Citation
Daily Commercial

Material Information

Title:
Daily Commercial
Place of Publication:
Leesburg, FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group, Steve Skaggs - Publisher, Tom McNiff - Executive Editor
Publication Date:

Subjects

Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Lake -- Leesburg
Coordinates:
28.81134 x -81.872708

Record Information

Rights Management:
Copyright Daily Commercial. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Digital Newspaper Library

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

LOCAL & STATE | A3CALL FOR CALENDARLake o cials seek photos for Adopt-aLake calendar SPORTS | B1DOLPHINS STAY PERFECT WITH WIN OVER RAIDERS SPORTS | B1TIGER COMPLETES COMEBACK WITH TOUR CHAMPIONSHIP WIN @dailycommercial Facebook.com/daily.commercial YOUR LOCAL SOURCE FOR LAKE & SUMTER COUNTIES Monday, September 24, 2018 75 ¢ Local and State .............A3 Opinion ...................... A9 Weather ..................... A10 Sports.......................... B1 Diversions ...................B7 Classified ..................... B8 Volume 142, Issue 267 2018 GateHouse Media Home delivery: 352-787-0600 By Lisa Mascaro, Mary Clare Jalonick and Jonathan LemireThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ The Senate Judiciary Committee scheduled a hearing Thursday for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford, a woman who says he sexually assaulted her as a teenager, as a claim of sexual misconduct emerged from anotherwoman.The New Yorker magazine reported Sunday night that Senate Democrats were investigating a second wom-ans accusation of sexual misconduct by Kavanaugh dating to the 1983-84 aca-demic year, Kavanaughs first at Yale University.Another Kavanaugh accuser emergesBy Jonathan Lemire and Zeke MillerThe Associated PressBRIDGEWATER, N.J. „ President Donald Trump is poised to redouble his commitment to America FirstŽ on the most global of stages this week.In the sequel to his stormy U.N. debut, Trump will stress his dedication to the primacy of U.S. interests while competing with Western allies for an advantage on trade and shining a spotlight on the threat that he says Iran poses to the Middle East and beyond.One year after Trump stood at the rostrum of the U.N. General Assembly and derided North Koreas Kim Jong Un as Rocket Man,Ž the push to denuclearize the Korean Peninsula is a work in progress, although fears of war have given way to hopes for rapprochement.Scores of world leaders, even those representing Americas closest friends, remain wary of Trump. In the At UN, Trump set to rattle foes, friends In this Sept. 19, 2017, photo, President Donald Trump speaks during the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters. [ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO] By Terry TangThe Associated PressKeon McGuire has no real attachment to Bill Cosby or his landmark show.As a black man, hes aware of the sitcoms place in pop culture, but he was barely in elementary school when The Cosby ShowŽ went off the air. Years later, he mostly tuned Cosby out after a widely panned speech to the NAACP A generational divide over Cosbys legacyIn this Nov. 6, 2013, photo, Bill Cosby performs an event in New York. Cosby is facing the start of a sentencing hearing on Monday at which a judge will decide how to punish the 81-year-old who was convicted in April of drugging and sexually assaulting Andrea Constand at his suburban Philadelphia home in 2004. [JOHN MINCHILLO/ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO] Lake County, Lake EMS well-prepared for smooth integration Oct. 1By Payne Raypray@dailycommercial.comTAVARES … Lake EMS will officially integrate into Lake County government on October 1, and officials say the transition couldnt be smoother.Lake EMS Executive Direc-tor Jerry Smith has worked for months with County Manager Jeff Cole and Commissioner Tim Sullivan to make sure everything is in place for Lake EMS employees to smoothly become County Commission employees.The newly minted Lake EMS Office of Emergency Medical Services will spend the next few months after the transition working out kinks in the joint system.Their current projection is that come February the EMS joining county soonLake County EMS will come under the umbrella of Lake County government Oct. 1 in a move of“ cials hope will mean better working conditions for EMS workers and better service for citizens. [DAILY COMMERCIAL FILE] See EMS, A7 See TRUMP, A8 See COSBY, A8 See KAVANAUGH, A7

PAGE 2

A2 Monday, September 24, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com NATION & WORLDPUBLISHER: Steve Skaggs steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.com .......................352-365-8213 EXECUTIVE EDITOR: Tom McNiff tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com ..........................352-365-8250 DIGITAL EDITOR, LIFESTYLES EDITOR: Whitney Lehnecker whitney.lehnecker@dailycommercial.com ..............352-365-8258 SPORTS EDITOR: Paul Jenkins paul.jenkins@dailycommercial.com .........................352-365-8204 SPORTS WRITER: Frank Jolley frank.jolley@dailycommet.com................................352-365-8268 REPORTER: Frank Stan“ eld frankstan“ eld@dailycommercial.com ......................352-365-8257 REPORTER: Roxanne Brown roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com ....................352-365-8266 REPORTER : Payne Ray pray@dailycommercial.com .....................................352-365-8262 Retail Advertising .....................................................352-314-3278 Classi“ ed Advertising ...............................................352-314-3278 Lake Circulation ........................................................352-787-0600 Sumter Circulation ...................................................877-702-0600 Billing .......................................................................352-787-0600 Accounting ................................................................352-365-8212 SUBSCRIPTION RATES Home delivery (Daily/Sunday) 3 months: 41.70 ....................Tax: 2.92 .......................Total: 44.62 6 months: 88.40 ....................Tax: 5.84 .......................Total: 89.24 1 year: 166.80 .......................Tax: 11.68 .....................Total: 178.47 FOR HOME DELIVERY: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., the Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Billed monthly at the rates shown.Print delivery available within the newspaper distribution area only. By submitting your address and/or email, you understand that you may receive promotional offers from GateHouse Media and its related companies. You may unsubscribe from receiving any such offers at any time by calling 352-787-0600 or emailing us at subscriptions@dailycommercial.com. The advertised price does not include the charges for any premium editions. Premium editions are published to provide additional information and value to our readers. You agree that you will be charged up to an additional $7 for each premium edition published and delivered to you during your subscription period, in addition to the cost of your subscription. The length of your subscription will be shortened by the publication of premium editions if those premium editions are delivered to you during your subscription. You may elect to be billed separately for premium editions by contacting Customer Service at 1-352-787-0600 or email us at subscriptions@dailycommercial.com. Thus, unless you elect to be billed separately up to an additional $7 for each premium edition, you agree that the length of your subscription will be shortened in proportion to the value of the number of premium editions published and delivered to you during your subscription period. As an illustrative example, if you select a subscription of up to 12 weeks at a cost of $48.00, and two premium editions at $2 each are published and delivered to you during that subscription period, your subscription will be shortened by 1 week because the weekly cost of the subscription is $4 per week and the premium charges total $4. Depending upon the length of your subscription and the timing of the publication and the delivery of premium editions, you will not be charged for any premium editions if none are published and delivered to you during your subscription. As such, in that case only, the length of your subscription will not be shortened. The timing of the publication and the delivery of the premium edition is variable. There will be no more than 18 premium editions published each calendar year. For more info or to make changes or cancel your subscription, please call Customer Service at 1-352-787-0600 or email us at subscriptions@dailycommercial.com.MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER?: Email subscriptions@ dailycommercial.com anytime or call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and from 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. If youre going on vacation, call circulation 48 hours ahead to stop service. OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY: The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. ANNOUNCEMENTS, CALENDAR, GAME RESULTS: Email upcoming events, along with news about awards and personal or professional milestones „ with a photo, if you desire „ to news@ dailycommercial.com. Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268 or 352-365-8204. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. YOUR LOCAL NEWS SOURCE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIESThe Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $178.47 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by GateHouse Media at 21 2 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to the Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edit ion is property of the Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Saturday, Sept. 22 Lotto: 12-13-14-25-28-36-x2 Powerball: 24-61-63-64-69-18-x5 Fantasy 5: 2-5-6-13-17 Sunday, Sept. 23 Pick 5 Afternoon: 5-7-5-1-9 Pick 4 Afternoon: 1-3-5-4 Pick 3 Afternoon: 3-0-3 Pick 2 Afternoon: 0-3LOTTERY SELMA, ALAAlabama police chief: Of“ cer wounded in ambush shootingAn Alabama police chief said Sunday that one of his officers was hospitalized and was expected to survive after being shot while on patrol.Selma Police Chief Spencer Collier did not immediately release the name of the officer who was wounded before dawn Sunday.Collier said he believes the shooting was an ambushŽ with multiple people involved.He told WSFA-TV that shots were from a high-powered rifle and pierced the officers bullet-proof vest and chest. The officer sped away, as he is trained to do, but lost con-trol of his vehicle and crashed.CAMDEN, N.J.7 riders rescued from stuck Ferris wheel at New Jersey fair Authorities say seven riders were rescued from a stuck Ferris wheel at a New Jersey county fair.Gloucester Township police say they were called to assist the fire department after the malfunction was reported Sat-urday at the Camden County Fair.Police say the occupied seats were at various heights, with one at the top approximately 40 feet off the ground.Ž The Blackwood Fire Company told NJ.com that about six of the riders were children.Fire crews used a tower ladder to rescue them. Police said all remained calm and were in good spirits. No injuries were reported.AUSTIN, TEXAS3D gun advocate accused of sex with minor is jailed in USThe owner of a Texas com-pany that sells plans to make untraceable 3-D printed guns was back in the U.S. Sunday after being arrested in Taiwan, where police say he flew after learning he was being investi-gated for allegedly having sex with an underage girl.The U.S. Marshals Service said 30-year-old Cody Wilson was booked into Harris County Jail in Houston early Sunday and was being held on $150,000 bond. It wasnt immediately clear if he had an attorney yet. BERLINGerman government reaches deal to solve spy chief disputeLeaders of German Chancel-lor Angela Merkels governing coalition reached a deal Sunday to resolve a standoff over the future of the countrys domes-tic intelligence chief, a dispute that has further dented the image of their fractious six-month-old alliance.Jack Maloney poses in front of the grain bins Wednesday on his Little Ireland Farms in Brownsburg, Ind. [MICHAEL CONROY/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]As aid checks go out, farmers worry bailout wont be enoughBy Juliet LindermanThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ Farmers across the United States will soon begin receiving government checks as part of a billion-dollar bailout to buoy growers experiencing financial strain from President Donald Trumps trade disputes with China.But even those poised for big payouts worry it wont be enough. And while support for Trump is near unwavering in the heartland, some growers say that with the November election nearing, such disap-pointing aid outcomes could potentially affect their vote.Its pretty obvious that the rural agriculture communities helped elect this administration, but the way things are going I believe farmers are going to have to vote with their checkbook when it comes time,Ž said Kevin Skunes, a corn and soybean grower from Arthur, North Dakota and president of the National Corn Growers Association.Corn farmers get the small-est slice of the aid pie. Corn groups estimate a loss of 44 cents per bushel, but theyre poised to receive just a single penny per bushel.If these issues havent been resolved, there could be a change in the way farmers vote,Ž Skunes said. A person has to consider all things.Ž Farmers are already feeling the impact of Trumps trade tiffs with China and other countries. China has hit back hard, responding with its own set of tariffs on U.S. agricultural products and other goods.The Trump administration is providing up to $12 billion in emergency relief funds for American farmers, with roughly $6 billion in an initial round. The three-pronged plan includes $4.7 billion in payments to corn, cotton, soybean, dairy, pork and sorghum farmers. The rest is for developing new foreign markets for American-grown commodities and purchasing more than two dozen select products, including certain fresh fruits and vegetables, nuts, meat and dairy.Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue announced last month that soybean growers will get the largest checks, at $1.65 per bushel for a total of $3.6 billion. China is the worlds leading buyer of American soybeans, purchas-ing roughly 60 percent of the U.S. crop. But since Beijing imposed a 25 percent tariff on soybean, imports prices have plunged.The lack of initial detail about how the calculations were made left farmers scratching their heads.Asked about the confusion, Rob Johansson, the Agriculture Departments chief economist, responded that the USDA took into account a number of factors including the share of production that is exported and the value of trade directly affected by the retaliatory tariffs.ŽThe level of damage is not the same for each commodity,Ž he said in a written response to questions submit-ted by The Associated Press.He estimated that there would be more than 784,000 applications for relief.The USDA has since released a detailed analysis of how the department made its calculations.The breakdown has stunned corn and wheat farmers who say the payments are uneven and wont do much of anything to help keep struggling farms afloat.A lobbying group that represents wheat growers is challenging the way the administration determined payments for wheat farmers, who are set to receive 14 cents a bushel. Chandler Goule, CEO of the National Association of Wheat Growers, said the USDA assumed U.S. wheat would be sold to China this year when it made its cal-culations. But the assumption was flawed, he said.China typically makes its requests for American wheat between March and June. U.S. wheat farmers have sold, on average, 20 million bushels of wheat to China over the past three years. But none came this year, Goule said, as Trump escalated his threatening rhetoric on trade with Beijing. He hopes the per-bushel rate for wheat goes up if theres a second round of payments.I am very certain that we will not sell any wheat to China this year,Ž Goule said. The window we sell in has come and gone.ŽThe response among farm-ers has been mixed. While some are grateful for the help, most are eager for the trade disputes to be quickly resolved.Nobody wants to have an aid package. I mean, if youre a farmer youre in the business of producing a crop. We just want a fair price for it,Ž said Joel Schreurs, a soybean and corn producer near Tyler in southwestern Minnesota who sits on the board of both the American Soybean Association and the Minnesota Soybean Growers Association.His personal operation is about 1,000 acres. He farms an additional 500 acres with his son-in-law and other relatives. He estimates that the tariffs would cost him $40,000 to $50,000 in lost income and that he would get $16,000 to $20,000 in emergency aid.Schreurs worries that it will be hard for farmers to get back the buyers theyll lose as a result of the trade wars. And in the short term we have to find another home for those beans, otherwise theyre going to pile up and it will keep prices depressed,Ž he said.In the Midwest, growers typically farm both corn and soybeans. Those farmers would get payments for both under the program, which began sign-ups Sept. 4.Perdue said checks could start going out as soon as the end of September for crops that have already been harvested; payouts are based on yield.In a recent C-SPAN interview, Perdue said he understands growers frustrations.Farmers always live in unpredictable times,Ž he said. Theyre very resilient, but obviously the longer trade issues go on the longer it bears on them regarding what is the future.ŽJack Maloney says corn farmers will be getting so little in bailout aid that for roughly 200,000 bushels of corn a farmer would get only about $2,000 for their losses.Thats not even beer money,Ž said the Brownsburg, Indiana, corn and soybean grower.Maloney, 62, began farming full time in 1978 and now has two employees. He said some fellow farmers are angry and upset.Agriculture has always been the butt of all the trade wars,Ž he said, adding that this isnt the first time hes seen trade disruptions affect the agricultural markets.Maloney said he had already cut back on expenses during the past three years and hasnt taken a paycheck from his farm for more than a year because of tough times before the trade war began. He said the recent tumult has dashed hopes for stabilizing agricultural markets anytime soon.We were seeing a little light at the end of the tunnel „ the markets were improv-ing a little,Ž he said, and then this tariff thing happened and this trade war.ŽDaniel Weinand worries the market downturn could be the death knell for his farm. Weinand, 30, grows corn, canola and yellow peas on 900 acres of rented land near Hazen, North Dakota. He said he expects to reap about 30,000 bushels of corn, and to receive about $300 in aid. A penny a bushel on corn, its not that its entirely worthless. But it almost is,Ž he said. I dont know how many more years I can weather.ŽConcern grows

PAGE 3

DailyCommercial.com | Monday, September 24, 2018 A3 LOCAL & STATETom McNiff, editor 352-365-8250 tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comNEWS BRIEFS ORLANDODeputies recover body of teenager found in pondAuthorities have recovered the body of an 18-year-old man in a pond near the University of Central Florida.A spokesman for the Orange County Sheriffs Office said the victim was identified as Adrian Edwin Diaz of Winter Springs.The Orlando Sentinel reported that deputies responded at 8 a.m. Sunday to reports that a body was in a pond located behind a hotel. A marine unit was sent to assist.Investigators said the death is not thought to have involved foul play. No further details were immediately available. PORT ST. LUCIEMan charged in deaths of woman, his unborn babyAuthorities said a Florida man is charged with two counts of murder in the killing of an expectant mother and their unborn child.TC Palm newspapers reported Sunday that 41-year-old Jose Soto Escalera is charged in the death of 23-year-old Tania Wise, whose body was found last month in a ditch. She was about to give birth to their child.St. Lucie County Sheriff Ken Mascara said investigators have digital forensic evidence and witnesses who con-firmed seeing a truck matching Escaleras near where Wises body was found. Authorities have not said how she died.Mascara said DNA proves Escalera was the father of the unborn child. He also is married to another woman and has four other children.It wasnt immediately clear whether Escalera has a lawyer to represent him. FORT LAUDERDALETeen charged for shooting over closed restaurantA Florida teenager is facing attempted murder charges after police said he fired shots on employees when denied late-night fast food at a Checkers restaurant.The Broward Sheriffs Office said in a news release that 17-year-old Albert Humberto Ponce was arrested Thursday and charged as an adult.The South Florida Sun Sentinel reported that the shooting happened about 4 a.m. July 26 when Ponce and a woman drove up to the Checkers near Fort Lau-derdale to order food.An arrest report says that two employees who were outside told Ponce they had just closed the restaurant and thats when he sprayed the front of the building with gunfire, hitting one man in the leg. The wounded employee was treated and released from the hospital. The other man was unharmed. PENSACOLAMan gets 20 years for cigarette theftA Florida man who stole $600 worth of cigarettes from a convenience store has been sentenced to 20 years in state prison.A jury in Pensacola convicted 48-year-old Robert Spellman of bur-glary and grand theft in August. Authorities said Spellman took 10 cartons By Mark HarperGateHouse Media GroupIf youve watched television at all in recent months, youve undoubtedly become aware that:a) Theres an election in November.b) That Gov. Rick Scott ischallenging incumbentU.S. Sen. Bill Nelson.c) That Rick Scott and Bill Nelson dont like each other much.Some $34 million has been spent by both candidatesthus far. Claims and counter-claims come at voters almost every day. The latest: Scott has doubled down on his com-mentWednesday that Nelson is a socialist.Whats perhaps obstructed by the fog of the campaign season is how the animosity goes back years, at least to Scotts first year as governor in 2011. Strained relationshipAt a stop in DeLand this week, Nelson was asked to describe his working relationship „ the senator and the governor, presumably bridging the federal and state Long before negativity of now, Bill Nelson and Rick Scott had strained relationshipAlthough they have been in of“ ce the past eight years, not many photographs exist featuring both U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, left, and Gov. Rick Scott, right, together in one place. In this case, they are ” anking Republican U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio at a Hurricane Irma brie“ ng in 2017 in Miami. [GATEHOUSE MEDIA FILE] Staff ReportTAVARES „ Celebrating a decade of production, the Lake County Adopt-a-Lake Program is seeking original photographs of Lake County waterways for its Adopt-aLake calendar. The top 14 photographs, as chosen by a panel of volunteers, will be published in the 2019 calendar. Once the semi-finalists are selected, online voting will be opened to the public. The top-scoring picture will receive the coveted cover spot.All photos submitted must be of a named Lake County water body and must be shot in landscape (horizontal) mode. Entries are limited to five photos per person and should include the name of the photographer and the body of water pictured. A photo release form will be required.To submit a photo, e-mail ccatasus@lakecountyfl.gov, bring a CD to the Water Resource Management Laboratory at 12923 County Landfill Road, Tavares, or mail a CD to Adopt-a-Lake Program, Attn: Cathie Cata-sus, P.O. Box 7800, Tavares, FL 32778.The deadline to submit entries is Oct. 10.The Adopt-a-Lake calendar will be available at the Water Resource Management Laboratory for a suggested donation of $5, with proceeds benefiting the Adopt-a-Lake Program.The Lake County Adopta-Lake Program encourages local civic organizations, individuals and fraternal and business groups to adopt a segment of a lakes shoreline. The program is comprised of three separate components: water-quality monitoring, public education and pollution prevention. Volunteers can select which aspects of the program best fit their level of interest.For more information about Lake Countys Adopt-aLake Program, the calendar, or to become a volunteer, contact Cathie Catasus at 352-253-1659 or ccatasus@lakecountyfl.gov.Adopt-a-Lake photos wantedLake County is inviting citizens to submit lake-themed photos for its annual Adopt-a-Lake calendar. [SUBMITTED] Submit your photos for inclusion in lake-themed calendarBy Austin L. MillerGateHouse Media GroupOCALA„ A corrections trainee at Lowell Correctional Institution who reportedly admitted to having sex with a female inmate at the facil-ity was arrested last week and charged with two counts of sexual misconduct.Nicholas Seaborn Jefferson, 26, told officials he and the inmate twice had sex in the early morning hours while other inmates were asleep, according to his arrest report. The 29-year-old inmate told officials the sex was payment for Jefferson bringing her a narcotic drug.Jefferson said he never forced the woman to have sex. He said the first encounter was in the beginning of September, with the second a week later.Jefferson remained at the Marion County Jail as of 5:45 p.m. Thursday on a $10,000 bond.State Department of Corrections officials said Jefferson Report: Prison guard trainee traded drugs for sex with inmateLowell Correctional Institution in Ocala [OCALA STAR-BANNER] See NELSON, A4 See PRISON, A4 See BRIEFS, A4 Staff reportSORRENTO … Crews are scheduled on Monday and Tuesday nights close some lanes of traffic at the State Road 46 and U.S. Highway 441 intersection.The single-lane closures, scheduled from 7 p.m. to 5 a.m., will allow crews to construct a northbound U.S. 441 left turn lane and add a left turn arrow to the traffic signal at the intersection. The work is part of the $1.6 billion Wekiva Parkway project, which will create a continuous belt-way around Central Florida while helping to protect the natural resources sur-rounding the Wekiva River. The Florida Department of Transportation and the Central Florida Expressway Authority have been work-ing together to build the 25-mile toll road, which is designed to provide travel alternatives, enhance safety and relieve conges-tion on local roads.To date, 13 miles of the parkway are open to traffic. The entire parkway is expected to be open to Lane closures at SR 46, US 441 intersectionA screen shot from a Wekiva Parkway YouTube video shows the construction plan of the State Road 46 and U.S. Highway 441 intersection in Mount Dora. [WEKIVA PARKWAY] See CLOSURES, A4

PAGE 4

A4 Monday, September 24, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com Penny B. Ericksen of Howey-in-the-Hills passed away on Friday, September 21, 2018 at the age of 80 years. Mrs. Penny Ericksen, 80, passed away at home on Friday, September 21, 2018, surrounded by her family. She was born in London, England to Phyllis and Bertie Doublard on May 5, 1938. Penny was preceded in death by her loving husband, Ray Ericksen, daughter, Linda Whitworth, and brother, John Doublard. Penny is survived by her brother Frank Doublard, his wife Pat and nephew Kevin. Penny leaves a family that will miss her dearly. Her daughter Debbie and her husband Stephen, and her daughter Michele and her husband Richard. Penny was lucky to have step children who cared about her. Ken Ericksen, his wife Stacey and their daughter, Amanda, Kathy Ericksen and her partner Trish, Kirk Ericksen, his wife Amy and their daughters, Kristina and Kelsea. Penny deeply loved her grandchildren, Alexander and William Stock, Ryan Croak and Joshua Yearout. She loved being a grandmother and was so proud of their accomplishments. Penny moved to the United States as a young woman and single mother with three young children. Through strength and perseverance Penny worked her way up through the phone company at a time when few women held managerial positions. Penny met the love of her life, Ray and they eventually relocated to Florida where they would raise their family. Penny was active in all of her childrens lives and activities. Penny was always “nding new adventures in addition to being a full-time mother and wife. She hosted her own radio show, The Penny ShowŽ she started her own computer billing company and worked at the regional of“ce for Home Depot for many years. She took an active interest in anything related to technology, our mom was ahead of her time! Penny and Ray loved to travel. They traveled extensively including England, France, Mexico, Italy, Belgium, Germany, Iceland, and Canada. One of their favorite places, was their second home in Murphy, North Carolina. Christmas and summers at the cabin in Murphy created many special memories and friendships that none of us will forget. Penny was a wonderful wife, mother and dear friend to those who were lucky enough to know her. Her friendships at Mission Inn meant very much to her. Family and friends are invited to gather on Tuesday, September 25, 2018 from 9am 10 AM. A funeral ceremony will start at 10 AM in the funeral home chapel. Interment will follow at Taylor Memorial Cemetery, HoweyIn-The-Hills, Florida 34737. Condolences, memories and photos may be shared on the tribute wall at www. steversonhamlinhilbish. comPenny Ericksen Funeral Servicesof cigarettes from a stock room in the store manag-ers office last December. He was sentenced Friday.The Pensacola News Journal reported that Spellman had 14 felony and 31 misdemeanor convictions prior to the cigarette theft, which qualified him as a habitual felony offender. That led to the lengthy 20-year prison sentence imposed Friday by an Escambia County judge. MIAMIProgram will spread orchids around Coconut GroveOrchids will soon be afoot again in Miamis Coconut Grove neighborhood.On Monday, government officials, botanists from Fairchild Botanical Garden and volunteers will mount 250 rare and endangered orchid seedlings onto tree trunks in the central part of the neighborhood.City Commissioner Ken Russell said in a news release that the Million Orchid ProjectŽ is aimed at reintroducing rare and endangered orchid species that have become nearly extinct in South Florida.Schoolyards, hospitals and roadways are among the sites for the reintroduction initia-tive, which aims to have the first generation of re-established orchids blooming throughout the area within five years.Russell says the orchids return will reinforce the Groves reputation as a Garden District of the Miami area. The Associated Press BRIEFSFrom Page A3has been with the agency since May, and they are moving forward with Officer Jeffersons immediate dismissal.Ž Officials noted: The Department will conduct an after-action review to determine what recommended changes are necessary to prevent future misconduct.ŽA Florida Department of Corrections report from Inspector Jennifer Langston with the Office of the Inspector General states that on Sept. 16, the inmate said, Jefferson was the housing officer assigned to her area. Around 2:30 a.m., she said, Jefferson walked throughout the area to wake up the diabetic inmates so they can be escorted by the housing sergeant to the pill line outside the dormitory.The victim said Jefferson woke her up and she walked toward the inmate bathroom. She said once the diabetic patients were out of the dorm, she met Jefferson beside the inmate bathroom in a small corner beside a door that leads to the laun-dry room, which is outside of the officers station, to have sex with Jefferson.The woman said the two were interrupted when Jefferson saw an inmate walking toward their location. She said Jefferson managed to leave without anyone seeing him. She said the sex was pay-ment for her receiving the narcotic drug suboxone from Jefferson on Sept. 15. Jefferson denied having sex with the inmate for suboxone.Langston did not see the act while reviewing the video, according to the report, but the video showed the two meeting at the time and location given by the inmate.FDCs Office of Inspec-tor General has taken swift action to arrest this officer for his grossly inappropriate and illegal involvement with an inmate at Lowell Correctional,Ž noted FDC secretary Julie Jones in a statement. There is no place in this department for staff who engage in mis-conduct, and I am confident Warden (Hope) Gartman and her leadership team will continue to ensure all officers at Lowell are treat-ing inmates with respect and conducting themselves in an appropriate and profes-sional manner.ŽFemale inmates at the prison have complained for years about such incidents.In August, the U.S. Department of Justice civil rights division met with alleged victims, families and loved ones of inmates in Ocala. A DOJ is investigating alleged sexual abuse at the all-female prison. At the meeting, family members and former inmates told the Star-Ban-ner about inmate abuse at the hands of their handlers.Government officials said if their investigation uncov-ers other allegations, they might expand their probe. They warn that the inves-tigation will take months.The day after the Ocala meeting, the justice depart-ment team went to Lowell for a tour of the facility.DOJ officials could not immediately be reached for comment about the latest allegation.Debra Bennett, a former inmate who calls herself the prison mom and voice for those incarcerated at Lowell, told the Ocala Star-Banner that shes not surprised to hear about the arrest.It happens more fre-quently than people realize,Ž she said. PRISONFrom Page A3governments„ with Scott.Its been strained,Ž Nelson said. It started off strained when he refused to take$2.4 billion for high-speed rail (in 2011), and we would have been the showcase for the nation.That would have been built within a few years long ago, and now hes saying he wants high… speed rail, but its not high-speed rail,ŽNelson said. High-speed rail iswhat wasproposed down the middle of I-4, 80 miles an hour.ŽAt the time, Scott called the project a boondoggle,Ž irrespon-sibleŽ and a risk.ŽNelson and Scott had what one governors spokesman described as a cordial conversationŽ about an effort to revive the project as both attended the Daytona 500 that year, but, ultimately, the federal money was broken into 22 different projects in other states.Darryl Paulson, a professor emeritus of government at the University of South Florida at St. Petersburg, said the high-speed rail decision was the start of a rocky relationship, but in poli-tics, decisions are made every day and winners and losers have to work together once again the next day.You would still expect political figures to do whats best for their state and cooperate on future political endeavors,Ž Paulson said. Both (Nelson and Scott) have a right to their own opinions. ... But this has become much more exaggerated because these two individuals are running for the same seat.Ž Other clashesIn 2013, Nelson told the TampaBay Times he was frustratedŽ with extremists bogging down progress in Washington, and speculation centered onhim taking a run at Scott in the gubernato-rial election the following year, though that didnt materialize.Just months after his second term as governor began in 2015, reports surfaced that Scott was eying Nelsons seat in 2018, even hiring consul-tants to help his approval ratings.Also in 2015, Nelson took a shot at Scott when the governor traveled to Washington to meet with the U.S. Health and Human Services secretary seeking more than $2 billion for a Florida hospital program.The states shortfall stemmed from a change in funding designed to encourage states to expand Medicaid, a move Scott was loath to make because of his aversion to the Affordable Care Act.Florida is not a corpo-ration, it is a community, and Gov. Scott should govern accordingly,Ž Nelson told the Miami Herald. Right now hes showing a callous disregard for the needs of many of his fellow Floridians.ŽSusan MacManus, a political science professor emeritus from the University of South Florida,identified two primary reasons for the clash between Nelson and Scott.Its an era of political polarization, whereDemocrats and Republicans are more likely to toe the party line, she said. Also, Scott and Nelson reflect different backgrounds and approaches to solving problems.One is from the pri-vate sector and the other is more public-sector driven,Ž MacManus said. It often tracks back to their different experiences. ... I think thats one of the biggest divides.Ž Attack ads, labelsNelson has long been considered a moderate Democrat, one with a history of working with both sides. Party inde-pendence is an approach he endorses in his ads.But the Scott campaign has attacked that, circulating a chartshow-ing Nelsons votes have grown increasingly par-tisan over the years. Where he voted with Democrats 49 percent of the time in the 1970s, its 91 percent in this decade. Politifact broke downNelsons voting history, referencing several studies of it, and determined Nelson remains among the most conservative Democrats, but it notes the effects of polarization on votes and calls a Democratic-lean-ing PACs response that Nelson is one of Amer-icas most independent senatorsŽ only half-true.Bill Nelson and his campaign are desperately trying to pretend hes a moderate. Maybe he was once. But the longer Bill Nelson has been in Washington, the more liberal hes become,Ž said Chris Hartline, a Scott campaign spokes-man.As liberals around the country embrace the socialist platform, the question becomes: Is Bill Nelson a socialist or just really, really lib-eral? Answer: Whats the difference?ŽRyan Brown, Nelsons spokesman, responded, saying: Rick Scott call-ing one of the nations most moderate and independent senators a socialist is a clear sign that he is getting desperate, and that his campaign is coming off the rails. Such a baseless claim is ridiculous but its what weve come to expect from Rick Scott who just makes things up.ŽIn speeches and ads, Scott has hammered away at Nelson, com-paring him to an old Ford Pinto, blaming the states toxic algae crisis on him and claiming Nelson has voted to raise taxes more than 300 times.This election offers voters the starkest choice possible in the direction and the future of our state,Ž Scott said at a Sept. 6 luncheon with Vice President Mike Pence in Orlando. The Democrat ticket of Bill Nelson and Andrew Gillum offers a very clear, very radical and very liberal and very But Nelson „ whose initial ad campaigns reflected his views on public service „ has responded with attacks on Scott for his financial fortunes while serving as governor and hisrole in the states environmental problems.In DeLand, Nelson said of Scott: Hes very partisan. He savaged education. He has systematically dismantled the environmental agencies. He completely eliminated growth man-agement, the Department of Community Affairs. He has constantly battled to prevent the passage of the Affordable Care Act and then forseven years he triedto kill it, to repeal it ƒ wherever you turn ƒ youve seen the algae crisis. This is a direct result of starving money from those regu-latory environmental agencies.ŽThe race is univer-sally considered close. A Florida Atlantic Univer-sity poll last weekend of 850 registered voters who said they were more likely to vote than not showed Scott and Nelson at 42 and 41 percent, respectively, a statistical tie with 11 percent of voters undecided.Other polls in recent weeks show similar results, with Scott ahead by a point or two or tied in most.Florida is a cutthroat state and its so polarized,Ž MacManus said. It looks like were headed toward another 1-percent election season. Thats just the way Florida is right now.Ž NELSONFrom Page A3 By Jeff KaroubThe Associated PressDETROIT „ The Detroit museum that hosted Aretha Franklins public visitations after her death is again holding space for her „ this time with an exhibit featur-ing photographs, videos and the red shoes she wore at the first funeral viewing that drew global attention.Billed as a tribute to the Queen of Soul,Ž THINKŽ opens to the public Tuesday at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History and runs until Jan. 21, Martin Luther King Jr. Day. The show is a prelude what the museum envisions is a larger, long-term exhibit that would debut late next year or in early 2020. And both could be a proving ground for a permanent museum honoring Franklin and her family.My aunt used to always talk about having a Franklin family museum,Ž Franklins niece, Sabrina Owens, told The Associated Press. Thats not on the immediate horizon, but I thought this would be a good start to it.ŽThe first show aims to capture and celebrate Franklins life in an intimate space thats designed to change and offer surprises over time „ much like its subject did.This mirrors the way she was „ keep on adding things to a collection, giving people something different to look forward to „ just goes along with who she was as a person,Ž Owens said. She just always wanted to change, keep herself relevant.ŽIn addition to the candy-apple red shoes, the exhibit includes a replica of the matching red dress she wore at the visitation. It also features video from various perfor-mances and appearances. Visitors are greeted by a large video monitor with three clips playing on a loop, including her scene-stealing turn sing-ing ThinkŽ in the film The Blues Brothers.ŽFranklin exhibit debuts with eye toward her legacytraffic by late 2022. Electronic message boards and detour signs will be posted to alert drivers. Flaggers will be present. Bad weather or other unforeseen circumstances could delay or prolong work.Work on Sections 3A and 3B began in October, 2017 and is scheduled to finish in spring of 2020. This 3-mile stretch of non-tolled road improve-ments includes widening SR 46 and U.S. 441 to six lanes, adding sidewalks and making other pedestrian improvements, and building a flyover ramp for the heavy traffic that will be trying to get to the parkway. Contact Mary Brooks, public information officer at 407-694-5505 or via email at info@wekivapark-way.com. Please visit www.wekivaparkway.com for project informa-tion, and follow the project on Facebook and Twitter for real-time updates.Authorized by the 2004 Wekiva Parkway and Protection Act, parkway development has included conserving more than 3,400 acres of land. The parkway will include four expansive wildlife bridges and will be largely elevated to reduce accidents between vehicles and wildlife. CLOSURESFrom Page A3

PAGE 5

DailyCommercial.com | Monday, September 24, 2018 A5

PAGE 6

A6 Monday, September 24, 2018 | DailyCommercial.comBy Nasser Karimi and Jon GambrellThe Associated PressTEHRAN, Iran „ Irans president on Sunday accused an unnamed U.S.-allied country in the Persian Gulf of being behind a terror attack on a military parade that killed 25 people and wounded 60, further rais-ing regional tensions.Hassan Rouhanis comments came as Irans Foreign Ministry also summoned Western diplomats over them allegedly providing havens for the Arab separatists who claimed Saturdays attacks in the southwestern city of Ahvaz.The Iranian moves, as well as promises of revenge by Irans elite Revolutionary Guard, come as the country already faces turmoil in the wake of the American withdraw from Tehrans nuclear deal with world powers. The attack in Ahvaz, which saw women and children flee with uniformed soldiers blood-ied, has further shaken the country.Rouhanis remarks could refer to Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates or Bahrain „ close U.S. military allies that view Iran as a regional menace over its support for militant groups across the Middle East.All of those small mer-cenary countries that we see in this region are backed by America. It is Americans who instigate them and provide them with necessary means to commit these crimes,Ž Rouhani said before leav-ing for the U.N. General Assembly in New York.Iran meanwhile summoned diplomats from Britain, Denmark and the Netherlands early Sunday for allegedly harboring members of the terrorist groupŽ that launched the attack. Danish Foreign Minister Anders Samuelsen condemned the attack and stressed that there would be con-sequencesŽ if it turns out that those respon-sible have connections to Denmark.The ministry later summoned the UAEs envoy as well over what it called the irresponsible and insulting statementsŽ of an Emirati adviser, according to the semi-official ISNA news agency. The UAE did not immediately acknowledge the summons.Saturdays attack, in which militants dis-guised as soldiers opened fire on an annual Iranian military parade in Ahvaz, was the deadliest attack in the country in nearly a decade. Women and chil-dren scattered along with once-marching Revolu-tionary Guard soldiers as heavy gunfire rang out, the chaos captured live on state television.The regions Arab sepa-ratists, once only known for nighttime attacks on unguarded oil pipelines, claimed responsibility for the assault, and Iranian officials appeared to believe the claim. The separatists accuse Irans Persian-dominated government of discriminating against its ethnic Arab minority. Khuzestan province also has seen recent protests over Irans nationwide drought, as well as eco-nomic protests.The attack killed at least 25 people and wounded 60, according to the state-run IRNA news agency. It said gunmen wore military uniforms and targeted a riser where military and police commanders were sitting. State TV hours later reported that all four gunmen had been killed.At least eight of the dead served in the Revo-lutionary Guard, an elite paramilitary unit that answers only to Irans supreme leader, according to the semi-official Tasnim news agency. The Guard responded to the attack on Sunday, warn-ing it would seek deadly and unforgiving revenge in the near future.ŽTensions have been on the rise in Iran since the Trump administration pulled out of the 2015 nuclear accord with Iran in May and began restor-ing sanctions that were eased under the deal. It also has steadily ramped up pressure on Iran to try to get it to stop what Washington calls its malign activitiesŽ in the region.Iran president blames US after attackA woman takes her children to shelter as an army member tries to help them, during a shooting at a military parade marking the 38th anniversary of Iraqs 1980 invasion of Iran, Saturday in the southwestern city of Ahvaz, Iran. [FATEMEH RAHIMAVIAN/FARS NEWS AGENCY VIA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

PAGE 7

DailyCommercial.com | Monday, September 24, 2018 A7system will be seamless.Earlier this year, Lake EMS began taking steps towards integration by cancelling contracts with other providers and slowly moving into county operations.According to Smith, this mostly meant getting Lake Countys Human Resources department to prepare Lake EMS employ-ees to switch over, carrying out an orientation and setting up each employee to begin receiving updated benefits and paychecks.Any real transition is going to be on the adminis-trative side, and thats been going very smoothly,Ž Smith said. All of our employees have completed orientation to become Board of County Commis-sioners employees.ŽSmith said that the months of preparation include vacating their cur-rent offices and moving to a new site in the County Administration building in Tavares. Lake EMS in April moved to terminate its building lease in Mount Dora.Smith said that nearly everything has already been put in place for the move, and they even decided to keep the name Lake EMS to assure people that the same people serving them on September 30 are the people serving them after October 1.If you do a name change, they think the people are changing,Ž Smith said. But the people arent changing.ŽThings will largely be the same, Smith said, with improved services in the future and a new deployment plan under development.Lake EMS will join the rest of Lake Countys Public Safety offices in getting a new computerassisted dispatch system in September, but that process can take between 12 and 18 months to see the software integrated.The change nearest from the transition date will be Lake County Fire and Rescue joining EMS in ambulance operations.Fire and Rescue will add an ambulance in Astor next year, and hopes to supplement the work of Lake EMS in rural areas.According to Smith, Fire and Rescues rural operations will allow EMS to better serve urban regions.Services aside, employ-ees will only see small but significant adjustments.Primarily the new, more comprehensive benefits package and an alternate payday, as Lake EMS and the Board of County Commissioners send out checks on different weeks.Lake Emergency Medi-cal Services was originally created out of the dissolution of Lake-Sumter EMS, a joint venture between Lake and Sumter Coun-ties to provide emergency medical services to both counties.When Sumter pulled out of the agreement in 2011, Lake County decided to keep the pro-gram running, as it was still cost-effective.The transition to dissolve Lake EMS and bring the service under the county umbrella came after a consulting agency spent 20 months starting in 2016 surveying potential alternatives.Integration was found to be the best option for the future, with potential savings of $500,000 in the first year. EMSFrom Page A1 The New Yorker said 53-year-old Deborah Ramirez described the incident in an interview after being contacted by the magazine. Ramirez recalled that Kavanaugh exposed himself at a drunken dormitory party, thrust his penis in her face, and caused her to touch it without her consent as she pushed him away, the magazine reported.In a statement pro-vided by the White House, Kavanaugh said the event did not happenŽ and that the allegation was a smear, plain and simple.Ž A White House spokeswoman added in a second statement that the allegation was designed to tear down a good man.ŽThe New Yorker said it contacted Ramirez after learning of a possible involvement in an incident with Kavanaugh and that the allegation came to Democratic sena-tors through a civil rights lawyer. She had been considering speaking to the magazine for at least a week. Meanwhile, Repub-licans were pressing for a swift hearing and a vote.The magazine reported that Ramirez was reluctant at first to speak publicly partly because her memories contained gaps because she had been drinking at the time of the alleged incident.Ž She also acknowledged reluctance to characterize Kavanaughs role in the alleged incident with certainty.ŽThe magazine reported that after six days of carefully assessing her memories and consulting with her attorney, Ramirez said that she felt confident enough of her recollec-tionsŽ to recall the incident.The new information came hours after the Senate committee agreed to a date and time for a hearing after nearly a week of uncertainty over whether Ford would appear to tell her story.The agreement and the latest accusation set the stage for a dramatic show-down as Kavanaugh and Ford each tell their side of the story. The develop-ments could also determine the fate of Kavanaughs confirmation, which hangs on the votes of a handful of senators.It had seemed assured before Ford, a 51-year-old California college professor, went public a week ago with her allegation that Kavanaugh assaulted her at a party when they were in high school.Kavanaugh, 53, an appel-late court judge, has denied Fords allegation and said he wanted to testify as soon as possible to clear his name.Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, wrangled with Fords lawyers for the last week over the exact terms of her appear-ance. She made several requests, some of which were accommodated „ a Thursday hearing, three days later than originally scheduled, and a smaller hearing room with less press access to avoid a media circus, for example. Grassleys staff also agreed to let Ford testify without Kavanaugh in the room, for there to be only one camera in the room, adequateŽ breaks and a high security presence.The committee said it would not negotiate on other points, though, including Fords desire for additional witnesses and a request to testify after, not before, Kavanaugh.As with any witness who comes before the Senate, the Senate Judiciary Committee cannot hand over its constitutional duties to attorneys for outside witnesses,Ž Mike Davis, Grassleys top nomi-nations counsel, wrote in an email exchange with Fords lawyers obtained by The Associated Press. The committee determines which witnesses to call, how many witnesses to call, in what order to call them, and who will question them. These are non-negotiable.ŽFords lawyers said it was still unclear who will ask questions, as Republi-cans were trying to hire an outside female counsel who could take over the ques-tioning. The 11 senators on the GOP side of the dais are all men, which could send an unwanted message on live television against the backdrop of the #MeToo era. They could also use Republican staff attorneys on the committee.Democratic senators were expected to ask their own questions.We were told no decision has been made on this important issue, even though various senators have been dismissive of her account and should have to shoulder their responsibil-ity to ask her questions,Ž the attorneys for Ford said in a statement.As he builds a case for his innocence, Kavanaugh plans to turn over to the committee calendars from the summer of 1982 that dont show a party consistent with Fords description of the gathering in which she says he attacked her, The New York Times reported Sunday. The newspaper reported that it had examined the calendars and noted they list basketball games, movie outings, football workouts, college interviews, and a few parties with names of friends other than those identified by Ford.A person working on Kavanaughs confirmation confirmed the Times account to The Associated Press. The person spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss the matter.Earlier Sunday, Sen. Lindsey Graham, a South Carolina Republican on the Senate Judiciary Commit-tee, said lawyers for Ford were contesting two GOP conditions „ that Ford and Kavanaugh would be the only witnesses and that an independent counsel would ask the questions. KAVANAUGHFrom Page A1

PAGE 8

A8 Monday, September 24, 2018 | DailyCommercial.comin 2004, when the star ranted about black moth-ers, clothing choices and language.That for me was kind of an emotional „ I wont say reckoning „ but it made me reposition how I felt about Bill Cosby as this figure within the larger representation of black leadership,Ž said McGuire, a 32-year-old education professor at Arizona State University.McGuires mindset reflects a broader generational divide over Cosby, who is scheduled to be sentenced Monday in a Philadelphia courtroom for drugging and molesting a woman. The sentence „ anything from probation to 30 years in prison „ will mark the final chapter of the 81-year-old entertainers resounding fall from grace.Those who grew up viewing Cosbys NBC show struggle to reconcile the conviction with the wise, warm television father they knew. But many millennials see him as long-irrelevant figure, and the #MeToo era has cast him as some-one who was deservingly vanquished, like so many other misbehaving men in power.The generational gap plays a huge role in the contrasting, at times con-flicting, views of Cosbys cultural importance,Ž said Michael Eric Dyson, a sociologist at George-town University. Those of us who are older have memories of Cosby as a cultural ambassador, a black icon and an Ameri-can hero.ŽJon Francois, a 26-year-old radio deejay in Lyndonville, Vermont, was too young to have grown up with The Cosby Show.Ž But he became a fan as a child when he found his parents watching reruns on cable. He didnt see it as a rarity until he later com-pared the show to older sitcoms that depicted the black experience as more lower class. Cosbys Cliff Huxtable was a doctor and his wife, Clair, a lawyer in New York City.It wasnt until I got older and kind of studied The Cosby Show, that I realized Oh hey, this was a groundbreaking thing to have a black family portrayed like this as upper middle class.ŽWhen sexual assault allegations started to surface against Cosby in large numbers, Francois said, younger relatives were more objective about it. The claims by women were too much to ignore. But his mother and aunt had the hardest time believing the accusations.They were still stapled on the idea of Bill Cosby, the man they enjoyed and loved so much on TV, Americas dad, that they just didnt really want to acknowledge the fact that hes an alleged rapist,Ž Francois said.An underlying issue is the lack of humanizing portrayals of AfricanAmericans in popular media, he added.If anything, thats a serious indictment on the culture, that someone would feel losing Cosby is losing a positive repre-sentation of black folks,Ž he said.The entire ordeal leaves him with mixed emotions „ mostly sadness and disappointment.If all this sexual assault stuff didnt happen, he could have retired and went off into the sunset and had this great legacy left behind as a ground-breaking comedian-actor who paved the way for so many African-Ameri-cans,Ž Francois said. Its so surreal even now hes being convicted.Ž12 months since his last visit to the U.N., the president has jolted the global status quo by pulling out of the Iran nuclear deal, starting trade conflicts with China and the West and embracing Russias Vladimir Putin even as the investigation into the U.S. presidents ties to Moscow moves closer to the Oval Office.Long critical of the United Nations, Trump delivered a warning shot ahead of his arrival by declaring that the world body had not lived up toŽ its potential.Its always been sur-prising to me that more things arent resolved,Ž Trump said in a weekend video message, because you have all of these countries getting together in one location but it doesnt seem to get there. I think it will.ŽIf there is a through-line to the still-evolving Trump doctrine on for-eign policy, it is that the president will not subordinate American interests on the world stage, whether for economic, military or political gain.Nikki Haley, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, told reporters in a preview of Trumps visit, that the presidents focus will be very much on the United States,Ž its role and the relations it wants to build.He is looking forward to talking about foreign policy successes the United States has had over the past year and where were going to go from here,Ž she said. He wants to talk about protecting U.S. sovereignty,Ž while building relationships with nations that share those values.ŽIn his four-day visit to New York, Trump will deliver major speeches and meet with representa-tives of a world order that he has so often upended in the past year. Like a year ago, North Koreas nuclear threat will hover over the gathering, though its shadow may appear somewhat less ominous.The nuclear threat was sure to be on the agenda at Trumps first meeting, a dinner with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in Manhattan on Sunday night. Abe stands first among world leaders in cultivating a close rela-tionship with the president through displays of flattery that he has used to advance his efforts to influence the unpredictable American leader.On Monday afternoon, Trump planned to sit down with South Korean President Moon Jae-in, who comes bearing a per-sonal message to Trump from North Koreas Kim after their inter-Korean talks last week. Trump and Moon were expected to sign a new version of the U.S.-South Korean trade agreement, one of Trumps first successes in his effort to renegotiate trade deals on more favor-able terms for the U.S.Even so, some U.S. officials worry that South Koreas eagerness to restore relations with the North could reduce sanc-tions pressure on Kims government, hampering efforts to negotiate a nuclear accord.We have our eyes wide open,Ž Secretary of State Mike Pompeo told NBCs Meet the PressŽ on Sunday. There is a long ways to go to get Chairman Kim to live up to the commitment that he made to President Trump and, indeed, to the demands of the world in the U.N. Security Council resolutions to get him to fully denuclearize.ŽTrumps address to the General Assembly comes Tuesday, and on Wednes-day he will for the first time chair the Security Council, with the stated topic of non-proliferation of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons. The subject initially was to have been Iran, but that could have allowed Iranian President Hassan Rouhani to attend, creating a potentially awkward situ-ation for the U.S. leader.Aides say the president will also use the session to discuss North Korea and other proliferation issues. While Trump is not seeking a meeting with Rouhani, he is open to talking with the Iranian leader if Rouhani requests one, adminis-tration officials said.In meetings with European leaders as well as during the Security Council session, Trump plans to try to make the case that global compa-nies are cutting ties with Iran ahead of the reim-position in five weeks of tough sanctions against Tehran. The penalties are a result of Trumps decision to withdraw the U.S. from the 2015 Iran nuclear deal.Trump at the time cited Irans role as a malign force in the region, par-ticularly its support of terrorist groups, but also its involvement in Syria. U.S. officials say their priority for the region now is removing Iranian forces from Syria.Trump is also expected to deliver a fresh warning to Syrias Bashar al-Assad that the use of chemical weapons against civilians in the major rebel stronghold of Idlib would have serious repercussions. Britain and France are actively planning a military response should Assad use chemical weapons again, according to U.S. officials.I think hes got a couple major possibilities really to help illuminate for the American people what Americas place in the world,Ž national security adviser John Bolton told Fox News Channels Sunday Morning Futures,Ž pre-viewing Trumps U.N. appearance.Bolton, like Pompeo, is part of a far more hawk-ish national security team than the one that surrounded Trump a year ago.Meetings on the side-lines of the General Assembly often come in rapid succession, a wearying test for even the most experienced foreign policy team. Trump has a robust schedule during his stay in New York, including meetings with Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, French President Emmanuel Macron, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and British Prime Minister Theresa May. But while some world leaders are still reeling from Trumps deference to Putin in their summer Helsinki summit, there will not be an encore in New York: The Russian president is not expected to attend the proceedings. COSBYFrom Page A1 TRUMPFrom Page A1Bill Cosby faces anything from probation to 30 years in prison on the three felony counts of aggravated indecent assault. [MATT ROURKE/ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO] We have our eyes wide open ... There is a long ways to go to get Chairman Kim to live up to the commitment that he made to President Trump and, indeed, to the demands of the world in the U.N. Security Council resolutions to get him to fully denuclearize.ŽMike Pompeo, Secretary of State

PAGE 9

DailyCommercial.com | Monday, September 24, 2018 A9HAVE YOUR SAYWe welcome signed letters and guest columns. Letters should not exceed 300 words and columns should not exceed 500 words. Columns need to include a recent headshot of the writer. We edit for length, clarity, and grammar. Mail: Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 Email: letters@dailycommercial.com Fax: 352-365-1951 The ongoing debate over guns in America has led some to vociferously call for abolishing the Second Amendment. Thats just not wise thinking. There are common-sense restrictions on guns that fall within the scope of the Second Amendment. So theres no need to even consider abolishing it. Nevertheless, calls for abolishing the Second Amendment are coming from such respected figures like retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens. And a new poll shows that about 20 percent of Americans favor repealing the Second Amendment. In reality, that probably shouldnt be a surprising statistic. There are actually Americans, after all, who regularly support restrictions on speech that would not be allowed under the First Amendment. So, of course, there will always be a fringe minority out there yapping for scrapping the Second Amendment. Or the Third Amendment. Or the Fourth Amendment. Or the ... You get the point. Fortunately, the anti-Second Amendment extremists have little support in Washington; even blue-state Democrats like Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California have made clear they support gun ownership for self-defense and hunting. Whats even more striking is that noted, liberal-leaning Harvard law professor Laurence Tribe has also dismissed the campaign to abolish the Second Amendment. In a piece for The Washington Post, Tribe wrote that the Second Amendment isnt the problem; in fact, Tribe declared, repealing the Second Amendment would not limit a single gun or enact a single regulation. The fact is abolishing the Second Amendment isnt necessary because the Supreme Court has already set some reasonable parameters. In the Supreme Courts historic 2008 Heller decision that underlined an individuals right to bear arms, the court also noted that right wasnt unlimited „ and that certain classes of dangerous and unusualŽ weapons could be limited. The court has also allowed limits on assault weapons, large magazines and the number of weapons that can be stockpiled. Thats why instead of abolishing the Second Amendment, the focus should be on reducing the ability of Americans to use military-style weapons to kill innocent fellow citizens. The focus should also be on restricting the ability of mentally ill people „ and those with histories of domestic violence „ to have easy access to firearms; clearly more safeguards must be built in to immediately red-flagŽ such Americans whenever they try to purchase weapons. There is certainly widespread support for that kind of proactive approach. In a recent poll, 85 percent even voiced support for letting the police take guns away from people deemed dangerous „ and at least five states have such laws in place. Gun advocates like to criticize the 1994 ban on assault weapons for its emphasis on cosmetic features; they deride it as a naive and unrealistic law designed by people who know nothing about guns. For example, the 1994 law defined assault weapons based on such features as pistol grips. In an opinion piece, Palm Beach County criminologist Thomas Gabor said such poor standards of definition have undermined attempts to strictly regulate assault weapons because the gun industry can easily make cosmetic modifications to skirt the regulation.Ž Gabor has proposed a more realistic definition of assault weapons that takes an objective, scientific approach based on lethality „ as well as relevant factors like caliber, muzzle velocity, rate of fire, capacity and design flexibility. Thats a reasonable idea. And its a far more palatable idea than the harebrained suggestion that its time for America to abolish the Second Amendment. The Florida Times-Union in Jacksonville is a GateHouse Media newspaperANOTHER OPINIONNo need to scrap Second Amendment ANOTHER OPINION As a Catholic, as a woman and as the daughter of a woman who suffers from past clergy sexual abuse, I share in the pain that the Pennsylvania Grand Jury Report has brought to our faith community. As I have been reading through the report, released last month, I am horrified that the jury was able to point to over 300 priests committing sexual crimes, and over 1,000 victims that the Catholic Diocese of Pennsylvania failed to handle appropriately over the last 70 years. What I am most angry about has been the ecclesial response of my bishops. What I am disheartened about is the response of the faithful. What I am in shock about is the lack of federal reaction. The response from the bishops in Pennsylvania and the wider Catholic ecclesial body has been superficial at best. Several bishops, some of whom were implicated in the report for aiding the mishandling of criminal activity, have asked for our forgiveness, for our prayers and to join them in fasting as an outward sign of a penitential attitude. The response of the faithful is not much better. I have seen several lay ministers and groups run by laity who rightfully feel moved by these accusations fall short of doing anything meaningful. They have organized meetings to discuss how bishops can incorporate independent investigations that deal with sexual abuse crimes. However, I doubt the sincerity of any independent investigation that will report to a bishop. The laity have participated in masses held for the victims where parishioners pray for their healing and the justice they are due. However, I have yet to see a significant sacramental gesture where the victims are invited to the mass. I have yet to see any church leaders offer to wash the feet of anyone they have hurt „ the feet of my mom, who was sexually abused by A. Joseph Maskell, the former chaplain at Archbishop Keough High School in Baltimore and subject of the Netflix crime saga The Keepers.Ž Our Congress has sorely let us down also. The covering up of child sexual abuse and the subsequent transport of criminals across state borders is a federal crime. Political leaders like Mark Rozzi, a Pennsylvania Democrat and also a victim, are truly carrying the cross uphill as they fight for reform on the statute of limitations laws, which limit the amount of time persons have to file criminal charges against anyone accused of committing such a crime. The response of sorrow is rightly placed. However, the victims of the Catholic Church do not need your prayers. Prayers are great, but when my mother, who has suffered ongoing physical and psychological damage from her experience, sees so many people speaking out against the actions of the bishops, it fills her with an affirming feeling. However, as time goes on, and other news stories take over, the support seems to wane. So she is left reliving the trauma of thinking nobody cares. Praying for justice is not a theologically sound action. Jesus did tell us The kingdom is comingŽ; he also said, the kingdom is here, repent and believe.Ž If we are to live in the kingdom together, Christians must take action. We have repented, now it is time to believe and act. In my opinion, the laity can take three meaningful, though radical, steps. First, they need to tell the bishops: No more.Ž That means meeting with them and refusing to hear apologies that consist of words alone. Secondly, it means refusing to give to the collection plate until you have seen real change. Finally, everyone must call their state and federal representatives and tell them to take action by abolishing the statute of limitations on sexual abuse crimes and to ask Congress to hold hearings with the leaders of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. It is entirely possible that the church is gambling with every citizens right to freedom of religion when, time after time, they refuse to properly handle sexual abuse committed by their clergy. If they cant clean up their own house, the government will. Jerri Von Den Bosch wrote this for The Baltimore Sun.ANOTHER OPINIONThree radical steps to change the Catholic ChurchBert and Ernie are not gay. That I even have to say this is the problem, not the actual fact that they arent. This week, long-time Sesame Street writer Mark Saltzman revealed that he wrote Bert and Ernies relationship as that of a loving coupleŽ and based it on his own relationship with film editor Arnold Glassman. Soon after, Sesame Workshop took to Twitter with a denial „ not just of Bert and Ernies romantic relationship but of the very concept of sexual orientation for puppets. Im with them. It always seemed evident to me that Bert and Ernie were not gay because of the way they dressed. Clearly, neither of them would have fit in on Queer Eye for the Straight Guy. (Though Kermit might be the Muppet most likely to be the target of a questionable #MeToo accusation from you-know-who.) Have I offended you with the non-PC references yet? Christine, how dare you suggest that gay men must be well-dressed? And that not-so-veiled reference to Miss Piggy and the possibility that shed lie? How dare you! Puppets must be believed! Im obviously joking. Frankly, I find it easier to laugh about the topic than to take it seriously. Of course, Bert and Ernie arent gay. Theyre just sweet, nebbish little animated socks who had to split the rent on a fourthfloor walk-up. But these days, we need to worry about the backstories and implications of everything, from Supreme Court nominees to animated socks. There is no question that Sesame Street has been on the cutting edge of diversity and inclusivity since the beginning. Over the years, the show included characters that reflect different demographics, such as Julia the autistic Muppet, and Muppets who had accents (other than the Count because there isnt a huge lobby for Transylvanians in the U.S.) and Muppets whose parents were divorced. From the beginning, the human characters, such as Maria and Gordon and Mr. Hooper, were of different ethnicities, and some of the vignettes were in Spanish, which was very exotic for 1969, when the show started. Teaching kids from an early age that everything and everyone has value is, unquestionably, one of the most positive lessons Sesame Street can impart on its viewers. But Sesame Street is not „ and should not be „ in the business of helping kids explore their sexuality. Its always been a show geared to the youngest of the young, the toddler set who were too tiny to really understand sex at all. No 3or 4or 5-yearold should have to deal with a topic that will cause them decades of angst later in life. Children shouldnt be forced to acknowledge their sexuality as toddlers. Thats not a burden that should be placed on their young shoulders. I call it burdenŽ not because we should have a negative view of different forms of sexuality, but because children should not have to think about those concepts while trying to figure out what number comes after 7Ž or what letter comes after K.Ž Im tired of adults turning childhood into some version of The Real Housewives of Sesame Street. Reality is a good thing, but children should be able to suspend it for the first few, sweet years. Making Bert and Ernies sexual orientation an issue deprives Sesame Streets prime audience of living an unencumbered childhood. The creator of the Muppets, Frank Oz, has denied that the pair are gay. The LGBTQ community is angry. To that I say, just wait. The kids will learn about those other letters soon enough. Christine M. Flowers is a lawyer and columnist for the Philadelphia Daily News. Readers may send her email at cflowers1961@gmail.com.ANOTHER OPINIONBert, Ernie arent supposed to teach LGBTQ OPINIONSteve Skaggs | Publisher Tom McNiff | Executive Editor Whitney Lehnecker | Digital Editor, Lifestyles Editor Tom McNiff, editor 352-365-8250 tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com

PAGE 10

A10 Monday, September 24, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com

PAGE 11

DailyCommercial.com | Monday, September 24, 2018 B1 SPORTSPaul Jenkins, Sports editor 352-365-8204 paul.jenkins@dailycommercial.comMiami uses trick plays to stay unbeaten, keep Raiders winlessBy Steven WineAP Sports WriterMIAMI „ Receiver Albert Wilson threw a 52-yard touchdown pass to put the Miami Dolphins ahead midway through the fourth quarter, and then turned a short reception into a 74-yard score that sealed a 28-20 vic-tory over the Oakland Raiders on Sunday.Miami coach Adam Gase used creative play-calling to overcome a wave of injuries and penalties, and a 17-minute deficit in time of possession. The Dolphins scored on a pair of shovel passes by Ryan Tan-nehill that each traveled less than a yard „ one on the flip to Wilson, and an earlier similar pass that Jakeem Grant caught before turning the corner for an 18-yard score.Thanks to all the flashy plays, the Dolphins are 3-0 for only the third time since 1998. The Raiders, led by first-year coach Jon Gruden, are 0-3 for the first time since 2014, when they started 0-10.Oakland outgained the Dol-phins, and Derek Carr threw for 345 yards. But Xavien Howard intercepted him twice deep in Miami territory, and the Dolphins mounted a first-half goal line stand to stay in the game.Trickery gave the Dolphins their first lead in the fourth quarter. Tannehill handed off to Frank Gore, who tossed the ball to Wilson on an end-around. Wilson „ a quarterback in high school „ then lobbed the first pass of his career to a wide-open Grant, who outmaneuvered two Raiders to the end zone.Following Howard's second interception, Wilson Dolphins down Raiders 28-20Miami Dolphins tight end Mike Gesicki (86) hoists up wide receiver Jakeem Grant (19) after Grant scored a touch down during the second half of an NFL football game against the Oakland Raiders on Sunday in Miami Gardens, Fla. [AP PHOTO/ LYNNE SLADKY] By Fred Goodall The Associated PressTAMPA „ So much for strug-gling without Jameis Winston.The Tampa Bay Buccaneers are not only thriving in the sus-pended quarterbacks absence, theyre evolving into an offen-sive juggernaut thats set to perform on a national stage when the Pittsburgh Steelers visit Monday night.Thanks to Ryan Fitzpatrick and a talented collection of playmakers that include DeSean Jackson, Mike Evans, O.J. Howard and Chris Godwin, the Bucs (2-0) are off to their best start in eight years and have the NFLs top-ranked offense.The Steelers (0-1-1) are not far behind at No. 2, however inconsistency on defense has Ben Roethlisberger and Co. winless through two weeks.I respect what theyve done. Im not so sure Im surprised,Ž Steelers coach Mike Tomlin said of Tampa Bays emergence with wins against the New Orleans Saints and the reigning Super Bowl champion Philadelphia Eagles.Theyve done it with Fitzpat-rick, a 35-year-old journeyman who has thrown TD passes for seven NFL franchises, deliver-ing the best two games of his career.Man, hes got some explosive weapons. Hes stepping in for Winston, but Fitz is not a step-in guy. This guy has started in multiple cities,Ž Tomlin said.Weve seen him extensively in Cincinnati and Buffalo. Hes a smart guy, Ivy Leagueeducated, always made good decisions. Thats why hes been able to sustain himself and play for the length of time that hes played.ŽWhat once looked as if it might be a potentially disas-trous stretch to open the season with Winston suspended three games for violating the NFLs personal conduct policy suddenly is an opportunity for the teams first 3-0 start since 2005.Very encouraging for a franchise that has missed the playoffs 10 consecutive seasons, the second-longest drought in the league behind the Cleveland Browns (15).Fitzpatrick believes hes playing the best football of his career. But, I mean, its early. Con-sistency is the biggest thing,Ž the 14th-year pro said. Trying to stay consistent with a high level of performance and just continue to try to win games.ŽAs well as things are coming together for the Bucs, though, its been rocky times for the struggling Steelers, off to their Bucs will show o weapons against Steelers Franks to Swain becoming dangerous combo for GatorsBy Pat DooleyGateHouse Media GroupKNOXVILLE, Tenn. „ If there is one thing that is clear about the 2018 Florida football team, it is that Freddie Swain is the big-play receiver.Last week it was a punt return for a touchdown and a TD catch. This week against Tennessee, Swain caught a pair of passes for 88 yards.The second was something special.As Feleipe Franks rolled to his right after the pocket broke down, Swain kept rolling with him.It was a good job by Fred-die just getting open,Ž Franks said. We talk all the time about the scramble rules. If I roll to my right, just go with me. He did a great job getting to the sidelines.ŽFranks spotted Swain sprinting toward the right sideline alone. He launched a perfect pass and Swain turned quickly to stay in bounds.Swain got a block and then sprinted toward paydirt. He finished it off with a dive to get into the end zone to finish off a 65-yard touchdown play and give Florida a 23-3 lead in the second quarter.UFs Swain is a big-play guy See GATORS, B3 See BUCS, B3 See DOLPHINS, B3Woods takes Tour Championship for rst victory in more than 5 years; Rose captures FedEx CupBy Doug FergusonThe Associated PressATLANTA „ A comeback not even Tiger Woods saw coming a year ago.A chaotic celebration that golf hasnt seen even in the best of times.Woods delivered the perfect ending to his amazing return from four back surgeries on Sunday with a performance that felt like the old days. He left the compe-tition feeling hopeless as he built a five-shot lead early and hung on to win the Tour Championship.Woods raised both arms over his head after he tapped in for par and a 1-over 71 for a two-shot victory over Billy Horschel, the 80th victory of his PGA Tour career and his first in more than five years.It was a grind out there,Ž Woods said. I loved every bit of it.ŽIt felt like a coronation coming down the 18th green after he hit his second shot to the par 5 safely in a bunker in front of the green. The crowd came through the ropes and walked behind him, just like that walk from the left side of the 18th fairway when he won the Masters in 1997, and when the enormous gallery of Chicago followed after him when he won the Western Open that summer. They chased after any inch of grass they could find to watch the ending.This felt just as big as a major, maybe better consid-ering where Woods had been.I didnt want to get run over,Ž Woods said with a laugh.A champion again Tiger Woods celebrates after winning the Tour Championship on Sunday in Atlanta. [JOHN AMIS/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]See TOUR, B3Florida wide receiver Freddie Swain followed his productive game against Colorado State last week with a 65-yard scoring pass play off a toss from Feleipe Franks on Saturday against Tennessee. [CYNDI CHAMBERS/CORRESPONDENT/FILE]

PAGE 12

B2 Monday, September 24, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com SCOREBOARD HOW TO REACH USPaul Jenkins, Sports Editor Email: paul.jenkins@dailycommercial.com Phone: 352-365-8204SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results by calling 352-365-8204. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. Results submitted after 9:30 p.m. may not appear in the next days edition of the Daily Commercial.SPORTS ON TVSPORTS ON TV MLB BASEBALL 7 p.m. SUN „ N.Y. Yankees at Tampa Bay FS-Florida „ Miami at Washington 8 p.m. MLB „ Regional coverage, Milwaukee at St. Louis OR Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs 11 p.m. MLB „ Regional coverage, Oakland at Seattle OR L.A. Dodgers at Arizona (games joined in progress) NFL FOOTBALL 8:15 p.m. ESPN — Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay (Note: ESPN Deportes simulcast on ESPN2) SPORTS BRIEFSNo. 11 Florida volleyball team sweeps MSUThe Florida volleyball team ran its winning streak to seven straight matches while posting back-to-back sweeps for the first time this season, as the Gators took care of Mississippi State with a 25-12, 25-21, 25-14 win before a crowd of 2,650 Sunday in the OConnell Center. No. 11 UF, which swept Ole Miss on Friday, improved to 11-3 overall and 2-0 in Southeastern Conference play while the Bulldogs fell to 4-11, 0-2. Paige Hammons had a match-high and career-best tying 11 kills with no errors en route to a match-high hitting percentage of .550, adding a pair of service aces for a match-high 13.5 points, while libero Allie Gregory had 11 digs to go with a match-high three aces. The highlights of this match would have to be the continuing performance of Paige Hammons … especially her offensive numbers … and the way Allie Gregory took control over the backcourt defense,Ž coach Mary Wise said. At the end of the season, well look back and go That was the weekend that we should win these matches because were at home and its early season as young teams are still trying to find their way. We play both these teams a month from now when theyre older, more experienced and theyre playing at home. They will look very different.Ž Also having solid matches for UF were senior middle blocker Taelor Kellum and redshirt sophomore Mia Sokolowski, each with eight kills, with the latter hit-ting a hefty .545.BLACKSBURG, VA.Virginia Tech dismisses DE Hill from teamVirginia Tech has dismissed junior defensive end Trevon Hill from the football team.Coach Justin Fuente made the announcement Sunday, saying Hill has failed to uphold the high standards that we have for our student-athletes.ŽHill had 11 tackles in three games for the Hokies (2-1), including six tackles and 1 sacks on Saturday night in their 49-35 loss at Old Dominion. Hill is the third defensive stalwart dismissed from the program since last season, joining defensive backs Adonis Alexander (academics) and Mook Reynolds (team rules violation). Virginia Tech plays at Duke on Saturday.CHICAGOCubs Bryant sidelined by shoulder fatigueCubs third baseman Kris Bryant is out of the start-ing lineup because of fatigue in his left shoulder.The 26-year-old was on the disabled list from July 26 to Sept. 1 with left shoulder inflammation. He missed time earlier in the season with the same issue.Manager Joe Maddon says Bryants shoulder is a little bit fatigued, not hurting, just fatigued.Ž Maddon says he wants to be proactive with the 2016 NL MVP.Bryant went 1 for 5 in Chicagos 8-3 victory over the crosstown White Sox on Saturday night. He is batting.276 with 12 homers and 49 RBIs in a career-low 96 games this year.David Bote started at third Sunday against the White Sox.VILAMOURA, PORTUGALLewis wins Portugal Masters for 2nd time Tom Lewis won the Portugal Masters for a second time after shooting a 5-under 66 in Sundays final round.Lewis finished three strokes ahead of fellow Eng-lishman Eddie Pepperell (67) and Australias Lucas Herbert (71).Sergio Garcia prepared for the Ryder Cup next weekend with a 65 to finish seven strokes behind Lewis.Lewis made six birdies along with a single bogey on No. 10 to finish the tournament at Dom Pedro Victoria Golf Course on 22-under 262.Herbert led through the first three rounds only to struggle on the final day. He hit a double bogey on the final hole to finish the round on par.Lewis had trailed Herbert by nine shots after the first round.Its been a rough ride but this week I played hard,Ž Lewis said. I obviously got off to a bad start, to finish the way Ive been finishing has been brilliant.Ž Lewis first won the tournament in 2011.I think this one means more,Ž Lewis said, it means a lot to come and win this again.Ž The Associated Press ODDS PREGAME.COM LINEMAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL Today National LeagueFAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE At Washington -240 Miami +220 At Chicago -160 Pittsburgh +150 At St. Louis -135 Milwaukee +125 At Colorado -135 Philadelphia +125 Los Angeles -165 At Arizona +155 At San Francisco -130 San Diego +120American LeagueHouston -195 At Toronto +180 At Tampa Bay Off New York Off At Boston -240 Baltimore +220 Cleveland -250 At Chicago +220 At Los Angeles -165 Texas +155 At Seattle -120 Oakland +110 COLLEGE FOOTBALL ThursdayFAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG At Miami 21 19 Off N. CarolinaFridayMemphis 11 13 Off At Tulane At Colorado 10 11 Off UCLASaturdayAt Buffalo 5 7 Off Army At UConn 25 25 Off Cincinnati At Mich. State 25 27 Off Cent. Mich. At E. Michigan 2 3 Off N. Illinois At Ball State 8 7 Off Kent State At Wake Forest 24 25 Off Rice At East Carolina 5 6 Off Old Dominion At Georgia Tech 24 26 Off Bwlng Grn At Boston Col 16 17 Off Temple At Clemson 18 21 Off Syracuse At App State 21 21 Off S. Alabama At Duke 1 3 Off Virginia Tech La.-Monroe 6 6 Off At Ga. State At Ohio Off Off Off UMass At UCF 15 16 Off Pittsburgh South Carolina Pk 1 Off At Kentucky At NC State 10 8 Off Virginia Indiana 13 14 Off At Rutgers At Air Force 10 7 Off Nevada At Wash. State 1 1 Off Utah At Arizona State 20 21 Off Oregon State At Washington 18 17 Off BYU At Fresno State 11 10 Off Toledo At Miami (Ohio) 3 2 Off W. Michigan Florida State 4 5 Off At Louisville Ohio State 4 3 Off At Penn State Arkansas State 3 4 Off At Ga. Southrn At Georgia Off Off Off Tennessee At New Mexico Off Off Off Liberty At Auburn 31 29 Off Southern Miss At TCU 13 12 Off Iowa State At Alabama 53 49 Off La.-Lafayette At Oklahoma 27 27 Off Baylor At UTSA 11 11 Off UTEP Purdue 3 3 Off At Nebraska Texas 9 9 Off At Kan. State West Virginia 5 7 Off At Texas Tech At North Texas 7 8 Off La. Tech At UAB 15 16 Off Charlotte Oklahoma State 16 15 Off At Kansas Marshall 9 8 Off At W. Ky. At Miss. State 8 9 Off Florida At LSU 13 14 Off Mississippi At Troy 19 15 Off Cstl Carolina FAU 3 4 Off At Mid. Tenn. Southern Cal 4 5 Off At Arizona Boise State 16 16 Off At Wyoming Hawaii 13 13 Off At SJSU At Notre Dame 2 3 Off Stanford At Northwestern Off Off Off Michigan At Texas A&M 19 21 Off Arkansas Oregon 5 2 Off At CaliforniaNFL TodayFAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG Pittsburgh 2 1 54 at Tampa BayThursdayAt LA Rams 7 7 Off MinnesotaSundayat New England 9 8 Off Miami At Indianapolis Pk 2 Off Houston At Atlanta 5 6 Off Cincinnati At Green Bay 12 11 Off Buffalo At Dallas 4 4 Off Detroit At Jacksonville 8 7 Off NY Jets At Chicago 3 3 Off Tampa Bay Philadelphia 2 2 Off At Tennessee Seattle 3 3 Off At Arizona At Oakland 2 1 Off Cleveland At LA Chargers Off Off Off San Fran New Orleans 2 2 Off At NY Giants At Pittsburgh 3 3 Off BaltimoreMonday, Oct. 1Kansas City 3 4 Off At Denver Updated odds available at Pregame.com TRANSACTIONS BASEBALLNational LeagueST. LOUIS CARDINALS „ Recalled INF Edmundo Sosa from Memphis (PCL).HOCKEYNational Hockey LeagueARIZONA C OYOTES „ Assigned RW Brayden Burke, LW Adam Helewka, G Merrick Madsen and Cs Trevor Creek and Matteo Gennaro to Tucson (AHL). DALLAS STARS „ Assigned RWs Nick Caamano, Tony Calderone and Joel LEsperance; Gs Philippe Desrosiers and Colton Point; D Ben Gleason, Niklas Hansson, Chris Martenet and Ondrej Vala; and LW Adam Mascherin to Texas (AHL). Released RWs Sam Laberge, Colin Markison and Robbie Payne; D Shane Hanna and LW James Phelan from their amateur tryouts. LOS ANGELES KINGS „ Assigned to D Alex Lintuniemi and F Zack Mitchell to Ontario (AHL). MONTREAL CANADIENS „ Agreed to terms F Paul Byron on a four-year contract extension. NASHVILLE PREDATORS „ Assigned Fs Tanner Jeannot, Justin Kirkland, Zach Magwood, Tyler Moy, Carl Persson, Anthony Richard, Emil Pettersson and Yakov Trenin; D Frederic Allard, Filip Pyrochta, Jack Dougherty, Joonas Lyytinen and Alexandre Carrier; and Gr Miroslav Svoboda to Milwaukee (AHL). Released Fs Alex Overhardt, Jeremy Gregoire, Matt Lane and Mathieu Olivier; D Matt Donovan; and G Thomas McCollum from their professional tryout agreements. NEW JERSEY DEVILS „ Assigned D Jocktan Chainey to Halifax (QMJHL) and G Akira Schmid to Lethbridge (WHL).COLLEGEVIRGINIA TECH „ Dismissed junior DE Trevon Hill. GOLF PGA TOURTOUR CHAMPIONSHIPSundays leaders at East Lake Golf Club, Atlanta; Purse: $9 million. Yardage: 7,346; Par: 70 (35-35) FINAL ROUND Tiger Woods (2,000), $1,620,000 65-68-65-71„269 Billy Horschel (1,200), $972,000 71-65-69-66„271 Dustin Johnson (760), $621,000 69-70-67-67„273 Hideki Matsuyama (460), $372,000 72-66-71-65„274 Justin Rose (460), $372,000 66-67-68-73„274 Webb Simpson (460), $372,000 69-70-68-67„274 Rickie Fowler (330), $279,900 65-72-73-65„275 Rory McIlroy (330), $279,900 67-68-66-74„275 Xander Schauffele (330), $279,900 68-70-68-69„275 Justin Thomas (330), $279,900 67-69-70-69„275 Paul Casey (252), $225,450 68-71-66-71„276 Tommy Fleetwood (252), $225,450 69-69-70-68„276 Jon Rahm (252), $225,450 68-68-68-72„276 Gary Woodland (252), $225,450 66-72-68-70„276 Tony Finau (212), $190,800 67-71-67-72„277 Kyle Stanley (212), $190,800 69-68-67-73„277 Aaron Wise (212), $190,800 70-69-67-71„277 Jason Day (196), $180,000 68-73-69-68„278 Bryson DeChambeau (188), $176,400 71-75-66-67„279 Cameron Smith (180), $172,800 70-73-69-68„280 Patrick Cantlay (160), $163,800 71-65-76-69„281 Patton Kizzire (160), $163,800 71-71-68-71„281 Marc Leishman (160), $163,800 73-69-68-71„281 Francesco Molinari (160), $163,800 70-75-69-67„281 Kevin Na (142), $154,800 72-68-72-71„283 Keegan Bradley (133), $150,300 73-73-69-69„284 Brooks Koepka (133), $150,300 69-78-67-70„284 Patrick Reed (124), $147,600 72-74-72-71„289 Bubba Watson (118), $145,800 70-72-73-75„290 Phil Mickelson (112), $144,000 73-72-76-72„293 PGA TOUR CHAMPIONSSANFORD INTERNATIONALSundays leaders at Minnehaha Country Club, Sioux Falls, S.D. Purse: $1.8 million. Yardage: 6,729; Par: 70 (34-36) FINAL ROUND Steve Stricker, $270,000 63-67-67„197 Tim Petrovic, $144,000 68-68-65„201 Jerry Smith, $144,000 63-68-70„201 Brandt Jobe, $97,200 63-67-72„202 Kevin Sutherland, $97,200 65-70-67„202 Woody Austin, $64,800 69-64-70„203 Tom Gillis, $64,800 68-66-69„203 Kirk Triplett, $64,800 66-68-69„203 Olin Browne, $43,200 68-66-70„204 Joe Durant, $43,200 67-72-65„204 Paul Goydos, $43,200 64-70-70„204 Brian Henninger, $43,200 72-67-65„204 Rocco Mediate, $43,200 66-70-68„204 Glen Day, $32,400 68-71-66„205 Scott McCarron, $32,400 64-68-73„205 Duffy Waldorf, $32,400 66-70-69„205 Mike Goodes, $27,060 65-69-72„206 Tom Pernice Jr., $27,060 67-70-69„206 Wes Short, Jr., $27,060 66-67-73„206 Tommy Tolles, $20,109 67-73-67„207 Stephen Ames, $20,109 69-68-70„207 Tommy Armour III, $20,109 66-72-69„207 Jay Haas, $20,109 68-70-69„207 Lee Janzen, $20,109 64-70-73„207 Esteban Toledo, $20,109 68-69-70„207 David Toms, $20,109 67-71-69„207 Scott Dunlap, $13,995 69-72-67„208 Bob Estes, $13,995 65-71-72„208 Doug Garwood, $13,995 67-68-73„208 Kent Jones, $13,995 67-71-70„208 Billy Mayfair, $13,995 70-72-66„208 Mark OMeara, $13,995 70-68-70„208 Scott Parel, $13,995 66-70-72„208 Jesper Parnevik, $13,995 68-69-71„208 Larry Mize, $10,575 68-71-70„209 Colin Montgomerie, $10,575 67-71-71„209 Jeff Sluman, $10,575 71-67-71„209 Mark Walker, $10,575 67-71-71„209 Marco Dawson, $8,640 69-72-69„210 Carlos Franco, $8,640 70-69-71„210 Jerry Kelly, $8,640 68-74-68„210 Peter Lonard, $8,640 70-69-71„210 Jeff Maggert, $8,640 68-74-68„210 David McKenzie, $8,640 63-77-70„210 Paul Broadhurst, $5,940 69-70-72„211 Tom Byrum, $5,940 67-72-72„211 David Frost, $5,940 68-70-73„211 Todd Hamilton, $5,940 65-75-71„211 P.H. Horgan III, $5,940 68-72-71„211 John Huston, $5,940 65-76-70„211 Steve Jones, $5,940 67-70-74„211 Tom Lehman, $5,940 73-70-68„211 Corey Pavin, $5,940 67-73-71„211 Jay Don Blake, $4,320 73-70-69„212 Mike Small, $4,140 69-73-71„213 Clark Dennis, $3,780 70-71-73„214 Steve Pate, $3,780 69-73-72„214 Ken Tanigawa, $3,780 67-70-77„214 Billy Andrade, $3,150 67-76-72„215 Dan Forsman, $3,150 70-72-73„215 Scott Hoch, $3,150 74-73-68„215 Blaine McCallister, $3,150 71-73-71„215 Gary Hallberg, $2,430 68-75-73„216 Tom Kite, $2,430 69-77-70„216 Sandy Lyle, $2,430 71-74-71„216 Vijay Singh, $2,430 74-69-73„216 Fran Quinn, $1,980 70-73-74„217 Chris DiMarco, $1,746 72-74-72„218 Joey Sindelar, $1,746 72-70-76„218 Darren Clarke, $1,530 72-75-72„219 Chad Proehl, $1,530 72-75-72„219 Mark Brooks, $1,314 71-76-73„220 Robert Gamez, $1,314 73-72-75„220 John Harris, $1,188 73-76-74„223 Mark Calcavecchia, $1,116 69-76-80„225 Steve Lowery, $1,044 77-74-75„226EUROPEAN TOURPORTUGAL MASTERSSundays leaders at Dom Pedro Victoria Golf Club, Vilamoura, Portugal Purse: $2.35 million. Yardage: 7,146; Par: 71 FINAL ROUND Tom Lewis, England 72-63-61-66„262 Eddie Pepperell, England 64-66-68-67„265 Lucas Herbert, France 63-67-64-71„265 Soomin Lee, South Korea 67-69-67-64„267 Marcus Kinhult, Sweden 68-65-65-69„267 Shane Lowry, Ireland 64-69-68-67„268 Sergio Garcia, Spain 66-70-68-65„269 Ricardo Gouveia, Portugal 67-66-70-66„269 Kim Koivu, Finland 66-68-68-67„269 Raphael Jacquelin, France 66-68-67-68„269 Oliver Fisher, England 71-59-69-70„269 Chris Wood, England 72-66-66-66„270 Jason Scrivener, Australia 66-67-68-69„270 Pep Angles, Spain 70-65-65-70„270 Mikko Korhonen, Finland 66-69-64-71„270 ALSO Thorbjorn Olesen, Denmark 68-69-68-67„272 David Lipsky, United States 69-69-71-70„279WEB.COM TOURWEB.COM TOUR CHAMPIONSHIPSundays leaders at Atlantic Beach Country Club, Atlantic Beach, Fla. Purse: $1 million. Yardage: 6,849; Par: 71 (35-36) FINAL ROUND Denny McCarthy, $180,000 64-65-67-65„261 Lucas Glover, $108,000 64-64-68-69„265 Cameron Davis, $45,100 66-67-67-66„266 Ben Silverman, $45,100 63-68-67-68„266 Sepp Straka, $45,100 65-66-64-71„266 Cameron Tringale, $45,100 63-67-67-69„266 Chase Wright, $45,100 66-69-67-64„266 Chad Campbell, $23,333 67-68-68-64„267 Stephan Jaeger, $23,333 68-65-70-64„267 Chase Seiffert, $23,333 67-66-69-65„267 Kramer Hickok, $23,333 66-66-68-67„267 Nicholas Lindheim, $23,333 64-69-67-67„267 Curtis Luck, $23,333 67-65-64-71„267 Chris Paisley, $23,333 61-74-63-69„267 Adam Schenk, $23,333 67-65-67-68„267 Adam Svensson, $23,333 65-68-66-68„267 Roberto Daz, $14,500 69-66-64-69„268 Kevin Dougherty, $14,500 67-66-70-65„268 Fabin Gmez, $14,500 68-68-69-63„268 Wes Roach, $14,500 67-67-68-66„268 Erik Compton, $9,466 68-66-70-65„269 Matt Every, $9,466 64-68-70-67„269 Ben Kohles, $9,466 66-68-67-68„269 Justin Lower, $9,466 68-66-66-69„269 Henrik Norlander, $9,466 67-67-67-68„269 David Skinns, $9,466 65-69-70-65„269 Julian Suri, $9,466 68-68-66-67„269 Michael Thompson, $9,466 66-68-64-71„269 Roger Sloan, $7,050 65-72-66-67„270 Josh Teater, $7,050 67-68-70-65„270 Anders Albertson, $6,225 72-64-68-67„271 Talor Gooch, $6,225 70-66-65-70„271 Parker McLachlin, $6,225 71-65-68-67„271 Shawn Stefani, $6,225 68-64-68-71„271 Brett Drewitt, $5,225 65-68-67-72„272 Robert Garrigus, $5,225 73-64-66-69„272 David Hearn, $5,225 70-66-70-66„272 Mark Hubbard, $5,225 68-66-68-70„272 Mark Anderson, $4,400 68-68-71-66„273 Dylan Frittelli, $4,400 65-72-68-68„273 Brad Hop“ nger, $4,400 69-68-68-68„273 Dylan Meyer, $3,700 67-69-68-70„274 Bhavik Patel, $3,700 69-66-70-69„274 Conrad Shindler, $3,700 68-69-67-70„274 Willy Wilcox, $3,700 68-67-70-69„274 Brian Campbell, $2,940 69-68-69-69„275 Sebastian Cappelen, $2,940 67-70-67-71„275 Vince Covello, $2,940 69-66-68-72„275 Edward Loar, $2,940 69-66-69-71„275 Dan McCarthy, $2,940 68-69-66-72„275 John Merrick, $2,940 66-70-70-69„275 Jos de Jess Rodrguez, $2,940 64-70-72-69„275 Max Rottluff, $2,940 70-66-70-69„275 Peter Malnati, $2,710 74-62-70-70„276 Andres Romero, $2,710 67-68-70-71„276 Robert Streb, $2,710 67-70-70-69„276 Ben Crane, $2,640 64-69-74-70„277 Jim Knous, $2,640 67-69-70-71„277 Carlos Ortiz, $2,640 64-70-72-71„277 Kyoung-Hoon Lee, $2,600 68-69-71-70„278 Scott Langley, $2,580 69-67-71-72„279 Trevor Cone, $2,560 64-69-81-71„285 PRO HOCKEY NHL PRESEASONAll times Eastern (ss-split squad) EASTERN CONFERENCE ATLANTIC DIVISION GP W L OT PTS GF GA Boston 5 4 0 1 9 17 11 Toronto 4 4 0 0 8 16 7 Detroit 4 4 0 0 8 14 9 Montreal 4 3 1 0 6 13 10 Florida 4 2 2 0 4 12 15 Tampa Bay 4 2 2 0 4 12 13 Buffalo 4 2 2 0 4 12 11 Ottawa 4 0 4 0 0 6 16 METROPOLITAN DIVISION GP W L OT PTS GF GA N.Y. Islanders 6 4 2 0 8 15 12 Philadelphia 5 3 1 1 7 16 12 Carolina 3 3 0 0 6 15 3 Pittsburgh 4 1 2 1 3 13 12 N.Y. Rangers 3 1 2 0 2 10 14 Columbus 5 1 4 0 2 9 20 New Jersey 3 0 2 1 1 4 9 Washington 4 0 3 1 1 6 17 WESTERN CONFERENCE CENTRAL DIVISION GP W L OT PTS GF GA St. Louis 4 3 1 0 6 14 8 Dallas 3 2 0 1 5 11 8 Winnipeg 3 2 1 0 4 9 11 Nashville 4 2 2 0 4 13 13 Chicago 3 1 2 0 2 8 10 Minnesota 4 1 3 0 2 11 8 Colorado 2 0 2 0 0 1 12 PACIFIC DIVISION GP W L OT PTS GF GA Vegas 4 4 0 0 8 24 9 Edmonton 3 3 0 0 6 18 9 Arizona 4 3 1 0 6 16 13 Calgary 6 2 2 2 6 20 21 San Jose 3 2 0 1 5 15 9 Vancouver 4 1 3 0 2 9 16 Los Angeles 4 0 3 1 1 10 19 Anaheim 3 0 3 0 0 5 17 2 points for win, 1 point for overtime loss. Top 3 teams in each division and two wild cards per conference advance to playoffs.Saturdays GamesPittsburgh 7, Columbus 3 Minnesota 7, Colorado 0 Tampa Bay 5, Nashville 2 Toronto 3, Buffalo 2 Detroit 4, Boston 3, OT N.Y. Islanders 5, N.Y. Rangers 2 Montreal 3, Ottawa 2 Florida 4, Dallas 3, OT Arizona 6, Anaheim 1 Calgary 5, Vancouver 2 Vegas 5, San Jose 4, SOSundays GamesDetroit 3, Pittsburgh 2 St. Louis 5, Columbus 1 Edmonton at Winnipeg, lateTodays GamesBoston at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. New Jersey at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m. Montreal at Toronto, 7:30 p.m. Minnesota at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Winnipeg at Calgary, 9 p.m. Vancouver vs. Los Angeles at Salt Lake City, Utah, 9 p.m. Colorado at Vegas, 10 p.m. Arizona at Anaheim, 10 p.m. SOCCER MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCERAll times Eastern EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T PTS GF GA Atlanta United FC 19 5 6 63 65 36 New York 18 7 5 59 55 32 New York City FC 14 8 8 50 52 39 Columbus 13 9 8 47 39 38 Philadelphia 14 12 4 46 43 45 Montreal 12 14 4 40 42 47 D.C. United 9 11 8 35 48 48 New England 8 10 11 35 43 45 Toronto FC 8 15 6 30 50 57 Chicago 7 15 7 28 43 54 Orlando City 7 18 4 25 40 66 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T PTS GF GA Sporting Kansas City 15 8 6 51 54 36 Los Angeles FC 14 7 8 50 57 43 FC Dallas 14 6 8 50 47 37 Portland 13 9 8 47 46 45 Real Salt Lake 13 11 6 45 49 49 Seattle 13 10 5 44 37 29 Vancouver 11 10 7 40 46 54 LA Galaxy 10 11 8 38 54 59 Minnesota United 10 16 3 33 43 57 Houston 8 13 8 32 47 43 Colorado 6 17 6 24 32 55 San Jose 4 18 8 20 45 63 3 points for victory, 1 point for tieSept. 19Portland 3, Columbus 2 Atlanta United FC 4, San Jose 3 Philadelphia 1, Seattle 0Saturdays GamesLos Angeles FC 2, San Jose 0 New York Red Bulls 2, Toronto FC 0 Atlanta United FC 2, Real Salt Lake 0 Chicago 2, New England 2, tie Columbus 2, Colorado 1 Houston 0, Orlando City 0, tie New York City FC 1, Montreal 1, tie Minnesota United 3, Portland 2Sundays GamesPhiladelphia 2, Sporting Kansas City 0 FC Dallas at Vancouver, late Seattle at Los Angeles Galaxy, lateWednesdays GameChicago at New York City FC, 7 p.m.Saturday, Sept. 29Los Angeles FC at Chicago, 3:30 p.m. Colorado at Seattle, 4 p.m. Montreal at D.C. United, 7 p.m. New England at Toronto FC, 7:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Columbus, 7:30 p.m. New York City FC at Minnesota United, 8 p.m. San Jose at Houston, 8:30 p.m. Vancouver at Los Angeles Galaxy, 10 p.m. FC Dallas at Portland, 10:30 p.m.Sunday, Sept. 30Atlanta United FC at New York, 1 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Sporting Kansas City, 5 p.m.U.S. OPEN CUPAll times Eastern CHAMPIONSHIP Wednesdays GamePhiladelphia (MLS) at Houston (MLS), 7 p.m.NATIONAL WOMENS SOCCER LEAGUEAll times Eastern PLAYOFFS Semi“ nalsSept. 15: Portland 2, Seattle 1 Sept. 18: North Carolina 2, Chicago 0ChampionshipSaturday: North Carolina 3, Portland 02018 U.S. MENS TEAM RESULTS/SCHEDULEAll times Eastern (Record: Won 3, Lost 1, Tied 3)Sunday, Jan. 28 „ United States 0, BosniaHerzogovina 0 Tuesday, March 27 „ United States 1, Paraguay 0 Monday, May 28 „ United States 3, Bolivia 0 Saturday, June 2 „ Ireland 1, United States 1 Saturday, June 9 „ United States 1, France 1 Friday, Sept. 7 „ Brazil 2, United States 0 Tuesday, Sept. 11 „ United States 1, Mexico 0 Thursday, Oct. 11 „ vs. Colombia at Tampa, Fla., 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 16 „ vs. Peru at East Hartford, Conn., 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 15 „ vs. England at London, 2:45 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 20 „ vs. Italy at site TBA, 3 p.m. AUTO RACING NASCAR MONSTER ENERGY CUPFEDERATED AUTO PARTS 400Saturday at Richmond Raceway, Richmond, Va. Lap length: 0.75 miles(Starting position in parentheses; P-playoff driver)1. (11) Kyle Busch (P), Toyota, 400. 2. (1) Kevin Harvick (P), Ford, 400. 3. (3) Martin Truex Jr. (P), Toyota, 400. 4. (18) Chase Elliott (P), Chevrolet, 400. 5. (6) Aric Almirola (P), Ford, 400. 6. (26) Austin Dillon (P), Chevrolet, 400. 7. (9) Kyle Larson (P), Chevrolet, 400. 8. (21) Jimmie Johnson (P), Chevrolet, 400. 9. (7) Brad Keselowski (P), Ford, 400. 10. (24) Clint Bowyer (P), Ford, 400. 11. (8) Erik Jones (P), Toyota, 400. 12. (13) Alex Bowman (P), Chevrolet, 400. 13. (15) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 400. 14. (12) Joey Logano (P), Ford, 399. 15. (16) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 399. 16. (2) Denny Hamlin (P), Toyota, 399. 17. (38) Daniel Suarez, Toyota, 399. 18. (5) Kurt Busch (P), Ford, 398. 19. (4) Ryan Blaney (P), Ford, 398. 20. (19) William Byron, Chevrolet, 398. 21. (14) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 398. 22. (20) Paul Menard, Ford, 397. 23. (40) David Ragan, Ford, 397. 24. (23) Michael McDowell, Ford, 397. 25. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 396. 26. (10) Cole Custer, Ford, 396. 27. (25) Bubba Wallace, Chevrolet, 395. 28. (29) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 395. 29. (28) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 394. 30. (22) Chris Buescher, Chevrolet, 394. 31. (39) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 394. 32. (31) Corey LaJoie, Chevrolet, 393. 33. (30) Ross Chastain, Chevrolet, 392. 34. (27) Matt DiBenedetto, Ford, 391. 35. (35) Joey Gase, Chevrolet, 388. 36. (36) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 387. 37. (32) Jeffrey Earnhardt, Toyota, 387. 38. (34) Alon Day, Toyota, 383. 39. (37) Timmy Hill, Toyota, 382. 40. (33) Gray Gaulding, Ford, Brakes, 289.Race StatisticsAverage Speed of Winner: 103.152 mph. Time of Race: 2 hours, 54 minutes, 30 seconds. Margin of Victory: 0.777 seconds. Caution Flags: 3 for 23 laps. Lead Changes: 16 among 8 drivers. Lap Leaders: K. Harvick (P) 1-40, M. Truex Jr. (P) 41-103, B. Keselowski (P) 104, M. Truex Jr. (P) 105-203, A. Almirola (P) 204, C. Elliott (P) 205-213, B. Keselowski (P) 214-243, C. Elliott (P) 244-268, A. Bowman (P) 269, M. Truex Jr. (P) 270, R. Stenhouse Jr. 271-272, B. Keselowski (P) 273-286, Kyle Busch (P) 287-327, B. Keselowski (P) 328, Kyle Busch (P) 329-342, B. Keselowski (P) 343-363, Kyle Busch (P) 364-400. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Lead, Laps Led): M. Truex Jr. (P) 3 times for 163 laps, Kyle Busch (P) 3 times for 92 laps, B. Keselowski (P) 5 times for 67 laps, K. Harvick (P) 1 time for 40 laps, C. Elliott (P) 2 times for 34 laps, R. Stenhouse Jr. 1 time for 2 laps, A. Almirola (P) 1 time for 1 lap, A. Bowman (P) 1 time for 1 lap.NHRASunday at Gateway Motorsports Park, Madison, Ill.Final Finish Order Top Fuel1. Steve Torrence. 2. Clay Millican. 3. Leah Pritchett. 4. Pat Dakin. 5. Antron Brown. 6. Tony Schumacher. 7. Blake Alexander. 8. Mike Salinas. 9. Doug Kalitta. 10. Bill Litton. 11. Brittany Force. 12. Billy Torrence. 13. Shawn Reed. 14. Terry McMillen. 15. Richie Crampton. 16. Scott Palmer.Funny Car1. Robert Hight. 2. Tim Wilkerson. 3. Tommy Johnson Jr.. 4. J.R. Todd. 5. Cruz Pedregon. 6. John Force. 7. Courtney Force. 8. Bob Tasca III. 9. Jonnie Lindberg. 10. Ron Capps. 11. Shawn Langdon. 12. Del Worsham. 13. Dale Creasy Jr.. 14. Jack Beckman. 15. Matt Hagan. 16. Jim Campbell.Pro Stock1. Tanner Gray. 2. Drew Skillman. 3. Vincent Nobile. 4. Jeg Coughlin. 5. Greg Anderson. 6. Erica Enders. 7. Jason Line. 8. Bo Butner. 9. Chris McGaha. 10. Kenny Delco. 11. Val Smeland. 12. Charlie Westcott Jr.. 13. Mark Hogan. 14. Fernando Cuadra. 15. Alan Prusiensky. 16. Deric Kramer.Pro Stock Motorcycle1. Matt Smith. 2. LE Tonglet. 3. Chip Ellis. 4. Jerry Savoie. 5. Joey Gladstone. 6. Angelle Sampey. 7. Andrew Hines. 8. Angie Smith. 9. Eddie Krawiec. 10. Steve Johnson. 11. Ryan Oehler. 12. Mark Paquette. 13. Jim Underdahl. 14. Scotty Pollacheck. 15. Hector Arana. 16. Hector Arana Jr.Final ResultsTop Fuel„ Steve Torrence, 3.770 seconds, 323.66 mph def. Clay Millican, 3.798 seconds, 320.28 mph. Funny Car„ Robert Hight, Chevy Camaro, 4.036, 276.29 def. Tim Wilkerson, Ford Mustang, 4.413, 201.91. Pro Stock„ Tanner Gray, Chevy Camaro, 6.567, 211.06 def. Drew Skillman, Camaro, 11.409, 78.68. Pro Stock Motorcycle„ Matt Smith, EBR, 6.877, 198.44 def. LE Tonglet, Suzuki, 6.867, 196.10. Pro Modi“ ed„ Steve Jackson, Chevy Camaro, 5.759, 250.88 def. Chad Green, Chevy Corvette, Foul Red Light. Competition Eliminator„ David Rampy, Bantam, 7.240, 166.13 def. Allen Wilson, GTO, 8.238, 163.75. Super Stock„ Greg Stan“ eld, Chevy Camaro, 9.937, 130.63 def. Brad Zaskowski, Camaro, 10.075, 120.20. Stock Eliminator„ Drew Skillman, Ford Mustang, 8.864, 150.03 def. Daryl Bureski, Olds Cutlass, 11.421, 115.53. Super Comp„ Rick Hughes, Dragster, 8.921, 161.40 def. Don Higgins, Dragster, 8.884, 166.05. Super Gas„ Tim Nicholson, Chevy Camaro, 9.904, 101.97 def. Mitch Withers, Chevy Corvette, 9.856, 149.48. Top Dragster presented by RacingRVs.com„ Jenifer White, Dragster, 6.164, 209.36 def. Afton Swanson, Dragster, 6.104, 226.85. Top Sportsman presented by RacingRVs. com„ Glenn Butcher, Chevy Camaro, 6.534, 203.68 def. Bill Yates Sr., Camaro, 6.717, 209.85. Factory Stock Showdown„ Leah Pritchett, Dodge Challenger, 8.001, 172.36 def. Stephen Bell, Chevy Camaro, Broke.Point Standings Through 20-of-24 Events Top Fuel1. Steve Torrence, 2,346. 2. Clay Millican, 2,276. 3. Tony Schumacher, 2,225. 4. Leah Pritchett, 2,192. 5. Antron Brown, 2,169. 6. Doug Kalitta, 2,135. 7. Mike Salinas, 2,119. 8. Terry McMillen, 2,093. 9. (tie) Brittany Force, 2,085. Scott Palmer, 2,085.Funny Car1. Robert Hight, 2,270. 2. J.R. Todd, 2,240. 3. Courtney Force, 2,200. 4. Tim Wilkerson, 2,196. 5. Ron Capps, 2,182. 6. Tommy Johnson Jr., 2,166. 7. Matt Hagan, 2,144. 8. John Force, 2,116. 9. Jack Beckman, 2,113. 10. Shawn Langdon, 2,086.Pro Stock1. Tanner Gray, 2,296. 2. Vincent Nobile, 2,244. 3. Drew Skillman, 2,222. 4. Jeg Coughlin, 2,215. 5. Greg Anderson, 2,206. 6. Erica Enders, 2,192. 7. Jason Line, 2,133. 8. Bo Butner, 2,120. 9. Deric Kramer, 2,104. 10. Chris McGaha, 2,064.Pro Stock Motorcycle1. Matt Smith, 2,263. 2. LE Tonglet, 2,242. 3. Eddie Krawiec, 2,222. 4. Hector Arana Jr, 2,214. 5. Andrew Hines, 2,201. 6. Jerry Savoie, 2,154. 7. Angie Smith, 2,115. 8. Steve Johnson, 2,108. 9. Scotty Pollacheck, 2,094. 10. Angelle Sampey, 2,085. TENNIS ATP WORLD TOUR ST. PETERSBURG OPENSunday at Sibur Arena, St. Petersburg, Russia Purse: $1.18 (WT250); Surface: Hard-IndoorMens Singles ChampionshipDominic Thiem (1), Austria, def. Martin Klizan, Slovakia, 6-3, 6-1.Mens Doubles ChampionshipMatteo Berrettini and Fabio Fognini, Italy, def. Roman Jebavy, Czech Republic, and Matwe Middelkoop (3), Netherlands, 7-6 (6), 7-6 (4).MOSELLE OPENSunday at Les Arenes de Metz, Metz, France Purse: $582,670 (WT250); Surface: Hard-IndoorMens Singles ChampionshipGilles Simon, France, def. Matthias Bachinger, Germany, 7-6 (2), 6-1.Mens Doubles ChampionshipNicolas Mahut and Edouard Roger-Vasselin (1), France, def. Ken and Neal Skupski (4), Britain, 6-1, 7-5.WTA TOURDONGFENG MOTOR WUHAN OPENSunday at Wuhan Optical Valley Tennis Centre Wuhan, China; Purse: $2.75 million (Premier); Surface: Hard-OutdoorWomens Singles First RoundZheng Saisai, China, def. Danielle Collins, United States, 2-6, 6-4, 6-2. Katerina Siniakova, Czech Republic, def. Kristina Mladenovic, France, 7-6 (4), 6-2. Monica Puig, Puerto Rico, def. Kirsten Flipkens, Belgium, 7-5, 5-7, 6-3. Julia Goerges (11), Germany, def. Marketa Vondrousova, Czech Republic, 6-3, 3-6, 7-6 (4). Rebecca Peterson, Sweden, def. Timea Babos, Hungary, 6-7 (0), 6-4, 4-1 retired. Daria Kasatkina (13), Russia, def. Lesia Tsurenko, Ukraine, 6-4, 7-5. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, Russia, def. Anastasija Sevastova, Latvia, 6-2, 6-3. Aliaksandra Sasnovich, Belarus, def. Elise Mertens (15), Belgium, 7-6 (5), 7-6 (3). Zhang Shuai, China, def. Sam Stosur, Australia, 6-2, 6-2. Anett Kontaveit, Estonia, def. Sloane Stephens (9), United States, 4-6, 7-5, 6-4.Womens Doubles First RoundShuko Aoyama, Japan, and Lidziya Marozava, Belarus, def. Nadiia Kichenok, Ukraine, and Anastasia Rodionova, Australia, 6-4, 6-3. Duan Yingying and Wang Yafan, China, def. Belinda Bencic, Switzerland, and Alize Cornet, France, 0-6, 7-6 (2), 10-6. Jelena Ostapenko, Latvia, and Aryna Sabalenka, Belarus, def. Andreja Klepac, Slovenia, and Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez (5), Spain, 6-3, 6-2.GUANGZHOU OPENSaturday at Tianhe Sports Centre, Guangzhou, China Purse: $226,750 (Intl.); Surface: Hard-OutdoorWomens Singles ChampionshipWang Qiang (3), China, def. Yulia Putintseva (5), Kazakhstan, 6-1, 6-2.

PAGE 13

Only when he was on the green, the last one to putt after Rory McIlroy tapped in for birdie, did it start to sink in.All of a sudden it hit me that I was going to win the tournament. I started tear-ing up a little bit,Ž Woods said. I cant believe I pulled this off.ŽHe paused as his voice started to crack. More roars.Several players, from Zach Johnson to Rickie Fowler to Horschel, waited to greet him. It was Johnson who unveiled red shirts at the Ryder Cup two years ago in the team room that said, Make Tiger Great Again.Ž They knew what I was struggling with,Ž Woods said. It was special to see them.ŽOne year ago, Woods was still waiting for his lower back to fuse and wasnt sure he could ever play again. He told stories of being unable to get off the couch to watch his kids play soccer, much less to chip and putt. He said after the second and third back surgeries in the latter end of 2015 that he already has achieved plenty in golf and anything else would be gravy.ŽHe was becoming a legend only in video highlights.Woods brought it all to life over four days at East Lake, and the players who have taken turns at No. 1 during his absence caught the full brunt of it. McIl-roy faded early. Justin Rose faded late.All that was left was the 42-year-old Woods in that Sunday red shirt blazing brighter than ever and a smile he couldnt shake walking up to collect another trophy. DailyCommercial.com | Monday, September 24, 2018 B3worst start in five years.Pro Bowl running back LeVeon Bell has not reported to the team and signed his one-year fran-chise tenderAnd star receiver Anto-nio Brown made headlines after shouting at offensive coordinator Randy Fich-tner on the sideline last week and then responding to criticism on social media from a former team employee by suggesting the team trade him if it wants to find out how productive he can be without Roethlisberger.Tomlin, however, isnt flinching.We are two weeks in. We do not have a large body of work. We are focused on winning this next opportunity,Ž the coach said.I am not ready to paint with a broad brush ... in terms of where our football team is or what is going to define this group.Ž BUCSFrom Page B1Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Antonio Brown (84) is hit by Kansas City Chiefs DeAnthony Thomas (13) during a game last week in Pittsburgh. [AP PHOTO/ DON WRIGHT] Florida went on to win 47-21 as Swain, from North Marion, contin-ues to be a budding star.Hes much more confident,Ž said Florida coach Dan Mullen. Hes making big plays and hes becoming more confident doing so.ŽSwain already has 193 receiving yards this season and four touchdowns, three of them receiving.Hes a hard working guy,Ž said Franks. Its just showing. It wasnt something I wasnt expecting because I see how hard he works.ŽMullen was happy with all of his receivers, even though they only had 10 catches, as Flor-ida threw the ball just 19 times.Three touchdowns by our receivers,Ž Mullen beamed after the game pointing to the catches by Swain, Tyrie Cleveland and tight end R.J. Raymond. And Feleipe broke his mark from last year.ŽA year ago, Franks threw for nine touchdowns and lost his job three times. This year he already has thrown 12 touchdowns.The one that really blew the game open was the one to Swain, where Franks pumped twice before scrambling to his right.He had to run and I just kept my play alive, kept my route on,Ž Swain said. Great blocking downfield, thats why I was able to score. He saw me streak-ing across the middle.ŽNotes: Floridabeat Tennesseefor the 13th time in the last 14 seasons. ... Tennessee has lost its last 10 games against Power Five opponents since beating Georgia Tech in overtime to open the 2017 season. ... Florida has 14 takeaways through its first four games. Florida already has 10 fumble recoveries this season, compared to just threelast year. GATORSFrom Page B1scooted around the end after taking Tannehills short pitch and scored the clincher. Wilson and Grant ran side by side in the clear for the final 30 yards and exchanged a gleeful high five approaching the end zone.Oaklands ball-control approach took a toll on a Miami front four that lost three players. Akeem Spence was ejected, and William Hayes and Andre Branch suffered knee injuries.The Raiders Jordy Nelson had 139 yards receiving in the first seven minutes, and finished with 173 on six catches.Tannehill went 17 for 23 for 289 yards and three scores with no turnovers.JARRINGMiamis Kenny Stills took a big hit when he made a 34-yard touchdown reception in stride in the back of the end zone and slammed into the cushioned retaining wall. NELSONS STARTMiami missed injured safety Reshad Jones at the start, with rookie replace-ment Minkah Fitzpatrick burned on the second play when Nelson turned a short pass over the middle into a 61-yard gain. That set up Nelsons 12-yard touchdown catch, again over the middle.On the Raiders next possession, Nelson beat Bobby McCain deep for a 66-yard gain „ his longest since 2014 „ before Miami made a goal-line stand. COSTLY FLAGSSpence was ejected in the second quarter for ripping off guard Kelechi Osemeles helmet. Spence was penalized for unnec-essary roughness, which negated a third-down sack by teammate Cameron Wake and led to an Oakland field goal. INJURY REPORTDolphins: Hayes (right knee) was hurt when he sacked Carr and missed the second half. ... Branch hurt his knee in the second half. ... TE A.J. Derby (foot) also sat out the second half. ... McCain was shaken up in the final minutes. ... LB Chase Allen suffered a foot injury in the first half. ... S Reshad Jones was inactive because of a shoulder injury.Raiders: T Donald Penn (concussion) and S Karl Joseph (lower leg) sat out the second half. ... WR Seth Roberts was among Oaklands inactives. ANTHEMStills and Wilson kneeled during the national anthem, and defensive end Robert Quinn raised his right fist. All three Dolphins have staged similar protests before their teams other games this season. UP NEXTDolphins: Play next Sunday at New England, where theyve lost nine games in a row.Raiders: Return home to play Cleveland next Sunday. DOLPHINSFrom Page B1 TOURFrom Page B1

PAGE 14

B4 Monday, September 24, 2018 | DailyCommercial.comAMERICAN LEAGUENATIONAL LEAGUEEAST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY x-Boston 105 50 .677 „ „ 6-4 L-1 54-21 51-29 y-New York 95 60 .613 10 „ 5-5 L-1 53-28 42-32 Tampa Bay 87 68 .561 18 6 7-3 W-1 48-26 39-42 Toronto 71 85 .455 34 23 6-4 L-1 39-39 32-46 Baltimore 45 110 .290 60 48 4-6 W-1 27-50 18-60 CENTRAL DIVISION TEAM W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY x-Cleveland 86 68 .558 „ „ 5-5 W-1 48-32 38-36 Minnesota 72 83 .465 14 21 5-5 W-1 43-31 29-52 Detroit 63 93 .404 24 31 4-6 L-1 38-43 25-50 Chicago 61 94 .394 25 32 5-5 L-2 29-49 32-45 Kansas City 54 102 .346 33 40 4-6 W-1 30-47 24-55 WEST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY z-Houston 98 57 .632 „ „ 7-3 W-3 46-35 52-22 Oakland 94 62 .603 4 „ 5-5 L-1 50-31 44-31 Seattle 85 70 .548 13 8 6-4 L-1 41-33 44-37 Los Angeles 75 81 .481 23 19 2-8 L-5 37-38 38-43 Texas 66 89 .426 32 27 4-6 W-1 34-47 32-42 z-clinched playoff berth x-clinched division y-clinched wild card EAST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY x-Atlanta 88 68 .564 „ „ 6-4 W-5 43-38 45-30 Philadelphia 78 77 .503 9 8 4-6 L-4 47-31 31-46 Washington 78 78 .500 10 9 4-6 L-1 38-40 40-38 New York 73 83 .468 15 14 5-5 W-1 33-42 40-41 Miami 62 93 .400 25 24 5-5 W-3 38-43 24-50 CENTRAL DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Chicago 91 64 .587 „ „ 7-3 W-2 47-27 44-37 Milwaukee 89 67 .571 2 „ 6-4 W-1 48-30 41-37 St. Louis 87 69 .558 4 „ 6-4 W-3 43-35 44-34 Pittsburgh 78 76 .506 12 8 7-3 L-1 44-36 34-40 Cincinnati 66 91 .420 26 21 3-7 L-3 36-40 30-51 WEST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Los Angeles 87 69 .558 „ „ 8-2 W-2 44-37 43-32 Colorado 85 70 .548 1 1 5-5 W-3 41-33 44-37 Arizona 79 77 .506 8 8 2-8 L-3 38-40 41-37 San Francisco 72 84 .462 15 15 4-6 L-4 41-34 31-50 San Diego 62 94 .397 25 25 4-6 L-2 29-49 33-45 x-clinched division MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALLRAYS 5, BLUE JAYS 2 T AMPA BAY AB R H BI BB SO AVG. S mith rf-cf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .299 Pham lf 2 2 1 0 2 0 .273 Duffy 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .295 Cron dh 4 1 2 2 0 1 .257 W endle ss 2 1 1 1 2 0 .301 Lowe 2b 4 1 1 2 0 1 .233 Kiermaier cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .220 a-Meadows ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .294 Bauers 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .198 S ucre c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .215 T OTALS 31 5 5 5 5 7 T ORONTO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Davis lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .167 Gurriel Jr. ss 4 0 0 1 0 3 .282 Diaz 3b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .262 Grichuk rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .241 Pillar cf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .249 T ellez 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .373 Hernandez dh 2 0 0 0 1 1 .239 b-Smoak ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .244 J ansen c 2 1 2 0 1 0 .267 c-Morales ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .252 1-Alford pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .125 Urena 2b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .266 T OTALS 34 2 8 2 2 11 T AMPA BAY 000 101 030„5 5 1 T ORONTO 000 000 020„2 8 1 a-pinch hit in the 8th. b-lined out in the 9th. c-singled in the 9th. 1-ran for Morales in the 9th. E „ Wendle (7), Tellez (2). LOB „ Tampa Bay 5, Toronto 7. 2B „ Cron (27), Wendle (31). HR „ Cron (28), off Biagini; Lowe (6), off Fernandez. RBIs „ Cron 2 (70), Wendle (57), Lowe 2 (21), Gurriel Jr. (35), Diaz (54). S B „ Pham (13), Hernandez (4). CS „ Pillar (3). S „ Duffy. T AMPA BAY IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA S nell, W, 21-5 6.2 3 0 0 2 11 100 1.90 Roe, H, 28 .1 0 0 0 0 0 6 3.51 Kittredge .2 3 2 2 0 0 10 6.69 Stanek, H, 9 .1 0 0 0 0 0 2 2.70 Romo, S, 23-31 1 2 0 0 0 0 15 3.66 T ORONTO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Borucki, L, 4-5 7 3 2 2 4 7 101 3.76 Biagini .2 1 1 1 0 0 11 5.77 Fernandez .1 1 2 2 1 0 11 6.00 Paulino 1 0 0 0 0 0 19 1.93 T „ 2:41. A „ 23,944 (53,506).ROYALS 3, TIGERS 2KANSAS CITY AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Merri“eld cf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .304 Mondesi ss 5 1 2 1 0 1 .287 Gordon lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .246 Perez dh 3 0 1 0 1 1 .233 Dozier 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .227 Bonifacio rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .228 Escobar 3b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .226 Herrera 2b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .236 Gallagher c 4 0 1 2 0 1 .211 T OTALS 36 3 10 3 2 7 DETROIT AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Candelario 3b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .226 S tewart dh 3 0 1 0 1 0 .240 Castellanos rf 3 0 0 1 0 1 .302 Goodrum 1b-ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .241 Mahtook lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .213 Rodriguez 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .227 Greiner c 2 0 1 0 2 0 .239 1-Castro pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Reyes cf 3 0 0 1 0 0 .228 Kozma ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 .197 a-Adduci ph-1b 2 0 1 0 0 1 .266 T OTALS 30 2 6 2 4 3 KANSAS CITY 100 002 000„3 10 0 DETROIT 000 100 001„2 6 0 a-singled in the 8th. 1-ran for Greiner in the 9th. LOB „ Kansas City 8, Detroit 7. 2B „ Mondesi (13). 3B „ Merri“eld (3). HR „ Mondesi (12), off Norris. RBIs „ Mondesi (33), Gallagher 2 (7), Castellanos (86), Reyes (12). SB „ Herrera (3). SF „ Castellanos, Reyes. KANSAS CITY IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Keller, W, 9-6 7 3 1 1 3 2 107 3.08 McCarthy, H, 15 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 3.31 Peralta, S, 13-13 1 2 1 1 1 1 20 4.02 DETROIT IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Norris 5 6 1 1 2 3 98 5.22 V erHagen, L, 3-3 1 3 2 2 0 1 26 4.80 Hardy 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 3.66 Hall 2 1 0 0 0 2 32 12.71 WP „ Keller 2. T „ 2:47. A „ 24,230 (41,297).MARLINS 6, REDS 0CINCINNATI AB R H BI BB SO AVG. S chebler lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .264 Peraza ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .290 Gennett 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .315 S uarez 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .284 Barnhart 1b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .244 Ervin rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .252 Casali c 3 0 0 0 0 3 .296 Guerrero cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .154 Lorenzen p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .286 a-Williams ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .284 Romano p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .057 Peralta p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Reyes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Herrera ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .171 Hughes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --T OTALS 30 0 4 0 1 9 MIAMI AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Riddle ss 5 0 2 0 0 0 .231 Dean lf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .218 Galloway lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .214 Castro 2b 4 1 0 0 1 1 .278 OBrien 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .262 Kinley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Rucinski p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 A nderson 3b 4 2 3 0 0 0 .271 Brinson cf 4 1 2 1 0 2 .203 W allach c 4 2 3 3 0 0 .171 Richards p 3 0 0 0 0 0 .069 b-Rojas ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .246 S ierra rf 3 0 2 1 1 1 .198 T OTALS 37 6 14 5 2 4 CINCINNATI 000 000 000„0 4 2 MIAMI 004 020 00X„6 14 0 a-struck out in the 5th. b-grounded out in t he 7th. c-grounded out in the 8th. E „ Gennett (11), Casali (4). LOB „ Cincinnati 4, Miami 9. HR „ Wallach (1), off Lorenzen. RBIs „ Brinson (40), Wallach 3 (5), Sierra (6). CINCINNATI IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lorenzen, L, 3-2 4 9 4 4 2 0 65 3.35 Romano .2 3 2 1 0 1 21 5.36 Peralta 1.1 2 0 0 0 1 23 4.87 Reyes 1 0 0 0 0 1 16 1.93 Hughes 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 2.01 MIAMI IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Richards, W, 4-9 7 3 0 0 1 9 95 4.66 Kinley 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 9.31 Rucinski 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 4.73 WP „ Romano 2. T „ 2:30. A „ 13,595 (36,742).BRAVES 2, PHILLIES 1PHILADELPHIA AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Hernandez 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .255 Hoskins lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .245 Herrera cf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .256 c-Bautista ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .199 S antana 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .229 Franco 3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .270 1-Quinn pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .278 A ltherr rf-cf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .183 e-Bour ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .229 Alfaro c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .262 Arano p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hunter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 f-Cabrera ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .262 2-Florimon pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .231 Kingery ss 3 1 2 1 0 0 .227 Nola p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .050 b-Ramos ph-c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .311 TOTALS 32 1 6 1 3 4 ATLANTA AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Culberson ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .277 Markakis rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .301 Tucker rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .228 F.Freeman 1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .311 Duda 1b 1 0 0 0 1 0 .241 Flowers c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .232 Duvall lf 3 1 1 0 0 2 .193 Ruiz 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Adams cf 3 1 2 2 0 1 .273 Flaherty 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .217 Sanchez p 1 0 1 0 0 0 .026 a-Albies ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .265 Fried p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .125 S.Freeman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Acuna ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .289 Carle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 TOTALS 28 2 4 2 1 9 PHILADELPHIA 001 000 000„1 6 1 ATLANTA 010 010 00X„2 4 0 a-grounded out in the 5th. b-struck out in the 7th. c-struck out in the 8th. d-lined out in the 8th. e-”ied out in the 9th. f-walked in the 9th. 1-ran for Franco in the 9th. 2-ran for Cabrera in the 9th. E „ Franco (15). LOB „ Philadelphia 8, Atlanta 3. 2B „ Duvall (20), Adams (1). HR „ Kingery (8), off Sanchez; Adams (2), off Nola. RBIs „ Kingery (34), Adams 2 (6). SB „ Quinn (9). PHILADELPHIA IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nola, L, 16-6 6 4 2 2 1 6 90 2.45 Arano 1 0 0 0 0 2 16 2.31 Hunter 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 3.61 ATLANTA IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sanchez, W, 7-6 5 4 1 1 0 1 57 2.96 Fried, H, 1 2 2 0 0 1 2 35 3.13 S.Freeman, H, 9 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 4.32 Carle, S, 1-2 1 0 0 0 2 0 28 2.86 HBP „ Carle (Kingery). T „ 2:43. A „ 34,214 (41,149).BREWERS 13, PIRATES 6MILWAUKEE AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Granderson rf-lf 6 1 2 0 0 1 .240 Yelich lf 3 2 2 3 1 1 .322 Santana rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .260 Cain cf 5 2 2 0 0 0 .308 Broxton cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .187 Shaw 2b-1b 4 2 2 2 2 0 .242 Aguilar 1b 4 1 1 0 1 1 .274 Lyles p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 f-Saladino ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .254 Albers p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Moustakas 3b 3 1 2 2 1 1 .251 Kratz c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .247 c-Braun ph 0 1 0 1 1 0 .248 Pina c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .248 Arcia ss 4 2 1 1 1 0 .221 Miley p 2 1 0 0 1 0 .185 Knebel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Thames ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .218 Burnes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Perez 2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .255 TOTALS 39 13 12 9 9 6 PITTSBURGH AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Reyes rf-lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .324 Marte cf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .276 b-Kramer ph-3b 2 0 0 0 0 2 .120 Bell 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .268 Diaz c 3 1 1 0 1 2 .285 Luplow lf-cf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .188 Osuna 3b-rf 4 2 1 0 0 0 .205 Harrison 2b 3 1 1 2 0 1 .252 Frazier 2b 1 1 1 2 0 0 .291 Mercer ss 3 0 1 2 0 1 .250 Newman ss 1 0 0 0 0 1 .188 Kingham p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .091 Anderson p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Lavar nway ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .750 Brault p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .158 Feliz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Neverauskas p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Moran ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .278 Burdi p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --TOTALS 33 6 6 6 1 9 MILWAUKEE 151 005 010„13 12 1 PITTSBURGH 000 040 002„6 6 2 a-struck out in the 5th. b-struck out in the 5th. c-walked in the 6th. d-walked in the 6th. e-hit by pitch in the 8th. f-”ied out in the 9th. E „ Moustakas (9), Reyes (2), Feliz (1). LOB „ Milwaukee 10, Pittsburgh 2. 2B „ Granderson (22), Arcia (14), Harrison (13), Mercer (29). HR „ Yelich (32), off Kingham; Shaw (31), off Kingham; Moustakas (28), off Neverauskas; Frazier (10), off Albers. RBIs „ Yelich 3 (96), Shaw 2 (83), Moustakas 2 (92), Arcia (28), Braun (54), Harrison 2 (37), Mercer 2 (39), Frazier 2 (35). SB „ Yelich (21), Cain (29). MILWAUKEE IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Miley 4 4 4 3 1 1 73 2.32 Knebel, W, 3-3 1 0 0 0 0 3 13 3.93 Burnes 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 2.65 Lyles 2 0 0 0 0 2 20 4.20 Albers 1 2 2 2 0 2 25 7.34 PITTSBURGH IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kingham, L, 5-7 1.1 7 6 5 2 2 51 5.23 Anderson 3.2 2 1 1 1 0 36 8.59 Brault .2 1 3 3 2 2 24 4.90 Feliz 1.1 0 2 1 3 0 30 6.04 Neverauskas 1 1 1 1 0 0 22 9.00 Burdi 1 1 0 0 1 2 19 20.25 Miley pitched to 5 batters in the 5th. HBP „ Kingham (Moustakas), Feliz (Yelich), Lyles (Moran). WP „ Anderson, Brault, Feliz. T „ 3:22. A „ 20,623 (38,362).CUBS 6, WHITE SOX 1CHICAGO (N) AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Murphy dh 6 1 2 0 0 1 .293 Zobrist 2b 6 1 3 0 0 0 .314 Baez ss 5 0 1 0 0 3 .293 Rizzo 1b 4 1 2 1 1 1 .277 Almora cf 5 1 2 1 0 1 .284 Bote 3b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .237 Contreras c 5 0 1 0 0 2 .254 Schwarber lf 2 1 2 2 2 0 .244 Heyward rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .273 Happ rf-lf 4 0 1 1 1 1 .229 TOTALS 42 6 15 6 4 9 CHICAGO (A) AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Moncada 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .232 Sanchez 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .246 Palka rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .239 Davidson 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .236 Narvaez dh 3 0 0 0 0 1 .274 Castillo c 3 1 2 0 0 0 .261 Garcia lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .275 LaMarre lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .282 Anderson ss 3 0 2 1 0 0 .244 Engel cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .236 TOTALS 31 1 4 1 0 8 CHICAGO (N) 312 000 000„6 15 0 CHICAGO (A) 000 010 000„1 4 0 LOB „ Chicago (N) 14, Chicago (A) 3. 2B „ Baez (38), Rizzo (26), Schwarber (14), Happ (19), Castillo (7), Anderson (28). HR „ Schwarber (26), off Rodon. RBIs „ Rizzo (96), Almora (37), Bote (30), Schwarber 2 (60), Happ (44), Anderson (64). SB „ Happ (8), Castillo (1). CHICAGO (N) IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hendricks, W, 13-11 7.2 4 1 1 0 5 103 3.49 De La Rosa 1.1 0 0 0 0 3 20 3.54 CHICAGO (A) IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Rodon, L, 6-7 2.1 9 6 6 0 3 66 3.61 Bummer 1.2 1 0 0 0 1 19 4.55 Burr 2 1 0 0 2 2 30 3.12 Gomez 1 1 0 0 2 1 26 4.43 Vieira 2 3 0 0 0 2 34 8.79 HBP „ Rodon (Bote). WP „ Bummer. T „ 3:08. A „ 39,449 (40,615).ASTROS 6, ANGELS 2LOS ANGELES AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Calhoun rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .207 Upton lf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .262 Ohtani dh 4 0 0 0 0 3 .281 Simmons ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .296 Ward 3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .165 Arcia c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .228 a-Briceno ph-c 2 1 1 1 0 0 .230 Marte 1b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .212 Cowart 3b-ss 4 0 1 0 0 2 .128 Hermosillo cf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .204 S.Johnson 2b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .000 TOTALS 31 2 4 1 2 13 HOUSTON AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Altuve 2b 4 1 1 0 1 0 .317 Bregman ss-3b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .288 Gurriel 3b-1b 5 2 2 2 0 1 .288 White 1b 3 0 2 0 0 0 .293 1-Straw pr-rf 0 1 0 0 0 0 .000 Gonzalez lf-ss 3 1 2 1 1 0 .251 Gattis dh 3 0 3 2 1 0 .232 Reddick rf-lf 3 0 0 1 1 1 .240 Maldonado c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .227 Marisnick cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .202 TOTALS 34 6 12 6 4 5 LOS ANGELES 100 001 000„2 4 1 HOUSTON 301 010 10X„6 12 0 a-homered in the 6th. 1-ran for White in the 7th. E „ Hermosillo (1). LOB „ Los Angeles 5, Houston 9. 2B „ Upton (17), Cowart (6), Gonzalez (25). HR „ Briceno (4), off Valdez; Gurriel (13), off Skaggs. RBIs „ Briceno (9), Gurriel 2 (84), Gonzalez (67), Gattis 2 (77), Reddick (45). LOS ANGELES IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Skaggs L, 8-9 2.1 5 4 4 1 0 54 3.91 Tazawa .2 0 0 0 1 1 11 7.42 Bedrosian 1 0 0 0 0 1 5 3.86 J.Johnson 1 3 1 1 0 0 12 3.82 McGuire 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 6.08 Despaigne .2 2 1 1 1 1 23 6.75 Jerez .1 0 0 0 1 1 9 5.84 Almonte 1 1 0 0 0 1 18 12.00 HOUSTON IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Morton 1 1 1 1 0 2 24 3.18 Valdez, W, 4-1 6 3 1 1 2 9 95 2.08 McHugh 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 2.07 Harris 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 3.58 HBP „ Valdez (Upton), Skaggs (White). WP „ Morton. T „ 3:11. A „ 43,247 (41,168).CARDINALS 9, GIANTS 2SAN FRANCISCO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Blanco cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .218 Panik 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .251 Longoria 3b 4 1 0 0 0 2 .245 Crawford ss 4 1 1 2 0 1 .256 Hundley c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .247 Shaw lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .222 Hanson rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .260 Ar.Garcia 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .341 Suarez p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .064 a-dArnaud ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .225 Black p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Okert p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Johnson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Strickland p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Pence ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .219 Kelly p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 TOTALS 34 2 5 2 0 11 ST. LOUIS AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Carpenter 1b 5 1 1 2 0 0 .262 Martinez rf 4 0 2 2 0 1 .304 2-ONeill pr-rf 0 1 0 0 0 0 .252 DeJong ss 5 0 1 1 0 4 .239 Ozuna lf 4 0 0 0 1 2 .277 Gallegos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Gyorko 3b 2 1 1 0 1 0 .274 1-Wisdom pr-3b 1 1 0 0 1 0 .227 Molina c 4 1 2 0 0 0 .270 Ad.Garcia lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .125 Bader cf 3 2 2 1 0 1 .272 Munoz 2b 4 1 2 2 0 1 .277 Mikolas p 2 0 1 1 0 0 .150 Brebbia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Sosa ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 --Pena c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .203 TOTALS 34 9 12 9 4 9 SAN FRANCISCO 000 000 200„2 5 0 ST. LOUIS 010 105 02X„9 12 2 a-struck out in the 6th. b-singled in the 8th. c-walked in the 8th. 1-ran for Gyorko in the 6th. 2-ran for Martinez in the 6th. E „ Munoz 2 (16). LOB „ San Francisco 5, St. Louis 8. 2B „ Hundley (13), Martinez 2 (28), Bader (19). HR „ Crawford (14), off Mikolas; Carpenter (36), off Kelly. RBIs „ Crawford 2 (54), Carpenter 2 (79), Martinez 2 (82), DeJong (64), Bader (37), Munoz 2 (39), Mikolas (6). S „ Bader, Mikolas. SAN FRANCISCO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Suarez, L, 7-12 5 6 2 2 1 5 77 4.22 Black .1 2 4 4 1 0 18 6.45 Okert .1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0.00 Johnson .1 2 1 1 0 1 18 5.53 Strickland 1 1 0 0 1 1 17 3.64 Kelly 1 1 2 2 1 2 22 2.89 ST. LOUIS IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Mikolas, W, 17-4 7 2 2 1 0 8 96 2.94 Brebbia 1 2 0 0 0 1 18 3.35 Gallegos 1 1 0 0 0 2 24 4.09 Inherited runners-scored „ Okert 2-0, Johnson 2-2. HBP „ Kelly (ONeill). Umpires „ Home, Roberto Ortiz; First, Kerwin Danley; Second, Mike Estabrook; Third, Chad Fairchild. T „ 3:02. A „ 46,596 (45,538).METS 8, NATIONALS 6NEW YORK AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Rosario ss 5 2 2 1 1 1 .261 McNeil 2b 5 1 4 1 1 0 .340 Conforto lf 6 0 2 3 0 2 .242 Bruce rf-1b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .226 Nimmo cf-rf 2 0 0 0 3 0 .261 Do.Smith 1b 5 1 1 0 0 3 .213 Blevins p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Swarzak p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Frazier 3b 3 1 1 0 2 1 .216 Plawecki c 5 1 2 2 0 0 .216 Matz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .111 a-Reyes ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .190 Gagnon p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Lobaton ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .149 Sewald p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Zamora p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Dr.Smith p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Jackson cf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .248 TOTALS 37 8 14 8 9 7 WASHINGTON AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Robles lf 6 2 2 3 0 1 .227 Turner ss 2 1 2 1 3 0 .272 Harper rf 4 1 1 1 1 0 .245 Rendon 3b 4 0 2 0 1 0 .306 Reynolds 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .251 Sanchez 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .191 Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .188 d-Soto ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .293 Glover p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Collins p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Kieboom c 3 0 1 1 1 0 .216 e-Eaton ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .294 Fedde p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .067 Suero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Solis p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Stevenson ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .260 Cordero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Difo 2b 2 1 1 0 0 0 .234 Taylor cf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .223 f-Zimmerman ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .267 TOTALS 38 6 11 6 6 8 NEW YORK 100 421 000„8 14 1 WASHINGTON 003 000 030„6 11 0 a-walked for Matz in the 4th. b-lined out for Gagnon in the 6th. c-singled for Solis in the 6th. d-popped out for Rodriguez in the 8th. e-hit by pitch for Kieboom in the 9th. f-struck out for Taylor in the 9th. E „ Rosario (15). LOB „ New York 13, Washington 13. 2B „ Bruce (18), Do.Smith (10), Frazier (17), Plawecki (13), Turner (26), Harper (30). 3B „ Conforto (1), Robles (1). HR „ Robles (2), off Matz. RBIs „ Rosario (50), McNeil (19), Conforto 3 (80), Bruce (36), Plawecki 2 (29), Robles 3 (5), Turner (68), Harper (99), Kieboom (10). SB „ Rosario (22), McNeil (6), Turner (42). SF „ Bruce. S „ Matz. Runners left in scoring position „ New York 8 (Rosario, Conforto 2, Nimmo, Do.Smith 3, Lobaton); Washington 7 (Harper 2, Reynolds, Taylor 2, Soto 2). RISP „ New York 4 for 21; Washington 4 for 15. Runners moved up „ Nimmo, Plawecki, Gagnon. GIDP „ Conforto, Nimmo. DP „ Washington 2 (Rendon, Kieboom, Reynolds), (Sanchez, Turner, Reynolds). NEW YORK IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Matz 3 5 3 3 3 4 78 4.14 Gagnon, W, 2-1 2 0 0 0 1 1 23 5.23 Sewald .2 1 0 0 1 0 15 5.86 Zamora, H, 4 .1 0 0 0 0 0 3 3.52 Dr.Smith 1 5 3 3 0 1 25 3.86 Blevins, H, 8 .1 0 0 0 0 0 7 4.57 Swarzak, S, 4-5 1.2 0 0 0 1 2 40 6.04 WASHINGTON IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Fedde 3.1 5 3 3 4 2 80 5.24 Suero, L, 3-1 1.1 6 4 4 1 0 35 3.74 Solis 1.1 1 1 1 2 2 28 6.18 Cordero 1 0 0 0 1 0 11 6.75 Rodriguez 1 0 0 0 1 2 19 5.29 Glover .1 2 0 0 0 0 15 3.52 Collins .2 0 0 0 0 1 8 2.86 Dr.Smith pitched to 4 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored „ Zamora 3-0, Blevins 1-0, Swarzak 1-0, Suero 2-2, Solis 2-0, Collins 2-0. HBP „ Matz (Reynolds), Swarzak (Eaton). WP „ Swarzak. Umpires „ Home, Jim Wolf; First, D.J. Reyburn; Second, Sam Holbrook; Third, Chris Segal. T „ 4:14. A „ 34,218 (41,313).RANGERS 6, MARINERS 1SEATTLE AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Segura ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .303 Cano 2b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .304 Cruz dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .261 Healy 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .239 Seager 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .221 Maybin lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .239 b-Gamel ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .275 Negron rf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .368 Heredia cf 1 0 1 1 2 0 .230 c-Vogelbach ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .213 Freitas c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .209 TOTALS 33 1 6 1 2 4 TEXAS AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Choo dh 5 0 0 0 0 1 .267 Profar 2b-3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .255 Andrus ss 3 1 2 0 0 0 .253 Beltre 3b 2 0 0 0 0 2 .275 Odor 2b 1 1 0 0 1 1 .258 Mazara rf 4 1 1 2 0 1 .261 Chirinos c 3 2 1 1 0 0 .219 Guzman 1b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .233 Rua lf 4 0 2 0 0 2 .197 Tocci cf 2 0 2 1 0 0 .228 a-Gallo ph-cf 1 1 1 2 0 0 .212 TOTALS 33 6 12 6 1 9 SEATTLE 001 000 000„1 6 0 TEXAS 000 004 02X„6 12 0 a-homered for Tocci in the 8th. b-”ied out for Maybin in the 9th. c-lined out for Heredia in the 9th. LOB „ Seattle 7, Texas 7. 2B „ Heredia (12), Andrus (18), Mazara (24). HR „ Gallo (39), off Cook. RBIs „ Heredia (18), Mazara 2 (76), Chirinos (63), Tocci (5), Gallo 2 (91). SB „ Heredia (2). SF „ Tocci. Runners left in scoring position „ Seattle 4 (Cano, Seager, Freitas 2); Texas 3 (Profar, Beltre 2). RISP „ Seattle 0 for 9; Texas 4 for 10. Runners moved up „ Maybin, Negron, Cruz. GIDP „ Choo. DP „ Seattle 1 (Segura, Healy). SEATTLE IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA LeBlanc, L, 8-5 5 8 3 3 1 5 81 3.55 Vincent 0 3 1 1 0 0 12 4.14 Pazos .2 0 0 0 0 0 9 2.91 Festa 1.1 0 0 0 0 2 14 1.17 Cook 1 1 2 2 0 2 19 5.62 TEXAS IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Perez 4 2 1 1 0 1 49 6.13 Springs, W, 1-1 2 2 0 0 1 2 35 3.03 Moore, H, 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 18 6.96 Martin, H, 14 1 2 0 0 0 1 18 4.62 Leclerc 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 1.62 LeBlanc pitched to 3 batters in the 6th. Vincent pitched to 3 batters in the 6th. Springs pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored „ Vincent 1-1, Pazos 3-1, Festa 2-0, Moore 1-0. HBP „ LeBlanc (Andrus), Cook (Chirinos). WP „ Cook 2. Umpires „ Home, Dave Rackley; First, Larry Vanover; Second, Jansen Visconti; Third, Mark Carlson. T „ 2:56. A „ 31,269 (49,115).TWINS 5, ATHLETICS 1MINNESOTA AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Mauer dh 4 1 2 0 0 1 .276 Polanco ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .279 Cave cf 4 1 2 2 0 2 .261 Grossman lf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .270 Austin 1b 4 1 0 0 0 3 .230 Kepler rf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .224 Adrianza 3b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .256 Gimenez c 3 0 0 1 0 2 .196 G.Petit 2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .264 TOTALS 34 5 9 5 0 10 OAKLAND AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Martini lf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .294 Chapman 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .280 Piscotty rf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .270 Davis dh 3 0 0 0 1 0 .249 Olson 1b 4 1 3 1 0 0 .246 Laureano cf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .301 Semien ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .257 Pinder 2b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .254 a-Joyce ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Barreto 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .229 b-Lowrie ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .267 Lucroy c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .240 TOTALS 33 1 8 1 4 5 MINNESOTA 200 300 000„5 9 0 OAKLAND 010 000 000„1 8 2 a-grounded out for Pinder in the 7th. bwalked for Barreto in the 9th. E „ Chapman (19), Lucroy (10). LOB „ Minnesota 3, Oakland 9. 2B „ Adrianza (23), Laureano (11). HR „ Cave (12), off Cahill; Olson (28), off Gibson. RBIs „ Cave 2 (40), Kepler (53), Adrianza (39), Gimenez (5), Olson (78). CS „ Cave (1). SF „ Gimenez. Runners left in scoring position „ Minnesota 1 (G.Petit); Oakland 4 (Martini, Laureano, Semien, Lucroy). RISP „ Minnesota 2 for 3; Oakland 0 for 7. Runners moved up „ Pinder, Lucroy. GIDP „ Mauer, Gimenez, Chapman 2. DP „ Minnesota 2 (Polanco, G.Petit, Austin), (Adrianza, G.Petit, Austin); Oakland 2 (Pinder, Semien, Olson), (Chapman, Barreto, Olson). MINNESOTA IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gibson, W, 9-13 7.1 7 1 1 3 3 114 3.68 Duffey .1 0 0 0 0 0 6 7.83 Moya 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 4.86 May, S, 1-1 1.1 0 0 0 1 2 27 3.52 OAKLAND IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cahill, L, 6-4 3.1 5 5 3 0 5 65 3.91 Kelley .2 0 0 0 0 0 8 3.06 Y.Petit 1 1 0 0 0 2 17 3.10 Pagan 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 4.30 Hendriks 2 2 0 0 0 1 22 4.57 Wendelken 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 0.71 Moya pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored „ Duffey 1-0, Moya 1-0, May 2-0, Kelley 2-1. Umpires „ Home, Tony Randazzo; First, Nick Mahrley; Second, Lance Barrett; Third, Bill Welke. T „ 3:02. A „ 35,754 (46,765).DODGERS 14, PADRES 0SAN DIEGO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Myers 3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .258 Reyes rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .275 Renfroe lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .252 Hosmer 1b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .250 c-Pirela ph-1b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .247 Mejia c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .209 Galvis ss 2 0 1 0 0 0 .241 Guerra ss 1 0 0 0 0 1 .100 Margot cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .244 Spangenberg 2b 3 0 0 0 0 3 .231 Lucchesi p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .063 Wingenter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Ellis ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .287 Maton p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Wick p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Brewer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Makita p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 TOTALS 32 0 5 0 0 13 LOS ANGELES AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Taylor lf-ss 3 2 1 0 2 1 .252 Turner 3b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .318 Bellinger cf 0 1 0 0 1 0 .258 Freese 1b 3 1 1 1 0 2 .286 b-Muncy ph-1b 2 1 2 4 0 0 .257 Machado ss 4 2 2 2 0 1 .296 Pederson lf 1 0 0 1 0 0 .253 Hernandez cf-3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .240 e-Farmer ph-3b 1 0 0 1 0 0 .242 Kemp rf 4 2 3 3 0 0 .287 f-Toles ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .214 Dozier 2b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .216 Utley 2b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .216 Barnes c 4 1 1 2 0 2 .202 Gale c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Ryu p 3 2 3 0 0 0 .292 Fields p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Verdugo ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .274 Urias p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 TOTALS 41 14 16 14 4 11 SAN DIEGO 000 000 000„0 5 0 LOS ANGELES 020 620 40X„14 16 0 a-struck out for Wingenter in the 5th. bsingled for Freese in the 5th. c-grounded out for Hosmer in the 6th. d-singled for Fields in the 7th. e-grounded out for Hernandez in the 7th. f-struck out for Kemp in the 7th. LOB „ San Diego 5, Los Angeles 7. 2B „ Myers (23), Turner (29), Hernandez (15), Kemp (23). HR „ Machado (37), off Lucchesi; Kemp (21), off Lucchesi; Barnes (3), off Lucchesi. RBIs „ Freese (48), Machado 2 (102), Kemp 3 (82), Barnes 2 (13), Muncy 4 (72), Pederson (55), Farmer (9). Runners left in scoring position „ San Diego 2 (Ellis, Pirela); Los Angeles 4 (Turner 2, Dozier, Barnes). RISP „ San Diego 0 for 6; Los Angeles 6 for 15. Runners moved up „ Renfroe, Dozier, Kemp, Pederson, Farmer. SAN DIEGO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lucchesi, L, 8-9 3.2 7 7 7 2 6 84 4.14 Wingenter .1 2 1 1 1 1 18 4.60 Maton 1 3 2 2 0 1 24 4.47 Wick 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 6.14 Brewer 0 3 4 4 1 0 16 8.10 Makita 2 0 0 0 0 2 23 5.73 LOS ANGELES IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ryu, W, 6-3 6 4 0 0 0 8 88 2.00 Fields 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 2.25 Urias 2 1 0 0 0 4 29 0.00 Brewer pitched to 4 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored „ Wingenter 2-2, Makita 2-2. WP „ Lucchesi. Umpires „ Home, Jim Reynolds; First, Mark Wegner; Second, John Tumpane; Third, Jeremie Rehak. T „ 3:11. A „ 50,250 (56,000).ROCKIES 2, DIAMONDBACKS 0COLORADO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Blackmon cf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .288 LeMahieu 2b 4 1 2 0 1 1 .279 Dahl rf 4 1 0 0 0 1 .269 Arenado 3b 3 0 1 1 1 1 .293 Parra lf 4 0 1 1 0 2 .281 Desmond 1b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .234 Iannetta c 3 0 0 0 1 2 .217 Hampson ss 4 0 2 0 0 1 .270 Freeland p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .095 Ottavino p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Oh p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Tapia ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .182 Davis p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --TOTALS 32 2 7 2 5 13 ARIZONA AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Souza Jr. rf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .217 Owings rf 3 0 2 0 0 0 .209 Escobar 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .270 Goldschmidt 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .294 Peralta lf 3 0 2 0 1 1 .297 Ahmed ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .238 Pollock cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .256 Marte 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .250 Mathis c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .204 d-Jay ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .271 Godley p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .059 a-Kivlehan ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .375 Bradley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Diekman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Walker ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .174 Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Bracho p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Descalso ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .239 TOTALS 34 0 7 0 3 9 COLORADO 001 010 000„2 7 1 ARIZONA 000 000 000„0 7 0 a-struck out for Godley in the 5th. b-popped out for Diekman in the 7th. c-struck out for Oh in the 9th. d-struck out for Mathis in the 9th. e-grounded out for Bracho in the 9th. E „ Hampson (3). LOB „ Colorado 9, Arizona 10. 2B „ Arenado (35), Hampson (2). RBIs „ Arenado (103), Parra (50). CS „ Escobar (4). S „ Freeland. Runners left in scoring position „ Colorado 4 (Blackmon, Desmond 3); Arizona 4 (Escobar 2, Pollock, Marte). RISP „ Colorado 1 for 11; Arizona 0 for 6. Runners moved up „ Parra. GIDP „ LeMahieu, Desmond. DP „ Arizona 2 (Ahmed, Marte, Goldschmidt), (Escobar, Marte, Goldschmidt). COLORADO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Freeland, W, 16-7 7 7 0 0 1 6 94 2.84 Ottavino, H, 33 .1 0 0 0 2 1 18 2.26 Oh, H, 20 .2 0 0 0 0 1 7 2.73 Davis, S, 41-47 1 0 0 0 0 1 18 4.26 ARIZONA IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Godley, L, 14-11 5 6 2 2 3 5 90 4.75 Bradley 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 3.59 Diekman 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 4.94 Walker 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 Lopez 1 0 0 0 1 3 21 4.50 Bracho 1 1 0 0 1 1 8 2.96 Inherited runners-scored „ Oh 2-0. WP „ Godley. Umpires „ Home, Chris Guccione; First, James Hoye; Second, Eric Cooper; Third, Marvin Hudson. T „ 3:15. A „ 29,191 (48,519).BOX SCORES ROUNDUP/MATCHUPSRays 5, Blue Jays 2: Blake Snell won his ninth straight start. Royals 3, Tigers 2: Rookie Brad Keller pitched seven strong innings. Marlins 6, Reds 0: The Marlins became the “rst major league team to draw fewer than 1 million fans at home since the 2004 Montreal Expos. Braves 2, Phillies 1: Lane Adams homered and drove in two runs. Brewers 13, Pirates 6: Christian Yelich hit his 32nd home run. Cubs 6, White Sox 1: Kyle Schwarber homered and drove in two runs. Cardinals 9, Giants 2: Miles Mikolas won his fourth straight start. Astros 6, Angels 2: Charlie Morton left Houstons win over the Los Angeles Angels after one inning because of discomfort in his pitching shoulder. Mets 8, Nationals 6: Michael Conforto hit a go-ahead, bases-loaded triple. Rangers 6, Mariners 1: Adrian Beltre was given a standing ovation when he was removed from what could be his last home game for Texas. Dodgers 14, Padres 0: Hyun-Jin Ryu pitched six scoreless innings and tied a career high with three of the Dodgers 16 hits. Twins 5, Athletics 1: Kyle Gibson allowed one run over 7 1/3 innings, Jake Cave hit a two-run homer and the Minnesota Twins beat the Athletics, preventing Oakland from clinching an AL wild-card berth in its last regular-season home game. Rockies 2, Diamondbacks 0: Kyle Freeland pitched seven shutout innings as Colorado completed a sweep. LATE Boston at ClevelandTODAYS PITCHING COMPARISONNATIONAL LEAGUE 2018 TEAM LAST THREE STARTS TEAMS PITCHERS TIME W-L ERA REC W-L IP ERA Miami Alcantara (R) 2-1 2.35 2-2 1-1 18.0 2.50 Washington Strasburg (R) 7:05p 9-7 3.82 11-9 2-0 18.2 2.41 Pittsburgh Taillon (R) 13-9 3.24 19-11 2-0 19.0 1.42 Chicago Hamels (L) 8:05p 9-10 3.90 14-16 0-1 18.1 5.89 Milwaukee Anderson (R) 9-8 3.93 16-14 0-1 12.2 3.55 St. Louis Flaherty (R) 8:15p 8-8 3.08 11-15 0-2 15.2 5.17 Philadelphia E”in (R) 11-7 4.09 12-11 2-1 14.1 4.40 Colorado Anderson (L) 8:40p 6-9 4.76 11-20 0-2 14.2 4.30 Los Angeles Kershaw (L) 8-5 2.45 14-10 2-0 19.0 2.84 Arizona Ray (L) 9:40p 6-2 3.92 11-11 1-0 17.1 2.08 San Diego Mitchell (R) 1-4 6.16 4-6 1-1 16.0 3.38 San Francisco Holland (L) 10:15p 7-8 3.57 15-14 0-0 17.0 3.71AMERICAN LEAGUE 2018 TEAM LAST THREE STARTS TEAMS PITCHERS TIME W-L ERA REC W-L IP ERA Houston Keuchel (L) 11-11 3.71 17-15 0-1 17.0 6.35 Toronto Estrada (R) 7:07p 7-13 5.57 12-15 0-2 14.2 6.75 Baltimore Bundy (R) 8-15 5.37 9-20 1-2 16.2 5.40 Boston Eovaldi (R) 7:10p 5-7 3.98 7-12 0-1 11.1 2.38 New York TBD ( ) 0-0 0.00 0-0 0-0 0.0 0.00 Tampa Bay Castillo (R) 7:10p 3-2 3.25 9-1 0-0 3.2 2.45 Cleveland Kluber (R) 19-7 2.93 20-11 2-0 16.1 4.41 Chicago Covey (R) 8:10p 5-13 5.33 5-14 0-2 16.0 3.94 Texas Sampson (R) 0-2 4.09 0-2 0-2 10.2 2.53 Los Angeles Pena (R) 10:07p 3-5 4.20 7-9 2-1 17.0 4.24 Oakland Anderson (L) 4-5 3.96 8-7 1-2 12.2 6.39 Seattle TBD ( ) 10:10p 0-0 0.00 0-0 0-0 0.0 0.00 KEY: TEAM REC-Teams Record in games started by todays pitcher. SATURDAYS GAMES American League N.Y. Yankees 3, Baltimore 2, 11 innings Toronto 5, Tampa Bay 2 Detroit 5, Kansas City 4 Cleveland 5, Boston 4, 11 innings Houston 10, L.A. Angels 5 Seattle 13, Texas 0 Oakland 3, Minnesota 2 National League Atlanta 5, Philadelphia 3 St. Louis 5, San Francisco 4, 10 innings Washington 6, N.Y. Mets 0 Pittsburgh 3, Milwaukee 0 Miami 5, Cincinnati 1 Colorado 5, Arizona 1 L.A. Dodgers 7, San Diego 2 Interleague Chicago Cubs 8, Chicago White Sox 3 TUESDAYS GAMES American League Houston at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Baltimore at Boston, 7:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. Cleveland at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. Detroit at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m. Texas at L.A. Angels, 10:07 p.m. Oakland at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. National League Miami at Washington, 7:05 p.m. Atlanta at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m. Milwaukee at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. Philadelphia at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. San Diego at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. Interleague Kansas City at Cincinnati, 6:40 p.m.

PAGE 15

DailyCommercial.com | Monday, September 24, 2018 B5 EAST T eamWLTPctPFPA Miami3001.0007552 NewEngland110.5004751 Buffalo120.3335084 N.Y.Jets120.3337758 S OUTH T eamWLTPctPFPA T ennessee210.6674950 J acksonville210.6675744 Indianapolis120.3336063 Houston030.0005974 NORTH T eamWLTPctPFPA Cincinnati210.6678977 Baltimore210.6679751 Cleveland111.5006059 Pittsburgh011.2505863 W EST T eamWLTPctPFPA KansasCity3001.00011892 Denver210.6676170 L.A.Chargers120.3338293 Oakland030.0005281 A lltimesEastern W EEK3 T hursdaysgameCleveland21,N.Y.Jets17 S undaysgames T ennessee9,Jacksonville6 N.Y.Giants27,Houston22 Miami28,Oakland20 Buffalo27,Minnesota6 Carolina31,Cincinnati21 Philadelphia20,Indianapolis16 Baltimore27,Denver14 Washington31,GreenBay17 KansasCity38,SanFrancisco27 NewOrleans43,Atlanta37,OT L.A.Rams35,L.A.Chargers23 S eattle24,Dallas13 Chicago16,Arizona14 NewEnglandatDetroit,late T odaysgamePittsburghatTampaBay,8:15p.m. W EEK4 T hursday,Sept.27MinnesotaatL.A.Rams,8:20p.m. S unday,Sept.30CincinnatiatAtlanta,1p.m. T ampaBayatChicago,1p.m. HoustonatIndianapolis,1p.m. N.Y.JetsatJacksonville,1p.m. MiamiatNewEngland,1p.m. DetroitatDallas,1p.m. BuffaloatGreenBay,1p.m. PhiladelphiaatTennessee,1p.m. S eattleatArizona,4:05p.m. ClevelandatOakland,4:05p.m. NewOrleansatN.Y.Giants,4:25p.m. S anFranciscoatL.A.Chargers,4:25p.m. BaltimoreatPittsburgh,8:20p.m. Open:Washington,CarolinaMonday,Oct.1KansasCityatDenver,8:15p.m.QUARTERBACKSDrewBrees,Saints: Threw for396yardsandthree touchdownsina43-37 overtimewinoverAtlanta. DeshaunWatson,Texans: Completed24of40passes for385yardsandtwo touchdowns. MattRyan,Falcons: Passed for374yardsand“ve touchdownsinthelossto Saints.RUNNINGBACKSChristianMcCaffrey, Panthers: Had28carries for184yardsinthewin overCincinnati. A drianPeterson,Redskins: Had19carriesfor120 yardsandtwotouchdowns inthewinoverGreenBay.RECEIVERSJordyNelson,Raiders: Caughtsixpassesfor173 yardsandatouchdownin thelosstoMiami. CalvinRidley,Falcons: Hadsevencatchesfor146 yardsandthreetouchdownsagainsttheSaints. TylerBoyd,Bengals: Made sixgrabsfor132yardsand atouchdown. F romwirereportsBILLS27,VIKINGS6: Josh Allenaccountedforthree touchdownsinhis“rst roadstartintheNFL SAINTS43,FALCONS37, OT: DrewBrees1-yard runcappedan80-yard touchdowndrivetoopen overtime. CHIEFS38,49ERS27: PatrickMahomestorchedSan Franciscosbanged-uppass defensefor314yardsand threetouchdowns. REDSKINS31,PACKERS17: AdrianPetersonranfor120 yardsandapairof2-yard scores. EAGLES20,COLTS16: CarsonWentzthrewa touchdownpassonhis“rst driveinninemonths. DOLPHINS28,RAIDERS 20: ReceiverAlbertWilson threwa52-yardtouchdown passandaddeda74-yard receivingscorethatsealed it. PANTHERS31,BENGALS21: CamNewtonthrewfortwo touchdownsandranfor twoothers. RAVENS27,BRONCOS 14: JoeFlaccopicked apartDenversdepleted defensefor277yardsanda touchdown. TITANS9,JAGUARS6: MarcusMariotacameoff thebenchanddirected threescoringdrives. GIANTS27,TEXANS22: EliManningthrewfor297 yardsandtwotouchdowns androokieSaquonBarkley addedascore. SEAHAWKS24,COWBOYS 13: RussellWilsonthrew fortwotouchdownsinthe “rsthalf. RAMS35,CHARGERS 23: JaredGoffpassed for354yardsandthree touchdowns. BEARS16,CARDINALS14: CodyParkeys43-yard“eld goalhelpedpropelChicago toacomebackwin.„TheAssociatedPress ROUNDUPWEEK 3 TodaysgameSteelersatBuccaneers: CanFitzMagiccontinue? Findoutat8:15p.m.EasternonESPN.AFCATAGLANCE SUMMARIESSAINTS43,FALCONS,OTNEWORLEANS797146„43 ATLANTA777160„37 FirstQuarter NO„Ginn4passfromBrees(Lutzkick),11:45. Atl„Ridley18passfromRyan(Bryantkick), 2:45. SecondQuarter NO„FGLutz49,9:37. NO„FGLutz21,3:06. Atl„Ridley75passfromRyan(Bryantkick), 2:12. NO„FGLutz45,:06. ThirdQuarter Atl„Ridley9passfromRyan(Bryantkick), 12:00. NO„Meredith11passfromBrees(Lutzkick), 6:07. FourthQuarter Atl„T.Coleman5passfromRyan(Hooperpass fromRyan),14:11. NO„Line1passfromBrees(Lutzkick),9:59. Atl„Sanu5passfromRyan(Sanupassfrom Ryan),6:58. NO„Brees7run(Lutzkick),1:15. Overtime NO„Brees1run,2:55. NOAtl Firstdowns3224 TotalNetYards534407 Rushes-yards27-14322-48 Passing391359 PuntReturns3-162-12 KickoffReturns3-643-74 Comp-Att-Int39-49-026-35-0 Sacked-YardsLost1-53-15 Punts4-50.56-36.0 Penalties-Yards11-1205-54 TimeofPossession37:4529:20 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„NewOrleans,Kamara16-66, T.Hill3-39,Ginn1-20,Gillislee3-10,Brees3-7, J.Williams1-1.Atlanta,T.Coleman15-33,Ryan 4-12,Ridley1-9,I.Smith2-(minus6). PASSING„NewOrleans,Brees39-49-0-396. Atlanta,Ryan26-35-0-374. RECEIVING„NewOrleans,Kamara15-124, Thomas10-129,Watson5-71,Ginn3-12,Line 2-6,Carr1-25,J.Hill1-17,Meredith1-11, J.Williams1-1.Atlanta,Ridley7-146,Jones 5-96,Sanu4-36,I.Smith3-41,Hooper3-23, T.Coleman2-14,Paulsen1-11,Hall1-7.RAVENS27,BRONCOS14DENVER1 4000„14 BALTIMORE101070„27 FirstQuarter Den„Freeman6run(McManuskick),13:29. Bal„Collins6run(Tuckerkick),10:57. Den„Sanders35run(McManuskick),7:02. Bal„FGTucker52,3:38. SecondQuarter Bal„Allen12passfromFlacco(Tucker kick),8:26. Bal„FGTucker52,:00. ThirdQuarter Bal„Allen1run(Tuckerkick),7:26. A„70,156. DenBal Firstdowns1820 TotalNetYards293342 Rushes-yards24-12028-77 Passing173265 PuntReturns3-313-12 KickoffReturns2-413-78 InterceptionsRet.0-01-33 Comp-Att-Int22-34-125-40-0 Sacked-YardsLost3-192-12 Punts7-41.05-39.4 Fumbles-Lost1-01-0 Penalties-Yards13-1207-52 TimeofPossession29:4630:14 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„Denver,Freeman13-53,Sanders 1-35,Lindsay4-20,Booker5-10,Janovich 1-2.Baltimore,Collins18-68,Allen6-7, Flacco4-2. PASSING„Denver,Keenum22-34-1-192. Baltimore,Flacco25-40-0-277. RECEIVING„Denver,De.Thomas5-63, Sanders5-38,Booker5-34,Sutton2-37,Butt 2-8,Heuerman2-7,Freeman1-5.Baltimore, Crabtree7-61,J.Brown5-86,Snead3-39, Allen3-19,Collins3-6,Andrews2-59, M.Williams1-5,Boyle1-2. MISSEDFIELDGOALS„None.EAGLES20,COLTS16INDIANAPOLIS 7063„16 PHILADELPHIA 7337„20 FirstQuarter Phi„Goedert13passfromWentz(Elliott kick),7:10. Ind„Grant5passfromLuck(Vinatieri kick),:24. SecondQuarter Phi„FGElliott33,3:05. ThirdQuarter Ind„FGVinatieri35,9:41. Ind„FGVinatieri31,8:23. Phi„FGElliott24,2:50. FourthQuarter Ind„FGVinatieri28,14:20. Phi„Smallwood4run(Elliottkick),3:02. A„69,696. IndPhi Firstdowns1426 TotalNetYards209379 Rushes-yards13-6835-152 Passing141227 PuntReturns1-24-5 KickoffReturns2-352-33 InterceptionsRet.1-110-0 Comp-Att-Int25-41-025-37-1 Sacked-YardsLost2-235-28 Punts5-44.43-42.7 Fumbles-Lost0-04-1 Penalties-Yards11-7710-110 TimeofPossession19:4040:20 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„Indianapolis,Luck1-33,Wilkins 6-19,Hines5-18,M.Johnson1-(minus2). Philadelphia,Smallwood10-56,Clement 16-56,J.Adams6-30,Wentz3-10. PASSING„Indianapolis,Luck25-40-0164,Brissett0-1-0-0.Philadelphia,Wentz 25-37-1-255. RECEIVING„Indianapolis,Hilton5-50,Ebron 5-33,Hines5-25,Grant3-35,Rogers2-14, Wilkins2-1,Swoope1-7,Pascal1-3,Kelly 1-(minus4).Philadelphia,Goedert7-73, Ertz5-73,Agholor4-24,Smallwood3-35, Clement3-19,Matthews2-21,Perkins1-10. MISSEDFIELDGOALS„Philadelphia, Elliott55.BILLS27,VIKINGS6BUFFALO171000„27 MINNESOTA 0006„6 FirstQuarter Buf„Allen10run(Hauschkakick),10:01. Buf„FGHauschka30,7:24. Buf„Croom26passfromAllen(Hauschka kick),5:09. SecondQuarter Buf„Allen1run(Hauschkakick),12:14. Buf„FGHauschka50,6:16. FourthQuarter Min„Rudolph4passfromCousins(pass failed),2:59. A„66,800. BufMin Firstdowns1621 TotalNetYards292292 Rushes-yards38-1286-14 Passing164278 PuntReturns1-131-0 KickoffReturns0-04-82 InterceptionsRet.1-00-0 Comp-Att-Int15-22-040-55-1 Sacked-YardsLost3-324-18 Punts6-43.25-51.8 Fumbles-Lost3-04-2 Penalties-Yards12-846-59 TimeofPossession35:4524:15 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„Buffalo,Ivory20-56,Allen10-39, M.Murphy8-33.Minnesota,Boone2-11, Cousins2-2,Murray2-1. PASSING„Buffalo,Allen15-22-0-196. Minnesota,Cousins40-55-1-296. RECEIVING„Buffalo,Ivory3-70,A.Holmes 3-29,Benjamin3-29,Clay2-18,Croom 1-26,Z.Jones1-17,McCloud1-6,M.Murphy 1-1.Minnesota,Thielen14-105,Rudolph 5-48,Ham5-47,Murray5-30,Treadwell 4-33,Diggs4-17,Robinson1-9,Conklin1-7, Boone1-0. MISSEDFIELDGOALS„None.PANTHERS31,BENGALS21CINCINNATI 7770„21 CAROLINA71473„31 FirstQuarter Cin„Bernard1run(Bullockkick),7:40. Car„Newton2run(Ganokick),3:02. SecondQuarter Car„Funchess4passfromNewton(Gano kick),12:03. Cin„Uzomah1passfromDalton(Bullock kick),6:59. Car„Anderson24passfromNewton(Gano kick),2:47. ThirdQuarter Car„Newton5run(Ganokick),5:34. Cin„Boyd27passfromDalton(Bullock kick),2:53. FourthQuarter Car„FGGano40,1:11. A„72,161. CinCar Firstdowns2523 TotalNetYards396377 Rushes-yards13-6641-230 Passing330147 PuntReturns1-91-4 KickoffReturns0-00-0 InterceptionsRet.0-04-4 Comp-Att-Int29-46-415-24-0 Sacked-YardsLost2-221-3 Punts3-44.04-41.3 Fumbles-Lost0-01-0 Penalties-Yards4-363-17 TimeofPossession26:0533:55 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„Cincinnati,Bernard12-61,Boyd 1-5.Carolina,McCaffrey28-184,Newton 10-36,Anderson2-9,Armah1-1. PASSING„Cincinnati,Dalton29-46-4-352. Carolina,Newton15-24-0-150. RECEIVING„Cincinnati,Boyd6-132,Eifert 6-74,Green5-58,Bernard5-25,Ross3-16, Uzomah2-19,Kroft1-16,Malone1-12. Carolina,Funchess4-67,Thomas3-20, T.Smith3-19,McCaffrey2-10,Anderson 1-24,Wright1-7,Moore1-3. MISSEDFIELDGOALS„Cincinnati,Bullock 53.CHIEFS38,49ERS27SANFRANCISCO010143„27 KANSASCITY142103„38 FirstQuarter KC„Hunt1run(Butkerkick),8:24. KC„Hunt1run(Butkerkick),2:20. SecondQuarter SF„Juszczyk35passfromGaroppolo(Gould kick),11:52. KC„Conley4passfromMahomes(Butker kick),8:54. KC„Harris13passfromMahomes(Butker kick),3:37. KC„Watkins12passfromMahomes(Butker kick),:34. SF„FGGould39,:00. ThirdQuarter SF„Goodwin11passfromGaroppolo(kick failed),8:59. SF„Morris3run(KittlepassfromGaroppolo), 2:43. FourthQuarter KC„FGButker37,13:47. SF„FGGould35,5:17. SFKC Firstdowns2631 TotalNetYards406384 Rushes-yards29-17828-77 Passing228307 PuntReturns1-11-5 KickoffReturns1-231-25 Comp-Att-Int20-30-024-38-0 Sacked-YardsLost4-232-7 Punts4-37.02-43.5 Fumbles-Lost3-02-0 Penalties-Yards14-1476-48 TimeofPossession29:5930:01 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„SanFrancisco,Breida10-90,Morris 14-67,Garoppolo3-23,Mostert1-0,Goodwin 1-(minus2).KansasCity,Hunt18-44,Watkins 2-20,Mahomes5-7,Hill2-5,Ware1-1. PASSING„SanFrancisco,Garoppolo20-30-0251.KansasCity,Mahomes24-38-0-314. RECEIVING„SanFrancisco,Kittle5-79, Goodwin3-30,Breida3-27, T.Ta ylor3-24, Juszczyk2-38,Bourne1-27,Garcon1-11, Mostert1-8,Celek1-7.KansasCity,Kelce 8-114,Watkins5-55,Hill2-51,Ware2-29,Dam. Williams2-16,Conley2-13,A.Sherman1-16, Harris1-13,Kemp1-7.DOLPHINS28,RAIDERS20OAKLAND 7373„20 MIAMI07714„28 FirstQuarter Oak„J.Nelson12passfromCarr(Nugent kick),13:34. SecondQuarter Mia„Stills34passfromTannehill(Sanders kick),12:11. Oak„FGNugent25,3:34. ThirdQuarter Oak„Lynch1run(Nugentkick),2:58. Mia„Grant18passfromTannehill(Sanders kick),:55. FourthQuarter Mia„Grant52passfromWilson(Sanders kick),7:18. Mia„Wilson74passfromTannehill (Sanderskick),2:00. Oak„FGNugent52,:20. A„65,667. OakMia Firstdowns2513 TotalNetYards434373 Rushes-yards32-10914-41 Passing325332 PuntReturns3-110-0 KickoffReturns2-394-105 InterceptionsRet.0-02-39 Comp-Att-Int27-39-218-24-0 Sacked-YardsLost3-201-9 Punts3-37.36-47.0 Fumbles-Lost1-00-0 Penalties-Yards8-389-74 TimeofPossession38:3121:29 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„Oakland,Lynch19-64,Martin 9-43,Bryant1-4,K.Smith1-0,Carr2-(minus 2).Miami,Tannehill3-26,Gore6-12,Drake 5-3. PASSING„Oakland,Carr27-39-2-345. Miami,Tannehill17-23-0-289,Wilson 1-1-0-52. RECEIVING„Oakland,J.Nelson6-173, Richard6-59,Cook5-31,Lynch3-22,Bryant 2-30,Cooper2-17,D.Harris2-11,K.Smith 1-2.Miami,Stills3-61,Amendola3-42, Gesicki3-31,Wilson2-74,Grant2-70, D.Parker2-40,Drake2-7,Derby1-16. MISSEDFIELDGOALS„None.GIANTS27,TEXANS22NEWYORK71307„27 HOUSTON33313„22 FirstQuarter Hou„FGFairbairn23,10:10. NYG„Barkley15run(Rosaskick),4:10. SecondQuarter NYG„FGRosas44,11:49. NYG„FGRosas30,4:35. NYG„Ellison16passfromManning(Rosas kick),1:20. Hou„FGFairbairn28,:00. ThirdQuarter Hou„FGFairbairn54,8:41. FourthQuarter Hou„Fuller6passfromWatson(pass failed),7:37. NYG„S.Shepard7passfromManning (Rosaskick),2:08. Hou„Miller4passfromWatson(Fairbairn kick),:01. A„71,838. NYGHou Firstdowns2121 TotalNetYards379427 Rushes-yards27-11419-59 Passing265368 PuntReturns2-63-45 KickoffReturns4-452-41 InterceptionsRet.1-00-0 Comp-Att-Int25-29-024-40-1 Sacked-YardsLost4-323-17 Punts4-49.53-51.7 Fumbles-Lost2-01-1 Penalties-Yards3-207-50 TimeofPossession35:3024:30 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„NewYork,Barkley17-82, Gallman6-25,Stewart2-8,Beckham1-0, Manning1-(minus1).Houston,Watson5-36, Blue4-13,Miller10-10. PASSING„NewYork,Manning25-29-0-297. Houston,Watson24-40-1-385. RECEIVING„NewYork,Beckham9-109, S.Shepard6-80,Barkley5-35,Ellison3-39, Engram1-19,Latimer1-15.Houston, Hopkins6-86,Fuller5-101,Miller5-41, J.Thomas2-53,Grif“n2-44,Smith1-28, Akins1-18,Ellington1-10,Blue1-4. MISSEDFIELDGOALS„None.REDSKINS31,PACKERS17GREENBAY01070„17 WASHINGTON141403„31 FirstQuarter Was„Richardson46passfromA.Smith (Hopkinskick),12:54. Was„Peterson2run(Hopkinskick),2:14. SecondQuarter GB„FGCrosby41,12:52. Was„C rowder9passfromA.Smith (Hopkinskick),4:26. GB„Allison64passfromRodgers(Crosby kick),2:15. Was„Peterson2run(Hopkinskick),:21. ThirdQuarter GB„D.Adams2passfromRodgers(Crosby kick),7:58. FourthQuarter Was„FGHopkins35,1:58. A„0. GBWas Firstdowns1920 TotalNetYards340386 Rushes-yards17-10035-166 Passing240220 PuntReturns4-291-9 KickoffReturns1-252-33 InterceptionsRet.1-10-0 Comp-Att-Int27-45-012-20-1 Sacked-YardsLost4-250-0 Punts5-46.45-47.0 Fumbles-Lost2-10-0 Penalties-Yards11-1156-66 TimeofPossession30:5529:05 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„GreenBay,A.Jones6-42, J.Williams5-29,Montgomery4-16,Rodgers 2-13.Washington,Peterson19-120,A.Smith 7-20,Thompson6-17,Crowder1-6,Bibbs 2-3. PASSING„GreenBay,Rodgers27-44-0265,Scott0-1-0-0.Washington,A.Smith 12-20-1-220. RECEIVING„GreenBay,D.Adams7-52, Montgomery6-48,Graham5-45,Cobb4-23, Allison2-76,J.Williams2-16,A.Jones1-5. Washington,Reed4-65,C rowder4-39,Davis 2-70,Richardson1-46,Thompson1-0. MISSEDFIELDGOALS„None.TITANS9,JAGUARS6TENNESSEE 3033„9 JACKSONVILLE 0303„6 FirstQuarter Ten„FGSuccop39,4:59. SecondQuarter Jac„FGLambo46,8:54. ThirdQuarter Ten„FGSuccop36,10:01. FourthQuarter Jac„FGLambo38,10:48. Ten„FGSuccop28,4:06. A„64,015. TenJac Firstdowns1512 TotalNetYards233232 Rushes-yards35-15019-87 Passing83145 PuntReturns4-262-11 KickoffReturns0-01-25 InterceptionsRet.0-00-0 Comp-Att-Int13-21-021-34-0 Sacked-YardsLost3-253-10 Punts6-46.76-45.5 Fumbles-Lost0-02-1 Penalties-Yards4-308-75 TimeofPossession32:4727:13 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„Tennessee,Henry18-57, Mariota7-51,D.Lewis9-26,Sharpe1-16. Jacksonville,Yeldon7-44,Bortles5-27, Grant6-11,Wilds1-5. PASSING„Tennessee,Gabbert1-3-0-8, Mariota12-18-0-100.Jacksonville,Bortles 21-34-0-155. RECEIVING„Tennessee,Taylor4-30, D.Lewis3-14,Cor.Davis2-34,Stocker 1-11,J.Smith1-9,Jennings1-7,Matthews 1-3.Jacksonville,Yeldon6-46,Cole5-40, Westbrook3-31,Seferian-Jenkins3-18, Moncrief2-16,Bohanon1-5,Grant1-(minus 1). MISSEDFIELDGOALS„Tennessee,Succop 48.RAMS35,CHARGERS23L.A.CHARGERS 6773„23 L.A.RAMS147140„35 FirstQuarter LAR„Gurley1run(Fickenkick),6:14. LAC„M.Williams42passfromRivers(kick failed),4:42. LAR„Woods3passfromGoff(Ficken kick),:51. SecondQuarter LAR„Countess0blockedpuntreturn (Fickenkick),7:44. LAC„Gordon11run(Sturgiskick),3:12. ThirdQuarter LAR„Kupp53passfromGoff(Fickenkick), 12:38. LAC„M.Williams20passfromRivers (Sturgiskick),8:18. LAR„Woods6passfromGoff(Fickenkick), 3:19. FourthQuarter LAC„FGSturgis26,11:49. A„68,947. LACLAR Firstdowns1633 TotalNetYards356521 Rushes-yards20-14135-171 Passing215350 PuntReturns1-112-8 KickoffReturns1-333-75 InterceptionsRet.1-40-0 Comp-Att-Int18-30-029-36-1 Sacked-YardsLost2-111-4 Punts3-34.01-49.0 Fumbles-Lost2-21-1 Penalties-Yards4-306-64 TimeofPossession25:4434:16 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„LosAngeles,Gordon15-80, Ekeler4-47,Ty.Williams1-14.LosAngeles, Gurley23-105,M.Brown5-42,Goff3-14, Woods3-13,Kupp1-(minus3). PASSING„LosAngeles,Rivers18-30-0-226. LosAngeles,Goff29-36-1-354. RECEIVING„LosAngeles,M.Williams 4-81,Gates3-45,K.Allen3-44,Ekeler3-24, Ty.Williams2-22,Gordon2-4,Green1-6.Los Angeles,Woods10-104,Cooks7-90,Gurley 5-51,Kupp4-71,Higbee2-35,Everett1-3. MISSEDFIELDGOALS„LosAngeles,Ficken 46.SEAHAWKS24,COWBOYS13DALLAS 0337„13 SEATTLE01707„24 SecondQuarter Sea„J.Brown16passfromR.Wilson (Janikowskikick),9:28. Dal„FGMaher50,5:26. Sea„Lockett52passfromR.Wilson (Janikowskikick),1:52. Sea„FGJani kowski47,:00. ThirdQuarter Dal„FGMaher35,3:43. FourthQuarter Sea„Carson5run(Jani kowskikick),12:54. Dal„Austin3passfromPrescott(Maher kick),7:11. A„69,047. DalSea Firstdowns1718 TotalNetYards303295 Rushes-yards19-16639-113 Passing137182 PuntReturns4-203-25 KickoffReturns3-813-66 InterceptionsRet.0-02-0 Comp-Att-Int19-34-216-26-0 Sacked-YardsLost5-312-10 Punts5-48.08-43.8 Fumbles-Lost1-11-0 Penalties-Yards7-5510-67 TimeofPossession27:1632:44 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„Dallas,Elliott16-127,Prescott 2-21,Austin1-18.Seattle,Carson32-102, Lockett1-5,Penny3-5,Madden1-2, R.Wilson2-(minus1). PASSING„Dallas,Prescott19-34-2-168. Seattle,R.Wilson16-26-0-192. RECEIVING„Dallas,Swaim5-47,Beasley 3-46,Elliott3-11,Austin3-2,D.Thompson 2-23,Hurns2-22,Gallup1-17.Seattle, Lockett4-77,Vannett4-27,Marshall2-30, J.Brown2-25,Carson2-22,Davis1-7,Dissly 1-4. MISSEDFIELDGOALS„None.BEARS16,CARDINALS14CHICAGO03103„16 ARIZONA1 4000„14 FirstQuarter Ari„Seals-Jones35passfromBradford (Dawsonkick),12:12. Ari„Johnson21passfromBradford (Dawsonkick),1:40. SecondQuarter Chi„FGParkey20,1:54. ThirdQuarter Chi„Howard1run(Parkeykick),6:16. Chi„FGParkey41,:44. FourthQuarter Chi„FGParkey43,4:31. A„62,163. ChiAri Firstdowns2113 TotalNetYards316221 Rushes-yards31-12218-53 Passing194168 PuntReturns2-242-7 KickoffReturns0-00-0 InterceptionsRet.3-01-0 Comp-Att-Int24-35-117-26-3 Sacked-YardsLost3-264-25 Punts3-52.74-50.8 Fumbles-Lost1-12-1 Penalties-Yards7-456-43 TimeofPossession36:2123:39 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„Chicago,Howard24-61,Cohen 5-53,Trubisky2-8.Arizona,Johnson12-31, Rosen1-12,Edmonds5-10. PASSING„Chicago,Trubisky24-35-1-220. Arizona,Bradford13-19-2-157,Rosen 4-7-1-36. RECEIVING„Chicago,Gabriel6-34,T.Burton 4-55,Miller4-35,Robinson3-50,Cohen3-15, Howard2-20,B.Cunningham1-9,Bellamy 1-2.Arizona,Kirk7-90,Johnson4-30, Fitzgerald2-9,Seals-Jones1-35,Coleman 1-12,Gresham1-9,C.Williams1-8. MISSEDFIELDGOALS„Chicago,Parkey46. EAST T eamWLTPctPFPA Washington210.6676444 Philadelphia210.6675955 Dallas120.3334153 N.Y.Giants120.33355622 S OUTH T eamWLTPctPFPA T ampaBay2001.0007561 NewOrleans210.667104103 Carolina210.6677160 A tlanta120.3338085 NORTH T eamWLTPctPFPA Chicago210.6676355 GreenBay111.5007083 Minnesota111.5005972 Detroit020.0004478 W EST T eamWLTPctPFPA L.A.Rams3001.00010236 Seattle120.3336564 SanFrancisco120.3337389 A rizona030.0002074NFCATAGLANCE RESULTS/ SCHEDULE SUNDAYSSTARS

PAGE 16

CLASSIC PEANUTS HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH COMICS B6 Monday, September 24, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com

PAGE 17

DEAR ABBY: My son has taken it upon himself to get romantically involved with two different married women. He's newly divorced after a long marriage and hates the idea of being alone. He says he loves them both, but realizes there's no future with either one, so he's trying to extricate himself from the jam he's gotten into. The problem is, the women refuse to let go, and it's causing all sorts of problems. Any ideas? -DAD IN THE MIDDLE IN NEW YORK DEAR DAD: If you are smart, you'll stay out of this mess. Hasn't it occurred to you that if your son was truly unhappy with the situation, he -not you -would have sought help for his problem? He doesn't love either of those women; he loves what he's getting from them -attention, companionship, sex. Because they are married, he doesn't have to worry about them wanting a commitment from him as a single woman might. If he really wanted to stop these dolls from "stalking" him, he would threaten to make their husbands aware of what's been going on, and THAT would be the end of it.DEAR ABBY: I am 15 and my mom was recently diagnosed with cancer. My two older sisters are away in college, and my dad works all the time. How should I balance taking care of Mom, doing schoolwork and playing eld hockey? I wish I could give each task my full attention, but I'm not going to be home much because of school. -JUGGLING IN PENNSYLVANIA DEAR JUGGLING: I am sure your mother's diagnosis has caused stress for every member of your family, including those who are away, and for that I am sorry. You are so young, and I can only imagine the stress you are feeling. If you were discussing this with your mother, I am sure she would tell you -as I am -how important it is that you keep up with your schoolwork and activities. You cannot assume the entire responsibility for her care by yourself. Who will help her during her treatments, and how much time you should realistically devote, is something both your parents should help you to determine. None of you will really know how much assistance she'll require until the process is started, so be exible and take things a step at a time.DEAR ABBY: My mom owns two successful women's clothing stores near my hometown that she's had for more than 10 years. The problem is, she named them after me, and I hate it! I've tried talking to her about it many times, but every time I bring it up she gets sarcastic, says things like, "This is a fun conversation," and doesn't let me get a word out. I have tried talking to the rest of my family about it, but they don't consider it a big deal and tell me I'm being ridiculous. I have run out of ideas about what to do, so if you could give me some advice, it would really help. -ANGRY DAUGHTER DEAR ANGRY DAUGHTER: Many daughters would consider what your mother did to be a compliment. However, because it bothers you so much, consider going by your MIDDLE name. And, if that doesn't satisfy you, and you feel strongly enough about this, go to court and legally change your name to another one you like when you reach adulthood. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in diculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION BRIDGE CRYPTOQUOTE HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORY DIVERSIONS Man afraid to be alone starts affairs with married women license tocruise...Place your auto ad in the and watch it go! Call Classieds Today!352-314-FAST (3278) HAPPY BIRTHDAY FOR MONDAY, SEPT. 24, 2018:This year you come to an understanding with those who often take the opposite point of view from yours. In fact, your comprehension will help resolve some hot issues. Your focus will be on nances and potential enhancements. If you are single, you will have quite a few opportunities to be coupled up, but you may back out of several potential bonds. Get involved only with someone who is right for you. If you are attached, your sweetie might not be as agreeable as usual. Give him or her some space for now. ARIES often stands up to you.ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19) Your dreams could be more signicant than you initially believe. Because of your precognitive abilities, you might opt to head in a new direction. You could feel a push and pull between you and others when discussing an issue. Keep your cool. TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20) You have been unusually focused as of late. Stay centered, as plans could change when you wake up. Honor the need to change your emphasis. You might feel a drive to do some long-overdue research. You need more facts at your ngertips.GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20) You have been very deep in your own thoughts. Today, you will start acting on some insights. You might not feel comfortable with what you are seeing. Sharing your thoughts works well in getting your message across. Be ready for a myriad of responses. CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22) You might be a bit frazzled as you swing from feeling levelheaded and logical to emotional. Tune in to your inner self and consider recent reections before you take the lead. Follow through on what you feel and know. Your imagination goes wild. LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22) You might want to rethink a personal issue that could be drawing a lot of attention. Of course, everyone has a different opinion that he or she might want to share. You could be overwhelmed by everything you hear. Step back, if possible. VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22) Close relating draws many people toward you. You could have a disagreement with several people over how to handle nances. You might nd a midpoint of agreement if you can understand where others are coming from. LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22) Youll want to approach a personal matter differently. Before you are able to act, the other party could make the rst move. Know that this person feels as strongly as you do, which might be a positive thing, as you can nd a point of agreement. SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21) Keep your focus on your work and on daily matters. Be sure to schedule a doctors appointment. Try to understand where someone is coming from, especially if the two of you have a difference of opinion. Encourage others to be more understanding. SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21) Opportunities head your way if you remain open. Your creativity sparks each time an offer comes in. You might enjoy some of the perks that emerge as a result. Do not get caught in a power struggle involving a loved one. Step away from control games. CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19) One-on-one relating could prove to be rather fruitful. Nevertheless, keep what you know to yourself right now. Answers might come forward in an odd manner. Someone is likely to ask a question that reveals more knowledge. Honor a promise.AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18) You often tell it like it is. You could be challenged by your knowledge of a situation. Hold off on speaking your mind for now. Weigh the pros and cons of a situation, and decide what might be most effective. Trust your instincts. PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20) Take charge, and run with an idea while you can. Others wont intend to interfere, but they will. You have reason to back off completely, as confusion seems to surround communication. Play it low-key. DailyCommercial.com | Monday, September 24, 2018 B7 TODAY IS MONDAY, SEPT. 24, the 267th day of 2018. There are 98 days left in the year. TODAY'S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY: On September 24, 1789, President George Washington signed a Judiciary Act establishing America's federal court system and creating the post of attorney general. ON THIS DATE: In 1934 Babe Ruth made his farewell appearance as a player with the New York Yankees in a game against the Boston Red Sox. (The Sox won, 5-0.) In 1968, the TV news magazine "60 Minutes" premiered on CBS. In 1976, former hostage Patricia Hearst was sentenced to seven years in prison for her part in a 1974 bank robbery in San Francisco carried out by the Symbionese Liberation Army. (Hearst was released after 22 months after receiving clemency from President Jimmy Carter.) In 1996, the United States and 70 other countries became the rst to sign a treaty at the United Nations to end all testing and development of nuclear weapons. (The Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty has yet to enter into force because of the refusal so far of eight nations including the United States to ratify it.)

PAGE 18

B8 Monday, September 24, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com Florida Air & Heat Inc. Your Comfort Company100% Financing Available Licensed Insured BondedServing Our Area Since 1986 State License # CAC1814030CALL 352-326-3202For ALL Your Heating & Cooling Needs A/C Services 352-408-7722 ASK FOR KEITH CARPORTS, SCREEN ROOMS POOL CAGES, PATIO STRUCTURES FOR HOME OWNERS QUESTIONS, WE HAVE ANSWERS! Aluminum Services John Philibert, IncWe do Everything from Ceilings to Floors. Pantries, Cabinets and more.Your pesky leaks gone and houses well paint. From inside and out, well make it great. Lic/Ins. Accepting Visa & MC. JPHandy.com (352) 308-0694 LAMINATE, WOOD & TILE SALE!Great Prices Exceptional Service!20 Years ExperienceSHOWROOM11433 US Hwy 441, Tavares Call Chris352-636-1643 D2452SD Garage Door Services €PressureWashing€Painting €Flooring€Carpet€CleanOuts €CleanUps€Hauling€Licensed352-787-7056 Handyman Services John Philibert, IncFor All Your Flooring Needs Pergo, Ceramic Tile, Travertine, Vinyl & MoreCall John @ (352) 308-0694 Flooring Services CCC1330633D2453SD BILL ROGERS IRRIGATION SERVICE35 YEARS EXPERIENCELIC NO. 22190/INS/BONDEDOWNER OPERATOR352-446-1059 Irrigation Services Home Improvement iMan 4-U O C D I AŽR CJOSEPH MAGRUM352-636-2599TAX ID, INSURED rufus_62@yahoo.com We Also Offer (352) 308-0694 John Philibert, IncFor All Your Interior/Exterior Painting Needs. FREE ESTIMATES!30 Years of Quality Experiencewww.BestPaintRem.com352-210-3964Lic/Ins15% OFFSenior Discount Painting Services Pressure Cleaning 352-396-9447 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed COUPON REQUIRED$15 OFF QUALITY WORK AT A FAIR PRICE Y Y T T Y Y T T Y T T T T N N N U U O U U U U U U U U L L C C C O A A O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A C C O O A A A L L A A O O C C O O A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N U U U U N N Y Y U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N T T T T T T T T T T Y Y Y Y T T T T T T T T T T Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y T T T T Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y T T T T Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y G G G N H H H S S S S S S A A W W W A A A A W W W E E E E E E W W W R R U S S S S S S U U S S S S R R R S P P P U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S R R R R R R R G G G G N N N N N N N N N N N N N N E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E I I I I I I I I I I I I H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H A A A A A A A A A A A A A W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P G G G U U U U S S S S S S S S E E A A A A S S S S S S S S S E E S S S S S S S A A P P P W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W R R R R R N N N S S S S S S S S S S H H S S S S S S S S P P P P S S G G G P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W A A A A A A A A W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A W A A A A A A A A A A A A A S W A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G Comfort Seal Roof Systems, Inc.TM352-242-5055 MEET THE CONTRACTOR NOT A SALESMANŽ! BETTER THAN ANY METAL OR SHINGLE ROOF! NOT ONE ROOF LOST TO ANY STORM! NO PAY UNTIL JOB IS DONE! SPECIAL DISCOUNT FOR FELLOW VETERANS!St. Lic. # CCC1325522 Our 32nd Year Over 12,000 Roofs For Mobile/Manufactured Homes BEST ROOF BEST PRICES GUARANTEED! LIC#CCC042879 #CCC1330633D2472SD Roo“ng Services Re-roofs/RepairsShingles/Metal/FlatLic. #CCC1329936Covenant Roo“ng and Construction, Inc.#1 IN ROOFINGFREE ROOF ESTIMATES352-314-3625 J.C.C.Bobcat&TreeSvc.Inc.LandClearing/Excavating FillDirt/Clay Hauling/DebrisRemoval StumpGrinding Demolition/Grading/Driveways OwnerOperator352-455-7608D2434SD Land Clearing Services Landscaping Services LandscapingTrimming,Mulching, Sod,TreeTrimming,Pavers&MuchMore! ArmandoSantamario352-587-1323D2415SD COMMERCIAL-RESIDENTIAL €AssortedRock&Stone €PaverInstallation/Repair €PalmandTreeInstallation €DecorativeWalls €RetainingWalls €CurbingandMulching €SoddingandIrrigation €SeasonedFirewood €FullLandscapingNeedsFULLGARDENCENTERFreeEstimates,SeniorDiscounts2402SouthSt.,Leesburg352-516-6936TEDBYRNE OwnerLic/InsD2420SD A-1 UNITED SERVICES 352-460-3763CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATESOne Call Does It AllŽLICENSEDINSUREDINT. / EXT. PAINTINGHOME REMODELSALL PHASES OF PRESSURE CLEANINGAND MUCH MORE! A-1 UNITED SERVICES 352-460-3763CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATESOne Call Does It AllŽLICENSEDINSURED Tree Services BAD TREE CALL ME!27 YEARS EXPERIENCE NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL! FREE ESTIMATES TONY THE TREE TRIMMER 2402SouthSt.,Leesburg352-516-6936Senior Discounts TreeRemoval,Trimming,CanopyReduction, CraneService,StumpGrinding, SeasonedFirewood-COMPLETEGARDENCENTERD2460SD D 2088S D D2471SD J.C.C.Bobcat&TreeSvc.Inc.Residential/Commercial Trimming/Removal Palms/Hedges/StumpGrinding Debrisremoval/Hauling FillDirt/Clay/Grading/Driveways Lic/Ins€InsuranceWork€24Hrs.352-455-7608 D2463SD Upholstery Services D2470SD Window Services GEORGE WATKINS 352-587-2735Window ReplacementLanai Enclosures Acrylic WindowsCRC# 1330701 BLIND REPAIRSNo Cost...If We Cant Fix It!352-217-7556exceptionsblinds.comTo have your Professional Service listed here, please contact the Classi“ed Department at (352) 314-3278. 352-396-6238DAMIAN BROOKSDamianbrooks80@yahoo.com You've Tried The Rest...Now Go With The Best! RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIALPERFECT CLEANING Cleaning Services CONCRETE 352.602.8077 Concrete For Less8x10 Slab $800 10x48 Slab $2600No UPFRONT Costs!Blocking/ Ref./Lic./Ins.Lic #113336Phillip 352-504-8372Includes Concrete & Labor D2424SD AllConcreteServices CrackRepair€FreeEstimatesServingLakeCounty30YearsBonded,Insured,Lic#11066CallBobat352.223.7935 Concrete Services CCC1330633D2453SD Construction Services Door & Lock Services D2451SD BRIAN DEGAGLIA CONSTRUCTION SERVICESIncludes: Forming, Pouring, Stripping, Cutting, & Materials. Does Not include stripping of sod or roots, removing of concrete, pumping or hauling of debris. 352-267-5723 CRC 1326327 Only Mobile/ Manufactured Home ROOFINGwww.AllFloridaRoofs.com All Florida Weatherproong & Construction, Inc.FREE VIDEO ROOF INSPECTIONS1-877.572.1019 GREEN ACRES MOWINGWe mow or bushhog acreage of any amount in all of Central & South Lake County REASONABLE PRICES!352-360-5445 352-348-3355 Commercial Cleaning Residential Cleaning Buf“ng/ Stripping Floors Advance coatings.incRepaint specialist~interior-exterior ~cabinet resurfacing ~pool decks/stains ~drivewaysMark Mccormickphone 352 255 0145licensed & insured RE-TILESpecializing in Total Bath & Kitchen Remodeling Serving Central Florida for over 30 years 352-391-5553 Bath & Kitchen Services Tile Service RE-TILESpecializing in Total Bath & Kitchen Remodeling Serving Central Florida for over 30 years 352-391-5553 Construction Services Screens Ripped? Call 352-504-0479SCREEN GENIEOne panel or complete screen enclosure. Lanais, Entryways, o job too small.We now do Vinyl Windows! I hope they call Screen Genie Enclosure Screening GoodwinsSprinkler RepairsThats all we do! State Certi“ed (SCC131152004) 30 years exp valves, timers, heads, broken pipes, leaks & tuneups (352) 787-9001

PAGE 19

2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHER'S NOTICEFederal and State laws prohibit advertising expressing a discriminatory preference on the basis of race, age, sex, color, national origin, religion, handicap or marital status. The Daily Commercial will not knowingly accept advertisement for employment which is in violation of the law. Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance Employment Classifications are intended to announce bona de employment offers only. Employment advertising must disclose the specic nature of the work being offered. Some employment categories may charge fees. If any advertiser does not comply with these standards, please notify a Classied Sales Representative at 365-8245 or 365-8200. DailyCommercial.com | Monday, September 24, 2018 B9 CROSSWORD PUZZLE This newspaper will never knowingly accept advertisement that is illegal or considered fraudulent. If you have questions or doubts about any ads on these pages, we advise that before responding or sending money ahead of time, you check with the local Attorney Generals Consumer Fraud Line and/or the Better Business Bureau. Also be advised that some phone numbers published in these ads may require an extra charge. In all cases of questionable value, such as promises or guaranteed income from work-athome programs, money to loan, etc., if it sounds too good to be true it may in fact be exactly that. This newspaper cannot be held responsible for any negative consequences that occur as a result of you doing business with these advertisers. Thank you. NOTICES 1000-1999READER NOTICE 1001

PAGE 20

6865PETSThe Florida Statute 828.29 states that no dog, puppy, cat or kitten may be offered for sale without a health certi cate, nor can any puppy or kitten be sold under the age of 8 weeks, nor can you advertise puppies or kittens with a deposit to hold. B10 Monday, September 17, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com Get the paper delivered to you! Call Us Today! Looking for a safe bet? Subscribe to the newspaper!