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Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Leesburg, FL
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Halifax Media Group, Steve Skaggs - Publisher, Tom McNiff - Executive Editor
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United States -- Florida -- Lake -- Leesburg
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28.81134 x -81.872708

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SPORTS | B1JAGS TOP GIANTSJacksonville opens season with convincing win LOCAL & STATE | A3CLERMONT THROWS INAUGURAL SALSA & SIPS FESTIVAL SPORTS | B1FITZPATRICK LEADS BUCS TO BIG WIN OVER SAINTS @dailycommercial Facebook.com/daily.commercial YOUR LOCAL SOURCE FOR LAKE & SUMTER COUNTIES Monday, September 10, 2018 75 ¢ Local and State .............A3 Opinion ...................... A11 Weather .....................A12 Sports.......................... B1 Diversions .................... B7 Classified .................... B9 VOLUME 142, ISSUE 253 2018 GateHouse Media Home delivery: 352-787-0600 Storm takes aim at Southeast, projected to make direct hitBy Pamela SampsonThe Associated PressATLANTA „ Tropical Storm Florence turned into a hurricane Sunday morning and swirled toward the U.S. for what forecasters said could be a direct hit on the Southeast toward the end of the week.The storms sustained winds reached 75 mph, just over the threshold for a hurricane, as it made its way across the Atlantic, about 750 miles southeast of Bermuda, the National Hurricane Center said. It was moving west at 6 mph.The Miami-based center said that it was still too early to predict the hurricanes exact path but that a huge coastal area from South Carolina to the mid-Atlantic region should prepare for a major strike late in the week.All indications are that Florence will be an extremely dangerous Category 4 hurri-cane while it moves over the western Atlantic toward the southeastern United States,Ž the hurricane center said. A Category 4 storm packs winds of 130 mph or more and has the potential for catastrophic damage.The governors of North and South Carolina and Virginia declared states of emergency to give them time to prepare, and the Navy said ships in Virginias Hampton Roads area would leave port for their own safety.North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper said in a statement Sunday that coastal and inland residents alike need to get ready for potentially heavy rainfall and flooding from the storm. Cooper urged residents to review your emergency plans and gather your supplies now.ŽThe South Carolina Emer-gency Management Division tweeted Sunday that officials there are preparing for the possibility of a large-scale disaster.ŽThe storm brings with it an increasing risk of two life-threatening impacts: storm surge along the coast and freshwater flooding from prolonged rains, the hurri-cane center said.Delaware Gov. John Carney says state officials are closely monitoring the approach of Hurricane Florence, which is heading toward the U.S. for what forecasters said could be a direct hit on the Southeast Florence becomes hurricaneThis satellite image made available by NOAA shows Tropical Storm Florence, center, in the Atlantic Ocean on Saturday. The stor m was upgraded to a hurricane. [NOAA VIA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] By Darlene SupervilleThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ Vice President Mike Pence says hes 100 percent confidentŽ that no one on his staff was involved with the anonymous New York Times column criticiz-ing President Donald Trumps leadership.I know them. I know their character,Ž Pence said in a taped interview aired Sunday by CBS Face the Nation.ŽSome pundits had speculated that Pence could be the senior administration officialŽ who wrote the opinion piece because it included language Pence has been known to use, like the unusual word lodestar.Ž The op-ed writer claimed to be part of a resistanceŽ movement within the Trump administration that was working quietly behind the scenes to thwart the presidents most dangerous impulses.Pence added his staff to the list of more than two dozen high-ranking administration officials who have denied writing the column.Let me be very clear. Im 100 percent confident that no one on the vice presidents Pence sure no one on his sta wrote op-ed Vice President Mike Pence speaks to airmen Friday during a visit to Nellis Air Force Base in Las Vegas. [STEVE MARCUS/ LAS VEGAS SUN VIA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] By Eric TalmadgeThe Associated PressPYONGYANG, North Korea „ North Korea held a major military parade and revived its iconic mass games to celebrate its 70th anniversary on Sunday, but in keeping with leader Kim Jong Uns new policies the emphasis was firmly on building up the economy, not on nuclear weapons. The North rolled out some of North Korea stresses economy, not nukesParticipants cheer as they take part in a parade marking the 70th anniversary of North Koreas founding day Sunday in Pyongyang, North Korea. North Korea staged a major military parade, huge rallies and will revive its iconic mass games on Sunday to mark its 70th anniversary as a nation. [NG HAN GUAN/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] By Joe McDonaldThe Associated PressBEIJING „ Chinas trade surplus with the United States widened to a record $31 billion in August as exports surged despite American tariff hikes, potentially adding fuel to Presi-dent Donald Trumps battle with Beijing over industrial policy.Exports to the United States rose 13.4 percent to $44.4 bil-lion, ticking up from Julys 13.3 percent growth, according to customs data. Imports of U.S. goods rose 11.1 percent to $13.3 billion, decelerating from the previous months 11.8 percent.That could help reignite U.S. demands that Beijing narrow its trade gap, which has temporarily been overshadowed by their clash over complaints China steals or pressures for-eign companies to hand over technology.The two sides have imposed 25 percent tariffs on $50 bil-lion of each others goods. The Trump administration is decid-ing whether to extend penalties to another $200 billion list of Chinese imports. Beijing says it will retaliate.Chinas trade surplus with US hits highest mark at $31 billionAll indications are that Florence will be an extremely dangerous Category 4 hurricane while it moves over the western Atlantic toward the southeastern United States.ŽHurricane center See KOREA, A9 See TRADE, A9 See HURRICANE, A10See PENCE, A10

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A2 Monday, September 10, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com NATION & WORLDPUBLISHER: Steve Skaggs steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.com .......................352-365-8213 EXECUTIVE EDITOR: Tom McNiff tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com ..........................352-365-8250 DIGITAL EDITOR, LIFESTYLES EDITOR: Whitney Lehnecker whitney.lehnecker@dailycommercial.com ..............352-365-8258 SPORTS EDITOR: Paul Jenkins paul.jenkins@dailycommercial.com .........................352-365-8204 SPORTS WRITER: Frank Jolley frank.jolley@dailycommet.com................................352-365-8268 REPORTER: Frank Stan“ eld frankstan“ eld@dailycommercial.com ......................352-365-8257 REPORTER: Roxanne Brown roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com ....................352-365-8266 REPORTER : Payne Ray pray@dailycommercial.com .....................................352-365-8262 Retail Advertising .....................................................352-314-3278 Classi“ ed Advertising ...............................................352-314-3278 Lake Circulation ........................................................352-787-0600 Sumter Circulation ...................................................877-702-0600 Billing .......................................................................352-787-0600 Accounting ................................................................352-365-8212 SUBSCRIPTION RATES Home delivery (Daily/Sunday) 3 months: 41.70 ....................Tax: 2.92 .......................Total: 44.62 6 months: 88.40 ....................Tax: 5.84 .......................Total: 89.24 1 year: 166.80 .......................Tax: 11.68 .....................Total: 178.47 FOR HOME DELIVERY: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., the Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Billed monthly at the rates shown.Print delivery available within the newspaper distribution area only. By submitting your address and/or email, you understand that you may receive promotional offers from GateHouse Media and its related companies. You may unsubscribe from receiving any such offers at any time by calling 352-787-0600 or emailing us at subscriptions@dailycommercial.com. The advertised price does not include the charges for any premium editions. Premium editions are published to provide additional information and value to our readers. You agree that you will be charged up to an additional $7 for each premium edition published and delivered to you during your subscription period, in addition to the cost of your subscription. The length of your subscription will be shortened by the publication of premium editions if those premium editions are delivered to you during your subscription. You may elect to be billed separately for premium editions by contacting Customer Service at 1-352-787-0600 or email us at subscriptions@dailycommercial.com. Thus, unless you elect to be billed separately up to an additional $7 for each premium edition, you agree that the length of your subscription will be shortened in proportion to the value of the number of premium editions published and delivered to you during your subscription period. As an illustrative example, if you select a subscription of up to 12 weeks at a cost of $48.00, and two premium editions at $2 each are published and delivered to you during that subscription period, your subscription will be shortened by 1 week because the weekly cost of the subscription is $4 per week and the premium charges total $4. Depending upon the length of your subscription and the timing of the publication and the delivery of premium editions, you will not be charged for any premium editions if none are published and delivered to you during your subscription. As such, in that case only, the length of your subscription will not be shortened. The timing of the publication and the delivery of the premium edition is variable. There will be no more than 18 premium editions published each calendar year. For more info or to make changes or cancel your subscription, please call Customer Service at 1-352-787-0600 or email us at subscriptions@dailycommercial.com.MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER?: Email subscriptions@ dailycommercial.com anytime or call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and from 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. If youre going on vacation, call circulation 48 hours ahead to stop service. OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY: The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. ANNOUNCEMENTS, CALENDAR, GAME RESULTS: Email upcoming events, along with news about awards and personal or professional milestones „ with a photo, if you desire „ to news@ dailycommercial.com. Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268 or 352-365-8204. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. YOUR LOCAL NEWS SOURCE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIESThe Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $178.47 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by GateHouse Media at 21 2 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to the Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edit ion is property of the Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Saturday, Sept. 8 Lotto: 20-21-22-35-45-53-x4 Powerball: 3-13-20-32-33-21-x3 Fantasy 5: 16-21-26-30-31 Sunday, Sept. 9 Pick 5 Afternoon: 5-4-3-7-1 Pick 4 Afternoon: 0-6-2-4 Pick 3 Afternoon: 5-3-4 Pick 2 Afternoon: 4-9LOTTERY DALLASLawyer: Cop who killed man at home should be chargedThe lawyer for the family of a man who was gunned down at his home by a Dallas police officer is calling for her to be arrested and charged, saying the fact that she remains free days after the shooting shows shes receiving favorable treatment.S. Lee Merritt, who is repre-senting the family of Botham Jean, said Saturday that the family isnt calling on the authorities to jump to conclu-sions or to deny Officer Amber Guyger her right to due pro-cess. But Merritt said they want Guyger to be treated like every other citizen, and where there is evidence that theyve committed a crime, that theres a warrant to be issued and an arrest to be made.ŽBANGKOKMeeting fails to “ nalize draft on climate change rulesAn international meeting in Bangkok fell short of its aim of completing fruitful preparations to help an agreement be reached in December on guidelines for implementing the 2015 Paris climate change agreement.The six-day meeting, which ended on Sunday, was scheduled to step up progress in the battle against rising global carbon emissions by adopting a completed text that could be presented at the COP24 conference in Katowice, Poland, three months from now. A primary objective of the 2015 Paris agreement, to which 190 nations subscribe, is to limit the global temperature increase by 2100 to less than 2 degrees Cel-sius and as close as possible to 1.5 degrees. A look inside the saga that has engulfed Pope Francis, the VaticanBy Nicole WinfieldThe Associated PressVATICAN CITY „ Two weeks after Pope Francis papacy was thrown into crisis by accusations that he covered up sexual misconduct by ex-Cardinal Theodore McCarrick, Francis has refused to respond, his accuser has changed his story and a host of new char-acters have entered the fray.Cardinals, bishops, priests and ordinary faithful are demanding answers, given that the Vatican knew since at least 2000 about allegations McCarrick had bedded seminarians.Francis is coming under increasing pressure to respond to claims by Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano that he rehabilitated McCarrick from sanctions Pope Benedict XVI had imposed.Here is a look at the scandal, which has split the U.S. Catholic hierarchy and fur-ther tarnished Francis record on abuse. What was the original accusation?Vigano said in his Aug. 26 expose that Benedict imposed canonical sanctionsŽ on McCarrick in 2009 or 2010 that were similar to what Francis imposed this summer after McCarrick was accused of groping a minor.The cardinal was to leave the seminary where he was living, he was forbidden to celebrate Mass in public, to participate in public meetings, to give lectures, to travel, with the obligation of dedicating himself to a life of prayer and penance,Ž Vigano wrote.Vigano said he told Francis on June 23, 2013, that McCarrick had corrupted a generation of seminarians and priestsŽ and that Benedict ordered him to withdraw to a life of prayer and penance.ŽBut he said Francis effec-tively rehabilitated McCarrick and made him a trusted coun-selor as he sought to remake the U.S. church leadership to be less focused on the culture wars.The public record, however, is rife with evidence that McCarrick lived a life devoid of any sanction from 2009 onwards, traveling widely for the church, attending official functions, including at the Vatican along-side Benedict and Vigano, who as Vatican ambassador in 2012 had the duty of honoring him at an awards ceremony in New York. How has Viganos story changed?Faced with such evidence, Vigano altered his story to say that while Benedicts mea-sures were in place, McCarrick didnt obeyŽ them and Vigano was unable to enforce them.Vigano told LifeSiteNews, an ultraconservative site, that Benedict had made the sanctions privateŽ probably because McCarrick was retired and Benedict, seeking to avoid scandal, thought he would obey.Even the conservative National Catholic Register, which originally published Viganos revelation, acknowl-edged that the severity of the measures reported by Vigano is now an open question.Citing someone close to Benedict, the Register reported that Benedict couldnt recall how he handled the matter but that there was no formal decree against McCarrick, just a private requestŽ to keep a low profile.If true, that would undercut Viganos core accusation that Francis rehabilitated McCar-rick from actual canonical sanctions. How has Pope Francis responded?Hours after Viganos accu-sations came to light, Francis told an in-flight news confer-ence: I will not say a word about this.Ž He challenged journalists to investigate Viganos claims and said, If time passes and youve drawn your conclusions, maybe Ill speak.ŽThat said, Francis has referred indirectly to the scandal a few times since. He has said silence and prayer  are often the best response to people seeking scandal. He has said it is un-Christian to accuse other people, but necessary to accuse oneself to recognize sin. And he has told newly ordained bishops to work in communion „ not as lone actors bent on settling personal scores.The Vatican press office has refused all comment, declining to say what, if any, sanctions were ever imposed on McCar-rick, and what, if anything, Francis did about them. What was going on in 2013?When Francis and Vigano met in June 2013, Francis was three months into a new job where he knew he was going to make enemies with the type of conservative culture warriors Vigano championed.A month after the reported encounter over McCarricks sexual past, Francis would go on to win praise from the lib-eral Catholic world for saying of another purportedly gay priest he had named a close adviser: Who am I to judge?ŽThat suggests that Francis, at least in 2013, didnt consider the past sex lives or homosexual orientation of his counselors to be a firing offense „ or recognize that those relationships could con-stitute an abuse of power.But Francis did recognize something was amiss when he sent the Vaticans top sex abuse expert to investigate Scottish Cardinal Keith OBrien, who recused himself from the conclave that elected Francis pope because of allegations he slept with seminarians.OBrien was a conservative hard-liner on homosexual-ity whose sexual peccadilloes were aired publicly, which could explain the disparity in treatment. How has this been received in the US?More than a week before Viganos disclosure, the head of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, announced he wanted an audience with Francis to present his request for a full-fledged Vatican investigation into the McCar-rick affair.At the time, DiNardos call was seen as a power play by the U.S. bishops, who were under fire for having covered for McCarrick for decades, to shift the blame to the Vatican. McCarrick was made archbishop of Washington and cardinal in 2001 by Pope John Paul II, despite knowledge in the Vatican that he slept with seminarians.DiNardo followed up his request for a Vatican investi-gation with a statement saying Viganos accusations deserve answers. More than a dozen U.S. bishops have echoed the call, though others, including a top Francis appointee, Cardinal Blase Cupich, have demurred. Cupich has said Francis shouldnt go down the rabbit holeŽ by responding.Sanctions, sex abuse and silenceIn this Aug. 22 photo, Pope Francis is caught in a pensive mood during his weekly general audience at the Vatican. [ANDREW MEDICHINI/ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO] DATELINES

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DailyCommercial.com | Monday, September 10, 2018 A3 LOCAL & STATETom McNiff, editor 352-365-8250 tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comNEWS BRIEFS LAKE WORTH2 dead after twin engine plane crashesFlorida authorities said two people died after a twin engine plane crashed in a south Florida park and caught fire.The Palm Beach Sheriffs Office said the accident occurred on Sunday morning near an airport located in south Palm Beach County.Albert Borroto, a spokesman for Palm Beach County Fire Rescue, told reporters that the plane was engulfed in flamesŽ when firefighters arrived on the scene. Borroto said no one in the plane survived.The Palm Beach Post reported that Federal Aviation Administration said the plane had departed from Key West. The crashed plane was a Cessna C340, according to the FAA.Luz Rodriguez told the newspaper she saw the plane before it crashed. She added she ran to the plane with two other men, but the flames were too intense to reach the people inside. LONGWOODPedestrian struck and killed by trainA Florida man walk-ing his bicycle in between train tracks was struck and killed by an Amtrak train.Authorities said that 53-year-old Mane Yee was killed Sunday morn-ing in Seminole County.The Florida Highway Patrol said the train oper-ator used his horn to warn Yee, but that he failed to get out of the way.Authorities issued a statement saying none of the approximately 100 passengers on the train were hurt.The Highway Patrol said that the crash remains under investigation. DAYTONA BEACHAuthorities investigate 2 rapes on beachesAuthorities are investigating two rapes that occurred on northeast Florida beaches.The Daytona Beach News-Journal reported Volusia County Sheriff Mike Chitwood has not ruled out whether the two attacks were committed by the same suspect.The latest incident was reported early Saturday morning. The previous rape happened about six miles south just before sunrise on Aug. 31.Authorities said that both women were struck violently and suffered severe facial trauma.ŽIn the most recent attack, the victim was walking down a road when she encountered her attacker. The two headed toward the beach after the woman agreed to have sex with the man in exchange for money, according to the sheriffs office.But Chitwood said after they were away from the street lights, the suspect beat the living crap out of herŽ and then raped her. ST. PETERSBURGOngoing red tide outbreak reaches Tampa Bay areaIt appears that a noxious red tide algal bloom has reached one of Floridas main metropolitan areas.The Tampa Bay Times reported Sunday that hundreds of thousands of dead fish have been found on and near roughly 20 miles of beaches located Andrew Gillum, the Democratic candidate for governor, appeared at Bethune-Cookman University in Daytona Beach before the Aug. 28 primary. He faces Republican Ron DeSantis in November. [NEWSJOURNAL FILE/LOLA GOMEZ] By Dara KamThe News Service of FloridaST. PETERSBURG„ Clad in her trademark uniformŽ of combat boots and cutoff shorts at Star Booty in downtown St. Petersburg, cosmetologist Cassandra Bradshaw boasts that she not only voted for Andrew Gillum but recruited more than two dozen pals to cast ballots for the surprise victor of the Democratic primary for governor.Bradshaw, a 29-year-old whose workplace is as much ELECTION 2018Democrats bank on Gillum o ering a fresh takeLegislators reject Gov. Scotts plea for $58 million for campus copsBy Gary FineoutThe Associated PressTALLAHASSEE „ Despite repeated requests from Flor-ida Gov. Rick Scott, legislative leaders have officially refused to steer $58 million to school districts to help them hire more campus police officers.Scott in late August asked that legislators shift unused money from the states guard-ian program to pay for more officers. Under the guardian program school districts were eligible to receive money to train school staff to act as armed guardians on school campuses.But most districts have opted instead to hire officers even though some districts have struggled to come up with enough money to pay for them.The Republican governor wanted a special legislative panel, which is meeting next week, to approve the money transfer.Lawmakers reject security moneyFlorida legislators will not go along with Gov. Rick Scotts push to get school districts an additional $58 million to hire more campus police of“ cers. [AP FILE PHOTO/JOHN RAOUX] By Terry Spencer The Associated PressSUNRISE „ Few Florida schools conducted security assessments before Febru-ary's campus massacre and most grossly underreported student crimes, the state panel investigating the shooting learned Thursday.Of the state's approximately 3,900 public schools, only 116 com-pleted an optional security assessment in 2016 and 16 were filed in 2017, said Pinellas County Sheriff Bob Gualtieri, chairman of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Commission. The state had been recommending schools do assessments since 2001, shortly after the Columbine High attack in Colorado. During that 17-year period, Stoneman Douglas never did one, Gualtieri said. Schools that didn't were not penalized."I don't think they were being taken as seriously as they should have been," Gualtieri said. After 14 students and three staff members were fatally shot at Stoneman Douglas on Feb. 14, the Legislature passed a law requiring all schools do a security assessment. The deadline was Aug. 1 and almost all schools complied. The assessments will be considered when the state distributes $99 million for security improvements next year „ about $25,000 per campus. To bring Flor-ida's schools up to modern security standards would cost $2.2 billion, the panel has been told. Separately, the commis-sion heard Thursday there has been massive underre-porting by Florida schools in their required crime reports. Stoneman Douglas Before massacre, Florida schools skimped on security testsClermont launched a new event on Saturday, drawing a crowd of hundreds to downtown Clermont. The Salsa & Sips Festival was staged on the newly re-done Minneola Avenue, one block off the tradi-tional Montrose Street business area. Minneola now has a triple-wide sidewalk and plenty of room to party. The festival fea-tured food trucks, competitive salsa making, an assortment of vendors, live music, chihuahua racing and plenty of dancing.Clermont Salsa & Sips Fest a hitMercy Hoskins and Daniel Diaz were among the dancers gathered at the stage early in the salsa event. [LINDA CHARLTON / CORRESPONDENT] First annual event drew hundreds to dance and eatAll smiles, Marisol and Tony Vega came out for the music and for the opportunity to dance in the street. [LINDA CHARLTON / CORRESPONDENT] Cleo the dachshund, shown here with owner Christina Melendez, was one of many dogs at Salsa & Sips Saturday. She was also the winner of the chihuahuaŽ races, in which a number of small dogs, all 15 pounds or under, raced down a short course. Melendez reports that Cleo beat out one shih tzu and several chihuahuas to take top honors. [LINDA CHARLTON / CORRESPONDENT] See TESTS, A4See GILLUM, A4 See BRIEFS, A4 See SECURITY, A4

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A4 Monday, September 10, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com TodaysServices reported zero incidents of bullying among its 3,200 students between 2014 and 2017 and three incidents of vandalism. The school reported 43 fights dur ing that period, two batteries and 12 incidents of smoking or other tobacco use. The commission heard that such underreporting has been common and isn't penal-ized. The commission was told many schools statewide don't accurately report their crimes because they didn't want to scare away students as funding is based on enrollment."There needs to be sanc-tions for underreporting or misreporting of data," said Commissioner Ryan Petty, whose daughter died in the massacre. He said the Broward County school district's security report filed with the state before the shooting was so incomplete, it probably took less than 30 minutes to prepare."The more I read, the angrier I get," said Petty, who lost a bid for a school board seat last week. "That they would treat (the report) with such a lack of respect is beyond words."Broward schools spokes-woman Tracy Clark said Superintendent Robert Runcie reminded administrators they must accurately report all student discipline and make sure victims and offenders receive appropriate support, if required. She also said that discipline records are now subject to auditing.The Stoneman Douglas commission, which has been holding regular multi-day hearings since April, is composed of law enforcement, school and mental health officials, a legislator, Petty and another victim's father. It is charged with investigating the shooting while also making recom-mendations in a report due Jan. 1 to the Legislature and next governor on what can be done to prevent another school shooting.Former Stoneman Douglas student Nikolas Cruz, 19, is charged with 17 counts of first-degree murder. His attorneys have said he would plead guilty in exchange for a life sentence. Prosecu-tors are seeking the death penalty. TESTSFrom Page A3But state Sen. Bill Galvano, the incoming Senate president, wrote a letter to Scott on Friday telling him he would not support the request. He said the guardian program is still evolving and more districts may opt into it in the future.For the guardian program to truly be vetted and ultimately embraced, I believe the program should maintain its own funding rather than having its funds comingled with other funds available for school safety,Ž wrote the Bradenton Republican. I respectfully disagree with your statement that the $58 million in available funding will go to waste if the proposed budget amendment is not adopted.ŽGalvano did say that he was open to reviewing the idea again in the near future. Legislators will hold a special organizational session in November follow-ing this years elections. The next regular session is scheduled to start in March 2019.After a gunman killed 17 people at Marjory Stone-man Douglas High School in February, Scott and the Legislature passed a law making Florida the first state to require all public schools to have armed security on site whenever theyre open. The states 67 countywide districts were given the more expensive choice of hiring additional police officers, also known as school resource officers, or supplementing the officers they already had with the cheaper guard-ian program. Any money not covered by the state had to be picked up by the districts. Legislators set aside $67 million for guardians, and boosted money for school resource officers by $97 million.Some districts, however, have said they cant afford officers and are hiring full-time guardians. These include Broward, Stoneman Douglas district. A police officer can cost $100,000 a year in salary and ben-efits, while guardians are estimated to cost between $30,000 and $50,000. Some districts, mostly in rural parts of the state, are supplementing officers with armed staff who get a $500 stipend, saying their communities sup-port that arrangement.So far, 22 districts have received $9.3 million out of the $67 million set aside for guardians.Rep. Jared Moskowitz, a Coral Springs Democrat who attended Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, said he was dis-appointed that legislators arent even considering Scotts request right now.I still have parents who are only seven months away from put-ting kids in the ground,Ž Moskowitz said. I think theres a compromise here. Lets give the program more time, but I dont think the program will use all $58 million between now and March. Lets put more police officers in schools, lets harden more schools.Ž SECURITYFrom Page A3a hair salon as it is a hub for hipsters, said the left-leaning Tallahassee mayor sparked an excitement that Florida Democratic candidates have lacked in the decade since she and her millen-nial cohorts began voting.Im sick of centrist Democrats. I want an actual progressive whos actually going to do things to help me and the people who sit in my chair,Ž Bradshaw said in a recent interview.Bradshaw and her friends are exactly the kind of progressive voters Democrats are banking on to show up in November and support Gillum and running mate Chris King, a one-time Gillum oppo-nent who finished in fifth place in the Aug. 28 Dem-ocratic primary.The two men and their young families „ theyre both 39 and each have three young children „ present a fresh take on politics for voters like Bradshaw who are eager to move a Democrat back into the governors man-sion after being shut out for two decades.The Democratic duo are in a matchup against a similarly youthful Repub-lican ticket comprised of U.S. Rep. Ron DeSantis, whos been endorsed by President Donald Trump, and Jeanette Nuez, a popular Miami-Dade County state legislator.DeSantis and his GOP supporters wasted no time in launching what are certain to be relentless attacks on Gillum, focus-ing on an FBI corruption probe thats been covered in depth by the mayors hometown paper, the Tallahassee Democrat. The federal investigation involves three undercover FBI agents „ including one who posed as a devel-oper and another who was a purported marijuana industry representa-tive „ who, among other things, traveled to New York with Gillum as part of their effort to unravel potential wrongdoing by city officials.Gillum, a former stu-dent government leader at Florida A&M University who served on the Talla-hassee City Commission before being elected mayor in 2014, has stead-fastly maintained that he is not the subject of the federal inquiry and that he has cooperated with investigators, turning over thousands of pages of documents.But Gillum, whos hoping to make history as the states first black governor, has been linked to the FBI investigation thanks to his ties to Adam Corey, a former friend who once served as Gil-lums campaign treasurer. According to the Talla-hassee newspaper, Corey, a lobbyist and entrepreneur, has been named in at least three subpoenas related to the public cor-ruption probe. Coreys $2.1 million loan in local tax money to renovate the Tallahassee-based Edison Restaurant is part of the FBI probe.He (Gillum) is embroiled in a lot of corruption scandals,Ž DeSantis told Fox News after cruising to victory in the Aug. 28 Republican primary. This guy cant even run the city of Tal-lahassee. There is no way Florida voters can trust him with the entire state.ŽBut, unlike DeSantis, Bradshaw isnt bothered by the FBI investigation.I think its also fair to say our presidents under an FBI probe, so I dont know why the Republicans would bring something up that he can throw right back in their face,Ž she said.Gillums team, and Democrats in general, also dont appear worried about the mayors link to the corruption probe and point to DeSantis defense of Trump amid investiga-tions in Washington and New York.Youve got a Republican in Ron DeSantis whos spent the last year obstructing the FBI, attacking the FBI and trying to discredit the FBI. And now he has the gall to talk about an FBI investigation that Andrew Gillum has been cooperating with and trying to help them resolve. We think the contrast here is clear. Theyll attack us on that, and well go right back at it,Ž Scott Arce-neaux, a former executive director of the Florida Democratic Party whos a senior consultant on Gil-lums campaign, told the News Service.Gillums primary cam-paign, with support from national groups backing black candidates and progressive politicians, laid out a strategy that relied on black voters, brown voters, younger voters and poor voters,Ž the mayor told the News Service in an interview about a week before his primary win.But, in a massive state like Florida, where nearly one-third of voters are independents, Democrats have to shift their approach to succeed in November, Arceneaux conceded.Were much more focused now on a statewide strategy. Were going to do 67 counties,Ž he said. In the primary, we had a focus on the big urban areas. But were taking this thing statewide. Andrews talked about going to all the counties, whether there are voters there who voted for you or not and trying to get our message out.ŽDespite being branded by DeSantis and other Republicans as socialists,Ž the Gillum-King ticket will appeal to voters beyond the left-wing fringes, Democratic con-sultant Steve Schale said in an interview.Gillum has called for access to affordable health care, increased spending on schools and a boost to the minimum wage „ all issues that many working-class Floridians support, according to Schale, an adviser to former Congresswoman Gwen Graham, the run-ner-up in the Democratic primary.I think people who think Andrew has limited appeal to swing voters are misreading the situation,Ž Schale said.The Gillum-King ticket also presents a shift that will resonate with Democrats tired of the same-old, same-old, as well as with new voters, said Allison Tant, a former Florida Democratic Party chairwoman.I do think it is an absolute tip of the hat to the youth voters, the independent voters, who want something besides traditional party-politics candidates,Ž she said. This changes the face of the future for the party. We have two young can-didates at the top of our ballot. This hasnt happened in a long time. Its very exciting to see this.Ž GILLUMFrom Page A3in Pinellas County on the Gulf Coast. Pinellas County is in the Tampa Bay area.County and city crews cleaned up fish that washed up on the shore. A Pinellas County environmental offi-cial told the newspaper that she expects the clean-up to run through the weekend and into next week.Red tide is a natural occurrence that happens due to the presence of nutrients in salt water and an organism called a dinoflagellate. This bloom started in Novem-ber and has been lingering in southwest Florida for weeks. JACKSONVILLE BEACHBritish sailors visit bars during stopoverBritish sailors flocked into northeast Florida beachside bars and restaurants after a British aircraft carrier docked at a United States naval station.The Florida TimesUnion reported that the HMS Queen Elizabeth arrived at Naval Station Mayport on Wednesday. The newspaper reported some bars and restaurants were unprepared for the hundreds of sailors who spread out to several beach cities.Keith Doherty, a general manager at Lynchs Irish Pub in Jacksonville Beach joked to the newspaper that we need a modern day Paul Revere to let us know that the British are coming.ŽThe Jacksonville Beach Police Department said six British sailors were taken into custody on mostly drunk and disorderly charges, and three of them also were charged with resisting arrest. Sgt. Larry Smith said the problem was that sailors were getting in fights with each other. The Associated Press BRIEFSFrom Page A3 St. Petersburg cosmetologist Cassandra Bradshaw, 29, and her friends are exactly the kind of progressive voters Democrats are banking on to show up in November and support Andrew Gillum and running mate Chris King. [NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA] Students walk to class at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland. Students at the school returned to a more secure campus as they began their “ rst new school year since a gunman killed 17 people in the freshman building. [AP PHOTO/WILFREDO LEE]

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DailyCommercial.com | Monday, September 10, 2018 A9With no settlement in sight, the spiraling conflict between the two biggest economies has fed fears it will chill global trade and economic growth.The Commerce Ministry expressed confidence Thursday that China can maintain steady and healthyŽ eco-nomic growth despite the trade pressure.On Friday, Trump he was ready to step up pressure by raising tariffs on yet another $267 billion list of Chinese imports. That would mean penalties cover almost all goods from China sold to the United States. Chinese leaders have rejected pressure to scale back plans for state-led development of global champions in robotics and other technologies.Their trading partners com-plain those violate Beijings free-trade commitments and U.S. officials worry they might erode American industrial leadership. But communist leaders see their industry plans as the path to prosperity and global influence.As tensions mounted, Beijing agreed in May to narrow its trade gap with the United States by purchasing more American soybeans, natural gas and other exports. Chinese leaders scrapped that deal after Trumps first tariff hikes hit. Chinese exporters of lower-value goods such as handbags and surgical gloves say U.S. orders have fallen off. But sell-ers of factory machinery and other more advanced exports express confidence they can keep their U.S. market share.The Chinese customs agency took the rare step of announc-ing August trade data on Saturday instead of a working day. That would give financial markets a chance to digest the politically sensitive data before trading opens Monday.The Chinese trade gap with the United States was up from Julys $28 billion and Junes $29 billion. Beijing reported a record $275.8 billion trade surplus with the United States last year.Forecasters had said Chi-nas sales to the United States, its largest national export market, might weaken after manufacturers rushed to fill orders ahead of Trumps first tariff hike July 6. But trade data have yet to show a sig-nificant impact. Chinas global exports rose 12.2 percent to $217.4 billion, down from Julys 12.6 percent. Imports rose 20.9 percent to $189.5 billion, down from 21 percent.The countrys global trade gap was $27.9 billion. That meant that without sales to the U.S. market, China would have run a trade deficit.China regularly runs deficits with many of its trading partners that supply oil, industrial components and other imports and pays for those by running a surplus with the United States and Europe.Exports to the 28-nation European Union, Chinas biggest trading partner, rose 11 percent to $37 billion. Imports rose 15 percent to $24.9 billion, leaving a surplus of $6.1 billion. TRADEFrom Page A1its latest tanks and marched its best-trained goose-stepping units in the parade but held back its most advanced missiles and devoted nearly half of the event to civilian efforts to build the domestic economy.It also brought the mass games back after a five-year hiatus. The games are a grand spectacle that features nearly 20,000 people flipping placards in unison to create huge mosa-ics as thousands more perform gymnastics or dance in forma-tion on the competition area of Pyongyangs 150,000-seat May Day Stadium.The strong emphasis on the economy underscores the strategy Kim has pursued since January of putting economic development front and center.Tens of thousands of North Koreans waving brightly colored plastic bouquets filled Pyongyangs Kim Il Sung Square as the parade began. Residents of Pyongyang, North Koreas capital, trained for months for the anniversary and held up the bouquets to spell out words and slogans that can be seen from the VIP viewing area.Kim attended the morning parade but did not address the assembled crowd, which included the head of the Chi-nese parliament and high-level delegations from countries that have friendly ties with the North.At the end of the two-hour event he strolled to the edge of the balcony with the Chinese special envoy, Li Zhanshu, the third-ranking member in Chinas ruling Communist Party. The two held up their joined hands to symbolize the countries traditionally close ties, though the absence of Chinese President Xi Jinping could indicate Beijing still has some reservations about Kims initiatives.Senior statesman Kim Yong Nam, the head of North Koreas parliament, set the relatively softer tone for the parade with an opening speech that empha-sized the economic goals of the regime, not its nuclear might. He called on the military to be ready to work to help build the economy.After a truncated parade featuring tanks and some of North Koreas biggest artillery, fewer than the usual number of missiles and lots of goose-stepping units from all branches of the military, the focus switched to civilian groups ranging from nurses to students to construction workers, many with colorful floats beside them.The combining of mili-tary and civilian sections is a familiar North Korean parade format.The past two big anniversaries of North Koreas founding, in 2008 and 2013, did not feature the Korean Peoples Army, only the civil defense units, which are offi-cially called Worker Peasant Red Guards.ŽAlthough North Korea stages military parades almost every year, and held one just before the Olympics began in South Korea in February this year, Sundays parade came at a particularly sensitive time.Kims effort to ease tensions with President Donald Trump has stalled since their June summit in Singapore. Both sides are now insisting on a different starting point. Washington wants Kim to commit to denuclearization first, but Pyongyang wants its security guaranteed and a peace agreement formally ending the Korean War.With tensions once again on the rise, a parade featuring the very missiles that so unnerved Trump last year, and led to a dangerous volley of insults from both leaders, could have been seen as a deliberate provocation. The North also refrained from immediately televising the event, though North Korean media were out in force to film it, deploy-ing booms and „ for possibly the first time „ drones with cameras.This is a big and very posi-tive statement from North Korea,Ž Trump tweeted. Thank you To Chairman Kim. We will both prove everyone wrong! There is nothing like good dialogue from two people that like each other! Much better than before I took office.ŽThe North did show off a battery of big artillery pieces known as self-propelled guns that could be used to threaten Seoul, South Koreas capital. But the only types of missiles displayed were short-range surface-to-surface missiles, a surface-to-air missile and an anti-ship cruise missile.Thats a big departure from Februarys parade, when it displayed its Hwasong-15 intercontinental ballistic missile, believed capable of reaching the U.S., and a number of other formidable missiles and the erector-launchers used to fire them off from remote locations.Pyongyang residents unable to attend at the square on Sunday lined the streets around town to cheer and applaud convoys carrying the troops after they completed the parade duties.Soon after the anniversary celebrations end, Kim will meet in Pyongyang with South Korean President Moon Jae-in to discuss ways to break the impasse over his nuclear weapons.The new lineŽ of putting economic development first has been Kims top priority this year. He claims to have perfected his nuclear arsenal enough to deter U.S. aggres-sion and devote his resources to raising his nations stan-dard of living.The economic theme was also prominent in the new mass games routine, which was markedly lighter in tone and more entertaining than in previous years, when it tended to be more dramatic and overtly political.The mass games, dubbed Shining Fatherland,Ž featured everything from a display of drones flying in for-mation to fireworks, lasers, circus-style performances and at one point hundreds of martial artists doing taekwondo. A running com-mentary throughout the show pointed out the importance of following Kims economic and development strategy, while significantly playing down the role of the military and not once mentioning North Koreas nuclear weapons.The mass games performances are expected to continue for the next month or so, with tickets for foreign-ers starting at just over $100 and going up to more than $800 per seat. KOREAFrom Page A1 In this Aug. 31 photo, workers pack tinned peaches for export at a fruits processor in Huaibei city in central Chinas Anhui province. Chinas trade surplus with the United States widened to a record $31 billion in August. [ANDY WONG/ THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

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A10 Monday, September 10, 2018 | DailyCommercial.comtoward the end of the week.Dangerous swells generated by Florence affected Bermuda and have begun to reach parts of the Eastern Seaboard.The National Weather Center warned of danger-ous rip currents in popular tourist areas like Virginia Beach and the Outer Banks. Advisories warning of dangerous beach conditions or coastal flooding were in effect for parts of New Jersey, Delaware, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. HURRICANEFrom Page A1staff was involved in this anonymous editorial. I know my people,Ž Pence said on Face the Nation.Ž They get up every day and are dedicated, just as much as I am, to advanc-ing the presidents agenda and supporting every-thing ... President Trump is doing for the people of this country.ŽAsked whether he had asked his staff about the op-ed, Pence said, I dont have to ask them because I know them. I know their character. I know their dedication and I am absolutely con-fident that no one on the vice presidents staff had anything to do with this.ŽHe restated that he thinks the essay writer should do the honorable thing and resign.ŽPublication of the op-ed followed the release of stunning details from an upcoming book by Watergate reporter Bob Woodward in which current and former aides referred to Trump as an idiotŽ and liarŽ and depicted him as prone to rash policy decisions that some aides either work to stall or derail entirely.Both releases are said to have infuriated Trump, who unleashed a string of attacks on Woodwards credibility and dismissed the celebrated authors book as a work of fiction.Ž Some of the officials featured in the books anecdotes about the president, including Defense Secretary Jim Mattis and White House chief of staff John Kelly, issued statements denying the comments attributed to them by Woodward.Woodward has said he stands by his reporting. The book, Fear: Trump in the White House,Ž is scheduled to be formally released Tuesday, all but ensuring that the debate over Trumps leadership ability and style will extend into a second straight week.Trump, meanwhile, has denounced the Times opinion piece as gutlessŽ and its publication as a disgraceŽ bordering on treason.Republican Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky, a Trump ally, has said the president would be justified in using lie detectors to ferret out the anonymous writer. The president has yet to say whether hed go that far, but Pence says hed be willing to submit to such an examination.I would agree to take it in a heartbeat and would submit to any review the administration wanted to do,Ž he said in a taped Fox News SundayŽ interview.Both Pence and Kelly-anne Conway, a counselor to Trump, pushed back during separate television appearances Sunday on the portrayals of Trump as anything but a thoughtful leader. Both also said they had no idea who wrote the piece; Trump has said he can name up to five people who could have written it.What I see is a tough leader, a demanding leader, someone who gets all the options on the table,Ž Pence said on Fox News. But he makes the decisions, and thats why weve made the progress weve made.ŽTrump has said the Jus-tice Department should investigate and unmask the anonymous author. He cited national security concerns as grounds for what would amount to an extraordinary criminal probe should Attorney General Jeff Sessions decide to pursue one.Neither Pence nor Conway answered directly when asked if Sessions should treat Trumps comments as an order. The Justice Depart-ment is supposed to make investigative decisions free of political pressure from the White House and the president.Appearing on CNN, Sen. Mark Warner of Vir-ginia, the top Democrat on the Senate intelligence committee, disagreed that the opinion piece amounted to a national security threat and attrib-uted Trumps musing about a Justice Department investigation to a president whos lashing out.ŽOn an unrelated matter, Pence said on CBS that he has not been called for an interview by special counsel Robert Mueller, who is investigating possible coordination between Russia and Trumps Republican presidential campaign as well as Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. election.Pence said hes willing to sit down with Mueller if he is asked and added that he so far has cooperated with all requests for information from the special counsel and will continue to do so. PENCEFrom Page A1 By Sarah EllisonThe Washington PostVideo or it didnt happen.That was almost the lesson nearly two years ago when The Washington Post published the Access HollywoodŽ tape capturing Donald Trump on a hot mic bragging about grabbing womens genitals.Except the world learned something else. With Trump, the normal rules dont apply: Even with a video, there are those who will still argue it didnt really happen. By the end of Novem-ber, Trump started to question the validity of the recording to aides. In January, just before his inauguration, he told a Republican senator that he wanted to investigate it and didnt think it was his voice.When asked about the matter in November 2017, Trump spokes-woman Sarah Huckabee Sanders said, Hes made his position on that clear ... as have the American people in his support of him.Ž She declined to elaborate.Ever since, tapes have defined the Trump presidency. Some real, some rumored, but all representative of the culture surrounding the 45th president.The world in which Donald Trump enjoyed his greatest success „ reality television „ is programmed to treat reality as reality,Ž a kind of altered recorded world that is shaped by producers who are gunning for maximum effect. In her book Bachelor Nation,Ž entertainment writer Amy Kaufman outlines all kinds of reality-show hacks that the matchmaking show adopted, including editing sound bites of contestants so that the meaning of their state-ments was the opposite of what the contestant intended, and tracking contestants menstrual cycles to try to catch them when they were most likely to cry.In other words, the world Trump comes from is one where everything is being recorded and nothing is to be believed.Maybe thats why he has been able to ignore all the tapes so far. In addition to the Access HollywoodŽ tape, there were the John MillerŽ tape, The ApprenticeŽ tapes, the pee tape,Ž the Michael Cohen tape, and the Omarosa tapes, not to mention the nonexistent James B. Comey-Trump Lordy, I hope they are tapesŽ tapes.The search for the cache of Trump tapes that will provide the proverbial smoking gun has become a neverending hunt in some corners. See: The Hunt for the Trump Tapes,Ž an eight-part series airing later this month on Viceland starring the comedian and outspoken Trump critic Tom Arnold, who says he wont stop digging until he uncovers incriminat-ing audio and video of Trump.Spoiler: Arnold doesnt find the tapes. But if he did, would it matter?There was a time when recordings were defini-tive. The release of key segments of Richard Nixons tape recordings of his conversations in the Oval Office were a decisive step in his road to impeachment.If it wasnt for tapes, Nixon might have survived in some form,Ž said Nixon biographer John A. Farrell.There are key differ-ences between then and now. Back then, there was a reverence for the Oval Office,Ž Farrell said. The American people didnt expect to hear Nixon and his aides speaking so cynically „ and profanely.Today, we swim in cynicism and are not easily shocked.In Donald Trumps world, everything is recordedPresident Donald Trump walks off of the stage following a fundraiser Friday in Sioux Falls, S.D. [SUSAN WALSH/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

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DailyCommercial.com | Monday, September 10, 2018 A11HAVE YOUR SAYWe welcome signed letters and guest columns. Letters should not exceed 300 words and columns should not exceed 500 words. Columns need to include a recent headshot of the writer. We edit for length, clarity, and grammar. Mail: Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 Email: letters@dailycommercial.com Fax: 352-365-1951 One misleading constitutional amendment has been stripped from Floridas November ballot, but three others will stand „ despite language thats clearly designed to befuddle voters over what the amendments will really accomplish. In a series of rapid-fire rulings Friday afternoon, the state Supreme Court gave great deference to the authority of the states 37-member Constitution Revision Commission, which convenes every 20 years. It was far more respect than the commission deserved. Though the CRC paid lip service to public involvement, its final product was a confusing mess, warped by political gamesmanship and servile to special interests. Most of the CRCs worst proposals were the product of a deplorable process known as bundlingŽ „ padding one or more controversial (and frequently bad) ideas with minor feel-good measures meant to distract and divide voters attention. Its cynicism taken to the extreme „ commission members obviously suspected the hot-button ideas wouldnt pass muster on their own. Why did the commission put them on the ballot in the first place? Voters will have to ask themselves that question as they evaluate three proposed amendments that, following the Supreme Court ruling, will be on the November ballot: € Amendment 6 could trick voters into creating vast „ and currently undetermined „ rights for crime victims. It sounds laudable but could create snarls and backlogs in the states criminal courts. That provision is bundled with a dictate that would make it easier for corporations to challenge the rulings of Florida regulatory agencies „ which may have been the CRCs real priority „ and extend the mandatory judicial retirement age from 70 to 75. € Amendment 10, which would let voters statewide determine whether Volusia, Broward and MiamiDade counties can keep their voter-approved charter government structure. If this measure is approved, charter officers … the sheriff, the clerk of court, the property appraiser and the supervisor of elections „ would revert to their old configurations under the Florida Constitution. It could throw county government into chaos, upending a system thats worked well for decades. The measures bundled around Amendment 10 are frankly ridiculous; they would mandate a state Department of Veterans Affairs and an office of domestic security and counterterrorism (both of which the state already has) and allow the Legislature to move its annual session forward to January in even-numbered years (which it can already do „ and did, this year). € Amendment 13, which says it would phase out greyhound racing in the state by 2020. A Leon County circuit-court judge says this amendment, which was not bundled, misleads voters because it doesnt prohibit wagering on dog races broadcast from out of state. One bundled amendment did bite the dust. In a 4-3 vote, the Supreme Court upheld a lower-court ruling striking Amendment 8, which would let charterschool companies circumvent local control (even as they claimed a portion of local tax dollars), was taken off the ballot by the Supreme Court. It was bundled with measures that would mandate civics education (which Florida already has) and setting term limits for local school board members. The end result of these ill-conceived amendments will be a confusing mess on the ballot „ and an indictment of the states formerly staid constitutional revision process. Hopefully, voters will take that into account.OUR OPINIONVoters job now more confusing ANOTHER OPINION This in response to the letter by Pete Bush, in which he asks "What does it take to be a Trump Republican?" His answer: racism. I would like to answer him. In his letter, Mr. Bush strings together inferences that it was OK with Trump and his supporters to lynch AfricanAmericans and that we support the KKK. He also claimed, we just as the Nazi's, considered Jews "vermin," that we use derogatory names of Nips for Japanese and Gooks for the North Vietnamese and that we wanted to dehumanize people with brown or black skin who want to enter our country. Mr. Bush, please learn your history and stop talking trash. It was a Republican President, Abraham Lincoln, who led our country in the Civil War, which started in April of 1861 when the Confederate forces fired on Fort Sumter. During the war, President Lincoln issued by proclamation and executive order, the Emancipation Proclamation, which freed 3.5 million slaves in the South. There were many Democrats and members of Congress who had been members of the KKK, including a prominent Democrat Robert Byrd. In your tirade you seem to conveniently forget one extremely important event, the bombing of Pearl Harbor by the Japanese, which brought us into World War II. You bemoan the death of the civilians that were killed in the bombing of Tokyo. But I bemoan the deaths of our young men who fought the Japanese on the islands of Iwo Jima, the battles of Guadalcanal, Saipan, Wake Island and Midway and all our men who died in France, Italy, Greece and Germany. All death is tragic, but we were in a war. A war we had to win. Yes, we called them Nips and Gooks and I am certain that they in turn had unflattering comments about us. But that is war „ and war is terrible to all. I found it truly offensive in your comments about Jews as vermin. That was a term the Nazis used against the Jews to justify their murder. But that term has NEVER been used by President Donald Trump, whose own daughter and son-in-law are Jewish. Donald Trump is held in the highest esteem in Israel. Other presidents have talked about moving our embassy to Jerusalem and recognizing it as the capital of Israel, but NONE did it. Donald Trump and his love of the Jewish people did just that and fulfilled a campaign promise. Your letter was filled with such lies and omission of facts that it is impossible to answer it all. But your final hate-filled comment about how he wants to prevent black and brown skin people from entering our country is over the top. What don't you understand about the word ILLEGAL? Congress established the laws for all people entering this country and ALL MUST abide by the LAW. If people choose to ILLEGALLY cross our border bringing their children, then they can expect to be separated from their children. That is the LAW. If you don't like the law, then CONGRESS should change it. Mr. Bush go back to your history books and take the time to learn. Doris Burgess lives in Wildwood.ANOTHER OPINIONTrump supporters are not racistsIt seems some people in the White House think President Donald Trump is ignorant, dangerous and unhinged. They told author Bob Woodward that, though they wouldn't allow him to use their names. One of them wrote an op-ed about Trump's deranged reign for the New York Times „ but wouldn't allow his or her name to be used. And, of course, White House reporters have been quoting anonymous White House sources about the Trump wreckage since Trump began his erratic run for president. Basically, everyone in the political business, including lots of people who collect taxpayer-funded salaries to pretend otherwise, know that Trump is a malicious, incompetent buffoon. But who's going to tell Trump's voters? After all, there are 63 million who voted for Trump. Some of those millions voted for him knowing full well that Trump is malicious. That's what they like about him; he operationalizes their resentments and rationalizes their insecurities. Other voters in 2016 soothed their doubts by hoping that Trump, upon taking the oath of office, would magically rise from the ethical sewer in which he had spent a lifetime. Nothing in the op-ed in the New York Times, or in the voluminous comments to Woodward about an unhinged executive, alters the political dynamics of the GOP or its red-capped, mutant offspring, MAGA. What these Republican insiders tell one another is that Trump is an abomination doing an abysmal job. What they tell their voters is something else. Out in the great wide electorate beyond the Potomac, 8 in 10 „ sometimes as many as 9 in 10 „ Republicans approve of the job Trump is doing. And because Republican leaders have spent years telling their voters to distrust legitimate news media and to believe only loyal partisans such as Fox News, there is no reason to expect the op-ed or the Woodward book or any other manifestation of truth to penetrate the veil of carefully constructed unreality. Six years ago, political scientists Norman Ornstein and Thomas Mann wrote, prematurely, the Republican Party's epitaph. The Republican Party has become an insurgent outlier „ ideologically extreme; contemptuous of the inherited social and economic policy regime; scornful of compromise; unpersuaded by conventional understanding of facts, evidence and science; and dismissive of the legitimacy of its political opposition. In the ensuing six years, the party has intensified those failings while adding others. It has embraced Trump's rampant personal corruption and grown comfortable with his attacks on blacks and Hispanics and women. The party has escalated bad-faith attacks on news media that accurately chronicle Trump lies, and on liberal institutions that resist the almost daily assaults on the rule of law and public ethics. House Speaker Paul Ryan has devoted the last two years of his speakership to deploying the House Intelligence Committee as a fog machine, the better to obscure any Trump connections to Russian subterfuge or other illegality. Senate leader Mitch McConnell floods the judiciary with conservative white male judges devoted to preserving and extending the racial and sexual hierarchies of the 20th century. It's not nothing that a nuclear holocaust has thus far been averted „ thanks for that, Anonymous. But other acts of aggression, from the Muslim ban to voter suppression, continue undeterred. The Trump administration planned and executed a policy of seizing infants from their parents at the U.S. border. It did so with such grotesque callousness that it is thus far unable to reunite hundreds of literally kidnapped children with their parents. Not one Republican in Congress has held a hearing to find out how this crime occurred, and who is responsible. The corruption of the party is endemic. Anyone who thinks they escape the moral and political taint of this administration by murmuring anonymous misgivings about Trump is a fool as well as a coward. Francis Wilkinson writes editorials on politics and U.S. domestic policy for Bloomberg Opinion. He was executive editor of the Week. He was previously a writer for Rolling Stone, a communications consultant and a political media strategist.ANOTHER OPINIONAnonymous is another word for complicit OPINIONSteve Skaggs | Publisher Tom McNiff | Executive Editor Whitney Lehnecker | Digital Editor, Lifestyles Editor Tom McNiff, editor 352-365-8250 tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comFirst AmendmentCongress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

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DailyCommercial.com | Monday, September 10, 2018 B1 SPORTSPaul Jenkins, Sports editor 352-365-8204 paul.jenkins@dailycommercial.comBy Tom Canavan AP Sports WriterEAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. (AP) „ Just like last season, the Jacksonville defense is carrying the team.Linebacker Myles Jack scored on a 32-yard interception return early in the fourth quarter and the Jaguars spoiled the New York Giants debuts of coach Pat Shurmur and second-overall draft pick Saquon Barkley, and the return of Odell Beckham Jr. with a 20-15 win on Sunday.Blake Bortles threw a short touchdown pass and led two other first-half field goal drives. The Jaguars dominated with the exception a Barkleyinduced hiccup in opening a season by living up to the Super Bowl hype. Held in check much of the game, Barkley brought the sellout crowd to its feet shortly after the Jack touchdown with a spectacular 65-yard run aided by a great block by receiver Sterling Shepard. It got New York within 20-15 with 10:39 to play.New York went for the 2-point conversion and Barkley (18-rushes for 106 yards) was stopped. It proved costly when passes of 19 and 21 yards to Beckham (11 catches for 111 yards in his first game since -October) got New York to the Jacksonville 34. Instead of attempting what could have been a tying fourth field goal from Aldrick Rosas, Eli Manning (23 of 37 for 224 yards) threw a fourth-down incompletion.A muffed punt cost the Giants a final possession in the last minute. The Jaguars led 13-6 at the half as Bortles methodically took his team on three scor-ing scores. Josh Lambo capped the first two with 39-yard field goals, and Bortles hit backup running back T.J. Yeldin from 1 yard for a 13-3 lead.Beckham, who broke an ankle on Oct. 8 and did not play in a preseason game, drew two pass interference penalties on the ensuing drive. Rosas closed the gap to a touchdown with a 31-yard field goal with :04 left in the half. He added a 44-yarder on the opening series of the third quarter on a drive helped by a ugly facemask penalty by Yan-nick Ngakoue against Barkley. National AnthemJaguars CB Jalen Ramsey and LB Telvin Smith Sr. stood for the anthem. They stayed in the locker room in the preseason. Both teams stood.Jags D strong in opening winJack interception return leads Jags over Barkley, Giants By Brett Martel AP Sports WriterNEW ORLEANS (AP) „ Ryan Fitzpatrick highlighted a 417-yard, four-touchdown performance with two scoring strikes of more than 50 yards, and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers stunned the New Orleans Saints 48-40 on Sunday.Starting for the suspended Jameis Winston, Fitzpatrick completed 21 of 28 passes without an interception and also ran for a short touchdown, bowling over free safety Marcus Williams on his way into the end zone.Saints cornerback Marshon Lattimore, the 2017 defensive rookie of the year, had arguably the worst performance of his career trying to cover receiver Mike Evans, who caught seven passes for 147 yards, including a 50-yard touchdown that put the Bucs up 41-24 late in the third quarter.DeSean Jackson caught scoring passes of 58 and 36 yards to highlight his fivecatch, 146-yard day before leaving with a concussion.After Jacksons second TD catch over the middle, Fitz-patrick backpedaled giddily for about 20 yards behind the line of scrimmage before thrusting his arm upward in celebration, seemingly oblivious of the roughing-the-passer penalty called on defensive tackle David Onyemata moments after Fitzpatrick had released the ball.Fitz-magic leads BucsBackup quarterback has career day in 48040 stunner over Saints Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick (14) passes in the “ rst half of a game against the New Orleans Saints in New Orleans on Sunday. [AP PHOTO/BILL FEIG] New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees (9) eludes a sack by Tampa Bay Buccaneers defensive end Carl Nassib in the “ rst half of a game in New Orleans on Sunday. [AP PHOTO/BUTCH DILL] By Steven WineThe Associated PressMIAMI GARDENS„ Jakeem Grant scored on a tiebreaking 102-yard kickoff return with 14 min-utes to go, and the Miami Dolphins overcame two weather delays to win the longest game since the 1970 NFL-AFL merger, beating the Tennessee Titans 27-20 Sunday.Delays for lightning lasted a total of 3 hours, 59 minutes, and the game took 7 hours, 10 minutes to play. The previous longest game since 1970 was a Bears overtime victory against the Ravens in 2013 that took 5 hours, 16 minutes. Grants touchdown trig-gered a late flurry of big plays in a season opener that was lackluster for the first six hours. After his score, Ryan Tannehill hit Kenny Stills deep for a 75-yard touchdown. Darius Jennings returned the ensuing kick-off 94 yards for a Titans score, and they were driv-ing when Miamis Reshad Jones helped to clinch the win with a 54-yard return after he intercepted Blaine Gabbert.Dolphins overcome 2 lightning delays to beat Titans, 2720Tennessee Titans running back Dion Lewis (33) scores a touchdown as Miami Dolphins cornerback Xavien Howard (25), attempts to block, during the second half of an NFL football game, Sunday, Sept. 9, 2018, in Miami Gardens, Fla. [AP PHOTO/ WILFREDO LEE] Tampa Bay Buccaneers wide receiver DeSean Jackson (11) celebrates his touchdown reception in the second half of an NFL football game against the New Orleans Saints in New Orleans, Sunday, Sept. 9, 2018. [AP PHOTO/BUTCH DILL] Starting for the suspended Jameis Winston, Fitzpatrick completed 21 of 28 passes without an interception and also ran for a short touchdown, bowling over free safety Marcus Williams on his way into the end zone.See BUCS, B6 See DOLPHINS, B6By Howard Fendrich AP Tennis WriterNEW YORK (AP) „ The U.S. Open final suddenly appeared to be slipping away from Novak Djokovic. He dropped three consecu-tive games. He was angered by a crowd roaring for his popular opponent, Juan Martin del Potro. He was, in short, out of sorts.And then came Sundays pivotal game, a 20-minute, 22-point epic. Three times, del Potro was a point from breaking and earning the right to serve to make it a set apiece. Three times, Djokovic steeled himself. Eventually, he seized that game „ and del Potros best chance to make a match of it.A year after missing the U.S. Open because of an injured right elbow that would require surgery, Djokovic showed that he is unquestionably back at his best and back at the top of tennis. His returns and defense-to-offense skills as impeccable as ever, Djokovic collected his 14th Grand Slam title and second in a row by getting through every crucial moment for a 6-3, 7-6 (4), 6-3 victory over 2009 champion del Potro at Flushing Meadows. This was Djokovics third champion-ship in New York, along with those in 2011 and 2015. Add in the trophies he has earned at six Australian Opens, one French Open and four Wimbledons, most recently in July, and the 31-year-old Serb pulled even with Pete Sampras for the third-most majors among men, trailing only Roger Federers 20 and Rafael Nadals 17.I was hoping he was going to be here, but hes not,Ž Djokovic said about Sampras. Hes my idol. Pete, I love you.ŽFederer lost in the fourth round in New York, while Nadal retired from his semifinal against del Potro because of a bad right knee. That put the 29-year-old Argentine back in a Grand Slam final for the first time since his breakthrough nine years ago, a comeback for a guy who had four wrist operations in the interim.Djokovic wins US Open for 14th majorWins ties his idol,Ž Pete SamprasSee US OPEN, B6

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B2 Monday, September 10, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com SCOREBOARD HOW TO REACH USPaul Jenkins, Sports Editor Email: paul.jenkins@dailycommercial.com Phone: 352-365-8204SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results by calling 352-365-8204. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. Results submitted after 9:30 p.m. may not appear in the next days edition of the Daily Commercial.SPORTS ON TVBASKETBALL 7 p.m. NBA „ Exhibition, Womens national teams, United States vs. Japan, at Washington MLB BASEBALL 7 p.m. MLB „ Regional coverage, Washington at Philadelphia OR N.Y. Yankees at Minnesota (8 p.m.) SUN „ Cleveland at Tampa Bay FS-Florida „ Miami at N.Y. Mets 10 p.m. MLB „ Regional coverage, Atlanta at San Francisco OR Texas at L.A. Angels (11 p.m., joined in progress) NFL FOOTBALL 7:10 p.m. ESPN „ N.Y. Jets at Detroit (Note: ESPN Deportes simulcast on ESPN2) 9:15 p.m. ESPN „ L.A. Rams at Oakland (Note: ESPN Deportes simulcast on ESPN2) SOCCER 2:30 p.m. ESPNEWS „ UEFA Nations League, Sweden vs. Turkey, at Solna, Sweden SPORTS BRIEFSATLANTIC CITY, N.J.Wallets open as sports betting meets NFL seasonFootball fans have their jerseys on and their wallets open as pro football season arrives in places where sports bet-ting is newly legal.New Jersey won a landmark U.S. Supreme Court case in May clear-ing the way for all 50 states to offer legal sports betting if they choose.There was an hour-long line waiting to place bets at Atlantic Citys Ocean Resort Casino as kickoff approached.Chris Matthews of Clementon, New Jersey put $50 a piece on the Browns, Patriots and Packers.Robert Stovall of Rahway put $100 on the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.Phil Henderson of Mahwah put $500 on the other side of that game, picking the New Orleans Saints to win.Other states where sports betting is currently offered include Nevada, Delaware, Mississippi, and West Virginia.GENEVARecord result for clubs with 1st-time pro“ tIn a record result for European soccer, toptier clubs combined to make a first-time profit of 600 million euros ($694 million) last year with spending on player transfers included.UEFA research „ involving 711 clubs financial accounts ending in 2017 „ showed they turned around a 300-million euro loss ($347 million) the previous year, European soccers governing body said Sunday.The clubs total reve-nue of 20.1 billion euros ($23.2 billion) extended a trend of annual rises at around 10 percent.UEFA said 27 of 54 top-tier divisions in its member countries were profitable. Thats up from eight in 2011 when UEFA began monitor-ing accounts of all clubs qualifying to enter the Champions League and Europa League.Thanks to Finan-cial Fair Play, European football is healthier than ever before,Ž UEFA President Aleksander Ceferin said in a statement.LAGOS DE COVADONGA, SPAINPinot dominates climb to win Vueltas 15th stageThibaut Pinot won the challenging 15th stage of the Spanish Vuelta with a dominant charge on the iconic climb into Lagos de Covadonga on Sunday, while Simon Yates stayed close and added a few seconds to his overall lead.Pinot broke away under dense fog with about 3.7 miles to go and the Groupama-FDJ rider held on for an impressive victory after a 110.7-mile ride through the Picos de Europa mountains in northern Spain.He crossed the line 28 seconds in front of Miguel Angel Lopez and 30 seconds ahead of Yates. Alejandro Valverde was fourth, 32 seconds off the lead.TEMPE, ARIZ.Arizona State thriving under coach Herm Edwards had a larger-than-life TV personality with ESPN, shouting out opinions multiple times a day. While coaching the NFLs New York Jets, he had the You play to win the game!Ž rant that people still bring up today.Through two games at Arizona State, Edwards has been mostly subdued, taking a businesslike approach to his first stint as a college coach. Oh, hes still loquacious, still exudes passion, but theres a confident calm to him that has helped Arizona State to a sur-prising 2-0 start.You have to stay humble and hungry,Ž Edwards said after the Sun Devils knocked off No. 15 Michigan State Saturday night.Edwards hire was met with criticism after he spent the previous eight years in a television studio and had not worked the sidelines as a coach since the Kansas City Chiefs fired him in 2008.More eyebrows were raised when the Sun Devils announced the football program would operate under a professional model with Edwards at the helm. The Associated Press GOLF PGA TOURBMW CHAMPIONSHIPSaturdays leaders at Aronimink GC, Newtown Square, Pa. Purse: $9 million. Yardage: 7,267; Par: 70 (35-35) (Final round postponed by rain to today.)Third RoundJustin Rose 66-63-64„193 Rory McIlroy 62-69-63„194 Xander Schauffele 63-64-67„194 Tommy Fleetwood 71-62-62„195 Rickie Fowler 65-65-65„195 Keegan Bradley 66-64-66„196 Francesco Molinari 70-63-64„197 Billy Horschel 64-67-66„197 Justin Thomas 64-67-66„197 Hideki Matsuyama 66-64-67„197 Patrick Reed 69-65-64„198 Gary Woodland 66-66-66„198 Webb Simpson 66-67-65„198 Tiger Woods 62-70-66„198 Scott Piercy 70-64-65„199 Andrew Putnam 67-66-66„199 Ted Potter, Jr. 68-64-67„199 Tony Finau 68-64-67„199 Kevin Na 70-62-67„199 Jason Day 67-64-68„199 Jon Rahm 66-69-65„200 Ryan Armour 65-67-68„200 Aaron Wise 65-67-68„200 Byeong Hun An 65-67-68„200 Alex Noren 64-66-70„200 Bubba Watson 71-65-65„201 Bryson DeChambeau 67-70-64„201 Keith Mitchell 67-67-67„201 Jason Kokrak 69-65-67„201 Austin Cook 71-67-63„201 Adam Hadwin 69-69-63„201 Charles Howell III 68-63-70„201 Brooks Koepka 69-68-65„202 Kyle Stanley 67-70-65„202 Henrik Stenson 66-69-67„202 Beau Hossler 67-67-68„202 Dustin Johnson 70-68-64„202 Luke List 70-66-67„203 Zach Johnson 68-68-68„204 J.J. Spaun 67-68-69„204 Brice Garnett 70-67-67„204 Andrew Landry 68-70-66„204 Jordan Spieth 67-71-66„204 Peter Uihlein 64-70-71„205 Abraham Ancer 69-68-68„205 C.T. Pan 67-67-71„205 Chez Reavie 68-70-67„205 Ian Poulter 68-70-67„205 Si Woo Kim 71-68-66„205 Patrick Cantlay 71-65-70„206 Paul Casey 69-68-69„206 Tyrrell Hatton 69-68-69„206 Chris Kirk 69-68-69„206 Brian Gay 66-71-69„206 Patton Kizzire 68-71-67„206 Marc Leishman 74-66-66„206 Pat Perez 69-70-68„207 Emiliano Grillo 67-70-71„208 Rafa Cabrera Bello 70-68-70„208 Kevin Kisner 72-67-69„208 Adam Scott 74-68-66„208 Chesson Hadley 69-69-71„209 Ryan Palmer 70-69-70„209 Louis Oosthuizen 73-68-68„209 Cameron Smith 71-71-68„210 Brandt Snedeker 71-69-71„211 Brendan Steele 74-69-69„212 Phil Mickelson 73-72-67„212 Brian Harman 69-72-76„217EUROPEAN TOUREUROPEAN MASTERSSundays leaders at Crans-sur-Sierre GC, Crans Montana, Switzerland Purse: $2.91 million. Yardage: 6,848; Par: 70 (x-won on “ rst playoff hole)Finalx-Matthew Fitzpatrick, England 69-64-63-67„263 Lucas Bjerregaard, Denmark 68-65-67-63„263 Mike Lorenzo-Vera, France 68-66-64-67„265 Nacho Elvira, Spain 66-69-67-66„268 Daniel Brooks, England 69-67-64-69„269 Hideto Tanihara, Japan 65-66-71-68„270 Wu Ashun, China 70-65-65-70„270 Darren Fichardt, South Africa 68-71-68-64„271 Phachara Khongwatmai, Thailand 68-71-68-64„271 Charl Schwartzel, South Africa 67-69-68-67„271 Doug Ghim, United States 66-65-71-71„271 Jeunghun Wang, South Korea 71-68-70-64„273 Soren Kjeldsen, Denmark 65-70-69-69„273 Lee Westwood, England 68-69-66-70„273 Gavin Green, Malaysia 69-69-63-72„273 Laurie Canter, England 68-69-72-65„274 Callum Shinkwin, England 69-69-70-66„274 Fabrizio Zanotti, Paraguay 69-70-69-66„274 Richard McEvoy, England 72-67-68-67„274 Pablo Larrazabal, Spain 67-72-68-67„274 Nino Bertasio, Italy 70-67-65-72„274 Haydn Porteous, South Africa 69-65-66-74„274AlsoChase Kopeka, United States 71-65-69-72„277 David Lipsky, United States 68-70-66-73„277 Kiradech Aphibarnrat, Thailand 71-67-70-71„279 SOCCER MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCERAll times Eastern EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T PTS GF GA New York Red Bulls 17 7 4 55 50 29 Atlanta United FC 16 5 6 54 56 33 New York City FC 14 8 7 49 51 38 Columbus 12 8 7 43 35 34 Philadelphia 12 11 4 40 39 41 Montreal 11 14 3 36 37 45 New England 8 10 9 33 40 42 D.C. United 8 11 7 31 43 44 Toronto FC 7 14 6 27 45 52 Orlando City 7 17 3 24 40 62 Chicago 6 15 6 24 37 52 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T PTS GF GA FC Dallas 14 6 7 49 47 37 Sporting Kansas City 14 7 6 48 49 33 Los Angeles FC 13 7 7 46 54 42 Real Salt Lake 13 10 5 44 48 46 Portland 12 7 8 44 40 36 Seattle 12 9 5 41 35 27 Vancouver 11 9 7 40 45 52 Los Angeles Galaxy 10 10 8 38 51 54 Minnesota United 9 15 2 29 38 52 Houston 7 13 7 28 43 42 Colorado 6 15 6 24 31 50 San Jose 4 15 8 20 41 52 3 points for victory, 1 point for tieSept. 5New England 1, New York City FC 0Saturdays GamesD.C. United 1, New York City FC 1, tie Sporting Kansas City 1, Orlando City 0 Portland 2, Colorado 0Wednesdays GameMinnesota United at D.C. United, 7:30 p.m.Saturday, Sept. 15Atlanta United FC at Colorado, 3:30 p.m. Los Angeles Galaxy at Toronto FC, 7:30 p.m. Montreal at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m. Columbus at FC Dallas, 8 p.m. Portland at Houston, 8:30 p.m. Minnesota United at Real Salt Lake, 9:30 p.m. Seattle at Vancouver, 10 p.m. New England at Los Angeles FC, 10:30 p.m. Sporting Kansas City at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.Sunday, Sept. 16New York Red Bulls at D.C. United, 1 p.m. Orlando City at Chicago, 5 p.m. NATIONAL WOMENS SOCCER LEAGUEAll times Eastern W L T PTS GF GA x-North Carolina 17 1 6 57 53 17 x-Portland 12 6 6 42 40 28 x-Seattle 11 5 8 41 27 19 x-Chicago 9 5 10 37 38 28 Utah 9 7 8 35 22 23 Houston 9 10 5 32 35 39 Orlando 8 10 6 30 30 37 Washington 2 17 5 11 12 35 Sky Blue FC 1 17 6 9 21 52 3 points for victory, 1 point for tie; xclinched playoff spotSept. 4Chicago 5, Sky Blue FC 0Sept. 7Portland 3, Seattle 1Saturdays GamesSky Blue FC 1, Orlando 0 Utah 2, Chicago 1 North Carolina 5, Houston 0PLAYOFFS Semi“ nalsSaturday, Sept. 15: Seattle at Portland, 3 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 16: Chicago at North Carolina, 3 p.m. ChampionshipSaturday, Sept. 22: TBD vs. TBD at Portland, 4:30 p.m.2018 U.S. MENS TEAM RESULTS/SCHEDULEAll times Eastern (Record: Won 2, Lost 1, Tied 3)Sunday, Jan. 28 United States 0, BosniaHerzogovina 0 Tuesday, March 27 „ United States 1, Paraguay 0 Monday, May 28 „ United States 3, Bolivia 0 Saturday, June 2 „ Ireland 1, United States 1 Saturday, June 9 „ United States 1, France 1 Friday, Sept. 7 „ Brazil 2, United States 0 Tuesday, Sept. 11 „ vs. Mexico at Nashville, Tenn., 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 15 „ vs. England at London, 3 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 20 „ vs. Italy (site TBD), 3 p.m. ODDS PREGAME.COM LINEMAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL Today National LeagueFAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE Los Angeles -165 at Cincinnati +155 at Philadelphia -115 Washington +105 at New York Off Miami Off at Chicago -135 Milwaukee +125 at St. Louis Off Pittsburgh Off at Colorado -135 Arizona +125 Atlanta -125 at San Francisco +115American Leagueat Kansas City -125 Chicago +115 Houston -290 at Detroit +260 at Tampa Bay Off Cleveland Off New York -150 at Minnesota +140 at Los Angeles -130 Texas +120COLLEGE FOOTBALL ThursdayFAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG Boston College 1 5 Off at Wak.ForestFridayat Memphis 23 23 Off Georgia St.Saturdayat Tennessee 27 28 Off UTEP at Indiana 18 14 Off Ball St. at Maryland 11 13 Off Temple at FIU 4 4 Off UMass Miami 8 10 Off at Toledo at Army 4 5 Off Hawaii at Penn State 37 35 Off Kent St. UCF 14 15 Off at N.Carolina Old Dominion 2 3 Off at Charlotte Florida St. 2 3 Off at Syracuse Oklahoma 13 17 Off at Iowa St. at Nebraska Off Off Off Troy at Kansas Off Off Off Rutgers at Virginia Tech 30 29 Off East Carolina Georgia Tech 3 4 Off at Pittsburgh at Notre Dame 14 14 Off Vanderbilt at Virginia 5 6 Off Ohio at Michigan 30 33 Off SMU at Appala. St. 13 14 Off South. Miss. at Oklahoma St. 4 3 Off Boise St. at Wisconsin 24 21 Off BYU at NC State 3 Pk Off West Virginia at Minnesota 14 15 Off Miami (OH) at Auburn 8 10 Off LSU Illinois 14 9 Off So. Florida at No. Illinois 14 14 Off Cent. Mich. at Clemson 36 35 Off Ga. Southern New Mexico 7 8 Off at NMSU Tulane 1 3 Off at UAB at Baylor +4 1 Off Duke at Florida 17 19 Off Colorado St. at Texas Tech Off Off Off Houston at Kansas St. 21 20 Off UTSA at Arkansas 5 7 Off North Texas at Oregon 39 40 Off San Jose St. at Buffalo 3 4 Off E. Michigan at Nevada 7 4 Off Oregon St. Alabama 22 21 Off at Mississippi Arkansas St. 1 2 Off at Tulsa at So. Alabama 10 10 Off Texas State at Georgia 32 31 Off Middle Tenn. at So. Carolina 14 13 Off Marshall Missouri 7 7 Off at Purdue at Northwestrn 22 21 Off Akron at Miss. St. 32 30 Off ULL at Texas A&M 27 27 Off ULM at Louisville 19 21 Off W. Kentucky at Texas Off Off Off Southern Cal Ohio State 8 13 Off TCU Washington 5 7 Off at Utah at UCLA Off Off Off Fresno St. Arizona St. 1 3 Off at S.D. StateNFL TodayFAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG at Detroit 6 7 45 N.y. Jets L.A. Rams 1 4 47 at OaklandThursdayat Cincinnati 1 Pk Off BaltimoreNext Sundayat Washington 3 3 Off Indianapolis at Atlanta 4 4 Off Carolina at Green Bay 3 3 Off Minnesota L.A. Chargers 7 8 Off at Buffalo at Tennessee Off Off Off Houston at Pittsburgh 4 4 Off Kansas City at N.Y. Jets Pk Pk Off Miami Philadelphia 3 3 Off at TampaBay at New Orleans 7 7 Off Cleveland at L.A. Rams 8 8 Off Arizona at San Fran. 3 3 Off Detroit at Jacksonville Pk Pk Off New England at Denver 3 3 Off Oakland at Dallas 5 5 Off N.Y. GiantsNext Mondayat Chicago 3 3 Off SeattleUpdated odds available at Pregame.com TRANSACTIONS BASEBALLAmerican LeagueOAKLAND ATHLETICS „ Recalled RHP Ryan Dull and OF Nick Martini from Nashville (PCL).National LeagueATLANTA BRAVES „ Recalled RHP Chad Sobotka from Gwinnett (IL). CHICAGO CUBS „ Recalled RHP Alec Mills from Iowa (PCL). MILWAUKEE BREWERS „ Recalled RHPs Freddy Peralta and Taylor Williams from Colorado Springs (PCL). NEW YORK METS „ Reinstated RHP Anthony Swarzak from the 10-day DL.HOCKEYNational Hockey LeagueDETROIT RED WINGS „ Agreed to terms with RW Matt Puempel on a two-year contract.TENNISU.S. OPEN „ Fined Serena Willliams $17,000 for three code violations during Saturdays womens singles “ nal.COLLEGESEMORY „ Named Jordan Schilit assistant cross country and track and “ eld coach. PRO FOOTBALL NFL All times Eastern AMERICAN CONFERENCE EAST W L T PCT. PF PA New England 1 0 0 1.000 27 20 Buffalo 0 1 0 .000 3 47 Miami 0 0 0 .000 0 0 N.Y. Jets 0 0 0 .000 0 0 SOUTH W L T PCT. PF PA Jacksonville 1 0 0 1.000 20 15 Indianapolis 0 1 0 .000 23 34 Houston 0 1 0 .000 20 27 Tennessee 0 0 0 .000 0 0 NORTH W L T PCT. PF PA Baltimore 1 0 0 1.000 47 3 Cincinnati 1 0 0 1.000 34 23 Cleveland 0 0 1 .500 21 21 Pittsburgh 0 0 1 .500 21 21 WEST W L T PCT. PF PA Denver 0 0 0 .000 0 0 Kansas City 0 0 0 .000 0 0 L.A. Chargers 0 0 0 .000 0 0 Oakland 0 0 0 .000 0 0 NATIONAL CONFERENCE EAST W L T PCT. PF PA Philadelphia 1 0 0 1.000 18 12 N.Y. Giants 0 1 0 .000 15 20 Dallas 0 0 0 .000 0 0 Washington 0 0 0 .000 0 0 SOUTH W L T PCT. PF PA Tampa Bay 1 0 0 1.000 48 40 New Orleans 0 1 0 .000 40 48 Atlanta 0 1 0 .000 12 18 Carolina 0 0 0 .000 0 0 NORTH W L T PCT. PF PA Minnesota 1 0 0 1.000 24 16 Chicago 0 0 0 .000 0 0 Detroit 0 0 0 .000 0 0 Green Bay 0 0 0 .000 0 0 WEST W L T PCT. PF PA San Francisco 0 1 0 .000 16 24 Arizona 0 0 0 .000 0 0 L.A. Rams 0 0 0 .000 0 0 Seattle 0 0 0 .000 0 0WEEK 1 Sept. 6Philadelphia 18, Atlanta 12Sundays GamesCincinnati 34, Indianapolis 23 Jacksonville 20, N.Y. Giants 15 New England 27, Houston 20 Minnesota 24, San Francisco 16 Tampa Bay 48, New Orleans 40 Baltimore 47, Buffalo 3 Cleveland 21, Pittsburgh 21, OT Tennessee at Miami, late Kansas City at L.A. Chargers, late Seattle at Denver, late Washington at Arizona, late Dallas at Carolina, late Chicago at Green Bay, lateTodays GamesNew York Jets at Detroit, 7:10 p.m. Los Angeles Rams at Oakland, 10:20 p.m.WEEK 2 Thursdays GameBaltimore at Cincinnati, 8:20 p.m.Sunday, Sept. 16Philadelphia at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m. Houston at Tennessee, 1 p.m. Indianapolis at Washington, 1 p.m. Minnesota at Green Bay, 1 p.m. Cleveland at New Orleans, 1 p.m. Kansas City at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. Miami at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m. Carolina at Atlanta, 1 p.m. L.A. Chargers at Buffalo, 1 p.m. Arizona at L.A. Rams, 4:05 p.m. Detroit at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m. Oakland at Denver, 4:25 p.m. New England at Jacksonville, 4:25 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Dallas, 8:20 p.m.NFL INJURY REPORTThe National Football League injury report, as provided by the league (DNP: did not practice; LIMITED: limited participation; FULL: Full participation):TodayN.Y. JETS at DETROIT „ JETS: DNP: LB Josh Martin (concussion), S Marcus Maye (foot). LIMITED: y LB Jeremiah Attaochu (calf), WR Jermaine Kearse (abdomen), LB Avery Williamson (hamstring). FULL: T Kelvin Beachum (foot), WR Quincy Enunwa (thumb), C Spencer Long (knee), DT Steve McLendon (knee), WR Terrelle Pryor (ankle), CB Buster Skrine (hand), G Brian Winters (back). LIONS: DNP: DT Ricky Jean Francois (illness). LIMITED: T Andrew Donnal (knee). COLLEGE FOOTBALL THE AP TOP 25 POLLThe Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with “ rst-place votes in parentheses, records through Sept. 8, total points based on 25 points for a “ rst-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and last weeks ranking (LW): RECORD PTS. LW 1. Alabama (54) 2-0 1,517 1 2. Clemson (6) 2-0 1,430 2 3. Georgia 2-0 1,407 3 4. Ohio State 2-0 1,288 4 5. Oklahoma 2-0 1,263 6 6. Wisconsin (1) 2-0 1,227 5 7. Auburn 2-0 1,224 7 8. Notre Dame 2-0 1,022 8 9. Stanford 2-0 992 10 10. Washington 1-1 884 9 11. Penn State 2-0 836 13 12. Louisiana State 2-0 830 11 13. Virginia Tech 2-0 794 12 14. West Virginia 2-0 793 14 15. Texas Christian 2-0 678 16 16. Mississippi State 2-0 654 18 17. Boise State 2-0 500 20 18. Central Florida 2-0 494 19 19. Michigan 1-1 385 21 20. Oregon 2-0 301 23 21. Miami (Fla.) 1-1 299 22 22. Southern California 1-1 250 17 23. Arizona State 2-0 139 „ 24. Oklahoma State 2-0 119 „ 25. Michigan State 1-1 104 „ Others receiving votes: Utah 92, Texas A&M 90, Boston College 45, Houston 32, Maryland 30, Colorado 25, Iowa 23, Kentucky 19, Duke 10, NC State 9, Mississippi 5, Hawaii 5, Washington St. 4, South Florida 3, South Carolina 2, Florida St. 1.AMWAY COACHES TOP 25 POLLThe Amway Top 25 football poll, with “ rstplace votes in parentheses, records through Sept. 8, total points based on 25 points for “ rst place through one point for 25th, and last weeks ranking (PRV): RECORD PTS. LW 1. Alabama (59) 2-0 1571 1 2. Clemson (3) 2-0 1481 2 3. Georgia 2-0 1437 3 4. Ohio State (1) 2-0 1391 4 5. Oklahoma 2-0 1319 5 6. Wisconsin 2-0 1252 6 7. Auburn 2-0 1221 7 8. Notre Dame 2-0 1029 8 9. Stanford 2-0 1010 9 10. Penn State 2-0 930 10 11. Virginia Tech 2-0 862 14 12. Washington 1-1 852 11 13. Louisiana State 2-0 850 15 14. Texas Christian 2-0 743 16 15. West Virginia 2-0 727 17 16. Mississippi State 2-0 650 18 17. Boise State 2-0 507 19 18. Central Florida 2-0 438 20 19. Oklahoma State 2-0 325 23 20. Miami (Fla.) 1-1 296 21 21. Southern California 1-1 295 12 22. Michigan 1-1 270 22 23. Oregon 2-0 255 „ 24. Michigan State 1-1 152 13 25. Arizona State 2-0 92 „ Others receiving votes: Texas A&M 87, Utah 86, Houston 46, South Carolina 43, Boston College 37, Kentucky 34, South Florida 27, Washington State 21, Colorado 20, Florida State 17, N.C. State 16, Iowa 15, Duke 13, Appalachian State 12, Cincinnati 11, Hawaii 10, Maryland 9, Missouri 8, Memphis 3, Vanderbilt 3, Arkansas State 1, Texas 1.THE AP TOP 25 RESULTS/SCHEDULEAll times EasternWEEK 3 Sept. 7No. 16 Texas Christian 42, SMU 12SaturdayNo. 1 Alabama 57, Arkansas State 7 No. 2 Clemson 28, Texas A&M 26 No. 3 Georgia 41, No. 24 South Carolina 17 No. 4 Ohio State 52, Rutgers 3 No. 5 Wisconsin 45, New Mexico 14 No. 6 Oklahoma 49, UCLA 21 No. 7 Auburn 63, Alabama State 9 No. 8 Notre Dame 24, Ball State 16 No. 9 Washington 45, North Dakota 3 No. 10 Stanford 17, No. 17 Southern California 3 No. 11 Louisiana State 31, SE Louisiana 0 No. 12 Virginia Tech 62, William & Mary 17 No. 13 Penn State 51, Pittsburgh 6 No. 14 West Virginia 52, Youngstown State 17 Arizona State 16, No. 15 Michigan State 13 No. 18 Mississippi State 31, Kansas State 10 No. 19 Central Florida 38, South Carolina State 0 No. 20 Boise State 62, UConn 7 No. 21 Michigan 49, Western Michigan 3 No. 22 Miami 77, Savannah State 0 No. 23 Oregon 62, Portland State 14 Kentucky 27, No. 25 Florida 16RESULTS/SCHEDULEWEEK 3 Sept. 6 SOUTHKennesaw State 49, Tennessee Tech 10MIDWESTMissouri State 52, Lincoln (Mo.) 24Sept. 7 EASTCentral Connecticut 55, Lincoln (Pa.) 0 SOUTHWESTTCU 42, SMU 12Saturdays Games EASTArmy 38, Liberty 14 Boston College 62, Holy Cross 14 Buffalo 36, Temple 29 Campbell 13, Georgetown 8 Colgate 10, New Hampshire 3 Delaware 37, Lafayette 0 Duquesne 23, Valparaiso 21 Monmouth (NJ) 56, Hampton 28 Navy 22, Memphis 21 Penn St. 51, Pittsburgh 6 Rhode Island 45, Albany (NY) 26 Sacred Heart 30, Bucknell 14 St. Francis (Pa.) 45, Delaware St. 14 Stony Brook 50, Bryant 21 Syracuse 62, Wagner 10 Villanova 31, Lehigh 9 West Virginia 52, Youngstown St. 17SOUTHAlabama 57, Arkansas St. 7 Alcorn St. 78, Louisiana-Lafayette 0 Appalachian St. 45, Charlotte 9 Auburn 63, Alabama St. 9 Austin Peay 24, Presbyterian 0 Bethune-Cookman 79, Va. Lynchburg 16 Chattanooga 29, The Citadel 28, OT Coastal Carolina 47, UAB 24 Davidson 49, Chowan 28 East Carolina 41, North Carolina 19 Elon 45, Furman 7 FAU 33, Air Force 27 FIU 28, Old Dominion 20 Florida St. 36, Samford 26 Georgia 41, South Carolina 17 Georgia Southern 34, UMass 13 Jacksonville St. 71, MVSU 0 James Madison 17, Norfolk St. 0 Kentucky 27, Florida 16 LSU 31, SE Louisiana 0 Louisiana Tech 54, Southern U. 17 Louisiana-Monroe 21, Southern Miss. 20 Louisville 31, Indiana St. 7 Maine 31, W. Kentucky 28 Marshall 32, E. Kentucky 16 Mercer 45, Jacksonville 3 Miami 77, Savannah St. 0 Middle Tennessee 61, UT Martin 37 Mississippi 76, S. Illinois 41 Morehead St. 48, Mount St. Joseph 19 NC A&T 45, Gardner-Webb 6 NC Central 51, St. Augustines 14 NC State 41, Georgia St. 7 North Alabama 25, Alabama A&M 20 Northwestern St. 34, Grambling St. 7 Richmond 52, Fordham 7 South Florida 49, Georgia Tech 38 Stetson 63, Waldorf 34 Tennessee 59, ETSU 3 Troy 59, Florida A&M 7 Tulane 42, Nicholls 17 UCF 38, SC State 0 Vanderbilt 41, Nevada 10 Virginia Tech 62, William & Mary 17 Wake Forest 51, Towson 20 Wofford 59, VMI 14MIDWESTAkron 41, Morgan St. 7 Butler 31, Taylor 17 Cincinnati 21, Miami (Ohio) 0 Colorado 33, Nebraska 28 Duke 21, Northwestern 7 E. Michigan 20, Purdue 19 Illinois 34, W. Illinois 14 Illinois St. 48, E. Illinois 10 Indiana 20, Virginia 16 Iowa 13, Iowa St. 3 Kansas 31, Cent. Michigan 7 Kent St. 54, Howard 14 Maryland 45, Bowling Green 14 Michigan 49, W. Michigan 3 Minnesota 21, Fresno St. 14 Mississippi St. 31, Kansas St. 10 Missouri 40, Wyoming 13 Notre Dame 24, Ball St. 16 Ohio St. 52, Rutgers 3 S. Dakota St. 45, Montana St. 14 SE Missouri 40, Dayton 21 South Dakota 43, N. Colorado 28 Utah 17, N. Illinois 6 Wisconsin 45, New Mexico 14SOUTHWESTAbilene Christian 41, Angelo St. 24 Ark.-Pine Bluff 55, Cumberland (Tenn.) 0 Baylor 37, UTSA 20 Cent. Arkansas 26, Murray St. 13 Clemson 28, Texas A&M 26 Houston 45, Arizona 18 McNeese St. 51, Houston Baptist 34 North Texas 58, Incarnate Word 16 Oklahoma 49, UCLA 21 Oklahoma St. 55, South Alabama 13 Sam Houston St. 41, Prairie View 32 Texas 28, Tulsa 21 Texas St. 36, Texas Southern 20 Texas Tech 77, Lamar 0FAR WESTArizona St. 16, Michigan St. 13 Boise St. 62, UConn 7 Cal Lutheran 24, Paci“ c Lutheran 8 California 21, BYU 18 Carroll (Mont.) 21, Lin“ eld 14 Claremont-Mudd 14, Northwestern (Minn.) 3 Colorado St. 34, Arkansas 27 E. Washington 31, N. Arizona 26 Hawaii 43, Rice 29 Idaho 56, W. New Mexico 10 Montana 48, Drake 16 Oregon 62, Portland St. 14 Oregon St. 48, S. Utah 25 Pomona-Pitzer 34, Lewis & Clark 21 Redlands 28, Puget Sound 21 Rocky Mountain 21, Dickinson St. 10 San Diego St. 28, Sacramento St. 14 Stanford 17, Southern Cal 3 UC Davis 54, San Diego 21 UNLV 52, UTEP 24 Utah St. 60, New Mexico St. 13 Washington 45, North Dakota 3 Washington St. 31, San Jose St. 0 Weber St. 24, Cal Poly 17 AUTO RACING NASCAR MONSTER ENERGY CUPBIG MACHINE VODKA 400 LINEUPSaturday qualifying cancelled, race Sunday postponed to today, at Indianapolis Motor Speedway, Indianapolis Lap length: 2.5 miles(Car number in parentheses)1. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, charter team owner points 1st. 2. (4) Kevin Harvick, Ford, charter team owner points 2nd. 3. (78) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, charter team owner points 3rd. 4. (41) Kurt Busch, Ford, charter team owner points 4th. 5. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, charter team owner points 5th. 6. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, charter team owner points 6th. 7. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, charter team owner points 7th. 8. (14) Clint Bowyer, Ford, charter team owner points 8th. 9. (12) Ryan Blaney, Ford, charter team owner points 9th. 10. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, charter team owner points 10th. 11. (9) Chase Elliott, Chevrolet, charter team owner points 11th. 12. (10) Aric Almirola, Ford, charter team owner points 12th. 13. (20) Erik Jones, Toyota, charter team owner points 13th. 14. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, charter team owner points 14th. 15. (88) Alex Bowman, Chevrolet, charter team owner points 15th. 16. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, charter team owner points 16th. 17. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, charter team owner points 17th. 18. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, charter team owner points 18th. 19. (21) Paul Menard, Ford, charter team owner points 19th. 20. (19) Daniel Suarez, Toyota, charter team owner points 20th. 21. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, charter team owner points 21st. 22. (24) William Byron, Chevrolet, charter team owner points 22nd. 23. (37) Chris Buescher, Chevrolet, charter team owner points 23rd. 24. (47) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, charter team owner points 24th. 25. (38) David Ragan, Ford, charter team owner points 25th. 26. (34) Michael McDowell, Ford, charter team owner points 26th. 27. (95) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, charter team owner points 27th. 28. (43) Bubba Wallace, Chevrolet, charter team owner points 28th. 29. (6) Matt Kenseth, Ford, charter team owner points 29th. 30. (13) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, charter team owner points 30th. 31. (32) Matt DiBenedetto, Ford, charter team owner points 31st. 32. (15) Ross Chastain, Chevrolet, charter team owner points 32nd. 33. (72) Corey LaJoie, Chevrolet, charter team owner points 33rd. 34. (00) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, charter team owner points 34th. 35. (23) JJ Yeley, Toyota, charter team owner points 35th. 36. (51) David Starr, Chevrolet, charter team owner points 36th. 37. (96) Jeffrey Earnhardt, Toyota, open team owner points 37th. 38. (7) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, open team owner points 38th. 39. (66) Timmy Hill, Toyota, open team owner points 42nd. 40. (52) BJ McLeod, Ford, open team owner points 44th.

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B4 Monday, September 10, 2018 | DailyCommercial.comAMERICAN LEAGUENATIONAL LEAGUEEAST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Boston 97 46 .678 „ „ 6-4 L-2 48-20 49-26 New York 89 54 .622 8 „ 5-5 L-1 48-24 41-30 Tampa Bay 78 64 .549 18 8 8-2 W-3 44-24 34-40 Toronto 65 78 .455 32 21 5-5 W-1 37-37 28-41 Baltimore 41 102 .287 56 45 2-8 L-4 24-44 17-58 CENTRAL DIVISION TEAM W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Cleveland 81 62 .566 „ „ 5-5 L-1 44-28 37-34 Minnesota 65 77 .458 15 21 3-7 W-1 41-30 24-47 Detroit 59 84 .413 22 27 6-4 L-1 36-35 23-49 Chicago 56 87 .392 25 30 3-7 L-5 28-47 28-40 Kansas City 47 95 .331 33 39 6-4 L-1 25-45 22-50 WEST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Houston 89 53 .627 „ „ 8-2 W-7 40-32 49-21 Oakland 87 57 .604 3 „ 7-3 W-4 46-29 41-28 Seattle 79 64 .552 10 7 5-5 W-1 41-31 38-33 Los Angeles 71 72 .497 18 15 7-3 W-4 34-34 37-38 Texas 61 82 .427 28 25 3-7 L-4 32-43 29-39 EAST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 79 64 .552 „ „ 5-5 W-2 37-34 42-30 Philadelphia 74 68 .521 4 4 4-6 L-2 43-26 31-42 Washington 71 72 .497 8 8 4-6 W-2 37-36 34-36 New York 65 77 .458 13 13 7-3 W-2 30-41 35-36 Miami 56 86 .394 22 22 3-7 L-2 34-41 22-45 CENTRAL DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Chicago 83 59 .585 „ „ 5-5 L-2 44-24 39-35 Milwaukee 82 62 .569 2 „ 8-2 W-3 45-27 37-35 St. Louis 79 64 .552 4 „ 5-5 W-1 37-31 42-33 Pittsburgh 71 71 .500 12 7 7-3 W-5 40-34 31-37 Cincinnati 61 82 .427 22 18 4-6 W-2 34-38 27-44 WEST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Colorado 78 64 .549 „ „ 6-4 L-1 38-32 40-32 Los Angeles 78 65 .545 1 6-4 W-1 39-36 39-29 Arizona 76 67 .531 2 3 3-7 L-2 37-35 39-32 San Francisco 68 76 .472 11 11 1-9 L-8 39-30 29-46 San Diego 56 88 .389 23 23 5-5 L-2 27-45 29-43 MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALLBLUE JAYS 6, INDIANS 2CLEVELAND AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Lindor ss 5 1 2 1 0 1 .285 Brantley lf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .306 Ramirez 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .282 Encarnacion dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .234 Y .Diaz 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .314 Guyer rf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .202 Gomes c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .258 Barnes cf 3 1 1 1 1 1 .400 Gonzalez 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .285 T OTALS 33 2 6 2 4 8 T ORONTO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. McKinney lf-rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .348 Gurriel Jr. ss 3 2 0 0 1 2 .286 S moak 1b 4 2 2 3 0 1 .248 Grichuk rf 2 0 0 0 0 2 .247 Hernandez lf 2 1 2 3 0 0 .244 Davis lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 T ellez dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .444 Pillar cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .247 S olarte 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .232 Urena 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250 A .Diaz 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .258 McGuire c 2 1 1 0 1 0 .333 T OTALS 31 6 6 6 2 11 CLEVELAND 001 000 100„2 6 1 T ORONTO 201 000 03X„6 6 0 E „ Ramirez (11). LOB „ Cleveland 8, T oronto 3. 2B „ McKinney (6), Hernandez (28). HR „ Lindor (34), off Pannone; Barnes (1), off Pannone; Smoak (24), off Clevinger; Hernandez (20), off Edwards. RBIs „ Lindor (85), Barnes (1), Smoak 3 (74), Hernandez 3 (55). SB „ Ramirez (30), McGuire (1). Runners left in scoring position „ Cleveland 3 (Lindor, Y.Diaz, Barnes); Toronto 2 (Gurriel J r., Pillar). RISP „ Cleveland 0 for 3; Toronto 2 for 7. Runners moved up „ McKinney, Tellez. CLEVELAND IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Clevinger, L, 11-8 6 4 3 3 2 9 108 3.16 Edwards 1.1 2 3 2 0 1 22 8.10 Cimber .2 0 0 0 0 1 8 3.52 T ORONTO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pannone, W, 2-1 6.1 4 2 2 3 2 93 4.12 T epera, H, 15 .2 0 0 0 0 2 10 3.45 Fernandez 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 1.93 Petricka, H, 1 1 0 0 0 0 3 17 4.38 Paulino .2 1 0 0 1 1 19 0.00 Giles, S, 20-20 .1 0 0 0 0 0 8 5.32 Fernandez pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored „ Petricka 1-0, Giles 2-0. Umpires „ Home, Todd Tichenor; First, Chad Whitson; Second, Alan Porter; T hird, Angel Hernandez. T „ 2:43. A „ 3 1,184 (53,506).CARDINALS 5, TIGERS 2 S T. LOUIS AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Carpenter dh 4 0 0 1 0 2 .270 Martinez rf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .303 1-Bader pr-cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .274 A dams 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .246 Ozuna lf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .278 DeJong ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .231 W ong 2b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .246 Munoz cf-rf-3b 2 1 0 1 1 0 .279 Garcia 3b 1 1 0 0 2 0 .217 ONeill rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .243 Kelly c 4 0 2 1 0 0 .138 T OTALS 32 5 7 5 3 7 DETROIT AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Candelario 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .228 A dduci 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .289 Castellanos dh 3 1 2 0 1 1 .295 Goodrum rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .236 Mahtook lf 4 0 0 1 0 1 .209 McCann c 4 1 1 0 0 0 .220 Rodriguez ss 3 0 1 1 0 1 .219 a-Stewart ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Lugo 2b 1 0 0 0 2 0 .270 J ones cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .207 T OTALS 31 2 5 2 3 7 S T. LOUIS 000 000 500„5 7 0 DETROIT 000 000 200„2 5 1 a-popped out for Rodriguez in the 9th. 1-ran for Martinez in the 7th. E „ Goodrum (13). LOB „ St. Louis 5, Detroit 5. 2B „ Castellanos 2 (39), McCann (15), Rodriguez (6). RBIs „ Carpenter (77), Martinez (79), Wong (33), Munoz (37), Kelly (3), Mahtook (21), Rodriguez (19). S B „ Goodrum (12). CS „ Munoz (6). SF „ Carpenter, Munoz. Runners left in scoring position „ St. Louis 2 (Martinez, Adams); Detroit 3 (Goodrum, Mahtook, Jones). RISP „ St. Louis 3 for 6; Detroit 1 for 6. Runners moved up „ Goodrum, Mahtook. LIDP „ Candelario. DP „ St. Louis 1 (Adams). S T. LOUIS IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gant, W, 7-5 6.2 5 2 2 1 6 94 3.16 Hudson, H, 9 .1 0 0 0 1 0 9 3.26 Hicks, H, 23 1 0 0 0 1 1 18 3.17 Martinez, S, 2-2 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 3.20 DETROIT IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Fulmer, L, 3-11 6.1 5 5 3 3 5 97 4.56 A lcantara .2 1 0 0 0 0 9 2.55 Baez 1 1 0 0 0 1 15 0.00 Coleman 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 3.72 Inherited runners-scored „ Hudson 1-0, A lcantara 3-2. Umpires „ Home, Lance Barrett; First, Bill Welke; Second, Tony Randazzo; Third, Ryan Additon. T „ 2:41. A „ 22,212 (41,297).METS 6, PHILLIES 4PHILADELPHIA AB R H BI BB SO AVG. S antana 3b-1b 4 1 1 1 1 0 .230 Bour 1b 2 1 1 0 0 1 .228 Kingery ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .228 Cabrera ss-3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .266 Hoskins lf 4 1 2 2 0 0 .251 Bautista rf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .196 Hernandez 2b 4 0 2 0 0 2 .258 Herrera cf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .261 A lfaro c 2 0 1 0 0 0 .261 d-Franco ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .266 V elasquez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .189 A rano p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Ramos ph 0 0 0 1 0 0 .310 Neshek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Morgan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Neris p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Williams ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .256 T OTALS 31 4 7 4 3 10 NEW YORK AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Rosario ss 3 2 1 0 1 0 .256 McNeil 2b 4 1 3 1 1 0 .340 Conforto lf 5 1 2 4 0 1 .233 Bruce 1b 4 0 0 0 1 2 .224 Frazier 3b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .226 Dr.Smith p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Reyes ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .192 Lugo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .091 Nimmo rf 2 1 1 0 2 0 .272 J ackson cf 4 0 1 1 0 2 .265 Plawecki c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .230 Oswalt p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Gagnon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Do.Smith ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .209 Hanhold p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Reinheimer 3b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .211 T OTALS 33 6 9 6 5 6 PHILADELPHIA 200 001 001„4 7 1 NEW YORK 100 040 10X„6 9 0 a-doubled for Gagnon in the 5th. b-out on s acri“ce ”y for Arano in the 6th. c-grounded out for Dr.Smith in the 7th. d-struck out for Alfaro in the 9th. e-struck out for Garcia in the 9th. E „ Garcia (1). LOB „ Philadelphia 7, New York 10. 2B „ Nimmo (24), Jackson (15), Do.Smith (7). 3B „ Rosario (8). HR „ Hoskins (30), off Oswalt; Santana (23), off Lugo; Conforto (23), off Velasquez. RBIs „ Santana (82), Hoskins 2 (88), Ramos (64), McNeil (14), Conforto 4 (63), Jackson (28). SF „ Ramos. S „ Velasquez 2. Runners left in scoring position „ Philadelphia 4 (Santana 2, Bour 2); New York 6 (Conforto, Bruce, Jackson 2, Plawecki 2). RISP „ Philadelphia 1 for 5; New York 3 for 10. PHILADELPHIA IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Velasquez, L, 9-11 4 7 5 5 1 4 73 4.30 Arano 1 0 0 0 1 0 12 2.50 Neshek .2 0 0 0 1 1 11 1.35 Morgan .1 0 0 0 1 0 9 4.19 Neris 1 1 1 1 1 1 23 5.31 Garcia 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 4.54 NEW YORK IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Oswalt 3 5 2 2 1 4 59 6.62 Gagnon, W, 1-1 2 0 0 0 1 1 32 8.10 Hanhold 0 1 1 1 1 0 14 7.71 Dr.Smith, H, 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 21 2.11 Lugo, S, 2-3 2 1 1 1 0 5 33 2.75 Velasquez pitched to 4 batters in the 5th. Hanhold pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored „ Morgan 1-0, Dr.Smith 2-1. HBP „ Velasquez 2 (Frazier,Rosario), Dr.Smith (Alfaro). WP „ Oswalt. Umpires „ Home, Will Little; First, Lance Barksdale; Second, Sean Barber; Third, Mark Carlson. T „ 3:12. A „ 24,153 (41,922).RAYS 8, ORIOLES 3BALTIMORE AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Mullins cf 4 0 0 0 1 2 .258 Rickard rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .244 Villar 2b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .269 Mancini 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .240 Davis dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .177 Beckham ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .226 Nunez 3b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .240 Peterson lf 3 1 1 2 0 1 .203 a-Andreoli ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .222 Joseph c 3 0 3 1 0 0 .212 TOTALS 33 3 9 3 3 10 TAMPA BAY AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Smith lf 4 2 3 0 0 0 .307 Pham dh 4 1 2 1 1 1 .259 Duffy 3b 4 0 1 0 1 2 .297 Cron 1b 4 1 1 1 1 1 .254 Kiermaier cf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .224 Adames ss 4 1 2 1 0 0 .266 Lowe 2b 4 1 1 3 0 1 .260 Gomez rf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .219 Sucre c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .190 TOTALS 36 8 13 7 3 5 BALTIMORE 000 000 300„3 9 1 TAMPA BAY 510 001 01X„8 13 0 a-singled for Peterson in the 9th. E „ Rickard (1). LOB „ Baltimore 7, Tampa Bay 8. 2B „ Nunez (11), Joseph (13), Pham (15), Cron (26), Kiermaier (11). 3B „ Peterson (2). HR „ Lowe (4), off Rogers; Gomez (9), off Yacabonis. RBIs „ Peterson 2 (27), Joseph (17), Pham (53), Cron (62), Adames (24), Lowe 3 (15), Gomez (32). SB „ Smith (31), Pham (11). CS „ Mullins (2). SF „ Joseph. Runners left in scoring position „ Baltimore 4 (Mullins, Rickard, Mancini, Davis); Tampa Bay 5 (Cron, Adames 2, Lowe, Gomez). RISP „ Baltimore 1 for 8; Tampa Bay 5 for 14. Runners moved up „ Mullins, Adames. LIDP „ Peterson. GIDP „ Pham. DP „ Baltimore 1 (Mancini, Villar); Tampa Bay 1 (Duffy, Lowe). BALTIMORE IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Rogers, L, 1-2 1.1 6 6 6 2 0 47 8.49 Yacabonis 4.2 4 1 1 0 4 58 6.66 Castro 2 3 1 1 1 1 40 4.08 TAMPA BAY IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stanek .1 0 0 0 3 0 15 2.64 Chirinos, W, 4-5 6.1 7 3 3 0 6 94 3.81 Roe .1 0 0 0 0 0 4 3.95 Nuno 2 2 0 0 0 4 42 1.55 Inherited runners-scored „ Yacabonis 2-0, Chirinos 2-0. HBP „ Yacabonis (Smith). Umpires „ Home, Nic Lentz; First, CB Bucknor; Second, Fieldin Culbreth; Third, Chris Conroy. T „ 2:51. A „ 13,632 (42,735).TWINS 3, ROYALS 1KANSAS CITY AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Merri“eld dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .302 Mondesi ss 4 1 1 1 0 1 .270 Gordon lf 1 0 0 0 2 0 .239 Dozier 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .233 OHearn 1b 3 0 1 0 1 2 .263 Bonifacio rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .239 Goodwin cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .236 Herrera 2b 2 0 1 0 1 0 .226 Gallagher c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .190 TOTALS 29 1 3 1 4 10 MINNESOTA AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Polanco ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .270 Rosario dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .289 Forsythe 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .236 Grossman lf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .261 Cave cf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .257 Adrianza 3b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .249 Kepler rf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .226 Astudillo c 4 1 2 2 0 0 .297 Gimenez 1b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .139 a-Mauer ph-1b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .272 TOTALS 32 3 7 3 3 7 KANSAS CITY 000 001 000„1 3 0 MINNESOTA 010 000 002„3 7 1 Two outs when winning run scored. a-singled for Gimenez in the 7th. E „ De Jong (1). LOB „ Kansas City 6, Minnesota 6. 2B „ Grossman (21), Kepler (27). HR „ Mondesi (7), off Littell; Astudillo (3), off Hammel. RBIs „ Mondesi (22), Adrianza (32), Astudillo 2 (7). Runners left in scoring position „ Kansas City 2 (Dozier 2); Minnesota 2 (Cave, Gimenez). RISP „ Kansas City 0 for 1; Minnesota 2 for 6. Runners moved up „ Cave. GIDP „ Bonifacio, Astudillo. DP „ Kansas City 1 (Dozier, Herrera, OHearn); Minnesota 1 (Adrianza, Forsythe, Gimenez). KANSAS CITY IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kennedy 6 4 1 1 3 6 93 4.92 McCarthy 1 1 0 0 0 0 10 3.26 Hill .2 0 0 0 0 0 6 4.54 Maurer .1 0 0 0 0 0 2 8.54 Hammel, L, 2-13 .2 2 2 2 0 1 10 6.09 MINNESOTA IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA De Jong 4 1 0 0 4 5 73 0.00 Littell 3.1 2 1 1 0 1 49 8.44 Rogers 1 0 0 0 0 3 16 3.02 Hildenberger, W, 4-3 .2 0 0 0 0 1 6 4.21 HBP „ Rogers (Gordon). Umpires „ Home, John Libka; First, Chad Fairchild; Second, Kerwin Danley; Third, Bruce Dreckman. T „ 2:36. A „ 20,903 (38,649).ANGELS 1, WHITE SOX 0LOS ANGELES AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Calhoun rf 4 0 1 1 1 2 .223 Fletcher ss 5 0 0 0 0 0 .282 Trout cf 4 0 2 0 0 2 .316 Ohtani dh 3 0 1 0 1 1 .291 Upton lf 4 0 0 0 0 4 .262 Fernandez 1b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .294 Ward 3b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .210 Cowart 2b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .138 Briceno c 2 0 0 0 2 1 .250 TOTALS 31 1 5 1 7 14 CHICAGO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Anderson ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .249 Rondon 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .253 b-Sanchez ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .251 Garcia dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .242 Davidson 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .235 1-Smith pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .297 Castillo c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .244 LaMarre lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .276 c-Delmonico ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .215 Moncada 2b 3 0 2 0 0 1 .225 Engel cf 2 0 0 0 0 2 .234 Cordell rf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 a-Palka ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .237 TOTALS 31 0 5 0 0 14 LOS ANGELES 000 000 100„1 5 0 CHICAGO 000 000 000„0 5 0 a-struck out for Cordell in the 8th. b-singled for Rondon in the 9th. c-struck out for LaMarre in the 9th. 1-ran for Davidson in the 9th. LOB „ Los Angeles 10, Chicago 6. 2B „ Ohtani (17). RBIs „ Calhoun (56). CS „ Ohtani (3). S „ Engel. Runners left in scoring position „ Los Angeles 4 (Fletcher 4); Chicago 3 (Anderson, Engel, Delmonico). RISP „ Los Angeles 1 for 5; Chicago 0 for 5. Runners moved up „ Ward, Castillo. GIDP „ Garcia. DP „ Los Angeles 1 (Cowart, Fletcher, Fernandez). LOS ANGELES IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Heaney, W, 9-9 7 3 0 0 0 12 96 3.98 Buttrey, H, 5 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 0.87 Parker, H, 3 .2 1 0 0 0 0 13 3.19 Alvarez, S, 1-4 .1 0 0 0 0 1 5 2.59 CHICAGO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lopez 6 2 0 0 3 10 105 4.22 Hamilton, L, 0-1 .2 1 1 1 1 1 18 2.25 Frare 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 11.57 Minaya 1.1 1 0 0 0 2 12 3.66 Santiago .2 0 0 0 3 1 31 4.56 Ruiz .1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0.00 Frare pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored „ Alvarez 2-0, Frare 2-1, Minaya 2-0, Ruiz 3-0. HBP „ Parker (Davidson). WP „ Heaney, Parker. Umpires „ Home, Ben May; First, Larry Vanover; Second, Hunter Wendelstedt; Third, Chris Guccione. T „ 3:17. A „ 24,020 (40,615).BREWERS 6, GIANTS 3SAN FRANCISCO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Blanco lf 2 1 1 2 0 0 .241 e-dArnaud ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .232 Black p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Melancon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Panik 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .243 Longoria 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .245 Crawford ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .259 Slater rf 4 0 1 1 0 2 .279 Hundley c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .235 Jones 1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .375 a-Belt ph-1b 2 1 0 0 1 1 .258 Hernandez cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .241 Bumgarner p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .135 c-Hanson ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .265 d-Pence ph-lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .214 TOTALS 34 3 9 3 1 8 MILWAUKEE AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Cain cf 3 2 1 0 1 0 .306 Yelich rf-lf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .316 Aguilar 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .276 Braun lf 2 1 1 1 1 0 .256 Broxton rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .188 Schoop 2b 4 1 1 5 0 2 .238 Moustakas 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Arcia ss 1 0 0 0 0 0 .216 Perez ss-3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .259 Kratz c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .244 Davies p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Burnes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Santana ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .246 Woodruff p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Cedeno p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --f-Thames ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .221 Soria p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Knebel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --TOTALS 29 6 5 6 3 5 SAN FRANCISCO 100 010 010„3 9 0 MILWAUKEE 100 004 01X„6 5 1 a-struck out for Jones in the 5th. b-grounded out for Burnes in the 6th. c-pinch hit for Bumgarner in the 7th. d-lined out for Hanson in the 7th. e-”ied out for Blanco in the 7th. f-grounded out for Cedeno in the 7th. E „ Perez (3). LOB „ San Francisco 6, Milwaukee 3. 2B „ Hernandez (15), Braun (23). 3B „ Slater (1). HR „ Blanco (2), off Davies; Schoop (21), off Bumgarner. RBIs „ Blanco 2 (7), Slater (18), Braun (52), Schoop 5 (58). SB „ Crawford (4), Braun (11). SF „ Blanco. Runners left in scoring position „ San Francisco 4 (Panik, Hundley 2, dArnaud); Milwaukee 2 (Schoop, Arcia). RISP „ San Francisco 1 for 8; Milwaukee 3 for 7. Runners moved up „ Aguilar 2. GIDP „ Longoria, Slater. DP „ Milwaukee 2 (Moustakas, Schoop, Aguilar), (Perez, Schoop, Aguilar). SAN FRANCISCO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bumgarner, L, 5-6 6 4 5 5 1 4 95 3.30 Black 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 4.82 Melancon 1 1 1 1 2 0 18 2.84 MILWAUKEE IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Davies 5 6 2 2 1 2 73 4.75 Burnes, W, 4-0 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 2.89 Woodruff, H, 1 .1 1 0 0 0 1 7 4.19 Cedeno, H, 9 .2 0 0 0 0 0 6 2.54 Soria, H, 11 .2 2 1 1 0 1 22 3.46 Knebel, S, 15-18 1.1 0 0 0 0 2 14 4.50 Inherited runners-scored „ Cedeno 1-0, Knebel 1-0. HBP „ Bumgarner (Braun). WP „ Melancon. Umpires „ Home, Tom Hallion; First, Dan Bellino; Second, Adam Hamari; Third, Phil Cuzzi. T „ 2:52. A „ 35,388 (41,900).DODGERS 9, ROCKIES 6LOS ANGELES AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Dozier 2b 2 1 0 0 1 1 .218 b-Bellinger ph-cf 2 1 0 0 1 2 .261 Turner 3b 5 2 4 2 1 0 .314 Machado ss 6 1 1 1 0 0 .300 Kemp rf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .283 1-Locastro pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .182 Puig rf 0 0 0 0 1 0 .261 Freese 1b 3 1 2 1 1 0 .290 e-Muncy ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .253 Maeda p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .094 Alexander p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Taylor lf-cf 4 0 1 2 1 2 .248 Hernandez cf-2b 4 2 2 1 1 0 .236 Barnes c 5 0 0 0 0 2 .197 Hill p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .121 Baez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Farmer ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .246 Ferguson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Verdugo cf-lf 1 0 1 1 0 0 .270 TOTALS 41 9 14 8 7 8 COLORADO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Blackmon cf 4 3 3 2 0 1 .282 LeMahieu 2b 4 2 2 1 0 1 .278 Arenado 3b 3 1 1 2 1 1 .297 Story ss 4 0 0 1 0 2 .293 Holliday lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .355 Tapia lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .211 Desmond 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .230 Parra rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .276 Iannetta c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .226 Anderson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .091 Bettis p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .088 Johnson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Murphy ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Almonte p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 McGee p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Cuevas ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .245 Oh p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Musgrave p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Shaw p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --f-Valaika ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .147 TOTALS 35 6 8 6 1 10 LOS ANGELES 220 022 001„9 14 1 COLORADO 100 103 010„6 8 1 a-struck out for Johnson in the 5th. b-walked for Dozier in the 6th. c-tripled for Baez in the 7th. d-”ied out for McGee in the 7th. e-lined out for Freese in the 8th. f-lined out for Shaw in the 9th. 1-ran for Kemp in the 6th. E „ Dozier (12), Holliday (2). LOB „ Los Angeles 12, Colorado 3. 2B „ Turner 2 (23), Machado (30), Taylor (32), Blackmon (23), LeMahieu (29). 3B „ Hernandez (2), Farmer (1), LeMahieu (2). HR „ Hernandez (20), off Anderson; Turner (13), off Almonte; Blackmon (25), off Hill; Arenado (32), off Baez; Blackmon (26), off Ferguson. RBIs „ Turner 2 (43), Machado (90), Freese (45), Taylor 2 (57), Hernandez (47), Verdugo (4), Blackmon 2 (61), LeMahieu (51), Arenado 2 (95), Story (96). SB „ Locastro (3), Desmond (18). Runners left in scoring position „ Los Angeles 8 (Machado 3, Taylor 2, Barnes, Hill, Bellinger); Colorado 1 (Valaika). RISP „ Los Angeles 3 for 18; Colorado 2 for 6. Runners moved up „ Hernandez, Freese, Story. FIDP „ Cuevas. DP „ Los Angeles 1 (Taylor, Hernandez). LOS ANGELES IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hill, W, 8-5 5 4 4 4 0 7 78 3.88 Baez 1 1 1 1 0 2 22 3.33 Ferguson, H, 4 1 2 1 1 0 0 20 3.63 Maeda, H, 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 18 3.89 Alexander, S, 3-6 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 3.47 COLORADO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Anderson, L, 6-8 2.2 5 4 3 2 2 72 4.89 Bettis 1.2 3 2 2 1 0 30 5.23 Johnson .2 0 0 0 0 2 12 0.00 Almonte 1 2 2 2 1 1 29 2.13 McGee 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 6.32 Oh .1 1 0 0 1 0 16 2.78 Musg rave 1.1 2 1 1 2 2 27 4.91 Shaw .1 0 0 0 0 0 6 6.27 Hill pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Ferguson pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Maeda pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored „ Baez 1-1, Alexander 1-0, Bettis 2-0, Johnson 1-0, Musgrave 2-0, Shaw 2-0. WP „ Oh, Musgrave. Umpires „ Home, Nick Mahrley; First, Jeff Nelson; Second, Andy Fletcher; Third, Laz Diaz. T „ 3:51. A „ 40,157 (50,398).ATHLETICS 7, RANGERS 3TEXAS AB R H BI BB SO AVG. DeShields cf 2 2 1 0 2 1 .208 Choo dh 2 1 0 0 2 2 .272 Odor 2b 3 0 1 1 1 0 .265 Mazara rf 2 0 0 1 1 0 .271 Beltre 3b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .279 Profar ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .253 Guzman 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .235 Calhoun lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .260 Kiner-Falefa c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .265 TOTALS 27 3 4 3 7 5 OAKLAND AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Laureano cf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .292 Chapman 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .280 Piscotty rf 3 1 1 1 1 2 .265 Davis dh 4 2 1 0 0 1 .248 Olson 1b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .241 Semien ss 4 0 1 1 0 0 .261 Barreto 2b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .246 Phegley c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .192 a-Joyce ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .203 Lucroy c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .243 Martini lf 1 1 1 1 0 0 .265 b-Pinder ph-lf 2 0 1 0 0 0 .256 TOTALS 32 7 9 5 3 6 TEXAS 102 000 000„3 4 2 OAKLAND 000 510 10X„7 9 0 a-walked for Phegley in the 4th. b-singled for Martini in the 6th. E „ Odor (9), Calhoun (2). LOB „ Texas 5, Oakland 5. 2B „ Laureano (7), Davis (27), Olson (32). HR „ Piscotty (23), off Moore. RBIs „ Odor (63), Mazara (74), Beltre (55), Laureano (14), Piscotty (74), Semien (56), Barreto (14), Martini (13). SB „ DeShields 2 (20). CS „ Odor (12). SF „ Mazara. Runners left in scoring position „ Texas 2 (Choo, Beltre); Oakland 2 (Piscotty, Barreto). RISP „ Texas 2 for 5; Oakland 3 for 7. GIDP „ Beltre, Barreto. DP „ Texas 1 (Profar, Odor, Guzman); Oakland 1 (Semien, Barreto, Olson). TEXAS IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Springs 3 1 0 0 0 2 44 1.99 Jurado, L, 2-5 .2 4 5 5 2 0 34 7.03 Pelham .2 2 1 1 1 1 28 7.71 Moore 3.1 2 1 1 0 3 34 7.04 Bibens-Dirkx .1 0 0 0 0 0 3 6.44 OAKLAND IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cahill 2.2 2 3 3 6 1 53 3.77 Kelley, W, 2-0 1.1 0 0 0 0 1 17 2.49 Pagan 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 4.18 Petit, H, 15 1 0 0 0 1 0 8 3.14 Buchter, H, 15 .2 0 0 0 0 0 10 3.03 Trivino, H, 22 .1 2 0 0 0 1 13 2.08 Familia 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 2.76 Treinen 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 0.87 Inherited runners-scored „ Pelham 1-0, Moore 1-0, Kelley 1-0. HBP „ Springs (Martini). WP „ Jurado. PB „ Kiner-Falefa (2). Umpires „ Home, Ramon De Jesus; First, Jerry Meals; Second, Ed Hickox; Third, Gabe Morales. T „ 2:59. A „ 27,932 (46,765).MARINERS 3, YANKEES 2NEW YORK AB R H BI BB SO AVG. McCutchen rf 3 0 0 1 1 1 .249 Stanton lf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .266 Andujar dh 4 0 2 1 0 0 .299 Sanchez c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .181 1-Wade pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .183 Romine c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .251 Walker 3b 4 1 1 0 0 3 .221 Voit 1b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .306 Torres 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .280 Hechavarria ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .254 c-Gregorius ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Gardner cf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .237 TOTALS 34 2 7 2 3 8 SEATTLE AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Haniger rf 3 1 0 0 1 2 .275 Segura ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .310 Cano 2b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .286 Cruz dh 4 1 1 0 0 2 .263 Healy 1b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .247 Maybin lf 2 0 1 1 0 0 .244 a-Span ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .271 Negron 3b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .200 b-Vogelbach ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .209 Beckham 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .222 Freitas c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .214 Heredia cf 2 0 1 0 1 0 .219 TOTALS 29 3 7 3 2 9 NEW YORK 100 100 000„2 7 0 SEATTLE 200 000 01X„3 7 1 a-struck out for Maybin in the 6th. b-”ied out for Negron in the 7th. c-grounded out for Hechavarria in the 9th. 1-ran for Sanchez in the 8th. E „ Segura (17). LOB „ New York 9, Seattle 5. 2B „ Stanton (30), Andujar (39), Voit (1). RBIs „ McCutchen (59), Andujar (77), Cano (32), Healy (70), Maybin (24). SB „ Haniger (8). CS „ Heredia (4). S „ Segura. Runners left in scoring position „ New York 6 (McCutchen, Stanton 2, Walker, Torres, Gardner); Seattle 1 (Negron). RISP „ New York 2 for 15; Seattle 2 for 6. Runners moved up „ Hechavarria. GIDP „ Sanchez, Segura. DP „ New York 1 (Hechavarria, Torres, Voit); Seattle 1 (Segura, Cano, Healy). NEW YORK IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sabathia 5 7 2 2 1 4 84 3.54 Green 2 0 0 0 0 3 31 2.54 Betances, L, 4-5 1 0 1 1 1 2 17 2.56 SEATTLE IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ramirez 5 6 2 2 2 4 85 5.31 Armstrong .2 1 0 0 0 1 9 0.00 Duke .1 0 0 0 0 0 5 4.30 Vincent 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 4.11 Colome, W, 6-5 1 0 0 0 1 1 20 3.34 Diaz, S, 54-58 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 1.84 Sabathia pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored „ Green 1-0, Duke 1-0. HBP „ Diaz (McCutchen). WP „ Colome 2. Umpires „ Home, Jeremie Rehak; First, Mark Wegner; Second, Jim Reynolds; Third, John Tumpane. T „ 3:05. A „ 34,917 (47,943).BRAVES 9, DIAMONDBACKS 5ATLANTA AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Acuna lf 3 3 2 2 2 1 .293 Camargo 3b 4 1 1 2 1 1 .278 F.Freeman 1b 4 0 2 1 1 0 .306 Markakis rf 5 0 0 0 0 0 .309 Flowers c 4 0 1 0 0 3 .233 1-Adams pr 1 1 0 0 0 0 .211 Brach p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Albies 2b 3 1 2 0 1 0 .271 Inciarte cf 4 1 1 3 0 1 .257 Swanson ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .246 Toussaint p 2 1 1 0 0 0 .167 Jackson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Sobotka p 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000 b-Tucker ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .239 c-Culberson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .276 S.Freeman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 e-Duda ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .240 Suzuki c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .268 TOTALS 36 9 11 9 5 7 ARIZONA AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Jay lf 4 0 2 1 1 1 .275 Escobar 3b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .267 Goldschmidt 1b 3 1 1 0 2 1 .298 Pollock cf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .260 Descalso 2b 2 1 0 0 2 0 .248 Diekman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Boxberger p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Sherfy p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --f-Vargas ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Souza Jr. rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .235 Ahmed ss 2 1 1 2 2 0 .248 Avila c 2 1 0 0 1 0 .164 d-Walker ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .219 Mathis c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .212 Ray p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .086 a-Peralta ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .297 Ziegler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Marte 2b 0 0 0 0 1 0 .251 TOTALS 31 5 6 5 9 9 ATLANTA 000 002 016„9 11 0 ARIZONA 000 004 001„5 6 0 a-singled for Ray in the 6th. b-pinch hit for Sobotka in the 8th. c-grounded out for Tucker in the 8th. d-struck out for Avila in the 8th. e-homered for S.Freeman in the 9th. f-struck out for Sherfy in the 9th. 1-ran for Flowers in the 9th. LOB „ Atlanta 5, Arizona 9. 2B „ Albies (35). 3B „ Acuna (2), Goldschmidt (5). HR „ Acuna (25), off Ray; Inciarte (10), off Boxberger; Duda (14), off Lopez; Camargo (18), off Lopez. RBIs „ Acuna 2 (53), Camargo 2 (70), F.Freeman (84), Inciarte 3 (57), Duda (49), Jay (38), Pollock (57), Ahmed 2 (65), Peralta (76). SB „ Acuna (13), Marte (6). CS „ Acuna (5), Marte (1). SF „ Pollock. Runners left in scoring position „ Atlanta 1 (Swanson); Arizona 4 (Escobar, Pollock, Ahmed, Avila). RISP „ Atlanta 3 for 5; Arizona 3 for 11. Runners moved up „ Camargo, Souza Jr., Pollock. GIDP „ F.Freeman. DP „ Atlanta 1 (Flowers, Camargo); Arizona 1 (Descalso, Ahmed, Goldschmidt). ATLANTA IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Toussaint 5.2 2 2 2 5 5 105 3.31 Jackson 0 3 2 2 1 0 20 4.42 Sobotka 1.1 0 0 0 2 1 18 3.00 S.Freeman, W, 3-5 1 0 0 0 1 2 15 4.56 Brach 1 1 1 1 0 1 15 3.59 ARIZONA IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ray 6 2 2 2 4 6 98 4.18 Ziegler, H, 17 1 1 0 0 0 1 15 3.99 Diekman, H, 16 1 1 1 1 1 0 17 3.86 Boxberger, L, 2-7 .1 3 3 3 0 0 12 4.41 Lopez 0 3 3 3 0 0 8 0.00 Sherfy .2 1 0 0 0 0 17 1.59 Jackson pitched to 4 batters in the 6th. Lopez pitched to 3 batters in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored „ Jackson 2-2, Sobotka 2-0. WP „ Toussaint, Sobotka. PB „ Flowers (6). Umpires „ Home, Marty Foster; First, Mark Ripperger; Second, Doug Eddings; Third, Joe West. T „ 3:45. A „ 28,339 (48,519).THIS DATE IN BASEBALLSept. 10 1919: Clevelands Ray Caldwell pitched a no-hitter against the New York Yankees as the Indians took a 3-0 decision in the opening game of a doubleheader. 1950: Joe DiMaggio became the “rst player to hit three home runs in one game at Grif“th Stadium as the New York Yankees beat the Washington Senators 8-1. 1967: Joe Horlen of the Chicago White Sox beat the Detroit Tigers with a 6-0 nohitter in the “rst game of a doubleheader. 1969: The New York Mets swept Montreal in a doubleheader at Shea Stadium, 3-2 in 12 innings and 7-1. The victories moved the Mets into “rst place in the NL East for their “rst time on top.BOX SCORES ROUNDUP/MATCHUPSBlue Jays 6, Indians 2: Blue Jays right “elder Randal Grichuk was injured in a bizarre collision with a security guards chair. Cardinals 5, Tigers 2: John Gant pitched effectively into the seventh inning. Mets 6, Phillies 4: Even after Jacob deGrom was scratched on a rainy afternoon, the Phillies stumbled again. Rays 8, Orioles 3: Brandon Lowe hit a three-run homer in a “ve-run “rst inning. Twins 3, Royals 1: Willians Astudillo hit a two-out, two-run homer in the bottom of the ninth inning. Angels 1, White Sox 0: Andrew Heaney tossed three-hit ball over seven innings and struck out a career-high 12. Brewers 6, Giants 3: Jonathan Schoop hit a grand slam after Ryan Braun was hit by a pitch in a tense sixth inning. Dodgers 9, Rockies 6: Justin Turner hit a two-run homer as part of a four-hit day Athletics 7, Rangers 3: Stephen Piscotty homered and Oakland rallied from an early three-run de“cit to beat the Texas Rangers. Mariners 3, Yankees 2: Mitch Haniger dashed home to score the go-ahead run on a grounder in the eighth inning. Braves 9, Diamondbacks 5: Ender Inciarte hit a three-run homer during a six-run rally in the ninth inning and the Atlanta Braves beat the skidding Arizona Diamondbacks to increase their NL East lead to 4 games. LATE San Diego at Cincinnati, 4:10 p.m. Houston at Boston, 8:05 p.m.TODAYS PITCHING COMPARISONNATIONAL LEAGUE 2018 TEAM LAST THREE STARTS TEAMS PITCHERS TIME W-L ERA REC W-L IP ERA Los Angeles Wood (L) 8-6 3.37 13-13 1-0 16.0 2.25 Cincinnati Reed (L) 6:40p 0-2 4.81 0-3 0-1 12.2 7.11 Washington Roark (R) 8-15 4.23 11-17 0-3 17.0 5.82 Philadelphia Arrieta (R) 7:05p 10-9 3.61 14-13 1-1 16.1 6.61 Miami Brigham (R) 0-1 9.00 0-1 0-1 3.0 9.00 New York Vargas (L) 7:10p 5-9 6.75 5-12 2-1 14.2 3.07 Milwaukee Miley (L) 3-2 2.12 8-4 1-0 18.1 1.96 Chicago Lester (L) 8:05p 15-5 3.51 21-7 1-0 13.0 2.08 Pittsburgh Williams (R) 12-9 3.15 14-13 2-0 18.2 0.48 St. Louis Wainwright (R) 8:15p 1-3 4.00 1-3 1-2 14.1 3.14 Arizona Godley (R) 14-8 4.51 16-12 1-2 17.2 5.09 Colorado Marquez (R) 8:40p 11-9 4.05 16-12 0-0 21.2 1.66 Atlanta Newcomb (L) 11-8 3.92 14-13 1-2 14.1 5.65 San Francisco Rodriguez (R) 10:15p 6-2 2.41 9-6 0-1 17.0 3.18AMERICAN LEAGUE 2018 TEAM LAST THREE STARTS TEAMS PITCHERS TIME W-L ERA REC W-L IP ERA Houston Verlander (R) 14-9 2.73 17-13 2-1 18.1 3.44 Detroit Liriano (L) 6:10p 4-9 4.90 8-14 1-1 14.2 6.14 Cleveland Kluber (R) 18-7 2.75 19-10 2-1 19.0 2.84 Tampa Bay TBD ( ) 7:10p 0-0 0.00 0-0 0-0 0.0 0.00 New York Happ (L) 15-6 3.90 18-9 1-0 16.1 4.41 Minnesota Gibson (R) 8:10p 7-12 3.74 12-16 0-3 17.0 5.82 Chicago Giolito (R) 10-10 5.85 14-14 1-1 14.2 3.68 Kansas City Junis (R) 8:15p 8-12 4.32 11-15 2-1 21.2 1.66 Texas Minor (L) 11-7 4.31 13-12 2-1 17.0 2.12 Los Angeles Barria (R) 10:07p 10-8 3.30 11-11 2-1 14.0 2.57 KEY: TEAM REC-Teams Record in games started by todays pitcher. SATURDAYS GAMES American League Houston 5, Boston 3 Oakland 8, Texas 6 Cleveland 9, Toronto 8 Tampa Bay 10, Baltimore 5 L.A. Angels 12, Chicago White Sox 3 Kansas City 4, Minnesota 1 N.Y. Yankees 4, Seattle 2 National League Pittsburgh 5, Miami 1 Washington 10, Chicago Cubs 3, 1st game Cincinnati 7, San Diego 2, 7 innings Milwaukee 4, San Francisco 3 N.Y. Mets 10, Philadelphia 5 Atlanta 5, Arizona 4, 10 innings Colorado 4, L.A. Dodgers 2 Washington 6, Chicago Cubs 5, 2nd game Interleague Detroit 4, St. Louis 3 TUESDAYS GAMES American League Houston at Detroit, 6:40 p.m. Oakland at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. Cleveland at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. Toronto at Boston, 7:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Kansas City, 8:15 p.m. Texas at L.A. Angels, 10:07 p.m. National League L.A. Dodgers at Cincinnati, 6:40 p.m. Washington at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. Miami at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m. Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. Arizona at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. Atlanta at San Francisco, 10:15p.m. Interleague San Diego at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.

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DailyCommercial.com | Monday, September 10, 2018 B5 EAST T eamWLTPctPFPA NewEngland1001.0002720 Miami1001.0002720 Buffalo010.000347 N.Y.Jets000.00000 S OUTH T eamWLTPctPFPA J acksonville1001.0002015 Houston010.0002027 Indianapolis010.0002334 T ennessee010.0002027 NORTH T eamWLTPctPFPA Baltimore1001.000473 Cincinnati1001.0003423 Cleveland001.5002121 Pittsburgh001.5002121 W EST T eamWLTPctPFPA KansasCity1001.0003828 Denver1001.0002724 L.A.Chargers010.0002838 Oakland000.00000 A lltimesEastern W EEK1 T hursdaysgamePhiladelphia18,Atlanta12 S undaysgamesCincinnati34,Indianapolis23 J acksonville20,N.Y.Giants15 NewEngland27,Houston20 Minnesota24,SanFrancisco16 T ampaBay48,NewOrleans40 Baltimore47,Buffalo3 Cleveland21,Pittsburgh21,OT KansasCity38,L.A.Chargers28 Washington24,Arizona6 Denver27,Seattle24 Carolina16,Dallas8 Miami27,Tennessee20 ChicagoatGreenBay,late T odaysgamesN.Y.JetsatDetroit,7:10p.m. L.A.RamsatOakland,10:20p.m. W EEK2 T hursday,Sept.13BaltimoreatCincinnati,8:20p.m. S unday,Sept.16PhiladelphiaatTampaBay,1p.m. HoustonatTennessee,1p.m. IndianapolisatWashington,1p.m. MinnesotaatGreenBay,1p.m. ClevelandatNewOrleans,1p.m. KansasCityatPittsburgh,1p.m. MiamiatN.Y.Jets,1p.m. CarolinaatAtlanta,1p.m. L.A.ChargersatBuffalo,1p.m. A rizonaatL.A.Rams,4:05p.m. DetroitatSanFrancisco,4:05p.m. OaklandatDenver,4:25p.m. NewEnglandatJacksonville,4:25p.m. N.Y.GiantsatDallas,8:20p.m.Monday,Sept.17 S eattleatChicago,8:15p.m.QUARTERBACKSRyanFitzpatrick,Buccaneers: Passedfor417yards andfourtouchdownsin TampaBays48-40victory overNewOrleans.RUNNINGBACKSJamesConner,Steelers: Rushedfor135yardson 31carriesandscoreda pairoftouchdownsagainst theClevelandBrowns.The gameendedinatie.RECEIVERSMichaelThomas,Saints: Caught16passesfor180 yardsandatouchdown duringthehigh-scoring contestagainstthe Buccaneers.DEFENSET.J.Watt,Steelers: Finishedwithfoursacksand eighttacklesinthegame atCleveland.KICKINGChandlerCatanzaro,Buccaneers: Madetwoofthree “eld-goalattemptsandhit onsixextrapoints,taking advantageoftheBucs explosiveoffensiveoutput. F romwirereportsSTEELERS21,BROWNS21: Well,the Brownsdidntlose.Clevelandendedits 17-gamelosingstreakwithatieagainst thePittsburghSteelers,buttheBrowns missedachanceattheir“rstvictory since2016whenkickerZaneGonzalezs 43-yard“eld-goalattemptwith9secondsleftinOTwasblockedbyT.J.Watt. PATRIOTS27,TEXANS20: TomBrady threwfor277yardsandthreetouchdowns,hittingRobGronkowskifor123 yardsandascoretoleadthedefending AFCchampionNewEnglandPatriots. VIKINGS24,49ERS16: KirkCousins passedfortwotouchdownsinhismuchanticipatedMinnesotadebut. BUCCANEERS48,SAINTS40: Ryan Fitzpatrickhighlighteda417-yard, four-touchdownperformancewithtwo scoringstrikesofmorethan50yards, andtheTampaBayBuccaneersstunned theNewOrleansSaints. PANTHERS16,COWBOYS8: CamNewton ranfor58yardsandatouchdown,and Carolinasdefenseturnedinadominatingperformance. JAGUARS20,GIANTS15: Linebacker MylesJackscoredona32-yardinterceptionreturnearlyinthefourthquarter andtheJaguarsspoiledtheNewYork GiantsdebutsofcoachPatShurmurand draftpickSaquonBarkley. DOLPHINS27,TITANS20: JakeemGrant scoredonatiebreaking102-yardkickoff returnwith14minutestogo,andthe MiamiDolphinsovercametwoweather delaystowinthelongestgamesincethe 1970NFL-AFLmerger BRONCOS27,SEAHAWKS24: VonMiller sackedRussellWilsonthreetimes, forcedtwofumblesandrecoveredone inhelpingCaseKeenumwinhisDenver debut. REDSKINS24,CARDINALS6: AlexSmith carveduptheArizonadefensefor255 yardsandtwotouchdowns,Adrian Petersonrushedfor96yardsanda score. CHIEFS38,CHARGERS28: TyreekHill scoredthreetouchdowns,Patrick Mahomespassedforhis“rstfourNFL scores. RAVENS47,BILLS3: TheBaltimore RavensharassedandembarrassedBuffaloquarterbackNathanPetermanina rout. BENGALS34,COLTS23: AndyDalton ralliedtheCincinnatiBengalswiththree scoresinthe“nal19minutes.„TheAssociatedPress ROUNDUPWEEK 1 TodaysgamesDoubleheader: TheLionshosttheJetsat7:10p.m.ET,thenthe RamsvisittheRaidersat10:20p.m.ET.BothgamesareonESPN.AFCATAGLANCE SUMMARIESVIKINGS24,49ERS16SANFRANCISCO03103„16 MINNESOTA37140„24 FirstQuarter Min„FGCarlson48,3:56. SecondQuarter Min„Diggs22passfromCousins(Carlson kick),13:39. SF„FGGould42,11:42. ThirdQuarter Min„Hughes28interceptionreturn (Carlsonkick),10:41. SF„FGGould33,9:15. Min„Rudolph11passfromCousins (Carlsonkick),4:22. SF„Pettis22passfromGaroppolo(Gould kick),:31. FourthQuarter SF„FGGould22,8:09. A„66,673. SFMin Firstdowns2019 TotalNetYards327343 Rushes-yards25-9032-116 Passing237227 PuntReturns2-143-7 KickoffReturns0-00-0 InterceptionsRet.0-03-45 Comp-Att-Int15-33-320-36-0 Sacked-YardsLost3-243-17 Punts4-43.56-38.3 Fumbles-Lost2-11-1 Penalties-Yards3-217-52 TimeofPossession28:5131:09 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„SanFrancisco,Breida11-46, Morris12-38,Garoppolo2-6.Minnesota, Murray11-42,Cook16-40,Cousins4-26, Diggs1-8. PASSING„SanFrancisco,Garoppolo15-333-261.Minnesota,Cousins20-36-0-244. RECEIVING„SanFrancisco,Kittle5-90, T.Ta ylor4-28,Pettis2-61,Garcon2-21, Juszczyk1-56,Breida1-5.Minnesota, Thielen6-102,Cook6-55,Diggs3-43, Treadwell2-18,Rudolph1-11,Morgan1-9, Conklin1-6. MISSEDFIELDGOALS„None.STEELERS21,BROWNS21,OTPITTSBURGH071400„21 CLEVELAND007140„21 SecondQuarter Pit„Conner4run(Boswellkick),11:16. ThirdQuarter Cle„Taylor20run(Gonzalezkick),10:05. Pit„Brown22passfromRoethlisberger (Boswellkick),8:24. Pit„Conner22run(Boswellkick),5:23. FourthQuarter Cle„Hyde1run(Gonzalezkick),7:32. Cle„Gordon17passfromTaylor(Gonzalez kick),1:58. A„67,431. PitCle Firstdowns2522 TotalNetYards472327 Rushes-yards35-15938-177 Passing313150 PuntReturns5-561-15 KickoffReturns3-693-46 InterceptionsRet.1-03-26 Comp-Att-Int23-41-315-40-1 Sacked-YardsLost4-227-47 Punts7-39.312-43.5 Fumbles-Lost3-31-0 Penalties-Yards12-11611-87 TimeofPossession35:1234:48 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„Pittsburgh,Conner31-135, Roethlisberger3-16,Switzer1-8.Cleveland, Taylor8-77,Hyde22-62,Chubb3-21, Johnson5-17. PASSING„Pittsburgh,Roethlisberger23-413-335.Cleveland,Taylor15-40-1-197. RECEIVING„Pittsburgh,Brown9-93,SmithSchuster5-119,Conner5-57,James3-60, Hunter1-6.Cleveland,Landry7-106,Njoku 3-13,Higgins1-38,Gordon1-17,Fells1-12, Johnson1-8,Hyde1-3. MISSEDFIELDGOALS„Pittsburgh,Boswell 42.BENGALS34,COLTS23CINCINNATI37717„34 INDIANAPOLIS31370„23 FirstQuarter Cin„FGBullock42,8:20. Ind„FGVinatieri21,1:23. SecondQuarter Ind„Ebron26passfromLuck(Vinatieri kick),12:02. Ind„FGVinatieri38,3:01. Cin„Ross3passfromDalton(Bullock kick),1:44. Ind„FGVinatieri51,:02. ThirdQuarter Ind„Hilton5passfromLuck(Vinatieri kick),8:13. Cin„Green38passfromDalton(Bullock kick),4:09. FourthQuarter Cin„Mixon1run(Bullockkick),11:07. Cin„FGBullock39,3:57. Cin„Fejedelem83fumblereturn(Bullock kick),:24. CinInd Firstdowns1924 TotalNetYards330380 Rushes-yards20-10122-75 Passing229305 PuntReturns1-(minu1-0 KickoffReturns2-422-54 InterceptionsRet.1-21-32 Comp-Att-Int21-28-139-53-1 Sacked-YardsLost2-142-14 Punts2-48.02-47.5 Fumbles-Lost2-11-1 Penalties-Yards8-947-91 TimeofPossession27:1232:48 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„Cincinnati,Mixon17-95,Dalton 2-8,Bernard1-(minus2).Indianapolis,Wilkins 14-40,Hines5-19,Michael2-9,Luck1-7. PASSING„Cincinnati,Dalton21-28-1-243. Indianapolis,Luck39-53-1-319. RECEIVING„Cincinnati,Green6-92,Mixon 5-54,Eifert3-44,Boyd3-26,Bernard1-11, Kroft1-9,Uzomah1-4,Ross1-3.Indianapolis, Grant8-59,Doyle7-60,Hines7-33,Hilton5-46, Ebron4-51,Wilkins3-21,Rogers3-18,Pascal 1-18,Swoope1-13. MISSEDFIELDGOALS„Indianapolis,Vinatieri 55.PATRIOTS27,TEXANS20HOUSTON3377„20 NEWENGLAND71433„27 FirstQuarter NE„Gronkowski21passfromBrady (Gostkowskikick),11:50. Hou„FGFairbairn42,2:33. SecondQuarter NE„White12passfromBrady(Gostkowski kick),12:38. Hou„FGFairbairn36,9:01. NE„Dorsett4passfromBrady(Gostkowski kick),:14. ThirdQuarter NE„FGGost kowski39,6:02. Hou„Blue1run(Fairbairnkick),1:52. FourthQuarter NE„FGGost kowski35,9:48. Hou„Ellington5passfromWatson (Fairbairnkick),2:08. HouNE Firstdowns2123 TotalNetYards325389 Rushes-yards34-16731-122 Passing158267 PuntReturns2-201-0 KickoffReturns5-1561-19 InterceptionsRet.1-01-0 Comp-Att-Int17-34-126-39-1 Sacked-YardsLost3-182-10 Punts6-38.36-46.8 Fumbles-Lost1-13-2 Penalties-Yards6-446-36 TimeofPossession28:5031:10 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„Houston,Miller20-98,Watson 8-40,Blue5-36,Hopkins1-(minus7).New England,Burkhead18-64,Hill4-25,White 5-18,Patterson3-13,Brady1-2. PASSING„Houston,Watson17-34-1-176. NewEngland,Brady26-39-1-277. RECEIVING„Houston,Hopkins8-78, Ellington4-37,Akins2-11,Thomas1-27, Ervin1-12,Miller1-11.NewEngland, Gronkowski7-123,Dorsett7-66,White4-38, Develin4-22,Hogan1-11,Hill1-6,Patterson 1-6,Burkhead1-5. MISSEDFIELDGOALS„None.JAGUARS20,GIANTS15JACKSONVILLE31007„20 NEWYORK3336„15 FirstQuarter Jac„FGLambo39,10:12. NYG„FGRosas27,:23. SecondQuarter Jac„FGLambo39,7:19. Jac„Yeldon1passfromBortles(Lambo kick),2:42. NYG„FGRosas31,:04. ThirdQuarter NYG„FGRosas44,9:18. FourthQuarter Jac„Jack32interceptionreturn(Lambo kick),11:24. NYG„Barkley68run(runfailed),10:39. A„77,992. JacNYG Firstdowns1715 TotalNetYards305324 Rushes-yards28-13723-114 Passing168210 PuntReturns2-103-4 KickoffReturns2-451-15 InterceptionsRet.1-321-0 Comp-Att-Int18-33-123-37-1 Sacked-YardsLost1-82-14 Punts7-37.75-49.4 Fumbles-Lost0-01-1 Penalties-Yards11-1196-43 TimeofPossession29:3130:29 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„Jacksonville,Yeldon14-51, Bortles4-42,Fournette9-41,Grant1-3. NewYork,Barkley18-106,Stewart2-8, Manning1-2,Beckham1-(minus1),Gallman 1-(minus1). PASSING„Jacksonville,Bortles18-33-1-176. NewYork,Manning23-37-1-224. RECEIVING„Jacksonville,Westbrook5-51, Cole3-54,Seferian-Jenkins3-25,Yeldon 3-18,Fournette3-14,Moncrief1-14.New York,Beckham11-111,S.Shepard5-48, Barkley2-22,Engram2-18,Gallman2-9, Ellison1-16. MISSEDFIELDGOALS_None.BUCCANEERS48,SAINTS40TAMPABAY1417107„48 NEWORLEANS1014016„40 FirstQuarter NO„Kamara5run(Lutzkick),11:41. TB„Jackson58passfromFitzpatrick (Catanzarokick),9:41. NO„FGLutz36,4:25. TB„Fitzpatrick3run(Catanzarokick),1:58. SecondQuarter NO„Ginn28passfromBrees(Lutzkick),14:54. TB„FGCatanzaro33,11:12. TB„Godwin9passfromFitzpatrick(Catanzaro kick),4:42. TB„J.Evans34fumblereturn(Catanzaro kick),4:27. NO„Thomas6passfromBrees(Lutzkick),:55. ThirdQuarter TB„FGCatanzaro36,11:24. TB„M.Evans50passfromFitzpatrick (Catanzarokick),2:58. FourthQuarter TB„Jackson36passfromFitzpatrick (Catanzarokick),12:19. NO„Kamara1run(Kamararun),8:54. NO„Kamara7passfromBrees(Ginnpassfrom Brees),3:31. TBNO Firstdowns2626 TotalNetYards529475 Rushes-yards34-11213-43 Passing417432 PuntReturns3-191-0 KickoffReturns2-333-69 Comp-Att-Int21-28-037-45-0 Sacked-YardsLost0-01-7 Punts1-42.03-52.0 Fumbles-Lost1-02-2 Penalties-Yards7-708-77 TimeofPossession32:0927:51 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„TampaBay,Barber19-69, Fitzpatrick12-36,Wilson1-6,Rodgers2-1.New Orleans,Kamara8-29,Gillislee3-9,Ginn1-5, J.Williams1-0. PASSING„TampaBay,Fitzpatrick21-28-0-417. NewOrleans,Brees37-45-0-439. RECEIVING„TampaBay,M.Evans7-147, Jackson5-146,Godwin3-41,Humphries3-27, Howard2-54,Rodgers1-2.NewOrleans, Thomas16-180,Kamara9-112,Ginn5-68, B.Watson4-44,Carr2-20,J.Hill1-15.DOLPHINS27,TITANS20TENNESSEE30017„20 MIAMI07317„27 FirstQuarter Ten„FGSuccop47,10:18. SecondQuarter Mia„Stills10passfromTannehill(Sanders kick),11:21. ThirdQuarter Mia„FGSanders27,4:05. FourthQuarter Ten„D.Lewis4run(Succopkick),14:17. Mia„Grant102kickoffreturn(Sanders kick),14:04. Mia„Stills75passfromTannehill(Sanders kick),10:22. Ten„Jennings94kickoffreturn(Succop kick),10:11. Mia„FGSanders30,3:49. Ten„FGSuccop53,:11. A„65,184. TenMia Firstdowns1918 TotalNetYards336342 Rushes-yards29-11629-120 Passing220222 PuntReturns2-442-1 KickoffReturns2-1212-125 InterceptionsRet.2-343-81 Comp-Att-Int20-38-320-28-2 Sacked-YardsLost0-01-8 Punts4-44.84-53.8 Fumbles-Lost0-00-0 Penalties-Yards5-487-51 TimeofPossession29:3530:25 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„Tennessee,D.Lewis16-75,Henry 10-26,Mariota3-15.Miami,Gore9-61, Drake14-48,Wilson2-7,Tannehill4-4. PASSING„Tennessee,Mariota9-16-2-103, Gabbert11-22-1-117.Miami,Tannehill 20-28-2-230. RECEIVING„Tennessee,C.Davis6-62, D.Lewis5-35,Walker4-52,Stocker2-37, Sharpe1-17,Smith1-12,Henry1-5.Miami, Grant5-38,Stills4-106,Amendola4-26, Wilson3-31,Drake3-18,Gesicki1-11. MISSEDFIELDGOALS_None.CHIEFS38,CHARGERS28KANSASCITY143147„38 L.A.CHARGERS66016„28 FirstQuarter KC„Hill91puntreturn(Butkerkick),13:03. LAC„FGSturgis45,9:20. KC„Hill58passfromMahomes(Butker kick),6:39. LAC„FGSturgis39,:21. SecondQuarter LAC„Ekeler13passfromRivers(pass failed),7:47. KC„FGButker46,2:00. ThirdQuarter KC„Thomas1passfromMahomes(Butker kick),9:25. KC„Sherman36passfromMahomes (Butkerkick),:48. FourthQuarter LAC„Allen20passfromRivers(Gatespass fromRivers),12:04. KC„Hill1passfromMahomes(Butker kick),9:42. LAC„Ty.Williams4passfromRivers(Gordon run),5:01. KCLAC Firstdowns1933 TotalNetYards362541 Rushes-yards27-10622-123 Passing256418 PuntReturns2-952-(minu KickoffReturns2-332-36 InterceptionsRet.1-00-0 Comp-Att-Int15-27-034-51-1 Sacked-YardsLost1-01-6 Punts5-51.23-48.0 Fumbles-Lost0-02-1 Penalties-Yards6-507-45 TimeofPossession25:3434:26 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„KansasCity,Hunt16-49,Ware3-32, Mahomes5-21,Hill2-4,Dam.Williams1-0.Los Angeles,Gordon15-64,Ekeler5-39,Benjamin 1-19,Watt1-1. PASSING„KansasCity,Mahomes15-27-0-256. LosAngeles,Rivers34-51-1-424. RECEIVING„KansasCity,Hill7-169,Watkins 3-21,Sherman1-36,Conley1-15,Ware1-8, Kelce1-6,Thomas1-1.LosAngeles,Gordon 9-102,Allen8-108,Ekeler5-87,M.Williams 5-81,Green2-21,Gates2-16,Ty.Williams2-8, Benjamin1-1.RAVENS47,BILLS3BUFFALO0030„3 BALTIMORE1412147„47 FirstQuarter Bal„Collins8run(Tuckerkick),8:42. Bal„J.Brown7passfromFlacco(Tucker kick),1:32. SecondQuarter Bal„FGTucker41,13:14. Bal„FGTucker39,4:16. Bal„Crabtree12passfromFlacco(pass failed),:13. ThirdQuarter Bal„Snead13passfromFlacco(Tucker kick),12:28. Bal„Ja.Allen1run(Tuckerkick),11:22. Buf„FGHauschka35,2:38. FourthQuarter Bal„Dixon2run(Tuckerkick),3:52. A„70,591. BufBal Firstdowns1026 TotalNetYards153369 Rushes-yards22-8334-117 Passing70252 PuntReturns3-196-54 KickoffReturns5-1651-24 InterceptionsRet.0-02-47 Comp-Att-Int11-33-226-38-0 Sacked-YardsLost6-282-8 Punts8-49.65-51.4 Fumbles-Lost1-04-1 Penalties-Yards10-1009-78 TimeofPossession24:4635:14 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„Buffalo,M.Murphy6-31,Jo.Allen 4-26,McCoy7-22,Ivory3-3,Peterman 1-1,Bojorquez1-0.Baltimore,Dixon13-44, Jackson7-39,Ja.Allen4-17,Collins7-13, Flacco2-3,J.Brown1-1. PASSING„Buffalo,Peterman5-18-2-24, Jo.Allen6-15-0-74.Baltimore,Flacco25-340-236,Jackson1-4-0-24. RECEIVING„Buffalo,Z.Jones3-26,Croom 2-18,Kerley2-7,Thomas1-24,Holmes 1-14,Benjamin1-10,McCoy1-(minus 1).Baltimore,Ja.Allen5-15,Snead4-49, J.Brown3-44,Boyle3-40,Crabtree3-38, M.Williams3-32,Andrews3-31,Collins1-6, Moore1-5. MISSEDFIELDGOALS„Buffalo,Hauschka 52.PANTHERS16,COWBOYS8DALLAS0008„8 CAROLINA01006„16 SecondQuarter Car„Newton4run(Ganokick),8:50. Car„FGGano27,:03. FourthQuarter Car„Armah1run(kickfailed),14:12. Dal„Elliott4run(Prescottrun),8:51. A„74,532. DalCar Firstdowns1720 TotalNetYards232293 Rushes-yards22-9432-147 Passing138146 PuntReturns2-134-62 KickoffReturns0-00-0 InterceptionsRet.0-00-0 Comp-Att-Int19-29-017-26-0 Sacked-YardsLost6-323-15 Punts6-48.86-47.8 Fumbles-Lost1-12-1 Penalties-Yards10-859-80 TimeofPossession29:2430:36 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„Dallas,Elliott15-69,Prescott 5-19,R.Smith1-5,Austin1-1.Carolina, Newton13-58,McCaffrey10-50,Anderson 7-35,Moore1-3,Armah1-1. PASSING„Dallas,Prescott19-29-0-170. Carolina,Newton17-26-0-161. RECEIVING„Dallas,Beasley7-73, D.Thompson3-27,Swaim3-18,Elliott3-17, Hurns1-20,Gallup1-9,T.Williams1-6. Carolina,McCaffrey6-45,Funchess3-41, Wright3-23,Olsen2-33,I.Thomas2-4, To.Smith1-15. MISSEDFIELDGOALS„Dallas,Maher47.BRONCOS27,SEAHAWKS24SEATTLE7377„24 DENVER71037„27 FirstQuarter Sea„Dissly15passfromWilson(Janikowski kick),9:04. Den„Lindsay29passfromKeenum (McManuskick),6:10. SecondQuarter Sea„FGJani kowski35,13:59. Den„Sanders43passfromKeenum (McManuskick),10:29. Den„FGMcManus51,5:25. ThirdQuarter Sea„null20passfromWilson(Jani kowski kick),6:02. Den„FGMcManus53,2:01. FourthQuarter Sea„Lockett51passfromWilson (Janikowskikick),14:46. Den„De.Thomas4passfromKeenum (McManuskick),11:11. A„76,761. SeaDen Firstdowns1325 TotalNetYards306470 Rushes-yards16-6432-146 Passing242324 PuntReturns3-112-9 KickoffReturns2-390-0 InterceptionsRet.3-642-0 Comp-Att-Int19-33-225-39-3 Sacked-YardsLost6-561-5 Punts6-59.06-44.5 Fumbles-Lost3-10-0 Penalties-Yards7-457-60 TimeofPossession24:5235:08 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„Seattle,Carson7-51,Penny7-8, Wilson2-5.Denver,Lindsay15-71,Freeman 15-71,Booker2-4. PASSING„Seattle,Wilson19-33-2-298. Denver,Keenum25-39-3-329. RECEIVING„Seattle,Penny4-35,Dissly 3-105,Lockett3-59,null3-46,Carson3-28, Vannett1-11,J.Brown1-7,Madden1-7. Denver,Sanders10-135,De.Thomas6-63, Sutton2-45,Lindsay2-31,Butt2-29,Booker 2-11,Heuerman1-15. MISSEDFIELDGOALS„Seattle,Jani kowski 46.REDSKINS24,CARDINALS6WASHINGTON02103„24 ARIZONA0006„6 SecondQuarter Was„Thompson13passfromAl.Smith (Hopkinskick),14:54. Was„A.Peterson1run(Hopkinskick),4:10. Was„Reed4passfromAl.Smith(Hopkins kick),:08. FourthQuarter Was„FGHopkins31,12:13. Ari„Dav.Johnson2run(passfailed),5:47. A„61,613. WasAri Firstdowns3014 TotalNetYards429213 Rushes-yards42-18215-68 Passing247145 PuntReturns2-122-44 KickoffReturns2-240-0 InterceptionsRet.1-(minu0-0 Comp-Att-Int21-30-020-34-1 Sacked-YardsLost3-82-8 Punts4-46.55-52.6 Fumbles-Lost3-11-1 Penalties-Yards9-639-67 TimeofPossession38:0821:52 INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS RUSHING„Washington,A.Peterson26-96, Thompson5-65,Al.Smith8-14,Kelley3-7. Arizona,Dav.Johnson9-37,Edmonds4-24, Bradford2-7. PASSING„Washington,Al.Smith21-30-0255.Arizona,Bradford20-34-1-153. RECEIVING„Washington,Thompson6-63, Reed4-48,Richardson4-22,Crowder3-32, A.Peterson2-70,Doctson1-11,Davis1-9. Arizona,Fitzgerald7-76,Dav.Johnson5-30, Edmonds4-24,Seals-Jones3-19,Kirk1-4. MISSEDFIELDGOALS„None. EAST T eamWLTPctPFPA Washington1001.000246 Philadelphia1001.0001812 N.Y.Giants010.0001520 Dallas010.000816 S OUTH T eamWLTPctPFPA T ampaBay1001.0004840 Carolina1001.000168 NewOrleans010.0004048 A tlanta010.0001218 NORTH T eamWLTPctPFPA Minnesota1001.0002416 Chicago000.00000 Detroit000.00000 GreenBay000.00000 WEST T eamWLTPctPFPA Seattle010.0002427 SanFrancisco010.0001624 A rizona010.000624 L.A.Rams000.00000NFCATAGLANCE RESULTS/ SCHEDULE SUNDAYSSTARS

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B6 Monday, September 10, 2018 | DailyCommercial.comFitzpatrick also threw a 9-yard touchdown pass to Chris Godwin.The Saints, coming off a playoff appearance and hosting a team that won only five games last season, were among the more heavily favored teams in Week 1. They put together a frantic offensive flurry in the fourth quarter. Kamara scored on a 1-yard run and again on a 7-yard catch. Both were followed by 2-point conversions, cutting the Saints deficit to eight points with 3:31 to go. On third-and-11, Fitzpatrick needed to make one more play „ and did. He scrambled to his left for 12 yards at the 2-minute warn-ing. With New Orleans out of timeouts, Fitzpatrick was able to run out the clock.Drew Brees was 37 of45 for 439 yards and three TDs for the Saints. Kamara, the 2017 offensive rookie of the year, caught nine passes for 112 yards and one touchdown to go with two touchdown runs. Receiver Michael Thomas caught a franchise single-game record 16 passes for 180 yards and a TD, but turned the ball over on a fumble across midfield in the third quarter. Tampa Bay scored on six of its first seven possessions and the only drive of the first half that did not produce points was when the Bucs ran out the final 55 seconds before half-time. Tampa Bay did not punt until their eighth drive ended with Fitzpatrick overthrow-ing an open receiver on third down, about halfway through the third quarter.The Saints punted only once in the first half, and were only one score down after Thomas 6-yard touchdown catch made it 31-24 shortly before halftime. Fumbled opportunityWith Mark Ingram serving a four-game suspension for use of a banned substance, the Saints brought in running back Mike Gillislee after he was cut by New England. In his Saints debut, Gillislee fumbled in the second quarter on a hit by Vernon Hargreaves. Corner-back Justin Evans scooped up the loose ball and ran it back for a 34-yard TD. PenaltiesThe Saints were fortunate to give up only a field goal after Onyemata and defensive end Marcus Davenport were flagged for roughing the passer on back-to-back plays in the third quarter. Ony-emata was penalized under a renewed emphasis on forbid-ding defensive players from driving quarterbacks into the ground with the full weight of their bodies. It was his first of two roughing penalties in then game. Davenport, the Saints first-round draft choice, struck Fitzpatricks helmet with his own. BUCSFrom Page B1Titans starting quarterback Marcus Mariota threw two interceptions in the third quarter and then came out of the game with an elbow injury. Tight end Delanie Walker was carted off the field later in the period with a right leg injury, and tackle Taylor Lewan suffered a concussion, all of which meant a miserable start for Mike Vrabel in his head coaching debut.Miami led 7-3 when the game was suspended for nearly two hours late in the first half. The teams went to the locker room during the delay and stayed on the field for halftime, which was shortened to 3 minutes.Lightning forced a halt again midway through the third quarter, and the second stoppage lasted just over two hours. Perhaps 10,000 fans remained at the finish.Sandwiched between the delays was a brawl that started after Lewan appeared to be briefly knocked out. Jordan Phillips and Bobby McCain of Miami and Dion Lewis of Tennessee received offsetting unsportsmanlike conduct penalties for taunt-ing, and Lewan missed the rest of the game.Gabbert drove the Titans 75 yards to make the score 10-10, but Grant needed only 13 seconds to break the tie, splitting the coverage untouched and racing into the clear near midfield. Tannehill, playing for the first time since a knee injury in late 2016, went 20 for 28 for 230 yards with two scores and two interceptions.The Titans had a firstand-goal at the 5 in the first quarter, but were stopped on downs when Mariota threw incomplete on three consecu-tive plays. The Dolphins then drove 98 yards in 12 plays for a touchdown and a 7-3 lead.On the first play after the second weather delay, Miamis Kiko Alonso made an interception to set up a field goal and end Mariotas day.A holding penalty on Walker negated a 62-yard touchdown run by Derrick Henry that would have tied the game in the fourth quarter. FracasLewan was flattened on Andre Branchs blindside block during an interception return by Jones. Lewan sprawled face down on the turf, then suddenly sprang to his feet, and players exchanged words and shoves.Injury reportTitans: Mariota was shaken up early in the third quarter when hit by defensive line-man William Hayes. Mariota missed one play, and then returned to throw two interceptions before again coming out of the lineup. ... Adoree Jackson hurt his shoulder on a 26-yard punt return in the third quarter. ... LB Wesley Woodyard was shaken up and left the game in the third quarter. National AnthemDolphins receivers Stills and Albert Wilson knelt during the national anthem, and defensive end Robert Quinn raised his right fist. They followed the same practice before preseason games. No Titans appeared to protest. DOLPHINSFrom Page B1Tennessee Titans wide receiver Darius Jennings (15) runs ahead of Miami Dolphins defensive back Minkah Fitzpatrick (29) and linebacker Chase Allen (59) for a touchdown on Sunday. [AP PHOTO/BRYNN ANDERSON] I believe hell be here again with the champions trophy. I really do,Ž said Djokovic, who gave his pal a hug at the net, and then went over to console del Potro as he wiped away tears at his sideline seat.Del Potro spoke this week about the low point, in 2015, when he considered quitting the sport. But supported by a dozen or so friends from back home, whose Ole!Ž choruses rang around the arena, he climbed up the rankings to a careerhigh No. 3 by thundering his 100 mph (160 kph) forehands and 135 mph (215 kph) serves.Those produce free points against so many foes. Not against Djokovic, who always seemed to have all the answers.Djokovic was better than del Potro on their many lengthy exchanges, using his trademark body-twisting, limb-splaying court coverage to get to nearly every ball, sneakers squeaking around the blue court in Arthur Ashe Stadium, where the roof was closed because of rain.I was playing almost at the limit, all the time, looking for winners with my forehands, backhands, and I couldnt make it,Ž del Potro said, because Novak (was) there every time.ŽNever was that more appar-ent than the game that stood out on this evening: with Djokovic serving while down 4-3 in the second set. They went back and forth, through eight deuces and all those break opportunities for del Potro, until he slapped one forehand into the net, and another sailed wide. Those were high-risk shots, but, as del Potro put it: Its the only way to beat these kind of players.Ž When it ended, thanks to a three-game closing run by Djokovic, he flung his racket away and landed on his back, arms and legs spread wide.Of course Im sad I (lost),Ž del Potro said. But Im happy for Novak and his team. They deserve to win.Ž US OPENFrom Page B1

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DEAR ABBY: There's this woman I've known since I was a child. She's a Jehovah's Witness I'll call Beatrice. She comes by my house every so often to share pamphlets and talk about her religion. She is a casual friend of my mother's (who I live with), so I feel I have to let her inside when she's at the door. If it were anyone else, I'd say a polite "No, thank you, goodbye," and shut the door. But because it's Beatrice, I'm roped into listening to her spiel. More often than not, Mom's not even home when Beatrice comes over with her pamphlets because they work similar hours. And each time, I nd myself trapped into listening to her jabber away while I politely smile and nod. Not only am I non-religious, but I am a member of the LGBTQ community, and I know for a fact that Beatrice shunned a family member after he came out as gay. I don't want to keep pretending I'm interested in listening to her script, or even talking to her in general, but I also don't want to ruin my mother's friendship with her by offending her by being honest. Is there a polite way to tell Beatrice that, with all due respect, I don't want to hear about her pamphlets, and she should come by to discuss them only when my mom's home? Or must I just continue to smile and nod politely like I always do? -NOT INTERESTED IN NEW ENGLAND DEAR NOT INTERESTED: No rule of etiquette demands that you listen to Beatrice's religious diatribes. All you need to say to her is, "My mother isn't home, and I'm not interested in taking your pamphlets or hearing you preach. Because you're a friend of Mom's, come back when Mom is home, and be sure to call rst." DEAR ABBY: I am really upset about something my best friend did involving a cruise that's planned for next February. Because of nancial setbacks, we can no longer afford the trip. She went ahead and paid for our cruise. I was so upset I called the travel agent and tried to cancel the trip but was informed it was nonrefundable. So now we are locked into a cruise that's still going to cost us $1,500 or more in other expenses while we are on the cruise. I like to pay my own way and have never asked anyone for help or money. She said it was "a gift, not a loan" and I was being ungrateful, so I nally accepted the "gift." Now I'm going to have this hanging over my head. It's putting us in more nancial trouble, so we are trying to get a loan to cover the extra expenses. I don't think I can enjoy the trip now. Am I ungrateful? She's been my best friend for more than 40 years and I don't want this to affect our friendship. What should I do at this point? -EXPENSIVE "GIFT" IN THE WEST DEAR EXPENSIVE "GIFT": Your generous friend acted on impulse, without considering the fact that even with her paying your fare, the cruise would still cost you money. Forgive her for her mistake, take the trip and do your best to enjoy it so you don't ruin the trip for her. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in diculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION BRIDGE CRYPTOQUOTE HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORY DIVERSIONS Daughter tired of indulging moms proselytizing friend license tocruise...Place your auto ad in the and watch it go! Call Classieds Today!352-314-FAST (3278) HAPPY BIRTHDAY FOR MONDAY, SEPT. 10, 2018:This year you open up to many changes. Communication becomes an even bigger priority. You want your message heard. As receptive and creative as you are, you cannot break past everyones barriers. You will learn to accept that some people refuse to open up. If you are single, you will continue to date, but you might not nd someone of signicance until the second half of your birthday year. This person will suddenly walk through the door. If you are attached, the two of you will actively relate all year long, though a greater intimacy exists between you later in the year. LIBRA listens, but also gives you strong feedback.ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19) Your effectiveness and ability to adapt to the unexpected could be tested. Responding to incoming requests could mar your desired efciency elsewhere. Try not to be hard on yourself. A boss could say that a project needs more work. TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20) Your imagination enhances your life. Once more, your creativity comes through for you. You will need to employ enough self-discipline to home in on a practical matter in the afternoon. Switching from one mode to the other can be challenging. GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20) Your playfulness emerges when interacting with others. Be more sensitive to their concerns. Not everyone can jump from one topic to another, especially if the topics represent different spectrums of life. Keep more observations to yourself. CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22)Have an important conversation in the morning rather than postpone it; the results will be better. A matter revolving around your domestic and personal life could come forward. Listening to a different point of view doesnt mean you will embrace it. LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22) You communicate your thoughts well, although you do have to let go of a problem rst. Deal with a matter that could affect how you feel about yourself. You will feel on top of your game. Listen to news with openness. Focus on the bottom line. VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22) Use the morning to look closely at an important issue. Detach and eye the situation as if you were not part of it. Put yourself in the other partys mindset. Work to understand others instead of justifying your views. If you do, solutions will come forward. LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22) You might choose not to share everything right now. In the afternoon, seize the opportunity to move a heartfelt project ahead. Others seem more amenable to your ideas. You could feel closed out by a family member who doesnt seem to care. SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21) Your ability to bypass a problem emerges. You might not feel as good as you would like about the resolution. Honor a fast change that reminds you to recognize that you can control only yourself. Be aware of what is happening around you. SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22DEC. 21) You have the ability to make a big change if you desire. A discussion within your immediate family becomes important. You test your ideas on them. Even if everyone does not agree with you, you are getting powerful feedback. CAPRICORN (DEC. 22JAN. 19) You might want to assume a more dominant role in what is happening. On some level, you could feel left out. You might be taking a bosss attitude too personally. Could this person be having a bad day? Stay on top of what you must do. AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18) An opportunity that you have wanted for a while in dealing with a partner opens up; seize it. You might be pushed too far, and could react negatively to someone you often conde in. Getting past this phase will have to come from you. PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20) Deal with a loved one who might be enormously challenging. It will be worthwhile to pursue a different approach. This person seems to emote feelings everywhere. You cannot help but respond, so get to the root of this emotional display. DailyCommercial.com | Monday, September 10, 2018 B7TODAY IS MONDAY, SEPT. 10, the 253rd day of 2018. There are 112 days left in the year. TODAY'S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY: On Sept. 10, 1963, 20 black students entered Alabama public schools following a stando between federal authorities and Gov. George C. Wallace. ON THIS DATE: In 1935, Sen. Huey P. Long died in Baton Rouge two days after being shot in the Louisiana state Capitol, allegedly by Dr. Carl Weiss. In 1960, Hurricane Donna, a dangerous Category 4 storm eventually blamed for 364 deaths, struck the Florida Keys. In 1962 the U.S. Supreme Court ordered the University of Mississippi to admit James Meredith, a black student. In 1979, four Puerto Rican nationalists imprisoned for a 1954 attack on the U.S. House of Representatives and a 1950 attempt on the life of President Harry S. Truman were freed from prison after being granted clemency by President Jimmy Carter. In 1987, Pope John Paul II arrived in Miami, where he was welcomed by President Ronald Reagan and rst lady Nancy Reagan as he began a 10-day tour of the United States. In 1991, the Senate Judiciary Committee opened hearings on the nomination of Clarence Thomas to the U.S. Supreme Court.

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CLASSIC PEANUTS HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH COMICS B8 Monday, September 10, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com

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A c e s T o w i n g 1 3 9 0 W N o r t h B l v d L e e s b u r g F L 3 4 7 4 8 ( 3 5 2 ) 7 8 7 8 0 0 0 Sale Date: 09/22/2018 2001 HONDA ACCORD (Black) VIN 1HGCG56451A053208 Pursuant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida Statutes. Aces Towing Inc. reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids. Ad No: 10080409 Se p tember 10 2018 I N T H E C O U N T Y C O U R T O F T H E 5 T H J U D I C I A L C I R C U I T I N A N D F O R L A K E C O U N T Y F L O R I D A C A S E : 2 0 1 8 C C 1 2 8 9 GRAND ISLAND RESERVE HOMEOWNERS ASSO CIATION, INC., a not-forprofit Florida corpora tion, Plaintiff, vs. PAUL VINCENT GARDINAL; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF PAUL VINCENT GARDINAL; AND UN KNOWN TENANT(S), Defendants. N O T I C E O F S A L E NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursu ant to the Final Judgment entered in this cause, in the County Court of Lake County, Florida, Neil Kelly, Clerk of Court, will sell all the property sit uated in Lake County, Florida described as: Lot 17, of GRAND ISLAND RESERVE, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 60, Pages 26 through 31, inclu sive, of the Public Records of Lake County, Florida, and any subse quent amendments to the aforesaid. A/K/A 2520 Plumadore Drive, Grand Island, FL 32725 at pub lic sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the Lake County Judicial Center, in the first floor lobby, 550 West Main Street, Ta vares, Florida at 11:00 A.M. on S e p t e m b e r 1 9 2 0 1 8 IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUC TION, THERE MAY BE ADDIT IONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFT ER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AF TER THE SALE, Y OU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFT ER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED T O ANY REMAINING FUNDS. GARY J. COONEY, CLERK OF COURT AND COMPTROLLER DATED: AUGUST 20, DATED: AUGUST 20, 2018 GARY J. COONEY, CLERK OF COUR T AND COMP TROL LER LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA CLERK OF COURT By: /s/ Trish Roberts As Deputy Clerk T h i s i n s t r u m e n t p r e p a r e d b y : MANKIN LAW GROUP 2535 Landmark Drive, Suite 212 Clearwater, FL 33761 (727) 725-0559 Ad No: 10079833 September 03, 2018 & Se p tember 10 2018 N o t i c e o f S a l e F r u i t l a n d P a r k M i n i S t o r a g e L L C 2394 U.S. Highway 27 / 441 Fruitland Park, Florida 34731 (352)787-9777 As required by Florida "Self Storage Act", Sec tion 83.806 and 83.807, no tice is hereby given that onO c t o b e r 3 r d 2 0 1 8 a t 1 0 A M there will be a pub lic sale at the above address to dis pose of house hold goods and miscel lane ous items. The tenants below have been given proper no tice at lest four teen days prior to the first publi cation of this Notice of Sale, that the Owner will en force a statutory lien on the prop erty located in their re spec tive unit(s) of the above men tioned self storage fa cility. 4 0 0 6 M a r i a P i z a n a Ad No: 10080329 September 10, 2018 & September 17, 2018 R E Q U E S T F O R I N F O R M A T I O N T he City of Clermont is seeking independent contractors to provide various recreational or in structional pro grams to participants at the Arts & Recreation Center (RFI 1801-001). All re sponses must be received prior to the F i r s t T u e s d a y o f t h e m o n t h u n t i l D e c e m b e r 3 1 2 0 1 8 a t 2 : 0 0 P M Information about the RFI may be ob tained from the City's website at http://www.clermontfl.gov/ or through BidSync at https://www.bidsync.com/. Ad No: 10072378 J anuary 16, 2018 & February 12, 2018 & March 14, 2018 & April 09, 2018 & May 18, 2018 & J une 12, 2018 & J uly 10, 2018 & August 14, 2018 & September 10, 2018 & October 19, 2018 & November 12, 2018 & December 10 2018 C E M E T E R Y P L O T S ( 2 ) G a r d e n o f R e s u r r e c t i o n a t L a k e s i d e M e m o r i a l G a r d e n s c o m e s w / c o n c r e t e v a u l t s $ 4 0 0 0 C a l l ( 8 2 8 ) 8 0 3 5 6 0 0 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHER'S NOTICEFederal and State laws prohibit advertising expressing a discriminatory preference on the basis of race, age, sex, color, national origin, religion, handicap or marital status. The Daily Commercial will not knowingly accept advertisement for employment which is in violation of the law. Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance Employment Classifications are intended to announce bona de employment offers only. Employment advertising must disclose the specic nature of the work being offered. Some employment categories may charge fees. If any advertiser does not comply with these standards, please notify a Classied Sales Representative at 365-8245 or 365-8200. $ $ I f $ 2 0 0 $ 2 5 0 w i l l h e l p y o u ? $ $ W o r k 2 0 3 0 h r s p e r w e e k S a l e s e x p e r i e n c e a m u s t H o u r l y p l u s C o m m i s s i o n G o o d f o r R e t i r e e s a n d C o l l e g e S t u d e n t s C a l l E d 3 5 2 2 1 7 9 9 3 7 * * * * * * * * * * * * $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ E X P E R I E N C E D D O O R T O D O O R E A S Y S A L E $ 5 0 0 $ 8 0 0 p e r w e e k p o s s i b l e S T A R T I M M E D I A T E L Y C a l l E d 3 5 2 2 1 7 9 9 3 7 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ H O T E L H O U S E K E E P I N G P O S I T I O N S a v a i l a b l e a t M i c r o t e l I n n & S u i t e s L a d y L a k e A p p l y a t H o t e l H O U S E K E E P I N G F U L L T I M E Must have transportation and valid driver's lic. Vacation rental home cleaning and move out cleans. D o w n H o m e P r o p e r t i e s A p p l y i n p e r s o n 1 0 8 8 7 N U S H w y 3 0 1 S t e 4 O x f o r d F L o r C a l l 3 5 2 7 5 3 0 9 7 6 M A I N T E N A N C E T E C H N I C I A N Flynn Management has a great FT op portunity for a Maintenance Person at our Sunny Hill and Woodcliff sister properties located in Clermont. 32 hrs. wk. Responsible for basic maint. such as paint ing, basic appl. repair, basic plumb ing, etc. A p p l y i n p e r s o n a t : 7 6 0 P i t t S t C l e r m o n t o r c a l l 3 5 2 3 9 4 6 7 1 9 o r s e n d r e s u m e t o : j o b s @ f l y n n m a n a g e m e n t c o m M A I N T E N A N C E T E C H N I C I A N Flynn Management has a great PT op portunity for a Maintenance Person at our Lakewood property located in Lees burg 15 hrs. per week. Responsible for basic maintenance such as painting, basic appliance repair, basic plumb ing, etc. A p p l y i n p e r s o n a t 2 3 4 5 S o u t h S t L e e s b u r g o r c a l l 3 5 2 3 6 5 6 9 9 6 o r s e n d r e s u m e t o : j o b s @ f l y n n m a n a g e m e n t c o m M A I N T E N A N C E / G R O U N D S K E E P E R F T G e n e r a l p u r p o s e h o t e l m a i n t e n a n c e H O T E L H O U S E K E E P I N G P O S I T I O N M u s t b e a b l e t o w o r k w k n d s & h o l i d a y s 3 0 4 0 h r s A p p l y a t Q u a l i t y I n n & S u i t e s 1 6 6 3 0 U S H w y 4 4 1 M t D o r a F L P E T G R O O M E R P T (In The Vil lages) Make your own schedule, must have own equip./supplies. Email resume to greatopp@y ahoo.com R E P A I R T E C H N I C I A N E X P D FT, for Shingle, metal, TPO roof ing. Pays weekly, Must have valid driv ers lic. DFWP. C a l l 3 5 2 3 1 4 3 6 2 5 S C H O O L B U S D R I V E R S N E E D E D I m m e d i a t e p o s i t i o n s a v a i l a b l e T r a i n i n g p r o v i d e d L a k e C o u n t y S c h o o l s T r a n s p o r t a t i o n 3 5 2 7 2 8 2 5 6 1 o r A p p l y o n l i n e : w w w l a k e k 1 2 f l u s T H E D A I L Y C O M M E R C I A L L A K E C O U N T Y S L E A D I N G N E W S P A P E R H A S R E C E N T L Y E X P A N D E D O P E R A T I O N S A N D H A S I M M E D I A T E O P E N I N G S A V A I L A B L E F O R N E W S P A P E R C A R R I E R S / I N D E P E N D E N T C O N T R A C T O R S This is a great opportunity to be your own boss and earn $800 to $1,800+ per month. Candidates must be reliable, have a valid driv er's license, proof of auto insur ance, and de pendable transporta tion. We have routes currently available in the fol lowing towns: C L E R M O N T M I N N E O L A A N D G R O V E L A N D E m a i l u s a t : c a r r i e r s @ d a i l y c o m m e r c i a l c o m w i t h y o u r N a m e P h o n e N u m b e r a n d t h e c i t y y o u l i v e i n O r c a l l 3 5 2 3 6 5 8 2 6 5 D A I L Y C O M M E R C I A L C I R C U L A T I O N D E P A R T M E N T I N L E E S B U R G I S N O W H I R I N G F O R A P A R T T I M E C U S T O M E R S E R V I C E R E P R E S E N T A T I V E Can didate should have a good understanding of com puters and good com mu nica tion skills. Must be willing to work week ends and holi days. Must be willing to sub mit to a background check and drug test. P l e a s e s e n d r e s u m e t o : J e s s i c a h e r n a n d e z @ d a i l y c o m m e r c i a l c o m N O B L E S G O L F C A R T S is seek ing reliable Golf Cart Mechanic. We will train. Duties will include ser vices & repair of golf carts, both in the shop and on the road. Must have a great atti tude, work ethic and be willing to learn. Candidate must be physi cally fit, able to lift 100lbs and have Drivers. License with a clean record. A p p l y i n p e r s o n 1 4 1 6 N o r t h B l v d E L e e s b u r g F L 3 4 7 4 8 R O O F I N G C R E W E x p d i n M E T A L a n d T P O D F W P C a l l 3 2 5 3 1 4 3 6 2 5 * P R I C E S R E D U C E D * T A V A R E S / D O R A C A N A L F U R N H O M E S F O R R E N T / L E A S E O P T I O N O R S A L E N O D O G S F r o m $ 5 9 9 / m o o r $ 5 2 9 9 C a l l 3 5 2 3 4 3 7 7 8 0 r i v e r e s t w a t e r f r o n t r e s o r t c o m F R U I T L A N D P A R K T W I N P A L M S M A R I N A 1 & 2 br. Mobiles newly renovated fully fur nished. All utilities in cluded. Weekly & Monthly rates. No Deposit Small dogs allowed. Old Florida Fish Camp with Convenience Store on prop erty. Pon toon/Boat Slip rentals. C a l l 3 5 2 7 8 7 4 5 1 4 T A V A R E S / D O R A C A N A L F U R N I S H E D R E N T A L S 5 5 + R E S O R T N O D O G S C a l l 3 5 2 3 4 3 7 7 8 0 * P R I C E S R E D U C E D * T A V A R E S / D O R A C A N A L F U R N H O M E S F O R R E N T / L E A S E O P T I O N O R S A L E N O D O G S F r o m $ 5 9 9 / m o o r $ 5 2 9 9 C a l l 3 5 2 3 4 3 7 7 8 0 r i v e r e s t w a t e r f r o n t r e s o r t c o m M O B I L E H O M E S F O R S A L E W / O W N E R F I N A N C E C L E R M O N T H W Y 5 0 ( B e f o r e G r o v e l a n d ) 2br/1ba from $500 down $400/mo A l s o A v a i l H a n d y m a n S p e c i a l s 1 & 2br from ---$350/mo. & up * * * * * * * * * * * * L E E S B U R G L A K E G R I F F I N M H P 5 5 + N E W 2 / 2 f o r r e n t $ 7 5 0 / m o I n c l u d e s l a k e a c c e s s * * * * * * * * * * * * 4 0 7 5 4 7 9 3 9 4 o r 4 0 7 2 4 6 4 5 5 0 F o r o t h e r r e n t a l s 3 5 2 8 7 4 7 3 7 5 M O B I L E H O M E S F O R S A L E W / O W N E R F I N A N C E C L E R M O N T H W Y 5 0 ( B e f o r e G r o v e l a n d ) 2br/1ba from $500 down $400/mo A l s o A v a i l H a n d y m a n S p e c i a l s 1 & 2br from ---$350/mo. & up * * * * * * * * * * * * L E E S B U R G L A K E G R I F F I N M H P 5 5 + N E W 2 / 2 f o r r e n t $ 7 5 0 / m o I n c l u d e s l a k e a c c e s s * * * * * * * * * * * * 4 0 7 5 4 7 9 3 9 4 o r 4 0 7 2 4 6 4 5 5 0 F o r o t h e r r e n t a l s 3 5 2 8 7 4 7 3 7 5 MT. DORA, 3/2 convenient loca tion, avail now $ 1150. 352-357-9305 W I L D W O O D B r a n d n e w 2 / 2 $ 1 0 9 9 P e t s o k P a r k w o o d C o m m u n i t i e s C a l l 3 5 2 7 4 8 6 1 3 3 * P R I C E S R E D U C E D * T A V A R E S / D O R A C A N A L F U R N H O M E S F O R R E N T / L E A S E O P T I O N O R S A L E N O D O G S F r o m $ 5 9 9 / m o o r $ 5 2 9 9 C a l l 3 5 2 3 4 3 7 7 8 0 r i v e r e s t w a t e r f r o n t r e s o r t c o m M O B I L E H O M E S F O R S A L E W / O W N E R F I N A N C E C L E R M O N T H W Y 5 0 ( B e f o r e G r o v e l a n d ) 2br/1ba from $500 down $400/mo A l s o A v a i l H a n d y m a n S p e c i a l s 1 & 2br from ---$350/mo. & up * * * * * * * * * * * * L E E S B U R G L A K E G R I F F I N M H P 5 5 + N E W 2 / 2 f o r r e n t $ 7 5 0 / m o I n c l u d e s l a k e a c c e s s * * * * * * * * * * * * 4 0 7 5 4 7 9 3 9 4 o r 4 0 7 2 4 6 4 5 5 0 F o r o t h e r r e n t a l s 3 5 2 8 7 4 7 3 7 5 M T D O R A R V S P O T S A V A I L W A T E R / S E W E R / T R A S H / E L E C T R I C I N C L U D E D Located in Beautiful Mt. Dora, FL, this 55+ re tirement mobile home com munity features on-site laundry facili ties and management for your com fort, and a spacious clubhouse and nice shuffleboard courts for your en tertain ment. Always pet friendly, Southernaire is also only 1 1/2 miles from downtown Mt. Dora which fea tures antique markets and regularly sched uled festivals. You have a lot of living to do, and we want to help you get started! $ 4 0 3 / m o C a l l t o d a y t o f i n d o u t h o w 3 5 2 4 0 8 9 4 6 5 T A V A R E S / D O R A C A N A L F U R N I S H E D R E N T A L S 5 5 + R E S O R T N O D O G S C a l l 3 5 2 3 4 3 7 7 8 0 T A V A R E S / D O R A C A N A L F U R N I S H E D R E N T A L S 5 5 + R E S O R T N O D O G S C a l l 3 5 2 3 4 3 7 7 8 0 MT. DORA, 3/2 convenient loca tion, avail now $ 1150. 352-357-9305 * * O P E N H O U S E * * 1 0 a m 3 p m N e w H o m e s U s e d H o m e s W e h a v e a H o m e f o r e v e r y o n e P A R K W O O D C O M M U N I T I E S 4 1 4 S p r i n g L a k e R d W i l d w o o d F l 3 4 7 8 5 C a l l ( 3 5 2 ) 7 4 8 6 1 3 3 * P R I C E S R E D U C E D * T A V A R E S / D O R A C A N A L F U R N H O M E S F O R R E N T / L E A S E O P T I O N O R S A L E N O D O G S F r o m $ 5 9 9 / m o o r $ 5 2 9 9 C a l l 3 5 2 3 4 3 7 7 8 0 r i v e r e s t w a t e r f r o n t r e s o r t c o m M O B I L E H O M E S F O R S A L E W / O W N E R F I N A N C E C L E R M O N T H W Y 5 0 ( B e f o r e G r o v e l a n d ) 2br/1ba from $500 down $400/mo A l s o A v a i l H a n d y m a n S p e c i a l s 1 & 2br from ---$350/mo. & up * * * * * * * * * * * * L E E S B U R G L A K E G R I F F I N M H P 5 5 + N E W 2 / 2 f o r r e n t $ 7 5 0 / m o I n c l u d e s l a k e a c c e s s * * * * * * * * * * * * 4 0 7 5 4 7 9 3 9 4 o r 4 0 7 2 4 6 4 5 5 0 F o r o t h e r r e n t a l s 3 5 2 8 7 4 7 3 7 5 L O T S F O R S A L E 2 & 3 a c r e l o t s f o r s a l e L a r g e M a j e s t i c O a k s s p l i t r a i l f e n c i n g O n l y m i n u t e s f r o m T h e V i l l a g e s C o m m u n i t y O w n e r / B r o k e r 3 5 2 5 1 6 1 2 7 7 * P R I C E S R E D U C E D * T A V A R E S / D O R A C A N A L F U R N H O M E S F O R R E N T / L E A S E O P T I O N O R S A L E N O D O G S F r o m $ 5 9 9 / m o o r $ 5 2 9 9 C a l l 3 5 2 3 4 3 7 7 8 0 r i v e r e s t w a t e r f r o n t r e s o r t c o m M O B I L E H O M E S F O R S A L E W / O W N E R F I N A N C E C L E R M O N T H W Y 5 0 ( B e f o r e G r o v e l a n d ) 2br/1ba from $500 down $400/mo A l s o A v a i l H a n d y m a n S p e c i a l s 1 & 2br from ---$350/mo. & up * * * * * * * * * * * * L E E S B U R G L A K E G R I F F I N M H P 5 5 + N E W 2 / 2 f o r r e n t $ 7 5 0 / m o I n c l u d e s l a k e a c c e s s * * * * * * * * * * * * 4 0 7 5 4 7 9 3 9 4 o r 4 0 7 2 4 6 4 5 5 0 F o r o t h e r r e n t a l s 3 5 2 8 7 4 7 3 7 5 C O F F E E T A B L E ,M a r b l e e x c e l c o n d $ 1 0 0 o b o C a l l ( 3 5 2 ) 4 0 6 4 5 2 1 DailyCommercial.com | Monday, September 10, 2018 B9 This newspaper will never knowingly accept advertisement that is illegal or considered fraudulent. If you have questions or doubts about any ads on these pages, we advise that before responding or sending money ahead of time, you check with the local Attorney Generals Consumer Fraud Line and/or the Better Business Bureau. Also be advised that some phone numbers published in these ads may require an extra charge. In all cases of questionable value, such as promises or guaranteed income from work-athome programs, money to loan, etc., if it sounds too good to be true it may in fact be exactly that. This newspaper cannot be held responsible for any negative consequences that occur as a result of you doing business with these advertisers. Thank you. NOTICES 1000-1999READER NOTICE 1001 091018_tdc_b09.crop.pdf 1 09-Sep-18 04:49:50

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6865PETSThe Florida Statute 828.29 states that no dog, puppy, cat or kitten may be offered for sale without a health certi cate, nor can any puppy or kitten be sold under the age of 8 weeks, nor can you advertise puppies or kittens with a deposit to hold. B10 Monday, September 10, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com Subscribe today! 352-787-0600 (Lake) 877-702-0600 (Sumter)The Daily CommercialYour local newspaper

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DailyCommercial.com | Monday, September 10, 2018 B11 CROSSWORD PUZZLE KEEP UP WITH THE LATEST SPORTS NEWS EVERY THURSDAY SPORTS FANATIC? WWW.DAILYCOMMERCIAL.COM

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B12 Monday, September 10, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com Florida Air & Heat Inc. Your Comfort Company100% Financing Available Licensed Insured BondedServing Our Area Since 1986 State License # CAC1814030CALL 352-326-3202For ALL Your Heating & Cooling Needs A/C Services 352-408-7722 ASK FOR KEITH CARPORTS, SCREEN ROOMS POOL CAGES, PATIO STRUCTURES FOR HOME OWNERS QUESTIONS, WE HAVE ANSWERS! Aluminum Services John Philibert, IncWe do Everything from Ceilings to Floors. Pantries, Cabinets and more.Your pesky leaks gone and houses well paint. From inside and out, well make it great. Lic/Ins. Accepting Visa & MC. JPHandy.com (352) 308-0694 LAMINATE, WOOD & TILE SALE!Great Prices Exceptional Service!20 Years ExperienceSHOWROOM11433 US Hwy 441, Tavares Call Chris352-636-1643 D2452SD Garage Door Services €PressureWashing€Painting €Flooring€Carpet€CleanOuts €CleanUps€Hauling€Licensed352-787-7056 Handyman Services John Philibert, IncFor All Your Flooring Needs Pergo, Ceramic Tile, Travertine, Vinyl & MoreCall John @ (352) 308-0694 Flooring Services CCC1330633D2453SD BILL ROGERS IRRIGATION SERVICE35 YEARS EXPERIENCELIC NO. 22190/INS/BONDEDOWNER OPERATOR352-446-1059 Irrigation Services Home Improvement iMan 4-U O C D I AŽR CJOSEPH MAGRUM352-636-2599TAX ID, INSURED rufus_62@yahoo.com We Also Offer (352) 308-0694 John Philibert, IncFor A ll Y our I nterior /Ex terior Painting N eeds FREE ESTIMATES!30 Years of Quality Experiencewww.BestPaintRem.com352-210-3964Lic/Ins15% OFFSenior Discount Painting Services Pressure Cleaning 352-396-9447 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed COUPON REQUIRED$15 OFF QUALITY WORK AT A FAIR PRICE A A A A A A O T T Y Y Y T T T T N N U U U U O U U U O U U U C O O C L L C C C A A U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y T T T T T T T T T T T N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A U U C C O O A A A L L A A N N O O O O C C O C C O O Y Y A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N T T T T T T T T T T T T T T Y Y Y Y Y T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T Y Y Y Y T T T T T T TY Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y T T T T T T Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y T T T T T T Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y P P P P P P P P P P P P P P S S U S S G G G G N H H H S S S S S S S S W W W A A A A W W W W E E E E E E W W W E R R R U S S S U U S S S S S S S S S R R R S R R R P P P P P U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S R R R R R R R R R R R R R G G G G G N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E I I I I I I I I I I I I I H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H A A A A A A A A A A A A A W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P G G G G G G U U U U S S S S S S S S E E E E A A A A S S S S S E E S S S S S A A A A P P P P P W W W W W W W W R R R R R R R R R R N N N S S S S S S S S S S S S H S S S P P P P S S G P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W A A A A A A A A W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W A A A A A W A A A A A A A A A A A A A A S W A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S A A A A A A A S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G Comfort Seal Roof Systems, Inc.TM352-242-5055 MEET THE CONTRACTOR NOT A SALESMANŽ! BETTER THAN ANY METAL OR SHINGLE ROOF! NOT ONE ROOF LOST TO ANY STORM! NO PAY UNTIL JOB IS DONE! SPECIAL DISCOUNT FOR FELLOW VETERANS!St. Lic. # CCC1325522 Our 32nd Year Over 12,000 Roofs For Mobile/Manufactured Homes BEST ROOF BEST PRICES GUARANTEED! LIC#CCC042879 #CCC1330633D2472SD Roo“ng Services Re-roofs/RepairsShingles/Metal/FlatLic. #CCC1329936Covenant Roo“ng and Construction, Inc.#1 IN ROOFINGFREE ROOF ESTIMATES352-314-3625 J.C.C.Bobcat&TreeSvc.Inc.LandClearing /Ex cavating FillDirt / Clay Hauling / DebrisRemoval StumpGrinding Demolition / Grading / Driveways OwnerOperator352-455-7608D2434SD Land Clearing Services Landscaping Services LandscapingTrimming,Mulching, Sod,TreeTrimming,Pavers&MuchMore! ArmandoSantamario352-587-1323D2415SD COMMERCIAL-RESIDENTIAL €AssortedRock&Stone €PaverInstallation/Repair €PalmandTreeInstallation €DecorativeWalls €RetainingWalls €CurbingandMulching €SoddingandIrrigation €SeasonedFirewood €FullLandscapingNeedsFULLGARDENCENTERFreeEstimates,SeniorDiscounts2402SouthSt.,Leesburg352-516-6936TEDBYRNE OwnerLic/InsD2420SD A-1 UNITED SERVICES 352-460-3763CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATESOne Call Does It AllŽLICENSEDINSUREDINT. / EXT. PAINTINGHOME REMODELSALL PHASES OF PRESSURE CLEANINGAND MUCH MORE! A-1 UNITED SERVICES 352-460-3763CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATESOne Call Does It AllŽLICENSEDINSURED Tree Services BAD TREE CALL ME!27 YEARS EXPERIENCE NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL! FREE ESTIMATES TONY THE TREE TRIMMER 2402SouthSt.,Leesburg352-516-6936Senior Discounts TreeRemoval,Trimming,CanopyReduction, CraneService,StumpGrinding, SeasonedFirewood-COMPLETEGARDENCENTERD2460SD D 2088S D D2471SD J.C. C.Bobcat & Tre e Svc. Inc.Residential / Commercial Tr imming / Removal Pa lms / Hedges / Stump Grinding Debris removal / Hauling Fi ll Dirt / Clay / Grading / Driveways Lic /I ns€ I nsuranceWork € 24Hrs .35 2-45 5-7608 D2463SD Upholstery Services D2470SD Window Services GEORGE WATKINS 352-587-2735Window ReplacementLanai Enclosures Acrylic WindowsCRC# 1330701 BLIND REPAIRSNo Cost...If We Cant Fix It!352-217-7556exceptionsblinds.comTo have your Professional Service listed here, please contact the Classi“ed Department at (352) 314-3278. 352-396-6238DAMIAN BROOKSDamianbrooks80@yahoo.com You've Tried The Rest...Now Go With The Best! RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIALPERFECT CLEANING Cleaning Services CONCRETE 352.602.8077 Concrete For Less8x10 Slab $800 10x48 Slab $2600No UPFRONT Costs!Blocking/ Ref./Lic./Ins.Lic #113336Phillip 352-504-8372Includes Concrete & Labor D2424SD AllConcreteServices CrackRepair€FreeEstimatesServingLakeCounty30YearsBonded,Insured,Lic#11066CallBobat352.223.7935 Concrete Services CCC1330633D2453SD Construction Services Door & Lock Services D2451SD BRIAN DEGAGLIA CONSTRUCTION SERVICESIncludes: Forming, Pouring, Stripping, Cutting, & Materials. Does Not include stripping of sod or roots, removing of concrete, pumping or hauling of debris. 352-267-5723 CRC 1326327 Only Mobile/ Manufactured Home ROOFINGwww.AllFloridaRoofs.com All Florida Weatherproong & Construction, Inc.FREE VIDEO ROOF INSPECTIONS1-877.572.1019 GREEN ACRES MOWINGWe mow or bushhog acreage of any amount in all of Central & South Lake County REASONABLE PRICES!352-360-5445 352-348-3355 Commercial Cleaning Residential Cleaning Buf“ng/ Stripping Floors Advance coatings.incRepaint specialist~interior-exterior ~cabinet resurfacing ~pool decks/stains ~drivewaysMark Mccormickphone 352 255 0145licensed & insured RE-TILESpecializing in Total Bath & Kitchen Remodeling Serving Central Florida for over 30 years 352-391-5553 Bath & Kitchen Services Tile Service RE-TILESpecializing in Total Bath & Kitchen Remodeling Serving Central Florida for over 30 years 352-391-5553 Construction Services