Lake Region Monitor

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Lake Region Monitor
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Newspaper
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John M. Miller
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Keystone Heights, Florida
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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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lrmonitor@bellsouth.net www.StarkeJournal.com Deadline Monday 5 p.m. before publication Phone 352-473-2210 Fax 352-473-2210 Lake Region Monitor USPS 114-170 Keystone Heights, Florida Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 41st Year 31st Issue 75 CENTSMiddleburg, Keystone switch Christmas parade datesMelrose, Keystone reach out for Thanksgiving BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor The Keystone Heights Christmas Parade, which has been on the second Saturday of December, will be on the first Saturday this year. Lake Region Kiwanis member and Keystone parade director Noel Thomas said the Clay County Sheriffs Office asked him about three months ago to move the Keystone parade to Dec. 7. He agreed to the change. The sheriffs office said it would have difficulty providing traffic control and other support for two simultaneous parades and asked Thomas to reschedule the Keystone event after Middleburg parade organizers requested the Dec. 14 date. Lorry Williams, first vice president of the Middleburg Civic Association and director for the Middleburg parade said she would have preferred to keep the Dec. 7 date for the event. We prefer having it on the first Saturday in December, but because of the way Middleburg is laid out, the only place we can line up is at the First Baptist Church, and they had an event on the first Saturday, she said. I am completely at the mercy of the church. The Middleburg parade route is in the two northbound lanes of Blanding Boulevard from Advanced Auto Parts (next to First Baptist Church and across the street from Publix Supermarkets) to Palmetto Street, the last right turn before the Black Creek Bridge. During the parade, deputies convert the two southbound lanes of Blanding Boulevard into one northbound and one southbound lane.   We have about 12 reserve officers available and it takes that many to do just Middleburgs parade, said Special Operations Division Lt. Mark Cowan in an email.   It takes nine to safely secure Keystones parade, so it causes a problem if they schedule them on the same night.   Safety is our number-one priority.   In Middleburg,   we have to put out about 250 cones,   direct northbound traffic over to one lane on the southbound side from the First Baptist Church, north to Palmetto to clear Blanding for the parade route.    We assign an officer   to   each side street and two at each major intersection. According to the First Baptist Church website calendar, the congregation has a choir and orchestra Christmas concert scheduled for Dec. 7. The change created a scheduling conflict for at least one other Keystone Heights event. For the past seven years, the Miss Keystone Heights High School Junior High Pageant scheduled its event for eighthgrade contestants on the first Saturday in December to avoid a scheduling conflict with the parade. Event organizer Lynn Dickinson said in an email that by the time she found out about the changed date for this years parade, it was too late to alter her event at the high school. She added that the pageant will proceed on Dec. 7 at 7 p.m. as originally planned.Keystone moves from Dec. 14 to Dec. 7. Miss KHHS Junior Pageant will go on as planned. Katz to lawmakers: send more Lake Lowry water to Keystone Clay County leaders pitch to local legislators Clay Electric raising power cost adjust.BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor For the second time in four months, Clay Electric members will see an increase in their monthly bills. In October, the utility increased its monthly customer charge by $3. In addition, the co-op increased its energy charge on the first 1,000-kilowatt hours of power from 7.48 cents to 7.63 cents per kilowatt hour. In January, Clay Electric will begin passing through a 4.4 percent increase that its power supplier, Seminole Electric, imposed on the Keystone Heights-based utility and nine other co-ops that own Seminole electric. The other nine co-ops that buy power from Seminole are Talquin in Quincy, TriCounty in Madison, Suwannee Valley in Live Oak, Central Florida in Chiefland, Sumter in Sumpterville, Withlacoochee River in Dade City, Peace River in Wauchula, Glades in Moore Haven, and Lee County in North Fort Myers. Seminole generates most of its power from a 1,300-megawatt coal fired power plant north of Palatka. The wholesale power supplier also operates an 810-megawatt natural gas-powered plant along the Polk and Hardee County line. It sells the electricity to its 10 members, which are located in the panhandle and down the middle of the state with seven located north of the Interstate 4 corridor and three located south of the highway. The January increase will appear in the power cost adjustment line of Clay Electric members bills. Members who consume 1,000 kilowatt hours of electricity per month will see their bill increase by about $5 a month. Seminole said it increased the rate because of excess capacity, increases in the costs of fuels and the necessity to replace expiring supply contracts with agreements that wound up more expensive. The power supplier said that it had planned for power demand to increase around 4 percent a year, but in recent years growth had slowed to 0. It projects that though 2016, it will have more capacity than consumer demand. Seminoles 10 member coops saw steady growth in both megawatt hours sold and customer connections through 2009. However, in the following year, customer connections dropped from 903,490 in 2009 to 848,274 in 2010. In 2011 and in 2012, connections rebounded to 850,631 and 858,972, around the same number of customers Seminole and its members served in 2005. Megawatt hours sold peaked from 17.172 million in 2009 to 15,468 million in 2012, a 10 percent decrease. Similarly, Seminoles revenues peaked from $1.459 billion in 2010 to $1.223 billion in 2012, a 16 percent drop. The co-ops net margin fell from $60 million in 2010 to $12 Keystone passes 1-year sign moratorium BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor The Keystone Heights City Council passed a moratorium during its Dec. 2 meeting for most new business signs within the city limits. The prohibition includes freestanding, groundmounted, illuminated, marquee, message center, projecting, under-canopy and wall-mounted signs. For types of signs not included in the moratorium, the ordinance reads that only temporary permits will be issued, and that when the moratorium is lifted, the holders of temporary permits will have to apply for a permanent permit. Keystone Vice Mayor, and chair of the citys growth management committee, Tony Brown said that within the year, he expected the council to pass a new sign ordinance and that the purpose of the moratorium was to prevent businesses from erecting new signs that may be in violation of the new rules. (The moratorium is) for the business owners, so that they will understand what we are trying to do as a growth-management (committee) for LDRs (land development regulations) and as a council to save them money from going and putting up a sign that we are not going to allow in the future. It still gives them leeway to put up something, he added, but they will know what is coming down the line. Mayor Mary Lou Hildreth, BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor The president of the Save Our Lake Organization told Clay County legislators that the state should pump more water from Camp Blandings Lake Lowry toward Lake Brooklyn in Keystone Heights in order to better manage the Upper Etonia Creek Basin. Vivian Katz made the request to Clay Countys legislative delegation during a Nov. 18 meeting in Green Cove Springs. Senator Rob Bradley, and Representatives Travis Cummings and Charles E. Van Zant Sr. make up the delegation. Katz showed the panel before and after photographs taken from the shore of Lake Brooklyn that showed an increase in water levels in the Keystone lake after the St. Johns River Water Management District pumped 194 million gallons from Lake Lowry into Alligator Creek and eventually into Lake Brooklyn earlier this year. She then asked the lawmakers to consider a plan that would artificially cap Lowrys water level to 130 feet and pump water that would exceed that level south toward Keystone Heights. Katz said the plan is a common sense, low cost approach to better manage the Upper Etonia Creek Basin. She displayed a blue line graph charting Lowrys water level over the past 50 years, and asked an associate to highlight the point on the graph representing 130 feet. If you look at all that blue above that, Katz told the lawmakers, that would be all the water that we would getprobably 70 to 80 percent of the time we would be receiving water from Lake Lowry. Katz added, What that would do is keep Alligator Creek flowing and when we get rain like we did this past summer, we get an exponential benefit. I believe we got 194 million from Lake Lowry, and I believe it was billions of gallons that actually came into Lake Brooklyn because of that. Katz also asked the lawmakers help in stopping the water management district from lowering minimum flows and levels on Lakes Brooklyn, Geneva and Cowpen. She said the districts proposed rule would lower the MFL for Lake Geneva from 98.5 feet to 93 feet, and lower Brooklyns standard from 101 feet to 81 feet. She also showed the trio an illustration of what she said Lake Brooklyn would look like at 81 feet. The illustration showed a mostly dry lake bed with only three small pools of water remaining. Katz gave the delegation a grave prediction if the districts plan of lowering Brooklyns MFL to 81 feet came to fruition. If it is lowered to 81 and Geneva to 83, it will be the nail in the coffin for our community, she said. Other speakers who made presentations to the delegation included:County Commission Vice Chair Wendell DavisClay County Commissioner Wendell Davis also asked the lawmakers to keep an eye on Keystone Heights-area water supply issues. Davis asked the legislators to help with funding for the First Coast Expressway, C.R. 218 and C.R. 220. He added that several bills pending in Tallahassee about housing minors in the juvenile justice system could have significant implications for Clay County taxpayers. Our request is that we be a part of the discussion, said Davis. When you are looking for information, or you are having committee meetings, we can participate.Superintendent of Schools Charlie Van ZantClay County Schools chief Charlie Van Zant complained that two late adjustments to last years state budget had a negative impact on local school district budgets around Florida. I feel like we got a little bit hoodwinked right there at the end, Van Zant said of the changes. He said legislators put an additional financial burden on his district when they increased the amount local governments had to pay into the state retirement system for their employees pension benefits. In 2011, lawmakers required employees in the Florida retirement system to begin contributing 3 percent of their pay into the system. In 2013, the legislature increased the percent of employees pay that employers must put into the system by 1.7 percent. Earlier this year, Van Zant said the change will cost the school district $3.5 million. The superintendent said the second last-minute change that hurt the school system was an adjustment in the funding allocation formula. He said the new formula peels away education funding from his district if a student spends part of the day in Florida Virtual School or in a college under a dual-enrollment program. The per-pupil funding from the state went up $146, he said. But if I have a kid in Clay High School down the street here for six classes a day, and he takes one class in Florida Virtual and then he goes to St. Johns (River State College) and takes another class, I have to provide six teachers all day long for him, and then we have to subdivide that pie by eight now, and then one-quarter (or) two-eighths of that funding (gets sent away from the district). Van Zant told the panel that this year, he hoped lawmakers would propose such changes earlier in the session, to give local school leaders the opportunity to provide input. Supervisor of Elections Chris ChamblessChambless said since 2014 is an election year, he hoped legislators would not make major changes to election laws. He thanked them for the reforms they made last year, including increasing the number of days for early voting and limiting the length of constitutional See CLAY, 4A See LAWS, 3A Churches and volunteers in the Lake Region celebrated Thanksgiving by serving free meals in both Melrose and Keystone Heights. In Melrose, Trinity Episcopal Church led the annual event: Thanksgiving in the Park. Father Tony Powell said the entire community contributed to the effort. In Keystone Heights, the United Methodist Church doubled the attendance in its Thanksgiving Day meal from last years. Left: Volunteers in Melrose take a break after serving around 300 people by noon. (Left-right) Bob Hood, Diane Reeves, William Pierson, Linda Wilcox, Dave Kidd, Lynn Meyer, Judy Randolph, Leo Lowe, Margaret Kidd and Father Tony Powell. Right: Volunteers at the Keystone United Methodist Church included (left-right) Robin Jones, JoAnne Sayers and Olive Inman. See SIGNS, 2A

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2A Lake Region Monitor Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 352-473-3356Keystone Heights, FL 32656 THE FROZEN PELICAN 130 SE Nightingale St. (Across from Compass Bank) Like us on Facebook for news, specials, contests and events! Shaved Ice Nathans Hot Dogs BBQ Nachos Fries and Sweet Treats! Mention this Ad for10% offfor the month DecemberCome see Santa on Dec 7, at 7pm after the Christmas Parade! who is vice chair of the growth management committee, said that although the moratorium is for a year, she hoped it would not last that long. She said once the growth management committee and city council finalized the new sign rules, the council would then lift the moratorium. Hildreth also said the citys Community Redevelopment Advisory Committee is putting together a sign grant program to help businesses replace signs that violate the new rules. In other business before the councils Dec. 2 meeting:City passing up grant applicationKeystones grant consultant, Scott Modesitt of Summit Professional Services, told the council that the city had little chance of securing a community development block grant for 2014. Last year, Keystone won a $600,000 award for housing rehabilitation. The state awards the grants based on a point system and last year, Keystone got 100 points because it had not received a CDBG grant in the previous five years. For 2014, that 100-point bonus is not available and Modesitt said without it, he estimated Keystone would only accumulate 423 points toward securing a CDBG grant. Last year, the city with the lowest point total that earned a grant had 655 points. The consultant added that Keystones best chance for securing another CDBG grant will be in five years when it will again be eligible for the 100-point bonus. He said the citys point total may also improve if the 2010 census shows a higher percentage of low-income families in the area. DAR chapter recognizedHildreth read a proclamation declaring Dec. 4 as Col. Samuel Elbert Chapter National Society Daughters of the American Revolution Day. The mayor said 170,000 women in 3,000 DAR chapters contribute 250,000 hours a year to visiting veterans, raising scholarship money and other volunteer efforts. She said in 1985, Mattie Rucks Taber, the great-great-great-great granddaughter of Col. Samuel Elbert, founded the chapter that bears her ancestors name. Elbert served in the Continental Army and was captured by the British in the Battle of Briar Creek. He subsequently escaped and led a victorious naval battle near St. Simons Island in 1778.Mayoral election set for March 4Hildreth read a proclamation announcing the election for her own office which will be held on March 4.Scarecrow strut winners recognized Keystone-area property crimesLaurie A. Buttry (left), of Therapy Through Message, accepts the Most Creative award from Mayor Mary Lou Hildreth for the citys Scarecrow Strut. Over 30 Keystone organizations displayed themed scarecrows in front of their establishments during the event, which was produced by the towns Community Redevelopment Advisory Committee. During the city councils Dec. 2 meeting, Debbie Etheridge, of Mallards Dollarama & More, also accepted the Advisory Committees Choice award. Photo by Dan Hildebran. 1. On Oct. 22, a victim reported that over the past several months, the refrigerator, stove and washer and dryer were stolen from a vacant residence on Jefferson Street. There were no signs of forced entry. 2. On Oct. 27, the interior components of the air-conditioning unit were stolen from a entered by breaking out the window in the rear door. Nothing was missing from inside the residence. 3. On Nov. 18, the window above an air-conditioning unit was pushed in from the outside 4. On Nov. 23, two unattended chainsaws were stolen from the back of a pickup truck parked at a business on S.R. 100. SIGNSContinued from 1A See CITY, 3A

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amendments. Jim Renninger, Orange Park MayorOrange Park Mayor Jim Renninger said his town is feeling the burden of unfunded mandates through the Florida Department of Environmental Regulations Total Maximum Daily Loads Program. The program caps the amount of pollutants the town may discharge into the St. Johns River. Renninger complained that the test to determine if acceptable levels of Mercury are in the towns wastewater costs $7,500. Today, there is no identified strategy for removal (of Mercury), he added. This TMDL requirement is headed through the legislature and we would like to really make sure somebody looks at that before we assign a maximum level without a removal strategy to eliminate it. He also said regulators requirement that cities cap Phosphorus going into the St. Johns appeared questionable to him. It is going to cost a lot of money, he said, and we are not sure that it is relevant. Rinninger also questioned the necessity to test for silver in wastewater. He said the element used to make its way into wastewater with its use in film developing. He said, however, that the practice is no longer performed. This is a very expensive test and we are not sure that this is a real problem anymore, he said. Renninger also said his town, like many other municipalities, is dealing with underfunded pension obligations and asked the lawmakers not to interfere in local labor negotiations. The mayor asked the panel to continue to restore funding to the Florida Recreation Development Assistance Program, which pays for local parks and recreation areas. Renninger said the program disbursed $39 million to local governments in 2006, but went unfunded in the three years prior to 2013. In 2013, the legislature put $642,000 into the program. We would like that to continue its upward trend, he said. It provides lifestyle opportunities and health improvement, tourism, economic activity and property values for our constituents, he said of the program. The mayor cautioned lawmakers about tinkering with local business taxes. He also asked them to intervene in increases in flood insurance rates which he said are going up 10-fold in some cases. State Attorney Angela CoreyState Attorney Angela Corey said lawmakers need to take another look at Floridas government-in-the-sunshine statues. Chapter 119 (the statue that governs open records requirements), I think is out of hand, to a certain extent, when it comes to the criminal justice system, she said. Corey said that the medias access to discovery evidence before a trial interferes with the defendants right to due process and the states right to a fair trial. She added that pre-trial publicity has led to expensive changes of venue for some cases. She said that the rules of evidence filters testimony and other evidence before it reaches a jury. Corey asked why the public should hear that evidence before a trial. We are not trying to hide anything, she added. I think everything about a criminal trial should come out in the courtroom. Corey also thanked lawmakers for past legislation that allows prosecutors to aggressively Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 Lake Region Monitor 3A N OW OPEN 1545 Branan Field Road Suite 5 Middleburg (Across from Walmart)EYE EXAM & 2 BoxesAcuvue 2 Contacts$99Restrictions apply. Middleburg Location Only. Expires 12-31-13Most Insurances Accepted Certified Optometrists Dr. Edwin Anguas & Dr. Margaret Allen 904-291-5800Lens options extra. Individual offers cannot be combined with any other coupon, discount package price or insurance benefit. See store for details. Certain restrictions apply. Coupons must be presented at time of service. The patient and the person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment, or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment.Quality Eyecare with Value in Mind $79Includes exam and 2 pair of single vision glasses with SV Plastic lenses, restrictions apply. Call store for details. (Middleburg Location Only) Expires 12-31-13EYE EXAM & 2 PAIR OF GLASSES Use your current insurance benefits and health savings account now...Some of these benefits will expire at the end of the year! Ge t Fit for the Holidays!Zumba ClassesMo nday Tuesday Wednesday6 7 p.m.C hampions HeartBehind Compass Bank Firs t Class is Free! $5 per class Last Will and Testament Power of Attorney Living Will and Healthcare Surrogate Designation Living Trusts Probate Administration Real Estate Deed Preparation Real Estate Closings Contracts Family and Juvenile Law Criminal and Traffic Matters 189 S. Lawrence Blvd. Keystone Heights, FLFirmofVeRonicaROwens@aol.comwww.VeRonicaROwens.comVeRonica R. OwensAttorney at Law D id you know we now make house visits? Call us today to set up an appointment.James 4:12 There is one Lawgiver, who is able to save. Qualifying for the three-year post will begin on Jan. 7 and end on Feb. 4. Hildreth first won the office in 2006 after placing second in a three-way race. Huntley Redfearn won the first primary with 101 votes. Hildreth placed second with 100 votes and Tony Brown came in third with 99. In the subsequent runoff, Hidlreth beat Redfearn with 54 percent of the vote. She ran unopposed in 2008 and 2011. Street paving contract awardedThe council accepted a $123,210.65 bid from John C. Hipp Construction of Alachua to resurface parts of Nightingale Street, Berea Avenue, Southeast Cypress Street and Azalea Avenue in 2014. The work will also include paving Beasley Lane. Other bidders included Oldcastle Southern/APAC which offered to complete the work for $136,093.21, V.E. Whitehurst which placed a bid of $149,225.40 and Duval Asphalt which bid $196,729.01.Special event procedures reviewedCouncil members reviewed and commented on an application for special events that city staff is developing. Under the emerging proposal, producers of large city events such as parades and festivals would have to apply for a permit and through the special event application, demonstrate that they have properly planned for the event, such as arranging for security and traffic control, notifying fire and safety officials and obtaining necessary insurance. Responding to a question from Brown, City Manager Terry Suggs said the permitting requirement would also apply to events held on private property such as church events. After the meeting, Brown pointed out that organizations that sponsor large events in Keystone already complete many of the procedures on the proposed special events application. He cited as one example First Baptist Churchs production of the Walk Through Bethlehem, pointing out that the church arranges for traffic control and hires additional security for the event.Manager to receive masters degreeBrown congratulated Suggs on Suggs completion of a masters degree in public administration from Barry University. Suggs said he has been in the program for 14 months, which covers policy analysis, public finance, human resources, planning and growth management, public law and other topics related to managing government operations. Suggs will receive his diploma on Dec. 14. Charter proposals passedCouncil members approved all five recommendations from the citys charter review committee. The five proposals that will appear on the March ballot include minimum attendance requirements for council members, procedures to replace council members, operating procedures for future charter review committees, and two measures abolishing the requirements for a town clerk. Bonney Farm House, circa 1876, oldest house in Melrose.Historic Melrose hosts tri-annual holiday tour Senior Services donates to LAMLake Area Ministries Co-director Chip Wester (left) accepts a $500 check from Keystone Senior Services President Dan Pickens (right) and Vice President Bill Lee. Photo by Cindy Lee. Jean Marshall, Rosemary Daurer and Historic Melrose are busy planning the Historic Melrose Holiday House Tour, set for December 15. The tour is given only once every three years around this time of year and is widely considered to be one of the best holiday treats for adults in the area. Historic Melrose will sponsor its Holiday House Tour on Sunday, Dec. 15 from 1 to 5 p.m. in Melrose. This years tour will highlight the Pearsall family from Westfield, NJ, who actively promoted Melrose businesses and properties in the late 1800s and early 1900s. On the day of the tour, tickets will be sold at the Baldwin Store, at the corner of S.R. 26 and Cypress Street. Tickets are $8 ($7 for HMI members.). For information and tickets in advance, call 352-475-3992 in the daytime, and in the evening 352-475-2413. Tour brochures will include a map of the sites and their histories. Parking is available at Heritage Park, just east of the Baldwin Store, or along the tour route. There will be eleven stops including historic homes and buildings, a chapel, a barn, and a potting garden. A display of Pearsall family history and craft demonstrations will be shown at the Homemakers Club, once the Vogelbach-McRae Drugstore. The Daurer History Center in Heritage Park and all four of Melroses art galleries will be open. Trinity Episcopal Church on S.R. 26 will host an organ concert at 3 p.m. The Mossman House will feature a selection of antiques and collectibles available for purchase. Craft demonstrations include boondoggling (weaving with palm fronds) and decorating for the holidays with local natural materials. Visitors are advised to wear comfortable shoes and stroll down tree-lined streets, past historic homes and gardens in the Melrose Historic District, which was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1990. Alfred Pearsall arrived in Melrose in the mid-1880s and was followed by his children, his siblings, and other relatives. His son Leigh visited Melrose in 1900, while on his honeymoon. Shortly after that Leigh bought property on Melrose Bay where he spent winters until making Melrose his permanent home in 1954. The original home was replaced by a second home where Leigh Pearsall lived until his death in 1964. This home will be open and on display. Pearsall became a large landowner in the Melrose area and owned a number of homes to accommodate his winter guests. His large collection of American Indian artifacts was housed on his property in a building called the Wigwam. In 1963 the collection went to the Florida State Museum, at the University of Florida, now the Florida Museum of Natural History, which had a special exhibition of the collection in 2003. See COREY, 4ALAWSContinued from 1A CITYContinued from 2A

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4A Lake Region Monitor Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 150 Channelsfor $3499 3 mths Premium Programming FREE The System & Standard Installationare Completely FREE Q:Have you ever been told that a lineofsight cant be found at your home?A:Give me a call I may be able to help!25 years experience in sales & serviceAUDIO VIDEO MASTERS1-866-988-MyDish (6934) EmployFlorida.com 1-866-352-2345 Employ Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. The Employ Florida telephone number may be reached by persons using TTY/TTD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol. JOB RESOURCES at EmployFlorida.com helped me nd a new job I enjoy earning higher pay than I did before I was laid off. You too can discover REAL RESULTS with Employ Florida. RANDAL HARDBOWER Industrial Electrician Green Circle Bio Energy Inc. www.orange-blossom.com/7100 1-800-624-8835 1-800-624-8835 1-800-624-8835 1-800-624-8835 1-800-624-8835 Order Navels & Grapefruit, get Tangelos FREE!EXTRA BONUS FREE 3 oz. Jar Genuine Honeybell MarmaladePlus standard shipping.* Gifts of Floridas Finest FruitIndian River CitrusORANGE BLOSSOM Item #7100 8115 lbs. of Citrus in each box! Send a healthy holiday gift of famous Florida Navel Oranges and Ruby Red Grapefruit, and get a box of sweet, easy to peel Tangelos FREE. Tree-ripened and picked at the peak of perfection, satisfaction guaranteed. All three boxes will be shipped to one address. Mon & Tu 8:30 11:30 12:30 4:30Wed & Thur 9:00 12:00 2:00 4:30 Friday 9:00 2:00W.H. Marshall, M.D.Opthamologist(352)475-3992EXAMS AVAILABLE Optical Hours Prescription Glasses, Sunglasses, Contacts & Swimming Goggles Give the Gift of Sight to Someone You Love! Melrose Art WalkFriday Dec. 6th, 6 to 9 pm thru Jan 12th open on weekends... Saturdays 10am-6pm Sundays 1-5pm www.MelroseBayArtGallery.com FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now survive DIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 rfntb rf ntand soreness nb naches THG-12902 A MarkNet Alliance Member AU-C002594 10% Buyers PremiumRowell Auctions, Inc.800-323-8388 For Details Visit RowellAuctions.com RowellAuctions.com 127 Acres Offered Divided Cropland, Recreational & Development Tract 127 Acres Offered DividedCropland, Recreational & Development TractPine Forest & Banks Road, Grady County, GeorgiaBidding Ends Wed., December 18th @ 2:00 p.m.~ Subject to Auto Extend Bidding Feature ~Offered Online Exclusively at RowellAuctions.comFantastic Agricultural Tracts Great Development Tracts Excellent Hunting Beautiful Homesites Peaceful Country Living Keystone Heights Elementary School straight-A studentsFourth grade, (left-right) front row: Lindsay Hovsepian, Riley Draney and Megan Herndon. Back row: Christopher Anderson, Jacob Lepanto and Caleb Moncrief. Sixth grade, (left-right) front row: Garrett Stanley, Christopher Resti and Travis Sheppard. Back row: Eliana Page, Ben Wacha and Will Yeldell. Fifth grade, (left-right) front row: Piper Pescara, Evan Andrews, Daelynn Eatmon, Aidan Perkins and Lindsay Schrader. Back row: Lisa Strickland, Colton Tibbetts, Luke Van Zant and Camryn Williams. pursue repeat and violent offenders, especially those who use a gun to commit their crimes, she said. The prosecutor cautioned the legislators against softening the states minimum-mandatory sentencing statutes, which require judges to sentence violent and repeat offenders to lengthy prison terms. When people bash our minimum-mandatory laws, look COREYContinued from 3A million in 2012, an 80 percent decline. In its November newsletter, The Kilowatt, Clay Electric said that even with the January increase in its power cost adjustment charge, the co-ops rates remain among the lowest in the state. CLAYContinued from 1A at what their motivation is, she said. Nine times out of ten, they want to coddle criminals.Wreaths across America ceremonyOn Dec. 14 at noon the first Wreaths Across America ceremony will be held at the Keystone Heights Cemetery. The ceremony will be brief and coincide similar observances held around the United States. If you purchased a wreath for a veteran, please come to the ceremony so that you can lay the wreath on the grave. The public is also invited to the ceremony just to honor our veterans. The wreaths will be escorted by AMVETS Post 86 Riders down S.R. 21 from C.R. 352 at approximately 10 a.m. to the cemetery. After the ceremony, there will be an open house at AMVETS Post 86 on Brooklyn Bay Road. If you have any questions, please call Ursula at 727-207-1657.

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Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 Lake Region Monitor 5A Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (LCMS)Sunday School 9 a.m. Worship Service at 10 a.m. 4900 NW 182nd Way Starke(Entrance to Conerly Estates on S.R. 16) (904) gslcstarke@aol.com Everyone W elcome!Childrens Church 10 a.m. Welcome Home To 4004 SE State Road 21, Keystone Heights, FL 32656 (352) 473-3829JOIN US THIS SUNDAY FOR WORSHIP in our Fellowship Hall Kathy Barrow speaking on in our Multi Ministry Worship Center in our Sanctuary Dr. Craig Moore, preaching on Matthew 3:1-12 Dinner Served (Call 352-473-3829 for reservations) Welcome & Announcements Gospel Singing 6:45pm Bible Study led by Dr. Tom Farmer, Jr. The Church with a BIG HEART where the Word of God is faithfully taught! Ministries for Children (all ages) & Youth Sunday & Wednesday! featuring a host of unique & beautiful Nativity Sets, refreshments and caroling right after the parade. (Parade starts at 10am) Sponsored by and the generosity of the wider communityCall 352-475-2177 for info or to volunteer your help. 4-Wheel Alignment$5995 Keystone District Office 352-473-4917 clayelectric.com rfntbtt Keystone Heights Elementary School straight-A students Toys for KidsThe Keystone Heights Jaycees will be handing out toys during its Toys for Kids event from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Dec. 21 at the clubs S.R. 100 headquarters. Participants must sign up through Lake Area Ministries. Faith Presbyterian CantataAnd Glory Shone Around A Christmas Cantata Celebrating Loves Perfect LightDecember 15th at 11:00am. Directed by Laurel Lamme. Faith Presbyterian Church, 2738 SE State Road 21 (Midway, between Keystone & Melrose).KHHS Christmas concert and dinnerThe band and chorus will present their Christmas concert and the band boosters will host a spaghetti dinner fundraiser on Tuesday, Dec. 10 at the KHHS auditorium.. Dinner is from 5 to 7 p.m. and entertainment is from 6-8 p.m. Dinner costs $6 per person or $20 for a family of four. Rotary pecan sales continueThe Keystone Heights Rotary Club has begun its annual fundraising pecan sale. Available now are 12-ounce bags of pecans in four varieties: pecan halves, pecans in pieces for all your holiday baking needs. This year, Rotary also offers praline and chocolate covered pecans. The halves and pieces are $8 per 12 ounce bag; the covered pecans are $9 per bag. All pecans are from this years fresh Georgia crop. Pecans may be ordered through any Rotary club member, but are also available, while they last, at the Keystone Heights Brians Ace Hardware and at the M&S Bank. Funds raised through the sales go toward various Rotary projects, such as Lake Area Ministries, the Keystone Youth Soccer League and other local youth sports programs, the Clay County Science Fair and Rotary Internationals campaign to eradicate polio worldwide. Community Church rummage saleCommunity Church, located behind Ace Hardware, will hold a rummage sale Dec. 5 through Dec. 7. Early bird shopping hours are Thursday, Dec. 5 from 4 to 7 p.m. Admission is $5 per family. Regular sale dates with no admission charges are Friday, Dec. 6 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday, Dec. 7, with the Dollar A Grocery Bag Day 9 a.m. until noon. Many Christmas items are available. Proceeds from the sale and items not sold will be donated to worthy causes.Breakfast with Santa at Melrose ElementaryBreakfast is from 8 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, Dec. 14 at the Melrose Elementary Auditorium. Breakfast includes all you can eat pancakes, 2 sausage patties, juice and coffee. Cost is $6 per person or $20 for a family of 4 if you prepay by Friday, Dec. 13. $6 per person at the door. Price includes a picture with Santa. Come eat breakfast and then go see the Merry Melrose Christmas Parade. Sixth grade (left-right) front row: Brendan Lee, Lauren Hix, Ashton Ludwig and Brooke Martin. Back row: Courtlin Gentry, Emily Loose, Karli Jennings and Sophia Kicklighter. Sixth grade (left-right) front row: Perla Alonzo, Matthew Forshee, Jason Channell and Casey DeWitt. Back row: Remington Draney, Kayla Elliott, Brian Armstrong and Tyler Friedlin. Third grade, (left-right) front row: Jerremy Miller, Caleb Mize, Lillian Paul and Wilford Rogel. Back row: Hunter Sarman, Joshua Smith, Logan Spence and Hunter Underwood. Budny and Kiley Channell. Second row: Steven Dong, Haley Kenney, Carson Eatmon and Kenneth Edsall. Back row: Matthew Golden, Alison Herndon, Courtney Dyches, Ian Kruzan and Garrett McDilda.

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6A Lake Region Monitor Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 YES NO YES YES YES YES YES YES NO NO NO NO NO NOFastest available Internet speeds The most TV shows and movies with XFINITY On Demand on TV and online The fastest in-home Wi-Fi for all rooms, all devices, all the time The best HD experience The most live sports More Internet protection included at no additional cost Advanced home phone calling features like Text Messaging at no extra costOffer ends 12/31/13, and is limited to new residential customers. Not available in all areas. Limited to Economy Plus Internet. After promotion, regular rates apply. Comcasts current monthly service charge is $39.95. Limited to service to a single outlet. Equipment, installation and taxes extra. May not be combined with other offers. TV: Digital Starter TV or above required for XFINITY On Demand. XFINITY On Demand selections subject to charge indicated at time of purchase. Internet: Not all features compatible with Macintosh systems. Wi-Fi claim based on August 2012 study of comparable in-home wireless routers by Allion Test Labs, Inc. Voice: Text messaging requires XFINITY Internet subscription. Most Live Sports available with Digital Preferred TV and WatchESPN. Call for restrictions and complete details. Comcast. All rights reserved. 30-Day Money-Back Guarantee applies to one months recurring service charge and standard installation charges up to $500. NPA132410-0030 rffr ffffntbnftrbnbtnbtrbt btrtbtntb rfnt btnbr rr 94731_NPA132410-0030 Yes-No U-verse 11.6x21.indd 1 9/30/13 2:17 PM

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Regional News Regional News B Section Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013News from Bradford County, Union County and the Lake RegionFEATURES CRIME SOCIALS OBITUARIES EDITORIAL When two experienced specialists in urology expand their practices, thats good news for Starke residents. Dr. Nseyo has an extensive medical background and is a proven educator in urologytraining the next generation of specialists. Dr. Narayan has expertise in less invasive and innovative urology care and is the former Chair of Urology at Shands UF in Gainesville. GLAD YOURE HERE, DR. NSEYO AND DR. NARAYAN 922 E. Call Street Starke, FL 32091 904-368-2300 For more information about our urologists and our staff of expert physicians, go to ShandsStarke.com.Independent members of the medical staff.SHANDS STARKE REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER WELCOMES TWO UROLOGISTS TO STARKE. Perinchery Narayan, M.D., Board-Certied Urologist Unyime Nseyo, M.D., FACS, Board-Certied Urologist Florida Twin TheatreAll Seats $6.00 Before 6 p.m. 964-5451* CLOSED MON & TUES SCREEN 1 SCREEN 2 Now Showing Visit us on-line at www.FloridaTwinTheatre.comFri, 7:00, 9:10 Sat, 4:50, 7,00, 9:10 Sun, 4:50, 7:00 Wed-Thurs, 7:30EXPENDABLES2Now Showing PGWalt DisneysFri, 8:00 Sat, 5:00, 8:00 Sun, 5:30 Wed-Thurs, 7:15 PG-13Jennifer Lawrence in FrozenTHE HUNGER GAMESCATCHING FIRE Cross-country bicyclist Bob Quick (far right) and his son, Conrad (far left), are pictured with Starke Fire Rescue members (l-r) Ashley Moore, Jason Hersey, retired chief Dwayne Hardee and his wife, Beth, Jerry Waters, Derrick Dowdy and Chris Seymour. Bob Quick (right) shakes hands with Jerry Waters after receiving Starke Fire Rescue patches as souvenirs. BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer It is fulfilling a lifelong passion, but more than anything, Bob Quicks coast-to-coast bicycle ride across the United States is a way of inspiring people to embrace active lifestyles. Quick, a Roy, Utah, resident, is in the advanced stages of coronary artery disease, thanks to a hereditary condition. He suffered a massive heart attack in 2004, has 16 stents and had a pacemaker/defibrillator implanted earlier this year. He hopes his journeywhich also includes his son, Conradhelps get people off the couch. If we can get them just walking around the block 30 daysthat catches on, said Spreading inspiration and thanks from coast to coastBob Quick is pictured during part of his San Diego to St. Augustine journey. Photo courtesy of Quick and his website www.bobquicksjourney. com. Quick, an avid cyclist who has always wanted to bike his way across the U.S. Then they go, Maybe I can venture a little farther. Maybe they go two blocks. Maybe they go three in a year. Those endorphins start kicking in, and they start feeling better. Quicks journey is also one of thanks. Thats what brought him to Starke Fire Rescue during the week of Thanksgiving and why his journey, once complete, will have consisted of stops to more than 80 fire departments. You see, Quick actually went into cardiac arrest in 2004 and was technically dead for more than three minutes. Paramedics with Roy City Fire and Rescue resuscitated Quick. They never gave up on me, said Quick, who is now an honorary member and chef of the Roy City department. They worked on me hard. They worked on me diligently. Thats the reason Im here. To bring attention to Americas hometown heroes, Quick made fire stations across the U.S. the stopping points throughout his ride, which began Sept. 2 in San Diego and ended this week in St. Augustine. Theyre the warriors, said Quick, who planned to stay overnight at two more fire departments once he left Starke. When people see them out in public, they need to thank them. Quick has stayed at several hotels on his journey, but that was because he needed a place from time to time that had a tub he could lie in and soak his muscles. Outside of that, he has enjoyed experiencing the uniqueness of each fire station he has stopped at and has also had the opportunity to witness some heart-touching Hersey signs one of Bob looks on. moments. There was the department in Globe, Ariz., for example, where members created a bond with a boy whose parents were both bed-ridden with multiple sclerosis. Firefighters would take the boy into their See QUICK, 3B

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2B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursda y, Dec. 5, 2013 Madison Bennett (left) and Brittany Toms, seventhand 12th-grade FFA students, respectively, gave presentations as part of the luncheon. Bennett talked about the importance of beef cattle, while Toms talked BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer It is an effort to bring agriculture to the forefront and to make a connection between those who work on farms and those who dont, but Farm-City Week is really just a continuation of what already takes place in Bradford County, according to Bob Hochmuth, the guest speaker at the Nov. 22 Bradford County Extension Farm-City luncheon, which was held at the Bradford County Fairgrounds. The folks here, I think, know their farmers more so than most counties where I work, said Hochmuth, a multicounty vegetable production agent and statewide small farms coordinator based at the Suwannee Valley Agricultural Extension Center in Live Oak. Hochmuth said Bradford County reminds him of Maryland, where he lived previously, because of its presence of roadside produce stands. He said people in Bradford County are not only aware of those stands, but know the people who operate them. I think people here, they know the Kings and the Normans and the Pendarvises, Hochmuth said. They know them from the sales of strawberries in particular, but (also know) the other products as well. I think that you all already know or have some connection with farm products in the county maybe more so than others. Hochmuth said Florida is defying the national trend when it comes to farming. In Bradford County, for example, the number of farms that have identified themselves as such in 2013 is 479an increase from 349 in 1987. Florida is one of the few states east of the Mississippi where the number of farms has actually been increasing in the last 10 or 15 years, he said. The size of the farms has been decreasing, so we have more smaller farms throughout the state of Florida. The average farm size is currently 119 acres here in Bradford County, down from 159 acres in the late 1990s. Hochmuth said 98.5 percent of the farms in Bradford County fall within the U.S. Department of Agricultures definition of a small farmone that generates $250,000 or less in gross sales annually. That may seem like a large dollar figure, Hochmuth said, but if you decrease that gross sales figure to $50,000$100,000, the percentage of small farms in Bradford County only drops to 93-94 percent. The reality is the majority of farms we have here are very small operations100 acres or less and with much less than Past, present and future are topics at Farm-City luncheonBob Hochmuth presents a bit of Bradford County history as the featured speaker during the Bradford County Extension Farm-City luncheon. $250,000 in sales, Hochmuth said. Hochmuth talked about some of the changes in farming (taking advantage of agritourism, small farms incorporating other crops such as shiitake mushrooms to take advantage of consumer demand, etc.) and challenges farmer face in the future. Water is going to be the most challenging issue across the whole state, Hochmuth said, adding, Were doing a number of things to conserve water by using fertigation and helping farmers with drip-irrigation technology in particular here. The Farm-City luncheon covered past, present and future. Hochmuth opened his presentation by covering some of Bradford Countys history, such as how Starke derived its name it was the last name of George Coles fianc (Cole bought the land that became Starke)and how the whole region was New River County before Bradford County was created. The rail system was really important for this region in those early days, Hochmuth said. The materials that were shipped out of here were timber, naval store product and cotton. For those who didnt know, Hochmuth explained that naval store product consisted of turpentine and other timber products that were used at naval shipyards. Hochmuth joked about Starkes population explosion to 400 in the 1800s before later talking about the mindboggling population explosion that occurred in the 1940s. See FARMS, 4B

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Members of the local Weight Watchers group, which meets on Mondays at First donating 291 pounds of food to the Bradford County Food Pantry. Participating members donated a pound of food for every pound they lost. The Bradford-area group participated in a food drive last year as well, but the food collected went to Gainesville. This year, though, the food stayed in Bradford County now that the all local residents. ABOVE: Members Robin Gish, Mammie Micthell, Betty Winn, Collette Huffman, Tonya Gibbs, Karya Merritt and Fellows are pictured (l-r) in the Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 3B The 3rd AnnualLight UpCrosby Lake CemeteryDecember 17th 7:00p.m. at the cemeteryFor the past 3 years the Radical Hospitality Team of the First United Methodist Church has built a bridge from the church into the community by hosting the Light Up Crosby Lake Campaign. This act of salty service provides revenue for the Crosby Lake Cemetery Association to assist with the costs of maintaining the cemetery. The Crosby Lake Cemetery Association has done a wonderful job providing quality perpetual care for our loved ones who have been placed there. This years service will be December 17th at 7:00p.m. at the cemetery. Luminaries can be placed for $10 each in memory of a friend or loved one. Visiting the church website online at (firstuumc.cc) or Stop by the church office (200 N. Walnut Street) or Mail donation to FUMC at ( P. O. Box 157 Starke, FL 32091) To find out how you can help with this event contact the church office at (904) 964-6864. Volunteers Neededto place 4,000 candlesIf you can volunteer, please show up at the cemetery at 1PM Dec. 17. Wear comfortable clothing and hats.All proceeds benefit the Crosby Lake Cemetery Association P REVATT SRESTAURANT(904)368-9156 NOW OPEN127 E. Call StreetLocated in Downtown StarkeOwners:Jackson, Jason & Brandon Prevatt Burgers Wraps Stuffed Potatoes Salads Steaks Wings Gator Tail Busted Onion Fried Green Tomatoes Quesadillas Mahi-Mahi Desserts & More! DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS$750Includes drinkWEDNESDAY NIGHT WINGS60EA.############THURSDAYBuy 10 Boneless Wings, Get 10 at 1/2 price!SAT & SUNBuy 25 Wings, Get A FREE Pitcher of Beer, Tea, or Soda############ When losing is a good thingfront. Pictured behind them (in no particular order) are: Christina New, Rebecca Brown, Jennifer Wheeler, Dale Reddish, Diane Andrews, Julee Hall, Nancy Huffman, Diane Ward, Peggy White, Ken Alsabrook, Rose Harrison, Jackie Brant and Sharon Kathi Fellows and Rachel Cooksey show off the food collected. homes to celebrate birthdays and holidays like Thanksgiving and Christmas. The boy is now grown and a member of that same fire department. Now, he is standing right alongside that captainon that same captains crewwhich just shows you the impact (firefighters) have on the community, Quick said. Quick and his son have been collecting the signatures of all the firefighters theyve met, as well as department paraphernalia. During his stay at the Starke department, Quick said he had already shipped six boxes of patches and T-shirts to his home. I dont think well have to buy another T-shirt again, he said. When the cross-country trip began, Quick said he and his son were averaging up to 10 hours of cycling per day. Issues with Quicks heart, though, slowed the duo to riding 25-40 miles per day. Quicks will never wavered. I promised America I was going to finish it, and Im going to finish it, he said. Quick has been accepting donations throughout his ride that will benefit Roy City Fire and Rescue, Special Olympics Utah, Primary Childrens Hospital in Salt Lake City and McKay-Dee Hospital Center in Ogden, Utah. I decided if Im going to ride across America, I want to do it for a good cause, he said. You can make a donation or read more about Quick and his ride at www.bobquicksjourney. com. He also has a Facebook account at www.facebook.com/ bobquicksjourney.QUICKContinued from 1B Whether you help support one of his causes or not, one thing that would make Quick happy is if you take the time to recognize a firefighter. Its not an easy job, Quick said, noting those times where firefighters have to respond to fatalitiesfatalities that may very well include someone they know personally. These guys need a pat on the back once in a while, Quick said. It means a lot to them when they see a thumbs-up, or somebody walks up to them in a store and shakes their hand. Derrick Dowdy adds his signature to collection during at Starke Fire Rescue. Quick hometown heroes and deserve to be thanked at every oportunity. You worked hard to prepare that Thanksgiving dinner. Now, how about enjoying a meal out and helping a good cause at the same time? The Downtown Grill in Starke is hosting a celebrity waiter event on Friday, Dec. 6, from 11 a.m. until 7 p.m. that will benefit the Starke Police Departments Shop With a Cop program. Besides the tips earned by local celebrities, 15 percent of the entire days sales will go toward the program. Shop With a Cop allows children who have been identified as having a need but who continue to strive to meet academic and discipline requirements in schoolto enjoy a shopping spree at Walmart. Through donations and the assistance of restaurants such as the Downtown Grill, children are allowed to pick out approximately $100 worth of gifts. This years Shop With a Cop event is Tuesday, Dec. 17. If youd like to provide further assistance to the ninth annual program, you can mail a donation in the form of a checkmade out to Starke Police Department-Shop With a Copto Starke Police Department, 830 Edwards Road, Starke, FL 32091. Please put to the attention of Capt. Barry Warren. You may also contact Warren at 352-494-3326 (cell), 904-964-5400 (office) or starkepdlo@yahoo.com for more information or to make a donation. If youd like to experience what the event is like and what kind of impact it has, please go to www.youtube.com and perform a search for Starke Shop With a Cop 2012.Celebrity waiter, Shop With a Cop event is this FridayThe fourth annual Santa Fe College Miss Bradford Fest, which is open to ages 4-22, is scheduled for Jan. 18 at the Brad ford High School auditorium at 7 p.m. Contestants will compete in Western wear, talent, party dress, evening wear, photogenic and on-stage question categories in the following age divisions: 4-7 (Little Miss), 8-12 (Junior Miss), 13-17 (Teen Miss) and graduating high school seniors-22 years old (Miss). The winner of the Miss division could win a twoyear Santa Fe College scholarship. (Must meet eligibility requirements for college enroll ment.) The deadline to enter the pageant is Jan. 4. Entry forms may be obtained via email. Please send email requests to thorn99@ embarqmail.com. Miss Bradford Fest funds San ta Fe College scholarships for Bradford County students. For more information, please call Lisa Tatum at 904-966-1514 or Brenda Thornton at 904-3648266.The annual Bradford Fest Talent Fest Showdown is scheduled for Jan. 25, 2014, at 6 p.m. at the Bradford High School auditorium. Admission is $7 for adults and $5 for 17 and under. Children 5 and under are admitted free. Prizes for contestants are as follows: $1,000 for first place, $300 for second place and $200 for third place. In addition, the top three will participate in final auditions April 18 for a chance to perform at the 2014 Suwannee River Jam as well as receiving a radio opportunity with WEAG. The first-place individual will also be invited perform at a May 17 Santa Fe College concert. The deadline for participants to enter is Jan. 15. For more information on entry fees and requirements, please contact Cheryl Canova at the Santa Fe College Andrews Center at cheryl.canova@sfcollege.edu or 352-395-4410. All profits will go toward funding Santa Fe College scholarships for Bradford County students.4th annual Miss Bradford Fest set for Jan. 18 Bradford Fest Talent Showdown is Jan. 25

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4B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursda y, Dec. 5, 2013 CRIME DOESNT PAYBUT WE DO!REWARDS UP TO $3,000 CRIME DOESNT PAYBUT WE DO!P AID FOR BY THE FLORIDA ATTORNEY GENERALS OFFICE CRIME STOPPERS TRUST FUNDREWARDS UP TO $3,000R EMAIN ANONYMOUSCALL TOLL FREE S TOPPE RSSubmit a TIP ON-LINE at: www.F CCrimeStoppers.com Jo es Tires 13761 South US 301 Starke(1/2 mile south of walmart) 964-(8473) W ashing, Clipping Teeth Brushing Ear Cleaning Nails Clipped & Filed Call for Appointment 904-386-0992 17145 SW 101st Ave Starke, FL 32091GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE! Owners & Operators Kathy Rensberger & Leisha Boyd Dear Editor: I am writing today about an incident that happened on Thanksgiving. My daughters and I went shopping at the Walmart in town after dinner. When we left, I apparently placed my checkbook (with cash in it) on the hood of my car. As soon as we turned onto 301, we noticed something fly off my hood. When we got to Sears, I realized it was my checkbook. Immediately we went back to see if we could find it. After about 15 minutes of searching through the median, we started driving home. Within two minutes of getting into the car, my son called and said a gentleman dropped it off at the house along with almost half of the cash that was in it. Apparently, he saw the checkbook and cash fly off the car and stopped to pick it up. I wanted to say thank you to whoever you are! I wish I could thank you personally, but I dont know who you are. Im so thankful to live in a community where there are still honest people! Merry Christmas! Mi Yong FitzpatrickSomething to truly be thankful for Letters editor@bctelegraph.com Wings of Dreams Aviation Museum joined the ranks of 178 educational organizations nation wide that received a NASA minigrant for an after-school STEM (science, technology, engineer ing, mathematics) program. Selected from a pool of more than 400 applications, the program closely followed the objec tives of the NASA STEM summer camp program, Solar System Adventures. The program sessions, which were attended by seventhand eighth-graders at Keystone Heights Jr.-Sr. High School, were held at Keystone Heights Airport and taught by Wings of Dreams volunteer Dr. Francisco Reyes, associate scientist at the Univer sity of Florida Department of Astronomy and director of the UF teaching observatories, with the support of the University of Flor ida Department of Astronomy public outreach initiative. This is an important first step in establishing Wings of Dreams as an aerospace educational cen ter in a rural, underserved area of North Central Florida, said Susan King, Wings of Dreams cofounder and managing director, who joined forces with Reyes to write and submit the grant. The after-school sessions in cluded lectures followed by hands-on activities. Sessions covered such topics as the solar system, sun, planets, comets, asteroids and exoplanets; the use of telescopes; exploration of the bodies of the solar system; the important discoveries made by manned and unmanned space craft; and the possibility of find ing life on other planets. The program concluded Nov. 14 with a star party, where stu dents learned firsthand about NASA minigrant funds Wings of Dreams after-school programthe moon, the planets and other celestial bodies. The UF astronomy department provided the use of telescopes and additional equipment to enhance the learn ing experience for the students participating in this and future programs. Reyes was instrumen tal in arranging for the donation of 10-inch Meade telescope to Wings of Dreams to be used for these educational programs and star party. With the assistance of Reyes, Peyton Phillips, science department chairman at KHHS, and other local educators and volunteers, Wings of Dreams will continue and expand these unique educational programs for students in the surrounding rural counties, according to King. In addition to astronomy and space exploration, we are planning to develop and imple ment after-school programs and summer camps on other topics, including aeronautics, aviation, rocketry and aviation and World War II history, she said. Wings of Dreams, a nonprofit organization, has more than 60 historic space artifacts that will be used to highlight the history of Americas space program and inspire youth to pursue educational programs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. The organization is seeking financial and in-kind assistance to help to preserve and restore these artifacts and complete the construction of a facility to display them and provide a space for educational programs. For more information, contact Wings of Dreams Executive Director Robert Oehl at 352-2568037 or bob@wingsofdreams. org. The population around World War II expanded for this immediate area to over 80,000 people to support the Camp Blanding efforts, Hochmuth said. Hochmuth talked a little about Doyle Conner, whom he described as one of the most famous people to be born in this area. Conner served as Floridas commissioner of agriculture for 30 years (1961-91), but he also had some accomplishments Hochmuth said those attending the Farm-City luncheon may not have been aware of. He was the national FFA president when he was in the FFA, Hochmuth said. He was elected to the House of Representatives when he was a student at the University of Florida in his 20s. He was elected as the House of Representatives speaker at the age of 28, if you can imagine that. At 28, theres no way I wouldve been ready to do any of that. Hochmuth said one of the most endearing things about Conner is that when reading his biography, he listed his profession as farmer. All of the time he spent serving the public, he still considered himself a farmer, Hochmuth said. FARMSContinued from 2B Bradford County FarmCity activities included exhibits for thirdgraders. Please see page 7B for photos. ABOVE: Kimberly Gray takes a look through a telescope during one of the Wings of Dreams Solar Systems programs. Photo by Cliff Francisco Reyes of the University of Florida is shown with a 10-inch Meade telescope donated to Wings of Dreams. Photo by Trace Choulat.Having some fun with glasses prior to an experiment are KHHS students (l-r) Brooklyn Goens, Dawson Kimberly Gray. Photo by Cliff Smelley.

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Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 5B 904-368-0687 ph 904-368-0689 faxMARGARET ANDERSON 1011 N. Temple Ave. Starke. FL (US 301 North)Family Law & Will Preparation30 years experience Margaret will continue to serve clients in Alachua County as well as Bradford & Union counties t Crime t Paul A. Byrd, 40, of Starke was arrested Dec. 1 by Starke police for larceny. According to the arrest report, Byrd was observed by a Walmart employee passing all points of sale (cash registers) with a shopping cart with two cases of light beer and two packages of steaks. When he was confronted by the Walmart employee, Byrd stated he was waiting for a friend to come and pay for the items. When Starke police arrived after noting Byrds prior criminal history (including retail theft) Byrd was arrested for larceny and transported him to jail.Man arrested for attempting to leave store with beer, steaksRobert Tyrone Williams, 28, of Tampa was arrested Nov. 27 by Union deputies for battery on a law-enforcement officer. According to the arrest report, Man arrested in prison parking lot after releaseWilliams had just finished serving a 10-year sentence at Union Correctional and was being escorted by correctional officers to meet his sister in the parking lot. As they were walking, Williams asked an officer where a garbage can was. When the officer turned his head to point to a can, Williams hit him in his chest with his fist. The officers then got Williams on the ground to detain him until the deputy arrived. Williams refused to say what prompted him to hit the correctional officer. Johnny A. Higgins, 41, was arrested Nov. 30 by Bradford deputies for driving under the influence and fleeing-attempting to elude law enforcement. According to the arrest report, deputies received a call Saturday night around 10:30 about a vehicle driving erratically on U.S. 301 south of Starke. Higgins, heading north on 301, stopped in the middle of the road with approximately 10 cars behind him as he approached a deputys Man arrested after stopping deputycar at C.R. 221 (Hampton). He then crossed the grass median and took off south on 301 a half mile before finally stopping at Southeast 57th Street. When Higgins exited the vehicle, he stumbled and fell to the ground, according to the arrest report. When the deputy approached him, he reached for his pocket and said he had a knife. After the deputy ordered him several times to remove his hand from his pocket, Higgins finally did so and was handcuffed and transported to the jail. The following individuals were arrested recently by local law enforcement officers in Bradford, Union or Clay (Keystone Heights area) counties:BradfordWilliam Noonen Bradley, 34, of Starke was arrested Dec. 1 by Starke police for disorderly intoxication, contempt of court and probation violation. Preston Lamar Burns, 22, of Jacksonville was arrested Nov. 27 by Bradford deputies for possession and distribution of marijuana. Toccara Sophia Carter, 29, was arrested for probation violation. Sean Christopher Cherry, 43, of Jacksonville was arrested Nov. 29 by Starke police for driving while license suspended or revoked. Quinton Travis Ford, 42, of Starke was arrested Dec. 2 by Starke police for probation violation. Kenneth Michael Gilliam, 51, of Hampton was arrested Nov. 25 by Bradford deputies for probation violation.Recent arrests in Bradford, Clay or UnionThomas Wayne Haehnel, 68, of Orange Park was arrested Nov. 25 by Bradford deputies for failure to appear. Michael Wayne Hall, 38, of Starke was arrested Nov. 25 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. Christina Lynn Hall, 35, of Keystone Heights was arrested Nov. 27 by Bradford deputies for larceny and fraud by swindle. Norma Jean Rose Jeffery, 22, of Ocala was arrested Nov. 27 by Bradford deputies for failure to appear. Robert Wayne Masey, 26, of Starke was arrested Nov. 25 by Bradford deputies for smuggling contraband, possession of drug equipment and probation violation. Brandon Adrian Nelson, 19, of Hampton was arrested Nov. 26 by Starke police for burglary and larceny. Albert Millard Nichols, 50, of Starke was arrested Dec. 1 by Bradford deputies for hit and run-leaving the scene of a crash involving property damage. Joshua Dale Pernell, 28, of Starke was arrested Nov. 30 by Bradford deputies for fleeing-attempting to elude law enforcement and driving while license suspended or revoked. Brandon Randall Smith, 18, of Jacksonville was arrested Nov. 26 by Starke police for burglary and larceny. James Phillip Spratlin, 27, of Lawtey was arrested Dec. 2 by Bradford deputies for larceny and dealing in stolen property. Joseph Thomas Stracner, 34, of Starke was arrested Nov. 26 by Bradford deputies for two charges of probation violation. Tessa Leigh Thomas, 34, of Keystone Heights was arrested Nov. 26 by Bradford deputies for possession of a weapon by a convicted felon, larceny and dealing in stolen property. Heather R. Tracy, 18, of Lincoln, R.I., was arrested Nov. 26 by Starke police for possession of marijuana and possession of drug equipment. Kisha Ladwonda Williams, 35, of Starke was arrested Nov. 29 by Starke police for driving while license suspended or revoked. Antoin Pierre Wrotten, 24, of Ocoee was arrested Nov. 30 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked.Keystone/MelroseJoshua Elliot, 23, of Keystone Heights was arrested Dec. 2 by Clay deputies for three probation violations. Joshua Forbes, 24, of Key stone Heights was arrested Nov. 28 by Clay deputies for domestic battery. Daniel Ramon Gallegos, 24, of Melrose was arrested Nov. 26 by Putnam deputies for a proba tion violation. Michael David Lavane, 38, of Melrose was arrested Dec. 2 by Putnam deputies for an out-ofcounty warrant. Austin Michael Lay, 37, of Melrose was arrested Dec. 2 by Putnam deputies for two proba tion violations. Matthew Limbert, 49, of Keystone Heights was arrested Nov. 30 by Clay deputies for trespass ing. James Lee Michael Oldham, 21, of Melrose was arrested Dec. 3 by Putnam deputies for three probation violations. Joshua Russell, 20, of Key stone Heights was arrested Nov. 27 by Clay deputies for failure to appear. Levi Wayne Sharp, 30, of Hampton was arrested Dec. 2 by Big End-of-Year Sale 1000 South Water St. Starke, FL 32091904 966-2221 E ntire Store on Sale 25% OFF 25% OFF Putnam deputies for possession of cocaine, possession of a controlled substance without a prescription and possession of drug equipment. Clint Sweeting, 30, of Keystone Heights was arrested Dec. 2 by Clay deputies for failure to appear.UnionToyce Fay Cribbs, 53, of Hampton was arrested in Union County by DOC officials at the Reception and Medical Center for possession of marijuana and smuggling contraband into a prison. Austin Cole Long, 18, of Lake Butler was arrested Nov. 24 by Union deputies for possession of marijuana and possession of narcotic equipment. Prentis Lynn Jefferson, 35, of Lake Butler was arrested Nov. 28 by Union deputies for leaving the scene of an accident and driving while license suspended or revoked. Daniel Raye Hall, 26, of Lake Butler was arrested Nov. 29 by Union deputies for an out-ofcounty warrant for petit theft in Alachua County. Daronte Jawaun Corbitt, 19, of Lake Butler was arrested Nov. 27 on a warrant for firing a weapon into a dwelling/vehicle/building/ or aircraft and for criminal mischief-property damage. Tom Marks, 61, of Starke was arrested Nov. 26 by Union deputies on a warrant for failure to appear. Kelli Amber Mclees, 31, of High Springs was arrested Dec. 2 by Union deputies on a warrant for failure to appear. Brian M. Griffis, 34, of Williston was arrested Nov. 27 by Union deputies for contempt of court-child support. Paul Washington, 30, of Mayo was arrested by Union deputies on Dec. 2 for lewd lascivious exhibition-in the presence of employee.NOTICE The New River Community Health Center Board of Directors will meet December 13, 2013 at the Union County Library, located at 250 SE 5th Ave, Lake Butler, FL 32054 from   12/5 1tchg-B-sect Legals

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6B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 Funeral with Burial20 Ga. Metal Casket (4 colors) Vault, Open & Closing Grave, Graveside or Chapel Service with one night visitation.............$5,595Funeral with Cremation(Rental Casket with Visitation prior to Services).................................$2,895Direct Cremation with Memorial ServiceServices held at Archer Memorial Chapel............................................$1,895Archer Funeral Home Pre-payment accepted Within Your Means Now, Peace of Mind Always 55 North Lake Avenue Lake Butler, Florida 32054 SR-230 E (2 miles east of US-301)B anquet Hall Driving Range Check out our web pagewww.starkegolf.com M emberships Available E xcellent Driving RangeP ro Shop Gift CertificatesG olf Lessons by AppointmentP rofessionally Run Tournaments H ome of the Strawberry Invitational Li ke us on facebook atStarke Veterinary ClinicSMALL & LARGE ANIMAL HEALTH SERVICES Stay 5 nights Get 6th FREE! Holiday Boarding Special 10334 S.E. SR-100(Intersection of Griffis Loop & SR-100)Starke, FL904-964-5569Dr. Art Riley Surgeries Dentistry Vaccinations X-Rays Ultra Sound Health Exams Preventative Health Care New Client SpecialFREE1st Exam! Large Animal Services also provided with Mobile Unit under Dr. Jennifer Frank Commercial Residential Fleets Autogas Farms Industry Piping for NewConstruction or Home Remodeling Most Major Brands Factory Trained4031 S.W. SR 121 Lake Butler, FL 32054 WilliamsLPGas.com wlpgas@windstream.net(386) 496-3725 Mozzell AzzolinaSTARKEMozzell Azzolina, 86, of Starke died at the Hospice of Citrus and the Nature Coast on Friday, Nov. 22, 2013. She lived in Arcadia most of her life and worked in the real estate business and as a beautician. She is the daughter of the late James William Steele and Minnie Lee Givens Steele. She is preceded in death by her husband, Rocco Azzolina and sister Edna Steele. She was a member of the Hillborn Springs Baptist Church. She is survived by: daughters, Diane Heiman, Elaine Peverell, and Teresa Peverell; son, Aldon (Shelby) Sanchez, Jr.; and sister, Sybil Mareva.   Archer Funeral Home is in charge of all arrangements.Retha DicksonRetha DicksonLAKE BUTLERRetha Ann Dickson, 60, died at the E.T York Haven Hospice on Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2013. She was born in Savannah. She lived most of her life in Georgia but has lived in Lake Butler for the past 30 years. She was a member of the Church of God of Prophecy. She is preceded in death by: her father and mother, Hugh and Darothy Medders; brother, Dennis Medders; and sister, Lawannia Clark. She is survived by: her husband, Bruce Dickson; sons, Christopher Lariscy, and Eric Dickson; one grandson; daughters, Patricia Herrin, Tonya Southerland, Marci Lariscy, Sandra Parks, and Glenda Cribbs; brothers, Royce Medders, Glenn Medders; and sister, Delinda Medders; and many grandchildren and great-grandchildren. The funeral services were held Dec. 1, in the Archer Memorial Chapel. Burial followed at Dyal Cemetery in Starke. Archer Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Marion Glover, Sr.LINCOLNTON, GA. Marion Maines Glover, Sr. entered into rest on Monday, Dec. 2, 2013 at Eisenhower Medical Center in Fort Gordon, Ga. Mr. Glover was the son of the late Reuben Ruldolph Glover and the late Mary Loraine Rawls Glover of Alachua. He was retired military after serving his country honorably during World War II, the Korean War, and Vietnam. Mr. Glover was a member of the Retired Officers Association, Military Police Corps, Lincolnton United Methodist Church and was a life member of the Lincoln County Historical Society. Mr. Glover was preceded in death by a son, Marion Maines Glover, Jr Survivors include: his wife of 66 years, Peggy McGee Glover; one daughter, Linda G. (Jerry) McKinney of Lincolnton; one son, Phillip (Tere) Glover of McCormick, S.C.; six grandchildren, George, Reuben and Marion Glover, Kristie Williamson, Kim Morrison and Lauren McKinney; four greatgrandchildren, Tyler Williamson, Zia Williamson, Hayden Williamson and Ava Morrison. The funeral service with full military honors was held on Dec. 4 at Lincolnton United Methodist Church with Rev. James Bocian officiating. Interment service will be 2 p.m. Friday, Dec. 6, at Dekle Cemetery in Lake Butler.PAID OBITUARYSam LoiacanoSTARKESam J. Lucky Loiacano, 75, of Starke died, Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2013 at the Haven Hospice Custead Care Center in Orange Park. He was born in Port Arthur, Texas on Aug. 16, 1938 to the late Arthur and Juanita (Benito) Loiacano and was a resident of Starke since 2000. He served in the United States Navy and was employed as a mechanical engineer with the Kennedy Space Center for 18 years before retiring. He was a member of the Bethel Baptist Church and the Machinists Union. Two of his granddaughters, Alexandria Nicole Barger and Victoria Paige Loiacano preceded him in death. Survivors are: his wife of 48 years, Liz Loiacano; children, Lora Barger of Titusville and David Loiacano of Starke; siblings, Joann (Chuck) Wheeler of Sour Lake, Texas and Robert Loiacano of Georgia; four grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held at the DeWitt C. Jones Chapel on Dec. 2 with Mr. Ricky Lee officiating and the burial followed at Crosby Lake Cemetery with full Military Honors. Arrangements are under the care of Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home of Starke. Thomas Nail, Jr.STARKEThomas Elegy Nail, Jr., 86, of Starke, died Monday, Nov. 25, 2013 at Roberts Care Center in Palatka. He was born in Plant City on Feb. 1, 1927 to the late Thomas Elegy Nail, Sr. and Mary Oliver Nail. He was a resident of Starke for the past 45 years. He served in the United States Army during World War II and retired after many years in the construction industry as a handyman. He is survived by: his wife of 9 years, Charlotte Jean Lauf Nail of Starke; daughters, Betty Lou, Patricia, Linda, and Jane; numerous grandchildren; and many great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at Tammy Johns In Loving Memory Tammy R, Richards Johns Feb. 23, 1965Dec. 9, 2012 If I could have a lifetime wish If I could have a lifetime wish, A dream that would come true, Id pray to God with all my heart for yesterday and you. A thousand words cant bring you back, I know because Ive tried, and neither can a million tears, I know because Ive cried. You left behind my broken heart and happy memories too. I never wanted memories I only wanted you. Tammy, We all miss you and love you so much. It still doesnt seem right for you not to be here with us. Your Family Joan mom, BeBe,sister, Catie, Kaylen, daughters Donald and Johnny Spencer, brothers And all friends who love you. d Obituaries d a later date. In lieu of flowers please send potted plants. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Archie Tanner Funeral Services of Starke. Randy PittmanSTARKERandy L. Pittman, 65, died Tuesday, Nov. 26, 2013. He was born in Indianapolis on Nov. 16, 1948 to the late La Pearson Pittman and Elma Alberta Pat Pittman. He served in the United States Marine Corps during the Vietnam War and later earned two Masters Degrees in Accounting and Business Administration. He attended the Revelation Church of Lawtey. He is survived by: his wife of 17 years, Teri Pittman; children, Randy (Charity) Pittman II, Alicia (Leonel) Anino and Micky Ruble; sister, La Donna (Robert) Browning; and four grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at a later date. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Archie Tanner Funeral Services of Starke.James RogersBROOKERJames Marvin Rogers, 73, of Brooker died Thursday, Nov. 28, 2013 at the Lake Butler Hospital with his family by his side after an extended illness. He was the son of the late Will and Toy Lee Rogers.   He was employed the Bradford County Solid Waste and was a member of the Church of God of Prophecy at Brooker.   He was preceded in death by sisters, Annie Tetstone and Armenta Hester; and brothers; Buddy and Freddie Rogers. He is survived by: his wife of 30 years; Geneva W. Rogers; daughter, Sandra (Jerry) Keller of Hawthorne; sons, Randall (Kay) Dobbins of Archer; Jimmy (Leah) Dobbins of LaCrosse; Donnie (Dawn) Dobbins of Bellview; 12 grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held Dec. 2, in the Chapel of Archer Funeral Home, with Rev. James Parker officiating. Burial followed in Dedan Cemetery. Archer Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. Nancy TweedyBROOKERNancy Joan Hopper Tweedy passed away Friday, Nov. 22 at Haven Hospice in Gainesville. She was born June 6, 1939 in Indianapolis. She worked as a sales clerk until she retired. She will be missed and loved by all. She is preceded in death by: her father, Mack Hopper; and her mother, Bonnie Deal; her fianc, Mark Walters; and half sister, Amy. She is survived by: a sister, Mary Baker; a half sister, Beckey Watson; two half brothers; and three children, Edwana Edie Jenkins of Brooker, Elizabeth Keith of Worthington Springs, and Willard Kitchen of California; six grandchildren; nine greatgrandchildren; one great-greatgrandson; and countless nieces and nephews. Services will be held at United Methodist Church in Worthington Springs on Saturday Dec. 7 at 2 pm. A dinner will be served at Edie and Dewey Jenkins home in Brooker following the service.PAID OBITUARY

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Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 7B Making the farm-city connection Trish Ray (left) talks to Hope Christian Academy student Kaia Wright during the Bradford County graders from Bradford schools visited the Bradford County Fairgrounds and learned about agriculture, interacted with animals and sampled some tasty farm products. All photos by Cliff Smelley. as Kailan Jefferson and Payton McKenzie, got to hold chicks at the embryology exhibit. TOP RIGHT: Jametrius Pringle samples a cup of goat milk. RIGHT: Michael Norman enjoys visiting wiht a goat. Carn and Ayanna help but laugh as they put their muscles to use in making butter. Jarrin Alexander is pictured in the background. Reddish and Ashley Clark try some sugar cane. DeJon McBride examines a piece of sugar cane as (background, l-r) Tyler Kite, Kale Waters and Danny Thornton look on. www. CaptainsPartyRentals .com Bounce Houses Water Slides Dunk Tanks Trackless Train 904-364-6128 Bradford County Forester Andy off different types of wood as (l-r) Cassie Acevedo, Kimberlynn Woods and Tanner Aucoin look on. and Steven Rugg shake it up as they make butter, which they were able to sample with crackers.

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BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer A 3-pointer by Caleb Jones at the end of the first quarter was the start of an 11-0 run for the Bradford High School boys basketball team, which rolled to a 53-16 win over visiting Keystone Heights in a District 5-4A matchup on Dec. 3. Jones, who finished with 12 points, made another 3-pointer as the Tornadoes (2-2, 1-0 in District 5) scored eight straight points to open the second quarter. Keaaris Ardley took a pass from Alex Mejias as he cut to the basket and scored to put Bradford up 19-5. Keystone (0-4, 0-2) got off to a good start when C.J. Rogers drained a 3-pointer for the first basket of the game, but the Indians got only two more field goals the remainder of the first half. They didnt score in the second quarter until approximately five minutes had elapsed. Joquez Ivey added seven points for Bradford, while Ardley and Oliver Griffin each had six. Benjamin Nichols scored five points, Don Jeffers and Tyler 8B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 BOUNCE HOUSE RENTALS Coming Soon! FloridaBounceRentals.com partytimebouncehouse@outlook.comServing Keystone Heights, Starke, Hampton, Earleton, Interlachen, Putnam Hall, Florahome C OUPONS10% OFF 1st time booking 10% OFF for referrals 15% OFF for renting 2 or more units 5% OFF reservations made 4 weeks in advanceOPEN SAT DEC 14352-745-1399 Gold Key Farm & Western Store, Inc.North 301 Starke, FL (Next to Fairgrounds)M-F 8:00-5:30 Sat 8:00-5:00 LARGE SELECTION MEN & WOMENS WESTERN SHIRTS Long & Short Sleeve20%Justin Work Boots for menRoper Boots for Women & KidsOFF Horse Tack Sale ~ 10% OFF Camo T-Shirts too... All T-Shirts 20-50% OFF Great Christmas Gifts MENS COWBOY CUT JEANSPrewashed & RegularGreat Selection ~ Western Belts and Hats W I N N E R W I N N E ROur last Football Contest Winner is missed 2 The Union County 10U faspitch softball team went undefeated in capturing the fall ball tournament championship on Nov. 16 in Fort White. Union, which finished the season with a 16-2 record, defeated Santa Fe, Starke and Fort White before defeating Santa Fe again for the championship. (The team would like to thank one of its major sponsors, Sweet Temptations, composed of: (front, l-r) Abby Andrews, Katie Tomlinson, Dubose, Candace Clifton, (middle, l-r) Randa Godwin, Emma Worrell, Haley Fishburn, Katie Caren, Breanna Melton, Meghan Mobley, (back, l-r) head coach Thomas James Goody Goodwin. RIGHT: Katie Caren, pictured with head coach Thomas Mobley, earned the Player of the Game trophy. Caren, Randa Goodwin and Meghan Fins, Fur & Tails Dwight Elder, his wife, Cleo, and their two sons, Jonathon and David, have been avid fishermen in North Central Florida for a long time, but they have never been able to gather all of their immediate family on the same trip until they went surf fishing a few weeks ago. Not only was it a productive fishing trip, it was relaxing and diversified. If sitting was anyones desire, they had lawn chairs.   If they got tired of watching fishing lines, they could walk St. Augustine Beach. If additional supplies were needed, the car was available without disrupting the fishing. As noted, the trip was productive, with multiple catches of pompano, whiting and blues. Dustin Elder was the star performer by landing a 6-foot black tip shark that was photographed and released. Dwight attributed much of the trips success to the guide he contracted to assist. The investment was well worth the expense considering the successful trip, the party size and the information gathered for future use should they repeat the event. Dwight also indicated he would get a beach cart if he pursued the activity because the amount of supplies and equipment would be too much to carry. The cart style he was talking about was not motorized, but pushed, much like a wheelbarrow. One thing that is so appealing about the activityif you are not a hunteris that winter surf fishing is so compatible with the beach crowds and fish runs.   This is the very time of the year that reds, whiting and pompano collect around the beaches and inland waterways.   Additionally, if you are near jetties, sheepshead are readily available. Another perk is that beach swimmers are rare during the winter. Dwight also indicated there are good online forums that continually discuss the best beach locations for fish. So if you are in the market for a good outdoors, winter activity and hunting is not an option, consider surf fishing.   Do not forget the value of a guide the first time out, and take a look at Dustins accompanying photo before you dismiss surf fishing as not exciting.Captain Randy HarrisA guides service the first time out on a new outdoors activity is always a good consideration. If by chance you are considering red fishing or any type of inshore fishing out of Steinhatchee on the Gulf Coast, then you might want to consider Captain Randy Harris. Harris is a longtime resident of Keystone and is a master of the activity. He is licensed with the Coast Guard, and he readily posts his catches on Joey Tysons Bald Eagle Bait and Tackle Facebook page, which is a good way to stay up to date on local outdoors activities. Harris knows the area like the back of his hand and uses an airboat to get to the best spots at the right time. He can be reached at 352-745-1507.Outdoors outlookJoey Tyson indicated that the crappie bite is picking up in both Santa Fe and Lowry. Most of the successful fishermen are drifting minnows in the deeper water.   Some fishermen are catching crappie trolling in the feeder creeks off of the St. Johns. Lochloosa especially has been giving up good crappie numbers. In the saltwater front on both coasts, the reds, spotted trout and black trout are doing well.   Lar ge sheepshead are being caught on the eastern side around jetties, especially in the Mayport area. The big impediment to both The excitement See JUMP, 2ABHS boys take 56-13 win over KHHS Jenkins (right) drives to the hoop against Brandon Nicholas 56-13 District 5-4A win. See JUMP, 2A Wainwright each scored four, and Mejias, Roderick Broomfield, Kenny Dinkins, Larry Highsmith and Drian Jenkins each scored two. Rogers and Micah Brown each had three points for Keystone, while Brandon Nicholas, Anton Noble, Buck Shobris, Fletcher Teague and Travis Wheeler each had two. In the Indians previous game, a 44-35 loss to St. Francis on ABOVE: Dustin Elder and Captain Noel Kuhn with black tip caught at St. Augustine Captain Randy Harris (left) displays a nice slot red with a client from the bow of his air boat.

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Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 9B 40 NoticesEQUAL HOUSING OP PORTUNITY. All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limita tion or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimina tion, call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777, the tollfree telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. For further information call Florida Commission on Human Relations, Lisa Sutherland 850-4887082 ext #1005.41 AuctionsKERR AUCTIONS, Lawtey Fl. 23931 NW CR 225A. Chickens, ducks, rabbits, goats, turkeys, sheep, all farm animals. Horses, tack, farm equipment, furniture, appliances. All consignments welcome. Cash sales only. 10% buyers premium. 6pm the 2nd and 4th Saturday of every month. For more information call Lyndel at 904-838-8069 or Randy at 904-591-4191. AB199 and AU1896. Buy, sell, or trade42 Motor Vehicles & AccessoriesTRUCK FOR SALE, 2000 Ford F-350 box truck. Overdrive, A/C, lift gate, excellent condition. Ready to go, asking $9,099 OBO. For more information please call Jim at 732-503-4098 anytime during evening after 6 pm. 732-8014538 anytime during the day45 KEYSTONE HEIGHTS 1 acre, beautiful trees. Must sell! $7,900 cash/ owner financing. 904631-3594. 1.5 ACRES!! Sampson City area. Well, ceptic tank. Must sell! $12,900. Cash/owner financing. 904-631359450 For RentMOBILE HOME for rent. In good condition. For more information call, 904290-0083 OR 904-9645006. 2BR/2 BA MOBILE HOME. 2 acres, outside Key stone Heights. Fenced, CH/A, deck, washer & dryer hookup. Unfur nished. $495/mo. Plus deposit and references. 352-317-5880 KEYSTONE HEIGHTS, 3BR/2BA MH on 1 acre, close to town, $525/mo. plus deposit. Call 352475-6260 3BR-2BA Doublewide MH. Stove, refrigerator, large screened-back-porch, storage in yard. $595/ mo $500 deposit. 105 Campbell Lane, Melrose. 352-226-9220 or 352475-5533 3BR-2BA House at 2844 SE CR 21B, Melrose. Stove, refrigerator, dishwasher, washer/dryer hook up, large screenedporch overlooking Lake Santa Fe $695/mo $600 deposit 352-226-9220 352-475-5533 BEAUTIFUL 3BR/2BA DOUBLE WIDE, in Starke, outside city limits. CH/A. $675/mo. plus $675 deposit 352-2356319 2BR/1BA CH/A single wide in Starke outside City limits. $475/mo $475 de posit. 352-235-6319 2BR/1BA 14 wide remod eled on private fenced lot paved road CH/A $500/ mo $400 deposit call 1-904-219-0684 3BR 2BA Double Wide on CR 221 in Starke Quiet area; Dishwasher, Cen tral Heat/Air. Service Animals only $575/mo plus deposit 352-284-3310 2BR 1BA partially furnished MH; prefer single or couple; service pets only $125/wk $350 move-in; call 904-964-2234 for more info DELIGHTFUL 2BR/1BA house. Shaded w/pe can trees, CH/A, stor age shed, W/D, hookup. 15484 21St. ave.(off Besset Rd.) Clay Electric utilities. Call 904-4726256 or 904-384-8013. 3BR 2BA MOBILE HOME Newly renovated, CH/A, Free Lawn care & garbage pick-up $700/mo $500 security. Located in Raiford. Pls call 904796-0621 FOR RENT Doublewide 3BR 2Bath, Very Clean. South of Starke, Fenced Yard, Large Front & Back porches, Florida Power & Light $550/mo plus de posit 352-468-2674 2/2 SWMH for Rent. Private, fenced-in back yard & porch. $625 includes water. Two months upfront to move in. CR 221 Hampton 352-258-4619 KINGSLEY LAKE HOME 2/2 ch/a private dock on beautiful Kingsley Lake. $800/mo $800 sec dep 386-623-2848 52 Animals & Pets2 Long-haired Chihuahua males; 9 yrs old free to a good home. call 904782-125353A Yard SalesYARD SALE for ADOPTION Fri & Sat Dec 6-7, 8am-2pm. 3900 S.E. SR 100, Starke across from Hope Baptist Church YARD SALE Thur & Fri 9AM-1PM. Very nice furniture, cream-colored sofa (like new!), bookcase DEALERS WEL COME Nice clothing, dolls, sewing machine, kitchen items, rugs, jewelrytoo much to list! 756 W. Market Rd, Starke (from 301 @ West onto Market Rd, 3rd house on left) YARD SALE 17598 NE 28th Ave, Starke. Fri & Sat 8am-12noon. Inside an old chicken house (rain or shine). For Sale: commercial incubator, outdoor Christmas decora tions/wire (starting at $3); Antiques, crafts, books, toys, Adult/children/baby clothes (25 cents ea. or 5 for $1.00); Furniture and Much More! Directions call Debby 904-226-5402 YARD SALE Fri-Sat 9am4pm Tools, ladders, furniture, clothes, glassware, lots of collectible plates & bells (discounted!), Costume jewelry. 14096 SE CR 100A (Griffis Loop, toward Keystone Hts over 2nd RRtrack 1/4 mile, yellow house) GARAGE SALE Dec 5-6 Unvented tropic gas heater, table top electric grill, coffee pot-electric, toaster, toaster oven, all very low prices. Quilting stand, sewing machine cabinet, coffee table very low prices or make offer 1671 S. Walnut 904-966-7479 YARD SALE Fri Sat & Sun 9am-?? Hampton on CR 18E next door to Church. Follow signs for directions. Lots of Christmas items, clothes, & other items GARAGE SALE Dec 7 8am-4pm Clothes, glass es, housewares, misc 9061 SW 137th St, Deerfoot Trail Lots of other good items! YARD SALE Sat 8-2 7268 NW CR 229A Starke. Household items & clothes SATURDAY Dec 7th 8am1pm Starke KOA on South HWY 301. Antique lamps, 40 gal water heater; tires and lots of misc. Food Stand from 10:30 to 12:30 HUGE 2-DAY YARD SALE Dec 13th & 14th from 8am to 5pm. 3018 NW CR 125 Lawtey (1.7 miles from 301; look for the sign Friends Helping Friends) EVERYTHING MUST GO! Living room & bedroom Sets, youth beds, dining room sets, odd chairs & recliners, dressers, washers & dryers. Tools; 24ft galv handicap ramp; Hub/ Around wheelchair; (5) 8x14 Storage sheds; nu merous items to choose from. Brand new refrig(3) Bunk beds, Coffee tables, end tables, enter tainment center & TVs; lamps, dishes, silverware, toys will make great Christmas Gifts COMMUNITY YARD SALE Sat Dec 7, 8am. Hwy 301 Flea Market   4812 SW 144 th St behind old Knuckle Draggers. Come sell for free or shop. Appliances, furniture, houseware, clothing, Christmas dcor & more. MULTI-FAMILY YARD SALE Furniture, clothes, household items, lots of other stuff. Sat Dec 7 8am-?? 2391 SE 15oth St Starke look for signs YARD SALE Sat 8am-?? Rain or shine. Tools, rug, antique toys, christmas decorations, household items. 7239 NW CR 229A Starke 53B Keystone Yard SalesYARD SALE Fri-Sat 9am4pm Toys clothes dishes, commercial sewing machine, Christmas stuff Lots More! 6559 Kings Rd. Keystone Hts (off 21) MOVING SALE Large dresser w/ mirror, drawers $75; Chest of draw ers $30; Tall white louvered cabinet w/ doors, open shelf $60; Assorted other items, shoe racks, lamps make offer; must go quickly. Must pick up from Keystone Hts area 352-473-9375 54 ProducePECANS. Buy, Sell, or Crack. Mon-Sat. 12:006:00. Closed Sunday. 904-964-4399. 2 miles East of Starke. Hwy. 16.55 WantedCASH FOR JUNK cars $300 & up. Free pick up, running or not. Call 352445-3909. 57 For SaleMOVING SALE: King-size Bed $450; Brown leather sofa $200; Flat computer screen $50; Baby swing w/music $25; 19-in TV $25; L-shaped glass computer desk, file cabinet, stair bookcase $325. 904-966-2451 or 904263-0454 HUGE ESTATE SALE A/C unit, TVs, Medical/ handicap supplies, dishes, furniture, etc. Sat Dec 7 8am 2pm. No early birds please.475 SW Naha St, Keystone Hts (352)226-6790 ROCK COLLECTION world-wide collection. Complete room, no sin gle sales. Starke area on 100 SE. Call 904964-8394, leave name & number. Also: 12-foot fiberglass canoe $165; Ford Ranger x-tra cab topper $150. 3 GRAND PIANOS: one with player, one with Austrian Antique; 1 Spinet piano with player. Call 904-964-8394, leave message & ph number. 59 Personal ServicesSTUMP grinding Low as $10.00 eachcall Robert 386-984-6040 AKC Pomeranian puppies; shots/HC Blue Male $600 White Fem $800 386-496-815765 Help WantedLOOKING to fill a part time position! Are you a per son who wants to be part of a fast paced team environment? If so please apply online at www.rowepp.com IT Network Administrator P/T needed for Rural Hospital & Clinic Practice. Responsibilities will include but are not limited to: Installation/ configuration,operation and maintenance of systems hardware and software and related infrastructure. Degree preferred, with technical major, such as engineer ing or computer science. Healthcare IT related experience For further information, please visit our website: www.lake butlerhospital.com 386496-2323 EXT 9258, fax 386-496-2105 Equal Employment Opportuni ty/Drug & Tobacco Free Workplace ER Clerk PRN Days, Nights and Weekend EXP. REQUIRED. For further information, please visit our web site: www.lakebutler hospital.com386-4962323 EXT 9258 FAX 386-496-2105Equal Employment Opportunity/ Drug & Tobacco Free Workplace Part-Time Youth Pastor for Starke Community Church. Send resume to 2138 N Temple Ave, Starke, Fl 32091 or call 904-368-9191 Seeking Licensed FL Mental Health Professional for work with youth in an outpatient SA, AM, and MH treatment program. minimum of 24 months experience required. Background and reference checks also re quired. Work hours: ap proximately 8 to 10 hours per week. Competitive salary. Please fax resume to 352-379-2843 or e-mail to jshaw@itmflorida.com. Wanted: 29 Serious People toWork From Anywhere using a Computer Up to $1,500 $5,000 PT/FT www.iluvmybiz123.com HELP WANTED Exp cleri cal, computer exp, peo ple person. Send brief resume to Clerical, PO Drawer A, Starke, FL 32091 Horizontal Grinder Equip ment Operator Wanted Baldwin, FL Send resume to radkins@ ietteam.com or fax to 866-863-8897 CONTRACTORS NEEDED: Must have depend able truck, trailer, lawn equipment, cellphone and must be able to cover surrounding areas. Biweekly pay. All materials and supplies furnished. Clean background required. Call 352-4788143. Drivers: $5,000 Sign-On Bonus! Great Pay! Consistent Freight, Great Miles on this Regional Account. Werner Enter prises: 1-855-515-8447 Drivers: Home EVERY Weekend, Dedicated Southern Lanes & OTR! All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Or Walk Away Lease: No Money Down, No Credit Check. 1-866823-0323 (904) 964-6305 (352) 473-2210 (386) 496-2261Classified Ads Where one call does it all! Bradford Union Clay 40Notices 41Auctions 42M otor Vehicles & Accessories43RVs & Campers 44Boats &ATVs 45Land for Sale 46Real Estate Out of Area 47Commercial Property (Rent, Lease, Sale) 48Homes for Sale 49Mobile Homes for Sale 50For Rent 61Scriptures 62Vacation/Travel 63Love Lines 64Business Opportunities65Help Wanted 66In vestme nt O ppo rtunities67Hunting Land for Rent 68Carpet Cleaning 69Food Supplements 70Money to Lend 71Farm Equipment 72Computers & Accessories51Lost/Found 52Animals & Pets53AYard Sales53BKeystone Yard Sales53CLake Butler Y ard Sales54Produce 55Wanted 56Antiques 57For Sale 58Child/Adult Home Care59Personal Services 60Home ImprovementWord Ad Classified Tuesday, 12:00 noon Classified Display Tuesday, 12:00 noon964-6305 473-2210 496-2261 C lassified Advertising should be paid in advance unless credit has already been established with the newspaper. A $3.00 service charge will be added to all billing to cover postage and handling. All ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser at the time of placement. However, the classified staff cannot be held responsible for mistakes in classified advertising taken by phone. The newspaper reserves the right to correctly classify and edit all copy or to reject or cancel any advertisements at any time. Only standard abbrevations will be accepted. TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED USE YOUR PHONE Out of Area Classifieds Inc. (Road striping division only) December 10th @ 10am 4421 12th St. Court East, Bradenton, Fl 34203 Specialized highway marking/striping equipment and vehicles that meets DOT safety. Special preview: 12/09 10am-4pm www.moeckerauctions. com (800) 840-BIDS 15%-18%BP, $100 ref. cash dep. Subj to confirm. Receivership case #2013 CA 002342 Circuit Court of Manatee County, Fl AB-1098 AU-3219, Eric Rubin Brand new 2BR/2BA 1,690sf luxury condo only $149,900 Originally under contract for $365,000. Near downtown Orlando & all theme parks/ attractions. Must see. Call now 877-3330272, x 173 Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Traning. Job ready in 15 days! (888)3681964 Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. 3 Weeks Hands On Program. Local Job Placement Assistance. National Certifications. GI Bill Benefits Eligible. 1866-362-6497 $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.co m EOE Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-3143769 Only $74,900 New 3BR, 2BA log cabin shell, lake access, nicely wooded, level setting. Quiet paved road frontage. Excellent financing. Call now 877-888-0267, x 453 Sale! Saturday, Dec 14th. 3BR, 2BA, 1700sf cabin on spectacular lake access setting in beautiful upscale community with all infrastructure/ amenities completed. Excellent financing. Call now 877-5253033, x 983. *constructed weather tight log home shell. Gorgeous Blue Ridge mountain acreage featuring spectacular 3 state views & towering hardwoods! Abuts U.S. National Forest. Great building spot! U/G utilities, paved rd frontage, RV friendly. Priced to sell only $69,900. Excellent financing. Call now 866_952_5303, x 92 2003HondaCivicPrice Reduced!.............................................$6,990 2011Ford FusionGas Saver!....................................................$9,800 2011Ford F150The right truck!..........................................$12,988 2011Nissan AltimaPriced to sell..............................................$10,900 2005ToyotaCamryDont wait!.....................................................$6,995 2011ChevySilveradoReady for work or play!.............................$12,988 2011ChevyMalibuBest Deal in town.......................................$11,988 2011Nissan RogueWhy buy new??.........................................$13,995 2007HyundaiSonataThis one loaded........................................... $9,500 2006Honda PilotPriced to move...........................................$11,980 2010Honda InsightA real gas Saver.........................................$11,988 2011ChevyAveoSave money and fuel.................................$11,980 2011Ford EscapeNicest around............................................$14,800 Honda of Gainesville 3800 N. Main St. (866) 363-0813 SELF EMPLOYED? OR 1099 EMPLOYEE? AT HONDA OF GAINESVILLE WE SAY YES! NO MATTER WHAT YOUR CREDIT IS!!! 2 Story Building has reception entry, 3 offices, Bathroom, Kitchen, Refrigerator, Cabinets, Dishwasher, Washer & Dryer, Hot Water & Shower. has 4 offices, Bathroom, Shower. Downtown Starke Location $1,200 per month on long term contract. Becky CarterC.B. Isaac RealtyBroker Associate Realtor(352) 213-4200beckycartercbi@yahoo.com CBIHomesandLand.com Opportunities Abound! Commercial Real Estate Prime Retail/Office Venue. C-91 Commercial building with over 2,400 sq.ft in high traffic location . C-97 Office/Showroom/Retail C-87 Facebook.com/NefarBass BsBoutique(904) 966-0020 Hwy 301 N. Starke DIESEL MECHANIC neededfor local trucking com pany. Must have experience and own hand tools. Call Today Florida Credit Union has a FT teller position available at our Starke branch. Experience with high volume cash handling, maintaining cash drawer, balancing, cross-selling, and customer service expertise is required. Prior credit union/bank experience is a plus. We offer competitive salary, incentives, and excellent benefits. Stop by our Starke branch at 2460 Commercial Drive (near Walmart) to complete an application or send resum to: Florida Credit Union, Attn: HR/TLR, P.O. Box 5549, Gainesville, FL 32627 Fax: 352-264-2661 Email: krose@flcu.org M/F/D/V EOE Drug Free Workplace D URRANCE PUMP 964-7061QUALITY SERVICE SINCE 1964 Pumps Sales Parts Service ST ATE LICENSE #1305 Chris State Licensed and InsuredARE YOU READY TO MOVE?If youre looking to move your mobile home, purchase a mobile, re-level, update your current set up, or site prep.We are here to help!Call us @352-318-4711 or 386-496-9722 Breakdown, Transport, Set Up, Re-level, Retrofit, Site Prep, Land Clearing, Fill Dirt, etc. 801 South Water Street Starke, FL 32091 TDD/TTY 711 1, 2, & 3 bedroom HC & Non-HCaccessible apartments.This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. Equal Housing Opportunity Set Right Mobile Homes Specializing In Relocations, Re-Levels, Set-Ups & Disposal Rodney A. Carmichael, OwnerEmail: set_right_homes@yahoo.com904-364-6383 Southern Villas of StarkeAsk about our 1&2 BR Apartments HC & non-HC Units. Central AC/ Heat, on-site laundry, playground, private, quiet atmosphere. 1001 Southern Villas Dr. Starke, FL Equal Housing Opportunity

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10B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 ea olidays! forthe Healthcarelawsarechanging.Nowisthetimetoinvestinyourhearingbeforepricesinc rease. EnfeYa 50%Off Blowout!offMSRP! select2013Models! Ourteamoflicensed hearinghealthcarepractitioners. imitedimenly alloday Drian Jenkins and Caleb Jones combined to score 25 points in leading the Bradford High School boys basketball team to a 56-53 win over Union County on Nov. 30 in Lake Butler. Jones, who made five 3-pointers, led the Tornadoes with 15 points, while Jenkins had 10. Don Jeffers added nine points for Bradford, which led 27-16 at the half. Kyle Mosher, who made four 3-pointers, led Union (1-2 prior to Dec. 3) with 15 points, while Darrell Watkins added 12. The Tigers played Eastside this past Tuesday and will travel to Cross City on Thursday, Dec. 5, to play District 7-1A opponent Dixie County at 7:30 p.m. On Tuesday, Dec. 10, Union hosts district opponent Chiefland at 7:30 p.m.Bradford boys defeat Union for 1st win Tigers split seasons 1st 2 gamesThe Union County High School boys basketball team won its first game over Trenton, but then dropped a game to Class 6A Columbia. Dakenundrick Wells posted a double-double, scoring 10 points and grabbing 12 rebounds, in a 50-47 win over visiting Trenton on Nov. 23. Darrell Watkins scored 12 points and had three assists, while Larry Collins scored 11 points and had three steals. Trey Spitze had a teamhigh four assists, while Kyle Mosher had three. Mosher also had six rebounds. Watkins scored 15 points in a 79-43 loss to Columbia on Nov. 26 in Lake City. He and Austin Dukes each had two steals, while Dukes also had three assists. Spitze added eight points, while Antonio Hendrieth and Zach Lee each grabbed five rebounds. Caroline McCormick scored in double figures in both games the Keystone High School girls basketball team played in its Turkey Shootout on Nov. 25-26 as the Indians have now won three straight games to improve to 3-4. McCormick had 11 points, seven rebounds, three assists and three steals in a 44-16 win over Menendez on Nov. 25. Caiylen Gonzales led the Indians with 14 points, while Bailey Zinkel grabbed a team-high 11 rebounds. On Nov. 26, McCormick and Abby Winters scored 13 and 12 points, respectively, in a 4643 win over Yulee. McCormick added seven rebounds and three steals, with Sierra Moore leading the team in rebounds (10) and assists (3). Alexa Born added eight points. Keystone played District 5-4A opponent Fort White this past Tuesday and will travel to Green Cove Springs to play Clay on Thursday, Dec. 5, at 6 p.m. The Indians travel to play district opponent Interlachen on Friday, Dec. 6, at 6 p.m. On Tuesday, Dec. 10, Keystone hosts district opponent Bradford at 7 p.m.Keystone girls go 2-0 in tournamentVisiting Fort White was no match for the Keystone Heights High School boys soccer team, which improved to 6-0 in District 5-2A and got five goals from Cory Hedding in a 12-0 win on Dec. 2. No second half was played due to the mercy rule as the Indians (8-1-1 overall prior to Dec. 3) scored all of their goals in the first half. Besides Heddings goals, Keystone got three from Zach Holman and one each from Juan Grimaldo, Nacho Grimaldo, Brandon Hannah and Ben Jones. Juan Grimaldo had six assists, while Wyatt Graziano had four. Hedding and Holman each had KHHS boys soccer team scores 12 in district winone. Keystone played Crescent City this past Tuesday and will host Clay on Thursday, Dec. 5, at 7 p.m. The Indians travel to play Crescent City on Tuesday, Dec. 10, at 7 p.m. After losing their first District 5-2A match (4-2 to Santa Fe), the Keystone Heights High School girls soccer team recorded a big win, scoring seven first-half goals and defeating visiting Fort Keystone girls bounce back, get 8-0 district winWhite 8-0 on Dec. 2 to improve to 8-1 in District 5. The Indians (8-4 overall prior to Dec. 3) got three goals from Madison Colaw and two from Raychel Trimble. Hanna Crane, Rachel Garvey and Rachel Lee each had one. Colaw led the team in assists with three, while Lee, Trimble, Julia Osteen and Cheyenne Riddling each had one. Keystone played Crescent City this past Tuesday and will host district opponent Bradford on Thursday, Dec. 5, at 5 p.m. The Indians travel to play Crescent City on Tuesday, Dec. 10, at 5 p.m. before traveling to Palatka for a 6 p.m. match on Wednesday, Dec. 11. fishing and hunting during the last week has been the wind.   The rain and cold front made its way into the area first, and the wind closely followed. It made hunting waterfowl especially difficult, but the first phase of waterfowl season ended on Dec. 1.   The second phase will open on Saturday, Dec. 7, and run through Jan. 26. Captain Randy Harris says the cold weather that we have recently experienced tends to make the inshore fish bunch and more available to catch.Crosshorn Ministeries to hold Christmas banquetCrosshorn Ministries holds its Christmas banquet at the Starke Golf and Country Club on Thursday, Dec. 19, from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. There are sure to be outdoors presentations, things to eat and some good conversations about hunting, fishing, trapping and other outdoors activities. Tight lines and safe hunting until next week. If you have a story, idea or photo to share, please contact Mickey Agner via email at mka@ maoutdoors.com, or by phone at 904-964-1488. Photos may also be submitted in person at the Bradford County Telegraph, Union County Times or Lake Region Monitor.FINSContinued from 8B HOOPSContinued from 8B Nov. 22, Nicholas and Wheeler led the team with 11 and eight points, respectively. Bradford will travel to play district opponent Interlachen on Thursday, Dec. 5, at 7:30 p.m. before hosting Englewood on Saturday, Dec. 7, at 7:30 p.m. The Tornadoes travel to play district opponent Fort White on Monday, Dec. 9, at 7:30 p.m. Keystone travels to Gainesville to play Oak Hall on Dec. 5 at 7 p.m. before hosting Interlachen on Friday, Dec. 6, at 7 p.m. On Tuesday, Dec. 10, the Indians travel to play Fort White at 7:30 p.m.



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lrmonitor@bellsouth.net www.StarkeJournal.com Deadline Monday 5 p.m. before publication Phone 352-473-2210 Fax 352-473-2210 Lake Region Monitor USPS 114-170 Keystone Heights, Florida Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 41st Year 31st Issue 75 CENTSMiddleburg, Keystone switch Christmas parade datesMelrose, Keystone reach out for Thanksgiving BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor The Keystone Heights Christmas Parade, which has been on the second Saturday of December, will be on the first Saturday this year. Lake Region Kiwanis member and Keystone parade director Noel Thomas said the Clay County Sheriffs Office asked him about three months ago to move the Keystone parade to Dec. 7. He agreed to the change. The sheriffs office said it would have difficulty providing traffic control and other support for two simultaneous parades and asked Thomas to reschedule the Keystone event after Middleburg parade organizers requested the Dec. 14 date. Lorry Williams, first vice president of the Middleburg Civic Association and director for the Middleburg parade said she would have preferred to keep the Dec. 7 date for the event. We prefer having it on the first Saturday in December, but because of the way Middleburg is laid out, the only place we can line up is at the First Baptist Church, and they had an event on the first Saturday, she said. I am completely at the mercy of the church. The Middleburg parade route is in the two northbound lanes of Blanding Boulevard from Advanced Auto Parts (next to First Baptist Church and across the street from Publix Supermarkets) to Palmetto Street, the last right turn before the Black Creek Bridge. During the parade, deputies convert the two southbound lanes of Blanding Boulevard into one northbound and one southbound lane. We have about 12 reserve officers available and it takes that many to do just Middleburgs parade, said Special Operations Division Lt. Mark Cowan in an email. It takes nine to safely secure Keystones parade, so it causes a problem if they schedule them on the same night. Safety is our number-one priority. In Middleburg, we have to put out about 250 cones, direct northbound traffic over to one lane on the southbound side from the First Baptist Church, north to Palmetto to clear Blanding for the parade route. We assign an officer to each side street and two at each major intersection. According to the First Baptist Church website calendar, the congregation has a choir and orchestra Christmas concert scheduled for Dec. 7. The change created a scheduling conflict for at least one other Keystone Heights event. For the past seven years, the Miss Keystone Heights High School Junior High Pageant scheduled its event for eighthgrade contestants on the first Saturday in December to avoid a scheduling conflict with the parade. Event organizer Lynn Dickinson said in an email that by the time she found out about the changed date for this years parade, it was too late to alter her event at the high school. She added that the pageant will proceed on Dec. 7 at 7 p.m. as originally planned.Keystone moves from Dec. 14 to Dec. 7. Miss KHHS Junior Pageant will go on as planned. Katz to lawmakers: send more Lake Lowry water to Keystone Clay County leaders pitch to local legislators Clay Electric raising power cost adjust.BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor For the second time in four months, Clay Electric members will see an increase in their monthly bills. In October, the utility increased its monthly customer charge by $3. In addition, the co-op increased its energy charge on the first 1,000-kilowatt hours of power from 7.48 cents to 7.63 cents per kilowatt hour. In January, Clay Electric will begin passing through a 4.4 percent increase that its power supplier, Seminole Electric, imposed on the Keystone Heights-based utility and nine other co-ops that own Seminole electric. The other nine co-ops that buy power from Seminole are Talquin in Quincy, TriCounty in Madison, Suwannee Valley in Live Oak, Central Florida in Chiefland, Sumter in Sumpterville, Withlacoochee River in Dade City, Peace River in Wauchula, Glades in Moore Haven, and Lee County in North Fort Myers. Seminole generates most of its power from a 1,300-megawatt coal fired power plant north of Palatka. The wholesale power supplier also operates an 810-megawatt natural gas-powered plant along the Polk and Hardee County line. It sells the electricity to its 10 members, which are located in the panhandle and down the middle of the state with seven located north of the Interstate 4 corridor and three located south of the highway. The January increase will appear in the power cost adjustment line of Clay Electric members bills. Members who consume 1,000 kilowatt hours of electricity per month will see their bill increase by about $5 a month. Seminole said it increased the rate because of excess capacity, increases in the costs of fuels and the necessity to replace expiring supply contracts with agreements that wound up more expensive. The power supplier said that it had planned for power demand to increase around 4 percent a year, but in recent years growth had slowed to 0. It projects that though 2016, it will have more capacity than consumer demand. Seminoles 10 member coops saw steady growth in both megawatt hours sold and customer connections through 2009. However, in the following year, customer connections dropped from 903,490 in 2009 to 848,274 in 2010. In 2011 and in 2012, connections rebounded to 850,631 and 858,972, around the same number of customers Seminole and its members served in 2005. Megawatt hours sold peaked from 17.172 million in 2009 to 15,468 million in 2012, a 10 percent decrease. Similarly, Seminoles revenues peaked from $1.459 billion in 2010 to $1.223 billion in 2012, a 16 percent drop. The co-ops net margin fell from $60 million in 2010 to $12 Keystone passes 1-year sign moratorium BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor The Keystone Heights City Council passed a moratorium during its Dec. 2 meeting for most new business signs within the city limits. The prohibition includes freestanding, groundmounted, illuminated, marquee, message center, projecting, under-canopy and wall-mounted signs. For types of signs not included in the moratorium, the ordinance reads that only temporary permits will be issued, and that when the moratorium is lifted, the holders of temporary permits will have to apply for a permanent permit. Keystone Vice Mayor, and chair of the citys growth management committee, Tony Brown said that within the year, he expected the council to pass a new sign ordinance and that the purpose of the moratorium was to prevent businesses from erecting new signs that may be in violation of the new rules. (The moratorium is) for the business owners, so that they will understand what we are trying to do as a growth-management (committee) for LDRs (land development regulations) and as a council to save them money from going and putting up a sign that we are not going to allow in the future. It still gives them leeway to put up something, he added, but they will know what is coming down the line. Mayor Mary Lou Hildreth, BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor The president of the Save Our Lake Organization told Clay County legislators that the state should pump more water from Camp Blandings Lake Lowry toward Lake Brooklyn in Keystone Heights in order to better manage the Upper Etonia Creek Basin. Vivian Katz made the request to Clay Countys legislative delegation during a Nov. 18 meeting in Green Cove Springs. Senator Rob Bradley, and Representatives Travis Cummings and Charles E. Van Zant Sr. make up the delegation. Katz showed the panel before and after photographs taken from the shore of Lake Brooklyn that showed an increase in water levels in the Keystone lake after the St. Johns River Water Management District pumped 194 million gallons from Lake Lowry into Alligator Creek and eventually into Lake Brooklyn earlier this year. She then asked the lawmakers to consider a plan that would artificially cap Lowrys water level to 130 feet and pump water that would exceed that level south toward Keystone Heights. Katz said the plan is a common sense, low cost approach to better manage the Upper Etonia Creek Basin. She displayed a blue line graph charting Lowrys water level over the past 50 years, and asked an associate to highlight the point on the graph representing 130 feet. If you look at all that blue above that, Katz told the lawmakers, that would be all the water that we would getprobably 70 to 80 percent of the time we would be receiving water from Lake Lowry. Katz added, What that would do is keep Alligator Creek flowing and when we get rain like we did this past summer, we get an exponential benefit. I believe we got 194 million from Lake Lowry, and I believe it was billions of gallons that actually came into Lake Brooklyn because of that. Katz also asked the lawmakers help in stopping the water management district from lowering minimum flows and levels on Lakes Brooklyn, Geneva and Cowpen. She said the districts proposed rule would lower the MFL for Lake Geneva from 98.5 feet to 93 feet, and lower Brooklyns standard from 101 feet to 81 feet. She also showed the trio an illustration of what she said Lake Brooklyn would look like at 81 feet. The illustration showed a mostly dry lake bed with only three small pools of water remaining. Katz gave the delegation a grave prediction if the districts plan of lowering Brooklyns MFL to 81 feet came to fruition. If it is lowered to 81 and Geneva to 83, it will be the nail in the coffin for our community, she said. Other speakers who made presentations to the delegation included:County Commission Vice Chair Wendell DavisClay County Commissioner Wendell Davis also asked the lawmakers to keep an eye on Keystone Heights-area water supply issues. Davis asked the legislators to help with funding for the First Coast Expressway, C.R. 218 and C.R. 220. He added that several bills pending in Tallahassee about housing minors in the juvenile justice system could have significant implications for Clay County taxpayers. Our request is that we be a part of the discussion, said Davis. When you are looking for information, or you are having committee meetings, we can participate.Superintendent of Schools Charlie Van ZantClay County Schools chief Charlie Van Zant complained that two late adjustments to last years state budget had a negative impact on local school district budgets around Florida. I feel like we got a little bit hoodwinked right there at the end, Van Zant said of the changes. He said legislators put an additional financial burden on his district when they increased the amount local governments had to pay into the state retirement system for their employees pension benefits. In 2011, lawmakers required employees in the Florida retirement system to begin contributing 3 percent of their pay into the system. In 2013, the legislature increased the percent of employees pay that employers must put into the system by 1.7 percent. Earlier this year, Van Zant said the change will cost the school district $3.5 million. The superintendent said the second last-minute change that hurt the school system was an adjustment in the funding allocation formula. He said the new formula peels away education funding from his district if a student spends part of the day in Florida Virtual School or in a college under a dual-enrollment program. The per-pupil funding from the state went up $146, he said. But if I have a kid in Clay High School down the street here for six classes a day, and he takes one class in Florida Virtual and then he goes to St. Johns (River State College) and takes another class, I have to provide six teachers all day long for him, and then we have to subdivide that pie by eight now, and then one-quarter (or) two-eighths of that funding (gets sent away from the district). Van Zant told the panel that this year, he hoped lawmakers would propose such changes earlier in the session, to give local school leaders the opportunity to provide input. Supervisor of Elections Chris ChamblessChambless said since 2014 is an election year, he hoped legislators would not make major changes to election laws. He thanked them for the reforms they made last year, including increasing the number of days for early voting and limiting the length of constitutional See CLAY, 4A See LAWS, 3A Churches and volunteers in the Lake Region celebrated Thanksgiving by serving free meals in both Melrose and Keystone Heights. In Melrose, Trinity Episcopal Church led the annual event: Thanksgiving in the Park. Father Tony Powell said the entire community contributed to the effort. In Keystone Heights, the United Methodist Church doubled the attendance in its Thanksgiving Day meal from last years. Left: Volunteers in Melrose take a break after serving around 300 people by noon. (Left-right) Bob Hood, Diane Reeves, William Pierson, Linda Wilcox, Dave Kidd, Lynn Meyer, Judy Randolph, Leo Lowe, Margaret Kidd and Father Tony Powell. Right: Volunteers at the Keystone United Methodist Church included (left-right) Robin Jones, JoAnne Sayers and Olive Inman. See SIGNS, 2A

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2A Lake Region Monitor Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 352-473-3356Keystone Heights, FL 32656 THE FROZEN PELICAN 130 SE Nightingale St. (Across from Compass Bank) Like us on Facebook for news, specials, contests and events! Shaved Ice Nathans Hot Dogs BBQ Nachos Fries and Sweet Treats! Mention this Ad for10% offfor the month DecemberCome see Santa on Dec 7, at 7pm after the Christmas Parade! who is vice chair of the growth management committee, said that although the moratorium is for a year, she hoped it would not last that long. She said once the growth management committee and city council finalized the new sign rules, the council would then lift the moratorium. Hildreth also said the citys Community Redevelopment Advisory Committee is putting together a sign grant program to help businesses replace signs that violate the new rules. In other business before the councils Dec. 2 meeting:City passing up grant applicationKeystones grant consultant, Scott Modesitt of Summit Professional Services, told the council that the city had little chance of securing a community development block grant for 2014. Last year, Keystone won a $600,000 award for housing rehabilitation. The state awards the grants based on a point system and last year, Keystone got 100 points because it had not received a CDBG grant in the previous five years. For 2014, that 100-point bonus is not available and Modesitt said without it, he estimated Keystone would only accumulate 423 points toward securing a CDBG grant. Last year, the city with the lowest point total that earned a grant had 655 points. The consultant added that Keystones best chance for securing another CDBG grant will be in five years when it will again be eligible for the 100-point bonus. He said the citys point total may also improve if the 2010 census shows a higher percentage of low-income families in the area. DAR chapter recognizedHildreth read a proclamation declaring Dec. 4 as Col. Samuel Elbert Chapter National Society Daughters of the American Revolution Day. The mayor said 170,000 women in 3,000 DAR chapters contribute 250,000 hours a year to visiting veterans, raising scholarship money and other volunteer efforts. She said in 1985, Mattie Rucks Taber, the great-great-great-great granddaughter of Col. Samuel Elbert, founded the chapter that bears her ancestors name. Elbert served in the Continental Army and was captured by the British in the Battle of Briar Creek. He subsequently escaped and led a victorious naval battle near St. Simons Island in 1778.Mayoral election set for March 4Hildreth read a proclamation announcing the election for her own office which will be held on March 4.Scarecrow strut winners recognized Keystone-area property crimesLaurie A. Buttry (left), of Therapy Through Message, accepts the Most Creative award from Mayor Mary Lou Hildreth for the citys Scarecrow Strut. Over 30 Keystone organizations displayed themed scarecrows in front of their establishments during the event, which was produced by the towns Community Redevelopment Advisory Committee. During the city councils Dec. 2 meeting, Debbie Etheridge, of Mallards Dollarama & More, also accepted the Advisory Committees Choice award. Photo by Dan Hildebran. 1. On Oct. 22, a victim reported that over the past several months, the refrigerator, stove and washer and dryer were stolen from a vacant residence on Jefferson Street. There were no signs of forced entry. 2. On Oct. 27, the interior components of the air-conditioning unit were stolen from a entered by breaking out the window in the rear door. Nothing was missing from inside the residence. 3. On Nov. 18, the window above an air-conditioning unit was pushed in from the outside 4. On Nov. 23, two unattended chainsaws were stolen from the back of a pickup truck parked at a business on S.R. 100. SIGNSContinued from 1A See CITY, 3A

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amendments. Jim Renninger, Orange Park MayorOrange Park Mayor Jim Renninger said his town is feeling the burden of unfunded mandates through the Florida Department of Environmental Regulations Total Maximum Daily Loads Program. The program caps the amount of pollutants the town may discharge into the St. Johns River. Renninger complained that the test to determine if acceptable levels of Mercury are in the towns wastewater costs $7,500. Today, there is no identified strategy for removal (of Mercury), he added. This TMDL requirement is headed through the legislature and we would like to really make sure somebody looks at that before we assign a maximum level without a removal strategy to eliminate it. He also said regulators requirement that cities cap Phosphorus going into the St. Johns appeared questionable to him. It is going to cost a lot of money, he said, and we are not sure that it is relevant. Rinninger also questioned the necessity to test for silver in wastewater. He said the element used to make its way into wastewater with its use in film developing. He said, however, that the practice is no longer performed. This is a very expensive test and we are not sure that this is a real problem anymore, he said. Renninger also said his town, like many other municipalities, is dealing with underfunded pension obligations and asked the lawmakers not to interfere in local labor negotiations. The mayor asked the panel to continue to restore funding to the Florida Recreation Development Assistance Program, which pays for local parks and recreation areas. Renninger said the program disbursed $39 million to local governments in 2006, but went unfunded in the three years prior to 2013. In 2013, the legislature put $642,000 into the program. We would like that to continue its upward trend, he said. It provides lifestyle opportunities and health improvement, tourism, economic activity and property values for our constituents, he said of the program. The mayor cautioned lawmakers about tinkering with local business taxes. He also asked them to intervene in increases in flood insurance rates which he said are going up 10-fold in some cases. State Attorney Angela CoreyState Attorney Angela Corey said lawmakers need to take another look at Floridas government-in-the-sunshine statues. Chapter 119 (the statue that governs open records requirements), I think is out of hand, to a certain extent, when it comes to the criminal justice system, she said. Corey said that the medias access to discovery evidence before a trial interferes with the defendants right to due process and the states right to a fair trial. She added that pre-trial publicity has led to expensive changes of venue for some cases. She said that the rules of evidence filters testimony and other evidence before it reaches a jury. Corey asked why the public should hear that evidence before a trial. We are not trying to hide anything, she added. I think everything about a criminal trial should come out in the courtroom. Corey also thanked lawmakers for past legislation that allows prosecutors to aggressively Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 Lake Region Monitor 3A N OW OPEN 1545 Branan Field Road Suite 5 Middleburg (Across from W almart)E YE EXAM & 2 BoxesAcuvue 2 Contacts$9 9Restrictions apply Middleburg Location Only. Expires 12-31-13Most Insurances Accepted Certified Optometrists Dr Edwin Anguas & Dr. Margaret Allen 904-291-5800Lens options extra. Individual of fers cannot be combined with any other coupon, discount package price or insurance benefit. See store for details. Certain restrictions apply. Coupons must be presented at time of service. The patient and the person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment, or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment.Quality Eyecar e with Value in Mind $7 9Includes exam and 2 pair of single vision glasses with SV Plastic lenses, restrictions apply Call store for details. (Middleburg Location Only) Expires 12-31-13EYE EXAM & 2 P AIR OF GLASSES Use your current insurance benefits and health savings account now ...Some of these benefits will expire at the end of the year! G e t Fit for the Holidays!Zumba ClassesM o nday Tuesday Wednesday6 7 p.m .C hampions HeartBehind Compass Bank F irs t Class is Free! $5 per class Last Will and Testament Power of Attorney Living Will and Healthcare Surrogate Designation Living Trusts Probate Administration Real Estate Deed Preparation Real Estate Closings Contracts Family and Juvenile Law Criminal and Traffic Matters 189 S. Lawrence Blvd. Keystone Heights, FLFirmofV eRonicaROwens@aol.comwww.VeRonicaROwens.comV eRonica R. OwensA ttorney at Law D id you know we now make house visits? Call us today to set up an appointment.Jam es 4:12 There is one Lawgiver, who is able to save. Qualifying for the three-year post will begin on Jan. 7 and end on Feb. 4. Hildreth first won the office in 2006 after placing second in a three-way race. Huntley Redfearn won the first primary with 101 votes. Hildreth placed second with 100 votes and Tony Brown came in third with 99. In the subsequent runoff, Hidlreth beat Redfearn with 54 percent of the vote. She ran unopposed in 2008 and 2011. Street paving contract awardedThe council accepted a $123,210.65 bid from John C. Hipp Construction of Alachua to resurface parts of Nightingale Street, Berea Avenue, Southeast Cypress Street and Azalea Avenue in 2014. The work will also include paving Beasley Lane. Other bidders included Oldcastle Southern/APAC which offered to complete the work for $136,093.21, V.E. Whitehurst which placed a bid of $149,225.40 and Duval Asphalt which bid $196,729.01.Special event procedures reviewedCouncil members reviewed and commented on an application for special events that city staff is developing. Under the emerging proposal, producers of large city events such as parades and festivals would have to apply for a permit and through the special event application, demonstrate that they have properly planned for the event, such as arranging for security and traffic control, notifying fire and safety officials and obtaining necessary insurance. Responding to a question from Brown, City Manager Terry Suggs said the permitting requirement would also apply to events held on private property such as church events. After the meeting, Brown pointed out that organizations that sponsor large events in Keystone already complete many of the procedures on the proposed special events application. He cited as one example First Baptist Churchs production of the Walk Through Bethlehem, pointing out that the church arranges for traffic control and hires additional security for the event.Manager to receive masters degreeBrown congratulated Suggs on Suggs completion of a masters degree in public administration from Barry University. Suggs said he has been in the program for 14 months, which covers policy analysis, public finance, human resources, planning and growth management, public law and other topics related to managing government operations. Suggs will receive his diploma on Dec. 14. Charter proposals passedCouncil members approved all five recommendations from the citys charter review committee. The five proposals that will appear on the March ballot include minimum attendance requirements for council members, procedures to replace council members, operating procedures for future charter review committees, and two measures abolishing the requirements for a town clerk. Bonney Farm House, circa 1876, oldest house in Melrose.Historic Melrose hosts tri-annual holiday tour Senior Services donates to LAMLake Area Ministries Co-director Chip Wester (left) accepts a $500 check from Keystone Senior Services President Dan Pickens (right) and Vice President Bill Lee. Photo by Cindy Lee. Jean Marshall, Rosemary Daurer and Historic Melrose are busy planning the Historic Melrose Holiday House Tour, set for December 15. The tour is given only once every three years around this time of year and is widely considered to be one of the best holiday treats for adults in the area. Historic Melrose will sponsor its Holiday House Tour on Sunday, Dec. 15 from 1 to 5 p.m. in Melrose. This years tour will highlight the Pearsall family from Westfield, NJ, who actively promoted Melrose businesses and properties in the late 1800s and early 1900s. On the day of the tour, tickets will be sold at the Baldwin Store, at the corner of S.R. 26 and Cypress Street. Tickets are $8 ($7 for HMI members.). For information and tickets in advance, call 352-475-3992 in the daytime, and in the evening 352-475-2413. Tour brochures will include a map of the sites and their histories. Parking is available at Heritage Park, just east of the Baldwin Store, or along the tour route. There will be eleven stops including historic homes and buildings, a chapel, a barn, and a potting garden. A display of Pearsall family history and craft demonstrations will be shown at the Homemakers Club, once the Vogelbach-McRae Drugstore. The Daurer History Center in Heritage Park and all four of Melroses art galleries will be open. Trinity Episcopal Church on S.R. 26 will host an organ concert at 3 p.m. The Mossman House will feature a selection of antiques and collectibles available for purchase. Craft demonstrations include boondoggling (weaving with palm fronds) and decorating for the holidays with local natural materials. Visitors are advised to wear comfortable shoes and stroll down tree-lined streets, past historic homes and gardens in the Melrose Historic District, which was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1990. Alfred Pearsall arrived in Melrose in the mid-1880s and was followed by his children, his siblings, and other relatives. His son Leigh visited Melrose in 1900, while on his honeymoon. Shortly after that Leigh bought property on Melrose Bay where he spent winters until making Melrose his permanent home in 1954. The original home was replaced by a second home where Leigh Pearsall lived until his death in 1964. This home will be open and on display. Pearsall became a large landowner in the Melrose area and owned a number of homes to accommodate his winter guests. His large collection of American Indian artifacts was housed on his property in a building called the Wigwam. In 1963 the collection went to the Florida State Museum, at the University of Florida, now the Florida Museum of Natural History, which had a special exhibition of the collection in 2003. See COREY, 4ALAWSContinued from 1A CITYContinued from 2A

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4A Lake Region Monitor Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 150 Channelsfor $3499 3 mths Premium Programming FREE The System & Standard Installationare Completely FREE Q:Have you ever been told that a lineofsight cant be found at your home?A:Give me a call I may be able to help!25 years experience in sales & serviceAUDIO VIDEO MASTERS1-866-988-MyDish (6934) EmployFlorida.com 1-866-352-2345 Employ Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. The Employ Florida telephone number may be reached by persons using TTY/TTD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol. JOB RESOURCES at EmployFlorida.com helped me nd a new job I enjoy earning higher pay than I did before I was laid off. You too can discover REAL RESULTS with Employ Florida. RANDAL HARDBOWER Industrial Electrician Green Circle Bio Energy Inc. www.orange-blossom.com/7100 1-800-624-8835 1-800-624-8835 1-800-624-8835 1-800-624-8835 1-800-624-8835 Order Navels & Grapefruit, get Tangelos FREE!EXTRA BONUS FREE 3 oz. Jar Genuine Honeybell MarmaladePlus standard shipping.* Gifts of Floridas Finest FruitIndian River CitrusORANGE BLOSSOM Item #7100 8115 lbs. of Citrus in each box! Send a healthy holiday gift of famous Florida Navel Oranges and Ruby Red Grapefruit, and get a box of sweet, easy to peel Tangelos FREE. Tree-ripened and picked at the peak of perfection, satisfaction guaranteed. All three boxes will be shipped to one address. M on & Tu 8:30 11:30 12:30 4:30W ed & Thur 9:00 12:00 2:00 4:30 Friday 9:00 2:00W .H. Marshall, M.D.Opthamologist(352)475-3992EXAMS AVAILABLE Optical Hours Prescription Glasses, Sunglasses, Contacts & Swimming Goggles G ive the Gift of Sight to Someone You Love! Melrose Art WalkFriday Dec. 6th, 6 to 9 pm thru Jan 12th open on weekends... Saturdays 10am-6pm Sundays 1-5pm www.MelroseBayArtGallery.com FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now survive DIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 rfntb rf ntand soreness nb naches THG-12902 A MarkNet Alliance Member AU-C002594 10% Buyers PremiumRowell Auctions, Inc.800-323-8388 For Details Visit RowellAuctions.com RowellAuctions.com 127 Acres Offered Divided Cropland, Recreational & Development Tract 127 Acres Offered DividedCropland, Recreational & Development TractPine Forest & Banks Road, Grady County, GeorgiaBidding Ends Wed., December 18th @ 2:00 p.m.~ Subject to Auto Extend Bidding Feature ~Offered Online Exclusively at RowellAuctions.comFantastic Agricultural Tracts Great Development Tracts Excellent Hunting Beautiful Homesites Peaceful Country Living Keystone Heights Elementary School straight-A studentsFourth grade, (left-right) front row: Lindsay Hovsepian, Riley Draney and Megan Herndon. Back row: Christopher Anderson, Jacob Lepanto and Caleb Moncrief. Sixth grade, (left-right) front row: Garrett Stanley, Christopher Resti and Travis Sheppard. Back row: Eliana Page, Ben Wacha and Will Yeldell. Fifth grade, (left-right) front row: Piper Pescara, Evan Andrews, Daelynn Eatmon, Aidan Perkins and Lindsay Schrader. Back row: Lisa Strickland, Colton Tibbetts, Luke Van Zant and Camryn Williams. pursue repeat and violent offenders, especially those who use a gun to commit their crimes, she said. The prosecutor cautioned the legislators against softening the states minimum-mandatory sentencing statutes, which require judges to sentence violent and repeat offenders to lengthy prison terms. When people bash our minimum-mandatory laws, look COREYContinued from 3A million in 2012, an 80 percent decline. In its November newsletter, The Kilowatt, Clay Electric said that even with the January increase in its power cost adjustment charge, the co-ops rates remain among the lowest in the state. CLAYContinued from 1A at what their motivation is, she said. Nine times out of ten, they want to coddle criminals.Wreaths across America ceremonyOn Dec. 14 at noon the first Wreaths Across America ceremony will be held at the Keystone Heights Cemetery. The ceremony will be brief and coincide similar observances held around the United States. If you purchased a wreath for a veteran, please come to the ceremony so that you can lay the wreath on the grave. The public is also invited to the ceremony just to honor our veterans. The wreaths will be escorted by AMVETS Post 86 Riders down S.R. 21 from C.R. 352 at approximately 10 a.m. to the cemetery. After the ceremony, there will be an open house at AMVETS Post 86 on Brooklyn Bay Road. If you have any questions, please call Ursula at 727-207-1657.

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Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 Lake Region Monitor 5A Good Shepherd Lutheran Chur ch (LCMS)Sunday School 9 a.m. Worship Service at 10 a.m. 4900 NW 182nd Way Starke(Entrance to Conerly Estates on S.R. 16) (904) gslcstarke@aol.com Everyone W elcome!Children s Church 10 a.m. Welcome Home To 4004 SE State Road 21, Keystone Heights, FL 32656 (352) 473-3829JOIN US THIS SUNDAY FOR WORSHIP in our Fellowship Hall Kathy Barrow speaking on in our Multi Ministry Worship Center in our Sanctuary Dr. Craig Moore, preaching on Matthew 3:1-12 Dinner Served (Call 352-473-3829 for reservations) Welcome & Announcements Gospel Singing 6:45pm Bible Study led by Dr. Tom Farmer, Jr. The Church with a BIG HEART where the Word of God is faithfully taught! Ministries for Children (all ages) & Youth Sunday & Wednesday! featuring a host of unique & beautiful Nativity Sets, refreshments and caroling right after the parade. (Parade starts at 10am) Sponsored by and the generosity of the wider communityCall 352-475-2177 for info or to volunteer your help. 4-Wheel Alignment$5995 Keystone District Office 352-473-4917 clayelectric.com rf nt b tt Keystone Heights Elementary School straight-A students Toys for KidsThe Keystone Heights Jaycees will be handing out toys during its Toys for Kids event from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Dec. 21 at the clubs S.R. 100 headquarters. Participants must sign up through Lake Area Ministries. Faith Presbyterian CantataAnd Glory Shone Around A Christmas Cantata Celebrating Loves Perfect LightDecember 15th at 11:00am. Directed by Laurel Lamme. Faith Presbyterian Church, 2738 SE State Road 21 (Midway, between Keystone & Melrose).KHHS Christmas concert and dinnerThe band and chorus will present their Christmas concert and the band boosters will host a spaghetti dinner fundraiser on Tuesday, Dec. 10 at the KHHS auditorium.. Dinner is from 5 to 7 p.m. and entertainment is from 6-8 p.m. Dinner costs $6 per person or $20 for a family of four. Rotary pecan sales continueThe Keystone Heights Rotary Club has begun its annual fundraising pecan sale. Available now are 12-ounce bags of pecans in four varieties: pecan halves, pecans in pieces for all your holiday baking needs. This year, Rotary also offers praline and chocolate covered pecans. The halves and pieces are $8 per 12 ounce bag; the covered pecans are $9 per bag. All pecans are from this years fresh Georgia crop. Pecans may be ordered through any Rotary club member, but are also available, while they last, at the Keystone Heights Brians Ace Hardware and at the M&S Bank. Funds raised through the sales go toward various Rotary projects, such as Lake Area Ministries, the Keystone Youth Soccer League and other local youth sports programs, the Clay County Science Fair and Rotary Internationals campaign to eradicate polio worldwide. Community Church rummage saleCommunity Church, located behind Ace Hardware, will hold a rummage sale Dec. 5 through Dec. 7. Early bird shopping hours are Thursday, Dec. 5 from 4 to 7 p.m. Admission is $5 per family. Regular sale dates with no admission charges are Friday, Dec. 6 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday, Dec. 7, with the Dollar A Grocery Bag Day 9 a.m. until noon. Many Christmas items are available. Proceeds from the sale and items not sold will be donated to worthy causes.Breakfast with Santa at Melrose ElementaryBreakfast is from 8 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, Dec. 14 at the Melrose Elementary Auditorium. Breakfast includes all you can eat pancakes, 2 sausage patties, juice and coffee. Cost is $6 per person or $20 for a family of 4 if you prepay by Friday, Dec. 13. $6 per person at the door. Price includes a picture with Santa. Come eat breakfast and then go see the Merry Melrose Christmas Parade. Sixth grade (left-right) front row: Brendan Lee, Lauren Hix, Ashton Ludwig and Brooke Martin. Back row: Courtlin Gentry, Emily Loose, Karli Jennings and Sophia Kicklighter. Sixth grade (left-right) front row: Perla Alonzo, Matthew Forshee, Jason Channell and Casey DeWitt. Back row: Remington Draney, Kayla Elliott, Brian Armstrong and Tyler Friedlin. Third grade, (left-right) front row: Jerremy Miller, Caleb Mize, Lillian Paul and Wilford Rogel. Back row: Hunter Sarman, Joshua Smith, Logan Spence and Hunter Underwood. Budny and Kiley Channell. Second row: Steven Dong, Haley Kenney, Carson Eatmon and Kenneth Edsall. Back row: Matthew Golden, Alison Herndon, Courtney Dyches, Ian Kruzan and Garrett McDilda.

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6A Lake Region Monitor Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 YES NO YES YES YES YES YES YES NO NO NO NO NO NOFastest available Internet speeds The most TV shows and movies with XFINITY On Demand on TV and online The fastest in-home Wi-Fi for all rooms, all devices, all the time The best HD experience The most live sports More Internet protection included at no additional cost Advanced home phone calling features like Text Messaging at no extra costOffer ends 12/31/13, and is limited to new residential customers. Not available in all areas. Limited to Economy Plus Internet. After promotion, regular rates apply. Comcasts current monthly service charge is $39.95. Limited to service to a single outlet. Equipment, installation and taxes extra. May not be combined with other offers. TV: Digital Starter TV or above required for XFINITY On Demand. XFINITY On Demand selections subject to charge indicated at time of purchase. Internet: Not all features compatible with Macintosh systems. Wi-Fi claim based on August 2012 study of comparable in-home wireless routers by Allion Test Labs, Inc. Voice: Text messaging requires XFINITY Internet subscription. Most Live Sports available with Digital Preferred TV and WatchESPN. Call for restrictions and complete details. Comcast. All rights reserved. 30-Day Money-Back Guarantee applies to one months recurring service charge and standard installation charges up to $500. NPA132410-0030 rffr ffffntbnftrbnbtnbtrbt btrtbtntb rfnt btnbr rr 94731_NPA132410-0030 Yes-No U-verse 11.6x21.indd 1 9/30/13 2:17 PM

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Regional News Regional News B Section Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 News from Bradford County, Union County and the Lake Region FEATURES CRIME SOCIALS OBITUARIES EDITORIAL When two experienced specialists in urology expand their practices, thats good news for Starke residents. Dr. Nseyo has an extensive medical background and is a proven educator in urologytraining the next generation of specialists. Dr. Narayan has expertise in less invasive and innovative urology care and is the former Chair of Urology at Shands UF in Gainesville. GLAD YOURE HERE, DR. NSEYO AND DR. NARAYAN 922 E. Call Street Starke, FL 32091 904-368-2300 For more information about our urologists and our staff of expert physicians, go to ShandsStarke.com.Independent members of the medical staff.SHANDS STARKE REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER WELCOMES TWO UROLOGISTS TO STARKE. Perinchery Narayan, M.D., Board-Certied Urologist Unyime Nseyo, M.D., FACS, Board-Certied Urologist Florida Twin TheatreAll Seats $6.00 Before 6 p.m. 964-5451* CLOSED MON & TUES SCREEN 1 SCREEN 2 Now Showing Visit us on-line at www.FloridaTwinTheatre.comFri, 7:00, 9:10 Sat, 4:50, 7,00, 9:10 Sun, 4:50, 7:00 Wed-Thurs, 7:30EXPENDABLES2Now Showing PGWalt DisneysFri, 8:00 Sat, 5:00, 8:00 Sun, 5:30 Wed-Thurs, 7:15 PG-13Jennifer Lawrence in FrozenTHE HUNGER GAMESCATCHING FIRE Cross-country bicyclist Bob Quick (far right) and his son, Conrad (far left), are pictured with Starke Fire Rescue members (l-r) Ashley Moore, Jason Hersey, retired chief Dwayne Hardee and his wife, Beth, Jerry Waters, Derrick Dowdy and Chris Seymour. Bob Quick (right) shakes hands with Jerry Waters after receiving Starke Fire Rescue patches as souvenirs. BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer It is fulfilling a lifelong passion, but more than anything, Bob Quicks coast-to-coast bicycle ride across the United States is a way of inspiring people to embrace active lifestyles. Quick, a Roy, Utah, resident, is in the advanced stages of coronary artery disease, thanks to a hereditary condition. He suffered a massive heart attack in 2004, has 16 stents and had a pacemaker/defibrillator implanted earlier this year. He hopes his journeywhich also includes his son, Conradhelps get people off the couch. If we can get them just walking around the block 30 daysthat catches on, said Spreading inspiration and thanks from coast to coast Bob Quick is pictured during part of his San Diego to St. Augustine journey. Photo courtesy of Quick and his website www.bobquicksjourney. com. Quick, an avid cyclist who has always wanted to bike his way across the U.S. Then they go, Maybe I can venture a little farther. Maybe they go two blocks. Maybe they go three in a year. Those endorphins start kicking in, and they start feeling better. Quicks journey is also one of thanks. Thats what brought him to Starke Fire Rescue during the week of Thanksgiving and why his journey, once complete, will have consisted of stops to more than 80 fire departments. You see, Quick actually went into cardiac arrest in 2004 and was technically dead for more than three minutes. Paramedics with Roy City Fire and Rescue resuscitated Quick. They never gave up on me, said Quick, who is now an honorary member and chef of the Roy City department. They worked on me hard. They worked on me diligently. Thats the reason Im here. To bring attention to Americas hometown heroes, Quick made fire stations across the U.S. the stopping points throughout his ride, which began Sept. 2 in San Diego and ended this week in St. Augustine. Theyre the warriors, said Quick, who planned to stay overnight at two more fire departments once he left Starke. When people see them out in public, they need to thank them. Quick has stayed at several hotels on his journey, but that was because he needed a place from time to time that had a tub he could lie in and soak his muscles. Outside of that, he has enjoyed experiencing the uniqueness of each fire station he has stopped at and has also had the opportunity to witness some heart-touching Hersey signs one of Bob looks on. moments. There was the department in Globe, Ariz., for example, where members created a bond with a boy whose parents were both bed-ridden with multiple sclerosis. Firefighters would take the boy into their See QUICK, 3B

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2B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 Madison Bennett (left) and Brittany Toms, seventhand 12th-grade FFA students, respectively, gave presentations as part of the luncheon. Bennett talked about the importance of beef cattle, while Toms talked BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer It is an effort to bring agriculture to the forefront and to make a connection between those who work on farms and those who dont, but Farm-City Week is really just a continuation of what already takes place in Bradford County, according to Bob Hochmuth, the guest speaker at the Nov. 22 Bradford County Extension Farm-City luncheon, which was held at the Bradford County Fairgrounds. The folks here, I think, know their farmers more so than most counties where I work, said Hochmuth, a multicounty vegetable production agent and statewide small farms coordinator based at the Suwannee Valley Agricultural Extension Center in Live Oak. Hochmuth said Bradford County reminds him of Maryland, where he lived previously, because of its presence of roadside produce stands. He said people in Bradford County are not only aware of those stands, but know the people who operate them. I think people here, they know the Kings and the Normans and the Pendarvises, Hochmuth said. They know them from the sales of strawberries in particular, but (also know) the other products as well. I think that you all already know or have some connection with farm products in the county maybe more so than others. Hochmuth said Florida is defying the national trend when it comes to farming. In Bradford County, for example, the number of farms that have identified themselves as such in 2013 is 479an increase from 349 in 1987. Florida is one of the few states east of the Mississippi where the number of farms has actually been increasing in the last 10 or 15 years, he said. The size of the farms has been decreasing, so we have more smaller farms throughout the state of Florida. The average farm size is currently 119 acres here in Bradford County, down from 159 acres in the late 1990s. Hochmuth said 98.5 percent of the farms in Bradford County fall within the U.S. Department of Agricultures definition of a small farmone that generates $250,000 or less in gross sales annually. That may seem like a large dollar figure, Hochmuth said, but if you decrease that gross sales figure to $50,000$100,000, the percentage of small farms in Bradford County only drops to 93-94 percent. The reality is the majority of farms we have here are very small operations100 acres or less and with much less than Past, present and future are topics at Farm-City luncheon Bob Hochmuth presents a bit of Bradford County history as the featured speaker during the Bradford County Extension Farm-City luncheon. $250,000 in sales, Hochmuth said. Hochmuth talked about some of the changes in farming (taking advantage of agritourism, small farms incorporating other crops such as shiitake mushrooms to take advantage of consumer demand, etc.) and challenges farmer face in the future. Water is going to be the most challenging issue across the whole state, Hochmuth said, adding, Were doing a number of things to conserve water by using fertigation and helping farmers with drip-irrigation technology in particular here. The Farm-City luncheon covered past, present and future. Hochmuth opened his presentation by covering some of Bradford Countys history, such as how Starke derived its name it was the last name of George Coles fianc (Cole bought the land that became Starke)and how the whole region was New River County before Bradford County was created. The rail system was really important for this region in those early days, Hochmuth said. The materials that were shipped out of here were timber, naval store product and cotton. For those who didnt know, Hochmuth explained that naval store product consisted of turpentine and other timber products that were used at naval shipyards. Hochmuth joked about Starkes population explosion to 400 in the 1800s before later talking about the mindboggling population explosion that occurred in the 1940s. See FARMS, 4B

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Members of the local Weight Watchers group, which meets on Mondays at First donating 291 pounds of food to the Bradford County Food Pantry. Participating members donated a pound of food for every pound they lost. The Bradford-area group participated in a food drive last year as well, but the food collected went to Gainesville. This year, though, the food stayed in Bradford County now that the all local residents. ABOVE: Members Robin Gish, Mammie Micthell, Betty Winn, Collette Huffman, Tonya Gibbs, Karya Merritt and Fellows are pictured (l-r) in the Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 3B The 3rd AnnualLight UpCrosby Lake CemeteryDecember 17th 7: 00p.m. at the cemeteryFor the past 3 years the Radical Hospitality Team of the First United Methodist Church has built a bridge from the church into the community by hosting the Light Up Crosby Lake Campaign. This act of salty service provides revenue for the Crosby Lake Cemetery Association to assist with the costs of maintaining the cemetery. The Crosby Lake Cemetery Association has done a wonderful job providing quality perpetual care for our loved ones who have been placed there. This years service will be December 17th at 7:00p.m. at the cemetery. Luminaries can be placed for $10 each in memory of a friend or loved one. V isiting the church website online at (firstuumc.cc) or Stop by the church office (200 N. Walnut Street) or Mail donation to FUMC at ( P. O. Box 157 Starke, FL 32091) To find out how you can help with this event contact the church office at (904) 964-6864. V olunteers Neededto place 4,000 candlesIf you can volunteer, please show up at the cemetery at 1PM Dec. 17. Wear comfortable clothing and hats.All pr oceeds benefit the Crosby Lake Cemetery Association P REVATT SRESTAURANT(904)368-9156 NOW OPEN127 E. Call StreetLocated in Downtown StarkeOwners:Jackson, Jason & Brandon Prevatt Burgers Wraps Stuffed Potatoes Salads Steaks Wings Gator Tail Busted Onion Fried Green Tomatoes Quesadillas Mahi-Mahi Desserts & More! DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS$750Includes drinkWEDNESDAY NIGHT WINGS60EA.############THURSDAYBuy 10 Boneless Wings, Get 10 at 1/2 price!SAT & SUNBuy 25 Wings, Get A FREE Pitcher of Beer, Tea, or Soda############ When losing is a good thing front. Pictured behind them (in no particular order) are: Christina New, Rebecca Brown, Jennifer Wheeler, Dale Reddish, Diane Andrews, Julee Hall, Nancy Huffman, Diane Ward, Peggy White, Ken Alsabrook, Rose Harrison, Jackie Brant and Sharon Kathi Fellows and Rachel Cooksey show off the food collected. homes to celebrate birthdays and holidays like Thanksgiving and Christmas. The boy is now grown and a member of that same fire department. Now, he is standing right alongside that captainon that same captains crewwhich just shows you the impact (firefighters) have on the community, Quick said. Quick and his son have been collecting the signatures of all the firefighters theyve met, as well as department paraphernalia. During his stay at the Starke department, Quick said he had already shipped six boxes of patches and T-shirts to his home. I dont think well have to buy another T-shirt again, he said. When the cross-country trip began, Quick said he and his son were averaging up to 10 hours of cycling per day. Issues with Quicks heart, though, slowed the duo to riding 25-40 miles per day. Quicks will never wavered. I promised America I was going to finish it, and Im going to finish it, he said. Quick has been accepting donations throughout his ride that will benefit Roy City Fire and Rescue, Special Olympics Utah, Primary Childrens Hospital in Salt Lake City and McKay-Dee Hospital Center in Ogden, Utah. I decided if Im going to ride across America, I want to do it for a good cause, he said. You can make a donation or read more about Quick and his ride at www.bobquicksjourney. com. He also has a Facebook account at www.facebook.com/ bobquicksjourney. QUICK Continued from 1B Whether you help support one of his causes or not, one thing that would make Quick happy is if you take the time to recognize a firefighter. Its not an easy job, Quick said, noting those times where firefighters have to respond to fatalitiesfatalities that may very well include someone they know personally. These guys need a pat on the back once in a while, Quick said. It means a lot to them when they see a thumbs-up, or somebody walks up to them in a store and shakes their hand. Derrick Dowdy adds his signature to collection during at Starke Fire Rescue. Quick hometown heroes and deserve to be thanked at every oportunity. You worked hard to prepare that Thanksgiving dinner. Now, how about enjoying a meal out and helping a good cause at the same time? The Downtown Grill in Starke is hosting a celebrity waiter event on Friday, Dec. 6, from 11 a.m. until 7 p.m. that will benefit the Starke Police Departments Shop With a Cop program. Besides the tips earned by local celebrities, 15 percent of the entire days sales will go toward the program. Shop With a Cop allows children who have been identified as having a need but who continue to strive to meet academic and discipline requirements in schoolto enjoy a shopping spree at Walmart. Through donations and the assistance of restaurants such as the Downtown Grill, children are allowed to pick out approximately $100 worth of gifts. This years Shop With a Cop event is Tuesday, Dec. 17. If youd like to provide further assistance to the ninth annual program, you can mail a donation in the form of a checkmade out to Starke Police Department-Shop With a Copto Starke Police Department, 830 Edwards Road, Starke, FL 32091. Please put to the attention of Capt. Barry Warren. You may also contact Warren at 352-494-3326 (cell), 904-964-5400 (office) or starkepdlo@yahoo.com for more information or to make a donation. If youd like to experience what the event is like and what kind of impact it has, please go to www.youtube.com and perform a search for Starke Shop With a Cop 2012. Celebrity waiter, Shop With a Cop event is this Friday The fourth annual Santa Fe College Miss Bradford Fest, which is open to ages 4-22, is scheduled for Jan. 18 at the Brad ford High School auditorium at 7 p.m. Contestants will compete in Western wear, talent, party dress, evening wear, photogenic and on-stage question categories in the following age divisions: 4-7 (Little Miss), 8-12 (Junior Miss), 13-17 (Teen Miss) and graduat ing high school seniors-22 years old (Miss). The winner of the Miss division could win a twoyear Santa Fe College schol arship. (Must meet eligibility requirements for college enroll ment.) The deadline to enter the pag eant is Jan. 4. Entry forms may be obtained via email. Please send email requests to thorn99@ embarqmail.com. Miss Bradford Fest funds San ta Fe College scholarships for Bradford County students. For more information, please call Lisa Tatum at 904-966-1514 or Brenda Thornton at 904-3648266. The annual Bradford Fest Talent Fest Showdown is scheduled for Jan. 25, 2014, at 6 p.m. at the Bradford High School auditorium. Admission is $7 for adults and $5 for 17 and under. Children 5 and under are admitted free. Prizes for contestants are as follows: $1,000 for first place, $300 for second place and $200 for third place. In addition, the top three will participate in final auditions April 18 for a chance to perform at the 2014 Suwannee River Jam as well as receiving a radio opportunity with WEAG. The first-place individual will also be invited perform at a May 17 Santa Fe College concert. The deadline for participants to enter is Jan. 15. For more information on entry fees and requirements, please contact Cheryl Canova at the Santa Fe College Andrews Center at cheryl.canova@sfcollege.edu or 352-395-4410. All profits will go toward funding Santa Fe College scholarships for Bradford County students. 4th annual Miss Bradford Fest set for Jan. 18 Bradford Fest Talent Showdown is Jan. 25

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4B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 CRIME DOESNT PAYB UT WE DO!REWARDS UP TO $3,000 CRIME DOESNT PAYB UT WE DO!P AID FOR BY THE FLORIDA ATTORNEY GENERALS OFFICE CRIME STOPPERS TRUST FUNDREWARDS UP TO $3,000R EMAIN ANONYMOUSC ALL TOLL FREE S TOPPE RSSubmit a TIP ON-LINE a t: www.F CCrimeStoppers.com Jo es Tires 13761 South US 301 Starke(1/2 mile south of walmart) 964-(8473) W ashing, Clipping Teeth Brushing Ear Cleaning Nails Clipped & Filed Call f or Appointment 904-386-0992 17145 SW 101st Ave Starke, FL 32091GIFT CER TIFICATES AVAILABLE! Owner s & Operators Kathy Rensberger & Leisha Boyd Dear Editor: I am writing today about an incident that happened on Thanksgiving. My daughters and I went shopping at the Walmart in town after dinner. When we left, I apparently placed my checkbook (with cash in it) on the hood of my car. As soon as we turned onto 301, we noticed something fly off my hood. When we got to Sears, I realized it was my checkbook. Immediately we went back to see if we could find it. After about 15 minutes of searching through the median, we started driving home. Within two minutes of getting into the car, my son called and said a gentleman dropped it off at the house along with almost half of the cash that was in it. Apparently, he saw the checkbook and cash fly off the car and stopped to pick it up. I wanted to say thank you to whoever you are! I wish I could thank you personally, but I dont know who you are. Im so thankful to live in a community where there are still honest people! Merry Christmas! Mi Yong Fitzpatrick Something to truly be thankful for Letters editor@bctelegraph.com Wings of Dreams Aviation Museum joined the ranks of 178 educational organizations nation wide that received a NASA minigrant for an after-school STEM (science, technology, engineer ing, mathematics) program. Selected from a pool of more than 400 applications, the pro gram closely followed the objec tives of the NASA STEM sum mer camp program, Solar Sys tem Adventures. The program sessions, which were attended by seventhand eighth-graders at Keystone Heights Jr.-Sr. High School, were held at Keystone Heights Airport and taught by Wings of Dreams volunteer Dr. Francisco Reyes, associate scientist at the Univer sity of Florida Department of As tronomy and director of the UF teaching observatories, with the support of the University of Flor ida Department of Astronomy public outreach initiative. This is an important first step in establishing Wings of Dreams as an aerospace educational cen ter in a rural, underserved area of North Central Florida, said Su san King, Wings of Dreams cofounder and managing director, who joined forces with Reyes to write and submit the grant. The after-school sessions in cluded lectures followed by hands-on activities. Sessions covered such topics as the solar system, sun, planets, comets, as teroids and exoplanets; the use of telescopes; exploration of the bodies of the solar system; the important discoveries made by manned and unmanned space craft; and the possibility of find ing life on other planets. The program concluded Nov. 14 with a star party, where stu dents learned firsthand about NASA minigrant funds Wings of Dreams after-school program the moon, the planets and other celestial bodies. The UF astron omy department provided the use of telescopes and additional equipment to enhance the learn ing experience for the students participating in this and future programs. Reyes was instrumen tal in arranging for the donation of 10-inch Meade telescope to Wings of Dreams to be used for these educational programs and star party. With the assistance of Reyes, Peyton Phillips, science de partment chairman at KHHS, and other local educators and volunteers, Wings of Dreams will continue and expand these unique educational programs for students in the surrounding rural counties, according to King. In addition to astronomy and space exploration, we are planning to develop and imple ment after-school programs and summer camps on other topics, including aeronautics, aviation, rocketry and aviation and World War II history, she said. Wings of Dreams, a nonprofit organization, has more than 60 historic space artifacts that will be used to highlight the history of Americas space program and in spire youth to pursue educational programs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. The organization is seeking fi nancial and in-kind assistance to help to preserve and restore these artifacts and complete the con struction of a facility to display them and provide a space for educational programs. For more information, contact Wings of Dreams Executive Di rector Robert Oehl at 352-2568037 or bob@wingsofdreams. org. The population around World War II expanded for this immediate area to over 80,000 people to support the Camp Blanding efforts, Hochmuth said. Hochmuth talked a little about Doyle Conner, whom he described as one of the most famous people to be born in this area. Conner served as Floridas commissioner of agriculture for 30 years (1961-91), but he also had some accomplishments Hochmuth said those attending the Farm-City luncheon may not have been aware of. He was the national FFA president when he was in the FFA, Hochmuth said. He was elected to the House of Representatives when he was a student at the University of Florida in his 20s. He was elected as the House of Representatives speaker at the age of 28, if you can imagine that. At 28, theres no way I wouldve been ready to do any of that. Hochmuth said one of the most endearing things about Conner is that when reading his biography, he listed his profession as farmer. All of the time he spent serving the public, he still considered himself a farmer, Hochmuth said. FARMS Continued from 2B Bradford County FarmCity activities included exhibits for thirdgraders. Please see page 7B for photos. ABOVE: Kimberly Gray takes a look through a telescope during one of the Wings of Dreams Solar Systems programs. Photo by Cliff Francisco Reyes of the University of Florida is shown with a 10-inch Meade telescope donated to Wings of Dreams. Photo by Trace Choulat. Having some fun with glasses prior to an experiment are KHHS students (l-r) Brooklyn Goens, Dawson Kimberly Gray. Photo by Cliff Smelley.

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Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 5B 904-368-0687 ph 904-368-0689 f axMARGARE T ANDERSON 101 1 N. Temple Ave. Starke. FL (US 301 North)Family Law & Will Preparation30 years experience Margaret will continue to serve clients in Alachua County as well as Bradford & Union counties t Crime t Paul A. Byrd, 40, of Starke was arrested Dec. 1 by Starke police for larceny. According to the arrest report, Byrd was observed by a Walmart employee passing all points of sale (cash registers) with a shopping cart with two cases of light beer and two packages of steaks. When he was confronted by the Walmart employee, Byrd stated he was waiting for a friend to come and pay for the items. When Starke police arrived after noting Byrds prior criminal history (including retail theft) Byrd was arrested for larceny and transported him to jail. Man arrested for attempting to leave store with beer, steaks Robert Tyrone Williams, 28, of Tampa was arrested Nov. 27 by Union deputies for battery on a law-enforcement officer. According to the arrest report, Man arrested in prison parking lot after release Williams had just finished serving a 10-year sentence at Union Correctional and was being escorted by correctional officers to meet his sister in the parking lot. As they were walking, Williams asked an officer where a garbage can was. When the officer turned his head to point to a can, Williams hit him in his chest with his fist. The officers then got Williams on the ground to detain him until the deputy arrived. Williams refused to say what prompted him to hit the correctional officer. Johnny A. Higgins, 41, was arrested Nov. 30 by Bradford deputies for driving under the influence and fleeing-attempting to elude law enforcement. According to the arrest report, deputies received a call Saturday night around 10:30 about a vehicle driving erratically on U.S. 301 south of Starke. Higgins, heading north on 301, stopped in the middle of the road with approximately 10 cars behind him as he approached a deputys Man arrested after stopping deputy car at C.R. 221 (Hampton). He then crossed the grass median and took off south on 301 a half mile before finally stopping at Southeast 57 th Street. When Higgins exited the vehicle, he stumbled and fell to the ground, according to the arrest report. When the deputy approached him, he reached for his pocket and said he had a knife. After the deputy ordered him several times to remove his hand from his pocket, Higgins finally did so and was handcuffed and transported to the jail. The following individuals were arrested recently by local law enforcement officers in Bradford, Union or Clay (Keystone Heights area) counties: Bradford William Noonen Bradley, 34, of Starke was arrested Dec. 1 by Starke police for disorderly intoxication, contempt of court and probation violation. Preston Lamar Burns, 22, of Jacksonville was arrested Nov. 27 by Bradford deputies for possession and distribution of marijuana. Toccara Sophia Carter, 29, was arrested for probation violation. Sean Christopher Cherry, 43, of Jacksonville was arrested Nov. 29 by Starke police for driving while license suspended or revoked. Quinton Travis Ford, 42, of Starke was arrested Dec. 2 by Starke police for probation violation. Kenneth Michael Gilliam, 51, of Hampton was arrested Nov. 25 by Bradford deputies for probation violation. Recent arrests in Bradford, Clay or Union Thomas Wayne Haehnel, 68, of Orange Park was arrested Nov. 25 by Bradford deputies for failure to appear. Michael Wayne Hall, 38, of Starke was arrested Nov. 25 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. Christina Lynn Hall, 35, of Keystone Heights was arrested Nov. 27 by Bradford deputies for larceny and fraud by swindle. Norma Jean Rose Jeffery, 22, of Ocala was arrested Nov. 27 by Bradford deputies for failure to appear. Robert Wayne Masey, 26, of Starke was arrested Nov. 25 by Bradford deputies for smuggling contraband, possession of drug equipment and probation violation. Brandon Adrian Nelson, 19, of Hampton was arrested Nov. 26 by Starke police for burglary and larceny. Albert Millard Nichols, 50, of Starke was arrested Dec. 1 by Bradford deputies for hit and run-leaving the scene of a crash involving property damage. Joshua Dale Pernell, 28, of Starke was arrested Nov. 30 by Bradford deputies for fleeing-attempting to elude law enforcement and driving while license suspended or revoked. Brandon Randall Smith, 18, of Jacksonville was arrested Nov. 26 by Starke police for burglary and larceny. James Phillip Spratlin, 27, of Lawtey was arrested Dec. 2 by Bradford deputies for larceny and dealing in stolen property. Joseph Thomas Stracner, 34, of Starke was arrested Nov. 26 by Bradford deputies for two charges of probation violation. Tessa Leigh Thomas, 34, of Keystone Heights was arrested Nov. 26 by Bradford deputies for possession of a weapon by a convicted felon, larceny and dealing in stolen property. Heather R. Tracy, 18, of Lincoln, R.I., was arrested Nov. 26 by Starke police for possession of marijuana and possession of drug equipment. Kisha Ladwonda Williams, 35, of Starke was arrested Nov. 29 by Starke police for driving while license suspended or revoked. Antoin Pierre Wrotten, 24, of Ocoee was arrested Nov. 30 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. Keystone/Melrose Joshua Elliot, 23, of Keystone Heights was arrested Dec. 2 by Clay deputies for three probation violations. Joshua Forbes, 24, of Key stone Heights was arrested Nov. 28 by Clay deputies for domestic battery. Daniel Ramon Gallegos, 24, of Melrose was arrested Nov. 26 by Putnam deputies for a proba tion violation. Michael David Lavane, 38, of Melrose was arrested Dec. 2 by Putnam deputies for an out-ofcounty warrant. Austin Michael Lay, 37, of Melrose was arrested Dec. 2 by Putnam deputies for two proba tion violations. Matthew Limbert, 49, of Key stone Heights was arrested Nov. 30 by Clay deputies for trespass ing. James Lee Michael Oldham, 21, of Melrose was arrested Dec. 3 by Putnam deputies for three probation violations. Joshua Russell, 20, of Key stone Heights was arrested Nov. 27 by Clay deputies for failure to appear. Levi Wayne Sharp, 30, of Hampton was arrested Dec. 2 by B ig End-of-Year Sale 1000 South W ater St. Starke, FL 32091904 966-2221 E ntire Store on Sale 25 % OFF 25% OFF Putnam deputies for possession of cocaine, possession of a con trolled substance without a pre scription and possession of drug equipment. Clint Sweeting, 30, of Key stone Heights was arrested Dec. 2 by Clay deputies for failure to appear. Union Toyce Fay Cribbs, 53, of Hampton was arrested in Union County by DOC officials at the Reception and Medical Center for possession of marijuana and smuggling contraband into a prison. Austin Cole Long, 18, of Lake Butler was arrested Nov. 24 by Union deputies for possession of marijuana and possession of narcotic equipment. Prentis Lynn Jefferson, 35, of Lake Butler was arrested Nov. 28 by Union deputies for leaving the scene of an accident and driving while license suspended or revoked. Daniel Raye Hall, 26, of Lake Butler was arrested Nov. 29 by Union deputies for an out-ofcounty warrant for petit theft in Alachua County. Daronte Jawaun Corbitt, 19, of Lake Butler was arrested Nov. 27 on a warrant for firing a weapon into a dwelling/vehicle/building/ or aircraft and for criminal mischief-property damage. Tom Marks, 61, of Starke was arrested Nov. 26 by Union deputies on a warrant for failure to appear. Kelli Amber Mclees, 31, of High Springs was arrested Dec. 2 by Union deputies on a warrant for failure to appear. Brian M. Griffis, 34, of Williston was arrested Nov. 27 by Union deputies for contempt of court-child support. Paul Washington, 30, of Mayo was arrested by Union deputies on Dec. 2 for lewd lascivious exhibition-in the presence of employee. NOTICE The New River Community Health Center Board of Directors will meet December 13, 2013 at the Union County Library, located at 250 SE 5th Ave, Lake Butler, FL 32054 from 12/5 1tchg-B-sect Legals

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6B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 Funeral with Burial20 Ga. Metal Casket (4 colors) Vault, Open & Closing Grave, Graveside or Chapel Service with one night visitation. . . . . . .$5,595Funeral with Cremation(Rental Casket with Visitation prior to Services). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,895Direct Cremation with Memorial ServiceServices held at Archer Memorial Chapel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,895Archer Funeral Home Pre-payment accepted Within Your Means Now, Peace of Mind Always 55 North Lake Avenue Lake Butler, Florida 32054 SR-230 E (2 miles east of US-301)B anquet Hall Driving Range Check out our web pagewww .starkegolf.com M emberships Available E xcellent Driving RangeP ro Shop Gift CertificatesG olf Lessons by AppointmentP rofessionally Run Tournaments H ome of the Strawberry Invitational Li ke us on facebook atStarke Veterinary ClinicSMALL & LARGE ANIMAL HEALTH SERVICES Stay 5 nights Get 6th FREE! Holiday Boarding Special 10334 S.E. SR-100(Intersection of Griffis Loop & SR-100)Starke, FL904-964-5569Dr. Art Riley Surgeries Dentistry Vaccinations X-Rays Ultra Sound Health Exams Preventative Health Care New Client SpecialFREE1st Exam! Large Animal Services also provided with Mobile Unit under Dr. Jennifer Frank C ommercial Residential Fleets Autogas Farms Industry Piping for NewConstruction or Home Remodeling M ost Major Brands Factory Trained4031 S.W SR 121 Lake Butler, FL 32054 W illiamsLPGas.com wlpgas@windstream.net(386) 496-3725 Mozzell Azzolina STARKEMozzell Azzolina, 86, of Starke died at the Hospice of Citrus and the Nature Coast on Friday, Nov. 22, 2013. She lived in Arcadia most of her life and worked in the real estate business and as a beautician. She is the daughter of the late James William Steele and Minnie Lee Givens Steele. She is preceded in death by her husband, Rocco Azzolina and sister Edna Steele. She was a member of the Hillborn Springs Baptist Church. She is survived by: daughters, Diane Heiman, Elaine Peverell, and Teresa Peverell; son, Aldon (Shelby) Sanchez, Jr.; and sister, Sybil Mareva. Archer Funeral Home is in charge of all arrangements. Retha Dickson Retha Dickson LAKE BUTLERRetha Ann Dickson, 60, died at the E.T York Haven Hospice on Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2013. She was born in Savannah. She lived most of her life in Georgia but has lived in Lake Butler for the past 30 years. She was a member of the Church of God of Prophecy. She is preceded in death by: her father and mother, Hugh and Darothy Medders; brother, Dennis Medders; and sister, Lawannia Clark. She is survived by: her husband, Bruce Dickson; sons, Christopher Lariscy, and Eric Dickson; one grandson; daughters, Patricia Herrin, Tonya Southerland, Marci Lariscy, Sandra Parks, and Glenda Cribbs; brothers, Royce Medders, Glenn Medders; and sister, Delinda Medders; and many grandchildren and great-grandchildren. The funeral services were held Dec. 1, in the Archer Memorial Chapel. Burial followed at Dyal Cemetery in Starke. Archer Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Marion Glover, Sr. LINCOLNTON, GA. Marion Maines Glover, Sr. entered into rest on Monday, Dec. 2, 2013 at Eisenhower Medical Center in Fort Gordon, Ga. Mr. Glover was the son of the late Reuben Ruldolph Glover and the late Mary Loraine Rawls Glover of Alachua. He was retired military after serving his country honorably during World War II, the Korean War, and Vietnam. Mr. Glover was a member of the Retired Officers Association, Military Police Corps, Lincolnton United Methodist Church and was a life member of the Lincoln County Historical Society. Mr. Glover was preceded in death by a son, Marion Maines Glover, Jr Survivors include: his wife of 66 years, Peggy McGee Glover; one daughter, Linda G. (Jerry) McKinney of Lincolnton; one son, Phillip (Tere) Glover of McCormick, S.C.; six grandchildren, George, Reuben and Marion Glover, Kristie Williamson, Kim Morrison and Lauren McKinney; four greatgrandchildren, Tyler Williamson, Zia Williamson, Hayden Williamson and Ava Morrison. The funeral service with full military honors was held on Dec. 4 at Lincolnton United Methodist Church with Rev. James Bocian officiating. Interment service will be 2 p.m. Friday, Dec. 6, at Dekle Cemetery in Lake Butler. PAID OBITUARY Sam Loiacano STARKESam J. Lucky Loiacano, 75, of Starke died, Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2013 at the Haven Hospice Custead Care Center in Orange Park. He was born in Port Arthur, Texas on Aug. 16, 1938 to the late Arthur and Juanita (Benito) Loiacano and was a resident of Starke since 2000. He served in the United States Navy and was employed as a mechanical engineer with the Kennedy Space Center for 18 years before retiring. He was a member of the Bethel Baptist Church and the Machinists Union. Two of his granddaughters, Alexandria Nicole Barger and Victoria Paige Loiacano preceded him in death. Survivors are: his wife of 48 years, Liz Loiacano; children, Lora Barger of Titusville and David Loiacano of Starke; siblings, Joann (Chuck) Wheeler of Sour Lake, Texas and Robert Loiacano of Georgia; four grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held at the DeWitt C. Jones Chapel on Dec. 2 with Mr. Ricky Lee officiating and the burial followed at Crosby Lake Cemetery with full Military Honors. Arrangements are under the care of Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home of Starke. Thomas Nail, Jr. STARKEThomas Elegy Nail, Jr., 86, of Starke, died Monday, Nov. 25, 2013 at Roberts Care Center in Palatka. He was born in Plant City on Feb. 1, 1927 to the late Thomas Elegy Nail, Sr. and Mary Oliver Nail. He was a resident of Starke for the past 45 years. He served in the United States Army during World War II and retired after many years in the construction industry as a handyman. He is survived by: his wife of 9 years, Charlotte Jean Lauf Nail of Starke; daughters, Betty Lou, Patricia, Linda, and Jane; numerous grandchildren; and many great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at Tammy Johns In Loving Memory Tammy R, Richards Johns Feb. 23, 1965Dec. 9, 2012 If I could have a lifetime wish If I could have a lifetime wish, A dream that would come true, Id pray to God with all my heart for yesterday and you. A thousand words cant bring you back, I know because Ive tried, and neither can a million tears, I know because Ive cried. You left behind my broken heart and happy memories too. I never wanted memories I only wanted you. Tammy, We all miss you and love you so much. It still doesnt seem right for you not to be here with us. Your Family Joan mom, BeBe,sister, Catie, Kaylen, daughters Donald and Johnny Spencer, brothers And all friends who love you. d Obituaries d a later date. In lieu of flowers please send potted plants. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Archie Tanner Funeral Services of Starke. Randy Pittman STARKERandy L. Pittman, 65, died Tuesday, Nov. 26, 2013. He was born in Indianapolis on Nov. 16, 1948 to the late La Pearson Pittman and Elma Alberta Pat Pittman. He served in the United States Marine Corps during the Vietnam War and later earned two Masters Degrees in Accounting and Business Administration. He attended the Revelation Church of Lawtey. He is survived by: his wife of 17 years, Teri Pittman; children, Randy (Charity) Pittman II, Alicia (Leonel) Anino and Micky Ruble; sister, La Donna (Robert) Browning; and four grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at a later date. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Archie Tanner Funeral Services of Starke. James Rogers BROOKERJames Marvin Rogers, 73, of Brooker died Thursday, Nov. 28, 2013 at the Lake Butler Hospital with his family by his side after an extended illness. He was the son of the late Will and Toy Lee Rogers. He was employed the Bradford County Solid Waste and was a member of the Church of God of Prophecy at Brooker. He was preceded in death by sisters, Annie Tetstone and Armenta Hester; and brothers; Buddy and Freddie Rogers. He is survived by: his wife of 30 years; Geneva W. Rogers; daughter, Sandra (Jerry) Keller of Hawthorne; sons, Randall (Kay) Dobbins of Archer; Jimmy (Leah) Dobbins of LaCrosse; Donnie (Dawn) Dobbins of Bellview; 12 grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held Dec. 2, in the Chapel of Archer Funeral Home, with Rev. James Parker officiating. Burial followed in Dedan Cemetery. Archer Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. Nancy Tweedy BROOKERNancy Joan Hopper Tweedy passed away Friday, Nov. 22 at Haven Hospice in Gainesville. She was born June 6, 1939 in Indianapolis. She worked as a sales clerk until she retired. She will be missed and loved by all. She is preceded in death by: her father, Mack Hopper; and her mother, Bonnie Deal; her fianc, Mark Walters; and half sister, Amy. She is survived by: a sister, Mary Baker; a half sister, Beckey Watson; two half brothers; and three children, Edwana Edie Jenkins of Brooker, Elizabeth Keith of Worthington Springs, and Willard Kitchen of California; six grandchildren; nine greatgrandchildren; one great-greatgrandson; and countless nieces and nephews. Services will be held at United Methodist Church in Worthington Springs on Saturday Dec. 7 at 2 pm. A dinner will be served at Edie and Dewey Jenkins home in Brooker following the service. PAID OBITUARY

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Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 7B Making the farm-city connection Trish Ray (left) talks to Hope Christian Academy student Kaia Wright during the Bradford County graders from Bradford schools visited the Bradford County Fairgrounds and learned about agriculture, interacted with animals and sampled some tasty farm products. All photos by Cliff Smelley. as Kailan Jefferson and Payton McKenzie, got to hold chicks at the embryology exhibit. TOP RIGHT: Jametrius Pringle samples a cup of goat milk. RIGHT: Michael Norman enjoys visiting wiht a goat. Carn and Ayanna help but laugh as they put their muscles to use in making butter. Jarrin Alexander is pictured in the background. Reddish and Ashley Clark try some sugar cane. DeJon McBride examines a piece of sugar cane as (background, l-r) Tyler Kite, Kale Waters and Danny Thornton look on. www. CaptainsPartyRentals .com Bounce Houses Water Slides Dunk Tanks Trackless Train 904-364-6128 Bradford County Forester Andy off different types of wood as (l-r) Cassie Acevedo, Kimberlynn Woods and Tanner Aucoin look on. and Steven Rugg shake it up as they make butter, which they were able to sample with crackers.

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BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer A 3-pointer by Caleb Jones at the end of the first quarter was the start of an 11-0 run for the Bradford High School boys basketball team, which rolled to a 53-16 win over visiting Keystone Heights in a District 5-4A matchup on Dec. 3. Jones, who finished with 12 points, made another 3-pointer as the Tornadoes (2-2, 1-0 in District 5) scored eight straight points to open the second quarter. Keaaris Ardley took a pass from Alex Mejias as he cut to the basket and scored to put Bradford up 19-5. Keystone (0-4, 0-2) got off to a good start when C.J. Rogers drained a 3-pointer for the first basket of the game, but the Indians got only two more field goals the remainder of the first half. They didnt score in the second quarter until approximately five minutes had elapsed. Joquez Ivey added seven points for Bradford, while Ardley and Oliver Griffin each had six. Benjamin Nichols scored five points, Don Jeffers and Tyler 8B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 BOUNCE HOUSE RENT ALS C oming Soon! FloridaBounceRentals.com partytimebouncehouse@outlook.comServing Keystone Heights, Starke, Hampton, Earleton, Interlachen, Putnam Hall, Florahome C OUPONS10% OFF 1st time booking 10% OFF for referrals 15% OFF for renting 2 or more units 5% OFF reservations made 4 weeks in advanceOPEN SA T DEC 14352-745-1399 Gold Key Farm & Western Store, Inc.North 301 Starke, FL (Next to Fairgrounds)M-F 8:00-5:30 Sat 8:00-5:00 LARGE SELECTION MEN & WOMENS WESTERN SHIRTS Long & Short Sleeve2 0%Justin Work Boots for menRoper Boots for Women & KidsOFF Horse Tack Sale ~ 10% OFF Camo T-Shirts too... All T-Shirts 20-50% OFF Great Christmas Gifts MENS COWBOY CUT JEANSPrewashed & RegularGreat Selection ~ Western Belts and Hats W I N N E R W I N N E ROur last Football Contest Winner is missed 2 The Union County 10U faspitch softball team went undefeated in capturing the fall ball tournament championship on Nov. 16 in Fort White. Union, which finished the season with a 16-2 record, defeated Santa Fe, Starke and Fort White before defeating Santa Fe again for the championship. (The team would like to thank one of its major sponsors, Sweet Temptations, composed of: (front, l-r) Abby Andrews, Katie Tomlinson, Dubose, Candace Clifton, (middle, l-r) Randa Godwin, Emma Worrell, Haley Fishburn, Katie Caren, Breanna Melton, Meghan Mobley, (back, l-r) head coach Thomas James Goody Goodwin. RIGHT: Katie Caren, pictured with head coach Thomas Mobley, earned the Player of the Game trophy. Caren, Randa Goodwin and Meghan Fins, Fur & Tails Dwight Elder, his wife, Cleo, and their two sons, Jonathon and David, have been avid fishermen in North Central Florida for a long time, but they have never been able to gather all of their immediate family on the same trip until they went surf fishing a few weeks ago. Not only was it a productive fishing trip, it was relaxing and diversified. If sitting was anyones desire, they had lawn chairs. If they got tired of watching fishing lines, they could walk St. Augustine Beach. If additional supplies were needed, the car was available without disrupting the fishing. As noted, the trip was productive, with multiple catches of pompano, whiting and blues. Dustin Elder was the star performer by landing a 6-foot black tip shark that was photographed and released. Dwight attributed much of the trips success to the guide he contracted to assist. The investment was well worth the expense considering the successful trip, the party size and the information gathered for future use should they repeat the event. Dwight also indicated he would get a beach cart if he pursued the activity because the amount of supplies and equipment would be too much to carry. The cart style he was talking about was not motorized, but pushed, much like a wheelbarrow. One thing that is so appealing about the activityif you are not a hunteris that winter surf fishing is so compatible with the beach crowds and fish runs. This is the very time of the year that reds, whiting and pompano collect around the beaches and inland waterways. Additionally, if you are near jetties, sheepshead are readily available. Another perk is that beach swimmers are rare during the winter. Dwight also indicated there are good online forums that continually discuss the best beach locations for fish. So if you are in the market for a good outdoors, winter activity and hunting is not an option, consider surf fishing. Do not forget the value of a guide the first time out, and take a look at Dustins accompanying photo before you dismiss surf fishing as not exciting. Captain Randy Harris A guides service the first time out on a new outdoors activity is always a good consideration. If by chance you are considering red fishing or any type of inshore fishing out of Steinhatchee on the Gulf Coast, then you might want to consider Captain Randy Harris. Harris is a longtime resident of Keystone and is a master of the activity. He is licensed with the Coast Guard, and he readily posts his catches on Joey Tysons Bald Eagle Bait and Tackle Facebook page, which is a good way to stay up to date on local outdoors activities. Harris knows the area like the back of his hand and uses an airboat to get to the best spots at the right time. He can be reached at 352-745-1507. Outdoors outlook Joey Tyson indicated that the crappie bite is picking up in both Santa Fe and Lowry. Most of the successful fishermen are drifting minnows in the deeper water. Some fishermen are catching crappie trolling in the feeder creeks off of the St. Johns. Lochloosa especially has been giving up good crappie numbers. In the saltwater front on both coasts, the reds, spotted trout and black trout are doing well. Large sheepshead are being caught on the eastern side around jetties, especially in the Mayport area. The big impediment to both The excitement See JUMP, 2A BHS boys take 56-13 win over KHHS Jenkins (right) drives to the hoop against Brandon Nicholas 56-13 District 5-4A win. See JUMP, 2A Wainwright each scored four, and Mejias, Roderick Broomfield, Kenny Dinkins, Larry Highsmith and Drian Jenkins each scored two. Rogers and Micah Brown each had three points for Keystone, while Brandon Nicholas, Anton Noble, Buck Shobris, Fletcher Teague and Travis Wheeler each had two. In the Indians previous game, a 44-35 loss to St. Francis on ABOVE: Dustin Elder and Captain Noel Kuhn with black tip caught at St. Augustine Captain Randy Harris (left) displays a nice slot red with a client from the bow of his air boat.

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Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 9B 40 Notices EQUAL HOUSING OP PORTUNITY. All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limita tion or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real es tate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimina tion, call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777, the tollfree telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. For further information call Florida Commission on Human Relations, Lisa Sutherland 850-4887082 ext #1005. 41 Auctions KERR AUCTIONS, Lawtey Fl. 23931 NW CR 225A. Chickens, ducks, rabbits, goats, turkeys, sheep, all farm animals. Horses, tack, farm equipment, furniture, appliances. All consignments welcome. Cash sales only. 10% buyers premium. 6pm the 2nd and 4th Saturday of every month. For more information call Lyndel at 904-838-8069 or Randy at 904-591-4191. AB199 and AU1896. Buy, sell, or trade 42 Motor Vehicles & Accessories TRUCK FOR SALE, 2000 Ford F-350 box truck. Overdrive, A/C, lift gate, excellent condition. Ready to go, asking $9,099 OBO. For more information please call Jim at 732-503-4098 anytime during evening after 6 pm. 732-8014538 anytime during the day 45 KEYSTONE HEIGHTS 1 acre, beautiful trees. Must sell! $7,900 cash/ owner financing. 904631-3594. 1.5 ACRES!! Sampson City area. Well, ceptic tank. Must sell! $12,900. Cash/owner financing. 904-6313594 50 For Rent MOBILE HOME for rent. In good condition. For more information call, 904290-0083 OR 904-9645006. 2BR/2 BA MOBILE HOME. 2 acres, outside Key stone Heights. Fenced, CH/A, deck, washer & dryer hookup. Unfur nished. $495/mo. Plus deposit and references. 352-317-5880 KEYSTONE HEIGHTS, 3BR/2BA MH on 1 acre, close to town, $525/mo. plus deposit. Call 352475-6260 3BR-2BA Doublewide MH. Stove, refrigerator, large screened-back-porch, storage in yard. $595/ mo $500 deposit. 105 Campbell Lane, Melrose. 352-226-9220 or 352475-5533 3BR-2BA House at 2844 SE CR 21B, Melrose. Stove, refrigerator, dish washer, washer/dryer hook up, large screenedporch overlooking Lake Santa Fe $695/mo $600 deposit 352-226-9220 352-475-5533 BEAUTIFUL 3BR/2BA DOUBLE WIDE, in Starke, outside city lim its. CH/A. $675/mo. plus $675 deposit 352-2356319 2BR/1BA CH/A single wide in Starke outside City limits. $475/mo $475 de posit. 352-235-6319 2BR/1BA 14 wide remod eled on private fenced lot paved road CH/A $500/ mo $400 deposit call 1-904-219-0684 3BR 2BA Double Wide on CR 221 in Starke Quiet area; Dishwasher, Cen tral Heat/Air. Service Ani mals only $575/mo plus deposit 352-284-3310 2BR 1BA partially furnished MH; prefer single or couple; service pets only $125/wk $350 move-in; call 904-964-2234 for more info DELIGHTFUL 2BR/1BA house. Shaded w/pe can trees, CH/A, stor age shed, W/D, hookup. 15484 21St. ave.(off Besset Rd.) Clay Electric utilities. Call 904-4726256 or 904-384-8013. 3BR 2BA MOBILE HOME Newly renovated, CH/A, Free Lawn care & gar bage pick-up $700/mo $500 security. Located in Raiford. Pls call 904796-0621 FOR RENT Doublewide 3BR 2Bath, Very Clean. South of Starke, Fenced Yard, Large Front & Back porches, Florida Power & Light $550/mo plus de posit 352-468-2674 2/2 SWMH for Rent. Pri vate, fenced-in back yard & porch. $625 includes water. Two months up front to move in. CR 221 Hampton 352-258-4619 KINGSLEY LAKE HOME 2/2 ch/a private dock on beautiful Kingsley Lake. $800/mo $800 sec dep 386-623-2848 52 Animals & Pets 2 Long-haired Chihuahua males; 9 yrs old free to a good home. call 904782-1253 53A Yard Sales YARD SALE for ADOP TION Fri & Sat Dec 6-7, 8am-2pm. 3900 S.E. SR 100, Starke across from Hope Baptist Church YARD SALE Thur & Fri 9AM-1PM. Very nice furniture, cream-colored sofa (like new!), book case DEALERS WEL COME Nice clothing, dolls, sewing machine, kitchen items, rugs, jewelrytoo much to list! 756 W. Market Rd, Starke (from 301 @ West onto Market Rd, 3rd house on left) YARD SALE 17598 NE 28th Ave, Starke. Fri & Sat 8am-12noon. Inside an old chicken house (rain or shine). For Sale: com mercial incubator, out door Christmas decora tions/wire (starting at $3); Antiques, crafts, books, toys, Adult/children/baby clothes (25 cents ea. or 5 for $1.00); Furniture and Much More! Directions call Debby 904-226-5402 YARD SALE Fri-Sat 9am4pm Tools, ladders, furni ture, clothes, glassware, lots of collectible plates & bells (discounted!), Costume jewelry. 14096 SE CR 100A (Griffis Loop, toward Keystone Hts over 2nd RRtrack 1/4 mile, yellow house) GARAGE SALE Dec 5-6 Unvented tropic gas heater, table top electric grill, coffee pot-electric, toaster, toaster oven, all very low prices. Quilting stand, sewing machine cabinet, coffee table very low prices or make offer 1671 S. Walnut 904-966-7479 YARD SALE Fri Sat & Sun 9am-?? Hampton on CR 18E next door to Church. Follow signs for direc tions. Lots of Christmas items, clothes, & other items GARAGE SALE Dec 7 8am-4pm Clothes, glass es, housewares, misc 9061 SW 137th St, Deer foot Trail Lots of other good items! YARD SALE Sat 8-2 7268 NW CR 229A Starke. Household items & clothes SATURDAY Dec 7th 8am1pm Starke KOA on South HWY 301. Antique lamps, 40 gal water heat er; tires and lots of misc. Food Stand from 10:30 to 12:30 HUGE 2-DAY YARD SALE Dec 13th & 14th from 8am to 5pm. 3018 NW CR 125 Lawtey (1.7 miles from 301; look for the sign Friends Helping Friends) EVERYTHING MUST GO! Living room & bedroom Sets, youth beds, dining room sets, odd chairs & recliners, dressers, washers & dryers. Tools; 24ft galv handicap ramp; Hub/ Around wheelchair; (5) 8x14 Storage sheds; nu merous items to choose from. Brand new refrig (3) Bunk beds, Coffee tables, end tables, enter tainment center & TVs; lamps, dishes, silver ware, toys will make great Christmas Gifts COMMUNITY YARD SALE Sat Dec 7, 8am. Hwy 301 Flea Market 4812 SW 144 th St behind old Knuckle Draggers. Come sell for free or shop. Appliances, furniture, houseware, clothing, Christmas dcor & more. MULTI-FAMILY YARD SALE Furniture, clothes, household items, lots of other stuff. Sat Dec 7 8am-?? 2391 SE 15oth St Starke look for signs YARD SALE Sat 8am-?? Rain or shine. Tools, rug, antique toys, christmas decorations, household items. 7239 NW CR 229A Starke 53B Keystone Yard Sales YARD SALE Fri-Sat 9am4pm Toys clothes dishes, commercial sewing ma chine, Christmas stuff Lots More! 6559 Kings Rd. Keystone Hts (off 21) MOVING SALE Large dresser w/ mirror, draw ers $75; Chest of draw ers $30; Tall white lou vered cabinet w/ doors, open shelf $60; Assorted other items, shoe racks, lamps make offer; must go quickly. Must pick up from Keystone Hts area 352-473-9375 54 Produce PECANS. Buy, Sell, or Crack. Mon-Sat. 12:006:00. Closed Sunday. 904-964-4399. 2 miles East of Starke. Hwy. 16. 55 Wanted CASH FOR JUNK cars $300 & up. Free pick up, running or not. Call 352445-3909. 57 For Sale MOVING SALE: King-size Bed $450; Brown leather sofa $200; Flat computer screen $50; Baby swing w/music $25; 19-in TV $25; L-shaped glass computer desk, file cabi net, stair bookcase $325. 904-966-2451 or 904263-0454 HUGE ESTATE SALE A/C unit, TVs, Medical/ handicap supplies, dish es, furniture, etc. Sat Dec 7 8am 2pm. No early birds please.475 SW Naha St, Keystone Hts (352)226-6790 ROCK COLLECTION world-wide collection. Complete room, no sin gle sales. Starke area on 100 SE. Call 904964-8394, leave name & number. Also: 12-foot fiberglass canoe $165; Ford Ranger x-tra cab topper $150. 3 GRAND PIANOS: one with player, one with Austrian Antique; 1 Spinet piano with player. Call 904-964-8394, leave message & ph number. 59 Personal Services STUMP grinding Low as $10.00 eachcall Robert 386-984-6040 AKC Pomeranian puppies; shots/HC Blue Male $600 White Fem $800 386-496-8157 65 Help Wanted LOOKING to fill a part time position! Are you a per son who wants to be part of a fast paced team en vironment? If so please apply online at www.row epp.com IT Network Administrator P/T needed for Rural Hospital & Clinic Prac tice. Responsibilities will include but are not limited to: Installation/ configuration,operation and maintenance of systems hardware and software and related infrastructure. Degree preferred, with technical major, such as engineer ing or computer science. Healthcare IT related experience For further information, please visit our website: www.lake butlerhospital.com 386496-2323 EXT 9258, fax 386-496-2105 Equal Employment Opportuni ty/Drug & Tobacco Free Workplace ER Clerk PRN Days, Nights and Weekend EXP. REQUIRED. For further information, please visit our web site: www.lakebutler hospital.com386-4962323 EXT 9258 FAX 386-496-2105Equal Em ployment Opportunity/ Drug & Tobacco Free Workplace Part-Time Youth Pastor for Starke Community Church. Send resume to 2138 N Temple Ave, Starke, Fl 32091 or call 904-368-9191 Seeking Licensed FL Men tal Health Professional for work with youth in an outpatient SA, AM, and MH treatment program. minimum of 24 months experience required. Background and refer ence checks also re quired. Work hours: ap proximately 8 to 10 hours per week. Competitive salary. Please fax re sume to 352-379-2843 or e-mail to jshaw@itm florida.com. Wanted: 29 Serious People toWork From Anywhere using a Computer Up to $1,500 $5,000 PT/FT www.iluvmybiz123.com HELP WANTED Exp cleri cal, computer exp, peo ple person. Send brief resume to Clerical, PO Drawer A, Starke, FL 32091 Horizontal Grinder Equip ment Operator Wanted Baldwin, FL Send re sume to radkins@ ietteam.com or fax to 866-863-8897 CONTRACTORS NEED ED: Must have depend able truck, trailer, lawn equipment, cellphone and must be able to cov er surrounding areas. Biweekly pay. All materials and supplies furnished. Clean background re quired. Call 352-4788143. Drivers: $5,000 Sign-On Bonus! Great Pay! Con sistent Freight, Great Miles on this Regional Account. Werner Enter prises: 1-855-515-8447 Drivers: Home EVERY Weekend, Dedicated Southern Lanes & OTR! All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Or Walk Away Lease: No Money Down, No Credit Check. 1-866823-0323 (904) 964-6305 (352) 473-2210 (386) 496-2261Classified Ads Where one call does it all! Bradford Union Clay 40Notices 41Auctions 42M otor Vehicles & Accessories43R Vs & Campers 44Boats &ATVs 45Land for Sale 46Real Estate Out of Area 47Commercial Property (Rent, Lease, Sale) 48Homes for Sale 49Mobile Homes for Sale 50For Rent 61Scriptur es 62Vacation/Travel 63Love Lines 64Business Opportunities65Help Wanted 66In vestme nt O ppo rtunities67Hunting Land for Rent 68Carpet Cleaning 69Food Supplements 70Money to Lend 71Farm Equipment 72Computers & Accessories51Lost/Found 52Animals & Pets53AY ard Sales53BKeystone Yard Sales53CLake Butler Y ard Sales54Pr oduce 55Wanted 56Antiques 57For Sale 58Child/Adult Home Car e59Personal Services 60Home Impr ovementW ord Ad Classified Tuesday, 12:00 noon Classified Display Tuesday, 12:00 noon964-6305 473-2210 496-2261 C lassified Advertising should be paid in advance unless credit has already been established with the newspaper. A $3.00 service charge will be added to all billing to cover postage and handling. All ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser at the time of placement. However, the classified staff cannot be held responsible for mistakes in classified advertising taken by phone. The newspaper reserves the right to correctly classify and edit all copy or to reject or cancel any advertisements at any time. Only standard abbrevations will be accepted. T O PLACE A CLASSIFIED USE YOUR PHONE Out of Area Classifieds Inc. (Road striping division only) December 10th @ 10am 4421 12th St. Court East, Bradenton, Fl 34203 Specialized highway marking/striping equipment and vehicles that meets DOT safety. Special preview: 12/09 10am-4pm www.moeckerauctions. com (800) 840-BIDS 15%-18%BP, $100 ref. cash dep. Subj to confirm. Receivership case #2013 CA 002342 Circuit Court of Manatee County, Fl AB-1098 AU-3219, Eric Rubin Brand new 2BR/2BA 1,690sf luxury condo only $149,900 Originally under contract for $365,000. Near downtown Orlando & all theme parks/ attractions. Must see. Call now 877-3330272, x 173 Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Traning. Job ready in 15 days! (888)3681964 Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. 3 Weeks Hands On Program. Local Job Placement Assistance. National Certifications. GI Bill Benefits Eligible. 1866-362-6497 $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.co m EOE Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-3143769 Only $74,900 New 3BR, 2BA log cabin shell, lake access, nicely wooded, level setting. Quiet paved road frontage. Excellent financing. Call now 877-888-0267, x 453 Sale! Saturday, Dec 14th. 3BR, 2BA, 1700sf cabin on spectacular lake access setting in beautiful upscale community with all infrastructure/ amenities completed. Excellent financing. Call now 877-5253033, x 983. *constructed weather tight log home shell. Gorgeous Blue Ridge mountain acreage featuring spectacular 3 state views & towering hardwoods! Abuts U.S. National Forest. Great building spot! U/G utilities, paved rd frontage, RV friendly. Priced to sell only $69,900. Excellent financing. 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10B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 ea olidays! forthe Healthcarelawsarechanging.Nowisthetimetoinvestinyourhearingbeforepricesinc rease. EnfeYa 50%Off Blowout!offMSRP! select2013Models! Ourteamoflicensed hearinghealthcarepractitioners. imitedimenly alloday Drian Jenkins and Caleb Jones combined to score 25 points in leading the Bradford High School boys basketball team to a 56-53 win over Union County on Nov. 30 in Lake Butler. Jones, who made five 3-pointers, led the Tornadoes with 15 points, while Jenkins had 10. Don Jeffers added nine points for Bradford, which led 27-16 at the half. Kyle Mosher, who made four 3-pointers, led Union (1-2 prior to Dec. 3) with 15 points, while Darrell Watkins added 12. The Tigers played Eastside this past Tuesday and will travel to Cross City on Thursday, Dec. 5, to play District 7-1A opponent Dixie County at 7:30 p.m. On Tuesday, Dec. 10, Union hosts district opponent Chiefland at 7:30 p.m. Bradford boys defeat Union for 1st win Tigers split seasons 1st 2 games The Union County High School boys basketball team won its first game over Trenton, but then dropped a game to Class 6A Columbia. Dakenundrick Wells posted a double-double, scoring 10 points and grabbing 12 rebounds, in a 50-47 win over visiting Trenton on Nov. 23. Darrell Watkins scored 12 points and had three assists, while Larry Collins scored 11 points and had three steals. Trey Spitze had a teamhigh four assists, while Kyle Mosher had three. Mosher also had six rebounds. Watkins scored 15 points in a 79-43 loss to Columbia on Nov. 26 in Lake City. He and Austin Dukes each had two steals, while Dukes also had three assists. Spitze added eight points, while Antonio Hendrieth and Zach Lee each grabbed five rebounds. Caroline McCormick scored in double figures in both games the Keystone High School girls basketball team played in its Turkey Shootout on Nov. 25-26 as the Indians have now won three straight games to improve to 3-4. McCormick had 11 points, seven rebounds, three assists and three steals in a 44-16 win over Menendez on Nov. 25. Caiylen Gonzales led the Indians with 14 points, while Bailey Zinkel grabbed a team-high 11 rebounds. On Nov. 26, McCormick and Abby Winters scored 13 and 12 points, respectively, in a 4643 win over Yulee. McCormick added seven rebounds and three steals, with Sierra Moore leading the team in rebounds (10) and assists (3). Alexa Born added eight points. Keystone played District 5-4A opponent Fort White this past Tuesday and will travel to Green Cove Springs to play Clay on Thursday, Dec. 5, at 6 p.m. The Indians travel to play district opponent Interlachen on Friday, Dec. 6, at 6 p.m. On Tuesday, Dec. 10, Keystone hosts district opponent Bradford at 7 p.m. Keystone girls go 2-0 in tournament Visiting Fort White was no match for the Keystone Heights High School boys soccer team, which improved to 6-0 in District 5-2A and got five goals from Cory Hedding in a 12-0 win on Dec. 2. No second half was played due to the mercy rule as the Indians (8-1-1 overall prior to Dec. 3) scored all of their goals in the first half. Besides Heddings goals, Keystone got three from Zach Holman and one each from Juan Grimaldo, Nacho Grimaldo, Brandon Hannah and Ben Jones. Juan Grimaldo had six assists, while Wyatt Graziano had four. Hedding and Holman each had KHHS boys soccer team scores 12 in district win one. Keystone played Crescent City this past Tuesday and will host Clay on Thursday, Dec. 5, at 7 p.m. The Indians travel to play Crescent City on Tuesday, Dec. 10, at 7 p.m. After losing their first District 5-2A match (4-2 to Santa Fe), the Keystone Heights High School girls soccer team recorded a big win, scoring seven first-half goals and defeating visiting Fort Keystone girls bounce back, get 8-0 district win White 8-0 on Dec. 2 to improve to 8-1 in District 5. The Indians (8-4 overall prior to Dec. 3) got three goals from Madison Colaw and two from Raychel Trimble. Hanna Crane, Rachel Garvey and Rachel Lee each had one. Colaw led the team in assists with three, while Lee, Trimble, Julia Osteen and Cheyenne Riddling each had one. Keystone played Crescent City this past Tuesday and will host district opponent Bradford on Thursday, Dec. 5, at 5 p.m. The Indians travel to play Crescent City on Tuesday, Dec. 10, at 5 p.m. before traveling to Palatka for a 6 p.m. match on Wednesday, Dec. 11. fishing and hunting during the last week has been the wind. The rain and cold front made its way into the area first, and the wind closely followed. It made hunting waterfowl especially difficult, but the first phase of waterfowl season ended on Dec. 1. The second phase will open on Saturday, Dec. 7, and run through Jan. 26. Captain Randy Harris says the cold weather that we have recently experienced tends to make the inshore fish bunch and more available to catch. Crosshorn Ministeries to hold Christmas banquet Crosshorn Ministries holds its Christmas banquet at the Starke Golf and Country Club on Thursday, Dec. 19, from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. There are sure to be outdoors presentations, things to eat and some good conversations about hunting, fishing, trapping and other outdoors activities. Tight lines and safe hunting until next week. If you have a story, idea or photo to share, please contact Mickey Agner via email at mka@ maoutdoors.com or by phone at 904-964-1488. Photos may also be submitted in person at the Bradford County Telegraph, Union County Times or Lake Region Monitor. FINS Continued from 8B HOOPS Continued from 8B Nov. 22, Nicholas and Wheeler led the team with 11 and eight points, respectively. Bradford will travel to play district opponent Interlachen on Thursday, Dec. 5, at 7:30 p.m. before hosting Englewood on Saturday, Dec. 7, at 7:30 p.m. The Tornadoes travel to play district opponent Fort White on Monday, Dec. 9, at 7:30 p.m. Keystone travels to Gainesville to play Oak Hall on Dec. 5 at 7 p.m. before hosting Interlachen on Friday, Dec. 6, at 7 p.m. On Tuesday, Dec. 10, the Indians travel to play Fort White at 7:30 p.m.