Citation
Daily Commercial

Material Information

Title:
Daily Commercial
Place of Publication:
Leesburg, FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group, Steve Skaggs - Publisher, Tom McNiff - Executive Editor
Publication Date:

Subjects

Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Lake -- Leesburg
Coordinates:
28.81134 x -81.872708

Record Information

Rights Management:
Copyright Daily Commercial. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Digital Newspaper Library

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

SPORTS B4LAKE SENIOR GAMES GET UNDERWAY IN APRIL DINE | C1SIP RESTAURANT BRINGS NIGHTLIFE TO DOWNTOWN LEESBURG SPORTS | B1EUSTIS ROUTS THE VILLAGES 10-0 IN BATTLE OF 5A-6 RIVALS Opinion .......................A9 Weather .....................A10 Sports ..........................B1 Dine ............................C1 Diversions ...................C7 Comics ....................... C8 Volume 142, Issue 87 2018 GateHouse Media Home delivery: 352-787-0600 @dailycommercial Facebook.com./daily.commercial YOUR LOCAL SOURCE FOR LAKE & SUMTER COUNTIES Wednesday, March 28, 2018 75 ¢ Additional $6 million would be used for road projects locallyBy Roxanne Brownroxanne.brown@ dailycommercial.comTAVARES „ Lake County commissioners want citizens to decide this November whether to raise the gas tax by 5 cents a gallon to pay for road construction projects.The commission voted 3-2 Tuesday, with Joshua Blake and Sean Parks voting no, to put the measure on the ballot for the mid-term elections.If passed, the gas tax would be implemented in January 1, 2020 and would remain in effect for 10 years.Anecdotally, just in talk-ing to people, I feel most of them want better roads,Ž Commissioner Leslie Cam-pione said.Blake said the last thing people need is another tax and that he would not vote for it unless property taxes could be reduced by a similar amount to offset it and reduce the average tax burden for citizens.Parks said although he feels that the gas tax is fair, he thinks thereare too many unanswered questions about what the tax money could be used for. He wants the county to present more information to educate Lake voters to decide on 5-cent gas tax By Frank Stanfieldfrankstanfield@dailycommercial.comLEESBURG „ City com-missioners Monday night got more good news about the historic Mote-Morris house damaged by fire in February.Brown and Brown insurance company has disclosed that the house will be funded up to $500,000 over the insured value. This will immediately provide approximately $1,225,000 for repair,Ž City Manager Al Minner wrote in a memo to the commissioners. If the city elected to demolish the building, the insurance would pay out only $725,000, he said.He also noted that while a final structural engineering report has Ready to rebuild Leesburgs historic Mote-Morris house was gutted by “ re on Feb. 20. [BOB SNOW/CORRESPONDENT] Big insurance payout may cover repairs to Mote-Morris houseBy David EggertThe Associated PressEAST LANSING, Mich. „ The sexual abuse scandal at Michigan State University widened Tuesday when authorities charged a former dean not only with failing to keep sports doctor Larry Nassar in line but with sexu-ally harassing female students and pressuring them for nude selfies.William Strampel, 70, is the first person charged since an investigation was launched in January into how Michi-gan State handled complaints against Nassar, who for years sexually violated girls and young women, especially gymnasts, with his fingers during examinations.Strampel, who as dean of the College of Osteopathic Former dean charged in Nassar scandalWilliam Strampel appears on a monitor Tuesday during his video arraignment in East Lansing, Mich. [PAUL SANCYA/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] By Julie Pace and Emily SwansonThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ The good news for President Donald Trump? His approval rating is up 7 points since last month, according to a new poll by The Asso-ciated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.The bad news? That only lifts Trumps approval to 42 percent, low for a president at this point in his tenure.Still, the trajectory is a welcome shift for a White House that has been battered by chaos, controversies and internal upheaval. The poll suggests that at least some of the presidents improving standing is tied to the economy and the Republican tax overhaul, which offers a glimmer of hope for GOP lawmakers who plan to make both issues the centerpiece of their efforts to maintain control of Congress in November.Nearly half of Americans surveyed „ 47 percent „ say they approve of how Trump is handling the economy, his highest rating on any issue. When it comes to tax policy, 46 percent of Americans back Trumps moves.Our fortunes will rise and fall with the economy and specifically with the middle-class tax cut this fall,Ž said Corry Bliss, executive director of the Congressional Leadership Fund, a super PAC aligned with House Speaker Paul Ryan. Bliss urged Republican can-didates to view the law as an offensive, not defensive weapon.ŽOne of the GOPs Trumps approval rating up from historic lows See TAX, A6 See REBUILD, A6 See NASSAR, A6 See TRUMP, A6

PAGE 2

A2 Wednesday, March 28, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com NATION & WORLDPUBLISHER Steve Skaggs: steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.com ......................352-365-8213 EXECUTIVE EDITOR Tom McNiff: tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com ............................352-365-8250 DIGITAL EDITOR, LIFESTYLES EDITOR Whitney Lehnecker: whitney.lehnecker@dailycommercial.com ....352-365-8258 SPORTS EDITOR Paul Jenkins: paul.jenkins@dailycommercial.com ..........................352-365-8204 SPORTS WRITER Frank Jolley: frank.jolley@dailycommet.com..................................352-365-8268 REPORTER Frank Stan“ eld: frank.stand“ eld@dailycommercial.com ...............352-374-8257 REPORTER Roxanne Brown: roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com ................352-365-8266 YOUR LOCAL NEWS SOURCE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIESPrint delivery available within the newspaper distribution area only. By submitting your address and/or email, you understand that you may receive promotional offers from Gatehouse Media and its related companies. You may unsubscribe from receiving any such offers at any ti me by calling 352-787-0600. The advertised price does not include the charges for any premium editions. Premium editions are published to p rovide additional information and value to our readers. You agree that you will be charged up to an additional $5.00 for each premium edition pub lished and delivered to you during your subscription period, in addition to the cost of your subscription. The length of your subscription will be s hortened by the publication of premium editions if those premium editions are delivered to you during your subscription. You may elect to be billed se parately for premium editions by contacting Customer Service at 1-352-787-0600. Thus, unless you elect to be billed separately up to an additional $ 3.00 for each premium edition, you agree that the length of your subscription will be shortened in proportion to the value of the number of premium e ditions published and delivered to you during your subscription period. As an illustrative example, if you select a subscription of up to 12 week s at a cost of $48.00, and two premium editions at $2.00 each are published and delivered to you during that subscription period, your subscription wi ll be shortened by 1 week because the weekly cost of the subscription is $4.00 per week and the premium edition charges total $4.00. Depending upo n the length of your subscription and the timing of the publication and delivery of premium editions, you will not be charged for any premium e ditions if none are published and delivered to you during your subscription. As such, in that case only, the length of your subscription will not b e shortened. The timing of the publication and delivery of premium editions is variable. There will be no more than 1 premium edition published each mo nth during the subscription term. Visit Dailycommercial.com for examples of premium editions. For more info or to cancel your subscription ple ase call 352-787-0600.The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $178.47 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by GateHouse Media at 21 2 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to the Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edit ion is property of the Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER?: Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call from 7 a. m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and from 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. If youre going on vacation, call circulation 48 hours ahead to stop service. ANNOUNCEMENTS, CALENDAR, GAME RESULTS: Email upcoming events, along with news about awards and personal or professional milestones „ with a photo, if you desire „ to news@dailycommercial.com. Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268 or 352-365-8204. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY: The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the n ews department at 352-365-8250. Retail Advertising .........................................................352-314-3278 Classi“ ed Advertising ...................................................352-314-3278 Lake Circulation............................................................352-787-0600 Sumter Circulation .......................................................877-702-0600 Billing ...........................................................................352-787-0600 Accounting ...................................................................352-365-8212 SUBSCRIPTION RATES Home delivery (Daily/Sunday) 3 months: 41.70 ....................Tax: 2.92 ..........................Total: 44.62 6 months: 88.40 ....................Tax: 5.84 ..........................Total: 89.24 1 year: 166.80 .......................Tax: 11.68 ........................Total: 178.47 FOR HOME DELIVERY: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., the Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. Monday, March 26 Fantasy 5: 6-15-17-33-34 Cash 4 Life: 2-9-23-47-54-3 Tuesday, March 27 Pick 5 Afternoon: 8-5-0-8-6 Evening: 0-9-9-9-1 Pick 4 Afternoon: 0-9-7-2 Evening: 8-3-1-9 Pick 3 Afternoon: 6-6-8 Evening: 9-9-4 Pick 2 Afternoon: 7-1 Evening: 5-8LOTTERY NATION AND WORLD DIGEST LOS ANGELESDecade-long makeover of King Tuts tomb nearly completedA nearly decade-long make-over of King Tuts tomb aimed at preserving one of Egypts most important archaeological sites and also one of its most popu-lar tourist attractions is close to complete, the Getty Conserva-tion Institute of Los Angeles said Tuesday.The project has added a filtration system to keep out dust and humidity and a barrier to keep visitors from continuing to damage the tombs elaborate wall paintings. Other amenities include walkways and a viewing platform.New lights are also scheduled to be installed in the fall in the tomb of Tutankhamen, the leg-endary boy king who ruled Egypt more than 3,000 years ago. ATLANTAAtlanta tries to get back to normal in wake of cyberattackAtlanta city employees have been advised to turn on their computers and printers for the first time since a cyberattack hit the citys network last week.A city news release said Tues-day that some computers are expected operate normally but others may still be affected by the ransomware attack that was announced last Thursday. The city said turning on com-puters is part of its restoration and recovery process after the attack got into the network and encrypted some city data.By Michael Kunzelman and Anthony IzaguirreThe Associated PressBATON ROUGE, La. „ Louisianas attorney general ruled out criminal charges Tuesday against two white Baton Rouge police officers in the shooting of a black man whose death led to widespread protests nearly two years ago.Attorney General Jeff Landrys decision came nearly 11 months after the Justice Department ruled out fed-eral criminal charges in Alton Sterlings July 2016 death.Officer Blane Salamoni shot and killed Sterling during a struggle outside a convenience store where the 37-year-old black man was selling homemade CDs. Officer Howie Lake II helped wrestle Sterling to the ground, but Lake didnt fire his gun. Two cellphone videos of the shooting quickly spread on social media, prompting large protests.Landry made the announcement of no charges against the officers at a news conference after meeting with family members of Sterling. Relatives and their lawyers angrily denounced the decision.Quinyetta McMillon, the mother of one of Sterlings children, Cameron, said the officers killed Sterling in cold blood.Ž They took a human away. They took a father away. They took somebody away that did not deserve to be away,Ž she said.Landry said his office reviewed all of the evidence compiled by the Justice Department and also conducted its own interviews of witnesses.I know the Sterling family is hurting,Ž Landry told reporters. I know that they may not agree with the decision.ŽToxicology and urine test results released Tuesday showed Sterling had cocaine, methamphetamine, fentanyl and other drugs in his system at the time of the confrontation. Landry said it was reasonableŽ to conclude Sterling was under the influence of drugs during the struggle with the officers and that contributed to his non-complianceŽ with their commands.Landry did not take any questions from reporters.A lawyer for two of Sterlings five children slammed the report as biased. L. Chris Stewart said investigators did not follow up with witnesses and relied heavily on the two federal investigators who already looked into the case. He also criticized the decision to put Sterlings criminal his-tory into the report, which he said had nothing to do with the case.The officers body cameras and a store surveillance camera also recorded the encounter. Those videos havent been released, but Baton Rouge Police Chief Murphy Paul said he intends to release both after he concludes the disciplinary process for the two officers, who have remained on paid administrative leave since the July 5, 2016, shooting.Paul said he hopes to com-plete the disciplinary process by Friday. Salamonis attorney, John McLindon, said he expects his client to be fired and called it grossly unfairŽ that a disciplinary hearing is planned less than a week after the end of the criminal investigation.I believe its a foregone conclusion,Ž McLindon said. The decision has already been made.ŽResidents at the convenience store where Sterling was killed said they werent surprised by Landrys decision. LeRoi Dunn, a 40-year-old cook, gestured at the spot where Sterling was killed and said it was wrong for the officers to avoid any charges.It hurts, though, to see them get away and go on with their lives,Ž Dunn said.State and federal authori-ties said Salamoni yelled that Sterling was reaching for a gun in his pocket before shooting him three times, and then fired three more shots into Sterlings back when he began to sit up and move. A 34-page report by Landrys office said its important to noteŽ that Sterlings hands were con-cealed from the officers as he sat up and rolled away from Salamoni.The officers recovered a loaded revolver from Sterlings pocket. As a convicted felon, Sterling could not legally carry a gun.Video footage shows Ster-ling threatening someone with a firearm before the offi-cers responding to a report of a man with a gun outside the Triple S Food Mart, according to Landrys report.The officers told Sterling to put his hands on the hood of a car and struggled with him when he didnt comply, Landrys office said. Sterling continued to resist after Sal-amoni drew his weapon and threatened to shoot him in the head if he didnt stop moving, according to Landrys report. Lake shocked Sterling with a stun gun twice before the officers wrestled him to the ground, investigators said.No charges in black mans shootingPhotos of Alton Sterling are taped to the wall at a makeshift memorial outside the Triple S convenience store July 6, 2016 in Baton Rouge, La. Sterling was shot and killed by Baton Rouge police outside the store where he was selling CDs. [ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO]

PAGE 3

DailyCommercial.com | Wednesday, March 28, 2018 A3 LOCAL & STATETom McNiff, editor 352-365-8250 tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com BEST BETS FOR TODAYEASTER EGGSTRAVAGANZA: From 6 to 8 p.m. at First Baptist Church of Montverde, 17409 Eighth St. With bounce houses, pony rides, hot dogs, popcorn and egg hunt. Free admission. Call 407-469-4569 for information. NATURE SPROUTS: At 10:30 a.m. the fourth Wednesday of each month at Trout Lake Nature Center, 520 E. County Road 44 in Eustis. For ages 2 to 5. Explore nature through stories, crafts, songs and games. Free. Registration required. Call 352357-7536 or register at universe. com/sprouts2017. PARTNERS FOR SUCCESS SKILLS SHOWCASE: From 5 to 7 p.m. at Clermont Arts and Recreation Center, 3700 S. U.S. Highway 27. Business leaders connect with future workforce through open dialogue focused on employment. Go to partnersforsuccesslc.org or call 352-742-3923.NEWS BRIEFSGROVELANDGroveland man charged with molesting girl multiple timesLake County sheriffs deputies on Monday arrested a Groveland man for molesting a girl. Scott Saul Weingeroff, 71, of Burkhalter Road, openly said he had done something he should not have and that he knew it was wrong,Ž according to the arrest af“ davit. The girl told a relative that Weingeroff had hurt her. When asked why she had not said anything sooner, she said he told her not to tell anyone. Weingeroff admitted to taking advantage of the girl three times over a year and a half, though he gave con” icting statements about what he had done, according to reports. He was charged with capital sex battery, exposing himself and lewd and lascivious molestation on a girl younger than 12. If convicted of capital sex battery, Weingeroff faces a mandatory life sentence. TAMPAGov. Scott signs bill to add bene“ ts to “ rst respondersFlorida will expand workers compensation bene“ ts so “ rst responders can get coverage for post-traumatic stress disorder. Gov. Rick Scott on Tuesday signed a bill that would allow “ re“ ghters, paramedics, and law-enforcement of“ cers to get PTSD treatment even if they do not sustain a physical injury. The legislation was a top priority for Chief Financial Of“ cer Jimmy Patronis. Patronis, who also serves as the state's “ re marshal, toured the state and met with “ re“ ghters and talked to them about their experiences. He said the number of suicide attempts is higher among “ re“ ghters than the general population. Rep. Matt Willhite sponsored the bill. His fulltime job is serving as a captain at Palm Beach County Fire Rescue. PENSACOLAAirport suspends ” ights over ball bearing tester in bagA suspicious item found in a checked bag at a Florida airport turned out to be a ball bearing tester. Before of“ cials “ gured out what the item was Tuesday morning, Pensacola International Airport suspended all ” ights, detained three South Korean passengers and called in a bomb squad from a nearby county in the Florida Panhandle. Pensacola police spokesman Mike Wood told news outlets there was a language barrier between the passengers and of“ cials. But he added that the airport was never in any danger. An interpreter spoke to the passengers, who were in Pensacola on business related to the device. They explained the ball bearing tester's purpose and the airport received the all-clear. Flights were suspended for about two hours.Superintendents say money may not cover resource o cersBy Lloyd DunkelbergerNews Service of FloridaTALLAHASSEE „ A new report from Floridas school superintendents warns that despite a nearly $100 million increase in funding, there may not be enough money to post an armed school resource officer at each school in the state. In reacting to the shoot-ing deaths of 17 students and staff members at Mar-jory Stoneman Douglas High School on Feb. 14, the Legislature passed a new budget and related bills that boosted funding for resource officers by $97.5 million to $162 million in the upcoming academic School safety budget tightBy Tom McNifftom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comTAVARES „ Lake County teachers, students and citizens implored the School Board Monday night to keep their schools safe but without arming faculty.The School Board did not make a decision on the con-troversial proposal and won't for some time, but several dozen people crammed into the small board meeting room in Tavares nonetheless in hopes of swaying board members away from the idea of implementing the guardian program or one of the other programs to arm and train teachers and faculty to repel an armed invader.Their sentiments were largely supported by a survey of school district fac-ulty, released Monday, that showed the vast majority „ 72 percent „ still feel safe on campus.One question asked respondents to rank which school safety ideas should receive funding. Paying for school resource officers for Voicing concernsSuperintendent Diane Kornegay noted on Monday that funding approved by the Florida Legislature this month to help pay for of“ cers at schools wont go very far, so the school district will have to “ nd some of the money on its own. [DAILY COMMERCIAL FILE] Survey: Lake school employees prefer cops over armed teachersLake County School board members Stephanie Luke, left, Marc Dodd, center, and Bill Mathias, right, listen during a meeting at t he Lake County School Board District Of“ ce in Tavares. [DAILY COMMERCIAL FILE] To see the whole survey, go to https://bit. ly/2DZdofC.Mount Dora Police Of“ cer St. Francis Smith is one of the school resource of“ cers who keeps watch over Lake County high and middle schools. [DAILY COMMERCIAL FILE] By Dara KamNews Service of FloridaTALLAHASSEE „ Putting gun control at the top of his to-do list, Democratic gubernatorial candidate Philip Levine said Tuesday hell push a ban on assaultŽ weapons „ including a ballot refer-endum, if necessary „ if elected in November.Levines appearance at the Capital Tiger Bay Club in Tallahassee brought him onto the home turf of two of his primary opponents: former Congresswoman Gwen Graham and Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum. Winter Park entre-preneur Chris King is also vying for the Democratic nomination in the race to succeed Gov. Rick Scott.From the podium Tues-day, Levine rattled off a list of accomplishments he said he achieved during eight years as mayor of Miami Beach, including addressing climate change, cleaning up the citys police department, and passing the states only minimum-wage ordi-nance. An appeals court in November upheld a judges earlier decision striking down the local minimum wage.But when asked about his priorities if elected gover-nor, Levine, who said he owns a gun and has a con-cealed weapons license, named a ban on assault weapons as his number-one issue.And if the Republicancontrolled Legislature wont make assault rifles off-limits, Levine said he would back an initiative to put a prohibition on the Democrat Levine says gun law top priorityBy Jim TurnerNews Service of FloridaTALLAHASSEE „ U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio warned Tuesday of a level of overconfidenceŽ about the security of the nations election system heading into the 2018 midterm elections.The Miami-Dade County Republican, who sits on the Senate Intelligence Committee, told reporters in his Tallahassee office he isnt satisfied enough safeguards are in place „ from the federal, state and local levels „ to ensure the accuracy of the upcoming elections.Its not just about Flor-ida,Ž Rubio said. Whether its pride or a sincere belief, theres a level of overcon-fidence in our system we should be careful about.ŽWith the Senate Intelligence Committee still working on a final report, he said Russian meddling in the 2016 elections involved probingŽ for vulnerabilities in advance of the upcoming contests.The threat is not neces-sarily that theyre going to break into ballot boxes and change the outcome of an election,Ž Rubio said. The threat is much more nefari-ous than that.ŽHe warned that the strategy is to create chaos to make election results questionable by hacking voter-registration databases to delay or prevent people from voting or to alter unofficial results posted online on election night.Theres going to be Rubio warns of election threats See SAFETY, A4 See SCHOOL, A4 See RUBIO, A4 See LEVINE, A7

PAGE 4

A4 Wednesday, March 28, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com Charles Harry BrunerCharles Harry Bruner, 91, Leesburg, Florida went to be with the Lord on March 24, 2018 at Leesburg Regional Medical Center, Leesburg, Florida. Charles was born on September 7, 1926 in Emanuel, Kentucky to his parents Charles S. Bruner and Bessie Thompson. He was retired from P“zer Pharmaceuticals as a Facilities Engineer. He and his loving wife moved to Leesburg in 1985 from Ann Arbor, Michigan. He was a proud veteran of World War II serving in the U.S. Navy and a Pearl Harbor survivor. He was a member of The First Baptist Church of Leesburg, Florida where he and his late wife served in the mission “eld Campers on MissionŽ where they spread Gods word to all and helped to build churches. He is survived by his loving children: Nancy Fretz and her husband Robert of St. Paul, MN, Charles S. Bruner and his wife Dee Anna of Leesburg, FL and Michael H. Bruner and his wife Bonnie of Leesburg, FL; a sister: Jane Vogt of Cincinnati, OH; eleven grandchildren; fourteen great-grandchildren and several loving nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his loving wife Henrietta Bruner and a daughter Jane Leah Youngs. Visitation will be held on Saturday, March 31, 2018 from 12:00PM to 4:00PM at Page-Theus Funeral Home, Leesburg, Florida. The burial will take place at a later date at Beatty Cemetery in Baileys Switch, Kentucky. In lieu of ”owers the family requests donations be made to The First Baptist Church of Leesburg, in the loving memory of Charles H. Bruner. Online condolences may be shared by visiting www.pagetheusfuneral. com. Arrangements are entrusted to PageTheus Funeral Home and Cremation Services, Leesburg. Funeral Services TodaysServices mass chaos,Ž Rubio said, if his concerns come to fruition. Theres going to be anger: The losing side is going to argue it was a rigged election. How could we have been winning when the results come out and were not winning anymore?ŽWe have an already-polarized country, already at each others throat,Ž Rubio continued. That is what I fear most of all.ŽRubio said hes opposed to federalizing elections but would like for more sharingŽ of information between state and federal officials.He also said state elections officials need more awareness about the threat, with more state and federal resources put into building firewalls and redundancy into voting systems.Florida Department of State spokeswoman Sarah Revell said Tuesday the agency engages with state and federal agencies and has upgraded hardware and firewalls to protect voter information and prevent against possible hacking.The agency received $1.9 million in the states new $88.7 billion budget for next fiscal year to establish a networkmonitoring security program that provides automated alerts about threats, allowing county election officials to respond when data may be at risk, according to Revell.Cybersecurity is an ongoing process and as we move forward, we will continue to build on our existing infrastructure to maintain the integrity and security of Floridas elections in the future,Ž Revell said in an email.Florida is one of several states where voter rolls were believed to have been targeted by Russian hackers before the 2016 presidential election.Florida officials have not disclosed what exactly transpired during the election.In September 2016, the Florida Department of State simply acknowledged the FBI held an informational call related to elections securityŽ with the state agency and 67 county supervisors of elections.A year later, the state agency further acknowl-edged it was notified by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security that Florida was targeted by hackers in 2016.This attempt was not in any way successful, and Florida's online elections databases and voting sys-tems remained secure,Ž the Florida Department of State said in a September 2017 statement.In February, NBC News reported that Florida was one of sev-eral states where election websites or databases were compromised. The Department of Homeland Security called the report inaccurate and misleading.Ž RUBIOFrom Page A3year.But a report from the Florida Association of District School Superinten-dents said school districts might not be able to meet the goal of posting at least one safety officer at each of Floridas more than 3,500 elementary, middle and high schools. The report was part of a State Board of Education agenda for a meeting Tuesday in LaBelle but was not discussed.We appreciate the legislative appropriations, but many districts will have difficulty meeting the requirement to estab-lish or assign one (or) more safe-school officers at each school facility,Ž the report said.The superintendents also said a lack of funding for law-enforcement officers may put pressure on districts to use the Coach Aaron Feis Guardian Pro-gram,Ž which would allow school employees, includ-ing some teachers, to bring guns to school if they are specially trained and depu-tized by sheriffs.But noting the opposition to the guardian program in many districts and commu-nities, the superintendents said much of the $67 million for that initiative may go unspent. They asked the Board of Education for support in shifting some of those funds to the school resource officer program. Superintendents request that you support and recommend that these unspent dollars be used in districts for additional school resource officers or other school safety mea-sures,Ž the report said.In a recent interview with The News Service of Florida, Senate President Joe Negron, R-Stuart, said lawmakers may consider using the Joint Legislative Budget Commission to shift some of the guard-ian funds into other safety measures if the money goes unspent, although it was too early to make that determination.The superintendents also raised concerns about a provision in the new school-safety law that will require active shooterŽ and hostage situationsŽ drills in the schools.Superintendents support these drills, but they must be accomplished with minimal disruption to teaching and learning and in a manner that does not unnecessarily frighten students, particularly elementary students,Ž the report said.The superintendents said they would work with the Department of Education on other school-safety initiatives, including establishing a state Safe Schools Office, developing a school secu-rity-risk assessment tool and implementing the guardian program.The report also offered some recommendations on implementing a new $69 million mental-health services program, which has been a top priority for the school superintendents for some time.But the report warned that some school districts could face budget cuts in the coming year because the bulk of increased spending in the new edu-cation budget is targeted toward the school safety and mental health issues in the wake of the Bro-ward County shooting.The superintendents noted that the base student allocation,Ž the primary source for gen-eral operational activities, only increased by 47 cents per student statewide, a fraction of the overall funding increase of $101.50 per student.With only a 47-cent increase in the BSA, superintendents will be forced to cut their budgets „ cuts that will impact students, schools and communities that are served,Ž the report said. SAFETYFrom Page A3every campus scored the highest, with 40 percent of respondents favoring that idea. HardeningŽ schools by adding addi-tional fencing, electronic door locks, cameras and such was next at 26 percent. Just 19 percent of respondents chose ALICE active shooter training for all school personnel.ŽWhen asked if they would support school personnel who do not have classroom dutiesŽ carrying a concealed fire-arm during school hours, almost two thirds of respondents said no. And 62 percent said having an armed school guardianŽ on campus would make them feel less safe or make no difference.Respondents were not universally against guns on campus, however.A slight majority said they would support a teacher carrying a con-cealed weapon if he or she is an ROTC instructor, former military or former law enforcement officer.About 2,500 of the more than 4,000 employees in the district responded to the questionnaire.While citizen supporters and opponents of arming teachers have turned out in equal numbers at recent School Board meetings to voice their concerns, Mondays audience was almost universally against arming faculty and staff.Putting guns in the hands of people only increases the risk of injury or death,Ž said Lucinda McGinn, of Eustis.Abigail Fussell, a soph-omore at Tavares High School, also expressed concern about introduc-ing guns into a classroom setting.Whos to say that on a day that were reading Shakespeare or a poem or reading something else that a teachers gun wont go off?ŽSome speakers were more defiant, echoing the calls of many teen survivors of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School massacre to vote out politicians who reject stricter gun control measures. School Board member Bill Mathias drew much of the ire because of his support for arming faculty.Several teens said they were prepared to organize voters against Mathias and other board members coming up for reelection.One of their adult supporters, Kevin Foster, expressed concern that the board would act out of fear, without thinking about all the consequences of guns on campus.I just dont think we should be cross-training our staff, administrators and teachers into security officers. I would much prefer to see fulltime deputies acting as security. Its something theyve, ostensibly, been training for all their lives. Protect and serve, right? Station them in or near the school, and thats something that I, per-sonally, could live with,Ž Foster said.But thats so expensive! might be the reply. It is. Our kids are worth it, dont you think?ŽWhile Lake County already pays for armed deputies and police officers at most middle and high schools, it does not have officers in elementary schools. Superintendent Diane Kornegay noted that funding approved by the Florida Legislature this month to help pay for officers at schools wont go very far statewide, nor in Lake County, so the school district will have to find some of the money on its own.This bothers me,Ž board member Sandy Gamble said, because were the ones who get blamed but we only have so much money to work with.ŽMeanwhile, the School Board will attend active shooter training held by the Lake County Sheriffs Office on April 2 in Tavares. SCHOOLFrom Page A3

PAGE 5

DailyCommercial.com | Wednesday, March 28, 2018 A5

PAGE 6

A6 Wednesday, March 28, 2018 | DailyCommercial.comvoters before turning the matter over to them.He said voters often question the high cost of building roads."We've been having this discussion for years. We have a great need for our roads and this is one of those things from aport-folio of options that's been presented, but I have some concerns," Parks said. "We need toroll up our sleeves and have some evening workshops to let people know what this is all about so they can understand it better or people will just perceive it as us just trying to pass another tax."The county estimates the tax could raise $6 million per year, with Lake County government getting $4 mil-lion and the rest split among various cities. The money could be used for resurfacing, paving and other projects but couldnot go toward road maintenance.Officials said the county's share would resurface 65 to 75 miles of roads that are in desperate need of repair. Needs would beassessed by the condition of the road and bylooking at the amount of traffic on them.Lake County resident T.J. Fish, who for the last 13 years served as theexecutive director of the Metropolitan Planning Organization before resigning last year,called the commissions decision Tuesday a big step."Fish said that thebenefit of the tax would outweigh the amount each person would have to pay annually, while at the same time saving roads that would otherwise have to be completely rebuilt if left unattended.The average driver uses about 400 gallons of gas per annually, he said. That means each person would pay about $20 per year.I'm happy to vote yes at the ballot box for that,Ž Fish said. "I'm hoping the residents in Novemberare like me,a resident of Lake County that knows we need better roads than what we have."Commission Chairman Tim Sullivan said the tax is fair because it is paid by everyone who fills up at local gas stations … resi-dents and visitors alike."It touches everybody that uses the roads," Sul-livan said. TAXFrom Page A1not been submitted, it looks as if only one-third of the house at Magnolia and 12th Street was destroyed.Upon Minners recommendation, com-missioners gave the green light to its construction manager, Evergreen Construction, to see how much it will cost to fix.Commissioner Bob Bone, repeating earlier concerns about the cost of replacing the damaged portion, asked if the city should consider finding a private vendor to lease the building as a restaurant, for example, as a way of allaying the costs and earning some revenue for the city.Minner suggested the city wait to hear from Evergreen. It might cost less,Ž he said.If rebuilt, plans will have to be approved by the citys historic preservation board since it is within the historic district.After the meet-ing,Minner said he hopes to have more information within a couple of weeks.The Mote-Morris house, built 126 years ago on Main Street, was moved to its present loca-tion to make room for Morrison United Meth-odist Church expansion.The city was leasing it to the Leesburg Area Cham-ber of Commerce. It was rented out for weddings, parties and other events.Weve got it sealed up,Ž Minner said. It had a lot of water damage.ŽIn other action, commissioners agreed to spend $478,955 for a dec-orative fence at Ski Beach in Venetian Gardens and a recreation path that runs up to Dixie Avenue. The work is part of a multi-million dollar renovation of the park, construc-tion of a new community building and demolition of the old structure and swimming pool. REBUILDFrom Page A1 Medicine oversaw the clinic where Nassar worked, neglected his duty to enforce examin-ing-room restrictions he imposed on Nassar after a patient accused the doctor in 2014 of sexual contact, authorities alleged.Nassar was not supposed to treat patients near any sensitive areasŽ on the body without a chaperone present. Because Strampel did not follow up to make sure Nassar was comply-ing, he was able to commit a host of additional sexual assaults until he was fired two years later, prosecu-tors said.The criminal complaint also accused Strampel of soliciting nude photos from at least one female medical student and using his office to harass, discriminate, demean, sexually proposition, and sexually assault female students in violation of his statutory duty as a public officer.ŽHis work computer was found to contain about 50 photos of female genitalia, nude and semi-nude women, sex toys and por-nography, prosecutors said. Many of these photos are of what appear to be selfies of female MSU students, as evidenced by the MSU clothing and piercings featured in multiple photos,Ž according to the complaint.It said the computer also had a video of Nassar per-forming a treatment on a young female patient.ŽStrampel was accused also of grabbing two students buttocks at the colleges annual ball and a scholarship dinner.Strampel spent Monday night in jail and was released Tuesday on $25,000 bail. The felony and misdemeanor charges „ misconduct in office, criminal sexual conduct and two counts of neglect of duty „ carry maximum penalties ranging from a year to five years behind bars. NASSARFrom Page A1 challenges, however, will be keeping the economy and tax overhaul in the spotlight through the fall given the crush of other matters roiling the White House and competing for Americans atten-tion. At the White House on Monday, the daily press briefing was domi-nated by questions about the presidents alleged affair with adult film star Stormy Daniels, a relationship he denies. Each week has seemed to bring a new departure among the presidents closest advisers. And many days, Trump is more inclined to use his Twitter megaphone to try to discredit the investigation into possible campaign contacts with Russia than promote the tax overhaul.Republican operatives acknowledge that even if they can break through the clutter, they still have a ways to go when it comes to explaining the $1.5 tril-lion tax plan to Americans. Democrats have aggressively cast the measure, which permanently slashes the tax rate for corporations and reduces taxes for the wealthiest Americans, as a boon for the rich that offers comparatively little for the middle class.The Democratic message does appear to be breaking through with voters. Among those Americans who are familiar with the new law, 77 percent believe it helps large corporations and 73 percent say it benefits the wealthy, while 53 percent say it helps small businesses. Americans are evenly divided on whether the measure helps the middle class.Republicans argue Dem-ocrats risk overreaching by downplaying the impact that even a small windfall from the tax bill can have for a family and individual. According to the AP-NORC poll, nearly half of those who receive a paycheck „ 46 percent „ say theyve seen an increase in their take-home pay as a result of the tax law.Heather Dilios, a 46-year-old social worker from Topsham, Maine, is among them. Dilios, a Republican, estimates shes now taking home between $100 to $200 more per pay-check as a result of the new tax law. Thats more than she expected when Trump signed the legislation.Dilios said its more than the dollar amount thats driving her support for the law.Its more about being able to keep what is right-fully mine rather than giving it to the government,Ž she said.Overall, taxes and the economy are the brightest spots for Trump, who gets lower numbers from voters on a range of other issues, including his handling of North Korea (42 percent), trade (41 percent), gun control (39 percent) and the budget deficit (35 percent). TRUMPFrom Page A1

PAGE 7

DailyCommercial.com | Wednesday, March 28, 2018 A72020 ballot.Im going to make sure that we have a referendum. That referendum is going to say, number one, do you want to ban assault rifles in Florida? And, number two, if we cant get Tallahassee to do what we need them to do, would you like the local governments in Florida to have the right and ability to regulate their own gun safety policy? I believe Floridians will say absolutely yes,Ž Levine, 56, said.Levine and Gillum want to do away with a 2011 pre-emptionŽ law that prohibits local governments from passing gun-related ordinances. The law also required cities and counties to eliminate gun-related restrictions already on the books and included hefty fines for local officials who failed to comply.We need to give (con-trol over gun regulations) back to the local communities,Ž Levine said.Less than two weeks after the Feb. 14 mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that left 14 students and three staff members dead, Levine helped lead a rally outside the Capitol where hundreds of protesters „ including many from the Parkland school „ demanded that the Legislature pass stricter gun regulations.The former mayor also delivered thousands of petitions to Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam, a Republican running for governor, whose office oversees concealed-weapons licenses.In an interview with The News Service of Flor-ida following Tuesdays appearance at the politi-cal club, Levine predicted gun control would play a critical role in this years elections. LEVINEFrom Page A3By The Associated PressWASHINGTON „ Retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens is calling for the repeal of the Second Amendment to allow for significant gun control legislation.The 97-year-old Stevens says in an essay on The New York Times website that repeal would weaken the National Rifle Association's ability to "block constructive gun control legislation."Stevens was on the losing end of a 2008 ruling in which the high court held that the Second Amendment gives individuals the right to own a gun for self-defense. He had previously called for changing the Second Amendment to permit gun control.Stevens says the decision in that case, District of Columbia v. Heller, "has provided the N.R.A. with a propaganda weapon of immense power." Stevens retired from the court in 2010, after more than 35 years.In his essay published Tuesday, Stevens talks about the "March for Our Lives" events on Satur-day which drew crowds in cities across the country. Stevens said the demon-strations "reveal the broad public support for legisla-tion to minimize the risk of mass killings of school-children and others in our society." He said the support "is a clear sign to lawmakers to enact legislation prohib-iting civilian ownership of semiautomatic weapons, increasing the minimum age to buy a gun from 18 to 21 years old, and establish-ing more comprehensive background checks on all purchasers of firearms."But Stevens called on demonstrators to "seek more effective and more lasting reform.""They should demand a repeal of the Second Amendment," he wrote.Repealing the amend-ment would be extremely difficult. An amendment to the Constitution can only be proposed either by Congress with a two thirds vote in both houses or by a constitu-tional convention called for by two thirds of the state legislatures. The amendment then has to be approved by three quarters of the states.Asked at a White House briefing whether President Donald Trump had any reaction to Ste-vens' comments, press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said the president and administration "still fully support the Second Amendment.""We think that the focus has to remain on removing weapons from dangerous individuals, not on blocking all Americans from their constitutional rights," she said.The National Rifle Association also issued a statement in response to Stevens' essay."The men and women of the National Rifle Association, along with the majority of the American people and the Supreme Court, believe in the Second Amendment right to self-protection and we will unapologetically continue to fight to pro-tect this fundamental freedom," the statement said.Retired justice urges repeal of Second AmendmentBy Danica KirkaThe Associated PressLONDON „ The com-puter expert who alleges a trove of Facebook data was improperly used to help Donald Trumps White House bid said Tuesday that he strongly believes the informa-tion was also used by the Brexit movement that persuaded Britain to quit the European Union.In a 3-hour hearing, Chris Wylie told the House of Commons media committee that he believes the breach exceeded the 50 million Facebook users reported earlier „ though he didnt give an exact figure. And he said the data compiled by the political consulting business Cambridge Analytica was available to other firms with links to it.All kinds of people had access to the data,Ž said Wylie, who helped develop Cambridge Ana-lyticas methods for using the information to target and persuade voters. It was everywhere.ŽAmong the companies that had access to the data was AggregateIQ, a Canadian political consultant that did work for Vote Leave, the official campaign backing Brit-ains withdrawal from the EU, Wylie said.Wylie described Cambridge Analytica as just one arm of a global com-pany, SCL Group, that gets most of its income from military contracts but is also a political gun-for-hire, often in countries where democratic institutions are weak. He suggested the com-pany combines computer algorithms and dirty tricks to help candidates win regardless of the cost.The 28-year-old Cana-dian with a swath of pink hair says he helped set up Cambridge Analytica in 2013. He left the next year.Expert says Brexit campaign used data mined from FacebookWhistleblower Christopher Wylie, who alleges that the campaign for Britain to leave the EU cheated in the referendum in 2016, speaks at a lawyers of“ ce to the media Monday in London. [ALASTAIR GRANT/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] Retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens testi“ es on the ever-increasing amount of money spent on elections as he appears before the Senate Rules Committee April 30, 2014 on Capitol Hill in Washington. [AP PHOTO]

PAGE 8

A8 Wednesday, March 28, 2018 | DailyCommercial.comBy Sylvia Hui and Vladimir IsachenkovThe Associated PressLONDON „ NATO on Tuesday joined a wave of countries and groups expelling Russian diplo-mats over the nerve-agent attack on a former spy in Britain. Russia denounced the actions as boorishŽ and pledged to retaliate.The mass expulsions were a show of solidarity for Britain, which blames Russia for the poisoning of ex-spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia. Moscow vehemently denies responsibility and has vowed a tough responseŽ to the expulsions.More than 20 countries on Monday announced that they were expelling a total of more than 130 Russian diplomats, includ-ing 60 kicked out by the United States. Australia, Belgium, Ireland and Mol-dova joined them Tuesday.NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg said the alliance also would expel seven staffers from the Russian mission and deny the pending accred-itation requests of three other workers at the Rus-sian mission.Stoltenberg said we will continue to work for meaningful dialogueŽ with Russia, but added that the measure announced Tues-day should send a very clear message to Russia that it has costs.ŽI actually think that Russia has underestimated the unity of NATO allies,Ž he said.The White House said that President Donald Trump spoke Tuesday with French President Emmanuel Macron and German Chancellor Angela Merkel, and the leaders expressed supportŽ for the expulsions and praisedŽ the announcement by others who have followed suit.On Tuesday, Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said his country was expelling two Russian diplomats whom he described as undeclared intelligence officers. They have been given seven days to leave Australia. Turnbull slammed Russia for reckless and deliberateŽ conduct that he said harms global security and violates rules against the use of chemical weapons.The Russian Embassy in Canberra said the deci-sion was regrettable and jeopardized bilateral relationships.It is astonishing how easily the allies of Great Britain follow it blindly contrary to the norms of civilized bilateral dialogue and international relations, and against ... common sense,Ž it said.Ireland also announced it was ordering one Russian diplomat to leave. Foreign Minister Simon Coveney called the nerve-agent attack on Skripal and his daughter a shocking and abhorrentŽ use of chemical weapons.Belgium followed suit, saying it would expel one Russian diplomat.NATO joins wave of Russian diplomat expulsionsBy Christopher Bodeen and Mark SchiefelbeinThe Associated PressBEIJING „ A mysteri-ous armored train traveled from North Korea to Bei-jing and then headed back without revealing its key secret: Was Kim Jong Un on board?Speculation about a visit to Beijing by North Koreas reclusive leader or another high-level Pyongyang official ran high Tuesday amid talk of preparations for a future meeting between Kim and U.S. President Donald Trump.The visit by the special train to Beijing and unusu-ally heavy security at a guesthouse where promi-nent North Koreans have stayed seemed to point to the possibility that Kim was making his first visit to China as the Norths leader.Such a trip would be seen as a potential precursor to Kims planned summit with South Korean President Moon Jae-in in late April and his anticipated meeting with Trump by May. Analysts, however, questioned whether Kim would make the visit to Beijing himself rather than send an envoy.Whoever was on the train, their visit to Bei-jing appeared to be short. On Tuesday afternoon, a vehicle convoy led by a motorcycle escort headed in the direction of Beijings main railway station. The train was seen leaving shortly afterward, less than a day after it arrived. While there has been no word of a meeting with Chinese leaders, China has been one of North Koreas most important allies even though rela-tions have chilled recently because of Kims develop-ment of nuclear weapons and long-range missiles.On Monday, heavy security was reported at the Friendship Bridge on the Yalu River marking the border between China and North Korea before a train passed through the Chinese city of Dandong. There were reports of it transiting several stations on the way from North Korea to Beijing.Japanese broadcaster NTV reported that the green and yellow train appeared very similar to the one that Kims father and predecessor as North Koreas leader, Kim Jong Il, took to Beijing in 2011.Video that aired on NTV also showed a motorcade of black limousines wait-ing at the train station and rows of Chinese soldiers marching on what appeared to be a train platform. The video did not show anyone getting off the train.At around 2:45 p.m. Tuesday, a convoy of about a dozen cars, including a large black limousine, was seen heading in the direction of the railway station. The limousine was seen about 10 minutes later entering the station under a heavy security presence. The station itself was closed to the public in an unusual security measure.Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying, asked whether Kim or another North Korean official was visiting Beijing, said, I know youre all very curious but I have no information on that.ŽPast visits by Kim Jong Il to China were surrounded in secrecy, with Beijing only confirming his pres-ence after he had crossed the border by train back into North Korea.North Koreas state-run media had no immediate reports of a delegation traveling to China.Mysterious train sparks speculation of Kim visit

PAGE 9

DailyCommercial.com | Wednesday, March 28, 2018 A9 The Florida Legislatures 2018 session, which ended March 11, was dominated by debates over the $88.7 billion budget, school safety and gun control „ all of them major, important issues. But the Legislature deserves credit for resolving two issues that gained less attention but are nonetheless critical to Floridas future. Those issues are the funding of Healthy Start Coalitions and the banning of child marriage. Healthy Start provides services for about 80,000 pregnant women and 56,000 infants, especially those at higher-thannormal risk of illness or death, in all 67 counties. Through Healthy Start, nurses and other personnel make home visits, arrange for prenatal screenings, promote good nutrition and, in the most risky cases, help mothers overcome addictions. Since Healthy Start was initiated in 1991, Floridas infant mortality rate has fallen by 35 percent, due in part to the coalitions resources and services. The states annual cost for Healthy Start „ around $66 million „ is modest considering the overall budget and the crucial services involved. Yet, under the state Senates proposed budget, Healthy Start was set to lose $19 million „ about 29 percent of its funding statewide. While $19 million is relatively small share of the states budget, the funding cut would be devastating. Fortunately, the state House of Representatives, whose budget called for maintaining Healthy Start funding at its current level, prevailed. All Floridians should be grateful that the budget ax was stayed for such a vital program. And Floridians can take pride that the Legislature overwhelmingly approved a bill prohibiting marriage for anyone under 17. Under the legislation, which Gov. Rick Scott has promised to sign, anyone marrying a 17-year-old could not be more than two years older and minors would need parental consent. According to Floridas Bureau of Vital Statistics, in the past five years, 1,828 marriage licenses were issued in the state to couples in which at least one of the applicants was a minor. One egregious example occurred in 2013, when one of the parties was 13 and the other was in the 16-17 range. Most of the examples between 2012 and 2016 involve one party of 16-17 and the other 18-24 „ although 135 involved one applicant between 16 and 17 and the other between 25 and 29. So this isnt all about kids marrying kids; its often about adults marrying teens „ and sometimes children. And, though its hard to believe, Floridas law will make it a leader in reform among other states. The child-marriage opponent organization Unchained at Last found that more than 167,000 underage Americans in 38 states were married between 2000 and 2010. An estimated 250,000 such marriages occurred nationwide, including those in states that did not provide data. The Legislatures actions regarding Healthy Start and child marriage are reminders that, beyond the headlines and controversies, Floridas lawmakers sometimes quietly take steps that maintain essential services and move the state forward. This editorial first appeared in the Sarasota HeraldTribune, the Daily Commercial's sister publicationOUR OPINIONProgress for kids, out of the spotlight ANOTHER OPINION The media is focused on the Democrats' bright prospects for winning control of the House this November. But the gains they expect to make in governor's races may be more important to the party's long-term future. Of 36 gubernatorial seats up for grabs this year, 26 are held by Republicans. The Democrats' top targets are Ohio, Florida and Michigan, where they have been out of power for years. If they succeed, the party stands to gain strength on three critically important fronts: Policy issues ranging from Medicaid expansion to environmental protection and gay rights. Congressional and state legislative redistricting after the 2020 census. National candidate development: Two of the past three Democratic presidents were governors, but the ranks have been thin recently. "The governor's races this year are even more important than Congress," says Terry McAuliffe, who just stepped down as Virginia governor and is a former party chairman. Republicans remember the impact of their 2010 sweep. They devoted huge resources to state races, then dominated redistricting the next year. The result: a policy and political counterweight to a Democratic White House. The fruits of state battles are already becoming clear. The GOP's gerrymandering in Pennsylvania in 2011 was overturned this year, thanks in part to help of a Democratic governor who took office in 2015. The result? Three to five House seats this fall, Democrats say. But they still are suffering from partisan lines in Ohio, Michigan and Florida. All three are purple; only a third of their combined 57 members of the House are Democrats. In recent months, in part reflecting a national tide, Democrats have become more optimistic about contests in Ohio and Michigan. Richard Cordray, who clashed with Trump as the head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, is the party's preferred candidate in Ohio. He should be a strong general election candidate if he avoids getting beat up in the primary by left wing provocateur Dennis Kucinich, the former congressman. That probably would set up a rematch with Attorney General Mike DeWine, who narrowly won in 2010, in a climate friendlier to Republicans. In Michigan, the political and labor union establishment has gotten behind Gretchen Whitmer, a former state legislative leader, one of many women this year riding the energy of the MeToo movement. She would be a slight favorite in a November race against the state's Republican attorney general. In Florida, where the primary isn't until August, the contests in both parties are unsettled. Still, Democrats say Trump has energized important elements of their voters, younger women and Latinos. Republicans seem certain to hold Texas and Democrats New York and California. After this week's primary, Democrats expect to flip Illinois. Governors aren't as directly affected by the Trump factor as are members of Congress, but the gathering blue wave represents a major force nevertheless. Two Republican governors in Democratic states, Charlie Baker in Massachusetts and Larry Hogan in Maryland, having distanced themselves from Trump are in good shape. Both sides are looking for a surprise. Republicans think they may turn Minnesota if former Governor Tim Pawlenty, after more than five years as a Washington lobbyist, returns. Democrats are also bullish on finally unseating Wisconsin's Gov. Scott Walker, who has been dashing to the political center. Overall, the opportunities for Democratic pickups range from Nevada and New Mexico in the West to Iowa in the Midwest to Maine on the East Coast. That's why Terry McAuliffe is upbeat: "The future of the Democratic Party will be decided in state capitals and it's looking very good." Albert R. Hunt is a Bloomberg View columnist.ANOTHER OPINIONDemocrats are bullish on governor's races, tooA poignant index on the abyss between our nation's aspirations and its realities was on display on Saturday, when many thousands of Americans took to the streets to demand alleviation of the gun violence that plagues this country like none other in the developed world. On one hand, a lot of good people were aspiring to solve a big problem; on the other, unfortunately, the reality is that we can be almost certain that these efforts will be in vain. And the worst outcome of the march could be the disillusionment of the impressively articulate and intelligent high school students who were moved to action by the murders of 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., on Feb. 14. The students have directed the nation's attention to the deaths and injuries caused by easy access to needlessly powerful weapons, and they organized the weekend event. Everyone was shocked by Parkland, just as they were shocked by Columbine, Sandy Hook and Virginia Tech. Politicians proffered "thoughts and prayers." President Donald Trump mused about solving the problem by arming teachers. A few concrete steps were taken by private companies: Dick's Sporting Goods and Walmart will not sell assaultstyle rifles or any guns to anyone under 21. Sens. John Cornyn and Chris Murphy managed to attach the "Fix NICS Act" to the spending bill that passed last Friday, strengthening accountability in criminal background checks for gun purchasers, But in a culture awash with guns, these are half-measures or quarter-measures or merely window dressing meant to give the impression of action without effecting much real change. Unfortunately, the powers that maintain the status quo are too great to be overcome by marches and rallies and speeches. Or, evidently, by the mass murders of many classrooms full of innocent American schoolchildren. But, Parkland students and fellow marchers, do not give up. The forces that make the gun problem appear to be unsolvable get their lifeblood from the same condition that has fostered a great deal of bad governance in our country over the last several decades: Too much money in the political system is overwhelming rational approaches to problem solving. Jane Mayer's "Dark Money," published in 2016, describes the problem at large, and it's not a bad place to start to understand the gun problem. Mayer chronicles several decades of an American politics flooded by cash from super-rich, libertarian-leaning families who mask their influence by channeling money through pseudo-philanthropic organizations and foundations. A significant focus of the book is on Kansas's immensely wealthy Koch brothers, who developed much of the organizational infrastructure for the donation of unspeakable amounts of money to support a radically deregulated, low-tax free market system. They were enormously successfully. As a result, they and other wealthy families have made enormous amounts of money and helped foster a system that keeps wealth in the hands of the already-wealthy, to the detriment of the middle class and the environment. This dynamic, writ small, illuminates the gun problem. The National Rifle Association, once chiefly an advocate for gun safety, education and marksmanship, has evolved into one of the most influential lobbying organizations in American politics today. It is motivated by a near-paranoid fear for the Second Amendment and fueled by donations of cash from gun enthusiasts, gun makers and gun sellers. It would be hard to overstate the NRA's political influence. By means of the same financial machinations used by the Kochs, the NRA directs huge sums of money to politicians who support its views. According to ABC News, during the 2016 election cycle alone the NRA spent $54 million, including $11 million to support Donald Trump and $20 million to attack Hillary Clinton. The NRA and its supporters thrive when people fear for their lives and when politicians fear for their political careers. So, Parkland students and other right-minded citizens, marching is important. But nothing will take the place of voting. Yes, indeed, if you are 18, do not fail to vote in November. Nothing else can restrain the power of the NRA. John M. Crisp lives in Georgetown, Texas, and can be reached at jcrispcolumns@gmail.com.ANOTHER OPINIONMarching is great, but our only hope is voting OPINIONSteve Skaggs | Publisher Tom McNiff | Executive Editor Whitney Lehnecker | Digital Editor, Lifestyles Editor Tom McNiff, editor 352-365-8250 tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com John Crisp

PAGE 10

A10 Wednesday, March 28, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com

PAGE 11

DailyCommercial.com | Wednesday, March 28, 2018 B1 SPORTS RECREATION | B4LAKE SENIOR GAMES GET UNDERWAY IN APRIL Paul Jenkins, Sports editor 352-365-8204 paul.jenkins@dailycommercial.comBy Doug FeinbergAssociated PressALBANY, N.Y. „ The womens Final Four is set, and its one exclusive party.UConn, Louisville, Missis-sippi State and Notre Dame are headed to Columbus, Ohio, marking the fourth time in tournament history that four No. 1 seeds made it to the national semifinals.Its the 11th consecutive Final Four appearance for the Huskies, breaking a tie with John Wooden and the UCLA mens team for the Division I record. UConn is into the national semifinals for the 19th time overall, snapping a tie with Tennessee for the most in womens basketball history.The Huskies will face former Big East rival Notre Dame on Friday night. The Cardinals will play the Bull-dogs in the other game.UConns 111-game winning streak was stopped at this point last season when Mississippi State won their semifinal on a last-second shot by Morgan William in overtime. The Huskies are undefeated again after knock-ing out defending national champion South Carolina in the Albany Region final.Every team starts the season saying thats our goal Womens Final Four features four No. 1 seedsConnecticuts Gabby Williams (15), center, celebrates with teammates after a regional “ nal against South Carolina at the womens NCAA college basketball tournament Monday in Albany, N.Y. Connecticut won 94-65. [AP PHOTO / FRANK FRANKLIN II] See WOMEN, B3By John MarshallThe Associated PressOklahomas Trae Young took college basketball by storm, leading the nation in scoring and assists. Deandre Ayton played his one season at Arizona with power and athleticism few could match. Versatile big man Marvin Bagley III made his lone year a Duke a memorable one.The talented trio made history Tuesday by being named to the AP All-America team, the first time three freshmen were named to the first team in its 70-year history.They were joined by Villano-vas Jalen Brunson and Kansas guard Devonte Graham on the team selected by the same 65-member national media panel that selects the weekly AP Top 25.The All-America first team has had a pair of freshmen three times: John Wall and Demarcus Cousins in 2010; Michael Beasley and Kevin Love in 2008; Kevin Durant and Greg Oden in 2007.Young, Ayton and Bagley set a new standard with stellar one-and-done seasons.Young was a top recruit coming out of Norman, Oklahoma, and chose to play for his hometown Sooners. Oklahoma fans were sure glad he did.A 6-foot-2 point guard, Young popped up on the national radar by scoring 43 points against Oregon early in the season and broke the NCAA record with 22 assists against Northwestern State less than a month later.Even when teams started to figure out ways to slow Young, he kept scoring and dishing, leading the nation at 27.4 points and 8.7 assists. Hes had an interesting year, probably as interesting as anyone can have,Ž Oklahoma coach Lon Kruger said. He battled well all year long.ŽTeam headlined by 3 freshmenIn this March 15 photo, Oklahomas Trae Young drives to the hoop during overtime of an NCAA mens college basketball tournament “ rst-round game against Rhode Island,in Pittsburgh. [ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO] By Barry WilnerThe Associated PressORLANDO, Fla. „ Maybe its too late for Jesse James and the Steelers or Zach Miller and the Bears.No matter, the NFL has a simplified catch rule designed to eliminate confusion „ and, the league hopes, controversy „ about receptions.Team owners unanimously approved the new language Tuesday, with basically three ele-ments defining a catch: € having control of the ball;€ getting two feet down or another body part;€ making a football move, such as taking a third step or extending the ball.We wanted to simplify and provide clarity,Ž Pittsburgh coach and longtime competition committee member Mike Tomlin said. It was time to do so after we got caught up in language that didnt do that. The language was obscure and confusing.ŽThe committee cited overturned receptions by tight ends James and Miller last season among the dozens of plays they reviewed dozens of times,Ž according to committee chairman Rick McKay, president of the Atlanta Falcons.The James call was particularly impactful because the Steelers wound up losing to New England in a December game that determined home-field advantage for the playoffs. The Patriots got it and wound up in the Super NFL owners approve simpli ed catch language See TEAM, B3 See MEETINGS, B3By Frank Jolleyfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comEUSTIS „ The keys to suc-cess for the Eustis High School softball team is no different from nearly every other team.Good pitching, timely hit-ting and solid defense.And when everything comes together, the Panthers are nearly unbeatable.That was the case when Eustis stopped The Villages 10-0 in six innings at the Panther Den. Pitcher Delaney Heaberlin tossed a one hitter, the Panthers defense was nearly flawless and the lineup batted around in an eight-run sixth inning in the win.It felt good,Ž said Eustis coach Brittany Beall. The Villages came in here with a solid record (10-1 before the game), but we got back to playing like we did last year and in the past. We just went out and did the things that made us so successful in the past.ŽEustis was on the scoreboard with a solo run in the first. With one out, Kayla Betts walked and moved to second on a single by Jaycie Michael.A double steal moved both runners up a base, allowing Betts to score on a sacrifice to left by Tori Rodebaugh.Seriah Brokenborough scored an unearned run in the fourth, setting the stage for the Panthers offensive explosion in the sixth. Eustis sent 11 batters to the plate in the frame, start-ing with an infield single by Rodebaugh and ending with a double by Brokenborough that plated Michael and Rodebaugh with the game-ending runs.The Panthers even got production from pinch hitters Panthers maul Bu aloEustis routs The Villages 100 in battle of 5A6 rivalsSee SOFTBALL, B3Eustis Kayla Betts (3) slides into third base at a game between Eustis High School and The Villages High School in Eustis on T uesday. [PAUL RYAN /CORRESPONDENT] Trio makes history by being rst freshmen named to AP All-America team

PAGE 12

B2 Wednesday, March 28, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com SCOREBOARD HOW TO REACH USPaul Jenkins, Sports Editor Email: paul.jenkins@dailycommercial.com Phone: 352-365-8204SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results by calling 352-365-8204. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. Results submitted after 9:30 p.m. may not appear in the next days edition of the Daily Commercial.SPORTS ON TV TODAYS LOCAL SCHEDULE COLLEGE BASKETBALL MENS BASKETBALL NCAA TOURNAMENTAll times Eastern EAST REGIONAL At TD Garden, Boston Regional Semi“ nals March 23Villanova 90, West Virginia 78 Texas Tech 78, Purdue 65Regional Championship March 25Villanova 71, Texas Tech 59SOUTH REGIONAL At Philips Arena, Atlanta Regional Semi“ nals March 22Loyola of Chicago 69, Nevada 68 Kansas State 61, Kentucky 58Regional Championship March 24Loyola of Chicago 78, Kansas State 62MIDWEST REGIONAL At CenturyLink Center Omaha, Neb. Regional Semi“ nals March 23Kansas 80, Clemson 76 Duke 69, Syracuse 65Regional Championship March 25Kansas 85, Duke 81, OTWEST REGIONAL At STAPLES Center, Los Angeles Regional Semi“ nals March 22Michigan 99, Texas A&M 72 Florida State 75, Gonzaga 60Regional Championship March 24Michigan 58, Florida State 54FINAL FOUR At The Alamodome, San Antonio National Semi“ nals SaturdayLoyola of Chicago (32-5) vs. Michigan (32-7), 6:09 p.m. Villanova (34-4) vs. Kansas (31-7), 8:49 p.m.National Championship April 2Semi“ nal winners, 9:20 p.m.NATIONAL INVITATION TOURNAMENTSemi“ nals At Madison Square Garden, New York TuesdayWestern Kentucky (27-10) vs. Utah (22-11), late Penn St. (24-13) vs. Mississippi St. (25-11), lateChampionship ThursdaySemi“ nal winners, 8 p.m.COLLEGE BASKETBALL INVITATIONALChampionship Series (Best-of-3; x-if necessary) MondaySan Francisco 72, North Texas 62TodaySan Francisco (22-15) at North Texas (18-18), 8:30 p.m.Fridayx-San Francisco at North Texas, 7 p.m.COLLEGEINSIDER.COM TOURNAMENT Semi“ nals TodayUIC (19-15) at Liberty (22-14), 7 p.m. Sam Houston State (21-14) at Northern Colorado (24-12), 9 p.m.Championship FridaySemi“ nal winners, 7 p.m.AP MENS ALL-AMERICA TEAMSStatistics through March 11:FIRST TEAMJalen Brunson, Villanova, 6-3, 190, junior, Lincolnshire, Ill., 19.4 ppg, 3.1 rpg, 4.7 apg, 53.1 fg pct, 41.3 3pt fg pct (63 “ rst-place votes, 321 points) Deandre Ayton, Arizona, 7-1, 250, freshman, Nassau, Bahamas, 20.3 ppg, 11.5 rpg, 61.6 fg pct, 2.0 blocks (61, 317) Trae Young, Oklahoma, 6-2, 180, freshman, Norman, Okla., 27.4 ppg, 3.9 rpg, 8.8 apg, 1.7 steals, 35.3 minutes (61, 315) Marvin Bagley III, Duke, 6-11, 234, freshman, Phoenix, 21.1 ppg, 11.5 rpg, 60.5 fg pct, 2.0 blocks (59, 313) Devonte Graham, Kansas, 6-2, 185, senior, Raleigh, N.C., 17.3 ppg, 3.9 rpg, 7.5 apg, 1.6 steals, 41.2 3pt fg pct, 83.4 ft pct, 37.6 minutes (54, 303)SECOND TEAMKeita Bates-Diop, Ohio State, 6-7, 235, junior, Normal, Ill., 19.4 ppg, 8.8 rpg, 1.7 blocks (10, 186) Trevon Bluiett, Xavier, 6-6, 198, senior, Indianapolis, 19.5 ppg, 5.7 rpg, 2.5 apg, 42.3 3pt fg pct, 86.1 ft pct (5, 183) Jock Landale, Saint Marys, 6-11, 255, senior, East Malvern, Australia, 21.4 ppg, 10.3 rpg, 2.1 apg, 64.0 fg pct, 1.1 blocks (3, 153) Miles Bridges, Michigan State, 6-7, 225, sophomore, Flint, Mich., 16.9 ppg, 6.9 rpg, 2.8 apg, 88.3 ft pct (3, 145) Jevon Carter, West Virginia, 6-2, 205, senior, Maywood, Ill., 17.0 ppg, 4.7 rpg, 6.6 apg, 86.3 ft pct, 2.9 steals (1, 109)THIRD TEAMKeenan Evans, Texas Tech, 6-3, 190, senior, Richardson, Texas, 17.5 ppg, 3.1 rpg, 3.2 apg, 1.2 steals (2, 102) Carsen Edwards, Purdue, 6-1, 200, sophomore, Atascocita, Texas, 18.5 ppg, 3.9 rpg, 3.0 apg, 41.2 3pt fg pct, 1.2 steals (0, 99) Mikal Bridges, Villanova, 6-7, 210, junior, Malvern, Pa., 18.0 ppg, 5.4 rpg, 2.1 apg, 52.1 fg pct, 43.3 3pt fg pct, 85.1 ft pct, 1.6 steals (2, 64) Luke Maye, North Carolina, 6-8, 240, junior, Huntersville, N.C., 17.2 ppg, 10.1 rpg, 2.4 apg, 44.0 3pt fg pct, 1.0 steals, 1.1 blocks (0, 64) Kyle Guy, Virginia, 6-2, 175, sophomore, Indianapolis, 14.1 ppg, 2.6 rpg, 39.5 3pt fg pct, 1.0 steals (0, 40)HONORABLE MENTIONJaylen Adams, St. Bonaventure; Peyton Aldridge, Davidson; Grayson Allen, Duke; Mo Bamba, Texas; Trae Bell-Haynes, Vermont; Joel Berry II, North Carolina; Bogdan Bliznyuk, Eastern Washington; Desonta Bradford, ETSU; Tony Carr, Penn State; Gary Clark, Cincinnati; Xavier Cooks, Winthrop; Jermaine Crumpton, Canisius; Clayton Custer, Loyola of Chicago; Mike Daum, South Dakota State; Angel Delgado, Seton Hall; Kahlil Dukes, Niagara; TreShaun Fletcher, Toledo; Marcus Foster, Creighton; Brandon Goodwin, Florida Gulf Coast; Isaac Haas, Purdue; Aaron Holiday, UCLA; Jordan Howard, Central Arkansas; Jemerrio Jones, New Mexico State; Nick King, Middle Tennessee; Kevin Knox, Kentucky; Fletcher Magee, Wofford; Caleb Martin, Nevada; Kelan Martin, Butler; Yante Maten, Georgia; Martaveous McKnight, Arkansas-Pine Bluff; Kendrick Nunn, Oakland; Shamorie Ponds, St. Johns; Jerome Robinson, Boston College; Junior Robinson, Mount St. Marys; Collin Sexton, Alabama; Landry Shamet, Wichita State; T.J. Shorts II, UC Davis; DMarcus Simonds, Georgia State; Jonathan Stark, Murray State; Brandon Tabb, BethuneCookman; Zach Thomas, Bucknell; Seth Towns, Harvard; Allonzo Trier, Arizona; Grant Williams, Tennessee; Johnathan Williams, Gonzaga; Justin Wright-Foreman, Hofstra.WOMENS BASKETBALL NCAA WOMENS TOURNAMENT All times Eastern ALBANY REGIONAL Regional Semi“ nals March 24 At Albany, N.Y.South Carolina 79, Buffalo 63 UConn 72, Duke 59Regional Championship MondayUConn 94, South Carolina 65 SPOKANE REGIONAL Regional Semi“ nals March 24 At Spokane, Wash.Notre Dame 90, Texas A&M 84 Oregon 83, Central Michigan 69Regional Championship MondayNotre Dame 84, Oregon 74 KANSAS CITY REGIONAL Regional Semi“ nals March 23 At Kansas City, Mo.Mississippi State 71, N.C. State 57 UCLA 84, Texas 75Regional Championship March 25 Mississippi State 89, UCLA 73 LEXINGTON REGIONAL Regional Semi“ nals March 23 At Lexington, Ky.Oregon State 72, Baylor 67 Louisville 86, Stanford 59Regional Championship March 25Louisville 76, Oregon State 43FINAL FOUR At Columbus, Ohio National Semi“ nals FridayMississippi St. (36-1) vs. Louisville (36-2), 7 p.m. UConn (36-0) vs. Notre Dame (33-3), 9:30 p.m.National Championship SundaySemi“ nal winners, 7 p.m.2017-18 AP WOMENS ALL-AMERICA TEAMSStatistics through March 11First TeamAja Wilson, South Carolina, 6-5, senior, Hopkins, S.C., 22.6 ppg, 11.8 rpg, 55.0 fg pct, 3.2 blocks (32 “ rst-place votes, 160 points) Katie Lou Samuelson, UConn, 6-3, junior, Huntington Beach, Calif., 17.9 ppg, 4.4 rpg, 3.7 apg, 53.1 fg pct, 46.2 3pt fg pct, 83.8 ft pct, 1.3 steals (30, 156) Sabrina Ionescu, Oregon, 5-11, sophomore, Walnut Creek, Calif., 19.4 ppg, 6.6 rpg, 7.8 apg, 43.7 3pt fg pct, 1.6 steals (21, 134) Asia Durr, Louisville, 5-10, junior, Douglasville, Ga., 18.8 ppg, 3.0 rpg, 2.1 apg, 42.5 3pt fg pct, 1.0 steals (19, 124) Victoria Vivians, Mississippi State, 6-1, senior, Carthage, Miss., 19.6 ppg, 6.0 rpg, 1.5 steals (20, 123)Second TeamKalani Brown, Baylor, 6-7, junior, Slidell, La., 20.2 ppg, 10.1 rpg, 66.3 fg pct, 1.2 blocks (13, 118) Kelsey Mitchell, Ohio State, 5-8, senior, Cincinnati, 24.5 ppg, 3.2 rpg, 4.2 apg, 40.8 3pt fg pct, 1.5 steals (7, 108) Gabby Williams, UConn, 5-11, senior, Sparks, Nev., 10.6 ppg, 7.5 rpg, 5.2 apg, 59.1 fg pct, 2.6 steals (8, 103) Megan Gustafson, Iowa, 6-3, junior, Port Wing, Wis., 25.6 ppg, 12.7 rpg, 66.8 fg pct, 2.1 blocks (7, 74) Arike Ogunbowale, Notre Dame, 5-8, junior, Milwaukee, 20.2 ppg, 5.4 rpg, 2.8 apg, 1.6 steals (1, 74)Third TeamNapheesa Collier, UConn, 6-1, junior, OFallon, Mo., 15.4 ppg, 7.5 rpg, 3.2 apg, 56.5 fg pct, 1.7 steals (1, 59) Teaira McCowan, Mississippi State, 6-7, junior, Brenham, Texas, 17.7 ppg, 13.2 rpg, 60.2 fg pct, 2.0 blocks (1, 42) Jordin Canada, UCLA, 5-6, senior, Los Angeles, 16.8 ppg, 3.5 rpg, 6.9 apg, 3.2 steals (0, 41) Lexie Brown, Duke, 5-9, senior, Suwanee, Ga., 20.1 ppg, 4.5 rpg, 4.4 apg, 3.5 steals (0, 15) Myisha Hines-Allen, Louisville, 6-2, senior, Montclair, N.J., 13.9 ppg, 9.8 rpg, 2.1 apg, 53.1 fg pct, 1.1 steals (0, 15)Honorable MentionAriel Atkins, Texas; Kenisha Bell, Minnesota; Tashia Brown, Western Kentucky; Natalie Butler, George Mason; Bridget Carleton, Iowa State; Chennedy Carter, Texas A&M; Lauren Cox, Baylor; Sophie Cunningham, Missouri; Katelynn Flaherty, Michigan; Loryn Goodwin, Oklahoma State; Marie Gulich, Oregon State; Ruthy Hebard, Oregon; Kaylee Jensen, Oklahoma State; Maria Jespersen, South Florida; Brooke McCarty, Texas; Brittany McPhee, Stanford; Tinara Moore, Central Michigan; Teana Muldrow, West Virginia; Kia Nurse, UConn; Jaime Nared, Tennessee; Shakayla Thomas, Florida State; Morgan William, Missisippi State; Imani Wright, Florida State.WOMENS NATIONAL INVITATION TOURNAMENTSemi“ nals TodayTCU (23-12) vs. Indiana (21-14), 7 p.m. Virginia Tech (22-13) at West Virginia (25-11), 7 p.m.Championship SaturdaySemi“ nal winners, 3 p.m.WOMENS BASKETBALL INVITATIONALChampionship ThursdayYale (18-13) vs. Central Arkansas (25-9), 8 p.m. PRO BASKETBALL NBAAll times EasternEASTERN CONFERENCEATLANTIC DIVISION W L PCT. GB x-Toronto 54 20 .730 „ x-Boston 51 23 .689 3 x-Philadelphia 43 30 .589 10 New York 27 48 .360 27 Brooklyn 23 51 .311 31 SOUTHEAST DIVISION W L PCT GB Washington 40 33 .548 „ Miami 39 35 .527 1 Charlotte 34 41 .453 7 Orlando 22 51 .301 18 Atlanta 21 53 .284 19 CENTRAL DIVISION W L PCT GB x-Cleveland 44 29 .603 „ x-Indiana 43 31 .581 1 Milwaukee 39 34 .534 5 Detroit 34 40 .459 10 Chicago 24 49 .329 20WESTERN CONFERENCESOUTHWEST DIVISION W L PCT GB y-Houston 60 14 .811 „ San Antonio 43 31 .581 17 New Orleans 43 31 .581 17 Dallas 22 51 .301 37 Memphis 20 54 .270 40 NORTHWEST DIVISION W L PCT GB Portland 45 28 .616 „ Oklahoma City 44 31 .587 2 Utah 42 32 .568 3 Minnesota 42 33 .560 4 Denver 40 34 .541 5 PACIFIC DIVISION W L PCT GB y-Golden State 54 19 .740 „ L.A. Clippers 39 34 .534 15 L.A. Lakers 32 41 .438 22 Sacramento 24 50 .324 30 Phoenix 19 56 .253 36x-clinched playoff berth; y-won divisionMondays GamesCharlotte 137, New York 128, OT Detroit 112, L.A. Lakers 106 Philadelphia 123, Denver 104 Memphis 101, Minnesota 93 Boston 102, Phoenix 94Tuesdays GamesSan Antonio at Washington, late Denver at Toronto, late Chicago at Houston, late Cleveland at Miami, late Portland at New Orleans, late Dallas at Sacramento, late Indiana at Golden State, late Milwaukee at L.A. Clippers, lateTodays GamesBrooklyn at Orlando, 7 p.m. Cleveland at Charlotte, 7 p.m. New York at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Atlanta at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Portland at Memphis, 8 p.m. Boston at Utah, 9:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Phoenix, 10 p.m. Dallas at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.Thursdays GamesWashington at Detroit, 7 p.m. Chicago at Miami, 7:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 8 p.m. Indiana at Sacramento, 10 p.m. Milwaukee at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. PRO HOCKEY NHLEASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division GP W L OT PTS GF GA x-Tampa Bay 76 51 21 4 106 273 217 x-Boston 74 47 17 10 104 245 189 Toronto 76 45 24 7 97 257 216 Florida 74 39 28 7 85 226 224 Montreal 77 28 37 12 68 196 245 Detroit 76 27 38 11 65 194 237 Ottawa 75 26 38 11 63 204 266 Buffalo 76 24 40 12 60 177 250Metropolitan Division GP W L OT PTS GF GA Washington 76 45 24 7 97 240 223 Pittsburgh 76 43 27 6 92 251 233 Columbus 76 42 29 5 89 215 208 Philadelphia 76 38 25 13 89 230 228 New Jersey 75 39 28 8 86 225 225 Carolina 76 34 31 11 79 212 240 N.Y. Rangers 76 33 35 8 74 221 245 N.Y. Islanders 76 31 35 10 72 242 276WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT PTS GF GA x-Nashville 75 48 16 11 107 243 192 x-Winnipeg 75 46 19 10 102 250 196 Minnesota 75 42 24 9 93 232 213 Colorado 76 41 27 8 90 240 222 St. Louis 75 42 28 5 89 209 196 Dallas 76 38 30 8 84 215 208 Chicago 77 31 36 10 72 217 238Paci“ c Division GP W L OT PTS GF GA x-Vegas 76 48 21 7 103 254 205 San Jose 76 44 23 9 97 236 206 Anaheim 76 39 24 13 91 217 204 Los Angeles 77 42 28 7 91 224 190 Calgary 77 35 32 10 80 205 234 Edmonton 76 34 36 6 74 221 243 Vancouver 76 27 40 9 63 197 247 Arizona 76 26 39 11 63 190 242 x-clinched playoff spot; 2 points for a win, 1 for OT loss. Top three teams in each division and two wild cards per conference advance to playoffsMondays GamesFlorida 3, N.Y. Islanders 0 Carolina 4, Ottawa 1 Buffalo 3, Toronto 2 Washington 4, N.Y. Rangers 2 Montreal 4, Detroit 2 Arizona 4, Tampa Bay 1 San Jose 4, Chicago 3, SO Vegas 4, Colorado 1 Los Angeles 3, Calgary 0Tuesdays GamesCarolina at New Jersey, late N.Y. Islanders at Ottawa, late Pittsburgh at Detroit, late Boston at Winnipeg, late San Jose at St. Louis, late Minnesota at Nashville, late Philadelphia at Dallas, late Columbus at Edmonton, late Anaheim at Vancouver, lateTodays GamesFlorida at Toronto, 7:30 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 8 p.m. Philadelphia at Colorado, 10 p.m. Arizona at Vegas, 10 p.m.Thursdays GamesDetroit at Buffalo, 7 p.m. Tampa Bay at Boston, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh at New Jersey, 7 p.m. Florida at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m. San Jose at Nashville, 8 p.m. Dallas at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Winnipeg at Chicago, 8:30 p.m. Columbus at Calgary, 9 p.m. Edmonton at Vancouver, 10 p.m. Arizona at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. SOCCER MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCERAll times Eastern EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T PTS GF GA Columbus 3 0 1 10 8 3 New York City FC 3 0 1 10 8 3 New York Red Bulls 2 1 0 6 7 1 Atlanta United FC 2 1 0 6 7 6 Philadelphia 1 0 1 4 2 0 New England 1 1 1 4 4 5 Montreal 1 2 0 3 4 5 D.C. United 0 2 2 2 5 9 Orlando City 0 2 1 1 2 5 Chicago 0 2 0 0 4 6 Toronto FC 0 2 0 0 0 3 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T PTS GF GA Sporting Kansas City 2 1 1 7 9 9 Vancouver 2 1 1 7 5 6 Los Angeles FC 2 0 0 6 6 1 Minnesota United 2 2 0 6 6 8 FC Dallas 1 0 2 5 5 2 Houston 1 1 1 4 7 4 LA Galaxy 1 1 1 4 3 3 Real Salt Lake 1 1 1 4 3 6 San Jose 1 1 0 3 5 5 Colorado 0 1 1 1 3 4 Portland 0 2 1 1 2 7 Seattle 0 2 0 0 0 4 3 points for victory, 1 point for tieMarch 24New York City FC 2, New England 2, tie Portland 1, FC Dallas 1, tie Columbus 3, D.C. United 1 New York 3, Minnesota United 0 Sporting Kansas City 2, Colorado 2, tie LA Galaxy 0, Vancouver 0, tieFridays GameReal Salt Lake at Toronto FC, 8 p.m.Saturdays GamesNew York at Orlando City, 1 p.m. Los Angeles FC at LA Galaxy, 3 p.m. Vancouver at Columbus, 3 p.m. Portland at Chicago, 6 p.m. Atlanta United FC at Minnesota United, 8 p.m. New York City FC at San Jose, 8 p.m. D.C. United at Sporting Kansas City, 8:30 p.m. New England at Houston, 8:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Colorado, 9 p.m. Montreal at Seattle, 10 p.m.NATIONAL WOMENS SOCCER LEAGUEAll times Eastern W L T PTS GF GA North Carolina 1 0 0 3 1 0 Seattle 1 0 0 3 2 1 Chicago 0 0 1 1 1 1 Houston 0 0 1 1 1 1 Orlando 0 0 1 1 1 1 Utah 0 0 1 1 1 1 Sky Blue FC 0 0 0 0 0 0 Portland 0 1 0 0 0 1 Washington 0 1 0 0 1 2 3 points for victory, 1 point for tie.March 24North Carolina 1, Portland 0 Utah 1, Orlando 1, tie Seattle 2, Washington 1March 25Chicago 1, Houston 1, tieFridays GameUtah at Houston, 8 p.m.Saturdays GamesSky Blue FC at North Carolina, 3:30 p.m. Orlando at Washington, 3:30 p.m. Portland at Chicago, 8:15 p.m. ODDS PREGAME.COM LINEMAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALLThursday National LeagueFAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINEChicago -186 at Miami +171 at New York -140 St. Louis +130 Washington -180 at Cincinnati +165 at Atlanta -106 Philadelphia -104 at San Diego -105 Milwaukee -105 at Los Angeles -275 San Francisco +245 at Arizona -121 Colorado +111American Leagueat Kansas City -158 Chicago +148 at Baltimore -116 Minnesota +106 Houston -159 at Texas +149 New York -140 at Toronto +130 Boston -155 at Tampa Bay +145 Los Angeles -117 at Oakland +107 Cleveland -151 at Seattle +141InterleaguePittsburgh -115 at Detroit +105NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATIONTodayFAVORITE LINE O/U UNDERDOG Brooklyn 1 216 at Orlando at Philadelphia 12 221 New York Cleveland 1 229 at Charlotte at Minnesota Off Off Atlanta at Memphis Off Off Portland at Utah 6 197 Boston at Phoenix Off Off L.A. Clippers at L.A. Lakers Off Off DallasCOLLEGE BASKETBALLTodayFAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG at Liberty 6 Ill. Chicago at N. Colorado 10 Sam Houston St. at North Texas 3 San FranciscoSaturdayMichigan 5 Loyola Of Chicago Villanova 5 KansasNATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE TodayFAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE at Toronto -150 Florida +140 at Washington -250 N.Y. Rangers +220 at Colorado -139 Philadelphia +129 at Vegas -250 Arizona +220 Updated odds available at Pregame.com TRANSACTIONS BASEBALLMajor League Baseball MLB „ Promoted Tony Reagins to executive vice president of baseball & softball development.American LeagueCLEVELAND INDIANS „ Claimed LHP Jack Leathersich off waivers from Pittsburgh and optioned him to Columbus (IL). Traded OF Rob Refsnyder to Tampa Bay for cash considerations. Received RHP Jordan Milbrath (Rule 5 selection) from Pittsburgh and assigned him to Columbus. Signed INF Adam Rosales to a minor league contract and assigned him to Columbus. MINNESOTA TWINS „ Announced 1B/DH Kennys Vargas cleared waivers and was assigned to Rochester (IL). SEATTLE MARINERS „ Reassigned OF Kirk Nieuwenhuis to minor league camp. TAMPA BAY RAYS „ Reassigned C Curt Casali and OFs Johnny Field and Brandon Snyder to minor league camp. TEXAS RANGERS „ Reassigned RHP Steve Delabar, C Brett Nicholas and OF Destin Hood to Round Rock (PCL). Reassigned RHPs Chi Chi Gonzalez, Shawn Tolleson and Edinson Volquez and LHP Anthony Gose to minor league camp.National LeagueARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS „ Signed INF Ketel Marte to a “ ve-year contract. Sent RHP Albert Suarez outright to Reno (PCL). Placed RHP Randall Delgado and RF Steven Souza Jr. on the 10-day DL. CINCINNATI REDS „ Announced LHP Justin Nicolino cleared waivers and sent him outright to Louisville (IL). COLORADO ROCKIES „ Optioned C Tom Murphy and OF Raimel Tapia to Albuquerque (PCL). LOS ANGELES DODGERS „ Claimed RHP Cory Mazzoni from the Chicago Cubs and optioned him to Oklahoma City (PCL). MIAMI MARLINS „ Optioned RHP Brian Ellington to New Orleans (PCL). PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES „ Signed INF-OF Alexi Amarista to a minor league contract. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS „ Selected the contract of LHP Derek Holland from Richmond (EL). WASHINGTON NATIONALS „ Selected the contract of C Miguel Montero. Placed RHP Koda Glover on the 60-day DL. Placed 2B Daniel Murphy and RHP Joaquin Benoit on the 10-day DL.Atlantic LeagueLONG ISLAND DUCKS „ Signed OF Tyler Holt and C Wilkin Castillo.BASKETBALLNational Basketball AssociationNBA „ Fined Portland G-F Evan Turner $10,000 for making an inappropriate gesture on the playing court during a March 25 game at Oklahoma City.Womens National Basketball AssociationWNBA „ Announced the resignation of chief operating of“ cer Jay Parry, effective April 30. Promoted Ann Rodriguez to chief operating of“ cer.FOOTBALLNational Football LeagueCHICAGO BEARS „ Re-signed CB Sherrick McManis to a two-year contract. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS „ Released QB Trevone Boykin. TENNESSEE TITANS „ Agreed to terms with QB Blaine Gabbert and OL Xavier Sua-Filo.Arena FootballAFL „ Named Randall Boe commissioner and Ron Jaworski chairman of the executive committee.HOCKEYNational Hockey LeagueCHICAGO BLACKHAWKS „ Agreed to terms with D Blake Hillman on a two-year contract through the 2018-19 season. Assigned F Matthew Highmore to Rockford (AHL). NEW YORK RANGERS „ Assigned G Alexandar Georgiev to Hartford (AHL). PHILADELPHIA FLYERS „ Reassigned G John Muse to Reading (ECHL) from Lehigh Valley (AHL). WASHINGTON CAPITALS „ Recalled G Pheonix Copley from Hershey (AHL).American Hockey LeagueHARTFORD WOLF PACK „ Announced G Chris Nell was reassigned to Greenville (ECHL).SOCCERMajor League SoccerLOS ANGELES FC „ Signed M Andre Horta. PHILADELPHIA UNION „ Named Dick Schreuder assistant coach.SKIINGU.S. ALPINE „ Announced the resignation of director Patrick Riml.COLLEGESCLEMSON „ Fired womens basketball coach Audra Smith. FLORIDA STATE „ Announced mens sophomore basketball G CJ Walker is leaving the program. LOUISVILLE „ Named Chris Mack mens basketball coach. MEMPHIS „ Named Kevin Clune senior defensive assistant. MINNESOTA „ Named Bob Motzko mens hockey coach. NEW MEXICO „ Announced senior F Connor MacDougall and junior F Jachai Simmons will be leaving the mens basketball team. SAINT ANSELM „ Named Jordan Softcheck offensive coordinator. TEXAS „ Junior G Kerwin Roach has declared for the NBA draft. UALR „ Named Darrell Walker mens basketball coach. WASHINGTON STATE „ Announced G Malachi Flynn says he will transfer to another mens basketball team. AUTO RACING NASCAR MONSTER ENERGY CUPSTP 500Monday at Martinsville Speedway, Martinsville, Va. Lap length: 0.526 miles(Starting position in parentheses)1. (9) Clint Bowyer, Ford, 500 laps. 2. (2) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 500. 3. (5) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 500. 4. (1) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 500. 5. (8) Kevin Harvick, Ford, 500. 6. (3) Joey Logano, Ford, 500. 7. (16) Alex Bowman, Chevrolet, 500. 8. (25) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 500. 9. (21) Chase Elliott, Chevrolet, 500. 10. (4) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 500. 11. (11) Kurt Busch, Ford, 500. 12. (6) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 500. 13. (15) Paul Menard, Ford, 500. 14. (10) Aric Almirola, Ford, 500. 15. (18) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 499. 16. (7) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 499. 17. (13) Erik Jones, Toyota, 497. 18. (23) Daniel Suarez, Toyota, 497. 19. (14) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 497. 20. (20) William Byron, Chevrolet, 497. 21. (24) Michael McDowell, Ford, 497. 22. (32) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 496. 23. (22) Chris Buescher, Chevrolet, 496. 24. (29) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 496. 25. (28) David Ragan, Ford, 495. 26. (26) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 495. 27. (35) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 493. 28. (37) DJ Kennington, Toyota, 493. 29. (33) Ross Chastain, Chevrolet, 493. 30. (12) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 493. 31. (38) JJ Yeley, Chevrolet, 493. 32. (31) Matt DiBenedetto, Ford, 488. 33. (27) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 486. 34. (19) Darrell Wallace Jr., Chevrolet, 486. 35. (30) Harrison Rhodes, Chevrolet, 482. 36. (34) Gray Gaulding, Toyota, 481. 37. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 481. 38. (36) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, rear gear, 211.Race StatisticsAverage Speed of Winner : 81.663 mph. Time: 3 hours, 13 minutes, 14 seconds. Margin of Victory: 1.146 seconds. Caution Flags: 4 for 33 laps. Lead Changes: 11 among 6 drivers. Lap Leaders: M. Truex Jr. 1-4; Kyle Busch 5-26; D. Hamlin 27-51; Kyle Busch 52; D. Hamlin 53135; B. Keselowski 136; R. Blaney 137-142; D. Hamlin 143-145; R. Blaney 146-284; C. Bowyer 285-385; Kyle Busch 386; C. Bowyer 387-500. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Lead, Laps Led): C. Bowyer 2 times for 215 laps; R. Blaney 2 times for 145 laps; D. Hamlin 3 times for 111 laps; Kyle Busch 3 times for 24 laps; M. Truex Jr. 1 time for 4 laps; B. Keselowski 1 time for 1 lap.BASKETBALL 5 p.m. ESPN2 „ High school, McDonald's Girls AllAmerican Game, at Atlanta 7 p.m. ESPN „ High school, McDonald's Boys All-American Game, at Atlanta COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. CBSSN „ College Insider Tournament, “ rst semi“ nal, Illinois-Chicago at Liberty 8:30 p.m. ESPNU „ CBI Tournament, championship series (best-of-3), Game 2, San Francisco at North Texas 9 p.m. CBSSN „ College Insider Tournament, second semi“ nal, Sam Houston St. at N. Colorado NBA BASKETBALL 7 p.m. NBA „ Cleveland at Charlotte FS-Florida „ Brooklyn at Orlando 9:30 p.m. ESPN „ Boston at Utah NHL HOCKEY 8 p.m. NBCSN „ N.Y. Rangers at Washington TENNIS 1 p.m. ESPN2 „ ATP-WTA Tours, Miami Open, men's & women's quarter“ nals, at Key Biscayne 7 p.m. ESPN2 „ ATP-WTA Tours, Miami Open, men's & women's quarter“ nals, at Key Biscayne Have a local sporting event you would like to have included in our schedule? Email details to Sports Editor Paul Jenkins at paul.jenkins@ dailycommercial.com. HIGH SCHOOL BASEBALL Real Life Christian at Lake Region, 1 p.m. Ocala Trinity Catholic at Montverde Academy, 6 p.m. GIRLS LACROSSE Lake Howell at East Ridge, 6 p.m. SOFTBALL Eden (New York) at Montverde Academy, 5 p.m. Montini Catholic (Chicago) at East Ridge, 7 p.m. TENNIS Apopka at East Ridge, 3:30 p.m. Umatilla at The Villages (girls), 4 p.m. TRACK & FIELD Umatilla meet, 3:30 p.m. Pepsi Relays at GainesvilleSPORTS BRIEFS KEY BISCAYNE, FLA.Isner upsets Cilic to reach quarter“ nalsAmerican John Isner upset second-seeded Marin Cilic of Croatia 7-6 (0), 6-3 on Tues-day to reach the Miami Open quarterfinals.The 14th-seeded Isner, who reached the Miami Open semifinals in 2015, never faced a break point in the match. He made an impressive 73 percent of his first serves to take down Cilic. I was in a very good serving rhythm today,Ž Isner said. I felt that really from my opening serve, the whole match that I knew it was going to be a good serving day.When I serve like that, Im certainly tough to beat,Ž Isner added.The key to Isners victory in the match came when he won all seven points in the first-set tiebreaker. The departure of Cilic, the 2014 U.S. Open champion and Australian Open final-ist in January, leaves fourth-seeded Alexan-der Zverev of Germany as the highest seed remaining in the draw. Top-seeded Roger Federer lost his opening match at the tournament TOKYOOlympic committees view Tokyo 2020 venuesA dozen national Olympic committees have taken a quick look at Tokyos venue prep-arations for the 2020 Summer Games.Mark England of the British Olympic Association says they were impressed.England says we havent had many questions to ask the organizing commit-tee because the venues have been absolutely fantastic.ŽThe tour Tuesday included Tokyos Met-ropolitan Gymnasium, which was built in 1954 hosted gymnastics for the 1964 Olympics. It will be the venue for table tennis in two years. Tokyos use of exist-ing venues will delight the International Olympic Committee, which has been criticized for pressuring cities to build white elephantŽ sports venues.NEWTON, IOWAPenn States Retherford again nations top wrestlerPenn States Zain Retherford for the second straight year has won the Hodge Trophy, given to the nations top college wrestler.The three-time NCAA champion received 35 of 48 votes from a panel of journal-ists, former winners and retired coaches.Retherford won titles this season at the Key-stone Classic, Southern Scuffle and the Big Ten meet before winning the national meet at 149 pounds. He finished his career with a record of 126-3. Retherford joined Ben Askren, former Penn State star David Taylor and his coach, Cael Sanderson, as the only multiple recipients of Hodge award, which is considered the Heisman Trophy of wrestling. The Associated Press

PAGE 13

DailyCommercial.com | Wednesday, March 28, 2018 B3to go to the Final Four. For us, its an opportunity to go back to where we felt like we didnt really give our best effort,Ž UConn coach Geno Auriemma said. We lost to a really good team. Happened in a way that was really, really disappointing. I know that we were anx-ious to go back and put ourselves in that same situation and see how much weve changed since last year.ŽThe Irish and Huskies have a storied history on the games biggest stage. The teams met early in December and UConn had to rally from an 11-point deficit in the fourth quarter to stay unbeaten.This might be one of the best coaching jobs by Muffet McGraw at Notre Dame. She lost four players over the course of the season to ACL injuries, but the Irish find themselves back in the Final Four after rallying from a six-point halftime deficit to beat Oregon 84-74 on Monday night.Its Notre Dames first trip to the national semi-finals since 2015.This ones just so rewarding because I think even though were a No. 1 seed, its a little unexpected,Ž McGraw said.The Bulldogs have lost only one game this season, falling to the Gamecocks in the final of the Southeastern Conference Tournament. They are back in the Final Four for the second straight season led virtually by the same group that got them to their first national semi-final last year.Theyve lived all year with a bulls eye on their backs. Thats hard to do, yall,Ž Mississippi State coach Vic Schaefer said. These kids are special.ŽLouisville has had its own special season, win-ning the Atlantic Coast Conference regular-sea-son and tournament titles for the first time in school history. They entered the NCAAs as a No. 1 seed for the first time and are back in the Final Four for a third time under coach Jeff Walz.The Cardinals are led by Asia Durr and Myisha Hines-Allen. Louisville also made the Final Four in 2009 and 2013. The team advanced to the title game both times before losing to UConn.They understand the task in front of them facing Mississippi State.Theyre a really good team and well have to be well-prepared against them,Ž Walz said.Other tidbits from the Final Four: ALL-AMERICAN TALENTThree of the five mem-bers of The Associated Press womens AllAmerica team are in the Final Four. Mississippi States Victoria Vivians, Durr and UConns Katie Lou Samuelson all reached Columbus. SEEING CHALKThe last time four No. 1 seeds made the Final Four was 2015. It also happened in 2012 and 1989. CONFERENCE SUPREMACYThe ACC has two teams in the Final Four. Its the fourth time in the past six years that a con-ference had two teams in the national semifinals. WOMENFrom Page B1Notre Dame head coach Muffet McGraw shouts to her team during the “ rst half in a regional “ nal at the NCAA womens college basketball tournament against Oregon on Monday in Spokane, Wash. [AP PHOTO / YOUNG KWAK] So did Ayton.An imposing presence at 7-foot-1, 260 pounds, the big man from the Bahamas dominated at both ends, throwing down massive dunks, dropping in mid-range jumpers and swatting shots into the stands.Ayton averaged 20.1 points on 61 percent shooting, 11.6 rebounds and 2.0 blocked shots per game on his way to becoming the Pac-12 player of the year.Hes a once-in-ageneration player,Ž Arizona coach Sean Miller said. I doubt if I will ever coach anyone like him again. I dont mean that we wont try, but there just arent many Deandres walking around.ŽSame could be said of Bagley.The big man from Phoenix is 6-11, but plays more like a much smaller player, athletically get-ting to the rim, stroking in 3-pointers, soaring in for alley-oop dunks. Bagley became the first Duke player since the 1960s to have 30 points and 20 rebounds in a game when he had 32 and 21 against Florida State, and led the Blue Devils with 21.2 points and 11.1 rebounds.Hes the most unique player weve had here at Duke during my 38 years,Ž Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski said. He has everything.ŽBrunson flirted with leaving for the NBA after his sophomore season. His decision to come back keyed Villanovas return to the Final Four.A 6-3 guard, Brunson is arguably the nations best all-around player. He led Villanova with 19.2 points, 4.6 assists and grabbed 3.1 rebounds per game while leading the Wildcats to the Final Four for the second time in three seasons.On the court hes as complete a player as there can be, very intel-ligent,Ž Villanova coach Jay Wright said. Posts up, shoots 3s, drives, passes, does everything. Defend, rebounds. And his work ethic is maturity every day. We joked hes the most mature person in the program including all of the coaches and me. And he is.ŽGraham took a backseat to All-American Frank Mason III in Kansas a year ago. This season, hes been the Jayhawks unques-tioned leader. Heady and with knack for making big plays late in games, Graham led Kansas with 17.2 points. 7.3 assists and grabbed 4.0 rebounds per game while taking the Jayhawks to the Final Four.Hes the best intan-gible guy weve ever had here and has as good of leadership qualities as anybody Ive ever coached,Ž Kansas coach Bill Self said. So hes been the complete package as a player, and basically hes a guy that I dont think coaches get an opportunity to coach but every few years. And certainly weve been blessed to have him.Ž 2018 MENS AP ALL-AMERICA TEAM LISTStatistics through March 11 First Team Jalen Brunson, Villanova, 6-3, 190, junior, Lincolnshire, Ill., 19.4 ppg, 3.1 rpg, 4.7 apg, 53.1 fg pct, 41.3 3pt fg pct (63 “ rst-place votes, 321 points) Deandre Ayton, Arizona, 7-1, 250, freshman, Nassau, Bahamas, 20.3 ppg, 11.5 rpg, 61.6 fg pct, 2.0 blocks (61, 317) Trae Young, Oklahoma, 6-2, 180, freshman, Norman, Okla., 27.4 ppg, 3.9 rpg, 8.8 apg, 1.7 steals, 35.3 minutes (61, 315) Marvin Bagley III, Duke, 6-11, 234, freshman, Phoenix, 21.1 ppg, 11.5 rpg, 60.5 fg pct, 2.0 blocks (59, 313) Devonte Graham, Kansas, 6-2, 185, senior, Raleigh, N.C., 17.3 ppg, 3.9 rpg, 7.5 apg, 1.6 steals, 41.2 3pt fg pct, 83.4 ft pct, 37.6 minutes (54, 303) TEAMContinued from B1Bowl. Pittsburgh lost its first postseason game to Jacksonville.Just as infamous were negated catches by Dez Bryant of the Cowboys in a 2015 playoff game at Green Bay, and Calvin Johnson of the Lions in 2010 against the Bears.I think the third step recommendation was excellent,Ž Packers coach Mike McCarthy said. It cleans up a majority of the (catches) that were in question. The old rule was so technical. Were better off today than in the past.ŽAdded Tom Coughlin, the Jaguars top executive:First of all, simplicity is the key. I think this is a fan-driven concept here because a lot of people have no idea why was this thing called that way and why was the next one not called that way. ... I think weve cleaned up a lot of that, and that will get the fans more engrossed in the game. Its going to be much easier for them to understand what is and what isnt.ŽLate Tuesday, the owners rewrote the rule on using the helmet, making it a 15-yard penalty for any player to lower his head to initiate any hit with the helmet.McKay called it a signif-icant change,Ž noting that it was a technique too dan-gerous for the player doing it and the player being hit.ŽMcKay said the tackle made by the Steelers Ryan Shazier last season that resulted in the linebacker suffering a spinal injury „ Shazier underwent spinal stabilization surgery two days later „ was not the impetus for the change. But it was an example of what needs to be eliminated from the game.This one technique, we saw so many hits when a player lowered his head and delivered a hit and either hurt himself or the player he was hitting,Ž McKay said. It was time for a change of this magnitude.ŽWhile the offender could be disqualified, owners did not call for an automatic ejection on such a play „ at least not yet. In college football, when a player is penalized for targeting and a replay review affirms it, he is ejected.Also approved Tuesday was making permanent spotting the ball at the 25-yard line after a touch-back on a kickoff; allowing players on injured reserve to be traded; and authoriz-ing a designated member of the officiating department to instruct on-field game officials to eject a player for a flagrant non-football act when a foul for that act is called on the field.Withdrawn by the Jets was a proposal to limit defensive pass interference to 15 yards, the penalty in college, except for egregious incidents. The competition commit-tee was not in favor of such a change, but McKay and football operations chief Troy Vincent said the idea has some momentum.Ž It is likely to come up again in future meetings.Tabled was a proposal to allow an assistant coach whose team is still playing in the postseason to sign a contract to become head coach elsewhere. Thats been dubbed the Josh McDaniels RuleŽ after the Patriots offensive coordinator agreed to become the Colts coach in January, then reneged and returned to New England soon after the Super Bowl.That suggestion also is expected to come up at future meetings, beginning in May at the Atlanta owners get-together.Also tabled was whether to allow video on sideline Surface tablets that teams use now to view photos. McKay said the voters werent there to pass it.On-field officials sup-ported having a member of the staff in New York call-ing for an ejection in certain blatant circumstances that involve non-football acts such as fighting. They cited the difficulty of determin-ing the culprits in a fight or other such situations. MEETINGSContinued from B1New England Patriots head football coach Bill Belichick, right, answers a question from a reporter at the coaches breakfast during the NFL owners meetings Tuesday in Orlando, Fla. [PHELAN M. EBENHACK/AP IMAGES FOR NFL] Alex Torres and Isabella Andujar, with a hit and run scored in two at bats between the pair.We made adjustments in the batters box,Ž said Beall. That was the difference between us in the first inning and the sixth inning. Weve been work-ing on learning to make adjustments based on what our hitters get with each at bat. By the time the sixth inning rolled around, we knew what we needed to do at the plate.ŽTruth be told, however, Betts run in the first was all the Panthers would need with Heaberlin in the circle.The senior was in the zone from the outset. She retired 11 straight at one point and struck out six in a row.Heaberlin had a no hitter for 5 ‡ innings, before Makaila Graham reached on a blooper that landed just out of Heaberlins reach. It marked the only time the Buffalo had multiple runners on base in a single inning and Heaberlin quickly snuffed out the potential threat with her 10 strikeout of the game.For the Panthers (10-2), which entered the game ranked fourth in Class 5A, Brokenborough and Lexi Rodriguez led the way with two hits apiece. Betts and Brokenborough had two RBIs apiece.Eustis had nine hits off Buffalo starter Lindsey Collins. SOFTBALLFrom Page B1Eustis Tori Rodebaugh (2) eyes the ball at a game between Eustis High School and The Villages High School in Eustis on Tuesday. Eustis Delaney Heaberlin (15) pitches at a game between Eustis High School and The Villages High School in Eustis on Tuesday. [PHOTOS BY PAUL RYAN /CORRESPONDENT]

PAGE 14

B4 Wednesday, March 28, 2018 | DailyCommercial.comTo submit news or notes for the weekly recreation page, contact Sports Editor Paul Jenkins at paul.jenkins@dailycommer-cial.com or 352-365-8204.Lawn bowling club celebrates 90 yearsThe Mount Dora Lawn Bowling Club will celebrate its 90th anniversary on April 7. The public is invited to an open house from 9 a.m. to noon where you can watch games, roll some bowls and meet some of the 300 members. Refreshments and snacks will be available.New flexible, shorter, free training classes are now available for those who want to consider joining the club.The Mount Dora Lawn Bowling Club is located at 125 Edgerton Court, near Evans Park and the Lakeside Inn. For more information, contact Tom Eppich at 352-254-0478, treppich@aol.com or go to www.mount-doralawnbowlingclub.com.Leesburg registration for sports now underwayThe Leesburg Recreation Department is currently taking registra-tion for flag football (ages 5-15), Pop Warner football and cheerleading (ages 5-14), prep basketball (ages 13-17) and adult flag football (ages 16 and up).For more information on any of the programs, visit http:/leesburgflorida.gov/ or call 352-728-9885.Plantation softball holding golf tournamentThe Plantation Softball Association will hold its 14th annual golf tourna-ment fundraiser on April 10 at the Plantation Cranes Roost golf course.Cost is $50 per person for the four-person scramble which will have an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start.A golf cart is being offered in a hole-in-one contest and there are prizes for closest to the pin and straightest drive, among others. Lunch is being catered by Oakwood.Registration forms for the tournament are avail-able at the clubhouse. Take a run through the park each SaturdayClermont's parkrun 5k takes place every Saturday from Lake Hiawatha Preserve Park promptly at 7:30 a.m. The Hiawatha Preserve is located on west side of Lake Minneola in Clermont.The address is 450 12th St., Clermont.The event is free and put on by volunteers each week and draws an average of about 75 runners a week. Participants are asked to register and print out a one-time parkrun barcode that is used for timing. Printing out the personal barcode is essential.For more information or to register, visit www.parkrun.us/ clermontwaterfront. Eustis offering Zumba classesThe Eustis Recreation Department is offering an adult Zumba class. The classes will be held on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 5:30 to 6:15 p.m. in the Garden Room at 2214 Bates Ave. The first class is free and the cost on a per-class basis is $5. You can purchase a 10-class card for $35.For more information, call Cartina Craft at 352-357-8510. Eustis holding Simply Gentle Yoga classesThe city of Eustis Parks and Recreation Department is offering Simply Gentle Yoga classes on Fridays at 10 a.m. and the cost is $7 per session. The classes will be held in the Lakeview Room at the Eustis Community Center, 601 Northshore Drive.Certified yoga instructor Nancy LaPointe will lead the classes that will combine chair, standing and floor work. Participants will learn techniques for healthy self-care; ways to move to keep your body strong and flex-ible; how to strengthen your balance muscles and healthy breathing techniques to manage stress and anxiety and to help you sleep.Contact the Eustis Recreation Department at 352-357-8510 or LaPointe at 352-383-1923 for more information. Open hours at Leesburg gymnasiumThe Leesburg Recreation Department holds open gym hours throughout the week. The cost to play is $2 a day or $20 a year for adults and $1 a day or $10 a year for youths ages 12 to 17. If you play 10 days, you automatically get a yearly membership.The gym, located at 1851 Griffin Road, is open from 8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Mondays and Fridays and from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Saturday open gym hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Line dancing for fun and “ tnessThe Leesburg Public Library at 100 E. Main St. will have line dancing instruction on the second Monday of each month at 1 p.m. The cost is free. Line dancing is a popular form of exercise. It doesn't require a partner and it improves bal-ance and memory. All levels are welcome, especially beginners. Peter Statham is the instructor.NEWS & NOTES By Paul Jenkinspaul.jenkins@dailycommercial.comGary Perigo has seen it time and time again. Call it the spirit of the Senior Games.Gold medal winners walk up to a fellow com-petitor and congratulate them on their performance. The reason for the congratulations may be that the competitor posted a personal best in an event even though they didnt medal, and that was worthy of some praise.The Lake Senior Games is competition with a twist. Sure, there are winners and losers, those who qualify for the state Senior Games and those who fall short of that goal.But at its heart, the Lake Senior Games is just about competing to the best of your ability, whatever that level may be.Its all about treating people with respect and dignity and everybody having a good time,Ž said Perigo, the director of the Lake Senior Games. But the first thing you have to do is show up.ŽNow in its fifth year, The Lake Senior Games has been growing each year and adding sports along the way.Registration for the Games is available at lakeseniorgames.com and the base price for entries is $15.We want it to keep getting bigger and bigger,Ž said Cindy Kilts, who handles mar-keting and swimming for the Games. The cama-raderie at the Games is just amazing.ŽThe Games run from April 4 through April 29 at locations all around Lake County. It all kicks off on April 4 with golf at Deer Run Golf Club in Casselberry, followed by powerlifting at CF Fit-ness in Mount Dora and swimming at the YMCA in Tavares on April 7. Tennis gets underway on April 13 at Summit Greens in Clermont. Archery and croquet are held April 14 at The Grand Oaks Resort in Lady Lake followed by pickleball at Grand Oaks April 16-18.Then there is lawn bowling at the Mount Dora Lawn Bowling Club on April 21, track and field at Mount Dora Christian Academy on April 28 and 5K and 10K cycling time trials April 29 in Clermont along with the closing ceremo-nies on April 29 at Epic Cycles in Clermont.The events serve as qualifiers for the state games and are open to all seniors starting at age 55. The competition is broken down into age brackets at 5-year incre-ments and you do not have to be a Lake County resident to enter.With about 200 total entries for the Games as of last week, the most popular event is pickleball. The least popular is turning out to be golf, mainly because its a scratch event and doesnt use handicap.Pickleball will be run by Grand Oaks pro John Sperling, a former U.S. Open champion, and the resort has four outdoor courts and four indoor courts, so weather wont be a factor.Pickleball is still in its infancy, but were start-ing to experience the boom,Ž Sperling said. Were a niche sport, but pickleball is like a little family. The whole goal is just to put the paddle in your hand and go and have fun.ŽA sentiment shared by Lake Senior Games as a whole.Spirit of the GamesLake Senior Games about more than just winningPickleball is the most popular sport at the Lake Senior Games and will be held April 16-18 at Grand Oaks Resort in Lady Lake. [PAUL RYAN / CORRESPONDENT] Cindy Kilts and Gary Perigo with the Lake Senior Games pose at Grand Oaks Resort in Lady Lake. This will be the “ fth year for the Games. [PAUL JENKINS / DAILY COMMERCIAL] RECREATION

PAGE 15

I had a foodie revelation the other day while I was teaching a class. I was explaining the USDA has advised that in order for us to receive all of the proper nutrition and be in optimal health, we must use the My Plate infographic. My Plate replaces the old food pyramid. The colorful infographic breaks down your plate and how much of a particular food group should occupy it. The largest portion on the infographic is vegetables, followed by grains, fruit and protein. Dairy is represented by a small glass outside of the plate. My revelation came in the following: We normally plan our meals around what protein we are having and then let it dictate the other components. What if we let vegetables run the plate? Bingo! All the alarms in my DailyCommercial.com | Wednesday, March 28, 2018 C1 DINE PROTEINEXERCISE NUTRITION ADVICEProper nutrition is a key component of any athletes performance. Here are a few recommended practices from IncredibleEgg.org: € Before a workout, load up on whole grains and protein to keep you fueled. Remember, your muscles rely on mainly carbohydrates, but also protein for sustained energy during activity. € A er physical activity, include protein-rich foods like eggs in a postworkout sandwich to help your recovery. Research indicates eating a mix of carbs and protein promotes muscle repair and optimal recovery. HEALTHY EATINGSWITCH UP YOUR ROUTINEIf youve been sticking to the same healthy eating routine since Jan. 1, changing things up is critical to staying motivated. SeaPak recommends infusing fresh avor into mealtime or enroll in a new tness class to update your workout regimen. „ Brandpoint SLOW COOKINGTOP TIPSThese tips from MidwestLiving.com will give you the skills needed for most slow cooker recipes. Ingredients: Thaw meat in the fridge before cooking. Cut veggies the same size so they cook evenly. Size: A 5-quart slow cooker is usually big enough. Food should reach halfway to twothirds up the side. Patience: When you li the lid to check on food, you let heat out and add 20 to 30 minutes to your cooking time. Tom McNiff, editor 352-365-8250 tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com By Linda FloreaCorrespondentLEESBURG „ Sip Restaurant, Jazz and Wine Bar in downtown Leesburg is giving shoppers a reason to stay downtown into the eve-nings and locals a destination to visit.General manager and owner Benjamin Mosley said he and his partners bought downtown buildings about 3 years ago and decided more restaurants were needed to make the area vital „ the heartbeat of downtown.We didn't have any res-taurants that were open past 3 p.m. and that was a prob-lem for us „ we were starting retail,Ž Mosley said. So I opened a restaurant that's open later and it helps the shoppers stay. Plus, we don't have much night life downtown. I needed a mid range restaurant, the kind of place you can go to all the time.ŽSip Restaurant, Jazz and Wine Bar was created to fill that need.The restaurant seats about 155 inside and 40 outside overlooking Main Street. There's a full liquor bar and a selection of about 40 wines. Entertainment is on stage four nights a week, including female vocalists Wednesday and Thursday with local names such as Bobby Black-mon on the weekends.A social atmosphereSip Restaurant, Jazz and Wine Bar brings night life to downtown LeesburgOwner and manager Benjamin Mosley calls restaurants the heartbeat of downtown Leesburg. Sip Restaurant Jazz and Wine Bar has entertainment four nights a week. [DAILY COMMERCIAL FILE] Osso Buco, a pork shank surrounded by mashed potatoes, is Sip Restaurants signature dinner dish. [SUBMITTED]  Here you walk in and you say I know you, and I know you, I know the bartender and I know the owner.ŽBenjamin Mosley, general manager and owner of Sip Restaurant Sip Restaurant, Jazz and Wine Bar seats about 155 inside and 40 outside overlooking Main Street in downtown Leesburg. [DAILY COMMERCIAL FILE] Ze CarterROAMING GOURMETMake vegetables the star of your mealGreen beans are plentiful, and Ze Carter likes to fry up slices of garlic in a little olive oil to give her beans a savory, nutty ” avor. [SUBMITTED] See SIP, C2 See VEGETABLES, C4

PAGE 16

C2 Wednesday, March 28, 2018 | DailyCommercial.comThe way I have it set up, it's more like a supper club,Ž Mosley said. Every table is really good, most tables are less than 15 feet from the entertainer.ŽLunch features paninis, flat breads, soups and salads. Mosley said a grilled romaine salad is very popular and can be topped with chicken, hummus or shrimp.Osso Buco is the res-taurant's signature dinner dish along with steak, lobster ravioli, shrimp scampi and ravioli and duck wings.Desserts include home-made crme brle, cheesecake, key lime pie and an assortment of cakes.Mosley said he's trying to create the kind of place people can drop in after work or to get away and relax.Here you walk in and you say I know you, and I know you, I know the bartender and I know the owner,Ž Mosley said. It's a social atmosphere you can't always have. Normally you have to call around and organize a group. I want a place you show up and just enjoy yourself.ŽSip,707 W. Main St., is open from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday and from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Friday and Saturday. They take reservations until 7:30 p.m. The entertainment schedule and special events are announced on Facebook. SIPFrom Page C1Sip Restaurant, Jazz and Wine Bar, 707 W. Main St. in Leesburg, is open Tuesday through Saturday and offers entertainment four nights a week. [DAILY COMMERCIAL FILE] The duck wing appetizer is pictured at Sip Restaurant in downtown Leesburg. The dish is made with duck wing drummettes roasted in orange champagne sauce and quickly broiled. The drummettes are served on a bed of spring greens and topped with scallions. [SUBMITTED]

PAGE 17

DailyCommercial.com | Wednesday, March 28, 2018 C3Browsing through a fruit and vegetable stand, I was stopped dead in my tracks by the rare and wonderful aroma of ripe strawberries. Rare? With strawberries in every supermarket and fruit stand? Ah, but most of them arent really ripe. Commercially speaking, a berry that is only ‡ red is considered ripe. These were totally red, berries I would have selected myself had I been picking them. It took all my willpower not to take them home and start making shortcake. But if you havent given up breads and biscuits in order to lose some poundage, and if youre lucky enough to find some of those perfectly ripe strawberries, you can enjoy the glories of old-fashioned strawberry shortcake. Feel free to use your own favorite biscuit recipe for the cakeŽ part of this dessert, although youll need to add sugar. Some recipes contain no sugar at all, others almost as much sugar as flour. I like shortcake sweeter than bread biscuits but not cake-sweet. To use baking mix, just follow the directions for biscuits on the box, adding the sugar that transforms your dough into the magic of shortcake. For the covering, heavy cream may be used, whipped or not, and calorie-conscious folks can resort to nondairy whipped topping instead. Not everyone keeps nutmeg on hand. Not everyone even likes nutmeg, and it certainly isnt a traditional ingredient. Its strictly optional. If you use it, do so with a light hand, just enough to be barely noticeable as a tantalizing aroma. Sift through a small mesh strainer to avoid lumps. Many recipes practically beg us to experiment. Strawberry shortcake is not one of them. Strawberry shortcake is basically berries ripe to the peak of perfection plus glorified biscuit dough. I do admit to the minor sin of using nutmeg, and Ive thought seriously of adding just a tad of vanilla extract when stirring in the milk. Or sprinkling a few sliced almonds over the topping. But nothing too brash or blatant. As for those fresh strawberries, you can make do with a pint, but youll be happier with at least a quart. After all, you need some extras for nibbling.OLD-FASHIONED STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE Ingredients: Fresh strawberries 2 cups all-purpose ” our 2 teaspoons baking powder teaspoon salt 3 tablespoons granulated sugar 1/8 to teaspoon nutmeg, optional cup shortening About cup milk Butter (or margarine) Whipping cream or whipped topping Directions: Slice strawberries into a bowl, sprinkle with a little sugar and set aside. (Save some whole berries for decorating the top). Preheat oven to 425 degrees. For one large shortcake, butter a 9-inch cake pan and set it aside; if making individual servings, butter a baking sheet and set aside. Sift together ” our, baking powder, salt, sugar and nutmeg, if desired. Cut in shortening (for richer dough, use butter). A little at a time, stir in milk, using just enough so the dough holds together, but remains soft. Dough should not look wet and shiny. Turn out onto a ” oured surface. If you want one large shortcake, divide dough into halves, and roll or pat each one out into a 9-inch round. Put “ rst layer into prepared cake pan and brush top generously with melted butter (about 2 tablespoons). Top with second round, and bake for about 12 minutes. The butter between the two layers makes it easy to separate them later, when youre ready to assemble your shortcake. Turn out and split with fork as you would an English muf“ n. Spread butter between layers and on top. Place bottom layer on serving dish. Spoon on a layer of prepared strawberries, then whipped cream or topping. Add top layer, then more berries, and cover the whole cake with cream or topping. For individual shortcakes, roll out dough and cut out with biscuit cutter at least 3 inches in diameter. Brush half the rounds with melted butter and each of these with an unbuttered round. Arrange on baking sheet, and continue as for large shortcake. Whatever the size, shortcake is best served while the biscuit portion is still hot, but its awfully good eaten cold, too.PRACTICAL POT WATCHERStrawberry season brings dr eams of old-fashioned shortcakeIf you havent given up breads and biscuits in order to lose some poundage, and if youre lucky enough to “ nd some of the seasons perfectly ripe strawberries, you can enjoy the glories of old-fashioned strawberry shortcake. [GATEHOUSE MEDIA FILE] By Becky KrystalThe Washington PostYou probably have a bag of flour in your pantry. And its probably all-purpose, the workhorse of baking. But there are plenty of other, more specialized flours out there, and even if youre just starting to dabble in baking, it will help to have a basic understanding of flour varieties. The biggest difference to consider is protein content, which is often referred to in percentages. When water interacts with the proteins in your flour, it forms elastic sheets of gluten, giving baked goods the ability to rise and the stability to stay that way. So, more protein means more gluten will be formed, and the amount of structure and chew youre after will affect what flour you use. Heres a rundown of the major types: All-purpose: The jack of all trades, hence the name. This versatile staple is what youll be pulling out most times you want to make almost anything: cookies, cakes, muffins, brownies, and even some breads and pizza dough. So if youre going to keep one type of flour in your pantry, this is it. The brand you use does make a difference to a certain extent, since protein content can vary from 10 to 12 percent. Whole wheat: As the name indicates, its made from the entire wheat kernel, including the bran (protective outer layer), endosperm (the starchy food for the seed that surrounds it, used in white flour) and germ (the seed). Its protein content is 13 to 14 percent. The fat in the wh eat germ can go rancid, which is why it should be stored in the refrigerator or freezer. Whole-wheat flour will give your baked goods a nuttier flavor, darker color and heartier texture. I like it in muffins, quick breads and rustic yeasted loaves. Bread: Best for bread (obviously) and other baked goods that use yeast. The higher protein content „ about 12 to 14 percent „ helps create more gluten, which gives bread its characteristic chew. That stretch is what allows a dough to rise without collapsing under the slowacting power of yeast. High gluten: Similar to bread flour, but with a slightly higher protein content (14 percent). Cake: Many of your cake recipes will call for all-purpose flour, but there are times when you might find yourself reaching for cake flour. Its low protein content (6 to 8 percent) and very smooth, fine consistency give baked goods a tender texture and high rise. Think angel food cake, chiffon cake and biscuits. If you dont want a separate box, you can get away with using a lower-protein all-purpose flour with similar, if not identical, results. How to choose the right our for the right recipe Mary Ryder

PAGE 18

C4 Wednesday, March 28, 2018 | DailyCommercial.combrain went off at once. Planning around the protein has been the standard for generations, and for Easter, many of us will enjoy lamb and ham. However, I want to encourage you to have as many fresh vegetables as possible. Green beans are plentiful, as are carrots, asparagus and collard greens. Many times we dont eat as many vegetables as we should because we dont know how to prepare them properly. Here are a few tips on preparation and dressing them up:GREEN BEANS AND ASPARAGUS Make sure your water is at a rapid boil before cooking them. Add salt to the boiling water, add vegetables and boil 4 to 5 minutes. Immediately drain and place in a bowl of ice water. Beans will warm up water, so keep ice on hand to keep water cool. Shock in water for 2 to 3 minutes. Remove beans from cold water, add to pan of melted butter and salt to taste. You can also add a sauce at this time. I like to fry up slices of garlic in a little olive oil to give my beans a savory, nutty ” avor. CARROTS My family's favorite is honey carrots. I like them because they are sweet and very easy to prepare. Place one package of baby carrots in a saut pan and drizzle with a cup of honey and teaspoon of salt. Cover carrots with water and boil until water is reduced to a thick sauce. Sprinkle with fresh parsley and serve. If you dont like honey, use agave nectar or 4 tablespoons of white or brown sugar. BRUSSELS SPROUTS Poor Brussels sprouts have had a bad reputation almost since the beginning of time, and it is not even their fault. Many times they are prepared in the one method that actually makes them taste awful. Water is the enemy of Brussels sprouts. They're a cruciferous vegetable, meaning it is already full of water, so sauting and roasting are the best ways to enhance the ” avor. Take a pound of sprouts and remove the “ rst three layers of tough leaves and cut sprouts in half. Season with salt and pepper, the juice of half of a fresh lemon and 2 to 3 tablespoons of olive oil. Roast in a shallow-rimmed baking dish at 400 degrees for 30 minutes. Toss every 10 minutes until done to ensure even cooking. Make sure you use fresh lemon juice, it really makes a difference. POTATOES Boxed potatoes have no place in my cupboard or on my table. They are so easy to prepare there really isnt a need to buy the ” akes. I like to buy the little golden nugget-style potatoes. Give them a good scrub and bring to a boil, skin on. They will boil in salted water about 15 minutes. They will pierce easily with a fork when done. Drain and mash in a shallow pan. You want to release all of the hot steam for 5 minutes. Return to pot, add cream to desired consistency along with sweet cream butter and salt to taste. Big baking potatoes make great baked potatoes, or you can boil then mash your potatoes for even more ” avor.Ze Carter is a food columnist for the Daily Commercial. Email her at zecarter12@gmail.com. VEGETABLESFrom Page C1 By Joe YonanThe Washington PostSome ingredients seem born to go together. Im not sure what genius first combined oranges and chipotle, but it had to have been in Mexico, soon after Columbus brought oranges to the Americas, since smoked chiles such as chipotle date to the Aztecs. Whoever it was, I applaud them, because the combination of the sweet-andsour orange and the smoky-spicy chipotle is sheer perfection. I was reminded of all this when I saw a recipe for Black-Eyed Peas With Oranges and Chipotle in Ilene Rosens new book, SaladishŽ (Artisan, 2018). She pitches it as a twist on the Souths traditional New Years dish, but its ideal for any time you come across good oranges. She calls for blood oranges, which Im sure would be beautiful here, but my beloved Cara Cara oranges were available instead, so I grabbed those for their deep-pink flesh. Navels would be fine, too. You cut up the oranges and make the dressing while the black-eyed peas cook (although Id forgive you for using canned peas). Besides protein and other nutrients, the legumes offer another taste dimension: earthy. But the dressing is the star. Its so good I made only one major adjustment, and that was to make more of it.A smoky-sweet dressing takes this dish to another levelBlack-Eyed Peas With Oranges and Chipotle. [DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST] 8 servings (makes about 8 cups) MAKE AHEAD: The dressing can be refrigerated for 1 week before making the rest of the dish. The cooked beans are best stored in their cooking liquid: refrigerated for 1 week or frozen for 6 months. Ingredients € 1 pound dried black-eyed peas, picked over and rinsed (may substitute 6 cups canned, no-salt-added blackeyed peas) € 1 teaspoons kosher salt, plus more as needed € 4 blood oranges or 3 medium navel or Cara Cara oranges € 1 or 2 canned chipotle peppers in adobo, plus 1 tablespoon of the adobo sauce, or more as needed € 1 tablespoon rice vinegar (seasoned or unseasoned) € 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard € 2/3 cup sun” ower, canola or another neutrally ” avored vegetable oil € teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, or more as needed € cup chopped red onion € cup lightly packed cilantro (leaves and tender stems) Steps Bring the black-eyed peas to a boil in a large pot of water over high heat. Reduce the heat until the liquid is gently bubbling; cook until they are tender but not mushy, 30 minutes to 1 hour, depending on their age. Add 1 teaspoon of the salt to the water toward the end of the cooking time. Drain thoroughly and transfer to a large bowl. While the peas are cooking, prepare the oranges: Use a Microplane or other “ ne grater to remove 1 tablespoons zest. Use a sharp knife to cut all the peel and any white pith off the oranges, then, working over a bowl, cut between the segments (to make supremes), letting them fall into the bowl as you work. Squeeze the juice from the remaining membranes, reserving 1/3 cup. To make the dressing, combine the orange zest and reserved juice, chipotle (to taste) and adobo, vinegar and mustard in a food processor or in a blender; pulse to incorporate. With the motor running, gradually add the oil, pureeing to form a smooth dressing. Add the black pepper and the remaining teaspoon of salt; pulse to incorporate. Black-Eyed Peas With Oranges and Chipotle

PAGE 19

DailyCommercial.com | Wednesday, March 28, 2018 C5By Ellie KriegerThe Washington PostThe average black bean dip is a reliably good snack option. Full of plant protein and savory spices, it is healthfully satisfying but rarely memorable. However, this is not your average black bean dip. While the accompanying recipe still qualifies as healthful, it is full of flavor and appeal. A key difference is that this dip is served warm. which immediately puts it in the comfort-food zone, and it is rustically presented in the skillet with an eye-catching cover of melted Monterey Jack cheese. The flavor is ratcheted up with the smoky spice of a chipotle chile in adobo, as well as earthy cumin and coriander. (A little chipotle goes a long way, so I recommend dividing up whats left in the can into small, sealable plastic bags and freezing for future use.) Half the beans are pureed with sauteed onion and garlic, the chile and spices and a bright punch of lime juice until smooth, then that creamy base is returned to the skillet with whole beans and cilantro for added texture and flecks of color. Served with contrastingly cool, crunchy vegetables and/or tortilla chips, its like a magnet as an appetizer at a party, but it also makes for a playful and nutritious meal in larger portions. Either way, its a dish youll be thinking dreamily about way after the last bite has been scooped up.Black bean dip, improved: Its smoky and warmWarm Chipotle Black Bean Dip. [GORAN KOSANOVIC FOR THE WASHINGTON POST] 6 servings (makes 1 cups) The ” avor and comfort-food appeal of this dip is ratcheted up by smoky spicy chipotle and the way it is served warm. Served with cool, crunchy celery sticks, sliced jicama, radishes and/or tortilla chips. its like a magnet as an appetizer at a party, but it also makes for a playful and nutritious meal in larger portions. MAKE AHEAD: The dip may be assembled in the skillet and refrigerated up to 2 days before baking; add a few extra minutes of oven time if you are baking from chilled. From nutritionist and cookbook author Ellie Krieger. Ingredients € 2 tablespoons olive oil € medium onion, diced € 1 clove garlic, minced € teaspoon ground cumin € 1/8 teaspoon ground coriander € One 15-ounce can no-salt-added black beans, drained and rinsed € 2 tablespoons water € 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoons fresh lime juice (from 2 limes) € 1 canned chipotle in adobo, seeded and minced, plus 2 teaspoons of the adobo € teaspoon salt € 2 tablespoons coarsely chopped fresh cilantro leaves, plus more leaves for garnish € 1/3 cup shredded Monterey Jack cheese (1 ounces) Steps Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a small, ovenproof skillet over medium heat. Add the onion and cook for about 3 minutes, until softened. Stir in the garlic, cumin and coriander; cook for 30 seconds more, then remove from the heat to cool slightly. Combine half the beans, the water, lime juice, chipotle pepper and its sauce, salt, the onion mixture and the remaining tablespoon of oil in a food processor; puree until smooth. Wipe out the skillet you used to cook the onion, then transfer the bean mixture to the pan. Stir in the remaining beans and the chopped cilantro. Top with the cheese and place in the oven until the cheese is melted, about 15 minutes. Garnish with the cilantro leaves, and let the dip rest for 5 minutes before serving.Warm Chipotle Black Bean Dip

PAGE 20

C6 Wednesday, March 28, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com BUSINESS 2,400 2,500 2,600 2,700 2,800 2,900 M ONDJF 2,560 2,680 2,800 S&P 500Close: 2,612.62 Change: -45.93 (-1.7%) 10 DAYS 22,000 23,000 24,000 25,000 26,000 27,000 M ONDJF 23,480 24,320 25,160 Dow Jones industrialsClose: 23,857.71 Change: -344.89 (-1.4%) 10 DAYSAdvanced 920 Declined 1986 New Highs 34 New Lows 118 Vol. (in mil.) 3,693 Pvs. Volume 3,494 2,301 2,308 641 2212 56 89 NYSE NASDDOW 24446.22 23708.73 23857.71 -344.89 -1.42% -3.49% DOW Trans. 10445.13 10136.80 10181.42 -191.79 -1.85% -4.06% DOW Util. 696.80 678.57 689.73 +9.56 +1.41% -4.65% NYSE Comp. 12517.26 12246.41 12302.54 -130.61 -1.05% -3.95% NASDAQ 7255.54 6963.68 7008.81 -211.74 -2.93% +1.53% S&P 500 2674.78 2596.12 2612.62 -45.93 -1.73% -2.28% S&P 400 1884.70 1844.24 1851.75 -27.71 -1.47% -2.57% Wilshire 5000 27732.39 26957.92 27108.48 -497.09 -1.80% -2.47% Russell 2000 1547.71 1508.94 1513.57 -30.15 -1.95% -1.43% HIGH LOW CLOSE CHG. %CHG. YTD Stocks Recap AT&T Inc T 32.55 41.77 34.90 +.21 +0.6 s t t -10.2 -12.0 13 2.00 f Advance Auto Parts AAP 78.81 151.72 115.01 +.24 +0.2 s s s +15.4 -23.2 21 0.2 4 Amer Express AXP 75.51 102.39 91.42 -1.20 -1.3 s t t -7.9 +20.2 16 1.4 0 AutoNation Inc AN 38.20 62.02 46.07 -1.03 -2.2 t t t -10.2 +11.4 12 .. Brown & Brown BRO 41.10 53.87 50.56 -.48 -0.9 s t t -1.7 +21.1 26 0.6 0 CocaCola Co KO 42.19 48.62 42.89 +.20 +0.5 s t t -6.5 +4.9 79 1.56 f Comcast Corp A CMCSA 32.74 44.00 32.99 -.55 -1.6 t t t -17.3 -8.6 16 0.76 f Darden Rest DRI 76.27 100.11 84.22 -.60 -0.7 r t t -12.3 +13.8 18 2.5 2 Disney DIS 96.20 116.10 99.36 -1.29 -1.3 s t t -7.6 -8.8 14 1.68 f Gen Electric GE 12.73 30.54 13.44 +.55 +4.3 s t t -23.1 -54.2 dd 0.4 8 General Mills GIS 44.15 60.69 45.31 +.01 ... s t t -23.6 -20.1 12 1.9 6 Harris Corp HRS 106.18 162.37 160.35 -1.72 -1.1 s s s +13.2 +48.2 28 2.2 8 Home Depot HD 144.25 207.61 174.68 -1.70 -1.0 s t t -7.8 +21.9 24 4.12 f IBM IBM 139.13 176.33 151.91 -1.46 -1.0 s t t -1.0 -8.3 11 6.0 0 Lowes Cos LOW 70.76 108.98 85.96 -3.34 -3.7 s t t -7.5 +10.6 20 1.6 4 NY Times NYT 14.08 25.70 23.15 -.45 -1.9 s t s +25.1 +66.7 cc 0.1 6 NextEra Energy NEE 127.09 164.25 162.59 +1.16 +0.7 s s s +4.1 +24.6 24 4.44 f PepsiCo PEP 105.94 122.51 107.64 +.83 +0.8 s t t -10.2 -1.9 22 3.2 2 Suntrust Bks STI 51.96 73.37 66.69 -1.73 -2.5 s t s +3.3 +27.5 17 1.6 0 WalMart Strs WMT 71.38 109.98 86.05 -1.45 -1.7 s t t -12.9 +28.7 19 2.08 f Xerox Corp XRX 26.64 37.42 29.00 -.40 -1.4 s t t -0.5 +5.1 36 1.0 0 52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIVStocks of Local Interest You can wheel and deal the best of them. And steal it from the rest of them. You know the score. Their ethics are a bore.Ž „ Ray Stevens, ŽMr. BusinessmanŽA recent 5th Circuit Court ruling has overturned a 2016 Department of Labor rule requiring use of the fiduciary standard by financial advisors in managing investors retirement accounts. Based on this ruling, the U.S. Department of Labor will immediately cease enforcing the fiduciary rule passed two years ago. Thus, an investor's retirement account can now be managed by an advisor who is required to adhere only to the less stringent suitability standard and not the fiduciary standard. In other words, an investment can be recommended for a client as long as it is deemed suitable. Imagine our local water company is providing a product that is less than pure, but meets minimum suitabilityŽ standards as prescribed by local environmental regulators. Would we be satisfied? What consumer would not balk at such an arrangement? We all want the purest water available and, naturally, given a choice, we all would choose to work with an advisor who is required to serve our best interests and not his own. We believe that all accounts, not just ERISA governed retirement accounts, should be managed according to the fiduciary standard. But the forces fighting against its uniform implementation have now gained the upper hand. Several things could happen. The decision could be appealed. The SEC might offer its own fiduciary standard. A groundswell of public opinion could persuade the investment industry to voluntarily adopt the fiduciary standard. Or none of that might occur, and many investors might continue to work with advisors who are not required to adhere to the highest standard of client care in a caveat emptorŽ scenario. With the 5th Circuit ruling, an advisor can sell or recommend products which are in his own best interests (and pay him a commission from a parent company) and not necessarily that of the client. That the investment vehicle may not be the best or most cost-efficient for the client is the price we pay for not operating under a fiduciary standard. I remember overhearing an advisor at a conference years ago explaining why he could never consider leaving his parent company and serving as a fiduciary to his clients. "They sent my wife and me to Italy last year because of my annuity sales and for how many clients I placed in their mutual funds," he said. "Next year we're going to Alaska. I'd like to serve as a fiduciary, but we can't afford to give up free trips like these." That advisor is compensated by his parent company, and works for them, not for his clients. Its hard to do both. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, author of the syndicated economic column Arbor OutlookŽ, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management LLC.ARBOR OUTLOOKFiduciary rule, clean water and Ray Stevens Margaret McDowell By Tom KrisherThe Associated PressDETROIT „ Autonomous vehicles get all the headlines, but automakers are gradually adding advanced electronic safety features to human-driven cars as they step toward a world of selfdriving vehicles.Car and tech companies are rolling out laser sensors, artifi-cial intelligence, larger viewing screens that show more of the road, cameras that can read speed limit signs, and systems that slow cars ahead of curves and construction zones.Many of the new features repurpose cameras and radar that already are in cars for automatic emergency braking, pedestrian detection and other safety devices. The companies also are keeping a closer watch on drivers to make sure theyre paying attention.On Monday, Arizonas governor suspended Ubers self-driving vehicle testing privileges after one of its autonomous vehicles struck and killed a pedestrian last week. But auto engineers and industry analysts still say roads will become safer as more vehicles get automated features that either assist or replace human driv-ers. The government says 94 percent of crashes are caused by human error.The cutting-edge devices usually come out first in more expensive vehicles, but go to mainstream vehicles as costs fall.Here are five new safety devices that are showing up in vehicles: Stay focusedA company called NVIDIA is using artificial intelligence and cameras to sense where a driver is looking and focus sensors everywhere else. If a pedestrian or another vehicle appears where the driver isnt looking, the system will intervene, either sounding a warning or by stopping the car from moving, says Danny Shapiro, senior director of automotive business for the Santa Clara, California, company. Before we get to full automation, if the driver is still in control and responsible, we want to know when we should provide alerts and when we should not,Ž Shapiro says. NVIDIA has a contract with Volkswagen to deploy the system in the next two years. Other auto-makers are likely to follow. Looking backwardWhen a driver activates a turn signal, an 8-inch screen behind the steering wheel on Hyundais new Nexo hydro-gen fuel cell vehicle shows everything on that side of the car plus whats directly behind it. The system uses existing cameras to let driv-ers see without turning their heads. The information we can offer from a camera may be better than a live look over the shoulder,Ž says Cason Grover, senior man-ager of vehicle technology planning for Hyundai. Other cars have similar technology but most dont have as wide of a view. Seeing signsMercedes new S-Class cars have advanced navi-gation and global mapping, and cameras that read speed limit signs. These enable the cars computers to warn drivers of the speed limit or keep them from exceeding it. The system also recognizes upcoming construction zones, curves or roundabouts, and can slow the car ahead of when a driver would. Volvo has a similar system that reads speed signs, including those in school zones. Laser guidedSmaller versions of those spinning 360-degree mechanical laser sensors that sit atop self-driving cars are coming to main-stream vehicles. The lasers, called Lidar for Light Detec-tion and Ranging, can see far-off objects in the dark, in bad weather, and in great detail. Audi plans to introduce a front-facing laser in the grille of the A8 sedan this fall as part of a limited self-driving system that takes control of the vehicle in freeway traffic jams below 37 miles per hour. Spokesman Mark Dahncke says Audi is still working to consolidate Lidar with radar and cameras as it steps from human control to limited automated driving.Audis system is the first step toward more wide-spread use of Lidar. Parts supplier Conti-nental is working on a fully electronic version for an unspecified automaker that can see smaller objects such as bicycles and pedestrians in three dimensions, 200 meters (656 feet) ahead. Currently Continental sells a Lidar system that spots only vehicles and can see only 10 meters (33 feet) forward. The longer-range system integrated into the cars body is the missing link in the march toward autono-mous vehicles, says Arnaud Lagandr, a Continental vice president. You can see through fog, you can see through rain, you can see through the water splash from the car in front of you.ŽNew cars quickly getting self-driving safety featuresA Lidar, a device that detects obstacles using laser sensors, is shown installed above the car plate of an autonomous vehicle during its test drive in Singapore. [YONG TECK LIM/ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO] MARKET WATCHDow 23,857.71 344.89 Nasdaq 7,008.81 211.74 S&P 2,612.62 45.93 Russell 1,513.57 30.15 NYSE 12,302.54 130.61COMMODITIES REVIEWGold 1,341.00 13.40 Silver 16.505 0.127 Platinum 946.70 3.70 Copper 2.9775 0.0170 Oil 65.25 0.30MARKET MOVERS€ GlaxoSmithKline PLC: Up 96 cents to $38.39. The British drugmaker agreed to buy out its Swiss partner Novartis in their consumer health joint venture. € Avon Products Inc.: Down 5 cents to $2.79. The cosmetics maker plans to give a board seat to an activist investor, avoiding a proxy “ ght.BRIEFCASEPORTLAND, MAINELawsuit against marine monument moves aheadOrganizations suing to elimi-nate the first national marine monument in the Atlantic Ocean have gotten the OK to proceed with a suit designed to reopen the area to commercial fishing, which environmentalists fear could jeopardize preservation efforts. The fishing groups sued to challenge the creation of the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument created by Presi-dent Barack Obama in 2016. Its a 5,000-square-mile area off of New England that contains frag-ile deep sea corals and vulnerable species of marine life such as right whales.NEW YORKMcCormick offers bonuses on tax cut bene“ t McCormick & Co. is the latest company to offer employees bonuses, citing sweeping tax reforms that slashed corpo-rate tax rates. The spice-maker is offering $1,000 bonuses to eligible hourly employees and says it plans to accelerateŽ wage increases, though it did not provide details. The Sparks, Maryland company will also us the tax cut to make investments, pay debt and benefit shareholders.WASHINGTONUS consumer con“ dence falls from 18-year highAmerican consumers confi-dence has slipped after reaching an 18-year high last month. The Conference Board said Tuesday its consumer confidence index fell to 127.7 in March. That was down from 130 in February, which was the highest level since November 2000.Consumers were less optimis-tic in March as their assessment of business conditions declined, the Conference Board said. Their short-term expectations also declined, although overall expectations remain favorable. The percentage of survey respondents saying that business conditions are good increased from 36.5 percent to 37.9 percent, but those saying business conditions are bad also rose, from 11.3 percent to 13.4 percent.The Associated Press

PAGE 21

DEAR ABBY: My husband and I have been married for a few months and are expecting our rst child. His father passed away about a year ago. His parents had been married 33 years when he died. A few weeks ago, we told my mother-in-law we were expecting our rst child. After a joyous moment and some conversation later about children, she brought up my husband's half-brother, someone I didn't know existed! My husband then said, "I thought we weren't supposed to talk about him." She told him my father-in-law had reached out to the half-brother before his death to make amends (she'd had no knowledge they were in contact), but while she was cleaning out his wallet she found a picture of him. Abby, I'm confused now about how to discuss this with my husband because I would love to know more details about his half-brother. I don't know how old he is, or what happened (i.e., indelity). Evidently, he lives close to us. We might have met before. My husband nor anyone in his family mentioned this person, ever! Should I just leave it alone, or should I probe some more to see if I can get more information? -PERPLEXED IN INDIANA DEAR PERPLEXED: It appears the existence of this half-sibling is the skeleton in your husband's family closet. If I were you, I'd be careful about rattling it. Ask your husband if he's willing to share what he knows. If he is interested in pursuing more information, offer to help him. But unless he is, I do not advise starting to dig. P.S. Because the father reached out to make amends, the half-brother may try to contact his siblings. But don't count on it.DEAR ABBY: I have been married for four months. My husband and I love each other very much. Although he has asked me multiple times for sex, we have only made love twice. My problem is, sex doesn't interest me. In fact, the thought of it terries me. I hate saying no because I know it hurts him, but I'm always scared that I won't enjoy it. Or that if I do say yes, I'll feel like it's a chore just to make him happy. I know that's the wrong mindset to have going into it. I have apologized almost every time I turn him down. He always says I don't need to be sorry and we'll only do it when I'm comfortable, but I'm scared I might not ever be comfortable with it. Plus I have doubts that I've ever had an orgasm. How should I approach this? -SCARED NEWLYWED DEAR SCARED: If you had experienced an orgasm, I assure you that you would not have forgotten the experience. You need to have at least two honest conversations -the rst with your husband, the second with your gynecologist. Your problem may be physical, emotional or a combination of the two. A licensed psychologist can help you gure out the reason for your feelings and resolve them, or refer you and your husband to a sex therapist. The only thing you should NOT do is wait any longer to deal with this. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in diculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION BRIDGE CRYPTOQUOTE HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORY DIVERSIONS New wife surprised to learn of husbands family secret HAPPY BIRTHDAY FOR WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28, 2018:This year excitement seems to follow you. You might do more reection and spend more time alone. This period is full of important information, especially when it comes to your longterm goals. If you are single, you easily could fall madly in love with someone who is emotionally unavailable. It is important to take your time getting to know potential suitors in order to avoid this type of problem. If you are attached, you often surprise your sweetie with your unpredictability. Spending time together cements the bond between you. VIRGO teaches you how to be of service to others. ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19) A dreamy quality surrounds you in the morning. You might nd it difcult to get going and start your day. You could decide to head in a different direction, which will stun your comrades. You pull the wild card, and anything could happen. TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20) You are a wild thing, no matter where you are or what youre doing. Your reaction at the moment might be to stay quiet, but very soon you are likely to put your thoughts and feelings on the table. Be prepared for a strong response. GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20) Stay on top of a change, and dont sell yourself short. The unexpected occurs and allows greater exibility. You could nd a partner to be rather explosive. How you handle a change will determine the outcome. Think before expressing your feelings. CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22) Speak your mind, and follow through on what is happening. Your ability to see past the obvious marks your feelings, yet you still might have trouble taking a leap of faith. Give yourself time. Dont react to a friends unpredictability just yet. LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22) You might be shaking something loose from your subconscious. What appears as a fantasy could actually be an unaddressed long-term goal. Youll be surprised by an insight you gain. Seek out answers, and perhaps do some writing. VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22)Youll want to slow down a bit in order to get a better sense of what seems to be happening. Recognize where you could be vested in a certain outcome, and let go of that expectation through detachment; otherwise, you wont be able to see the big picture. LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22) You seem to be viewing a situation from a skewed perspective. Know that your interpretation is likely biased. You see enormous potential surrounding work or a hobby. Diagnosing the cause of a problem will be difcult at present. SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21) Tap into your ingenuity when dealing with a longterm goal. Friends might want to be involved. A meeting or get-together will be very important. Reach out to someone who might be in the background, but who clearly has feelings for you. SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22DEC. 21) You have the ability to prevent yourself from being stopped by someones dillydallying. An issue surrounds your domestic life. Be aware of an associate who might have more clout than you. A confusing situation could be setting up. CAPRICORN (DEC. 22JAN. 19) Your energy plays a signicant role in your next few days. You have the ability to distance yourself from a situation and look at the big picture. You might be surprised by what someone has to say. Listen to what is being shared. AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18) Note a tendency to be more explosive than usual and to say things that would make most people feel uncomfortable. Your ability to detach seems to vanish at times. Deal with a loved one on an individual level; he or she has more say than you might realize. PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20) Others will make the rst move. You dont need to worry about their decisions; just listen to what is being shared. An unpredictable element could affect your wallet when you least expect it. A friend or associate might be particularly touchy. DailyCommercial.com | Wednesday, March 28, 2018 C7 TODAY IS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28, the 87th day of 2018. There are 278 days left in the year. TODAY'S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY: On March 28, 1898, the U.S. Supreme Court, in United States v. Wong Kim Ark, ruled 6-2 that Wong, who was born in the United States to Chinese immigrants, was an American citizen. ON THIS DATE: In 1797 Nathaniel Briggs of New Hampshire received a patent for a washing machine. In 1941, novelist and critic Virginia Woolf, 59, drowned herself near her home in Lewes, East Sussex, England. In 1942 during World War II, British naval forces staged a successful raid on the Nazi-occupied French port of St. Nazaire in Operation Chariot, destroying the only dry dock on the Atlantic coast capable of repairing the German battleship Tirpitz. In 1955, John Marshall Harlan II was sworn in as an associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. In 1979, America's worst commercial nuclear accident occurred with a partial meltdown inside the Unit 2 reactor at the Three Mile Island plant near Middletown, Pennsylvania. In 1990, President George H.W. Bush presented the Congressional Gold Medal to the widow of U.S. Olympic legend Jesse Owens.

PAGE 22

C8 Wednesday, March 28, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com BUSINESS 2,400 2,500 2,600 2,700 2,800 2,900 M ONDJF 2,560 2,680 2,800 S&P 500Close: 2,612.62 Change: -45.93 (-1.7%) 10 DAYS 22,000 23,000 24,000 25,000 26,000 27,000 M ONDJF 23,480 24,320 25,160 Dow Jones industrialsClose: 23,857.71 Change: -344.89 (-1.4%) 10 DAYSAdvanced 920 Declined 1986 New Highs 34 New Lows 118 Vol. (in mil.) 3,693 Pvs. Volume 3,494 2,301 2,308 641 2212 56 89 NYSE NASDDOW 24446.22 23708.73 23857.71 -344.89 -1.42% -3.49% DOW Trans. 10445.13 10136.80 10181.42 -191.79 -1.85% -4.06% DOW Util. 696.80 678.57 689.73 +9.56 +1.41% -4.65% NYSE Comp. 12517.26 12246.41 12302.54 -130.61 -1.05% -3.95% NASDAQ 7255.54 6963.68 7008.81 -211.74 -2.93% +1.53% S&P 500 2674.78 2596.12 2612.62 -45.93 -1.73% -2.28% S&P 400 1884.70 1844.24 1851.75 -27.71 -1.47% -2.57% Wilshire 5000 27732.39 26957.92 27108.48 -497.09 -1.80% -2.47% Russell 2000 1547.71 1508.94 1513.57 -30.15 -1.95% -1.43% HIGH LOW CLOSE CHG. %CHG. YTD Stocks Recap AT&T Inc T 32.55 41.77 34.90 +.21 +0.6 s t t -10.2 -12.0 13 2.00 f Advance Auto Parts AAP 78.81 151.72 115.01 +.24 +0.2 s s s +15.4 -23.2 21 0.2 4 Amer Express AXP 75.51 102.39 91.42 -1.20 -1.3 s t t -7.9 +20.2 16 1.4 0 AutoNation Inc AN 38.20 62.02 46.07 -1.03 -2.2 t t t -10.2 +11.4 12 .. Brown & Brown BRO 41.10 53.87 50.56 -.48 -0.9 s t t -1.7 +21.1 26 0.6 0 CocaCola Co KO 42.19 48.62 42.89 +.20 +0.5 s t t -6.5 +4.9 79 1.56 f Comcast Corp A CMCSA 32.74 44.00 32.99 -.55 -1.6 t t t -17.3 -8.6 16 0.76 f Darden Rest DRI 76.27 100.11 84.22 -.60 -0.7 r t t -12.3 +13.8 18 2.5 2 Disney DIS 96.20 116.10 99.36 -1.29 -1.3 s t t -7.6 -8.8 14 1.68 f Gen Electric GE 12.73 30.54 13.44 +.55 +4.3 s t t -23.1 -54.2 dd 0.4 8 General Mills GIS 44.15 60.69 45.31 +.01 ... s t t -23.6 -20.1 12 1.9 6 Harris Corp HRS 106.18 162.37 160.35 -1.72 -1.1 s s s +13.2 +48.2 28 2.2 8 Home Depot HD 144.25 207.61 174.68 -1.70 -1.0 s t t -7.8 +21.9 24 4.12 f IBM IBM 139.13 176.33 151.91 -1.46 -1.0 s t t -1.0 -8.3 11 6.0 0 Lowes Cos LOW 70.76 108.98 85.96 -3.34 -3.7 s t t -7.5 +10.6 20 1.6 4 NY Times NYT 14.08 25.70 23.15 -.45 -1.9 s t s +25.1 +66.7 cc 0.1 6 NextEra Energy NEE 127.09 164.25 162.59 +1.16 +0.7 s s s +4.1 +24.6 24 4.44 f PepsiCo PEP 105.94 122.51 107.64 +.83 +0.8 s t t -10.2 -1.9 22 3.2 2 Suntrust Bks STI 51.96 73.37 66.69 -1.73 -2.5 s t s +3.3 +27.5 17 1.6 0 WalMart Strs WMT 71.38 109.98 86.05 -1.45 -1.7 s t t -12.9 +28.7 19 2.08 f Xerox Corp XRX 26.64 37.42 29.00 -.40 -1.4 s t t -0.5 +5.1 36 1.0 0 52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIVStocks of Local Interest You can wheel and deal the best of them. And steal it from the rest of them. You know the score. Their ethics are a bore.Ž „ Ray Stevens, ŽMr. BusinessmanŽA recent 5th Circuit Court ruling has overturned a 2016 Department of Labor rule requiring use of the fiduciary standard by financial advisors in managing investors retirement accounts. Based on this ruling, the U.S. Department of Labor will immediately cease enforcing the fiduciary rule passed two years ago. Thus, an investor's retirement account can now be managed by an advisor who is required to adhere only to the less stringent suitability standard and not the fiduciary standard. In other words, an investment can be recommended for a client as long as it is deemed suitable. Imagine our local water company is providing a product that is less than pure, but meets minimum suitabilityŽ standards as prescribed by local environmental regulators. Would we be satisfied? What consumer would not balk at such an arrangement? We all want the purest water available and, naturally, given a choice, we all would choose to work with an advisor who is required to serve our best interests and not his own. We believe that all accounts, not just ERISA governed retirement accounts, should be managed according to the fiduciary standard. But the forces fighting against its uniform implementation have now gained the upper hand. Several things could happen. The decision could be appealed. The SEC might offer its own fiduciary standard. A groundswell of public opinion could persuade the investment industry to voluntarily adopt the fiduciary standard. Or none of that might occur, and many investors might continue to work with advisors who are not required to adhere to the highest standard of client care in a caveat emptorŽ scenario. With the 5th Circuit ruling, an advisor can sell or recommend products which are in his own best interests (and pay him a commission from a parent company) and not necessarily that of the client. That the investment vehicle may not be the best or most cost-efficient for the client is the price we pay for not operating under a fiduciary standard. I remember overhearing an advisor at a conference years ago explaining why he could never consider leaving his parent company and serving as a fiduciary to his clients. "They sent my wife and me to Italy last year because of my annuity sales and for how many clients I placed in their mutual funds," he said. "Next year we're going to Alaska. I'd like to serve as a fiduciary, but we can't afford to give up free trips like these." That advisor is compensated by his parent company, and works for them, not for his clients. Its hard to do both. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, author of the syndicated economic column Arbor OutlookŽ, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management LLC.ARBOR OUTLOOKFiduciary rule, clean water and Ray Stevens Margaret McDowell By Tom KrisherThe Associated PressDETROIT „ Autonomous vehicles get all the headlines, but automakers are gradually adding advanced electronic safety features to human-driven cars as they step toward a world of selfdriving vehicles.Car and tech companies are rolling out laser sensors, artifi-cial intelligence, larger viewing screens that show more of the road, cameras that can read speed limit signs, and systems that slow cars ahead of curves and construction zones.Many of the new features repurpose cameras and radar that already are in cars for automatic emergency braking, pedestrian detection and other safety devices. The companies also are keeping a closer watch on drivers to make sure theyre paying attention.On Monday, Arizonas governor suspended Ubers self-driving vehicle testing privileges after one of its autonomous vehicles struck and killed a pedestrian last week. But auto engineers and industry analysts still say roads will become safer as more vehicles get automated features that either assist or replace human driv-ers. The government says 94 percent of crashes are caused by human error.The cutting-edge devices usually come out first in more expensive vehicles, but go to mainstream vehicles as costs fall.Here are five new safety devices that are showing up in vehicles: Stay focusedA company called NVIDIA is using artificial intelligence and cameras to sense where a driver is looking and focus sensors everywhere else. If a pedestrian or another vehicle appears where the driver isnt looking, the system will intervene, either sounding a warning or by stopping the car from moving, says Danny Shapiro, senior director of automotive business for the Santa Clara, California, company. Before we get to full automation, if the driver is still in control and responsible, we want to know when we should provide alerts and when we should not,Ž Shapiro says. NVIDIA has a contract with Volkswagen to deploy the system in the next two years. Other auto-makers are likely to follow. Looking backwardWhen a driver activates a turn signal, an 8-inch screen behind the steering wheel on Hyundais new Nexo hydro-gen fuel cell vehicle shows everything on that side of the car plus whats directly behind it. The system uses existing cameras to let driv-ers see without turning their heads. The information we can offer from a camera may be better than a live look over the shoulder,Ž says Cason Grover, senior man-ager of vehicle technology planning for Hyundai. Other cars have similar technology but most dont have as wide of a view. Seeing signsMercedes new S-Class cars have advanced navi-gation and global mapping, and cameras that read speed limit signs. These enable the cars computers to warn drivers of the speed limit or keep them from exceeding it. The system also recognizes upcoming construction zones, curves or roundabouts, and can slow the car ahead of when a driver would. Volvo has a similar system that reads speed signs, including those in school zones. Laser guidedSmaller versions of those spinning 360-degree mechanical laser sensors that sit atop self-driving cars are coming to main-stream vehicles. The lasers, called Lidar for Light Detec-tion and Ranging, can see far-off objects in the dark, in bad weather, and in great detail. Audi plans to introduce a front-facing laser in the grille of the A8 sedan this fall as part of a limited self-driving system that takes control of the vehicle in freeway traffic jams below 37 miles per hour. Spokesman Mark Dahncke says Audi is still working to consolidate Lidar with radar and cameras as it steps from human control to limited automated driving.Audis system is the first step toward more wide-spread use of Lidar. Parts supplier Conti-nental is working on a fully electronic version for an unspecified automaker that can see smaller objects such as bicycles and pedestrians in three dimensions, 200 meters (656 feet) ahead. Currently Continental sells a Lidar system that spots only vehicles and can see only 10 meters (33 feet) forward. The longer-range system integrated into the cars body is the missing link in the march toward autono-mous vehicles, says Arnaud Lagandr, a Continental vice president. You can see through fog, you can see through rain, you can see through the water splash from the car in front of you.ŽNew cars quickly getting self-driving safety featuresA Lidar, a device that detects obstacles using laser sensors, is shown installed above the car plate of an autonomous vehicle during its test drive in Singapore. [YONG TECK LIM/ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO] MARKET WATCHDow 23,857.71 344.89 Nasdaq 7,008.81 211.74 S&P 2,612.62 45.93 Russell 1,513.57 30.15 NYSE 12,302.54 130.61COMMODITIES REVIEWGold 1,341.00 13.40 Silver 16.505 0.127 Platinum 946.70 3.70 Copper 2.9775 0.0170 Oil 65.25 0.30MARKET MOVERS€ GlaxoSmithKline PLC: Up 96 cents to $38.39. The British drugmaker agreed to buy out its Swiss partner Novartis in their consumer health joint venture. € Avon Products Inc.: Down 5 cents to $2.79. The cosmetics maker plans to give a board seat to an activist investor, avoiding a proxy “ ght.BRIEFCASEPORTLAND, MAINELawsuit against marine monument moves aheadOrganizations suing to elimi-nate the first national marine monument in the Atlantic Ocean have gotten the OK to proceed with a suit designed to reopen the area to commercial fishing, which environmentalists fear could jeopardize preservation efforts. The fishing groups sued to challenge the creation of the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument created by Presi-dent Barack Obama in 2016. Its a 5,000-square-mile area off of New England that contains frag-ile deep sea corals and vulnerable species of marine life such as right whales.NEW YORKMcCormick offers bonuses on tax cut bene“ t McCormick & Co. is the latest company to offer employees bonuses, citing sweeping tax reforms that slashed corpo-rate tax rates. The spice-maker is offering $1,000 bonuses to eligible hourly employees and says it plans to accelerateŽ wage increases, though it did not provide details. The Sparks, Maryland company will also us the tax cut to make investments, pay debt and benefit shareholders.WASHINGTONUS consumer con“ dence falls from 18-year highAmerican consumers confi-dence has slipped after reaching an 18-year high last month. The Conference Board said Tuesday its consumer confidence index fell to 127.7 in March. That was down from 130 in February, which was the highest level since November 2000.Consumers were less optimis-tic in March as their assessment of business conditions declined, the Conference Board said. Their short-term expectations also declined, although overall expectations remain favorable. The percentage of survey respondents saying that business conditions are good increased from 36.5 percent to 37.9 percent, but those saying business conditions are bad also rose, from 11.3 percent to 13.4 percent.The Associated Press

PAGE 23

DailyCommercial.com | Wednesday, March 28, 2018 C9 This newspaper will never knowingly accept advertisement that is illegal or considered fraudulent. If you have questions or doubts about any ads on these pages, we advise that before responding or sending money ahead of time, you check with the local Attorney Generals Consumer Fraud Line and/or the Better Business Bureau. Also be advised that some phone numbers published in these ads may require an extra charge. In all cases of questionable value, such as promises or guaranteed income from work-athome programs, money to loan, etc., if it sounds too good to be true „ it may in fact be exactly that. This newspaper cannot be held responsible for any negative consequences that occur as a result of you doing business with these advertisers. Thank you. NOTICES 1000-1999READER NOTICE 1001 Find yourFurry Friends pet supplies in CLASSIFIEDS Looking for a Handyman?Check out theService Directory

PAGE 24

C10 Wednesday, March 28, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com Florida Air & Heat Inc. Your Comfort Company100% Financing Available Licensed Insured BondedServing Our Area Since 1986 State License # CAC1814030CALL 352-326-3202For ALL Your Heating & Cooling Needs A/C Services ServingLake,Sumter &S.MarionCountiesWeServiceAll ApplianceBrands Licensed/Insured FreeServiceCall w/RepairEricWolf€352-630-220215+YearsExp.€Senior&MilitaryDiscountsWeDontWantToBeTheBiggest JustTheBest Appliance Repair D2445SD PERFECTCLEANING DamianBrooksDamianbrooks80@yahoo.comNoJobTooSmall FreeEstimatesResidential&Commercial24/8 352-396-6238 You'veTriedtheRest...NowGoWiththeBest! Cleaning Services CONCRETE 352.602.8077 Concrete For Less8x10 Slab $800 10x48 Slab $2600No UPFRONT Costs!Blocking/ Ref./Lic./Ins.Lic #113336Phillip 352-504-8372Includes Concrete & Labor D2424SD AllConcreteServices CrackRepair€FreeEstimatesServingLakeCounty30YearsBonded,Insured,Lic#11066CallBobat352.223.7935 Concrete Services CCC1330633D2453SD Construction Services Door & Lock Services D2451SD John Philibert, IncWe do Everything from Ceilings to Floors. Pantries, Cabinets and more.Your pesky leaks gone and houses well paint. From inside and out, well make it great. Lic/Ins. Accepting Visa & MC. JPHandy.com (352) 308-0694 NEW WAVE HANDYMAN Jeff 352.643.1790 DECKS, PAINTING, SIDING, METAL ROOFS, REMODELING, PRESSURE WASHING, LAMINATE WOOD, VINYL, TILE, FLOORS AND MORE LAMINATE, WOOD & TILE SALE! Great Prices Exceptional Service!20 Years ExperienceSHOWROOM11433 US Hwy 441, Tavares Call Chris352-636-1643 D2452SD Garage Door Services €PressureWashing€Painting €Flooring€Carpet€CleanOuts €CleanUps€Hauling€Licensed352-787-7056 Handyman Services John Philibert, IncFor All Your Flooring Needs Pergo, Ceramic Tile, Travertine, Vinyl & MoreCall John @ (352) 308-0694 Flooring Services CCC1330633D2453SD CNA & HHA Certi“ed 20 Years Experience Teresa 352-617-4896Trusting Us With Your Love Ones SERVING GOD AND YOU WITH A CHRIST LIKE CARECHRISTIAN HOME COMPANIONSHIP BILL ROGERS IRRIGATION SERVICE35 YEARS EXPERIENCELIC NO. 22190/INS/BONDEDOWNER OPERATOR352-446-1059 Irrigation Services Home Improvement Home Care Services ONLY $5 FT. INSTALLED! 352-801-9774 Most estimates can be done over the phone with gutter footage & number of downspouts. SEAMLESS GUTTERS iMan 4-U O C D I AŽR CJOSEPH MAGRUM352-636-2599TAX ID, INSURED rufus_62@yahoo.com Gutter Services All Pro Movers LLC Lic./Ins. Fla IM NO: IM2580ResidentialRandall Rolle Manager 352-817-5159 allpromovers.villages@gmail.comwww.allpromoversllc.com We Also Offer (352) 308-0694 John Philibert, IncFor All Your Interior/Exterior Painting Needs. FREE ESTIMATES! 30 Years of Quality Experience www.BestPaintRem.com352-210-3964 Lic/Ins15% OFFSenior Discount Painting Services Lawn Mower Repair Services Moving Services Pressure Cleaning D2458SD EXTERIOR CLEANING SERVICES RESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL 352-603-4240 Licensed & Insured Comfort Seal Roof Systems, Inc.TM352-242-5055 MEET THE CONTRACTOR NOT A SALESMANŽ! BETTER THAN ANY METAL OR SHINGLE ROOF! NOT ONE ROOF LOST TO ANY STORM! NO PAY UNTIL JOB IS DONE! SPECIAL DISCOUNT FOR FELLOW VETERANS!St. Lic. # CCC1325522 Our 32nd Year Over 12,000 Roofs For Mobile/Manufactured Homes Lifetime Warranty! LIC#CCC042879 #CCC1330633D2472SD Roo“ng Services Re-roofs/RepairsShingles/Metal/FlatLic. #CCC1329936Covenant Roo“ng and Construction, Inc.#1 IN ROOFINGFREE ROOF ESTIMATES352-314-3625 J.C.C.Bobcat&TreeSvc.Inc.LandClearing/Excavating FillDirt/Clay Hauling/DebrisRemoval StumpGrinding Demolition/Grading/Driveways OwnerOperator352-455-7608D2434SD 352.321.7432 coderedenterprises@hotmail.com D2444SD Land Clearing Services Landscaping Services LandscapingTrimming,Mulching, Sod,TreeTrimming,Pavers&MuchMore! ArmandoSantamario352-587-1323D2415SD COMMERCIAL-RESIDENTIAL €AssortedRock&Stone €PaverInstallation/Repair €PalmandTreeInstallation €DecorativeWalls €RetainingWalls €CurbingandMulching €SoddingandIrrigation €SeasonedFirewood €FullLandscapingNeeds FULLGARDENCENTER FreeEstimates,SeniorDiscounts2402SouthSt.,Leesburg 352-516-6936 TEDBYRNE OwnerLic/Ins D2420SD A-1 UNITED SERVICES 352-460-3763CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATESOne Call Does It AllŽLICENSEDINSUREDINT. / EXT. PAINTINGHOME REMODELSALL PHASES OF PRESSURE CLEANINGAND MUCH MORE! A-1 UNITED SERVICES 352-460-3763CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATESOne Call Does It AllŽLICENSEDINSURED Tree Services BAD TREE CALL ME!27 YEARS EXPERIENCE NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL! FREE ESTIMATES TONY THE TREE TRIMMER 2402SouthSt.,Leesburg 352-516-6936 Senior Discounts TreeRemoval,Trimming,CanopyReduction, CraneService,StumpGrinding, SeasonedFirewood-COMPLETEGARDENCENTERD2460SD D 20 88 S D D2471SD J.C.C.Bobcat&TreeSvc.Inc.Residential/Commercial Trimming/Removal Palms/Hedges/StumpGrinding Debrisremoval/Hauling FillDirt/Clay/Grading/Driveways Lic/Ins€InsuranceWork€24Hrs.352-455-7608 D2463SD Upholstery Services D2470SD Window Services GEORGE WATKINS 352-587-2735Window ReplacementLanai Enclosures Acrylic WindowsCRC# 1330701 BLIND REPAIRSNo Cost...If We Cant Fix It!352-217-7556exceptionsblinds.comTo have your Professional Service listed here, please contact the Classi“ed Department at (352) 314-3278. BRIAN DEGAGLIA CONSTRUCTION SERVICESIncludes: Forming, Pouring, Stripping, Cutting, & Materials. Does Not include stripping of sod or roots, removing of concrete, pumping or hauling of debris. 352-267-5723 CRC 1326327 Only Mobile/ Manufactured Home ROOFING www.AllFloridaRoofs.com All Florida Weatherproong & Construction, Inc. FREE VIDEO ROOF INSPECTIONS1-877.572.1019 352-586-7178Serving Citrus, Hernando, Sumter and Surrounding CountiesCHEAP RATES

PAGE 25

1500LEGAL SERVICESThe hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask the attorney to send you free written information about the individuals quali cations and experience. Under Florida law non lawyers are permitted to sell legal forms and kits and type in the information provided by their customer. They may not, however, give legal advice or provide legal services. 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHER'S NOTICEFederal and State laws prohibit advertising expressing a discriminatory preference on the basis of race, age, sex, color, national origin, religion, handicap or marital status. The Daily Commercial will not knowingly accept advertisement for employment which is in violation of the law. Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance Employment Classifications are intended to announce bona de employment offers only. Employment advertising must disclose the specic nature of the work being offered. Some employment categories may charge fees. If any advertiser does not comply with these standards, please notify a Classied Sales Representative at 365-8245 or 365-8200. 2990 2990 DailyCommercial.com | Wednesday, March 28, 2018 D1 Thank you for reading The Daily Commercial! www.dailycommercial.com WITH US. EVERYTHING

PAGE 26

6865PETSThe Florida Statute 828.29 states that no dog, puppy, cat or kitten may be offered for sale without a health certi cate, nor can any puppy or kitten be sold under the age of 8 weeks, nor can you advertise puppies or kittens with a deposit to hold. D2 Wednesday, March 28, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com Subscribe to the TODAY!LAKE: 352-787-0600 SUMTER: 877-702-0600Your ticket to local news! SEIZETHE DAYSLOCAL AREANEWS.www.dailycommercial.com SEIZETHE DAYSENTERTAINMENTNEWS.www.dailycommercial.com 0 3 2 8 1 8 t d c d 0 2 c r o p p d f 1 2 7 M a r 1 8 2 1 : 1 8 : 1 5

PAGE 27

CROSSWORD PUZZLE DailyCommercial.com | Wednesday, March 28, 2018 D3

PAGE 28

D4 Wednesday, March 28, 2018 | DailyCommercial.com Advertise your business 352-365-8210 Run with the pack! TODAY! in the Service Directory