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Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Leesburg, FL
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Halifax Media Group, Steve Skaggs - Publisher, Tom McNiff - Executive Editor
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United States -- Florida -- Lake -- Leesburg
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28.81134 x -81.872708

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LOCAL & STATE | A3LEESBURG HAS LONG HAD A NEED FOR HOTEL ROOMS SPORTS | B1CHASE ELLIOTT HANGS ON FOR FIRST NASCAR CUP VICTORY LOCAL & STATE | A3LAKE COUNTY SHELTER WILL TACKLE FERAL CATPROBLEM @dailycommercial Facebook.com/daily.commercial YOUR LOCAL SOURCE FOR LAKE & SUMTER COUNTIES Monday, August 6, 2018 75 ¢ Local and State .............A3 Opinion .......................A9 Weather ......................A10 Sports...........................B1 Diversions .....................B5 Classified .....................B7 VOLUME 142, ISSUE 218 2018 GateHouse Media Home delivery: 352-787-0600 By John KennedyGateHouse Capital BureauTALLAHASSEE „ President Donald Trumps endorsement of Republican Ron DeSantis for Florida governor included not only a massive rally in Tampa last week „ it also brought a fresh torrent of cash to the campaign from top GOP donors nationwide.Trumps early morning tweet June 22 „ saying that DeSantis will be a Great Governor & has my full EndorsementŽ „ swiftly lead to $500,000 in contributions from the GOPs single biggest spenders, Las Vegas casino magnate Sheldon Adelson and his wife, Miriam.Another $500,000 also arrived last month from Laura Perlmutter, a Trump inaugu-ration committee member, whose husband, Ike, is chair of Marvel Entertainment.Other big GOP contribu-tors also are getting on board with Trumps formal backing of the Palm Coast congressman over Republican rival Adam Putnam in the Aug. 28 primary, turning the usual in-state focus of the governors contest into a national affair.Even former Gov. Jeb Bush, the son of one president and the brother of another, relied chiefly on Florida financing DeSantis cashes inRon DeSantis, Republican candidate for Florida governor, speaks at a rally with President Donald Trump in Tampa on Tuesday. Trumps support has brought in waves of campaign cash for DeSantis from national donors. [DAN WAGNER/GATEHOUSE MEDIA] Trumps backing brings national funding forGOP hopefulBy Jonathan LemireThe Associated PressBRIDGEWATER, N.J. „ President Donald Trump on Sunday acknowledged that the 2016 Trump Tower meeting between a Kremlin-connected lawyer and his son was to collect information about his political opponent, casting new light on a moment central to the special coun-sels Russia probe.Trump, amid a series of searing tweets sent from his New Jersey golf club, tore into two of his favorite targets, the news media and Robert Muellers ongoing investigation into possible links between the presidents campaign and Russia. Trump unleashed particularly fury at reports that he was anx-ious about the Trump Tower meeting attended by Donald Trump Jr. and other senior campaign officials.Fake News reporting, a complete fabrication, that I am concerned about the meeting my wonderful son, Donald, had in Trump Tower,Ž Trump wrote. This was a meeting to get information on an opponent, totally legal and done all the time in politics „ and it went nowhere. I did not know about it!ŽBut 13 months ago, Trump gave a far different explanation for the meeting. A July 2017 statement dictated by the president read: We primarily discussed a program about the adoption of Russian children that was active and popular with American families years ago.ŽBut since then, the story about the meeting has changed several times, eventually forced by the dis-covery of emails between the Trump concedes purpose of 16 meetingPresident on Twitter acknowledges meeting between son, Russian lawyer was to get information on an opponent See TRUMP, A8 See DESANTIS, A8By Jim VertunoThe Associated PressAUSTIN, Texas „ Texas schools have been adding metal detectors and armed personnel in an effort to improve campus security in response to the deadly May attack at a Houston-area high school that left eight students and two teachers dead.Texas Republicans squelch red ag gun law prospectsIn this May 18 photo, law enforcement of“ cers respond to Santa Fe High School after an active shooter was reported on campus in Santa Fe, Texas. [STEVE GONZALES/HOUSTON CHRONICLE VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO] By Ricardo Alonso-ZaldivarThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ President Donald Trump says insurers are going wildŽ about his new health care options and millions and millionsŽ of people will be signing up.But insurance companies say it will take time to design new plans and get approval from state regulators, and two major industry groups have actually expressed concern about potential downsides for consumers.For people who need an individual policy and are anticipating cheaper plans this fall, the advice seems to be: Look carefully and read the fine print.Short-term, limited-dura-tion insurance„ just approved „ and association health plans represent the Trump Slow rollout, more ne print with Trump health care options See GUNS, A6 See HEALTH, A6

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A2 Monday, August 6, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com NATION & WORLDPUBLISHER Steve Skaggs: steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.com ...................352-365-8213 EXECUTIVE EDITOR Tom McNiff: tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com .........................352-365-8250 DIGITAL EDITOR, LIFESTYLES EDITOR Whitney Lehnecker: whitney.lehnecker@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8258 SPORTS EDITOR Paul Jenkins: paul.jenkins@dailycommercial.com ......................352-365-8204 SPORTS WRITER Frank Jolley: frank.jolley@dailycommet.com ..............................352-365-8268 REPORTER Frank Stan“ eld: frank.stand“ eld@dailycommercial.com............352-365-8257 REPORTER Roxanne Brown: roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com ............352-365-8266 YOUR LOCAL NEWS SOURCE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIESPrint delivery available within the newspaper distribution area only. By submitting your address and/or email, you understand that you may receive promotional offers from Gatehouse Media and its related companies. You may unsubscribe from receiving any such offers a t any time by calling 352-787-0600. The advertised price does not include the charges for any premium editions. Premium editions are publis hed to provide additional information and value to our readers. You agree that you will be charged up to an additional $5.00 for each premium edition published and delivered to you during your subscription period, in addition to the cost of your subscription. The length of your subscrip tion will be shortened by the publication of premium editions if those premium editions are delivered to you during your subscription. You may elect t o be billed separately for premium editions by contacting Customer Service at 1-352-787-0600. Thus, unless you elect to be billed separately up to an additional $3.00 for each premium edition, you agree that the length of your subscription will be shortened in proportion to the value of the nu mber of premium editions published and delivered to you during your subscription period. As an illustrative example, if you select a subscripti on of up to 12 weeks at a cost of $48.00, and two premium editions at $2.00 each are published and delivered to you during that subscription period, your subscription will be shortened by 1 week because the weekly cost of the subscription is $4.00 per week and the premium edition charges total $4.00. Depending upon the length of your subscription and the timing of the publication and delivery of premium editions, you will not be charge d for any premium editions if none are published and delivered to you during your subscription. As such, in that case only, the length of your su bscription will not be shortened. The timing of the publication and delivery of premium editions is variable. There will be no more than 15 premium ed itions published each calendar year. Visit Dailycommercial.com for examples of premium editions. For more info or to cancel your subscription, please call 352-787-0600.The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $178.47 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by GateHouse Media at 21 2 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to the Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edit ion is property of the Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER?: Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call from 7 a. m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and from 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. If youre going on vacation, call circulation 48 hours ahead to stop service. ANNOUNCEMENTS, CALENDAR, GAME RESULTS: Email upcoming events, along with news about awards and personal or professional milestones „ with a photo, if you desire „ to news@dailycommercial.com. Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268 or 352-365-8204. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY: The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the n ews department at 352-365-8250. Retail Advertising .........................................................352-314-3278 Classi“ ed Advertising ...................................................352-314-3278 Lake Circulation............................................................352-787-0600 Sumter Circulation .......................................................877-702-0600 Billing ...........................................................................352-787-0600 Accounting ...................................................................352-365-8212 SUBSCRIPTION RATES Home delivery (Daily/Sunday) 3 months: 41.70 ....................Tax: 2.92 ..........................Total: 44.62 6 months: 88.40 ....................Tax: 5.84 ..........................Total: 89.24 1 year: 166.80 .......................Tax: 11.68 ........................Total: 178.47 FOR HOME DELIVERY: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., the Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. LOTTERY Saturday, Aug. 4 Lotto: 7-16-31-35-37-53 x5 Powerball: 3-11-38-44-58-2 x4 Fantasy 5: 8-9-22-32-35 Sunday, Aug. 5 Pick 5 Afternoon: 1-2-2-7-0 Pick 4 Afternoon: 0-3-8-9 Pick 3 Afternoon: 6-7-9 Pick 2 Afternoon: 3-1 Note: The evening draw times for daily pick games has been pushed back. Results can be found at www.” lottery.comBy Ros Idin and Ali KotarumalosThe Associated PressMATARAM, Indonesia „ A powerful earthquake struck the Indonesian tourist island of Lombok on Sunday, killing at least 82 people and shaking neighboring Bali, one week after another quake on Lombok killed more than a dozen.The latest quake, which triggered a brief tsunami warning, damaged buildings as far away as Denpasar on Bali, including a department store and the airport termi-nal, where ceiling panels were shaken loose, authorities said.Video showed screaming people running in panic from houses in a Bali neighborhood and vehicles rocking. On Lombok, soldiers and other rescuers carried injured people on stretchers and carpets to an evacuation center.National Disaster Mitigation Agency spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho said the toll had risen 82 with hundreds others were injured. Earlier officials said at least 39 people had died.A total of 65 of the deaths in North Lombok district, nine in West Lombok district, four in the provincial capital Mataram and two each in Central Lombok and East Lombok districts, Nugroho said.Thousands of houses were damaged, and most of the dead victims were hit by col-lapsed houses, Nugroho said.The quake, recorded at magnitude 7.0 by the U.S. Geological Survey, struck early Sunday evening at a depth of 10.5 kilometers (6 miles) in the northern part of Lombok.I was watching TV when I felt a big shake,Ž said Harian, a Lombok woman who uses one name. The lamp was shaking, and people were shouting Get out. I ran out into the dark because the power cut off.ŽA tsunami warning was lifted after waves just 15 cen-timeters (6 inches) high were recorded in three villages, said Dwikorita Karnawati, the head of Indonesias Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics Agency.The quake was felt strongly across Lombok and Bali and had damaged houses on both islands, Nugroho said.Frightened people poured out of their homes to move to higher ground, particularly in North Lombok and Mataram, the capital of West Nusa Tenggara province, said Iwan Asmara, a Lombok disaster official.The Bali and Lombok air-ports continued operating Sunday night, according to the director general of civil aviation. There had been a half-hour evacuation at the Lombok airport following the quake because the elec-tricity went off. TV showed crying women consoling each other outside Lomboks airport.The island was already reeling from a magnitude 6.4 quake on July 29, which killed 16 people.Like Bali, Lombok is known for pristine beaches and mountains. Hotels and other buildings in both locations are not allowed to exceed the height of coconut trees.Indonesia is prone to earthquakes because of its location on the Pacific Ring of Fire,Ž an arc of volcanoes and fault lines in the Pacific Basin. In December 2004, a massive magnitude 9.1 earthquake off Sumatra island triggered a tsunami that killed 230,000 people in a dozen countries.Powerful quake rocks IndonesiaDebris lies on top of motorcycles Sunday after an earthquake in Bali, Indonesia. A strong earthquake struck the Indonesian tour ist island of Lombok on Sunday, killing at least 82 people and shaking neighboring Bali, one week after another quake on Lombok killed mor e than a dozen. [FIRDIA LISN AWATI/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] Second earthquake hits tourist island of Lombok, one week a er rst; 82 deadIN BRIEFAmazon removes Nazi-themed items after complaintsAmazon says it has removed items with Nazi or white supremacist symbols from its website after criticism from advocacy groups.An Amazon executive said the company blocked the accounts of some retailers and might sus-pend them.Democratic U.S. Rep. Keith Ellison of Minnesota complained to Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos last month. The companys vice president of public policy, Brian Huseman, responded to Ellison, telling him that Amazon prohibits listing products that promote or glorify hatred, violence or intolerance.A spokeswoman for Seattle-based Amazon.com Inc. declined to comment further on Sunday.ROMEHalfway through summer, Rome gets riverside beachSummers half over, but the people of Rome finally have their beach along the Tiber River.The artificial beach officially was inaugurated on Friday. But thunderstorms and uncompleted details kept Romans waiting until Sunday for a full day of sunbathing and beach volleyball near Marconi Bridge.Romes populist mayor, Virginia Raggi, promised the riverside strand months ago. Admission is free, and the beach is set to be open until October. Critics say the sand and lounge chairs are so far away from the heart of the Italian capital, resi-dents might as well travel a little farther to swim in the Mediterranean Sea at Ostia.MOGADISHU, SOMALIATwo car bomb blasts kill six in SomaliaTwo car bombs hit Somalia on Sunday, killing six people.Somalias Islamic extremist rebels claimed responsibility for the first suicide car bomb blast that that killed four people when it exploded near the gate of a military base in Afgoye town, 18 miles northwest of Mogadishu.Al-Shabab has claimed the responsibility for the attack, according to the groups radio arm, Andalus.Two of the dead were soldiers and fatalities could increase from the 10 injured in the blast which was close to the former national water agencys offices, said Somali police officer Col. Ahmed Ali.Residents report hearing a powerful explosion, followed by gunfire from the base. The Associated Press By Dan ElliottThe Associated PressDENVER „ A psychiatrist who spent hours talking with mass murderer James Holmes says that what led Holmes to open fire in a crowded Colorado movie theater was a one-of-a-kind vortex of his mental illness, his personality and his circumstances „ and some other, unknown currents that will probably never be uncovered.A big part of it is, its hidden in Holmes mind, and he cant see it either,Ž William H. Reid said in an interview with The Associated Press about his new book, A Dark Night in Aurora: Inside James Holmes and the Colorado Mass Shootings.ŽHolmes killed 12 people and wounded 58 when he opened fire during a midnight showing of The Dark Knight Rises,Ž a Batman movie, in the Denver suburb of Aurora on July 20, 2012. Twelve other people were injured in the scramble to escape.He was convicted of murder and sentenced to life in prison without parole.Reid was one of two court-appointed psychiatrists who evaluated Holmes mental health before the trial. Reid spent a total of 24 hours interviewing Holmes in July and August 2014, two years after the massacre. Reid also reviewed 80,000 to 85,000 pages of documents provided by prosecutors, the defense and law enforcement.In the book, Reid acknowl-edges that readers will want to know what led Holmes to commit mass murder, and he predicts they wont be happy with his conclusion.The answer „ and this really is the answer, but its not very satisfying „ lies in an unimaginably detailed and complex confluence that we cant replicate because we cant see all of it,Ž he writes.In his interview with the AP, Reid listed the factors that can be seen:€ Holmes mental illness, and the way it influenced his behavior.€ The way Holmes per-sonality shaped his awkward interactions with other people and influenced his view of the world.€ The ups and downs of Holmes life as he struggled in neuroscience graduate school at the University of Colorado in Denver and broke up with his girlfriend.The other factors are unknown, Reid said, because no one knows his entire social and genetic and biological life.ŽReid said society will likely never have a comprehensive understanding of what led Holmes to commit murder.Hes unique,Ž Reid said. The answers are not going to come, at least not in any of our lifetimes.ŽReids book is a chronology of Holmes life, from his rela-tively uneventful childhood through the murders, the trial and Holmes conviction and sentencing. Reid said he relied on the court records, including his videotaped interviews with Holmes, which were shown to jurors during the trial. Psychiatrist: Much is still hidden in shooters mind

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DailyCommercial.com | Monday, August 6, 2018 A3 LOCAL & STATETom McNiff, editor 352-365-8250 tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comNEWS BRIEFS PARKLANDMetal detectors delayed at Parkland schoolMetal detectors will not be installed for the start of classes at a Florida high school where 17 students and faculty were slain on Valentines Day.The South Florida Sun Sen-tinel reports Broward County Public Schools Superintendent Robert Runcie sent a letter Friday to parents of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School students inform-ing them that plans for the metal detectors were on hold.A school board work-shop on security measures is scheduled Aug. 14. Among the issues being considered: how to get 3,200 students through metal detectors each morning.As we continue our due diligence to implement the program consulting with vendors and experts and reviewing turnkey solutions many issues have been raised that require the Dis-trict to pause and have a more thoughtful discussion on policy and procedural aspects of this pilot,Ž Runcie wrote. Class starts Aug. 15.Officials previously said students would no longer have to use see-through backpacks when they returned to the Parkland school.The Miami Herald reports that students and faculty will see other safety measures in place when they return to the Parkland campus, including the addition of more security staff.School identification badges will be required again for all students and staff members. New fences, gates, and surveillance video cam-eras have been installed, and the schools intercom system has been upgraded.DAYTONA BEACHVeteran receives medals from WWII service A 94-year-old Florida vet-eran has finally received the medals he earned for serving as a pilot during World War II.The Daytona Beach News-Journal reports Richard Charles of Daytona Beach was honored Tuesday in a ceremony hosted by Embry-Riddle Aeronautical Universitys Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps.Charles son recently dis-covered he was never formally awarded with four medals for flying C-47 transport aircraft in the Pacific from 1944 to 1946.Charles enlisted in the Army Air Corps at age 19 after his brother died in a military training accident in 1942. He learned to fly at Embry-Riddle. Navy Capt. Pat Everly called the pilot another stel-lar example of somebody who put service before self.ŽCharles said he just did his duty, and some of it was unpleasant and some of it was fun.ŽSEVILLESheriff: Deputy justi“ ed in shootingA Florida sheriff says a deputy was justified in fatally shooting a man who grabbed his stun gun during a struggle.The Daytona Beach News-Journal reports the Volusia County Sheriffs Office released a 12-minute body camera video from the altercation Friday between 29-year-old Emmanuel Alquisiras and Deputy Bran-don Watson.Watson had responded to a domestic disturbance call at Alquisiras home in Seville.The video shows Alquisiras refusing to allow Watson to speak to a woman in the home and struggling with the deputy after being shocked by the stun gun.Sheriff Mike Chitwood said the video shows Alquisiras had taken Watsons stun gun and was aiming to fire it. He said Watson did everything Staff ReportTAVARES „ The Lake County Animal Shelter is launching a new program to help decrease the feral cat population countywide.Operation Community Caturday,Ž a partnership between the shelter and LEASH Inc., plans to steril-ize up to 600 cats per year. Trap-Neuter-Vaccinate-Return, or TNVR, improves the lives of cats, addresses community concerns, reduces complaints about cats, and stops the breeding cycle, according to Alley Cat Allies, a leading cat advocacy group.The shelter will sterilize and vaccinate up to 50 unowned, free-roaming cats on the last Saturday of each month, at a rate of $10 per cat.TNVR is the only humane and proactive approach to reducing the outdoor cat population,Ž said shelter Director Whitney Boylston. With the support of LEASH Inc., we are able to offer this service at a very affordable rate, making sterilization of community cats more Shelter tackles feral cat problemPlans to sterilize up to 600 cats per yearThe goal of Operation Community CaturdayŽ is to cut down on the feral cat population in a humane way. [SUBMITTED] By Rick ReedCorrespondentLEESBURG „ An old motel near the intersection of U.S. Highways 27 and 441 began life in a national chain but has met with tough times. But, as the Daily Commercial story said, That is all in the past, howeverŽ at the Stay & Save Inn.A few weeks ago, new owners bought the 80-room motel for $1.5 million, according to Lake County Property Appraiser Carey Baker. It had been on the county books valued at $700,000.The city received more than $70,000 in code enforcement fines when the property was sold. Demo work has already begun as the new owner wants it fully restored as a motel.Despite new hotel/motel facilities being constructed over the past several years in Lake County there is never enough room for events like Bikefest.There has always been a need for more rooms in Leesburg and Lake County. That was proven as early as 1880-81 when former Presi-dent Ulysses S. Grant said a new hotel was needed.How did Grant get involved?Grant traveled to Florida with George M. Barbour, a writer for the Chicago Daily Times.Ž Barbour documented their journey in a book called Florida for Tourists, Invalids and Settlers,Ž which was published by the D. Appleton Company of New York in 1881. It received nationwide distribution. The group accompanying Barbour and Grant stayed in the Lake Eustis area for a day or so before the party ven-tured over toward Leesburg.The country from this point to Leesburg is all a rolling pineland, in some places quite hilly, and con-tains innumerable small lakes and frequent tracts of rich hammocks, in which we saw many wild groves of wild oranges growing, all laden with their deceptive golden fruit,Ž Barbour wrote.NOW AND THENLakeview Hotel on Main Street and old Leesburg Boarding House on Palmetto. [SUBMITTED] Plenty of room to growLack of hotel rooms is a longtime problemAnother view of the Lakeview Hotel with the Leesburg Hotel moved to Palmetto. [SUBMITTED] Staff ReportMOUNT DORA „ Artists interested in participating in Bra-Vo 2018, a creative fun-draiser in the battle against breast cancer, can collect their entry packets and bra forms at Artisans on fifth.Bra-form choices available for artistic treatment this year are a female half-form or a full-torso male form. The finished works of art, due back by 5p.m. Sept. 26, will be part of an Oct. 6-28 exhibit at the Mount Dora Center for the Arts gallery to raise funds for free or lowcost diagnostic testing and treatment for breast cancer for men and women in Lake County.Artisans on fifth, a non-profit shop, is at 134 E. Fifth Ave. in Mount Dora, on the downstairs level of the his-toric brick building occupied by the Mount Dora Center for the Arts. The shop asks that artists pick up the bra forms and packets during normal business hours, 10a.m. to 5p.m. Tuesdays Bra-Vo 2018 seeks creative talent for a causeDont Let Cancer Get A Hold of YouŽ by Corine Garrett was the Bra-Vo Viewers Choice winner for 2017. [SUBMITTED] By Emily SullivanGatehouse MediaJACKSONVILLE „ A pioneering Womens Army Auxiliary Corps volunteer turned 100 on July 20, clinging to her bed railing as she recounted her time as a typist behind the Ameri-can World War II effort.Anne Butler, who grew up in America and Poland, has just her memory and several col-orless portraits to remind her of the years she spent stationed in old New York City offices. She typed her way through World War II, donating her time to make some, any, helpful impact.She joined the Army at the wars beginning and left after its violent end.During WWII, over 150,000 American women joined the Womens Army Corps (WACs), initially formed as the Womens Army Auxiliary Corps, accord-ing to a U.S. Army Center of Military History pub-lication. Those women were the first, after nurses, to serve formally within U.S. Army ranks, and many took on repeti-tive, detailed tasks that freed up more men for combat.Butler said she never desired to go to the front lines herself, because she didnt think that was her place.Still, when war broke out and Butler inquired about volunteering to help in some capacity, she was told there was no position for her.They said no, no, WWII vet turns 100, recalls years of serviceSee BRIEFS, A4 See CATS, A4 See BUTLER, A4 See HOTEL, A4 See BRA-VO, A4

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A4 Monday, August 6, 2018 | DailyCommercial.comhe could to avoid shoot-ing Alquisiras.Chitwood said Alqui-siras had previous arrests.JACKSONVILLEGay teen kicked out of home gets free tuitionAfter raising nearly $130,000 to cover tuition, the gay Florida valedicto-rian who says his parents kicked him out will pay nothing to go to college this fall.News outlets report Georgetown University adjusted 18-year-old Seth Owens financial aid package, reducing his expected out-of-pocket contribution from $20,000 to $0.His aid package had been calculated based on his parents ability to pay. But he says they kicked him out in February, fol-lowing disagreements over his sexuality and an ultimatum: attend their Southern Baptist church or leave.Having initially refused to adjust aid, Georgetown has now enrolled Owen in its scholarship program. Georgetown released a statement Friday in which Owen says he hopes to use the GoFundMe set up by his biology teacher to create scholarships for LGBTQ students facing similar circumstances. BRIEFSFrom Page A3through Saturdays, and 11a.m.-5p.m. on Sundays.A $35 entry fee is required for the bra forms. The entry fee for businesses that wish to participate starts at $60. Fees and donations can be paid in cash, by check or charge card at Arti-sans on fifth.The public is invited to visit the gallery and vote on their favorites, either in person or online, at www.Bra-Vo.org. Auc-tions are scheduled as well. The Bra-Vo 2018 Gala Reception for Artists & Sponsors will be held Oct. 12, 5-9p.m., during Second Friday Art Stroll. It is is free and open to the public.Artisans on fifth donates 100 percent of Bra-Vo proceeds to the Waterman Foundation. In the past six years, Artisans on fifth has raised $38,318 for the cause. BRA-VOFrom Page A3accessible to the public.ŽResidents who are feeding outdoor cats are encouraged to register online for a TNVR appointment. The cost of $10 per cat must be paid directly to the shelter by cash or card.Appointments are limited to five cats per res-ident per month. Each cat must arrive at the shelter on Friday between 6 and 7 p.m., or Saturday between 7:30 and 8:30 a.m.All cats must be healthy, in a humane trap, and weigh at least four pounds. Trapping and returning the cats is the responsibility of the caregiver. Residents are required to pick up the cats after surgery on Saturday afternoon and return them to the location where they were trapped.Participants may sign up directly via Eventbrite at https://www.eventbrite.com/o/the-lake-county-animal-shelter-17614317118.To find out more about the Lake County Animal Shelter, or to adopt or vol-unteer, stop by the shelter at 28123 County Road 561, Tavares, or call 352343-9688. For the most up-to-date information and photos of adoptable animals, follow the shelter on Facebook at www.facebook.com/Lake-CountyAnimalShelter and Twitter at www.twitter.com/lakeshelterpets. CATSFrom Page A3Later that day they crossed the wild head-waters of the Ocklawaha, on a ferry worked by hauling on a rope stretched across on poles,Ž Barbour wrote. The road on either side was, for a long distance, through a dense jungle, and we were glad to get well through it and reach our destination.ŽThe Leesburg that Grant discovered had a population of about 200 people and was the seat of Sumter County.It was a contented, easy-going rather old-fashioned sort of a place,Ž Barbour wrote. All the business houses being low, plain, wooden buildings mostly of one-story, ranged along one wide, sandy street.ŽAnd one thing was sorely missing.A winter hotel is badly needed, and would probably be a profitable investment,Ž added Barbour.Edward Mote, one of Leesburgs early movers and shakers, would eventually build that hotel „ the Lake View „ along with partner Gen. Davis Tillson sometime between 1885 and 1890.Mote wanted to purchase the former town square between Fourth and Fifth streets along Main and Magnolia streets that surrounded the old courthouse while Leesburg was the Sumter County Seat from about 1868 to 1881. Mote planned to build a big, two-story brick facility with an opera house on the second floor.He eventually did so by building the Opera House.The city fathers told Mote he would have to build a modern hotel first. So Mote and Tillson purchased the Leesburg Hotel, which had been more of a boarding house, from Gillie Lee Stivender, the widowed daughter of town founder Evander Lee. They moved it back from Main Street down Palmetto Street. A more modern twostory brick facility was constructed along Main Street and the new hotel was attached to the old one by a two-story cov-ered walkway.Eventually the hotel was razed in 1957 to make way for a city parking lot at the corner of Main and Palmetto Streets. HOTELFrom Page A3you dont even belong in this,Ž Butler recalled.In her early 20s, wideeyed and ready to work as hard as anyone else, she declared that, in fact, there would be a spot for her.Ill make one,Ž she responded. I came here to volunteer and, by golly, Im gonna do it,Ž she said.Butler said she was finally stationed with a small group a couple of blocks down from New Yorks Collingwood hotel, in what looked like an old post office.WAC volunteers filled that hotel, four to a room. Men guarded the women, some of whom, including Butler, did secretŽ work, she said. Butler recalled few spe-cifics about her secretŽ work but said she took any assignment that crossed her path. Those mostly involved typing; she was high-school educated and studied business and sec-retarial work before the war began.Although Butler was supposed to keep her work confidential, she said she kind of told everybody.Ž The caveat, she said, was that she never really knew exactly she was doing.When Butler first volunteered, she worried about that uncertainty. So, she moseyed across the street to Macys and made a purchase.I didnt know what I was supposed to do,Ž Butler said. I decided that I better get a nice-looking hat to wear.ŽShe soon learned the Army-green hat she picked out was reserved for officers use.Butler said she never really knew what was expected of her. Before she joined the Army, she might have joined a convent, since she grew up around nuns and went through the Catholic school system.Her excitement about rallying around the flag and helping as much as she could overrode that.There was another reason Butler said she joined the Army, which was to travel. Butler wanted to see India; she had not seen much of the world and had a school-mate stationed there.That was so selfish, wasnt it?Ž Butler won-dered. I joined the service to go to India.ŽButler didnt make it to India, bound to a womans clerical assignments in the post-office-like building where she balanced higher-ups instructions.She remembered one sergeant whose com-mands resembled lectures as he urged the girlsŽ to stay true to their Army roots and stay out of trou-ble, mainly with men.Everything was secret those days,Ž Butler said, especially the men.ŽMen were not allowed in the womens metropolitan hotel, but Butler said they snuck them in anyway, hiding them on the second floor. They all were a tight military squad,Ž she said, playing tricks on guards and marching to and from work, all in good spirits.It was the funniest thing,Ž she said, reveal-ing a rosy smile.Butler said otherwise, there was little ruckus among her group, and that the only trouble came from traveling women who made military pay while she did not.When the war ended and Butler left the Army, after rejecting a discharge deal to accompany war brides coming to America, she married Timothy Butler, an Army man coming back from Italy. They moved into a Jacksonville home in 1950.She might have worked in a factory after leaving the Army, said her son, Larry Butler. He added she volunteered with a childrens hospital about 20 years ago and was always active, doing yardwork and tending to her orchids.Still holding onto her bed railing, Butler once more downplayed the feat of reaching her centennial after helping an American war effort, completing tasks higher-ups expected of her without relying on a surplus of remarkable skills.Anybody could be 100 years old,Ž she said.Butler said shes not sure what lies ahead for her as she marks her 100th year.I guess whatevers expected of me,Ž she said, in her humble fashion. BUTLERFrom Page A3 Anne Butler served during World War II in the Womens Army Corps, and is photographed on her 100th birthday July 20 at her home in Jacksonville. [WILL DICKEY/GATEHOUSE MEDIA] By Geir MoulsonThe Associated PressBERLIN „ A vintage propeller plane plunged near-vertically into a Swiss mountain, killing all 20 people on board as they returned from a two-day trip to southern Switzerland, investigators said Sunday.The Junkers Ju-52 plane, operated by small Swiss company Ju-Air, went down Saturday on the Piz Segnas mountain above the Alpine resort of Flims in the countrys south-east, at an altitude of about 8,330 feet above sea level.There was no immediate word on the cause of the crash, and officials said they expect a complex investigation given that the 79-year-old plane was not equipped with black boxes.Police said Sunday they had determined that the 17 passengers and three crew members on board the plane all died.The victims were 11 men and nine women between the ages of 42 and 84„ seven couples from various parts of Switzerland, a couple from neighboring Austria and their son, and the three crew members. Their names were not released.The fully booked plane was flying the passengers back to its base at Dueben-dorf, near Zurich, from a two-day trip to Switzerlands Italian-speaking southern Ticino region. It crashed shortly before 5 p.m. Saturday, less than 50 minutes after taking off from Locarnos Magadino airfield.Photos released by Graubuenden canton (state) police showed the crumpled wreckage of the plane lying on the mountain, with only the upside-down tail more or less intact.Police said they were not aware of any distress call from the aircraft before it crashed.We can assume that the aircraft hit the ground near-vertically and at relatively high speed,Ž Daniel Knecht of the Swiss Transportation Safety Investigation Board said at a news conference in Flims.He and senior police official Andreas Tobler said the vintage plane lacked black boxes,Ž the crash-resistant cockpit voice and data recorders that more modern aircraft have. Old-time aircraft crashes in Swiss Alps, killing 20 on board

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administration alternatives to comprehensive but costly policies under the Affordable Care Act. Both offer lower premi-ums than comprehensive health insurance but also cover less. The plans wont be sold through HealthCare.gov.Myra Simon of the industry group Americas Health Insurance Plans said consumers are likely to see advertising this fall for short-term plans but association plans may be harder to find, since theyre not open to every-body. Policyholders must have a common link, such as working in an industry like real estate.The short timeline may mean that this fall we arent going to see all the products we are eventually going to see,Ž said Simon, an expert on indi-vidual health insurance. We might see some more heavy marketing of prod-ucts that already existed.ŽJeff Smedrud, CEO of Pivot Health, which offers short-term plans, says companies are behind the curve on updating their plans to account for the greater leeway provided by the Trump administration. Hes forecasting minor improvementsŽ in plans by October but a lot of change in 2019.ŽStrictly speaking, short-term and association health plans are not new. The Trump administration has broadened their potential reach, although some states may push back with restrictions.Short-term plans dont have to take people with pre-existing medical conditions, or provide benefits like coverage for maternity, mental health, prescription drugs and substance abuse treatment. They can last up to 364 days and be renewed for up to 36 months.Association health plans do have to accept people with pre-existing medical conditions, but they dont have to cover the full menu of 10 essentialŽ kinds of benefits required by the ACA. On the whole, asso-ciation health plans have more federal consumer safeguards than short-term plans.Speaking at the White House last month, Trump almost made it sound like theres going to be a stam-pede to get the new plans.So all of the insurance companies are going wild, they want to get it,Ž he said of association health plans. Youre going to have great health care at a much lower price.ŽAs for short-term insurance, somewhat different, result the same,Ž Trump said. Much less expensive health care at a much lower price; will cost our country nothing.ŽThats not what the industrys saying.The Blue Cross Blue Shield Association warned that the broader avail-ability and longer duration of slimmed-down policies that do not provide comprehensive coverage has the potential to harm consumers.ŽAnd Americas Health Insurance Plans, the main trade group, said, We remain concerned that consumers who rely on short-term plans for an extended time period will face high medical bills when they need care that isnt covered or exceed their coverage limits.ŽUnder the Obama-era health law, consumer complaints centered on high premiums, particularly for middle-class people not eligible for its income-based subsidies.But the fear of being turned down because of a pre-existing condition faded away. So did worries about being denied coverage for certain kinds of care, like substance abuse treatment. And insurers were forbidden from imposing annual and lifetime dollar limits on coverage.Now concerns about such fine print will be back, particularly with short-term plans.Some consumers may be willing to gamble, figuring that if they get sick they can always switch to comprehensive coverage at HealthCare.gov with an ACA plan.Not so fast, said Simon, the individual insurance expert.With some exceptions, people can only sign up for ACA plans during open enrollment season from Nov. 1-Dec. 15. If someone in your family later gets diagnosed with a serious mental illness, for exam-ple, you might have to wait months to get them into a comprehensive plan that will cover that condition. Its not simple to move back and forth,Ž said Simon. HEALTHFrom Page A1 A6 Monday, August 6, 2018 | DailyCommercial.comIn this Sept. 26, 2017, photo, President Donald Trump responds to a reporters question on health care after arriving at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York. [ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO] Among the steps that Texas apparently wont be taking anytime soon is tightening restrictions on gun access for people deemed dangerous to themselves or others.In the aftermath of the May 18 attack at Santa Fe High School, Republican Gov. Greg Abbott suggested that Texas should look for ways to keep guns away from people who pose an immediate danger to others,Ž which is the point of so-called red flag laws like those passed by six states since the February massacre at a high school in Parkland, Florida.But faced with criticism from gun enthusiasts in the countrys largest conserva-tive state, Abbott „ who gets top ratings from the National Rifle Association „ later clarified that he was only suggesting such laws be part of a broader conversation about school security and that he thinks theres growing opposition to the idea of gun restrictions.Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, who presides over the Texas Senate, was even more forceful.I have never supported these policies, nor has the majority of the Texas Senate,Ž he said minutes after the last in a series of state Senate hearings on gun violence.The one-two punch by the states top Republi-cans drew cheers from gun rights advocates in a state that has more than 1.2 million handgun license holders and allows the open carry in public of handguns and long rifles.While they vary from state to state, red flag laws generally allow law enforcement or family members to ask a judge to order the seizure or surren-der of guns from someone who is deemed dangerous, often because of mental health concerns or threats of violence. About a dozen states have red flag laws, including Republican-led Florida, which passed its law following the Parkland school attack.Texas can deny a handgun license based on a persons mental health history, but that restriction applies to the license to carry a hand-gun, not buying one. The state can seize weapons from people determined to be in a mental crisis in some circumstances.Some gun rights activists worry that expanding red flag laws would allow the government to seize someones guns based on the suspicion of a threat or a false report without that person having acted violently.Red flag laws are nothing more than ways to take guns out of the hands of law-abiding persons on nothing more than mere suspicion,Ž said C.J. Grisham, leader of gun rights group Open Carry Texas, which has pushed to reduce gun restrictions for years. You never get good policy when you base it off of emotion.Ž GUNSFrom Page A1

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A8 Monday, August 6, 2018 | DailyCommercial.compresidents eldest son and an intermediary from the Russian government offer-ing damaging information about Trumps opponent, Hillary Clinton. Betraying no surprise or misgivings about the offer from a hos-tile foreign power, Trump Jr. replied: If its what you say I love it especially later in the summer.ŽSundays tweet was Trumps clearest statement yet on the purpose of the meeting, which has become a focal point of Muellers investigation even as the president and his lawyers try to downplay its significance and pummel the Mueller probe with attacks. On Sunday, Trump again suggested without evidence that Mueller was biased against him, declaring, This is the most one sided Witch Hunt in the history of our country.ŽAnd as Trump and his allies have tried to discredit the probe, a new talking point has emerged: that even if that meeting was held to collect damaging information, none was provided and collusionŽ „ Trumps go-to description of what Muel-ler is investigating „ never occurred.The question is what law, statute or rule or reg-ulation has been violated, and nobody has pointed to one,Ž said Jay Sekulow, one of Trumps attorneys, on ABCs This Week.ŽBut legal experts have pointed out several possible criminal charges, including conspiracy against the United States and aiding and abetting a conspiracy. And despite Trumps public Twitter denial, the president has expressed worry that his son may face legal exposure even as he believes he did nothing wrong, accord-ing to three people close to the White House familiar with the presidents think-ing but not authorized to speak publicly about pri-vate conversations.Sekulow acknowledged that the public explanation for the meeting has changed but insisted that the White House has been very clear with the special counsels office. He said he was not aware of Trump Jr. facing any legal exposure.I dont represent Don Jr.,Ž Sekulow said, but I will tell you I have no knowledge at all of Don Jr. being told that hes a target of any investigation, and I have no knowledge of him being interviewed by the special counsel.ŽTrumps days of pri-vate anger spilled out into public with the Twitter outburst, which comes at a perilous time for the president.A decision about whether he sits for an interview with Mueller may also occur in the coming weeks, according to another one of his attorneys, Rudy Giuliani. Trump has seethed against what he feels are trumped-up charges against his former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, whose trial began last week and provided a vis-ible reminder of Muellers work. TRUMPFrom Page A1also are getting on board with Trumps formal backing of the Palm Coast congressman over Repub-lican rival Adam Putnam in the Aug. 28 primary, turning the usual in-state focus of the governors contest into a national affair.Even former Gov. Jeb Bush, the son of one pres-ident and the brother of another, relied chiefly on Florida financing „ not national cash „ for his campaigns.This is the first time in my memory that Ive seen it where we have a candidate for governor who can tap this kind of rich vein of money across the country,Ž said Brian Ballard, Trumps lobbyist in Tallahassee and a major Florida fundraiser for the presidents campaign, who hasnt taken sides in DeSantis-Putnam primary.Whats happening here is really unique,Ž Ballard said.As a member of Congress and frequent Fox News guest, DeSantis already had a national profile that was pulling out-of-state money to his campaign. But once Trump left no doubt who he favored in the race, more cash arrived from the GOPs top givers.Billionaire conserva-tive brothers Charles and David Koch, who Trump is now feuding with over trade policy, still turned to DeSantis after the June 22 tweet, pouring in almost $250,000 last month for digital adver-tising and mailers for the candidate through their Freedom Partners PAC.Others spending on DeSantis in recent weeks include venture capitalist Joe Childs, whose $100,000 donation June 29 brought to $503,000 his stake in the candidate. The same day, Silicon Valley real estate investor Carl Berg cut a $100,000 check, and three weeks later Ahmad Khawaja, a controversial online payment processor, sent $10,000, bringing his DeSantis contributions to almost $200,000.Indeed, the 30 Republican donors who the Center for Responsive Politics has named as the top federal contribu-tors to GOP candidates this election cycle have pumped more than $3 million into the DeSantis campaign.But DeSantis, 39, may need the national help.Putnam, 44, is the two-term state agriculture commissioner, first elected to the Florida House at age 22 and later to Congress „ a Florida officeholder half his life.Putnam's Florida Grown political action committee has been bankrolled by many of the Florida GOP's big-gest donors and industry allies, including U.S. Sugar Corp., Walt Disney World, Florida Power & Light, the private-prison Geo Group, and agribusi-nesses long allied with the Bartow son of a cattle ranching family.Putnam has raised about $36 million for his campaign, more than double DeSantiss total. Even when Trump hinted in December that he sup-ported DeSantis, tweeting he would make a GREAT Governor of Florida,Ž Putnam managed to stay on top in many polls.But that changed dramatically by the time Trumps June 22 tweet was sent, followed by Tuesday nights rally in Tampa that drew roughly 10,000 people.Theres no question Trumps endorsement helps DeSantis in many ways, including campaign financing,Ž said state Rep. Joe Gruters, R-Sarasota, who was co-chair of Trumps presidential campaign in Florida.Unlike the president, Gruters is remaining neutral in the Republican primary for governor. But he said Trump is signaling to national donors to send checks DeSantis way.The primarys closing weeks are likely to see more money flowing that way, possibly with some Putnam backers looking to cross over, Gruters said.It becomes like how the New York Yankees can attract fans, because theyre seen as a winning team,Ž Gruters said.With the national buzz around DeSantis, Putnam has stepped up his TV attacks on his rival as dis-connected from Florida issues. He also is turning to grassroots events that heighten his Florida FirstŽ pitch.We dont want to import Washington dys-function into the state of Florida,Ž Putnam said during his own Fox News appearance the day after Trumps Tampa rally.The winner of the Aug. 28 primary will face whoever emerges from the crowded Democratic field. Former U.S. Rep. Gwen Graham, former Miami Beach Mayor Philip Levine, Orlando-area businessman Chris King, Palm Beach billionaire Jeff Greene and Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum so far are narrowly dividing the Democratic vote in most polls.Democrats see DeSan-tis tie to Trump as helping them capture Florida centrist voters this fall.DeSantis is the far right billionaire whisperer, and he has spent this campaign courting special corporate interests rather than talking to Florida voters,Ž said Kevin Donohoe, a Florida Democratic Party spokesman.While DeSantis appears to be the darling of national GOP donors, many Florida Republican activists and businesses now backing Putnam could rally easily around whoever the nominee is heading into the Nov. 6 general election.That is what happened in 2010, when first-time candidate Rick Scott spent $50 million of his own money in a Republican primary upset of Attorney General Bill McCollum, the favorite of the Republican establish-ment for governor.Within days of Scotts victory, he was collecting checks from Tallahassee lobbyists and industry groups he had railed against during the primary campaign.I think the traditional resources that the Republican nominee for governor has will be at (DeSantiss) disposal,Ž Ballard said. But I think what we can bring uniquely to the table, because of the presidents support, is this national finance operation.But truthfully, until the president got involved, whatever national money he was getting just wasnt moving the needle much for him,Ž he said. DESANTISFrom Page A1Florida Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam stands for the Pledge of Allegiance before a meeting of the Christian Family Coalition Florida on July 24 in Miami. While his opponent has been raking in cash from national donors, Putnam has been doing well among major Florida donors. [AP PHOTO/LYNNE SLADKY]

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In the final analysis, government is not the chief actor that gets the economy perking again after some kind of setback or the other, but our free enterprise system, entrepreneurs, American workers and, yes, industrial management. But government can do a lot to slow things down, as was the case with the Obama administration, and it can unleash our exceptional oomph and ingenuity, as has been the case with the Trump administration. It is amazing what President Donald Trump has done for the economy and what the economy has then done for the American people, a gift far beyond any welfare state offering. What has happened is beautifully summed up by African-Americans having the lowest unemployment record in history. And after President Barack Obama managed to degrade economic growth to 1.9 percent in his last year in office, we just witnessed second-quarter growth under Trump at an annual rate of 4.1 percent. The issue is not that Obama did nothing positive, but that the recovery from the 2008 crash was the slowest since World War II. He worked hard at this. First of all he gave us massive debt, and then tax increases and intimations of more to come, a surefire message to businesses not to risk expansionary investments. Despite some leniency toward natural gas, there were all kinds of moves to deprive our industrial society of the energy it needed. The biggest hit, though, was regulatory mania as executed through a record number of major regulations doing dubious good. What they unquestionably did do is cost businesses a fortune and lessen opportunities and prosperity for everyone else through complicated, twisted and bizarre demands. Some of the tens of thousands of pages micromanaging our behavior actually contradict one another. One thinks of Sen. George McGovern, who retired from public life, started a business and, looking at the regulatory mess he had to deal with, asked what in the world was he thinking of as a politician. Trump got it right. He deregulated to a historical degree. In addition to freeing up our energy resources, Trump and the Republican Congress gave us tax reform that just might sustain this new growth level and significantly reduce our debt. Critics say it was just a handout to the rich, although the rich are now paying a higher percentage of overall taxes than they were, while average folks are paying less. According to varied news accounts, it also overlooks the huge rise in corporate investment and how corporate tax breaks have led to higher profits that then have led to more government revenue. Reports have it that this was the biggest tax cut for small businesses ever, helping them join with corporations to induce far more jobs and slightly higher wages. Household wealth is up, and the jobless rate is 3.9 percent, the lowest in 18 years, while claims for unemployment insurance are the lowest since 1969. On top of all of this, Trump also wants a new program to train workers. Sadness and danger pop into the story when we turn to Trumps tariff interventions, such as high steel and aluminum hits on European and other imports that are already costing jobs, raising prices and leading to retaliation. Europe is not without guilt here. The European Union imposes a 10 percent tariff on our cars, while our tariff on the EUs cars is just 2.8 percent, for example. Keep in mind, though, that the EU just recently agreed to negotiations that could take us to zero tariffs on both sides while helping to hem in China without the kind of self-defeating trade war Trump has been instigating. There are more questions than answers in all of this, and Trump could still undo all the good he has accomplished if he does not calm down. But what he has done so far is huge, and economic growth is about more than material goods. It can be about increased societal virtue, an important study shows, and we could do with some more. Jay Ambrose is an op-ed columnist for Tribune News Service. Readers may email him at speaktojay@aol.com.ANOTHER OPINION DailyCommercial.com | Monday, August 6, 2018 A9 ANOTHER OPINION OPINIONSteve Skaggs | Publisher Tom McNiff | Executive Editor Whitney Lehnecker | Digital Editor, Lifestyles Editor Tom McNiff, editor 352-365-8250 tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comIts August, which means peak Atlantic hurricane season is upon us. We hope the damage wont be anything like last years „ which saw catastrophes strike Texas (Harvey), Florida (Irma) and Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands (Maria). No matter what the weather has in store, we already know the United States enters this key period, and a longer term of possibly increased extreme weather because of climate change, having failed to act on a major lesson of past storms. Specifically, Congress is about to perpetuate the National Flood Insurance Program without any reforms to this increasingly dysfunctional program. Enacted 50 years ago as a delayed response to the havoc Hurricane Betsy wreaked on the Gulf Coast in 1965, the program made a certain sense in theory. The private sector lacked the analytical sophistication or capital to insure against such risks, so the government would do so, in return for appropriate local land-use and other measures to prevent development in low-lying areas and for actuarially sound premiums. Politics being what they are, the program gradually fell prey to pressure from developers and homeowners in the nations coastal areas. Arguably, the existence of flood insurance encouraged development in flood zones that would not have occurred otherwise. Certain properties „ overwhelmingly concentrated in a handful of Louisiana, Texas, New Jersey and New York counties „ have collected repeated insurance payouts. People who own property by the beach tend to be better-off than average, which makes this a permanent taxpayer subsidy to upper-income people, too. Not surprisingly, revenue consistently lagged costs, until Hurricane Katrina in 2005 essentially bankrupted the program. In fiscal 2017, it took in $4.2 billion and paid out $6.9 billion, raising the programs total debt to $20.3 billion. This is about $10 billion below its legal limit „ but only because Congress canceled $16 billion in debt last year. Ideally, more of the costs of flood insurance would be shouldered by the people and places who benefit most from it; modern technology and financial tools should enable the private sector to handle more of the business, too. Such radical reform is not on Congresss agenda, of course, but lawmakers could at least try more modest updates, in the spirit of a 2012 bipartisan measure that would have transitioned the programs more than 5 million customers into new and more actuarially accurate insurance premiums. That necessarily implied higher premiums for many homeowners, however, so, under pressure from aggrieved constituents, Congress reversed the reform in 2014. In 2018, there was another opportunity to reform the program, created by its scheduled expiration during the year. And Congress has missed it. Coastal-area lawmakers of both parties in both houses pushed instead for yet another short-term bill to reauthorize the program, more or less as is. A measure doing that passed both houses, and President Donald Trump signed it on Tuesday. It expires Nov. 30. Take note of that date: It keeps the program going through the end of the hurricane season and, perhaps more importantly to the politicians, through the end of election season. The Washington PostANOTHER OPINIONCongress drops the ball on ood insuranceWednesday was not our first visit to Trumps Land of Oz, otherwise known as President Donald Trumps Twitter feed. Thats where he feverishly expresses whatever is on his mind or grinding his gears. Some of what he says on social media tells Americans where he stands on issues. But a lot of what he tosses out is absurd, emotional, half-baked and ultimately meaningless. Thats some background for the reckless series of Trump tweets in which he lashed out at the Mueller investigation on Russian interference in the 2016 election and declared that Attorney General Jeff Sessions should stop this Rigged Witch Hunt right now, before it continues to stain our country any further.Ž With those words the president crossed a line „ publicly calling on his attorney general to shut down special counsel Robert Muellers independent investigation. Consider: One part of Muellers probe is asking whether Trump committed obstruction of justice last year by firing FBI Director James Comey, who previously led the investigation. Wednesdays tweet had Trump directing Sessions to fire Mueller and therefore ... obstruct justice? Heres where previous visits to Oz are helpful. We recognize the surreal terrain: What Trump typed was angry, irresponsible „ and not to be taken literally. Soon after the tweets landed, two of the presidents lawyers clarified that he was not ordering Sessions or the Justice Department to fire Mueller „ he was sharing some thoughts. I think its very well-established the president uses tweets to express his opinion,Ž Trump attorney Rudy Giuliani said. He very carefully used the word should.Ž Giuliani would have Americans pay no attention to the man tweeting behind the curtain. Yet even for those who give Trump latitude to rant, what he did Wednesday went far beyond the pale. Its unacceptable for him to rail recklessly to a populace that remembers another presidents meddling, during Watergate. When Trump attacks his own government, he corrodes democratic norms, just as his ad hominem attacks on individuals tell Americans that its OK to bully and belittle. In these instances, Trump earns our scorn. Although his Wednesday tweets were quickly repudiated by his own lawyers, the president was threatening to take the law into his own hands. Trump cannot fire Mueller. Since Sessions has recused himself in this case, the person who would take that action is Muellers overseer, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein. But Rosenstein could remove Mueller only for misconduct, conflict of interest or other goodŽ cause. Trump obviously thinks Mueller deserves to be fired, but weve seen no reason the he should be. We trust Mueller to finish the job he started. Rosenstein agrees. Last month he told Congress his goal is for the investigation is to finish it appropriately and reach a conclusion.Ž Lets be clear: Any attempt by Trump to remove Mueller would set off a constitutional crisis and potentially end Trumps presidency. Trump likely understands that. Hes wanted Mueller fired in the past yet not taken action. He jumped on Twitter Wednesday out of frustration with the cloud of accusations that hang over his presidency. He sought to distract attention from negative news events, such as the ongoing trial of former Trump campaign official Paul Manafort. He wanted to fire up his supporters. He tried to pressure Mueller to finish, and get a head start on trashing the integrity of any damaging conclusions. None of that justifies what Trump did Wednesday. Message to Oz: The Mueller investigation is no witch hunt. From Tribune News Service.ANOTHER OPINIONNo, Mr. President, this is not a witch hunt Jay AmbrosePresident Trump scores on the economy

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DailyCommercial.com | Monday, August 6, 2018 B1 SPORTS BASEBALL | B4A ROUNDUP OF ALL THE DAYS ACTION AROUND MLB Paul Jenkins, Sports editor 352-365-8204 paul.jenkins@dailycommercial.comBy Robbie AndreuGateHouse MediaGAINESVILLE „ It took only a few minutes into that very first practice in the spring to realize that the two new receivers on the Florida roster were going to potentially have a big impact on the Gators passing game.The only question was when? Would it be this fall?Or would the Gators have to wait until 2019?Finally, the long wait to find out the answer ended Thursday, the day before the opening of preseason camp.Transfers Van Jefferson and Trevon Grimes were ruled eligible by the NCAA. They will start making their impact now, in this season.I called my mom and told her the news, and I actually shed a little tear I was so excited to get on the field and be able to play this season,Ž Grimes, a trans-fer from Ohio State, said Saturday. I was pretty nervous. I put my faith in God. I know if he wanted me to play, Id play. Of course, I was granted the waiver and Im excited to play.ŽJefferson, a transfer from Ole Miss, has not been totally cleared yet. He still needs approval from the SEC, but that is a mere formality after the league changed its transfer rule in the spring. The favorable ruling from the SEC is expected any day now.Transfers give the Gators full deck at receiver See GATORS, B3Justin Thomas watches his tee shot on the “ fth hole during the “ nal round of the Bridgestone Invitational golf tournament at Firestone Country Club on Sunday in Akron, Ohio. [AP PHOTO/DAVID DERMER] By Doug FergusonThe Associated PressAKRON, Ohio „ Justin Thomas took all the drama out of the final World Golf Championship at Firestone, never letting anyone closer than two shots and closing with a 1-under 69 to win the Bridgestone Invitational for his third PGA Tour title this season.Sweeter than capturing his first World Golf Champion-ship was the sight behind the 18th green Sunday. His grandparents, Paul and Phyllis Thomas, watched him win for the first time on the PGA Tour. Paul Thomas was a career club professional and played at Firestone in the 1960 PGA Championship, missing the 54-hole cut. His son, Mike Thomas, also is a career club pro in Kentucky and a former PGA of America board member.I got a little choked up when I saw grandma and grandpa over there,Ž Thomas said. Its really cool. They dont get to come out very often.Ž They saw a one-man show.Playing in the final group with Rory McIlroy, the 25-year-old Thomas made only two birdies. That was all he needed on a day when just about everyone within range was making all the mistakes.McIlroy finished the front nine with consecutive bogeys and never recovered. Ian Poulter shot 74. Jason Day tried to make a run by making three straight birdies, only to play the final six holes in 5 over to shoot 73.Tiger Woods, an eight-time winner at Firestone, started 11 shots behind and figured he would go out with a bang by playing aggressively. He turned in a dud, and a birdie on the 18th hole gave him another 73 to leave him 15 shots behind.Thomas coasts to Firestone win Chase Elliott, center, celebrates after winning a NASCAR Cup Series auto race Sunday in Watkins Glen, N.Y. [AP PHOTOS/JULIE JACOBSON] Chase Elliott (9) leads the pack around Turn 1 during a NASCAR Cup Series auto race Sunday in Watkins Glen, N.Y. By John KekisThe Associated PressWATKINS GLEN, N.Y. „ Like father, like son.Mired in a confounding losing streak since the start of his NASCAR Cup career in 2016, Chase Elliott finally broke into the win column Sunday, holding off road course ace Martin Truex Jr. at Watkins Glen.The son of Hall of Famer Bill Elliott, who also won his first Cup race on a road course (Riverside in 1983 in his 124th start), Chase celebrated a tri-umph he will cherish forever. Out of fuel after the finish, he was pushed to victory lane by the banged-up No. 48 Chevy of seven-time Cup champion Jimmie Johnson, a teammate and one of his staunchest sup-porters, as his father raced to join the celebration.Toss in the raucous cheers of the sellout crowd and it doesnt get much better than that.Its something Ill never forget,Ž said Elliott, who has finished second eight times in Cup. I was going to do a burnout, but I ran out of gas. Certainly glad that we were on the front end today.ŽBREAKING THROUGHChase Elliott wins at Watkins Glen, his rst Cup victoryBy Barry WilnerThe Associated PressCANTON, Ohio „ Just as the demonstrations of players during the national anthem have become a means of expression for NFL players, the stage at the Hall of Fame inductions often turns into a political platform. It certainly did Saturday night.Ray Lewis did so with his words, and Randy Moss with his tie.There even were political tones with a different target 600 miles away during Terrell Owens speech at his personal celebration of entering the pro football shrine.Lewis was a man on the prowl as he concluded proceedings in Canton, just as he was on the field as the greatest linebacker of his generation. He eschewed the lectern, wearing a cordless microphone for his 33-minute oratory focusing on hope, faith and love,Ž on family, honor, legacy.ŽAnd then on the division in this country.Our country needs real leaders,Ž Lewis said. We need people that are willing to step up and take action. We need people willing to fight for what is good and what is right.NFL Hall of Fame speeches get politicalFormer NFL player Ray Lewis delivers his speech Saturday during an induction ceremony at the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio. [RON SCHWANE/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] See SPEECHES, B3 See FIRESTONE, B3 See ELLIOTT, B3

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B2 Monday, August 6, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com SCOREBOARD HOW TO REACH USPaul Jenkins, Sports Editor Email: paul.jenkins@dailycommercial.com Phone: 352-365-8204SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results by calling 352-365-8204. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. Results submitted after 9:30 p.m. may not appear in the next days edition of the Daily Commercial.SPORTS ON TVBASEBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 „ Little League, Southeast Regional, “ rst semi“ nal, at Warner Robins, Ga. 9 p.m. ESPN2 „ Little League, Southwest Regional, “ rst semi“ nal, at Waco, Texas CYCLING 3:30 p.m. FS2 „ Tour of Utah, Prolouge, at St. George, Utah MLB BASEBALL 7 p.m. FS-Florida „ St. Louis at Miami 8 p.m. ESPN „ N.Y. Yankees at Chicago White Sox 10 p.m. MLB „ Regional coverage, Houston at San Francisco OR Detroit at L.A. Angels SOCCER 7:20 a.m. FS2 „ Women, FIFA Under-20 World Cup, Group stage: Group D, Nigeria vs. Germany, at Saint-Malo, France 10:20 a.m. FS2 „ Women, FIFA Under-20 World Cup, Group stage: Group C, Paraguay vs. Spain, at Concarneau, France 1:20 p.m. FS2 „ Women, FIFA Under-20 World Cup, Group stage: Group C, United States vs. Japan, at Concarneau, France 5:30 p.m. FS2 „ Women, FIFA Under-20 World Cup, Group stage: Group D, Haiti vs. China, at Saint-Malo, France (sameday tape) WNBA BASKETBALL 11 a.m. NBA „ Seattle at New York AUTO RACING NASCAR MONSTER ENERGY CUP-GO BOWLING AT THE GLEN RESULTSSunday At Watkins Glen International Watkins Glen, N.Y. Lap length: 2.45 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (3) Chase Elliott, Chevrolet, 90. 2. (4) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 90. 3. (2) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 90. 4. (21) Daniel Suarez, Toyota, 90. 5. (9) Erik Jones, Toyota, 90. 6. (5) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 90. 7. (14) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 90. 8. (16) William Byron, Chevrolet, 90. 9. (36) Kurt Busch, Ford, 90. 10. (15) Kevin Harvick, Ford, 90. 11. (18) Clint Bowyer, Ford, 90. 12. (11) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 90. 13. (1) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 90. 14. (22) Alex Bowman, Chevrolet, 90. 15. (8) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 90. 16. (23) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 90. 17. (17) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 90. 18. (12) Michael McDowell, Ford, 90. 19. (19) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 90. 20. (20) Chris Buescher, Chevrolet, 90. 21. (10) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 90. 22. (7) Aric Almirola, Ford, 90. 23. (30) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 90. 24. (27) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 90. 25. (29) Bubba Wallace, Chevrolet, 89. 26. (25) David Ragan, Ford, 89. 27. (24) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 89. 28. (37) Paul Menard, Ford, 89. 29. (26) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 89. 30. (13) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 89. 31. (35) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 88. 32. (32) Ross Chastain, Chevrolet, Suspension, 77. 33. (28) Matt DiBenedetto, Ford, 75. 34. (31) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 73. 35. (34) Spencer Gallagher, Toyota, 73. 36. (33) Josh Bilicki, Ford, Electrical, 69. 37. (6) Joey Logano, Ford, Accident, 1. Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 98.928 mph. Time of Race: 2 hours, 13 minutes, 44 seconds. Margin of Victory: 7.560 Seconds. Caution Flags: 4 for 11 laps. Lead Changes: 9 among 5 drivers. Lap Leaders: D. Hamlin 1; Kyle Busch 2-17; M. Truex Jr. 18-21; J. Johnson 22; Kyle Busch 23-26; C. Elliott 27-44; Kyle Busch 45-54; D. Hamlin 55; Kyle Busch 56; C. Elliott 57-90. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Lead, Laps Led): C. Elliott 2 times for 52 laps; Kyle Busch 4 times for 31 laps; M. Truex Jr. 1 time for 4 laps; D. Hamlin 2 times for 2 laps; J. Johnson 1 time for 1 lap. GOLF WORLD GOLF CHAMPIONSHIPSBRIDGESTONE INVITATIONALSundays leaders at Firestone CC (South) Akron, Ohio Purse: $10 million. Yardage: 7,400; Par: 70 (35-35)FinalJustin Thomas (550), $1,700,000 65-64-67-69„265 Kyle Stanley (315), $1,072,000 63-68-70-68„269 Dustin Johnson (170), $510,000 69-71-66-64„270 Thorbjrn Olesen, $510,000 71-67-68-64„270 Brooks Koepka (115), $357,000 66-70-68-67„271 Patrick Cantlay (93), $241,375 64-72-68-68„272 Anirban Lahiri (93), $241,375 65-70-69-68„272 Rory McIlroy (93), $241,375 65-67-67-73„272 Aaron Wise (93), $241,375 67-71-67-67„272 Jason Day (71), $160,875 65-66-69-73„273 Tony Finau (71), $160,875 68-66-71-68„273 Si Woo Kim (71), $160,875 64-68-72-69„273 Ian Poulter (71), $160,875 62-67-70-74„273 Tommy Fleetwood (59), $128,250 66-63-74-71„274 Matt Kuchar (59), $128,250 68-70-67-69„274 Marc Leishman (59), $128,250 65-69-67-73„274 Rafa Cabrera Bello (51), $104,250 68-67-69-71„275 Ross Fisher (51), $104,250 67-68-71-69„275 Rickie Fowler (51), $104,250 63-74-65-73„275 Zach Johnson (51), $104,250 69-70-67-69„275 Jon Rahm (51), $104,250 64-70-68-73„275 Gary Woodland (51), $104,250 67-71-69-68„275 Cameron Smith (44), $92,250 70-70-69-67„276 Luke List (39), $87,250 65-68-71-73„277 Phil Mickelson (39), $87,250 66-69-72-70„277 Louis Oosthuizen (39), $87,250 68-66-69-74„277 Webb Simpson (39), $87,250 69-65-71-72„277 Tyrrell Hatton (34), $81,250 68-67-72-71„278 Patrick Reed (34), $81,250 66-70-70-72„278 Bryson DeChambeau (32), $79,250 75-69-68-67„279 Kiradech Aphibarnrat, $74,750 70-70-69-71„280 Paul Casey (25), $74,750 68-71-71-70„280 Patton Kizzire (25), $74,750 68-67-74-71„280 Kevin Na (25), $74,750 65-72-70-73„280 Alex Noren (25), $74,750 70-73-66-71„280 Charl Schwartzel (25), $74,750 71-72-74-63„280 Bubba Watson (25), $74,750 71-69-67-73„280 Tiger Woods (25), $74,750 66-68-73-73„280 Kevin Chappell (15), $66,250 71-72-68-70„281 Sergio Garcia (15), $66,250 70-69-67-75„281 Kevin Kisner (15), $66,250 74-68-68-71„281 HaoTong Li, $66,250 66-67-72-76„281 Hideki Matsuyama (15), $66,250 67-72-70-72„281 Francesco Molinari (15), $66,250 70-72-70-69„281 Wade Ormsby, $66,250 69-71-68-73„281 Henrik Stenson (15), $66,250 70-69-69-73„281 Ryuko Tokimatsu, $66,250 68-71-71-71„281 Daniel Berger (10), $59,250 67-71-71-73„282 Alexander Bjrk, $59,250 69-71-71-71„282 Matthew Fitzpatrick, $59,250 66-70-73-73„282 Russell Knox (10), $59,250 67-70-73-72„282 Ted Potter, Jr. (10), $59,250 70-66-75-71„282 Austin Cook (7), $54,875 73-69-71-70„283 Charley Hoffman (7), $54,875 69-70-73-71„283 Brandon Stone, $54,875 71-74-66-72„283 Jhonattan Vegas (7), $54,875 70-75-70-68„283 Byeong Hun An (6), $52,750 68-72-75-69„284 Andrew Landry (6), $52,750 70-67-74-73„284 Adam Scott (6), $52,750 68-75-67-74„284 Jordan Spieth (6), $51,500 71-72-68-74„285 Brendan Steele (6), $51,500 73-69-70-73„285 Brian Harman (5), $50,750 71-68-72-75„286 Branden Grace (5), $49,750 73-74-71-69„287 Satoshi Kodaira (5), $49,750 73-69-71-74„287 Pat Perez (5), $49,750 68-70-73-76„287 Paul Dunne, $48,500 71-68-75-74„288 Emiliano Grillo (4), $48,500 72-70-68-78„288 Xander Schauffele (4), $47,750 69-73-72-78„292 Kodai Ichihara, $47,000 73-74-78-68„293 Shubhankar Sharma, $47,000 72-79-72-70„293 Jaco Ahlers, $46,500 68-79-77-79„303PGA TOURBARRACUDA CHAMPIONSHIP Saturdays leaders at Montreux Golf & Country Club, Reno, Nev. Purse: $3.4 million. Yardage: 7,472; Par: 72(Tournament uses the modi“ ed Stableford scoring format, with 8 points for an albatross, 5 points for an eagle, 2 points for a birdie and zero points for a par. One point is subtracted for a bogey, and 3 points are subtracted for a double bogey or worse.) Third RoundAndrew Putnam 6 17 15„38 Sam Saunders 10 13 12„35 Chad Campbell 6 4 22„32 Shane Lowry 10 12 8„30 John Oda 7 9 13„29 J.J. Spaun 7 12 10„29 Chris Stroud 7 6 13„26 Michael Thompson 10 3 13„26 Martin Laird 9 8 9„26 Aaron Baddeley 14 12 0„26 Ollie Schniederjans 17 8 1„26 Derek Fathauer 6 14 5„25 Zac Blair 0 12 12„24 Scott Stallings 9 9 6„24 Matt Jones 10 10 4„24 Tom Hoge 5 8 10„23 Stuart Appleby 3 10 10„23 Ethan Tracy 9 6 8„23 Alex Cejka 10 6 7„23 Dylan Meyer 10 2 10„22 Ben Silverman 11 8 3„22 Ken Duke 2 8 11„21 Patrick Rodgers 9 3 9„21 C.T. Pan 7 8 6„21 Brandon Harkins 5 13 3„21 Hudson Swafford 12 10 -1„21 Parker McLachlin 4 3 13„20 Johnson Wagner 6 2 12„20 Doug Ghim 6 3 11„20 Tom Lovelady 10 6 4„20 Charlie Beljan 10 5 5„20 Seamus Power 8 10 2„20 John Merrick 11 12 -3„20 Hunter Mahan 7 12 0„19 Vaughn Taylor 2 6 10„18 Jonas Blixt 3 6 9„18 Kris Blanks 6 4 8„18 Jonathan Byrd 1 9 8„18 Lanto Grif“ n 8 5 5„18 Denny McCarthy 14 3 1„18 Ryan Palmer 12 6 0„18 Kevin Tway 8 8 1„17 Dicky Pride 8 1 7„16 Nick Hardy 6 4 6„16 Conrad Shindler 5 8 3„16 Ricky Barnes -1 15 2„16 Tyrone Van Aswegen 11 6 -1„16 Joel Dahmen 9 9 -2„16 William McGirt 6 2 7„15 D.J. Trahan 8 10 -3„15 Padraig Harrington 6 1 6„13 Billy Hurley III 6 1 6„13 Harris English 2 8 3„13 Brett Stegmaier 5 8 0„13 Xinjun Zhang 6 2 4„12 Jonathan Kaye 8 7 -3„12 Sulman Raza 2 14 -4„12 Retief Goosen 6 11 -5„12 Graeme McDowell 4 3 4„11 Cameron Beckman 5 3 3„11 Andres Romero 4 5 2„11 Robert Streb 13 -3 1„11 Rod Pampling 9 4 -2„11 Grant Booth 0 7 3„10 Martin Flores 4 5 1„10 Talor Gooch 7 3 0„10 Nicholas Lindheim 1 6 1„ 8 Heath Slocum 4 5 -2„ 7 Stephan Jaeger 10 -2 -2„ 6 Nick Taylor 2 6 -3„ 5 Brendon de Jonge 7 4 -6„ 5 Brian Davis 5 5 -7„ 3 Omar Uresti 8 2 -8„ 2(Final results from Sunday were not available at press time.)LPGA TOURWOMENS BRITISH OPENSundays leaders at Royal Lytham & St. Annes Golf Links, Lytham St. Annes, England. Purse: $3.25 million. Yardage: 6,585; Par: 72 (35-37) (a-denotes amateur)FinalGeorgia Hall, $490,000 67-68-69-67„271 Pornanong Phatlum, $300,388 67-67-69-70„273 So Yeon Ryu, $217,910 69-69-67-70„275 Sei Young Kim, $138,420 71-71-71-66„279 Ariya Jutanugarn, $138,420 71-70-69-69„279 Mamiko Higa, $138,420 66-69-71-73„279 Shanshan Feng, $82,505 71-71-69-69„280 Carlota Ciganda, $82,505 69-73-68-70„280 Yu Liu, $82,505 69-72-68-71„280 Minjee Lee, $66,606 65-70-71-75„281 Jeong Eun Lee, $55,956 73-70-71-68„282 Thidapa Suwannapura, $55,956 72-71-67-72„282 Lydia Ko, $55,956 68-71-70-73„282 Brooke M. Henderson, $55,956 69-70-69-74„282 Jaye Marie Green, $43,088 74-69-73-67„283 Su Oh, $43,088 73-70-72-68„283 Brittany Altomare, $43,088 70-70-70-73„283 Teresa Lu, $43,088 67-69-73-74„283 Sung Hyun Park, $43,088 67-70-69-77„283 Haeji Kang, $37,168 72-72-70-70„284 Madelene Sagstrom, $37,168 69-70-74-71„284 Aditi Ashok, $32,070 72-72-73-68„285 Ryann OToole, $32,070 72-71-72-70„285 Sandra Gal, $32,070 68-74-72-71„285 Hyo Joo Kim, $32,070 72-69-72-72„285 Pannarat Thanapolboonyaras, $32,070 73-71-69-72„285 Phoebe Yao, $32,070 71-71-67-76„285 Mi Hyang Lee, $24,856 67-74-76-69„286 Ally McDonald, $24,856 71-74-71-70„286 Marina Alex, $24,856 71-73-71-71„286 In Gee Chun, $24,856 72-72-70-72„286 Amy Olson, $24,856 72-70-71-73„286 Cristie Kerr, $24,856 72-72-68-74„286 Mina Harigae, $24,856 68-71-69-78„286 Amy Yang, $19,818 72-73-72-70„287 Wei-Ling Hsu, $19,818 73-69-73-72„287 Mi Jung Hur, $19,818 70-74-70-73„287 Pernilla Lindberg, $19,818 71-68-72-76„287 Mo Martin, $17,104 73-72-71-72„288 Bronte Law, $17,104 70-74-72-72„288 In-Kyung Kim, $17,104 70-71-74-73„288 Nelly Korda, $14,571 71-72-75-71„289 Tiffany Joh, $14,571 71-74-72-72„289 Moriya Jutanugarn, $14,571 69-75-72-73„289 Catriona Matthew, $14,571 71-70-72-76„289 Jessica Korda, $14,571 71-70-70-78„289 Azahara Munoz, $12,499 77-66-74-73„290 Florentyna Parker, $12,499 69-70-75-76„290 Lizette Salas, $12,499 71-73-69-77„290 Klara Spilkova, $11,348 76-68-75-72„291 Mariajo Uribe, $11,348 73-70-74-74„291 Eri Okay ama, $10,525 73-72-77-70„292 Hee Young Park, $10,525 76-69-71-76„292 Caroline Inglis, $10,525 73-70-72-77„292 Hannah Green, $9,702 75-70-76-72„293 Sun-Ju Ahn, $9,702 74-71-75-73„293 Emma Talley, $8,717 72-73-77-72„294 Lydia Hall, $8,717 69-72-77-76„294 Nuria Iturrios, $8,717 74-70-73-77„294 Annie Park, $8,717 71-73-73-77„294 Rebecca Artis, $7,977 72-71-76-77„296 Celine Herbin, $7,977 70-71-77-78„296 Meghan MacLaren, $7,730 73-72-72-80„297 a-Atthaya Thitikul 73-71-79-77„300 Cloe Frankish, $7,567 70-75-77-78„300PGA TOUR CHAMPIONS3M CHAMPIONSHIPSundays leaders at TPC Twin Cities, Blaine, Minn. Purse: $1.75 million. Yardage: 7,114; Par: 72FinalKenny Perry, $262,500 66-60-69„195 Wes Short, Jr., $154,000 67-68-63„198 Glen Day, $115,500 66-65-70„201 Tom Gillis, $115,500 67-67-67„201 Joe Durant, $64,400 71-65-67„203 Bob Estes, $64,400 72-65-66„203 Lee Janzen, $64,400 66-68-69„203 Tim Petrovic, $64,400 70-65-68„203 Kevin Sutherland, $64,400 67-70-66„203 Scott Hoch, $42,000 70-69-65„204 Tom Lehman, $42,000 69-66-69„204 Scott Parel, $42,000 67-69-68„204 Tom Byrum, $33,250 70-67-68„205 Jerry Smith, $33,250 64-70-71„205 Duffy Waldorf, $33,250 69-70-66„205 Woody Austin, $27,169 72-66-68„206 Michael Bradley, $27,169 71-67-68„206 Kent Jones, $27,169 70-67-69„206 Kirk Triplett, $27,169 69-68-69„206 John Daly, $20,545 69-72-66„207 Jay Haas, $20,545 67-68-72„207 Larry Mize, $20,545 67-72-68„207 Gene Sauers, $20,545 72-66-69„207 Joey Sindelar, $20,545 68-72-67„207 Bart Bryant, $17,500 68-69-71„208 Olin Browne, $15,225 71-71-67„209 Peter Lonard, $15,225 66-75-68„209 Tom Pernice Jr., $15,225 68-71-70„209 John Riegger, $15,225 72-66-71„209 Jeff Sluman, $15,225 70-70-69„209 Marco Dawson, $12,075 73-70-67„210 Brian Henninger, $12,075 73-68-69„210 Rocco Mediate, $12,075 68-68-74„210 Corey Pavin, $12,075 70-69-71„210 Mark Walker, $12,075 70-67-73„210 Tommy Tolles, $10,500 68-70-73„211 Dan Forsman, $9,800 70-75-67„212 Rod Spittle, $9,800 74-70-68„212 Scott Dunlap, $8,925 76-65-72„213 Doug Garwood, $8,925 69-72-72„213 Mike Goodes, $8,925 74-68-71„213 Tommy Armour III, $7,525 71-71-72„214 Steve Flesch, $7,525 75-68-71„214 Todd Hamilton, $7,525 70-74-70„214 Ken Tanigawa, $7,525 76-69-69„214 Scott Verplank, $7,525 71-74-69„214 Bill Glasson, $5,600 71-72-72„215 John Inman, $5,600 70-73-72„215 Steve Pate, $5,600 73-69-73„215 Fran Quinn, $5,600 72-72-71„215 Esteban Toledo, $5,600 68-72-75„215 Willie Wood, $5,600 71-70-74„215 Mark Brooks, $3,850 70-75-71„216 Carlos Franco, $3,850 73-70-73„216 Robert Gamez, $3,850 73-76-67„216 Paul Goydos, $3,850 71-75-70„216 Gary Hallberg, $3,850 70-76-70„216 David McKenzie, $3,850 77-67-72„216 Mike Small, $3,850 69-73-74„216 Billy Mayfair, $3,063 73-73-71„217 Mike Reid, $3,063 68-73-76„217 Ted Schulz, $2,800 73-75-70„218 R.W. Eaks, $2,450 71-79-69„219 David Eger, $2,450 73-71-75„219 David Frost, $2,450 73-71-75„219 Jay Don Blake, $2,100 73-74-73„220 John Harris, $1,715 78-73-72„223 John Huston, $1,715 74-76-73„223 Tom Kite, $1,715 74-70-79„223 Jeff LeMaster, $1,715 74-74-75„223 Neal Lancaster, $1,383 74-70-80„224 Chad Proehl, $1,383 71-73-80„224 Blaine McCallister, $1,225 77-77-72„226 Ron Streck, $1,155 72-82-75„229 Keith Clearwater, $1,085 77-79-74„230 Dave Stockton, Jr., $1,015 78-75-81„234 Charlie Rymer, $945 77-84-75„236EUROPEAN TOURFIJI INTERNATIONALSundays leaders at Natadola Bay Championship GC, Natadola, Fiji Purse: $1.25 million. Yardage: 7,190; Par: 72 FinalGaganjeet Bhullar, India 70-69-69-66„274 Anthony Quayle, Australia 75-66-71-63„275 Ben Campbell, New Zealand 67-66-77-66„276 Ernie Els, South Africa 72-70-69-65„276 Jarryd Felton, Australia 67-71-71-69„278 Andrew Dodt, Australia 67-70-72-71„280 Jake McLeod, Australia 72-67-70-71„280 Poom Saksanin, Thailand 73-68-71-68„280 Andrew Martin, Australia 72-71-70-69„282 Matthew Millar, Australia 71-73-71-67„282 Matthew Grif“ n, Australia 69-72-71-71„283 Steven Jeffress, Australia 73-66-75-69„283 Ashun Wu, China 70-69-74-70„283 Richard Green, Australia 76-67-73-68„284 James Marchesani, Australia 72-70-74-68„284 Damien Jordan, Australia 75-70-69-71„285 Terry Pilkadaris, Australia 70-68-71-76„285 Harry Bateman, New Zealand 70-69-74-73„286 Mark Brown, New Zealand 75-68-71-72„286 Thitiphun Chuayprakong, Thailand 75-72-69-70„286 Nick Cullen, Australia 67-72-75-72„286 Lucas Herbert, Australia 70-75-71-70„286 Travis Smyth, Australia 71-70-72-73„286 Michael Wright, Australia 73-75-71-67„286AlsoVijay Singh, Fiji 76-72-71-68„287 Johannes Veerman, U.S. 72-74-70-71„287 John Catlin, United States 75-72-74-71„292WEB.COM TOURKC GOLF CLASSICSundays leaders at Nicklaus GC at LionsGate, Overland Park, Kan. Purse: $675,000. Yardage: 7,237; Par: 71 (35-36)FinalSepp Straka, $121,500 64-65-64-69„262 Kyle Jones, $72,900 63-66-63-71„263 Sam Burns, $45,900 66-64-70-66„266 Max Rottluff, $29,700 67-63-69-68„267 Chris Thompson, $29,700 67-64-67-69„267 Brad Brunner, $22,613 70-68-63-68„269 Sebastian Cappelen, $22,613 68-68-64-69„269 Billy Kennerly, $22,613 67-66-68-68„269 Rico Hoey, $18,900 67-71-68-64„270 Brian Richey, $18,900 67-70-65-68„270 Anders Albertson, $15,525 70-69-66-66„271 Vince Covello, $15,525 63-72-68-68„271 Bo Hoag, $15,525 66-67-65-73„271 Bio Kim, $12,150 63-69-71-69„272 Kyoung-Hoon Lee, $12,150 70-67-66-69„272 Roger Sloan, $12,150 69-66-64-73„272 Jimmy Gunn, $7,987 69-68-69-67„273 Scott Langley, $7,987 68-71-69-65„273 Alex Prugh, $7,987 68-70-68-67„273 Brady Schnell, $7,987 69-69-67-68„273 Jimmy Stanger, $7,987 69-66-70-68„273 Ryan Brehm, $7,987 73-64-67-69„273 Adam Long, $7,987 65-70-67-71„273 Chad Ramey, $7,987 68-69-67-69„273 Roland Thatcher, $7,987 64-71-66-72„273 Jos Toledo, $7,987 69-69-62-73„273 Mark Anderson, $4,590 67-72-69-66„274 Michael Johnson, $4,590 70-66-68-70„274 Curtis Luck, $4,590 65-69-72-68„274 Brandon Matthews, $4,590 73-65-66-70„274 Carlos Ortiz, $4,590 69-69-67-69„274 Andrew Svoboda, $4,590 70-65-68-71„274 Martin Trainer, $4,590 63-74-70-67„274 Michael Visacki, $4,590 65-68-69-72„274 Richard H. Lee, $3,780 66-69-70-70„275 Gonzalo Fernandez-Castao, $3,134 66-70-70-70„276 Oscar Fraustro, $3,134 68-71-65-72„276 Seann Harlingten, $3,134 67-71-68-70„276 Kramer Hickok, $3,134 64-71-73-68„276 Steven Ihm, $3,134 70-68-71-67„276 Seth Reeves, $3,134 70-69-68-69„276 Wade Bin“ eld, $3,134 68-68-66-74„276 Connor Arendell, $2,218 68-70-68-71„277 Brian Campbell, $2,218 68-70-72-67„277 Rafael Campos, $2,218 66-73-72-66„277 Justin Lower, $2,218 66-72-69-70„277 Mike Van Sickle, $2,218 66-69-71-71„277 Wyndham Clark, $2,218 67-67-69-74„277 Sungjae Im, $2,218 66-68-71-72„277 Armando Favela, $1,887 66-70-74-68„278 Jim Knous, $1,887 68-66-75-69„278 Augusto Nez, $1,887 68-68-73-69„278 Roberto Castro, $1,887 70-68-67-73„278 Jin Park, $1,887 67-64-73-74„278 Casey Wittenberg, $1,887 64-73-72-69„278 Christian Brand, $1,782 68-68-71-72„279 Seth Fair, $1,782 70-68-68-73„279 Justin Hueber, $1,782 67-70-68-74„279 Nelson Ledesma, $1,782 68-71-69-71„279 Doug Letson, $1,782 68-69-68-74„279 Luke Guthrie, $1,742 72-66-72-70„280 Mark Baldwin, $1,701 69-70-69-73„281 Conner Godsey, $1,701 72-67-71-71„281 Rick Lamb, $1,701 68-68-71-74„281 Gerardo Ruiz, $1,701 73-66-71-71„281 Josh Teater, $1,701 67-70-72-72„281 Bryan Bigley, $1,654 69-70-70-73„282 Max Marsico, $1,654 66-68-70-78„282 J.T. Grif“ n, $1,634 68-71-68-76„283 SOCCER MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCERAll times Eastern EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T PTS GF GA Atlanta United FC 14 4 6 48 50 28 New York City FC 13 5 5 44 45 29 New York Red Bulls 13 6 2 41 42 22 Columbus 10 7 6 36 30 29 Montreal 9 13 2 29 30 40 New England 7 7 8 29 36 35 Philadelphia 8 11 3 27 29 37 Orlando City 7 14 2 23 35 54 Toronto FC 6 11 5 23 37 41 Chicago 6 13 5 23 35 48 D.C. United 4 9 6 18 30 36 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T PTS GF GA FC Dallas 12 4 6 42 36 28 Portland 10 3 7 37 33 25 Sporting Kansas City 10 6 6 36 40 30 Los Angeles FC 10 5 6 36 44 35 Los Angeles Galaxy 10 8 5 35 44 38 Real Salt Lake 10 9 4 34 33 40 Vancouver 8 9 6 30 36 46 Seattle 8 9 5 29 24 25 Minnesota United 9 13 1 28 36 46 Houston 7 9 6 27 39 33 Colorado 5 12 5 20 27 37 San Jose 3 12 7 16 32 41 3 points for victory, 1 point for tieAug. 1 All-Star Game at AtlantaMLS All-Stars 1, Juventus (Italy) 1, tieSaturdays GamesToronto FC 2, Atlanta United FC 2, tie D.C. United 1, Montreal 1, tie New England 3, Orlando City 3, tie San Jose 3, FC Dallas 1 Seattle 2, Minnesota United 1 Vancouver 2, New York City FC 2, tie Colorado 2, Los Angeles Galaxy 1 Sporting Kansas City 1, Houston 0 Real Salt Lake 2, Chicago 1 Portland 3, Philadelphia 0Sundays GameLos Angeles FC at New York Red Bulls, lateSaturday, Aug. 11Houston at Columbus, 7:30 p.m. Philadelphia at New England, 7:30 p.m. New York Red Bulls at Chicago, 8:30 p.m. San Jose at Colorado, 9 p.m. Montreal at Real Salt Lake, 10 p.m. Minnesota United at Los Angeles Galaxy, 10:30 p.m. Sporting Kansas City at Los Angeles FC, 10:30 p.m. Vancouver at Portland, 11 p.m.Sunday, Aug. 12New York City FC at Toronto FC, 4 p.m. Orlando City at D.C. United, 8 p.m. FC Dallas at Seattle, 10 p.m.U.S. OPEN CUPAll times Eastern (Home teams listed “ rst) SEMIFINALS WednesdayChicago Fire (MLS) at Philadelphia Union (MLS), 7 p.m. Los Angeles FC (MLS) at Houston Dynamo (MLS), 8:30 p.m.NATIONAL WOMENS SOCCER LEAGUEAll times Eastern W L T PTS GF GA North Carolina 14 1 4 46 41 14 Seattle 8 4 6 30 20 15 Portland 8 5 5 29 29 22 Orlando 8 6 5 29 27 26 Chicago 7 4 7 28 26 22 Utah 5 6 7 22 14 18 Houston 5 7 5 20 21 28 Washington 2 11 4 10 11 24 Sky Blue FC 0 13 3 3 12 32 3 points for victory, 1 point for tie.Sundays GamesPortland at North Carolina, late Sky Blue FC at Orlando, late Utah at Houston, late Washington at Seattle, lateWednesdays GamesWashington at Utah, 10 p.m. Fridays GameNorth Carolina at Chicago, 8 p.m. PRO BASKETBALL WNBAAll times EasternEASTERN CONFERENCE W L PCT. GB Atlanta 17 10 .630 „ Washington 16 11 .593 1 Connecticut 16 12 .571 1 Chicago 10 18 .357 7 New York 7 20 .259 10 Indiana 5 23 .179 12WESTERN CONFERENCE W L PCT. GB x-Seattle 21 7 .750 „ Los Angeles 16 11 .593 4 Phoenix 16 12 .571 5 Minnesota 15 12 .556 5 Dallas 14 14 .500 7 Las Vegas 12 15 .444 8 x-clinched playoff spotSaturdays GameIndiana 68, New York 55Sundays GamesConnecticut 109, Las Vegas 88 Washington 76, Dallas 74 Phoenix at Los Angeles, late Atlanta at Minnesota, lateTodays GameSeattle at New York, 11 a.m.Tuesdays GamesSeattle at Indiana, 7 p.m. Las Vegas at Atlanta, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Chicago, 8:30 p.m. Washington at Phoenix, 10 p.m. ODDS PREGAME.COM LINEMAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL Today National LeagueFAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE St. Louis -145 at Miami +135 at New York -165 Cincinnati +155 at Colorado -140 Pittsburgh +130 at Arizona -125 Philadelphia +115American LeagueNew York -196 at Chicago +181 at Cleveland -185 Minnesota +170 Seattle -115 at Texas +105 at Los Angeles Off Detroit OffInterleagueChi. Cubs -200 at Kansas City +180 Houston -148 at San Francisco +138NFL PRESEASON ThursdayFAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG at Buffalo 1 2 34 Carolina at Cincinnati Pk 2 36 Chicago at Miami 1 1 34 Tampa Bay at N.Y. Giants 3 2 34 Cleveland at Philadelphia 3 3 35 Pittsburgh at Jacksonville 3 2 34 New Orleans at Baltimore 1 2 36 L.A. Rams at New England 4 4 37 Washington at Green Bay Pk Pk 35 Tennessee at Kansas City 2 2 35 Houston at San Francisco 3 3 35 Dallas at Seattle 2 3 34 IndianapolisFridayat N.Y. Jets 1 2 35 Atlanta at Oakland 3 3 36 DetroitAug. 11at Denver 1 Pk 34 Minnesota at Arizona 2 2 36 L.A. ChargersUpdated Odds Available at Pregame.com TRANSACTIONS BASEBALLAmerican LeagueHOUSTON ASTROS „ Placed RHP Lance McCullers Jr. on the 10-day DL. Reinstated RHP Roberto Osuna from the restricted list. LOS ANGELES ANGELS „ Designated INF Luis Valbuena for assignment. Recalled RHP Deck McGuire from Salt Lake (PCL). MINNESOTA TWINS „ Sent RHP Aaron Slegers to Rochester (IL) for a rehab assignment. TAMPA BAY RAYS „ Optioned RHP Austin Pruitt to Durham (IL). Reinstated LHP Blake Snell from the 10-day DL.National LeagueARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS „ Released LHP Jorge De La Rosa. CHICAGO CUBS „ Sent RHP Anthony Bass to Iowa (PCL) for a rehab assignment. CINCINNATI REDS „ Optioned RHP Austin Brice to Louisville (IL). COLORADO ROCKIES „ Placed RHP Antonio Senzatela on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Friday, Aug. 3. Recalled OF David Dahl from Albuquerque (PCL). MIAMI MARLINS „ Sent RHP Drew Rucinski to Jupiter (FSL) for a rehab assignment. MILWAUKEE BREWERS „ Placed RHP Taylor Williams on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Friday, Aug. 3. Recalled RHP Jacob Barnes from Colorado Springs (PCL). Claimed RHP Jordan Lyles off waivers from San Diego. NEW YORK METS „ Placed RHP Anthony Swarzak on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Saturday, Aug. 4. Recalled RHP Jacob Rhame from Las Vegas (PCL). Traded RHP Eric Villanueva to Detroit for cash. Signed LHP Matt Gage to a minor league contract. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES „ Sent RHP Jerad Eickhoff to Clearwater (FSL) for a rehab assignment. PITTSBURGH PIRATES „ Optioned RHP Alex McRae to Indianapolis (IL). Recalled RHP Casey Sadler from Indianapolis. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS „ Claimed RHP Tyson Ross off waivers from San Diego. SAN DIEGO PADRES „ Selected the contract of RHP Trey Wingenter from El Paso (PCL). SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS „ Sent RHP Hunter Strickland to the AZL Giants Black for a rehab assignment. WASHINGTON NATIONALS „ Recalled RHP Austin Voth from Syracuse (IL).American AssociationGARY SOUTHSHORE RAILCATS „ Released RHP Edward Cruz. LINCOLN SALTDOGS „ Activated RHP Brad Thoutt from the DL. TEXAS AIRHOGS „ Signed C Sebastian Murray.FOOTBALLNational Football LeagueBUFFALO BILLS „ Activated WR Zay Jones from the non-football injury list. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS „ Waived S Corey Grif“ n. Signed G Chris Gonzalez to a one-year contract.SOCCERMajor League SoccerNEW YORK RED BULLS „ Placed D Tommy Redding on season-ending injury reserve. TENNIS ATP WORLD TOUR/WTA TOURCITI OPENSunday at William H.G. FitzGerald Tennis Center, Washington Purse: ATP, $1.89 million (WT500); WTA, $226,750 (Intl.); Surface: Hard-OutdoorMens Singles ChampionshipAlexander Zverev (1), Germany, def. Alex de Minaur, Australia, 6-2, 6-4.Mens Doubles ChampionshipJamie Murray, Britain, and Bruno Soares (4), Brazil, def. Mike Bryan, United States, and Edouard Roger-Vasselin, France, 3-6, 6-3, 10-4.Womens Doubles ChampionshipHan Xinyun, China, and Darija Jurak (3), Croatia, def. Alexa Guarachi, Chile, and Erin Routliffe (4), New Zealand, 6-3, 6-2.SATURDAYS RESULTS Mens Singles Quarter“ nalsAndrey Rublev (16), Russia, def. Denis Kudla, United States, 6-1, 6-4.Semi“ nalsAlexander Zverev (1), Germany, def. Stefanos Tsitsipas (10), Greece, 6-2, 6-4. Alex de Minaur, Australia, def. Andrey Rublev (16), Russia, 5-7, 7-6 (8), 6-4.Womens Singles Semi“ nalsSvetlana Kuznetsova, Russia, def. Andrea Petkovic, Germany, 6-2, 6-2. Donna Vekic (7), Croatia, def. Zheng Saisai, China, 7-5, 6-3.By Schuyler DixonThe Associated PressOXNARD, Calif. „ Tavon Austin never really had a fresh start with a new coach in Los Angeles because of a wrist injury that plagued him and a hamstring that popped before the last of five dis-appointing seasons with the Rams. The eighth overall pick in the 2013 draft believes the oppor-tunity has arrived through a trade to the Dallas Cow-boys and the health that Austin hoped would come with it. Having something to prove is nothing new for the 5-foot-8 hybrid receiver/returner/runner.Theres always going to be a chip on my shoul-der, No. 1 because Ive always been small,Ž Austin said. I had the same thing coming out, when I went No. 8. So the chips always going to be there regardless. But last year was a little hard, my injury and I didnt get a fair chance over there.ŽAt first, Austin really didnt know what to make of the draft-day deal that sent a sixth-round pick to LA. He had largely been a spectator when the Rams ended a 12-year playoff drought in the first season under offensive-minded coach Sean McVay.Austins first conversation with owner Jerry Jones boosted his spirits, and he later told reporters he was close to a recovery from ligament damage in his left wrist. He hasnt missed a day at training camp as part of a revamped group of targets for quarterback Dak Prescott. While he played in all 16 games for the NFC West champions with nine starts, Austin had just 13 catches for 47 yards. Most of his work was as a runner (59 carries, 270 yards and his only touchdown). Most of his time was spent on the bench.Last year was the first time I had hit rock bottom dealing with an injury and the media bashing me saying I couldnt do it,Ž said Austin, who had 1,689 yards and 12 touch-downs receiving and 1,238 yards and nine TDs rush-ing with the Rams, who were in St. Louis when they drafted him.But I stayed true to myself and I knew what happened to me. I wasnt a person to cry or point fingers or find any sym-pathy. If I went out there, I went out there. I thought I was ready, so thats what it was.ŽAustin tries to stay out of the spotlight after practices at camp, only occasionally stopping for interviews. The 28-year-old is soft-spoken and reserved, but quick with a smile once he gets to talking.The Cowboys signed a pair of free agents in Allen Hurns and Deonte Thompson, dumped franchise touchdown receptions leader Dez Bryant in a cost-cutting move and drafted Michael Gallup in the third round, a day before the trade for Austin. The change of scenery offered Austin the rare chance to fill a leadership void despite being new to Dallas. Not only are the Cowboys likely to have four new receiv-ers on the 53-man roster, they have a new coach at the position as well.Hes that veteran guy that I dont know that Ive really had that I can say, Hey, get them to do this,Ž receivers coach Sanjay Lal said. Because even in the walkthrough, hes working through his footwork, hes sinking his hips, which is how you build muscle memory. Dont waste these reps.ŽThe way Austin sees it, he didnt get Lals attention by doing anything unusual. Tavon Austin starts fresh with Cowboys

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DailyCommercial.com | Monday, August 6, 2018 B3There's one more step, so I'm praying it still gets cleared quick,Ž Jefferson said. When I transferred I already knew what could happen, I could come in and sit. But I wanted to leave anyway, so there was no doubt. I prayed about it, my family prayed about it, I had people in my corner just praying to God, just believing in God and things could work out in my favor.Right now I'm just focus-ing on camp and just going out there with my teammates.ŽWhile Jefferson and Grimes are happy and relieved about becoming instantly eligible, the Gators seem almost downright giddy.The players have seen, and continue to see, what these two highly rated receivers are capable of doing.Im super excited,Ž redshirt sophomore quarterback Feleipe Franks said. Theyre both really good weapons for us. Both are going to be utilized.Theyre both just supergood players. They both work hard on and off the field and are really good people, which is more important. Theyre just great assets to have on our team. Theyre naturally gifted.ŽIn Grimes, the Gators are getting a former five-star recruit from Fort Lauderdale St. Thomas Aquinas who is big (6-foot-5, 214 pounds) and fast and has already emerged as perhaps UFs best deep threat.In Jefferson, the Gators are getting an already polished and accomplished SEC wide receiver. In his two seasons with the Rebels, he combined to catch 91 passes for 999 yards and four touchdowns.Since hes been at UF, Jef-ferson has shown the ability to separate from defensive backs and make plays, many of them down the field.Grimes was asked Saturday what he likes about Jeffersons game.Everything,Ž he said. Hes smooth, flowing. Hes one of the best receivers Ive ever been around. Hes a phenom-enal player.ŽJefferson is the son of former standout NFL wide receiver Shawn Jefferson, who is now an assistant coach with the Miami Dolphins. By all accounts, Jef-ferson looks and plays a lot like his father.If so, its not by accident. Shawn Jefferson has been coaching his son for as long as Van can remember.My dad deserves a lot of credit,Ž Jefferson said. He taught me everything I know. Down the line, I learned things from other coaches as well, but my dad instilled in me everything I know. Getting out of breaks, creating separation. ... I owe it all to my dad.Hes been a great influence on my life. We talk every day. What can I do to get better?ŽJefferson is taking some of the things hes learned from his father and imparting them on his new wide receiver team-mates, including Grimes. Grimes said his overall game has improved dramatically since he arrived at UF in Janu-ary and he started taking tips from Jefferson.Hes taught me a lot,Ž Grimes said. Just the little things, like showing me how to get in and out of my breaks, how to be smooth with the route running.Being around such a good receiver like him, it kind of rubs off on you and you learn your own little rhythm being around guys like him.ŽGrimes is a big receiver who is starting to play like a smaller receiver in terms of quickness and fluidity. He credits Jeffer-son for the makeover.First coming in, I wouldnt say I was stiff, but I just wasnt as fluid as I wanted to be,Ž Grimes said. Working with him, hes taught me a lot of things with drills I can do, with stretches I can do, with rehab and stuff I can do.I give him the biggest props for helping me transition from being a 6-5 receiver thats kind of stiff to being a 6-5 receiver that plays fluid and smooth. Hes taught me a lot with that.Ž Jefferson said hes also been learning from Grimes and the other wide receivers.I was helping over the summer and they were help-ing me as well,Ž Jefferson said.This is a wide receiver group that probably would have been pretty solid even if Grimes and Jefferson had not been ruled eligible. GATORSFrom Page B1The Associated PressLYTHAM ST. ANNES, England „ Named in honor of a famous Masters victory, Georgia Hall has her hands on one of the big trophies in womens golf at the age of 22.The Englishwoman reeled in long-time leader Pornanong Phatlum in a gripping finalround duel at Royal Lytham to win the Womens British Open for her first major title on Sunday.Hull tapped in for a bogey „ her first of the day „ at the last hole to clinch a two-shot victory over Pornanong. Hall then hugged her playing partner from Thailand before being lifted off her feet by her caddie, father Wayne.It was fitting that Wayne, a former two-handicapper himself, was on the bag to experience the biggest moment of his daughters career.Georgia was born during the 1996 Masters won by English golfer Nick Faldo at Augusta, Georgia. She was named in honor of that victory, which came after Faldo overcame a six-stroke deficit to Greg Norman in the final round.Twenty-two years later, Hall is the pride of English golf just like Faldo was. And the way Hall kept her composure and kept producing the shots of her life down the stretch, there might be more major titles to come.Her round of 5-under 67, which included six birdies, saw her finish on 17-under 271. I was loving it deep down, hitting the shots under pres-sure,Ž said Hall, who barely showed any emotions all round. To get six birdies in the final round of a major is not bad.ŽHall, who receives a check of $490,000, became the first English major winner since Karen Stupples won this event in 2004, and the fourth overall along with Laura Davies and Alison Nicholas.She followed Stupples and Catriona Matthew „ in 2009 at Lytham „ as the only Brit-ish winners of the Womens British Open since it achieved major status in 2001.Roared on under blue skies by the large gallery desperate for a home winner, the 39th-ranked Hall started the day a shot behind Pornanong, who led after the second and third rounds.From the moment Pornanong curled in a long left-to-right putt at the second hole to answer Halls 15-foot birdie at the first, it had the makings of a duel in the Lytham sun.And a two-player race for the years fourth major was definitely established when both picked up a shot at No. 4 and Pornanong followed Hall in birdying No. 6. That regained a two-shot lead for Pornanong, who had also birdied the par-3 fifth hole.Hall was always chasing but was given hope when Pornanong bogeyed No. 8 to reduce her lead to one shot. Then, when Hall rolled in a 10-foot birdie putt at No. 13, they were tied for the first time since the first hole.Hall took the outright lead for the first time in the tour-nament after a 20-foot putt for birdie at the 16th hole and went down the last with a three-shot lead after Pornanong, ranked No. 97 and also seeking her first major and LPGA title, missed a two-foot putt to make dou-ble-bogey at No. 17.Hall played safe in three-putting from distance in front of Royal Lythams storied clubhouse and celebrated her first win on the LPGA Tour. She had never won on the Ladies European Tour, either.It is too good to be true,Ž Hall said. It was my goal when I was nine to win the British Open. I am so happy. I just had to stay calm and patient. It was very close up to the last two holes and I holed all the putts today.ŽRyu So-yeon of South Korea was third on 13 under after a final-round 70.Hall wins Womens British Open for 1st major titleEnglands Georgia Hall kisses the trophy after winning the Womens British Open at Royal Lytham & St Annes Golf Club in Lytham, England, on Sunday. [RICHARD SELLERS/PA VIA AP] How do we react to challenges in our country right now? Think about this,Ž he added, looking around at his fellow Hall of Famers. We can go from being legends to build-ing a legacy bigger than football, bigger than sports. I want us to work together to really take on these challenges, to look at our goals and what unites us. Surely, there is something.ŽWhile he never specifically mentioned anyone or any political party, Lewis delivered a message about unity that stretched far beyond the foot-ball field. It echoed the powerful speeches in recent years by LaDainian Tomlinson, Tony Dungy and Cris Carter.How about stopping our kids from dying in schools?Ž Lewis asked. Can we please put prayer back in schools? Please. How about protecting our children from a terrifying life of being sex trafficked? How about helping our neighbors that cant afford their medicine?How can we do this? How can we come together? The answer is simple. The answer is love. ... The love that sacrifices and is defined by action taken for others. The actions of step-ping up and being a leader. Its no different than we all did to get here. We rose to the challenge, week after week for the love of the game and for the love of our team. That love just doesnt go away when we retire. Its still in us burning to be used.ŽYes, the loudest cheers during Lewis time onstage came when he mentioned Baltimore or paid tribute to former teammates and coaches. But Lewis admit-ted to being hopeful that the words at the end of his speech would have a lasting impact.Instead of politicizing his speech, Moss wore a tie he said bore the names of 13 black men and women who have been killed by police in recent years. Late Saturday night, he explained his reasoning for wearing it to NFL Network.You see the names on my tie. Being able to use a big plat-form like this here at the Hall of Fame ... what I wanted to be able to express with my tie is to let these families know that theyre not alone. Im not here voicing; but by these names on my tie, at a big platform „ its the Pro Football Hall of Fame „ theres a lot of stuff going on in our country. I just wanted to let these family members know that theyre not alone.Ž Things could have certainly gone better,Ž Woods said. But it is what it is, and on to next week.ŽThomas must feel the same way. He had gone five months since his last victory, a playoff win at the Honda Classic. While he didnt feel he was playing poorly, he didnt have the results to back it up. Now he does, and Thomas heads to St. Louis next week for the PGA Championship.Thomas had not had a score better than 67, and he had not finished higher than a tie for 28th in his two previous appearances at Firestone.Im glad I finally played well around here, just in time to leave,Ž he said.Firestone has held tour events since the Rubber City Open in 1954. The World Series of Golf began in 1962, and it became an off icial PGA Tour event in 1976. In many respects, it was the precursor to the World Golf Champion-ships by bringing in winners from around the world.Bridgestone shifted its title sponsorship to the PGA Tour Champions, which will bring its Senior Players Championship to Firestone next year. The World Golf Cham-pionship instead will move to Memphis, Tennessee.Thomas finished at 15-under 265 for a four-shot victory over Kyle Stanley, who got within two shots of the lead until bogeys on the 13th and 14th holes. Stanley closed with a 68.Dustin Johnson, the worlds No. 1 player who was coming off a victory in the Canadian Open last week, started the final round 10 shots behind and shot 29 on the front nine. A birdie at No. 10 put him three shots behind, but that was all he had. John-son bogeyed the last hole for a 64 and shared third with Thorbjorn Olesen of Den-mark, who also had a 64.U.S. Open champion Brooks Koepka had a 67 to finish fifth. McIlroy won at Bay Hill in March and has three runner-up finishes, and he had said Saturday afternoon he was tired of finishing second. Not to worry. His 73 gave him a tie for sixth.Thomas becomes the 21st player to win a World Golf Championship and a major, and his three victories tie him with Johnson and Bubba Watson for most on the PGA Tour this year. The ninth vic-tory of his career moves him to No. 2 in the world, with a shot to regain the No. 1 rank-ing next week at the PGA Championship. FIRESTONEFrom Page B1 SPEECHESFrom Page B1Elliotts victory came in his 99th Cup start and was the 250th win for Hendrick Motorsports, breaking a 37-race losing streak for one of NASCARs signature teams. It also assured Elliott a spot in the playoffs as he became only the fifth driver to win a race outside of the Big 3Ž of Kyle Busch, Kevin Harvick and Truex, who have combined to win 16 of 22 races.Truex ran second to Elliott for most of the final stage and began to steadily close as both drivers tried to save enough gas to reach the end of the 90-lap race. It was a two-car breakaway as the rest of the field was more than 11 seconds back.Truex closed to the back bumper of Elliotts No. 9 Chevy as his car bobbled slightly out of the first turn on the final lap around the 2.45-mile natural terrain layout. But Truexs No. 78 Toyota skidded, Elliott regrouped and pulled away and Truex sputtered home, out of fuel.I just tried all I could to chase him down, and I got there with plenty of time,Ž Truex said. Its just every time Id start putting together some good corners and get close enough to him to even think about making a move, Id get sideways behind him. He did a good job of putting his car exactly where it needed to be and not making a mistake.ŽTruex was bidding to become the first Cup driver to win three straight road races since Tony Stewart accomplished the feat just over a decade ago (200405). Kyle Busch finished third, 20 seconds behind, followed by Daniel Suarez and Erik Jones, a triumvirate of Joe Gibbs Racing Toyotas. Pole-sitter Denny Hamlin finished 13th. The race promised to turn into a fuel mileage race as the laps wound down, and nobody has been better with the strategy than Truex and crew chief Cole Pearn. All three of Truexs road course wins were won with strategy, including last year at The Glen and this year at Sonoma in Californias wine country.You feel satisfied,Ž Elliott said. Its a huge deal. It has not been an easy year. We were getting closer, closer, closer and finally got it done.ŽElliott won the races second stage and brought the crowd to its feet with a pass of Busch. Elliott pulled out to a half-second lead while Truex was fighting to get back to the front after a restart mired him in 12th.Midway through the seg-ment, the Big 3 were running in the top 10, but Elliott dominated and beat Busch by 1.3 seconds.Buschs day was ruined when Matt DiBenedetto brought out a caution just past the midpoint of the race. The fuel probe malfunctioned on the ensuing pit stop and the crew only got a few gallons into the No. 18 Toyota. That forced him to pit again, dropping him out of contention after dominat-ing the opening segment.Every year we come here, we have a fast car and fail to execute, whether thats just called bad luck or whatever,Ž Busch said. Last year we had a lug nut get stuck in the caliper, this year we had fueling problems. It never ceases to amaze me.Ž ELLIOTTFrom Page B1

PAGE 14

B4 Monday, August 6, 2018 | DailyCommercial.comAMERICAN LEAGUENATIONAL LEAGUEEAST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Boston 78 34 .696 „ „ 7-3 W-3 41-15 37-19 New York 68 41 .624 8 „ 4-6 L-4 38-16 30-25 Tampa Bay 56 56 .500 22 10 4-6 L-3 32-23 24-33 Toronto 51 60 .459 26 15 5-5 L-1 27-28 24-32 Baltimore 34 78 .304 44 32 5-5 W-1 20-35 14-43 CENTRAL DIVISION TEAM W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Cleveland 61 49 .555 „ „ 7-3 W-2 34-22 27-27 Minnesota 52 58 .473 9 13 5-5 W-3 33-24 19-34 Detroit 47 65 .420 15 19 4-6 L-3 29-27 18-38 Chicago 41 70 .369 20 25 5-5 W-4 21-33 20-37 Kansas City 34 77 .306 27 32 3-7 L-4 15-37 19-40 WEST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Houston 71 42 .628 „ „ 4-6 L-1 32-24 39-18 Oakland 67 46 .593 4 „ 7-3 W-6 32-22 35-24 Seattle 64 48 .571 6 2 3-7 W-1 36-24 28-24 Los Angeles 55 58 .487 16 12 4-6 L-2 29-28 26-30 Texas 49 64 .434 22 18 7-3 L-1 23-35 26-29 EAST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Philadelphia 63 48 .568 „ „ 6-4 W-5 38-18 25-30 Atlanta 60 48 .556 1 „ 6-4 W-1 28-23 32-25 Washington 57 54 .514 6 4 7-3 W-2 28-26 29-28 New York 45 64 .413 17 15 3-7 L-1 22-36 23-28 Miami 46 67 .407 18 16 2-8 L-6 26-31 20-36 CENTRAL DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Chicago 64 47 .577 „ „ 5-5 L-1 35-21 29-26 Milwaukee 65 50 .565 1 „ 6-4 L-1 35-22 30-28 St. Louis 58 54 .518 6 4 7-3 W-2 29-26 29-28 Pittsburgh 57 55 .509 7 5 4-6 L-2 33-29 24-26 Cincinnati 49 63 .438 15 13 4-6 L-2 26-31 23-32 WEST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Arizona 62 51 .549 „ 6-4 L-1 30-28 32-23 Los Angeles 62 51 .549 „ „ 5-5 W-1 31-28 31-23 Colorado 59 52 .532 2 2 5-5 W-1 27-24 32-28 San Francisco 57 56 .504 5 5 5-5 W-1 32-22 25-34 San Diego 44 70 .386 18 19 2-8 W-1 20-36 24-34 MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALLINDIANS 4, ANGELS 3LOS ANGELES AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Calhoun rf 5 1 2 1 0 0 .210 Y oung Jr. cf 4 0 1 0 0 3 .235 a-Upton ph 1 1 0 0 0 0 .256 Ohtani dh 4 0 2 1 0 0 .271 S immons ss 5 0 2 1 0 0 .304 Fletcher 2b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .270 A rcia 1b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .286 Cowart lf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .091 Marte 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .203 Briceno c 3 1 2 0 0 0 .279 T OTALS 38 3 11 3 1 9 CLEVELAND AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Lindor ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .293 Brantley lf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .293 Ramirez 3b 2 1 1 3 2 0 .300 Encarnacion dh 3 0 0 0 0 0 .232 A lonso 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .252 Cabrera rf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .250 1-Guyer pr-rf 1 1 1 0 0 0 .206 Kipnis 2b 3 0 1 1 0 0 .219 Perez c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .157 Martin cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .255 T OTALS 28 4 7 4 4 5 LOS ANGELES 000 020 001„3 11 1 CLEVELAND 300 001 00X„4 7 1 a-out on “elders choice in the 9th. 1-ran for Cabrera in the 6th. E„Simmons (8), Martin (3). LOB„Los Angeles 11, Cleveland 6. 2B„Ohtani (14), Lindor (36), Kipnis (19). 3B„Calhoun (2). HR„Ramirez (33), off McGuire. RBIs„Calhoun (42), Ohtani (29), Simmons (50), Ramirez 3 (82), Kipnis (44). S B„Cowart (1). Runners left in scoring position„Los Angeles 6; Cleveland 2. RISP„Los Angeles 2 for 11; Cleveland 1 for 7. GIDP„Encarnacion, Martin. DP„Los Angeles 2 (Marte, Fletcher, Arcia), (Fletcher, Simmons, Arcia). LOS ANGELES IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McGuire, L, 0-2 .1 3 3 3 1 1 25 7.11 Cole 3.2 1 0 0 1 3 48 1.72 A lvarez 1.1 0 0 0 1 1 13 2.89 Bedrosian .2 2 1 1 1 0 13 3.47 Parker 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 3.31 J ohnson 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 3.27 CLEVELAND IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bieber, W, 6-2 5.2 7 2 2 1 7 94 4.58 Cimber, H, 8 .1 0 0 0 0 0 9 3.48 Miller, H, 6 .1 1 0 0 0 0 6 4.02 A llen, H, 1 1.2 1 0 0 0 1 15 4.27 Hand, S, 27-32 1 2 1 1 0 1 14 2.92 Cimber pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. HBP„McGuire 2 (Encarnacion,Kipnis), Cimber (Briceno), Miller (Ohtani). WP„McGuire, Hand. T „3:06. A„28,993 (35,225).BRAVES 5, METS 4 A TLANTA AB R H BI BB SO AVG. A cuna lf 5 0 1 1 0 1 .268 A lbies 2b 5 0 0 0 0 0 .276 Freeman 1b 5 0 1 0 0 2 .316 Markakis rf 5 1 4 1 0 0 .319 S uzuki c 5 0 0 0 0 1 .254 Camargo 3b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .254 Inciarte cf 4 2 3 2 0 0 .253 S wanson ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .246 T eheran p 2 1 1 1 0 1 .214 V enters p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Flaherty ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .234 Brach p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --W inkler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Duvall ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .205 Minter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Biddle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 T OTALS 40 5 12 5 0 8 NEW YORK AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Rosario ss 3 2 0 0 2 0 .233 McNeil 2b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .310 Lugo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .091 c-Plawecki ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .224 Bashlor p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Flores 1b 5 0 3 1 0 1 .272 Conforto lf 5 0 2 0 0 1 .232 Bautista rf 5 0 0 0 0 3 .198 J ackson cf 2 1 1 1 1 1 .257 Blevins p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Frazier 3b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .209 Reyes 3b-2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .187 Mesoraco c 4 1 1 1 0 1 .226 Oswalt p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .000 S ewald p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Nimmo cf 1 0 1 0 1 0 .246 T OTALS 37 4 9 4 5 12 A TLANTA 000 010 201 1„5 12 0 NEW YORK 101 100 001 0„4 9 0 a-out on sacri“ce bunt in the 7th. b-struck out in t he 9th. c-struck out in the 9th. LOB„Atlanta 7, New York 8. 2B„McNeil (2), Flores (19). HR„Teheran (1), off Oswalt; Inciarte (7), off Oswalt; Markakis (13), off Bashlor; J ackson (2), off Teheran; Mesoraco (9), off Minter. RBIs„Acuna (28), Markakis (68), Inciarte 2 (40), T eheran (3), McNeil (3), Flores (36), Jackson (17), Mesoraco (28). SB„Rosario (10), Nimmo (8). CS„Reyes (2). S„Swanson, Flaherty. Runners left in scoring position„Atlanta 2; New Y ork 4. RISP„Atlanta 1 for 5; New York 1 for 10. DP„Atlanta 1 (Camargo, Albies, Suzuki). A TLANTA IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA T eheran 5.2 5 3 3 4 6 93 4.48 V enters .1 0 0 0 0 0 3 3.18 Brach 1 0 0 0 1 2 18 4.50 Winkler 1 1 0 0 0 3 17 2.98 Minter, W, 4-2, BS, 1-9 1 2 1 1 0 1 15 2.98 Biddle, S, 1-2 1 1 0 0 0 0 16 2.30 NEW YORK IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Oswalt 6 8 3 3 0 4 87 5.13 Sewald .2 0 0 0 0 0 8 4.91 Blevins .2 1 0 0 0 1 13 4.23 Lugo 1.2 2 1 1 0 2 24 2.87 Bashlor, L, 0-1 1 1 1 1 0 1 26 5.68 Oswalt pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. T „3:19. A„27,134 (41,922). W HITE SOX 8, RAYS 7CHICAGO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Moncada 2b 4 0 0 0 1 0 .222 S anchez 3b 5 0 0 0 0 3 .244 A breu 1b 4 1 2 0 1 0 .270 Palka dh 5 1 1 2 0 4 .236 A .Garcia rf 4 3 2 2 1 0 .269 Delmonico lf 3 2 1 0 1 2 .232 L.Garcia cf 3 0 1 1 0 1 .280 Engel cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .222 A nderson ss 4 1 2 2 0 2 .246 Garneau c 2 0 1 1 1 0 .500 c-Narvaez ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .282 T OTALS 35 8 10 8 5 12 T AMPA BAY AB R H BI BB SO AVG. S mith rf 5 1 4 0 0 1 .299 Duffy 3b 5 2 1 0 0 1 .301 Bauers 1b-lf 2 1 0 0 3 2 .235 W endle 2b 3 2 3 2 0 0 .292 a-Cron ph-1b 2 1 1 0 0 1 .250 Choi dh 4 0 1 3 0 1 .230 Kiermaier cf 4 0 1 1 1 1 .189 Lowe lf-2b 4 0 0 0 1 1 .000 Perez c 2 0 0 0 1 0 .381 b-C.Gomez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .219 S ucre c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .218 A dames ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .209 T OTALS 36 7 11 6 7 9 CHICAGO 010 220 102„8 10 1 T AMPA BAY 102 010 201„7 11 0 a-struck out in the 7th. b-grounded out in the 7th. c-”ied out in the 8th. E„Garneau (1). LOB„Chicago 6, Tampa Bay 10. 2B„Delmonico (7), Kiermaier (5), Cron (20). HR„A.Garcia (12), off Yarbrough; A.Garcia (13), off Yarbrough; Palka (17), off Castillo; Wendle (6), off Shields. RBIs„Palka 2 (44), A.Garcia 2 (26), L.Garcia (31), Anderson 2 (46), Garneau (1), Wendle 2 (33), Choi 3 (12), Kiermaier (17). SB„A. Garcia (1), Anderson (22), Smith (23). SF„Choi. S„L.Garcia. Runners left in scoring position„Chicago 3; Tampa Bay 5. RISP„Chicago 4 for 7; Tampa Bay 3 for 13. GIDP„A.Garcia, Sucre. DP„Chicago 1 (Sanchez, Moncada, Abreu); Tampa Bay 1 (Adames, Wendle, Bauers). CHICAGO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Shields 6 5 4 2 4 6 114 4.50 Cedeno 0 2 2 2 1 0 15 3.78 J.Gomez, BS, 1-1 .1 1 0 0 0 1 5 5.79 Fry .1 0 0 0 1 1 14 4.54 Danish 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 3.60 Santiago, W, 4-3 1.1 2 1 1 1 1 23 5.42 TAMPA BAY IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wood 1.2 2 1 1 2 3 43 3.22 Yarbrough 5.1 6 5 5 3 6 94 4.24 Castillo, L, 2-2 2 2 2 2 0 3 28 4.34 Cedeno pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. T„3:38. A„14,379 (42,735).NATIONALS 2, REDS 1CINCINNATI AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Peraza ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .283 Ervin lf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .308 Gennett 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .310 Suarez 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .304 Williams rf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .379 Barnhart c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .246 d-Votto ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .287 Dixon 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .176 Castillo p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .122 Peralta p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Tucker ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .246 Lorenzen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Garrett p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Hamilton cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .225 TOTALS 33 1 7 1 0 5 WASHINGTON AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Eaton rf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .306 Madson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Herrera p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Soto lf 2 0 0 0 2 0 .310 Rendon 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .287 Harper cf-rf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .234 Murphy 2b-1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .294 Adams 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .277 c-Turner ph-ss 0 0 0 0 1 0 .267 Wieters c 4 1 1 1 0 1 .197 Roark p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .186 b-Taylor ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .243 Difo ss-2b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .247 TOTALS 31 2 8 2 3 4 CINCINNATI 000 100 000„1 7 0 WASHINGTON 011 000 00X„2 8 0 a-”ied out in the 7th. b-grounded out in the 7th. c-pinch hit in the 8th. d-struck out in the 9th. LOB„Cincinnati 5, Washington 8. 2B„Harper (20). HR„Wieters (4), off Castillo. RBIs„Williams (4), Harper (68), Wieters (12). Runners left in scoring position„Cincinnati 2; Washington 4. RISP„Cincinnati 2 for 6; Washington 1 for 7. GIDP„Dixon, Soto. DP„Cincinnati 1 (Gennett, Peraza, Dixon); Washington 1 (Difo, Murphy, Adams). CINCINNATI IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Castillo, L, 6-9 5.1 6 2 2 2 3 88 4.91 Peralta .2 0 0 0 0 1 6 5.97 Lorenzen 1 2 0 0 0 0 23 2.61 Garrett 1 0 0 0 1 0 10 3.61 WASHINGTON IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Roark, W, 6-12 7 7 1 1 0 2 88 4.21 Madson, H, 13 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 4.43 Herrera, S, 17-19 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 2.13 Lorenzen pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. T„2:39. A„33,486 (41,313).PHILLIES 5, MARLINS 3MIAMI AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Dietrich lf 5 1 2 2 0 0 .280 Anderson rf 5 0 3 0 0 1 .288 Castro 2b 4 0 0 0 1 2 .287 Bour 1b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .225 Prado 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .234 Rojas ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .255 Sierra cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .222 Conley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Guerrero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Riddle ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .220 Steckenrider p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Holaday c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .175 Straily p 1 0 0 0 1 0 .167 Galloway cf 2 1 1 0 0 1 .333 TOTALS 37 3 9 3 2 7 PHILADELPHIA AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Hernandez 2b 2 1 0 0 2 1 .261 Hoskins lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .264 Williams rf 3 2 1 0 1 1 .262 Santana 1b 2 1 0 0 2 1 .220 Cabrera ss 4 1 1 2 0 1 .271 Kingery ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .227 Herrera cf 2 0 1 2 1 0 .276 Dominguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Neshek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Knapp ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .227 Hunter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Franco 3b 4 0 2 1 0 1 .276 Alfaro c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .257 Nola p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .075 Quinn cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .333 TOTALS 28 5 6 5 6 9 MIAMI 000 000 300„3 9 0 PHILADELPHIA 000 003 02X„5 6 1 a-grounded out in the 8th. b-struck out in the 8th. E„Nola (1). LOB„Miami 9, Philadelphia 6. HR„ Dietrich (14), off Nola; Bour (19), off Dominguez; Cabrera (20), off Steckenrider. RBIs„Dietrich 2 (38), Bour (53), Cabrera 2 (62), Herrera 2 (60), Franco (57). Runners left in scoring position„Miami 4; Philadelphia 1. RISP„Miami 0 for 5; Philadelphia 2 for 4. GIDP„Cabrera. DP„Miami 2 (Holaday, Bour), (Castro, Rojas, Bour). MIAMI IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Straily 5.1 1 2 2 5 7 103 4.35 Conley .2 2 1 1 1 0 18 3.45 Guerrero 1 0 0 0 0 0 20 4.19 Steckenrider, L, 3-2 1 3 2 2 0 2 22 3.49 PHILADELPHIA IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nola 6 7 2 2 2 2 91 2.37 Dominguez, BS, 2-14 1 1 1 1 0 3 13 2.02 Neshek, W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 0.79 Hunter, S, 2-4 1 1 0 0 0 1 8 4.17 Nola pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. HBP„Straily (Alfaro). T„3:15. A„42,343 (43,647).CARDINALS 2, PIRATES 1ST. LOUIS AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Carpenter 1b 5 1 1 1 0 1 .282 Molina c 5 1 2 0 0 0 .289 Martinez rf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .298 Shreve p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Mayers p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Hicks p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Norris p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ozuna lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .265 Gyorko 3b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .256 Wong 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .224 Garcia ss 3 0 1 0 1 0 .235 Bader cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .271 Flaherty p 3 0 1 0 0 1 .156 Munoz rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .293 TOTALS 37 2 10 2 1 6 PITTSBURGH AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Dickerson lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .314 Marte cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .285 Polanco rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .247 Cervelli c-1b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .256 Moran 3b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .264 b-Harrison ph-3b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .253 Frazier 2b 4 1 2 1 0 2 .272 Osuna 1b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .190 Kela p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Crick p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Rodriguez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .163 Mercer ss 1 0 1 0 1 0 .260 Williams p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .069 a-Luplow ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Santana p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Diaz ph-c 1 0 1 0 0 0 .289 TOTALS 30 1 5 1 2 11 ST. LOUIS 000 020 000„2 10 0 PITTSBURGH 000 000 100„1 5 1 a-grounded out in the 5th. b-popped out in the 7th. c-singled in the 7th. d-popped out in the 9th. E„Osuna (1). LOB„St. Louis 9, Pittsburgh 6. 2B„Frazier (10). HR„Carpenter (29), off Williams; Frazier (4), off Shreve. RBIs„Carpenter (60), Gyorko (37), Frazier (14). SB„Garcia (1). S„Williams. Runners left in scoring position„St. Louis 4; Pittsburgh 3. RISP„St. Louis 1 for 6; Pittsburgh 1 for 6. GIDP„Molina, Luplow. DP„St. Louis 1 (Garcia, Wong, Carpenter); Pittsburgh 1 (Moran, Frazier, Osuna). ST. LOUIS IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Flaherty, W, 5-6 6 3 0 0 1 7 84 3.27 Shreve, H, 4 .1 1 1 1 0 0 10 4.24 Mayers, H, 5 .1 1 0 0 1 1 17 3.60 Hicks, H, 16 1.1 0 0 0 0 1 10 3.10 Norris, S, 21-24 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 2.93 PITTSBURGH IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Williams, L, 9-8 5 9 2 2 0 3 90 3.88 Luplow 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 Rodriguez 1 0 0 0 0 0 19 2.96 Santana 1 1 0 0 0 0 7 2.86 Kela 1 0 0 0 1 2 17 3.26 Crick 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 2.09 HBP„Flaherty (Mercer). T„2:58. A„19,376 (38,362).ROCKIES 5, BREWERS 4COLORADO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Blackmon cf 5 0 0 0 1 1 .277 LeMahieu 2b 5 2 2 0 1 1 .274 Arenado 3b 5 2 3 1 1 2 .306 Story ss 6 1 1 4 0 2 .288 Gonzalez rf 4 0 1 0 1 0 .291 Desmond lf-1b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .238 Valaika 1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .154 b-Parra ph-lf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .288 Murphy c 3 0 0 0 1 3 .227 e-Dahl ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .275 Wolters c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .159 Gray p 4 0 0 0 0 2 .077 Ottavino p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --f-McMahon ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .221 Oberg p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Oh p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --TOTALS 41 5 7 5 7 13 MILWAUKEE AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Yelich cf 5 0 2 0 0 2 .326 Thames rf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .237 Moustakas 3b 4 1 1 1 1 0 .248 Shaw 1b 5 1 2 1 0 2 .246 Braun lf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .246 Schoop 2b 5 0 1 0 0 2 .235 Kratz c 5 1 0 0 0 1 .228 Arcia ss 3 0 1 1 1 0 .201 Miley p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .182 a-Aguilar ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .273 Soria p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Jeffress p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hader p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 c-Cain ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .293 Burnes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Perez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .256 Knebel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --TOTALS 40 4 9 3 2 11 COLORADO 000 030 001 01„5 7 1 MILWAUKEE 010 000 003 00„4 9 2 a-out on “elders choice in the 5th. b-grounded out in the 6th. c-struck out in the 8th. d-struck out in the 9th. e-walked in the 10th. f-struck out in the 10th. E„Murphy (5), Schoop (10), Arcia (9). LOB„Colorado 11, Milwaukee 6. 2B„LeMahieu (23), Gonzalez (21), Arcia (7). HR„Story (24), off Miley; Arenado (29), off Knebel; Shaw (22), off Gray; Moustakas (21), off Ottavino. RBIs„Arenado (81), Story 4 (79), Moustakas (65), Shaw (66), Arcia (18). SB„Story (14), Dahl (3), Yelich (14), Braun 2 (9). S„Valaika. Runners left in scoring position„Colorado 6; Milwaukee 3. RISP„Colorado 1 for 12; Milwaukee 1 for 8. GIDP„Moustakas, Schoop, Kratz. DP„Colorado 3 (Story, LeMahieu, Valaika), (Story, Desmond), (Desmond, Story, Oh); Milwaukee 1 (Arcia, Schoop, Shaw). COLORADO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gray 8 4 1 1 2 8 99 4.73 Ottavino, BS, 3-7 1 2 3 2 0 3 31 1.66 Oberg, W, 7-0 1 1 0 0 0 0 7 2.73 Oh, S, 3-6 1 2 0 0 0 0 10 2.42 MILWAUKEE IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Miley 5 5 3 3 3 5 72 2.10 Soria 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 2.30 Jeffress 1 0 0 0 1 1 20 1.34 Hader 1 0 0 0 1 2 16 1.31 Burnes 1 1 1 1 1 0 17 2.45 Knebel, L, 2-2 2 1 1 1 1 4 33 3.89 WP„Ottavino 2. T„3:35. A„37,954 (41,900).TWINS 6, ROYALS 5KANSAS CITY AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Merri“eld 2b 5 1 4 2 0 0 .307 Gordon lf 4 1 2 1 1 1 .250 Perez c 5 0 1 0 0 1 .232 2-Mondesi pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .269 Duda dh 4 1 1 2 1 3 .235 Herrera 3b 5 0 1 0 0 0 .257 Phillips cf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .188 Bonifacio rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .200 OHearn 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .125 a-Dozier ph-1b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .213 Escobar ss 4 2 2 0 0 1 .200 TOTALS 39 5 12 5 2 10 MINNESOTA AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Grossman rf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .253 1-Morrison pr-1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .195 Rosario lf-rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .295 Polanco ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .287 Sano 1b-3b 4 1 2 0 0 2 .217 Forsythe 2b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .215 Kepler dh 3 1 2 0 1 1 .241 Garver c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .259 Adrianza 3b-lf 3 2 1 1 1 0 .246 Cave cf 3 1 1 4 0 2 .276 TOTALS 33 6 11 6 2 7 KANSAS CITY 200 010 200„5 12 0 MINNESOTA 040 200 00X„6 11 1 a-singled in the 8th. 1-ran for Grossman in the 7th. 2-ran for Perez in the 9th. E„Sano (7). LOB„Kansas City 9, Minnesota 5. 2B„Escobar (14), Grossman (17), Kepler (23). HR„Duda (10), off Santana; Merri“eld (7), off Hildenberger; Cave (4), off Duffy. RBIs„Merri“eld 2 (37), Gordon (28), Duda 2 (41), Grossman (34), Adrianza (20), Cave 4 (20). SB„Duda (1), Dozier (1), Mondesi 2 (11), Polanco (4). CS„Merri“eld (6). Runners left in scoring position„Kansas City 6; Minnesota 5. RISP„Kansas City 2 for 9; Minnesota 3 for 12. Runners moved up„Perez, Rosario, Garver. GIDP„Garver 2. DP„Kansas City 2 (Escobar, Merri“eld, OHearn), (Escobar, Perez, Dozier). KANSAS CITY IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Duffy, L, 7-10 6 8 6 6 1 6 103 4.70 Hill 1 1 0 0 0 1 11 5.29 McCarthy .2 2 0 0 1 0 20 3.74 Peralta .1 0 0 0 0 0 1 3.07 MINNESOTA IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Santana 4.1 7 3 3 1 3 78 6.14 Moya, W, 2-0 1.2 0 0 0 0 2 16 6.39 Hildenberger, H, 16 1 2 2 2 0 1 13 3.81 Rogers, H, 7 .2 0 0 0 0 2 13 4.03 May, H, 2 .1 1 0 0 0 1 7 3.86 Rodney, S, 24-30 1 2 0 0 1 1 20 3.16 T„2:53. A„25,390 (38,649).PADRES 10, CUBS 6SAN DIEGO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Margot cf 5 1 2 0 0 2 .253 Hosmer 1b 5 1 3 2 0 0 .254 Renfroe lf-rf 4 1 2 3 0 0 .238 Villanueva 3b 3 0 2 0 1 0 .229 Stammen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Ellis ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .292 Yates p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hedges c 5 1 1 0 0 1 .243 Galvis ss 4 1 1 1 1 1 .237 Reyes rf 3 1 2 1 0 1 .234 Jankowski lf 1 1 1 2 1 0 .256 Pirela 2b 3 1 0 0 0 1 .251 Castillo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Spangenberg 3b 2 0 1 1 0 0 .233 Lucchesi p 1 1 0 0 1 0 .045 Asuaje 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .198 TOTALS 39 10 15 10 5 7 CHICAGO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Almora cf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .302 Edwards Jr. p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Rosario p 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000 e-Heyward ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .283 Baez 2b 5 1 2 2 0 2 .300 Bote 3b 3 0 2 0 0 1 .328 c-Rizzo ph-1b 2 0 1 1 0 1 .266 Russell ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .263 Schwarber lf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .247 Contreras c 4 0 2 0 0 2 .281 Caratini 1b-3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .259 Lester p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .109 a-La Stella ph 0 1 0 0 0 0 .283 Chavez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Zobrist ph-rf 2 2 2 1 0 0 .310 Happ rf-cf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .245 TOTALS 37 6 12 5 1 14 SAN DIEGO 130 100 014„10 15 2 CHICAGO 001 020 201„6 12 0 a-advanced on catcher interference in the 5th. b-singled in the 7th. c-singled in the 7th. d-walked in the 9th. e-walked in the 9th. E„Renfroe (6), Hedges (7). LOB„San Diego 8, Chicago 6. 2B„Villanueva (13), Hedges (8), Spangenberg (7), Baez (30), Bote (5). 3B„Hosmer (2). HR„Galvis (6), off Lester; Reyes (7), off Lester; Renfroe (9), off Rosario; Baez (24), off Lucchesi; Zobrist (8), off Yates. RBIs„Hosmer 2 (46), Renfroe 3 (31), Galvis (42), Reyes (9), Jankowski 2 (14), Spangenberg (19), Almora (31), Baez 2 (86), Zobrist (43), Rizzo (74). SB„Jan kowski (15). CS„Margot (9), Baez (5). SF„Renfroe. Runners left in scoring position„San Diego 5; Chicago 3. RISP„San Diego 3 for 10; Chicago 3 for 7. GIDP„Hedges. DP„Chicago 1 (Bote, Baez, Caratini). SAN DIEGO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lucchesi 5.2 7 3 2 0 9 86 3.70 Castillo, H, 4 .2 3 2 2 0 0 18 3.00 Stammen, W, 5-1, BS, 4-4 1.2 1 0 0 0 3 33 2.45 Yates 1 1 1 1 1 2 24 1.66 CHICAGO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lester 5 8 5 5 2 1 97 3.44 Chavez 2 2 0 0 0 3 33 3.18 Edwards Jr., L, 3-2 1 1 1 1 1 1 27 2.80 Rosario 1 4 4 4 2 2 28 3.00 WP„Lester. T„3:29. A„41,136 (41,649).ORIOLES 9, RANGERS 6BALTIMORE AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Peterson lf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .208 Beckham ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .231 Villar 2b 3 3 3 1 1 0 .274 Trumbo rf 4 2 3 5 0 0 .262 Jones cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .282 Valencia dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .262 Mancini 1b 3 1 0 0 1 0 .227 Nunez 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .253 Rickard cf-rf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .212 Wynns c 4 1 2 3 0 1 .275 TOTALS 34 9 11 9 3 5 TEXAS AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Choo rf 3 0 0 1 1 1 .276 Odor 2b 5 1 1 1 0 2 .272 Andrus ss 5 1 1 1 0 1 .279 Profar 3b 2 1 1 0 3 0 .254 Gallo dh 4 0 1 1 1 3 .195 Chirinos c 4 0 1 2 1 2 .225 Guzman 1b 3 0 0 0 1 3 .231 Calhoun lf 3 1 0 0 1 0 .255 Robinson cf 3 2 1 0 1 1 .181 TOTALS 32 6 6 6 9 13 BALTIMORE 132 010 200„9 11 0 TEXAS 230 000 010„6 6 0 LOB„Baltimore 2, Texas 9. 2B„Villar (11), Odor (17), Robinson (3). 3B„Andrus (3). HR„Wynns (3), off Hutchison; Trumbo (14), off Hutchison; Villar (7), off Moore; Trumbo (15), off Moore. RBIs„Villar (24), Trumbo 5 (39), Wynns 3 (6), Choo (53), Odor (40), Andrus (20), Gallo (66), Chirinos 2 (48). SB„Villar (15), Profar (9). SF„ Choo. S„Beckham. Runners left in scoring position„Baltimore 1; Texas 5. RISP„Baltimore 4 for 5; Texas 3 for 9. GIDP„Peterson. DP„Texas 1 (Odor, Andrus, Guzman). BALTIMORE IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ramirez 1.2 5 5 5 5 1 69 5.66 Scott, W, 2-2 2.1 1 0 0 0 4 37 5.77 Hart 1.2 0 0 0 1 3 26 4.05 Castro, H, 1 1.1 0 0 0 1 4 29 3.32 Fry .2 0 1 1 2 0 15 3.38 Givens, S, 2-4 1.1 0 0 0 0 1 16 4.72 TEXAS IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hutchison, L, 1-2 3 6 6 6 3 0 66 6.29 Moore 4 4 3 3 0 4 65 7.60 Springs 2 1 0 0 0 1 18 2.25 WP„Fry. T„3:19. A„19,961 (49,115).GIANTS 3, DIAMONDBACKS 2SAN FRANCISCO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. McCutchen rf 2 1 1 0 2 1 .265 Posey 1b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .298 Longoria 3b 4 2 3 2 0 0 .262 Hundley c 3 0 1 1 1 0 .247 Slater lf 4 0 1 0 0 3 .315 dArnaud 2b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .255 a-Panik ph-2b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .232 Hernandez cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .262 Hanson ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .275 Smith p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Holland p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .056 Moronta p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Pence ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .219 Black p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Watson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Dyson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Crawford ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .276 TOTALS 31 3 8 3 4 11 ARIZONA AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Peralta lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .293 Escobar 3b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .278 Goldschmidt 1b 1 0 0 0 3 0 .276 Souza Jr. rf 3 1 1 1 0 0 .246 Marte 2b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .255 Ahmed ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .244 Jay cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .277 Murphy c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .209 d-Pollock ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .285 Ray p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Hirano p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Cha“n p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Bradley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Descalso ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .266 Diekman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --TOTALS 30 2 4 2 4 9 SAN FRANCISCO 001 001 010„3 8 0 ARIZONA 010 100 000„2 4 0 a-grounded out in the 6th. b-grounded out in the 7th. c-singled in the 8th. d-struck out in the 9th. LOB„San Francisco 5, Arizona 6. 2B„Longoria (19), Escobar (39). HR„Longoria (12), off Bradley; Souza Jr. (3), off Holland. RBIs„Longoria 2 (38), Hundley (26), Souza Jr. (19), Marte (45). SB„Goldschmidt (4). CS„McCutchen (6), dArnaud (1). Runners left in scoring position„San Francisco 3; Arizona 4. RISP„San Francisco 2 for 6; Arizona 1 for 6. LIDP„Hundley. GIDP„Goldschmidt. DP„San Francisco 1 (dArnaud, Hanson, Posey); Arizona 2 (Goldschmidt), (Murphy, Ahmed). SAN FRANCISCO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Holland 5.1 3 2 2 2 6 87 3.88 Moronta .2 0 0 0 1 0 13 1.79 Black, W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 2.53 Watson, H, 24 .2 1 0 0 1 1 14 2.03 Dyson, H, 15 .1 0 0 0 0 0 8 2.85 Smith, S, 7-8 1 0 0 0 0 2 17 1.27 ARIZONA IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ray 5.1 7 2 2 4 8 101 4.92 Hirano .2 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.25 Cha“n .2 0 0 0 0 0 8 1.83 Bradley, L, 3-3 1.1 1 1 1 0 2 26 3.06 Diekman 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 3.54 HBP„Dyson (Souza Jr.). WP„Hirano. T„3:15. A„27,884 (48,519).ATHLETICS 6, TIGERS 0DETROIT AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Gerber rf 4 0 2 0 0 2 .333 Iglesias ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .267 Castellanos dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .285 Goodrum lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .238 Candelario 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .228 Adduci 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .250 McCann c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .222 Rodriguez 2b 2 0 0 0 1 2 .177 Reyes cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .217 TOTALS 32 0 5 0 2 12 OAKLAND AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Semien ss 2 0 0 0 2 1 .257 Chapman 3b 3 1 1 2 0 0 .271 Lowrie 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .267 Davis dh 4 1 1 1 0 0 .253 Canha lf 3 1 0 0 0 1 .258 Olson 1b 4 2 2 2 0 0 .240 Piscotty rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .251 Laureano cf 4 1 3 1 0 0 .333 Phegley c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .226 TOTALS 31 6 8 6 2 6 DETROIT 000 000 000„0 5 0 OAKLAND 000 200 22X„6 8 1 E„Cahill (1). LOB„Detroit 7, Oakland 5. 2B„ Adduci (2). HR„Davis (31), off Liriano; Chapman (15), off Stumpf; Olson (22), off Jimenez. RBIs„Chapman 2 (38), Davis (86), Olson 2 (54), Laureano (2). SB„Laureano (1). Runners left in scoring position„Detroit 3; Oakland 3. RISP„Detroit 0 for 5; Oakland 2 for 6. GIDP„Goodrum, Phegley. DP„Detroit 1 (Candelario, Adduci); Oakland 1 (Lowrie, Semien, Olson). DETROIT IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Liriano, L, 3-6 5 5 2 2 2 3 89 4.37 Alcantara 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 0.84 Stumpf 1 2 2 2 0 2 24 6.93 Jimenez 1 1 2 2 0 0 16 3.35 OAKLAND IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cahill, W, 4-2 6 3 0 0 1 10 93 3.12 Petit, H, 11 1 0 0 0 1 1 18 3.10 Trivino 1 2 0 0 0 0 11 1.16 Buchter 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 3.65 HBP„Liriano (Chapman), Jimenez (Canha). T„2:41. A„19,559 (46,765).MARINERS 6, BLUE JAYS 3TORONTO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Granderson lf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .235 a-Hernandez ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .245 Travis 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .248 Grichuk rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .231 Smoak 1b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .252 Morales dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Solarte 3b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .233 Diaz ss 4 2 3 2 0 0 .261 Maile c 4 0 1 1 0 1 .232 Pillar cf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .249 TOTALS 34 3 9 3 1 8 SEATTLE AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Span lf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .264 Segura ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .309 Haniger rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .263 Cruz dh 4 1 2 4 0 1 .267 Seager 3b 4 2 2 2 0 1 .231 Healy 1b 4 0 2 0 0 2 .238 Herrmann c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .213 Zunino c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .196 Heredia cf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .226 Romine 2b 2 1 0 0 2 1 .202 TOTALS 34 6 10 6 3 10 TORONTO 000 010 200„3 9 0 SEATTLE 002 001 30X„6 10 1 a-struck out in the 7th. E„Leake (3). LOB„Toronto 5, Seattle 7. 2B„Diaz (15), Healy (10), Herrmann (3). HR„Diaz (14), off Leake; Seager (17), off Gaviglio; Cruz (29), off Biagini; Seager (18), off Biagini. RBIs„Diaz 2 (34), Maile (25), Cruz 4 (71), Seager 2 (60). SB„Segura (16). Runners left in scoring position„Toronto 1; Seattle 5. RISP„Toronto 2 for 5; Seattle 3 for 11. LIDP„Travis. GIDP„Maile. DP„Seattle 2 (Romine, Healy), (Seager, Romine). TORONTO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gaviglio 5.2 7 3 3 3 7 89 5.08 Biagini, L, 1-6 .2 3 3 3 0 0 18 6.66 Petricka .2 0 0 0 0 2 10 4.50 Santos 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 6.75 SEATTLE IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Leake 6.2 9 3 3 0 5 84 4.16 Duke, W, 4-4 .1 0 0 0 0 1 5 3.99 Colome, H, 19 1 0 0 0 1 0 13 3.45 Diaz, S, 41-44 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 2.00 T„2:37. A„40,515 (47,943).DODGERS 3, ASTROS 2HOUSTON AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Springer cf 1 1 1 1 1 0 .250 Marisnick cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .206 Reddick rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .253 Bregman ss 2 0 1 0 1 0 .277 Gonzalez 2b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .233 White 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .269 Davis 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .192 Pressly p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Gattis ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .247 Stassi c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .246 T.Kemp lf 4 1 1 1 0 3 .288 Cole p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Harris p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Gurriel ph-3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .289 TOTALS 29 2 5 2 3 11 LOS ANGELES AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Pederson lf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .258 Machado 3b 4 2 3 0 0 1 .309 Grandal c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .256 Bellinger cf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .241 Dozier 2b 4 0 1 2 0 1 .231 Muncy 1b 3 0 0 0 0 3 .253 Taylor ss 3 0 0 0 0 2 .255 Hernandez rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .218 Buehler p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .111 Floro p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-M.Kemp ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .289 Alexander p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Jansen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --TOTALS 31 3 7 3 1 13 HOUSTON 100 010 000„2 5 0 LOS ANGELES 201 000 00X„3 7 0 a-lined out in the 7th. b-struck out in the 7th. c-popped out in the 9th. LOB„Houston 6, Los Angeles 5. 2B„Bregman (36), Machado (23), Bellinger (23), Dozier (24), Hernandez (9). HR„Springer (19), off Buehler; T.Kemp (4), off Buehler. RBIs„Springer (58), T.Kemp (21), Bellinger (50), Dozier 2 (59). SB„ Bellinger (7). CS„Springer (4). Runners left in scoring position„Houston 1; Los Angeles 5. RISP„Houston 0 for 4; Los Angeles 1 for 11. GIDP„Gonzalez, Davis. DP„Los Angeles 2 (Taylor, Dozier, Muncy), (Alexander, Dozier, Muncy). HOUSTON IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cole, L, 10-4 5 6 3 3 1 8 99 2.64 Harris 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 4.24 Pressly 2 1 0 0 0 4 29 3.29 LOS ANGELES IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Buehler, W, 5-4 5.1 4 2 2 2 8 91 3.63 Floro, H, 5 1.2 0 0 0 0 2 20 2.59 Alexander, H, 15 1 0 0 0 1 0 9 3.42 Jansen, S, 31-34 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 2.19 HBP„Buehler 2 (Bregman,Marisnick), Floro (Stassi). T„2:54. A„50,628 (56,000).BOX SCORES ROUNDUP/MATCHUPSIndians 4, Angels 3: Jose Ramirez hit a three-run homer. Braves 5, Mets 4, 10 innings: Nick Markakis hit a go-ahead home run in the 10th inning. White Sox 8, Rays 7: Daniel Palka hit a go-ahead two-run homer in the ninth inning. Nationals 2, Reds 1: Matt Wieters homered to back Tanner Roark, who went seven innings to win his third straight start. Phillies 5, Marlins 3: Asdrubal Cabrera hit a tiebreaking two-run homer in the eighth inning. Cardinals 2, Pirates 1: Jack Flaherty cruised through six innings. Rockies 5, Brewers 4, 11 innings: Nolan Arenado hit a go-ahead homer with two outs in the 11th inning. Twins 6, Royals 5: Rookie Jake Cave hit his “rst career grand slam. Padres 10, Cubs 6: Cubs ace Jon Lester was hit hard again. Orioles 9, Rangers 6: Mark Trumbo homered twice and drove in “ve runs. Giants 3, Diamondbacks 2: Evan Longorias solo home run in the eighth inning led the San Francisco Giants to a win over the Arizona Diamondbacks. Athletics 6, Tigers 0: Trevor Cahill struck out 10 in six innings. Mariners 6, Blue Jays 3: Kyle Seager hit two home runs. Dodgers 3, Astros 2: Brian Dozier delivered a two-run double in the “rst inning and Manny Machado had three hits with two runs scored as the Los Angeles Dodgers defeated the Houston Astros. LATE N.Y. Yankees at BostonTODAYS PITCHING COMPARISONNATIONAL LEAGUE 2018 TEAM LAST THREE STARTS TEAMS PITCHERS TIME W-L ERA REC W-L IP ERA St. Louis Weaver (R) 6-9 4.90 1-2 1-2 16.0 3.38 Miami Chen (L) 7:10p 3-8 5.86 1-2 1-2 17.0 4.76 Cincinnati Bailey (R) 1-8 5.87 0-1 0-0 6.2 2.70 New York Syndergaard (R) 7:10p 6-2 2.98 2-0 2-0 10.0 1.80 Pittsburgh Musg rove (R) 4-5 3.63 2-2 1-1 21.2 3.32 Colorado Freeland (L) 8:40p 9-7 3.20 3-0 1-0 16.1 2.76 Philadelphia Arrieta (R) 9-6 3.32 3-0 2-0 16.1 3.31 Arizona Godley (R) 9:40p 12-6 4.46 1-2 1-0 16.2 4.32AMERICAN LEAGUE 2018 TEAM LAST THREE STARTS TEAMS PITCHERS TIME W-L ERA REC W-L IP ERA Minnesota Gibson (R) 5-8 3.47 2-1 2-1 21.1 2.53 Cleveland Bauer (R) 7:10p 10-6 2.40 3-1 1-0 18.0 3.00 Seattle LeBlanc (L) 6-2 3.95 1-2 1-1 17.2 4.08 Texas Perez (L) 8:05p 2-4 6.50 1-3 0-0 16.1 4.41 New York Lynn (R) 7-8 4.89 1-2 1-1 16.0 4.50 Chicago Covey (R) 8:10p 4-7 5.57 1-2 1-2 18.0 5.00 Detroit Boyd (L) 6-9 4.22 1-2 1-2 17.0 4.24 Los Angeles Tropeano (R) 10:07p 4-6 4.94 1-1 1-1 11.1 4.76INTERLEAGUE 2018 TEAM LAST THREE STARTS TEAMS PITCHERS TIME W-L ERA REC W-L IP ERA Chicago (NL) Hamels (L) 6-9 4.53 1-1 1-1 11.1 8.74 Kansas City Junis (R) 8:15p 6-11 5.12 1-1 0-1 8.2 4.15 Houston Morton (R) 12-2 2.90 0-2 0-0 10.1 3.48 San Francisco Rodriguez (R) 10:15p 5-1 2.59 1-1 1-0 12.1 2.19 KEY: TEAM REC-Teams Record in games started by todays pitcher. SATURDAYS GAMES American League Boston 4, N.Y. Yankees 1 Chicago White Sox 2, Tampa Bay 1 Cleveland 3, L.A. Angels 0 Minnesota 8, Kansas City 2 Texas 3, Baltimore 1 Oakland 2, Detroit 1 Toronto 5, Seattle 1 National League Cincinnati 7, Washington 1, 1st game Chicago Cubs 5, San Diego 4 Philadelphia 8, Miami 3 St. Louis 8, Pittsburgh 4 Washington 6, Cincinnati 2, 2nd game Milwaukee 8, Colorado 4 N.Y. Mets 3, Atlanta 0 Arizona 9, San Francisco 3 Interleague Houston 14, L.A. Dodgers 0 TUESDAYS GAMES American League Boston at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. Minnesota at Cleveland, 7:10 p.m. Seattle at Texas, 8:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. Detroit at L.A. Angels, 10:07 p.m. National League Atlanta at Washington, 1:05 p.m., 1st game Atlanta at Washington, 7:05 p.m., 2nd game Cincinnati at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. St. Louis at Miami, 7:10 p.m. San Diego at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. Philadelphia at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. Interleague Houston at San Francisco, 3:45 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Kansas City, 8:15 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.

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DEAR ABBY: After 16 years of loyal and dedicated service to my employer, I nd myself out of work. Months ago, I needed double knee replacements. I gave him three months' notice about my surgery, planning to return on June 1. It was a one-girl ofce; I was responsible for all the administrative duties. When I called my employer, he said, "Sorry. No work," and hung up on me! I am 64 years old and jobless. I haven't written a resume in more than 20 years. How do I start rebuilding my life? Life is not kind when you are over 50, and I never thought this day would come. I had intended to work until I was 70. I can't think straight, and am hurt beyond words that I was tossed to the curb after being a loyal and dedicated employee all these years. -DEEPLY HURT DEAR DEEPLY HURT: You have my sympathy. For your boss to have kicked you while you were down is disgraceful. Run this scenario by an attorney who specializes in labor issues and ask if you have any recourse. Although you can't think straight right now, I assure you the lawyer will be able to advise you with a dispassionate eye. And while you are at it, start constructing your resume. Although there may not be a job opening in the eld you were working in, surely there is work for someone with a 16-year history of loyal service to one employer and the skills you have acquired and polished along the way.DEAR ABBY: My brother "Nick" was married for 17 years until he got caught cheating on his wife with her much-younger niece. He's 34; she's 20. They say they are in love. Nick has come home to be near family because he has been a stay-athome dad for the last four years and doesn't have the means to start over without help. (They lived 10 hours away.) The problem is, he has asked to stay with me, which would've been ne, but he's bringing along his new love. We all love Nick's wife, and they have three children together. To let his lover stay here with him feels like a betrayal of my sister-in-law. Out of all the siblings, I have the most room (we are recent empty nesters), and I could swing it nancially. I suppose I should just get over it and help because he's family, but I'm afraid my husband won't be so forgiving. -CAUGHT IN THE MIDDLE DEAR CAUGHT: It's difcult, but I'll refrain from commenting on your brother's morals or judgment. Whether you should get into the middle of this mess because Nick is family isn't a question I can answer. And you won't know the answer until after you have discussed it with your husband. P.S. I'm so mad I changed my mind about not being judgmental. It would be poetic justice if the niece met a handsome hunk her age and dumped your brother. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in diculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION BRIDGE CRYPTOQUOTE HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORY DIVERSIONS Loyal worker is out of a job following knee replacements license tocruise...Place your auto ad in the and watch it go! Call Classieds Today!352-314-FAST (3278) HAPPY BIRTHDAY FOR MONDAY, AUG. 6, 2018:This year you will experience many different facets of various associates personalities. You might wonder if you ever really knew them before. Their behavior might be an immediate reaction to your more open and dynamic behavior. If you are single, many admirers will not have the courage to declare their interest; hence, if you nd someone intriguing, you need to let him or her know. You could meet someone extremely magnetic and interesting sometime around fall. If you are attached, the two of you could open yourselves up for much more excitement. Your relationship will become more passionate. GEMINI might be critical of your emotions. ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19) Reach out to someone who has a vigorous mind and a novel perspective. You could enjoy an impromptu conversation, or you might have a reason behind initiating contact. It makes no difference, as this person likes spending time with you. TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20) You might feel pressured to do more than your share. You feel much more in touch with what you need than you have in a while. If you hang back a little, you will discover that a friend supports you and helps with achieving your desires. GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20) You could get ahead of a project. If you opt for an early start, you will be more than pleased. You will need to deal with interference to a degree. Several people will make an effort to touch base. Knowing your priorities remains instrumental. CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22) Understand that a discussion might not take place in the open. Do yourself a favor and let the issue vacate your mind for the day. Let go of your concerns and throw yourself into something that you feel is worthwhile. LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22) Keep your objectives in mind when dealing with an overly optimistic person. Remember that his or her ideas do carry a lot of power. Use positive thinking when coming up with a solution. A discussion makes you feel more condent. VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22) You could say more than you wish to with your expressions and actions. Recognize that you are simply not good at the art of deception! Good news puts a smile on your face. Remain open to a conversation, and share more of your thoughts. LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22) Consider heading in a new direction; several novel and unusual ideas are likely to come forward as a result. You might want a course correction. Can you do this without any negative ramications? If you can, then go ahead. SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21) Relating on a one-onone basis encourages you to be more open and expressive. Others will be delighted when they see this facet of your personality. You have a air for letting others know who you are, which draws them in with intensity. SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21) Defer to others, and make it clear where you are coming from. You will nd that a friend is sensitive to your desires and needs. To those around you, you seem to have endless energy. Understand that your plate is full. CAPRICORN (DEC. 22JAN. 19) You might be a bit more on edge than usual. How you see someone could be very different from how others see him or her. You look for certain qualities that others do not; herein lies the difference. Do a better job of thinking through a decision. AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18) You greet many people with your playful style. As a result, you help them loosen up for a while. Sometimes, people get a little too uptight and/or self-conscious. Be aware of your limitations when relaxing and letting go. PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20) You might be overly concerned about your home life. You are capable of looking at long-term trends at the present moment. You also make insightful judgments about people in general and their motives. Make decisions that benet the whole. DailyCommercial.com | Monday, August 6, 2018 B5 TODAY IS MONDAY, AUG. 6, the 218th day of 2018. There are 147 days left in the year. TODAY'S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY: On August 6, 1945, during World War II, the U.S. B-29 Superfortress Enola Gay dropped an atomic bomb code-named "Little Boy" on Hiroshima, Japan, resulting in an estimated 140,000 deaths. (Three days later, the United States exploded a nuclear device over Nagasaki; ve days after that, Imperial Japan surrendered.) ON THIS DATE: In 1926, Gertrude Ederle became the rst woman to swim the English Channel, arriving in Kingsdown, England, from France in 14 1/2 hours. In 1942 Queen Wilhelmina of the Netherlands became the rst reigning queen to address a joint session of Congress, telling lawmakers that despite Nazi occupation, her people's motto remained, "No surrender." In 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act. In 1973 former Cuban dictator Fulgencio Batista, 72, died in exile in Spain. Entertainer Stevie Wonder was seriously injured in a car accident in North Carolina. In 1986, William J. Schroeder (SHRAY'-dur) died at Humana Hospital-Audubon in Louisville, Kentucky, after living 620 days with the Jarvik 7 articial heart.

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CLASSIC PEANUTS HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH COMICS B6 Monday, August 6, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com

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DailyCommercial.com | Monday, August 6, 2018 B7 Florida Air & Heat Inc. Your Comfort Company100% Financing Available Licensed Insured BondedServing Our Area Since 1986 State License # CAC1814030CALL 352-326-3202For ALL Your Heating & Cooling Needs A/C Services 352-408-7722 ASK FOR KEITH CARPORTS, SCREEN ROOMS POOL CAGES, PATIO STRUCTURES FOR HOME OWNERS QUESTIONS, WE HAVE ANSWERS! Aluminum Services John Philibert, IncWe do Everything from Ceilings to Floors. Pantries, Cabinets and more.Your pesky leaks gone and houses well paint. From inside and out, well make it great. Lic/Ins. Accepting Visa & MC. JPHandy.com (352) 308-0694 LAMINATE, WOOD & TILE SALE!Great Prices Exceptional Service!20 Years ExperienceSHOWROOM11433 US Hwy 441, Tavares Call Chris352-636-1643 D2452SD Garage Door Services €PressureWashing€Painting €Flooring€Carpet€CleanOuts €CleanUps€Hauling€Licensed352-787-7056 Handyman Services John Philibert, IncFor All Your Flooring Needs Pergo, Ceramic Tile, Travertine, Vinyl & MoreCall John @ (352) 308-0694 Flooring Services CCC1330633D2453SD BILL ROGERS IRRIGATION SERVICE35 YEARS EXPERIENCELIC NO. 22190/INS/BONDEDOWNER OPERATOR352-446-1059 Irrigation Services Home Improvement iMan 4-U O C D I AŽR CJOSEPH MAGRUM352-636-2599TAX ID, INSURED rufus_62@yahoo.com We Also Offer (352) 308-0694 John Philibert, IncFor All Your Interior/Exterior Painting Needs. FREE ESTIMATES!30 Years of Quality Experiencewww.BestPaintRem.com352-210-3964Lic/Ins15% OFFSenior Discount Painting Services Pressure Cleaning D2458SD EXTERIOR CLEANING SERVICES RESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL352-603-4240Licensed & Insured Comfort Seal Roof Systems, Inc.TM352-242-5055 MEET THE CONTRACTOR NOT A SALESMANŽ! BETTER THAN ANY METAL OR SHINGLE ROOF! NOT ONE ROOF LOST TO ANY STORM! NO PAY UNTIL JOB IS DONE! SPECIAL DISCOUNT FOR FELLOW VETERANS!St. Lic. # CCC1325522 Our 32nd Year Over 12,000 Roofs For Mobile/Manufactured Homes BEST ROOF BEST PRICES GUARANTEED! LIC#CCC042879 #CCC1330633D2472SD Roo“ng Services Re-roofs/RepairsShingles/Metal/FlatLic. #CCC1329936Covenant Roo“ng and Construction, Inc.#1 IN ROOFINGFREE ROOF ESTIMATES352-314-3625 J.C.C.Bobcat&TreeSvc.Inc.LandClearing/Excavating FillDirt/Clay Hauling/DebrisRemoval StumpGrinding Demolition/Grading/Driveways OwnerOperator352-455-7608D2434SD Land Clearing Services Landscaping Services LandscapingTrimming,Mulching, Sod,TreeTrimming,Pavers&MuchMore! ArmandoSantamario352-587-1323D2415SD A-1 UNITED SERVICES 352-460-3763CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATESOne Call Does It AllŽLICENSEDINSUREDINT. / EXT. PAINTINGHOME REMODELSALL PHASES OF PRESSURE CLEANINGAND MUCH MORE! A-1 UNITED SERVICES 352-460-3763CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATESOne Call Does It AllŽLICENSEDINSURED Tree Services BAD TREE CALL ME!27 YEARS EXPERIENCE NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL! FREE ESTIMATES TONY THE TREE TRIMMER D 20 88 S D D2471SD J.C. C.Bobcat & Tre e Svc. Inc.Residential/Commercial Tr imming/Removal Pa lms/Hedges/Stump Grinding Debris removal/Hauling Fi ll Dirt/Clay/Grading/Driveways Lic/Ins€ InsuranceWork € 24Hrs.35 2-45 5-7608 D2463SD Upholstery Services D2470SD Window Services GEORGE WATKINS 352-587-2735Window ReplacementLanai Enclosures Acrylic WindowsCRC# 1330701 BLIND REPAIRSNo Cost...If We Cant Fix It!352-217-7556exceptionsblinds.comTo have your Professional Service listed here, please contact the Classi“ed Department at (352) 314-3278. 352-396-6238DAMIAN BROOKSDamianbrooks80@yahoo.com You've Tried The Rest...Now Go With The Best! RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIALPERFECT CLEANING Cleaning Services CONCRETE 352.602.8077 Concrete For Less8x10 Slab $800 10x48 Slab $2600No UPFRONT Costs!Blocking/ Ref./Lic./Ins.Lic #113336Phillip 352-504-8372Includes Concrete & Labor D2424SD AllConcreteServices CrackRepair€FreeEstimatesServingLakeCounty30YearsBonded,Insured,Lic#11066CallBobat352.223.7935 Concrete Services CCC1330633D2453SD Construction Services Door & Lock Services D2451SD BRIAN DEGAGLIA CONSTRUCTION SERVICESIncludes: Forming, Pouring, Stripping, Cutting, & Materials. Does Not include stripping of sod or roots, removing of concrete, pumping or hauling of debris. 352-267-5723 CRC 1326327 Only Mobile/ Manufactured Home ROOFINGwww.AllFloridaRoofs.com All Florida Weatherproong & Construction, Inc.FREE VIDEO ROOF INSPECTIONS1-877.572.1019 GREEN ACRES MOWINGWe mow or bushhog acreage of any amount in all of Central & South Lake County REASONABLE PRICES!352-360-5445 352-348-3355 Commercial Cleaning Residential Cleaning Buf“ng/ Stripping Floors Advance coatings.incRepaint specialist~interior-exterior ~cabinet resurfacing ~pool decks/stains ~drivewaysMark Mccormickphone 352 255 0145licensed & insured RE-TILESpecializing in Total Bath & Kitchen Remodeling Serving Central Florida for over 30 years JIM CHANEY 352-391-5553 Bath & Kitchen Services Tile Service RE-TILESpecializing in Total Bath & Kitchen Remodeling Serving Central Florida for over 30 years JIM CHANEY 352-391-5553 Construction Services

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2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHER'S NOTICEFederal and State laws prohibit advertising expressing a discriminatory preference on the basis of race, age, sex, color, national origin, religion, handicap or marital status. The Daily Commercial will not knowingly accept advertisement for employment which is in violation of the law. Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance Employment Classifications are intended to announce bona de employment offers only. Employment advertising must disclose the specic nature of the work being offered. Some employment categories may charge fees. If any advertiser does not comply with these standards, please notify a Classied Sales Representative at 365-8245 or 365-8200. B8 Monday, August 6, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com Looking for a Handyman?Check out theService Directory This newspaper will never knowingly accept advertisement that is illegal or considered fraudulent. If you have questions or doubts about any ads on these pages, we advise that before responding or sending money ahead of time, you check with the local Attorney Generals Consumer Fraud Line and/or the Better Business Bureau. Also be advised that some phone numbers published in these ads may require an extra charge. In all cases of questionable value, such as promises or guaranteed income from work-athome programs, money to loan, etc., if it sounds too good to be true „ it may in fact be exactly that. This newspaper cannot be held responsible for any negative consequences that occur as a result of you doing business with these advertisers. Thank you. NOTICES 1000-1999READER NOTICE 1001

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2990 DailyCommercial.com | Monday, August 6, 2018 B9 CROSSWORD PUZZLE Find yourFurry Friends pet supplies in CLASSIFIEDS

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B10 Monday, August 6, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com SEIZETHE DAYSLOCAL AREANEWS.www.dailycommercial.com