Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Newspaper
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Halifax Media Group
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Rod Dixon
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Leesburg, Floirda
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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Minimumchargesapply.Cannotbecombinedwithothercouponsoroffers.Combinedlivingareas,L-shapedroomsandrooms ov er300sq.ft. ar econsidered2area s. Baths, halls,large wa lk-i n closetsan d arearu gsar epricedseparately. Offerdoes no t in clude protecto r. Residentialonl y. Cannotbeusedfor re stor ationser vices. Mu stpresen t couponattimeofservice Va lidatparticipatinglocationsonly.Certain re strictionsmayapply.Callfordetails.BEYONDCARPET CLEANINGCARPET|TILE&GROUT|HARDWOOD|UPHOLSTERY|AIRDUCT728-1668 394-1739fla#CAC18 1640 8 CARPET CLEANING3$99CleaningCompletedBy7/31/14 PromoCode:JULY AIRDUCT CLEANING$50OFF(MINIMUMCHARGESAPPLY) FL#CAC1816408CleaningCompletedBy7/31/14 PromoCode:JULY TILE&GROUT CLEANING15%OFF(MINIMUMCHARGESAPPLY)CleaningCompletedBy7/31/14 PromoCode:JULYROOMS &AHALL GERMANY CLINCHES WORLD CUP TITLE, SPORTS B1MARION COUNTY: Man accused of fracturing 2-year-olds skull, A3 SCHOOL SEX ASSAULTS: UF ranks highest in the state, A3 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, July 14, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 195 4 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED C10 COMICS C8 CROSSWORDS C10 DIVERSIONS C9 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 SCOREBOARD B2 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A11 NATION A9 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A12.90 / 75Clouds and sun. 50 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillardives@dailycommercial.comSigns warning of possible dangers to big rigs going over a railroad crossing in Sumter County havent de terred some truck drivers from trying and getting stuck. The legs of these semi-tractor trailers extended about a foot to keep the trailers level when their cabs are driven away are getting lodged in the train rails as the rigs go over the low ground clearance posted crossing near the intersection of U.S. Highway 301 and County Road 104 in Oxford. But after two trailers were recently ripped apart by trains, Sumter County ofcials voted last week to raise the approaches to both sides of the tracks. In the meantime, the crossing will be temporarily closed, County Administrator Bradley Arnold said. R. Taylor, a Florida Highway Patrol trooper who worked both crashes, said within the same time period another semi got stuck on the tracks but was towed before a train came. He agreed the crossing is danger ous. Something needs to be done about it before someone gets killed, said Taylor, on the scene at the July 1 crash. Arnold said for years there have been cautionary signs on both sides of the crossing, indicating a grade problem for heavy trucks as well as the addition of short-term signage restricting No Through Trucks. On July 1, a 68-car train car rying molten sulfur sheared through a commercial moving truck stuck on the crossing, leaving the vehicles rear half on the east side of the tracks and the cab on the west side. On May 28, a 130-car train barreled through a semi-truck hauling watermelons, scattering smashed fruit along the tracks. Arnold said after county public works representatives met with CSX ofcials last week, county commissioners voted unanimously to approve $55,000 to upgrade the crossing approaches. Arnold didnt give a timetable for the project but said it should start soon. According to Federal Railroad Association statistics, 2,087 highway-rail grade crossing collisions occurred across the nation in 2013, including 65 Flor ida incidents resulting in 12 deaths.OXFORDTrain track snagsSemi-trucks caught on crossings cause crashes, lead to upgrades MILLARD K. IVES / DAILY COMMERCIALCrews clear debris caused by a Union-Pacic train barreling through an Allied moving vehicle in Sumter County earlier this month after the semi got stuck on the track.On July 1, a 68-car train carrying molten sulfur sheared through a commercial moving truck stuck on the crossing, leaving the vehicles rear half on the east side of the tracks and the cab on the west side. MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillard.ives@dailycommercial.comFruitland Park Police Chief Terry Isaacs said Sunday his continuing efforts to create a bet ter image of his depart ment will go on in light of what he called disturbing allegations his now former deputy chief and a police corporal were associated with the Ku Klux Klan. Isaacs called it a black eye on the department. This is 2014 and we serve all the community. We will not tolerate this type of conduct, Isaacs said. Armed with a con dential FBI report that Isaacs said stated the two ofcers were associated with a subver sive organization, he said Deputy Chief David Borst resigned Thursday midway through being confronted by Isaacs with the allegations. Isaacs added an internal investigation would be conducted on the second ofcer, Cpl. George Hun newell, to deter mine what pos sible disciplinary actions would be taken since it is against department policy to be a member of an anti-government organization. But then the chief and city manag er decided to terminate Hunnewell when they also considered past problems with him that led to letters of counseling, suspensions and a FRUITLAND PARKIsaacs: Officers alleged Klan ties are intolerable BORST HUNNEWELL LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comLake County commissioners learned last week that 60 percent of the countys vehicle eet is outdated and must be replaced. The public works ve hicles, re trucks and county buses, among others, are either over seven years old or have more than 140,000 miles on them, according to Fleet vehicles aging, in need of replacementLAKE COUNTY CALVIN WOODWARDAssociated PressWASHINGTON Its considered bad form for politicians to say things that are not true. When they talk about their own am bitions, though, de ception pretty much comes with the territory and no one seems to mind. People who are patently feeling out their presidential prospects claim not to be even thinking about that, when you know theyve got to be hum ming Hail to the Chief in the shower. They say they dont pay attention to polls ha! They suggest their families will drive their decision whether to run, setting up a dramatic tension that is more ction than fact. As the 2016 presi dential campaign eld begins to take shape, here are ve things to know not to believe when you hear them:THE SIT-DOWNOver Christmas 2010, Mitt Romneys big family gathered round and cast ballots on whether he should run again for the Republican nom ination. The vote was 10-2 against, with Romney himself vot ing no. The voters had 5 things to know not to believe when presidential prospects say them Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, left, talks to his running mate, Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., along with his wife, Ann Romney, after he conceded the 2012 presidential race at his election night rally in Boston.AP FILE PHOTOSEE KLAN | A2SEE TRACK | A2SEE PROSPECTS | A2SEE FLEET | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 14, 2014 HOW TO REACH US JULY 13CASH 3 . ............................................... 2-1-3 Afternoon . .......................................... 4-0-4 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 2-3-0-0 Afternoon . ....................................... 4-7-0-5FLORIDALOTTERY JULY 12FANTASY 5 . ........................... 9-13-18-19-35 FLORIDA LOTTO . ................. 2-4-14-16-44-48 POWERBALL ........................ 2-3-7-23-5126 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONSTEVE SKAGGS, publisher352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comPAUL RYAN, digital editor352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com.CALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. demotion last year. Isaacs said although both men denied the allegations and there was no positive proof linking them to a subversive or ganization, the image as sociated with them would lower the credibility of the department. Isaacs came aboard as chief three years ago, shortly after another of cer resigned because of reports and photos showing his alleged ties to the Klan, and has made it a goal to improve the de partments image. Its disturbing, I cant have this, said Isaacs who called Hunnewell a marginal employee. I had no condence in the ofcers anymore. Isaacs said the FBI had been conducting a global investigation unrelated to the Fruitland Park Police Department when an informant said that Borst and Hunnew ell were associated with a subversive organization between 2005 and 2008. The case was given to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, which contacted Isaacs, who in turn spoke with the State Attorneys Ofce to determine if any criminal charges should be led. Isaacs said he didnt know the name of the group. However, Chief Deputy State Attorney Ric Ridgway said Saturday the report linked the two of cers to the Klan, and after his ofce determined any such association wasnt criminal, the case was turned over to the Fruit land Park police for an in ternal investigation. In 2009, Police Of cer James Elkins resigned from the department after allegations surfaced that he was a district Kleagle (recruiter) for the Engle wood-based National Ary an Knights of the Ku Klux Klan and subsequently, after a merger, a member of the United Northern and Southern Knights. However, in a depart ment with 13 full-time and ve part-time of cers, many of whom were trained by Borst, Isaacs dismissed any notion of his department being heavily associated with the Klan, calling Hun newell a bad apple. KLAN FROM PAGE A1 Taylor said both truck drivers, who remained in their vehicles during the crashes, were cited for improper stopping after not paying heed to the low ground clearance signs and not calling 911. Marsitisa Cook, owner of Groundcovers nursery, which sits just east of the crossing, said a Walmart truck got stuck recently but a farm tractor was able to move it. Its real rural out here. Many of the roads werent set up for these types of crossings, she said. TRACK FROM PAGE A1 GEORGE MADDOX / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL A 130-car CSX train collided with a trailer hauling watermelons that was stuck on railroad tracks in Sumter County. spoken. But Romney ran. The lesson: On this question, family matters, not so much. In the lead-up to 2016, Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., has made much of his wife, Kelley, being a hard sell. Theres two votes in my family, he said when asked in December about running. My wife has both of them, and both of them are no votes right now. ... Ill tell you in a year whether Im able to persuade my wife. Reserved but political ly savvy, Kelley Paul has stood in for him at cam paign events and worked for a Republican consult ing rm. Running for presi dent is a heavyweight (and intoxicating) decision that gives some fam ilies pause. But pinning the matter on the spouse and kids is generally part of a broader effort to put off answers and decisions until its time to commit one way or the other.THE DODGEMy focus is entirely on working for Texans in the U.S. Senate. When Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, made this declaration, his feet were planted in South Carolina, a big presidential primary state. To be sure, South Caro lina was a bit off his path. Hes more apt to be found in Iowa, an even bigger state in presidential politics. Cruz has been seen more often in Iowa, New Hampshire and South Car olina than in the volatile border region of his own state since he won election as a senator in 2012. Hillary Rodham Clinton went from no plans to run to stay tuned to Im running around the park to statements making clear shes consider ing it and will decide by the end of the year.THE DOWNPLAYGov. Chris Christie, R-N.J., says the bridge scandal thats been dog ging him will be a footnote by 2016. Hes feeling done with it. Gov. Scott Walker, R-Wis., says an investiga tion by prosecutors into whether he and aides conducted illegal political activities in 2011 and 2012 is old news and case closed. Public gures cant wish these things away. They can write their memoirs and their epitaphs, but not history. When scandal happens, they hold the reins of a runaway horse that will stop only when its good and tired.WHAT POLLS?Cliches abound here. You may have heard this one the only poll that matters is the one on Election Day. Its too soon for that, but not for this: I dont listen to polls. Polls are everywhere all the time, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., said in May. I dont really pay a lot of attention to them. Thats what people say when theyre lagging in polls. To be sure, horserace polls this far from the con test in November 2016 are mostly worth ignoring. As Rubio pointed out, theres a whole campaign to be waged rst. But polls, like money, are the mothers milk of politics. They drive fundraising, messaging and all-important perceptions of momentum.VEEP CREEP Democrat Al Gore called the vice presidency a political dead end in one campaign, then signed on for it the next campaign. Repub lican Nelson Rockefeller said he refused offers to be such standby equipment, then became that for President Gerald Ford. George H.W. Bush said Im not leaving the door open to becoming the running mate to his GOP rival, Ronald Reagan, then did. This disdain for being No. 2 is bound to arise when the primaries are underway and people start losing for real. For a strug gling candidate, acknowledging any interest in be ing someones running mate can be the kiss of death until its obvious the campaign is dying anyway. Then the vice presidency doesnt sound so bad. PROSPECTS FROM PAGE A1 Keith Stevenson, manager of the Fa cilities and Fleet Management De partment. Stevenson said the older the ve hicle, the more it costs to maintain. In evaluating a sample of 13 vehicles and their maintenance costs, Stevenson determined the aver age maintenance costs for vehicles over 120,000 miles was $2,813 compared to $1,021 for a vehicle under 30,000 miles. He added he is also concerned about the reliability of the 314 ve hicles that are in need of replacement. For example, he said, if a dump truck was in the repair shop, the crew wouldnt be able to work. The County Commission is deal ing with a $15 million shortfall in the scal year 2015 budget, and there is no funding allocated in that budget to replace the vehicles. County Manager David Heath said it would cost an estimated $8 million to replace all the vehicles, but it is not possible to replace them all at once. They would be phased in over a period of time, he said. The replacement of the vehicles is critical, Heath said. It is exacerbated by the fact we have not replaced any vehicles since 2008, he said. Replacing the eet is important, Commissioner Tim Sullivan said. I think that is an issue that we need to put a long-term solution on, he said. It is going to cost us more later if we dont do something now. Commissioner Jimmy Conner said because the county has been so scally conservative, it failed to address infrastructure needs. It is partially my fault because I have been so determined to keep taxes low, he said. Now we see our infrastructure is literally falling apart and we have got to address it. We dont have a choice. I want to nd a way to address it. The longer you ignore it, the more expensive it is going to be. Commissioner Sean Parks echoed those sentiments. You can only put off repairs and purchase of new equipment so long before it becomes more costly to maintain vehicles instead of purchasing new ones, he said. However, Commissioner Leslie Campione emphasized it was im portant to do these replacements incrementally. If you start with the premise that you are going to nd a way to take care of all the needs without rais ing taxes you approach these type of questions from a standpoint of lets nd a solution, she said. FLEET FROM PAGE A1 AP FILE PHOTO Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush greets his mother, former rst lady Barbara Bush, at the White Houses 2010 Presidential Medal of Freedom ceremony in Washington. Associated PressOCALA Police say a woman in pos session of heroin was arrested after she began undressing and doing yoga in the middle of a North Florida street. Ocala police arrested 51-year-old Mi chele Cernak on possession of heroin and drug paraphernalia Wednesday. The Ocala Star-Banner reports that of cers found Cernak in the middle of the street with her jeans around her ankles and in the midst of a yoga pose. She was still wearing her underwear.Woman doing yoga in street busted for heroin

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Monday, July 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LEESBURG Korean Service Veterans to host August 2 ceremonyKorean Service Veterans will be recognized in a special 61st anniversary ceremony at 10 / a.m. on Aug. 2 at the Veterans Memorial at Fountain Park. The anniversary event is sponsored by the Korean War and Korean Service Veterans Association of Lake County, Chapter 169. In the event of inclement weather, the ceremony will be held at the National Guard Armory, 400 W. Meadow St. For information or to participate as a veteran, call 352-408-6612 or email kwvathiel@gmail.com.LEESBURG Career Source to host hiring event for veteransCareerSource Central Florida will connect veterans with employers at two separate Paychecks for Patriots hiring fairs, from 9 / a.m. to 1 / p.m. on July 16. Paychecks for Patriots is sponsored by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity in conjunction with the Florida Department of Veterans Affairs, Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve, Florida National Guard, Career Source Central Florida, Dollar General and private employers. The event is open to United States veterans (active and retired) and their families at Florida National Guard, 400 W. Meadow St., and the American Legion, 300 N. Third St. Job seekers and employers can register at no cost at www. CareerSourceCentralFlorida.com/ Patriots.TAVARES Park rangers invite residents to bird and butterfly surveysThe Lake County Parks & Trails Division invites outdoor enthusiasts to enjoy three opportunities in July to survey birds and butteries. Join park rangers for the events, from 7:30 to 11 / a.m., on the following dates: Friday at Lake May Reserve, 36300 County Road 44A, Eustis, and Saturday at Ferndale Preserve, 19220 County Road 455, Ferndale. Knowledge of common species is a plus but not required. The event includes hiking about 2 miles on unpaved trails. For information or to register, call 352-253-4950, email parksandtrails@lakecounty.gov or go to www.lakecounty.gov/parks.MOUNT DORA Library to host Hurricane Preparedness programA panel of experts, including city of Mount Dora engineer/paramedic Anne Bell, Charles Revell of the citys electric department, a representative of the American Red Cross of Lake & Sumter Counties, a representative from Lake County Emergency Management and Kevin McEwen of Hillcrest Insurance Agency, is set to take part in the event at the W.T. Bland Public Library, 1995 N. Donnelly St. The programs will be July 22 at 6:30 / p.m. and July 28 at 2 / p.m. For information, call 352-735-7180.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 AUSTIN L. MILLERHalifax Media GroupA man was arrested by a sheriffs detective on Saturday, accused of giving a 2-year-old two skull frac tures and a black-and-blue face. The toddler is in in tensive care. Reese William Rockwell was charged with aggravated child abuse by De tective Rhonda Stroup of the Marion County Sher iffs Ofce, and taken to the Marion County Jail, where bond was set at $10,000. The childs mother, Jessi ca Todd, told a Star-Banner reporter that her 2-year-old son, Gabriel Peterson, re mains in the intensive care unit at UF Health Shands Hospital in Gainesville. Todd said doctors at the hospital are monitoring Gabriel, and the little boys eyes are black and blue and he has at least two skull fractures. Todd said she visited her son at the hospital on Saturday and that Gabriel cannot open his eyes and his face is swollen and puffy. Other than that, hes really doing good. He stood up in his bed and gave me a hug and kiss and told me that he loves me, she said. Todd said she was puz zled by Rockwells appar ently violent outburst. Ive known (Rockwell) for 14 years and I never expected this from him. I want people to know Man accused of fracturing 2-year-olds skull THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comLake Square Mall has been touted as a vital part of the economic life of Leesburg since it was built, and tonight city leaders will have a rst read ing on nixing the deposit fee for new non-residential customers setting up utility service at the mall. The city commission meets at 5:30 / p.m. today in the commis sion chambers on the third oor of Leesburg City Hall, 501 W. Meadow St. William Spinelli, the citys nance director, said in an agen da memo that the city can aid in helping to restore the retail center. Lake Square Mall has experienced difculty of late attracting and keeping quality retail tenants due to the recession, Spinelli said in the agenda memo, while also noting that general economic and cultural changes have affected enclosed malls as shopping destinations. Spinelli said in the memo that it would be benecial to Leesburg if the Lake Square Mall could be revitalized, and he noted that it would be a great detriment to the city if the mall were to stop doing business completely. The nance director said by approving the ordinance, the city will be increasing its risk in baddebt allowance. However, Spinelli noted the city currently has very limited bad-debt write-offs due to the strict deposit policy. At this time, some risk may be allowable to encourage development, he said in the memo, while noting the citys nance department will closely monitor electric utility accounts to ensure a balance between opening new accounts and lack of utility payment. Spinelli added that the ordinance is intended to provide a temporary benet to the redevelopment of the Lake Square Mall, and it will expire three years after its passage by the city commission. He also noted that expiration of the ordinance shall not require any utility customer then receiving service in the Lake Square Mall property to place a deposit with the city for continued service. Other items on tonights agenda: %  %  The public and commission LEESBURGUtility deposits may be waived for new mall tenants BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL A couple walks through the Lake Square Mall in Leesburg.(William) Spinelli (Leesburg finance director) said in a memo that it would be beneficial to Leesburg if the Lake Square Mall could be revitalized, and he noted that it would be a great detriment to the city if the mall were to stop doing business completely. JEFF SCHWEERSHalifax Media GroupThe University of Florida led all state universities in Florida in the number of reported sexual assaults for 2010, 2011 and 2012, based on data universities and colleges in the U.S. must report each year to the De partment of Education. UF reported 24 incidents of forced sex for that three-year period, com pared with 21 reported by the Uni versity of Central Florida and 17 by the University of South Floridas main campus for the same period. UF also reported more than any private university or college in Flor ida. Eckerd College in St. Petersburg led the private schools with 15, fol lowed by Rollins College in Winter Park with 10 and the University of Miami with nine. Victim advocates, counselors, police and other ofcials whose job it is to look after the safe ty and well-being of students, facul ty, staff and visitors on campus said those numbers show that UF is do ing its job to make victims of sexual violence aware of their options and the resources available to them. They said the numbers also show that UF is more vigilant about reporting and investigating incidents of sexual assaults. We have done a lot of education around it. Thats why our numbers are increasing, said Jen Day Shaw, UF dean of students. Campus sexual assault is a nation wide epidemic that has drawn the attention of the White House and Con gress. There is a growing consensus and body of research that universities and colleges are failing to pro tect students. Critics contend there are far more campus rapes than are being report ed and that universities and colleges are not investigating all of the cases being reported to them meaning assailants are getting away with it. A report released by the White House alleged that one in ve wom en are sexually assaulted during their time in college, based on data kept by the Department of Justice. Only 5 percent are reporting those assaults, according to a report re leased Wednesday by Sen. Claire THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comMadison, a Border collie mix, along with Justice, a pit bull ter rier mix, and numer ous other dogs, cats and kittens like Char lie and Cuddly Connie, are available through Lake County Animal Services special deal for animal lovers: the Cat and Dog Days of Summer Sale. The sale began Saturday and runs through July 26, with steep discounts on all adoptable animals on a rst-come, rstserved basis for a lim ited time only. Brian Sheahan, director of Lake Coun tys Community Safe ty and Compliance Department, said in a press release that the event is geared to help reduce the popu lation at the now over crowded shelter and avoid the euthanasia of adoptable animals. Sheahan said the county is offering dogs and cats at a drasti cally reduced rate of $10, down from the regular cost of $50 for dogs and $40 for cats. Several dogs will be secretly labeled Gold Ribbon Dogs, which will be free of charge upon check-out, he said in the press re lease. In addition, cats will be offered as buy-oneget-one-free during TAVARESAnimal Services reduces fees during summer sale PHOTO COURTESY OF LAKE COUNTY ANIMAL SERVICES Justice, a pit bull terrier mix, is one of many dogs available during the Cat and Dog Days of Summer Sale.UF tops state schools in sexual assaultsSEE FRACTURE | A4SEE SALE | A4SEE MALL | A4SEE ASSAULTS | A4

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 14, 2014 CR OW NS$399Each(3ormorepervisit) D2751/ Re g $59 9 ea. Po rcelainonnon Pr eciousme ta l DENTURES$74 9EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SA VIN GSThepatientand anyotherperson re sponsibleforpaymenthastherightto re fusetopay cancelpaymentorbe re imbursed forpaymentforanyotherservices, ex aminationwhic h isperformedas a re sultofandwithin72hoursof re spondingtothe advertisemen t fo r th ediscountedfeeor re ducedfeeserviceortreatment.Feesmay va ry duetocomplexityofcase.This discount does notapplytothosepatients wi thdentalplans.Feesare mi nimal. PR ICESARESUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBUR GM T. DORASunris e Dent al Tr i-D ental r ffnt bb fConsultation and Second Op inion No Ch arge!n t t NEW PA TIENTSPECIAL COMPLETESETOFX-RAYS(D0210) CLEANINGBYHYGIENIST(D110) EX AMINATIONBY DO CTOR(D0150) SECONDOPINION$49Reg.$155(INABSENCEOFGUMDISEASE ) D002409 OBITUARIESOmerine Vera, 89, of Leesburg, passed away July 12, 2014 in Mt. Dora, Florida Visitation and a ser vice will be held at Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations in Tavares, Florida on Wednesday, July 16th, 2014. Visitation to begin at 9:30 am and service to begin at 11:00 am. She will be in terred at Vista Memo rial Gardens in Miami Gardens, Florida next to her husband, Peter Vera. Omerine was born in Lawrence, MA to Al fred and Rose Marasse on January 5, 1925. She graduated from Law rence High School in 1942 and married her high school sweetheart in 1948. In 1950 she moved to Hialeah, Flor ida and raised her ve children. When her children were grown, Omer ine had several careers with companies such as Marriott Corp. and The American Automobile Association. In 1995, after her second hus band, Peter Vera passed away, Omerine moved to the Leesburg, FL area and retired. Retire ment for her meant vol unteering at St. Pauls Catholic Church where she worked in the thrift shop and sang in the choir amongst oth er things. She also vol unteered at the United Way helping in the ofce and where ever else they needed her. She was such a xture at the United Way that a spe cial volunteering award was named in her hon or that is given out an nually. Omerine had been residing at The Bridgewater ALF at Waterman Village where she enjoyed many ac tivities and made many friends especially staff member Lorna. Omer ine is preceded in death by her parents, four brothers Paul, Danny, Raymond, and Alfred Marasse, her husband, Peter Vera; son Danny Morel and daughter Dawn Elmore. Om erine is survived by her sons Joseph (Dale) Morel, Paul (Teresa) Morel, Marc (Randee) Morel; ten grandchildren, Denise (Hoyt) Ballard, Kelly Brooks, Michael (Annhy) Morel, Kimber ly (Rick) Johannes, De siree (Dan) Tobin, Paul Morel, Jr., Thomas (Ra chel) Brooks, Stephanie (Matt) Streicher, Tracy (Jeff) Perez, and Jayne Morel and 11 great grandchildren. She also leaves a sis ter Julie Marasse Spino la of Atascadaro, CA. You may leave your own memories and condolences by visiting stever sonhamlinhilbish.com. Steverson Hamlin & Hilbish Funeral Home 226 E. Burleigh Boulevard, Tavares, FL 352343-8000.IN MEMORYthat the people who do these kinds of things are the ones you least expect, Todd said. She said she and Rockwell went to high school to gether and he was her high school sweetheart. Rockwell, in an inter view with a Star-Banner reporter, calls Gabriel his stepson, and insists the incident was an ac cident. I got overwhelmed. I couldnt be everywhere at once and it got out of control, said Rockwell, a truck driver. The 25-year-old Silver Springs Shores man said he was babysitting four children two of whom are his children. The other two, includ ing Gabriel, belong to Todd. Rockwell said Gabri el was playing with an electrical socket when he rushed over to stop him from doing so. He said he then hit Gabriel, but doesnt remember if it was with his st or his open hand. I never meant to hit him, Rockwell said. It was an accident. It was not a vicious attack or anything. Gabriel fell, Rockwell said, and hit his face. Rockwell told Detec tive Stroup that he was the only adult at the home and that the vic tim had fallen while playing with another child in the backyard of the residence, according to sheriffs ofcials. He said he did not see the little boy fall. Stroup said that when she was talking with Rockwell, he changed his story and told the detective that he had dropped the juvenile on the concrete at the residences back porch. According to Stroup, Rockwell claimed he was attempting to get two of the children into the home and had picked up the victim by his right arm and swung him to his shoulder. Rockwell said the vic tim was not properly FRACTURE FROM PAGE A3 the two-week period, due to the animal shelter being heavily inundated with kittens during the height of kit ten season. A maximum of three dogs and three cats may be adopt ed per household, according to the press release. Located at 28123 County Road 561 in Tavares, the Lake County Animal Services shelter is open 10 / a.m. to 6 / p .m. Monday through Friday and 10 / a.m. to 4 / p .m. on Satur day. To learn more about Lake County Animal Services or make a donation to the shelter, go to www.lakecounty.gov/adopt or call 352343-9688. Residents can also follow the shelter on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ LakeCountyAnimalServices to view photos of the dogs and cats up for adoption. To learn more about Lake County Animal Services vol unteer animal foster program, go to www.lakecounty.gov/ volunteer. For information on the countys spay/neuter rebate program, and to download an application, go to www.lakecounty.gov/rebate. SALE FROM PAGE A3 PHOTO COURTESY OF LAKE COUNTY ANIMAL SERVICES Lamington is one of many cats and kittens available at Lake County Animal Services for $10 during the Cat and Dog Days of Summer Sale.hearing a presentation about the nal design of the Main Street streetscape project by Frank Bellomo of Bellomo Herbert Inc. %  en The commission considering authorizing The Restoration Outreach Community Center and Christian Care Center to provide vouchers to utility customers who are unable to pay their utility bills. In September 1991, the city created the Citizens Utility Relief Effort (C.U.R.E.) Voucher Program to assist utility customers who experienced loss of employment or an unexpected illness or injury. Lori Beach, customer service manager for Leesburg, said in the agenda memo for tonights meeting that the city budgets $5,000 for the C.U.R.E. program. The city also accepts donations to the C.U.R.E. program, and the amount of money provided to the agencies is based on the amount received from customers in donations. MALL FROM PAGE A3 balanced on his body and when he reached over for the other child, the victim fell off the back of his shoulder and onto the concrete oor, authorities said. Ofcials at Shands said the child suffered two separate occipital fractures, along with multiple facial bruises. Gabriel also had other injuries that were be ing examined by the doctors to see if theyre related to the incident. Notied about the injuries, Stroup then re-interviewed Rockwell, authorities said. Rockwell told the de tective that the child fell from his shoulder. Told that the childs injuries did not match what he was describing, Rockwell said the child was playing with an electrical outlet and that Rockwell punched the boy in the back of the head. The impact caused the child to fall face rst onto carpeting that had no padding between it and the concrete underneath, ofcials said. After hitting the boy, Rockwell said he sent him outside to play and a short time later, one of the children who was outside came inside and told Rockwell that Gabriel had fall en down. Rockwell said he went outside and picked up the child by his right arm. He said as he was lifting the boy up to his shoulder, the victim was unbal anced, and fell about 5 feet to the concrete. Rockwell described the sound as horrible, when Gabriels head struck the oor. The victims head was swollen and he said he put ice on the wound and made him lie on the couch. Rockwell said he thought about calling 911 but didnt because he didnt want to get into trouble. He also said he did not tell the childs moth er about the incident when she came home. Im worried about my son. Im very hurt and upset about it, Todd told the Star-Banner. She said Rockwell has never been violent to ward the children. She said he has two children, ages 3 years old and 9 months old. She said they do not have any children together and have been living together since March. Locally, Rockwell does not have a crimi nal record.Told that the childs injuries did not match what he was describing, (Reese) Rockwell said the child was playing with an electrical outlet and that Rockwell punched the boy in the back of the head.McCaskill, D-Mo. The Sexual Violence on Campus report also said that only 16 per cent of college campuses conduct climate sur veys on sexual assault, which experts have said is one of the best ways to get an accurate pic ture of whats happen ing on campus. UF conducted campus climate surveys in 2008, 2010 and last spring. Shaw said the university is going to make it an annual survey. In last years survey, 4 percent of the 2,200 stu dents who responded said they were sexually touched against their will, while 2.1 percent said someone attempted to force them to have sex against their will, and 1.1 percent said they were raped. Those numbers were higher for women than men 4.9 percent compared with 2.3 re ported being touched against their will; 3.2 percent compared with 0.3 percent reported attempted sexual assault and 1.2 percent compared with 0.3 percent reported rape. The McCaskill survey also found that many schools dont encour age reporting of sexu al assaults, 51 percent dont have hotlines and 56 percent dont have a way to report assaults online. Eight percent still dont allow con dential reporting. UF provides conden tial reporting online, has a hotline for reporting assaults and lots of infor mation available to students. It conducts ed ucational seminars for incoming students and training throughout the year and at the request of student organizations, as well as staff training. Students also have several options for help, including the UF Po lice Department, Victim Services, Student Conduct and Conict Resolution, the Counseling and Wellness Center and the STRIVE peer advocacy program. The Counseling and Wellness Center serves lots and lots of sexual assault victims. Proba bly a lot more students here have experienced it here or in their life, Shaw said. The Clery Act also known as the Campus Security Act of 1990 requires all colleges and universities that receive federal nancial aid to le an annual report of all crimes committed on or adjacent to campus for a three-year period. The number of sexual assaults reported on college campuses nationally rose more than 50 percent from 2001 to 2011 from 2,200 to 3,300. That number rose another 18 percent to 3,900 in 2012. UFs numbers also show an upward trend during those three years from three in 2010 to nine in 2011 to 12 in 2012. UPDs crime log also shows 16 incidents of sexual violence reported in 2013. Numbers increasing is going to be a pos itive sign of a campus with good practices in place where people feel comfortable coming forward, as opposed to feeling unsafe, said Chris Loschiavo, assistant dean of students and director of Student Conduct and Conict Resolution at UF. That spike in reporting occurred around the same time the Ofce of Civil Rights sent out a Dear Colleague letter in 2011 to colleges and universities saying un derreporting might be an issue and recommended ways to improve report ing, Loschiavo said. ASSAULTS FROM PAGE A3

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 14, 2014 rfrntb rfrbtb rfnn rbrt tbn n bbrbbrnn f nn rfbr rfn tb nftb tb tb tb rf f n t b t n fftfrr f tf ff bbb bbtbb bbb b n rbb rf ntbbn n LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PA RK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904David Wa lkerDr.(InPublixPlaza)352-308-8318THEVILLAGES352-205-7804THEVILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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Monday, July 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 rfrntb rfrbtb rfnn rbrt tbn n bbrbbrnn f nn rfbr rf rffntb rfnt rfrf ntb b ntb btn f ntb b rfbtn f ntb b rf rtnn rf ntb b brnrrrr fnt nntfn nnfntn rff n nn r f nff t b t f f t LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PA RK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904David Wa lkerDr.(InPublixPlaza)352-308-8318THEVILLAGES352-205-7804THEVILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 14, 2014 r r fr nr f n tb t rfrntb rfrbtb rfnn rbrt tbn n bbrbbrnn f nn rfbr LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PA RK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904David Wa lkerDr.(InPublixPlaza)352-308-8318THEVILLAGES352-205-7804THEVILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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Monday, July 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A9 JILL COLVINAssociated PressJERSEY CITY, N.J. A gunman who killed a rookie of cer responding to a report of an armed robbery at a drugstore early Sunday nev er tried to rob the store and instead lay in wait for police, telling a witness to watch the news because he was going to be famous, authorities said. Lawrence Campbell shot Ofcer Melvin Santiago in the head shortly after he and his partner arrived at the 24hour Walgreens at around 4 / a.m., Jersey City Mayor Ste ven Fulop said. Other ofcers returned re at Campbell, killing him. Campbell, 27, of Jersey City, was one of three sus pects wanted by police for a prior homicide, Fulop said. Fulop said Campbell was carrying a knife when he walked into Walgreens and asked for directions to the greeting card aisle. He as saulted an armed securi ty guard at the store and snatched his gun, Fulop said. According to Fulop, Campbell approached a witness and apologized for his conduct, then said to watch the news later because he was going to be famous, then waited for ofcers to arrive and shot Santiago with what police believe was the guards weapon. Today was a horrible day for Jersey City, Fulop said. Dozens of ofcers stood single le at the entrance of the hospital and saluted as Santiagos ag-draped body was carried into an ambu lance. A handful of younger ofcers consoled one anoth er as they walked away. San tiago, 23, graduated from the police academy in Decem ber. Fulop was there when San tiagos body arrived at the hospital. As Santiagos mother identied the body, Fulop said, she just keep repeating the badge number and say ing that its not possible. Santiago is the rst Jersey City ofcer killed in the line of duty since Detective Marc DiNardo died in July 2009 during a raid on an apart ment while searching for suspects in a robbery. It is a tragic situation when any ofcer is killed in the line of duty, Fulop said. Melvin was an ofcer who represented everything one would want to see in a po lice ofcer. I know the entire citys thoughts and prayers are with the Santiago family during this difcult time and we mourn together. Jean Belviso, who has been delivering newspapers for 10 years, was driving through the Walgreens parking lot when she said saw a man wearing burgundy sweatpants and a baseball cap walk out of the store. A police cruiser pulled up in front of Walgreens, and the suspect began shooting, the 61-yearold Belviso said. We thought he was running, coming toward us, said Belviso, who was riding along with a friend. He kept on shooting. Bullets ew through the cruisers windshield, 13 in all. The suspect was shot multiple times, and ofcers slapped handcuffs on him, Belviso said. Campbells body remained on the ground next to the bullet-riddled cruiser for more than ve hours after the shooting before it was placed in a coroners van and taken away. Markeisha Marshall, a spokeswoman for Walgreens, said the company was deeply regretful over the of cers death and extended its sympathies to his family and friends. The store has roundthe-clock armed security, Marshall noted. Police are also search ing for another man who they believe was involved in the previous homicide with Campbell, Fulop said. They have been aggressively seek ing Daniel Wilson for the last three days, Fulop said. The Jersey City Police Be nevolent Association said in a statement that their hearts were heavy over Santiagos death. Patrolman Santiago knew the risks associated with this job, yet he put himself in front of danger in order to keep Jersey City safe, the association said. Words can not adequately express our feelings about this senseless tragedy. The ofcers stepfather, Alex McBride, said Santiago was very proud to be a police ofcer, following in the footsteps of his uncle. Mc Bride said he had been in Santiagos life for 14 years, noting that his stepson had wanted to be a police of cer since playing the Call of Duty video game. Melvin was the best kid, he said, choking up as he sat hunched over on a plas tic crate in an alley outside the familys apartment. I watched him graduate from high school. He joined every sport, everything. He never did no harm to nobody. And he was full of life. Gary Nahrwold, 24, re called his friend Santiago rst saying a decade ago that he wanted to become a police ofcer. Nahrwold also hopes to join the force and said he wont be discouraged by Santiagos slaying. It just gives me more pur pose to do it, he said. Im not going to be deterred by some senseless crimes.Mayor: Cop killer said he was going to be famous JULIO CORTEZ / AP A person lays on the ground near evidence markers as ofcials investigate the scene where a Jersey City Police Department ofcer was shot and killed while responding to a call at a 24-hour pharmacy, Sunday in Jersey City, N.J. JEFFREY COLLINSAssociated PressLATTA, S.C. When openly gay police chief Crystal Moore was red by a mayor who condemned her lifestyle as questionable, she feared her two decade career in law enforcement in this town was over. Then, this conser vative, small town rebelled. The people of Latta, who voted overwhelm ingly for a state amendment banning gay marriage eight years ago, turned against the mayor, stripped him of his powers and the town council rehired Moore. They said her dedication to the town mattered more than her sexual orientation. Residents remembered Moores civ ic spirit from as far back as 1989, when Hurricane Hugo tore through Latta. She was a high school student working part time as a police dispatcher, and helped cut downed tree limbs to clean up the debris. This February, when an ice storm crippled the town and left it without power for days, Moore piled her ofcers in her SUV and checked on as many people as she could. Thats Crystal. All she does is help people. I dont get why he red her. Maybe its the ig norant people who talk the loudest. She was the same great Crystal yesterday as she is today, and shell be the same person tomor row, said lifelong Latta resident Dottie Walters. Mayor Earl Bullard ve hemently denied that he red Moore because she was gay. Instead, he said she was dismissed for sheer insubordination during the three months he was her boss. Moore said she hadnt received a single reprimand during her career until Bullard presented her with seven the day she was red in April. Word of her termination spread fast in this tobac co hub of about 1,400 people, just off Inter state 95. About two dozen people gathered at her ofce in support on the day she was let go. The support for Moore grew when Town Councilman Jar ett Taylor started se cretly recording his conversations with the mayor, which is legal in South Carolina. Tay lor said he learned not to trust the mayor be cause he would tell him something, and later deny he ever said it. In a conversation re leased to reporters after Moore was red, the mayor said: Id much rather have somebody who drank and drank too much tak ing care of my child than I had somebody whose lifestyle is questionable around children, because that aint the damn way its sup posed to be. Bullard, who has avoided reporters for much of the past three months, told The As sociated Press that was him on the tape. He of fered no apologies. I dont like the homosexual ways por trayed in front of children, Bullard told AP by telephone Thursday. You cant explain to a 5-year-old why anoth er child has two mom mies or two daddies. Since the story made headlines, Bullard said he had received a stack of hate mail that was probably an inchand-a-half thick. Within days of Moores termination, the town council passed a vote of con dence in her. Small SC town rallies for fired gay police chief JEFFREY COLLINS / AP Latta Police Chief Crystal Moore talks with friends at a fundraiser for a youth softball team in Latta, S.C. MARK GILLISPIEAssociated PressCLEVELAND Michelle Knight has discovered that the fame that fol lowed her escape from Ariel Castros house of horrors cuts both ways. There has been some obvious good. The girl who grew up without a toothbrush and spent nearly 11 years in captivity can provide for her self. She has her own apartment. Her book, Finding Me, spent ve weeks on the New York Times Bestsellers List. She and the other two women kidnapped by Castro split $1.4 mil lion in donations collected after their escape. Phil McGraw of Dr. Phil television fame presented Knight with an oversized check for more than $400,000 from his foundation. In a recent interview with The Associated Press, Knight said she is ready to assume a normal life and, with it, a new name and identity Lily Rose Lee. Im not a celebrity, said Knight, 33. I dont want to be. I want to be me. Fame has brought some frustrations. Knight becomes frightened when crowds sometimes gather around her as she walks alone. She nds it annoying when people snap cellphone photos without asking. And people from her distant past have re appeared, feigning friendship but ul timately seeking money, she said. You have to be careful every day because of the book and the money and the it factor of who you are, she said. Theyre not coming at me to be my friend. They want what I have. Knight writes in her book that she grew up under less than ideal cir cumstances. Food and clothing were hard to come by. Strangers drifted in and out of the house at all hours. She said her mother kept her home from school for days at a time to care for her twin brothers and assorted cousins who lived there. She ran away from home at 15 and lived beneath a highway underpass and then with a drug dealer for a few months. She said in the interview that it was the most nurturing period of her early life. Knight was 21 when Castro lured her to his home in August 2002. Amanda Berry was abducted in April 2003 just a day shy of her 17th birth day, and Gina DeJesus was 14 when he kidnapped her a year later. The women escaped from Castros home on May 6, 2013. Castro took a plea deal to avoid a potential death sentence and received life in prison plus 1,000 years. Knight said he vio lently aborted ve of her pregnancies by kicking, punching and stomping on her abdomen after impregnating her. He ended up hanging himself in his prison cell a month after sentencing.Knight: Fame comes with complications TONY DEJAK / AP Michelle Knight is shown during an interview in Cleveland.

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Monday, July 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A11 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 H ow about we rename The Today Show the Yesterday Show since host Matt Lau er asks questions from 1953? Isnt what Lauer asked GM CEO Mary Barra about whether shell do well at being simultaneously an executive and a mom about, oh, 30 years past its sellby date? Today, havent weve stopped asking whether Hillary can be a good Nana as well as lead the free world? Today, havent we stopped lling the teleprompter with queries regarding whether Elizabeth Warren makes her own pie crusts from scratch or is reduced, out of desperation, to using pre-made? Today, havent we decided that girls can be reghters, astronauts and soldiers without asking what happens if they get their periods or if they dont? Asking the head of Gener al Motors whether she can be a good mommy and do her job effectively (not to mention asking her whether she got the position because shes a woman and could bring a softer face to the companys image) is like asking a girl whether she can be both smart and pretty. Its a false dichotomy a trick and a con. These are not questions we ask in 2014 without expecting the audience to gasp, laugh and treat the interviewer with contempt. The fact that days later, Lauers female producer comes out and giggles, Oopsy, it was us silly girls who forced poor Matt to ask that question makes it even more ridiculous. In no way does it mitigate Lauers exchange with Barra; instead it exacerbates our irritation while undermining Lauers credibility. Look, women have been working double shifts for lousy wages, cleaning airport toilets, stocking shelves in dirty warehouses, serving bad coffee at fast-food restaurants and cleaning up the mess of the world in hotel rooms, bars and ofce buildings without being asked if they can do their jobs effectively and be good mothers. Its assumed that a woman in such a position will simply be the best mother she can. This, indeed, has always been assumed of men that they will work hard because they have to and that they will be the best parents possible. In this way, underprivileged women and privileged men are oddly linked: the world declares their primary function in life is to bring home the bacon and they are judged on their ability to earn. When it comes to women in positions of professional leader ship however, the ground suddenly shifts. They never asked whether you could be a good nurse and good mother, said a friend who entered medical school at 36; They only asked whether you could be a good doctor and a good mother. Lauer is trotting out a very old argument: Can a woman be anything in addition to being a woman? Published in 1938, mystery writer Dorothy Sayers still trenchant essay Are Women Human? examines what it would be like if men were always positioned in terms of their domestic and sexual roles. Sayers wonders what it would be like for a man If he gave an interview to a reporter, or per formed any unusual exploit, he would nd it recorded in such terms as these: Professor Bract, although a distinguished botanist, is not in any way an unman ly man. He has, in fact, a wife and seven children. Tall and bur ly, the hands with which he handles his delicate specimens are as gnarled and powerful as those of a Canadian lumberjack. What do they expect women to say when interviewers ask these questions, anyhow? Is there a secret wish that the women will look into the camera and announce, Gee, I never thought about it. Guess Ill just reabsorb my offspring into my body and rebirth them when its more convenient, like when I can cash in my stock options; or maybe, I never much liked being a mom anyhow, Matt; Im putting them up for auction; or do we secretly long to hear, I am going to make my husband raise them, plus Im going to make him start wearing my slips? When faced with inappropriate questions, perhaps we should all say, Ill forgive you for asking me that if you forgive me for not answering. Only then we can get down to business and talk about whats important today.Gina Barreca is an English professor at the University of Connecticut, a feminist scholar who has written eight books, and a columnist for the Hartford Courant. She can be reached through her www.ginabarreca.com.OTHERVOICES Gina BarrecaMCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Today Shows Matt Lauer is so last century President Barack Obama has gone from being the deporter-in-chief to being held politically responsible for a ood of im migrants crossing the nations southern bor der. But this is more than politics it is a real humanitarian crisis. Illegal immigrants have long crossed the Mexican border, but never like this. By the thousands, children are coming from Central America especially Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala unaccompanied by their parents. It is an exodus unparalleled in recent history, recalling the harrowing stories of the so-called Childrens Crusade said to have drawn youngsters to the Holy Land 800 years ago. Why this is occurring now is not altogether clear. It could be a reaction to the decision two years ago by the Obama administration to allow immigrants who came as children to stay without fear of deportation. But it could also be a desperate bet made by parents who gure that an immigration bill will eventually be passed and that their children, even though they arrive now, will get a chance at a better life. Whatever the cause, it has overwhelmed those charged with guarding the nations bor ders and has led to scenes of angry Americans barring the way to immigrant children, a reaction that shames the nations humanitarian conscience. Mr. Obamas response earlier this week was to ask Congress for $3.7 billion to deal with the inux. Republicans (and some fearful Democrats) are refusing to give the request serious consideration. They believe a crisis is unfolding, but they dont trust Mr. Obama and they resist giving him a blank check. Not exactly blank. The money would go to building more detention centers, adding immigration judges, beeng up border patrols and aerial surveillance, the very things needed to protect the borders and take care of the children prior to processing. Instead, congressional gridlock and dysfunction rule. Mr. Obama needs to be more explicit in saying these children will be returned to their homes. But Republicans cant have it both ways. They cant savage Mr. Obama for doing nothing and then argue against him when he acts. The congressional critics have to decide: Do they want to be part of the solution or part of the problem?Distributed by MCT Information Services.AVOICEObamas request to Congress cant be dismissed Classic DOONESBURY 1976Asking the head of General Motors whether she can be a good mommy and do her job effectively (not to mention asking her whether she got the position because shes a woman and could bring a softer face to the companys image) is like asking a girl whether she can be both smart and pretty. Its a false dichotomy a trick and a con. These are not questions we ask in 2014 without expecting the audience to gasp, laugh and treat the interviewer with contempt.

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 14, 2014www.dailycommercial.comGOLF: Martin eagles 18th to win title / B3 NATACHA PIARENKO / AP Germanys Philipp Lahm holds up the World Cup trophy as the team celebrates their 1-0 victory over Argentina after the World Cup nal on Sunday at the Maracana Stadium in Rio de Janeiro.Germany by a whiskerMario Goetzes 113th-minute goal clinches title over Argentina MATTIAS KARENAssociated PressRIO DE JANEIRO With two quick touches, Mario Goetze ended Germanys 24-year wait for another World Cup title. Goetze scored the winning goal in extra time to give Germany a 1-0 victory over Argentina on Sunday in a tight and tense World Cup nal that came down to one piece of individual skill. Goetze, who wasnt born when West Germany beat Argentina in the 1990 nal, controlled a cross with his chest in the 113th minute and in one uid motion volleyed the ball past goal keeper Sergio Romero and inside the far post. It was a goal that gave Germany its fourth World Cup title in its eighth nal, and left Argentina star Li onel Messi still walking in the shadow of his compa triot Diego Maradona, who led his country to the 1986 title. Goetze had come on as a substitute for Miro slav Klose toward the end of regulation time and the 22-year-old midelders fresh legs made the differ ence. Andre Schuerrle broke down the left ank, send ing his cross into the area, and the Bayern Munich player did the rest with a clinical nish. The goal echoed that of Andres Ini estas four years ago, when the midelder scored in similar fashion but from the other side of the area to give Spain a 1-0 extra time win over the Netherlands. For Germany, the win ends a string of near misses since winning its last major title at the 1996 Eu ropean Championship. The team lost the 2002 World Cup nal to Brazil and lost in the seminals in both 2006 and 2010. It is Germanys rst World Cup title as a unied nation, having won as West Germany in 1954, 1974 and 1990. It was also the third World Cup nal between these countries and had been billed as a matchup between the perfect team and the perfect individu al, pitting Germanys ma chine-like unit against the brilliance of Messi, the four-time world player of FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comFollowing an impressive perfor mance at the USA Weightlifting Youth National Championships last month, Lake Countys Iron Jungle weightlifting club raised its game to a new level. Iron Jungle, the only weightlifting team in Lake and Sumter counties, picked up six medals three gold, one silver and two bronze at the Sun shine State Games at The Lakeland Center on June 21-22 in Lakeland. Morgan Rhone, Alexis Smith and Jose Barajas won gold medals for the Iron Jungle. Katrina Lanier picked up a silver medal in her rst meet with Iron Jungle, while Warren Brown and Alexandria Mitchell earned bronze medals for the club. Our ladies performed remarkably well at the Sunshine State Games, Iron Jungle lifters step up at Sunshine State Games Iron Jungle weightlifting coach Josh Boyer (center) poses for a picture with club members (from left): Alexandria Mitchell, Katrina Lanier, Morgan Rhone and Alexis Smith. All four medaled recently at the Sunshine State Games.PHOTO COURTESY OF JOSH BOYER SEE JUNGLE | B2 VICTOR R. CAIVANO / AP Germanys Mario Goetze, right, scores the deciding goal in the 113th minute, past Argentinas goalkeeper Sergio Romero. CHERYL SENTER / AP Brad Keselowski, right, celebrates with members of his team on Sunday after winning the Sprint Cup series race in Loudon, N.H. DAN GELSTONAssociated PressLOUDON, N.H. Brad Keselows ki completed a awless weekend at New Hampshire Motor Speed way and won Sunday under a greenwhite checkered nish. Keselowski followed up Saturdays Nationwide Series victory with his rst Sprint Cup win at New Hamp shire, dominating in the No. 2 Ford for his third victory of the season. After the last caution came with four laps left, Keselowski pulled away on the nal restart to become the rst driver to sweep the week end in track history. He had the fast est car most of the weekend, even leading the speed charts during both ZACHARY HANKLESpecial to the Daily CommercialThe Leesburg Lightning snapped a four-game losing streak on Sunday with an 8-7 win in 10 innings against DeLand in the second game of a doubleheader at Pat Thomas Stadi um-Buddy Lowe Field. With the win, which countered a 6-3 loss in the opener, the Lightning (13-14) maintained a hold on fourth place in the Florida Collegiate Sum mer League standings. Leesburg plated the game winner when Matt Menard scored on a sac rice y to right eld by Brad An tchak. The Lightning faced a threerun decit heading into the eighth inning and Menards run completed the comeback. The Suns (12-16) took an ear ly lead in the first inning on Angel Keselowski dominates in New Hampshire SEE NASCAR | B2SEE CUP | B2Up until Goetzes winning goal, the game was more notable for top-class defending than creative attacking, but both teams had their share of chances.Lightning comeback splits twin billSEE FCSL | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 14, 2014 SUNmon tu es we dthursfriSatLeesburgLightningJuly13 -1 9DelandHOME5pmWinterGardenAW AY7pmWinterGardenHOME7pmWinterGardenHOME7pmSanfordAW AY7pmSanfordHOME7pmSanfordAW AY1pm AUTO RACING NASCAR Sprint Cup-Camping World RV Sales 301 ResultsSunday At New Hampshire Motor Speedway Loudon, N.H. Lap length: 1.058 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (7) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 305 laps, 145.7 rating, 48 points, $306,998. 2. (1) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 305, 123.5, 43, $239,066. 3. (13) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 305, 99.1, 42, $166,270. 4. (15) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 305, 112.3, 41, $166,086. 5. (24) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 305, 88.9, 39, $119,750. 6. (8) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 305, 109.7, 39, $139,431. 7. (4) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 305, 91.9, 37, $138,473. 8. (3) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 305, 115, 37, $109,565. 9. (22) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 305, 82.1, 35, $129,290. 10. (28) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 305, 97, 34, $101,715. 11. (10) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 305, 95.1, 33, $107,415. 12. (9) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 305, 86, 32, $118,873. 13. (14) Carl Edwards, Ford, 305, 77.6, 31, $105,465. 14. (23) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 305, 72.5, 30, $133,476. 15. (27) Greg Bife, Ford, 305, 68, 29, $130,115. 16. (5) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 305, 96, 28, $120,629. 17. (18) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 305, 73.9, 28, $86,940. 18. (20) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 305, 68.7, 26, $104,798. 19. (16) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 305, 79.3, 25, $113,554. 20. (30) Jeff Burton, Toyota, 305, 63.1, 24, $95,240. 21. (17) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 305, 78.2, 23, $117,765. 22. (29) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 305, 60.9, 22, $93,340. 23. (19) Aric Almirola, Ford, 305, 63.1, 21, $121,951. 24. (33) David Gilliland, Ford, 305, 49.6, 20, $108,873. 25. (26) David Ragan, Ford, 305, 54.6, 19, $107,173. 26. (11) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 305, 79.5, 19, $128,151. 27. (21) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 304, 63.1, 17, $110,335. 28. (35) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 304, 45.2, 16, $83,290. 29. (32) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 304, 47.4, 15, $80,515. 30. (12) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 304, 88.7, 14, $122,798. 31. (36) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 303, 41.7, 13, $91,723. 32. (39) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 303, 38.2, 12, $89,337. 33. (37) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 302, 42.8, 11, $79,565. 34. (34) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 301, 37.5, 0, $79,365. 35. (40) Eddie MacDonald, Ford, 300, 32.6, 9, $79,165. 36. (38) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 300, 34.1, 8, $78,935. 37. (25) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, accident, 296, 49.7, 7, $86,717. 38. (31) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 292, 45, 6, $81,655. 39. (43) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet, 278, 26.4, 0, $69,655. 40. (6) Joey Logano, Ford, accident, 211, 92.9, 5, $105,646. 41. (42) Timmy Hill, Toyota, electrical, 76, 26.8, 3, $61,655. 42. (2) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, accident, 11, 35.4, 2, $114,091. 43. (41) Mike Bliss, Toyota, electrical, 6, 27.9, 0, $54,155.GOLF Womens British Open Leading Scores Sunday At Royal Birkdale Golf Club Southport, England Purse: $3 million Yardage: 6,458; Par: 72 Final Mo Martin, $474,575 69-69-77-72 287 -1 Shanshan Feng, $235,204 73-71-69-75 288 E Suzann Pettersen, $235,204 72-73-68-75 288 E Inbee Park, $151,532 72-72-68-77 289 +1 Jessica Korda, $104,425 72-72-73-74 291 +3 Angela Stanford, $104,425 74-72-70-75 291 +3 Eun-Hee Ji, $104,425 74-70-71-76 291 +3 Julieta Granada, $104,425 72-70-72-77 291 +3 Laura Davies, $72,911 75-72-72-73 292 +4 Marina Alex, $72,911 72-76-68-76 292 +4 Sun-Ju Ahn, $72,911 75-67-71-79 292 +4 Anna Nordqvist, $51,257 72-78-71-72 293 +5 Azahara Munoz, $51,257 72-72-74-75 293 +5 Gwladys Nocera, $51,257 73-70-73-77 293 +5 Charley Hull, $51,257 73-76-66-78 293 +5 Stacy Lewis, $51,257 71-74-70-78 293 +5 a-Emma Talley 72-73-76-73 294 +6 Beatriz Recari, $39,530 74-67-74-79 294 +6 So Yeon Ryu, $39,530 71-70-74-79 294 +6 Amelia Lewis, $39,530 72-71-71-80 294 +6 Giulia Sergas, $32,283 76-73-72-74 295 +7 Erina Hara, $32,283 73-74-73-75 295 +7 Paula Creamer, $32,283 75-73-71-76 295 +7 Morgan Pressel, $32,283 70-74-75-76 295 +7 Meena Lee, $32,283 73-75-70-77 295 +7 Amy Yang, $32,283 71-72-72-80 295 +7 Pornanong Phatlum, $27,506 73-74-75-74 296 +8 Rikako Morita, $27,506 75-75-68-78 296 +8 a-Georgia Hall 73-72-78-74 297 +9 Belen Mozo, $22,977 77-72-74-74 297 +9 Ayaka Watanabe, $22,977 76-72-75-74 297 +9 Carlota Ciganda, $22,977 74-75-73-75 297 +9 Mina Harigae, $22,977 70-78-74-75 297 +9 Lee-Anne Pace, $22,977 75-73-72-77 297 +9 Jenny Shin, $22,977 73-72-73-79 297 +9 Jiyai Shin, $22,977 72-75-71-79 297 +9 Lydia Ko, $22,977 72-76-69-80 297 +9 Nikki Campbell, $18,447 77-72-73-76 298 +10 John Deere Classic Leading Scores Sunday At TPC Deere Run Silvis, Ill. Purse: $4.7 million Yardage: 7,268; Par: 71 Final a-amateur Brian Harman (500), $846,000 63-68-65-66 262 -22 Zach Johnson (300), $507,600 63-67-69-64 263 -21 Jerry Kelly (163), $272,600 66-68-65-66 265 -19 Jhonattan Vegas (163), $272,600 69-68-63-65 265 -19 Scott Brown (105), $178,600 67-70-61-68 266 -18 Tim Clark (105), $178,600 72-63-64-67 266 -18 Ryan Moore (83), $141,588 66-67-67-68 268 -16 Jordan Spieth (83), $141,588 71-64-67-66 268 -16 Bo Van Pelt (83), $141,588 67-69-67-65 268 -16 Johnson Wagner (83), $141,588 66-65-69-68 268 -16 Steven Bowditch (68), $112,800 64-67-70-68 269 -15 Steve Stricker (68), $112,800 68-65-64-72 269 -15 Chad Campbell (55), $80,571 69-71-62-68 270 -14 Bryce Molder (55), $80,571 73-65-67-65 270 -14 Kevin Na (55), $80,571 68-66-71-65 270 -14 Shawn Stefani (55), $80,571 73-67-64-66 270 -14 Daniel Summerhays (55), $80,571 69-68-65-68 270 -14 David Toms (55), $80,571 65-70-67-68 270 -14 Brad Fritsch (55), $80,571 70-68-63-69 270 -14 Kevin Kisner (50), $56,713 68-72-68-64 272 -12 D.H. Lee (50), $56,713 72-66-66-68 272 -12 Troy Merritt (50), $56,713 68-70-66-68 272 -12 Charlie Beljan (47), $43,240 71-68-66-68 273 -11 Charles Howell III (47), $43,240 66-68-67-72 273 -11 William McGirt (47), $43,240 64-66-69-74 273 -11 John Rollins (47), $43,240 72-68-66-67 273 -11 Luke Guthrie (40), $30,628 69-69-69-67 274 -10 Justin Hicks (40), $30,628 66-70-70-68 274 -10 Dicky Pride (40), $30,628 70-70-66-68 274 -10 Glen Day (40), $30,628 72-65-69-68 274 -10 Tommy Gainey (40), $30,628 70-68-67-69 274 -10 Russell Henley (40), $30,628 70-67-68-69 274 -10 Steven Ihm, $30,628 73-65-68-68 274 -10 Scott Langley (40), $30,628 69-70-65-70 274 -10 Will MacKenzie (40), $30,628 73-65-67-69 274 -10 a-Jordan Niebrugge, $0 71-68-66-69 274 -10 Greg Chalmers (31), $20,709 70-68-71-66 275 -9 Scottish Open Leading Scores Sunday At Royal Aberdeen Golf Club Aberdeen, Scotland Purse: $5.14 million Yardage: 6,867; Par: 71 Final a-amateur Justin Rose, England 69-68-66-65 268 Kristoffer Broberg, Sweden 65-71-68-66 270 Marc Warren, Scotland 67-69-67-70 273 Stephen Gallacher, Scotland 72-69-70-63 274 Matteo Manassero, Italy 69-72-68-65 274 Shane Lowry, Ireland 72-68-68-66 274 Tyrrell Hatton, England 69-71-66-68 274 Scott Jamieson, Scotland 74-67-70-64 275 Rickie Fowler, United States 71-71-68-65 275 Robert Karlsson, Sweden 71-71-67-66 275 Phil Mickelson, United States 68-73-70-65 276 Danny Willett, England 70-71-68-67 276 Pablo Larrazabal, Spain 69-73-66-68 276 Paul Casey, England 69-71-72-65 277 Rory McIlroy, Northern Ireland 64-78-68-67 277 Luke Donald, England 67-73-72-66 278 James Morrison, England 71-72-69-66 278 Mikko Ilonen, Finland 71-68-69-70 278 Craig Lee, Scotland 72-69-66-71 278 Ricardo Gonzalez, Argentina 65-71-71-71 278 Paul Waring, England 75-66-73-65 279 Alexander Levy, France 75-69-69-66 279 John Hahn, United States 71-71-68-69 279 TV2DAY SCOREBOARD FCSL STANDINGS W L .Pct GB Sanford 17 10 .630 Winter Park 17 12 .586 1 Winter Garden 16 13 .552 2 Leesburg 13 14 .481 4 DeLand 12 16 .429 5.5 College Park 8 18 .308 8.5 SUNDAYS GAMESDeLand 6, Leesburg 3, 1st game Leesburg 8, DeLand 7 (10), 2nd gameWinter Garden 9, College Park 5TODAYS GAMESLeesburg at Winter Garden, 11 a.m.Winter Park at DeLand, 7 p.m. College Park at Sanford, 7 p.m.TUESDAYS GAMESWinter Garden at Leesburg, 7p.m.Winter Park at DeLand, 7 p.m. Sanford at College Park, 7 p.m. ARENA FOOTBALL 8 p.m.ESPN2 New Orleans at JacksonvilleCYCLING 7 a.m.NBCSN Tour de France, Stage 10, Mulhouse to La Planche des Belles Filles, FranceMAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 8 p.m.ESPN Exhibition, Home Run Derby, at Minneapolisbringing home four medals, Iron Jungle coach Josh Boyer said. But our male competitors did well, too, with two medals. Im very proud of our club as we continue to make progress towards becoming a nationally recognized organi zation. Rhone, lifting in the Youth Division at 53 kilo grams (about 116 pounds), used the momentum she rode to a Top-10 nish at the Youth National Cham pionships to personal records in the Clean & Jerk, Snatch and total weight. She hit on ve of her six lifts in both disciplines. Rhone lifted 43 kilograms (95 pounds) in the Snatch and 57 kilograms (125 pounds) in the clean and jerk. She nished with a nal combined to tal weight of 100 kilograms (220 pounds) for the clubs rst gold medal of the competition. Morgan has already qualied for the 2014 USA Weightlifting Junior Nationals, even though she has a year of Youth eligibility left, Boyer said. The qualifying total for Junior Nationals is typically around 90 kilograms (198 pounds). Her next step will be her championship at the Florida Weightlifting Federation State Championship. Smith hit on four of six lifts en route to her Gold medal-winning effort. Competing in the Youth Division at 75 kilograms (165 pounds), Smith, like Rhone, nished with a to tal weight of 100 kilograms. She had a personal best of 47 kilograms (103 pounds) in the snatch and 53 kilograms (117 pounds) in the clean and jerk. After securing the gold medal, Smith attempted to estab lish a new personal mark with 58 kilograms (128 pounds). Alexis had a good clean and a good jerk, but she lost it on the gather, Boyer said. The lift isnt over un til the lifter brings their feet parallel to each other with control and that was Alexis downfall. During the portion where she brings her feet to a normal stand ing position, she lost control of the weight. Her next prep will be geared toward improving on her bronze medal at the Florida State Weightlifting Federation nals in No vember. Boyer said Smith also will be training to hit her qualifying total of 112 kilograms (247 pounds). He feels she will hit that goal in August. Barajas, the Florida High School Athletic Associa tion Class 1A state cham pion at 169 pounds, was the Iron Jungles only gold medalist among its male lifters. Competing in the Junior Division at 85 kilograms (187 pounds), Barajas hit a personal record snatch of 97 kilograms (214 pounds) and 125 kilograms (275 (pounds) in the clean and jerk for a total of 222 kilograms (489 pounds). Boyer said Barajas, a Tavares graduate, is working out details on a weightlift ing scholarship with North Michigan University in Marquette, Mich. Northern Michigan is a regional Olympic training center and Boyer said it is one of a handful of colleges that offer weightlifting scholar ships. Jose had a great high school coach in Chris Gauntlett, who has done an outstanding job in de veloping him, Boyer said. Im proud of Jose. He knew what he wanted to do with his talents, and he didnt allow anyone to talk to him out of his vision. He stayed the course and continued working towards his goals. Lanier, competing in Ju nior Division at 75 kilograms, picked up a Sil ver medal in her rst club meet. She hit on ve of six lifts, hitting on 43 kilograms in the snatch and 66 kilograms (145 pounds) in the clean and jerk for a to tal of 109 kilograms (240 pounds). Katrina is going to be big for the high school girls program at Leesburg this season, Boyer said. Im glad she is getting these club meets under her belt. She satised her Flori da Weightlifting Federation state qualifying total as well and is only a few ki lograms aways from reach ing her Junior Nationals qualifying weight. I believe she will reach that goal in August. Mitchell, in her rst club meet, earned a bronze medal in the Youth Division at 53 kilograms with a total weight of 66 kilo grams (145 pounds). She hit on ve of six lifts. Boyer said a solid perfor mance in a debut competition can often be a spring board to future success. For Warren Brown, who lifted in the Junior Divi sion at 77 kilograms (170 pounds), the Sunshine State Games may turn out to be his nal competition with Iron Jungle. Brown is scheduled to depart for basic training with the U.S. Navy in August. Brown nailed all six of his lifts with 84 kilograms (185 pounds) in the snatch, 103 kilograms (227 pounds) in the clean and jerk, good for a total of 187 kilograms (412 pounds). All three to tals were personal records. If this is Warrens last meet with us, Im glad he got to go out at his best, Boyer said. Warren is a great kid and a very coach able one, as well. It has been a privilege to train with him over this last year. The U.S. Navy is getting an outstanding recruit. Despite the impending loss of Brown, Boyer said the Iron Jungle will con tinue to grow. At least ve more lifters will make their USA-Weightlifting debut with the Iron Jungle in August. Iron Jungle Weightlifting is making plans to com pete in the Georgia Games 2014 Olympics Weightlift ing Championships in Atlanta on Aug. 2 and the Vero Beach Open on Aug. 23. The future is very bright for out club, Boyer said. We will continue to make progress like always until we have achieved all our goals. We have the chem istry to motivate each other, the will to succeed, the work ethic to be great, and we are as hungry as ever. We have the desire to be great and each new pro gression is better than the last. We are on our way. JUNGLE FROM PAGE B1 Sprint Cup practices on Saturday. Keselowski tied Jimmie John son for the series high in wins. Ke selowski and Dale Earnhardt Jr. clinched spots in the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship, provided they attempt to qualify for the nal seven races before the cutoff. Pole sitter Kyle Busch was second. Kyle Larson, Matt Kenseth and Ryan Newman completed the top ve. I dont think anybody had any thing for, Keselowski, Busch said. Keselowski hopped out of his car and grabbed an oversized broom to give a playful sweep of all the confetti already collected around the Ford. NASCAR FROM PAGE B1 the year. But in the biggest game of his career, Messi came up short. He had one good chance to score when he was sent free in the area just af ter the halftime break, but sent his shot wide of the far post. It was a difcult angle, but still the type of chance he so often converts for Barcelona. Messi threatened in termittently throughout the match, but was effec tively neutralized for long stretches. When he did try to break forward with one of his quick dribbles, he was surrounded by the German defense. His free kick in the 120th minute went well high. When the nal whistle blew, Germany players col lapsed in a pile in the mid dle of the pitch, while Mes si walked with his hands on his hips toward the cen ter circle. Messi, who scored four goals in the group stage but none in the knockout rounds, then had to trudge alone up the stairs of the Maracana Stadium to accept the Golden Ball award for the tournaments best player, shaking hands with German Chancellor Ange la Merkel along the way. He never broke a smile. Ger many goalkeeper Manuel Neuer was voted best goal keeper of the tournament. Up until Goetzes win ning goal, the game was more notable for top-class defending than creative at tacking, but both teams had their share of chances. Gonzalo Higuain was gifted a free chance when Toni Kroos back header landed at his feet and left him all alone with Neuer. However, he sent his shot woefully wide. Higuain thought he had scored in the 30th after Messi picked out Ezequiel Lavezzi with a great ball and he sent a cross in toward the Napoli striker. Higuain slotted in his n ish inside the far post and ran all the way to the cor ner ag in celebration be fore realizing he had been called for offside. Shortly afterward, Ger many was forced to use a substitution as Christoph Kramer had to go off with a suspected concussion after colliding with Ezequiel Garays shoulder earlier in the game. Kramer had continued playing but looked visibly dizzy as he was led off the eld. Kramer, who was a late inclusion in the lineup after Sami Khedira was injured during the warmup, was replaced by Schuerrle. Germanys best chance came just before the break when Benedikt Hoewedes hit the post with a header from a corner. CUP FROM PAGE B1 Arroyos RBI single, but the Light ning struck back in the second when Garrett Suggs provided an RBI double to tie the score. Suggs then scored on Shea Pierces eld ers choice to give Leesburg a 2-1 lead. DeLand then tied it up on a wild pickoff attempt by Brett Jones. The Suns responded in the fourth in ning with a elders choice to close to within 3-2. In the sixth inning, the Suns took the lead to make it 4-3, adding an other run in the eighth on a triple by Austin Hays, who later scored on a wild throw by the right elder to extend DeLands lead to 6-3. Danny Murray started Leesburgs comeback in the eighth by plating two runs to slice the Suns ad vantage to 6-5. Suggs then tied it up with an RBI double to center. Both teams scored in the ninth to send the game to extra innings, set ting the stage for Menards and An tchaks heroics. In the rst game, a four-run out burst in the sixth inning by the Suns broke open a tied game. DeLand scored solo runs in the rst and second innings before Leesburg tied it with a pair of runs in the fourth. Antchak had both RBIs for the Lightning with a single to center, which scored Colby Lusignan and Igor Baez. The Lightning tied the game at 7 in the ninth inning when Kevin Ol meda hit an RBI single. Leesburg travels to Winter Gar den at 7 / p.m. today for a rare Mon day game against Winter Garden at West Orange High School. FCSL FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, July 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 GOLF DOUG FERGUSONAP Golf WriterSOUTHPORT, England Mo Martin knew she hit her 3-wood exactly the way she wanted on the 18th hole at Royal Birkdale. With the ball slightly be low her feet, just under 240 yards away and a strong wind at her back, she let it rip and watched the ball track toward the ag. Martin thought it was short. Then she thought it might be too long. Moments later, she re alized just how good it was. I could hear it hit the pin from the fairway, Martin said. That was a pretty fun feeling. The ball rolled into the center of the agstick and settled 6 feet away for an ea gle, and when no one could catch her, the 31-year-old American became a ma jor champion Sunday at the Ricoh Womens British Open. I think I still need to be pinched, Martin said after closing with an even-par 72 for a one-shot victory over Shanshan Feng of China and Suzann Pettersen of Norway. It was Martins rst eagle of the year one of the short est hitters in the game, she doesnt get many opportunities. She had not won on the LPGA Tour in 63 previous tries. And on a wind-swept Sunday when no one broke par, she was never closer than two shots of the leaders the entire nal round. The best shot of her life changed everything. An absolutely perfect 3-wood, she said. When it was in the air, I said, Sit. And then I said, Stop. And then when it was going toward the hole, I said, OK, I dont have anything more to say to that ball. I actually heard it hit the pin. Its denitely one to remember. She turned and did a little jig in the fairway. An hour later, it turned out to be the winning shot when Feng and Inbee Park of South Korea couldnt stay under par.JOHN DEERE CLASSICSILVIS, Ill. Brian Har man used three straight birdies down the stretch to hold off Zach Johnson by one stroke and win the John Deere Classic on Sunday for his rst PGA Tour title. Harman had a 5-under 66 in the nal round for a 22-un der-262 total. The 27-yearold Georgian in his third full season on the PGA Tour earned $846,000 and the last exemption for next weeks British Open. Harman withstood John sons challenge by making three birdies beginning at No. 14 to get to 23 under with two holes to play. Johnson, playing four pairs ahead of Harman, birdied the 17th to get within a stroke, but ran out of holes. Jhonattan Vegas had a 65 to nished tied for third with Jerry Kelly (66) at 265. Scott Brown (68) and Tim Clark (67) tied for fth another shot back. Three-time winner Steve Stricker fell off the pace set by Harman on the front nine, then fell off the leader board with a double-bogey on the par-3 12th. His approach ended up in high brush be hind and below the green, and he couldnt recover, nishing with a 72 and a tie for 11th at 269. Brown was tied with John son and Clark briey mid way through the round, but played the back nine in par 36 and fell back. Clark, the lone contender with a long putter, bogeyed No. 9 to fall out of the joint lead. Harman, whose best previous nishes were ties for third place, also earned his rst invitations to the Mas ters and the Tournament of Champions. He got his third eagle in 19 holes when he eagled the par-5 second for the second straight day. He sank a 4-foot putt after a brilliant approach from 223 yards. A bogey on No. 5 was offset by a birdie on the ninth, the most difcult hole on the front nine. SCOTTISH OPENABERDEEN, Scotland Justin Rose won the Scottish Open by two shots after a nal round of 6-under 65 on Sunday, sealing back-to-back victories either side of the At lantic and bolstering his con dence ahead of next weeks British Open. The 2013 U.S. Open cham pion turned the last day into a procession, rolling in six birdies and going bogey-free on a windless Royal Aber deen links course. Unheralded Swede Kristoffer Broberg nished sec ond on 14 under after a 66. That secured him a place at the British Open at Hoylake, along with other top-10 nishers Tyrrell Hatton and Scott Jamieson. Rose, who started the day tied for the lead with Marc Warren, eased to a rst win in Europe since 2007 and backed up his victory at the Quicken Loans National at Congressional last month.US SENIOR OPENEDMOND, Okla. Colin Montgomerie won a threehole playoff against Gene Sauers to win the U.S. Senior Open title Sunday at Oak Tree National. Both entered the playoff at 5 under. Montgomerie entered the third extra hole with a one-shot lead, then made a putt on No. 18 to par the hole and claim the win. Montgomerie became the fth golfer to win both the PGA Championship and U.S. Senior Open in the same year. He led at the end of the rst and second days of the Senior Open, but entered the nal round four shots behind Sauers and shot a 2-under 69 to force the playoff. It was the rst playoff at a U.S. Senior Open since 2002, when Don Pooley beat Tom Watson in a ve-hole playoff.Martins eagle on 18 wins Womens British Open SCOTT HEPPELL / AP Mo Martin of the U.S. poses with the trophy after winning the Womens British Open golf championship on Sunday at the Royal Birkdale Golf Club, in Southport, England. NBA BRIAN MAHONEYAP Basketball WriterNEW YORK Carme lo Anthony wanted to be a Knick a few years ago, and nothing has changed now. Anthony is staying in New York, announcing his decision Sunday in a posting titled My City, My Heart on his website. This organization has supported me and in return, I want to stay and build here with this city and my team, An thony said. He explained that he owed it to himself to explore all his options as a free agent, and thanked the teams he met with for their interest. Through it all, my heart never wavered, he wrote. The Knicks can pay the All-Star forward nearly $130 million over ve years, though Anthony has said he would be open to taking less if it would help build a winning team. But the 30-year-old forward also wants to compete for champi onships, and the Knicks dont seem ready at the moment. They went 3745 last season, the rst time in Anthonys 11year career he missed the postseason. They hired Phil Jack son as president in March, and Antho ny believes the 11-time champion as a coach can turn the organization into a winner.CYCLING BASEBALL JEROME PUGMIREAP Sports WriterMULHOUSE, France German rider Tony Martin broke ahead early and comfortably held on to win the hilly ninth stage of the Tour de France on Sunday, while Frenchman Tony Gallopin took the yellow jersey from over night leader Vincenzo Nibali of Italy. The 29-year-old Ger man, a three-time world time trial champion, broke away with specialist climber Alessan dro De Marchi of Italy. The objective was to win the stage. There was a chance to do it and I felt good, my legs felt good, Martin said. The 105.4-mile trek from Gerardmer to Mulhouse in the mid-sized Vosges mountain range near the German border featured six mostly moderate uphill treks that posed Martin little problem. It was a good day for France with Gallopin set to defend the yellow jer sey today Bastille Day. Gallopin, of the Lotto Belisol team, nished several minutes behind but did well enough to erase his decit of more than three minutes to Nibali. Its with great pride that I will ride on the national holiday. Its a little bit scary, but I will enjoy the day. Shortly before the days most difcult climb a Category 1 ascent of 10.8 ki lometers up Le Markstein Martin broke away about 60 kilometers from the end. Gal lopins chasing group was about two minutes behind them and Nibali more than six min utes adrift. Martin was no threat to Nibalis yellow jer sey, but the 26-year-old Gallopin was. CHRISTOPHE ENA / AP Frances Tony Gallopin celebrates on the podium of the ninth stage of the Tour de France on Sunday in Mulhouse, France.NBA MARK DIDTLERAssociated PressST. PETERSBURG All-Star David Price scattered ve hits in eight-plus innings to win his fourth consecutive start and the Tampa Bay Rays beat the Toronto Blue Jays 3-0 on Sunday. Price (9-7), who had his start pushed back one day because of a stomach virus, struck out ve and walked one. The left-hander was pulled after giving up a leadoff single in the ninth to Melky Cabrera. Because Price pitched on Sunday, he is ineligible to play in the All-Star game Tuesday night in Minnesota. His roster spot was taken by his former teammate, Seattle clos er Fernando Rodney. The Rays, who have won 11 of 15, got RBI singles from Logan Forsythe and Jose Mo lina. Jake McGee got three outs for his sev enth save. R.A. Dickey (7-9) gave up two runs and ve hits over six innings. Toronto has not won a road series against Tampa Bay since April 2007, a span of 22 sets. Toronto has lost eight of 10 overall. Despite their recent struggles, the Blue Jays 49 wins at the AllStar break are their most since 2006. A win Sunday would have given them 50 victo ries before the break for the rst time since 1992. The Rays took a 1-0 lead on a two-out sin gle by Forsythe in the second.Martin wins Tours 9th stage TIM REYNOLDSAP Basketball WriterHalf a world away, Chris Bosh could not escape the frenzy of last week. An offer from the Houston Rockets was waiting. His long time Miami teammate LeB ron James was leaving. For a few moments, Bosh found himself wondering if his days with the Heat were over. Then he looked at his fami ly, and everything stopped. Weve built a life in South Florida and were comfort able, Bosh said Sunday. So I had to do whats best now for myself and my family. With that, his decision be came very easy. Bosh will sign a $118 million, ve-year deal to stay with the Heat, a for mality only held up by the lo gistical challenge presented by him being in Ghana right now and with more exotic stops on a family vacation still to come before returning home. When he nally puts pen to paper, the Heat locker room will essentially become his and in an interview with The Associated Press, Bosh said that while its a shock to re alize James is no longer with Miami after four seasons, hes ready to have that voice. I cant lie to you: Im excit ed. Im excited for the chal lenge, Bosh said during a break from NBA Africa duties. I want to step up to the chal lenge. I feel this is a chance to prove to myself and others that I can still do this. I want to see if I can do whats necessary to go in there and win every night. Thats the challenge of being a leader. Im a much better player and a leader now, so itll be fun.Bosh excited for the challenge of staying with HeatPrice wins 4th straight, Rays top Blue Jays 3-0Knicks will keep Anthony

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 14, 2014 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Baltimore 51 42 .548 7-3 L-1 25-23 26-19 Toronto 49 47 .510 3 2 2-8 L-2 25-21 24-26 New York 47 46 .505 4 3 6-4 W-1 18-23 29-23 Tampa Bay 44 53 .454 9 8 6-4 W-2 22-28 22-25 Boston 43 52 .453 9 8 5-5 W-1 23-26 20-2 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 53 38 .582 6-4 L-1 25-22 28-16 Kansas City 48 46 .511 6 2 4-6 W-1 22-25 26-21 Cleveland 47 47 .500 7 3 6-4 W-1 29-19 18-28 Chicago 45 51 .469 10 6 5-5 L-1 24-21 21-30 Minnesota 43 50 .462 11 7 5-5 W-1 21-22 22-28 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 59 36 .621 7-3 W-1 30-15 29-21 Los Angeles 57 37 .606 1 9-1 W-5 32-15 25-22 Seattle 51 44 .537 8 4-6 L-1 24-26 27-18 Houston 40 56 .417 19 11 4-6 L-1 21-28 19-28 Texas 38 57 .400 21 13 1-9 L-8 18-30 20-27 NATIONAL LEAGUEEAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Washington 51 42 .548 6-4 W-2 28-19 23-23 Atlanta 52 43 .547 5-5 W-2 25-19 27-24 New York 45 50 .474 7 7 8-2 W-3 25-23 20-27 Miami 44 50 .468 7 7 3-7 L-4 27-22 17-28 Philadelphia 42 53 .442 10 10 5-5 L-2 19-29 23-24 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 53 43 .552 2-8 W-1 25-24 28-19 St. Louis 52 44 .542 1 6-4 L-1 27-20 25-24 Cincinnati 51 44 .537 1 1 7-3 W-1 27-21 24-23 Pittsburgh 49 46 .516 3 3 5-5 L-1 29-20 20-26 Chicago 40 54 .426 12 11 2-8 L-2 20-22 20-32 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Los Angeles 54 43 .557 6-4 W-2 25-24 29-19 San Francisco 52 43 .547 1 5-5 W-1 28-25 24-18 San Diego 41 54 .432 12 11 3-7 L-2 24-25 17-29 Colorado 40 54 .426 12 11 4-6 L-1 24-24 16-30 Arizona 40 56 .417 13 12 5-5 L-1 17-31 23-25 SATURDAYS GAMESChicago White Sox 6, Cleveland 2 N.Y. Yankees 3, Baltimore 0 Houston 3, Boston 2 Minnesota 9, Colorado 3 Tampa Bay 10, Toronto 3 Detroit 5, Kansas City 1 L.A. Angels 5, Texas 2 Seattle 6, Oakland 2SATURDAYS GAMESArizona 2, San Francisco 0 Atlanta 11, Chicago Cubs 6 N.Y. Mets 5, Miami 4 Minnesota 9, Colorado 3 St. Louis 10, Milwaukee 2 Pittsburgh 6, Cincinnati 5, 11 innings Washington 5, Philadelphia 3, 10 innings L.A. Dodgers 1, San Diego 0SUNDAYS GAMESCleveland 3, Chicago White Sox 2 Tampa Bay 3, Toronto 0 Boston 11, Houston 0 Kansas City 5, Detroit 2 L.A. Angels 10, Texas 7 Oakland 4, Seattle 1 Minnesota 13, Colorado 5 N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore, lateSUNDAYS GAMESN.Y. Mets 9, Miami 1 Cincinnati 6, Pittsburgh 3 Washington 10, Philadelphia 3 Milwaukee 11, St. Louis 2 Atlanta 10, Chicago Cubs 7 San Francisco 8, Arizona 4 L.A. Dodgers 1, San Diego 0 Minnesota 13, Colorado 5 MIKE CARLSON / AP Toronto Blue Jays Colby Rasmus walks away after striking out during the ninth inning on Sunday in St. Petersburg. The Rays won 3-0. TODAYS GAMESNone scheduledTODAYS GAMESNone scheduledAMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Altuve, Houston, .339; Beltre, Texas, .338; Cano, Seattle, .334; Chisenhall, Cleveland, .328; VMartinez, Detroit, .328; Brantley, Cleveland, .326; Mi Cabrera, Detroit, .309; KSuzuki, Minnesota, .309. RUNS: Dozier, Minnesota, 67; Kinsler, Detroit, 64; Trout, Los Angeles, 64; Brantley, Cleveland, 63; Donaldson, Oak land, 61; Bautista, Toronto, 58; Pujols, Los Angeles, 58. RBI: MiCabrera, Detroit, 74; NCruz, Baltimore, 74; JAbreu, Chicago, 73; Encarnacion, Toronto, 70; Trout, Los Angeles, 69; Donaldson, Oakland, 65; Moss, Oak land, 65. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 130; Cano, Seattle, 117; Me Cabrera, Toronto, 116; AJones, Baltimore, 116; Kinsler, Detroit, 115; Brantley, Cleveland, 113. DOUBLES: MiCabrera, Detroit, 34; Altuve, Houston, 29; Kinsler, Detroit, 26; Pedroia, Boston, 26; Plouffe, Min nesota, 26; Hosmer, Kansas City, 25; AEscobar, Kansas City, 24; EEscobar, Minnesota, 24; AGordon, Kansas City, 24; Trout, Los Angeles, 24. TRIPLES: Rios, Texas, 8; Bourn, Cleveland, 7; Eaton, Chicago, 6; Gardner, New York, 6; Trout, Los Angeles, 5. HOME RUNS: JAbreu, Chicago, 29; NCruz, Baltimore, 28; Encarnacion, Toronto, 26; Trout, Los Angeles, 22; VMartinez, Detroit, 21; Donaldson, Oakland, 20; Moss, Oakland, 20; Ortiz, Boston, 20; Pujols, Los Angeles, 20. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 41; RDavis, Detroit, 24; Ellsbury, New York, 24; AEscobar, Kansas City, 22. PITCHING: Tanaka, New York, 12-4; Porcello, Detroit, 12-5; FHernandez, Seattle, 11-2; Richards, Los Angeles, 11-2; Scherzer, Detroit, 11-3; Kazmir, Oakland, 113; Buehrle, Toronto, 10-6; Weaver, Los Angeles, 10-6; Lackey, Boston, 10-6. ERA: Sale, Chicago, 2.08; FHernandez, Seattle, 2.12; Kazmir, Oakland, 2.38; Tanaka, New York, 2.51; Richards, Los Angeles, 2.55; Buehrle, Toronto, 2.64; Lester, Boston, 2.65. STRIKEOUTS: Price, Tampa Bay, 159; FHernandez, Seattle, 154; Scherzer, Detroit, 146; Kluber, Cleveland, 142; Darvish, Texas, 142; Tanaka, New York, 135. SAVES: Rodney, Seattle, 27; Holland, Kansas City, 24; DavRobertson, New York, 23; Perkins, Minnesota, 22.NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Tulowitzki, Colorado, .344; MaAdams, St. Louis, .330; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, .325; McGehee, Miami, .319; Lucroy, Milwaukee, .315; Goldschmidt, Ar izona, .312; Morneau, Colorado, .307; Puig, Los Angeles, .307. RUNS: Tulowitzki, Colorado, 71; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 66; Pence, San Francisco, 66; FFreeman, Atlanta, 64; Rendon, Washington, 64; Rizzo, Chicago, 61; Stanton, Miami, 61. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 63; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 61; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 61; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 60; Morneau, Colorado, 59; Desmond, Washington, 55; Howard, Philadelphia, 55; JUpton, Atlanta, 55. HITS:AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 114; McGehee, Miami, 114; DanMurphy, New York, 113; Pence, San Francisco, 113; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 110; FFreeman, Atlanta, 108; Blackmon, Colorado, 106; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 106. DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 36; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 31; FFreeman, Atlanta, 28; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 28; Span, Washington, 28; SCastro, Chicago, 26; Puig, Los Angeles, 26. TRIPLES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 9; BCrawford, San Fran cisco, 8; Braun, Milwaukee, 6; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 6. HOME RUNS: Stanton, Miami, 21; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 21; Rizzo, Chicago, 20; Byrd, Philadelphia, 18; Frazier, Cincinnati, 18; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 17. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 42; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 38; Revere, Philadelphia, 26; EYoung, New York, 23; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 21; Rollins, Philadelphia, 19. PITCHING: Simon, Cincinnati, 12-3; Wainwright, St. Louis, 12-4; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 11-2; Greinke, Los Angeles, 11-5; Lynn, St. Louis, 10-6. ERA: Kershaw, Los Angeles, 1.78; Wainwright, St. Louis, 1.83; Cueto, Cincinnati, 2.03; Beckett, Los Angeles, 2.26; Teheran, Atlanta, 2.57; HAlvarez, Miami, 2.63. STRIKEOUTS: Strasburg, Washington, 149; Cueto, Cincinnati, 134; Kennedy, San Diego, 133; Greinke, Los Angeles, 127; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 126; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 123; Miley, Arizona, 118. SAVES: Rosenthal, St. Louis, 28; Kimbrel, Atlanta, 28; FrRodriguez, Milwaukee, 27; Jansen, Los Angeles, 26. Rays 3, Blue Jays 0 T oronto T ampa Bay ab r h bi ab r h bi Reyes ss 4 0 1 0 Kier mr cf 3 1 1 0 MeCarr lf 3 0 1 0 Zobrist rf 3 0 0 0 Bautist rf 4 0 1 0 Jo yce dh 3 0 1 0 DJhnsn 1b 3 0 0 0 SRdrgz ph-dh 1 0 0 0 ClRsms ph 1 0 0 0 Longori 3b 3 0 1 1 Kratz dh 4 0 0 0 Lone y 1b 2 0 0 0 StTllsn 2b 3 0 0 0 Guyer lf 4 0 0 0 Mstrnn cf 3 0 0 0 YEscor ss 4 2 1 0 JFrncs 3b 2 0 2 0 JMolin c 3 0 1 1 Thole c 2 0 0 0 F orsyth 2b 3 0 1 1 DNavrr ph-c 1 0 0 0 Totals 30 0 5 0 T otals 29 3 6 3 Toronto 000 000 000 0 Tampa Bay 010 001 10x 3 DPTampa Bay 2. LOBToronto 5, Tampa Bay 8. SB Kiermaier (2), Zobrist (5), Y.Escobar (1). SFLongoria. IP H R ER BB SO Toronto Dickey L,7-9 6 5 2 2 3 5 Cecil 1/3 1 1 1 1 1 Redmond 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 Janssen 1 0 0 0 0 1 Tampa Bay Price W,9-7 8 5 0 0 1 5 McGee S,7-8 1 0 0 0 0 2 Price pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. HBPby Dickey (J.Molina), by Price (J.Francisco). WPMcGee. UmpiresHome, Sean Barber; First, Tim Timmons; Second, Todd Tichenor; Third, Mike Everitt. T:45. A,187 (31,042). Mets 9, Marlins 1 Miami Ne w York ab r h bi ab r h bi Yelich lf 3 0 1 0 Gr ndrs rf 4 2 3 1 Hchvrr ss 4 0 1 0 Campll 2b 4 1 1 0 Stanton rf 1 0 0 0 DWrght 3b 4 2 2 2 RJhnsn ph 1 0 0 0 Duda 1b 5 1 2 1 McGeh 3b 4 1 1 0 Lagar s cf 5 0 2 1 GJones 1b 4 0 1 0 CY oung lf 2 1 1 2 Ozuna cf 3 0 1 1 Reck er c 5 0 1 1 Lucas 2b 3 0 0 0 T ejada ss 4 1 0 0 Mathis c 3 0 0 0 deGr m p 3 0 1 1 Hand p 1 0 0 0 F amili p 0 0 0 0 Bour ph 1 0 0 0 EY ong ph 2 1 1 0 JaTrnr p 0 0 0 0 Car lyle p 0 0 0 0 Solano ph 1 0 0 0 Gregg p 0 0 0 0 Hatchr p 0 0 0 0 SDyson p 0 0 0 0 Totals 29 1 5 1 T otals 38 9 14 9 Miami 000 100 000 1 New York 010 211 04x 9 EMcGehee (6). DPNew York 2. LOBMiami 4, New York 12. 2BG.Jones (21), Granderson (16), D.Wright 2 (24), Duda (21), Lagares (15). SBHechavarria (5), Granderson (7), E.Young 2 (25). CSYelich (3). SFC.Young. IP H R ER BB SO Miami Hand L,0-2 4 6 3 3 2 1 Ja.Turner 3 4 2 2 1 4 Gregg 0 1 3 3 2 0 Hatcher 1/3 3 1 1 1 0 S.Dyson 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 New York deGrom W,3-5 7 5 1 1 2 8 Familia 1 0 0 0 1 0 Carlyle 1 0 0 0 0 1 Gregg pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. UmpiresHome, Paul Schrieber; First, Ted Barrett; Second, Will Little; Third, Alfonso Marquez. Indians 3, White Sox 2 Chicago Cle veland ab r h bi ab r h bi De Aza lf 4 0 0 0 Kipnis 2b 4 0 0 0 CSnchz ss 5 0 0 0 A Carer ss 4 0 1 0 JAreu dh 5 0 3 0 Brantly cf 4 0 0 0 A.Dunn 1b 3 0 0 0 CSantn 1b 4 0 1 0 Viciedo rf 5 0 1 0 Rabur n rf 3 1 0 0 Gillaspi 3b 3 1 2 0 DvMr p rf 0 0 0 0 GBckh 2b 4 1 1 1 Swisher dh 4 1 2 0 Flowrs c 4 0 2 0 YGoms c 4 1 2 3 LeGarc cf 4 0 2 1 Chsnhll 3b 3 0 1 0 A viles lf 4 0 2 0 Totals 37 2 11 2 T otals 34 3 9 3 Chicago 000 000 020 2 Cleveland 010 000 02x 3 EC.Sanchez (1). DPCleveland 1. LOBChicago 12, Cleveland 10. 2BFlowers (7), Aviles (9). HRY. Gomes (12). SBLe.Garcia 2 (10). IP H R ER BB SO Chicago Joh.Danks 7 7 1 1 2 4 Guerra L,0-2 BS,3-3 1 2 2 2 0 1 Cleveland Bauer 6 2/3 8 0 0 3 10 Rzepczynski H,8 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Shaw W,4-1 BS,3-5 1 3 2 2 1 1 Allen S,12-13 1 0 0 0 0 2 UmpiresHome, Dan Iassogna; First, CB Bucknor; Second, Gary Cederstrom; Third, Tripp Gibson. T:00. A,070 (42,487). Reds 6, Pirates 3 Pittsburgh Cincinnati ab r h bi ab r h bi GPolnc rf 4 0 0 0 BHmltn cf 4 1 2 0 JHrrsn lf 4 0 2 1 Cozar t ss 3 0 0 0 AMcCt cf 4 1 1 0 F razier 3b 5 1 1 2 NWalkr 2b 4 1 1 2 Heise y lf 5 1 3 0 RMartn c 3 0 0 0 Br uce rf 4 1 0 0 I.Davis 1b 3 0 0 0 Mesorc c 2 1 2 1 Worley p 0 0 0 0 B.P ena 1b 4 0 0 0 Decker ph 1 0 0 0 Negron 2b 3 1 1 3 JHughs p 0 0 0 0 Cueto p 2 0 0 0 PAlvrz 3b 3 1 1 0 Ju.Diaz p 0 0 0 0 Mercer ss 4 0 0 0 Lutz ph 1 0 0 0 Liriano p 1 0 0 0 Broxtn p 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 3 5 3 T otals 33 6 9 6 Pittsburgh 000 111 000 3 Cincinnati 030 012 00x 6 EP.Alvarez (20), Cozart 2 (7). LOBPittsburgh 6, Cincinnati 11. 2BJ.Harrison (15), B.Hamilton (19), Heisey 2 (11), Mesoraco (15). 3BA.McCutchen (5). HRN.Walker (13), Frazier (19), Negron (1). CSR. Martin (4), B.Hamilton (15), Mesoraco (3). IP H R ER BB SO Pittsburgh Liriano L,1-7 4 3 3 3 6 4 Pimentel 1 1 1 1 2 1 Worley 2 4 2 2 0 1 J.Hughes 1 1 0 0 0 1 Cincinnati Cueto W,10-6 6 5 3 3 2 7 Ju.Diaz H,3 1 0 0 0 0 0 Broxton H,14 1 0 0 0 0 1 A.Chapman S,21-23 1 0 0 0 0 3 HBPby Cueto (R.Martin). WPLiriano. UmpiresHome, Tom Woodring; First, Brian Knight; Second, Fieldin Culbreth; Third, Manny Gonzalez. Nationals 10, Phillies 3 W ashington Philadelphia ab r h bi ab r h bi Span cf 5 2 2 0 GSizmr lf 4 1 1 0 Rendon 2b 5 3 3 1 Rollins ss 4 0 1 0 Werth rf 3 2 2 4 Utle y 2b 3 0 0 0 Frndsn pr-3b 0 0 0 0 CHr ndz ph 1 1 0 0 LaRoch 1b 5 0 0 0 How ard 1b 3 1 0 1 Barrett p 0 0 0 0 Byrd rf 3 0 0 0 Zmrmn 3b-1b 3 1 1 2 Asche 3b 4 0 2 1 Harper lf 4 1 1 0 Rupp c 4 0 0 1 Dsmnd ss 4 1 1 2 Re vere cf 3 0 1 0 Loaton c 4 0 1 1 DeF rts p 0 0 0 0 Roark p 3 0 1 0 Manshp p 0 0 0 0 Detwilr p 0 0 0 0 DBrwn ph 1 0 0 0 McLoth ph-rf 1 0 0 0 Kndrck p 1 0 0 0 Hollnds p 0 0 0 0 GwynJ cf 0 0 0 0 Mayrry ph-cf 1 0 0 0 Totals 37 10 12 10 T otals 32 3 5 3 Washington 300 004 012 10 Philadelphia 000 001 002 3 EFrandsen (2). DPPhiladelphia 1. LOBWashington 3, Philadelphia 5. 2BRendon (24), Desmond (15), Asche 2 (15). HRWerth (12), Zimmerman (4). SK. Kendrick. SFZimmerman. IP H R ER BB SO Washington Roark W,8-6 7 4 1 1 0 6 Detwiler 1 0 0 0 0 1 Barrett 1 1 2 0 1 1 Philadelphia K.Kendrick L,4-9 5 2/3 5 5 5 0 5 Hollands 1 1/3 3 2 2 1 2 De Fratus 1 1/3 4 3 3 0 2 Manship 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby Roark (Byrd), by K.Kendrick (Werth). WPBarrett, K.Kendrick 2, De Fratus. UmpiresHome, Toby Basner; First, Mark Wegner; Second, Mike Winters; Third, Andy Fletcher. T:03. A,185 (43,651). Red Sox 11, Astros 0 Boston Houston ab r h bi ab r h bi B.Holt rf-2b 6 2 5 1 Altuve 2b 4 0 0 0 Pedroia 2b 4 0 2 0 JCastro c 3 0 1 0 Carp 1b 1 0 1 2 Cor prn c 1 0 0 0 D.Ortiz dh 4 0 0 2 Springr dh 3 0 0 0 Napoli 1b 3 1 1 0 Guzmn ph 1 0 0 0 Betts rf 1 1 0 0 Car ter lf 3 0 1 0 Nava lf 4 2 2 0 Singltn 1b 3 0 0 0 BrdlyJr cf 4 1 1 1 MDmn 3b 3 0 0 0 Bogarts 3b 3 2 0 1 Gr ssmn rf 3 0 1 0 Drew ss 4 1 2 0 KHr ndz cf 3 0 0 0 Vazquz c 4 1 2 2 MGnzlz ss 3 0 0 0 Totals 38 11 16 9 T otals 30 0 3 0 Boston 112 020 203 11 Houston 000 000 000 0 EMa.Gonzalez (3), Altuve (5), Singleton (6). DP Houston 5. LOBBoston 11, Houston 3. 2BVazquez (3). 3BCarp (1). HRB.Holt (3). SFBogaerts, Vazquez. IP H R ER BB SO Boston Buchholz W,4-5 9 3 0 0 0 12 Houston Peacock L,3-6 1/3 2 1 1 1 1 Bass 3 1/3 6 3 2 1 0 D.Downs 1 1 2 1 3 0 Zeid 2 3 2 0 1 2 Veras 1 1/3 1 0 0 2 1 D.Martinez 1 3 3 3 0 0 UmpiresHome, Marty Foster; First, Rob Drake; Sec ond, Alan Porter; Third, Joe West. T:23. A,681 (42,060). Royals 5, Tigers 2 Detroit Kansas City ab r h bi ab r h bi AJcksn cf 4 1 2 0 Aoki rf-lf 4 0 0 0 Kinsler 2b 4 0 0 0 Infante 2b 4 0 1 2 MiCarr 1b 3 0 0 1 Hosmer 1b 4 0 1 1 JMrtnz rf 4 0 3 1 BButler dh 3 1 1 0 TrHntr dh 4 0 0 0 Mostks 3b 4 1 1 0 Cstllns 3b 4 0 0 0 Ibanez lf 3 0 1 0 Avila c 4 0 1 0 L.Cain pr-rf 1 1 0 0 Suarez ss 3 0 0 0 AEscor ss 4 1 2 1 RDavis lf 3 1 3 0 JDyson cf 4 0 2 1 Ha yes c 2 0 1 0 S.P erez ph-c 1 1 0 0 Totals 33 2 9 2 T otals 34 5 10 5 Detroit 002 000 000 2 Kansas City 000 000 50x 5 DPKansas City 2. LOBDetroit 5, Kansas City 8. 2BHosmer (26), Hayes (1). SBJ.Dyson (18). SF Mi.Cabrera. IP H R ER BB SO Detroit Verlander L,8-8 6 1/3 6 4 4 1 3 Krol 1/3 0 1 1 1 0 Alburquerque 0 1 0 0 0 0 Coke 1 1/3 3 0 0 1 0 Kansas City B.Chen 5 1/3 8 2 2 0 2 Ventura W,7-7 1 2/3 1 0 0 0 3 W.Davis H,17 1 0 0 0 0 1 G.Holland S,25-26 1 0 0 0 0 1 Alburquerque pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. WPVentura. UmpiresHome, Bill Miller; First, Adam Hamari; Second, Chad Fairchild; Third, Vic Carapazza. T:02. A,424 (37,903). Brewers 11, Cardinals 2 St. Louis Milw aukee ab r h bi ab r h bi MCrpnt 3b 3 0 0 0 CGomz cf 4 3 3 2 M.Ellis ph-3b 1 0 0 0 Gennett 2b 4 2 3 2 Wong 2b 4 1 1 0 Braun rf 4 0 2 2 Hollidy lf 3 0 0 0 ArRmr 3b 5 1 3 1 Bourjos cf 0 1 0 0 F rRdrg p 0 0 0 0 MAdms 1b 4 0 1 1 Lucro y c 4 1 1 0 JhPerlt ss 3 0 1 0 Maldnd c 0 0 0 0 Grenwd p 0 0 0 0 KDa vis lf 5 1 1 2 Kottars ph 1 0 0 1 Overa y 1b 5 0 1 1 Craig rf 4 0 1 0 EHer rr ss 5 3 5 0 Jay cf-lf 4 0 0 0 WP erlt p 1 0 0 0 T.Cruz c 3 0 1 0 R Weks ph 0 0 0 0 CMrtnz p 1 0 0 0 WSmith p 0 0 0 0 Tavers ph 1 0 0 0 MrRynl ph-3b 1 0 0 0 Maness p 0 0 0 0 Motte p 0 0 0 0 Descals ss 1 0 0 0 Totals 33 2 5 2 T otals 38 11 19 10 St. Louis 000 100 001 2 Milwaukee 200 213 12x 11 EM.Ellis (1), Gennett (7). DPSt. Louis 2, Milwaukee 1. LOBSt. Louis 5, Milwaukee 10. 2BT.Cruz (4), C.Gomez (24), Gennett (22), Lucroy (32), E.Herrera (5). HRK.Davis (15). SBWong (12). SW.Peralta 2. IP H R ER BB SO St. Louis C.Martinez L,2-4 4 7 4 4 3 5 Maness 1 1/3 5 4 4 0 0 Motte 2/3 1 0 0 0 0 Greenwood 2 6 3 3 0 1 Milwaukee W.Peralta W,10-6 7 3 1 0 0 5 W.Smith 1 1 0 0 0 1 Fr.Rodriguez 1 1 1 1 1 0 HBPby Greenwood (R.Weeks), by C.Martinez (C.Go mez). PBLucroy. BalkC.Martinez. UmpiresHome, Jeff Nelson; First, Laz Diaz; Second, Mark Carlson; Third, Scott Barry. T:55. A,345 (41,900). Braves 10, Cubs 7 Atlanta Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi BUpton cf 5 0 0 0 Coghln lf 4 2 2 2 ASmns ss 2 2 0 0 Alcantr 2b 5 1 2 2 FFrmn 1b 5 0 0 0 Rizzo 1b 5 1 1 0 J.Upton lf 4 2 2 0 SCastro ss 2 0 0 0 Heywrd rf 5 2 2 1 V aluen 3b 3 1 1 0 CJhnsn 3b 4 3 3 3 Ruggin cf 3 0 0 0 LaStell 2b 5 1 3 3 Grimm p 0 0 0 0 Laird c 5 0 1 2 Olt ph 1 0 0 0 Tehern p 2 0 0 1 Wrght p 0 0 0 0 JSchafr ph 1 0 0 0 NRmrz p 0 0 0 0 Avilan p 0 0 0 0 Sw eeny rf 3 1 0 1 Smmns p 0 0 0 0 JoBakr c 4 0 2 2 JWaldn p 0 0 0 0 T .Wood p 2 0 0 0 Kimrel p 0 0 0 0 Rosscp p 0 0 0 0 Lak e cf 2 1 1 0 Totals 38 10 11 10 T otals 34 7 9 7 Atlanta 034 000 300 10 Chicago 000 002 230 7 LOBAtlanta 7, Chicago 5. 2BJ.Upton (19), La Stella (8), Laird (7), Alcantara (3), Jo.Baker (4). HRC.Johnson (6), Coghlan (5), Alcantara (1). CSCoghlan (1). IP H R ER BB SO Atlanta Teheran W,9-6 7 7 4 4 2 6 Avilan 0 1 2 2 2 0 S.Simmons 1/3 0 1 1 1 1 J.Walden H,11 2/3 1 0 0 0 0 Kimbrel S,29-33 1 0 0 0 0 1 Chicago T.Wood L,7-8 6 7 7 7 3 4 Rosscup 2/3 2 3 3 2 2 Grimm 1 1/3 0 0 0 1 1 W.Wright 1/3 1 0 0 0 0 N.Ramirez 2/3 1 0 0 0 0 Avilan pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. UmpiresHome, Jeff Kellogg; First, Dan Bellino; Second, Brian ONora; Third, Pat Hoberg.

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ComeDiscover... rfrntbt ComeDiscover... ComeDiscover... ComeDiscover... ComeDiscover... ComeDiscover... ComeDiscover... ComeDiscover... ComeDiscover... ComeDiscover... ComeDiscover... ComeDiscover... Ca ll352-253-5100 fo ra co mplimentary Lu nch& To ur ComeDiscover... ComeDiscover... ComeDiscover... ComeDiscover... ComeDiscover... ComeDiscover... ComeDiscover... ComeDiscover... Ca ll 352-253-5100 fo r a complimentary Lu nch & To ur License# AL12259 Living HealthySend your health news to features@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 14, 2014VEGANS: Communities, research are increasing / C6 Health check www.dailycommercial.com LAKE COUNTY AARP to offer Smart Driver Classes for seniors The AARP Driver Safety program helps participants rene their skills in a six-hour class. Upon completion of the course, Florida drivers age 50 or older may be eligible for insurance discounts. The cost is $15 for AARP members and $20 for non-members. Payment must be made by check to AARP. No cash or credit cards accepted. Classes will be: Tuesday and Thursday from 1 to 4 p.m., Harden-Pauli Funeral Home, 1617 S. Bay St., in Eustis, call 352-394-0250 to register; August 4 and 6, from 1 to 4 p.m., Leesburg Senior Center, 1211 Penn St., register by calling 352-3263540; August 4 and 6, from 9 a.m. to noon at the W.T. Bland Public Library,1995 N. Donnelly St., Mount Dora, register at 352-735-7180. LEESBURG Volunteers sought for New VisionOfce volunteers are needed at the New Vision for Independence branch in Leesburg at 9501 U.S. Highway 441. Volunteers should be able to do data entry, take phone calls and other projects supporting the vision rehabilitation team, with a weekly commitment of three-to-six-hours. New Vision is a local provider of services for people with low vision or blindness providing support through rehabilitation and education. Call 352-435-5040 for information, or go to www.newvision.org. LAKE COUNTY LIFE group will hold luncheons for the widowLIFE will hold Social Support Group luncheons for the widowed for July will be held in Eustis at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday at the Golden Corral, 15810 U.S. Highway 441, in Eustis. Another luncheon will be held in Lady Lake at the North Lake Presby terian Church at 11:30 a.m. Friday, 975 Rolling Acres Road. The meal will be prepared by church staff and DJ Bob Fowler will entertain. Luncheons cost $10 and an RSVP is needed by calling 352-787-0403 or emailing rreed@beyersfhc.com.TAVARES Extension offers Put Pain in Its Place classThe UF/IFAS Lake County Extension Service will offer classes for the public about osteoarthritis pain and strategies for controlling and even preventing pain in this program created by the National Council on Aging and the Arthritis Foundation. Classes will be offered at two different locations beginning on Aug. 4 from 1 to 2:30 p.m. at the Lady Lake Public Library, 225 W. Guava St. Registration is needed by going to ar thritisaug2014.eventbrite.com. The second class will be held from 10 to 11:30 a.m. on Aug. 5 at the Leesburg Public Library, 100 E. Main St. Registration needed by going to leesburgarthritis.eventbrite.com. For information call 352-3434101, ext. 2719. KIM HONE-MCMAHANMCTIf youve been in Portage Lakes State Park in Ohio recently you just might have spotted some dragons. Not the long-toothed Loch Ness kind that live under the sea, but dragon boats that glide across the water. Members of the Dragon Dream Team, all wearing pink life jackets, have been practicing their strokes on recent warm summer evenings. The women remained in sync when paddling the 40-foot watercraft. They were beautiful, strong, ener getic and breast cancer survivors. The team, which hones its skills three times a week on Rex Lake, is Ohios rst all-breast cancer survivor dragon boat team. On Saturday, they are hosting the second annual Dragons on the Lake Festival featur ing 29 teams, 600 paddlers and six boats. The day begins at 8:15 / a.m. with a ceremonial awakening of the dragons. Once the racing begins at 9 / a.m., it will be nonstop action with dragon boats heading to the nish line every 12 minutes. The races are fast and furious, typically lasting one to two minutes. There will also be activities at the beach until the closing ceremony around 3:30 / p.m. Sitting in the front of the boat, petite Mary Hlavac beat on the drum, its vibrations echoing in the cove. It was her job to help the 20 paddlers with technique, keeping them moving at the same pace. When asked how she got that cake job, she laughed noting it was her size combined with problems with her hands and elbows that earned her the spot. Being a boisterous musician who knows how to keep a beat didnt hurt either. Im an outdoor person who loves being here, said Hlavac, an 18-year cancer survivor. Getting out on the lake is great. The women, who come to Portage Lakes from all over Northeast Ohio, said its the camaraderie that they share with the other women that is as important, or maybe even more so, than the exercise. Throughout the year, the team has picnics, par ties and other social events. Their ages range from late 20s to around 80, said Marilyn Purdy, an eight-year survivor. And anyone, regardless of experience or skill level, can participate. What we try to do is live our team motto: good quality of life following breast cancer. Dragon boating is certainly one way to show others Awakening the dragonAncient dragon boat racing gives cancer survivors a vigorous workout PHOTOS BY ED SUBA JR. / MCT ABOVE: Helmsman Tony Torgersen, left, and drummer Mary Hlavac, right, watch while members of the Dragon Dream Team raise their paddles in preparation to start a practice run on Rex Lake in Akron, Ohio. BELOW: Members of the Dragon Dream Team head out onto Rex Lake to begin their practice session. COLLEEN SCHRAPPENMCTIt has been 75 years since baseball icon Lou Gehrig declared himself the luckiest man on the face of the earth, despite a diagnosis at age 35 of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a disease with no cure. In the years since, polio has been virtually erad icated. Chemotherapy has made numerous cancers into curable illnesses. Chemically synthesized insulin treats diabetes. AIDS is kept in check with protease inhibitors. Prozac and its ilk alleviate depres sion. In those 75 years, ALS, the disease that often bears Gehrigs name, has taken the lives of 375,000 Americans, including Gehrigs life at age 37. In those 75 years, one drug has received FDA ap proval in the treatment of ALS. That was in 1995.75 years after Gehrigs speech, frustration, hope surround disease ROBERT COHEN / MCT Dave Larson, who suffers from ALS, gets a treatment from massage therapist Kelly Sontheimer.SEE GEHRIG | C4SEE DRAGON | C6

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 14, 2014

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Whatstheruling?RainoutInformation 352-234-4489 Mon.7/14..............WinterGarden(away) Tu es.7/15..............WinterGarden(home) We d.7/16..............WinterGarden(home) Thurs.7/17..............Sanford(away) Fri.7/18..............Sanford(home) Sat.7/19..............Sanford(away) Sun.7/20..............SEProspectShowcase (Atlanta,GA)ANSWERonFriday 20 This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule MIKE STOBBEAssociated PressATLANTA A govern ment scientist cleaning out an old storage room at a research center near Washington made a startling discovery last week decades-old vials of smallpox packed away and forgotten in a cardboard box. The six glass vials were intact and sealed, and scientists have yet to establish whether the virus is dead or alive, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday. Still, the nd was dis turbing because for decades after smallpox was declared eradicated in 1980, world health authorities said the only known samples left were safely stored in su per-secure laboratories in Atlanta and in Russia. Ofcials said this is the rst time in the U.S. that unaccounted-for smallpox has been discovered. At least one leading scientist raised the possibility that there are more such vials out there around the world. It was the second recent incident in which a U.S. government health agency appeared to have mishandled a highly dangerous germ. Last month, scores of CDC employees in Atlanta were feared exposed to anthrax because of a laboratory safety lapse. The CDC began giving them anti biotics as a precaution. The freeze-dried smallpox samples were found in a building at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, that has been used by the Food and Drug Administration since 1972, according to the CDC. The scientist was cleaning out a cold room between two laboratories on July 1 when he made the discovery, FDA ofcials said. Ofcials said labeling indicated the small pox had been put in the vials in the 1950s. But they said its not clear how long the vials had been in the building, which did not open until the 1960s. No one has been infected, and no smallpox contamination was found in the building. Smallpox can be deadly even after it is freeze-dried, but the virus usually has to be kept cold to remain alive and dangerous. In an interview Tuesday, a CDC ofcial said he believed the vials were stored for many years at room temperature, which would sug gest the samples are dead. But FDA ofcials said later in the day that the smallpox was in cold storage for decades. We dont yet know if its live and infectious, said Stephan Monroe, deputy director of the CDC center that handles highly dangerous infectious agents. The samples were rushed under FBI pro tection to the CDC in Atlanta for testing, which could take a few weeks. After that, they will be destroyed. In at least one other such episode, vials of smallpox were found at the bottom of a freezer in an Eastern Europe an country in the 1990s, according to Dr. David Heymann, a former World Health Organization ofcial who is now a professor at the Lon don School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Heymann said that when smallpox sam ples were gathered up for destruction decades ago, requests went out to ministers of health to collect all vials. As far as I know, there was never a conrma tion they had checked in with all groups who could have had the virus, he said.Forgotten vials of smallpox found in storage roomOfficials said this is the first time in the U.S. that unaccounted-for smallpox has been discovered. At least one leading scientist raised the possibility that there are more such vials out there around the world.

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 14, 2014 PUBLICNOTICENOTICEOFPREPARATION OFACOMPREHENSIVE PLANEVALUATIONAND APPRAISALLETTERTO THEDEPARTMENTOF ECONOMICOPPORTUNITYTheCityofColemanproposestoprepare andsend,inaccordancewithFlorida Statutes,anEvaluationandAppraisalletter regardingtheComprehensivePlantothe DepartmentofEconomicOpportunity. ApublichearingontheEvaluationand AppraisalletterwillbeheldonJuly21, 2014at7:00pmatColemanCityHall,3502 East Wa rmSprings Av e.,Coleman,Florida. TheCityofColemanispreparinga ComprehensivePlanEvaluationand ApprovalNotificationLettertosubmit totheFloridaDepartmentofEconomic OpportunityonAugust1.2014asrequired byFloridaStatutes.Acopyofthedraft letterisavailableatCityHallforreview.A publichearingisscheduledforJuly21, 2014at7:00pmatColemanCityHall. Commentsandrecommendationswill bereceivedbytheCityCouncilatthat time.Writtencommentsforconsideration maybemailedordeliveredtotheCity ofColeman,POBox456/3502E. Wa rm Springs Av e.,Coleman,Florida,335210456,by5:00p.m.onJuly21,2014. RuthBusby PublicServiceDirector CityofColemanD004185-July14,2014 rf n t b nnnYo ur Po diatristtreats... CENTRALFLORI DAFOOTCARE, P. A.Dr Nic k Przystawski,DPM www.Floridafoot.comD004208 That drug, riluzole, extends the life expec tancy of patients by two to three months. Half of the 5,600 Americans di agnosed with ALS each year will die within three years. Its an awful disor der, says neurologist Ghazala Hayat. The neurodegenerative disease attacks motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord, pro gressively weakening the body. Muscles twitch and cramp. Speech be comes thick and dif cult to understand. Swallowing and walking become arduous, then impossible. Eventually, the muscles that control breathing are affected; paralysis sets in. The lack of a medical breakthrough belies the amount of research going on. So far, 20 genes have been identied as linked to ALS, and mul tiple drug trials are underway. Each drug, even if its a failure, shows us a pathway, says Hayat, who runs an ALS clinic at St. Louis University. SLUs clinic is one of about 35 in the country to offer specialized, multidisciplined services to patients with ALS. More than a dozen practitioners at the clinic, including neurolo gists, social workers, di eticians and therapists, work together to de sign a treatment plan to manage each patients symptoms.AN EXHAUSTING DISEASEFor Dave Larson of Sunset Hills, Mo.,slurred speech and issues with swallowing rst tipped him off that something was wrong. But we would never have guessed ALS, says Ann Larson, his wife of 18 years. You put symptoms into WebMD, and about eight (possible causes) come up. Since his diagnosis in January 2013, their lives have revolved around the disease. Larson, 49, quit his job in publish ing; his wife stopped working, to care for him. A lifelong athlete he played Division 1 soccer at Texas Christian University Larson had to give up going to the gym in January. His athletic build has long faded. Larsons ngers curl in toward his palms. His toes, too, are curled, and his feet turn inward, soles facing each other, when he is seated. The muscles in his upper arms twitch because the nerves are not getting signals from his brain. Sometimes the muscles in his neck seize up and stiffen. He has a feeding tube but still tries to eat soft foods on his own. He eats and drinks only when someone else is with him, in case he as pirates. It is an exhausting dis ease, marked by con stant discomfort if not outright pain. He was red from occupational therapy as his wife jokingly puts it when he stopped improving. But twice a week, a massage thera pist from the Wellspring Journey Project comes to work his muscles. He is at his best in the morning. As the day progresses and fatigue sets in, it is harder to talk, to walk, to eat. But Larson is deter mined to hold onto whatever independence he can for as long as possible. In the slow, thick growl that makes his speech nearly impossible to un derstand, he says, My motto is, if you dont use it, it will die faster. With that in mind, the Larsons traveled to Ohio last month to have a diaphragmatic pacing device implanted in his abdomen. The surgery, per formed at Universi ty Hospitals of Cleveland at Case Western, involves implanting electrodes into the di aphragm, the muscle wall below the lungs. The electrodes stimu late the muscle to help with breathing. Its like (physical ther apy) for the diaphragm, so it will atrophy slower, says Ann Larson. They hope. With no cure, the goal is to slow the diseases progress. But ALS is unrelenting. You give up a little more independence each day, Dave Larson says. A shower wand helped when he couldnt lift his arm to wash his hair. Two weeks later, he could no longer use that. Now the bathroom is being renovated to keep it accessible when he can no longer walk. Soon, some of the furniture in the sunny family room that over looks the backyard will be moved elsewhere. The space will be taken over by a ramp so he no longer has to navigate the two steps up to the kitchen. What he misses the most, Larson says, is ex pressing his thoughts. By the time he can get his mouth to say what he is thinking, the conversation has often tak en a turn. Or people talk over him. Sometimes he raises his hand when he needs to say something, Ann Larson says as her hus band laughs. You dont realize how much people interrupt each other.ALS ADVOCACYSince Larsons diagnosis, Ann has found herself speaking for Dave. But she has also become well-versed on the legislative and med ical obstacles facing all ALS patients. With about 30,000 Americans estimated to have ALS, it is con sidered an orphan dis ease. That means little nancial incentive exists for research and devel opment. One proposal in Congress, the MOD DERN Cures Act, would ease some patent reg ulations and speed pa tient access to diagnos tic tools and treatments. The couple traveled to Washington in May to urge political support for the legislation. They were among a thousand people from across the country who met with their representatives for ALS Advocacy Day. The group lobbied for continued funding of the national ALS registry, which was started in 2008. The registry tracks patients, providing comparison data to doctors and potential trial sub jects to researchers. That funding is pend ing, says Maureen Hill, the president of the ALS Associations St. Louis Regional Chapter. But since the advocacy day, the House has approved a budget with $7.5 mil lion earmarked for ALS research programs. GEHRIG FROM PAGE C1 ROBERT COHEN / MCT Dave Larson gets help form his wife, Ann, following a massage treatment at their home in St. Louis.

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Monday, July 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 14, 2014 D004934 Seehowaffordablea RemingtonKitchen canbe! See how affordable a Remington Kitchen can be! CALL FORFREE ESTIMATES SERVICES:Ne w Cu st om Cabi ne tr y Cab in et Re fa ci ng G ra ni te Cou nter to ps Wi lso na rt HDLami na te Cou nter to pswi th Be ve led Ed ge & In te gr at ed Sinks RKFA MIL Y OW NED & OPERATEDSINCE1997(352)728-4441Monday -F rida y 9am-5pm Aching Fe et?Steprightintoourof fi ce.We specializeinquality medicalcareforall typesoffootproblems.Wa lk-Ins We lcome.Callnowtoschedule yourappointment. 923 We stDixie Av enueSuite B|Leesburg,FL34748352-435-7849|Nextto Dr Ta troDr Erik Zimmer mannPo dia tristYo urfeetareingoodhandswithus! rf Mos tM aj or Insurances Ac cep te d that can be very true, and it is true for us, she explained. We are not only a dragon boat team, but we are also a great support system. Dragon boating is an ancient Chinese sport. Present-day dragon boats are similar to those used more than a thousand years ago. The Dragon Dream Team notes that its the second most popular team sport in the world, after soccer. Nearly 50 million people race dragon boats worldwide. The local team was started by Jessica Mader, a breast cancer survivor from Silver Lake, Ohio. In 2006, while recuperating from surgery at her summer home on a lake in Nova Scotia, the 76-year-old woke up one morning and found a paddle and note on her front porch. The note instructed her to show up at a dock where she would meet members of the Bosom Buddies, a Canadian breast cancer sur vivor dragon boat team. Thrilled that she had morphed from a convalescing patient into a summer athlete, she told her plastic sur geon, Dr. Douglas Wagner, about her adventure when she returned to Ohio. Impressed, he offered to buy a dragon boat if she could nd enough people to form a team. Today, there are about 80 on the roster and around 50 active paddlers. With so many participants, a second boat was purchased. Many practice nights, both boats are lled with grinning women in pink. Last year, the rst Dragons on the Lake Festival was launched to benet Boatloads of Hope, a breast cancer and community outreach in Northeast Ohio. They give beautiful pashmina wraps to newly diagnosed breast cancer patients who are undergoing radiation or chemotherapy in area hospitals, along with a powerful message of hope. I think what makes them (the wraps) so special is that they are coming from women who have been there, Purdy said, going through what they are going through. DRAGON FROM PAGE C1 ED SUBA JR. / MCT Members of the Dragon Dream Team hold hands and say a short prayer before beginning their practice. BILL WADE / MCT Rebecca Gilbert, of Shadyside, is the author of Its Easy to Start Eating Vegan! DAVID TEMPLETONMCTNo, vegans are not extraterrestri als from a planet orbiting Vega, al though many might consider their dietary habits to be completely alien. Plant-only eaters represent a mere 2 percent of the population; another 5 percent describe themselves as veg etarian. In contrast, Americans are noted for their penchant for overconsump tion of such animal-based foods as meat, eggs and dairy along with high sugar intake. More than two-thirds of Americans are overweight or obese, more than a third having diabetes or metabolic syndrome. A poor diet is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, which carries with it a number of serious and life-threatening complications. Family history, low activity and ex cess body weight also increase a per sons chance of getting the disease. The vegan term can connote an animal-rights ethic and environmental activism, but the common denominator among all vegans is avoidance of all animal-based foodstuff. What might sound crazy to some, a diet completely devoid of steaks, eggs, cheese and ice cream, has an ally: science. There are no guarantees, but evidence continues blooming that a daily diet based on whole plant foods can prevent or reverse many of the chronic health problems plaguing America hypertension, high cho lesterol, heart disease and type 2 di abetes. Theres further evidence that a plant-based diet also can help pre vent or ght cancer, autoimmune diseases and arthritis, among many Vegan communities growing, along with research on health benefitsSEE VEGAN | C7 LAURAN NEERGAARDAssociated PressWASHINGTON How strong is that pina colada? Depending on how its made, it could contain as much alcohol as two glasses of wine. The National Insti tutes of Health is try ing to spread the word: Take a look at its online alcohol calculator to see how much youre real ly drinking with those summer cocktails. A standard drink is the amount of alcohol in a 12-ounce beer, 5 ounces of wine or 1.5 ounces of distilled spirits. Its a useful way to How strong is that drink? Calculator helps figuretrack alcohol con sumption. But the multiple ingredients of mixed drinks make for a harder count. Most people dont realize how much al cohol is actually in a drink, said Dr. George Koob, director of the NIHs National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Obviously it depends on the bartend er and whos mixing the drinks, Koob adds. Recipes matter: The calculators pina colada example, for instance, assumes it contains 3 ounces of rum. Plan on using 2 ounces instead? The calculator adjusts to show its like 1.3 stan dard drinks. What about a mar garita? The calculator concludes its the equivalent of 1.7 stan dard drinks, if made with 1.5 ounces of te quila, an ounce of or ange liqueur and half an ounce of lime juice. Other favorites? Type them in: rethinkingdrinking. niaaa.nih.gov/ToolsResources/CocktailCalculator.asp.

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Monday, July 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 LINDSEY TANNERAssociated PressCHICAGO Bad re actions to psychiatric drugs result in nearly 90,000 emergency room visits each year by U.S. adults, with anti-anxiety medicines and sed atives among the most common culprits, a study suggests. A drug used in some popular sleeping pills was among the most commonly involved sedatives, especially in adults aged 65 and old er. Most of the visits were for troublesome side ef fects or accidental over doses and almost 1 in 5 resulted in hospitaliza tion. The results come from an analysis of 2009-2011 medical records from 63 hospitals that participate in a nationally representative government surveillance project. The study was published Wednesday in JAMA Psychiatry. Overall, the sedative zolpidem tartrate, contained in Ambien and some other sleeping pills, was involved in al most 12 percent of all ER visits and in 1 out of 5 visits for older adults. The Food and Drug Administration last year approved label chang es for those pills recommending lower doses because of injury risks including car crashes from morning drows iness. Head injuries and falls in adults using zolpidem-containing drugs were among rea sons for ER visits in the new study. Sano, the pharmaceutical company that makes Ambien, in cludes a warning in its prescribing information that says the drug can cause impaired alertness and motor coordination. It also says doctors should caution patients against driving and other activities requiring complete mental alertness the morn ing after use. Sano issued a state ment Wednesday after the study was published noting that the FDA ap proved Ambien in 1992 based on data showing the drug is safe and ef fective. Drs. Lee Hampton and Daniel Budnitz of the Centers for Disease Control and Preventions health care quality promotion division led the study. The authors cited previously published national data showing that ER visits for bad reactions to zolpidem increased 220 percent from 2005 to 2010. The FDAs recent efforts to modify recommended dosing regimens hold promise for reducing zolpidem-re lated problems, the authors said. But they also said doctors can help by recommending that pa tients use other insom nia treatments rst, in cluding better sleep habits and behavior therapy. Living Yo urBestLife 255 Wa terman Av enue MountDora,FL32757 www.WatermanVillage.com Wa te rman Vi llage: Lo ca te d inoneof Am erica s Wa terman Vi llage s MountDorawasthe ONL Y TOWNINFLORIDA tobenamedto America s 20BestSmall To wns bySmithsonianMagazine.AndwhenUSA To day ranked smalltownsontheir re tirementappeal toBabyBoomers,theynamedMount Doraasoneofthe TOP 4 INTHENATION, andthe ONL Y ONEINFLORIDA!Se e fo ryou rs el f!To arrangeavisitto Wa termanVillageandMountDora,call (352)385-1126oremailinfo@watermanvillage.com. NEWPATIENT SPECIAL-CompleteExam(D0150)-DigitalXrays(D0210)-Cleaning(D1110)-OralCancerScreening(D0431)withIdenta3000*Non-InsuredPatientsOnly. Allmajorinsurancesaccepted includingPPO&HMOplans.$59* R.KimEtheredge,D.C.ChiropracticCare withaPersonal To uch rfntbn ttt ntbtCompleteChiropracticCareb352.365.1191tCornerofPicciola Cu toffandHwy44/127bnbbLakeSumterLandingProfessionalPlaza ChiropracticCare withaPersonal To uch rfntbn ttt ntbtCompleteChiropracticCare other common condi tions. Nutrition science prefers discussing a whole-plant-food diet, rather than a veg an one, to eliminate connotations of an imal-rights or environmental ideology. But theres little de bate that diets limited to vegetables, fruits, nuts, beans, spices and herbs are healthful. They increase ber in take thats lacking in the large majority of American diets, while providing a wide range of antioxidants, minerals and other nutri ents, which build the immune system, re duce inammation and improve metabolism and gastrointes tinal health. The diet also reduces or eliminates the intake of pro cessed foods, empty calories and carcino gens. Up to 50 vegans responded to a Post-Ga zette Facebook request, many advocating animal rights. But many also said they experienced no table health benets as a welcome side effect, including dramatic weight loss. The diet also helped individuals to reverse osteoar thritis, autoimmune disorders, colitis or Crohns disease, multiple sclerosis and cancer and bring sugar levels back to normal for those with type 2 diabetes. Others say their plant-based diets increase their energy levels, eliminate aller gies and improve their skin, including eliminating acne. I will never not be a vegan, said Ellie Gor don, 28, of Squirrel Hill, a vegetarian at age 11 and a vegan for seven years. There have been so many scientic studies and re search connecting lon gevity and alleviation of a whole plethora of health problems with a plant-based diet. There is a whole lot of research to support it even if people dont care about it. VEGAN FROM PAGE C6 LARRY ROBERTS / MCT Ashley Frohnert, PETAs recently awarded Sexiest Vegan, buys a veggie burger at the Bluebird Kitchen at Market Square in Pittsburgh.Study: Psych drug ER trips approach 90,000 a year

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 14, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTSComicswww.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

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Monday, July 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C9 rf nftbWo rkinggalleryoflocalartistsANTIQUEDEA LERSWANTED (352)460-4806 rfntb fa cebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburg D004572 D004211 Tu es da y Ju ly 15th at 3PM www.dailycommercial.comDiversions352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper.YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, July 14, the 195th day of 2014. There are 170 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On July 14, 1789, in an event symbolizing the start of the French Revolution, citizens of Paris stormed the Bastille prison and released the seven prisoners inside. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, July 14, 2014: This year you express your devotion to your family, loved ones and close friends. You are willing to go more than your share of the way to make relationships work. One relationship will be a high priority, and it will add to your security. If you are single, you soon could meet someone who will affect your life. Dont get discouraged if you go through a difcult period with this person. Still, dont hang in there too long if the bond is not working. If you are attached, the two of you enjoy working out problems together. As a result, you become quite the team. PISCES understands you well. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Your creativity will pave the way to better relationships, work situations and interactions in general. Sometimes you feel limited by time. Schedule a much-needed visit with a key person in your life. You could get ak today for ignoring someone. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You might feel as if you cant do everything you want. This likely will be true, but you can prioritize by using what you deem to be important criteria. You also might want to take another look at your budget. Show caring to a special friend, no matter how busy you get. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Youll want to be where your friends are. Stop and take the time to visit with someone who is always present and who you might take for granted. It is much more important to be aware of who really facilitates your life. CANCER (June 21-July 22) One person could dominate most of your day. Whether you understand the reason why might not make a difference. Ultimately you need to deal with any issues that surround this person. Hopefully, you have only one person in your life like this! LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Youll want to be available to most people right now. You can postpone conversations and interactions, but not for long. Why not complete as much as you can? You will want more free time soon. A restrictive family member could rain on your parade. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You could be overwhelmed, especially if someone is not on the same page as you. Avoid a strong reaction, and let what you dont like just wash over you. Incorporate more exercise into the next 24 hours, and that will help you release some tension. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Your creativity will kick in as you eye various issues. Youll see a way to bypass these problems, so be sure to follow that path. A nancial matter might not appear to be positive. Do some needed research, and speak with several experts. You will know what to do. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Be careful not to rain on anyones parade; otherwise, it could make you very unpopular. If you really feel negative, take some personal time or include some activity that you love in todays plans. You could be suppressing some anger. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) You might want to verify plans. Others could decide to follow a different course of action or make other plans. As hard as it might be, try not to take others decisions personally. What is good for one person wont necessarily be good for others. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Someone could be saying no to what you think is a great idea. How positive is this person in general? Remember to take his or her comments with a grain of salt. Return calls and messages. Decide to walk in friendlier elds if you want more positive reinforcement. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You might not like everything you hear, but you will get the message. Do your best not to let certain people discourage you. Understand where they are coming from, and support yourself as you normally do. Blaze a new path. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Someone could disappoint you, which is likely to cause an unusually strong reaction. You know not to internalize these feelings, yet you do anyway. Dive into a fun happening, especially if it involves a loved one; your mood will change sooner than you think. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORYDEAR ABBY: We were visiting my daughter and her husband when their 3-year-old, Bethany, entered our room and rummaged through our medications. The door to the guest room was closed and the medications had been placed on a desk. Of course, every one thought she had ingested some, so they rushed her to the ER. We were fortunate that nothing was found in her system. My son-in-law thinks we should help pay the medical bills. I have sent several hundred dollars, but he is asking for more. Bethany is an only child, and they allow her free reign of the house. I have other grandchildren who are even younger, and none of them would dream of touching something that wasnt theirs. It has been almost a year since the incident, and they still havent taught her to respect and leave things alone that are not hers. My daughter is a professional and her husband works from home, which concerns me because he isnt as strict as I feel is necessary. Are we obligated to help with more of her medical expenses? I dont think so because we have already helped, and I dont think its our job to teach our grandchild boundaries. OHIO GRANDMA DEAR OHIO GRANDMA: That must have been some hefty emergency room bill! Obviously, closing the guest room door was not enough to deter your granddaughter. In hindsight, you now know that you should keep anything you dont want her to get into locked in your suitcase. But you and your husband are not mind readers. If this wasnt a wakeup call to your daughter and son-in-law that it was time to teach their child the meaning of No! and Dont touch! then I dont know what it will take to prevent another oops! As to your shelling out more money than you already have for Bethanys medical bills, I think you have given enough, and you should not be blamed for what happened. DEAR ABBY: My best friend told me several months ago that she needed to make new friends. When I gave her a surprised look, her response was, No, you took that the wrong way. I left it at that. She recently mentioned that she was going to invite several of our neighbors over for cocktails and a light dinner, but she did not invite me. The evening of the event, while her guests were still there, she phoned me. She said they were nished with dinner and asked if I wanted to walk over and get some leftovers. I politely declined, say ing I wasnt dressed. Abby, Im shocked that she would ask me to come over to, basically, get a takeout plate. Your thoughts? NO TAKEOUT FOR ME DEAR NO TAKEOUT: I think what the woman did was insensitive, and that its time you, too, started making some new friends. Considering how this one treated you, it cer tainly couldnt hurt.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Wandering grandchild must be taught to respect boundaries JEANNE PHILLIPSDEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGARBIGARS STARS

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C10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 14, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX CROSSWORD PUZZLE

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Monday, July 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C11 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX

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Monday, July 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHER'S NOTICEFederal and State laws prohibit advertising expressing a discriminatory preference on the basis of race, age, sex, color, national origin, religion, handicap or marital status. The Daily Commercial will not knowingly accept advertisement for employment which is in violation of the law. Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance Employment Classifications are intended to announce bona de employment offers only. Employment advertising must disclose the specic nature of the work being offered. Some employment categories may charge fees. If any advertiser does not comply with these standards, please notify a Classied Sales Representative at 365-8245 or 365-8200. Thank you for reading the local newspaper, the Daily Commercial!

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 14, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX

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Monday, July 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr Thank you for reading the local paper!

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Mu st pr esen t coup on at time of ser vi ce Va lid at participating locations only Certain re striction s may apply Call for details.BEY OND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWO OD | UPHOLSTER Y | AIR DUCT728-1668 394-1739fla# CAC18 16 40 8 CARPET CLEANING3$99Cleaning Completed By 7/31/14 Promo Code: JUL Y AIR DUCT CLEANING$50 OFF(MINIMUM CHARGES APPL Y) FL#CAC1816408Cleaning Completed By 7/31/14 Promo Code: JUL Y TILE & GROUT CLEANING15% OFF(MINIMUM CHARGES APPL Y)Cleaning Completed By 7/31/14 Promo Code: JUL YROOMS & A HALL GERMANY CLINCHES WORLD CUP TITLE, SPORTS B1 MARION COUNTY: Man accused of fracturing 2-year-olds skull A3 SCHOOL SEX ASSAULTS: UF ranks highest in the state A3 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, July 14, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 195 4 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED C10 COMICS C8 CROSSWORDS C10 DIVERSIONS C9 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 SCOREBOARD B2 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A11 NATION A9 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A12. 90 / 75 Clouds and sun. 50 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millardives@dailycommercial.com S igns warning of possible dangers to big rigs going over a railroad crossing in Sumter County havent de terred some truck drivers from trying and getting stuck. The legs of these semi-trac tor trailers extended about a foot to keep the trailers lev el when their cabs are driv en away are getting lodged in the train rails as the rigs go over the low ground clearance posted crossing near the in tersection of U.S. Highway 301 and County Road 104 in Oxford. But after two trailers were re cently ripped apart by trains, Sumter County ofcials voted last week to raise the approach es to both sides of the tracks. In the meantime, the crossing will be temporarily closed, County Administrator Bradley Arnold said. R. Taylor, a Florida High way Patrol trooper who worked both crashes, said within the same time period another semi got stuck on the tracks but was towed before a train came. He agreed the crossing is danger ous. Something needs to be done about it before someone gets killed, said Taylor, on the scene at the July 1 crash. Arnold said for years there have been cautionary signs on both sides of the crossing, in dicating a grade problem for heavy trucks as well as the ad dition of short-term signage re stricting No Through Trucks. On July 1, a 68-car train car rying molten sulfur sheared through a commercial mov ing truck stuck on the crossing, leaving the vehicles rear half on the east side of the tracks and the cab on the west side. On May 28, a 130-car train barreled through a semi-truck haul ing watermelons, scattering smashed fruit along the tracks. Arnold said after county pub lic works representatives met with CSX ofcials last week, county commissioners vot ed unanimously to approve $55,000 to upgrade the crossing approaches. Arnold didnt give a timetable for the project but said it should start soon. According to Federal Railroad Association statistics, 2,087 highway-rail grade crossing col lisions occurred across the na tion in 2013, including 65 Flor ida incidents resulting in 12 deaths. OXFORD Train track snags Semi-trucks caught on crossings cause crashes, lead to upgrades MILLARD K. IVES / DAILY COMMERCIAL Crews clear debris caused by a Union-Pacic train barreling through an Allied moving vehicle in Sumter County earlier this month after the semi got stuck on the track. On July 1, a 68-car train carrying molten sulfur sheared through a commercial moving truck stuck on the crossing, leaving the vehicles rear half on the east side of the tracks and the cab on the west side. MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millard.ives@dailycommercial.com Fruitland Park Police Chief Terry Isaacs said Sunday his continuing efforts to create a bet ter image of his depart ment will go on in light of what he called disturb ing allegations his now former deputy chief and a police corporal were associated with the Ku Klux Klan. Isaacs called it a black eye on the department. This is 2014 and we serve all the community. We will not tolerate this type of conduct, Isaa cs said. Armed with a con dential FBI report that Isaacs said stated the two ofcers were asso ciated with a subver sive organization, he said Deputy Chief David Borst resigned Thurs day midway through being confronted by Isaacs with the allega tions. Isaacs added an in ternal investi gation would be conducted on the second ofcer, Cpl. George Hun newell, to deter mine what pos sible disciplinary actions would be taken since it is against depart ment policy to be a member of an anti-govern ment organiza tion. But then the chief and city manag er decided to terminate Hunnewell when they also considered past problems with him that led to letters of counsel ing, suspensions and a FRUITLAND PARK Isaacs: Officers alleged Klan ties are intolerable BORST HUNNEWELL LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com Lake County com missioners learned last week that 60 percent of the countys vehicle eet is outdated and must be replaced. The public works ve hicles, re trucks and county buses, among others, are either over seven years old or have more than 140,000 miles on them, according to Fleet vehicles aging, in need of replacement LAKE COUNTY CALVIN WOODWARD Associated Press WASHINGTON Its considered bad form for politicians to say things that are not true. When they talk about their own am bitions, though, de ception pretty much comes with the terri tory and no one seems to mind. People who are pa tently feeling out their presidential pros pects claim not to be even thinking about that, when you know theyve got to be hum ming Hail to the Chief in the shower. They say they dont pay attention to polls ha! They suggest their families will drive their decision wheth er to run, setting up a dramatic tension that is more ction than fact. As the 2016 presi dential campaign eld begins to take shape, here are ve things to know not to believe when you hear them: THE SIT-DOWN Over Christmas 2010, Mitt Romneys big family gathered round and cast bal lots on whether he should run again for the Republican nom ination. The vote was 10-2 against, with Romney himself vot ing no. The voters had 5 things to know not to believe when presidential prospects say them Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, left, talks to his running mate, Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., along with his wife, Ann Romney, after he conceded the 2012 presidential race at his election night rally in Boston. AP FILE PHOTO SEE KLAN | A2 SEE TRACK | A2 SEE PROSPECTS | A2 SEE FLEET | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 14, 2014 HOW TO REACH US JULY 13 CASH 3 ............................................... 2-1-3 Afternoon .......................................... 4-0-4 PLAY 4 ............................................. 2-3-0-0 Afternoon ....................................... 4-7-0-5 FLORIDA LOTTERY JULY 12 FANTASY 5 ........................... 9-13-18-19-35 FLORIDA LOTTO ................. 2-4-14-16-44-48 POWERBALL ........................ 2-3-7-23-5126 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION STEVE SKAGGS publisher 352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com PAUL RYAN digital editor 352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. demotion last year. Isaacs said although both men denied the al legations and there was no positive proof linking them to a subversive or ganization, the image as sociated with them would lower the credibility of the department. Isaacs came aboard as chief three years ago, shortly after another of cer resigned because of reports and photos show ing his alleged ties to the Klan, and has made it a goal to improve the de partments image. Its disturbing, I cant have this, said Isaacs who called Hunnewell a marginal employee. I had no condence in the ofcers anymore. Isaacs said the FBI had been conducting a glob al investigation unre lated to the Fruitland Park Police Department when an informant said that Borst and Hunnew ell were associated with a subversive organization between 2005 and 2008. The case was given to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, which contacted Isaacs, who in turn spoke with the State Attorneys Ofce to de termine if any criminal charges should be led. Isaacs said he didnt know the name of the group. However, Chief Deputy State Attorney Ric Ridgway said Saturday the report linked the two of cers to the Klan, and after his ofce determined any such association wasnt criminal, the case was turned over to the Fruit land Park police for an in ternal investigation. In 2009, Police Of cer James Elkins resigned from the department after allegations surfaced that he was a district Kleagle (recruiter) for the Engle wood-based National Ary an Knights of the Ku Klux Klan and subsequently, af ter a merger, a member of the United Northern and Southern Knights. However, in a depart ment with 13 full-time and ve part-time of cers, many of whom were trained by Borst, Isaa cs dismissed any notion of his department being heavily associated with the Klan, calling Hun newell a bad apple. KLAN FROM PAGE A1 Taylor said both truck drivers, who remained in their vehicles during the crashes, were cited for improper stopping af ter not paying heed to the low ground clearance signs and not calling 911. Marsitisa Cook, owner of Groundcovers nursery, which sits just east of the crossing, said a Walmart truck got stuck recent ly but a farm tractor was able to move it. Its real rural out here. Many of the roads werent set up for these types of crossings, she said. TRACK FROM PAGE A1 GEORGE MADDOX / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL A 130-car CSX train collided with a trailer hauling watermelons that was stuck on railroad tracks in Sumter County. spoken. But Romney ran. The lesson: On this question, family matters, not so much. In the lead-up to 2016, Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., has made much of his wife, Kelley, being a hard sell. Theres two votes in my family, he said when asked in December about running. My wife has both of them, and both of them are no votes right now. ... Ill tell you in a year whether Im able to persuade my wife. Reserved but political ly savvy, Kelley Paul has stood in for him at cam paign events and worked for a Republican consult ing rm. Running for presi dent is a heavyweight (and intoxicating) deci sion that gives some fam ilies pause. But pinning the matter on the spouse and kids is generally part of a broader effort to put off answers and decisions until its time to commit one way or the other. THE DODGE My focus is entirely on working for Texans in the U.S. Senate. When Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, made this declaration, his feet were planted in South Carolina, a big presiden tial primary state. To be sure, South Caro lina was a bit off his path. Hes more apt to be found in Iowa, an even bigger state in presidential pol itics. Cruz has been seen more often in Iowa, New Hampshire and South Car olina than in the volatile border region of his own state since he won election as a senator in 2012. Hillary Rodham Clinton went from no plans to run to stay tuned to Im running around the park to statements mak ing clear shes consider ing it and will decide by the end of the year. THE DOWNPLAY Gov. Chris Christie, R-N.J., says the bridge scandal thats been dog ging him will be a foot note by 2016. Hes feeling done with it. Gov. Scott Walker, R-Wis., says an investiga tion by prosecutors into whether he and aides conducted illegal politi cal activities in 2011 and 2012 is old news and case closed. Public gures cant wish these things away. They can write their memoirs and their epitaphs, but not history. When scandal happens, they hold the reins of a runaway horse that will stop only when its good and tired. WHAT POLLS? Cliches abound here. You may have heard this one the only poll that matters is the one on Election Day. Its too soon for that, but not for this: I dont listen to polls. Polls are everywhere all the time, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., said in May. I dont really pay a lot of attention to them. Thats what people say when theyre lagging in polls. To be sure, horserace polls this far from the con test in November 2016 are mostly worth ignoring. As Rubio pointed out, theres a whole campaign to be waged rst. But polls, like money, are the mothers milk of politics. They drive fundraising, messaging and all-im portant perceptions of momentum. VEEP CREEP Democrat Al Gore called the vice presi dency a political dead end in one campaign, then signed on for it the next campaign. Repub lican Nelson Rockefeller said he refused offers to be such standby equip ment, then became that for President Gerald Ford. George H.W. Bush said Im not leaving the door open to becoming the running mate to his GOP rival, Ronald Reagan, then did. This disdain for be ing No. 2 is bound to arise when the primaries are underway and people start losing for real. For a strug gling candidate, acknowl edging any interest in be ing someones running mate can be the kiss of death until its obvious the campaign is dying anyway. Then the vice presidency doesnt sound so bad. PROSPECTS FROM PAGE A1 Keith Stevenson, manager of the Fa cilities and Fleet Management De partment. Stevenson said the older the ve hicle, the more it costs to maintain. In evaluating a sample of 13 ve hicles and their maintenance costs, Stevenson determined the aver age maintenance costs for vehi cles over 120,000 miles was $2,813 compared to $1,021 for a vehicle under 30,000 miles. He added he is also concerned about the reliability of the 314 ve hicles that are in need of replace ment. For example, he said, if a dump truck was in the repair shop, the crew wouldnt be able to work. The County Commission is deal ing with a $15 million shortfall in the scal year 2015 budget, and there is no funding allocated in that budget to replace the vehicles. County Manager David Heath said it would cost an estimated $8 million to replace all the vehi cles, but it is not possible to replace them all at once. They would be phased in over a period of time, he said. The replacement of the vehicles is critical, Heath said. It is exacerbated by the fact we have not replaced any vehicles since 2008, he said. Replacing the eet is important, Commissioner Tim Sullivan said. I think that is an issue that we need to put a long-term solution on, he said. It is going to cost us more later if we dont do something now. Commissioner Jimmy Conner said because the county has been so scally conservative, it failed to address infrastructure needs. It is partially my fault because I have been so determined to keep taxes low, he said. Now we see our infrastructure is literally falling apart and we have got to address it. We dont have a choice. I want to nd a way to address it. The longer you ignore it, the more expensive it is going to be. Commissioner Sean Parks echoed those sentiments. You can only put off repairs and purchase of new equipment so long before it becomes more cost ly to maintain vehicles instead of purchasing new ones, he said. However, Commissioner Leslie Campione emphasized it was im portant to do these replacements incrementally. If you start with the premise that you are going to nd a way to take care of all the needs without rais ing taxes you approach these type of questions from a standpoint of lets nd a solution, she said. FLEET FROM PAGE A1 AP FILE PHOTO Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush greets his mother, former rst lady Barbara Bush, at the White Houses 2010 Presidential Medal of Freedom ceremony in Washington. Associated Press OCALA Police say a woman in pos session of heroin was arrested after she began undressing and doing yoga in the middle of a North Florida street. Ocala police arrested 51-year-old Mi chele Cernak on possession of heroin and drug paraphernalia Wednesday. The Ocala Star-Banner reports that of cers found Cernak in the middle of the street with her jeans around her ankles and in the midst of a yoga pose. She was still wearing her underwear. Woman doing yoga in street busted for heroin

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Monday, July 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LEESBURG Korean Service Veterans to host August 2 ceremony Korean Service Veterans will be recognized in a special 61st an niversary ceremony at 10 a.m. on Aug. 2 at the Veterans Memorial at Fountain Park. The anniversary event is spon sored by the Korean War and Korean Service Veterans Association of Lake County, Chapter 169. In the event of inclement weath er, the ceremony will be held at the National Guard Armory, 400 W. Meadow St. For information or to participate as a veteran, call 352-408-6612 or email kwvathiel@gmail.com. LEESBURG Career Source to host hiring event for veterans CareerSource Central Florida will connect veterans with employers at two separate Paychecks for Patriots hiring fairs, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on July 16. Paychecks for Patriots is spon sored by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity in conjunc tion with the Florida Department of Veterans Affairs, Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve, Florida National Guard, Career Source Central Florida, Dollar General and private employers. The event is open to United States veterans (active and retired) and their families at Florida National Guard, 400 W. Meadow St., and the American Legion, 300 N. Third St. Job seekers and employers can register at no cost at www. CareerSourceCentralFlorida.com/ Patriots. TAVARES Park rangers invite residents to bird and butterfly surveys The Lake County Parks & Trails Division invites outdoor enthusiasts to enjoy three opportunities in July to survey birds and butteries. Join park rangers for the events, from 7:30 to 11 a.m., on the following dates: Friday at Lake May Reserve, 36300 County Road 44A, Eustis, and Saturday at Ferndale Preserve, 19220 County Road 455, Ferndale. Knowledge of common species is a plus but not required. The event includes hiking about 2 miles on unpaved trails. For information or to regis ter, call 352-253-4950, email park sandtrails@lakecounty.gov or go to www.lakecounty.gov/parks. MOUNT DORA Library to host Hurricane Preparedness program A panel of experts, including city of Mount Dora engineer/paramed ic Anne Bell, Charles Revell of the citys electric department, a represen tative of the American Red Cross of Lake & Sumter Counties, a represen tative from Lake County Emergency Management and Kevin McEwen of Hillcrest Insurance Agency, is set to take part in the event at the W.T. Bland Public Library, 1995 N. Donnelly St. The programs will be July 22 at 6:30 p.m. and July 28 at 2 p.m. For information, call 352-735-7180. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 AUSTIN L. MILLER Halifax Media Group A man was arrested by a sheriffs detective on Sat urday, accused of giving a 2-year-old two skull frac tures and a black-and-blue face. The toddler is in in tensive care. Reese William Rockwell was charged with aggra vated child abuse by De tective Rhonda Stroup of the Marion County Sher iffs Ofce, and taken to the Marion County Jail, where bond was set at $10,000. The childs mother, Jessi ca Todd, told a Star-Banner reporter that her 2-year-old son, Gabriel Peterson, re mains in the intensive care unit at UF Health Shands Hospital in Gainesville. Todd said doctors at the hospital are monitoring Gabriel, and the little boys eyes are black and blue and he has at least two skull fractures. Todd said she visited her son at the hospital on Saturday and that Gabri el cannot open his eyes and his face is swollen and puffy. Other than that, hes re ally doing good. He stood up in his bed and gave me a hug and kiss and told me that he loves me, she said. Todd said she was puz zled by Rockwells appar ently violent outburst. Ive known (Rockwell) for 14 years and I never expected this from him. I want people to know Man accused of fracturing 2-year-olds skull THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com L ake Square Mall has been touted as a vital part of the economic life of Leesburg since it was built, and tonight city leaders will have a rst read ing on nixing the deposit fee for new non-residential customers setting up utility service at the mall. The city commission meets at 5:30 p.m. today in the commis sion chambers on the third oor of Leesburg City Hall, 501 W. Meadow St. William Spinelli, the citys nance director, said in an agen da memo that the city can aid in helping to restore the retail center. Lake Square Mall has experi enced difculty of late attracting and keeping quality retail tenants due to the recession, Spinelli said in the agenda memo, while also noting that general economic and cultural changes have affected enclosed malls as shopping desti nations. Spinelli said in the memo that it would be benecial to Leesburg if the Lake Square Mall could be revitalized, and he noted that it would be a great detriment to the city if the mall were to stop doing business completely. The nance director said by ap proving the ordinance, the city will be increasing its risk in baddebt allowance. However, Spi nelli noted the city currently has very limited bad-debt write-offs due to the strict deposit policy. At this time, some risk may be allow able to encourage development, he said in the memo, while not ing the citys nance department will closely monitor electric utility accounts to ensure a balance be tween opening new accounts and lack of utility payment. Spinelli added that the ordi nance is intended to provide a temporary benet to the redevel opment of the Lake Square Mall, and it will expire three years af ter its passage by the city com mission. He also noted that ex piration of the ordinance shall not require any utility customer then receiving service in the Lake Square Mall property to place a deposit with the city for contin ued service. Other items on tonights agenda: The public and commission LEESBURG Utility deposits may be waived for new mall tenants BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL A couple walks through the Lake Square Mall in Leesburg. (William) Spinelli (Leesburg finance director) said in a memo that it would be beneficial to Leesburg if the Lake Square Mall could be revitalized, and he noted that it would be a great detriment to the city if the mall were to stop doing business completely. JEFF SCHWEERS Halifax Media Group The University of Florida led all state universities in Florida in the number of reported sexual assaults for 2010, 2011 and 2012, based on data universities and colleges in the U.S. must report each year to the De partment of Education. UF reported 24 incidents of forced sex for that three-year period, com pared with 21 reported by the Uni versity of Central Florida and 17 by the University of South Floridas main campus for the same period. UF also reported more than any private university or college in Flor ida. Eckerd College in St. Petersburg led the private schools with 15, fol lowed by Rollins College in Winter Park with 10 and the University of Miami with nine. Victim advocates, counselors, police and other ofcials whose job it is to look after the safe ty and well-being of students, facul ty, staff and visitors on campus said those numbers show that UF is do ing its job to make victims of sexual violence aware of their options and the resources available to them. They said the numbers also show that UF is more vigilant about re porting and investigating incidents of sexual assaults. We have done a lot of education around it. Thats why our numbers are increasing, said Jen Day Shaw, UF dean of students. Campus sexual assault is a nation wide epidemic that has drawn the at tention of the White House and Con gress. There is a growing consensus and body of research that universi ties and colleges are failing to pro tect students. Critics contend there are far more campus rapes than are being report ed and that universities and colleges are not investigating all of the cases being reported to them meaning assailants are getting away with it. A report released by the White House alleged that one in ve wom en are sexually assaulted during their time in college, based on data kept by the Department of Justice. Only 5 percent are reporting those assaults, according to a report re leased Wednesday by Sen. Claire THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com Madison, a Border collie mix, along with Justice, a pit bull ter rier mix, and numer ous other dogs, cats and kittens like Char lie and Cuddly Connie, are available through Lake County Animal Services special deal for animal lovers: the Cat and Dog Days of Summer Sale. The sale began Saturday and runs through July 26, with steep discounts on all adoptable animals on a rst-come, rstserved basis for a lim ited time only. Brian Sheahan, di rector of Lake Coun tys Community Safe ty and Compliance Department, said in a press release that the event is geared to help reduce the popu lation at the now over crowded shelter and avoid the euthanasia of adoptable animals. Sheahan said the county is offering dogs and cats at a drasti cally reduced rate of $10, down from the regular cost of $50 for dogs and $40 for cats. Several dogs will be secretly labeled Gold Ribbon Dogs, which will be free of charge upon check-out, he said in the press re lease. In addition, cats will be offered as buy-oneget-one-free during TAVARES Animal Services reduces fees during summer sale PHOTO COURTESY OF LAKE COUNTY ANIMAL SERVICES Justice, a pit bull terrier mix, is one of many dogs available during the Cat and Dog Days of Summer Sale. UF tops state schools in sexual assaults SEE FRACTURE | A4 SEE SALE | A4 SEE MALL | A4 SEE ASSAULTS | A4

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 14, 2014 CR OW NS$399Eac h(3 or mor e per visit) D2751/ Re g $59 9 ea. Po rcel ain on non Pr ecious me ta l DENTURES$74 9Eac hD0 51 10 or D0 51 20DENT AL SA VIN GSTh e patie nt an d any oth er per son re spons ible for paym ent has the right to re fuse to pay cancel payme nt or be re imburs ed for paym ent for any other ser vices, ex aminat ion whic h is per for med as a re sult of and with in 72 hours of re spon ding to the ad ve rt is em en t fo r th e discounted fee or re duced fee ser vice or tr eatment. Fees may va ry due to comple xity of case This disc ount do es no t appl y to th ose patie nt s wi th den tal pla ns. Fee s ar e mi ni mal. PR IC ES ARE SU BJ ECT TO CHA NGE. LEESBUR GM T. DORASu nr is e De nt al Tr i-D ent al r ff nt bb f Consul tat ion and Seco nd Op in ion No Ch ar ge!n t t NEW PA TIENT SPEC IAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RA YS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EX AMINA TION BY DO CTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABS ENCE OF GUM DISEA SE ) D00 2409 OBITUARIES Omerine Vera, 89, of Leesburg, passed away July 12, 2014 in Mt. Dora, Florida Visitation and a ser vice will be held at Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations in Tavares, Florida on Wednesday, July 16th, 2014. Visita tion to begin at 9:30 am and service to begin at 11:00 am. She will be in terred at Vista Memo rial Gardens in Miami Gardens, Florida next to her husband, Peter Vera. Omerine was born in Lawrence, MA to Al fred and Rose Marasse on January 5, 1925. She graduated from Law rence High School in 1942 and married her high school sweetheart in 1948. In 1950 she moved to Hialeah, Flor ida and raised her ve children. When her chil dren were grown, Omer ine had several careers with companies such as Marriott Corp. and The American Automobile Association. In 1995, after her second hus band, Peter Vera passed away, Omerine moved to the Leesburg, FL area and retired. Retire ment for her meant vol unteering at St. Pauls Catholic Church where she worked in the thrift shop and sang in the choir amongst oth er things. She also vol unteered at the United Way helping in the of ce and where ever else they needed her. She was such a xture at the United Way that a spe cial volunteering award was named in her hon or that is given out an nually. Omerine had been residing at The Bridgewater ALF at Wa terman Village where she enjoyed many ac tivities and made many friends especially staff member Lorna. Omer ine is preceded in death by her parents, four brothers Paul, Danny, Raymond, and Alfred Marasse, her husband, Peter Vera; son Dan ny Morel and daugh ter Dawn Elmore. Om erine is survived by her sons Joseph (Dale) Mo rel, Paul (Teresa) Mo rel, Marc (Randee) Mo rel; ten grandchildren, Denise (Hoyt) Ballard, Kelly Brooks, Michael (Annhy) Morel, Kimber ly (Rick) Johannes, De siree (Dan) Tobin, Paul Morel, Jr., Thomas (Ra chel) Brooks, Steph anie (Matt) Streich er, Tracy (Jeff) Perez, and Jayne Morel and 11 great grandchildren. She also leaves a sis ter Julie Marasse Spino la of Atascadaro, CA. You may leave your own memories and condo lences by visiting stever sonhamlinhilbish.com. Steverson Hamlin & Hilbish Funeral Home 226 E. Burleigh Boule vard, Tavares, FL 352343-8000. IN MEMORY that the people who do these kinds of things are the ones you least ex pect, Todd said. She said she and Rockwell went to high school to gether and he was her high school sweetheart. Rockwell, in an inter view with a Star-Banner reporter, calls Gabriel his stepson, and insists the incident was an ac cident. I got overwhelmed. I couldnt be everywhere at once and it got out of control, said Rockwell, a truck driver. The 25-year-old Sil ver Springs Shores man said he was babysitting four children two of whom are his children. The other two, includ ing Gabriel, belong to Todd. Rockwell said Gabri el was playing with an electrical socket when he rushed over to stop him from doing so. He said he then hit Gabriel, but doesnt remember if it was with his st or his open hand. I never meant to hit him, Rockwell said. It was an accident. It was not a vicious attack or anything. Gabriel fell, Rockwell said, and hit his face. Rockwell told Detec tive Stroup that he was the only adult at the home and that the vic tim had fallen while playing with another child in the backyard of the residence, accord ing to sheriffs ofcials. He said he did not see the little boy fall. Stroup said that when she was talking with Rockwell, he changed his story and told the detective that he had dropped the juvenile on the concrete at the residences back porch. According to Stroup, Rockwell claimed he was attempting to get two of the children into the home and had picked up the victim by his right arm and swung him to his shoulder. Rockwell said the vic tim was not properly FRACTURE FROM PAGE A3 the two-week period, due to the animal shelter being heavily inundated with kit tens during the height of kit ten season. A maximum of three dogs and three cats may be adopt ed per household, according to the press release. Located at 28123 County Road 561 in Tavares, the Lake County Animal Services shel ter is open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Satur day. To learn more about Lake County Animal Services or make a donation to the shel ter, go to www.lakecoun ty.gov/adopt or call 352343-9688. Residents can also follow the shelter on Face book at www.facebook.com/ LakeCountyAnimalServices to view photos of the dogs and cats up for adoption. To learn more about Lake County Animal Services vol unteer animal foster program, go to www.lakecounty.gov/ volunteer. For information on the countys spay/neuter rebate program, and to download an application, go to www.lake county.gov/rebate. SALE FROM PAGE A3 PHOTO COURTESY OF LAKE COUNTY ANIMAL SERVICES Lamington is one of many cats and kittens available at Lake County Animal Services for $10 during the Cat and Dog Days of Summer Sale. hearing a presenta tion about the nal de sign of the Main Street streetscape project by Frank Bellomo of Bellomo Herbert Inc. The commission considering authoriz ing The Restoration Outreach Community Center and Christian Care Center to provide vouchers to utility cus tomers who are un able to pay their utili ty bills. In September 1991, the city creat ed the Citizens Utility Relief Effort (C.U.R.E.) Voucher Program to assist utility customers who experienced loss of employment or an unexpected illness or injury. Lori Beach, custom er service manager for Leesburg, said in the agenda memo for to nights meeting that the city budgets $5,000 for the C.U.R.E. pro gram. The city also ac cepts donations to the C.U.R.E. program, and the amount of money provided to the agencies is based on the amount received from custom ers in donations. MALL FROM PAGE A3 balanced on his body and when he reached over for the other child, the victim fell off the back of his shoulder and onto the concrete oor, authorities said. Ofcials at Shands said the child suffered two separate occipital fractures, along with multiple facial bruises. Gabriel also had other injuries that were be ing examined by the doctors to see if theyre related to the incident. Notied about the injuries, Stroup then re-interviewed Rock well, authorities said. Rockwell told the de tective that the child fell from his shoulder. Told that the childs in juries did not match what he was describ ing, Rockwell said the child was playing with an electrical outlet and that Rockwell punched the boy in the back of the head. The impact caused the child to fall face rst onto carpeting that had no padding between it and the concrete underneath, ofcials said. After hitting the boy, Rockwell said he sent him outside to play and a short time later, one of the children who was outside came in side and told Rockwell that Gabriel had fall en down. Rockwell said he went outside and picked up the child by his right arm. He said as he was lifting the boy up to his shoulder, the victim was unbal anced, and fell about 5 feet to the concrete. Rockwell described the sound as horrible, when Gabriels head struck the oor. The victims head was swollen and he said he put ice on the wound and made him lie on the couch. Rockwell said he thought about calling 911 but didnt because he didnt want to get into trouble. He also said he did not tell the childs moth er about the incident when she came home. Im worried about my son. Im very hurt and upset about it, Todd told the Star-Ban ner She said Rockwell has never been violent to ward the children. She said he has two chil dren, ages 3 years old and 9 months old. She said they do not have any children togeth er and have been living together since March. Locally, Rockwell does not have a crimi nal record. Told that the childs injuries did not match what he was describing, (Reese) Rockwell said the child was playing with an electrical outlet and that Rockwell punched the boy in the back of the head. McCaskill, D-Mo. The Sexual Violence on Campus report also said that only 16 per cent of college campus es conduct climate sur veys on sexual assault, which experts have said is one of the best ways to get an accurate pic ture of whats happen ing on campus. UF conducted campus climate surveys in 2008, 2010 and last spring. Shaw said the university is going to make it an an nual survey. In last years survey, 4 percent of the 2,200 stu dents who responded said they were sexual ly touched against their will, while 2.1 percent said someone attempt ed to force them to have sex against their will, and 1.1 percent said they were raped. Those numbers were higher for women than men 4.9 percent compared with 2.3 re ported being touched against their will; 3.2 percent compared with 0.3 percent reported at tempted sexual assault and 1.2 percent com pared with 0.3 percent reported rape. The McCaskill survey also found that many schools dont encour age reporting of sexu al assaults, 51 percent dont have hotlines and 56 percent dont have a way to report assaults online. Eight percent still dont allow con dential reporting. UF provides conden tial reporting online, has a hotline for reporting assaults and lots of infor mation available to stu dents. It conducts ed ucational seminars for incoming students and training throughout the year and at the request of student organizations, as well as staff training. Students also have several options for help, including the UF Po lice Department, Victim Services, Student Con duct and Conict Res olution, the Counsel ing and Wellness Center and the STRIVE peer advocacy program. The Counseling and Wellness Center serves lots and lots of sexual assault victims. Proba bly a lot more students here have experienced it here or in their life, Shaw said. The Clery Act also known as the Campus Security Act of 1990 requires all colleges and universities that receive federal nancial aid to le an annual report of all crimes committed on or adjacent to campus for a three-year period. The number of sexu al assaults reported on college campuses na tionally rose more than 50 percent from 2001 to 2011 from 2,200 to 3,300. That number rose another 18 percent to 3,900 in 2012. UFs numbers also show an upward trend during those three years from three in 2010 to nine in 2011 to 12 in 2012. UPDs crime log also shows 16 incidents of sexual violence re ported in 2013. Numbers increas ing is going to be a pos itive sign of a campus with good practices in place where people feel comfortable com ing forward, as opposed to feeling unsafe, said Chris Loschiavo, assis tant dean of students and director of Student Conduct and Conict Resolution at UF. That spike in report ing occurred around the same time the Ofce of Civil Rights sent out a Dear Colleague letter in 2011 to colleges and universities saying un derreporting might be an issue and recommended ways to improve report ing, Loschiavo said. ASSAULTS FROM PAGE A3

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Monday, July 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 r f n t b n nr

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Monday, July 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 rfrntb rfrbtb rf nn rbrt tb n n bbrbbrnn f n n rfbr r f rff nt b r fnt rf rf n t b b nt b btn f n t b b rf btn f n t b b rf r t n n rf n t b b b rn rr r r fnt n nt fn nn fntn r ff n nn r f nf f t b t f f t LEESBU RG/ FRUIT LAND PA RK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Wa lker Dr (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 14, 2014 r r fr nr f n tb t rfrntb rfrbtb rf nn rbrt tb n n bbrbbrnn f n n rfbr LEESBU RG/ FRUIT LAND PA RK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Wa lker Dr (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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Monday, July 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A9 JILL COLVIN Associated Press JERSEY CITY, N.J. A gun man who killed a rookie of cer responding to a report of an armed robbery at a drugstore early Sunday nev er tried to rob the store and instead lay in wait for police, telling a witness to watch the news because he was going to be famous, authorities said. Lawrence Campbell shot Ofcer Melvin Santiago in the head shortly after he and his partner arrived at the 24hour Walgreens at around 4 a.m., Jersey City Mayor Ste ven Fulop said. Other ofcers returned re at Campbell, killing him. Campbell, 27, of Jersey City, was one of three sus pects wanted by police for a prior homicide, Fulop said. Fulop said Campbell was carrying a knife when he walked into Walgreens and asked for directions to the greeting card aisle. He as saulted an armed securi ty guard at the store and snatched his gun, Fulop said. According to Fulop, Camp bell approached a witness and apologized for his conduct, then said to watch the news later because he was going to be famous, then waited for ofcers to arrive and shot San tiago with what police believe was the guards weapon. Today was a horrible day for Jersey City, Fulop said. Dozens of ofcers stood single le at the entrance of the hospital and saluted as Santiagos ag-draped body was carried into an ambu lance. A handful of younger ofcers consoled one anoth er as they walked away. San tiago, 23, graduated from the police academy in Decem ber. Fulop was there when San tiagos body arrived at the hospital. As Santiagos moth er identied the body, Fulop said, she just keep repeating the badge number and say ing that its not possible. Santiago is the rst Jersey City ofcer killed in the line of duty since Detective Marc DiNardo died in July 2009 during a raid on an apart ment while searching for sus pects in a robbery. It is a tragic situation when any ofcer is killed in the line of duty, Fulop said. Melvin was an ofcer who represented everything one would want to see in a po lice ofcer. I know the entire citys thoughts and prayers are with the Santiago family during this difcult time and we mourn together. Jean Belviso, who has been delivering newspapers for 10 years, was driving through the Walgreens parking lot when she said saw a man wearing burgundy sweat pants and a baseball cap walk out of the store. A police cruiser pulled up in front of Walgreens, and the suspect began shooting, the 61-yearold Belviso said. We thought he was run ning, coming toward us, said Belviso, who was riding along with a friend. He kept on shooting. Bullets ew through the cruisers windshield, 13 in all. The suspect was shot multiple times, and ofcers slapped handcuffs on him, Belviso said. Campbells body remained on the ground next to the bullet-riddled cruiser for more than ve hours after the shooting before it was placed in a coroners van and taken away. Markeisha Marshall, a spokeswoman for Walgreens, said the company was deep ly regretful over the of cers death and extended its sympathies to his family and friends. The store has roundthe-clock armed security, Marshall noted. Police are also search ing for another man who they believe was involved in the previous homicide with Campbell, Fulop said. They have been aggressively seek ing Daniel Wilson for the last three days, Fulop said. The Jersey City Police Be nevolent Association said in a statement that their hearts were heavy over Santiagos death. Patrolman Santiago knew the risks associated with this job, yet he put himself in front of danger in order to keep Jersey City safe, the as sociation said. Words can not adequately express our feelings about this senseless tragedy. The ofcers stepfather, Alex McBride, said Santiago was very proud to be a po lice ofcer, following in the footsteps of his uncle. Mc Bride said he had been in Santiagos life for 14 years, noting that his stepson had wanted to be a police of cer since playing the Call of Duty video game. Melvin was the best kid, he said, choking up as he sat hunched over on a plas tic crate in an alley outside the familys apartment. I watched him graduate from high school. He joined every sport, everything. He never did no harm to nobody. And he was full of life. Gary Nahrwold, 24, re called his friend Santiago rst saying a decade ago that he wanted to become a po lice ofcer. Nahrwold also hopes to join the force and said he wont be discouraged by Santiagos slaying. It just gives me more pur pose to do it, he said. Im not going to be deterred by some senseless crimes. Mayor: Cop killer said he was going to be famous JULIO CORTEZ / AP A person lays on the ground near evidence markers as ofcials investigate the scene where a Jersey City Police Department ofcer was shot and killed while responding to a call at a 24-hour pharmacy, Sunday in Jersey City, N.J. JEFFREY COLLINS Associated Press LATTA, S.C. When openly gay police chief Crystal Moore was red by a mayor who con demned her lifestyle as questionable, she feared her two decade career in law enforce ment in this town was over. Then, this conser vative, small town re belled. The people of Latta, who voted overwhelm ingly for a state amend ment banning gay marriage eight years ago, turned against the mayor, stripped him of his powers and the town council rehired Moore. They said her dedication to the town mattered more than her sexual orientation. Residents remem bered Moores civ ic spirit from as far back as 1989, when Hurricane Hugo tore through Latta. She was a high school student working part time as a police dispatcher, and helped cut downed tree limbs to clean up the debris. This Febru ary, when an ice storm crippled the town and left it without power for days, Moore piled her ofcers in her SUV and checked on as many people as she could. Thats Crystal. All she does is help people. I dont get why he red her. Maybe its the ig norant people who talk the loudest. She was the same great Crystal yesterday as she is to day, and shell be the same person tomor row, said lifelong Latta resident Dottie Walters. Mayor Earl Bullard ve hemently denied that he red Moore because she was gay. Instead, he said she was dismissed for sheer insubordina tion during the three months he was her boss. Moore said she hadnt received a single repri mand during her career until Bullard presented her with seven the day she was red in April. Word of her termination spread fast in this tobac co hub of about 1,400 people, just off Inter state 95. About two doz en people gathered at her ofce in support on the day she was let go. The support for Moore grew when Town Councilman Jar ett Taylor started se cretly recording his conversations with the mayor, which is legal in South Carolina. Tay lor said he learned not to trust the mayor be cause he would tell him something, and later deny he ever said it. In a conversation re leased to reporters af ter Moore was red, the mayor said: Id much rather have some body who drank and drank too much tak ing care of my child than I had somebody whose lifestyle is ques tionable around chil dren, because that aint the damn way its sup posed to be. Bullard, who has avoided reporters for much of the past three months, told The As sociated Press that was him on the tape. He of fered no apologies. I dont like the ho mosexual ways por trayed in front of chil dren, Bullard told AP by telephone Thursday. You cant explain to a 5-year-old why anoth er child has two mom mies or two daddies. Since the story made headlines, Bullard said he had received a stack of hate mail that was probably an inchand-a-half thick. Within days of Moores termina tion, the town council passed a vote of con dence in her. Small SC town rallies for fired gay police chief JEFFREY COLLINS / AP Latta Police Chief Crystal Moore talks with friends at a fundraiser for a youth softball team in Latta, S.C. MARK GILLISPIE Associated Press CLEVELAND Michelle Knight has discovered that the fame that fol lowed her escape from Ariel Castros house of horrors cuts both ways. There has been some obvious good. The girl who grew up without a toothbrush and spent nearly 11 years in captivity can provide for her self. She has her own apartment. Her book, Finding Me, spent ve weeks on the New York Times Bestsellers List. She and the other two women kidnapped by Castro split $1.4 mil lion in donations collected after their escape. Phil McGraw of Dr. Phil television fame presented Knight with an oversized check for more than $400,000 from his foundation. In a recent interview with The Asso ciated Press, Knight said she is ready to assume a normal life and, with it, a new name and identity Lily Rose Lee. Im not a celebrity, said Knight, 33. I dont want to be. I want to be me. Fame has brought some frustra tions. Knight becomes frightened when crowds sometimes gather around her as she walks alone. She nds it annoying when people snap cellphone photos without asking. And people from her distant past have re appeared, feigning friendship but ul timately seeking money, she said. You have to be careful every day because of the book and the money and the it factor of who you are, she said. Theyre not coming at me to be my friend. They want what I have. Knight writes in her book that she grew up under less than ideal cir cumstances. Food and clothing were hard to come by. Strangers drifted in and out of the house at all hours. She said her mother kept her home from school for days at a time to care for her twin brothers and assorted cous ins who lived there. She ran away from home at 15 and lived beneath a highway underpass and then with a drug dealer for a few months. She said in the interview that it was the most nurturing period of her early life. Knight was 21 when Castro lured her to his home in August 2002. Amanda Berry was abducted in April 2003 just a day shy of her 17th birth day, and Gina DeJesus was 14 when he kidnapped her a year later. The women escaped from Castros home on May 6, 2013. Castro took a plea deal to avoid a potential death sentence and received life in prison plus 1,000 years. Knight said he vio lently aborted ve of her pregnancies by kicking, punching and stomping on her abdomen after impregnating her. He ended up hanging himself in his prison cell a month after sentencing. Knight: Fame comes with complications TONY DEJAK / AP Michelle Knight is shown during an interview in Cleveland.

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A10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 14, 2014 r f n t r b b b r f n tt f bt b r r f f nt b r fb f b b f t b n f r f b f n n ft nt r b f f n b n b n f f f f r b f b b r f f f b r f f f f b t t r n r n n r f f n tf f b nf n f f r f f r t nf f nf b r f n nf r t f f r f ft r t t r n t f n f t n f f f rt rt r f f f f t f f f tn f t nf r f f r r r b n n b b b f r t n

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Monday, July 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A11 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 H ow about we rename The Today Show the Yesterday Show since host Matt Lau er asks questions from 1953? Isnt what Lauer asked GM CEO Mary Barra about whether shell do well at being simulta neously an executive and a mom about, oh, 30 years past its sellby date? Today, havent weve stopped asking whether Hillary can be a good Nana as well as lead the free world? Today, havent we stopped lling the teleprompt er with queries regarding wheth er Elizabeth Warren makes her own pie crusts from scratch or is reduced, out of desperation, to using pre-made? Today, havent we decided that girls can be re ghters, astronauts and soldiers without asking what happens if they get their periods or if they dont? Asking the head of Gener al Motors whether she can be a good mommy and do her job ef fectively (not to mention ask ing her whether she got the posi tion because shes a woman and could bring a softer face to the companys image) is like asking a girl whether she can be both smart and pretty. Its a false di chotomy a trick and a con. These are not questions we ask in 2014 without expecting the audience to gasp, laugh and treat the interviewer with contempt. The fact that days later, Lau ers female producer comes out and giggles, Oopsy, it was us sil ly girls who forced poor Matt to ask that question makes it even more ridiculous. In no way does it mitigate Lau ers exchange with Barra; instead it exacerbates our irritation while undermining Lauers credibility. Look, women have been work ing double shifts for lousy wag es, cleaning airport toilets, stock ing shelves in dirty warehouses, serving bad coffee at fast-food restaurants and cleaning up the mess of the world in hotel rooms, bars and ofce buildings without being asked if they can do their jobs effectively and be good mothers. Its assumed that a woman in such a position will simply be the best mother she can. This, indeed, has always been assumed of men that they will work hard because they have to and that they will be the best parents possible. In this way, un derprivileged women and privi leged men are oddly linked: the world declares their primary function in life is to bring home the bacon and they are judged on their ability to earn. When it comes to women in positions of professional leader ship however, the ground sud denly shifts. They never asked whether you could be a good nurse and good mother, said a friend who entered medical school at 36; They only asked whether you could be a good doctor and a good mother. Lauer is trotting out a very old argument: Can a woman be anything in addition to being a woman? Published in 1938, mys tery writer Dorothy Sayers still trenchant essay Are Women Hu man? examines what it would be like if men were always posi tioned in terms of their domestic and sexual roles. Sayers wonders what it would be like for a man If he gave an interview to a reporter, or per formed any unusual exploit, he would nd it recorded in such terms as these: Professor Bract, although a distinguished bota nist, is not in any way an unman ly man. He has, in fact, a wife and seven children. Tall and bur ly, the hands with which he han dles his delicate specimens are as gnarled and powerful as those of a Canadian lumberjack. What do they expect women to say when interviewers ask these questions, anyhow? Is there a se cret wish that the women will look into the camera and an nounce, Gee, I never thought about it. Guess Ill just reabsorb my offspring into my body and rebirth them when its more con venient, like when I can cash in my stock options; or maybe, I never much liked being a mom anyhow, Matt; Im putting them up for auction; or do we secretly long to hear, I am going to make my husband raise them, plus Im going to make him start wearing my slips? When faced with inappropriate questions, perhaps we should all say, Ill forgive you for asking me that if you forgive me for not answering. Only then we can get down to business and talk about whats important today. Gina Barreca is an English professor at the University of Connecticut, a feminist schol ar who has written eight books, and a col umnist for the Hartford Courant. She can be reached through her www.ginabarreca.com. OTHER VOICES Gina Barreca MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Today Shows Matt Lauer is so last century P resident Barack Obama has gone from being the deporter-in-chief to being held politically responsible for a ood of im migrants crossing the nations southern bor der. But this is more than politics it is a real humanitarian crisis. Illegal immigrants have long crossed the Mexican border, but never like this. By the thousands, children are coming from Central America especially Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala unaccompanied by their parents. It is an exodus unparalleled in re cent history, recalling the harrowing stories of the so-called Childrens Crusade said to have drawn youngsters to the Holy Land 800 years ago. Why this is occurring now is not altogeth er clear. It could be a reaction to the decision two years ago by the Obama administration to allow immigrants who came as children to stay without fear of deportation. But it could also be a desperate bet made by parents who gure that an immigration bill will eventu ally be passed and that their children, even though they arrive now, will get a chance at a better life. Whatever the cause, it has overwhelmed those charged with guarding the nations bor ders and has led to scenes of angry Americans barring the way to immigrant children, a re action that shames the nations humanitarian conscience. Mr. Obamas response earlier this week was to ask Congress for $3.7 billion to deal with the inux. Republicans (and some fearful Democrats) are refusing to give the request serious con sideration. They believe a crisis is unfolding, but they dont trust Mr. Obama and they resist giving him a blank check. Not exactly blank. The money would go to building more detention centers, adding im migration judges, beeng up border patrols and aerial surveillance, the very things need ed to protect the borders and take care of the children prior to processing. Instead, con gressional gridlock and dysfunction rule. Mr. Obama needs to be more explicit in saying these children will be returned to their homes. But Republicans cant have it both ways. They cant savage Mr. Obama for doing nothing and then argue against him when he acts. The congressional critics have to decide: Do they want to be part of the solution or part of the problem? Distributed by MCT Information Services. A VOICE Obamas request to Congress cant be dismissed Classic DOONESBURY 1976 Asking the head of General Motors whether she can be a good mommy and do her job effectively (not to mention asking her whether she got the position because shes a woman and could bring a softer face to the companys image) is like asking a girl whether she can be both smart and pretty. Its a false dichotomy a trick and a con. These are not questions we ask in 2014 without expecting the audience to gasp, laugh and treat the interviewer with contempt.

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 14, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com GOLF: Martin eagles 18th to win title / B3 NATACHA PIARENKO / AP Germanys Philipp Lahm holds up the World Cup trophy as the team celebrates their 1-0 victory over Argentina after the World Cup nal on Sunday at the Maracana Stadium in Rio de Janeiro. Germany by a whisker Mario Goetzes 113th-minute goal clinches title over Argentina MATTIAS KAREN Associated Press RIO DE JANEIRO With two quick touches, Mario Goetze ended Germanys 24-year wait for another World Cup title. Goetze scored the win ning goal in extra time to give Germany a 1-0 victory over Argentina on Sunday in a tight and tense World Cup nal that came down to one piece of individual skill. Goetze, who wasnt born when West Germany beat Argentina in the 1990 nal, controlled a cross with his chest in the 113th minute and in one uid motion volleyed the ball past goal keeper Sergio Romero and inside the far post. It was a goal that gave Germany its fourth World Cup title in its eighth nal, and left Argentina star Li onel Messi still walking in the shadow of his compa triot Diego Maradona, who led his country to the 1986 title. Goetze had come on as a substitute for Miro slav Klose toward the end of regulation time and the 22-year-old midelders fresh legs made the differ ence. Andre Schuerrle broke down the left ank, send ing his cross into the area, and the Bayern Munich player did the rest with a clinical nish. The goal echoed that of Andres Ini estas four years ago, when the midelder scored in similar fashion but from the other side of the area to give Spain a 1-0 extra time win over the Netherlands. For Germany, the win ends a string of near miss es since winning its last major title at the 1996 Eu ropean Championship. The team lost the 2002 World Cup nal to Brazil and lost in the seminals in both 2006 and 2010. It is Germanys rst World Cup title as a unied nation, having won as West Germany in 1954, 1974 and 1990. It was also the third World Cup nal between these countries and had been billed as a matchup between the perfect team and the perfect individu al, pitting Germanys ma chine-like unit against the brilliance of Messi, the four-time world player of FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Following an impressive perfor mance at the USA Weightlifting Youth National Championships last month, Lake Countys Iron Jungle weightlifting club raised its game to a new level. Iron Jungle, the only weightlifting team in Lake and Sumter counties, picked up six medals three gold, one silver and two bronze at the Sun shine State Games at The Lakeland Center on June 21-22 in Lakeland. Morgan Rhone, Alexis Smith and Jose Barajas won gold medals for the Iron Jungle. Katrina Lanier picked up a sil ver medal in her rst meet with Iron Jungle, while Warren Brown and Alex andria Mitchell earned bronze medals for the club. Our ladies performed remarkably well at the Sunshine State Games, Iron Jungle lifters step up at Sunshine State Games Iron Jungle weightlifting coach Josh Boyer (center) poses for a picture with club members (from left): Alexandria Mitchell, Katrina Lanier, Morgan Rhone and Alexis Smith. All four medaled recently at the Sunshine State Games. PHOTO COURTESY OF JOSH BOYER SEE JUNGLE | B2 VICTOR R. CAIVANO / AP Germanys Mario Goetze, right, scores the deciding goal in the 113th minute, past Argentinas goalkeeper Sergio Romero. CHERYL SENTER / AP Brad Keselowski, right, celebrates with members of his team on Sunday after winning the Sprint Cup series race in Loudon, N.H. DAN GELSTON Associated Press LOUDON, N.H. Brad Keselows ki completed a awless weekend at New Hampshire Motor Speed way and won Sunday under a greenwhite checkered nish. Keselowski followed up Saturdays Nationwide Series victory with his rst Sprint Cup win at New Hamp shire, dominating in the No. 2 Ford for his third victory of the season. After the last caution came with four laps left, Keselowski pulled away on the nal restart to become the rst driver to sweep the week end in track history. He had the fast est car most of the weekend, even leading the speed charts during both ZACHARY HANKLE Special to the Daily Commercial The Leesburg Lightning snapped a four-game losing streak on Sunday with an 8-7 win in 10 innings against DeLand in the second game of a doubleheader at Pat Thomas Stadi um-Buddy Lowe Field. With the win, which countered a 6-3 loss in the opener, the Lightning (13-14) maintained a hold on fourth place in the Florida Collegiate Sum mer League standings. Leesburg plated the game winner when Matt Menard scored on a sac rice y to right eld by Brad An tchak. The Lightning faced a threerun decit heading into the eighth inning and Menards run completed the comeback. The Suns (12-16) took an ear ly lead in the first inning on Angel Keselowski dominates in New Hampshire SEE NASCAR | B2 SEE CUP | B2 Up until Goetzes winning goal, the game was more notable for top-class defending than creative attacking, but both teams had their share of chances. Lightning comeback splits twin bill SEE FCSL | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 14, 2014 SUN mon tu es we d thurs fri Sa tLeesbur g LightningJul y 13 -1 9DelandHOME5pmWinter GardenAW AY7pmWinter GardenHOME7pmWinter GardenHOME7pmSanfordAW AY7pmSanfordHOME7pmSanfordAW AY1pm AUTO RACING NASCAR Sprint Cup-Camping World RV Sales 301 Results Sunday At New Hampshire Motor Speedway Loudon, N.H. Lap length: 1.058 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (7) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 305 laps, 145.7 rating, 48 points, $306,998. 2. (1) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 305, 123.5, 43, $239,066. 3. (13) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 305, 99.1, 42, $166,270. 4. (15) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 305, 112.3, 41, $166,086. 5. (24) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 305, 88.9, 39, $119,750. 6. (8) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 305, 109.7, 39, $139,431. 7. (4) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 305, 91.9, 37, $138,473. 8. (3) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 305, 115, 37, $109,565. 9. (22) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 305, 82.1, 35, $129,290. 10. (28) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 305, 97, 34, $101,715. 11. (10) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 305, 95.1, 33, $107,415. 12. (9) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 305, 86, 32, $118,873. 13. (14) Carl Edwards, Ford, 305, 77.6, 31, $105,465. 14. (23) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 305, 72.5, 30, $133,476. 15. (27) Greg Bife, Ford, 305, 68, 29, $130,115. 16. (5) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 305, 96, 28, $120,629. 17. (18) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 305, 73.9, 28, $86,940. 18. (20) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 305, 68.7, 26, $104,798. 19. (16) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 305, 79.3, 25, $113,554. 20. (30) Jeff Burton, Toyota, 305, 63.1, 24, $95,240. 21. (17) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 305, 78.2, 23, $117,765. 22. (29) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 305, 60.9, 22, $93,340. 23. (19) Aric Almirola, Ford, 305, 63.1, 21, $121,951. 24. (33) David Gilliland, Ford, 305, 49.6, 20, $108,873. 25. (26) David Ragan, Ford, 305, 54.6, 19, $107,173. 26. (11) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 305, 79.5, 19, $128,151. 27. (21) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 304, 63.1, 17, $110,335. 28. (35) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 304, 45.2, 16, $83,290. 29. (32) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 304, 47.4, 15, $80,515. 30. (12) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 304, 88.7, 14, $122,798. 31. (36) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 303, 41.7, 13, $91,723. 32. (39) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 303, 38.2, 12, $89,337. 33. (37) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 302, 42.8, 11, $79,565. 34. (34) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 301, 37.5, 0, $79,365. 35. (40) Eddie MacDonald, Ford, 300, 32.6, 9, $79,165. 36. (38) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 300, 34.1, 8, $78,935. 37. (25) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, accident, 296, 49.7, 7, $86,717. 38. (31) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 292, 45, 6, $81,655. 39. (43) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet, 278, 26.4, 0, $69,655. 40. (6) Joey Logano, Ford, accident, 211, 92.9, 5, $105,646. 41. (42) Timmy Hill, Toyota, electrical, 76, 26.8, 3, $61,655. 42. (2) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, accident, 11, 35.4, 2, $114,091. 43. (41) Mike Bliss, Toyota, electrical, 6, 27.9, 0, $54,155. GOLF Womens British Open Leading Scores Sunday At Royal Birkdale Golf Club Southport, England Purse: $3 million Yardage: 6,458; Par: 72 Final Mo Martin, $474,575 69-69-77-72 287 -1 Shanshan Feng, $235,204 73-71-69-75 288 E Suzann Pettersen, $235,204 72-73-68-75 288 E Inbee Park, $151,532 72-72-68-77 289 +1 Jessica Korda, $104,425 72-72-73-74 291 +3 Angela Stanford, $104,425 74-72-70-75 291 +3 Eun-Hee Ji, $104,425 74-70-71-76 291 +3 Julieta Granada, $104,425 72-70-72-77 291 +3 Laura Davies, $72,911 75-72-72-73 292 +4 Marina Alex, $72,911 72-76-68-76 292 +4 Sun-Ju Ahn, $72,911 75-67-71-79 292 +4 Anna Nordqvist, $51,257 72-78-71-72 293 +5 Azahara Munoz, $51,257 72-72-74-75 293 +5 Gwladys Nocera, $51,257 73-70-73-77 293 +5 Charley Hull, $51,257 73-76-66-78 293 +5 Stacy Lewis, $51,257 71-74-70-78 293 +5 a-Emma Talley 72-73-76-73 294 +6 Beatriz Recari, $39,530 74-67-74-79 294 +6 So Yeon Ryu, $39,530 71-70-74-79 294 +6 Amelia Lewis, $39,530 72-71-71-80 294 +6 Giulia Sergas, $32,283 76-73-72-74 295 +7 Erina Hara, $32,283 73-74-73-75 295 +7 Paula Creamer, $32,283 75-73-71-76 295 +7 Morgan Pressel, $32,283 70-74-75-76 295 +7 Meena Lee, $32,283 73-75-70-77 295 +7 Amy Yang, $32,283 71-72-72-80 295 +7 Pornanong Phatlum, $27,506 73-74-75-74 296 +8 Rikako Morita, $27,506 75-75-68-78 296 +8 a-Georgia Hall 73-72-78-74 297 +9 Belen Mozo, $22,977 77-72-74-74 297 +9 Ayaka Watanabe, $22,977 76-72-75-74 297 +9 Carlota Ciganda, $22,977 74-75-73-75 297 +9 Mina Harigae, $22,977 70-78-74-75 297 +9 Lee-Anne Pace, $22,977 75-73-72-77 297 +9 Jenny Shin, $22,977 73-72-73-79 297 +9 Jiyai Shin, $22,977 72-75-71-79 297 +9 Lydia Ko, $22,977 72-76-69-80 297 +9 Nikki Campbell, $18,447 77-72-73-76 298 +10 John Deere Classic Leading Scores Sunday At TPC Deere Run Silvis, Ill. Purse: $4.7 million Yardage: 7,268; Par: 71 Final a-amateur Brian Harman (500), $846,000 63-68-65-66 262 -22 Zach Johnson (300), $507,600 63-67-69-64 263 -21 Jerry Kelly (163), $272,600 66-68-65-66 265 -19 Jhonattan Vegas (163), $272,600 69-68-63-65 265 -19 Scott Brown (105), $178,600 67-70-61-68 266 -18 Tim Clark (105), $178,600 72-63-64-67 266 -18 Ryan Moore (83), $141,588 66-67-67-68 268 -16 Jordan Spieth (83), $141,588 71-64-67-66 268 -16 Bo Van Pelt (83), $141,588 67-69-67-65 268 -16 Johnson Wagner (83), $141,588 66-65-69-68 268 -16 Steven Bowditch (68), $112,800 64-67-70-68 269 -15 Steve Stricker (68), $112,800 68-65-64-72 269 -15 Chad Campbell (55), $80,571 69-71-62-68 270 -14 Bryce Molder (55), $80,571 73-65-67-65 270 -14 Kevin Na (55), $80,571 68-66-71-65 270 -14 Shawn Stefani (55), $80,571 73-67-64-66 270 -14 Daniel Summerhays (55), $80,571 69-68-65-68 270 -14 David Toms (55), $80,571 65-70-67-68 270 -14 Brad Fritsch (55), $80,571 70-68-63-69 270 -14 Kevin Kisner (50), $56,713 68-72-68-64 272 -12 D.H. Lee (50), $56,713 72-66-66-68 272 -12 Troy Merritt (50), $56,713 68-70-66-68 272 -12 Charlie Beljan (47), $43,240 71-68-66-68 273 -11 Charles Howell III (47), $43,240 66-68-67-72 273 -11 William McGirt (47), $43,240 64-66-69-74 273 -11 John Rollins (47), $43,240 72-68-66-67 273 -11 Luke Guthrie (40), $30,628 69-69-69-67 274 -10 Justin Hicks (40), $30,628 66-70-70-68 274 -10 Dicky Pride (40), $30,628 70-70-66-68 274 -10 Glen Day (40), $30,628 72-65-69-68 274 -10 Tommy Gainey (40), $30,628 70-68-67-69 274 -10 Russell Henley (40), $30,628 70-67-68-69 274 -10 Steven Ihm, $30,628 73-65-68-68 274 -10 Scott Langley (40), $30,628 69-70-65-70 274 -10 Will MacKenzie (40), $30,628 73-65-67-69 274 -10 a-Jordan Niebrugge, $0 71-68-66-69 274 -10 Greg Chalmers (31), $20,709 70-68-71-66 275 -9 Scottish Open Leading Scores Sunday At Royal Aberdeen Golf Club Aberdeen, Scotland Purse: $5.14 million Yardage: 6,867; Par: 71 Final a-amateur Justin Rose, England 69-68-66-65 268 Kristoffer Broberg, Sweden 65-71-68-66 270 Marc Warren, Scotland 67-69-67-70 273 Stephen Gallacher, Scotland 72-69-70-63 274 Matteo Manassero, Italy 69-72-68-65 274 Shane Lowry, Ireland 72-68-68-66 274 Tyrrell Hatton, England 69-71-66-68 274 Scott Jamieson, Scotland 74-67-70-64 275 Rickie Fowler, United States 71-71-68-65 275 Robert Karlsson, Sweden 71-71-67-66 275 Phil Mickelson, United States 68-73-70-65 276 Danny Willett, England 70-71-68-67 276 Pablo Larrazabal, Spain 69-73-66-68 276 Paul Casey, England 69-71-72-65 277 Rory McIlroy, Northern Ireland 64-78-68-67 277 Luke Donald, England 67-73-72-66 278 James Morrison, England 71-72-69-66 278 Mikko Ilonen, Finland 71-68-69-70 278 Craig Lee, Scotland 72-69-66-71 278 Ricardo Gonzalez, Argentina 65-71-71-71 278 Paul Waring, England 75-66-73-65 279 Alexander Levy, France 75-69-69-66 279 John Hahn, United States 71-71-68-69 279 TV 2 DAY SCOREBOARD FCSL STANDINGS W L .Pct GB Sanford 17 10 .630 Winter Park 17 12 .586 1 Winter Garden 16 13 .552 2 Leesburg 13 14 .481 4 DeLand 12 16 .429 5.5 College Park 8 18 .308 8.5 SUNDAYS GAMES DeLand 6, Leesburg 3, 1st game Leesburg 8, DeLand 7 (10), 2nd game Winter Garden 9, College Park 5 TODAYS GAMES Leesburg at Winter Garden, 11 a.m. Winter Park at DeLand, 7 p.m. College Park at Sanford, 7 p.m. TUESDAYS GAMES Winter Garden at Leesburg, 7p.m. Winter Park at DeLand, 7 p.m. Sanford at College Park, 7 p.m. ARENA FOOTBALL 8 p.m. ESPN2 New Orleans at Jacksonville CYCLING 7 a.m. NBCSN Tour de France, Stage 10, Mulhouse to La Planche des Belles Filles, France MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 8 p.m. ESPN Exhibition, Home Run Derby, at Minneapolis bringing home four med als, Iron Jungle coach Josh Boyer said. But our male competitors did well, too, with two medals. Im very proud of our club as we continue to make progress towards becoming a na tionally recognized organi zation. Rhone, lifting in the Youth Division at 53 kilo grams (about 116 pounds), used the momentum she rode to a Top-10 nish at the Youth National Cham pionships to personal re cords in the Clean & Jerk, Snatch and total weight. She hit on ve of her six lifts in both disciplines. Rhone lifted 43 kilo grams (95 pounds) in the Snatch and 57 kilograms (125 pounds) in the clean and jerk. She nished with a nal combined to tal weight of 100 kilograms (220 pounds) for the clubs rst gold medal of the competition. Morgan has already qualied for the 2014 USA Weightlifting Junior Na tionals, even though she has a year of Youth eligibil ity left, Boyer said. The qualifying total for Ju nior Nationals is typically around 90 kilograms (198 pounds). Her next step will be her championship at the Florida Weightlifting Federation State Champi onship. Smith hit on four of six lifts en route to her Gold medal-winning effort. Competing in the Youth Division at 75 kilograms (165 pounds), Smith, like Rhone, nished with a to tal weight of 100 kilograms. She had a personal best of 47 kilograms (103 pounds) in the snatch and 53 kilograms (117 pounds) in the clean and jerk. After securing the gold medal, Smith attempted to estab lish a new personal mark with 58 kilograms (128 pounds). Alexis had a good clean and a good jerk, but she lost it on the gather, Boyer said. The lift isnt over un til the lifter brings their feet parallel to each other with control and that was Alex is downfall. During the portion where she brings her feet to a normal stand ing position, she lost con trol of the weight. Her next prep will be geared toward improving on her bronze medal at the Florida State Weightlifting Federation nals in No vember. Boyer said Smith also will be training to hit her quali fying total of 112 kilograms (247 pounds). He feels she will hit that goal in August. Barajas, the Florida High School Athletic Associa tion Class 1A state cham pion at 169 pounds, was the Iron Jungles only gold medalist among its male lifters. Competing in the Junior Division at 85 kilograms (187 pounds), Barajas hit a personal record snatch of 97 kilograms (214 pounds) and 125 kilograms (275 (pounds) in the clean and jerk for a total of 222 kilo grams (489 pounds). Boyer said Barajas, a Ta vares graduate, is working out details on a weightlift ing scholarship with North Michigan University in Marquette, Mich. North ern Michigan is a region al Olympic training center and Boyer said it is one of a handful of colleges that offer weightlifting scholar ships. Jose had a great high school coach in Chris Gauntlett, who has done an outstanding job in de veloping him, Boyer said. Im proud of Jose. He knew what he wanted to do with his talents, and he didnt allow anyone to talk to him out of his vision. He stayed the course and continued working to wards his goals. Lanier, competing in Ju nior Division at 75 kilo grams, picked up a Sil ver medal in her rst club meet. She hit on ve of six lifts, hitting on 43 kilo grams in the snatch and 66 kilograms (145 pounds) in the clean and jerk for a to tal of 109 kilograms (240 pounds). Katrina is going to be big for the high school girls program at Leesburg this season, Boyer said. Im glad she is getting these club meets under her belt. She satised her Flori da Weightlifting Federa tion state qualifying total as well and is only a few ki lograms aways from reach ing her Junior Nationals qualifying weight. I believe she will reach that goal in August. Mitchell, in her rst club meet, earned a bronze medal in the Youth Divi sion at 53 kilograms with a total weight of 66 kilo grams (145 pounds). She hit on ve of six lifts. Boyer said a solid perfor mance in a debut competi tion can often be a spring board to future success. For Warren Brown, who lifted in the Junior Divi sion at 77 kilograms (170 pounds), the Sunshine State Games may turn out to be his nal competition with Iron Jungle. Brown is scheduled to depart for ba sic training with the U.S. Navy in August. Brown nailed all six of his lifts with 84 kilograms (185 pounds) in the snatch, 103 kilograms (227 pounds) in the clean and jerk, good for a total of 187 kilograms (412 pounds). All three to tals were personal records. If this is Warrens last meet with us, Im glad he got to go out at his best, Boyer said. Warren is a great kid and a very coach able one, as well. It has been a privilege to train with him over this last year. The U.S. Navy is getting an outstanding recruit. Despite the impending loss of Brown, Boyer said the Iron Jungle will con tinue to grow. At least ve more lifters will make their USA-Weightlifting debut with the Iron Jungle in Au gust. Iron Jungle Weightlifting is making plans to com pete in the Georgia Games 2014 Olympics Weightlift ing Championships in At lanta on Aug. 2 and the Vero Beach Open on Aug. 23. The future is very bright for out club, Boyer said. We will continue to make progress like always until we have achieved all our goals. We have the chem istry to motivate each oth er, the will to succeed, the work ethic to be great, and we are as hungry as ever. We have the desire to be great and each new pro gression is better than the last. We are on our way. JUNGLE FROM PAGE B1 Sprint Cup practices on Saturday. Keselowski tied Jimmie John son for the series high in wins. Ke selowski and Dale Earnhardt Jr. clinched spots in the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship, provided they attempt to qualify for the nal seven races before the cutoff. Pole sitter Kyle Busch was second. Kyle Larson, Matt Kenseth and Ryan Newman completed the top ve. I dont think anybody had any thing for, Keselowski, Busch said. Keselowski hopped out of his car and grabbed an oversized broom to give a playful sweep of all the confet ti already collected around the Ford. NASCAR FROM PAGE B1 the year. But in the biggest game of his career, Messi came up short. He had one good chance to score when he was sent free in the area just af ter the halftime break, but sent his shot wide of the far post. It was a difcult angle, but still the type of chance he so often con verts for Barcelona. Messi threatened in termittently throughout the match, but was effec tively neutralized for long stretches. When he did try to break forward with one of his quick dribbles, he was surrounded by the German defense. His free kick in the 120th minute went well high. When the nal whistle blew, Germany players col lapsed in a pile in the mid dle of the pitch, while Mes si walked with his hands on his hips toward the cen ter circle. Messi, who scored four goals in the group stage but none in the knockout rounds, then had to trudge alone up the stairs of the Maracana Stadium to ac cept the Golden Ball award for the tournaments best player, shaking hands with German Chancellor Ange la Merkel along the way. He never broke a smile. Ger many goalkeeper Manuel Neuer was voted best goal keeper of the tournament. Up until Goetzes win ning goal, the game was more notable for top-class defending than creative at tacking, but both teams had their share of chances. Gonzalo Higuain was gifted a free chance when Toni Kroos back header landed at his feet and left him all alone with Neuer. However, he sent his shot woefully wide. Higuain thought he had scored in the 30th af ter Messi picked out Eze quiel Lavezzi with a great ball and he sent a cross in toward the Napoli striker. Higuain slotted in his n ish inside the far post and ran all the way to the cor ner ag in celebration be fore realizing he had been called for offside. Shortly afterward, Ger many was forced to use a substitution as Christoph Kramer had to go off with a suspected concussion af ter colliding with Ezequiel Garays shoulder earlier in the game. Kramer had con tinued playing but looked visibly dizzy as he was led off the eld. Kramer, who was a late inclusion in the lineup after Sami Khedi ra was injured during the warmup, was replaced by Schuerrle. Germanys best chance came just before the break when Benedikt Hoewedes hit the post with a header from a corner. CUP FROM PAGE B1 Arroyos RBI single, but the Light ning struck back in the second when Garrett Suggs provided an RBI double to tie the score. Suggs then scored on Shea Pierces eld ers choice to give Leesburg a 2-1 lead. DeLand then tied it up on a wild pickoff attempt by Brett Jones. The Suns responded in the fourth in ning with a elders choice to close to within 3-2. In the sixth inning, the Suns took the lead to make it 4-3, adding an other run in the eighth on a triple by Austin Hays, who later scored on a wild throw by the right elder to extend DeLands lead to 6-3. Danny Murray started Leesburgs comeback in the eighth by plat ing two runs to slice the Suns ad vantage to 6-5. Suggs then tied it up with an RBI double to center. Both teams scored in the ninth to send the game to extra innings, set ting the stage for Menards and An tchaks heroics. In the rst game, a four-run out burst in the sixth inning by the Suns broke open a tied game. DeLand scored solo runs in the rst and second innings before Leesburg tied it with a pair of runs in the fourth. Antchak had both RBIs for the Lightning with a single to center, which scored Colby Lusignan and Igor Baez. The Lightning tied the game at 7 in the ninth inning when Kevin Ol meda hit an RBI single. Leesburg travels to Winter Gar den at 7 p.m. today for a rare Mon day game against Winter Garden at West Orange High School. FCSL FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, July 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 GOLF DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer SOUTHPORT, England Mo Martin knew she hit her 3-wood exactly the way she wanted on the 18th hole at Royal Birkdale. With the ball slightly be low her feet, just under 240 yards away and a strong wind at her back, she let it rip and watched the ball track toward the ag. Martin thought it was short. Then she thought it might be too long. Moments later, she re alized just how good it was. I could hear it hit the pin from the fairway, Martin said. That was a pretty fun feeling. The ball rolled into the center of the agstick and settled 6 feet away for an ea gle, and when no one could catch her, the 31-year-old American became a ma jor champion Sunday at the Ricoh Womens British Open. I think I still need to be pinched, Martin said after closing with an even-par 72 for a one-shot victory over Shanshan Feng of China and Suzann Pettersen of Norway. It was Martins rst eagle of the year one of the short est hitters in the game, she doesnt get many opportu nities. She had not won on the LPGA Tour in 63 previous tries. And on a wind-swept Sunday when no one broke par, she was never closer than two shots of the leaders the entire nal round. The best shot of her life changed everything. An absolutely perfect 3-wood, she said. When it was in the air, I said, Sit. And then I said, Stop. And then when it was going toward the hole, I said, OK, I dont have anything more to say to that ball. I actually heard it hit the pin. Its denitely one to remember. She turned and did a little jig in the fairway. An hour later, it turned out to be the winning shot when Feng and Inbee Park of South Korea couldnt stay under par. JOHN DEERE CLASSIC SILVIS, Ill. Brian Har man used three straight birdies down the stretch to hold off Zach Johnson by one stroke and win the John Deere Classic on Sunday for his rst PGA Tour title. Harman had a 5-under 66 in the nal round for a 22-un der-262 total. The 27-yearold Georgian in his third full season on the PGA Tour earned $846,000 and the last exemption for next weeks British Open. Harman withstood John sons challenge by making three birdies beginning at No. 14 to get to 23 under with two holes to play. Johnson, playing four pairs ahead of Harman, birdied the 17th to get within a stroke, but ran out of holes. Jhonattan Vegas had a 65 to nished tied for third with Jerry Kelly (66) at 265. Scott Brown (68) and Tim Clark (67) tied for fth another shot back. Three-time winner Steve Stricker fell off the pace set by Harman on the front nine, then fell off the leader board with a double-bogey on the par-3 12th. His approach ended up in high brush be hind and below the green, and he couldnt recover, n ishing with a 72 and a tie for 11th at 269. Brown was tied with John son and Clark briey mid way through the round, but played the back nine in par 36 and fell back. Clark, the lone contender with a long putter, bogeyed No. 9 to fall out of the joint lead. Harman, whose best pre vious nishes were ties for third place, also earned his rst invitations to the Mas ters and the Tournament of Champions. He got his third eagle in 19 holes when he eagled the par-5 second for the second straight day. He sank a 4-foot putt after a brilliant approach from 223 yards. A bogey on No. 5 was offset by a birdie on the ninth, the most difcult hole on the front nine. SCOTTISH OPEN ABERDEEN, Scotland Justin Rose won the Scottish Open by two shots after a nal round of 6-under 65 on Sunday, sealing back-to-back victories either side of the At lantic and bolstering his con dence ahead of next weeks British Open. The 2013 U.S. Open cham pion turned the last day into a procession, rolling in six birdies and going bogey-free on a windless Royal Aber deen links course. Unheralded Swede Krist offer Broberg nished sec ond on 14 under after a 66. That secured him a place at the British Open at Hoylake, along with other top-10 n ishers Tyrrell Hatton and Scott Jamieson. Rose, who started the day tied for the lead with Marc Warren, eased to a rst win in Europe since 2007 and backed up his victory at the Quicken Loans National at Congressional last month. US SENIOR OPEN EDMOND, Okla. Colin Montgomerie won a threehole playoff against Gene Sauers to win the U.S. Senior Open title Sunday at Oak Tree National. Both entered the playoff at 5 under. Montgomerie en tered the third extra hole with a one-shot lead, then made a putt on No. 18 to par the hole and claim the win. Montgomerie became the fth golfer to win both the PGA Championship and U.S. Senior Open in the same year. He led at the end of the rst and second days of the Senior Open, but entered the nal round four shots behind Sauers and shot a 2-under 69 to force the playoff. It was the rst playoff at a U.S. Senior Open since 2002, when Don Pooley beat Tom Watson in a ve-hole playoff. Martins eagle on 18 wins Womens British Open SCOTT HEPPELL / AP Mo Martin of the U.S. poses with the trophy after winning the Womens British Open golf championship on Sunday at the Royal Birkdale Golf Club, in Southport, England. NBA BRIAN MAHONEY AP Basketball Writer NEW YORK Carme lo Anthony wanted to be a Knick a few years ago, and nothing has changed now. Anthony is staying in New York, announcing his decision Sunday in a posting titled My City, My Heart on his website. This organization has supported me and in return, I want to stay and build here with this city and my team, An thony said. He explained that he owed it to himself to ex plore all his options as a free agent, and thanked the teams he met with for their interest. Through it all, my heart never wavered, he wrote. The Knicks can pay the All-Star forward nearly $130 million over ve years, though An thony has said he would be open to taking less if it would help build a winning team. But the 30-year-old forward also wants to compete for champi onships, and the Knicks dont seem ready at the moment. They went 3745 last season, the rst time in Anthonys 11year career he missed the postseason. They hired Phil Jack son as president in March, and Antho ny believes the 11-time champion as a coach can turn the organiza tion into a winner. CYCLING BASEBALL JEROME PUGMIRE AP Sports Writer MULHOUSE, France German rider Tony Martin broke ahead early and comfortably held on to win the hilly ninth stage of the Tour de France on Sunday, while Frenchman Tony Gallopin took the yel low jersey from over night leader Vincenzo Nibali of Italy. The 29-year-old Ger man, a three-time world time trial champion, broke away with spe cialist climber Alessan dro De Marchi of Italy. The objective was to win the stage. There was a chance to do it and I felt good, my legs felt good, Martin said. The 105.4-mile trek from Gerardmer to Mulhouse in the mid-sized Vosges mountain range near the German border featured six mostly moderate uphill treks that posed Martin little problem. It was a good day for France with Gallopin set to defend the yellow jer sey today Bastille Day. Gallopin, of the Lotto Belisol team, nished several minutes behind but did well enough to erase his decit of more than three minutes to Nibali. Its with great pride that I will ride on the national holiday. Its a little bit scary, but I will enjoy the day. Shortly before the days most difcult climb a Catego ry 1 ascent of 10.8 ki lometers up Le Mark stein Martin broke away about 60 kilome ters from the end. Gal lopins chasing group was about two minutes behind them and Niba li more than six min utes adrift. Martin was no threat to Nibalis yellow jer sey, but the 26-year-old Gallopin was. CHRISTOPHE ENA / AP Frances Tony Gallopin celebrates on the podium of the ninth stage of the Tour de France on Sunday in Mulhouse, France. NBA MARK DIDTLER Associated Press ST. PETERSBURG All-Star David Price scattered ve hits in eight-plus innings to win his fourth con secutive start and the Tampa Bay Rays beat the Toronto Blue Jays 3-0 on Sunday. Price (9-7), who had his start pushed back one day because of a stomach virus, struck out ve and walked one. The left-hander was pulled after giv ing up a leadoff single in the ninth to Melky Cabrera. Because Price pitched on Sunday, he is ineligible to play in the All-Star game Tues day night in Minneso ta. His roster spot was taken by his former teammate, Seattle clos er Fernando Rodney. The Rays, who have won 11 of 15, got RBI singles from Logan Forsythe and Jose Mo lina. Jake McGee got three outs for his sev enth save. R.A. Dickey (7-9) gave up two runs and ve hits over six in nings. Toronto has not won a road se ries against Tampa Bay since April 2007, a span of 22 sets. Toronto has lost eight of 10 overall. Despite their recent struggles, the Blue Jays 49 wins at the AllStar break are their most since 2006. A win Sunday would have given them 50 victo ries before the break for the rst time since 1992. The Rays took a 1-0 lead on a two-out sin gle by Forsythe in the second. Martin wins Tours 9th stage TIM REYNOLDS AP Basketball Writer Half a world away, Chris Bosh could not escape the frenzy of last week. An offer from the Houston Rockets was waiting. His long time Miami teammate LeB ron James was leaving. For a few moments, Bosh found himself wondering if his days with the Heat were over. Then he looked at his fami ly, and everything stopped. Weve built a life in South Florida and were comfort able, Bosh said Sunday. So I had to do whats best now for myself and my family. With that, his decision be came very easy. Bosh will sign a $118 million, ve-year deal to stay with the Heat, a for mality only held up by the lo gistical challenge presented by him being in Ghana right now and with more exotic stops on a family vacation still to come before returning home. When he nally puts pen to paper, the Heat locker room will essentially become his and in an interview with The Associated Press, Bosh said that while its a shock to re alize James is no longer with Miami after four seasons, hes ready to have that voice. I cant lie to you: Im excit ed. Im excited for the chal lenge, Bosh said during a break from NBA Africa duties. I want to step up to the chal lenge. I feel this is a chance to prove to myself and others that I can still do this. I want to see if I can do whats necessary to go in there and win every night. Thats the challenge of being a leader. Im a much better player and a leader now, so itll be fun. Bosh excited for the challenge of staying with Heat Price wins 4th straight, Rays top Blue Jays 3-0 Knicks will keep Anthony

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 14, 2014 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Baltimore 51 42 .548 7-3 L-1 25-23 26-19 Toronto 49 47 .510 3 2 2-8 L-2 25-21 24-26 New York 47 46 .505 4 3 6-4 W-1 18-23 29-23 Tampa Bay 44 53 .454 9 8 6-4 W-2 22-28 22-25 Boston 43 52 .453 9 8 5-5 W-1 23-26 20-2 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 53 38 .582 6-4 L-1 25-22 28-16 Kansas City 48 46 .511 6 2 4-6 W-1 22-25 26-21 Cleveland 47 47 .500 7 3 6-4 W-1 29-19 18-28 Chicago 45 51 .469 10 6 5-5 L-1 24-21 21-30 Minnesota 43 50 .462 11 7 5-5 W-1 21-22 22-28 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 59 36 .621 7-3 W-1 30-15 29-21 Los Angeles 57 37 .606 1 9-1 W-5 32-15 25-22 Seattle 51 44 .537 8 4-6 L-1 24-26 27-18 Houston 40 56 .417 19 11 4-6 L-1 21-28 19-28 Texas 38 57 .400 21 13 1-9 L-8 18-30 20-27 NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Washington 51 42 .548 6-4 W-2 28-19 23-23 Atlanta 52 43 .547 5-5 W-2 25-19 27-24 New York 45 50 .474 7 7 8-2 W-3 25-23 20-27 Miami 44 50 .468 7 7 3-7 L-4 27-22 17-28 Philadelphia 42 53 .442 10 10 5-5 L-2 19-29 23-24 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 53 43 .552 2-8 W-1 25-24 28-19 St. Louis 52 44 .542 1 6-4 L-1 27-20 25-24 Cincinnati 51 44 .537 1 1 7-3 W-1 27-21 24-23 Pittsburgh 49 46 .516 3 3 5-5 L-1 29-20 20-26 Chicago 40 54 .426 12 11 2-8 L-2 20-22 20-32 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Los Angeles 54 43 .557 6-4 W-2 25-24 29-19 San Francisco 52 43 .547 1 5-5 W-1 28-25 24-18 San Diego 41 54 .432 12 11 3-7 L-2 24-25 17-29 Colorado 40 54 .426 12 11 4-6 L-1 24-24 16-30 Arizona 40 56 .417 13 12 5-5 L-1 17-31 23-25 SATURDAYS GAMES Chicago White Sox 6, Cleveland 2 N.Y. Yankees 3, Baltimore 0 Houston 3, Boston 2 Minnesota 9, Colorado 3 Tampa Bay 10, Toronto 3 Detroit 5, Kansas City 1 L.A. Angels 5, Texas 2 Seattle 6, Oakland 2 SATURDAYS GAMES Arizona 2, San Francisco 0 Atlanta 11, Chicago Cubs 6 N.Y. Mets 5, Miami 4 Minnesota 9, Colorado 3 St. Louis 10, Milwaukee 2 Pittsburgh 6, Cincinnati 5, 11 innings Washington 5, Philadelphia 3, 10 innings L.A. Dodgers 1, San Diego 0 SUNDAYS GAMES Cleveland 3, Chicago White Sox 2 Tampa Bay 3, Toronto 0 Boston 11, Houston 0 Kansas City 5, Detroit 2 L.A. Angels 10, Texas 7 Oakland 4, Seattle 1 Minnesota 13, Colorado 5 N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore, late SUNDAYS GAMES N.Y. Mets 9, Miami 1 Cincinnati 6, Pittsburgh 3 Washington 10, Philadelphia 3 Milwaukee 11, St. Louis 2 Atlanta 10, Chicago Cubs 7 San Francisco 8, Arizona 4 L.A. Dodgers 1, San Diego 0 Minnesota 13, Colorado 5 MIKE CARLSON / AP Toronto Blue Jays Colby Rasmus walks away after striking out during the ninth inning on Sunday in St. Petersburg. The Rays won 3-0. TODAYS GAMES None scheduled TODAYS GAMES None scheduled AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Altuve, Houston, .339; Beltre, Texas, .338; Cano, Seattle, .334; Chisenhall, Cleveland, .328; VMartinez, Detroit, .328; Brantley, Cleveland, .326; Mi Cabrera, Detroit, .309; KSuzuki, Minnesota, .309. RUNS: Dozier, Minnesota, 67; Kinsler, Detroit, 64; Trout, Los Angeles, 64; Brantley, Cleveland, 63; Donaldson, Oak land, 61; Bautista, Toronto, 58; Pujols, Los Angeles, 58. RBI: MiCabrera, Detroit, 74; NCruz, Baltimore, 74; JAbreu, Chicago, 73; Encarnacion, Toronto, 70; Trout, Los Angeles, 69; Donaldson, Oakland, 65; Moss, Oak land, 65. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 130; Cano, Seattle, 117; Me Cabrera, Toronto, 116; AJones, Baltimore, 116; Kinsler, Detroit, 115; Brantley, Cleveland, 113. DOUBLES: MiCabrera, Detroit, 34; Altuve, Houston, 29; Kinsler, Detroit, 26; Pedroia, Boston, 26; Plouffe, Min nesota, 26; Hosmer, Kansas City, 25; AEscobar, Kansas City, 24; EEscobar, Minnesota, 24; AGordon, Kansas City, 24; Trout, Los Angeles, 24. TRIPLES: Rios, Texas, 8; Bourn, Cleveland, 7; Eaton, Chicago, 6; Gardner, New York, 6; Trout, Los Angeles, 5. HOME RUNS: JAbreu, Chicago, 29; NCruz, Baltimore, 28; Encarnacion, Toronto, 26; Trout, Los Angeles, 22; VMartinez, Detroit, 21; Donaldson, Oakland, 20; Moss, Oakland, 20; Ortiz, Boston, 20; Pujols, Los Angeles, 20. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 41; RDavis, Detroit, 24; Ellsbury, New York, 24; AEscobar, Kansas City, 22. PITCHING: Tanaka, New York, 12-4; Porcello, Detroit, 12-5; FHernandez, Seattle, 11-2; Richards, Los Ange les, 11-2; Scherzer, Detroit, 11-3; Kazmir, Oakland, 113; Buehrle, Toronto, 10-6; Weaver, Los Angeles, 10-6; Lackey, Boston, 10-6. ERA: Sale, Chicago, 2.08; FHernandez, Seattle, 2.12; Kazmir, Oakland, 2.38; Tanaka, New York, 2.51; Rich ards, Los Angeles, 2.55; Buehrle, Toronto, 2.64; Lester, Boston, 2.65. STRIKEOUTS: Price, Tampa Bay, 159; FHernandez, Seat tle, 154; Scherzer, Detroit, 146; Kluber, Cleveland, 142; Darvish, Texas, 142; Tanaka, New York, 135. SAVES: Rodney, Seattle, 27; Holland, Kansas City, 24; DavRobertson, New York, 23; Perkins, Minnesota, 22. NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Tulowitzki, Colorado, .344; MaAdams, St. Louis, .330; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, .325; McGehee, Miami, .319; Lucroy, Milwaukee, .315; Goldschmidt, Ar izona, .312; Morneau, Colorado, .307; Puig, Los Ange les, .307. RUNS: Tulowitzki, Colorado, 71; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 66; Pence, San Francisco, 66; FFreeman, Atlanta, 64; Rendon, Washington, 64; Rizzo, Chicago, 61; Stanton, Miami, 61. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 63; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 61; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 61; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 60; Morneau, Colorado, 59; Desmond, Washington, 55; Howard, Philadelphia, 55; JUpton, Atlanta, 55. HITS:AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 114; McGehee, Miami, 114; DanMurphy, New York, 113; Pence, San Francisco, 113; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 110; FFreeman, Atlanta, 108; Blackmon, Colorado, 106; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 106. DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 36; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 31; FFreeman, Atlanta, 28; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 28; Span, Washington, 28; SCastro, Chicago, 26; Puig, Los Angeles, 26. TRIPLES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 9; BCrawford, San Fran cisco, 8; Braun, Milwaukee, 6; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 6. HOME RUNS: Stanton, Miami, 21; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 21; Rizzo, Chicago, 20; Byrd, Philadelphia, 18; Frazier, Cincinnati, 18; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 17. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 42; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 38; Revere, Philadelphia, 26; EYoung, New York, 23; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 21; Rollins, Philadelphia, 19. PITCHING: Simon, Cincinnati, 12-3; Wainwright, St. Louis, 12-4; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 11-2; Greinke, Los Angeles, 11-5; Lynn, St. Louis, 10-6. ERA: Kershaw, Los Angeles, 1.78; Wainwright, St. Louis, 1.83; Cueto, Cincinnati, 2.03; Beckett, Los Angeles, 2.26; Teheran, Atlanta, 2.57; HAlvarez, Miami, 2.63. STRIKEOUTS: Strasburg, Washington, 149; Cueto, Cin cinnati, 134; Kennedy, San Diego, 133; Greinke, Los An geles, 127; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 126; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 123; Miley, Arizona, 118. SAVES: Rosenthal, St. Louis, 28; Kimbrel, Atlanta, 28; FrRodriguez, Milwaukee, 27; Jansen, Los Angeles, 26. Rays 3, Blue Jays 0 Toronto Tampa Bay ab r h bi ab r h bi Reyes ss 4 0 1 0 Kiermr cf 3 1 1 0 MeCarr lf 3 0 1 0 Zobrist rf 3 0 0 0 Bautist rf 4 0 1 0 Joyce dh 3 0 1 0 DJhnsn 1b 3 0 0 0 SRdrgz ph-dh 1 0 0 0 ClRsms ph 1 0 0 0 Longori 3b 3 0 1 1 Kratz dh 4 0 0 0 Loney 1b 2 0 0 0 StTllsn 2b 3 0 0 0 Guyer lf 4 0 0 0 Mstrnn cf 3 0 0 0 YEscor ss 4 2 1 0 JFrncs 3b 2 0 2 0 JMolin c 3 0 1 1 Thole c 2 0 0 0 Forsyth 2b 3 0 1 1 DNavrr ph-c 1 0 0 0 Totals 30 0 5 0 Totals 29 3 6 3 Toronto 000 000 000 0 Tampa Bay 010 001 10x 3 DPTampa Bay 2. LOBToronto 5, Tampa Bay 8. SB Kiermaier (2), Zobrist (5), Y.Escobar (1). SFLongoria. IP H R ER BB SO Toronto Dickey L,7-9 6 5 2 2 3 5 Cecil 1 / 3 1 1 1 1 1 Redmond 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Janssen 1 0 0 0 0 1 Tampa Bay Price W,9-7 8 5 0 0 1 5 McGee S,7-8 1 0 0 0 0 2 Price pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. HBPby Dickey (J.Molina), by Price (J.Francisco). WPMcGee. UmpiresHome, Sean Barber; First, Tim Timmons; Second, Todd Tichenor; Third, Mike Everitt. T:45. A,187 (31,042). Mets 9, Marlins 1 Miami New York ab r h bi ab r h bi Yelich lf 3 0 1 0 Grndrs rf 4 2 3 1 Hchvrr ss 4 0 1 0 Campll 2b 4 1 1 0 Stanton rf 1 0 0 0 DWrght 3b 4 2 2 2 RJhnsn ph 1 0 0 0 Duda 1b 5 1 2 1 McGeh 3b 4 1 1 0 Lagars cf 5 0 2 1 GJones 1b 4 0 1 0 CYoung lf 2 1 1 2 Ozuna cf 3 0 1 1 Recker c 5 0 1 1 Lucas 2b 3 0 0 0 Tejada ss 4 1 0 0 Mathis c 3 0 0 0 deGrm p 3 0 1 1 Hand p 1 0 0 0 Famili p 0 0 0 0 Bour ph 1 0 0 0 EYong ph 2 1 1 0 JaTrnr p 0 0 0 0 Carlyle p 0 0 0 0 Solano ph 1 0 0 0 Gregg p 0 0 0 0 Hatchr p 0 0 0 0 SDyson p 0 0 0 0 Totals 29 1 5 1 Totals 38 9 14 9 Miami 000 100 000 1 New York 010 211 04x 9 EMcGehee (6). DPNew York 2. LOBMiami 4, New York 12. 2BG.Jones (21), Granderson (16), D.Wright 2 (24), Duda (21), Lagares (15). SBHechavarria (5), Granderson (7), E.Young 2 (25). CSYelich (3). SFC.Young. IP H R ER BB SO Miami Hand L,0-2 4 6 3 3 2 1 Ja.Turner 3 4 2 2 1 4 Gregg 0 1 3 3 2 0 Hatcher 1 / 3 3 1 1 1 0 S.Dyson 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 New York deGrom W,3-5 7 5 1 1 2 8 Familia 1 0 0 0 1 0 Carlyle 1 0 0 0 0 1 Gregg pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. UmpiresHome, Paul Schrieber; First, Ted Barrett; Second, Will Little; Third, Alfonso Marquez. Indians 3, White Sox 2 Chicago Cleveland ab r h bi ab r h bi De Aza lf 4 0 0 0 Kipnis 2b 4 0 0 0 CSnchz ss 5 0 0 0 ACarer ss 4 0 1 0 JAreu dh 5 0 3 0 Brantly cf 4 0 0 0 A.Dunn 1b 3 0 0 0 CSantn 1b 4 0 1 0 Viciedo rf 5 0 1 0 Raburn rf 3 1 0 0 Gillaspi 3b 3 1 2 0 DvMrp rf 0 0 0 0 GBckh 2b 4 1 1 1 Swisher dh 4 1 2 0 Flowrs c 4 0 2 0 YGoms c 4 1 2 3 LeGarc cf 4 0 2 1 Chsnhll 3b 3 0 1 0 Aviles lf 4 0 2 0 Totals 37 2 11 2 Totals 34 3 9 3 Chicago 000 000 020 2 Cleveland 010 000 02x 3 EC.Sanchez (1). DPCleveland 1. LOBChicago 12, Cleveland 10. 2BFlowers (7), Aviles (9). HRY. Gomes (12). SBLe.Garcia 2 (10). IP H R ER BB SO Chicago Joh.Danks 7 7 1 1 2 4 Guerra L,0-2 BS,3-3 1 2 2 2 0 1 Cleveland Bauer 6 2 / 3 8 0 0 3 10 Rzepczynski H,8 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Shaw W,4-1 BS,3-5 1 3 2 2 1 1 Allen S,12-13 1 0 0 0 0 2 UmpiresHome, Dan Iassogna; First, CB Bucknor; Second, Gary Cederstrom; Third, Tripp Gibson. T:00. A,070 (42,487). Reds 6, Pirates 3 Pittsburgh Cincinnati ab r h bi ab r h bi GPolnc rf 4 0 0 0 BHmltn cf 4 1 2 0 JHrrsn lf 4 0 2 1 Cozart ss 3 0 0 0 AMcCt cf 4 1 1 0 Frazier 3b 5 1 1 2 NWalkr 2b 4 1 1 2 Heisey lf 5 1 3 0 RMartn c 3 0 0 0 Bruce rf 4 1 0 0 I.Davis 1b 3 0 0 0 Mesorc c 2 1 2 1 Worley p 0 0 0 0 B.Pena 1b 4 0 0 0 Decker ph 1 0 0 0 Negron 2b 3 1 1 3 JHughs p 0 0 0 0 Cueto p 2 0 0 0 PAlvrz 3b 3 1 1 0 Ju.Diaz p 0 0 0 0 Mercer ss 4 0 0 0 Lutz ph 1 0 0 0 Liriano p 1 0 0 0 Broxtn p 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 3 5 3 Totals 33 6 9 6 Pittsburgh 000 111 000 3 Cincinnati 030 012 00x 6 EP.Alvarez (20), Cozart 2 (7). LOBPittsburgh 6, Cincinnati 11. 2BJ.Harrison (15), B.Hamilton (19), Heisey 2 (11), Mesoraco (15). 3BA.McCutchen (5). HRN.Walker (13), Frazier (19), Negron (1). CSR. Martin (4), B.Hamilton (15), Mesoraco (3). IP H R ER BB SO Pittsburgh Liriano L,1-7 4 3 3 3 6 4 Pimentel 1 1 1 1 2 1 Worley 2 4 2 2 0 1 J.Hughes 1 1 0 0 0 1 Cincinnati Cueto W,10-6 6 5 3 3 2 7 Ju.Diaz H,3 1 0 0 0 0 0 Broxton H,14 1 0 0 0 0 1 A.Chapman S,21-23 1 0 0 0 0 3 HBPby Cueto (R.Martin). WPLiriano. UmpiresHome, Tom Woodring; First, Brian Knight; Second, Fieldin Culbreth; Third, Manny Gonzalez. Nationals 10, Phillies 3 Washington Philadelphia ab r h bi ab r h bi Span cf 5 2 2 0 GSizmr lf 4 1 1 0 Rendon 2b 5 3 3 1 Rollins ss 4 0 1 0 Werth rf 3 2 2 4 Utley 2b 3 0 0 0 Frndsn pr-3b 0 0 0 0 CHrndz ph 1 1 0 0 LaRoch 1b 5 0 0 0 Howard 1b 3 1 0 1 Barrett p 0 0 0 0 Byrd rf 3 0 0 0 Zmrmn 3b-1b 3 1 1 2 Asche 3b 4 0 2 1 Harper lf 4 1 1 0 Rupp c 4 0 0 1 Dsmnd ss 4 1 1 2 Revere cf 3 0 1 0 Loaton c 4 0 1 1 DeFrts p 0 0 0 0 Roark p 3 0 1 0 Manshp p 0 0 0 0 Detwilr p 0 0 0 0 DBrwn ph 1 0 0 0 McLoth ph-rf 1 0 0 0 Kndrck p 1 0 0 0 Hollnds p 0 0 0 0 GwynJ cf 0 0 0 0 Mayrry ph-cf 1 0 0 0 Totals 37 10 12 10 Totals 32 3 5 3 Washington 300 004 012 10 Philadelphia 000 001 002 3 EFrandsen (2). DPPhiladelphia 1. LOBWashington 3, Philadelphia 5. 2BRendon (24), Desmond (15), Asche 2 (15). HRWerth (12), Zimmerman (4). SK. Kendrick. SFZimmerman. IP H R ER BB SO Washington Roark W,8-6 7 4 1 1 0 6 Detwiler 1 0 0 0 0 1 Barrett 1 1 2 0 1 1 Philadelphia K.Kendrick L,4-9 5 2 / 3 5 5 5 0 5 Hollands 1 1 / 3 3 2 2 1 2 De Fratus 1 1 / 3 4 3 3 0 2 Manship 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby Roark (Byrd), by K.Kendrick (Werth). WPBar rett, K.Kendrick 2, De Fratus. UmpiresHome, Toby Basner; First, Mark Wegner; Second, Mike Winters; Third, Andy Fletcher. T:03. A,185 (43,651). Red Sox 11, Astros 0 Boston Houston ab r h bi ab r h bi B.Holt rf-2b 6 2 5 1 Altuve 2b 4 0 0 0 Pedroia 2b 4 0 2 0 JCastro c 3 0 1 0 Carp 1b 1 0 1 2 Corprn c 1 0 0 0 D.Ortiz dh 4 0 0 2 Springr dh 3 0 0 0 Napoli 1b 3 1 1 0 Guzmn ph 1 0 0 0 Betts rf 1 1 0 0 Carter lf 3 0 1 0 Nava lf 4 2 2 0 Singltn 1b 3 0 0 0 BrdlyJr cf 4 1 1 1 MDmn 3b 3 0 0 0 Bogarts 3b 3 2 0 1 Grssmn rf 3 0 1 0 Drew ss 4 1 2 0 KHrndz cf 3 0 0 0 Vazquz c 4 1 2 2 MGnzlz ss 3 0 0 0 Totals 38 11 16 9 Totals 30 0 3 0 Boston 112 020 203 11 Houston 000 000 000 0 EMa.Gonzalez (3), Altuve (5), Singleton (6). DP Houston 5. LOBBoston 11, Houston 3. 2BVazquez (3). 3BCarp (1). HRB.Holt (3). SFBogaerts, Vazquez. IP H R ER BB SO Boston Buchholz W,4-5 9 3 0 0 0 12 Houston Peacock L,3-6 1 / 3 2 1 1 1 1 Bass 3 1 / 3 6 3 2 1 0 D.Downs 1 1 2 1 3 0 Zeid 2 3 2 0 1 2 Veras 1 1 / 3 1 0 0 2 1 D.Martinez 1 3 3 3 0 0 UmpiresHome, Marty Foster; First, Rob Drake; Sec ond, Alan Porter; Third, Joe West. T:23. A,681 (42,060). Royals 5, Tigers 2 Detroit Kansas City ab r h bi ab r h bi AJcksn cf 4 1 2 0 Aoki rf-lf 4 0 0 0 Kinsler 2b 4 0 0 0 Infante 2b 4 0 1 2 MiCarr 1b 3 0 0 1 Hosmer 1b 4 0 1 1 JMrtnz rf 4 0 3 1 BButler dh 3 1 1 0 TrHntr dh 4 0 0 0 Mostks 3b 4 1 1 0 Cstllns 3b 4 0 0 0 Ibanez lf 3 0 1 0 Avila c 4 0 1 0 L.Cain pr-rf 1 1 0 0 Suarez ss 3 0 0 0 AEscor ss 4 1 2 1 RDavis lf 3 1 3 0 JDyson cf 4 0 2 1 Hayes c 2 0 1 0 S.Perez ph-c 1 1 0 0 Totals 33 2 9 2 Totals 34 5 10 5 Detroit 002 000 000 2 Kansas City 000 000 50x 5 DPKansas City 2. LOBDetroit 5, Kansas City 8. 2BHosmer (26), Hayes (1). SBJ.Dyson (18). SF Mi.Cabrera. IP H R ER BB SO Detroit Verlander L,8-8 6 1 / 3 6 4 4 1 3 Krol 1 / 3 0 1 1 1 0 Alburquerque 0 1 0 0 0 0 Coke 1 1 / 3 3 0 0 1 0 Kansas City B.Chen 5 1 / 3 8 2 2 0 2 Ventura W,7-7 1 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 3 W.Davis H,17 1 0 0 0 0 1 G.Holland S,25-26 1 0 0 0 0 1 Alburquerque pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. WPVentura. UmpiresHome, Bill Miller; First, Adam Hamari; Sec ond, Chad Fairchild; Third, Vic Carapazza. T:02. A,424 (37,903). Brewers 11, Cardinals 2 St. Louis Milwaukee ab r h bi ab r h bi MCrpnt 3b 3 0 0 0 CGomz cf 4 3 3 2 M.Ellis ph-3b 1 0 0 0 Gennett 2b 4 2 3 2 Wong 2b 4 1 1 0 Braun rf 4 0 2 2 Hollidy lf 3 0 0 0 ArRmr 3b 5 1 3 1 Bourjos cf 0 1 0 0 FrRdrg p 0 0 0 0 MAdms 1b 4 0 1 1 Lucroy c 4 1 1 0 JhPerlt ss 3 0 1 0 Maldnd c 0 0 0 0 Grenwd p 0 0 0 0 KDavis lf 5 1 1 2 Kottars ph 1 0 0 1 Overay 1b 5 0 1 1 Craig rf 4 0 1 0 EHerrr ss 5 3 5 0 Jay cf-lf 4 0 0 0 WPerlt p 1 0 0 0 T.Cruz c 3 0 1 0 RWeks ph 0 0 0 0 CMrtnz p 1 0 0 0 WSmith p 0 0 0 0 Tavers ph 1 0 0 0 MrRynl ph-3b 1 0 0 0 Maness p 0 0 0 0 Motte p 0 0 0 0 Descals ss 1 0 0 0 Totals 33 2 5 2 Totals 38 11 19 10 St. Louis 000 100 001 2 Milwaukee 200 213 12x 11 EM.Ellis (1), Gennett (7). DPSt. Louis 2, Milwaukee 1. LOBSt. Louis 5, Milwaukee 10. 2BT.Cruz (4), C.Gomez (24), Gennett (22), Lucroy (32), E.Herrera (5). HRK.Davis (15). SBWong (12). SW.Peralta 2. IP H R ER BB SO St. Louis C.Martinez L,2-4 4 7 4 4 3 5 Maness 1 1 / 3 5 4 4 0 0 Motte 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 Greenwood 2 6 3 3 0 1 Milwaukee W.Peralta W,10-6 7 3 1 0 0 5 W.Smith 1 1 0 0 0 1 Fr.Rodriguez 1 1 1 1 1 0 HBPby Greenwood (R.Weeks), by C.Martinez (C.Go mez). PBLucroy. BalkC.Martinez. UmpiresHome, Jeff Nelson; First, Laz Diaz; Second, Mark Carlson; Third, Scott Barry. T:55. A,345 (41,900). Braves 10, Cubs 7 Atlanta Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi BUpton cf 5 0 0 0 Coghln lf 4 2 2 2 ASmns ss 2 2 0 0 Alcantr 2b 5 1 2 2 FFrmn 1b 5 0 0 0 Rizzo 1b 5 1 1 0 J.Upton lf 4 2 2 0 SCastro ss 2 0 0 0 Heywrd rf 5 2 2 1 Valuen 3b 3 1 1 0 CJhnsn 3b 4 3 3 3 Ruggin cf 3 0 0 0 LaStell 2b 5 1 3 3 Grimm p 0 0 0 0 Laird c 5 0 1 2 Olt ph 1 0 0 0 Tehern p 2 0 0 1 Wrght p 0 0 0 0 JSchafr ph 1 0 0 0 NRmrz p 0 0 0 0 Avilan p 0 0 0 0 Sweeny rf 3 1 0 1 Smmns p 0 0 0 0 JoBakr c 4 0 2 2 JWaldn p 0 0 0 0 T.Wood p 2 0 0 0 Kimrel p 0 0 0 0 Rosscp p 0 0 0 0 Lake cf 2 1 1 0 Totals 38 10 11 10 Totals 34 7 9 7 Atlanta 034 000 300 10 Chicago 000 002 230 7 LOBAtlanta 7, Chicago 5. 2BJ.Upton (19), La Stella (8), Laird (7), Alcantara (3), Jo.Baker (4). HRC.John son (6), Coghlan (5), Alcantara (1). CSCoghlan (1). IP H R ER BB SO Atlanta Teheran W,9-6 7 7 4 4 2 6 Avilan 0 1 2 2 2 0 S.Simmons 1 / 3 0 1 1 1 1 J.Walden H,11 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 Kimbrel S,29-33 1 0 0 0 0 1 Chicago T.Wood L,7-8 6 7 7 7 3 4 Rosscup 2 / 3 2 3 3 2 2 Grimm 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 1 1 W.Wright 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 N.Ramirez 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 Avilan pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. UmpiresHome, Jeff Kellogg; First, Dan Bellino; Sec ond, Brian ONora; Third, Pat Hoberg.

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Come Discover... rfr ntbt Come Discover... Come Discover... Come Discover... Come Discover... Come Discover... Come Discover... Come Discover... Come Discover... Come Discover... Come Discover... Come Discover... Ca ll 352-253-5100 fo r a co mplimen tar y Lu nch & To ur Come Discover... Come Discover... Come Discover... Come Discover... Come Discover... Come Discover... Come Discover... Come Discover... Ca ll 352-253-5100 fo r a c omplimen tar y Lu nch & To ur License # AL12259 Living Healthy Send your health news to features @dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 14, 2014 VEGANS: Communities, research are increasing / C6 Health check www.dailycommercial.com LAKE COUNTY AARP to offer Smart Driver Classes for seniors The AARP Driver Safety program helps participants rene their skills in a six-hour class. Upon comple tion of the course, Florida drivers age 50 or older may be eligible for insurance discounts. The cost is $15 for AARP members and $20 for non-members. Payment must be made by check to AARP. No cash or credit cards accepted. Classes will be: Tuesday and Thursday from 1 to 4 p.m., Hard en-Pauli Funeral Home, 1617 S. Bay St., in Eustis, call 352-394-0250 to register; August 4 and 6, from 1 to 4 p.m., Leesburg Senior Center, 1211 Penn St., register by calling 352-3263540; August 4 and 6, from 9 a.m. to noon at the W.T. Bland Public Li brary,1995 N. Donnelly St., Mount Dora, register at 352-735-7180. LEESBURG Volunteers sought for New Vision Ofce volunteers are needed at the New Vision for Independence branch in Leesburg at 9501 U.S. Highway 441. Volunteers should be able to do data entry, take phone calls and other projects supporting the vision rehabilitation team, with a weekly commitment of three-to-six-hours. New Vision is a local provider of services for people with low vision or blindness providing support through rehabilitation and education. Call 352-435-5040 for informa tion, or go to www.newvision.org. LAKE COUNTY LIFE group will hold luncheons for the widow LIFE will hold Social Support Group luncheons for the widowed for July will be held in Eustis at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday at the Golden Corral, 15810 U.S. Highway 441, in Eustis. Another luncheon will be held in Lady Lake at the North Lake Presby terian Church at 11:30 a.m. Friday, 975 Rolling Acres Road. The meal will be prepared by church staff and DJ Bob Fowler will entertain. Luncheons cost $10 and an RSVP is needed by calling 352-787-0403 or emailing rreed@beyersfhc.com. TAVARES Extension offers Put Pain in Its Place class The UF/IFAS Lake County Exten sion Service will offer classes for the public about osteoarthritis pain and strategies for controlling and even preventing pain in this program cre ated by the National Council on Ag ing and the Arthritis Foundation. Classes will be offered at two dif ferent locations beginning on Aug. 4 from 1 to 2:30 p.m. at the Lady Lake Public Library, 225 W. Guava St. Reg istration is needed by going to ar thritisaug2014.eventbrite.com. The second class will be held from 10 to 11:30 a.m. on Aug. 5 at the Leesburg Public Library, 100 E. Main St. Registration needed by going to leesburgarthritis.eventbrite.com. For information call 352-3434101, ext. 2719. KIM HONE-MCMAHAN MCT I f youve been in Portage Lakes State Park in Ohio recently you just might have spotted some dragons. Not the long-toothed Loch Ness kind that live under the sea, but dragon boats that glide across the water. Members of the Dragon Dream Team, all wearing pink life jackets, have been practicing their strokes on recent warm summer evenings. The women remained in sync when paddling the 40-foot watercraft. They were beautiful, strong, ener getic and breast cancer survivors. The team, which hones its skills three times a week on Rex Lake, is Ohios rst all-breast cancer survi vor dragon boat team. On Saturday, they are hosting the second annual Dragons on the Lake Festival featur ing 29 teams, 600 paddlers and six boats. The day begins at 8:15 a.m. with a ceremonial awakening of the dragons. Once the racing begins at 9 a.m., it will be nonstop action with dragon boats heading to the nish line every 12 minutes. The races are fast and furious, typ ically lasting one to two minutes. There will also be activities at the beach until the closing ceremony around 3:30 p.m. Sitting in the front of the boat, pe tite Mary Hlavac beat on the drum, its vibrations echoing in the cove. It was her job to help the 20 paddlers with technique, keeping them mov ing at the same pace. When asked how she got that cake job, she laughed noting it was her size combined with problems with her hands and elbows that earned her the spot. Being a boisterous mu sician who knows how to keep a beat didnt hurt either. Im an outdoor person who loves being here, said Hlavac, an 18-year cancer survivor. Getting out on the lake is great. The women, who come to Portage Lakes from all over Northeast Ohio, said its the camaraderie that they share with the other women that is as important, or maybe even more so, than the exercise. Throughout the year, the team has picnics, par ties and other social events. Their ages range from late 20s to around 80, said Marilyn Purdy, an eight-year survivor. And anyone, re gardless of experience or skill level, can participate. What we try to do is live our team motto: good quality of life follow ing breast cancer. Dragon boating is certainly one way to show others Awakening the dragon Ancient dragon boat racing gives cancer survivors a vigorous workout PHOTOS BY ED SUBA JR. / MCT ABOVE: Helmsman Tony Torgersen, left, and drummer Mary Hlavac, right, watch while members of the Dragon Dream Team raise their paddles in preparation to start a practice run on Rex Lake in Akron, Ohio. BELOW: Members of the Dragon Dream Team head out onto Rex Lake to begin their practice session. COLLEEN SCHRAPPEN MCT It has been 75 years since baseball icon Lou Gehrig declared himself the luck iest man on the face of the earth, despite a diagnosis at age 35 of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a disease with no cure. In the years since, po lio has been virtually erad icated. Chemotherapy has made numerous cancers into curable illnesses. Chemically synthesized insulin treats diabetes. AIDS is kept in check with protease inhibitors. Prozac and its ilk alleviate depres sion. In those 75 years, ALS, the disease that often bears Gehrigs name, has taken the lives of 375,000 Ameri cans, including Gehrigs life at age 37. In those 75 years, one drug has received FDA ap proval in the treatment of ALS. That was in 1995. 75 years after Gehrigs speech, frustration, hope surround disease ROBERT COHEN / MCT Dave Larson, who suffers from ALS, gets a treatment from massage therapist Kelly Sontheimer. SEE GEHRIG | C4 SEE DRAGON | C6

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 14, 2014

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The six glass vials were intact and sealed, and scientists have yet to establish whether the virus is dead or alive, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday. Still, the nd was dis turbing because for de cades after smallpox was declared eradicat ed in 1980, world health authorities said the only known samples left were safely stored in su per-secure laboratories in Atlanta and in Russia. Ofcials said this is the rst time in the U.S. that unaccounted-for smallpox has been dis covered. At least one leading scientist raised the possibility that there are more such vials out there around the world. It was the second re cent incident in which a U.S. government health agency appeared to have mishandled a highly dangerous germ. Last month, scores of CDC employees in At lanta were feared ex posed to anthrax be cause of a laboratory safety lapse. The CDC began giving them anti biotics as a precaution. The freeze-dried smallpox samples were found in a building at the National Institutes of Health in Bethes da, Maryland, that has been used by the Food and Drug Administra tion since 1972, accord ing to the CDC. The scientist was cleaning out a cold room between two lab oratories on July 1 when he made the discovery, FDA ofcials said. Ofcials said label ing indicated the small pox had been put in the vials in the 1950s. But they said its not clear how long the vials had been in the building, which did not open un til the 1960s. No one has been in fected, and no small pox contamination was found in the building. Smallpox can be deadly even after it is freeze-dried, but the vi rus usually has to be kept cold to remain alive and dangerous. In an interview Tues day, a CDC ofcial said he believed the vials were stored for many years at room tempera ture, which would sug gest the samples are dead. But FDA ofcials said later in the day that the smallpox was in cold storage for decades. We dont yet know if its live and infectious, said Stephan Monroe, deputy director of the CDC center that han dles highly dangerous infectious agents. The samples were rushed under FBI pro tection to the CDC in Atlanta for testing, which could take a few weeks. After that, they will be destroyed. In at least one oth er such episode, vials of smallpox were found at the bottom of a freezer in an Eastern Europe an country in the 1990s, according to Dr. Da vid Heymann, a former World Health Organiza tion ofcial who is now a professor at the Lon don School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Heymann said that when smallpox sam ples were gathered up for destruction decades ago, requests went out to ministers of health to collect all vials. As far as I know, there was never a conrma tion they had checked in with all groups who could have had the vi rus, he said. Forgotten vials of smallpox found in storage room Officials said this is the first time in the U.S. that unaccounted-for smallpox has been discovered. At least one leading scientist raised the possibility that there are more such vials out there around the world.

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 14, 2014 PUBLIC NOTICENOTICE OF PREP ARA TION OF A COMPREHENSIVE PLAN EV ALUA TION AND APPRAISAL LETTER TO THE DEP AR TMENT OF ECONOMIC OPPOR TUNITYThe City of Coleman proposes to prepare and send, in accordance with Florida Statutes, an Evaluation and Appraisal letter regarding the Comprehensive Plan to the Department of Economic Opportunity A public hearing on the Evaluation and Appraisal letter will be held on July 21, 2014 at 7:00pm at Coleman City Hall, 3502 East Wa rm Springs Av e., Coleman, Florida. The City of Coleman is preparing a Comprehensive Plan Evaluation and Approval Notification Letter to submit to the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity on August 1. 2014 as required by Florida Statutes. A copy of the draft letter is available at City Hall for review A public hearing is scheduled for July 21, 2014 at 7:00pm at Coleman City Hall. Comments and recommendations will be received by the City Council at that time. Written comments for consideration may be mailed or delivered to the City of Coleman, PO Box 456/3502 E. Wa rm Springs Av e., Coleman, Florida, 335210456, by 5:00 p.m. on July 21, 2014. Ruth Busby Public Ser vice Director City of ColemanD004185 July 14, 2014 rf n t b nnnYo ur Po diatr is t tr eats... CENTRALFLORI DAFOO TCARE, P. A.Dr Nic k Przysta wski, DPM www .Floridafoot.comD004208 That drug, riluzole, extends the life expec tancy of patients by two to three months. Half of the 5,600 Americans di agnosed with ALS each year will die within three years. Its an awful disor der, says neurologist Ghazala Hayat. The neurodegenera tive disease attacks mo tor neurons in the brain and spinal cord, pro gressively weakening the body. Muscles twitch and cramp. Speech be comes thick and dif cult to understand. Swallowing and walking become arduous, then impossible. Eventually, the muscles that control breathing are affected; paralysis sets in. The lack of a medical breakthrough belies the amount of research go ing on. So far, 20 genes have been identied as linked to ALS, and mul tiple drug trials are un derway. Each drug, even if its a failure, shows us a pathway, says Hayat, who runs an ALS clinic at St. Louis University. SLUs clinic is one of about 35 in the country to offer specialized, mul tidisciplined services to patients with ALS. More than a dozen practitioners at the clin ic, including neurolo gists, social workers, di eticians and therapists, work together to de sign a treatment plan to manage each patients symptoms. AN EXHAUSTING DISEASE For Dave Larson of Sunset Hills, Mo.,slurred speech and issues with swallowing rst tipped him off that something was wrong. But we would never have guessed ALS, says Ann Larson, his wife of 18 years. You put symp toms into WebMD, and about eight (possible causes) come up. Since his diagnosis in January 2013, their lives have revolved around the disease. Larson, 49, quit his job in publish ing; his wife stopped working, to care for him. A lifelong athlete he played Division 1 soccer at Texas Christian Uni versity Larson had to give up going to the gym in January. His athletic build has long faded. Larsons ngers curl in toward his palms. His toes, too, are curled, and his feet turn inward, soles facing each other, when he is seated. The muscles in his upper arms twitch be cause the nerves are not getting signals from his brain. Sometimes the muscles in his neck seize up and stiffen. He has a feeding tube but still tries to eat soft foods on his own. He eats and drinks only when someone else is with him, in case he as pirates. It is an exhausting dis ease, marked by con stant discomfort if not outright pain. He was red from occupational therapy as his wife jokingly puts it when he stopped improving. But twice a week, a massage thera pist from the Wellspring Journey Project comes to work his muscles. He is at his best in the morning. As the day progresses and fatigue sets in, it is harder to talk, to walk, to eat. But Larson is deter mined to hold onto whatever indepen dence he can for as long as possible. In the slow, thick growl that makes his speech nearly impossible to un derstand, he says, My motto is, if you dont use it, it will die faster. With that in mind, the Larsons traveled to Ohio last month to have a diaphragmatic pacing device implanted in his abdomen. The surgery, per formed at Universi ty Hospitals of Cleve land at Case Western, involves implanting electrodes into the di aphragm, the muscle wall below the lungs. The electrodes stimu late the muscle to help with breathing. Its like (physical ther apy) for the diaphragm, so it will atrophy slow er, says Ann Larson. They hope. With no cure, the goal is to slow the diseases progress. But ALS is un relenting. You give up a lit tle more independence each day, Dave Larson says. A shower wand helped when he couldnt lift his arm to wash his hair. Two weeks later, he could no longer use that. Now the bathroom is being renovated to keep it accessible when he can no longer walk. Soon, some of the furniture in the sunny family room that over looks the backyard will be moved elsewhere. The space will be taken over by a ramp so he no longer has to navigate the two steps up to the kitchen. What he misses the most, Larson says, is ex pressing his thoughts. By the time he can get his mouth to say what he is thinking, the con versation has often tak en a turn. Or people talk over him. Sometimes he raises his hand when he needs to say something, Ann Larson says as her hus band laughs. You dont realize how much people interrupt each other. ALS ADVOCACY Since Larsons diag nosis, Ann has found herself speaking for Dave. But she has also become well-versed on the legislative and med ical obstacles facing all ALS patients. With about 30,000 Americans estimated to have ALS, it is con sidered an orphan dis ease. That means little nancial incentive exists for research and devel opment. One proposal in Congress, the MOD DERN Cures Act, would ease some patent reg ulations and speed pa tient access to diagnos tic tools and treatments. The couple traveled to Washington in May to urge political support for the legislation. They were among a thousand people from across the country who met with their representatives for ALS Advocacy Day. The group lobbied for continued funding of the national ALS regis try, which was started in 2008. The registry tracks patients, providing com parison data to doctors and potential trial sub jects to researchers. That funding is pend ing, says Maureen Hill, the president of the ALS Associations St. Louis Regional Chapter. But since the advocacy day, the House has approved a budget with $7.5 mil lion earmarked for ALS research programs. GEHRIG FROM PAGE C1 ROBERT COHEN / MCT Dave Larson gets help form his wife, Ann, following a massage treatment at their home in St. Louis.

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Monday, July 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 14, 2014 D004934 See how affordable a Remington Kitchen can be See how affordable a Remington Kitchen can be! CALL FOR FREE ESTIMA TES SER VICES:Ne w Cu st om Ca bi ne tr y Cab in et Re fa ci ng G ra ni te Cou nt er to ps Wi lso na rt HD Lami na te Cou nt er to ps wi th Be ve le d Ed ge & In te gr at ed Si nks R KFA MIL Y OW NED & OPERA TED SINCE 1997(352) 728-4441Monday F ri da y 9am-5p m Aching Fe et?Step right into our of fi ce.We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Wa lk-Ins We lcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 We st Dixie Av enue Suite B|Leesburg, FL 34748352-435-7849 |Next to Dr Ta troDr Er ik Zimmer mannPo dia tr is tYo ur feet are in good hands with us! r f Mos tM aj or Insurances Ac cep te d that can be very true, and it is true for us, she explained. We are not only a dragon boat team, but we are also a great support system. Dragon boating is an ancient Chinese sport. Present-day drag on boats are similar to those used more than a thousand years ago. The Dragon Dream Team notes that its the second most pop ular team sport in the world, after soccer. Nearly 50 million peo ple race dragon boats worldwide. The local team was started by Jessica Mader, a breast cancer survivor from Silver Lake, Ohio. In 2006, while recu perating from surgery at her summer home on a lake in Nova Sco tia, the 76-year-old woke up one morning and found a paddle and note on her front porch. The note instructed her to show up at a dock where she would meet members of the Bo som Buddies, a Cana dian breast cancer sur vivor dragon boat team. Thrilled that she had morphed from a con valescing patient into a summer athlete, she told her plastic sur geon, Dr. Douglas Wag ner, about her adven ture when she returned to Ohio. Impressed, he offered to buy a dragon boat if she could nd enough people to form a team. Today, there are about 80 on the roster and around 50 active paddlers. With so many participants, a second boat was purchased. Many practice nights, both boats are lled with grinning women in pink. Last year, the rst Dragons on the Lake Festival was launched to benet Boatloads of Hope, a breast can cer and community outreach in Northeast Ohio. They give beauti ful pashmina wraps to newly diagnosed breast cancer patients who are undergoing radia tion or chemotherapy in area hospitals, along with a powerful mes sage of hope. I think what makes them (the wraps) so special is that they are coming from women who have been there, Purdy said, going through what they are going through. DRAGON FROM PAGE C1 ED SUBA JR. / MCT Members of the Dragon Dream Team hold hands and say a short prayer before beginning their practice. BILL WADE / MCT Rebecca Gilbert, of Shadyside, is the author of Its Easy to Start Eating Vegan! DAVID TEMPLETON MCT No, vegans are not extraterrestri als from a planet orbiting Vega, al though many might consider their dietary habits to be completely alien. Plant-only eaters represent a mere 2 percent of the population; another 5 percent describe themselves as veg etarian. In contrast, Americans are noted for their penchant for overconsump tion of such animal-based foods as meat, eggs and dairy along with high sugar intake. More than two-thirds of Americans are overweight or obese, more than a third having diabetes or metabolic syndrome. A poor diet is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, which carries with it a number of serious and life-threatening complications. Family history, low activity and ex cess body weight also increase a per sons chance of getting the disease. The vegan term can connote an animal-rights ethic and environ mental activism, but the common denominator among all vegans is avoidance of all animal-based food stuff. What might sound crazy to some, a diet completely devoid of steaks, eggs, cheese and ice cream, has an ally: science. There are no guarantees, but ev idence continues blooming that a daily diet based on whole plant foods can prevent or reverse many of the chronic health problems plaguing America hypertension, high cho lesterol, heart disease and type 2 di abetes. Theres further evidence that a plant-based diet also can help pre vent or ght cancer, autoimmune diseases and arthritis, among many Vegan communities growing, along with research on health benefits SEE VEGAN | C7 LAURAN NEERGAARD Associated Press WASHINGTON How strong is that pina colada? Depending on how its made, it could contain as much alcohol as two glasses of wine. The National Insti tutes of Health is try ing to spread the word: Take a look at its online alcohol calculator to see how much youre real ly drinking with those summer cocktails. A standard drink is the amount of alcohol in a 12-ounce beer, 5 ounc es of wine or 1.5 ounces of distilled spirits. Its a useful way to How strong is that drink? Calculator helps figure track alcohol con sumption. But the multiple ingredients of mixed drinks make for a harder count. Most people dont realize how much al cohol is actually in a drink, said Dr. George Koob, director of the NIHs National Insti tute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Obviously it de pends on the bartend er and whos mixing the drinks, Koob adds. Recipes matter: The calculators pina co lada example, for in stance, assumes it contains 3 ounces of rum. Plan on using 2 ounces instead? The calculator adjusts to show its like 1.3 stan dard drinks. What about a mar garita? The calcula tor concludes its the equivalent of 1.7 stan dard drinks, if made with 1.5 ounces of te quila, an ounce of or ange liqueur and half an ounce of lime juice. Other favorites? Type them in: re thinkingdrinking. niaaa.nih.gov/Tool sResources/Cocktail Calculator.asp.

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Monday, July 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 LINDSEY TANNER Associated Press CHICAGO Bad re actions to psychiatric drugs result in nearly 90,000 emergency room visits each year by U.S. adults, with anti-anxi ety medicines and sed atives among the most common culprits, a study suggests. A drug used in some popular sleeping pills was among the most commonly involved sedatives, especially in adults aged 65 and old er. Most of the visits were for troublesome side ef fects or accidental over doses and almost 1 in 5 resulted in hospitaliza tion. The results come from an analysis of 2009-2011 medical re cords from 63 hospitals that participate in a na tionally representative government surveil lance project. The study was published Wednes day in JAMA Psychiatry. Overall, the sedative zolpidem tartrate, con tained in Ambien and some other sleeping pills, was involved in al most 12 percent of all ER visits and in 1 out of 5 visits for older adults. The Food and Drug Administration last year approved label chang es for those pills recom mending lower doses because of injury risks including car crashes from morning drows iness. Head injuries and falls in adults using zolpidem-containing drugs were among rea sons for ER visits in the new study. Sano, the pharma ceutical company that makes Ambien, in cludes a warning in its prescribing informa tion that says the drug can cause impaired alertness and motor co ordination. It also says doctors should caution patients against driving and other activities re quiring complete men tal alertness the morn ing after use. Sano issued a state ment Wednesday after the study was published noting that the FDA ap proved Ambien in 1992 based on data showing the drug is safe and ef fective. Drs. Lee Hampton and Daniel Budnitz of the Centers for Disease Control and Preven tions health care qual ity promotion division led the study. The au thors cited previous ly published nation al data showing that ER visits for bad reactions to zolpidem increased 220 percent from 2005 to 2010. The FDAs recent ef forts to modify recom mended dosing regi mens hold promise for reducing zolpidem-re lated problems, the au thors said. But they also said doctors can help by recommending that pa tients use other insom nia treatments rst, in cluding better sleep habits and behavior therapy. Living Yo ur Best Life 255 Wa terman Av enue Mount Dora, FL 32757 www .W atermanV illage.com Wa te rman Vi llage: Lo ca te d in one of Am erica s Wa terman Vi llage s Mount Dora was the ONL Y TOWN IN FLORIDA to be named to America s 20 Best Small To wns by Smithsonian Magazine. 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Nutrition science prefers discussing a whole-plant-food diet, rather than a veg an one, to eliminate connotations of an imal-rights or envi ronmental ideology. But theres little de bate that diets limit ed to vegetables, fruits, nuts, beans, spices and herbs are healthful. They increase ber in take thats lacking in the large majority of American diets, while providing a wide range of antioxidants, min erals and other nutri ents, which build the immune system, re duce inammation and improve metabo lism and gastrointes tinal health. The diet also reduces or elimi nates the intake of pro cessed foods, empty calories and carcino gens. Up to 50 vegans re sponded to a Post-Ga zette Facebook request, many advo cating animal rights. But many also said they experienced no table health benets as a welcome side ef fect, including dramat ic weight loss. The diet also helped individu als to reverse osteoar thritis, autoimmune disorders, colitis or Crohns disease, mul tiple sclerosis and can cer and bring sugar levels back to normal for those with type 2 diabetes. Others say their plant-based diets increase their energy levels, eliminate aller gies and improve their skin, including elimi nating acne. I will never not be a vegan, said Ellie Gor don, 28, of Squirrel Hill, a vegetarian at age 11 and a vegan for sev en years. There have been so many scien tic studies and re search connecting lon gevity and alleviation of a whole plethora of health problems with a plant-based diet. There is a whole lot of research to support it even if people dont care about it. VEGAN FROM PAGE C6 LARRY ROBERTS / MCT Ashley Frohnert, PETAs recently awarded Sexiest Vegan, buys a veggie burger at the Bluebird Kitchen at Market Square in Pittsburgh. Study: Psych drug ER trips approach 90,000 a year

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 14, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTS Comics www.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

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Monday, July 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C9 rf n ft bWo rking gallery of local artistsANTIQ UEDEA LERSWANTE D (352) 460-4806 r f ntb fa cebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburg D004572 D004211 Tu es da y Ju ly 15th at 3 PM www.dailycommercial.com Diversions 352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puz zle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, July 14 the 195th day of 2014. There are 170 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in His tory : On July 14, 1789, in an event symbolizing the start of the French Revolution, cit izens of Paris stormed the Bastille prison and released the seven prisoners inside. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, July 14, 2014: This year you express your devotion to your fam ily, loved ones and close friends. You are willing to go more than your share of the way to make relationships work. One relationship will be a high priority, and it will add to your security. If you are single, you soon could meet someone who will af fect your life. Dont get dis couraged if you go through a difcult period with this person. Still, dont hang in there too long if the bond is not working. If you are at tached, the two of you en joy working out problems together. As a result, you become quite the team. PI SCES understands you well. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Your creativity will pave the way to better relation ships, work situations and interactions in general. Sometimes you feel lim ited by time. Schedule a much-needed visit with a key person in your life. You could get ak today for ig noring someone. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You might feel as if you cant do everything you want. This likely will be true, but you can prioritize by us ing what you deem to be im portant criteria. You also might want to take another look at your budget. Show caring to a special friend, no matter how busy you get. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Youll want to be where your friends are. Stop and take the time to visit with someone who is always present and who you might take for granted. It is much more important to be aware of who really facilitates your life. CANCER (June 21-July 22) One person could dom inate most of your day. Whether you understand the reason why might not make a difference. Ultimate ly you need to deal with any issues that surround this person. Hopefully, you have only one person in your life like this! LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Youll want to be available to most people right now. You can postpone conversa tions and interactions, but not for long. Why not com plete as much as you can? You will want more free time soon. A restrictive family member could rain on your parade. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You could be over whelmed, especially if someone is not on the same page as you. Avoid a strong reaction, and let what you dont like just wash over you. Incorporate more exercise into the next 24 hours, and that will help you release some tension. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Your creativity will kick in as you eye various is sues. Youll see a way to by pass these problems, so be sure to follow that path. A nancial matter might not appear to be positive. Do some needed research, and speak with several experts. You will know what to do. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Be careful not to rain on anyones parade; other wise, it could make you very unpopular. If you really feel negative, take some person al time or include some ac tivity that you love in todays plans. You could be sup pressing some anger. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) You might want to verify plans. Others could decide to follow a different course of action or make other plans. As hard as it might be, try not to take others decisions personal ly. What is good for one per son wont necessarily be good for others. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Someone could be saying no to what you think is a great idea. How positive is this person in general? Remember to take his or her comments with a grain of salt. Return calls and messages. Decide to walk in friendlier elds if you want more positive rein forcement. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You might not like ev erything you hear, but you will get the message. Do your best not to let certain people discourage you. Un derstand where they are coming from, and support yourself as you normally do. Blaze a new path. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Someone could disap point you, which is likely to cause an unusually strong reaction. You know not to in ternalize these feelings, yet you do anyway. Dive into a fun happening, especially if it involves a loved one; your mood will change sooner than you think. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORY DEAR ABBY: We were visiting my daugh ter and her husband when their 3-year-old, Bethany, entered our room and rummaged through our medica tions. The door to the guest room was closed and the medications had been placed on a desk. Of course, every one thought she had ingested some, so they rushed her to the ER. We were fortunate that nothing was found in her system. My son-in-law thinks we should help pay the medical bills. I have sent several hundred dollars, but he is asking for more. Bethany is an only child, and they al low her free reign of the house. I have oth er grandchildren who are even younger, and none of them would dream of touching something that wasnt theirs. It has been almost a year since the inci dent, and they still ha vent taught her to re spect and leave things alone that are not hers. My daughter is a pro fessional and her hus band works from home, which concerns me because he isnt as strict as I feel is neces sary. Are we obligated to help with more of her medical expens es? I dont think so be cause we have already helped, and I dont think its our job to teach our grandchild boundaries. OHIO GRANDMA DEAR OHIO GRANDMA: That must have been some hefty emergen cy room bill! Obviously, closing the guest room door was not enough to deter your grand daughter. In hindsight, you now know that you should keep anything you dont want her to get into locked in your suitcase. But you and your husband are not mind readers. If this wasnt a wakeup call to your daugh ter and son-in-law that it was time to teach their child the mean ing of No! and Dont touch! then I dont know what it will take to prevent anoth er oops! As to your shelling out more money than you al ready have for Beth anys medical bills, I think you have giv en enough, and you should not be blamed for what happened. DEAR ABBY: My best friend told me sev eral months ago that she needed to make new friends. When I gave her a surprised look, her response was, No, you took that the wrong way. I left it at that. She recently men tioned that she was go ing to invite several of our neighbors over for cocktails and a light dinner, but she did not invite me. The evening of the event, while her guests were still there, she phoned me. She said they were nished with dinner and asked if I wanted to walk over and get some leftovers. I politely declined, say ing I wasnt dressed. Abby, Im shocked that she would ask me to come over to, ba sically, get a takeout plate. Your thoughts? NO TAKEOUT FOR ME DEAR NO TAKEOUT: I think what the wom an did was insensi tive, and that its time you, too, started mak ing some new friends. Considering how this one treated you, it cer tainly couldnt hurt. Dear Abby is written by Abi gail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was found ed by her mother, Pauline Phil lips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Wandering grandchild must be taught to respect boundaries JEANNE PHILLIPS DEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGAR BIGARS STARS

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C12 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 14, 2014 To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact the Classied Department at (352) 314-3278.D004096 A/C Services Appliance Repair Cleaning Services $ 20 OFFFIRST CLEANI NG Ci sC i sCall for FREE Estimate Best Rates in To wn 352-25 5-8432Home Cleaning Ser vices Concrete Services Concrete For Less 8x10 Slab $450 10x48 Slab $1700No UPFRONT Costs!Blocking/ Ref./Lic./Ins.Phillip 352-504-8372Includes Concrete &L abor Construction Services Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Electrical Services Enclosure Screening rf nrt rfrb r r Garage Door Services Handyman Services r f n tb Hauling Services f rb r Lic Ins. Home Improvement Irrigation Services Spri nk ler Rep air sTi mer s, V alv es ,H eads ,L eaks etc .(352) 787-9 001Th ats all we do .S inc e1 979 Native ,4 th Gener ation Land Clearing Services Ca ll Duane Goodwin(35 2) 78 7-9001 Tr actor Wo rkBush Hogging, Rototilling, Fr on ten dW or k, Prepare Garden Beds nb t b b r r LA KES HO RES &M OR EProfessional Wa terfront Cleanup rf n t b f fb fr b b f f b r bf bf Please call to arr ange af re eq uote Landscaping Services t f t t r f r rrb r ffrb b r ff nf t r fb r r Lawn Services Dannys Lawn Care Ser viceQu al ity Ser vic ef ro mt he Ground UpMo wing ,E dging ,T rimmingFREE ESTIMA TESNo job too lar ge or small352-455-6679 Legal Services Marine Services Painting Services C& SP aintingInterior /E xterior Painting Pressure Washing Deck Restorations Refinishing &S tainingLicensed, Insured &B ondedFree Estimates 352-350-1515www.cspainting03.com D004095 All Accurate Painting &D esignsInt./Ext. ~D riveway Coatings &M oreSenior &V eterans DiscountsAsk for Paul 352-267-6601 One call does it all! Plumbing Services Pressure Cleaning All County Pressure Washing Quality Work At AF air Price100% Satisfaction Guaranteed rf n tf bt tf t 352-396-9447tn Psychic Services Roong Services Shower Doors Service Tree Service bt b b b nt t Window Services AT otal Lawn Service FREE ESTIMATES -L IC./INS. r f n tn tb t 352-326-8712 /3 52-406-3354 Bathtub Renishing BATHTUBS REFINISHED ON LOCATIONRenew, on location, your rf LAKESIDE TUB &T ILE REFINISHING(352) 742-9602 LA WN SERVICE35 224 278 64Mowing Tr imming Mulching Bathroom Services RE-TILE 352-391-5553n tbr r f n bn r b t r f b Tile Service RE-TILE 352-391-5553n tbr r f n bn r b t r f b Lawn Services All Lawn and Tree Care ServiceNatural Land Clearing (Goats) 352-460-7186 Home Improvement BOYDSYou call it, We haul it!352-460-7186Grading, Loading, etc.

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Monday, July 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr Thank you for reading the local paper!

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