Lake Region Monitor

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Lake Region Monitor
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Newspaper
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John M. Miller
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Keystone Heights, Florida
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University of Florida
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BY KAREN LAKE Santa Fe College KEYSTONE HEIGHTS-Nineteen area seniors are graduating with an Associate of Arts degree in addition to their high school diplomas this year. These students dual enrolled at Santa Fe Colleges Watson Center as rising juniors and have earned 60 hours of college credit while satisfying high school requirements over the past two years. Here is what they had to say: Sarah Guilfoyle said she is taking the summer off. Rightly so. She said she is happy her mom pushed her towards this (AA degree) and that, yes, shed do it all over again. My parents helped me with this, she said. Guilfoyle plans to continue her education either at Santa Fe College or at the University of Florida in her pursuit of a teaching degree. She said the summer will give her the time to decide between teaching history or drama. When asked what she liked best about her dual enrollment experience she said it was the activities at the Watson Center. And hey, it was free college, she said. David Wyatt Bennett is an engineering major. He is returning to Santa Fe College to finish the prerequisite courses needed for his degree and will use this time to consider his future transfer options. Madison Colaw is continuing her education at Florida Southern College on an athletic scholarship. She is a health sciences major and wants to specialize in pediatric oncology. She said earning her Associates of Arts degree has definitely helped her in achieving her goals and that if she had it to do over again, shed make the same decision. Music is his first love but since Zachary Coursey decided on a major, Florida State University is now his destination school. High school dual enrollment saved me a lot of money, he said, The only thing I would change is making my decision about a major earlier. Coursey said he would have taken different prerequisite coursework to help him toward his major. Overall, lrmonitor@bellsouth.net www.StarkeJournal.com Deadline Monday 5 p.m. before publication Phone 352-473-2210 Fax 352-473-2210 Worth Noting Melrose UMC fish fryFriday, May 16, 5-7 p.m., $8.50. Melrose United Methodist Church, 5802 Centre St. Soccer try-outsThe Keystone Youth Soccer U13/U14 competitive travel soccer team will be holding tryouts for the 2014-2015 season. Any player under the age of 14 on July 31, 2014 is eligible. Try-outs will be at Twin Lakes Park, 6065 Twin Lakes Road, on Saturday, May 31 beginning at 9 a.m. Please arrive 30 minutes early to stretch and register. For more information call 352-2350393.Cheerleader tryoutsThe KHHS Cheerleaders are having tryouts for upcoming 7th   grade girls for the 2014/2015, football and basketball season on Monday and Tuesday, May 19th   and 20th, from 3:30 to 5. On Monday, you will be working on your cheer, chant and jumps. Tuesday will be the official tryout. Both days are mandatory and will be held in the multipurpose room of the KHHS gym. Applications are available at the front offices of KHHS, MES and KHES. Also, the KHHS Varsity Cheerleaders will be coming to KHES and MES to meet with the 6th   grade girls to answer questions and to hand out applications. Applications are due by 2:00 pm, Thursday, 5/15/14, to Margie McCall at KHHS.Lake Region Monitor Lake Region Monitor USPS 114-170 Keystone Heights, Florida Thursday, May 15, 2014 42 nd Year 2nd Issue 75 CENTS Clay County Sheriffs Office honors fallen heroesBuglers from Union Correctional Institution and Clay County Fire Rescue play Taps after BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor GREEN COVE SPRINGS Members of the Clay County Sheriffs Office honored eight of their fallen comrades during a ceremony at the David A. White Memorial Headquarters in Green Cove Springs on May 8. Sheriff Rick Beseler told family members of the fallen officers that their memories are honored on a daily basis by members of the public passing by the agencys stone memorial, placed outside Beselers office window. I spend most of my days in that office overlooking the memorial, he said. I have watched hundreds of visitors as they arrive here to conduct business and I notice as they approach the building they pause and read the names inscribed on the stone. Their actions and reactions vary, but without exception they seem respectful and mindful of what each of those names represent. Activities during the ceremony included prayer led by See OFFICERS, 2A High school hosts suicide prevention training for parentsBY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor KEYSTONE HEIGHTS Administrators at Keystone Heights High School held a parents night in the schools auditorium May 1 to train parents about the warning signs of childhood depression and teen suicide. Principal Dr. Susan Sailor told the crowd of around 50 that after a second KHHS student took her own life in March, many parents asked for the training. She added See PARENTS, 3A 23 judges run unopposed in 4 corners countiesBY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor GREEN COVE SPRINGS Nearly two dozen circuit court judges in jurisdictions covering Clay, Bradford, Putnam and Alachua counties were returned to the bench after qualifying with no opposition on May 2. Circuit judges preside over felony criminal cases, civil suits involving more than $15,000, probate cases and family law matters. In the Fourth Judicial Circuit, which includes Clay County, incumbents James Hunt Daniel, See JUDGES, 2A approves change to Kingsley Lake developmentBY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor GREEN COVE SPRINGS The Clay County Planning Board approved a change in the visual barrier requirements for a 70lot Kingsley Lake development during its May 6 meeting. Kinglsey Cove is a 46.5acre project on the former site of Stricklands Landing and Kingsley Beach. In 2008, the planning board approved an application by a group of Lake Butler-based See KINGSLEY, 4A Clay commission extends Waste Management contractBY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor GREEN COVE SPRINGSClay County Commissioners extended their multi-million dollar contract with Waste Management through September 2023, during a May 13 board meeting. The current agreement between the county and Waste Management was set to expire in two years. Under the contract, Waste Management picks up the countys garbage See WASTE, 5A 19 high school seniors earn Associate of Arts degreesSeniors at Keystone Heights High School and Hope Christian Academy who earned an See COLLEGE, 6A Keystone man stole from heart attack victimBY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor PALATKAA Keystone Heights man resigned from Putnam County Emergency Medical Services after he was accused of stealing $40 in cash from a cardiac victim. According to a Palatka Police Department report, a nurse said she saw EMS worker William Earl Curtis, 46, putting money into his pocket while standing close to heart attack victim Robert Hancock, 71. Hancock later died at Putnam County Community Medical Center. The nurse added that she and another hospital employee counted the victims cash both before and after the alleged theft and determined that $40 was missing from the mans wallet. According to the report, EMS Chief Chad Hutchinson confronted Curtis about the incident, and Curtis admitted taking $20 from the victims wallet, which he turned over to Hutchinson. As of press time, Curtis had not been arrested nor charged. Palatka police filed a complaint with the State Attorneys Office, which is now reviewing the case. Lake Geneva resident arrested after confronting BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor KEYSTONE HEIGHTSClay County deputies arrested a Lake Geneva man after the lake dweller struck two riders of dirt bikes and ATVs with a shotgun and then fired the weapon as the victims fled the scene, according to a sheriffs office report. Tony Waters, 50, of Keystone Heights was arrested on May 8 for discharging a firearm in public, possession of not more than 20 grams of cannabis, battery and possession of drug paraphernalia. According to a sheriffs office report, Waters confronted three men who were doing wheelies on dirt bikes and ATVs in the dry lakebed of Lake Geneva near his home. With his granddaughter watching, Waters struck two of the men in the sternum with the barrel of a 12-gauge shotgun. As the victims fled the scene, Waters fired three shots over their heads. A Clay County deputy wrote that before interviewing Waters about the incident, he patted down Waters for his own safety. During the search, the deputy found marijuana and a pipe in Waters pants pockets. Florahome UMC   centennial Florahome United Methodist Church was founded in 1914 and is located on the corner of S. R. 100 and Coral Farms Road at the flashing light in Florahome. The Church will begin celebration of its centennial year with a devotional, historical presentation, food and fellowship at 5 p.m. Saturday, May 17.   The celebrations will continue with a worship program on Sunday May 18 at 11 a.m. with special guest speaker the Rev. Dr. Rick Neal.   A fellowship meal will follow the service. Degrees of SeparationNew and selected works by Jim Carpenter are now on display April 12 May 18. Reception is Friday, May 2nd, 6 to 9 p.m., part of Melrose Art Walk. Including works by member and consignment artists in various media, painting, sculpture, photography, printmaking, ceramics, pottery, textile, glass and jewelry.We need your clothesCommunity Church of Keystone Heights is hosting our 6th Annual Back to School event on July 22. Clothes will be given away free to children in need. Donate clean, gently used clothes for children sizes 3T through adult. Teenagers come in all sizes and this collection is for all ages and sizes. Drop clothes off at Community Church marked B2S (Back to School). The deadline is July 10. Please call Barbara Sullivan (258-3113), Karen Powell (5389546), Jenn Cumbus (258-5479) or Kim Nugent (258-3602) for more information or to volunteer.

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Gregg McCaulie, Tyrie W. Boyer, Lance M. Day, Adrian G. Soud, David M. Gooding, John Hills Skinner, Harvey L. Jay, Tatiana Radi Salvador, Virginia Norton and Waddell A. Wallace were all returned to office for six-year terms. Skinner has been a circuit court judge in Clay County since 1996. From 1987 to 1996 he was a county judge in Green Cove Springs. The only contested judicial race in the Fourth Circuit is between Anthony Paul Penoso and Mike Sharrit in Group 27. Voters will choose between the two in the Aug. 26 primary. In the Eighth Judicial Circuit, which includes Bradford and Alachua Counties, incumbents Robert K. Groeb and James P. Nilon qualified without opposition. Phillip A. Pena also qualified with no opponent. William Falik is challenging incumbent William E. Davis in group 11. Groeb currently handles criminal cases in Bradford County. Pena is currently an Alachua County judge. He will replace Judge Phyllis M. Rosier, who did not seek reelection. In the Seventh Circuit, which includes Putnam County, incumbents David J. Walsh, James R. Clayton, Margaret W. Hudson, John M. Alexander, Carlos E. Mendoza, Howard M. Maltz, Raul A. Zimbrano and Randel H. Rowe III all qualified without opposition. Sandy Upchurch also qualified unopposed. Mendoza is the administrative judge in Putnam County and handles criminal cases in Palatka. Four contested races remain in the Seventh Circuit. David Hood and Mike Orfinger will compete in Group 6, Karen Foxman and Steve Sands will run in Group 18, Steven N. DeLaroche, Adam Warren and Kathy Weston are running in Group 20 and Kellie Jo Killebrew is challenging incumbent Thomas G. Portuallo in Group 23. 2A Lake Region Monitor Thursday, May 15, 2014 Pd. Pol. Adv. paid for and approved by Stephan O. Hart for City of Keystone Heights City Council, Seat 5. Thank You My Friends, Volunteers, and Voters for electing me to the Keystone Heights City Council, Seat 5. Steve Hart is the perfect time for Grannies, Moms, Dads, Grandparents and others to recognize their graduates achievements. Print them for the world to see...Only$30THE LAKE REGION MONITOR 7382 SR 21N Keystone Heights352-473-2210Email your message and/or photo & your phone # to ads@bctelegraph.com or take your copy to: For your convenience, you can also bring your photo and information by the Bradford County Telegraph at 131 West Call St. in Starke between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. KHHS Graduation May 30, 2014 www.MelroseBayArtGallery.comMelrose Bay Gallery Regional Fine Art & Fine Crafts 103 Fla.SR-26 (btw. Cypress & Centre)Hours: Sat 10-6 + Sun 1-5 tel. 352.475.3866 Jim Carpenter Degrees of SeparationCurrent art exhibit showing thru May 18 Lake Region MonitorUSPS 114-170 Published each Thursday and entered as Periodical Postage Paid at Keystone Heights, Florida under Act of March 3, 1879.POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Lake Region MonitorP.O. Drawer A Starke, FL 32091 7382 SR 21 Keystone Heights, FL 32656Phone: (352) 473-2210 (352) 473-6721 John M. Miller, PublisherSubscription Rate in Trade Area $39.00 per year: $20.00 six months Outside Trade Area: $39.00 per year: $20.00 six monthsEditor: Dan Hildebran Sports Editor:Cliff Smelley Advertising:Kevin Miller Darlene Douglass Typesetting Eileen Gilmore Advertising and Newspaper Prod. Earl W. Ray Classified Adv. Heather Padgett Bookkeeping:Joan Stewart-Jones Also pictured is a granite monument memorializing fallen Keystone Heights resident Tom Croft, music by the sheriffs pipe and drum corps and a moment of silence on the agencys radio frequency. Beseler also led a roll call of the agencys fallen officers. The sheriff read a profile of each man as family member or deputy pinned a rose on a wreath near the granite monument The honorees were: Sheriff Josephus Peeler, who died on May 10, 1894, five days after he was shot at the Green Cove Springs train station. Peeler was attempting to break up a fight between two men at the time of the shooting; Sheriff Charles Wilson, who on July 10, 1906 was shot on a train in Palatka while he was attempting to arrest a man. The shooter was subsequently shot and killed by another train passenger. Wilson was a former Green Cove Springs marshal; Sheriff Theodore Cherry, who was shot on July 6, 1913 while questioning a suspect. The shooter fled the scene but was later killed by a citizen posse; Sgt. Richard Watkins, who was killed in a crash on May 3, 1976 at the intersection of Old Jennings Road and S.R. 21 while following an ambulance from the scene of a suicide attempt; Auxiliary Deputy Burton Caton Sr., who suffered a fatal heart attack on July 15, 1979 while working a traffic detail in Orange Park; Deputy Wilson Walker, who died on Dec. 17, 1994, as a result of medical complications caused by materials used during his work as an evidence technician; Sgt. Kenneth Eddie Hayes, who died on May 26, 2002 from a heart attack while on duty; and Detective David White, who on Feb. 16, 2012 was shot and killed during a raid on a methamphetamine lab in Middleburg. The shooter was later killed by deputies as he fled the house while firing on other officers.OFFICERSContinued from 1A Edwards, Shienne MacKinnon, Cindy Grimaldo, Wyatt Hopkins, Makayla Smith, Summer JUDGESContinued from 1A Blanding Boulevard resurfacingORANGE PARK The Florida Department of Transportation began a resurfacing project on May 12 on Blanding Boulevard from Kingsley Avenue to Knight Boxx Road. In addition to paving, the nearly 5-mile long resurfacing project includes drainage and sidewalk repairs, improving sidewalk ramps at side street intersections and traffic signal upgrades. Construction also includes a median modification at Parkridge Avenue which will allow cars to only travel a certain direction when crossing through the median. This modification reduces the potential number of crashes in the intersection by guiding motorists directionally and minimizing conflicts with cross traffic. Blanding Boulevard is a major thoroughfare, logging more than 50,000 cars per day through the project area. During construction, lane closures for paving are restricted to nighttime hours. Northbound Blanding Boulevard lane closures may occur from 8 p.m. to 5 a.m., and southbound lane closures may be scheduled from 9 p.m. to 7 a.m. Restricting lane closure times minimizes impacts to motorists, especially during rush hour. DOT hired Hubbard Construction Company of Jacksonville to complete the $4.9 million project by spring, 2015. New suppression system at airportBY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor KEYSTONE HEIGHTS--The chair of the Keystone Airpark Authority said an extended fire suppression system and a new beacon are among the recent improvements to the airport, which straddles the Clay and Bradford county line. Noel Thomas gave the Keystone Heights Rotary Club an update on May 8 about the developments. Thomas said the airports old beacon and tower were 45 feet tall. The new structure is 70 feet tall. In addition, the airport moved the rotating light to a new location that is 23 feet higher than the previous spot, increasing the lights total height LRM Legals 5/15/14 Notice is hereby given that pursu ant to the Florida Self Storage Fa cility Act Statutes (Section 83.801, 83.809), Lake area Storage, LLC, will sell the following items to the highest and best bidder on Monday, May 19, 2014 at 9:00 A.M. (EST) at 7101 SR 21, Keystone Heights, Florida 32656: Unit# 226, containing misc. house hold items. 5/8 2tchg 5/15-LRMLEGALS See AIRPORT, 4A

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Thursday, May 15, 2014 Lake Region Monitor 3A Mon Thurs: 9:00am 11:30am & 2:00pm 4:30pm Fridays: 9:00am 2:00pmW.H. Marshall, M.D.Opthamologist(352)475-3991EXAMS AVAILABLE Optical Hours Why go to Gainesville? Were right around the corner!Prescription Glasses, Sunglasses, Contacts & Swimming Goggles 105 SR-26 Melrose Worship in the Park COME JOIN US ONSunday May 18th 8:30 AM State Road 26 Melrose State Road 26 Melrose FREE(352) Fly-In RED DRAGONAERIAL DEMONSTRATION www.visitjacksoncountyfla.com that the schools expert in suicide prevention advised her to delay the session for several weeks until the emotional impact of the students death waned. Sailor said she has lived in the Lake Region her entire life, and that she has never seen the combination of two suicides and the death of a third student by accident over the course of three months. Were talking about things that we probably needed to have been talking about for years, she said, but now things are coming to the surface and kids are reaching out for help, parents are reaching out for help and we are trying to do the best that we can in the school system. Sailor added that over the past three months, the schools staff has had to adapt to the rush of students seeking counseling after the deaths. When you talk about school-level people: the teachers the counselors and the administrators who work in the building every day, we were trained to teach kids We werent really equipped to handle the kinds of grief issues that weve been dealing with here with our students. Sailor said that after the second suicide, the school district assigned six social workers, two mental health counselors, a military family life counselor and several school psychologists to the campus. For the parents training, Sailor invited Dr. Stephanie Jallen, a fellow in child and adolescent psychiatry at the University of Floridas College of Medicine to address parents about the warning signs of childhood depression and teen suicide. Childhood depressionJallen said childhood depression often manifests itself by increased irritability, rather than by the stereotypical symptoms of despondency and sorrow. Although some kids get sad and they may become tearful, a lot of them just become irritable, she said of depressed children. You will see a change. Nothing makes them happy. They get annoyed with every little thing. She said all teenagers have bad days. It goes beyond that, she said. It has to be this persistent, lower-mood irritability for the majority of the day, for weeks: two, three, four weeks in a row. Jallen said parents should also watch for changes in sleeping patterns. Either they are not sleeping at all, waking up in the middle of the night, waking up before the alarm clock goes off, tossing and turning or they are sleeping more, she said. Jallen said that children dealing with depression also lose interest in the things they used to enjoy. Theyll start making excuses about not going out with friends, she said. They dont want to go fishing anymore, they dont want to play basketball anymore. The things that they really took pride in just dont seem to matter anymore, or as much as they used to. Jallen said children with depression may also withdraw from relationships and experience declines in energy levels. It is harder to concentrate. Grades start to drop. Drug and alcohol use is also a sign of depression. They are looking for ways to cover up their pain, she said. Jallen said risk factors for depression include family history and personal history. If the child has ever been abused or neglected, they are going to be at a higher risk of depression, she said. She added that students living in households with active alcohol or drug abuse, or in families with high levels of strife or discord have increased risks for depression. They just have a lot on their plates, she said. Jallen added that students are adept at covering up depression, and almost never seek help from their parents in dealing with it. Teenage suicideJallen said most student suicides result from depression. Suicide is the third-leading cause of death for people between the ages of 14 and 25, following only accidents and homicide. On average, there are around 5,000 teenage suicides a year in the U.S. Jallen said students contemplating suicide sometimes make statements like Nothing matters, You dont care, You wont have to deal with me later, or It will all be over soon. She added that teenagers who have been struggling over the long term, and suddenly seem relieved or happy may have decided to commit suicide. Theyve got a plan and they are going to end the suffering, she said. They might start giving things away, Jallen added. Sarah gets the Xbox and John gets the fishing rod. Risk factors for suicide include depression and drug or alcohol abuse. She added that teenage substance abuse goes beyond the typical drugs of marijuana and cocaine. Buying someone elses Adderall, stealing Moms Xanax, she said. Cough medicine, over-the-counter has really picked up in this area. Theyll look at synthetics because you cant test them on a drug screen. Previous suicide attempts are also a risk factor for subsequent attempts, as well as non-suicidal self injury like cutting, burning, biting and punching. It can be a call for help, Jallen said. There are a lot of kids who do it just to kind of release some tension. Their intention is not to kill themselves, but they can get lost in the moment and it can go too deep and it can become more serious. Cutting is the most common form of this behavior and teenagers will often go to great lengths to hide their scars. A lot of girls will cut under the bikini line so they can still wear their swimsuits in the summer and no one sees it, Jallen said. They will cut on their upper thighs so they can cover it up with shorts. They cut above their arms, so its always covered up by T-shirts. In Florida, sometimes I get worried when girls come into my office all the time wearing long sleeve shirts. Easy access to firearms is another risk factor for teenage suicide. Im not here to talk about the Second Amendment, Jallen said. I know a lot of people have guns. They like hunting and thats OK, but the reality is, if its in the home, the kids can get at it. Jallen added that parents should eliminate a depressed teenagers access to firearms in the same way they limit a toddlers access to household chemicals. She also said most teenagers who survive an overdose suicide attempt live to regret the attempt. The problem is with guns you dont get time to regret it, she added. It is, by far the most lethal way of suicide, followed by hanging. Jallen said if a teenager knows someone who committed suicide, they are at greater risk of suicide themselves. Low selfesteem is another risk factor. She said that students who are at a lower risk of suicide are engaged with their family or school. Theyre doing well in school, she said. They really take pride in their school work. They feel like they can talk to teachers or friends. There is not a lot of bullying going on. Jallen also recommended parents view a four-minute video produced by the Mayo Clinic about teen suicide prevention. The video is available on Youtube.com. Jallen said the most important thing parents can do is to stay alert. She said adults should take action when teenagers make statements indicating they may be thinking about taking their own lives. When any child makes any comments about thinking of suicide, dying or not wanting to be alive, you should take it very seriously, she warned. Because all you need is one minute when this kid is home alone and feeling very low, feeling alone, feeling like they cant do anything; they go get the gun and theyre done.PARENTSContinued from 1A Womans plans luauKEYSTONE HEIGHTS-The Womans Club of Keystone Heights elected its new officers for 2014-2015 during its April meeting. The new officials are President, Sally Linton; First Vice President, Sue Plaster; Second Vice President, Joanne Motter; Third Vice President, Cindy Martorano. Treasurer, Tina Bullock; Recording Secretary, JoAnne Gill and Corresponding Secretary, Shirlie Davis. The club continued preparations for its luau and Bunko party for Saturday, May 17.   Proceeds for the 6 p.m. event at the clubhouse on Womans Club Drive will go toward education and club upkeep.   The menu includes shrimp sliders, pulled-pork sliders, pineapple casserole, fresh fruit, pineapple and spam skewers, frozen fruit salad, sweet and sour meatballs, Hawaiian dream cake, Hawaiian pie, South Sea cookies, punch, iced tea and coffee.   Bunko is an easy game to learn and play.   Instructors will be on hand to help everyone get started for an evening of fun. Tickets are $10. For information about the event, call 352-473-3553 or Sally Linton at 352-473-0045.New Melrose gallery hosts student art showMELROSEThe Lake Regions newest gallery opened a student art show during the the Melrose First Friday May Art Walk. Artisans Way is inside the historic Hilton House at the corner of S.R. 26 and Hampton Street. The student exhibit   i s an outgrowth of an end-of-year show coordinated last year by Interlachen High School art teacher Ann Hamilton at Shake Rag Cultural Arts Center. This year, Hamilton invited Keystone Heights High School art teacher Trisha Qualls and her students to participate in the show. The exhibit will be on display through Sunday, May 25. Winners in the threedimensional category were: First placeAbi Loose of Keystone, metal bird; Second placeJarret Jones of Keystone, metal dog and Third placeAlexis White of Keystone, paper tree. Winners in the twodimensional category were: First placeNik Sevlik of Interlachen, red manga style; Second placeMary Fournier of Interlachen, apple basket; Third placeBrandon Figueroa of Interlachen, tempera resist and Honorable MentionSamantha Korth of Keystone, Cheshire cat, Hannah White of Interlachen, op art, Haley Arzie of Keystone, pen and ink and Mason Davis of Keystone, snail. Clay County school board member Tina Bullock applauded the gallerys involvement in the project. With the arts being an area that suffers during an economic downturn, I commend community people for stepping up, she said. I would also thank the art teachers from the schools for doing such a great job. Church yard saleHuge yard sale at 275 Satsuma St. this Friday and Saturday, May 16 and 17.Artisans Way Dim Lights Benefit ConcertFeaturing Karan Newman, Chuck Spitzer, Ned Stewart and Gerald Snyder. Saturday, May 17, 8-10 p.m. 5910 Hampton St., on the corner of S.R. 26 in Melrose. 352-639-0730 http:// artisansway.org.

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4A Lake Region Monitor Thursday, May 15, 2014 Keystone District Office 352-473-4917 clayelectric.com Rays Auto RepairEstablished 1972473-30837382 Sunrise Blvd.(Next to Hitchcocks Grocery) *** Comfortable Waiting Area ***Jones-Gallagher Funeral HomeDistinquished Caring Service for Over 50 YearsJoe Gallagher OwnerStarke 964-6200 Keystone Heights 473-3176J B SJackson Building SupplyStarke 964-6078 Lake Butler 496-3079See us for all your Lumber & PlywoodThe Transmission ShopAutomotive Repair and Sales, Inc. Complete Auto Repair Facility Imports & Domestic 352-473-3404www.Transmission-Repair-Shop.com 135 Commercial Circle Keystone Heigths, FL BryansHARDWARE & GARDEN CENTERHighway 100 Keystone Heights, FL 473-4006 Highway 21 Melrose, FL 475-2400Worship in the House of the Lord...Somewhere this week! FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now survive DIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 Welcome Home To 4004 SE State Road 21, Keystone Heights, FL 32656 (352) 473-3829 Son-shine Worship in our Fellowship Hall Contemporary Worship in our MMC Traditional Worship in our Sanctuary Dr. Craig Moore preaching on Dinner Served Fried Chicken (Call 352-473-3829 for reservations) Bible Study by Dr. Tom Farmer, Jr. Series: Ministries for Children (all ages) & Youth Sundays & Wednesdays! Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (LCMS)Sunday School 9 a.m. Worship Service at 10 a.m. 4900 NW 182nd Way Starke(Entrance to Conerly Estates on S.R. 16) (904) gslcstarke@aol.com Everyone Welcome!Childrens Church 10 a.m. Keystone man recalls piloting days during a May 2 meeting of the Keystone Heights Rotary said the 2,700-horsepower, single prop had the same was designed to deliver a nuclear weapon using the overCulinary program awards cake decorating winners BY MERI-LIN PIANTANIDA Keystone Heights High School KEYSTONE HEIGHTS The culinary arts program at Keystone Heights High School recently completed a week of cake decorating which culminated with a program competition. There were 24 entries in two divisions: first-year culinary students and advanced students. To complete the project, students used 75 pounds of cake mix, 50 pounds of powdered sugar and 12 pounds each of butter and shortening. Following the competition, students and faculty both enjoyed eating the cake, lots of cake. Advanced division winners were: First PlaceBrianna McCarty and Brittany Frantz for Bambi Second PlaceMelissa Fain and Brittany Filing for Split Personality Wedding; Third Place Cory Hedding, Kyle Richardson and Kody Downs for Mind Craft. First-year division winners were: First PlaceLexy Hamlow, Hailey Turner, Larann Massey, Eiron McGee and Adri Nassif for A Day at the Beach; Second PlaceKaitlyn Cline and Sabriya Bacote for KHHS Volleyball; Third Place Shannon Aldhous-Evans and Marissa Williams for Minion. First-year Division winners Massey, Adri Nassif and Lexy Hamlow and Eiron of Keystone Heights High developers, including Avery C. Roberts and Jon W. Pritchett, to rezone the land to a planned unit development. The application and subsequent PUD stipulated that a 6-foot high, opaque barrier consisting of vegetation or fencing would buffer the development from residential properties on either side. At the May 6 meeting, the developers requested that the barrier requirement be changed from an opaque buffer to a 4-foot-high board fence. Gloria Strickland Valinski, who owns the parcel to the east of the development, said she supported the change. She said that the opaque fence would have blocked the view of the lake along her quarter-mile driveway. Dawn Strickland also appeared before the board. She said she was representing her parents, Louis and Delores Atchison, who own the property west of Kingsley Cove. Strickland said her parents also supported the change in barrier. She added that Roberts, who did not attend the planning board meeting, indicated to her parents that the original stipulation for an opaque fence was an error. Both women complemented the developers for their willingness to change the barrier stipulation to accommodate neighbors. One property owner objected to the proposal. Vinette D. Godelia, writing on behalf of the Leseman Family Land Partnership wrote a letter to the board saying that the purpose of the original opaque barrier was to protect adjacent property owners from incompatible components of the PUD, such as the amenities area. Godelia added that the change will not visually protect nearby property owners from the recreational activities in the amenities area. In other business during its May 6 meeting, the board: Approved a large scale land use amendment for a 14.12acre parcel to the northeast of the intersection of C.R. 209 (Russell Road) and the CSX railroad track, north of Green Cove Springs. The change in land use to Rural Reserve matches the land use to an adjacent 100-acre property and clears the way for a 21-homesite development by Edgewater Landing LLP. Rural Reserve is a land use designation that serves as a transition between suburban and rural land uses. It requires minimum buffers of 50 feet and stipulates that 35 percent of the acreage be preserved as permanent open space; Approved a change in zoning to Agricultural-Residential for a lot on Chicory Circle, off C.R. 215 between Middleburg and Camp Blanding. The applicant, R. Timothy Carter, plans to place a mobile home on the property and had already installed a well and septic tank on the parcel before realizing the lot was zoned Private Service-2, a business classification. According to the countys planning and zoning director, the land was rezoned in 1986 to PS-2. Planning and zoning staff members could not determine why the change in zoning occurred at that time.KINGSLEYContinued from 1A to nearly 100 feet. Thomas added that the new beacon uses LED technology, rather than incandescent bulbs. He said some pilots have reported seeing the new beacon shortly after taking off from Ocalas airport. Thomas also said the airport extended a water main and a series of fire hydrants from the airports terminal along the facilitys main entrance road to S.R. 100 for about a mile and a half. He added that the new hydrants are equipped with special connectors that prevent their unauthorized use. Its a liability issue, believe it or not, he told the club. Thomas explained that the hydrants are supported by a pump that pushes 1,700 gallons a minute through them and that the airport could be liable for injuries sustained to individuals attempting to acquire water through them. A lot of these companies, they find a hydrant out in the open like we have at the airport, he said. They will be pulling up there and filling up their tanks, and so we are having to shut that down. Thomas also said the airport has upgraded its capability to host blimps, Several times a year weve had blimps come in and stay out AIRPORTContinued from 2A See BLIMPS, 5A

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at the Rosemary Hill Transfer Station west of Green Cove Springs and disposes of it at Waste Managements Chapman Landfill near Brunswick, Ga. The county recoups the disposal costs through an $84 annual assessment to property owners in unincorporated Clay County. The county has a separate contract with Advance Disposal to collect trash and recyclables from curbsides and deliver the materials to the Rosemary Hill transfer and recycling facilities. The county assesses almost $150 a year to property owners in unincorporated areas to cover collection costs. The countys four municipalities each have their own agreements to collect household waste. In Keystone Heights, Advance Disposal bills city residents to collect and dispose of trash. During a special board meeting on May 5 and a regular board meeting on May 13, county commissioners considered an alternative proposal from Republic Services to dispose of the countys trash at a Putnam County landfill that Republic is in the process of acquiring. However, when negotiations between Putnam County and Republic bogged down, Clay commissioners focused instead on extending the Waste Management deal. At both meetings, Commissioner Ronnie Robinson pushed for the renewal. He pointed out that the Waste Management extension gives the county manager until Dec. 31, 2016 to designate an alternative disposal facility. He said that if Republic and Putnam County did finalize an agreement, and Republic offered Clay County a better deal, then the county could switch. Commissioner Diane Hutchings joined Robinson in supporting the deal. Commissioner Wendell Davis voted against the extension. He said that regardless of the pending agreement between Putnam County and Republic, he thought Clay County could negotiate better terms with Waste Management. Doug Conkey also voted no. He said the contract for the countys waste disposal services was too important and too big to rush through. He noted that the agreement touches every Clay County resident. That left Chereese Stewart, who did not respond when Chair Davis asked for a voice vote. She initially said she could not make up her mind but voted in favor of the renewal after more discussion. She cited the uncertainty surrounding Putnam Countys negotiations with Republic Services as a factor in her decision. Doug Conkey changed his vote, making the final tally 4-1. Conkey reasoned that Putnam County officials would likely be forced to resolve their negotiations with Republic before October 1, the start of the new fiscal year. That timeline put the resolution of the Putnam County contract well before the December 31, 2016 deadline for the county manager to designate an alternative disposal site. Thursday, May 15, 2014 Lake Region Monitor 5A OFFYou will save your subscription many times over from coupons from: Hitchcocks, Harveys, CVS, Walgreens, Winn-Dixie, Ace and other advertisers ... This Coupon is for Off the yearly subscription price for the Please send me 52 weeks of the MonitorWe accept MC, VISA, American Express Must have/mention coupon for offerCall 904-964-6305 to subscribe or send check to: P.O. Drawer A Starke, FL 32091Be part of the fast growing ...when you subscribe you get 52 weeks of news from Keystone, Melrose and surrounding areas we cover Clay County government, School Board, and other informationName Address City/ST/Zip Phone #s Promote Service Business with a E mail your med-to-hi-resolution digital photo (150dpi+) & ad text to: by 5pm Monday OR bring it to:B radford County Telegraph Union County Times Lake Region Monitor( 904) 964-6305W ell help you design your ad cash/check/credit cards accepted all for only /wk covering Bradford, Union & Clay Counties a in our weekly community giveaway paper: Stand Outfrom the crowd Ee ctrify Y our Business! Reach New Customerswith aClassified P hoto Ad Licensed Bonded Insured A ctual Size Ad Sample Coleman running for District 4 commission seatMy name is Ronnie Coleman. I am the candidate running for the District 4 seat on the Board of County Commissioners. I am running to be your full time commissioner, serving you every day with community leadership, integrity and commitment. I have faithfully served this community and the people of District 4 for over 37 years. My wife Marlene and I reside in the Middleburg area of Clay County along Black Creek. We have 5 children and 15 grandchildren. I attended local public schools in Jacksonville, graduating from Robert E. Lee High School. I then continued my education at Jacksonville University majoring in business management. I also served in the U.S. Army and the Florida National Guard, both from which I was honorably discharged. I am qualified to be your county commissioner because I have been actively engaged with the board of commissioners for the last 37 years, representing my neighborhood, community, and various county committees for which I was appointed. I have stayed up-to-date with the county commission through attending meetings and watching tapings when I am unable to attend. This being a steadily increasing district, it is crucial that our leaders remain steady, strong, and consistent in these tough economic times. We must maintain our focused commitment on lowering taxes, improving our roads and public safety, and helping the school board to achieve educational excellence. Most important, elected officials must remember that they work for the taxpayers. When I take office, my only job will be that of your full time commissioner, providing every day help to the citizens of District 4 and Clay County. When voting on issues as your county commissioner, my vote will go towards what is best for this community and not what is best for special interest groups. My past and present affiliations include member of First Presbyterian Church, Clay County Cattlemens Association, Republican Men of Clay County, Middleburg area Republican Club, 2-time president of the Middleburg Civic Association, Director of the annual Middleburg 4th of July and Lighted Christmas parades, cofounder and president of the Clay County Gator Club, president of Delta Nu Alpha, awarded International Transportation Person of the Year 2 times, Clay County Transportation Advisory Commission, associate member of the University of Florida Alumni Association and 19 years as president of the Black Creek Hills Homeowners Association. I hope to be serving you soon as your full time commissioner, providing a redefined trust in keeping the citizens informed and updated to the changing issues and decisions made on their behalf. If you have any further questions you may contact me at mrcoleman9@aol.com, 904614-3752, or 904-282-2574. Thank you and God bless, Ronnie ColemanJohnson seeking District 4 commission seatMy name is Steven Johnson. I was born in Jacksonville at St. Vincents Hospital on April 12, 1970. I arrived in District 4, Clay County, Middleburg and have resided here for 43 years. I am proud to be a thirdgeneration Johnson to reside, live and raise a family in Clay County. I attended Middleburg Elementary School and J.L. Wilkinson Middle School, and graduated from Middleburg High School in the proud class of 1989. I have worked diligently at many jobs and different trades throughout my life. I have personally started, owned and operated three businesses in Clay County and succeeded in all. I am currently the owner of Artistic Designs Lawn Care LLC and am running for Clay County Commissioner District 4. I have attended many meetings giving testimony at the Jacksonville City Council, Duval County legislative delegation, JEA Council, Florida Department of Environmental Protection and the Florida Senate in Tallahassee. I have met with the EPA Criminal Division, Army Corps of Engineers, Sheriff Rick Beseler, the Clay County State Attorneys office, Rep. Travis Cummings, Sen. Rob Bradley, Rep. Charles Van Zant, Congressmen Yohos deputy director and Gov. Rick Scott. All of these meetings directly pertain to the safety and wellbeing of our children, schools, community, environment, drinking water and property values in District 4. I have helped stop the delivery and use in Clay County of EZBase, a contaminated, manufactured, trademarked product created by the Jacksonville Electric Authority based on an incorrect Material Safety Data Sheet through the aid of scientific data, analogical reports, a former EPA senior chief chemist PhD reviews and the Clay County Commission. I have started an ongoing investigation with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection about the analogically tested toxic EZBase directly adjacent to our public school playground and their source of drinking water. I have attended meetings in Keystone Heights and Palatka with the St. Johns River Water Management District pertaining to our dry lakes in District 4. I will continue to monitor and research this ongoing problem that affects our beautiful ecosystem, property values and inevitably us all. Our forgotten neighbors, Keystone Heights, District 4 need our help and support as a community in this matter. I have lived in District 4 my whole life and realize that our basic roads, drainage and community park infrastructure need our immediate attention. I realize this is an ongoing problem and I will do my best to be a voice for District 4 and get the needed funds to help resolve these problems. I believe in God, truth and honesty. I believe puppets are for children and promises are meant to be kept. My promise to Clay County: My door is always open. I will listen to our community and do my best to keep the will of the people. I will keep my faith in God, and I will seek counsel from my elders. I will uphold the safety and well-being of the public and our environment. I am a member of the NRA and support the rights of citizens to bear arms. I will research extensively why our beautiful lakes in Keystone Heights are dry. I will make it a goal to bring back the water, beauty, and value of this great county. I will respect the rights of our veterans, the great men and women who have fought to protect our freedom. I will fight for the senior citizens and our handicapped. I support private business owners and welcome new job creation in our community. I am directly involved with the county, state and community through the civic association, historical society, Facebook, email and my website. I will be the ears, eyes and voice that District 4 needs. We must stand together and keep Clay County clean, beautiful and honest for generations to come. I look forward to representing District 4 as your Clay County Commissioner. Thank you for your support. Steven R. Johnson Coleman JohnsonWASTEContinued from 1A at the airport, he said. Weve got plenty of space for them. He added that blimp traffic usually picks up during basketball season, when the vessels circle the Stephen C. OConnell Center during University of Florida games. Thomas also said his board is planning to host an annual music festival in November. The event is an outgrowth of a Montgomery Gentry concert the Florida National Guard Foundation produced in 2013. He said the inaugural event, slated for Nov. 8 will feature activities centering on aircraft and vintage cars during the day, before the evening concert.BLIMPSContinued from 4A

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Historical society Enduring Freedom veteranORANGE PARKThe Orange Park Historical Society, in its May newsletter remembered a local veteran who died in Afghanistan in 2002. A marker honoring U.S. Army Sgt. Bradley Crose is in the Veterans Memorial within Magnolia Cemetery. Crose was born at the naval hospital in Orlando. His family relocated to Orange Park where he participated in Tae Kwon Do national championship tournaments and graduated from Orange Park High School in 1988. Shortly after graduation Crose volunteered for military service with the U.S. Army, later becoming a Ranger and earning the rank of sergeant. Crose was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment at Hunter Army Airfield. His unit was sent to Afghanistan to serve in Operation Enduring Freedom. On March 2, 2002, 20 Rangers, including Crose, took off from Bagram Airfield in support of a SEAL team taking heavy fire on a ridgeline in eastern Afghanistans Shahikot Valley. Believing the SEAL team to still be at the top of the ridge, but with little accurate information to guide them, they planned to land their helicopter along the top of the ridge to extract the SEAL team. As they prepared to land, the aircraft was hit with a rocket-propelled grenade and by heavy machine gun fire. The grenade knocked out the right engine. The helicopter dropped about 20 feet to the ground. Gunfire continued, killing one door gunner and wounding both pilots and the second door gunner. The Rangers rushed to evacuate the helicopter and take up defensive positions to return fire. Crose and two other Rangers were killed attempting to exit the aircraft. Aided by the arrival of reinforcements, the ridgeline was secured and all U.S. personnel were evacuated the following evening. Six soldiers were killed in the rescue attempt. A week after his death, a memorial service was held for Crose at Pinewood Presbyterian Church in Middleburg. Over 900 people attended the service. Thousands of others, some waving American flags and others with their hands over their hearts lined Knight Boxx Road and Blanding Boulevard as the funeral procession made its way to Jacksonville Memory Gardens. The Florida Times-Union quoted Sheila Maguhn, Croses mother as saying, Theres no way you could see it without crying. It was just too touching. It was just overwhelming, the support and the love that we saw. Theres no way to tell them how much it meant to us. Crose was buried at Jacksonville Memory Gardens with full military honors. He was also awarded a Purple Heart, a Bronze Star with a V for valor and a meritorious service commendation for exceptional gallantry during combat. 6A Lake Region Monitor Thursday, May 15, 2014 Crose in front of his BY TONI DAVIS Garden Club of the Lakes KEYSTONE HEIGHTS-The Garden Club of the Lakes has awarded the Yard of the Month for May to Ken and Mary Jean Mitchell. The Mitchells moved to Keystone Heights 14 years ago from northwest Pennsylvania. They also served three years in the mission field in Africa. Ken and Mary Jean now operate the Keystone Auction Service. Mary Jean also enjoys quilting and has painted some of her favorite quilt patterns on their fence. Some of the plants in their yard are the black jack and live oaks that are the setting for a variety of plants and flowering trees. Other plants include dogwood, purple plum crepe myrtle, magnolia, citrus, azaleas, spiraea, sago palm, old world roses, camellia, and gardenias. They also have day lilies, begonias, amaryllis, impatience and hydrangea for summer color. To nominate a Yard of the Month, contact Jackie Host at 352-473-8095 or Toni Davis at 352-475-3146. Anyone with an interest in gardening is invited to the Garden Club meetings at Faith Presbyterian Church located at S.R. 21 and Southeast C.R. 21B in Midway on the second Thursday of each month at 10 a.m. Our next meeting will be in September.its been great, he said. Coursey is pursuing a degree in marine biology. Valedictorian John Crittenden recently changed his mind about his major. Initially, he was set on becoming a doctor but somewhere during a Chem 1 class while he was good at it he said he realized he didnt enjoy it. Hes headed to the University of Florida where he will pursue a degree in business. Ochesa Hall is a health sciences major who is being admitted to the University of Florida. Zachary Hawkins is returning to Santa Fe College to continue taking prerequisite courses towards an engineering degree. The Heinz sisters, Olyvia and Taylor, are both moving to Alabama this summer where they will play on the womens golf team on a combined athletic and academic scholarship. They will attend Faulkner University in Montgomery this fall. Olyvia is a health sciences major while Taylor will seek a degree in criminal justice. Anika Henanger is being offered a full scholarship to attend Northwestern University in Chicago as a journalism major. Taylor Jewett is also a health sciences major headed to the University of Florida. Florida State University welcomes Nicholas Jones this fall. Hes double majoring in religion and digital media communications. He said his dual enrollment experience was fantastic and that hes very happy he did it (earned an Associate of Arts degree). Rebekah Lampkin is a psychology major attending the University of Florida in the fall. In addition to an Associate of Arts degree, Delaina McEwen is returning to Santa Fe College to earn an Associate of Science degree in radiology. Caleb Moore is attending the University of Florida. He is majoring in philosophy while pursuing his love of music. Having earned an Associate of Arts degree, Christina Schrader is returning to Santa Fe College to earn an Associate of Science degree in radiography. She said she would absolutely no questions asked decide to do the same thing (earn an AA degree) all over again if given the choice. The majority of the professors were really fun to learn from, said Schrader. Anna Tuller said the best part of earning an Associate of Arts degree is the feeling of accomplishment. She plans to stay at Santa Fe College and continue earning credits towards a degree in English. She said she hopes one day to teach high school English.COLLEGEContinued from 1A

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he said. The quarterback position is certainly experienced, with Luke returning for his third year as starter. Where the Tornadoes will lack experience is in the defensive secondary. Reynolds said Bradford was blessed the last two years to have a veteran secondary, but graduation will leave only Rodderick Broomfield as a returning corner, though Carlton Hankerson played a lot last season as well at safety. There are six players in the mix for the four secondary positions. Its good, Reynolds said. They understand that they cant have a bad day two days in a row. There are some serious things at trying to show their hand and show off how much stronger and bigger theyve gotten. Union head coach Ronny Pruitt said he enjoys reuniting with players he sometimes doesnt come in close contact with for three to four months because of the fact they play other sports. Im glad to be back out here, Pruitt said. It gets boring after a while, not being able to be around the kids. Following is a brief look at each team:BradfordDuring a break on May 8, Luke talked about practices, saying his favorite activity is seven-onseven drills and trying to beat the defense. Luke said the worst part of practice is conditioning, but his drive to continually get better gets him through it. That always keeps me going, age of 7, said, This is the best thing ever. This is what I live for. Like Bradford and Keystone, Union saw its season come to an end in the regional playoffs. Union linebacker Casey Driggers has been ready to work on improving and getting stronger since his teams season came to an end against District 7-1A rival Dixie County. Its good to get ready and just get back into that motion, Driggers said. Everybodys just getting ready, getting fit and getting used to how we run things. Coaches, of course, are glad to get back onto the field as well. I hate the off-season, Bradford head coach Steve Reynolds said. I love to finally get back out here (and see) young kids who maybe didnt get as much playing time last year excited about coming out and time indoors in front of televisions or glued to their phones, tablets and other technological devices, but a group of teenagers are spending their afternoons in the Florida heat, running gassers and hitting each other. And you know what? They like it. Spring football practice for high schools in Florida began May 1, and returning players at Bradford, Keystone Heights and Union County were glad of it. Its great. I missed it, said Bradford quarterback Jacob Luke, who just recently finished playing baseball. This is, for real, probably my favorite sport. Nothing beats football. Keystone running back/ defensive back Brighton Gibbs, who has played football since the Regional News Regional News B Section Thursday, May 15, 2014News from Bradford County, Union County and the Lake RegionFEATURES CRIME SOCIALS OBITUARIES EDITORIAL Michael may not recognize Lowyn. But 8 months ago his cooling technique saved her life. UFHealth.orgWhen Lowyn Yancey was born, a pinched umbilical cord kept her brain from getting oxygen for several minutes. A cooling technique developed by Dr. Michael Weiss at UF Health helped her brain recover, and today shes a healthy little girl. Michael and Lowyn share an important, if invisible, connection one that helps us move medicine forward.UF Health and Shands Starke Regional Medical Center, an innovative alliance to enhance our community. 20819 11.62 x 10.5 Bradford all versions.indd 3 5/9/2014 9:25:53 AM BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer There is a conception that todays youth spend too much High school teams gearing up for 2014 season Quarterback Caleb Cox gets some work in during Juwan Crum each other during

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blanket on a bed. Theyre on the evening newsCleaning crew destroys crime scene. It turned out the womans sister had killed her, stolen her identity and moved to Georgia, Smith said. I guess she was the only living relative because no one was even looking for her. Jonathan said one of the most interesting jobs he was a part of involved a compound in Georgia that was utilized by the United Nuwaubian Naion of Moors religious sect. The 476-acre compound, which consisted of pyramids, was seized by the federal government after the sects leader, Dwight Malachi York, was arrested for child molestation and racketeering. That was probably the biggest, weirdest thing weve done, Jonathan said. Occupied evictions are never fun, Smith said. She cited one example of a daycare in Jacksonville where those involved had to wait while the owner called parents to come pick up their children. The owner knew she was being evicted, but had done nothing in response until that day officers showed up. Jonathan agreed that evictions are not enjoyable. They may be willing to move out, Jonathan said, but you always feel bad. Ive never been homeless, but what do you do when all of a sudden its, OK, theyre going to put me out of my house? Jonathan has witnessed several types of instances where people either had enough assets they couldve sold to earn money for mortgage payments, Shannon said, Weve had meth houses in Atlanta where the (law enforcement) officers wouldnt even go inside. You had to call HAZMAT and the fire department. There was the house in St. Petersburg where contractors, in the midst of cleaning, discovered the body of a dead woman wrapped in plastic underneath a Though things are easier, that doesnt make each day predictable.Never the same day twiceThose are Shannons words. Her husband said he never says hes seen it all because as soon as he does, something will come along that hes never seen before. I worked in the Panhandle, Jonathan said of his and Shannons time as contractors, so I worked in $1 million houses out on the water to shacks way up a back road and 4 miles of dirt road to get there. Theyd have barns and sheds falling in and everything else. You never knew what you were going to see. Thats probably the best part about it. Its an interesting mix. With Jonathan, Shannon and Smith all having done work in the field, they can relate to what contractors are experiencing, and sometimes it isnt pleasant. Some days, its the nastiest thing youve ever done, Jonathan said. Smith said contractors have witnessed some of the worst examples of hoarding one can imagine. She once worked in the field and remembered one house she went into. We had one where the entire kitchen was so full that they put in a new refrigerator in the dining room, Smith said. On their end table were pizza boxes stacked up. You could turn sideways to get down the hallway, and when you got to like the kids bedroom, you just literally had to jump over stuff to the bed. BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer It is the true definition of a success storya business that began in a spare bedroom, but has since expanded and earned recognition, such as being named a Best Company to Work For by Florida Trend in 2012 and Contractor of the Year by Lender Processing Services that same year. Chances are youve heard of Bradford Countys Rowe Enterprises. Chances are youre not fully sure what Rowe Enterprises is. What is this business that was founded by Jerry and Donna Rowechief executive officer and chief financial officer, respectivelyand includes their children, Jonathan Rowe and Justis Smith, as part of its management team? Good question. Smith, who is the vice president of client relations, said its hard to give people who ask what Rowe Enterprises is a simple answer. She said she can use terms such as property preservation or taking care of foreclosed properties, but they dont seem to fully explain what the company does. She can say, Prepare properties for conveyance, but added, No one knows what that means. Property Preservation Director Shannon Rowe, who is married to Jonathan Rowe, listened to Smith try to define the business and laughed, saying, We dont even know what we do. Basically, Rowe Enterprises coordinates with independent contractors it trainsand who work only for Rowe Enterprisesto provide a variety of services in regard to foreclosed, rental and real-estateowned properties. Those services can include changing locks, lawn maintenance and various repairs and clean-up tasks. Its a big conglomeration of items, said Jonathan Rowe, who is the vice president of field operations. Jonathan said the company will be contacted by a bank, for example, that has decided it needs to take action in regard to a particular property. At first, Rowe Enterprises contractors will do things such as lawn maintenance, changing locks and assessing the property. They may do some emergency repairs and take care of code violations. Basically, at that point youre just doing a protection of the property so that the value maintains, Jonathan said. When a property goes into the foreclosure stage, contractors will go inside the house, cleaning up debris and bringing it up to the guarantors standards, Jonathan said. Another level of work comes into play for real-estate-owned properties and properties that banks hold onto to sell. Jonathan said that entails heavy cleaning and possibly minor repairs and carpet replacementthings that go into making the property more marketable. Every client has a different idea of how marketable they want it to be, Jonathan said. There are banks out there thatll take a property and spend $20,000 on itto paint it, put carpet in it and plumbing fixtures and everything to make it movein ready in order to sell it. Then, there are some thatll just say, Look, just get it cleaned up enough. Instead of spending $20,000, were going to ask $20,000 less. Technological advances have made the working relationship between office staff and contractors in the field much easier. Jonathan said if the company was using the same technology it was 12 years ago, it would need three times the office staff to handle the current workload. It was once a time of relying on Polaroid photos, UPS and FedEx, and physical visits to the office by contractors. Tons of paperwork was coming in via the fax machine, which Shannon said had three members of the office staff going into work 30 minutes early to start sorting papers into stacks corresponding to clients. It took about an hour to sort the work just so everybody else could go to work on the fax machine, and then (we had) to hope all the pages were there, Shannon said. Now, contractors are entering all their information on iPads and sending it instantly to office staff. Technology has been a huge lifesaver for us, Smith said. 2B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, M ay 15, 2014 FAM PAK$699 lb FAM PAK$299 lbPRICES AVAILABLEMAY 14 MAY 20 $ 1 99 $299$349$269$229 ASST VARIETIES 14OZ 12 OZ 5LB BAG 3LB BAG Open 7 Days a Week 8am to 8pm1371 South Walnut St. (Hwy 301) Starke (904)368-9188 Amazing quality. Fantastic prices.Satisfaction Guaranteed FAM PAK$479 lb $599 FAM PAK$479lb lb $199 lb $379 lb $ 1 1LB BAG ( 352) 473-9873Open Every Day 10:30AM-9PM NO W OPEN BBQ Burgers Steaks Salads7 154 S.E. CR 21B Keystone (intersection of SR100 & 21B) www.t omsrealpitbbq.comfacebook.com/tomsrealpitbbq twitter.com/tomsrealpitbbq T ickets on Sale Now at Toms & Freedom Outdoors Bring in your church bulletin on Sunday and well donate 10% of your purchase back to your church! For more info visit: Contest Prize: 3 day Turkey/Hog Hunt on 5,200 acres in GeorgiaW e have partnered with to Live Band at Night Friday & Saturday Steak & Shrimp Night Florida Twin TheatreAll Seats $6.00 Before 6 p.m. 964-5451* CLOSED MON & TUES SCREEN 1 SCREEN 2 STARTS FRIDAY Visit us on-line at www.FloridaTwinTheatre.comFri: 7:00, 9:15 Sat: 4:45, 7:00, 9:15 Sun: 4:45, 7:00 Wed. Thurs: 7:30EXPENDABLESNOW SHOWING Fri: 8:00 Sat: 5:00, 8:00 Sun: 5:30 Wed. Thurs: 7:15 PG-13Bryan Cranston in Andrew Garfield inAmazing Spiderman 2 PG-13 Rowe Enterpises: making a mark after humble beginnings management (clockwise

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in the center of town. There were government-sponsored fiestas, dancing and music on the square nearly every evening despite the fact that Oaxaca is the poorest state in Mexico. Dining out in Oaxaca offered unexpected pleasures. We learned that the area is famous for its culinary offerings, particularly mole, a sauce that includes chocolate flavoring. I sampled the concoction finding it smooth, creamy and not too sweetover turkey at Casa Oaxaca, a lovely dining establishment featuring rooftop views of the towers of the church written completely in Spanish, which I found easy to use. We worked through exercises during the first 80 minutes of class, took a 10-minute break and then continued for another 70 minutes, followed by a 30-minute lunch. After lunch, we met with another teacher, Javier, for conversation. We were joined in conversation class by a third student, a young man named Grant, who hoped to be hired by the United States Border Patrol. He believed fluency in Spanish would make him a more attractive candidate. I enjoyed all aspects of the coursework, especially the low student/teacher ratio, which permitted more impromptu learning. Most interesting were the conversations, which often provided insight into the culture of Mexicoits religion (predominantly Roman Catholic), family life, healthcare system and government. Although the focus of our stay was studying Spanish, afternoons and evenings were free for exploring. One of the teachers at our school, Miguel, was available to drive us to local destinations and also provided transportation to and from the airport. Ever the diligent teacher, he turned each expedition into a lesson. He never seemed to tire of our endless questions and grammar snafus. Miguel took us to Monte Alban, an ancient Zapotecan capital and one of the most important Mesoamerica cities. It was founded around 500 BC and flourished for over 200 years. The site, uninhabited since colonial times, featured a great plaza, ball court, tombs and fabulous views of the surrounding mountains. Another interesting afternoon was spent at Santo Domingo Cultural Center, which is housed in a former convent that was constructed in the late 16th century. Opened in 1998, the center is composed of the magnificent Church of Santo Domingo, the Museum of Oaxacan Cultures, the Ethnobotanical Garden of Oaxaca, two libraries and conference facilities. Susan was particularly impressed by the celebratory feel of the Zocalo, a traffic-free square lasts from April through October. Due to its altitude of over 5,000 feet, Oaxaca is much cooler than lowland areas. The mild climate, more than historic and archaeological sites, is doubtless responsible for Oaxacas booming tourist trade per cent of its jobs are related to tourism. Many Americans and Canadians winter there, escaping the harsh conditions of their homelands. Susan planned to stay for three weeks, but I decided to go for one. Her intention was to arrange home stays for the weeks prior to and following the week I would be there, and move to the schools residence during our time together. However, her home-stay experience wasnt satisfactory. The home was isolated, and her hosts limited their interactions with herthe language barrier contributed to the problem. Susan checked out the schools residence prior to my arrival and was disappointed with it as well. It offered very little in the way of aesthetics and amenities. So, with the help of the school, Susan located a bed and breakfast, where we could share a room. The cost of the weeks study was reasonable$700 covered both instruction and lodging. However, I experienced sticker shock when I started searching for flightsover $1,100 for a roundtrip ticket. I flew United from Gainesville to Tampa and them from there to Houston before catching a direct flight to Oaxaca, thus avoiding a long layover in Mexico City, about 300 miles to the north. Oaxacas airport has nine gates, but is comfortable and modern. I never asked what exactly is meant by the term immersion when applied to language studies. I assumed it meant students would be required to speak only Spanish, but that is not strictly true. Classes are taught in Spanish, but students are permitted to ask questions in English. In Oaxaca, Amerispan contracts with a school called Solexico. Classes are small no more than three or four students per classwith private instruction also available. My week at Solexico began with a four-page exam, which I didnt find terribly difficult. I was quickly placed in a class with one other student, a woman my age named Tami, also retired, from California. Her vocabulary was more comprehensive than mine, but she, like me, needed more practice with conjugation of verbs and, of course, conversation. Our teacher, Adrian, was gentle and patient with our fumbling attempts to become better speakers. We received four hours of instruction dailythree of grammar and one devoted to conversation. The school uses a four-level grammar series, Thursday, May 15, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 3B Proceeds Will Benefit Youth Programs in Bradford County The West Course will open at 9:00 AM and will close at Noon Scorecards must be in by 12:00 NSCA Registered Shoot Sportsmens Class A-B-C (three places in each) ***European Rotation Start on any station you wish then proceed in numerical order until course has been completed. Registration includes NSCA & FSCA fees, lunch & awardsPRIZES BASED ON NUMBER OF SHOOTERS1-25 Shooters = $200 26-50 Shooters $250 51-75 Shooters = $300 75-100 Shooters $350 Awards to HOA, Runner-Up and 3 places in all Classes including Concurrent. Sportsmens Class awards to 3 places in A, B, and C Dr. Virgil A. BerryCHIROPRACTIC PHYSICIAN Modern methods with old-fashioned concern. Auto Accidents Work Injuries Headaches Neck and Back Pain Back & Neck Pain Clinic NEED RELIEF FROM:Call Dr. Berry Serving the Area for 21 Years 24-month CD Special $10,000 min. cu.org 1.46 % APY* 1.00 % APY* Deposits are federally insured by the NCUA, a US Government Agency, for up to $250,000. Annual Percentage Yield (APY) effective 3/13/2014 and subject to change at any time. 36-month APR is 1.45%, 540 penalty days. 24-month APR is 1.00%, 360 penalty days. Offer expires 6/30/14. 36-month CD Special Federally Insured by the NCUA. BY MARY W. BRIDGMAN Special to the Telegraph-TimesMonitor Life after 50 can be an age of exploration, offering both time and opportunity to explore tantalizing roads not taken during ones youth. Learning a foreign language is a road that beckoned during my high school and college days. I took three years of Spanish in high school, followed by another two in college, all purely elective, simply because I enjoyed the language. The ingredient missing from those early experiences was extemporaneous conversation. I found it difficult to formulate a Spanish sentence that made any sense on those few occasions when it might have been useful. Fast forward to retirement, a welcome phase of life that has allowed me to reacquaint myself with activities I havent enjoyed for years, writing being chief among them. I began to play organ and piano again, volunteered in a variety of capacities and became a Master Gardener and a certified group-fitness instructor. My husband and I moved to a smaller community and launched a few home-improvement projects. Studying Spanish wasnt on my radar screen. One day out of the blue, my friend Susan invited me to accompany her to Mexico for a Spanish-immersion study program arranged by Amerispan, a company that offers language programs all over the world. Amerispan suggested that Susan and I study in Oaxaca, a city of 500,000 people. Oaxaca is the capital and largest city of the Mexican state of the same name. It is located in the foothills of the Sierra Madre in southwestern Mexico. The area features a large number of colonial-era structures as well as native Zapotec and Mixtec cultures and archeological sites that attract many tourists. The weather in Oaxaca is mild year round, varying from 50 degrees in the evening to the mid 80s in the afternoons during the month of February, when our trip was scheduled. The rainy season Spanish language immersion: jumping in with both feet is atSTARKE INDOOR FLEA MARKET! 9'X10' BoothOffer good til 6-1-14 904-796-7081 Indoor OPEN7days a week!Hwy 301 S Just before Walmart (next to Knuckle Draggers)

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Joshua C. Williams graduated from the University of Florida on May 4, 2014. Williams, the 2011 KHHS Valedictorian, completed two degrees in three years. He graduated with Honors, with a Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy from the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences and a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from the Warrington School of Business with a Minor in Organizational Leadership for Non-Profits. At UF, Williams was a University of Florida Scholar and worked on research involving the codification of ethics into our capitalistic system and its impact on modern businesses and presented research at the Annual University of Florida Undergraduate Research Program in the spring of 2013. His record of service during his three years at the university was recognized recently as he is a recipient of a University of Florida Presidential Service Award. Williams plans to continue his education in Law and Philosophy. He has accepted a $62,000 scholarship to attend the University of Southern California Gould School of Law to earn his Juris Doctorate. Williams graduates from UF 4B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thu rsday, May 15, 2014 NOEGELS AUTO SALES, INC.1018 N. Temple Ave., Starke, FL 32091 904-964-6461 www.noegels.com*Plus tag fee, WACwww.noegels.com SELLING TRUCKS & CARS LIKE CANDY BARS24/24 SERVICE CONTRACT AVAILABLE ON ALL OUR VEHICLES Does your business have a story to tell? A product or service to sell?The Bradford County Telegraph Advertising Department can provide you with the in depth coverage you desire...Call 904-964-6305or email us atDarlene Douglassdarlene@bctelegraph.comor Kevin Millerkmiller@bctelegraph.comAdvertorial Advertising Works! Jennifer Leigh Robbins and Matthew Stuart Pauley of Starke, wish to announce the birth of their daughter, Kyleigh Mychelle Pauley on April 24, 2014 at 6:31 p.m., at the Birth Center, Shands Lake Shore, Lake City. Maternal grandparents are Gillie Robbins and Wayne Goodwin of Starke. Paternal grandparents are Stuart and Janice Pauley of Julington Creek, and Susie and Kirby Smith of Keystone Heights. Paternal great-grandparents are Grady and Gabriella Pauley of Lawtey. Paternal great-great grandparents are Margaret Pauley and the late Obed Pauley of Lawtey.Birth: Kyleigh Mychelle Pauley Williams is the   son of Mike and Rebecca Williams of Keystone Heights and grandson of Barbara Northam of Keystone Heights and Charles and Patti Williams of Palatka. Dear Editor: It was with great interest that I read the April 24th front page article Not So Fast, wherein Sheriff Gordon Smith and Sergeant Ray Shuford enlightened the public to the City of Starke illegally annexing properties south of the city limits including US 301 and more important to me, Southwest 143rd Street. Since 143rd Street was apparently annexed illegally, then any demands made by the City of Starke regarding that roadway must therefore have been done without legal ground. During construction of Knuckle Draggers Motorcycles and Accessories, Inc. at its current location in the county, the Florida Department of Transportation withdrew permission for access from US 301 and informed us we had to have our access made from 143rd Street. We then discovered we had to contact the City of Starke to get permission to access our county property from their city street. While the City Manager gave us the approval for access to the property, the permission was based on our compliance with new specifications dictated by him for entrance to and exit from the property resulting in greater costs to us for engineering and pavement. Those specifications resulted in loss of additional paved parking, very important for our motorcycle riding customers. Additionally, access was granted only if we paid for paving 143rd Street from US 301 for 185 feet to the west and 20 feet wide. The pavement on 143rd alone cost us $13,460.00, A little history is important now for those who do not know. Southwest 143rd Street provides access from US 301 to the city sewage spray field and to a sod farm which leases the spray field from Starke. That business existed before we did. The nature of its business results in many vehicles weighing tens of thousands of pounds with their loads of sod using 143rd Street. The City of Starke has not paved the street. The sod business was not required to pave it for its customers to gain access. Why were we required to do so? 143rd Street beyond our required pavement is riddled with potholes and only once in four years have I seen it graded. Now I wonder why our business was required to pave what another was not in order to gain access to its business. If Starke illegally annexed 143rd Street, did the City Manager illegally burden us with additional construction specifications and costs? I think the city owes Knuckle Draggers $13,460.00. Since the decision was made by the City Manager, I think it would be appropriate for him and his supervisor(s) to reimburse us, not the taxpayers. The taxpayers have paid enough by paying the salary of managers who made bad decisions. The city managers will of course use the excuse that they were misguided by counsel. If that is the case, hire new counsel and pay up. Jack Schenck Knuckle Draggers Motorcycles and Accessories Starke Dear Editor: Thank you friends and family of the Boy Scouts of America. Our Timucua District (made up of Putnam County, Bradford County and Keystone Heights) of the North Florida Council thanks all the members of our communities. We are grateful for the parents and grandparents who bring their sons to the meetings and support them in so many waysmany of whom are also serving as scouting leaders. We are grateful for our volunteer leaders. They do so much and with very little thanks except for the smiles on the faces of the boys they serve. We are grateful for those who contribute financially. Individuals have contributed so Does illegal annexation mean city of Starke owes business? Boy Scouts thankful for supportgenerously in our Friends of Scouting campaign. Recently we held an American Values Dinner in both Starke and in Palatka. Both were an overwhelming success. The energy and enthusiasm were wonderful. Many, many folks of our communities stepped up to invite others and the response was terrific. Once again, I thank every one of you for the effort and generosity each one has demonstrated as we move ahead in support of our boys and young men through the Boy Scouts of America. Sincerely, Richard Brinker, 2014 Chairman of the Timucua District The Kiwanis Club of Starke will be hosting its annual clay shoot on Saturday, May 17, at 9 a.m. at the Bradford Sportsmens Farm in Graham. The National Sporting Clay Association-registered shoot will award cash prizesdependent upon the overall number of shootersfor high-overall score, overall runner-up and for first, second and third places in each class (A, B and C). Registration is from 8 a.m. until 10 a.m. and costs $75, which includes 100 targets. Lunch will be available from noon until 1:30 p.m. For more information, please call Kiwanis Club of Starke member Sherry Ruszkowski at the Arc of Bradford County (904964-7699), or visit the Bradford Sportsmens Farm website at www.bsfshootingsports.com.Starke Kiwanis clay shoot is May 17The Starke campuses of Santa Fe College are once again hosting Jr. College for Kids and College for Kids this summer, and registration is open now. Jr. College for Kids, which is for rising first-, second-, thirdand fourth-graders, is scheduled for June 23-27, 8 a.m.-noon each day. College for Kids, which is for rising fifth-, sixth-, seventh-, eighthand ninth-graders, will be held Mondays-Fridays, July 7-18, from 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. (Half-day sessions are an option.) Visit the Santa Fe College Andrews Center to register for either Jr. College for Kids or College for Kids, or to pick up a scholarship application. You may also call 904-9645382. A concert featuring Alter Eagles and the three winners of the 2014 Bradford Fest Talent Showdown will be hosted by Santa Fe College on Saturday, May 17, at 7 p.m. at the Bradford High School auditorium. Alter Eagles is a tribute band that plays the music of Eagles, the group responsible for such hits as Take It Easy, Lyin Eyes, One of these Nights and Hotel California. Tickets are $10 for general admission and $15 for reserved seats. They may be purchased at the Santa Fe College Andrews Center or the North Florida Regional Chamber of Commerce. All proceeds will go to the Santa Fe Foundation to fund scholarships for Bradford County students.College for Kids registration is ongoing Alter Eagles highlight May 17 Santa Fe concert at BHS Letters editor@bctelegraph.com The Starke Police Department has joined with hundreds of other law enforcement agencies across Florida in renewing a pledge to save lives by intensifying efforts to enforce seat belt laws during the Click It or Ticket mobilization. This enforcement, which began May 12, runs through Memorial Day (May 26). Memorial Day weekend is upon us, and that means excitement in the air and summer fun, Starke Police Chief Jeff Johnson said. We hope everyone has a safe and fun holiday weekend. Most importantly, we hope everyone returns home from their fun activities alive and well. Help ensure your chances by wearing your seatbelts. Its not only the law, but its the smart thing to do. Starke Police Capt. Barry Warren said, Worn correctly, seat belts have proven to reduce the risk of fatal injury in a crash by 45 percent for front-seat passenger vehicle occupants and by 60 percent in pickup trucks, SUVs and minivans. In fact, data shows that more than three-quarters (77 percent) of passenger vehicle occupants who were in a serious crash in 2006 and were buckled up survived the crash. To learn more, please visit www.nhtsa.gov.Click It or Ticket campaign underway in Starke

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Thursday, May 15, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 5B Join the Modular Movementat Normandy Homes you can get the home you want at a price you can afford! NO REASONABLE OFFER REFUSED! TRADE-INS WELCOME!Let Normandy Homes guide you through your home buying process. Please call for an appointment with one of our home specialists. 904-783-4619 Madison Street Baptist ChurchInvites you to an Amazing Kids Praise MusicalSunday, May 18th, at 6:00 pm900 W. Madison Street Starke, FL 32091 (904) 964-7557 www.madisonstreet.orgRev. JustinKirksey, Senior Pastor t Crime t The following individuals were arrested recently by local law enforcement officers in Bradford, Union or Clay (Keystone Heights area) counties: BradfordBriana Roshae Aaron, 23, of Starke was arrested May 7 by Starke police for possession of cocaine and drug equipment, selling cocaine and public order crimes-using two-way communication device to commit a felony. According to the arrest report, a confidential buy was made from Aaron for cocaine and marijuana, with the transaction monitored and recorded on video by the police department. Bond was set at $155,000 for the charges. Isaiah Allen, 49, of Starke was arrested May 6 by Starke police for probation violation. No bond was allowed for the charge. Iven Keith Allen, 61, of Raiford was arrested May 6 by Bradford deputies on an out-of-county warrant for failure to appear for original charge of attaching an unassigned tag/license to a vehicle. Bond was set at $1,000 for the charge. Marvaleious IKeme Armstrong, 23, of Jacksonville was arrested May 6 by Lawtey police for driving without having a valid drivers license. Bond was set at $500 for the charge. John Michael Barnhard, 30, of St. Petersburg was arrested May 11 by Bradford deputies for possession of marijuana during a traffic stop for not wearing a seat belt. Angela McGaw Brown, 39, of Hampton was arrested May 10 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $500 for the charge. Christopher Duane Brown, 37, of Hampton was arrested May 10 by Bradford deputies for failure to appear. Bond was set at $1,000 for the charge. Tremaine Alvin Byrd, 29, of Starke was arrested May 7 by Starke police for child abuse causing bodily harm. According to the arrest report, Byrd is accused of spanking a girlfriends 7-year-old child with a switch hard enough to cause bruising to the back of the childs legs and buttocks. Bond was set at $50,000 for the charges. Ieashae Selest Chandler, 23, of Jacksonville was arrested May 9 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for Food Stamp fraud. Bond was set at $15,000 for the charge. Larry Earl Dobbs, 43, of Raiford was arrested May 6 by Bradford deputies for probation violation. Shawn Roy Fischer, 19, of Jacksonville was arrested May 7 by Bradford deputies for possession of a weapon or ammo by a convicted felon, possession of marijuana and possession of drugs-controlled substance without a prescription. According to the arrest report, a deputy was parked at the Kangaroo at S.R. 16 and U.S. 301 in Starke when a vehicle pulled in front of the deputys vehicle and slammed on the brakes. Fischer exited the vehicle and walked toward the deputy, saying he needed to use his phone. The deputy told Fischer the Kangaroo had a phone, but Fischer was acting strange, walking in circles and becoming angry at the deputy. He dropped a bag with marijuana on the ground as he went back to his vehicle, at which time the deputy asked him to stand in front of the car. The deputy found two pills and ammo to a revolver in the seat, and arrested Fischer. Bond was set at $9,500 for the charges. Preston Ford, 56, of Jacksonville was arrested May 12 by Bradford deputies on an out-of-county warrant from Jefferson for driving while license permanently revoked. Bond was set at $2,500 for the charge.Recent arrests in Bradford, Clay and UnionRoger Neil Gilliam, 46, of Waldo was arrested May 6 by Starke police for disorderly intoxication and for loiteringprowling. According to the arrest report, Gilliam was found behind an office building on S.R. 100 in Starke by police after a pedestrian, observing him banging on a window, called 911. Gilliam was intoxicated and wouldnt explain to the officer what he was doing behind the building. There was no apparent damage to the window or building. Bond was set at $1,000 for the charges. Theordore Franklin Hurst, 51, of Starke was arrested May 7 by Bradford deputies for failing to register as a sex offender and for failing to report a residence change as a sex offender. Hurst is a convicted sexual predator, and bond was set at $50,000 for the charges. Brandon Lee Kay, 26, of Jacksonville was arrested May 8 by Bradford deputies for failure to appear. Taurean Tivon Keel, 25, of Gainesville was arrested May 8 by Bradford deputies for probation violation. Bond was set at $1,000 for the charge. Kenneth Ash McNeal, 50, of Brooker was arrested May 6 by Bradford deputies for resisting an officer-fleeing and eluding a law enforcement officer with lights and siren active, and for driving while license suspended or revoked. According to the arrest report, a deputy spotted McNeal driving on C.R. 18 near Graham and turned around to stop him, as the deputy knew McNeals license was permanently revoked. The deputy got behind McNeal with his flashing lights, but he didnt pull over, so the deputy activated his siren. McNeal still didnt pull over, and eventually turned off C.R. 18 and made several other turns before pulling into his residence. He told the deputy he didnt stop because he didnt want his vehicle towed. Bond was set at $20,000 for the charges. Sholeke Lomeke Merriweather, 25, of Starke was arrested May 11 by Starke police for criminal mischiefproperty damage. According to the arrest report, Merriweather got into an argument with Takiesha McCutchen outside at Whispering Oaks Aptartments in Starke. During the argument, Merriweather ran over to McCutchens vehicle and kicked it, causing damage. McCutchen, 30, of Starke, then got into her vehicle and attempted to hit Merriweather with it as she moved it to another parking space. McCutchen was also arrested by Starke police and charged with aggravated assault with a weapon. Bond was set at $500 for the charge against Merriweather, while bond for McCutchens charge was set at $1,000. Michael Wayne Minton, 39, of Middleburg was arrested May 6 by Lawtey police on an out-ofcounty warrant. Bond was set at $2,012 for the charge. Kathryn Sing Monsivais, 25, of Jacksonville was arrested May 7 by Starke police for possession of marijuana during a traffic stop. Bond was set at $500 for the charge. James McCracken Nooney, 39, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 9 by Bradford deputies for possession of marijuana, possession of cocaine, possession of drugs-controlled substance without prescription, possession of drug equipment and for destroying evidence. According to the arrest report, Nooney was a passenger in a van that was stopped for speeding at C.R. 18 and S.R. 100. They deputy smelled marijuana and asked to search the van. He found a small amount of cocaine in a wallet and then observed Nooney trying to bury a Crown Royal bag in the dirt with his foot. The bag contained a larger amount of cocaine. A K9 was then called in, discovering a plastic container with more marijuana and a pipe used for smoking the marijuana. Nooney stated that all the drugs and the pipe were his, and he was arrested. Bond was set at $85,000 for the charges. Joshua W. Padgett, 22, of Starke was arrested May 12 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked, failing to register his vehicle, possession of drugs and destroying evidence. According to the arrest report, a deputy was called to Market Road in Starke about a suspicious vehicle. The deputy observed a vehicle parked in a driveway with the gate closed and ran the tag, which wasnt registered to any vehicle. When Padgett left in the vehicle, the deputy pulled him over, but Padgett tossed two objects out the window before pulling over. The objects turned out to be synthetic marijuana, recovered by a Starke police officer, who arrived to assist the deputy. Matthew Aaron Pardekooper, 27, of Starke was arrested May 7 by Bradford deputies on an outof-county warrant from Putnam for failure to pay child support. Leslie Michelle Parrish, 31, of Starke was arrested May 12 by Bradford deputies on an out-ofcounty warrant from Union for battery with no bond allowed. Dylan Chase Phillips, 18, of Gainesville was arrested May 11 by Bradford deputies for burglary. According to the arrest report, a homeowner on Northwest C.R. 233 woke up to feed her young baby when she discovered a man asleep on her living room couch. She woke up her boyfriend, who confronted Phillips, but Phillips ran out of the back door of the house. A neighbor, who had called deputies earlier to search for a man that left his home all of a sudden after being there with his daughters friend, was outside his home when he saw Phillips being chased out of the victims home. The neighbor detained Phillips, who later told law enforcement that he was drunk and didnt know how he ended up sleeping on the couch of the victims home. Mildred Elizabeth Pope, 24, of Starke was arrested May 10 by Starke police for battery and on an out-of-county warrant from Union for failure to appear on an original charge of driving without a valid license. According to the arrest report, Pope got into an argument with her husband and cut him on the forehead by throwing an unknown object at him. She then threw a picture at him, cutting his hands with the glass frame. Bond was set at $7,500 for the charges. Maurice Javonne Portis, 25, of Starke was arrested May 6 by Bradford deputies for probation violation. Patrice Lynette Randall, 43, of Kissimmee was arrested May 9 by Bradford deputies for two charges of probation violation. Lishawn Likeith Sharon, 27, of Palatka was arrested May 8 by Lawtey police for two charges of possession of marijuana, possession of drug equipment, fraud-using a false name, driving while license suspended or revoked and for an out-ofcounty warrant. Bond was set at $106,000 for the charges. Joseph Brian Stafford, 44, of Perry was arrested May 11 by Bradford deputies for probation violation. Vincent Wayne Sutherland, 36, of Alachua was arrested May 7 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for welfare fraud. Bond was set at $1,000 for the charge. Clara Denne Tedder, 48, of Lawtey was arrested May 6 by Bradord deputies for aggravated assault with a weapon. According to the arrest report, Tedder and her boyfriend started arguing before Tedder began packing her clothes to leave the residence. When the boyfriend asked her to not take his movies, she started screaming and striking him with a shoe. She then went outside to a shed, returned with an axe and began to chase the boyfriend and his teenage son around the home. They both went outside and called law enforcement, but could hear Tedder breaking things inside the home. When deputies arrived, Tedder claimed the victim had actually started the argument by demanding she make him some food, grabbing her by the arm, head-butting her, and throwing her against a fireplace before she went outside to get the axe in self-defense. In the report, the deputy stated he didnt observe any injuries or markings on Tedder that were consistent with her story and arrested her for assault. Bond was set at $25,000 for the charge. Matthew Leon Wilkerson, 29, of Raiford was arrested May 9 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $5,000 for the charge. Allen Lee Williams, 32, of Lawtey was arrested May 12 by Bradford deputies for contempt of court-violation of an injunction protection domestic violence and for possession of cocaine. According to the arrest report, the cocaine was found on Williams when deputies arrested him on the contempt of court charge.Keystone/MelroseDavid Austin, 42 of Keystone Heights was arrested May 12 by Clay deputies for battery. Sarah Drawdy, 19, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 11 by Clay deputies for an out-ofcounty warrant. Delcia Fermin-Gonzales, 56, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 9 by Clay deputies for battery on a person 65 years or older. According to an arrest report, Fermin-Gonzales had an argument with her roommate and then attacked the victim with a stun gun. Curtis Franke, 24, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 8 by Clay deputies for contempt of court. Earl Murby, 49, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 9 by Clay deputies for aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. According to an arrest report, Murby and another man were arguing about money when Murby pulled out a gun and fired five rounds toward the victims camper. Murby then walked over to the camper and fired two additional rounds, while threatening the other mans girlfriend. Marc Perreault, 35, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 7 by Clay deputies for a probation violation. Natalee Strombeck, 22, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 7 by Clay deputies for failure to appear. Travis Vazquez, 25, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 12 by Clay deputies for possession of not more than 20 grams of cannabis and reckless driving. Tony Waters, 50, of Keystone Heights was arrested on May 8 by Clay deputies for discharging a firearm in public, possession of not more than 20 grams of cannabis, battery and possession of drug paraphernalia. According to a sheriffs office report, Waters confronted three men who were doing wheelies on dirt bikes and ATVs in the dry bed of Lake Geneva near his home. With his granddaughter watching, Waters struck two of the men in the sternum with the barrel of a 12-gauge shotgun. As the victims fled the scene, Waters fired three shots over their heads. A Clay County deputy wrote that before interviewing Waters about the incident, he patted down Waters for his own safety. During the search, the deputy found marijuana and a pipe in Waters pants pockets.

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Weve got to find a way to get more guys involved and more guys on the field, and be able to have a little more gas in the fourth quarter, Pruitt said. Younger players will have to step up, but Driggers is confident in how things will play out. Some of them still have a lot of learning and growing to do, Driggers said, but I think well do very well. Union caps the spring by hosting a classic against Duval Charter on Friday, May 23, at 7 p.m. Youre glad to get on the field and actually hit somebody whos not wearing the same colors as you, Driggers said. stake. Theyre trying to learn. Their noses are in the playbook. Reynolds is excited about the fact he has seven rising seniors battling for spots along the offensive line, saying, Were getting as much production from the offensive line as we have the last three or four springs. In looking at all of the players attending practices, Reynolds said they are eager to learn from coaches and fellow players and diligent in attending meetings and fulfilling other requirements. Luke said its a good, closeknit group. Weve all got each others backs no matter what, Luke said. Were going to be there for each other. Bradford will play an intra-squad Scarlet and Gray scrimmage on Thursday, May 15, at 6 p.m. (Admission is free.) The Tornadoes will cap the spring with a three-team classic at Newberry High School on Friday, May 23. Play begins at 7 p.m. with Bradford taking on Dunnellon. Dunnellon will then play Newberry before Newberry plays Bradford. Its going to just be great to be out there in another game-day situation, Luke said. Nothing beats game days.KeystoneThe Indians are coming off of a district championship season, which provides a good spark for spring practices, Gibbs said. However, he also noted that the team will lose quite a few seniors, so the 2014 team cant get caught up in what happened last season. Gibbs mindset is, Lets just get it started, boys, (and) not think about last year, not think about the past. Just start off fresh and make things happen for us and make our own name. Keystone loses 14 players from last season and could count on a lot of newcomers. Weve got a big freshman class, head coach Chuck Dickinson said. Im looking at a lot of them this spring to see if they can play or not. There are several areas of concern for Keystone. The Indians will have to replace quarterback Blake Valenzuela and tight end Micah Brown, as well as find several new starters on the offensive line to play alongside Joe Pace and Roy Williams. On defense, the Indians currently have no returning linebackers, with Sam Anderson sitting out this spring as he 6B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, May 15, 2014 Dr. Anubha Gupta received her family medicine training from Jamaica Hospital Medical Center in New York City and her fellowship training in geriatric medicine from the VA Medical Center in Gainesville. She received her medical degree from Terna Medical College, Navi Mumbai, India. Dr. Gupta will be joining the staff of PALMS MEDICAL GROUP facilities in Starke every Tuesday. She will be seeing pediatric and adult clients for routine health maintenance and sick visits. Dr. Guptas husband is attending the University of Florida with a Fellowship in Pediatric Cardiology & Pediatrics ICU. The joy in the doctors lives is their toddler son. They are making their home in Gainesville, hopefully for a very long time! NEW DOCTOR IN TOWN Continued from 1B recovers from an ACL injury. Thats a big concern, Dickinson said, along with depth in the secondary. Defensive backs Gibbs and Ray Trimble return, plus Hogg also got quite a bit of experience as a starter late last season. Some of those players in the secondary, though, will be counted on to play key positions on offense as well. Youre going to have to know more than one position, but weve always been that way, Dickinson said. So far, this spring has involved a lot more teaching as coaches are evaluating so many younger players. Last year, going into the spring, I didnt have to spend as much time on the teaching end of it, Dickinson said. Were trying to keep stuff simple this year. Right now, weve got kids who dont understand the routes and things like that, but itll come. Gibbs said his fellow players are like brothers, and he cant wait to start the season with them. However, he knows the team is not where it needs to be just yet. Weve just got to keep working hard every practice and not give anything less than 110 percent, Gibbs said. Keystone will travel to St. Augustine to play a classic against Menendez on Friday, May 23, at 7 p.m. Im ready to hit somebody else and get our season started, Gibbs said.UnionThe Tigers lose 17 players from last season, but Pruitt doesnt see a lot of difference between the players out this spring and the ones who come out in springs past. They are coachable and do whatever is asked of them, Pruitt said. This year, though, the Tigers seem to be benefiting from new strength and conditioning coach Mark Williams. Hes got these kids pumped up about getting strong and getting in shape, Pruitt said. Driggers is just pumped up to be out on the field again, saying, I like being able to spend time with the guys Im going to be playing with over the fall and just growing with them and getting better. Battling it out through tough, hot practices is not always easy, Driggers said, but he added it just takes a certain mindset to be successful. You can always push harder than you think, he said, adding, If you push through it, it just makes you stronger. The right mindset is key also in that some players find themselves learning positions theyre not familiar with. For example, players who have most of their experience on the defensive side of the ball are getting a look at offensive line, Pruitt said. Were putting them in different roles and trying to teach them, Pruitt said. Theyre picking it up. Theyve got great attitudes. There are key roles to be filled on the offensive side of the ball as just two starters return on the offensive line and one returns to the offensive backfield. Defensively, the Tigers have issues, too. Driggers is the only returner at linebacker, while the secondarys most experienced player returning is probably Kel Galloway, who played a limited role last year. Isaiah Johnson also brings experience to the secondary, but he has been and will be such an important part of the offense. Josh Smith works on 904-368-0687 ph 904-368-0689 fax MARGARET ANDERSON1011 N. Temple Ave. Starke. FL (US 301 North)Family Law & Will Preparation30 years experience Margaret will continue to serve clients in Alachua County as well as Bradford & Union counties

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of Santo Domingo. Although our lodgings in Oaxaca were inexpensive$150 per person per week for a shared double roompremium lodgings are available. Tami stayed at a nice hotel for $150 per night. Another student, who was sent for Spanish studies by his employer, stayed at an even more impressive luxury hotel, Quinta Real. The Quinta had the look of a former convent or monastery and reminded me of paradors that Id stayed at in Europe. During our stay in Oaxaca, Susan and I felt completely safe. Before we left, we checked for U.S. Department of State travel advisories and found none related to Oaxaca. We often saw police patrolling the city on foot, accompanied by leashed dogs. One evening, when we couldnt find a restaurant we wanted to try, we asked one of the policemen to help us. He promptly radioed someone to get the information, and together with several of his colleagues, escorted us to the place. On my last evening in Oaxaca, Susan and I joined four other students from the school for a buffet dinner and a colorful folk dance exhibition at Quinta Real. During one of the numbers, a male performer grabbed my hand and led me to the stage to dance. Several others in the audience accepted similar invitations, not quite understanding exactly what we were doing, but getting the hang of it in a spirit of international goodwill. I cant say that I had a breakthrough learning experience with Spanish during my week in Oaxaca. By far, the most frustrating moments came during conversation, when the vast expanse of my ignorance hit full force. Id sit in silence, white noise filling my brain as I struggled to formulate the words needed to express my thoughts. However, I can say that my Spanish, limited though it may be, proved more than adequate for shopping, ordering meals, taking taxis and asking directions. I had an enjoyable time in Oaxaca, an intense and lively learning experience. After a week of study, I understood that fluency in Spanish would take me years to attain. With pocket translators readily accessible on my Smartphone, Ill probably never have sufficient motivation to learn, but theres more to learning another language than wrestling with grammatical rules. Ill always treasure memories of simple human interactions with people of another culture, from a different country, who spoke and taughta mellifluous language not my own.William Curtis Watson and Flossie Nix Watson. She moved to Starke around 1955. Doris worked for Rowe Enterprises until retiring in 2009, where she was famous for home cooked lunches and also breakfast and lunches for the hunters at Moccasin Quail Preserve. She was a member of Kingsley Lake Baptist Church in Starke. She is preceded in death by her parents, Curt and Flossie Watson, by her husbands, Olan Rowe and Melvin Summerlin and two brothers: Frank Watson and James E. Watson. She is survived by: her daughter, Sharon (Al) Coston of Starke, three sons, Jerry (Donna) Rowe of Starke, Gary (Mary) Rowe of Moyock, N.C., and Mel Summerlin of Gainesville, a step-son, Jimmy (Aileen) Summerlin of Jacksonville, a sister, Theresa Watson Reardon of Albany, Ga., a brother, William Russell (Evelyn) Watson of Hampton, two sister-inlaws, Joan Watson of Graham, and Carolyn Watson of Ray City, Ga., 13 grandchildren; and 14 greatgrandchildren. She is also survived by many loving cousins, nieces, nephews and friends in Florida and Georgia. Funeral Services will be held on Sunday, May 18, at 2:00 p.m. at Kingsley Lake Baptist Church, State Road 16 East in Starke, with Pastor Zeb Cook officiating. Interment will be at Crosby Lake Cemetery in Starke. Visitation will be held on Saturday, May 17, from 6:00-8:00 p.m. at Jones Gallagher Funeral Home, 620 E. Nona Street, Starke. In lieu of flowers donations may be made in memory of Doris to: Kingsley Lake Baptist Church, 6289 Mary Dot Lane, Starke, FL. 32091 or to Haven Hospice, 4200 N.W. 90th Blvd, Gainesville, FL. 32606. Arrangements under the care of nephew, Clay Watson owner of Watson Funeral Home, 426 W. Wade Street, Trenton, FL. 32693 (352) 463-8888, and assisted by nephew, Doug Watson. Online condolences or to sign the guest book at www.watsonfhtrenton. com   PAID OBITUARY Thursday, May 15, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 7B Funeral with Burial20 Ga. Metal Casket (4 colors) Vault, Open & Closing Grave, Graveside or Chapel Service with one night visitation.............$5,595Funeral with Cremation(Rental Casket with Visitation prior to Services).................................$2,895Direct Cremation with Memorial ServiceServices held at Archer Memorial Chapel............................................$1,895 Archer Funeral Home Pre-payment accepted Within Your Means Now, Peace of Mind Always 55 North Lake Avenue Lake Butler, Florida 32054 Serving Families in North Florida since 1973 S TARKE OFFICE OPEN 8:30 to 5:30 MON-FRIHwy 301 North, Starke 904-964-2010 (Next to Best Western) The areas largest supplier of Colored GraniteWhen Quality Counts, You Can Count On UsPrimary Location in Lake City at 561 NW Hilton Ave.Member of Better Business Bureau Monument Builders of North America Florida Monument BuildersFL Lic. # F037700 SR-230 E (2 miles east of US-301)B anquet Hall Driving Range Check out our web pagewww.starkegolf.com M emberships Available E xcellent Driving RangeP ro Shop Gift CertificatesG olf Lessons by AppointmentP rofessionally Run Tournaments H ome of the Strawberry Invitational Li ke us on facebook D ont Forget Flowers, Occasions and More...Flowers Live Plants Silks Balloons Gift Baskets Greeting Cards (904) 368-9725 368-9739 fax923 N. Pine Street Starke(formerly Tammys Flowers)come to starting at $20 www.atpflowers.com Owners Vince & Iana Adrienne Patterson d Obituaries d Grace BerrySTARKEGrace South Berry 97, died Monday, May 5, 2014. She was born in Balwin, Miss. on June 23, 1916, and lived in Starke for the past 22 years. She is the daughter of the late B.C South and Kate Hifflin South. She worked as a bookkeeper for Plough Inc. She is preceded in death by her husband: Virgil A. Berry. She is survived by: her step son Dr. Virgil Berry of Starke; sister, Barbara Lumpkin of Oklahoma City; one granddaughter; one grandson; and one great-granddaughter. Archer Funeral Home is in charge of all arrangements, Burial will be held at a later date.   Florence SilcoxNORWALK, OHIO Florence H. Silcox, 94, of Norwalk, Ohio, passed away Tuesday evening, April 29, 2014 in Twilight Gardens Home.   She was born April 2, 1920 in Havana, Ohio to the late George N. and Myerl R. (Perry) Baker, and was a lifelong area resident.   Florence was the Valedictorian of the North Fairfield High School Class of 1937.   She was a member of St. Peter Evangelical Lutheran Church, Norwalk, and was a former employee of Schilds IGA in Norwalk.   Florence enjoyed playing cards, bingo, reading, embroidery, baking, and studying her Bible, and spending time with her family.   Florence was preceded in death by her husband, Oscar A. Silcox in 1998, and by her sister, Vernice Roth.   She is survived by: her daughters, Yvonne (Daniel) Obringer of Norwalk, and Mary (Thomas) Osborn of Keystone Heights.   She is also survived by her grandchildren, Kathleen Miller, Amy (Sean) Berry, Jeffrey (Amy) Obringer, and Gregory (Ann) Obringer, and by her great-grandchildren, Colleen, Erica, and Kennan Miller, Larissa, Alaina, Ian, Brenna, Anessa, Sela, and Mara   Berry, Colin, Quinn, Matigan, Samantha, Sydney, Blake, Garrett, and Eli Obringer.   Services were held Saturday, May 3, at 11:00 a.m. in St. Peter Evangelical Lutheran Church, 243 Benedict Avenue, Norwalk.   Rev. David Connor officiated.   Interment was in St. Peter Lutheran Cemetery in Pontiac.   Memorial contributions may be made to Stein Hospice Service, 1200 Sycamore Line, Sandusky, Ohio 44870, or to St. Peter Evangelical Lutheran Church, 243 Benedict Ave., Norwalk, OH 44587. Walker Funeral Home, 98 West Main Street, Norwalk was in charge of arrangements. Online condolences may be made by going to www.edwalkerfuneralhome.com.PAID OBITUARYDoris SummerlinSTARKE Doris Watson Summerlin, age 82, died peacefully on Saturday, May 10, 2014 after an extended illness. She was born on Sept. 21, 1931 in Lakeland, Ga., to We the family of the late Vera Aaron would like to thank each and everyone for all of the love youve shown to our family. We could never thank you enough. We will forever be   so very grateful to each and every one of you.   We would like to give a special thanks to Haile Funeral Home and staff for going above and beyond their call of duty during our time of bereavement. We would also like to give a special thanks to Dr. Joelle Simon-Greenwood for always being there for Vera. We will never forget any of you. Thanks again The Family of the late Vera Aaron Card of ThanksJesse WheelerSTARKE Mr. Jesse Thomas Wheeler, age 67, of Starke passed away Wednesday, May 7, 2014 at Shands UF from injuries sustained in an automobile accident. Mr. Wheeler was born on Jan. 20, 1947 in Nashville, Tenn. to the late Herschel Fred Wheeler, Sr. and Nellie Bell (Thomas) Wheeler and was a lifelong area resident. Prior to retirement he was the meat market manager for Winn Dixie and later worked for Hitchcocks as their meat market manager. Jesse served six years in the Florida Army National Guard and operated a booth at the Waldo Flea Market where he made many friends. He was a Gator fan and a NASCAR fan especially Dale Earnhart. Jesse was a very involved grandfather, enjoyed fishing and along with his family had a wildlife sanctuary. In addition to his parents he was preceded in death by his brother Herschel Fred Wheeler, Jr. Survivors are: sons, Richie Wheeler and Devin Wheeler both of Starke; brothers, Paul (Pam) Wheeler of Starke, Jimmy (Cindy) Wheeler of Starke, Donald J.J. (Linda) Wheeler of Keystone Heights; grandson, Konley Snyder of Starke; close friend and mother of his children, Glenda Wheeler of Starke. A casual memorial service will be held on Saturday afternoon, May 17, at 4 oclock in the Dewitt C. Jones Chapel of Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home, 620 Nona Street, Starke, with Reverend Gene Bass officiating. In lieu of flowers contributions may be made in is memory to your favorite charity. Arrangements are by Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home of Starke 904-964-6200. On-line condolences may be left at www. jonesgallagherfh.com. PAID OBITUARYContinued from 3B

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8B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, May 15, 2014 EQUAL HOUSING OP PORTUNITY. All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex or national origin, or an in tention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing cus tody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate, which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimina tion, call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777, the tollfree telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. For further information call Florida Commission on Human Relations, Lisa Sutherland 850-488-7082 ext #1005 Commercial FOR RENT PROFESSIONAL OFFICE, 1,500 sq.ft. $1,000/mo.up to 3,000 sq.ft. Contiguous $2,000/ mo. Warehouse 3,000 sq. ft. $800/mo. Smith & Smith Realty. 904-9649222. RETAIL SPACE in busy strip center. 1,000 sq.ft. and 2,000 sq. ft. units. South HWY 301 front age, across from the KOA Campground. Call 352235-1675. DOWNTOWN STARKE Pro $315 per month. Conference room, kitchen, utili ties and more provided. 904-364-8395. 3BR/2BA living room, din ing room, family room, laundry room. Back porch is screened in. Storage shed. Large fenced & paint. A/C. Immaculate condition. $120,000.00. Near downtown & schools. 823 Parkwood Place. 912-843-2194 or 912-281-9053 2007 2 BED DWMH Like new cond. w/ low-e windows. $39,900 setup & delivered 904-259-4663 Bradford Union Clay 40Notices 41Auctions 42M otor Vehicles & Accessories43RVs & Campers 44Boats &ATVs 45Land for Sale 46Real Estate Out of Area 47Commercial Property (Rent, Lease, Sale) 48Homes for Sale 49Mobile Homes for Sale 50For Rent 61Scriptures 62Vacation/Travel 63Love Lines 64Business Opportunities65Help Wanted 66In vestme nt O ppo rtunities67Hunting Land for Rent 68Carpet Cleaning 69Food Supplements 70Money to Lend 71Farm Equipment 72Computers & Accessories51Lost/Found 52Animals & Pets53AYard Sales53BKeystone Yard Sales53CLake Butler Y ard Sales54Produce 55Wanted 56Antiques 57For Sale 58Child/Adult Home Care59Personal Services 60Home ImprovementWord Ad Classified Tuesday, 12:00 noon Classified Display Tuesday, 12:00 noon964-6305 473-2210 496-2261 C lassified Advertising should be paid in advance unless credit has already been established with the newspaper. A $3.00 service charge will be added to all billing to cover postage and handling. All ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser at the time of placement. However, the classified staff cannot be held responsible for mistakes in classified advertising taken by phone. The newspaper reserves the right to correctly classify and edit all copy or to reject or cancel any advertisements at any time. Only standard abbrevations will be accepted. TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED USE YOUR PHONE Are you looking for an AFFORDABLE Medicare Supplement solution?WE HAVE IT!SENIORS COMPARE (Monthly Premium)$216 (Monthly Premium)$55 1-800-942-2003CALL TODAY! DURRANCE PUMP QUALITY SERVICE SINCE 1964 Pumps Sales Parts Service STATE LICENSE #1305 N EED C ASH F AST! E mail your med-to-hi-resolution digital photo (150dpi+) & ad text to: by 5pm Monday or bring it to:B radford County Telegraph Union County Times Lake Region Monitor( 904) 964-6305 c ash/check/credit cards accepted all for only /wk c overing Bradford, Union & Clay Counties a in our weekly f ree c ommunity shopper: Target your audience quickly (904) 964-6305 (352) 473-2210 (386) 496-2261 Classified Ads Where one call does it all! Want to reach people?Nows the perfect time to see just how well our classifieds can work for you. Whether youre looking for a great buy or a great place to sell, call our classified department today.904-964-6305Ask for Mary Fins, Fur & Tails tumbler scaler the deheading Since it is bream fishing season, it is also bream cleaning season. For those who ardently look for the beds, catch them in large numbers and eat them, the cleaning chore can be much more daunting than the catching part. These are the finned creatures that can keep the attention of the youngest members of the family who want to go fishing, but quickly become bored when it comes to waiting. Shellcrackers, redbellies and bluegills are all excellent eating. Just do not try to fillet them, because they are just a little too small for the boning procedure. Learn where the pin bones are and separate them after cooking, and the backbone presents no problems. Without filleting them, you will necessarily scale them, which, along with the bones, actually enhances the taste. Unfortunately, it also makes the process a little more tedious and adds to the daunting nature of cleaning large numbers of small fish. Some fishermen who love catching and eating bream have become rather efficient at the cleaning process, and Dennis Burkhalter is one of these fishermen. Burkhalter can clean a large bunch of panfish without making a big mess, and he can do it quite efficiently as well. Burkhalter uses a tumbler scaler, which advertises that it can scale 50 fish at a time. However, Burkhalter prefers to use groups of 20. It takes less time and does a better job, he said. After the scaling process, Burkhalter removes the fish one at a time and places them on a modified paper cutter, as shown in the accompanying photo.   He raises the lever, places the fish into position and with one cut, he cleanly removes the fishs head. This could not be done with the original paper-cutting blade because it typically has a square or chamfer edge. In order to cut fish flesh, the blade needs a beveled edge like a knife. Burkhalter removed the papercutting blade and put a sharp, knife-like edge on it.   The process is smooth, clean and completed in microseconds. Another tool that Burkhalter uses is a citrus spoon. The spoon is shaped like any other spoon, but it has serrated edges.   The spoon is perfectly sized to clean the body chamber of panfish, and with one scoop into the fishs body, it needs only to be washed off to complete the cleaning process in record time.Making quick work of cleaning breamOutdoors outlookThe big female bass are less common at local tournaments, and the bass bite has tapered off locally in late spring. The cool water-loving crappie are gradually seeking the colder temperatures in deeper water, which is also slowing their bite. However, May starts the beginning of bream season. The warmer weather triggers these panfishs spawning instinct, and they will readily pop a cork under the water. These are great targets for those youngsters that are too impatient for bass. The shellcrackers, which are the largest of the three types, will probably bed around full moon in many of the local lakes. The bluegills, which are just as broad, but not as thick in body size, will peak their bedding habits for the month around the same moon, but they are so prolific that they are already spreading their pungent mating smell around the shorelines.   The redbellies, which are the smallest, but also the prettiest of the three, will follow bluegill habits, but in the creeks and rivers in our local areas. K.J. Stormant and Jim Thornton launched their boat at Sampson Lake on May 13 in the afternoon and bream fished the docks and lake cover of Sampson with little luck.   However the wind made it difficult for them to stay in place, so they sought refuge in the canal between Sampson and Rowell. Finally, they found a few places where it was difficult to keep crickets on their hooks, and they ended up with a cooler half full of keepers. More telling was the fact that some of the fish appeared to be full of roe.   Tournament resultsAt the April 29 Bald Eagle Bass Tournament, Andy Spartman and Darren Cowart placed first and also landed the big bass, while Evan Hurst and Joe Yarborough placed second. Cody Black and Robert Black took first in the May 7 Bald Eagle event, with Hurst and Yarborough placing second. Ed Prader placed third, while Erick Dougherty and Emily Canto landed the big bass. At the April 30 Sampson Lake Bass Tournament, Zack Smith and Richard Kingsberry placed first, while Bradon Gray and Cason Noles placed second. Sam Sibley and Donnie Brooks made up the third-place team, while Jonathon Nash and Randal Alvarez were fourth. Mike Christie landed the big bass. Trevor Corbitt and Drew Rogers landed the big bass at the May 8 Sampson Lake Bass tournament and placed first. Alvarez and Mike Rhoden placed second, while James Robinson and Tyler Carr were third. Braden Esimer and Tommy Wallace placed fourth. Local fishermen continue to make good showings in major charity tournaments in the Palatka area. The April 26 NEFAR tournament, which gives its proceeds to Haven Hospice, featured a good number of locals that finished with recognition, including Timmy Givens, Coy Givens, Wally Johns, Mark Roberts, Glen Barnes, C.K. Ryan, Chuck Foster, Richard Barnes, Robert Black, Cody Black, Treg Johns and John Mobley. The Save Rodman Tournament, organized to support the preservation of Rodman Lake, gave up the winning position to Wally Johns of Starke and Mark Roberts of Middleburg. Tight lines until next week.

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Thursday, May 15, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 9B BIGGEST SALE EVER All homes 20% off. With free furni ture. Ends 5/20 904-259-4663 waynefriermacclenny. com 2008 14x70 2 BED $19,900 Setup & delivered. 904-259-4663 waynefriermacclenny. com BRAND NEW 28x80 4 bed $59,900 28x60 3 bed $49,900 Setup w/AC, steps & skirting 904-259-4663 waynefriermacclenny. com USED DOUBLE WIDE will move free. Only $9,900. 904-783-4619 DOLLAR & A DEED can get you a new 3BR/2BA. Only $350/month. 904-7834619 WILL MOVE FOR FREE. 16x80 3BR/2BA. Only $16,900. 904-783-4619 16x80 3BR/2BA. $1500/ down, $250/month. 904-783-4619 NEVER BEFORE TITLED 2013 4BR Palm Harbor only $550/month. 904-783-4619 PALM HARBOR 4BR/2BA. Over 2,300 sqft. Only $450/month. 904-7834619. SUITE OF OFFICES IN CLUDES Kitchen, Show er, Washer Dryer. Downtown STARKE $1000/ MO. For information Call 904-364-9022. PERMANENT ROOMS for rent at the Magnolia Hotel. Both refrigerator and microwave. Special rates, by the month. Call 904-964-4303 for more information. 3BR/2BA living room, din ing room, family room, laundry room. Back porch is screened in. Storage shed. Large fenced & paint. A/C. Immacu late condition. No pets other than service ani mals. $950/month plus deposit. Near downtown & schools. 823 Parkwood Place. 912-843-2194 or 912-281-9053 MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT starting at $525 per month. Hidden Oaks, Lake Butler. Call 386496-8111. NICE MOBILE HOMES in Lake Butler & Starke 2 & 3 BR single wides, fenced. 2BR/2BA. Lake front. Deposit required. Call 678-438-6828. WE HAVE 2 OR 3 bed room MH, clean, close to prison. Call 352-468-1323 2BR MH. CR 221 OFF 301. $475/month Please call 352-468-1455 3BR/1.5BA VERY CLEAN. Large yard, perfect for a family. $550/month plus deposit. 904-364-8135 50 HOUSE for rent. In good condition. For more information call, 904-290-0083 OR 904-964-5006. LIVE IN THE COUNTRY. 14 X60 MOBILE HOME. 2BR/1BA. CH/A, very clean. $300 deposit, $550/ mo. Call 904-782-3380 or 904-451-5236. CLEAN 2BR HOMES in Keystone. Available May 29. From $525 up to $600/ mo. has lake access. Includes lawn & mainte nance. Call 352-478-8321 2BR/1BA APT. CH/A. Electric range, refrig. Wall to wall carpet. $400/mo. sec. deposit. References, call 904-966-1334. NICE FURNISHED ROOMS for rent. Low income, SSI is welcomed. Own bathroom, kitchen, large out door sitting porch. Dis nursing assistant in home. $250 Call 904-769-8077 anytime. 2BR/1BA MH. $450/mo. $450 deposit First, Last and Security required to move in. Located on CR 364-7107. 3BR/2BA DW. $550/month, $550/security deposit, plus $150/deposit on electric. Call 904-3646145 & leave message. 3BR/2BA DW 12273 SE 21st Ave., Starke. $650/ month plus $650/security. Out in country. Service animals only! 904-9648637. IN LAWTEY 4BR/2BA CH/A, water softener. $750/mo., 904-364-9869. OFFICES FOR LARGE STAFF. Includes living qtrs, showers, kitchen, washer & dryer. This is a living qtrs. $1000/month. Call 904-364-9022 2BR/1BA SW. CH/A $600/ mo. $300/deposit. Be tween Lake Butler & Rai ford. 904-305-8287 or 904-263-3999 2BR/2BA SW. Outside Starke city limits. CH/A. $500/mo. $500/deposit. 352-235-6319 3BR/2BA SW. Outside Starke city limits. CH/A. $575/month plus $575/ deposit. Please call 352-235-6319 KEYSTONE HEIGHTS. 4BR/2BA DW. In High Ridge. CH/A. $650/month plus $650/deposit. Please call 352-235-6319 MELROSE 2BR/2BA. Conveniently located in town. Clean. $675/month plus last & security. Please call 352-235-1143 or 352475-3094 KEYSTONE 2BR/1BA. 1 acre fenced. SW w/room addition. Clean. $525/ month plus last & security. Please call 352-475-3094 or 352-235-1143 Yard SalesYOUTH CAMP FUNDRAIS ER. First Baptist Church of Raiford Sat., May 17 8am-12pm. Yard sale inside fellowship hall (rain yard sale before going to camp and all must go! Anyone interested in buying everything come make a reasonable offer and take it all! SAT 8AM-2PM. 403 South Cherry St. Come and see. BIG 2 FAMILY YARD SALE. 347 SE 71st Street, Starke. Crystal Lake home sites. Sat & Sun 9am-4pm. FRI & SAT 9AM-3PM. Lo cated near Southside Elementary on SR 100. SalesMOVING SALE IN MEL ROSE Sat 10am-4pm, no early sales!! Everything goes at low low prices! Garden and woodwork ing shop tools, furniture, kitchen items, electronics, saws, and much more; about 150 items, no junk! 6026 Dogwood Lane off SR 26 in Melrose, 3/4 mile town. For SalePURE BRED Americana, Deleware, and Red Sex Links for sale. $1.75 each. Hatching eggs available. 386-496-2985 HOME DAYCARE all hours. Great rates. 30 plus years experience. All hours, lots of TLC. HRS certified, CPR certified and First 496-1062. CLARK FOUNDATION REPAIRS, INC. Correction of termite & water-dam aged wood & sills. Level ing & raising Houses/ Bldgs. Pier Replacement & alignment. We do all types of tractor work, excavation and small demolition jobs. Free Estimates: Danny (Buddy) Clark, 904-545-5241. HOW TO COUPON: Save hundreds of dollars monthly. Learn couponing the correct way. In local area for limited time. See: www.how-to-coupon.com or text: 386-546-8737 No Calls Please! DRIVERS: $5,000 SIGN-ON BONUS! Great Pay! Consistent Freight, Great Miles on This Regional Account. Werner Enterprises: 1-855-515-8447 SECURITY (NIGHT SHIFT), FOR SAT/SUN/HOLI DAYS. We are an EEOC, drug free workplace. We offer dental & health insur ance, paid holiday and vacation. Apply at Gil man Building Products, CR 218 Maxville, FL. or fax resume to 904-2897736 LOCAL STARKE BUSI NESS is looking to hire a part-time and/or full-time staff member. Optional shifts are available and Military Veterans are wel come to apply! We are looking for a self-starter, goal oriented person with the willingness to learn. No experience necessary! E-mail application request to vtoddf@gmail.com UF DAIRY UNIT seeks milkers/farm work. 40 hours per week. Possibility of working days, nights, weekends and/or holidays. Must have reli able transportation. Back ground check required. Apply at 13200 NW 59th Drive Gainesville, FL. 32653 NEED HANYMAN for some jobs on inside home and outside work. Must have references. For more info please call 904-3680659 NEED LIVE IN SITTER for 2 children. Keystone area. Call 904-614-6632 if interested. DRIVERS, CDL-A: Home EVERY weekend! All loaded/empty miles paid! Dedicated southeast! Or lease: No money down, no credit check. 1-800-823-0323 EQUIPMENT OPERATOR. The New River Solid Waste Association is seeking qualified appli cants for the position of Equipment Operator. Re sponsibilities will include operation of a variety of heavy equipment in addi tion to screening wastes for removal of unauthor ized materials. Experi ence in the operation and maintenance of heavy operation experience is desired. Employee will be required to complete a Landfill Operator and an Inmate Supervision course within 6 months of employment. Gradu ation from high school or GED needed. Salary range will vary based on experience. Applications can be picked up at the Administration Office at New River Regional Road 121, 2 miles north of Raiford, Florida. Dead line for submitting ap plications will be May 28th, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. For further information, call 386-431-1000. New River Solid Waste is a drug-free workplace; drug testing will be required. NRSWA is an Equal Opportunity Employer LOCAL CHRISTIAN SCHOOL seeking dedi cated, dependable, Christ-minded individual for vacant position. Ex perienced, A Beka Certistudent seeking a BA in Education preferred. Call 904-964-6100 for applica tion information. HAIRBIZ STYLING SA LON is looking for an experienced nail tech. Call 352-258-4135 or 386-496-2078 DISABLED WOMAN needs help with activities of daily living. Such as dressing, bathing, toileting, and meal preparation. In need of live in custodial care giver in exchange for free room & board. Only serious, dedicated persons need to apply. Please call 352-478-8167 FRONT DESK POSITION in dental clinic. Com puter skills a MUST, to tal electronic records. Check in/out, INS veri and collection of pay ments. Fax resume to 352-485-1961. Salary BRADFORD TERRACE 808 S. Colley Rd. Starke, FL 32091 is now accept ing applications Long-term care exp. preferred. Apply in person at or Fax resume to 904-964-1497 DFWP. EOE. BRADFORD TERRACE 808 S. Colley Rd. Starke, FL 32091 is now accept ing applications exp preferred. Apply in person or Fax resume to 904-964-1497 DFWP. EOE. UNION COUNTY SOLID WASTE is currently ac cepting applications for a P/T roll-off truck driver, Inmate supervisor. Ap plicant must have at least 5 years experience in operating a truck, have at least a Class B license by the interview date, be able to lift at least 50pds, pass a drug screening and a DOC background check. This position will be Monday-Friday and will go to F/T on Sept 22, 2014. (904) 964-6305 (352) 473-2210 (386) 496-2261 Classified Ads Where one call does it all! FOR SALEOlder 2BR/1BA singe wide on 2.10 acres, w/ heat & A/C in need of some repairs. Can be lived in with minimal repairs. Has well, septic, and elect. Several storage bldgs, & livestock pen w/water.Call 386-496-1215 for more information$28,500NO OWNER FINANCE NO RENT TO OWN will help you, unconditionally love. Hands on with your baby. Maintain contact. Allowed expenses paid. Doug & Liz 866-777-9344 Susan StockmanFL # 0342521 A childless loving married couple seeks to adopt. Will be hand on mom/dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Dawn & Domenick 1(855)985-4592. Adam Sklar #0150789 Be the 1st and Only Distributor in your area! Unlimited $ return. Small investment required. Call toll free 1-844-225-1200. Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial Aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877741-9260 www.FixJets.com earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-2663731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE Commissions average $56K+/ yr. Training & leads. Sales experience required, LA&H license preferred. Call Jessica at 904-562-9527. Learn to drive for Werner Enterprises! Earn $750 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! 1-888-368-1964 $$$ Top Pay $$$ Be a Name, Not a Number Quality Home Time! BCBS + Pet & Rider Orientation Sign On Bonus CDL-A Req 877-258-8782 www.ad-drivers.com Hey Girls! Heres Your Chance Win $5,000 Cash, a Recording Contract, and Many More Prizes! 18+ Only Call (904) 2468222 Roy Aderholt at 1-386-397-3856 or 1-386-755-2615 AU#1596 AB#1133 PUBLIC AUCTION 6 miles south of Lake City on US Hwy 41 & 441Saturday, May 17 at 9 amYour consignments are welcome. Cash, personal checks, business checks. 10% Buyer PremiumFor more information call FOR SALE (3.2 miles south from intersection of US 301 & SR100) CALL MIKE352-665-8067mhanksgatorcountry@yahoo.com BUS DRIVERS NEEDEDUnion County School Board 40 hour Training Class provided. CDL required to enroll.ContactMike: 386-496-2182orMark: 904-966-2396 Florida Credit Union has a FT teller position available at our Starke branch. Experience with high volume cash handling, maintaining cash drawer, balancing, cross-selling, and customer service expertise is required. Prior credit union/bank experience is a plus. We offer competitive salary, incentives, and excellent benefits. Stop by our Starke branch at 2460 Commercial Drive (near Walmart) to complete an application or send resum to: Florida Credit Union, Attn: HR/TLR, P.O. Box 5549, Gainesville, FL 32627 Fax: 352-264-2661 Email: krose@flcu.org M/F/D/V EOE Drug Free Workplace rffntb b rfntfbnfffbffnbnff ffbfrfffbfnfnfbfntfnf frfntbfbfffrtffbfbffbnf fntfffrfnff Southern Villas of StarkeAsk about our 1&2 BR Apartments HC & non-HC Units. Central AC/ Heat, on-site laundry, playground, private, quiet atmosphere. 1001 Southern Villas Dr. Starke, FL Equal Housing Opportunity 2 Bedroom Townhome$100 security1/2 OFF 1st 3 months rentEqual housing opportunity. This institution is an equal o pportunity provider & employer. 1 Bdrm $460 2 Bdrm $485 3 Bdrm $515 801 South Water Street Starke, FL 32091 TDD/TTY 711 1, 2, & 3 bedroom HC & Non-HCaccessible apartments.This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. Equal Housing Opportunity EXTRA CASH! Could you use some now that the holidays are over? We specialize in helping people sell through our Classifieds! YARD SALES AUTOS BOATS CLOTHES APPLIANCES... The list goes on..Call Mary Today at 904-964-6305

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but he said the worst cases are where somebody is not making payments and receives eviction notices, but says nothing to their spouse. Thankfully, most of the time they go ahead and move out before we get there, Shannon said. Rarely do we do an occupied eviction. Rowe Enterprises may have to evict itself from its current home on U.S. 301 in Hampton. Due to the amount of growth it has experienced, it really needs a larger building. Thats a good problem to have, Jonathan said.Growing a business, a family and a communityIt began in 1995 with Jerry Rowe doing inspections of properties that went into delinquency. His wife, Donna, helped him at nights with paperwork and photos. Smith said within two years, the business, which became incorporated in 1999, moved into the Rowes barn. From there, the business grew in leaps and bounds, Shannon Rowe said. Other people may have been able to ride by properties and take pictures, but not everyone could prepare invoices, make sure they got paid and handle other aspects of the business side of things, she said. Jerrys a very good businessman, Shannon said. He just is. The office moved from the barn into a doublewide trailer. Approximately two years later, another move was made into the building the business currently occupiesa building that offers 3,000 square feet. Smith said that prompted a few family arguments about whether or not it was too much space. Well, it didnt take long to realize it wasnt enough space once 26 desks were installed. We have people in every corner possible, Smith said. We have one working from home and two more offices next door. Expansion included bringing family together. At the time of the business start, Smith was attending college, while Jonathan and Shannon, were living in Georgia, where Jonathan worked for Applebees. Jerry and Donna, though, saw an opportunity to bring their children and grandchildren closer to home, Smith said. In a way, though, all of the employees have become family. If an employee has a problem, the Rowe family will do what it can to help, whether its during times of need, such as deaths in the family or divorces, or just giving somebody a bit of a handup to get a little bit ahead in life. The company recognizes Employees of the Month, and each employee receives a gift card on his or her birthday. Every employee is involved in what Rowe Enterprises accomplishes, Smith said. Some of the best ideas to come out of brainstorming sessions have come from employees who arent in management, she said. Jonathan said taking care of employees and participating in employee-appreciation efforts goes a long way in making the business successful in terms of employee retention. Will I tell you were the highest-paying place in Bradford County? Absolutely not, Jonathan said, but I will say we do what we can. We try to be fair. Smith said, Weve just always treated everybody like family and tried to take good care of them. That family not only contributes to a successful business, but to the needs of the community as well. Smith said staff has always come together to donate to the Bradford County Food Pantry. Office events, such as Silly String Day, Holey Jean Day and Pajama Day helped raise approximately $3,000 for last 10B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, May 15, 2014 Continued from 2B years Starke Police Department Shop with a Cop program. Smith and Shannon Rowe are active in the Kiwanis Club of Starke, and that has opened their eyes to even more needs in the community. The willingness to come together for a cause is impressive, Smith said. Duval County has way more need, but being such a huge community, nobodys getting involved, or theres a million different little projects, Smith said. They dont come together near the way we can. Perhaps its easy to give, though, when the heads of the familyJerry and Donna Roweset an example. I think thats part of their success, Smith said. Theyve describing all that always given back. Theyve always appreciated and always helped somebody who had less and needed an opportunity.Whats next?It would appear that part of Rowe Enterprises future is finding a larger working space for its office staff, whether its utilizing its existing property for expansion or moving to a new location. Shannon Rowe said Jerry Rowe probably didnt envision such growth from that simple start in a bedroom. I dont think he saw this coming, she said. I dont think any of us saw this coming. Outside of accommodations, Jonathan Rowe said eyes are on industry changes and how Rowe Enterprises can remain successful. A big change in the industry is that large investment groups are buying foreclosed properties for the purpose of making them rentals, Jonathan said. The hope is that Rowe Enterprises can offer its services by preparing the properties for rental and to continue doing so between tenants. There are other areas the business may look into. There are plenty of other avenues weve discussed as far as having this sized network as people begin to be homeowners again, Jonathan said. We may look at occupied-property opportunitieswhat can we do to help people and whether its our same type of services. Jonathan said the key is adaptability, and he believes Rowe Enterpises has already shown it has that ability. Are we the best in the industry at this? I couldnt tell you, Jonathan said, but I am happy with the direction weve taken. I have seen companies come and go. Ive seen several go in the last year with some industry changes and the way things have developed. I think were sustainable. I think thats a lot of our benefit. If youd like to learn more about Rowe Enterprises, please visit the website www.rowepp. com. The New River Community Health Center Board of Directors will meet May 21, 2014 at the Union County Library, located at 250 SE 5th Ave, Lake Butler, FL 32054 from 12:30 1:30 pm. (   5/15 1tchg-B-sect Legals



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BY KAREN LAKE Santa Fe College KEYSTONE HEIGHTS-Nineteen area seniors are graduating with an Associate of Arts degree in addition to their high school diplomas this year. These students dual enrolled at Santa Fe Colleges Watson Center as rising juniors and have earned 60 hours of college credit while satisfying high school requirements over the past two years. Here is what they had to say: Sarah Guilfoyle said she is taking the summer off. Rightly so. She said she is happy her mom pushed her towards this (AA degree) and that, yes, shed do it all over again. My parents helped me with this, she said. Guilfoyle plans to continue her education either at Santa Fe College or at the University of Florida in her pursuit of a teaching degree. She said the summer will give her the time to decide between teaching history or drama. When asked what she liked best about her dual enrollment experience she said it was the activities at the Watson Center. And hey, it was free college, she said. David Wyatt Bennett is an engineering major. He is returning to Santa Fe College to finish the prerequisite courses needed for his degree and will use this time to consider his future transfer options. Madison Colaw is continuing her education at Florida Southern College on an athletic scholarship. She is a health sciences major and wants to specialize in pediatric oncology. She said earning her Associates of Arts degree has definitely helped her in achieving her goals and that if she had it to do over again, shed make the same decision. Music is his first love but since Zachary Coursey decided on a major, Florida State University is now his destination school. High school dual enrollment saved me a lot of money, he said, The only thing I would change is making my decision about a major earlier. Coursey said he would have taken different prerequisite coursework to help him toward his major. Overall, lrmonitor@bellsouth.net www.StarkeJournal.com Deadline Monday 5 p.m. before publication Phone 352-473-2210 Fax 352-473-2210 Worth Noting Melrose UMC fish fry Friday, May 16, 5-7 p.m., $8.50. Melrose United Methodist Church, 5802 Centre St. Soccer try-outs The Keystone Youth Soccer U13/U14 competitive travel soccer team will be holding tryouts for the 2014-2015 season. Any player under the age of 14 on July 31, 2014 is eligible. Try-outs will be at Twin Lakes Park, 6065 Twin Lakes Road, on Saturday, May 31 beginning at 9 a.m. Please arrive 30 minutes early to stretch and register. For more information call 352-2350393. Cheerleader tryouts The KHHS Cheerleaders are having tryouts for upcoming 7th grade girls for the 2014/2015, football and basketball season on Monday and Tuesday, May 19th and 20th, from 3:30 to 5. On Monday, you will be working on your cheer, chant and jumps. Tuesday will be the official tryout. Both days are mandatory and will be held in the multipurpose room of the KHHS gym. Applications are available at the front offices of KHHS, MES and KHES. Also, the KHHS Varsity Cheerleaders will be coming to KHES and MES to meet with the 6th grade girls to answer questions and to hand out applications. Applications are due by 2:00 pm, Thursday, 5/15/14, to Margie McCall at KHHS. Lake Region Monitor Lake Region Monitor USPS 114-170 Keystone Heights, Florida Thursday, May 15, 2014 42 nd Year 2 nd Issue 75 CENTS Clay County Sheriffs Office honors fallen heroes Buglers from Union Correctional Institution and Clay County Fire Rescue play Taps after BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor GREEN COVE SPRINGS Members of the Clay County Sheriffs Office honored eight of their fallen comrades during a ceremony at the David A. White Memorial Headquarters in Green Cove Springs on May 8. Sheriff Rick Beseler told family members of the fallen officers that their memories are honored on a daily basis by members of the public passing by the agencys stone memorial, placed outside Beselers office window. I spend most of my days in that office overlooking the memorial, he said. I have watched hundreds of visitors as they arrive here to conduct business and I notice as they approach the building they pause and read the names inscribed on the stone. Their actions and reactions vary, but without exception they seem respectful and mindful of what each of those names represent. Activities during the ceremony included prayer led by See OFFICERS, 2A High school hosts suicide prevention training for parents BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor KEYSTONE HEIGHTS Administrators at Keystone Heights High School held a parents night in the schools auditorium May 1 to train parents about the warning signs of childhood depression and teen suicide. Principal Dr. Susan Sailor told the crowd of around 50 that after a second KHHS student took her own life in March, many parents asked for the training. She added See PARENTS, 3A 23 judges run unopposed in 4 corners counties BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor GREEN COVE SPRINGS Nearly two dozen circuit court judges in jurisdictions covering Clay, Bradford, Putnam and Alachua counties were returned to the bench after qualifying with no opposition on May 2. Circuit judges preside over felony criminal cases, civil suits involving more than $15,000, probate cases and family law matters. In the Fourth Judicial Circuit, which includes Clay County, incumbents James Hunt Daniel, See JUDGES, 2A approves change to Kingsley Lake development BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor GREEN COVE SPRINGS The Clay County Planning Board approved a change in the visual barrier requirements for a 70lot Kingsley Lake development during its May 6 meeting. Kinglsey Cove is a 46.5acre project on the former site of Stricklands Landing and Kingsley Beach. In 2008, the planning board approved an application by a group of Lake Butler-based See KINGSLEY, 4A Clay commission extends Waste Management contract BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor GREEN COVE SPRINGSClay County Commissioners extended their multi-million dollar contract with Waste Management through September 2023, during a May 13 board meeting. The current agreement between the county and Waste Management was set to expire in two years. Under the contract, Waste Management picks up the countys garbage See WASTE, 5A 19 high school seniors earn Associate of Arts degrees Seniors at Keystone Heights High School and Hope Christian Academy who earned an See COLLEGE, 6A Keystone man stole from heart attack victim BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor PALATKAA Keystone Heights man resigned from Putnam County Emergency Medical Services after he was accused of stealing $40 in cash from a cardiac victim. According to a Palatka Police Department report, a nurse said she saw EMS worker William Earl Curtis, 46, putting money into his pocket while standing close to heart attack victim Robert Hancock, 71. Hancock later died at Putnam County Community Medical Center. The nurse added that she and another hospital employee counted the victims cash both before and after the alleged theft and determined that $40 was missing from the mans wallet. According to the report, EMS Chief Chad Hutchinson confronted Curtis about the incident, and Curtis admitted taking $20 from the victims wallet, which he turned over to Hutchinson. As of press time, Curtis had not been arrested nor charged. Palatka police filed a complaint with the State Attorneys Office, which is now reviewing the case. Lake Geneva resident arrested after confronting BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor KEYSTONE HEIGHTSClay County deputies arrested a Lake Geneva man after the lake dweller struck two riders of dirt bikes and ATVs with a shotgun and then fired the weapon as the victims fled the scene, according to a sheriffs office report. Tony Waters, 50, of Keystone Heights was arrested on May 8 for discharging a firearm in public, possession of not more than 20 grams of cannabis, battery and possession of drug paraphernalia. According to a sheriffs office report, Waters confronted three men who were doing wheelies on dirt bikes and ATVs in the dry lakebed of Lake Geneva near his home. With his granddaughter watching, Waters struck two of the men in the sternum with the barrel of a 12-gauge shotgun. As the victims fled the scene, Waters fired three shots over their heads. A Clay County deputy wrote that before interviewing Waters about the incident, he patted down Waters for his own safety. During the search, the deputy found marijuana and a pipe in Waters pants pockets. Florahome UMC centennial Florahome United Methodist Church was founded in 1914 and is located on the corner of S. R. 100 and Coral Farms Road at the flashing light in Florahome. The Church will begin celebration of its centennial year with a devotional, historical presentation, food and fellowship at 5 p.m. Saturday, May 17. The celebrations will continue with a worship program on Sunday May 18 at 11 a.m. with special guest speaker the Rev. Dr. Rick Neal. A fellowship meal will follow the service. Degrees of Separation New and selected works by Jim Carpenter are now on display April 12 May 18. Reception is Friday, May 2nd, 6 to 9 p.m., part of Melrose Art Walk. Including works by member and consignment artists in various media, painting, sculpture, photography, printmaking, ceramics, pottery, textile, glass and jewelry. We need your clothes Community Church of Keystone Heights is hosting our 6th Annual Back to School event on July 22. Clothes will be given away free to children in need. Donate clean, gently used clothes for children sizes 3T through adult. Teenagers come in all sizes and this collection is for all ages and sizes. Drop clothes off at Community Church marked B2S (Back to School). The deadline is July 10. Please call Barbara Sullivan (258-3113), Karen Powell (5389546), Jenn Cumbus (258-5479) or Kim Nugent (258-3602) for more information or to volunteer.

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Gregg McCaulie, Tyrie W. Boyer, Lance M. Day, Adrian G. Soud, David M. Gooding, John Hills Skinner, Harvey L. Jay, Tatiana Radi Salvador, Virginia Norton and Waddell A. Wallace were all returned to office for six-year terms. Skinner has been a circuit court judge in Clay County since 1996. From 1987 to 1996 he was a county judge in Green Cove Springs. The only contested judicial race in the Fourth Circuit is between Anthony Paul Penoso and Mike Sharrit in Group 27. Voters will choose between the two in the Aug. 26 primary. In the Eighth Judicial Circuit, which includes Bradford and Alachua Counties, incumbents Robert K. Groeb and James P. Nilon qualified without opposition. Phillip A. Pena also qualified with no opponent. William Falik is challenging incumbent William E. Davis in group 11. Groeb currently handles criminal cases in Bradford County. Pena is currently an Alachua County judge. He will replace Judge Phyllis M. Rosier, who did not seek reelection. In the Seventh Circuit, which includes Putnam County, incumbents David J. Walsh, James R. Clayton, Margaret W. Hudson, John M. Alexander, Carlos E. Mendoza, Howard M. Maltz, Raul A. Zimbrano and Randel H. Rowe III all qualified without opposition. Sandy Upchurch also qualified unopposed. Mendoza is the administrative judge in Putnam County and handles criminal cases in Palatka. Four contested races remain in the Seventh Circuit. David Hood and Mike Orfinger will compete in Group 6, Karen Foxman and Steve Sands will run in Group 18, Steven N. DeLaroche, Adam Warren and Kathy Weston are running in Group 20 and Kellie Jo Killebrew is challenging incumbent Thomas G. Portuallo in Group 23. 2A Lake Region Monitor Thursday, May 15, 2014 Pd. Pol. Adv. paid for and approved by Stephan O. Hart for City of Keystone Heights City Council, Se at 5. Thank You My Friends, Volunteers, and Voters for electing me to the Keystone Heights City Council, Seat 5. Steve Hart is the perfect time for Grannies, Moms, Dads, Grandparents and others to recognize their graduates achievements. Print them for the world to see...Only$30THE LAKE REGION MONITOR 7382 SR 21N Keystone Heights352-473-2210Email your message and/or photo & your phone # to ads@bctelegraph.com or take your copy to: For your convenience, you can also bring your photo and information by the Bradford County Telegraph at 131 West Call St. in Starke between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. KHHS Graduation May 30, 2014 www.MelroseBayArtGallery.comMelrose Bay Gallery Regional Fine Art & Fine Crafts 103 Fla.SR-26 (btw. Cypress & Centre)Hours: Sat 10-6 + Sun 1-5 tel. 352.475.3866 Jim Carpenter Degrees of SeparationCurrent art exhibit showing thru May 18 Lake Region MonitorUSPS 114-170 Published each Thursday and entered as Periodical Postage Paid at Keystone Heights, Florida under Act of March 3, 1879.POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Lake Region MonitorP.O. Drawer A Starke, FL 32091 7382 SR 21 Keystone Heights, FL 32656Phone: (352) 473-2210 (352) 473-6721 John M. Miller, PublisherSubscription Rate in Trade Area $39.00 per year: $20.00 six months Outside Trade Area: $39.00 per year: $20.00 six monthsEditor: Dan Hildebran Sports Editor: Cliff Smelley Advertising: Kevin Miller Darlene Douglass Typesetting Eileen Gilmore Advertising and Newspaper Prod. Earl W. Ray Classified Adv. Heather Padgett Bookkeeping: Joan Stewart-Jones Also pictured is a granite monument memorializing fallen Keystone Heights resident Tom Croft, music by the sheriffs pipe and drum corps and a moment of silence on the agencys radio frequency. Beseler also led a roll call of the agencys fallen officers. The sheriff read a profile of each man as family member or deputy pinned a rose on a wreath near the granite monument The honorees were: Sheriff Josephus Peeler, who died on May 10, 1894, five days after he was shot at the Green Cove Springs train station. Peeler was attempting to break up a fight between two men at the time of the shooting; Sheriff Charles Wilson, who on July 10, 1906 was shot on a train in Palatka while he was attempting to arrest a man. The shooter was subsequently shot and killed by another train passenger. Wilson was a former Green Cove Springs marshal; Sheriff Theodore Cherry, who was shot on July 6, 1913 while questioning a suspect. The shooter fled the scene but was later killed by a citizen posse; Sgt. Richard Watkins, who was killed in a crash on May 3, 1976 at the intersection of Old Jennings Road and S.R. 21 while following an ambulance from the scene of a suicide attempt; Auxiliary Deputy Burton Caton Sr., who suffered a fatal heart attack on July 15, 1979 while working a traffic detail in Orange Park; Deputy Wilson Walker, who died on Dec. 17, 1994, as a result of medical complications caused by materials used during his work as an evidence technician; Sgt. Kenneth Eddie Hayes, who died on May 26, 2002 from a heart attack while on duty; and Detective David White, who on Feb. 16, 2012 was shot and killed during a raid on a methamphetamine lab in Middleburg. The shooter was later killed by deputies as he fled the house while firing on other officers. OFFICERS Continued from 1A Edwards, Shienne MacKinnon, Cindy Grimaldo, Wyatt Hopkins, Makayla Smith, Summer JUDGES Continued from 1A Blanding Boulevard resurfacing ORANGE PARK The Florida Department of Transportation began a resurfacing project on May 12 on Blanding Boulevard from Kingsley Avenue to Knight Boxx Road. In addition to paving, the nearly 5-mile long resurfacing project includes drainage and sidewalk repairs, improving sidewalk ramps at side street intersections and traffic signal upgrades. Construction also includes a median modification at Parkridge Avenue which will allow cars to only travel a certain direction when crossing through the median. This modification reduces the potential number of crashes in the intersection by guiding motorists directionally and minimizing conflicts with cross traffic. Blanding Boulevard is a major thoroughfare, logging more than 50,000 cars per day through the project area. During construction, lane closures for paving are restricted to nighttime hours. Northbound Blanding Boulevard lane closures may occur from 8 p.m. to 5 a.m., and southbound lane closures may be scheduled from 9 p.m. to 7 a.m. Restricting lane closure times minimizes impacts to motorists, especially during rush hour. DOT hired Hubbard Construction Company of Jacksonville to complete the $4.9 million project by spring, 2015. New suppression system at airport BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor KEYSTONE HEIGHTS--The chair of the Keystone Airpark Authority said an extended fire suppression system and a new beacon are among the recent improvements to the airport, which straddles the Clay and Bradford county line. Noel Thomas gave the Keystone Heights Rotary Club an update on May 8 about the developments. Thomas said the airports old beacon and tower were 45 feet tall. The new structure is 70 feet tall. In addition, the airport moved the rotating light to a new location that is 23 feet higher than the previous spot, increasing the lights total height LRM Legals 5/15/14 Notice is hereby given that pursu ant to the Florida Self Storage Fa cility Act Statutes (Section 83.801, 83.809), Lake area Storage, LLC, will sell the following items to the highest and best bidder on Monday, May 19, 2014 at 9:00 A.M. (EST) at 7101 SR 21, Keystone Heights, Florida 32656: Unit# 226, containing misc. house hold items. 5/8 2tchg 5/15-LRM LEGALS See AIRPORT, 4A

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Thursday, May 15, 2014 Lake Region Monitor 3A Mon Thurs: 9:00am 11:30am & 2:00pm 4:30pm Fridays: 9:00am 2:00pmW.H. Marshall, M.D.Opthamologist(352 ) 475-3991EXAMS AVAILABLE Optical Hours Why go to Gainesville? Were right around the corner!Prescription Glasses, Sunglasses, Contacts & Swimming Goggles 105 SR-26 Melrose Worship in the Park COME JOIN US ONSunday May 18th 8:30 AM State Road 26 Melrose State Road 26 Melrose FREE(352) F l y -In RED DRA GONAERIAL DEM ONS TRA TION w w w v i s i t j a c k s o n c o u n t y f l a c o m that the schools expert in suicide prevention advised her to delay the session for several weeks until the emotional impact of the students death waned. Sailor said she has lived in the Lake Region her entire life, and that she has never seen the combination of two suicides and the death of a third student by accident over the course of three months. Were talking about things that we probably needed to have been talking about for years, she said, but now things are coming to the surface and kids are reaching out for help, parents are reaching out for help and we are trying to do the best that we can in the school system. Sailor added that over the past three months, the schools staff has had to adapt to the rush of students seeking counseling after the deaths. When you talk about school-level people: the teachers the counselors and the administrators who work in the building every day, we were trained to teach kids We werent really equipped to handle the kinds of grief issues that weve been dealing with here with our students. Sailor said that after the second suicide, the school district assigned six social workers, two mental health counselors, a military family life counselor and several school psychologists to the campus. For the parents training, Sailor invited Dr. Stephanie Jallen, a fellow in child and adolescent psychiatry at the University of Floridas College of Medicine to address parents about the warning signs of childhood depression and teen suicide. Childhood depression Jallen said childhood depression often manifests itself by increased irritability, rather than by the stereotypical symptoms of despondency and sorrow. Although some kids get sad and they may become tearful, a lot of them just become irritable, she said of depressed children. You will see a change. Nothing makes them happy. They get annoyed with every little thing. She said all teenagers have bad days. It goes beyond that, she said. It has to be this persistent, lower-mood irritability for the majority of the day, for weeks: two, three, four weeks in a row. Jallen said parents should also watch for changes in sleeping patterns. Either they are not sleeping at all, waking up in the middle of the night, waking up before the alarm clock goes off, tossing and turning or they are sleeping more, she said. Jallen said that children dealing with depression also lose interest in the things they used to enjoy. Theyll start making excuses about not going out with friends, she said. They dont want to go fishing anymore, they dont want to play basketball anymore. The things that they really took pride in just dont seem to matter anymore, or as much as they used to. Jallen said children with depression may also withdraw from relationships and experience declines in energy levels. It is harder to concentrate. Grades start to drop. Drug and alcohol use is also a sign of depression. They are looking for ways to cover up their pain, she said. Jallen said risk factors for depression include family history and personal history. If the child has ever been abused or neglected, they are going to be at a higher risk of depression, she said. She added that students living in households with active alcohol or drug abuse, or in families with high levels of strife or discord have increased risks for depression. They just have a lot on their plates, she said. Jallen added that students are adept at covering up depression, and almost never seek help from their parents in dealing with it. Teenage suicide Jallen said most student suicides result from depression. Suicide is the third-leading cause of death for people between the ages of 14 and 25, following only accidents and homicide. On average, there are around 5,000 teenage suicides a year in the U.S. Jallen said students contemplating suicide sometimes make statements like Nothing matters, You dont care, You wont have to deal with me later, or It will all be over soon. She added that teenagers who have been struggling over the long term, and suddenly seem relieved or happy may have decided to commit suicide. Theyve got a plan and they are going to end the suffering, she said. They might start giving things away, Jallen added. Sarah gets the Xbox and John gets the fishing rod. Risk factors for suicide include depression and drug or alcohol abuse. She added that teenage substance abuse goes beyond the typical drugs of marijuana and cocaine. Buying someone elses Adderall, stealing Moms Xanax, she said. Cough medicine, over-the-counter has really picked up in this area. Theyll look at synthetics because you cant test them on a drug screen. Previous suicide attempts are also a risk factor for subsequent attempts, as well as non-suicidal self injury like cutting, burning, biting and punching. It can be a call for help, Jallen said. There are a lot of kids who do it just to kind of release some tension. Their intention is not to kill themselves, but they can get lost in the moment and it can go too deep and it can become more serious. Cutting is the most common form of this behavior and teenagers will often go to great lengths to hide their scars. A lot of girls will cut under the bikini line so they can still wear their swimsuits in the summer and no one sees it, Jallen said. They will cut on their upper thighs so they can cover it up with shorts. They cut above their arms, so its always covered up by T-shirts. In Florida, sometimes I get worried when girls come into my office all the time wearing long sleeve shirts. Easy access to firearms is another risk factor for teenage suicide. Im not here to talk about the Second Amendment, Jallen said. I know a lot of people have guns. They like hunting and thats OK, but the reality is, if its in the home, the kids can get at it. Jallen added that parents should eliminate a depressed teenagers access to firearms in the same way they limit a toddlers access to household chemicals. She also said most teenagers who survive an overdose suicide attempt live to regret the attempt. The problem is with guns you dont get time to regret it, she added. It is, by far the most lethal way of suicide, followed by hanging. Jallen said if a teenager knows someone who committed suicide, they are at greater risk of suicide themselves. Low selfesteem is another risk factor. She said that students who are at a lower risk of suicide are engaged with their family or school. Theyre doing well in school, she said. They really take pride in their school work. They feel like they can talk to teachers or friends. There is not a lot of bullying going on. Jallen also recommended parents view a four-minute video produced by the Mayo Clinic about teen suicide prevention. The video is available on Youtube.com. Jallen said the most important thing parents can do is to stay alert. She said adults should take action when teenagers make statements indicating they may be thinking about taking their own lives. When any child makes any comments about thinking of suicide, dying or not wanting to be alive, you should take it very seriously, she warned. Because all you need is one minute when this kid is home alone and feeling very low, feeling alone, feeling like they cant do anything; they go get the gun and theyre done. PARENTS Continued from 1A Womans plans luau KEYSTONE HEIGHTS-The Womans Club of Keystone Heights elected its new officers for 2014-2015 during its April meeting. The new officials are President, Sally Linton; First Vice President, Sue Plaster; Second Vice President, Joanne Motter; Third Vice President, Cindy Martorano. Treasurer, Tina Bullock; Recording Secretary, JoAnne Gill and Corresponding Secretary, Shirlie Davis. The club continued preparations for its luau and Bunko party for Saturday, May 17. Proceeds for the 6 p.m. event at the clubhouse on Womans Club Drive will go toward education and club upkeep. The menu includes shrimp sliders, pulled-pork sliders, pineapple casserole, fresh fruit, pineapple and spam skewers, frozen fruit salad, sweet and sour meatballs, Hawaiian dream cake, Hawaiian pie, South Sea cookies, punch, iced tea and coffee. Bunko is an easy game to learn and play. Instructors will be on hand to help everyone get started for an evening of fun. Tickets are $10. For information about the event, call 352-473-3553 or Sally Linton at 352-473-0045. New Melrose gallery hosts student art show MELROSEThe Lake Regions newest gallery opened a student art show during the the Melrose First Friday May Art Walk. Artisans Way is inside the historic Hilton House at the corner of S.R. 26 and Hampton Street. The student exhibit is an outgrowth of an end-of-year show coordinated last year by Interlachen High School art teacher Ann Hamilton at Shake Rag Cultural Arts Center. This year, Hamilton invited Keystone Heights High School art teacher Trisha Qualls and her students to participate in the show. The exhibit will be on display through Sunday, May 25. Winners in the threedimensional category were: First placeAbi Loose of Keystone, metal bird; Second placeJarret Jones of Keystone, metal dog and Third placeAlexis White of Keystone, paper tree. Winners in the twodimensional category were: First placeNik Sevlik of Interlachen, red manga style; Second placeMary Fournier of Interlachen, apple basket; Third placeBrandon Figueroa of Interlachen, tempera resist and Honorable MentionSamantha Korth of Keystone, Cheshire cat, Hannah White of Interlachen, op art, Haley Arzie of Keystone, pen and ink and Mason Davis of Keystone, snail. Clay County school board member Tina Bullock applauded the gallerys involvement in the project. With the arts being an area that suffers during an economic downturn, I commend community people for stepping up, she said. I would also thank the art teachers from the schools for doing such a great job. Church yard sale Huge yard sale at 275 Satsuma St. this Friday and Saturday, May 16 and 17. Artisans Way Dim Lights Benefit Concert Featuring Karan Newman, Chuck Spitzer, Ned Stewart and Gerald Snyder. Saturday, May 17, 8-10 p.m. 5910 Hampton St., on the corner of S.R. 26 in Melrose. 352-639-0730 http:// artisansway.org.

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4A Lake Region Monitor Thursday, May 15, 2014 Keystone District Office 352-473-4917 clayelectric.com Rays Auto RepairEstablished 1972473-30837382 Sunrise Blvd.(Next to Hitchcocks Grocery) *** Comfortable Waiting Area ***Jones-Gallagher Funeral HomeDistinquished Caring Service for Over 50 YearsJoe Gallagher OwnerStarke 964-6200 Keystone Heights 473-3176J B SJackson Building SupplyStarke 964-6078 Lake Butler 496-3079See us for all your Lumber & PlywoodThe Transmission ShopAutomotive Repair and Sales, Inc. Complete Auto Repair Facility Imports & Domestic 352-473-3404www.Transmission-Repair-Shop.com 135 Commercial Circle Keystone Heigths, FL BryansHARDWARE & GARDEN CENTERHighway 100 Keystone Heights, FL 473-4006 Highway 21 Melrose, FL 475-2400Worship in the House of the Lord...Somewhere this week! FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now survive DIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 Welcome Home To 4004 SE State Road 21, Keystone Heights, FL 32656 (352) 473-3829 Son-shine Worship in our Fellowship Hall Contemporary Worship in our MMC Traditional Worship in our Sanctuary Dr. Craig Moore preaching on Dinner Served Fried Chicken (Call 352-473-3829 for reservations) Bible Study by Dr. Tom Farmer, Jr. Series: Ministries for Children (all ages) & Youth Sundays & Wednesdays! Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (LCMS)Sunday School 9 a.m. W orship Service at 10 a.m. 4900 NW 182nd Way Starke(Entrance to Conerly Estates on S.R. 16) (904) gslcstarke@aol.com Everyone Welcome!Childrens Church 10 a.m. Keystone man recalls piloting days during a May 2 meeting of the Keystone Heights Rotary said the 2,700-horsepower, single prop had the same was designed to deliver a nuclear weapon using the overCulinary program awards cake decorating winners BY MERI-LIN PIANTANIDA Keystone Heights High School KEYSTONE HEIGHTS The culinary arts program at Keystone Heights High School recently completed a week of cake decorating which culminated with a program competition. There were 24 entries in two divisions: first-year culinary students and advanced students. To complete the project, students used 75 pounds of cake mix, 50 pounds of powdered sugar and 12 pounds each of butter and shortening. Following the competition, students and faculty both enjoyed eating the cake, lots of cake. Advanced division winners were: First PlaceBrianna McCarty and Brittany Frantz for Bambi Second PlaceMelissa Fain and Brittany Filing for Split Personality Wedding; Third Place Cory Hedding, Kyle Richardson and Kody Downs for Mind Craft. First-year division winners were: First PlaceLexy Hamlow, Hailey Turner, Larann Massey, Eiron McGee and Adri Nassif for A Day at the Beach; Second PlaceKaitlyn Cline and Sabriya Bacote for KHHS Volleyball; Third Place Shannon Aldhous-Evans and Marissa Williams for Minion. First-year Division winners Massey, Adri Nassif and Lexy Hamlow and Eiron of Keystone Heights High developers, including Avery C. Roberts and Jon W. Pritchett, to rezone the land to a planned unit development. The application and subsequent PUD stipulated that a 6-foot high, opaque barrier consisting of vegetation or fencing would buffer the development from residential properties on either side. At the May 6 meeting, the developers requested that the barrier requirement be changed from an opaque buffer to a 4-foot-high board fence. Gloria Strickland Valinski, who owns the parcel to the east of the development, said she supported the change. She said that the opaque fence would have blocked the view of the lake along her quarter-mile driveway. Dawn Strickland also appeared before the board. She said she was representing her parents, Louis and Delores Atchison, who own the property west of Kingsley Cove. Strickland said her parents also supported the change in barrier. She added that Roberts, who did not attend the planning board meeting, indicated to her parents that the original stipulation for an opaque fence was an error. Both women complemented the developers for their willingness to change the barrier stipulation to accommodate neighbors. One property owner objected to the proposal. Vinette D. Godelia, writing on behalf of the Leseman Family Land Partnership wrote a letter to the board saying that the purpose of the original opaque barrier was to protect adjacent property owners from incompatible components of the PUD, such as the amenities area. Godelia added that the change will not visually protect nearby property owners from the recreational activities in the amenities area. In other business during its May 6 meeting, the board: Approved a large scale land use amendment for a 14.12acre parcel to the northeast of the intersection of C.R. 209 (Russell Road) and the CSX railroad track, north of Green Cove Springs. The change in land use to Rural Reserve matches the land use to an adjacent 100-acre property and clears the way for a 21-homesite development by Edgewater Landing LLP. Rural Reserve is a land use designation that serves as a transition between suburban and rural land uses. It requires minimum buffers of 50 feet and stipulates that 35 percent of the acreage be preserved as permanent open space; Approved a change in zoning to Agricultural-Residential for a lot on Chicory Circle, off C.R. 215 between Middleburg and Camp Blanding. The applicant, R. Timothy Carter, plans to place a mobile home on the property and had already installed a well and septic tank on the parcel before realizing the lot was zoned Private Service-2, a business classification. According to the countys planning and zoning director, the land was rezoned in 1986 to PS-2. Planning and zoning staff members could not determine why the change in zoning occurred at that time. KINGSLEY Continued from 1A to nearly 100 feet. Thomas added that the new beacon uses LED technology, rather than incandescent bulbs. He said some pilots have reported seeing the new beacon shortly after taking off from Ocalas airport. Thomas also said the airport extended a water main and a series of fire hydrants from the airports terminal along the facilitys main entrance road to S.R. 100 for about a mile and a half. He added that the new hydrants are equipped with special connectors that prevent their unauthorized use. Its a liability issue, believe it or not, he told the club. Thomas explained that the hydrants are supported by a pump that pushes 1,700 gallons a minute through them and that the airport could be liable for injuries sustained to individuals attempting to acquire water through them. A lot of these companies, they find a hydrant out in the open like we have at the airport, he said. They will be pulling up there and filling up their tanks, and so we are having to shut that down. Thomas also said the airport has upgraded its capability to host blimps, Several times a year weve had blimps come in and stay out AIRPORT Continued from 2A See BLIMPS, 5A

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at the Rosemary Hill Transfer Station west of Green Cove Springs and disposes of it at Waste Managements Chapman Landfill near Brunswick, Ga. The county recoups the disposal costs through an $84 annual assessment to property owners in unincorporated Clay County. The county has a separate contract with Advance Disposal to collect trash and recyclables from curbsides and deliver the materials to the Rosemary Hill transfer and recycling facilities. The county assesses almost $150 a year to property owners in unincorporated areas to cover collection costs. The countys four municipalities each have their own agreements to collect household waste. In Keystone Heights, Advance Disposal bills city residents to collect and dispose of trash. During a special board meeting on May 5 and a regular board meeting on May 13, county commissioners considered an alternative proposal from Republic Services to dispose of the countys trash at a Putnam County landfill that Republic is in the process of acquiring. However, when negotiations between Putnam County and Republic bogged down, Clay commissioners focused instead on extending the Waste Management deal. At both meetings, Commissioner Ronnie Robinson pushed for the renewal. He pointed out that the Waste Management extension gives the county manager until Dec. 31, 2016 to designate an alternative disposal facility. He said that if Republic and Putnam County did finalize an agreement, and Republic offered Clay County a better deal, then the county could switch. Commissioner Diane Hutchings joined Robinson in supporting the deal. Commissioner Wendell Davis voted against the extension. He said that regardless of the pending agreement between Putnam County and Republic, he thought Clay County could negotiate better terms with Waste Management. Doug Conkey also voted no. He said the contract for the countys waste disposal services was too important and too big to rush through. He noted that the agreement touches every Clay County resident. That left Chereese Stewart, who did not respond when Chair Davis asked for a voice vote. She initially said she could not make up her mind but voted in favor of the renewal after more discussion. She cited the uncertainty surrounding Putnam Countys negotiations with Republic Services as a factor in her decision. Doug Conkey changed his vote, making the final tally 4-1. Conkey reasoned that Putnam County officials would likely be forced to resolve their negotiations with Republic before October 1, the start of the new fiscal year. That timeline put the resolution of the Putnam County contract well before the December 31, 2016 deadline for the county manager to designate an alternative disposal site. Thursday, May 15, 2014 Lake Region Monitor 5A OFFYou will save your subscription many times over from coupons from: Hitchcocks, Harveys, CVS, Walgreens, Winn-Dixie, Ace and other advertisers ... This Coupon is for Off the yearly subscription price for the Please send me 52 weeks of the MonitorWe accept MC, VISA, American Express Must have/mention coupon for offerCall 904-964-6305 to subscribe or send check to: P.O. Drawer A Starke, FL 32091Be part of the fast growing ...when you subscribe you get 52 weeks of news from Keystone, Melrose and surrounding areas we cover Clay County government, School Board, and other informationName Address City/ST/Zip Phone #s P romote S ervice B usiness with a E mail your med-to-hi-resolution digital photo (150dpi+) & ad text to: by 5pm Monday OR bring it to:B radford County Telegraph Union County Times Lake Region Monitor( 904) 964-6305W ell help you design your ad cash/check/credit cards accepted all for only /wk c overing Bradford, Union & Clay Counties a in o ur weekly community g iveaway paper: S tand Outfro m the crowd Ee ctrify Y our Business! Reach New Customersw ith aClassified P hoto Ad Licensed Bonded Insured A ctual Size Ad Sample Coleman running for District 4 commission seat My name is Ronnie Coleman. I am the candidate running for the District 4 seat on the Board of County Commissioners. I am running to be your full time commissioner, serving you every day with community leadership, integrity and commitment. I have faithfully served this community and the people of District 4 for over 37 years. My wife Marlene and I reside in the Middleburg area of Clay County along Black Creek. We have 5 children and 15 grandchildren. I attended local public schools in Jacksonville, graduating from Robert E. Lee High School. I then continued my education at Jacksonville University majoring in business management. I also served in the U.S. Army and the Florida National Guard, both from which I was honorably discharged. I am qualified to be your county commissioner because I have been actively engaged with the board of commissioners for the last 37 years, representing my neighborhood, community, and various county committees for which I was appointed. I have stayed up-to-date with the county commission through attending meetings and watching tapings when I am unable to attend. This being a steadily increasing district, it is crucial that our leaders remain steady, strong, and consistent in these tough economic times. We must maintain our focused commitment on lowering taxes, improving our roads and public safety, and helping the school board to achieve educational excellence. Most important, elected officials must remember that they work for the taxpayers. When I take office, my only job will be that of your full time commissioner, providing every day help to the citizens of District 4 and Clay County. When voting on issues as your county commissioner, my vote will go towards what is best for this community and not what is best for special interest groups. My past and present affiliations include member of First Presbyterian Church, Clay County Cattlemens Association, Republican Men of Clay County, Middleburg area Republican Club, 2-time president of the Middleburg Civic Association, Director of the annual Middleburg 4th of July and Lighted Christmas parades, cofounder and president of the Clay County Gator Club, president of Delta Nu Alpha, awarded International Transportation Person of the Year 2 times, Clay County Transportation Advisory Commission, associate member of the University of Florida Alumni Association and 19 years as president of the Black Creek Hills Homeowners Association. I hope to be serving you soon as your full time commissioner, providing a redefined trust in keeping the citizens informed and updated to the changing issues and decisions made on their behalf. If you have any further questions you may contact me at mrcoleman9@aol.com, 904614-3752, or 904-282-2574. Thank you and God bless, Ronnie Coleman Johnson seeking District 4 commission seat My name is Steven Johnson. I was born in Jacksonville at St. Vincents Hospital on April 12, 1970. I arrived in District 4, Clay County, Middleburg and have resided here for 43 years. I am proud to be a thirdgeneration Johnson to reside, live and raise a family in Clay County. I attended Middleburg Elementary School and J.L. Wilkinson Middle School, and graduated from Middleburg High School in the proud class of 1989. I have worked diligently at many jobs and different trades throughout my life. I have personally started, owned and operated three businesses in Clay County and succeeded in all. I am currently the owner of Artistic Designs Lawn Care LLC and am running for Clay County Commissioner District 4. I have attended many meetings giving testimony at the Jacksonville City Council, Duval County legislative delegation, JEA Council, Florida Department of Environmental Protection and the Florida Senate in Tallahassee. I have met with the EPA Criminal Division, Army Corps of Engineers, Sheriff Rick Beseler, the Clay County State Attorneys office, Rep. Travis Cummings, Sen. Rob Bradley, Rep. Charles Van Zant, Congressmen Yohos deputy director and Gov. Rick Scott. All of these meetings directly pertain to the safety and wellbeing of our children, schools, community, environment, drinking water and property values in District 4. I have helped stop the delivery and use in Clay County of EZBase, a contaminated, manufactured, trademarked product created by the Jacksonville Electric Authority based on an incorrect Material Safety Data Sheet through the aid of scientific data, analogical reports, a former EPA senior chief chemist PhD reviews and the Clay County Commission. I have started an ongoing investigation with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection about the analogically tested toxic EZBase directly adjacent to our public school playground and their source of drinking water. I have attended meetings in Keystone Heights and Palatka with the St. Johns River Water Management District pertaining to our dry lakes in District 4. I will continue to monitor and research this ongoing problem that affects our beautiful ecosystem, property values and inevitably us all. Our forgotten neighbors, Keystone Heights, District 4 need our help and support as a community in this matter. I have lived in District 4 my whole life and realize that our basic roads, drainage and community park infrastructure need our immediate attention. I realize this is an ongoing problem and I will do my best to be a voice for District 4 and get the needed funds to help resolve these problems. I believe in God, truth and honesty. I believe puppets are for children and promises are meant to be kept. My promise to Clay County: My door is always open. I will listen to our community and do my best to keep the will of the people. I will keep my faith in God, and I will seek counsel from my elders. I will uphold the safety and well-being of the public and our environment. I am a member of the NRA and support the rights of citizens to bear arms. I will research extensively why our beautiful lakes in Keystone Heights are dry. I will make it a goal to bring back the water, beauty, and value of this great county. I will respect the rights of our veterans, the great men and women who have fought to protect our freedom. I will fight for the senior citizens and our handicapped. I support private business owners and welcome new job creation in our community. I am directly involved with the county, state and community through the civic association, historical society, Facebook, email and my website. I will be the ears, eyes and voice that District 4 needs. We must stand together and keep Clay County clean, beautiful and honest for generations to come. I look forward to representing District 4 as your Clay County Commissioner. Thank you for your support. Steven R. Johnson Coleman Johnson WASTE Continued from 1A at the airport, he said. Weve got plenty of space for them. He added that blimp traffic usually picks up during basketball season, when the vessels circle the Stephen C. OConnell Center during University of Florida games. Thomas also said his board is planning to host an annual music festival in November. The event is an outgrowth of a Montgomery Gentry concert the Florida National Guard Foundation produced in 2013. He said the inaugural event, slated for Nov. 8 will feature activities centering on aircraft and vintage cars during the day, before the evening concert. BLIMPS Continued from 4A

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Historical society Enduring Freedom veteran ORANGE PARKThe Orange Park Historical Society, in its May newsletter remembered a local veteran who died in Afghanistan in 2002. A marker honoring U.S. Army Sgt. Bradley Crose is in the Veterans Memorial within Magnolia Cemetery. Crose was born at the naval hospital in Orlando. His family relocated to Orange Park where he participated in Tae Kwon Do national championship tournaments and graduated from Orange Park High School in 1988. Shortly after graduation Crose volunteered for military service with the U.S. Army, later becoming a Ranger and earning the rank of sergeant. Crose was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 75 th Ranger Regiment at Hunter Army Airfield. His unit was sent to Afghanistan to serve in Operation Enduring Freedom. On March 2, 2002, 20 Rangers, including Crose, took off from Bagram Airfield in support of a SEAL team taking heavy fire on a ridgeline in eastern Afghanistans Shahikot Valley. Believing the SEAL team to still be at the top of the ridge, but with little accurate information to guide them, they planned to land their helicopter along the top of the ridge to extract the SEAL team. As they prepared to land, the aircraft was hit with a rocket-propelled grenade and by heavy machine gun fire. The grenade knocked out the right engine. The helicopter dropped about 20 feet to the ground. Gunfire continued, killing one door gunner and wounding both pilots and the second door gunner. The Rangers rushed to evacuate the helicopter and take up defensive positions to return fire. Crose and two other Rangers were killed attempting to exit the aircraft. Aided by the arrival of reinforcements, the ridgeline was secured and all U.S. personnel were evacuated the following evening. Six soldiers were killed in the rescue attempt. A week after his death, a memorial service was held for Crose at Pinewood Presbyterian Church in Middleburg. Over 900 people attended the service. Thousands of others, some waving American flags and others with their hands over their hearts lined Knight Boxx Road and Blanding Boulevard as the funeral procession made its way to Jacksonville Memory Gardens. The Florida Times-Union quoted Sheila Maguhn, Croses mother as saying, Theres no way you could see it without crying. It was just too touching. It was just overwhelming, the support and the love that we saw. Theres no way to tell them how much it meant to us. Crose was buried at Jacksonville Memory Gardens with full military honors. He was also awarded a Purple Heart, a Bronze Star with a V for valor and a meritorious service commendation for exceptional gallantry during combat. 6A Lake Region Monitor Thursday, May 15, 2014 Crose in front of his BY TONI DAVIS Garden Club of the Lakes KEYSTONE HEIGHTS-The Garden Club of the Lakes has awarded the Yard of the Month for May to Ken and Mary Jean Mitchell. The Mitchells moved to Keystone Heights 14 years ago from northwest Pennsylvania. They also served three years in the mission field in Africa. Ken and Mary Jean now operate the Keystone Auction Service. Mary Jean also enjoys quilting and has painted some of her favorite quilt patterns on their fence. Some of the plants in their yard are the black jack and live oaks that are the setting for a variety of plants and flowering trees. Other plants include dogwood, purple plum crepe myrtle, magnolia, citrus, azaleas, spiraea, sago palm, old world roses, camellia, and gardenias. They also have day lilies, begonias, amaryllis, impatience and hydrangea for summer color. To nominate a Yard of the Month, contact Jackie Host at 352-473-8095 or Toni Davis at 352-475-3146. Anyone with an interest in gardening is invited to the Garden Club meetings at Faith Presbyterian Church located at S.R. 21 and Southeast C.R. 21B in Midway on the second Thursday of each month at 10 a.m. Our next meeting will be in September. its been great, he said. Coursey is pursuing a degree in marine biology. Valedictorian John Crittenden recently changed his mind about his major. Initially, he was set on becoming a doctor but somewhere during a Chem 1 class while he was good at it he said he realized he didnt enjoy it. Hes headed to the University of Florida where he will pursue a degree in business. Ochesa Hall is a health sciences major who is being admitted to the University of Florida. Zachary Hawkins is returning to Santa Fe College to continue taking prerequisite courses towards an engineering degree. The Heinz sisters, Olyvia and Taylor, are both moving to Alabama this summer where they will play on the womens golf team on a combined athletic and academic scholarship. They will attend Faulkner University in Montgomery this fall. Olyvia is a health sciences major while Taylor will seek a degree in criminal justice. Anika Henanger is being offered a full scholarship to attend Northwestern University in Chicago as a journalism major. Taylor Jewett is also a health sciences major headed to the University of Florida. Florida State University welcomes Nicholas Jones this fall. Hes double majoring in religion and digital media communications. He said his dual enrollment experience was fantastic and that hes very happy he did it (earned an Associate of Arts degree). Rebekah Lampkin is a psychology major attending the University of Florida in the fall. In addition to an Associate of Arts degree, Delaina McEwen is returning to Santa Fe College to earn an Associate of Science degree in radiology. Caleb Moore is attending the University of Florida. He is majoring in philosophy while pursuing his love of music. Having earned an Associate of Arts degree, Christina Schrader is returning to Santa Fe College to earn an Associate of Science degree in radiography. She said she would absolutely no questions asked decide to do the same thing (earn an AA degree) all over again if given the choice. The majority of the professors were really fun to learn from, said Schrader. Anna Tuller said the best part of earning an Associate of Arts degree is the feeling of accomplishment. She plans to stay at Santa Fe College and continue earning credits towards a degree in English. She said she hopes one day to teach high school English. COLLEGE Continued from 1A

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he said. The quarterback position is certainly experienced, with Luke returning for his third year as starter. Where the Tornadoes will lack experience is in the defensive secondary. Reynolds said Bradford was blessed the last two years to have a veteran secondary, but graduation will leave only Rodderick Broomfield as a returning corner, though Carlton Hankerson played a lot last season as well at safety. There are six players in the mix for the four secondary positions. Its good, Reynolds said. They understand that they cant have a bad day two days in a row. There are some serious things at trying to show their hand and show off how much stronger and bigger theyve gotten. Union head coach Ronny Pruitt said he enjoys reuniting with players he sometimes doesnt come in close contact with for three to four months because of the fact they play other sports. Im glad to be back out here, Pruitt said. It gets boring after a while, not being able to be around the kids. Following is a brief look at each team: Bradford During a break on May 8, Luke talked about practices, saying his favorite activity is seven-onseven drills and trying to beat the defense. Luke said the worst part of practice is conditioning, but his drive to continually get better gets him through it. That always keeps me going, age of 7, said, This is the best thing ever. This is what I live for. Like Bradford and Keystone, Union saw its season come to an end in the regional playoffs. Union linebacker Casey Driggers has been ready to work on improving and getting stronger since his teams season came to an end against District 7-1A rival Dixie County. Its good to get ready and just get back into that motion, Driggers said. Everybodys just getting ready, getting fit and getting used to how we run things. Coaches, of course, are glad to get back onto the field as well. I hate the off-season, Bradford head coach Steve Reynolds said. I love to finally get back out here (and see) young kids who maybe didnt get as much playing time last year excited about coming out and time indoors in front of televisions or glued to their phones, tablets and other technological devices, but a group of teenagers are spending their afternoons in the Florida heat, running gassers and hitting each other. And you know what? They like it. Spring football practice for high schools in Florida began May 1, and returning players at Bradford, Keystone Heights and Union County were glad of it. Its great. I missed it, said Bradford quarterback Jacob Luke, who just recently finished playing baseball. This is, for real, probably my favorite sport. Nothing beats football. Keystone running back/ defensive back Brighton Gibbs, who has played football since the Regional News Regional News B Section Thursday, May 15, 2014 News from Bradford County, Union County and the Lake Region FEATURES CRIME SOCIALS OBITUARIES EDITORIAL Michael may not recognize Lowyn. But 8 months ago his cooling technique saved her life. UFHealth.orgWhen Lowyn Yancey was born, a pinched umbilical cord kept her brain from getting oxygen for several minutes. A cooling technique developed by Dr. Michael Weiss at UF Health helped her brain recover, and today shes a healthy little girl. Michael and Lowyn share an important, if invisible, connection one that helps us move medicine forward.UF Health and Shands Starke Regional Medical Center, an innovative alliance to enhance our community. 20819 11.62 x 10.5 Bradford all versions.indd 3 5/9/2014 9:25:53 AM BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer There is a conception that todays youth spend too much High school teams gearing up for 2014 season Quarterback Caleb Cox gets some work in during Juwan Crum each other during

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blanket on a bed. Theyre on the evening newsCleaning crew destroys crime scene. It turned out the womans sister had killed her, stolen her identity and moved to Georgia, Smith said. I guess she was the only living relative because no one was even looking for her. Jonathan said one of the most interesting jobs he was a part of involved a compound in Georgia that was utilized by the United Nuwaubian Naion of Moors religious sect. The 476-acre compound, which consisted of pyramids, was seized by the federal government after the sects leader, Dwight Malachi York, was arrested for child molestation and racketeering. That was probably the biggest, weirdest thing weve done, Jonathan said. Occupied evictions are never fun, Smith said. She cited one example of a daycare in Jacksonville where those involved had to wait while the owner called parents to come pick up their children. The owner knew she was being evicted, but had done nothing in response until that day officers showed up. Jonathan agreed that evictions are not enjoyable. They may be willing to move out, Jonathan said, but you always feel bad. Ive never been homeless, but what do you do when all of a sudden its, OK, theyre going to put me out of my house? Jonathan has witnessed several types of instances where people either had enough assets they couldve sold to earn money for mortgage payments, Shannon said, Weve had meth houses in Atlanta where the (law enforcement) officers wouldnt even go inside. You had to call HAZMAT and the fire department. There was the house in St. Petersburg where contractors, in the midst of cleaning, discovered the body of a dead woman wrapped in plastic underneath a Though things are easier, that doesnt make each day predictable. Never the same day twice Those are Shannons words. Her husband said he never says hes seen it all because as soon as he does, something will come along that hes never seen before. I worked in the Panhandle, Jonathan said of his and Shannons time as contractors, so I worked in $1 million houses out on the water to shacks way up a back road and 4 miles of dirt road to get there. Theyd have barns and sheds falling in and everything else. You never knew what you were going to see. Thats probably the best part about it. Its an interesting mix. With Jonathan, Shannon and Smith all having done work in the field, they can relate to what contractors are experiencing, and sometimes it isnt pleasant. Some days, its the nastiest thing youve ever done, Jonathan said. Smith said contractors have witnessed some of the worst examples of hoarding one can imagine. She once worked in the field and remembered one house she went into. We had one where the entire kitchen was so full that they put in a new refrigerator in the dining room, Smith said. On their end table were pizza boxes stacked up. You could turn sideways to get down the hallway, and when you got to like the kids bedroom, you just literally had to jump over stuff to the bed. BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer It is the true definition of a success storya business that began in a spare bedroom, but has since expanded and earned recognition, such as being named a Best Company to Work For by Florida Trend in 2012 and Contractor of the Year by Lender Processing Services that same year. Chances are youve heard of Bradford Countys Rowe Enterprises. Chances are youre not fully sure what Rowe Enterprises is. What is this business that was founded by Jerry and Donna Rowechief executive officer and chief financial officer, respectivelyand includes their children, Jonathan Rowe and Justis Smith, as part of its management team? Good question. Smith, who is the vice president of client relations, said its hard to give people who ask what Rowe Enterprises is a simple answer. She said she can use terms such as property preservation or taking care of foreclosed properties, but they dont seem to fully explain what the company does. She can say, Prepare properties for conveyance, but added, No one knows what that means. Property Preservation Director Shannon Rowe, who is married to Jonathan Rowe, listened to Smith try to define the business and laughed, saying, We dont even know what we do. Basically, Rowe Enterprises coordinates with independent contractors it trainsand who work only for Rowe Enterprisesto provide a variety of services in regard to foreclosed, rental and real-estateowned properties. Those services can include changing locks, lawn maintenance and various repairs and clean-up tasks. Its a big conglomeration of items, said Jonathan Rowe, who is the vice president of field operations. Jonathan said the company will be contacted by a bank, for example, that has decided it needs to take action in regard to a particular property. At first, Rowe Enterprises contractors will do things such as lawn maintenance, changing locks and assessing the property. They may do some emergency repairs and take care of code violations. Basically, at that point youre just doing a protection of the property so that the value maintains, Jonathan said. When a property goes into the foreclosure stage, contractors will go inside the house, cleaning up debris and bringing it up to the guarantors standards, Jonathan said. Another level of work comes into play for real-estate-owned properties and properties that banks hold onto to sell. Jonathan said that entails heavy cleaning and possibly minor repairs and carpet replacementthings that go into making the property more marketable. Every client has a different idea of how marketable they want it to be, Jonathan said. There are banks out there thatll take a property and spend $20,000 on itto paint it, put carpet in it and plumbing fixtures and everything to make it movein ready in order to sell it. Then, there are some thatll just say, Look, just get it cleaned up enough. Instead of spending $20,000, were going to ask $20,000 less. Technological advances have made the working relationship between office staff and contractors in the field much easier. Jonathan said if the company was using the same technology it was 12 years ago, it would need three times the office staff to handle the current workload. It was once a time of relying on Polaroid photos, UPS and FedEx, and physical visits to the office by contractors. Tons of paperwork was coming in via the fax machine, which Shannon said had three members of the office staff going into work 30 minutes early to start sorting papers into stacks corresponding to clients. It took about an hour to sort the work just so everybody else could go to work on the fax machine, and then (we had) to hope all the pages were there, Shannon said. Now, contractors are entering all their information on iPads and sending it instantly to office staff. Technology has been a huge lifesaver for us, Smith said. 2B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, May 15, 2014 FAM PAK$699 lb FAM PAK$299 lbPRICES AVAILABLEMAY 14 MAY 20 $ 1 99 $299$349$269$229 ASST VARIETIES 14OZ 12 OZ 5LB BAG 3LB BAG Open 7 Days a Week 8am to 8pm1371 South Walnut St. (Hwy 301) Starke (904)368-9188 Amazing quality. Fantastic prices.Satisfaction Guaranteed FAM PAK$479 lb $599 FAM PAK$479lb lb $199 lb $379 lb $ 1 1LB BAG ( 352) 473-9873Open Ev ery Day 10:30AM-9PM NO W OPEN BBQ Burgers Steaks Salads7 154 S.E. CR 21B Keystone (intersection of SR100 & 21B) www .t omsrealpitbbq.comfacebook.com /tomsrealpitbbq twitter.com/tomsrealpitbbq T ickets on Sale Now at Toms & Freedom Outdoors Bring in your church bulletin on Sunday and well donate 10% of your purchase back to your church! For more info visit: Contest Prize: 3 da y Turkey/Hog Hunt on 5,200 acres in GeorgiaW e have partnered with to L ive Band at Night Friday & Saturday Steak & Shrimp Night Florida Twin TheatreAll Seats $6.00 Before 6 p.m. 964-5451* CLOSED MON & TUES SCREEN 1 SCREEN 2 STARTS FRIDAY Visit us on-line at www.FloridaTwinTheatre.comFri: 7:00, 9:15 Sat: 4:45, 7:00, 9:15 Sun: 4:45, 7:00 Wed. Thurs: 7:30EXPENDABLESNOW SHOWING Fri: 8:00 Sat: 5:00, 8:00 Sun: 5:30 Wed. Thurs: 7:15 PG-13Bryan Cranston in Andrew Garfield inAmazing Spiderman 2 PG-13 Rowe Enterpises: making a mark after humble beginnings management (clockwise

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in the center of town. There were government-sponsored fiestas, dancing and music on the square nearly every evening despite the fact that Oaxaca is the poorest state in Mexico. Dining out in Oaxaca offered unexpected pleasures. We learned that the area is famous for its culinary offerings, particularly mole, a sauce that includes chocolate flavoring. I sampled the concoction finding it smooth, creamy and not too sweetover turkey at Casa Oaxaca, a lovely dining establishment featuring rooftop views of the towers of the church written completely in Spanish, which I found easy to use. We worked through exercises during the first 80 minutes of class, took a 10-minute break and then continued for another 70 minutes, followed by a 30-minute lunch. After lunch, we met with another teacher, Javier, for conversation. We were joined in conversation class by a third student, a young man named Grant, who hoped to be hired by the United States Border Patrol. He believed fluency in Spanish would make him a more attractive candidate. I enjoyed all aspects of the coursework, especially the low student/teacher ratio, which permitted more impromptu learning. Most interesting were the conversations, which often provided insight into the culture of Mexicoits religion (predominantly Roman Catholic), family life, healthcare system and government. Although the focus of our stay was studying Spanish, afternoons and evenings were free for exploring. One of the teachers at our school, Miguel, was available to drive us to local destinations and also provided transportation to and from the airport. Ever the diligent teacher, he turned each expedition into a lesson. He never seemed to tire of our endless questions and grammar snafus. Miguel took us to Monte Alban, an ancient Zapotecan capital and one of the most important Mesoamerica cities. It was founded around 500 BC and flourished for over 200 years. The site, uninhabited since colonial times, featured a great plaza, ball court, tombs and fabulous views of the surrounding mountains. Another interesting afternoon was spent at Santo Domingo Cultural Center, which is housed in a former convent that was constructed in the late 16 th century. Opened in 1998, the center is composed of the magnificent Church of Santo Domingo, the Museum of Oaxacan Cultures, the Ethnobotanical Garden of Oaxaca, two libraries and conference facilities. Susan was particularly impressed by the celebratory feel of the Zocalo, a traffic-free square lasts from April through October. Due to its altitude of over 5,000 feet, Oaxaca is much cooler than lowland areas. The mild climate, more than historic and archaeological sites, is doubtless responsible for Oaxacas booming tourist trade per cent of its jobs are related to tourism. Many Americans and Canadians winter there, escaping the harsh conditions of their homelands. Susan planned to stay for three weeks, but I decided to go for one. Her intention was to arrange home stays for the weeks prior to and following the week I would be there, and move to the schools residence during our time together. However, her home-stay experience wasnt satisfactory. The home was isolated, and her hosts limited their interactions with herthe language barrier contributed to the problem. Susan checked out the schools residence prior to my arrival and was disappointed with it as well. It offered very little in the way of aesthetics and amenities. So, with the help of the school, Susan located a bed and breakfast, where we could share a room. The cost of the weeks study was reasonable$700 covered both instruction and lodging. However, I experienced sticker shock when I started searching for flightsover $1,100 for a roundtrip ticket. I flew United from Gainesville to Tampa and them from there to Houston before catching a direct flight to Oaxaca, thus avoiding a long layover in Mexico City, about 300 miles to the north. Oaxacas airport has nine gates, but is comfortable and modern. I never asked what exactly is meant by the term immersion when applied to language studies. I assumed it meant students would be required to speak only Spanish, but that is not strictly true. Classes are taught in Spanish, but students are permitted to ask questions in English. In Oaxaca, Amerispan contracts with a school called Solexico. Classes are small no more than three or four students per classwith private instruction also available. My week at Solexico began with a four-page exam, which I didnt find terribly difficult. I was quickly placed in a class with one other student, a woman my age named Tami, also retired, from California. Her vocabulary was more comprehensive than mine, but she, like me, needed more practice with conjugation of verbs and, of course, conversation. Our teacher, Adrian, was gentle and patient with our fumbling attempts to become better speakers. We received four hours of instruction dailythree of grammar and one devoted to conversation. The school uses a four-level grammar series, Thursday, May 15, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 3B Proceeds Will Benefit Youth Programs in Bradford County The West Course will open at 9:00 AM and will close at Noon Scorecards must be in by 12:00 NSCA Registered Shoot Sportsmens Class A-B-C (three places in each) ***European Rotation Start on any station you wish then proceed in numerical order until course has been completed. Registration includes NSCA & FSCA fees, lunch & awardsPRIZES BASED ON NUMBER OF SHOOTERS1-25 Shooters = $200 26-50 Shooters $250 51-75 Shooters = $300 75-100 Shooters $350 Awards to HOA, Runner-Up and 3 places in all Classes including Concurrent. Sportsmens Class awards to 3 places in A, B, and C Dr. Virgil A. BerryCHIROPRACTIC PHYSICIAN Modern methods with old-fashioned concern. Auto Accidents Work Injuries Headaches Neck and Back Pain Back & Neck Pain Clinic NEED RELIEF FROM:Call Dr. Berry Serving the Area for 21 Years 2 4 m o n t h C D S p e c i a l $ 1 0 0 0 0 m i n c u o r g 1 4 6 % A P Y* 1 0 0 % A P Y* D e p o s i t s a r e f e d e r a l l y i n s u r e d b y t h e N C U A a U S G o v e r n m e n t A g e n c y f o r u p t o $ 2 5 0 0 0 0 A n n u a l P e r c e n t a g e Y i e l d ( A P Y ) e f f e c t i v e 3 / 1 3 / 2 0 1 4 a n d s u b j e c t t o c h a n g e a t a n y t i m e 3 6 m o n t h A P R i s 1 4 5 % 5 4 0 p e n a l t y d a y s 2 4 m o n t h A P R i s 1 0 0 % 3 6 0 p e n a l t y d a y s O f f e r e x p i r e s 6 / 3 0 / 1 4 3 6 m o n t h C D S p e c i a l F e d e r a l l y I n s u r e d b y t h e N C U A BY MARY W. BRIDGMAN Special to the Telegraph-TimesMonitor Life after 50 can be an age of exploration, offering both time and opportunity to explore tantalizing roads not taken during ones youth. Learning a foreign language is a road that beckoned during my high school and college days. I took three years of Spanish in high school, followed by another two in college, all purely elective, simply because I enjoyed the language. The ingredient missing from those early experiences was extemporaneous conversation. I found it difficult to formulate a Spanish sentence that made any sense on those few occasions when it might have been useful. Fast forward to retirement, a welcome phase of life that has allowed me to reacquaint myself with activities I havent enjoyed for years, writing being chief among them. I began to play organ and piano again, volunteered in a variety of capacities and became a Master Gardener and a certified group-fitness instructor. My husband and I moved to a smaller community and launched a few home-improvement projects. Studying Spanish wasnt on my radar screen. One day out of the blue, my friend Susan invited me to accompany her to Mexico for a Spanish-immersion study program arranged by Amerispan, a company that offers language programs all over the world. Amerispan suggested that Susan and I study in Oaxaca, a city of 500,000 people. Oaxaca is the capital and largest city of the Mexican state of the same name. It is located in the foothills of the Sierra Madre in southwestern Mexico. The area features a large number of colonial-era structures as well as native Zapotec and Mixtec cultures and archeological sites that attract many tourists. The weather in Oaxaca is mild year round, varying from 50 degrees in the evening to the mid 80s in the afternoons during the month of February, when our trip was scheduled. The rainy season Spanish language immersion: jumping in with both feet is atSTARKE INDOOR FLEA MARKET! 9'X10' BoothOffer good til 6-1-14 904-796-7081 Indoor OPEN7days a week!Hwy 301 S Just before Walmart (next to Knuckle Draggers)

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Joshua C. Williams graduated from the University of Florida on May 4, 2014. Williams, the 2011 KHHS Valedictorian, completed two degrees in three years. He graduated with Honors, with a Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy from the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences and a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from the Warrington School of Business with a Minor in Organizational Leadership for Non-Profits. At UF, Williams was a University of Florida Scholar and worked on research involving the codification of ethics into our capitalistic system and its impact on modern businesses and presented research at the Annual University of Florida Undergraduate Research Program in the spring of 2013. His record of service during his three years at the university was recognized recently as he is a recipient of a University of Florida Presidential Service Award. Williams plans to continue his education in Law and Philosophy. He has accepted a $62,000 scholarship to attend the University of Southern California Gould School of Law to earn his Juris Doctorate. Williams graduates from UF 4B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, May 15, 2014 NOEGELS AUTO SALES, INC.1018 N. Temple Ave., Starke, FL 32091 904-964-6461 www.noegels.com*Plus tag fee, WACwww.noegels.com SELLING TRUCKS & CARS LIKE CANDY BARS24/24 SERVICE CONTRACT AVAILABLE ON ALL OUR VEHICLES Does your business have a story to tell? A product or service to sell?The Bradford County Telegraph Advertising Department can provide you with the in depth coverage you desire...Call 904-964-6305or email us atDarlene Douglassdarlene@bctelegraph.comor Kevin Millerkmiller@bctelegraph.comAdvertorial Advertising Works! Jennifer Leigh Robbins and Matthew Stuart Pauley of Starke, wish to announce the birth of their daughter, Kyleigh Mychelle Pauley on April 24, 2014 at 6:31 p.m., at the Birth Center, Shands Lake Shore, Lake City. Maternal grandparents are Gillie Robbins and Wayne Goodwin of Starke. Paternal grandparents are Stuart and Janice Pauley of Julington Creek, and Susie and Kirby Smith of Keystone Heights. Paternal great-grandparents are Grady and Gabriella Pauley of Lawtey. Paternal great-great grandparents are Margaret Pauley and the late Obed Pauley of Lawtey. Birth: Kyleigh Mychelle Pauley Williams is the son of Mike and Rebecca Williams of Keystone Heights and grandson of Barbara Northam of Keystone Heights and Charles and Patti Williams of Palatka. Dear Editor: It was with great interest that I read the April 24th front page article Not So Fast, wherein Sheriff Gordon Smith and Sergeant Ray Shuford enlightened the public to the City of Starke illegally annexing properties south of the city limits including US 301 and more important to me, Southwest 143rd Street. Since 143rd Street was apparently annexed illegally, then any demands made by the City of Starke regarding that roadway must therefore have been done without legal ground. During construction of Knuckle Draggers Motorcycles and Accessories, Inc. at its current location in the county, the Florida Department of Transportation withdrew permission for access from US 301 and informed us we had to have our access made from 143rd Street. We then discovered we had to contact the City of Starke to get permission to access our county property from their city street. While the City Manager gave us the approval for access to the property, the permission was based on our compliance with new specifications dictated by him for entrance to and exit from the property resulting in greater costs to us for engineering and pavement. Those specifications resulted in loss of additional paved parking, very important for our motorcycle riding customers. Additionally, access was granted only if we paid for paving 143rd Street from US 301 for 185 feet to the west and 20 feet wide. The pavement on 143rd alone cost us $13,460.00, A little history is important now for those who do not know. Southwest 143rd Street provides access from US 301 to the city sewage spray field and to a sod farm which leases the spray field from Starke. That business existed before we did. The nature of its business results in many vehicles weighing tens of thousands of pounds with their loads of sod using 143rd Street. The City of Starke has not paved the street. The sod business was not required to pave it for its customers to gain access. Why were we required to do so? 143rd Street beyond our required pavement is riddled with potholes and only once in four years have I seen it graded. Now I wonder why our business was required to pave what another was not in order to gain access to its business. If Starke illegally annexed 143rd Street, did the City Manager illegally burden us with additional construction specifications and costs? I think the city owes Knuckle Draggers $13,460.00. Since the decision was made by the City Manager, I think it would be appropriate for him and his supervisor(s) to reimburse us, not the taxpayers. The taxpayers have paid enough by paying the salary of managers who made bad decisions. The city managers will of course use the excuse that they were misguided by counsel. If that is the case, hire new counsel and pay up. Jack Schenck Knuckle Draggers Motorcycles and Accessories Starke Dear Editor: Thank you friends and family of the Boy Scouts of America. Our Timucua District (made up of Putnam County, Bradford County and Keystone Heights) of the North Florida Council thanks all the members of our communities. We are grateful for the parents and grandparents who bring their sons to the meetings and support them in so many waysmany of whom are also serving as scouting leaders. We are grateful for our volunteer leaders. They do so much and with very little thanks except for the smiles on the faces of the boys they serve. We are grateful for those who contribute financially. Individuals have contributed so Does illegal annexation mean city of Starke owes business? Boy Scouts thankful for support generously in our Friends of Scouting campaign. Recently we held an American Values Dinner in both Starke and in Palatka. Both were an overwhelming success. The energy and enthusiasm were wonderful. Many, many folks of our communities stepped up to invite others and the response was terrific. Once again, I thank every one of you for the effort and generosity each one has demonstrated as we move ahead in support of our boys and young men through the Boy Scouts of America. Sincerely, Richard Brinker, 2014 Chairman of the Timucua District The Kiwanis Club of Starke will be hosting its annual clay shoot on Saturday, May 17, at 9 a.m. at the Bradford Sportsmens Farm in Graham. The National Sporting Clay Association-registered shoot will award cash prizesdependent upon the overall number of shootersfor high-overall score, overall runner-up and for first, second and third places in each class (A, B and C). Registration is from 8 a.m. until 10 a.m. and costs $75, which includes 100 targets. Lunch will be available from noon until 1:30 p.m. For more information, please call Kiwanis Club of Starke member Sherry Ruszkowski at the Arc of Bradford County (904964-7699), or visit the Bradford Sportsmens Farm website at www.bsfshootingsports.com. Starke Kiwanis clay shoot is May 17 The Starke campuses of Santa Fe College are once again hosting Jr. College for Kids and College for Kids this summer, and registration is open now. Jr. College for Kids, which is for rising first-, second-, thirdand fourth-graders, is scheduled for June 23-27, 8 a.m.-noon each day. College for Kids, which is for rising fifth-, sixth-, seventh-, eighthand ninth-graders, will be held Mondays-Fridays, July 7-18, from 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. (Half-day sessions are an option.) Visit the Santa Fe College Andrews Center to register for either Jr. College for Kids or College for Kids, or to pick up a scholarship application. You may also call 904-9645382. A concert featuring Alter Eagles and the three winners of the 2014 Bradford Fest Talent Showdown will be hosted by Santa Fe College on Saturday, May 17, at 7 p.m. at the Bradford High School auditorium. Alter Eagles is a tribute band that plays the music of Eagles, the group responsible for such hits as Take It Easy, Lyin Eyes, One of these Nights and Hotel California. Tickets are $10 for general admission and $15 for reserved seats. They may be purchased at the Santa Fe College Andrews Center or the North Florida Regional Chamber of Commerce. All proceeds will go to the Santa Fe Foundation to fund scholarships for Bradford County students. College for Kids registration is ongoing Alter Eagles highlight May 17 Santa Fe concert at BHS Letters editor@bctelegraph.com The Starke Police Department has joined with hundreds of other law enforcement agencies across Florida in renewing a pledge to save lives by intensifying efforts to enforce seat belt laws during the Click It or Ticket mobilization. This enforcement, which began May 12, runs through Memorial Day (May 26). Memorial Day weekend is upon us, and that means excitement in the air and summer fun, Starke Police Chief Jeff Johnson said. We hope everyone has a safe and fun holiday weekend. Most importantly, we hope everyone returns home from their fun activities alive and well. Help ensure your chances by wearing your seatbelts. Its not only the law, but its the smart thing to do. Starke Police Capt. Barry Warren said, Worn correctly, seat belts have proven to reduce the risk of fatal injury in a crash by 45 percent for front-seat passenger vehicle occupants and by 60 percent in pickup trucks, SUVs and minivans. In fact, data shows that more than three-quarters (77 percent) of passenger vehicle occupants who were in a serious crash in 2006 and were buckled up survived the crash. To learn more, please visit www.nhtsa.gov. Click It or Ticket campaign underway in Starke

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Thursday, May 15, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 5B Join the Modular Movementat Normandy Homes you can get the home you want at a price you can afford! NO REASONABLE OFFER REFUSED! TRADE-INS WELCOME!Let Normandy Homes guide you through your home buying process. Please call for an appointment with one of our home specialists. 904-783-4619 Madison Street Baptist ChurchInvites you to an Amazing Kids Praise MusicalSunday, May 18th, at 6:00 pm900 W. Madison Street Starke, FL 32091 (904) 964-7557 www.madisonstreet.orgRev. Justin Kirksey, Senior Pastor t Crime t The following individuals were arrested recently by local law enforcement officers in Bradford, Union or Clay (Keystone Heights area) counties: Bradford Briana Roshae Aaron, 23, of Starke was arrested May 7 by Starke police for possession of cocaine and drug equipment, selling cocaine and public order crimes-using two-way communication device to commit a felony. According to the arrest report, a confidential buy was made from Aaron for cocaine and marijuana, with the transaction monitored and recorded on video by the police department. Bond was set at $155,000 for the charges. Isaiah Allen, 49, of Starke was arrested May 6 by Starke police for probation violation. No bond was allowed for the charge. Iven Keith Allen, 61, of Raiford was arrested May 6 by Bradford deputies on an out-of-county warrant for failure to appear for original charge of attaching an unassigned tag/license to a vehicle. Bond was set at $1,000 for the charge. Marvaleious IKeme Armstrong, 23, of Jacksonville was arrested May 6 by Lawtey police for driving without having a valid drivers license. Bond was set at $500 for the charge. John Michael Barnhard, 30, of St. Petersburg was arrested May 11 by Bradford deputies for possession of marijuana during a traffic stop for not wearing a seat belt. Angela McGaw Brown, 39, of Hampton was arrested May 10 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $500 for the charge. Christopher Duane Brown, 37, of Hampton was arrested May 10 by Bradford deputies for failure to appear. Bond was set at $1,000 for the charge. Tremaine Alvin Byrd, 29, of Starke was arrested May 7 by Starke police for child abuse causing bodily harm. According to the arrest report, Byrd is accused of spanking a girlfriends 7-year-old child with a switch hard enough to cause bruising to the back of the childs legs and buttocks. Bond was set at $50,000 for the charges. Ieashae Selest Chandler, 23, of Jacksonville was arrested May 9 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for Food Stamp fraud. Bond was set at $15,000 for the charge. Larry Earl Dobbs, 43, of Raiford was arrested May 6 by Bradford deputies for probation violation. Shawn Roy Fischer, 19, of Jacksonville was arrested May 7 by Bradford deputies for possession of a weapon or ammo by a convicted felon, possession of marijuana and possession of drugs-controlled substance without a prescription. According to the arrest report, a deputy was parked at the Kangaroo at S.R. 16 and U.S. 301 in Starke when a vehicle pulled in front of the deputys vehicle and slammed on the brakes. Fischer exited the vehicle and walked toward the deputy, saying he needed to use his phone. The deputy told Fischer the Kangaroo had a phone, but Fischer was acting strange, walking in circles and becoming angry at the deputy. He dropped a bag with marijuana on the ground as he went back to his vehicle, at which time the deputy asked him to stand in front of the car. The deputy found two pills and ammo to a revolver in the seat, and arrested Fischer. Bond was set at $9,500 for the charges. Preston Ford, 56, of Jacksonville was arrested May 12 by Bradford deputies on an out-of-county warrant from Jefferson for driving while license permanently revoked. Bond was set at $2,500 for the charge. Recent arrests in Bradford, Clay and Union Roger Neil Gilliam, 46, of Waldo was arrested May 6 by Starke police for disorderly intoxication and for loiteringprowling. According to the arrest report, Gilliam was found behind an office building on S.R. 100 in Starke by police after a pedestrian, observing him banging on a window, called 911. Gilliam was intoxicated and wouldnt explain to the officer what he was doing behind the building. There was no apparent damage to the window or building. Bond was set at $1,000 for the charges. Theordore Franklin Hurst, 51, of Starke was arrested May 7 by Bradford deputies for failing to register as a sex offender and for failing to report a residence change as a sex offender. Hurst is a convicted sexual predator, and bond was set at $50,000 for the charges. Brandon Lee Kay, 26, of Jacksonville was arrested May 8 by Bradford deputies for failure to appear. Taurean Tivon Keel, 25, of Gainesville was arrested May 8 by Bradford deputies for probation violation. Bond was set at $1,000 for the charge. Kenneth Ash McNeal, 50, of Brooker was arrested May 6 by Bradford deputies for resisting an officer-fleeing and eluding a law enforcement officer with lights and siren active, and for driving while license suspended or revoked. According to the arrest report, a deputy spotted McNeal driving on C.R. 18 near Graham and turned around to stop him, as the deputy knew McNeals license was permanently revoked. The deputy got behind McNeal with his flashing lights, but he didnt pull over, so the deputy activated his siren. McNeal still didnt pull over, and eventually turned off C.R. 18 and made several other turns before pulling into his residence. He told the deputy he didnt stop because he didnt want his vehicle towed. Bond was set at $20,000 for the charges. Sholeke Lomeke Merriweather, 25, of Starke was arrested May 11 by Starke police for criminal mischiefproperty damage. According to the arrest report, Merriweather got into an argument with Takiesha McCutchen outside at Whispering Oaks Aptartments in Starke. During the argument, Merriweather ran over to McCutchens vehicle and kicked it, causing damage. McCutchen, 30, of Starke, then got into her vehicle and attempted to hit Merriweather with it as she moved it to another parking space. McCutchen was also arrested by Starke police and charged with aggravated assault with a weapon. Bond was set at $500 for the charge against Merriweather, while bond for McCutchens charge was set at $1,000. Michael Wayne Minton, 39, of Middleburg was arrested May 6 by Lawtey police on an out-ofcounty warrant. Bond was set at $2,012 for the charge. Kathryn Sing Monsivais, 25, of Jacksonville was arrested May 7 by Starke police for possession of marijuana during a traffic stop. Bond was set at $500 for the charge. James McCracken Nooney, 39, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 9 by Bradford deputies for possession of marijuana, possession of cocaine, possession of drugs-controlled substance without prescription, possession of drug equipment and for destroying evidence. According to the arrest report, Nooney was a passenger in a van that was stopped for speeding at C.R. 18 and S.R. 100. They deputy smelled marijuana and asked to search the van. He found a small amount of cocaine in a wallet and then observed Nooney trying to bury a Crown Royal bag in the dirt with his foot. The bag contained a larger amount of cocaine. A K9 was then called in, discovering a plastic container with more marijuana and a pipe used for smoking the marijuana. Nooney stated that all the drugs and the pipe were his, and he was arrested. Bond was set at $85,000 for the charges. Joshua W. Padgett, 22, of Starke was arrested May 12 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked, failing to register his vehicle, possession of drugs and destroying evidence. According to the arrest report, a deputy was called to Market Road in Starke about a suspicious vehicle. The deputy observed a vehicle parked in a driveway with the gate closed and ran the tag, which wasnt registered to any vehicle. When Padgett left in the vehicle, the deputy pulled him over, but Padgett tossed two objects out the window before pulling over. The objects turned out to be synthetic marijuana, recovered by a Starke police officer, who arrived to assist the deputy. Matthew Aaron Pardekooper, 27, of Starke was arrested May 7 by Bradford deputies on an outof-county warrant from Putnam for failure to pay child support. Leslie Michelle Parrish, 31, of Starke was arrested May 12 by Bradford deputies on an out-ofcounty warrant from Union for battery with no bond allowed. Dylan Chase Phillips, 18, of Gainesville was arrested May 11 by Bradford deputies for burglary. According to the arrest report, a homeowner on Northwest C.R. 233 woke up to feed her young baby when she discovered a man asleep on her living room couch. She woke up her boyfriend, who confronted Phillips, but Phillips ran out of the back door of the house. A neighbor, who had called deputies earlier to search for a man that left his home all of a sudden after being there with his daughters friend, was outside his home when he saw Phillips being chased out of the victims home. The neighbor detained Phillips, who later told law enforcement that he was drunk and didnt know how he ended up sleeping on the couch of the victims home. Mildred Elizabeth Pope, 24, of Starke was arrested May 10 by Starke police for battery and on an out-of-county warrant from Union for failure to appear on an original charge of driving without a valid license. According to the arrest report, Pope got into an argument with her husband and cut him on the forehead by throwing an unknown object at him. She then threw a picture at him, cutting his hands with the glass frame. Bond was set at $7,500 for the charges. Maurice Javonne Portis, 25, of Starke was arrested May 6 by Bradford deputies for probation violation. Patrice Lynette Randall, 43, of Kissimmee was arrested May 9 by Bradford deputies for two charges of probation violation. Lishawn Likeith Sharon, 27, of Palatka was arrested May 8 by Lawtey police for two charges of possession of marijuana, possession of drug equipment, fraud-using a false name, driving while license suspended or revoked and for an out-ofcounty warrant. Bond was set at $106,000 for the charges. Joseph Brian Stafford, 44, of Perry was arrested May 11 by Bradford deputies for probation violation. Vincent Wayne Sutherland, 36, of Alachua was arrested May 7 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for welfare fraud. Bond was set at $1,000 for the charge. Clara Denne Tedder, 48, of Lawtey was arrested May 6 by Bradord deputies for aggravated assault with a weapon. According to the arrest report, Tedder and her boyfriend started arguing before Tedder began packing her clothes to leave the residence. When the boyfriend asked her to not take his movies, she started screaming and striking him with a shoe. She then went outside to a shed, returned with an axe and began to chase the boyfriend and his teenage son around the home. They both went outside and called law enforcement, but could hear Tedder breaking things inside the home. When deputies arrived, Tedder claimed the victim had actually started the argument by demanding she make him some food, grabbing her by the arm, head-butting her, and throwing her against a fireplace before she went outside to get the axe in self-defense. In the report, the deputy stated he didnt observe any injuries or markings on Tedder that were consistent with her story and arrested her for assault. Bond was set at $25,000 for the charge. Matthew Leon Wilkerson, 29, of Raiford was arrested May 9 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $5,000 for the charge. Allen Lee Williams, 32, of Lawtey was arrested May 12 by Bradford deputies for contempt of court-violation of an injunction protection domestic violence and for possession of cocaine. According to the arrest report, the cocaine was found on Williams when deputies arrested him on the contempt of court charge. Keystone/Melrose David Austin, 42 of Keystone Heights was arrested May 12 by Clay deputies for battery. Sarah Drawdy, 19, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 11 by Clay deputies for an out-ofcounty warrant. Delcia Fermin-Gonzales, 56, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 9 by Clay deputies for battery on a person 65 years or older. According to an arrest report, Fermin-Gonzales had an argument with her roommate and then attacked the victim with a stun gun. Curtis Franke, 24, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 8 by Clay deputies for contempt of court. Earl Murby, 49, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 9 by Clay deputies for aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. According to an arrest report, Murby and another man were arguing about money when Murby pulled out a gun and fired five rounds toward the victims camper. Murby then walked over to the camper and fired two additional rounds, while threatening the other mans girlfriend. Marc Perreault, 35, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 7 by Clay deputies for a probation violation. Natalee Strombeck, 22, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 7 by Clay deputies for failure to appear. Travis Vazquez, 25, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 12 by Clay deputies for possession of not more than 20 grams of cannabis and reckless driving. Tony Waters, 50, of Keystone Heights was arrested on May 8 by Clay deputies for discharging a firearm in public, possession of not more than 20 grams of cannabis, battery and possession of drug paraphernalia. According to a sheriffs office report, Waters confronted three men who were doing wheelies on dirt bikes and ATVs in the dry bed of Lake Geneva near his home. With his granddaughter watching, Waters struck two of the men in the sternum with the barrel of a 12-gauge shotgun. As the victims fled the scene, Waters fired three shots over their heads. A Clay County deputy wrote that before interviewing Waters about the incident, he patted down Waters for his own safety. During the search, the deputy found marijuana and a pipe in Waters pants pockets.

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Weve got to find a way to get more guys involved and more guys on the field, and be able to have a little more gas in the fourth quarter, Pruitt said. Younger players will have to step up, but Driggers is confident in how things will play out. Some of them still have a lot of learning and growing to do, Driggers said, but I think well do very well. Union caps the spring by hosting a classic against Duval Charter on Friday, May 23, at 7 p.m. Youre glad to get on the field and actually hit somebody whos not wearing the same colors as you, Driggers said. stake. Theyre trying to learn. Their noses are in the playbook. Reynolds is excited about the fact he has seven rising seniors battling for spots along the offensive line, saying, Were getting as much production from the offensive line as we have the last three or four springs. In looking at all of the players attending practices, Reynolds said they are eager to learn from coaches and fellow players and diligent in attending meetings and fulfilling other requirements. Luke said its a good, closeknit group. Weve all got each others backs no matter what, Luke said. Were going to be there for each other. Bradford will play an intra-squad Scarlet and Gray scrimmage on Thursday, May 15, at 6 p.m. (Admission is free.) The Tornadoes will cap the spring with a three-team classic at Newberry High School on Friday, May 23. Play begins at 7 p.m. with Bradford taking on Dunnellon. Dunnellon will then play Newberry before Newberry plays Bradford. Its going to just be great to be out there in another game-day situation, Luke said. Nothing beats game days. Keystone The Indians are coming off of a district championship season, which provides a good spark for spring practices, Gibbs said. However, he also noted that the team will lose quite a few seniors, so the 2014 team cant get caught up in what happened last season. Gibbs mindset is, Lets just get it started, boys, (and) not think about last year, not think about the past. Just start off fresh and make things happen for us and make our own name. Keystone loses 14 players from last season and could count on a lot of newcomers. Weve got a big freshman class, head coach Chuck Dickinson said. Im looking at a lot of them this spring to see if they can play or not. There are several areas of concern for Keystone. The Indians will have to replace quarterback Blake Valenzuela and tight end Micah Brown, as well as find several new starters on the offensive line to play alongside Joe Pace and Roy Williams. On defense, the Indians currently have no returning linebackers, with Sam Anderson sitting out this spring as he 6B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, May 15, 2014 Dr. Anubha Gupta received her family medicine training from Jamaica Hospital Medical Center in New York City and her fellowship training in geriatric medicine from the VA Medical Center in Gainesville. She received her medical degree from Terna Medical College, Navi Mumbai, India. Dr. Gupta will be joining the staff of PALMS MEDICAL GROUP facilities in Starke every Tuesday. She will be seeing pediatric and adult clients for routine health maintenance and sick visits. Dr. Guptas husband is attending the University of Florida with a Fellowship in Pediatric Cardiology & Pediatrics ICU. The joy in the doctors lives is their toddler son. They are making their home in Gainesville, hopefully for a very long time! NEW DOCTOR IN TOWN Continued from 1B recovers from an ACL injury. Thats a big concern, Dickinson said, along with depth in the secondary. Defensive backs Gibbs and Ray Trimble return, plus Hogg also got quite a bit of experience as a starter late last season. Some of those players in the secondary, though, will be counted on to play key positions on offense as well. Youre going to have to know more than one position, but weve always been that way, Dickinson said. So far, this spring has involved a lot more teaching as coaches are evaluating so many younger players. Last year, going into the spring, I didnt have to spend as much time on the teaching end of it, Dickinson said. Were trying to keep stuff simple this year. Right now, weve got kids who dont understand the routes and things like that, but itll come. Gibbs said his fellow players are like brothers, and he cant wait to start the season with them. However, he knows the team is not where it needs to be just yet. Weve just got to keep working hard every practice and not give anything less than 110 percent, Gibbs said. Keystone will travel to St. Augustine to play a classic against Menendez on Friday, May 23, at 7 p.m. Im ready to hit somebody else and get our season started, Gibbs said. Union The Tigers lose 17 players from last season, but Pruitt doesnt see a lot of difference between the players out this spring and the ones who come out in springs past. They are coachable and do whatever is asked of them, Pruitt said. This year, though, the Tigers seem to be benefiting from new strength and conditioning coach Mark Williams. Hes got these kids pumped up about getting strong and getting in shape, Pruitt said. Driggers is just pumped up to be out on the field again, saying, I like being able to spend time with the guys Im going to be playing with over the fall and just growing with them and getting better. Battling it out through tough, hot practices is not always easy, Driggers said, but he added it just takes a certain mindset to be successful. You can always push harder than you think, he said, adding, If you push through it, it just makes you stronger. The right mindset is key also in that some players find themselves learning positions theyre not familiar with. For example, players who have most of their experience on the defensive side of the ball are getting a look at offensive line, Pruitt said. Were putting them in different roles and trying to teach them, Pruitt said. Theyre picking it up. Theyve got great attitudes. There are key roles to be filled on the offensive side of the ball as just two starters return on the offensive line and one returns to the offensive backfield. Defensively, the Tigers have issues, too. Driggers is the only returner at linebacker, while the secondarys most experienced player returning is probably Kel Galloway, who played a limited role last year. Isaiah Johnson also brings experience to the secondary, but he has been and will be such an important part of the offense. Josh Smith works on 904-368-0687 p h 904-368-0689 fax M ARGARET ANDERSON101 1 N. Temple Ave. Starke. FL (US 301 North)Family Law & Will Preparation30 years experience Margaret will continue to serve clients in Alachua County as well as Bradford & Union counties

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of Santo Domingo. Although our lodgings in Oaxaca were inexpensive$150 per person per week for a shared double roompremium lodgings are available. Tami stayed at a nice hotel for $150 per night. Another student, who was sent for Spanish studies by his employer, stayed at an even more impressive luxury hotel, Quinta Real. The Quinta had the look of a former convent or monastery and reminded me of paradors that Id stayed at in Europe. During our stay in Oaxaca, Susan and I felt completely safe. Before we left, we checked for U.S. Department of State travel advisories and found none related to Oaxaca. We often saw police patrolling the city on foot, accompanied by leashed dogs. One evening, when we couldnt find a restaurant we wanted to try, we asked one of the policemen to help us. He promptly radioed someone to get the information, and together with several of his colleagues, escorted us to the place. On my last evening in Oaxaca, Susan and I joined four other students from the school for a buffet dinner and a colorful folk dance exhibition at Quinta Real. During one of the numbers, a male performer grabbed my hand and led me to the stage to dance. Several others in the audience accepted similar invitations, not quite understanding exactly what we were doing, but getting the hang of it in a spirit of international goodwill. I cant say that I had a breakthrough learning experience with Spanish during my week in Oaxaca. By far, the most frustrating moments came during conversation, when the vast expanse of my ignorance hit full force. Id sit in silence, white noise filling my brain as I struggled to formulate the words needed to express my thoughts. However, I can say that my Spanish, limited though it may be, proved more than adequate for shopping, ordering meals, taking taxis and asking directions. I had an enjoyable time in Oaxaca, an intense and lively learning experience. After a week of study, I understood that fluency in Spanish would take me years to attain. With pocket translators readily accessible on my Smartphone, Ill probably never have sufficient motivation to learn, but theres more to learning another language than wrestling with grammatical rules. Ill always treasure memories of simple human interactions with people of another culture, from a different country, who spoke and taughta mellifluous language not my own. William Curtis Watson and Flossie Nix Watson. She moved to Starke around 1955. Doris worked for Rowe Enterprises until retiring in 2009, where she was famous for home cooked lunches and also breakfast and lunches for the hunters at Moccasin Quail Preserve. She was a member of Kingsley Lake Baptist Church in Starke. She is preceded in death by her parents, Curt and Flossie Watson, by her husbands, Olan Rowe and Melvin Summerlin and two brothers: Frank Watson and James E. Watson. She is survived by: her daughter, Sharon (Al) Coston of Starke, three sons, Jerry (Donna) Rowe of Starke, Gary (Mary) Rowe of Moyock, N.C., and Mel Summerlin of Gainesville, a step-son, Jimmy (Aileen) Summerlin of Jacksonville, a sister, Theresa Watson Reardon of Albany, Ga., a brother, William Russell (Evelyn) Watson of Hampton, two sister-inlaws, Joan Watson of Graham, and Carolyn Watson of Ray City, Ga., 13 grandchildren; and 14 greatgrandchildren. She is also survived by many loving cousins, nieces, nephews and friends in Florida and Georgia. Funeral Services will be held on Sunday, May 18, at 2:00 p.m. at Kingsley Lake Baptist Church, State Road 16 East in Starke, with Pastor Zeb Cook officiating. Interment will be at Crosby Lake Cemetery in Starke. Visitation will be held on Saturday, May 17, from 6:00-8:00 p.m. at Jones Gallagher Funeral Home, 620 E. Nona Street, Starke. In lieu of flowers donations may be made in memory of Doris to: Kingsley Lake Baptist Church, 6289 Mary Dot Lane, Starke, FL. 32091 or to Haven Hospice, 4200 N.W. 90 th Blvd, Gainesville, FL. 32606. Arrangements under the care of nephew, Clay Watson owner of Watson Funeral Home, 426 W. Wade Street, Trenton, FL. 32693 (352) 463-8888, and assisted by nephew, Doug Watson. Online condolences or to sign the guest book at www.watsonfhtrenton. com PAID OBITUARY Thursday, May 15, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 7B Funeral with Burial20 Ga. Metal Casket (4 colors) Vault, Open & Closing Grave, Graveside or Chapel Service with one night visitation. . . . . . .$5,595Funeral with Cremation(Rental Casket with Visitation prior to Services). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,895Direct Cremation with Memorial ServiceServices held at Archer Memorial Chapel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,895 Archer Funeral Home Pre-payment accepted Within Your Means Now, Peace of Mind Always 55 North Lake Avenue Lake Butler, Florida 32054 Serving F amilies in North Florida since 1973 S TARKE OFFICE OPEN 8:30 to 5:30 MON-FRIHwy 301 North, Starke 904-964-2010 (Next to Best Western) The area s largest supplier of Colored GraniteWhen Quality Counts, You Can Count On UsPrimary Location in Lake City at 561 NW Hilton Ave.Member of Better Business Bureau Monument Builders of North America Florida Monument BuildersFL Lic. # F037700 SR-230 E (2 miles east of US-301)B anquet Hall Driving Range Check out our web pagewww .starkegolf.com M emberships Available E xcellent Driving RangeP ro Shop Gift CertificatesG olf Lessons by AppointmentP rofessionally Run Tournaments H ome of the Strawberry Invitational Li ke us on facebook D ont Forget Flowers, Occasions and More...Flowers Live Plants Silks Balloons Gift Baskets Greeting Cards (904) 368-9725 368-9739 fax923 N. Pine Street Starke(formerly Tammys Flowers)come to starting at $20 www.atpflowers.com Owners Vince & Iana Adrienne Patterson d Obituaries d Grace Berry STARKEGrace South Berry 97, died Monday, May 5, 2014. She was born in Balwin, Miss. on June 23, 1916, and lived in Starke for the past 22 years. She is the daughter of the late B.C South and Kate Hifflin South. She worked as a bookkeeper for Plough Inc. She is preceded in death by her husband: Virgil A. Berry. She is survived by: her step son Dr. Virgil Berry of Starke; sister, Barbara Lumpkin of Oklahoma City; one granddaughter; one grandson; and one great-granddaughter. Archer Funeral Home is in charge of all arrangements, Burial will be held at a later date. Florence Silcox NORWALK, OHIO Florence H. Silcox, 94, of Norwalk, Ohio, passed away Tuesday evening, April 29, 2014 in Twilight Gardens Home. She was born April 2, 1920 in Havana, Ohio to the late George N. and Myerl R. (Perry) Baker, and was a lifelong area resident. Florence was the Valedictorian of the North Fairfield High School Class of 1937. She was a member of St. Peter Evangelical Lutheran Church, Norwalk, and was a former employee of Schilds IGA in Norwalk. Florence enjoyed playing cards, bingo, reading, embroidery, baking, and studying her Bible, and spending time with her family. Florence was preceded in death by her husband, Oscar A. Silcox in 1998, and by her sister, Vernice Roth. She is survived by: her daughters, Yvonne (Daniel) Obringer of Norwalk, and Mary (Thomas) Osborn of Keystone Heights. She is also survived by her grandchildren, Kathleen Miller, Amy (Sean) Berry, Jeffrey (Amy) Obringer, and Gregory (Ann) Obringer, and by her great-grandchildren, Colleen, Erica, and Kennan Miller, Larissa, Alaina, Ian, Brenna, Anessa, Sela, and Mara Berry, Colin, Quinn, Matigan, Samantha, Sydney, Blake, Garrett, and Eli Obringer. Services were held Saturday, May 3, at 11:00 a.m. in St. Peter Evangelical Lutheran Church, 243 Benedict Avenue, Norwalk. Rev. David Connor officiated. Interment was in St. Peter Lutheran Cemetery in Pontiac. Memorial contributions may be made to Stein Hospice Service, 1200 Sycamore Line, Sandusky, Ohio 44870, or to St. Peter Evangelical Lutheran Church, 243 Benedict Ave., Norwalk, OH 44587. Walker Funeral Home, 98 West Main Street, Norwalk was in charge of arrangements. Online condolences may be made by going to www.edwalkerfuneralhome.com. PAID OBITUARY Doris Summerlin STARKE Doris Watson Summerlin, age 82, died peacefully on Saturday, May 10, 2014 after an extended illness. She was born on Sept. 21, 1931 in Lakeland, Ga., to We the family of the late Vera Aaron would like to thank each and everyone for all of the love youve shown to our family. We could never thank you enough. We will forever be so very grateful to each and every one of you. We would like to give a special thanks to Haile Funeral Home and staff for going above and beyond their call of duty during our time of bereavement. We would also like to give a special thanks to Dr. Joelle Simon-Greenwood for always being there for Vera. We will never forget any of you. Thanks again The Family of the late Vera Aaron Card of Thanks Jesse Wheeler STARKE Mr. Jesse Thomas Wheeler, age 67, of Starke passed away Wednesday, May 7, 2014 at Shands UF from injuries sustained in an automobile accident. Mr. Wheeler was born on Jan. 20, 1947 in Nashville, Tenn. to the late Herschel Fred Wheeler, Sr. and Nellie Bell (Thomas) Wheeler and was a lifelong area resident. Prior to retirement he was the meat market manager for Winn Dixie and later worked for Hitchcocks as their meat market manager. Jesse served six years in the Florida Army National Guard and operated a booth at the Waldo Flea Market where he made many friends. He was a Gator fan and a NASCAR fan especially Dale Earnhart. Jesse was a very involved grandfather, enjoyed fishing and along with his family had a wildlife sanctuary. In addition to his parents he was preceded in death by his brother Herschel Fred Wheeler, Jr. Survivors are: sons, Richie Wheeler and Devin Wheeler both of Starke; brothers, Paul (Pam) Wheeler of Starke, Jimmy (Cindy) Wheeler of Starke, Donald J.J. (Linda) Wheeler of Keystone Heights; grandson, Konley Snyder of Starke; close friend and mother of his children, Glenda Wheeler of Starke. A casual memorial service will be held on Saturday afternoon, May 17, at 4 oclock in the Dewitt C. Jones Chapel of Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home, 620 Nona Street, Starke, with Reverend Gene Bass officiating. In lieu of flowers contributions may be made in is memory to your favorite charity. Arrangements are by Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home of Starke 904-964-6200. On-line condolences may be left at www. jonesgallagherfh.com. PAID OBITUARY Continued from 3B

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8B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, May 15, 2014 EQUAL HOUSING OP PORTUNITY. All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex or national origin, or an in tention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal cus todians, pregnant women and people securing cus tody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate, which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimina tion, call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777, the tollfree telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. For further information call Florida Commission on Human Relations, Lisa Sutherland 850-488-7082 ext #1005 Commercial FOR RENT PROFESSION AL OFFICE, 1,500 sq.ft. $1,000/mo.up to 3,000 sq.ft. Contiguous $2,000/ mo. Warehouse 3,000 sq. ft. $800/mo. Smith & Smith Realty. 904-9649222. RETAIL SPACE in busy strip center. 1,000 sq.ft. and 2,000 sq. ft. units. South HWY 301 front age, across from the KOA Campground. Call 352235-1675. DOWNTOWN STARKE Pro $315 per month. Confer ence room, kitchen, utili ties and more provided. 904-364-8395. 3BR/2BA living room, din ing room, family room, laundry room. Back porch is screened in. Storage shed. Large fenced & paint. A/C. Immaculate condition. $120,000.00. Near downtown & schools. 823 Parkwood Place. 912-843-2194 or 912-281-9053 2007 2 BED DWMH Like new cond. w/ low-e windows. $39,900 setup & delivered 904-259-4663 Bradford Union Clay 40Notices 41Auctions 42M otor Vehicles & Accessories43R Vs & Campers 44Boats &ATVs 45Land for Sale 46Real Estate Out of Area 47Commercial Property (Rent, Lease, Sale) 48Homes for Sale 49Mobile Homes for Sale 50For Rent 61Scriptur es 62Vacation/Travel 63Love Lines 64Business Opportunities65Help Wanted 66In vestme nt O ppo rtunities67Hunting Land for Rent 68Carpet Cleaning 69Food Supplements 70Money to Lend 71Farm Equipment 72Computers & Accessories51Lost/Found 52Animals & Pets53AY ard Sales53BKeystone Yard Sales53CLake Butler Y ard Sales54Pr oduce 55Wanted 56Antiques 57For Sale 58Child/Adult Home Car e59Personal Services 60Home Impr ovementW ord Ad Classified Tuesday, 12:00 noon Classified Display Tuesday, 12:00 noon964-6305 473-2210 496-2261 C lassified Advertising should be paid in advance unless credit has already been established with the newspaper. A $3.00 service charge will be added to all billing to cover postage and handling. All ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser at the time of placement. However, the classified staff cannot be held responsible for mistakes in classified advertising taken by phone. The newspaper reserves the right to correctly classify and edit all copy or to reject or cancel any advertisements at any time. Only standard abbrevations will be accepted. T O PLACE A CLASSIFIED USE YOUR PHONE Are you looking for an AFFORDABLE Medicare Supplement solution?WE HAVE IT!SENIORS COMPARE (Monthly Premium)$216 (Monthly Premium)$55 1-800-942-2003CALL TODAY! DURRANCE PUMP Q UALITY SERVICE SINCE 1964 Pumps Sales Parts Service ST ATE LICENSE #1305 N EED C ASH F AST! E mail your med-to-hi-resolution digital photo (150dpi+) & ad text to: by 5pm Monday or bring it to:B radford County Telegraph Union County Times Lake Region Monitor( 904) 964-6305 c ash/check/credit cards accepted all for only /wk c overing Bradford, Union & Clay Counties a in our weekly f ree c ommunity shopper: T arget your audience quickly (904) 964-6305 (352) 473-2210 (386) 496-2261 Classified Ads Where one call does it all! Want to reach people?Nows the perfect time to see just how well our classifieds can work for you. Whether youre looking for a great buy or a great place to sell, call our classified department today.904-964-6305Ask for Mary Fins, Fur & Tails tumbler scaler the deheading Since it is bream fishing season, it is also bream cleaning season. For those who ardently look for the beds, catch them in large numbers and eat them, the cleaning chore can be much more daunting than the catching part. These are the finned creatures that can keep the attention of the youngest members of the family who want to go fishing, but quickly become bored when it comes to waiting. Shellcrackers, redbellies and bluegills are all excellent eating. Just do not try to fillet them, because they are just a little too small for the boning procedure. Learn where the pin bones are and separate them after cooking, and the backbone presents no problems. Without filleting them, you will necessarily scale them, which, along with the bones, actually enhances the taste. Unfortunately, it also makes the process a little more tedious and adds to the daunting nature of cleaning large numbers of small fish. Some fishermen who love catching and eating bream have become rather efficient at the cleaning process, and Dennis Burkhalter is one of these fishermen. Burkhalter can clean a large bunch of panfish without making a big mess, and he can do it quite efficiently as well. Burkhalter uses a tumbler scaler, which advertises that it can scale 50 fish at a time. However, Burkhalter prefers to use groups of 20. It takes less time and does a better job, he said. After the scaling process, Burkhalter removes the fish one at a time and places them on a modified paper cutter, as shown in the accompanying photo. He raises the lever, places the fish into position and with one cut, he cleanly removes the fishs head. This could not be done with the original paper-cutting blade because it typically has a square or chamfer edge. In order to cut fish flesh, the blade needs a beveled edge like a knife. Burkhalter removed the papercutting blade and put a sharp, knife-like edge on it. The process is smooth, clean and completed in microseconds. Another tool that Burkhalter uses is a citrus spoon. The spoon is shaped like any other spoon, but it has serrated edges. The spoon is perfectly sized to clean the body chamber of panfish, and with one scoop into the fishs body, it needs only to be washed off to complete the cleaning process in record time. Making quick work of cleaning bream Outdoors outlook The big female bass are less common at local tournaments, and the bass bite has tapered off locally in late spring. The cool water-loving crappie are gradually seeking the colder temperatures in deeper water, which is also slowing their bite. However, May starts the beginning of bream season. The warmer weather triggers these panfishs spawning instinct, and they will readily pop a cork under the water. These are great targets for those youngsters that are too impatient for bass. The shellcrackers, which are the largest of the three types, will probably bed around full moon in many of the local lakes. The bluegills, which are just as broad, but not as thick in body size, will peak their bedding habits for the month around the same moon, but they are so prolific that they are already spreading their pungent mating smell around the shorelines. The redbellies, which are the smallest, but also the prettiest of the three, will follow bluegill habits, but in the creeks and rivers in our local areas. K.J. Stormant and Jim Thornton launched their boat at Sampson Lake on May 13 in the afternoon and bream fished the docks and lake cover of Sampson with little luck. However, the wind made it difficult for them to stay in place, so they sought refuge in the canal between Sampson and Rowell. Finally, they found a few places where it was difficult to keep crickets on their hooks, and they ended up with a cooler half full of keepers. More telling was the fact that some of the fish appeared to be full of roe. Tournament results At the April 29 Bald Eagle Bass Tournament, Andy Spartman and Darren Cowart placed first and also landed the big bass, while Evan Hurst and Joe Yarborough placed second. Cody Black and Robert Black took first in the May 7 Bald Eagle event, with Hurst and Yarborough placing second. Ed Prader placed third, while Erick Dougherty and Emily Canto landed the big bass. At the April 30 Sampson Lake Bass Tournament, Zack Smith and Richard Kingsberry placed first, while Bradon Gray and Cason Noles placed second. Sam Sibley and Donnie Brooks made up the third-place team, while Jonathon Nash and Randal Alvarez were fourth. Mike Christie landed the big bass. Trevor Corbitt and Drew Rogers landed the big bass at the May 8 Sampson Lake Bass tournament and placed first. Alvarez and Mike Rhoden placed second, while James Robinson and Tyler Carr were third. Braden Esimer and Tommy Wallace placed fourth. Local fishermen continue to make good showings in major charity tournaments in the Palatka area. The April 26 NEFAR tournament, which gives its proceeds to Haven Hospice, featured a good number of locals that finished with recognition, including Timmy Givens, Coy Givens, Wally Johns, Mark Roberts, Glen Barnes, C.K. Ryan, Chuck Foster, Richard Barnes, Robert Black, Cody Black, Treg Johns and John Mobley. The Save Rodman Tournament, organized to support the preservation of Rodman Lake, gave up the winning position to Wally Johns of Starke and Mark Roberts of Middleburg. Tight lines until next week.

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Thursday, May 15, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 9B BIGGEST SALE EVER All homes 20% off. With free furni ture. Ends 5/20 904-259-4663 waynefriermacclenny. com 2008 14x70 2 BED $19,900 Setup & delivered. 904-259-4663 waynefriermacclenny. com BRAND NEW 28x80 4 bed $59,900 28x60 3 bed $49,900 Setup w/AC, steps & skirting 904-259-4663 waynefriermacclenny. com USED DOUBLE WIDE will move free. Only $9,900. 904-783-4619 DOLLAR & A DEED can get you a new 3BR/2BA. Only $350/month. 904-7834619 WILL MOVE FOR FREE. 16x80 3BR/2BA. Only $16,900. 904-783-4619 16x80 3BR/2BA. $1500/ down, $250/month. 904-783-4619 NEVER BEFORE TI TLED 2013 4BR Palm Harbor only $550/month. 904-783-4619 PALM HARBOR 4BR/2BA. Over 2,300 sqft. Only $450/month. 904-7834619. SUITE OF OFFICES IN CLUDES Kitchen, Show er, Washer Dryer. Down town STARKE $1000/ MO. For information Call 904-364-9022. PERMANENT ROOMS for rent at the Magnolia Hotel. Both refrigerator and microwave. Special rates, by the month. Call 904-964-4303 for more information. 3BR/2BA living room, din ing room, family room, laundry room. Back porch is screened in. Storage shed. Large fenced & paint. A/C. Immacu late condition. No pets other than service ani mals. $950/month plus deposit. Near downtown & schools. 823 Parkwood Place. 912-843-2194 or 912-281-9053 MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT starting at $525 per month. Hidden Oaks, Lake Butler. Call 386496-8111. NICE MOBILE HOMES in Lake Butler & Starke 2 & 3 BR single wides, fenced. 2BR/2BA. Lake front. Deposit required. Call 678-438-6828. WE HAVE 2 OR 3 bed room MH, clean, close to prison. Call 352-468-1323 2BR MH. CR 221 OFF 301. $475/month Please call 352-468-1455 3BR/1.5BA VERY CLEAN. Large yard, perfect for a family. $550/month plus deposit. 904-364-8135 50 HOUSE for rent. In good condition. For more infor mation call, 904-290-0083 OR 904-964-5006. LIVE IN THE COUNTRY. 14 X60 MOBILE HOME. 2BR/1BA. CH/A, very clean. $300 deposit, $550/ mo. Call 904-782-3380 or 904-451-5236. CLEAN 2BR HOMES in Keystone. Available May 29. From $525 up to $600/ mo. has lake access. Includes lawn & mainte nance. Call 352-478-8321 2BR/1BA APT. CH/A. Elec tric range, refrig. Wall to wall carpet. $400/mo. sec. deposit. References, call 904-966-1334. NICE FURNISHED ROOMS for rent. Low income, SSI is welcomed. Own bathroom, kitchen, large out door sitting porch. Dis nursing assistant in home. $250 Call 904-769-8077 anytime. 2BR/1BA MH. $450/mo. $450 deposit First, Last and Security required to move in. Located on CR 364-7107. 3BR/2BA DW. $550/month, $550/security deposit, plus $150/deposit on electric. Call 904-3646145 & leave message. 3BR/2BA DW 12273 SE 21st Ave., Starke. $650/ month plus $650/security. Out in country. Service animals only! 904-9648637. IN LAWTEY 4BR/2BA CH/A, water softener. $750/mo., 904-364-9869. OFFICES FOR LARGE STAFF. Includes living qtrs, showers, kitchen, washer & dryer. This is a living qtrs. $1000/month. Call 904-364-9022 2BR/1BA SW. CH/A $600/ mo. $300/deposit. Be tween Lake Butler & Rai ford. 904-305-8287 or 904-263-3999 2BR/2BA SW. Outside Starke city limits. CH/A. $500/mo. $500/deposit. 352-235-6319 3BR/2BA SW. Outside Starke city limits. CH/A. $575/month plus $575/ deposit. Please call 352-235-6319 KEYSTONE HEIGHTS. 4BR/2BA DW. In High Ridge. CH/A. $650/month plus $650/deposit. Please call 352-235-6319 MELROSE 2BR/2BA. Con veniently located in town. Clean. $675/month plus last & security. Please call 352-235-1143 or 352475-3094 KEYSTONE 2BR/1BA. 1 acre fenced. SW w/room addition. Clean. $525/ month plus last & security. Please call 352-475-3094 or 352-235-1143 Yard Sales YOUTH CAMP FUNDRAIS ER. First Baptist Church of Raiford Sat., May 17 8am-12pm. Yard sale inside fellowship hall (rain yard sale before going to camp and all must go! Anyone interested in buying everything come make a reasonable offer and take it all! SAT 8AM-2PM. 403 South Cherry St. Come and see. BIG 2 FAMILY YARD SALE. 347 SE 71st Street, Starke. Crystal Lake home sites. Sat & Sun 9am-4pm. FRI & SAT 9AM-3PM. Lo cated near Southside Elementary on SR 100. Sales MOVING SALE IN MEL ROSE Sat 10am-4pm, no early sales!! Everything goes at low low prices! Garden and woodwork ing shop tools, furniture, kitchen items, electronics, saws, and much more; about 150 items, no junk! 6026 Dogwood Lane off SR 26 in Melrose, 3/4 mile town. For Sale PURE BRED Americana, Deleware, and Red Sex Links for sale. $1.75 each. Hatching eggs available. 386-496-2985 HOME DAYCARE all hours. Great rates. 30 plus years experience. All hours, lots of TLC. HRS certified, CPR certified and First 496-1062. CLARK FOUNDATION RE PAIRS, INC. Correction of termite & water-dam aged wood & sills. Level ing & raising Houses/ Bldgs. Pier Replacement & alignment. We do all types of tractor work, excavation and small demolition jobs. Free Es timates: Danny (Buddy) Clark, 904-545-5241. HOW TO COUPON: Save hundreds of dollars monthly. Learn couponing the correct way. In local area for limited time. See: www.how-to-coupon.com or text: 386-546-8737 No Calls Please! DRIVERS: $5,000 SIGN-ON BONUS! Great Pay! Consistent Freight, Great Miles on This Regional Account. Werner Enterprises: 1-855-515-8447 SECURITY (NIGHT SHIFT), FOR SAT/SUN/HOLI DAYS. We are an EEOC, drug free workplace. We offer dental & health insur ance, paid holiday and vacation. Apply at Gil man Building Products, CR 218 Maxville, FL. or fax resume to 904-2897736 LOCAL STARKE BUSI NESS is looking to hire a part-time and/or full-time staff member. Optional shifts are available and Military Veterans are wel come to apply! We are looking for a self-starter, goal oriented person with the willingness to learn. No experience necessary! E-mail application request to vtoddf@gmail.com UF DAIRY UNIT seeks milkers/farm work. 40 hours per week. Pos sibility of working days, nights, weekends and/or holidays. Must have reli able transportation. Back ground check required. Apply at 13200 NW 59th Drive Gainesville, FL. 32653 NEED HANYMAN for some jobs on inside home and outside work. Must have references. For more info please call 904-3680659 NEED LIVE IN SITTER for 2 children. Keystone area. Call 904-614-6632 if interested. DRIVERS, CDL-A: Home EVERY weekend! All loaded/empty miles paid! Dedicated southeast! Or lease: No money down, no credit check. 1-800-823-0323 EQUIPMENT OPERATOR. The New River Solid Waste Association is seeking qualified appli cants for the position of Equipment Operator. Re sponsibilities will include operation of a variety of heavy equipment in addi tion to screening wastes for removal of unauthor ized materials. Experi ence in the operation and maintenance of heavy operation experience is desired. Employee will be required to complete a Landfill Operator and an Inmate Supervision course within 6 months of employment. Gradu ation from high school or GED needed. Salary range will vary based on experience. Applications can be picked up at the Administration Office at New River Regional Road 121, 2 miles north of Raiford, Florida. Dead line for submitting ap plications will be May 28th, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. For further information, call 386-431-1000. New River Solid Waste is a drug-free workplace; drug testing will be required. NRSWA is an Equal Opportunity Employer LOCAL CHRISTIAN SCHOOL seeking dedi cated, dependable, Christ-minded individual for vacant position. Ex perienced, A Beka Certi student seeking a BA in Education preferred. Call 904-964-6100 for applica tion information. HAIRBIZ STYLING SA LON is looking for an experienced nail tech. Call 352-258-4135 or 386-496-2078 DISABLED WOMAN needs help with activities of daily living. Such as dressing, bathing, toileting, and meal preparation. In need of live in custodial care giver in exchange for free room & board. Only seri ous, dedicated persons need to apply. Please call 352-478-8167 FRONT DESK POSITION in dental clinic. Com puter skills a MUST, to tal electronic records. Check in/out, INS veri and collection of pay ments. Fax resume to 352-485-1961. Salary BRADFORD TERRACE 808 S. Colley Rd. Starke, FL 32091 is now accept ing applications Long-term care exp. preferred. Apply in person at or Fax resume to 904-964-1497 DFWP. EOE. BRADFORD TERRACE 808 S. Colley Rd. Starke, FL 32091 is now accept ing applications exp preferred. Apply in person or Fax resume to 904-964-1497 DFWP. EOE. UNION COUNTY SOLID WASTE is currently ac cepting applications for a P/T roll-off truck driver, Inmate supervisor. Ap plicant must have at least 5 years experience in operating a truck, have at least a Class B license by the interview date, be able to lift at least 50pds, pass a drug screening and a DOC background check. This position will be Monday-Friday and will go to F/T on Sept 22, 2014. (904) 964-6305 (352) 473-2210 (386) 496-2261 Classified Ads Where one call does it all! FOR SALEOlder 2BR/1BA singe wide on 2.10 acres, w/ heat & A/C in need of some repairs. Can be lived in with minimal repairs. Has well, septic, and elect. Several storage bldgs, & livestock pen w/water.Call 386-496-1215 for more information$28,500NO OWNER FINANCE NO RENT TO OWN will help you, unconditionally love. Hands on with your baby. Maintain contact. Allowed expenses paid. Doug & Liz 866-777-9344 Susan StockmanFL # 0342521 A childless loving married couple seeks to adopt. Will be hand on mom/dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Dawn & Domenick 1(855)985-4592. Adam Sklar #0150789 Be the 1st and Only Distributor in your area! Unlimited $ return. Small investment required. Call toll free 1-844-225-1200. Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial Aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877741-9260 www.FixJets.com earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-2663731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE Commissions average $56K+/ yr. Training & leads. Sales experience required, LA&H license preferred. Call Jessica at 904-562-9527. Learn to drive for Werner Enterprises! Earn $750 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! 1-888-368-1964 $$$ Top Pay $$$ Be a Name, Not a Number Quality Home Time! BCBS + Pet & Rider Orientation Sign On Bonus CDL-A Req 877-258-8782 www.ad-drivers.com Hey Girls! Heres Your Chance Win $5,000 Cash, a Recording Contract, and Many More Prizes! 18+ Only Call (904) 2468222 Roy Aderholt at 1-386-397-3856 or 1-386-755-2615 AU#1596 AB#1133 PUBLIC AUCTION 6 miles south of Lake City on US Hwy 41 & 441Saturday, May 17 at 9 amYour consignments are welcome. Cash, personal checks, business checks. 10% Buyer PremiumFor more information call FOR SALE (3.2 miles south from intersection of US 301 & SR100) CALL MIKE352-665-8067mhanksgatorcountry@yahoo.com BUS DRIVERS NEEDEDUnion County School Board 40 hour Training Class provided. CDL required to enroll.ContactMike: 386-496-2182orMark: 904-966-2396 F lorida Credit Union has a FT teller position available at our Starke branch. Experience with high volume cash handling, maintaining cash drawer, balancing, cross-selling, and customer service expertise is required. Prior credit union/bank experience is a plus. We offer competitive salary, incentives, and excellent benefits. Stop by our Starke branch at 2460 Commercial Drive (near Walmart) to complete an application or send resum to: F lorida Credit Union, Attn: HR/TLR, P.O. Box 5549, Gainesville, FL 32627 Fax: 352-264-2661 E mail: krose@flcu.org M/F/D/V EOE Drug Free Workplace rffntb b rfntfbnfffbffnbnff ffbfrfffbfnfnfbfntfnf frfntbfbfffrtffbfbffbnf fntfffrfnff Southern Villas of StarkeAsk about our 1&2 BR Apartments HC & non-HC Units. Central AC/ Heat, on-site laundry, playground, private, quiet atmosphere. 1001 Southern Villas Dr. Starke, FL Equal Housing Opportunity 2 Bedroom Townhome$100 security1/2 OFF 1st 3 m onths rentEqual housing opportunity This institution is an equal o pportunity provider & employer. 1 Bdrm $460 2 Bdrm $485 3 Bdrm $515 801 South Water Street Starke, FL 32091 TDD/TTY 711 1, 2, & 3 bedroom HC & Non-HC accessible apartments.This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. Equal Housing Opportunity EXTRA CASH! Could you use some now that the holidays are over? We specialize in helping people sell through our Classifieds! YARD SALES AUTOS BOATS CLOTHES APPLIANCES... The list goes on..Call Mary Today at 904-964-6305

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but he said the worst cases are where somebody is not making payments and receives eviction notices, but says nothing to their spouse. Thankfully, most of the time they go ahead and move out before we get there, Shannon said. Rarely do we do an occupied eviction. Rowe Enterprises may have to evict itself from its current home on U.S. 301 in Hampton. Due to the amount of growth it has experienced, it really needs a larger building. Thats a good problem to have, Jonathan said. Growing a business, a family and a community It began in 1995 with Jerry Rowe doing inspections of properties that went into delinquency. His wife, Donna, helped him at nights with paperwork and photos. Smith said within two years, the business, which became incorporated in 1999, moved into the Rowes barn. From there, the business grew in leaps and bounds, Shannon Rowe said. Other people may have been able to ride by properties and take pictures, but not everyone could prepare invoices, make sure they got paid and handle other aspects of the business side of things, she said. Jerrys a very good businessman, Shannon said. He just is. The office moved from the barn into a doublewide trailer. Approximately two years later, another move was made into the building the business currently occupiesa building that offers 3,000 square feet. Smith said that prompted a few family arguments about whether or not it was too much space. Well, it didnt take long to realize it wasnt enough space once 26 desks were installed. We have people in every corner possible, Smith said. We have one working from home and two more offices next door. Expansion included bringing family together. At the time of the business start, Smith was attending college, while Jonathan and Shannon, were living in Georgia, where Jonathan worked for Applebees. Jerry and Donna, though, saw an opportunity to bring their children and grandchildren closer to home, Smith said. In a way, though, all of the employees have become family. If an employee has a problem, the Rowe family will do what it can to help, whether its during times of need, such as deaths in the family or divorces, or just giving somebody a bit of a handup to get a little bit ahead in life. The company recognizes Employees of the Month, and each employee receives a gift card on his or her birthday. Every employee is involved in what Rowe Enterprises accomplishes, Smith said. Some of the best ideas to come out of brainstorming sessions have come from employees who arent in management, she said. Jonathan said taking care of employees and participating in employee-appreciation efforts goes a long way in making the business successful in terms of employee retention. Will I tell you were the highest-paying place in Bradford County? Absolutely not, Jonathan said, but I will say we do what we can. We try to be fair. Smith said, Weve just always treated everybody like family and tried to take good care of them. That family not only contributes to a successful business, but to the needs of the community as well. Smith said staff has always come together to donate to the Bradford County Food Pantry. Office events, such as Silly String Day, Holey Jean Day and Pajama Day helped raise approximately $3,000 for last 10B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, May 15, 2014 Continued from 2B years Starke Police Department Shop with a Cop program. Smith and Shannon Rowe are active in the Kiwanis Club of Starke, and that has opened their eyes to even more needs in the community. The willingness to come together for a cause is impressive, Smith said. Duval County has way more need, but being such a huge community, nobodys getting involved, or theres a million different little projects, Smith said. They dont come together near the way we can. Perhaps its easy to give, though, when the heads of the familyJerry and Donna Roweset an example. I think thats part of their success, Smith said. Theyve describing all that always given back. Theyve always appreciated and always helped somebody who had less and needed an opportunity. Whats next? It would appear that part of Rowe Enterprises future is finding a larger working space for its office staff, whether its utilizing its existing property for expansion or moving to a new location. Shannon Rowe said Jerry Rowe probably didnt envision such growth from that simple start in a bedroom. I dont think he saw this coming, she said. I dont think any of us saw this coming. Outside of accommodations, Jonathan Rowe said eyes are on industry changes and how Rowe Enterprises can remain successful. A big change in the industry is that large investment groups are buying foreclosed properties for the purpose of making them rentals, Jonathan said. The hope is that Rowe Enterprises can offer its services by preparing the properties for rental and to continue doing so between tenants. There are other areas the business may look into. There are plenty of other avenues weve discussed as far as having this sized network as people begin to be homeowners again, Jonathan said. We may look at occupied-property opportunitieswhat can we do to help people and whether its our same type of services. Jonathan said the key is adaptability, and he believes Rowe Enterpises has already shown it has that ability. Are we the best in the industry at this? I couldnt tell you, Jonathan said, but I am happy with the direction weve taken. I have seen companies come and go. Ive seen several go in the last year with some industry changes and the way things have developed. I think were sustainable. I think thats a lot of our benefit. If youd like to learn more about Rowe Enterprises, please visit the website www.rowepp. com. The New River Community Health Center Board of Directors will meet May 21, 2014 at the Union County Library, located at 250 SE 5th Ave, Lake Butler, FL 32054 from 12:30 1:30 pm. 5/15 1tchg-B-sect Legals