Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Rod Dixon
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Leesburg, Floirda
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University of Florida
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Minimumchargesapply.Cannotbecombinedwithothercouponsoroffers.Combinedlivingareas,L-shapedroomsandrooms ov er300sq.ft. ar econsidered2area s. Baths, halls,large wa lk-i n closetsan d arearu gsar epricedseparately. Offerdoes no t in clude protecto r. Residentialonl y. Cannotbeusedfor re stor ationser vices. Mu stpresen t couponattimeofservice Va lidatparticipatinglocationsonly.Certain re strictionsmayapply.Callfordetails.BEYONDCARPET CLEANINGCARPET|TILE&GROUT|HARDWOOD|UPHOLSTERY|AIRDUCT728-1668 394-1739fla#CAC18 1640 8 CARPET CLEANING3$99CleaningCompletedBy7/31/14 PromoCode:JULY AIRDUCT CLEANING$50OFF(MINIMUMCHARGESAPPLY) FL#CAC1816408CleaningCompletedBy7/31/14 PromoCode:JULY TILE&GROUT CLEANING15%OFF(MINIMUMCHARGESAPPLY)CleaningCompletedBy7/31/14 PromoCode:JULYROOMS &AHALL MCILROY TAKES WIRE-TO-WIRE WIN AT BRITISH OPEN, SPORTS B1LEESBURG: Education summit will address failing schools, A3 BASEBALL: Loney, Archer lead Rays to win over Twins, B1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, July 21, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 202 4 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED C8 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS C8 DIVERSIONS C7 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 SCOREBOARD B2 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 WORLD A6 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8.89 / 75Afternoon thunderstorms. 50 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comThe Eustis City Commission di rected its staff last week to explore buying a small part of Sharps Mobile Home Park to extend Ferran Park and get access to the lakefront, according to Economic Devel opment Director Tom Carrino. However, Don Oliver, the realtor and listing agent for the property, said Friday afternoon the citys ideas conict with the owners plan to sell the entire 7 acres. They want to sell it all at one time, not piecemeal, Oliver said. Oliver added it could be sold to two buyers at one time, if a private developer was inter ested in the bulk of it and the city in a smaller portion. Carrino said Friday afternoon that the staff will inform commissioners of this position and ask how they want to proceed. The idea of partnering with another buyer sounds viable, he said, and something they would look at if a developer came to the city to partner with them. The mobile home park is located on Lake Eustis on the south end of Ferran Park, and just before Lakeshore Drive enters downtown Eustis. In January 2009, the city commission offered $2,673,107, an av erage of two appraisals, for the mobile home park when the asking price was $7 million, according to a report by city staff. Oliver said he approached the city to restart discussions with an asking price of $3.9 million, but the price has since been lowered to $3.3 million. Oliver said with the market improving it seemed like a good time to reopen the dialogue with the city. I woke up this EUSTIS Purchase potentialCity looks at possibility of buying part of Sharps Mobile Home ParkPHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIALABOVE: Donnie Osborne, left, and his wife Carolyn Osborne, pose for a photo at their home of four years in Sharps Mobile Home Park in Eustis. BELOW: A mobile home sits next to Lake Eustis. LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comFollowing the release of the Florida Depart ment of Educations an nual report card for all school districts, city of Lees burg ofcials, the Leesburg Area Chamber of Commerce and the Lake Coun ty School District are coming together to sponsor an education summit to address failing school grades in the city. Five schools in the district received an F this year, compared with none the previous year. Of those ve schools, three are in Lees burg: Oak Park Middle School, Leesburg Ele mentary School and Humanities and Fine Arts Charter School. It affects not just the schools but our city and economic development, Leesburg Mayor John Christian said of the failing grades. Christian said the pur pose of the summit is to bring everyone together LEESBURGEducation summit will address citys failing schools LAURAN NEERGAARD and JENNIFER AGIESTAAssociated PressWASHINGTON Americans consider insurance and a good bedside manner in choosing a doctor, but will that doctor provide high-quality care? A new poll shows that people dont know how to determine that. Being licensed and likable doesnt necessari ly mean a doctor is up to date on best practices. But consumers ar ent sure how to uncover much more. Just 22 per cent of those questioned are condent they can nd information to com pare the quality of local doctors, according to the poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. Today, 6 in 10 people say they trust doctor recommendations from friends or family, and nearly half value referrals from their regular physician. The poll found far fewer trust quality infor mation from online patient reviews, health in surers, ratings web sites, the media, even the government. I usually go on refer ences from somebody Before doctors check your vitals, check out theirs YURAS KARMANAU and PETER LEONARDAssociated PressTOREZ, Ukraine Pro-Mos cow rebels piled nearly 200 bodies from the downed Ma laysian jetliner into four refrigerated boxcars Sunday in eastern Ukraine, and cranes at the crash scene moved big chunks of the Boeing 777, drawing con demnation from Western leaders that the rebels were tampering with the site. The United States, meanwhile, presented what it called powerful evidence that the rebels shot down the plane with a Rus sian surface-to-air missile and training. Although other govern ments have stopped short of ac cusing Russia of actually causing the crash, the U.S. was ahead of most in pointing blame on Mos cow for the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 that killed all 298 people aboard. Russia is supporting these separatists. Russia is arm ing these separatists. Russia is training these separatists, Secretary of State John Kerry said on CNNs State of the Union. Leaders of Britain, France and Germany spoke to Russian Pres ident Vladimir Putin by phone late Sunday, urging him to use his inuence on the separat ists to ensure the victims could be repatriated and international investigators could have full access to collect evidence. They said European foreign ministers Bodies from downed jetliner piled in boxcars in Ukraine VADIM GHIRDA / AP Ukrainian miners carry the body of a victim at the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 near the village of Hrabove, Ukraine. CHRISTIAN SEE SUMMIT | A2SEE PARK | A2SEE VITALS | A2SEE PLANE | A2The United States, meanwhile, presented what it called powerful evidence that the rebels shot down the plane with a Russian surface-toair missile and training.

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 21, 2014 HOW TO REACH US JULY 20CASH 3 . ............................................... 3-9-3 Afternoon . .......................................... 3-4-2 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 5-7-0-8 Afternoon . ....................................... 9-7-2-9FLORIDALOTTERY JULY 19FANTASY 5 . ........................... 9-10-11-24-30 FLORIDA LOTTO . ............... 6-12-13-34-41-43 POWERBALL .................... 10-17-25-45-539 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONSTEVE SKAGGS, publisher352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comPAUL RYAN, digital editor352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com.CALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. to help the schools. We are trying to lure industry to our city, he said. We know this is a big undertaking. We are not going in nave, think ing we can get this turned around overnight. We need the long-haul approach. If we all work together, we can solve these issues. Christian said it was critical for everyone to be united. We want to hold our schools accountable, he said. We are not just go ing to accept an F and say it is OK because of the economics of the city. It comes down to nd ing ways to get students motivated about learning while thinking outside the box, Christian said. The summit is scheduled for 7 / p .m. on July 29 at the Leesburg Commu nity Building. School Board Member Bill Mathias said he was approached about the summit by Christian and said it was a good idea. This is a community issue, and the silver lining for me is to see the com munity come together, he said. They will solve the problem. The school district cannot do it on its own. Sandi Moore, executive director of the Leesburg Area Chamber of Commerce, agreed. For me it is a time for our community to reclaim our schools and get involved, she said. For too long it was the school boards problem. It is our problem as a community. The solution is not remov ing our kids. It is people getting involved and making it better. We care. We want to see success, and I feel like it is important the chamber is involved. For information on the summit, contact Christian at 352 504-7437. SUMMIT FROM PAGE A1 morning with the task at hand, which is to nd a ready, willing and able buyer, Oliver said Friday. The park is listed for $3.3 million and well sell it to a buyer, be it the public or private sector. Vice Mayor Albert Eckian proposed buying only a small part of the mobile home park. He said he would want a 40-footwide strip that could accommodate bicycle and walking paths, a small barrier wall for the path and then some benches and landscaping by the lakefront. He said this would extend Ferran Park closer to Sunset Island Park and would also benet a future developer of the rest of Sharps Mobile Home Park. He said the future connectivity would provide easy access to the rest of the park and the downtown and its amenities. Donnie Osborne and his wife, Carolyn Osborne, have lived in the park for four years. Carolyn said there have been rumors for years and she was not surprised by the potential sale. Carolyn said if they had to move they would need some compensation. Carolyn said she likes the communitys lake view, its closeness to the main part of town and its proximity to doctors and pharmacies. It was not immediately clear whether their home, which is separated from the lake by a road and another home, would be impacted by a purchase. Before the citys initial offer in early 2009, the city found out that it could approach around $200,000 to compensate residents for the relocation and abandonment of trailers, the staff report states. Mayor Linda Bob, when questioned about why staff was asked to explore the smaller purchase, said one of her concerns was that the city cannot afford the property. The only way that we could buy it is to actually borrow and thats not fair, Bob said. When we look at our voter I would hate to say that we are buying it because we borrowed to make that happen. Bob also did not want the city to become a landlord. Commissioner Michael Holland said it is important for Eustis to expand its lakefront, as Eustis has always been a very vibrant lakefront city. The staff report also identies three potential ways the whole property could be developed. Car rino said the scenarios are based on the downtown plan and would be multi-use. He said the least intense would have residential as well as commercial space, such as retail and ofces. The mid-range scenario would have residential and possibly a hotel, and the high end would have residential, commer cial and a possible hotel. Some parts of the property have soil issues, which can be worked around, that would come into play with denser redevelopment, but would not be as important with low-density development or the park idea, Carrino said, referring to geotechnical exploration documents from 2008 and past summaries drawn up by city staff from those explorations. PARK FROM PAGE A1 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Mobile homes sit lakeside at Sharps Mobile Home Park in Eustis. else, because its hard to track them any other way, said Kenneth Murks, 58, of Lex ington, Ala. I guess you can do some Internet searches now, he added, but questions the accuracy of online reviews. The United States spends more on health care than most developed nations, yet Americans dont have better health to show for it. A recent government report found we miss out on 30 percent of the care recommended to prevent or treat common con ditions. At the same time, we undergo lots of unneeded medical testing and outmod ed or inappropriate therapies. Yet people rarely see a problem. In the poll, only 4 percent said they receive poor quality care. About half believe better care is more expensive, even as the government, insur ers and health specialists are pushing for new systems to improve quality while hold ing down costs. Its hard to imagine buying a car without checking rankings, but checking out a doctor is much more difcult. Many specialists say standardized measures of health outcomes are key, though very little is available. Doctors who listen are im portant, but some of the nic est doctors are the least com petent, cautioned Dr. Elliott Fisher of the Dartmouth In stitute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice. Higher-quality care actually tends to be less expensive, by keeping people healthy and out of the hospital, and avoiding er rors and the complications of unneeded care, he said. Its getting a little easier to compare multi-physician ofces, if not individual doctors. Online report cards in a few states have begun of fering some information on quality outcomes from group practices. In Minnesota, for example, consumers can compare how many people have diabe tes, high blood pressure and some other chronic condi tions under control in differ ent practices, plus how satis ed patients are. By years end, Medicare plans to have released qual ity measurements for more than 160 large group practic es, with more information on smaller clinics set for 2015. Called Physician Compare, the online star ratings also will include patient feedback. The goal is to spur better care as doctors check out the competition. The arrival of large amounts of quality information is a big deal. Its a huge shift in terms of transparency and driving quality improvement, Dr. Patrick Conway, Medicares chief medical ofcer, told the AP. Consumers think it would help. More than 7 in 10 say quality would improve if doctors had to publicly re port their patients health outcomes and how satised they are. The AP-NORC Center poll found about 1 in 5 Ameri cans recall seeing informa tion comparing the quality of health providers in the last year. Nearly half arent con dent they even could learn if their doctor had been disci plined. In choosing a doctor, not surprisingly the top factor is insurance coverage, the poll found. For the uninsured, its cost. Eight in 10 look for the doc tors experience with a specif ic procedure. A nearly equal number say bedside manner is crucial. About three-quar ters say a helpful ofce staff and how long it takes to get an appointment are import ant. A majority, 62 percent, also factor how long they sat in the waiting room. Asked the characteristics of a high-quality doctor, a good listener is by far the top an swer. Others value the right diagnosis, a caring attitude, a good bedside manner and knowledge, in that order. Dartmouths Fisher said consumers should ask how the ofce the doctors team supports safe and effective care: Are patient outcomes tracked? Do they check on patients with chronic diseases between visits? Does the person taking after-hours calls know what medications you take? We tend to think, Oh our friend had a great experi ence with this doctor. But Id encourage people to think about the systems around that as well, he said. The AP-NORC Center sur vey was conducted with funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, which has nanced projects to publicly report data on care quality. It was conducted by telephone May 27 to June 18 among a random national sample of 1,002 adults. VITALS FROM PAGE A1 will be meeting in Brussels Tuesday to consider fur ther sanctions on Russia. More than three days after the jetliner crashed, international investigators still had only limited access to the sprawling elds where the plane fell. British Prime Minister David Cameron, in a blistering opinion piece for the Sunday Times, said the growing weight of evidence suggests the rebels shot down the plane, and if that is so, this is a direct result of Russia destabilizing a sovereign state, violating its territorial integrity, backing thuggish militias and training and arming them. The crash site, spread out on farmland and villages, looked dramatical ly different Sunday, a day after armed rebels had stood guard while dozens of bodies lay in the summer heat. The rebels were gone, and 192 bod ies were loaded into the refrigerated train cars in the rebel-held town of Torez, 9 miles away. The Ukrainian govern ment said in a statement on its website that a sec ond train with four refrigerator cars had arrived at Torez station. Emergency workers, who the rebels have allowed to operate under their control, were searching the sprawling elds. Cranes moved pieces of the plane around, ap parently to look for more bodies underneath. By Sunday night, Ukraines emergency ser vices agency said the total number of bodies found was 251, with dozens of body parts. PLANE FROM PAGE A1 VADIM GHIRDA / AP A man walks amongst charred debris at the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 near the village of Hrabove, Ukraine, on Sunday.

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Monday, July 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT MOUNT DORA Fire department offers free smoke alarms to residentsThe Mount Dora Fire Department is offering free smoke alarms to Mount Dora residents age 55 and older, made possible through a grant from the Florida State Fire Marshal through Sept. 15. Residents living in the city limits can sign up to receive a smoke alarm and have it installed for free at www.cityofmountdora.com or by calling the re department at 352735-7140, ext. 2101.LEESBURG Free Medicaid assistance available at the public libraryFree help applying for Medicaid, food stamps or temporary cash assistance, and information about Medicare, Medigap or long-term care options are available from 10 / a.m. to 2 / p.m. at the Leesburg Public Library, 100 E. Main St., every Tuesday. Trained Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders volunteers are also on hand from 10 / a.m. to noon every rst and third Tuesday of the month to provide Medicare and health insurance information and counseling for those over age 65. All services are free and available to the public. For information, call 352-728-9790.CLERMONT Public welcome at open forum about Lake schoolsInnovation Exchange, an open forum for the public hosted by Dr. Susan Moxley, superintendent of schools, will be from 8 to 10 / a.m. on July 29 at the Community Center, located at 620 W. Montrose St. Business leaders, community members and parents are welcome to participate in the forum to exchange ideas, insights and challenges as Moxley shares school updates. Guests are encouraged to go to www.lake.k12..us/innovation to suggest a topic for the forum. For information, call 352-253-6515 or email pattonc@lake.k12..us.TAVARES Tavares Splash Park closed for repair July 28-29The Splash Park at Wooton Park, 100 E. Ruby St., will be closed on July 28-29 for maintenance and repairs. Regular hours at the park, 10 / a.m. to 6 / p.m., will resume July 30. For information, call 352-742-6267.LADY LAKE American Legion Post 347 to host Bloodstock 2014Donors are invited to save lives at the Bloodstock 2014 blood donation event by giving blood. Donors will receive a Bloodstock 2014 T-shirt and free admission to a music festival featuring local artists and refreshments from 10 / a.m. to 6 / p.m., Saturday at American Legion Post 347, 699 W. Lady Lake Blvd. Donors should be at least age 16, weigh at least 110 pounds and be in good health. Appointments can be made by calling 888-936-6283 or at www.oneblood.org/bloodstock. Walk-ins are welcome.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comClermont city ofcials are hoping for south Lake native Dolores Gano Walk er, the citys honorary his torian, to be voted into the Lake County Womens Hall of Fame this year. At a recent city meeting, Councilman Ray Goodgame suggested the move and mentioned the upcoming deadline for nom inations. Goodgame got the ball rolling with a letter he wrote supporting Walkers nomination. Since then, city spokesperson Doris Bloodsworth has been working to put the application together, a process that includes submitting as much information, doc umentation, newspaper clippings and pictures as possible about Walker illustrating why she should be chosen. I have known Dolores Walker since 2004 when I joined the South Lake County Historical Society. It was abundantly clear to me that if I wanted to know anything about the history of south Lake County, all I had to do was ask Dolores Walker, Goodgame said, mentioning that although CLERMONTOfficials seek recognition for city historian PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: From left to right, Pastor Jose Gonzales, kindergarten teacher Manuela Motyl and Principal Heather Gelb work on the Sawgrass Bay Elementary School Buttery Garden on Saturday. BELOW: The garden features a ribbon-shaped walkway, along with a new fountain. V olunteers nished re building the Sawgrass Bay Elementary School Buttery Garden on Satur day, holding the ofcial re dedication ceremony at 1 p.m. The garden was rededicated to former Sawgrass Bay teacher Jennifer Wade and all that have been touched by cancer. Wade taught second grade, and died of lymphoma shortly after the initial dedication. By 2014 the garden was in need of considerable work. Pastor Jose Gonzales of Love & Living Hope Church stepped in, as did Lowes (through their Lowes Hero Project program) and staffers from Sawgrass Bay.Sawgrass Bay completes memorial butterfly garden THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comAn Urban Cooperation Agree ment between Lake County and Leesburg was approved last week by city leaders. The two governments will work together toward Com munity Development Block Grant funding for projects in the com munitys lowto moderate-income area, and Leesburg Commission er Bill Polk already has a project he would love to see come to fruition. What about Kids Korner? Polk quickly asked Leesburg City Man ager Al Minner, referring to the ag ing childrens playground at Venetian Gardens. Minner said the playground may meet the criteria for CDBG funds. Built 20 years ago, Kids Korner STEVE FUSSELLSpecial to the Daily CommercialAn iconic seed and feed store owned by longtime resident Dan Kerr could close in September if Kerr fails to reach agreement with the Umatilla City Council over the way he sells hay. More than 50 of Kerrs customers showed up at a city council meeting last week to praise Dans Discount Feed and Fence store, and lambast council members for what one area resident called the councils effort to tart up downtown. As voices rose and tempers frayed, one protesting resident was escorted from the meeting without inci dent. The issue is three to ve semi-trail ers at Dans that hold hay for sale. Buyers back up to the trailers, load their purchases and drive off. Kerr says more than 3,000 horse and cat tle owners from ve counties are regular customers. Wholesalers wheel fully stocked trailers in to replace the empties, and Kerr claims his trailer sales op eration reduces costs to unload, stock and inventory merchandise in a barn facility with adequate re and pest control measures. Kerr, a Umatilla High School football star in the 1970s, reconditioned an abandoned packing plant in 1993 to open the feed store. The city has grown up around him. What was once a rundown corner where Uma tilla Boulevard meets U.S. Highway 19 the citys main thoroughfare is now the heart of the city, and a focal point for the citys emerging downtown redevelopment district. The city is trying to assert a new identity thats more similar to quaint Mount Dora than rustic Altoona. And Dans Feed, trailers and all, is right in the middle of it. Theres been trailers there since the 1940s, Kerr said. Ive had trailers there since 1998. There never was a problem until ve years ago, he explained. In 2009, city ofcials cited Kerr for code violations. Kerr said the city threatened nes of $250 per day unless he did something about the trailers. Kerr promised to install fencing, skirting and other improve ments, and to build a barn-type building within ve years.UMATILLAFeed store gets 30-day reprieveLEESBURGCity, Lake County to partner for CDBG-funded projects ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comThe same committee that worked with Wile smith Advertising and Design to develop the city of Clermonts newly instated logo and tagline is considering two rms to head the citys master planning pro cess. City ofcials said this is the next step in a three-tier process to take Clermont forward, a process that started with a group of vi sioning sessions City Man ager Darren Gray headed last summer to hear from residents, ofcials and business owners about the citys evolution over the next 20 years. Participants were asked what they did and did not want to see in the branding process, which resulted in updating the citys mot to and tagline from Gem of the Hills, to Choice of Champions, a phrase more in line with the citys commitment to health, wellness and tness. In the master planning process, plans that will map out the citys vision for the foreseeable future will be developed by the selected company based on input from the visioning sessions as well as natural city progression. The committee is made up of department heads chosen by Gray: Economic Development Director Jim Hitt, Police Chief Charles Broadway, city spokesper son Doris Bloodsworth, Development Services Di rector Barbara Hollerand and Environmental Ser vices Director James Kins ler. The committee already has met with the Cribb Philbeck Weaver Group of Brandon, a design rm established in 2005, and GAI Consultants of Orlando, a design rm established in 1990.Clermont still choosing firm to conduct master planningSEE REPRIEVE | A4SEE HISTORIAN | A4SEE PROJECTS | A6

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 21, 2014 DENTURE REPAIR/RELINE ONEHOUR WEDNESDAYSONLYSUNRISEDENTAL1380N.Blvd., We st Leesburg,Florida352-326-3368 r f r f n rr rt n t r b b f f f f f n n f f t f f f t t f b D003571 OBITUARIESJerry Lee DunnJerry Lee Dunn, age 74, of Tavares passed away on Friday, July 18, 2014. He was born De cember 27, 1939 in De catur, IL and moved to Tavares in 1984 from Las Vegas, NV. He was a retired switchman with Norfolk and Western Railroad and was a realtor. He was also a veteran of the U.S. Navy. He loved spending time with his family and was an avid golf er. He is survived by his wife, Mary E. Dunn of Tavares, FL; sons, Ja mie Dunn of Tavares, FL and Sean Dunn of Lees burg, FL; brothers, Jack Dunn of Decatur, IL and Dick Dunn of Sheridan, WY; sisters, Sandra Sanderson of Sheridan, WY and Susan Tudor of St. Louis, MO; 5 grandchildren, Kelsi, Kaitlyn, Jaylin, Lily, and Saige. The family will receive friends on Tuesday, July 22, 2014 from 2:00PM until 4:00PM at Stever son Hamlin & Hilbish Funeral Home, Tavares. A Memorial Service will follow at 4:00PM in the funeral home chapel. In lieu of owers, memorial contributions may be made to Cornerstone Hospice, 2445 Lane Park Rd., Tavares, FL 32778. Arrangements have been entrusted to Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, 226 E. Burleigh Blvd., Tava res, FL 32778, (352)3434444. Online condo lences may be left at www.steversonhamlinhilbish.com.IN MEMORY THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comResidents interested in a new career eld or a jumpstart on their college education close to home are encouraged to apply at Lake-Sumter State College within the next three weeks. Aug. 11 is the dead line to submit an appli cation for admission for the fall semester. Class es begin the week of Aug. 25, and the semes ter ends in mid-December. Sasheika Tomlinson, director of marketing and college relations at LSSC, said in a press re lease that LSSC offers associate of science degrees in the following programs: %  en Nursing %  en Business administration %  en Computer infor mation technology %  en Criminal justice technology %  en Early childhood education %  en Emergency medical services %  en Environmental science technology %  en Fire science technology %  en Health information technology %  en Ofce administration %  en Electrical distribution technology LSSC launched its rst bachelors degree program in 2013 in the eld of organiza tional management. LSSC also offers 11 technical certicates in business, early childhood education, health information technology, digital forensics and electrical distribution. Tomlinson also noted LSSC students who graduate with associate of arts degrees are guaranteed admission to the University of Central Florida through Direct Con nect. Those interested in taking classes at LSSC may apply at www. lssc.edu or by visiting one of the colleges three campuses locat ed in Leesburg, Cler mont or Sumterville.LSSC accepting fall applicantsLEESBURGhis good friend (now deceased) Oak ley Seaver was known as Mr. Cler mont and knew everything about Cl ermont, Walker knows everything about the entire south Lake area. I spent many hours of my spare time at Clermont Historic Village, learning about the early families that settled Clermont. Dolores knew every family and something about them. My gosh, she was a walking museum, he wrote. Bloodsworth has gathered much of the necessary information and has put together a biography not only about what Walker has contribut ed to the county, but what her fam ily has meant to the area since 1878, when her ancestors rst arrived here. Archibald Gano, her paternal grandfather, brought the family to south Lake and ran a sawmill in what was once known as Villa City, and George Myers, her maternal grand father, was Mascottes rst mayor. In all, with Walkers children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren, six generations of her family have lived in south Lake County. Dolores was born on Tuscanooga Road near Mascotte in 1926, gradu ated from Groveland High School in 1943 and is married to Robert Walk er, a man she she met in Jacksonville while in secretarial school there. Dolores moved with her husband while he was in the service and both returned to Clermont in 1946. Dolores was the rst bookkeeper for what is now South Lake Hospital and has been living in Clermont for many years. She has been involved with First United Methodist Church and served as the secretary for Cler monts centennial committee. Walker also had a hand in the development of the Groveland, south Lake and Lake County historical societies, and was part of the group that committed to preserving and develop ing Clermonts Historic Village, where on Sundays she donates her time as a tour guide for the museums. We think shes very deserving. Shes done many, many things and shes not the type to seek any credit for them, Bloodsworth said. To ease the application process, Bloodsworth is calling for help from the community to gather more infor mation about Walker to submit with the application. If people want to email antecdotes, send in newspaper clippings or if they want to send letters of support, they are welcome to, Blood sworth said. Bloodsworth can be reached by calling 352-241-7345 or by email at dbloodsworth@clermont.org. To nominate someone for the Lake County Womens Hall of Fame, down load an application at www.lake county.gov. According to the application and county website, nominees must have made signicant contributions to the improvement of life for all citizens of Lake County in the eld of art, agri culture, government, health care, hu manities, philanthropy or science/ education, and must have been born in or adopted Lake County as home. Nominees may be living or dead. Applications are due by Aug. 15. For information, call 352-343-9850 or email wtaylor@lakecounty.gov. HISTORIAN FROM PAGE A3 We even offered to pay for half of the build ing, Council Member Peter Tarby added. I had no choice back then, Kerr explained. Im just trying to stay in business. Despite Kerrs cos metic improvements, some city residents still complain that the trailers are an eyesore that diminish the citys new countenance. Am I the only one or do you all get calls from people? Council mem ber David Adams asked the board. They say weve xed up downtown, weve spent all this money. I got hit twice at church, and I dont go to church to talk politics, Adams said. Kerr waved a list of sig natures from more than 100 customers who sup port him, but he found little sympathy from council members. You do outstanding stuff for this city and I appreciate it, Council Vice President Donnie Kent Jr. told Kerr. But youve had ve years to x this. We want to set tle this, but Im lost. The x wont be easy. Everyone admits the trailers violate the citys zoning code. Greg Beliveau, who heads LPG Urban and Regional Planners in Mount Dora and serves as the citys planner, said he might be able to nd a solution. I just learned about this a few hours ago, so maybe theres a solution in the code but I dont see it now, he said. Council members agreed to postpone any action until September. In the meantime, Kerr is weighing his options. Umatilla is my city and I want to stay here, Kerr said. If theres a way, Ill do it. But I dont know. REPRIEVE FROM PAGE A3

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DORASunris e Dent al Tr i-D ental r ffnt bb fConsultation and Second Op inion No Ch arge!n t t NEW PA TIENTSPECIAL COMPLETESETOFX-RAYS(D0210) CLEANINGBYHYGIENIST(D110) EX AMINATIONBY DO CTOR(D0150) SECONDOPINION$49Reg.$155(INABSENCEOFGUMDISEASE ) D002409 was a community fund raising project that involved hundreds of res idents who volunteered their time to construct the wooden castle in the middle of Rogers Park, lled with slides, bridge and tunnels. The structure has weathered over the years and is now in need of many repairs. Some of the playgrounds orig inal parts have warped or cracked. Since 2012, many local residents, including Carolyn Van Dyken, have been spearheading fundraising efforts for a new Kids Korner playground made with better, longer-lasting materials, while Robert Sargent, spokesman for Leesburg, envisioned the new Kids Korner built with playground amenities to make the park more accessible to children with physical limitations. Minner said the city partnering with the county on CDBG funds is one way it can collect its entitlement money along with the county. They will increase our funding with their funding so that we can have some projects of magnitude in our lowto moderate-income ar eas, Minner said. Cheryl Howell, housing services manager for Lake County, told the commission that she oversees housing and community development for the entire county. We partnered with the city on the Berry Park project, and we are currently working with Umatilla right now to do a small sewer project to replace septic tanks in a small area, so we do a lot of different types of projects, and we just did a community cen ter in Yalaha. We have already committed our willingness to the city of Leesburg on partner ships, and we would like to continue to do that. Minner said CDBG funding could help fund a project of the year, such as a housing, road, sewer or park project. Minner believes the Urban Cooperation Agreement partnership is a way of using entitle ment money wisely. Mix a little bit of the county money with our money and we still have an impact project, the city manager said. According to the countys website, the CDBG program is ad ministered at the fed eral level by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, which makes funds available to lo cal governments. Lake County became an en titlement community in 1999 and started receiv ing funds in 2000. The Housing and Community Development Division of the Department of Community Services admin isters the Lake County CDBG program. The division is responsible for ensuring the funds are used to improve the liv ing environment, quality of life and housing opportunities for lowand moderate-income citizens. Tavares, Montverde, Astatula, Minneola, Howey-in-the-Hills and Lady Lake also receive a share of the entitlement dollars from their Ur ban County Partnership Agreements with Lake County, the county said on its website. Since Lake County became a CDBG entitle ment community, the county and its partners are using CDBG funds for roadway paving and paying paving assess ments, for housing re habilitation, to provide prescription assistance, to improve communi ty centers, sidewalks and parks and to con struct ADA-accessible restrooms and entrances in public buildings. The county also noted on its website that the projects are intended to help lowand mod erate-income neighborhoods improve their quality of life and are community-driven. Each year, interested community groups may apply for grants to con struct or improve neighborhood facilities. At the same time, the county helps the successful and not-so-successful applicants to build capacity, to access other resourc es to meet their particu lar needs and serves as a liaison with other county agencies. By itself, Leesburg is eligible for approx imately $150,000 annually in CDBG en titlement funds. In a partnership with Lake County, additional funds can be added to this amount and larger annual projects can be considered and accomplished. Leesburg will have a three-year commitment to accept the fund. After that, the city can re sume applying for larg er grants. PROJECTS FROM PAGE A3 SAMEER N. YACOUB and SINAN SALAHEDDINAssociated PressBAGHDAD Iraqs prime minister on Sun day condemned the Is lamic State extremist groups actions targeting Christians in territory it controls, saying they reveal the threat the jihadists pose to the minority communitys centuries-old heritage. The comments from Nouri al-Maliki come a day after the expira tion of a deadline im posed by the Islamic State group calling on Christians in the mili tant-held city of Mosul to convert to Islam, pay a tax or face death. Most Christians opted to ee to the nearby self-rule Kurdish region or oth er areas protected by Kurdish security forces. What is being done by the Daesh terrorist gang against our Chris tian citizens in Ninevah province, and their aggression against the churches and houses of worship in the areas un der their control reveals beyond any doubt the extremist criminal and terrorist nature of this group, al-Maliki said in a statement released by his ofce, using the Ar abic acronym for the Islamic State group. Those people, through their crimes, are revealing their true identity and the false al legations made here and there about the existence of revolutionaries among their ranks. At the Vatican, Pope Francis expressed his concern Sunday for Mosuls Christians, offering prayers for Iraqi Chris tians who are persecuted, chased away, forced to leave their hous es without out the possibility of taking any thing with them. Residents in Mosul also say the Islam ic State groups ght ers recently have begun to occupy churches and seize the homes of Christians who have ed the city. These actions stem from the harsh interpretation of Islamic law the group seeks to impose on the territory it controls in Iraq and neigh boring Syria. Already in Mosul, the extremist group has banned alcohol and water pipes, and painted over street advertisements showing womens faces. It has, however, held off on stricter punishments so far. Iraqs Christian communities date back to the rst centuries of the religion. Before the 2003 U.S-led invasion, around 1 million Chris tians called Iraq home. But since then, the community has been a frequent target for militants, and attacks prompted many Christians to leave the coun try. Church ofcials now estimate the communi ty at around 450,000. U.N. Secretary-Gen-Iraqi PM condemns jihadis for targeting ChristiansAP PHOTODisplaced Christians who ed the violence in Mosul, pray at Mar Aframa church in the town of Qaraqoush on the outskirts of Mosul. eral Ban Ki-moon strongly condemned the systematic per secution of minority populations in Iraq by Islamic State and associated armed groups, in particular the recent threats against Christians in Mosul, according to a statement released Sunday. Ban also expressed concern about abductions and killings of minority Yazidis, Turkmens and Shabaks, and reiterated that targeting a pop ulation because of its ethnic background or faith could constitute a crime against humanity. He also said the U.N. would inten sify its efforts to address the urgent hu manitarian needs of the displaced.

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Monday, July 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 I ve lived my life with enthu siasm, courage, raucousness and passion. Why on earth would I want to grow old grace fully? Why would I want to be Whistlers Mother when my whole life what Ive wanted to be is Mae West? Lets face it: Its about as likely that Ill become calm, serene and dignied as I age as it was that Id be prim, proper and sweet in my youth. Those were always lovely fantasies for somebody else. But like charming dresses that would never atter me, I dont t into these patterns. They werent designed with me in mind. No matter how I try to tailor them or hold my breath long enough to slip them on, I know theyd be conning, inappropriate and impossible to carry off. But growing old gracefully is one of those phrases weve heard so often weve internalized the concept without examining it. Ive decided that as I age, rather than becoming contemplative and introspective, to become more disruptive, seditious and boisterous instead. Not only am I not going gentle into that good night, I am not go ing gracefully into that late after noon. I intend to go as gentle as a mastodon stuck in a tar pit. I want to be one of those women who brandish a cane. I come from a family of people with bad knees, so that particular accesso ry is probably in my future. But I dont plan to carry, rely upon, or make occasional use of a cane, but to brandish it. The two things a person can brandish are canes and swords, and Im unlikely to model myself after either Xena, the Warrior Princess, or Joan of Arc at this stage (although anything is possible). Cane it is. I might also start carrying a ask. It might contain gin; it might contain Ensure. What it contains is beside the point: What matters is that I will be able to whip out a ask. I might also begin to dispense some of my possessions to the young under my care. This will happen in those instances where I can now afford to purchase higher quality goods. Please take this handmade quilt. Grandmas gonna get some sheets from Frettes. After 50, you can begin to distinguish what actually makes you happy from what youve always done to please others. Being able to dene that differ ence is an accomplishment. Its one of those areas of expertise that takes at least 10,000 hours to learn. After a certain age, you nally become the indisputable author ity on the subject of yourself. Its absurd to think that youre then supposed to spend all your time sitting quietly while people tell you dull stories about their kids (whom you dont know), their dogs (who have a limited range of talents, although often cuter and less self-involved than their kids) or their gallbladder surgery (more engaging than either offspring or pets). Is it simply a lack of imagination that makes us view old age as a time of life when people are mostly worried about what will get stuck in their trachea? Or is it because were still bound by weirdly constructed and entirely arbitrary denitions telling us how people are supposed to act at a certain age? When I was a girl, I was told I wasnt supposed to be energetic, ambitious or competitive. I was told I wasnt supposed to be erce, seditious or demanding. I didnt listen then; why would I lis ten now, when Im being told essentially the same thing a ver sion of Sit down and be quiet? Its easy to say that what I really want for my 80th birthday is to be surrounded by loved ones and to have my health, but what I truly believe Ill want on my 80th birthday is a leased Ferrari and a month at the Waldorf. Im 57, so if Im lucky, I have a little time to make plans. But on his deathbed, my father preferred Prosecco sipped from a straw to chicken soup; he was a good role model. Like him, Id rather be a legend than leave a legacy. Rather than grow old gracefully, I want to grow old gaudily.Gina Barreca is an English professor at the University of Connecticut, a feminist scholar who has written eight books, and a columnist for the Hartford Courant. She can be reached through her www.ginabarreca.com.OTHERVOICES Gina BarrecaMCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE I wont take growing old sitting down In Fortaleza, Brazil, on Tuesday, the other shoe dropped in terms of the effect of U.S. decline on the international economic or der as the BRICS nations Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa created The New Development Bank to rival the World Bank and International Monetary Fund, dominated by the United States and Western Europe for the past 70 years. The new institution, whose ve countries include about half the worlds population, will start with $50 billion in capital and a $100 billion reserve fund, designed to buffer member nations against turbulence in the world market. China, the largest economy, will have the headquarters in Shanghai. India will name the rst president. Brazil will choose the rst chairman of the board of directors. Russia will select the head of the central bank governors council, and South Africa will host the rst regional ofce. By contrast, the United States always names the president of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, or World Bank, and the Western Europeans choose the president of the International Monetary Fund. American governments have put as head of the World Bank people like former Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara, key architect of the Vietnam War, and former Deputy Secretary of Defense Paul D. Wolfowitz, a designer of the Iraq War who was forced to resign from the bank in a personnel scandal. The BRlCS countries decided to unhitch themselves from the World Bank and the IMF for a number of reasons. Their primary reason was resentment of their own underrepresen tation in these two institutions, even as they grew in importance on the world stage. Their average growth rate in 2013 was 3.7 percent; the average growth rate of the United States and the European Union was 1 percent. The second reason was probably nervousness on their part at the weakening economic and political state of the United States. Relations among the executive, legislative and judicial sectors of the American government are currently such that paralysis prevails not the sort of government that any rational person wants to see if America is to continue to play an economic leadership role in the world, including in the World Bank and IMF. For the United States, the creation of the new BRICS bank means a clear diminution of its global inuence. For the rest of the world, particularly the important BRICS countries, it probably makes good sense. For Americans it should also constitute a wake-up call: rats leaving a listing, if not sinking, ship.Distributed by MCT Information Services.AVOICEBRICS nations to start an alternative World Bank Classic DOONESBURY 1975After a certain age, you finally become the indisputable authority on the subject of yourself. Its absurd to think that youre then supposed to spend all your time sitting quietly while people tell you dull stories about their kids (whom you dont know), their dogs (who have a limited range of talents, although often cuter and less self-involved than their kids) or their gallbladder surgery (more engaging than either offspring or pets). Is it simply a lack of imagination that makes us view old age as a time of life when people are mostly worried about what will get stuck in their trachea? Or is it because were still bound by weirdly constructed and entirely arbitrary definitions telling us how people are supposed to act at a certain age?

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 21, 2014www.dailycommercial.comLPGA: Lydia Ko wins Marathon Classic / B4 PETER MORRISON / AP Rory McIlroy of Northern Ireland kisses the Claret Jug trophy after winning the British Open championship on Sunday at the Royal Liverpool golf club, Hoylake, England. Associated PressMINNEAPOLIS James Lo ney had two hits and two RBIs and Chris Archer won consecutive decisions for the rst time this season as the Tampa Bay Rays won their fth straight with a 5-3 victory against the Minnesota Twins on Sunday. Archer (6-5) pitched 6 1-3 innings, giving up one earned run on six hits while walking two and striking out four. Rookie Kirby Yates got two outs in the ninth for his rst career save. The Rays, who went on an 11-4 tear going into the All-Star break, matched their longest winning streak of the season against the punchless Twins, who scored six Wire-to-wire winRory McIlroy wraps up third major title with victory in British Open DOUG FERGUSONAP Golf WriterHOYLAKE, England Rory McIlroy had to work a little harder, sweat a little more. No matter. Just like his other two majors, this British Open was never really in doubt. Staked to a sixshot lead going into the nal round, McIlroy turned back brief challeng es with key birdies around the turn and a majestic drive at just the right mo ment to close with a 1-under 71 and complete a wire-towire victory at Roy al Liverpool. In another major lacking drama over the nal hour, what brought the Brit ish Open to life was the potential of its champion. McIlroy won the U.S. Open by eight shots. He won the PGA Championship by eight shots. And with his two-shot victory over Sergio Garcia and Rickie Fowl er, the 25-year-old from Northern Ire land joined some elite company be yond the names on that silver clar et jug. Jack Nick laus (23) and Tiger Woods (24) are the only other players since 1934 to win three majors before age 25. Boy Wonder is back. Or maybe hes just getting started again. Ive really found my passion again for golf, McIlroy said. Not that it ever dwindled, but its what I think about when I get up in the morning. Its LEADERBOARD Rory McIlroy 271 -17 Sergio Garcia 273 -15 Rickie Fowler 273 -15 Jim Furyk 275 -13 Marc Leishman 276 -12 Adam Scott 276 -12 Edoardo Molinari 277 -11 Charl Schwartzel 277 -11 Victor Dubuisson 278 -10 Shane Lowry 278 -10 Graeme McDowell 278 -10 Dustin Johnson 279 -9 Robert Karlsson 279 -9 Ryan Moore 279 -9 Stephen Gallacher 280 -8 David Howell 280 -8 Francesco Molinari 280 -8 George Coetzee 281 -7 SCOTT HEPPELL / AP Sergio Garcia of Spain, who trailed McIlroy by two shots at time, fails to hit out of a bunker on the 15th hole. Miami Dolphins quarterback Ryan Tannehill (17) passes against the Buffalo Bills on Dec. 22 in Orchard Park, N.Y. If Tannehill is to keep his job, he needs to improve on his 15-17 record. AP FILE PHOTODolphins focus centered on OL, quarterback STEVEN WINEAssociated PressIf we give up 72 sacks, everybody should be red the whole offensive line, guard Richie Incognito said. The pace slackened, but the Dolphins still allowed a franchise-re cord 58 sacks, then sacked their offensive line. They begin train ing camp with new starters at all ve posi tions. The lone holdover from last year, center Mike Pouncey, is recovering from hip sur gery and will likely miss at least the rst couple of games. Incogni to and tackle Jonathan Martin, both involved in the bullying scandal that soured last season, departed along with Tyson Clabo, John Jer ry and Bryant McKin nie, who combined for 41 starts in 2013. Sorting out replacements will be coach Joe Philbins top priori ty when training camp begins Friday. Here are some things to watch as the Dolphins begin six weeks of drills:WHOS GOING TO BLOCK The Dolphins thought they had acquired a long-term left tackle when they took Martin in the second round of When youre out here running these plays for the first time, it may not be pretty. Were all figuring things out.Ryan Tannehill,Miami Dolphins quarterbackSEE NFL | B2 CHRISTOPHE ENA / AP The pack rides in a downpour during the 15th stage of the Tour de France in Nimes, France. JAMEY KEATENAssociated PressNIMES, France Alexander Kristoff of Norway cap tured his second stage win of this years Tour de France by leading home a pack that overtook two breakaway rid ers with only about 50 meters to go in a dramatic nish to Stage 15 on Sunday. Vincenzo Nibali of Italy, having made sure that his main rivals couldnt claw back any time, nished smoothly in the trailing pack to keep the overall leaders yellow jersey. After two days in the Alps, Sundays stage offered some relief over a at 138 miles from Tallard, southeast Frances parachuting capital, toward the city of Nimes known for its Roman are na and bullghting. Kristoff, a Katusha rider who also won Stage 12, lift ed a st after leading the sprinters who surged ahead of the two breakaways Swiss champion Martin Elmiger and Jack Bauer of New Kristoff wins Tours flat Stage 15 SEE TOUR | B2Nibali, the leader of Kazakh team Astana, is looking likely to take home the yellow jersey when the three-week race finishes next Sunday in Paris. SEE GOLF | B2 CHUCK BURTON / AP Florida States Jameis Winston answers a question during a news conference on Sunday in Greensboro, N.C. JOEDY MCCREARYAssociated PressGREENSBORO, N.C. Its been a while since the Atlantic Coast Conference entered a sea son with this much buzz. The realigned league has the defending national champion, a Heisman Trophy winner and a national coach of the year. The ACC stumbled through ACC riding wave from FSUs title, Jameis WinstonSEE ACC | B2Loney, Archer lead Rays to win over TwinsSEE RAYS | B2

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Monday, July 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Baltimore 53 44 .546 6-4 L-1 26-23 27-21 New York 50 47 .515 3 1 6-4 W-3 21-23 29-24 Toronto 51 48 .515 3 1 4-6 W-2 27-22 24-26 Tampa Bay 47 53 .470 7 6 7-3 W-5 22-28 25-25 Boston 46 52 .469 7 6 7-3 W-4 26-26 20-26 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 54 41 .568 6-4 W-1 26-25 28-16 Cleveland 50 48 .510 5 2 7-3 L-1 29-19 21-29 Kansas City 48 49 .495 7 3 3-7 L-3 22-25 26-24 Chicago 47 52 .475 9 5 5-5 L-1 26-22 21-30 Minnesota 44 53 .454 11 7 5-5 L-3 21-25 23-28 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 61 37 .622 6-4 W-1 32-16 29-21 Los Angeles 59 38 .608 1 8-2 W-1 34-16 25-22 Seattle 52 46 .531 9 4-6 L-1 24-26 28-20 Houston 41 58 .414 20 11 5-5 W-1 21-28 20-30 Texas 39 59 .398 22 13 1-9 L-2 18-30 21-29 NATIONAL LEAGUEEAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Washington 53 43 .552 6-4 W-2 30-20 23-23 Atlanta 54 44 .551 5-5 W-1 27-20 27-24 New York 46 52 .469 8 7 7-3 L-2 25-23 21-29 Miami 45 52 .464 8 8 3-7 W-1 28-24 17-28 Philadelphia 43 55 .439 11 10 6-4 L-1 19-29 24-26 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY St. Louis 54 44 .551 7-3 W-2 29-20 25-24 Milwaukee 54 45 .545 2-8 L-2 25-24 29-21 Pittsburgh 52 46 .531 2 1 5-5 W-3 32-20 20-26 Cincinnati 51 47 .520 3 2 5-5 L-3 27-21 24-26 Chicago 40 57 .412 13 13 2-8 L-5 20-22 20-35 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY San Francisco 54 44 .551 5-5 L-1 28-25 26-19 Los Angeles 54 45 .545 4-6 L-2 25-24 29-21 San Diego 43 55 .439 11 10 4-6 W-2 26-26 17-29 Arizona 43 56 .434 11 11 7-3 W-3 20-31 23-25 Colorado 40 58 .408 14 13 3-7 L-5 24-25 16-33 SATURDAYS GAMESN.Y. Yankees 7, Cincinnati 1 Toronto 4, Texas 1 Cleveland 6, Detroit 2, 1st game Cleveland 5, Detroit 2, 2nd game Chicago White Sox 4, Houston 3 Boston 2, Kansas City 1 Tampa Bay 5, Minnesota 1 Baltimore 8, Oakland 4 Seattle 3, L.A. Angels 2, 12 inningsSATURDAYS GAMESN.Y. Yankees 7, Cincinnati 1 St. Louis 4, L.A. Dodgers 2 Pittsburgh 3, Colorado 2, 11 innings Washington 8, Milwaukee 3 Philadelphia 2, Atlanta 1 San Francisco 5, Miami 3 Arizona 9, Chicago Cubs 3 San Diego 6, N.Y. Mets 0SUNDAYS GAMESN.Y. Yankees 3, Cincinnati 2 Toronto 9, Texas 6 Detroit 5, Cleveland 1 Boston 6, Kansas City 0 Houston 11, Chicago White Sox 7 Tampa Bay 5, Minnesota 3 L.A. Angels 6, Seattle 5 Oakland 10, Baltimore 2SUNDAYS GAMESN.Y. Yankees 3, Cincinnati 2 Miami 3, San Francisco 2 Pittsburgh 5, Colorado 3 Washington 5, Milwaukee 4 Atlanta 8, Philadelphia 2 Arizona 3, Chicago Cubs 2 San Diego 2, N.Y. Mets 1 L.A. Dodgers at St. Louis, late NAM Y. HUH / AP Houston Astros L.J. Hoes slams a one-run double against the Chicago White Sox during the seventh inning on Sunday in Chicago. TODAYS GAMESTexas (Mikolas 0-2) at N.Y. Yankees (Greene 2-0), 7:05 p.m. Boston (Lackey 10-6) at Toronto (Hutchison 6-8), 7:07 p.m. Cleveland (Salazar 1-4) at Minnesota (Kr.Johnson 0-1), 8:10 p.m. Kansas City (Guthrie 5-8) at Chicago White Sox (Sale 8-1), 8:10 p.m. Detroit (Verlander 8-8) at Arizona (Nuno 0-1), 9:40 p.m. Baltimore (B.Norris 7-6) at L.A. Angels (Shoemaker 7-2), 10:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Niese 5-4) at Seattle (Elias 7-8), 10:10 p.m.TODAYS GAMESL.A. Dodgers (Ryu 10-5) at Pittsburgh (Volquez 8-6), 7:05 p.m. San Francisco (Vogelsong 5-7) at Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 4-4), 7:05 p.m. Miami (Koehler 6-7) at Atlanta (Teheran 9-6), 7:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Latos 2-1) at Milwaukee (W.Peralta 10-6), 8:10 p.m. Washington (Fister 8-2) at Colorado (F.Morales 5-4), 8:40 p.m. Detroit (Verlander 8-8) at Arizona (Nuno 0-1), 9:40 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Niese 5-4) at Seattle (Elias 7-8), 10:10 p.m.AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Beltre, Texas, .335; Cano, Seattle, .335; Altuve, Houston, .335; Brantley, Cleveland, .329; Chisenhall, Cleveland, .327; VMartinez, Detroit, .322; MiCabrera, Detroit, .313. RUNS: Dozier, Minnesota, 71; Brantley, Cleveland, 66; Trout, Los Angeles, 66; Kinsler, Detroit, 64; Donaldson, Oakland, 63; Bautista, Toronto, 59; Pujols, Los Angeles, 59. RBI: MiCabrera, Detroit, 75; NCruz, Baltimore, 74; JAbreu, Chicago, 73; Trout, Los Angeles, 73; Encarnacion, Toronto, 70; Donaldson, Oakland, 68; Moss, Oakland, 67. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 133; Cano, Seattle, 122; Me Cabrera, Toronto, 121; Brantley, Cleveland, 120; AJones, Baltimore, 118; Markakis, Baltimore, 118; Kinsler, De troit, 115. DOUBLES: MiCabrera, Detroit, 36; Altuve, Houston, 30; Trout, Los Angeles, 29; Plouffe, Minnesota, 28; Hosmer, Kansas City, 27; Kinsler, Detroit, 26; Pedroia, Boston, 26. TRIPLES: Rios, Texas, 8; Bourn, Cleveland, 7; Eaton, Chicago, 7; Gardner, New York, 6; De Aza, Chicago, 5; AJackson, Detroit, 5; Odor, Texas, 5; Trout, Los Angeles, 5. HOME RUNS: JAbreu, Chicago, 29; NCruz, Baltimore, 28; Encarnacion, Toronto, 26; Moss, Oakland, 22; Trout, Los Angeles, 22; Donaldson, Oakland, 21. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 41; Ellsbury, New York, 25; RDavis, Detroit, 24; AEscobar, Kansas City, 22; Andrus, Texas, 20; JDyson, Kansas City, 18; JJones, Seattle, 18; LMartin, Texas, 18. PITCHING: Tanaka, New York, 12-4; Porcello, Detroit, 12-5; Richards, Los Angeles, 11-2; FHernandez, Seattle, 11-2; Scherzer, Detroit, 11-3; Kazmir, Oakland, 11-3. ERA: FHernandez, Seattle, 2.02; Kazmir, Oakland, 2.38; Richards, Los Angeles, 2.47; Tanaka, New York, 2.51; Buehrle, Toronto, 2.64; Lester, Boston, 2.65; Gray, Oakland, 2.79. STRIKEOUTS: Price, Tampa Bay, 173; FHernandez, Seattle, 163; Darvish, Texas, 154; Kluber, Cleveland, 152; Scherzer, Detroit, 150; Tanaka, New York, 135; Richards, Los Angeles, 134; Lester, Boston, 134. SAVES: Rodney, Seattle, 27; Holland, Kansas City, 25; DavRobertson, New York, 24; Perkins, Minnesota, 22; Uehara, Boston, 20; Nathan, Detroit, 19.NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Tulowitzki, Colorado, .340; MaAdams, St. Louis, .324; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, .320; McGehee, Miami, .320; Lucroy, Milwaukee, .314; Goldschmidt, Ari zona, .314; Morneau, Colorado, .312. RUNS: Tulowitzki, Colorado, 71; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 70; Pence, San Francisco, 69; Rendon, Washington, 68; FFree man, Atlanta, 64; Rizzo, Chicago, 64; Stanton, Miami, 63. RBI: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 65; Stanton, Miami, 65; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 61; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 60; Morneau, Colorado, 60; Desmond, Washington, 59. HITS: McGehee, Miami, 118; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 116; Pence, San Francisco, 116; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 114; DanMurphy, New York, 114; CGomez, Milwaukee, 109; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 109. DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 37; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 33; Span, Washington, 29; FFreeman, Atlanta, 28; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 28; Puig, Los Angeles, 27; SCastro, Chicago, 26; JhPeralta, St. Louis, 26. TRIPLES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 9; BCrawford, San Francisco, 8; Braun, Milwaukee, 6; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 6. HOME RUNS:Stanton, Miami, 23; Rizzo, Chicago, 22; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 21; Frazier, Cincinnati, 19; Byrd, Phil adelphia, 18; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 18; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 17; JUpton, Atlanta, 17. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 44; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 38; Revere, Philadelphia, 26; EYoung, New York, 25; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 21; Rollins, Philadelphia. PITCHING: Wainwright, St. Louis, 12-4; Simon, Cincinnati, 12-4; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 11-2; Lynn, St. Louis, 11-6; Greinke, Los Angeles, 11-6; Bumgarner, San Fran cisco, 11-7; 5 tied at 10. ERA: Wainwright, St. Louis, 1.83; Cueto, Cincinnati, 2.13; Beckett, Los Angeles, 2.26; HAlvarez, Miami, 2.64; TRoss, San Diego, 2.70; Teheran, Atlanta, 2.71; Simon, Cincinnati, 2.74. STRIKEOUTS: Strasburg, Washington, 158; Cueto, Cincinnati, 141; Kennedy, San Diego, 137; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 135; TRoss, San Diego, 132; Greinke, Los Angeles, 130; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 126. SAVES: Kimbrel, Atlanta, 30; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 30; FrRodriguez, Milwaukee, 28; Jansen, Los Angeles, 27. Rays 5, Twins 3 T ampa Bay Minnesota ab r h bi ab r h bi DJnngs cf 5 1 2 0 Dozier 2b 5 0 0 0 Zobrist 2b-lf 3 1 0 1 Nunez 3b 5 0 0 0 Joyce lf 3 1 1 0 Plouffe dh 3 1 1 0 Forsyth ph-2b 1 0 0 0 KMor ls 1b 4 1 2 0 Longori 3b 5 1 2 1 Arcia rf 3 1 0 0 Loney 1b 4 0 2 2 Colaell ph-rf 1 0 0 0 Guyer dh 4 0 1 0 Wlngh lf 4 0 1 2 YEscor ss 4 0 2 1 EEscor ss 4 0 1 0 Casali c 5 0 0 0 F ryer c 1 0 0 0 Kiermr rf 2 1 1 0 KSuzuk ph 0 0 0 0 Fuld cf 2 0 1 0 Totals 36 5 11 5 T otals 32 3 6 2 Tampa Bay 211 001 000 5 Minnesota 010 002 000 3 EArcher (2), Kiermaier (3), Arcia (3). DPTampa Bay 1. LOBTampa Bay 12, Minnesota 8. 2BDe.Jen nings (24), Joyce (18), Longoria 2 (16), Y.Escobar (12), K.Morales (11). SBLoney (3), Kiermaier (3), Fuld (12). SY.Escobar, Fuld. SFZobrist. IP H R ER BB SO Tampa Bay Archer W,6-5 6 1/3 6 3 1 2 4 Boxberger H,8 2/3 0 0 0 0 2 McGee H,12 1 0 0 0 1 1 Balfour H,7 1/3 0 0 0 2 0 Yates S,1-2 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 Minnesota Correia L,5-12 4 7 4 4 3 4 Deduno 3 3 1 1 3 5 Duensing 1 0 0 0 0 2 Perkins 1 1 0 0 0 2 WPArcher, Deduno 2. BalkCorreia. UmpiresHome, Gabe Morales; First, Mike Esta brook; Second, Hunter Wendelstedt; Third, Mike DiMuro. T:40. A,821 (39,021). Marlins 3, Giants 2 San F rancisco Miami ab r h bi ab r h bi Pence rf 4 1 2 0 Y elich lf 4 0 0 0 Scutaro 2b 4 1 1 0 Vldspn 2b 3 0 1 0 Posey 1b 3 0 2 2 Stanton rf 4 1 1 0 Sandovl 3b 4 0 0 0 McGeh 3b 4 1 2 2 Morse lf 4 0 1 0 GJones 1b 3 0 0 0 HSnchz c 4 0 0 0 Ozuna cf 3 0 1 0 Arias ss 3 0 0 0 Hchvr r ss 3 1 1 0 GBlanc cf 3 0 0 0 Mathis c 2 0 0 0 Linccm p 3 0 0 0 Hand p 2 0 0 0 JGutrrz p 0 0 0 0 RJhnsn ph 1 0 0 0 J.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 Mor ris p 0 0 0 0 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 Totals 32 2 6 2 T otals 29 3 6 2 San Francisco 002 000 000 2 Miami 200 000 10x 3 EArias (2). DPMiami 1. LOBSan Francisco 4, Mi ami 5. 2BPosey (16), Morse (26), Stanton (22), Hechavarria (14). HRMcGehee (2). SBStanton (9), Ozuna (3). SMathis. IP H R ER BB SO San Francisco Lincecum L,9-6 7 5 3 3 2 7 J.Gutierrez 2/3 1 0 0 0 0 J.Lopez 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Miami Hand W,1-2 7 6 2 2 1 4 Morris H,8 1 0 0 0 0 1 Cishek S,21-24 1 0 0 0 0 1 WPLincecum 2. BalkLincecum. UmpiresHome, Tony Randazzo; First, David Rackley; Second, Brian Gorman; Third, Chris Segal. T:41. A,221 (37,442). Red Sox 6, Royals 0 Kansas City Boston ab r h bi ab r h bi L.Cain cf 3 0 0 0 B.Holt 3b 5 1 2 0 Infante 2b 4 0 0 0 Na va lf 3 0 2 3 Hosmer 1b 3 0 1 0 P edroia 2b 4 0 0 1 Valenci 3b 4 0 1 0 D .Ortiz dh 5 0 0 0 AGordn lf 3 0 0 0 Car p 1b 2 0 0 0 BButler dh 4 0 0 0 V ictorn rf 4 1 2 0 AEscor ss 3 0 2 0 Dre w ss 3 0 0 0 Hayes c 3 0 0 0 D .Ross c 3 2 1 2 Aoki rf 3 0 0 0 BrdlyJr cf 3 2 2 0 Totals 30 0 4 0 T otals 32 6 9 6 Kansas City 000 000 000 0 Boston 102 300 00x 6 EA.Escobar (10). DPKansas City 1, Boston 1. LOBKansas City 6, Boston 10. 2BA.Escobar (25), Nava (7), Victorino (6). HRD.Ross (6). SFNava. IP H R ER BB SO Kansas City Ventura L,7-8 4 1/3 9 6 6 4 0 Bueno 2 2/3 0 0 0 1 4 S.Downs 1 0 0 0 2 0 Boston Lester W,10-7 8 4 0 0 2 8 Tazawa 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 Mujica 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby Lester (Hosmer). WPVentura. UmpiresHome, Kerwin Danley; First, Mark Ripperger; Second, Gary Cederstrom; Third, Lance Barksdale. T:56. A,439 (37,071). Yankees 3, Reds 2 Cincinnati Ne w York ab r h bi ab r h bi BHmltn cf 4 0 0 0 Gardnr lf 4 1 0 0 Schmkr 2b 3 0 2 1 Jeter ss 5 0 1 1 Frazier 1b 4 1 1 1 Ellsur y cf 4 1 4 1 Bruce rf 4 0 0 0 T eixeir 1b 5 0 0 0 Ludwck dh 3 0 1 0 McCnn c 5 0 2 1 B.Pena c 4 0 0 0 Beltran dh 3 0 0 0 Heisey lf 4 0 0 0 ISuzuki rf 4 0 1 0 Cozart ss 4 1 0 0 BRor ts 2b 4 0 2 0 RSantg 3b 2 0 2 0 KJhnsn 3b 0 1 0 0 ZeWhlr ph-3b 2 0 1 0 Totals 32 2 6 2 T otals 36 3 11 3 Cincinnati 000 010 010 2 New York 000 020 001 3 One out when winning run scored. ER.Santiago (2), B.Roberts (9). DPCincinnati 1. LOBCincinnati 6, New York 13. 2BSchumaker (9), Ludwick (14), R.Santiago (5), Ellsbury (21). HRFra zier (20). SBR.Santiago (1), Ellsbury 2 (27). CS Schumaker (1). SR.Santiago. IP H R ER BB SO Cincinnati Cueto 5 5 2 2 4 7 M.Parra 2/3 2 0 0 0 2 LeCure 1 1/3 1 0 0 1 0 Broxton 1 1 0 0 0 1 A.Chapman L,0-3 1/3 2 1 1 0 1 New York Kuroda 6 2/3 3 1 0 2 6 Betances BS,3-4 1 1/3 3 1 1 0 1 Dav.Robertson W,1-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 WPA.Chapman. UmpiresHome, Angel Hernandez; First, Adrian Johnson; Second, Larry Vanover; Third, Paul Nauert. T:32. A,115 (49,642). Blue Jays 9, Rangers 6 T exas T oronto ab r h bi ab r h bi DRrtsn rf 5 0 2 4 Re yes ss 5 1 2 2 Andrus ss 5 1 2 0 Ka wsk 2b 5 0 2 1 ABeltre dh 5 0 0 0 MeCar r lf 5 2 3 3 Gimenz 1b 3 0 1 1 Bautist dh 4 1 1 0 Smlnsk lf 4 0 1 0 DNa vrr c 5 1 2 1 G.Soto c 4 1 2 0 ClRsms cf 3 0 1 1 Choo ph 0 0 0 0 DJhnsn 1b 3 2 2 1 Arencii ph 1 0 0 0 StTllsn 3b 3 1 0 0 LMartn cf 4 2 3 0 Gose rf 4 1 2 0 Rosales 3b 3 1 0 0 Odor 2b 3 1 1 0 Totals 37 6 12 5 T otals 37 9 15 9 Texas 002 003 001 6 Toronto 031 010 13x 9 ED.Johnson (1). DPTexas 1. LOBTexas 9, Toronto 8. 2BAndrus (23), G.Soto (1), Bautista (17), D.Na varro (13), D.Johnson (2). HRMe.Cabrera (12), D.Navarro (6). SBReyes (18), Col.Rasmus (2). CSD.Rob ertson (3), Gimenez (1). SOdor. SFD.Johnson. IP H R ER BB SO Texas Tepesch 4 1/3 9 5 5 2 0 Sh.Tolleson 1 2/3 0 0 0 0 3 Feliz L,0-1 1 1 1 1 0 0 West 1 5 3 3 0 1 Toronto Buehrle 6 8 5 5 3 5 Redmond W,1-4 1 1 0 0 1 0 Cecil H,16 1 0 0 0 0 1 Janssen 2/3 3 1 1 0 0 Loup S,4-7 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Redmond pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. HBPby Tepesch (St.Tolleson). BalkBuehrle. UmpiresHome, James Hoye; First, Chris Conroy; Second, Bill Welke; Third, John Tumpane. T:07. A,011 (49,282). Astros 11, White Sox 7 Houston Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi Altuve 2b 5 2 2 2 Eaton cf 3 1 2 0 KHrndz cf 5 1 2 0 AlRmrz ss 5 1 1 1 Carter dh 3 2 2 1 JAreu 1b 5 1 2 1 MDmn 3b 5 2 3 4 A.Dunn dh 4 0 0 1 Singltn 1b 5 1 1 0 V iciedo rf 5 1 1 0 Corprn c 5 0 1 0 Gillaspi 3b 5 1 2 0 Grssmn rf 4 1 2 1 De Aza lf 3 1 0 1 Hoes lf 5 1 1 1 GBckh 2b 4 0 1 0 MGnzlz ss 4 1 3 2 Nieto c 4 1 1 1 Totals 41 11 17 11 T otals 38 7 10 5 Houston 103 030 400 11 Chicago 001 213 000 7 EAltuve (6), K.Hernandez (1), Singleton (7). DP Houston 1, Chicago 2. LOBHouston 6, Chicago 9. 2BCarter 2 (14), M.Dominguez (14), Hoes (5), Ma.Gonzalez (5), Al.Ramirez (16). HRAltuve (3), M.Dominguez (12). SBCarter (1), Eaton (9). SFCarter. IP H R ER BB SO Houston Cosart 5 7 4 3 4 4 D.Downs H,9 1/3 1 1 1 0 0 Veras BS,2-2 1/3 2 2 1 0 0 Sipp W,2-1 1 1/3 0 0 0 1 1 Fields 1 0 0 0 0 3 Qualls 1 0 0 0 0 0 Chicago Joh.Danks 4 1/3 12 7 7 0 4 Thompson 1 2/3 1 0 0 0 2 D.Webb L,5-3 1 4 4 4 1 1 Surkamp 1 0 0 0 1 2 Guerra 1 0 0 0 0 1 Sipp pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. WPCosart. UmpiresHome, Marcus Pattillo; First, D.J. Reyburn; Second, Dan Bellino; Third, Brian ONora. T:39. A,256 (40,615). Tigers 5, Indians 1 Cle veland Detroit ab r h bi ab r h bi Kipnis 2b 3 0 1 0 AJcksn cf 3 1 2 0 ACarer ss 3 0 0 0 Kinsler 2b 4 1 1 1 Brantly cf 3 0 0 0 MiCar r dh 4 0 0 0 CSantn 1b 3 0 0 0 VMrtnz 1b 3 0 1 1 Raburn lf 3 0 0 0 JMr tnz lf 3 1 1 0 ChDckr ph 1 0 0 0 T rHntr rf 3 2 1 2 Swisher dh 4 0 0 0 Cstllns 3b 4 0 2 1 YGoms c 3 1 2 1 A vila c 4 0 0 0 DvMrp rf 3 0 0 0 AnRmn ss 3 0 1 0 Aviles 3b 2 0 1 0 Chsnhll ph-3b 1 0 0 0 Totals 29 1 4 1 T otals 31 5 9 5 Cleveland 000 000 100 1 Detroit 200 200 01x 5 DPCleveland 1, Detroit 1. LOBCleveland 5, Detroit 6. 2BY.Gomes (14), A.Jackson (22), V.Martinez (20), Castellanos (23). HRY.Gomes (13), Tor.Hunter (13). IP H R ER BB SO Cleveland Tomlin L,5-7 4 1/3 6 4 4 1 3 C.Lee 1 2 0 0 1 2 Crockett 2/3 0 0 0 0 2 A.Adams 1 2/3 1 1 1 1 1 Rzepczynski 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Detroit Smyly W,6-8 7 4 1 1 2 6 Chamberlain H,19 1 0 0 0 2 0 Nathan 1 0 0 0 0 1 UmpiresHome, Mark Carlson; First, Laz Diaz; Sec ond, Scott Barry; Third, Mike Everitt. T:54. A,736 (41,681). Pirates 5, Rockies 3 Colorado Pittsburgh ab r h bi ab r h bi Barnes lf 3 1 1 0 GP olnc rf 5 0 0 0 Belisle p 0 0 0 0 JHrrsn lf-3b 4 1 2 0 BBrwn p 0 0 0 0 AMcCt cf 4 0 1 1 Rutledg ss 4 1 2 2 GSnchz 1b 4 1 1 0 CGnzlz rf 4 0 0 0 NW alkr 2b 4 2 3 1 Arenad 3b 4 0 1 0 Mercer ss 3 1 2 2 Stubbs cf 4 0 2 0 P Alvrz 3b 4 0 1 0 Culersn 1b 4 0 0 0 W atson p 0 0 0 0 McKnr c 3 1 2 1 Melncn p 0 0 0 0 LeMahi 2b 3 0 0 0 CStwr t c 4 0 2 1 Matzek p 2 0 0 0 Lock e p 2 0 0 0 CDckrs ph-lf 0 0 0 0 SMar te ph 0 0 0 0 JGomz p 0 0 0 0 Snider lf 1 0 0 0 Totals 31 3 8 3 T otals 35 5 12 5 Colorado 210 000 000 3 Pittsburgh 020 001 20x 5 EArenado (10), LeMahieu (4). DPPittsburgh 2. LOBColorado 5, Pittsburgh 11. 2BC.Stewart 2 (3). HRRutledge (3), McKenry (2), N.Walker (14). SBJ.Harrison 2 (11), A.McCutchen (16), Mercer (2). CSBarnes (3), A.McCutchen (1). SLeMahieu. IP H R ER BB SO Colorado Matzek 6 7 3 3 3 8 Belisle L,2-6 2/3 4 2 2 1 0 B.Brown 1 1/3 1 0 0 1 1 Pittsburgh Locke 6 7 3 3 2 3 J.Gomez W,2-2 1 1 0 0 1 0 Watson H,23 1 0 0 0 0 2 Melancon S,18-21 1 0 0 0 0 1 UmpiresHome, Marvin Hudson; First, Clint Fagan; Second, Tim Timmons; Third, Tim Welke. T:05. A,609 (38,362). Nationals 5, Brewers 4 Milw aukee W ashington ab r h bi ab r h bi CGomz cf 4 0 0 1 Span cf 4 0 2 0 RWeks 2b 5 0 2 1 Rendon 2b-3b 5 1 0 0 Braun rf 3 1 1 0 W erth rf 5 0 2 1 ArRmr 3b 3 1 0 0 LaRoch 1b 3 2 2 0 Lucroy c 3 0 0 1 Zmr mn 3b 4 1 2 2 KDavis lf 4 0 1 1 Espinos 2b 0 0 0 0 MrRynl 1b 4 0 1 0 Har per lf 3 0 1 0 Segura ss 4 1 1 0 Dsmnd ss 4 0 1 1 Gallard p 1 0 0 0 Loaton c 4 1 1 0 Overay ph 1 0 0 0 GGnzlz p 1 0 0 0 Duke p 0 0 0 0 Stmmn p 1 0 1 0 WSmith p 0 0 0 0 Storen p 0 0 0 0 Gennett ph 1 0 1 0 Hair stn ph 1 0 0 0 LSchfr pr 0 1 0 0 Clipprd p 0 0 0 0 Wooten p 0 0 0 0 RSorin p 0 0 0 0 McLoth ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 33 4 7 4 T otals 36 5 12 4 Milwaukee 002 100 001 4 Washington 010 300 001 5 Two outs when winning run scored. EZimmerman (3). DPMilwaukee 1. LOBMilwaukee 8, Washington 8. 2BSegura (10), Werth (23), Loba ton (7). HRZimmerman (5). SBR.Weeks (2), Braun (9). CSR.Weeks (3). SGallardo. IP H R ER BB SO Milwaukee Gallardo 6 8 4 4 2 6 Duke 1 1 0 0 1 2 W.Smith 1 1 0 0 0 3 Wooten L,1-4 2/3 2 1 1 0 1 Washington G.Gonzalez 3 1/3 4 3 3 3 5 Stammen 2 2/3 0 0 0 0 2 Storen H,12 1 1 0 0 1 1 Clippard H,20 1 0 0 0 0 3 R.Soriano W,2-0 BS,3-25 1 2 1 1 1 0 WPGallardo, W.Smith. UmpiresHome, Angel Campos; First, Bill Miller; Second, Chad Fairchild; Third, Vic Carapazza.

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 21, 2014 *UnlessOtherwiseNotedontheSchedule Yo uMaketheCA LL !This We eksLeesburgLightningScheduleAlw ay sFREEAdmission! RainoutInformation 352-234-4489 Yo uMaketheCA LL !July21 -2 7This We eksLeesburgLightningScheduleAlw ay sFREEAdmission! GameTimes: 7pm We ekdays Sun5pm*THEPLAY:Withthescoretiedinthelastinningandtwo outs,thehometeamhasthebasesloaded.B2hitsa singletoenterfieldandR3touchestheplate.B2touches firstandeveryonecelebratesthevictor y, includingR1and R2,whodidnotadvancetothenextbase.Theinfieldersall starttoleavethefieldandarall at ornearthedugout,but observantF8picksuptheballandrunsinandtouches secondbasewhileholdingtheball. Whatstheruling?RainoutInformation 352-234-4489 Mon.7/21..............OffDay Tu es.7/22..............CollegePark(away) We d.7/23..............CollegePark(home) Thurs.7/24..............CollegePark(away) Fri.7/25..............Deland(away) Sat.7/26..............WinterPark(home) Sun.7/27..............WinterPark(home)ANSWERonFriday 27 This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule COLLEGE FOOTBALL STEPHEN HAWKINSAP Sports WriterThe new-look Big 12 is ready for some foot ball. OK, the conferences logo is whats new this year. There are no changes in the make up or format of the 10team league, the only power conference with a round-robin sched ule that determines a champion without an extra game. The goal now for the Big 12, last represent ed in the BCS nation al championship game ve seasons ago, is to get a team in the new four-team College Foot ball Playoff that begins this season. The rst championship game will be played in the heart of Big 12 country Arlington, Texas. Baylor arrives today at Big 12 football me dia days as the defend ing league champion for the rst time. The Bears should be pretty good again, but eighttime champ Oklahoma is the preseason pick to win another title. Here are ve things to know about media days:DIFFERENT TONEWhen Big 12 Commissioner Bob Bowls by addressed the media during the opening session last year, he was part of a coordinated effort by the leaders of the power conferences the Big 12, SEC, Big Ten, Pac 12 and ACC in calling for transfor mative changes in the governance system of the NCAA. Bowlsbys opening address Monday comes 2 1-2 weeks before the NCAA board of directors vote Aug. 7 on a formal proposal to give schools in the high est-prole conferences more inuence over the college rules. The proposal also would give athletic directors and student-athletes bigger roles in the legislative process.WHOS PICKED FIRST?There is much more consensus this year among the media on who will win the Big 12 title. Oklahoma is the overwhelming favorite to win its ninth Big 12 championship. The Sooners got 47 of the 56 rst-place votes, with defending champ Baylor getting the oth er nine. In the same poll before last season, there were 43 total votes cast and six dif ferent teams got picked rst. Oklahoma State was then the preseason pick and the Bears were tabbed fth with only two rst-place votes.STRONG DEBUT The last of the 10 coaches to take the po dium in the main press conference room at the Omni Dallas Hotel will be new Texas coach Charlie Strong. It is rst time since 1997 that Mack Brown isnt speak ing on behalf of the Longhorns. Strong did a 12-city tour last spring, with a message to Tex as fans about improved mental and physical toughness. This will be his rst appearance be fore the fully assembled Big 12 media.WHERE ARE THE QBS? After leading Baylor to its rst Big 12 title, throwing for 4,200 yards with 32 touchdowns and leading the Big 12 with 14 rushing scores, Bryce Petty is an obvi ous pick to take part in media days. He was also voted by media as the Big 12s preseason offensive player of the year. But Petty is only one of three quarter backs set to be in Dallas. The others are Oklahoma sophomore Trevor Knight, who threw four TDs in a Sugar Bowl victory over Alabama, and Kansas State senior Jake Waters.NEW IDENTITYThe Big 12 unveiled its new logo July 1 as part of a new set of branding and identity standards. Big 12 football media days will be the rst ma jor event for prominent display of the new logo which Bowlsby said in tegrates the leagues iconic heritage with a progressive new look. Big 12 featuring new look, new goal AP FILE PHOTO Baylor cornerback Demetri Goodson celebrates after defeating Texas 30-10 for the 2013 Big 12 title in Waco, Texas. LPGA RICK OSENTOSKI / AP Lydia Ko, of New Zealand, holds up her trophy after winning the Marathon Classic LPGA golf tournament on Sunday at Highland Meadows Golf Club in Sylvania, Ohio. RUSTY MILLERAP Sports WriterSYLVANIA, Ohio Seventeen-year-old Lydia Ko broke free from a late tie with So Yeon Ryu, hitting a wedge to 4 feet for birdie on the 72nd hole on Sunday to win the Marathon Classic. She became the youngest player to top $1 million in career earnings on the LPGA Tour. Ryu had poured in a big-breaking, 25-foot birdie putt on the 17th to pull even. But then Ko stuck her approach at the par-5 closing hole and calm ly rolled in the birdie putt for a 6-under 65 that left her at 15-un der 269. It was her sec ond LPGA win as a pro to go with the two Ca nadian Open titles she grabbed as an amateur. Ryu pushed a 6-footer at the 18th that would have forced a playoff. Ko was resilient, also shrugging aside a challenge from veteran Cristie Kerr, who pulled into a tie with her on the homeward nine. Ko is roughly 17 months younger than Lexi Thompson, who previously was the youngest to hit the $1 million mark in LPGA earnings. She has shown incredible con sistency in her rook ie year on tour, making the cut in all 15 tour naments shes entered. She has six top-10 n ishes in addition to her wins, with ve of those being top-ves. Ko, who proudly bears the ag of her native New Zealand on her golf bag, started the nal round in fth place, three shots behind co-leaders Laura Diaz and Lee-Anne Pace. While they foun dered, she crept up the leaderboard with birdies at holes 3 and 4. She tied for the top spot with a 12-foot birdie putt at the par-3 eighth, then took a solo lead for the rst time.Lydia Ko victorious in Marathon Classic

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LivingHealthySend your health news to features@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 21, 2014GENE THERAPY: Scientists creating biological pacemaker / C2 Health check www.dailycommercial.com LADY LAKE Bloodstock 2014 donation event will be SaturdayBloodstock 2014, a blood dona tion event, invites donors to save lives by giving blood and in turn re ceive a Bloodstock 2014 T-shirt and free admission to a music festival featuring local artists and refresh ments from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Sat urday at American Legion Post 347, 699 W. Lady Lake Blvd. Donors should be age 16 or older, weigh at least 110 pounds and be in generally good health. Appointments can be made by calling 888-936-6283 or at www.one blood.org/bloodstock. Walk-ins are welcome.THE VILLAGES Moffit Cancer Center aims to improve patient self-esteemWith the aim of improving cancer patients self-esteem and the quali ty of life for those undergoing cancer treatments, the Moftt Cancer Center offers the Look Good Feel Better program. An upcoming Look Good Feel Bet ter meeting will be held from 9 to 11 a.m., on July 28. Meetings will also be held on Sept. 22 and Nov. 24. For information, email Ida Perea at iperea@cfhalliance.org. LAKE COUNTY Lake County Extension will offer pain control classThe UF/IFAS Lake County Exten sion Service will offer classes about osteoarthritis pain and offer strategies for controlling and even preventing pain in this program creat ed by the National Council on Aging and the Arthritis Foundation. Classes will be offered at two dif ferent locations beginning Aug. 4 from 1 to 2:30 p.m., at the Lady Lake Public Library, 225 W. Guava St. Reg istration is required by going to ar thritisaug2014.eventbrite.com. The second class will be held from 10 to 11:30 a.m. on Aug. 5 at the Leesburg Public Library, 100 E. Main St. Registration is required by going to leesburgarthritis.eventbrite.com. For information, call 352-3434101, ext. 2719. TAVARES Hospital foundation raises nearly $100,000The Florida Hospital Waterman Foundations recent 5th Annual Celebration of Life Gala brought together 176 guests who enjoyed an evening of dining, silent and live auctions and entertainment by the band Hot Property, raising $97,942 in support of the Florida Hospital Waterman Emergency Department. The foundation provides funding for programs and services at the hos pital, including the open heart pro gram, the Community Clinic, mis sion trips and cancer care services. For information, call 352-253-3270 or go to www.FHWaterman.com.LEESBURG Health Alliance welcomes new VP of Support Services The Central Florida Health Alli ance has welcomed the new Vice President of Support Services, Alex Chang, FACHE, in his new role that includes overseeing Materials Man agement, Environmental Services, Food and Nutrition, facilities/plant operation, Bio-Med and construction and security. Chang served as the Chief Operat ing Ofcer of HCA Fawcett Memorial Hospital, Englewood Community Hospital in Port Charlotte since 2006. ERIC BOODMANMCTTen days after signing the lease on Resurrec tion Fitness, in Carn egie, Pa., Jeff Donato was found lying in a pool of blood. At a local hospital, doctors ordered a rush CT scan and, as they were wheeling him into surgery, they told his wife that he had had a ruptured brain aneurysm. A blood vessel in the left side of his brain had ballooned out and burst. He had been ly ing on his bedroom oor for almost 12 hours. His chances of survival were slim. Donato, 60, is a personal trainer who lives and works in Carnegie. He has been lifting weights since the age of 8, and he does not smoke, have high blood pressure or use ar tery-damaging drugs like cocaine. He had none of the characteristics that might predispose him to such an emergency. Donato knew nothing about aneurysms until he had one. The same goes for most brain aneurysm patients. There was no sign, there was no warning, said his wife, Theresa Donato, 52. Thats what a lot of people say. For the past three years, there has been a support group at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center for brain aneurysm patients and their families. Recently a walk and run was held to raise awareness in the wider community. Robert Friedlander, chairman of neurosur gery at UPMC, explains that brain aneurysms can be caught before or after they rupture. In patients whose aneurysms rupture, he says, theres a ton of blood under high pressure that goes into the brain and causes severe brain damage. A lot of them die on the spot. A ruptured aneurysm often manifests itself as the worst headache of your life, he added. Approximately 50 percent of people die within 30 days. But an unruptured aneurysm can go undetected for years.Without warningBlindsided by aneurysms, patients and their families hail support program PHOTOS BY D.A. ROBIN / MCT ABOVE: Amanda Tocci, a recent Penn State grad, had surgery to remove an aneurysm in her brain. BELOW: Jeff Donato, a jazz guitarist and personal trainer, is shown in the gym. He had none of the characteristics that might predispose him to a brain aneurysm, but he survived slim odds after a blood vessel suddenly ballooned and burst. JULIE DEARDORFFMCTLast year Martha Montalvo-Ariri underwent a routine hysterecto my to help treat painful uterine broids. During surgery, her doctor used a morcellator, a device that cuts the tissue into pieces so it can be re moved through small incisions. Ten days after the procedure, Montalvo-Ariri was diagnosed with a rare and aggressive form of uterine cancer called leiomyosarcoma. Even more devastating, the rotating blade of the morcellator had scattered cancerous tissue fragments around her abdomen and pelvic area, accel erating the diseases progression. None of the forms I signed men tioned anything about cancer, said Montalvo-Ariri, a 46-year-old moth er of four in Riverside, Calif. They said it was in and out, very easy, and youre back to your life. Instead, they took my life away. Cases such as Montalvo-Ariris have raised signicant concerns over the use of power morcellation to re move a womans uterus or broids. Cleared for gynecological surgeries in 1995, morcellators facilitate min imally invasive procedures that can reduce womens pain, recovery time and complications. In April, however, after reviewing new data, federal regulators urged doctors to stop using morcellators, Hysterectomy tool stirs fears, spurs call for ban GINA FERAZZI / MCT Martha Montalvo-Ariri, center, surrounded by her family, is battling cancer after a surgical tool spread an undetected cancer during a routine hysterectomy.SEE SURGERY | C2SEE ANEURYSM | C2

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 21, 2014 Wisdom Te ethExtraction's FREEIVSEDATION(9241)&(9242) wi thth re e ormor e wi sd om te et h ex tr ac ti on -s er vi ce s pe rf orme d by Ge ne ra l De nt is t$79New Pa tient SpecialIncludes Re gularCleaningIncludes;(90150)ComprehensiveExam,(0210) CompleteSeriesX-Rays,(0350)Oral/Facial PhotographicImages&OralCancerScreening &(1110)AdultProhylaxis Whereinsuranceisnotapplicable(352)205-8355LakeAdvancedDentistry109NUSHwy27/441 LadyLake,Fl.32159www.lakeadvanceddentistr y. com because if cancer is present the device can spread malignant cells beyond the uterus and worsen a patients chance for long-term survival. In response, a leading manufacturer of mor cellators, Johnson & Johnsons Ethicon subsidiary, suspended sales of the device. Now medical providers are wrestling with a difcult deci sion: Should they offer a pro cedure that has proven benets for the majority of patients but also carries a rare but dead ly risk for a small number? If women could be tested for all uterine cancers beforehand, doctors could avoid morcella tion with some patients. But without doing surgery, theres no reliable way to predict whether a woman with broids has a uterine sarcoma, notably leiomyosarcoma, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Admin istration. Many hospitals around the country have stopped using mor cellation at least temporarily. But others have said morcella tion still has a role in gynecological surgery and that, with ap propriate counseling, patients can decide for themselves. Last month Northwestern Memorial Hospital reinstated the technique under controlled cir cumstances and for those who might be at higher risk with a traditional open procedure. Advocate Health Care lifted a systemwide ban in May. Three professional medical associations acknowledge the risk but say morcellation should be an option in some cases be cause minimally invasive pro cedures cause fewer complica tions, injuries and deaths than open surgery. Recently the FDA held a pub lic meeting to discuss how to make morcellation safer, in cluding whether a black box warning should be added to the product labeling. The agency has not yet publicly announced any conclusions. Meanwhile, a growing chorus of doctors, clinicians and leiomyosarcoma patients and their families want the device banned, arguing that morcellation is reckless and viable alter natives exist. Ive been seeing women harmed by this thing for the last eight years, said Dr. Robert Lamparter, a pathologist at a small Pennsylvania hospital who wrote a letter to the FDA requesting the devices clear ance be revoked. He said he has analyzed tissue in ve cases in which an unanticipated cancer was morcellated. Im just horried, Lam parter said in an interview. Its not just another complication. There is no acceptable injury or death rate for an elective surgi cal device, even if its wonderful for those who arent harmed. About 600,000 hysterectomies are performed in the U.S. each year. Research suggests about 40 percent are done to remove presumably benign or noncan cerous broids that are causing heavy bleeding, pelvic pressure or pain, or other symptoms. The number of morcella tions is not tracked, prompting calls for a nationwide registry of gynecological surgeries that would include information on the devices used. The safest and most cost-ef fective way to remove the uter us is through a vaginal incision, according to the American Col lege of Obstetricians and Gyne cologists. But that isnt possible with enlarged uteruses or large broids unless the tissue is cut into small pieces with a power morcellator or by hand using a scalpel. The traditional surgical choice involves a 5to 7-inch incision in a womans abdomen. This method offers doctors the clearest view but like all surger ies carries a higher risk of infec tion and complications such as blood clots. Though the over all mortality risk is low, research suggests abdominal hysterec tomy patients die three times more often than those who undergo a laparoscopic procedure. SURGERY FROM PAGE C1 GINA FERAZZI / MCT Martha Montalvo-Ariri, the mother of four, was never told the risks of using a morcellator. On Oct. 30, Amanda Tocci was sitting in class at Penn State University preparing for an exam when she began to feel nauseated. She needed to leave. As I was walking across the street, I got a black screen in front of my face and my legs kind of gave out, she recalled. A friend came and drove her to the hospital. They kept telling me it was a combination of dehydration and lack of sleep, she said. But Im a very health-conscious per son. I drink plenty of water. I knew it wasnt dehydration. When doctors did a CT scan, they saw a blur they thought might be an aneurysm. They conrmed the diagnosis with an MRI. To check if it was ruptured, they did a spinal tap, inserting a long needle into Toccis spinal cord to check if blood had leaked into her cerebral uid. It hadnt. Her boyfriend drove her home, and early the next morning she was at UPMC, booking surgery with Daniel Wecht for Nov. 19. Waiting was the hardest part, knowing there was a ticking time bomb in my head, said the 22-year-old. Her aneurysm, shaped almost like a ower, was larger than most, presenting an even greater risk of rupture. After she was anesthetized, Dr. Wecht xed her head into position and cut a crescent from her right ear to her forehead, pinning down the ap of skin. Then, using a power-drill, he removed a window of skull, putting it into a solution that keeps it clean. With scissors and scalpel, he snipped back the dura, a brous layer that protects the brain. His path was the Sylvian ssure, a natural crevice between lobes. Widening it, he found a map of arteries, rst locating the internal carotid, which he could clip in case the aneurysm began to bleed, the way a plumber could turn off a water main. Following the blood vessels through a microscope, he clamped a temporary titanium clip onto the artery that was feeding the aneurysm, and then a permanent one at the neck of the aneurysm. He pricked the dome of the aneurysm with a tiny needle to make sure there was no longer any blood ow, before closing up the wound layer by layer. Within a month, Tocci was back at the gym, slowly beginning to work out again. For someone like Donato, whose aneurysm had ruptured, the recovery process is longer. Nothing I am doing through the surgery is healing the damage done to the brain, said Dr. Friedlander. It only prevents the aneurysm from bleeding again, so the brain can heal itself as best it can. ANEURYSM FROM PAGE C1 D.A. ROBIN / MCT Back in the gym just a month after her surgery, Tocci now works out every day, lifting weights and doing several rounds of pushups. LAURAN NEERGAARDAssociated PressWASHINGTON No batteries required: Scientists are creating a biological pacemaker by injecting a gene into the hearts of sick pigs that changed ordinary car diac cells into a spe cial kind that induces a steady heartbeat. The study, published Wednesday, is one step toward developing an alternative to electronic pacemakers that are implanted into 300,000 Americans a year. There are people who desperately need a pacemaker but cant get one safely, said Dr. Eduardo Marban, director of the Cedars-Si nai Heart Institute in Los Angeles, who led the work. This devel opment heralds a new era of gene therapy that one day might offer them an option. Your heartbeat de pends on a natural pacemaker, a small cluster of cells its about the size of a pep percorn, Marban says that generates electrical activity. Called the sinoatrial node, it acts like a metronome to keep the heart pulsing at 60 to 100 beats a minute or so, more when youre active. If that node quits working correctly, hooking the heart to an electronic pacemaker works very well for most people. But about 2 percent of recipients develop an Scientists trying gene therapy to create biological pacemaker AP PHOTO Dr. Eduardo Marban, director of the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, is shown in Los Angeles.SEE GENE | C3

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Monday, July 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 R.KimEtheredge,D.C.ChiropracticCare withaPersonal To uch rfntbn ttt ntbtCompleteChiropracticCareb352.365.1191tCornerofPicciola Cu toffandHwy44/127bnbbLakeSumterLandingProfessionalPlaza ChiropracticCare withaPersonal To uch rfntbn ttt ntbtCompleteChiropracticCare CANADIANDISCOUNTSERVICES SaveUp To ... 80% OFFPharmacyPrices!Generic Me dicine sCialis20mg .2 4count.....$89.95 Vi agra100mg .2 0 co unt.....$65.95 Actonel35 mg .1 2count.....$69 RXREQUIRED rfn ntbft trr f tb tf n t nff fr CANADIANDISCOUNTSERVICES1011 1S .E .H WY 441 Bellevie w, FL34420 (1/ 4 mi.Nort h of KMartonHwy 441)(352 ) 347-0403 /f x(352) 347-2034CDRX441@gmail.com rD004202 Aching Fe et?Steprightintoourof fi ce.We specializeinquality medicalcareforall typesoffootproblems.Wa lk-Ins We lcome.Callnowtoschedule yourappointment. 923 We stDixie Av enueSuite B|Leesburg,FL34748352-435-7849|Nextto Dr Ta troDr Erik Zimmer mannPo dia tristYo urfeetareingoodhandswithus! rf Mos tM aj or Insurances Ac cep te d MARIA CHENGAssociated PressLONDON The number of people living with HIV worldwide has remained vir tually unchanged in the past two years and AIDS-relat ed deaths are at their lowest since peaking almost a decade ago, according to a re port from the United Na tions AIDS agency released Wednesday. Ofcials declared that end ing the AIDS epidemic is possible even though they ac knowledged the number of new infections more than 2 million last year was still very high. UNAIDS estimat ed there were about 35 mil lion people living with HIV last year and in 2012. The agency also set targets to reduce deaths and new cases by 90 percent by 2030. It previously unveiled a strategy to get to zero AIDS-related deaths, which included ensuring all people who need treatment are on it by 2015. Last year, there were about 12.9 million people receiv ing life-saving drugs and 22 million people still waiting. Some 1.5 million people died from AIDS-related causes. Other health experts questioned whether setting more ambitious targets is wise. This idea of ending AIDS isnt realistic, said Sophie Harman, a senior lecturer in public health at Queen Mary University of London, who was not part of the report. She said it would be more helpful to think about managing the epidemic. Every one can get behind ending AIDS, but this report doesnt really tell us how to do that. Still, UNAIDS insisted in its report that we are at the beginning of the end of the AIDS epidemic and said the global outbreak can be stopped by 2030. But with no vaccine and millions of people carrying the virus or becoming newly infected, some scientists said ending HIV may be idealistic rather than practical. Weve made progress, but the number of people getting infected is still extraordinarily high, said Shabbar Jaffar, a professor of epidemiology at the London School of Hy giene and Tropical Medicine. He said that scaling up treat ment further, especially in Africa, where about 70 per cent of people with HIV live, would be very difcult. They are already working beyond capacity at the moment. Jaffar said it was mislead ing to suggest we are close to eliminating AIDS. The road will get lon ger and harder and we really dont know where were going to end up, he said.Number of people with HIV unchanged since 2012 AP FILE PHOTOA newly diagnosed HIV positive woman, who arrived at the hospital with symptoms of tuberculosis, receives treatment at the Mildmay Uganda clinic in Kampala, Uganda.infection that requires the pacemaker to be removed for weeks until antibiotics wipe out the germs, Mar ban said. And some fetuses are at risk of stillbirth when their heartbeat falters, a condition called congenital heart block. For over a decade, teams of researchers have worked to cre ate a biological al ternative that might help those kinds of patients, trying such approaches as using stem cells to spur the growth of a new si noatrial node. Marbans newest attempt uses gene ther apy to reprogram a small number of existing heart muscle cells so that they start looking and acting like natural pacemaker cells instead. Because pigs hearts are so similar to hu man hearts, Marbans team studied the ap proach in 12 labora tory pigs with a defective heart rhythm. They used a gene named TBX18 that plays a role in the em bryonic development of the sinoatrial node. Working through a vein, they injected the gene into some of the pigs hearts in a spot that doesnt nor mally initiate heart beats and tracked GENE FROM PAGE C2 them for two weeks. Two days later, treat ed pigs had faster heart beats than control pigs who didnt receive the gene, the researchers reported in the jour nal Science Translational Medicine. That heart rate automatically uc tuated, faster during the day. The treated animals also became more active, without signs of side effects. In essence, we created a new sinoatri al node, Marban said. The newly created node then takes over as a functional pacemak er, bypassing the need for implanted electronics and hardware. Its a different type of gene therapy, and a few other genes that might switch one cell type to another are under ear ly study to treat deaf ness and diabetes, Mar ban said. Its not clear how long these newly repro grammed cells would keep working, cau tioned Drs. Nikhil Mun shi and Eric Olson of the University of Texas Southwestern Medi cal Center, who werent involved in the research but analyzed the nd ings in a journal com mentary. Also, the gene was delivered by putting it into a virus engineered to disappear relatively soon afterward. The Texas pair noted that some virus particles landed in the lung and spleen, and that longer studies are needed to rule out safe ty concerns. Still, the results provide an encouraging indication that a biolog ical pacemaker might eventually be ready for human translation, Munshi and Olson con cluded. The heart rate did start to slow a little to ward the studys end, but Marban said theres no reason to believe that the two weeks is somehow a magic cap. We have every reason to believe that this could go on longer. He said longer-term animal studies are underway, and he hopes to begin rst-step human studies in about three years. MARY CLARE JALONICK and LAURAN NEERGAARDAssociated PressWASHINGTON Nutrition facts labels on food packages list ingredients and nutrient levels, but they dont tell consumers outright if a food is good for them. Public health advo cates say that infor mation is necessary to help consumers make healthy choices at the supermarket. Theyd like to see la bels on the front of packages and a clearer statement of which in gredients are good and which should be avoid ed. The Food and Drug Administration is working on a label overhaul and has proposed two different versions. Writing separately in The New England Journal of Medicine on Wednesday, former FDA Commissioner David Kessler and for mer Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ofcial William H. Dietz both say the FDA doesnt go far enough. Dietz, the CDCs former director of the Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity, is now with George Washington University. Five ways these ex perts, and others, say nutrition facts labels could be improved:INDICATE OVERALL NUTRITIONAL VALUE The FDA proposed a nutrition facts over haul in February that made a lot of improvements sought by the public health community. There was more emphasis on calories, revised serving sizes closer to what Amer icans really eat and a new line for added sugars. But Kessler says there is nothing in the new framework that actively encourages consumers to purchase food rich in the fruits, vegetables and whole grains that are rightfully considered real food. Both Kessler and Di etz say the panels emphasis on specific nutrients gives food companies the ability to make claims on the fronts of their packages that can mislead con sumers. For example, sugary or fatty foods can entice custom ers by adding ber and promoting that. Diners often consume more of a food that is adver tised as low in calories, whether it is healthy or not. As Michael Jacobsen of the Center for Sci ence in the Public Inter est puts it: Its a bunch of technical terms saturated fat and cho lesterol and dietary Health officials: Food label changes not enoughSEE LABEL | C4For over a decade, teams of researchers have worked to create a biological alternative that might help (patients who develop infections), trying such approaches as using stem cells to spur the growth of a new sinoatrial node.

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 21, 2014 Deliveringpremiermedicalcar ew ithcompassionand understandingh asbeenthe goldst andar df oralmost2d ecadesa t PREMIERMEDICALASSOCIATES &U RGENTCARE. r rf n t brrrr brf f r rr r rf rf r r rf fWe ar ep ro viders forthefollowingMedicar eP lans:Medicare ,B lueCross,Freedom,Optimum,P UP ,U nitedHealthCar ea nd manyothers.DISCOUNTSTO PA TIE NT SW ITHO U TI NSURANCE f n t bf t rtr t r r r rr rfr rr fr rr b f r t r br fr rrr rrf b t r rr frrfwww.pma-physicians.comwww.pmaflorida.com t f tf 5C ONVENIEN TL OCA TIONS rf UrgentCareCenter rrf f b UrgentCar eC enter r UrgentCareCente rANDPREMIERURGENTC AR EURGENTCAREOPE N365 DAY S! t NEWPATIENT SPECIAL-CompleteExam(D0150)-DigitalXrays(D0210)-Cleaning(D1110)-OralCancerScreening(D0431)withIdenta3000*Non-InsuredPatientsOnly. Allmajorinsurancesaccepted includingPPO&HMOplans.$59* ber. What do those mean? Are these num bers high or low, good or bad, what do you do with it?MAKE INGREDIENT LISTS CLEARER Shoppers may turn over a package of food and look for sugar on its ingredient list. What that consumer may not know is that sugar could be listed as malt ose, dextrose, sucrose, corn syrup, brown rice syrup, maple syrup, high-fructose corn syr up, honey or a variety of fruit juice concentrates, among other ways. Tiny type, complex names, and confusing formats make many in gredient lists almost impossible to read or understand, Kessler says. He added, If we instead dened all forms of sugar as a single in gredient, sugar might emerge near the top of many products lists.CREATE A DAILY VALUE FOR SUGAR Though public health specialists have over whelmingly praised the FDAs proposed addition of an added sug ars line that would dis tinguish from naturally occurring sugars, Kes sler says the agency needs to include a line suggesting how much sugar people should eat daily. The FDA has said they didnt include a line be cause there is no accept ed recommendation for how much sugar should be consumed on a dai ly basis.PUT LABELS ON THE FRONT, TOO The FDA said in 2009 that it was developing proposed nutritional standards that would have to be met before manufacturers place claims on the fronts of packages. That effort has since stalled as the industry has said it is working on its own standards, a move that has frustrat ed public health advocates. Kessler proposes front-of-package labels that would list the top three ingredients, the calorie count and the number of additional ingredients in bold type. FDA spokeswoman Theresa Eisenman says the agency is still work ing on a front-of-pack label, but is monitoring what industry is doing.GIVE THE LABELS SOME CONTEXTAt a recent public meeting, several experts told the FDA they would endorse a version of the nutrition facts label that would sort nutrients by get enough and avoid too much. The FDA of fered that version as a second option in Feb ruarys proposal. Dr. Frank Hu of the Harvard School of Public Health said sorting nutrients that way is easier for people to un derstand than reading the column that lists the percent of the daily recommended value of a nutrient. Pepin Tuma of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics agreed, saying nobody wants to do math. The food industry protested. Telling shoppers what they should get enough of and what they should avoid goes beyond just the facts, said Donna Garren of the American Frozen Food Institute. LABEL FROM PAGE C3 FDA / APA current food nutrition label, a proposed label and an alternate label are shown.

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Monday, July 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 6 X 11.325 Black Thank you for reading the local newspaper, The Daily Commercial!

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 21, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHER'S NOTICEFederal and State laws prohibit advertising expressing a discriminatory preference on the basis of race, age, sex, color, national origin, religion, handicap or marital status. The Daily Commercial will not knowingly accept advertisement for employment which is in violation of the law. Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance Employment Classifications are intended to announce bona de employment offers only. Employment advertising must disclose the specic nature of the work being offered. Some employment categories may charge fees. If any advertiser does not comply with these standards, please notify a Classied Sales Representative at 365-8245 or 365-8200. SEIZETHE DA Y SSPORTSNEWS.www.dailycommercial.com

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Mu st pr esen t coup on at time of ser vi ce Va lid at participating locations only Certain re striction s may apply Call for details.BEY OND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWO OD | UPHOLSTER Y | AIR DUCT728-1668 394-1739fla# CAC18 16 40 8 CARPET CLEANING3$99Cleaning Completed By 7/31/14 Promo Code: JUL Y AIR DUCT CLEANING$50 OFF(MINIMUM CHARGES APPL Y) FL#CAC1816408Cleaning Completed By 7/31/14 Promo Code: JUL Y TILE & GROUT CLEANING15% OFF(MINIMUM CHARGES APPL Y)Cleaning Completed By 7/31/14 Promo Code: JUL YROOMS & A HALL MCILROY TAKES WIRE-TO-WIRE WIN AT BRITISH OPEN, SPORTS B1 LEESBURG: Education summit will address failing schools A3 BASEBALL: Loney, Archer lead Rays to win over Twins B1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, July 21, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 202 4 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED C8 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS C8 DIVERSIONS C7 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 SCOREBOARD B2 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 WORLD A6 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8. 89 / 75 Afternoon thunderstorms. 50 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com T he Eustis City Commission di rected its staff last week to explore buying a small part of Sharps Mobile Home Park to extend Ferran Park and get access to the lakefront, according to Economic Devel opment Director Tom Carrino. However, Don Oliver, the realtor and listing agent for the property, said Friday afternoon the citys ideas con ict with the owners plan to sell the entire 7 acres. They want to sell it all at one time, not piecemeal, Oliver said. Oliver added it could be sold to two buyers at one time, if a private developer was inter ested in the bulk of it and the city in a small er portion. Carrino said Friday afternoon that the staff will inform commis sioners of this position and ask how they want to proceed. The idea of partnering with anoth er buyer sounds viable, he said, and something they would look at if a developer came to the city to partner with them. The mobile home park is located on Lake Eustis on the south end of Ferran Park, and just before Lakeshore Drive enters downtown Eu stis. In January 2009, the city commission of fered $2,673,107, an av erage of two appraisals, for the mobile home park when the asking price was $7 million, according to a report by city staff. Oliver said he ap proached the city to re start discussions with an asking price of $3.9 million, but the price has since been lowered to $3.3 million. Oliver said with the market improving it seemed like a good time to reopen the dia logue with the city. I woke up this EUSTIS Purchase potential City looks at possibility of buying part of Sharps Mobile Home Park PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Donnie Osborne, left, and his wife Carolyn Osborne, pose for a photo at their home of four years in Sharps Mobile Home Park in Eustis. BELOW: A mobile home sits next to Lake Eustis. LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com Following the release of the Florida Depart ment of Educations an nual report card for all school districts, city of Lees burg ofcials, the Leesburg Area Chamber of Commerce and the Lake Coun ty School District are coming together to sponsor an education summit to address fail ing school grades in the city. Five schools in the district received an F this year, compared with none the previous year. Of those ve schools, three are in Lees burg: Oak Park Middle School, Leesburg Ele mentary School and Humanities and Fine Arts Charter School. It affects not just the schools but our city and economic devel opment, Lees burg Mayor John Chris tian said of the failing grades. Christian said the pur pose of the summit is to bring everyone together LEESBURG Education summit will address citys failing schools LAURAN NEERGAARD and JENNIFER AGIESTA Associated Press WASHINGTON Americans consider in surance and a good bedside manner in choosing a doctor, but will that doctor pro vide high-quality care? A new poll shows that people dont know how to determine that. Being licensed and lik able doesnt necessari ly mean a doctor is up to date on best practic es. But consumers ar ent sure how to uncover much more. Just 22 per cent of those questioned are condent they can nd information to com pare the quality of local doctors, according to the poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. Today, 6 in 10 peo ple say they trust doctor recommendations from friends or family, and nearly half value referrals from their regular physi cian. The poll found far fewer trust quality infor mation from online pa tient reviews, health in surers, ratings web sites, the media, even the gov ernment. I usually go on refer ences from somebody Before doctors check your vitals, check out theirs YURAS KARMANAU and PETER LEONARD Associated Press TOREZ, Ukraine Pro-Mos cow rebels piled nearly 200 bodies from the downed Ma laysian jetliner into four refrig erated boxcars Sunday in east ern Ukraine, and cranes at the crash scene moved big chunks of the Boeing 777, drawing con demnation from Western lead ers that the rebels were tam pering with the site. The United States, meanwhile, presented what it called pow erful evidence that the rebels shot down the plane with a Rus sian surface-to-air missile and training. Although other govern ments have stopped short of ac cusing Russia of actually causing the crash, the U.S. was ahead of most in pointing blame on Mos cow for the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 that killed all 298 people aboard. Russia is supporting these separatists. Russia is arm ing these separatists. Russia is training these separatists, Sec retary of State John Kerry said on CNNs State of the Union. Leaders of Britain, France and Germany spoke to Russian Pres ident Vladimir Putin by phone late Sunday, urging him to use his inuence on the separat ists to ensure the victims could be repatriated and internation al investigators could have full access to collect evidence. They said European foreign ministers Bodies from downed jetliner piled in boxcars in Ukraine VADIM GHIRDA / AP Ukrainian miners carry the body of a victim at the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 near the village of Hrabove, Ukraine. CHRISTIAN SEE SUMMIT | A2 SEE PARK | A2 SEE VITALS | A2 SEE PLANE | A2 The United States, meanwhile, presented what it called powerful evidence that the rebels shot down the plane with a Russian surface-toair missile and training.

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 21, 2014 HOW TO REACH US JULY 20 CASH 3 ............................................... 3-9-3 Afternoon .......................................... 3-4-2 PLAY 4 ............................................. 5-7-0-8 Afternoon ....................................... 9-7-2-9 FLORIDA LOTTERY JULY 19 FANTASY 5 ........................... 9-10-11-24-30 FLORIDA LOTTO ............... 6-12-13-34-41-43 POWERBALL .................... 10-17-25-45-539 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION STEVE SKAGGS publisher 352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com PAUL RYAN digital editor 352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. to help the schools. We are trying to lure industry to our city, he said. We know this is a big undertaking. We are not going in nave, think ing we can get this turned around overnight. We need the long-haul ap proach. If we all work to gether, we can solve these issues. Christian said it was critical for everyone to be united. We want to hold our schools accountable, he said. We are not just go ing to accept an F and say it is OK because of the economics of the city. It comes down to nd ing ways to get students motivated about learn ing while thinking outside the box, Christian said. The summit is sched uled for 7 p.m. on July 29 at the Leesburg Commu nity Building. School Board Member Bill Mathias said he was approached about the summit by Christian and said it was a good idea. This is a community issue, and the silver lining for me is to see the com munity come together, he said. They will solve the problem. The school district cannot do it on its own. Sandi Moore, executive director of the Leesburg Area Chamber of Com merce, agreed. For me it is a time for our community to re claim our schools and get involved, she said. For too long it was the school boards problem. It is our problem as a community. The solution is not remov ing our kids. It is people getting involved and mak ing it better. We care. We want to see success, and I feel like it is important the chamber is involved. For information on the summit, contact Chris tian at 352 504-7437. SUMMIT FROM PAGE A1 morning with the task at hand, which is to nd a ready, willing and able buyer, Oliver said Friday. The park is listed for $3.3 million and well sell it to a buyer, be it the public or private sector. Vice Mayor Albert Eckian pro posed buying only a small part of the mobile home park. He said he would want a 40-footwide strip that could accommo date bicycle and walking paths, a small barrier wall for the path and then some benches and landscap ing by the lakefront. He said this would extend Ferran Park closer to Sunset Island Park and would also benet a future de veloper of the rest of Sharps Mo bile Home Park. He said the future connectivity would provide easy access to the rest of the park and the downtown and its amenities. Donnie Osborne and his wife, Carolyn Osborne, have lived in the park for four years. Carolyn said there have been rumors for years and she was not surprised by the potential sale. Carolyn said if they had to move they would need some compensa tion. Carolyn said she likes the com munitys lake view, its closeness to the main part of town and its prox imity to doctors and pharmacies. It was not immediately clear whether their home, which is sep arated from the lake by a road and another home, would be impacted by a purchase. Before the citys initial offer in early 2009, the city found out that it could approach around $200,000 to compensate residents for the relocation and abandonment of trailers, the staff report states. Mayor Linda Bob, when ques tioned about why staff was asked to explore the smaller purchase, said one of her concerns was that the city cannot afford the property. The only way that we could buy it is to actually borrow and thats not fair, Bob said. When we look at our voter I would hate to say that we are buying it because we borrowed to make that happen. Bob also did not want the city to become a landlord. Commissioner Michael Holland said it is important for Eustis to ex pand its lakefront, as Eustis has al ways been a very vibrant lakefront city. The staff report also identies three potential ways the whole property could be developed. Car rino said the scenarios are based on the downtown plan and would be multi-use. He said the least intense would have residential as well as com mercial space, such as retail and ofces. The mid-range scenario would have residential and pos sibly a hotel, and the high end would have residential, commer cial and a possible hotel. Some parts of the property have soil issues, which can be worked around, that would come into play with denser redevelopment, but would not be as important with low-density development or the park idea, Carrino said, referring to geotechnical exploration doc uments from 2008 and past sum maries drawn up by city staff from those explorations. PARK FROM PAGE A1 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Mobile homes sit lakeside at Sharps Mobile Home Park in Eustis. else, because its hard to track them any other way, said Kenneth Murks, 58, of Lex ington, Ala. I guess you can do some Internet searches now, he added, but questions the ac curacy of online reviews. The United States spends more on health care than most developed nations, yet Americans dont have better health to show for it. A recent government report found we miss out on 30 percent of the care recommended to pre vent or treat common con ditions. At the same time, we undergo lots of unneeded medical testing and outmod ed or inappropriate therapies. Yet people rarely see a problem. In the poll, only 4 percent said they receive poor quality care. About half believe better care is more expensive, even as the government, insur ers and health specialists are pushing for new systems to improve quality while hold ing down costs. Its hard to imagine buying a car without checking rank ings, but checking out a doc tor is much more difcult. Many specialists say stan dardized measures of health outcomes are key, though very little is available. Doctors who listen are im portant, but some of the nic est doctors are the least com petent, cautioned Dr. Elliott Fisher of the Dartmouth In stitute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice. High er-quality care actually tends to be less expensive, by keep ing people healthy and out of the hospital, and avoiding er rors and the complications of unneeded care, he said. Its getting a little easier to compare multi-physician of ces, if not individual doc tors. Online report cards in a few states have begun of fering some information on quality outcomes from group practices. In Minnesota, for example, consumers can compare how many people have diabe tes, high blood pressure and some other chronic condi tions under control in differ ent practices, plus how satis ed patients are. By years end, Medicare plans to have released qual ity measurements for more than 160 large group practic es, with more information on smaller clinics set for 2015. Called Physician Compare, the online star ratings also will include patient feedback. The goal is to spur better care as doctors check out the competition. The arrival of large amounts of quality informa tion is a big deal. Its a huge shift in terms of transparency and driving quality improve ment, Dr. Patrick Conway, Medicares chief medical of cer, told the AP. Consumers think it would help. More than 7 in 10 say quality would improve if doctors had to publicly re port their patients health outcomes and how satised they are. The AP-NORC Center poll found about 1 in 5 Ameri cans recall seeing informa tion comparing the quality of health providers in the last year. Nearly half arent con dent they even could learn if their doctor had been disci plined. In choosing a doctor, not surprisingly the top factor is insurance coverage, the poll found. For the uninsured, its cost. Eight in 10 look for the doc tors experience with a specif ic procedure. A nearly equal number say bedside manner is crucial. About three-quar ters say a helpful ofce staff and how long it takes to get an appointment are import ant. A majority, 62 percent, also factor how long they sat in the waiting room. Asked the characteristics of a high-quality doctor, a good listener is by far the top an swer. Others value the right diagnosis, a caring attitude, a good bedside manner and knowledge, in that order. Dartmouths Fisher said consumers should ask how the ofce the doctors team supports safe and effective care: Are patient outcomes tracked? Do they check on patients with chronic diseas es between visits? Does the person taking after-hours calls know what medications you take? We tend to think, Oh our friend had a great experi ence with this doctor. But Id encourage people to think about the systems around that as well, he said. The AP-NORC Center sur vey was conducted with funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, which has nanced projects to publicly report data on care quality. It was conducted by tele phone May 27 to June 18 among a random national sample of 1,002 adults. VITALS FROM PAGE A1 will be meeting in Brussels Tuesday to consider fur ther sanctions on Russia. More than three days after the jetliner crashed, international investiga tors still had only limit ed access to the sprawling elds where the plane fell. British Prime Minis ter David Cameron, in a blistering opinion piece for the Sunday Times said the growing weight of evidence suggests the rebels shot down the plane, and if that is so, this is a direct result of Russia destabilizing a sovereign state, violat ing its territorial integrity, backing thuggish militias and training and arming them. The crash site, spread out on farmland and vil lages, looked dramatical ly different Sunday, a day after armed rebels had stood guard while doz ens of bodies lay in the summer heat. The rebels were gone, and 192 bod ies were loaded into the refrigerated train cars in the rebel-held town of To rez, 9 miles away. The Ukrainian govern ment said in a statement on its website that a sec ond train with four refrig erator cars had arrived at Torez station. Emergency workers, who the rebels have al lowed to operate under their control, were search ing the sprawling elds. Cranes moved pieces of the plane around, ap parently to look for more bodies underneath. By Sunday night, Ukraines emergency ser vices agency said the total number of bodies found was 251, with dozens of body parts. PLANE FROM PAGE A1 VADIM GHIRDA / AP A man walks amongst charred debris at the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 near the village of Hrabove, Ukraine, on Sunday.

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Monday, July 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT MOUNT DORA Fire department offers free smoke alarms to residents The Mount Dora Fire Department is offering free smoke alarms to Mount Dora residents age 55 and older, made possible through a grant from the Florida State Fire Marshal through Sept. 15. Residents living in the city lim its can sign up to receive a smoke alarm and have it installed for free at www.cityofmountdora.com or by calling the re department at 352735-7140, ext. 2101. LEESBURG Free Medicaid assistance available at the public library Free help applying for Medicaid, food stamps or temporary cash as sistance, and information about Medicare, Medigap or long-term care options are available from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Leesburg Public Library, 100 E. Main St., every Tuesday. Trained Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders volunteers are also on hand from 10 a.m. to noon every rst and third Tuesday of the month to provide Medicare and health in surance information and counseling for those over age 65. All services are free and available to the public. For information, call 352-728-9790. CLERMONT Public welcome at open forum about Lake schools Innovation Exchange, an open forum for the public hosted by Dr. Susan Moxley, superintendent of schools, will be from 8 to 10 a.m. on July 29 at the Community Center, lo cated at 620 W. Montrose St. Business leaders, community members and parents are welcome to participate in the forum to ex change ideas, insights and challeng es as Moxley shares school updates. Guests are encouraged to go to www.lake.k12..us/innovation to suggest a topic for the forum. For information, call 352-253-6515 or email pattonc@lake.k12..us. TAVARES Tavares Splash Park closed for repair July 28-29 The Splash Park at Wooton Park, 100 E. Ruby St., will be closed on July 28-29 for maintenance and repairs. Regular hours at the park, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., will resume July 30. For information, call 352-742-6267. LADY LAKE American Legion Post 347 to host Bloodstock 2014 Donors are invited to save lives at the Bloodstock 2014 blood donation event by giving blood. Donors will receive a Bloodstock 2014 T-shirt and free admission to a music fes tival featuring local artists and re freshments from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Saturday at American Legion Post 347, 699 W. Lady Lake Blvd. Donors should be at least age 16, weigh at least 110 pounds and be in good health. Appointments can be made by calling 888-936-6283 or at www.oneblood.org/bloodstock. Walk-ins are welcome. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Clermont city ofcials are hoping for south Lake native Dolores Gano Walk er, the citys honorary his torian, to be voted into the Lake County Womens Hall of Fame this year. At a recent city meeting, Councilman Ray Good game suggested the move and mentioned the up coming deadline for nom inations. Goodgame got the ball rolling with a letter he wrote supporting Walkers nomination. Since then, city spokesperson Do ris Bloodsworth has been working to put the appli cation together, a process that includes submitting as much information, doc umentation, newspaper clippings and pictures as possible about Walker il lustrating why she should be chosen. I have known Dolores Walker since 2004 when I joined the South Lake County Historical Society. It was abundantly clear to me that if I wanted to know anything about the history of south Lake County, all I had to do was ask Dolores Walker, Goodgame said, mentioning that although CLERMONT Officials seek recognition for city historian PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: From left to right, Pastor Jose Gonzales, kindergarten teacher Manuela Motyl and Principal Heather Gelb work on the Sawgrass Bay Elementary School Buttery Garden on Saturday. BELOW: The garden features a ribbon-shaped walkway, along with a new fountain. V olunteers nished re building the Sawgrass Bay Elementary School Buttery Garden on Satur day, holding the ofcial re dedication ceremony at 1 p.m. The garden was rededicat ed to former Sawgrass Bay teacher Jennifer Wade and all that have been touched by cancer. Wade taught second grade, and died of lymphoma shortly after the initial dedication. By 2014 the garden was in need of considerable work. Pastor Jose Gonzales of Love & Living Hope Church stepped in, as did Lowes (through their Lowes Hero Project program) and staff ers from Sawgrass Bay. Sawgrass Bay completes memorial butterfly garden THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com An Urban Cooperation Agree ment between Lake County and Leesburg was approved last week by city leaders. The two governments will work together toward Com munity Development Block Grant funding for projects in the com munitys lowto moderate-income area, and Leesburg Commission er Bill Polk already has a project he would love to see come to fruition. What about Kids Korner? Polk quickly asked Leesburg City Man ager Al Minner, referring to the ag ing childrens playground at Vene tian Gardens. Minner said the playground may meet the criteria for CDBG funds. Built 20 years ago, Kids Korner STEVE FUSSELL Special to the Daily Commercial An iconic seed and feed store owned by longtime resident Dan Kerr could close in September if Kerr fails to reach agreement with the Umatilla City Council over the way he sells hay. More than 50 of Kerrs customers showed up at a city council meeting last week to praise Dans Discount Feed and Fence store, and lambast council members for what one area resident called the councils effort to tart up downtown. As voices rose and tempers frayed, one protesting resident was escort ed from the meeting without inci dent. The issue is three to ve semi-trail ers at Dans that hold hay for sale. Buyers back up to the trailers, load their purchases and drive off. Kerr says more than 3,000 horse and cat tle owners from ve counties are regular customers. Wholesalers wheel fully stocked trailers in to replace the empties, and Kerr claims his trailer sales op eration reduces costs to unload, stock and inventory merchandise in a barn facility with adequate re and pest control measures. Kerr, a Umatilla High School foot ball star in the 1970s, reconditioned an abandoned packing plant in 1993 to open the feed store. The city has grown up around him. What was once a rundown corner where Uma tilla Boulevard meets U.S. Highway 19 the citys main thoroughfare is now the heart of the city, and a focal point for the citys emerging downtown redevelopment district. The city is trying to assert a new identity thats more similar to quaint Mount Dora than rustic Al toona. And Dans Feed, trailers and all, is right in the middle of it. Theres been trailers there since the 1940s, Kerr said. Ive had trail ers there since 1998. There never was a problem until ve years ago, he explained. In 2009, city ofcials cited Kerr for code violations. Kerr said the city threatened nes of $250 per day unless he did something about the trailers. Kerr promised to install fencing, skirting and other improve ments, and to build a barn-type building within ve years. UMATILLA Feed store gets 30-day reprieve LEESBURG City, Lake County to partner for CDBG-funded projects ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com The same committee that worked with Wile smith Advertising and De sign to develop the city of Clermonts newly instated logo and tagline is consid ering two rms to head the citys master planning pro cess. City ofcials said this is the next step in a three-tier process to take Clermont forward, a process that started with a group of vi sioning sessions City Man ager Darren Gray headed last summer to hear from residents, ofcials and business owners about the citys evolution over the next 20 years. Participants were asked what they did and did not want to see in the branding process, which resulted in updating the citys mot to and tagline from Gem of the Hills, to Choice of Champions, a phrase more in line with the citys commitment to health, wellness and tness. In the master planning process, plans that will map out the citys vision for the foreseeable future will be developed by the selected company based on input from the vision ing sessions as well as nat ural city progression. The committee is made up of department heads chosen by Gray: Economic Development Director Jim Hitt, Police Chief Charles Broadway, city spokesper son Doris Bloodsworth, Development Services Di rector Barbara Hollerand and Environmental Ser vices Director James Kins ler. The committee already has met with the Cribb Philbeck Weaver Group of Brandon, a design rm es tablished in 2005, and GAI Consultants of Orlando, a design rm established in 1990. Clermont still choosing firm to conduct master planning SEE REPRIEVE | A4 SEE HISTORIAN | A4 SEE PROJECTS | A6

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 21, 2014 DENTURE REP AIR/RELINE ONE HOUR WEDNESDA YS ONL YSUNRISE DENT AL1380 N. Blvd., We st Leesburg, Florida352-326-3368 r f r f n r r rt n t r b b f f f f f n n f f t f f f t t f b D003571 OBITUARIES Jerry Lee Dunn Jerry Lee Dunn, age 74, of Tavares passed away on Friday, July 18, 2014. He was born De cember 27, 1939 in De catur, IL and moved to Tavares in 1984 from Las Vegas, NV. He was a retired switchman with Norfolk and West ern Railroad and was a realtor. He was also a veteran of the U.S. Navy. He loved spend ing time with his fami ly and was an avid golf er. He is survived by his wife, Mary E. Dunn of Tavares, FL; sons, Ja mie Dunn of Tavares, FL and Sean Dunn of Lees burg, FL; brothers, Jack Dunn of Decatur, IL and Dick Dunn of Sheri dan, WY; sisters, Sandra Sanderson of Sheridan, WY and Susan Tudor of St. Louis, MO; 5 grand children, Kelsi, Kaitlyn, Jaylin, Lily, and Saige. The family will receive friends on Tuesday, July 22, 2014 from 2:00PM until 4:00PM at Stever son Hamlin & Hilbish Funeral Home, Tavares. A Memorial Service will follow at 4:00PM in the funeral home chapel. In lieu of owers, memori al contributions may be made to Cornerstone Hospice, 2445 Lane Park Rd., Tavares, FL 32778. Arrangements have been entrust ed to Steverson, Ham lin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, 226 E. Burleigh Blvd., Tava res, FL 32778, (352)3434444. Online condo lences may be left at www.steversonhamlin hilbish.com. IN MEMORY THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com Residents interested in a new career eld or a jumpstart on their col lege education close to home are encouraged to apply at Lake-Sumter State College within the next three weeks. Aug. 11 is the dead line to submit an appli cation for admission for the fall semester. Class es begin the week of Aug. 25, and the semes ter ends in mid-Decem ber. Sasheika Tomlinson, director of marketing and college relations at LSSC, said in a press re lease that LSSC offers associate of science de grees in the following programs: Nursing Business adminis tration Computer infor mation technology Criminal justice technology Early childhood education Emergency medi cal services Environmental sci ence technology Fire science tech nology Health informa tion technology Ofce adminis tration Electrical distri bution technology LSSC launched its rst bachelors degree program in 2013 in the eld of organiza tional management. LSSC also offers 11 technical certicates in business, early childhood education, health information technology, digital fo rensics and electrical distribution. Tomlinson also not ed LSSC students who graduate with associ ate of arts degrees are guaranteed admis sion to the Universi ty of Central Florida through Direct Con nect. Those interested in taking classes at LSSC may apply at www. lssc.edu or by visiting one of the colleges three campuses locat ed in Leesburg, Cler mont or Sumterville. LSSC accepting fall applicants LEESBURG his good friend (now deceased) Oak ley Seaver was known as Mr. Cler mont and knew everything about Cl ermont, Walker knows everything about the entire south Lake area. I spent many hours of my spare time at Clermont Historic Village, learning about the early families that settled Clermont. Dolores knew every family and something about them. My gosh, she was a walking museum, he wrote. Bloodsworth has gathered much of the necessary information and has put together a biography not only about what Walker has contribut ed to the county, but what her fam ily has meant to the area since 1878, when her ancestors rst arrived here. Archibald Gano, her paternal grandfather, brought the family to south Lake and ran a sawmill in what was once known as Villa City, and George Myers, her maternal grand father, was Mascottes rst mayor. In all, with Walkers children, grand children and great-grandchildren, six generations of her family have lived in south Lake County. Dolores was born on Tuscanooga Road near Mascotte in 1926, gradu ated from Groveland High School in 1943 and is married to Robert Walk er, a man she she met in Jacksonville while in secretarial school there. Dolores moved with her husband while he was in the service and both returned to Clermont in 1946. Dolores was the rst bookkeeper for what is now South Lake Hospital and has been living in Clermont for many years. She has been involved with First United Methodist Church and served as the secretary for Cler monts centennial committee. Walker also had a hand in the devel opment of the Groveland, south Lake and Lake County historical societies, and was part of the group that com mitted to preserving and develop ing Clermonts Historic Village, where on Sundays she donates her time as a tour guide for the museums. We think shes very deserving. Shes done many, many things and shes not the type to seek any credit for them, Bloodsworth said. To ease the application process, Bloodsworth is calling for help from the community to gather more infor mation about Walker to submit with the application. If people want to email antec dotes, send in newspaper clippings or if they want to send letters of sup port, they are welcome to, Blood sworth said. Bloodsworth can be reached by calling 352-241-7345 or by email at dbloodsworth@clermont.org. To nominate someone for the Lake County Womens Hall of Fame, down load an application at www.lake county.gov. According to the application and county website, nominees must have made signicant contributions to the improvement of life for all citizens of Lake County in the eld of art, agri culture, government, health care, hu manities, philanthropy or science/ education, and must have been born in or adopted Lake County as home. Nominees may be living or dead. Applications are due by Aug. 15. For information, call 352-343-9850 or email wtaylor@lakecounty.gov. HISTORIAN FROM PAGE A3 We even offered to pay for half of the build ing, Council Member Peter Tarby added. I had no choice back then, Kerr explained. Im just trying to stay in business. Despite Kerrs cos metic improvements, some city residents still complain that the trail ers are an eyesore that diminish the citys new countenance. Am I the only one or do you all get calls from people? Council mem ber David Adams asked the board. They say weve xed up downtown, weve spent all this money. I got hit twice at church, and I dont go to church to talk politics, Adams said. Kerr waved a list of sig natures from more than 100 customers who sup port him, but he found little sympathy from council members. You do outstanding stuff for this city and I appreciate it, Council Vice President Donnie Kent Jr. told Kerr. But youve had ve years to x this. We want to set tle this, but Im lost. The x wont be easy. Everyone admits the trailers violate the citys zoning code. Greg Beliveau, who heads LPG Urban and Regional Planners in Mount Dora and serves as the citys planner, said he might be able to nd a solution. I just learned about this a few hours ago, so maybe theres a solu tion in the code but I dont see it now, he said. Council members agreed to postpone any action until September. In the meantime, Kerr is weighing his options. Umatilla is my city and I want to stay here, Kerr said. If theres a way, Ill do it. But I dont know. REPRIEVE FROM PAGE A3

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 21, 2014 rf n t b nnnYo ur Po diatr is t tr eats... CENTRALFLORI DAFOO TCARE, P. A.Dr Nic k Przysta wski, DPM www .Floridafoot.comD004208 CR OW NS$399Eac h(3 or mor e per visit) D2751/ Re g $59 9 ea. Po rcel ain on non Pr ecious me ta l DENTURES$74 9Eac hD0 51 10 or D0 51 20DENT AL SA VIN GSTh e patie nt an d any oth er per son re spons ible for paym ent has the right to re fuse to pay cancel payme nt or be re imburs ed for paym ent for any other ser vices, ex aminat ion whic h is per for med as a re sult of and with in 72 hours of re spon ding to the ad ve rt is em en t fo r th e discounted fee or re duced fee ser vice or tr eatment. Fees may va ry due to comple xity of case This disc ount do es no t appl y to th ose patie nt s wi th den tal pla ns. Fee s ar e mi ni mal. PR IC ES ARE SU BJ ECT TO CHA NGE. LEESBUR GM T. DORASu nr is e De nt al Tr i-D ent al r ff nt bb f Consul tat ion and Seco nd Op in ion No Ch ar ge!n t t NEW PA TIENT SPEC IAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RA YS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EX AMINA TION BY DO CTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABS ENCE OF GUM DISEA SE ) D00 2409 was a community fund raising project that in volved hundreds of res idents who volunteered their time to construct the wooden castle in the middle of Rogers Park, lled with slides, bridge and tunnels. The structure has weathered over the years and is now in need of many repairs. Some of the playgrounds orig inal parts have warped or cracked. Since 2012, many lo cal residents, includ ing Carolyn Van Dyken, have been spearhead ing fundraising efforts for a new Kids Korner playground made with better, longer-lasting materials, while Robert Sargent, spokesman for Leesburg, envisioned the new Kids Korner built with playground amenities to make the park more accessible to children with physical limitations. Minner said the city partnering with the county on CDBG funds is one way it can collect its entitlement money along with the county. They will increase our funding with their funding so that we can have some projects of magnitude in our lowto moderate-income ar eas, Minner said. Cheryl Howell, hous ing services manag er for Lake County, told the commission that she oversees housing and community devel opment for the entire county. We partnered with the city on the Berry Park project, and we are currently working with Umatilla right now to do a small sewer project to replace septic tanks in a small area, so we do a lot of different types of projects, and we just did a community cen ter in Yalaha. We have already committed our willingness to the city of Leesburg on partner ships, and we would like to continue to do that. Minner said CDBG funding could help fund a project of the year, such as a housing, road, sewer or park project. Minner believes the Urban Cooperation Agreement partnership is a way of using entitle ment money wisely. Mix a little bit of the county money with our money and we still have an impact project, the city manager said. According to the countys website, the CDBG program is ad ministered at the fed eral level by the U.S. Department of Hous ing and Urban Devel opment, which makes funds available to lo cal governments. Lake County became an en titlement community in 1999 and started receiv ing funds in 2000. The Housing and Community Develop ment Division of the Department of Com munity Services admin isters the Lake County CDBG program. The di vision is responsible for ensuring the funds are used to improve the liv ing environment, qual ity of life and housing opportunities for lowand moderate-income citizens. Tavares, Montverde, Astatula, Minneola, Howey-in-the-Hills and Lady Lake also receive a share of the entitlement dollars from their Ur ban County Partnership Agreements with Lake County, the county said on its website. Since Lake County became a CDBG entitle ment community, the county and its partners are using CDBG funds for roadway paving and paying paving assess ments, for housing re habilitation, to provide prescription assistance, to improve communi ty centers, sidewalks and parks and to con struct ADA-accessible restrooms and entranc es in public buildings. The county also noted on its website that the projects are intended to help lowand mod erate-income neigh borhoods improve their quality of life and are community-driven. Each year, interested community groups may apply for grants to con struct or improve neigh borhood facilities. At the same time, the county helps the successful and not-so-successful appli cants to build capacity, to access other resourc es to meet their particu lar needs and serves as a liaison with other coun ty agencies. By itself, Leesburg is eligible for approx imately $150,000 an nually in CDBG en titlement funds. In a partnership with Lake County, additional funds can be added to this amount and larger annual projects can be considered and accom plished. Leesburg will have a three-year commitment to accept the fund. Af ter that, the city can re sume applying for larg er grants. PROJECTS FROM PAGE A3 SAMEER N. YACOUB and SINAN SALAHEDDIN Associated Press BAGHDAD Iraqs prime minister on Sun day condemned the Is lamic State extremist groups actions target ing Christians in terri tory it controls, saying they reveal the threat the jihadists pose to the minority communi tys centuries-old heri tage. The comments from Nouri al-Maliki come a day after the expira tion of a deadline im posed by the Islamic State group calling on Christians in the mili tant-held city of Mosul to convert to Islam, pay a tax or face death. Most Christians opted to ee to the nearby self-rule Kurdish region or oth er areas protected by Kurdish security forces. What is being done by the Daesh terrorist gang against our Chris tian citizens in Nine vah province, and their aggression against the churches and houses of worship in the areas un der their control reveals beyond any doubt the extremist criminal and terrorist nature of this group, al-Maliki said in a statement released by his ofce, using the Ar abic acronym for the Is lamic State group. Those people, through their crimes, are revealing their true identity and the false al legations made here and there about the exis tence of revolutionaries among their ranks. At the Vatican, Pope Francis expressed his concern Sunday for Mo suls Christians, offering prayers for Iraqi Chris tians who are persecut ed, chased away, forced to leave their hous es without out the pos sibility of taking any thing with them. Residents in Mo sul also say the Islam ic State groups ght ers recently have begun to occupy churches and seize the homes of Christians who have ed the city. These actions stem from the harsh interpre tation of Islamic law the group seeks to impose on the territory it con trols in Iraq and neigh boring Syria. Already in Mosul, the extrem ist group has banned al cohol and water pipes, and painted over street advertisements show ing womens faces. It has, however, held off on stricter punishments so far. Iraqs Christian com munities date back to the rst centuries of the religion. Before the 2003 U.S-led invasion, around 1 million Chris tians called Iraq home. But since then, the community has been a frequent target for militants, and attacks prompted many Chris tians to leave the coun try. Church ofcials now estimate the communi ty at around 450,000. U.N. Secretary-Gen Iraqi PM condemns jihadis for targeting Christians AP PHOTO Displaced Christians who ed the violence in Mosul, pray at Mar Aframa church in the town of Qaraqoush on the outskirts of Mosul. eral Ban Ki-moon strongly condemned the systematic per secution of minori ty populations in Iraq by Islamic State and associated armed groups, in particu lar the recent threats against Christians in Mosul, according to a statement released Sunday. Ban also expressed concern about ab ductions and killings of minority Yazidis, Turkmens and Sha baks, and reiterated that targeting a pop ulation because of its ethnic background or faith could constitute a crime against hu manity. He also said the U.N. would inten sify its efforts to ad dress the urgent hu manitarian needs of the displaced.

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Monday, July 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 I ve lived my life with enthu siasm, courage, raucousness and passion. Why on earth would I want to grow old grace fully? Why would I want to be Whis tlers Mother when my whole life what Ive wanted to be is Mae West? Lets face it: Its about as likely that Ill become calm, serene and dignied as I age as it was that Id be prim, proper and sweet in my youth. Those were always lovely fan tasies for somebody else. But like charming dresses that would never atter me, I dont t into these patterns. They werent designed with me in mind. No matter how I try to tailor them or hold my breath long enough to slip them on, I know theyd be conning, inappropriate and impossible to carry off. But growing old gracefully is one of those phrases weve heard so often weve internalized the concept without examining it. Ive decided that as I age, rath er than becoming contemplative and introspective, to become more disruptive, seditious and boisterous instead. Not only am I not going gentle into that good night, I am not go ing gracefully into that late after noon. I intend to go as gentle as a mastodon stuck in a tar pit. I want to be one of those wom en who brandish a cane. I come from a family of people with bad knees, so that particular accesso ry is probably in my future. But I dont plan to carry, rely upon, or make occasional use of a cane, but to brandish it. The two things a person can brandish are canes and swords, and Im un likely to model myself after either Xena, the Warrior Princess, or Joan of Arc at this stage (although anything is possible). Cane it is. I might also start carrying a ask. It might contain gin; it might contain Ensure. What it contains is beside the point: What matters is that I will be able to whip out a ask. I might also begin to dis pense some of my possessions to the young under my care. This will happen in those instanc es where I can now afford to purchase higher quality goods. Please take this handmade quilt. Grandmas gonna get some sheets from Frettes. After 50, you can begin to dis tinguish what actually makes you happy from what youve al ways done to please others. Be ing able to dene that differ ence is an accomplishment. Its one of those areas of expertise that takes at least 10,000 hours to learn. After a certain age, you nally become the indisputable author ity on the subject of yourself. Its absurd to think that youre then supposed to spend all your time sitting quietly while people tell you dull stories about their kids (whom you dont know), their dogs (who have a limited range of talents, although often cuter and less self-involved than their kids) or their gallbladder surgery (more engaging than ei ther offspring or pets). Is it simply a lack of imagina tion that makes us view old age as a time of life when people are mostly worried about what will get stuck in their trachea? Or is it because were still bound by weirdly constructed and entire ly arbitrary denitions telling us how people are supposed to act at a certain age? When I was a girl, I was told I wasnt supposed to be energet ic, ambitious or competitive. I was told I wasnt supposed to be erce, seditious or demanding. I didnt listen then; why would I lis ten now, when Im being told es sentially the same thing a ver sion of Sit down and be quiet? Its easy to say that what I real ly want for my 80th birthday is to be surrounded by loved ones and to have my health, but what I truly believe Ill want on my 80th birthday is a leased Ferrari and a month at the Waldorf. Im 57, so if Im lucky, I have a little time to make plans. But on his deathbed, my father preferred Prosecco sipped from a straw to chicken soup; he was a good role model. Like him, Id rather be a legend than leave a legacy. Rather than grow old graceful ly, I want to grow old gaudily. Gina Barreca is an English professor at the University of Connecticut, a feminist schol ar who has written eight books, and a col umnist for the Hartford Courant. She can be reached through her www.ginabarreca.com. OTHER VOICES Gina Barreca MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE I wont take growing old sitting down I n Fortaleza, Brazil, on Tuesday, the other shoe dropped in terms of the effect of U.S. decline on the international economic or der as the BRICS nations Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa created The New Development Bank to rival the World Bank and International Monetary Fund, dominated by the United States and Western Europe for the past 70 years. The new institution, whose ve countries in clude about half the worlds population, will start with $50 billion in capital and a $100 bil lion reserve fund, designed to buffer member nations against turbulence in the world market. China, the largest economy, will have the head quarters in Shanghai. India will name the rst president. Brazil will choose the rst chairman of the board of directors. Russia will select the head of the central bank governors council, and South Africa will host the rst regional ofce. By contrast, the United States always names the president of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, or World Bank, and the Western Europeans choose the president of the International Monetary Fund. American governments have put as head of the World Bank people like former Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara, key architect of the Vietnam War, and former Deputy Secretary of Defense Paul D. Wolfowitz, a designer of the Iraq War who was forced to resign from the bank in a personnel scandal. The BRlCS countries decided to unhitch themselves from the World Bank and the IMF for a number of reasons. Their primary reason was resentment of their own underrepresen tation in these two institutions, even as they grew in importance on the world stage. Their average growth rate in 2013 was 3.7 percent; the average growth rate of the United States and the European Union was 1 percent. The second reason was probably nervous ness on their part at the weakening econom ic and political state of the United States. Re lations among the executive, legislative and judicial sectors of the American government are currently such that paralysis prevails not the sort of government that any rational person wants to see if America is to contin ue to play an economic leadership role in the world, including in the World Bank and IMF. For the United States, the creation of the new BRICS bank means a clear diminution of its global inuence. For the rest of the world, particularly the important BRICS countries, it probably makes good sense. For Americans it should also constitute a wake-up call: rats leaving a listing, if not sinking, ship. Distributed by MCT Information Services. A VOICE BRICS nations to start an alternative World Bank Classic DOONESBURY 1975 After a certain age, you finally become the indisputable authority on the subject of yourself. Its absurd to think that youre then supposed to spend all your time sitting quietly while people tell you dull stories about their kids (whom you dont know), their dogs (who have a limited range of talents, although often cuter and less self-involved than their kids) or their gallbladder surgery (more engaging than either offspring or pets). Is it simply a lack of imagination that makes us view old age as a time of life when people are mostly worried about what will get stuck in their trachea? Or is it because were still bound by weirdly constructed and entirely arbitrary definitions telling us how people are supposed to act at a certain age?

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 21, 2014 2014 HearUSA, Al l Ri gh ts Re ser ve d. rf Fi na nc ing as lo w as $ 33 / mo .* *S ame as ca s h and 0 % AP R O. A.C (on ap pr ov al of c re dit). Mi ni mum mon thl y pa ym en t s re qui re d on all same as ca s h an d 0% co nt ra ct s. *$7 50 o each he ar in g aid Va lid on Sieme ns 5mi and 7mi aid s on ly No t va lid wi th an y ot her o er or dis co un t. O er ex pir e s 7/31 /14 $ 15 00 Tr ade in y our old hea rin g a ids a nd re ce iv e o yo ur ne xt purc ha s e. *with Hea ring Sc re ening* *M ust ha ve hea ri ng loss FREE Ga s C ar d nt tb tr t r b t r r tr t fr tr tb rf t ALIFETIMEOFBETTERHEARING!FIRSTCLASSCAREWORLDCLASSTECHNOLOGY rfn t t r rf Ca ll T ol l Fr ee t od ay for a FREE Hea rin g C h ec k-u p! rf r t t tt rtr tt r t t r t b r fb t t tr t br rf t rwww .hear usa.c om7512 Dr Phillips Blv d. Suit e 90, Or landoCa ll To ll Fr ee: 855.80 2.553 1

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 21, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com LPGA: Lydia Ko wins Marathon Classic / B4 PETER MORRISON / AP Rory McIlroy of Northern Ireland kisses the Claret Jug trophy after winning the British Open championship on Sunday at the Royal Liverpool golf club, Hoylake, England. Associated Press MINNEAPOLIS James Lo ney had two hits and two RBIs and Chris Archer won consecu tive decisions for the rst time this season as the Tampa Bay Rays won their fth straight with a 5-3 victory against the Minne sota Twins on Sunday. Archer (6-5) pitched 6 1-3 in nings, giving up one earned run on six hits while walking two and striking out four. Rookie Kirby Yates got two outs in the ninth for his rst career save. The Rays, who went on an 11-4 tear going into the All-Star break, matched their longest winning streak of the season against the punchless Twins, who scored six Wire-to-wire win Rory McIlroy wraps up third major title with victory in British Open DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer HOYLAKE, En gland Rory McIl roy had to work a little harder, sweat a little more. No matter. Just like his other two majors, this British Open was never really in doubt. Staked to a sixshot lead going into the nal round, McIlroy turned back brief challeng es with key bird ies around the turn and a majestic drive at just the right mo ment to close with a 1-under 71 and complete a wire-towire victory at Roy al Liverpool. In another major lacking drama over the nal hour, what brought the Brit ish Open to life was the potential of its champion. McIlroy won the U.S. Open by eight shots. He won the PGA Champion ship by eight shots. And with his two-shot victory over Sergio Garcia and Rickie Fowl er, the 25-year-old from Northern Ire land joined some elite company be yond the names on that silver clar et jug. Jack Nick laus (23) and Tiger Woods (24) are the only other players since 1934 to win three majors before age 25. Boy Wonder is back. Or maybe hes just getting started again. Ive really found my passion again for golf, McIl roy said. Not that it ever dwindled, but its what I think about when I get up in the morning. Its LEADERBOARD Rory McIlroy 271 -17 Sergio Garcia 273 -15 Rickie Fowler 273 -15 Jim Furyk 275 -13 Marc Leishman 276 -12 Adam Scott 276 -12 Edoardo Molinari 277 -11 Charl Schwartzel 277 -11 Victor Dubuisson 278 -10 Shane Lowry 278 -10 Graeme McDowell 278 -10 Dustin Johnson 279 -9 Robert Karlsson 279 -9 Ryan Moore 279 -9 Stephen Gallacher 280 -8 David Howell 280 -8 Francesco Molinari 280 -8 George Coetzee 281 -7 SCOTT HEPPELL / AP Sergio Garcia of Spain, who trailed McIlroy by two shots at time, fails to hit out of a bunker on the 15th hole. Miami Dolphins quarterback Ryan Tannehill (17) passes against the Buffalo Bills on Dec. 22 in Orchard Park, N.Y. If Tannehill is to keep his job, he needs to improve on his 15-17 record. AP FILE PHOTO Dolphins focus centered on OL, quarterback STEVEN WINE Associated Press If we give up 72 sacks, everybody should be red the whole offensive line, guard Richie Incogni to said. The pace slackened, but the Dolphins still allowed a franchise-re cord 58 sacks, then sacked their offensive line. They begin train ing camp with new starters at all ve posi tions. The lone holdover from last year, center Mike Pouncey, is re covering from hip sur gery and will likely miss at least the rst cou ple of games. Incogni to and tackle Jonathan Martin, both involved in the bullying scandal that soured last season, departed along with Tyson Clabo, John Jer ry and Bryant McKin nie, who combined for 41 starts in 2013. Sorting out replace ments will be coach Joe Philbins top priori ty when training camp begins Friday. Here are some things to watch as the Dolphins begin six weeks of drills: WHOS GOING TO BLOCK The Dolphins thought they had acquired a long-term left tackle when they took Martin in the second round of When youre out here running these plays for the first time, it may not be pretty. Were all figuring things out. Ryan Tannehill, Miami Dolphins quarterback SEE NFL | B2 CHRISTOPHE ENA / AP The pack rides in a downpour during the 15th stage of the Tour de France in Nimes, France. JAMEY KEATEN Associated Press NIMES, France Alexan der Kristoff of Norway cap tured his second stage win of this years Tour de France by leading home a pack that overtook two breakaway rid ers with only about 50 meters to go in a dramatic nish to Stage 15 on Sunday. Vincenzo Nibali of Ita ly, having made sure that his main rivals couldnt claw back any time, nished smoothly in the trailing pack to keep the overall leaders yellow jersey. After two days in the Alps, Sundays stage offered some relief over a at 138 miles from Tallard, southeast Frances parachuting capi tal, toward the city of Nimes known for its Roman are na and bullghting. Kristoff, a Katusha rider who also won Stage 12, lift ed a st after leading the sprinters who surged ahead of the two breakaways Swiss champion Martin El miger and Jack Bauer of New Kristoff wins Tours flat Stage 15 SEE TOUR | B2 Nibali, the leader of Kazakh team Astana, is looking likely to take home the yellow jersey when the three-week race finishes next Sunday in Paris. SEE GOLF | B2 CHUCK BURTON / AP Florida States Jameis Winston answers a question during a news conference on Sunday in Greensboro, N.C. JOEDY MCCREARY Associated Press GREENSBORO, N.C. Its been a while since the Atlantic Coast Conference entered a sea son with this much buzz. The realigned league has the defending national champion, a Heisman Trophy winner and a national coach of the year. The ACC stumbled through ACC riding wave from FSUs title, Jameis Winston SEE ACC | B2 Loney, Archer lead Rays to win over Twins SEE RAYS | B2

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Monday, July 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Baltimore 53 44 .546 6-4 L-1 26-23 27-21 New York 50 47 .515 3 1 6-4 W-3 21-23 29-24 Toronto 51 48 .515 3 1 4-6 W-2 27-22 24-26 Tampa Bay 47 53 .470 7 6 7-3 W-5 22-28 25-25 Boston 46 52 .469 7 6 7-3 W-4 26-26 20-26 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 54 41 .568 6-4 W-1 26-25 28-16 Cleveland 50 48 .510 5 2 7-3 L-1 29-19 21-29 Kansas City 48 49 .495 7 3 3-7 L-3 22-25 26-24 Chicago 47 52 .475 9 5 5-5 L-1 26-22 21-30 Minnesota 44 53 .454 11 7 5-5 L-3 21-25 23-28 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 61 37 .622 6-4 W-1 32-16 29-21 Los Angeles 59 38 .608 1 8-2 W-1 34-16 25-22 Seattle 52 46 .531 9 4-6 L-1 24-26 28-20 Houston 41 58 .414 20 11 5-5 W-1 21-28 20-30 Texas 39 59 .398 22 13 1-9 L-2 18-30 21-29 NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Washington 53 43 .552 6-4 W-2 30-20 23-23 Atlanta 54 44 .551 5-5 W-1 27-20 27-24 New York 46 52 .469 8 7 7-3 L-2 25-23 21-29 Miami 45 52 .464 8 8 3-7 W-1 28-24 17-28 Philadelphia 43 55 .439 11 10 6-4 L-1 19-29 24-26 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY St. Louis 54 44 .551 7-3 W-2 29-20 25-24 Milwaukee 54 45 .545 2-8 L-2 25-24 29-21 Pittsburgh 52 46 .531 2 1 5-5 W-3 32-20 20-26 Cincinnati 51 47 .520 3 2 5-5 L-3 27-21 24-26 Chicago 40 57 .412 13 13 2-8 L-5 20-22 20-35 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY San Francisco 54 44 .551 5-5 L-1 28-25 26-19 Los Angeles 54 45 .545 4-6 L-2 25-24 29-21 San Diego 43 55 .439 11 10 4-6 W-2 26-26 17-29 Arizona 43 56 .434 11 11 7-3 W-3 20-31 23-25 Colorado 40 58 .408 14 13 3-7 L-5 24-25 16-33 SATURDAYS GAMES N.Y. Yankees 7, Cincinnati 1 Toronto 4, Texas 1 Cleveland 6, Detroit 2, 1st game Cleveland 5, Detroit 2, 2nd game Chicago White Sox 4, Houston 3 Boston 2, Kansas City 1 Tampa Bay 5, Minnesota 1 Baltimore 8, Oakland 4 Seattle 3, L.A. Angels 2, 12 innings SATURDAYS GAMES N.Y. Yankees 7, Cincinnati 1 St. Louis 4, L.A. Dodgers 2 Pittsburgh 3, Colorado 2, 11 innings Washington 8, Milwaukee 3 Philadelphia 2, Atlanta 1 San Francisco 5, Miami 3 Arizona 9, Chicago Cubs 3 San Diego 6, N.Y. Mets 0 SUNDAYS GAMES N.Y. Yankees 3, Cincinnati 2 Toronto 9, Texas 6 Detroit 5, Cleveland 1 Boston 6, Kansas City 0 Houston 11, Chicago White Sox 7 Tampa Bay 5, Minnesota 3 L.A. Angels 6, Seattle 5 Oakland 10, Baltimore 2 SUNDAYS GAMES N.Y. Yankees 3, Cincinnati 2 Miami 3, San Francisco 2 Pittsburgh 5, Colorado 3 Washington 5, Milwaukee 4 Atlanta 8, Philadelphia 2 Arizona 3, Chicago Cubs 2 San Diego 2, N.Y. Mets 1 L.A. Dodgers at St. Louis, late NAM Y. HUH / AP Houston Astros L.J. Hoes slams a one-run double against the Chicago White Sox during the seventh inning on Sunday in Chicago. TODAYS GAMES Texas (Mikolas 0-2) at N.Y. Yankees (Greene 2-0), 7:05 p.m. Boston (Lackey 10-6) at Toronto (Hutchison 6-8), 7:07 p.m. Cleveland (Salazar 1-4) at Minnesota (Kr.Johnson 0-1), 8:10 p.m. Kansas City (Guthrie 5-8) at Chicago White Sox (Sale 8-1), 8:10 p.m. Detroit (Verlander 8-8) at Arizona (Nuno 0-1), 9:40 p.m. Baltimore (B.Norris 7-6) at L.A. Angels (Shoemaker 7-2), 10:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Niese 5-4) at Seattle (Elias 7-8), 10:10 p.m. TODAYS GAMES L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 10-5) at Pittsburgh (Volquez 8-6), 7:05 p.m. San Francisco (Vogelsong 5-7) at Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 4-4), 7:05 p.m. Miami (Koehler 6-7) at Atlanta (Teheran 9-6), 7:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Latos 2-1) at Milwaukee (W.Peralta 10-6), 8:10 p.m. Washington (Fister 8-2) at Colorado (F.Morales 5-4), 8:40 p.m. Detroit (Verlander 8-8) at Arizona (Nuno 0-1), 9:40 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Niese 5-4) at Seattle (Elias 7-8), 10:10 p.m. AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Beltre, Texas, .335; Cano, Seattle, .335; Altuve, Houston, .335; Brantley, Cleveland, .329; Chi senhall, Cleveland, .327; VMartinez, Detroit, .322; Mi Cabrera, Detroit, .313. RUNS: Dozier, Minnesota, 71; Brantley, Cleveland, 66; Trout, Los Angeles, 66; Kinsler, Detroit, 64; Donaldson, Oakland, 63; Bautista, Toronto, 59; Pujols, Los Angeles, 59. RBI: MiCabrera, Detroit, 75; NCruz, Baltimore, 74; JAbreu, Chicago, 73; Trout, Los Angeles, 73; Encarnacion, Toronto, 70; Donaldson, Oakland, 68; Moss, Oakland, 67. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 133; Cano, Seattle, 122; Me Cabrera, Toronto, 121; Brantley, Cleveland, 120; AJones, Baltimore, 118; Markakis, Baltimore, 118; Kinsler, De troit, 115. DOUBLES: MiCabrera, Detroit, 36; Altuve, Houston, 30; Trout, Los Angeles, 29; Plouffe, Minnesota, 28; Hosmer, Kansas City, 27; Kinsler, Detroit, 26; Pedroia, Boston, 26. TRIPLES: Rios, Texas, 8; Bourn, Cleveland, 7; Eaton, Chi cago, 7; Gardner, New York, 6; De Aza, Chicago, 5; AJack son, Detroit, 5; Odor, Texas, 5; Trout, Los Angeles, 5. HOME RUNS: JAbreu, Chicago, 29; NCruz, Baltimore, 28; Encarnacion, Toronto, 26; Moss, Oakland, 22; Trout, Los Angeles, 22; Donaldson, Oakland, 21. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 41; Ellsbury, New York, 25; RDavis, Detroit, 24; AEscobar, Kansas City, 22; Andrus, Texas, 20; JDyson, Kansas City, 18; JJones, Se attle, 18; LMartin, Texas, 18. PITCHING: Tanaka, New York, 12-4; Porcello, Detroit, 12-5; Richards, Los Angeles, 11-2; FHernandez, Seattle, 11-2; Scherzer, Detroit, 11-3; Kazmir, Oakland, 11-3. ERA: FHernandez, Seattle, 2.02; Kazmir, Oakland, 2.38; Richards, Los Angeles, 2.47; Tanaka, New York, 2.51; Buehrle, Toronto, 2.64; Lester, Boston, 2.65; Gray, Oak land, 2.79. STRIKEOUTS: Price, Tampa Bay, 173; FHernandez, Se attle, 163; Darvish, Texas, 154; Kluber, Cleveland, 152; Scherzer, Detroit, 150; Tanaka, New York, 135; Rich ards, Los Angeles, 134; Lester, Boston, 134. SAVES: Rodney, Seattle, 27; Holland, Kansas City, 25; DavRobertson, New York, 24; Perkins, Minnesota, 22; Uehara, Boston, 20; Nathan, Detroit, 19. NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Tulowitzki, Colorado, .340; MaAdams, St. Louis, .324; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, .320; McGehee, Miami, .320; Lucroy, Milwaukee, .314; Goldschmidt, Ari zona, .314; Morneau, Colorado, .312. RUNS: Tulowitzki, Colorado, 71; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 70; Pence, San Francisco, 69; Rendon, Washington, 68; FFree man, Atlanta, 64; Rizzo, Chicago, 64; Stanton, Miami, 63. RBI: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 65; Stanton, Miami, 65; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 61; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 60; Morneau, Colorado, 60; Desmond, Washington, 59. HITS: McGehee, Miami, 118; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 116; Pence, San Francisco, 116; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 114; DanMurphy, New York, 114; CGomez, Milwaukee, 109; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 109 DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 37; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 33; Span, Washington, 29; FFreeman, Atlanta, 28; AMc Cutchen, Pittsburgh, 28; Puig, Los Angeles, 27; SCastro, Chicago, 26; JhPeralta, St. Louis, 26. TRIPLES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 9; BCrawford, San Fran cisco, 8; Braun, Milwaukee, 6; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 6. HOME RUNS:Stanton, Miami, 23; Rizzo, Chicago, 22; Tu lowitzki, Colorado, 21; Frazier, Cincinnati, 19; Byrd, Phil adelphia, 18; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 18; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 17; JUpton, Atlanta, 17. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 44; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 38; Revere, Philadelphia, 26; EYoung, New York, 25; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 21; Rollins, Philadelphia. PITCHING: Wainwright, St. Louis, 12-4; Simon, Cincin nati, 12-4; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 11-2; Lynn, St. Louis, 11-6; Greinke, Los Angeles, 11-6; Bumgarner, San Fran cisco, 11-7; 5 tied at 10. ERA: Wainwright, St. Louis, 1.83; Cueto, Cincinnati, 2.13; Beckett, Los Angeles, 2.26; HAlvarez, Miami, 2.64; TRoss, San Diego, 2.70; Teheran, Atlanta, 2.71; Simon, Cincinnati, 2.74. STRIKEOUTS: Strasburg, Washington, 158; Cueto, Cin cinnati, 141; Kennedy, San Diego, 137; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 135; TRoss, San Diego, 132; Greinke, Los Angeles, 130; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 126. SAVES: Kimbrel, Atlanta, 30; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 30; FrRodriguez, Milwaukee, 28; Jansen, Los Angeles, 27. Rays 5, Twins 3 Tampa Bay Minnesota ab r h bi ab r h bi DJnngs cf 5 1 2 0 Dozier 2b 5 0 0 0 Zobrist 2b-lf 3 1 0 1 Nunez 3b 5 0 0 0 Joyce lf 3 1 1 0 Plouffe dh 3 1 1 0 Forsyth ph-2b 1 0 0 0 KMorls 1b 4 1 2 0 Longori 3b 5 1 2 1 Arcia rf 3 1 0 0 Loney 1b 4 0 2 2 Colaell ph-rf 1 0 0 0 Guyer dh 4 0 1 0 Wlngh lf 4 0 1 2 YEscor ss 4 0 2 1 EEscor ss 4 0 1 0 Casali c 5 0 0 0 Fryer c 1 0 0 0 Kiermr rf 2 1 1 0 KSuzuk ph 0 0 0 0 Fuld cf 2 0 1 0 Totals 36 5 11 5 Totals 32 3 6 2 Tampa Bay 211 001 000 5 Minnesota 010 002 000 3 EArcher (2), Kiermaier (3), Arcia (3). DPTampa Bay 1. LOBTampa Bay 12, Minnesota 8. 2BDe.Jen nings (24), Joyce (18), Longoria 2 (16), Y.Escobar (12), K.Morales (11). SBLoney (3), Kiermaier (3), Fuld (12). SY.Escobar, Fuld. SFZobrist. IP H R ER BB SO Tampa Bay Archer W,6-5 6 1 / 3 6 3 1 2 4 Boxberger H,8 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 2 McGee H,12 1 0 0 0 1 1 Balfour H,7 1 / 3 0 0 0 2 0 Yates S,1-2 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Minnesota Correia L,5-12 4 7 4 4 3 4 Deduno 3 3 1 1 3 5 Duensing 1 0 0 0 0 2 Perkins 1 1 0 0 0 2 WPArcher, Deduno 2. BalkCorreia. UmpiresHome, Gabe Morales; First, Mike Esta brook; Second, Hunter Wendelstedt; Third, Mike DiMuro. T:40. A,821 (39,021). Marlins 3, Giants 2 San Francisco Miami ab r h bi ab r h bi Pence rf 4 1 2 0 Yelich lf 4 0 0 0 Scutaro 2b 4 1 1 0 Vldspn 2b 3 0 1 0 Posey 1b 3 0 2 2 Stanton rf 4 1 1 0 Sandovl 3b 4 0 0 0 McGeh 3b 4 1 2 2 Morse lf 4 0 1 0 GJones 1b 3 0 0 0 HSnchz c 4 0 0 0 Ozuna cf 3 0 1 0 Arias ss 3 0 0 0 Hchvrr ss 3 1 1 0 GBlanc cf 3 0 0 0 Mathis c 2 0 0 0 Linccm p 3 0 0 0 Hand p 2 0 0 0 JGutrrz p 0 0 0 0 RJhnsn ph 1 0 0 0 J.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 Morris p 0 0 0 0 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 Totals 32 2 6 2 Totals 29 3 6 2 San Francisco 002 000 000 2 Miami 200 000 10x 3 EArias (2). DPMiami 1. LOBSan Francisco 4, Mi ami 5. 2BPosey (16), Morse (26), Stanton (22), Hechavarria (14). HRMcGehee (2). SBStanton (9), Ozuna (3). SMathis. IP H R ER BB SO San Francisco Lincecum L,9-6 7 5 3 3 2 7 J.Gutierrez 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 J.Lopez 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Miami Hand W,1-2 7 6 2 2 1 4 Morris H,8 1 0 0 0 0 1 Cishek S,21-24 1 0 0 0 0 1 WPLincecum 2. BalkLincecum. UmpiresHome, Tony Randazzo; First, David Rackley; Second, Brian Gorman; Third, Chris Segal. T:41. A,221 (37,442). Red Sox 6, Royals 0 Kansas City Boston ab r h bi ab r h bi L.Cain cf 3 0 0 0 B.Holt 3b 5 1 2 0 Infante 2b 4 0 0 0 Nava lf 3 0 2 3 Hosmer 1b 3 0 1 0 Pedroia 2b 4 0 0 1 Valenci 3b 4 0 1 0 D.Ortiz dh 5 0 0 0 AGordn lf 3 0 0 0 Carp 1b 2 0 0 0 BButler dh 4 0 0 0 Victorn rf 4 1 2 0 AEscor ss 3 0 2 0 Drew ss 3 0 0 0 Hayes c 3 0 0 0 D.Ross c 3 2 1 2 Aoki rf 3 0 0 0 BrdlyJr cf 3 2 2 0 Totals 30 0 4 0 Totals 32 6 9 6 Kansas City 000 000 000 0 Boston 102 300 00x 6 EA.Escobar (10). DPKansas City 1, Boston 1. LOBKansas City 6, Boston 10. 2BA.Escobar (25), Nava (7), Victorino (6). HRD.Ross (6). SFNava. IP H R ER BB SO Kansas City Ventura L,7-8 4 1 / 3 9 6 6 4 0 Bueno 2 2 / 3 0 0 0 1 4 S.Downs 1 0 0 0 2 0 Boston Lester W,10-7 8 4 0 0 2 8 Tazawa 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Mujica 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby Lester (Hosmer). WPVentura. UmpiresHome, Kerwin Danley; First, Mark Rip perger; Second, Gary Cederstrom; Third, Lance Barksdale. T:56. A,439 (37,071). Yankees 3, Reds 2 Cincinnati New York ab r h bi ab r h bi BHmltn cf 4 0 0 0 Gardnr lf 4 1 0 0 Schmkr 2b 3 0 2 1 Jeter ss 5 0 1 1 Frazier 1b 4 1 1 1 Ellsury cf 4 1 4 1 Bruce rf 4 0 0 0 Teixeir 1b 5 0 0 0 Ludwck dh 3 0 1 0 McCnn c 5 0 2 1 B.Pena c 4 0 0 0 Beltran dh 3 0 0 0 Heisey lf 4 0 0 0 ISuzuki rf 4 0 1 0 Cozart ss 4 1 0 0 BRorts 2b 4 0 2 0 RSantg 3b 2 0 2 0 KJhnsn 3b 0 1 0 0 ZeWhlr ph-3b 2 0 1 0 Totals 32 2 6 2 Totals 36 3 11 3 Cincinnati 000 010 010 2 New York 000 020 001 3 One out when winning run scored. ER.Santiago (2), B.Roberts (9). DPCincinnati 1. LOBCincinnati 6, New York 13. 2BSchumaker (9), Ludwick (14), R.Santiago (5), Ellsbury (21). HRFra zier (20). SBR.Santiago (1), Ellsbury 2 (27). CS Schumaker (1). SR.Santiago. IP H R ER BB SO Cincinnati Cueto 5 5 2 2 4 7 M.Parra 2 / 3 2 0 0 0 2 LeCure 1 1 / 3 1 0 0 1 0 Broxton 1 1 0 0 0 1 A.Chapman L,0-3 1 / 3 2 1 1 0 1 New York Kuroda 6 2 / 3 3 1 0 2 6 Betances BS,3-4 1 1 / 3 3 1 1 0 1 Dav.Robertson W,1-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 WPA.Chapman. UmpiresHome, Angel Hernandez; First, Adrian John son; Second, Larry Vanover; Third, Paul Nauert. T:32. A,115 (49,642). Blue Jays 9, Rangers 6 Texas Toronto ab r h bi ab r h bi DRrtsn rf 5 0 2 4 Reyes ss 5 1 2 2 Andrus ss 5 1 2 0 Kawsk 2b 5 0 2 1 ABeltre dh 5 0 0 0 MeCarr lf 5 2 3 3 Gimenz 1b 3 0 1 1 Bautist dh 4 1 1 0 Smlnsk lf 4 0 1 0 DNavrr c 5 1 2 1 G.Soto c 4 1 2 0 ClRsms cf 3 0 1 1 Choo ph 0 0 0 0 DJhnsn 1b 3 2 2 1 Arencii ph 1 0 0 0 StTllsn 3b 3 1 0 0 LMartn cf 4 2 3 0 Gose rf 4 1 2 0 Rosales 3b 3 1 0 0 Odor 2b 3 1 1 0 Totals 37 6 12 5 Totals 37 9 15 9 Texas 002 003 001 6 Toronto 031 010 13x 9 ED.Johnson (1). DPTexas 1. LOBTexas 9, Toronto 8. 2BAndrus (23), G.Soto (1), Bautista (17), D.Na varro (13), D.Johnson (2). HRMe.Cabrera (12), D.Na varro (6). SBReyes (18), Col.Rasmus (2). CSD.Rob ertson (3), Gimenez (1). SOdor. SFD.Johnson. IP H R ER BB SO Texas Tepesch 4 1 / 3 9 5 5 2 0 Sh.Tolleson 1 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 3 Feliz L,0-1 1 1 1 1 0 0 West 1 5 3 3 0 1 Toronto Buehrle 6 8 5 5 3 5 Redmond W,1-4 1 1 0 0 1 0 Cecil H,16 1 0 0 0 0 1 Janssen 2 / 3 3 1 1 0 0 Loup S,4-7 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Redmond pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. HBPby Tepesch (St.Tolleson). BalkBuehrle. UmpiresHome, James Hoye; First, Chris Conroy; Second, Bill Welke; Third, John Tumpane. T:07. A,011 (49,282). Astros 11, White Sox 7 Houston Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi Altuve 2b 5 2 2 2 Eaton cf 3 1 2 0 KHrndz cf 5 1 2 0 AlRmrz ss 5 1 1 1 Carter dh 3 2 2 1 JAreu 1b 5 1 2 1 MDmn 3b 5 2 3 4 A.Dunn dh 4 0 0 1 Singltn 1b 5 1 1 0 Viciedo rf 5 1 1 0 Corprn c 5 0 1 0 Gillaspi 3b 5 1 2 0 Grssmn rf 4 1 2 1 De Aza lf 3 1 0 1 Hoes lf 5 1 1 1 GBckh 2b 4 0 1 0 MGnzlz ss 4 1 3 2 Nieto c 4 1 1 1 Totals 41 11 17 11 Totals 38 7 10 5 Houston 103 030 400 11 Chicago 001 213 000 7 EAltuve (6), K.Hernandez (1), Singleton (7). DP Houston 1, Chicago 2. LOBHouston 6, Chicago 9. 2BCarter 2 (14), M.Dominguez (14), Hoes (5), Ma.Gonzalez (5), Al.Ramirez (16). HRAltuve (3), M.Dominguez (12). SBCarter (1), Eaton (9). SFCarter. IP H R ER BB SO Houston Cosart 5 7 4 3 4 4 D.Downs H,9 1 / 3 1 1 1 0 0 Veras BS,2-2 1 / 3 2 2 1 0 0 Sipp W,2-1 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 1 1 Fields 1 0 0 0 0 3 Qualls 1 0 0 0 0 0 Chicago Joh.Danks 4 1 / 3 12 7 7 0 4 Thompson 1 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 2 D.Webb L,5-3 1 4 4 4 1 1 Surkamp 1 0 0 0 1 2 Guerra 1 0 0 0 0 1 Sipp pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. WPCosart. UmpiresHome, Marcus Pattillo; First, D.J. Reyburn; Second, Dan Bellino; Third, Brian ONora. T:39. A,256 (40,615). Tigers 5, Indians 1 Cleveland Detroit ab r h bi ab r h bi Kipnis 2b 3 0 1 0 AJcksn cf 3 1 2 0 ACarer ss 3 0 0 0 Kinsler 2b 4 1 1 1 Brantly cf 3 0 0 0 MiCarr dh 4 0 0 0 CSantn 1b 3 0 0 0 VMrtnz 1b 3 0 1 1 Raburn lf 3 0 0 0 JMrtnz lf 3 1 1 0 ChDckr ph 1 0 0 0 TrHntr rf 3 2 1 2 Swisher dh 4 0 0 0 Cstllns 3b 4 0 2 1 YGoms c 3 1 2 1 Avila c 4 0 0 0 DvMrp rf 3 0 0 0 AnRmn ss 3 0 1 0 Aviles 3b 2 0 1 0 Chsnhll ph-3b 1 0 0 0 Totals 29 1 4 1 Totals 31 5 9 5 Cleveland 000 000 100 1 Detroit 200 200 01x 5 DPCleveland 1, Detroit 1. LOBCleveland 5, Detroit 6. 2BY.Gomes (14), A.Jackson (22), V.Martinez (20), Castellanos (23). HRY.Gomes (13), Tor.Hunter (13). IP H R ER BB SO Cleveland Tomlin L,5-7 4 1 / 3 6 4 4 1 3 C.Lee 1 2 0 0 1 2 Crockett 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 2 A.Adams 1 2 / 3 1 1 1 1 1 Rzepczynski 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Detroit Smyly W,6-8 7 4 1 1 2 6 Chamberlain H,19 1 0 0 0 2 0 Nathan 1 0 0 0 0 1 UmpiresHome, Mark Carlson; First, Laz Diaz; Sec ond, Scott Barry; Third, Mike Everitt. T:54. A,736 (41,681). Pirates 5, Rockies 3 Colorado Pittsburgh ab r h bi ab r h bi Barnes lf 3 1 1 0 GPolnc rf 5 0 0 0 Belisle p 0 0 0 0 JHrrsn lf-3b 4 1 2 0 BBrwn p 0 0 0 0 AMcCt cf 4 0 1 1 Rutledg ss 4 1 2 2 GSnchz 1b 4 1 1 0 CGnzlz rf 4 0 0 0 NWalkr 2b 4 2 3 1 Arenad 3b 4 0 1 0 Mercer ss 3 1 2 2 Stubbs cf 4 0 2 0 PAlvrz 3b 4 0 1 0 Culersn 1b 4 0 0 0 Watson p 0 0 0 0 McKnr c 3 1 2 1 Melncn p 0 0 0 0 LeMahi 2b 3 0 0 0 CStwrt c 4 0 2 1 Matzek p 2 0 0 0 Locke p 2 0 0 0 CDckrs ph-lf 0 0 0 0 SMarte ph 0 0 0 0 JGomz p 0 0 0 0 Snider lf 1 0 0 0 Totals 31 3 8 3 Totals 35 5 12 5 Colorado 210 000 000 3 Pittsburgh 020 001 20x 5 EArenado (10), LeMahieu (4). DPPittsburgh 2. LOBColorado 5, Pittsburgh 11. 2BC.Stewart 2 (3). HRRutledge (3), McKenry (2), N.Walker (14). SBJ.Harrison 2 (11), A.McCutchen (16), Mercer (2). CSBarnes (3), A.McCutchen (1). SLeMahieu. IP H R ER BB SO Colorado Matzek 6 7 3 3 3 8 Belisle L,2-6 2 / 3 4 2 2 1 0 B.Brown 1 1 / 3 1 0 0 1 1 Pittsburgh Locke 6 7 3 3 2 3 J.Gomez W,2-2 1 1 0 0 1 0 Watson H,23 1 0 0 0 0 2 Melancon S,18-21 1 0 0 0 0 1 UmpiresHome, Marvin Hudson; First, Clint Fagan; Second, Tim Timmons; Third, Tim Welke. T:05. A,609 (38,362). Nationals 5, Brewers 4 Milwaukee Washington ab r h bi ab r h bi CGomz cf 4 0 0 1 Span cf 4 0 2 0 RWeks 2b 5 0 2 1 Rendon 2b-3b 5 1 0 0 Braun rf 3 1 1 0 Werth rf 5 0 2 1 ArRmr 3b 3 1 0 0 LaRoch 1b 3 2 2 0 Lucroy c 3 0 0 1 Zmrmn 3b 4 1 2 2 KDavis lf 4 0 1 1 Espinos 2b 0 0 0 0 MrRynl 1b 4 0 1 0 Harper lf 3 0 1 0 Segura ss 4 1 1 0 Dsmnd ss 4 0 1 1 Gallard p 1 0 0 0 Loaton c 4 1 1 0 Overay ph 1 0 0 0 GGnzlz p 1 0 0 0 Duke p 0 0 0 0 Stmmn p 1 0 1 0 WSmith p 0 0 0 0 Storen p 0 0 0 0 Gennett ph 1 0 1 0 Hairstn ph 1 0 0 0 LSchfr pr 0 1 0 0 Clipprd p 0 0 0 0 Wooten p 0 0 0 0 RSorin p 0 0 0 0 McLoth ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 33 4 7 4 Totals 36 5 12 4 Milwaukee 002 100 001 4 Washington 010 300 001 5 Two outs when winning run scored. EZimmerman (3). DPMilwaukee 1. LOBMilwaukee 8, Washington 8. 2BSegura (10), Werth (23), Loba ton (7). HRZimmerman (5). SBR.Weeks (2), Braun (9). CSR.Weeks (3). SGallardo. IP H R ER BB SO Milwaukee Gallardo 6 8 4 4 2 6 Duke 1 1 0 0 1 2 W.Smith 1 1 0 0 0 3 Wooten L,1-4 2 / 3 2 1 1 0 1 Washington G.Gonzalez 3 1 / 3 4 3 3 3 5 Stammen 2 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 2 Storen H,12 1 1 0 0 1 1 Clippard H,20 1 0 0 0 0 3 R.Soriano W,2-0 BS,3-25 1 2 1 1 1 0 WPGallardo, W.Smith. UmpiresHome, Angel Campos; First, Bill Miller; Sec ond, Chad Fairchild; Third, Vic Carapazza.

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 21, 2014 *Unless Otherwise Noted on the Schedule Yo u Make the CA LL !This We eks Leesburg Lightning ScheduleAlw ay s FREE Admission! Rainout Information 352-234-4489 Yo u Make the CA LL !July 21 -2 7This We eks Leesburg Lightning ScheduleAlw ay s FREE Admission! Game Times: 7pm We ekda ys Sun 5pm*THE PLA Y: With the score tied in the last inning and two outs, the home team has the bases loaded. B2 hits a single to enter field and R3 touches the pla te. B2 touches first and ever yone celebra tes the victor y, inc luding R1 and R2, who did not advance to the next base. The infielders all start to lea ve the field and ar all at or near the dugout, but obser vant F8 picks up the ball and runs in and touches second base while holding the ball. What s the ruling?Rainout Information 352-234-4489 Mon. 7/21 .............. Off Day Tu es. 7/22 .............. College Park (aw ay) We d. 7/23 .............. College Park (home) Thurs. 7/24 .............. College Park (aw ay) Fri. 7/25 .............. Deland (aw ay) Sat. 7/26 .............. Winter Park (home) Sun. 7/27 .............. Winter Park (home)ANSWER on Frida y 27 This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule COLLEGE FOOTBALL STEPHEN HAWKINS AP Sports Writer The new-look Big 12 is ready for some foot ball. OK, the conferences logo is whats new this year. There are no changes in the make up or format of the 10team league, the only power conference with a round-robin sched ule that determines a champion without an extra game. The goal now for the Big 12, last represent ed in the BCS nation al championship game ve seasons ago, is to get a team in the new four-team College Foot ball Playoff that begins this season. The rst championship game will be played in the heart of Big 12 country Arlington, Texas. Baylor arrives today at Big 12 football me dia days as the defend ing league champion for the rst time. The Bears should be pretty good again, but eighttime champ Oklahoma is the preseason pick to win another title. Here are ve things to know about media days: DIFFERENT TONE When Big 12 Com missioner Bob Bowls by addressed the me dia during the opening session last year, he was part of a coordinated effort by the leaders of the power conferences the Big 12, SEC, Big Ten, Pac 12 and ACC in calling for transfor mative changes in the governance system of the NCAA. Bowlsbys opening address Mon day comes 2 1-2 weeks before the NCAA board of directors vote Aug. 7 on a formal proposal to give schools in the high est-prole conferences more inuence over the college rules. The pro posal also would give athletic directors and student-athletes bigger roles in the legislative process. WHOS PICKED FIRST? There is much more consensus this year among the media on who will win the Big 12 title. Oklahoma is the overwhelming fa vorite to win its ninth Big 12 championship. The Sooners got 47 of the 56 rst-place votes, with defending champ Baylor getting the oth er nine. In the same poll before last sea son, there were 43 total votes cast and six dif ferent teams got picked rst. Oklahoma State was then the preseason pick and the Bears were tabbed fth with only two rst-place votes. STRONG DEBUT The last of the 10 coaches to take the po dium in the main press conference room at the Omni Dallas Hotel will be new Texas coach Charlie Strong. It is rst time since 1997 that Mack Brown isnt speak ing on behalf of the Longhorns. Strong did a 12-city tour last spring, with a message to Tex as fans about improved mental and physical toughness. This will be his rst appearance be fore the fully assembled Big 12 media. WHERE ARE THE QBS? After leading Baylor to its rst Big 12 title, throwing for 4,200 yards with 32 touchdowns and leading the Big 12 with 14 rushing scores, Bryce Petty is an obvi ous pick to take part in media days. He was also voted by media as the Big 12s preseason offensive player of the year. But Petty is only one of three quarter backs set to be in Dallas. The others are Oklaho ma sophomore Trevor Knight, who threw four TDs in a Sugar Bowl vic tory over Alabama, and Kansas State senior Jake Waters. NEW IDENTITY The Big 12 unveiled its new logo July 1 as part of a new set of branding and identity standards. Big 12 football media days will be the rst ma jor event for prominent display of the new logo which Bowlsby said in tegrates the leagues iconic heritage with a progressive new look. Big 12 featuring new look, new goal AP FILE PHOTO Baylor cornerback Demetri Goodson celebrates after defeating Texas 30-10 for the 2013 Big 12 title in Waco, Texas. LPGA RICK OSENTOSKI / AP Lydia Ko, of New Zealand, holds up her trophy after winning the Marathon Classic LPGA golf tournament on Sunday at Highland Meadows Golf Club in Sylvania, Ohio. RUSTY MILLER AP Sports Writer SYLVANIA, Ohio Seventeen-year-old Lydia Ko broke free from a late tie with So Yeon Ryu, hitting a wedge to 4 feet for birdie on the 72nd hole on Sunday to win the Marathon Classic. She became the youngest player to top $1 million in career earnings on the LPGA Tour. Ryu had poured in a big-breaking, 25-foot birdie putt on the 17th to pull even. But then Ko stuck her approach at the par-5 closing hole and calm ly rolled in the bird ie putt for a 6-under 65 that left her at 15-un der 269. It was her sec ond LPGA win as a pro to go with the two Ca nadian Open titles she grabbed as an amateur. Ryu pushed a 6-footer at the 18th that would have forced a playoff. Ko was resilient, also shrugging aside a chal lenge from veteran Cristie Kerr, who pulled into a tie with her on the homeward nine. Ko is roughly 17 months younger than Lexi Thompson, who previously was the youngest to hit the $1 million mark in LPGA earnings. She has shown incredible con sistency in her rook ie year on tour, making the cut in all 15 tour naments shes entered. She has six top-10 n ishes in addition to her wins, with ve of those being top-ves. Ko, who proudly bears the ag of her na tive New Zealand on her golf bag, started the nal round in fth place, three shots behind co-leaders Laura Diaz and Lee-Anne Pace. While they foun dered, she crept up the leaderboard with birdies at holes 3 and 4. She tied for the top spot with a 12-foot birdie putt at the par-3 eighth, then took a solo lead for the rst time. Lydia Ko victorious in Marathon Classic

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Living Healthy Send your health news to features @dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 21, 2014 GENE THERAPY: Scientists creating biological pacemaker / C2 Health check www.dailycommercial.com LADY LAKE Bloodstock 2014 donation event will be Saturday Bloodstock 2014, a blood dona tion event, invites donors to save lives by giving blood and in turn re ceive a Bloodstock 2014 T-shirt and free admission to a music festival featuring local artists and refresh ments from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Sat urday at American Legion Post 347, 699 W. Lady Lake Blvd. Donors should be age 16 or older, weigh at least 110 pounds and be in generally good health. Appointments can be made by calling 888-936-6283 or at www.one blood.org/bloodstock. Walk-ins are welcome. THE VILLAGES Moffit Cancer Center aims to improve patient self-esteem With the aim of improving cancer patients self-esteem and the quali ty of life for those undergoing cancer treatments, the Moftt Cancer Cen ter offers the Look Good Feel Better program. An upcoming Look Good Feel Bet ter meeting will be held from 9 to 11 a.m., on July 28. Meetings will also be held on Sept. 22 and Nov. 24. For information, email Ida Perea at iperea@cfhalliance.org. LAKE COUNTY Lake County Extension will offer pain control class The UF/IFAS Lake County Exten sion Service will offer classes about osteoarthritis pain and offer strat egies for controlling and even pre venting pain in this program creat ed by the National Council on Aging and the Arthritis Foundation. Classes will be offered at two dif ferent locations beginning Aug. 4 from 1 to 2:30 p.m., at the Lady Lake Public Library, 225 W. Guava St. Reg istration is required by going to ar thritisaug2014.eventbrite.com. The second class will be held from 10 to 11:30 a.m. on Aug. 5 at the Leesburg Public Library, 100 E. Main St. Registration is required by going to leesburgarthritis.eventbrite.com. For information, call 352-3434101, ext. 2719. TAVARES Hospital foundation raises nearly $100,000 The Florida Hospital Waterman Foundations recent 5th Annual Cel ebration of Life Gala brought to gether 176 guests who enjoyed an evening of dining, silent and live auctions and entertainment by the band Hot Property, raising $97,942 in support of the Florida Hospital Waterman Emergency Department. The foundation provides funding for programs and services at the hos pital, including the open heart pro gram, the Community Clinic, mis sion trips and cancer care services. For information, call 352-253-3270 or go to www.FHWaterman.com. LEESBURG Health Alliance welcomes new VP of Support Services The Central Florida Health Alli ance has welcomed the new Vice President of Support Services, Alex Chang, FACHE, in his new role that includes overseeing Materials Man agement, Environmental Services, Food and Nutrition, facilities/plant operation, Bio-Med and construc tion and security. Chang served as the Chief Operat ing Ofcer of HCA Fawcett Memori al Hospital, Englewood Community Hospital in Port Charlotte since 2006. ERIC BOODMAN MCT T en days after signing the lease on Resurrec tion Fitness, in Carn egie, Pa., Jeff Donato was found lying in a pool of blood. At a local hospital, doc tors ordered a rush CT scan and, as they were wheeling him into surgery, they told his wife that he had had a ruptured brain aneurysm. A blood ves sel in the left side of his brain had ballooned out and burst. He had been ly ing on his bedroom oor for almost 12 hours. His chances of survival were slim. Donato, 60, is a person al trainer who lives and works in Carnegie. He has been lifting weights since the age of 8, and he does not smoke, have high blood pressure or use ar tery-damaging drugs like cocaine. He had none of the characteristics that might predispose him to such an emergency. Dona to knew nothing about an eurysms until he had one. The same goes for most brain aneurysm patients. There was no sign, there was no warning, said his wife, Theresa Donato, 52. Thats what a lot of peo ple say. For the past three years, there has been a sup port group at University of Pittsburgh Medical Cen ter for brain aneurysm pa tients and their families. Recently a walk and run was held to raise aware ness in the wider commu nity. Robert Friedlander, chairman of neurosur gery at UPMC, explains that brain aneurysms can be caught before or after they rupture. In patients whose aneurysms rupture, he says, theres a ton of blood under high pressure that goes into the brain and causes severe brain damage. A lot of them die on the spot. A ruptured aneurysm of ten manifests itself as the worst headache of your life, he added. Approxi mately 50 percent of peo ple die within 30 days. But an unruptured an eurysm can go undetected for years. Without warning Blindsided by aneurysms, patients and their families hail support program PHOTOS BY D.A. ROBIN / MCT ABOVE: Amanda Tocci, a recent Penn State grad, had surgery to remove an aneurysm in her brain. BELOW: Jeff Donato, a jazz guitarist and personal trainer, is shown in the gym. He had none of the characteristics that might predispose him to a brain aneurysm, but he survived slim odds after a blood vessel suddenly ballooned and burst. JULIE DEARDORFF MCT Last year Martha Montalvo-Ari ri underwent a routine hysterecto my to help treat painful uterine broids. During surgery, her doctor used a morcellator, a device that cuts the tissue into pieces so it can be re moved through small incisions. Ten days after the procedure, Montalvo-Ariri was diagnosed with a rare and aggressive form of uterine cancer called leiomyosarcoma. Even more devastating, the rotating blade of the morcellator had scattered cancerous tissue fragments around her abdomen and pelvic area, accel erating the diseases progression. None of the forms I signed men tioned anything about cancer, said Montalvo-Ariri, a 46-year-old moth er of four in Riverside, Calif. They said it was in and out, very easy, and youre back to your life. Instead, they took my life away. Cases such as Montalvo-Ariris have raised signicant concerns over the use of power morcellation to re move a womans uterus or broids. Cleared for gynecological surgeries in 1995, morcellators facilitate min imally invasive procedures that can reduce womens pain, recovery time and complications. In April, however, after reviewing new data, federal regulators urged doctors to stop using morcellators, Hysterectomy tool stirs fears, spurs call for ban GINA FERAZZI / MCT Martha Montalvo-Ariri, center, surrounded by her family, is battling cancer after a surgical tool spread an undetected cancer during a routine hysterectomy. SEE SURGERY | C2 SEE ANEURYSM | C2

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 21, 2014 Wisdom Te eth Extraction's FREE IV SED ATION(9241) & (9242) wi th th re e or mor e wi sd om te et h ex tr ac ti on -s er vi ce s pe rf or me d by Ge ne ra l De nt is t$79New Pa tient SpecialIncludes Re gular CleaningIncludes; (90150) Comprehensive Exam, (0210) Complete Series X-Rays, (0350) Oral/Facial Photographic Images & Oral Cancer Screening & (1110) Adult Prohylaxis Where insurance is not applicable(352) 205-8355Lak e Adv anced Dentistr y109 N US Hwy 27/441 Lady Lak e, Fl. 32159www .lakeadvanceddentistr y. com because if cancer is present the device can spread malignant cells beyond the uterus and worsen a patients chance for long-term survival. In response, a leading manufacturer of mor cellators, Johnson & Johnsons Ethicon subsidiary, suspended sales of the device. Now medical providers are wrestling with a difcult deci sion: Should they offer a pro cedure that has proven bene ts for the majority of patients but also carries a rare but dead ly risk for a small number? If women could be tested for all uterine cancers beforehand, doctors could avoid morcella tion with some patients. But without doing surgery, theres no reliable way to predict whether a woman with broids has a uterine sarcoma, notably leiomyosarcoma, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Admin istration. Many hospitals around the country have stopped using mor cellation at least temporarily. But others have said morcella tion still has a role in gynecolog ical surgery and that, with ap propriate counseling, patients can decide for themselves. Last month Northwestern Memori al Hospital reinstated the tech nique under controlled cir cumstances and for those who might be at higher risk with a traditional open procedure. Ad vocate Health Care lifted a sys temwide ban in May. Three professional medical associations acknowledge the risk but say morcellation should be an option in some cases be cause minimally invasive pro cedures cause fewer complica tions, injuries and deaths than open surgery. Recently the FDA held a pub lic meeting to discuss how to make morcellation safer, in cluding whether a black box warning should be added to the product labeling. The agency has not yet publicly announced any conclusions. Meanwhile, a growing cho rus of doctors, clinicians and leiomyosarcoma patients and their families want the device banned, arguing that morcella tion is reckless and viable alter natives exist. Ive been seeing women harmed by this thing for the last eight years, said Dr. Rob ert Lamparter, a pathologist at a small Pennsylvania hospital who wrote a letter to the FDA requesting the devices clear ance be revoked. He said he has analyzed tissue in ve cases in which an unanticipated cancer was morcellated. Im just horried, Lam parter said in an interview. Its not just another complication. There is no acceptable injury or death rate for an elective surgi cal device, even if its wonderful for those who arent harmed. About 600,000 hysterectomies are performed in the U.S. each year. Research suggests about 40 percent are done to remove presumably benign or noncan cerous broids that are causing heavy bleeding, pelvic pressure or pain, or other symptoms. The number of morcella tions is not tracked, prompting calls for a nationwide registry of gynecological surgeries that would include information on the devices used. The safest and most cost-ef fective way to remove the uter us is through a vaginal incision, according to the American Col lege of Obstetricians and Gyne cologists. But that isnt possible with enlarged uteruses or large broids unless the tissue is cut into small pieces with a power morcellator or by hand using a scalpel. The traditional surgical choice involves a 5to 7-inch incision in a womans abdomen. This method offers doctors the clearest view but like all surger ies carries a higher risk of infec tion and complications such as blood clots. Though the over all mortality risk is low, research suggests abdominal hysterec tomy patients die three times more often than those who un dergo a laparoscopic procedure. SURGERY FROM PAGE C1 GINA FERAZZI / MCT Martha Montalvo-Ariri, the mother of four, was never told the risks of using a morcellator. On Oct. 30, Aman da Tocci was sitting in class at Penn State Uni versity preparing for an exam when she began to feel nauseated. She needed to leave. As I was walking across the street, I got a black screen in front of my face and my legs kind of gave out, she recalled. A friend came and drove her to the hos pital. They kept tell ing me it was a combi nation of dehydration and lack of sleep, she said. But Im a very health-conscious per son. I drink plenty of water. I knew it wasnt dehydration. When doctors did a CT scan, they saw a blur they thought might be an aneurysm. They con rmed the diagnosis with an MRI. To check if it was ruptured, they did a spinal tap, inserting a long needle into Toc cis spinal cord to check if blood had leaked into her cerebral uid. It hadnt. Her boyfriend drove her home, and early the next morning she was at UPMC, book ing surgery with Daniel Wecht for Nov. 19. Waiting was the hardest part, knowing there was a ticking time bomb in my head, said the 22-year-old. Her aneurysm, shaped al most like a ower, was larger than most, pre senting an even greater risk of rupture. After she was anes thetized, Dr. Wecht xed her head into position and cut a crescent from her right ear to her fore head, pinning down the ap of skin. Then, us ing a power-drill, he re moved a window of skull, putting it into a solution that keeps it clean. With scissors and scalpel, he snipped back the dura, a brous layer that protects the brain. His path was the Syl vian ssure, a natural crevice between lobes. Widening it, he found a map of arteries, rst lo cating the internal ca rotid, which he could clip in case the aneu rysm began to bleed, the way a plumb er could turn off a wa ter main. Following the blood vessels through a microscope, he clamped a temporary titanium clip onto the artery that was feed ing the aneurysm, and then a permanent one at the neck of the an eurysm. He pricked the dome of the aneurysm with a tiny needle to make sure there was no longer any blood ow, before closing up the wound layer by layer. Within a month, Toc ci was back at the gym, slowly beginning to work out again. For someone like Do nato, whose aneurysm had ruptured, the re covery process is lon ger. Nothing I am do ing through the surgery is healing the damage done to the brain, said Dr. Friedlander. It only prevents the aneurysm from bleeding again, so the brain can heal itself as best it can. ANEURYSM FROM PAGE C1 D.A. ROBIN / MCT Back in the gym just a month after her surgery, Tocci now works out every day, lifting weights and doing several rounds of pushups. LAURAN NEERGAARD Associated Press WASHINGTON No batteries required: Sci entists are creating a bi ological pacemaker by injecting a gene into the hearts of sick pigs that changed ordinary car diac cells into a spe cial kind that induces a steady heartbeat. The study, published Wednesday, is one step toward developing an alternative to electron ic pacemakers that are implanted into 300,000 Americans a year. There are people who desperately need a pacemaker but cant get one safely, said Dr. Eduardo Marban, di rector of the Cedars-Si nai Heart Institute in Los Angeles, who led the work. This devel opment heralds a new era of gene therapy that one day might offer them an option. Your heartbeat de pends on a natural pacemaker, a small cluster of cells its about the size of a pep percorn, Marban says that generates elec trical activity. Called the sinoatrial node, it acts like a metronome to keep the heart puls ing at 60 to 100 beats a minute or so, more when youre active. If that node quits working correctly, hooking the heart to an electronic pacemaker works very well for most people. But about 2 percent of recipients develop an Scientists trying gene therapy to create biological pacemaker AP PHOTO Dr. Eduardo Marban, director of the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, is shown in Los Angeles. SEE GENE | C3

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Nort h of KMart on Hwy 44 1)(352 ) 34 7-0403 /f x (3 52) 34 7-2034CDRX441@ gmail.com rD004202 Aching Fe et?Step right into our of fi ce.We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Wa lk-Ins We lcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 We st Dixie Av enue Suite B|Leesburg, FL 34748352-435-7849 |Next to Dr Ta troDr Er ik Zimmer mannPo dia tr is tYo ur feet are in good hands with us! r f Mos tM aj or Insurances Ac cep te d MARIA CHENG Associated Press LONDON The num ber of people living with HIV worldwide has remained vir tually unchanged in the past two years and AIDS-relat ed deaths are at their lowest since peaking almost a de cade ago, according to a re port from the United Na tions AIDS agency released Wednesday. Ofcials declared that end ing the AIDS epidemic is pos sible even though they ac knowledged the number of new infections more than 2 million last year was still very high. UNAIDS estimat ed there were about 35 mil lion people living with HIV last year and in 2012. The agency also set targets to reduce deaths and new cases by 90 percent by 2030. It previously unveiled a strat egy to get to zero AIDS-relat ed deaths, which included ensuring all people who need treatment are on it by 2015. Last year, there were about 12.9 million people receiv ing life-saving drugs and 22 million people still waiting. Some 1.5 million people died from AIDS-related causes. Other health experts ques tioned whether setting more ambitious targets is wise. This idea of ending AIDS isnt realistic, said Sophie Harman, a senior lecturer in public health at Queen Mary University of London, who was not part of the report. She said it would be more helpful to think about man aging the epidemic. Every one can get behind ending AIDS, but this report doesnt really tell us how to do that. Still, UNAIDS insisted in its report that we are at the beginning of the end of the AIDS epidemic and said the global outbreak can be stopped by 2030. But with no vaccine and millions of people carrying the virus or becoming newly infected, some scientists said ending HIV may be idealistic rather than practical. Weve made progress, but the number of people getting infected is still extraordinari ly high, said Shabbar Jaffar, a professor of epidemiology at the London School of Hy giene and Tropical Medicine. He said that scaling up treat ment further, especially in Africa, where about 70 per cent of people with HIV live, would be very difcult. They are already working beyond capacity at the moment. Jaffar said it was mislead ing to suggest we are close to eliminating AIDS. The road will get lon ger and harder and we really dont know where were going to end up, he said. Number of people with HIV unchanged since 2012 AP FILE PHOTO A newly diagnosed HIV positive woman, who arrived at the hospital with symptoms of tuberculosis, receives treatment at the Mildmay Uganda clinic in Kampala, Uganda. infection that requires the pacemaker to be removed for weeks until antibiotics wipe out the germs, Mar ban said. And some fetuses are at risk of stillbirth when their heartbeat falters, a condition called con genital heart block. For over a decade, teams of researchers have worked to cre ate a biological al ternative that might help those kinds of patients, trying such approaches as using stem cells to spur the growth of a new si noatrial node. Marbans newest at tempt uses gene ther apy to reprogram a small number of ex isting heart muscle cells so that they start looking and acting like natural pacemak er cells instead. Because pigs hearts are so similar to hu man hearts, Marbans team studied the ap proach in 12 labora tory pigs with a defec tive heart rhythm. They used a gene named TBX18 that plays a role in the em bryonic development of the sinoatrial node. Working through a vein, they injected the gene into some of the pigs hearts in a spot that doesnt nor mally initiate heart beats and tracked GENE FROM PAGE C2 them for two weeks. Two days later, treat ed pigs had faster heart beats than control pigs who didnt receive the gene, the researchers reported in the jour nal Science Translation al Medicine. That heart rate automatically uc tuated, faster during the day. The treated an imals also became more active, without signs of side effects. In essence, we cre ated a new sinoatri al node, Marban said. The newly created node then takes over as a functional pacemak er, bypassing the need for implanted electron ics and hardware. Its a different type of gene therapy, and a few other genes that might switch one cell type to another are under ear ly study to treat deaf ness and diabetes, Mar ban said. Its not clear how long these newly repro grammed cells would keep working, cau tioned Drs. Nikhil Mun shi and Eric Olson of the University of Tex as Southwestern Medi cal Center, who werent involved in the research but analyzed the nd ings in a journal com mentary. Also, the gene was delivered by putting it into a virus engineered to disappear relatively soon afterward. The Tex as pair noted that some virus particles landed in the lung and spleen, and that longer studies are needed to rule out safe ty concerns. Still, the results pro vide an encouraging in dication that a biolog ical pacemaker might eventually be ready for human translation, Munshi and Olson con cluded. The heart rate did start to slow a little to ward the studys end, but Marban said theres no reason to believe that the two weeks is somehow a magic cap. We have every reason to believe that this could go on longer. He said longer-term animal studies are un derway, and he hopes to begin rst-step human studies in about three years. MARY CLARE JALONICK and LAURAN NEERGAARD Associated Press WASHINGTON Nutrition facts labels on food packages list in gredients and nutrient levels, but they dont tell consumers outright if a food is good for them. Public health advo cates say that infor mation is necessary to help consumers make healthy choices at the supermarket. Theyd like to see la bels on the front of packages and a clearer statement of which in gredients are good and which should be avoid ed. The Food and Drug Administration is work ing on a label overhaul and has proposed two different versions. Writing separate ly in The New England Journal of Medicine on Wednesday, former FDA Commissioner David Kessler and for mer Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ofcial William H. Di etz both say the FDA doesnt go far enough. Dietz, the CDCs former director of the Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity, is now with George Wash ington University. Five ways these ex perts, and others, say nutrition facts labels could be improved: INDICATE OVERALL NUTRITIONAL VALUE The FDA proposed a nutrition facts over haul in February that made a lot of improve ments sought by the public health commu nity. There was more emphasis on calories, revised serving sizes closer to what Amer icans really eat and a new line for added sug ars. But Kessler says there is nothing in the new framework that actively encourages consumers to purchase food rich in the fruits, vegetables and whole grains that are rightfully considered real food. Both Kessler and Di etz say the panels emphasis on specif ic nutrients gives food companies the ability to make claims on the fronts of their packages that can mislead con sumers. For example, sugary or fatty foods can entice custom ers by adding ber and promoting that. Diners often consume more of a food that is adver tised as low in calories, whether it is healthy or not. As Michael Jacobsen of the Center for Sci ence in the Public Inter est puts it: Its a bunch of technical terms saturated fat and cho lesterol and dietary Health officials: Food label changes not enough SEE LABEL | C4 For over a decade, teams of researchers have worked to create a biological alternative that might help (patients who develop infections), trying such approaches as using stem cells to spur the growth of a new sinoatrial node.

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