Lake Region Monitor

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Lake Region Monitor
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Newspaper
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English
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John M. Miller
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Keystone Heights, Florida
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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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BY JAMES WILLIAMS Special to the Monitor Debbie Strickland is native to Keystone Heights and, as she put it last weekend, Im used to traveling somewhere else for employment or shopping. Over the years, Strickland has commuted to Starke, Melrose, Gainesville, and for the last two years, to Palatka. Chad Rischar also lives in Keystone Heights and works in Palatka. He is a project manager and soil scientist for the St. Johns River Water Management District. Rischar said he begins his commute in his Chevy Silverado pick up about 7:30 a.m. His trip requires two right hand turns from his house, involves no traffic lights, one school zone and takes almost exactly 25 minutes door to door. Strickland goes a little further and takes a back road near Palatka; her commute takes 35 minutes one way. At one time, Strickland worked for North Florida Regional Hospital, and made a 45-minute trek from Keystone Heights to northwest Gainesville. This required a great deal of focus and defensive driving for about half that amount of driving time, she said. There were a lot of traffic lights, once you got to Gainesville, especially if you were travelling during peak rush hours.The hospital workers with a 6 a.m. shift could make that trip in a lot less time, she said. Then, she was asked to help develop the hospitals senior health center in Melrose. The commute that required the biggest adjustment, Strickland said, was the commute from Keystone Heights to Melrose. Up to then, she was used to lrmonitor@bellsouth.net www.StarkeJournal.com Deadline Monday 5 p.m. before publication Phone 352-473-2210 Fax 352-473-2210 Lake Region Monitor Lake Region Monitor USPS 114-170 Keystone Heights, Florida Thursday, June 19, 2014 42 nd Year 7 th Issue 75 CENTS Katz asks city, county to set aside money for lakes BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor Save Our Lakes President Vivian Katz asked Keystone Heights council members and Clay County Commissioners to set aside money for lakes restoration projects, during both boards June meetings. Katz asked Keystone Heights officials for set aside $10,000 a year and county commissioners to budget $40,000 a year. She said the St. Johns River Water Management District budgets a large amount of money for cost-sharing projects, items in which the district partners Wronglyarrested woman intends to sue sheriff BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor A Louisiana woman whom Clay County deputies arrested twice for crimes she did not commit intends to sue Sheriff Rick Beseler. The womans lawyer, Andrew M. Bonderund wrote in a letter to Beselers general counsel that his client, Ashley Nicole Chiasson, could sue Beseler and some of his employees under several causes of action including false arrest, false imprisonment, malicious prosecution and intentional infliction of emotional distress. According to Bonderund, deputies obtained an arrest warrant for his client after they already identified another woman with the same first and last name as the actual perpetrator of a grand theft that occurred in August. Sheriffs office says it found the real criminal BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor The Clay County Sheriffs Office said it found and arrested the real perpetrator of crimes for which it had earlier arrested the wrong woman. Ashley Odessa Chiasson was charged on June 12 with grand theft and attempting to defraud a financial institution. According to a sheriffs office report, Chiasson, while working as a live-in maid, made off with an iPod, sunglasses, toiletries, candles, prescription medication and other items in August of 2013 from a home in the Ridgewood neighborhood near Orange Park. Deputies also accused Chiasson of attempting to cash a fraudulent check at an Orange Park Wells Fargo branch on March 25. According to a report, Chiasson tried to cash a $912.67 BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor Clay County Schools Superintendent Charlie Van Zant has transferred three Keystone Heights school administrators to other areas of the county, including the longtime principal of Keystone Heights Elementary School. Van Zant moved Mary Mimbs to J.R. Wilkinson Jr. High School 3 Keystone school administrators transferred out Former Keystone Heights Elementary School administrators: principal (l) Mary Mimbs and Assistant Principal Erin Uria Farmers market vendors summer home BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor A group of vendors from the Keystone Heights Farmers Market is setting up a summer venue. Former market manager and current vendor Cheryl Owen said the group of nearly 20 merchants intends to operate from Faith Presbyterian Church in Midway. The vendors effort is in response to the Keystone Heights City Councils unanimous June 2 vote to suspend the citys farmers market for the months Clay County Fair Manager: 2014 was best year ever BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor Pete Sutton, the manager of the Clay County Agricultural Fair, told county commissioners during their June 10 meeting that this years edition of the event was the best ever. Sutton said attendance during the 10-day event was 110,078, an increase of 6.69 percent over last year. Sutton added that good weather significantly contributed to the event exceeding his goal of 110,000 attendees. The previous high attendance was in 2011 A K-9 unit from Union Correctional Institution found a suspect that broke away from a Bradford County deputy on June 13 near the Clay County line. behind a BPbranded convenience store on S.R. 100 and near the Keystone Heights Shrine Club. The responding deputies established a perimeter around the area and requested help from the K-9 unit. In less than 10 minutes, the dog, named Dawg found Lee hiding under a house. Lee was wanted in Alachua County for failure to appear on charges of driving with a suspended license and possession of a controlled substance without a prescription. Vickery, Dawg, DOC Sgt. Danny Klein and Bradford County Sheriffs Deputy Jamie Our Country Day 2014: One Community, One Team Photos from last years Our Country Day parade. Clockwise of Jacksonville; (2) Riding the American Legion Post 202 Helen Hersey, Emily Pitocchi, 8, and Dewitt Hersey. (4) and Abigail Milam toss candy to parade patrons. Keystone Heights 45-year tradition of celebrating the nations independence is right around the corner. Our Country Day2014 kicks off on Saturday, June 28th and activities continue all day Friday, July 4th. This years theme is One Community. One Team. Together everyone accomplishes more. On Saturday, June 28th, the Our Country Day Street Dance continues at its new location: the Keystone Airport. Vendors will offer food and beverages, plus rides and games for children and music to keep you dancing until (nearly) midnight. This years street dance features the local band Wreckless. Opening for them Two Keystone residents enjoy daily drive to Palatka Commuter profile Keystone resident Chad Rischars 25-minute drive from Water Management gives him time to think about life at home. Deborah Strickland favorably compares her 35-minute ride from Keystone to Palatkas Haven Hospice to her previous 10-minute commute to Melrose. Ashley Odessa Chiasson Ashley Nicole Chiasson See MOVE, 2A See OCD, 2A See MARKET, 3A See KATZ, 2A See FAIR, 3A See DRIVE, 3A

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Acting on the arrest warrant, officers in Jefferson Parrish, Louisiana arrested the mother of a two-year-old son and 12-year-old daughter. She was then extradited to Clay County, where according to Bonderund, she had never been before. The lawyer added that after spending nearly four weeks in jail, his client was released on her own recognizance and was immediately arrested again under a separate charge for another crime she did not commit. Bonderund also cited another case in which the sheriffs office arrested the wrong person. In 2013, deputies jailed 17-yearold Clay High School student Cody Lee Williams for sexual assault. Deputies later realized they should have arrested Cody Raymond Williams, also a student at Clay High. with local funding sources. She told the Keystone Heights council that communities and towns frequently ask the district for help in funding local water improvements and that the district shares in the costs of many of those projects. The district has a pot of money for cost share projects, she said. I dont know that we have ever asked for any of it. She also told city council members that an upfront financial commitment would demonstrate that community leaders are unified around lake issues. I dont think I have to go into details here but we havent been on the same page for a lot of years, she said. We are now. She also told city council members that her focus now is on the management of the Upper Etoniah chain of lakes, which stretches from Blue Pond within Camp Blanding to Lake Geneva. She said two projects she is pushing for within the chain of lakes is the cleanup of Alligator Creek and lowering Lake Lowry by one foot with the excess water put into Alligator Creek. In everything that I am seeing and hearing from the district, from the GIA project to everything else, we are going to get the best that we can get, short term, from managing this chain of lakes, she said. Responding to questions from Councilman Paul Yates, Katz said the way she envisions the water funding is that each year the city would set aside $10,000 for water issues with a total limit of $50,000. The council would then approve any disbursements from the fund. Katz told county commissioners that the funding would keep Alligator Creek and the lakes flowing to work on keeping our community healthier and getting our ecotourism going again, and that all depends on the level of our lakes. City council members said they would take up Katzs proposal during the citys budget process. County Commissioners did not comment on Katzs request. 2A Lake Region Monitor Thursday, June 19, 2014 Lake Region MonitorUSPS 114-170 Published each Thursday and entered as Periodical Postage Paid at Keystone Heights, Florida under Act of March 3, 1879.POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Lake Region MonitorP.O. Drawer A Starke, FL 32091 7382 SR 21 Keystone Heights, FL 32656Phone: (352) 473-2210 (352) 473-6721 John M. Miller, PublisherSubscription Rate in Trade Area $39.00 per year: $20.00 six months Outside Trade Area: $39.00 per year: $20.00 six monthsEditor: Dan Hildebran Sports Editor: Cliff Smelley Advertising: Kevin Miller Darlene Douglass Typesetting Eileen Gilmore Advertising and Newspaper Prod. Earl W. Ray Classified Adv. Heather Padgett Bookkeeping: Joan Stewart-Jones Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (LCMS)Sunday School 9 a.m. W orship Service at 10 a.m. 4900 NW 182nd Way Starke(Entrance to Conerly Estates on S.R. 16) (904) gslcstarke@aol.com Everyone Welcome!Childrens Church 10 a.m. Op e n H o u se check drawn from the account of a Middleburg plumbing business, but was told by a teller she would instead have to open an account and then deposit the money into her new account. Chiasson handed over her Louisiana drivers license to a bank official to open the account but a few minutes later obtained the license back and bolted from the branch before completing the transaction. Investigators later found and arrested another Louisiana woman, Ashley Nicole Chiasson, for both crimes but asked the State Attorneys office to drop the charges when they realized they had the wrong woman. Continued from 1A Bullock is Kiwanis member of the month The Lake Region-Keystone Heights-Melrose Kiwanis Club recognized Clay County School Board member Tina Bullock as its member of the month. Sara Matukaitus, chair of the committee that selected Bullock, composed a poem in the recipients honor: A love of Kiwanis and the community too, Our Kiwanian of the month represents and supports kids all the day through. Womans Club, Business Association, Schools, and wherever theres a need, Our KOM is Tina Bullock for all of her good deeds! Pictured are (l) Sara Matukaitus and Tina Bullock. Photo courtesy of the Lake RegionKeystone Heights-Melrose Kiwanis Club. Melrose Public Library volunteers and staff members donned lab coats for the librarys Family Fun Festival on June 7. Forty-one children and 27 adults came to the event, which featured food, games and activities with a science theme. (R) Peggy Alseph also uses the vinegar and baking soda combination to blow up a balloon. All photos by Madelaine Cajal Melrose Public Library volunteer. in Middleburg, where she will be the vice principal. Mimbs had been the principal at Keystone Elementary for 16 years. Also departing Keystone Elementary is Assistant Principal Erin Uria, who will be taking the same job at Clay Hill Elementary. Replacing Mimbs at the elementary school is Melrose resident Jackie Cory, who was principal at Lake Asbury Elementary. Joining Cory is Assistant Principal Melanie Sanders, who also comes to Keystone from Lake Asbury Elementary. Van Zant transferred Keystone Heights Jr./Sr. High School Vice Principal Justin Williams to the same job at Middleburg Sr. High. Taking over for Williams in Keystone is Barry Underwood, who was vice principal at J.R. Wilkinson Jr. High. Other administrative assignments for the 2014-2015 school year include Linda Pratt as principal of Swimming Pen Creek Elementary, Scott Voytko as principal at Grove Park Elementary, John OBrian as principal at Paterson Elementary, Rob Feltner as principal of Middleburg Sr. High, Anthony Williams as assistant principal at Orange Park Sr. High, Michelle Rovira-Daly as vice principal of Oakleaf Jr. High, Janice Tucker as assistant principal of Oakleaf Sr. High, Anthony Bradley as assistant principal at Orange Park Sr. High, Tracy McLaughlin as principal at Ridgeview Elementary, Bonnie Barker as assistant principal at W.E. Cherry Elementary, Amy Vann as assistant principal of Paterson Elementary, Bridget Payne as assistant principal at Lake Asbury Elementary, Debra Gaynes as assistant principal at Fleming Island Sr. High, Heather Roche as assistant principal at Coppergate Elementary, Shelly Lester as principal at Charles E. Bennett Elementary, Brenda Troutman as vice principal at Oakleaf Sr. High, Jen Halter as vice principal at Green Cove Springs Jr. High, Roger Dailey as assistant principal at Fleming Island Sr. High, Becky Murphy as vice principal at Fleming Island Sr. High, Justin Faulkner as assistant principal at Green Cove Springs Jr. High and Pamela White as principal at Tynes Elementary. Van Zant also appointed Teresa Hankel as the districts supervisor of exceptional student education. She has been employed by Clay County schools for 21 years, with the last seven as an administrator at Fleming Island Sr. High School. Evelyn Chastain is the districts new supervisor of elementary education. Chastain is a former school board member and school superintendent candidate in Bradford County. For the past five years, she has served as the principal at Charles E. Bennett Elementary and was previously the principal at Clay Hill Elementary. MOVE Continued from 1A will be another Lake Region act, Jake Calhoun and the Chasers. Both bands play high energy music that includes tasteful covers, powerful vocals, and creative originals. On Friday, July 4, Our Country Day gets off to a running start with the 5K run. Registration starts at 7 a.m. and the run begins at 8. Over 1,300 runners participated in last years 5K. Visit www.ourcountryday.com, email ourcountryday5k@gmail. com or visit the Our Country Day 5k Facebook page for further information. Join in a volleyball tournament at the Keystone Beach, registration begins at 8 a.m. at the Beach. Arts, crafts, food and beverage vendors will be featured in the Keystone Heights Nature Park and around city hall from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. Live music will also be featured throughout the day. And dont miss Keystones other annual race, the baby crawl, which begins at 10 a.m. in Keystones Theme Park behind city hall. The Our Country Day parade begins at 11 a.m. The patriotic procession features a marching band, floats, bicycles, buggies, beauty queens, tractors, clowns and more surprises. Parade organizers will award prizes for floats and entries closest to the theme, commanders choice, the best marching band and others. At Noon, join in for an acoustic jam session. Bring whatever you play, open mike; all styles of music encouraged. Everyone welcome. At 1 p.m., at the park behind City Hall, join in on some summer fun and participate in our 2nd annual watermelon eating contest. Fireworks will be at Keystone Beach Park again this year. Due to crowd size restrictions, visitors should arrive early. Weather permitting, there will be live music and food and beverages for sale. Entry into the beach park will require each spectator to have an armband, no exceptions and this year armbands cost $1. Armbands will go to the first 4,000 buyers, the absolute limit to entries to the beach park, so get yours early. Armbands are now available and can be purchased at city hall, Mallards Dollarama, Genesis Fitness and other Keystone Heights locations. Fireworks will begin at dusk, weather permitting. Detailed information about all Our Country Day events and applications are available on our website www.ourcountryday. com. Our Country Day is sponsored by the City of Keystone Heights, the Keystone Heights Community Redevelopment Agency, The Clay County Tourist Development Council and generous individuals and businesses. OCD Continued from 1A KATZ Continued from 1A Continued from 1A

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using the daily drives to work and home again as a kind of therapeutic travel, shifting from home life to work life and back again. The trip to Melrose only took 10 to 15 minutes, and there wasnt much time to make adjustments, Strickland said. Before she even had time to think about work, she was already there. Two years ago, she was approached by Haven Hospice to manage their Palatka facility. She and Rischar now make roughly the same commute each day. Over a decade ago, Rischar was living in Gainesville and working in Jacksonville for an environmental consulting company. Then, he and his wife decided to move to the country, to Keystone Heights, which cut almost half an hour off his daily drive. About eight years ago, he saw a job opportunity on the Internet at the water management district, an agency he had worked with often. He applied for and got the job. His commute over the last eight years has gone from over an hour-and-a-half one way, to 25 minutes, one way. Strickland said she leaves home around 7:20 a.m. and uses her 35-minute travel time to organize her day; prepare for whatever meetings she will have and once in a while she makes a call on her hands-free phone. I work with people all day, and I use the drive home for myself, she said. On good days, she opens the sun roof of her Nissan Maxima and enjoys the drive to St. Johns Avenue, north of Palatka and home again. Rischar said On the way to work, I think about the strategy for the day, prepare for meetings or projects. I focus my thoughts and do mental preparations. I listen to talk radio and NPR. Coming home at the end of the day, he said, he decompresses and thinks about what needs to be done at home. Depending on the weather he thinks about what he will do with his two kids, and the fact that theres another one on the way. And on the way home, he listens to music, not news or talk radio. Strickland passes only two or three service stations along her route and sometimes buys Valero gas at the Gizmo. But she said she buys most of her gas in Florahome. The Florahome station is on the right hand side of the road as I go to work; theres not much traffic. Strickland said on the way home she may buy gas at the C.R. 214 BP station just outside Keystone Heights. Gas prices dont determine where she shops, she said; it is the roadside convenience factor that motivates her. She estimated she spends $50 a week on gas. Rischars Silverado uses diesel. He first estimated he spent $60 each week on gas, but then his scientific skills took over. He whipped out his calculator and lowered that to $55.55 per week. Neither highway position nor the price of gas determine where hell buy gas, he said. Hes not the type that runs until the empty indicator comes on he keeps about half a tank in his truck almost always. The two commuters have similar and yet different overall descriptions of their daily commute. Strickland said the traffic and the roads are generally good. She hasnt seen a lot of traffic accidents over the last two years, and only occasionally a reckless driver with not enough time or distance to pass safely. Most traffic slows down when it rains, she said. Neither Strickland nor Rischar were ever inconvenienced by student drop-off traffic at Q.I. Roberts Elementary, though it has long been a 40-mph zone. Theres even less traffic now that the Roberts school is Cambridge High with fewer students. Both commuters notice a frequent presence of sand and logging trucks and drivers doing 50 miles per hour. Substantially more than they saw on other commutes. When I want to pass somebody, I have the power to do it, Strickland said of her Nissan. Rischar, who has been making the same trip for eight years, compared to Stricklands two years, said hes pulled people out of ditches and seen a number of traffic accidents and crazy drivers over the years. He has encountered a number of accidents at the blinking light in Grandin. The fog from Putnam Prairie is sometimes an issue, but he said he hasnt been bothered by smoke from prairie and woods fires along S.R. 100. The difference in the two commuters perspectives on the commute may be due to the major resurfacing of S.R. 100 about three years ago. Soil scientist Rischar said the road used to have slight dips and upticks all along the highway, and those were a problem, especially for semi-trucks. The road was widened a little during the project and bridges redone. DOT did a good job on resurfacing that road, Rischar said. Thinking about it a little, he said the traffic on S.R. 100 got calmer after the resurfacing project was completed, and hes seen fewer traffic incidents since then. Rischar said he knew about a dozen Keystone Heights residents who work in Palatka; Thursday, June 19, 2014 Lake Region Monitor 3A FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now survive DIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 Absolute 2-Day Public Auction June 27-28Alabama Dept. of Transportation 537 Tra c Operations Dr. Montgomery, AL 36110 Bryant Wood AL LIC #1137(334) 264-3265 Online Bidding: visit us at: www.jmwood.com EXTRA CASH! Could you use some now that the holidays are over? We specialize in helping people sell through our Classifieds! YARD SALES AUTOS BOATS CLOTHES APPLIANCES... The list goes on..Call Mary Today at 904-964-6305 Lawyers win yard of the month Photo by Toni Davis By TONI DAVIS Garden Club of the Lakes The Garden Club of the Lakes, FFGC, has awarded the Yard of the Month for June to attorneys Taylor and Taylor in Keystone Heights. The flowers in front of their office really brighten up the downtown business area where they are located at 420 S. Lawrence Blvd. Mary and Jim Taylor have been in this location since 1998. They are both from Jacksonville and graduates of the University of Florida. Mary enjoys working with her plants and has plans for more projects in her landscaping. Alan Bischoff of Sunshine Pest Control takes care of the lawn spraying and fertilizing. Some of the plants in their front yard are vinca, marigolds, plumbago, mums, sago palms, pittosporum, lantana, pindo palms, crepe myrtle, and loropetalum (Chinese fringe tree). To nominate a Yard of the Month, contact Jackie Host at 352-473-8095 or Toni Davis at 352-475-3146. Anyone with an interest in gardening is invited to the Garden Club meetings at Faith Presbyterian Church located at S.R. 21 and S.E. C.R. 21B in Midway on the second Thursday of each month at 10 a.m.. Our next meeting will be Sept. 11. TPO outlines plans to county commission BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor A representative of the Northeast Florida Transportation Planning Organization outlined the agencys transportation improvement plan for Clay County Commissioners during the commissions June 10 meeting. Wanda Forrest, a transportation planning manager with the TPO, reviewed the agencys short term plans for Clay County. Forrest said the most immediate project is resurfacing Blanding Boulevard from Kingsley Avenue to Knight Boxx Road. Construction for the 4.5-mile, $5.8 million project is now underway and should be completed by 2016. Forest said the next project is widening Blanding Boulevard from four lanes to six lanes from Old Jennings Road to C.R. 218 in Middleburg. Construction for that project will occur in three phases. DOT will begin adding lanes to the section of Blanding Boulevard between Old Jennings Road and Allie Murray Road later this year. Workers will add lanes to Blanding from Allie Murray Road to the Black Creek Bridge in 2017 and 2018, as well as replace the bridge. Lane additions will occur on the most southerly portion of the project, from Black Creek to C.R. 218 in 2018 and 2019. Forrest also said development of the First Coast Expressway is on the short-term work plan, with most of the $190.8 million right of way acquisition between Blanding Boulevard and U.S. 17 scheduled to occur in 2017 and 2018. County approves plats for three subdivisions BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor Clay County Commissioners approved plans for a new subdivision near Lakeside, a two more near Branan Field Road during its June 10 meeting. KB Home is developing Angora Bay, a 48.4-acre planned unit development that consists of 98 single-family, residential lots. Angora Bay is located on C.R. 220 south of Lakeside, about one mile west of the intersection of C.R. 220 and College Drive. Richmond American Homes asked the county commission to approve a replat for its Pine Ridge Plantation phase 2-A. The 31.39-acre subdivision, yielding 64 home sites is located within the Branan Field Road Master Plan Overlay off Tynes Boulevard, south of Trail Ridge Road. Taylor Morrison of Florida Inc. is developing Kindlewood Phase Three, a 22.4-acre planned unit development with 78 home sites within the Branan Field Road Master Plan Overlay. The neighborhood is east of Challenger Drive, a quartermile south of Oakleaf Plantation Parkway. of July and August. Council members said they needed to temporarily close the market while the search continued for a market manager. In an email, Owen wrote that the new group will operate as the Keystone Heights Summer Market and it will begin on July 5. Hours will be from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. In a telephone interview, Owen said vendors began organizing the new venue following the councils vote. She said she searched for a location nearer to Keystones downtown area but could not find the proper combination of parking, shade and restroom facilities. Owen added that she is now representing the group but that vendors will run the market jointly. She also said that if the Keystone market reopens in September, vendors plan to return to the event in Natural Park, across from city hall. We still support the Keystone market, she said. At least I do. I dont know where we will be in September and I dont know what the city is going to do. At least one vendor has told me that this (the summer closing) is a prelude to shutting it down. However, Keystone Heights Mayor Tony Brown disputed that claim. I dont know how much clearer we could be, he said of the councils plans to reopen the venue in September. The council hasnt even discussed closing it down permanently. He added that there is strong support for the farmers market on the council. However, the city needs to find a qualified market manager before continuing operations. We need more than someone who just shows up on Saturday and puts out cones, he said. MARKET Continued from 1A with 106,789. Sutton also said the fair came close to breaking its single-day attendance record set in 2013 with 23,199. The attendance on the last day of this years fair reached 22,449. He said that the Saturday before the fairs opening, Green Cove Springs received two inches of rain. However, once the fair opened, sunshine persisted throughout the event. Sutton also said that this years fair appeared to run much smoother than in recent years with no accidents or major problems. He credited the addition of the venues south parking lot for the increased efficiency. Sutton also said the directors of 10 Florida-based fairs visited Clay County during the event, as well as the board of directors for the National Independent Concessionaries Association. Sutton said the events outof-county visitors continued to grow, with 49 percent of this years attendees residing outside of Clay County, an increase of four percent over the previous year and nine percent better than 2012. Sutton added that the 2014 livestock sale also set a record with $223,325 in revenues. Thats significant because most of those kids use that money for college education, he said. Sutton said the one area in which the fair saw a decrease this year was in competitive exhibits. He blamed the drop in participation on converting to an all-online system for entering the exhibits competition. We think that was a mistake, he said. We are going to address that and go back to a more flexible system. We had over 2,300 entries though, in those competitive exhibits. Sutton said the fairs recycling efforts paid off in 2014. He said that this year, workers hauled 34.4 tons of trash from the fairgrounds compared to 64.6 tons in 2011. He credited advice and volunteers from Waste Management, Keep Clay Beautiful, the University of North Floridas Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity and the countys environmental services department for the improvement. Sutton also said the events volunteers were key in building the fairs reputation as a fun, safe and family-oriented venue. There are three paid people: myself, an office manager and a part-time assistant, he said. But weve got thousands of volunteers who have passion. They dedicate their time and talents to put this onThey do it out of pride, and it we ever lose that, the fair will never be the same. FAIR Continued from 1A DRIVE Continued from 1A See COMMUTE, 4A

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We need your clothes Community Church of Keystone Heights is hosting our 6th Annual Back to School event on July 22. Clothes will be given away free to children in need. Donate clean, gently used clothes for children sizes 3T through adult. Teenagers come in all sizes and this collection is for all ages and sizes. Drop clothes off at Community Church marked B2S (Back to School). The deadline is July 10. Please call Barbara Sullivan (258-3113), Karen Powell (5389546), Jenn Cumbus (258-5479) or Kim Nugent (258-3602) for more information or to volunteer. Fizz, Boom, Read! At the Keystone Heights branch library Preschool programs for children aged 3-5 will be offered each Wednesday morning at 10:30 a.m. June 11, 18, 25 and July 2, 9, and 16. Stories, songs and crafts and a related snack will be offered. There will be a special Stuffed Animal Sleepover (for stuffed reading buddies only) as well as a preschool story time program on July 15 at 6:30 p.m. Reading buddies to be picked up at the final story time, theaterevent breakfast, the following morning. For school-aged children, kindergarten through fifth grade we will offer: June 20th Friday at 10:30am Fizz, Boom, Science! with our friends from Sugarplum Entertainment. June 26th Thursday at 6:00pm Fire and Ice with Mad Science of NE Central Florida June 30th Monday at 2:00pm Did Someone Say Bats?! with Lubee Bat Conservancy and winged friends. July 11th Friday at 10:30am How and Why stories with Kaye Byrnes, Storyteller extraordinaire July 18th Friday at 10:30am Its a Wrap! Finale with special guest, Ronald McDonald. Melrose Bay Art Murmurations. Work by Valerie Aslakson-Jennings, guest artist showing thru June 29 Concert at the beach The City of Keystone Heights presents Concerts at the beach: Jake Calhoun and the Chasers, The Treble Makers, And It Seems Like Ages Ago. Saturday, 4A Lake Region Monitor Thursday, June 19, 2014 Keystone District Office 352-473-4917 clayelectric.com Rays Auto RepairEstablished 1972473-30837382 Sunrise Blvd.(Next to Hitchcocks Grocery) *** Comfortable Waiting Area ***Jones-Gallagher Funeral HomeDistinquished Caring Service for Over 50 YearsJoe Gallagher OwnerStarke 964-6200 Keystone Heights 473-3176 J B SJackson Building SupplyStarke 964-6078 Lake Butler 496-3079See us for all your Lumber & Plywood BryansHARDWARE & GARDEN CENTERHighway 100 Keystone Heights, FL 473-4006 Highway 21 Melrose, FL 475-2400Worship in the House of the Lord...Somewhere this week! Detailed Info 800.479.1763 johndixon.com400 *ABSOLUTE AUCTION Only 48 Properties Selling with ReserveGAL: 2034, FL: AB-1488, AL: 1481, NC: 6397, SC: 002815R, AK: Thomas J. Tarpley, AR AU Lic #1536, MS: Joe Bilbro, Lic. MS R.E. Broker Thomas J. Tarpley, MS AU Lic #565, Bank-Owned Properties & Other Secured Parties in 180 Offerings Welcome Home To 4004 SE State Road 21, Keystone Heights, FL 32656 (352) 473-3829 Son-shine Worship in our Fellowship Hall Dr. Tom Farmer, Jr. preaching on Contemporary Worship in our MMC Traditional Worship in our Sanctuary Dr. Craig Moore preaching on Exodus 33:12-16 Dinner Served Fried Chicken (Call 352-473-3829 for reservations) Bible Study by Dr. Tom Farmer, Jr. Series: JOIN US FOR VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL!M onday June 23rd thru Friday June 27th9:00AM til 12:30PM daily WEIRD ANIMALS Where Jesus Love is One-of-a-KindMinistries for Children (all ages) & Youth Sundays & Wednesdays! only a few of them work with him at the water management district. Strickland said she knows only one or two other people who live in Keystone Heights and work in the Palatka area, both of them at Haven Hospice. I dont think Palatkas at the top of their minds when Lake Region residents are looking for work, Strickland said. Most people turn immediately to Gainesville or Jacksonville. But there are some large industries or employers in Palatka, she noted, like GeorgiaPacific, the St. Johns River Water Management District, Putnam County Schools or Seminole Electric. Both Rischar and Strickland said they enjoy their daily commutes. Rischar especially likes watching the seasons change along the wooded drive. His drive is helped by memories of the time workmen were burping a gas line and he passed a 30-foot high pillar of fire; or the time two large red stags escaped from their private animal preserve and after wandering along the highway were trying to get home again. All in all, its a fairly gentle ride, Rischar added. COMMUTE Continued from 4A Poison Information Center: Celebrate Summer Safely Summertime fun means enjoying the outdoors. As such, it is important to remember that summer poisoning hazards can threaten your familys health, especially children. The Florida Poison Information Center in Jacksonville urges you to remain aware of these hazards that occur most often during the summer. Children are out of school for the summer and may be spending more time unsupervised in or out of doors with ready access to potentially dangerous chemicals, plants and home products, cautions Dr. Jay Schauben, director of the Florida Poison Information Center in Jacksonville. Poison proof your home and outdoor areas by following a few simple tips to reduce the chance of accidental poisoning emergencies. However, if a poisoning emergency does occur, dont search the Internet; call the poison center Help line immediately at 1-800-2221222. Our specialists in poison information will give you the right answer the first time. Insect repellent Be sure to read the label on every insect repellent and follow directions carefully. Be aware that most contain DEET, and repeatedly applying a product with DEET can increase the risk of harmful effects. When using repellent on a child, adults should place a little on your their hands, and then rub them on the child. Avoid the eyes and mouth. Do not spray on childrens hands as they tend to rub their eyes or place their hands or fingers in their mouths. After returning indoors, wash treated skin with soap and water. Charcoal lighter fluid When accidentally swallowed, this can lead to difficulty breathing and lung damage. Call the poison center help line immediately at 1-800222-1222. Do not induce vomiting. This can make it worse. Keep these products in their original containers and prevent access to them by children. Traveling and camping Remember to program your cell phone with the nationwide toll-free poison center help line: 1-800-222-1222. Store medications, personal products, insect repellent or sunscreen, in locked suitcases away from children. Avoid bringing along a few pills in unmarked containers as these may not be child-resistant and they are unlabeled as to content or quantity. For visitors who are not used to the activity of children, remind them to properly store all personal products, especially prescription items, out of the reach and sight of children. When camping, be careful of the underbrush, as it could contain poison ivy or stinging or biting animals. Remember, Leaves of three, let it be. If someone touches poison ivy, immediately rinse with plenty of running water for at least 15 minutes. For poisonous plant and animal contact, immediately call the poison center help line at 1-800-222-1222 for treatment information. Food poisoning Always wash hands, cutting boards, utensils, and dishes with hot, soapy water after handling raw meat, poultry, or seafood Store, cooked and reheated food at the proper temperatures. Do not let food sit out at room temperature for more than 2 hours. The following food items can quickly spoil and become unsafe: party platters, meat, poultry, seafood, dairy products, eggs, mayonnaise, and cooked vegetables. Signs of food poisoning include fever, headache, diarrhea, stomach pains, nausea, and vomiting. The onset of symptoms could be as little as a few hours to as long as several days. If you suspect a poisoning has occurred, or if you have questions concerning poisonings, immediately call the poison center help line toll free, 24 hours a day at 1-800-222-1222 and a health care professional will assist you. Worth Noting June 21, 2014 5-9 p.m. Homeschool Used Book Swap Trinity Baptist Church Fellowship Hall Friday, June 20. 9-1. No entrance fee, sellers fee $1 per table. email: tha. kh.1997@gmail.com to reserve table. 303 State Road 26, Melrose June 21, Saturday from 10 to noon. Stepping Stones with Stained Glass. Cost: $25. One day workshop, pick-up on Sunday. Materials included. Teacher: Linda Kemp WUFT TV Meteorologist Jeff Huffman visits the Melrose Public Library June 19th Have you ever wondered what tools a Meteorologist uses to predict the weather? How he knows if it is going to be a sunny day or if there will be rain? Do weather terms like, Airstream, Ball Lightning, Atmospheric Pressure, Bubble High, and Back Door Cold Front leave you baffled? Have your questions answered on Thursday, June 19th at 10 a.m. when WUFT TV Meteorologist Jeff Huffman visits the library. This exciting program is part of the Putnam County Library Systems Summer Childrens Programs and all school age children and their caretakers are invited to attend. Huffman will speak about the tools he uses and the science of weather. There will be time to ask questions, hear some of his weather stories, make crafts, and eat a rainbow-themed snack. The library is located at 312 Wynnwood Avenue, behind the Melrose Post Office. Space is limited so call the library today at 352 475-1237 and reserve your place. Plan to arrive at least 15 minutes early to get a good seat. Whats That Smell? Your Library Children can explore the sense of smell and smelly thing at their library this summer. There will be smelly experiments, stories, crafts, and games. This free science fun program is open to all school age children and their caretaker. Thursday, July 3rd at 10 at the Melrose Public Library the fun begins. The library is located at 312 Wynnwood Avenue behind the post office. For more information about this and other childrens summer library programs contact the library at 352 475-1237. This program is a Fizz, Boom, Read, a Summer Library Program of the Putnam County Library System with refreshments provided by the Melrose Library Association. Park Rangers Teach Children how to be Nature Detectives at the Melrose Public Library Are you a nature detective? Do you know the difference between a frog and a toad? Have you ever wondered why there are so many different shapes of leaves or where the seeds of a pine tree are? A Gold Head Branch State Park Ranger will visit the Melrose Public Library on Thursday, July 31st at 10 am. School age children and their caretakers will learn how to be nature detectives, and explore the librarys native garden with the ranger. There will also be nature stories, crafts, and a special snack. This free Putnam County Library System Summer Program has been made possible because of the support of the Gold Head Branch Parks staff. Additional program funds are provided by the Melrose Library Association. The Melrose Public Library is located at 312 Wynnwood Avenue, behind the Melrose Post Office. For more information about the program call the library at (352) 4751237. Florahome man celebrates 100 th birthday Charlie Bryant displays one of the gifts he received during his 100 th birthday celebration. Photo by Cornelius Clayton Charlie Bryant, who turned 100 years of age on June 2, celebrated his special day with friends and family at his home in Florahome on June 7. Guests included Bradley Caouette, representing State Rep. Charles E. Van Zant, Putnam County Commissioners Karl Flagg, Larry Harvey and E. Walton Pellicer II, Putnam County Sheriff Jeff Hardee and former Alachua County Commissioner Rodney Long. Also attending the party was Helen Suri of Keystone Heights, who is also 100 years of age. Many of Bryants friends and family from Florahome, Putnam Hall, Palatka, Keystone Heights and Johnson joined him during the celebration. He said he wanted to thank everyone for making his 100 th birthday special.

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job at Orange Parks Oakleaf High School. Chipoletti, who has family in Clay County, said the move would allow him to be closer to an ill family member. Farnsworth said he believes that perfect fit is out there and indicated he feels good about this upcoming search. He stressed the search will be approached the same way he approached hiring Bryan Boyer as BHS principal, with longevity being a key factor. A successful applicant should want to be at BHS for 10 years or more, Farnsworth said, adding, Were going to find that person. The superintendent said there should be quite a number applicants to consider. The Bradford High School football coaching job is always a coveted position whenever it opens up, Farnsworth said. BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer Steve Reynolds has resigned after two seasons as Bradford High Schools head football coach, leaving the school looking for its 10 th coach in 23 years. In a statement via text message, Reynolds said, I decided it was time to make a move. From a head-coaching standpoint, Im looking for something different. Thank you for your years of love and support. Superintendent of Schools Chad Farnsworth said Reynolds didnt go into detail about the decision, though he said he believed Reynolds, as a young coach, was still mapping out his future. His resignation came unexpectedly, but I know Steven was looking at his career path, Farnsworth said, adding, I feel like he just felt it was a good time to move on. The Tornadoes were 9-11 under Reynolds, a 2004 BHS graduate. Bradford went just 3-7 last season, but did qualify for the playoffs for the second time in three years as the District 4-4A runner-up. Farnsworth said hes appreciative of what Reynolds did and said Reynolds will always be a part of the program. Hes a lifelong Tornado, Farnsworth said. He put a tremendous amount of love and effort into our program. When Reynolds was hired in 2012, he wanted to assure BHS supporters that he was going be around for a while, telling the Telegraph-Times-Monitor, People can rest assured its not going to be a revolving door around here anymore. Instead, though, its more of the same for the program, which hasnt had much stability since David Hurse retired after a 29year stint as head coach following the 1990 season. Bradford has had nine head coaches since, with all but one lasting just three years or less. Rowland Cummings the one exceptioncoached four seasons before resigning. Four of the last five BHS coaches have resigned. Cummings, who had a record of 31-16, guided the Tornadoes to three postseason appearances and had the team one win away from playing for a state title in 2003, cited the fact he was being moved as an administrator from BHS to Bradford Middle School as his reason for quitting. Chad Bankston, who followed Cummings, led the Tornadoes again to within one win of playing for a state title in 2004. Bankston, who had a record of 17-15, resigned in June 2007, but refused to discuss the matter with the Telegraph-Times-Monitor. After Steve Hoard (13-17 in 2007-09) was fired, Derek Chipoletti was hired. Chipoletti was 14-7 and guided the team to one postseason appearance, but stepped down after his second season to take the head-coaching Regional News Regional News B Section Thursday, June 19, 2014 News from Bradford County, Union County and the Lake Region FEATURES CRIME SOCIALS OBITUARIES EDITORIAL ** ** ** Reynolds resigns as Bradford High football coach Leslie Shorty Libby was incorrectly identified as Shorty Livey in a June 12 story about Woodrow Griffis Sr. The Telegraph-Times-Monitor apologizes for the error. Correction Steve Reynolds is shown during a practice this past May.

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required him to submit a resume and go through a four-part interview process. In the end, 12 ambassadors are chosen. Bergman was not one of the original 12 chosen for 2014-15, but he was the first alternate who would become an ambassador in the case something came up to prevent one of the original selections from serving. That exact scenario occurred, leading to Bergman stepping up into one of the 12 roles. I will actually go through a rigorous training at the end of this month to prepare me for the fall and spring terms, Bergman said. One of the things Bergman is most looking forward to is interacting with his fellow ambassadors, some of whom come from such countries as Ecuador and North Korea. Again, its that diversity that Santa Fe has given me such a love for and appreciation for, Bergman said. Im going to get to be right in the center of that type of diversity. Being selected for the schools hall of fame is considered the highest honor a Santa Fe College student can achieve. Bergman said its an honor hell never forget and one that will continue to inspire him to make the most of his studies. That really made me feel good, Bergman said. That picture will be in the hall of fame forever. Thats something Ill look back at when I go to grad school and say, Well, when you thought you couldnt go back to college, you went back to college, and you did these things. That will be a constant reminder for me to carry that confidence through grad school, too, when I go to UF. Bergman first intended to study psychology when he enrolled at Santa Fe, but has since been pursuing a lifelong passion music. He credits Canova for helping to foster his love for music and the arts. Bergman was involved in Starke Recreation Department activities when Canova was the departments director. There, Bergman learned to play piano and participated in dinner theater performances among other things. She just gave me a love for 2B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 19, 2014 F AM PAK$69 9 lb F AM PAK$29 9 lbPRICES A VAILABLEJ UNE 18 JUNE 24 2 $499$9992 $42 $1 3LB BAG Amazing quality Fantastic prices.S atisfaction Guaranteed F AM PAK$299lb $299 F AM PAK$449 lb HOT BUY$159 lb F AM PAK2 $514 OZ $39910 lb8 CT O pen 7 Days a Week 8am to 8pm1 371 South Walnut St. (Hwy 301) Starke (904) 368-9188 Florida Twin TheatreAll Seats $6.00 Before 6 p.m. 964-5451* OPEN EVERY NIGHT SCREEN 1 SCREEN 2 STARTS FRIDAY Visit us on-line at www.FloridaTwinTheatre.comFri: 7:00, 9:00 Sat: 5:00, 7:00, 9:00 Sun: 5:00, 7:10 Mon. Thurs: 7:30 NOW SHOWING Fri: 8:00 Sat: 5:00, 8:00 Sun: 4:50, 7:15 Mon. Thurs: 7:15 Shailene Woodley in Gerard Butler in Wed. Kids Shows 10am & 1pm All Seats $5.00June 25th How to Train Your Dragon 2 2 4 m o n t h C D S p e c i a l $ 1 0 0 0 0 m i n c u o r g 1 4 6 % A P Y* 1 0 0 % A P Y* D e p o s i t s a r e f e d e r a l l y i n s u r e d b y t h e N C U A a U S G o v e r n m e n t A g e n c y f o r u p t o $ 2 5 0 0 0 0 A n n u a l P e r c e n t a g e Y i e l d ( A P Y ) e f f e c t i v e 3 / 1 3 / 2 0 1 4 a n d s u b j e c t t o c h a n g e a t a n y t i m e 3 6 m o n t h A P R i s 1 4 5 % 5 4 0 p e n a l t y d a y s 2 4 m o n t h A P R i s 1 0 0 % 3 6 0 p e n a l t y d a y s O f f e r e x p i r e s 8 / 1 5 / 1 4 3 6 m o n t h C D S p e c i a l F e d e r a l l y I n s u r e d b y t h e N C U A 103 Edwards Road (next to Fays Salon)Starke 904-964-7579 BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer Sometimes, Timothy Bergman doesnt feel like himself. The things that are happening to him now seem unreal. Yet it is his picture that will hang on a wall at Santa Fe College, designating him as a member of the schools most recent hall of fame. Plus, Bergman will represent Santa Fe during the 2014-15 school year as an ambassador. A lot has happened in the past year and a half after Bergman, 28, enrolled at Santa Fe College. Its almost like somebody elses dream, Bergman said. Its my dream, but its later. It took 10 years to happen, but its happening now. Its surreal. The Santa Fe College Hall of Fame is limited to one-tenth of the top 1 percent of students in a given year. To apply for consideration, a student must have a cumulative 3.0 GPA and be involved in service to the college and the community. Students selected for the Ambassador Program work with faculty, staff and students to help promote Santa Fe College, assisting in such areas as recruitment, campus tours and public speaking engagements. Santa Fe College Andrews Center adviser Kathleen Combass said its impressive for someone to not only enroll in college at a non-traditional age, but to also become as involved as Bergman has. Were all kind of Timmy rooters here, Combass said. Were his cheerleaders here at the Andrews Center. Bergman dealt with some issues in the past that caused him to leave home at the age of 17 and eventually give up on his schooling. He said he went to a private school at one point and was actually going to enroll at Bradford High School to finish his high school education. However, because of the differences in curriculum, he found out he was going to have to basically repeat his sophomore year while also taking seniorlevel classes. He doesnt doubt that he couldve successfully done what was required of him, but there were just other things going on in his life that affected him at that time. With a loved one who was suffering with cancer at the time, it was so much to handle, Bergman said. I think I couldve done it, but I was just so beaten down by the fact I was going to have to go back and repeat what I had already done. I gave up temporarily. Then temporarily turned into almost 10 years. Bergman admitted it was almost traumatizing for him. He had always been an A student, so grades had never been an issue when it came to giving up on school. He went to work for Verizon Bergman shines in return to school, earns top SFC accolades ARMSTRONGFENCE COMPANY Securing the SoutheastCommercial Residential Rent a Fence Access ControlCall for your FREE Estimate LOCAL PEOPLE ... LOCAL SERVICE! and advanced to a position of district manager. However, the business went through an ownership change, and Bergman said he saw an opportunity to return to school. Bergman signed up for classes at the Andrews Center, though he admitted, I was extremely nervous. The first couple of weeks I even doubted myself, wondering, What am I doing here? Combass and Andrews Center Director Cheryl Canova wereand still areextremely supportive and encouraging, Bergman said. They helped him to realize, This isnt as bad as I thought it was going to be. Canova said, That first step to come (back to school) is one of the hardest things for anybody to do, but it just shows that it can be done. Bergman did more than just enroll and take classes. He joined the Andrews Centers Student Activities and eventually becoming president of that group. That kind of surprised him, he admitted, but it really has been beneficial in establishing a network among fellow students. There are commonalities and diversities there that Ive grown to appreciate, Bergman said. Theyve actually helped me in my studies a lot because Ive gotten to interact with so many different types of people from different walks of life. He fell in love with Santa Fe College during his first semester, and nothing changed when he later began taking classes at the Northwest Campus in Gainesville. Therefore, he applied for the Student Ambassador Program, which BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer A district championship in football and a state championship in weightlifting helped the Keystone Heights High School boys athletic program finish fourth among Class 4A public schools in the Florida High School Athletic Association Floyd E. Lay Sunshine Cup AllSports Awards. Points are awarded for district and regional championships, as well as a schools finish in FHSAA state series competition. Keystone earned 18.75 points, finishing behind Miami Washington (50), Pensacola West Florida (32) and Tallahassee Florida High (29). Coral Springs Charter placed just behind Keystone with 18 points. The next highest finisher among schools in the TelegraphTimes-Monitor coverage area was the Union County boys program, which placed 18 th in the Class 1A standings. See SFC, 6B Santa Fe College student Timothy Bergman is pictured with Andrews Center adviser Kathleen Combass. Bergman said Combass and Andrews Center Director Cheryl Canova deserve a lot of credit for his success at the school.

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to Florida, accompanied by an agent form FDLE. He described Taylor as congenial, with a generally good and cooperative attitude. Taylor determined to be what was then known as a crosscountry killerwhat would be called a serial killer in todays terminology. He had been in and out of prison since 1966. going on then in the job market around here, Reddish said. I knew I did not want to farm, so I went around applying for jobs. In March 1957, I was working at a temporary job at DuPont when my father called me and said he wanted me to take over the jail. I asked him when, and he said a in a couple of days. Reddish said he had never had any idea about getting into law enforcement, but he needed the job, so he took it. He moved into the jail (then on Broadway Street) with his family and stayed there until 1960. Reddish lived downstairs, and the prisoners lived upstairs. It was a very consuming job, with something going on all the time, Reddish said. Dad was the boss. I had no training in law enforcement or corrections, but I soon learned. I guess you could say that I had on-the-job training. At the time, the county had only two jailors, so Reddish would work the morning shift, while the other man worked second shift. The jail closed at midnight, but Reddish was on call all night and had to open up and process any prisoners who were brought in after hours. The county also had only two deputies at that time, and one of them resigned, so Reddish found himself working as a deputy as well. I would work the mornings at the jail and then work second shift as a deputy, Reddish said. Russell Redding was the other deputy. He drove a black, unmarked 1957 Dodge. I got to drive the car the deputy who had resigned had been driving, the first marked car owned by the BCSOa 1957 Chevy Bel Air, painted green and white. Reddish was also one of the first two deputies in the county to wear a uniform. It seems that the Florida Sheriffs Association passed a ruling on Oct. 1, 1956, that required all officers to have marked cars and that the deputies wear uniforms. Redding and Reddish worked six months straight, seven days a week, without a day off unless they were sick, which didnt happen often. Finally, Redding talked Reddish into going to talk to his father to see if he would get then some help. I went to my dads office and told him about the problem sweet corn and strawberries, as cash crops. He even remembers plowing fields behind a mule when he was a boy. In 1948, when Reddish was 17, his father ran for county sheriff and was elected by the slim margin of 20 votes. After the election, the family continued to live on the farm until April 1949, when P.D. moved them into town to a house on Broadway Street, near the jail. It seems that telephone service was not available at the farm, and the sheriff was required to have access to a phone. The family still ran the farm, with Dolph Reddish overseeing the operation for his father. He graduated from Bradford High School in 1951 and continued to farm until December 1952, when he enlisted in the Air Force. During his four-year tour of duty as an aircraft mechanic, he served a year at Thule Air Force Base in Greenland (part of Denmark). Even today, I still consider my time in the service as one of the highlights of my life, Reddish said. Here I was, a farm boy who had only been out of the state a couple of times,and not far thensuddenly meeting a lot of people from everywhere. I enjoyed all the diverse backgrounds of my fellow soldiers, and I learned to be on my own and make decisions for myself. The whole experience was a great benefit to me. Spending a year in the Artic Circle close to the North Pole did not provide Reddish with much to do or spend his pay on, so he saved his money. He said that by the time he was transferred to West Palm Beach Air Force Base for his final two years, he had saved up enough to buy himself a new 1955 Ford. Reddish said several of his buddies at West Palm tried to get him to reenlist, but he was ready to come home, returning to Bradford County in December 1956. There really wasnt a lot Thursday, June 19, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 3B Cookout... Car Show & Cookout 12pm 3pm ... Stop by! Its ALL FREE Lots of Great Vendors will be here: Drinks by VFW Post Schwans Truck Handmade Jewelry by Denise Griffis Joes Tires Snow Cones Tuff Girl Designs by Tommy Sue904-368-91051699 N. Temple Ave Hwy 301 North StarkeAarons.com Dr. Virgil A. BerryCHIROPRACTIC PHYSICIANServing the area for 21 years. THERAPEUTIC MASSAGEAVAILABLE Modern methods with old-fashioned concern. Auto Accidents Work Injuries Headaches Neck and Back PainBack & Neck Pain Clinic BY TRACY LEE TATE Special to the Telegraph, Monitor and Times Following in a fathers footsteps is sometimes difficult for sons, and meeting and exceeding the standard of excellence set by a father is even harder. Dolph Eugene Reddish was born on the family farm in Heilbronn Springs on Aug. 27, 1932. He is the son of Pete D. P.D. and Ruth (Sapp) Reddishboth members of old Bradford County families. The Reddishes were some of the first people to settle in Bradford County, Reddish said. The family came down from Jessup in Wayne County, Ga., where there was a pair of father and son sheriffs. Ive seen the first voter role for this county, and there are about a dozen Reddishes on it. Reddish was the second oldest of seven boys, six of whom are still living and remain in the area. He is the only one, however, who followed in his fathers footsteps into politics. Reddish was named by his mothers brother Felix Sapp. He doesnt know why he was named Dolph and said he has often wished for a different name. Its just so uncommon, Reddish said. When people ask you your name, and you tell them, half the time they dont understand and ask you to repeat yourself. P.D. Reddish was a Bradford County commissioner and owned a successful truck farm. Reddish remembers that the family grew most of its own food, as well as Chevy. Information for this story was derived from numerous Bradford County Telegraph stories from 1971 and 1975 and in an interview with former Bradford County Sheriff Dolph Reddish. BY TRACY LEE TATE Special to the Telegraph, Monitor and Times On the morning of Nov. 30, 1971, Bobbie Turner, 38, of Lake Geneva and Patricia (Pat) Marr, 22, of Melrose arrived at work at Nells Style Shop. Nell Duncan, who was taking the day off, owned the combination hair salon and boutique, located on C.R. 21 between Keystone Heights and Melrose. Turners 16-year-old daughter, Valerie, a student at Keystone Heights High School, accompanied the women. Valerie answered the phone about 8:45 a.m., taking a call from a patron checking an appointment time. The woman said the girl did not sound like anything was wrong. At 9:30 a.m., another patron entered the store for an appointment and found the shop apparently empty and the phone ringing. She answered the phone, which was Duncan checking in. The patron, who told Duncan that no one seemed to be there, was asked to check in the back, where there was a small storeroom. When the woman opened the storeroom door, she found a shocking scene. Bobbie Turner and Marr were lying on the floor, shot to death and nearly nude. Turner was wearing only a bra and had been shot four times. Marr was wearing only her shoes and had been shot five times. The patron called law enforcement, but was so upset by her grisly discovery that her name was withheld by the Bradford County Sheriffs Office. Upon arrival at the scene, then BCSO Deputy and Chief Investigator Dolph Reddish quickly determined that Turners daughter, Valerie, was missing. There were no signs of sexual molestation (which was totally ruled out at autopsy) or of a struggle. It appeared that a small amount of money had been taken from the three womens purses and the salons cash box (eventually determined to be about $12). The FBI was immediately called in, as kidnapping was a suspected issue. The murders started a 40-plusmonth odyssey for Reddish, who would become Bradford County Sheriff in just a little over a year. Tips came pouring in to the BCSO, with Reddish questioning 150 people in the first nine days after the crime. I just never could bring myself to give up on the case, Reddish said. I had a desk drawer full of information, and I just kept at it whenever I could. I just couldnt let the case go cold. On June 24, 1972, some children playing in a wooded area near S.R. 16 found a badly decomposed body. Using personal effects, the body was identified as the missing Valerie Turner. She had been shot three times. Reddish said the body had most likely lain there since the day of the other two murders. Finally, after 40 months and two trips to California, Reddish obtained an indictment for Carl Robert Taylor. Taylor was currently serving time at Folsom Prison in San Quentin, Cal., with a further sentence awaiting him in Texas. Reddish traveled to California to bring him back

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Tour where they feasted on good southern home cooking, followed by a family barbeque celebration at the Coburn residence. Thank you mom and dad for making your home, a home of love and character, and allowing the beauty of Jesus to be seen in your commitment to each other through the toils, hardships and happiness of life. Congratulations, Happy 50th Anniversary! Air Force Airman 1st Class Evan A. Willis graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San AntonioLackland, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program. He is a 2013 graduate of Keystone Heights Junior Senior High School. He earned an associate degree in 2013 from Santa Fe College, Gainesville. 4B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 19, 2014 Official Sports Medicine ProvidersTornadoesfor the Bradford High School KATIE TRUMBLE, DPT, A T C/L CAITLIN RAUCKHORST, A T C/L 319 West Call Street Suite A Starke, Florida 32091 Phone: (904) 368-1257 Fax: (904) 368-1258 On June 20, 2014, Charles and Charlene Blalock will celebrate 60 years of marriage. Charles and Charlene met in St. Augustine, Florida in 1950, at Calvary Baptist Church. Charles family made it a point to give Charlene a ride to church any time there was a service. Charles waited patiently for Charlene to finish High School (four years), while he worked for his Uncle Jake at Blalocks Grocery, there in St. Augustine. Finally the day came that they were married in the same church in which they met. They were blessed two years later with the worlds most wonderful baby, Charles Edwin Blalock, Jr. (Eddie). Four years later God blessed with another son, just as wonderful, Jerry Michael Blalock. In 1961 Charles was transferred to Starke, as manager of Food Fair Grocery, where he worked for several years. Charles left the grocery business after several years, but by this time, they had fallen in love with the city of Starke and chose to make it their home. During the 1970s Charles owned Blalocks Meat Market and many will remember him from that. Their son, Eddie is currently pastor at the Orchard Community Church in Lake City. Jerry has retired from the Department of Corrections and is now serving with the police department in St. Augustine. They were blessed with two great daughters-in-love, Beth Chapman Blalock and Lee Ann Green Blalock. Madison Street Baptist Church has been (and still is) an integral part of the Blalocks lives. They have been active members there for 52 years where Charles served as deacon and Charlene has taught various ages in Sunday School. They have enjoyed four grandchildren; five greatgrandchildren and another on the way. The Blalock family has truly been blessed by God and gives Him honor and glory for 64 wonderful years. Blalocks celebrate 60 years Happy 50th Anniversary Larry and Valarie Coburn! As children, Larry and Valarie grew up just a block away from each other in Miami. They attended the same church and became High school sweethearts, at the age of 16. After graduation they got married on June 19, 1964. From high school Larry attended a four-year technical school, and has been a faithful protector and provider as a sheet-metal mechanic and other various types of construction for nearly 55 years. In 1974 they built with their own two hands the house in which they still reside. Valarie as a godly wife, mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother has made this house the beautiful home it is today. They have lived out their dream in raising a family, and living on a farm, in which they still enjoy their growing family, various gardens and all kinds of animal life. As a gift from their children, Larry and Valarie celebrated their 50th Anniversary in the romantic city of Savannah, Ga. They stayed at a bed and breakfast and enjoyed the sites and sounds of Savannah, including the famous Paula Deen Coburns celebrate 50 years Larry and Valarie Coburn Socials The Union County High School class of 1956 held its 58 th reunion with an informal gettogether at Cedar River in Starke on June 7. Lowell Loadholtz, recipient of numerous awards and honored for a lifetime of distinguished service with his induction into the National Hall of Fame for County Agricultural Agents, served as master of ceremony. He also shared his talent as an auctioneer by auctioning off several items for the Sunshine Fund. A social hour was followed by a Dutch-treat luncheon, at which plans were made concerning where the 59 th reunion will be held. The monthly Lunch Bunch group was selected to work on the event. Class members from outside Union County who attended were Loadholtz of Cocoa, Eldred Bivins of Earleton, Ronald Hersey and Shirley Guynn Patterson of Jacksonville and Donna Dekle Coleman of McAlpin. To date, the class of 1956 has lost only seven members: Jimmy Nettles, G.A. Mole, Lamar Williams, Gary Roberts, Geneva Andrews Grimes, Kenneth Stafford and Josphine Crews Peeples. Nettles, Mole and Williams never had the opportunity to attend a reunion. UCHS class of holds 58th reunion Bivins. Team members, friends and family are invited to the Bradford-Keystone Heights Relay for Life wrap-up party, which will be held Tuesday, June 24, from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. at the Starke Golf and Country Club. Awards and door prizes will be part of the event, which also includes dinner. For more information, please contact Linda Lee at 904966-3022 or linda19855@ embarqmail.com. BradfordKeystone Relay for Life is June 24 Willis completes basic training Evan Willis

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The trial began Sept. 22, 1975. It had already been ruled by Judge R.A. Green Jr. that the death penalty was not an option since the murders took place during the time that the U.S. Supreme Court had ruled the death penalty to be invalid. The judge also rejected motions from the defense that testimony given by Taylor in other states be disallowed in his trial. The all-male, six-member jury heard testimony from law enforcement and 31 subpoenaed witnesses before finding Taylor guilty on three counts of firstdegree murder. He was given three life sentences, to be served sequentially, but first had to be returned to California to finish out his terms there before then serving another term in Texas. It was the worst case I have ever handled in my years in law enforcement, Reddish said in a recent interview. It was the most grisly and the most timeconsuming case I have ever worked. Im just glad it was finally solved. Thursday, June 19, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 5B we were having, Reddish said. He listened very patiently, but I could tell he wasnt too happy. Finally, he looked at me and said, I dont remember telling you when I hired you that you would work just 40 hours a week, so get your behind back out there and go to work. I dont want to hear any more about this. That was the end of the conversation. I told Mr. Redding about it, and he just laughed, and we continued on for a while, but Dad did eventually hire another person. Reddish said he has no really clear idea of why he stayed on the job. The only reason he could come up with was that he liked the job because it allowed him to help people. He worked as a jailor/deputy until 1960, when he resigned his jailor position and used a Veterans Administration loan to build a home off Wilson Road. He became a full-time outside deputy, while his second-shift man at the jail moved in and took the day shift. As a combination jailor/deputy, Reddish said he had been making $300 a month plus room and board. Once he cut back to just being a deputy, he made about $400 a month and acquired a $70-a-month house payment. As a deputy, Reddish said he got a lot of training, both formal (such as at the FBI Academy in 1969, where Reddish participated in the FBI School for Law Enforcement) and through experience, which has helped him, both in his work in law enforcement and later in the political arena. He said he learned to treat people well and to be as nice to them as was possible, although he allowed that you could only be so nice and still arrest someone. He said he learned to make hard decisions and to speak to people frankly and directly with limited BS. He quickly learned the best way was to tell it like it is and to make quick, right decisions based on the circumstances known at the time. He said if this was done sincerely, then the decision was usually the right one. One of the hardest lessons for him was when he had to arrest someone he knew, especially if that person was a friend. When I first went to work for the sheriffs office, Bradford County had its share of moonshiners, Reddish said. I remember going out to a still site on a raid with some state and federal officers. We would catch whoever was there, or wait for them until they showed up. We could tell the batch they were making was about ready to run off, so we all set up a perimeter and waited for the moonshiners to show up. About daylight, I was hiding in a bush about 200 yards out from the still, and the people showed up. One agent flushed them, and as they ran, we were supposed to catch them. I could see one of them running toward me at a high rate of speed, and as he got closer, I recognized him as a friend. I pulled my pistolan old Luger and shot up in the air. The gun sounded like a cannon going off, and my friend just stopped and wilted away (because) I scared him so bad. When he got straightened out, he came up to me and said, Dolph, what kind of damn gun is that? I told him and then arrested him. We are still friends to this day, even though he didnt quit making moonshine. Reddish found pleasure in the variety provided by his job. He said it was not mundane, not the same all the time. He said he loved the diversity of situations he discovered and was proud of the fact that the job taught him the art of making quick decisions. By 1971, he was chief investigator for the department, dealing with all of the serious crimes and felonies. It was in this capacity that he dealt with the case which he recalls as the worst case he ever dealt with in his entire career: the murders at Nells Style Shop on Nov. 30, 1971. (See sidebar for details.) Reddish was still investigating the case in 1972 when his father decided not to run for sheriff again. P.D. Reddish had been sheriff for 24 years and a county commissioner for 10 years before that, so he felt he had done his share for the people of the county. He told his son that the job was there if he wanted to try for it and that he would help him if he could. Reddish faced seven opponents in his first election, and it served as a real eye-opener for him as to how small-town (or county) politics worked. I had to go out and meet the public on different terms when running for office, Reddish said. As a deputy, I was out there every day providing a service, but in an election, the tables were turned, so to speak. They werent asking me for my help. I was asking them for theirs. Reddish won the election and took office at midnight on Dec. 31, 1972. This first term started a 16-year odyssey as Bradford County sheriff. He said that at the time he became sheriff, the BCSO had seven full-time deputies, either three or four full-time jailors and three office workers to keep up with the paperwork. The amount of paperwork required of my office, including the jail, was huge, Reddish said. I knew money was going to be an issue and that keeping track of it was going to be a full-time job. Reddish described himself as an ultra fiscal conservative, who was even more conservative with the countys money than he was with his own. He said REDDISH Continued from 3B his solution to what he saw as a potential problem came in the form of a financial secretary. I was lucky to find an excellentnot just good financial secretary in Grace Searle, Reddish said. We devised a system where if a deputy needed something, he requested a purchase order for it, which Grace would sign after checking to see if the budget would allow the purchase. It then came to me, and if I thought it was all right, then I would sign it as well. If we didnt have the money, we didnt spend it. Reddish remembered that when his father was sheriff, he would have a sort of wish list of items, which he would select from at the end of the year to purchase with any money left over in his budget. Reddish stresses that these were needed items, just not critically so. That was the mentality back then around the courthouse, the whole group of elected officials, Reddish said. The thinking was clearly, If I dont spend it, someone else will, or else the county commission will cut my budget by that much next year. I felt a little different. Reddish said he always stayed within or under budget and turned any excess money left in his budget at the end of the year back to the county. This brought him some criticism from other county officials. At the end of the first year, I turned back a few thousand dollars, Reddish said. The county tax collector at the time, J.R. Kelley, came to me and told me I couldnt do it. When I asked him why, he said it just wasnt the way things worked. When I persisted, he finally said that it was because it would make all the rest of us look bad. Reddish was elected for three more terms, running unopposed and becoming, in fact, the first sheriff to do so in Bradford County. This state of affairs suited Reddish, he said, because he never really liked getting out and politicking. His father told him it was the worst mistake in his career. Dad told me in 1976 that running unopposed and not getting out there to the people was the worst thing that could happen to me politically, Reddish said. He told me I was losing my political base, which was hard work to build and even harder to rebuild. I guess he was proved right in the 1988 election. Reddish was high man in the primary election of 1988, but lost in the run-off to Kenneth Etheridge. He credits his loss of his political base as one of the main reasons. My dad was right, Reddish said, but then he was always more of a politician than I was. I like Kenneth and think hes a good man, and we are friends to this day. Reddish said Etheridges four years as sheriff were plagued with problemsnot all of his makingand a sort of opposition party developed which asked Reddish to run again. I really didnt want to run again in 1992, but I did it just to quiet people down about it, Reddish said. I was settling in to being retired, and my heart just wasnt in it. I had bought a farmcows not cropsand I was enjoying life. Once again, Reddish made a strong showing in the primary, garnering the most votes, but he lost in the run-off to Bob Milner, who went on to also serve the county for 16 years as Reddish had. This second loss was it for Reddish, and he vowed never to throw his hat into the political ring again. He does, however, have many fond memories of the years he and his father served the county and is grateful that they had the opportunity. On behalf of my late father, P.D. Pete Reddish, and myself, I want to thank all the citizens of Bradford County for allowing us to serve them, Reddish said. Between us, we served for 40 years, 1948-1988, and both of us considered it to be a great honor. Just because he no longer serves does not mean that Reddish doesnt keep up with what is going on in law enforcement. The biggest issues when I was in office were mainly felonies like theft and breaking and entering, with a few shootings and robberies mixed in, Reddish said. The numbers then were very similar to those we see in the county today with one exception: drugs. Reddish said drugs were not really an issue in the county until his last term (1984-88) as sheriff. He said that before that time, moonshine was the predominant illegal substance his deputies had to deal with. The first drug on the scene was marijuana, Reddish said. It slowly replaced moonshine. It started with a few local people growing it for their own use. When they started selling it, the problem quickly grew. As drugs became more prominent, the people became very afraid and couldnt understand why law enforcement couldnt just stamp it out. My arrest record was as good or better than any since, but the problem didnt go away. It kept growing and getting worse every year. As the drug problem mushroomed nationally, not just in Bradford County, law enforcement budgets mushroomed right along with it. Today, it has become the single biggest issue in law enforcement, and the cost is astronomical. (See sidebar.) Not only do you have the cost of enforcement, (but) add in the costs of prosecution, incarceration, care and rehabilitation. Reddish said law enforcement has changed since his time in the field, becoming more socialized and politicalized. He said it has expanded into areas where it didnt travel before, such as into the schools and more community outreach. He wonders if that is really what its for. CASE Continued from 3B by his father, P.D. Pete Reddish. BY TRACY LEE TATE Special to the Telegraph, Times and Monitor The business of enforcing the law has changed a great deal since the days of P.D. Reddish and his son Dolph. The scope of coverage in the community has increased greatly, as has the focus and emphasis placed on various areas addressed, but in no area has there been a greater increase as in the overall cost of doing business. The budget for the Bradford County Sheriffs Office, including the jail, for the 198899 fiscal year (the last budget compiled by Dolph Reddish) shows an initial budget request of $1,002,767, with a final commission-approved figure of $964,767 after the lack of county commission approval for $38,000 to fund the hiring of a new deputy and providing him a car. According to the U.S. Census, the estimated population of Bradford County in 1988 was 22,355. The cost per person for funding the BCSO and Bradford County Jail was $43.16 per person in the county. Census estimates of the Bradford County population for the current budget year, 2013-14, is 26,850an increase of about 20 percent since 1988. The 201314 BCSO budget has increased as well to $5 million. This translates to a cost of $186.22 for every man, woman and child in the countyan increase of about 431 percent.

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a lot of little parts of the arts, Bergman said of Canova. Thats where that started. At Santa Fe, Bergman has been a part of the Santa Fe Jazz Ensemble and the Santa Fe Singers. Plus, he also earned a fine arts scholarship. He wants to be an educator of music, Combass said. I think thats wonderful. Thats going to touch a lot of peoples lives. It has all added up to quite a full college experience in a short amount of time. Canova said Bergman has certainly put his whole heart into his efforts, which makes watching his success rewarding. Im proud that hes going back (to school) and trying to accomplish his dreams, Canova said. He will eventually transfer to the University of Florida, but Bergman will never forget the start Santa Fe College gave him. In fact, if he hadnt been selected as an official ambassador, he would still be one. He loves to talk about Santa Fe College and what it can offer. Why would you not want to go to Santa Fe? Its wonderful, in learning more or becoming involved as a mentor for the 2014-15 school year, please call TALKS Director Byron Ramseur at 904-964-2435 (office) or 904742-6942 (cell). The TALKS (Transferring a Little Knowledge Systematically) mentoring program held a banquet May 29, honoring the 58 students whose lives were touched by 21 mentors this past school year. TALKS, designed by Bradford County Faith Community Center founder James E. McKnight Jr. and its director, Iana Patterson, is a program in which adult mentors share their wisdom with children in Bradford Countys public schools. (TALKS has an agreement with the Bradford County School District to conduct the program on school campuses.) The belief is that an impact can be made on the life of a child with a minimal investment of time by an adult. If you would be interested Banquet honors TALKS students, mentors 6B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 19, 2014 Join us for aJungle Safari Adventure!atFIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCHVACATIONBIBLESCHOOLPre-K to 5th GradeJune 23 276:00pm 8:30pm 11AM to 1PM Come Join the FUN with Us!Pre-register: www.VacationBibleSchool.com/fccs or call the church office 904-964-6100 Graduates407 W. Washington St. Starke 964-4361(Next to Bradford High School) Lic. #30969 Owner, Linda Bryant In Business Since 1979 Back row: Henry Prescott, Jaden Richardson, Ian Shores, Isabella Smith, Travis Reed, Khamari Ellis, Destiny Randolph, Demontay Simmons, Johnny Reeves, Anistyn Lee. Middle row: Natalie Thames, Gabriel Starr, Zamariah Pierce, Jaden Prevatt, Conner Rowe, Joshua Williams, Jaden Vought, Brilyn Brown.Front row: Skye Shores, Braelyn Brown Mildred Batten STARKE Mildred Louise Batten, 86, of Starke died Wednesday, June 11, 2014 at her residence. She was born on Dec. 17, 1927 in Lawtey to the late Harry and Lillie (Tanner) Padgett and was a lifelong area resident. She was a homemaker and a member of Jehovahs Kingdom Hall. She was preceded in death by her husband Earl Ray Batten. Survivors are: daughter, Linda (Joey) Baldree of Starke; brother, L.E. Padgett of Starke; two grandchildren; and one greatgrandchild. Services were held June 16 in the Dewitt C. Jones Chapel. Interment followed in Hope Cemetery with Elder Kirby Crosley officiating. Arrangements are by JonesGallagher Funeral Home of Starke. Angela Bishop RAIFORD Angela Truett Bishop, 43 of Raiford died Saturday, June 14, 2014 at her mothers residence after an extended illness. She was born Sept. 2, 1971 in Griffin, Ga. but lived most of her life in Union County. She was a Phlebotomist nursing assistant. She is survived by her daughter, Angelique Truett of Raiford; sons, Joshua Brown and John Roberts both of Lake Butler; mother, Dorothy Raulerson of Raiford; father, Charles Truett; sisters, Debbie Cox of Raiford and Terri Truett of Lake Butler; half sisters, Kalay Truett and Shanon Truett of Lake Butler; step sisters, Heather Harden of Lake Butler and Brandy Knight of Starke; brothers, Kevin Truett and Chris Truett of Lake Butler; step brothers, Qwinn Raulerson and Brad Kirce of Starke and AJ Knight of Graham. Funeral services will be held Friday, June 20 at 10:00 am in the Archer Memorial Chapel, with Pastor Terry Elixson officiating. Burial will follow services at Dedan Cemetery. Family invites friends for visitation Thursday, June 19 at the funeral home from 6-8 pm. Archer Funeral Home is charge of arrangements. Jesse Burgess KEYSTONE HEIGHTSJesse Ray Burgess, 91, of Keystone Heights died Wednesday, June 11, 2014 at the Haven Hospice Roberts Care Center in Palatka. He was born in Gamaliel, Ky. on Sept. 14, 1922 to the late Hillary and Virgie Burgess, and served in the United States Army. He was of the Baptist Faith, a World War II veteran. Prior to retirement, he was a custodian for the Indiana School System. He was preceded in death by: the mother of his children, Freida Burgess and their son, Earl Burgess. Survivors are: children, Freida Boggs of Keystone Heights and Edward Wayne Burgess of Indiana; siblings, Reed Burgess and Carson Burgess both of Gamaliel; eight grandchildren; and ten greatgrandchildren. Funeral services and internment will be held in Gamaliel, Ky.. Arrangements are under the care of Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home of Keystone Heights. Harold Byers STARKEHarold Albert Byers, 58, of Starke died Wednesday, June 11, 2014 at his brothers residence with family by his side. He was born in Lockport, N.Y. on Jan. 3, 1956 to the late Albert Harold Byers and Mildred Shutt Byers. He has been a resident of Bradford County for over 35 years where he was a member of Madison Street Baptist Church and recently had been attending the Pentecostal Church of Gainesville. He retired after 31 years at Griffin Industries. He was preceded in death by his parents and his brother, Roger Byers. He is survived by: his wife of over 29 years, Bonnie Byers of Starke; his daughter, Ruth Hurst of Starke; his step children, Mark (Patricia) Hurst of Starke, Carl Swain and Lillie Eubank of Georgia; his brothers, Ron Byers and James Byers both of Starke and Timothy Byers of Greenville, N.C.; his sister, Susie Byers of Starke; and five grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at a later date. In lieu of flowers please make donations to the funeral home to assist with expenses. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Archie Tanner Funeral Services of Starke. KEYSTONE HEIGHTS Aldwyn Columbus Catlett, 93, of Keystone Heights died at the Roberts Care Center in Palatka, Tuesday, June 10, 2014. He was born in Rural, Georgia on Oct. 11, 1920 to the late Harvie C. and Eliza (Volumna) Lummie Catlett. He served in the United States Navy. He was a long time resident of Jacksonville and an accountant for the railroad department until retiring in Keystone Heights. He was a member at Trinity Baptist Church. He was preceded in death by a sister, Lydia Sailers; a brother, Wallace Catlett, and a grandson, Rory Webb. Survivors are: his wife of 43 years, Juanita (Bessent) Catlett of Keystone Heights; and children, Wayne Aldwyn (Susan) Catlett of Ft. Myers, Daniel (Rae) Overtsreet of Shelby, N.C. and Linda (David) Orr of Jacksonville; a sister, Lillie Mae Waters of Commerce, Ga.; eight grandchildren; and five greatgrandchildren;. Funeral services were held June 17 in Trinity Baptist Church with Pastor James Peoples and Pastor Scott Stanland officiating. Interment followed at the Greenlawn Cemetery in Jacksonville. In lieu of flowers the family would greatly appreciate donations made to Trinity Baptist Church, P.O. Box 1099, Keystone Heights, FL 32656. Arrangements are under the care of Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home of Keystone Heights. Norma Donn STARKENorma Jean Donn, age 62, of Starke passed away June 12, 2014 at her residence with family by her side. She was born in Irwin, Pa. to Charles Wiehagen and the late Velma Summerfield. Norma was raised in Irwin, where she graduated from Norwin High School. She married the love of her life, Gene Donn, on June 5, 1973. They resided in Kissimmee for many years until they moved to Starke in 1979. Norma had a passion for bringing beauty to any situation with flowers. She was the owner and operator of Bradford Square Florist and later opened Bradford Florist. Norma was a Florist at Wilsons Florist before opening Normas Floral Etc. Norma loved Bradford County and enjoyed helping others. She helped with fundraisers, community events, and founded the Great Pumpkin Escape event. Norma was an avid Gator fan who enjoyed painting, drawing, and doing arts and crafts. She loved her family especially her grandchildren. Norma was preceded in death by her mother and her husband of 31 years, Gene Donn. Norma is survived by: her loving children, Kelly (Kenny Plemons) Sweat, Gina (Wendell) Collins, Tiffany (Jeremy) Snyder, and Kelly Donn all of Starke; her brother, Richard (Amanda) Wiehagen of Pa.; her sister, Patty (Ed) Carroll of Pa.; her ten grandchildren, Tony, Jessica, Karen, Candice, Amber, Wynn, Elijah, Emma, Kali, and Lily; her four great grandchildren; and many close family members. Memorial services will be held on Thursday, June 19 at 6:00 pm at Archie Tanner Funeral Services Chapel with Pastor Al Paulson officiating. The family will receive friends an hour prior to the service at the funeral home. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Archie Tanner Funeral Services, Starke, FL. 904-964-5757. Visit www.archietannerfuneralservices. com to sign the familys guest book. PAID OBITUARY Deanna Coleman and Byron Ramseur. and the importance of maintaining the TALKS program. 964-(8473)13761 South US 301 Starke(1/2 mile south of walmart) Tires Wheels Vehicle Accessories Golf Carts & Parts Jo es Tires Summer Time We have Deep Blue Engel Coolers... Many Sizes!!! SFC Continued from 2B Bergman said. Its in the (Aspen Institutes) top 10 (for community college excellence). Its right her local. Its everything you could want in a college. As Bergman can also tell you, going to college is a viable option for a person of any age. All the things I wanted to do in high school, Im doing now at the college level, he said. I think its kind of an example to anybody that its never too late to go back and do those things. d Obituaries d

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Thursday, June 19, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 7B Watch for our Independence Day (352) 473-9873Open Every Day 10:30AM-9PMN OW OPEN BBQ Burgers Steaks Salads7154 S.E. CR 21B Keystone (intersection of SR100 & 21B) www.tomsrealpitbbq.comfacebook.com/tomsrealpitbbq twitter.com/tomsrealpitbbq Bring in your church bulletin on Sunday and well donate 10% of your purchase back to your church! For more info visit: Friday & Saturday Steak & Shrimp Night SAT JUNE 21STLOTS OF WATER FUN!Waterslide Bounce House & More! 10% OFFTotal PurchaseWith this Ad Expires 6-30-14 Event Coming in July! Celebration Event Coming in July!Hotrod LincolnLive Band 6:30 pmDraft Beer $2 Serving F amilies in North Florida since 1973 S TARKE OFFICE OPEN 8:30 to 5:30 MON-FRIHwy 301 North, Starke 904-964-2010 (Next to Best Western) The area s largest supplier of Colored GraniteWhen Quality Counts, You Can Count On UsPrimary Location in Lake City at 561 NW Hilton Ave.Member of Better Business Bureau Monument Builders of North America Florida Monument BuildersFL Lic. # F037700 SR-230 E (2 miles east of US-301)B anquet Hall Driving Range Check out our web pagewww .starkegolf.com M emberships Available E xcellent Driving RangeP ro Shop Gift CertificatesG olf Lessons by AppointmentP rofessionally Run Tournaments H ome of the Strawberry Invitational Li ke us on facebook 904-368-0687 phwww.starkedivorce.comMARGARET ANDERSON1011 N. Temple Ave. Starke. FL (US 301 North)Family Law & Will Preparation30 years experience Margaret will continue to serve clients in Alachua County as well as Bradford & Union counties d Obituaries d KEYSTONE HEIGHTS Anne F. Gavrish, 99, of Keystone Heights DIED Tuesday, June 17, 2014 at Haven Hospice Roberts Care Center in Palatka. She was born in Philadelphia, Pa. on Aug. 29, 1914 to the late Pasquale and Librata (Tana) Frederick. She was a telephone operator, grocery store cashier, worked in a sewing factory, and a homemaker. She was a resident of Keystone Heights for the past 10 years moving here from Coastville, Pa. where she still has her membership with the Our Lady of The Rosary Catholic Church. She is affiliated St. William Catholic Church in Keystone. She was preceded in death by two husbands and one grandson. Survivors are: daughters, Elizabeth (Betty) Monko of Keystone Heights and Phyllis Jones of Coastville, Pa.; sister, Martha Luminella of Coastville, Pa.; three grandchildren; several great-grandchildren; and three great-great grandchildren. There will be no local services held. She will be having a Catholic Mass with internment in Pennsylvania. In lieu of flowers contributions can be made to Haven Hospice, 6400 St. Johns Ave., Palatka, FL 32177. Arrangements are under the care of Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home of Keystone Heights. Roger Henneman KEYSTONE HEIGHTSRoger E. Henneman, CPO, USN RET., 66, of Keystone Heights died June 8, 2014 at the VA Medical Center in Gainesville. He moved from Long Beach, Calif. to the Keystone Heights-Hawthorne area back in 1990 after retiring from the U.S. Navy. He was predeceased by his parents, Oathur and Geraldine Henneman; brother, Douglas Henneman; and step-daughter, Laureen Chessel. He is survived by: his wife of 38 years, Barbara Henneman of Keystone Heights; step-daughter, Lisabeth Knapp of Green Cove Springs; step-son, Bradley Michael Knapp of Hawthorne; brother, Randy Henneman; sisters, Star Littles and Kathy Drye all of Arizona; seven grandchildren and one great-granddaughter. Memorial services will be held Monday, June 23 at 3:00 pm at First Assembly of God in Hawthorne with Military Honors and Pastor Lowell Greene officiating. Arrangements are under the care of Moring Funeral Home of Melrose. FORT WHITE Woodrow Wilson Woody Hollingsworth Jr., 73, died at his home surrounded by family and friends on Wednesday, June 11, 2014. He was born Nov. 30, 1940, in Palatka. He served in the U.S. Army and the National Guard. He worked for the Department of Corrections at RMC from 1969 to 1995. He is preceded in death by parents, Woodrow and Willa Hollingsworth; brother, Warren Hollingsworth; and granddaughter Ashlyn Hollingsworth. He is survived by: his wife of 43 years, Joann; son, Lance Hollingsworth; daughter, Kimberly Owens; and three grandsons, all of Lake Butler; and brother, Robert Hollingsworth of Ohio. Services were held at Shiloh Baptist Church in Ft. White on June 17. Arrangements by Evans-Carter Funeral Home, High Springs. Jacob Johns JACKSONVILLLE Jacob Keith Johns, 32, a lifelong resident of Jacksonville died Saturday, June 14, 2014 at Orange Park Medical Center. He was born on Nov. 2, 1981 to Susan McKenzie Dyer and the late Jefferson Jacob Luther Johns, Jr. He attended Evangel Temple. He was preceded in death by: his father; his brother, Matthew Johns; and his maternal grandfather, Jasper Lee McKenzie. He is survived by: mother, Susan McKenzie Dyer of Jacksonville; step-father, Natividad Barahona of Jacksonville; daughters, Alexis Marie Evans and Breeauna Lynn Lied both of Jacksonville; brother, Barry Johns of Jacksonville; half brothers, Jeff Johns of Jacksonville and Michael Lynn (Jennifer) McKenzie of Starke; half-sisters, Lynn (Eldy) Flores of Jacksonville and Jennifer Johns of Bradenton; his maternal grandmother, Willie Mae McKenzie of Starke; and girlfriend, Marie Parrish of Jacksonville. Funeral Services will be held at a later date. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to the funeral home to assist with expenses. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Archie Tanner Funeral Services of Starke. William STARKE William John OBraden, Jr., age 89, of Starke passed away June 15, 2014 at Bradford Terrace Nursing Home. He was born in Baltimore, Md. to the late William and Nellie OBraden, Sr. William and spent most of his life in Baltimore, Md. until relocating to Deltona in 2004. He has been a resident of Starke for the past five years where he became a member of the Harvest of Christ Central Church. William served his country proudly in the United States Army during World War II and retired after many years of dedicated service as a Mason. He was a member of the VFW Post 34 in Brooklyn Park, Md. as a Chaplain for many years. William enjoyed watching wrestling and fishing. William is survived by: his son, Bill (Jackie) OBraden, III of Starke; his grandchildren, Kimberly Ann (Arian) Buhler and William John Beejer OBraden, IV, an active duty U.S. Army member; and his great-grandson, Elias Von Tater Buhler. Private memorial services will be held at a later date. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Archie Tanner Funeral Services, Starke. 904-964-5757. Visit www. archietannerfuneralservices.com to sign the familys guest book. PAID OBITUARY Odessa Pueschel LAKE CITYOdessa Charlene Taylor Pueschel, 67, of Lake City died Saturday, June 14, 2104 at Shands of UF in Gainesville. She was born Aug. 12, 1946 in Starke to the late Robert G. Taylor and Odessa McRae Taylor. She graduated from Union County High School and Lake City Community College as a registered nurse. She was preceded in death by her husband Doyle Pueschel. She is survived by: son, Alain (Michelle ) Crews of Raiford; sister, Mary Louise (Tony) Griffis, of Providence; brother, Robert E. (Lucienne) Taylor, Jr. of Lake City; and five grandchildren. Funeral services will be held Thursday, June 19 at 3:00 pm at the First Baptist Church of Raiford with Rev. J. Tommy Smith and Rev. Steve Haskell officiating. Burial will follow at Sapp Cemetery in Raiford. Archer Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Mary Soles KEYSTONE HEIGHTSMary Alice Turner Soles, 79, of Keystone Heights died Monday, June 16, 2014 at Windsor Manor Nursing Home. She was born in Georgia on Feb. 21, 1935 to the late C.B. and Ruby Lee (DeVane) Turner. She moved to Keystone Heights over 25 years ago, was a Baptist and a homemaker. Survivors are: her husband, Hudson Soles of Keystone Heights; children, Ronnie OBryan of Blountstown, Mary Young, Wayne OBryan, and Tim OBryan all of Port St. Joe; brother, Charles Turner; seven grandchildren; fourteen greatgrandchildren and three great-greatgrandchildren. Memorial services and interment will be at a later date. Arrangements are by Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home of Starke. Lewis Thompson MELROSE Lewis Henry Thompson, 90, of Melrose passed away on Monday, June 16, 2014, at Haven Hospice in Palatka. Born in Cochran, Ga. and raised in Macon, Ga. He is preceded in death by his parents, Fred and Jessie Mae Thompson; son, Rick Thompson; and beloved sister Bessie Thompson Kite. Lewis loved his country and served it proudly for 22 years active duty in the Navy and Civil Service at NARF, Jax from 1966 to 1985. He was a faithful member of Trinity Baptist Church, Keystone Heights since April 1997, where he received a five year Sunday School Perfect Attendance Award. He loved his church family and appreciated his pastors, Dr. James Peoples and Rev. Scott Stanland. An avid Georgia Dawg fan since 1970, Lewis had a boisterous voice and a wonderful sense of humor. Anytime asked how are you? he always replied Outstanding. Lewis was raised as a Master Mason in 1950 and a member of Scottish Rite since 1972 and a member of the Morocco Shrine in Jacksonville since 1973. He is a past member of West Jax Shrine Club, where he served as President of the Boosters 1973, 1978 and 1984; President of W. Jax Shrine Club 1978; and President of W. Jax Hot Sparks 1982. He served as Morocco Shrine Club coordinator 1979, and also held several other volunteer positions at Morocco. After retirement and move to Melrose, he was a member of Putnam County Shrine Club in Palatka. He leaves to cherish his memory: his devoted wife, Jo; and her sister Betty Green; nieces, Dianne Sapp of Macon, Ga. and Karen (Randy) Allen Kennesaw, Ga.; great nieces, Jill (Ryan) Samples of Dallas, Ga., Jennifer (David) McCollum of Powder Springs, Ga.; nephew, Chuck (Cay) Kite of Macon, Ga.; great nieces, Kimberly (Donovan) Brown, Marietta, Ga., and Kelli (Luke) Wood of St. Simons Island, Ga.; granddaughter, Taylor Thompson (Angel) Clark of Pensacola; and great-grandson Maximo; grandsons, Sean (Marie) Thompson of Jacksonville and Jason (Sara) Thompson of Portland, Ore.; greatgrandsons, Trevor and Christopher; and many dear friends at Trinity Baptist Church and Morocco Shrine. At Lewis request please wear casual clothes or your Shrine or Masonic shirts to his services. He refused to wear suit and tie the last 18 years of his life and hoped you would come comfortable to his services. Flowers are accepted or make a donation to: Haven Hospice, 6400 St. Johns Avenue, Palatka, FL 32177. Funeral services celebrating his life will be held at 11:00 am on June 18 at Trinity Baptist Church, 3716 S.E. State Road 21, Keystone Heights. Viewing will be one hour prior to the service, Dr. James Peoples and Rev. Scott Stanland officiating. Burial will be (the next day) June 19 at 11:00 am at Macon Memorial Park, 3969 Mercer University Drive, Macon, Ga. Arrangements are by Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home of Keystone Heights www. jonesgallagherfh.com. 352-4733176. PAID OBITUARY Minnie Walker KEYSTONE HEIGHTS Minnie Reita Alexander Walker, lovingly known as Reita Mae, left her loved ones on June 11, 2014. She was born in Pickens County, Ala. on Jan. 20, 1929 to the late Towrey Thomas T.T. and Molly Mae (Jones) Alexander. She taught 7th and 8th grade science and home economics, and was an amazing teacher and mentor to many people. She was a fantastic seamstress and she loved sports, talking and getting to know people, reading and especially playing the card game, canasta. She always taught her children to try to do one good thing daily; she blessed the lives of the people she met and she had a servants heart and will be truly missed. Her husband Lavern Walker had preceded her in death along with her sister Grace. Survivors are: her daughters, Yvette (Jim) Wynn and Lana Annette Ervin. She was a loving grandmother to Brian (Sabrina) Wynn and Justin Ervin. Funeral services were held June 17 in the Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home Chapel with Rev. Lonnie Broome officiating. Arrangements are by Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home, 340 E. Walker Dr., Keystone Heights. 352-473-3176.www. jonesgallagherfh.com PAID OBITUARY Lonnie Waters LAKE BUTLERLonnie Earl Waters, 77, of Lake Butler passed away suddenly Sunday, June 15, 2014 at Shands of UF. Earl was born Sept. 14, 1936 in Lake Butler and lived most of his life there. He was the son of the late L.V. and Georgie Martin Waters. Earl was a plumber with the University of Florida for 33 years before he retired. Earl was a wonderful husband and father to his five children. He was a friend to everyone and never met a stranger, to know him was to love him. Earl was a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Lake Butler Ward. He is preceded in death by two sisters, Eloise Monds and Mary Jane Waters. Mr. Waters is survived by: his loving wife of 48 years, Frances Mathis Waters; three daughters, Beverly Taylor of Lake City, Deborah (Dave) Marszalek, and Martha (Ran) Waters; two sons, Mitchell (Doreen) Waters, Richard (Elizabeth) Waters; brothers, Robert (Pat) Waters, Ted (Jean) Waters, and Alvin Waters; sisters, Joanne (Peter) McDonald, Margaret Stansell, Corrine Stringer, Jeanette (Jake) Bielling, Madelin (Mark) Richardson; 13 grandchildren; and nine great-grandchildren. Funeral services for Mr. Earl Waters will be held Thursday, June 19 at 10:30 am at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Lake Butler ward, with Bishop Paul Waters officiating. Burial will follow at Oak Grove Cemetery. Archer Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. 386-496-2008. PAID OBITUARY Muriel Wilson Muriel Wilson LAWTEYMuriel Mercedes Boyette Wilson, 90, of Lawtey, died Monday, June 16, 2014 at her residence. She was born on Nov. 15, 1923 in Birmingham, Ala. to the late William Elias and Mabel Merrilee (Rape) Boyette. She was a longtime area resident and was a homemaker. She was a member of the First United Methodist Church of Starke. Survivors are: her husband of 72 years, Col. William Wilson of Lawtey, daughters, Del (Jim) Dougherty of Gainesville, Wendie (John) Crommelin of Atlanta, Jackie (Steve) Sullivan of Belleville, Ill., Billie (John) Bloom of Lawtey; sons, William (Jeff Hamaker) Wilson, Jr. of Lawtey, Ray Wilson of Orange Park, and John (Becky) Wilson of Lawtey; and 22 grandchildren and 18 great-grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the First United Methodist Church in Starke on Saturday, June 21 at 2:00 p.m. with Reverend Mike Moore officiating. Arrangements are by Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home of Starke. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a proposed ordinance, which title hereinafter appears, will be consid ered for enactment by the Board of County Commissioners of Bradford County, Florida at a public hearing on July 7, 2014, at 9:30 a.m., or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard, at the County Commission Chambers in the North Wing of the Bradford County Courthouse, lo cated at 945 North Temple Avenue, Starke, Florida. Copies of said or dinance may be inspected by any member of the public at the Office of the County Clerk, located at 945 North Temple Avenue, Starke, Flor ida, during regular business hours. On the date, time and place first above mentioned, all interested per sons may appear and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. AN ORDINANCE OF THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF BRADFORD COUNTY, FLORIDA AMENDING ARTICLE IV OF THE BRADFORD COUNTY CODE TO REVISE THE BRADFORD COUN TY PURCHASING PROCEDURES; PROVIDING DIRECTION TO STAFF; PROVIDING OR SEVER ABILITY; PROVIDING DIRECTION TO THE CODIFIER; AND PROVID ING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. The public hearing may be continued to one or more future dates. Any interested party shall be advised that the date, time and place of any continuation of the public hearing shall be announced during the pub lic hearing and that no further notice concerning the matter will be pub lished. All persons are advised that, if they decide to appeal any decision made at the public hearing, they will need a record of the proceedings and, for such purpose, they may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which re cord includes the testimony and evi dence upon which the appeal is to be based. Persons with disabilities who require assistance to participate in the meeting are requested to no tify the Clerk of the Court, Bradford County Courthouse, Starke, Florida, 904-966-6280 at least two business days in advance; if you are hearing or voice impaired call 1-800-955-8771. 6/19 1tchg-B-sect Legals

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The following individuals were arrested recently by local law enforcement officers in Bradford, Union and Clay (Keystone Heights area) counties: Bradford Danyelle Lee Barreda, 28, of Melrose was arrested June 14 by Bradford deputies for child neglect and for probation violation. According to the arrest report, Barreda went to the Kangaroo store in the Midway area between Keystone and Melrose and tried to purchase beer. The clerk refused to sell her the beer as she was already intoxicated, holding an infant and falling down in the store. Barreda then tried to get into her vehicle to leave the store, but the clerk and several other customers took her baby from her and wouldnt let her drive away. The clerk told the deputy Barreda had already purchased several four-packs of beer earlier in the day, and the deputy discovered through dispatch that Barreda was already on probation for trafficking in stolen property and that part of her probation conditions was no alcohol or drugs. She was arrested, with no bond allowed for the charges. Allen Brent Carlisle, 24, of Lake Butler was arrested June 15 by Bradford deputies for driving a vehicle without having a valid drivers license. Bond was set at $2,000 for the charge. Christopher Lee Crawford, 26, of Starke was arrested June 11 by Bradford deputies for probation violation. Bond was set at $5,000 for the charge. Kristi Nicole Crews, 21, of Starke was arrested June 10 by Starke police for battery. According to the arrest report, Crews and her boyfriend got into an argument, and when he tried to leave in his vehicle, Crews grabbed and scratched him as he tried to shut the door. Robin Michelle Dampier, 23, of Lake Butler was arrested June 15 by Bradford deputies on an out-of-county warrant for failure to appear for original charge of disorderly conduct. Bond was set at $5,000 for the charge. Robert Demps, 62, of Starke was arrested June 13 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. Derric James Dinnell, 32, of Starke was arrested June 14 by Starke police for driving under the influence, possession of marijuana and possession of drug equipment. According to the arrest report, Dinnell was driving and hit another vehicle at the intersection of Old Lawtey Road and S.R. 16. When police arrived, Dinnell admitted the accident was his fault, with the officer noting his speech was slurred and observing open beer cans in his vehicle. Dinnell refused to do the DUI tests, and a search of his vehicle turned up a pill bottle with marijuana in it, along with a pack of rolling papers. Dinnell was arrested and transported to the jail. Brothers Cody David Dover, 23, of Starke and Jessey Lee Dover, 19, of Lake Butler were arrested June 12 by Bradford deputies for burglary and larceny for stealing two ATVs from two different residences, according to the arrest reports. In addition to the burglary and larceny charges, Jessey Dover was charged with criminal mischief-property damage and charged on three different out-of-county warrants from Columbia for failure to appear relating to original charges of driving with license suspended or revoked. The brothers were caught after one of the victims spotted someone driving an ATV near his propertyan ATV the victim thought might be his even though it was black in color and his was yellow. The victim knew those particular ATVs come in only two colors, and black isnt one of them. The victim called law enforcement, and they went to Cody Dovers residence, eventually discovering the missing ATV hidden behind the house, which had been painted black. They also found another ATV that had been stolen in early April, with several people verifying both brothers had been seen driving the ATVs in the area recently. Bond was set at $45,000 for Jessey Dovers charges, and bond was set at $30,000 for Cody Dovers charges. Lafonda Norman Garrard, 44, of Lake Butler was arrested June 14 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. 8B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 19, 2014 40 EQUAL HOUSING OP PORTUNITY. All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex or national origin, or an in tention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal cus todians, pregnant women and people securing cus tody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimina tion, call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777, the tollfree telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. For further information call Florida Commission on Human Relations, Lisa Sutherland 850-488-7082 ext #1005 Commercial FOR RENT PROFESSION AL OFFICE, 1,500 sq.ft. $1,000/mo.up to 3,000 sq.ft. Contiguous $2,000/ mo. Warehouse 3,000 sq. ft. $800/mo. Smith & Smith Realty. 904-9649222. RETAIL SPACE in busy strip center. 1,000 sq.ft. and 2,000 sq. ft. units. South HWY 301 front age, across from the KOA Campground. Call 352235-1675. DOWNTOWN STARKE Pro $315 per month. Confer ence room, kitchen, utili ties and more provided. 904-364-8395. 48 Homes for Sale 3BR/2BA living room, din ing room, family room, laundry room. Back porch is screened in. Storage shed. Large fenced & paint. A/C. Immaculate condition. $120,000.00. Near downtown & schools. 823 Parkwood Place. 912-843-2194 or 912-281-9053 For Rent 3BR/2BA DW 12273 SE 21st Ave.,Starke. $675/ month plus $650/security. Out in country. Service animals only! 904-9648637. SUITE OF OFFICES IN CLUDES Kitchen, Show er, Washer Dryer. Down town STARKE $1000/ MO. For information Call 904-364-9022. PERMANENT ROOMS for rent at the Magnolia Hotel. Both refrigerator and microwave. Special rates, by the month. Call 904-964-4303 for more information. MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT starting at $525 per month. Hidden Oaks, Lake Butler. Call 386496-8111. NICE MOBILE HOMES in Lake Butler & Starke 2 & 3 BR single wides, fenced. DW in Lake But ler. Deposit required. Call 678-438-6828. WE HAVE 2 OR 3 bed room MH, clean, close to prison. Call 352-468-1323 OFFICES FOR LARGE STAFF. Includes living qtrs, showers, kitchen, washer & dryer. This is a living qtrs. $1000/month. Call 904-364-9022 KEYSTONE 2BR/1BA. 1 acre fenced. SW w/room addition. Clean. $525/ month plus last & security. Please call 352-475-3094 or 352-235-1143 5 Yr. 3BR/2BA house for rent. Tile floor, granite counters, Jacuzzi tub, gas wrap around porch. Lake access. Post Masters Vil lage in Keystone Heights. $1,050/mo. plus 1-month deposit. Call Dave 352473-3560. 2BR APT DOWNTOWN STARKE. $500/month. Call 904-364-9022 to see apt. 3BR/1BA home for rent. $500/mo. Providence Area. 386-208-1979 KEYSTONE HEIGHTS 2BR/1BA. CH/A, newly renovated. $500/month. On Silver Lake. Lawn care & maintenance included. Call 352-478-8321 RENT A ROOM IN AN OF FICE. $300 per month. Utilities furnished, kitch en provided. 6 offices available. 4 downstairs, 2 upstairs. For info call 904-964-6305. BUILDING THAT USES METAL SHOP. (Mc Clellan Recycling) 224 E. Washington Street. Starke. $200 per month. Call 904-964-6305 SMALL TRAILER FOR RENT, One person. $350/ monthly, satellite and utilities included. $150/ deposit. 1/2 acre, pet wel come. 904-964-2747 3BR/2BA NEAR Starke Golf course. Available June 16th. $775/mo. $675/ deposit. Will accept HUD. Call Chris @ 904-7320590 3BR/1.5BA VERY CLEAN. Large yard, perfect for a family. $500/month plus deposit. 904-3648135 HOUSECOUNTRY LIVING 5 MILES W. STARKE 2BR / 2BA, LR, DR, Kitchen, Utility Room, 2 car Car port, Central Heat & Air. $700. /moFirst and Last mo. Rent. Sorry NO pets. Call 904-964-6718 Bradford Union Clay 40Notices 41Auctions 42M otor Vehicles & Accessories43R Vs & Campers 44Boats &ATVs 45Land for Sale 46Real Estate Out of Area 47Commercial Property (Rent, Lease, Sale) 48Homes for Sale 49Mobile Homes for Sale 50For Rent 61Scriptur es 62Vacation/Travel 63Love Lines 64Business Opportunities65Help Wanted 66In vestme nt O ppo rtunities67Hunting Land for Rent 68Carpet Cleaning 69Food Supplements 70Money to Lend 71Farm Equipment 72Computers & Accessories51Lost/Found 52Animals & Pets53AY ard Sales53BKeystone Yard Sales53CLake Butler Y ard Sales54Pr oduce 55Wanted 56Antiques 57For Sale 58Child/Adult Home Car e59Personal Services 60Home Impr ovementW ord Ad Classified Tuesday, 12:00 noon Classified Display Tuesday, 12:00 noon964-6305 473-2210 496-2261 C lassified Advertising should be paid in advance unless credit has already been established with the newspaper. A $3.00 service charge will be added to all billing to cover postage and handling. All ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser at the time of placement. However, the classified staff cannot be held responsible for mistakes in classified advertising taken by phone. The newspaper reserves the right to correctly classify and edit all copy or to reject or cancel any advertisements at any time. Only standard abbrevations will be accepted. T O PLACE A CLASSIFIED USE YOUR PHONE A childless loving married couple seeks to adopt. Will be hand on mom/ dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Dawn & Domenick 1(855)9854592. Adam Sklar #0150789 MEDICAL BILLING ACCOUNTING ASST CUSTOMER SERVICE NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED. HS/GED NEEDED TO APPLY Sullivan and Cogliano Training Centers. 1800-451-0709 Start Here Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Housing and Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 844-210-3935 New Pay Increase For Regional Drivers! 40 to 46 CPM + Fuel Bonus! Also, Post-Training Pay Increase for Students! (Depending on Domicile) Get Home EVERY Week + Excellent Benefits. CDL-A req. 888-3628608 Apply @ AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer Females, minorities, protected veterans, and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE save over 60% on these properties with waterfront, stunning vies, EZ access, wooded, level building site and more 2.57acs 15,900 or 1.84acs 23,900. 1-866-738-5522 Hurry Wont Last! Brkr DURRANCE PUMP Q UALITY SERVICE SINCE 1964 Pumps Sales Parts Service ST ATE LICENSE #1305 N EED C ASH F AST! E mail your med-to-hi-resolution digital photo (150dpi+) & ad text to: by 5pm Monday or bring it to:B radford County Telegraph Union County Times Lake Region Monitor( 904) 964-6305 c ash/check/credit cards accepted all for only /wk c overing Bradford, Union & Clay Counties a in our weekly f ree c ommunity shopper: T arget your audience quickly (904) 964-6305 (352) 473-2210 (386) 496-2261 Classified Ads Where one call does it all! Set Right Mobile Homes Specializing In Relocations, Re-Levels, Set-Ups & Disposal Rodney A. Carmichael, OwnerEmail: set_right_homes@yahoo.com904-364-6383 t Crime t Recent arrests in Bradford Clay and Union Craig Hart, 51, of Starke was arrested June 16 by Starke police for possession of drug equipment. According to the arrest report, Hart was riding a bike and stopped by an officer. The officer stated Hart was riding in an area known for narcotics activity (Oak Street and Crosby Street) and that Hart was known by the officer as a narcotics user due to previous contacts. While questioning Hart, the officer spotted a metal homemade pipe secured to the bike rack, which had an odor of marijuana and marijuana residue in it. Hart was arrested, and his bike was taken to the police department. Christopher Jermaine Henderson, 22, of Lawtey was arrested June 16 by Bradford deputies for burglary and contempt of court. According to the arrest report, the victim came home from work and found Henderson in her home and an unidentified female exiting her home. The victim, who had a no-contact order placed against Henderson previously, got in a verbal altercation with Henderson about him and the other person being in her home without her permission. Henderson left, and law enforcement was called. The victim discovered the rear door of the home had been opened and found candles burning and an alcoholic container unopened and still cold in the home. Henderson was located later by the deputy and arrested. Bond was set at $35,000 for the charges. Michael Hudnall, 45, of Starke was arrested June 12 by Bradford deputies on an out-ofcounty warrant from Alachua for violation of a pre-trial release for original charge of domestic battery. Bond was set at $70,000 for the charge. Chelsea Hudnell, 19, was arrested June 12 by Lawtey police for driving a vehicle without having a valid drivers license and possession of drug equipment. Bond was set at $3,000 for the charges. Brian K. Jenkins, 43, of Lawtey was arrested June 15 by Bradford deputies for domestic battery. According to the arrest report, he punched and slapped his wife after getting into an argument during a cookout. The victim also told the deputies Jenkins had bruised her wrists and scratched her legs the previous day when he grabbed her to stop her from leaving their home to go to the store with a friend. Bond was set at $5,000 for the charge. Christopher Mark Adam Lee, 27, of Keystone Heights was arrested June 13 by Bradford deputies for operating a vehicle without a valid drivers license, possession of drug equipment, destroying evidence, resisting an officer, escape, and on an out-of-county warrant from Alachua for failure to appear on original charges of driving with license suspended or revoked and possession of a controlled substance without a prescription. According to the arrest report, deputies were called to a residence near Keystone Heights by Lees girlfriend about a stolen vehicle. Lee told his girlfriend he would go put gas in her car, but hadnt returned and had texted that the vehicle was broken down. While the deputy was talking with the girlfriend, Lee returned with the car and apologized to her, as she needed to leave for work. Determining the car wasnt stolen, the deputy started to leave, but he ran Lees information through dispatch and discovered the warrant on him from Alachua County. The deputy returned and told Lee about the warrant, asked him to place his hands behind his back and searched him for a weapon. The deputy found a box with a pipe and a scouring pad commonly used for smoking crack. He started to place handcuffs on Lee when Lee took off running into the woods with the handcuffs on one of his arms. Lee circled back and appeared to be running to his residence, but he instead grabbed the box with the pipe that the deputy had placed on the ground and went back into the woods. A K-9 unit from Union Correctional was called, and Lee was eventually found in a nearby residence hiding under a lawnmower tarp underneath a porch. After being completely handcuffed, he told the officers he had thrown away the pipe while running in the woods. Bond was set at $320,000 for Lees charges. Charles Edward Lee, 50, of Lawtey was arrested June 14 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $500 for the charge. Denario Marquontis Lewis, 20, of Starke was arrested June 15 by Bradford deputies for probation violation. No bond was allowed for the charge. Michael Samuel Mckean, 29, of Starke was arrested June 15 by Bradford deputies for probation violation. Bond was set at $5,000 for the charge. Beatalise Justin Moses, 25, of Jacksonville was arrested June 15 by Lawtey police for possession of marijuana during a traffic stop. Bond was set at $1,000 for the charge. Leigh Phillip Pinckney, 20, of Lawtey was arrested June 11 by Lawtey police for trespassing. Cory Dequilla Randall, 34, of Putnam Hall was arrested June 16 by Bradford deputies for possession of marijuana. According to the arrest report, Randall was stopped for speeding, and the deputy could smell marijuana in the vehicle. A search of Randall turned up a small bag of marijuana, plus over $1,400 in cash, which he eventually admitted was proceeds from selling marijuana. Deon Jamal Sewell, 24, of Starke was arrested June 14 by Bradford deputies during a traffic stop for possession of marijuana. Sarah Louise Sizemore, 50, of Keystone Heights was arrested June 14 by Bradford deputies for cruelty toward a child. According to the arrest report, Sizemore came home intoxicated and slapped the 15-year-old victim in the face for no apparent reason. Meri Ann Sova, 33, of Starke was arrested June 11 by Bradford deputies for two charges of probation violation. Bond was set at $30,000. Quenisha Toreaarque Trice, 27, of Jacksonville was arrested June 14 by Lawtey police for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $500 for the charge. Mario Demetrie Wiggins, 27, of Jacksonville was arrested June 15 by Lawtey police during a traffic stop for possession of marijuana. Bond was set at $2,000 for the charge. Matthew Duane Wilkinson, 26, of Lawtey was arrested June 15 by Bradford deputies for probation violation. Keystone/Melrose Justin Carmichael, 19, of Keystone Heights, was arrested June 13 by Clay deputies for possession of not more than 20 grams of cannabis and four counts of criminal mischief. Susan Cavender, 36, of Keystone heights was arrested June 11 by Clay deputies for failure to appear. Justin Crouch, 20, of Melrose was arrested June 10 by Clay deputies for two counts of petit theft and three counts of burglary. Douglas Curles, 62, of Keystone Heights was arrested June 11 by Clay deputies for aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. Union Nubbie Wendell Rowan, 30, of Lake Butler was arrested June 13 by Union deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. Eugena Geneva Finley, 31, of Lake Butler was arrested June 8 by Union deputies on out-of-county warrants from Baker for failure to appear on original charges of disorderly intoxication, aggravated assault, disorderly conduct and aggravated battery. Bond was set at $50,000 for the charges. Jerry Ryan Jones, 40, of Lake Butler was arrested June 11 by Union deputies for probation violation. Bond was set at $10,000 for the charge.

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FOR RENT. HOUSE: 3BR/2BA, LR, DRKitch en, utility room, 1 car carport, CH/A, walking distance to down town. $700/mo. First and last month rent. Sorry NO pets. 904-964-6718 KEYSTONE HEIGHTS, 2BR/2BA MH on 1 acre, close to town, $525/ mo. plus deposit. Call 352-475-6260. 3BR/2BA DOUBLEWIDE on 2.5 acres in Lawtey. $750/ 2041. 3BR/2BA living room, din ing room, family room, laundry room. Back porch is screened in. Storage shed. Large fenced & paint. A/C. Immacu late condition. No pets other than service ani mals. $875/month plus deposit. Near downtown & schools. 823 Parkwood Place. 912-843-2194 or 912-281-9053 2BR/1.5BA $595/mo, $500 sec. Service animals only, no smoking. Washer/dry er hookup CH/A, stove, refrigerator. Call 352-4755620. 3BR/2BA SW. Between Starke & Lake Butler. $550/monthly $300/de posit. 904-305-8287 or 904-263-3999 LARGE FURNISHED ROOM WITH BATH for rent $80/weekly. Located on State Rd 100 Starke. Ride to & from doctors, food store, low income are welcome. Monthly rent can be arranged. 904-769-8077. 2BR/2BA DW in Hampton. $650/month, $650/secu rity. Call Kathy 352-8711506 3BR/2BA DW. Outside Starke city limits. CH/A. $650/month, $650/ deposit. Call 352-2356319 Lost/Found HELP ME PLEASE! 9 beautiful puppies. Need home. Father is fullblooded boxer. Mom is a mixed breed, stray took in. Please call 904-2637464. Or 904-796-0917 after 5pm. MOVING SALE. FRI & SAT 10am-2pm. 100A Starke, Grace Baptist Church. Look for signs. GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH RUMMAGE SALE. 13393 June 20 & 21 8am-? June 27 & 28 8am-? Lots of clothing! Fri & Sat 8am-1pm. 15748 NE 17th Avenue. Near Country Club. HOMESCHOOL USED BOOK SWAP. Trinity Bap tist Church Fellowship Hall. Friday 9am-1pm. No entrance fees, sellers fee $1 per table. Email: tha. kh.1997@gmail.com to reserve table. Sales YARD SALE SATURDAY JUNE 21. 7690 Ranchette Rd. (look for signs on C.R. 214 near the landfill). Furniture, tools, and other items. FRI 8AM-5PM SAT 8AM3PM. 5318 NE 255th Drive Melrose. Lots of household items, plus many other things. $5.00 or less items. SAT 8AM-3PM. 7093 Im mokalee Rd. Keystone Heights. Moving sale. Furniture, household items, and clothing. For Sale BUILDING AT 224 E. Washington Street. $7000. Could be mower shop or recycling shop. Call 904-964-6305 CAMPER FOR SALE. 1988 $2000.00. Moving. Call 765-238-9992. 2844 Lake St. Lawtey, FL. KENMORE WASHER & DRYER, GE electric self-clean range. $50 for each or $125.00 for all. 904-782-1889 PLEASE BUY MY OLD 1971 Jackson dump truck. Also pretty good, tires kinda bald. $2,800.00. Please call 904-966-1287 Personal Services CLARK FOUNDATION RE PAIRS, INC. Correction of termite & water-dam aged wood & sills. Level ing & raising Houses/ Bldgs. Pier Replacement & alignment. We do all types of tractor work, excavation and small demolition jobs. Free Es timates: Danny (Buddy) Clark, 904-545-5241. HANDY MANS yard work, cleaning houses, and house repairs. 520-9901407. 352-260-1463. 904368-0867. PRIVATE SWIM LESSONS. Contact Tiffany Gnann at 904-528-8196. Help Wanted LOCAL STARKE BUSI NESS is looking to hire a part-time and/or full-time staff member. Optional shifts are available and Military Veterans are wel come to apply! We are looking for a self-starter, goal oriented person with the willingness to learn. No experience necessary! Please email employment app or resume to vtoddf@ gmail.com DISPATCHER NEEDED: Hours 8am-5pm, MonFri. Good benefits lo cated 4154 SW State Rd 121, Worthington Springs, Fl. Send resume windstream.com. Fax: 386-496-2606, Ap plication online www.mid-flahauling.net. Call Mid-Fla Hauling 800-766-7558 between 10am-3pm. LOCAL PAVEMENT ENGI NEERING AND MANU FACTURING Company is seeking a full time Admin istrative Assistant for their copy of the complete job description from jobs@ dynatest.com DRIVERS: $5,000 SIGN-ON BONUS! Great Pay! Consistent Freight, Great Miles on This Regional Account. Werner Enterprises: 1-855-515-8447 EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT Court Administration Specialty Courts Manager Salary: $45,303.72/ annually For information, visit our website http://www.circuit8.org/ employment COSMETOLOGIST NEED ED must have clientele. Booth rental. Please call Donna at 904-9645485 PART-TIME STAFF WANT ED to work with male & females with disabilities in Starke area. Must meet State reqs. and possess a positive attitude. Call 904-964-7767 or send sionservices@gmail.com Thursday, June 19, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 9B (904) 964-6305 (352) 473-2210 (386) 496-2261 Classified Ads Where one call does it all! Storage building with fenced yard. Can be used for tool rental, mower repair shop, metal buying & sales, record storage... (Or bldg can be changed to meet your equipment) For more info call 904-364-9022 FOR RENT OR SALE PUBLIC AUCTION 6 miles south of Lake City on US Hwy 41 & 441Saturday, June 21 at 9 amYour consignments are welcome. Cash, personal checks, business checks. For more information call AU#1596 AB#1133 Join the rewarding field of correctional nursing! Youll find autonomy, variety, stability and flexibility in this ambulatory setting. Corizon has positions available at the We are currently looking for Full Time, Part Time RNs and LPNs. Call to learn why correctional nursing could be the refreshing change you need! We offer competitive pay plus an excellent benefit package that includes generous paid days off and so much more!For more info, contact: EOE/AAP/DTR Class A CDL Drivers Needed! 704 N. Lake Street Starke NOW OPENJulie Morrow welcomes new agent Julie Morrell DOG WASH JUNE 21, 2014All donations will go towards the Bradford Animal Shelter Come out to help support our shelters needs! Check out Carls Ice Cream while you wait!11AM 3PMLAWTEYSHELL STATION rffntb b rfntfbnfffbffnbnff ffbfrfffbfnfnfbfntfnf frfntbfbfffrtffbfbffbnf fntfffrfnff Southern Villas of StarkeAsk about our 1&2 BR Apartments HC & non-HC Units. Central AC/ Heat, on-site laundry, playground, private, quiet atmosphere. 1001 Southern Villas Dr. Starke, FL Equal Housing Opportunity 801 South Water Street Starke, FL 32091 TDD/TTY 711 1, 2, & 3 bedroom HC & Non-HC accessible apartments.This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. Equal Housing Opportunity

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10B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 19, 2014



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BY JAMES WILLIAMS Special to the Monitor Debbie Strickland is native to Keystone Heights and, as she put it last weekend, Im used to traveling somewhere else for employment or shopping. Over the years, Strickland has commuted to Starke, Melrose, Gainesville, and for the last two years, to Palatka. Chad Rischar also lives in Keystone Heights and works in Palatka. He is a project manager and soil scientist for the St. Johns River Water Management District. Rischar said he begins his commute in his Chevy Silverado pick up about 7:30 a.m. His trip requires two right hand turns from his house, involves no traffic lights, one school zone and takes almost exactly 25 minutes door to door. Strickland goes a little further and takes a back road near Palatka; her commute takes 35 minutes one way. At one time, Strickland worked for North Florida Regional Hospital, and made a 45-minute trek from Keystone Heights to northwest Gainesville. This required a great deal of focus and defensive driving for about half that amount of driving time, she said. There were a lot of traffic lights, once you got to Gainesville, especially if you were travelling during peak rush hours.The hospital workers with a 6 a.m. shift could make that trip in a lot less time, she said. Then, she was asked to help develop the hospitals senior health center in Melrose. The commute that required the biggest adjustment, Strickland said, was the commute from Keystone Heights to Melrose. Up to then, she was used to lrmonitor@bellsouth.net www.StarkeJournal.com Deadline Monday 5 p.m. before publication Phone 352-473-2210 Fax 352-473-2210 Lake Region Monitor Lake Region Monitor USPS 114-170 Keystone Heights, Florida Thursday, June 19, 2014 42 nd Year 7th Issue 75 CENTS Katz asks city, county to set aside money for lakesBY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor Save Our Lakes President Vivian Katz asked Keystone Heights council members and Clay County Commissioners to set aside money for lakes restoration projects, during both boards June meetings. Katz asked Keystone Heights officials for set aside $10,000 a year and county commissioners to budget $40,000 a year. She said the St. Johns River Water Management District budgets a large amount of money for cost-sharing projects, items in which the district partners Wronglyarrested woman intends to sue sheriffBY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor A Louisiana woman whom Clay County deputies arrested twice for crimes she did not commit intends to sue Sheriff Rick Beseler. The womans lawyer, Andrew M. Bonderund wrote in a letter to Beselers general counsel that his client, Ashley Nicole Chiasson, could sue Beseler and some of his employees under several causes of action including false arrest, false imprisonment, malicious prosecution and intentional infliction of emotional distress. According to Bonderund, deputies obtained an arrest warrant for his client after they already identified another woman with the same first and last name as the actual perpetrator of a grand theft that occurred in August. Sheriffs office says it found the real criminalBY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor The Clay County Sheriffs Office said it found and arrested the real perpetrator of crimes for which it had earlier arrested the wrong woman. Ashley Odessa Chiasson was charged on June 12 with grand theft and attempting to defraud a financial institution. According to a sheriffs office report, Chiasson, while working as a live-in maid, made off with an iPod, sunglasses, toiletries, candles, prescription medication and other items in August of 2013 from a home in the Ridgewood neighborhood near Orange Park. Deputies also accused Chiasson of attempting to cash a fraudulent check at an Orange Park Wells Fargo branch on March 25. According to a report, Chiasson tried to cash a $912.67 BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor Clay County Schools Superintendent Charlie Van Zant has transferred three Keystone Heights school administrators to other areas of the county, including the longtime principal of Keystone Heights Elementary School. Van Zant moved Mary Mimbs to J.R. Wilkinson Jr. High School 3 Keystone school administrators transferred out Former Keystone Heights Elementary School administrators: principal (l) Mary Mimbs and Assistant Principal Erin Uria Farmers market vendors summer homeBY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor A group of vendors from the Keystone Heights Farmers Market is setting up a summer venue. Former market manager and current vendor Cheryl Owen said the group of nearly 20 merchants intends to operate from Faith Presbyterian Church in Midway. The vendors effort is in response to the Keystone Heights City Councils unanimous June 2 vote to suspend the citys farmers market for the months Clay County Fair Manager: 2014 was best year everBY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor Pete Sutton, the manager of the Clay County Agricultural Fair, told county commissioners during their June 10 meeting that this years edition of the event was the best ever. Sutton said attendance during the 10-day event was 110,078, an increase of 6.69 percent over last year. Sutton added that good weather significantly contributed to the event exceeding his goal of 110,000 attendees. The previous high attendance was in 2011 A K-9 unit from Union Correctional Institution found a suspect that broke away from a Bradford County deputy on June 13 near the Clay County line. behind a BPbranded convenience store on S.R. 100 and near the Keystone Heights Shrine Club. The responding deputies established a perimeter around the area and requested help from the K-9 unit. In less than 10 minutes, the dog, named Dawg found Lee hiding under a house. Lee was wanted in Alachua County for failure to appear on charges of driving with a suspended license and possession of a controlled substance without a prescription. Vickery, Dawg, DOC Sgt. Danny Klein and Bradford County Sheriffs Deputy Jamie Our Country Day 2014: One Community, One TeamPhotos from last years Our Country Day parade. Clockwise of Jacksonville; (2) Riding the American Legion Post 202 Helen Hersey, Emily Pitocchi, 8, and Dewitt Hersey. (4) and Abigail Milam toss candy to parade patrons. Keystone Heights 45-year tradition of celebrating the nations independence is right around the corner. Our Country Day2014 kicks off on Saturday, June 28th and activities continue all day Friday, July 4th. This years theme is One Community. One Team. Together everyone accomplishes more. On Saturday, June 28th, the Our Country Day Street Dance continues at its new location: the Keystone Airport. Vendors will offer food and beverages, plus rides and games for children and music to keep you dancing until (nearly) midnight. This years street dance features the local band Wreckless. Opening for them Two Keystone residents enjoy daily drive to PalatkaCommuter profile Keystone resident Chad Rischars 25-minute drive from Water Management gives him time to think about life at home. Deborah Strickland favorably compares her 35-minute ride from Keystone to Palatkas Haven Hospice to her previous 10-minute commute to Melrose. Ashley Odessa Chiasson Ashley Nicole Chiasson See MOVE, 2A See OCD, 2A See MARKET, 3A See KATZ, 2A See FAIR, 3A See DRIVE, 3A

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Acting on the arrest warrant, officers in Jefferson Parrish, Louisiana arrested the mother of a two-year-old son and 12-year-old daughter. She was then extradited to Clay County, where according to Bonderund, she had never been before. The lawyer added that after spending nearly four weeks in jail, his client was released on her own recognizance and was immediately arrested again under a separate charge for another crime she did not commit. Bonderund also cited another case in which the sheriffs office arrested the wrong person. In 2013, deputies jailed 17-yearold Clay High School student Cody Lee Williams for sexual assault. Deputies later realized they should have arrested Cody Raymond Williams, also a student at Clay High. with local funding sources. She told the Keystone Heights council that communities and towns frequently ask the district for help in funding local water improvements and that the district shares in the costs of many of those projects. The district has a pot of money for cost share projects, she said. I dont know that we have ever asked for any of it. She also told city council members that an upfront financial commitment would demonstrate that community leaders are unified around lake issues. I dont think I have to go into details here but we havent been on the same page for a lot of years, she said. We are now. She also told city council members that her focus now is on the management of the Upper Etoniah chain of lakes, which stretches from Blue Pond within Camp Blanding to Lake Geneva. She said two projects she is pushing for within the chain of lakes is the cleanup of Alligator Creek and lowering Lake Lowry by one foot with the excess water put into Alligator Creek. In everything that I am seeing and hearing from the district, from the GIA project to everything else, we are going to get the best that we can get, short term, from managing this chain of lakes, she said. Responding to questions from Councilman Paul Yates, Katz said the way she envisions the water funding is that each year the city would set aside $10,000 for water issues with a total limit of $50,000. The council would then approve any disbursements from the fund. Katz told county commissioners that the funding would keep Alligator Creek and the lakes flowing to work on keeping our community healthier and getting our ecotourism going again, and that all depends on the level of our lakes. City council members said they would take up Katzs proposal during the citys budget process. County Commissioners did not comment on Katzs request. 2A Lake Region Monitor Thursday, June 19, 2014 Lake Region MonitorUSPS 114-170 Published each Thursday and entered as Periodical Postage Paid at Keystone Heights, Florida under Act of March 3, 1879.POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Lake Region MonitorP.O. Drawer A Starke, FL 32091 7382 SR 21 Keystone Heights, FL 32656Phone: (352) 473-2210 (352) 473-6721 John M. Miller, PublisherSubscription Rate in Trade Area $39.00 per year: $20.00 six months Outside Trade Area: $39.00 per year: $20.00 six monthsEditor: Dan Hildebran Sports Editor:Cliff Smelley Advertising:Kevin Miller Darlene Douglass Typesetting Eileen Gilmore Advertising and Newspaper Prod. Earl W. Ray Classified Adv. Heather Padgett Bookkeeping:Joan Stewart-Jones Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (LCMS)Sunday School 9 a.m. Worship Service at 10 a.m. 4900 NW 182nd Way Starke(Entrance to Conerly Estates on S.R. 16) (904) gslcstarke@aol.com Everyone Welcome!Childrens Church 10 a.m. Open House check drawn from the account of a Middleburg plumbing business, but was told by a teller she would instead have to open an account and then deposit the money into her new account. Chiasson handed over her Louisiana drivers license to a bank official to open the account but a few minutes later obtained the license back and bolted from the branch before completing the transaction. Investigators later found and arrested another Louisiana woman, Ashley Nicole Chiasson, for both crimes but asked the State Attorneys office to drop the charges when they realized they had the wrong woman.Continued from 1A Bullock is Kiwanis member of the month The Lake Region-Keystone Heights-Melrose Kiwanis Club recognized Clay County School Board member Tina Bullock as its member of the month. Sara Matukaitus, chair of the committee that selected Bullock, composed a poem in the recipients honor: A love of Kiwanis and the community too, Our Kiwanian of the month represents and supports kids all the day through. Womans Club, Business Association, Schools, and wherever theres a need, Our KOM is Tina Bullock for all of her good deeds! Pictured are (l) Sara Matukaitus and Tina Bullock. Photo courtesy of the Lake RegionKeystone Heights-Melrose Kiwanis Club. Melrose Public Library volunteers and staff members donned lab coats for the librarys Family Fun Festival on June 7. Forty-one children and 27 adults came to the event, which featured food, games and activities with a science theme. (R) Peggy Alseph also uses the vinegar and baking soda combination to blow up a balloon. All photos by Madelaine Cajal Melrose Public Library volunteer. in Middleburg, where she will be the vice principal. Mimbs had been the principal at Keystone Elementary for 16 years. Also departing Keystone Elementary is Assistant Principal Erin Uria, who will be taking the same job at Clay Hill Elementary. Replacing Mimbs at the elementary school is Melrose resident Jackie Cory, who was principal at Lake Asbury Elementary. Joining Cory is Assistant Principal Melanie Sanders, who also comes to Keystone from Lake Asbury Elementary. Van Zant transferred Keystone Heights Jr./Sr. High School Vice Principal Justin Williams to the same job at Middleburg Sr. High. Taking over for Williams in Keystone is Barry Underwood, who was vice principal at J.R. Wilkinson Jr. High. Other administrative assignments for the 2014-2015 school year include Linda Pratt as principal of Swimming Pen Creek Elementary, Scott Voytko as principal at Grove Park Elementary, John OBrian as principal at Paterson Elementary, Rob Feltner as principal of Middleburg Sr. High, Anthony Williams as assistant principal at Orange Park Sr. High, Michelle Rovira-Daly as vice principal of Oakleaf Jr. High, Janice Tucker as assistant principal of Oakleaf Sr. High, Anthony Bradley as assistant principal at Orange Park Sr. High, Tracy McLaughlin as principal at Ridgeview Elementary, Bonnie Barker as assistant principal at W.E. Cherry Elementary, Amy Vann as assistant principal of Paterson Elementary, Bridget Payne as assistant principal at Lake Asbury Elementary, Debra Gaynes as assistant principal at Fleming Island Sr. High, Heather Roche as assistant principal at Coppergate Elementary, Shelly Lester as principal at Charles E. Bennett Elementary, Brenda Troutman as vice principal at Oakleaf Sr. High, Jen Halter as vice principal at Green Cove Springs Jr. High, Roger Dailey as assistant principal at Fleming Island Sr. High, Becky Murphy as vice principal at Fleming Island Sr. High, Justin Faulkner as assistant principal at Green Cove Springs Jr. High and Pamela White as principal at Tynes Elementary. Van Zant also appointed Teresa Hankel as the districts supervisor of exceptional student education. She has been employed by Clay County schools for 21 years, with the last seven as an administrator at Fleming Island Sr. High School. Evelyn Chastain is the districts new supervisor of elementary education. Chastain is a former school board member and school superintendent candidate in Bradford County. For the past five years, she has served as the principal at Charles E. Bennett Elementary and was previously the principal at Clay Hill Elementary. MOVEContinued from 1A will be another Lake Region act, Jake Calhoun and the Chasers. Both bands play high energy music that includes tasteful covers, powerful vocals, and creative originals. On Friday, July 4, Our Country Day gets off to a running start with the 5K run. Registration starts at 7 a.m. and the run begins at 8. Over 1,300 runners participated in last years 5K. Visit www.ourcountryday.com, email ourcountryday5k@gmail. com or visit the Our Country Day 5k Facebook page for further information. Join in a volleyball tournament at the Keystone Beach, registration begins at 8 a.m. at the Beach. Arts, crafts, food and beverage vendors will be featured in the Keystone Heights Nature Park and around city hall from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. Live music will also be featured throughout the day. And dont miss Keystones other annual race, the baby crawl, which begins at 10 a.m. in Keystones Theme Park behind city hall. The Our Country Day parade begins at 11 a.m. The patriotic procession features a marching band, floats, bicycles, buggies, beauty queens, tractors, clowns and more surprises. Parade organizers will award prizes for floats and entries closest to the theme, commanders choice, the best marching band and others. At Noon, join in for an acoustic jam session. Bring whatever you play, open mike; all styles of music encouraged. Everyone welcome. At 1 p.m., at the park behind City Hall, join in on some summer fun and participate in our 2nd annual watermelon eating contest. Fireworks will be at Keystone Beach Park again this year. Due to crowd size restrictions, visitors should arrive early. Weather permitting, there will be live music and food and beverages for sale. Entry into the beach park will require each spectator to have an armband, no exceptions and this year armbands cost $1. Armbands will go to the first 4,000 buyers, the absolute limit to entries to the beach park, so get yours early. Armbands are now available and can be purchased at city hall, Mallards Dollarama, Genesis Fitness and other Keystone Heights locations. Fireworks will begin at dusk, weather permitting. Detailed information about all Our Country Day events and applications are available on our website www.ourcountryday. com. Our Country Day is sponsored by the City of Keystone Heights, the Keystone Heights Community Redevelopment Agency, The Clay County Tourist Development Council and generous individuals and businesses.OCDContinued from 1A KATZContinued from 1A Continued from 1A

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using the daily drives to work and home again as a kind of therapeutic travel, shifting from home life to work life and back again. The trip to Melrose only took 10 to 15 minutes, and there wasnt much time to make adjustments, Strickland said. Before she even had time to think about work, she was already there. Two years ago, she was approached by Haven Hospice to manage their Palatka facility. She and Rischar now make roughly the same commute each day. Over a decade ago, Rischar was living in Gainesville and working in Jacksonville for an environmental consulting company. Then, he and his wife decided to move to the country, to Keystone Heights, which cut almost half an hour off his daily drive. About eight years ago, he saw a job opportunity on the Internet at the water management district, an agency he had worked with often. He applied for and got the job. His commute over the last eight years has gone from over an hour-and-a-half one way, to 25 minutes, one way. Strickland said she leaves home around 7:20 a.m. and uses her 35-minute travel time to organize her day; prepare for whatever meetings she will have and once in a while she makes a call on her hands-free phone. I work with people all day, and I use the drive home for myself, she said. On good days, she opens the sun roof of her Nissan Maxima and enjoys the drive to St. Johns Avenue, north of Palatka and home again. Rischar said On the way to work, I think about the strategy for the day, prepare for meetings or projects. I focus my thoughts and do mental preparations. I listen to talk radio and NPR. Coming home at the end of the day, he said, he decompresses and thinks about what needs to be done at home. Depending on the weather he thinks about what he will do with his two kids, and the fact that theres another one on the way. And on the way home, he listens to music, not news or talk radio. Strickland passes only two or three service stations along her route and sometimes buys Valero gas at the Gizmo. But she said she buys most of her gas in Florahome. The Florahome station is on the right hand side of the road as I go to work; theres not much traffic. Strickland said on the way home she may buy gas at the C.R. 214 BP station just outside Keystone Heights. Gas prices dont determine where she shops, she said; it is the roadside convenience factor that motivates her. She estimated she spends $50 a week on gas. Rischars Silverado uses diesel. He first estimated he spent $60 each week on gas, but then his scientific skills took over. He whipped out his calculator and lowered that to $55.55 per week. Neither highway position nor the price of gas determine where hell buy gas, he said. Hes not the type that runs until the empty indicator comes on he keeps about half a tank in his truck almost always. The two commuters have similar and yet different overall descriptions of their daily commute. Strickland said the traffic and the roads are generally good. She hasnt seen a lot of traffic accidents over the last two years, and only occasionally a reckless driver with not enough time or distance to pass safely. Most traffic slows down when it rains, she said. Neither Strickland nor Rischar were ever inconvenienced by student drop-off traffic at Q.I. Roberts Elementary, though it has long been a 40-mph zone. Theres even less traffic now that the Roberts school is Cambridge High with fewer students. Both commuters notice a frequent presence of sand and logging trucks and drivers doing 50 miles per hour. Substantially more than they saw on other commutes. When I want to pass somebody, I have the power to do it, Strickland said of her Nissan. Rischar, who has been making the same trip for eight years, compared to Stricklands two years, said hes pulled people out of ditches and seen a number of traffic accidents and crazy drivers over the years. He has encountered a number of accidents at the blinking light in Grandin. The fog from Putnam Prairie is sometimes an issue, but he said he hasnt been bothered by smoke from prairie and woods fires along S.R. 100. The difference in the two commuters perspectives on the commute may be due to the major resurfacing of S.R. 100 about three years ago. Soil scientist Rischar said the road used to have slight dips and upticks all along the highway, and those were a problem, especially for semi-trucks. The road was widened a little during the project and bridges redone. DOT did a good job on resurfacing that road, Rischar said. Thinking about it a little, he said the traffic on S.R. 100 got calmer after the resurfacing project was completed, and hes seen fewer traffic incidents since then. Rischar said he knew about a dozen Keystone Heights residents who work in Palatka; Thursday, June 19, 2014 Lake Region Monitor 3A FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now survive DIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 Absolute 2-Day Public Auction June 27-28Alabama Dept. of Transportation 537 Tra c Operations Dr. Montgomery, AL 36110 Bryant Wood AL LIC #1137(334) 264-3265 Online Bidding: visit us at: www.jmwood.com EXTRA CASH! Could you use some now that the holidays are over? We specialize in helping people sell through our Classifieds! YARD SALES AUTOS BOATS CLOTHES APPLIANCES... The list goes on..Call Mary Today at 904-964-6305 Lawyers win yard of the monthPhoto by Toni Davis By TONI DAVIS Garden Club of the Lakes The Garden Club of the Lakes, FFGC, has awarded the Yard of the Month for June to attorneys Taylor and Taylor in Keystone Heights. The flowers in front of their office really brighten up the downtown business area where they are located at 420 S. Lawrence Blvd. Mary and Jim Taylor have been in this location since 1998. They are both from Jacksonville and graduates of the University of Florida. Mary enjoys working with her plants and has plans for more projects in her landscaping. Alan Bischoff of Sunshine Pest Control takes care of the lawn spraying and fertilizing. Some of the plants in their front yard are vinca, marigolds, plumbago, mums, sago palms, pittosporum, lantana, pindo palms, crepe myrtle, and loropetalum (Chinese fringe tree). To nominate a Yard of the Month, contact Jackie Host at 352-473-8095 or Toni Davis at 352-475-3146. Anyone with an interest in gardening is invited to the Garden Club meetings at Faith Presbyterian Church located at S.R. 21 and S.E. C.R. 21B in Midway on the second Thursday of each month at 10 a.m.. Our next meeting will be Sept. 11.TPO outlines plans to county commission BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor A representative of the Northeast Florida Transportation Planning Organization outlined the agencys transportation improvement plan for Clay County Commissioners during the commissions June 10 meeting. Wanda Forrest, a transportation planning manager with the TPO, reviewed the agencys short term plans for Clay County. Forrest said the most immediate project is resurfacing Blanding Boulevard from Kingsley Avenue to Knight Boxx Road. Construction for the 4.5-mile, $5.8 million project is now underway and should be completed by 2016. Forest said the next project is widening Blanding Boulevard from four lanes to six lanes from Old Jennings Road to C.R. 218 in Middleburg. Construction for that project will occur in three phases. DOT will begin adding lanes to the section of Blanding Boulevard between Old Jennings Road and Allie Murray Road later this year. Workers will add lanes to Blanding from Allie Murray Road to the Black Creek Bridge in 2017 and 2018, as well as replace the bridge. Lane additions will occur on the most southerly portion of the project, from Black Creek to C.R. 218 in 2018 and 2019. Forrest also said development of the First Coast Expressway is on the short-term work plan, with most of the $190.8 million right of way acquisition between Blanding Boulevard and U.S. 17 scheduled to occur in 2017 and 2018. County approves plats for three subdivisionsBY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor Clay County Commissioners approved plans for a new subdivision near Lakeside, a two more near Branan Field Road during its June 10 meeting. KB Home is developing Angora Bay, a 48.4-acre planned unit development that consists of 98 single-family, residential lots. Angora Bay is located on C.R. 220 south of Lakeside, about one mile west of the intersection of C.R. 220 and College Drive. Richmond American Homes asked the county commission to approve a replat for its Pine Ridge Plantation phase 2-A. The 31.39-acre subdivision, yielding 64 home sites is located within the Branan Field Road Master Plan Overlay off Tynes Boulevard, south of Trail Ridge Road. Taylor Morrison of Florida Inc. is developing Kindlewood Phase Three, a 22.4-acre planned unit development with 78 home sites within the Branan Field Road Master Plan Overlay. The neighborhood is east of Challenger Drive, a quartermile south of Oakleaf Plantation Parkway. of July and August. Council members said they needed to temporarily close the market while the search continued for a market manager. In an email, Owen wrote that the new group will operate as the Keystone Heights Summer Market and it will begin on July 5. Hours will be from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. In a telephone interview, Owen said vendors began organizing the new venue following the councils vote. She said she searched for a location nearer to Keystones downtown area but could not find the proper combination of parking, shade and restroom facilities. Owen added that she is now representing the group but that vendors will run the market jointly. She also said that if the Keystone market reopens in September, vendors plan to return to the event in Natural Park, across from city hall. We still support the Keystone market, she said. At least I do. I dont know where we will be in September and I dont know what the city is going to do. At least one vendor has told me that this (the summer closing) is a prelude to shutting it down. However, Keystone Heights Mayor Tony Brown disputed that claim. I dont know how much clearer we could be, he said of the councils plans to reopen the venue in September. The council hasnt even discussed closing it down permanently. He added that there is strong support for the farmers market on the council. However, the city needs to find a qualified market manager before continuing operations. We need more than someone who just shows up on Saturday and puts out cones, he said.MARKETContinued from 1A with 106,789. Sutton also said the fair came close to breaking its single-day attendance record set in 2013 with 23,199. The attendance on the last day of this years fair reached 22,449. He said that the Saturday before the fairs opening, Green Cove Springs received two inches of rain. However, once the fair opened, sunshine persisted throughout the event. Sutton also said that this years fair appeared to run much smoother than in recent years with no accidents or major problems. He credited the addition of the venues south parking lot for the increased efficiency. Sutton also said the directors of 10 Florida-based fairs visited Clay County during the event, as well as the board of directors for the National Independent Concessionaries Association. Sutton said the events outof-county visitors continued to grow, with 49 percent of this years attendees residing outside of Clay County, an increase of four percent over the previous year and nine percent better than 2012. Sutton added that the 2014 livestock sale also set a record with $223,325 in revenues. Thats significant because most of those kids use that money for college education, he said. Sutton said the one area in which the fair saw a decrease this year was in competitive exhibits. He blamed the drop in participation on converting to an all-online system for entering the exhibits competition. We think that was a mistake, he said. We are going to address that and go back to a more flexible system. We had over 2,300 entries though, in those competitive exhibits. Sutton said the fairs recycling efforts paid off in 2014. He said that this year, workers hauled 34.4 tons of trash from the fairgrounds compared to 64.6 tons in 2011. He credited advice and volunteers from Waste Management, Keep Clay Beautiful, the University of North Floridas Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity and the countys environmental services department for the improvement. Sutton also said the events volunteers were key in building the fairs reputation as a fun, safe and family-oriented venue. There are three paid people: myself, an office manager and a part-time assistant, he said. But weve got thousands of volunteers who have passion. They dedicate their time and talents to put this onThey do it out of pride, and it we ever lose that, the fair will never be the same. FAIRContinued from 1A DRIVEContinued from 1A See COMMUTE, 4A

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We need your clothesCommunity Church of Keystone Heights is hosting our 6th Annual Back to School event on July 22. Clothes will be given away free to children in need. Donate clean, gently used clothes for children sizes 3T through adult. Teenagers come in all sizes and this collection is for all ages and sizes. Drop clothes off at Community Church marked B2S (Back to School). The deadline is July 10. Please call Barbara Sullivan (258-3113), Karen Powell (5389546), Jenn Cumbus (258-5479) or Kim Nugent (258-3602) for more information or to volunteer.Fizz, Boom, Read! At the Keystone Heights branch libraryPreschool programs for children aged 3-5 will be offered each Wednesday morning at 10:30 a.m. June 11, 18, 25 and July 2, 9, and 16. Stories, songs and crafts and a related snack will be offered. There will be a special Stuffed Animal Sleepover (for stuffed reading buddies only) as well as a preschool story time program on July 15 at 6:30 p.m. Reading buddies to be picked up at the final story time, theaterevent breakfast, the following morning. For school-aged children, kindergarten through fifth grade we will offer: June 20th Friday at 10:30am Fizz, Boom, Science! with our friends from Sugarplum Entertainment. June 26th Thursday at 6:00pm Fire and Ice with Mad Science of NE Central Florida June 30th Monday at 2:00pm Did Someone Say Bats?! with Lubee Bat Conservancy and winged friends. July 11th Friday at 10:30am How and Why stories with Kaye Byrnes, Storyteller extraordinaire July 18th Friday at 10:30am Its a Wrap! Finale with special guest, Ronald McDonald.Melrose Bay Art Murmurations. Work by Valerie Aslakson-Jennings, guest artist showing thru June 29. Concert at the beachThe City of Keystone Heights presents Concerts at the beach: Jake Calhoun and the Chasers, The Treble Makers, And It Seems Like Ages Ago. Saturday, 4A Lake Region Monitor Thursday, June 19, 2014 Keystone District Office 352-473-4917 clayelectric.com Rays Auto RepairEstablished 1972473-30837382 Sunrise Blvd.(Next to Hitchcocks Grocery) *** Comfortable Waiting Area ***Jones-Gallagher Funeral HomeDistinquished Caring Service for Over 50 YearsJoe Gallagher OwnerStarke 964-6200 Keystone Heights 473-3176 J B SJackson Building SupplyStarke 964-6078 Lake Butler 496-3079See us for all your Lumber & Plywood BryansHARDWARE & GARDEN CENTERHighway 100 Keystone Heights, FL 473-4006 Highway 21 Melrose, FL 475-2400Worship in the House of the Lord...Somewhere this week! Detailed Info 800.479.1763 johndixon.com400 *ABSOLUTE AUCTION Only 48 Properties Selling with ReserveGAL: 2034, FL: AB-1488, AL: 1481, NC: 6397, SC: 002815R, AK: Thomas J. Tarpley, AR AU Lic #1536, MS: Joe Bilbro, Lic. MS R.E. Broker Thomas J. Tarpley, MS AU Lic #565, Bank-Owned Properties & Other Secured Parties in 180 Offerings Welcome Home To 4004 SE State Road 21, Keystone Heights, FL 32656 (352) 473-3829 Son-shine Worship in our Fellowship Hall Dr. Tom Farmer, Jr. preaching on Contemporary Worship in our MMC Traditional Worship in our Sanctuary Dr. Craig Moore preaching on Exodus 33:12-16 Dinner Served Fried Chicken (Call 352-473-3829 for reservations) Bible Study by Dr. Tom Farmer, Jr. Series: JOIN US FOR VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL!M onday June 23rd thru Friday June 27th9:00AM til 12:30PM daily WEIRD ANIMALS Where Jesus Love is One-of-a-KindMinistries for Children (all ages) & Youth Sundays & Wednesdays! only a few of them work with him at the water management district. Strickland said she knows only one or two other people who live in Keystone Heights and work in the Palatka area, both of them at Haven Hospice. I dont think Palatkas at the top of their minds when Lake Region residents are looking for work, Strickland said. Most people turn immediately to Gainesville or Jacksonville. But there are some large industries or employers in Palatka, she noted, like GeorgiaPacific, the St. Johns River Water Management District, Putnam County Schools or Seminole Electric. Both Rischar and Strickland said they enjoy their daily commutes. Rischar especially likes watching the seasons change along the wooded drive. His drive is helped by memories of the time workmen were burping a gas line and he passed a 30-foot high pillar of fire; or the time two large red stags escaped from their private animal preserve and after wandering along the highway were trying to get home again. All in all, its a fairly gentle ride, Rischar added.COMMUTEContinued from 4A Poison Information Center: Celebrate Summer SafelySummertime fun means enjoying the outdoors. As such, it is important to remember that summer poisoning hazards can threaten your familys health, especially children. The Florida Poison Information Center in Jacksonville urges you to remain aware of these hazards that occur most often during the summer. Children are out of school for the summer and may be spending more time unsupervised in or out of doors with ready access to potentially dangerous chemicals, plants and home products, cautions Dr. Jay Schauben, director of the Florida Poison Information Center in Jacksonville. Poison proof your home and outdoor areas by following a few simple tips to reduce the chance of accidental poisoning emergencies. However, if a poisoning emergency does occur, dont search the Internet; call the poison center Help line immediately at 1-800-2221222. Our specialists in poison information will give you the right answer the first time.Insect repellent Be sure to read the label on every insect repellent and follow directions carefully. Be aware that most contain DEET, and repeatedly applying a product with DEET can increase the risk of harmful effects. When using repellent on a child, adults should place a little on your their hands, and then rub them on the child. Avoid the eyes and mouth. Do not spray on childrens hands as they tend to rub their eyes or place their hands or fingers in their mouths. After returning indoors, wash treated skin with soap and water.Charcoal lighter fluid When accidentally swallowed, this can lead to difficulty breathing and lung damage. Call the poison center help line immediately at 1-800222-1222. Do not induce vomiting. This can make it worse. Keep these products in their original containers and prevent access to them by children.Traveling and camping Remember to program your cell phone with the nationwide toll-free poison center help line: 1-800-222-1222. Store medications, personal products, insect repellent or sunscreen, in locked suitcases away from children. Avoid bringing along a few pills in unmarked containers as these may not be child-resistant and they are unlabeled as to content or quantity. For visitors who are not used to the activity of children, remind them to properly store all personal products, especially prescription items, out of the reach and sight of children. When camping, be careful of the underbrush, as it could contain poison ivy or stinging or biting animals. Remember, Leaves of three, let it be. If someone touches poison ivy, immediately rinse with plenty of running water for at least 15 minutes. For poisonous plant and animal contact, immediately call the poison center help line at 1-800-222-1222 for treatment information.Food poisoning Always wash hands, cutting boards, utensils, and dishes with hot, soapy water after handling raw meat, poultry, or seafood Store, cooked and reheated food at the proper temperatures. Do not let food sit out at room temperature for more than 2 hours. The following food items can quickly spoil and become unsafe: party platters, meat, poultry, seafood, dairy products, eggs, mayonnaise, and cooked vegetables. Signs of food poisoning include fever, headache, diarrhea, stomach pains, nausea, and vomiting. The onset of symptoms could be as little as a few hours to as long as several days. If you suspect a poisoning has occurred, or if you have questions concerning poisonings, immediately call the poison center help line toll free, 24 hours a day at 1-800-222-1222 and a health care professional will assist you. Worth Noting June 21, 2014 5-9 p.m.en Homeschool Used Book SwapTrinity Baptist Church Fellowship Hall Friday, June 20. 9-1. No entrance fee, sellers fee $1 per table. email: tha. kh.1997@gmail.com to reserve table.303 State Road 26, Melrose June 21, Saturday from 10 to noon. Stepping Stones with Stained Glass. Cost: $25. One day workshop, pick-up   on Sunday. Materials included. Teacher: Linda Kemp   WUFT TV Meteorologist Jeff Huffman visits the Melrose Public Library June 19thHave you ever wondered what tools a Meteorologist uses to predict the weather? How he knows if it is going to be a sunny day or if there will be rain? Do weather terms like, Airstream, Ball Lightning, Atmospheric Pressure, Bubble High, and Back Door Cold Front leave you baffled? Have your questions answered on Thursday, June 19th at 10 a.m. when WUFT TV Meteorologist Jeff Huffman visits the library. This exciting program is part of the Putnam County Library Systems Summer Childrens Programs and all school age children and their caretakers are invited to attend. Huffman will speak about the tools he uses and the science of weather. There will be time to ask questions, hear some of his weather stories, make crafts, and eat a rainbow-themed snack. The library is located at 312 Wynnwood Avenue, behind the Melrose Post Office. Space is limited so call the library today at 352 475-1237 and reserve your place. Plan to arrive at least 15 minutes early to get a good seat.Whats That Smell? Your LibraryChildren can explore the sense of smell and smelly thing at their library this summer. There will be smelly experiments, stories, crafts, and games. This free science fun program is open to all school age children and their caretaker. Thursday, July 3rd at 10 at the Melrose Public Library the fun begins. The library is located at 312 Wynnwood Avenue behind the post office. For more information about this and other childrens summer library programs contact the library at 352 475-1237. This program is a Fizz, Boom, Read, a Summer Library Program of the Putnam County Library System with refreshments provided by the Melrose Library Association. Park Rangers Teach Children how to be Nature Detectives at the Melrose Public LibraryAre you a nature detective? Do you know the difference between a frog and a toad? Have you ever wondered why there are so many different shapes of leaves or where the seeds of a pine tree are? A Gold Head Branch State Park Ranger will visit the Melrose Public Library on Thursday, July 31st at 10 am. School age children and their caretakers will learn how to be nature detectives, and explore the librarys native garden with the ranger. There will also be nature stories, crafts, and a special snack. This free Putnam County Library System Summer Program has been made possible because of the support of the Gold Head Branch Parks staff. Additional program funds are provided by the Melrose Library Association. The Melrose Public Library is located at 312 Wynnwood Avenue, behind the Melrose Post Office. For more information about the program call the library at (352) 4751237. Florahome man celebrates 100th birthdayCharlie Bryant displays one of the gifts he received during his 100th birthday celebration. Photo by Cornelius Clayton. Charlie Bryant, who turned 100 years of age on June 2, celebrated his special day with friends and family at his home in Florahome on June 7. Guests included Bradley Caouette, representing State Rep. Charles E. Van Zant, Putnam County Commissioners Karl Flagg, Larry Harvey and E. Walton Pellicer II, Putnam County Sheriff Jeff Hardee and former Alachua County Commissioner Rodney Long. Also attending the party was Helen Suri of Keystone Heights, who is also 100 years of age. Many of Bryants friends and family from Florahome, Putnam Hall, Palatka, Keystone Heights and Johnson joined him during the celebration. He said he wanted to thank everyone for making his 100th birthday special.

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job at Orange Parks Oakleaf High School. Chipoletti, who has family in Clay County, said the move would allow him to be closer to an ill family member. Farnsworth said he believes that perfect fit is out there and indicated he feels good about this upcoming search. He stressed the search will be approached the same way he approached hiring Bryan Boyer as BHS principal, with longevity being a key factor. A successful applicant should want to be at BHS for 10 years or more, Farnsworth said, adding, Were going to find that person. The superintendent said there should be quite a number applicants to consider. The Bradford High School football coaching job is always a coveted position whenever it opens up, Farnsworth said. BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer Steve Reynolds has resigned after two seasons as Bradford High Schools head football coach, leaving the school looking for its 10th coach in 23 years. In a statement via text message, Reynolds said, I decided it was time to make a move. From a head-coaching standpoint, Im looking for something different. Thank you for your years of love and support. Superintendent of Schools Chad Farnsworth said Reynolds didnt go into detail about the decision, though he said he believed Reynolds, as a young coach, was still mapping out his future. His resignation came unexpectedly, but I know Steven was looking at his career path, Farnsworth said, adding, I feel like he just felt it was a good time to move on. The Tornadoes were 9-11 under Reynolds, a 2004 BHS graduate. Bradford went just 3-7 last season, but did qualify for the playoffs for the second time in three years as the District 4-4A runner-up. Farnsworth said hes appreciative of what Reynolds did and said Reynolds will always be a part of the program. Hes a lifelong Tornado, Farnsworth said. He put a tremendous amount of love and effort into our program. When Reynolds was hired in 2012, he wanted to assure BHS supporters that he was going be around for a while, telling the Telegraph-Times-Monitor, People can rest assured its not going to be a revolving door around here anymore. Instead, though, its more of the same for the program, which hasnt had much stability since David Hurse retired after a 29year stint as head coach following the 1990 season. Bradford has had nine head coaches since, with all but one lasting just three years or less. Rowland Cummings the one exceptioncoached four seasons before resigning. Four of the last five BHS coaches have resigned. Cummings, who had a record of 31-16, guided the Tornadoes to three postseason appearances and had the team one win away from playing for a state title in 2003, cited the fact he was being moved as an administrator from BHS to Bradford Middle School as his reason for quitting. Chad Bankston, who followed Cummings, led the Tornadoes again to within one win of playing for a state title in 2004. Bankston, who had a record of 17-15, resigned in June 2007, but refused to discuss the matter with the Telegraph-Times-Monitor. After Steve Hoard (13-17 in 2007-09) was fired, Derek Chipoletti was hired. Chipoletti was 14-7 and guided the team to one postseason appearance, but stepped down after his second season to take the head-coaching Regional News Regional News B Section Thursday, June 19, 2014News from Bradford County, Union County and the Lake RegionFEATURES CRIME SOCIALS OBITUARIES EDITORIAL ** ** ** Reynolds resigns as Bradford High football coach Leslie Shorty Libby was incorrectly identified as Shorty Livey in a June 12 story about Woodrow Griffis Sr. The Telegraph-Times-Monitor apologizes for the error.CorrectionSteve Reynolds is shown during a practice this past May.

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required him to submit a resume and go through a four-part interview process. In the end, 12 ambassadors are chosen. Bergman was not one of the original 12 chosen for 2014-15, but he was the first alternate who would become an ambassador in the case something came up to prevent one of the original selections from serving. That exact scenario occurred, leading to Bergman stepping up into one of the 12 roles. I will actually go through a rigorous training at the end of this month to prepare me for the fall and spring terms, Bergman said. One of the things Bergman is most looking forward to is interacting with his fellow ambassadors, some of whom come from such countries as Ecuador and North Korea. Again, its that diversity that Santa Fe has given me such a love for and appreciation for, Bergman said. Im going to get to be right in the center of that type of diversity. Being selected for the schools hall of fame is considered the highest honor a Santa Fe College student can achieve. Bergman said its an honor hell never forget and one that will continue to inspire him to make the most of his studies. That really made me feel good, Bergman said. That picture will be in the hall of fame forever. Thats something Ill look back at when I go to grad school and say, Well, when you thought you couldnt go back to college, you went back to college, and you did these things. That will be a constant reminder for me to carry that confidence through grad school, too, when I go to UF. Bergman first intended to study psychology when he enrolled at Santa Fe, but has since been pursuing a lifelong passion music. He credits Canova for helping to foster his love for music and the arts. Bergman was involved in Starke Recreation Department activities when Canova was the departments director. There, Bergman learned to play piano and participated in dinner theater performances among other things. She just gave me a love for 2B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, J une 19, 2014 FAM PAK$699 lb FAM PAK$299 lbPRICES AVAILABLEJ UNE 18 JUNE 24 2 $499$9992 $42 $1 3LB BAG Amazing quality. Fantastic prices.S atisfaction Guaranteed FAM PAK$299lb $299 FAM PAK$449 lb HOT BUY$159 lb FAM PAK2 $514 OZ $39910 lb8 CT O pen 7 Days a Week 8am to 8pm1 371 South Walnut St. (Hwy 301) Starke (904) 368-9188 Florida Twin TheatreAll Seats $6.00 Before 6 p.m. 964-5451* OPEN EVERY NIGHT SCREEN 1 SCREEN 2 STARTS FRIDAY Visit us on-line at www.FloridaTwinTheatre.comFri: 7:00, 9:00 Sat: 5:00, 7:00, 9:00 Sun: 5:00, 7:10 Mon. Thurs: 7:30 NOW SHOWING Fri: 8:00 Sat: 5:00, 8:00 Sun: 4:50, 7:15 Mon. Thurs: 7:15 Shailene Woodley in Gerard Butler in Wed. Kids Shows 10am & 1pm All Seats $5.00June 25th How to Train Your Dragon 2 24-month CD Special $10,000 min. cu.org 1.46 % APY* 1.00 % APY* Deposits are federally insured by the NCUA, a US Government Agency, for up to $250,000. Annual Percentage Yield (APY) effective 3/13/2014 and subject to change at any time. 36-month APR is 1.45%, 540 penalty days. 24-month APR is 1.00%, 360 penalty days. Offer expires 8/15/14. 36-month CD Special Federally Insured by the NCUA. 103 Edwards Road (next to Fays Salon)Starke 904-964-7579 BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer Sometimes, Timothy Bergman doesnt feel like himself. The things that are happening to him now seem unreal. Yet it is his picture that will hang on a wall at Santa Fe College, designating him as a member of the schools most recent hall of fame. Plus, Bergman will represent Santa Fe during the 2014-15 school year as an ambassador. A lot has happened in the past year and a half after Bergman, 28, enrolled at Santa Fe College. Its almost like somebody elses dream, Bergman said. Its my dream, but its later. It took 10 years to happen, but its happening now. Its surreal. The Santa Fe College Hall of Fame is limited to one-tenth of the top 1 percent of students in a given year. To apply for consideration, a student must have a cumulative 3.0 GPA and be involved in service to the college and the community. Students selected for the Ambassador Program work with faculty, staff and students to help promote Santa Fe College, assisting in such areas as recruitment, campus tours and public speaking engagements. Santa Fe College Andrews Center adviser Kathleen Combass said its impressive for someone to not only enroll in college at a non-traditional age, but to also become as involved as Bergman has. Were all kind of Timmy rooters here, Combass said. Were his cheerleaders here at the Andrews Center. Bergman dealt with some issues in the past that caused him to leave home at the age of 17 and eventually give up on his schooling. He said he went to a private school at one point and was actually going to enroll at Bradford High School to finish his high school education. However, because of the differences in curriculum, he found out he was going to have to basically repeat his sophomore year while also taking seniorlevel classes. He doesnt doubt that he couldve successfully done what was required of him, but there were just other things going on in his life that affected him at that time. With a loved one who was suffering with cancer at the time, it was so much to handle, Bergman said. I think I couldve done it, but I was just so beaten down by the fact I was going to have to go back and repeat what I had already done. I gave up temporarily. Then temporarily turned into almost 10 years. Bergman admitted it was almost traumatizing for him. He had always been an A student, so grades had never been an issue when it came to giving up on school. He went to work for Verizon Bergman shines in return to school, earns top SFC accolades ARMSTRONGFENCE COMPANY Securing the SoutheastCommercial Residential Rent a Fence Access ControlCall for your FREE Estimate LOCAL PEOPLE ... LOCAL SERVICE! and advanced to a position of district manager. However, the business went through an ownership change, and Bergman said he saw an opportunity to return to school. Bergman signed up for classes at the Andrews Center, though he admitted, I was extremely nervous. The first couple of weeks I even doubted myself, wondering, What am I doing here? Combass and Andrews Center Director Cheryl Canova wereand still areextremely supportive and encouraging, Bergman said. They helped him to realize, This isnt as bad as I thought it was going to be. Canova said, That first step to come (back to school) is one of the hardest things for anybody to do, but it just shows that it can be done. Bergman did more than just enroll and take classes. He joined the Andrews Centers Student Activities and eventually becoming president of that group. That kind of surprised him, he admitted, but it really has been beneficial in establishing a network among fellow students. There are commonalities and diversities there that Ive grown to appreciate, Bergman said. Theyve actually helped me in my studies a lot because Ive gotten to interact with so many different types of people from different walks of life. He fell in love with Santa Fe College during his first semester, and nothing changed when he later began taking classes at the Northwest Campus in Gainesville. Therefore, he applied for the Student Ambassador Program, which BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer A district championship in football and a state championship in weightlifting helped the Keystone Heights High School boys athletic program finish fourth among Class 4A public schools in the Florida High School Athletic Association Floyd E. Lay Sunshine Cup AllSports Awards. Points are awarded for district and regional championships, as well as a schools finish in FHSAA state series competition. Keystone earned 18.75 points, finishing behind Miami Washington (50), Pensacola West Florida (32) and Tallahassee Florida High (29). Coral Springs Charter placed just behind Keystone with 18 points. The next highest finisher among schools in the TelegraphTimes-Monitor coverage area was the Union County boys program, which placed 18th in the Class 1A standings.See SFC, 6B Santa Fe College student Timothy Bergman is pictured with Andrews Center adviser Kathleen Combass. Bergman said Combass and Andrews Center Director Cheryl Canova deserve a lot of credit for his success at the school.

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to Florida, accompanied by an agent form FDLE. He described Taylor as congenial, with a generally good and cooperative attitude. Taylor determined to be what was then known as a crosscountry killerwhat would be called a serial killer in todays terminology. He had been in and out of prison since 1966. going on then in the job market around here, Reddish said. I knew I did not want to farm, so I went around applying for jobs. In March 1957, I was working at a temporary job at DuPont when my father called me and said he wanted me to take over the jail. I asked him when, and he said a in a couple of days. Reddish said he had never had any idea about getting into law enforcement, but he needed the job, so he took it. He moved into the jail (then on Broadway Street) with his family and stayed there until 1960. Reddish lived downstairs, and the prisoners lived upstairs. It was a very consuming job, with something going on all the time, Reddish said. Dad was the boss. I had no training in law enforcement or corrections, but I soon learned. I guess you could say that I had on-the-job training. At the time, the county had only two jailors, so Reddish would work the morning shift, while the other man worked second shift. The jail closed at midnight, but Reddish was on call all night and had to open up and process any prisoners who were brought in after hours. The county also had only two deputies at that time, and one of them resigned, so Reddish found himself working as a deputy as well. I would work the mornings at the jail and then work second shift as a deputy, Reddish said. Russell Redding was the other deputy. He drove a black, unmarked 1957 Dodge. I got to drive the car the deputy who had resigned had been driving, the first marked car owned by the BCSOa 1957 Chevy Bel Air, painted green and white. Reddish was also one of the first two deputies in the county to wear a uniform. It seems that the Florida Sheriffs Association passed a ruling on Oct. 1, 1956, that required all officers to have marked cars and that the deputies wear uniforms. Redding and Reddish worked six months straight, seven days a week, without a day off unless they were sick, which didnt happen often. Finally, Redding talked Reddish into going to talk to his father to see if he would get then some help. I went to my dads office and told him about the problem sweet corn and strawberries, as cash crops. He even remembers plowing fields behind a mule when he was a boy. In 1948, when Reddish was 17, his father ran for county sheriff and was elected by the slim margin of 20 votes. After the election, the family continued to live on the farm until April 1949, when P.D. moved them into town to a house on Broadway Street, near the jail. It seems that telephone service was not available at the farm, and the sheriff was required to have access to a phone. The family still ran the farm, with Dolph Reddish overseeing the operation for his father. He graduated from Bradford High School in 1951 and continued to farm until December 1952, when he enlisted in the Air Force. During his four-year tour of duty as an aircraft mechanic, he served a year at Thule Air Force Base in Greenland (part of Denmark). Even today, I still consider my time in the service as one of the highlights of my life, Reddish said. Here I was, a farm boy who had only been out of the state a couple of times,and not far thensuddenly meeting a lot of people from everywhere. I enjoyed all the diverse backgrounds of my fellow soldiers, and I learned to be on my own and make decisions for myself. The whole experience was a great benefit to me. Spending a year in the Artic Circle close to the North Pole did not provide Reddish with much to do or spend his pay on, so he saved his money. He said that by the time he was transferred to West Palm Beach Air Force Base for his final two years, he had saved up enough to buy himself a new 1955 Ford. Reddish said several of his buddies at West Palm tried to get him to reenlist, but he was ready to come home, returning to Bradford County in December 1956. There really wasnt a lot Thursday, June 19, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 3B Cookout... Car Show & Cookout 12pm 3pm ... Stop by! Its ALL FREE Lots of Great Vendors will be here: Drinks by VFW Post Schwans Truck Handmade Jewelry by Denise Griffis Joes Tires Snow Cones Tuff Girl Designs by Tommy Sue904-368-91051699 N. Temple Ave Hwy 301 North StarkeAarons.com Dr. Virgil A. BerryCHIROPRACTIC PHYSICIANServing the area for 21 years. THERAPEUTIC MASSAGEAVAILABLE Modern methods with old-fashioned concern. Auto Accidents Work Injuries Headaches Neck and Back PainBack & Neck Pain Clinic BY TRACY LEE TATE Special to the Telegraph, Monitor and Times Following in a fathers footsteps is sometimes difficult for sons, and meeting and exceeding the standard of excellence set by a father is even harder. Dolph Eugene Reddish was born on the family farm in Heilbronn Springs on Aug. 27, 1932. He is the son of Pete D. P.D. and Ruth (Sapp) Reddishboth members of old Bradford County families. The Reddishes were some of the first people to settle in Bradford County, Reddish said. The family came down from Jessup in Wayne County, Ga., where there was a pair of father and son sheriffs. Ive seen the first voter role for this county, and there are about a dozen Reddishes on it. Reddish was the second oldest of seven boys, six of whom are still living and remain in the area. He is the only one, however, who followed in his fathers footsteps into politics. Reddish was named by his mothers brother Felix Sapp. He doesnt know why he was named Dolph and said he has often wished for a different name. Its just so uncommon, Reddish said. When people ask you your name, and you tell them, half the time they dont understand and ask you to repeat yourself. P.D. Reddish was a Bradford County commissioner and owned a successful truck farm. Reddish remembers that the family grew most of its own food, as well as Chevy. Information for this story was derived from numerous Bradford County Telegraph stories from 1971 and 1975 and in an interview with former Bradford County Sheriff Dolph Reddish. BY TRACY LEE TATE Special to the Telegraph, Monitor and Times On the morning of Nov. 30, 1971, Bobbie Turner, 38, of Lake Geneva and Patricia (Pat) Marr, 22, of Melrose arrived at work at Nells Style Shop. Nell Duncan, who was taking the day off, owned the combination hair salon and boutique, located on C.R. 21 between Keystone Heights and Melrose. Turners 16-year-old daughter, Valerie, a student at Keystone Heights High School, accompanied the women. Valerie answered the phone about 8:45 a.m., taking a call from a patron checking an appointment time. The woman said the girl did not sound like anything was wrong. At 9:30 a.m., another patron entered the store for an appointment and found the shop apparently empty and the phone ringing. She answered the phone, which was Duncan checking in. The patron, who told Duncan that no one seemed to be there, was asked to check in the back, where there was a small storeroom. When the woman opened the storeroom door, she found a shocking scene. Bobbie Turner and Marr were lying on the floor, shot to death and nearly nude. Turner was wearing only a bra and had been shot four times. Marr was wearing only her shoes and had been shot five times. The patron called law enforcement, but was so upset by her grisly discovery that her name was withheld by the Bradford County Sheriffs Office. Upon arrival at the scene, then BCSO Deputy and Chief Investigator Dolph Reddish quickly determined that Turners daughter, Valerie, was missing. There were no signs of sexual molestation (which was totally ruled out at autopsy) or of a struggle. It appeared that a small amount of money had been taken from the three womens purses and the salons cash box (eventually determined to be about $12). The FBI was immediately called in, as kidnapping was a suspected issue. The murders started a 40-plusmonth odyssey for Reddish, who would become Bradford County Sheriff in just a little over a year. Tips came pouring in to the BCSO, with Reddish questioning 150 people in the first nine days after the crime. I just never could bring myself to give up on the case, Reddish said. I had a desk drawer full of information, and I just kept at it whenever I could. I just couldnt let the case go cold. On June 24, 1972, some children playing in a wooded area near S.R. 16 found a badly decomposed body. Using personal effects, the body was identified as the missing Valerie Turner. She had been shot three times. Reddish said the body had most likely lain there since the day of the other two murders. Finally, after 40 months and two trips to California, Reddish obtained an indictment for Carl Robert Taylor. Taylor was currently serving time at Folsom Prison in San Quentin, Cal., with a further sentence awaiting him in Texas. Reddish traveled to California to bring him back

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Tour where they feasted on good southern home cooking, followed by a family barbeque celebration at the Coburn residence. Thank you mom and dad for making your home, a home of love and character, and allowing the beauty of Jesus to be seen in your commitment to each other through the toils, hardships and happiness of life. Congratulations, Happy 50th Anniversary! Air Force   Airman 1st Class   Evan   A.   Willis   graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San AntonioLackland, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program. He is a 2013 graduate of Keystone Heights   J unior   Se nior High School. He earned an associate degree in 2013 from Santa Fe College, Gainesville. 4B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thu rsday, June 19, 2014 Official Sports Medicine ProvidersTornadoesfor the Bradford High School KATIE TRUMBLE, DPT, ATC/L CAITLIN RAUCKHORST, A TC/L 319 West Call Street Suite A Starke, Florida 32091 Phone: (904) 368-1257 Fax: (904) 368-1258 On June 20, 2014, Charles and Charlene Blalock will celebrate 60 years of marriage. Charles and Charlene met in St. Augustine, Florida in 1950, at Calvary Baptist Church. Charles family made it a point to give Charlene a ride to church any time there was a service. Charles waited patiently for Charlene to finish High School (four years), while he worked for his Uncle Jake at Blalocks Grocery, there in St. Augustine. Finally the day came that they were married in the same church in which they met. They were blessed two years later with the worlds most wonderful baby, Charles Edwin Blalock, Jr. (Eddie). Four years later God blessed with another son, just as wonderful, Jerry Michael Blalock. In 1961 Charles was transferred to Starke, as manager of Food Fair Grocery, where he worked for several years. Charles left the grocery business after several years, but by this time, they had fallen in love with the city of Starke and chose to make it their home. During the 1970s Charles owned Blalocks Meat Market and many will remember him from that. Their son, Eddie is currently pastor at the Orchard Community Church in Lake City. Jerry has retired from the Department of Corrections and is now serving with the police department in St. Augustine. They were blessed with two great daughters-in-love, Beth Chapman Blalock and Lee Ann Green Blalock. Madison Street Baptist Church has been (and still is) an integral part of the Blalocks lives. They have been active members there for 52 years where Charles served as deacon and Charlene has taught various ages in Sunday School. They have enjoyed four grandchildren; five greatgrandchildren and another on the way. The Blalock family has truly been blessed by God and gives Him honor and glory for 64 wonderful years.Blalocks celebrate 60 years Happy 50th Anniversary Larry and Valarie Coburn! As children, Larry and Valarie grew up just a block away from each other in Miami. They attended the same church and became High school sweethearts, at the age of 16. After graduation they got married on June 19, 1964. From high school Larry attended a four-year technical school, and has been a faithful protector and provider as a sheet-metal mechanic and other various types of construction for nearly 55 years. In 1974 they built with their own two hands the house in which they still reside. Valarie as a godly wife, mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother has made this house the beautiful home it is today. They have lived out their dream in raising a family, and living on a farm, in which they still enjoy their growing family, various gardens and all kinds of animal life. As a gift from their children, Larry and Valarie celebrated their 50th Anniversary in the romantic city of Savannah, Ga. They stayed at a bed and breakfast and enjoyed the sites and sounds of Savannah, including the famous Paula Deen Coburns celebrate 50 yearsLarry and Valarie Coburn Socials ,The Union County High School class of 1956 held its 58th reunion with an informal gettogether at Cedar River in Starke on June 7. Lowell Loadholtz, recipient of numerous awards and honored for a lifetime of distinguished service with his induction into the National Hall of Fame for County Agricultural Agents, served as master of ceremony. He also shared his talent as an auctioneer by auctioning off several items for the Sunshine Fund. A social hour was followed by a Dutch-treat luncheon, at which plans were made concerning where the 59th reunion will be held. The monthly Lunch Bunch group was selected to work on the event. Class members from outside Union County who attended were Loadholtz of Cocoa, Eldred Bivins of Earleton, Ronald Hersey and Shirley Guynn Patterson of Jacksonville and Donna Dekle Coleman of McAlpin. To date, the class of 1956 has lost only seven members: Jimmy Nettles, G.A. Mole, Lamar Williams, Gary Roberts, Geneva Andrews Grimes, Kenneth Stafford and Josphine Crews Peeples. Nettles, Mole and Williams never had the opportunity to attend a reunion.UCHS class of holds 58th reunion Bivins. Team members, friends and family are invited to the Bradford-Keystone Heights Relay for Life wrap-up party, which will be held Tuesday, June 24, from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. at the Starke Golf and Country Club. Awards and door prizes will be part of the event, which also includes dinner. For more information, please contact Linda Lee at 904966-3022 or linda19855@ embarqmail.com.BradfordKeystone Relay for Life is June 24 Willis completes basic training Evan Willis

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The trial began Sept. 22, 1975. It had already been ruled by Judge R.A. Green Jr. that the death penalty was not an option since the murders took place during the time that the U.S. Supreme Court had ruled the death penalty to be invalid. The judge also rejected motions from the defense that testimony given by Taylor in other states be disallowed in his trial. The all-male, six-member jury heard testimony from law enforcement and 31 subpoenaed witnesses before finding Taylor guilty on three counts of firstdegree murder. He was given three life sentences, to be served sequentially, but first had to be returned to California to finish out his terms there before then serving another term in Texas. It was the worst case I have ever handled in my years in law enforcement, Reddish said in a recent interview. It was the most grisly and the most timeconsuming case I have ever worked. Im just glad it was finally solved. Thursday, June 19, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 5B we were having, Reddish said. He listened very patiently, but I could tell he wasnt too happy. Finally, he looked at me and said, I dont remember telling you when I hired you that you would work just 40 hours a week, so get your behind back out there and go to work. I dont want to hear any more about this. That was the end of the conversation. I told Mr. Redding about it, and he just laughed, and we continued on for a while, but Dad did eventually hire another person. Reddish said he has no really clear idea of why he stayed on the job. The only reason he could come up with was that he liked the job because it allowed him to help people. He worked as a jailor/deputy until 1960, when he resigned his jailor position and used a Veterans Administration loan to build a home off Wilson Road. He became a full-time outside deputy, while his second-shift man at the jail moved in and took the day shift. As a combination jailor/deputy, Reddish said he had been making $300 a month plus room and board. Once he cut back to just being a deputy, he made about $400 a month and acquired a $70-a-month house payment. As a deputy, Reddish said he got a lot of training, both formal (such as at the FBI Academy in 1969, where Reddish participated in the FBI School for Law Enforcement) and through experience, which has helped him, both in his work in law enforcement and later in the political arena. He said he learned to treat people well and to be as nice to them as was possible, although he allowed that you could only be so nice and still arrest someone. He said he learned to make hard decisions and to speak to people frankly and directly with limited BS. He quickly learned the best way was to tell it like it is and to make quick, right decisions based on the circumstances known at the time. He said if this was done sincerely, then the decision was usually the right one. One of the hardest lessons for him was when he had to arrest someone he knew, especially if that person was a friend. When I first went to work for the sheriffs office, Bradford County had its share of moonshiners, Reddish said. I remember going out to a still site on a raid with some state and federal officers. We would catch whoever was there, or wait for them until they showed up. We could tell the batch they were making was about ready to run off, so we all set up a perimeter and waited for the moonshiners to show up. About daylight, I was hiding in a bush about 200 yards out from the still, and the people showed up. One agent flushed them, and as they ran, we were supposed to catch them. I could see one of them running toward me at a high rate of speed, and as he got closer, I recognized him as a friend. I pulled my pistolan old Luger and shot up in the air. The gun sounded like a cannon going off, and my friend just stopped and wilted away (because) I scared him so bad. When he got straightened out, he came up to me and said, Dolph, what kind of damn gun is that? I told him and then arrested him. We are still friends to this day, even though he didnt quit making moonshine. Reddish found pleasure in the variety provided by his job. He said it was not mundane, not the same all the time. He said he loved the diversity of situations he discovered and was proud of the fact that the job taught him the art of making quick decisions. By 1971, he was chief investigator for the department, dealing with all of the serious crimes and felonies. It was in this capacity that he dealt with the case which he recalls as the worst case he ever dealt with in his entire career: the murders at Nells Style Shop on Nov. 30, 1971. (See sidebar for details.) Reddish was still investigating the case in 1972 when his father decided not to run for sheriff again. P.D. Reddish had been sheriff for 24 years and a county commissioner for 10 years before that, so he felt he had done his share for the people of the county. He told his son that the job was there if he wanted to try for it and that he would help him if he could. Reddish faced seven opponents in his first election, and it served as a real eye-opener for him as to how small-town (or county) politics worked. I had to go out and meet the public on different terms when running for office, Reddish said. As a deputy, I was out there every day providing a service, but in an election, the tables were turned, so to speak. They werent asking me for my help. I was asking them for theirs. Reddish won the election and took office at midnight on Dec. 31, 1972. This first term started a 16-year odyssey as Bradford County sheriff. He said that at the time he became sheriff, the BCSO had seven full-time deputies, either three or four full-time jailors and three office workers to keep up with the paperwork. The amount of paperwork required of my office, including the jail, was huge, Reddish said. I knew money was going to be an issue and that keeping track of it was going to be a full-time job. Reddish described himself as an ultra fiscal conservative, who was even more conservative with the countys money than he was with his own. He said REDDISHContinued from 3B his solution to what he saw as a potential problem came in the form of a financial secretary. I was lucky to find an excellentnot just good financial secretary in Grace Searle, Reddish said. We devised a system where if a deputy needed something, he requested a purchase order for it, which Grace would sign after checking to see if the budget would allow the purchase. It then came to me, and if I thought it was all right, then I would sign it as well. If we didnt have the money, we didnt spend it. Reddish remembered that when his father was sheriff, he would have a sort of wish list of items, which he would select from at the end of the year to purchase with any money left over in his budget. Reddish stresses that these were needed items, just not critically so. That was the mentality back then around the courthouse, the whole group of elected officials, Reddish said. The thinking was clearly, If I dont spend it, someone else will, or else the county commission will cut my budget by that much next year. I felt a little different. Reddish said he always stayed within or under budget and turned any excess money left in his budget at the end of the year back to the county. This brought him some criticism from other county officials. At the end of the first year, I turned back a few thousand dollars, Reddish said. The county tax collector at the time, J.R. Kelley, came to me and told me I couldnt do it. When I asked him why, he said it just wasnt the way things worked. When I persisted, he finally said that it was because it would make all the rest of us look bad. Reddish was elected for three more terms, running unopposed and becoming, in fact, the first sheriff to do so in Bradford County. This state of affairs suited Reddish, he said, because he never really liked getting out and politicking. His father told him it was the worst mistake in his career. Dad told me in 1976 that running unopposed and not getting out there to the people was the worst thing that could happen to me politically, Reddish said. He told me I was losing my political base, which was hard work to build and even harder to rebuild. I guess he was proved right in the 1988 election. Reddish was high man in the primary election of 1988, but lost in the run-off to Kenneth Etheridge. He credits his loss of his political base as one of the main reasons. My dad was right, Reddish said, but then he was always more of a politician than I was. I like Kenneth and think hes a good man, and we are friends to this day. Reddish said Etheridges four years as sheriff were plagued with problemsnot all of his makingand a sort of opposition party developed which asked Reddish to run again. I really didnt want to run again in 1992, but I did it just to quiet people down about it, Reddish said. I was settling in to being retired, and my heart just wasnt in it. I had bought a farmcows not cropsand I was enjoying life. Once again, Reddish made a strong showing in the primary, garnering the most votes, but he lost in the run-off to Bob Milner, who went on to also serve the county for 16 years as Reddish had. This second loss was it for Reddish, and he vowed never to throw his hat into the political ring again. He does, however, have many fond memories of the years he and his father served the county and is grateful that they had the opportunity. On behalf of my late father, P.D. Pete Reddish, and myself, I want to thank all the citizens of Bradford County for allowing us to serve them, Reddish said. Between us, we served for 40 years, 1948-1988, and both of us considered it to be a great honor. Just because he no longer serves does not mean that Reddish doesnt keep up with what is going on in law enforcement. The biggest issues when I was in office were mainly felonies like theft and breaking and entering, with a few shootings and robberies mixed in, Reddish said. The numbers then were very similar to those we see in the county today with one exception: drugs. Reddish said drugs were not really an issue in the county until his last term (1984-88) as sheriff. He said that before that time, moonshine was the predominant illegal substance his deputies had to deal with. The first drug on the scene was marijuana, Reddish said. It slowly replaced moonshine. It started with a few local people growing it for their own use. When they started selling it, the problem quickly grew. As drugs became more prominent, the people became very afraid and couldnt understand why law enforcement couldnt just stamp it out. My arrest record was as good or better than any since, but the problem didnt go away. It kept growing and getting worse every year. As the drug problem mushroomed nationally, not just in Bradford County, law enforcement budgets mushroomed right along with it. Today, it has become the single biggest issue in law enforcement, and the cost is astronomical. (See sidebar.) Not only do you have the cost of enforcement, (but) add in the costs of prosecution, incarceration, care and rehabilitation. Reddish said law enforcement has changed since his time in the field, becoming more socialized and politicalized. He said it has expanded into areas where it didnt travel before, such as into the schools and more community outreach. He wonders if that is really what its for.CASEContinued from 3B by his father, P.D. Pete Reddish. BY TRACY LEE TATE Special to the Telegraph, Times and Monitor The business of enforcing the law has changed a great deal since the days of P.D. Reddish and his son Dolph. The scope of coverage in the community has increased greatly, as has the focus and emphasis placed on various areas addressed, but in no area has there been a greater increase as in the overall cost of doing business. The budget for the Bradford County Sheriffs Office, including the jail, for the 198899 fiscal year (the last budget compiled by Dolph Reddish) shows an initial budget request of $1,002,767, with a final commission-approved figure of $964,767 after the lack of county commission approval for $38,000 to fund the hiring of a new deputy and providing him a car. According to the U.S. Census, the estimated population of Bradford County in 1988 was 22,355. The cost per person for funding the BCSO and Bradford County Jail was $43.16 per person in the county. Census estimates of the Bradford County population for the current budget year, 2013-14, is 26,850an increase of about 20 percent since 1988. The 201314 BCSO budget has increased as well to $5 million. This translates to a cost of $186.22 for every man, woman and child in the countyan increase of about 431 percent.

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a lot of little parts of the arts, Bergman said of Canova. Thats where that started. At Santa Fe, Bergman has been a part of the Santa Fe Jazz Ensemble and the Santa Fe Singers. Plus, he also earned a fine arts scholarship. He wants to be an educator of music, Combass said. I think thats wonderful. Thats going to touch a lot of peoples lives. It has all added up to quite a full college experience in a short amount of time. Canova said Bergman has certainly put his whole heart into his efforts, which makes watching his success rewarding. Im proud that hes going back (to school) and trying to accomplish his dreams, Canova said. He will eventually transfer to the University of Florida, but Bergman will never forget the start Santa Fe College gave him. In fact, if he hadnt been selected as an official ambassador, he would still be one. He loves to talk about Santa Fe College and what it can offer. Why would you not want to go to Santa Fe? Its wonderful, in learning more or becoming involved as a mentor for the 2014-15 school year, please call TALKS Director Byron Ramseur at 904-964-2435 (office) or 904742-6942 (cell). The TALKS (Transferring a Little Knowledge Systematically) mentoring program held a banquet May 29, honoring the 58 students whose lives were touched by 21 mentors this past school year. TALKS, designed by Bradford County Faith Community Center founder James E. McKnight Jr. and its director, Iana Patterson, is a program in which adult mentors share their wisdom with children in Bradford Countys public schools. (TALKS has an agreement with the Bradford County School District to conduct the program on school campuses.) The belief is that an impact can be made on the life of a child with a minimal investment of time by an adult. If you would be interested Banquet honors TALKS students, mentors 6B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 19, 2014 Join us for aJungle Safari Adventure!atFIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCHVACATIONBIBLESCHOOLPre-K to 5th GradeJune 23 276:00pm 8:30pm 11AM to 1PM Come Join the FUN with Us!Pre-register: www.VacationBibleSchool.com/fccs or call the church office 904-964-6100 Graduates407 W. Washington St. Starke 964-4361(Next to Bradford High School) Lic. #30969 Owner, Linda Bryant In Business Since 1979 Back row: Henry Prescott, Jaden Richardson, Ian Shores, Isabella Smith, Travis Reed, Khamari Ellis, Destiny Randolph, Demontay Simmons, Johnny Reeves, Anistyn Lee. Middle row: Natalie Thames, Gabriel Starr, Zamariah Pierce, Jaden Prevatt, Conner Rowe, Joshua Williams, Jaden Vought, Brilyn Brown.Front row: Skye Shores, Braelyn Brown Mildred BattenSTARKE Mildred Louise Batten, 86, of Starke died Wednesday, June 11, 2014 at her residence. She was born on Dec. 17, 1927 in Lawtey to the late Harry and Lillie (Tanner) Padgett and was a lifelong area resident. She was a homemaker and a member of Jehovahs Kingdom Hall. She was preceded in death by her husband Earl Ray Batten. Survivors are: daughter, Linda (Joey) Baldree of Starke; brother, L.E. Padgett of Starke; two grandchildren; and one greatgrandchild. Services were held June 16 in the Dewitt C. Jones Chapel. Interment followed in Hope Cemetery with Elder Kirby Crosley officiating. Arrangements are by JonesGallagher Funeral Home of Starke. Angela BishopRAIFORD Angela Truett Bishop, 43 of Raiford died Saturday, June 14, 2014 at her mothers residence after an extended illness. She was born Sept. 2, 1971 in Griffin, Ga. but lived most of her life in Union County. She was a Phlebotomist nursing assistant. She is survived by her daughter, Angelique Truett of Raiford; sons, Joshua Brown and John Roberts both of Lake Butler; mother, Dorothy Raulerson of Raiford; father, Charles Truett; sisters, Debbie Cox of Raiford and Terri Truett of Lake Butler; half sisters, Kalay Truett and Shanon Truett of Lake Butler; step sisters, Heather Harden of Lake Butler and Brandy Knight of Starke; brothers, Kevin Truett and Chris Truett of Lake Butler; step brothers, Qwinn Raulerson and Brad Kirce of Starke and AJ Knight of Graham.   Funeral services will be held Friday, June 20 at 10:00 am in the Archer Memorial Chapel, with Pastor Terry Elixson officiating. Burial will follow services at Dedan Cemetery. Family invites friends for visitation Thursday, June 19 at the funeral home from 6-8 pm. Archer Funeral Home is charge of arrangements. Jesse BurgessKEYSTONE HEIGHTSJesse Ray Burgess, 91, of Keystone Heights died Wednesday, June 11, 2014 at the Haven Hospice Roberts Care Center in Palatka. He was born in Gamaliel, Ky. on Sept. 14, 1922 to the late Hillary and Virgie Burgess, and served in the United States Army. He was of the Baptist Faith, a World War II veteran. Prior to retirement, he was a custodian for the Indiana School System. He was preceded in death by: the mother of his children, Freida Burgess and their son, Earl Burgess. Survivors are: children, Freida Boggs of Keystone Heights and Edward Wayne Burgess of Indiana; siblings, Reed Burgess and Carson Burgess both of Gamaliel; eight grandchildren; and ten greatgrandchildren. Funeral services and internment will be held in Gamaliel, Ky.. Arrangements are under the care of Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home of Keystone Heights. Harold ByersSTARKEHarold Albert Byers, 58, of Starke died Wednesday, June 11, 2014 at his brothers residence with family by his side. He was born in Lockport, N.Y. on Jan. 3, 1956 to the late Albert Harold Byers and Mildred Shutt Byers. He has been a resident of Bradford County for over 35 years where he was a member of Madison Street Baptist Church and recently had been attending the Pentecostal Church of Gainesville. He retired after 31 years at Griffin Industries. He was preceded in death by his parents and his brother, Roger Byers. He is survived by: his wife of over 29 years, Bonnie Byers of Starke; his daughter, Ruth Hurst of Starke; his step children, Mark (Patricia) Hurst of Starke, Carl Swain and Lillie Eubank of Georgia; his brothers, Ron Byers and James Byers both of Starke and Timothy Byers of Greenville, N.C.; his sister, Susie Byers of Starke; and five grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at a later date. In lieu of flowers please make donations to the funeral home to assist with expenses. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Archie Tanner Funeral Services of Starke. KEYSTONE HEIGHTS Aldwyn Columbus Catlett, 93, of Keystone Heights died at the Roberts Care Center in Palatka, Tuesday, June 10, 2014. He was born in Rural, Georgia on Oct. 11, 1920 to the late Harvie C. and Eliza (Volumna) Lummie Catlett. He served in the United States Navy. He was a long time resident of Jacksonville and an accountant for the railroad department until retiring in Keystone Heights. He was a member at Trinity Baptist Church. He was preceded in death by a sister, Lydia Sailers; a brother, Wallace Catlett, and a grandson, Rory Webb. Survivors are: his wife of 43 years, Juanita (Bessent) Catlett of Keystone Heights; and children, Wayne Aldwyn (Susan) Catlett of Ft. Myers, Daniel (Rae) Overtsreet of Shelby, N.C. and Linda (David) Orr of Jacksonville; a sister, Lillie Mae Waters of Commerce, Ga.; eight grandchildren; and five greatgrandchildren;. Funeral services were held June 17 in Trinity Baptist Church with Pastor James Peoples and Pastor Scott Stanland officiating. Interment followed at the Greenlawn Cemetery in Jacksonville. In lieu of flowers the family would greatly appreciate donations made to Trinity Baptist Church, P.O. Box 1099, Keystone Heights, FL 32656. Arrangements are under the care of Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home of Keystone Heights.Norma DonnSTARKENorma Jean Donn, age 62, of Starke passed away June 12, 2014 at her residence with family by her side. She was born in Irwin, Pa. to Charles Wiehagen and the late Velma Summerfield. Norma was raised in Irwin, where she graduated from Norwin High School. She married the love of her life, Gene Donn, on June 5, 1973. They resided in Kissimmee for many years until they moved to Starke in 1979. Norma had a passion for bringing beauty to any situation with flowers. She was the owner and operator of Bradford Square Florist and later opened Bradford Florist. Norma was a Florist at Wilsons Florist before opening Normas Floral Etc. Norma loved Bradford County and enjoyed helping others. She helped with fundraisers, community events, and founded the Great Pumpkin Escape event. Norma was an avid Gator fan who enjoyed painting, drawing, and doing arts and crafts. She loved her family especially her grandchildren. Norma was preceded in death by her mother and her husband of 31 years, Gene Donn. Norma is survived by: her loving children, Kelly (Kenny Plemons) Sweat, Gina (Wendell) Collins, Tiffany (Jeremy) Snyder, and Kelly Donn all of Starke; her brother, Richard (Amanda) Wiehagen of Pa.; her sister, Patty (Ed) Carroll of Pa.; her ten grandchildren, Tony, Jessica, Karen, Candice, Amber, Wynn, Elijah, Emma, Kali, and Lily; her four great grandchildren; and many close family members. Memorial services will be held on Thursday, June 19 at 6:00 pm at Archie Tanner Funeral Services Chapel with Pastor Al Paulson officiating. The family will receive friends an hour prior to the service at the funeral home. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Archie Tanner Funeral Services, Starke, FL. 904-964-5757. Visit www.archietannerfuneralservices. com to sign the familys guest book.PAID OBITUARY Deanna Coleman and Byron Ramseur. and the importance of maintaining the TALKS program. 964-(8473)13761 South US 301 Starke(1/2 mile south of walmart) Tires Wheels Vehicle Accessories Golf Carts & Parts Jo es Tires Summer Time We have Deep Blue Engel Coolers... Many Sizes!!! SFCContinued from 2B Bergman said. Its in the (Aspen Institutes) top 10 (for community college excellence). Its right her local. Its everything you could want in a college. As Bergman can also tell you, going to college is a viable option for a person of any age. All the things I wanted to do in high school, Im doing now at the college level, he said. I think its kind of an example to anybody that its never too late to go back and do those things. d Obituaries d

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Thursday, June 19, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 7B Watch for our Independence Day (352) 473-9873Open Every Day 10:30AM-9PMN OW OPEN BBQ Burgers Steaks Salads7154 S.E. CR 21B Keystone (intersection of SR100 & 21B) www.tomsrealpitbbq.comfacebook.com/tomsrealpitbbq twitter.com/tomsrealpitbbq Bring in your church bulletin on Sunday and well donate 10% of your purchase back to your church! For more info visit: Friday & Saturday Steak & Shrimp Night SAT JUNE 21STLOTS OF WATER FUN!Waterslide Bounce House & More! 10% OFFTotal PurchaseWith this Ad Expires 6-30-14 Event Coming in July! Celebration Event Coming in July!Hotrod LincolnLive Band 6:30 pmDraft Beer $2 Serving Families in North Florida since 1973 S TARKE OFFICE OPEN 8:30 to 5:30 MON-FRIHwy 301 North, Starke 904-964-2010 (Next to Best Western) The areas largest supplier of Colored GraniteWhen Quality Counts, You Can Count On UsPrimary Location in Lake City at 561 NW Hilton Ave.Member of Better Business Bureau Monument Builders of North America Florida Monument BuildersFL Lic. # F037700 SR-230 E (2 miles east of US-301)B anquet Hall Driving Range Check out our web pagewww.starkegolf.com M emberships Available E xcellent Driving RangeP ro Shop Gift CertificatesG olf Lessons by AppointmentP rofessionally Run Tournaments H ome of the Strawberry Invitational Li ke us on facebook 904-368-0687 phwww.starkedivorce.comMARGARET ANDERSON1011 N. Temple Ave. Starke. FL (US 301 North)Family Law & Will Preparation30 years experience Margaret will continue to serve clients in Alachua County as well as Bradford & Union counties d Obituaries d KEYSTONE HEIGHTSAnne F. Gavrish, 99, of Keystone Heights DIED Tuesday, June 17, 2014 at Haven Hospice Roberts Care Center in Palatka. She was born in Philadelphia, Pa. on Aug. 29, 1914 to the late Pasquale and Librata (Tana) Frederick. She was a telephone operator, grocery store cashier, worked in a sewing factory, and a homemaker. She was a resident of Keystone Heights for the past 10 years moving here from Coastville, Pa. where she still has her membership with the Our Lady of The Rosary Catholic Church. She is affiliated St. William Catholic Church in Keystone. She was preceded in death by two husbands and one grandson. Survivors are: daughters, Elizabeth (Betty) Monko of Keystone Heights and Phyllis Jones of Coastville, Pa.; sister, Martha Luminella of Coastville, Pa.; three grandchildren; several great-grandchildren; and three great-great grandchildren. There will be no local services held. She will be having a Catholic Mass with internment in Pennsylvania. In lieu of flowers contributions can be made to Haven Hospice, 6400 St. Johns Ave., Palatka, FL 32177. Arrangements are under the care of Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home of Keystone Heights.Roger HennemanKEYSTONE HEIGHTSRoger E. Henneman, CPO, USN RET., 66, of Keystone Heights died June 8, 2014 at the VA Medical Center in Gainesville. He moved from Long Beach, Calif. to the Keystone Heights-Hawthorne area back in 1990 after retiring from the U.S. Navy. He was predeceased by his parents, Oathur and Geraldine Henneman; brother, Douglas Henneman; and step-daughter, Laureen Chessel. He is survived by: his wife of 38 years, Barbara Henneman of Keystone Heights; step-daughter, Lisabeth Knapp of Green Cove Springs; step-son, Bradley Michael Knapp of Hawthorne; brother, Randy Henneman; sisters, Star Littles and Kathy Drye all of Arizona; seven grandchildren and one great-granddaughter. Memorial services will be held Monday, June 23 at 3:00 pm at First Assembly of God in Hawthorne with Military Honors and Pastor Lowell Greene officiating. Arrangements are under the care of Moring Funeral Home of Melrose.   FORT WHITE Woodrow Wilson Woody Hollingsworth Jr., 73, died at his home surrounded by family and friends on Wednesday, June 11, 2014. He was born Nov. 30, 1940, in Palatka. He served in the U.S. Army and the National Guard. He worked for the Department of Corrections at RMC from 1969 to 1995. He is preceded in death by parents, Woodrow and Willa Hollingsworth; brother, Warren Hollingsworth; and granddaughter Ashlyn Hollingsworth. He is survived by: his wife of 43 years, Joann; son, Lance Hollingsworth; daughter, Kimberly Owens; and three grandsons, all of Lake Butler; and brother, Robert Hollingsworth of Ohio.   Services were held at Shiloh Baptist Church in Ft. White on June 17. Arrangements by Evans-Carter Funeral Home, High Springs. Jacob JohnsJACKSONVILLLE Jacob Keith Johns, 32, a lifelong resident of Jacksonville died Saturday, June 14, 2014 at Orange Park Medical Center. He was born on Nov. 2, 1981 to Susan McKenzie Dyer and the late Jefferson Jacob Luther Johns, Jr. He attended Evangel Temple. He was preceded in death by: his father; his brother, Matthew Johns; and his maternal grandfather, Jasper Lee McKenzie. He is survived by: mother, Susan McKenzie Dyer of Jacksonville; step-father, Natividad Barahona of Jacksonville; daughters, Alexis Marie Evans and Breeauna Lynn Lied both of Jacksonville; brother, Barry Johns of Jacksonville; half brothers, Jeff Johns of Jacksonville and Michael Lynn (Jennifer) McKenzie of Starke; half-sisters, Lynn (Eldy) Flores of Jacksonville and Jennifer Johns of Bradenton; his maternal grandmother, Willie Mae McKenzie of Starke; and girlfriend, Marie Parrish of Jacksonville. Funeral Services will be held at a later date. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to the funeral home to assist with expenses. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Archie Tanner Funeral Services of Starke. William STARKE William John OBraden, Jr., age 89, of Starke passed away June 15, 2014 at Bradford Terrace Nursing Home. He was born in Baltimore, Md. to the late William and Nellie OBraden, Sr. William and spent most of his life in Baltimore, Md. until relocating to Deltona in 2004. He has been a resident of Starke for the past five years where he became a member of the Harvest of Christ Central Church. William served his country proudly in the United States Army during World War II and retired after many years of dedicated service as a Mason. He was a member of the VFW Post 34 in Brooklyn Park, Md. as a Chaplain for many years. William enjoyed watching wrestling and fishing. William is survived by: his son, Bill (Jackie) OBraden, III of Starke; his grandchildren, Kimberly Ann (Arian) Buhler and William John Beejer OBraden, IV, an active duty U.S. Army member; and his great-grandson, Elias Von Tater Buhler. Private memorial services will be held at a later date. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Archie Tanner Funeral Services, Starke. 904-964-5757. Visit www. archietannerfuneralservices.com to sign the familys guest book.PAID OBITUARYOdessa PueschelLAKE CITYOdessa Charlene Taylor Pueschel, 67, of Lake City died Saturday, June 14, 2104 at Shands of UF in Gainesville. She was born Aug. 12, 1946 in Starke to the late Robert G. Taylor and Odessa McRae Taylor. She graduated from Union County High School and Lake City Community College as a registered nurse. She was preceded in death by her husband Doyle Pueschel. She is survived by: son, Alain (Michelle ) Crews of Raiford; sister, Mary Louise (Tony) Griffis, of Providence; brother, Robert E. (Lucienne) Taylor, Jr. of Lake City; and five grandchildren.   Funeral services will be held Thursday, June 19 at 3:00 pm at the First Baptist Church of Raiford with Rev. J. Tommy Smith and Rev. Steve Haskell officiating. Burial will follow at Sapp Cemetery in Raiford. Archer Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Mary SolesKEYSTONE HEIGHTSMary Alice Turner Soles, 79, of Keystone Heights died Monday, June 16, 2014 at Windsor Manor Nursing Home. She was born in Georgia on Feb. 21, 1935 to the late C.B. and Ruby Lee (DeVane) Turner. She moved to Keystone Heights over 25 years ago, was a Baptist and a homemaker. Survivors are: her husband, Hudson Soles of Keystone Heights; children, Ronnie OBryan of Blountstown, Mary Young, Wayne OBryan, and Tim OBryan all of Port St. Joe; brother, Charles Turner; seven grandchildren; fourteen greatgrandchildren and three great-greatgrandchildren. Memorial services and interment will be at a later date. Arrangements are by Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home of Starke.Lewis ThompsonMELROSE Lewis Henry Thompson, 90, of Melrose passed away on Monday, June 16, 2014, at Haven Hospice in Palatka. Born in Cochran, Ga. and raised in Macon, Ga. He is preceded in death by his parents, Fred and Jessie Mae Thompson; son, Rick Thompson; and beloved sister Bessie Thompson Kite. Lewis loved his country and served it proudly for 22 years active duty in the Navy and Civil Service at NARF, Jax from 1966 to 1985. He was a faithful member of Trinity Baptist Church, Keystone Heights since April 1997, where he received a five year Sunday School Perfect Attendance Award. He loved his church family and appreciated his pastors, Dr. James Peoples and Rev. Scott Stanland. An avid Georgia Dawg fan since 1970, Lewis had a boisterous voice and a wonderful sense of humor. Anytime asked how are you? he always replied Outstanding. Lewis was raised as a Master Mason in 1950 and a member of Scottish Rite since 1972 and a member of the Morocco Shrine in Jacksonville since 1973. He is a past member of West Jax Shrine Club, where he served as President of the Boosters 1973, 1978 and 1984; President of W. Jax Shrine Club 1978; and President of W. Jax Hot Sparks 1982. He served as Morocco Shrine Club coordinator 1979, and also held several other volunteer positions at Morocco. After retirement and move to Melrose, he was a member of Putnam County Shrine Club in Palatka. He leaves to cherish his memory: his devoted wife, Jo; and her sister Betty Green; nieces, Dianne Sapp of Macon, Ga. and Karen (Randy) Allen Kennesaw, Ga.; great nieces, Jill (Ryan) Samples of Dallas, Ga., Jennifer (David) McCollum of Powder Springs, Ga.; nephew, Chuck (Cay) Kite of Macon, Ga.; great nieces, Kimberly (Donovan) Brown, Marietta, Ga., and Kelli (Luke) Wood of St. Simons Island, Ga.; granddaughter, Taylor Thompson (Angel) Clark of Pensacola; and great-grandson Maximo; grandsons, Sean (Marie) Thompson of Jacksonville and Jason (Sara) Thompson of Portland, Ore.; greatgrandsons, Trevor and Christopher; and many dear friends at Trinity Baptist Church and Morocco Shrine. At Lewis request please wear casual clothes or your Shrine or Masonic shirts to his services. He refused to wear suit and tie the last 18 years of his life and hoped you would come comfortable to his services. Flowers are accepted or make a donation to: Haven Hospice, 6400 St. Johns Avenue, Palatka, FL 32177. Funeral services celebrating his life will be held at 11:00 am on June 18 at Trinity Baptist Church, 3716 S.E. State Road 21, Keystone Heights. Viewing will be one hour prior to the service, Dr. James Peoples and Rev. Scott Stanland officiating. Burial will be (the next day) June 19 at 11:00 am at Macon Memorial Park, 3969 Mercer University Drive, Macon, Ga. Arrangements are by Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home of Keystone Heights www. jonesgallagherfh.com. 352-4733176.PAID OBITUARYMinnie WalkerKEYSTONE HEIGHTS Minnie Reita Alexander Walker, lovingly known as Reita Mae, left her loved ones on June 11, 2014. She was born in Pickens County, Ala. on Jan. 20, 1929 to the late Towrey Thomas T.T. and Molly Mae (Jones) Alexander. She taught 7th and 8th grade science and home economics, and was an amazing teacher and mentor to many people. She was a fantastic seamstress and she loved sports, talking and getting to know people, reading and especially playing the card game, canasta. She always taught her children to try to do one good thing daily; she blessed the lives of the people she met and she had a servants heart and will be truly missed. Her husband Lavern Walker had preceded her in death along with her sister Grace. Survivors are: her daughters, Yvette (Jim) Wynn and Lana Annette Ervin. She was a loving grandmother to Brian (Sabrina) Wynn and Justin Ervin. Funeral services were held June 17 in the Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home Chapel with Rev. Lonnie Broome officiating. Arrangements are by Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home, 340 E. Walker Dr., Keystone Heights. 352-473-3176.www. jonesgallagherfh.comPAID OBITUARYLonnie WatersLAKE BUTLERLonnie Earl Waters, 77, of Lake Butler passed away suddenly Sunday, June 15, 2014 at Shands of UF. Earl was born Sept. 14, 1936 in Lake Butler and lived most of his life there. He was the son of the late L.V. and Georgie Martin Waters. Earl was a plumber with the University of Florida for 33 years before he retired. Earl was a wonderful husband and father to his five children. He was a friend to everyone and never met a stranger, to know him was to love him. Earl was a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Lake Butler Ward. He is preceded in death by two sisters, Eloise Monds and Mary Jane Waters. Mr. Waters is survived by: his loving wife of 48 years, Frances Mathis Waters; three daughters, Beverly Taylor of Lake City, Deborah (Dave) Marszalek, and Martha (Ran) Waters; two sons, Mitchell (Doreen) Waters, Richard (Elizabeth) Waters; brothers, Robert (Pat) Waters, Ted (Jean) Waters, and Alvin Waters; sisters, Joanne (Peter) McDonald, Margaret Stansell, Corrine Stringer, Jeanette (Jake) Bielling, Madelin (Mark) Richardson; 13 grandchildren; and nine great-grandchildren. Funeral services for Mr. Earl Waters will be held Thursday, June 19 at 10:30 am at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Lake Butler ward, with Bishop Paul Waters officiating. Burial will follow at Oak Grove Cemetery. Archer Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. 386-496-2008. PAID OBITUARY Muriel WilsonMuriel WilsonLAWTEYMuriel Mercedes Boyette Wilson, 90, of Lawtey, died Monday, June 16, 2014 at her residence. She was born on Nov. 15, 1923 in Birmingham, Ala. to the late William Elias and Mabel Merrilee (Rape) Boyette. She was a longtime area resident and was a homemaker. She was a member of the First United Methodist Church of Starke. Survivors are: her husband of 72 years, Col. William Wilson of Lawtey, daughters, Del (Jim) Dougherty of Gainesville, Wendie (John) Crommelin of Atlanta, Jackie (Steve) Sullivan of Belleville, Ill., Billie (John) Bloom of Lawtey; sons, William (Jeff Hamaker) Wilson, Jr. of Lawtey, Ray Wilson of Orange Park, and John (Becky) Wilson of Lawtey; and 22 grandchildren and 18 great-grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the First United Methodist Church in Starke on Saturday, June 21 at 2:00 p.m. with Reverend Mike Moore officiating. Arrangements are by Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home of Starke. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a proposed ordinance, which title hereinafter appears, will be consid ered for enactment by the Board of County Commissioners of Bradford County, Florida at a public hearing on July 7, 2014, at 9:30 a.m., or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard, at the County Commission Chambers in the North Wing of the Bradford County Courthouse, lo cated at 945 North Temple Avenue, Starke, Florida. Copies of said or dinance may be inspected by any member of the public at the Office of the County Clerk, located at 945 North Temple Avenue, Starke, Flor ida, during regular business hours. On the date, time and place first above mentioned, all interested per sons may appear and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. AN ORDINANCE OF THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF BRADFORD COUNTY, FLORIDA AMENDING ARTICLE IV OF THE BRADFORD COUNTY CODE TO REVISE THE BRADFORD COUN TY PURCHASING PROCEDURES; PROVIDING DIRECTION TO STAFF; PROVIDING OR SEVER ABILITY; PROVIDING DIRECTION TO THE CODIFIER; AND PROVID ING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. The public hearing may be continued to one or more future dates. Any interested party shall be advised that the date, time and place of any continuation of the public hearing shall be announced during the pub lic hearing and that no further notice concerning the matter will be pub lished. All persons are advised that, if they decide to appeal any decision made at the public hearing, they will need a record of the proceedings and, for such purpose, they may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which re cord includes the testimony and evi dence upon which the appeal is to be based. Persons with disabilities who require assistance to participate in the meeting are requested to no tify the Clerk of the Court, Bradford County Courthouse, Starke, Florida, 904-966-6280 at least two business days in advance; if you are hearing or voice impaired call 1-800-955-8771. 6/19 1tchg-B-sect Legals

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The following individuals were arrested recently by local law enforcement officers in Bradford, Union and Clay (Keystone Heights area) counties: BradfordDanyelle Lee Barreda, 28, of Melrose was arrested June 14 by Bradford deputies for child neglect and for probation violation. According to the arrest report, Barreda went to the Kangaroo store in the Midway area between Keystone and Melrose and tried to purchase beer. The clerk refused to sell her the beer as she was already intoxicated, holding an infant and falling down in the store. Barreda then tried to get into her vehicle to leave the store, but the clerk and several other customers took her baby from her and wouldnt let her drive away. The clerk told the deputy Barreda had already purchased several four-packs of beer earlier in the day, and the deputy discovered through dispatch that Barreda was already on probation for trafficking in stolen property and that part of her probation conditions was no alcohol or drugs. She was arrested, with no bond allowed for the charges. Allen Brent Carlisle, 24, of Lake Butler was arrested June 15 by Bradford deputies for driving a vehicle without having a valid drivers license. Bond was set at $2,000 for the charge. Christopher Lee Crawford, 26, of Starke was arrested June 11 by Bradford deputies for probation violation. Bond was set at $5,000 for the charge. Kristi Nicole Crews, 21, of Starke was arrested June 10 by Starke police for battery. According to the arrest report, Crews and her boyfriend got into an argument, and when he tried to leave in his vehicle, Crews grabbed and scratched him as he tried to shut the door. Robin Michelle Dampier, 23, of Lake Butler was arrested June 15 by Bradford deputies on an out-of-county warrant for failure to appear for original charge of disorderly conduct. Bond was set at $5,000 for the charge. Robert Demps, 62, of Starke was arrested June 13 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. Derric James Dinnell, 32, of Starke was arrested June 14 by Starke police for driving under the influence, possession of marijuana and possession of drug equipment. According to the arrest report, Dinnell was driving and hit another vehicle at the intersection of Old Lawtey Road and S.R. 16. When police arrived, Dinnell admitted the accident was his fault, with the officer noting his speech was slurred and observing open beer cans in his vehicle. Dinnell refused to do the DUI tests, and a search of his vehicle turned up a pill bottle with marijuana in it, along with a pack of rolling papers. Dinnell was arrested and transported to the jail. Brothers Cody David Dover, 23, of Starke and Jessey Lee Dover, 19, of Lake Butler were arrested June 12 by Bradford deputies for burglary and larceny for stealing two ATVs from two different residences, according to the arrest reports. In addition to the burglary and larceny charges, Jessey Dover was charged with criminal mischief-property damage and charged on three different out-of-county warrants from Columbia for failure to appear relating to original charges of driving with license suspended or revoked. The brothers were caught after one of the victims spotted someone driving an ATV near his propertyan ATV the victim thought might be his even though it was black in color and his was yellow. The victim knew those particular ATVs come in only two colors, and black isnt one of them. The victim called law enforcement, and they went to Cody Dovers residence, eventually discovering the missing ATV hidden behind the house, which had been painted black. They also found another ATV that had been stolen in early April, with several people verifying both brothers had been seen driving the ATVs in the area recently. Bond was set at $45,000 for Jessey Dovers charges, and bond was set at $30,000 for Cody Dovers charges. Lafonda Norman Garrard, 44, of Lake Butler was arrested June 14 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. 8B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 19, 2014 40 EQUAL HOUSING OP PORTUNITY. All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex or national origin, or an in tention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing cus tody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimina tion, call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777, the tollfree telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. For further information call Florida Commission on Human Relations, Lisa Sutherland 850-488-7082 ext #1005 Commercial FOR RENT PROFESSIONAL OFFICE, 1,500 sq.ft. $1,000/mo.up to 3,000 sq.ft. Contiguous $2,000/ mo. Warehouse 3,000 sq. ft. $800/mo. Smith & Smith Realty. 904-9649222. RETAIL SPACE in busy strip center. 1,000 sq.ft. and 2,000 sq. ft. units. South HWY 301 front age, across from the KOA Campground. Call 352235-1675. DOWNTOWN STARKE Pro $315 per month. Conference room, kitchen, utili ties and more provided. 904-364-8395. 48 Homes for Sale3BR/2BA living room, din ing room, family room, laundry room. Back porch is screened in. Storage shed. Large fenced & paint. A/C. Immaculate condition. $120,000.00. Near downtown & schools. 823 Parkwood Place. 912-843-2194 or 912-281-9053 For Rent3BR/2BA DW 12273 SE 21st Ave.,Starke. $675/ month plus $650/security. Out in country. Service animals only! 904-9648637. SUITE OF OFFICES IN CLUDES Kitchen, Shower, Washer Dryer. Down town STARKE $1000/ MO. For information Call 904-364-9022. PERMANENT ROOMS for rent at the Magnolia Hotel. Both refrigerator and microwave. Special rates, by the month. Call 904-964-4303 for more information. MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT starting at $525 per month. Hidden Oaks, Lake Butler. Call 386496-8111. NICE MOBILE HOMES in Lake Butler & Starke 2 & 3 BR single wides, fenced. DW in Lake But ler. Deposit required. Call 678-438-6828. WE HAVE 2 OR 3 bed room MH, clean, close to prison. Call 352-468-1323 OFFICES FOR LARGE STAFF. Includes living qtrs, showers, kitchen, washer & dryer. This is a living qtrs. $1000/month. Call 904-364-9022 KEYSTONE 2BR/1BA. 1 acre fenced. SW w/room addition. Clean. $525/ month plus last & security. Please call 352-475-3094 or 352-235-1143 5 Yr. 3BR/2BA house for rent. Tile floor, granite counters, Jacuzzi tub, gas wrap around porch. Lake access. Post Masters Village in Keystone Heights. $1,050/mo. plus 1-month deposit. Call Dave 352473-3560. 2BR APT DOWNTOWN STARKE. $500/month. Call 904-364-9022 to see apt. 3BR/1BA home for rent. $500/mo. Providence Area.   386-208-1979 KEYSTONE HEIGHTS 2BR/1BA. CH/A, newly renovated. $500/month. On Silver Lake. Lawn care & maintenance included. Call 352-478-8321 RENT A ROOM IN AN OF FICE. $300 per month. Utilities furnished, kitch en provided. 6 offices available. 4 downstairs, 2 upstairs. For info call 904-964-6305. BUILDING THAT USES METAL SHOP. (Mc Clellan Recycling) 224 E. Washington Street. Starke. $200 per month. Call 904-964-6305 SMALL TRAILER FOR RENT, One person. $350/ monthly, satellite and utilities included. $150/ deposit. 1/2 acre, pet welcome. 904-964-2747 3BR/2BA NEAR Starke Golf course. Available June 16th. $775/mo. $675/ deposit. Will accept HUD. Call Chris @ 904-7320590 3BR/1.5BA VERY CLEAN. Large yard, perfect for a family. $500/month plus deposit. 904-3648135 HOUSECOUNTRY LIVING 5 MILES W. STARKE 2BR / 2BA, LR, DR, Kitchen, Utility Room, 2 car Car port, Central Heat & Air. $700. /moFirst and Last mo. Rent. Sorry NO pets. Call 904-964-6718 Bradford Union Clay 40Notices 41Auctions 42M otor Vehicles & Accessories43RVs & Campers 44Boats &ATVs 45Land for Sale 46Real Estate Out of Area 47Commercial Property (Rent, Lease, Sale) 48Homes for Sale 49Mobile Homes for Sale 50For Rent 61Scriptures 62Vacation/Travel 63Love Lines 64Business Opportunities65Help Wanted 66In vestme nt O ppo rtunities67Hunting Land for Rent 68Carpet Cleaning 69Food Supplements 70Money to Lend 71Farm Equipment 72Computers & Accessories51Lost/Found 52Animals & Pets53AYard Sales53BKeystone Yard Sales53CLake Butler Y ard Sales54Produce 55Wanted 56Antiques 57For Sale 58Child/Adult Home Care59Personal Services 60Home ImprovementWord Ad Classified Tuesday, 12:00 noon Classified Display Tuesday, 12:00 noon964-6305 473-2210 496-2261 C lassified Advertising should be paid in advance unless credit has already been established with the newspaper. A $3.00 service charge will be added to all billing to cover postage and handling. All ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser at the time of placement. However, the classified staff cannot be held responsible for mistakes in classified advertising taken by phone. The newspaper reserves the right to correctly classify and edit all copy or to reject or cancel any advertisements at any time. Only standard abbrevations will be accepted. TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED USE YOUR PHONE A childless loving married couple seeks to adopt. Will be hand on mom/ dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Dawn & Domenick 1(855)9854592. Adam Sklar #0150789 MEDICAL BILLING ACCOUNTING ASST CUSTOMER SERVICE NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED. HS/GED NEEDED TO APPLY Sullivan and Cogliano Training Centers. 1800-451-0709 Start Here Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Housing and Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 844-210-3935 New Pay Increase For Regional Drivers! 40 to 46 CPM + Fuel Bonus! Also, Post-Training Pay Increase for Students! (Depending on Domicile) Get Home EVERY Week + Excellent Benefits. CDL-A req. 888-3628608 Apply @ AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer Females, minorities, protected veterans, and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE save over 60% on these properties with waterfront, stunning vies, EZ access, wooded, level building site and more 2.57acs 15,900 or 1.84acs 23,900. 1-866-738-5522 Hurry Wont Last! Brkr DURRANCE PUMP QUALITY SERVICE SINCE 1964 Pumps Sales Parts Service STATE LICENSE #1305 N EED C ASH F AST! E mail your med-to-hi-resolution digital photo (150dpi+) & ad text to: by 5pm Monday or bring it to:B radford County Telegraph Union County Times Lake Region Monitor( 904) 964-6305 c ash/check/credit cards accepted all for only /wk c overing Bradford, Union & Clay Counties a in our weekly f ree c ommunity shopper: Target your audience quickly (904) 964-6305 (352) 473-2210 (386) 496-2261 Classified Ads Where one call does it all! Set Right Mobile Homes Specializing In Relocations, Re-Levels, Set-Ups & Disposal Rodney A. Carmichael, OwnerEmail: set_right_homes@yahoo.com904-364-6383 t Crime t Recent arrests in Bradford Clay and UnionCraig Hart, 51, of Starke was arrested June 16 by Starke police for possession of drug equipment. According to the arrest report, Hart was riding a bike and stopped by an officer. The officer stated Hart was riding in an area known for narcotics activity (Oak Street and Crosby Street) and that Hart was known by the officer as a narcotics user due to previous contacts. While questioning Hart, the officer spotted a metal homemade pipe secured to the bike rack, which had an odor of marijuana and marijuana residue in it. Hart was arrested, and his bike was taken to the police department. Christopher Jermaine Henderson, 22, of Lawtey was arrested June 16 by Bradford deputies for burglary and contempt of court. According to the arrest report, the victim came home from work and found Henderson in her home and an unidentified female exiting her home. The victim, who had a no-contact order placed against Henderson previously, got in a verbal altercation with Henderson about him and the other person being in her home without her permission. Henderson left, and law enforcement was called. The victim discovered the rear door of the home had been opened and found candles burning and an alcoholic container unopened and still cold in the home. Henderson was located later by the deputy and arrested. Bond was set at $35,000 for the charges. Michael Hudnall, 45, of Starke was arrested June 12 by Bradford deputies on an out-ofcounty warrant from Alachua for violation of a pre-trial release for original charge of domestic battery. Bond was set at $70,000 for the charge. Chelsea Hudnell, 19, was arrested June 12 by Lawtey police for driving a vehicle without having a valid drivers license and possession of drug equipment. Bond was set at $3,000 for the charges. Brian K. Jenkins, 43, of Lawtey was arrested June 15 by Bradford deputies for domestic battery. According to the arrest report, he punched and slapped his wife after getting into an argument during a cookout. The victim also told the deputies Jenkins had bruised her wrists and scratched her legs the previous day when he grabbed her to stop her from leaving their home to go to the store with a friend. Bond was set at $5,000 for the charge. Christopher Mark Adam Lee, 27, of Keystone Heights was arrested June 13 by Bradford deputies for operating a vehicle without a valid drivers license, possession of drug equipment, destroying evidence, resisting an officer, escape, and on an out-of-county warrant from Alachua for failure to appear on original charges of driving with license suspended or revoked and possession of a controlled substance without a prescription. According to the arrest report, deputies were called to a residence near Keystone Heights by Lees girlfriend about a stolen vehicle. Lee told his girlfriend he would go put gas in her car, but hadnt returned and had texted that the vehicle was broken down. While the deputy was talking with the girlfriend, Lee returned with the car and apologized to her, as she needed to leave for work. Determining the car wasnt stolen, the deputy started to leave, but he ran Lees information through dispatch and discovered the warrant on him from Alachua County. The deputy returned and told Lee about the warrant, asked him to place his hands behind his back and searched him for a weapon. The deputy found a box with a pipe and a scouring pad commonly used for smoking crack. He started to place handcuffs on Lee when Lee took off running into the woods with the handcuffs on one of his arms. Lee circled back and appeared to be running to his residence, but he instead grabbed the box with the pipe that the deputy had placed on the ground and went back into the woods. A K-9 unit from Union Correctional was called, and Lee was eventually found in a nearby residence hiding under a lawnmower tarp underneath a porch. After being completely handcuffed, he told the officers he had thrown away the pipe while running in the woods. Bond was set at $320,000 for Lees charges. Charles Edward Lee, 50, of Lawtey was arrested June 14 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $500 for the charge. Denario Marquontis Lewis, 20, of Starke was arrested June 15 by Bradford deputies for probation violation. No bond was allowed for the charge. Michael Samuel Mckean, 29, of Starke was arrested June 15 by Bradford deputies for probation violation. Bond was set at $5,000 for the charge. Beatalise Justin Moses, 25, of Jacksonville was arrested June 15 by Lawtey police for possession of marijuana during a traffic stop. Bond was set at $1,000 for the charge. Leigh Phillip Pinckney, 20, of Lawtey was arrested June 11 by Lawtey police for trespassing. Cory Dequilla Randall, 34, of Putnam Hall was arrested June 16 by Bradford deputies for possession of marijuana. According to the arrest report, Randall was stopped for speeding, and the deputy could smell marijuana in the vehicle. A search of Randall turned up a small bag of marijuana, plus over $1,400 in cash, which he eventually admitted was proceeds from selling marijuana. Deon Jamal Sewell, 24, of Starke was arrested June 14 by Bradford deputies during a traffic stop for possession of marijuana. Sarah Louise Sizemore, 50, of Keystone Heights was arrested June 14 by Bradford deputies for cruelty toward a child. According to the arrest report, Sizemore came home intoxicated and slapped the 15-year-old victim in the face for no apparent reason. Meri Ann Sova, 33, of Starke was arrested June 11 by Bradford deputies for two charges of probation violation. Bond was set at $30,000. Quenisha Toreaarque Trice, 27, of Jacksonville was arrested June 14 by Lawtey police for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $500 for the charge. Mario Demetrie Wiggins, 27, of Jacksonville was arrested June 15 by Lawtey police during a traffic stop for possession of marijuana. Bond was set at $2,000 for the charge. Matthew Duane Wilkinson, 26, of Lawtey was arrested June 15 by Bradford deputies for probation violation.Keystone/MelroseJustin Carmichael, 19, of Keystone Heights, was arrested June 13 by Clay deputies for possession of not more than 20 grams of cannabis and four counts of criminal mischief. Susan Cavender, 36, of Keystone heights was arrested June 11 by Clay deputies for failure to appear. Justin Crouch, 20, of Melrose was arrested June 10 by Clay deputies for two counts of petit theft and three counts of burglary. Douglas Curles, 62, of Keystone Heights was arrested June 11 by Clay deputies for aggravated assault with a deadly weapon.UnionNubbie Wendell Rowan, 30, of Lake Butler was arrested June 13 by Union deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. Eugena Geneva Finley, 31, of Lake Butler was arrested June 8 by Union deputies on out-of-county warrants from Baker for failure to appear on original charges of disorderly intoxication, aggravated assault, disorderly conduct and aggravated battery. Bond was set at $50,000 for the charges. Jerry Ryan Jones, 40, of Lake Butler was arrested June 11 by Union deputies for probation violation. Bond was set at $10,000 for the charge.

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FOR RENT. HOUSE: 3BR/2BA, LR, DRKitchen, utility room, 1 car carport, CH/A, walking distance to down town. $700/mo. First and last month rent. Sorry NO pets. 904-964-6718 KEYSTONE HEIGHTS, 2BR/2BA MH on 1 acre, close to town, $525/ mo. plus deposit. Call 352-475-6260. 3BR/2BA DOUBLEWIDE on 2.5 acres in Lawtey. $750/ 2041. 3BR/2BA living room, din ing room, family room, laundry room. Back porch is screened in. Storage shed. Large fenced & paint. A/C. Immacu late condition. No pets other than service ani mals. $875/month plus deposit. Near downtown & schools. 823 Parkwood Place. 912-843-2194 or 912-281-9053 2BR/1.5BA $595/mo, $500 sec. Service animals only, no smoking. Washer/dry er hookup CH/A, stove, refrigerator. Call 352-4755620. 3BR/2BA SW. Between Starke & Lake Butler. $550/monthly $300/de posit. 904-305-8287 or 904-263-3999 LARGE FURNISHED ROOM WITH BATH for rent $80/weekly. Located on State Rd 100 Starke. Ride to & from doctors, food store, low income are welcome. Monthly rent can be arranged. 904-769-8077. 2BR/2BA DW in Hampton. $650/month, $650/secu rity. Call Kathy 352-8711506 3BR/2BA DW. Outside Starke city limits. CH/A. $650/month, $650/ deposit. Call 352-2356319 Lost/FoundHELP ME PLEASE! 9 beautiful puppies. Need home. Father is fullblooded boxer. Mom is a mixed breed, stray took in. Please call 904-2637464. Or 904-796-0917 after 5pm. MOVING SALE. FRI & SAT 10am-2pm. 100A Starke, Grace Baptist Church. Look for signs. GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH RUMMAGE SALE. 13393 June 20 & 21 8am-? June 27 & 28 8am-? Lots of clothing! Fri & Sat 8am-1pm. 15748 NE 17th Avenue. Near Country Club. HOMESCHOOL USED BOOK SWAP. Trinity Bap tist Church Fellowship Hall. Friday 9am-1pm. No entrance fees, sellers fee $1 per table. Email: tha. kh.1997@gmail.com to reserve table. SalesYARD SALE SATURDAY JUNE 21. 7690 Ranchette Rd. (look for signs on C.R. 214 near the landfill). Furniture, tools, and other items. FRI 8AM-5PM SAT 8AM3PM. 5318 NE 255th Drive Melrose. Lots of household items, plus many other things. $5.00 or less items. SAT 8AM-3PM. 7093 Im mokalee Rd. Keystone Heights. Moving sale. Furniture, household items, and clothing. For SaleBUILDING AT 224 E. Washington Street. $7000. Could be mower shop or recycling shop. Call 904-964-6305 CAMPER FOR SALE. 1988 $2000.00. Moving. Call 765-238-9992. 2844 Lake St. Lawtey, FL. KENMORE WASHER & DRYER, GE electric self-clean range. $50 for each or $125.00 for all. 904-782-1889 PLEASE BUY MY OLD 1971 Jackson dump truck. Also pretty good, tires kinda bald. $2,800.00. Please call 904-966-1287 Personal ServicesCLARK FOUNDATION REPAIRS, INC. Correction of termite & water-dam aged wood & sills. Level ing & raising Houses/ Bldgs. Pier Replacement & alignment. We do all types of tractor work, excavation and small demolition jobs. Free Estimates: Danny (Buddy) Clark, 904-545-5241. HANDY MANS yard work, cleaning houses, and house repairs. 520-9901407. 352-260-1463. 904368-0867. PRIVATE SWIM LESSONS. Contact Tiffany Gnann at 904-528-8196. Help WantedLOCAL STARKE BUSI NESS is looking to hire a part-time and/or full-time staff member. Optional shifts are available and Military Veterans are wel come to apply! We are looking for a self-starter, goal oriented person with the willingness to learn. No experience necessary! Please email employment app or resume to vtoddf@ gmail.com DISPATCHER NEEDED: Hours 8am-5pm, MonFri. Good benefits located 4154 SW State Rd 121, Worthington Springs, Fl. Send resume windstream.com. Fax: 386-496-2606, Ap plication online www.mid-flahauling.net. Call Mid-Fla Hauling 800-766-7558 between 10am-3pm. LOCAL PAVEMENT ENGINEERING AND MANU FACTURING Company is seeking a full time Admin istrative Assistant for their copy of the complete job description from jobs@ dynatest.com DRIVERS: $5,000 SIGN-ON BONUS! Great Pay! Consistent Freight, Great Miles on This Regional Account. Werner Enterprises: 1-855-515-8447 EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT Court Administration Specialty Courts Manager Salary: $45,303.72/ annually For information, visit our website http://www.circuit8.org/ employment COSMETOLOGIST NEEDED must have clientele. Booth rental. Please call Donna at 904-9645485 PART-TIME STAFF WANT ED to work with male & females with disabilities in Starke area. Must meet State reqs. and possess a positive attitude. Call 904-964-7767 or send sionservices@gmail.com Thursday, June 19, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 9B (904) 964-6305 (352) 473-2210 (386) 496-2261 Classified Ads Where one call does it all! Storage building with fenced yard. Can be used for tool rental, mower repair shop, metal buying & sales, record storage... (Or bldg can be changed to meet your equipment) For more info call 904-364-9022 FOR RENT OR SALE PUBLIC AUCTION 6 miles south of Lake City on US Hwy 41 & 441Saturday, June 21 at 9 amYour consignments are welcome. Cash, personal checks, business checks. For more information call AU#1596 AB#1133 Join the rewarding field of correctional nursing! Youll find autonomy, variety, stability and flexibility in this ambulatory setting. Corizon has positions available at the We are currently looking for Full Time, Part Time RNs and LPNs. Call to learn why correctional nursing could be the refreshing change you need! We offer competitive pay plus an excellent benefit package that includes generous paid days off and so much more!For more info, contact: EOE/AAP/DTR Class A CDL Drivers Needed! 704 N. Lake Street Starke NOW OPENJulie Morrow welcomes new agent Julie Morrell DOG WASH JUNE 21, 2014All donations will go towards the Bradford Animal Shelter Come out to help support our shelters needs! Check out Carls Ice Cream while you wait!11AM 3PMLAWTEYSHELL STATION rffntb b rfntfbnfffbffnbnff ffbfrfffbfnfnfbfntfnf frfntbfbfffrtffbfbffbnf fntfffrfnff Southern Villas of StarkeAsk about our 1&2 BR Apartments HC & non-HC Units. Central AC/ Heat, on-site laundry, playground, private, quiet atmosphere. 1001 Southern Villas Dr. Starke, FL Equal Housing Opportunity 801 South Water Street Starke, FL 32091 TDD/TTY 711 1, 2, & 3 bedroom HC & Non-HCaccessible apartments.This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. Equal Housing Opportunity

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10B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 19, 2014