Lake Region Monitor

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Lake Region Monitor
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John M. Miller
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Keystone Heights, Florida
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lrmonitor@bellsouth.net www.StarkeJournal.com Deadline Monday 5 p.m. before publication Phone 352-473-2210 Fax 352-473-2210 Lake Region Monitor Lake Region Monitor USPS 114-170 Keystone Heights, Florida Thursday, June 5, 2014 42 nd Year 5th Issue 75 CENTS Melrose man accused of killing NY trooper had Clay Co. DUIBY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor MELROSE-The Melrose man accused of killing a New York State Trooper on May 29 was arrested for DUI in Clay County five-and-a-half years ago. New York officials said Almond Arnold Upton, 60, intentionally struck and killed Trooper Christopher Skinner on Interstate 81 near Binghamton.   Skinner was conducting a traffic stop when he was hit. Officials added that before the fatal collision, the Melrose man, driving a Toyota Tacoma around noon, intentionally struck two other vehicles that were also traveling north on the interstate. Law enforcement officials said that prior to striking Skinner, Upton swerved from the inside passing lane of the roadway to the right, crossing the outside lane and hitting the stopped car and the trooper. Moments later, Upton pulled over and ran into the woods.   Law enforcement officers caught him an hour later.   They said he showed no signs of impairment. According to a Clay County Sheriffs report, on Oct. 19, 2008, a motorist reported seeing a silver Toyota pickup driven by a possibly drunk driver traveling west on S.R. 100 near C.R. 219.   A deputy, who was already parked at a nearby convenience store wrote in the report that he saw Upton stagger out of the pickup, walk inside the store and purchase lottery tickets.   After Upton refused to take a field sobriety test, the officer arrested him.   At the Clay County jail, deputies took two breath samples from Upton, which registered alcohol levels of .201 and .190, double the states legal limit. According to the arresting officer, Upton said he refused to take the field sobriety test because he had failed one in Connecticut.   He also told the deputy that he had consumed around a dozen beers before encountering the lawman at the convenience store. Upton Lake Brooklyn up 11 feet in nearly 2 yearsOn May 31, Lake Brooklyns water level was at 96.25 feet above sea level. That is up 11.07 feet since its last low of 85.18 feet on June 23, 2012. The record low since 1991 occurred on Sept. 6, 1994 at 85.15 feet. The record high since 1991 was 112.87 feet on May 2, 1998. Keystone Heights council member sworn inKeystone Heights City Manager (L) Terry Suggs swears in the municipalitys newest council member, Steve Hart during the councils June 2 meeting while city staff member member Tony Brown. Brown vacated the seat to run for mayor. Sheriffs owning up to Kindergarten marijuanaBY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor KEYSTONE HEIGHTS The family members of a sixyear-old boy who brought marijuana to Keystone Heights Elementary School are all denying the cannabis belongs to them, according to the Clay County Sheriffs Office. A school resource officer wrote in a report that during the morning of May 28, the kindergartener was bragging to classmates that he had brought his mothers cigarettes to school. Principal Mary Mimbs took possession of the childs backpack, confiscated the pack of cigarettes and discovered what appeared to be a small plastic bag of marijuana in the box. At the time of the discovery, the childs mother happened to be on campus to watch her son in a kindergarten performance. After the show, the deputy interviewed the mother who denied owning the drugs. She said she had no idea how the boy obtained the marijuana. Sheriffs office spokesperson Mary Justino said that none of the childs family members have, so far, claimed the substance, and unless someone does, an arrest us unlikely. We dont believe the 6-yearold boy knew there was pot in the cigarette box/case, she wrote in Clay Electric trustee Angus Hastings dead at 87BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor KEYSTONE HEIGHTS-Clay Electric Cooperatives longestserving trustee and a pioneer in political action for electric co-ops died on May 25. Angus Hastings was 87. Clay Electric members first elected the Ft. McCoy resident to the board of trustees in 1965. For nearly 50 years, he represented District 9, which includes parts of Putnam and Marion Counties. Before his service on the Clay Electric board, Hastings worked as a meat grader for the U.S. Department of Agriculture for 15 years. In 1968 he ran for the Florida legislature, losing the Democratic primary to future U.S. Congressman and Gov. Buddy MacKay, who took over the statehouse for 23 days after the death of Lawton Chiles. In 1974 Hastings began his 40-year association with the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, representing Florida co-ops on the board. The following year he met Georgia Gov. and future U.S. Middleburg realtor leading state GOPBY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor Members of Floridas Republican State Executive Committee elected Clay Countys GOP chairwoman as their next leader. Leslie Dougher, 50, of Middleburg, will fill the unexpired term of State Chairman Lenny Curry, who resigned in April to run for mayor of Jacksonville. The term expires in January, 2015. Dougher is a California native who moved to Florida in 1995. She is a realtor for Caldwell Banker Vanguard Realty in Fleming Island, and is married with a 15-year-old daughter. In 2006, Dougher attempted to unseat school board member Lisa Graham and lost with 38 percent of the vote. In 2008 she was elected chairwoman of the Clay County Republican Executive Committee. She also chairs the Clay County Chamber of Commerce Government Affairs Committee. In Saturdays election at the Grand Hyatt Tampa Bay, she defeated Eric Miller, a state committeeman from Martin County, 106-69. In a statement released by the party, Dougher said, I arrest warrant scam resurfacesBY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor GREEN COVE SPRINGSThe Clay County Sheriffs Office said that area residents are once again receiving bogus phone calls from individuals posing as law enforcement officials demanding payment of fines or court costs. In January, the sheriffs office arrested a prison inmate and his girlfriend after deputies traced similar phone calls to Georgia. Daniel Ray Floyd, 38, an inmate at Autry State Prison, was charged with 10 counts of participating in a scheme to defraud. Ashley Nicole Dean, 27, of Fayetteville, Ga. was charged with one count of participating in a scheme to defraud. According to a sheriffs office report, Dean provided Floyd with information about Florida cities that were using red light cameras. Floyd then telephoned residents in those communities, including 13 in Orange Park and Green Cove Springs. Claiming he was Lt. Little with the Clay County Sheriffs Office, Floyd told victims that they had run red lights, had missed court dates and were going to be arrested unless they remitted fines and late fees to him. Floyd instructed his victims to purchase a prepaid debit card and then provide him with the cards number and security code. Dougher Hastings Keystone graduates endure rainSenior Class President Grant McGee addresses his classmates. Also pictured are Principal Dr. Susan Sailor, Santa Fe College Watson Center Administrative Assistant Karen Lake and Bob Kinsey. Photo by Tonya Gibbs. BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor KEYSTONE HEIGHTSA sea of umbrellas spread across the schools football field greeted the 2014 graduating class of Keystone Heights High School during the commencement service at the schools football stadium. A light rain persisted throughout the May 30 ceremony, but the weather appeared not to dampen the enthusiasm of the over 200 departing seniors. Class president Grant McGee told his classmates that a solid work ethic and the ability to work with people are keys to success. He also told the graduates that the best is yet to come for them and he urged them to be a generation that will be remembered. Melrose residents to get faster responseBY MARK J. CRAWFORD Telegraph Editor Bradford County aims to provide better service to its southernmost residents by relying more on friends for emergency response. On Monday, the Bradford County Commission approved a mutual aid agreement with Alachua County, assuring that Melrose-area responders will know sooner about emergencies. Commissioner Chairman Danny Riddick yielded his time to EMS Director Allen Parrish, who discussed the details of the agreement. Four counties meet in the Co-op business customers targeted by scammersKEYSTONE HEIGHTS-Clay Electric Cooperative is warning its commercial accounts and business owners to be aware of scams being attempted by people who demand immediate payment of delinquent bills. The most recent scam attempts occurred last week in Putnam Keystone farmers market closing in July and AugustBY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor KEYSTONE HEIGHTS-The Keystone Heights City Council voted to close its farmers market for the summer, beginning in July. City Manager Terry Suggs said that code enforcement officer Lynn Rutkowski can no longer serve as interim market manager and he has been unable to find candidates for the approximately $6,000-a-year, part-time job that are willing to complete the application process. Suggs also said that several of the markets most popular vendors will be taking the summer off from the venue. The market will reopen the first Saturday in September.. See MELROSE, 4A See GRADS, 4A See SCAM, 5A See MARIJUANA, 2A See HASTINGS, 5A See DOUGHER, 6A See WARRANT, 6A

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2A Lake Region Monitor Thursday, June 5, 2014 Lake Region Monitor USPS 114-170 Published each Thursday and entered as Periodical Postage Paid at Keystone Heights, Florida under Act of March 3, 1879.POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Lake Region MonitorP.O. Drawer A Starke, FL 32091 7382 SR 21 Keystone Heights, FL 32656Phone: (352) 473-2210 (352) 473-6721 John M. Miller, Publisher Subscription Rate in Trade Area $39.00 per year: $20.00 six months Outside Trade Area: $39.00 per year: $20.00 six monthsEditor: Dan Hildebran Sports Editor:Cliff Smelley Advertising:Kevin Miller Darlene Douglass Typesetting Eileen Gilmore Advertising and Newspaper Prod. Earl W. Ray Classified Adv. Heather Padgett Bookkeeping:Joan Stewart-Jones www.MelroseBayArtGallery.com Friday night, June 6thMelrose is the Place! June Special Fridays Only50% Off ALL Clothing Many plus sizes Golf Clubs Shoes Tea Cups Knick Knacks Odds & Ends ... and Much More! OPEN THURSDAY thru SATURDAY For more info call (352) 222-0286 350 Lawrence Blvd Keystone Heights at FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH of KEYSTONE Sunday June 8ththroughThursday (Family Night) June 12th6 pm to 8:45 pm nightly FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now survive DIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 DOT beginning Clay County section of First Coast Expressway BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor OAKLEAF-Floridas Department of Transportation began clearing land last week for a portion of the First Coast Expressway that will run through Clay County. Workers removed trees on a parcel southwest of Blanding Boulevards intersection with Branan Field Road. The route of the expressway in northern Clay County follows Branan Field Road from Argyle Forest Boulevard to Old Jennings Road.   The route then breaks west and goes behind St. Vincents Hospital and the Walmart Supercenter to connect with Blanding Boulevard (S.R. 21) southwest of Branan Field Road. DOT officials hosted an open house on May 28 in Orange Park to explain the project to the public.River crossing and frontage roadsOnce complete, the 46.5-mile toll road with 13 interchanges will connect Interstate 10 in western Duval County to I-95 in St. Johns County. The state agency plans to cross the St. Johns River near the Shands Bridge south of Green Cove Springs. The two-lane Shands Bridge will remain open after the expressway is complete to offer motorists a toll-free option across the river. Floridas legislature has so far, only funded the portion of the road between I-10 and Blanding Boulevard. For the past year DOT contractors have been clearing land in the Duval County portion of the road, north of Argyle Forest Parkway. DOT also recently opened two frontage roads that will operate on both sides of the expressway, between Old Jennings Road and Oakleaf Plantation Parkway in Clay County. Project spokesperson Laurie Sanderson said that workers will soon begin clearing land and constructing drainage facilities between the two frontage roads, and north to Argyle Forest Boulevard. She added that in Duval County, workers will begin constructing on-ramps and off-ramps for the limited access highway.Toll collection, costs, speed limitSanderson added that the most unique feature of the toll road will be the absence of toll booths or plazas. Instead, DOT will erect a series of gantries along the route, which will track SunPass users along the road and bill them appropriately. SunPass is the states electronic toll collection system that uses radio frequency identification transponders, about the size of a credit card that SunPass users affix to their vehicles.   Users either link their SunPass accounts to a credit card or manually replenish their balances.   DOT uses SunPass to collect tolls on the Florida Turnpike. Other toll collecting agencies, such as those in Orlando, Lakeland, Miami and Ft. Myers have integrated SunPass into their own systems. For expressway users who are not SunPass customers, the gantries will photograph the license plates of the drivers vehicles and bill them for the toll, plus an administrative fee. DOT officials said in handouts they distributed during the open house that the speed limit on the expressway will be 70 mph. Motorists in Clay County will be able to access the road from on-ramps at Argyle Forest Boulevard, Oakleaf Plantation Parkway and Blanding Boulevard.   DOT will construct overpasses at Trail Ridge Road and Old Jennings Road. The agency also said the anticipated toll between Blanding Boulevard and Oakleaf Plantation Parkway will be 60 cents.   Motorists will pay another 60 cents between Oakleaf Plantation Parkway and Argyle Forest Boulevard.   The toll from Argyle Forest Boulevard to 103rd Street in Jacksonville will be 60 cents and an additional 40 cents will get motorists to I-10.DOT permanently closing section of Chaffee RoadDOT also said that as part of the expressways construction, it will permanently close a section of Chaffee Road between Normandy Boulevard and S.R. 23 (the expressway). Motorists traveling south on Chaffee Road from Normandy will instead follow a new section of Samaritan Way to 103rd Street. DOT said it plans to complete the $77 million, 8-mile Duval County section of the highway in early 2016.   Its estimated completion date for the $84.8 million, 7.3-mile Clay County section to Blanding Boulevard is late 2016. Sanderson said DOT will not start charging tolls on the road until both sections are complete. The route of the expressway in northern Clay County follows Branan Field Road from Argyle Forest Boulevard to Old Jennings Road. The route then breaks west and goes behind St. Vincents Hospital and the Walmart Supercenter to connect with Blanding Boulevard (S.R. 21) southwest of Branan Field Road.KHHS seniors recognized during Class Night KEYSTONE HEIGHTS The faculty and administration of Keystone Heights High School recognized the achievements of the 2014 graduating class during the schools Class Night May 30.Community awards Community-based scholarships and awards included the Keystone Heights Animal Hospital Scholarship, which went to Nathanial Tate Williams; Ryan Rossano Baseball Scholarship: Tristen Starling; Florida First Coast Coalition of Labor Union Women Scholarship: Kayla Granthem and Melissa Fain; Whitley Steel Clay County Golf Classis Scholarship: Rachel Lee and Jacquelyn Bryant; XI KAPPA MU Chapter of Beta Sigma Phi Scholarship: Jenna Dugger; Florida Credit Union Scholarship: Kristen Wood; Clay Electric Scholarship: Nathanial Tate Williams; Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of Florida Why Education Is Important Essay Scholarship: Kayla Grantham; Briggle-Bradley Scholarship: Brooke Tussinger; Federated Republican Womens Club of Clay County Scholarship: Diana Ramos; Keystone Heights Womans Club Scholarship: Rachel Lee and Mellissa Fain ; Lake Region Kiwanis Scholarship: Katrina Sessions and Nicholas Jones; Held in Trust by Keystone United Methodist Church Hubert White Scholarship: Rachel Lee; William Scott Wilkes Scholarship: Cory Taylor; Emily Rund Champions Heart Scholarship: Emily Frampton and Geoffrey Messer; Daughters of the American Revolution Citizenship Award: Rachel Lee; General Roy S. Geiger Leadership Award: Christopher Priest and Mia Nelson-Gauthier Faith Presbyterian Church Scholarship: Rachel Lee; Duty-Owens Family Scholarship: Grant Bostick, Jacquelyn Bryant, Melissa Fain, Corbin Frakes, Taylor Jewett, Geoffrey Messer, Zachary Poole, and Anna Tuller; The Jason Bishop Scholarship: Joshua Knight Chief Level Award, Brandon Nicholas Lieutenant Level Award, Courtland Singletary Lieutenant Level Award Rachel Lee Lieutenant Level Award, Tara Shobris Honorable Mention Award; Sons of Amvets Scholarship: Eric Wood, Rachel Lee and Diana Ramos; Billy Joe Hagens scholarship: Joshua Knight; Gator Bowl Scholarship: Nathaniel Tate Williams; Geico Family Scholarship: Rachel Maddox; George Bolden Scholarship on behalf of the Melrose Masonic Lodge #89 in Keystone Heights: Rachel Lee; Comcast Leaders and Achievers Scholarship: Nathaniel TateWilliams; Clay County Chamber of Commerce: Joel Michel; Mark Allen Ochkie Jr. Memorial Scholarship: Rachel Lee; Miss KHHS 2013-2014 Scholarship: Emily Peoples; Erin L. Erxleben/HOSA Scholarship: Diana Ramos; FFA Alumni Award: Austin Saunders and James McCoy; IMPACT Scholarship from the Orange Park Charter Chapter of the American Business Womens Association: Rachel Lee; NAACP Minority Health Scholarship: Dayshia Jenkins; Imagine America Vocational Scholarship: William Walker; Clay Bar Association Scholarship: Corbin Frakes; Wes Whiddon Athletic Scholarship: Rachel Lee and Emily Frampton; Southern Scholarship House Foundation Scholarship: Joel Michel; KHHS Faculty & Staff Scholarship: Ann M. Roberts and Brooke Tussinger; Chef of the Year: Shane Savoy; Shane Savoy Culinary Scholarship: Brittany Filing; Clay County Education Foundation: Diana Ramos, Zachary Poole, Rachel Maddox (Barbara Denton Memorial Scholarship), Brittany Filling (Ruth Alexander Scholarship) and Garrett Clance (Pellerito Scholarship); Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association Scholarship: Brittany Filing; John P. Hall Sr. Childrens Charities Scholarship: Diana Ramos; Gainesville Junior Golf Tour Scholarship: Taylor Heinz; Questbridge Scholarship: Anika Henanger. Scholarships awarded by collegesScholarships and awards from specific colleges included Santa Fe College Watson Scholarship: Laura Danis, Rachel Maddox, James McCoy, Delaina McEwen, Grant McGee, Chase Musselman, Emily Peoples, Zachary Poole, Courtland Singletary and Nathanial Tate Williams; SFC Boone Bussard Welding Technologies Scholarship: Sean Walls: Northwestern University and Pledge Scholarship: Anika Heneger; St Johns River State College Collier-Blocker Minority Scholarship: Diana Ramos; Florida State University Merit Scholarship: Zachary Coursey; St. Pete State College Athletic scholarship for volleyball: Keerston Skinner; Willmington College Athletic Scholarship Ohio Football: John Ashton and Blake Valenzuela; The University of New England Merit Award and Scholarship: Natasha Sudsbury; Faulkner University Academic and Athletic Scholarship/Golf: Taylor Heinz; Faulkner University Faulkner University Academic & Athletic Scholarship/ Golf : Olyvia Heinz; Full Sail University Creative Minds Scholarship: Mackenzie Marsh; University of West Florida Argonaut Scholarship: Hannah Royalty; Florida Southern College Athletic Scholarship for Soccer and George Jenkins Academic Scholarship: Madison Colaw Clearwater Christian College an email. He thought cigs were in it. There is no evidence that he consumed anything. DCFs investigation into the home life of this child remains open/ active.MARIJUANAContinued from 1A See CLASS, 3A

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Thursday, June 5, 2014 Lake Region Monitor 3A Keystone District Office 352-473-4917 clayelectric.com Rays Auto RepairEstablished 1972473-30837382 Sunrise Blvd.(Next to Hitchcocks Grocery) *** Comfortable Waiting Area ***Jones-Gallagher Funeral HomeDistinquished Caring Service for Over 50 YearsJoe Gallagher OwnerStarke 964-6200 Keystone Heights 473-3176 J B SJackson Building SupplyStarke 964-6078 Lake Butler 496-3079See us for all your Lumber & Plywood BryansHARDWARE & GARDEN CENTERHighway 100 Keystone Heights, FL 473-4006 Highway 21 Melrose, FL 475-2400Worship in the House of the Lord...Somewhere this week! SAVE OUR LAKES MEETING TUES., JUNE 10, 2014 7 p.m. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF KEYSTONE HEIGHTS (Hwy 100 just east of Hwy 21)COME JOIN US! VISITORS WELCOME! Athletic Scholarship for Soccer: Raychel Trimble; Southeastern University Academic and Athletic Scholarship for Football: Michael Carroll; Kentucky Christian College Athletic Scholarship: Micah Brown Lewis Football and Trinity Baptist College Athletic Scholarship Baseball: Blake Richardson U.S. Military Students entering U.S. military branches include: Ashley Norris and Bradley Collins Air Force; Anthony Delano and Parker RollinsArmy and Danny Fritch, Christopher Priest and Benjamin WatersMarines. Other awardsRachel Lee received the Presidents Volunteer Service Award: and the Wendys High School Heisman award. John Crittenden is the KHHS nominee for the Lombardi Scholarship. Caroline Felicia Vargas was awarded the KHHS Perseverance Award.Students earning AA degreesStudents receiving an Associate of Arts degree from Santa Fe College, concurrent with a high school diploma received a blue honor cord. They were David Wyatt Bennett, Madison Colaw, Zach Coursey, John Crittenden, Sarah Guilfoyle, Ochesa Hall, Zach Hawkins, Olyvia Heinz, Taylor Heinz, Anika Henanger, Taylor Jewett, Nicholas Jones, Rebekah Lampkin, Delaina McEwen, Caleb Moore, Christina Schrader and Anna Tuller.Bright Futures ScholarsRecipients of the Vocational Gold Seal Bright Futures Scholarship were Amanda Crawford, Jessica Garcia, James McCoy, Austin Saunders, Tara Shobris, Courtland Singletary, Eric Wood, Glen Farson, Rachel Lee, Santana Wallace and Charles Rogers. Winners of the Florida Bright Futures Florida Medallion Scholarship were Zachary Hawkins, Kaitlin Collison, Parker Dykes, Hannah Royalty, Christina Schrader, Katrina Sessions, Rachel Maddox, Nathaniel Williams, Grant McGee, Cecelia Buckley and Taylor Reed. Winners of the Bright Futures Florida Academic Scholars Scholarship were Kayla Baker, David Bennett, Zacary Coursey, John Crittenden, Emily Frampton, Taylor Jewett, Nicholas Jones, Rebekah Lampkin, Joel Michel, Caleb Moore, Chase Musselman, Raksmey Vorn, Kristen Wood, Anika Heniger, Madison Colaw, Shaun Young, Cory Taylor, Zachary Burns and Emily Peoples.Vocational honorsStudents receiving the vocational honor cord for business digital design were Zachary Burns, Brendan Guildry, Gabriel le Gee, Joel Michel, Harley Mosely, Jalissa Willis and Jarrett Jones. Students receiving the Culinary Arts v ocational honor cord were Melissa Fain and Steven Trimble. Students receiving the health careers v ocational honor cord were Mirah Beck, Katie Dalton, Laura Danis, Jailene Garcia, Dayshia Jenkins, Rachel Lee, Morgan Lord, Meranda McCarty, Nathan Nelson, Brandon Nicholas, Ashley Norris, Diana Ramos, CJ Rogers, Tara Shobris, Courtland Singletary, Santana Wallace, Joshua Knight and Rachel Bellman. Students receiving the agriscience vocational honor cord were Glen Farson, Thompson, Austin Saunders, John Crittenden, Eric Wood, Nina Horton, Jacob Fanton, James McCoy, Hallie Wheeler, Haley Arzie and Brianna Bowman.Academic HonorsStudents receiving a silver honor cord earned a grade point average between 3.0 and 3.499. Silver honor cord recipients were Meranda McCary, Taylor Reed, Mia Nelson-Gauthier, Santana Wallace, Jacob Maddox, Nicole Straka, Tara Shobris, Danney Fritch, Tristan Starling, Nina Horten, Darien Gilio, Geoffrey Messer, Julian Harrison, Kierra Collins, Natacha Sudsbury, Logan Deuel, Rachel Wells, Timothy Mock, Brianne Bowman, Micah Brown-Lewis, Ashley Norris, Wyatt Graziano, Kelsey Hassell, Zachary Poole, Parker Rollins, Logan Evans, Charles Rogers, Dakota Black, Dayshia Jenkins, Brooke Tussinger, Brenton Moring, Lowell Triest, Nathaniel Nelson, Lane Blanton, Aaron Thomas, Joshua Knight, Taylor Haney, Jailissa Willis, Samantha Bass, Brittany Filing, Ann Roberts, Brandon Nicholas, Kennon Brock, Addison Mosher, Keerston Skinner, Morgan Smith, John Waters, Kami Ferriell and Steven Trimble.Academic High honorsStudents receiving a gold honor cord earned a grade point average from 3.5 to 4.6. Students receiving a gold honor cord were John Crittenden, Joel Michel, Kayla Baker, Rebekah Lampkin, Kayla Grantham, Eric Wood, Grant McGee, Emily Frampton, Shaun Young, Anika Henanger, Cory Taylor, Taylor Heinz, Corbin Frakes, Raksmey Vorn, Olyvia Heinz, Madison Colaw, Chase M usselman, Courtland Singletary, Kristen Wood, David Bennett, Parker Dykes, Nicholas Jones, Farrah Hicks, Zachary Jacquelyn Bryant, Emily Peoples, Melissa Fain, Diana Ramos, Kyle Saunders, James Richardson, Caleb Moore, Miriah Beck, Christina Schrader, Taylor Jewett, Jessica Garcia, Delaina McEwen, Miranda Moulton, Kaitlin Collison, Kent Carson, Rachel Maddox, Nathaniel Williams, Katrina Sessions, Glen Farson, Jailene Garcia, Anna Tuller, Amanda Crawford, Zachary Burns, Grant Bostick, Rachel Lee, Erika Dingman, Zachary Hawkins, Lucy Montford, Ochesa Hall, Alexa Born, Elizabeth Weaver, Jacob Fanton, Jenna Dugger, Matthew Smith, Cailen Gonzales, Cecelia Buckley, Kaycee Sapp, Hailey Arzie, Raychel Trimble, Honey Harvey, Hannah Royalty, Brenden Guidry, Robert McCormick, Haillie Wheeler, Kenneth Booth, Sarah Guilfoyle, James McCoy, Laura Danis, Katlyn Dalton, Michael Carroll, Donald Bailey and Christina Hopkins.Department awards Hallie Wheeler won the English award. Allen Vorn won the mathematics award. Grant McGee won the science award. Addison Mosher won the social studies award. Kaitlin Collison won the Spanish award. Kayla Baker won the French award. Brandy Dennis won the art award. Addison Mosher w on the drama award. Melissa Fain won the television production award. Elizabeth Weaver won the musical theatre award. Elizabeth Weaver won the band award. Kaitlin Collison won the chorus award. Jalissa Willis won the digital design business award. Melissa Fain won the yearbook award. Parker Rollins won the AROTC award. Austin Saunders won the agriculture award. Courtland Singletary won the health science award. Melissa Fain won the culinary arts award. William Walker won the carpentry award. Hall of FameValedictorian John Crittenden, Co-Salutatorian Kayla Baker, Co-Salutatorian Joel Michel, Corbin Frakes, Emily Frampton, Grant McGee, Chase Musselman and Emily Peoples were inducted into the Keystone Heights High School Hall of Fame. BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor OAKLEAF-The Clay County Sheriffs Office said it caught three youths after they broke into Oakleaf Junior High School. Officers later charged two of the defendants with burglarizing and vandalizing a nearby elementary school. Deputies charged a 14-yearold and two 13-year olds with trespassing on school grounds, burglary, grand theft of a fire extinguisher, criminal mischief and breaking a fence containing animals. According to a sheriffs office report, on May 27, around 6:30 p.m., witnesses told dispatchers they saw three youths on skateboards leaving the campus and heading toward the Whitfield subdivision, across the street from the junior high school. A deputy intercepted the suspects in the neighborhood and three witnesses later identified them as the individuals they saw leaving the campus. Deputies then inspected the school and observed that two fire extinguishers had been discharged within school buildings and that toilets in bathrooms had been stopped up with toilet paper. The officers also documented graffiti on the schools walls and found that pens containing farm animals on the campus had been opened, allowing goats and chickens to run loose on the property. After interviewing the defendants, deputies later charged two of them with breaking into portable classrooms at Plantation Oaks Elementary School on May 18 and damaging telecommunications lines.City honors Keystone weightliftersKeystone Heights Mayor Tony Brown congratulates KHHS weightlifting coaches (l) Chuck Dickinson and Lantz Lowery during the June 2 city council meeting. Brown read a proclamation recognizing the weightlifting team for winning Floridas Class 1A state title. Keystone tied with Baker County for the championship. Clay Countys newest hospital plans expansionMIDDLEBURG-The parent company of St. Vincents Clay County has tentatively approved a $24 million expansion plan for the Middleburg hospital. The project, first reported by the Jacksonville Business Journal, would add nearly 200 jobs, a maternity ward and 37 beds to the facility that now has 64 beds. Ascension Health, the Catholic charity that operates the Branan Field Road hospital, gave partial approval to the project in May. It must give final approval before construction can begin this summer, as scheduled. The project would also expand the hospitals emergency room and add a three-story patient tower to the facility.CLASSContinued from 2A

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4A Lake Region Monitor Thursday, June 5, 2014 Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (LCMS)Sunday School 9 a.m. Worship Service at 10 a.m. 4900 NW 182nd Way Starke(Entrance to Conerly Estates on S.R. 16) (904) gslcstarke@aol.com Everyone Welcome!Childrens Church 10 a.m. Welcome Home To 4004 SE State Road 21, Keystone Heights, FL 32656 (352) 473-3829 S on-shine Worship in our Fellowship Hall C ontemporary Worship in our MMC T raditional Worship in our Sanctuary Dr. Craig Moore preaching on D inner Served Ham & Sweet Potatoes (Call 352-473-3829 for reservations) B ible Study by Dr. Tom Farmer, Jr. Series: Ministries for Children (all ages) & Youth Sundays & Wednesdays! Rotary Club wrapping up year BY JAMES WILLIAMS Special to the Monitor KEYSTONE HEIGHTS-The Keystone Heights Rotary Club had an active, successful and even award-winning year, as shown by its activities just since January. The club was well represented at a recent conference and awards banquet, held at EmbryRiddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach on May 17. Among those attending were President Paul Fessenden and his wife, Karen, President-Elect and Keystone Heights City Manager Terry Suggs, Secretary Richard Segall, and Past President James Williams. Rotarians from around the state took a tour of the EmbryRiddle campus, which has grown far beyond its earliest years as a flying school. The university now offers degrees in aviation financing and aviation management. There is a National Security Agency program on the campus, engineering and robotics, plus theres still a flying school. The university now offers courses in small craft flight, commercial flight, jets and even space flight. At the awards banquet, the Keystone Heights Rotary was given three District 697 awards for its efforts during the past year. Included was an award for best membership retention percentage (100 percent) for a small club. The club also received a Platinum Premier Award for having 100-percent membership participation, with member contributions of $100 or more to the Rotary Foundation. The club also received an award for its three-to-five-year plan and taking steps during the year to meet its goals. The club currently has 16 members, its smallest membership since formation in the 1940s. However, over the last three years, the average age of the club has fallen by about 10 years, due to several younger members joining the ranks and the departure of several senior members. On May 20, club members were also happy to join charter night festivities for the Club of Interlachen and Lakes Area, held at Interlachen High School. The Interlachen club was sponsored by the Palatka Sunrise Rotary, and the club comes with a builtin Interact Club at the high school. The new club inducted over 40 brand new members that night. Many high school students also attended the new clubs charter night. The Keystone Rotary made a contribution to the Interlachen Clubs start-up fund-a Rotary tradition. At Keystone Heights High Schools Class Night, the Rotary also gave two $750 scholarships, including one for the clubs new Glenn Harris Scholarship, in honor of a club member, who died almost two years ago. The scholarship was funded by a generous donation from the Harris family. The late Glen Harris was widely known for his work in silvaculture and forestry. The first recipient of the Harris award went to graduating KHHS senior Austin Saunders, who plans to study agricultural management at Santa Fe College. Graduating senior and Student Council President Lucy Montford received the second Rotary scholarship. Rotarian Karen Lake, who was on the scholarship committee, said Montfords student council commitment and her work with Haven Hospice made her a good match with Rotarys motto: Service Above Self. The club also recently gave or confirmed donations to the Clay County Science Fair and Seamark Ranch. Later this month, Rotary will close out the year as Fessenden hands the gavel to Suggs, president for the coming year. Club awards will be handed out at a dinner later in June, to be given at the home of Rotary member and M&S Bank Branch Manager Shelly Gibbs. The Rotary year ends on June 28, with one of the clubs two biggest annual fund-raisers, the three-on-three soccer tournament, held in cooperation with the Keystone Youth Soccer Club at Twin Lakes Park. For information on Keystone Heights Rotary Club membership, call Century 21 Realtor and Rotarian Paul Fessenden, 352-665-2121. The Keystone Heights Rotary Club earned three accolades this year, including an award for 100-percent membership retention. Pictured is President Paul Fessenden with the award. Melrose area, and yet its underserved by first responders, he said. Theressas EMS station and volunteer fire department are the Bradford Countys first responders to the south end of the county, as well as much of the area west of Theressa. Anytime we have a 911 call from down in this area, whether it be a first responder call for medical or for fire, it takes a long time for us to get people to that area, Parrish said. Melrose, although unincorporated, has a wellequipped station manned during the day by a full-time responder paid for by Alachua County. If youre having a heart attack or your heart stops, they have a defibrillator a mile away that can come and help you, said Parrish. It takes us anywhere from 10 to 12 minutes to get to that area. It takes Clay County just as long to get there from their county. Parrish said the solution is an agreement that has been in the works for sometime and cements a cooperative arrangement between Alachua, Bradford, Clay and Putnam counties. Parrish said his goal has been to expand services. This agreement will accomplish that he said, and at no additional cost to Bradford County. We benefit more than any other county, he said, because we have the largest population in that area. The agreement removes a time consuming process of phone tag. A call from a mobile phone in Melrose will be answered by one of multiple communications centers, but most likely the center in either Putnam or Clay. There are examples of calls being transferred between counties until the correct responder for the address is identified, Parrish said. Calls have even been transferred from one county to another, and then back to the county that originally received the call. So what were trying to do is reduce that time frame by introducing an automatic agreement, he said. With an agreement in place and all of the communications employees informed, the Melrose station will be dispatched automatically, regardless of address. Sheriff Gordon Smith compared the automatic aid contract to the Four Corners agreement that exists for law enforcement between the Alachua, Bradford, Clay and Putnam sheriffs. He commended Parrish for stepping up and getting the deal done. Parrish said hes spoken to many residents in the Melrose area and they dont care which county shows up. If they cant breathe, they want to breathe, he said. Parrish has also applied for a grant that would construct an EMS station in the Brooker area to improve response times for residents there. MELROSEContinued from 1A Co-salutatorian Kayla Baker thanked the schools workers, including the cafeteria and custodial staff. She advised her classmates to show kindness to others throughout their lives. She also said that the phrase follow your dreams may be a shop worn clich, but it is also good advice. Baker added that people who are in jobs they are passionate about are happier and more productive throughout their careers. Co-salutatorian Joel Michel said that because he and his classmates are now adults, they should make decisions in a judicious and thoughtful manner. He also admonished his colleagues to not fear failure and added that if they attempt GRADSContinued from 1A anything worthwhile, they will fall short of some of their goals. Michel quoted former basketball star Michael Jordan, who recounted the many failures he experienced en route to six NBA championships and five Most Valuable Player awards. Ive missed more than 9,000 shots in my career, Michel said, quoting Jordan. Ive lost almost 300 games. Twenty-six times Ive been trusted to take the game-winning shot and missed. Ive failed over and over and over again in my life, and that is why I succeed. Michel invoked the memory of former President Ronald Reagan when encouraging his classmates to lend a helping hand to others throughout their lives. We cant help everyone, Michel said, quoting Reagan, but everyone can help someone. Valedictorian John Crittenden spoke about opportunity. He started off by thanking the schools teachers for investing in Keystones students, and also thanked veterans for preserving the freedoms that make education in a open society possible. Crittenden also commended the schools weightlifting team for capitalizing on an opportunity to win the state championship. Crittenden cited the civic service of Cincinnatus, the Roman statesman, as an example of opportunity. He said that as rival factions threatened to tear the republic apart, the Roman Senate proclaimed Cincinnatus dictator. However, after quelling the rival tribes in two weeks, See SPEECH, 5A Jaydin Wilson, Abbey Anthony-Rozier, Tres Wilkerson, Cooper Alsabrook and Hailey Principal Marcus Dooley, Megan Callahan, Rachel Brookshire, Christopher Hoffmeyer, Kylie Fischer, Alyssa Smith, Alyssa Gilbert, Jessica Falana and Jacob Morgan.

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Thursday, June 5, 2014 Lake Region Monitor 5A Please send 52 weeks of the Monitor to my graduate:We accept MC, VISA, American Express We need your phone # too in case of questions.Call 904-964-6305 to subscribe or send a $39 check to: P.O. Drawer A Starke, FL 32091Give a Grad a Giftthat will keep giving for 52 weeks ... Name Address City/ST/Zip Phone #s Your graduate can keep up with local news from home: Keystone, Melrose and surrounding areas.Great reminder of home for those joining the military, college students, those leaving for work or travel children, grandchildren, nieces, nephews, cousins, friends. Promote Service Business with a TOOT YOUR OWN HORN! Email your med-to-hi-resolution digital photo (150dpi+) & ad text to: b y 5pm Monday OR bring it to:Br adford County Telegraph Union County Times Lake Region Monitor(9 04) 964-6305We ll help you design your ad cash/check/credit cards accepted all for only /wk covering Bradford, Union & Clay Counties a in our weekly community giveaway paper: Stand out from the crowd Promote YOUR Servicewith aClassified Photo AdActual Size Ad Sample CLAY COUNTYMore than 170 members of Clay County Local #3362 raised $46,193 during the annual Muscular Dystrophy Associations Fill the Boot drive on May 23-25 to benefit children and adults affected by muscle disease throughout the Clay County area. For six decades, firefighters have fueled MDAs mission to find treatments and cures for life-threatening muscle diseases, and this years Clay County Fill the Boot results are a perfect example of the true dedication Clay County Local #3362 has toward supporting the families we serve, said Lauren Herringdine, executive director of MDA, Jacksonville. Were grateful for the support of these inspiring, selfless individuals who provide life-saving help that will fund research, advocate for children and adults affected by muscle disease, and rally our community to fight back. Funds raised during the 2014 Clay County Fill the Boot event will help support MDAs programs of worldwide research, specialized health care services, and day-to-day support, which includes sending children affected by muscular dystrophy and related muscle diseases to a weeklong, barrier-free MDA summer camp at Camp Suwannee in Dowling Park. $46,193 for MDACincinnatus resigned from the post, preserving the Roman Republic. Crittenden also urged the graduates to courageously take on the difficulties of adulthood by quoting Theodore Geisel, widely known as Dr. Seuss. Crittenden quoted the childrens author, reading, Ive heard there are troubles of more than one kind; some come from ahead, and some come from behind. But Ive brought a big bat. Im all ready, you see; now my troubles are going to have troubles with me. Principal Dr. Susan Sailor told the crowd that due to the weather, she was cutting her two-page, prepared remarks to one paragraph. She said that every graduate will soon wake up and realize that the life he or she has led over the past dozen years is over. What you create in its path is completely up to you, she added. Sailor also counseled the graduates to seek guidance from above by quoting Proverbs 3:5-6. Trust in the Lord with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding, she said. In all your ways acknowledge Him and He shall direct your paths.SPEECHContinued from 4A and Lake counties. Someone called a grocery store owner and said their bill was past due and payment was needed immediately, said Palatka District Member Relations Representative Derek Hembree. In another incident, the owner of a Chinese restaurant was called and told that payment was required immediately or the power would be shut off. Both fraud attempts failed when the business owners called Clay Electrics Palatka District office and inquired about their bills. Earlier this year, the coop received reports that two commercial accounts it serves in Clay County were the target of attempted scams. The two businesses reported someone claiming to represent the co-op contacted them about making payment on an overdue bill. In one case, a payment for more than $2,000 was requested, and the caller wanted the money wired. Clay Electric encourages the businesses it serves to be very suspicious of anyone who calls and claims he or she represents the co-op and wants to be paid for an overdue bill. The cooperative does not collect past-due amounts in this manner. If the caller asks you to wire money or use a prepaid debit card, thats a red flag, said Bruce McHollan, director of the cooperatives information and communication technology department. If you have any doubt at all, hang up and call Clay Electric at 800-224-4917 and confirm if any payment is due. Clay Electric sends a reminder letter and makes an automated reminder call when bills are past due. Members with residential accounts have also been subject SCAMContinued from 1A to scam attempts during the past year that involved emails. Clay Electric does not send emails that threaten or require immediate action to provide personal information. We urge our members to ignore suspicious requests for personal information such as bank account numbers, credit card numbers, user names and passwords, or Social Security numbers, said Derick Thomas, director of the co-ops Member and Public Relations Department. We ask our members to delete all suspicious emails that require immediate action to verify or provide personal information. If a member has an overdue bill, he or she will likely receive a call from our automated phone messaging system as a reminder to call the cooperative to arrange payment. Theyll also receive a courtesy notice in the mail, Thomas said. Members should not share confidential personal information over the phone. President Jimmy Carter at the NRECA Convention in New Orleans. Hastings went onto become a Carter supporter, making several visits to the White House in the 1970s and serving as a Carter delegate in the 1980 Democratic Convention. In the 1980s, Hastings led the fight against Ronald Reagans attempt to cut off co-ops from federal low-interest loans. He served as president of Clay Electrics board of trustees for 10 years and as the NRECA president in 1981-1982. Last year, the NRECA honored Hastings with a lifetime achievement award. In March, during Clay Electrics annual meeting, the co-op thanked Hastings for his long service with the NRECA. Hastings also hit the Florida Lotto in 1992, winning $6.78 million.HASTINGSContinued from 1A See CLAY, 6A Coppergate, RideOut students win Tropicana contestGREEN COVE SPRINGSFourth, fifth and sixth-grade students from 22 schools competed in the Clay County 4-H Tropicana Public Speaking Contest on May 20 and 21 at the University of Florida/IFAS extension office. The winners of 20 elementary school contests competed in the fourthand fifth-grade category. Dorion Sledge of Coppergate Elementary won the countys fourth and fifth-grade title with his speech, My Family (Help!), Rylee Martin of Shadowlawn Elementary School placed second with One Hip Girl and Sarah Cobb of Fleming Island Elementary placed third with The Black Flood. Paxton Shuppert of Orange Park Elementary came in fourth with her speech titled Narcissism. In the sixth grade category, winners from 17 school contests competed for the county title. Landon Opp of RideOut Elementary won the competition with his speech, Life. Jeremiah Jackson from Doctors Inlet Elementary placed second with Three Things that are Important to Me and Madison Baity of Shadowlawn Elementary came in third with Body Language. Wade Taylor of Swimming Pen Creek Elementary placed fourth with A Dream is a Wish Your Brain Makes. Each of the winners from both categories received plaques and the first-place winners won a week at 4-H summer camp in July sponsored by Tropicana. Sixth-grade winners Landon Opp, Jeremiah Jackson, Madison Baity and Wade Taylor. Sledge, Rylee Martin, Sarah Cobb and Paxton Shuppert.Wings of Dreams Fly-in, Cruise-inAround seven D-Day veterans, U.S. Congressman Ted Yoho and a large crowd is expected at the June 7 Wings of Dreams Fly-in and Cruise-in at the Keystone Airport. Wings of Dreams Executive Director Bob Oehl said the event is the only D-Day observance scheduled in the Gainesville area. A buffet breakfast will be served. The cost is $7 for adults and $4 for children nine and under. For more information, see www.wingsofdreams.com or call 352-256-8037Community Church rummage saleIts rummage sale time at Community Church, located behind Ace Hardware in Keystone Heights. The popular early bird shopping continues on Thursday, June 5 from 4 to 7 p.m. The admission is $5 per family. There is no admission charge for the regular sale dates on Friday June 6 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday, June 7 from 9 to noon. Saturday will also feature the Dollar-A-Bag sale. Reasonably priced merchandise. Proceeds serve many projects.Soccer try-outsThe Keystone Youth Soccer U13/U14 competitive travel soccer team will be holding tryouts for the 2014-2015 season. Any player under the age of 14 on July 31, 2014 is eligible. Try-outs will be at Twin Lakes Park, 6065 Twin Lakes Road, on Saturday, May 31 beginning at 9 a.m. Please arrive 30 minutes early to stretch and register. For more information call 352-2350393.We need your clothesCommunity Church of Keystone Heights is hosting our 6th Annual Back to School event on July 22. Clothes will be given away free to children in need. Donate clean, gently used clothes for children sizes 3T through adult. Teenagers come in all sizes and this collection is for all ages and sizes. Drop clothes off at Community Church marked B2S (Back to School). The deadline is July 10. Please call Barbara Sullivan (258-3113), Karen Powell (5389546), Jenn Cumbus (258-5479) or Kim Nugent (258-3602) for more information or to volunteer.100 year birthday celebrationThe friends and family of Charlie Bryant invite the community to celebrate his 100th birthday on Saturday, June 7 at 3 p.m. The celebration will be held at his home at 102 S. Sipprell Road in Florahome. Worth Noting

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6A Lake Region Monitor Thursday, June 5, 2014 Our thoughts and prayers are with the Hastings family, said Ricky Davis, Clay Electrics general manager and CEO. Angus dedicated almost 50 years to serving Clay Electric members in his own district and across our service area, and was also a state and national leader. We will miss his spirit and his leadership. Hastings is the second Clay Electric trustee to die in the last eight months. Middleburg board member Floyd Gnann died on Aug. 18.CLAYContinued from 5A am honored and humbled to have been chosen by my fellow grassroots leaders to serve as the next RPOF Chairman. It was an honor to even be considered, and I am looking forward to getting right to work to make sure the thousands of volunteers across the state have the tools to be successful in November. We are united in one purpose electing Republicans and I am excited for the opportunities that are ahead for our party. Dougher is the fifth chair for the state organization in the past four years. In 2010, Jim Greer resigned under pressure and later pleaded guilty to grand theft and money laundering in connection with a contract his company, Victory Strategies, had with the state party. Later that year, former State Rep. Dave Bitner replaced interim Chair Jim Thrasher. Republicans elected Curry in 2011 after Bitner died from Lou Gehrigs disease.DOUGHERContinued from 5A The sheriffs office said that around May 29, three county residents and one Green Cove Springs resident received phone calls from individuals claiming to be law enforcement officials. The callers claimed there were arrest warrants for the residents and demanded payment for outstanding fines or court costs using a prepaid debit card. Sheriffs office public information officer Mary Justino said investigators are trying to identify the latest callers. She added that law enforcement agencies never demand payment of fines and costs over the phone. Any such call is fraudulent and bogus, she said. The CCSO reminds residents dont fall for it. Make note of as much information as possible and report it to your local law enforcement agency. WARRANTContinued from 1A Letter to the editorAs a resident of Alachua county since 1985, Ive always had a keen interest in our urban and suburban, rural development and the conservation of lands.   Weve done an excellent job as a community thus far, but some areas have benefited from it more than others.   We can help those communities left out, while preserving areas that want to stay unchanged, including conservation lands and historic towns that enhance everybodys quality of life. I followed Plum Creeks 2.5 year-long community workshop known as Envision Alachua.   I attended as many public meetings as I could, and filled out comment cards with suggestions.   Im happy with the results: a balance of our need for economic development while preserving and enhancing conservation at the same time.   A future agriculture-based research park near Windsor, with skilled workers living there instead of all commuting from Gainesville.   And built from labor in Gainesville looking for work, starting now.   But there is a smear campaign going on in the Suns letters section, and organized under the banner Stand Melrose AfricanAmerican Heritage FestivalJune 14 at Tommys Place, the intersection of S.R. 26 and C.R. 219. Games, food, DJ, bounce house, car club and door prizes. Jaycees kick off haunted holiday plansGet into the Halloween Clay Countys newest hospital plans expansionMIDDLEBURG-The parent company of St. Vincents Clay County has tentatively approved a $24 million expansion plan for the Middleburg hospital. The project, first reported by the Jacksonville Business Journal, would add nearly 200 jobs, a maternity ward and 37 beds to the facility that now has 64 beds. Ascension Health, the Catholic charity that operates the Branan Field Road hospital, gave partial approval to the project in May. It must give final approval before construction can begin this summer, as scheduled. The project would also expand the hospitals emergency room and add a three-story patient tower to the facility. spirit early and get involved in the Keystone Heights Jaycees annual Haunted Trail. A kickoff party for the organization of this years event will take place at the Jaycees clubhouse on Saturday, June 7, at 8 p.m. The zombie themed party will include a costume contest, games, prizes, snacks and movies. If you are interested in participating in the Haunted Trail, join the Jaycees June 7 for an evening of planning and fun. Contact Paul Huff for more details at 352-572-3892, and look for the Keystone Jaycees on Facebook.Fizz, Boom, Read! At the Keystone Heights branch libraryPreschool programs for children aged 3-5 will be offered each Wednesday morning at 10:30 a.m. June 11, 18, 25 and July 2, 9, and 16. Stories, songs and crafts and a related snack will be offered. There will be a special Stuffed Animal Sleepover (for stuffed reading buddies only) as well as a preschool story time program on July 15 at 6:30 p.m. Reading buddies to be picked up at the final story time, theaterevent breakfast, the following morning. For school-aged children, kindergarten through fifth grade we will offer: June 13th Friday at 10:30am Wild Wonders animal program, with Mike Rossi and his live friends. June 20th Friday at 10:30am Fizz, Boom, Science! with our friends from Sugarplum Entertainment. June 26th Thursday at 6:00pm Fire and Ice with Mad Science of NE Central Florida June 30th Monday at 2:00pm Did Someone Say Bats?! with Lubee Bat Conservancy and winged friends. July 11th Friday at 10:30am How and Why stories with Kaye Byrnes, Storyteller extraordinaire July 18th Friday at 10:30am Its a Wrap! Finale with special guest, Ronald McDonald.Melrose Bay Art GalleryMurmurations. Work by Valerie Aslakson-Jennings, guest artist showing thru June 29.Reception during Melrose Art Walk, Friday, June 6, 6-9 p.m. By Our Plan to continue without compromise the disenfranchisement of many citizens whove waited long enough, under the guise of protecting the Comprehensive Plan.   Their false claims are already answered in Envision Alachuas thick report published and available online at   www.envisionalachua.com   such as: 1). Its 8 miles from east Gainesville, and wont happen for 30-50 years anyway -Wrong.   The construction can begin in a couple years, and includes plans for a bus line connecting east Gainesville to Hawthorne and in between near the Windsor site; 2). Its more sprawl and will hurt downtown -Wrong.   Its no more sprawl than Micanopy is.   Newnans Lake and vast preservation lands separate Windsor-Rochelle from Gainesville, much as Paynes Prairie buffers to the south of town.   Hawthorne already exists, and is ideal for a new industry located near CSX rail lines there.   (Downtown Gainesville was hurt in the 70s when the interstate and mall were fashionable, and planners let sprawl happen.   But now   urban renewal is in full swing, starting in the 80s at the same time Butler Plaza blossomed.   Our area is big enough to accommodate it all, at once; 3). Itll hurt the small towns in eastern Alachua county -Wrong.   Only towns that want to participate in Plum Creeks offer will change.   Hawthorne and Windsor, yes.   But Melrose, Cross Creek and Orange Heights dont if they dont want to.   Micanopy is flanked by I-75 and US-441, but the town stayed the same.   S o did High Springs.   B ut Alachua town and JonesvilleNewberry residents wanted change, and did;   4). Itll deplete our aquifer and run off wildlife -Wrong.   The latest knowledge in water management and recovery will be used, plus the developments only use a small fraction of the entire Plum Creek properties in the area (most will be enhanced preservation lands, including wetland setbacks and a wildlife corridor protected).   Its an improvement over the old crazy-quilt pattern of west Gainesville, and not a retirement community of golf courses.   Even if a small residential area were added on the north end off SR-26, it wouldnt hurt because eastern Alachua County has lost population in recent decades, having moved west.   Rainfall cycles are beginning to turn around after the 60-year low period soon ends, too. Then theres those who say doing nothing is better than Plum Creeks plan.   Wrong,   doing nothing is worse because its a continuation of the status quo which hurts the environment and people, alike: Nothing would continue hole-punching the aquifer on every five acre lot, reducing overall water pressures, levels and flows; Nothing continues placing a septic tank every five acres, leaking into the watershed and the aquifer with nitrate pollution; Nothing continues the haphazard, crazy quilt development pattern weve seen before on the Gainesvilles west side; Nothing continues a one-industry college town economy and residential construction fluctuating economy.   Get the facts and ignore the smears:   Jeff Knee, Gainesville

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Bradford High School seniors were able to 30, eating pizza, running obstacle course, playing kickball and getting wet, among other things. doused, no one was safe... not even Principal Bryan Boyer, who gets a cooling off, courtesy of senior Bradley Davis. all? I thought I did, Ricker said. I dont know. I wasnt expecting it. It proved to be an interesting experience from start to finish. Ricker was told beforehand there wouldnt be a problem with her carrying her project onto the plane for the flight to Houston. When she got to the airport, Regional News Regional News B Section Thursday, June 5, 2014News from Bradford County, Union County and the Lake RegionFEATURES CRIME SOCIALS OBITUARIES EDITORIAL New friends Amazing experiements Untamed games Lip-smacking snacks Surprising adventures Incredible music Saturday, June 14th 1:00:00pmWe will be kicking off the week with an afternoon of fun!! There will be inflatables, train rides, sno-cones & more... Florida Twin TheatreAll Seats $6.00 Before 6 p.m. 964-5451* SCREEN 1 SCREEN 2 STARTS FRIDAY Visit us on-line at www.FloridaTwinTheatre.comFri: 7:05, 9:10 Sat: 5:00, 7:05, 9:10 Sun: 5:00, 7:05 Mon Thurs: 7:30EXPENDABLESNOW SHOWING Fri: 7:00, 9:15 Sat: 4:45, 7:00, 9:15 Sun: 4:45, 7:00 Mon Thurs: 7:15 PG-13Angelina Jolie Adam Sandler PG BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer Bradford High School freshman Tessa Ricker earned a silver medal at this years International Sustainable World (Energy, Engineering, Environment) Project Olympiad, an international science fair held annually in Houston. Ricker, whose project, The Rate of Decomposition of Compostable Packing Materials, received one of 40 silver medals in the Environment division, shared her I-SWEEEP experience with the Kiwanis Club of Starke on May 27. I wasnt expecting this at all, to say the least, Ricker said of earning a medal. Ricker was one of more than 600 participantssome of whom were part of group projects from more than 40 states and more than 70 countries at the April 30-May 5 event. More than 300 medals (gold, silver, bronze) and honorablemention awards were presented, which made for a long awards ceremony. Ricker admitted she almost didnt accept her medal. After sitting through a portion of the ceremony, she told her older sister Hannah, who accompanied her on the trip, Im not going to get anything. Lets go. Her sister persuaded her to stay just a little longer, which was good. Ricker heard her name called and went up to accept her award, though according to her sister, you couldnt tell she was excited about it. When I got back, Hannah was like, Why didnt you smile at Ricker earns medal at international science fairTessa Ricker is shown with her project, The Rate of Soon-to-be BHS grads soak up fun on last day Dinkins. Please see page 6B for more photos. Photos are also available for viewing

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I was confident on about 75 percent of it, Yates said. The other 25 percent were some BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer John Andrews looked forward to going to school after enrolling in the Bradford County School Districts Academy of Academics. Four years later, he is preparing to accept his high school diploma. Andrews said he wouldnt have gotten through school were it not for the Academy of Academics, a voluntary performance-based program for middle-school and high-school students that are behind in terms of grade level, and at risk for dropping out of school. Andrews enjoyed the environment and being exposed to more one-on-one attention from teachers who seemed compassionate in helping him and other students. Its like family here, Andrews said. You dont see teacherstheyre just like my moms and dads. I love it here. 2B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, J une 5, 2014 $499 lb $399 lbPRICES AVAILABLEJ UNE 04 JUNE 10 2 $3$499$100 $299 O SCAR MAYER Amazing quality. Fantastic prices.S atisfaction Guaranteed $199lb $499 $299 lb1 6 OZ FAM PAK$259 lb 8 LB BAG FAM PAK$279lb $1 $149 $299lb lb O pen 7 Days a Week 8am to 8pm1 371 South Walnut St. (Hwy 301) Starke (904) 368-9188 RICE SIDES WYLWOOD KRAFT SINGLES IMPERIAL PILLSBURY $100 $199 $100GINGER EVANS 4LB BAGCRYSTAL O2 MAXWELL HOUSE CHIPS VARIETY PACK $189 $229 $449 $399 $100 were not present.Academy of Academics students recognized for their effortsTeachers handed out certificates of achievement on May 29, with Andrews receiving several, including one for overall excellence. Teacher Peg Stanwix-Hay said Andrews really blossomed in the program and took advantage of the welding program at the Bradford-Union Technical Center as well. Andrews has one more welding area to become certified in. John Andrews receives a for overall excellence from BradfordCenter Director Christy Reddish. Also pictured (foreground to are Academy of Academics teachers Peg Stanwix-Hay, Linda Rudoi, Cindy Bagley, Bish Bishop. BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer Bradford High School junior Kristie Yates earned a third-place finish in the area of medical terminology at the April 27-29 Skills USA Florida Leadership and Skills Conference in Pensacola. Teresa Jackson, a health sciences teacher at the BradfordUnion Technical Center, said, I am very proud of Kristie. I had no doubt that she would be successful. Yates, who advanced to the state event after placing first at the Feb. 21 Region 2 SkillsUSA Florida Conference in Jacksonville, had to take a 100-question multiplechoice test. A college medical terminology class was a big help to her.BHS junior Yates earns 3rd place at SkillsUSA Florida event

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and part of his hand. I thought he probably didnt want this war any more than I did, Mandeville said. The people that want it the least suffer the most. Art Butler of Lake City also participated in the D-Day invasions, landing on Utah Beach on June 19. Like Towers, he was 27. We didnt know what we were getting into, Butler said. It was noisy. There was shelling over us all night. Butler said he didnt worry about making it home because he had a wife and two children and knew he had to. He settled in Lake City after the war, pursuing a career in lumber and building and construction supply. Asked about whether he felt the eyes of the world upon him during those harrowing days, Butler paused before answering. We went over there knowing we had a big job to do, he said. We were hell-bent to make good.Remembering those who served and sacrificed their livesTowers is one of the founders of Les Fleurs de la Memoire, an association that arranges for French families to adopt the grave of an American soldier buried in Normandy in perpetuity, making at least one visit annually to place flowers on it. The associations website includes an excerpt from a letter Towers wrote to Claude Lavieille, a co-founder of the association: When I come to Europe, it is most difficult for me to visit the American cemeteries wherein my comrades lie at eternal rest. As a liaison officer, I knew many of them personally. Each of these visits is hard on mefor when I am standing in silence in front of a tomb, images of my comrades life come to mind, and it is like that for each visit. But I have to do it. I cant miss visiting each of them. Soon, neither I nor any of my companions will be able to visit the graves of American service men and women at eternal rest in Europe. Then what? Will they be BY MARY W. BRIDGMAN Special to the Telegraph-TimesMonitor The men who landed on the beaches of Normandy on D-Day during World War II and lived to tell about it are quickly fading into history, yet the significance of their sacrifices and valor will be remembered, especially this year, the 70th anniversary of the invasions. The commemorations will culminate Friday, June 6, in Ouistreham, France, where President Barack Obama, French President Francois Hollande and Britains Queen Elizabeth II will gather to remember the more than 9,000 Allied soldiers killed or wounded on June 6, 1944. Frank W. Towers of Alachua County will also be there. Towers, hale and hearty at 97, was there on D-Day plus six, landing in France on his 27th birthday. He reminisced about his experiences recently at a meeting of the D-Day Veterans of North Central Florida at Conestoga Restaurant in downtown Alachua. I was on a Liberty ship, taking packets from the Isle of Wight to the beaches, Towers said. Towers unit was supposed to land on Omaha Beach, but ended up at Utah Beach, 40 miles to the west, by mistake. Because there was a foot-long drop to the beach from the landing ramp, the service vehicles could not be reloaded. They traveled by land and met the ship when it landed at Omaha Beach later that day, the only unit to land at both beaches. There was no fighting at Omaha Beach when Towers landed. He could hear artillery fire, and he saw the carnage. There were wrecked vehicles and ships and stacks of bodies waiting to be shipped to England, he said. There were a lot of wounded and field hospitals. It was not pleasant. For the five months leading up to D-Day, Towers had been training in England. It was all playdummy bullets, he said. But this was the real thing. Towers wife of 71 years, Mary, remembers how she felt back home in the U.S., waiting to Thursday, June 5, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 3B HOPE CHRISTIAN ACADEMY SALUTES OUR 2014 SENIORSHope Christian Academy 352-473-40403900 S.E. State Road 100, Starke, FL Honors Honors Honors Honors HonorsTrain up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old he will not depart from it. Proverbs 22:6 (KJV)Photos: Teddy Bear Portraits SALUTATORIAN SUMMERLYN BYRD Magna Cum Laude: 3.59 weighted GPA. Dual enrolled at Santa Fe College. VALEDICTORIAN KATIE KRUZAN Summa Cum Laude: 4.47 weighted GPA. Earned AA degree through dual enrollment while attending HCA. GARHETT WILSON Dual Enrolled CHLOE WALKERTIFFANY GEORGSSONANDRE CANADY Dual Enrolled JOSEPH MOORE Dual Enrolled CHRIS TRESTERRYAN SILCOXOLIVIA SANDERSJOHNNY GIBSONCLASS MOTTO: We Were Made to Thrive.NOW ENROLLINGINFANTS 12TH GRADECurrent Enrollment: 330 students Curriculum: Abeka and A.C.E. Dual Enrollment: Currently, 27 students are dual enrolled at Santa Fe College. Scholarships: McKay and Step Up Award-Winning Sports Program: Tackle Football Flag Football Cheerleading Baseball Fast-Pitch Softball Volleyball Basketball Before/After Care & Summer Programs: Contact the school Hot Lunches: Order online Yearbook: Produced by students Praise Team/Band: Performs at chapel Safety Patrol: Elementary students School Uniforms: Variety of choices Spring Formal: Grades 9th-12th Title I:Intensive math & readingWorld Languages: Spanish Tours: Tuesdays & Thursdays Call for appointment Dr. Virgil A. BerryCHIROPRACTIC PHYSICIANServing the area for 21 years. Modern methods with old-fashioned concern. Auto Accidents Work Injuries Headaches Neck and Back PainBack & Neck Pain Clinic Remembering D-Day 70 years later pictured with his wife, organization that arranges Americans interned in soldiers across the hear from Frank with his mother in Boston. I was scared to death, she said. I pictured him in every one of the pictures. Because there was no TV in those days, she went to the movie theatre to see newsreels. We wrote letters to each other each day, Mary said, noting that the first letters arrived about 10 days after her husbands landing. They numbered their letters, so when several arrived at once, she could put them in order for reading. Towers served in Europe for 18 months and was due to go to the Pacific when atomic bombs dropped over Hiroshima and Nagasaki, ending the war. His commission was deactivated, although within six months he returned to Germany, where he was stationed for three years. Mary went with him, and their three children were born there. The family settled in Alachua County, where they raised chickens and eventually opened a country store. Years later, Frank took a computer course and went to work at the University of Florida. Frank and Mary Towers have made many trips to the Normandy beaches over the years, although Mary is no longer able to fly due to medical issues. This time, their 17-year-old grandson will accompany Frank. Don Mandeville of Gainesville, also a member of the D-Day Veterans of North Central Florida, was in the Navy, working aboard a rhino bargea long, wide, floating platform built of steel pontoons joined together by steel angle irons during the Normandy invasions. We werent scared. We were petrified, he said. Mandeville compared the devastation of the battle to destruction left by fierce tornadoes. We made 26 trips carrying soldiers across, he said. The following November, Mandevilles ship hit a mine and sunk, although the water was shallow so it didnt go completely under, and he was able to board another ship. The incident left him shell-shocked and jumpy. He recalled seeing a terribly wounded German soldier, who was missing a leg forgotten? Thanks to the efforts of Towers and other American and French citizens who share his concern, approximately 95 percent of the graves have been adopted. Towers also works hard to keep the memories alive at home, volunteering every Tuesday afternoon at the the Camp Blanding museum. The American monument on Omaha Beach commemorates those who lost their lives during the bloody D-Day battle. D-Day will be commemorated at the Keystone Heights Airport on Saturday, June 7, at 8 a.m. with a Wings of Dreams flyin breakfast. All veterans will receive a free breakfast, which will be followed by a program honoring those who participated in the Normandy campaign.Wings of Dreams to remember

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Andrews really excelled in the subject of math and helped assist other students who were having problems understanding it. You would not believe how many kids today give John credit for them knowing their multiplication tables, said Stanwix-Hay, who also said she has many photos of Andrews up at the board teaching fellow students how to do math problems. Basically, Andrews demonstrates what good citizenship is all about, StanwixHay said. Hes the kind of kid everybody wants to help because hes so helpful himself, she said. Andrews just never fit into a regular classroom setting, which is true of many students, Stanwix-Hay said. Some students just cant maintain the same level as others. Many, many kids arent cut out for that, which is why kids drop out of school, StanwixHay said. They just cant sit in a class where everyone is on page 51 at the same time. Some of them should be on page 98, and some of them shouldnt even be in that book. The Academy of Academics use of an individual educational plan is beneficial to a lot of students. Like Andrews, Jacob Slayton is set to graduate, and it wouldnt have been possible otherwise. Slayton was so behind on his credits he didnt think it would be possible to graduate after enrolling in the academy this school year. Slayton gave a lot of credit to the academy teachers, saying, Everybody here cares and wants to help you out. An appreciation for teachers Stanwix-Hay, Cindy Bagley, Harold Bish Bishop, Anna Kirley, Linda Rudoi and Robin Tatumas well as guidance counselor Cynthia Rossseems to be share by many of the academy students. Charlotte Carter, who said she would be sitting at home doing nothing if not for the program, stressed how the individual attention students receive is a big plus. They want you to succeed, she said of the teachers. Aaron Akridge said the teachers have helped him make tremendous progress since he joined the program last year. Theyve brought me a long way, he said. Like Andrews, Akridge has been participating in the Bradford-Union Technical Centers welding program. He became certified in two areas this past year. Akridge now sees a future for himself. If not for the Academy of Academics, he said, I probably wouldve left (school). Akridge and Andrews received certificates at the May 29 ceremony for the achievements in welding. Andrews and Slayton received Florida Ready to Work certificates, while Shania Rosier received a certificate for meeting the requirements to become a Microsoft Office specialist. Certificates of achievement 4B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, J une 5, 2014 (352) 473-9873Open Every Day 10:30AM-9PM N OW OPEN BBQ Burgers Steaks Salads7154 S.E. CR 21B Keystone (intersection of SR100 & 21B) www.tomsrealpitbbq.comfacebook.com/tomsrealpitbbq twitter.com/tomsrealpitbbq SAT JUNE 14THMOVIE NIGHT Bring in your church bulletin on Sunday and well donate 10% of your purchase back to your church! For more info visit: Friday & Saturday Steak & Shrimp Night SAT JUNE 21STLOTS OF WATER FUN! 10% OFFTotal PurchaseWith this Ad Expires 6-30-14 Letters editor@bctelegraph.com Dear Editor: In response to your article about the temporary fire station in Keystone for CCFR Station 11, I would like to offer the following information. 1. CCFR has been living in the house and utilizing the facilities owned by KHVFD rent free for 30 years! In 2004 CCBOCC entered into a 15 year agreement/contract with KHVFD to resolve the inadequate living quarters for the paid crews that are assigned there when the county staffed a paid fire engine in Keystone in addition to the rescue unit which increased staffing from 2 to 5. This allowed them to renovate the twostory building to resolve those issues that were recognized and were rushed due to the important nature in 2004. When the contract was signed by the County Commissioners, a quote was provided for the amount of $250,000 in which Clay County had budgeted for the project. Had your county administration followed through with the contract they entered into (for their benefit) none of this nonsense would be taking place today. Had the County administration completed the renovation as contracted to do they could have had this problem CRIME DOESNT PAYBUT WE DO!REWARDS UP TO $3,000 CRIME DOESNT PAYBUT WE DO!P AID FOR BY THE FLORIDA ATTORNEY GENERALS OFFICE CRIME STOPPERS TRUST FUNDREWARDS UP TO $3,000R EMAIN ANONYMOUSCALL TOLL FREE S TOPPE RSSubmit a TIP ON-LINE at: www.F CCrimeStoppers.com INTERNETAVAILABLE 904-388-9279 $ 24 99 USA Gymnastics Registrationnow underway MonFri 3-8pm (904) 368-0006 Ronnie McReynolds Registration: $10Evening Classes: $50/month (Begins June 9) 5-Day Camp: $100All Camps run 9am 3pm and include movie fieldtripUSA Gymnastics of FL is proud to announce registration for our summer programs. If the kids are looking for something fun to do this summer, let us help. With 26 years of experience USAGF is a proven hit for all ages! Like us on at Shooting Stars Gymnastics June 9 13 July 28 Aug 1 July 14 18 Continued from 2B were also awarded in the following areas: Math: Rosier Joshua Hundley, Justin Mann and Markayla Smith. History: Smith, Javone Blackshear and Tahlera Sweeting. English: Andrews and Smith. Science: Carter, Rosier and Slayton. Edmentum (online learning program)/Reading: Sweeting and Kristen Harris. Some information regarding CCFR Station 11solved 10 years ago. I would also remind you that CCBOCC vetoed the contract in April of 2013 with KHVFD, yet KHVFD continues to allow the career CCFR staff to reside there and to continue to use the facilities to store the fire engine, spare engine, and spare rescue all while paying no rent. Clay County is kind enough to pay the utilities, insurance, and partially maintain the buildings while they continue to use KHVFD to operate from. KHVFD has yet to file or enter into any litigation for the breach of contract in hopes Clay County would resolve the deficit they have caused. Over the last 12 months, KHVFD directors and individual Volunteer firefighters have made several attempts to work things out with Clay County and put KHVFD back to work to provide fire and first responder services to the area and Clay County will not even respond to our phone calls or emails any longer. KHVFD is negotiating with Bradford County to serve Southeast Bradford County as the primary fire protection and that would reduce homeowners insurance rates for all of those that are uninsurable in Bradford County because they are more than 5 road miles from Theressa Station 2. Yet Bradfords County Manager wants permission from Clay County to allow a non-profit fully functional, self-sustaining fire department to provide additional fire/rescue services to the citizens of Bradford County. (Clay County does not even recognize KHVFD as a department any longer) If you were not aware, Bradford Station 2 is covering fire/rescue services for Hampton now on a regular basis which has them spread thin due to lower manpower and a larger response area. In closing, I would encourage and challenge each person in Clay County and Bradford County to contact your respective County Commissioners, and Manager and express to them how much KHVFD could save the property owners in insurance rates, provide fire and medical response quicker and more efficiently supplementing the services provided by Bradford County currently, and why Bradford County needs permission to use KHVFD for the benefit of the citizens which Clay County Commissioners took from the Lake Region last year. Kevin Lee Mobley Firefighter/Paramedic/ Instructor/Inspector/Officer Dear Editor: So one of the issues that the town of Hampton was scolded for was nepotism...ok. What makes Bradford County so superior? Chapter 112.3135 Florida Statutes clearly defines that law. Yet, Bradford County thumbs their nose at that law and employs a County Commissioners Niece and the County Managers Son. The County Attorney, who Nepotism OK for county, but not Hampton?apparently is supposed to be smarter than everybody else, allows the BOCC to adopt resolutions (2012-04 and 201210), to circumvent the state statutes, and no big deal. So.. if Im clear on this, the local governments can adopt resolutions to circumvent any law the State of Florida has set forth?   Thats convenient. Not a single Commissioner questioned the legality of this... no surprise, being as the two public officials whose relatives benefit from this have a history of termination from the DOC scandal and Ethics Commission violations. So what else are they up to? Hampton was nearly abolished for wrong doing... Think about this as an election is coming up. Change is needed, and there is competition out there against the way we always do it Paul McDavid Resident, Bradford County District 5 Dear Editor: Last night as we were going to church, the weather got real stormy. The wind was blowing rain and limbs in sheets across the roads. Lightning and thunder came as we got into the church. The preacher was preaching about the miracle of creation, Storm a time on faithwhich I liked a lot, but I was distracted by the sounds of the storm and the words of the 19th Psalm kept running through my head. The Heavens declare the glory of God and the firmament showeth His Handiwork Music of the spheres: Gods orchestra blessing the earth and all we who are aware of it! It is no wonder that I like stormy weather. When I got home, I read the whole Psalm and found it so familiar, I think I know most of it by heart. In the night, I lay there saying it over and over. The last verse: Let the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart be acceptable in your sight O Lord. My strength and my Redeemer. Those are good words to go to sleep on. Hazel Wall 24-month CD Special $10,000 min. cu.org 1.46 % APY* 1.00 % APY* Deposits are federally insured by the NCUA, a US Government Agency, for up to $250,000. Annual Percentage Yield (APY) effective 3/13/2014 and subject to change at any time. 36-month APR is 1.45%, 540 penalty days. 24-month APR is 1.00%, 360 penalty days. Offer expires 6/30/14. 36-month CD Special Federally Insured by the NCUA.

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BY MICKEY AGNER Special to the Telegraph-TimesMonitor Drew Andrews is the new director of exceptional student education with the Bradford County School District, and he knows and loves his job. He will answer any related question and transition into new, but related, topics extemporaneously and without hesitation. Discussing the recent growth specifically in the autism spectrum area during a May 30 interview, Andrews said, The question quickly arises as to whether environmental issues are causing a growth of autism spectrum disorders, or have we just become better at evaluating and identifying them?   I dont know the answer to that question, but what I do know is that in the last few years, we have gained massive amounts of information about how people learn and how to help those with disabilities grow. Andrews indicated that the requirements and regulations for the ESE program are mandated and regulated according to the Individuals with Disabilities Educational Act. Moreover and according to that disabilities actthe necessary instruction required for identified disabilities was previously provided in separate classes, but research indicates that including the students with disabilities in the regular classa process known as inclusionis much more effective. When reminded that many people say that inclusion lowers the standards of the regular class, Andrews quickly responded that the claim is simply not true. Each student with disabilities is given a weight based upon the complexity and severity of the identified disability, and every public school is provided additional funding to address those needs according to the disability. The classes with more noted disability presence are provided additional teacher support. With that additional teacher support, the class is better able to address the skill diversification of each class, whether that is the student with educational disabilities or the Andrews passionate about students with disabilities Thursday, June 5, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 5B SR-230 E (2 miles east of US-301)B anquet Hall Driving Range Check out our web pagewww.starkegolf.com M emberships Available E xcellent Driving RangeP ro Shop Gift CertificatesG olf Lessons by AppointmentP rofessionally Run Tournaments H ome of the Strawberry Invitational Li ke us on facebook Brandi Barrington of Starke and Jackson Tatum of Lawtey announce their wedding on June 21 at 3 p.m. at Madison Street Baptist Church in Starke. Brandi is the daughter of Halbert and Nadine Barrington. She attended Bradford High School (Class of 2010) and just graduated from the University of North Florida in April, earning a bachelors degree in Elementary Education. Jackson is the son of John and Christina Tatum. He attended Bradford High School (Class of 2008) and works at his familys business. All friends and relatives are invited to attend. Barrington, Tatum to wed June 21 Brandi Barrington and Jackson Tatum Chelsey Marie Collins of Starke and Davin Sloan Crews of Lawtey announce their upcoming wedding. Chelsey is the daughter of Rex and Lisa Collins of Starke. She is a Graduate of Bradford High School. Davin is the son of Herman and Sandra Crews of Lawtey. He is a graduate of Bradford High School, Santa Fe College, Criminal Justice. The wedding will be on June 20, 2014 at Crystal Lake in Keystone Heights at 11:00 am. Roy Spaulding is the minister. The bride will be given in marriage by Clinton Collins, her brother. Lisa Collins will be Maid of Honor. The Best Man will be Herman Crews, grooms grandfather. Collins, Crews to wed June 20Davin Crews and Chelsey Collins Born in 1920 when the life expectancy was only 66 years, Margaret Peek has definitely defied the odds by 28 years. Four generations of her family came together to celebrate her 94th birthday with lunch in the park. We all enjoyed reminiscing about previous get-togethers throughout the years. A highlight of the celebration was watching her great-grandchildren interact with each other and the adults. We all delighted in sharing new and old memories as we celebrated the 94th birthday of our mother, mother-in-law, and nana. Peek celebrates 94th birthday Socials ,John Edward Parker graduated Magna Cum Laude from Elon University with a Bachelor of Science degree in Physics. He is a member of Sigma Pi Sigma, the national physics honors society. John is the grandson of Mary Ann Soud of Keystone Heights. Parker graduates from Elon UniversityJohn Parker Anna Sucsy of Keystone Heights, was named to the Deans List at Bates located in Lewiston, Maine, for the winter 2014 semester -a distinction earned by students whose cumulative grade point average is 3.71 or higher. Deans List students at Bates are exemplary high academic achievers. They model the good things that come from being goal-oriented, hard-working and persistent, said Matthew R. Auer, vice president for academic affairs and dean of the faculty at Bates. Sucsy is the daughter of Peter V. Sucsy Ph.D. of Keystone Heights, and is a 2013 graduate of Eastside High School. Sucsy named to Bates deans listHis parents are Tim and Esther Parker, and sister, Laura Soud Parker, all of Raleigh, N.C. Drew Andrews is the new director of exceptional student education with the Bradford County School District.

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Bradford High School seniors enjoyed food and lots of 6B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 5, 2014 Going out with a fun day of memories through a gauntlet of balls are (foreground Richardson, and Janell Danielle Clark Detlefsen seem to have the hang of it in the three-legged hang of it as they go crashing to the ground. obstacle course. easy. as she makes sure BHS football coach Steve Reynolds gets dunked. Tillotson Haleigh Clary are all smiles as they look for unsuspecting victims to Chadwick has a water gun ready Scotty Peirce up to no good. He has a tub full of water balloons. prepares to put some power into it during throws a football.BHS graduation: June 6, 8 p.m.

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Thursday, June 5, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 7B Dr. Anubha Gupta received her family medicine training from Jamaica Hospital Medical Center in New York City and her fellowship training in geriatric medicine from the VA Medical Center in Gainesville. She received her medical degree from Terna Medical College, Navi Mumbai, India. Dr. Gupta will be joining the staff of PALMS MEDICAL GROUP facilities in Starke every Tuesday. She will be seeing pediatric and adult clients for routine health maintenance and sick visits. Dr. Guptas husband is attending the University of Florida with a Fellowship in Pediatric Cardiology & Pediatrics ICU. The joy in the doctors lives is their toddler son. They are making their home in Gainesville, hopefully for a very long time! NEW DOCTOR IN TOWN t Crime t The following individuals were arrested recently by local law enforcement officers in Bradford, Union or Clay (Keystone Heights area) counties: BradfordThomas Henry Anderson, 63, of Jacksonville was arrested May 28 by Lawtey police for driving a vehicle not registered or licensed with the state. Jeremy Christopher Brewer, 21, of Starke was arrested May 31 by Starke police for battery. According to the arrest report, Brewer slapped his wife and pulled her to the ground by her hair before almost pushing her down the steps of the front porch as she tried to get away from him. The police were called, and Brewer was arrested. Bond was set at $5,000 for the charge. Chad Austin Carpenter, 27, of Lake Butler was arrested June 2 by Starke police for trespassing. According to the arrest report, Carpenter went to an auto parts store in Starke where a relative works and caused a disturbance, yelling obscenities and threatening several employees. He had been trespassed already in February from the same store. Tonya Gisela Carter, 32, of Starke was arrested June 2 by Bradford deputies for battery. According to the arrest report, Carter was irritated with a male at the residence. He was sitting outside on the front porch when she ran out the door, headbutted the victim and then tried to shove him off the porch. The victim was able to catch himself before falling and called law enforcement. A witness verified the victims account, and Carter was arrested. Rolando Carreno of Miami was arrested May 30 by the Florida Highway Patrol on two out-of-county warrants. Bond was set at $7,000 for the charges. David Orman Cox, 52, of Starke was arrested June 1 by Bradford deputies for aggravated assault with a weapon. According to the arrest report, Cox had been drinking and got into an argument with his son. Cox had purchased a new knife and had it in a sheath on his side, and threatened to stab his son with it during the argument. The son called law enforcement after Cox passed out on the couch. Bond was set at $50,000 for the charge. Elmer Ray Cox, 47, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 29 by Bradford deputies on an out-of-county warrant from Clay for domestic battery. Bond was set at $5,002 for the charge. Brittany Mae Daugherty, 18, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 27 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for making a false report of child abuse. Bond was set at $10,000 for the charge. Willie Kevin Dolison, 35, of Lawtey was arrested May 28 by Bradford deputies for battery. According to the arrest report, Dolison was arguing with his girlfriend when he came up behind her and grabbed her, pushed her against the wall and took her cell phone. He then threw the phone in the yard. Bond was set at $20,000 for the charge. Marc Howard Duncan, 21, of Lawtey was arrested May 28 by Lawtey police during a traffic stop for possession of cocaine, possession of marijuana and destroying evidence. According to the arrest report, Duncan threw a bag of marijuana out of the vehicle before being pulled over by the officer. Crack cocaine was found during a search of the vehicle, along with more marijuana. Bond was set at $17,000 for the charges. Nicholas Shane Faulkner, 27, of Jacksonville was arrested May 30 by Bradford deputies for probation violation. No bond was allowed for the charge. John Anthony Faust, 28, of Salisbury, N.C., was arrested May 27 by Lawtey police during a traffic stop for two charges of possession of marijuana and for five charges of possession of drug equipment. Bond was set at $29,000 for the charges. Timothy Lavain Floweres, 33, of Starke was arrested May 29 by Bradford deputies on four warrants for probation violation. No bond was allowed for the charges. Christopher Daniel Recent arrests in Bradford, Clay and UnionGeistlinger, 27, of Starke was arrested May 29 by Bradford deputies for possession of marijuana, producing marijuana, possession of drug equipment and destroying evidence. According to the arrest report, deputies received a tip that Geistlinger had a marijuana-growing operation at his residence, and after going to the residence once and smelling the marijuana, they returned later to speak with him. After gaining entry into the home and observing marijuana plants, they obtained a search warrant for the residence and found six pots with marijuana growing in them, along with other equipment used to grow the plants. Bond was set at $62,000 for the charges. Aaron Roy Griffis, 21, of Lawtey was arrested June 1 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for possession of a weapon or ammo by a convicted felon. Bond was set at $50,000 for the charge. Danielle N. Hamm, 36, of Starke was arrested May 29 by Starke police for failure to appear. Lucella Hill, 37, of Starke was arrested June 1 by Starke police for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $5,000 for the charge. Tyrise D. Jackson, 19, of Lawtey was arrested May 28 by Lawtey police for battery. According to the arrest report, Jackson got into an argument with a 14-year-old relative over the use of a phone and slammed her head into a dresser, causing a knot the size of a baseball on the back of her head. Richard Kelly, 24, of Lady Lake was arrested June 1 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $500 for the charge. Jeremy James Manning, 35, of Starke was arrested May 30 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for battery. Bond was set at $50,000 for the charge. Demetrius A. Martin, 20, of Starke was arrested May 28 by Lawtey police during a traffic stop for possession of marijuana. Bond was set at $5,000 for the charge. Richard Craig Nipper, 46, of Brooker was arrested May 27 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for larceny-petit theft second degree, third subsequent offense. Bond was set at $15,000 for the charge. Shynequia M. Oneil, 18, of Starke was arrested May 30 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $5,000 for the charge. Mathew R. Padgett, 24, of Jacksonville was arrested May 31 by Bradford deputies during a traffic stop for possession of marijuana and possession of drug equipment. Alphonso Leon Pernell, 34, of Starke was arrested May 28 by Bradford deputies for aggravated assault with a weapon, two charges of battery, kidnapfalse imprisonment, criminal mischief-property damage, resisting an officer, disturbing the peace and obstructing justice. According to the arrest report, the police were called to a residence about a disturbance. Pernell was at his mothers home in Starke washing his clothes when he became irate over something and started threatening to shoot and kill everyone in the house. While his mother was on the phone calling 911, Pernell snatched the phone out of her hand and broke it. Police arrived shortly thereafter, though, with several deputies and a K-9 unit to assist. Pernell refused to come out of the home and threatened that he had something for the officers if they went in the home. Pernells mom then snuck out of the house in the back and was talking to the officers from the front porch when Pernell stepped out onto the porch. She quickly went back inside and locked the front door, leaving him outside. After Pernell wouldnt comply with the officers to get on the ground, they released the K-9, but Pernell hit and kicked the dog several times. An officer then used a Taser, but Pernell continued to resist. Another officer used a Taser before Pernell was handcuffed and arrested. Bond was set at $1,102,000 for the charges. Timothy Warren Potts, 31, of Starke was arrested May 31 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for larceny-grand theft of a dwelling. Bond was set at $50,000 for the charge. Dennie Rae Randolph, 34, of Starke was arrested May 27 by Bradford deputies for possession of marijuana and possession of drug equipment. Bond was set at $1,500 for the charge. Daryl S. Risby, 40, of Starke was arrested May 29 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for violation of conditional release by the Florida Parole Commission. No bond was allowed for the charge. Ronald Eric Sawyer, 42, of Starke was arrested May 29 by Bradford deputies for possession of opium or derivative. According to the arrest report, during a traffic stop it was discovered that Sawyer had 19 Methadone pills he intended to distribute to another individual. Bond was set at $20,000 for the charge. Rosamarie Denice Simmons, 34, of Starke was arrested May 30 by Bradford deputies on an out-of-county warrant from Putnam. Bond was set at $500 for the charge. Rachel Marie Smith, 24, of Jacksonville was arrested May 30 by Bradford deputies for failure to appear. No bond was allowed for the charge. Robert Gerald Swanson, 41, of Baldwin was arrested May 31 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $500 for the charge.Keystone/MelroseJacqueline Fraga, 49, of Melrose was arrested May 30 by Putnam deputies for DUI. Dana Charles Hoffman, 55, of Melrose was arrested May 30 by Putnam deputies for perjury. Justen Kelley, 24, of Keystone Heights was arrested June 2 by Clay deputies for failure to appear. Jessica Nail, 21, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 30 by Clay deputies for burglary. Amanda Smith, 44, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 30 by Clay deputies for failure to appear. Derick Luther Phillips, 23, of Melrose was arrested June 1 by Putnam deputies for an out-ofcounty warrant. Ronnie Allen Stratten, 49, of Melrose was arrested May 28 by state troopers for driving with a suspended or revoked license. John Waters, 18, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 28 by Clay deputies for lewd or lascivious battery. UnionMarion Eugene York, 52, of Lake Butler was arrested May 28 by Union deputies for battery. According to the arrest report, deputies were called to a disturbance, where it was eventually determined that York struck his girlfriend in her face during an argument. According to the victim and a friend staying at the residence, this wasnt the first time York struck the victim during arguments. He was arrested and transported to jail. Stephen Louis Heslar, 27, of Lake Butler was arrested May 30 by Union deputies on an out-ofcounty warrant from Bradford. A 16-year-old juvenile from Lake Butler was arrested May 27 by Union deputies for three charges of possession of marijuana, possession of narcotic equipment and obstructing justice-tamper or destroy evidence.

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8B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 5, 2014 ARMSTRONGFENCE COMPANY Securing the SoutheastCommercial Residential Rent a Fence Access ControlCall for your FREE Estimate LOCAL PEOPLE ... LOCAL SERVICE! Thrift Store Lawtey, FLWatch for sign at Red Light on right. Cross Railroad. Were the first building on right after crossing RR.904-964-2524 Blake Valenzuela, between and Jennifer Valenzuela, and brothers and Jacob signs to play College. seated between Athletes for mother, Holly Hudson, signs Christian of intent. signs his letter of intent to attend Southeastern joined by sister, Courtney, and parents, Jodi and Sean Carroll. BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer Three recent Keystone Heights High School graduates signed letters of intent to play football during a May 22 ceremony. Tight end Micah Brown, who also played safety, will join former teammate Nate Smitha 2013 KHHS graduateat Kentucky Christian University in Grayson, Ky., while quarterback Blake Valenzuela will attend Wilmington (Ohio) College. Fullback/kicker Michael Carroll, who also played the linebackerdefensive end hybrid position, will join the first-year program at Lakelands Southeastern University. Each player generated interest from more than 20 schools through the Athletes for College recruiting service. Brown said it was a stressful time, talking to various coaches every day, but it was an experience he also enjoyed. It was a mixture of feelings at the signing ceremony as well. Im nervous and excited really excited, Brown said. Brown said he believes the small, Christian school will be a good fit for him. Plus, he enjoys the fact he gets to join a friend in Smith. Keystone head coach Chuck Dickinson said Brown possesses a 6-3, 6-4 frame that could use a little more weight. He said Brown probably weighs approximately 200 pounds now, but could see him putting on 25 to 30 pounds. As it was, though, Brown did the job he needed to do at tight end. Even though he wasnt real heavy, he came off the ball, Dickinson said. We ran quite a bit to his side. He was able to get people moved out of there just because of leverage. Brown already catches the ball well, though Dickinson said thats something hell have to continue to work on. Hes got above-average hands, Dickinson said, but thats something he can improve on. Brown feels good about his chances to contribute. I think Ill get the opportunity to play a lot at this school, he said. Carroll seemed almost at a loss for words in describing what it felt like to get a chance to keep playing. I dont know, its just mind blowing getting this far, he said. Its crazy to think of. It was a hard decision to choose a school, Carroll said. He narrowed his choices to Southeastern and Faulkner University in Montgomery, Ala. In the end, Carroll said he liked Southeasterns commitment to academics and its closer location to home. As far as the football side of Southeastern, Carroll said hes not sure where hell end up playing, though he does have a preference for lining up in the offensive backfield. Id like to get the ball, but its just wherever the coaches need me, Carroll said. Dickinson said Carroll is a strong blocker, with an emphasis on strong. Michael benches 335, 340, and cleans over 300, Dickinson 3 KHHS football players receive college opportunitiessaid. From a strength standpoint, hes already there. Hes just got to fit into their system. Its a new system in the sense of being a first-year program, so maybe hell have a chance to get in and have some early playing time. Carroll proved his worth at KHHS as a kicker as well with his ability to kick off into the end zone. He was a very big asset to the team, Dickinson said. Valenzuela admitted he didnt like talking during his interview with the Telegraph-TimesMonitor, but he had no trouble putting into words what the day meant to him. Im pretty happy, he said. Ive always wanted to go play a sport in college. Its always been my dream. Now, its happening. Valenzuela helped lead the Indians to the District 4-4A championship last season. That accomplishment will only help as he attempts to make his mark at the collegiate level. It helped me because it showed that anything can happen, Valenzuela said. Nobody determined that we would go as far as we did (in 2013). We were supposed to be the underdogs, and we proved everybody wrong. Dickinson said Valenzuela was a big part of that district championship by adding another dimension to his game. Valenzuela showed the ability to run the ball and did so successfully in key games, such as a win over district opponent Bradford. I think that helped our offense tremendously with him being able to be a run threat, Dickinson said. He still was able to throw, but I think thats part of the game hell have to work on a little bit more at the next level. Hopefully, A girls basketball/softball camp will be held at the Keystone Heights High School gym from 8:30 a.m. until 4 p.m. starting June 30 and running through July 2. A session will be offered for girls in second through fourth grade, while another will be offered for those in fifth through seventh grade. The cost is $130 (or $65 for those who want to do only one sport) and includes lunches, drinks, T-shirts and awards. Applications may be obtained at Keystone Heights Elementary School. For more information, please call Keystone Heights Elementary School at 352-4734844 and speak to either Jessica Carter (ext. 2315) or MaryAnne McCall (ext. 2270). Keystone girls basketball/ softball camp starts June 30

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Thursday, June 5, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 9B Caregiver for Mother she lives near Hampton 3 to 5 days a week 5 to 6 hours a day Pay is negotiable CONTACT: (c) Serving Families in North Florida since 1973 S TARKE OFFICE OPEN 8:30 to 5:30 MON-FRIHwy 301 North, Starke 904-964-2010 (Next to Best Western) The areas largest supplier of Colored GraniteWhen Quality Counts, You Can Count On UsPrimary Location in Lake City at 561 NW Hilton Ave.Member of Better Business Bureau Monument Builders of North America Florida Monument BuildersFL Lic. # F037700 d Obituaries d Mildred CopelandLAKE BUTLERMildred Dansie Copeland, 93, of Lake Butler passed away Wednesday, May 28, 2014 at her residence from an extended illness. Mrs. Copeland was born on Jan. 23, 1921 in Salt Lake City, Utah to the late Mahonri Dansie and Estella Starling Dansie. She was a homemaker. She was a lifetime member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, currently of the Lake Butler Ward. She is preceded in death by a son, David Copeland. Mrs. Copeland is survived by: her loving husband of 72 years, William O. Copeland; seven daughters, Ellen Virden, Mary (Robert) Porter, Donna (Glenn) Milton, Christine (George) Bradberry, Nancy (Tom) Price, Barbara Trambley, and Sarah (Mark) Hill; two sons, Tommy Copeland and James (Carolyn) Copeland; brother, Wesley Dansie; sisters, Dorothy Dansie and Stella Benson; 36 grandchildren; numerous great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren. Funeral services for Mrs. Copeland were held May 31 at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Lake Butler Ward. Burial took place after the funeral in the Jacksonville Memory Gardens, 111 Blanding Blvd. Orange Park. Archer Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. 386-4962008. please sign the guestbook at archerfuneralhome.com   PAID OBITUARYWanda JonesSTARKEWanda Leen Jones, age 77, of Starke passed away at E.T. York Hospice Care Center in Gainesville on Friday, May 30, 2014. She was born on Nov. 18, 1936 in Kings Mills, Ohio to the late Edward and Edith Robinson. Wanda was preceded in death by her husband of 54 years, Reverend Reed Jones. While a resident of Starke, Wanda worked as a Preschool Teacher at St. Marks Daycare and Little Peoples Daycare. She and Reed then moved to Shelby, North Carolina where they pastored New Bethel Nazarene Church for 22 years. Wandas two favorite things were spending time with her family and sharing the love of the Lord through time spent with her church family. Wanda is survived by: her children, Rhoda (Wayne) Wainwright, Danny Jones and Jeanetta Skinner all of Starke; her brother, Jimmy Robinson of Manchester, Ohio; her sister, Beulah Reese of Little Valley, N.Y.; her grandchildren, Kenneth Wainwright, Kristen Quinones, Tarah Jones and Daina Skinner; her great-grandchildren, Tyler, Carson and Kencie Wainwright, Ava and Luka Quinones, and Libby and Hannah Jones. Funeral services will be held on Saturday, June 7, at 11:00 am, with visitation beginning at 10:00 am, followed by a memorial service at Madison Street Baptist Church. Wanda lovingly requested donations be made to Haven Hospice, 4200 N. W. 90th. Blvd. Gainesville, Fl 32606, in her memory. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Archie Tanner Funeral Services of Starke. 904-964-5757. Visit www. archietannerfuneralservices.com to sign the familys guest book.PAID OBITUARYRoy KnightBROOKER Roy Edward Knight, 63 of Brooker passed away Monday, June 2, 2014 at ET York Haven Hospice in Gainesville. He was born Dec. 11, 1950 in Brooker to the late James Knight and Geraldine McNeal Knight. Mr. Knight was a heavy equipment operator. He enjoyed gardening, his dogs, and being a mechanic. He was preceded in death by his brothers, David and Jack Knight. Mr. Knight is survived by: his loving wife, Bethany Goodrich Knight; three brothers, Richard Knight, John Knight, and Vernon Knight; two sisters, Alice Sanford and Thelma McQuaig. Archer Funeral Home is in charge of the funeral arrangements. 386496-2008PAID OBITUARYShirley MarshallSTARKE Shirley Tyson Marshall, 64, of Starke, died on Thursday, May 29, 2014 at Shands at University of Florida Hospital Gainesville. She was a lifelong resident of Starke. She was a member of Pleasant Grove United Methodist Church. She was a graduate of RJE High School Class of 1968. She was also employed with Head Start and Episcopal Children Services for 34 years. She is survived by: son, Mark A. Marshall; and daughter, Stacy L. Marshall, both of Starke; sisters, Helen Pitts of Cocoa, Gloria Mack and Hazel Hamilton, both of Starke; brothers, Clinton Kelly of Cocoa, Vernon Tyson of Gainesville, Oliver Tyson of Starke, and Gad Tyson Jacksonville; and three grandchildren. Funeral services will be held at 2:00 p.m on Saturday, June 7 in the Church of God by Faith in Lawtey with Rev Carl Tyson Presiding and Rev. Alvin Green Eulogist conducting the services. Interment will be held in Bob-Love Cemetery in Starke. Viewing Family Hour, Haile Funeral Home Chapel Friday June 6, 2014 3-4:00 p.m. Viewing for Friends will be held at Pleasant Grove United Methodist Church 5-7:00 p.m. and 1 hour prior to the services on Saturday at the church. The Cortege will form at the Home of Ms. Shirley Marshall 17285 N. W 55th Avenue in Pleasant Grove at 1:15 p.m. Arrangements are under the Haile Funeral Home, Inc. of Starke.Lujune SoutherlandLAKE BUTLERLujune Rush Southerland, 56, of Lake Butler died Monday, June 2, 2014 at ET York Haven Hospice in Gainesville after an extended illness, surrounded by her family. She was born on June 15, 1957 in Ocala to the late James Rush, Sr. and Velva Gay Rush. She was employed with medical records at Shands in Gainesville for many years. She is survived by: her husband of 35 years, John Earl Southerland, Jr.; daughter, Jennifer Dawn Southerland; one granddaughter; brother, James Rush, Jr.; sisters, Penni (Anthony) Williams and Teresa McGill. Funeral services will be held Friday, June 6 at 11:00 a.m. in the chapel of Archer Funeral Home, with Rev. Steve Hutchinson officiating. Burial will be at New Zion Cemetery following the services. Family invites friends for visitation Thursday, June 5 from 6 to 8 pm at the funeral home. Archer Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. Daniel WilliamsLAWTEY Daniel Wayne Williams, 67, of Lawtey died June 3, 2014 at the V.A. Medical Center 1954 On behalf of the family of Mal colm H. Crews, Jr. we would like to thank all those who surrounded us with prayer, encouragement, food and flowers during this most difficult time. We are truly overwhelmed with gratitude for the love you have shown us.   God bless you all Card of Thanksin Lake City. He was born July 27, 1946 in Jacksonville. He is preceded in death by his brother, Dale Walker Prescott and his mother, Lavada Ivey Prescott. He served in the United States Air Force during the Vietnam War. He is survived by: his brother, Eugene Prescott of Lawtey. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Archie Tanner Funeral Services of Starke.things I had never seen before, so I just kind of guessed. BHS sophomore Cole Johnson also competed at the state event in the area of computer maintenance. He placed fifth after earning a first-place finish at the Region 2 event. The winner in each area at the state event will compete in the SkillsUSA national event. This was the first year of SkillsUSA competition for Johnson and Yates. SkillsUSA is a partnership of students, teachers and industry representatives working to provide the U.S. with a skilled labor force. Yates said she wasnt expecting to come out on top at the Region 2 event, which featured 12 other students competing in medical terminology. In fact, she said she was hesitant about even placing due to a soccer injury that had her on crutches. I was recovering from an ACL reconstruction, Yates said. They were going to make me walk up to the stage and walk across it. Mrs. Jackson walked up (to the stage) with me and went on stage and got my award. I was thankful for that. By virtue of a top-three finish, Yates earned the right to compete at state along with Johnson, who also placed first at the Region 2 event. I was really excited because I had never been to Pensacola before, she said. At the time of the SkillsUSA event, though, the area was deluged by rain and experienced flooding. Jeff Ledger, a computer systems and information technology teacher at the Bradford-Union Technical Center who went on the trip, said it was the craziest weather hes ever seen. The electricity at the Bay Center, where the SkillsUSA event was held, went out halfway through the competition. When it came back on, Ledger said, they said, Just so you know, theres a funnel cloud Continued from 2B about a mile from us. Well keep you alerted. Yates said, We got like 21 inches of rain overnight. There was actually a lightning bolt that hit the hotel and shook the whole building. It woke me up from a dead sleep. Still, the SkillsUSA event was fun, Yates said. She competed against approximately 20 people in medical terminology. She was off crutches by that time, but that didnt make hearing her name announced as a third-place finisher any less intimidating as the state event had more competitors overall than at the Region 2 event. I was a bit more nervous, Yates said. I was off crutches, but I still had to walk down about three flights of stairs and get on stage with all those people looking at me. It was nerveracking. Yates believes competitions hosted by such organizations as SkillsUSA and Health Occupations Students of America can help students plan out a career path. However, she made up her mind to do something in medicine years ago, citing her parents as influences. Her father, Rusty, works for Philips and provides service for medical equipment, while her mother, Susan, works for the Cardiac and Vascular Institute in Gainesville as a nuclear technologist. Ive known from a young age I always wanted to go into the medical field, said Yates, who is contemplating becoming either an obstetrician/gynecologist or a neonatologist. I think these classes here (at the BradfordUnion Technical Center) help solidify that. Ledger said he wished to thank the following for their support in allowing Yates and Johnson to compete in the SkillsUSA events: George Roberts Insurance, Starke Chiropractic, Mosley Tire, Denmark Enterprise, Knuckle Draggers, Capital City Bank, State Farm, Community State Bank, Bradford County Education Foundation, Tatum Brothers Saw Mill, Jackson Building Supply   and Ameriprise Financial. Network $2999 904-388-9279

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student with gifted skills. Additionally, those classes with additional teacher support are better able to intensify the support for students learning new skills and gradually withdraw that support as the student progresses, a successful process known as scaffolding. That, Andrews said, is not his opinion, but the conclusion of research. From there, his conversation with the Telegraph-TimesMonitor quickly flowed into the area of specific learning disabilities because it is by far the largest area of disabilities in every public school district.   According to the National Center for Learning Disabilities, nearly 2.5 million school-age children in the United States today have been identified as having learning disabilities, and this does not include the students enrolled in private or religious schools.   That number of students represents about 42 percent of hell continue to progress. The fact that Valenzuela progressed each year while at KHHS has the coach believing he can do the same at Wilmington. I think if he does what hes supposed to, hell have an opportunity to do well, Dickinson said. The three players cant wait to suit up for their respective schools. Its something Ive always wanted to do, Valenzuela said, while Brown said, I cant wait. Its so exciting. Carroll said, Its going to be an adrenaline rush, definitely. Dickinson, of course, is proud of all three for achieving their goals and putting in the work necessary in the classroom to do so. Hopefully, they found the (school) that will best fit them, and theyll have success, Dickinson said. 10B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 5, 2014 EQUAL HOUSING OP PORTUNITY. All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex or national origin, or an in tention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing cus tody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimina tion, call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777, the tollfree telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. For further information call Florida Commission on Human Relations, Lisa Sutherland 850-488-7082 ext #1005 Commercial Property (Rent, FOR RENT PROFESSIONAL OFFICE, 1,500 sq.ft. $1,000/mo.up to 3,000 sq.ft. Contiguous $2,000/ mo. Warehouse 3,000 sq. ft. $800/mo. Smith & Smith Realty. 904-9649222. RETAIL SPACE in busy strip center. 1,000 sq.ft. and 2,000 sq. ft. units. South HWY 301 front age, across from the KOA Campground. Call 352235-1675. DOWNTOWN STARKE Pro $315 per month. Conference room, kitchen, utili ties and more provided. 904-364-8395. Home for Sale3BR/2BA living room, din ing room, family room, laundry room. Back porch is screened in. Storage shed. Large fenced & paint. A/C. Immaculate condition. $120,000.00. Near downtown & schools. 823 Parkwood Place. 912-843-2194 or 912-281-9053 HOUSE for rent. In good condition. For more information call, 904-290-0083 OR 904-964-5006. VERY CLEAN NEWLY PAINTED, 2BR/1BA SW. W/D hookup, CH/A, 1 acre, in country. $450/mo. $500 deposit, no lease. Call 904-769-9559. 3BR/2BA DW 12273 SE 21st Ave., Starke. $675/ month plus $650/security. Out in country. Service animals only! 904-9648637. SUITE OF OFFICES IN CLUDES Kitchen, Show er, Washer Dryer. Downtown STARKE $1000/ MO. For information Call 904-364-9022. PERMANENT ROOMS for rent at the Magnolia Hotel. Both refrigerator and microwave. Special rates, by the month. Call 904-964-4303 for more information. MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT starting at $525 per month. Hidden Oaks, Lake Butler. Call 386496-8111. NICE MOBILE HOMES in Lake Butler & Starke 2 & 3 BR single wides, fenced. 2BR/2BA. Lake front. Deposit required. Call 678-438-6828. WE HAVE 2 OR 3 bed room MH, clean, close to prison. Call 352-468-1323 2BR/1BA APT. CH/A. Electric range, refrig. Wall to wall carpet. $400/mo. sec. deposit. References, call 904-966-1334. OFFICES FOR LARGE STAFF. Includes living qtrs, showers, kitchen, washer & dryer. This is a living qtrs. $1000/month. Call 904-364-9022 Bradford Union Clay 40Notices 41Auctions 42M otor Vehicles & Accessories43RVs & Campers 44Boats &ATVs 45Land for Sale 46Real Estate Out of Area 47Commercial Property (Rent, Lease, Sale) 48Homes for Sale 49Mobile Homes for Sale 50For Rent 61Scriptures 62Vacation/Travel 63Love Lines 64Business Opportunities65Help Wanted 66In vestme nt O ppo rtunities67Hunting Land for Rent 68Carpet Cleaning 69Food Supplements 70Money to Lend 71Farm Equipment 72Computers & Accessories51Lost/Found 52Animals & Pets53AYard Sales53BKeystone Yard Sales53CLake Butler Y ard Sales54Produce 55Wanted 56Antiques 57For Sale 58Child/Adult Home Care59Personal Services 60Home ImprovementWord Ad Classified Tuesday, 12:00 noon Classified Display Tuesday, 12:00 noon964-6305 473-2210 496-2261 C lassified Advertising should be paid in advance unless credit has already been established with the newspaper. A $3.00 service charge will be added to all billing to cover postage and handling. All ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser at the time of placement. However, the classified staff cannot be held responsible for mistakes in classified advertising taken by phone. The newspaper reserves the right to correctly classify and edit all copy or to reject or cancel any advertisements at any time. Only standard abbrevations will be accepted. TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED USE YOUR PHONE (904) 964-6305 (352) 473-2210 (386) 496-2261 Classified Ads Where one call does it all! Set Right Mobile Homes Specializing In Relocations, Re-Levels, Set-Ups & Disposal Rodney A. Carmichael, OwnerEmail: set_right_homes@yahoo.com904-364-6383 EXTRA CASH! Could you use some now that the holidays are over? We specialize in helping people sell through our Classifieds! YARD SALES AUTOS BOATS CLOTHES APPLIANCES... The list goes on..Call Mary Today at 904-964-6305 N EED C ASH F AST! E mail your med-to-hi-resolution digital photo (150dpi+) & ad text to: by 5pm Monday or bring it to:B radford County Telegraph Union County Times Lake Region Monitor( 904) 964-6305 c ash/check/credit cards accepted all for only /wk c overing Bradford, Union & Clay Counties a in our weekly f ree c ommunity shopper: Target your audience quickly A childless loving married couple seeks to adopt. Will be hand on mom/dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Dawn & Domenick 1(855)985-4592. Adam Sklar #0150789 Fri, June 13th @ 10am Online & Onsite 10950 N Kendall Dr, 2 nd Fl, Miami, Fl 33176 Office Furniture & Equipment Cubicles Computers/Laptops Phone System & more! 904-368-0687 phwww.starkedivorce.comMARGARET ANDERSON1011 N. Temple Ave. Starke. FL (US 301 North)Family Law & Will Preparation30 years experience Margaret will continue to serve clients in Alachua County as well as Bradford & Union counties all U.S. students enrolled in any kind of ESE class. Unlike many common perceptions, these disabilities are not a discriminator of people. They are caused by genetics and problems in pregnancy, at birth or after birth.   Additionally they can be caused after birth by head injuries, poor nutrition or chemical exposures to elements such as lead. According to Andrews, a major factor in the students educational growth, regardless of the relevant type or severity of disability, is early detection. Even when a young child encounters brain damage from accidents, he or she has a better chance of regaining the original neurological function compared to adults. Likewise, the younger the child is when a disability is identified, the better chance he or she has of overcoming those disabilities educationally. Consequently, the district places much emphasis upon its relationship with childcare programs, voluntary pre-K programs and early organizations like Child Find and Early Steps. Andrews indicated that good communications between parents and people who work with children in preschool organizations are very important.   Those professional childcare workers have been trained to recognize disability indicators that are age specific to those children. Some of the more profound and physical disabilities are easily identified, but specific learning disabilities are manifested in subtle expressions. Andrews concurred that the identifying behaviors and skills listed on the idonline.org website are good indicators of the lessobvious learning disabilities of preschool-age children to look for. Those identifying skills and behaviors are: Speaks later than most children. Pronunciation problems. Slow vocabulary growth, often unable to find the right word. Difficulty rhyming words. Trouble learning numbers, alphabet, days of the week, colors or shapes. Extremely restless and easily distracted. Trouble interacting with peers. Difficulty following directions or routines. Fine motor skills are slow to develop.   When you listen to Andrews talk about children with disabilities, you not only get the impression that children with disabilities can be successful, but that they are also very significant assets to all of our schools and community.Continued from 5B Continued from 8B

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Thursday, June 5, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 11B KEYSTONE 2BR/1BA. 1 acre fenced. SW w/room addition. Clean. $525/ month plus last & security. Please call 352-475-3094 or 352-235-1143 2BR/1BA APT. CH/A. Electric range, refrig. Hard wood floors. $495/mo. sec. deposit. References, call 904-966-1334. 5 Yr. 3BR/2BA house for rent. Tile floor, granite counters, Jacuzzi tub, gas wrap around porch. Lake access. Post Masters Village in Keystone Heights. $1,050/mo. plus 1-month deposit. Call Dave 352473-3560. 14 BY 70. 2BR MOBILE HOME on Private Lot. 301 Hampton. Like new. $525/ month. 904-966-3212 2BR APT DOWNTOWN STARKE. $500/month. Call 904-364-9022 to see apt. 3BR/2BA SW. Between Starke & Lake Butler. $600/monthly $300/de posit. 904-305-8287 or 904-263-3999 CH/A $600/mo. $300/ deposit. Between Lake Butler & Raiford. 904-305-8287 or 904-263-3999 3BR/2BA living room, din ing room, family room, laundry room. Back porch is screened in. Storage shed. Large fenced & paint. A/C. Immacu late condition. No pets other than service ani mals. $950/month plus deposit. Near downtown & schools. 823 Parkwood Place. 912-843-2194 or 912-281-9053 DW 3BR/2BA. On 2 acres with add. 2 acres fenced w/pond/horses. Lawn maintenance included. Has water softener. $1,150/mo. First & last plus deposit $200.00. Call 904-769-1636 LARGE FURNISHED ROOM WITH BATH for rent $80/weekly. Located on State Rd 100 Starke. Ride to & from doctors, food store, low income are welcome. Monthly rent can be arranged. 904-769-8077. KEYSTONE HEIGHTS 2BR/1BA. CH/A, newly renovated. $500/month. On Silver Lake. Lawn care & maintenance included. Call 352-478-8321 2BR/1BA HOUSE. Across from RJE in Reno. Nice clean, freshly painted. Must see. Kitchen com pletely redone. Contact Marvin 904-742-3406 3BR/2BA DW. Outside Starke city limits. CH/A. $650/month, $650/ deposit. Call 352-2356319 2BR/1BA HOUSE in Starke city limits. $500/month plus $500/deposit. Call 352-235-6319 RENT A ROOM IN AN OF FICE. $300 per month. Utilities furnished, kitch en provided. 6 offices available. 4 downstairs, 2 upstairs. For info call 904-964-6305. BUILDING THAT USES METAL SHOP. (Mc Clellan Recycling) 224 E. Washington Street. Starke. $200 per month. Call 904-964-6305 SMALL TRAILER FOR RENT, One person. $350/ monthly, satellite and utilities included. $150/ deposit. 1/2 acre, pet welcome. 904-964-2747 LAWTEY CHURCH OF GOD yard sale. Sat. 8am-2pm. FRIDAY 8AM-2PM. 10321 NW CR 225 Starke. Lots of nice miscellaneous items. Kamado-Joe XL Grill, brand-new used 3x $500.00. Sm. furniture, attic fan, clothes, some tools. MULTI FAMILY. MISSION TRIP FUNDRAISER. Fri & Sat 8am-1pm. House wares, clothes, shoes, toys, tools, elec tronics & more. Harvest Church N of Starke on 301. FRI & SAT 8AM-2PM. Come see. 5062 NW 182nd way. Conerly Estates. Rain date June 13th & 14th. YARD SALE SATUR DAY ONLY! SE SR 100 8am-2pm SAT 8AM-5PM. Huge sale. 3 miles past Hospital on 230. Follow signs on left. SalesA FUNDRAISING YARD SALE will be held at Key stone Heights VFD on Fri & Sat 8am-3pm. The funds raised from this yard sale will assist with the cost of the cemetery monument for DJ Mob ley. 231/121 go south as if go ing to RMC. 9515 CR 231 on right side of hwy. $2.00 coupon for 30. 00 carton cigarettes all new custom ers on 1st. carton. FIFTY FIVE (55) GAL LON AQUARIUM. Fully equipped and stocked in operation call Charles. 904-966-2911 BUILDING AT 224 E. Washington Street. $7000. Could be mower shop or recycling shop. Call 904-964-6305 Child/Adult Home CareCAREGIVER IN YOUR HOME. 25 years experience excellent refer ences live-in available cell 352-328-1883 home 352-475-3900 Personal ServicesCLARK FOUNDATION REPAIRS, INC. Correction of termite & water-dam aged wood & sills. Level ing & raising Houses/ Bldgs. Pier Replacement & alignment. We do all types of tractor work, excavation and small demolition jobs. Free Estimates: Danny (Buddy) Clark, 904-545-5241. DRIVERS: $5,000 SIGN-ON BONUS! Great Pay! Consistent Freight, Great Miles on This Regional Account. Werner Enterprises: 1-855-515-8447 DRIVERS: Company. Home Every Week. Excellent & Loaded. No Touch, 50% D&H. CDL-A, 3 yrs exp. 800-588-7911 x225. LOCAL STARKE BUSI NESS is looking to hire a part-time and/or full-time staff member. Optional shifts are available and Military Veterans are wel come to apply! We are looking for a self-starter, goal oriented person with the willingness to learn. No experience necessary! Please email employment app or resume to vtoddf@ gmail.com. HELP WANTED; RETAIL COUNTER SALES, FT position-40 plus hours. Applicant should have High School Diploma. Must have Retail Sales exp., and basic knowl edge of the computer. Lake Butler Farm Center Phone Number 386-4963921. Fax Number 386-496-1294. Email address: farm538@ windstream.net THE CITY OF HAMPTON WILL BE ACCEPTING applications through June 12, 2014 for a part time position of Street/Maintenance Worker. Ability to lift 50 lbs.> operate lawn and outdoor equipment, general knowledge of street and maintenance duties desired. This position will work in conjunction with the Utility Distribution Op erator and other city em ployees including evening and weekend work as needed. Applications can be picked up and returned at/to the Hampton City Hall, 5784 Navarre Ave, Hampton, Fl. (904) 964-6305 (352) 473-2210 (386) 496-2261 Classified Ads Where one call does it all! for positions of and Full Time in Keystone in Gainesville 352-473-0680 Excellence Through Senior AdvocacyServing Clay County and Surrounding Areas.105 Commercial Drive Keystone Heights, FL 32656HHA29991306Must have been a registered nurse for at least a year and prefer home health care experience, but not required for right candidate. with resume in hand. Episcopal Childrens Services has openings for a for our Head Start program in Starke.A bachelors degree in early childhood education preferred; associates required for Lead position. Salaries vary by position & credentials ($11-$17 per hour) Excellent benefits package, including:Health, Dental and Life Insurance Retirement Plan w/ Employer Matching Paid Vacation & Holidays Employer Paid Training & Tuition AdvancementEmail resum to hhodges@ecs4kids.org or Fax to (904) 726-1520 ATTN HRECS is an Equal Oppo rtunity / Affirmative Action / Drug Free E m ployer. DURRANCE PUMP QUALITY SERVICE SINCE 1964 Pumps Sales Parts Service STATE LICENSE #1305 rffntb b rfntfbnfffbffnbnff ffbfrfffbfnfnfbfntfnf frfntbfbfffrtffbfbffbnf fntfffrfnff Southern Villas of StarkeAsk about our 1&2 BR Apartments HC & non-HC Units. 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12B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 5, 2014 however, she was told her project would have to be considered checked baggage. We got it back when we were in Houston, and there was this black line down the back of it, Ricker said. The black line could be removed, though, so no harm done. Upon arriving at the Hilton Americas-Houston, where she was supposed to be staying, Ricker found out her name was not on the hotel list. She was asked if she could provide her I-SWEEEP project code, but she didnt have it on her. I had to call my parents, but they were in Gainesville, Ricker said. There was no way they could get me the project code on time. Im calling random people and asking them if they are in Starke. I finally got a hold of one of my youth directors. She was like, Yeah, Ill get it for you. She had to break into our house and get my project code for me. Ricker said it was intimidating showing up at the George R. Brown Convention Center with her project. There were so many people and so many projects she thought looked better than hers, she said. She said she didnt feel good about her chances. Then you start to talk to the kids, Ricker said. Its not like youre in a competition with them. Youre friends. I didnt meet a single rude person while I was there. It wasnt that kind of environment. Everyone was so nice. Prior to the project judging, there was a flag ceremony in which some of the I-SWEEEP participants showed off their countries flags and traditional attire. It was interesting, Ricker said. She said she saw kids from Mexico wearing reindeer headdresses, while Bangladeshi kids wore what she could only describe as Mrs. Claus-type outfits. The girls from Puerto Rico had these huge, pink dresses, Ricker said. I was wondering how they walking. More interesting attire awaited Ricker when I-SWEEEP participants visited Johnson Space Center on May 4, which happens to be Star Wars Day. She said there were crazy people dressed in costumes from Wookies to Galactic Empire stormtroopers. It was an interesting cultural experience, she said. Ricker got to visit the Houston Museum of Natural Science, at which she found a vending machine that sold flavored crickets. She bought salt and vinegar and bacon and cheddar varieties and offered them to any Kiwanis member who was bold enough to try them. (Two members did.) I brought them back originally for my dad, but he wouldnt eat them, Ricker said. I ate one for him. I got like cricket stuff in between my teeth. It was not fun. I was one and done. A STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) Expo was held prior to project judging as well. It was an event open to the public that featured more than 100 physics, chemistry and math demonstrations. Ricker said there was a robotics competition in which you raced against another person to build a robot and then use the finished robot to pick up balls and place them in a bin. I was going up against this kid who looked like he was 5, Ricker said. Im like one third of the way through my robot, and hes already putting balls into the bin. It was not fair, so I just gave up. It was embarrassing. The expo also featured the Texas A&M University Chemistry Roadshow, a publicservice program designed to entertain as well as educate students. Dr. Jim Pennington, a senior lecturer and research associate at Texas A&M who coordinates the roadshow, made quite an impression on Ricker with his colorful tie-dyed smock and propensity for scaring people with a contraption that made loud noises. He was insane because he kept blowing things up and not telling you (beforehand), Ricker Continued from 1B said. At one point, Pennington called Ricker to the stage and asked her to provide him with a monetary bill. I gave it to him and he sprayed something on it and lit it on fire, Ricker said, adding, Then he just handed it back to me, and it wasnt even hot. It was the coolest thing, but he really scared me. Ricker got her money back safely, plus went home with a little extra, receiving a $400 check for earning a silver medal after project judging. Despite a rough beginning with the inability to carry her project on the plane and not being on the hotel list, it turned out to be quite a trip. I really did just have so much fun at I-SWEEEP, Ricker said. Medals and honorablemention awards are given to participants in three divisions: Environment, Engineering and Energy. A grand winner is named in each division. This years grand winners were Albert Kima student at Manhasset High School in Long Island, N.Y.in Environment, Drew Prevosta student in the Huntsville, Ala., Covenant Christian Academy home-schooled programin Engineering and Raymond Yina student at Ward Melville High School in East Setauket, N.Y.in Energy. money seemingly burns, but Pennington coated the bill with something to prevent



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lrmonitor@bellsouth.net www.StarkeJournal.com Deadline Monday 5 p.m. before publication Phone 352-473-2210 Fax 352-473-2210 Lake Region Monitor Lake Region Monitor USPS 114-170 Keystone Heights, Florida Thursday, June 5, 2014 42 nd Year 5 th Issue 75 CENTS Melrose man accused of killing NY trooper had Clay Co. DUI BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor MELROSE-The Melrose man accused of killing a New York State Trooper on May 29 was arrested for DUI in Clay County five-and-a-half years ago. New York officials said Almond Arnold Upton, 60, intentionally struck and killed Trooper Christopher Skinner on Interstate 81 near Binghamton. Skinner was conducting a traffic stop when he was hit. Officials added that before the fatal collision, the Melrose man, driving a Toyota Tacoma around noon, intentionally struck two other vehicles that were also traveling north on the interstate. Law enforcement officials said that prior to striking Skinner, Upton swerved from the inside passing lane of the roadway to the right, crossing the outside lane and hitting the stopped car and the trooper. Moments later, Upton pulled over and ran into the woods. Law enforcement officers caught him an hour later. They said he showed no signs of impairment. According to a Clay County Sheriffs report, on Oct. 19, 2008, a motorist reported seeing a silver Toyota pickup driven by a possibly drunk driver traveling west on S.R. 100 near C.R. 219. A deputy, who was already parked at a nearby convenience store wrote in the report that he saw Upton stagger out of the pickup, walk inside the store and purchase lottery tickets. After Upton refused to take a field sobriety test, the officer arrested him. At the Clay County jail, deputies took two breath samples from Upton, which registered alcohol levels of .201 and .190, double the states legal limit. According to the arresting officer, Upton said he refused to take the field sobriety test because he had failed one in Connecticut. He also told the deputy that he had consumed around a dozen beers before encountering the lawman at the convenience store. Upton Lake Brooklyn up 11 feet in nearly 2 years On May 31, Lake Brooklyns water level was at 96.25 feet above sea level. That is up 11.07 feet since its last low of 85.18 feet on June 23, 2012. The record low since 1991 occurred on Sept. 6, 1994 at 85.15 feet. The record high since 1991 was 112.87 feet on May 2, 1998. Keystone Heights council member sworn in Keystone Heights City Manager (L) Terry Suggs swears in the municipalitys newest council member, Steve Hart during the councils June 2 meeting while city staff member member Tony Brown. Brown vacated the seat to run for mayor. Sheriffs owning up to Kindergarten marijuana BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor KEYSTONE HEIGHTS The family members of a sixyear-old boy who brought marijuana to Keystone Heights Elementary School are all denying the cannabis belongs to them, according to the Clay County Sheriffs Office. A school resource officer wrote in a report that during the morning of May 28, the kindergartener was bragging to classmates that he had brought his mothers cigarettes to school. Principal Mary Mimbs took possession of the childs backpack, confiscated the pack of cigarettes and discovered what appeared to be a small plastic bag of marijuana in the box. At the time of the discovery, the childs mother happened to be on campus to watch her son in a kindergarten performance. After the show, the deputy interviewed the mother who denied owning the drugs. She said she had no idea how the boy obtained the marijuana. Sheriffs office spokesperson Mary Justino said that none of the childs family members have, so far, claimed the substance, and unless someone does, an arrest us unlikely. We dont believe the 6-yearold boy knew there was pot in the cigarette box/case, she wrote in Clay Electric trustee Angus Hastings dead at 87 BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor KEYSTONE HEIGHTS-Clay Electric Cooperatives longestserving trustee and a pioneer in political action for electric co-ops died on May 25. Angus Hastings was 87. Clay Electric members first elected the Ft. McCoy resident to the board of trustees in 1965. For nearly 50 years, he represented District 9, which includes parts of Putnam and Marion Counties. Before his service on the Clay Electric board, Hastings worked as a meat grader for the U.S. Department of Agriculture for 15 years. In 1968 he ran for the Florida legislature, losing the Democratic primary to future U.S. Congressman and Gov. Buddy MacKay, who took over the statehouse for 23 days after the death of Lawton Chiles. In 1974 Hastings began his 40-year association with the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, representing Florida co-ops on the board. The following year he met Georgia Gov. and future U.S. Middleburg realtor leading state GOP BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor Members of Floridas Republican State Executive Committee elected Clay Countys GOP chairwoman as their next leader. Leslie Dougher, 50, of Middleburg, will fill the unexpired term of State Chairman Lenny Curry, who resigned in April to run for mayor of Jacksonville. The term expires in January, 2015. Dougher is a California native who moved to Florida in 1995. She is a realtor for Caldwell Banker Vanguard Realty in Fleming Island, and is married with a 15-year-old daughter. In 2006, Dougher attempted to unseat school board member Lisa Graham and lost with 38 percent of the vote. In 2008 she was elected chairwoman of the Clay County Republican Executive Committee. She also chairs the Clay County Chamber of Commerce Government Affairs Committee. In Saturdays election at the Grand Hyatt Tampa Bay, she defeated Eric Miller, a state committeeman from Martin County, 106-69. In a statement released by the party, Dougher said, I arrest warrant scam resurfaces BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor GREEN COVE SPRINGSThe Clay County Sheriffs Office said that area residents are once again receiving bogus phone calls from individuals posing as law enforcement officials demanding payment of fines or court costs. In January, the sheriffs office arrested a prison inmate and his girlfriend after deputies traced similar phone calls to Georgia. Daniel Ray Floyd, 38, an inmate at Autry State Prison, was charged with 10 counts of participating in a scheme to defraud. Ashley Nicole Dean, 27, of Fayetteville, Ga. was charged with one count of participating in a scheme to defraud. According to a sheriffs office report, Dean provided Floyd with information about Florida cities that were using red light cameras. Floyd then telephoned residents in those communities, including 13 in Orange Park and Green Cove Springs. Claiming he was Lt. Little with the Clay County Sheriffs Office, Floyd told victims that they had run red lights, had missed court dates and were going to be arrested unless they remitted fines and late fees to him. Floyd instructed his victims to purchase a prepaid debit card and then provide him with the cards number and security code. Dougher Hastings Keystone graduates endure rain Senior Class President Grant McGee addresses his classmates. Also pictured are Principal Dr. Susan Sailor, Santa Fe College Watson Center Administrative Assistant Karen Lake and Bob Kinsey. Photo by Tonya Gibbs. BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor KEYSTONE HEIGHTSA sea of umbrellas spread across the schools football field greeted the 2014 graduating class of Keystone Heights High School during the commencement service at the schools football stadium. A light rain persisted throughout the May 30 ceremony, but the weather appeared not to dampen the enthusiasm of the over 200 departing seniors. Class president Grant McGee told his classmates that a solid work ethic and the ability to work with people are keys to success. He also told the graduates that the best is yet to come for them and he urged them to be a generation that will be remembered. Melrose residents to get faster response BY MARK J. CRAWFORD Telegraph Editor Bradford County aims to provide better service to its southernmost residents by relying more on friends for emergency response. On Monday, the Bradford County Commission approved a mutual aid agreement with Alachua County, assuring that Melrose-area responders will know sooner about emergencies. Commissioner Chairman Danny Riddick yielded his time to EMS Director Allen Parrish, who discussed the details of the agreement. Four counties meet in the Co-op business customers targeted by scammers KEYSTONE HEIGHTS-Clay Electric Cooperative is warning its commercial accounts and business owners to be aware of scams being attempted by people who demand immediate payment of delinquent bills. The most recent scam attempts occurred last week in Putnam Keystone farmers market closing in July and August BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor KEYSTONE HEIGHTS-The Keystone Heights City Council voted to close its farmers market for the summer, beginning in July. City Manager Terry Suggs said that code enforcement officer Lynn Rutkowski can no longer serve as interim market manager and he has been unable to find candidates for the approximately $6,000-a-year, part-time job that are willing to complete the application process. Suggs also said that several of the markets most popular vendors will be taking the summer off from the venue. The market will reopen the first Saturday in September.. See MELROSE, 4A See GRADS, 4A See SCAM, 5A See MARIJUANA, 2A See HASTINGS, 5A See DOUGHER, 6A See WARRANT, 6A

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2A Lake Region Monitor Thursday, June 5, 2014 Lake Region Monitor USPS 114-170 Published each Thursday and entered as Periodical Postage Paid at Keystone Heights, Florida under Act of March 3, 1879.POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Lake Region MonitorP.O. Drawer A Starke, FL 32091 7382 SR 21 Keystone Heights, FL 32656Phone: (352) 473-2210 (352) 473-6721 John M. Miller, Publisher Subscription Rate in Trade Area $39.00 per year: $20.00 six months Outside Trade Area: $39.00 per year: $20.00 six monthsEditor: Dan Hildebran Sports Editor: Cliff Smelley Advertising: Kevin Miller Darlene Douglass Typesetting Eileen Gilmore Advertising and Newspaper Prod. Earl W. Ray Classified Adv. Heather Padgett Bookkeeping: Joan Stewart-Jones www.MelroseBayArtGallery.com Friday night, June 6thMelrose is the Place! June Special Fridays Only50% Off ALL Clothing Many plus sizes Golf Clubs Shoes Tea Cups Knick Knacks Odds & Ends ... and Much More! OPEN THURSDAY thru SATURDAY For more info call (352) 222-0286 350 Lawrence Blvd Keystone Heights at FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH of KEYSTONE Sunday June 8ththroughThursday (Family Night) June 12th6 pm to 8:45 pm nightly FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now survive DIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 DOT beginning Clay County section of First Coast Expressway BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor OAKLEAF-Floridas Department of Transportation began clearing land last week for a portion of the First Coast Expressway that will run through Clay County. Workers removed trees on a parcel southwest of Blanding Boulevards intersection with Branan Field Road. The route of the expressway in northern Clay County follows Branan Field Road from Argyle Forest Boulevard to Old Jennings Road. The route then breaks west and goes behind St. Vincents Hospital and the Walmart Supercenter to connect with Blanding Boulevard (S.R. 21) southwest of Branan Field Road. DOT officials hosted an open house on May 28 in Orange Park to explain the project to the public. River crossing and frontage roads Once complete, the 46.5-mile toll road with 13 interchanges will connect Interstate 10 in western Duval County to I-95 in St. Johns County. The state agency plans to cross the St. Johns River near the Shands Bridge south of Green Cove Springs. The two-lane Shands Bridge will remain open after the expressway is complete to offer motorists a toll-free option across the river. Floridas legislature has so far, only funded the portion of the road between I-10 and Blanding Boulevard. For the past year DOT contractors have been clearing land in the Duval County portion of the road, north of Argyle Forest Parkway. DOT also recently opened two frontage roads that will operate on both sides of the expressway, between Old Jennings Road and Oakleaf Plantation Parkway in Clay County. Project spokesperson Laurie Sanderson said that workers will soon begin clearing land and constructing drainage facilities between the two frontage roads, and north to Argyle Forest Boulevard. She added that in Duval County, workers will begin constructing on-ramps and off-ramps for the limited access highway. Toll collection, costs, speed limit Sanderson added that the most unique feature of the toll road will be the absence of toll booths or plazas. Instead, DOT will erect a series of gantries along the route, which will track SunPass users along the road and bill them appropriately. SunPass is the states electronic toll collection system that uses radio frequency identification transponders, about the size of a credit card that SunPass users affix to their vehicles. Users either link their SunPass accounts to a credit card or manually replenish their balances. DOT uses SunPass to collect tolls on the Florida Turnpike. Other toll collecting agencies, such as those in Orlando, Lakeland, Miami and Ft. Myers have integrated SunPass into their own systems. For expressway users who are not SunPass customers, the gantries will photograph the license plates of the drivers vehicles and bill them for the toll, plus an administrative fee. DOT officials said in handouts they distributed during the open house that the speed limit on the expressway will be 70 mph. Motorists in Clay County will be able to access the road from on-ramps at Argyle Forest Boulevard, Oakleaf Plantation Parkway and Blanding Boulevard. DOT will construct overpasses at Trail Ridge Road and Old Jennings Road. The agency also said the anticipated toll between Blanding Boulevard and Oakleaf Plantation Parkway will be 60 cents. Motorists will pay another 60 cents between Oakleaf Plantation Parkway and Argyle Forest Boulevard. The toll from Argyle Forest Boulevard to 103rd Street in Jacksonville will be 60 cents and an additional 40 cents will get motorists to I-10. DOT permanently closing section of Chaffee Road DOT also said that as part of the expressways construction, it will permanently close a section of Chaffee Road between Normandy Boulevard and S.R. 23 (the expressway). Motorists traveling south on Chaffee Road from Normandy will instead follow a new section of Samaritan Way to 103rd Street. DOT said it plans to complete the $77 million, 8-mile Duval County section of the highway in early 2016. Its estimated completion date for the $84.8 million, 7.3-mile Clay County section to Blanding Boulevard is late 2016. Sanderson said DOT will not start charging tolls on the road until both sections are complete. The route of the expressway in northern Clay County follows Branan Field Road from Argyle Forest Boulevard to Old Jennings Road. The route then breaks west and goes behind St. Vincents Hospital and the Walmart Supercenter to connect with Blanding Boulevard (S.R. 21) southwest of Branan Field Road. KHHS seniors recognized during Class Night KEYSTONE HEIGHTS The faculty and administration of Keystone Heights High School recognized the achievements of the 2014 graduating class during the schools Class Night May 30. Community awards Community-based scholarships and awards included the Keystone Heights Animal Hospital Scholarship, which went to Nathanial Tate Williams; Ryan Rossano Baseball Scholarship: Tristen Starling; Florida First Coast Coalition of Labor Union Women Scholarship: Kayla Granthem and Melissa Fain; Whitley Steel Clay County Golf Classis Scholarship: Rachel Lee and Jacquelyn Bryant; XI KAPPA MU Chapter of Beta Sigma Phi Scholarship: Jenna Dugger; Florida Credit Union Scholarship: Kristen Wood; Clay Electric Scholarship: Nathanial Tate Williams; Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of Florida Why Education Is Important Essay Scholarship: Kayla Grantham; Briggle-Bradley Scholarship: Brooke Tussinger; Federated Republican Womens Club of Clay County Scholarship: Diana Ramos; Keystone Heights Womans Club Scholarship: Rachel Lee and Mellissa Fain ; Lake Region Kiwanis Scholarship: Katrina Sessions and Nicholas Jones; Held in Trust by Keystone United Methodist Church Hubert White Scholarship: Rachel Lee; William Scott Wilkes Scholarship: Cory Taylor; Emily Rund Champions Heart Scholarship: Emily Frampton and Geoffrey Messer; Daughters of the American Revolution Citizenship Award: Rachel Lee; General Roy S. Geiger Leadership Award: Christopher Priest and Mia Nelson-Gauthier Faith Presbyterian Church Scholarship: Rachel Lee; Duty-Owens Family Scholarship: Grant Bostick, Jacquelyn Bryant, Melissa Fain, Corbin Frakes, Taylor Jewett, Geoffrey Messer, Zachary Poole, and Anna Tuller; The Jason Bishop Scholarship: Joshua Knight Chief Level Award, Brandon Nicholas Lieutenant Level Award, Courtland Singletary Lieutenant Level Award Rachel Lee Lieutenant Level Award, Tara Shobris Honorable Mention Award; Sons of Amvets Scholarship: Eric Wood, Rachel Lee and Diana Ramos; Billy Joe Hagens scholarship: Joshua Knight; Gator Bowl Scholarship: Nathaniel Tate Williams; Geico Family Scholarship: Rachel Maddox; George Bolden Scholarship on behalf of the Melrose Masonic Lodge #89 in Keystone Heights: Rachel Lee; Comcast Leaders and Achievers Scholarship: Nathaniel TateWilliams; Clay County Chamber of Commerce: Joel Michel; Mark Allen Ochkie Jr. Memorial Scholarship: Rachel Lee; Miss KHHS 2013-2014 Scholarship: Emily Peoples; Erin L. Erxleben/HOSA Scholarship: Diana Ramos; FFA Alumni Award: Austin Saunders and James McCoy; IMPACT Scholarship from the Orange Park Charter Chapter of the American Business Womens Association: Rachel Lee; NAACP Minority Health Scholarship: Dayshia Jenkins; Imagine America Vocational Scholarship: William Walker; Clay Bar Association Scholarship: Corbin Frakes; Wes Whiddon Athletic Scholarship: Rachel Lee and Emily Frampton; Southern Scholarship House Foundation Scholarship: Joel Michel; KHHS Faculty & Staff Scholarship: Ann M. Roberts and Brooke Tussinger; Chef of the Year: Shane Savoy; Shane Savoy Culinary Scholarship: Brittany Filing; Clay County Education Foundation: Diana Ramos, Zachary Poole, Rachel Maddox (Barbara Denton Memorial Scholarship), Brittany Filling (Ruth Alexander Scholarship) and Garrett Clance (Pellerito Scholarship); Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association Scholarship: Brittany Filing; John P. Hall Sr. Childrens Charities Scholarship: Diana Ramos; Gainesville Junior Golf Tour Scholarship: Taylor Heinz; Questbridge Scholarship: Anika Henanger. Scholarships awarded by colleges Scholarships and awards from specific colleges included Santa Fe College Watson Scholarship: Laura Danis, Rachel Maddox, James McCoy, Delaina McEwen, Grant McGee, Chase Musselman, Emily Peoples, Zachary Poole, Courtland Singletary and Nathanial Tate Williams; SFC Boone Bussard Welding Technologies Scholarship: Sean Walls: Northwestern University and Pledge Scholarship: Anika Heneger; St Johns River State College Collier-Blocker Minority Scholarship: Diana Ramos; Florida State University Merit Scholarship: Zachary Coursey; St. Pete State College Athletic scholarship for volleyball: Keerston Skinner; Willmington College Athletic Scholarship Ohio Football: John Ashton and Blake Valenzuela; The University of New England Merit Award and Scholarship: Natasha Sudsbury; Faulkner University Academic and Athletic Scholarship/Golf: Taylor Heinz; Faulkner University Faulkner University Academic & Athletic Scholarship/ Golf : Olyvia Heinz; Full Sail University Creative Minds Scholarship: Mackenzie Marsh; University of West Florida Argonaut Scholarship: Hannah Royalty; Florida Southern College Athletic Scholarship for Soccer and George Jenkins Academic Scholarship: Madison Colaw Clearwater Christian College an email. He thought cigs were in it. There is no evidence that he consumed anything. DCFs investigation into the home life of this child remains open/ active. MARIJUANA Continued from 1A See CLASS, 3A

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Thursday, June 5, 2014 Lake Region Monitor 3A Keystone District Office 352-473-4917 clayelectric.com Rays Auto RepairEstablished 1972473-30837382 Sunrise Blvd.(Next to Hitchcocks Grocery) *** Comfortable Waiting Area ***Jones-Gallagher Funeral HomeDistinquished Caring Service for Over 50 YearsJoe Gallagher OwnerStarke 964-6200 Keystone Heights 473-3176 J B SJackson Building SupplyStarke 964-6078 Lake Butler 496-3079See us for all your Lumber & Plywood BryansHARDWARE & GARDEN CENTERHighway 100 Keystone Heights, FL 473-4006 Highway 21 Melrose, FL 475-2400Worship in the House of the Lord...Somewhere this week! SAVE OUR LAKES MEETING TUES., JUNE 10, 2014 7 p.m. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF KEYSTONE HEIGHTS (Hwy 100 just east of Hwy 21)COME JOIN US! VISITORS WELCOME! Athletic Scholarship for Soccer: Raychel Trimble; Southeastern University Academic and Athletic Scholarship for Football: Michael Carroll; Kentucky Christian College Athletic Scholarship: Micah Brown Lewis Football and Trinity Baptist College Athletic Scholarship Baseball: Blake Richardson U.S. Military Students entering U.S. military branches include: Ashley Norris and Bradley CollinsAir Force; Anthony Delano and Parker RollinsArmy and Danny Fritch, Christopher Priest and Benjamin WatersMarines. Other awards Rachel Lee received the Presidents Volunteer Service Award: and the Wendys High School Heisman award. John Crittenden is the KHHS nominee for the Lombardi Scholarship. Caroline Felicia Vargas was awarded the KHHS Perseverance Award. Students earning AA degrees Students receiving an Associate of Arts degree from Santa Fe College, concurrent with a high school diploma received a blue honor cord. They were David Wyatt Bennett, Madison Colaw, Zach Coursey, John Crittenden, Sarah Guilfoyle, Ochesa Hall, Zach Hawkins, Olyvia Heinz, Taylor Heinz, Anika Henanger, Taylor Jewett, Nicholas Jones, Rebekah Lampkin, Delaina McEwen, Caleb Moore, Christina Schrader and Anna Tuller. Bright Futures Scholars Recipients of the Vocational Gold Seal Bright Futures Scholarship were Amanda Crawford, Jessica Garcia, James McCoy, Austin Saunders, Tara Shobris, Courtland Singletary, Eric Wood, Glen Farson, Rachel Lee, Santana Wallace and Charles Rogers. Winners of the Florida Bright Futures Florida Medallion Scholarship were Zachary Hawkins, Kaitlin Collison, Parker Dykes, Hannah Royalty, Christina Schrader, Katrina Sessions, Rachel Maddox, Nathaniel Williams, Grant McGee, Cecelia Buckley and Taylor Reed. Winners of the Bright Futures Florida Academic Scholars Scholarship were Kayla Baker, David Bennett, Zacary Coursey, John Crittenden, Emily Frampton, Taylor Jewett, Nicholas Jones, Rebekah Lampkin, Joel Michel, Caleb Moore, Chase Musselman, Raksmey Vorn, Kristen Wood, Anika Heniger, Madison Colaw, Shaun Young, Cory Taylor, Zachary Burns and Emily Peoples. Vocational honors Students receiving the vocational honor cord for business digital design were Zachary Burns, Brendan Guildry, Gabriel le Gee, Joel Michel, Harley Mosely, Jalissa Willis and Jarrett Jones. Students receiving the Culinary Arts vocational honor cord were Melissa Fain and Steven Trimble. Students receiving the health careers vocational honor cord were Mirah Beck, Katie Dalton, Laura Danis, Jailene Garcia, Dayshia Jenkins, Rachel Lee, Morgan Lord, Meranda McCarty, Nathan Nelson, Brandon Nicholas, Ashley Norris, Diana Ramos, CJ Rogers, Tara Shobris, Courtland Singletary, Santana Wallace, Joshua Knight and Rachel Bellman. Students receiving the agriscience vocational honor cord were Glen Farson, Thompson, Austin Saunders, John Crittenden, Eric Wood, Nina Horton, Jacob Fanton, James McCoy, Hallie Wheeler, Haley Arzie and Brianna Bowman. Academic Honors Students receiving a silver honor cord earned a grade point average between 3.0 and 3.499. Silver honor cord recipients were Meranda McCary, Taylor Reed, Mia Nelson-Gauthier, Santana Wallace, Jacob Maddox, Nicole Straka, Tara Shobris, Danney Fritch, Tristan Starling, Nina Horten, Darien Gilio, Geoffrey Messer, Julian Harrison, Kierra Collins, Natacha Sudsbury, Logan Deuel, Rachel Wells, Timothy Mock, Brianne Bowman, Micah Brown-Lewis, Ashley Norris, Wyatt Graziano, Kelsey Hassell, Zachary Poole, Parker Rollins, Logan Evans, Charles Rogers, Dakota Black, Dayshia Jenkins, Brooke Tussinger, Brenton Moring, Lowell Triest, Nathaniel Nelson, Lane Blanton, Aaron Thomas, Joshua Knight, Taylor Haney, Jailissa Willis, Samantha Bass, Brittany Filing, Ann Roberts, Brandon Nicholas, Kennon Brock, Addison Mosher, Keerston Skinner, Morgan Smith, John Waters, Kami Ferriell and Steven Trimble. Academic High honors Students receiving a gold honor cord earned a grade point average from 3.5 to 4.6. Students receiving a gold honor cord were John Crittenden, Joel Michel, Kayla Baker, Rebekah Lampkin, Kayla Grantham, Eric Wood, Grant McGee, Emily Frampton, Shaun Young, Anika Henanger, Cory Taylor, Taylor Heinz, Corbin Frakes, Raksmey Vorn, Olyvia Heinz, Madison Colaw, Chase Musselman, Courtland Singletary, Kristen Wood, David Bennett, Parker Dykes, Nicholas Jones, Farrah Hicks, Zachary Jacquelyn Bryant, Emily Peoples, Melissa Fain, Diana Ramos, Kyle Saunders, James Richardson, Caleb Moore, Miriah Beck, Christina Schrader, Taylor Jewett, Jessica Garcia, Delaina McEwen, Miranda Moulton, Kaitlin Collison, Kent Carson, Rachel Maddox, Nathaniel Williams, Katrina Sessions, Glen Farson, Jailene Garcia, Anna Tuller, Amanda Crawford, Zachary Burns, Grant Bostick, Rachel Lee, Erika Dingman, Zachary Hawkins, Lucy Montford, Ochesa Hall, Alexa Born, Elizabeth Weaver, Jacob Fanton, Jenna Dugger, Matthew Smith, Cailen Gonzales, Cecelia Buckley, Kaycee Sapp, Hailey Arzie, Raychel Trimble, Honey Harvey, Hannah Royalty, Brenden Guidry, Robert McCormick, Haillie Wheeler, Kenneth Booth, Sarah Guilfoyle, James McCoy, Laura Danis, Katlyn Dalton, Michael Carroll, Donald Bailey and Christina Hopkins. Department awards Hallie Wheeler won the English award. Allen Vorn won the mathematics award. Grant McGee won the science award. Addison Mosher won the social studies award. Kaitlin Collison won the Spanish award. Kayla Baker won the French award. Brandy Dennis won the art award. Addison Mosher won the drama award. Melissa Fain won the television production award. Elizabeth Weaver won the musical theatre award. Elizabeth Weaver won the band award. Kaitlin Collison won the chorus award. Jalissa Willis won the digital design business award. Melissa Fain won the yearbook award. Parker Rollins won the AROTC award. Austin Saunders won the agriculture award. Courtland Singletary won the health science award. Melissa Fain won the culinary arts award. William Walker won the carpentry award. Hall of Fame Valedictorian John Crittenden, Co-Salutatorian Kayla Baker, Co-Salutatorian Joel Michel, Corbin Frakes, Emily Frampton, Grant McGee, Chase Musselman and Emily Peoples were inducted into the Keystone Heights High School Hall of Fame. BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor OAKLEAF-The Clay County Sheriffs Office said it caught three youths after they broke into Oakleaf Junior High School. Officers later charged two of the defendants with burglarizing and vandalizing a nearby elementary school. Deputies charged a 14-yearold and two 13-year olds with trespassing on school grounds, burglary, grand theft of a fire extinguisher, criminal mischief and breaking a fence containing animals. According to a sheriffs office report, on May 27, around 6:30 p.m., witnesses told dispatchers they saw three youths on skateboards leaving the campus and heading toward the Whitfield subdivision, across the street from the junior high school. A deputy intercepted the suspects in the neighborhood and three witnesses later identified them as the individuals they saw leaving the campus. Deputies then inspected the school and observed that two fire extinguishers had been discharged within school buildings and that toilets in bathrooms had been stopped up with toilet paper. The officers also documented graffiti on the schools walls and found that pens containing farm animals on the campus had been opened, allowing goats and chickens to run loose on the property. After interviewing the defendants, deputies later charged two of them with breaking into portable classrooms at Plantation Oaks Elementary School on May 18 and damaging telecommunications lines. City honors Keystone weightlifters Keystone Heights Mayor Tony Brown congratulates KHHS weightlifting coaches (l) Chuck Dickinson and Lantz Lowery during the June 2 city council meeting. Brown read a proclamation recognizing the weightlifting team for winning Floridas Class 1A state title. Keystone tied with Baker County for the championship. Clay Countys newest hospital plans expansion MIDDLEBURG-The parent company of St. Vincents Clay County has tentatively approved a $24 million expansion plan for the Middleburg hospital. The project, first reported by the Jacksonville Business Journal, would add nearly 200 jobs, a maternity ward and 37 beds to the facility that now has 64 beds. Ascension Health, the Catholic charity that operates the Branan Field Road hospital, gave partial approval to the project in May. It must give final approval before construction can begin this summer, as scheduled. The project would also expand the hospitals emergency room and add a three-story patient tower to the facility. CLASS Continued from 2A

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4A Lake Region Monitor Thursday, June 5, 2014 Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (LCMS)Sunday School 9 a.m. W orship Service at 10 a.m. 4900 NW 182nd Way Starke(Entrance to Conerly Estates on S.R. 16) (904) gslcstarke@aol.com Everyone Welcome!Childrens Church 10 a.m. Welcome Home To 4004 SE State Road 21, Keystone Heights, FL 32656 (352) 473-3829 S on-shine Worship in our Fellowship Hall C ontemporary Worship in our MMC T raditional Worship in our Sanctuary Dr. Craig Moore preaching on D inner Served Ham & Sweet Potatoes (Call 352-473-3829 for reservations) B ible Study by Dr. Tom Farmer, Jr. Series: Ministries for Children (all ages) & Youth Sundays & Wednesdays! Rotary Club wrapping up year BY JAMES WILLIAMS Special to the Monitor KEYSTONE HEIGHTS-The Keystone Heights Rotary Club had an active, successful and even award-winning year, as shown by its activities just since January. The club was well represented at a recent conference and awards banquet, held at EmbryRiddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach on May 17. Among those attending were President Paul Fessenden and his wife, Karen, President-Elect and Keystone Heights City Manager Terry Suggs, Secretary Richard Segall, and Past President James Williams. Rotarians from around the state took a tour of the EmbryRiddle campus, which has grown far beyond its earliest years as a flying school. The university now offers degrees in aviation financing and aviation management. There is a National Security Agency program on the campus, engineering and robotics, plus theres still a flying school. The university now offers courses in small craft flight, commercial flight, jets and even space flight. At the awards banquet, the Keystone Heights Rotary was given three District 697 awards for its efforts during the past year. Included was an award for best membership retention percentage (100 percent) for a small club. The club also received a Platinum Premier Award for having 100-percent membership participation, with member contributions of $100 or more to the Rotary Foundation. The club also received an award for its three-to-five-year plan and taking steps during the year to meet its goals. The club currently has 16 members, its smallest membership since formation in the 1940s. However, over the last three years, the average age of the club has fallen by about 10 years, due to several younger members joining the ranks and the departure of several senior members. On May 20, club members were also happy to join charter night festivities for the Club of Interlachen and Lakes Area, held at Interlachen High School. The Interlachen club was sponsored by the Palatka Sunrise Rotary, and the club comes with a builtin Interact Club at the high school. The new club inducted over 40 brand new members that night. Many high school students also attended the new clubs charter night. The Keystone Rotary made a contribution to the Interlachen Clubs start-up fund-a Rotary tradition. At Keystone Heights High Schools Class Night, the Rotary also gave two $750 scholarships, including one for the clubs new Glenn Harris Scholarship, in honor of a club member, who died almost two years ago. The scholarship was funded by a generous donation from the Harris family. The late Glen Harris was widely known for his work in silvaculture and forestry. The first recipient of the Harris award went to graduating KHHS senior Austin Saunders, who plans to study agricultural management at Santa Fe College. Graduating senior and Student Council President Lucy Montford received the second Rotary scholarship. Rotarian Karen Lake, who was on the scholarship committee, said Montfords student council commitment and her work with Haven Hospice made her a good match with Rotarys motto: Service Above Self. The club also recently gave or confirmed donations to the Clay County Science Fair and Seamark Ranch. Later this month, Rotary will close out the year as Fessenden hands the gavel to Suggs, president for the coming year. Club awards will be handed out at a dinner later in June, to be given at the home of Rotary member and M&S Bank Branch Manager Shelly Gibbs. The Rotary year ends on June 28, with one of the clubs two biggest annual fund-raisers, the three-on-three soccer tournament, held in cooperation with the Keystone Youth Soccer Club at Twin Lakes Park. For information on Keystone Heights Rotary Club membership, call Century 21 Realtor and Rotarian Paul Fessenden, 352-665-2121. The Keystone Heights Rotary Club earned three accolades this year, including an award for 100-percent membership retention. Pictured is President Paul Fessenden with the award. Melrose area, and yet its underserved by first responders, he said. Theressas EMS station and volunteer fire department are the Bradford Countys first responders to the south end of the county, as well as much of the area west of Theressa. Anytime we have a 911 call from down in this area, whether it be a first responder call for medical or for fire, it takes a long time for us to get people to that area, Parrish said. Melrose, although unincorporated, has a wellequipped station manned during the day by a full-time responder paid for by Alachua County. If youre having a heart attack or your heart stops, they have a defibrillator a mile away that can come and help you, said Parrish. It takes us anywhere from 10 to 12 minutes to get to that area. It takes Clay County just as long to get there from their county. Parrish said the solution is an agreement that has been in the works for sometime and cements a cooperative arrangement between Alachua, Bradford, Clay and Putnam counties. Parrish said his goal has been to expand services. This agreement will accomplish that he said, and at no additional cost to Bradford County. We benefit more than any other county, he said, because we have the largest population in that area. The agreement removes a time consuming process of phone tag. A call from a mobile phone in Melrose will be answered by one of multiple communications centers, but most likely the center in either Putnam or Clay. There are examples of calls being transferred between counties until the correct responder for the address is identified, Parrish said. Calls have even been transferred from one county to another, and then back to the county that originally received the call. So what were trying to do is reduce that time frame by introducing an automatic agreement, he said. With an agreement in place and all of the communications employees informed, the Melrose station will be dispatched automatically, regardless of address. Sheriff Gordon Smith compared the automatic aid contract to the Four Corners agreement that exists for law enforcement between the Alachua, Bradford, Clay and Putnam sheriffs. He commended Parrish for stepping up and getting the deal done. Parrish said hes spoken to many residents in the Melrose area and they dont care which county shows up. If they cant breathe, they want to breathe, he said. Parrish has also applied for a grant that would construct an EMS station in the Brooker area to improve response times for residents there. MELROSE Continued from 1A Co-salutatorian Kayla Baker thanked the schools workers, including the cafeteria and custodial staff. She advised her classmates to show kindness to others throughout their lives. She also said that the phrase follow your dreams may be a shop worn clich, but it is also good advice. Baker added that people who are in jobs they are passionate about are happier and more productive throughout their careers. Co-salutatorian Joel Michel said that because he and his classmates are now adults, they should make decisions in a judicious and thoughtful manner. He also admonished his colleagues to not fear failure and added that if they attempt GRADS Continued from 1A anything worthwhile, they will fall short of some of their goals. Michel quoted former basketball star Michael Jordan, who recounted the many failures he experienced en route to six NBA championships and five Most Valuable Player awards. Ive missed more than 9,000 shots in my career, Michel said, quoting Jordan. Ive lost almost 300 games. Twenty-six times Ive been trusted to take the game-winning shot and missed. Ive failed over and over and over again in my life, and that is why I succeed. Michel invoked the memory of former President Ronald Reagan when encouraging his classmates to lend a helping hand to others throughout their lives. We cant help everyone, Michel said, quoting Reagan, but everyone can help someone. Valedictorian John Crittenden spoke about opportunity. He started off by thanking the schools teachers for investing in Keystones students, and also thanked veterans for preserving the freedoms that make education in a open society possible. Crittenden also commended the schools weightlifting team for capitalizing on an opportunity to win the state championship. Crittenden cited the civic service of Cincinnatus, the Roman statesman, as an example of opportunity. He said that as rival factions threatened to tear the republic apart, the Roman Senate proclaimed Cincinnatus dictator. However, after quelling the rival tribes in two weeks, See SPEECH, 5A Jaydin Wilson, Abbey Anthony-Rozier, Tres Wilkerson, Cooper Alsabrook and Hailey Principal Marcus Dooley, Megan Callahan, Rachel Brookshire, Christopher Hoffmeyer, Kylie Fischer, Alyssa Smith, Alyssa Gilbert, Jessica Falana and Jacob Morgan.

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Thursday, June 5, 2014 Lake Region Monitor 5A Please send 52 weeks of the Monitor to my graduate:We accept MC, VISA, American Express We need your phone # too in case of questions.Call 904-964-6305 to subscribe or send a $39 check to: P.O. Drawer A Starke, FL 32091Give a Grad a Giftthat will keep giving for 52 weeks ... Name Address City/ST/Zip Phone #s Your graduate can keep up with local news from home: Keystone, Melrose and surrounding areas.Great reminder of home for those joining the military, college students, those leaving for work or travel children, grandchildren, nieces, nephews, cousins, friends. Prom ote Service Business with a TOOT YOUR OWN HORN! Email your med-to-hi-resolution digital photo (150dpi+) & ad text to: b y 5pm Monday OR bring it to:B r adford County Telegraph Union County Times Lake Region Monitor( 9 04) 964-6305W e ll help you design your ad cash/check/credit cards accepted all for only /wk co vering Bradford, Union & Clay Counties a in o u r weekly community gi veaway paper: Stand out from the crowd Pr omote YOUR Servicewith aClassified Photo A dA ctu al Size Ad Sample CLAY COUNTYMore than 170 members of Clay County Local #3362 raised $46,193 during the annual Muscular Dystrophy Associations Fill the Boot drive on May 23-25 to benefit children and adults affected by muscle disease throughout the Clay County area. For six decades, firefighters have fueled MDAs mission to find treatments and cures for life-threatening muscle diseases, and this years Clay County Fill the Boot results are a perfect example of the true dedication Clay County Local #3362 has toward supporting the families we serve, said Lauren Herringdine, executive director of MDA, Jacksonville. Were grateful for the support of these inspiring, selfless individuals who provide life-saving help that will fund research, advocate for children and adults affected by muscle disease, and rally our community to fight back. Funds raised during the 2014 Clay County Fill the Boot event will help support MDAs programs of worldwide research, specialized health care services, and day-to-day support, which includes sending children affected by muscular dystrophy and related muscle diseases to a weeklong, barrier-free MDA summer camp at Camp Suwannee in Dowling Park. $46,193 for MDA Cincinnatus resigned from the post, preserving the Roman Republic. Crittenden also urged the graduates to courageously take on the difficulties of adulthood by quoting Theodore Geisel, widely known as Dr. Seuss. Crittenden quoted the childrens author, reading, Ive heard there are troubles of more than one kind; some come from ahead, and some come from behind. But Ive brought a big bat. Im all ready, you see; now my troubles are going to have troubles with me. Principal Dr. Susan Sailor told the crowd that due to the weather, she was cutting her two-page, prepared remarks to one paragraph. She said that every graduate will soon wake up and realize that the life he or she has led over the past dozen years is over. What you create in its path is completely up to you, she added. Sailor also counseled the graduates to seek guidance from above by quoting Proverbs 3:5-6. Trust in the Lord with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding, she said. In all your ways acknowledge Him and He shall direct your paths. SPEECH Continued from 4A and Lake counties. Someone called a grocery store owner and said their bill was past due and payment was needed immediately, said Palatka District Member Relations Representative Derek Hembree. In another incident, the owner of a Chinese restaurant was called and told that payment was required immediately or the power would be shut off. Both fraud attempts failed when the business owners called Clay Electrics Palatka District office and inquired about their bills. Earlier this year, the coop received reports that two commercial accounts it serves in Clay County were the target of attempted scams. The two businesses reported someone claiming to represent the co-op contacted them about making payment on an overdue bill. In one case, a payment for more than $2,000 was requested, and the caller wanted the money wired. Clay Electric encourages the businesses it serves to be very suspicious of anyone who calls and claims he or she represents the co-op and wants to be paid for an overdue bill. The cooperative does not collect past-due amounts in this manner. If the caller asks you to wire money or use a prepaid debit card, thats a red flag, said Bruce McHollan, director of the cooperatives information and communication technology department. If you have any doubt at all, hang up and call Clay Electric at 800-224-4917 and confirm if any payment is due. Clay Electric sends a reminder letter and makes an automated reminder call when bills are past due. Members with residential accounts have also been subject SCAM Continued from 1A to scam attempts during the past year that involved emails. Clay Electric does not send emails that threaten or require immediate action to provide personal information. We urge our members to ignore suspicious requests for personal information such as bank account numbers, credit card numbers, user names and passwords, or Social Security numbers, said Derick Thomas, director of the co-ops Member and Public Relations Department. We ask our members to delete all suspicious emails that require immediate action to verify or provide personal information. If a member has an overdue bill, he or she will likely receive a call from our automated phone messaging system as a reminder to call the cooperative to arrange payment. Theyll also receive a courtesy notice in the mail, Thomas said. Members should not share confidential personal information over the phone. President Jimmy Carter at the NRECA Convention in New Orleans. Hastings went onto become a Carter supporter, making several visits to the White House in the 1970s and serving as a Carter delegate in the 1980 Democratic Convention. In the 1980s, Hastings led the fight against Ronald Reagans attempt to cut off co-ops from federal low-interest loans. He served as president of Clay Electrics board of trustees for 10 years and as the NRECA president in 1981-1982. Last year, the NRECA honored Hastings with a lifetime achievement award. In March, during Clay Electrics annual meeting, the co-op thanked Hastings for his long service with the NRECA. Hastings also hit the Florida Lotto in 1992, winning $6.78 million. HASTINGS Continued from 1A See CLAY, 6A Coppergate, RideOut students win Tropicana contest GREEN COVE SPRINGSFourth, fifth and sixth-grade students from 22 schools competed in the Clay County 4-H Tropicana Public Speaking Contest on May 20 and 21 at the University of Florida/IFAS extension office. The winners of 20 elementary school contests competed in the fourthand fifth-grade category. Dorion Sledge of Coppergate Elementary won the countys fourth and fifth-grade title with his speech, My Family (Help!), Rylee Martin of Shadowlawn Elementary School placed second with One Hip Girl and Sarah Cobb of Fleming Island Elementary placed third with The Black Flood. Paxton Shuppert of Orange Park Elementary came in fourth with her speech titled Narcissism. In the sixth grade category, winners from 17 school contests competed for the county title. Landon Opp of RideOut Elementary won the competition with his speech, Life. Jeremiah Jackson from Doctors Inlet Elementary placed second with Three Things that are Important to Me and Madison Baity of Shadowlawn Elementary came in third with Body Language. Wade Taylor of Swimming Pen Creek Elementary placed fourth with A Dream is a Wish Your Brain Makes. Each of the winners from both categories received plaques and the first-place winners won a week at 4-H summer camp in July sponsored by Tropicana. Sixth-grade winners Landon Opp, Jeremiah Jackson, Madison Baity and Wade Taylor. Sledge, Rylee Martin, Sarah Cobb and Paxton Shuppert. Wings of Dreams Fly-in, Cruise-in Around seven D-Day veterans, U.S. Congressman Ted Yoho and a large crowd is expected at the June 7 Wings of Dreams Fly-in and Cruise-in at the Keystone Airport. Wings of Dreams Executive Director Bob Oehl said the event is the only D-Day observance scheduled in the Gainesville area. A buffet breakfast will be served. The cost is $7 for adults and $4 for children nine and under. For more information, see www.wingsofdreams.com or call 352-256-8037 Community Church rummage sale Its rummage sale time at Community Church, located behind Ace Hardware in Keystone Heights. The popular early bird shopping continues on Thursday, June 5 from 4 to 7 p.m. The admission is $5 per family. There is no admission charge for the regular sale dates on Friday June 6 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday, June 7 from 9 to noon. Saturday will also feature the Dollar-A-Bag sale. Reasonably priced merchandise. Proceeds serve many projects. Soccer try-outs The Keystone Youth Soccer U13/U14 competitive travel soccer team will be holding tryouts for the 2014-2015 season. Any player under the age of 14 on July 31, 2014 is eligible. Try-outs will be at Twin Lakes Park, 6065 Twin Lakes Road, on Saturday, May 31 beginning at 9 a.m. Please arrive 30 minutes early to stretch and register. For more information call 352-2350393. We need your clothes Community Church of Keystone Heights is hosting our 6th Annual Back to School event on July 22. Clothes will be given away free to children in need. Donate clean, gently used clothes for children sizes 3T through adult. Teenagers come in all sizes and this collection is for all ages and sizes. Drop clothes off at Community Church marked B2S (Back to School). The deadline is July 10. Please call Barbara Sullivan (258-3113), Karen Powell (5389546), Jenn Cumbus (258-5479) or Kim Nugent (258-3602) for more information or to volunteer. 100 year birthday celebration The friends and family of Charlie Bryant invite the community to celebrate his 100 th birthday on Saturday, June 7 at 3 p.m. The celebration will be held at his home at 102 S. Sipprell Road in Florahome. Worth Noting

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6A Lake Region Monitor Thursday, June 5, 2014 Our thoughts and prayers are with the Hastings family, said Ricky Davis, Clay Electrics general manager and CEO. Angus dedicated almost 50 years to serving Clay Electric members in his own district and across our service area, and was also a state and national leader. We will miss his spirit and his leadership. Hastings is the second Clay Electric trustee to die in the last eight months. Middleburg board member Floyd Gnann died on Aug. 18. CLAY Continued from 5A am honored and humbled to have been chosen by my fellow grassroots leaders to serve as the next RPOF Chairman. It was an honor to even be considered, and I am looking forward to getting right to work to make sure the thousands of volunteers across the state have the tools to be successful in November. We are united in one purpose electing Republicans and I am excited for the opportunities that are ahead for our party. Dougher is the fifth chair for the state organization in the past four years. In 2010, Jim Greer resigned under pressure and later pleaded guilty to grand theft and money laundering in connection with a contract his company, Victory Strategies, had with the state party. Later that year, former State Rep. Dave Bitner replaced interim Chair Jim Thrasher. Republicans elected Curry in 2011 after Bitner died from Lou Gehrigs disease. DOUGHER Continued from 5A The sheriffs office said that around May 29, three county residents and one Green Cove Springs resident received phone calls from individuals claiming to be law enforcement officials. The callers claimed there were arrest warrants for the residents and demanded payment for outstanding fines or court costs using a prepaid debit card. Sheriffs office public information officer Mary Justino said investigators are trying to identify the latest callers. She added that law enforcement agencies never demand payment of fines and costs over the phone. Any such call is fraudulent and bogus, she said. The CCSO reminds residents dont fall for it. Make note of as much information as possible and report it to your local law enforcement agency. WARRANT Continued from 1A Letter to the editor As a resident of Alachua county since 1985, Ive always had a keen interest in our urban and suburban, rural development and the conservation of lands. Weve done an excellent job as a community thus far, but some areas have benefited from it more than others. We can help those communities left out, while preserving areas that want to stay unchanged, including conservation lands and historic towns that enhance everybodys quality of life. I followed Plum Creeks 2.5 year-long community workshop known as Envision Alachua. I attended as many public meetings as I could, and filled out comment cards with suggestions. Im happy with the results: a balance of our need for economic development while preserving and enhancing conservation at the same time. A future agriculture-based research park near Windsor, with skilled workers living there instead of all commuting from Gainesville. And built from labor in Gainesville looking for work, starting now. But there is a smear campaign going on in the Suns letters section, and organized under the banner Stand Melrose AfricanAmerican Heritage Festival June 14 at Tommys Place, the intersection of S.R. 26 and C.R. 219. Games, food, DJ, bounce house, car club and door prizes. Jaycees kick off haunted holiday plans Get into the Halloween Clay Countys newest hospital plans expansion MIDDLEBURG-The parent company of St. Vincents Clay County has tentatively approved a $24 million expansion plan for the Middleburg hospital. The project, first reported by the Jacksonville Business Journal, would add nearly 200 jobs, a maternity ward and 37 beds to the facility that now has 64 beds. Ascension Health, the Catholic charity that operates the Branan Field Road hospital, gave partial approval to the project in May. It must give final approval before construction can begin this summer, as scheduled. The project would also expand the hospitals emergency room and add a three-story patient tower to the facility. spirit early and get involved in the Keystone Heights Jaycees annual Haunted Trail. A kickoff party for the organization of this years event will take place at the Jaycees clubhouse on Saturday, June 7, at 8 p.m. The zombie themed party will include a costume contest, games, prizes, snacks and movies. If you are interested in participating in the Haunted Trail, join the Jaycees June 7 for an evening of planning and fun. Contact Paul Huff for more details at 352-572-3892, and look for the Keystone Jaycees on Facebook. Fizz, Boom, Read! At the Keystone Heights branch library Preschool programs for children aged 3-5 will be offered each Wednesday morning at 10:30 a.m. June 11, 18, 25 and July 2, 9, and 16. Stories, songs and crafts and a related snack will be offered. There will be a special Stuffed Animal Sleepover (for stuffed reading buddies only) as well as a preschool story time program on July 15 at 6:30 p.m. Reading buddies to be picked up at the final story time, theaterevent breakfast, the following morning. For school-aged children, kindergarten through fifth grade we will offer: June 13th Friday at 10:30am Wild Wonders animal program, with Mike Rossi and his live friends. June 20th Friday at 10:30am Fizz, Boom, Science! with our friends from Sugarplum Entertainment. June 26th Thursday at 6:00pm Fire and Ice with Mad Science of NE Central Florida June 30th Monday at 2:00pm Did Someone Say Bats?! with Lubee Bat Conservancy and winged friends. July 11th Friday at 10:30am How and Why stories with Kaye Byrnes, Storyteller extraordinaire July 18th Friday at 10:30am Its a Wrap! Finale with special guest, Ronald McDonald. Melrose Bay Art Gallery Murmurations. Work by Valerie Aslakson-Jennings, guest artist showing thru June 29 Reception during Melrose Art Walk, Friday, June 6, 6-9 p.m. By Our Plan to continue without compromise the disenfranchisement of many citizens whove waited long enough, under the guise of protecting the Comprehensive Plan. Their false claims are already answered in Envision Alachuas thick report published and available online at www.envisionalachua.com such as: 1). Its 8 miles from east Gainesville, and wont happen for 30-50 years anyway -Wrong. The construction can begin in a couple years, and includes plans for a bus line connecting east Gainesville to Hawthorne and in between near the Windsor site; 2). Its more sprawl and will hurt downtown -Wrong. Its no more sprawl than Micanopy is. Newnans Lake and vast preservation lands separate Windsor-Rochelle from Gainesville, much as Paynes Prairie buffers to the south of town. Hawthorne already exists, and is ideal for a new industry located near CSX rail lines there. (Downtown Gainesville was hurt in the 70s when the interstate and mall were fashionable, and planners let sprawl happen. But now urban renewal is in full swing, starting in the 80s at the same time Butler Plaza blossomed. Our area is big enough to accommodate it all, at once; 3). Itll hurt the small towns in eastern Alachua county -Wrong. Only towns that want to participate in Plum Creeks offer will change. Hawthorne and Windsor, yes. But Melrose, Cross Creek and Orange Heights dont if they dont want to. Micanopy is flanked by I-75 and US-441, but the town stayed the same. So did High Springs. But Alachua town and JonesvilleNewberry residents wanted change, and did; 4). Itll deplete our aquifer and run off wildlife -Wrong. The latest knowledge in water management and recovery will be used, plus the developments only use a small fraction of the entire Plum Creek properties in the area (most will be enhanced preservation lands, including wetland setbacks and a wildlife corridor protected). Its an improvement over the old crazy-quilt pattern of west Gainesville, and not a retirement community of golf courses. Even if a small residential area were added on the north end off SR-26, it wouldnt hurt because eastern Alachua County has lost population in recent decades, having moved west. Rainfall cycles are beginning to turn around after the 60-year low period soon ends, too. Then theres those who say doing nothing is better than Plum Creeks plan. Wrong, doing nothing is worse because its a continuation of the status quo which hurts the environment and people, alike: Nothing would continue hole-punching the aquifer on every five acre lot, reducing overall water pressures, levels and flows; Nothing continues placing a septic tank every five acres, leaking into the watershed and the aquifer with nitrate pollution; Nothing continues the haphazard, crazy quilt development pattern weve seen before on the Gainesvilles west side; Nothing continues a one-industry college town economy and residential construction fluctuating economy. Get the facts and ignore the smears: Jeff Knee, Gainesville

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Bradford High School seniors were able to 30, eating pizza, running obstacle course, playing kickball and getting wet, among other things. doused, no one was safe... not even Principal Bryan Boyer, who gets a cooling off, courtesy of senior Bradley Davis. all? I thought I did, Ricker said. I dont know. I wasnt expecting it. It proved to be an interesting experience from start to finish. Ricker was told beforehand there wouldnt be a problem with her carrying her project onto the plane for the flight to Houston. When she got to the airport, Regional News Regional News B Section Thursday, June 5, 2014 News from Bradford County, Union County and the Lake Region FEATURES CRIME SOCIALS OBITUARIES EDITORIAL New friends Amazing experiements Untamed games Lip-smacking snacks Surprising adventures Incredible music Saturday June 14th 1:00:00pmWe will be kicking off the week with an afternoon of fun!! There will be inflatables, train rides, sno-cones & more... Florida Twin TheatreAll Seats $6.00 Before 6 p.m. 964-5451* SCREEN 1 SCREEN 2 STARTS FRIDAY Visit us on-line at www.FloridaTwinTheatre.comFri: 7:05, 9:10 Sat: 5:00, 7:05, 9:10 Sun: 5:00, 7:05 Mon Thurs: 7:30EXPENDABLESNOW SHOWING Fri: 7:00, 9:15 Sat: 4:45, 7:00, 9:15 Sun: 4:45, 7:00 Mon Thurs: 7:15 PG-13Angelina Jolie Adam Sandler PG BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer Bradford High School freshman Tessa Ricker earned a silver medal at this years International Sustainable World (Energy, Engineering, Environment) Project Olympiad, an international science fair held annually in Houston. Ricker, whose project, The Rate of Decomposition of Compostable Packing Materials, received one of 40 silver medals in the Environment division, shared her I-SWEEEP experience with the Kiwanis Club of Starke on May 27. I wasnt expecting this at all, to say the least, Ricker said of earning a medal. Ricker was one of more than 600 participantssome of whom were part of group projects from more than 40 states and more than 70 countries at the April 30-May 5 event. More than 300 medals (gold, silver, bronze) and honorablemention awards were presented, which made for a long awards ceremony. Ricker admitted she almost didnt accept her medal. After sitting through a portion of the ceremony, she told her older sister Hannah, who accompanied her on the trip, Im not going to get anything. Lets go. Her sister persuaded her to stay just a little longer, which was good. Ricker heard her name called and went up to accept her award, though according to her sister, you couldnt tell she was excited about it. When I got back, Hannah was like, Why didnt you smile at Ricker earns medal at international science fair Tessa Ricker is shown with her project, The Rate of Soon-to-be BHS grads soak up fun on last day Dinkins. Please see page 6B for more photos. Photos are also available for viewing

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I was confident on about 75 percent of it, Yates said. The other 25 percent were some BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer John Andrews looked forward to going to school after enrolling in the Bradford County School Districts Academy of Academics. Four years later, he is preparing to accept his high school diploma. Andrews said he wouldnt have gotten through school were it not for the Academy of Academics, a voluntary performance-based program for middle-school and high-school students that are behind in terms of grade level, and at risk for dropping out of school. Andrews enjoyed the environment and being exposed to more one-on-one attention from teachers who seemed compassionate in helping him and other students. Its like family here, Andrews said. You dont see teacherstheyre just like my moms and dads. I love it here. 2B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 5, 2014 $49 9 lb $39 9 lbPRICES A VAILABLEJ UNE 04 JUNE 10 2 $3$499 $100 $299 O SCAR MAYER Amazing quality Fantastic prices.S atisfaction Guaranteed $199lb $499 $299 lb1 6 OZ F AM PAK$25 9 lb 8 LB BAG F AM PAK$279lb $1 $149 $299lb lb O pen 7 Days a Week 8am to 8pm1 371 South Walnut St. (Hwy 301) Starke (904) 368-9188 RICE SIDES WYL WOOD KRAFT SINGLES IMPERIAL PILLSBUR Y $100 $199 $100GINGER EV ANS 4LB BAGCR YSTAL O2 MAXWELL HOUSE CHIPS V ARIETY PACK $189 $229 $449 $399 $100 were not present. Academy of Academics students recognized for their efforts Teachers handed out certificates of achievement on May 29, with Andrews receiving several, including one for overall excellence. Teacher Peg Stanwix-Hay said Andrews really blossomed in the program and took advantage of the welding program at the Bradford-Union Technical Center as well. Andrews has one more welding area to become certified in. John Andrews receives a for overall excellence from BradfordCenter Director Christy Reddish. Also pictured (foreground to are Academy of Academics teachers Peg Stanwix-Hay, Linda Rudoi, Cindy Bagley, Bish Bishop. BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer Bradford High School junior Kristie Yates earned a third-place finish in the area of medical terminology at the April 27-29 Skills USA Florida Leadership and Skills Conference in Pensacola. Teresa Jackson, a health sciences teacher at the BradfordUnion Technical Center, said, I am very proud of Kristie. I had no doubt that she would be successful. Yates, who advanced to the state event after placing first at the Feb. 21 Region 2 SkillsUSA Florida Conference in Jacksonville, had to take a 100-question multiplechoice test. A college medical terminology class was a big help to her. BHS junior Yates earns 3rd place at SkillsUSA Florida event

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and part of his hand. I thought he probably didnt want this war any more than I did, Mandeville said. The people that want it the least suffer the most. Art Butler of Lake City also participated in the D-Day invasions, landing on Utah Beach on June 19. Like Towers, he was 27. We didnt know what we were getting into, Butler said. It was noisy. There was shelling over us all night. Butler said he didnt worry about making it home because he had a wife and two children and knew he had to. He settled in Lake City after the war, pursuing a career in lumber and building and construction supply. Asked about whether he felt the eyes of the world upon him during those harrowing days, Butler paused before answering. We went over there knowing we had a big job to do, he said. We were hell-bent to make good. Remembering those who served and sacrificed their lives Towers is one of the founders of Les Fleurs de la Memoire, an association that arranges for French families to adopt the grave of an American soldier buried in Normandy in perpetuity, making at least one visit annually to place flowers on it. The associations website includes an excerpt from a letter Towers wrote to Claude Lavieille, a co-founder of the association: When I come to Europe, it is most difficult for me to visit the American cemeteries wherein my comrades lie at eternal rest. As a liaison officer, I knew many of them personally. Each of these visits is hard on mefor when I am standing in silence in front of a tomb, images of my comrades life come to mind, and it is like that for each visit. But I have to do it. I cant miss visiting each of them. Soon, neither I nor any of my companions will be able to visit the graves of American service men and women at eternal rest in Europe. Then what? Will they be BY MARY W. BRIDGMAN Special to the Telegraph-TimesMonitor The men who landed on the beaches of Normandy on D-Day during World War II and lived to tell about it are quickly fading into history, yet the significance of their sacrifices and valor will be remembered, especially this year, the 70 th anniversary of the invasions. The commemorations will culminate Friday, June 6, in Ouistreham, France, where President Barack Obama, French President Francois Hollande and Britains Queen Elizabeth II will gather to remember the more than 9,000 Allied soldiers killed or wounded on June 6, 1944. Frank W. Towers of Alachua County will also be there. Towers, hale and hearty at 97, was there on D-Day plus six, landing in France on his 27 th birthday. He reminisced about his experiences recently at a meeting of the D-Day Veterans of North Central Florida at Conestoga Restaurant in downtown Alachua. I was on a Liberty ship, taking packets from the Isle of Wight to the beaches, Towers said. Towers unit was supposed to land on Omaha Beach, but ended up at Utah Beach, 40 miles to the west, by mistake. Because there was a foot-long drop to the beach from the landing ramp, the service vehicles could not be reloaded. They traveled by land and met the ship when it landed at Omaha Beach later that day, the only unit to land at both beaches. There was no fighting at Omaha Beach when Towers landed. He could hear artillery fire, and he saw the carnage. There were wrecked vehicles and ships and stacks of bodies waiting to be shipped to England, he said. There were a lot of wounded and field hospitals. It was not pleasant. For the five months leading up to D-Day, Towers had been training in England. It was all playdummy bullets, he said. But this was the real thing. Towers wife of 71 years, Mary, remembers how she felt back home in the U.S., waiting to Thursday, June 5, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 3B HOPE CHRISTIAN ACADEMY SALUTES OUR 2014 SENIORSHope Christian Academy 352-473-40403900 S.E. State Road 100, Starke, FL Honors Honors Honors Honors HonorsTrain up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old he will not depart from it. Proverbs 22:6 (KJV)Photos: Teddy Bear Portraits SALUTATORIAN SUMMERLYN BYRD Magna Cum Laude: 3.59 weighted GPA. Dual enrolled at Santa Fe College. VALEDICTORIAN KATIE KRUZAN Summa Cum Laude: 4.47 weighted GPA. Earned AA degree through dual enrollment while attending HCA. GARHETT WILSON Dual Enrolled CHLOE WALKER TIFFANY GEORGSSON ANDRE CANADY Dual Enrolled JOSEPH MOORE Dual Enrolled CHRIS TRESTER RYAN SILCOX OLIVIA SANDERS JOHNNY GIBSONCLASS MOTTO: We Were Made to Thrive.NOW ENROLLINGINFANTS 12TH GRADECurrent Enrollment: 330 students Curriculum: Abeka and A.C.E. Dual Enrollment: Currently, 27 students are dual enrolled at Santa Fe College. Scholarships: McKay and Step Up Award-Winning Sports Program: Tackle Football Flag Football Cheerleading Baseball Fast-Pitch Softball Volleyball Basketball Before/After Care & Summer Programs: Contact the school Hot Lunches: Order online Yearbook: Produced by students Praise Team/Band: Performs at chapel Safety Patrol: Elementary students School Uniforms: Variety of choices Spring Formal: Grades 9th-12th Title I:Intensive math & readingWorld Languages: Spanish Tours: Tuesdays & Thursdays Call for appointment Dr. Virgil A. BerryCHIROPRACTIC PHYSICIANServing the area for 21 years. Modern methods with old-fashioned concern. Auto Accidents Work Injuries Headaches Neck and Back PainBack & Neck Pain Clinic Remembering D-Day 70 years later pictured with his wife, organization that arranges Americans interned in soldiers across the hear from Frank with his mother in Boston. I was scared to death, she said. I pictured him in every one of the pictures. Because there was no TV in those days, she went to the movie theatre to see newsreels. We wrote letters to each other each day, Mary said, noting that the first letters arrived about 10 days after her husbands landing. They numbered their letters, so when several arrived at once, she could put them in order for reading. Towers served in Europe for 18 months and was due to go to the Pacific when atomic bombs dropped over Hiroshima and Nagasaki, ending the war. His commission was deactivated, although within six months he returned to Germany, where he was stationed for three years. Mary went with him, and their three children were born there. The family settled in Alachua County, where they raised chickens and eventually opened a country store. Years later, Frank took a computer course and went to work at the University of Florida. Frank and Mary Towers have made many trips to the Normandy beaches over the years, although Mary is no longer able to fly due to medical issues. This time, their 17-year-old grandson will accompany Frank. Don Mandeville of Gainesville, also a member of the D-Day Veterans of North Central Florida, was in the Navy, working aboard a rhino bargea long, wide, floating platform built of steel pontoons joined together by steel angle irons during the Normandy invasions. We werent scared. We were petrified, he said. Mandeville compared the devastation of the battle to destruction left by fierce tornadoes. We made 26 trips carrying soldiers across, he said. The following November, Mandevilles ship hit a mine and sunk, although the water was shallow so it didnt go completely under, and he was able to board another ship. The incident left him shell-shocked and jumpy. He recalled seeing a terribly wounded German soldier, who was missing a leg forgotten? Thanks to the efforts of Towers and other American and French citizens who share his concern, approximately 95 percent of the graves have been adopted. Towers also works hard to keep the memories alive at home, volunteering every Tuesday afternoon at the the Camp Blanding museum. The American monument on Omaha Beach commemorates those who lost their lives during the bloody D-Day battle. D-Day will be commemorated at the Keystone Heights Airport on Saturday, June 7, at 8 a.m. with a Wings of Dreams flyin breakfast. All veterans will receive a free breakfast, which will be followed by a program honoring those who participated in the Normandy campaign. Wings of Dreams to remember

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Andrews really excelled in the subject of math and helped assist other students who were having problems understanding it. You would not believe how many kids today give John credit for them knowing their multiplication tables, said Stanwix-Hay, who also said she has many photos of Andrews up at the board teaching fellow students how to do math problems. Basically, Andrews demonstrates what good citizenship is all about, StanwixHay said. Hes the kind of kid everybody wants to help because hes so helpful himself, she said. Andrews just never fit into a regular classroom setting, which is true of many students, Stanwix-Hay said. Some students just cant maintain the same level as others. Many, many kids arent cut out for that, which is why kids drop out of school, StanwixHay said. They just cant sit in a class where everyone is on page 51 at the same time. Some of them should be on page 98, and some of them shouldnt even be in that book. The Academy of Academics use of an individual educational plan is beneficial to a lot of students. Like Andrews, Jacob Slayton is set to graduate, and it wouldnt have been possible otherwise. Slayton was so behind on his credits he didnt think it would be possible to graduate after enrolling in the academy this school year. Slayton gave a lot of credit to the academy teachers, saying, Everybody here cares and wants to help you out. An appreciation for teachers Stanwix-Hay, Cindy Bagley, Harold Bish Bishop, Anna Kirley, Linda Rudoi and Robin Tatumas well as guidance counselor Cynthia Rossseems to be share by many of the academy students. Charlotte Carter, who said she would be sitting at home doing nothing if not for the program, stressed how the individual attention students receive is a big plus. They want you to succeed, she said of the teachers. Aaron Akridge said the teachers have helped him make tremendous progress since he joined the program last year. Theyve brought me a long way, he said. Like Andrews, Akridge has been participating in the Bradford-Union Technical Centers welding program. He became certified in two areas this past year. Akridge now sees a future for himself. If not for the Academy of Academics, he said, I probably wouldve left (school). Akridge and Andrews received certificates at the May 29 ceremony for the achievements in welding. Andrews and Slayton received Florida Ready to Work certificates, while Shania Rosier received a certificate for meeting the requirements to become a Microsoft Office specialist. Certificates of achievement 4B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 5, 2014 (352) 473-9873Open Every Day 10:30AM-9PM N OW OPEN BBQ Burgers Steaks Salads7154 S.E. CR 21B Keystone (intersection of SR100 & 21B) www.tomsrealpitbbq.comfacebook.com/tomsrealpitbbq twitter.com/tomsrealpitbbq SAT JUNE 14THMOVIE NIGHT Bring in your church bulletin on Sunday and well donate 10% of your purchase back to your church! For more info visit: Friday & Saturday Steak & Shrimp Night SAT JUNE 21STLOTS OF WATER FUN! 10% OFFTotal PurchaseWith this Ad Expires 6-30-14 Letters editor@bctelegraph.com Dear Editor: In response to your article about the temporary fire station in Keystone for CCFR Station 11, I would like to offer the following information. 1. CCFR has been living in the house and utilizing the facilities owned by KHVFD rent free for 30 years! In 2004 CCBOCC entered into a 15 year agreement/contract with KHVFD to resolve the inadequate living quarters for the paid crews that are assigned there when the county staffed a paid fire engine in Keystone in addition to the rescue unit which increased staffing from 2 to 5. This allowed them to renovate the twostory building to resolve those issues that were recognized and were rushed due to the important nature in 2004. When the contract was signed by the County Commissioners, a quote was provided for the amount of $250,000 in which Clay County had budgeted for the project. Had your county administration followed through with the contract they entered into (for their benefit) none of this nonsense would be taking place today. Had the County administration completed the renovation as contracted to do they could have had this problem CRIME DOESNT PAYB UT WE DO!REWARDS UP TO $3,000 CRIME DOESNT PAYB UT WE DO!P AID FOR BY THE FLORIDA ATTORNEY GENERALS OFFICE CRIME STOPPERS TRUST FUNDREWARDS UP TO $3,000R EMAIN ANONYMOUSC ALL TOLL FREE S TOPPE RSSubmit a TIP ON-LINE a t: www.F CCrimeStoppers.com INTERNETAVAILABLE 904-388-9279 $ 24 99 USA Gymnastics Registrationnow underway MonFri 3-8pm (904) 368-0006 Ronnie McReynolds Registration: $10Evening Classes: $50/month (Begins June 9) 5-Day Camp: $100All Camps run 9am 3pm and include movie fieldtripUSA Gymnastics of FL is proud to announce registration for our summer programs. If the kids are looking for something fun to do this summer, let us help. With 26 years of experience USAGF is a proven hit for all ages! Like us on at Shooting Stars Gymnastics June 9 13 July 28 Aug 1 July 14 18 Continued from 2B were also awarded in the following areas: Math: Rosier, Joshua Hundley, Justin Mann and Markayla Smith. History: Smith, Javone Blackshear and Tahlera Sweeting. English: Andrews and Smith. Science: Carter, Rosier and Slayton. Edmentum (online learning program)/Reading: Sweeting and Kristen Harris. Some information regarding CCFR Station 11 solved 10 years ago. I would also remind you that CCBOCC vetoed the contract in April of 2013 with KHVFD, yet KHVFD continues to allow the career CCFR staff to reside there and to continue to use the facilities to store the fire engine, spare engine, and spare rescue all while paying no rent. Clay County is kind enough to pay the utilities, insurance, and partially maintain the buildings while they continue to use KHVFD to operate from. KHVFD has yet to file or enter into any litigation for the breach of contract in hopes Clay County would resolve the deficit they have caused. Over the last 12 months, KHVFD directors and individual Volunteer firefighters have made several attempts to work things out with Clay County and put KHVFD back to work to provide fire and first responder services to the area and Clay County will not even respond to our phone calls or emails any longer. KHVFD is negotiating with Bradford County to serve Southeast Bradford County as the primary fire protection and that would reduce homeowners insurance rates for all of those that are uninsurable in Bradford County because they are more than 5 road miles from Theressa Station 2. Yet Bradfords County Manager wants permission from Clay County to allow a non-profit fully functional, self-sustaining fire department to provide additional fire/rescue services to the citizens of Bradford County. (Clay County does not even recognize KHVFD as a department any longer) If you were not aware, Bradford Station 2 is covering fire/rescue services for Hampton now on a regular basis which has them spread thin due to lower manpower and a larger response area. In closing, I would encourage and challenge each person in Clay County and Bradford County to contact your respective County Commissioners, and Manager and express to them how much KHVFD could save the property owners in insurance rates, provide fire and medical response quicker and more efficiently supplementing the services provided by Bradford County currently, and why Bradford County needs permission to use KHVFD for the benefit of the citizens which Clay County Commissioners took from the Lake Region last year. Kevin Lee Mobley Firefighter/Paramedic/ Instructor/Inspector/Officer Dear Editor: So one of the issues that the town of Hampton was scolded for was nepotism...ok. What makes Bradford County so superior? Chapter 112.3135 Florida Statutes clearly defines that law. Yet, Bradford County thumbs their nose at that law and employs a County Commissioners Niece and the County Managers Son. The County Attorney, who Nepotism OK for county, but not Hampton? apparently is supposed to be smarter than everybody else, allows the BOCC to adopt resolutions (2012-04 and 201210), to circumvent the state statutes, and no big deal. So.. if Im clear on this, the local governments can adopt resolutions to circumvent any law the State of Florida has set forth? Thats convenient. Not a single Commissioner questioned the legality of this... no surprise, being as the two public officials whose relatives benefit from this have a history of termination from the DOC scandal and Ethics Commission violations. So what else are they up to? Hampton was nearly abolished for wrong doing... Think about this as an election is coming up. Change is needed, and there is competition out there against the way we always do it Paul McDavid Resident, Bradford County District 5 Dear Editor: Last night as we were going to church, the weather got real stormy. The wind was blowing rain and limbs in sheets across the roads. Lightning and thunder came as we got into the church. The preacher was preaching about the miracle of creation, Storm a time on faith which I liked a lot, but I was distracted by the sounds of the storm and the words of the 19 th Psalm kept running through my head. The Heavens declare the glory of God and the firmament showeth His Handiwork Music of the spheres: Gods orchestra blessing the earth and all we who are aware of it! It is no wonder that I like stormy weather. When I got home, I read the whole Psalm and found it so familiar, I think I know most of it by heart. In the night, I lay there saying it over and over. The last verse: Let the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart be acceptable in your sight O Lord. My strength and my Redeemer. Those are good words to go to sleep on. Hazel Wall 2 4 m o n t h C D S p e c i a l $ 1 0 0 0 0 m i n c u o r g 1 4 6 % A P Y* 1 0 0 % A P Y* D e p o s i t s a r e f e d e r a l l y i n s u r e d b y t h e N C U A a U S G o v e r n m e n t A g e n c y f o r u p t o $ 2 5 0 0 0 0 A n n u a l P e r c e n t a g e Y i e l d ( A P Y ) e f f e c t i v e 3 / 1 3 / 2 0 1 4 a n d s u b j e c t t o c h a n g e a t a n y t i m e 3 6 m o n t h A P R i s 1 4 5 % 5 4 0 p e n a l t y d a y s 2 4 m o n t h A P R i s 1 0 0 % 3 6 0 p e n a l t y d a y s O f f e r e x p i r e s 6 / 3 0 / 1 4 3 6 m o n t h C D S p e c i a l F e d e r a l l y I n s u r e d b y t h e N C U A

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BY MICKEY AGNER Special to the Telegraph-TimesMonitor Drew Andrews is the new director of exceptional student education with the Bradford County School District, and he knows and loves his job. He will answer any related question and transition into new, but related, topics extemporaneously and without hesitation. Discussing the recent growth specifically in the autism spectrum area during a May 30 interview, Andrews said, The question quickly arises as to whether environmental issues are causing a growth of autism spectrum disorders, or have we just become better at evaluating and identifying them? I dont know the answer to that question, but what I do know is that in the last few years, we have gained massive amounts of information about how people learn and how to help those with disabilities grow. Andrews indicated that the requirements and regulations for the ESE program are mandated and regulated according to the Individuals with Disabilities Educational Act. Moreover and according to that disabilities actthe necessary instruction required for identified disabilities was previously provided in separate classes, but research indicates that including the students with disabilities in the regular classa process known as inclusionis much more effective. When reminded that many people say that inclusion lowers the standards of the regular class, Andrews quickly responded that the claim is simply not true. Each student with disabilities is given a weight based upon the complexity and severity of the identified disability, and every public school is provided additional funding to address those needs according to the disability. The classes with more noted disability presence are provided additional teacher support. With that additional teacher support, the class is better able to address the skill diversification of each class, whether that is the student with educational disabilities or the Andrews passionate about students with disabilities Thursday, June 5, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 5B SR-230 E (2 miles east of US-301)B anquet Hall Driving Range Check out our web pagewww .starkegolf.com M emberships Available E xcellent Driving RangeP ro Shop Gift CertificatesG olf Lessons by AppointmentP rofessionally Run Tournaments H ome of the Strawberry Invitational Li ke us on facebook Brandi Barrington of Starke and Jackson Tatum of Lawtey announce their wedding on June 21 at 3 p.m. at Madison Street Baptist Church in Starke. Brandi is the daughter of Halbert and Nadine Barrington. She attended Bradford High School (Class of 2010) and just graduated from the University of North Florida in April, earning a bachelors degree in Elementary Education. Jackson is the son of John and Christina Tatum. He attended Bradford High School (Class of 2008) and works at his familys business. All friends and relatives are invited to attend. Barrington, Tatum to wed June 21 Brandi Barrington and Jackson Tatum Chelsey Marie Collins of Starke and Davin Sloan Crews of Lawtey announce their upcoming wedding. Chelsey is the daughter of Rex and Lisa Collins of Starke. She is a Graduate of Bradford High School. Davin is the son of Herman and Sandra Crews of Lawtey. He is a graduate of Bradford High School, Santa Fe College, Criminal Justice. The wedding will be on June 20, 2014 at Crystal Lake in Keystone Heights at 11:00 am. Roy Spaulding is the minister. The bride will be given in marriage by Clinton Collins, her brother. Lisa Collins will be Maid of Honor. The Best Man will be Herman Crews, grooms grandfather. Collins, Crews to wed June 20 Davin Crews and Chelsey Collins Born in 1920 when the life expectancy was only 66 years, Margaret Peek has definitely defied the odds by 28 years. Four generations of her family came together to celebrate her 94 th birthday with lunch in the park. We all enjoyed reminiscing about previous get-togethers throughout the years. A highlight of the celebration was watching her great-grandchildren interact with each other and the adults. We all delighted in sharing new and old memories as we celebrated the 94 th birthday of our mother, mother-in-law, and nana. Peek celebrates 94th birthday Socials John Edward Parker graduated Magna Cum Laude from Elon University with a Bachelor of Science degree in Physics. He is a member of Sigma Pi Sigma, the national physics honors society. John is the grandson of Mary Ann Soud of Keystone Heights. Parker graduates from Elon University John Parker Anna Sucsy of Keystone Heights, was named to the Deans List at Bates located in Lewiston, Maine, for the winter 2014 semester -a distinction earned by students whose cumulative grade point average is 3.71 or higher. Deans List students at Bates are exemplary high academic achievers. They model the good things that come from being goal-oriented, hard-working and persistent, said Matthew R. Auer, vice president for academic affairs and dean of the faculty at Bates. Sucsy is the daughter of Peter V. Sucsy Ph.D. of Keystone Heights, and is a 2013 graduate of Eastside High School. Sucsy named to Bates deans list His parents are Tim and Esther Parker, and sister, Laura Soud Parker, all of Raleigh, N.C. Drew Andrews is the new director of exceptional student education with the Bradford County School District.

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Bradford High School seniors enjoyed food and lots of 6B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 5, 2014 Going out with a fun day of memories through a gauntlet of balls are (foreground Richardson, and Janell Danielle Clark Detlefsen seem to have the hang of it in the three-legged hang of it as they go crashing to the ground. obstacle course. easy. as she makes sure BHS football coach Steve Reynolds gets dunked. Tillotson Haleigh Clary are all smiles as they look for unsuspecting victims to Chadwick has a water gun ready Scotty Peirce up to no good. He has a tub full of water balloons. prepares to put some power into it during throws a football. BHS graduation: June 6, 8 p.m.

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Thursday, June 5, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 7B Dr. Anubha Gupta received her family medicine training from Jamaica Hospital Medical Center in New York City and her fellowship training in geriatric medicine from the VA Medical Center in Gainesville. She received her medical degree from Terna Medical College, Navi Mumbai, India. Dr. Gupta will be joining the staff of PALMS MEDICAL GROUP facilities in Starke every Tuesday. She will be seeing pediatric and adult clients for routine health maintenance and sick visits. Dr. Guptas husband is attending the University of Florida with a Fellowship in Pediatric Cardiology & Pediatrics ICU. The joy in the doctors lives is their toddler son. They are making their home in Gainesville, hopefully for a very long time! NEW DOCTOR IN TOWN t Crime t The following individuals were arrested recently by local law enforcement officers in Bradford, Union or Clay (Keystone Heights area) counties: Bradford Thomas Henry Anderson, 63, of Jacksonville was arrested May 28 by Lawtey police for driving a vehicle not registered or licensed with the state. Jeremy Christopher Brewer, 21, of Starke was arrested May 31 by Starke police for battery. According to the arrest report, Brewer slapped his wife and pulled her to the ground by her hair before almost pushing her down the steps of the front porch as she tried to get away from him. The police were called, and Brewer was arrested. Bond was set at $5,000 for the charge. Chad Austin Carpenter, 27, of Lake Butler was arrested June 2 by Starke police for trespassing. According to the arrest report, Carpenter went to an auto parts store in Starke where a relative works and caused a disturbance, yelling obscenities and threatening several employees. He had been trespassed already in February from the same store. Tonya Gisela Carter, 32, of Starke was arrested June 2 by Bradford deputies for battery. According to the arrest report, Carter was irritated with a male at the residence. He was sitting outside on the front porch when she ran out the door, headbutted the victim and then tried to shove him off the porch. The victim was able to catch himself before falling and called law enforcement. A witness verified the victims account, and Carter was arrested. Rolando Carreno of Miami was arrested May 30 by the Florida Highway Patrol on two out-of-county warrants. Bond was set at $7,000 for the charges. David Orman Cox, 52, of Starke was arrested June 1 by Bradford deputies for aggravated assault with a weapon. According to the arrest report, Cox had been drinking and got into an argument with his son. Cox had purchased a new knife and had it in a sheath on his side, and threatened to stab his son with it during the argument. The son called law enforcement after Cox passed out on the couch. Bond was set at $50,000 for the charge. Elmer Ray Cox, 47, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 29 by Bradford deputies on an out-of-county warrant from Clay for domestic battery. Bond was set at $5,002 for the charge. Brittany Mae Daugherty, 18, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 27 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for making a false report of child abuse. Bond was set at $10,000 for the charge. Willie Kevin Dolison, 35, of Lawtey was arrested May 28 by Bradford deputies for battery. According to the arrest report, Dolison was arguing with his girlfriend when he came up behind her and grabbed her, pushed her against the wall and took her cell phone. He then threw the phone in the yard. Bond was set at $20,000 for the charge. Marc Howard Duncan, 21, of Lawtey was arrested May 28 by Lawtey police during a traffic stop for possession of cocaine, possession of marijuana and destroying evidence. According to the arrest report, Duncan threw a bag of marijuana out of the vehicle before being pulled over by the officer. Crack cocaine was found during a search of the vehicle, along with more marijuana. Bond was set at $17,000 for the charges. Nicholas Shane Faulkner, 27, of Jacksonville was arrested May 30 by Bradford deputies for probation violation. No bond was allowed for the charge. John Anthony Faust, 28, of Salisbury, N.C., was arrested May 27 by Lawtey police during a traffic stop for two charges of possession of marijuana and for five charges of possession of drug equipment. Bond was set at $29,000 for the charges. Timothy Lavain Floweres, 33, of Starke was arrested May 29 by Bradford deputies on four warrants for probation violation. No bond was allowed for the charges. Christopher Daniel Recent arrests in Bradford, Clay and Union Geistlinger, 27, of Starke was arrested May 29 by Bradford deputies for possession of marijuana, producing marijuana, possession of drug equipment and destroying evidence. According to the arrest report, deputies received a tip that Geistlinger had a marijuana-growing operation at his residence, and after going to the residence once and smelling the marijuana, they returned later to speak with him. After gaining entry into the home and observing marijuana plants, they obtained a search warrant for the residence and found six pots with marijuana growing in them, along with other equipment used to grow the plants. Bond was set at $62,000 for the charges. Aaron Roy Griffis, 21, of Lawtey was arrested June 1 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for possession of a weapon or ammo by a convicted felon. Bond was set at $50,000 for the charge. Danielle N. Hamm, 36, of Starke was arrested May 29 by Starke police for failure to appear. Lucella Hill, 37, of Starke was arrested June 1 by Starke police for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $5,000 for the charge. Tyrise D. Jackson, 19, of Lawtey was arrested May 28 by Lawtey police for battery. According to the arrest report, Jackson got into an argument with a 14-year-old relative over the use of a phone and slammed her head into a dresser, causing a knot the size of a baseball on the back of her head. Richard Kelly, 24, of Lady Lake was arrested June 1 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $500 for the charge. Jeremy James Manning, 35, of Starke was arrested May 30 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for battery. Bond was set at $50,000 for the charge. Demetrius A. Martin, 20, of Starke was arrested May 28 by Lawtey police during a traffic stop for possession of marijuana. Bond was set at $5,000 for the charge. Richard Craig Nipper, 46, of Brooker was arrested May 27 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for larceny-petit theft second degree, third subsequent offense. Bond was set at $15,000 for the charge. Shynequia M. Oneil, 18, of Starke was arrested May 30 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $5,000 for the charge. Mathew R. Padgett, 24, of Jacksonville was arrested May 31 by Bradford deputies during a traffic stop for possession of marijuana and possession of drug equipment. Alphonso Leon Pernell, 34, of Starke was arrested May 28 by Bradford deputies for aggravated assault with a weapon, two charges of battery, kidnapfalse imprisonment, criminal mischief-property damage, resisting an officer, disturbing the peace and obstructing justice. According to the arrest report, the police were called to a residence about a disturbance. Pernell was at his mothers home in Starke washing his clothes when he became irate over something and started threatening to shoot and kill everyone in the house. While his mother was on the phone calling 911, Pernell snatched the phone out of her hand and broke it. Police arrived shortly thereafter, though, with several deputies and a K-9 unit to assist. Pernell refused to come out of the home and threatened that he had something for the officers if they went in the home. Pernells mom then snuck out of the house in the back and was talking to the officers from the front porch when Pernell stepped out onto the porch. She quickly went back inside and locked the front door, leaving him outside. After Pernell wouldnt comply with the officers to get on the ground, they released the K-9, but Pernell hit and kicked the dog several times. An officer then used a Taser, but Pernell continued to resist. Another officer used a Taser before Pernell was handcuffed and arrested. Bond was set at $1,102,000 for the charges. Timothy Warren Potts, 31, of Starke was arrested May 31 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for larceny-grand theft of a dwelling. Bond was set at $50,000 for the charge. Dennie Rae Randolph, 34, of Starke was arrested May 27 by Bradford deputies for possession of marijuana and possession of drug equipment. Bond was set at $1,500 for the charge. Daryl S. Risby, 40, of Starke was arrested May 29 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for violation of conditional release by the Florida Parole Commission. No bond was allowed for the charge. Ronald Eric Sawyer, 42, of Starke was arrested May 29 by Bradford deputies for possession of opium or derivative. According to the arrest report, during a traffic stop it was discovered that Sawyer had 19 Methadone pills he intended to distribute to another individual. Bond was set at $20,000 for the charge. Rosamarie Denice Simmons, 34, of Starke was arrested May 30 by Bradford deputies on an out-of-county warrant from Putnam. Bond was set at $500 for the charge. Rachel Marie Smith, 24, of Jacksonville was arrested May 30 by Bradford deputies for failure to appear. No bond was allowed for the charge. Robert Gerald Swanson, 41, of Baldwin was arrested May 31 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $500 for the charge. Keystone/Melrose Jacqueline Fraga, 49, of Melrose was arrested May 30 by Putnam deputies for DUI. Dana Charles Hoffman, 55, of Melrose was arrested May 30 by Putnam deputies for perjury. Justen Kelley, 24, of Keystone Heights was arrested June 2 by Clay deputies for failure to appear. Jessica Nail, 21, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 30 by Clay deputies for burglary. Amanda Smith, 44, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 30 by Clay deputies for failure to appear. Derick Luther Phillips, 23, of Melrose was arrested June 1 by Putnam deputies for an out-ofcounty warrant. Ronnie Allen Stratten, 49, of Melrose was arrested May 28 by state troopers for driving with a suspended or revoked license. John Waters, 18, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 28 by Clay deputies for lewd or lascivious battery. Union Marion Eugene York, 52, of Lake Butler was arrested May 28 by Union deputies for battery. According to the arrest report, deputies were called to a disturbance, where it was eventually determined that York struck his girlfriend in her face during an argument. According to the victim and a friend staying at the residence, this wasnt the first time York struck the victim during arguments. He was arrested and transported to jail. Stephen Louis Heslar, 27, of Lake Butler was arrested May 30 by Union deputies on an out-ofcounty warrant from Bradford. A 16-year-old juvenile from Lake Butler was arrested May 27 by Union deputies for three charges of possession of marijuana, possession of narcotic equipment and obstructing justice-tamper or destroy evidence.

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8B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 5, 2014 ARMSTRONGFENCE COMPANY Securing the SoutheastCommercial Residential Rent a Fence Access ControlCall for your FREE Estimate LOCAL PEOPLE ... LOCAL SERVICE! Thrift Store Lawtey, FLWatch for sign at Red Light on right. Cross Railroad. Were the first building on right after crossing RR.904-964-2524 Blake Valenzuela, between and Jennifer Valenzuela, and brothers and Jacob signs to play College. seated between Athletes for mother, Holly Hudson, signs Christian of intent. signs his letter of intent to attend Southeastern joined by sister, Courtney, and parents, Jodi and Sean Carroll. BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer Three recent Keystone Heights High School graduates signed letters of intent to play football during a May 22 ceremony. Tight end Micah Brown, who also played safety, will join former teammate Nate Smitha 2013 KHHS graduateat Kentucky Christian University in Grayson, Ky., while quarterback Blake Valenzuela will attend Wilmington (Ohio) College. Fullback/kicker Michael Carroll, who also played the linebackerdefensive end hybrid position, will join the first-year program at Lakelands Southeastern University. Each player generated interest from more than 20 schools through the Athletes for College recruiting service. Brown said it was a stressful time, talking to various coaches every day, but it was an experience he also enjoyed. It was a mixture of feelings at the signing ceremony as well. Im nervous and excited really excited, Brown said. Brown said he believes the small, Christian school will be a good fit for him. Plus, he enjoys the fact he gets to join a friend in Smith. Keystone head coach Chuck Dickinson said Brown possesses a 6-3, 6-4 frame that could use a little more weight. He said Brown probably weighs approximately 200 pounds now, but could see him putting on 25 to 30 pounds. As it was, though, Brown did the job he needed to do at tight end. Even though he wasnt real heavy, he came off the ball, Dickinson said. We ran quite a bit to his side. He was able to get people moved out of there just because of leverage. Brown already catches the ball well, though Dickinson said thats something hell have to continue to work on. Hes got above-average hands, Dickinson said, but thats something he can improve on. Brown feels good about his chances to contribute. I think Ill get the opportunity to play a lot at this school, he said. Carroll seemed almost at a loss for words in describing what it felt like to get a chance to keep playing. I dont know, its just mind blowing getting this far, he said. Its crazy to think of. It was a hard decision to choose a school, Carroll said. He narrowed his choices to Southeastern and Faulkner University in Montgomery, Ala. In the end, Carroll said he liked Southeasterns commitment to academics and its closer location to home. As far as the football side of Southeastern, Carroll said hes not sure where hell end up playing, though he does have a preference for lining up in the offensive backfield. Id like to get the ball, but its just wherever the coaches need me, Carroll said. Dickinson said Carroll is a strong blocker, with an emphasis on strong. Michael benches 335, 340, and cleans over 300, Dickinson 3 KHHS football players receive college opportunities said. From a strength standpoint, hes already there. Hes just got to fit into their system. Its a new system in the sense of being a first-year program, so maybe hell have a chance to get in and have some early playing time. Carroll proved his worth at KHHS as a kicker as well with his ability to kick off into the end zone. He was a very big asset to the team, Dickinson said. Valenzuela admitted he didnt like talking during his interview with the Telegraph-TimesMonitor, but he had no trouble putting into words what the day meant to him. Im pretty happy, he said. Ive always wanted to go play a sport in college. Its always been my dream. Now, its happening. Valenzuela helped lead the Indians to the District 4-4A championship last season. That accomplishment will only help as he attempts to make his mark at the collegiate level. It helped me because it showed that anything can happen, Valenzuela said. Nobody determined that we would go as far as we did (in 2013). We were supposed to be the underdogs, and we proved everybody wrong. Dickinson said Valenzuela was a big part of that district championship by adding another dimension to his game. Valenzuela showed the ability to run the ball and did so successfully in key games, such as a win over district opponent Bradford. I think that helped our offense tremendously with him being able to be a run threat, Dickinson said. He still was able to throw, but I think thats part of the game hell have to work on a little bit more at the next level. Hopefully, A girls basketball/softball camp will be held at the Keystone Heights High School gym from 8:30 a.m. until 4 p.m. starting June 30 and running through July 2. A session will be offered for girls in second through fourth grade, while another will be offered for those in fifth through seventh grade. The cost is $130 (or $65 for those who want to do only one sport) and includes lunches, drinks, T-shirts and awards. Applications may be obtained at Keystone Heights Elementary School. For more information, please call Keystone Heights Elementary School at 352-4734844 and speak to either Jessica Carter (ext. 2315) or MaryAnne McCall (ext. 2270). Keystone girls basketball/ softball camp starts June 30

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Thursday, June 5, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 9B Caregiver for Mother she lives near Hampton 3 to 5 days a week 5 to 6 hours a day Pay is negotiable CONTACT: (c) Serving F amilies in North Florida since 1973 S TARKE OFFICE OPEN 8:30 to 5:30 MON-FRIHwy 301 North, Starke 904-964-2010 (Next to Best Western) The area s largest supplier of Colored GraniteWhen Quality Counts, You Can Count On UsPrimary Location in Lake City at 561 NW Hilton Ave.Member of Better Business Bureau Monument Builders of North America Florida Monument BuildersFL Lic. # F037700 d Obituaries d Mildred Copeland LAKE BUTLERMildred Dansie Copeland, 93, of Lake Butler passed away Wednesday, May 28, 2014 at her residence from an extended illness. Mrs. Copeland was born on Jan. 23, 1921 in Salt Lake City, Utah to the late Mahonri Dansie and Estella Starling Dansie. She was a homemaker. She was a lifetime member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, currently of the Lake Butler Ward. She is preceded in death by a son, David Copeland. Mrs. Copeland is survived by: her loving husband of 72 years, William O. Copeland; seven daughters, Ellen Virden, Mary (Robert) Porter, Donna (Glenn) Milton, Christine (George) Bradberry, Nancy (Tom) Price, Barbara Trambley, and Sarah (Mark) Hill; two sons, Tommy Copeland and James (Carolyn) Copeland; brother, Wesley Dansie; sisters, Dorothy Dansie and Stella Benson; 36 grandchildren; numerous great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren. Funeral services for Mrs. Copeland were held May 31 at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Lake Butler Ward. Burial took place after the funeral in the Jacksonville Memory Gardens, 111 Blanding Blvd. Orange Park. Archer Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. 386-4962008. please sign the guestbook at archerfuneralhome.com PAID OBITUARY Wanda Jones STARKEWanda Leen Jones, age 77, of Starke passed away at E.T. York Hospice Care Center in Gainesville on Friday, May 30, 2014. She was born on Nov. 18, 1936 in Kings Mills, Ohio to the late Edward and Edith Robinson. Wanda was preceded in death by her husband of 54 years, Reverend Reed Jones. While a resident of Starke, Wanda worked as a Preschool Teacher at St. Marks Daycare and Little Peoples Daycare. She and Reed then moved to Shelby, North Carolina where they pastored New Bethel Nazarene Church for 22 years. Wandas two favorite things were spending time with her family and sharing the love of the Lord through time spent with her church family. Wanda is survived by: her children, Rhoda (Wayne) Wainwright, Danny Jones and Jeanetta Skinner all of Starke; her brother, Jimmy Robinson of Manchester, Ohio; her sister, Beulah Reese of Little Valley, N.Y.; her grandchildren, Kenneth Wainwright, Kristen Quinones, Tarah Jones and Daina Skinner; her great-grandchildren, Tyler, Carson and Kencie Wainwright, Ava and Luka Quinones, and Libby and Hannah Jones. Funeral services will be held on Saturday, June 7, at 11:00 am, with visitation beginning at 10:00 am, followed by a memorial service at Madison Street Baptist Church. Wanda lovingly requested donations be made to Haven Hospice, 4200 N. W. 90th. Blvd. Gainesville, Fl 32606, in her memory. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Archie Tanner Funeral Services of Starke. 904-964-5757. Visit www. archietannerfuneralservices.com to sign the familys guest book. PAID OBITUARY Roy Knight BROOKER Roy Edward Knight, 63 of Brooker passed away Monday, June 2, 2014 at ET York Haven Hospice in Gainesville. He was born Dec. 11, 1950 in Brooker to the late James Knight and Geraldine McNeal Knight. Mr. Knight was a heavy equipment operator. He enjoyed gardening, his dogs, and being a mechanic. He was preceded in death by his brothers, David and Jack Knight. Mr. Knight is survived by: his loving wife, Bethany Goodrich Knight; three brothers, Richard Knight, John Knight, and Vernon Knight; two sisters, Alice Sanford and Thelma McQuaig. Archer Funeral Home is in charge of the funeral arrangements. 386496-2008 PAID OBITUARY Shirley Marshall STARKE Shirley Tyson Marshall, 64, of Starke, died on Thursday, May 29, 2014 at Shands at University of Florida Hospital Gainesville. She was a lifelong resident of Starke. She was a member of Pleasant Grove United Methodist Church. She was a graduate of RJE High School Class of 1968. She was also employed with Head Start and Episcopal Children Services for 34 years. She is survived by: son, Mark A. Marshall; and daughter, Stacy L. Marshall, both of Starke; sisters, Helen Pitts of Cocoa, Gloria Mack and Hazel Hamilton, both of Starke; brothers, Clinton Kelly of Cocoa, Vernon Tyson of Gainesville, Oliver Tyson of Starke, and Gad Tyson Jacksonville; and three grandchildren. Funeral services will be held at 2:00 p.m on Saturday, June 7 in the Church of God by Faith in Lawtey with Rev Carl Tyson Presiding and Rev. Alvin Green Eulogist conducting the services. Interment will be held in Bob-Love Cemetery in Starke. Viewing Family Hour, Haile Funeral Home Chapel Friday June 6, 2014 3-4:00 p.m. Viewing for Friends will be held at Pleasant Grove United Methodist Church 5-7:00 p.m. and 1 hour prior to the services on Saturday at the church. The Cortege will form at the Home of Ms. Shirley Marshall 17285 N. W 55th Avenue in Pleasant Grove at 1:15 p.m. Arrangements are under the Haile Funeral Home, Inc. of Starke. Lujune Southerland LAKE BUTLERLujune Rush Southerland, 56, of Lake Butler died Monday, June 2, 2014 at ET York Haven Hospice in Gainesville after an extended illness, surrounded by her family. She was born on June 15, 1957 in Ocala to the late James Rush, Sr. and Velva Gay Rush. She was employed with medical records at Shands in Gainesville for many years. She is survived by: her husband of 35 years, John Earl Southerland, Jr.; daughter, Jennifer Dawn Southerland; one granddaughter; brother, James Rush, Jr.; sisters, Penni (Anthony) Williams and Teresa McGill. Funeral services will be held Friday, June 6 at 11:00 a.m. in the chapel of Archer Funeral Home, with Rev. Steve Hutchinson officiating. Burial will be at New Zion Cemetery following the services. Family invites friends for visitation Thursday, June 5 from 6 to 8 pm at the funeral home. Archer Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. Daniel Williams LAWTEY Daniel Wayne Williams, 67, of Lawtey died June 3, 2014 at the V.A. Medical Center 1954 On behalf of the family of Mal colm H. Crews, Jr. we would like to thank all those who surrounded us with prayer, en couragement, food and flowers during this most difficult time. We are truly overwhelmed with gratitude for the love you have shown us. God bless you all Card of Thanks in Lake City. He was born July 27, 1946 in Jacksonville. He is preceded in death by his brother, Dale Walker Prescott and his mother, Lavada Ivey Prescott. He served in the United States Air Force during the Vietnam War. He is survived by: his brother, Eugene Prescott of Lawtey. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Archie Tanner Funeral Services of Starke. things I had never seen before, so I just kind of guessed. BHS sophomore Cole Johnson also competed at the state event in the area of computer maintenance. He placed fifth after earning a first-place finish at the Region 2 event. The winner in each area at the state event will compete in the SkillsUSA national event. This was the first year of SkillsUSA competition for Johnson and Yates. SkillsUSA is a partnership of students, teachers and industry representatives working to provide the U.S. with a skilled labor force. Yates said she wasnt expecting to come out on top at the Region 2 event, which featured 12 other students competing in medical terminology. In fact, she said she was hesitant about even placing due to a soccer injury that had her on crutches. I was recovering from an ACL reconstruction, Yates said. They were going to make me walk up to the stage and walk across it. Mrs. Jackson walked up (to the stage) with me and went on stage and got my award. I was thankful for that. By virtue of a top-three finish, Yates earned the right to compete at state along with Johnson, who also placed first at the Region 2 event. I was really excited because I had never been to Pensacola before, she said. At the time of the SkillsUSA event, though, the area was deluged by rain and experienced flooding. Jeff Ledger, a computer systems and information technology teacher at the Bradford-Union Technical Center who went on the trip, said it was the craziest weather hes ever seen. The electricity at the Bay Center, where the SkillsUSA event was held, went out halfway through the competition. When it came back on, Ledger said, they said, Just so you know, theres a funnel cloud Continued from 2B about a mile from us. Well keep you alerted. Yates said, We got like 21 inches of rain overnight. There was actually a lightning bolt that hit the hotel and shook the whole building. It woke me up from a dead sleep. Still, the SkillsUSA event was fun, Yates said. She competed against approximately 20 people in medical terminology. She was off crutches by that time, but that didnt make hearing her name announced as a third-place finisher any less intimidating as the state event had more competitors overall than at the Region 2 event. I was a bit more nervous, Yates said. I was off crutches, but I still had to walk down about three flights of stairs and get on stage with all those people looking at me. It was nerveracking. Yates believes competitions hosted by such organizations as SkillsUSA and Health Occupations Students of America can help students plan out a career path. However, she made up her mind to do something in medicine years ago, citing her parents as influences. Her father, Rusty, works for Philips and provides service for medical equipment, while her mother, Susan, works for the Cardiac and Vascular Institute in Gainesville as a nuclear technologist. Ive known from a young age I always wanted to go into the medical field, said Yates, who is contemplating becoming either an obstetrician/gynecologist or a neonatologist. I think these classes here (at the BradfordUnion Technical Center) help solidify that. Ledger said he wished to thank the following for their support in allowing Yates and Johnson to compete in the SkillsUSA events: George Roberts Insurance, Starke Chiropractic, Mosley Tire, Denmark Enterprise, Knuckle Draggers, Capital City Bank, State Farm, Community State Bank, Bradford County Education Foundation, Tatum Brothers Saw Mill, Jackson Building Supply and Ameriprise Financial. Network $2999 904-388-9279

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student with gifted skills. Additionally, those classes with additional teacher support are better able to intensify the support for students learning new skills and gradually withdraw that support as the student progresses, a successful process known as scaffolding. That, Andrews said, is not his opinion, but the conclusion of research. From there, his conversation with the Telegraph-TimesMonitor quickly flowed into the area of specific learning disabilities because it is by far the largest area of disabilities in every public school district. According to the National Center for Learning Disabilities, nearly 2.5 million school-age children in the United States today have been identified as having learning disabilities, and this does not include the students enrolled in private or religious schools. That number of students represents about 42 percent of hell continue to progress. The fact that Valenzuela progressed each year while at KHHS has the coach believing he can do the same at Wilmington. I think if he does what hes supposed to, hell have an opportunity to do well, Dickinson said. The three players cant wait to suit up for their respective schools. Its something Ive always wanted to do, Valenzuela said, while Brown said, I cant wait. Its so exciting. Carroll said, Its going to be an adrenaline rush, definitely. Dickinson, of course, is proud of all three for achieving their goals and putting in the work necessary in the classroom to do so. Hopefully, they found the (school) that will best fit them, and theyll have success, Dickinson said. 10B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 5, 2014 EQUAL HOUSING OP PORTUNITY. All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex or national origin, or an in tention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal cus todians, pregnant women and people securing cus tody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimina tion, call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777, the tollfree telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. For further information call Florida Commission on Human Relations, Lisa Sutherland 850-488-7082 ext #1005 Commercial Property (Rent, FOR RENT PROFESSION AL OFFICE, 1,500 sq.ft. $1,000/mo.up to 3,000 sq.ft. Contiguous $2,000/ mo. Warehouse 3,000 sq. ft. $800/mo. Smith & Smith Realty. 904-9649222. RETAIL SPACE in busy strip center. 1,000 sq.ft. and 2,000 sq. ft. units. South HWY 301 front age, across from the KOA Campground. Call 352235-1675. DOWNTOWN STARKE Pro $315 per month. Confer ence room, kitchen, utili ties and more provided. 904-364-8395. Home for Sale 3BR/2BA living room, din ing room, family room, laundry room. Back porch is screened in. Storage shed. Large fenced & paint. A/C. Immaculate condition. $120,000.00. Near downtown & schools. 823 Parkwood Place. 912-843-2194 or 912-281-9053 HOUSE for rent. In good condition. For more infor mation call, 904-290-0083 OR 904-964-5006. VERY CLEAN NEWLY PAINTED, 2BR/1BA SW. W/D hookup, CH/A, 1 acre, in country. $450/mo. $500 deposit, no lease. Call 904-769-9559. 3BR/2BA DW 12273 SE 21st Ave., Starke. $675/ month plus $650/security. Out in country. Service animals only! 904-9648637. SUITE OF OFFICES IN CLUDES Kitchen, Show er, Washer Dryer. Down town STARKE $1000/ MO. For information Call 904-364-9022. PERMANENT ROOMS for rent at the Magnolia Hotel. Both refrigerator and microwave. Special rates, by the month. Call 904-964-4303 for more information. MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT starting at $525 per month. Hidden Oaks, Lake Butler. Call 386496-8111. NICE MOBILE HOMES in Lake Butler & Starke 2 & 3 BR single wides, fenced. 2BR/2BA. Lake front. Deposit required. Call 678-438-6828. WE HAVE 2 OR 3 bed room MH, clean, close to prison. Call 352-468-1323 2BR/1BA APT. CH/A. Elec tric range, refrig. Wall to wall carpet. $400/mo. sec. deposit. References, call 904-966-1334. OFFICES FOR LARGE STAFF. Includes living qtrs, showers, kitchen, washer & dryer. This is a living qtrs. $1000/month. Call 904-364-9022 Bradford Union Clay 40Notices 41Auctions 42M otor Vehicles & Accessories43R Vs & Campers 44Boats &ATVs 45Land for Sale 46Real Estate Out of Area 47Commercial Property (Rent, Lease, Sale) 48Homes for Sale 49Mobile Homes for Sale 50For Rent 61Scriptur es 62Vacation/Travel 63Love Lines 64Business Opportunities65Help Wanted 66In vestme nt O ppo rtunities67Hunting Land for Rent 68Carpet Cleaning 69Food Supplements 70Money to Lend 71Farm Equipment 72Computers & Accessories51Lost/Found 52Animals & Pets53AY ard Sales53BKeystone Yard Sales53CLake Butler Y ard Sales54Pr oduce 55Wanted 56Antiques 57For Sale 58Child/Adult Home Car e59Personal Services 60Home Impr ovementW ord Ad Classified Tuesday, 12:00 noon Classified Display Tuesday, 12:00 noon964-6305 473-2210 496-2261 C lassified Advertising should be paid in advance unless credit has already been established with the newspaper. A $3.00 service charge will be added to all billing to cover postage and handling. All ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser at the time of placement. However, the classified staff cannot be held responsible for mistakes in classified advertising taken by phone. The newspaper reserves the right to correctly classify and edit all copy or to reject or cancel any advertisements at any time. Only standard abbrevations will be accepted. T O PLACE A CLASSIFIED USE YOUR PHONE (904) 964-6305 (352) 473-2210 (386) 496-2261 Classified Ads Where one call does it all! Set Right Mobile Homes Specializing In Relocations, Re-Levels, Set-Ups & Disposal Rodney A. Carmichael, OwnerEmail: set_right_homes@yahoo.com904-364-6383 EXTRA CASH! Could you use some now that the holidays are over? We specialize in helping people sell through our Classifieds! YARD SALES AUTOS BOATS CLOTHES APPLIANCES... The list goes on..Call Mary Today at 904-964-6305 N EED C ASH F AST! E mail your med-to-hi-resolution digital photo (150dpi+) & ad text to: by 5pm Monday or bring it to:B radford County Telegraph Union County Times Lake Region Monitor( 904) 964-6305 c ash/check/credit cards accepted all for only /wk c overing Bradford, Union & Clay Counties a in our weekly f ree c ommunity shopper: T arget your audience quickly A childless loving married couple seeks to adopt. Will be hand on mom/dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Dawn & Domenick 1(855)985-4592. Adam Sklar #0150789 Fri, June 13th @ 10am Online & Onsite 10950 N Kendall Dr, 2 nd Fl, Miami, Fl 33176 Office Furniture & Equipment Cubicles Computers/Laptops Phone System & more! 904-368-0687 phwww.starkedivorce.comMARGARET ANDERSON1011 N. Temple Ave. Starke. FL (US 301 North)Family Law & Will Preparation30 years experience Margaret will continue to serve clients in Alachua County as well as Bradford & Union counties all U.S. students enrolled in any kind of ESE class. Unlike many common perceptions, these disabilities are not a discriminator of people. They are caused by genetics and problems in pregnancy, at birth or after birth. Additionally, they can be caused after birth by head injuries, poor nutrition or chemical exposures to elements such as lead. According to Andrews, a major factor in the students educational growth, regardless of the relevant type or severity of disability, is early detection. Even when a young child encounters brain damage from accidents, he or she has a better chance of regaining the original neurological function compared to adults. Likewise, the younger the child is when a disability is identified, the better chance he or she has of overcoming those disabilities educationally. Consequently, the district places much emphasis upon its relationship with childcare programs, voluntary pre-K programs and early organizations like Child Find and Early Steps. Andrews indicated that good communications between parents and people who work with children in preschool organizations are very important. Those professional childcare workers have been trained to recognize disability indicators that are age specific to those children. Some of the more profound and physical disabilities are easily identified, but specific learning disabilities are manifested in subtle expressions. Andrews concurred that the identifying behaviors and skills listed on the idonline.org website are good indicators of the lessobvious learning disabilities of preschool-age children to look for. Those identifying skills and behaviors are: Speaks later than most children. Pronunciation problems. Slow vocabulary growth, often unable to find the right word. Difficulty rhyming words. Trouble learning numbers, alphabet, days of the week, colors or shapes. Extremely restless and easily distracted. Trouble interacting with peers. Difficulty following directions or routines. Fine motor skills are slow to develop. When you listen to Andrews talk about children with disabilities, you not only get the impression that children with disabilities can be successful, but that they are also very significant assets to all of our schools and community. Continued from 5B Continued from 8B

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Thursday, June 5, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 11B KEYSTONE 2BR/1BA. 1 acre fenced. SW w/room addition. Clean. $525/ month plus last & security. Please call 352-475-3094 or 352-235-1143 2BR/1BA APT. CH/A. Elec tric range, refrig. Hard wood floors. $495/mo. sec. deposit. References, call 904-966-1334. 5 Yr. 3BR/2BA house for rent. Tile floor, granite counters, Jacuzzi tub, gas wrap around porch. Lake access. Post Masters Vil lage in Keystone Heights. $1,050/mo. plus 1-month deposit. Call Dave 352473-3560. 14 BY 70. 2BR MOBILE HOME on Private Lot. 301 Hampton. Like new. $525/ month. 904-966-3212 2BR APT DOWNTOWN STARKE. $500/month. Call 904-364-9022 to see apt. 3BR/2BA SW. Between Starke & Lake Butler. $600/monthly $300/de posit. 904-305-8287 or 904-263-3999 CH/A $600/mo. $300/ deposit. Between Lake Butler & Raiford. 904-305-8287 or 904-263-3999 3BR/2BA living room, din ing room, family room, laundry room. Back porch is screened in. Storage shed. Large fenced & paint. A/C. Immacu late condition. No pets other than service ani mals. $950/month plus deposit. Near downtown & schools. 823 Parkwood Place. 912-843-2194 or 912-281-9053 DW 3BR/2BA. On 2 acres with add. 2 acres fenced w/pond/horses. Lawn maintenance included. Has water softener. $1,150/mo. First & last plus deposit $200.00. Call 904-769-1636 LARGE FURNISHED ROOM WITH BATH for rent $80/weekly. Located on State Rd 100 Starke. Ride to & from doctors, food store, low income are welcome. Monthly rent can be arranged. 904-769-8077. KEYSTONE HEIGHTS 2BR/1BA. CH/A, newly renovated. $500/month. On Silver Lake. Lawn care & maintenance included. Call 352-478-8321 2BR/1BA HOUSE. Across from RJE in Reno. Nice clean, freshly painted. Must see. Kitchen com pletely redone. Contact Marvin 904-742-3406 3BR/2BA DW. Outside Starke city limits. CH/A. $650/month, $650/ deposit. Call 352-2356319 2BR/1BA HOUSE in Starke city limits. $500/month plus $500/deposit. Call 352-235-6319 RENT A ROOM IN AN OF FICE. $300 per month. Utilities furnished, kitch en provided. 6 offices available. 4 downstairs, 2 upstairs. For info call 904-964-6305. BUILDING THAT USES METAL SHOP. (Mc Clellan Recycling) 224 E. Washington Street. Starke. $200 per month. Call 904-964-6305 SMALL TRAILER FOR RENT, One person. $350/ monthly, satellite and utilities included. $150/ deposit. 1/2 acre, pet wel come. 904-964-2747 LAWTEY CHURCH OF GOD yard sale. Sat. 8am-2pm. FRIDAY 8AM-2PM. 10321 NW CR 225 Starke. Lots of nice miscellaneous items. Kamado-Joe XL Grill, brand-new used 3x $500.00. Sm. furniture, attic fan, clothes, some tools. MULTI FAMILY. MISSION TRIP FUNDRAISER. Fri & Sat 8am-1pm. House wares, clothes, shoes, toys, tools, elec tronics & more. Harvest Church N of Starke on 301. FRI & SAT 8AM-2PM. Come see. 5062 NW 182nd way. Conerly Estates. Rain date June 13th & 14th. YARD SALE SATUR DAY ONLY! SE SR 100 8am-2pm SAT 8AM-5PM. Huge sale. 3 miles past Hospital on 230. Follow signs on left. Sales A FUNDRAISING YARD SALE will be held at Key stone Heights VFD on Fri & Sat 8am-3pm. The funds raised from this yard sale will assist with the cost of the cemetery monument for DJ Mob ley. 231/121 go south as if go ing to RMC. 9515 CR 231 on right side of hwy. $2.00 coupon for 30. 00 carton cigarettes all new custom ers on 1st. carton. FIFTY FIVE (55) GAL LON AQUARIUM. Fully equipped and stocked in operation call Charles. 904-966-2911 BUILDING AT 224 E. Washington Street. $7000. Could be mower shop or recycling shop. Call 904-964-6305 Child/Adult Home Care CAREGIVER IN YOUR HOME. 25 years expe rience excellent refer ences live-in available cell 352-328-1883 home 352-475-3900 Personal Services CLARK FOUNDATION RE PAIRS, INC. Correction of termite & water-dam aged wood & sills. Level ing & raising Houses/ Bldgs. Pier Replacement & alignment. We do all types of tractor work, excavation and small demolition jobs. Free Es timates: Danny (Buddy) Clark, 904-545-5241. DRIVERS: $5,000 SIGN-ON BONUS! Great Pay! Consistent Freight, Great Miles on This Regional Account. Werner Enterprises: 1-855-515-8447 DRIVERS: Company. Home Every Week. Excellent & Loaded. No Touch, 50% D&H. CDL-A, 3 yrs exp. 800-588-7911 x225. LOCAL STARKE BUSI NESS is looking to hire a part-time and/or full-time staff member. Optional shifts are available and Military Veterans are wel come to apply! We are looking for a self-starter, goal oriented person with the willingness to learn. No experience necessary! Please email employment app or resume to vtoddf@ gmail.com. HELP WANTED; RETAIL COUNTER SALES, FT position-40 plus hours. Applicant should have High School Diploma. Must have Retail Sales exp., and basic knowl edge of the computer. Lake Butler Farm Center Phone Number 386-4963921. Fax Number 386-496-1294. Email address: farm538@ windstream.net THE CITY OF HAMPTON WILL BE ACCEPTING applications through June 12, 2014 for a part time position of Street/Mainte nance Worker. Ability to lift 50 lbs.> operate lawn and outdoor equipment, gen eral knowledge of street and maintenance duties desired. This position will work in conjunction with the Utility Distribution Op erator and other city em ployees including evening and weekend work as needed. Applications can be picked up and returned at/to the Hampton City Hall, 5784 Navarre Ave, Hampton, Fl. (904) 964-6305 (352) 473-2210 (386) 496-2261 Classified Ads Where one call does it all! for positions of and Full Time in Keystone in Gainesville 352-473-0680 Excellence Through Senior AdvocacyServing Clay County and Surrounding Areas.105 Commercial Drive Keystone Heights, FL 32656HHA29991306Must have been a registered nurse for at least a year and prefer home health care experience, but not required for right candidate. with resume in hand. Episcopal Childrens Services has openings for a for our Head Start program in Starke.A bachelors degree in early childhood education preferred; associates required for Lead position. Salaries vary by position & credentials ($11-$17 per hour) Excellent benefits package, including:Health, Dental and Life Insurance Retirement Plan w/ Employer Matching Paid Vacation & Holidays Employer Paid Training & Tuition AdvancementEmail resum to hhodges@ecs4kids.org or Fax to (904) 726-1520 ATTN HRECS is an Equal Oppo r tunity / Aff i r m ative Action / Drug Free E m ployer. DURRANCE PUMP Q UALITY SERVICE SINCE 1964 Pumps Sales Parts Service ST ATE LICENSE #1305 rffntb b rfntfbnfffbffnbnff ffbfrfffbfnfnfbfntfnf frfntbfbfffrtffbfbffbnf fntfffrfnff Southern Villas of StarkeAsk about our 1&2 BR Apartments HC & non-HC Units. Central AC/ Heat, on-site laundry, playground, private, quiet atmosphere. 1001 Southern Villas Dr. Starke, FL Equal Housing Opportunity 801 South Water Street Starke, FL 32091 TDD/TTY 711 1, 2, & 3 bedroom HC & Non-HC accessible apartments.This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. Equal Housing Opportunity W/D Hook-ups Pool Business Center Fitness Room Kids CornerPETS WELCOME !Call 904-368-0007Spacious 2, 3 and 4 Bedroom Apartments AVAILABLE NOW!STARTING AS LOW AS $550/moCall today to hear about our current special to help get you moved in! (904) 964-3948 Cell (904) 364-6890204 West Adkins St Starke, FLTONYA THORNTON Realtor Cell (904) 364-6890 Large screened porch, separate utility room, storage shed w/covered carport. Large city lot, walking distance to area schools. On Pratt Street in Starke. on 1 acre in Starke fenced yard. nestled in the middle of a Pecan grove on SR-16 in Starke on 4+ acres. Pool & much more! in Union County on 1/2 acre lot. Many upgrades! acres on CR125, Bradford County. Country Living! PERFECT Getaway HomeFully furnished LOG CABIN within minutes to Georges Lake in Florahome, FL. 3/1 with unfinished loft being a 3rd room. CallSherry AshleyREALTOR Coldwell Banker Smith & Smith Realty Cell: 904-364-6517Office: 904-964-9222 704 N. Lake Street Starke NOW OPEN

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12B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 5, 2014 however, she was told her project would have to be considered checked baggage. We got it back when we were in Houston, and there was this black line down the back of it, Ricker said. The black line could be removed, though, so no harm done. Upon arriving at the Hilton Americas-Houston, where she was supposed to be staying, Ricker found out her name was not on the hotel list. She was asked if she could provide her I-SWEEEP project code, but she didnt have it on her. I had to call my parents, but they were in Gainesville, Ricker said. There was no way they could get me the project code on time. Im calling random people and asking them if they are in Starke. I finally got a hold of one of my youth directors. She was like, Yeah, Ill get it for you. She had to break into our house and get my project code for me. Ricker said it was intimidating showing up at the George R. Brown Convention Center with her project. There were so many people and so many projects she thought looked better than hers, she said. She said she didnt feel good about her chances. Then you start to talk to the kids, Ricker said. Its not like youre in a competition with them. Youre friends. I didnt meet a single rude person while I was there. It wasnt that kind of environment. Everyone was so nice. Prior to the project judging, there was a flag ceremony in which some of the I-SWEEEP participants showed off their countries flags and traditional attire. It was interesting, Ricker said. She said she saw kids from Mexico wearing reindeer headdresses, while Bangladeshi kids wore what she could only describe as Mrs. Claus-type outfits. The girls from Puerto Rico had these huge, pink dresses, Ricker said. I was wondering how they walking. More interesting attire awaited Ricker when I-SWEEEP participants visited Johnson Space Center on May 4, which happens to be Star Wars Day. She said there were crazy people dressed in costumes from Wookies to Galactic Empire stormtroopers. It was an interesting cultural experience, she said. Ricker got to visit the Houston Museum of Natural Science, at which she found a vending machine that sold flavored crickets. She bought salt and vinegar and bacon and cheddar varieties and offered them to any Kiwanis member who was bold enough to try them. (Two members did.) I brought them back originally for my dad, but he wouldnt eat them, Ricker said. I ate one for him. I got like cricket stuff in between my teeth. It was not fun. I was one and done. A STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) Expo was held prior to project judging as well. It was an event open to the public that featured more than 100 physics, chemistry and math demonstrations. Ricker said there was a robotics competition in which you raced against another person to build a robot and then use the finished robot to pick up balls and place them in a bin. I was going up against this kid who looked like he was 5, Ricker said. Im like one third of the way through my robot, and hes already putting balls into the bin. It was not fair, so I just gave up. It was embarrassing. The expo also featured the Texas A&M University Chemistry Roadshow, a publicservice program designed to entertain as well as educate students. Dr. Jim Pennington, a senior lecturer and research associate at Texas A&M who coordinates the roadshow, made quite an impression on Ricker with his colorful tie-dyed smock and propensity for scaring people with a contraption that made loud noises. He was insane because he kept blowing things up and not telling you (beforehand), Ricker Continued from 1B said. At one point, Pennington called Ricker to the stage and asked her to provide him with a monetary bill. I gave it to him and he sprayed something on it and lit it on fire, Ricker said, adding, Then he just handed it back to me, and it wasnt even hot. It was the coolest thing, but he really scared me. Ricker got her money back safely, plus went home with a little extra, receiving a $400 check for earning a silver medal after project judging. Despite a rough beginning with the inability to carry her project on the plane and not being on the hotel list, it turned out to be quite a trip. I really did just have so much fun at I-SWEEEP, Ricker said. Medals and honorablemention awards are given to participants in three divisions: Environment, Engineering and Energy. A grand winner is named in each division. This years grand winners were Albert Kima student at Manhasset High School in Long Island, N.Y.in Environment, Drew Prevosta student in the Huntsville, Ala., Covenant Christian Academy home-schooled programin Engineering and Raymond Yina student at Ward Melville High School in East Setauket, N.Y.in Energy. money seemingly burns, but Pennington coated the bill with something to prevent