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Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Leesburg, FL
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Halifax Media Group, Steve Skaggs - Publisher, Tom McNiff - Executive Editor
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United States -- Florida -- Lake -- Leesburg
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28.81134 x -81.872708

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SPORTS | B1FITZPATRICKS BIG DAY LIFTS BUCS OVER EAGLES SPORTS | B1DOLPHINS ROUT MISTAKE-PRONE JETS TO STAY UNBEATEN LOCAL & STATE | A3AN IMPORTANT SPEECHLeesburg culinary arts student to address Congress @dailycommercial Facebook.com/daily.commercial YOUR LOCAL SOURCE FOR LAKE & SUMTER COUNTIES Monday, September 17, 2018 75 ¢ Local and State ............. A3 Opinion ...................... A11 Weather .....................A12 Sports ..........................B1 Diversions .................... B7 Classified ....................B9 VOLUME 142, ISSUE 260 2018 GateHouse Media Home delivery: 352-787-0600 By Julie Pace, Catherine Lucey and Zeke MillerThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ The prognosis for President Donald Trump and his party was grim.In a post-Labor Day brief-ing at the White House, a top Republican pollster told senior staff that the determining factor in the election wouldnt be the improving economy or the steady increase in job cre-ation. It would be how voters feel about Trump. And the majority of the electorate, including a sizable percentage of Republican-leaning voters, doesnt feel good about the president, according to a presentation from pollster Neil Newhouse that spanned dozens of pages.Newhouses briefing came amid a darkening mood among Republican officials as the November election nears. Party leaders were already worried that a surge in enthu-siasm among Democrats and disdain for Trump by moderate Republicans would put the House out of reach. But some Republicans now fear their Senate majority is also in peril „ a scenario that was unthinkable a few months ago given the favorable Senate map for the GOP.For Republican candidates to win in swing states, they need all of the voters who support President Trump, plus a chunk of those who do not,Ž said Whit Ayres, a GOP pollster. That is threading a very narrow strategic needle.ŽOperatives in both parties say Republicans still have the edge in the fight for con-trol of the Senate. But GOP officials are increasingly worried that nominees in conservative-leaning states like Missouri and Indiana are underperforming, while races Warnings for GOP ahead of electionIn this Sept. 12 photo, President Donald Trump speaks during a Congressional Medal of Honor Society Reception in the East Room of the White House in Washington. [SUSAN WALSH/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] By Chuck BurtonThe Associated PressWILMINGTON, N.C. „ Catastrophic flooding from Florence spread across the Carolinas on Sunday, with roads to Wilmington cut off by the epic deluge and muddy river water swamping entire neighborhoods miles inland. The risk to life is rising with the angry waters,Ž Gov. Roy Cooper declared as the storms death toll climbed to 15.As the storm continued to crawl inland, dumping more than 30 inches of rain in spots since Friday, fears of historic flooding grew and tens of thousands were ordered evacuated from communi-ties along the states steadily rising rivers „ with the Cape Fear, Little River, Lumber, Waccamaw and Pee Dee rivers all projected to burst their banks.In Wilmington, with roads leading in and out of the coastal city underwater and streams still headed upward, residents waited for hours outside stores and restaurants for basic necessities like water. Police guarded the door of one store, and only 10 people were allowed inside at a time. Woody White, chairman of the board of commissioners of New Hanover County, said officials were planning for food and water to be flown into the coastal city of nearly 120,000 people.Our roads are flooded,Ž he said. There is no access to Wilmington.ŽAbout 70 miles away from the coast, residents near the Lumber River stepped from their homes directly into boats floating in their front yards; river forecasts showed the scene could be repeated in towns as far as 250 miles inland as waters rise for days.Downgraded to a tropical depression overnight, Flooding fears surge as rivers riseMembers of the North Carolina Task Force urban search and rescue team check cars in a ” ooded neighborhood Sunday looking for residents who stayed behind as Florence continues to dump rain on Fayetteville, N.C. [DAVID GOLDMAN/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] By Felicia SonmezThe Washington PostWASHINGTON Embattled FEMA Admin-istrator William BrockŽ Long said Sunday that the figures for how many people died as a result of Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico last year are all over the place,Ž in remarks that echoed President Donald Trumps efforts to cast doubt on a George Washington University study that found there were nearly 3,000 excess deaths on the island in the months after the storm.Its hard to tell whats accurate and whats not,Ž Long said in an appearance on Fox News Sunday.Ž He made similar remarks in appearances on NBC News Long: Puerto Rico death toll numbers are all over the placeBy Lynn ElberThe Associated PressLOS ANGELES „ There are critical points about the 70th Emmy Awards to keep in mind, starting with this: The ceremony airs Monday.Typically held on a Sunday, it was punted one day so this years host network, NBC, could accommodate its Sunday Night FootballŽ franchise SNL, politics, diversity could rule EmmysIn this Sept. 13 photo, Emmy Award statuettes are displayed inside the Lindt Chocolate Lounge inside the Microsoft Theatre in Los Angeles. [CHRIS PIZZELLO/ INVISION/ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO] See EMMYS, A9 See DEATH, A10 See GOP, A10 See FLOODING, A9

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A2 Monday, September 17, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com NATION & WORLDPUBLISHER: Steve Skaggs steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.com .......................352-365-8213 EXECUTIVE EDITOR: Tom McNiff tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com ..........................352-365-8250 DIGITAL EDITOR, LIFESTYLES EDITOR: Whitney Lehnecker whitney.lehnecker@dailycommercial.com ..............352-365-8258 SPORTS EDITOR: Paul Jenkins paul.jenkins@dailycommercial.com .........................352-365-8204 SPORTS WRITER: Frank Jolley frank.jolley@dailycommet.com................................352-365-8268 REPORTER: Frank Stan“ eld frankstan“ eld@dailycommercial.com ......................352-365-8257 REPORTER: Roxanne Brown roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com ....................352-365-8266 REPORTER : Payne Ray pray@dailycommercial.com .....................................352-365-8262 Retail Advertising .....................................................352-314-3278 Classi“ ed Advertising ...............................................352-314-3278 Lake Circulation ........................................................352-787-0600 Sumter Circulation ...................................................877-702-0600 Billing .......................................................................352-787-0600 Accounting ................................................................352-365-8212 SUBSCRIPTION RATES Home delivery (Daily/Sunday) 3 months: 41.70 ....................Tax: 2.92 .......................Total: 44.62 6 months: 88.40 ....................Tax: 5.84 .......................Total: 89.24 1 year: 166.80 .......................Tax: 11.68 .....................Total: 178.47 FOR HOME DELIVERY: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., the Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Billed monthly at the rates shown.Print delivery available within the newspaper distribution area only. By submitting your address and/or email, you understand that you may receive promotional offers from GateHouse Media and its related companies. You may unsubscribe from receiving any such offers at any time by calling 352-787-0600 or emailing us at subscriptions@dailycommercial.com. The advertised price does not include the charges for any premium editions. Premium editions are published to provide additional information and value to our readers. You agree that you will be charged up to an additional $7 for each premium edition published and delivered to you during your subscription period, in addition to the cost of your subscription. The length of your subscription will be shortened by the publication of premium editions if those premium editions are delivered to you during your subscription. You may elect to be billed separately for premium editions by contacting Customer Service at 1-352-787-0600 or email us at subscriptions@dailycommercial.com. Thus, unless you elect to be billed separately up to an additional $7 for each premium edition, you agree that the length of your subscription will be shortened in proportion to the value of the number of premium editions published and delivered to you during your subscription period. As an illustrative example, if you select a subscription of up to 12 weeks at a cost of $48.00, and two premium editions at $2 each are published and delivered to you during that subscription period, your subscription will be shortened by 1 week because the weekly cost of the subscription is $4 per week and the premium charges total $4. Depending upon the length of your subscription and the timing of the publication and the delivery of premium editions, you will not be charged for any premium editions if none are published and delivered to you during your subscription. As such, in that case only, the length of your subscription will not be shortened. The timing of the publication and the delivery of the premium edition is variable. There will be no more than 18 premium editions published each calendar year. For more info or to make changes or cancel your subscription, please call Customer Service at 1-352-787-0600 or email us at subscriptions@dailycommercial.com.MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER?: Email subscriptions@ dailycommercial.com anytime or call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and from 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. If youre going on vacation, call circulation 48 hours ahead to stop service. OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY: The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. ANNOUNCEMENTS, CALENDAR, GAME RESULTS: Email upcoming events, along with news about awards and personal or professional milestones „ with a photo, if you desire „ to news@ dailycommercial.com. Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268 or 352-365-8204. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. YOUR LOCAL NEWS SOURCE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIESThe Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $178.47 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by GateHouse Media at 21 2 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to the Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edit ion is property of the Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Saturday, Sept. 15 Lotto: 4-5-35-40-46-53-x5 Powerball: 2-18-19-24-34-3-x3 Fantasy 5: 4-5-8-13-30 Sunday, Sept. 16 Pick 5 Afternoon: 1-8-6-8-7 Pick 4 Afternoon: 5-4-5-8 Pick 3 Afternoon: 4-0-0 Pick 2 Afternoon: 9-8LOTTERY DATELINESPHOENIXPhoenix airport terminal re-opened after scarePolice say a terminal at the Phoenix airport has been reopened after an unattended rental car left in a curb lane prompted a security scare.Phoenix police Sgt. Tommy Thompson says a bomb squad determined the vehicle was not a danger before the ter-minal re-opened.The car was found early Sunday on the upper deck of Terminal 4.Officials at Sky Harbor International Airport say some outbound flights were delayed. Carriers affected include American Airlines, Air Canada, British Airways and Southwest Airlines.Airport officials encouraged travelers to confirm the status of flights with their carrier.HAZLETON, PA.Fugitive sought in Trump threats suspected in theftFederal authorities sus-pect a man accused of having threatened President Donald Trump and other officials may have stolen a truck overnight from the same northeastern Pennsylvania business he is believed to have burglarized earlier this month.U.S. Marshals, the FBI and the U.S. Secret Service have been searching for 27-year-old Shawn Christy of McAdoo for more than two months, saying he has threatened to use full lethal force on any law enforcement officer that tries to detain me.Ž Florence likely to reveal areas of vulnerability in ood insuranceBy Ken Sweet and Meghan HoyerThe Associated PressNEW YORK „ The number of Americans with flood insurance is on the rise, yet Hurricane Florence is likely to make it painfully clear that too many homeowners in the Carolinas and other vulnerable regions remain unprotected.. An analysis of federal flood insurance records by The Associated Press found there were roughly 5.1 million active flood insurance policies in the U.S. as of July 31, up from 4.94 million a year earlier.The Carolinas had modest gains „ a 2.5 percent increase in South Carolina and a 3.5 percent increase in North Carolina.But large gaps in coverage remain. South Carolina is the second-highest insured state for flooding, with roughly 65 percent of properties in flood hazard areas insured. But in North Carolina, where forecasters say the storm might bring the most destructive round of flooding in state history, flood coverage is less common, with only 35 percent of at-risk properties insured.After blowing ashore as a hurricane with 90 mph (145 kph) winds, Florence virtu-ally parked itself much of the weekend atop the Carolinas as it pulled warm water from the ocean and hurled it onshore. Storm surges, flash floods and winds scattered destruction widely.Most of the gains observed in the federal flood insurance data over the past 12 months occurred in Texas, with about 145,000 new policies. Insurance experts say that Hurricane Harvey, which brought tremendous flood damage to Texas and Louisi-ana late last summer, helped increase public awareness that homeowners need flood insurance.Thats terrific. Nothing sells flood insurance like a storm,Ž said Robert Hunter, who ran the National Flood Insurance Program in the 1970s.Still, federal officials say there are too many Americans in vulnerable areas who lack flood insurance „ even after storms such as Sandy, Matthew and Harvey caused widespread property damage and financial losses with storm surge and rainfall. A look at the five-year and 10-year trends shows a decline in the number of flood insurance policies nationwide.Property insurance typically doesnt cover flooding, and flood insurance remains by and large a federal government program run by the Federal Emergency Manage-ment Agency, or FEMA.FEMA requires most home-owners with mortgages living in certain designated areas to buy flood insurance. But there are numerous neighborhoods across the U.S. that are vul-nerable to flooding but where insurance isnt mandatory and many residents choose not to enroll „ sometimes with dire consequences.In the five years before Hurricane Harvey walloped Houston last year, for instance, the number of homes covered in the city dropped 11 percent. The monster storm ended up flooding more than 150,000 homes in the area, leaving many people digging into their savings to repair their houses.Data show that even with the increase in flood insurance coverage over the past year, the number of homes covered is down 3 percent in North Carolina and 6 percent South Carolina compared with five years ago.Researchers and insurance experts say many Americans choose not to get flood insur-ance because of a belief that flooding will not happen to them, or if it does, federal disaster assistance cover their losses.But federal disaster relief typically consists of low-interest loans „ money that must be repaid. The maximum amount of disaster assistance available to an individual or household is $34,000, which is typically not enough to cover repairs caused by flooding. The average damage caused by flooding during Harvey was around $80,000, according to the Texas Department of Insurance.We have been working for the last couple years to close the insurance gap, but still not near enough people have necessary coverage. We still have a lot of work to do,Ž said David Maursted, the current director of the governments flood insurance program, in a conference call with reporters on Thursday.Because Hurricane Florence hit the Carolina coast as a less powerful Category 1 storm, damages are expected to be less severe than originally estimated. Property data company CoreLogic estimates the storm surge and wind from Florence will cause roughly $3 billion to $5 billion in damages.Exposing gaps Rescue personnel use a small boat as they go house to house checking for ” ood victims from Florence, Saturday in New Bern, N.C. [STEVE HELBER/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

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DailyCommercial.com | Monday, September 17, 2018 A3 LOCAL & STATETom McNiff, editor 352-365-8250 tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comNEWS BRIEFS POMONA PARK2 children killed in mobile-home “ reFirefighters in north Florida found the lifeless bodies of two children while putting out a fast-moving mobile-home fire.The Putnam County Sher-iffs Office said firefighters on Sunday unsuccessfully tried to rescue the two children, whose names and ages werent released by authorities.The Florida TimesUnion reported that the fire destroyed the mobile home in Pomona Park, about 75 miles south of Jacksonville.Authorities said the cause of the fire wasnt immediately known. SPRING HILLPolice: Man killed by uncle acting erraticallyAuthorities said a manager who was acting erratically at a gambling business in Florida is charged with kill-ing his nephew, who came to the business to try to calm him down.The Hernando County Sheriffs Office said Sunday in a news release that 55-yearold Roger Vazquez began acting erratically and waving a gun around while working at Lucky Fish Games in Spring Hill on Saturday evening.Another manager called the business owner, who called Vazquezs nephew, 44-year-old Raymond Correa.When Correa showed up, he and another manager con-vinced his uncle to unload the gun.Deputies said Vazquez pulled out another gun and fatally shot Correa.Court records show Vazquez was being held in jail Sunday on $70,000 bail.He faces charges of homicide and aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. JACKSON, WYO.Wyoming guide dead after bear attack; Florida hunter hurtWyoming authorities said a hunting guide has been found dead after he and a client were attacked by a bear.The Jackson Hole News & Guide reported the body of 37-year-old Mark Uptain was found Saturday.Teton County spokesman Billy Kirk said the client, Corey Chubon of Florida, suffered leg, chest and arm injuries and was flown to a Jackson hospital. The newspaper reported he left the hospital Saturday.His hometown wasnt listed.Authorities said Chubon was bow hunting and shot an elk Thursday, but he and Uptain could not find the animal until Friday. They were preparing to pack it out that day when they were charged by two bears.Kirk said one of the bears attacked Uptain and then Chubon. He said Chubon was able to flee and phone for help.TALLAHASSEE Warrant issued for man who ” ashed gun at FAMU studentsAn arrest warrant has been issued for a man in Florida who flashed a gun while trying to prevent four students from getting on an elevator with him at an apartment building.The Tallahassee Democrat reports that the Tallahassee Police Department last Friday issued the warrant for Don Crandall for improper exhi-bition of a firearm.Crandall, who is white, was videotaped trying to stop a group of mostly-African American young men from entering an elevator at the building, claiming they didnt belong in the building without a key. The men were students at Florida A&M University.After the video went viral, Crandall was fired from his The Mount Dora City Council decided last week to lease a temporary home for the Public Works Department while a new building is constructed. [DAILY COMMERCIAL FILE] Department will reside on Robie Avenue while new building is builtBy Roxanne Brown roxanne.brown @dailycommercial.comMOUNT DORA … The Mount Dora City Council on Thursday decided to relocate the Public Works department, which includes water, waste water, electric, public works and parks operations, to a 19,000-square-foot warehouse at 1501 Robie Avenue while the new public works building is being constructed.City Manager Robin Hayes estimates that construction of the new Public Works Complex, when fully approved, will take about two years or more on the site of its current building on Highland Street.The existing building will be demolished and a new build-ing constructed from scratch to reduce costs and construc-tion time. City staff said that remodeling the building would have increased the price of the project.Mount Dora Public Works to move Florida Hospital Waterman will soon be known as Adven-tHealth Waterman in 2019. Its come a long way from the day the hospital began two towns removed from todays present Tavares location.The hospital had its begin-ning in an old Umatilla hotel in 1933.The Lake County Medical Center opened in the north wing of Umatillas Rowebuilt Hotel and became Lake Coun-tys first general hospital. It opened that January with 18 beds and six bassinets.According to the late Emmett Peter, Harold Over-heiser, Jr. was the first patient there on Jan. 11, 1933, and David Treadway was the first baby born there two weeks later.The county hospital remained in the Rowebuilt until 1938, when it was moved into another closed hotel, the Fountain Inn in Eustis, which was owned by Frank Waterman of the Waterman Fountain Pen Company.NOW AND THENWatermans humble beginningsFlorida Hospital Waterman had humble beginnings in a Eustis hotel. [DAIILY COMMERCIAL FILE] One of Lake Countys major medical centers bene tted from a struggling hotelLake Countys 13th annual Stuff the Bus food drive will bene“ t Lake Cares in Mount Dora. [SUBMITTED] Staff ReportEUSTIS „ The county is seeking donations of nonperishable food to be stuffed inside a Lake County Connec-tion bus.The 13th Annual Stuff the Bus food drive will be from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 6 at Publix, 2840 David Walker Drive in Eustis. Over the last Stu the Bus event will bene t Lake CaresStaff ReportLEESBURG … Lane Davis, a 17-year-old student in the Leesburg High School culinary program, will travel to Washington, D.C., in November to speak before Congress about the importance of Career and Technical Education.CTE programs are extremely valuable to students,Ž he plans to tell Congress. Its hands on. Its career oriented. Its a great way to hone your skills before you go into the real world."Davis got involved in the Leesburg High culinary program as a sophomore and became active in SkillsUSA during his junior year when he became a regional officer.SkillsUSA is a partnership of students, teachers and industry working together to ensure America has a skilled workforce. Leesburg culinary student to address Congress The Fountain Inn opened in 1923 and the Lake County Hospital … later named Waterman Hospital … moved into its upper ” oors in 1938. [SUBMITTED] Lane Davis See DORA, A4 See BRIEFS, A4 See WATERMAN, A4 See STUDENT, A4See BUS, A4

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A4 Monday, September 17, 2018 | DailyCommercial.comjob as a hotel manager. CAPE CANAVERALDelta 2 joins rocket hall of fameA rocket known for launching satellites and other spacecraft into the sky for the past three decades is joining a hall-of-fame of sorts for historic rockets.Officials said Saturday that the Delta 2 rocket will join the Rocket Garden on display at NASAs Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Cape Canaveral.The gardenŽ includes rockets used to launch Alan Shepards first U.S. human spaceflight as well as launch the mission to the Skylab space station and the first U.S.-Soviet joint spaceflight.The Delta 2 rocket was retired Saturday after launching a NASA satellite designed to precisely mea-sure changes in Earths ice sheets.The first Delta 2 lifted off in 1989.Besides satellites, the rocket has launched GPS orbiters and interplanetary missions including the twin Mars rovers Spirit and Opportunity. The Associated Press BRIEFSFrom Page A3The city will lease the temporary building, plus about two and a half acres around the building for equipment and storage, for $9,600 per month, or $115,200 per year.The cost and details of the new Public Works complex is set to be dis-cussed soon.Bentley Architects is in the process of creating a design for the new Public Works Complex after it was given the green light to do so by the council in May.Mayor Nick Girone made it clear that the only firm detail regarding the new complex thus far is that it will not be a round building. DORAFrom Page A3Construction of the 158room Fountain Inn had been delayed by World War I and transportation problems caused further delays. A Fountain Inn promotional piece for the 1923 season told visitors the building wouldnt be finished until late March of that year. The brochure invited visitors to make reservations for the following season.The Spanish-style hotel was E-shaped, which afforded each of its rooms an outside view. Many of the rooms had baths, and all the rooms had running water.President Calvin Coolidge dined at the hotels restaurant while staying at Mount Doras Lakeside Inn, accord-ing to Eustis historian Louise Carter. The hotel was also a business center.The first floor facing Magnolia Avenue had 10 storefronts with everything from a grocery store and dentist office to a beauty parlor and drug store. The First State Bank occupied the corner, later the home of the Pink Elephant Thrift Shop.William Kennedys History of Lake County, published in 1929, gave this description of the Fountain Inn: The Foun-tain Inn is of Spanish style but the motif is subordinated to harmonize with the beauty of natural environment. The hotel is of four stories, base-ment and roof garden. There are 164 bedrooms with bath. There are palatial lobbies, sun parlors, writing rooms, recep-tion rooms, small banquet halls, and all the refinements of a modern hotel. Eleven storerooms occupy the ground floor on the Mag-nolia Avenue side. There is an entrance to the hotel from Magnolia Avenue, but the principal entrance is on the opposite side, where onethird of the block is devoted to cement drives, flowers and shrubbery. Across the street the hotel grounds continue in a natural park, showing a bit of old Florida, with towering cypress trees, pines and stately palms.ŽThere was always plenty for the guests to do at the hotel and surrounding area. The 1923 advertisement boasted: Located in the beautiful highlands of Lake County, Fla., the eye feasts on soulsatisfying tropical beauty in every direction, while the balminess of the air invites a natural relaxation of high-strung nerves and over-taxed bodies, making it at once the Mecca of health and plea-sure seekers from all over the country.ŽThere was a miniature golf course and archery at Ferran Park, a nice garden park in front of the Fountain Inn, with a large fountain that was added after the hotel opened. Waterman also had a boardwalk built that meandered through a wooded area that is now the site of the local post office. The hotel was the social center of the town. In addition to dances, civic club functions and other affairs, high school proms were held there. The hotel began hurting financially, along with the rest of the country, after the Stock Market crash in 1929.Then came the Bank Moratorium in 1932. The inn continued to struggle for the next three years. It was finally closed in 1936.Waterman had suffered a stroke and offered the hotel to the Lake County Medical Center. In 1938, the fourth floor was turned into a hospital by a group of physicians headed by Dr. C.M. Tyre, Watermans personal physician. Though it became a hospital in 1938, visi-tors could still get hotel rooms and visit the dining room for the next 20 years as physicians struggled to keep the hospital doors opened.Water is now a 269-bed hospital on U.S. Highway 441 in Tavares. It was purchased by Adventist Healthcare in 1992 and moved to its current location in 2003. WATERMANFrom Page A3The national organization provides opportunities for students to compete and train in their chosen disciplines with their peers across the country.Through the LHS culinary program, Davis had the opportunity to attend a Skill-sUSA Regional Leadership Training that he describes as life changing.Ž This year, he is in charge of fundraising and public relations statewide. Under the direction of his culinary teacher, Chef John Bell, Davis and his classmates maintain a winning record in SkillsUSA competitions.Lake County high schools currently offer more than 77 pro-fessional certification programs in careers such as construction, nursing, TV production and robotics. Programs are free to students and frequently launch them into successful, highly paid professions.To find out more about Lake Countys College and Career Readiness programs visit the districts webpage at https://www.lake.k12.fl.us/ Page/55067. STUDENTFrom Page A312 years, Lake County Transit Division staff and volunteers collected more than 45,000 items for those in need.All food donations will benefit the Lake Cares Food Pantry in Mount Dora. Lake Cares is a not-for-profit organization serving poor and middle-class families, seniors and individuals with disabilities.Nonperishable food items accepted for donation include: canned meats, vegetables, fruits, stews and chili, canned or dry soups, canned or pack-aged pasta, peanut butter, tea bags and ground coffee, hot and cold cereals, rice, cake and pancake mixes, syrup, powdered milk, juice boxes, granulated sugar, baby food and formula, granola and cereal bars and dry or canned pet food.Those who cant make it to the event can drop off items from 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Lake County Transit Divisions office, 2440 U.S. Highway 441/ 27 in Fruitland Park.Volunteers are also needed to work shifts of two hours or more beginning at 8:45 a.m. and ending at 5:15 p.m.For information, con-tact Amy Bradford at 352-323-5733 or ABrad-ford@lakecountyfl.gov. BUSFrom Page A3 Woman says Supreme Court nominee sexually assaulted her at party in high schoolBy Darlene SupervilleAssociated PressWASHINGTON „ President Donald Trumps nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court was thrust into turmoil Sunday after the woman accusing him of high school-era sexual misconduct told her story publicly for the first time. Democrats immedi-ately called for a delay in a key committee vote set for this later week and a Republican on the closely divided panel said hes not comfortableŽ voting on the nomination without first hearing from the accuser.The woman, Christine Blasey Ford, told The Washington Post in her first interview that Kavanaugh pinned her to a bed at a Mary-land party they attended in the early 1980s, clumsily tried to remove her clothing and put his hand over her mouth when she tried to scream.I thought he might inadvertently kill me,Ž Ford said. He was trying to attack me and remove my clothing.ŽFord, 51 and a clinical psychology professor at Palo Alto University in California, says she was able to get away after a friend of Kavanaughs who was in the room jumped on top of them and everyone tumbled. Kavanaugh, 53 and a federal appeals judge in Washington, on Sunday repeated an earlier denial of Fords allegation.I categorically and unequivocally deny this allegation. I did not do this back in high school or at any time,Ž Kavanaugh said through the White House.The allegation first came to light late last week in the form of a letter that has been in the possession of Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California, the top Democrat on the Senate Judiciary Committee, for some time.The committee recently concluded four days of public hearings on the nomination and the panels Republican chairman, Chuck Grassley of Iowa, scheduled a Thursday vote on whether to recommend that the full Senate confirm Kavanaugh for a lifetime appointment to the nations highest court.Democrats, led by New York Sen. Chuck Schumer, immediately called for it to be postponed, though Republi-cans gave no indication Sunday that they would accede to the calls by Democrats, most of whom already publicly oppose Kavanaugh. A spokesman for the Senate Judiciary Committee said late Sunday that Grassley is trying to arrange separate, followup calls with Kavanaugh and Ford, but just for aides to Grassley and Feinstein, before Thursdays scheduled vote. But Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., a committee member, told The Washington Post and Politico in interviews Sunday that hes not comfortableŽ voting for Kavanaugh until he learns more about the allegation. Flake is one of 11 Republicans on the committee, whose 10 Democrats all oppose Kavanaugh. A potential noŽ vote from Flake would complicate Kavanaughs prospects.Another Republican member, Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, said hes willing to hear from Ford provided that its done immediatelyŽ to keep the con-firmation process on track. Critics have accused the GOP of fast-tracking the process to get Kavanaugh on the court by Oct. 1, the first day of the fall term.Senate Republicans, along with the White House, see no need to postpone voting over what they consider uncorroborated and unverifiable accusations, according to a person familiar with the situ-ation but not authorized to speak publicly. In considering their options Sunday, Republicans largely settled on the view that Fords story alone was not enough to delay Kavanaughs confirmation.Grassley could invite Ford to testify, likely in closed session before Thursday. Kavanaugh would also probably be asked to appear before senators. The panel would also likely seek testimony from Mark Judge, Kavanaughs friend and class-mate who Ford says jumped on top of her and Kavanaugh. Judge has denied that the inci-dent happened.Republicans have not settled on the strategy, the person familiar with the situation said, but were weighing options, including doing nothing.Republicans say the allegations have already cast a shadow over Kavanaugh but that it does not appear to be enough to change the votes in the narrowly divided 51-49 Senate. Key will be the views of Sens. Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, who did not immediately com-ment publicly Sunday.A spokesman for Grassley said Kavanaugh already went through several days of hear-ings and has been investigated by the FBI.The White House has accused Feinstein, who revealed the letters existence late last week, of mounting an 11th hour attempt to delay his confirmation.Ž The White House has also sought to cast doubt about Fords allegation by noting that the FBI has repeatedly investigated Kavanaugh since the 1990s for highly sensitive positions he has held, including in the office of independent counsel Ken Starr, at the White House and his current post on the federal appeals court in Washington.Both Democratic and Republican senators questioned Feinsteins handling of the allegation. Feinstein on Sunday called on the FBI to investigate Fords story before the Senate moves for-ward on this nominee.ŽKavanaughs nomination has sharply divided an already closely divided Senate, with most Democrats opposing him and most Republicans supporting him.But the allegations of sexual misconduct, particularly coming amid the #MeToo movement against sexual harassment, coupled with Fords emergence could complicate matters, especially as key Republican senators, including Collins and Murkowski, are under enormous pressure from out-side groups who want them to oppose Kavanaugh on grounds that as a justice he could vote to undercut the Roe v. Wade ruling legalizing abortion in the U.S.Ford told the Post that Kavanaugh and a friend „ both stumbling drunk,Ž she says „ corralled her into a bedroom during a house party in Mary-land in the early 1980s when she was around 15 and Kava-naugh was around 17. She says Kavanaugh groped her over her clothes, grinded his body against hers and tried to take off her one-piece swimsuit and the outfit she wore over it.Kavanaugh covered her mouth with his hand when she tried to scream, she says, and escaped when Judge jumped on them.Kavanaugh accuser comes forwardIn this Sept. 6 photo, President Donald Trumps Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh testi“ es before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. [ALEX BRANDON/ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO]

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DailyCommercial.com | Monday, September 17, 2018 A9Florence was still mas-sive. Radar showed parts of the sprawling storm over six states, with North and South Carolina in the bulls-eye.Thousands were ordered to evacuate from what offi-cials said could be the worst flooding in North Carolina history, but it wasnt clear how many had fled or even could. The head of Federal Emergency Management Agency, Brock Long, said officials were focused on finding people and rescu-ing them.Well get through this. Itll be ugly, but well get through it,Ž Long told NBCs Meet The Press.ŽPresident Donald Trump said federal emergency workers, first responders and law enforcement officials are working really hardŽ on Florence. He tweeted that as the storm begins to finally recede, they will kick into an even higher gear. Very Professional!ŽThe storms death toll climbed to 15 when a pickup truck ran off Interstate 20 in South Carolina and struck an overpass support, killing the driver. Earlier, authorities said a man drowned after his pickup truck flipped into a drainage ditch along a flooded South Carolina road and two people died from inhal-ing carbon monoxide from a generator in their home.About 740,000 homes and businesses remained without power in the Caro-linas, and utilities said some could be out for weeks.Victor Merlos was over-joyed to find a store open for business in Wilmington since he had about 20 relatives staying at his apartment, which still had power. He spent more than $500 on cereal, eggs, soft drinks and other necessi-ties, plus beer.I have everything I need for my whole family,Ž said Merlos. Nearby, a Waffle House restaurant limited breakfast customers to one biscuit and one drink, all take-out, with the price of $2 per item.Florence was still spinning slowly atop the Carolinas as it pulled warm water from the ocean and hurled it onshore. Ken-neth Campbell had donned waterproof waders intend-ing to check out his home in Lumberton, but he didnt bother when he saw the Coast Guard and murky waters in his neighborhood.Im not going to waste my time. I already know,Ž he said. As rivers swelled toward record levels, state regulators and environmental groups were monitoring the threat from gigantic hog and poultry farms located in low-lying, flood-prone areas.The industrial-scale farms typically feature vast pits of animal feces and urine that can pose a signif-icant pollution threat if they are breached or inundated by floodwaters. In past hur-ricanes, flooding at dozens of farms also left hundreds of thousands of dead hogs, chickens and other decom-posing livestock bobbing in floodwaters.Stream gauges across the region showed water levels rising steadily, with forecasts calling for rivers to crest Sunday and Monday at or near record levels: The Little River, the Cape Fear, the Lumber, the Neuse, the Waccamaw and the Pee Dee were all projected to burst their banks, possibly flood-ing nearby communities.Evacuations were ordered for thousands of people, and the Defense Department said about 13,500 military personnel had been assigned to help relief efforts.Authorities ordered the immediate evacuation of up to 7,500 people living within a mile of a stretch of the Cape Fear River and the Little River, about 100 miles from the North Caro-lina coast. The evacuation zone included part of the city of Fayetteville, popu-lation 200,000.John Rose owns a furniture business with stores less than a mile from the river. Rain-soaked furniture workers helped him quickly empty more than 1,000 mattresses from a warehouse in a low-lying strip mall.Its the first time weve ever had to move anything like this,Ž Rose said. If the river rises to the level they say its going to, then this warehouse is going to be under water.ŽFayettevilles city offi-cials, meanwhile, got help from the Nebraska Task Force One search and rescue team to evacuate 140 residents of an assisted-living facility in Fayetteville to a safer loca-tion at a church.Already, more than 2 feet of rain had fallen in places, and forecasters were saying there could be an additional 1 feet (45 centimeters) before Sunday was out. FLOODINGFrom Page A1(New York Giants at Dallas Cowboys, for viewers inclined toward that spectacle).As for what the 8-11 p.m. EDT awards telecast will offer, the basics are 26 categories with nominees including defending drama champ The Handmaids Tale.Ž Its challenged by 2016 winner Game of Thrones,Ž which aired out-side the eligibility window for last years awards and wants a triumphant (please, not blood-soaked) return.Comedy series including Atlanta,Ž The Marvelous Mrs. MaiselŽ and Inse-cureŽ are poised to capitalize on the temporary absence of five-time winner VeepŽ and its star Julia LouisDreyfus, who nabbed six best-actress trophies.The late Anthony Bourdain, whose Parts UnknownŽ was showered with six awards at the recent creative arts Emmy ceremony that preceded the main event, likely will be remembered.Heres more on what to expect from televisions biggest night: Live from LA, its Saturday night!ŽDont be surprised if theres occasional confusion about whether youre watching the Emmys or a very long episode of NBCs Saturday Night Live.ŽSNLŽ creator Lorne Michaels is producing the awards ceremony. Its hosted by Michael Che and Colin Jost, who anchor the Weekend UpdateŽ segment of SNL.Ž Past and present SNLŽ players including Kate McKinnon and Tina Fey are presenters, with McKinnon a nominee along with three other cast members and Alec Baldwin, the shows regular Trump impersonator. The long-running sketch show already claimed seven awards at the creative arts ceremony and is up for three more including best variety sketch series Monday. But dont think SNLŽ will hog the stage, according to Jost.There will be a lot of people from the SNL family involved. But also a lot of people that are just the stars of television now that have nothing to do with SNL, because people want to see everyone whos on TV,Ž he said. Did someone mention politics?Awards ceremonies and politics have become increasingly inseparable, and its likely that President Donald Trump will be the subject of a few „ OK, more than a few „ punchlines and speeches. That could be the best opportunity for a drinking game, with men-tions of Paul Manafort for bonus points.Hosts Che and Jost traffic in political satire on Weekend Update,Ž so its reasonable to expect they will here as well. But they played it cool before the awards, with Jost saying there might be some, and there might not.Ž Theres gonna be politi-cal jokes. And were gonna come out on the wrong side of history, for sure. Were aiming toward it,Ž a smil-ing Che said.A close-to-home issue likely will be addressed: The sexual-misconduct cloud over the entertainment industry, including last weeks firings of CBS Corp. CEO Leslie Moonves and top 60 MinutesŽ exec-utive Jeff Fager. If not, the #MeToo movement may have something to say. Big tentThe Emmy Awards are opening up wider to diversity, with more than a third of the 101 acting nods announced in July going to ethnic minorities compared to a quarter of the field in 2017.The 2018 awards are already historic: Saturday Night LiveŽ host Tiffany Haddish and Samira Wiley of The Handmaids TaleŽ were part of the first-ever African-American sweep of guest actor awards at the creative arts awards.The main event Monday could advance inclusivity on-screen and off. Donald Glover, the star and creator of Atlanta,Ž won trophies last year for acting and directing and is a multiple nominee again, including for writing.Tracee Ellis Ross of black-ishŽ and Issa Rae of InsecureŽ are competing for comedy series acting honors. On the drama side, Brown could repeat as best actor for This Is Us,Ž with Jeffrey Wright of WestworldŽ also competing. Latino actors up for honors include Ricky Martin, Penelope Cruz and Edgar Ramirez, all for The Assas-sination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story.Ž Oh, you groundbreakersSandra Oh has the chance to become the first performer of Asian descent to win a lead drama actress trophy „ a victory that would coincide nicely with the landmark box-office success of Crazy Rich Asians.Ž The KoreanCanadian is nominated for the spy thriller Killing EveŽ after receiving five support-ing actress nods for Greys Anatomy.ŽA streaming service or basic cable series has yet to win top comedy, some-thing that FXs AtlantaŽ or Amazon Prime Videos The Marvelous Mrs. MaiselŽ could change.Issa Rae of InsecureŽ or black-ishŽ star Tracee Ellis Ross could become the second African-Amer-ican to win as best comedy actress, following Isabel Sanford (1981, The Jef-fersonsŽ) by 37 years „ and making for a 21st-century first.The Assassination of Gianni VersaceŽ star Darren Criss, of Filipino descent, could become the second Asian-American actor to claim an acting award after Riz Ahmeds win last year for The Night After,Ž a notable back-to-back outcome if it happens. EMMYSFrom Page A1

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A10 Monday, September 17, 2018 | DailyCommercial.comin Tennessee and Texas that should be slamdunks for Republicans are close.Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell raised an alarm last week, warning that each of the competitive Senate races would be like a knife fight in an alley.ŽSome of the public fretting among Republicans appears to be strategic, as party officials try to motivate both voters and donors. Many moderate Republican voters dont believe there is anything at stake in this election,Ž according to the documents Newhouse presented to White House officials. He attributed that belief in part to a dis-regard for public polling, given that most surveys showed Democrat Hillary Clinton defeating Trump in the 2016 presidential election.Newhouse and the White House would not comment on the early September meeting. The Associated Press obtained a copy of Newhouses presentation, and two Republicans with knowledge of the briefing discussed the details on the condition of anonym-ity because they were not authorized to speak about the matter publicly.At the White House, anxiety over the midterms has been on the rise for months as polls increasingly show a chal-lenging environment for the GOP and heightened Democratic enthusiasm. The sheer number of competitive races in both the House and Senate is stretching cash reserves and forcing tough calculations about where to deploy resources and surrogates. And there are growing fears that the coalition of voters that delivered Trump to the White House will not come out for midterms.Even if those voters do show up in large numbers, Republicans could still come up short. The polling presented to White House officials, which was commissioned by the Republican National Committee, showed that Trumps loyal supporters make up about one-quarter of the elec-torate. Another quarter is comprised of Republicans who like Trumps poli-cies but not the president himself and do not appear motivated to back GOP candidates. And roughly half of expected midterm voters are Democrats who are energized by their opposition to the president.White House aides say Trump is getting regular briefings on the political landscape and is aware of the increasingly grim polling, even though hes predicted a red waveŽ for Republicans on Twit-ter and at campaign rallies. Aides say Trumps sober briefings from GOP officials are sometimes offset by the frequent conversations he has with a cadre of outside advisers who paint a sunnier picture of the electoral landscape and remind the president of his upset vic-tory in 2016.The paradox for Republicans is that most Americans are largely sat-isfied with the economy, according to numerous surveys. But the party has struggled to keep the economy centered at the center of the elec-tion debate. Trump keeps thrusting other issues to the forefront, including his frustration with special counsel Robert Muellers investigation and his intense anger with unflattering portrayals of his presidency in a book by journalist Bob Woodward and an anonymous editorial from a senior administration official that was published in the New York Times. He stunned some backers Thursday when he disputed the death toll in Puerto Rico from last years Hurricane Maria, just as another storm was barreling toward the East Coast.Newhouse told White House officials that Trump could appeal to moder-ates and independents by emphasizing that a Dem-ocratic majority would be outside the mainstream on issues like abolishing U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and government-funded health care. Other Republican strategists have offered candidates similar advice.Karl Rove, who served as chief political strategist to President George W. Bush, said that if Republicans cast their Democratic rivals as soft on immigration or in favor of high-dollar government spending on health care, thats a toxic mix to the soft Republicans and Republican-leaning independents.Ž GOPFrom Page A1Meet the PressŽ and CBS News Face the Nation.ŽPuerto Rican authori-ties have accepted the results of the GWU study. Long also did not dis-pute Trumps incorrect claim that Democrats raised the death toll to make the president look as bad as possible,Ž telling NBCs Chuck Todd, I dont know why the studies were done.ŽHe cast doubt on the GWU study, suggesting that researchers took into account deaths due to a range of causes with tenuous links to Hurricane Maria, such as automobile crashes and domestic violence.You might see more deaths indirectly occur as time goes on, because people have heart attacks due to stress, they fall off their house trying to fix their roof, they die in car crashes because they went through an intersection where the stoplights werent working. ... Spousal abuse goes through the roof. You cant blame spousal abuse after a disaster on anybody,Ž Long said on Meet the Press.ŽHe contended that the crucial figure is direct deaths which is the wind, the water and the waves, buildings collapsing.ŽLongs remarks came after Trump on Thursday denied large-scale casualties from Hurricane Maria. 3000 people did not die in the two hurricanes that hit Puerto Rico,Ž Trump tweeted. When I left the Island, AFTER the storm had hit, they had anywhere from 6 to 18 deaths.ŽTrump also claimed that if a person died for any reason, like old age,Ž the researchers would just add them onto the list.ŽThe GWU researchers did not, however, attribute any specific individuals death to Maria. The study exam-ined the number of deaths from September 2017 to February 2018 and compared that total with what would have been expected based on historical patterns, making adjustments for a range of variables, including the mass departure of residents in the aftermath of the storm.If researchers had attributed every death on the island to the storm, the six-month death toll from the hurricane would have been more than five times as high.Democrats as well as some Republicans criticized Trump for appearing to minimize the death toll, and House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., said last week that he has no reason to disputeŽ the 2,975 figure.On CNNs State of the Union,Ž Alexan-dria Ocasio-Cortez, the progressive insurgent who ousted Democratic Rep. Joe Crowley in New Yorks 14th District pri-mary in June, strongly criticized the neglect and government inactionŽ in the wake of Hurricane Maria, which she described as the worst humanitarian crisis in modern American history.ŽShe said her grandfather was in a medical facility in Puerto Rico and passed away in the middle of the nightŽ after the storm. DEATHFrom Page A1

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DailyCommercial.com | Monday, September 17, 2018 A11HAVE YOUR SAYWe welcome signed letters and guest columns. Letters should not exceed 300 words and columns should not exceed 500 words. Columns need to include a recent headshot of the writer. We edit for length, clarity, and grammar. Mail: Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 Email: letters@dailycommercial.com Fax: 352-365-1951 What do you call an animal that has venomous spikes, no natural predators, a voracious appetite and the capacity for one female to lay as many as 2 million eggs a year? Many people might say an ecological nightmare.Ž And in Floridas offshore waters, that definitely works. But the more specific answer is lionfish.Ž The fishs scary appearance „ striped in maroon and white, liberally garnished with 18 projecting spines „ is a good match for its problematic behavior. Scientists say lionfish basically never stop breeding or eating. They particularly love young grouper, snapper and other sought-after fish, along with parrotfish and other species that help clean coastal reefs. The lionfishs only saving grace is that they are pretty dang delicious themselves, with mild, white, flaky flesh. Once the spines are removed or cooked, they are perfectly safe to eat. Restaurants and seafood vendors say theyre having no trouble convincing Floridians to try lionfish; they could sell more if they had it. So how does Florida get more lionfish from ocean to plate? The trick may lie in new technology „ and in rightsizing regulation to encourage entrepreneurs. Thats an effort state and federal officials should get behind. The time-honored method of catching lionfish is spearfishing „ but that means one diver, catching one fish at a time. In addition to being labor-intensive, that method cant reach lionfish hiding in the depths, hundreds of feet below safe diving range. Several options are being explored, including deep-sea robots that spear or electrocute fish. But the most promising option might be traps. These work well because lionfish like to gather in large groups, and tend to remain relatively still. In July, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission won federal permission to test traps designed to catch more lionfish at a time. Its a step in the right direction. But private groups who want to test their own alternatives say theyve been stymied by the byzantine federal bureaucracy. A lot of people have given up on it because of the pushback you get,Ž says Joe Glass, who heads a Gainesville-based advocacy organization known as ReefSavers. He says the FWC traps are individually made and expensive to manufacture. He and others would like to design traps that can be mass-produced less expensively; ReefSavers plan is to give the traps to commercial fishing operations for free, in return for sharing the proceeds of the catch. The other problem: Developing a reliable supply chain. Grocery storesand restaurants are interested in selling lionfish. But seafood distributors deal in large quantities, and lionfish come in small batches. Traps could help stabilize that supply. The final wrinkle: Nobody wants to establish a lionfish fisheryŽ to maintain a steady supply of the invasive pest. Ideally, lionfish should be eradicated from Floridas waters, and other parts of the U.S. coast. Its a tricky problem, with a lot of moving parts, and government shouldnt try to solve it on its own. Enlisting private industry to the cause „ with the clear goal of removing the fish „ makes sense, and might also make for good eating. The Daytona Beach News-JournalANOTHER OPINIONWaging war on lion sh ANOTHER OPINION Former Presid ent Barack Obama embraced Medicare for allŽ last week as he rallied Democrats for the midterm elections. Critics pounced, charging that this rhetorical flourish proved that he always meant to use Obamacare as a stalking horse for government-run health care. It didnt. Obamas version of Medicare for all would be an option for people under 65 to enroll in a basic Medicare plan with the same choices that seniors now have to buy supplemental private insurance for more coverage. By contrast, a government-run plan, also known as singlepayer, would replace private insurance and Obamacare. Yet Republicans have grabbed hold of Obamas phrase for an attack line against Democratic candidates in the final eight weeks before the Nov. 6 elections. When it comes to singlepayer health care, Barack Obama was against it before he was for it,Ž a Las Vegas Journal Review editorial charged on Monday. The Journal Review is owned by the billionaire gambling mogul Sheldon Adelson, a Republican activist and campaign contributor. Thats a political hit job, intended to sow confusion, that Democrats will have to repel. Substantively and politically, advocacy of single-payer health care is perilous for Democrats. A purely government-run system could require trillions of dollars of tax increases and, despite widespread complaints about the health-care system, many Americans would rebel at the prospect of losing their existing private coverage. The benefits, including universal coverage and increased ability to control health-care costs, are harder to explain persuasively than the impact of big tax hikes. Republicans are already on the defensive over their unsuccessful and now unpopular efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act, Obamas signature domestic achievement. The current Republican threat to repeal an Obamacare rule that bans discrimination by insurance companies against people with preexisting medical conditions is proving to be a political bonanza for Democrats all over the country. Only where Democratic candidates are openly supporting a single-payer plan are Republicans on the offensive. A Medicare-for-all option is far more appealing politically. Though specifics remain vague, it wouldnt entail huge tax increases and would be modeled on the familiar and popular Medicare program. Unlike a single-payer plan that forces people into a government system, Medicare-for-all offers lots of choices,Ž said Ezekiel Emanuel, one of the architects of the Affordable Care Act and now vice provost and professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. In an interview this week, he noted that the private insurance supplemental plans now comprise about one-third of Medicare and are well liked by patients, the insurance industry and the medical community. Obamas Sept. 7 speech at the University of Illinois was a blistering assault on President Donald Trump and his administration, breaking a year-and-a-half of restraint in the face of incessant and misleading attacks from Trump. Still, Obama counseled against the increasingly confrontational politics favored by some of his liberal friends. He said Democrats this year are running on good new ideas like Medicare for all, giving workers seats on corporate boards, reversing the most egregious corporate tax cuts to make sure college students graduate debt-free.Ž These proposals arent new, and there arent enough egregiousŽ and reversible corporate tax cuts to free up money to pay for all college students to graduate debt-free. But they are mainstream Democratic ideas, not a call for a the federal government to run the entire health-care system. Medicare-for-all is not, as the right-wing North Carolina Congressman Mark Walker charged this week, an admission of Obamacares failure.Ž Its a way to build on Obamacare, just as President George W. Bushs prescription drug benefits for seniors built on Medicare. But when it comes to the health-care politics of 2018, struggling Republicans are desperate. Albert R. Hunt is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering politics and policy. He was the executive editor of Bloomberg News, before which he was a reporter, bureau chief and executive Washington editor at the Wall Street Journal.ANOTHER OPINIONGOP twists Obama phrase into political attack lineIt is better to be on the moral side of history than on the amoral side. Just as the victims of priest sexual assault should not be constantly reminded of the abuse every time they see a priest, descendants of the victims of apartheid, oppression, rape, beatings, deprivation and murder need not be reminded that their forebears suffered each time they see a statute of a Confederate soldier. We should deify our heroes, not our adversaries and criminals. We should not deify with a statue those who fought against the United States and those who fought to perpetuate the captivity of human beings. Though the families of Confederate soldiers might consider them heroes; though the families of the Gestapos Heinrich Mueller, Reinhardt Heinrich or Heinrich Himmler might consider them heroes; though the family of the Saudi Arabian, butcher, Osama bin Ladin, might consider him a hero; or the family of Willis McCall might consider him just a good ol boy, most people worldwide, with the possible exception of Nazis, do not! We have historic heroes and villains attached to Lake County. One villain is the aforementioned criminal McCall. One hero is Mable Norris Reese who fought for justice for the Groveland Four and against the criminal, Sheriff McCall. I made the request to the Clermont City Council and they joined other cities in opposition to relocating the statue of General Smith to Lake County. I have contributed to the effort to commission a sculpt bust of the heroine at the gofundme account established by Gary McKechnie, https:// www.gofundme.com/ remembermabel. Perhaps others might contribute to reach the $8,000 goal. Mabel is a most suitable replacement of General Smith. All those who wish to be on the moral side of history thank all the Lake County elected officials and cities who have come out in opposition to the relocation of the General to Lake County, a place to which he had and has no connection. We can not change the facts of history and there is no attempt to. This is to stop the deification of a traitor to this country. By his insistence on acquiring the Smith statue, the curator of the Lake County Historical Museum exhibits little knowledge of Lake County history and more of this nations racist past in his quest to preserve oppression. Choice Edwards lives in Clermont.ANOTHER OPINIONLake County should honor a real hero, Mable Norris Reese OPINIONSteve Skaggs | Publisher Tom McNiff | Executive Editor Whitney Lehnecker | Digital Editor, Lifestyles Editor Tom McNiff, editor 352-365-8250 tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com

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DailyCommercial.com | Monday, September 17, 2018 B1 SPORTSPaul Jenkins, Sports editor 352-365-8204 paul.jenkins@dailycommercial.comBy Dennis Waszak Jr. AP Pro Football WriterEAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. „ Ryan Tannehill threw two touchdown passes, Kenyan Drake ran for a score and the Miami Dolphins took advan-tage of several mistakes by Sam Darnold and the New York Jets for a 20-12 victory Sunday. T.J. McDonald and Xavien Howard each intercepted the Jets' rookie quarterback, helping the Dolphins to their first 2-0 start to a season since 2013. Tannehill finished 17 of 23 for 168 yards and also ran for 44 yards on eight carries for the Dolphins, coming off a win in the longest NFL game since 1970 merger by outlast-ing Tennessee in 7 hours, 8 minutes last Sunday. With the Jets (1-1) holding on to hopes for a late comeback, Frank Gore „ who passed Curtis Martin for fourth on the NFL's career rushing list „ took a short pass and gained 19 yards on third-and-19 to effectively seal the win. Darnold was 25 of 41 for 334 yards and a touchdown with the two INTs in his second NFL start, but struggled to get the offense moving through-out the day. The 21-year-old quarter-back got off to a much better start than in the Jets' opener, when his first NFL pass was intercepted and returned for a touchdown. But on the Jets' second possession in this one, Darnold turned it over when his pass intended for Quincy Enunwa was intercepted by McDonald. The Dolphins safety avoided a few tackle attempts and returned it 31 yards to New York's 15. After two run plays for 9 yards, Drake took the handoff from Tannehill up the middle for a 6-yard run to give the Dolphins a 7-0 lead. Miami took advantage of another turnover after Darnold completed a 10-yard pass to Robby Anderson, who had the ball knocked out of his hands by Kiko Alonso. Fin-ishing strongTannehill, Dolphins top Darnold, mistake-prone Jets 20-12Miami Dolphins A.J. Derby (85) celebrates with Danny Amendola (80) after scoring a touchdown during the “ rst half Sunday against the New York Jets in East Rutherford, N.J. [AP PHOTO/BILL KOSTROUN] By Fred Goodall AP Sports WriterTAMPA „ Ryan Fitzpat-rick threw for more than 400 yards and four touchdowns for the second straight week, leading the Tampa Bay Buccaneers to a 27-21 victory over the reigning Super Bowl champion Philadelphia Eagles on Sunday.Filling in for suspended quarterback Jameis Winston, the 35-year-old Fitzpatrick completed 27 of 32 passes for 402 yards and has the suddenly explosive Bucs off to a 2-0 start for the first time since 2010.DeSean Jackson scored on a 75-yard reception on the first play of the game. O.J. Howard also had a 75-yard TD catch in the first half for Tampa Bay, which stunned New Orleans 48-40 on the road in its season opener.Nick Foles threw for 338 yards for the Eagles (1-1), who rallied from a 20-point, third-quarter deficit.The Super Bowl MVP's 2-yard TD pass to Nelson Agholor on fourth down trimmed Tampa Bay's lead to 27-21 with 2:46 remaining. The Bucs didn't give the Eagles' injury-decimated offense a chance to finish the comeback.Fitzpatrick, a 14-year veteran and one of four players in NFL history to throw TD passes for seven franchises, produced a couple first downs on Tampa Bay's ensuing pos-session to drain all but 19 seconds off the clock.Chris Godwin and Mike Evans had TD receptions of 8 and 4 yards, respectively, for the Bucs. Jackson, who had two TD receptions before leaving the season opener with a concussion, finished with four catches for 129 yards.The Eagles opened the season with Foles throwing for just 117 yards in an 18-12 victory over the Atlanta Falcons.They drove 78 yards in 13 plays to pull even with Tampa Bay in the second quarter, only to watch Howard turn a short pass into another long TD by eluding two defenders and turning up the left sideline. Eagles cornerback Ronald Darby was unable to chase down the 6-foot-6, 251-pound tight end.Foles finished 34 of 46 with no interceptions. Fitzpatrick shines, Bucs stun EaglesVeteran QB passes for more than 400 yards in upset winTampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick (14) looks to pass during the “ rst half of the Bucs win over the Philadelphia Eagles on Sunday in Tampa. [AP PHOTO/CHRIS OMEARA] New York Jets Jamal Adams (33) closes in on Miami Dolphins quarterback Ryan Tannehill (17) during the “ rst half of the Dolphins win over the Jets. [AP PHOTO/JULIO CORTEZ] By Graham HallCorrespondentThe jeers rang out as Florida once again settled for a field goal against a seemingly infe-rior opponent. The starting quarterback? A paltry 0-for-6 performance to start the game, with an interception to boot. For many, 14 games of Feleipe Franks was enough.But in the eyes of his head coach, Franks was improving, regardless of the passer rating or statistics. Franks performance in the first half paled in comparison to how he finished the game. Before being replaced under center by Kyle Trask in the waning minutes, Franks had completed eight of his last nine passes for 119 yards and two touchdowns, as the Gators completed a 38-point victory.After previously implying Franks could play himself out of a starting role, Mullen said after the game that Franks leash is longer than he let on, and that his willingness to learn and improve is a better gauge of improvement than missed reads and turnovers.Considering a multitude of reasons could explain a turnover or blown play, Mul-lens evaluation of Franks will be defined by his gradual improvement in controllable aspects, such as his attitude and demeanor on the field. Mullen, who reiterated after the game that he wouldnt yank Franks unless he showed a hesitance to take advice and criticism, said Franks wouldnt have arrived in Gainesville with ambitions of becoming a successful Florida quarterback if he wasnt expecting a considerable amount of pressure.I think you got to work harder in the quarterback room than it is out there in the public to thicken up his skin. Im starting to see that a little bit. Ask any quarterback that has played for me, youve got some thick skin to go do that. We get after you. We expect certain things from you,Ž Mullen said. If you dont like public scrutiny, dont be a quarterback at Florida. But you have the potential to get a lot of praise, too.ŽFor Franks, a redshirt sophomore quarterback who has already received more than his fair share of criticism, its important for his head coach to regard him as a true freshman, considering the staff and scheme changes Mullen: Franks also developing thick skin See BUCS, B3 See DOLPHINS, B3 See GATORS, B3By Greg BeachamThe Associated PressLAS VEGAS „ Brad Kes-elowski raced to his third consecutive NASCAR Cup victory Sunday, persevering through a wreck-filled Sunday afternoon and roar-ing away from the field in overtime to claim the playoff opener.Keselowski secured team owner Roger Penskes 500th victory across all competitions with a resourceful performance amid trying circumstances and 99-degree Las Vegas heat.Kyle Larson was second, and defending Cup series champion Martin Truex Jr. third after a stop-and-start finish to a race that featured 12 cautions.To start off the playoffs with a win, thats really strong, let alone three in a row,Ž Keselowski said. We nailed the pit stops and the restarts when it counted, and we were strong.ŽEight of the 16 playoff drivers had various problems in the opener of the 10-race postseason. Four playoff drivers failed to finish „ including co-leader Kevin Harvick, who wrecked with 120 laps to go when he blew his right front tire.Michael McDowell and Kurt Busch wrecked with just two laps to go, forcing a red-flag stop and overtime. After the drivers re-fired their engines for the two-lap shootout, nobody could keep up with Keselowskis Team Penske Ford.We did it, boss!Ž Kesel-owski shouted. Thats quite a number, right? Its really great to be a part of that, and to get the last one to get us there, thats pretty great.ŽPenske was not in attendance for his landmark victory at Las Vegas Motor Speedway, instead watching from Sonoma at the IndyCar season finale. He formed Team Penske in 1966, and it has fielded 50 winning drivers across 14 race series during the ensuing 52 years.Keselowski won at Darlington and the Brickyard in consecutive weeks before Vegas. His late surge has added some intrigue into a NASCAR season dominated by the Big Three of Truex, Harvick and Kyle Busch, who finished seventh in Vegas even after skidding and plowing through the infield grass with 35 laps to go.Joey Logano finished fourth, and Ryan Blaney was fifth.Truex moved into the overall points lead over Keselowski wins NASCAR playo openBrad Keselowski drives past the start/“ nish line during a NASCAR Cup Series auto race Sunday in Las Vegas. [ISAAC BREKKEN/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] See NASCAR, B3

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B2 Monday, September 17, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com SCOREBOARD HOW TO REACH USPaul Jenkins, Sports Editor Email: paul.jenkins@dailycommercial.com Phone: 352-365-8204SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results by calling 352-365-8204. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. Results submitted after 9:30 p.m. may not appear in the next days edition of the Daily Commercial.SPORTS ON TV SPORTS BRIEFSSINGAPOREHamilton turns up heat on Vettel with Singapore winIn the sweltering heat of the Singapore Grand Prix, Lewis Hamilton turned up the heat on Sebastian Vettel a notch further.Hamilton won comfortably from pole position on Sunday, extending his Formula One championship lead over Vettel to 40 points.Winning from pole on one of the hardest tracks for overtaking in F1 was nothing special in itself. But Hamiltons masterclass in qualifying was excep-tional as he recorded one of the best pole positions of his career „ described as epic within his Mercedes team.It afforded him a more relaxing race than expected „ heat aside „ given Ferraris advantage during practice this weekend.Considering Vettel makes more mistakes than Hamilton, a 40-point gap looks a huge advantage with only six races left.Especially as Hamilton has no intention of easing up. The British driver is on a major roll after winning four of the past five races, pinning Vettel firmly on the ropes in their bid for a fifth F1 title.BERLINKipchoge sets world record in Berlin marathonOlympic champion Eliud Kipchoge smashed the marathon world record, winning the Berlin race in 2 hours, 1 minute, 39 seconds on Sunday.His feat came as Kevin Mayer set a decathlon world record with a total of 9,126 points in his native France on Sunday, topping a previous best of 9,045 points set by American Ashton Eaton three years ago.Organizers of the Berlin marathon initially put Kipchoges time at 2 hours, 1 minute, 40 seconds, but later reduced it by one second.The 33-year-old broke the previous world record set in Berlin by fellow Kenyan Dennis Kimetto in 2014 by 1 minute and 18 seconds.MADRIDYates wins Vuelta, Britain sweeps Grand ToursSimon Yates won his first Grand Tour title after a largely ceremonial ride into Madrid in the final stage of the Spanish Vuelta on Sunday, giving British riders a sweep of the seasons three biggest races.The 26-year-old Englishman was dominant through-out the three-week race across Spain, thriving on the toughest climbs and the flattest routes to secure the victory after a last stage in which riders didnt attack the leaders under cycling tradition.Yates Vuelta title means Britain has swept the three Grand Tours. Geraint Thomas of Wales won the Tour de France in July and Kenyan-born British rider Chris Froome the Giro dItalia in May.BUCHAREST, ROMANIA2 US basketball players stabbed in Romania; 1 seriously hurtTwo U.S. basketball players have been stabbed in a club in eastern Romania and one is in a serious condition, Romanian authorities said Sunday.Police said Darrell Bowie, 24, and Joseph McClain, 25, who play for local club ACS Cuza Braila, were attacked Saturday night in the city after a fight broke out with locals.Braila County Emergency Hospital spokeswoman Alina Neacsu told The Associated Press both men underwent emergency surgery at the hospital early Sunday. She said McClain sustained stab wounds to his chest and stomach and was stableŽ and in intensive care. She said Bowie suffered multiple abdominal wounds, correcting reports that he had suffered a perforated lung. She said both had per-forated woundsŽ but could not say how they were caused. The Associated Press SOCCER MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCERAll times Eastern EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T PTS GF GA Atlanta United FC 17 5 6 57 59 33 New York Red Bulls 17 7 5 56 53 32 New York City FC 14 8 7 49 51 38 Columbus 12 8 8 44 35 34 Philadelphia 12 12 4 40 40 45 Montreal 12 14 3 39 41 46 D.C. United 9 11 8 35 48 48 New England 8 10 10 34 41 43 Toronto FC 8 14 6 30 50 55 Orlando City 7 17 3 24 40 62 Chicago 6 15 6 24 37 52 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T PTS GF GA Sporting Kansas City 15 7 6 51 54 34 FC Dallas 14 6 8 50 47 37 Los Angeles FC 13 7 8 47 55 43 Real Salt Lake 13 10 6 45 49 47 Seattle 13 9 5 44 37 28 Portland 12 8 8 44 41 40 Vancouver 11 10 7 40 46 54 Los Angeles Galaxy 10 11 8 38 54 59 Houston 8 13 7 31 47 43 Minnesota United 9 16 3 30 40 55 Colorado 6 16 6 24 31 53 San Jose 4 16 8 20 42 57 3 points for victory, 1 point for tieSept. 12D.C. United 2, Minnesota United 1Saturdays GamesAtlanta United FC 3, Colorado 0 Montreal 4, Philadelphia 1 Toronto FC 5, LA Galaxy 3 Columbus 0, FC Dallas 0, tie Houston 4, Portland 1 Minnesota United 1, Real Salt Lake 1, tie Seattle 2, Vancouver 1 New England 1, Los Angeles FC 1, tie Sporting Kansas City 5, San Jose 1Sundays GameNew York Red Bulls 3, D.C. United 3, tie Orlando City at Chicago, lateWednesdays GamesColumbus at Portland, 10:30 p.m. Atlanta United FC at San Jose, 11 p.m. Philadelphia at Seattle, 11 p.m.Saturday, Sept. 22San Jose at Los Angeles FC, 3:30 p.m. Toronto FC at New York Red Bulls, 5 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Atlanta United FC, 7 p.m. Chicago at New England, 7:30 p.m. Colorado at Columbus, 7:30 p.m. Houston at Orlando City, 7:30 p.m. New York City FC at Montreal, 7:30 p.m. Portland at Minnesota United, 8 p.m.Sunday, Sept. 23Sporting Kansas City at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. FC Dallas at Vancouver, 7 p.m. Seattle at Los Angeles Galaxy, 7 p.m.U.S. OPEN CUPAll times Eastern CHAMPIONSHIP Wednesday, Sept. 26Philadelphia (MLS) at Houston (MLS), 7 p.m.NATIONAL WOMENS SOCCER LEAGUEAll times Eastern PLAYOFFS Semi“ nalsSaturday: Portland 2, Seattle 1 Tuesday: Chicago vs. North Carolina at Portland, 9 p.m.ChampionshipSaturday, Sept. 22: Portland vs. Chicago-North Carolina winner at Portland, 4:30 p.m.2018 U.S. MENS TEAM RESULTS/SCHEDULEAll times Eastern (Record: Won 3, Lost 1, Tied 3)Sunday, Jan. 28 „ United States 0, BosniaHerzogovina 0 Tuesday, March 27 „ United States 1, Paraguay 0 Monday, May 28 „ United States 3, Bolivia 0 Saturday, June 2 „ Ireland 1, United States 1 Saturday, June 9 „ United States 1, France 1 Friday, Sept. 7 „ Brazil 2, United States 0 Tuesday „ United States 1, Mexico 0 Thursday, Oct. 11 „ vs. Colombia at Tampa, Fla., 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 16 „ vs. Peru at East Hartford, Conn., 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 15 „ vs. England at London, 2:45 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 20 „ vs. Italy at site TBA, 3 p.m. PRO FOOTBALL NFL All times Eastern AMERICAN CONFERENCE EAST W L T PCT. PF PA Miami 2 0 0 1.000 47 32 New England 1 0 0 1.000 27 20 N.Y. Jets 1 1 0 .500 60 37 Buffalo 0 2 0 .000 23 78 SOUTH W L T PCT. PF PA Jacksonville 1 0 0 1.000 20 15 Tennessee 1 1 0 .500 40 44 Indianapolis 1 1 0 .500 44 43 Houston 0 2 0 .000 37 47 NORTH W L T PCT. PF PA Cincinnati 2 0 0 1.000 68 46 Baltimore 1 1 0 .500 70 37 Cleveland 0 1 1 .250 39 42 Pittsburgh 0 1 1 .250 58 63 WEST W L T PCT. PF PA Kansas City 2 0 0 1.000 80 65 Denver 1 0 0 1.000 27 24 L.A. Chargers 1 1 0 .500 59 58 Oakland 0 1 0 .000 13 33 NATIONAL CONFERENCE EAST W L T PCT. PF PA Washington 1 1 0 .500 33 27 Philadelphia 1 1 0 .500 39 39 Dallas 0 1 0 .000 8 16 N.Y. Giants 0 1 0 .000 15 20 SOUTH W L T PCT. PF PA Tampa Bay 2 0 0 1.000 75 61 Atlanta 1 1 0 .500 43 42 Carolina 1 1 0 .500 40 39 New Orleans 1 1 0 .500 61 66 NORTH W L T PCT. PF PA Green Bay 1 0 1 .750 53 52 Minnesota 1 0 1 .750 53 45 Chicago 0 1 0 .000 23 24 Detroit 0 1 0 .000 17 48 WEST W L T PCT. PF PA L.A. Rams 2 0 0 1.000 67 13 Seattle 0 1 0 .000 24 27 San Francisco 0 1 0 .000 16 24 Arizona 0 2 0 .000 6 58WEEK 2 Sept. 13Cincinnati 34, Baltimore 23Sundays GamesIndianapolis 21, Washington 9 New Orleans 21, Cleveland 18 Tennessee 20, Houston 17 Miami 20, N.Y. Jets 12 L.A. Chargers 31, Buffalo 20 Atlanta 31, Carolina 24 Tampa Bay 27, Philadelphia 21 Kansas City 42, Pittsburgh 37 Green Bay 29, Minnesota 29, OT L.A. Rams 34, Arizona 0 Detroit at San Francisco, late Oakland at Denver, late New England at Jacksonville, late N.Y. Giants at Dallas, lateTodays GameSeattle at Chicago, 8:15 p.m.WEEK 3 Thursdays GameN.Y. Jets at Cleveland, 8:20 p.m.Sunday, Sept. 23New Orleans at Atlanta, 1 p.m. Buffalo at Minnesota, 1 p.m. Denver at Baltimore, 1 p.m. Indianapolis at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. Cincinnati at Carolina, 1 p.m. San Francisco at Kansas City, 1 p.m. Green Bay at Washington, 1 p.m. Oakland at Miami, 1 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Houston, 1 p.m. Tennessee at Jacksonville, 1 p.m. L.A. Chargers at L.A. Rams, 4:05 p.m. Chicago at Arizona, 4:25 p.m. Dallas at Seattle, 4:25 p.m. New England at Detroit, 8:20 p.m.Monday, Sept. 24Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 8:15 p.m. COLLEGE FOOTBALL THE AP TOP 25 POLLThe Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with “ rst-place votes in parentheses, records through Sept. 15, total points based on 25 points for a “ rst-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and last weeks ranking: RECORD PTS LW 1. Alabama (58) 3-0 1,521 1 2. Georgia 3-0 1,416 3 3. Clemson (3) 3-0 1,405 2 4. Ohio State 3-0 1,357 4 5. Oklahoma 3-0 1,283 5 6. Louisiana State 3-0 1,241 12 7. Stanford 3-0 1,055 9 8. Notre Dame 3-0 1,034 8 9. Auburn 2-1 958 7 10. Washington 2-1 947 10 10. Penn State 3-0 947 11 12. West Virginia 2-0 841 14 13. Virginia Tech 2-0 816 13 14. Mississippi State 3-0 790 16 15. Oklahoma State 3-0 587 24 16. Central Florida 2-0 556 18 17. Texas Christian 2-1 502 15 18. Wisconsin 2-1 486 6 19. Michigan 2-1 448 19 20. Oregon 3-0 399 20 21. Miami (Fla.) 2-1 362 21 22. Texas A&M 2-1 193 „ 23. Boston College 3-0 130 „ 24. Michigan State 1-1 86 25 25. Brigham Young 2-1 75 „ Others receiving votes: Iowa 64, Boise St. 62, Duke 61, Colorado 49, California 40, Kentucky 38, South Florida 14, Texas 12, NC State 10, Arizona St. 9, Missouri 8, Utah 6, San Diego St. 5, North Texas 4, South Carolina 4, Washington St. 2, Syracuse 2.AMWAY COACHES TOP 25 POLLThe A mway T op 25 football poll, with “ rst-place votes in parentheses, records through Sept. 15, total points based on 25 points for “ rst place through one point for 25th, and last weeks ranking: RECORD PTS LW 1. Alabama (60) 3-0 1,572 1 2. Clemson (2) 3-0 1,477 2 3. Georgia 3-0 1,436 3 4. Ohio State (1) 3-0 1,405 4 5. Oklahoma 3-0 1,339 5 6. Louisiana State 3-0 1,171 13 7. Stanford 3-0 1,116 9 8. Notre Dame 3-0 1,083 8 9. Penn State 3-0 1,070 10 10. Virginia Tech 2-0 927 11 11. Auburn 2-1 921 7 12. Washington 2-1 909 12 13. West Virginia 2-0 824 15 14. Mississippi State 3-0 780 16 15. Oklahoma State 3-0 672 19 16. Wisconsin 2-1 626 6 17. Texas Christian 2-1 508 14 18. Central Florida 2-0 500 18 19. Oregon 3-0 384 23 20. Miami (Fla.) 2-1 373 20 21. Michigan 2-1 354 22 22. Texas A&M 2-1 150 „ 23. Michigan State 1-1 141 24 24. Boise State 2-1 114 17 25. Boston College 3-0 109 „ Others receiving votes: Kentucky 98, Duke 55, South Florida 45, Colorado 41, South Carolina 40, Iowa 36, Washington State 35, BYU 30, Missouri 21, N.C. State 19, Appalachian State 13, California 11, Syracuse 11, Cincinnati 10, Utah 10, Texas 9, North Texas 5, Troy 4, Arizona State 3, Florida 3, Minnesota 3, San Diego State 3, Arkansas State 2, Houston 2, Tennessee 2, Vanderbilt 2, Fresno State 1.THE AP TOP 25RESULTS/SCHEDULESaturdays GamesNo. 1 Alabama 62, Mississippi 7 No. 2 Clemson 38, Georgia Southern 7 No. 3 Georgia 49, Middle Tennessee 7 No. 4 Ohio State 40, No. 15 Texas Christian 28 No. 5 Oklahoma 37, Iowa State 27 BYU 24, No. 6 Wisconsin 21 No. 12 LSU 22, No. 7 Auburn 21 No. 8 Notre Dame 22, Vanderbilt 17 No. 9 Stanford 30, UC Davis 10 No. 10 Washington 21, Utah 7 No. 11 Penn State 63, Kent State 10 No. 13 Virginia Tech vs. East Carolina, ccd. No. 14 West Virginia at NC State, ccd. No. 16 Mississippi St. 56, Louisiana-Lafayette 10 No. 24 Oklahoma State 44, No. 17 Boise St. 21 No. 18 Central Florida at North Carolina, ccd. No. 19 Michigan 45, SMU 20 No. 20 Oregon 35, San Jose State 22 No. 21 Miami 49, Toledo 24 Texas 37, No. 22 Southern California 14 San Diego State 28, No. 23 Arizona State 21RESULTSWEEK 4 Sept. 13 SOUTHBoston College 41, Wake Forest 34 Charlotte 28, Old Dominion 25 Davidson 91, Guilford 61 James Madison 73, Robert Morris 7 Richmond 35, St. Francis (Pa.) 27FAR WESTUtah St. 73, Tennessee Tech 12 Sept. 14 SOUTHETSU 27, VMI 24 Memphis 59, Georgia State 22 W. Carolina 28, Gardner-Webb 10FAR WESTCal Poly 44, Brown 15 Saturdays Games EASTAlbany (NY) 30, Morgan St. 27 Army 28, Hawaii 21 Bryant 37, Marist 27 Buffalo 35, E. Michigan 21 Columbia 41, Central Connecticut 24 Dartmouth 41, Georgetown 0 Delaware 27, Cornell 10 Duquesne 31, Dayton 26 Harvard 36, San Diego 14 Holy Cross 31, Yale 28, OT Monmouth (NJ) 24, Lafayette 20 Navy 51, Lehigh 21 Penn 34, Bucknell 17 Penn St. 63, Kent St. 10 Pittsburgh 24, Georgia Tech 19 Stony Brook 28, Fordham 6 Syracuse 30, Florida St. 7 Towson 45, Villanova 35 UConn 56, Rhode Island 49SOUTHAlabama 62, Mississippi 7 Alcorn St. 27, Texas Southern 15 Austin Peay 78, Morehead St. 40 Cent. Arkansas 33, SE Louisiana 25 Chattanooga 34, UT Martin 24 Clemson 38, Georgia Southern 7 Colgate at Furman, ccd. East Carolina at Virginia Tech, ccd. Elon at William & Mary, ppd. FAU 49, Bethune-Cookman 28 FIU 63, UMass 24 Florida 48, Colorado St. 10 Georgia 49, Middle Tennessee 7 Jackson St. 18, Florida A&M 16 Kennesaw St. 62, Alabama St. 13 Kentucky 48, Murray St. 10 LSU 22, Auburn 21 Louisville 20, W. Kentucky 17 Marshall at South Carolina, ccd. McNeese St. 20, Nicholls 10 Mercer 30, Samford 24 Mississippi St. 56, Louisiana-Lafayette 10 NC Central at SC State, ppd. Norfolk St. at Liberty, ppd. Presbyterian at Stetson, ccd. Savannah St. at Howard, ppd. South Alabama 41, Texas St. 31 Southern Miss. at Appalachian St., ccd. Southern U. 33, Langston 18 St. Augustines at Virginia St., ccd. Temple 35, Maryland 14 Tennessee 24, UTEP 0 Tennessee St. at Hampton, ppd. UAB 31, Tulane 24 UCF at North Carolina, ccd. Virginia 45, Ohio 31 West Virginia at NC State, ccd.MIDWESTAkron 39, Northwestern 34 BYU 24, Wisconsin 21 Bowling Green 42, E. Kentucky 35 Cincinnati 63, Alabama A&M 7 Indiana 38, Ball St. 10 Indiana St. 55, E. Illinois 41 Iowa 38, N. Iowa 14 Kansas 55, Rutgers 14 Kansas St. 41, UTSA 17 Miami 49, Toledo 24 Michigan 45, SMU 20 Minnesota 26, Miami (Ohio) 3 Missouri 40, Purdue 37 Missouri St. 40, N. Arizona 8 N. Dakota St. 38, North Alabama 7 N. Illinois 24, Cent. Michigan 16 Notre Dame 22, Vanderbilt 17 Oklahoma 37, Iowa St. 27 Princeton 50, Butler 7 S. Dakota St. 90, Ark.-Pine Bluff 6 SE Missouri 48, S. Illinois 44 South Florida 25, Illinois 19 Troy 24, Nebraska 19 W. Illinois 31, Montana 27 W. Michigan 68, Delaware St. 0 Youngstown St. 42, Valparaiso 7SOUTHWESTAbilene Christian 38, Houston Baptist 13 Arkansas St. 29, Tulsa 20 Duke 40, Baylor 27 Incarnate Word 31, Stephen F. Austin 7 North Dakota 24, Sam Houston St. 23 North Texas 44, Arkansas 17 Northwestern St. 49, Lamar 48 Ohio State 40, Texas Christian 28 Oklahoma St. 44, Boise St. 21 Texas 37, Southern California 14 Texas A&M 48, Louisiana-Monroe 10 Texas Tech 63, Houston 49FAR WESTArizona 62, S. Utah 31 California 45, Idaho St. 23 Colorado 45, New Hampshire 14 Fresno St. 38, UCLA 14 Montana St. 47, Wagner 24 Nevada 37, Oregon St. 35 New Mexico 42, New Mexico St. 25 Oregon 35, San Jose St. 22 Portland St. 63, Coll. of Idaho 14 Sacramento St. 28, N. Colorado 25 San Diego St. 28, Arizona St. 21 Stanford 30, UC Davis 10 UNLV 46, Prairie View 17 Washington 21, Utah 7 Washington St. 59, E. Washington 24 Weber St. 27, South Dakota 10 Wyoming 17, Wofford 14 ODDS PREGAME.COM LINEMAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL Today National LeagueFAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE at Arizona -133 Chicago +123 at Philadelphia -113 New York +103 Washington -155 at Miami +145 at Atlanta -135 St. Louis +125 at Milwaukee -175 Cincinnati +163 at San Diego -118 San Francisco +108 at Los Angeles -140 Colorado +130American Leagueat Baltimore Off Toronto Off at Detroit Off Minnesota Off at Texas Off Tampa Bay Off at Houston -175 Seattle +163Interleagueat Pittsburgh -164 Kansas City +154COLLEGE FOOTBALL ThursdayFAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG at Temple 7 6 Off TulsaFridayat UCF 15 13 Off FAU Penn State 27 27 Off at Illinois at Southern Cal. 5 4 Off Wash. St.Saturdayat Iowa St. 19 18 Off Akron N.C. State 3 7 Off at Marshall at UMass Off Off Off Charlotte Michigan St. 6 4 Off at Indiana at Maryland Off Off Off Minnesota at Ball St. Pk 3 Off W.Kentucky Boston College 7 7 Off at Purdue at Syracuse Off Off Off UConn at Miami 29 28 Off FIU Pittsburgh 2 3 Off at N.Carolina at Florida St. 11 11 Off No. Illinois Miami (OH) 7 5 Off at Bowl.Gren at Ohio State 35 34 Off Tulane Clemson 14 16 Off at Ga. Tech at Cincinnati 6 9 Off Ohio at So. Florida 21 21 Off E. Carolina Notre Dame 5 8 Off at WFU at Toledo 13 10 Off Nevada at Virginia 3 3 Off Louisville W. Michigan 5 7 Off at Georgia St. Buffalo 2 4 Off at Rutgers Arizona 7 6 Off at OregonSt. Stanford +1 1 Off at Oregon Florida 8 6 Off at Tennessee TRANSACTIONS BASEBALLAmerican LeagueHOUSTON ASTROS „ Recalled OF Kyle Tucker from Fresno (PCL).National LeagueCHICAGO CUBS „ Reinstated OF Jason Heyward from the 10-day DL.HOCKEYNational Hockey LeagueDETROIT RED WINGS „ Assigned Fs Zach Gallant and Brady Gilmour and D Cole Fraser, Jared McIsaac, Alec Regula and Reilly Webb to their major junior teams. Released Fs Pavel Gogolev, Maxim Golod and Nicolas Guay and G Justin Fazio from amateur tryouts.SOCCERMajor League SoccerPHILADELPHIA UNION „ Signed F Kacper Przybylko for the remainder of the season. GOLF LPGA TOURTHE EVIAN CHAMPIONSHIPSundays leaders at Evian Resort Golf Club, Evian-les-Bains, France Purse: $3.85 million. Yardage: 6,523; Par: 71 (a-denotes amateur)FinalAngela Stanford, $577,500 72-64-68-68„272 Austin Ernst, $244,615 66-70-69-68„273 Mo Martin, $244,615 68-66-69-70„273 Sei Young Kim, $244,615 69-68-64-72„273 Amy Olson, $244,615 69-65-65-74„273 Ryann OToole, $121,293 68-74-63-69„274 Jeongeun Lee6, $121,293 72-66-67-69„274 Jessica Korda, $91,949 69-71-67-68„275 Inbee Park, $91,949 68-69-67-71„275 Lydia Ko, $69,096 72-70-67-67„276 Brooke M. Henderson, $69,096 67-69-72-68„276 So Yeon Ryu, $69,096 67-69-72-68„276 Katherine Kirk, $69,096 68-73-66-69„276 Mi Hyang Lee, $69,096 68-66-73-69„276 Wei-Ling Hsu, $56,732 69-67-69-72„277 Minjee Lee, $47,995 72-68-69-69„278 Chella Choi, $47,995 70-69-69-70„278 In Gee Chun, $47,995 68-70-70-70„278 Jenny Shin, $47,995 70-66-72-70„278 Nasa Hataoka, $47,995 67-71-68-72„278 Georgia Hall, $47,995 68-68-68-74„278 Lindy Duncan, $41,083 72-67-71-69„279 Charley Hull, $41,083 72-67-70-70„279 Megan Khang, $38,051 76-67-70-67„280 Eun-Hee Ji, $38,051 68-71-71-70„280 Lizette Salas, $32,056 75-70-71-65„281 Jin Young Ko, $32,056 73-69-71-68„281 Pannarat Thanapolboonyaras, $32,056 73-69-71-68„281 Pernilla Lindberg, $32,056 72-70-69-70„281 Jane Park, $32,056 69-70-70-72„281 Morgan Pressel, $32,056 70-68-71-72„281 Maria Torres, $32,056 65-69-72-75„281 Azahara Munoz, $26,084 71-70-69-72„282 Caroline Masson, $26,084 68-70-71-73„282 Carlota Ciganda, $26,084 65-70-74-73„282 Ariya Jutanugarn, $24,062 71-73-70-69„283 Sandra Gal, $20,835 72-71-73-68„284 Jeong Eun Lee, $20,835 70-74-69-71„284 Alena Sharp, $20,835 73-68-72-71„284 Emma Talley, $20,835 70-72-70-72„284 Thidapa Suwannapura, $20,835 73-68-71-72„284 Anne Van Dam, $20,835 72-70-68-74„284 Ally McDonald, $17,997 68-76-69-72„285 Anna Nordqvist, $16,335 71-70-75-70„286 Moriya Jutanugarn, $16,335 73-71-71-71„286 a-Rachel Heck 70-73-72-71„286 Shanshan Feng, $16,335 73-71-69-73„286 Brittany Altomare, $16,335 73-70-69-74„286 Brittany Marchand, $13,811 74-71-74-68„287 Brittany Lincicome, $13,811 73-71-73-70„287 Hyo Joo Kim, $13,811 71-73-69-74„287 Jennifer Song, $13,811 69-72-71-75„287 Amy Yang, $13,811 70-67-75-75„287 Jaye Marie Green, $11,933 72-73-75-68„288 Brittany Lang, $11,933 71-71-75-71„288 Paula Creamer, $11,933 74-71-69-74„288 Caroline Hedwall, $11,933 77-68-68-75„288 Marina Alex, $10,956 69-71-80-69„289 Bronte Law, $10,369 69-74-76-71„290 Mariajo Uribe, $10,369 72-68-70-80„290 Nelly Korda, $9,488 72-73-76-70„291 Gaby Lopez, $9,488 69-75-77-70„291 Benyapa Niphatsophon, $9,488 77-68-75-71„291 Pornanong Phatlum, $9,488 76-66-74-75„291 Camille Chevalier, $8,901 75-69-72-76„292 Dani Holmqvist, $8,901 69-73-74-76„292 Daniela Darquea, $8,511 73-72-74-74„293 Christina Kim, $8,511 77-68-73-75„293 Celine Boutier, $8,118 70-75-74-75„294 Angel Yin, $8,118 76-68-74-76„294 Sherman Santiwiwatthanaphong, $7,826 76-69-78-74„297 Peiyun Chien, $7,729 76-69-74-80„299PGA TOUR CHAMPIONSTHE ALLY CHALLENGESundays leaders at Warwick Hills GC, Grand Blanc, Mich. Purse: $2 million; Yardage: 7,127; Par: 72FinalPaul Broadhurst, $300,000 67-68-66„201 Brandt Jobe, $176,000 65-71-67„203 Tom Lehman, $132,000 67-67-70„204 Mark OMeara, $132,000 71-64-69„204 Rocco Mediate, $82,667 70-69-66„205 Gene Sauers, $82,667 72-67-66„205 David Toms, $82,667 67-70-68„205 Billy Andrade, $52,800 68-70-68„206 Bob Estes, $52,800 68-71-67„206 Bernhard Langer, $52,800 70-67-69„206 Jeff Maggert, $52,800 66-68-72„206 Joey Sindelar, $52,800 70-67-69„206 Fred Couples, $37,000 69-73-65„207 Marco Dawson, $37,000 70-69-68„207 Dan Forsman, $37,000 73-67-67„207 Jeff Sluman, $37,000 69-71-67„207 Billy Mayfair, $26,657 69-73-66„208 Kirk Triplett, $26,657 72-67-69„208 Tom Byrum, $26,657 69-66-73„208 Bill Glasson, $26,657 71-67-70„208 David McKenzie, $26,657 67-69-72„208 Kenny Perry, $26,657 70-67-71„208 Esteban Toledo, $26,657 66-69-73„208 Scott Dunlap, $19,120 70-69-70„209 Gibby Gilbert III, $19,120 70-68-71„209 John Huston, $19,120 68-70-71„209 Jesper Parnevik, $19,120 70-68-71„209 Vijay Singh, $19,120 66-71-72„209 Woody Austin, $15,450 72-69-69„210 Jerry Kelly, $15,450 72-69-69„210 Scott Parel, $15,450 68-71-71„210 Corey Pavin, $15,450 69-72-69„210 Glen Day, $12,900 71-70-70„211 Joe Durant, $12,900 69-70-72„211 Doug Garwood, $12,900 72-70-69„211 Scott McCarron, $12,900 71-63-77„211 Tommy Armour III, $10,600 70-70-72„212 Lee Janzen, $10,600 67-71-74„212 Kent Jones, $10,600 71-69-72„212 Colin Montgomerie, $10,600 69-72-71„212 Jerry Smith, $10,600 68-72-72„212 Olin Browne, $8,800 70-68-75„213 Loren Roberts, $8,800 70-72-71„213 Wes Short, Jr., $8,800 70-71-72„213 Duffy Waldorf, $8,800 71-71-71„213 Darren Clarke, $7,200 71-72-71„214 David Frost, $7,200 69-73-72„214 Mark Walker, $7,200 72-71-71„214 Tom Werkmeister, $7,200 72-70-72„214 Stephen Ames, $5,300 73-68-74„215 Jay Haas, $5,300 71-71-73„215 Gary Hallberg, $5,300 72-67-76„215 Dudley Hart, $5,300 73-68-74„215 Tommy Tolles, $5,300 72-72-71„215 Scott Verplank, $5,300 72-70-73„215 Jay Don Blake, $4,100 72-71-73„216 Mark Calcavecchia, $4,100 70-71-75„216 Paul Goydos, $4,100 70-73-73„216 Fran Quinn, $4,100 73-73-70„216 Mark Brooks, $3,400 70-75-72„217 Blaine McCallister, $3,400 73-70-74„217 Ken Tanigawa, $3,400 71-73-73„217 Scott Hoch, $2,900 72-71-75„218 Larry Mize, $2,900 75-70-73„218 Mike Goodes, $2,069 73-73-73„219 Paul Claxton, $2,069 68-73-78„219 Chris DiMarco, $2,069 72-73-74„219 Carlos Franco, $2,069 70-73-76„219 Kevin Johnson, $2,069 74-71-74„219 Steve Pate, $2,069 72-74-73„219 Tim Petrovic, $2,069 72-73-74„219 Tom Pernice Jr., $1,520 76-72-73„221 Tom Gillis, $1,400 78-70-75„223 Todd Hamilton, $1,280 74-73-77„224 Sandy Lyle, $1,280 73-75-76„224 Robert Gamez, $1,160 79-77-71„227EUROPEAN TOURKLM OPENSundays leaders at The Dutch, Spijk, The Netherlands Purse: $2.09 million. Yardage: 6,983; Par: 71FinalAshun Wu, China 64-66-71-67„268 Chris Wood, England 65-70-65-69„269 Thomas Detry, Belgium 74-67-63-66„270 Hideto Tanihara, Japan 68-70-63-69„270 Padraig Harrington, Ireland 68-70-65-68„271 Eddie Pepperell, England 66-72-69-65„272 Soren Kjeldsen, Denmark 66-73-68-65„272 Bradley Dredge, Wales 70-67-69-66„272 David Drysdale, Scotland 69-65-69-69„272 Jordan Smith, England 66-71-68-68„273 Pablo Larrazabal, Spain 68-69-70-67„274 Austin Connelly, Canada 68-70-69-67„274 Benjamin Hebert, France 66-69-71-68„274 Erik van Rooyen, South Africa 73-66-67-68„274 Jason Scrivener, Australia 66-73-71-65„275 Martin Kaymer, Germany 70-67-70-68„275 Jorge Campillo, Spain 69-69-69-68„275 Richard McEvoy, England 67-71-64-73„275 Jonathan Thomson, England 69-64-68-74„275 Alexander Levy, France 69-68-73-66„276 Wade Ormsby, Australia 70-68-71-67„276 Andrea Pavan, Italy 66-71-69-70„276 Matthew Baldwin, England 70-67-69-70„276AlsoChase Koepka, United States 69-71-73-65„278 Paul Peterson, United States 68-69-72-71„280 Daniel Im, United States 72-66-69-73„280 Kevin Stadler, United States 66-74-73-74„287WEB.COM TOURALBERTSONS BOISE OPENSaturdays leaders at Hillcrest Country Club, Boise, Idaho Purse: $1 million. Yardage: 6,880; Par: 71 (36-35)Third RoundScott Pinckney 66-70-63„199 Roberto Diaz 68-66-65„199 Sangmoon Bae 65-67-67„199 Max Homa 68-66-66„200 Kyle Jones 68-69-64„201 Adam Schenk 71-67-64„202 Dylan Frittelli 70-68-64„202 John Chin 70-67-65„202 Fabian Gomez 65-68-69„202 Brett Drewitt 69-63-70„202 Tyrone Van Aswegen 70-69-64„203 Roger Sloan 69-69-65„203 Willy Wilcox 70-68-65„203 Mark Hubbard 69-68-66„203 David Hearn 69-67-67„203 Michael Thompson 67-68-68„203 Justin Lower 66-70-67„203 Julian Suri 68-67-68„203 Aaron Baddeley 68-67-68„203 Steve Wheatcroft 68-67-68„203 Andres Romero 71-64-68„203 Henrik Norlander 66-67-70„203 Shawn Stefani 68-72-64„204 Curtis Luck 67-71-66„204 Tim Herron 72-65-67„204 Jonathan Byrd 68-69-67„204 Matt Every 68-68-68„204 Daniel Summerhays 68-68-68„204 Denny McCarthy 67-69-68„204 Anders Albertson 68-67-69„204 Brian Campbell 69-66-69„204 Rob Oppenheim 69-70-66„205 Adam Svensson 68-70-67„205 Zac Blair 66-71-68„205 Jim Knous 69-67-69„205 Mark Anderson 68-67-70„205 Ben Crane 70-65-70„205 Martin Trainer 65-70-70„205 Alex Prugh 67-65-73„205 Max Rottluff 70-70-66„206 Conrad Shindler 71-69-66„206 Lucas Glover 71-68-67„206 Ricky Barnes 69-69-68„206 Robert Garrigus 70-68-68„206 Corey Conners 69-68-69„206 Nate Lashley 68-68-70„206 Cameron Champ 70-70-67„207 Sebastian Cappelen 70-70-67„207 J.J. Henry 71-69-67„207 Sungjae Im 68-71-68„207 Talor Gooch 70-69-68„207 David Lingmerth 68-70-69„207 Nicholas Lindheim 67-69-71„207 David Skinns 64-72-71„207 Seth Reeves 69-67-71„207 Cameron Percy 72-64-71„207 Carlos Ortiz 73-67-68„208 Justin Hueber 73-67-68„208 John Senden 68-72-68„208 Hunter Mahan 72-68-68„208 Trevor Cone 70-69-69„208 Rhein Gibson 68-71-69„208 Edward Loar 71-69-69„209 Peter Malnati 69-71-69„209 Erik Barnes 74-66-69„209 Stuart Appleby 68-72-69„209 Martin Piller 68-72-69„209 Stephan Jaeger 69-69-71„209 Steven Ihm 70-69-71„210 Erik Compton 72-67-71„210 Ben Kohles 68-68-74„210 Christian Brand 68-72-71„211 Jim Herman 73-67-72„212 Brady Schnell 71-68-73„212 Ryan Yip 70-69-74„213 Chase Wright 70-69-75„214 Julian Etulain 71-69-79„219 (Results from Sundays “ nal round were not available at press time.)SPORTS ON TV BEACH VOLLEYBALL 9 p.m. NBCSN „ AVP Pro Series, Hawaii Invitational, at Waikiki, Hawaii (taped) MLB BASEBALL 7 p.m. FS-Florida „ Washington at Miami 7:30 p.m. MLB „ Regional coverage, St. Louis at Atlanta OR Cincinnati at Milwaukee 8 p.m. SUN „ Tampa Bay at Texas 10:30 p.m. MLB „ Regional coverage, Chicago Cubs at Arizona OR San Francisco at San Diego (games joined in progress) NFL FOOTBALL 8:15 p.m. ESPN „ Seattle at Chicago (Note: ESPN Deportes simulcast on ESPN2) SOCCER 3 p.m. NBCSN „ Southampton vs. Brighton & Hove Albion

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DailyCommercial.com | Monday, September 17, 2018 B3By Ralph D. RussoThe Associated PressLSU surged to No. 6 in The Associated Press college football poll after its second victory of Sep-tember against a highly ranked team, and Wis-consin tumbled to No. 18 after becoming the first top-10 team to be upset by an unranked team.Top-ranked Alabama strengthened its hold on No. 1 on Sunday receiving a season-high 58 first-place votes from the media panel. Clemson slipped out of the No. 2 spot for the first time this season. Georgia moved up a spot to second behind the Crimson Tide, giving the Southeastern Conference the top two teams in the ranking. Clemson is third with three firstplace votes, followed by No. 4 Ohio State and No. 5 Oklahoma.LSU has now gone from No. 25 to start the season to No. 6 in three weeks.The Tigers beat Miami, the preseason No. 8, in Week 1 in Arlington, Texas, and then knocked off Auburn on Saturday at Jordan-Hare Stadium. Auburn slipped from No. 7 to No. 9.Wisconsins loss to BYU was Saturdays most surprising result. The Badgers were threetouchdown favorites but missed a last-second field goal to tie and lost 24-21 in Madison. The Big Ten had five teams in the top 14 to begin the seasons and three (Mich-igan, Michigan State, Wisconsin) have already lost.BYUs reward was being ranked No. 25. Pac-12 slopThe Big Ten drew a lot of attention for having a rough Saturday, with half the league losing nonconference games. The Pac-12, more specifically the Pac-12 South, also had a rough one „ though much of the damage was done after a lot of East of the Mississippi bedtimes.Southern California fell out of the ranking after its second straight loss, a thumping at Texas. The Trojans have now been outscored 54-17 the last two weeks. Arizona State also fell from the ranking when it could not back up its nice home win against Michigan State, losing at San Diego State.Within the conference, Utah was beaten at home by Pac-12 North power No. 10 Washing-ton, thwarting the Utes chances of being ranked. UCLA dropped to 0-3 under Chip Kelly and Ari-zona finally managed to get coach Kevin Sumlin a victory „ by beating Southern Utah of the FCS.Colorado is the lone unbeaten Pac-12 South team. Looks bleak, but just two seasons ago the landscape was similar for the division. After opening-week losses by USC and UCLA to start 2016, the Pac-12 South had no ranked teams. Ulti mately, Colorado, the eventual Pac-12 South champ, and Utah moved into the ranking and finished in the Top 25. USC made a late-season surge behind Sam Darnold, too.UpThe other big mover in the right direction this week was Oklahoma State. The Cowboys jumped nine spots to No. 15 after an impressive 44-21 victory against Boise State, which tumbled out of the rankings after being No. 17.Oklahoma State began the season unranked after being ranked at the end of the last three seasons. InThree teams moved into the ranking for the first time this season, with Boston College making its return to the Top 25 for the first time since 2008.The Eagles beat Wake Forest on Thursday night to improve to 3-0 behind a dynamic offense led by running back A.J. Dillon and blossoming quarter-back Anthony Brown. BC has not won more than seven games since 2009. The 2008 team won nine and the ACC Atlantic Division but was last ranked on Nov. 30 of that year.€ No. 22 Texas A&M is ranked for the first time since November 2016.€ No. 25 BYU is ranked for the first time since September 2015. Conference callThe SEC has the top two teams in the AP poll for the 23rd time since 2006. Alabama was either No. 1 or 2 in all of those. The conference with the next most 1-2 appearances in the poll since 2006 is the Big Ten with eight. SEC „ 6. Big Ten „ 5. Big 12 „ 4. ACC „ 4. Pac-12 „ 3. Independent „ 2. American „ 1. Ranked vs. RankedNo. 22 Texas A&M at No. 1 Alabama. First ranked opponent for the Crimson Tide.AP Top 25: LSU jumps to No. 6; Wisconsin tumbles from top 10LSU players celebrate after they defeated Auburn on a last second “ eld goal during the second half of a college football game, Saturday in Auburn, Ala. LSU won 22-21. [BUTCH DILL/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] Corey Clement scored on a 15-yard run in the first half, and Jay Ajayi's 2-yard TD run began Philadelphia's rally from a 27-7 deficit. INJURIESEagles: The Eagles were already without receiver Alshon Jeffery and running back Darren Sproles, and Foles' job got tougher when run-ning back Jay Ajayi (back), receiver Mike Wallace (ankle) and tackle Jason Peters (quad) left in the first half. Ajayi returned at the start of the second half.Buccaneers: With Brent Grimes (groin) missing his second straight game and Vernon Hargreaves III (shoulder) on injured reserve after getting hurt at New Orleans, the Bucs played without both starting cornerbacks. Defensive tackle Beau Allen (foot) and safety Chris Conte (knee) left the game in the second half. UP NEXTEagles: Host Indianap-olis next Sunday.Buccaneers: Pittsburgh at home next Monday night, final game of Winston's suspension. BUCSFrom Page B1 Raekwon McMillan recovered for the Dolphins at the Jets 49, giving Miami a short field. Jakeem Grant took a pitch from Tannehill and gained 5 yards, but Buster Skrine grabbed him by the facemask for a 15-yard penalty. On the next play, Albert Wilson took a short pass from Tannehill, slipped out of Skrine's diving tackle attempt and took off down the sideline for a 29-yard touchdown. The Jets made another mistake that had the effect of a turnover when Henry Anderson's sack of Tannehill on thirdand-6 was negated by a holding penalty on Morris Claiborne, keeping the Dolphins' drive alive. Two plays later, Tannehill connected with A.J. Derby for a 19-yard touchdown, put-ting Miami up 20-0 after Jason Sanders missed the extra point. New York showed some life starting with a 44-yard completion from Darnold to Terrelle Pryor. Darnold completed a pass to Chris Herndon, who fumbled, recovered and tried to get into the end zone, but was tackled at the 1 as time expired, keeping New York off the scoreboard in the opening half. Darnold and the Jets answered right back to begin the third quarter with a solid drive capped by a 28-yard touchdown catch by Bilal Powell. Jason Myers missed the extra point, making it 20-6. The Jets, coming off a 48-17 rout of Detroit on Monday night, appeared in great shape when Jordan Jenkins forced and recovered a fumble after a strip-sack of Tannehill gave New York the ball at the Miami 12. But, Darnold's pass to Pryor on the next play was intercepted in the end zone by Howard. After Avery Williamson recovered a fumbled shotgun snap by Tannehill late in the third quarter, the Jets capped an 11-play drive with a 55-yard field goal by Myers. Myers added a 41-yarder with 5:56 remaining. GORE-Y NUMBERS Gore entered the game with 14,087 career yards rushing and needed just 15 to surpass Martin (14,101). The 35-year-old running back reached the milestone with an 8-yard run in the third quarter while play-ing against Martin's former team. He finished with 25 yards on nine carries. DOLPHINSFrom Page B1 Busch and Keselowski, who leapfrogged Harvick.Harvicks blowout also wrecked pole-sitter Erik Jones, who couldnt react quickly enough and rear-ended Harvick.Harvick likely d oesnt need a fantastic result from the first set of playoff races to advance, but the veteran driver was still furious about his tire failure.We had a great car, and then you put a set of tires on it and you cant hardly make it through the field,Ž he s aid. Im not happy about anything right now.Ž Las Vegas has a second race this season for the first time, and the driv-ers learned that the track is much different in the waning days of summer. The temperature reached only 58 degrees during the annual March race, but the drivers were sweating in 99-degree heat from the start on Sunday.The desert sun made the 1 1/ 2-mile track even slicker than usual, and it appeared to wreak havoc with some teams tire pressure decisions. NASCARFrom Page B1 the program has under-gone since Mullen arrived in late November. While many wont allow Franks the same room to grow as the teams true freshmen, Mullen emphasized its important to put Franks development to date in perspective.I cant tell you what offense they ran last year, you know what I mean? What he was being coached, what he was being taught, I dont spend any time on that,Ž Mullen said. Its his third game in our system right there, OK? And the fact that I dont see him make poor decisions, all right. I dont see him make poor decisions, I see him maybe needing to make them a little quicker and I see him sometimes missing one.ŽRegardless, Franks seemed to improve rather than regress over the night, but the next part for Florida and Mullen will be identify-ing a way to accelerate the improvement on the field.I dont know (why he improved). I was prob-ably yelling at him on the sidelines,Ž Mullen said. No, I think its just him getting in the flow of the game. Hes got to do a better job of just getting in the flow of the game early and play that way, understand what goes on.Ž GATORSFrom Page B1

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B4 Monday, September 17, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com EAST T eamWLTPctPFPA Miami2001.0004732 NewEngland110.5004751 N.Y.Jets110.5006037 Buffalo020.0002378 S OUTH T eamWLTPctPFPA J acksonville2001.0005135 T ennessee110.5004044 Indianapolis110.5004443 Houston020.0003747 NORTH T eamWLTPctPFPA Cincinnati2001.0006846 Baltimore110.5007037 Cleveland011.2503942 Pittsburgh011.2505863 W EST T eamWLTPctPFPA KansasCity2001.0008065 Denver2001.0004743 L.A.Chargers110.5005958 Oakland020.0003253 A lltimesEastern W EEK2 T hursdaysgameCincinnati34,Baltimore23 S undaysgamesIndianapolis21,Washington9 NewOrleans21,Cleveland18 T ennessee20,Houston17 Miami20,N.Y.Jets12 L.A.Chargers31,Buffalo20 A tlanta31,Carolina24 T ampaBay27,Philadelphia21 KansasCity42,Pittsburgh37 GreenBay29,Minnesota29,OT L.A.Rams34,Arizona0 S anFrancisco30,Detroit27 J acksonville31,NewEngland20 Denver20,Oakland19 N.Y.GiantsatDallas,late T odaysgame S eattleatChicago,8:15p.m. W EEK3 T hursday,Sept.20N.Y.JetsatCleveland,8:20p.m. S unday,Sept.23NewOrleansatAtlanta,1p.m. BuffaloatMinnesota,1p.m. DenveratBaltimore,1p.m. IndianapolisatPhiladelphia,1p.m. CincinnatiatCarolina,1p.m. S anFranciscoatKansasCity,1p.m. GreenBayatWashington,1p.m. OaklandatMiami,1p.m. N.Y.GiantsatHouston,1p.m. T ennesseeatJacksonville,1p.m. L.A.ChargersatL.A.Rams,4:05p.m. ChicagoatArizona,4:25p.m. DallasatSeattle,4:25p.m. NewEnglandatDetroit,8:20p.m.Monday,Sept.24PittsburghatTampaBay,8:15p.m.QUARTERBACKSBenRoethlisberger, Steelers: Completed39of 60passesfor452yards andthreetouchdownsina 42-37losstoKansasCity. KirkCousins,Vikings: Threwfor425yardsand fourtouchdownsagainst GreenBay.RUNNINGBACKSMattBreida,49ers: Had11 carriesfor138yardsanda touchdowninthewinover theLions. TevinColeman,Falcons: Rushedfor107yardson16 carriesina31-24winover theCarolinaPanthers.RECEIVERSBrandinCooks,Rams: Caughtsevenpassesfor 159yardsinthewinover Arizona. JesseJames,Steelers: Made“vegrabsfor138 yardsandatouchdown. A damThielen,Vikings: Had 12catchesfor131yards andatouchdown.SPECIALTEAMSMasonCrosby,Packers: Made“veofhissix “eld-goalattempts. F romwirereportsWEEK 2 MondaysgameSeahawksatBears: Amatchupofteamscomingoff toughWeek1losses,at8:15p.m.ETonESPN.AFCATAGLANCE SUMMARIESBUCCANEERS27,EAGLES21PHILADELPHIA 0777„21 TAMPABAY71370„27 FirstQuarter TB„Jackson75passfromFitzpatrick (Catanzarokick),14:49. SecondQuarter Phi„Clement15run(Jak.Elliottkick),4:51. TB„Howard75passfromFitzpatrick(kick failed),4:39. TB„Godwin8passfromFitzpatrick (Catanzarokick),:42. ThirdQuarter TB„M.Evans4passfromFitzpatrick (Catanzarokick),9:19. Phi„Ajayi2run(Jak.Elliottkick),:09. FourthQuarter Phi„Agholor2passfromFoles(Jak.Elliott kick),2:46. A„56,552. PhiTB Firstdowns2418 TotalNetYards412436 Rushes-yards24-9123-43 Passing321393 PuntReturns3-134-29 KickoffReturns0-01-13 InterceptionsRet.1-160-0 Comp-Att-Int35-48-027-33-1 Sacked-YardsLost3-132-9 Punts5-56.06-43.3 Fumbles-Lost2-21-1 Penalties-Yards6-554-44 TimeofPossession35:3924:21 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„Philadelphia,Clement6-30, Smallwood7-28,Ajayi7-23,Foles3-8, Agholor1-2.TampaBay,Barber16-22, Rodgers5-13,Wilson1-9,Fitzpatrick 1-(minus1). PASSING„Philadelphia,Foles35-48-0-334. TampaBay,Fitzpatrick27-33-1-402. RECEIVING„Philadelphia,Ertz11-94, Agholor8-88,Clement5-55,Aiken5-39, Perkins4-57,Ajayi1-4,Smallwood1-2. TampaBay,M.Evans10-83,Godwin5-56, Jackson4-129,Howard3-96,Rodgers3-23, Humphries1-8,Barber1-7. MISSEDFIELDGOALS„Philadelphia,Jak. Elliott42.COLTS21,REDSKINS9INDIANAPOLIS 7707„21 WASHINGTON0333„9 FirstQuarter Ind„Ebron7passfromLuck(Vinatieri kick),9:25. SecondQuarter Was„FGHopkins49,11:12. Ind„Hines8run(Vinatierikick),6:51. ThirdQuarter Was„FGHopkins27,5:40. FourthQuarter Was„FGHopkins49,13:28. Ind„Hilton3passfromLuck(Vinatieri kick),7:32. A„57,013. IndWas Firstdowns1720 TotalNetYards281334 Rushes-yards28-10422-65 Passing177269 PuntReturns0-01-6 KickoffReturns1-191-16 InterceptionsRet.0-02-11 Comp-Att-Int21-31-233-46-0 Sacked-YardsLost1-23-23 Punts5-47.05-36.4 Fumbles-Lost0-02-1 Penalties-Yards6-267-90 TimeofPossession26:4033:20 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„Indianapolis,Wilkins1061,Mack10-34,Hines4-7,Luck4-2. Washington,Crowder2-29,Peterson11-20, A.Smith4-14,Kelley1-1,Thompson4-1. PASSING„Indianapolis,Luck21-31-2-179. Washington,A.Smith33-46-0-292. RECEIVING„Indianapolis,Hilton7-83,Ebron 3-26,Rogers3-17,Grant2-30,Doyle2-20, Wilkins2-3,Mack1-2,Hines1-(minus2). Washington,Thompson13-92,Reed6-55, Richardson4-63,Doctson4-37,Peterson 3-30,Crowder2-8,Davis1-7. MISSEDFIELDGOALS„Washington, Hopkins49.VIKINGS29,PACKERS29,OTMINNESOTA700220„29 GREENBAY710390„29 FirstQuarter GB„J.Jackson0blockedpuntreturn(Crosby kick),7:28. Min„Treadwell14passfromCousins (Carlsonkick),3:04. SecondQuarter GB„D.Adams9passfromRodgers(Crosby kick),12:28. GB„FGCrosby37,:00. ThirdQuarter GB„FGCrosby40,6:32. FourthQuarter Min„Diggs3passfromCousins(Carlson kick),14:17. GB„FGCrosby31,7:35. Min„Diggs75passfromCousins(Carlson kick),7:18. GB„FGCrosby48,2:13. GB„FGCrosby36,1:45. Min„Thielen22passfromCousins(Diggs passfromCousins),:31. MinGB Firstdowns2424 TotalNetYards480351 Rushes-yards18-6824-98 Passing412253 InterceptionsRet.0-01-24 Comp-Att-Int35-48-130-42-0 Sacked-YardsLost2-134-28 Punts5-40.85-51.8 Fumbles-Lost0-01-0 Penalties-Yards8-707-54 TimeofPossession31:2038:08 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„Minnesota,Cook10-38,Murray 4-19,Ham1-5,Cousins2-5,Diggs1-1.Green Bay,J.Williams16-59,Montgomery5-31, Rodgers2-11. PASSING„Minnesota,Cousins35-48-1-425. GreenBay,Rodgers30-42-0-281. RECEIVING„Minnesota,Thielen12-131,Diggs 9-128,Rudolph7-72,Cook3-52,Treadwell 2-23,Morgan2-19.GreenBay,D.Adams 8-64,Graham6-95,Allison6-64,Cobb4-30, J.Williams3-12,Montgomery1-9,L.Kendricks 1-4,Valdes-Scantling1-3. MISSEDFIELDGOALS„Minnesota,Carlson48, Carlson49,Carlson35.GreenBay,Crosby52.TITANS20,TEXANS17HOUSTON 0737„17 TENNESSEE14006„20 FirstQuarter Ten„Cruikshank66passfromByard (Succopkick),9:51. Ten„Taylor18passfromGabbert(Succop kick),:35. SecondQuarter Hou„Hopkins28passfromWatson (Fairbairnkick),:58. ThirdQuarter Hou„FGFairbairn34,2:39. FourthQuarter Hou„Fuller39passfromWatson(Fairbairn kick),13:25. Ten„FGSuccop42,9:43. Ten„FGSuccop31,1:00. A„62,372. HouTen Firstdowns2115 TotalNetYards437283 Rushes-yards26-14834-100 Passing289183 PuntReturns4-251-2 KickoffReturns0-00-0 InterceptionsRet.0-01-0 Comp-Att-Int22-32-115-22-0 Sacked-YardsLost4-211-8 Punts4-41.05-52.2 Fumbles-Lost2-01-0 Penalties-Yards11-888-70 TimeofPossession29:3830:22 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„Houston,Miller14-68,Watson 5-44,Blue7-36.Tennessee,Henry18-56, D.Lewis14-42,Gabbert2-2. PASSING„Houston,Watson22-32-1-310. Tennessee,Gabbert13-20-0-117,Byard1-10-66,Henry1-1-0-8. RECEIVING„Houston,Fuller8-113,Hopkins 6-110,Ellington3-45,Akins2-21,Miller 2-2,Grif“n1-19.Tennessee,Davis5-55, Taylor3-32,Stocker2-15,Matthews2-8, Cruikshank1-66,Sharpe1-14,D.Lewis1-1. MISSEDFIELDGOALS„Houston,Fairbairn 54.SAINTS21,BROWNS18CLEVELAND 3366„18 NEWORLEANS30018„21 FirstQuarter Cle„FGGonzalez39,8:29. NO„FGLutz31,2:47. SecondQuarter Cle„FGGonzalez39,1:55. ThirdQuarter Cle„Hyde1run(kickfailed),6:43. FourthQuarter NO„M.Thomas2passfromBrees(Lutz kick),8:41. NO„M.Thomas5passfromBrees(Kamara run),2:40. Cle„Callaway47passfromTaylor(kick failed),1:16. NO„FGLutz44,:21. A„73,086. CleNO Firstdowns1618 TotalNetYards327275 Rushes-yards27-9323-62 Passing234213 PuntReturns1-01-0 KickoffReturns3-821-47 InterceptionsRet.0-01-22 Comp-Att-Int22-30-128-35-0 Sacked-YardsLost3-123-30 Punts3-39.34-44.8 Fumbles-Lost3-02-2 Penalties-Yards4-434-53 TimeofPossession27:1932:41 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„Cleveland,Hyde16-43,Taylor 4-26,Chubb2-14,Callaway2-7,Johnson33 NewOrleans,Kamara13-46,Gillislee8-18, Brees1-(minus1),J.Williams1-(minus1). PASSING„Cleveland,Taylor22-30-1-246. NewOrleans,Brees28-35-0-243. RECEIVING„Cleveland,Landry5-69, Higgins5-47,Njoku4-20,Callaway3-81, Fells2-15,Johnson2-7,Hyde1-7.New Orleans,M.Thomas12-89,Kamara6-53, Ginn4-55,Watson3-19,T.Smith1-18,J.Hill 1-5,Line1-4. MISSEDFIELDGOALS„Cleveland,Gonzale z 44,Gonzalez52.NewOrleans,Lutz44.CHIEFS42,STEELERS37KANSASCITY210147„42 PITTSBURGH02179„37 FirstQuarter KC„Conley15passfromMahomes(Butker kick),13:05. KC„Kelce19passfromMahomes(Butker kick),9:08. KC„Hunt5passfromMahomes(Butker kick),2:24. SecondQuarter Pit„James26passfromRoethlisberger (Boswellkick),14:20. Pit„Smith-Schuster2passfrom Roethlisberger(kickfailed),6:27. Pit„Washington14passfromRoethlisberger (ConnerpassfromRoethlisberger),:18. ThirdQuarter KC„Kelce25passfromMahomes(Butker kick),12:42. Pit„Conner1run(Boswellkick),7:12. KC„Robinson3passfromMahomes(Butker kick),3:15. FourthQuarter KC„Hill29passfromMahomes(Butker kick),13:42. Pit„safety,12:02. Pit„Roethlisberger3run(Boswellkick),1:59. KCPit Firstdowns2433 TotalNetYards449475 Rushes-yards25-12713-33 Passing322442 Comp-Att-Int23-28-039-60-0 Sacked-YardsLost1-41-10 Fumbles-Lost3-11-0 Penalties-Yards12-7612-90 TimeofPossession27:4932:11 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„KansasCity,Hunt18-75,Watkins 1-31,Mahomes5-18,Ware1-3.Pittsburgh, Conner8-17,Roethlisberger2-9,Switzer 2-5,Ridley1-2. PASSING„KansasCity,Mahomes23-28-0326.Pittsburgh,Roethlisberger39-60-0-452. RECEIVING„KansasCity,Kelce7-109, Watkins6-100,Hill5-90,Conley2-17, Hunt1-5,Robinson1-3,Dam.Williams1-2. Pittsburgh,Smith-Schuster13-121,Brown 9-67,James5-138,Conner5-48,McDonald 3-26,Nix1-19,Washington1-14,Switzer 1-14,Ridley1-5.FALCONS31,PANTHERS24CAROLINA37014„24 ATLANTA31477„31 FirstQuarter Car„FGGano54,11:36. Atl„FGBryant44,5:41. SecondQuarter Car„Wright5passfromNewton(Gano kick),8:42. Atl„Ridley11passfromRyan(Bryant kick),4:03. Atl„Hooper8passfromRyan(Bryant kick),:22. ThirdQuarter Atl„Ryan1run(Bryantkick),9:23. FourthQuarter Car„T.Smith3passfromNewton(Gano kick),11:23. Atl„Ryan8run(Bryantkick),7:17. Car„Moore51passfromNewton(Gano kick),2:20. A„72,528. CarAtl Firstdowns2723 TotalNetYards439442 Rushes-yards18-12132-170 Passing318272 PuntReturns2-91-3 KickoffReturns1-262-50 InterceptionsRet.1-01-28 Comp-Att-Int32-45-123-28-1 Sacked-YardsLost2-170-0 Punts4-47.84-44.8 Fumbles-Lost0-03-0 Penalties-Yards7-492-26 TimeofPossession30:1829:42 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„Carolina,Newton5-42, McCaffrey8-37,Anderson3-31,Moore1-7, Armah1-4.Atlanta,Coleman16-107,I.Smith 9-46,Ryan4-18,Ridley1-3,Schaub1-0, Sanu1-(minus4). PASSING„Carolina,Newton32-45-1-335. Atlanta,Ryan23-28-1-272. RECEIVING„Carolina,McCaffrey14-102, Funchess7-77,Wright5-62,T.Smith3-33, Thomas2-10,Moore1-51.Atlanta,J.Jones 5-64,Hooper5-59,Ridley4-64,Coleman 4-18,Sanu2-19,Hall1-30,Paulsen1-10, I.Smith1-8. MISSEDFIELDGOALS„None.CHARGERS31,BILLS20L.A.CHARGERS141403„31 BUFFALO0677„20 FirstQuarter LAC„M.Williams10passfromRivers (Sturgiskick),9:26. LAC„Gordon20run(Sturgiskick),4:18. SecondQuarter Buf„FGHauschka43,13:38. LAC„Gordon9passfromRivers(Sturgis kick),10:43. LAC„Gordon2passfromRivers(Sturgis kick),1:55. Buf„FGHauschka40,:47. ThirdQuarter Buf„Ivory1run(Hauschkakick),11:06. FourthQuarter LAC„FGSturgis24,3:50. Buf„K.Benjamin3passfromJ.Allen (Hauschkakick),:38. A„69,187. LACBuf Firstdowns2117 TotalNetYards349293 Rushes-yards26-10922-84 Passing240209 PuntReturns3-171-6 KickoffReturns1-252-48 InterceptionsRet.2-90-0 Comp-Att-Int23-27-018-33-2 Sacked-YardsLost2-165-36 Punts5-45.05-44.6 Fumbles-Lost2-02-0 Penalties-Yards6-456-31 TimeofPossession33:0226:58 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„LosAngeles,Ekeler11-77, Gordon9-28,Rivers3-5,Newsome1-0, J..Jones1-0,Smith1-(minus1).Buffalo, McCoy9-39,J.Allen8-32,Ivory2-7, M.Murphy3-6. PASSING„LosAngeles,Rivers23-27-0-256. Buffalo,J.Allen18-33-2-245. RECEIVING„LosAngeles,K.Allen6-67, Gordon6-38,Green3-55,Ty.Williams3-48, Ekeler3-21,M.Williams2-27.Buffalo, McCoy4-29,Z.Jones2-63,Clay2-29, K.Benjamin2-19,Croom2-7,Ivory1-30, DiMarco1-24,Holmes1-19,Foster1-11, M.Murphy1-7,L.Thomas1-7. MISSEDFIELDGOALS„None.DOLPHINS20,JETS12MIAMI71300„20 NEWYORK0066„12 FirstQuarter Mia„Drake6run(Sanderskick),1:12. SecondQuarter Mia„Wilson29passfromTannehill (Sanderskick),4:10. Mia„Derby19passfromTannehill(kick failed),:42. ThirdQuarter NYJ„Powell28passfromDarnold(kick failed),11:51. FourthQuarter NYJ„FGMyers55,10:06. NYJ„FGMyers41,5:56. A„77,982. MiaNYJ Firstdowns1821 TotalNetYards257362 Rushes-yards31-13519-42 Passing122320 PuntReturns3-481-4 KickoffReturns1-340-0 InterceptionsRet.2-310-0 Comp-Att-Int17-23-025-41-2 Sacked-YardsLost4-463-14 Punts6-49.25-52.6 Fumbles-Lost3-24-1 Penalties-Yards2-107-50 TimeofPossession28:2531:35 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„Miami,Drake11-53,Tannehill 8-44,Gore9-25,Wilson2-8,Grant1-5.New York,Crowell12-35, Powell 5-6,Darnold2-1. PASSING„Miami,Tannehill17-23-0-168. NewYork,Darnold25-41-2-334. RECEIVING„Miami,Amendola4-32,Drake 4-17,Wilson3-37,Grant2-27,Stills2-17, Derby1-19,Gore1-19.NewYork,Enunwa 7-92, Powell 5-74,Pryor4-84,R.Anderson 3-27,Herndon2-30,Crowell2-4,Tomlinson 1-24,Kearse1-(minus1). MISSEDFIELDGOALS„None. Dolphins-JetsStatsRAMS34,CARDINALS0ARIZONA 0000„ 0 L.A.RAMS01987„3 4 SecondQuarter La„Gurley11run(Gurleyrun),14:29. La„FGHekker20,8:07. La„Gurley1run(Gurleyrun),:00. ThirdQuarter La„Gurley2run(BrownpassfromGoff), 3:39. FourthQuarter La„Higbee3passfromGoff(Hekkerkick), 3:17. A„66,515. AriLA Firstdowns524 TotalNetYards137432 Rushes-yards15-5433-90 Passing83342 PuntReturns0-06-133 KickoffReturns3-491-22 InterceptionsRet.1-01-22 Comp-Att-Int17-27-124-32-1 Sacked-YardsLost1-72-12 Punts8-50.42-51.0 Fumbles-Lost0-00-0 Penalties-Yards9-475-49 TimeofPossession25:5234:08 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„Arizona,D.Johnson13-48, Edmonds1-5,Coleman1-1.LosAngeles, Brown12-46,Gurley19-42,Goff2-2. PASSING„Arizona,Bradford17-27-1-90.Lo s Angeles,Goff24-32-1-354. RECEIVING„Arizona,Edmonds5-15,Kirk 4-27,Seals-Jones4-17,Fitzgerald3-28, D.Johnson1-3.LosAngeles,Cooks7-159, Woods6-81,Kupp6-63,Gurley3-31,Everet 1-17,Higbee1-3. MISSEDFIELDGOALS„None.49ERS30,LIONS27DETROIT73314„27 SANFRANCISCO310143„30 FirstQuarter SF„FGGould45,6:18. Det„Golladay30passfromStafford(Prater kick),2:45. SecondQuarter SF„Bourne4passfromGaroppolo(Gould kick),12:07. SF„FGGould42,4:55. Det„FGPrater27,:03. ThirdQuarter SF„Celek11passfromGaroppolo(Gould kick),13:17. Det„FGPrater43,8:46. SF„Breida66run(Gouldkick),:52. FourthQuarter SF„FGGould36,11:21. Det„M.Jones5passfromStafford(Prater kick),8:36. Det„Roberts15passfromStafford(Prater kick),3:27. A„70,164. DetSF Firstdowns2523 TotalNetYards427346 Rushes-yards18-9828-190 Passing329156 PuntReturns4-112-14 KickoffReturns5-1445-174 InterceptionsRet.0-00-0 Comp-Att-Int34-53-018-26-0 Sacked-YardsLost2-186-50 Punts5-42.25-45.4 Fumbles-Lost1-11-0 Penalties-Yards10-1059-86 TimeofPossession30:2629:34 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„Detroit,Johnson8-43,Blount 8-38,Tate1-9,Stafford1-8.SanFrancisco, Breida11-138,Morris14-48,Garoppolo3-4. PASSING„Detroit,Stafford34-53-0-347.San Francisco,Garoppolo18-26-0-206. RECEIVING„Detroit,Riddick9-47,Tate 7-109,Golladay6-89,Johnson5-23,M.Jones 4-54,Roberts1-15,Willson1-13,Blount 1-(minus3).SanFrancisco,Garcon4-57, Breida3-21,Juszczyk3-13,Morris2-32,Celek 2-22,Kittle2-22,Pettis1-35,Bourne1-4. MISSEDFIELDGOALS„None.JAGUARS31,PATRIOTSNEWENGLAND03710„20 JACKSONVILLE14737„31 FirstQuarter Jac„Moncrief4passfromBortles(Lambo kick),7:46. Jac„Cole24passfromBortles(Lambo kick),2:10. SecondQuarter NE„FGGostkowski29,2:45. Jac„Seferian-Jenkins4passfromBortles (Lambokick),:09. ThirdQuarter Jac„FGLambo28,7:50. NE„Hogan7passfromBrady(Gostkowski kick),1:42. FourthQuarter NE„FGGostkowski46,14:10. Jac„Westbrook61passfromBortles (Lambokick),7:35. NE„Hogan29passfromBrady(Gostkowski kick),3:40. NEJac Firstdowns1827 TotalNetYards302481 Rushes-yards24-8224-104 Passing220377 PuntReturns0-02-21 KickoffReturns2-473-36 Comp-Att-Int24-35-029-45-1 Sacked-YardsLost2-140-0 Punts4-55.53-35.3 Fumbles-Lost1-12-1 Penalties-Yards2-257-71 TimeofPossession29:1430:46 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„NewEngland,Michel10-34, Burkhead6-22,White4-11,Brady3-10, Patterson1-5.Jacksonville,Yeldon10-58, Bortles6-35,Grant4-13,Wilds3-4, Westbrook1-(minus6). PASSING„NewEngland,Brady24-35-0-234. Jacksonville,Bortles29-45-1-377. RECEIVING„NewEngland,White7-73,Dorsett 5-44,Hogan3-42,Hollister3-35,Patterson3-18, Gronkowski 2-15,Michel1-7.Jacksonville,Cole 7-116,Grant6-56,Westbrook4-83,Moncrief 4-34,Seferian-Jenkins3-23,Yeldon2-13,Paul 1-22,OShaughnessy1-17,Chark1-13. MISSEDFIELDGOALS„NewEngland, Gostkowski54.BRONCOS20,RAIDERS19OAKLAND 3970„19 DENVER001010„20 FirstQuarter Oak„FGNugent26,9:33. SecondQuarter Oak„FGNugent46,11:47. Oak„Lynch1run(kickblocked),:35. ThirdQuarter Den„Freeman1run(McManuskick),9:06. Oak„Roberts20passfromCarr(Nugent kick),5:25. Den„FGMcManus39,2:43. FourthQuarter Den„Keenum1run(McManuskick),5:58. Den„FGMcManus36,:06. A„76,696. OakDen Firstdowns2120 TotalNetYards373385 Rushes-yards27-9228-168 Passing281217 PuntReturns1-71-1 KickoffReturns0-00-0 InterceptionsRet.1-150-0 Comp-Att-Int29-32-019-35-1 Sacked-YardsLost1-71-5 Punts4-47.34-51.0 Fumbles-Lost0-00-0 Penalties-Yards4-306-35 TimeofPossession32:5627:04 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„Oakland,Lynch18-65,Martin 7-24,Richard2-3.Denver,Lindsay14-107, Freeman8-28,Booker3-17,Keenum3-16. PASSING„Oakland,Carr29-32-0-288. Denver,Keenum19-35-1-222. RECEIVING„Oakland,Cooper10-116,Cook 4-49,Bryant4-30,Roberts3-43,J.Nelson 2-30,K.Smith2-12,Lynch2-3,Carrier 1-5,Martin1-0.Denver,De.Thomas5-18, Sanders4-96,Butt4-48,Heuerman2-10, Patrick1-26,Janovich1-11,Sutton1-9, Lindsay1-4. MISSEDFIELDGOALS„None. EAST T eamWLTPctPFPA Washington110.5003327 Philadelphia110.5003939 Dallas010.000816 N.Y.Giants010.0001520 S OUTH T eamWLTPctPFPA T ampaBay2001.0007561 A tlanta110.5004342 Carolina110.5004039 NewOrleans110.5006166 NORTH T eamWLTPctPFPA GreenBay101.7505352 Minnesota101.7505345 Chicago010.0002324 Detroit020.0004478 W EST T eamWLTPctPFPA L.A.Rams2001.0006713 S anFrancisco110.5004651 S eattle010.0002427 A rizona020.000658NFCATAGLANCE RESULTS/ SCHEDULE SUNDAYSSTARS JAGUARS31,PATRIOTS20: BlakeBortlesthrewfour touchdownpasses,threein the“rsthalfinanAFCtitle gamerematch. SAINTS21,BROWNS18: Wil Lutzkickeda44-yard“eld goalforNewOrleanswith 21secondsleft,andthe Saintsheldonforavictory thatextendedtheBrowns winlessstreakto19games. VIKINGS29,PACKERS29: DanielCarlsonmissedtwo “eldgoalsinovertime, includingonefrom35yards astimeexpired,andthe Vikingshadtosettlefora tieafterrallyingfromalate 13-pointde“cit. CHIEFS42,STEELERS37: PatrickMahomestieda franchiserecordwithsix touchdownpasses. BUCCANEERS27,EAGLES 21: RyanFitzpatrickthrew formorethan400yardsand fourtouchdownsforthe secondstraightweek. FALCONS31,PANTHERS24: MattRyanranforapairof scoresforthe“rsttimein hiscareerandthrewapair ofTDpasses. RAMS34,CARDINALS0: ToddGurleyranforthree touchdownsandJaredGof f threwfor354yardsanda touchdown. DOLPHINS20,JETS12: Rya n Tannehillthrewtwotouchdownpasses. CHARGERS31,BILLS20: MelvinGordonmatcheda careerhighbyscoringthre e touchdowns. TITANS20,TEXANS17: Rya n Succopkickeda31-yard “eldgoalwith1:00left. COLTS21,REDSKINS9: AndrewLuckthrewfortwo touchdownpasses. BRONCOS20,RAIDERS19: BrandonMcManuskicked a36-yard“eldgoalwithsi x secondslefttowinit. 49ERS30,LIONS27: Jimmy Garoppolothrewtwo touchdownpassesandMa t Breidaranfor138yards.„TheAssociatedPress ROUNDUP

PAGE 17

DailyCommercial.com | Monday, September 17, 2018 B5AMERICAN LEAGUENATIONAL LEAGUEEAST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY z-Boston 103 47 .687 „ „ 7-3 W-2 54-21 49-26 New York 91 58 .611 11 „ 4-6 L-2 49-26 42-32 Tampa Bay 82 66 .554 20 7 7-3 W-2 48-26 34-40 Toronto 67 82 .450 35 22 4-6 W-2 37-37 30-45 Baltimore 43 106 .289 59 46 2-8 W-1 26-48 17-58 CENTRAL DIVISION TEAM W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY x-Cleveland 83 66 .557 „ „ 4-6 L-1 45-30 38-36 Minnesota 68 81 .456 15 21 5-5 W-1 43-31 25-50 Detroit 61 88 .409 22 28 5-5 W-1 36-38 25-50 Chicago 59 90 .396 24 30 3-7 L-1 28-47 31-43 Kansas City 52 97 .349 31 37 6-4 L-1 30-47 22-50 WEST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Houston 94 55 .631 „ „ 8-2 W-2 42-33 52-22 Oakland 90 60 .600 4 „ 7-3 L-2 46-29 44-31 Seattle 82 67 .550 12 7 5-5 L-1 41-33 41-34 Los Angeles 74 76 .493 20 16 6-4 W-1 37-38 37-38 Texas 64 85 .430 30 25 3-7 L-1 32-43 32-42 z-clinched playoff berth x-clinched division EAST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 83 66 .557 „ „ 7-3 L-2 38-36 45-30 Philadelphia 76 72 .514 6 5 3-7 L-1 45-30 31-42 Washington 76 74 .507 7 6 7-3 W-2 37-37 39-37 New York 69 80 .463 14 13 6-4 L-2 33-42 36-38 Miami 58 91 .389 25 24 3-7 W-1 34-41 24-50 CENTRAL DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Chicago 87 62 .584 „ „ 5-5 L-1 47-27 40-35 Milwaukee 85 65 .567 2 „ 6-4 L-2 46-29 39-36 St. Louis 81 68 .544 6 1 4-6 L-4 39-35 42-33 Pittsburgh 74 74 .500 12 7 7-3 W-2 40-34 34-40 Cincinnati 64 86 .427 23 18 5-5 W-1 36-40 28-46 WEST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Colorado 82 67 .550 „ „ 5-5 W-1 41-33 41-34 Los Angeles 82 67 .550 „ „ 6-4 W-4 39-36 43-31 Arizona 78 72 .520 4 4 3-7 L-2 37-35 41-37 San Francisco 70 80 .467 12 12 2-8 L-1 41-34 29-46 San Diego 60 90 .400 22 22 5-5 W-1 28-47 32-43 MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALLORIOLES 8, WHITE SOX 4CHICAGO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Moncada 2b 5 1 0 0 0 3 .226 S anchez 3b 4 1 1 2 1 1 .247 A breu dh 3 0 0 0 1 2 .265 Palka rf 4 2 2 2 0 1 .243 LaMarre rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .273 Davidson 1b 4 0 1 0 1 0 .233 Delmonico lf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .213 Castillo c 4 0 2 0 0 1 .243 Rondon ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .244 Engel cf 4 0 2 0 0 2 .238 T OTALS 37 4 9 4 4 14 BALTIMORE AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Mullins cf 5 1 4 1 0 0 .276 Rickard lf 4 1 0 0 0 0 .238 V illar ss 5 2 3 2 0 1 .268 J ones rf 4 2 2 2 1 0 .285 Mancini 1b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .240 S tewart dh 4 1 0 1 0 1 .000 Nunez 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .240 1-Peterson pr-3b 0 1 0 0 0 0 .204 V alera 2b 2 0 1 1 1 0 .245 S isco c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .181 W ynns c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .241 T OTALS 33 8 11 7 3 4 CHICAGO 010 030 000„4 9 1 BALTIMORE 500 100 11X„8 11 2 1-ran for Nunez in the 8th. E „ Davidson (3), Villar (10), Mancini (4). LOB „ Chicago 11, Baltimore 8. 2B „ Mullins (9), Nunez (12). HR „ Palka (23), off Hess; S anchez (8), off Hess; Palka (24), off Hess; V illar (14), off Giolito; Jones (15), off Ruiz. RBIs „ Sanchez 2 (51), Palka 2 (60), Mullins (8), V illar 2 (45), Jones 2 (58), Stewart (1), Valera (7). SB „ Sanchez (14), Mullins (1), Jones (7). S F „ Valera. S „ Wynns. CHICAGO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Giolito, L, 10-11 6 8 6 4 2 1 98 5.77 Ruiz 1 1 1 1 0 2 15 3.38 Burr .1 2 1 1 1 0 13 4.05 S cahill .2 0 0 0 0 1 6 0.00 BALTIMORE IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hess 4.1 6 4 3 1 7 104 5.22 Meisinger, W, 1-0 .2 1 0 0 1 0 15 5.62 S cott, H, 3 1 1 0 0 1 3 22 5.62 Castro, H, 4 1.1 1 0 0 0 0 16 4.03 Fry, S, 1-2 1.2 0 0 0 1 4 28 3.60 Inherited runners-scored „ Scahill 3-0, Fry 1-0. HBP „ Hess (Abreu), Giolito (Nunez), Burr (Rickard). Umpires „ Home, Nick Mahrley; First, Tom Hallion; Second, Dan Bellino; Third, A dam Hamari. T „ 3:27. A „ 19,104 (45,971).RED SOX 4, METS 3NEW YORK AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Rosario ss 4 1 2 1 0 0 .259 McNeil 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .328 Flores 1b 1 0 0 1 1 0 .266 1-Reinheimer pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .167 S mith 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .208 Conforto lf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .239 Frazier 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .222 Bruce dh 3 1 1 0 1 0 .222 Nimmo rf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .266 Plawecki c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .223 J ackson cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .255 T OTALS 30 3 6 3 3 5 BOSTON AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Betts rf 2 0 0 1 0 2 .337 Lin cf 1 1 1 0 0 0 .208 Holt ss 4 1 1 2 0 2 .262 Benintendi lf 3 0 0 1 0 0 .287 Pearce dh 3 0 1 0 1 2 .298 Moreland 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .246 Kinsler 2b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .249 Bradley Jr. cf-rf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .232 Devers 3b 3 1 1 0 0 1 .238 V azquez c 3 1 1 0 0 1 .214 T OTALS 28 4 6 4 1 13 NEW YORK 000 002 100„3 6 0 BOSTON 003 000 01X„4 6 1 1-ran for Flores in the 8th. E „ Lin (3). LOB „ New York 6, Boston 3. 2B „ Rosario (25), Conforto (21), Pearce (13), Lin (3). HR „ Holt (5), off deGrom. RBIs „ Rosario (48), Flores (51), Conforto (69), Betts (72), Holt 2 (41), Benintendi (81). SB „ Bradley Jr. (16). CS „ Bruce (2), Reinheimer (1). SF „ Flores, Betts, Benintendi. NEW YORK IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA deGrom 7 5 3 3 1 12 107 1.78 Lugo, L, 3-4 1 1 1 1 0 1 12 2.76 BOSTON IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sale 3 1 0 0 0 1 42 1.92 V elazquez 1 1 0 0 0 0 20 3.24 Pomeranz 1.2 3 2 2 0 0 34 6.17 Hembree, H, 20 .1 0 1 1 1 0 18 4.15 Kelly, BS, 5-7 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 4.19 Workman, W, 6-0 1 0 0 0 1 2 19 2.33 Wright, S, 1-1 1 0 0 0 1 1 14 2.87 Hembree pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored „ Hembree 1-0, Kelly 2-1. HBP „ Velazquez (Flores), Hembree (Nimmo). WP „ Velazquez. PB „ Vazquez (10). Umpires „ Home, Bill Miller; First, Angel Hernandez; Second, Todd Tichenor; Third, Chad Whitson. T „ 2:55. A „ 36,526 (37,731).BLUE JAYS 3, YANKEES 2 T ORONTO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. McKinney lf-1b-lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .289 S moak 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .248 2-Pillar pr-cf 0 1 0 0 0 0 .246 Morales dh 1 0 0 0 2 0 .255 1-Davis pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .167 a-Tellez ph-dh-1b 1 0 1 1 0 0 .407 Grichuk cf-rf 4 0 1 1 0 2 .247 S olarte 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .232 3 -Diaz pr-3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .257 Hernandez rf-lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .243 Giles p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Urena ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .262 T ravis 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .236 McGuire c 4 1 2 1 0 0 .308 T OTALS 34 3 7 3 2 9 NEW YORK AB R H BI BB SO AVG. McCutchen rf 4 1 1 1 0 2 .252 S tanton dh 3 1 2 0 1 0 .265 Hicks cf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .242 A ndujar 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .298 Hechavarria 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .254 b-Walker ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .218 Gregorius ss 2 0 1 1 1 0 .270 T orres 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .279 S anchez c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .188 V oit 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .280 Gardner lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .237 T OTALS 31 2 6 2 2 9 T ORONTO 001 000 020„3 7 1 NEW YORK 200 000 000„2 6 0 a-singled for Davis in the 8th. b-”ied out for Hechavarria in the 9th. 1-ran for Morales in the 6th. 2-ran for Smoak in t he 8th. 3-ran for Solarte in the 8th. E „ Hernandez (8). LOB „ Toronto 6, New Y ork 5. 2B „ Grichuk (28), McGuire (2). HR „ McCutchen (19), off Pannone. RBIs „ Grichuk (54), McGuire (1), Tellez (5), McCutchen (62), Gregorius (84). SF „ Gregorius. T ORONTO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pannone, W, 3-1 7 4 2 2 2 6 103 3.77 Leiter Jr., H, 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 17 5.82 Giles, S, 22-22 1 1 0 0 0 2 12 5.05 NEW YORK IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lynn 5 3 1 1 1 7 80 4.90 Robertson, H, 18 2 0 0 0 1 1 24 2.89 Betances, L, 4-6, BS, 3-6 1 4 2 2 0 1 21 2.77 Britton 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 3.50 WP „ Lynn. Umpires „ Home, Gerry Davis; First, Pat Hoberg; Second, Brian Knight; Third, Roberto Ortiz. T „ 2:50. A „ 41,758 (47,309).TIGERS 6, INDIANS 4DETROIT AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Candelario 3b 5 2 3 0 0 1 .231 Stewart lf 5 1 3 1 0 0 .280 Castellanos dh 5 0 0 0 0 3 .292 Adduci 1b 3 1 1 4 0 0 .280 Mahtook rf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .214 Greiner c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .235 Lugo 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .241 Rodriguez ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .214 Reyes cf 4 1 0 0 0 0 .235 TOTALS 38 6 12 6 0 6 CLEVELAND AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Davis lf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .229 Allen cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .241 Donaldson 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .227 Diaz 1b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .291 Guyer dh 2 2 2 0 1 0 .209 Barnes rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .364 Haase c 4 0 1 1 0 1 .167 Gonzalez ss 4 0 0 1 0 1 .277 Rosales 2b 3 0 1 1 1 0 .167 TOTALS 34 4 8 4 2 9 DETROIT 100 040 010„6 12 0 CLEVELAND 100 200 001„4 8 0 LOB „ Detroit 6, Cleveland 6. 2B „ Allen (9), Diaz (3). HR „ Adduci (3), off Bieber; Mahtook (8), off Miller. RBIs „ Stewart (1), Adduci 4 (20), Mahtook (23), Diaz (13), Haase (1), Gonzalez (16), Rosales (1). SB „ Mahtook (4), Rodriguez (2). SF „ Adduci. DETROIT IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Liriano, W, 5-10 7 5 3 3 2 7 94 4.54 Jimenez, H, 22 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 4.20 Greene, S, 30-36 1 3 1 1 0 1 13 5.07 CLEVELAND IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bieber, L, 10-4 6 9 5 5 0 4 93 4.50 Miller 1.1 1 1 1 0 0 18 3.54 Edwards .2 0 0 0 0 1 6 5.40 Plutko 1 2 0 0 0 1 23 5.27 HBP „ Liriano (Guyer). Umpires „ Home, Andy Fletcher; First, John Tumpane; Second, Jeremie Rehak; Third, Mark Wegner. T „ 2:33. A „ 24,862 (35,225).RAYS 5, ATHLETICS 4OAKLAND AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Martini lf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .284 Chapman 3b 3 1 0 0 1 0 .282 Lowrie 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .268 Davis dh 4 1 1 4 0 1 .249 Olson 1b 3 0 2 0 1 1 .246 Piscotty rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .265 Laureano cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .281 Semien ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .258 Lucroy c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .239 a-Joyce ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .199 TOTALS 29 4 4 4 4 6 TAMPA BAY AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Smith rf-lf 4 0 0 0 1 1 .300 Duffy 3b 3 1 1 0 0 0 .297 Choi dh 4 1 0 0 0 0 .262 Cron 1b 3 1 2 2 1 1 .252 1-Gomez pr-rf 0 1 0 0 0 0 .219 Lowe 2b 4 0 1 2 0 0 .247 Kiermaier cf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .226 Adames ss 3 1 2 1 1 0 .267 Bauers lf-1b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .199 Sucre c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .188 TOTALS 32 5 9 5 4 4 OAKLAND 000 000 004„4 4 0 TAMPA BAY 200 100 20X„5 9 0 a-walked for Lucroy in the 9th. 1-ran for Cron in the 7th. LOB „ Oakland 2, Tampa Bay 8. 2B „ Laureano (9), Duffy (21), Adames (7), Bauers (18). 3B „ Lowe (2). HR „ Davis (43), off Romo; Cron (27), off Fiers; Adames (9), off Fiers. RBIs „ Davis 4 (115), Cron 2 (64), Lowe 2 (19), Adames (26). SB „ Kiermaier (10), Bauers (5). OAKLAND IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Fiers, L, 12-7 4 4 3 3 3 2 80 3.38 Gearrin 1 1 0 0 0 0 16 3.51 Buchter 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 2.86 Pagan 1 2 2 2 1 1 20 4.42 Montas 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 3.90 TAMPA BAY IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Castillo 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 3.24 Kittredge, W, 3-2 2 0 0 0 1 1 25 6.37 Wood 2 1 0 0 0 0 29 3.82 Schultz, H, 2 2 0 0 0 0 1 24 3.49 Kolarek 1 2 0 0 0 0 16 4.20 Faria 0 0 3 3 3 0 16 5.34 Alvarado .1 0 0 0 0 1 5 2.09 Romo, S, 21-28 .2 1 1 1 0 1 7 3.36 Faria pitched to 3 batters in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored „ Alvarado 3-0, Romo 3-3. HBP „ Fiers (Duffy). WP „ Gearrin. PB „ Sucre (4). Umpires „ Home, Jansen Visconti; First, Chris Guccione; Second, Dave Rackley; Third, Larry Vanover. T „ 2:59. A „ 13,197 (42,735).NATIONALS 6, BRAVES 4WASHINGTON AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Robles cf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .150 Turner ss 5 1 1 0 0 1 .267 Harper rf 3 3 2 2 2 0 .249 Rendon 3b 4 2 3 2 1 0 .300 Soto lf 5 0 2 1 0 1 .305 Zimmerman 1b 5 0 1 1 0 0 .265 Wieters c 3 0 1 0 1 0 .231 Sanchez 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Roark p 2 0 0 0 1 1 .190 Collins p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Suero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 e-Stevenson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Grace p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Holland p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Doolittle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --TOTALS 37 6 11 6 5 4 ATLANTA AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Acuna lf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .292 Albies 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .271 Freeman 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .304 Markakis rf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .307 Culberson 3b 4 1 2 2 0 1 .280 Inciarte cf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .260 Flowers c 2 1 1 2 0 1 .233 c-Duda ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .238 Suzuki c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .271 Swanson ss 4 0 2 0 0 0 .243 Newcomb p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .045 a-Ruiz ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .000 Wright p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Tucker ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .236 Carle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Flaherty ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .221 Sobotka p 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000 Brach p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --f-Duvall ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .192 TOTALS 35 4 8 4 2 7 WASHINGTON 302 000 001„6 11 0 ATLANTA 000 200 020„4 8 0 a-walked for Newcomb in the 3rd. b-grounded out for Wright in the 5th. c-struck out for Flowers in the 6th. d-grounded out for Carle in the 7th. e-”ied out for Suero in the 8th. f-grounded out for Brach in the 9th. LOB „ Washington 9, Atlanta 6. 2B „ Markakis (41). HR „ Harper (34), off Newcomb; Rendon (20), off Newcomb; Flowers (7), off Roark; Culberson (12), off Holland. RBIs „ Harper 2 (97), Rendon 2 (75), Soto (64), Zimmerman (48), Culberson 2 (42), Flowers 2 (28). WASHINGTON IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Roark, W, 9-15 5.1 5 2 2 2 3 95 4.34 Collins, H, 4 .1 0 0 0 0 1 3 3.20 Suero, H, 2 1.1 1 0 0 0 1 17 3.14 Grace, H, 6 .1 1 1 1 0 0 8 2.80 Holland, H, 5 .2 1 1 1 0 1 10 5.10 Doolittle, S, 24-25 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 1.74 ATLANTA IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Newcomb, L, 12-9 3 6 5 5 2 3 73 4.04 Wright 2 1 0 0 2 0 40 1.80 Carle 2 1 0 0 0 1 19 2.80 Sobotka 1 0 0 0 1 0 15 2.61 Brach 1 3 1 1 0 0 20 3.62 Inherited runners-scored „ Collins 2-0, Suero 2-0, Holland 1-1. Umpires „ Home, Phil Cuzzi; First, Jeff Nelson; Second, Laz Diaz; Third, Manny Gonzalez. T „ 3:15. A „ 33,403 (41,149).MARLINS 6, PHILLIES 4MIAMI AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Riddle ss 5 0 1 0 0 1 .236 Rojas 3b-1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .248 Castro 2b 4 2 1 0 0 1 .280 Dietrich 1b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .266 Rivera 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .178 OBrien rf 3 1 1 3 0 2 .238 Steckenrider p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Conley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Brinson cf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .199 Dean lf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .217 Sierra rf 0 0 0 0 1 0 .174 Holaday c 3 0 2 1 1 0 .214 Urena p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .045 b-Ortega ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .244 Kinley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Barraclough p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Galloway lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .220 TOTALS 33 6 9 5 2 11 PHILADELPHIA AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Hernandez 2b 5 1 1 1 0 1 .257 Hoskins lf 5 0 2 0 0 2 .252 Cabrera 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .263 Santana 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .230 Herrera rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .256 De Los Santos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Knapp ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .211 Morgan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Crawford ss 2 1 1 0 0 0 .223 d-Bautista ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .197 Alfaro c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .255 e-Ramos ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .314 Pivetta p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .108 a-Bour ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .230 Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Altherr rf 2 1 2 0 0 0 .189 Quinn cf 4 1 1 2 0 1 .330 TOTALS 36 4 7 3 1 10 MIAMI 000 213 000„6 9 2 PHILADELPHIA 100 000 102„4 7 1 a-struck out for Pivetta in the 5th. b-struck out for Urena in the 6th. c-”ied out for De Los Santos in the 8th. d-”ied out for Crawford in the 9th. e-struck out for Alfaro in the 9th. E „ Castro (12), Dietrich (4), Crawford (9). LOB „ Miami 4, Philadelphia 7. 2B „ Holaday 2 (5), Hoskins (34), Altherr 2 (11). 3B „ Brinson (5). HR „ OBrien (2), off Pivetta; Hernandez (13), off Urena. RBIs „ OBrien 3 (5), Brinson (37), Holaday (16), Hernandez (53), Quinn 2 (12). SB „ Quinn (8). SF „ OBrien. S „ Urena. MIAMI IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Urena, W, 7-12 5 3 1 1 1 4 79 4.21 Kinley 1 1 0 0 0 1 20 10.57 Barraclough 1 1 1 1 0 2 25 4.42 Steckenrider 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 4.04 Conley 1 2 2 1 0 2 25 4.47 PHILADELPHIA IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pivetta, L, 7-13 5 4 3 3 1 8 80 4.67 Garcia 1 4 3 3 0 1 27 4.95 De Los Santos 2 1 0 0 0 1 23 4.50 Morgan 1 0 0 0 1 1 22 4.06 HBP „ Barraclough (Crawford). WP „ Garcia. Umpires „ Home, D.J. Reyburn; First, Chris Segal; Second, Alfonso Marquez; Third, Jim Wolf. T „ 3:04. A „ 30,040 (43,647).PIRATES 3, BREWERS 2PITTSBURGH AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Frazier 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .278 Marte cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .272 Bell 1b 2 1 0 0 2 0 .262 Luplow rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .214 Dickerson lf 4 2 3 1 0 1 .293 Moran 3b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .276 Newman ss 3 0 1 2 0 0 .189 Stallings c 3 0 0 0 1 2 .185 Williams p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .100 Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Kramer ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .214 d-Osuna ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Crick p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Vazquez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 TOTALS 28 3 5 3 5 8 MILWAUKEE AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Cain cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .311 Yelich rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .313 Aguilar 1b 3 1 1 1 1 2 .275 Shaw 2b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .237 f-Santana ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .259 Braun lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .247 Moustakas 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .252 Kratz c 4 0 2 0 0 0 .249 Arcia ss 2 0 1 0 0 1 .223 b-Schoop ph-ss 1 0 0 0 0 1 .232 Chacin p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .170 a-Thames ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .221 Knebel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Soria p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Cedeno p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Granderson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .249 Burnes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --TOTALS 32 2 5 2 2 9 PITTSBURGH 010 100 001„3 5 0 MILWAUKEE 000 000 002„2 5 0 a-struck out for Chacin in the 5th. b-struck out for Arcia in the 7th. c-pinch hit for Rodriguez in the 8th. d-grounded out for Kramer in the 8th. e-”ied out for Cedeno in the 8th. f-homered for Shaw in the 9th. LOB „ Pittsburgh 5, Milwaukee 5. 2B „ Dickerson 2 (31), Kratz (6), Arcia (12). HR „ Aguilar (32), off Vazquez; Santana (4), off Vazquez. RBIs „ Dickerson (50), Newman 2 (4), Aguilar (99), Santana (18). CS „ Bell (4). SF „ Newman. S „ Williams. PITTSBURGH IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Williams, W, 13-9 6 2 0 0 2 7 97 3.16 Rodriguez, H, 10 1 1 0 0 0 1 15 2.57 Crick, H, 15 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 2.56 Vazquez, S, 34-38 1 2 2 2 0 1 16 2.81 MILWAUKEE IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chacin, L, 14-8 5 3 2 2 3 4 79 3.54 Knebel 1 0 0 0 1 2 14 4.15 Soria 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 3.46 Cedeno 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 2.35 Burnes 1 2 1 1 1 1 18 2.87 Umpires „ Home, Adrian Johnson; First, Brian Gorman; Second, Nic Lentz; Third, Tripp Gibson. T „ 2:57. A „ 32,180 (41,900).ASTROS 5, DIAMONDBACKS 4ARIZONA AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Jay rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .271 Pollock cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .261 Peralta lf 3 2 2 1 1 1 .298 Goldschmidt 1b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .299 Escobar 3b 3 0 0 1 0 1 .267 Descalso dh 3 1 1 2 1 1 .244 Marte 2b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .252 Ahmed ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .246 Mathis c 2 0 0 0 0 2 .207 a-Vargas ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Murphy c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .207 TOTALS 30 4 5 4 2 13 HOUSTON AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Springer cf-rf 3 2 2 0 2 0 .268 Altuve 2b 5 0 2 1 0 2 .319 Bregman 3b 2 0 0 0 1 0 .294 Gurriel 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .278 White dh 4 0 1 1 0 0 .299 Correa ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .242 Reddick rf-lf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .240 Maldonado c 4 0 2 1 0 1 .226 Kemp lf 3 1 0 0 0 0 .284 Marisnick cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .207 TOTALS 34 5 12 4 3 3 ARIZONA 000 001 003„4 5 1 HOUSTON 100 001 21X„5 12 0 a-struck out for Mathis in the 8th. E „ Marte (7). LOB „ Arizona 3, Houston 9. 2B „ White (11), Correa (19). HR „ Peralta (28), off Verlander; Descalso (13), off Osuna; Reddick (15), off Greinke. RBIs „ Peralta (82), Escobar (83), Descalso 2 (57), Altuve (57), White (39), Reddick (44), Maldonado (44). SB „ Kemp (9). SF „ Escobar. S „ Marte. ARIZONA IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Greinke, L, 14-10 6.1 8 4 4 2 2 98 3.20 Bradley .2 2 0 0 0 0 24 3.64 Boxberger 1 2 1 0 1 1 22 4.47 HOUSTON IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Verlander, W, 16-9 7 3 1 1 1 11 101 2.67 Pressly, H, 17 1 0 0 0 0 1 7 2.67 McHugh .1 1 2 2 1 0 11 2.15 Osuna, S, 18-19 .2 1 1 1 0 1 11 2.65 Inherited runners-scored „ Bradley 1-1, Osuna 2-2. HBP „ Bradley (Bregman). Umpires „ Home, Mark Carlson; First, Paul Nauert; Second, Scott Barry; Third, Carlos Torres. T „ 3:09. A „ 37,889 (41,168).TWINS 9, ROYALS 6MINNESOTA AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Polanco ss 5 1 4 2 0 0 .285 Rosario dh 4 1 2 0 0 1 .288 a-Cave ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 1 .263 Grossman lf 3 0 1 1 2 1 .268 Forsythe 2b 5 0 2 0 0 2 .240 Kepler cf 4 2 1 1 1 0 .228 Adrianza 3b-1b 5 1 1 1 0 1 .243 Austin 1b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .223 Petit 3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .308 Field rf 5 2 4 2 0 1 .212 Gimenez c 5 1 2 0 0 0 .182 TOTALS 42 9 18 8 3 8 KANSAS CITY AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Merri“eld 2b 5 0 1 1 0 1 .302 Mondesi ss 5 1 3 2 0 1 .291 Gordon lf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .242 OHearn 1b 4 2 3 1 0 0 .270 Herrera rf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .230 Goodwin cf 4 0 1 1 0 2 .240 Escobar 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .218 Phillips dh 4 0 1 0 0 2 .200 Gallagher c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .240 Viloria c 3 2 2 0 0 0 .273 TOTALS 38 6 13 6 0 9 MINNESOTA 011 302 002„9 18 0 KANSAS CITY 200 120 001„6 13 1 a-struck out for Rosario in the 8th. E „ OHearn (2). LOB „ Minnesota 9, Kansas City 5. 2B „ Adrianza (17), Field (10), OHearn 2 (7), Herrera (12), Viloria (2). HR „ Kepler (19), off Junis; Austin (16), off Junis; Field (7), off Junis; Polanco (5), off Vasto; Mondesi (9), off Gibson. RBIs „ Polanco 2 (32), Grossman (42), Kepler (52), Adrianza (35), Austin (35), Field 2 (17), Merri“eld (57), Mondesi 2 (29), OHearn (25), Herrera (19), Goodwin (18). SB „ Mondesi (25). CS „ Polanco (4), Mondesi (6). MINNESOTA IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gibson, W, 8-13 6.2 11 5 5 0 6 94 3.78 Rogers, H, 16 1.1 0 0 0 0 2 20 2.80 Hildenberger 1 2 1 1 0 1 16 4.76 KANSAS CITY IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Junis 3 8 4 4 1 3 82 4.42 Flynn 2 4 1 1 0 0 36 4.06 Vasto, L, 0-1 .2 3 2 1 0 1 20 8.31 McCarthy 1.1 0 0 0 0 1 15 3.18 Maurer 1 1 0 0 1 2 23 7.94 Peralta 1 2 2 2 1 1 22 4.13 Junis pitched to 2 batters in the 4th. Inherited runners-scored „ Rogers 1-0, McCarthy 2-1. WP „ Peralta. Umpires „ Home, Cory Blaser; First, Stu Scheurwater; Second, Gary Cederstrom; Third, Ben May. T „ 3:24. A „ 20,286 (37,903).REDS 2, CUBS 1CINCINNATI AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Schebler rf 5 1 1 1 0 2 .271 Peraza ss 5 0 1 0 0 2 .293 Votto 1b 4 0 3 0 0 0 .288 Suarez 3b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .287 Gennett 2b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .318 Ervin lf 3 1 1 1 1 2 .261 Barnhart c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .247 Castillo p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .107 Garrett p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Herrera ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .183 Hughes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Iglesias p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Hamilton cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .239 TOTALS 34 2 6 2 4 11 CHICAGO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Rizzo 1b 2 0 1 0 1 1 .277 Happ lf-cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .229 Zobrist rf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .312 Murphy 2b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .284 Caratini c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Bote 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .229 Russell ss 2 1 0 0 1 1 .252 d-Baez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .294 Quintana p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .082 a-Contreras ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .261 Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Bryant ph-lf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .279 Almora cf 2 0 1 1 0 0 .285 Maples p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Edwards Jr. p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --TOTALS 28 1 5 1 4 3 CINCINNATI 100 100 000„2 6 0 CHICAGO 000 010 000„1 5 2 a-doubled for Quintana in the 5th. b-singled for Garcia in the 7th. c-grounded out for Garrett in the 8th. d-grounded out for Russell in the 9th. E „ Russell 2 (17). LOB „ Cincinnati 9, Chicago 6. 2B „ Votto (27), Contreras (26). HR „ Schebler (17), off Quintana; Ervin (7), off Quintana. RBIs „ Schebler (48), Ervin (30), Almora (34). SF „ Almora. CINCINNATI IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Castillo, W, 10-12 6.2 4 1 1 4 2 98 4.52 Garrett, H, 20 .1 0 0 0 0 1 4 4.42 Hughes, H, 14 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 1.82 Iglesias, S, 27-31 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 2.47 CHICAGO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Quintana, L, 13-10 5 5 2 2 3 7 98 3.95 Garcia 2 1 0 0 1 2 19 6.03 Maples 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 9.64 Edwards Jr. 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 2.39 Inherited runners-scored „ Garrett 2-0. HBP „ Castillo (Rizzo). WP „ Garcia, Garrett. Umpires „ Home, Mike Estabrook; First, Hunter Wendelstedt; Second, John Libka; Third, Bruce Dreckman. T „ 2:43. A „ 41,314 (41,649).ROCKIES 3, GIANTS 2COLORADO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Blackmon cf 3 0 1 0 2 0 .287 LeMahieu 2b 3 0 0 1 0 1 .281 Arenado 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .296 Dahl lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .276 Story ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .289 Gonzalez rf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .276 Desmond 1b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .236 Iannetta c 2 1 0 0 2 1 .221 Senzatela p 3 0 1 2 0 2 .105 Rusin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Oberg p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ottavino p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Parra ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .282 Davis p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --TOTALS 32 3 7 3 4 9 SAN FRANCISCO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Blanco rf-cf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .227 Panik 2b 3 2 2 0 1 0 .254 Longoria 3b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .249 Crawford ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .254 Slater 1b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .268 Shaw lf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .115 Garcia c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .368 Hernandez cf 2 0 0 0 0 2 .240 a-Hanson ph-rf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .257 Rodriguez p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .069 Black p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Pence ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .209 Okert p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Dyson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Moronta p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Hundley ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .242 TOTALS 33 2 7 2 3 12 COLORADO 030 000 000„3 7 0 SAN FRANCISCO 000 001 010„2 7 1 a-struck out for Hernandez in the 7th. b-struck out for Black in the 7th. c-singled for Ottavino in the 9th. d-struck out for Moronta in the 9th. E „ Slater (4). LOB „ Colorado 7, San Francisco 7. 2B „ Blackmon (26). RBIs „ LeMahieu (57), Senzatela 2 (3), Slater (23), Shaw (4). SB „ Desmond (19), Blanco (5), Panik (4). CS „ Dahl (2). SF „ LeMahieu. COLORADO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Senzatela, W, 5-6 5 5 1 1 2 5 86 4.81 Rusin, H, 7 .1 0 0 0 0 1 8 6.53 Oberg, H, 13 1.2 1 0 0 0 3 18 2.22 Ottavino, H, 31 1 1 1 1 1 1 24 2.25 Davis, S, 40-46 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 4.48 SAN FRANCISCO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Rodriguez, L, 6-4 6 5 3 1 3 5 91 2.30 Black 1 0 0 0 1 1 17 4.50 Okert 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0.00 Dyson 1 0 0 0 0 1 6 2.89 Moronta 1 1 0 0 0 2 13 2.61 Senzatela pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Okert pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored „ Rusin 2-0, Oberg 2-1, Dyson 1-0. Umpires „ Home, Jerry Meals; First, Ed Hickox; Second, Gabe Morales; Third, Ramon De Jesus. T „ 3:02. A „ 38,824 (41,915).ANGELS 4, MARINERS 3SEATTLE AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Haniger rf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .282 Span lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .267 Cano 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .279 Healy 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .245 Seager 3b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .219 Vogelbach dh 4 1 1 2 0 1 .211 Freitas c 2 0 1 0 0 1 .216 a-Gamel ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .276 Zunino c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .196 Gordon cf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .269 Romine ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .204 TOTALS 32 3 7 3 1 9 LOS ANGELES AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Calhoun rf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .214 Fletcher 2b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .275 1-Cowart pr-2b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .123 Ohtani dh 3 1 0 0 1 2 .290 Upton lf 4 1 1 3 0 1 .263 Simmons ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .295 Marte 1b 3 0 2 0 0 0 .218 Ward 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .184 Briceno c 2 0 0 0 0 2 .238 b-Fernandez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .272 Hudson c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Hermosillo cf 2 1 1 0 0 0 .182 c-Young Jr. ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .218 TOTALS 30 4 7 4 2 9 SEATTLE 001 200 000„3 7 0 LOS ANGELES 003 000 10X„4 7 0 a-struck out for Freitas in the 7th. b-lined out for Briceno in the 7th. c-grounded out for Hermosillo in the 7th. 1-ran for Fletcher in the 1st. LOB „ Seattle 3, Los Angeles 4. 2B „ Haniger (34), Fletcher (18), Hermosillo (3). HR „ Vogelbach (3), off Barria; Upton (30), off Gonzales; Calhoun (19), off Vincent. RBIs „ Haniger (89), Vogelbach 2 (9), Calhoun (57), Upton 3 (84). CS „ Span (4), Ohtani (4), Marte (1). SEATTLE IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gonzales 5 6 3 3 2 6 84 4.28 Armstrong 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 0.00 Vincent, L, 3-4 1 1 1 1 0 0 13 4.05 Warren 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 3.23 LOS ANGELES IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Barria 5 6 3 3 1 3 82 3.61 Cole, W, 2-2 2 0 0 0 0 3 22 2.93 Anderson, H, 22 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 3.29 Buttrey, S, 3-3 1 0 0 0 0 3 16 0.66 WP „ Barria, Warren. Umpires „ Home, Ryan Additon; First, Lance Barrett; Second, Bill Welke; Third, Tony Randazzo. T „ 2:55. A „ 35,578 (45,050).PADRES 7, RANGERS 3TEXAS AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Odor 2b 5 0 1 0 0 2 .259 Profar ss 4 1 2 1 1 0 .258 Mazara rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .266 Gallo cf-lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .210 Kiner-Falefa 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .263 Guzman 1b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .236 Chirinos c 3 0 1 1 0 0 .217 Calhoun lf 3 1 1 1 0 0 .247 DeShields cf 0 0 0 0 1 0 .209 Minor p 3 0 1 0 0 1 .333 Pelham p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Butler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Claudio p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Choo ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .270 1-Robinson pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .183 Springs p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --TOTALS 33 3 8 3 3 7 SAN DIEGO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Mejia c 4 1 1 4 1 1 .241 Myers 3b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .251 Renfroe lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .253 Hosmer 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .250 Reyes rf 3 0 2 0 1 0 .276 2-Jankowski pr 0 1 0 0 0 0 .258 Galvis 2b-ss 4 2 1 1 0 0 .233 Margot cf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .250 Guerra ss 2 0 0 0 0 1 .143 a-Hedges ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .245 Stammen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Wingenter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Yates p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Ellis ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .289 Nix p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Wick p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Spangenberg 2b 0 1 0 0 2 0 .230 TOTALS 32 7 8 7 5 8 TEXAS 011 001 000„3 8 1 SAN DIEGO 100 000 105„7 8 0 Two outs when winning run scored. a-grounded out for Guerra in the 7th. b-walked for Claudio in the 9th. c-pinch hit for Yates in the 9th. 1-ran for Choo in the 9th. 2-ran for Reyes in the 9th. E „ Chirinos (3). LOB „ Texas 8, San Diego 4. 2B „ Profar (33), Gallo (24), Guzman (17), Minor (1), Hosmer (31), Galvis (25). 3B „ Margot (6). HR „ Calhoun (2), off Nix; Profar (18), off Nix; Renfroe (23), off Minor; Mejia (3), off Springs. RBIs „ Profar (74), Chirinos (62), Calhoun (10), Mejia 4 (8), Renfroe (61), Galvis (61), Margot (45). TEXAS IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Minor 6.1 4 2 2 1 7 87 4.14 Pelham, H, 1 .1 1 0 0 0 0 3 4.91 Butler, H, 2 .2 0 0 0 2 1 23 6.00 Claudio, H, 14 .2 0 0 0 0 0 5 4.74 Springs, L, 0-1, BS, 1-1 .2 3 5 5 2 0 30 3.55 SAN DIEGO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nix 6 7 3 3 1 3 80 5.75 Wick 1 1 0 0 0 0 17 7.11 Stammen 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 2.49 Wingenter .1 0 0 0 2 1 19 4.40 Yates, W, 5-3 .2 0 0 0 0 1 9 2.04 Inherited runners-scored „ Pelham 1-0, Butler 1-0, Claudio 2-0, Yates 3-0. HBP „ Nix (KinerFalefa), Wingenter (Chirinos). WP „ Springs. Umpires „ Home, Ryan Blakney; First, Chris Conroy; Second, CB Bucknor; Third, Fieldin Culbreth. T „ 3:15. A „ 22,242 (42,445).BOX SCORES ROUNDUP/MATCHUPSRed Sox 4, Mets 3: Red Sox right “elder Mookie Betts left the game after hurting his left side making a throw to home plate. Blue Jays 3, Yankees 2: Dellin Betances wasted a 2-1 eighth-inning lead. Astros 5, Diamondbacks 4: Justin Verlander (16-9) struck out 11 in seven innings. Rays 5, Athletics 4: Khris Davis hit a grand slam in the ninth off Sergio Romo. Nationals 6, Braves 4: Bryce Harper and Anthony Rendon hit two-run homers off Sean Newcomb (12-9). Marlins 6, Phillies 4: Peter OBrien homered and drove in three runs. Reds 2, Cubs 1: The Cubs NL Central lead remained at 2 games over second-place Milwaukee when Scott Schebler homered on the “rst pitch of the game. Pirates 3, Brewers 2: Jesus Aguilar and Domingo Santana homered on consecutive pitches from Felipe Vazquez to begin the ninth. Rockies 3, Giants 2: Antonio Senzatela pitched shutout ball into the sixth inning. Padres 7, Rangers 3: Rookie Francisco Mejia hit a grand slam with two outs in the ninth inning. Angels 4, Mariners 3: Kole Calhoun hit a two-run homer. Tigers 6, Indians 4: The Indians rested several regulars a day after clinching the AL Central. Orioles 8, White Sox 4: Jonathan Villar and Adam Jones homered. Twins 9, Royals 6: Tyler Austin hit one of Minnesotas four home runs. LATE L.A. Dodgers at St. LouisTODAYS PITCHING COMPARISONNATIONAL LEAGUE 2018 TEAM LAST THREE STARTS TEAMS PITCHERS TIME W-L ERA REC W-L IP ERA New York Wheeler (R) 11-7 3.23 14-14 2-1 22.0 1.64 Philadelphia Arrieta (R) 7:05p 10-9 3.66 14-14 1-0 15.1 6.46 Washington Fedde (R) 2-3 5.12 4-5 1-0 10.2 3.38 Miami Richards (R) 7:10p 3-9 4.85 8-14 0-2 12.0 9.75 St. Louis Mikolas (R) 15-4 2.99 21-8 2-1 18.2 3.38 Atlanta Foltynewicz (R) 7:35p 11-9 2.66 13-15 1-1 21.0 2.57 Cincinnati DeSclafani (R) 7-5 4.80 11-7 0-1 12.1 8.03 Milwaukee Miley (L) 7:40p 4-2 2.23 9-4 2-0 18.1 1.96 Chicago Hendricks (R) 11-11 3.71 15-15 1-1 16.0 2.25 Arizona Corbin (L) 9:40p 11-5 3.05 17-13 1-0 17.1 2.08 Colorado Gray (R) 11-7 4.80 17-11 1-0 14.0 5.14 Los Angeles Ryu (L) 10:10p 4-3 2.42 7-5 0-2 18.0 3.00 San Francisco Suarez (L) 6-11 4.33 11-15 1-2 19.0 3.79 San Diego Mitchell (R) 10:10p 1-3 6.07 4-5 1-0 13.1 3.38AMERICAN LEAGUE 2018 TEAM LAST THREE STARTS TEAMS PITCHERS TIME W-L ERA REC W-L IP ERA Toronto Borucki (L) 3-4 4.26 6-8 0-1 17.0 4.76 Baltimore Cashner (R) 7:05p 4-15 5.29 8-20 0-3 12.0 11.25 Minnesota Stewart (R) 1-1 5.47 2-2 0-0 12.0 6.75 Detroit Zimmermann (R) 7:10p 7-7 4.17 10-12 1-1 16.0 2.81 Tampa Bay Glasnow (R) 1-6 4.48 3-5 0-3 14.2 6.14 Texas TBD ( ) 8:05p 0-0 0.00 0-0 0-0 0.0 0.00 Seattle LeBlanc (L) 8-4 3.56 15-9 1-1 18.0 1.00 Houston Valdez (L) 8:10p 3-1 2.66 3-1 1-1 14.1 3.77INTERLEAGUE 2018 TEAM LAST THREE STARTS TEAMS PITCHERS TIME W-L ERA REC W-L IP ERA Kansas City Keller (R) 8-6 3.04 9-9 2-1 22.0 1.64 Pittsburgh Musgrove (R) 7:05p 6-9 3.87 7-11 1-2 18.1 5.40 KEY: TEAM REC-Teams Record in games started by todays pitcher. SATURDAYS GAMES American League Cleveland 15, Detroit 0 Toronto 8, N.Y. Yankees 7 Tampa Bay 7, Oakland 5 Chicago White Sox 2, Baltimore 0 Kansas City 10, Minnesota 3 Seattle 6, L.A. Angels 5 National League L.A. Dodgers 17, St. Louis 4 Washington 7, Atlanta 1 Chicago Cubs 1, Cincinnati 0 Philadelphia 5, Miami 4 Pittsburgh 3, Milwaukee 1 San Francisco 3, Colorado 0 Interleague Boston 5, N.Y. Mets 3 Houston 10, Arizona 4 Texas 6, San Diego 3 TUESDAYS GAMES American League Boston at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m. Toronto at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Cleveland, 7:10 p.m. Minnesota at Detroit, 7:10 p.m. Tampa Bay at Texas, 8:05 p.m. Seattle at Houston, 8:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Oakland, 10:05 p.m. National League N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. Washington at Miami, 7:10 p.m. St. Louis at Atlanta, 7:35 p.m. Cincinnati at Milwaukee, 7:40 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. San Francisco at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. Interleague Kansas City at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.

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CLASSIC PEANUTS HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH COMICS B6 Monday, September 17, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com

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DEAR ABBY: My husband, "Bill," and I have been happily married for 22 years and have two very active, beautiful children. Our oldest daughter has been playing on a traveling soccer team for the last ve years. Bill and I go all over the country to watch her play and have become very close to the head coach, "Marla," and her family. I recently learned through another parent that Bill dated Marla for three years prior to us getting married. This parent informed me the relationship between Bill and Marla was so serious they had discussed marriage. When I heard it, I was very upset. I couldn't understand why my husband would keep that information from me all this time. When I asked him, he said it was true, but he hadn't felt it had been necessary to tell me. Bill hasn't always been the greatest communicator, but I think this has crossed the line. I feel I have been misled and lied to. He acted as if he had never even met her. It makes me wonder how many other secrets he's hiding from me. I'm having a hard time trusting him now, and I feel there's something seriously wrong with our relationship. I'm also uncomfortable around Marla and her family. I wonder if her husband knows about their relationship. Do I have the right to be upset about this situation? -KEPT IN THE DARK DEAR KEPT: You have the right to be upset -and angry -about the deception. If you want to know if Marla's husband knows what went on between her and your husband, ask her. Perhaps she can ll you in on what else your husband "forgot" to mention. Bill appears to have a large character aw, and the two of you appear to have a serious communication problem. Before this damages your marriage further, you and Bill should schedule some sessions with a licensed marriage and family therapist. If he stonewalls or refuses to go with you, go without him.DEAR ABBY: My aunt and uncle from another state still send me a birthday check every year for my birthday, which is generous and thoughtful of them. While the sum is not large, I feel it is not necessary, and it makes me uncomfortable. I'm in my late 20s now and have a good job with a good income. How do I politely tell them that while I appreciate their kindness, it is not necessary to send their adult niece a check every year? I'm not particularly close with them and am afraid of offending. -UNCOMFORTABLE IN MICHIGAN DEAR UNCOMFORTABLE: From your description of your aunt and uncle, they are thoughtful, caring people, so when you talk to them, express your gratitude for their generosity. Then suggest that because you are now an adult, with a good job and a good income, you think it might be time to consider exchanging only greeting cards on special occasions. Of course, this means you will be sending them cards for their birthdays, anniversary and Christmas, if you don't already do it. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in diculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION BRIDGE CRYPTOQUOTE HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORY DIVERSIONS Wife is blindsided by news of husbands past romance license tocruise...Place your auto ad in the and watch it go! Call Classieds Today!352-314-FAST (3278) HAPPY BIRTHDAY FOR MONDAY, SEPT. 17, 2018:This year you witness several unanticipated changes. Make it OK to be a little reticent or cautious about your choices. Know that you will make strong selections if you open up your imagination. If you are single, you could become overly serious in a relationship, which likely will put a damper on the other partys feelings. If you are attached, the two of you want to add a stronger foundation to your bond. You also desire a concrete expression of your love. CAPRICORN might be full of ideas for how to achieve your goals.ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19) Tension mounts. With your strengths and capabilities, you will walk right through any problems. Your nances might be prone to more ups and downs. Take precautions, and dont worry unnecessarily. Push yourself to take the lead on a project. TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20) You might need to get some feedback from a loved one about a personal decision. Remember to thank this person, but also let him or her know that you have not made a decision yet. One-on-one relating could seem like a hefty task today! GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20) Close relating with an associate produces a strong sense of togetherness. Your willingness to reveal more of what is going on within yourself adds to this persons comfort. As a result, he or she will start revealing more with you. CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22) You could be more open to change than you realize. You recognize your moodiness, but you know that it doesnt indicate a long-term change. When greeted with a serious proposal that could evoke a change in the status quo, you likely will say yes. LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22) You might be more mellow than you think. The unexpected occurs within a partnership. You might want to make a change, but how, and in what direction? Look at your daily schedule and decide how to renew your interest in various areas. VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22) Your creativity helps you deal with a very difcult person who might be viewed as being closed down. If you dont approach this person with seriousness, he or she will not open up. Your sensitivity counts; try not to be defensive. LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22) Tension mounts, as does your ability to get past a problem, probably on the domestic front. You might want to schedule some downtime for reection and re-evaluation. Your efforts will be appreciated beyond your expectations. SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21) A conversation of depth between you and a loved one cant be escaped, and could be worthwhile. You might want to set the stage for this talk. Relax more, and ultimately you will be happy with the results. SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21) You might be dealing with recent extravagances. On the other hand, you also might be creating a valid and workable budget. Your serious attitude carries you far. Remain sensitive to those around you, especially a loved one. CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19) You could breeze through the day with considerable ease, though you might be overly serious at some point. Someone close to you attempts to lift your spirits. The unexpected occurs with a new friend. Your openness could make or break this bond.AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18) If you play it low-key, you wont be unhappy. You have the ability to change your mind and head in a different direction. Your exibility surprises people who look to you as an authority gure. Be more direct in how you deal with a problem. PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20) You could be surprised by what you hear. Your choices might feel limited. If you apply your imagination, however, workable solutions appear. Your discussions could be quite animated. Demonstrate your caring toward a loved one. DailyCommercial.com | Monday, September 17, 2018 B7 TODAY IS MONDAY, SEPT. 17, the 260th day of 2018. There are 105 days left in the year. TODAY'S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY: On Sept. 17, 1787, the Constitution of the United States was completed and signed by a majority of delegates attending the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia. ON THIS DATE: In 1862 more than 3,600 men were killed in the Civil War Battle of Antietam in Maryland. In 1920 the American Professional Football Association -a precursor of the National Football League -was formed in Canton, Ohio. In 1939 the Soviet Union invaded Poland during World War II, more than two weeks after Nazi Germany had launched its assault. In 1964 the James Bond movie "Goldnger," starring Sean Connery, premiered in London. In 1978 after meeting at Camp David, Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin and Egyptian President Anwar Sadat signed a framework for a peace treaty. In 1987 the city of Philadelphia, birthplace of the U.S. Constitution, threw a big party to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the historic document; in a speech at Independence Hall, President Ronald Reagan acclaimed the framing of the Constitution as a milestone "that would profoundly and forever alter not just these United States but the world."

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B8 Monday, September 17, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com Florida Air & Heat Inc. Your Comfort Company100% Financing Available Licensed Insured BondedServing Our Area Since 1986 State License # CAC1814030CALL 352-326-3202For ALL Your Heating & Cooling Needs A/C Services 352-408-7722 ASK FOR KEITH CARPORTS, SCREEN ROOMS POOL CAGES, PATIO STRUCTURES FOR HOME OWNERS QUESTIONS, WE HAVE ANSWERS! Aluminum Services John Philibert, IncWe do Everything from Ceilings to Floors. Pantries, Cabinets and more.Your pesky leaks gone and houses well paint. From inside and out, well make it great. Lic/Ins. Accepting Visa & MC. JPHandy.com (352) 308-0694 LAMINATE, WOOD & TILE SALE!Great Prices Exceptional Service!20 Years ExperienceSHOWROOM11433 US Hwy 441, Tavares Call Chris352-636-1643 D2452SD Garage Door Services €PressureWashing€Painting €Flooring€Carpet€CleanOuts €CleanUps€Hauling€Licensed352-787-7056 Handyman Services John Philibert, IncFor All Your Flooring Needs Pergo, Ceramic Tile, Travertine, Vinyl & MoreCall John @ (352) 308-0694 Flooring Services CCC1330633D2453SD BILL ROGERS IRRIGATION SERVICE35 YEARS EXPERIENCELIC NO. 22190/INS/BONDEDOWNER OPERATOR352-446-1059 Irrigation Services Home Improvement iMan 4-U O C D I AŽR CJOSEPH MAGRUM352-636-2599TAX ID, INSURED rufus_62@yahoo.com We Also Offer (352) 308-0694 John Philibert, IncFor All Your Interior/Exterior Painting Needs. FREE ESTIMATES!30 Years of Quality Experiencewww.BestPaintRem.com352-210-3964Lic/Ins15% OFFSenior Discount Painting Services Pressure Cleaning 352-396-9447 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed COUPON REQUIRED$15 OFF QUALITY WORK AT A FAIR PRICE Y Y T T Y Y T T Y T T T T N N N U U O U U U U U U U U L L C C C O A A O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A C C O O A A A L L A A O O C C O O A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N U U U U N N Y Y U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N T T T T T T T T T T Y Y Y Y T T T T T T T T T T Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y T T T T Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y T T T T Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y G G G N H H H S S S S S S A A W W W A A A A W W W E E E E E E W W W R R U S S S S S S U U S S S S R R R S P P P U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S R R R R R R R G G G G N N N N N N N N N N N N N N E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E I I I I I I I I I I I I H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H A A A A A A A A A A A A A W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P G G G U U U U S S S S S S S S E E A A A A S S S S S S S S S E E S S S S S S S A A P P P W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W R R R R R N N N S S S S S S S S S S H H S S S S S S S S P P P P S S G G G P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W A A A A A A A A W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A W A A A A A A A A A A A A A S W A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G Comfort Seal Roof Systems, Inc.TM352-242-5055 MEET THE CONTRACTOR NOT A SALESMANŽ! BETTER THAN ANY METAL OR SHINGLE ROOF! NOT ONE ROOF LOST TO ANY STORM! NO PAY UNTIL JOB IS DONE! SPECIAL DISCOUNT FOR FELLOW VETERANS!St. Lic. # CCC1325522 Our 32nd Year Over 12,000 Roofs For Mobile/Manufactured Homes BEST ROOF BEST PRICES GUARANTEED! LIC#CCC042879 #CCC1330633D2472SD Roo“ng Services Re-roofs/RepairsShingles/Metal/FlatLic. #CCC1329936Covenant Roo“ng and Construction, Inc.#1 IN ROOFINGFREE ROOF ESTIMATES352-314-3625 J.C.C.Bobcat&TreeSvc.Inc.LandClearing/Excavating FillDirt/Clay Hauling/DebrisRemoval StumpGrinding Demolition/Grading/Driveways OwnerOperator352-455-7608D2434SD Land Clearing Services Landscaping Services LandscapingTrimming,Mulching, Sod,TreeTrimming,Pavers&MuchMore! ArmandoSantamario352-587-1323D2415SD COMMERCIAL-RESIDENTIAL €AssortedRock&Stone €PaverInstallation/Repair €PalmandTreeInstallation €DecorativeWalls €RetainingWalls €CurbingandMulching €SoddingandIrrigation €SeasonedFirewood €FullLandscapingNeedsFULLGARDENCENTERFreeEstimates,SeniorDiscounts2402SouthSt.,Leesburg352-516-6936TEDBYRNE OwnerLic/InsD2420SD A-1 UNITED SERVICES 352-460-3763CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATESOne Call Does It AllŽLICENSEDINSUREDINT. / EXT. PAINTINGHOME REMODELSALL PHASES OF PRESSURE CLEANINGAND MUCH MORE! A-1 UNITED SERVICES 352-460-3763CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATESOne Call Does It AllŽLICENSEDINSURED Tree Services BAD TREE CALL ME!27 YEARS EXPERIENCE NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL! FREE ESTIMATES TONY THE TREE TRIMMER 2402SouthSt.,Leesburg352-516-6936Senior Discounts TreeRemoval,Trimming,CanopyReduction, CraneService,StumpGrinding, SeasonedFirewood-COMPLETEGARDENCENTERD2460SD D 2088S D D2471SD J.C.C.Bobcat&TreeSvc.Inc.Residential/Commercial Trimming/Removal Palms/Hedges/StumpGrinding Debrisremoval/Hauling FillDirt/Clay/Grading/Driveways Lic/Ins€InsuranceWork€24Hrs.352-455-7608 D2463SD Upholstery Services D2470SD Window Services GEORGE WATKINS 352-587-2735Window ReplacementLanai Enclosures Acrylic WindowsCRC# 1330701 BLIND REPAIRSNo Cost...If We Cant Fix It!352-217-7556exceptionsblinds.comTo have your Professional Service listed here, please contact the Classi“ed Department at (352) 314-3278. 352-396-6238DAMIAN BROOKSDamianbrooks80@yahoo.com You've Tried The Rest...Now Go With The Best! RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIALPERFECT CLEANING Cleaning Services CONCRETE 352.602.8077 Concrete For Less8x10 Slab $800 10x48 Slab $2600No UPFRONT Costs!Blocking/ Ref./Lic./Ins.Lic #113336Phillip 352-504-8372Includes Concrete & Labor D2424SD AllConcreteServices CrackRepair€FreeEstimatesServingLakeCounty30YearsBonded,Insured,Lic#11066CallBobat352.223.7935 Concrete Services CCC1330633D2453SD Construction Services Door & Lock Services D2451SD BRIAN DEGAGLIA CONSTRUCTION SERVICESIncludes: Forming, Pouring, Stripping, Cutting, & Materials. Does Not include stripping of sod or roots, removing of concrete, pumping or hauling of debris. 352-267-5723 CRC 1326327 Only Mobile/ Manufactured Home ROOFINGwww.AllFloridaRoofs.com All Florida Weatherproong & Construction, Inc.FREE VIDEO ROOF INSPECTIONS1-877.572.1019 GREEN ACRES MOWINGWe mow or bushhog acreage of any amount in all of Central & South Lake County REASONABLE PRICES!352-360-5445 352-348-3355 Commercial Cleaning Residential Cleaning Buf“ng/ Stripping Floors Advance coatings.incRepaint specialist~interior-exterior ~cabinet resurfacing ~pool decks/stains ~drivewaysMark Mccormickphone 352 255 0145licensed & insured RE-TILESpecializing in Total Bath & Kitchen Remodeling Serving Central Florida for over 30 years 352-391-5553 Bath & Kitchen Services Tile Service RE-TILESpecializing in Total Bath & Kitchen Remodeling Serving Central Florida for over 30 years 352-391-5553 Construction Services Screens Ripped? Call 352-504-0479SCREEN GENIEOne panel or complete screen enclosure. Lanais, Entryways, o job too small.We now do Vinyl Windows! I hope they call Screen Genie Enclosure Screening GoodwinsSprinkler RepairsThats all we do! State Certi“ed (SCC131152004) 30 years exp valves, timers, heads, broken pipes, leaks & tuneups (352) 787-9001

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DailyCommercial.com | Monday, September 17, 2018 B11 CROSSWORD PUZZLE

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B12 Monday, September 17, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com