Dylan) Sanchez of Crawfordville, Javier Sanchez of Tallahassee, and Megan (Ever) Pineda of Tallahassee; siblings, Maria Elana Sanchez Gutierrez, Rosa Sanchez Gutierrez, Jose Gutierrez, Ines Adriana Sanchez Gutierrez, Ma Soledad Patricia Gonzalez Gutierrez, Agustin Ignaclo Gonzalez Gutierrez, Jose Juan Gonzalez Gutierrez, Maria Dolores Gonzalez Gutierrez; granddaughters, Adeline Brodie, Teona, Isabella, Meya Pineda. A visitation was held on April 28 at Archie Tanner Memorial Chapel. Arrangements are under the care and direction of V. Todd Ferreira Funeral Services and Archie Tanner Memorial Chapel, Starke. 904-964-5757. Visit www.ferreirafuneralservices.com to sign the familys guest book. PAID OBITUARY Barbara Whaley STARKE Barbara Jean Wilkinson Whaley, 83, of Starke died Wednesday, April 25, 2018 at Windsor Health and Rehabilitation Center in Starke. She was born on May 3, 1934 in Lawtey to the late Wesley and Nellie (Austin) Wilkinson and moved to Starke from Tampa 25 years ago. She was a homemaker and a member of Kingsley Lake Baptist Church. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by: her husband, Thomas George Tom Whaley; and her sister, Daisy Boch. Survivors are: daughters, Lynn Whaley, Kelli (Danny) Luke, Jana (Jerry) Revels all of Starke, Mindi (John) Raymond of Valrico; sisters, Palatka. Also left are twelve grandchildren and eleven great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held at Kingsley Lake Baptist Church on April 27. Interment will be at a later date in Jacksonville National Cemetery. Arrangements are by Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home of Starke. Eaves, wed Kimberly Eaves and Steven Thornton were engaged on Oct. 30, 2014. The bride is the daughter of Donald W. Davis Sr. and stepmother, Cheri Davis of Starke and Deborah Ann Batten (deceased) and stepfather, Stoney Ray Batten. The groom is the son of Richard and Carolyn Thornton (deceased). They plan to be to be married on Saturday, May 5, 2018, 1 p.m. at the Holy Mission of Jesus Christ Church, 625 East Brownlee Street, Starke. Oody graduates jump school at Fort Benning The United States Army Airborne School widely known as Jump School conducts the basic paratrooper (military parachutist) training for the United States armed forces. It is operated by the 1st Battalion (Airborne), 507th Infantry, United States Army Infantry School, Fort Benning, Georgia. The Airborne School conducts the Basic Airborne Course, which is open to troops of both genders from all branches of the United States Department of Defense, and allied military personnel. The vast majority of students at Airborne School come from the U.S. Army. These include soldiers headed for assignments to the 82nd Airborne Division, XVIII Airborne Corps and its subordinate units, 4th BCT 25th Infantry Division, 173rd Airborne BCT, United States Special Operations Command and its subordinate units, 1st battalion 509th infantry regiment, the 1 battalion 143rd

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Hurt over advertisement Dear Editor: Our family has been harassed, stalked and bullied by an individual for a few years now. He has threatened our lives, abused our mother, and went to the extent on exhuming her body and moving it to another county. This was done secretly, without contacting any family members. The Sheriffs the death threats, and has even taken this person into custody, after which the person was put into a mental rehab facility. Unfortunately, the Union County Times/Bradford County Telegraph has been pulled into this harassment. They have been used as a tool to further harass and abuse our family. I understand they may not have time to review or investigate every ad that someone pays to put in the paper, but we are not talking about selling a piece of furniture or a job offer, we are talking about peoples lives. I would ask readers to consider that anything can be printed about you. Remember there are two sides to every story and usually one side is wrong. I plead with the Union County Times/Bradford County Telegraph to consider how words in print can affect peoples lives. Think about what you would be willing to print about someone you know personally. What about Do Unto Others ... What would you do? You would probably take the time to check facts, or you could choose not to print because of consideration or how this does not help anyone to print, but disregard for common courtesy just makes the paper look like a public forum for someones pettiness. The family of Linda Gay Lake Butler Museum thanks Dear Editor: The Rose Crystal Bell was put on in the auditorium of the Santa Fe Cultural Building this past April 19th. Without the support of the community and the businesses in Starke, it would not have been the success it was. The Telegraph and WEAGFM advertised the event. Local about the event. On the night of the play, Dinks and Tony and Als gave a ten percent discount to people bringing in their program. The play was a joint effort between the Matthews Museum and the BHS drama class. The students, led by Mrs. Young did the performance. Chuck Kramer did the 1954 news, both national and local. The museum thanks the community and individuals who made this evening a success. We hope to bring other events for the community. James Love, Chairman Eugene L. Matthews Bradford County Historical Museum. School district should shop local Dear Editor: In response to BHS principal Blyes comments at the Kiwanis Club on April 10. I do agree with Mr. Blye and Ms. Worrell that businesses need to get involved in our schools. I am sold on vocational schooling. This is where I training at the Vo-Tech and it was some of the best training. It even helped us to grow up faster because we were treated like adults. The only problem, as I see it, is that the Bradford County School system does not use enough Starke/Bradford County businesses. There are enough businesses in Bradford County that could handle all of our schools needs so far as maintenance, products, electric, air conditioning, camera/security and of course that the school board uses some businesses but there are more of us that would like some of the schools business. Some of the best times that I have had in my over 34 years in business was with the principal of the middle school when he asked me to sponsor the student of the month award. He thought it was going to be just one student but we made it one student per grade or 3 plaques/trophies plus a cash award per month. This was back in the late 80s, early 90s. We continued with that program for about 3 or 4 years and I have some of those students that still have their plaques come up to me and thank me. What caused this, simple economics, the school board paid me, and I paid the Sporting Chance for the plaque (with the childs name engraved on it). We had a live video presentation and gave back to our school children. Sporting Chance made some very impressive plaques and the children enjoyed receiving them. But had it not been for the work we were doing for the schools, the middle school principal would have probably never met me. This was a win-win for us and the Sporting Chance, but mainly the children won. The school system receives the highest amount of taxes from all residential and business real estate so even more reason that the school system would business. Max Norton, Jr. Pres. Norton Telecom/A+ Alarms Thursday, May 3, 2018 Telegraph, Times and Monitor B Section 5B Letters Miller, Erica Davis, Haley Jones, Shelby Burkhalter, Melanie Sammons, Sabrina Clouser. Serving Families in North Florida since 1973 STARKE OFFICE OPEN 8:30 to 5:00 MON-FRIHwy 301 North, Starke 904-964-2010 (Next to Best Western) The areas largest supplier of Colored GraniteWhen Quality Counts, You Can Count On UsPrimary Location in Lake City at 561 NW Hilton Ave.Member of Better Business Bureau Monument Builders of North America Florida Monument BuildersFL Lic. # F037700 HOME MOBILE HOME B uying or B uilding? Is it insurable? What is the cost?Daryl S. BrewerFREE CONSULTATIONDaryl S. BrewerLicensed Agent386-496-2271dsbrewer@windstream.netINSURANCE PAID BY CSTFRemain AnonymousCALL TOLL FREE (8477) STOPP ERS Submit a TIP ON-LINE at: www. FCCrimeStoppers.com Starke Shriners set record with paper exchange Four members of the Starke Shrine Club spent Saturday handing out information about Shrine hospitals and collecting donations for the facilities in what the Shriners continued for two-and-a-half hours until fatigue set in, Barber added that thanks to the generosity of drivers, the group set a new record for the local paper exchange. Infantry Regiment of the Texas ARNG, divisional Long Range Surveillance Units, the Ranger Assessment and Selection Program, or the Special Forces Chance Oody, a past graduate of Bradford High Class of 2016, recently received his wings while completing Jump School at Fort Benning. Oody, a recipient of the Nomination to West Point Class of 2020, has now been relocated to Fort Bragg, North Carolina, where he will undergo the endurance associated with Course. Continued from 4B On April 6, the Bradford Middle School Intermediate and Concert Bands attended their annual music performance assessment in Minneola, Florida. Both bands were tasked to perform three contrasting pieces of music for Each piece of music is scored in multiple categories with a rating of poor, fair, good, excellent or superior. Bands are then taken to a room and given two pieces of music they have never seen before. The band director is allotted 3-5 minutes of silent (speaking only) rehearsal time to go over the music and then the band must play the music and receive a score. At this years state assessment, both BMS bands received the highest mark, superior, for sight reading and straight superiors across all categories on their stage performance! Professor Jay Watkins from the University of Florida, Band Director Zachary Sullivan from Bradford High School and Everett McConn from Ft. Clark Middle School were guest clinicians that helped to prepare the students this year. The BMS Band would also like to thank Clay Cobb from Williston Junior/Senior High School and Jim Peronto of Bradford County for volunteering their time at the pre-assessment concert. BMS earns straight superiors at assessment

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Telegraph, Times and Monitor B Section Legals B-sect Legals 5/3/18 The New River Community Health Center Board of Directors will meet May 9, 2018, at 395 West Main Street, Lake Butler, FL 32054 from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. 5/3 1tchg-B-sect Tree & Field Services, Inc. 24 Hour Emergency Services Complete Tree Services Land Clearing Privacy, Wood & Farm Fences Debris Removal Firewood & Cooking Wood Residential & Commercial CRIME Bradford County arrests Witnesses trail hit-and-run suspect until deputies arrive Bradford County Bradford deputies arrested a Keystone Heights woman after the 32-year-old allegedly on SR 21 Saturday night. Samantha Lumpkins was arrested for hit-and run and DUI. Bradford deputies took Lumpkins into custody at Chiappinis Gulf Station in Melrose. But the collision occurred four miles away, just south of Trinity Baptist Church in Bradford County. There, Johnny Austin of Keystone Heights said he was driving toward Keystone Heights when he saw an oncoming car cross the centerline and head straight for him. I tried to go in the ditch, but she still clipped me, Austin said. She caught my side and then spun my back end around. Austins car wound up in the Melrose-bound ditch facing Melrose. Auston added that the driver of the other car, a female, lost her left, front tire in the collision, but kept going. Austin said the other driver then drove by the crash scene twice before leaving for good. Neither driver was injured. Ryan and Theida Tusher said they were following behind Austin when they saw the crash occur. We saw the whole thing, said Ryan Tusher, We had to swerve off the road too, added Theida Tusher. the hit-and-run suspect. It wasnt hard. Without a tire, Lumpkins rim and wheel left a trail on S.R. 21 that the Tushers followed to the Melrose convenience store. We pulled up behind her but kept our distance, Ryan said, called 911 and waited for the police to arrive. Inother Bradford County arrests; Demetri Blount, 26, of Jacksonville was arrested April 30 by Bradford deputies on a hold from Clay County. Samuel Reese Box, 23, of Starke was arrested on April possession of drugs. Travis Q, Brown, 36, of Jacksonville was arrested April 30 by Bradford deputies for failure to appear. Marie, Shantell Clark, 38, of Fort Myers was arrested larceny. Ronald Lee Colvin, 58, of Jacksonville was arrested April 30 by Bradford deputies for failure to appear. Allegra Cashun George, 43, of Starke was arrested larceny. Avion Treavon Gunsby, 27, was arrested May 1 by Bradford deputies for possession of marijuana, and an out-of-county warrant (Marion County). Brandi Nicole Harrison, 36, of Glen St. Mary, was arrested April 30 by Bradford deputies on a hold from Baker County for violation of probation. Jason Bernard Howell, 38, of Brooker, was arrested April 28 by Bradford deputies for DUI Unlawful Blood Alcohol. Mark Timothy Kurimay, 36, of Graham, was arrested April 26 by Bradford deputies for two counts of possession of drugs, possession of marijuana and possession of drug equipment. Shiquita Mays, 30, of Lake Butler was arrested April 27 by Bradford deputies on a hold from Union County for aggravated battery. Leroy Roger Mccauley, 42, of Starke was arrested April 28 by Bradford deputies for battery. Jonathan Gregory Norman, 24, of Lake Butler was arrested April 27 by Bradford deputies in a hold from the Department of Corrections for probation violation. Cody Allan Summerlin, 25, homeless, was arrested April 27 by Bradford deputies on an out-of-county warrant (Alachua County) for failure to appear. Ryan Michael Taylor, 25, of Starke, was arrested May 1 by Donald Wayne Thornton, 35, of Starke, was arrested April 30 by Bradford deputies for violation of probation. Christopher Allan Willingham, 44, of Starke, was arrested April 28 by Bradford deputies for battery. Richard William Wright, 45, of Starke, was arrested April 30 by Bradford deputies for sexual assault. Brent Antonio Young, 29, of Green Cove Springs, was arrested April 26 by Bradford deputies for violation of probation. Suspect arrested for burglaries Clay County Clay County deputies arrested a suspect in six Keystone Heights-area burglaries. Cirocco David Fox, 26, of Keystone Heights was arrested April 15 on unrelated charges but was interviewed as a person of interest in a number of break-ins which occurred over the last few months in the Lake Region. by photograph in all of the cases. at a residence on Appomattox Avenue on Feb. 14. According to the arrest report, Fox entered the dwelling while it was unoccupied and stole items from the inside. Fox is also accused of a Feb. 16 burglary, at a home on Silver Sands Circle. In this incident, the arrest report states that Fox entered the unoccupied dwelling and stole a tablet, a laptop, paper currency and a box of condoms. There was no forced entry and it is believed that the suspect entered the residence through an unlocked door. The third break-in occurred on Feb. 25, about a block away from the Silver Sands Circle burglary. A house-sitter told investigators that she noticed items missing and reported the burglary. Missing are guns, a four-wheeler, two book bags, a variety of ammunition and other small items. Deputies also linked Fox to a Feb. 25 theft on Hillridge Road. According to an arrest report, early on Feb. 26, the owner of a backyard shed noticed the door open and a motorcycle stored in the structure missing. Deputies found the bike nearby, leaning against a utility pole. However, they did not recover other items missing from the shed, including woodworking tools. Another break-in occurred on Silver Sands Circle on March 7. In that incident, the resident noticed his back gate open the next day and informed law enforcement. The victim was in the process of moving and noticed several boxes of items missing from the home, including one marked electronics and another containing several bottles of liquor. Also missing was a tool set and some laundry soap. March 18 on Rollins Street. The victim reported that he had been out grocery shopping with his disabled mother and left his 2007 Hyundai running at the curb in front of the residence while he walked her inside. When he tried to return to the vehicle a short time later, he found it missing. Charged this time with grand by the victim as a former friend. The victim added that he never gave Fox permission to drive the car. In other Clay County arrests: Rebekah Louise Hall, 29, was arrested April 30 by Clay deputies in Keystone Heights for retail petty theft, and possession of drug equipment. Robert Dalton Thornton, 32, was arrested April 28 by Clay deputies in Keystone Heights for domestic battery. used to capture Union County man Pierre Louis Williams, 21, of Lake Butler was arrested April 25 by Union Deputy Charles Townsend for aggravated assault with a deadly weapon without intent to kill, possession of a weapon by a convicted weapon), drug possession (controlled substance without a prescription) and felony violation of probation. According to the arrest report, Townsend responded to a call in reference to a disturbance on SW 126 th Ave. in Lake Butler. Dispatch had advised that a male and a female at this residence had been arguing verbally earlier in the day, but that the male was now in the possession of to shoot her and any police present. The female was able to get away from the male Williams. When she made contact with deputies at the scene she said Williams was and had discharged one twice. She described the guns as a .45 pistol and a 9 mm pistol. She said Williams had threatened to shoot her and law enforcement. She said she had last seen the .45 in the car, and that Williams had the other pistol and was going out the back door of the home. She also said he had extended the stock of the 9 mm to make reported that Williams told her that he had taken 7 to 9 Zanax pills and she thought that was why he was acting as if he was intoxicated and could not walk. Sheriff Brad Whitehead and Captain Lynn Williams were RMC K-9 and SWAT Leader Sgt. Andrews were activated and arrived at the scene, taking command. Deputies surrounded the house and the female was allowed to retreat to a safe location with family. Bradford/Union SWAT was able to take Williams into custody without incident. After the residence had been cleared, the female gave deputies permission to search the residence and vehicle, which were photographed before the search began. The the car. During the search, deputies noticed a game camera behind the residence, outside the residences back door which appeared to be operational. The camera was taken as evidence. Also found inside the vehicle were seven Zanax pills stored in a clear plastic bag. Williams in currently on felony probation, of which he only had four months left. Ethan Paul Crawford, 16, of Raiford was arrested on April 26 by Union deputies on a Union County Take into Custody Warrant for burglary of a dwelling, unarmed with no assault or battery and larceny theft of $300 or more but less than $5,000 and another Union County Take into Custody Warrant for burglary of a structure or conveyance, unarmed, without persons inside and a second count of larceny. In ther Union County arrests: Dalton Wayne Elixson, 16, of Lake Butler was arrested April 27 by Union deputies on a Union County warrant for armed burglary of a dwelling or conveyance, larceny robbery by sudden snatching Caleb Michael Glaspy, 16, of Lake Butler was arrested April 27 by Union deputies for armed burglary of a dwelling structure or conveyance, larceny grand by sudden snatching with a Justin Lee Lanterman, 16, of Lake Butler was arrested April 25 by Union Deputy Jason Lepanto on a Union County warrant for burglary of a structure of conveyance, unarmed without persons inside and larceny, theft of $300 but not more than $5,000 and another warrant for another count of burglary of a dwelling structure or conveyance, unarmed, without persons inside and another count of larceny. Shiquita Semon Mays, 30, of Lake Butler was arrested by Union deputies for aggravated battery person uses a deadly weapon, a second-degree felony. Willie Jerome Newsome, 18, was arrested April 27 by Union deputies for distribution of marijuana, possession of narcotic equipment and on a warrant for armed burglary of a dwelling structure or conveyance, larceny grand by sudden snatching with a Torrence Demetrious Reed, 23, of Lake Butler was arrested April 27 by Union deputies on a warrant for distribution of marijuana, possession of marijuana with intent to sell, manufacture or deliver within 1,000 feet of public housing, and possession and/or use of narcotic equipment. Susan Alison Shuler, 37, of Lake Butler was arrested April 26 by Union Deputy Robert Fipps on an out-ofcounty warrant. Bradley Ryan Spiegel, 15, of Lake Butler was arrested April 27 by Union deputies on a Union County warrant for armed burglary of a dwelling structure or conveyance, larceny grand theft of a weapon. William Ira Tillman, 48, of Lake Butler was arrested April 27 by Union Deputy Shelby Seay Ellis on a Union County warrant for felony violation of probation. Pennie Arla Waldron, 52, of Lake Butler was arrested April 28 by Union Deputy David Gladding for delivering/distributing drugs (methamphetamine), possession and/or use of narcotic equipment and smuggling contraband into prison (a controlled substance). Curtis Donell Watkins, 44, of Lake Butler was arrested by Union Deputy Shelby Seay Ellis on a Union County Warrant for sexual assault on a victim over 12 years of age with physical force but no damage. Arch G. Mainous III, the Florida Blue Endowed Professor of Health Administration and chair of health services research, management and policy in the UF College of Public Health and Health Professions; Christiaan Leeuwenburgh, a professor and chief of the UF College of Medicines division of biology with the UF Institute on Aging; and researchers from The Johns Hopkins University and the National Institute on Aging Intramural Research Program, both in Baltimore.

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Thursday, May 3, 2018 Telegraph, Times and Monitor B Section 7B T h e h i r i n g o f a l a w y e r i s a n i m p o r t a n t d e c i s i o n t h a t s h o u l d n o t b e b a s e d s o l e l y u p o n a d v e r t i s e m e n t s B e f o r e y o u d e c i d e a s k u s t o s e n d y o u i n f o r m a t i o n a b o u t o u r q u a l i f i c a t i o n s a n d e x p e r i e n c e STARKE LANDSCAPE & OUTDOORSMAY 12thOPEN 7 am-3 pm FREE HOTDOGS AND HAMBURGERS From 11am-2pm 3rd Annual 904-964-3112 1469 S Walnut St. Starke, FL 32091 BY CLIFF SMELLEY Keystone Heights High School struggled against Newberry pitcher Brett Baron, who gave up four hits and struck out seven in 6.2 innings as the third seed Panthers defeated the fourth seed Indians 3-1 in the April 30 the District 5-5A baseball tournament in Keystone. Connor Osteen pitched a complete game for the Indians (9-16), giving up six hits and one walk, while striking though, couldnt generate much stranded in scoring position. Kaison Harvey went 2-for-3 with a double, but the rest of the team went a combined 2-for-23. Harvey put the Indians up 1-0 in the third inning when he singled and eventually scored on an error. Newberry (15-8) answered with two runs in the bottom half of the inning, with one run scoring on a passed ball and ground out. The Panthers advanced to play second seed P.K. Yonge in a regular season didnt go very well, either, as the Indians lost games to Ridgeview, Clay and Buchholz. Host Ridgeview erased a 4-0 on April 24. Andrew Cox, Alex Kanos and Gary Searle each had an RBI, with Kanos going 2-for-3. Cox and Trey Alsabrook each hit a double, while Nate Gagnon went 2-for-3. Alsabrook pitched three innings of scoreless relief, giving up two hits. On April 25, Gagnon and Kanos each had three RBI, but it wasnt enough as visiting Clay handed the Indians a 23-8 loss in Gagnon and Kanos each went 3-for-3, while Osteen went 2-for2. Keystone managed just two which was a 9-0 road loss to Buchholz. Cox had both hits, going 2-for3. BHS Alvarez to play football at Kentucky Christian BY CLIFF SMELLEY If one thing can be said about Bradford High School senior Jakob Alvarez, its that when he sets a goal, he reaches it. One goal was to continue playing football. He gets the chance after receiving a scholarship from Kentucky Christian University, which is located in the city of Grayson. Im just excited, Alvarez said following an April 25 signing ceremony in the BHS media center. Just to get to play college football thats what Ive been waiting for. BHS Head Coach Brian Alvarez when he was hired last May. Alvarez told his new coach he was going to win a state championship in weightlifting, which he did earlier this month. Tomlinson said after football season was over, Alvarez said he wanted to play college football. I do believe he can do anything he puts his mind to, Tomlinson said. Alvarez, an offensive lineman, said a couple of other schools, such as Point University in West Point, Georgia, were interested in him, but he believes he made the right choice in selecting Kentucky Christian. He became convinced of when he was shown around its campus by coaches. He said to himself, Yeah. This is where I want to go. The schools nursing program was an appeal also, as was the fact Alvarez said Grayson feels a lot like Starke to him. I felt right at home, he said. Tomlinson said one of the biggest assets Alvarez who received second-team Gainesville Sun All-Area and Florida Times-Union All-First Coast honors this past season possesses as an offensive lineman is his attitude. A lot of people say they want mean and nasty offensive linemen, Tomlinson said. He is, but the great thing about him is hes only mean and nasty for that four six seconds of the play. After that, hes a great person a great, young man with a bright future. Tomlinson said Alvarez still has techniques to learn about playing on the line, but that will come once he gets into college and is around coaches who will devote a lot of time to teaching him. He has a few things hes still going to have to learn, but hes a quick learner, Tomlinson said. Hes smart. Hes intelligent. He understands what has to be done. Then you throw in the fact that hes so strong. Being a quick learner and being as strong as he is it makes it a lot easier as a coach to have an offensive lineman like that. Alvarez played tackle at BHS, but that could possibly change. He may have to end up making a change from tackle to somewhere like center, Tomlinson said, but if anybody can do it, he can. It doesnt matter to Alvarez. contributing. Wherever they put me, Ill play, he said. The Kentucky Christian Knights are coached by Corey Fipps, who is entering his third season. The team went 4-18 his KCU plays at the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics level and is a member of the National Christian College Athletic Association. The Knights play football in the Bluegrass Division of the MidSouth Conference. When asked what itll feel time as a college player, Alvarez said, Probably a little nervewracking, obviously, because you dont know anybody. His high school coach thinks I think Kentucky Christians getting a hard-working young man, Tomlinson said. I can tell you, theyre going to fall in love with him. Theyre going to get going to want to let him off the hes out there. intent to play football at Kentucky Christian University. BY CLIFF SMELLEY Jacob Polk went 2-for-3 and scored three runs, but the rest of his teammates couldnt get anything off Palatka pitcher Chandler Mullins, who gave up four hits and struck out 13 as the seventh seed Panthers defeated the sixth seed Tornadoes 18-3 of the District 5-5A baseball tournament at Keystone Heights High School. run when Tucker Stack was hit by a pitch with the bases loaded. His second came on a steal of home from third, while his third came off a Stack single. Palatka had no trouble against four Bradford pitchers, getting 17 hits. eight games, ended its season with an 8-14 record. Palatka (11-15) advanced to past Tuesday to play top seed Santa Fe. Bryant makes a throw to by a pitch in the third inning. \Jacob Polk watches a pitch come in. He was the only Bradford batter with multiple hits, one of which was a double.

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Telegraph, Times and Monitor B Section Breakfast at Grannies, reading the Telegraph and watching Chris Forbach and Chuck Trotter may not live in Bradford County, but after a year working out of their Elite Automotive shop at the corner of U.S. 301 and Pratt Street, the two are very comfortable with Starke and the surrounding area. But more importantly, Bradford County residents have gotten very comfortable with Chris and Chuck. Their small-town outlook: Chris lives in Hawthorne and Chuck in MacClenney, their honesty and the pride they take in their work have made them a favorite, not only of individuals but also of businesses and governmental entities within the county. Ask them what they appreciate most about owning their own business and the answer may surprise you. Were grateful for the relationships were building around here, said Chris. And were thankful for the large number of referrals weve gotten from our new friends here, added Chuck. I mean, the best compliment you could have is for one of your customers to send a friend to you: We came because so-and-so said you guys are the best. All weve heard are good things about you. Its gratifying and humbling to know that our customers not only trust us with their vehicles but also trust us with their friends, Chuck added. Although the pair opened Elite Automotive a little over a year ago, they spent nearly a month refurbishing the former site of Corbetts Auto Repair before opening the doors: remodeling equipment. Since that time, theyve invested more money into the operation with a new, fourpost, 14,000 lbs.-capacity truck lift and a new state-of-the-art alignment machine. The new equipment gives the guys the capability to use the technical expertise they have accumulated over three decades. Chris worked for 31 years as a shop foreman for Chrysler and is a 5-star Chrysler technician. Chuck has owned several automotive repair businesses in Florida and has been a service manager with Ford Lincoln Mercury. Both men are ASE But there are some things they dont test for on the ASE exams: like honesty, building trust and valuing relationships over money. Chuck and Chris believe those values are just as important, maybe even more important than their technical know-how. And its what they dont do that is more important as things they do. They dont take on business they cant handle; they dont use lowball pricing and then cut corners on quality; and they wont tell you that you need to replace a part when its not true. Theyre just regular guys who know a lot about cars and appreciate their friends in Bradford County. The two met on the NHRA drag racing circuit and became friends after Chris was involved in a bad crash. The friendship grew over time from two guys who competed together to two guys with common interests, both at the track and away from it. They also discovered that they shared the same business values: and pride in workmanship. Thats why they came to way of doing business: building a reputation for quality work and fair prices, would work better in a small community than in the big city. Funny thing is, now people in the big city, like Jacksonville and Ponte Vedra are driving to Starke to have their cars worked on. Turns out that small-town values are appreciated in the big city too. Elite Automotive offers a full range of auto repair services, including brake work, engine repair, tune-ups, air conditioning service and repair and front-end alignment and repair. They also offer new and used tires and tire repair. The shop is equipped with complete state-of-the-art diagnostic equipment that allows them to interface with a cars computer and detect problems. and correcting electrical problems in vehicles. Just regular guys Elite Automotive marks one-year anniversary in Starke

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expects to provide dental care for nine to 15 disabled veterans. Care provided will include annual exams and treatment planning, bi-annual cleanings, and restorative care as needed, dentures and partial dentures. ACORN Clinic intends that after initial treatment these veterans will be able to able to sustain their dental health with ongoing preventive oral healthcare and avoid dental emergencies in the future. Serving the underserved is an important part of ACORNs mission. Our disabled veterans deserve a spotlight on supporting their health care, including their oral health, said Candice King, ACORN Clinic executive director. The Disabled American Veterans Charitable Service Trust has awarded the ACORN Clinic with over $75,000 in funding from 2011 to present. Over the years these funds have been used to provide dental care services for veterans in the community. With the trusts continued funding, the ACORN Clinic is able to better serve this special group of veterans. ACORN Clinic (Alachua County Organization for Rural located in rural northern Alachua County that provides affordable medical, dental and social services care for residents of north central Florida. If you or someone you grant, contact ACORN Dental Clinic at 352-485-2772 or visit http://acornclinic.org for more information. BY CLIFF SMELLEY Meghan Harris and Jade Hines will represent Bradford High School at the Florida High School Athletic Association Track and Field Finals after their performances at the April were hosted by Orlandos First Academy. The top four individuals in each event earned the right to advance to state, which will be held Friday and Saturday, May 4-5, at the University of North Florida in Jacksonville. events she competed in, placing Thursday, May 3, 2018 Telegraph, Times and Monitor B Section 9B Bradford resident Sutton to play baseball at Delgado Contact me today at 904-364-0123 Dawn Corbett DAWN CORBETT AGENCY INC 116 N Walnut St Starke, FL 32091 904-364-0123 dawn@corbettagency.net We are an insurance agency, that means we work for you. My job is to protect your family. AUTO CLASSIC CAR BOAT RV MOTORCYCLE RENTERS UMBRELLAD C Contact me today at 904-364-0123 Dawn Corbett DAWN CORBETT AGENCY INC 116 N Walnut St Starke, FL 32091 904-364-0123 dawn@corbettagency.netWe are an insurance agency, that means we work for you. My job is to protect your family.AUTO CLASSIC CAR BOAT RV MOTORCYCLE RENTERS UMBRELLAD C Contact me today at 904-364-0123 Dawn Corbett DAWN CORBETT AGENCY INC 116 N Walnut St Starke, FL 32091 904-364-0123 dawn@corbettagency.net We are an insurance agency, that means we work for you. My job is to protect your family.AUTO CLASSIC CAR BOAT RV MOTORCYCLE RENTERS UMBRELLAD C Insurance AUTO HOMEMOTORCYCLE MOBILE HOME BOAT RENTERS UMBRELLACLASSIC CAR RV Insurance AUTO HOMEMOTORCYCLE MOBILE HOME BOAT RENTERS UMBRELLACLASSIC CAR RV Insurance AUTO HOMEMOTORCYCLE MOBILE HOME BOAT RENTERS UMBRELLACLASSIC CAR RV Insurance AUTO HOMEMOTORCYCLE MOBILE HOME BOAT RENTERS UMBRELLACLASSIC CAR RV Insurance AUTO HOMEMOTORCYCLE MOBILE HOME BOAT RENTERS UMBRELLACLASSIC CAR RV Insurance AUTO HOMEMOTORCYCLE MOBILE HOME BOAT RENTERS UMBRELLACLASSIC CAR RV Insurance AUTO HOMEMOTORCYCLE MOBILE HOME BOAT RENTERS UMBRELLACLASSIC CAR RV Insurance Agency rfn ntb rtrr AUTO BOAT RV HOME OWNER LIFE INSURANCE MOTORCYCLE RENTERS UMBRELLA advance to district title game with 12-2 win BY CLIFF SMELLEY Four players drove in two runs each as the Union County High School baseball team defeated second seed Crescent City 12-2 of the District 6-1A tournament on May 1 in Lake Butler. The third seed Tigers (17-8) play for the district championship on Thursday, May 3, at 6:30 p.m. against either top seed Williston or fourth seed Hilliard. Union scored four runs in each Rogers drove in two runs on a Davis drove in two off a triple in the second. Whip Davis and Matthew Starling each had two RBI as well, with Davis going 3-for4. Leadoff batter Skyler Shatto went 2-for-4. innings, giving up six hits and two walks, while striking out three. He also picked off two BY CLIFF SMELLEY P.K. Yonges baseball team attempted to extend its season this the District 5-5A tournament, but regardless of the outcome, there is more baseball in Austin Suttons future after he accepted a scholarship from New Orleans Delgado Community College. I love it, said Sutton, who lives in Bradford County and is the son of Brian and Elizabeth Sutton. Thats all Ive ever wanted to do, go to college and play baseball and get my education. Im going to be able to do that. The grandson of Monica Clements and Ken and Glenda Sutton all Bradford County residents as well said Delgado interest in him. He took a visit to the school and was surprised to receive an offer during that visit. It didnt really kick in until I got home and was talking to my parents about it, Sutton said. It was great. Sutton said, explaining, They campus up there is beautiful. All the players are nice. Theyre a family up there. This year (through April 30) for P.K. Yonge, Sutton has hit a team-leading 13 doubles. He currently has a .432 batting average, which is third on the team, and has 28 RBI, which is second on the team. He is 22-for22 on stolen-base attempts. As a junior, Sutton broke the P.K. Yonge record for stolen bases in a season with 33. The old record was 26 set in 1981. Sutton also batted .375 as a junior and earned second-team Gainesville Sun All-Area honors. Though he plays shortstop now, that may change at Delgado. Theyre talking about me maybe playing second base, Sutton said. with him. Sutton said. In looking at his game, Sutton said he needs to work on his discipline at the plate and do a better job or recognizing balls and strikes. He also needs to prepare to adapt to a different level of play. Next year is going to be a lot faster, he said. Sutton, of course, hopes to move on to a four-year school after two years at Delgado. He said playing for LSU would be a dream. Delgado, as of press time, was 33-17. The Dolphins head coach is Joe Scheuermann, who is in his 27th season. When asked what it will feel Dolphin, Sutton said, Its going to be amazing, I know that. I just cant wait for it. at P.K. Yonge, accepted a scholarship to play baseball at with his sister, Lila, at his signing ceremony. His parents, Brian and Elizabeth Sutton, are pictured standing behind him. compete in 2 state events for KHHS BY CLIFF SMELLEY Alex Guy is the only Keystone athlete who will be advancing to the the 800m and 1600m at the Region 25 at Orlandos First Academy. event earned the right to compete in the Florida High School Athletic Association Finals, which will be held Friday and Saturday, May 4-5, at the University of North Florida in Jacksonville. the 800m with a time of 1:59.37. Tavares Dalton Brown won the event with a time of 1:57.47. In the 1600m, Guy earned the last state-qualifying spot ahead of of 4:32.36. Brown had a time of 4:32.38. The times for Guys races at state are 10:30 a.m. on Friday, May 4, for the 800m and 5 p.m. on Saturday, May 5, for the 1600m. spots out of qualifying for state in the 1600m, placing sixth with a time of 5:25.91. Williams also placed seventh in the 320mm with a time of 12:43.23. Others competing for Keystone included Marcus McGruder, who was in three events: high jump (55.75), long jump (18-5.25) and triple jump (38-2.75). The boys team was also represented by Raymond Anderson in the discus (112-11) and by Guy, Ryan Williams, Garrett Stanley and Jerry Payne in the 4x400m relay (3:41.39). The girls 4x400m relay team of Danielle Garvey, Haley Phillips, Lindssay Schrader and Jessi Yeldell 4:37.59. As individuals, Phillips competed in the 1600m (5:47.31), while Yeldell competed in the high jump (4-6). Victoria Bannon also competed, running a time of 19.93 in the 100m hurdles. Harris, Hines to compete at state for BHS Meghan Harris will participate in three events hurdles and triple jump. She will also be joined at state by teammate Jade Hines, who will compete in the long jump. fourth in each one. She jumped 34-11 in the triple jump, earning the last state-qualifying spot ahead of Lake Highland Preps Payton Sorensen, who jumped 33-9.5. In the 300m hurdles, Harris edged out Orlando Jones Destini Franklin for the last qualifying spot with a time of 49.40 (Franklin had a time of 49.43), while in the 400m, Harris posted a time of 59.51 to beat out Trinity Catholics Sarah Richmond, who had a time of 59.57. Hines competed in two events and will advance in the long jump after jumping 1611.25, which was good for third. Hines also competed in the 200m, placing seventh with a time of 26.96. On Friday, May 4, at state, Harris will compete in the 400m preliminaries at 1:10 p.m. and the 300m hurdles preliminaries held Saturday, May 5, with the 400m starting at 3:30 p.m. and the 300m hurdles starting at 4 p.m. Hines will compete in the long at state at 5 p.m. on May 4. Harris will compete in the triple jump at 10:30 p.m. on May 5. Jeremiah Vaughn just missed out on advancing in the 200m. 22.90, which left him trailing Orlando Jones Jadan Robinson, who had a time of 22.62. Vaughn also competed in the 100m, placing sixth with a time of 11.18. Jordan Hill placed eighth in the high jump (5-7.75), while Travis Lee was 11th in the triple jump (39-1). Continued from 2B

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Telegraph, Times and Monitor B Section 40 Notices EQUAL HOUSING OP PORTUNITY. All real estate advertising in this newspaper is sub ject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 in which makes it illegal to advertise any pref erence, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimina tion. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custo dians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children un der 18. This newspa per will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate in which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwell ings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination, call HUD toll-free at 1-800669-9777, the toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. For further information call Florida Commission on Human Relations, Lisa Sutherland 850-4887082 ext #1005 42 Motor Vehicles & Accessories $CASH$ FOR JUNK cars, up to $500. Free pick up, running or not. Call 352-771-6191. 45 Land For Sale FOR SALE. Building lot on 17th Ave near Golf Course. For Sale on termspay $199/mo. No interest. Until you receive construction or Call 904-364-9022. 47 Commercial Property (Rent, Lease, Sale) OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT. Keystone Heights next to W.D. large conference room, kitchen, 2/BA, parking. $1000/per mo. on con tract. For info call 904364-9022. OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT. Keystone Heights next to W.D. large conference room, kitchen, 2/BA, parking. $1000/per mo. on con tract. For info call 904364-9022. DOWNTOWN STARKE for rent. 113 E. Call St. Call Freddie American Dream Realty at 904509-9893. OFFICE LOCATION next for retail or can be made Call 904-364-9022. 48 Homes For Sale 2 HOUSES FOR SALE/ LEASE TO BUY. Must have credit score of 660+ 3BR/2BA house. ers, Jacuzzi tub, gas Lake access. Post Mas ters Village in Keystone Heights. $1000/mo.$1050/mo. plus 1 month deposit. Call Dave 352-473-3560. 50 For Rent WE HAVE 2 OR 3 bed room MH, clean, close to prison. Call 352-4681323 NEWLY RENOVATED mobile homes. 3 BR/ 2 BA DW and 2 BR/ 2 BA. (One) 16x80 2 BR/2 BA. Lake Butler. 1-678-4386828 WALK TO KEYSTONE SCHOOL. 2BR/1BA duplex. $700/mo. plus deposit. 352-478-9104. 53 A Yard Sales HUGE 2-FAMILY yard sale. Thurs. 8-3, Fri. 8-? 604 Melton Terr. (behind Winn-Dixie) Something for men, women & kids. YARD SALE; Raiford Cal vary Temple in Raiford. Sat. 8:30-? Furniture, clothes, baby items & misc. SIDEWALK SALE at Car Bessent Rd. Thurs day and Friday 11am6pm. GARAGE SALE; Sat. 8am-2pm. Furniture, dishes, etc. 8616 SE 11th Ave. YARD SALE; Fri. & Sat. 8-12, household items, clothes, furniture. Take Bessent at Shands 3rd road to left. 368 East Mi mosa HUGE YARD Sale Fri/ Sat 8 a.m-2 p.m 2 1/2 miles pass Vo tech on 59th Loop Carpentry and Concrete tools, house wares and much more. 53 B Keystone Yard Sales HUGE YARD SALE, Fri, Sat. 8am-3pm. 6311 Baker Road, Keystone Heights. Household items, variety of cloth ing, too much to list. Lots and lots of books. All books are free. Ev No early birds. 53 C Lake Butler Yard Sales VENDOR YARD SALE event. May 4th & 5th. 15664 W SR 238 Lake Butler, (1 mile from town on left). 8:30-? 55 Wanted WORKING SINGLE mom w/one child looking for MH/House to rent. 2/3BR preferably quiet area around Lawtey or Starke. Need immedi ately. Have a job and references. Please call 904-635-1989 Sonja or 904-364-6681 Janice 57 For Sale YOU PICK BLUEBER RIES$3/per pound. We pick for you$4/ per pound. 7 days a week, 8am-6pm. Off hwy 100, a quarter mile East of Grandin. 386-336-0949 or 386-937-6839. 58 Child/Adult Home Care 24-HOUR HOME DAY CARE. All ages. Excel lent reference. 40 yr tions. CPRFirst aid. Starke, Fl area. Betty 740-534-3282 (Cell) xcellentnanny@yahoo. com (email.) 65 Help Wanted LAKE BUTLER HOSPITAL Facility and Main tenance Technician Pharmacy Tech Please visit our web site www.lakebutler hospital.com for more out an application. PH. 386.496.2323 Ext 9258, Fax 386.496.2105 Equal Employment Op portunity / Drug & To bacco Free Workplace INDUSTRIAL COMMER CIAL CONSTRUCTOR. $12-$25/per hour. Must be willing to come to Raiford to pick me up. Will pay transportation. Jimmy, 904-263-6719 LAKE BUTLER HOSPITAL Systems Administrator Please visit our web site www.lakebutler hospital.com for more out an application. PH. 386.496.2323 Ext 9258, Fax 386.496.2105 Equal Employment Op portunity / Drug & To bacco Free Workplace WEST FRASER LAKE BUTLER MILL is ac cepting applications for a Second Shift Store room Clerk. This is an evening position with some weekends if need ed. Duties will include receiving inventories and handling purchase orders. Computer skills are a must. A high school diploma or equil valent is required. This is a salary Non-exempt and paid vacation. Inter ested applicants should apply online at www. westfraser.com. DUMP TRUCK/ EQUIPMENT OP ERATOR Position Union Coun ty Road Dept. Seeking full-time, Mon day-Friday, 7:30 a.m.4:00 p.m. Applicant must possess a high school diploma or GED, have a valid Florida at least a Class B/CDL. Responsible for the safe any heavy equipment ; primarily dump trucks, loaders and backhoe. Must have a minimum of one to three years of re lated experience. Must pass a pre-employment drug screen, physical and DOC background check. Must be able to lift/move 50 pounds and occasionally up to 100 pounds. Apply in per son at the Union County Road Dept, 15285 SW 84th Street, Lake Butler, Florida or Union County Board of County Com 1st Street, Lake Butler, Florida. Union County is an equal opportuni ty employer and gives Veterans preference. Applications will be ac cepted until 4:00 p.m. on May 9, 2018. LAKE BUTLER HOSPITAL Director of Envi ronmental Services Please visit our web site www.lakebutler hospital.com for more out an application. PH. 386.496.2323 Ext 9258, Fax 386.496.2105 Equal Employment Op portunity / Drug & To bacco Free Workplace THE BRADFORD COUN TY Solid Waste Depart ment is accepting appli part-time Site Attendant and Relief Driver at a pay rate of $12.00 per hour. Applicants must possess a High School Diploma or G.E.D and a CDL Class B License. Applications along with a detailed job descrip tion may be obtained from the Solid Waste Department, located at 925 N. Temple Av enue, Suite E, Starke, Florida 32091 or from the county website at www.bradfordcountyfl. gov. The deadline for accepting applications is Friday, May 18, 2018, before the close of busi ness. Bradford County is an Equal Opportunity Employer. For inquiries, please contact Solid Waste Director, Bennie Jackson at (904) 9666212. THE BRADFORD COUN TY Solid Waste De partment is accepting applications for a qual tendant at a pay rate of $10.00 per hour. Ap plicants must possess a High School Diploma or G.E.D. Applications along with a detailed job description may be obtained from the Solid Waste Department, lo cated at 925 N. Temple Avenue, Suite E, Starke, Florida 32091 or from the county website at www.bradfordcountyfl. gov. The deadline for accepting applications is Friday, May 18, 2018, before the close of busi ness. Bradford County is an Equal Opportunity Employer. For inquiries, please contact Solid Waste Director, Bennie Jackson at (904) 9666212. THE CITY OF LAWTEY is taking application for maintenance supervi sor. Applicant must be able to pass a non-DOC supervisor class and background to get in mate labor. Must be able to install and read water meters, repair water mains and other water related issues. A lev el III water distribution system operator class and license must be ob tained if not already cer full job discription can be picked up at Lawtey City Hall, 2793 Lake St. Law tey, FL. 32058, between the hours of 7 a.m. and 4 p.m.. Applications are due by May 17, 2018 at 4 p.m. This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer. We are also a drug free work place. HANDYMAN SERVICES and tractor work. Please 796-2136. RETAIL SALES/CASHIER position available, apply at Gator II Farm Supply. South of Starke on Hwy 301. HS Diploma re quired. Tri-County Classifieds Bradford Union Clay Reach over 27,000 Readers Every Week!INDEX40 Notice 41 Vehicles Accessories 42 Motor Vehicles 43 RVs & Campers 44 Boats 45 Land for Sale 46 Real Estate Out of Area 47 Commercial Property Rent, Lease, Sale 48 Homes for Sale 49 Mobile Homes for Sale 50 For RentWord Ad Classified Tuesday, 12:00 noon Classified Display Tuesday, 12:00 noon 964-6305 473-2210 496-2261 NOTICEClassified Advertising should be paid in advance unless credit has already been established with the newspaper. A $3.00 service charge will be added to all billing to cover postage and handling. All ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser at the time of placement. However, the classified staff cannot be held responsible for mistakes in classified advertising taken by phone. The newspaper rese rves the right to correctly classify and edit all copy or to reject or cancel any advertisements at any t ime. Only standard abbrevations will be accepted.63 Love Lines 64 Business Opportunity 65 Help Wanted 66 Investment Opportunity 67 Hunting Land for Rent 68 Rent to Own 69 Food Supplements 70 Money to Lend 72 Sporting Goods 73 Farm Equipment 74 Computers & Computer Accessories 51 Lost/Found 52 Animals & Pets 53 Yard Sales 54 Keystone Yard Sales 55 Wanted 56 Trade or Swap 57 For Sale 58 Building Materials 59 Personal Services 60 Secretarial Services 61 Scriptures 62 Vacation/TravelCLASSIFIED DEADLINES TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED USE YOUR PHONE (904) 964-6305 (352) 473-2210 (386) 496-2261 Classified Ads Where one call does it all! 904-964-6305 Lake Property Liquidation Foreclosure Resale $39,900 Before Foreclosure sold for $137,900 Financing Available. Being sold off May 5th! Watch Video: www.LakeLotsCloseout. com 877.712.3650 Florida Waterfront Marketing, LLC. Licensed Real Estate Broker. Live & Online Bankruptcy Auction Tuesday, May 8th at 10:00 AM National Shutter & Aluminum, Inc. 700 Commerce Way W, Jupiter, FL 33458 Sale will consist of: manufacturing equipment, hurricane protection parts and products, inventory, Out of Area Classifieds forklifts, storage containers, vehicles, office furniture, office equipment, warehouse items and related equipment. Catalog and photos available at www.moeckerauctions.com Bankruptcy Case No. 1812495-EPK Preview: 1 hour prior to sale. 10%13% BP. To register: $100 refundable cash deposit and valid drivers license. (800) 840-BIDS | info@ moeckerauctions.com AB1098 AU-3219, Eric Rubin Were you an (machinist/ boilermaker/pipefitter etc) and recently diagnosed with LUNG CANCER? You may be entitled to a SIGNIFICANT CASH AWARD. Risk free consultation! 855-259-0557 ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS ARE NEEDED IN THE FOLLOWING AREAS: EMS PROGRAMS FIRE FIGHTER MINIMUM STANDARDS TRAINING LAW ENFORCEMENT/ CORRECTIONS TRAINING NURSING CLINICAL SOCIOLOGY SPANISH Position details and application s available online at: www.fgc.edu o r visit Human Resources Florida Gateway College 149 S.E. College Place Lake City F L 32025 2007 Phone (386) 754 4314 Fax (386) 754 4814 Email : human.resources@fgc.edu FG C is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education and Employment ENROLLMENT SPECIALIST I (Re Advertised) H ighly responsible front line position with the Office of Enrollment Services, requiring excellent customer service skills and the ability to accurately coordinate, process, and complete a high volume and varie ty of duties and data entry to assist in all phases of the operations of the office. R equires independent initiative, judgment, the ability to handle confidential records, ensuring compliance with FERPA regulations, accurate data entry. Requires an Associ ate degree in appropriate area plus two years of related experience; or high school diploma plus four years of related experience. Additional education may substitute on a year for year basis for required experience in related area. Must be computer liter ate. SALARY: $ 28,410 annually, plus benefits. APPLICATION DEADLINE: Open Until Filled Position details and applications available online at: www.fgc.edu o r visit Human Resources Florida Gateway College 149 S.E. College Place Lak e City F L 32025 2007 Phone (386) 754 4314 Fax (386) 754 4814 Email : human.resources@fgc.edu FG C is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education and Employment Lowest Daily & Weekly Rates in Town. Newly Renovated Rooms GUEST LAUNDRY ON SITE & ROOM SERVICE1101 N TEMPLE AVE STARKE, FL904.964.7600 Application Deadline: Friday, May 18, 2018 For additional information contact Human Resources at (352)395-5185. To apply check out: https://sfcollege.hiretouch.com/ SF is an EA/EO Employer http://www.sfcollege.edu/eaeo/. Call1-844-991-9814 EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY As low as $15000 security deposit! 15 DURRANCE PUMP Q UALITY SERVICE SINCE 1964 Pumps Sales Parts Service ST ATE LICENSE #1305 Handicapped AccessibleThis Institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer.Now Accepting Applications1 AND 2 BEDROOM APARTMENTS 607 Bradford Court Starke, FLCall for more info 904-964-6216Hearing Impaired Only call 800-955-8771 E Q U A L H O U S I N GO P P O R T U N I T Y Southern Villas of StarkeAsk about our 1&2 BR Apartments HC & non-HC Units. Central AC/ Heat, on-site laundry, playground, private, quiet atmosphere. 1001 Southern Villas Dr. Starke, FL Equal Housing Opportunity 1 & 2BedroomsNOW AVAILABLE$460 $505 Equal housing opportunity. This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer. 1, 2 3 & 4BEDROOM APARTMENTSHC & Non-HC accessible.1005 SW 6th St. Lake Butler, FL386-496-3141TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. Equal Housing Opportunity 801 South Water Street Starke, FL 32091 TDD/TTY 711 1, 2, & 3 bedroom HC & NonHC accessible apartments.This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. Equal Housing Opportunity EXTRA CASH! Could you use some now that the holidays are over? We specialize in helping people sell through our Classifieds! YARD SALES AUTOS BOATS CLOTHES APPLIANCES... The list goes on..Call Today904-964-6305Ask for Classified Ads Season ends for UCHS track, regional level BY CLIFF SMELLEY Solomon Jones and Austin Wilson competed for Union County High School at the April 25 Region 2-2A track and Academy, but neither placed high enough to qualify for state. Jones placed had a 15th-place distance in the shot put of 33-8, while Wilson had a 16th-place time of 5:07.23 in the 1600m. four to move on to the Florida High School Athletic Association Finals. but did not make the trip to Orlando. compete in the high jump, but wasnt listed as having any Times-Monitor could not reach coach Robbie Best for UCHS defeats BY CLIFF SMELLEY Whip Davis and Caden Cox combined to pitch 4.1 scoreless innings as the Union County High School baseball team defeated host Bradford 5-2 in the regularApril 26. The Tigers trailed 2-1 after the the top of the second to take the