Citation
Daily Commercial

Material Information

Title:
Daily Commercial
Place of Publication:
Leesburg, FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group, Steve Skaggs - Publisher, Tom McNiff - Executive Editor
Publication Date:

Subjects

Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Lake -- Leesburg
Coordinates:
28.81134 x -81.872708

Record Information

Rights Management:
Copyright Daily Commercial. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Digital Newspaper Library

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

SPORTS | B1FORMER NFL PLAYER RON DIXON HOSTING SUMMER CAMP IN WILDWOOD SPORTS | B1GATORS FACING ELIMINATION AT COLLEGE WORLD SERIES LOCAL & STATE | A3WOMAN HURLED OUT OF DAYTONA ROLLER COASTER TALKS ABOUT ORDEAL @dailycommercial Facebook.com/daily.commercial YOUR LOCAL SOURCE FOR LAKE & SUMTER COUNTIES Tuesday, June 19, 2018 75 ¢ Local & State ................ A3 Health ........................ A8 Opinion ...................... A9 Weather ..................... A10 Sports.......................... B1 Comics ....................... B6 Volume 142, Issue 170 2018 GateHouse Media Home delivery: 352-787-0600 Tracie Jo Naffziger, 42, was sentenced Monday, June 18 to a 10-year suspended term in prison for helping David Mariotti after he killed 84-year-old Bernadine Montgomery in 2016. [FRANK STANFIELD/DAILY COMMERCIAL] By Frank Stanfield frankstanfield@dailycommercial.comTAVARES „ A judgeMondaysentenced Tracie Jo Naffziger to a 10-year suspended term in prison for helping David Mariotti after he killed 84-year-old Berna-dine Montgomery in 2016, but Naffzigers family was not happy: They were hoping she would go to prison.Thats the only thing thats going to help her,Ž said her sister, Marcie, who did not want to give her last name after the sentencing hearing.Circuit Judge Don Briggs was reluctant to depart from the minimum 35-year prison sentence for accessory after the fact first-degree murder No prison timeMontgomery Na zigers testimony gets her a suspended sentence in Leesburg widows murderBernadine Montgomery was killed in her home by David Mariotti. Mariotti was sentenced to life in prison for murder. He narrowly escaped the death sentence when one of the 12 jurors recommended life. [DAILY COMMERCIAL FILE] See SENTENCE, A5By Eric Tucker and Mary Clare JalonickThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ The FBI is determined to not repeat any of the mistakes identified in a harshly criti-cal watchdog report on the handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation, Director Chris Wray said Monday at a congres-sional hearing at which he repeatedly sought to distance himself from his predecessor.Wray told lawmakers that the FBI accepted the findings of the Office of the Inspector General report and has begun making changes, including about how it handles especially sensitive investigations, like the Clinton one. The FBI is also reinforcing through employee training the need to avoid the appearance of political bias, a key point of criticism in last weeks report, and has referred employees singled out in the report to the agencys investiga-tive arm for possible discipline. The OIGs report makes clear that we have significant work to do and as I said were going to learn from the report and be better as a result,Ž Wray said, even as multiple Republicans on the Senate Judiciary Commit-tee pounced on the reports findings to allege rampant bias within the FBI.The departments inspector general, Michael Horowitz, appeared Director: FBI wont repeat mistakes noted in report See FBI, A5By Zeke Miller and Kevin McGillThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ An unapologetic President Donald Trump defended his administrations border-pro-tection policies Monday in the face of rising national outrage over the forced separation of migrant children from their parents. Calling for tough action against illegal immigration, Trump declared the U.S. will not be a migrant campŽ on his watch.Images of children held in fenced cages fueled a growing chorus of condemnation from both political parties, four former first ladies and national evangelical leaders. The children are being held separately from parents who are being prosecuted under the administrations zerotoleranceŽ policy for illegal border crossings. I say its very strongly the Democrats fault,Ž Trump said Monday as his administration rejected criticism that the policy has resulted in inhuman and immoral conditions.Trump pointed to more lenient policies under past administrations that had not charged all migrants who had crossed illegally.We will not apologize for the job we do or for the job law enforcement does, for doing the job that the Ameri-can people expect us to do,Ž Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said in an appearance before the National Sheriffs Association in New Orleans. Illegal actions have and must have consequences. No more free passes, no more get out of jail free cards.ŽNearly 2,000 children were separated from their families over a six-week period in April Trump digs in on immigrationBy Nomaan MerchantThe Associated PressMCALLEN, Texas „ Politicians and advocates flocked to the Mexican border to visit U.S. immigration detention centers and turn up the pressure on the Trump administra-tion amid a growing uproar Monday over its policy of separating immigrant chil-dren from their parents. A group of congressional lawmakers on Sunday vis-ited an old warehouse in South Texas where hun-dreds of children are being held in cages created by metal fencing. One cage held 20 youngsters.Those kids inside who have been separated from their parents are already being traumatized,Ž said Democratic Sen. Jeff Merk-ley of Oregon. It doesnt matter whether the floor is swept and the bedsheets tucked in tight.ŽNearly 2,000 children were taken from their parents over a six-week period in April and May after Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced a zero toleranceŽ policy when it comes to prosecuting those arrested for illegally enter-ing the country. Church groups and human rights advocates have sharply criticized the policy, call-ing it inhumane.The policy has divided Republicans, with former first lady Laura Bush saying in a guest column in Sun-days Washington Post that Politicians visit border amid outrageWray See BORDER, A5 See TRUMP, A5

PAGE 2

A2 Tuesday, June 19, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com NATION & WORLDPUBLISHER Steve Skaggs: steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.com ......................352-365-8213 EXECUTIVE EDITOR Tom McNiff: tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com ............................352-365-8250 DIGITAL EDITOR, LIFESTYLES EDITOR Whitney Lehnecker: whitney.lehnecker@dailycommercial.com ....352-365-8258 SPORTS EDITOR Paul Jenkins: paul.jenkins@dailycommercial.com ..........................352-365-8204 SPORTS WRITER Frank Jolley: frank.jolley@dailycommet.com..................................352-365-8268 REPORTER Frank Stan“ eld: frank.stand“ eld@dailycommercial.com ...............352-374-8257 REPORTER Roxanne Brown: roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com ................352-365-8266 YOUR LOCAL NEWS SOURCE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIESPrint delivery available within the newspaper distribution area only. By submitting your address and/or email, you understand that you may receive promotional offers from Gatehouse Media and its related companies. You may unsubscribe from receiving any such offers at any ti me by calling 352-787-0600. The advertised price does not include the charges for any premium editions. Premium editions are published to p rovide additional information and value to our readers. You agree that you will be charged up to an additional $5.00 for each premium edition pub lished and delivered to you during your subscription period, in addition to the cost of your subscription. The length of your subscription will be s hortened by the publication of premium editions if those premium editions are delivered to you during your subscription. You may elect to be billed se parately for premium editions by contacting Customer Service at 1-352-787-0600. Thus, unless you elect to be billed separately up to an additional $ 3.00 for each premium edition, you agree that the length of your subscription will be shortened in proportion to the value of the number of premium e ditions published and delivered to you during your subscription period. As an illustrative example, if you select a subscription of up to 12 week s at a cost of $48.00, and two premium editions at $2.00 each are published and delivered to you during that subscription period, your subscription wi ll be shortened by 1 week because the weekly cost of the subscription is $4.00 per week and the premium edition charges total $4.00. Depending upo n the length of your subscription and the timing of the publication and delivery of premium editions, you will not be charged for any premium e ditions if none are published and delivered to you during your subscription. As such, in that case only, the length of your subscription will not b e shortened. The timing of the publication and delivery of premium editions is variable. There will be no more than 1 premium edition published each mo nth during the subscription term. Visit Dailycommercial.com for examples of premium editions. For more info or to cancel your subscription ple ase call 352-787-0600.The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $178.47 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by GateHouse Media at 21 2 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to the Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edit ion is property of the Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER?: Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call from 7 a. m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and from 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. If youre going on vacation, call circulation 48 hours ahead to stop service. ANNOUNCEMENTS, CALENDAR, GAME RESULTS: Email upcoming events, along with news about awards and personal or professional milestones „ with a photo, if you desire „ to news@dailycommercial.com. Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268 or 352-365-8204. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY: The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the n ews department at 352-365-8250. Retail Advertising .........................................................352-314-3278 Classi“ ed Advertising ...................................................352-314-3278 Lake Circulation............................................................352-787-0600 Sumter Circulation .......................................................877-702-0600 Billing ...........................................................................352-787-0600 Accounting ...................................................................352-365-8212 SUBSCRIPTION RATES Home delivery (Daily/Sunday) 3 months: 41.70 ....................Tax: 2.92 ..........................Total: 44.62 6 months: 88.40 ....................Tax: 5.84 ..........................Total: 89.24 1 year: 166.80 .......................Tax: 11.68 ........................Total: 178.47 FOR HOME DELIVERY: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., the Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. LOTTERY LAFAYETTE, LA.La. man charged in bomb threat to Trump Tower cafA Louisiana man has been charged with phoning in a bomb threat to a restaurant at the Trump Tower building in New York City last year.A federal grand jury in Louisiana handed up an indict-ment last Thursday charging 27-year-old Paul Miller, of Lafayette, with making the bomb threat last September.The indictment says Miller called Trump Caf at President Donald Trumps namesake skyscraper in Manhattan and told the person who answered that a bomb was in the building. It doesnt say where he called from.WASHINGTONTwo federal agencies take closer look into Tesla “ reOne federal safety agency has dispatched an investigator and another says it is gathering information on a Tesla battery fire in Southern California.The National Transportation Safety Board said Monday it is sending a technical specialist to watch Teslas examination of the Model S that caught fire Friday on a street in West Hol-lywood. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administra-tion said in a statement that it continues to collect informa-tion regarding this incident and will take appropriate action as warranted.Ž The Associated PressBy Mari Yamaguchi and Ken MoritsuguThe Associated PressTOKYO „ Residents in western Japan were cleaning up debris Monday evening after a powerful earthquake hit the area around Osaka, the countrys second-largest city, killing four people and injuring hundreds while knocking over walls and set-ting off fires.The magnitude 6.1 earthquake that struck the area early Monday damaged build-ings and left many homes without water or gas. The quake also grounded flights in and out of Osaka and par-alyzed traffic and commuter trains most of the day.By evening, bullet trains and some local trains had resumed operation, and stations were swollen with commuters trying to get home, many of them waiting in long lines. An exodus of commuters who chose to walk home filled sidewalks and bridges.Some commuters took refuge in nearby shelters instead of going home. NHK public television showed dozens of men wearing ties and carrying briefcases sitting on gym mats at a junior high school gymnasium in Ibaraki city, where some families also gathered.Takatsuki city confirmed another victim late Monday, as the death toll rose to four. City officials didnt have details of the victim, but NHK and Kyodo News reported that an 81-year-old woman was found dead underneath a wardrobe that fell on her at her home in Takatsuki.Also in Takatsuki, a concrete wall at an elementary school fell onto the street, killing 9-year-old Rina Miyake as she walked to the school. NHK showed the collapsed upper half of the high wall, which was painted cheerfully with flowers, trees and blue sky and surrounded the school swimming pool.Mayor Takeshi Hamada apologized over her death because of the walls collapse. The city acknowledged that the wall did not meet building safety codes. The structure was old and made of concrete blocks „ a known risk in earthquakes. Chief Cabi-net Secretary Yoshihide Suga ordered the Education Ministry to conduct nationwide safety checks of concrete block structures at public schools.More than 1,000 schools were closed in Osaka and nearby prefectures, Kyodo News reported. Wall cracks and other minor damage were found at several schools.A man in his 80s died in the collapse of a concrete wall in Osaka city. An 85-year-old man in nearby Ibaraki died after a bookcase fell on top of him at home, according to the disaster management agency.The Fire and Disaster Man-agement Agency said 307 people were treated for inju-ries at hospitals. Most of the injured were in Osaka. Osaka officials did not give details, but the injuries reported in Kyoto and three other neighboring prefectures were all minor.The quake struck shortly before 8 a.m. north of Osaka at a depth of about 8 miles, the Japan Meteorological Agency said. The strongest shaking was north of Osaka, but the quake rattled large parts of western Japan, including Kyoto, the agency said.Dozens of domestic flights in and out of Osaka were grounded, while train and subway service in the Osaka area, including bullet trains, was suspended to check for damage. Passengers exited trains on the tracks between stations.Some subway service resumed in the afternoon, but stations remained crowded with passengers waiting for trains to restart, many of them sitting on the floor. Long lines of people waited to board bullet trains as they resumed operation.Some manufacturers, including automakers Dai-hatsu Motor Co. and Honda Motor Co., electronics makers Panasonic and Sharp Corp., and confectioners Ezaki Glico Co. and Meiji Co., temporarily stopped production lines at their factories in the region for safety checks, news reports said.The quake knocked over walls, broke windows and set off scattered building fires. It toppled furniture in homes and goods onto shop floors. It also cracked roads and broke water pipes, leav-ing homes without water.Many homes and buildings, including a major hospital, were temporarily without power, though elec-tricity was restored at most places by midafternoon.Strong quake near Osaka, Japan, kills 4The gate of Myotoku-ji temple collapsed Monday after an earthquake hit Ibaraki City, Osaka, western Japan. A strong earthquake knocked over walls and set off scattered “ res around metropolitan Osaka on Monday morning. [YOSUKE MIZUNO/KYODO NEWS VIA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] IN BRIEFSunday, June 17 Fantasy 5: 4-9-11-12-14 Monday, June 18 Pick 5 Afternoon: 0-0-0-6-8 Evening: 7-1-7-3-1 Pick 4 Afternoon: 4-4-8-5 Evening: 8-4-1-5 Pick 3 Afternoon: 6-8-3 Evening: 9-0-3 Pick 2 Afternoon: 2-4 Evening: 8-9

PAGE 3

DailyCommercial.com | Tuesday, June 19, 2018 A3 LOCAL & STATETom McNiff, editor 352-365-8250 tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comNEWS BRIEFS SORRENTOEustis man jailed after con” ict over his aggressive drivingA woman who confronted a driver about his aggressive driving suddenly found herself being strangled by the man, according to a sheriffs deputy report.Zachary C. Clark, 19, of Eustis, was arrested Friday morning and charged with felony battery strangulation and resisting arrest with violence.The deputy said he arrived at County Road 46A in Sorrento in response to a call about a fight in progress. Clark was out of his car and yelling at a Florida Highway Patrol trooper, and the trooper was telling him to get back in his vehicle because of traffic from the nearby highway. The deputy said he tried to talk to Clark but he got in the troopers face. Law enforcement officers took him to the ground, where he resisted being handcuffed.The woman said Clark was driving aggressively and almost caused her to have an accident. When the two vehi-cles stopped at a stop sign, she got out of her car to complain about his driving. She said he got out of his car, stepped on her shoes and put her in a choke hold. She said she could not breathe and scratched and hit him while trying to free herself. A witness corrobo-rated her account. EUSTISTraf“ c stop goes from bad to worse for Eustis manA simple traffic stop quickly spiraled out of control early Sunday morning for a Eustis man who decided he wasn't going to jail quietly.The Florida Highway Patrol says Hunter C. Padgett, 31, was stopped at 3:34 a.m. on State Road 44 for report-edly going 71 mph in a 55 mph zone while driving in the median in a pickup truck. The tag was expired and there was a broken taillight.Troopers say Padgett stopped in the middle of an intersection, but when he partially rolled down his window, the trooper said he could smell alcohol, noted the driver was glassy-eyed and lethargic, and said his speech was slurred.Padgett said he had just come back from having sex with a woman and that he only had two beers. He reportedly cursed when another trooper asked the same questions and said, None of your business," then sped off.Troopers said he didn't get far before he crashed into a tree and was handcuffed fol-lowing a brief foot chase.Padgett reportedly said his back and chest hurt, so troopers called for an ambu-lance. He was abusive to the rescue workers, too, and had By Christine SextonNews Service of FloridaTALLAHASSEE „ Responding to a torrent of criticism from Democrats, Gov. Rick Scott on Monday repeated past statements that he supports maintain-ing protections for people with pre-existing medical conditions who purchase health insurance.My position has not changed „ I do not agree with efforts to remove pre-existing conditions,Ž Scott said in a statement distributed by his U.S. Senate campaign and not the governors office. Ive continued to say that it is Scott pushes back on pre-existing conditionsResponding to a torrent of criticism from Democrats, Gov. Rick Scott on Monday repeated past statements that he supports maintaining protections for people with pre-existing medical conditions who purchase health insurance. [NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA] See SCOTT, A4By Jim AbbottGateHouse Media FloridaDAYTONA … One of two riders thrown 34 feet to the ground in last weeks acci-dent on the Sandblaster roller coaster at the Boardwalk in Daytona Beach spoke out for the first time on Monday, calling the experience terrifyingŽ in an interview on ABCs Good Morning America.ŽFor a national TV audience, Bostic offered the following recollection of the accident:I remember hearing a lot of screeching, a lot of metal-lic, a lot of sounds that just... werent right,Ž Bostic told ABC. I closed my eyes, I held on. I remember being airborne, feeling as if I was falling. And then the next thing I remember was coming to, on the ground, looking up.As the ride started, it was shaky and didnt feel as stable as other rides that we had been on,Ž Bostic said. It seemed to be going a lot faster than I felt comfortable with. As we went around the turn it felt as if it wasnt completely attached It was terrifyingBy John KennedyGateHouse Capital BureauTALLAHASSEE „ Flor-idas election contests got a little more serious Monday with candidates filing papers and plunking down fees to qualify for the governors race, Cabi-net contests and legislative, county and special district campaigns.Democrats Philip Levine and Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum showed up in person at the states Division of Election to submit paperwork and a check for $7,816 to get in the crowded field of con-tenders looking to succeed Republican Gov. Rick Scott.The term-limited governor filed papers during federal qualifying ending last month to take on three-term Democratic U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson.By the time this weeks paperwork is finished at noon Friday, the field for the Aug. 28 primaries will be set. Some contenders not facing primary opposi-tion will go straight to the Nov. 6 general election.I think what it comes down to, is the fact is for us, anybody can buy TV time, anybody can be on social media and anybody can do direct mail, but I think where the rubber hits the road is where you all are. Its boots on the ground,Ž Levine, the former Miami Beach mayor, told a hand-ful of campaign workers gathered at the Tallahassee headquarters he also opened Monday.Another Democratic gubernatorial hopeful former U.S Rep. Gwen Graham of Tallahassee dropped off papers last week at the state elections office and was listed as a qualified candidate when the weeklong event opened at noon Monday.State races take shape as qualifying begins See RACES, A4Amanda Bostic, one of the two people hurled from a derailed roller Coaster in Daytona Beach, speaks to Good Morning AmericaŽ a bout the terrifyingŽ incident in this image taken from video. [ABC] Crews remove damaged roller coaster cars from The Sandblaster roller coaster amusement ride on the Boardwalk in Daytona Beach, Saturday, June 16, 2018. [NEWS-JOURNAL/NIGEL COOK] Woman hurled out of Daytona roller coaster talks about ordeal MondaySee ACCIDENT, A4Padgett Clark See BRIEFS, A4By Dara KamNews Service of FloridaTALLAHASSEE „ In a widely expected move, an appellate court Monday refused to lift a stay on a Tal-lahassee judges ruling that would allow patients to smoke medical marijuana if their doctors approve it.The 1st District Court of Appeals decision means that patients will continue to be barred from legally smoking medical marijuana for the foreseeable future „ at least until the appellate court issues a final ruling on the merits of the case.Leon County Circuit Judge Karen Gievers last month sided with Orlando trial lawyer John Morgan and a group of plaintiffs who filed a legal challenge after the Legislature included a ban on smoking in a 2017 law carrying out a constitutional amendment broadly legalizing medical marijuana.Gievers agreed that the text of the constitutional amend-ment, approved by 72 percent of Floridians in 2016, allows patients to use any form of marijuana as their treatment.Health officials, who argued that the amendment did not expressly authorize smoking and that the state had broad leeway to regulate medical marijuana use, immediately filed an appeal, which put an automatic stay on Gievers May 25 ruling.On June 6, Gievers vacated the stay, prompting the state to ask the appellate court to keep it in place. The court sided with the state on Monday, saying that Gievers order vacating the stay was quashedŽ and that the hold shall remain in effect pending final disposition of the merits of this appeal.ŽWhether patients should be able to smoke marijuana if Smokable pot issue on holdAppellate court refuses to li stay on judges medical marijuana rulingSee POT, A4

PAGE 4

A4 Tuesday, June 19, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com Funeral Services Tammy S. Frank von Frankenstein, age 58, passed away peacefully on June 12, 2018 after a long battle with cancer at Florida Hospital Waterman in Tavares. Tammy was born Oct. 5, 1959 in Orlando, Fl. She worked as a charge nurse at Waterman Hospital. Tammy was very well liked and respected by everyone she encountered. She could light up the room with her personality and was a natural leader that people looked up to. She is survived by her husband Ronald, her two children Cameron and Sabrina, her parents Barbara ODonnell and Ted and Betty Jackubowski, brothers and sisters Chris J., Mark J., Lisa L., Ellen B., John O., and Matthew O., and many aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, and cousins. The service will be held at Steverson, Hamlin, and Hilbish in Tavares, FL on Friday, June 22, 2018 at 2 pm. Immediately following the service will be a Celebration of Life at Mission Inns Marina Del Rey in Howey in the Hills, FL. Arrangements have been entrusted to Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, 226 E. Burleigh Blvd., Tavares, FL 32778, (352)343-4444. Online condolences may be left on the Tribute Wall at www. steversonhamlinhilbish. comTammy S. Frank von Frankenstein Barbara Joan GinettBarbara Joan Ginett, 76, of Leesburg, Florida, passed away on Sunday, May 27, 2018. Arrangements by Baldwin Brothers, Tavares, FL.Zavier Craig GomilaZavier Craig Gomila, 73 of Grand Island, died Monday, June 18, 2018. Arrangements by Harden/ Pauli Funeral Home, Eustis.important to cover indi-viduals with pre-existing conditions and that every American, including those with pre-existing conditions, should have the ability to buy any kind of insurance they want.ŽThe statement came the same day that U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson „ Scotts opponent in this falls election „ held a meeting in Orlando with people who have pre-existing conditions. During the meeting, Nelson discussed a lawsuit that 20 states, including Florida, have filed against the federal Affordable Care Act that could result in those pro-tections being eliminated.A pivotal moment in the lawsuit happened this month when President Donald Trumps admin-istration decided it would not defend the Affordable Care Act. In the immediate after-math, Scott avoided directly discussing the potential impact of the lawsuit, despite his history of being critical of the health care overhaul pushed by President Barack Obama. Democrats pounced on Scotts statements. Florida joined the lawsuit at the direction of Attorney General Pam Bondi.Scotts statement on Monday still did not completely address the lawsuit, but he said that Obamacare is a disaster and costs way too much, but keeping pre-existing provisions should be a part of any health care reform. I disagree with efforts to dismantle protections for those with pre-existing conditions.ŽIf the lawsuit by Florida and other states is success-ful, it would do away with key parts of the law that require insurance compa-nies to sell health policies to people regardless of pre-existing conditions and prevents charging more because of the conditions. The provisions benefit people who arent covered by employer-based plans or Medicaid.When asked about the lawsuit last week, Scott briefly outlined changes he thinks could lower health-insurance costs. The governor said the changes should be incremental but said he supports allowing more competition (among insurers), we gotta let people buy the insurance that fits for their family and weve got to reward people for taking care of themselves.ŽPrior to the federal law, there was no requirement in Florida that insurance companies offer policies to people, regardless of their pre-existing medi-cal conditions. Scott has maintained that he sup-ports the protections that policies must be sold to the sick.But the federal law also makes clear that insurance companies cannot charge higher premiums based on pre-existing conditions or use of health care services. It established adjusted community rating, which barred insurers from rais-ing premiums based on health status, medical claims or gender, among other things.When pressed about the price protections, Scott campaign spokes-person Lauren Schenone said the governor does not agree with efforts to remove pre-existing conditions. Period.ŽBut Marshall Kapp, professor emeritus and former director of Florida State University Center for Innovative Collaboration in Medicine and Law, said maintaining pricing protections for sick people while reward-ing those who are healthy could be at odds.There does seem to be a tension between those two things,Ž Kapp told The News Service of Florida. SCOTTFrom Page A3 to those tracks. I was told that I bounced from support beam to support beam like a pinball but I dont know that, I was told that. I dont remember any of that.Ill never forget that in my life. There was people still on the ride, there was screaming. One (person) was dangling, the other was [unintelligible]. Everyone was screaming and crying, and it was terrifying.ŽAlso on Mo nday, Orlando law firm Morgan & Morgan confirmed that Bostic is among three vic-tims being represented by the firm. At a press confer-ence in Orlando, attorney Matt Morgan announced that the firm has hired two amusement industry safety experts to investigate the circumstances surrounding the Thursday night accident in preparation for potential legal action.We hope to shed a little bit more light on what happened in this tragic failure of the roller coaster,Ž Morgan said at the firms Orlando office. Our clients came to Day-tona Beach with healthy bodies, looking forward to their summer vacation. They will leave Daytona Beach with broken bones and with walkers. Many of them forever (will) have their lives changed as a direct result of the failure of this roller coaster. Make no mistake: There is no question there was a fail-ure of this particular roller coaster. This event would not have happened had there not been a failure.ŽTo determine the accidents cause, the law firm has hired a father-son team of experts in amuse-ment park safety: Bill Avery Sr., an amusement ride and device safety consultant and president of Orlando-based Avery Safety Consulting; and his son Brian Avery, a Univer-sity of Florida professor and operational attractions safety expert.Both men said on Monday that they will be seeking past inspection records for the ride, information on the rides history including details on the frequency and types of safety tests that had been conducted on it.Its premature to come out with a final root cause,Ž said Bill Avery, adding that the rides proximity to the salt air and water on the beach should have been a factor in its maintenance. Corrosion is an ongoing factor for anyone who operates under those con-ditions. It gets back to what kind of maintenance has been done and has it been done frequently.ŽAvery also mentioned a specific piece of equipment that he wanted to examine, the rides safety restraints.The restraints are made to keep you in the ride when its operating correctly and when its not operating correctly,Ž Avery said.Other than Bostic, Morgan declined to reveal the identities of the law firms remaining clients, but did confirm that they are all Kentucky residents. The group, a party of 10, all worked for the same company, according to the ABC interview. The Associated Press reported the company is Alternative Outlook LLC, based out of Hindman, Kentucky, that provides services for the developmentally disabled.In all, 10 people either were ejected or had to be rescued and nine of them wound up hospitalized, according to spokeswomen with the Daytona Beach Fire Department and Hali-fax Health Medical Center.In other recent develop-ments, work crews used a crane, a hook, a cable and a blow torch on Saturday afternoon, less than 48 hours after the accident, to disconnect the three disabled coaster cars and lift them from the steel track onto a nearby flatbed trailer.Also over the weekend, a group of Florida Democrats on Sunday called for Floridas Department of Agriculture, which inspected the ride on Thursday, hours before the accident, to be held accountable, as well as the agencys head, Adam Putnam, who also is a can-didate for governor.This is unacceptable,Ž said Susanne Raines, presi-dent of the Democratic Club of Northern Volusia County. Its supposed to be the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services „ not corporate services, not NRA services. Adam Putnam needs to go back to Tallahassee and get his own house in order before he campaigns for another job.ŽDepartment of Agriculture spokeswoman Jennifer Meale forwarded a statement originally released on Friday, stating that the department has launched an investigation to determine the cause of the accident, and anyone who should be held accountable will be held accountable.ŽAt this point, Morgan said he doesnt foresee legal action against the Department of Agriculture, the agency responsible for inspecting amusement rides.Our primary targets will be the ride operator, the ride manufacturer and the owner of the ride itself,Ž Morgan said.The likelihood of litiga-tion would depend on the amount of insurance cov-erage on the ride, Morgan said, adding that the legal minimum for operating such rides was $1 million.Obviously, $1 mil-lion will not be enough to cover the magnitude of this loss,Ž Morgan said. These are really serious injuries; these are not minor situations that were dealing with.For them (victims), it was beyond terrifying. They saw their friends falling from the coaster like pinballs through the track. Its an experience that will haunt them forever. You dont get over that.Ž ACCIDENTFrom Page A3There are likely to be few surprises in the big contests, where at least two more major Democrats, Orlando businessman Chris King and Palm Beach billionaire Jeff Greene plan to file as candidates for governor.Republican Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam and U.S. Rep. Ron DeSantis, R-Palm Coast, are the leading Republican candidates. Putnam has raised nearly $31 mil-lion through May for his campaign account and his Florida Grown political committee, topping the field of candidates, according to the latest campaign finance reports.But on qualifyings opening day, the Repub-licans first to formally file were longshot contenders Don Baldauf, a 59-year-old Bradenton alarm contractor, and Bruce Nathan, a Palm City physical therapist.I think you can say Im pretty serious after I put down my very own check for about $8,000,Ž said Baldauf, who said he hopes to attract support from the GOPs Tea Party wing for his candidacy. Money is always a seri-ous issue in campaigns. Among Democrats, Levine has raised more than $16 million for his campaign and his All About Florida political committee … with $8.8 million coming from loans and contribu-tions hes made to his own campaign. Greene, who has a net worth of $3.8 billion, spent almost $23 mil-lion of his own money in 2010, losing the Democratic primary for U.S. Senate. Greene has said this time around, hes willing to spend plenty more … throwing out figures ranging from $50 million to $200 million.In Cabinet contests, former state senator Jeremy Ring, a Margate Democrat, was among the first to qualify for the states chief financial officer post, where Republican CFO Jimmy Patronis is expected to be on the ballot for the first time.Patronis was appointed last year by Gov. Rick Scott to replace two-term Republican CFO Jeff Atwater, who stepped down to take an admin-istrative job at Florida Atlantic University.Cabinet races for attorney general and agriculture commissioner feature no incumbents and are drawing a stampede of candidates, with most expected to qualify by weeks end. RACESFrom Page A3 to be handcuffed to the gurney. He was taken to an area hospital, where he was cleared by a doctor but then exposed himself.On the way to jail, "he began to turn upside down in the back seat of the vehicle, placing his neck on the seat and his feet on the roof," a report states. "After complaining of neck and back pain."He also said he was going to urinate in the back seat of the patrol car. At the jail, he made racial slurs and had to be put into a special restraint chairŽ and placed in a pri-vate holding cell until he could control himself.ŽHe was charged with aggravated fleeing with injury or damage, resist-ing arrest, DUI with property damage, and hit and run. Police bust area stores for selling alcohol to minorsPolice and Lake County sheriffs investigators last week issued 29 misde-meanor citations and made one arrest to store clerks for selling alcohol to minors.The probe, which took place on Wednesday and Thursday, involved 78 stores, with 30 breaking the law selling to underage cus-tomers. The one arrest, in the Clermont area, was for an individual charged with the same offense last year. Islam Niyazov, 50, was arrested last year, but the State Attorneys Office dropped the charge.The operation included the sheriff's Special Investigation's Unit and undercover officers from the Tavares, Clermont, Eustis and the Leesburg police departments. BRIEFSFrom Page A3Niyazov their doctors recommend it has set off a partisan firestorm, with Morgan „ a political rainmaker and registered Democrat who largely bankrolled the 2016 constitutional amendment „ stirring the political pot.Morgan told The News Service of Florida he had expected the appellate court to keep Gievers ruling on hold.Not surprised. Rick Scott could end the appeal today. It will cost him his Senate bid. The makers of opioids are cheering him on,Ž Morgan wrote in an email Monday.Morgan has repeatedly asked Scott to drop the appeal, warning that the governors opposition to smokable medical mari-juana will alienate moderate Republicans and independents in the governors quest to oust U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson in November.Nelson, a Democrat, recently came out in sup-port of doctor-ordered smokable marijuana for sick patients, as have each of the Democratic candi-dates seeking to replace Scott as governor.In her June 5 order lifting the stay, Gievers wrote that plaintiffs Cathy Jordan, a Lou Geh-rigs disease patient who credits smoking mari-juana with saving her life, and Diana Dodson, who has neuralgia associated with HIV, would suffer without having access to smokable marijuana.Individual patients Jordan and Dodson are exposed to irreparable harm on two fronts. First, they cannot legally access the treatment recommended for them. Second, they face poten-tial criminal prosecution for possession and use of the medicinal substance,Ž the judge wrote.On the other hand, there is no evidence the defendants (the state) will suffer harm if the stay is vacated,Ž the judge wrote.Lifting the stay preserves the status quo by returning the law to its previous state as it existed following the 2016 adoption of the constitutional medical marijuana rightsŽ and before the 2017 law went into effect, she added.But during a hearing before Gievers, Assistant Attorney General Karen Brodeen argued that there was no hurry for the stay to be lifted, in part because of a lengthy state rulemaking process. Smokable pot wont be available for a long time,Ž if the courts ultimately decide that it is legal, Bro-deen said. POTFrom Page A3

PAGE 5

DailyCommercial.com | Tuesday, June 19, 2018 A5and credit card theft. He sentenced Naffziger, 42, to the suspended 10-year sentence for the first-degree felony and five for the third-degree felony credit card charge.Briggs acknowledged that her testimony in April was helpful to the state, but he said she has been a disappointmentŽ since he let her out of jail on bond. One of those conditions was that she was to live in a stable, safe place. That didnt pan out, he said. I assume it was because of your behavior.ŽMariotti was sentenced to life in prison for murder. He narrowly escaped the death sentence when one of the 12 jurors recommended life.He said he had almost no certainty that anything other than incarcerationŽ would solve anything, but added, Im constantly surprised.ŽNaffzigers lawyer, Julian Kemp, said she was willing to pay back the $4,171 from Montgomerys stolen credit card. She was also willing to get mental health counseling.Kemp said she is already getting counseling and testifiedMondaythat Naffziger gets prescrip-tion drugs for a variety of illnesses, including post-traumatic stress disorder and anxiety.Briggs ordered her to immediately report to probation officials with a list of prescriptions andNaffzigers medical records.Kemp said Naffziger didnt know that Mariotti had strangled Montgom-ery in her Palmora Park home in Leesburg. She had been lured into an unholy alliance when Mariotti called her and said, We can make some money.ŽShe testified at Mariottis trial that he first took her to Montgomerys house in Palmora Park on June 18, 2016. He left her there for about an hour to go out and buy drugs, using Montgom-erys car. She sat in a chair and noticed someone she thought was sleeping on a couch with a cover over her face.Naffziger testified that four days later, Mariotti brought her back to Montgomerys house, which had a ter-rible smell.Ž She said he ordered her to help move Montgomerys body.She refused, Kemp said, but he said, Youll help or youll be right next to her.ŽKemp also reminded the judge that she took Leesburg detectives to the Ocala National Forest in an attempt to recover Montgomerys body.I guess you did your best,Ž Briggs saidMonday, but noted that Montgomerys body was never found.Naffziger wept and told the judge, Im sorry.ŽOutside the courtroom when the sentencing was completed, Marcie and other family members talked to Assistant State Attorney Rich Buxman and expressed their disappointment.She was diagnosed as bipolar when she was 11. She would run away. She lived in the woods, she was smoking weed and hanging out with the wrongcrowd,Ž Marcie said.She blamed her family,Ž and she never took responsibility, she noted.I dont think youve ever had that inner meet-ing with yourself that says Im going to go down a different path. Youve been on this path for a long time,Ž Briggs told Naffziger, referring to the people she hangs out with and the drugs she takes. You have to decide.ŽShe can b„„„-t any-body,Ž Marcie said. Shes probably high right now.Ž SENTENCEFrom Page A1 alongside Wray and repeated the reports central conclusions that the Clinton inves-tigation was plagued by leadership missteps but not tainted by political bias.The report blasted FBI actions during the 2016 investigation into whether Clinton, the Democratic presidential candidate, had mishandled classified information on her private email server when she was secretary of state.It said anti-Donald Trump text messages exchanged by FBI employees who worked on the investigation cast a cloud on the agencys handling of the probe and damaged its reputation. It also said that fired FBI Director James Comey repeatedly broke from protocol, including when he publicly announced his recommendation against charging Clin-ton and when he bucked the judgment of Justice Department bosses by alerting Congress months later that the investigation was being reopened because of newly discovered emails.Republicans, increas-ingly skeptical of special counsel Robert Muellers investigation into potential coordination between Russia and Trumps Republican presidential campaign, said Monday they werent convinced by the reports conclusion that the decision to spare Clinton from criminal charges was free from bias, or by reassurances that the problems were limited to just a handful of employees. Trump him-self had eagerly awaited the inspector generals report in hopes that criticism of Comey and the FBI could discredit Muellers investigation.There is a serious problem with the culture at FBI headquarters,Ž said Utah Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch.The Republican com-mittee chairman, Sen. Chuck Grassley of Iowa, drew a contrast between what he said were aggressive actions taken during Muellers investigation and the kid-glove treatmentŽ that Grassley maintained had occurred during the Clinton investigation.The Justice Department faces a serious credibility problem because millions of Americans suspect that there is a double standard,Ž Grassley said. They see a story of kid-glove treatment for one side and bare-knuckle tactics for the other. They see politics in that story.Ž FBIFrom Page A1 the practice of separating immigrant parents and children along the nations southern border is cruelŽ and ?immoralŽ and breaks my heart.Ž Bush likened the policy to the internment of Jap-anese-Americans during World War II.Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker cited the administrations cruel and inhumanŽ policy separating children from their parents in reversing a decision to send a National Guard helicopter from his state to the Mexican border. Migrant advocates announced they would rally outside the federal courthouse in Phoenix on Monday afternoon to pro-test the policy.President Donald Trump emphatically defended his adminis-trations policy Monday, again falsely blaming Democrats.The United States will not be a migrant camp and it will not be a refugee hold-ing facility,Ž he declared. Not on my watch.Ž In San Diego, Rep. Juan Vargas and the Congres-sional Hispanic Caucus were leading members of Congress on a visit Monday to several immigration detention facilities. Vargas, Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi and other U.S. lawmakers hoped to meet with men, women and children detained at the international boundary.Inside the South Texas warehouse, hundreds of immigration children waited inside chain-link enclosures. Scattered about were bottles of water, bags of chips and blankets that looked like large sheets of metal foil.It was the same facil-ity the U.S. Border Patrol allowed reporters to briefly visit on Sunday. Agents did not allow reporters to interview detainees or take photos.More than 1,100 people were inside the large, dark facility, which is divided into separate wings for unaccompanied children, adults on their own, and mothers and fathers with children. The cages in each wing open out into common areas so that detainees can use portable restrooms. The overhead lighting in the warehouse stays on around the clock.At the federal courthouse in McAllen on Monday, some among the estimated 80 immigrants preparing to plead guilty on immigration charges asked the judge questions such as, Whats going to happen to my daughter?Ž and What will happen to my son?ŽAttorneys at the hearings said the immigrants had brought several dozen boys and girls with them to the U.S., and the judge replied that he didnt know what would happen to their children. BORDERFrom Page A1and May after Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the new zero-toleranceŽ policy that refers all cases of illegal entry for criminal prosecution. Prior procedure had limited prosecution for many family entrants, in part because regulations pro-hibit detaining children with their parents since the children are not charged with a crime and the parents are.The policy change was meant to deter unlawful crossings „ and Sessions issued a warning last month to those entering the U.S. ille-gally that their children inevitably for a period of time might be in dif-ferent conditions.ŽThe current holding areas have drawn wide-spread attention after journalists gained access to one site Sunday. At a McAllen, Texas, deten-tion center hundreds of immigrant children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets.Administration offi-cials said they do not like the family separations either „ calling it the result of legal loopholes „ but insist migrants who arrive illegally simply wont be released or loosely kept track of.The United States will not be a migrant camp and it will not be a refugee holding facility,Ž Trump declared. Not on my watch.ŽSessions, on Monday, echoed the administra-tions defense of the zero tolerance policy, and called on Congress to act.We do not want to separate parents from their children,Ž he said. If we build the wall, if we pass legislation to end the lawlessness, we wont face these terrible choices.ŽMindful of the national outcry, lawmakers in both parties rushed Monday to devise a targeted legislative fix.GOP senators, includ-ing Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, Jeff Flake of Arizona and Susan Collins of Maine, said they were consider-ing legislation that would keep migrant families together; provide addi-tional judges so detained families would face shorter waiting periods; and provide facilities for the families to stay.Graham said he talked Mondayto about 40 senators, including Democrats, but not Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. Its a concept it seems everybody is jumping on board,Ž he said. TRUMPFrom Page A1

PAGE 6

A6 Tuesday, June 19, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com

PAGE 7

DailyCommercial.com | Tuesday, June 19, 2018 A7 BUSINESS 2,560 2,640 2,720 2,800 2,880 DJ JFMAM 2,720 2,760 2,800 S&P 500Close: 2,773.75 Change: -5.91 (-0.2%) 10 DAYS 23,200 24,000 24,800 25,600 26,400 27,200 DJ JFMAM 24,680 25,060 25,440 Dow Jones industrialsClose: 24,987.47 Change: -103.01 (-0.4%) 10 DAYSAdvanced 1607 Declined 1240 New Highs 103 New Lows 74 Vol. (in mil.) 3,265 Pvs. Volume 5,396 2,035 2,967 1454 1360 188 43 NYSE NASDDOW 25003.10 24825.77 24987.47 -103.01 -0.41% +1.09% DOW Trans. 11093.18 10953.64 11049.85 -24.14 -0.22% +4.12% DOW Util. 682.55 677.01 680.56 +2.25 +0.33% -5.92% NYSE Comp. 12711.68 12639.25 12708.63 -26.01 -0.20% -0.78% NASDAQ 7749.36 7676.83 7747.02 +0.65 +0.01% +12.22% S&P 500 2774.99 2757.12 2773.75 -5.91 -0.21% +3.75% S&P 400 1997.90 1981.95 1995.18 +2.81 +0.14% +4.98% Wilshire 5000 29029.31 28817.67 29021.33 -14.76 -0.05% +4.42% Russell 2000 1692.46 1674.41 1692.46 +8.55 +0.51% +10.22% HIGH LOW CLOSE CHG. %CHG. YTD Stocks Recap AT&T Inc T 31.17 39.80 32.19 -.96 -2.9 t t t -17.2 -9.6 12 2.00f Advance Auto Parts AAP 78.81 137.33 138.24 +1.08 +0.8 s s s +38.7 +4.8 25 0.24 Amer Express AXP 81.29 103.24 98.47 -.05 -0.1 t t s -0.8 +23.8 15 1.40 AutoNation Inc AN 38.59 62.02 49.51 +.09 +0.2 s s s -3.5 +15.6 13 ... Brown & Brown BRO 21.15 28.64 28.42 +.16 +0.6 s s s ... +28.9 28 0.30 CocaCola Co KO 41.45 48.62 43.55 -.57 -1.3 t s s -5.1 +0.9 74 1.56 Comcast Corp A CMCSA 30.43 44.00 32.58 -1.30 -3.8 t s t -18.3 -16.6 16 0.76 Darden Rest DRI 76.27 100.11 94.32 +.22 +0.2 s s s -1.8 +7.6 20 2.52 Disney DIS 96.20 113.18 107.06 -1.79 -1.6 t s s -0.4 +4.2 15 1.68f Gen Electric GE 12.73 29.00 13.20 -.10 -0.8 t t t -24.5 -52.0 dd 0.48 General Mills GIS 41.01 60.69 44.73 -.70 -1.5 t s t -24.6 -19.5 12 1.96 Harris Corp HRS 108.29 170.54 149.27 +.04 ... r t t +5.4 +38.4 26 2.28 Home Depot HD 144.25 207.61 200.69 +.15 +0.1 s s s +5.9 +30.4 26 4.12 IBM IBM 139.13 171.13 144.48 -.91 -0.6 t t t -5.8 -1.8 10 6.28f Lowes Cos LOW 70.76 108.98 98.59 -.59 -0.6 t s s +6.1 +25.4 22 1.92f NY Times NYT 16.95 25.70 24.95 -.40 -1.6 t s s +34.9 +44.5 cc 0.16 NextEra Energy NEE 138.00 166.62 160.41 +.87 +0.5 s s t +2.7 +15.4 12 4.44f PepsiCo PEP 95.94 122.51 105.38 -2.23 -2.1 t s t -12.1 -5.3 21 3.71f Suntrust Bks STI 51.96 73.37 68.68 -.13 -0.2 t t s +6.3 +25.7 14 1.60 WalMart Strs WMT 73.13 109.98 83.00 -.70 -0.8 t t t -15.9 +8.7 20 2.08f Xerox Corp XRX 27.11 37.42 27.24 -.17 -0.6 t t t -6.6 +1.6 34 1.00 52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIVStocks of Local Interest By Tom KrisherThe Associated PressDETROIT „ Every workday, about 7,400 trucks mostly loaded with automotive parts rumble across the Ambassador Bridge connecting Detroit and Canada, at times snarling traffic along the busy corridor.But if President Donald Trump delivers on threats to slap 25 percent tariffs on imported vehicles and components, there will be far fewer big rigs heading to factories that are now humming close to capac-ity on both sides of the border.The tariff threat could be a negotiating ploy to restart stalled talks on the North American Free Trade Agreement. But it also could be real, since the administration already has imposed duties on $50 billion worth of Chinese imports, as well as steel and aluminum from China, the European Union, Canada and Mexico.Tariffs against China include some autos and parts but if those spread to Canada and Mexico, the impact will be far larger because auto manufac-turing has been integrated between the three countries for nearly a quarter Experts say auto tari s would raise prices, cost jobsMARKET WATCHDow 24,987.47 103.01 Nasdaq 7,747.03 0.65 S&P 2,773.75 5.91 Russell 1,692.46 8.55 NYSE 12,708.63 26.01 COMMODITIES REVIEWGold 1,276.20 1.60 Silver 16.412 .040 Platinum 883.90 3.90 Copper 3.1035 .0375 Oil 65.85 0.79MARKET MOVERS€ Rent-A-Center Inc.: Up $2.65 to $14.68 „ The chain, which leases household goods on a rentto-own basis, accepted an offer of $15 a share from Vintage Capital Management. € JD.com Inc.: Up 17 cents to $43.76 „ Google said it will invest $550 million in the Chinese e-commerce company. century.The Commerce Depart-ment said in a statement last week that it has just launched its investigation into whether imports of auto and auto parts threaten to impair the national secu-rity. That investigation, which has only just begun, will inform recommendations to the president for action or inaction.ŽIf the wider auto tariffs are imposed, industry experts say they will disrupt a decades-old symbiotic parts supply chain, raise vehicle prices, cut newvehicle sales, cost jobs in the U.S., Canada and Mexico, and even slow related sectors of the economy.It seems like it is going to be so devastating that I cant imagine that theyre actually going to do it,Ž said Kristen Dziczek, vice president of labor and economics at the Center for Automotive Research, an industry think tank.Trump, who was sniping on Twitter at Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau after a contentious economic summit of the Group of Seven earlier this month, told the Commerce Department to look at national security reasons to justify tariffs with hopes of bringing factory jobs to the U.S.He tweeted that the administration would look at tariffs on automobiles flooding the U.S. Market!ŽBut experts predict the tariffs likely would do the opposite, slowing the economy as other countries retaliate. Heres what they say is likely to happen: Auto prices rise, sales fallThe tariffs would be charged on parts and assembled autos. Canada, Mexico and others would likely retaliate with duties, and automakers wont be able to absorb all of the increases. So they will have to raise prices. Imported parts, which all cars and trucks have, will cost more, further raising costs.Trucks cross the Ambassador Bridge on June 12 from Windsor, Ontario, into Detroit. In nearly a quartercentury since NAFTA was app roved, a complex chain of automotive parts makers has sprung up on both sides of the U.S.-Canada border. [PAUL SANCYA/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

PAGE 8

A8 Tuesday, June 19, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com TODAYSWORKOUT Forwardfoldhelpsincreaseexibility ByBlakeFarmerKaiserHealthNews/NashvillePublicRadio H ospitalsaroundthecountryhavebeenupgrading theirneonatalintensive careunitstoincludepersonalwebcamsforeachtiny patient.Itsaconvenienceforparents„andreducesworriesabout visitorsbringingingerms. Theneonatalintensivecareunit atSt.ThomasMidtowninNashville,Tennesee,isthelatesthospital tojointhewebcamwave,among facilitiesaroundthecountryfrom bigcitiestotownsthatareinstallingcamerasovereachinfant. AtSt.Thomas,SherriAnderson has20yearsofexperienceasaneonatalnurse,watchingparentsrun themselvesraggedtryingtobeatthe hospitaleverywakinghour,sometimescommutinglongdistances. Theparentsgothroughalot „emotionally,spiritually,physically,ŽAndersonsaid.Itsvery taxing,andsometimestheyjust needtogohomeandjustrecover.Ž The$1,200cameras„whichSt. Thomaspaidforthroughaspecial fundraiser„comefromacompanycalledNatusMedical. Theyprovideaclose-upshot thatanyoneintheworldcanlog ontosee„usingapassword. JillBrothershadtwinboysborn at27weeks,requiringatwo-month stayintheNICU.Herhusband,who playsprofessionalbaseball,was awayforspringtrainingmostofthat time,buthecouldgetonthecomputerandwatchtheboysprogress. Thishasbeenacrucialelement tojustbeingapartandfeelinglike youreinvolvedwiththeirgrowth,Ž shesaid.Thereslotsofotherpeople inthefamilythathavebeenableto logonandseetheboysandseethem [in]realtime,whichisgreat.Ž Brothersstillcametothehospitaleveryday,butshefoundherself checkingthewebstreamwhenshe wasupinthemiddleofthenight „towatchtheboysbreathing. Ireallyjustfeltlikeitwassafe andcomfortable,Žshesaid. Parentspeaceofmindisonly oneaim,though.St.ThomasNICU nursingdirectorDonnaDarnellsaid thenewcamerascouldcutdown ongermssneakingintotheunit fromotherrelativesstoppingby. Therearetimesthroughouttheyearthatweworryabout alotofvisitors.Fluseasonisthe bestexample,ŽDarnellsaid. Evenduringnormaltimes,accessfor familyandfriendsishighlyrestricted becauseofgerms„andthecameras givemanymorepeopletheopportunitytoseethetinypatients. Inthelittleresearchthathasbeen done,parentshavelovedthevideo access.DoctorsalsoareOKwithit, butastudypublishedintheAmerican JournalofPerinatologyfoundthat somenurseshavemisgivingsabout beingwatchedalldayandallnight. Oneofthestudysauthors,Dr. GeneDempseyfromtheUniversityCollegeCorkinIreland,helped conductthesurveyandsaidnurses worrytheywillgetevenmoreafterhourscalls,wantinganexplanationforwhatsonscreen.But,he said,thatdoesntseemtohappen. Infactsomeoftheworkers[in hospitalswiththesecameras]suggestedthattheinteractionatparent level„intermsofphonecallsinthe eveningandatnighttime„areless whenthesystemisinplace,Žhesaid. Dempseysownhospitalislaunchingawebcamsysteminthenext fewweeks,andhehasmadea pointofgettingnursesonboard. Whatwereprobablygoing todo,andwevehadmuchdiscussionwiththenursingstaff initially,isthatthiswouldbea phased-inprocess,Žhesaid. AtSt.Thomas,thenursingdirectordecidedtoturnoffthelivestreams wheneveranurseisworkingwitha child„acompromisethatseemsto haveeveryonesmilingforthecamera. Thisstoryispartofapartnership thatincludesNashvillePublicRadio, NPRandKaiserHealthNews. Camerasonpreemiesletfamilyin,keepgermsout ByMarloAllevaMoreContentNow F itnessisanecessity foralllevelsofability. Nomattertheamount ofweightlifted,themiles logged,orcaloriesburned, movementiskey.Andthe bodywillthankyouforit. Alongwithfitnesscomes stretching.Itsamust.And onthosedayswhenfitnesscantbefitin,your bodyneedsabitofstretching.Nothingmajor,or time-consuming,itcan beassimpleasreaching fortheskyandholdingita littlelongerthannormal. Ourmovetodayisa forwardfold.Thisfolding stretchwillloosenyour back,arms,glutesand hamstrings.Andbestof all,everyonecandoit. Beginthisstretchby standingtall,feetflat onthefloor,abouthip widthapart.Holding yourchesttallandcore strong,takeadeepbreath andbendatthehips. Keepthisforwardmotion somewhatslow,takingyourtimetoarticulateinyourspine. Reachingwiththehands towardthefloorinfront ofyourtoes,youwill begintofeelthetargeted musclesbeginningtopull slightly(inagoodway). Dependingonyour levelofflexibility,startby reachingfortheknees,if thatsgood,gotowardthe shins,andifthatsgood, reachallthewaytothefeet. Onceyougettoyour deepestpoint,tryholdingitforabout10-15 seconds.Takeanotherdeep breath,andtrytoextendit slightlymore.Repeatthis afewtimes,thenreturn toastandingposition. Takeasmallbreak,lettingthebloodflowfrom yourforehead,thenrepeat theforwardfoldagain. Remembertonotholdyour breathwhileholdingthis move,asyouwillfeellightheaded.Youcanalways startsmallandmoveintoa completefoldingmotion. Thisstretchisgreaton itsownandevenbetter afterafull-bodyworkout. MarloAlleva,aninstructoratGoldsGymand groupfitnesscoordinator atFontaine-GillsYMCA inFlorida,canbereached atfaluvzpa@msn.com.MarloAllevademonstratesa forwardfoldstretch.[SCOTT WHEELER/THELEDGER] Virtualvisitinghours Howdoesitwork?Thewebcameradeliversasecure imagestreamforparentsandother relativestoviewtheirbabyremotely. Familymemberscansecurelyaccess NicViewfromanywherethereisan internetconnectionviaalaptop, smartphoneortablet. Livestreamingisonlyaccessibleto speci“edusers.Norecordingsare made,andnoimagesarestored. Thehospitalstaffdeterminecamera positioning,programsviewing timesandissuesusernamesand passwords.„NatusMedical,makersof NicViewwebcamerasystem WhileDukeBrothersstayedintheNICU atSt.ThomasMidtowninNashville, Tennessee,hisparentscouldwatch overhimviaawebcamattachedtothe topofhisisolette.[BLAKEFARMER/WPLN] TIP OF THE WEEKACHIEVE A HEALTHY BRAINDr. Georgia Ede o ers the following tips for a brain-healthy diet in Psychology Today. € Eat only real, whole, preagriculturalŽ foods like seafood, red meat, poultry, eggs, vegetables, fruits and nuts. € Drink water or unsweetened, naturally avored water/seltzer when youre thirsty. € Avoid re ned carbohydrates. € Minimize alcohol, and be careful with ca eine, especially if you have anxiety or insomnia. ALLERGIESMANAGE CONDITION AT COLLEGEIf you or someone in your family has allergies or asthma and is going away to college in the fall, here are tips to prepare for the transition. € See your current allergist and discuss plans for the fall. € Talk to food handlers and ask about ingredients at every meal. € Anyone at risk for anaphylaxis needs to always keep two doses of epinephrine on hand. AGINGSALT AND SENIORSA recent study published in the American Journal of Hypertension identi ed signi cant risks to cardiovascular health and longevity from consuming less than one or more than three teaspoons of salt per day. Low-salt diets can also cause seniors to su er from mild hyponatremia, an electrolyte imbalance in the blood. „ Brandpoint HEALTH

PAGE 9

DailyCommercial.com | Tuesday, June 19, 2018 A9HAVE YOUR SAYWe welcome signed letters and guest columns. Letters should not exceed 300 words and columns should not exceed 500 words. Colum ns need to include a recent headshot of the writer. We edit for length, clarity, and grammar. Mail: Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 Email: letters@dailycommercial.com Fax: 352-365-1951 ANOTHER OPINION OPINIONSteve Skaggs | Publisher Tom McNiff | Executive Editor Whitney Lehnecker | Digital Editor, Lifestyles Editor Tom McNiff, editor 352-365-8250 tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comIf a family enters the United States from Mexico without permission, immigration officials should not separate minor children from their parents. To do so „ to detain adults in one facility and send kids to a shelter, maybe in a different state „ is cruel and unnecessary. Yet its happening. Enough alarm bells have gone off in Washington that the House appears willing to take up legislation in the coming days to end this monstrous abuse of authority. House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., said Thursday: We dont want kids to be separated from their parents.Ž Will that edict be enough to drive a solution? One might think so, except that immigration bills and Congress have proved a frustratingly inert combination for years. If lawmakers had summoned the courage last year or 10 years ago to fix the broken immigration system, these messes would be avoided. Remember that the so-called Dreamers „ the young foreigners who grew up in the U.S. after being brought here without permission „ are still living in limbo. The current issue with separating children stems from Attorney General Jeff Sessions insistence on a zero-tolerance policy of prosecuting people for violating immigration laws. Locking up parents raises the question of what to do with the children. In nearly 2,000 instances, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement has separated them. The reasoning is linked to a 1997 court case that requires children to be sheltered in the least restrictive immigration facility possible. In other words, kids cant be detained with their parents. But we just get lost in that logic. More likely, the threat of grabbing children is a scare tactic by the Trump administration to dissuade parents from crossing the border or seeking asylum. Until Sessions changed the rules, immigration authorities typically kept families together by releasing them with orders to appear in court. Court case or not, separating children from parents is heartless. Ryan and a group of House Republicans are working on a bill that would resolve both the treatment of migrant children and the Dreamers. So far, Democrats are staying away. Ryans bill would provide $25 billion for border security, including money to build the wall that President Donald Trump obsesses about. It would end child separations and give the Dreamers a path to stay in the country legally. It would tighten legal immigration by ending the diversity lottery and family member programs. Hard-liners have their own version. Getting a bill through the House and onto the Senate and the presidents desk should be doable. Theres a governing principle at stake that says all people, especially children, should be treated with fairness and compassion. Both the Dreamers and the separated children were brought to the U.S. by adults. The children should not be unduly punished for the decisions of their parents. An overwhelming percentage of Americans want to give lawabiding Dreamers a chance to stay in the U.S. Were certain most Americans also are appalled by the government dividing families. Congress has failed on immigration reform so many times. It would be a great relief „ as well as just and humane „ if lawmakers seized on this moment to pass this legislation. It will be tragic if Congress fails again. From Tribune News Service.ANOTHER OPINIONDont separate immigrant kids from parentsEver since the first college campus was created, its program of studies, modes of instruction and standards have, one way or the other, been controlled by the college and its faculty. Campuses were, relatively speaking, intellectually pristine, information-rich enclaves, separated from the rest of the information-poor world. Fast forward to the beginning of the community college movement and the passage of the GI Bill in late-1940s America. Suddenly, colleges were not only for the elite, but they had overtly economic „ as well as intellectual „ purposes. Over the last 70 years, there have been multiple changes in post-secondary education and the employment landscape. The basic model, however, that a degree or certificate from a college signals that the individual is intellectually prepared and ready to work, has remained dominant. Today, there is a revolution underway, and the credibility of even those core signaling devices is under assault from forces inside and outside the academy. At the heart of this revolution lie two realities, one very old and the other brand new. First, the old: As long as there has been folklore in America, we have known that life herself is a magnificent teacher. Think of phrases such as live and learnŽ, the school of hard knocks and older, but wiser.Ž Maryland proposal for free community college follows national trend. But results arent clear. Even when Canadian researcher Allen Tough proved that the average adult spends about 12 hours a week learning purposefully in their daily life, most colleges and employers, as well as adult learners, continued to ignore the value of that learning. This learning discriminationŽ placed a determinative value on where and when you learned something, not how well you knew a topic and could apply the knowledge. So, colleges won,Ž and personal learning lost.Ž As a result, this personalŽ „ or experiential „ learning, despite it constituting well more than half of the learning we do in a lifetime, has been largely ignored by colleges and employers. The new reality is the technological capacity that is changing the face of the world, including the world of higher education and employment. Now, the entire curriculum of MIT, among other colleges, is available online, for free. Job requirements can be searched and dissected, matching the knowledge, behavior, skills and abilities needed for a specific career path with those held by an individual or taught by a college. And adult-friendlyŽ colleges are aligning learners personal and experiential learning with their degree requirements, thus awarding advanced standing for that learning. Furthermore, they are aligning their degree requirements with work requirements, including behaviors and cross-cutting intellectual skills such as critical thinking and teamwork. These two realities „ the power of personal learning and the technological development to harness its value „ are redefining the pathway to the degree. In other cases, it is eliminating the need for the degree and blowing through the parchment ceilingŽ that has stymied and frustrated so many adults. Using evidence-based assessments, learners knowledge can be described and applied directly to job and other real-life requirements. And knowledge gained on the-job, in the community or in other venues, such as the armed services, can be applied for academic and economic value, deepening the learners personal understanding of their learning as well as the value of that learning academically and economically. Imagine a world in which you can do all of the following from your living room: Calculate your current profile of knowledge, skills, behaviors and abilities; Describe the goal(s) you have for your personal or professional growth; Determine the gap between what you presently knowŽ and what knowledge you need to gain to meet your goal; And chart your learning path forward to meet that goal, either with a college, an informal learning group, an employer, or on your own. These are the benefits of free-range learning in a digital world and driven by the new rules and the new eco-system that is evolving to support you and your learning throughout life. And, more broadly, by bridging this divide for all who qualify, it can only improve the social, civic and economic future of our country. Peter Smith, Ph.D., is the Orkand Endowed Chair and Professor of Innovative Practices in Higher Education at University of Maryland University College.ANOTHER OPINIONRecognizing the value of experience Gun dealers who break the law by turning a blind eye to federal licensing rules are as dangerous to society as people who have no right to a possess a firearm in the first place. Yet a recent report shows that the federal agency responsible for policing the legal gun trade routinely goes soft on dealers who violate the law. This is not the only gap in the system, but also a breach that undermines the foundation of the nations gun safety protections. The New York Times recently reported that even as federal investigators inspecting the nations gun stores regularly find violations of the law, higher-ups at the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives routinely overrule them. They allow gun dealers who fail inspections to keep their licenses even after they were previously warned on the rules, according to records and interviews with current and former law enforcement officials. Of about 11,000 inspections of federally licensed firearms dealers in 2016-17, more than half were cited for violations, the Times reported „ yet less than 1 percent of all inspections resulted in the loss of a license. Many violations, as the newspaper noted, were minor: stores made clerical and bookkeeping errors or failed to manage their records appropriately. But there were also many examples of serious violations. One store was cited for not conducting a criminal background check before selling a gun. Another acknowledged that it actively tried to circumvent the gun laws. One seller threatened an ATF officer; another sold a gun to a customer who identified himself as a felon. Felons cannot legally possess a gun. All were previously cited by the ATF, and in each case, supervisors overrode the staff recommendations that the stores licenses be revoked. Allowing even one gun into the wrong hands could result in a tragedy. Were not selling ice cream here,Ž one retired ATF inspector said. If you screw up, somebody can be killed.Ž The light punishment reflects another dimension of the gun lobbys clout in Congress. For gun dealers to lose their license, the ATF must prove not only that gun dealers broke the law but that they intended to do so. One former inspector said the hurdle was so high that it prompted the agency to bend over backwardsŽ to bring dealers into compliance rather than to risk losing a case in court. The Times review found that even after stores had been warned they continued to violate the law „ and the agency allowed them to continue operating. This is a ridiculous operating practice for regulating one of the most dangerous possessions in society. It rewards the worst operators in the industry and reduces federal law enforcement to a paper tiger. The recent mass shootings have highlighted how no one gun safety measure works in isolation. But even the ideal safety net is meaningless if authorities lack the power and intention to enforce the spirit of the law. Gun dealers who dont follow the law should not be allowed to profit from noncompliance. Congress needs to give the ATF more direct authority and the resources it needs to ensure that dealers are acting responsibly. It also needs to demand a greater sense of accountability at the agency. Inspectors shouldnt have to keep pleading with gun dealers to behave as the law intends. Tampa Bay Times ANOTHER OPINIONATF should get tougher on gun dealers who violate the law

PAGE 10

A10 Tuesday, June 19, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com

PAGE 11

DailyCommercial.com | Tuesday, June 19, 2018 B1 SPORTSPaul Jenkins, Sports editor 352-365-8204 paul.jenkins@dailycommercial.comBy Kevin BrockwayGateHouse MediaGetting to Omaha wasnt easy for the 2018 Florida base-ball team.Staying there will be even harder.Defending national champion Florida put itself in a bind following its 6-3 loss to Texas Tech late Sunday night in its College World Series opener. The Gators (47-20) will resume play on Tuesday afternoon against Texas (42-22) needing four straight wins to return to the CWS cham-pionship series for the second straight year.Florida has gone 5-0 in NCAA Tournament elimination games since the beginning of the 2017 season, but will have no margin for error the rest of the week. The last team to lose its opening College World Series game and win a national title was South Carolina in 2010.Junior righty Jackson Kowar (9-5, 3.24 ERA) will start for the Gators against the Longhorns, who lost 11-5 to Arkansas earlier Sunday afternoon.We're going to have to have Jackson pitch really good on Tuesday,Ž Florida coach Kevin OSullivan said following the loss Sunday night. We'll have to take it one day at a time. And ultimately we'll have to have some guys step up because we've got to win some more games here. But it's certainly doable.ŽHow much more OSullivan will shuffle the lineup remains to be seen. Senior captain JJ Schwarz, in his first game back in close to a month after breaking his hand, was shaky at first base during the Texas Tech loss. Schwarz misplayed a grounder that wound up being a two-RBI single by Gators facing elimination at CWSFlorida coach Kevin OSullivan covers his mouth as he talks to pitcher Brady Singer (51) and catcher Jonah Girand, in the “ fth inning Sunday of the College World Series game against Texas Tech in Omaha, Neb. [NATI HARNIK/ASSOCIATED PRESS] By Joe ReedyAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE „ Mike Martin will take one more shot at getting Florida State a national championship in baseball.The university announced on Monday that 2019 will be Martin's 40th and final season as the Seminoles' coach. The 74-year old Martin, who became college baseball's career wins leader in May, has a 1,987-713-4 record and .736 win percentage.Martin was honored by Florida Gov. Rick Scott last Wednesday and said follow-ing the ceremony that he was hoping to finalize the rest of his career when he met with athletics director Stan Wilcox. Wilcox said in a statement he has talked with Martin several times over the past couple of years about his plans.Wilcox added that the school will wait until the conclusion of next season to conduct a search and name Martin's successor. Martin, who played at Florida State, was an assistant for five sea-sons before taking over the program in October of 1979 when Dick Howser was hired to manage the New York Yankees.Florida State has reached the NCAA Tournament and won at least 40 games for 41 straight seasons, which are Florida States Mike Martin to retire after 2019 seasonMike Martin, who has led the Seminoles since 1980, became college baseballs wins leader in May. He has a 1,987-713-4 record and .736 win percentage. Florida State announced on Monday that 2019 will be Martins 40th and “ nal season as the Seminoles coach. [AP FILE] By Frank Jolley frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comWILDWOOD „ Ron Dixon overcame the odds.A former standout at Wild-wood, Dixon never let the fact he grew up off footballs beaten path stop him from from playing on the sports biggest stage.Dixon played for the New York Giants in Super Bowl XXXV against the Baltimore Ravens. In that game, played at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, he accounted for the Giants only touchdown with a 97 yard kickoff return „ the 10th kickoff return for a touchdown and the fourth longest in Super Bowl history.And Dixon „ the first student-athlete from Lake and Sumter counties to play in the Super Bowl „ wants area youngsters to have the same opportunities he had by host-ing his first area youth football camp.Dixons NFL Pros Youth Football Camp will be held from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. on June 30 on the football field at Wildwood Middle High School. The camp will feature Dixon along with up to 15 former professional football players, including Brandon Meriweather, Clint Hart, former Tampa Bay Buccaneer Lee Paige, Kevin Lewis, Barry Wagner and Mike Hollis.I remember what Wildwood football used to be like in the 1980s,Ž said Dixon. There was so much excitement on Friday nights whenever the Wildcats played and I wanted to try and bring some of that back to the community. Wildwood had a great season last year that got things buzzing again and I felt it was a good time to put on a camp and get kids excited about football again.Its been a long time since Making dreams a realityFormer Wildwood football standout Ron Dixon poses with a golden football sent to the school in his honor. The ball was sent to Wildwood by the National Football League in commemoration of Dixons participation in Super Bowl XXXV. [COURTESY RON DIXON] Former Wildwood standout, pro football player starting summer camp See MARTIN, B3 See GATORS, B3 See DREAMS, B3Koepka could use more winsBy Doug FergusonThe Associated PressSOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. „ Brooks Koepka now has as many majors as Greg Norman and as many PGA Tour victories as Pat Perez.Koepka belongs in the conversation of elite players in his generation by winning his second U.S. Open at Shinnecock Hills, a test that asked an entirely different set of questions than the U.S. Open he won last year at Erin Hills.Rory McIlroy and Jordan Spieth are the only players in their 20s to have won multiple majors, at least for now.And while the 28-year-old Koepka is only in his fourth full year on the PGA Tour, to see his supreme performance at Shinnecock Hills makes it hard to believe he has only one other PGA Tour title. That was three years ago at the Phoenix Open.Thats likely to change. It might have to for Koepka to get the recog-nition he deserves, even if thats not what drives him.His record should get anyones attention.Koepka has finished among the top 15 in nine of his past 10 majors starting with the 2015 British Open at St. Andrews. The exception was the Masters two years ago, when he tied for 21st. He missed a month with an ankle injury and returned with a tie for fourth at the 2016 PGA Championship to secure a spot on his first Ryder Cup team. And then he went 3-1 in his Ryder Cup debut at Hazeltine.He really is a major player.So what about all the other tournaments hes played?Koepka touched on that last summer at the Bridgestone Invitational when he said the majors are where I feel like Im going to shine.ŽUnfortunately, I havent done it as much in regular tour events or throughout my career,Ž Koepka said. Its just being a little bit more focused, maybe taking it more serious, knowing that every shot ... to me, it feels like life or death. If you screw up, youre gone. I just love getting See KOEPKA, B3

PAGE 12

B2 Tuesday, June 19, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com SCOREBOARD HOW TO REACH USPaul Jenkins, Sports Editor Email: paul.jenkins@dailycommercial.com Phone: 352-365-8204SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results by calling 352-365-8204. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. Results submitted after 9:30 p.m. may not appear in the next days edition of the Daily Commercial.SPORTS ON TVCOLLEGE BASEBALL 2 p.m. ESPN „ NCAA College World Series, Game 7, Florida vs. Texas, at Omaha, Neb. 7 p.m. ESPN „ NCAA College World Series, Game 8, Texas Tech vs. Arkansas, at Omaha, Neb. GOLF 7 p.m. GOLF „ PGA Professional Championship, third round, at Seaside, Calif. HORSE RACING 8:30 a.m. NBCSN „ Breeders Cup Challenge Series: Royal Ascot, Queen Anne Stakes (plus Kings Stand Stakes and St. Jamess Palace Stakes), at Ascot, England MLB BASEBALL 7 p.m. MLB „ Regional coverage, Baltimore at Washington OR Seattle at N.Y. Yankees 8 p.m. SUN „ Tampa Bay at Houston 10 p.m. FS-Florida „ Miami at San Francisco ESPN „ Arizona at L.A. Angels SOCCER 8 a.m. FS1 „ FIFA World Cup, Group stage: Group H, Colombia vs. Japan, at Saransk, Russia 11 a.m. FOX „ FIFA World Cup, Group stage: Group H, Poland vs. Senegal, at Moscow 2 p.m. FOX „ FIFA World Cup, Group stage: Group A, Russia vs. Egypt, at St. Petersburg, Russia SPORTS BRIEFSEAGAN, MINN.Vikings to induct former coach in Ring of HonorThe Minnesota Vikings will induct former head coach Dennis Green into their Ring of Honor this season.The Vikings announced Monday theyll hold a halftime ceremony with Greens family during their Sept. 23 game against Buffalo. Green died at age 67 in 2016. His record over 10 seasons was 101-70, including eight trips to the playoffs. Only Bud Grant has more wins in franchise history. The Vikings won four division titles and reached the NFC championship game twice under his guidance, setting what was then the NFL single-season scoring record with 556 points in 1998. Hes the 24th member of the Vikings Ring of Honor.ST. PAUL, MINN. Minnesota gets regular PGA Tour stop in dealThe PGA Tour is putting Minnesota on its schedule for the first time under an agreement that elevates a PGA Tour Champions event.The 2019 dates for the 3M Open will not be announced until the PGA Tour reveals its full schedule in the coming weeks.Minnesota has hosted the 3M Championship on the PGA Tour Cham-pions since 1993, and the final event for seniors will be Aug. 3-5 with Paul Goydos as the defending champion. The PGA Tour event will be held on the same course, the TPC Twin Cities.For years, the best golfers have come to Minnesota for big events, most recently the Ryder Cup at Hazeltine in 2016. Hazeltine also hosted the PGA Championship in 2009 and 2002, and it held the 1970 U.S. Open won by Tony Jacklin.ST. PETERSBURG, RUSSIAFIFA charges Mexico after fans chant slurFIFA has opened disciplinary proceedings against Mexico after its fans used an anti-gay slur during the teams 1-0 win over Germany.Some Mexican sup-porters chanted the slur when Germany goalkeeper Manuel Neuer prepared to take a goal kick in the 24th minute of Sundays game at the Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow.Fans in Mexico use the chant to insult opposing goalkeepers as they take a goal kick. Widely considered a slur, some argue there is no dis-criminatory intent. FIFA did not elaborate on the nature of the dis-ciplinary proceedings and didnt say when a hearing would take place.NEW YORKFIBA changes way womens hoops teams qualify for OlympicsFIBA is changing the way womens basketball teams qualify for the Olympics and world cup.The International Basketball Federation announced Sunday the new system that will give more countries a chance to qualify for both major international events.It will give more teams a chance to play and host tournaments,Ž said USA Basketball CEO Jim Tooley, who is on the FIBA executive board.First round qualifiers for the Olympics will be held in November 2019. Those tournaments will be geographically based with contests in the Americas, Europe, Africa and Asia. The Oceania region that includes Australia will now play as part of Asia for these tournaments. Six-teen teams will advance to play in four mini-tourna-ments around the world in February. The Associated Press BASEBALL FCSL STANDINGSTEAM W L .PCT GB Leesburg 9 1 .900 „ DeLand 7 6 .539 3.5 Winter Park 6 6 .500 4 Sanford 5 7 .417 5 Seminole 5 7 .417 5 Winter Garden 3 8 .273 6.5 Fridays games Leesburg 14, Sanford 3 DeLand 10, Seminole 2 Winter Park at Winter Garden, ppd. Saturdays games Leesburg at Sanford, ppd. Winter Garden 9, 3, Winter Park 3, 7 Seminole 3, DeLand 1 Mondays games DeLand at Leesburg, late Seminole at Winter Garden, late Winter Park at Sanford, late Tuesdays games Leesburg at DeLand, 7 p.m. Seminole at Winter Garden, 6 p.m. Winter Park at Sanford, 7 p.m. Wednesdays games DeLand at Leesburg, 7 p.m. Winter Garden at Seminole, 7 p.m. Winter Park at Sanford, 7 p.m. AUTO RACING NASCAR XFINITYIOWA 250Sunday at Iowa Speedway, Newton, Iowa Lap length: 0.875 miles(Start position in parentheses)1. (11) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 250 laps, 60 points. 2. (39) Christopher Bell, Toyota, 250, 48. 3. (2) Daniel Hemric, Chevrolet, 250, 51. 4. (5) Cole Custer, Ford, 250, 46. 5. (3) Brandon Jones, Toyota, 250, 44. 6. (9) Riley Herbst, Toyota, 250, 0. 7. (17) Ty Majeski, Ford, 250, 32. 8. (7) Tyler Reddick, Chevrolet, 250, 33. 9. (12) Matt Tifft, Chevrolet, 250, 28. 10. (8) Kaz Grala, Ford, 250, 27. 11. (1) Austin Cindric, Ford, 250, 41. 12. (13) Justin Haley, Chevrolet, 250, 0. 13. (10) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 250, 24. 14. (6) Ryan Truex, Chevrolet, 250, 23. 15. (15) John Hunter Nemechek, Chevrolet, 250, 28. 16. (14) Shane Lee, Chevrolet, 250, 22. 17. (40) Ryan Reed, Ford, 250, 21. 18. (21) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, 250, 19. 19. (16) Ross Chastain, Chevrolet, 249, 18. 20. (19) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 249, 17. 21. (27) Joey Gase, Chevrolet, 249, 16. 22. (26) Spencer Boyd, Chevrolet, 247, 15. 23. (18) Alex Labbe, Chevrolet, 247, 14. 24. (23) David Starr, Chevrolet, 247, 13. 25. (20) Garrett Smithley, Chevrolet, 244, 12. 26. (29) Chad Finchum, Chevrolet, 244, 11. 27. (32) Blake Jones, Chevrolet, 243, 10. 28. (4) Elliott Sadler, Chevrolet, 239, 9. 29. (22) BJ McLeod, Chevrolet, 239, 8. 30. (28) Brandon Hightower, Toyota, accident, 220, 7. 31. (36) Vinnie Miller, Chevrolet, overheating, 205, 6. 32. (25) Tommy Joe Martins, Chevrolet, 201, 5. 33. (38) Stan Mullis, Dodge, 150, 4. 34. (33) Josh Williams, Chevrolet, electrical, 134, 3. 35. (24) Jeff Green, Chevrolet, garage, 131, 2. 36. (34) Josh Bilicki, Toyota, fuelpump, 95, 1. 37. (35) Timmy Hill, Toyota, brakes, 75, 1. 38. (37) Mike Harmon, Dodge, reargear, 31, 1. 39. (30) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet, brakes, 28, 1. 40. (31) JJ Yeley, Chevrolet, vibration, 21, 1.Race StatisticsAverage Speed of Winner: 102.102 mph. Time of Race: 2 hours, 8 minutes, 33 seconds. Margin of Victory: 0.745 seconds. Caution Flags: 5 for 31 laps. Lead Changes: 13 among 5 drivers. Lap Leaders: A.Cindric 1-58; J.Allgaier 59-88; D.Hemric 89; J.Allgaier 90; D.Hemric 91; J.Allgaier 92-124; C.Custer 125-129; J.Allgaier 130-180; C.Bell 181; J.Allgaier 182-197; C.Bell 198; J.Allgaier 199-204; C.Custer 205; J.Allgaier 206-250 Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): J.Allgaier, 7 times for 182 laps; A.Cindric, 1 time for 58 laps; C.Custer, 2 times for 4 laps; C.Bell, 2 times for 6 laps; D.Hemric, 2 times for 2 laps.NASCAR CAMPING WORLD TRUCKM&MS 200Saturday night at Iowa Speedway, Newton, Iowa Lap length: 0.875 miles(Start position in parentheses)1. (16) Brett Mof“ tt, Toyota, 200 laps, 0 rating, 51 points. 2. (3) Noah Gragson, Toyota, 200, 0, 47. 3. (1) Harrison Burton, Toyota, 200, 0, 47. 4. (12) David Gilliland, Toyota, 200, 0, 35. 5. (7) Johnny Sauter, Chevrolet, 200, 0, 41. 6. (13) Jesse Little, Toyota, 200, 0, 35. 7. (14) Cody Coughlin, Chevrolet, 200, 0, 30. 8. (9) Christian Eckes, Toyota, 200, 0, 30. 9. (5) Stewart Friesen, Chevrolet, 200, 0, 45. 10. (17) Myatt Snider, Ford, 200, 0, 33. 11. (15) Grant En“ nger, Ford, 200, 0, 26. 12. (27) Justin Fontaine, Chevrolet, 200, 0, 25. 13. (22) Tanner Thorson, Chevrolet, 199, 0, 24. 14. (18) Austin Hill, Chevrolet, 199, 0, 23. 15. (19) Austin Wayne Self, Chevrolet, 199, 0, 22. 16. (6) Justin Haley, Chevrolet, 196, 0, 25. 17. (11) Ben Rhodes, Ford, 195, 0, 20. 18. (26) Cory Roper, Ford, 195, 0, 19. 19. (10) Dalton Sargeant, Chevrolet, 195, 0, 20. 20. (30) Norm Benning, Chevrolet, 194, 0, 17. 21. (28) Wendell Chavous, Chevrolet, 191, 0, 16. 22. (31) Jennifer Jo Cobb, Chevrolet, 173, 0, 15. 23. (23) Jordan Anderson, Chevrolet, engine, 153, 0, 14. 24. (29) Bayley Currey, Chevrolet, engine, 152, 0, 13. 25. (32) Bobby Reuse, Chevrolet, suspension, 136, 0, 12. 26. (2) Matt Crafton, Ford, accident, 135, 0, 21. 27. (8) John Hunter Nemechek, Chevrolet, accident, 135, 0, 0. 28. (20) Reid Wilson, Chevrolet, overheating, 109, 0, 9. 29. (4) Todd Gilliland, Toyota, accident, 102, 0, 8. 30. (24) Ross Chastain, Chevrolet, suspension, 56, 0, 7. 31. (21) Joe Nemechek, Chevrolet, brakes, 50, 0, 6. 32. (25) JJ Yeley, Chevrolet, brakes, 19, 0, 0.Race StatisticsAverage Speed of Winner: 89.942 mph. Time of Race: 1 hour, 56 minutes, 45 seconds. Margin of Victory: 0.333 seconds. Caution Flags: 6 for 44 laps. Lead Changes: 7 among 7 drivers. Lap Leaders: H.Burton 1-30; M.Crafton 31-50; Joh.Nemechek 51-64; C.Eckes 65-68; N.Gragson 69-75; Joh.Nemechek 76; S.Friesen 77-124; B.Mof“ tt 125-200 Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): B.Mof“ tt, 1 time for 75 laps; S.Friesen, 1 time for 47 laps; H.Burton, 1 time for 29 laps; M.Crafton, 1 time for 19 laps; Joh. Nemechek, 2 times for 13 laps; N.Gragson, 1 time for 6 laps; C.Eckes, 1 time for 3 laps. Wins: J.Sauter, 4; B.Mof“ tt, 2; N.Gragson, 1; Joh.Nemechek, 1. Top 10 in Points: 1. J.Sauter, 419; 2. N.Gragson, 348; 3. B.Mof“ tt, 334; 4. G.En“ nger, 308; 5. S.Friesen, 308; 6. M.Crafton, 300; 7. B.Rhodes, 291; 8. J.Haley, 278; 9. M.Snider, 247; 10. D.Sargeant, 239.NHRA MELLO YELLO DRAG RACINGTHUNDER VALLEY NATIONALSSunday at Bristol Dragway, Bristol, Tenn.Final Finish Order Top Fuel1. Tony Schumacher. 2. Mike Salinas. 3. Steve Torrence. 4. Scott Palmer. 5. Pat Dakin. 6. Doug Kalitta. 7. Antron Brown. 8. Clay Millican. 9. Brittany Force. 10. Leah Pritchett. 11. Shawn Reed. 12. Richie Crampton. 13. Dom Lagana. 14. Bill Litton. 15. Terry Totten. 16. Terry McMillen.Funny Car1. Ron Capps. 2. Bob Tasca III. 3. Courtney Force. 4. J.R. Todd. 5. Robert Hight. 6. Jack Beckman. 7. Tommy Johnson Jr.. 8. Cruz Pedregon. 9. Tim Wilkerson. 10. Del Worsham. 11. Jonnie Lindberg. 12. Shawn Langdon. 13. Jim Campbell. 14. Matt Hagan. 15. John Force. 16. Jeff Diehl.Pro Stock1. Jeg Coughlin. 2. Greg Anderson. 3. Tanner Gray. 4. Drew Skillman. 5. Erica Enders. 6. Vincent Nobile. 7. Tim Freeman. 8. Chris McGaha. 9. Jason Line. 10. Bo Butner. 11. Alex Laughlin. 12. John Gaydosh Jr. 13. Wally Stroupe. 14. Alan Prusiensky. 15. Deric Kramer. 16. Tommy Lee.Final ResultsTop Fuel „Tony Schumacher, 3.946 seconds, 313.58 mph def. Mike Salinas, 5.251 seconds, 152.18 mph. Funny Car „Ron Capps, Dodge Charger, 4.234, 296.37 def. Bob Tasca III, Ford Mustang, 4.300, 286.98. Pro Stock „Jeg Coughlin, Chevy Camaro, 6.709, 205.10 def. Greg Anderson, Camaro, 6.741, 205.07. Pro Modi“ ed „Khalid alBalooshi, Chevy Camaro, 5.924, 247.38 def. Todd Tutterow, Camaro, 5.948, 242.10. Top Fuel Harley „Tii Tharpe, Dixie, 6.491, 220.33 def. Doug Vancil, Weekend, Foul Red Light. Factory Stock Showdown „Joseph Welch, Dodge Dodge Challenger, 8.275, 164.67 def. Arthur Kohn, Chevy Camaro, Foul Red Light. Super Stock „Scott Stillings, Pontiac Grand Am, 8.854, 148.72 def. Ed Longhany Sr., Plymouth Duster, 10.690, 121.79. Stock Eliminator„Eddie Longhany Jr, Chevy Camaro, 10.698, 118.70 def. Joe Santangelo, Camaro, 10.686, 113.69. Super Comp „Tyler Caheely, Dragster, 8.928, 170.71 def. Jacob Elrod, Dragster, 8.930, 165.01. Super Gas „Steve Furr, Chevy Camaro, 9.917, 160.81 def. Ray Miller III, Chevy Camaro, 9.927, 164.21. Top Sportsman presented by RacingRVs. com „Jeff Brooks, Henry J, 6.720, 206.29 def. Royce Freeman, Chevy Camaro, 6.933, 202.18. Top Dragster presented by RacingRVs. com „Aaron Stan“ eld, Dragster, 6.320, 217.84 def. Joe Fisher, Dragster, 6.498, 197.54.Point Standings (Through 11 of 24 Events) Top Fuel1. Steve Torrence, 896. 2. Clay Millican, 786. 3. Tony Schumacher, 760. 4. Doug Kalitta, 717. 5. Leah Pritchett, 663. 6. Antron Brown, 588. 7. (tie) Brittany Force, 552. Terry McMillen, 552. 9. Scott Palmer, 461. 10. Mike Salinas, 421.Funny Car1. Courtney Force, 937. 2. Jack Beckman, 736. 3. Robert Hight, 717. 4. J.R. Todd, 694. 5. Ron Capps, 693. 6. Matt Hagan, 669. 7. Tommy Johnson Jr., 606. 8. Cruz Pedregon, 508. 9. John Force, 502. 10. Bob Tasca III, 500.Pro Stock1. Greg Anderson, 823. 2. Tanner Gray, 768. 3. Vincent Nobile, 758. 4. Erica Enders, 738. 5. Drew Skillman, 679. 6. Jeg Coughlin, 671. 7. Chris McGaha, 659. 8. Bo Butner, 642. 9. Deric Kramer, 627. 10. Jason Line, 569. SOCCER MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCERAll times Eastern EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T PTS GF GA Atlanta United FC 10 3 3 33 33 19 New York City FC 8 3 4 28 30 20 Columbus 7 4 6 27 22 16 New York Red Bulls 8 4 2 26 30 16 New England 6 4 6 24 27 23 Orlando City 6 8 1 19 24 31 Chicago 5 7 4 19 23 28 Philadelphia 5 7 3 18 16 21 Montreal 5 11 0 15 18 31 Toronto FC 4 7 3 15 23 27 D.C. United 2 6 4 10 19 24 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T PTS GF GASporting Kansas City 8 2 5 29 28 14 FC Dallas 8 1 5 29 24 14 Los Angeles FC 7 4 3 24 29 24 Vancouver 6 5 5 23 26 30 Real Salt Lake 7 7 1 22 19 29 Portland 6 3 4 22 20 18 Houston 6 5 3 21 29 21 Los Angeles Galaxy 6 7 2 20 22 23 Minnesota United 5 8 1 16 17 26 Seattle 3 8 2 11 10 17 San Jose 2 9 4 10 24 31 Colorado 2 9 3 9 16 26 3 points for victory, 1 point for tieJune 13Atlanta United FC 2, Columbus 0 Montreal 3, Orlando City 0 D.C. United 4, Toronto FC 4, tie New York 2, Seattle 1 Chicago 2, Colorado 2, tie New England 2, San Jose 2, tieSaturday, June 23Vancouver at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. FC Dallas at New York Red Bulls, 6 p.m. Montreal at Orlando City, 7:30 p.m. Houston at Sporting Kansas City, 8:30 p.m. Minnesota United at Colorado, 9 p.m. Chicago at Seattle, 10 p.m. San Jose at Real Salt Lake, 10 p.m. Columbus at Los Angeles FC, 10:30 p.m.Sunday, June 24Portland at Atlanta United FC, 4:30 p.m. Toronto FC at New York City FC, 5 p.m.NATIONAL WOMENS SOCCER LEAGUEAll times Eastern W L T PTS GF GA North Carolina 10 0 3 33 25 11 Seattle 5 2 4 19 13 8 Orlando 5 3 4 19 19 15 Portland 4 4 4 16 16 17 Chicago 3 3 7 16 17 17 Utah 3 3 5 14 9 9 Houston 3 4 5 14 13 17 Washington 2 7 4 10 10 17 Sky Blue FC 0 9 2 2 8 19 3 points for victory, 1 point for tie.Saturdays GamesSeattle 0, Washington 0, tie North Carolina 1, Utah 0 Orlando 3, Sky Blue 2 Portland 1, Chicago 1, tieFriday, June 22Portland at Houston, 8:30 p.m.Saturday, June 23North Carolina at Seattle, 4 p.m. Orlando at Washington, 7 p.m. Utah at Chicago, 8 p.m.2018 U.S. MENS TEAM RESULTS/SCHEDULEAll times Eastern (Record: Won 2, Lost 0, Tied 3)Sunday, Jan. 28 United States 0, BosniaHerzogovina 0 Tuesday, March 27 „ United States 1, Paraguay 0 Monday, May 28 „ United States 3, Bolivia 0 Saturday, June 2 „ Ireland 1, United States 1 Saturday, June 9 „ United States 1, France 1 Friday, Sept. 7 „ vs. Brazil at East Rutherford, N.J. (tentative) Tuesday, Sept. 11 „ vs. Mexico at Nashville, Tenn., 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 15 „ vs. England at London (tentative) Tuesday, Nov. 20 „ vs. Italy (tentative)FIFA WORLD CUPAll times EasternFIRST ROUNDGROUP A W T L GF GA Pts Russia 1 0 0 5 0 3 Uruguay 1 0 0 1 0 3 Egypt 0 0 1 0 1 0 Saudi Arabia 0 0 1 0 5 0 3 points for win, 1 for tie June 14 At Moscow (Luzhniki) Russia 5, Saudi Arabia 0 June 15 At Ekaterinburg, Russia Uruguay 1, Egypt 0 Today At St. Petersburg, Russia Russia vs. Egypt, 2 p.m. Wednesday At Rostov-on-Don, Russia Uruguay vs. Saudi Arabia, 11 a.m. Monday, June 25 At Samara, Russia Uruguay vs. Russia, 10 a.m. At Volgograd, Russia Saudi Arabia vs. Egypt, 10 a.m. GROUP B W T L GF GA Pts Iran 1 0 0 1 0 3 Portugal 0 1 0 3 3 1 Spain 0 1 0 3 3 1 Morocco 0 0 1 0 1 0 June 15 At St. Petersburg, Russia Iran 1, Morocco 0 At Sochi, Russia Portugal 3, Spain 3, tie Wednesday At Moscow (Luzhniki) Portugal vs. Morocco, 8 a.m. At Kazan, Russia Iran vs. Spain, 2 p.m. Monday, June 25 At Kaliningrad, Russia Spain vs. Morocco, 2 p.m. At Saransk, Russia Iran vs. Portugal, 2 p.m. GROUP C W T L GF GA Pts France 1 0 0 2 1 3 Denmark 1 0 0 1 0 3 Australia 0 0 1 1 2 0 Peru 0 0 1 0 1 0 Saturday At Kazan, Russia France 2, Australia 1 At Saransk, Russia Denmark 1, Peru 0 Thursday At Samara, Russia Denmark vs. Australia, 8 a.m. At Ekaterinburg, Russia France vs. Peru, 11 a.m. Tuesday, June 26 At Moscow (Luzhniki) Denmark vs. France, 10 a.m. At Sochi, Russia Australia vs. Peru, 10 a.m. GROUP D W T L GF GA Pts Croatia 1 0 0 2 0 3 Iceland 0 1 0 1 1 1 Argentina 0 1 0 1 1 1 Nigeria 0 0 1 0 2 0 Saturday At Moscow (Spartak) Argentina 1, Iceland 1, tie At Kaliningrad, Russia Croatia 2, Nigeria 0 Thursday At Nizhny Novgorod, Russia Argentina vs. Croatia, 2 p.m. At Volgograd, Russia Nigeria vs. Iceland, 11 a.m. Tuesday, June 26 At Rostov-on-Don, Russia Iceland vs. Croatia, 2 p.m. At St. Petersburg, Russia Nigeria vs. Argentina, 2 p.m. GROUP E W T L GF GA Pts Serbia 1 0 0 1 0 3 Brazil 0 1 0 1 1 1 Switzerland 0 1 0 1 1 1 Costa Rica 0 0 1 0 1 0 Sunday At Samara, Russia Serbia 1, Costa Rica 0 At Rostov-on-Don, Russia Brazil 1, Switzerland 1, tie Friday At St. Petersburg, Russia Brazil vs. Costa Rica, 8 a.m. At Kaliningrad, Russia Serbia vs. Switzerland, 2 p.m. Wednesday, June 27 At Moscow (Spartak) Serbia vs. Brazil, 2 p.m. At Nizhny Novgorod, Russia Switzerland vs. Costa Rica, 2 p.m. GROUP F W T L GF GA Pts Mexico 1 0 0 1 0 3 Sweden 1 0 0 1 0 3 Germany 0 0 1 0 1 0 Korea Republic 0 0 1 0 1 0 Sunday At Moscow (Luzhniki) Mexico 1, Germany 0 Monday At Nizhny Novgorod, Russia Sweden 1, Korea Republic 0 Saturday, June 23 At Rostov-on-Don, Russia Korea Republic vs. Mexico, 11 a.m. At Sochi, Russia Germany vs. Sweden, 2 p.m. Wednesday, June 27 At Ekaterinburg, Russia Mexico vs. Sweden, 10 a.m. At Kazan, Russia Korea Republic vs. Germany, 10 a.m. GROUP G W T L GF GA Pts Belgium 1 0 0 3 0 3 England 1 0 0 2 1 3 Tunisia 0 0 1 1 2 0 Panama 0 0 1 0 3 0 Monday At Sochi, Russia Belgium 3, Panama 0 At Volgograd, Russia England 2, Tunisia 1 Saturday, June 23 At Moscow (Spartak) Belgium vs. Tunisia, 8 a.m. Sunday, June 24 At Nizhny Novgorod, Russia England vs. Panama, 8 a.m. Thursday, June 28 At Kaliningrad, Russia England vs. Belgium, 2 p.m. At Saransk, Russia Panama vs. Tunisia, 2 p.m. GROUP H W T L GF GA Pts Colombia 0 0 0 0 0 0 Japan 0 0 0 0 0 0 Poland 0 0 0 0 0 0 Senegal 0 0 0 0 0 0 Today At Saransk, Russia Colombia vs. Japan, 8 a.m. At Moscow (Spartak) Poland vs. Senegal, 11 a.m. Sunday, June 24 At Ekaterinburg, Russia Japan vs. Senegal, 11 a.m. At Kazan, Russia Poland vs. Colombia, 2 p.m. Thursday, June 28 At Samara, Russia Senegal vs. Colombia, 10 a.m. At Volgograd, Russia Japan vs. Poland, 10 a.m. ODDS PREGAME.COM LINEMAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL Today National LeagueFAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE at Pittsburgh -118 Milwaukee +108 at Philadelphia -121 St. Louis +111 at Chicago -130 Los Angeles +120 at Colorado -153 New York +143 at San Francisco -165 Miami +155American Leagueat New York -157 Seattle +147 at Cleveland -196 Chicago +181 at Houston -253 Tampa Bay +223 Boston -165 at Minnesota +155 Texas -130 at Kansas City +120Interleagueat Washington Off Baltimore Off Atlanta -109 at Toronto -101 at Cincinnati -125 Detroit +115 at LA Angels Off Arizona Off at San Diego -105 Oakland -105 Updated odds available at Pregame.com TRANSACTIONS BASEBALLAmerican LeagueBALTIMORE ORIOLES „ Signed INF Zack McLeod; 1B Ian Evans; Cs Jared Denning and Matt Beaird; OFs Trey Whitley, Trey Truitt and Andrew Jayne; LHPs Jason Montville, Kevin Magee and Cody Hacker; and RHPs Jake Zebron, Jayvien Sandridge, Parker McFadden, Dallas Litscher, Tyler Joyner and Andrew Ciolli to minor league contracts. CLEVELAND INDIANS „ Activated 1B Yonder Alonso from the family medical emergency list. Optioned OF Greg Allen to Columbus (IL). Signed LHP Marc Rzepczynski to a minor league contract and assigned him to the Columbus. Announced OF Melky Cabrera cleared outright waivers and elected free agency. HOUSTON ASTROS „ Promoted Jeff Luhnow to president of baseball operations and general manager and signed him to a contract extension through the 2023 season. LOS ANGELES ANGELS „ Optioned OF Jabari Blash to Salt Lake (PCL). Reinstated OF Kole Calhoun from the 10-day DL. MINNESOTA TWINS „ Signed 1B Gabe Snyder, OFs Tyler Webb and Willie Joe Garry Jr. and RHPs Dylan Stowell and Tanner Howell to minor league contracts. NEW YORK YANKEES „ Recalled OF Clint Frazier from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). Optioned INF Ronald Torreyes to Scranton/ Wilkes-Barre. Signed RHP Derek Craft and OF Bryant Arrieche to minor league contracts. Recalled RHP Giovanny Gallegos from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre as the 26th man.Ž OAKLAND ATHLETICS „ Named Adam Buckfelder vice president of “ nance. SEATTLE MARINERS „ Activated RHP Juan Nicasio and C Chris Herrmann from the 10-day DL. Optioned RHP Rob Whalen and C David Freitas to Tacoma (PCL). TAMPA BAY RAYS „ Signed 3B Kaleo Johnson and OF Nick Schnell to minor league contracts. TEXAS RANGERS „ Activated SS Elvis Andrus from 60-day DL. Recalled RHP Ricardo Rodrguez from Round Rock (PCL). Optioned C Jose Trevino optioned to Frisco (TL). Designated RHP Deck McGuire for assignment.National LeagueATLANTA BRAVES „ Signed OF Gabriel Rodriguez, LHP Victor Cavalieri, C Logan Brown, 2B Trey Harris, 3B CJ Alexander and Ray Hernandez and RHPs Luke Jackson, William Woods and Alex Camacho to minor league contracts. CHICAGO CUBS „ Placed LHP Brian Duensing on the bereavement list. Recalled LHP Rob Zastryzny from Iowa (PCL). MIAMI MARLINS „ Signed RHPs C.J. Carter, Cam Baird and Jameson McGrane to minor league contracts. MILWAUKEE BREWERS „ Signed LHP Michael Mediavilla, OF Micah Bello, Cs Kekai Rios and Caleb Marquez and RHPs Peter Strzelecki, Luis Gonzalez and Justin Jarvis to minor league contracts. NEW YORK METS „ Optioned RHP Jacob Rhame to Las Vegas (PCL). Reinstated RHP Jeurys Familia from the 10-day DL. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES „ Optioned RHP Hector Neris to Lehigh Valley (IL). Recalled LHP Austin Davis from Lehigh Valley. PITTSBURGH PIRATES „ Reinstated RHP Richard Rodrguez from the 10-day DL. Optioned RHP Dovydas Neverauskas and C Jacob Stallings to Indianapolis (IL). Recalled INF-OF Jos Osuna from Indianapolis. SAN DIEGO PADRES „ Sent C Austin Hedges to El Paso (PCL) for a rehab assignment. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS „ Placed INF Brandon Crawford on the paternity list. Recalled INF Kelby Tomlinson from Sacramento (PCL).American AssociationCHICAGO DOGS „ Signed OF Tony Rosselli. GARY SOUTHSHORE RAILCATS „ Released RHP Jeremy Holcombe. ST. PAUL SAINTS „ Released INF Jayce Boyd. TEXAS AIRHOGS „ Released RHP Cal Drummond.Atlantic LeagueLONG ISLAND DUCKS „ Signed C Robert De La Hoz. Released C Keith Ezersky. Activated LHP Jake Fisher and RHP Jair Jurrjens. Placed INF Alec Sole and RHP Matt Marsh on the restricted list. Placed LHP Tyler Honahan on the reserve/retired list.Frontier LeagueEVANSVILLE OTTERS „ Released INF Pedro Barrios, RHP Sean Johnson, and C Luis Villorio. FLORENCE FREEDOM „ Traded OF Connor Crane to Sussex County (Can-Am). Released INF Chandler Rodriguez. SCHAUMBURG BOOMERS „ Traded RHP Steven Ridings to Southern Illinois.FOOTBALLNational Football LeagueCAROLINA PANTHERS „ Signed WR D.J. Moore.Canadian Football LeagueEDMONTON ESKIMOS „ Signed OL Travis Bond, DL Rakim Cox and OL Kelvin Palmer. Activated DB Aaron Grymes from the suspended list. WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS „ Signed QB Mitchell Gale to the practice roster.LACROSSENational Lacrosse LeagueVANCOUVER STEALTH „ Announced the team was purchased by Canucks Sports & Entertainment.

PAGE 13

DailyCommercial.com | Tuesday, June 19, 2018 B3the longest streaks in both categories. To put the Seminoles' run of 40-win seasons in context, Louis-ville is next with seven.Florida State has accomplished everything under Martin except win a national championship. His teams have made 16 trips to the College World Series including last year but have only reached the finals twice (1986 and '99).The Seminoles were 43-19 and won their eighth Atlantic Coast Conference title this season but were eliminated in the Tallahassee Regional. They lost on a walk-off homer by Mississippi State's Elijah MacNamee after Martin decided to remain with pitcher Drew Parrish despite the sophomore sitting 2 hours for a rain delay after throwing 109 pitches. The left-hander ended up throwing 133 pitches in the 3-2 loss on June 2.Martin was heavily criticized on social media, including by incoming Baseball Hall of Famer Chipper Jones, due to the chance of Parrish suffering an arm injury. Martin did not second guess his decision."I am not going to com-ment in any way because it is in the past," Martin said. "Drew will th row in the next two weeks. I think that's really all I need to say." MARTINFrom Page B1Ive been back to Wildwood and Im really looking forward to getting everyone together and interacting with the kids.ŽThe camp is sanctioned by World Sports Alumni, which proclaims itself the only professional athlete association in the world that connects athletes from all sports under one umbrella. Dixon is president of the Pro Football International Board. Dixon said about 100 youngsters between the ages of 5 and 18 have already signed up for the camp, with some participants coming from as far away as Melbourne and Miami to take part. There is still room for more, Dixon added, and parents can sign their kids up at worldsportsalumni. com. Tuition for the camp is $60 per participant.This is the first football camp Ive seen that has brought together as many as 15 former players to offer instruction and life lessons,Ž said Dixon. We want everyone to walk away feeling as if they learned about football and life. We all have a story to tell; I can talk about how I made things tougher because I didnt keep up with classwork. A lot of these guys will take some time and speak to the kids about things that pertain to everyday life and how they learned from those experiences.ŽDixon said when formulating ideas for the camp, he had no problem finding former professionals to be instructors.So many of these guys were looking for ways to give back and help young players try to achieve their dreams,Ž said Dixon. Nowadays, a lot of people seem to have a problem with professional athletes, particularly professional football players. They can think what they want, but what they might not realize is that most play-ers „ former and current „ will do anything they can to help young people and their communities.Things like that dont often get talked about.ŽNot only will youngsters get something out of the camp, but parents can, too. Dixon said parents can stay at the camp and watch the proceedings from the stands.Once the camps wraps up, parents will be welcomed on the field for autographs and to take photos with the professionals.Dixon hopes to build on the camp and transform it into an annual event. To that end, he is looking for spon-sors „ for this and future camps „ to help offset costs and keep registration fees affordable.At the end of the day, we want to get the kids excited about football and life,Ž said Dixon. We want to help them by providing instruc-tion and encouragement. Lake and Sumter counties are filled with talent. The basketball programs at Wildwood and Leesburg, along with the local student athletes who sign with col-leges all around the country, are proof of that. It doesnt matter where youre from; anyone can aim for the stars and achieve their dreams. Im proof of that.Ž DREAMSFrom Page B1 Gabe Holt, which put the Red Raiders ahead to stay 3-1. Schwarz also did not have his foot on the bag when catcher Brady Smith fired a throw to first while attempting to get Texas Tech runner Cody Farhat out following a strikeout on a wild pitch to start the ninth inning. Farhat scored Texas Techs final run on an RBI single from Holt.Schwarz was playing just his eighth game at first base on the season and first game at first since May 13 against Georgia. Hes started 45 games at catcher this season, but OSullivan opted to play him at first base due to concerns about how his hand would hold up for nine innings behind the plate. Schwarz was not inserted at designated hitter because that is the regular spot for junior Nelson Maldonado, who belted a two-run homer Sunday. Maldonado could play outfield, but that would mean Florida would need to bench one of its three starting outfielders, left fielder Austin Langworthy, center fielder Nick Horvath or right fielder Wil Dalton.At the plate, Schwarz went 0 for 4 with two strikeouts. That dropped Schwarz to .319 on the season with 12 home runs and 46 RBIs.He hasn't played in a while,Ž OSullivan said. The first at-bat was pretty good. He hit the ball to the warning track the other way. He had a good approach. We're here because he's one of the main reasons why we're here. And he felt like he could play tonight and I wasn't going to juggle the whole lineup. Just put him right in there and see what happens.We did that a couple of years ago with Pete Alonso and he had a really good tournament. So I'm just happy that JJ went out there for his team and gave a great effort.ŽSchwarz wasnt the only Gator to struggle in the field Sunday night. Shortstop Deacon Liput had a throwing error, just his fifth of the season, which extended Texas Techs two-run fifth inning. Langworthy mis-played a fly ball to deep left field in the eighth inning.I can't put my finger on it,Ž OSullivan said of the defensive problems. I do know when we start struggling defensively we start doing some more live defense during practice. Actually we do it every day. We hadn't done that up until the last part of the year, but once we start struggling defensively we tried to play some games, you know, some defensive live stuff during practice and our defense got back on track. But obviously tonight it hurt us a little more.ŽOffensively, Florida will be looking to jump-start a lineup that went 0 for 7 with runners in scoring position and 1 for 15 with runners on base against Texas Tech. Florida has scored three runs or less in each of its last three games.We went through all the pitchers,Ž OSullivan said. We knew exactly what they were going to do „ start with their lefty and then go to (Ryan) Shetter and then go to their little right-hander there with a good arm. We were prepared. We went through everybody and they just executed some pitches.Ž Game 4: Texas Tech 6, Florida 3Texas Tech; 000; 122; 001„6 12 1 Florida; 001; 000; 200„3 5 1 Dusek, Shetter (3), Harpenau (7) and Fulford; Singer, Butler (7), Byrne (8) and Girand, Smith (7). W_ Shetter, 6-0. L_Singer, 12-2. E Davis, M.(16); Liput (5). DP Florida 2. LOB Texas Tech 6; Florida 8. 2B Little (25); Rheams (11). 3B India (4). HR Maldonado (9). SH Fulford (3). SF Little (6). SB Little 2 (11); Liput (10). GATORSFrom Page B1Former Wildwood and New York Giants football standout Ron Dixon evades Baltimores James Trapp, during Super Bowl XXXV, on Jan. 28, 2001, at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa. [GATEHOUSE MEDIA FILE] up for it and playing the best and playing really, really hard golf courses.ŽShinnecock went from ridiculously hard on Saturday to overly gentle on Sunday, though the ultimate measure was Koepka playing the final 36 holes in even par to win. He finished at 1-over 281, the first time in five years that no one broke par at the U.S. Open.The USGA doesnt like to talk about scores, but thats the identity of this major.And for now, majors define Koepka.Norman gets beat up for the number of majors he could have won, including at Shinnecock Hills in 1986, the year he had the 54-hole lead at all four majors. The Shark also had 75 victories around the world and was No. 1 longer than any other player until Tiger Woods came along.Sunday at Shinnecock began with a four-way tie for the lead, with the past two U.S. Open champi-ons „ Koepka and Dustin Johnson „ playing in the penultimate group. They are close friends off the course, and even worked out together in the morn-ing before their last two rounds.Koepka went 1 up on U.S. Open trophies. Still, he was stumped when asked who was ahead in their back-and-forth.Johnson, still only 33 but much like Norman, hasnt cashed in at the majors as much as he should have. Attribute that to a cold putter on the weekend at Shinnecock, which also held him back at Augusta in April.Even so, he has 18 victo-ries and is the only player to sweep the World Golf Championships, small fields with the best players.Hes won every year hes been out here. Thats incredible,Ž Koepka said. I dont know how long hes been out here, 11 years? How many wins has got, 18? Thats pretty good. Ive got some catch-ing up to do.ŽKoepka believes John-son will win another U.S. Open and said he would end his career as among the best to ever play. That will require more than one additional major, for sure, though Johnson already is well ahead in the victory count. Thats the next step for Koepka, at least until the next major.Before earning his PGA Tour card, Koepka won the Turkish Airlines Open against a strong European Tour field that included Henrik Stenson, S ergio Garcia, Branden Grace and Ian Poulter. Late last year, he registered a nine-shot victory in the Dunlop Phoenix, one of the strongest Japan Golf Tour events. KOEPKAFrom Page B1

PAGE 14

B4 Tuesday, June 19, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com AMERICANLEAGUENATIONALLEAGUEEASTDIVISION TEAMWLPCT.GBWCGBL10STRHOME AWAY NewYork4622.676„6-4L-226-1120-11 Boston4924.671„„6-4W-123-1126-13 TampaBay3338.46515125-5W-115-1618-22 Toronto3338.46515127-3W-319-1914-19 Baltimore2050.28627251-9W-111-239-27 CENTRALDIVISION TEAMWLPCTGBWCGBL10STRHOME AWAY Cleveland3733.529„„5-5W-121-1316-20 Detroit3637.4932107-3W-523-1713-20 Minnesota3137.4565135-5L-117-1714-20 Chicago2446.34313214-6L-412-2412-22 KansasCity2249.31015231-9L-610-2612-23 WESTDIVISION TEAMWLPCTGBWCGBL10STRHOME AWAY Houston4825.658„„10-0W-1119-1429-11 Seattle4626.6391„7-3L-125-1421-12 LosAngeles3834.528984-6L-217-1821-16 Oakland3636.50011105-5W-220-2016-16 Texas2944.39719173-7W-215-2414-20 EASTDIVISION TEAMWLPCT.GBWCGBL10STRHOME AWAY Atlanta4229.592„„6-4W-221-1321-16 Washington3831.5513„4-6W-116-1622-15 Philadelphia3732.536415-5W-222-1215-20 NewYork3038.4411073-7W-213-2117-17 Miami2844.38914116-4L-114-2114-23 CENTRALDIVISION TEAMWLPCT.GBWCGBL10STRHOME AWAY Milwaukee4229.592„„5-5L-221-1421-15 Chicago4028.588„6-4L-119-1321-15 St.Louis3732.536415-5W-121-1816-14 Pittsburgh3536.493744-6L-120-1615-20 Cincinnati2645.36616135-5W-111-2315-22 WESTDIVISION TEAMWLPCT.GBWCGBL10STRHOME AWAY Arizona3932.549„„7-3L-223-1616-16 LosAngeles3733.529117-3L-120-1917-14 SanFrancisco3537.486444-6W-119-1116-26 Colorado3437.479552-8L-211-1923-18 SanDiego3440.459665-5L-218-2116-19 MAJORLEAGUEBASEBALLGAME1:NATIONALS5,YANKEES3NEWYORKABRHBIBBSOAVG. Hickscf400001.242 J udgerf300023.278 S tantonlf411012.241 S anchezc402010.194 Gregoriusss410000.258 A ustin1b212300.223 W alker1b100000.204 A ndujar3b401001.291 T anakap200001.000 b-Gardnerph100000.258 Greenp000000--S hrevep000000--g-Birdph101000.227 W arrenp000000--T orres2b302001.287 T OTALS3339349 W ASHINGTONABRHBIBBSOAVG. T urnerss401000.259 Harperrf300011.216 Rendon3b422101.266 A damslf200000.275 c-Sotoph-lf211201.316 Kendrick2b211000.303 d-Goodwinph-cf200001.190 Reynolds1b301001.279 S tevensoncf211100.255 e-Difoph-2b100000.241 S everinoc301100.195 Gonzalezp100001.042 a-Sierraph100000.167 S uerop000000--S olisp000000--f -Eatonph100001.327 Madsonp000000--Doolittlep000000--T OTALS 3158517 NEWYORK000210000„390 W ASHINGTON12000200X„581 a-”iedoutforGonzalezinthe5th.b-”iedoutfor T anakainthe6th.c-homeredforAdamsinthe 6th.d-struckoutforKendrickinthe6th.e-”ied outforStevensoninthe6th.f-struckoutfor S olisinthe7th.g-doubledforShreveinthe8th. E„Stevenson(1).LOB„NewYork10, Washington3.2B„Sanchez2(14),Andujar(22), Bird(6),Turner(13),Kendrick(14),Severino (7).HR„Austin(8),offGonzalez;Rendon(6),off T anaka;Soto(6),offGreen.RBIs„Austin3(23), Rendon(24),Stevenson(8),Severino(10),Soto 2(14).SF„Austin.S„Hicks. Runnersleftinscoringposition„NewYork 8 (Hicks3,Judge,Gregorius2,Andujar2); Washington1(Turner).RISP„NewYork2for11; Washington1for4. LIDP„Gregorius.GIDP„Stanton. DP„Washington2(Kendrick,Turner,Reynolds), (Soto,Turner). NEWYORKIPHRERBBSONPERA T anaka54 330272 4.58 Green,L,4-113 220232 2.36 S hreve11001116 4.56 Warren10000216 1.93 W ASHINGTONIPHRERBBSONPERA Gonzalez56 3245111 3.01 Suero,W,1-01.11 000219 3.31 Solis,H,11.20 00005 3.38 Madson,H,812 000012 4.38 Doolittle, S ,18-1910 000214 1.47 Inheritedrunners-scored„Solis1-0.HBP„Suero (Torres).WP„Gonzalez.PB„Sanchez(9). T „2:55.A„41,567(41,313).BOXSCORES ROUNDUP/MATCHUPSNationals5,Yankees3,Game1: Juan Sotospinch-hittwo-runhomerin thesixthinningofagamethatbegan andwassuspendedbecauseofrain lastmonth,“vedaysbeforehemade hismajorleaguedebut,liftedWashingtonintheopenerofanunusual doubleheader.Game1resumedwith thescore3-allandtheNationals abouttobatinthebottomofthe sixth.AfterBryceHarper„whohad afullbeardbackonMay15,whenthe gamebegan,butwasclean-shaven thistime„struckout,andAnthony Rendonsingled,Sotodrovea97mph fastballfromChadGreen(4-1)tothe backoftheseconddeckinright“eld. Itwasthe19-year-oldout“elders sixthhomersincehewascalledup fromDouble-AHarrisburgonMay 20.Sotostoodandadmiredtheshot beforebeginninghistrotaroundthe bases.Hisstats„andallothersfrom Game1„willcountasbeingpart oftheoriginallyscheduledgameon May15,butSotosof“cialdebutwill stillbeconsideredontheactualdate ithappened,accordingtotheNationals,citingtheEliasSportsBureau. LATE N.Y.YankeesatWashington,Game2 ChicagoWhiteSoxatCleveland TampaBayatHouston TexasatKansasCity ArizonaatL.A.Angels MilwaukeeatPittsburgh St.LouisatPhiladelphia L.A.DodgersatChicagoCubs N.Y.MetsatColorado MiamiatSanFranciscoTODAYSPITCHINGCOMPARISONNATIONALLEAGUE2018TEAMLASTTHREESTARTS TEAMSPITCHERSTIMEW-LERARECW-LIPERA MilwaukeePeralta(R)1-03.722-01-09.23.72 PittsburghTaillon(R)7:05p4-53.947-72-120.02.25 St.LouisWeaver(R)3-64.766-80-115.15.28 PhiladelphiaVelasquez(R)7:05p5-74.746-81-216.27.02 LosAngelesHill(L)1-26.202-40-19.26.52 ChicagoMontgomery(L)8:05p2-23.313-11-118.01.50 NewYorkVargas(L)2-57.392-61-215.03.00 ColoradoMarquez(R)8:40p4-75.136-80-216.08.44 MiamiStraily(R)2-24.235-40-113.05.54 SanFran.Rodriguez(R)10:15p1-14.342-11-115.14.70AMERICANLEAGUE2018TEAMLASTTHREESTARTS TEAMSPITCHERSTIMEW-LERARECW-LIPERA SeattleGonzales(L)7-33.4210-42-019.02.84 NewYorkTBD7:05p0-00.000-00-00.00.00 ChicagoRodon(L)0-13.600-20-110.03.60 ClevelandClevinger(R)7:10p5-23.156-81-019.23.20 BostonSale(L)6-42.758-71-220.02.70 MinnesotaBerrios(R)8:10p7-53.518-62-021.03.00 TampaBaySnell(L)8-42.588-71-117.02.65 HoustonVerlander(R)8:10p9-21.6110-52-019.03.79 TexasHamels(L)3-63.694-100-120.13.54 KansasCityHammel(R)8:15p2-75.004-100-219.14.19INTERLEAGUE2018TEAMLASTTHREESTARTS TEAMSPITCHERSTIMEW-LERARECW-LIPERA BaltimoreHess(R)2-34.132-40-215.14.11 WashingtonTBD7:05p0-00.000-00-00.00.00 AtlantaSoroka(R)2-12.573-11-115.03.00 TorontoGarcia(L)7:07p2-55.716-60-212.26.39 DetroitBoyd(L)4-43.238-51-018.13.93 CincinnatiRomano(R)7:10p3-75.676-81-118.05.00 ArizonaKoch(R)5-34.097-42-018.03.50 AngelsTBD10:07p0-00.000-00-00.00.00 OaklandBlackburn(R)1-111.051-11-17.111.05 SanDiegoLauer(L)10:10p3-46.203-72-115.23.45 KEY: TEAMREC-TeamsRecordingamesstartedbytodayspitcher. VSOPP-Pitchersrecordversusthisopponent. THISDATEINBASEBALLJUNE19 1927: JackScottofthePhiladelphiaPhilliespitched twocompletegamesinadoubleheader.Scottbeatthe CincinnatiReds3-1andlost3-0inthesecondgame. Scottwasthelastpitcherinmajorleaguehistoryto completetwogamesonthesameday. 1941: Enrouteto56,JoeDiMaggiohitinhis32nd consecutivegame,going3-for-3,includingahomerun, againsttheChicagoWhiteSox. 1942: PaulWanergothitnumber3,000„asingleoff RipSewell„buttheBostonBraveslosttothePittsburghPirates7-6. 1961: RogerMarisninth-inninghomeroffKansasCitys JimArcherwashis25thoftheyear,puttinghimseven gamesaheadofBabeRuthspacein1927. 1974: SteveBusbyoftheKansasCityRoyalshurledhis secondno-hitterin14monthsandgaveupjustone walkinbeatingtheBrewers2-0atMilwaukee. 1977: TheBostonRedSoxhit“vehomerunsinan11-1 triumphovertheNewYorkYankees.The“vehomers gavetheRedSoxamajorleaguerecord16inthree games.Bostonhitsixhomersonthe17thand“veon the18th,alsoagainsttheYankees.Intheseriesthe Yankeeshadnohomers. 1994: JohnSmoltzbecamethe14thmajorleague pitchertogiveupfourhomersinaninningwhenhe wastaggedbyCincinnati.TheRedssetateamrecord forhomerunsinaninning,connectingfourtimesinthe “rstinning.HalMorris,KevinMitchell,JeffBransonand EddieTaubenseehomered. Todaysbirthdays: AustinBrice,26;ChristianVillanueva,27;JacobdeGrom,30;DevinMesoraco,30;Collin McHugh,31;BlakeParker,33.STATISTICALLEADERSAMERICANLEAGUE RUNS: Trout,LosAngeles,60;Betts, Boston,55;Springer,Houston,54;Lindor, Cleveland,53;Segura,Seattle,52;Benintendi,Boston,51;Rosario,Minnesota,50; Judge,NewYork,49;Ramirez,Cleveland, 47;Martinez,Boston,46. RBI: Martinez,Boston,55;Haniger,Seattle, 53;Machado,Baltimore,53;KDavis,Oakland,49;Benintendi,Boston,47;Correa, Houston,47;Gattis,Houston,47;Ramirez, Cleveland,47;4tiedat46. HITS: Altuve,Houston,99;Segura,Seattle, 98;Castellanos,Detroit,89;Rosario,Minnesota,87;Lindor,Cleveland,84;Machado, Baltimore,83;Trout,LosAngeles,83; AJones,Baltimore,82;Martinez,Boston, 82;Springer,Houston,80. DOUBLES: Escobar,Minnesota,30;Abreu, Chicago,26;Lindor,Cleveland,23;Andujar, NewYork,22;Castellanos,Detroit,22;Merri“eld,KansasCity,22;Bregman,Houston, 21;Pillar,Toronto,21;Segura,Seattle,21. HOMERUNS: Trout,LosAngeles,23; Martinez,Boston,22;Ramirez,Cleveland, 21;KDavis,Oakland,20;Betts,Boston, 18;Gallo,Texas,18;Judge,NewYork,18; Machado,Baltimore,18;Cruz,Seattle,17; 5tiedat16. STOLENBASES: Gordon,Seattle,19; DeShields,Texas,15;Merri“eld,Kansas City,15;Anderson,Chicago,14;Segura, Seattle,14;Betts,Boston,13;Trout,Los Angeles,13;Benintendi,Boston,12;RDavis, Cleveland,12;Smith,TampaBay,12. ERA: Verlander,Houston,1.62;Severino, NewYork,2.09;Kluber,Cleveland,2.24; Cole,Houston,2.40;Snell,TampaBay,2.58; Bauer,Cleveland,2.69;Sale,Boston,2.75; Skaggs,LosAngeles,2.81;Morton,Houston,2.94;Clevinger,Cleveland,3.15. STRIKEOUTS: Cole,Houston,130;Sale, Boston,129;Bauer,Cleveland,121;Verlander,Houston,120;Severino,NewYork, 118;Paxton,Seattle,115;Kluber,Cleveland,106;Morton,Houston,105;Bundy, Baltimore,100;Snell,TampaBay,97. NATIONALLEAGUE RUNS: Albies,Atlanta,53;Blackmon,Colorado,53;Pham,St.Louis,51;Goldschmidt, Arizona,49;Hernandez,Philadelphia,47; Yelich,Milwaukee,47;Freeman,Atlanta, 46;Arenado,Colorado,45;CTaylor,Los Angeles,45;Cain,Milwaukee,43. RBI: Story,Colorado,54;Suarez,Cincinnati,52;Freeman,Atlanta,49;Gennett, Cincinnati,48;Baez,Chicago,46;Rizzo, Chicago,46;Shaw,Milwaukee,45;Markakis,Atlanta,44;Harper,Washington,43; Kemp,LosAngeles,43. HITS: Markakis,Atlanta,92;Freeman, Atlanta,91;Gennett,Cincinnati,87; Anderson,Miami,81;Crawford,SanFrancisco,78;Castro,Miami,77;Dickerson, Pittsburgh,77;5tiedat76. DOUBLES: Albies,Atlanta,21;Markakis, Atlanta,21;Freeman,Atlanta,20;Hosmer, SanDiego,20;McCutchen,SanFrancisco, 20;Anderson,Miami,19;Castro,Miami, 19;5tiedat18. HOMERUNS: Harper,Washington,19; Albies,Atlanta,16;Freeman,Atlanta,15; Story,Colorado,15;Villanueva,SanDiego, 15;6tiedat14. STOLENBASES: MTaylor,Washington, 21;Inciarte,Atlanta,20;Turner,Washington,20;Cain,Milwaukee,15;Hamilton, Cincinnati,13;SMarte,Pittsburgh,13; Baez,Chicago,12;Dyson,Arizona,12; Jankowski,SanDiego,11;Hernandez, Philadelphia,10. ERA: deGrom,NewYork,1.55;Scherzer, Washington,2.06;Foltynewicz,Atlanta, 2.17;Lester,Chicago,2.28;Mikolas,St. Louis,2.43;Nola,Philadelphia,2.55;Newcomb,Atlanta,2.70;Guerra,Milwaukee, 2.89;Gonzalez,Washington,3.01;Wacha, St.Louis,3.24. STRIKEOUTS: Scherzer,Washington, 152;Corbin,Arizona,117;deGrom,New York,113;Gray,Colorado,100;Strasburg, Washington,95;Foltynewicz,Atlanta,94; Nola,Philadelphia,94;Greinke,Arizona, 90;Velasquez,Philadelphia,89.SUNDAYSGAMES AmericanLeague Cleveland4,Minnesota1 TampaBay3,N.Y.Yankees1 Detroit3,ChicagoWhiteSox1 Houston7,KansasCity4 Oakland6,L.A.Angels5,11innings Boston9,Seattle3 NationalLeague Atlanta4,SanDiego1 Cincinnati8,Pittsburgh6 Philadelphia10,Milwaukee9 N.Y.Mets5,Arizona3 SanFrancisco4,L.A.Dodgers1 St.Louis5,ChicagoCubs0 Interleague Toronto8,Washington6 Baltimore10,Miami4 Texas13,Colorado12 WEDNESDAYSGAMES AmericanLeague DetroitatCincinnati,12:35p.m. Chi.WhiteSoxatCleveland,1:10p.m. SeattleatN.Y.Yankees,7:05p.m. BostonatMinnesota,8:10p.m. TampaBayatHouston,8:10p.m. TexasatKansasCity,8:15p.m. NationalLeague St.LouisatPhiladelphia,1:05p.m. L.A.DodgersatChicagoCubs,2:20p.m. MiamiatSanFrancisco,3:45p.m. MilwaukeeatPittsburgh,7:05p.m. N.Y.MetsatColorado,8:40p.m. Interleague AtlantaatToronto,12:37p.m. OaklandatSanDiego,3:40p.m. BaltimoreatWashington,7:05p.m.BASEBALLCALENDARJULY2: Internationalamateursigning periodopens. JULY6: Lastdaytosignforamateur draftpickssubjecttodeadline. JULY17: All-StarGame,Washington. JULY29: HallofFameinductions, Cooperstown,N.Y. JULY31: Lastdaytotradeaplayer withoutsecuringwaivers. OCT.2-3: Wild-cardgames. DEC.10-13: Winter meetings,LasVegas. TOPTEN A MERICANLEAGUE PlayerGABRHPct. SeguraSea692885298.340 BettsBos542095571.340 AltuveHou732944599.337 TroutLAA722536083.328 RosarioMin682715087.321 BrantleyCle592413677.320 MDuffyTB562231871.318 SimmonsLAA612233371.318 JMartinezBos692604682.315 CastellanosDet702873689.310 NATIONALLEAGUE PlayerGABRHPct. KempLAD682163273.338 FFreemanAtl712704691.337 GennettCin692593687.336 MarkakisAtl712814292.327 AlmoraChC632003865.325 MartinezStL632343275.321 BCrawfordSF702483178.315 ArenadoCol652454576.310 DickersonPit652503277.308 VottoCin702523476.302 ThroughJune17 Rain,raingoaway T heWrigleyFieldgroundscrewpreparesthein“eldtarpforanapproachingstormbeforeagamebetweenthe ChicagoCubsandtheLosAngelesDodgersonMondayinChicago.[CHARLESREXARBOGAST/THEASSOCIATEDPRESS]

PAGE 15

DEAR ABBY: A dear friend has been battling cervical cancer. Her condition has left her dependent on a colostomy bag. She's not shy about discussing it on Facebook and in public, where she speaks loudly. I have tried to be understanding and supportive, but there are limits. My problem is, she's hell-bent on making sure I see this colostomy bag by frequently checking to see if it's full, even after returning from the bathroom where I'm certain she checked it. More recently, we were at a restaurant and she exposed her bag in full view of others while they were eating. (The bag was full!) Not only was it disgusting, it's also unhygienic should the bag become disconnected or rupture. Am I insensitive for thinking this is inappropriate and that she should excuse herself to go to the bathroom? -NAUSEATED IN MICHIGAN DEAR NAUSEATED: No, I don't think you are insensitive. While a colostomy bag is nothing to be ashamed of, because it involves human waste, decorum dictates that it be kept away from the dining table. Have a frank talk with your friend, tell her her behavior is inappropriate, and ask her not to do it in front of you.DEAR ABBY: I grew up in the generation where if you were gay and you came "out of the closet," as it was called, you were not accepted in the community. A lot has changed since then. However, when it hits close to home, it's difcult for me to deal with. My 19-year-old daughter told me three years ago that she's gay. At rst I thought she was going through a phase and she was trying to nd herself. Now she's dating girls her age, and I'm having a difcult time accepting it. Can you help me? -STRUGGLING MOTHER IN ILLINOIS DEAR STRUGGLING: Be glad we're not living in the bad old days because the ones we're living in are healthier for everyone. Start by congratulating yourself for having raised a daughter who is honest about her feelings and determined to live her life authentically. While some things may be different than you fantasized when she was little, it does not mean she won't be happy, successful and possibly a parent, if she wishes. Support her as she navigates through her journey in life. If you do, you -and she -will be ne.DEAR ABBY: During the last year, a female friend of mine has started suggesting that she wants more from our relationship than just a friendship. She has had a history of doing this whenever she becomes friends with a guy. When she started sending me pictures that became more and more suggestive, I decided to distance myself from her. But in the last month, she has been getting increasingly bold with her advances. How do I handle this without hurting her? -FRIEND AND NOTHING MORE IN IOWA DEAR FRIEND: Tell your friend you like her, but what she has been doing is making you increasingly uncomfortable. Be direct about saying you are not interested in a sexual relationship with her. Then, if she persists, continue to distance yourself from her. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in diculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION BRIDGE CRYPTOQUOTE HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORY DIVERSIONS HAPPY BIRTHDAY FOR TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2018:This year you often feel tense, as you see and hear so many different views and solutions. You will be successful, but you also want to be healthy. Develop some stress-busting habits. If you are single, you might meet someone special from out of the blue. From fall onward, you will feel particularly cared for. If you are attached, develop a shared interest or hobby with your sweetie. As a result, you will nd that your bond strengthens. VIRGO might be very instrumental in your decision-making process.ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19) You count on your intuition when making decisions. At times, you might be getting mixed messages. Opportunities come through a close relationship or friendship. Even if you trust this person, it doesnt mean that all of his or her ideas t your situation. TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20) Tap into your creativity to nd solutions. Confusion could continue to be an issue in certain relationships. Wait until there is some clarity. You need to approach a situation with respect for different styles; be open to a more liberal slant. GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20) You are centered and focused. Your priorities reect who you are, and they tend to involve your home and family. Confusion surrounds joint nances and choices. You have the energy to handle everything you must. A partner could be more demanding than usual. CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22) Your upbeat personality emerges. Ask as many questions as you need to. Listen to your inner voice when dealing with a partner. You might nd that this person seems to be distancing himor herself. Be resourceful in how you draw him or her in. LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22) Your concerns revolve around your nances and how much you give to others. On some level, you could be overwhelmed. You might be pleasantly surprised by how a friend offers to pitch in. Recognize that a trip to the doctor might be appropriate. VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22) Your charisma draws others toward you. You often are overwhelmed by situations and what occurs. Remain sure of yourself and ready to move in a new direction. Your creativity and intellect help you sort through a confusing comment or situation. LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22) Remain sensitive to a loved one. Know that what this person says about you has little to do with his or her true feelings. Activity involving your nances seems busier than usual, whether money is coming in or going out of your wallet. SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21) Beam in more of what you want. How you say what you think and how you approach the matter could be quite different. Try to be more in sync, and you will be in a stronger position. Listen to a wiser person and you will gain insight. SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21) You nd tension mounting, no matter what you do. Your ability to let go of a problematic matter could dene your day. Do your best to enjoy yourself despite someone elses criticism. Your easygoing nature is one of the reasons you are successful. CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19) Try harder to identify with a loved one. You will open up to new visions and different ways of looking at a personal matter. A friend appears and seems to bring good luck with him or her. Listen and value this persons suggestions and ideas. AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18) One-on-one relating points to a better image in public and within your immediate circle. You tend to sit on some strong feelings, as you might not be conscious of their source. Refuse to close down. Allow yourself to open up more. PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20) Defer to someone you care about but with whom you often disagree. The two of you have similar issues, but how you deal with them differs greatly. A friend could be difcult. Give this person the space he or she needs to learn and grow. Cancer patient discusses too much detail in public DailyCommercial.com | Tuesday, June 19, 2018 B5 TODAY IS TUESDAY, JUNE 19, the 170th day of 2018. There are 195 days left in the year. TODAY'S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY: On June 19, 1953, Julius Rosenberg, 35, and his wife, Ethel, 37, convicted of conspiring to pass U.S. atomic secrets to the Soviet Union, were executed at Sing Sing Prison in Ossining, New York. ON THIS DATE: In 1775 George Washington was commissioned by the Continental Congress as commander in chief of the Continental Army. In 1938, four dozen people were killed when a railroad bridge in Montana collapsed, sending a train known as the Olympian hurtling into Custer Creek. In 1944, during World War II, the two-day Battle of the Philippine Sea began, resulting in a decisive victory for the Americans over the Japanese. In 1952 the U.S. Army Special Forces, the elite unit of ghters known as the Green Berets, was established at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. In 1964, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was approved by the U.S. Senate, 73-27, after surviving a lengthy libuster. In 1978, the comic strip "Gareld," created by Jim Davis, was rst published in 41 newspapers. In 1999, author Stephen King was seriously injured when he was struck by a van driven by Bryan Smith in North Lovell, Maine.

PAGE 16

CLASSIC PEANUTS HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH COMICS B6 Tuesday, June 19, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com

PAGE 17

DailyCommercial.com | Tuesday, June 19, 2018 B7 Florida Air & Heat Inc. Your Comfort Company100% Financing Available Licensed Insured BondedServing Our Area Since 1986 State License # CAC1814030CALL 352-326-3202For ALL Your Heating & Cooling Needs A/C Services 352-408-7722 ASK FOR KEITH CARPORTS, SCREEN ROOMS POOL CAGES, PATIO STRUCTURES FOR HOME OWNERS QUESTIONS, WE HAVE ANSWERS! Aluminum Services John Philibert, IncWe do Everything from Ceilings to Floors. Pantries, Cabinets and more.Your pesky leaks gone and houses well paint. From inside and out, well make it great. Lic/Ins. Accepting Visa & MC. JPHandy.com (352) 308-0694 LAMINATE, WOOD & TILE SALE!Great Prices Exceptional Service!20 Years ExperienceSHOWROOM11433 US Hwy 441, Tavares Call Chris352-636-1643 D2452SD Garage Door Services €PressureWashing€Painting €Flooring€Carpet€CleanOuts €CleanUps€Hauling€Licensed352-787-7056 Handyman Services John Philibert, IncFor All Your Flooring Needs Pergo, Ceramic Tile, Travertine, Vinyl & MoreCall John @ (352) 308-0694 Flooring Services CCC1330633D2453SD JERRYS AFFORDABLE CARTS 352-818-9959 LIC. / INS. CHECKS OR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED BILL ROGERS IRRIGATION SERVICE35 YEARS EXPERIENCELIC NO. 22190/INS/BONDEDOWNER OPERATOR352-446-1059 Irrigation Services Home Improvement Golf Cart Services 352-455-8241 Also Specializing in Siding, Soft Fascia and Screen Roooms SEAMLESS GUTTERS iMan 4-U O C D I AŽR CJOSEPH MAGRUM352-636-2599TAX ID, INSURED rufus_62@yahoo.com Gutter Services All Pro Movers LLC Lic./Ins. Fla IM NO: IM2580ResidentialRandall Rolle Manager352-817-5159allpromovers.villages@gmail.comwww.allpromoversllc.com We Also Offer (352) 308-0694 John Philibert, IncFor All Your Interior/Exterior Painting Needs. FREE ESTIMATES!30 Years of Quality Experiencewww.BestPaintRem.com352-210-3964Lic/Ins15% OFFSenior Discount Painting Services Painting Services Lawn Mower Repair Services Moving Services Pressure Cleaning D2458SD EXTERIOR CLEANING SERVICES RESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL352-603-4240Licensed & Insured LAWN PRO LAWN SERVICE352-978-6014Reliable Service with Quality Results! FREE ESTIMATES ADVANTAGE LANDSCAPE 352.242.8445 MARCELOS PAINTING NEW CONSTRUCTION COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL REPAINT INTERIOR & EXTERIOR FREE ESTIMATES Tel: 352-257-261720 YRS. EXPERIENCE LICENSED & INSURED Comfort Seal Roof Systems, Inc.TM352-242-5055 MEET THE CONTRACTOR NOT A SALESMANŽ! BETTER THAN ANY METAL OR SHINGLE ROOF! NOT ONE ROOF LOST TO ANY STORM! NO PAY UNTIL JOB IS DONE! SPECIAL DISCOUNT FOR FELLOW VETERANS!St. Lic. # CCC1325522 Our 32nd Year Over 12,000 Roofs For Mobile/Manufactured Homes BEST ROOF BEST PRICES GUARANTEED! LIC#CCC042879 #CCC1330633D2472SD Roo“ng Services Re-roofs/RepairsShingles/Metal/FlatLic. #CCC1329936Covenant Roo“ng and Construction, Inc.#1 IN ROOFINGFREE ROOF ESTIMATES352-314-3625 D2444SD J.C.C.Bobcat&TreeSvc.Inc.LandClearing/Excavating FillDirt/Clay Hauling/DebrisRemoval StumpGrinding Demolition/Grading/Driveways OwnerOperator352-455-7608D2434SD Land Clearing Services Landscaping Services LandscapingTrimming,Mulching, Sod,TreeTrimming,Pavers&MuchMore! ArmandoSantamario352-587-1323D2415SD COMMERCIAL-RESIDENTIAL €AssortedRock&Stone €PaverInstallation/Repair €PalmandTreeInstallation €DecorativeWalls €RetainingWalls €CurbingandMulching €SoddingandIrrigation €SeasonedFirewood €FullLandscapingNeedsFULLGARDENCENTERFreeEstimates,SeniorDiscounts2402SouthSt.,Leesburg352-516-6936TEDBYRNE OwnerLic/InsD2420SD A-1 UNITED SERVICES 352-460-3763CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATESOne Call Does It AllŽLICENSEDINSUREDINT. / EXT. PAINTINGHOME REMODELSALL PHASES OF PRESSURE CLEANINGAND MUCH MORE! A-1 UNITED SERVICES 352-460-3763CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATESOne Call Does It AllŽLICENSEDINSURED Tree Services Tree Services Tree Services BAD TREE CALL ME!27 YEARS EXPERIENCE NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL! FREE ESTIMATES TONY THE TREE TRIMMER 2402SouthSt.,Leesburg352-516-6936Senior Discounts TreeRemoval,Trimming,CanopyReduction, CraneService,StumpGrinding, SeasonedFirewood-COMPLETEGARDENCENTERD2460SD D 20 88 S D D2471SD J.C.C.Bobcat&TreeSvc.Inc.Residential/Commercial Trimming/Removal Palms/Hedges/StumpGrinding Debrisremoval/Hauling FillDirt/Clay/Grading/Driveways Lic/Ins€InsuranceWork€24Hrs.352-455-7608 D2463SD Upholstery Services D2470SD Window Services GEORGE WATKINS 352-587-2735Window ReplacementLanai Enclosures Acrylic WindowsCRC# 1330701 BLIND REPAIRSNo Cost...If We Cant Fix It!352-217-7556exceptionsblinds.comTo have your Professional Service listed here, please contact the Classi“ed Department at (352) 314-3278. 352-396-6238DAMIAN BROOKSDamianbrooks80@yahoo.com You've Tried The Rest...Now Go With The Best! RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIALPERFECT CLEANING Cleaning Services CONCRETE 352.602.8077 Concrete For Less8x10 Slab $800 10x48 Slab $2600No UPFRONT Costs!Blocking/ Ref./Lic./Ins.Lic #113336Phillip 352-504-8372Includes Concrete & Labor D2424SD AllConcreteServices CrackRepair€FreeEstimatesServingLakeCounty30YearsBonded,Insured,Lic#11066CallBobat352.223.7935 Concrete Services CCC1330633D2453SD Construction Services Door & Lock Services D2451SD BRIAN DEGAGLIA CONSTRUCTION SERVICESIncludes: Forming, Pouring, Stripping, Cutting, & Materials. Does Not include stripping of sod or roots, removing of concrete, pumping or hauling of debris. 352-267-5723 CRC 1326327 Only Mobile/ Manufactured Home ROOFINGwww.AllFloridaRoofs.com All Florida Weatherproong & Construction, Inc.FREE VIDEO ROOF INSPECTIONS1-877.572.1019 352-586-7178Serving Citrus, Hernando, Sumter and Surrounding CountiesCHEAP RATES GREEN ACRES MOWINGWe mow or bushhog acreage of any amount in all of Central & South Lake County REASONABLE PRICES!352-360-5445

PAGE 18

2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHER'S NOTICEFederal and State laws prohibit advertising expressing a discriminatory preference on the basis of race, age, sex, color, national origin, religion, handicap or marital status. The Daily Commercial will not knowingly accept advertisement for employment which is in violation of the law. Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance Employment Classifications are intended to announce bona de employment offers only. Employment advertising must disclose the specic nature of the work being offered. Some employment categories may charge fees. If any advertiser does not comply with these standards, please notify a Classied Sales Representative at 365-8245 or 365-8200. 2990 B8 Tuesday, June 19, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com This newspaper will never knowingly accept advertisement that is illegal or considered fraudulent. If you have questions or doubts about any ads on these pages, we advise that before responding or sending money ahead of time, you check with the local Attorney Generals Consumer Fraud Line and/or the Better Business Bureau. Also be advised that some phone numbers published in these ads may require an extra charge. In all cases of questionable value, such as promises or guaranteed income from work-athome programs, money to loan, etc., if it sounds too good to be true „ it may in fact be exactly that. This newspaper cannot be held responsible for any negative consequences that occur as a result of you doing business with these advertisers. Thank you. NOTICES 1000-1999READER NOTICE 1001

PAGE 19

6865PETSThe Florida Statute 828.29 states that no dog, puppy, cat or kitten may be offered for sale without a health certi cate, nor can any puppy or kitten be sold under the age of 8 weeks, nor can you advertise puppies or kittens with a deposit to hold. DailyCommercial.com | Tuesday, June 19, 2018 B9 CROSSWORD PUZZLE Get the paper delivered to you! Call Us Today! 787-0600 (Lake) 877-702-0600 (Sumter) 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Mon Fri. subscribe online at www.dailycommercial.com

PAGE 20

B10 Tuesday, June 19, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com Advertise your business 352-365-8210 Run with the pack! TODAY! in the Service Directory