Citation
Daily Commercial

Material Information

Title:
Daily Commercial
Place of Publication:
Leesburg, FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group, Steve Skaggs - Publisher, Tom McNiff - Executive Editor
Publication Date:

Subjects

Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Lake -- Leesburg
Coordinates:
28.81134 x -81.872708

Record Information

Rights Management:
Copyright Daily Commercial. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Digital Newspaper Library

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

LOCAL & STATE A3LEESBURG SEAPLANE BASE DATES BACK TO 40S LOCAL & STATE A3DEADLINE APPROACHING FOR VOTER REGISTRATION SPORTS B1MOLINARI SURVIVES TO CAPTURE BRITISH OPEN @dailycommercial Facebook.com/daily.commercial YOUR LOCAL SOURCE FOR LAKE & SUMTER COUNTIES Monday, July 23, 2018 75 ¢ Local and State .............A3 Opinion .......................A9 Weather ......................A10 Sports...........................B1 Diversions .....................B5 Classified .....................B7 Volume 142, Issue 204 2018 GateHouse Media Home delivery: 352-787-0600 Lawmakers from both parties say there is no sign of wrongdoingBy Zeke MillerThe Associated PressBRIDGEWATER, N.J. „ President Donald Trump asserted without evidence Sunday that newly released documents relating to the wiretapping of his onetime campaign adviser Carter Page confirm with little doubtŽ that intelligence agencies misled the court that approved the warrant.But lawmakers from both political parties said that the documents dont show wrongdoing and that they even appear to undermine some previous claims by top Republicans on the basis for obtaining a warrant against Page.Visible portions of the heavily redacted documents, released Saturday under the Freedom of Information Act, show the FBI telling the court that Page has been collaborating and conspiring with the Russian government.Ž The agency also told the court that the FBI believes Page has been the subject of targeted recruitment by the Russian government.ŽThe documents were part of officials application for a warrant to the secretive foreign intelligence surveillance court, which signed off on surveilling Page.Trump tweeted Sunday on the documents: As usual they are ridiculously heavily redacted but confirm with little doubt that the Department of Justice and FBI misled the courts. Witch Hunt Rigged, a Scam!ŽThe release appears to undercut some of the contentions in a memo prepared by House Intelligence Committee Chairman Rep. Devin Nunes earlier this year. Nunes, R-Calif., and other Republicans had said that anti-Trump research in a dossier prepared by former British intelligence agent Christopher Steele and paid for by Democrats was used inappropriately to obtain the warrant on Page.Trump: Misconduct con rmedIn this 2017 photo, Carter Page, a foreign policy adviser to Donald Trumps 2016 presidential campaign, speaks with reporters following a day of questions from the House Intelligence Committee, on Capitol Hill in Washington. President Donald Trump claimed Sunday that newly released documents relating to the wiretapping of Page con“ rm with little doubtŽ that intelligence agencies misled the courts that approved the warrant. [FILE/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] A little more time is needed to perform due diligence tasksBy Frank Stanfieldfrankstanfield@dailycommercial.comLEESBURG „ The city Monday is set to amend its due diligenceŽ agreement with The Villages, slightly delaying the sale of 1,200 acres to the retirement community.The land purchase agreement with the Vil-lages continues to move forward,Ž City Manager Al Minner wrote in a memo to city commissioners. As you know, this has been a tremendous undertaking with numerous tasks associated to sell the property and plan for major development.Ž City to delay land sale to The Villages Lake Countys library names rst poet laureateStaff ReportTAVARES „ A Mount Dora teacher who says poetry chose herŽ has been chosen as the Lake County Library Systems first poet laureate.Laura Sobbott Ross will serve a one-year term volunteering for library-related events and writing for the Lake County Poet Laureate Journal.Sobbott Ross poetry has appeared in more than 100 liter-ary journals. In addition to four Pushcart Prize nominations, she was a finalist for the Arts & Letters Poetry Prize and won the Southern Humanities Reviews Auburn Witness Poetry Prize.She has published two chap-books, A Tiny HungerŽ and My Mississippi.Ž A third book, The Graffiti of Pompeii,Ž is scheduled for publication this year. Her recent poem, The Writing Lesson,Ž reflects her strong affinity for the Lake County community.Getting poetry out there Laura Sobbott Ross of Mount Dora has won several poetry awards and has written two books, with a third on the way. [SUBMITTED] By Ryan J. FoleyThe Associated PressIOWA CITY, Iowa „ One app promotes itself as a way to discuss sensitive negotiations and human resources problems without leaving a digital record.Another boasts that disappearing messages keep your message history tidy.Ž And a popular email service recently launched a confidential modeŽ allowing the content of messages to disappear after a set time.The proliferation of digital tools that make text and email messages vanish may be welcome to Americans seek-ing to guard their privacy. But open government advocates fear they are being misused by public officials to conduct business in secret and evade transparency laws.Private messaging apps often used for public businessGov. Eric Greitens leaves the civil courts building May 14 in St. Louis, Mo., after a felony invasion-of-privacy case against him was dismissed. In Missouri, Democratic lawmakers introduced a bill that would make clear that personal social media pages and messages sent through digital platforms are public records as long as they relate to of“ cial business. The legislation arose because of issues involving use of the Con“ de app by Greitens. [ROBERT COHEN/AP FILE] See POETRY, A7 See VILLAGES, A7 See APPS, A7 See TRUMP, A6

PAGE 2

A2 Monday, July 23, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com NATION & WORLDPUBLISHER Steve Skaggs: steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.com ...................352-365-8213 EXECUTIVE EDITOR Tom McNiff: tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com .........................352-365-8250 DIGITAL EDITOR, LIFESTYLES EDITOR Whitney Lehnecker: whitney.lehnecker@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8258 SPORTS EDITOR Paul Jenkins: paul.jenkins@dailycommercial.com ......................352-365-8204 SPORTS WRITER Frank Jolley: frank.jolley@dailycommet.com ..............................352-365-8268 REPORTER Frank Stan“ eld: frank.stand“ eld@dailycommercial.com............352-374-8257 REPORTER Roxanne Brown: roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com ............352-365-8266 YOUR LOCAL NEWS SOURCE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIESPrint delivery available within the newspaper distribution area only. By submitting your address and/or email, you understand that you may receive promotional offers from Gatehouse Media and its related companies. You may unsubscribe from receiving any such offers a t any time by calling 352-787-0600. The advertised price does not include the charges for any premium editions. Premium editions are publis hed to provide additional information and value to our readers. You agree that you will be charged up to an additional $5.00 for each premium edition published and delivered to you during your subscription period, in addition to the cost of your subscription. The length of your subscrip tion will be shortened by the publication of premium editions if those premium editions are delivered to you during your subscription. You may elect t o be billed separately for premium editions by contacting Customer Service at 1-352-787-0600. Thus, unless you elect to be billed separately up to an additional $3.00 for each premium edition, you agree that the length of your subscription will be shortened in proportion to the value of the nu mber of premium editions published and delivered to you during your subscription period. As an illustrative example, if you select a subscripti on of up to 12 weeks at a cost of $48.00, and two premium editions at $2.00 each are published and delivered to you during that subscription period, your subscription will be shortened by 1 week because the weekly cost of the subscription is $4.00 per week and the premium edition charges total $4.00. Depending upon the length of your subscription and the timing of the publication and delivery of premium editions, you will not be charge d for any premium editions if none are published and delivered to you during your subscription. As such, in that case only, the length of your su bscription will not be shortened. The timing of the publication and delivery of premium editions is variable. There will be no more than 15 premium ed itions published each calendar year. Visit Dailycommercial.com for examples of premium editions. For more info or to cancel your subscription, please call 352-787-0600.The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $178.47 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by GateHouse Media at 21 2 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to the Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edit ion is property of the Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER?: Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call from 7 a. m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and from 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. If youre going on vacation, call circulation 48 hours ahead to stop service. ANNOUNCEMENTS, CALENDAR, GAME RESULTS: Email upcoming events, along with news about awards and personal or professional milestones „ with a photo, if you desire „ to news@dailycommercial.com. Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268 or 352-365-8204. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY: The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the n ews department at 352-365-8250. Retail Advertising .........................................................352-314-3278 Classi“ ed Advertising ...................................................352-314-3278 Lake Circulation............................................................352-787-0600 Sumter Circulation .......................................................877-702-0600 Billing ...........................................................................352-787-0600 Accounting ...................................................................352-365-8212 SUBSCRIPTION RATES Home delivery (Daily/Sunday) 3 months: 41.70 ....................Tax: 2.92 ..........................Total: 44.62 6 months: 88.40 ....................Tax: 5.84 ..........................Total: 89.24 1 year: 166.80 .......................Tax: 11.68 ........................Total: 178.47 FOR HOME DELIVERY: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., the Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. Saturday, July 21 Lotto: 6-12-20-26-27-34 x2 Powerball: 9-23-56-58-68-1 x2 Fantasy 5: 2-13-18-26-30 Sunday, July 22 Pick 5 Afternoon: 2-4-9-6-5 Evening: 9-5-5-3-4 Pick 4 Afternoon: 1-6-4-0 Evening: 9-7-1-9 Pick 3 Afternoon: 0-4-1 Evening: 7-9-2 Pick 2 Afternoon: 1-6 Evening: 9-9LOTTERY DATELINESKABUL, AFGHANISTAN LONDONPolice think boy, 3, was attacked with acid at storeA 3-year-old boy suffered severe burns on his face and arm during a suspected acid attack in England that investigators think was deliberate, police said Sunday. West Mercia police Chief Super-intendent Mark Travis said police were working to identify the substance that burned the child Sat-urday at a discount store in Worcester.A 39-year-old man has been arrested on suspi-cion of conspiracy to cause grievous bodily harm. Three others were being sought for questioning and police released photos to generate public tips.PARISMacron aide handed initial charges from protest assaultA French judge handed preliminary charges Sunday to one of President Emmanuel Macrons top security aides after video surfaced that showed him beating a protester at a May Day demonstration.The initial charges against Alexandre Benalla came the same day French authorities opened a judi-cial investigation of the assault. The multiple alleged offenses included violence, interfering in the exercise of public office and the unauthorized public dis-play of official insignia. The Associated PressAfghan security personnel stand guard next to wounded comrades at the site of an attack near the Kabul International Airport Sunday in Kabul, Afghanistan. A suicide bomber carried out an attack near the airport on Sunday, killing 14 people, and narrowly missing the countrys vice president, who was returning home after living in Turkey for over a year, security of“ cials said. [RAHMAT GUL/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]VATICAN CITYParamedics carry a person rescued from a boat that capsized off Cyprus northern coastline as he is brought to a hospital in Silifke, near the city of Mersin, southern Turkey, late Wednesday. Pope Francis has lamented the latest migrant deaths in shipwrecks of smugglers boats and entreated nations to act swiftly to prevent more tragedies. Francis in his traditional Sunday appearance to faithful in St. Peters Square expressed sorrow over recent deaths in the Mediterranean Sea and assured victims loved ones of his prayers. [MUSTAFA ERCAN/DHA-DEPO PHOTOS VIA AP]By Bassem MroueThe Associated PressDAMASCUS, Syria „ Crossing into Syria from neighboring Lebanon, visitors are greeted by giant posters of President Bashar Assad.The signs proclaim: Welcome to victorious Syria.ŽIn the capital of Damascus, many of the checkpoints that for years have snarled traffic are gone. The city is again connected to its sprawl-ing suburbs once held by the opposition, and many former residents and vis-itors from other parts of Syria fill its streets.Theres a new feeling of hope that an end is near to Syrias seven-year civil war.It is almost over,Ž Nazeer Habash, 60, said as he walked home near the Hijaz train station in central Damascus. It is like a child when he starts to walk, taking one step after another, and victory will always be on our side.ŽIn a central square not far from where rebel shells used to land just a few months ago, families and groups of teenag-ers took selfies. Children played on a large sculpture spelling out, I (heart) Damascus.ŽThe celebratory mood in governmentcontrolled areas stems from successive military advances in the past year.It is fed by a feeling that Assad, thanks to unwav-ering support from allies Russia and Iran, has won „ or at least has defeated those opposition fighters trying to topple him.The country has suffered catastrophic damage and some aspects of the conflict are far from over. Still, many Syrians „ even some among the opposition „ are hoping for some degree of secu-rity and stability.The government now controls major opposi-tion strongholds and key cities like Aleppo, Homs and even Daraa, the southern city where the uprising was born from protests in March 2011.The vital border cross-ing with Jordan, sealed for years, is expected to reopen soon after troops recaptured Daraa province, and hopes are high for the resumption of trade and Syrian exports to Arab countries.Syrians can now drive all the way form the Jor-danian border in the south to the central province of Hama on one of the countrys most important highways that was severed by insurgents for years in several locations. There is talk that the railway from Damascus to Aleppo might resume operations later this year.The latest government triumph came this week when rebels agreed to surrender their last pock-ets of control in Quneitra province in the southwest, opening the way for Assads forces to re-establish authority along the Israeli frontier.The direct threat to Damascus has ended. And since its the capital, its conditions affect all other parts of the country,Ž said Rami al-Khayer, 27, as he sipped a hot beverage with a friend at the famous Nofara cafe in the capitals old quarter.The scene in devastated areas once controlled by rebels outside Damascus is starkly different. But even amid the ruins there, life is slowly returning to normal, with more busi-nesses reopening and people tricking back.Syrians dare to hope that wars end may be nearA poster of President Bashar Assad with Arabic that reads Welcome in victorious Syria.Ž is seen on the border between Lebanon and Syria on Friday. The celebratory mood in government-controlled areas stems from successive military advances in the past year and an impression that Assad, with massive support by unwavering allies Russia and Iran, has won the war „ or at least militarily defeated the opposition trying to topple him. [HASSAN AMMAR/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

PAGE 3

DailyCommercial.com | Monday, July 23, 2018 A3 LOCAL & STATETom McNiff, editor 352-365-8250 tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comNEWS BRIEFS PENSACOLACracks found in bridge under constructionCracks have been found in a portion of concrete being used for a mammoth bridge project in Florida.The Pensacola News-Journal reported this week that cracks have twice halted construction of the $400-million bridge in the last several months, raising concerns about oversight and disclosure from the state.The state is replacing a nearly 60-year-old bridge that crosses Pensacola Bay in northwest Florida. The bridge connects Pensacola to Gulf Breeze.A Florida Department of Transportation spokesman told the newspaper that the cracks were found on part of a bridge deck that cracked during hardening.Gulf Breeze Mayor Matt Dannheisser said state officials should have let the community know about the cracks.Federal investigators are currently investigating the March collapse of a pedestrian bridge in south Florida where six people were killed. Cracks were discovered days before the collapse.FORT MYERSPolice of“ cer in hospital after getting shotA Florida police officer is in serious but stable condition after getting shot.The News-Press of Fort Myers reports that the officer was seriously wounded Satur-day night near a gas station. The police officer was taken by heli-copter to a local hospital.Local officials, however, have not provided many other details about the shooting. Fort Myers Police Chief Derrick Diggs told local reporters that a suspect in the shooting had been taken into custody. Gov. Rick Scott spoke to the police chief and the local sheriff about the shooting shortly after it happened.PALM COASTChildren found living in “ lth and bug-infested homeFlorida authorities have charged three people with child neglect after investigators said they found three young children living with them in "deplorable" conditions.The Florida Times-Union reported that the Flagler County Sheriff's Office found three children between the ages of 4 months and 4 years old living in filth and covered with bug bites. One child had broken bones.The investigation started after a 4-month-old child with multiple fractures and bites was taken to a local hospital for treatment. Authorities say the home where the children lived was so severely infested that investigators saw hundreds of cockroaches crawling on the furniture as well as the floors, walls and ceilings.The three adults were booked into jail on Friday. Records do not show if they have attorneys.TALLAHASSEEFSU moves statue of Jefferson's grandsonFlorida State University has put in storage a statue of Thomas Jefferson's grandson after the school's president agreed to the change.FSU maintenance crews removed the statue of Francis Eppes on Thursday night from its spot near the school's main administration build-ing. Student groups had voiced opposition to the statue because Eppes was a slave owner.Edward Jonas, the sculptor who created the statue, told The Tallahassee Democrat that moving the statue appears like "censorship." He said the school could have used it as a teaching tool.President John Thrasher earlier in the week agreed with a recommendation to move the 16-year-old statue to another spot. A panel suggested the change because of Eppes slave ownership and because of questions about his role in the creation of FSU. Voters must register for August primary by July 30Staff ReportTAVARES „ July 30 is the deadline for voters to register for the upcoming primary on Aug. 28.Lake County Supervisor of Elections Alan Hays said voters have several options to register.They can take advantage of online voter registration options at www.LakeV-otes.com,Ž he said. If they prefer to not submit their information online, they may prefile the online appli-cation and print, sign, date and mail or deliver it to our office.ŽOther registration options include downloading the application form from the Supervisor of Elections website, registering in person at the Supervisor of Elections office or one of the local libraries, having a registration form mailed or registering when you obtain your drivers license.Party affiliation changes may also be made until the July 30 deadline. Primary deadline approachingJuly 30 is the deadline for voters to register for the upcoming primary on Aug. 28. [AP PHOTO / GERRY BROOME] By Adiel KaplanAssociated PressMIAMI „ For the past three years, Judge Cindy Lederman has walked by a half-dozen statues of playful bear cubs every day on her way up to her high-ceilinged, top-floor office looking out toward Miamis waterfront. On a shelf behind her desk, below rows of glass awards and family photos, sit two teddy bears. In six months, shell take them with her and walk past the statues for the last time.The stuffed bears are from a program the retiring judge helped start 20 years ago to give every child who came to juvenile court a teddy bear. The building, Miami-Dade Coun-tys three-year-old childrens courthouse, and its bear stat-utes „ meant to be played with by those same unlucky children who find themselves needing court hearings „ were a proj-ect she began working on with colleagues more than a decade ago to replace Miami-Dades previous and notoriously hor-rible childrens courthouse.Judge leaving a mark on juvenile courtBy Linda CharltonCorrespondentCLERMONT „ About a dozen moth enthusiasts gathered at Clermonts Florida Scrub-Jay Trail on Saturday night to observe, count and pho-tograph moths and kickoff National Moth Week.The event was led by mothing enthusiast Cheri Pierce, of Sorrento, who filed the resulting data with Butterflies and Moths of North America.The week itself is organized by nationalmothweek.org, in what is the moth equivalent of Audubons Christmas Bird Count. At the Clermont event, some participants were veterans while others were novices. But all went home with a reminder that when youre out mothing, it pays to keep your mouth closed and your drinks covered, because those bugs can and will go just about anywhere.A separate moth event is scheduled for Saturday at 8 p.m. at the Pine Mead-ows Conservation Area in Eustis.Spending an evening among the mothsCathy Brown gets close to photograph some of the tiny insects at Clermonts Florida Scrub-Jay Trail on Saturday. The little bugs came out “ rst. [LINDA CHARLTON / CORRESPONDENT] LEFT: Cheri Pierce at her moth cloth, before the bugs start coming on Saturday at Clermonts Florida Scrub-Jay Trail. Each side has different types of light source, as different moths are attracted to different types of light. [LINDA CHARLTON / CORRESPONDENT] ABOVE: It was a mothing event, but the gathering of enthusiasts was captivated for quite a while by this praying mantis, undoubtedly attracted by the smorgasbord of little bugs on Saturday at Clermonts Florida Scrub-Jay Trail. [LINDA CHARLTON / CORRESPONDENT] By Rick ReedCorrespondentLEESBURG „ After four years and spending more than $3 million, Leesburg International Airport has its own the seaplane ramp.But its not the first-time seaplanes could land in Leesburg.Leesburgs first seaplane base was dedicated at Vene-tian Gardens in 1941. In 1946 airplanes once landed in the area that is now Bev-erly Shores Elementary School and seaplanes landed in Lake Griffin, close to the two runways of the Leesburg Aviation Center. It was located at the Beverly Grizzard Camp and was home to Hal Hoovers Seaplane Base.After the war, the government had money available to build airports and on the GI Bill, you could learn how to fly,Ž said Tom Grizzard, retired broker/ president of ERA Tom Grizzard Inc. Hal Hoover was the instructor and my daddy built the airport on whats now Lee Court.ŽIn 1946, Grizzards father, Beverly, owned the property. Some of the land was later donated so Beverly Shores Elementary School could be build. There had been plans to build a munic-ipal airport there around 1937. It was a Works Prog-ress Administration project, according to a story the late Norma Hendricks wrote in the Commercial. THEN AND NOWA history of ightAn aviation center and seaplane base on Lake Grif“ n in Leesburg. [SUBMITTED] First seaplane base in Leesburg dates to 1941 See SEAPLANE, A4See JUDGE, A4 See VOTING, A4

PAGE 4

A4 Monday, July 23, 2018 | DailyCommercial.comA written request is needed to make a party affiliation change and must include the voters signature. A voter registration application form can easily be used to process this type of update/change but must be done in hardcopy format due to the signature requirement. Party changes received after the deadline will be effective for the General Election in November.Hays recommends that voters hand deliver their completed applications to the Elections Office or to their local library. The Elections Office is now located at 1898 E. Burleigh Blvd., Tavares. For a listing of libraries located throughout the county, visit: https://www.mylakelibrary. org/libraries/.Voters are also advised to let the elections office know if they have moved, have a name change or have any other updates since they last voted. VOTINGFrom Page A3WPA workers also built much of Venetian Gardens.WPA workers started clearing it,Ž wrote Hendricks of the airfield, running into the most extensive rattlesnake haven ever uncovered.ŽBut it wasnt rattlesnakes that delayed completion of the proposed airport. WPA money ran out, accord-ing to Hendricks. Hoover experienced his first flight from a Leesburg airstrip around 1976, according to a Daily Commercial story that ran in 1976. His family moved to Leesburg from Ohio in 1920.The aviation bug bit Hoover hard after his barn-storming flight. He later learned to fly at the Orlando air school at the old Hern-don Field in the early 1940s. Hoover received his private license Oct. 3, 1941, and his commercial license April 29, 1942.After completing his training Hoover became an instructor at the same school. And after Pearl Harbor, there was a rush for instructors. Hoover became a civilian instruc-tor of the Naval cadets. He later spent more than a year in Auburn, Alabama, instructing fighter and glider pilots.Hoover was also a member of the Leesburg Flying Fish Hawks, a flying club, which purchased a Piper Cub. Beverly Grizzard, an old barnstormer himself according to his son, gave the Leesburg Flying Fish Hawks flight club permission to use a section of his property as a new landing field, accord-ing to a story in the Daily Commercial.Hoover opened Hals Flight School at the Eustis Municipal Airport in August 1944. Previously, the school was in Leesburg, according to an Orlando Sentinel story. He sold his successful flight school in Eustis and opened a seaplane base in Leesburg, according to a newspaper story that ran May 31, 1946.Hoover and another pilot gave flight instructions and Hoovers wife ran the ground school.The GI Bill was the lifeblood of the busi-ness,Ž Nathan Wall wrote. Many people learned to fly there. Many pilots got their Seaplane Rating there. Many of us used it as a place to hang out.ŽOn Sundays, Hoover sent Wall and Don Smith to Eatons Beach to hop passengersŽ for a $1 a ride and business was brisk. Part of the base later became the Leesburg Lakeshore Mobile Home Park, Beverly Shores Subdivision and Beverly Shores Elementary School. The mobile home park was opened in 1947. Hoover had two planes when he opened, with a third seaplane expected within two months. Wall remembers that Hoover eventually had four seaplanes and four land-based planes.An ad in the Daily Com-mercial of May 31, 1946, explained in bold letters, Now Fly Sea-Planes, over 1,500 perfect landing areas in Lake County alone.Ž The ad likely used a chamber of commerce-type count of the number of lakes in Lake County, usually quoted as 1,400.Hal Hoover, after two years of successful flying school operation in Eustis, is now back home in Lees-burg and is offering the aviation minded public of Lake and surrounding counties the safety, dependability, utility and fun of seaplane flying,Ž read the ad Combine the enjoyment of boating with the thrill of flying.ŽHoover offered flight instruction, charter trips, passenger flights and seaplane rentals. Leesburg Aviation Center was turned into the Beverly Shore Subdivision in the 1950s, according to Grizzard. SEAPLANEFrom Page A3Ledermans legacy stretches far beyond bears. During her 25-year tenure as a juvenile court judge, including a decade as the courts top judge, shes ruled in some of the most important cases to pass through, including that of 5-year-old Rilya Wilson, a child lost and apparently killed, and her decision to strike down the states gay adoption ban. Lederman has also led a movement to introduce science into the courtroom. Collaborating with child development experts, she transformed the Miami-Dade childrens court. Ledermans reforms spread around the state and the model she built has been replicated across the country.She has seen thousands of children in her courtroom, making difficult decisions about foster care, adoption and family reunification. Throughout the decades, she has been a strong advocate for the best, most scientific option in deciding the future of a child.She seemed to put her life into it,Ž said retired Judge Seymour Gelber, a decades-long childrens court judge and mentor of Ledermans from her early days on the court. (The courthouse was named for him and another former judge, the late William Gladstone.) She was one of the great things that happened to the juvenile court.ŽIn court, Lederman moves quickly, conducting her busy courtroom like an orchestra. Childrens court can be chaotic, with case workers from child welfare agencies, lawyers, guardians, parents and relatives moving in and out and speaking out of turn. Leder-man stands unfazed behind her bench with the easy authority of experience, making decisive rulings.On one Monday after-noon, she heard 10 cases in just over an hour. She over-saw an inmate signing away the rights to his three chil-dren, shouted down an irate grandfather, reprimanded a child welfare agency for not putting a 3-year-old with developmental delays into treatment quickly enough, told a mother she was responsible for coordinating $7,000 worth of dental work for her chil-dren, refused to rule in two cases without more information on related child abuse investigations and pulled over a school bus by calling the driver from the courtroom to ask how his children were doing. It was a light day.When Lederman arrived at the juvenile court in 1994, the states child welfare system was a mess.It was almost like we were engaging in criminal behavior every day, the way we were treating these chil-dren,Ž she said.Lederman got to work. The junior judge had already made waves in county criminal court when she helped establish a separate domestic violence court. Her efforts got her labeled an agitatorŽ by a superior and earned her an invite to sit on a research committee at the National Academy of Sciences.I went to Washington and my whole world „ my whole professional, legal world „ completely changed,Ž she said.Lederman found herself on a committee with some of the nations top child psychology researchers. She began to learn about evidence-based practice, and what science said was best for children. She had been a judge for seven years and on the childrens court for one.I thought every day I was helping people,Ž she said, still haunted by those early decisions. I thought every program I sent a child or parent to was helping them. It never occurred to me that that program could be hurting them.ŽTenacious and curious, Lederman began a campaign to learn more and bring child welfare science into the courtroom, in what she calls the marriage of science and law. She spent the next decade serving on panels, committees and research projects with the National Academy of Sciences, integrating what she learned into her court and starting local research partnerships that continue to this day.One of her first partners was Dr. Lynne Katz, who runs the Linda Ray Intervention Center for high-risk children at the University of Miami. Katz, whose research focused on babies born with drug exposure, received a subpoena to appear in Ledermans court in the late 90s about a child who was in a program at her center.We were never invited into court,Ž Katz said. No one ever asked our opinions. We would send our reports and they would fall into black holes.ŽIn court, Lederman told her to approach the bench.It was very intimidat-ing,Ž Katz recalled. I didnt know if Id done something to be arrested. She said, What is this program? What is this center about? Can we have lunch? It was the first of many meetings between the two women discussing the overlap between the chil-dren they worked with and the expertise they held.She said we need to col-laborate, and thats how it began,Ž Katz said.Nationwide, juvenile courts, sometimes called childrens courts, are seen as low-status „ the bottom of the barrel. They are where new judges go, or judges in trouble. Most dont stick around long. But Lederman chose to stay.Its a national problem ... I dont know why they think this isnt real judging,Ž Lederman said. To me its so difficult and so stressful and so frustrat-ing. But the people who stay here have this passion for it.We help children, we help them grow, we change their path. Theres no more important court.ŽIn Florida, theyve been going away. Since the early 1990s, juvenile courts across the state have been merging with family courts „ which generally handle internal family issues such as divorce, custody and domestic violence. Lederman has fought to keep Miami-Dade Childrens Court independent.She argues that the separation is important. Childrens court is the one place in the legal system where the child comes first. The court proceedings are about what is best for the child, not what the parents want, a responsibility Lederman takes seriously, and has defended vigorously.Theres a canon of ethics in California for juvenile judges that requires you to fight for children, for the needs of children. We dont have that here,Ž Lederman said. Its something she strongly believes in.I feel that any child in my division I am ultimately responsible for. Period,Ž she said. The judge has to be a leader. The judge has to advocate for the needs of these children. Because if we step back,Ž the judge says, pausing. She shakes her head. Imagine.ŽThroughout her career, Ledermans strong principles and willingness to call out behavior she finds unacceptable have brought her attention and no shortage of criticism. Lederman has had her share of fights, facing off with the Department of Children & Families, lawyers who wont reveal the whereabouts of the underage children they represent and the county public defender.Lederman has presided over more than an average judges share of newswor-thy cases, some of which still conjure nightmares. The first that thrust her into the national spotlight was the disappearance of 5-year-old Rilya Wilson in 2001. The scandal began when it emerged that DCF had not seen Rilya in 15 months, did not know where she was and had been filing false paperwork that said the girl was fine. The case was one of Ledermans.Remembering Rilya, Lederman grows quieter.We never found her. Never found her body.Ž The memory still shakes Leder-man. Just think about it. How could they not have known that that child was missing for all those months when theyre legally obli-gated to go out every month and see the child? Its just inexcusable.ŽLedermans courtroom flooded with reporters from across the country. She made headlines for publicly chewing out DCF for its failures. Rilyas ordeal led to a new emphasis on keeping track of children in care, and the passage of a state law „ the Rilya Wilson Act „ that required greater oversight of pre-schoolaged children in the child welfare system.In 2008, in a case that happened behind closed doors, Lederman struck down Floridas ban on gay adoption. Lederman had a case where a gay man wanted to adopt his foster child. Under Florida law, she could grant him a permanent guardianship instead. Lederman chose not to. She refused to close the case and a four-day trial ensued. A lawyer from the ACLU came down to represent the would-be adoptive father, an expert from the U.K. flew in to tes-tify. Her ruling, later upheld by an appellate court, made national news.It came back down to science.What is the science in terms of are gay and lesbian parents horrible human beings and they destroy their children or not? Of course not. And the science was very clear,Ž she said. JUDGEFrom Page A3After four years and $3.3 million, the seaplane ramp at Leesburg International Airport is open for business. [SUBMITTED] Miami Judge Cindy Lederman reacts after she allowed 2-year-old Yonathan Canavaciolo to bang her gavel after she “ nalized his adoption and that of his brother, Brian, 1, by Jose and Veronical Canavaciolo, at the Juvenile Justice Center as part of National Adoption Day in Miami in 2007. [NURI VALLBONA / MIAMI HERALD VIA AP]

PAGE 5

DailyCommercial.com | Monday, July 23, 2018 A5

PAGE 6

A6 Monday, July 23, 2018 | DailyCommercial.comWhile the documents confirm that the FBI relied, in part, on information from Steele to obtain the initial warrant, they also show how the FBI informed the court of his likely motiva-tion. A page-long footnote in the warrant application lays out the FBIs assessment of Steeles history and the likely interest of his backer, adding that despite the political concern, the bureau believed at least some of his report to be credible.ŽDemocratic Rep. Adam Schiff of California, a rank-ing member on the House Intelligence Committee, said the documents detail just why the FBI was so concerned that Carter Page might be acting as an agent of a foreign power.ŽIt was a solid application and renewals signed by four different judges appointed by three different Republi-can presidents,Ž Schiff said on ABCs This Week.ŽRepublican Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida also broke with Trump, saying he didnt think the FBI did anything wrong in obtain-ing warrants against Page.I have a different view on this issue than the presi-dent and the White House,Ž Rubio said Sunday on CBS Face the Nation.Ž They did not spy on the campaign from anything and everything that I have seen. You have an individual here who has openly bragged about his ties to Russia and Russians.Ž On Sunday, Page said on CNNs State of the UnionŽ: Ive never been the agent of a foreign power.Ž In a 2013 letter, Page had described himself as an informal adviser to the Kremlin but now said its really spinŽ to call him an adviser.Page has not been charged with a crime, but he has been interviewed by the FBI and congressio-nal investigators about his ties to Russia. White House officials have argued that Page, announced by the president in early 2016 as a foreign policy adviser, played only a minor role in the Trump campaign. Another former campaign policy aide, George Papadopoulos, pleaded guilty last year to charges brought by special counsel Robert Mueller alleging he had lied to the FBI about his Russia contacts. He is now cooperating with Muellers expansive probe.The documents released Saturday include the FBIs October 2016 request to surveil Page and several renewal applications. It marks the first time in the more than 40-year history of the highly-secretive court that underlying doc-uments for a warrant have been released. TRUMPFrom Page A1By Christopher Weber and Michael BalsamoThe Associated PressLOS ANGELES „ A gunman who got into a deadly shootout with police, then took dozens of people hostage at a Los Angeles supermarket has been arrested on suspicion of murder, authorities said Sunday. Gene Evin Atkins, 28, was being held Sunday morning on $2 million bail, according to Officer Drake Madison, a Los Angeles police spokesman. It wasnt clear if he had an attorney and a message left at a number listed for Atkins in public records wasnt immediately returned.A woman was shot and killed when Atkins ran into the Trader Joes supermar-ket in Los Angeles Silver Lake section on Saturday, but no hostages were seri-ously hurt before the man handcuffed himself and surrendered about three hours later, police said.Coroners officials iden-tified the woman Sunday as 27-year-old Melyda Corado. Her brother, Albert Corado, said on Twitter that she worked at Trader Joes.Im sad to say she didnt make it. My baby sister. My world,Ž he tweeted.Atkins grandmother was hospitalized in critical condition after the shooting and police had no update on her condition Sunday.Authorities said Atkins shot his grandmother seven times and wounded another woman, whom he forced into a car, at a South Los Angeles home around 1:30 p.m., police said. Officers tracked the car, gave chase and exchanged gunfire with the man, who crashed into a pole outside the supermarket and then ran inside, they said. The unidentified woman, who suffered a graze wound ear-lier, was taken out of the car by police. Frightened customers and workers dove for cover as police bullets fired at the man shattered the stores glass doors.Some people inside the supermarket climbed out windows, and others barri-caded themselves in rooms as scores of police officers and firefighters and 18 ambulances converged on the scene and prepared for mass casualties.Heavily armed officers in riot gear stood along the side of the store and used mirrors to look inside as hostage negotiators tried to coax the man into freeing his 40 to 50 hostages and surrendering.At around 6:30 p.m., Atkins agreed to handcuff himself and walked out the front door, surrounded by four of the hostages. He was immediately taken into custody.Gunman in LA supermarket stando arrested for murder

PAGE 7

DailyCommercial.com | Monday, July 23, 2018 A7My goal is to get it out there, make it accessible and enjoyable,Ž Sobbott Ross said. Lake County is artistic. Its time we uncov-ered the raw, untapped potential of the people in our community.ŽSobbott Ross is an English teacher and a trained writing coach. Much of her career was spent teaching in the Lake County Schools system. She currently teaches English to adults in the ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) program and GED prep at Lake Techni-cal College. She has worked with students ages 5 to 91.The Lake County Library System offers physical and digital content, as well as education, research and workforce training ser-vices. For more information on the library system and future programs, call 352-253-6180, visit your local library, or connect at http://mylakelibrary.org or www.facebook.com/LakeCountyFLLibrary. POETRYFrom Page A1He is asking city commissioners to ratify the agreement.There are still four issues that need to be dealt with before the parties can sign on the dotted line. They are: consumptive water use permit, mineral rights escrow, complet-ing a general government service agreement and a sanity sewer franchise agreement.The amendment moves the due diligence date from Aug. 8 to Sept. 21. Both parties believe that the above mentioned tasks will be complete by this date ...ŽClosing is scheduled for Oct. 8, the memo says.The agreement also spells out a change in the size of the property to be sold. The retirement com-munity is buying 1,127 acres for $7,000 per acre.Originally, more than 530 acres south of County Road 470 were to be included in the deal, but the city needs that acreage for wastewater treatment.Several years ago, the city, with a grant from the federal Environmen-tal Protection Agency, bought hundreds of acres of land along CR 470 and Floridas Turnpike. It wont need all of it now. The Villages has agreed to treat six million gallons per day from the city at its treatment facility. The Villages is building thousands of new homes from Wildwood in Sumter County to Leesburg. City commissioners agreed to sell property to the mega-retirement community, acknowledging it will vastly increase the tax base and bring jobs to the city. Mondays meeting is at 5:30 p.m. at City Hall. VILLAGESFrom Page A1 The Villages is is buying 1,127 acres from the city of Leesburg for $7,000 per acre. [ALAN YOUNGBLOOD / GATEHOUSE MEDIA] Whether communications on those platforms should be part of the public record is a grow-ing but unsettled debate in states across the country. Updates to transparency laws lag behind rapid tech-nological advances, and the public and private personas of state officials overlap on private smartphones and social media accounts. Those kind of technol-ogies literally undermine, through the technology itself, state open government laws and policies,Ž said Daniel Bevarly, execu-tive director of the National Freedom of Information Coalition. And they come on top of the misuse of other technologies, like people using their own pri-vate email and cellphones to conduct business.ŽSome government offi-cials have argued that public employees should be free to communicate on private, non-governmen-tal cellphones and social media platforms without triggering open records requirements.Lawmakers in Ken-tucky and Arizona this year unsuccessfully proposed exempting all communications on personal phones from state open records laws, alarming open government advo-cates. A Virginia lawmaker introduced a bill to exempt all personal social media records of state lawmak-ers from disclosure.New Kansas Gov. Jeff Colyer went the opposite direction in February with an executive order that requires his staff to use official email accounts for all government business. He also banned private accounts for any commu-nications related to the functions, activities, programs, or operationsŽ of the office.In neighboring Missouri, Democratic lawmakers introduced a bill that would make clear that personal social media pages and messages sent through digital platforms such as Confide and Signal are public records as long as they relate to official business. The legislation arose because of a controversy involving use of the Confide app by former Gov. Eric Greitens, who resigned in June amid a series of scandals.We need to clarify the expectations, because we should not be allowed to conduct state business using invisible ink,Ž said state Rep. Ingrid Burnett, who said shes disappointed the bill didnt advance.The proposals were cap-tured by a new Associated Press application called SunshineHub, a digital tool that tracks bills related to government transparency in all 50 states. They point to the mushrooming challenge of defining and maintaining government records in the smartphone era. The issue exploded into public view last year amid reports that several employees in the office of Greitens, then Missouris governor, had accounts on Confide. The app makes messages disappear imme-diately after they are read and doesnt allow them to be saved, forwarded, printed or captured by screenshot.The news prompted an inquiry from the state attorney general, an ongo-ing lawsuit alleging the practice violated the states sunshine law and the bill that would declare all such communications relating to government business to be public records.Greitens and aides have said they used Confide only to discuss logistics such as scheduling matters that were insignificant, tran-sitoryŽ and therefore not required to be maintained as public records. An inquiry by Attorney General Josh Hawley found no evidence the practice as described was illegal, but investigators didnt recover the disappeared messages. APPSFrom Page A1In this May 30, 2018, “ le photo, Kansas Gov. Jeff Colyer, right, answers a question from reporters as Lt. Gov. Tracey Mann, left, listens during a news conference in Topeka, Kan. Kansas Gov. Colyer in February issued an executive order that requires his staff to use of“ cial email accounts for all government business. He also banned private accounts for any communications related to the functions, activities, programs, or operationsŽ of the of“ ce. [AP PHOTO/JOHN HANNA, FILE]

PAGE 8

A8 Monday, July 23, 2018 | DailyCommercial.comBy Scott Clement and Dan BalzThe Washington PostBy wide margins, Ameri-cans give President Donald Trump negative marks for his conduct during a summit with Russian Pres-ident Vladimir Putin last week and for his casting doubt on U.S. intelligence conclusions that Russia interfered in the 2016 presidential election, a new Washington Post-ABC News poll finds.But public reaction nationally appears more muted than in Washington, where Trump faced with-ering bipartisan criticism for appearing to side with Putin over U.S. intelligence agencies at a Monday news conference in Helsinki. Most Americans do not feel Trump went too farŽ in supporting Putin, and while more Americans say U.S. leadership has gotten weaker than stronger under Trump, his ratings on this question are slightly improved from last fall.The findings indicate that while Trump was judged critically for his summit performance, the event has not at this time proved to be a significant turning point in his presi-dency, despite the sharp criticism he received in the hours and days after the meeting and the multiple efforts by White House officials and the president to clarify his remarks in Helsinki. The poll results suggest that overall atti-tudes toward the president have hardened on both sides and that major events like Helsinki produce only modest changes in his overall standing, if any.The Post-ABC poll conducted Wednesday through Friday finds that overall, 33 percent of Americans approve of Trumps handling of his meeting with Putin while 50 percent disapprove. A sizable 18 percent say they have no opinion. A slightly larger 56 percent disapprove of Trump expressing doubts about U.S. intelligence agencies conclusion that Russia tried to influence the outcome of the 2016 election. On both questions, those who say they strongly disapproveŽ of Trumps performance outnumber those who say they strongly approveŽ by better than 2 to 1.Trumps ratings for han-dling the summit represent a weakened moment for him, but they are not mark-edly worse than ratings of his presidency overall in other recent polls. A Wash-ington Post-Schar School poll earlier this month, for instance, found 43 per-cent approved of Trumps job performance while 55 percent disapproved, with strong disapproval out-pacing strong approval by roughly 2 to 1.The new Post-ABC poll finds 40 percent saying Trump went too farŽ in supporting Putin, a criticism that was voiced by both Democrats and Republicans in Washing-ton over the past week.Americans give Trump poor marks for Putin meetingPresident Donald Trump, left, and Russian President Vladimir Putin address the media at a July 16 news conference in Helsinki, Finland. [CHRIS RATCLIFFE/BLOOMBERG]

PAGE 9

DailyCommercial.com | Monday, July 23, 2018 A9HAVE YOUR SAYWe welcome signed letters and guest columns. Letters should not exceed 300 words and columns should not exceed 500 words. Columns need to include a recent headshot of the writer. We edit for length, clarity, and grammar. Mail: Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 Email: letters@dailycommercial.com Fax: 352-365-1951 Most Americans are far likelier to be searched by an agent of the Transportation Security Administration than by an FBI agent. But according to a federal appeals court, if an FBI agent violates your rights you can file a lawsuit. If youre manhandled by a TSA employee youre out of luck. By a 2-1 vote, the U.S. 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals in Philadelphia has ruled against Nadine Pellegrino, a business consultant from Boca Raton, who claimed that a search of her belongings at Philadelphia International Airport in 2006 was too rough and invasive. She was arrested and charged with assault after she clashed with TSA agents, but was found not guilty. She then filed a lawsuit against the TSA and the individual agents. The appeals courts decision turned not on the truth or falsity of Pellegrinos allegations but on a question of how a law called the Federal Tort Claims Act should be interpreted. Generally, the federal government is immune to lawsuits under the doctrine of sovereign immunity.Ž But the Federal Tort Claims Act creates various exceptions, including one allowing citizens to sue investigative or law enforcement officersŽ for civil wrongs including false arrest, false imprisonment and malicious prosecution. Writing for the majority, Judge Cheryl Ann Krause said that TSA agents didnt qualify because the searches they performed were administrative.Ž The judge suggested that if searches by TSA agents could give rise to lawsuits, so could other routine searches by government officials, such as those carried out by meat inspectors and employees of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Yet Krause conceded that airport screenings are particularly invasive because they may involve thorough searches of not only the belongings of passengers but also their physical persons „ searches that are even more rigorous and intimate for individuals who happen to be selected for physical pat-downs after passing through a metal detector or imaging scanner.Ž She suggested that although current law didnt authorize lawsuits against TSA agents in her view, Congress could pass a law allowing them. We disagree. The judges cramped reading of the law seems to miss the point of what TSA agents do. And it denies recourse to people who are abused by them. Most TSA agents do their jobs diligently and courteously. But those who take advantage of the sometimes intimate contact they have with the traveling public shouldnt be immune to legal sanctions. If the courts wont recognize that, Congress should step in. Los Angeles TimesANOTHER OPINIONTravelers should be able to sue abusive airport screeners ANOTHER OPINION Painful to hear, read butchered language I so enjoy reading the op-ed pieces of Professor John Crisp, and his offering in Wednesdays Daily Commercial was no exception (Imprecise Language Leads to Bad PoliticsŽ). I found myself immediately recalling Professor Henry Higgins in My Fair LadyŽ lamenting Why Cant the English Teach Their Children How to Speak?Ž (All one needs to do is change the reference to AmericansŽ rather than the EnglishŽ); and I also recall Winston Churchill lamenting the fact that the United States and the United Kingdom are two nations divided by a common language.Ž That, of course, was proven recently when The Donald castigated English Prime Minister Theresa May while telling her how she should govern her country. What an overblown idiot that man continues to prove himself to be to the world. But more on point, Crisp has rightfully concluded that the pundits and commentators so misuse the word biasŽ that it has lost its meaning. I have noted the same misuse of words such as socialist,Ž fascist,Ž communistŽ and other such epithets bandied about by those so-called pundits and commentators and writers of letters to the editor. Its obvious to me that they have no idea of the definition of those terms. I would strongly suggest that those writers have a copy of the MerriamWebster or the Oxford English or the Cambridge dictionaries in front of them before they assail anyone, especially those who are running for office. As Crisp points out, the term biasŽ has a specific meaning, and it seldom applies to the misuse made of it by the illiteratti of both the left and the right. Not meaning to be snobbish, but I was fortunate to have attended an incredible high school (Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit) where, as a freshman and sophomore, I was taught by priests with doctorates in the precise use of the English language. From there, I benefited from a Jesuitbased college education at the University of Detroit, and subsequently a law school education at the University of Michigan. I learned early on the advantages of using language to its fullest. And that grounding served me well through a near 40-year career as a lawyer. It is so discouraging to read or hear people who so abuse our language. May God have mercy on their souls!Daniel J. Andrews, The Villages Idle of“ cials will pay in November How is it possible that you, our elected officials, can sit idly by and watch this atrocity happen, under your watch? Have you lost all sense of compassion? Blaming Democrats? Using these kids as hostages to get a bad bill passed? Saying nothing when Jeff Sessions and Sarah Huckabee Sanders claim they are doing the work of the Bible, as good Christians? You are all parents. Your silence and inaction makes you culpable in crimes against humanity. Do you really value your own wealth more than that of other human beings? These are babies and young children. You must be on the payroll of Trump or the Russians to stand by and do nothing. Its the only explanation for your inaction, and its atrocious. What shame you have brought to the Republican Party and to the United States in the eyes of the world. You, as one of the checks and balances of our government, allow a despot and dictator-worshiping con man to completely undo all the good work you have done over your years of service to this country. He wants one thing. To be worshiped like a king and to have complete control, and you stand by and do nothing to stop him, at the expense of every American. You want an America that looks like North Korea? One TV station. Strictly limited internet. People killed for not supporting their dictator? Keep doing nothing. November cant come soon enough.Alan Harris, ClermontLETTERS TO THE EDITORTwo decades ago, Americans hoped the slaughter of students at Columbine High School would prove to be a horrible aberration, an event provoked by some bizarre confluence of causes unlikely to be repeated. Tragically, we now know better. School shootings in America have proved maddeningly difficult to predict „ and just as maddeningly difficult to prevent. Theres no widely accepted profile of the young person likely to emerge as a shooter. Law enforcement authorities say attackers have been male and female, high academic achievers and laggards, loners and popular students. Some made threats, others didnt. Some showed symptoms of mental illness or were under psychiatric care, others didnt and werent. This final variable can be misleading; the vast majority of people with mental illness pose no threat. Chilling fact: In the vast majority of school attacks, someone was aware of what the student was thinking or planning. But many of those who suspected a proclivity for violence didnt alert authorities. Why not? One reason is that this is a distressing judgment call. People fear that reporting suspicions may start a database entry that marks a child for life. They hesitate to interfere in parental or teacher responsibilities. These troubled students generally arent criminals lurking in the shadows, after all. Theyre teens with teenage problems, often exhibiting typical teenage angst. Some are abruptly withdrawn, others crave attention „ two passages of adolescence that many of us traveled. The question, then, that confronts adults and fellow students: Which young people are potentially, perhaps imminently, dangerous to themselves or others and which ones are ... just negotiating the often tumultuous teenage years? But there are smart ways to approach that ambiguity. In a just-released report on school safety, the U.S. Secret Service recommends that schools create threat teamsŽ that can include teachers, coaches, guidance counselors, mental health and law enforcement professionals. The aim of this group enterprise: to identify students of concern, assess their risk for engaging in violence or other harmful activities, and identify intervention strategies to manage that risk.Ž Instead of only focusing on the students personality or school performance the teams would, for instance, flag threatening social media posts, texting or other troubling communications. The teams also could try to determine a students access to weapons or explosives. The threshold to intervene should be relatively low,Ž before dangerous behavior escalates, the Secret Service says: It is much easier to intervene when the concern is related to a students struggle to overcome personal setbacks, such as a romantic breakup, than when there are concerns about threats posed to others.Ž Many people may consider calling the police an extreme response. Not really. But calling a schools threat assessment team should be easier. Schools that set up these teams „ and many already have „ should ensure that not just students and parents, but everyone in the community knows they can confidentially air suspicions about a student. The flip side is that local educators, trained to spot trouble and intervene, have to handle these cases tactfully (or squander the school communitys trust). Students should be reminded, again and again, that its safe to speak up to prevent an attack. That this is not snitching or ratting or narc-ing but possibly helping a classmate who is struggling. And adults who deal with young people? Yes, it may be awkward to report a suspicion about a child you know. But that act could save the lives of many other schoolchildren youve never met. So err on the side of reporting. You never know when youre not the first person, but the third, to voice a concern. Warning signals flash yellow before red. From Tribune News Service.ANOTHER OPINIONThe awkward obligation: When you suspect a student is dangerous OPINIONSteve Skaggs | Publisher Tom McNiff | Executive Editor Whitney Lehnecker | Digital Editor, Lifestyles Editor Tom McNiff, editor 352-365-8250 tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com

PAGE 10

A10 Monday, July 23, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com WEATHER

PAGE 11

DailyCommercial.com | Monday, July 23, 2018 B1 SPORTS BASEBALL B4A ROUNDUP OF ALL THE DAYS ACTION AROUND MLB Paul Jenkins, Sports editor 352-365-8204 paul.jenkins@dailycommercial.com Molinari survives wild day to win British Open By Doug FergusonThe Associated PressCARNOUSTIE, Scotland „ Francesco Molinari didnt get the loudest cheers for the best golf at British Open.He was overlooked for so much of Sunday playing alongside Tiger Woods, who caused pure pandemonium at Carnoustie by taking the lead in the final round of a major for the first time in nine years.Molinari settled for the best cheer of them all. The last one.Amid so much chaos „ seven players atop the lead-erboard, six of them still tied on the back nine „ Molinari played a steady hand by going the entire weekend without a bogey and finishing with a 5-foot birdie putt that secured his place in history as Italys first major champion.Clearly, in my group, the attention wasnt really on me, lets put it that way,Ž Molinari said, the gleaming claret jug in front of him. If someone was expecting a charge, they prob-ably werent expecting it from me. But its been the same the whole of my career.ŽHis charge was a 2-under 69 in the strongest wind of the week, the only player from the last four groups to break par.Woods lost the lead with one bad swing that would have been even farther left of the 11th green had it not crashed into the fans, leading to double bogey. He followed that with a bogey and never caught up. He had to settle for a 71.Last man standingFrancesco Molinari holds the trophy after winning the British Open in Carnoustie, Scotland, on Sunday. [AP PHOTO / JON SUPER] Jordan Spieth “ nds himself in the rough during the “ nal round of the British Open in Carnoustie, Scotland, on Sunday. [AP PHOTO / JON SUPER] By Larry SavageGateHouse MediaGAINESVILLE „ Concus-sions have been a fear of high school coaches for years, particularly in such physical sports as football.But a recent study indicates the biggest rise in concussions proportionally comes in girls soccer, which according to the study has more than any sport, including football.The data, which say about 300,000 adolescents suffer concussions annually while participating in organized athletics, indicates approximately 27 percent of all injuries in girls soccer are concussions. Football, in comparison, is at 24 percent.Whats more, girls tend to have more concussions than boys, according to the study conducted by Northwestern University orthopaedic surgeons Michael S. Schallmo, Joseph A. Weiner and Wel-lington K. Hsu.They researched how con-cussions impact nine different high school sports, which also include boys soccer, girls bas-ketball, boys basketball, girls softball, boys wrestling, girls volleyball and boys baseball.Concussions have impacted my (Gainesville) Eastside girls teams the last two years,Ž Rams coach Sergio Quintana said. We lost two girls to concussions each for over four weeks.The reinstatement protocols are lengthy, but very necessary.ŽQuintana pointed out a Washington Post article that said if you compared in games played, football has more concussions than soccer, but agrees it is a serious problem in girls.Just the other day my daughter was out with a concussion playing club soccer,Ž he said. Not all players in soccer have a lot of playing experience, dont know how to fall, its all new to them dealing with the challenges of soccer. A lot of kids hit their head on the turf and end up with a concussion or a ball is hit into their face.ŽAbout 2.1 million total con-cussions occurred nationally among high school athletes between 2005-2015 in the nine sports considered, according to the study. Since 2009, a significant higher proportion of concussions were seen for girls over boys.Study: More concussions su ered in girls soccerGirls soccer has the highest per capita rate of concussion among high school sports, according to a study led by a professor at Northwesterns Feinberg School of Medicine. [KEN BLEVINS/GATEHOUSE MEDIA] By Steven WineThe Associated PressMIAMI „ Tony Sparano once beat Bill Belichick with the single wing, but wasnt as old as that made him sound.Sparano was only 56 when he died unexpectedly Sunday. The Minnesota Vikings announced his death in a statement that did not pro-vide a cause.He had been the Vikings offensive line coach since 2016.The most memorable moment in Sparanos 19-year NFL coaching career came in 2008, when he was a rookie head coach with the Miami Dolphins, inheriting a team that had gone 1-15 the previous season. In Week 3 he surprised Belichick with a single wing-style formation that the Dolphins called the wildcat, and they won at New England 38-13.The wildcat became a fad around the league, and the stunning upset propelled Sparanos team to 11 wins and the AFC East title. Its one of Ex-Miami head coach Sparano dies at 56See SOCCER, B3 See OPEN, B3 See SPARANO, B3By Dan GelstonAssociated PressLOUDON, N.H. „ Kevin Harvick used a bump-and-run on Kyle Busch with seven laps left to win a thrilling battle of two of NASCARs dominant drivers Sunday at New Hampshire Motor Speedway.Harvick aimed his Ford bumper at the right side of Buschs Toyota and nudged the leader out of the way for the move of the race in another stellar showing for the leader of the Big Three.I felt like it was my best opportunity to do what I had to do to win,Ž Harvick said. I didnt want to wreck him. But I didnt want to waste a bunch of time behind him.ŽAdded Busch: How you race is how you get raced.ŽHarvick raced to his sixth victory of the season and went 1-2 in some order with Busch for the ninth time this year. Busch has five wins and Martin Truex Jr., fourth Sunday, has four. The Big Three were threatened in a race delayed by rain for more than three hours by Aric Almirola, who replaced Bump-and-run li s Harvick to winKevin Harvick celebrates in Victory Lane after winning a NASCAR Cup Series auto race Sunday at New Hampshire Motor Speedway in Loudon, N.H. [AP PHOTO / MARY SCHWALM] See NASCAR, B3

PAGE 12

B2 Monday, July 23, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com SCOREBOARD HOW TO REACH USPaul Jenkins, Sports Editor Email: paul.jenkins@dailycommercial.com Phone: 352-365-8204SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results by calling 352-365-8204. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. Results submitted after 9:30 p.m. may not appear in the next days edition of the Daily Commercial.SPORTS ON TV BASEBALL FCSL STANDINGSTEAM W L T GBLeesburg 24 10 .0 „ DeLand 19 15 0 5 Sanford 16 18 1 8 Winter Park 14 18 0 9 Winter Garden 14 19 1 9.5 Seminole 14 21 0 10.5 Fridays games DeLand 3, Leesburg 1 Winter Garden 12, Seminole 3 Sanford at Winter Park, ppd. Saturdays games Leesburg 3, Winter Garden 0 Sanford 3, DeLand 0 Seminole 14, Winter Park 4 Sundays games Seminole at Leesburg, ppd. Winter Park at DeLand ppd. Winter Garden at Sanford, ppd. Todays games Leesburg at Seminole (2), 4:30 p.m. Sanford at Winter Garden, 6 p.m. DeLand at Winter Park, 7 p.m. Tuesdays games Leesburg at Seminole, 7 p.m. Sanford at Winter Garden, 11 a.m. DeLand at Winter Park, 7 p.m. AUTO RACING NASCAR MONSTER ENERGY CUPFOXWOODS RESORT CASINO 301 RESULTSSunday At New Hampshire Motor Speedway Loudon, N.H. Lap length: 1.06 miles (Start position in parentheses)1. (14) Kevin Harvick, Ford, 301. 2. (3) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 301. 3. (13) Aric Almirola, Ford, 301. 4. (2) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 301. 5. (10) Chase Elliott, Chevrolet, 301. 6. (18) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 301. 7. (5) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 301. 8. (1) Kurt Busch, Ford, 301. 9. (19) Joey Logano, Ford, 301. 10. (21) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 301. 11. (8) Alex Bowman, Chevrolet, 301. 12. (20) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 301. 13. (4) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 301. 14. (11) William Byron, Chevrolet, 301. 15. (31) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 301. 16. (7) Erik Jones, Toyota, 301. 17. (12) Paul Menard, Ford, 301. 18. (22) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 301. 19. (26) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 301. 20. (24) Chris Buescher, Chevrolet, 300. 21. (17) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 300. 22. (9) Daniel Suarez, Toyota, 300. 23. (25) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 300. 24. (27) Bubba Wallace, Chevrolet, 299. 25. (32) Ross Chastain, Chevrolet, 298. 26. (29) Michael McDowell, Ford, 298. 27. (33) Corey LaJoie, Chevrolet, 298. 28. (28) Matt DiBenedetto, Ford, 298. 29. (30) David Ragan, Ford, 298. 30. (23) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 296. 31. (35) Kyle Weatherman, Chevrolet, 294. 32. (6) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 293. 33. (37) Blake Jones, Toyota, 289. 34. (36) BJ McLeod, Chevrolet, 267. 35. (15) Clint Bowyer, Ford, Accident, 255. 36. (16) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, Accident, 19. 37. (34) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, Accident, 13.RACE STAISTICSAverage Speed of Race Winner: 110.49 mph. Time of Race: 2 Hours, 52 Minutes, 56 Seconds. Margin of Victory: 1.877 Seconds. Caution Flags: 7 for 31 laps. Lead Changes: 10 among 7 drivers. Lap Leaders: Kurt Busch 1-37; R. Stenhouse Jr. 38-48; M. Truex Jr. 49-131; C. Elliott 132-154; Kurt Busch 155-211; A. Almirola 212-228; K. Harvick 229-232; A. Almirola 233-257; K. Harvick 258; Kyle Busch 259-294; K. Harvick 295-301. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Lead, Laps Led): Kurt Busch 2 times for 94 laps; M. Truex Jr. 1 time for 83 laps; A. Almirola 2 times for 42 laps; Kyle Busch 1 time for 36 laps; C. Elliott 1 time for 23 laps; K. Harvick 3 times for 12 laps; R. Stenhouse Jr. 1 time for 11 laps. GOLF ROYAL & ANCIENT GOLF CLUBBRITISH OPEN Sundays leaders at Royal & Ancient Golf Club, Carnoustie, Scotland Purse: $10.5 million. Yardage: 7,402; Par: 71 (36-35) (a-denotes amateur)FinalFrancesco Molinari (600), $1,890,000 70-72-65-69„276 (-8) Kevin Kisner (203), $694,250 66-70-68-74„278 Rory McIlroy (203), $694,250 69-69-70-70„278 Justin Rose (203), $694,250 72-73-64-69„278 Xander Schauffele (203), $694,250 71-66-67-74„278 Kevin Chappell (101), $327,000 70-69-67-73„279 Eddie Pepperell, $327,000 71-70-71-67„279 Tiger Woods (101), $327,000 71-71-66-71„279 Tony Finau (82), $219,000 67-71-71-71„280 Matt Kuchar (82), $219,000 70-68-70-72„280 Jordan Spieth (82), $219,000 72-67-65-76„280 Patrick Cantlay (65), $154,500 70-71-70-70„281 Tommy Fleetwood (65), $154,500 72-65-71-73„281 Ryan Moore (65), $154,500 68-73-69-71„281 Thorbjrn Olesen, $154,500 70-70-70-71„281 Webb Simpson (65), $154,500 70-71-67-73„281 Jason Day (51), $109,714 71-71-72-68„282 Charley Hoffman (51), $109,714 71-70-68-73„282 Zach Johnson (51), $109,714 69-67-72-74„282 Alex Noren (51), $109,714 70-71-67-74„282 Pat Perez (51), $109,714 69-68-74-71„282 Erik van Rooyen, $109,714 67-71-71-73„282 Adam Scott (51), $109,714 71-70-68-73„282 Stewart Cink (39), $84,000 72-70-71-70„283 Bernhard Langer (39), $84,000 73-71-68-71„283 Phil Mickelson (39), $84,000 73-69-70-71„283 Danny Willett, $84,000 69-71-70-73„283 Austin Cook (30), $67,143 72-70-67-75„284 Rickie Fowler (30), $67,143 70-69-73-72„284 Louis Oosthuizen (30), $67,143 72-70-69-73„284 Thomas Pieters (30), $67,143 70-73-70-71„284 Patrick Reed (30), $67,143 75-70-68-71„284 Julian Suri, $67,143 74-69-70-71„284 Chris Wood, $67,143 70-74-66-74„284 Adam Hadwin (22), $53,750 73-70-71-71„285 Michael Kim (22), $53,750 73-69-69-74„285 Satoshi Kodaira (22), $53,750 72-71-68-74„285 Henrik Stenson (22), $53,750 70-75-71-69„285 Cameron Davis, $41,375 71-72-73-70„286 Ross Fisher (15), $41,375 75-70-68-73„286 Ryan Fox, $41,375 74-71-71-70„286 Masahiro Kawamura, $41,375 77-67-71-71„286 Brooks Koepka (15), $41,375 72-69-75-70„286 HaoTong Li, $41,375 71-72-67-76„286 Luke List (15), $41,375 70-70-77-69„286 Kyle Stanley (15), $41,375 72-69-69-76„286 Sean Crocker, $31,000 71-71-69-76„287 Tom Lewis, $31,000 75-70-68-74„287 Yusaku Miyazato, $31,000 71-74-65-77„287 Brendan Steele (10), $31,000 68-76-73-70„287 Byeong Hun An (7), $27,161 73-71-66-78„288 Paul Casey (7), $27,161 73-71-72-72„288 Bryson DeChambeau (7), $27,161 75-70-73-70„288 Jason Dufner (7), $27,161 75-70-68-75„288 Tyrrell Hatton (7), $27,161 74-71-72-71„288 Lucas Herbert, $27,161 73-69-69-77„288 Yuta Ikeda, $27,161 70-73-71-74„288 Kevin Na (7), $27,161 70-73-73-72„288 Shubhankar Sharma, $27,161 73-71-71-73„288 Marc Leishman (6), $25,800 72-72-69-76„289 Gavin Kyle Green, $25,317 72-73-71-74„290 Marcus Kinhult, $25,317 74-69-71-76„290 Shaun Norris, $25,317 74-68-69-79„290 Brett Rumford, $25,317 74-70-72-74„290 Brandon Stone, $25,317 68-72-73-77„290 Lee Westwood, $25,317 72-72-69-77„290 Paul Dunne, $24,250 71-73-73-74„291 Rhys Enoch, $24,250 74-71-70-76„291 Sung Kang (3), $24,250 69-72-72-78„291 Si Woo Kim (3), $24,250 71-72-75-73„291 Zander Lombard, $24,250 67-71-71-82„291 Matthew Southgate, $24,250 69-72-73-77„291 Gary Woodland (3), $24,250 71-72-72-76„291 Rafa Cabrera Bello (3), $23,675 74-70-76-72„292 Kiradech Aphibarnrat, $23,488 74-71-74-74„293 Beau Hossler (3), $23,488 73-70-77-73„293 a-Sam Locke 72-73-70-78„293 Cameron Smith (2), $23,300 73-71-73-77„294 Keegan Bradley (2), $23,175 74-71-73-77„295BRITISH OPENCHAMPIONS YEAR-BY-YEAR(x-won playoff) 2018 „ Francesco Molinari 2017 „ Jordan Spieth 2016 „ Henrik Stenson 2015 „ x-Zach Johnson 2014 „ Rory McIlroy 2013 „ Phil Mickelson 2012 „ Ernie Els 2011 „ Darren Clarke 2010 „ Louis Oosthuizen 2009 „ x-Stewart Cink 2008 „ Padraig Harrington 2007 „ x-Padraig Harrington 2006 „ Tiger Woods 2005 „ Tiger Woods 2004 „ x-Todd Hamilton 2003 „ Ben Curtis 2002 „ x-Ernie Els 2001 „ David Duval 2000 „ Tiger Woods 1999 „ x-Paul Lawrie 1998 „ x-Mark OMeara 1997 „ Justin Leonard 1996 „ Tom Lehman 1995 „ x-John Daly 1994 „ Nick Price 1993 „ Greg Norman 1992 „ Nick Faldo 1991 „ Ian Baker-Finch 1990 „ Nick Faldo 1989 „ x-Mark Calcavecchia 1988 „ Seve Ballesteros 1987 „ Nick Faldo 1986 „ Greg Norman 1985 „ Sandy Lyle 1984 „ Seve Ballesteros 1983 „ Tom Watson 1982 „ Tom Watson 1981 „ Bill Rogers 1980 „ Tom Watson 1979 „ Seve Ballesteros 1978 „ Jack Nicklaus 1977 „ Tom Watson 1976 „ Johnny Miller 1975 „ x-Tom Watson 1974 „ Gary Player 1973 „ Tom Weiskopf 1972 „ Lee TrevinoPGA TOURBARBASOL CHAMPIONSHIPSaturdays leaders at Keene Trace Golf Club, Nicholasville, Ky. Purse: $3.5 million; Yardage: 7,328; Par: 72Third RoundRobert Streb 67-68-63„198 Hunter Mahan 66-68-64„198 Tom Lovelady 66-67-65„198 Troy Merritt 62-67-69„198 Sam Ryder 68-68-63„199 Blayne Barber 71-65-63„199 Billy Horschel 65-66-68„199 Richy Werenski 66-66-68„200 Cameron Percy 67-64-69„200 J.T. Poston 69-66-66„201 Zac Blair 69-67-66„202 Davis Love III 68-68-66„202 Xinjun Zhang 70-65-67„202 Andres Romero 65-67-70„202 Brian Stuard 68-70-65„203 David Lingmerth 67-69-67„203 Brian Gay 67-68-68„203 Steve Wheatcroft 68-67-68„203 Josh Teater 68-66-69„203 Jonathan Byrd 66-72-66„204 Nick Taylor 67-71-66„204 John VanDerLaan 67-70-67„204 Danny Lee 69-68-67„204 D.A. Points 69-69-66„204 Conrad Shindler 72-64-69„205 Joel Dahmen 65-72-68„205 J.J. Henry 69-67-69„205 Ricky Barnes 67-69-69„205 Johnson Wagner 69-66-70„205 Robert Garrigus 70-69-66„205 William McGirt 68-72-65„205 Ben Silverman 67-70-69„206 Scott Brown 68-70-68„206 Heath Slocum 71-67-68„206 Mackenzie Hughes 68-70-68„206 John Peterson 67-71-68„206 Fabin Gmez 70-69-67„206 D.J. Trahan 67-68-71„206 Charlie Wi 68-66-72„206 Shawn Stefani 66-68-72„206 Chris Wilson 71-66-70„207 Sebastin Muoz 67-70-70„207 Billy Hurley III 71-67-69„207 Stephan Jaeger 70-67-70„207 John Oda 69-69-69„207 Michael Thompson 67-69-71„207 Brian Davis 71-68-68„207 Chris Kirk 71-68-68„207 Tyler Duncan 66-72-70„208 Seamus Power 70-68-70„208 Peter Malnati 69-68-71„208 Martin Piller 66-72-70„208 Rob Oppenheim 71-67-70„208 Jonathan Randolph 67-69-72„208 Matt Atkins 66-69-73„208 Cooper Musselman 70-69-69„208 Kyle Thompson 68-69-72„209 John Rollins 69-70-70„209 Dicky Pride 72-68-69„209 Parker McLachlin 69-68-73„210 Whee Kim 71-67-72„210 Lanto Grif“ n 67-71-72„210 Daniel Summerhays 72-67-71„210 Will Cannon 69-71-70„210 Neal Lancaster 69-69-73„211 Nicholas Lindheim 67-72-72„211 Chip McDaniel 74-66-71„211 Shaun Micheel 70-68-75„213 Michael Bradley 69-70-74„213 Olin Browne 70-70-73„213 Jay Don Blake 70-70-73„213 Ethan Tracy 70-70-73„213 Jason Bohn 68-70-76„214 (Results from the “ nal round Sunday were not available at press time.) WEB.COM TOURPINNACLE BANK CHAMPIONSHIPSundays leaders at The Club at Indian Creek, Omaha, Neb. Purse: $600,000; Yardage: 7,581; Par: 71FinalDavid Skinns, $108,000 68-66-69-65„268 Sungjae Im, $64,800 65-67-71-67„270 Kramer Hickok, $40,800 67-66-71-67„271 Roberto Castro, $26,400 71-68-68-65„272 Dawie van der Walt, $26,400 66-66-69-71„272 Erik Barnes, $19,425 68-66-71-68„273 Vince Covello, $19,425 73-67-67-66„273 Sean Kelly, $19,425 73-67-64-69„273 Scott Pinckney, $19,425 67-69-71-66„273 Joseph Bramlett, $14,400 69-69-67-69„274 Alex Prugh, $14,400 71-70-69-64„274 Wes Roach, $14,400 68-71-68-67„274 Roger Sloan, $14,400 69-67-72-66„274 Wade Bin“ eld, $9,300 69-67-69-70„275 Sam Burns, $9,300 69-66-69-71„275 J.T. Grif“ n, $9,300 72-68-69-66„275 Jonathan Hodge, $9,300 69-68-70-68„275 Adam Long, $9,300 69-70-70-66„275 Kyle Reifers, $9,300 69-72-69-65„275 Mike Van Sickle, $9,300 68-69-71-67„275 Adam Webb, $9,300 69-67-73-66„275 Sebastian Cappelen, $5,189 73-68-67-68„276 Donald Constable, $5,189 72-67-71-66„276 Jim Herman, $5,189 69-68-70-69„276 Mark Hubbard, $5,189 69-69-70-68„276 Doug Letson, $5,189 70-69-69-68„276 Chase Wright, $5,189 67-72-67-70„276 Conner Godsey, $5,189 72-69-64-71„276 Brock Mackenzie, $5,189 69-64-72-71„276 Brian Richey, $5,189 68-68-68-72„276 Chris Baker, $3,218 72-68-72-65„277 Armando Favela, $3,218 69-70-70-68„277 Mark Anderson, $3,218 71-69-68-69„277 John Chin, $3,218 68-71-68-70„277 Grant Leaver, $3,218 72-68-68-69„277 Kyoung-Hoon Lee, $3,218 71-69-67-70„277 Fernando Mechereffe, $3,218 70-67-71-69„277 Chad Ramey, $3,218 70-68-66-73„277 Nick Rousey, $3,218 71-70-66-70„277 Adam Svensson, $3,218 69-68-68-72„277 Curtis Thompson, $3,218 67-68-72-70„277 Bio Kim, $2,220 73-67-67-71„278 Henrik Norlander, $2,220 70-69-72-67„278 Roland Thatcher, $2,220 67-72-70-69„278 Chris Thompson, $2,220 70-71-69-68„278 Mark Anguiano, $1,812 69-71-67-72„279 Mark Baldwin, $1,812 69-70-69-71„279 Bo Hoag, $1,812 70-67-72-70„279 Ben Taylor, $1,812 69-72-67-71„279 Jared Wolfe, $1,812 68-70-71-70„279 Steven Alker, $1,664 69-72-70-69„280 Derek Ernst, $1,664 66-70-73-71„280 Jim Knous, $1,664 70-68-73-69„280 Jack Maguire, $1,664 70-70-67-73„280 Jordan Russell, $1,664 74-66-69-71„280 Scott Gutschewski, $1,578 71-69-70-71„281 Justin Hicks, $1,578 67-72-70-72„281 Rico Hoey, $1,578 69-69-70 -73„281 Kyle Jones, $1,578 72-68-71-70„281 Brandon Matthews, $1,578 68-66-73-74„281 Dan McCarthy, $1,578 70-70-66-75„281 Trevor Cone, $1,512 70-70-70-72„282 Brandon Crick, $1,512 71-69-71-71„282 Vince India, $1,512 70-70-72-70„282 William Kropp, $1,512 66-75-72-69„282 Max McGreevy, $1,512 71-70-70-71„282 Christian Brand, $1,440 68-71-74-70„283 Luke Guthrie, $1,440 71-69-73-70„283 Brad Hop“ nger, $1,440 73-68-71-71„283 Stuart Macdonald, $1,440 74-67-71-71„283 Gerardo Ruiz, $1,440 71-70-72-70„283 Carlos Sainz Jr, $1,440 67-70-77-69„283 Casey Wittenberg, $1,440 71-70-74-68„283 Hank Lebioda, $1,386 67-71-78-69„285 Matt Ryan, $1,386 71-70-72-72„285 Andres Gonzales, $1,356 68-73-75-71„287 Kevin Lucas, $1,356 70-70-75-72„287 Andre Metzger, $1,356 66-72-75-74„287 Ray Beau“ ls, $1,332 71-69-77-73„290 Michael Buttacavoli, $1,320 69-71-78-74„292 SOCCER MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCERAll times EasternEASTERN CONFERENCE W L T PTS GF GAAtlanta United FC 13 4 5 44 46 25 New York City FC 12 4 4 40 40 24 New York Red Bulls 12 5 2 38 39 19 Columbus 9 7 6 33 27 27 Montreal 9 12 1 28 28 37 New England 7 7 7 28 33 32 Philadelphia 7 10 3 24 26 33 Chicago 6 11 5 23 34 43 Orlando City 7 12 1 22 29 45 Toronto FC 5 11 4 19 32 39 D.C. United 3 8 5 14 27 33WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T PTS GF GAFC Dallas 11 3 6 39 32 23 Los Angeles FC 10 4 5 35 41 28 Sporting Kansas City 9 5 6 33 37 27 Los Angeles Galaxy 9 7 4 31 37 31 Portland 8 3 7 31 28 24 Real Salt Lake 9 9 2 29 29 37 Houston 7 6 6 27 37 27 Vancouver 7 9 5 26 30 42 Minnesota United 8 11 1 25 28 39 Seattle 5 9 5 20 18 23 Colorado 4 11 4 16 22 32 San Jose 2 11 6 12 29 393 points for victory, 1 point for tieJuly 18Minnesota United 2, New England 1Saturdays GamesAtlanta United FC 3, D.C. United 1 Seattle 2, Vancouver 0 Los Angeles Galaxy 3, Philadelphia 1 New York 2, New England 0 Toronto FC 2, Chicago 1 Columbus 3, Orlando City 2 FC Dallas 1, Houston 1, tie Colorado 2, Real Salt Lake 2, tie Montreal 2, Portland 2, tieSundays GameLos Angeles FC at Minnesota United, lateWednesdays GamesNew York at D.C. United, 8 p.m. Philadelphia at Houston, 9 p.m. Seattle at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.Thursdays GamesNew York City FC at Orlando City, 8 p.m. L.A. Galaxy at Los Angeles FC, 10:30 p.m.Saturday, July 28Chicago at Toronto FC, 7 p.m. Columbus at New York Red Bulls, 7 p.m. Atlanta United FC at Montreal, 7:30 p.m. Colorado at D.C. United, 8 p.m. FC Dallas at Sporting Kansas City, 8:30 p.m. Houston at Portland, 9 p.m. Minnesota United at Vancouver, 10 p.m. Real Salt Lake at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.Sunday, July 29New York City FC at Seattle, 5 p.m. Orlando City at Los Angeles Galaxy, 9:30 p.m. ODDS PREGAME.COM LINEMAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL Today National LeagueFAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE at Chicago Off Arizona Off Los Angeles -140 at Philadelphia +130 at Cincinnati -119 St. Louis +109 Atlanta -124 at Miami +114 at New York -125 San Diego +115 at Milwaukee -105 Washington -105American LeagueFAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE at Los Angeles Off Chicago Off Boston -158 at Baltimore +148 at Toronto Off Minnesota Off at Tampa Bay Off New York Off at Texas -107 Oakland -103 at Kansas City -105 Detroit -105InterleagueFAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE at Cleveland -255 Pittsburgh +225 Updated Odds Available at Pregame.com TRANSACTIONS BASEBALLAmerican LeagueBALTIMORE ORIOLES „ Reinstated RHP Andrew Cashner from the 10-day DL. Optioned LHP Donnie Hart to Norfolk (IL). KANSAS CITY ROYALS „ Acquired OF Brian Goodwin from Washington for RHP Jacob Condra-Bogan. LOS ANGELES ANGELS „ Optioned RHP Taylor Cole to Salt Lake (PCL). Reinstated RHP Jim Johnson from the DL. MINNESOTA TWINS „ Reinstated DH-1B Logan Morrison from the 10-day DL. Optioned INF-OF Willians Astudillo and RHP Alan Busenitz to Rochester (IL). NEW YORK YANKEES „ Recalled RHP Giovanny Gallegos from Scranton/WilkesBarre (IL). OAKLAND AS „ Optioned LHP Jeremy Bleich to Nashville (PCL).National LeagueCOLORADO ROCKIES „ Reinstated RHP Antonio Senzatela from the 10-day DL. Placed RHP German Mrquez on the paternity list. NEW YORK METS „ Placed RHP Noah Syndergaard on the 10-day DL. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES „ Placed RHP Edubray Ramos on the 10-day DL. Activated RHP Luis Garcia from the 10-day DL. WASHINGTON NATIONALS „ Recalled LHP Sammy Solis from Syracuse (IL).American AssociationCHICAGO DOGS „ Released OF Shawon Dunston Jr. and INF Zach Racusin. Signed C Ray Gonzalez. LINCOLN SALTDOGS „ Removed RHP Dimitri Kourtis from the active roster to participate for the Greek national team. SIOUX CITY EXPLORERS „ Signed RHP Dominic Topoozian.Atlantic LeagueLONG ISLAND DUCKS „ Signed LHP Hector Silvestre. Placed RHP Tyler Badamo on the inactive list.Can-Am LeagueNEW JERSEY JACKALS „ Released RHPs Justin Martinez and Alberto Rodriguez. OTTAWA CHAMPIONS „ Signed RHP James Jones. ROCKLAND BOULDERS „ Signed INF Matt Dacey.FOOTBALLNational Football LeagueINDIANAPOLIS COLTS „ Signed LB Darius Leonard. NEW YORK GIANTS „ Signed RB Saquon Barkley and DT RJ McIntosh.HOCKEYNational Hockey LeagueNHL „ Announced an arbitrator awarded Winnipeg D Jacob Trouba a one-year contract for the 2018-19 season. CYCLING TOUR DE FRANCE15TH STAGESunday at Carcassonne, France A 112.7-mile leg from Millau to Carcassonne: 1. Magnus Cort Nielsen, Denmark, Astana Pro Team, 4:25:52. 2. Ion Izagirre, Spain, Bahrain-Merida same time. 3. Bauke Mollema, Netherlands, Trek-Segafredo, :02. 4. Michael Valgren, Denmark, Astana Pro Team, :29. 5. Toms Skujins, Latvia, Trek-Segafredo, :34. 6. Domenico Pozzovivo, Italy, BahrainMerida, same time. 7. Lilian Calmejane, France, Direct Energie, same time. 8. Rafal Majka, Poland, Bora-Hansgrohe, :37. 9. Nikias Arndt, Germany, Team Sunweb, 2:31. 10. Julien Bernard, France, Trek-Segafredo, same time. 11. Greg Van Avermaet, Belgium, BMC Racing Team, same time. 12. Niki Terpstra, Netherlands, Quick-Step Floors, same time. 13. Daniele Bennati, Italy, Movistar Team, same time. 14. Fabien Grellier, France, Direct Energie, same time. 15. Pawel Poljanski, Poland, Bora-Hansgrohe, same time. 16. Amael Moinard, France, Fortuneo-Samsic, same time. 17. Daryl Impey, South Africa, MitcheltonScott, same time. 18. Romain Sicard, France, Direct Energie, same time. 19. Daniel Martinez, Colombia, EF Education First-Drapac, same time. 20. Jesus Herrada, Spain, Co“ dis, Solutions Credits, same time.Also29. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky, 13:11. 34. Geraint Thomas, Britain, Sky, same time. 36. Tom Dumoulin, Netherlands, Team Sunweb, same time. 42. Mikel Landa, Spain, Movistar Team, 18:38. 43. Romain Bardet, France, AG2R La Mondiale, same time. 44. Jakob Fuglsang, Denmark, Astana, same time. 53. Steven Kruijswijk, Netherlands, LottoNLJumbo, same time. 59. Nairo Quintana, Colombia, Movistar Team, same time. 60. Dan Martin, Ireland, UAE Team Emirates, same time. 62. Primoz Roglic, Slovenia, LottoNL-Jumbo, same time. 63. Tejay van Garderen, United States, BMC Racing, same time. 84. Chad Haga, United States, Sunweb, 17:55. 88. Ian Boswell, United States, Katusha Alpecin, same time. 127. Taylor Phinney, United States, EF Education First-Drapac, 23:36. 149. Lawson Craddock, United States, EF Education First-Drapac, same time.Overall Standings (After 15 stages)1. Geraint Thomas, Britain, Sky, 62:49:47. 2. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky, 1:39. 3. Tom Dumoulin, Netherlands, Sunweb, 1:50. 4. Primoz Roglic, Slovenia, LottoNL-Jumbo, 2:38. 5. Romain Bardet, France, AG2R La Mondiale, 3:21. 6. Mikel Landa, Spain, Movistar, 3:42. 7. Steven Kruijswijk, Netherlands, LottoNLJumbo, 3:57. 8. Nairo Quintana, Colombia, Movistar, 4:23. 9. Jakob Fuglsang, Denmark, Astana, 6:14. 10. Dan Martin, Ireland, UAE Team Emirates, 6:54. 11. Alejandro Valverde, Spain, Movistar, 9:36. 12. Bob Jungels, Luxembourg, Quick-Step Floors, 9:53. 13. Ilnur Zakarin, Russia, Katusha Alpecin, 10:01. 14. Pierre Latour, France, AG2R La Mondiale, 17:28. 15. Greg Van Avermaet, Belgium, BMC Racing Team, 18:22. 16. Mikel Nieve, Spain, Mitchelton-Scott, 18:51. 17. Guillaume Martin, France, Wanty-Groupe Gobert, 19:55. 18. Damiano Caruso, Italy, BMC Racing Team, 21:26. 19. Tanel Kangert, Estonia, Astana Pro Team, 21:36. 20. Lilian Calmejane, France, Direct Energie, 22:17. Also 39. Tejay van Garderen, United States, BMC Racing, 57:30. 72. Chad Haga, United States, Sunweb, 1:35:41. 85. Ian Boswell, United States, Katusha Alpecin, 1:45:59. 136. Taylor Phinney, United States, EF Education First-Drapac, 2:20:08. 151. Lawson Craddock, United States, EF Education First-Drapac, 2:54:14.TOUR DE FRANCE STAGESJuly 7 „ Stage 1: Noirmoutier-en-lIle„ Fontenay-le-Comte, ” at (201km-124.9 miles) (Stage: Fernando Gaviria, Colombia; Yellow Jersey: Gaviria)July 8 „ Stage 2: Mouilleron-SaintGermain„La Roche-sur-Yon, ” at (182.5113.4) (Peter Sagan, Slovakia; Sagan)July 9 „ Stage 3: Cholet„Cholet, team time trial (35.5-22.1) (BMC Racing; Greg Van Avermaet, Belgium)July 10 „ Stage 4: La Baule„Sarzeau, ” at (195-121.2) (Gaviria; Van Avermaet)July 11 „ Stage 5: Lorient„Quimper, hilly (204.5-127.1) (Sagan; Van Avermaet)July 12 „ Stage 6: Brest„Mur de Bretagne Guerledan, hilly (181-112.5) (Dan Martin, Ireland; Van Avermaet)July 13 „ Stage 7: Fougeres„Chartres, ” at (231-143.5) (Dylan Groenewegen, Netherlands; Van Avermaet)July 14 „ Stage 8: Dreux„Amiens Metropole, ” at (181-112.5) (Groenewegen; Van Avermaet)July 15 „ Stage 9: Arras Citadelle„Roubaix, hilly (156.5-97.2) (John Degenkolb, Germany; Van Avermaet)July 16 „ Rest Day: AnnecyJuly 17 „ Stage 10: Annecy„Le GrandBornand, high mountain (158.5-98.5) (Julian Alaphilippe, France; Van Avermaet)July 18 „ Stage 11: Albertville„La Rosiere Espace San Bernardo, high mountain (108.567.4) (Geraint Thomas, Britain; Thomas)July 19 „ Stage 12: Bourg-Saint-Maurice les Arcs„Alpe dHuez, high mountain (175.5109.1) (Thomas; Thomas)July 20 „ Stage 13: Bourg dOisans„Valence, ” at (169.5-105.3) (Sagan; Thomas)Saturday „ Stage 14: Saint-Paul-TroisChateaux„Mende, hilly (188-116.8) (Omar Fraile, Spain; Thomas)Sunday „ Stage 15: Millau„Carcassonne, hilly (181.5-112.8) (Magnus Cort Nielsen, Denmark; Thomas)Today „ Rest Day: CarcassonneTuesday „ Stage 16: Carcassonne„ Bagneres-de-Luchon, mountain (218-135.5)Wednesday „ Stage 17: Bagneres-deLuchon„Saint-Lary-Soulan, high mountain (65-40.4)Thursday „ Stage 18: Trie-sur-Baise„Pau, ” at (171-106.3)Friday „ Stage 19: Lourdes„Laruns, high mountain (200.5-124.6)July 28 „ Stage 20: Saint-Pee-sur-Nivelle„ Espelette, individual time trial (31-19.3)July 29 „ Stage 21: Houilles„Paris ChampsElysees, ” at (116-72.1)Total „ 3,351 kilometers, 2082 miles PRO BASKETBALL WNBAAll times EasternEASTERN CONFERENCE W L PCT GBAtlanta 15 9 .625 „ Washington 14 10 .583 1 Connecticut 13 12 .520 2 Chicago 8 16 .333 7 New York 7 17 .292 8 Indiana 3 21 .125 12WESTERN CONFERENCE W L PCT GBSeattle 18 7 .720 „ Phoenix 15 10 .600 3 Los Angeles 14 10 .583 3 Minnesota 14 10 .583 3 Dallas 14 11 .560 4 Las Vegas 11 13 .458 6Saturdays GamesWashington 95, New York 78 Minnesota 80, Phoenix 75Sundays GamesAtlanta 87, Seattle 74 Connecticut 92, Dallas 75 Los Angeles at Chicago, late Indiana at Las Vegas, lateTodays GamesNone scheduledTuesdays GamesWashington at Connecticut, 7 p.m. Seattle at Indiana, 7 p.m. New York at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Atlanta at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. HORSE RACING 4 p.m. FS2 „ Saratoga Live, Caress Stakes, at Saratoga Springs, N.Y. MLB BASEBALL 7 p.m. FS-Florida „ Atlanta at Miami SUN „ NY Yankees at Tampa Bay 8 p.m. ESPN „ Arizona at Chicago Cubs 11 p.m. MLB „ Chicago White Sox at L.A. Angels (joined in progress) TRACK & FIELD 6 p.m. NBCSN „ IAAF Diamond League, Mller Anniversary Games, at London (taped)By Matt HolzapfelCorrespondentWINTER GARDEN „ Hunter Caudelle teamed with three relievers on a two-hit shutout as the Leesburg Lightning rediscovered their win-ning ways with a 3-0 victory over Winter Garden on Saturday night.Caudelle pitched 5.1 innings to pick up the win, allowing both Winter Garden hits and two walks while striking out four.It was awesome to see him come out and just do the job that we expect him to do,Ž Lightning coach Rich Billings said of Caudelle. He did a fantastic job of keeping good tempo, he was in the zone, he got himself in a little bit of trouble but he was able to get himself out. Fantastic job by Hunter tonight.ŽAfter getting swept by second-place DeLand in a three-game series, Leesburgs win on Saturday, combined with a DeLand loss, gave the Lightning a five-game lead in the standings.The Lightning gave Caudelle all the run support he needed by scoring twice in the top of the first inning on four singles.After Caudelle departed with one out in the bottom of the sixth, William Walter, Louis Davenport and Pedro Reyes-Ruiz finished up with 3.2 innings of hit-less relief.Leesburg added an insurance run in the top of the ninth on Tanner Clarks RBI single.Billings, who chal-lenged his team to fight through adversity just two days earlier, was happy with his teams effort despite their lack of offense.When youre struggling, a win is what youre looking for. I dont think we can be picky at this point, a win is a win and we got that tonight,Ž Billings said. We got some great pitching, it was probably one of the more frustrat-ing shutouts that Ive been a part of on the offensive side but you cant be picky when you need to win ballgames.ŽThe Lightnings home game against Seminole County was rained out on Sunday and is sched-uled to be made up on Wednesday at 7 p.m. at Pat Thomas StadiumBuddy Lowe Field. Leesburg goes on the road for a doubleheader against Seminole today Lightning pitchers combine for 2-hitter in win By Joseph WilsonAssociated PressCARCASSONNE, France „ With the Pyr-enees looming, Geraint Thomas had his last calm ride wearing the yellow jersey at the Tour de France on Sunday.The Welshmans rivals for cyclings most prestigious prize, which include teammate Chris Froome in second place, mostly held back over the hilly Stage 15 with a decisive final week of racing ahead.Thomas kept the overall lead for a fourth consecutive day before the race pauses for riders to rest on Monday.That break will precede a stretch in the Pyrenees that will feature three mountain stages before an individual time trial on the Tours penultimate day.There are three big, big days left, and then the time trial, so (I) just take each day as it comes and we will see what happens,Ž Thomas said.Thomas maintained his advantage of 1 minute, 39 seconds over defending champion Froome. Tom Dumoulin, the world time trial champion, remained third at 1:50 back. Primoz Roglic was fourth at 2:38 behind and Romain Bardet 3:21 behind in fifth.With Froome seeking a fifth Tour title, Team Sky has yet to declare its current top option for the title since Thomas won back-to-back summit finishes in the Alps.Thomas keeps lead before Tours decisive week in Pyrenees

PAGE 13

DailyCommercial.com | Monday, July 23, 2018 B3By Tim DahlbergThe Associated PressCARNOUSTIE, ScotlandAll around him on a windy summer day on the links of Carnoustie, the leaders were imploding as Tiger Woods moved into the lead at the turn. It felt like old times at the British Open, as familiar as his Sunday red shirt and the swarm of fans that cheered his every shot. Then Woods imploded, too, and theres something thats become increasingly familiar about that. If this was the Woods of 15 years ago, he likely would be the champion golfer of the year,Ž as they say over here, and have his name on the claret jug a fourth time. The fans felt this could be the culmination of the comeback. Twitter told late-rising Americans to get to their screens, and fans at church services checked the scores from Scotland incredulously. But what felt like old times for a brief moment ended up as just another collapse story, like the ones Woods fans have seen more recently. Francesco Molinari, Woods partner on Sunday, won the tournament with no bogeys over the final 37 holes Woods finished tied for sixth. Woods flinched when it mattered most, the nerves of a 42-year-old on display for all to see. Just when he took the lead and everyones imagination began to swirl about what might be, he kicked away his best chance of breaking a decade-long drought in major championships. Even a long hug from his two children afterward wasnt enough to ease the sting. A little ticked off at myself, for sure,Ž Woods said. I had a chance starting that back nine to do something, and I didnt do it.Ž Woods had the tournament in his hands after hitting a brilliant fairway bunker shot to make par on No. 10. He walked to the next tee with a one-shot lead. Then his tee shot went right, and his second shot veered way left. Woods got a break by hitting someone in the gallery, but then left his pitch hanging precariously on the side of a pot bunker. When he missed an 8-footer to make double bogey he was out of the lead. Another bogey on the next hole, and he was basically out of the tournament. It used to be that Woods was steely and superhuman, and no one dared get in his way. Now hes more of a nostalgia act teasing fans with sparks of his past greatness. He wouldnt tell you, but hes human,Ž Jordan Spieth said. That kind of pressure that he would have felt leading the Open on a Sunday is no different than anybody else, especially having not experienced it for so long.Ž Spieth had his own issues, of course, kicking away a share of the lead on his way to a fat 76 in the final round. But Spieth is a 24-year-old with three major titles and many years to get more. Woods is in a race against time „ and thats a race no one ever seems to win. It didnt feel any different,Ž he insisted. It didnt feel any different to be next to the lead and knowing what I need to do. Ive done it so many different ways.Ž But it was different, as different as his bald spot is to the full head of hair he had in his prime. It wasnt like the course wasnt gettable. Molinari didnt make a bogey on his way to a 69 while playing alongside Woods. A Brit named Eddie Pepperell shot 67 with a hangover to end up tied with him. Sometimes I have a few drinks,Ž said Pepperell, who finished as Woods was in the lead. Tiger is minus-7, he didnt have a drink last night, I bet. Proper athlete.Ž Of that there is little doubt. Woods looks as strong as he did in his prime, even though hes had surgeries, a sex-scandal, a divorce and a drug-related DUI. But good muscles dont mean calm nerves. And throughout his comeback year Woods has misfired every time he has gotten near contention. It might be because there is so much as stake, despite a legacy from his earlier years that is already in golfs record books. Another major would have validated years of struggles. A tie for sixth means nothing. Woods embraced his two children, telling them he hoped they were proud of him for trying hard. He spoke about it later, in a rare personal admission for a player who grew up as a celebrity and has fought hard to keep his privacy over the years. Its pretty emotional because they gave me some pretty significant hugs there and squeezed,Ž Woods said. I know that they know how much this championship means to me and how much it feels good to be back playing again. To me, its just so special to have them aware because Ive won a lot of golf tournaments in my career, but they dont remember any of them.Ž It was a tender moment between a father and his kids, but also another reminder that Father Time waits for no one. Not even Tiger Woods.This version of Woods seems like a nostalgia actJordan Spieth, tied for the lead in his bid to go back-to-back in the British Open, failed to make a single birdie and shot 76, his highest score on a Sunday in a major.Kevin Chappell made two double bogeys, the last one on No. 17 that derailed his hopes. Kevin Kisner made his double bogey early. Rory McIlroy and Justin Rose each made a run with eagles on the par-5 14th hole, McIlroy with a 50-foot putt, Rose with a second shot that bounced off the base of the pin. They ran out of holes.Xander Schauffele, the last hope to keep alive the Amer-ican streak of five straight majors, was one shot behind until he sent a long iron to the right of the 17th and failed to make a 15-foot putt for par.Molinari clinched it with a driver that skirted the edge of a pot bunker, leaving him a lob wedge from 112 yards to 5 feet. He poured it in, raised his right fist and shook it lightly before slamming it for emphasis.Then, he waited in the trailer to see if anyone could catch him. At one point, he went over to the practice green, but not to prepare for a playoff.I probably would have felt sick watching on TV,Ž he said.Molinari finished at 8-under 276, the lowest score in eight Opens at Carnoustie, the course where Jean Van de Velde threw away the British Open with a triple bogey on the last hole in 1999, where Padraig Harrington twice hit into Barry Burn on the last hole to make double bogey and still won.Just disbelief, to be honest,Ž the 35-year-old said. To go the weekend bogey-free, its unthinkable. Playing with Tiger was another chal-lenge. But I felt really good this morning. I felt I was ready for the challenge.ŽWoods had every reason to believe he would cap a most improbable comeback from four back surgeries.His red shirt blazing against the yellow grass of a dry Scottish summer, Woods hit driver into the wind on the par-4 fourth to set up birdie. Into the wind on the par-5 sixth, three deep bunkers to the right and out-of-bounds to the left, he got to the front of the green with a driver and a 3-wood for another birdie.And just like the Woods of old, the players he was chas-ing started to collapse.Spieth gambled with a shot to clear the burn on No. 6 and went into a gorse bush, making double bogey. Schauffele chopped up the next hole for double bogey. Woods had the lead.And then he lost it with two bad holes. Still in range, he couldnt get close enough for a birdie when it mattered. It was the first time since the 2007 U.S. Open that he trailed going into the final round of a major, had the lead and didnt win.His anger over his mistakes was tempered by perspective, comparing it to Serena Williams losing in the finals at Wimbledon.The beginning of the year, if theyd have said, Youre playing The Open Championship, I would have said Id be very lucky to do that. Serena and I are good friends. Im sure shell probably call me and talk to me about it because youve got to put things in perspec-tive. ... I know that its going to sting for a little bit here, but given where I was to where Im at now, blessed.ŽIt might sting even worse for Spieth. One day after a bogey-free round of 65 to share the lead, he had a birdie-free round at the worst time. His best chance was at the 14th, where he three-putted for par from about 40 feet.When you put yourself in position enough times, it goes your way sometimes, it doesnt go your way some-times,Ž Spieth said, who goes to the PGA Championship in three weeks for a chance at the career Grand Slam.The victory adds to Moli-naris best stretch of golf.Now at a career-best No. 6 in the world, he has won three times and been runner-up twice in his last six tournaments. One of those was three weeks ago at the Quicken Loans National when he shot 62 in the final round and Woods, the tour-nament host, presented him the trophy. OPENFrom Page B1two playoff berths for the franchise since 2002.That was Sparanos lone win-ning season, and he was fired in 2011 after going 29-32 in Miami. He was popular with his players, but a dismal home record, declining attendance and a falling-out with general man-ager Jeff Ireland accel erated his firing by owner Stephen Ross.Sparano was the Oakland Raiders interim head coach in 2014 after the team fired Dennis Allen, and he went 3-9. He also worked as an assistant for the Browns, Red-skins, Jaguars, Cowboys and 49ers, and most recently for Vikings coach Mike Zimmer.I love Tony Sparano,Ž Zimmer said in a statement. He was a great teacher, a grinder of a worker and had a toughness and fighting spirit that showed in our linemen. He was a great husband, father and grandfather and a great friend to me. This is just sinking in for us, but Tony will be sorely missed by all.ŽSparanos former players also paid tribute. Heart broken and lost for words! We lost a great man,Ž tweeted Brian Hartline, who played receiver for Sparano in Miami.Damn Im at a loss for words,Ž tweeted Raiders Pro Bowl tackle Donald Penn. Coach Sparano taught me so much not just about football about life also.ŽSparano played at the Uni-versity of New Haven where he was a four-year letterman. He was hired as New Havens head coach in 1994 and held that position for five seasons.In Miami, Sparano lost his first two games before turning to the wildcat. Six times they ran plays from the formation at New England, snapping the ball directly to running back Ronnie Brown, and four of those plays resulted in touchdowns.It was like playing hide and go seek, making them guess,Ž Brown said at the time.Sparano said the Dolphins began practicing the wildcat during training camp but waited until the Patriots game to spring it. This is not something that just came up and we scribbled on the board a couple of days ago,Ž the coach said.Defenses soon adjusted, and a sputtering offense in Sparanos final two seasons at Miami contributed to his firing. But the Dolphins havent won at New England since the wild-cat game. SPARANOFrom Page B1Danica Patrick in the No. 10 Ford, for a portion of the race. He threatened to crash the party and had his second career Cup victory in sight. He led for more than 40 laps but was derailed by a poor pit stop and spun his tires on a restart that cost him.You think Id be happy,Ž he said. Not in this race.Almirola was the latest also-ran to realize drivers have to be perfect to catch either of the Big Three.Harvick, who won his 43rd career race, was in New Hampshire.Harvick reeled off three straight victories at Atlanta, Las Vegas and Phoenix and went back-to-back in May at Dover and Kansas. It had been seven races since he reached victory lane.He did what he had to do again in the No. 4 Ford to celebrate there again for Stewart-Haas Racing. ONE AND DONENew Hampshire hosted its only Cup weekend of the season because track owner Speedway Motorsports Inc. transferred the fall playoff race to Las Vegas Motor Speedway. New Hampshire ran its first Cup race in 1993 and got a second date in 1997.The track will fill the open date in September with the NASCAR Modified Tour and the winner of the marquee Musket 250 race will claim a share of the $181,100 purse. New Hampshire also plans to hold a country music festival in 2019.Many drivers feel the sport would be helped if it stopped racing twice a season at some tracks.Track general manager Dave McGrath said there was a modest ticket bump from Sundays race compared to last July. He did not reveal attendance numbers.Theres no significant drop year over year. Were holding our own,Ž McGrath said. I wish that everybody that was here in September was here in July but I think thats going to take a few years for that to truly take hold. The good news is, that level, steady (crowd) is a big win in my book. That clearly shows were keeping those that we had and its our job now to find that next group to come and be part of the weekend.Ž NASCARFrom Page B1 The study concluded that concussions have increased, even after more education and better recog-nition of the injury.To our knowledge, this is the first study to report that concussions now account for a higher proportion of injuries in girls soccer than boys football,Ž according to the research-ers. By identifying differences in the propor-tion and rate of concussions in high school sports, this study may help to inform future work aimed at exam-ining specific risk factors and developing targeted measures to reduce con-cussion incidences.ŽThere is a giant miscon-ception that there are more concussions in football, when the biggest continues to be in soccer, said Kyle Niblett, public relations specialist with the Florida High School Ath-letic Association.With football practices beginning July 30, coaches are required to see a FHSAA video on concussions. The same will happen when the start of soccer draws closer.We have a concussion protocol in place,Ž Niblett said. We try to educate on the front end so coaches know what to look for.Back in the 1990s, there wasnt as much concussion awareness, especially in youth soccer. Now there is such an increase in aware-ness about this topic, and education is a big piece.ŽQuintana credits the FHSAA with putting a pro-tocol in place for coaches, and said with trainers on hand it makes the game safer. But unfortunately, injuries happen.I think the education and the protocol is good, I dont know if there is that much more FHSAA can do,Ž he said. Referees maybe could call tighter games. I would like to see a tighter game called.Ž SOCCERFrom Page B1Miami Dolphins head coach Tony Sparano calls out a play during a game against the Buffalo Bills on Nov. 20, 2011, in Miami. Sparano died Sunday at age 56. [AP PHOTO / HANS DERYK]

PAGE 14

B4 Monday, July 23, 2018 | DailyCommercial.comAMERICAN LEAGUENATIONAL LEAGUEEAST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Boston 70 31 .693 „ „ 8-2 W-1 34-13 36-18 New York 63 34 .649 5 „ 5-5 W-1 34-14 29-20 Tampa Bay 50 49 .505 19 9 5-5 W-1 27-19 23-30 Toronto 46 52 .469 22 13 5-5 W-3 27-25 19-27 Baltimore 28 72 .280 41 32 3-7 L-3 16-33 12-39 CENTRAL DIVISION TEAM W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Cleveland 54 44 .551 „ „ 5-5 L-1 31-19 23-25 Minnesota 44 53 .454 9 14 5-5 L-3 29-22 15-31 Detroit 42 59 .416 13 18 2-8 L-1 26-25 16-34 Chicago 34 64 .347 20 25 4-6 L-1 19-29 15-35 Kansas City 30 68 .306 24 29 5-5 W-3 14-35 16-33 WEST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Houston 66 36 .647 „ „ 5-5 L-1 32-21 34-15 Seattle 60 40 .600 5 „ 4-6 W-1 33-18 27-22 Oakland 57 43 .570 8 3 7-3 W-2 26-22 31-21 Los Angeles 50 50 .500 15 10 5-5 W-1 25-25 25-25 Texas 42 58 .420 23 18 3-7 W-1 20-30 22-28 EAST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 53 42 .558 „ „ 4-6 W-2 25-20 28-22 Philadelphia 54 43 .557 „ „ 5-5 L-1 31-17 23-26 Washington 48 49 .495 6 6 4-6 L-1 22-25 26-24 Miami 43 58 .426 13 13 7-3 L-1 23-28 20-30 New York 40 56 .417 13 13 5-5 L-1 19-32 21-24 CENTRAL DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Chicago 58 40 .592 „ „ 7-3 W-1 31-17 27-23 Milwaukee 56 45 .554 3 „ 2-8 L-1 31-20 25-25 Pittsburgh 51 49 .510 8 4 9-1 W-9 29-24 22-25 St. Louis 50 49 .505 8 5 4-6 L-1 24-24 26-25 Cincinnati 43 56 .434 15 12 4-6 L-4 21-29 22-27 WEST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Los Angeles 55 44 .556 „ „ 7-3 W-1 28-24 27-20 Arizona 54 46 .540 1 1 4-6 W-1 27-25 27-21 Colorado 53 46 .535 2 2 7-3 L-1 23-23 30-23 San Francisco 51 50 .505 5 5 5-5 L-2 31-19 20-31 San Diego 41 60 .406 15 15 3-7 W-1 20-31 21-29 MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALLRAYS 6, MARLINS 4MIAMI AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Dietrich lf 5 0 1 0 0 4 .289 A nderson rf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .282 Realmuto dh 5 0 0 0 0 4 .307 Castro 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .290 Bour 1b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .234 Riddle ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .252 Prado 3b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .237 Maybin cf 1 1 0 0 0 1 .243 Rivera cf 2 0 1 0 0 0 .200 Rojas ss-1b 4 1 2 2 0 1 .257 Holaday c 4 0 1 1 0 1 .183 T OTALS 37 4 9 3 1 14 T AMPA BAY AB R H BI BB SO AVG. W endle 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .281 Duffy 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .314 Bauers lf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .243 Cron 1b 3 2 1 0 1 1 .254 Choi dh 4 0 1 1 0 3 .212 1-Wood pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Gomez rf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .221 S mith cf 3 1 1 1 0 0 .288 A dames ss 3 1 0 0 1 1 .209 Moore c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 a-Robertson ph 1 1 1 4 0 0 .255 T OTALS 32 6 7 6 2 8 MIAMI 040 000 000 „4 9 0 T AMPA BAY 010 000 005 „6 7 2 T wo outs when winning run scored. a-homered for Moore in the 9th. 1-ran for Choi in the 9th. E„Gomez (6), Adames (5). LOB„Miami 8, T ampa Bay 4. 2B„Dietrich (19), Prado (6), Rojas (10), Bauers (14), Gomez (12). 3B„Smith (7). HR„Robertson (8), off Barraclough. RBIs„Rojas 2 (37), Holaday (12), Choi (7), Smith (24), Robertson 4 (30). SF„Smith. Runners left in scoring position„Miami 3 (Dietrich, Realmuto, Bour); Tampa Bay 3 (Smith, A dames 2). RISP„Miami 2 for 6; Tampa Bay 3 for 8. MIAMI IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Richards 6.2 3 1 1 1 6 102 4.41 Ziegler, H, 10 1.1 0 0 0 0 1 21 4.20 Barraclough, L, 0-4, BS, 4-14 .2 4 5 5 1 1 40 2.45 T AMPA BAY IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA A rcher 6 8 4 3 0 13 101 4.30 S tanek 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 1.96 Kolarek, W, 1-0 2 1 0 0 1 0 31 9.72 Inherited runners-scored„Ziegler 1-0. HBP„ A rcher (Maybin), Richards (Duffy). WP„Richards. T „3:04. A„11,828 (42,735).BLUE JAYS 5, ORIOLES 4BALTIMORE AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Beckham ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .209 Rickard cf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .193 S choop 2b 5 2 2 1 0 2 .231 V alencia rf 4 0 1 0 0 3 .250 T rumbo dh 3 1 2 0 1 0 .252 Nunez 3b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .170 Mancini 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .218 J oseph c 4 0 1 0 0 3 .211 Peterson lf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .196 T OTALS 37 4 9 3 1 15 T ORONTO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Granderson rf 4 1 0 0 0 1 .230 Grichuk cf 4 1 2 2 0 0 .213 S moak 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .243 1-Travis pr-2b 0 1 0 0 0 0 .240 Morales dh 3 1 2 0 1 0 .245 S olarte 3b-1b 4 1 2 3 0 0 .239 Martin c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .181 S mith Jr. lf 2 0 1 0 0 0 .300 a-Hernandez ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .252 Diaz ss-3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .254 Gurriel Jr. 2b-ss 3 0 2 0 0 0 .281 T OTALS 32 5 10 5 1 4 BALTIMORE 000 011 020 „4 9 0 T ORONTO 000 100 04X „5 10 1 a-struck out for Smith Jr. in the 7th. 1-ran for Smoak in the 8th. E„Gurriel Jr. (7). LOB„Baltimore 8, Toronto 4. 2B„Valencia (8), Trumbo (12), Nunez (3), Joseph (11), Grichuk (13), Solarte (19). HR„Schoop (12), off Biagini; Grichuk (13), off Brach; Solarte (17), off Scott. RBIs„Schoop (27), Nunez (3), Peterson (20), Grichuk 2 (32), Solarte 3 (51). Runners left in scoring position„Baltimore 6 (Beckham 2, Nunez, Mancini 2, Joseph); Toronto 2 (Solarte, Martin). RISP„Baltimore 2 for 12; T oronto 1 for 4. Runners moved up„Trumbo, Smoak, Morales. GIDP„Martin, Diaz. DP„Baltimore 2 (Beckham, Schoop, Mancini), (Schoop, Mancini). BALTIMORE IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cashner 5.2 6 1 1 1 2 79 4.40 Fry, H, 2 .2 0 0 0 0 0 6 1.69 Givens, H, 14 .2 0 0 0 0 1 8 4.50 Brach, H, 3 .2 3 3 3 0 0 19 4.97 S cott, L, 1-2, BS, 3-3 .1 1 1 1 0 1 10 6.67 T ORONTO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Happ 5 4 1 1 0 9 102 4.18 Biagini 1 2 1 1 0 0 17 5.73 Petricka 1 1 0 0 0 3 16 3.20 A xford, W, 4-1 1 2 2 1 1 2 28 4.05 Clippard, S, 7-13 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 3.61 Inherited runners-scored„Fry 2-0, Scott 1-1. HBP„Clippard (Beckham). T „2:54. A„39,021 (53,506).ROYALS 5, TWINS 3MINNESOTA AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Mauer dh 4 0 0 0 0 3 .278 Rosario lf 3 1 0 0 1 0 .309 Dozier 2b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .225 E.Escobar 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .272 Morrison 1b 3 0 0 1 1 1 .191 Garver c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .246 b-Polanco ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .258 Kepler rf-cf 3 1 1 1 0 0 .226 A drianza ss 2 0 0 0 1 2 .259 Cave cf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .289 a-Grossman ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .255 T OTALS 30 3 3 3 3 10 KANSAS CITY AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Merri“eld 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .302 Bonifacio rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .246 Moustakas 3b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .245 Perez dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .220 Duda 1b 3 1 1 0 0 0 .246 Herrera cf 2 1 0 0 1 1 .237 Gordon lf 3 1 1 2 0 0 .240 A .Escobar ss 1 1 1 0 1 0 .204 Butera c 3 1 1 3 0 1 .168 T OTALS 27 5 4 5 3 8 MINNESOTA 000 200 010„3 3 1 KANSAS CITY 000 020 30X„5 4 0 a-grounded out for Cave in the 8th. b-struck out f or Garver in the 9th. E„E.Escobar (4). LOB„Minnesota 3, Kansas City 2. 2B„Dozier (20), Gordon (11). HR„Kepler (12), off Keller; Butera (2), off Hildenberger. RBIs„ Dozier (50), Morrison (32), Kepler (38), Gordon 2 (19), Butera 3 (13). S„A.Escobar. Runners left in scoring position„Minnesota 1 (Rosario); Kansas City 1 (Merri“eld). RISP„ Minnesota 1 for 4; Kansas City 2 for 4. Runners moved up„Grossman. GIDP„Perez. DP„Minnesota 1 (E.Escobar, Dozier, Morrison). Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Odorizzi 6 2 2 1 1 8 100 4.37 Duke, L, 3-4 .2 1 2 2 1 0 20 3.75 Hildenberger .1 1 1 1 0 0 9 3.42 Busenitz 1 0 0 0 1 0 17 6.23 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Keller, W, 3-4 7 3 3 3 2 8 99 3.20 Hill, H, 7 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 5.59 Peralta, S, 4-4 1 0 0 0 1 1 16 3.18 Keller pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored„Hildenber g er 2-2 Hill 1-0. T„2:35. A„18,107 (37,903).GAME 1: PADRES 10, PHILLIES 2SAN DIEGO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Jankowski cf 5 1 2 2 0 0 .263 Asuaje 2b 4 2 2 1 0 2 .237 Myers lf 5 1 1 2 0 3 .284 Hosmer 1b 5 2 2 1 0 3 .247 Renfroe rf 5 1 3 1 0 1 .249 Galvis ss 5 1 3 2 0 1 .239 Villanueva 3b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .229 Stammen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Pirela ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .259 Brewer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hedges c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .226 Ross p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .118 a-Reyes ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .230 Strahm p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Spangenberg 3b 1 1 1 0 0 0 .237 TOTALS 41 10 15 9 1 13 PHILADELPHIA AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Hernandez 2b 5 0 1 0 0 2 .272 Hoskins lf 5 2 2 1 0 0 .252 Herrera cf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .280 Santana 1b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .208 d-Walding ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Williams rf 2 0 0 1 1 0 .244 Franco 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .266 Davis p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Altherr ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .171 Leiter Jr. p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Kingery ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .237 Pivetta p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .143 Ramos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Plouffe 3b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .286 Knapp c 3 0 1 0 1 0 .242 TOTALS 34 2 6 2 4 11 SAN DIEGO 301 003 003„10 15 1 PHILADELPHIA 100 010 000„2 6 1 a-walked for Ross in the 6th. b-struck out for Davis in the 7th. c-”ied out for Stammen in the 9th. d-struck out for Santana in the 9th. E„Villanueva (12), Hernandez (8). LOB„San Diego 6, Philadelphia 11. 2B„Jan kowski (7), Asuaje 2 (8), Renfroe (15), Hoskins (22). HR„ Myers (9), off Leiter Jr.; Hoskins (15), off Ross. RBIs„Jan kowski 2 (11), Asuaje (19), Myers 2 (23), Hosmer (42), Renfroe (26), Galvis 2 (37), Hoskins (58), Williams (35). SF„Asuaje. Runners left in scoring position„San Diego 2 (Villanueva, Pirela); Philadelphia 5 (Hoskins, Franco, Kingery 3). RISP„San Diego 4 for 11; Philadelphia 0 for 10. SAN DIEGO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ross, W, 6-8 5 5 2 2 3 5 84 4.29 Strahm 2 1 0 0 1 2 43 2.21 Stammen 1 0 0 0 0 2 9 2.85 Brewer 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 0.00 PHILADELPHIA IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pivetta, L, 6-8 5.1 8 6 4 0 9 94 4.69 Ramos .1 0 1 0 1 0 13 1.91 Davis 1.1 1 0 0 0 3 19 3.14 Leiter Jr. 2 6 3 3 0 1 44 5.74 Inherited runners-scored„Ramos 2-2. HBP„Ross (Herrera), Strahm (Williams). T„3:10. A„29,392 (43,647).PIRATES 9, REDS 2PITTSBURGH AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Dickerson lf 5 3 4 2 0 0 .315 Marte cf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .287 Polanco rf 5 1 2 3 0 3 .237 Diaz c 5 0 1 1 0 2 .287 Moran 3b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .266 Bell 1b 5 0 2 0 0 0 .269 Rodriguez 2b 4 2 2 1 0 1 .178 Moroff ss 4 1 1 1 0 0 .186 Nova p 3 1 1 0 0 0 .026 Feliz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Glasnow p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 TOTALS 40 9 15 9 0 7 CINCINNATI AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Peraza ss 4 0 2 0 0 0 .296 Gennett 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .319 Herrera 2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .111 Votto 1b 2 0 0 0 1 0 .284 Casali c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .298 Suarez 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .307 Brice p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Lorenzen ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .333 Crockett p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Winker rf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .300 Barnhart c-1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .248 Duvall lf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .203 Ervin cf 3 0 2 2 0 0 .255 Harvey p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .061 Stephens p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Dixon ph-3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .212 TOTALS 32 2 6 2 2 4 PITTSBURGH 240 201 000„9 15 0 CINCINNATI 000 000 200„2 6 0 a-lined out for Stephens in the 7th. b-struck out for Brice in the 8th. LOB„Pittsburgh 6, Cincinnati 5. 2B„Dickerson (23), Diaz (10), Rodriguez (5), Peraza (17), Duvall (17). HR„Polanco (17), off Harvey; Dickerson (11), off Harvey; Marte (15), off Harvey; Rodriguez (5), off Harvey. RBIs„Dickerson 2 (42), Marte (49), Polanco 3 (54), Diaz (25), Rodriguez (18), Moroff (9), Ervin 2 (5). S„Marte, Nova. Runners left in scoring position„Pittsburgh 4 (Diaz, Moran 2, Nova); Cincinnati 1 (Lorenzen). RISP„Pittsburgh 5 for 10; Cincinnati 1 for 4. GIDP„Suarez. DP„Pittsburgh 1 (Moran, Rodriguez, Bell). PITTSBURGH IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nova, W, 6-6 6.2 5 2 2 2 2 98 4.28 Feliz 1.1 1 0 0 0 1 14 5.35 Glasnow 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 4.58 CINCINNATI IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Harvey, L, 5-6 3.2 8 8 8 0 2 59 5.21 Stephens 3.1 7 1 1 0 3 65 4.82 Brice 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 5.62 Crockett 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 4.91 Inherited runners-scored„Feliz 1-0, Stephens 1-1. WP„Stephens. T„2:46. A„23,615 (42,319).DODGERS 11, BREWERS 2LOS ANGELES AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Taylor lf-cf 4 1 1 3 0 1 .255 Machado ss 5 1 2 1 0 1 .317 Turner 3b 2 0 1 1 0 1 .259 Bellinger 1b 2 1 1 0 1 0 .246 Muncy 1b-3b 5 1 2 1 0 1 .274 Kemp rf 5 3 3 2 0 0 .316 Pederson lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .252 Hernandez cf-rf 4 2 1 0 1 0 .231 Forsythe 2b 4 2 3 1 1 0 .219 A.Barnes c 4 0 1 2 0 2 .211 Wood p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .057 Ferguson p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 TOTALS 39 11 15 11 3 7 MILWAUKEE AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Broxton rf-cf 4 1 0 0 1 2 .170 Yelich lf 3 1 2 0 0 0 .303 a-Miller ph-2b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .247 Cain cf 2 0 2 0 1 0 .293 Jennings p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .667 Orf 2b-rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .050 Braun 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .232 Kratz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .231 Shaw 3b 3 0 1 2 1 0 .242 Saladino ss 3 0 0 0 1 2 .284 Perez 2b-p-1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .245 Pina c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .227 Suter p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .192 Williams p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .333 J.Barnes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Phillips cf-lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .190 TOTALS 34 2 6 2 4 8 LOS ANGELES 051 050 000„11 15 2 MILWAUKEE 200 000 000„2 6 1 ag rounded out for Yelich in the 7th. E„Muncy (10), Forsythe (8), Braun (1). LOB„Los Angeles 7, Milwaukee 9. 2B„Machado (22), Turner (8), Muncy (11). 3B„Bellinger (5). HR„Kemp (16), off Suter; Kemp (17), off Suter. RBIs„Taylor 3 (47), Machado (66), Turner (20), Muncy (43), Kemp 2 (62), Forsythe (13), A.Barnes 2 (7), Shaw 2 (57). SF„Taylor. S„Wood. Runners left in scoring position„Los Angeles 3 (Machado, Muncy, Hernandez); Milwaukee 3 (Braun 2, Pina). RISP„Los Angeles 4 for 15; Milwaukee 2 for 6. GIDP„Hernandez, Ferguson, Perez. DP„Los Angeles 1 (Wood, A.Barnes, Muncy); Milwaukee 2 (Saladino, Perez, Braun), (Kratz, Miller, Perez). LOS ANGELES IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wood, W, 6-5 6 5 2 2 3 4 100 3.87 Ferguson, S, 2-2 3 1 0 0 1 4 50 3.71 MILWAUKEE IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Perez 2 1 0 0 1 1 34 0.00 Suter, L, 8-7 3 8 6 6 0 3 62 4.80 Williams 1 4 5 3 1 2 31 3.66 J.Barnes 1 0 0 0 0 0 16 3.55 Jennings 1 1 0 0 1 0 14 3.35 Kratz 1 1 0 0 0 1 12 4.50 Williams pitched to 6 batters in the 5th. Inherited runners-scored„J.Barnes 2-1. HBP„ Perez (A.Barnes). T„2:59. A„38,249 (41,900).CUBS 7, CARDINALS 2ST. LOUIS AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Carpenter 3b-1b 4 1 1 0 1 1 .277 Molina c 5 0 2 0 0 1 .283 DeJong ss 3 0 0 1 0 1 .254 Ozuna lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .265 Martinez 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .295 Mayers p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Garcia ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .248 Cecil p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Brebbia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Pham cf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .254 Fowler rf 3 1 2 0 1 0 .179 Munoz 2b 3 0 2 1 1 0 .298 Mikolas p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .057 a-Gyorko ph-3b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .247 TOTALS 32 2 8 2 4 8 CHICAGO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Rizzo 1b 3 0 2 1 1 1 .262 Bryant 3b 5 0 2 1 0 1 .280 Heyward rf 3 1 0 0 2 0 .284 Baez 2b 5 0 1 0 0 0 .291 Happ cf-lf 3 2 1 1 1 2 .256 Schwarber lf 4 1 1 1 0 3 .246 Rosario p 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000 Contreras c 4 1 2 2 0 0 .282 Russell ss 3 2 2 0 1 0 .271 Quintana p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 b-La Stella ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .279 Chavez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Almora ph-cf 1 0 1 1 0 0 .321 TOTALS 33 7 12 7 5 8 ST. LOUIS 100 100 000„2 8 1 CHICAGO 000 201 13X„7 12 0 a-grounded out for Mikolas in the 6th. b-lined out for Quintana in the 7th. c-struck out for Mayers in the 8th. d-singled for Chavez in the 8th. E„Gyorko (12). LOB„St. Louis 9, Chicago 9. 2B„ Molina (9), Fowler (10), Munoz (6), Happ (12). HR„Schwarber (19), off Mayers. RBIs„DeJong (22), Munoz (27), Rizzo (64), Bryant (44), Happ (30), Schwarber (45), Contreras 2 (37), Almora (29). SB„Happ (5). CS„Baez (3). SF„DeJong. S„Mikolas, Quintana. Runners left in scoring position„St. Louis 6 (Carpenter, Molina 3, Martinez, Gyorko); Chicago 4 (Bryant, Baez 3). RISP„St. Louis 0 for 9; Chicago 6 for 14. Runners moved up„Baez. GIDP„Ozuna, Heyward. DP„St. Louis 2 (Molina, DeJong), (Munoz, DeJong, Martinez); Chicago 1 (Bryant, Baez, Rizzo). ST. LOUIS IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Mikolas 5 6 2 2 2 6 74 2.82 Mayers, L, 2-1 2 2 2 2 1 1 31 3.86 Cecil .1 4 3 3 1 1 19 5.70 Brebbia .2 0 0 0 1 0 12 4.05 CHICAGO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Quintana, W, 9-6 7 6 2 2 4 6 121 3.87 Chavez, H, 4 1 0 0 0 0 2 16 3.34 Rosario 1 2 0 0 0 0 15 2.15 Inherited runners-scored„Brebbia 2-0. HBP„ Mayers (Rizzo). WP„Cecil. T„3:05. A„39,737 (41,649).RANGERS 5, INDIANS 0CLEVELAND AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Lindor ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .293 Brantley lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .302 Ramirez 3b 1 0 0 0 2 0 .304 Alonso 1b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .258 Cabrera rf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .242 Diaz dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .545 Kipnis 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .219 Gomes c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .245 Naquin cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .267 TOTALS 30 0 5 0 5 4 TEXAS AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Choo dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .288 Odor 2b 3 1 3 3 0 0 .259 Andrus ss 4 1 1 0 0 3 .261 Profar 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .246 Guzman 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .249 Gallo rf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .187 Rua rf-lf 1 1 1 2 0 0 .195 Kiner-Falefa c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .250 Calhoun lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .154 Tocci rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .105 DeShields cf 1 2 0 0 2 1 .207 TOTALS 29 5 7 5 4 8 CLEVELAND 000 000 000„0 5 0 TEXAS 001 010 03X„5 7 1 E„Profar (18). LOB„Cleveland 9, Texas 5. 2B„Lindor (33), Brantley (26). HR„Odor (7), off Perez; Rua (6), off Ramirez. RBIs„Odor 3 (27), Rua 2 (12). SB„Odor (8), Andrus (4), DeShields 2 (18). SF„Odor. Runners left in scoring position„Cleveland 4 (Cabrera 2, Diaz 2); Texas 3 (Profar, Guzman 2). RISP„Cleveland 0 for 7; Texas 3 for 9. Runners moved up„Alonso, Brantley, Choo, Profar. LIDP„Kipnis. GIDP„Alonso, Kiner-Falefa. DP„Cleveland 1 (Kipnis, Lindor, Alonso); Texas 2 (Gallardo, Andrus, Guzman), (Gallo, Guzman). CLEVELAND IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Clvingr, L, 7-6 6.2 4 2 2 4 7 102 3.43 Perez .1 1 1 1 0 0 7 1.23 Ramirez 1 2 2 2 0 1 19 3.91 TEXAS IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gallardo, W, 4-1 6 3 0 0 4 1 72 7.18 Leclerc, H, 12 1 1 0 0 0 2 18 2.06 Diekman, H, 13 1 1 0 0 1 1 26 3.28 Gearrin 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 3.57 Perez pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored„Perez 1-0. HBP„ Diekman (Ramirez). T„2:33. A„21,829 (49,115).RED SOX 9, TIGERS 1BOSTON AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Betts rf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .352 Benintendi lf 4 1 1 2 0 1 .303 Martinez dh 3 0 0 1 0 1 .322 Pearce 1b 4 2 2 0 0 1 .328 Bogaerts ss 3 2 2 0 0 0 .283 Lin ss 1 0 0 0 0 0 .182 Devers 3b 4 0 0 1 0 1 .239 Nunez 2b 4 1 1 2 0 0 .252 Bradley Jr. cf 4 1 2 3 0 1 .211 Leon c 3 1 0 0 1 2 .232 TOTALS 35 9 9 9 1 8 DETROIT AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Rodriguez 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .190 Goodrum rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .243 Castellanos dh 3 0 1 0 0 1 .304 a-Adduci ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .192 Hicks 1b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .268 Candelario 3b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .230 McCann c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .225 Jones cf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .207 Iglesias ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .270 Reyes lf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .224 TOTALS 32 1 5 1 2 10 BOSTON 020 400 300„9 9 1 DETROIT 000 000 100„1 5 0 a-lined out for Castellanos in the 8th. E„Lin (2). LOB„Boston 1, Detroit 7. 2B„Bogaerts 2 (28), Castellanos (30). 3B„Benintendi (6). HR„ Bradley Jr. (7), off VerHagen; Candelario (14), off Workman. RBIs„Benintendi 2 (59), Martinez (81), Devers (49), Nunez 2 (26), Bradley Jr. 3 (35), Candelario (37). SF„Martinez. Runners left in scoring position„Detroit 3 (Candelario 3). RISP„Boston 3 for 6; Detroit 0 for 4. Runners moved up„Devers, Nunez. BOSTON IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sale, W, 11-4 6 2 0 0 0 9 99 2.13 Workman 1 3 1 1 0 0 23 2.04 Kelly 1 0 0 0 2 0 25 4.20 Thornburg 1 0 0 0 0 1 7 8.44 DETROIT IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hardy, L, 3-3 3 5 4 4 0 3 55 3.77 VerHagen 3 2 2 2 0 3 46 6.99 Stumpf .1 2 3 3 1 1 21 6.53 Coleman 1.2 0 0 0 0 0 13 3.49 Farmer 1 0 0 0 0 1 17 4.57 Hardy pitched to 3 batters in the 4th. Inherited runners-scored„VerHagen 3-2, Coleman 1-1. HBP„Sale (Iglesias). T„2:55. A„25,012 (41,297).DIAMONDBACKS 6, ROCKIES 1COLORADO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Blackmon cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .288 Parra lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .291 Arenado 3b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .310 Gonzalez rf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .278 Story ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .293 Desmond 1b 3 1 1 1 0 1 .238 Hampson 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .167 Murphy c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .276 Senzatela p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .125 Rusin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Almonte p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Tapia ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Shaw p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --TOTALS 29 1 3 1 1 13 ARIZONA AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Peralta lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .288 Goldschmidt 1b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .274 Pollock cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .298 Souza Jr. rf 3 1 1 1 1 1 .216 Lamb 3b 3 2 0 0 1 0 .226 Descalso 2b 2 2 1 0 2 0 .260 Cha“n p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Bracho p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ahmed ss 3 0 2 3 1 0 .231 Mathis c 4 0 1 2 0 1 .198 Greinke p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Marte 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .247 TOTALS 30 6 7 6 5 7 COLORADO 000 010 000„1 3 1 ARIZONA 100 203 00X„6 7 0 a-struck out for Almonte in the 8th. E„Hampson (1). LOB„Colorado 2, Arizona 5. 2B„Peralta (20), Pollock (14), Souza Jr. (5). 3B„Ahmed (4). HR„Desmond (19), off Greinke. RBIs„Desmond (58), Souza Jr. (9), Ahmed 3 (43), Mathis 2 (12). Runners left in scoring position„Arizona 3 (Souza Jr., Lamb, Mathis). RISP„; Arizona 3 for 9. LIDP„Mathis. GIDP„Parra, Greinke. DP„Colorado 2 (Arenado, Desmond), (Arenado, Story, Hampson); Arizona 1 (Marte, Ahmed, Goldschmidt). COLORADO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Snzatla, L, 3-3 5.1 5 4 4 2 6 83 5.55 Rusin 0 0 2 1 1 0 10 6.81 Almonte 1.2 2 0 0 1 1 28 0.00 Shaw 1 0 0 0 1 0 13 6.98 ARIZONA IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Greinke, W, 11-5 8 2 1 1 1 13 111 3.05 Cha“n .2 1 0 0 0 0 8 1.51 Bracho .1 0 0 0 0 0 3 2.04 Rusin pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored„Rusin 1-0, Almonte 3-3. T„2:45. A„32,985 (48,519).MARINERS 8, WHITE SOX 2CHICAGO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Anderson ss 4 1 2 2 0 0 .244 L.Garcia lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .282 Abreu 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .250 A.Garcia rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .273 Davidson dh 4 0 1 0 0 2 .221 Moncada 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .231 Smith c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .310 Sanchez 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .260 Engel cf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .217 TOTALS 32 2 5 2 1 11 SEATTLE AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Gordon 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .290 Segura ss 4 1 1 0 0 0 .321 Haniger rf 1 2 0 0 3 0 .270 Cruz dh 4 1 1 0 0 0 .264 Seager 3b 3 2 1 1 1 0 .233 Span lf 2 0 0 1 1 0 .266 Healy 1b 4 2 3 6 0 1 .244 Zunino c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .185 Heredia cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .224 TOTALS 29 8 7 8 5 3 CHICAGO 000 002 000„2 5 0 SEATTLE 500 000 03X„8 7 2 E„Segura (12), Vincent (1). LOB„Chicago 4, Seattle 3. 3B„Gordon (4). HR„Anderson (14), off Gonzales; Healy (19), off Lopez; Healy (20), off Santiago. RBIs„Anderson 2 (42), Seager (57), Span (44), Healy 6 (53). SB„Segura (15). SF„Span. Runners left in scoring position„Chicago 2 (Moncada, Smith); Seattle 1 (Cruz). RISP„ Chicago 0 for 4; Seattle 3 for 7. GIDP„Moncada, Sanchez. DP„Seattle 2 (Seager, Gordon, Healy), (Segura, Gordon, Healy). CHICAGO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lopez, L, 4-8 5 5 5 5 4 1 89 4.13 Avilan 1 0 0 0 0 2 9 4.13 Gomez 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 3.86 Volstad .1 0 1 1 1 0 7 5.08 Santiago .2 2 2 2 0 0 22 5.81 SEATTLE IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gnzales, W, 11-5 6.1 4 2 2 1 6 84 3.38 Pazos, H, 16 .1 0 0 0 0 0 4 2.43 Nicasio, H, 18 .1 0 0 0 0 1 5 6.03 Colome, H, 16 1 1 0 0 0 2 12 3.95 Vincent 1 0 0 0 0 2 19 3.99 Inherited runners-scored„Santiago 1-1, Pazos 2-0, Nicasio 2-0. T„2:53. A„38,207 (47,943).ATHLETICS 6, GIANTS 5SAN FRANCISCO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. dArnaud 3b 5 0 1 0 0 3 .308 Belt 1b 5 0 0 0 0 0 .282 McCutchen rf 5 1 1 1 0 2 .259 Posey dh 3 0 0 0 1 0 .283 Hundley c 4 2 2 0 0 0 .253 Crawford ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .284 Slater lf 4 1 3 1 0 0 .326 Hernandez cf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .271 a-Sandoval ph 1 0 1 2 0 0 .254 1-Duggar pr-cf 1 1 0 0 0 1 .237 Tomlinson 2b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .214 b-Hanson ph-2b 2 0 1 1 0 0 .278 TOTALS 38 5 9 5 1 8 OAKLAND AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Martini lf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .238 Semien ss 2 1 0 0 2 1 .251 Piscotty rf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .258 Davis dh 4 2 2 3 1 1 .249 Olson 1b 4 2 2 2 1 0 .237 Chapman 3b 5 0 2 1 0 0 .256 Lucroy c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .238 2-Phegley pr-c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .214 Fowler cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .230 Barreto 2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .218 c-Lowrie ph-2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .279 TOTALS 34 6 8 6 6 4 SAN FRANCISCO 000 010 310 0 „ 5 9 1 OAKLAND 200 101 010 1 „ 6 8 0 Two outs when winning run scored. a-doubled for Hernandez in the 7th. b-singled for Tomlinson in the 7th. c-”ied out for Barreto in the 9th. 1-ran for Sandoval in the 7th. 2-ran for Lucroy in the 9th. E„Belt (7). LOB„San Francisco 4, Oakland 7. 2B„Slater (3), Sandoval (9), Chapman (18). HR„McCutchen (10), off Petit; Davis (22), off Cueto; Olson (20), off Cueto; Olson (21), off Cueto; Davis (23), off Melancon. RBIs„McCutchen (42), Slater (6), Sandoval 2 (38), Hanson (27), Davis 3 (67), Olson 2 (49), Chapman (30). SB„Hanson (5), Fowler (6). S„Semien. Runners left in scoring position„San Francisco 3 (dArnaud, McCutchen, Hernandez); Oakland 4 (Martini, Davis 2, Barreto). RISP„San Francisco 2 for 5; Oakland 1 for 8. Runners moved up„Piscotty. GIDP„Hanson, Chapman. DP„San Francisco 1 (Belt, Crawford, Melancon); Oakland 1 (Semien, Barreto, Olson). SAN FRANCISCO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cueto 7 6 4 4 2 3 94 2.76 Melancon 1 1 1 1 1 1 19 2.65 Black 1 0 0 0 1 0 19 5.06 Blach, L, 6-6 .2 1 1 1 2 0 19 4.55 OAKLAND IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Manaea 6.2 4 2 2 0 5 98 3.38 Pagan 0 1 1 1 0 0 6 3.73 Trivino .1 2 1 1 0 1 10 1.36 Petit 1 1 1 1 1 1 22 3.47 Familia, W, 5-4 2 1 0 0 0 1 22 2.74 Pagan pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored„Pagan 1-0, Trivino 2-2. HBP„Cueto (Martini). WP„Cueto, Manaea. T„3:19. A„44,374 (46,765).ANGELS 14, ASTROS 5HOUSTON AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Springer rf 3 1 2 1 2 0 .253 Bregman ss 5 0 1 2 0 0 .282 Altuve 2b 5 0 1 0 0 0 .328 1-Stassi pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .254 Gurriel 1b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .301 Gattis dh 2 1 0 0 2 0 .235 Tucker lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .139 Gonzalez lf-3b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .236 Davis 3b-p 4 1 1 1 0 0 .200 Federowicz c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .206 Kemp cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .301 TOTALS 36 5 9 4 5 4 LOS ANGELES AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Calhoun rf-cf 3 1 2 3 2 1 .190 Simmons ss 5 1 2 2 0 0 .307 Trout cf 4 2 2 2 1 1 .307 Blash rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .091 Upton lf 3 1 1 2 2 2 .253 Ohtani dh 4 2 1 0 1 0 .282 Kinsler 2b 4 3 3 2 1 1 .227 Valbuena 1b 4 1 1 1 1 1 .202 Briceno c 4 0 0 0 0 3 .286 Fletcher 3b 5 3 3 2 0 0 .273 TOTALS 36 14 15 14 8 9 HOUSTON 010 000 220„5 9 0 LOS ANGELES 022 101 71X„14 15 1 1-ran for Altuve in the 9th. E„Kinsler (6). LOB„Houston 9, Los Angeles 7. 2B„Springer (19), Bregman (32), Gonzalez 2 (15), Kinsler 2 (17). HR„Upton (20), off McCullers; Calhoun (10), off Devenski; Trout (26), off Devenski; Kinsler (12), off Davis. RBIs„Springer (52), Bregman 2 (66), Davis (5), Calhoun 3 (29), Simmons 2 (43), Trout 2 (52), Upton 2 (56), Kinsler 2 (28), Valbuena (31), Fletcher 2 (10). SB„Trout (16). S„Briceno. Runners left in scoring position„Houston 5 (Bregman 3, Altuve, Kemp); Los Angeles 3 (Simmons, Trout, Upton). RISP„Houston 2 for 8; Los Angeles 4 for 10. Runners moved up„Fletcher, Simmons. LIDP„ Valbuena. GIDP„Gurriel. DP„Houston 1 (Gurriel, Gonzalez); Los Angeles 1 (Simmons, Kinsler, Valbuena). HOUSTON IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA MCllrs, L, 10-5 4.1 6 5 5 5 3 92 4.01 Davis 1 1 1 1 0 1 9 9.00 Perez 1.1 1 1 1 1 3 28 4.50 Peacock .1 1 0 0 0 1 10 2.95 Harris .2 3 4 4 1 1 24 4.71 Devenski 0 3 3 3 1 0 22 3.03 Smith .1 0 0 0 0 0 2 4.05 LOS ANGELES IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Heaney, W, 6-6 6 4 1 1 2 4 104 3.66 Bedrosian .2 2 2 2 1 0 16 3.71 Anderson, H, 13 .1 0 0 0 0 0 1 3.34 Johnson .2 2 2 0 0 0 23 3.86 McGuire 1.1 1 0 0 2 0 35 6.12 Devenski pitched to 4 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored„Perez 1-0, Peacock 2-1, Devenski 2-2, Smith 1-0, Anderson 1-0, McGuire 2-1. WP„McCullers. T„3:41. A„35,298 (45,050).THIS DATE IN BASEBALLJULY 23 1925: Lou Gehrig hit the “rst of his major league record 23 grand slam homers as the New York Yankees posted an 11-7 triumph over the Washington Senators. 1930: Pie Traynor won both ends of a doubleheader for the Pittsburgh Pirates with home runs. In the “rst game, Traynor homered in the ninth and in the second game, he connected in the 13th. 1944: Bill Nicholson of the Chicago Cubs hit four home runs in a doubleheader split with the New York Giants. Nicholson hit a home run in the opener, which the Cubs won 7-4. He hit three straight in the second game, but the Giants won 12-10. In that game, Nicholson was walked with the bases loaded in the seventh inning. 1955: Bob Cerv and Elston Howard of the New York Yankess hit consecutive pinch-hit home runs to force extra innings against Kansas City. The Athletics won 8-7 in the 11th inning on Hector Lopezs RBI-single. Trailing 7-5 entering the top of the ninth, Cerv batted for pitcher Tommy Byrne and homered of Alex Kellner. Tom Gorman replaced Kellner and Howard, hitting for Irv Noren, tied the game.BOX SCORES ROUNDUP/MATCHUPSBlue Jays 5, Orioles 4: Yangervis Solarte hit a go-ahead, two-run homer in the eighth inning and Toronto swept Baltimore. Rays 6, Marlins 4: Pinch-hitter Daniel Robertson connected for a gameending grand slam. Royals 5, Twins 3: Drew Butera hit a tiebreaking, three-run inside-the-park home run when center “elder Jake Cave failed to make a diving catch in the seventh inning. Padres 10, Phillies 2, 1st game: Freddy Galvis had his second straight three-hit game against Philadelphia. Pirates 9, Reds 2: Corey Dickerson homered for the fourth time in three days. Dodgers 11, Brewers 2: Matt Kemp hit two solo homers and Manny Machado drove in his “rst run since joining L.A. Cubs 7, Cardinals 2: Jose Quintana pitched seven effective innings, keeping Matt Carpenter in the ballpark. Red Sox 9, Tigers 1: Chris Sale struck out nine in six scoreless innings and Jackie Bradley Jr. hit a three-run homer. Rangers 5, Indians 0: Rougned Odor drove in three runs and Ryan Rua hit a two-run homer. Diamondbacks 6, Rockies 1: Zack Greinke allowed two hits and struck out a season-high 13 in eight innings. Athletics 6, Giants 5, 10 innings: Jeurys Familia got the win in his Oakland debut. Mariners 8, White Sox 2: Ryon Healy hit a pair of three-run homers for a careerbest six RBIs. Angels 14, Astros 5: Kole Calhoun and Mike Trout both homered in a sevenrun seventh inning. LATE Atlanta at Washington San Diego at Philadelphia, 2nd game N.Y. Mets at N.Y. YankeesTODAYS PITCHING COMPARISONNATIONAL LEAGUE 2018 TEAM LAST THREE STARTS TEAMS PITCHERS TIME W-L ERA REC W-L IP ERA L.A. Dodgers Stripling (R) 8-2 2.08 9-5 2-0 18.0 2.50 Philadelphia E”in (R) 7:05p 7-2 3.15 8-4 2-0 19.0 2.37 Atlanta Newcomb (L) 8-5 3.51 9-10 0-3 12.0 9.75 Miami Urena (R) 7:10p 2-9 4.39 5-14 0-0 14.2 4.30 San Diego Lauer (L) 5-6 4.87 5-11 2-1 15.2 4.02 N.Y. Mets Wheeler (R) 7:10p 3-6 4.44 6-12 1-0 18.2 4.34 St. Louis Poncedeleon (R) 0-0 0.00 0-0 0-0 0.0 0.00 Cincinnati Castillo (R) 7:10p 5-8 5.49 10-10 0-0 15.2 3.45 Arizona Corbin (L) 6-4 3.16 10-10 0-1 16.1 3.86 Chi. Cubs Farrell (R) 8:05p 3-3 3.86 0-1 0-1 2.2 10.13 Washington Gonzalez (L) 6-6 3.72 10-9 0-1 16.0 3.94 Milwaukee Chacin (R) 8:10p 8-3 3.68 14-7 2-0 18.0 3.50AMERICAN LEAGUE 2018 TEAM LAST THREE STARTS TEAMS PITCHERS TIME W-L ERA REC W-L IP ERA Boston Porcello (R) 11-4 4.13 13-7 2-1 15.0 7.80 Baltimore Gausman (R) 7:05p 4-7 4.33 5-14 1-1 18.0 5.00 Minnesota Mejia (L) 0-0 9.00 0-1 0-0 4.0 9.00 Toronto TBD ( ) 7:07p 0-0 0.00 0-0 0-0 0.0 0.00 N.Y. Yankees Severino (R) 14-2 2.31 18-2 2-0 16.2 3.78 Tampa Bay TBD ( ) 7:10p 0-0 0.00 0-0 0-0 0.0 0.00 Oakland Anderson (L) 1-2 6.08 4-2 1-0 9.1 2.89 Texas Hamels (L) 8:05p 5-8 4.36 7-12 1-2 12.0 10.50 Detroit Liriano (L) 3-5 4.67 5-10 0-1 11.1 8.74 Kansas City Fillmyer (R) 8:15p 0-1 3.45 0-1 0-1 4.1 6.23 CWS Giolito (R) 6-8 6.18 8-11 1-1 18.2 4.34 L.A. Angels Barria (R) 10:07p 5-6 3.55 5-8 0-3 15.2 4.02INTERLEAGUE 2018 TEAM LAST THREE STARTS TEAMS PITCHERS TIME W-L ERA REC W-L IP ERA Pittsburgh Williams (R) 7-7 4.36 9-10 1-2 12.0 6.75 Cleveland Kluber (R) 7:10p 12-5 2.76 12-8 1-1 20.1 3.98 KEY: TEAM REC-Teams Record in games started by todays pitcher. SATURDAYS GAMES American League Toronto 4, Baltimore 1 Detroit 5, Boston 0 Houston 7, L.A. Angels 0 Kansas City 4, Minnesota 2 Cleveland 16, Texas 3 Chicago White Sox 5, Seattle 0 National League Atlanta at Washington, ppd. San Diego at Philadelphia, ppd. Chicago Cubs 7, St. Louis 2, 1st game Milwaukee 4, L.A. Dodgers 2 Pittsburgh 6, Cincinnati 2 St. Louis 6, Chicago Cubs 3, 2nd game Colorado 6, Arizona 5 Interleague Miami 3, Tampa Bay 2 N.Y. Yankees 7, N.Y. Mets 6 Oakland 4, San Francisco 3, 11 innings TUESDAYS GAMES American League Boston at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. Minnesota at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. Oakland at Texas, 8:05 p.m. Detroit at Kansas City, 8:15 p.m. Chi. White Sox at L.A. Angels, 10:07 p.m. National League Atlanta at Miami, 12:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. San Diego at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. St. Louis at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. Arizona at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m. Washington at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. Interleague Pittsburgh at Cleveland, 7:10 p.m. Houston at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. San Francisco at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.

PAGE 15

DEAR ABBY: As a child, I suffered a lot of abuse from my parents until I nally, at 13, opened up to a teacher. I was removed from my house and spent the remainder of my youth in various foster homes. I never felt like I had a home or family until I was an adult and made my own. I have cut all ties with my biological family, as I am happier and more sane without them. They have never shown remorse for their abuse, and I feel my children's safety would be jeopardized if I were to rekindle a relationship with them. The problem is, co-workers and sometimes even strangers at my retail job ask me about my children's grandparents. When I explain that we have a "strained" relationship, they often tell me I need to get over it, learn to forgive or that I'll regret not mending things. Am I wrong for wanting to maintain a distance? How can I assert my position rmly without giving too much detail? -CUT OFF BY CHOICE IN KENTUCKY DEAR CUT OFF: You are not obligated to give a detailed response to these individuals, who may only be trying to make conversation when they ask. All you need to say is that "the grandparents are not involved." There could be many reasons for it, but you don't have to share them. If you are questioned further say, "I'd rather not discuss it." P.S. While forgiveness may work in some situations, when a family is so dysfunctional that the children must be removed from the home, those children are NOT obligated to forgive what was done to them!DEAR ABBY: I married right out of high school, 20 years ago. We have two amazing kids in their late teens -a son in college and a daughter in her last year of high school. I haven't been in love with my wife for a very long time. I have tried everything to bring those feelings back, including talking with her about it, but the feelings just aren't there anymore. When I rst realized I was no longer in love with her, I was going to le for divorce, but my kids were little. I didn't want to put them through that, so I pushed my happiness aside. Now the kids are doing great, I'm still miserable and I don't know what to do anymore. Sometimes I feel I don't deserve to be happy, but doesn't my happiness count? Must I continue putting on a fake smile and pretending to be happy, or is it time for me to look out for my happiness? -MISERABLE IN MAINE DEAR MISERABLE: Talk to your wife again about the fact that you haven't been happy for many years. Unless you are an Academy Award-winning actor, she probably won't be shocked. Delay separating until your daughter has left for college, and in the meantime, give marriage counseling a shot, even if you already have. If, after that, nothing has improved, try to keep the divorce as amicable as possible for the sake of everyone concerned. A divorce mediator may be able to help you through the process. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in diculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION BRIDGE CRYPTOQUOTE HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORY DIVERSIONS Cause of familys separation is no business of co-workers license tocruise...Place your auto ad in the and watch it go! Call Classieds Today!352-314-FAST (3278) HAPPY BIRTHDAY FOR MONDAY, JULY 23, 2018:This year you feel as if you can indulge others more often than in the recent past. People in your immediate environment will feel your compassion. Be as authentic as you can be. If you are single, you might nd that the person you choose to relate to gives you a feeling that there is a wedge between you. Understand that this person might not be right for you. If you are attached, you seem unusually content together. Realize what is important for you, support yourself in this pursuit and expect the same type of support from your signicant other. SAGITTARIUS wants to connect with you.ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19) If you incorporate your enthusiasm into whatever you do, you can count on completion and success. Do not overthink any situations, and rely on your spontaneity and instincts. You will meet a challenge; adjust and continue on cruise control. TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20) Others want your attention. Whether you planned on group meetings or one-to-one talks becomes irrelevant. The good news is that you come up with effective solutions. Your expectations of each person become more realistic. GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20) You will bring information to the table. You will watch others process what you have shared. You will note how several people want to take action. Defer to these individuals, especially when it comes to a nancial matter. CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22) You might notice that a lot is going on around you. Depending on whom you are speaking to, the activity will vary. You will touch base with quite a few people today. Be willing to accept a friends need to make a major change. LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22) Excess often marks your days. You might not have the control you desire, but you have the ability to make the most of even the wildest situations. You will decide to be a lot more disciplined, not only for your sake, but also for those around you. VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22) Tension builds around your nances. You might want to slow down and look at judgments you are making that cause some of the stress. You are likely to nd an easier way of handling some matters that often become triggers. LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22) Your ability to communicate what is on your mind excels. You are able to see life with renewed enthusiasm. A transformation might be taking a toll on you in your personal life. You are aware of what you need to do. Test the waters rst. SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21) You need to move forward and not get stuck worrying about a nancial risk. You seem to be on the road to success. Tap into your imagination for additional support and renewed vitality when approaching a difcult issue or intense project.SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22DEC. 21) You feel appreciated for your high energy, intellect and willingness to take risks. Your creativity helps others to stay enthusiastic. Refuse to use money for power and control. You are likely to want to indulge in some good times. CAPRICORN (DEC. 22JAN. 19) You rarely choose to be subtle, and you will approach your day in this way. Someone at a distance might decide to reach out to you. This person sees life very differently from how you do, but he or she appreciates your authenticity and strength. AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18) Focus on your longterm goals. Evaluate where you are. A meeting will give you feedback, support and improved ideas. Your inner circle will take in the comments and support you in your desires. Listen to a friend who cares about you. PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20) You might be pressured to perform at a high level. Though you do well in this type of situation, a problem still could emerge. Be willing to see whether you misunderstood what is being said or just are not communicating your message clearly. DailyCommercial.com | Monday, July 23, 2018 B5 TODAY IS MONDAY, JULY 23, the 204th day of 2018. There are 161 days left in the year. TODAY'S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY: On July 23, 1829, William Austin Burt received a patent for his "typographer," a forerunner of the typewriter. ON THIS DATE: In 1962 the rst public TV transmissions over Telstar 1 took place during a special program featuring live shots beamed from the United States to Europe, and vice versa. In 1982 actor Vic Morrow and two child actors, 7-year-old Myca Dinh Le and 6-year-old Renee Shin-Yi Chen, were killed when a helicopter crashed on top of them during lming of a Vietnam War scene for "Twilight Zone: The Movie." (Director John Landis and four associates were later acquitted of manslaughter.) In 1984 Vanessa Williams became the rst Miss America to resign her title, after nude photographs of her taken in 1982 were published in Penthouse magazine. In 1996 at the Atlanta Olympics, Kerri Strug made a heroic nal vault despite torn ligaments in her left ankle as the U.S. women gymnasts clinched their rst-ever Olympic team gold medal. In 1999 space shuttle Columbia blasted o with the world's most powerful X-ray telescope and Eileen Collins, the rst woman to command a U.S. space ight.

PAGE 16

CLASSIC PEANUTS HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH COMICS B6 Monday, July 23, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com

PAGE 17

DailyCommercial.com | Monday, July 23, 2018 B7 Florida Air & Heat Inc. Your Comfort Company100% Financing Available Licensed Insured BondedServing Our Area Since 1986 State License # CAC1814030CALL 352-326-3202For ALL Your Heating & Cooling Needs A/C Services 352-408-7722 ASK FOR KEITH CARPORTS, SCREEN ROOMS POOL CAGES, PATIO STRUCTURES FOR HOME OWNERS QUESTIONS, WE HAVE ANSWERS! Aluminum Services John Philibert, IncWe do Everything from Ceilings to Floors. Pantries, Cabinets and more.Your pesky leaks gone and houses well paint. From inside and out, well make it great. Lic/Ins. Accepting Visa & MC. JPHandy.com (352) 308-0694 LAMINATE, WOOD & TILE SALE!Great Prices Exceptional Service!20 Years ExperienceSHOWROOM11433 US Hwy 441, Tavares Call Chris352-636-1643 D2452SD Garage Door Services €PressureWashing€Painting €Flooring€Carpet€CleanOuts €CleanUps€Hauling€Licensed352-787-7056 Handyman Services John Philibert, IncFor All Your Flooring Needs Pergo, Ceramic Tile, Travertine, Vinyl & MoreCall John @ (352) 308-0694 Flooring Services CCC1330633D2453SD BILL ROGERS IRRIGATION SERVICE35 YEARS EXPERIENCELIC NO. 22190/INS/BONDEDOWNER OPERATOR352-446-1059 Irrigation Services Home Improvement 352-455-8241 Also Specializing in Siding, Soft Fascia and Screen Rooms SEAMLESS GUTTERS iMan 4-U O C D I AŽR CJOSEPH MAGRUM352-636-2599TAX ID, INSURED rufus_62@yahoo.com Gutter Services All Pro Movers LLC Lic./Ins. Fla IM NO: IM2580ResidentialRandall Rolle Manager352-817-5159allpromovers.villages@gmail.comwww.allpromoversllc.com We Also Offer (352) 308-0694 John Philibert, IncFor All Your Interior/Exterior Painting Needs. FREE ESTIMATES!30 Years of Quality Experiencewww.BestPaintRem.com352-210-3964Lic/Ins15% OFFSenior Discount Painting Services Lawn Mower Repair Services Moving Services Pressure Cleaning D2458SD EXTERIOR CLEANING SERVICES RESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL352-603-4240Licensed & Insured Comfort Seal Roof Systems, Inc.TM352-242-5055 MEET THE CONTRACTOR NOT A SALESMANŽ! BETTER THAN ANY METAL OR SHINGLE ROOF! NOT ONE ROOF LOST TO ANY STORM! NO PAY UNTIL JOB IS DONE! SPECIAL DISCOUNT FOR FELLOW VETERANS!St. Lic. # CCC1325522 Our 32nd Year Over 12,000 Roofs For Mobile/Manufactured Homes BEST ROOF BEST PRICES GUARANTEED! LIC#CCC042879 #CCC1330633D2472SD Roo“ng Services Re-roofs/RepairsShingles/Metal/FlatLic. #CCC1329936Covenant Roo“ng and Construction, Inc.#1 IN ROOFINGFREE ROOF ESTIMATES352-314-3625 D2444SD J.C.C.Bobcat&TreeSvc.Inc.LandClearing/Excavating FillDirt/Clay Hauling/DebrisRemoval StumpGrinding Demolition/Grading/Driveways OwnerOperator352-455-7608D2434SD Land Clearing Services Landscaping Services LandscapingTrimming,Mulching, Sod,TreeTrimming,Pavers&MuchMore! ArmandoSantamario352-587-1323D2415SD COMMERCIAL-RESIDENTIAL €AssortedRock&Stone €PaverInstallation/Repair €PalmandTreeInstallation €DecorativeWalls €RetainingWalls €CurbingandMulching €SoddingandIrrigation €SeasonedFirewood €FullLandscapingNeedsFULLGARDENCENTERFreeEstimates,SeniorDiscounts2402SouthSt.,Leesburg352-516-6936TEDBYRNE OwnerLic/InsD2420SD A-1 UNITED SERVICES 352-460-3763CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATESOne Call Does It AllŽLICENSEDINSUREDINT. / EXT. PAINTINGHOME REMODELSALL PHASES OF PRESSURE CLEANINGAND MUCH MORE! A-1 UNITED SERVICES 352-460-3763CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATESOne Call Does It AllŽLICENSEDINSURED Tree Services Tree Services BAD TREE CALL ME!27 YEARS EXPERIENCE NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL! FREE ESTIMATES TONY THE TREE TRIMMER 2402SouthSt.,Leesburg352-516-6936Senior Discounts TreeRemoval,Trimming,CanopyReduction, CraneService,StumpGrinding, SeasonedFirewood-COMPLETEGARDENCENTERD2460SD D 20 88 S D D2471SD J.C.C.Bobcat&TreeSvc.Inc.Residential/Commercial Trimming/Removal Palms/Hedges/StumpGrinding Debrisremoval/Hauling FillDirt/Clay/Grading/Driveways Lic/Ins€InsuranceWork€24Hrs.352-455-7608 D2463SD Upholstery Services D2470SD Window Services GEORGE WATKINS 352-587-2735Window ReplacementLanai Enclosures Acrylic WindowsCRC# 1330701 BLIND REPAIRSNo Cost...If We Cant Fix It!352-217-7556exceptionsblinds.comTo have your Professional Service listed here, please contact the Classi“ed Department at (352) 314-3278. 352-396-6238DAMIAN BROOKSDamianbrooks80@yahoo.com You've Tried The Rest...Now Go With The Best! RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIALPERFECT CLEANING Cleaning Services CONCRETE 352.602.8077 Concrete For Less8x10 Slab $800 10x48 Slab $2600No UPFRONT Costs!Blocking/ Ref./Lic./Ins.Lic #113336Phillip 352-504-8372Includes Concrete & Labor D2424SD AllConcreteServices CrackRepair€FreeEstimatesServingLakeCounty30YearsBonded,Insured,Lic#11066CallBobat352.223.7935 Concrete Services CCC1330633D2453SD Construction Services Door & Lock Services D2451SD BRIAN DEGAGLIA CONSTRUCTION SERVICESIncludes: Forming, Pouring, Stripping, Cutting, & Materials. Does Not include stripping of sod or roots, removing of concrete, pumping or hauling of debris. 352-267-5723 CRC 1326327 Only Mobile/ Manufactured Home ROOFINGwww.AllFloridaRoofs.com All Florida Weatherproong & Construction, Inc.FREE VIDEO ROOF INSPECTIONS1-877.572.1019 352-586-7178Serving Citrus, Hernando, Sumter and Surrounding CountiesCHEAP RATES GREEN ACRES MOWINGWe mow or bushhog acreage of any amount in all of Central & South Lake County REASONABLE PRICES!352-360-5445 352-348-3355 Commercial Cleaning Residential Cleaning Buf“ng/ Stripping Floors Painting Services Advance coatings.incRepaint specialist~interior-exterior ~cabinet resurfacing ~pool decks/stains ~drivewaysMark Mccormickphone 352 255 0145licensed & insured RE-TILESpecializing in Total Bath & Kitchen Remodeling Serving Central Florida for over 30 years JIM CHANEY 352-391-5553 Bath & Kitchen Services Tile Service RE-TILESpecializing in Total Bath & Kitchen Remodeling Serving Central Florida for over 30 years JIM CHANEY 352-391-5553 Construction Services

PAGE 18

2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHER'S NOTICEFederal and State laws prohibit advertising expressing a discriminatory preference on the basis of race, age, sex, color, national origin, religion, handicap or marital status. The Daily Commercial will not knowingly accept advertisement for employment which is in violation of the law. Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance Employment Classifications are intended to announce bona de employment offers only. Employment advertising must disclose the specic nature of the work being offered. Some employment categories may charge fees. If any advertiser does not comply with these standards, please notify a Classied Sales Representative at 365-8245 or 365-8200. 2990 B8 Monday, July 23, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com This newspaper will never knowingly accept advertisement that is illegal or considered fraudulent. If you have questions or doubts about any ads on these pages, we advise that before responding or sending money ahead of time, you check with the local Attorney Generals Consumer Fraud Line and/or the Better Business Bureau. Also be advised that some phone numbers published in these ads may require an extra charge. In all cases of questionable value, such as promises or guaranteed income from work-athome programs, money to loan, etc., if it sounds too good to be true it may in fact be exactly that. This newspaper cannot be held responsible for any negative consequences that occur as a result of you doing business with these advertisers. Thank you. NOTICES 1000-1999READER NOTICE 1001 Looking for a Handyman?Check out theService Directory Get the paper delivered to you! Call Us Today! 787-0600 (Lake) 877-702-0600 (Sumter) 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Mon Fri. subscribe online at www.dailycommercial.com

PAGE 19

DailyCommercial.com | Monday, July 23, 2018 B9 6865PETSThe Florida Statute 828.29 states that no dog, puppy, cat or kitten may be offered for sale without a health certi cate, nor can any puppy or kitten be sold under the age of 8 weeks, nor can you advertise puppies or kittens with a deposit to hold. Boat Trailers7680 CROSSWORD PUZZLE

PAGE 20

B10 Monday, July 23, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com Advertise your business 352-365-8210 Run with the pack! TODAY! in the Service Directory