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Daily Commercial
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Minimumchargesapply.Cannotbecombinedwithothercouponsoroffers.Combinedlivingareas,L-shapedroomsandrooms ov er300sq.ft. ar econsidered2area s. Baths, halls,large wa lk-i n closetsan d arearu gsar epricedseparately. Offerdoes no t in clude protecto r. Residentialonl y. Cannotbeusedfor re stor ationser vices. Mu stpresen t couponattimeofservice Va lidatparticipatinglocationsonly.Certain re strictionsmayapply.Callfordetails.BEYONDCARPET CLEANINGCARPET|TILE&GROUT|HARDWOOD|UPHOLSTERY|AIRDUCT728-1668 394-1739fla#CAC18 1640 8 CARPET CLEANING3$99CleaningCompletedBy7/31/14 PromoCode:JULY AIRDUCT CLEANING$50OFF(MINIMUMCHARGESAPPLY) FL#CAC1816408CleaningCompletedBy7/31/14 PromoCode:JULY TILE&GROUT CLEANING15%OFF(MINIMUMCHARGESAPPLY)CleaningCompletedBy7/31/14 PromoCode:JULYROOMS &AHALL DJOKOVIC TOPS FEDERER FOR WIMBLEDON TITLE, SPORTS B1HOB NOB: Event allows residents a sneak peek at potential election results, A3 NASCAR: Almirola wins rainshortened race at Daytona, B1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, July 7, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 188 4 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED C10 COMICS C8 CROSSWORDS C10 DIVERSIONS C9 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 NATION A9 SCOREBOARD B2 SPORTS B1 VOICES A11 STATE/REGION A3 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A12.89 / 73Partly sunny, evening T-storms. 50 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comWhen Sunstate Carriers opened its doors in Lake County in 2001, economic incentives served an important role in job creation, company ofcials said. It helped us to cover the expensive advertising for people and getting them to the training, Richard Baugh, president of Sunstate Companies, said. But at the same time, he said his company would have created those 20 to 25 jobs without incentives. We would have found a way to make it work as most business people would, he said. You cant let the window of opportunity shut on it. In the coming months, Lake Countys Economic Development and Tourism Department is evaluating its incentive program to determine whether the countys resources are being used appropriately. The department must come before the Lake County Commission for approval of any change in its incentive program. While the evaluation has been discussed for months, county ofcials said a recent review of incentives which revealed several outstanding incentive grants with auditing periods that had expired brought the issue to the forefront. Although all job growth incentive grants require an auditing period to make sure the jobs created are retained for a minimum of two years, according to county documents, six incentive grants, from 2004 to 2008, were found to have incomplete reporting. The department distributed $287,000 for 78 jobs created but could only verify 18 that were retained. The county has 13 open incentive accounts with eight different companies. The contract agreements allow for $345,000 in incentive grants associated with the creation of 142 Evaluating incentivesLake County economic director weighs effect on job creation PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: A worker walks past a line of parked tractor-trailer cabs at Sunstate Carriers in Tavares, on Thursday. BELOW: Sunstate workers enjoy a pizza lunch in the workshop for tractor-trailer cabs. DAVE COLLINSAssociated PressHARTFORD, Conn. As state ofcials across the country grapple with how to prevent mass killings like the ones at Sandy Hook Ele mentary School in Newtown and near the University of California, Santa Barbara, some are turning to a gun seizure law pioneered in Connecticut 15 years ago. Connecticuts law allows judges to order guns temporarily seized after police present States look to gun seizure law after mass killings LAURA WIDES-MUNOZ and PAUL WISEMANAssociated PressKelly Parker was thrilled when she land ed her dream job in 2012 providing tech support for Harley-Davidsons Tomahawk, Wis., plants. The divorced mother of three hoped it was the beginning of a new ca reer with the motorcy cle company. The dream didnt last long. Parker claims she was laid off one year lat er after she trained her replacement, a newly arrived worker from India. Now she has joined a federal lawsuit alleg ing the global stafng rm that ran Harley-Da vidsons tech support discriminated against American workers in part by replacing them with temporary workers from South Asia. The rm, India-based Infosys Ltd., denies wrongdoing and contends, as many com panies do, that it has Backlash stirs in US against visas for foreign workers AP FILE PHOTO Jennifer Wedel of Fort Worth, Texas, is photographed at her home after chatting with President Obama via Google. CHRIS CAROLAAssociated PressSARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. Even after seven decades, Wilfred Spike Mailloux wont talk about surviving a bloody World War II battle unless longtime friend John Sidur is by his side. It was Sidur who found the severely wounded Mailloux hours after both survived Ja pans largest mass suicide attack in the Pacic. The predawn assault launched 70 years ago Monday on the Japan-held island of Saipan nearly wiped out two former New York National Guard battalions ghting alongside U.S. Marines. He found me in the mud, Mailloux recounted during a visit to the New York State Military Museum to attend a pre sentation on the battles 70th anniversary. Mailloux and Sidur are among the dwindling ranks of WWII veterans of the Armys 27th Infantry Division, which endured some of the bloodiest ghting in the Pacic, only to have its reputation be smirched by a volatile Marine general in one of the wars big gest controversies. In the Mariana Islands, 1,400 miles south of Tokyo, Saipan was sought by the Americans as a base for bombing raids against Japan. U.S. forces landed on Saipan on June 15, 1944, with two Marine divisions, the 2nd and the 4th, making the initial beach assaults and losing some 2,000 men on the rst day alone.US survivors of WWII battle recall Saipan attack BOB DIAL / AP World War II veterans Wilfred Spike Mailloux, left, and John Sidur, both of Cohoes, N.Y., pose at a presentation on the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Saipan at the New York State Military Museum on June 7 in Saratoga Springs, N.Y.In the Mariana Islands, 1,400 miles south of Tokyo, Saipan was sought by the Americans as a base for bombing raids against Japan. SEE GUNS | A2SEE INCENTIVES | A2SEE SAIPAN | A2SEE VISAS | A10

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 7, 2014 HOW TO REACH US JULY 6CASH 3 . ............................................... 5-0-4 Afternoon . .......................................... 7-0-2 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 3-5-1-9 Afternoon . ....................................... 0-4-8-4FLORIDALOTTERY JULY 5FANTASY 5 . ........................... 7-23-29-34-35 FLORIDA LOTTO . ............... 1-39-41-43-46-49 POWERBALL .................. 24-34-36-57-5811 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONSTEVE SKAGGS, publisher352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comPAUL RYAN, digital editor352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com.CALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. evidence that a person is a danger to themselves or others. A court hearing must be held within 14 days to determine whether to return the guns or authorize the state to hold them for up to a year. The 1999 law, the rst of its kind in the country, was in response to the 1998 killings of four man agers at the Connecticut Lottery headquarters by a disgruntled employee with a history of psychiat ric problems. Indiana is the only other state that has such a law, passed in 2005 after an Indianapolis police ofcer was shot to death by a mentally ill man. Califor nia and New Jersey law makers are now consider ing similar statutes, both proposed in the wake of the killings of six people and wounding of 13 oth ers near the University of California, Santa Barbara by a mentally ill man who had posted threatening videos on YouTube. Michael Lawlor, Connecticuts undersecretary for criminal justice planning and policy, believes the states gun seizure law could have prevented the killings of 20 rst-graders and six educators at Sandy Hook Elementary School in December 2012, if police had been made aware that gunman Adam Lanza had mental health problems and access to his mothers legally owned guns. Thats the kind of sit uation where you see the red ags and the warn ing signs are there, you do something about it, Law lor said. In many shootings around the country, after the fact its clear that the warning signs were there. Gun rights advocates oppose gun seizure laws, saying they allow po lice to take peoples rearms based only on al legations and before the gun owners can present their side of the story to a judge. They say theyre concerned the laws violate constitutional rights. The government taking things away from peo ple is never a good thing, said Rich Burgess, pres ident of the gun rights group Connecticut Car ry. They come take your stuff and give you 14 days for a hearing. Would any body else be OK if they just came and took your car and gave you 14 days for a hearing? Rachel Baird, a Con necticut lawyer who has represented many gun owners, said one of the biggest problems with the states law is that police are abusing it. She said she has had eight clients whose guns were seized by police who obtained the required warrants af ter taking possession of the guns. Its stretched and abused, and since its re arms, the courts go along with it, Baird said of the law. But backers of such laws say they can prevent shootings by getting guns out of the hands of men tally disturbed people. You want to make sure that when people are in crisis ... there is a way to prevent them to get ac cess to rearms, said Josh Horwitz, executive director of the nonprof it Education Fund to Stop Gun Violence in Washing ton, D.C. GUNS FROM PAGE A1 JOHN MINCHILLO / AP Demonstrators raise posters as they march across the Brooklyn Bridge to call for tougher gun control laws Saturday in New York.jobs. The department has paid out $290,000 on the creation of 85 jobs, according to economic development ofcials. A company must create the jobs and hire before receiving incentive payments. Robert Chandler, the countys director of Economic Development and Tourism, said in his personal opinion, many of these companies were going to create those jobs regardless of whether they received incentives. The whole reason we are here is to help businesses create jobs, he said. The question is, is providing incentives directly to a company for job growth the most efcient way to do that? Chandler said directly incentivizing companies, in his opinion, leads to a far lesser return on investment than if the county were to invest that same money in ar eas such as workforce, education, infrastructure and transportation. Training and developing the workforce continues to be the number one issue for small businesses, according to Chandler. Many businesses want to hire, he said, but do not have enough skilled labor. Chandler said if the department used the funding it receives for incentives, which was $150,000 last scal year, for workforce development instead, it would be more benecial for economic development. For example, he said if a company said it needed a certain type of skill, then perhaps the countys economic development department could sponsor the training of that skill at Lake Technical College or Lake-Sumter State College. If a business needs a specic type of skill not made available, our money could help subsidize the program to get people trained, Chandler said. He cited the Lake Tech Center for Advanced Manufacturing a partnership between the county and the school to train workers in manufacturing, machining and welding, and the Partners for Success program for bringing the business and education communities together. Infrastructure also is an important factor in economic development, Chandler said. If you have better roads, better infrastructure, it is more attractive for companies to come in and help existing businesses, he said. Moving away from providing traditional economic incentives will allow the county to support a larger number of businesses with more benetting from incentive resources, Chandler said. If you are truly looking out for the best interest of the taxpayer dollars and moving the needle with economic development, this is the best way to go, he said. Chandler said the county does not have a large amount of money to play the big recruitment game, and when companies express interest in relocating to the county, incentives are not high on the list of criteria in making their decision. Indeed, in the top 10 criteria for businesses to relocate, incentives are ranked seventh, according to a Site Selection Consultant Location Criteria Study. At the top is an available workforce. INCENTIVES FROM PAGE A1 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunstate Carriers in Tavares, is shown on Thursday. A few days later, the inexperi enced 27th Division joined the ght. A New York National Guard outt activated in October 1940, the Appleknockers still retained a sizable Empire State contingent among its ranks after two years of garrison duty in Hawaii. The commander of the ground forces at Saipan was Marine Corps Lt. Gen. Holland M. Smith, dubbed Howling Mad for his volcanic temper. A week into the battle, Smith re lieved the 27ths commander, Maj. Gen. Ralph Smith (no relation), after the division lagged behind the Marine units operating on its anks. The Marine commander not only blasted the 27ths leader ship, but he also openly criticized its soldiers in front of war corre spondents, who later reported on the rift that became known as Smith vs. Smith. Arthur Robinson, 92, of Saratoga Springs knew nothing of the Army versus Marine ap brewing on Saipan. As an infantryman in the 27ths 105th Infantry Regiment, he was concentrating on staying alive. On July 3, he was wounded in both thighs by machine gun re. Rob inson endured a 10-mile ride in a Jeep to a eld hospital, with the driver opting to travel on railroad tracks because the road was mined. On July 7, after three weeks of ghting, two battalions of the 105th Regiment were positioned across a plain along Saipans west ern shore. With the islands 30,000 defenders down to a few thousand starving, ill-equipped soldiers and sailors, Japanese commanders or dered one last charge. The battalions 1,100 soldiers bore the brunt of what became known as the banzai attack. U.S. military ofcials later said 3,000 Japanese charged the American lines, though others put the esti mate closer to 5,000. Many of the attackers were armed with samurai swords and bayonets tied to poles. I was scared as hell, said Mail loux, then a 20-year-old cor poral from Cohoes, a mill town north of Albany. When you hear that screaming banzai who wouldnt be? The 105ths positions were over run. Firing their ries until they ran out of ammunition and their ma chine guns until the barrels over heated, the Americans fell back as the attack became a running street brawl. They set up a second perim eter along the beach and, with their backs to the water, fought for hours before the attackers were all but annihilated. When it was over, some 4,300 enemy dead were found on the battle eld, about half of them in front of the 105ths positions. The regiment saw 406 killed and 512 wounded. Mailloux was stabbed in the thigh by a Japanese ofcer wield ing a long knife. Unable to move, he lay in a ditch for hours before Sidur, a 26-year-old sergeant also from Cohoes, found him bleeding in a muddy ditch. I didnt know who it was, Sidur said. I just thought, Boy, he looks familiar. More than 3,000 Americans died in the land battle for Saipan, about a third of them 27th Division sol diers. Among the dead were scores of New Yorkers, including more than two dozen from Albany-area factory towns. Three members of the 105th killed in the July 7 attack were awarded the Medal of Honor posthumously, including Col. Wil liam OBrien and Sgt. Thomas Baker, both from Troy. SAIPAN FROM PAGE A1 MIKE GROLL / AP World War II veteran Arthur Robinson of Saratoga Springs, N.Y., points to himself in a 1940 photograph with his unit at the New York State Military Museum.

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Monday, July 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT BUSHNELL Registration ends today for Dade Battlefield campKids ages 8-12 can take part in Slither, Splash and Ambush and Animal Detective Day at the annual nature camp at Dade Battleeld State Park, 7200 County Road 603. Registration deadline for the camp, running from 9 / a.m. to 3 / p .m. July 1418, is today. The cost is $75 per child. Registration can be completed on line at www.dadebattleeld.com. Call 352-793-4781 for information.LEESBURG Bricks, benches for sale to refurbish NAACP buildingBuy a brick or a bench for the Commemorative Legacy Walk, an ongoing fundraiser project by the Tri-City Branch of the NAACP of Lake and Sumter Counties, to refurbish the historic Tri-City Branch of the NAACP building, 1107 Beecher St. To purchase a brick or bench, go to www.bricksrus.com or call 352551-3085 or 352-552-7540. Deadline for purchase is July 17.LEESBURG Foundation donates grant for STEM scholarshipsA $10,000 grant has been donated to Lake-Sumter State College (LSSC) by the Hans & Cay Jacobsen Foundation for the Johnson Scholars STEM Scholarship program, to fund scholarships for students majoring in science, technology, engineering and math. The Johnson Scholarship program partnership is a matching grant between local colleges, including LSSC and University of Central Florida. For information, call 352-365-3518 or go to www.lssc.edu.THE VILLAGES Paramount Urgent Care to offer free student physicalsTo ensure student success for the new school year, Paramount Urgent Care and the local charity Back to School is COOL-Lake County have teamed up to offer free back-toschool physicals for local students. Families receiving physicals, or anyone who would like to contribute, are encouraged to donate school supplies at any Paramount location to benet homeless and economically-challenged students. Appointments are required. Dates are as follows: July 16-17, 8640 E. County Road 466, in The Villages, 352-674-9218, and July 23-24, 628 U.S. Highway 27, in Clermont, 352-242-1988.MOUNT DORA Volunteers invited to help combat invasive air potatoesResidents are asked to assist in the release of leaf beetles, which tar get only the air potato vine at an event hosted by the Lake County Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area, at 9:30 / a.m. Friday at Palm Island Park, 411 S. Tremain St. No registration is necessary. Activities and games will be provided for children after the event. Call 352-343-4101 or email Burnb48@u.edu.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comA 43-year-old Eustis woman, riding on the back of an all-terrain vehicle driven by her 21-year-old son, died Saturday night when he drove into the path of a pickup truck, the Flori da Highway Patrol said. Melissa Cole was pro nounced dead at the scene by the Medical Examin ers Ofce. Dillon Ash, 21, driver of the ATV, was air lifted to Orlando Regional Medical Center, where he remains in critical condition, according to the FHP. Raeanne Champion, 16, of Eustis, driver of the pickup, was not injured. The accident occurred at about 9:30 / p .m. at the intersection of County Road 44-A (Burlington Av enue) and June Avenue, just west of where CR 44-A intersects with State Road 44. The FHP said Ash was driving the ATV west on the shoulder of CR 44-A with his mother on the back. As Ash attempted to cross CR 44-A, he drove into the path of the truck, which was headed east on CR 44-A, the FHP said. Champion was unable to stop in time and a headon collision resulted. The FHP said the crash remains under investigation and Ash will be test ed to see if he was under the inuence of alcohol. Champion was wearing a seatbelt but Cole and Ash were not wearing helmets, the FHP added.Eustis mother dies in ATV crash ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comThe South Lake Chamber of Commerce will host its bi-annual Hob Nob event on Aug. 7 at the Clermont City Cen ter, 620 West Montrose St., in downtown Clermont. Guests will have the chance to vote in a straw poll in various city, county, state and federal races to provide an idea of potential election results. The Hob Nob is a unique opportunity to see democracy in action, as candidates for ofce meet face to face with voters eager to participate in the free exchange of ideas, said Kasey Kesselring, Montverde Academy headmaster and event chair. The chamber expects more than 20 candidates to take part, representing local, county, state and federally elected ofces. More than 500 people are expected to attend the free event. Chamber president Ray San Fratello said in past years, the turnout has been great. San Fratello said candidates like the event because it is a forum where they can share passions, platforms and CLERMONTHob Nob gives a preview of potential election results PHOTO COURTESY OF SOUTH LAKE CHAMBER OF COMMERCEAt the last Hob Nob, attendees watched an overhead screen to see the results of a straw poll. This years event is Aug. 7. KEVIN BOUFFARDHalifax Media GroupNearly a decade into the era of the bacterial disease citrus greening, Flor ida growers are pondering the existen tial question: Is there a future in Flori da citrus? The question has taken on more ur gency following the past two seasons of unprecedented pre-harvest fruit drop from diseased trees. Its a plague of biblical propor tions, said Scott Young, 57, an Altur as-based grower with 350 grove acres in Polk County, referring to the toll cit rus greening has taken on his harvests in the past two seasons. Its already critical. Were still in it, but were claw ing to hang on. As a third-generation citrus grower whose family business stretches back to the 1930s, Young is committed to hanging on for another season or two, he said, because growing citrus is the only occupation he knows. But hes not optimistic, and neither are many of his fellow growers. For the rst time ever in the cit rus industry, you see despair because weve tried everything, and theres no silver bullet on the horizon, Young said. This is doomsday; this is going to kill us. Just getting by for the next couple of seasons will mean downsizing, selling some of his best groves to raise the upfront cash needed for grove caretak ing costs before more revenue comes in with the new fall harvest, Young said. Peace Valley Enterprise Inc., the family company, already has sold about 50 acres in recent years to raise cash for the new crop, he added. Were going to have to sell property thats been in the family for three gen erations, Young said. Peace Valley also will have to consid er cutting back on its caretaking mea sures in the face of next seasons de clining crop and revenues, he said. That represents a genuine dilemma, as any letup in anti-greening caretak ing measures could allow the disease to spread or cause more damage to the trees, which could further diminish the 2014-15 harvest. The rise in pessimism about the fu ture of Florida citrus comes after grow ers hoped they could manage greenings deleterious effects through the decade, Pessimism reigns among citrus growers Associated PressTAMPA The Florida Department of Transportation is studying whether Port Tampa Bays cruise ship business could go from thriv ing to shriveling with out a plan to get the newest and largest of these oating cities past the height lim itations of the Sun shine Skyway bridge. The Tampa Tribune reports that a draft study examines four options: do noth ing, replace the Sky way, build a cruise ship terminal near the Hillsborough-Pinellas county line in Tampa Bay to avoid the bridge, or build a drawbridge at one end of the Skyway with a new channel for the giant ships. Ofcials say the de cision will likely be based on return on investment. Pinellas and Manatee counties are pos sible sites for a new port and cruise facil ity, at a cost of more than $600 million.Sunshine Skyway could hobble Tampa Bay cruise ship industry Associated PressTAMPA Florida is known for being the deadliest state in the country for lightning strikes and 2014 has been no exception. Four people in Florida have been fatally struck so far this year, The Tampa Tribune reports. Thats the same number as in the rest of the entire nation, according to the National Weather Service. Summer is the peak season for lightning, and nationwide, 51 peo ple on average are killed each year while hundreds more suffer severe injuries. Overall the number of lightning fatalities appears to be on the decline: Across the U.S., there were 23 lightning fatalities last year, a record low. There were four in all of 2013 in Florida, leading meteorologists to believe this year is an anomaly. Scientists point to several possible factors contributing to an SEE CITRUS | A4SEE HOB NOB | A4Florida still deadliest state for lightning strikes STEVEN ROBICSEK / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUPA one-second exposure from atop the Seagle Building in downtown Gainesville captures a double lightning strike over the western portion of Alachua County on June 8.SEE LIGHTNING | A9

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 7, 2014 JOE HENDERSONAssociated PressTAMPA You know how Tampa came to be known as the Cigar City, right? There used to be more than 150 cigar factories here, but that was a long time ago. Po litical events that include the U.S. trade restrictions with Cuba caused some to close. Changing public attitudes about tobacco caused others to lock their doors for good. There is only one still in business, the J.C. Newman Cigar Co. on North 16th Street in Ybor City. The company dates back 119 years to when Julius C. Newman he went by the initials J.C. founded his cigar-making operation in Cleveland. The company moved to its current location in 1954, into the abandoned Regensberg cigar factory. Newmans 130 employees use amazing old machines from the 1930s to produce thousands of cigars every day. Those are shipped to all 50 states and 81 countries. We are the last of the Mo hicans, so to speak, company President Eric Newman said. Proposed regulations from the Food and Drug Adminis tration could end that, though. Essentially, the FDA proposes treating cigar manufacturers such as J.C. Newman the same as cigarette giants. Among other things, it would require FDA approval before a company could add a new size, shape or brand. The company says the FDA estimates a manufactur er would spend about 5,000 hours testing each new product before it could even apply for approval. The effect of those and other proposed restrictions could be to increase costs so much that Tampas last cigar factory would close. New products are the life blood of any industry, Newman said. If it becomes too expensive to create a new product, we cant stay in business. So the company is ghting back, and it has some pow erful bipartisan political al lies in the battle to win an ex emption from the proposed regulations. Nothing is more Tampa than the Newman cigar factory, Democratic U.S. Rep. Kathy Castor said. Im not going to stand for this, and I think we have a good chance to win. I think something like this is the government interfer ing where the government shouldnt interfere, Republican U.S. Rep. Dennis Ross added. Were talking about an industry that is the foundation of Tampa. Im just sor ry we have to le legislation and say to the FDA, You cant do that. Democratic U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson and his Republican counterpart, Marco Rubio, also have joined the ght. This issue goes back to 2009, when Congress gave the FDA control over tobacco products. The agency has been particularly focused on discouraging minors from smoking. If this was about ciga rettes, I would agree with the aim of what theyre trying to do, said Bobby Newman, the companys executive vice president. I dont like ciga rettes either. But the Newmans argue theirs is a premium product with a limited audience. They dene a premium product as 100 percent tobacco (no llers), a larger size than the kind of cigars you might nd in a convenience store, and no tip. The FDA proposed saying a premium cigar had to cost at least $10, which many New man cigars dont. That denition of what makes a premi um cigar is at the heart of the issue. The Newmans say its not as much about price as it is how the cigar is made. In deed, a trip through their factory is like time travel. Workers still operate machines that were used in the 1930s. That may sound ar chaic by todays standards, but the Newmans insist its another thing that makes them different from the giant cigarette manufacturers. The proposed bills would override FDA rules and help companies such as New man survive, but they have a slim chance of becoming law this year. That will not be the end of the ght, howev er. The FDA has extended the chance for public comment until Aug. 9, and it could be at least a year before any new rules would take effect. Newman isnt taking chances, though. On Monday, the company plans to cover El Reloj, its iconic 104-year-old clock tower that is easily visible from Interstate 4, with a gi ant banner to bring attention to this issue. There is further information on the website www.savecigarcity.com Ross promises the issue isnt going away no matter what the FDA does. Its one thing to say you cant go out into a public restaurant and smoke, he said. I support that. Im glad when I go out to eat, I dont have to smell cigarette smoke. Its another thing to say you cant go on your own pa tio and smoke a cigar. Thats when you become the nanny state. We dont want that.Tampas last cigar factory fights for survival JIM REED / AP Machines that were in use in the 1930s and still in use now are seen at the El Reloj cigar factory in Tampa.long enough to allow sci entists to come up with a better strategy for coun teracting or even curing the disease. Pre-harvest drop, which surfaced during the 2012-13 sea son, dashed such hopes. Two years ago, the industry was thinking weve got a Band-Aid and the crops were go ing to hold up, said Tom Spreen, emeritus professor of agricultural economics at the University of Florida and an authority on Flori da citrus. I think whats changed here is the ex pectation. I dont think anybody had foreseen production falling off the map the way it has. Although still bullish on Florida citrus, Ben Hill Grifn III agreed that the growers mood has turned sour. Theres a lot more pessimism in the citrus industry today because of pre-harvest drop, said Grifn, CEO of Ben Hill Grifn Inc. in Frost proof, one of the states biggest growers, whose family rm dates to the 1930s.NEAR TOTAL INFECTIONGreening is a bacterial disease that weakens a citrus tree and eventually kills it. The disease was rst discovered in Florida in the fall of 2005 near Homestead, but it had a history of devastating commercial citrus indus tries in Asia and Africa since its initial discovery in China in the early 20th century. Growers and re searchers think greening has infected virtually all the states 524,640 commercial citrus acres. In those rst years into the era of greening, Florida growers thought they could manage the disease through more frequent pesticide spraying to tamp down populations of the Asian citrus psyllid, the bacterias host that spreads the disease, and an enhanced fertilizer regimen that appeared to keep fruit on infected trees healthy. In 200708, Florida growers pro duced 170.2 million boxes of oranges, just 30 percent lower than the 242 million orange boxes harvested in 2003-04, before greenings arrival. In 2012-13, howev er, growers noticed an alarming level of pre-har vest drop of seemingly healthy fruit from dis eased trees, even those getting enhanced fertilization. What the U.S. Department of Agriculture projected as a 154 million-box orange crop at the beginning of the season nished at 133.6 million boxes, or 13 per cent lower. When the recently completed 2013-14 season began in the fall, many growers had hoped pre-harvest drop was a single-season event. No such luck. Ofcially the USDA initially estimated 125 million orange boxes in the 2013-14 season. It nished with just 104.3 million boxes, nearly 17 percent less. Those averages mask more severe drop problems among some growers like Young. Young reported 201213 orange production in his groves declined 50 percent from the previ ous season largely because of pre-harvest drop, despite the fact that he took all recommended caretaking measures against greening. The drop problem grew worse this past season with production off 70 percent, Young said. Before greening, pre-har vest drop attributable to weather, pests and oth er diseases amounted to about 5 percent of his crop, he added.BETTING ON A CURENot everyone is so bearish on the future of Florida citrus, however. If you go back and look at all the earlier 10year projections, theyve never been correct. Theyve been all over the board, Grifn said. I dont disregard it entirely. Its certainly trending that way. It would be ri diculous to say well produce 150 million boxes next year. But Grifn and other optimists base their hopes on what poker players call betting on the come that the next card dealt will turn a weak or worthless hand into a winner. Theyre hoping scientists soon will come up with an ef fective treatment either for the drop problem or a wider solution to coun teract greenings damage to their trees. I see advancement in many areas of scientic research that we didnt have three or four years ago, Grifn said. He cited heat treat ment, which has been shown to kill the bacte ria in single young trees but remains difcult CITRUS FROM PAGE A3 views, and voters like it because they can learn more about candidates by interacting with them in person. In addition, there will be an ongoing straw ballot with regular updates where participants can vote for their favorite candidates as if it were election day. All the state referendum issues scheduled to be on the ballot in November will be included. The straw poll is great because it lets candidates see how they might be faring with this group of qualied voters who are asking questions about what they are planning to do for them if they get elected, San Fratello said. The atmosphere at these Hob Nobs is just a nice night out with great food, mingling and the feel of election night when really, we are just prepping for the primary. The Hob Nob will feature food furnished by Carrabbas Italian Grill. Beverages, including a cash bar, will be hosted by the Kiwanis Club of South Lake. Tickets will be available on a rst-come, rst-served basis. Tickets must be reserved in advance, and are necessary to participate in the straw ballot. The event is sponsored by many local businesses and organizations that have partnered with the chamber. It will be a fun and valuable event for the public and candidates, San Fratello said. For information or to reserve tickets, call 352394-4191 or email ofce@southlakechamber-.com. HOB NOB FROM PAGE A3 to apply on a large scale; anti-bacterial agents that could kill the bacteria in mature trees; hampering or eliminating the psyl lids ability to host the greening bacteria and breeding new tree va rieties more tolerant or resistant to the dis ease. Meanwhile, Grifn said, growers can enhance their ability to survive economically through a proven method: denser planting of new groves, as many as 325 trees per acre. Denser plant ings were not uncom mon before greening, but even those groves had fewer than 200 trees per acre. We would have never planted 300 trees per acre 10 years ago, he said. Caretaking costs for denser groves stay close to the traditional architecture, but production and returns per acre remain prof itable even if yields per tree diminish because of greening and pre-harvest drop, Grifn said. More trees per acre enable a grove to absorb greening-related losses and still have a protable harvest. If we lose a tree and have that many trees per acre, were still in the game, he said. Still, the costs of replacing existing groves remain daunt ing, Young said. That includes the cost of removing existing trees, a new irrigation system and the price of the new trees. It costs $35 to get a new tree into the ground before it takes a drink of water, Young added. Were too small to be able to weather this kind of trauma. Theres too much overhead. MICHAEL WILSON/HALIFAX MEDIA GROUPScott Young, owner/operator of Peace Valley Enterprise Inc., shows the effects of citrus greening on a leaf of one his honey tangerine trees damaged by the disease at his grove in Alturas.

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Monday, July 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 r f n t b n nr

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 7, 2014 rfrntb rfrbtb rfnn rbrt tbn n bbrbbrnn f nn rfbr rfn tb nftb tb tb tb rf f n t b t n fftfrr f tf ff bbb bbtbb bbb b n rbb rf ntbbn n LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PA RK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904David Wa lkerDr.(InPublixPlaza)352-308-8318THEVILLAGES352-205-7804THEVILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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Monday, July 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 rfrntb rfrbtb rfnn rbrt tbn n bbrbbrnn f nn rfbr rf rffntb rfnt rfrf ntb b ntb btn f ntb b rfbtn f ntb b rf rtnn rf ntb b brnrrrr fnt nntfn nnfntn rff n nn r f nff t b t f f t LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PA RK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904David Wa lkerDr.(InPublixPlaza)352-308-8318THEVILLAGES352-205-7804THEVILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 7, 2014 r r fr nr f n tb t rfrntb rfrbtb rfnn rbrt tbn n bbrbbrnn f nn rfbr LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PA RK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904David Wa lkerDr.(InPublixPlaza)352-308-8318THEVILLAGES352-205-7804THEVILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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Monday, July 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A9 CR OW NS$399Each(3ormorepervisit) D2751/ Re g $59 9 ea. Po rcelainonnon Pr eciousme ta l DENTURES$74 9EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SA VIN GSThepatientand anyotherperson re sponsibleforpaymenthastherightto re fusetopay cancelpaymentorbe re imbursed forpaymentforanyotherservices, ex aminationwhic h isperformedas a re sultofandwithin72hoursof re spondingtothe advertisemen t fo r th ediscountedfeeor re ducedfeeserviceortreatment.Feesmay va ry duetocomplexityofcase.This discount does notapplytothosepatients wi thdentalplans.Feesare mi nimal. PR ICESARESUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBUR GM T. DORASunris e Dent al Tr i-D ental r ffnt bb fConsultation and Second Op inion No Ch arge!n t t NEW PA TIENTSPECIAL COMPLETESETOFX-RAYS(D0210) CLEANINGBYHYGIENIST(D110) EX AMINATIONBY DO CTOR(D0150) SECONDOPINION$49Reg.$155(INABSENCEOFGUMDISEASE ) D002409 overall drop in the number of fa talities, including the drought in the Southeast, an area typically ripe for lightning strikes. But overall, fewer casualties are the result of awareness, said John Jensenius, lightning guru for the National Weather Service. People are more concerned and are taking actions to protect themselves. However, he cautioned that the downward trend could quickly reverse itself. I would suspect that once the Southeast gets into a more nor mal yearly rainfall, we will see the lightning strikes go up, Jen senius said. Weather Service meteorologists say there are about 1.45 million lightning strikes in Flor ida each year. The reason we get so many thunderstorms in Florida is that the state is a long piece of land with warm water on both sides, said Joe Dwyer, professor of physics and space sciences with the Florida Institute of Technol ogy in Melbourne. During the summer, the sun warms the pen insula, and that brings sea breezes. The moist air collides, and that causes updrafts, and that leads to thunderstorms. The eight people fatally struck in Florida engaged in a variety of activities when they were hit. One was repairing a roof, two were shing and another was picking blueberries. Fishing is the No. 1 activity that puts people in danger, Jensenius said. People who are out shing on a boat, it takes time to get to safety. LIGHTNING FROM PAGE A3 MARK SHERMAN and RACHEL ZOLLAssociated PressWASHINGTON How much distance from an immoral act is enough? Thats the difcult question behind the next legal dis pute over religion, birth con trol and the health law that is likely to be resolved by the Supreme Court. The issue in more than four dozen lawsuits from faith-afliated charities, colleges and hospitals that op pose some or all contracep tion as immoral is how far the Obama administration must go to accommodate them. The justices on June 30 re lieved businesses with religious objections of their obligation to pay for womens contraceptives among a range of preventive services the new law calls for in their health plans. Religious-oriented nonprot groups already could opt out of covering the con traceptives. But the organizations say the accom modation provided by the administration does not go far enough because, though they are not on the hook nancially, they remain com plicit in the provision of government-approved contraceptives to women cov ered by their plans. Anything that forces unwilling religious believers to be part of the system is not going to pass the test, said Mark Rienzi, senior counsel for the Becket Fund for Re ligious Liberty, which represents many of the faith-af liated nonprots. Hobby Lobby Inc., winner of its Su preme Court case last month, also is a Becket Fund client. The high court will be asked to take on the issue in its term that begins in October. A challenge from the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana, probably will be the rst case to reach the court. The Obama administration argues that the accommodation creates a generous moral and nancial buffer between religious objectors and funding birth control. The nonprot groups just have to raise their hands and say that paying for any or all of the 20 devices and meth ods approved by government regulators would violate their religious beliefs. To do so, they must ll out a government document known as Form 700 that enables their insurers or third-party administrators to take on the responsibility of paying for the birth control. The employer does not have to arrange the coverage or pay for it. Insurers get reimbursed by the govern ment through credits against fees owed under other parts of the health law. Houses of worship and other religious institutions whose primary purpose is to spread the faith are exempt from the requirement to offer birth control. The objections by religious nonprots are rooted in teachings against facilitating sin. Roman Catholic bishops and other religious plaintiffs argue that lling out the gov ernment form that registers opposition to contraceptives, then sending the document to the insurer or third-party administrator, is akin to signing a permission slip to en gage in evil. In the Hobby Lobby case, the justices rejected the gov ernment argument that there was no violation of con science because the link be tween birth control cover age and the outcome the employer considers morally wrong was slight. Just hours after the Hobby Lobby decision, the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in At lanta granted a temporary re prieve to the Alabama-based Eternal Word Television Network. Judge William H. Pryor Jr. said in a separate opinion in that case that the admin istration turns a blind eye to the undisputed evidence that delivering Form 700 would violate the Networks reli gious beliefs. But the Supreme Court could draw a distinction be tween subsidizing birth con trol and signing a document to deputize a third-party to do so, said Robin Fretwell Wilson, a family law special ist at the University of Illinois College of Law. Think about how thinned down that objection is, Fretwell Wilson said. The court might say that is a bridge too far. Judge Karen Nelson Moore of the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati said the document is a reasonable way for objecting organizations to inform the insur er, but that the obligation to cover contraception is in the health law, not the form. Self-certication allows the eligible organization to tell the insurance issuer and third-party administrator, Were excused from the new federal obligation relating to contraception, and in turn, the government tells those insurance companies, But youre not, the judge wrote.Nonprofits contraceptive cases next for justices PABLO MARTINEZ MONSIVAIS / AP Demonstrators react outside the Supreme Court in Washington after hearing the courts decision on the Hobby Lobby case on June 30. Associated PressWASHINGTON When the U.S. National Security Agency intercepted the online accounts of legally tar geted foreigners over a four-year period it also collected the conversa tions of nine times as many ordinary Internet users, both Americans and non-Americans, according to a probe by The Washington Post. Nearly half of those surveillance les con tained names, email addresses or other details that the NSA marked as belonging to U.S. citi zens or residents, the Post reported in a sto ry posted on its website Saturday night. While the federal agency tried to protect their privacy by masking more than 65,000 such referenc es to individuals, the newspaper said it found nearly 900 additional email addresses that could be strongly linked to U.S. citizens or resi dents. At the same time, the intercepted messages contained material of considerable intelli gence value, the Post reported, such as infor mation about a secret overseas nuclear project, double-dealing by an ostensible ally, a mil itary calamity that be fell an unfriendly pow er, and the identities of aggressive intruders into U.S. computer net works. As an example, the newspaper said the les showed that months of tracking commu nications across doz ens of alias accounts led directly to the cap ture in 2011 of a Pa kistan-based bomb builder suspected in a 2002 terrorist bombing in Bali. The Post said it was withholding oth er examples, at the re quest of the CIA, that would compromise on going investigations. The material reviewed by the Post in cluded roughly 160,000 intercepted e-mail and instant-message conversations, some of them hundreds of pages long, and 7,900 docu ments taken from more than 11,000 online ac counts. It spanned Pres ident Barack Obamas rst term, 2009 to 2012, and was provided to the Post by former NSA an alyst Edward Snowden. The daily lives of more than 10,000 ac count holders who were not targeted were cat alogued and recorded, the Post reported. The newspaper described that material as tell ing stories of love and heartbreak, illicit sexual liaisons, mental-health crises, political and religious conversions, nancial anxieties and disappointed hopes. The material collected included more than 5,000 private photos, the paper said.Report: NSA surveillance collects data on far more ordinary online users than actual targets AP FILE PHOTO Plaques outside the National Security Agency (NSA) campus in Fort Meade, Md., are shown.MANHATTAN BEACH, Calif. Ste ven Robles was an hour into his regular weekend swim off some of Southern Californias most popular beaches when he came face-toface with a great white shark. The 7-foot-long juvenile had been try ing to free itself from a shermans hook for about half an hour when it attacked. It came up to the surface, it looked at me and attacked me right on the side of my chest, Robles told KABC-TV. That all happened within two seconds, I saw the eyes of the shark as I was seeing it swim to wards me. It lunged at my chest, and it locked into my chest. He tried to pry open the sharks mouth, but it quickly disappeared. Robles had been go ing for 2 miles with about a dozen friends Saturday when the at tack happened around 9:30 / a.m., fello w swim mer Nader Nejadhashemi said Sunday. He said Ive been bit, and he was screaming, said Nejadhashemi, who didnt see the shark even though he was just 5 feet away. Then I saw the blood. Victim recounts Southern California shark attackJOHN ANTCZAK / APSurfers and swimmers return to the ocean Sunday, one day after a swimmer was bitten by a great white shark off of Manhattan Beach, Calif.

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A10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 7, 2014 faced a shortage of talent and specialized skill sets in the U.S. Like oth er rms, Infosys wants Congress to allow even more of these temporary workers. But amid calls for expanding the nations socalled H-1B visa program, there is growing pushback from Ameri cans who argue the pro gram has been hijacked by stafng companies that import cheaper, lower-level workers to replace more expensive U.S. employees or keep them from getting hired in the rst place. Its getting pret ty frustrating when you cant compete on salary for a skilled job, said Rich Hajinlian, a veteran computer programmer from the Boston area. You hear references all the time that these big companies ... cant nd skilled workers. I am a skilled worker. Hajinlian, 56, who de velops his own web ap plications on the side, said he applied for a job in April through a headhunter and that the po tential client appeared interested, scheduling a longer interview. Then, said Hajinlian, the headhunter called back and said the client had gone with an H-1B worker whose annual salary was about $10,000 less. I didnt even get a chance to negotiate down, he said. The H-1B program allows employers to tem porarily hire workers in specialty occupations. The government issues up to 85,000 H-1B visas to businesses every year, and recipients can stay up to six years. Although no one tracks exactly how many H-1B holders are in the U.S., experts estimate there are at least 600,000 at any one time. Skilled guest workers can also come in on other types of visas. An immigration bill passed in the U.S. Sen ate last year would have increased the number of annually available H-1B visas to 180,000 while raising fees and increasing oversight, al though language was removed that would have required all com panies to consider qual ied U.S. workers be fore foreign workers are hired. The House never acted on the measure. With immigration reform considered dead this year in Congress, Presi dent Barack Obama last week declared he will use executive actions to address some changes. It is not known whether the H-1B program will be on the agenda. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is among the high-prole executives pushing for more H-1Bs. The argument has long been that there arent enough qualied Amer ican workers to ll cer tain jobs, especially in science, engineering and technology. Advocates also assert that some visa holders will stay and become entrepreneurs. Critics say there is no across-the-board shortage of American tech workers, and that if there were, wages would be rising rapid ly. Instead, wage gains for software develop ers have been modest, while wages have fallen for programmers. The liberal Economic Policy Institute reported last year that only half of U.S. college graduates in science, engineering and technology found jobs in those elds and that at least one third of IT jobs were going to foreign guest workers. The top users of H-1B visas arent even tech companies like Google and Facebook. Eight of the 10 biggest H1-B users last year were outsourcing rms that hire out thousands of most ly lowerand mid-level tech workers to corporate clients, according to an analysis of feder al data by Ron Hira, an associate professor of public policy at Rochester Institute of Technology. The top 10 rms accounted for about a third of the H-1Bs allot ted last year. The debate over whether foreign work ers are taking jobs isnt new, but for years it cen tered on low-wage sec tors like agriculture and construction. The highskilled visas have thrust a new sector of Amer ican workers into the fray: the middle class. Last month, three tech advocacy groups launched a labor boy cott against Infosys, IBM and the global stafng and consulting company Manpower Group, citing a pattern of excluding U.S. work ers from job openings on U.S soil. They say Manpower, for example, last year posted U.S. job open ings in India but not in the United States. We have a shortage in the industry all right a shortage of fair and eth ical recruiting and hir ing, said Donna Con roy, director of Bright Future Jobs, a group of tech professionals ght ing to end what it calls discriminatory hir ing that is blocking us ... from competing for jobs we are qualied to do. Infosys spokesman Paul de Lara responded that the rm encourages diversity recruitment, while spokesman Doug Shelton said IBM con siders all qualied can didates without regard to citizenship and immigration status. Manpower issued a statement saying it adopts the highest ethical stan dards and complies with all applicable laws and regulations when hiring individuals. VISAS FROM PAGE A1 CHARLES BABINGTONAssociated PressWASHINGTON The legal, humanitarian and political constraints facing the Obama administration as it copes with thousands of Central American children entering the country il legally came into sharp focus in a series of inter views Sunday. A George W. Bush-era law to address human trafcking prevents the government from returning the children to their home countries without taking them into custody and eventually through a depor tation hearing. Minors from Mexico and Can ada, by contrast, can be sent back across the border more easily. The administration says it wants more exibility under the law. Even if Congress agrees, however, the change might do little to ease the partisan quarreling and com plex logistical and humanitarian challenges surrounding the issue. Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson said Sunday the administration has dramatically sped up the process ing of adults who enter the country illegally, and it is opening more de tention facilities. He ac knowledged that the unaccompanied children from Central America, some 9,700 taken into custody in May alone, pose the most vexing problem. All persons, regardless of age, face a deportation proceeding if they are caught en tering the country il legally, Johnson said. The administration, he said, is looking at ways to create additional options for dealing with the children in particu lar, consistent with our laws and our values. Repeatedly pressed to say whether thousands of Central Amer ican children will be deported promptly, Johnson said, we need to nd more efcient, effective ways to turn this tide around gener ally, and weve already begun to do that. Several Republicans, and even a Democrat, said the administration has reacted too slow ly and cautiously to the crisis. More than 50,000 unaccompanied minors have been caught on the U.S.-Mexico border this year. Most are from Gua temala, Honduras and El Salvador, where a spike in violence and poverty are prompting parents to send their children on difcult and dangerous journeys north. Their numbers have overwhelmed feder al agencies. When 140 would-be immigrants mostly mothers with children were own to southern California to ease an overcrowded Texas facility, an gry residents of Murrie ta greeted the bus as it pulled into town, com plaining that they were being asked to do more than their share. This is a failure of di plomacy, it is a failure of leadership from the administration, said Texas Gov. Rick Perry, who sought the 2012 GOP presidential nom ination. Rep. Henry Cuellar, D-Texas, said the administration is one step behind a major dilemma that was fore seeable. The number of children coming from Central America with out adults has been rising dramatically for several years. President Barack Obama is asking Congress for more money and authority to send the children home, even as he also seeks ways to allow millions of other people already living in the U.S. illegal ly to stay. The Bush-era law requires unaccompanied children to be handed over to the Department of Health and Human Services for care and housing. Unlike Mexican or Canadian children, the Central Amer icans must be taken into custody and given a de portation hearing before they can be returned to their home countries. A possible change to the Bush-era law could give Border Patrol agents more leeway in handling these children. Unaccompanied Central American children generally are be ing released to relatives already in the United States. Mothers with their children often are released with a notice to appear later in im migration court. Meanwhile, word of seemingly successful border crossings reaches their home countries, encouraging oth ers to try. Johnson said the U.S. government is try ing to send the mes sage that all persons who enter the country illegally will face deportation proceedings eventually. In Central America, he said, the criminal smuggling or ganizations are putting out a lot of disinforma tion about supposed free passes into this country that will expire soon. Were cracking down on the smuggling organizations by surg ing law enforcement re sources, Johnson said.Child immigrant crisis poses legal, political hurdles AP FILE PHOTO Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson arrives to testify before the House Committee on Homeland Security in Washington about the growing problem of unaccompanied children crossing the border into the United States. BEBETO MATTHEWS / AP Jay Palmer, a whistleblower against Infosys, an Indian rm that eventually paid a hefty ne for H1 B visa infractions, poses during a New York visit, CHARLES BABINGTONAssociated PressRALEIGH, N.C. North Car olina Democratic Sen. Kay Hagan has her Republican oppo nent right where she wants him geographically and, there fore, politically. Thom Tillis is stuck at the state capitol trying to resolve a budget quarrel as speaker of the North Carolina House. Its a spot that helps Hagan emphasize Tillis role leading a Republican-controlled state government that Democrats contend has gone overboard with conservative zeal by restricting access to abortion and the voting booth while cut ting corporate taxes and slashing spending on schools. If Tillis is worried by Hagans portrayal, he doesnt show it. Drinking coffee this past week from a hand-grenade-shaped mug in his no-frills legislative ofce, hes got his own message in his campaign to take Ha gans Senate seat. Obamacare, he said, continues to be a big problem. Similar themes are playing out in other crucial Senate races, as voters have four months to decide which party will control the chamber in the nal two years of Barack Obamas presidency. For Republicans, its all about ty ing Democrats to Obama es pecially to a health care law that remains unpopular with many Americans. And for Democrats, the election is about just about anything else, especially if they can steer attention away from Washington and federal matters. Its a political strategy that sometimes gives the campaigns an inside-out feel, with veteran senators running as if they were rst-timers without a Washington resume to defend or tout. Democrat Mark Pryor has represented Arkansas in the Senate for two terms, yet one of his TV ads begins with a man saying, I remember when Pryor was at torney general. A woman adds that he pursued scam artists that were ripping off seniors. Pryor was state attorney gen eral more than a decade ago, and for just four years, compared to his nearly dozen in the Senate. His harkening back to that time points to his desire to make the election a choice between a fa mous name in Arkansas state politics and rst-term Rep. Tom Cotton, a Republican whom many view as less personable and engaging than Pryor. The GOP strategy, in return, is straightforward. One TV ad has a young girl spelling Pryors name as O-B-A-M-A. The amount spent on the Ha gan-Tillis race about $17 mil lion and climbing is among the nations highest. It comes in a state that few can rival for po litical change in recent years, as Republicans ended a century of frustration by winning control of both legislative cham bers and the governors ofce in 2012. What came next is a conservative revolution that Tillis said hes proud of leading. Hagan and her fellow Democrats argue the Re publicans went too far in a state so closely divided politically that Obama carried it in 2008 and lost it four years later. They believe a bump in teacher pay that Tillis promises lawmakers will enact this summer wont erase North Carolinians memories of the deep cuts to education that Re publicans passed last year. That approach, said Rep. Da vid Price, D-N.C., is Hagans best chance to focus November vot ers attention on something other than Obama. Democrats try to pull focus from Obamacare AP FILE PHOTO North Carolina House Speaker Thom Tillis greets supporters at an election night rally in Charlotte, N.C., after winning the Republican nomination for the U.S. Senate.

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Monday, July 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A11 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 P erhaps, like mine, your in box is being ooded with emails from Barack Obama, Joe Biden and Michelle Obama. President Obama usually says hey or Ann or So, Ann. Biden says Heres the thing, Ann. And Mrs. Obama (Michelle) says Hi or Hi, Ann. Obama wants to thank me in person by telling me to enter a contest to travel to Austin, where, presumably, he will be waiting to meet me although we live just a couple of miles apart in Washing ton. Im not sure why he wants to thank me. He doesnt say. But this is the amazing part. He only wants me to contribute $3 to be eligible for a free ight and ho tel room in Texas and handshake. Michelle is more practical. She wants me to give $10 to have a chance at this opportunity. Unlike regulated contests, however, my friends Barack, Michelle and Joe dont tell me what the chances are of winning. Obviously, political columnists may not participate in such giveaways, let alone contribute to politicians. So if the goal of the emails is to make me give money to Democrats, that email deluge is having no effect. Its the same thing from Republicans, although they want me to give more much more. Hundreds of dollars. Thousands of dollars. Hundreds of millions of dollars. (I am on these email lists by mistake because somehow Republicans are not taking advantage of the personal infor mation out there for free which might indicate that anything in that range is highly implausible.) Messages from the president, vice president and rst lady warn that because Obamas name wont be on the ballot in November, many Democrats may not be motivated to vote or give money. In that case, they note with alarm, Republicans will have enormous amounts of money to fund their candidates and take over the Senate. Joe in particular is worried that the Koch brothers, those astoundingly rich guys (think $1 billion) in Kansas who loathe Obama and everything he stands for, will control the outcome of the autumn election by giving conservative candidates millions of dollars. On the other hand, Bill and Hillary Clinton helped raise between $2 billion and $3 billion for politics and their causes in the past two decades, according to The Wall Street Journal. Republicans wor ry that if Hilary runs for president in 2016 shell have a built-in money advantage. (The two Bush presidents raised $2.9 billion, so presumably if Jeb runs, theyd help.) The 2012 presidential election cost $2 billion. It will cost much more in 2016. This year the Supreme Court weighed in again on the perennial issue of campaign nance, a subject guaranteed to make eyes glaze over but which is incredibly important. The rulings are changing our country, helping to make Washington gridlock permanent. The Court has ruled that just about anything goes when it comes to raising money for candidates. Them what has can give. Special interest groups may raise millions and hide the names of the donors. Seven times the high court headed by Justice John Roberts has ruled by ve-to-four votes to weaken laws designed to prevent the rich from controlling democracy. The court this year had an unusual number of unanimous decisions but not on campaign nance. The latest decision struck down the cap on contributions a donor may give to federal candidates, causing a lot of people to worry that this opens the door to more corruption. Politicians denitely respond to the money that elects them. Oddly, fewer Americans are checking that little box on their tax returns that gives $3 of the taxes they owe (not an additional $3) to help fund the presidential election. If candidates take it, their fundraising is restricted. But candidates know they can rake in more dollars by refusing to take pro-rated money from the public fund. So, fellow voters, expect more political emails in your inbox. How about $3 giving you a chance to meet the president in his home state of Hawaii or $5,000 to watch House Speaker John Boehner play golf in Cincinnati?Ann McFeatters is an op-ed columnist for McClatchy-Tribune. Readers may send her email at amcfeatters@nationalpress.com.OTHERVOICES Ann McFeattersMCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Political emails unrelenting Is there anything sadder than the kill ing of children? Of course not, and no one should be surprised at the shock, distress and outrage in Israel after the bodies of three missing teenagers were found Monday. The boys, kidnapped more than two weeks ago, were apparently shot and then partially bur ied in an open eld near the West Bank vil lage of Halhul. What kind of world, what kind of politics, can possibly justify the abduction of teenagers in the name of ideology or na tionalism or religion or whatever it turns out was the motivation for this gruesome act? If, as Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu suggests, the kidnappings were the work of Hamas, they should serve as a stark reminder that the militant Islamic organization has not changed its ways. Since its founding during the rst intifada in 1987, Hamas has been responsible for countless civilian deaths, and its leaders notwithstanding their recent reconciliation with the Palestinian Authority have not evolved substantially since then. Hamas has not ofcially endorsed a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conict or promised to renounce violence or acknowledged Israels right to exist. Its unclear as yet what its role was, if any, in these most recent events, but its top ofcials loudly celebrated the kidnappings. Hamas obviously cannot be a meaningful partner in the search for peace as long as it remains committed to violence and rejectionism. Hamas will pay, Netanyahu vowed after the boys bodies were found, and indeed, the crackdown is already underway. But Israel must behave carefully and responsibly rather than emotionally. Of course it must defend its citizens against enemies. But Netanyahu must also display the evidence he says he has that Hamas orchestrated the killings. He must minimize civilian casualties and not engage in the collective punishment of people who have done no wrong. He must not undermine those Palestinian leaders, such as President Mahmoud Abbas, who say and do the right things. Israel as well as the Palestinians must nd reasons to come back to the negotiating table rather than seeking excuses to walk away. This conict, like other conicts around the world, has killed many innocent children. The latest deaths must not become a justication for an escalation of violence, for the continued death of innocents or for yet another downward spiral in the depressing and destabilizing war that so often seems to be moving in exactly the wrong direction.Distributed by MCT Information Services.AVOICEIsrael vs. Hamas: Moving in the wrong direction again? Classic DOONESBURY 1976Messages from the president, vice president and first lady warn that because Obamas name wont be on the ballot in November, many Democrats may not be motivated to vote or give money. In that case, they note with alarm, Republicans will have enormous amounts of money to fund their candidates and take over the Senate. Joe in particular is worried that the Koch brothers, those astoundingly rich guys (think $1 billion) in Kansas who loathe Obama and everything he stands for, will control the outcome of the autumn election by giving conservative candidates millions of dollars.

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DENNIS PASSAAssociated PressLONDON Novak Djokovic won his second Wimbledon title and denied Roger Federer his record eighth by outlasting the Swiss player in ve sets Sun day. Djokovic wasted a 5-2 lead, and a match point, in the fourth set but held on for a 6-7 (7), 6-4, 7-6 (4), 5-7, 6-4 Centre Court victory that returned the Ser bian player to the No. 1 ranking. It was Djokovics sev enth Grand Slam title and broke a streak of three consecutive loss es in major nals and in ve of his past six. In the last set, Djokovic broke in the nal game with the help of four mistakes by Feder er to seal the win. After the players met at the net, Djokovic went to the middle of the court, knelt down and plucked out a piece of grass and ate it, sim ilar to what he did in 2011 when he won his rst title here. Trailing 5-4 in the fourth set, Federer dou ble-faulted to make it 30-30. He then put a backhand into the net to set up a champion ship point for Djokovic. The 32-year-old Federer then hit a serve that was ruled out, but he challenged it and the Hawk-Eye replay showed that it hit the line for an ace one of his 29 in the match. Federer went on to break in the next game before forcing a fth set. I was hoping that Roger was going to miss the rst serve, but that didnt happen, Djokov ic said. It rarely happens. Thats why he has 17 Grand Slams and hes been the most suc cessful player ever, be cause in important mo ments, he comes up with his best shots and top game. Djokovic said it was difcult to stay focused heading into a deciding set. Of course, after dropping a fourth set, it wasnt easy to regroup and compose myself and nd that necessary energy to win the fth, Djokovic said. I dont know how I managed to do it.SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 7, 2014www.dailycommercial.comMLB: Pitching leads Marlins past Cards / B4 MARK LONGAssociated PressDAYTONA BEACH Aric Almirola has won the rain-delayed and rain-shortened NASCAR Sprint Cup race at Daytona International Speedway, putting Richard Pettys famed No. 43 in Victory Lane for the rst time since 1999. Almirolas unexpected win came on the same weekend Petty celebrated the 30th anniversary of his 200th win. Petty wasnt around for the festivities, having already left Daytona during one of the many delays. He didnt miss much considering steady rain put a slight damper on the postrace party. The amount of ef fort thats gone into this race team this year with everybody at Richard Petty Motor sports trying to build this race team back to a winning race team, the way its supposed to be, Almirola said in a rain-soaked Victory Lane. Thirty years to the weekend that Richard Petty got his 200th win is really, really special. The Coke Zero 400 was originally sched uled to go off Saturday night, but steady rain forced it to be post poned a day. When it did nally get started Sunday, it was interrupted several more times. BEN CURTIS / AP Novak Djokovic of Serbia kisses the trophy after defeating Roger Federer of Switzerland in the mens singles nal at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships on Sunday in Wimbledon, London. Legendary matchup PAVEL GOLOVKIN / AP Djokovic plays a return to Federer in the fourth set. JOHN RAOUX / AP The Greenbrier Classic Springhouse Trophy is displayed on the 18th tee at the Greenbrier Resort in White Sulphur Springs, W.Va.Former Umatilla standout Lucroy is an All-StarSEE NASCAR | B2 LAURENT CIPRIANI / AP Italys Vincenzo Nibali celebrates on the podium of the Tour de France on Sunday in Shefeld, England. JAMEY KEATENAssociated PressSHEFFIELD, England Italys Vincenzo Nibali dis played his riding smarts at the Tour de France, winning Stage 2 on Sunday and tak ing the yellow jersey after a well-choreographed attack on rivals in the postindus trial English city known for The Full Monty. The Astana team leader nicknamed The Shark for his road savvy took the nal lead in a cycling dance of sorts with other title hope fuls, who took turns in front in the last stretch through a sea of fans from York to Shefeld. Nibali perhaps had more at stake: The 29-year-old rider has won the Italian Giro and Spains Vuelta, but has never captured cy clings showcase event. The victory on Sunday gave him both his rst Tour stage win and yellow jersey, The Full Nibali: Savvy Italian wins second stage of Tour de FranceSEE TOUR | B2 JOHN RABYAssociated PressWHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, W.Va. Angel Cabrera won the Greenbrier Classic on Sunday for his rst non-major victory on the PGA Tour, closing with his second straight 6-under 64 for a two-stroke victory over George McNeill. Cabrera, the 44-year-old Argentine whose only other PGA Tour victories came in the 2007 U.S. Open and 2009 Masters, built a three-shot lead before making things interesting with a pair of late bogeys. He nished at 16-under 264. McNeill shot a season-best 61 for his fourth SEE GOLF | B2 RONALD BLUMAssociated PressNEW YORK The trade that put Jeff Samardzija on a postseason con tender cost him a chance to pitch in his rst All-Star game. A day after Samardzija was dealt from the Chicago Cubs to Oakland, a big league-high six Athletics were picked Sunday for the game at Target Field in Minnesota on July 15. That doesnt include Samardzija, selected as an NL All-Star. Major League Baseball said he is ineligible to play because of the league switch. The right-hander will be introduced with the National League players. Still to be decided is whether he wears a Cubs or As uniform or a generic NL jersey. The former Notre Dame receiv er was 2-7 with a 2.83 ERA and 103 strikeouts for the Cubs. In his debut for Oakland on Sunday, the 29-yearold Samardzija allowed one run in seven innings for a 4-2 victory over Toronto. Oakland has its most All-Stars since 1975: left-handers Sean Doolittle and Scott Kazmir; catcher Derek Norris; rst baseman Brandon Moss; third baseman Josh Donaldson; and out elder Yoenis Cespedes. Former Umatilla High School standout Jonathan Lucroy, now the starting catcher for the Milwaukee Brewers, was named to the Nation al League squad as a reserve. Lucroy currently boasts a .329 batting aver age and has collected nine homers and 44 RBI. Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter, playing his 20th and nal season, was chosen for his 14th All-Star team and will start for the ninth time. Among the big names bypassed entirely were slugger David Ortiz and closer Koji Uehara from World Se ries champion Boston, San Francis co catcher Buster Posey, and Dodgers pitcher Josh Beckett. Also elected by fans to start for the AL were Detroit rst baseman Miguel Cabrera, Donaldson, and outelders Jose Bautista of Toronto, Adam Jones of Baltimore and Mike Trout of the Los Angeles Angels.Almirola wins delayed race at DaytonaSEE TENNIS | B2SEE ALL-STARS | B2Angel Cabrera wins Greenbrier Classic by 2Novak Djokovic outlasts Roger Federer in 5-set Wimbledon marathon

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 7, 2014 SUNmon tu es we dthursfriSatLeesburgLightningJuly 612WinterParkAW AY1pmAll-StarGame@SANFORD7pmDelandAW AY7pmDelandHOME6pmWinterParkAW AY7pm AUTO RACING NASCAR Sprint Cup-Coke Zero 400 Results Sunday At Daytona International Speedway Daytona Beach Lap length: 2.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (15) Aric Almirola, Ford, 112 laps, 111.4 rating, 47 points, $377,176. 2. (30) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 112, 74.6, 42, $237,655. 3. (40) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 112, 120.8, 43, $187,680. 4. (22) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 112, 88.5, 41, $172,113. 5. (23) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 112, 84.1, 39, $179,916. 6. (37) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 112, 101.8, 38, $135,370. 7. (27) Michael McDowell, Ford, 112, 77, 37, $122,770. 8. (29) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 112, 86.8, 36, $127,045. 9. (34) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 112, 87.2, 36, $150,536. 10. (18) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 112, 76.4, 34, $140,565. 11. (38) Terry Labonte, Ford, 112, 56.5, 33, $128,643. 12. (9) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 112, 69.8, 33, $154,696. 13. (43) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 112, 60.2, 31, $124,843. 14. (7) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 112, 56.9, 30, $117,785. 15. (19) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 112, 63, 29, $136,843. 16. (21) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 112, 74.1, 28, $136,574. 17. (28) Joey Logano, Ford, 112, 95.4, 27, $144,501. 18. (26) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 111, 54.8, 26, $149,093. 19. (41) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 111, 40.6, 25, $113,735. 20. (6) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 111, 67, 25, $152,021. 21. (32) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 104, 65, 24, $115,793. 22. (8) David Ragan, Ford, accident, 102, 86.5, 23, $120,957. 23. (33) Josh Wise, Ford, 101, 58.7, 21, $102,635. 24. (20) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 100, 59.2, 20, $110,010. 25. (31) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, accident, 98, 72.5, 19, $109,460. 26. (4) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet, accident, 98, 67.1, 18, $97,710. 27. (14) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, accident, 97, 96.9, 17, $116,460. 28. (39) Kyle Busch, Toyota, accident, 97, 79.3, 16, $149,676. 29. (10) Greg Bife, Ford, accident, 97, 108, 16, $140,785. 30. (36) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, accident, 97, 88.7, 15, $134,749. 31. (3) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, accident, 97, 88.5, 0, $96,810. 32. (42) Ryan Truex, Toyota, accident, 97, 63.4, 12, $95,735. 33. (2) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, accident, 97, 74.3, 12, $96,635. 34. (17) Cole Whitt, Toyota, accident, 97, 59.7, 10, $95,460. 35. (1) David Gilliland, Ford, accident, 97, 90.2, 10, $111,285. 36. (35) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 69, 27.4, 8, $121,480. 37. (11) Carl Edwards, Ford, 66, 36.4, 7, $113,948. 38. (25) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 46, 33.8, 0, $89,240. 39. (13) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 46, 32, 5, $126,273. 40. (12) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 45, 47.7, 5, $115,398. 41. (16) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 37, 34.1, 3, $113,065. 42. (5) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, accident, 20, 48.3, 2, $127,176. 43. (24) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, accident, 19, 29.4, 1, $69,740. Pocono IndyCar 500 Results Sunday At Pocono Raceway Long Pond, Pa. Lap length: 2.5 miles (Starting position in parentheses) All cars Dallara chassis 1. (1) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 200 laps. 2. (7) Helio Castroneves, Chevrolet, 200. 3. (3) Carlos Munoz, Honda, 200. 4. (10) Ryan Briscoe, Chevrolet, 200. 5. (15) Scott Dixon, Chevrolet, 200. 6. (11) Simon Pagenaud, Honda, 200. 7. (12) Mikhail Aleshin, Honda, 200. 8. (21) Josef Newgarden, Honda, 200. 9. (5) Marco Andretti, Honda, 200. 10. (2) Will Power, Chevrolet, 200. 11. (8) Tony Kanaan, Chevrolet, 200. 12. (6) James Hinchcliffe, Honda, 199. 13. (13) Ed Carpenter, Chevrolet, 199. 14. (16) Justin Wilson, Honda, 199. 15. (19) Sebastian Saavedra, Chevrolet, 199. 16. (18) Sebastien Bourdais, Chevrolet, 199. 17. (17) Charlie Kimball, Chevrolet, 198. 18. (9) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Honda, 181. 19. (14) Graham Rahal, Honda, 157, electrical. 20. (20) Carlos Huertas, Honda, 89, electrical. 21. (4) Takuma Sato, Honda, 25, electrical. 22. (22) Jack Hawksworth, Honda, 0, did not start. BASEBALL 2014 All-Star Rosters Rosters for the MLB All-Star game on July 15 at Target Field, Minneapolis. AMERICAN LEAGUE STARTERS Catcher Matt Wieters, Orioles (inactive) First Base Josh Donaldson, Athletics Second Base Robinson Cano, Mariners Third Base Miguel Cabrera, Tigers Shortstop Derek Jeter, Yankees Outeld Jose Bautista, Blue Jays; Mike Trout, Angels; Adam Jones, Orioles Designated Hitter Nelson Cruz, Orioles RESERVES Pitchers Dellin Betances, RHP, Yankees Mark Buehrle, LHP, Blue Jays Yu Darvish, RHP, Rangers Sean Doolittle, LHP, Athletics Felix Hernandez, RHP, Mariners Greg Holland, RHP, Royals Scott Kazmir, LHP, Athletics Jon Lester, LHP, Red Sox Glen Perkins, LHP, Twins David Price, LHP, Rays Max Scherzer, RHP, Tigers Masahiro Tanaka, RHP, Yankees Catchers Derek Norris, Athletics Salvador Perez, Royals Kurt Suzuki, Twins Inelders Jose Abreu, White Sox Jose Altuve, Astros Adrian Beltre, Rangers Edwin Encarnacion, Blue Jays Brandon Moss, Athletics Alexei Ramirez, White Sox Outelders Michael Brantley, Indians Yoenis Cespedes, Athletics Alex Gordon, Royals Designated Hitters Victor Martinez, Tigers MLB.Com Final Vote Candidates LHP Dallas Keuchel, Astros RHP Corey Kluber, Indians RHP Garrett Richards, Angels RHP Rick Porcello, Tigers LHP Chris Sale, White Sox NATIONAL LEAGUE STARTERS Catcher Yadier Molina, Cardinals First Base Paul Goldschmidt, Diamondbacks Second Base Chase Utley, Phillies Third Base Aramis Ramirez, Brewers Shortstop Troy Tulowitzki, Rockies Outeld Andrew McCutchen, Pirates; Carlos Gomez, Brewers; Yasiel Puig, Dodgers RESERVES Pitchers Madison Bumgarner, LHP, Giants Aroldis Chapman, LHP, Reds Johnny Cueto, RHP, Reds Zack Greinke, RHP, Dodgers Clayton Kershaw, LHP, Dodgers Craig Kimbrel, RHP, Braves Pat Neshek, RHP, Cardinals Francisco Rodriguez, RHP, Brewers Tyson Ross, RHP, Padres Jeff Samardzija, RHP, Cubs/As (inactive) Julio Teheran, RHP, Braves Adam Wainwright, RHP, Cardinals Tony Watson, LHP, Pirates Jordan Zimmermann, RHP, Nationals Catchers Jonathan Lucroy, Brewers Devin Mesoraco, Reds Inelders Matt Carpenter, Cardinals Starlin Castro, Cubs Todd Frazier, Reds Freddie Freeman, Braves Dee Gordon, Dodgers Daniel Murphy, Mets Outelders Charlie Blackmon, Rockies Josh Harrison, Pirates Hunter Pence, Giants Giancarlo Stanton, Marlins MLB.Com Final Vote Candidates 3B Casey McGehee, Marlins 1B Justin Morneau, Rockies 3B Anthony Rendon, Nationals 1B Anthony Rizzo, Cubs OF Justin Upton, Braves GOLF Alstom Open de France Leading Scores Sunday At Le Golf National (Albatross Course) Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, France Purse: $4.1 million Yardage: 7,331; Par: 71 Final Graeme McDowell, Northern Ireland 70-69-73-67 279 Kevin Stadler, United States 64-68-72-76 280 Thongchai Jaidee, Thailand 70-69-69-72 280 Robert Karlsson, Sweden 73-69-70-69 281 Jamie Donaldson, Wales 67-72-74-69 282 Matthew Baldwin, England 70-71-70-71 282 Michael Hoey, Northern Ireland 73-66-73-71 283 Victor Riu, France 68-67-73-76 284 Fabrizio Zanotti, Paraguay 73-70-75-67 285 Oliver Fisher, England 69-71-77-68 285 Wade Ormsby, Australia 70-75-69-72 286 Gregory Bourdy, France 73-72-72-70 287 Kristoffer Broberg, Sweden 70-74-72-71 287 Magnus A. Carlsson, Sweden 73-72-70-72 287 Matthew Nixon, England 71-72-70-74 287 Damien McGrane, Ireland 71-69-72-75 287 Martin Kaymer, Germany 72-68-70-77 287 Also Joost Luiten, Netherlands 73-69-73-73 288 Stephen Gallacher, Scotland 66-73-74-75 288 Bernd Wiesberger, Austria 70-70-71-77 288 TV2DAY SCOREBOARD FCSL STANDINGS W L .Pct GB Sanford 16 9 .640 Winter Park 15 11 .577 1.5 Winter Garden 14 12 .538 2.5 Leesburg 12 10 .545 2.5 DeLand 9 15 .375 6.5 College Park 7 16 .304 8 SUNDAYS GAMESLeesburg at Winter Park, canceled DeLand at College Park, canceled Winter Garden at Sanford, canceled TODAYS GAMESNone scheduledTUESDAYS GAMEFCSL All-Star Game, at Sanford, 7 p.m. ARENA LEAGUE FOOTBALL 8 p.m. ESPN2 Orlando at Philadelphia CYCLING 8 a.m. NBCSN Tour de France, stage 3, Cambridge, England to London MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7 p.m.ESPN N.Y. Yankees at Cleveland7:10 p.m.SUN Kansas City at Tampa Bay 9:40 p.m. FS-Florida Miami at ArizonaThere were three red ags, two of them because of huge accidents that took out most of the 43-car eld and several top contenders. Jimmie Johnson, Tony Stewart, Kev in Harvick, Jamie McMurray, Carl Edwards, Kasey Kahne, Greg Bife and Kyle Busch were among those knocked out of contention. NASCAR FROM PAGE B1 and sent a message that he could contend to take it home from Paris in three weeks. With about a mile left, Nibali escaped a 21-man breakaway bunch at the end of the 125-mile course over nine heath-covered hills of Yorkshire, and held off their late surge. England is hosting the rst three Tour stages this year.GERMAN STRIPPED OF YELLOW JERSEYMarcel Kittel, a power ful German sprinter who often struggles on climbs, trailed nearly 20 min utes back and lost the yel low jersey that he had cap tured by winning Stage 1. While the Italian won the battle to the line, under the shadow of a black Shefeld Forgemasters tower, de fending champion Chris Froome of Britain and twotime winner Alberto Contador of Spain are focusing more on the overall race which ends July 27 on Par is Champs-Elysees. Overall, Nibali leads 20 other riders by two sec onds, including Froome in fth place and Contador in eighth. A six-man breakaway bunch tried its chances early, but got swallowed up by the pack with some 20 miles left. Then, the big race stars moved to the front, splitting the pack. Contador, Froome, and Americans Andrew Talansky and Tejay van Garderen all spent time at the front. At times, they mustered bursts of speed or zipped across with width of the road in tactical maneuvers. In the nale, a lot of contenders were making moves: Nibali ended up taking two seconds on us, Froome said. Its not a big margin. For me, it was about staying out of trou ble to stay at the front, and avoiding any major issues or splits. Im tired, but I hope everyones tired after a day like today.TIME TO WORK, ASTANADave Brailsford, boss of Froomes Team Sky, said the leaders actually were all hesitant, because nobody wanted the jersey. In the cycling playbook, the yellow shirt brings both glory and responsibility. Brailsford said: Astana will have to now defend it, which is pretty good for anybody else. Nibali didnt dare claim he might keep it all the way to Paris, saying the Tour de France doesnt stop here: We have three weeks to go, and very tough and tricky stages lie ahead. Mondays stage should be a far less grueling ride: Riders cover 96 miles from university town Cambridge to London, where the pack will nish on the Mall not far from Big Ben and Westminster Abbey. TOUR FROM PAGE B1 The Greenbrier Classic Leading Scores Sunday At The Old White TPC White Sulphur Springs, W.Va. Purse: $6.5 million Yardage: 7,287; Par 70 Final Angel Cabrera (500), $1,170,000 68-68-64-64 264 -16 George McNeill (300), $702,000 70-67-68-61 266 -14 Webb Simpson (190), $442,000 71-69-67-63 270 -10 Keegan Bradley (96), $227,036 67-69-69-66 271 -9 Bud Cauley (96), $227,036 69-68-70-64 271 -9 Brendon Todd (96), $227,036 71-67-67-66 271 -9 Billy Hurley III (96), $227,036 68-63-67-73 271 -9 Chris Stroud (96), $227,036 66-66-70-69 271 -9 Cameron Tringale (96), $227,036 72-66-64-69 271 -9 Will Wilcox (96), $227,036 68-69-65-69 271 -9 Charlie Beljan (62), $137,800 67-69-71-65 272 -8 Jason Bohn (62), $137,800 65-72-68-67 272 -8 Joe Durant (62), $137,800 65-71-66-70 272 -8 Steve Marino (62), $137,800 69-70-66-67 272 -8 Michael Thompson (62), $137,800 66-72-64-70 272 -8 Sang-Moon Bae (52), $91,186 66-74-66-67 273 -7 Danny Lee (52), $91,186 65-71-71-66 273 -7 Troy Merritt (52), $91,186 66-72-68-67 273 -7 Kevin Chappell (52), $91,186 67-65-69-72 273 -7 David Lingmerth (52), $91,186 67-68-69-69 273 -7 Jim Renner (52), $91,186 65-70-68-70 273 -7 Bubba Watson (52), $91,186 68-67-69-69 273 -7 Patrick Cantlay (47), $62,400 69-68-69-68 274 -6 Bill Haas (47), $62,400 69-70-65-70 274 -6 J.B. Holmes (47), $62,400 68-68-69-69 274 -6 Ted Potter, Jr. (41), $44,236 70-70-68-67 275 -5 Robert Allenby (41), $44,236 67-70-68-70 275 -5 Luke Guthrie (41), $44,236 67-69-68-71 275 -5 Scott Langley (41), $44,236 68-71-67-69 275 -5 Andrew Loupe (41), $44,236 69-69-67-70 275 -5 Patrick Reed (41), $44,236 67-69-71-68 275 -5 David Toms (41), $44,236 69-69-68-69 275 -5 Camilo Villegas (41), $44,236 68-67-67-73 275 -5 Johnson Wagner (41), $44,236 68-68-71-68 275 -5 Jonas Blixt (32), $28,698 64-73-68-71 276 -4 Brice Garnett (32), $28,698 68-66-72-70 276 -4 Davis Love III (32), $28,698 67-73-65-71 276 -4 Carl Pettersson (32), $28,698 71-68-70-67 276 -4 Michael Putnam (32), $28,698 67-72-67-70 276 -4 Scott Stallings (32), $28,698 70-69-70-67 276 -4 Kyle Stanley (32), $28,698 71-68-66-71 276 -4 Shawn Stefani (32), $28,698 73-67-67-69 276 -4 Steve Stricker (32), $28,698 66-68-68-74 276 -4 Tom Watson (32), $28,698 71-68-68-69 276 -4 Chris Kirk (23), $18,219 65-69-75-68 277 -3 Richard H. Lee (23), $18,219 71-68-67-71 277 -3 Troy Matteson (23), $18,219 72-61-71-73 277 -3 Patrick Rodgers, $18,219 65-75-68-69 277 -3 Andres Romero (23), $18,219 72-68-67-70 277 -3 Heath Slocum (23), $18,219 70-69-68-70 277 -3 Josh Teater (23), $18,219 69-69-70-69 277 -3 Stephen Ames (17), $15,158 69-68-71-70 278 -2 Charles Howell III (17), $15,158 67-71-68-72 278 -2 Justin Leonard (17), $15,158 71-67-69-71 278 -2 Kevin Na (17), $15,158 66-70-71-71 278 -2 top-10 of the season and rst since mid-March. Webb Simpson had a 63 to nish third at 10 under. Third-round leader Bil ly Hurley III bogeyed four of the rst six holes to fall out of contention. He shot 73 and nished in a sev en-way tie for fourth at 9 under. No third-round lead er has hung on to win the Greenbrier Classic in its ve-year existence. McNeill was the clubhouse leader at 14 under well ahead of Cabrera, who still had the back nine to play. Cabrera had no top 10-finishes this season entering the tournament, but had everything work ing Sunday, hammering drives and approach shots with precision and coming up with clutch putts, espe cially on the back nine. Cabrera overtook McNeill with birdie putts of 17 and 7 feet on the 11th and 12th holes, then gave a st pump after moving to 17 under by holing a 176-yard 8-iron up the hill for eagle on the par-4 13th, the hardest hole at Old White TPC. By then his lead was three strokes, but he bo geyed the 14th after his approach shot spun off the front of the green and bogeyed the par-3 15th after hitting into the rough on his tee shot. Cabrera smashed a 330yard drive over the lake on the par-4 16th and made par, then drilled a 336yard drive on the 616-yard 17th and two-putted for birdie. He closed out with par on the par-3 18th. Cabrera won $1.2 mil lion and is projected to im prove from 158th to 54th in the FedEx Cup stand ings. McNeill would move from 60th to 29th. Joining Hurley at 9 under were Bud Cauley (64), Kea gan Bradley (66), Brendon Todd (66), Chris Stroud (69), Cameron Tringale (69) and Will Wilcox (69). GOLF FROM PAGE B1 Federer said it was dramatic match. You know going into a match with Novak, its always going to be tough, Federer said. It had every thing for fans to like, the swing of momentum in the rst set, him coming back in the second and third, all the back and forth in the fourth set and all the dra mas in the fth. Boris Becker, a three-time Wimbledon champion and Djokovics coach, paid tribute to both players. Roger played unbelievable today, Becker said. Its the best Roger Ive seen in years and it couldve gone either way in the fth set. Novak digs deep and nds another way, his sense of not giving up, giving it al ways another try. Djokovic had 27 unforced errors in the match while Federer had 29. Djokovic broke Federer four times while Federer converted three of his seven break points. There had been only one service break through the rst three sets before a string of three straight in the fourth as Djokovic took a 4-2 lead before holding serve again. Djokovic returns to the top ranking for the rst time since last Septem ber, taking over from Ra fael Nadal, who lost in the fourth round here. The Serbian player rst rose to No. 1 when he won Wimbledon in 2011, although he was already guaranteed of securing the top ranking even before beating Nadal in that nal. Djokovic fell awkwardly in the rst game of the second set and called for a trainer immediately after he broke Federers serve. The trainer worked on Djokovics left ankle. Djokovic again called for the trainer after the third game of the nal set. TENNIS FROM PAGE B1 Baltimores Matt Wieters, side lined by season-ending elbow sur gery on June 17, was elected to start at catcher and will be replaced by Minnesotas Kurt Suzuki, Kansas Citys Salvador Perez or Norris. Orioles bopper Nelson Cruz, tied for the major league home run lead with 27, was voted in by fans at des ignated hitter after serving a 50game suspension last year for vio lating baseballs drug agreement. Elected to the NL starting line up were Arizona rst baseman Paul Goldschmidt, Philadelphia second baseman Chase Utley, Colorado shortstop Troy Tulowitzki, Milwau kee third baseman Aramis Ramirez and St. Louis catcher Yadier Mo lina along with outelders Carlos Gomez of Milwaukee, Andrew McCutchen of Pittsburgh and Yasiel Puig of the Los Angeles Dodgers. Top rookies Masahiro Tanaka of the Yankees and Jose Abreu of the Chicago White Sox were picked for the AL squad. Surprise selections included Pitts burgh utilityman Josh Harrison and left-hander Tony Watson, and St. Louis reliever Pat Neshek. Milwaukee closer Francisco Ro driguez made his fth All-Star team, his rst since 2009. Bautista, at 5.68 million, received the most votes for the second time in four years. Tulowitzki topped the NL at 5.35 million. Other players omitted despite strong credentials were Cincinnati pitcher Alfredo Simon, Seattle third baseman Kyle Seager and San Diego closer Huston Street, who had con verted 23 consecutive save chances before allowing a tying home run in the ninth Saturday. Milwaukee outelder Ryan Braun and Toronto outelder Melky Cabrera, who like Cruz served lengthy drug-related suspensions, also were left out. The candidates in online voting for the nal AL spot are all pitchers: Houstons Dallas Keuchel, Cleve lands Corey Kluber, Los Angeles Garrett Richards, Detroits Rick Por cello and Chicagos Chris Sale. ALL-STARS FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, July 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Baltimore 48 40 .545 7-3 W-2 23-21 25-19 Toronto 47 43 .522 2 2 3-7 L-4 25-21 22-22 New York 44 43 .506 3 3 4-6 W-1 18-23 26-20 Tampa Bay 40 50 .444 9 9 8-2 W-2 19-25 21-25 Boston 39 49 .443 9 9 4-6 L-2 21-24 18-25 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 48 36 .571 6-4 L-2 23-21 25-15 Kansas City 45 42 .517 4 2 5-5 L-2 21-22 24-20 Cleveland 43 44 .494 6 4 6-4 W-2 25-16 18-28 Chicago 42 47 .472 8 6 6-4 W-1 24-21 18-26 Minnesota 39 48 .448 10 8 3-7 L-1 21-22 18-26 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 55 33 .625 7-3 W-4 28-15 27-18 Los Angeles 51 36 .586 3 7-3 W-4 30-14 21-22 Seattle 48 40 .545 7 6-4 L-1 21-22 27-18 Texas 38 50 .432 17 10 3-7 L-1 18-23 20-27 Houston 36 54 .400 20 13 2-8 L-7 20-26 16-28 NATIONAL LEAGUEEAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 49 39 .557 9-1 L-1 25-19 24-20 Washington 48 39 .552 7-3 W-2 28-18 20-21 Miami 43 45 .489 6 5 4-6 W-2 27-22 16-23 New York 39 49 .443 10 9 3-7 W-1 19-22 20-27 Philadelphia 37 51 .420 12 11 1-9 L-3 18-27 19-24 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 52 37 .584 5-5 L-1 24-18 28-19 Pittsburgh 47 41 .534 4 1 8-2 W-3 29-20 18-21 St. Louis 47 42 .528 5 2 4-6 L-2 24-19 23-23 Cincinnati 45 42 .517 6 3 6-4 W-1 21-19 24-23 Chicago 38 48 .442 12 9 6-4 L-2 19-20 19-28 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Los Angeles 50 40 .556 6-4 L-1 22-23 28-17 San Francisco 48 39 .552 3-7 W-1 25-23 23-16 San Diego 39 48 .448 9 9 6-4 L-1 24-24 15-24 Colorado 37 51 .420 12 11 2-8 W-1 21-21 16-30 Arizona 37 53 .411 13 12 4-6 W-1 15-30 22-23 SATURDAYS GAMESBoston 3, Baltimore 2, 1st game Minnesota 2, N.Y. Yankees 1, 11 innings Seattle 3, Chicago White Sox 2, 14 innings Tampa Bay 7, Detroit 2 Cleveland 7, Kansas City 3 Baltimore 7, Boston 4, 2nd game Texas 5, N.Y. Mets 3 L.A. Angels 11, Houston 5 Oakland 5, Toronto 1SATURDAYS GAMESMiami 6, St. Louis 5 Washington 13, Chicago Cubs 0 Pittsburgh 3, Philadelphia 2 Atlanta 10, Arizona 4 Colorado 8, L.A. Dodgers 7 Milwaukee 1, Cincinnati 0 San Francisco 5, San Diego 3, 10 innings Texas 5, N.Y. Mets 3SUNDAYS GAMESCleveland 4, Kansas City 1 N.Y. Mets 8, Texas 4 Baltimore 7, Boston 6, 12 innings N.Y. Yankees 9, Minnesota 7 Chicago White Sox 1, Seattle 0 L.A. Angels 6, Houston 1 Oakland 4, Toronto 2 Tampa Bay at Detroit, lateSUNDAYS GAMESCincinnati 4, Milwaukee 2 N.Y. Mets 8, Texas 4 Arizona 3, Atlanta 1 Washington 2, Chicago Cubs 1 Pittsburgh 6, Philadelphia 2 Miami 8, St. Louis 4 San Francisco5, San Diego 3 L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, lateALEX BRANDON / APWashington Nationals third baseman Ryan Zimmerman throws a ball hit by Chicago Cubs Starlin Castro for the last out of the game on Sunday at Nationals Park in Washington. The Nationals won 2-1. TODAYS GAMESBaltimore (Tillman 7-4) at Washington (Strasburg 7-6), 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Undecided) at Cleveland (Masterson 4-5), 7:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Carroll 2-5) at Boston (Buchholz 3-4), 7:10 p.m. Kansas City (Shields 8-4) at Tampa Bay (Odorizzi 4-7), 7:10 p.m. Houston (Cosart 8-6) at Texas (Mikolas 0-0), 8:05 p.m. San Francisco (Vogelsong 5-5) at Oakland (J.Chavez 6-5), 10:05 p.m. Toronto (Happ 7-4) at L.A. Angels (Weaver 9-6), 10:05 p.m. Minnesota (Correia 4-10) at Seattle (Iwakuma 6-4), 10:10 p.m.TODAYS GAMESBaltimore (Tillman 7-4) at Washington (Strasburg 7-6), 7:05 p.m. Atlanta (Minor 2-5) at N.Y. Mets (Matsuzaka 3-3), 7:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (E.Jackson 5-8) at Cincinnati (Leake 6-7), 7:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Hamels 2-5) at Milwaukee (Estrada 7-5), 8:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Morton 5-9) at St. Louis (Wainwright 11-4), 8:15 p.m. San Diego (Kennedy 6-9) at Colorado (Matzek 1-2), 8:40 p.m. Miami (Koehler 6-6) at Arizona (C.Anderson 5-4), 9:40 p.m. San Francisco (Vogelsong 5-5) at Oakland (J.Chavez 6-5), 10:05 p.m.AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Altuve, Houston, .338; Beltre, Texas, .335; VMartinez, Detroit, .328; Cano, Seattle, .323; Brantley, Cleveland, .319; MiCabrera, Detroit, .311; AJones, Baltimore, .309. RUNS: Dozier, Minnesota, 62; Kinsler, Detroit, 60; Brantley, Cleveland, 58; Donaldson, Oakland, 58; Encarna cion, Toronto, 57; Trout, Los Angeles, 57; Bautista, Toronto, 56. RBI: NCruz, Baltimore, 70; Encarnacion, Toronto, 70; JAbreu, Chicago, 69; MiCabrera, Detroit, 67; Trout, Los An geles, 63; Donaldson, Oakland, 62; Moss, Oakland, 62. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 121; AJones, Baltimore, 110; MeCabrera, Toronto, 109; Kinsler, Detroit, 107; Marka kis, Baltimore, 106; Cano, Seattle, 104; Brantley, Cleveland, 101; Rios, Texas, 101. DOUBLES: MiCabrera, Detroit, 32; Altuve, Houston, 26; Kinsler, Detroit, 26; AEscobar, Kansas City, 24; Pedroia, Boston, 24; Plouffe, Minnesota, 24; EEscobar, Minnesota, 23; AGordon, Kansas City, 23; Trout, Los Angeles, 23. TRIPLES: Rios, Texas, 8; Bourn, Cleveland, 7; Eaton, Chicago, 6; Gardner, New York, 6; Trout, Los Angeles, 5; JJones, Seattle, 4; Kiermaier, Tampa Bay, 4. HOME RUNS: JAbreu, Chicago, 27; NCruz, Baltimore, 27; Encarnacion, Toronto, 26; VMartinez, Detroit, 21; Trout, Los Angeles, 20; Donaldson, Oakland, 19; Moss, Oakland, 19; Ortiz, Boston, 19; Pujols, Los Angeles, 19. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 37; Ellsbury, New York, 23; RDavis, Detroit, 22; AEscobar, Kansas City, 21; Andrus, Texas, 19; JJones, Seattle, 17; LMartin, Texas, 17. PITCHING: Tanaka, New York, 12-3; Porcello, Detroit, 11-4; FHernandez, Seattle, 10-2; Kazmir, Oakland, 10-3; Scherzer, Detroit, 10-3; Buehrle, Toronto, 10-6; Richards, Los Angeles, 9-2; Lackey, Boston, 9-6; Weaver, Los An geles, 9-6; Lester, Boston, 9-7. ERA: FHernandez, Seattle, 2.11; Tanaka, New York, 2.27; Kazmir, Oakland, 2.53; Buehrle, Toronto, 2.60; Darvish, Texas, 2.63; Lester, Boston, 2.73. STRIKEOUTS: Price, Tampa Bay, 153; FHernandez, Seattle, 145; Scherzer, Detroit, 139; Darvish, Texas, 134. SAVES: Rodney, Seattle, 25; Holland, Kansas City, 23; Perkins, Minnesota, 20; DavRobertson, New York, 20.NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Tulowitzki, Colorado, .350; Lucroy, Milwaukee, .333; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, .322; MaAdams, St. Louis, .320; McGehee, Miami, .317; Morneau, Colorado, .314; Gennett, Milwaukee, .310. RUNS: Tulowitzki, Colorado, 66; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 63; Pence, San Francisco, 61; FFreeman, Atlanta, 60; Rendon, Washington, 60; Stanton, Miami, 60; Rizzo, Chicago, 56. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 62; Morneau, Colorado, 59; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 56; Desmond, Washington, 53; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 53; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 53; McGehee, Miami, 52. HITS: McGehee, Miami, 106; DanMurphy, New York, 105; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 104; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 104; Pence, San Francisco, 103; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 102; Stanton, Miami, 101. DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 32; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 30; SCastro, Chicago, 26; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 26; Span, Washington, 26; FFreeman, Atlanta, 25; Utley, Philadelphia, 24. TRIPLES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 9; BCrawford, San Francisco, 8; Yelich, Miami, 6; Braun, Milwaukee, 5; Ow ings, Arizona, 5; Rendon, Washington, 5. HOME RUNS: Stanton, Miami, 21; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 18; Byrd, Philadelphia, 17; Frazier, Cincinnati, 17; Rizzo, Chicago, 17; JUpton, Atlanta, 17; Gattis, Atlanta, 16. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 42; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 35; Revere, Philadelphia, 25; EYoung, New York, 22; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 21; Rollins, Philadelphia, 16. PITCHING: Simon, Cincinnati, 11-3; Wainwright, St. Louis, 11-4; Greinke, Los Angeles, 11-4; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 10-2; Lohse, Milwaukee, 9-3; Ryu, Los Angeles, 9-4; WP eralta, Milwaukee, 9-5; JDe La Rosa, Colorado, 9-6. ERA: Wainwright, St. Louis, 1.89; Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.99; Teheran, Atlanta, 2.29; HAlvarez, Miami, 2.33; Beckett, Los Angeles, 2.37; Hudson, San Francisco, 2.53; Greinke, Los Angeles, 2.66. STRIKEOUTS: Strasburg, Washington, 131; Cueto, Cincinnati, 130; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 120; Greinke, Los Angeles, 119; Kennedy, San Diego, 116. SAVES: Kimbrel, Atlanta, 27; FrRodriguez, Milwaukee, 27; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 26; Jansen, Los Angeles, 26. Marlins 8, Cardinals 4 Miami St. Louis ab r h bi ab r h bi Yelich lf 5 2 2 0 MCr pnt 3b 4 0 0 0 Lucas 2b 6 0 1 0 Hollidy lf 3 0 0 0 Stanton rf 5 1 2 0 Bourjos ph-cf 2 1 2 0 McGeh 3b 4 2 2 1 MAdms 1b 5 1 4 1 Ozuna cf 4 0 2 2 Craig rf-lf 4 0 0 1 JeBakr 1b 4 1 2 2 YMolin c 2 0 0 0 Sltlmch c 4 1 1 3 T .Cruz ph-c 0 0 0 0 Hchvrr ss 5 0 1 0 T avers cf-rf 4 0 0 0 HAlvrz p 4 1 3 0 W ong 2b 4 2 2 1 Bour ph 1 0 0 0 Descals ss 4 0 1 1 Gregg p 0 0 0 0 Gonzals p 1 0 0 0 DJnngs p 0 0 0 0 Maness p 1 0 1 0 Hatchr p 0 0 0 0 Grenwd p 0 0 0 0 Ja y ph 1 0 0 0 Motte p 0 0 0 0 Choate p 0 0 0 0 M.Ellis ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 42 8 16 8 T otals 36 4 10 4 Miami 100 003 040 8 St. Louis 000 000 121 4 DPMiami 1, St. Louis 1. LOBMiami 14, St. Louis 8. 2BHechavarria (11), Bourjos (6), Ma.Adams (20), Descalso (5). HRSaltalamacchia (9), Wong (2). SB Ma.Adams (3). IP H R ER BB SO Miami H.Alvarez W,6-3 7 5 1 1 1 3 Gregg 2/3 2 2 2 1 0 Da.Jennings 1/3 2 1 1 0 1 Hatcher 1 1 0 0 0 0 St. Louis Gonzales L,0-2 4 2/3 7 1 1 5 5 Maness 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Greenwood 2 5 3 3 1 1 Motte 1 4 4 4 1 1 Choate 1 0 0 0 0 0 Da.Jennings pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. HBPby H.Alvarez (Y.Molina). WPGregg. UmpiresHome, Tim Timmons; First, Tim Welke; Sec ond, Todd Tichenor; Third, Clint Fagan. T:13. A,160 (45,399). Yankees 9, Twins 7 Ne w York Minnesota ab r h bi ab r h bi Gardnr lf 3 1 0 0 Dozier 2b 5 1 1 0 Jeter ss 4 1 3 2 Nunez ss 5 1 2 0 Ellsury cf 5 2 2 4 P armel 1b-cf 5 0 1 1 Teixeir 1b 5 0 2 1 Wlngh lf 3 1 0 0 McCnn c 5 0 1 1 Arcia rf 4 0 2 1 Beltran dh 4 0 0 0 KSuzuk c 5 1 1 0 BRorts 2b 4 1 1 0 Plouffe 3b 4 2 3 2 ISuzuki rf 4 2 3 0 Colaell dh 3 1 2 2 KJhnsn 3b 4 2 2 0 Fuld cf 3 0 1 0 ZeWhlr 3b 0 0 0 0 KMorls ph-1b 1 0 0 0 Totals 38 9 14 8 T otals 38 7 13 6 New York 240 300 000 9 Minnesota 000 400 111 7 EKe.Johnson (9), Kuroda (1). DPNew York 2, Minnesota 1. LOBNew York 5, Minnesota 8. 2BEllsbury (18), McCann (9), K.Suzuki (18), Plouffe (25), Colabello (12). HREllsbury (5), Plouffe (6), Colabello (6). SFJeter. IP H R ER BB SO New York Kuroda W,6-6 5 2/3 7 4 4 2 3 Warren 1 1/3 2 1 1 1 2 Ji.Miller 1 1 1 1 1 0 Dav.Robertson S,21-23 1 3 1 1 0 2 Minnesota Nolasco L,5-7 2 7 6 6 1 0 Swarzak 3 4 3 3 0 1 Thielbar 2 1 0 0 1 0 Guerrier 2 2 0 0 0 0 WPKuroda. BalkSwarzak. UmpiresHome, Rob Drake; First, Alan Porter; Second, Joe West; Third, Marty Foster. T:11. A,171 (39,021). Mets 8, Rangers 4 T exas Ne w York ab r h bi ab r h bi Choo lf 5 0 1 0 Gr ndrs rf 2 2 0 0 Andrus ss 4 0 0 0 DnMr p 2b 4 0 1 1 Rios rf 5 1 1 1 DWrght 3b 4 0 0 0 ABeltre 3b 4 1 1 0 Duda 1b 3 1 1 1 LMartn cf 4 1 2 2 Niwnhs lf 2 3 1 1 Chirins c 4 1 1 1 Lagar s cf 4 1 1 1 C.Pena 1b 3 0 1 0 Reck er c 4 1 1 3 Poreda p 0 0 0 0 T ejada ss 3 0 2 1 Feliz p 0 0 0 0 ZaWhlr p 1 0 0 0 Odor 2b 4 0 1 0 Evelnd p 0 0 0 0 Tepsch p 2 0 1 0 Black p 0 0 0 0 Choice ph 1 0 1 0 EY ong ph 1 0 0 0 Frasor p 0 0 0 0 Ger mn p 0 0 0 0 Gimenz ph-1b 1 0 0 0 F amili p 0 0 0 0 BAreu ph 1 0 0 0 Mejia p 0 0 0 0 Totals 37 4 10 4 T otals 29 8 7 8 Texas 000 100 030 4 New York 500 001 11x 8 DPTexas 1. LOBTexas 8, New York 4. 2BChoo (14), C.Pena (2), Odor (4), Dan.Murphy (20), Duda (18), Tejada (8). HRRios (4), L.Martin (4), Chirinos (9), Nieuwenhuis (2), Recker (3). SBNieuwenhuis (1), Lagares (2). CSDuda (2). SZa.Wheeler. IP H R ER BB SO Texas Tepesch L,3-4 6 5 6 6 4 4 Frasor 1 1 1 1 1 0 Poreda 0 0 1 1 1 0 Feliz 1 1 0 0 0 0 New York Za.Wheeler W,4-8 6 1/3 6 1 1 2 4 Eveland 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 Black 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Germen 1/3 3 3 3 0 1 Familia H,7 2/3 1 0 0 0 1 Mejia 1 0 0 0 0 1 Poreda pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. UmpiresHome, Marvin Hudson; First, D.J. Reyburn; Second, Jim Joyce; Third, Doug Eddings. T:21. A,213 (41,922). Indians 4, Royals 1 Kansas City Cle veland ab r h bi ab r h bi L.Cain rf 4 0 1 0 Kipnis 2b 4 1 1 0 Hosmer 1b 4 0 1 0 A Carer ss 4 0 1 0 S.Perez c 4 0 0 0 Brantly cf 4 0 2 1 Ibanez lf 4 0 0 0 CSantn 1b 4 1 1 1 Valenci dh 4 0 0 0 Rabur n rf 4 1 1 0 Mostks 3b 2 1 1 1 T .Holt rf 0 0 0 0 AEscor ss 3 0 0 0 Swisher dh 3 0 1 0 JDyson cf 3 0 1 0 YGoms c 4 1 2 2 C.Colon 2b 3 0 0 0 Chsnhll 3b 3 0 0 0 A viles lf 3 0 1 0 Totals 31 1 4 1 T otals 33 4 10 4 Kansas City 000 010 000 1 Cleveland 030 010 00x 4 DPKansas City 1. LOBKansas City 4, Cleveland 6. 2BHosmer (22), Y.Gomes (12), Aviles (8). HRMoustakas (10), C.Santana (13), Y.Gomes (10). SBJ. Dyson (14). IP H R ER BB SO Kansas City Duffy L,5-8 6 10 4 4 0 6 S.Downs 1 0 0 0 0 1 B.Chen 1 0 0 0 1 0 Cleveland Kluber W,8-6 8 1/3 4 1 1 1 10 Allen S,9-10 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 UmpiresHome, Eric Cooper; First, Tom Hallion; Second, Angel Campos; Third, Chris Guccione. T:32. A,991 (42,487). Reds 4, Brewers 2 Milw aukee Cincinnati ab r h bi ab r h bi Gennett 2b 4 0 0 1 BHmltn cf 4 0 0 0 Segura ss 3 0 0 0 F razier 1b 4 1 2 0 Lucroy c 4 0 0 0 Phillips 2b 3 1 2 0 CGomz cf 4 0 0 0 Br uce rf 4 2 1 3 ArRmr 3b 3 0 1 0 Lud wck lf 3 0 0 0 KDavis lf 3 0 0 0 Broxtn p 0 0 0 0 Overay 1b 3 0 0 0 Mesorc c 4 0 3 1 LSchfr rf 3 2 2 0 Cozar t ss 3 0 1 0 Gallard p 2 0 0 0 RSantg 3b 3 0 0 0 RWeks ph 1 0 1 1 Latos p 3 0 0 0 WSmith p 0 0 0 0 Heise y lf 0 0 0 0 Totals 30 2 4 2 T otals 31 4 9 4 Milwaukee 000 001 010 2 Cincinnati 200 000 02x 4 LOBMilwaukee 2, Cincinnati 5. 2BL.Schafer (9). 3BL.Schafer (1). HRBruce (8). IP H R ER BB SO Milwaukee Gallardo 7 8 2 2 0 3 W.Smith L,1-2 1 1 2 2 1 1 Cincinnati Latos W,2-1 8 4 2 2 1 3 Broxton S,6-8 1 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby Gallardo (Ludwick). UmpiresHome, Jordan Baker; First, Jerry Meals; Second, Paul Emmel; Third, Chris Conroy. T:38. A,923 (42,319). Diamondbacks 3, Braves 1 Arizona Atlanta ab r h bi ab r h bi Inciart cf 3 0 0 0 BUpton cf 4 0 0 0 A.Hill 2b 4 0 0 0 ASmns ss 4 0 2 0 Gldsch 1b 3 1 2 2 FF rmn 1b 4 0 1 0 Prado 3b 4 1 1 0 J.Upton lf 2 1 0 0 DPerlt lf 4 0 1 0 He ywrd rf 4 0 0 0 C.Ross rf 2 0 0 0 CJhnsn 3b 4 0 1 1 EMrshl p 0 0 0 0 LaStell 2b 4 0 2 0 Ziegler p 0 0 0 0 Bthncr t c 4 0 1 0 Kschnc ph 0 0 0 0 A.W ood p 2 0 0 0 Evans ph 1 0 1 1 Uggla ph 0 0 0 0 A.Reed p 0 0 0 0 JW aldn p 0 0 0 0 Gswsch c 4 0 0 0 V arvar p 0 0 0 0 Ahmed ss 3 0 0 0 A vilan p 0 0 0 0 Miley p 1 1 0 0 Doumit ph 1 0 0 0 GParra rf 1 0 0 0 Totals 30 3 5 3 T otals 33 1 7 1 Arizona 002 000 001 3 Atlanta 000 100 000 1 EA.Wood (2). DPArizona 1, Atlanta 2. LOBArizona 4, Atlanta 8. 2BEvans (1). HRGoldschmidt (16). SBPrado (2). IP H R ER BB SO Arizona Miley W,4-6 6 2/3 5 1 1 1 8 E.Marshall H,11 1/3 0 0 0 1 1 Ziegler H,22 1 1 0 0 1 1 A.Reed S,20-24 1 1 0 0 0 1 Atlanta A.Wood L,6-7 7 3 2 2 3 2 J.Walden 1 0 0 0 1 1 Varvaro 2/3 1 1 1 0 2 Avilan 1/3 1 0 0 0 0 UmpiresHome, Toby Basner; First, Scott Barry; Second, Jeff Nelson; Third, Laz Diaz. T:43. A,709 (49,586). Nationals 2, Cubs 1 Chicago W ashington ab r h bi ab r h bi Sweeny lf 4 0 1 0 Span cf 4 2 2 0 Ruggin cf 4 0 2 0 Rendon 2b 4 0 0 0 Rizzo 1b 5 0 2 0 W erth rf 3 0 0 1 SCastro ss 4 0 0 1 LaRoch 1b 2 0 0 0 Valuen 3b 4 0 0 0 Zmr mn 3b 3 0 1 1 Schrhlt rf 4 0 1 0 Har per lf 3 0 0 0 JoBakr c 2 0 2 0 Dsmnd ss 3 0 2 0 Barney 2b 3 0 1 0 WRams c 3 0 2 0 Arrieta p 2 0 0 0 Zmr mn p 2 0 0 0 Coghln ph 1 1 1 0 Storen p 0 0 0 0 Schlittr p 0 0 0 0 Ble vins p 0 0 0 0 Castillo ph 1 0 0 0 Hair stn ph 1 0 0 0 Strop p 0 0 0 0 Clipprd p 0 0 0 0 RSorin p 0 0 0 0 Totals 34 1 10 1 T otals 28 2 7 2 Chicago 000 000 100 1 Washington 100 000 01x 2 DPChicago 2. LOBChicago 12, Washington 6. 2B Ruggiano (10), Span 2 (28). SBSchierholtz (4). S Sweeney, Barney. SFS.Castro. IP H R ER BB SO Chicago Arrieta 6 4 1 1 3 5 Schlitter 1 1 0 0 0 0 Strop L,1-4 1 2 1 1 1 1 Washington Zimmermann 6 7 0 0 1 5 Storen BS,2-2 2/3 2 1 1 1 0 Blevins 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 Clippard W,6-2 1 1 0 0 1 1 R.Soriano S,21-23 1 0 0 0 0 0 WPArrieta. UmpiresHome, Mike Everitt; First, Paul Schrieber; Second, Ted Barrett; Third, Will Little. T:12. A,941 (41,408). Pirates 6, Phillies 2 Philadelphia Pittsburgh ab r h bi ab r h bi Revere cf 4 0 1 0 GP olnc rf 4 0 0 0 CHrndz 2b 4 0 0 0 JHr rsn lf-3b 4 2 1 0 Rollins ss 4 1 0 0 AMcCt cf 4 2 2 1 Byrd rf 4 1 2 2 NW alkr 2b 3 1 1 1 Mayrry 1b 3 0 0 0 RMar tn c 3 1 1 2 Asche 3b 3 0 1 0 I.Da vis 1b 3 0 0 0 DBrwn lf 3 0 0 0 GSnchz ph-1b 0 0 0 0 Rupp c 2 0 0 0 P Alvrz 3b 2 0 0 0 Utley ph 1 0 0 0 SMar te lf 1 0 1 1 K.Hill c 0 0 0 0 Mercer ss 3 0 1 1 ABrntt p 1 0 0 0 Lock e p 1 0 0 0 Howard ph 1 0 0 0 Mr tnz ph 0 0 0 0 DeFrts p 0 0 0 0 JHughs p 0 0 0 0 Diekmn p 0 0 0 0 Totals 30 2 4 2 T otals 28 6 7 6 Philadelphia 100 000 100 2 Pittsburgh 201 000 03x 6 EAsche (8), P.Alvarez (18). DPPittsburgh 2. LOB Philadelphia 2, Pittsburgh 7. 2BR.Martin (8). 3BJ. Harrison (4), A.McCutchen (4). HRByrd (18). SBN. Walker (2). SLocke 2. SFN.Walker, Mercer. IP H R ER BB SO Philadelphia A.Burnett L,5-8 7 5 3 3 2 7 De Fratus 0 1 2 1 0 0 Diekman 1 1 1 1 2 2 Pittsburgh Locke W,2-1 8 3 2 1 1 4 J.Hughes 1 1 0 0 0 0 De Fratus pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. HBPby Diekman (G.Sanchez). UmpiresHome, Dale Scott; First, Dan Iassogna; Second, CB Bucknor; Third, Tripp Gibson. T:43. A,408 (38,362). White Sox 1, Mariners 0 Seattle Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi EnChvz cf 3 0 0 0 Eaton cf 4 0 0 0 MSndrs rf 3 0 0 0 GBckh 2b 4 0 0 0 Cano 2b 3 0 0 0 Gillaspi 3b 0 1 0 0 Hart dh 3 0 1 0 LeGarc pr-3b 1 0 0 0 Seager 3b 4 0 0 0 JAreu 1b 4 0 1 0 Morrsn 1b 4 0 0 0 A.Dunn dh 1 0 0 0 Buck c 4 0 0 0 AlRmrz ss 3 0 0 0 Ackley lf 4 0 2 0 V iciedo rf 3 0 0 0 BMiller ss 4 0 2 0 Sier ra rf 0 0 0 0 De Aza lf 3 0 0 0 Nieto c 3 0 1 0 Totals 32 0 5 0 T otals 26 1 2 0 Seattle 000 000 000 0 Chicago 100 000 00x 1 EG.Beckham (9). LOBSeattle 9, Chicago 9. 2BNi eto (4). SBCano (7). SEn.Chavez. IP H R ER BB SO Seattle T.Walker L,1-1 4 2 1 1 5 3 Leone 2 0 0 0 1 3 Maurer 2 0 0 0 1 2 Chicago Noesi W,3-6 6 2/3 5 0 0 2 5 Surkamp H,3 1/3 0 0 0 1 0 Petricka S,3-4 2 0 0 0 0 2 HBPby Leone (Gillaspie). WPT.Walker 2, Noesi. UmpiresHome, Lance Barrett; First, Ron Kulpa; Sec ond, Dana DeMuth; Third, Ed Hickox. T:50. A,370 (40,615).

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 7, 2014 GERALD IMRAYAP Sports WriterRIO DE JANEIRO Nigeria is not backing down after sacking its entire national football federation leadership, ignoring a FIFA directive and moving closer to a ban from internationals for the reigning African champion. A weekend meet ing of football and gov ernment ofcials in the capital Abuja endorsed the earlier sacking of Nigeria Football Feder ation President Aminu Maigari and his execu tive committee for not solving a player pay ment dispute during the World Cup. Ofcials said in a statement Sun day they were planning new elections. The NFF is now be ing led by an ofcial appointed by the sports minister. World body FIFA, which doesnt allow governments to inter fere in football affairs, said it would not recog nize Saturdays meeting and has given Ni geria until Tuesday to reinstate Maigari or face sanctions. That would likely involve banning the countrys nation al team and clubs from playing in continental or international tourna ments, and could leave players like Chelseas John Obi Mikel and Liv erpools Victor Moses frozen out of next years African Cup in Moroc co, where Nigeria is due to defend its title. Maigari was also ar rested on his return from the World Cup in Brazil and delegates at the emergency meeting said they blamed him for embarrassing Nige ria at the tournament by not resolving the bonus dispute. Nigeria reached the second round for the rst time since 1998 but had its campaign marred by the payment dispute, where play ers rebelled against the federation after not receiving their money for making the last 16 of the showcase. A statement from the meeting said Maigaris NFF had failed to ful ly and rmly resolve is sues of nance with the Super Eagles ahead of the championship. The ofcials also said they want an investigation into the nances of the NFF under Maigari. The temporary NFF administration said Sunday that the meet ing endorsing his ring was valid, opposing the stance of FIFA, which said the congress had no authority. Dont forget that in as much as we respect FIFAs law, we can not jettison our own law here, said Obinna Ogba, a delegate at the congress. Nigeria and Algeria progressed from their groups at the World Cup to give Africa two teams in the last 16 for the rst time. However, the con tinents reputation was also badly damaged as Nigeria, Cameroon and Ghana all had their tournaments under mined by disputes between players and ofcials over money. Cameroon and Ghana, which both failed to win a game in Brazil, have ordered investigations into their World Cup embarrassments. Nigeria was temporarily banned by FIFA for government inter ference after the 2010 World Cup when the countrys president said he was withdrawing the team from internation al competition until it improved. DAN GELSTONAP Sports WriterLONG POND, Pa. Juan Pablo Montoya has won the IndyCar race at Pocono Race way, the highlight of a triumphant return to open wheel racing af ter seven years in NA SCAR. Helio Castroneves was second to make it a 1-2 nish Sunday for team owner Roger Penske. Montoya won for the rst time in the CART/IndyCar Series since 2000 and had his rst major victory since he won a road course race at Watkins Glen in NASCAR in 2010. With double points awarded in the 500mile races, Castroneves moved into a tie for the points lead with Team Penske teammate Will Power. Power was hit with a blocking penalty on Castroneves late in the race and had to serve a drive through penalty, costing him a shot at racing for the win. He nished 10th. Carlos Munoz, Ryan Briscoe and Scott Dixon completed the top ve. Montoya, who won from the pole, took the lead for good when Tony Kanaan was forced to pit for fuel with four laps left. Montoya took it from there and continued to stamp himself a player in the champi onship hunt. As soon as we signed him, I knew he would be an asset for us, and a headache, Castroneves said. Montoya damaged his front wing when he connected with Power on a pass for the lead on the 167th lap. Pow ers penalty troubles continued at Pocono when he blocked Castroneves on the 171st lap, effectively ending his shot at victory. Montoya, the 1999 CART champion and 2000 Indianapolis 500, winner took the check ered ag to the sight of hundreds of Colombi an fans waving the ag and cheering him on. Montoya wanted a competitive ride again after lackluster results driving for Chip Ganas si in NASCAR. He knew his open wheel return would have a learning curve: Montoya last ran in CART in 2000, then left Formula One midway through the 2006 season for NASCAR. After only two top 10s in his rst seven starts, Montoya reeled off a third, second and sev enth in his past three. Now, he has a win needed to validate his open wheel comeback. Are you kidding? This guy is unbelievable, Castroneves said. Coming back after 15 years to win a race, he did a great job. The 200-lap race was caution free for the rst 158 laps until Graham Rahal spun to bring out the yellow. The 158 con secutive laps of green ag racing to open a race was the longest stretch for a 500-mile race in IndyCar history. *UnlessOtherwiseNotedontheSchedule Yo uMaketheCA LL !This We eksLeesburgLightningScheduleAlw ay sFREEAdmission! RainoutInformation 352-234-4489 Yo uMaketheCA LL !July7-13This We eksLeesburgLightningScheduleAlw ay sFREEAdmission! GameTimes: 7pm We ekdays Sun5pm*THEPLAY:R2isonsecondandR3isonthirdwithone out.B5getsahittotheoutfield.R3scoreseasily,but R2isout at home.B5advancstosecondonthethrow home.Afterallplayingactionstopsandamoundconferenceoccurs,F1comessetandthrowstofirstbase, ap pealingthatB5missedfirstbase.Thebaseumpire ag reees. Whatstheruling?RainoutInformation 352-234-4489 Mon.7/7................OffDay Tu es.7/8................All-StarGame(atSanford) We d.7/9................OffDay Thurs.7/10..............Deland(away) Fri.7/11..............Deland(home) Sat.7/12..............WinterPark(away) Sun.7/13..............Deland(home)ANSWERonFriday This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule AUTO RACING HASSAN AMMAR / AP Nigerias Joseph Yobo, left, and Frances Mathieu Debuchy go for a header during the World Cup round of 16 soccer match between France and Nigeria. WORLD CUP BASEBALL R.B. FALLSTROMAP Sports WriterST. LOUIS Hen derson Alvarez worked seven stingy innings and started the key ral ly with the rst of his career-best three hits, helping the Miami Mar lins beat the St. Lou is Cardinals 8-4 Sun day to take two of three from their spring training partners. Casey McGehee ex tended his hitting streak to a career-high 13 games with an RBI single in the rst. Mar cell Ozuna had a tworun single in a threerun sixth that made it 4-0, and Jarrod Salta lamacchias three-run homer off Jason Motte put Miami up 8-1 in the eighth. The rst two games of the series were decided by one run. The Marlins have won a franchise-re cord 10 straight games started by Alvarez (63), and they easily took the series nale despite stranding 14 runners. Alvarez is 4-0 with a 1.04 ERA during that stretch, allowing no more than two runs in any outing. Kolten Wong, just off the 15-day disabled list, homered in the seventh for the lone run against Alvarez. Matt Adams had a career-best four hits, including an RBI double. Cardinals rookie Mar co Gonzalez (0-2) allowed a run in 4 2-3 in nings despite giving up seven hits and walk ing ve in his third ca reer start since being recalled from Double-A Springeld. He yielded ve runs in each of his rst two starts. Alvarez struck out to end the second and then had a hit in three consecutive at-bats. MATT SLOCUM / AP Juan Pablo Montoya, second from left, hoists the trophy with Pocono Raceway president Brandon Igdalsky, second from right, after Montoya won the Pocono IndyCar 500 on Sunday, in Long Pond, Pa. Montoya victorious in IndyCar event at Pocono RacewayAre you kidding? This guy (Montoya) is unbelievable. Coming back after 15 years to win a race, he did a great job.Helio Castroneves,second-place nisherNigeria heading fror FIFA ban over governmental interference TOM GANNAM / AP Miami Marlins Jarrod Saltalamacchia follows through on a three-run home run in the eighth inning against the St. Louis Cardinals on Sunday in St. Louis. Alvarez, Saltalamacchia lead the way as Marlins defeat Cardinals 8-4

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LivingHealthySend your health news to features@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 7, 2014STUDY: Questions UN strategies to save mothers / C6 Health check www.dailycommercial.com MARIA CHENGAssociated PressOn a recent morn ing in London, Lara Thomson practiced spinning on benches, swinging from metal bars and balancing off raised ledges all elements of a daredevil discipline known as parkour. What was unusual about the scene is that Thomson is 79 and all of her classmates are over 60. They are members of a unique weekly class for seniors in a sport more commonly known for gravity-defying jumps than helping people with ar thritis. Invented in the 1980s in France, parkour is a sport usually favored by extremely nimble people who move freely through any terrain using their own strength and exibility, often using urban environments such as benches, buildings and walls as a type of obstacle course. Its also known as free running. The London parkour class of about a dozen students is taught by two instructors who have adapted the sports main elements to a level that can be handled even by those over 60 who have replacement joints or other medical conditions. I wondered whether it was a government plot to get rid of old people when I heard about the class, Thomson joked. She said she has balance problems and that the class helps her feel more condent about getting around. Being able to get outside and do silly things like hugging trees is great, she said, referring to a stretching exercise. While most tness classes aimed at seniors focus on calmer activities such as dance or yoga, experts say parkour is a reasonable, if unorthodox, option. When I rst heard about this, I had a picture in my mind of elderly people jumping off of walls and I thought there was no way this could be appropriate, said Bruce Paton, a physical therapist who works with the elder ly at the Institute of Sport, Exercise and Health at Sporty seniorsClass teaches parkour, known for daredevil youths, to the elderly PHOTOS BY LEFTERIS PITARAKIS / AP ABOVE: Elderly people participate in a unique weekly class for people over 60 called parkour, a ashy discipline usually known for its acrobatic running, climbing and gravity-defying jumps. BELOW: George Jackson, 85, an army veteran and former boxer swings on monkey bars as he participates at a parkour class for elderly people at a park in South London. LAURAN NEERGAARDAssociated PressWASHINGTON Jon Sacker was near death, too sick for doctors to attempt the double lung transplant he so desperately needed. His only chance: An experimental machine that essentially works like dialysis for the lungs. But the device has not been approved by the Food and Drug Ad ministration and there were none in the country. It would take an over night race into Canada to retrieve a Hemolung. Sacker rapidly improved as the de vice cleansed his blood of carbon dioxide so much so that in midMarch, 20 days later, he got a trans plant after all. That machine is a lifesaver, Sack er said from the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.Unapproved device buys time for new pair of lungs JOSEPH FREDERICK / AP This frame grab image from video shows Jon Sacker and his wife Sallie, in his room at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in Pittsburgh, discussing Sackers struggle to survive until a double lung transplant.SEE SENIORS | C2SEE LUNGS | C5 SUMTERVILLE Cornerstone Hospice hosts training for volunteers Pet sitting, stafng fundraising events and ofce work are just some of the things that volunteers do at Cornerstone Hospice. Volunteer training will be offered for interested parties in two classes from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. July 15 and 22 at the Cornerstone Hospice building, 2294 County Road 526 in Sumterville. Pre-registration is required by calling 352-636-2604 or 352-7426895. LEESBURG New Dimensions to host meeting for visually impaired Sponsored by New Vision for Independence, New Dimensions offers rehabilitation, education and sup port services to those with low vision or blindness and their families, and will host guest Brian Sweezea with the Lake County Supervisor of Elec tions ofce, who will discuss tech nology for visually impaired voters, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Friday at IHOP restaurant, 10332 U.S. Highway 441 in Leesburg. For information, call 352-435-5040. LAKE COUNTY LIFE to host July group luncheons for widowedLIFE, a social support group for the widowed, will host three luncheons in July at different locations, beginning with the Leesburg luncheon at 11:30 a.m. on Thursday, at the Leesburg Community Center, 109 E. Dixie Ave., in Venetian Gar dens. Entertainment will be provided by DJ Bob Fowler. The Eustis LIFE luncheon will be at 11:30 a.m. July 16 at Golden Cor ral, 15810 U.S. Highway 441, in Eustis. The third luncheon will be in Lady Lake at the North Lake Presbyterian Church at 11:30 a.m. July 18, at 975 Rolling Acres Road, where the meal will be prepared by church staff and DJ Bob Fowler will once again entertain. Luncheons cost $10 and an RSVP is needed by calling 352-787-0403 or emailing rreed@beyersfhc.com.LAKE COUNTY AARP to offer Smart Driver Safety classes The AARP Driver Safety program helps participants rene their skills in a six-hour class, and upon completion of the course Florida drivers age 50 or older may be eligible for insurance discounts. Cost is $15 for AARP members and $20 for non-members. Payment must be made by check to AARP. No cash or credit cards accepted. Classes will be: July 15 and 17 from 1 to 4 p.m., Harden-Pauli Funeral Home, 1617 S. Bay St., Eustis, call 352-394-0250 to register; August 4 and 6, from 1 to 4 p.m., Leesburg Senior Center, 1211 Penn St., register by calling 352-326-3540; August 4 and 6, from 9 a.m. to noon at the W.T. Bland Public Library, 1995 N. Donnelly St., Mount Dora, register at 352-735-7180.

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 7, 2014 University College London. He is not connected to the program. But when you look at the things theyre doing, its actually quite gentle and could increase their strength and exibility to help them with their daily activities. Still, Paton said parkour could potentially be dangerous for people with serious heart problems and warned anyone with a joint replacement or muscle weakness should be careful. The parkour instructors said everyone who takes the class lls out a health form and they are particularly careful to dissuade participants from doing too much; several students have articial joints, ar thritis or a pacemaker. Every single technique in parkour can be changed so that any one can do it, said Jade Shaw, artistic director of Parkour Dance, who teaches the class. The parkour sessions initially began as a pilot project last year and Shaw is hoping to get more funding to expand it further. For now, the classes are free and held at a Tibetan Buddhist center in South London. I think its very benecial and Im hoping well soon have a lot more older people bouncing around the parks, she said. David Terrace, a health and tness expert for the charity Age U.K., said any efforts to get older people more active should be welcomed. He said adaptations have been made to other sports to help the elderly exer cise more, such as turning soccer into walking soccer and building customized boats to accommodate wheelchairs for sailing. Theres no age limit for exercise, its just about the individual and what they feel comfortable doing, he said. At 85, George Jackson is the oldest participant in the London parkour class. I really enjoy it and wish I could do more, said Jackson, an army veteran and former boxer. I just sometimes forget how old I am and that I cant do certain things. He said he struggles with a swollen ankle and knee but that the class has helped. I was limping around before and now I can walk straight, Jackson said. But I still dont plan to jump off of anything higher than a bench. R.KimEtheredge,D.C.ChiropracticCare withaPersonal To uch rfntbn ttt ntbtCompleteChiropracticCareb352.365.1191tCornerofPicciola Cu toffandHwy44/127bnbbLakeSumterLandingProfessionalPlaza ChiropracticCare withaPersonal To uch rfntbn ttt ntbtCompleteChiropracticCare HARMONYUNITED PSYCHIATRICCARE We are a fullservicepsychiatr y practice dedicated and experienced in working wit h psychiatricpatientstomaintain & improvetheirmentalhealth Psychiatric Evaluation,Diagnosis & Managemen t of: rfnfrt rbr t ftr b tntAdilA.Mohammed,M.D. frtn fr r BrendaS. 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LINDSEY TANNERAssociated PressCHICAGO Bone marrow transplants can reverse severe sickle cell disease in adults, a small study by government scientists found, echoing results seen with a similar technique used in children. The researchers and others say the ndings show age need not be a barrier and that the technique may change practice for some adult patients when standard treatment fails. The transplant worked in 26 of 30 adults, and 15 of them were even able to stop taking drugs that pre vent rejection one year later. Were very pleased, said Dr. John Tisdale, the studys senior author and a senior investigator at the Nation al Institutes of Health. This is what we hoped for. The treatment is a modied version of bone marrow transplants that have worked in kids. Donors are a brother or sister whose stem cell-rich bone marrow is a good match for the patient. Tisdale said doctors have avoided trying standard transplants in adults with severe sick le cell disease because the treatment is so toxic. Children can often tolerate it because the disease typically hasnt taken as big a toll on their bodies, he said. The disease is de bilitating and often life-shortening; patients die on average in their 40s, Tisdale said. Thats one reason why the researchers decided to try the transplants in adults, with hopes that the technique could ex tend their lives. The treatment involves using chemotherapy and radiation to destroy bone marrow before replacing it with healthy donor mar row cells. In children, bone marrow is completely wiped out. In the adult study, the re searchers only partially destroyed the bone marrow, requiring less donor marrow. That marrows healthy blood cells outlast sickle cells and eventually replace them. Sickle cell disease is a genetic condition that damages oxygen-car rying hemoglobin in red blood cells, caus ing them to form ab normal, sickle shapes that can block blood ow through the veins. It can cause anemia, pain and organ dam age. The disease affects about 100,000 Americans, mostly blacks, and millions worldwide. Results from the adult study, involving pa tients aged 29 on average, were published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The usual treatment hadnt worked, a drug called hydroxyurea, and they had transplants at an NIH research hospital in Bethesda, Maryland. The treatment failed to reverse sickle cell in four of the 30 patients and one died of a disease-related complication. Another pa tient died suddenly a few weeks ago an el derly man whose transplant four years ago had been a success. Tisdale said that man had lived longer than the nor mal lifespan for sickle cell patients but that his death was unexpected and an autopsy was to be performed. The researchers are unsure why the technique didnt work for everyone but they note that most patients sur vived more than three years on average, and some patients from an early phase of the study have been off anti-re jection drugs for more than seven years. Tisdale said based on the latest results, adults with severe disease should be offered trans plants if drug treatment doesnt work. One limitation is that few er than 1 out of 4 adults with sickle cell disease likely have siblings who would be a good match. But Tisdale said NIH scientists are studying whether relatives who arent as close a match would also be suitable donors. A JAMA editorial by blood specialists at Washington University in St. Louis said the study shows that limiting the transplants to children should be re considered. These ndings of fer hope, Drs. Allison King and John DiPersio wrote in the editorial.Marrow transplants can reverse adult sickle cell NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH / AP Red blood cells in a patient with sickle cell disease are shown at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md.

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 7, 2014 NEWPATIENT SPECIAL-CompleteExam(D0150)-DigitalXrays(D0210)-Cleaning(D1110)-OralCancerScreening(D0431)withIdenta3000*Non-InsuredPatientsOnly. Allmajorinsurancesaccepted includingPPO&HMOplans.$59* rf n t b nnnYo ur Po diatristtreats... CENTRALFLORI DAFOOTCARE, P. A.Dr Nic k Przystawski,DPM www.Floridafoot.comD004208 D004210 Tu es da y Ju ly 8th,2014 at 3PM JOHN CARLSONAssociated PressMUNCIE, Ind. Theyre lush, beauti ful and ourishing, but gardens arent the only things thriving at Golden Livingcenter nursing home these days. So are the Alzhei mers patients who tend them. It softens the ef fects of an institution al setting, said Laurie Lunsford, the facilitys interactive arts specialist who also oversees the gardening program. It is just a dream. It ex cites me so much to see them blossom. As she spoke, Lunsford was in the big ger of the two fenced gardens, this one frequented by the midstage Alzheimers and dementia patients. The other, smaller garden, also completely fenced, is for the late-stage Alz heimers patients. Both, however, were peace ful, attractive places, verdant and colorful thanks to the profusion of plants, decorations and art the patients also help make, wheth er brightly colored bird houses or a wooden sign reading Bears Tomatoes. Family members and Master Garden ers of Delaware County have been instrumental in providing plants, mulch, work and more for the patients, Lunsford told The Star Press. In the larger garden, 83-year-old Sue Southworth, dressed in pink and looking resplendent in a oppy straw sunhat decorated with fake red roses, was hap pily hoeing a raised po tato patch. This winter, she admitted, being stuck inside had affect ed her adversely, lead ing her to become what she called down. Now? Getting out here real ly does it, Southworth said, brightly, motioning toward her room. I look out the window to see what needs to be done, and Im out here. Shell work out here a couple hours a day, Lunsford said, noting the Alzheimers patients have taken ownership of these gardens where cherry tomato plants line fences, pale-green cabbage plants spread their elephant-ear leaves to the sun and a volunteer sunower already looks to be top ping 10 feet tall. This used to be taken care of by the grounds crew, she continued. Now we take care of it ourselves. Thats not to say there was much of a master plan involved, though. We used what we had and we just plopped them where we thought they would grow, Lunsford said. Meanwhile, the only thing that wasnt grow ing tall back here was the grass, thanks to resident Glen Tapley. One glance and you knew he was no stranger to work. After a word or two, you also knew he was a man of faith, quickly intro ducing the Good Book into his conversation. Im 80 years old and Ive always worked, Tapley said, recalling summers as a kid hoeing tobacco elds in his na tive Kentucky, where his father, a miner, walked him into a coal mine for the rst time at age 18. Turned out it was the last time, too. After 100 yards, Tapley reversed course and walked out, heading north for facto ry work instead. Now he mows the grass in the bigger gar den with a simple push mower, one powered only by his muscles He can tell you about every plant out here, Lunsford said. How it grows, what it needs. From the bigger gar den, which residents can visit unsupervised, to the smaller garden, which residents cant, was a quick walk. In the latter, which is attached to the late-stage Alzhei mers wing, going outside is coveted. I walk down that hall and they know its time to go outside, Lunsford said with a smile, add ing that volunteers willing to just sit out there with the patients are needed. They follow me like the Pied Piper.Alzheimers patients blossom in centers gardens KURT HOSTETLER / AP Golden Livingcenter nursing home Alzheimers patient Forrest Smith uses two cabbage leaves to give himself elephant ears while walking in the garden in Muncie, Ind. LAURAN NEERGAARDAssociated PressWASHINGTON No more dreaded pelvic exam? New guidelines say most healthy women can skip the yearly ritual. Routine pelvic exams dont benet women who have no symptoms of disease and who ar ent pregnant, and they can cause harm, the American College of Physicians said Monday as it recommended that doctors quit using them as a screening tool. Its part of a growing movement to evaluate whether many longtime medical practices are done more out of habit than necessity, and the guideline is sure to be controversial. Scientic evidence just doesnt support the benet of having a pelvic exam every year, said guideline coauthor Dr. Linda Humphrey of the Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Oregon Health & Science University. There will be women who are relieved, and there are women who really want to go in and talk with their doctor about it and will choose to continue this, she added. The recommendations arent binding to doctors or insurers. Indeed, a differ ent doctors group, the American College of Obstetricians and Gy necologists, still rec ommends yearly pelvic exams, even as it ac knowledges a lack of ev idence supporting, or refuting, them. Pelvic exams have long been considered part of a well-wom an visit, and some 62 million were performed in the United States in 2010, the latest available data. Heres what put the test under the microscope: Pap smears that check for cervical cancer used to be done yearly but now are rec ommended only every three to ve years. So if women werent going through that test every year, did they still need the pelvic exam that traditionally accompanied it? Pelvic exams are appropriate for women with symptoms such as vaginal discharge, abnormal bleeding, pain, urinary problems or sexual dysfunction, the ACP said. And women should get their Pap smears on schedule but a Pap doesnt require the extra step of a manual pelvic exam, it said.Most healthy women can skip pelvic exam

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Suit e 90, Or landoCa ll To ll Fr ee:855.802.553 1 Sackers struggle high lights a critical void: There is no fully func tioning articial lung to buy time for someone awaiting a transplant, like patients who need a new heart can stay alive with an implanted heart pump or those with failing kidneys can turn to dialysis. It seems like it should be possible for the lung as well, said Dr. Andrea Harabin of the National Institutes of Health. NIH-funded researchers are working to develop wearable respiratory assist de vices that could do the lungs two jobs sup plying oxygen and getting rid of carbon diox ide without tethering patients to a bulky bed side machine. It has proven challenging. The lung is an amaz ing organ for gas ex change. Its not so easy to develop a mechani cal device that can es sentially replace the function of a lung, said bioengineer William Federspiel of Pitts Mc Gowan Institute for Re generative Medicine, who helped invent the bedside Hemolung and is working on these next-step devices. So when Sacker need ed an emergency x, Dr. Christian Bermudez, UPMCs chief of cardiothoracic transplants, gambled on the unap proved Hemolung. We had no other options, he said. Cystic brosis de stroyed Sackers own lungs. The Moore, Oklahoma, man received his rst double lung transplant in 2012. He thrived until a severe infection last fall damaged his new lungs, spurring rejection. By February, he needed another transplant. The odds were long. Donated lungs are in such short supply that only 1,923 transplants were performed last year, just 80 of them re peats, according to the United Network for Or gan Sharing. Still, the Pittsburgh hospital, known for tackling tough cases, agreed to try only to have Sacker, 33, arrive too debilitated for an operation. A ventilator was providing adequate oxygen. But carbon di oxide had built to toxic levels in his body. When a ventilator isnt enough, todays re course is a decades-old technology so difcult that only certain hos pitals, including Pittsburgh, offer it. Called ECMO, it rests the lungs by draining blood from the body, oxygenating it and removing carbon dioxide, and then re turning it. Sacker was too sick to try. I didnt see any other alternative other than withdrawing support from this young man, Bermudez said. Then he remembered the Hemolung, invent ed by Pittsburgh engineering colleagues as an alternative to ECMO. It was designed to treat patients with a differ ent lung disease, called COPD, during crises when their stiffened lungs retain too much carbon dioxide, Feder spiel said. The Hemolung recently was approved in Europe and Canada; its maker is planning the stricter U.S. testing required by FDA. For Sacker to become the rst U.S. Hemolung patient, hospital safety ofcials would have to agree and notify FDA. We had actually just almost decided to turn the ventilator off, be cause we were putting him through suffering, Sackers wife, Sallie, recalled. Then the phone rang: The experiment was on. But Pittsburgh-based ALung Technologies Inc. couldnt get a device shipped for a few days. Doctors feared Sacker wouldnt live that long. Late at night, ALung CEO Peter DeComo tracked down a device in Toronto, and started driving. It took some ex plaining to get the unap proved medical device past U.S. border of cials. But the next day, Sacker was hooked up, and quickly improved. Federspiel, also an ALung co-founder, said researchers ultimate goal is a fully function ing, portable articial lung. Thousands each year suffer acute lung fail ure from trauma or dis ease that hits too sud denly to even consider transplant. Researchers like Grifth want to test if these experimental technologies could of fer them a better chance to heal than ventilators, which can further damage lungs. Back in Pittsburgh, Sacker is slowly gaining strength with his second set of transplant ed lungs. He doesnt re member the ght for his life; he was sedated through it. But his wife has told him how touch and go it was. You get a call at the last second about a de vice that has never been used here in the United States thats a miracle, he said. LUNGS FROM PAGE C1 AP PHOTO Dr. Christian Bermudez of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center checks patient Jon Sacker, who was being treated with an experimental device called the Hemolung that acts like dialysis for lungs.

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 7, 2014 365-6442ShoppesofLakeVillage(next to LakeSquareMall)PublixShoppingCenter I havesufferedwith teeth problemsallofmyadultlife. rfrnftb ftttt r tft rf ffft ftr t r t tr t t rfftftt ttfft frntfft trffb ftrft MOSTINSURANCESACCEPTEDFINANCING AV AILABLE*X-ray s notincluded.License # DN1438 9FREECONSUL TA TIONNewPatients$85 Va lueDr Va ziri & Staff www. LeadingDental.com r f ntbftf t f *X-Raysnotincluded.Thepatientandanyotherpersonresponsibleforpaymenthasarighttorefusetopay,cancelpaymentorbereimbursedforpaymentforanyotherservice, ex aminationor treatmentwhichisperformedasaresultofanwithin72hoursofrespondingtotheadvertisementfortreatment.Proudlycelebrating20YEARSinLeesburg. Proudly ce lebrating20YEARSinLeesburg.Exp.06/30/2014 D0 0357 9 ysnot in cluded. Ex p. 07/31/2014 MARIA CHENGAssociated PressLONDON In the past decade, billions of dollars have been spent trying to save the lives of mothers in developing countries using strategies usually inexpensive drugs deemed essential by the U.N. health agency. Yet two large analyses of maternal health pro grams including one conducted by the U.N. itself report that the efforts appeared almost useless, raising troubling questions about why all that money was spent. While critics are call ing for the pricey glob al initiatives to be sig nicantly overhauled, the programs are still being implemented de spite little proof they work. The practices mainly involve things like ensuring women giving birth get cheap drugs such as magne sium sulphate to treat labor complications or pre-emptive antibiotics for those getting a cesarean section. Even public health ofcials acknowledge they were taken aback by the studies. Nobody could have been more surprised than I was when we got the results, said Dr. Omrana Pasha of Aga Khan University in Pakistan, who led a study of maternal health interventions in six coun tries in Latin America, Africa and Asia. In clinical medicine, we would not prescribe a drug unless multi ple trials show that it works, she added. The FDA wont allow a drug to be marketed without that evidence. But things are different in public health. At an international meeting of U.N. partners starting Monday in South Africa, health ofcials are getting ready to ask donors for even more money to pour into maternal health programs. Since 2009, the U.S. has invested more than $13 bil lion in maternal and child survival, hoping to save lives by supporting high-impact health interventions. According to the re search papers, includ ing one done in 30 coun tries that tracked more than 300,000 women, scientists found no link between the supposedly life-saving inter ventions and the death rates of women giving birth. Areas that used the interventions didnt have better survival rates for mothers than areas that didnt. The two papers published last year are the biggest to assess the ef fectiveness of mater nal health strategies, although smaller stud ies have previously suggested the methods help. But they gained little traction, perhaps because there doesnt appear to be an easy x. Experts, meanwhile, are largely stumped as to why their methods failed to prevent deaths. We assume that if women get these things, they will be saved. But its too simple to say one plus one equals two, said Dr. Marleen Tem merman, director of WHOs maternal health department. She isnt convinced the interventions dont work. She suspects there were problems imple menting the strategies. Maybe the health facility has the medicine, but the man who has the key to the cupboard is gone, she suggested. Temmerman also said it would be dangerous if donors abruptly slashed their support for mater nal health initiatives. The message is not to stop investing, its to invest money more wisely, she said. Some experts said existing plans should be adjusted. These essential interventions are im portant but they are not enough, said San drine Simon, a public health adviser at Doctors of the World char ity. This is about more than buying the right medicines. But others said major changes were required to save more women. We need to be more honest and serious about past failures otherwise we will keep making the same mistakes, said Bill Easter ly, an economist at New York University. Its not just the fault of countries receiving aid who arent implementing the technology properly, its the fault of Western aid agencies and donors who are not trying hard enough to get it right.Studies question UN strategies to save mothers AP FILE PHOTOTraditional birth attendant Magret Atieno assists Mary Wairimu into a position to give birth, during labor in the Korogocho neighborhood of Nairobi, Kenya.

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Monday, July 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C9 www.dailycommercial.comDiversions352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper.YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, July 7 the 188th day of 2014. There are 177 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On July 7, 1865, four people were hanged in Washington, D.C., for conspiring with John Wilkes Booth to assassinate President Abraham Lincoln. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, July 7, 2014: This year you manifest creativity and determination, though not necessarily together. If you are in an artistic eld, you will see more acknowledgment for your work. If you are single, you are likely to have a very intense love life. If you are attached, you might discover that you have a new addition to the house. For some people, it might be a baby; for others, it could be a puppy, a new roommate or some other change involving your home. Watch a tendency to overspend. SCORPIO is also emotional like you, but does not reveal their feelings as easily. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You might have a lot to think about, as a friend might express a little too much consideration for your comfort level. Your intuition comes into play. Could this person want to coax you in a certain direction? You might feel out of sync with others in general. One person could be particularly demanding. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Defer to others and see a situation for what it is. A loved one or partner could be aloof and touchy. Understand what is going on with this person. Conversations move forward, allowing you to gain insight. You are overly cautious with funds. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Be aware of others needs and what they might require. Your feelings come forward, and you might be hesitant to pursue a certain path. Your sensitivity might be offended by anothers request. Be true to yourself no matter what goes down. CANCER (June 21-July 22) You might want to understand more of what is motivating those around you. They might be coming from a place of negativity, but you can help them turn it around to a more positive attitude. Tap into your creativity. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Make time for what you need and want to do. You might want to take a nap or have a discussion with a family member or roommate. Schedule time for a snooze or talk sometime during the day. Your instincts guide you with a domestic or personal matter. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Return calls while balancing other matters and errands. You could be quite touched by a comment from someone you respect. Be more aware of what is happening within your immediate circle. You might want to share your thoughts with a dear friend, loved one or partner. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Curb a need to be overly possessive and demanding. You want situations to take the twists and turns you would like. You can only create so much, as you only have so much control. Be careful about spending. You easily could make a mistake. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You might go out of your way to ease another persons stress level. Your sensitivity to the moment and other people allows for greater give-andtake. Be sure you want to proceed in your present chosen direction. If you opt to make a commitment, it will be likely to occur, but it will demand endurance. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) You might want to see a situation move in a new direction think again. The ramications and what you would need to do could be more than what you are willing to do. Investigate an unusually creative idea. Could it really work? CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Zero in on an objective outlined in a meeting. You might have a surprising response to this goal. Discuss and debate all you need to in order to root out a problem. You nd that the obligations are far more serious than youd anticipated. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Notice that others look to you for advice and often admire your choices. Your unpredictability throws many people, as they dont understand you well. Often what looks irrational to others is highly logical. You have often thought out your seemingly impulsive actions. Consider sharing your processing more often. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Read between the lines when someone makes what seems like an outrageous statement. Your feelings might be involved, making your detachment a must. What is being said probably has a deeper meaning than you are aware of and possibly has nothing to do with you. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORYDEAR ABBY: I am an ophthalmologist, and all too often I see patients who have already lost some of their vision because they waited too long to schedule an appointment for an eye exam. Many times the reason was limited insurance or they couldnt afford the co-pay. After helping nearly 1.8 million people, EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, continues to match eligible seniors in need with volunteer ophthalmologists who provide a medical eye exam and up to one year of care at no out-ofpocket cost to the patient. This July, as we celebrate our countrys independence, invite your readers to also celebrate their personal independence by getting regular eye exams, especially as they age. Many eye diseases develop later in life. In fact, one in six people age 65 and older has a vision impairment that cannot be corrected with glasses or contact lenses. Please help to save your readers from the falls, injuries, depression and social isolation that are associated with vision loss and join me in spreading the word about EyeCare America. Thank you for your help. CHARLES P. WILKINSON, M.D., CHAIR, EYECARE AMERICA DEAR DR. WILKINSON: Youre welcome. But I am the one who should thank you and the other members of the American Academy of Ophthalmology for their generosity in offering this program to seniors nationwide. Readers, this is important and I know the need is great. To nd out if you or your loved ones qualify for this program, visit www. eyecareamerica.org. (The online application does not request nancial information.) DEAR ABBY: My inlaws are pressuring me to let them take our small children for over nights and trips around the city. Im extremely uncomfortable about it because I dont trust their supervision. They obviously love the kids, and Im happy theyre in our childrens lives as long as they come to our house to visit. There have been several instances in which they made some questionable decisions with respect to supervising my little ones in public. I have so far successfully dodged their requests, but it will be impossible to do it for ever. If I tell them how I and their son feel, they will be hurt, especially because my par ents routinely watch the kids outside our home. Whats the best way to handle this with the least hurt feelings? ST. LOUIS MOMMY DEAR MOMMY: This is something you and your husband will have to discuss with his par ents TOGETHER. If you do it alone, you will forever be blamed for favoring your family over his. When the discussion happens, you should cite your reasons for feeling the way you do. I cant promise there wont be hurt feelings, because there probably already are, but your childrens safety must come rst.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Eligible seniors can sign up for free medical eye exam JEANNE PHILLIPSDEAR ABBY rf nftbWo rkinggalleryoflocalartistsANTIQUEDEA LERSWANTED (352)460-4806 rfntb fa cebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburg D004572 GolfCarAccessible 50% 30% 30%

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C10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 7, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX CROSSWORD PUZZLE

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Monday, July 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHER'S NOTICEFederal and State laws prohibit advertising expressing a discriminatory preference on the basis of race, age, sex, color, national origin, religion, handicap or marital status. The Daily Commercial will not knowingly accept advertisement for employment which is in violation of the law. Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance Employment Classifications are intended to announce bona de employment offers only. Employment advertising must disclose the specic nature of the work being offered. Some employment categories may charge fees. If any advertiser does not comply with these standards, please notify a Classied Sales Representative at 365-8245 or 365-8200.

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Mu st pr esen t coup on at time of ser vi ce Va lid at participating locations only Certain re striction s may apply Call for details.BEY OND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWO OD | UPHOLSTER Y | AIR DUCT728-1668 394-1739fla# CAC18 16 40 8 CARPET CLEANING3$99Cleaning Completed By 7/31/14 Promo Code: JUL Y AIR DUCT CLEANING$50 OFF(MINIMUM CHARGES APPL Y) FL#CAC1816408Cleaning Completed By 7/31/14 Promo Code: JUL Y TILE & GROUT CLEANING15% OFF(MINIMUM CHARGES APPL Y)Cleaning Completed By 7/31/14 Promo Code: JUL YROOMS & A HALL DJOKOVIC TOPS FEDERER FOR WIMBLEDON TITLE, SPORTS B1 HOB NOB: Event allows residents a sneak peek at potential election results A3 NASCAR: Almirola wins rainshortened race at Daytona B1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, July 7, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 188 4 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED C10 COMICS C8 CROSSWORDS C10 DIVERSIONS C9 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 NATION A9 SCOREBOARD B2 SPORTS B1 VOICES A11 STATE/REGION A3 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A12. 89 / 73 Partly sunny, evening T-storms. 50 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com W hen Sunstate Carriers opened its doors in Lake County in 2001, economic incentives served an important role in job creation, company ofcials said. It helped us to cover the expensive advertis ing for people and get ting them to the train ing, Richard Baugh, president of Sunstate Companies, said. But at the same time, he said his compa ny would have creat ed those 20 to 25 jobs without incentives. We would have found a way to make it work as most busi ness people would, he said. You cant let the window of opportunity shut on it. In the coming months, Lake Countys Economic Develop ment and Tourism De partment is evaluating its incentive program to determine whether the countys resources are being used appro priately. The depart ment must come be fore the Lake County Commission for ap proval of any change in its incentive program. While the evaluation has been discussed for months, county of cials said a recent re view of incentives which revealed several outstanding incentive grants with auditing periods that had ex pired brought the is sue to the forefront. Although all job growth incentive grants require an au diting period to make sure the jobs created are retained for a min imum of two years, according to coun ty documents, six in centive grants, from 2004 to 2008, were found to have incom plete reporting. The department distribut ed $287,000 for 78 jobs created but could only verify 18 that were re tained. The county has 13 open incentive ac counts with eight dif ferent companies. The contract agree ments allow for $345,000 in incentive grants associated with the creation of 142 Evaluating incentives Lake County economic director weighs effect on job creation PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: A worker walks past a line of parked tractor-trailer cabs at Sunstate Carriers in Tavares, on Thursday. BELOW: Sunstate workers enjoy a pizza lunch in the workshop for tractor-trailer cabs. DAVE COLLINS Associated Press HARTFORD, Conn. As state ofcials across the country grapple with how to prevent mass killings like the ones at Sandy Hook Ele mentary School in New town and near the Uni versity of California, Santa Barbara, some are turning to a gun seizure law pioneered in Con necticut 15 years ago. Connecticuts law al lows judges to order guns temporarily seized after police present States look to gun seizure law after mass killings LAURA WIDES-MUNOZ and PAUL WISEMAN Associated Press Kelly Parker was thrilled when she land ed her dream job in 2012 providing tech support for Harley-Davidsons Tomahawk, Wis., plants. The divorced mother of three hoped it was the beginning of a new ca reer with the motorcy cle company. The dream didnt last long. Parker claims she was laid off one year lat er after she trained her replacement, a newly arrived worker from In dia. Now she has joined a federal lawsuit alleg ing the global stafng rm that ran Harley-Da vidsons tech support discriminated against American workers in part by replacing them with temporary workers from South Asia. The rm, India-based Infosys Ltd., denies wrongdoing and con tends, as many com panies do, that it has Backlash stirs in US against visas for foreign workers AP FILE PHOTO Jennifer Wedel of Fort Worth, Texas, is photographed at her home after chatting with President Obama via Google. CHRIS CAROLA Associated Press SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. Even after seven decades, Wilfred Spike Mailloux wont talk about surviving a bloody World War II battle unless longtime friend John Sidur is by his side. It was Sidur who found the severely wounded Mailloux hours after both survived Ja pans largest mass suicide at tack in the Pacic. The predawn assault launched 70 years ago Monday on the Ja pan-held island of Saipan nearly wiped out two former New York National Guard bat talions ghting alongside U.S. Marines. He found me in the mud, Mailloux recounted during a visit to the New York State Mil itary Museum to attend a pre sentation on the battles 70th anniversary. Mailloux and Sidur are among the dwindling ranks of WWII veterans of the Armys 27th Infantry Division, which endured some of the blood iest ghting in the Pacic, only to have its reputation be smirched by a volatile Marine general in one of the wars big gest controversies. In the Mariana Islands, 1,400 miles south of Tokyo, Saipan was sought by the Americans as a base for bombing raids against Japan. U.S. forces land ed on Saipan on June 15, 1944, with two Marine divisions, the 2nd and the 4th, making the initial beach assaults and los ing some 2,000 men on the rst day alone. US survivors of WWII battle recall Saipan attack BOB DIAL / AP World War II veterans Wilfred Spike Mailloux, left, and John Sidur, both of Cohoes, N.Y., pose at a presentation on the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Saipan at the New York State Military Museum on June 7 in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. In the Mariana Islands, 1,400 miles south of Tokyo, Saipan was sought by the Americans as a base for bombing raids against Japan. SEE GUNS | A2 SEE INCENTIVES | A2 SEE SAIPAN | A2 SEE VISAS | A10

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 7, 2014 HOW TO REACH US JULY 6 CASH 3 ............................................... 5-0-4 Afternoon .......................................... 7-0-2 PLAY 4 ............................................. 3-5-1-9 Afternoon ....................................... 0-4-8-4 FLORIDA LOTTERY JULY 5 FANTASY 5 ........................... 7-23-29-34-35 FLORIDA LOTTO ............... 1-39-41-43-46-49 POWERBALL .................. 24-34-36-57-5811 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION STEVE SKAGGS publisher 352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com PAUL RYAN digital editor 352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. evidence that a person is a danger to themselves or others. A court hearing must be held within 14 days to determine wheth er to return the guns or authorize the state to hold them for up to a year. The 1999 law, the rst of its kind in the coun try, was in response to the 1998 killings of four man agers at the Connecticut Lottery headquarters by a disgruntled employee with a history of psychiat ric problems. Indiana is the only other state that has such a law, passed in 2005 after an Indianapolis police of cer was shot to death by a mentally ill man. Califor nia and New Jersey law makers are now consider ing similar statutes, both proposed in the wake of the killings of six people and wounding of 13 oth ers near the University of California, Santa Barbara by a mentally ill man who had posted threatening videos on YouTube. Michael Lawlor, Con necticuts undersecretary for criminal justice plan ning and policy, believes the states gun seizure law could have prevented the killings of 20 rst-graders and six educators at Sandy Hook Elementary School in December 2012, if police had been made aware that gunman Adam Lanza had mental health problems and access to his mothers legally owned guns. Thats the kind of sit uation where you see the red ags and the warn ing signs are there, you do something about it, Law lor said. In many shoot ings around the country, after the fact its clear that the warning signs were there. Gun rights advocates oppose gun seizure laws, saying they allow po lice to take peoples re arms based only on al legations and before the gun owners can present their side of the story to a judge. They say theyre concerned the laws vio late constitutional rights. The government tak ing things away from peo ple is never a good thing, said Rich Burgess, pres ident of the gun rights group Connecticut Car ry. They come take your stuff and give you 14 days for a hearing. Would any body else be OK if they just came and took your car and gave you 14 days for a hearing? Rachel Baird, a Con necticut lawyer who has represented many gun owners, said one of the biggest problems with the states law is that police are abusing it. She said she has had eight clients whose guns were seized by police who obtained the required warrants af ter taking possession of the guns. Its stretched and abused, and since its re arms, the courts go along with it, Baird said of the law. But backers of such laws say they can prevent shootings by getting guns out of the hands of men tally disturbed people. You want to make sure that when people are in crisis ... there is a way to prevent them to get ac cess to rearms, said Josh Horwitz, executive director of the nonprof it Education Fund to Stop Gun Violence in Washing ton, D.C. GUNS FROM PAGE A1 JOHN MINCHILLO / AP Demonstrators raise posters as they march across the Brooklyn Bridge to call for tougher gun control laws Saturday in New York. jobs. The department has paid out $290,000 on the cre ation of 85 jobs, according to economic development of cials. A company must create the jobs and hire before re ceiving incentive payments. Robert Chandler, the coun tys director of Economic De velopment and Tourism, said in his personal opinion, many of these companies were going to create those jobs regardless of whether they received incentives. The whole reason we are here is to help businesses create jobs, he said. The question is, is providing in centives directly to a compa ny for job growth the most efcient way to do that? Chandler said directly in centivizing companies, in his opinion, leads to a far lesser return on investment than if the county were to in vest that same money in ar eas such as workforce, ed ucation, infrastructure and transportation. Training and developing the workforce continues to be the number one issue for small businesses, according to Chandler. Many business es want to hire, he said, but do not have enough skilled labor. Chandler said if the de partment used the fund ing it receives for incentives, which was $150,000 last s cal year, for workforce devel opment instead, it would be more benecial for econom ic development. For example, he said if a company said it needed a certain type of skill, then perhaps the countys eco nomic development de partment could sponsor the training of that skill at Lake Technical College or Lake-Sumter State College. If a business needs a spe cic type of skill not made available, our money could help subsidize the program to get people trained, Chan dler said. He cited the Lake Tech Center for Advanced Man ufacturing a partnership between the county and the school to train workers in manufacturing, machining and welding, and the Part ners for Success program for bringing the business and education communities together. Infrastructure also is an important factor in econom ic development, Chandler said. If you have better roads, better infrastructure, it is more attractive for compa nies to come in and help ex isting businesses, he said. Moving away from provid ing traditional economic in centives will allow the coun ty to support a larger number of businesses with more ben etting from incentive re sources, Chandler said. If you are truly look ing out for the best interest of the taxpayer dollars and moving the needle with eco nomic development, this is the best way to go, he said. Chandler said the coun ty does not have a large amount of money to play the big recruitment game, and when companies express in terest in relocating to the county, incentives are not high on the list of criteria in making their decision. Indeed, in the top 10 crite ria for businesses to relocate, incentives are ranked sev enth, according to a Site Se lection Consultant Location Criteria Study. At the top is an available workforce. INCENTIVES FROM PAGE A1 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunstate Carriers in Tavares, is shown on Thursday. A few days later, the inexperi enced 27th Division joined the ght. A New York National Guard outt activated in October 1940, the Appleknockers still retained a sizable Empire State contingent among its ranks after two years of garrison duty in Hawaii. The commander of the ground forces at Saipan was Marine Corps Lt. Gen. Holland M. Smith, dubbed Howling Mad for his volcanic temper. A week into the battle, Smith re lieved the 27ths commander, Maj. Gen. Ralph Smith (no relation), after the division lagged behind the Marine units operating on its anks. The Marine commander not only blasted the 27ths leader ship, but he also openly criticized its soldiers in front of war corre spondents, who later reported on the rift that became known as Smith vs. Smith. Arthur Robinson, 92, of Saratoga Springs knew nothing of the Army versus Marine ap brewing on Saipan. As an infantryman in the 27ths 105th Infantry Regiment, he was concentrating on staying alive. On July 3, he was wounded in both thighs by machine gun re. Rob inson endured a 10-mile ride in a Jeep to a eld hospital, with the driver opting to travel on railroad tracks because the road was mined. On July 7, after three weeks of ghting, two battalions of the 105th Regiment were positioned across a plain along Saipans west ern shore. With the islands 30,000 defenders down to a few thousand starving, ill-equipped soldiers and sailors, Japanese commanders or dered one last charge. The battalions 1,100 soldiers bore the brunt of what became known as the banzai attack. U.S. military ofcials later said 3,000 Japanese charged the American lines, though others put the esti mate closer to 5,000. Many of the attackers were armed with samurai swords and bayonets tied to poles. I was scared as hell, said Mail loux, then a 20-year-old cor poral from Cohoes, a mill town north of Albany. When you hear that screaming banzai who wouldnt be? The 105ths positions were over run. Firing their ries until they ran out of ammunition and their ma chine guns until the barrels over heated, the Americans fell back as the attack became a running street brawl. They set up a second perim eter along the beach and, with their backs to the water, fought for hours before the attackers were all but annihilated. When it was over, some 4,300 en emy dead were found on the battle eld, about half of them in front of the 105ths positions. The regiment saw 406 killed and 512 wounded. Mailloux was stabbed in the thigh by a Japanese ofcer wield ing a long knife. Unable to move, he lay in a ditch for hours before Sidur, a 26-year-old sergeant also from Cohoes, found him bleeding in a muddy ditch. I didnt know who it was, Sidur said. I just thought, Boy, he looks familiar. More than 3,000 Americans died in the land battle for Saipan, about a third of them 27th Division sol diers. Among the dead were scores of New Yorkers, including more than two dozen from Albany-area factory towns. Three members of the 105th killed in the July 7 attack were awarded the Medal of Honor posthumously, including Col. Wil liam OBrien and Sgt. Thomas Bak er, both from Troy. SAIPAN FROM PAGE A1 MIKE GROLL / AP World War II veteran Arthur Robinson of Saratoga Springs, N.Y., points to himself in a 1940 photograph with his unit at the New York State Military Museum.

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Monday, July 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT BUSHNELL Registration ends today for Dade Battlefield camp Kids ages 8-12 can take part in Slither, Splash and Ambush and Animal Detective Day at the annu al nature camp at Dade Battleeld State Park, 7200 County Road 603. Registration deadline for the camp, running from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 1418, is today. The cost is $75 per child. Registration can be completed on line at www.dadebattleeld.com. Call 352-793-4781 for information. LEESBURG Bricks, benches for sale to refurbish NAACP building Buy a brick or a bench for the Commemorative Legacy Walk, an ongoing fundraiser project by the Tri-City Branch of the NAACP of Lake and Sumter Counties, to refurbish the historic Tri-City Branch of the NAACP building, 1107 Beecher St. To purchase a brick or bench, go to www.bricksrus.com or call 352551-3085 or 352-552-7540. Deadline for purchase is July 17. LEESBURG Foundation donates grant for STEM scholarships A $10,000 grant has been donat ed to Lake-Sumter State College (LSSC) by the Hans & Cay Jacobsen Foundation for the Johnson Scholars STEM Scholarship pro gram, to fund scholarships for stu dents majoring in science, technol ogy, engineering and math. The Johnson Scholarship program partnership is a matching grant be tween local colleges, including LSSC and University of Central Florida. For information, call 352-365-3518 or go to www.lssc.edu. THE VILLAGES Paramount Urgent Care to offer free student physicals To ensure student success for the new school year, Paramount Urgent Care and the local charity Back to School is COOL-Lake County have teamed up to offer free back-toschool physicals for local students. Families receiving physicals, or anyone who would like to con tribute, are encouraged to donate school supplies at any Paramount location to benet homeless and economically-challenged students. Appointments are required. Dates are as follows: July 16-17, 8640 E. County Road 466, in The Villages, 352-674-9218, and July 23-24, 628 U.S. Highway 27, in Clermont, 352-242-1988. MOUNT DORA Volunteers invited to help combat invasive air potatoes Residents are asked to assist in the release of leaf beetles, which tar get only the air potato vine at an event hosted by the Lake County Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area, at 9:30 a.m. Friday at Palm Island Park, 411 S. Tremain St. No registration is necessary. Activities and games will be provid ed for children after the event. Call 352-343-4101 or email Burnb48@u.edu. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com A 43-year-old Eustis woman, riding on the back of an all-terrain vehicle driven by her 21-year-old son, died Saturday night when he drove into the path of a pickup truck, the Flori da Highway Patrol said. Melissa Cole was pro nounced dead at the scene by the Medical Examin ers Ofce. Dillon Ash, 21, driver of the ATV, was air lifted to Orlando Regional Medical Center, where he remains in critical condi tion, according to the FHP. Raeanne Champion, 16, of Eustis, driver of the pickup, was not injured. The accident occurred at about 9:30 p.m. at the intersection of County Road 44-A (Burlington Av enue) and June Avenue, just west of where CR 44-A intersects with State Road 44. The FHP said Ash was driving the ATV west on the shoulder of CR 44-A with his mother on the back. As Ash attempted to cross CR 44-A, he drove into the path of the truck, which was headed east on CR 44-A, the FHP said. Champion was unable to stop in time and a headon collision resulted. The FHP said the crash remains under investiga tion and Ash will be test ed to see if he was under the inuence of alcohol. Champion was wearing a seatbelt but Cole and Ash were not wearing helmets, the FHP added. Eustis mother dies in ATV crash ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com T he South Lake Chamber of Commerce will host its bi-annual Hob Nob event on Aug. 7 at the Clermont City Cen ter, 620 West Montrose St., in downtown Clermont. Guests will have the chance to vote in a straw poll in various city, county, state and federal rac es to provide an idea of potential election results. The Hob Nob is a unique op portunity to see democracy in action, as candidates for ofce meet face to face with voters ea ger to participate in the free ex change of ideas, said Kasey Kes selring, Montverde Academy headmaster and event chair. The chamber expects more than 20 candidates to take part, representing local, county, state and federally elected ofces. More than 500 people are expect ed to attend the free event. Chamber president Ray San Fratello said in past years, the turnout has been great. San Fratel lo said candidates like the event because it is a forum where they can share passions, platforms and CLERMONT Hob Nob gives a preview of potential election results PHOTO COURTESY OF SOUTH LAKE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE At the last Hob Nob, attendees watched an overhead screen to see the results of a straw poll. This years event is Aug. 7. KEVIN BOUFFARD Halifax Media Group Nearly a decade into the era of the bacterial disease citrus greening, Flor ida growers are pondering the existen tial question: Is there a future in Flori da citrus? The question has taken on more ur gency following the past two seasons of unprecedented pre-harvest fruit drop from diseased trees. Its a plague of biblical propor tions, said Scott Young, 57, an Altur as-based grower with 350 grove acres in Polk County, referring to the toll cit rus greening has taken on his harvests in the past two seasons. Its already critical. Were still in it, but were claw ing to hang on. As a third-generation citrus grower whose family business stretches back to the 1930s, Young is committed to hanging on for another season or two, he said, because growing citrus is the only occupation he knows. But hes not optimistic, and neither are many of his fellow growers. For the rst time ever in the cit rus industry, you see despair because weve tried everything, and theres no silver bullet on the horizon, Young said. This is doomsday; this is going to kill us. Just getting by for the next couple of seasons will mean downsizing, selling some of his best groves to raise the up front cash needed for grove caretak ing costs before more revenue comes in with the new fall harvest, Young said. Peace Valley Enterprise Inc., the fam ily company, already has sold about 50 acres in recent years to raise cash for the new crop, he added. Were going to have to sell property thats been in the family for three gen erations, Young said. Peace Valley also will have to consid er cutting back on its caretaking mea sures in the face of next seasons de clining crop and revenues, he said. That represents a genuine dilemma, as any letup in anti-greening caretak ing measures could allow the disease to spread or cause more damage to the trees, which could further diminish the 2014-15 harvest. The rise in pessimism about the fu ture of Florida citrus comes after grow ers hoped they could manage greenings deleterious effects through the decade, Pessimism reigns among citrus growers Associated Press TAMPA The Florida Department of Transportation is studying wheth er Port Tampa Bays cruise ship business could go from thriv ing to shriveling with out a plan to get the newest and largest of these oating cities past the height lim itations of the Sun shine Skyway bridge. The Tampa Tribune reports that a draft study examines four options: do noth ing, replace the Sky way, build a cruise ship terminal near the Hillsborough-Pi nellas county line in Tampa Bay to avoid the bridge, or build a drawbridge at one end of the Skyway with a new channel for the giant ships. Ofcials say the de cision will likely be based on return on investment. Pinellas and Mana tee counties are pos sible sites for a new port and cruise facil ity, at a cost of more than $600 million. Sunshine Skyway could hobble Tampa Bay cruise ship industry Associated Press TAMPA Florida is known for being the deadliest state in the country for lightning strikes and 2014 has been no exception. Four people in Florida have been fatally struck so far this year, The Tampa Tribune reports. Thats the same num ber as in the rest of the entire nation, according to the National Weather Service. Summer is the peak season for lightning, and nationwide, 51 peo ple on average are killed each year while hun dreds more suffer severe injuries. Overall the number of lightning fatalities ap pears to be on the de cline: Across the U.S., there were 23 lightning fatalities last year, a re cord low. There were four in all of 2013 in Florida, leading meteorologists to believe this year is an anomaly. Scientists point to several possible fac tors contributing to an SEE CITRUS | A4 SEE HOB NOB | A4 Florida still deadliest state for lightning strikes STEVEN ROBICSEK / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP A one-second exposure from atop the Seagle Building in downtown Gainesville captures a double lightning strike over the western portion of Alachua County on June 8. SEE LIGHTNING | A9

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 7, 2014 JOE HENDERSON Associated Press TAMPA You know how Tampa came to be known as the Cigar City, right? There used to be more than 150 cigar factories here, but that was a long time ago. Po litical events that include the U.S. trade restrictions with Cuba caused some to close. Changing public attitudes about tobacco caused others to lock their doors for good. There is only one still in business, the J.C. Newman Cigar Co. on North 16th Street in Ybor City. The com pany dates back 119 years to when Julius C. Newman he went by the initials J.C. founded his cigar-making operation in Cleveland. The company moved to its current location in 1954, into the abandoned Regensberg cigar factory. Newmans 130 employees use amazing old machines from the 1930s to produce thousands of cigars every day. Those are shipped to all 50 states and 81 countries. We are the last of the Mo hicans, so to speak, compa ny President Eric Newman said. Proposed regulations from the Food and Drug Adminis tration could end that, though. Essentially, the FDA proposes treating cigar manufacturers such as J.C. Newman the same as cigarette giants. Among other things, it would require FDA approval before a company could add a new size, shape or brand. The company says the FDA estimates a manufactur er would spend about 5,000 hours testing each new prod uct before it could even apply for approval. The effect of those and other proposed restrictions could be to increase costs so much that Tampas last cigar factory would close. New products are the life blood of any industry, New man said. If it becomes too expensive to create a new product, we cant stay in business. So the company is ghting back, and it has some pow erful bipartisan political al lies in the battle to win an ex emption from the proposed regulations. Nothing is more Tampa than the Newman cigar fac tory, Democratic U.S. Rep. Kathy Castor said. Im not going to stand for this, and I think we have a good chance to win. I think something like this is the government interfer ing where the government shouldnt interfere, Repub lican U.S. Rep. Dennis Ross added. Were talking about an industry that is the foun dation of Tampa. Im just sor ry we have to le legislation and say to the FDA, You cant do that. Democratic U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson and his Republican counterpart, Marco Rubio, also have joined the ght. This issue goes back to 2009, when Congress gave the FDA control over tobac co products. The agency has been particularly focused on discouraging minors from smoking. If this was about ciga rettes, I would agree with the aim of what theyre trying to do, said Bobby Newman, the companys executive vice president. I dont like ciga rettes either. But the Newmans argue theirs is a premium product with a limited audience. They dene a premium product as 100 percent tobacco (no llers), a larger size than the kind of cigars you might nd in a convenience store, and no tip. The FDA proposed saying a premium cigar had to cost at least $10, which many New man cigars dont. That deni tion of what makes a premi um cigar is at the heart of the issue. The Newmans say its not as much about price as it is how the cigar is made. In deed, a trip through their fac tory is like time travel. Workers still operate ma chines that were used in the 1930s. That may sound ar chaic by todays standards, but the Newmans insist its another thing that makes them different from the giant cigarette manufacturers. The proposed bills would override FDA rules and help companies such as New man survive, but they have a slim chance of becoming law this year. That will not be the end of the ght, howev er. The FDA has extended the chance for public comment until Aug. 9, and it could be at least a year before any new rules would take effect. Newman isnt taking chances, though. On Monday, the compa ny plans to cover El Reloj, its iconic 104-year-old clock tower that is easily visible from Interstate 4, with a gi ant banner to bring attention to this issue. There is further information on the website www.savecigarcity.com Ross promises the issue isnt going away no matter what the FDA does. Its one thing to say you cant go out into a public restaurant and smoke, he said. I support that. Im glad when I go out to eat, I dont have to smell cigarette smoke. Its another thing to say you cant go on your own pa tio and smoke a cigar. Thats when you become the nanny state. We dont want that. Tampas last cigar factory fights for survival JIM REED / AP Machines that were in use in the 1930s and still in use now are seen at the El Reloj cigar factory in Tampa. long enough to allow sci entists to come up with a better strategy for coun teracting or even curing the disease. Pre-harvest drop, which surfaced during the 2012-13 sea son, dashed such hopes. Two years ago, the industry was thinking weve got a Band-Aid and the crops were go ing to hold up, said Tom Spreen, emeritus professor of agricultural economics at the Uni versity of Florida and an authority on Flori da citrus. I think whats changed here is the ex pectation. I dont think anybody had foreseen production falling off the map the way it has. Although still bullish on Florida citrus, Ben Hill Grifn III agreed that the growers mood has turned sour. Theres a lot more pessimism in the citrus industry today because of pre-harvest drop, said Grifn, CEO of Ben Hill Grifn Inc. in Frost proof, one of the states biggest growers, whose family rm dates to the 1930s. NEAR TOTAL INFECTION Greening is a bacteri al disease that weakens a citrus tree and eventu ally kills it. The disease was rst discovered in Florida in the fall of 2005 near Homestead, but it had a history of devastating commercial citrus indus tries in Asia and Africa since its initial discovery in China in the early 20th century. Growers and re searchers think greening has infected virtually all the states 524,640 com mercial citrus acres. In those rst years into the era of greening, Florida growers thought they could manage the disease through more frequent pesticide spraying to tamp down populations of the Asian citrus psyllid, the bac terias host that spreads the disease, and an en hanced fertilizer regi men that appeared to keep fruit on infected trees healthy. In 200708, Florida growers pro duced 170.2 million boxes of oranges, just 30 percent lower than the 242 million orange box es harvested in 2003-04, before greenings arrival. In 2012-13, howev er, growers noticed an alarming level of pre-har vest drop of seeming ly healthy fruit from dis eased trees, even those getting enhanced fertil ization. What the U.S. Department of Agricul ture projected as a 154 million-box orange crop at the beginning of the season nished at 133.6 million boxes, or 13 per cent lower. When the recent ly completed 2013-14 season began in the fall, many growers had hoped pre-harvest drop was a single-season event. No such luck. Ofcially the USDA initially estimated 125 million orange boxes in the 2013-14 season. It nished with just 104.3 million boxes, nearly 17 percent less. Those av erages mask more se vere drop problems among some growers like Young. Young reported 201213 orange production in his groves declined 50 percent from the previ ous season largely be cause of pre-harvest drop, despite the fact that he took all recom mended caretaking mea sures against greening. The drop problem grew worse this past season with production off 70 percent, Young said. Be fore greening, pre-har vest drop attributable to weather, pests and oth er diseases amounted to about 5 percent of his crop, he added. BETTING ON A CURE Not everyone is so bearish on the future of Florida citrus, however. If you go back and look at all the earlier 10year projections, theyve never been correct. Theyve been all over the board, Grifn said. I dont disregard it entire ly. Its certainly trending that way. It would be ri diculous to say well pro duce 150 million boxes next year. But Grifn and oth er optimists base their hopes on what poker players call betting on the come that the next card dealt will turn a weak or worthless hand into a winner. Theyre hoping scientists soon will come up with an ef fective treatment either for the drop problem or a wider solution to coun teract greenings damage to their trees. I see advancement in many areas of scientic research that we didnt have three or four years ago, Grifn said. He cited heat treat ment, which has been shown to kill the bacte ria in single young trees but remains difcult CITRUS FROM PAGE A3 views, and voters like it because they can learn more about candidates by interacting with them in person. In addition, there will be an ongoing straw ballot with regular up dates where partici pants can vote for their favorite candidates as if it were election day. All the state referen dum issues scheduled to be on the ballot in November will be in cluded. The straw poll is great because it lets candidates see how they might be faring with this group of qual ied voters who are asking questions about what they are plan ning to do for them if they get elected, San Fratello said. The at mosphere at these Hob Nobs is just a nice night out with great food, mingling and the feel of election night when re ally, we are just prep ping for the primary. The Hob Nob will fea ture food furnished by Carrabbas Italian Grill. Beverages, including a cash bar, will be hosted by the Kiwanis Club of South Lake. Tickets will be avail able on a rst-come, rst-served basis. Tick ets must be reserved in advance, and are nec essary to participate in the straw ballot. The event is spon sored by many local businesses and organi zations that have part nered with the chamber. It will be a fun and valuable event for the public and candidates, San Fratello said. For information or to reserve tickets, call 352394-4191 or email of ce@southlakecham ber-.com. HOB NOB FROM PAGE A3 to apply on a large scale; anti-bacterial agents that could kill the bacteria in mature trees; hampering or eliminating the psyl lids ability to host the greening bacteria and breeding new tree va rieties more tolerant or resistant to the dis ease. Meanwhile, Grifn said, growers can en hance their ability to survive economical ly through a proven method: denser plant ing of new groves, as many as 325 trees per acre. Denser plant ings were not uncom mon before greening, but even those groves had fewer than 200 trees per acre. We would have never planted 300 trees per acre 10 years ago, he said. Caretaking costs for denser groves stay close to the traditional architecture, but pro duction and returns per acre remain prof itable even if yields per tree diminish be cause of greening and pre-harvest drop, Grif n said. More trees per acre enable a grove to absorb greening-relat ed losses and still have a protable harvest. If we lose a tree and have that many trees per acre, were still in the game, he said. Still, the costs of replacing existing groves remain daunt ing, Young said. That includes the cost of removing existing trees, a new irrigation system and the price of the new trees. It costs $35 to get a new tree into the ground before it takes a drink of water, Young added. Were too small to be able to weather this kind of trauma. Theres too much overhead. MICHAEL WILSON/HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP Scott Young, owner/operator of Peace Valley Enterprise Inc., shows the effects of citrus greening on a leaf of one his honey tangerine trees damaged by the disease at his grove in Alturas.

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Monday, July 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 r f n t b n nr

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 7, 2014 rfrntb rfrbtb rf nn rbrt tb n n bbrbbrnn f n n rfbr rf n tb nftb tb tb t b rf f n t b t n f f tfr r f tf f f bb b bbt bb bb b b n r bb rf ntbb n n LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PA RK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Wa lker Dr (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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Monday, July 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 rfrntb rfrbtb rf nn rbrt tb n n bbrbbrnn f n n rfbr r f rff nt b r fnt rf rf n t b b nt b btn f n t b b rf btn f n t b b rf r t n n rf n t b b b rn rr r r fnt n nt fn nn fntn r ff n nn r f nf f t b t f f t LEESBU RG/ FRUIT LAND PA RK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Wa lker Dr (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 7, 2014 r r fr nr f n tb t rfrntb rfrbtb rf nn rbrt tb n n bbrbbrnn f n n rfbr LEESBU RG/ FRUIT LAND PA RK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Wa lker Dr (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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Monday, July 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A9 CR OW NS$399Eac h(3 or mor e per visit) D2751/ Re g $59 9 ea. Po rcel ain on non Pr ecious me ta l DENTURES$74 9Eac hD0 51 10 or D0 51 20DENT AL SA VIN GSTh e patie nt an d any oth er per son re spons ible for paym ent has the right to re fuse to pay cancel payme nt or be re imburs ed for paym ent for any other ser vices, ex aminat ion whic h is per for med as a re sult of and with in 72 hours of re spon ding to the ad ve rt is em en t fo r th e discounted fee or re duced fee ser vice or tr eatment. Fees may va ry due to comple xity of case This disc ount do es no t appl y to th ose patie nt s wi th den tal pla ns. Fee s ar e mi ni mal. PR IC ES ARE SU BJ ECT TO CHA NGE. LEESBUR GM T. DORASu nr is e De nt al Tr i-D ent al r ff nt bb f Consul tat ion and Seco nd Op in ion No Ch ar ge!n t t NEW PA TIENT SPEC IAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RA YS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EX AMINA TION BY DO CTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABS ENCE OF GUM DISEA SE ) D00 2409 overall drop in the number of fa talities, including the drought in the Southeast, an area typically ripe for lightning strikes. But overall, fewer casualties are the result of awareness, said John Jensenius, lightning guru for the National Weather Service. People are more concerned and are taking actions to protect themselves. However, he cautioned that the downward trend could quickly reverse itself. I would suspect that once the Southeast gets into a more nor mal yearly rainfall, we will see the lightning strikes go up, Jen senius said. Weather Service meteorolo gists say there are about 1.45 million lightning strikes in Flor ida each year. The reason we get so many thunderstorms in Florida is that the state is a long piece of land with warm water on both sides, said Joe Dwyer, professor of physics and space sciences with the Florida Institute of Technol ogy in Melbourne. During the summer, the sun warms the pen insula, and that brings sea breez es. The moist air collides, and that causes updrafts, and that leads to thunderstorms. The eight people fatally struck in Florida engaged in a variety of activities when they were hit. One was repairing a roof, two were shing and another was picking blueberries. Fishing is the No. 1 activity that puts people in danger, Jen senius said. People who are out shing on a boat, it takes time to get to safety. LIGHTNING FROM PAGE A3 MARK SHERMAN and RACHEL ZOLL Associated Press WASHINGTON How much distance from an im moral act is enough? Thats the difcult question behind the next legal dis pute over religion, birth con trol and the health law that is likely to be resolved by the Supreme Court. The issue in more than four dozen lawsuits from faith-afliated charities, col leges and hospitals that op pose some or all contracep tion as immoral is how far the Obama administration must go to accommodate them. The justices on June 30 re lieved businesses with re ligious objections of their obligation to pay for wom ens contraceptives among a range of preventive services the new law calls for in their health plans. Religious-oriented non prot groups already could opt out of covering the con traceptives. But the orga nizations say the accom modation provided by the administration does not go far enough because, though they are not on the hook nancially, they remain com plicit in the provision of government-approved con traceptives to women cov ered by their plans. Anything that forces un willing religious believers to be part of the system is not going to pass the test, said Mark Rienzi, senior counsel for the Becket Fund for Re ligious Liberty, which rep resents many of the faith-af liated nonprots. Hobby Lobby Inc., winner of its Su preme Court case last month, also is a Becket Fund client. The high court will be asked to take on the issue in its term that begins in October. A challenge from the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana, probably will be the rst case to reach the court. The Obama administra tion argues that the accom modation creates a generous moral and nancial buffer between religious objectors and funding birth control. The nonprot groups just have to raise their hands and say that paying for any or all of the 20 devices and meth ods approved by government regulators would violate their religious beliefs. To do so, they must ll out a government document known as Form 700 that enables their insurers or third-party admin istrators to take on the respon sibility of paying for the birth control. The employer does not have to arrange the cov erage or pay for it. Insurers get reimbursed by the govern ment through credits against fees owed under other parts of the health law. Houses of worship and other religious institutions whose primary purpose is to spread the faith are exempt from the requirement to offer birth control. The objections by religious nonprots are rooted in teach ings against facilitating sin. Roman Catholic bishops and other religious plaintiffs argue that lling out the gov ernment form that registers opposition to contraceptives, then sending the document to the insurer or third-party administrator, is akin to sign ing a permission slip to en gage in evil. In the Hobby Lobby case, the justices rejected the gov ernment argument that there was no violation of con science because the link be tween birth control cover age and the outcome the employer considers morally wrong was slight. Just hours after the Hobby Lobby decision, the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in At lanta granted a temporary re prieve to the Alabama-based Eternal Word Television Net work. Judge William H. Pryor Jr. said in a separate opinion in that case that the admin istration turns a blind eye to the undisputed evidence that delivering Form 700 would violate the Networks reli gious beliefs. But the Supreme Court could draw a distinction be tween subsidizing birth con trol and signing a document to deputize a third-party to do so, said Robin Fretwell Wilson, a family law special ist at the University of Illinois College of Law. Think about how thinned down that objection is, Fretwell Wilson said. The court might say that is a bridge too far. Judge Karen Nelson Moore of the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati said the document is a reasonable way for objecting organiza tions to inform the insur er, but that the obligation to cover contraception is in the health law, not the form. Self-certication allows the eligible organization to tell the insurance issuer and third-party administrator, Were excused from the new federal obligation relating to contraception, and in turn, the government tells those insurance companies, But youre not, the judge wrote. Nonprofits contraceptive cases next for justices PABLO MARTINEZ MONSIVAIS / AP Demonstrators react outside the Supreme Court in Washington after hearing the courts decision on the Hobby Lobby case on June 30. Associated Press WASHINGTON When the U.S. Nation al Security Agency in tercepted the online accounts of legally tar geted foreigners over a four-year period it also collected the conversa tions of nine times as many ordinary Internet users, both Americans and non-Americans, according to a probe by The Washington Post Nearly half of those surveillance les con tained names, email ad dresses or other details that the NSA marked as belonging to U.S. citi zens or residents, the Post reported in a sto ry posted on its website Saturday night. While the federal agency tried to protect their privacy by masking more than 65,000 such referenc es to individuals, the newspaper said it found nearly 900 addition al email addresses that could be strongly linked to U.S. citizens or resi dents. At the same time, the intercepted messag es contained material of considerable intelli gence value, the Post re ported, such as infor mation about a secret overseas nuclear proj ect, double-dealing by an ostensible ally, a mil itary calamity that be fell an unfriendly pow er, and the identities of aggressive intruders into U.S. computer net works. As an example, the newspaper said the les showed that months of tracking commu nications across doz ens of alias accounts led directly to the cap ture in 2011 of a Pa kistan-based bomb builder suspected in a 2002 terrorist bombing in Bali. The Post said it was withholding oth er examples, at the re quest of the CIA, that would compromise on going investigations. The material re viewed by the Post in cluded roughly 160,000 intercepted e-mail and instant-message con versations, some of them hundreds of pag es long, and 7,900 docu ments taken from more than 11,000 online ac counts. It spanned Pres ident Barack Obamas rst term, 2009 to 2012, and was provided to the Post by former NSA an alyst Edward Snowden. The daily lives of more than 10,000 ac count holders who were not targeted were cat alogued and recorded, the Post reported. The newspaper described that material as tell ing stories of love and heartbreak, illicit sexual liaisons, mental-health crises, political and re ligious conversions, nancial anxieties and disappointed hopes. The material collect ed included more than 5,000 private photos, the paper said. Report: NSA surveillance collects data on far more ordinary online users than actual targets AP FILE PHOTO Plaques outside the National Security Agency (NSA) campus in Fort Meade, Md., are shown. MANHATTAN BEACH, Calif. Ste ven Robles was an hour into his regular week end swim off some of Southern Californias most popular beaches when he came face-toface with a great white shark. The 7-foot-long ju venile had been try ing to free itself from a shermans hook for about half an hour when it attacked. It came up to the surface, it looked at me and attacked me right on the side of my chest, Robles told KABC-TV. That all happened within two seconds, I saw the eyes of the shark as I was seeing it swim to wards me. It lunged at my chest, and it locked into my chest. He tried to pry open the sharks mouth, but it quickly disappeared. Robles had been go ing for 2 miles with about a dozen friends Saturday when the at tack happened around 9:30 a.m., fellow swim mer Nader Nejadhash emi said Sunday. He said Ive been bit, and he was screaming, said Ne jadhashemi, who didnt see the shark even though he was just 5 feet away. Then I saw the blood. Victim recounts Southern California shark attack JOHN ANTCZAK / AP Surfers and swimmers return to the ocean Sunday, one day after a swimmer was bitten by a great white shark off of Manhattan Beach, Calif.

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A10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 7, 2014 faced a shortage of tal ent and specialized skill sets in the U.S. Like oth er rms, Infosys wants Congress to allow even more of these tempo rary workers. But amid calls for ex panding the nations socalled H-1B visa pro gram, there is growing pushback from Ameri cans who argue the pro gram has been hijacked by stafng companies that import cheaper, lower-level workers to replace more expensive U.S. employees or keep them from getting hired in the rst place. Its getting pret ty frustrating when you cant compete on sala ry for a skilled job, said Rich Hajinlian, a veteran computer programmer from the Boston area. You hear references all the time that these big companies ... cant nd skilled workers. I am a skilled worker. Hajinlian, 56, who de velops his own web ap plications on the side, said he applied for a job in April through a head hunter and that the po tential client appeared interested, scheduling a longer interview. Then, said Hajinlian, the head hunter called back and said the client had gone with an H-1B work er whose annual salary was about $10,000 less. I didnt even get a chance to negotiate down, he said. The H-1B program al lows employers to tem porarily hire workers in specialty occupations. The government issues up to 85,000 H-1B visas to businesses every year, and recipients can stay up to six years. Although no one tracks exactly how many H-1B holders are in the U.S., experts estimate there are at least 600,000 at any one time. Skilled guest work ers can also come in on other types of visas. An immigration bill passed in the U.S. Sen ate last year would have increased the number of annually available H-1B visas to 180,000 while raising fees and increasing oversight, al though language was removed that would have required all com panies to consider qual ied U.S. workers be fore foreign workers are hired. The House never act ed on the measure. With immigration reform considered dead this year in Congress, Presi dent Barack Obama last week declared he will use executive actions to address some changes. It is not known whether the H-1B program will be on the agenda. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is among the high-prole executives pushing for more H-1Bs. The argument has long been that there arent enough qualied Amer ican workers to ll cer tain jobs, especially in science, engineering and technology. Advocates also assert that some visa holders will stay and be come entrepreneurs. Critics say there is no across-the-board shortage of American tech workers, and that if there were, wages would be rising rapid ly. Instead, wage gains for software develop ers have been modest, while wages have fallen for programmers. The liberal Economic Policy Institute reported last year that only half of U.S. college graduates in science, engineering and technology found jobs in those elds and that at least one third of IT jobs were going to foreign guest workers. The top users of H-1B visas arent even tech companies like Google and Facebook. Eight of the 10 biggest H1-B us ers last year were out sourcing rms that hire out thousands of most ly lowerand mid-level tech workers to corpo rate clients, according to an analysis of feder al data by Ron Hira, an associate professor of public policy at Roch ester Institute of Tech nology. The top 10 rms accounted for about a third of the H-1Bs allot ted last year. The debate over whether foreign work ers are taking jobs isnt new, but for years it cen tered on low-wage sec tors like agriculture and construction. The highskilled visas have thrust a new sector of Amer ican workers into the fray: the middle class. Last month, three tech advocacy groups launched a labor boy cott against Infos ys, IBM and the global stafng and consulting company Manpower Group, citing a pattern of excluding U.S. work ers from job openings on U.S soil. They say Manpower, for example, last year posted U.S. job open ings in India but not in the United States. We have a shortage in the industry all right a shortage of fair and eth ical recruiting and hir ing, said Donna Con roy, director of Bright Future Jobs, a group of tech professionals ght ing to end what it calls discriminatory hir ing that is blocking us ... from competing for jobs we are qualied to do. Infosys spokesman Paul de Lara responded that the rm encourages diversity recruitment, while spokesman Doug Shelton said IBM con siders all qualied can didates without regard to citizenship and im migration status. Man power issued a state ment saying it adopts the highest ethical stan dards and complies with all applicable laws and regulations when hiring individuals. VISAS FROM PAGE A1 CHARLES BABINGTON Associated Press WASHINGTON The legal, humanitarian and political constraints facing the Obama ad ministration as it copes with thousands of Cen tral American children entering the country il legally came into sharp focus in a series of inter views Sunday. A George W. Bush-era law to address human trafcking prevents the government from re turning the children to their home countries without taking them into custody and even tually through a depor tation hearing. Minors from Mexico and Can ada, by contrast, can be sent back across the border more easily. The administration says it wants more exibility under the law. Even if Congress agrees, however, the change might do lit tle to ease the partisan quarreling and com plex logistical and hu manitarian challenges surrounding the issue. Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson said Sunday the admin istration has dramatical ly sped up the process ing of adults who enter the country illegally, and it is opening more de tention facilities. He ac knowledged that the un accompanied children from Central America, some 9,700 taken into custody in May alone, pose the most vexing problem. All persons, regard less of age, face a de portation proceeding if they are caught en tering the country il legally, Johnson said. The administration, he said, is looking at ways to create additional op tions for dealing with the children in particu lar, consistent with our laws and our values. Repeatedly pressed to say whether thou sands of Central Amer ican children will be deported promptly, Johnson said, we need to nd more efcient, effective ways to turn this tide around gener ally, and weve already begun to do that. Several Republicans, and even a Democrat, said the administration has reacted too slow ly and cautiously to the crisis. More than 50,000 unaccompanied minors have been caught on the U.S.-Mexico border this year. Most are from Gua temala, Honduras and El Salvador, where a spike in violence and poverty are prompting parents to send their children on difcult and dangerous journeys north. Their numbers have overwhelmed feder al agencies. When 140 would-be immigrants mostly mothers with children were own to southern California to ease an overcrowd ed Texas facility, an gry residents of Murrie ta greeted the bus as it pulled into town, com plaining that they were being asked to do more than their share. This is a failure of di plomacy, it is a failure of leadership from the administration, said Texas Gov. Rick Perry, who sought the 2012 GOP presidential nom ination. Rep. Henry Cuellar, D-Texas, said the ad ministration is one step behind a major dilemma that was fore seeable. The number of children coming from Central America with out adults has been ris ing dramatically for several years. President Barack Obama is asking Con gress for more money and authority to send the children home, even as he also seeks ways to allow millions of other people already living in the U.S. illegal ly to stay. The Bush-era law re quires unaccompanied children to be handed over to the Department of Health and Human Services for care and housing. Unlike Mexi can or Canadian chil dren, the Central Amer icans must be taken into custody and given a de portation hearing before they can be returned to their home countries. A possible change to the Bush-era law could give Border Patrol agents more leeway in handling these children. Unaccompanied Central American chil dren generally are be ing released to relatives already in the United States. Mothers with their children often are released with a notice to appear later in im migration court. Meanwhile, word of seemingly successful border crossings reach es their home coun tries, encouraging oth ers to try. Johnson said the U.S. government is try ing to send the mes sage that all persons who enter the coun try illegally will face de portation proceedings eventually. In Central America, he said, the criminal smuggling or ganizations are putting out a lot of disinforma tion about supposed free passes into this country that will expire soon. Were cracking down on the smuggling organizations by surg ing law enforcement re sources, Johnson said. Child immigrant crisis poses legal, political hurdles AP FILE PHOTO Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson arrives to testify before the House Committee on Homeland Security in Washington about the growing problem of unaccompanied children crossing the border into the United States. BEBETO MATTHEWS / AP Jay Palmer, a whistleblower against Infosys, an Indian rm that eventually paid a hefty ne for H1 B visa infractions, poses during a New York visit, CHARLES BABINGTON Associated Press RALEIGH, N.C. North Car olina Democratic Sen. Kay Ha gan has her Republican oppo nent right where she wants him geographically and, there fore, politically. Thom Tillis is stuck at the state capitol trying to resolve a budget quarrel as speaker of the North Carolina House. Its a spot that helps Hagan emphasize Tillis role leading a Republican-con trolled state government that Democrats contend has gone overboard with conservative zeal by restricting access to abortion and the voting booth while cut ting corporate taxes and slashing spending on schools. If Tillis is worried by Hagans portrayal, he doesnt show it. Drinking coffee this past week from a hand-grenade-shaped mug in his no-frills legislative ofce, hes got his own mes sage in his campaign to take Ha gans Senate seat. Obamacare, he said, continues to be a big problem. Similar themes are playing out in other crucial Senate races, as voters have four months to de cide which party will control the chamber in the nal two years of Barack Obamas presidency. For Republicans, its all about ty ing Democrats to Obama es pecially to a health care law that remains unpopular with many Americans. And for Democrats, the election is about just about anything else, especially if they can steer attention away from Washington and federal matters. Its a political strategy that sometimes gives the campaigns an inside-out feel, with veteran senators running as if they were rst-timers without a Washing ton resume to defend or tout. Democrat Mark Pryor has rep resented Arkansas in the Senate for two terms, yet one of his TV ads begins with a man saying, I remember when Pryor was at torney general. A woman adds that he pursued scam artists that were ripping off seniors. Pryor was state attorney gen eral more than a decade ago, and for just four years, compared to his nearly dozen in the Senate. His harkening back to that time points to his desire to make the election a choice between a fa mous name in Arkansas state politics and rst-term Rep. Tom Cotton, a Republican whom many view as less personable and engaging than Pryor. The GOP strategy, in return, is straightforward. One TV ad has a young girl spelling Pryors name as O-B-A-M-A. The amount spent on the Ha gan-Tillis race about $17 mil lion and climbing is among the nations highest. It comes in a state that few can rival for po litical change in recent years, as Republicans ended a century of frustration by winning con trol of both legislative cham bers and the governors ofce in 2012. What came next is a conserva tive revolution that Tillis said hes proud of leading. Hagan and her fellow Democrats argue the Re publicans went too far in a state so closely divided politically that Obama carried it in 2008 and lost it four years later. They believe a bump in teacher pay that Tillis promises lawmakers will enact this summer wont erase North Carolinians memories of the deep cuts to education that Re publicans passed last year. That approach, said Rep. Da vid Price, D-N.C., is Hagans best chance to focus November vot ers attention on something other than Obama. Democrats try to pull focus from Obamacare AP FILE PHOTO North Carolina House Speaker Thom Tillis greets supporters at an election night rally in Charlotte, N.C., after winning the Republican nomination for the U.S. Senate.

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Monday, July 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A11 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 P erhaps, like mine, your in box is being ooded with emails from Barack Obama, Joe Biden and Michelle Obama. President Obama usually says hey or Ann or So, Ann. Biden says Heres the thing, Ann. And Mrs. Obama (Mi chelle) says Hi or Hi, Ann. Obama wants to thank me in person by telling me to enter a contest to travel to Austin, where, presumably, he will be waiting to meet me although we live just a couple of miles apart in Washing ton. Im not sure why he wants to thank me. He doesnt say. But this is the amazing part. He only wants me to contribute $3 to be eligible for a free ight and ho tel room in Texas and handshake. Michelle is more practical. She wants me to give $10 to have a chance at this opportunity. Un like regulated contests, however, my friends Barack, Michelle and Joe dont tell me what the chanc es are of winning. Obviously, political columnists may not participate in such give aways, let alone contribute to politicians. So if the goal of the emails is to make me give money to Democrats, that email deluge is having no effect. Its the same thing from Re publicans, although they want me to give more much more. Hundreds of dollars. Thousands of dollars. Hundreds of millions of dollars. (I am on these email lists by mistake because some how Republicans are not taking advantage of the personal infor mation out there for free which might indicate that anything in that range is highly implausible.) Messages from the president, vice president and rst lady warn that because Obamas name wont be on the ballot in November, many Democrats may not be mo tivated to vote or give money. In that case, they note with alarm, Republicans will have enormous amounts of money to fund their candidates and take over the Sen ate. Joe in particular is worried that the Koch brothers, those as toundingly rich guys (think $1 bil lion) in Kansas who loathe Obama and everything he stands for, will control the outcome of the au tumn election by giving conserva tive candidates millions of dollars. On the other hand, Bill and Hil lary Clinton helped raise between $2 billion and $3 billion for politics and their causes in the past two decades, according to The Wall Street Journal. Republicans wor ry that if Hilary runs for president in 2016 shell have a built-in mon ey advantage. (The two Bush pres idents raised $2.9 billion, so pre sumably if Jeb runs, theyd help.) The 2012 presidential election cost $2 billion. It will cost much more in 2016. This year the Supreme Court weighed in again on the peren nial issue of campaign nance, a subject guaranteed to make eyes glaze over but which is incredibly important. The rulings are chang ing our country, helping to make Washington gridlock permanent. The Court has ruled that just about anything goes when it comes to raising money for can didates. Them what has can give. Special interest groups may raise millions and hide the names of the donors. Seven times the high court headed by Justice John Roberts has ruled by ve-to-four votes to weaken laws designed to prevent the rich from controlling democ racy. The court this year had an unusual number of unanimous decisions but not on campaign nance. The latest decision struck down the cap on contributions a donor may give to federal can didates, causing a lot of people to worry that this opens the door to more corruption. Politicians denitely respond to the money that elects them. Oddly, fewer Americans are checking that little box on their tax returns that gives $3 of the taxes they owe (not an addition al $3) to help fund the presiden tial election. If candidates take it, their fundraising is restricted. But candidates know they can rake in more dollars by refusing to take pro-rated money from the public fund. So, fellow voters, expect more political emails in your inbox. How about $3 giving you a chance to meet the president in his home state of Hawaii or $5,000 to watch House Speaker John Boehner play golf in Cincinnati? Ann McFeatters is an op-ed columnist for McClatchy-Tribune. Readers may send her email at amcfeatters@nationalpress.com. OTHER VOICES Ann McFeatters MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Political emails unrelenting I s there anything sadder than the kill ing of children? Of course not, and no one should be surprised at the shock, distress and outrage in Israel after the bodies of three missing teenagers were found Monday. The boys, kidnapped more than two weeks ago, were apparently shot and then partially bur ied in an open eld near the West Bank vil lage of Halhul. What kind of world, what kind of politics, can possibly justify the abduction of teenagers in the name of ideology or na tionalism or religion or whatever it turns out was the motivation for this gruesome act? If, as Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Ne tanyahu suggests, the kidnappings were the work of Hamas, they should serve as a stark reminder that the militant Islamic organi zation has not changed its ways. Since its founding during the rst intifada in 1987, Hamas has been responsible for countless civilian deaths, and its leaders notwith standing their recent reconciliation with the Palestinian Authority have not evolved substantially since then. Hamas has not of cially endorsed a two-state solution to the Is raeli-Palestinian conict or promised to re nounce violence or acknowledged Israels right to exist. Its unclear as yet what its role was, if any, in these most recent events, but its top ofcials loudly celebrated the kidnap pings. Hamas obviously cannot be a mean ingful partner in the search for peace as long as it remains committed to violence and re jectionism. Hamas will pay, Netanyahu vowed af ter the boys bodies were found, and indeed, the crackdown is already underway. But Israel must behave carefully and responsibly rath er than emotionally. Of course it must defend its citizens against enemies. But Netanyahu must also display the evidence he says he has that Hamas orchestrated the killings. He must minimize civilian casualties and not engage in the collective punishment of people who have done no wrong. He must not undermine those Palestinian leaders, such as President Mahmoud Abbas, who say and do the right things. Israel as well as the Palestinians must nd reasons to come back to the nego tiating table rather than seeking excuses to walk away. This conict, like other conicts around the world, has killed many innocent children. The latest deaths must not become a justica tion for an escalation of violence, for the con tinued death of innocents or for yet another downward spiral in the depressing and desta bilizing war that so often seems to be moving in exactly the wrong direction. Distributed by MCT Information Services. A VOICE Israel vs. Hamas: Moving in the wrong direction again? Classic DOONESBURY 1976 Messages from the president, vice president and first lady warn that because Obamas name wont be on the ballot in November, many Democrats may not be motivated to vote or give money. In that case, they note with alarm, Republicans will have enormous amounts of money to fund their candidates and take over the Senate. Joe in particular is worried that the Koch brothers, those astoundingly rich guys (think $1 billion) in Kansas who loathe Obama and everything he stands for, will control the outcome of the autumn election by giving conservative candidates millions of dollars.

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DENNIS PASSA Associated Press LONDON Novak Djokovic won his sec ond Wimbledon title and denied Roger Fed erer his record eighth by outlasting the Swiss player in ve sets Sun day. Djokovic wasted a 5-2 lead, and a match point, in the fourth set but held on for a 6-7 (7), 6-4, 7-6 (4), 5-7, 6-4 Centre Court victory that returned the Ser bian player to the No. 1 ranking. It was Djokovics sev enth Grand Slam title and broke a streak of three consecutive loss es in major nals and in ve of his past six. In the last set, Djokov ic broke in the nal game with the help of four mistakes by Feder er to seal the win. After the players met at the net, Djokovic went to the middle of the court, knelt down and plucked out a piece of grass and ate it, sim ilar to what he did in 2011 when he won his rst title here. Trailing 5-4 in the fourth set, Federer dou ble-faulted to make it 30-30. He then put a backhand into the net to set up a champion ship point for Djokovic. The 32-year-old Fed erer then hit a serve that was ruled out, but he challenged it and the Hawk-Eye replay showed that it hit the line for an ace one of his 29 in the match. Federer went on to break in the next game before forcing a fth set. I was hoping that Roger was going to miss the rst serve, but that didnt happen, Djokov ic said. It rarely hap pens. Thats why he has 17 Grand Slams and hes been the most suc cessful player ever, be cause in important mo ments, he comes up with his best shots and top game. Djokovic said it was difcult to stay focused heading into a deciding set. Of course, after dropping a fourth set, it wasnt easy to regroup and compose myself and nd that necessary energy to win the fth, Djokovic said. I dont know how I managed to do it. SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 7, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com MLB: Pitching leads Marlins past Cards / B4 MARK LONG Associated Press DAYTONA BEACH Aric Almirola has won the rain-delayed and rain-shortened NA SCAR Sprint Cup race at Daytona Interna tional Speedway, put ting Richard Pettys famed No. 43 in Victory Lane for the rst time since 1999. Almirolas unexpect ed win came on the same weekend Petty celebrated the 30th an niversary of his 200th win. Petty wasnt around for the festivities, hav ing already left Dayto na during one of the many delays. He didnt miss much considering steady rain put a slight damper on the postrace party. The amount of ef fort thats gone into this race team this year with everybody at Richard Petty Motor sports trying to build this race team back to a winning race team, the way its supposed to be, Almirola said in a rain-soaked Victory Lane. Thirty years to the weekend that Richard Petty got his 200th win is really, really special. The Coke Zero 400 was originally sched uled to go off Saturday night, but steady rain forced it to be post poned a day. When it did nally get start ed Sunday, it was in terrupted several more times. BEN CURTIS / AP Novak Djokovic of Serbia kisses the trophy after defeating Roger Federer of Switzerland in the mens singles nal at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships on Sunday in Wimbledon, London. Legendary matchup PAVEL GOLOVKIN / AP Djokovic plays a return to Federer in the fourth set. JOHN RAOUX / AP The Greenbrier Classic Springhouse Trophy is displayed on the 18th tee at the Greenbrier Resort in White Sulphur Springs, W.Va. Former Umatilla standout Lucroy is an All-Star SEE NASCAR | B2 LAURENT CIPRIANI / AP Italys Vincenzo Nibali celebrates on the podium of the Tour de France on Sunday in Shefeld, England. JAMEY KEATEN Associated Press SHEFFIELD, England Italys Vincenzo Nibali dis played his riding smarts at the Tour de France, winning Stage 2 on Sunday and tak ing the yellow jersey after a well-choreographed attack on rivals in the postindus trial English city known for The Full Monty. The Astana team leader nicknamed The Shark for his road savvy took the nal lead in a cycling dance of sorts with other title hope fuls, who took turns in front in the last stretch through a sea of fans from York to Shefeld. Nibali perhaps had more at stake: The 29-year-old rider has won the Italian Giro and Spains Vuelta, but has never captured cy clings showcase event. The victory on Sunday gave him both his rst Tour stage win and yellow jersey, The Full Nibali: Savvy Italian wins second stage of Tour de France SEE TOUR | B2 JOHN RABY Associated Press WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, W.Va. Angel Cabrera won the Greenbrier Classic on Sunday for his rst non-major victory on the PGA Tour, closing with his second straight 6-under 64 for a two-stroke victory over George McNeill. Cabrera, the 44-year-old Argentine whose only other PGA Tour victories came in the 2007 U.S. Open and 2009 Masters, built a three-shot lead before making things interesting with a pair of late bogeys. He nished at 16-under 264. McNeill shot a season-best 61 for his fourth SEE GOLF | B2 RONALD BLUM Associated Press NEW YORK The trade that put Jeff Samardzija on a postseason con tender cost him a chance to pitch in his rst All-Star game. A day after Samardzija was dealt from the Chicago Cubs to Oakland, a big league-high six Athletics were picked Sunday for the game at Target Field in Minnesota on July 15. That doesnt include Samardzi ja, selected as an NL All-Star. Major League Baseball said he is ineligible to play because of the league switch. The right-hander will be intro duced with the National League players. Still to be decided is whether he wears a Cubs or As uniform or a generic NL jersey. The former Notre Dame receiv er was 2-7 with a 2.83 ERA and 103 strikeouts for the Cubs. In his debut for Oakland on Sunday, the 29-yearold Samardzija allowed one run in seven innings for a 4-2 victory over Toronto. Oakland has its most All-Stars since 1975: left-handers Sean Doolittle and Scott Kazmir; catcher Derek Norris; rst baseman Brandon Moss; third baseman Josh Donaldson; and out elder Yoenis Cespedes. Former Umatilla High School standout Jonathan Lucroy, now the starting catcher for the Milwaukee Brewers, was named to the Nation al League squad as a reserve. Lucroy currently boasts a .329 batting aver age and has collected nine homers and 44 RBI. Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter, playing his 20th and nal season, was chosen for his 14th All-Star team and will start for the ninth time. Among the big names bypassed entirely were slugger David Ortiz and closer Koji Uehara from World Se ries champion Boston, San Francis co catcher Buster Posey, and Dodg ers pitcher Josh Beckett. Also elected by fans to start for the AL were Detroit rst baseman Miguel Cabrera, Donaldson, and outelders Jose Bautista of Toronto, Adam Jones of Baltimore and Mike Trout of the Los Angeles Angels. Almirola wins delayed race at Daytona SEE TENNIS | B2 SEE ALL-STARS | B2 Angel Cabrera wins Greenbrier Classic by 2 Novak Djokovic outlasts Roger Federer in 5-set Wimbledon marathon

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 7, 2014 SUN mon tu es we d thurs fri Sa tLeesbur g LightningJul y 612Winter ParkAW AY1pmAll-Star Game@ SANFORD7pmDelandAW AY7pmDelandHOME6pmWinter ParkAW AY7pm AUTO RACING NASCAR Sprint Cup-Coke Zero 400 Results Sunday At Daytona International Speedway Daytona Beach Lap length: 2.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (15) Aric Almirola, Ford, 112 laps, 111.4 rating, 47 points, $377,176. 2. (30) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 112, 74.6, 42, $237,655. 3. (40) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 112, 120.8, 43, $187,680. 4. (22) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 112, 88.5, 41, $172,113. 5. (23) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 112, 84.1, 39, $179,916. 6. (37) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 112, 101.8, 38, $135,370. 7. (27) Michael McDowell, Ford, 112, 77, 37, $122,770. 8. (29) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 112, 86.8, 36, $127,045. 9. (34) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 112, 87.2, 36, $150,536. 10. (18) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 112, 76.4, 34, $140,565. 11. (38) Terry Labonte, Ford, 112, 56.5, 33, $128,643. 12. (9) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 112, 69.8, 33, $154,696. 13. (43) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 112, 60.2, 31, $124,843. 14. (7) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 112, 56.9, 30, $117,785. 15. (19) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 112, 63, 29, $136,843. 16. (21) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 112, 74.1, 28, $136,574. 17. (28) Joey Logano, Ford, 112, 95.4, 27, $144,501. 18. (26) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 111, 54.8, 26, $149,093. 19. (41) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 111, 40.6, 25, $113,735. 20. (6) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 111, 67, 25, $152,021. 21. (32) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 104, 65, 24, $115,793. 22. (8) David Ragan, Ford, accident, 102, 86.5, 23, $120,957. 23. (33) Josh Wise, Ford, 101, 58.7, 21, $102,635. 24. (20) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 100, 59.2, 20, $110,010. 25. (31) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, accident, 98, 72.5, 19, $109,460. 26. (4) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet, accident, 98, 67.1, 18, $97,710. 27. (14) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, accident, 97, 96.9, 17, $116,460. 28. (39) Kyle Busch, Toyota, accident, 97, 79.3, 16, $149,676. 29. (10) Greg Bife, Ford, accident, 97, 108, 16, $140,785. 30. (36) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, accident, 97, 88.7, 15, $134,749. 31. (3) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, accident, 97, 88.5, 0, $96,810. 32. (42) Ryan Truex, Toyota, accident, 97, 63.4, 12, $95,735. 33. (2) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, accident, 97, 74.3, 12, $96,635. 34. (17) Cole Whitt, Toyota, accident, 97, 59.7, 10, $95,460. 35. (1) David Gilliland, Ford, accident, 97, 90.2, 10, $111,285. 36. (35) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 69, 27.4, 8, $121,480. 37. (11) Carl Edwards, Ford, 66, 36.4, 7, $113,948. 38. (25) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 46, 33.8, 0, $89,240. 39. (13) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 46, 32, 5, $126,273. 40. (12) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 45, 47.7, 5, $115,398. 41. (16) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 37, 34.1, 3, $113,065. 42. (5) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, accident, 20, 48.3, 2, $127,176. 43. (24) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, accident, 19, 29.4, 1, $69,740. Pocono IndyCar 500 Results Sunday At Pocono Raceway Long Pond, Pa. Lap length: 2.5 miles (Starting position in parentheses) All cars Dallara chassis 1. (1) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 200 laps. 2. (7) Helio Castroneves, Chevrolet, 200. 3. (3) Carlos Munoz, Honda, 200. 4. (10) Ryan Briscoe, Chevrolet, 200. 5. (15) Scott Dixon, Chevrolet, 200. 6. (11) Simon Pagenaud, Honda, 200. 7. (12) Mikhail Aleshin, Honda, 200. 8. (21) Josef Newgarden, Honda, 200. 9. (5) Marco Andretti, Honda, 200. 10. (2) Will Power, Chevrolet, 200. 11. (8) Tony Kanaan, Chevrolet, 200. 12. (6) James Hinchcliffe, Honda, 199. 13. (13) Ed Carpenter, Chevrolet, 199. 14. (16) Justin Wilson, Honda, 199. 15. (19) Sebastian Saavedra, Chevrolet, 199. 16. (18) Sebastien Bourdais, Chevrolet, 199. 17. (17) Charlie Kimball, Chevrolet, 198. 18. (9) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Honda, 181. 19. (14) Graham Rahal, Honda, 157, electrical. 20. (20) Carlos Huertas, Honda, 89, electrical. 21. (4) Takuma Sato, Honda, 25, electrical. 22. (22) Jack Hawksworth, Honda, 0, did not start. BASEBALL 2014 All-Star Rosters Rosters for the MLB All-Star game on July 15 at Target Field, Minneapolis. AMERICAN LEAGUE STARTERS Catcher Matt Wieters, Orioles (inactive) First Base Josh Donaldson, Athletics Second Base Robinson Cano, Mariners Third Base Miguel Cabrera, Tigers Shortstop Derek Jeter, Yankees Outeld Jose Bautista, Blue Jays; Mike Trout, Angels; Adam Jones, Orioles Designated Hitter Nelson Cruz, Orioles RESERVES Pitchers Dellin Betances, RHP, Yankees Mark Buehrle, LHP, Blue Jays Yu Darvish, RHP, Rangers Sean Doolittle, LHP, Athletics Felix Hernandez, RHP, Mariners Greg Holland, RHP, Royals Scott Kazmir, LHP, Athletics Jon Lester, LHP, Red Sox Glen Perkins, LHP, Twins David Price, LHP, Rays Max Scherzer, RHP, Tigers Masahiro Tanaka, RHP, Yankees Catchers Derek Norris, Athletics Salvador Perez, Royals Kurt Suzuki, Twins Inelders Jose Abreu, White Sox Jose Altuve, Astros Adrian Beltre, Rangers Edwin Encarnacion, Blue Jays Brandon Moss, Athletics Alexei Ramirez, White Sox Outelders Michael Brantley, Indians Yoenis Cespedes, Athletics Alex Gordon, Royals Designated Hitters Victor Martinez, Tigers MLB.Com Final Vote Candidates LHP Dallas Keuchel, Astros RHP Corey Kluber, Indians RHP Garrett Richards, Angels RHP Rick Porcello, Tigers LHP Chris Sale, White Sox NATIONAL LEAGUE STARTERS Catcher Yadier Molina, Cardinals First Base Paul Goldschmidt, Diamondbacks Second Base Chase Utley, Phillies Third Base Aramis Ramirez, Brewers Shortstop Troy Tulowitzki, Rockies Outeld Andrew McCutchen, Pirates; Carlos Gomez, Brewers; Yasiel Puig, Dodgers RESERVES Pitchers Madison Bumgarner, LHP, Giants Aroldis Chapman, LHP, Reds Johnny Cueto, RHP, Reds Zack Greinke, RHP, Dodgers Clayton Kershaw, LHP, Dodgers Craig Kimbrel, RHP, Braves Pat Neshek, RHP, Cardinals Francisco Rodriguez, RHP, Brewers Tyson Ross, RHP, Padres Jeff Samardzija, RHP, Cubs/As (inactive) Julio Teheran, RHP, Braves Adam Wainwright, RHP, Cardinals Tony Watson, LHP, Pirates Jordan Zimmermann, RHP, Nationals Catchers Jonathan Lucroy, Brewers Devin Mesoraco, Reds Inelders Matt Carpenter, Cardinals Starlin Castro, Cubs Todd Frazier, Reds Freddie Freeman, Braves Dee Gordon, Dodgers Daniel Murphy, Mets Outelders Charlie Blackmon, Rockies Josh Harrison, Pirates Hunter Pence, Giants Giancarlo Stanton, Marlins MLB.Com Final Vote Candidates 3B Casey McGehee, Marlins 1B Justin Morneau, Rockies 3B Anthony Rendon, Nationals 1B Anthony Rizzo, Cubs OF Justin Upton, Braves GOLF Alstom Open de France Leading Scores Sunday At Le Golf National (Albatross Course) Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, France Purse: $4.1 million Yardage: 7,331; Par: 71 Final Graeme McDowell, Northern Ireland 70-69-73-67 279 Kevin Stadler, United States 64-68-72-76 280 Thongchai Jaidee, Thailand 70-69-69-72 280 Robert Karlsson, Sweden 73-69-70-69 281 Jamie Donaldson, Wales 67-72-74-69 282 Matthew Baldwin, England 70-71-70-71 282 Michael Hoey, Northern Ireland 73-66-73-71 283 Victor Riu, France 68-67-73-76 284 Fabrizio Zanotti, Paraguay 73-70-75-67 285 Oliver Fisher, England 69-71-77-68 285 Wade Ormsby, Australia 70-75-69-72 286 Gregory Bourdy, France 73-72-72-70 287 Kristoffer Broberg, Sweden 70-74-72-71 287 Magnus A. Carlsson, Sweden 73-72-70-72 287 Matthew Nixon, England 71-72-70-74 287 Damien McGrane, Ireland 71-69-72-75 287 Martin Kaymer, Germany 72-68-70-77 287 Also Joost Luiten, Netherlands 73-69-73-73 288 Stephen Gallacher, Scotland 66-73-74-75 288 Bernd Wiesberger, Austria 70-70-71-77 288 TV 2 DAY SCOREBOARD FCSL STANDINGS W L .Pct GB Sanford 16 9 .640 Winter Park 15 11 .577 1.5 Winter Garden 14 12 .538 2.5 Leesburg 12 10 .545 2.5 DeLand 9 15 .375 6.5 College Park 7 16 .304 8 SUNDAYS GAMES Leesburg at Winter Park, canceled DeLand at College Park, canceled Winter Garden at Sanford, canceled TODAYS GAMES None scheduled TUESDAYS GAME FCSL All-Star Game, at Sanford, 7 p.m. ARENA LEAGUE FOOTBALL 8 p.m. ESPN2 Orlando at Philadelphia CYCLING 8 a.m. NBCSN Tour de France, stage 3, Cambridge, England to London MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7 p.m. ESPN N.Y. Yankees at Cleveland 7:10 p.m. SUN Kansas City at Tampa Bay 9:40 p.m. FS-Florida Miami at Arizona There were three red ags, two of them because of huge accidents that took out most of the 43-car eld and several top contenders. Jimmie Johnson, Tony Stewart, Kev in Harvick, Jamie McMurray, Carl Edwards, Kasey Kahne, Greg Bife and Kyle Busch were among those knocked out of contention. NASCAR FROM PAGE B1 and sent a message that he could contend to take it home from Paris in three weeks. With about a mile left, Nibali escaped a 21-man breakaway bunch at the end of the 125-mile course over nine heath-covered hills of Yorkshire, and held off their late surge. En gland is hosting the rst three Tour stages this year. GERMAN STRIPPED OF YELLOW JERSEY Marcel Kittel, a power ful German sprinter who often struggles on climbs, trailed nearly 20 min utes back and lost the yel low jersey that he had cap tured by winning Stage 1. While the Italian won the battle to the line, under the shadow of a black Shefeld Forgemasters tower, de fending champion Chris Froome of Britain and twotime winner Alberto Con tador of Spain are focusing more on the overall race which ends July 27 on Par is Champs-Elysees. Overall, Nibali leads 20 other riders by two sec onds, including Froome in fth place and Contador in eighth. A six-man breakaway bunch tried its chances early, but got swallowed up by the pack with some 20 miles left. Then, the big race stars moved to the front, splitting the pack. Contador, Froome, and Americans Andrew Talan sky and Tejay van Garderen all spent time at the front. At times, they mustered bursts of speed or zipped across with width of the road in tactical maneuvers. In the nale, a lot of contenders were mak ing moves: Nibali ended up taking two seconds on us, Froome said. Its not a big margin. For me, it was about staying out of trou ble to stay at the front, and avoiding any major issues or splits. Im tired, but I hope ev eryones tired after a day like today. TIME TO WORK, ASTANA Dave Brailsford, boss of Froomes Team Sky, said the leaders actually were all hesitant, because no body wanted the jersey. In the cycling playbook, the yellow shirt brings both glory and responsibili ty. Brailsford said: Asta na will have to now defend it, which is pretty good for anybody else. Nibali didnt dare claim he might keep it all the way to Paris, saying the Tour de France doesnt stop here: We have three weeks to go, and very tough and tricky stages lie ahead. Mondays stage should be a far less grueling ride: Riders cover 96 miles from university town Cam bridge to London, where the pack will nish on the Mall not far from Big Ben and Westminster Abbey. TOUR FROM PAGE B1 The Greenbrier Classic Leading Scores Sunday At The Old White TPC White Sulphur Springs, W.Va. Purse: $6.5 million Yardage: 7,287; Par 70 Final Angel Cabrera (500), $1,170,000 68-68-64-64 264 -16 George McNeill (300), $702,000 70-67-68-61 266 -14 Webb Simpson (190), $442,000 71-69-67-63 270 -10 Keegan Bradley (96), $227,036 67-69-69-66 271 -9 Bud Cauley (96), $227,036 69-68-70-64 271 -9 Brendon Todd (96), $227,036 71-67-67-66 271 -9 Billy Hurley III (96), $227,036 68-63-67-73 271 -9 Chris Stroud (96), $227,036 66-66-70-69 271 -9 Cameron Tringale (96), $227,036 72-66-64-69 271 -9 Will Wilcox (96), $227,036 68-69-65-69 271 -9 Charlie Beljan (62), $137,800 67-69-71-65 272 -8 Jason Bohn (62), $137,800 65-72-68-67 272 -8 Joe Durant (62), $137,800 65-71-66-70 272 -8 Steve Marino (62), $137,800 69-70-66-67 272 -8 Michael Thompson (62), $137,800 66-72-64-70 272 -8 Sang-Moon Bae (52), $91,186 66-74-66-67 273 -7 Danny Lee (52), $91,186 65-71-71-66 273 -7 Troy Merritt (52), $91,186 66-72-68-67 273 -7 Kevin Chappell (52), $91,186 67-65-69-72 273 -7 David Lingmerth (52), $91,186 67-68-69-69 273 -7 Jim Renner (52), $91,186 65-70-68-70 273 -7 Bubba Watson (52), $91,186 68-67-69-69 273 -7 Patrick Cantlay (47), $62,400 69-68-69-68 274 -6 Bill Haas (47), $62,400 69-70-65-70 274 -6 J.B. Holmes (47), $62,400 68-68-69-69 274 -6 Ted Potter, Jr. (41), $44,236 70-70-68-67 275 -5 Robert Allenby (41), $44,236 67-70-68-70 275 -5 Luke Guthrie (41), $44,236 67-69-68-71 275 -5 Scott Langley (41), $44,236 68-71-67-69 275 -5 Andrew Loupe (41), $44,236 69-69-67-70 275 -5 Patrick Reed (41), $44,236 67-69-71-68 275 -5 David Toms (41), $44,236 69-69-68-69 275 -5 Camilo Villegas (41), $44,236 68-67-67-73 275 -5 Johnson Wagner (41), $44,236 68-68-71-68 275 -5 Jonas Blixt (32), $28,698 64-73-68-71 276 -4 Brice Garnett (32), $28,698 68-66-72-70 276 -4 Davis Love III (32), $28,698 67-73-65-71 276 -4 Carl Pettersson (32), $28,698 71-68-70-67 276 -4 Michael Putnam (32), $28,698 67-72-67-70 276 -4 Scott Stallings (32), $28,698 70-69-70-67 276 -4 Kyle Stanley (32), $28,698 71-68-66-71 276 -4 Shawn Stefani (32), $28,698 73-67-67-69 276 -4 Steve Stricker (32), $28,698 66-68-68-74 276 -4 Tom Watson (32), $28,698 71-68-68-69 276 -4 Chris Kirk (23), $18,219 65-69-75-68 277 -3 Richard H. Lee (23), $18,219 71-68-67-71 277 -3 Troy Matteson (23), $18,219 72-61-71-73 277 -3 Patrick Rodgers, $18,219 65-75-68-69 277 -3 Andres Romero (23), $18,219 72-68-67-70 277 -3 Heath Slocum (23), $18,219 70-69-68-70 277 -3 Josh Teater (23), $18,219 69-69-70-69 277 -3 Stephen Ames (17), $15,158 69-68-71-70 278 -2 Charles Howell III (17), $15,158 67-71-68-72 278 -2 Justin Leonard (17), $15,158 71-67-69-71 278 -2 Kevin Na (17), $15,158 66-70-71-71 278 -2 top-10 of the season and rst since mid-March. Webb Simpson had a 63 to nish third at 10 under. Third-round leader Bil ly Hurley III bogeyed four of the rst six holes to fall out of contention. He shot 73 and nished in a sev en-way tie for fourth at 9 under. No third-round lead er has hung on to win the Greenbrier Classic in its ve-year existence. McNeill was the club house leader at 14 under well ahead of Cabrera, who still had the back nine to play. Cabrera had no top 10-finishes this season entering the tournament, but had everything work ing Sunday, hammering drives and approach shots with precision and coming up with clutch putts, espe cially on the back nine. Cabrera overtook Mc Neill with birdie putts of 17 and 7 feet on the 11th and 12th holes, then gave a st pump after mov ing to 17 under by holing a 176-yard 8-iron up the hill for eagle on the par-4 13th, the hardest hole at Old White TPC. By then his lead was three strokes, but he bo geyed the 14th after his approach shot spun off the front of the green and bogeyed the par-3 15th af ter hitting into the rough on his tee shot. Cabrera smashed a 330yard drive over the lake on the par-4 16th and made par, then drilled a 336yard drive on the 616-yard 17th and two-putted for birdie. He closed out with par on the par-3 18th. Cabrera won $1.2 mil lion and is projected to im prove from 158th to 54th in the FedEx Cup stand ings. McNeill would move from 60th to 29th. Joining Hurley at 9 under were Bud Cauley (64), Kea gan Bradley (66), Brendon Todd (66), Chris Stroud (69), Cameron Tringale (69) and Will Wilcox (69). GOLF FROM PAGE B1 Federer said it was dra matic match. You know going into a match with Novak, its al ways going to be tough, Federer said. It had every thing for fans to like, the swing of momentum in the rst set, him coming back in the second and third, all the back and forth in the fourth set and all the dra mas in the fth. Boris Becker, a three-time Wimbledon champion and Djokovics coach, paid trib ute to both players. Roger played unbeliev able today, Becker said. Its the best Roger Ive seen in years and it couldve gone either way in the fth set. Novak digs deep and nds another way, his sense of not giving up, giving it al ways another try. Djokovic had 27 un forced errors in the match while Federer had 29. Djokovic broke Federer four times while Federer converted three of his sev en break points. There had been only one service break through the rst three sets before a string of three straight in the fourth as Djokovic took a 4-2 lead before holding serve again. Djokovic returns to the top ranking for the rst time since last Septem ber, taking over from Ra fael Nadal, who lost in the fourth round here. The Serbian player rst rose to No. 1 when he won Wimbledon in 2011, al though he was already guaranteed of securing the top ranking even before beating Nadal in that nal. Djokovic fell awkward ly in the rst game of the second set and called for a trainer immediately after he broke Federers serve. The trainer worked on Djokovics left ankle. Djokovic again called for the trainer after the third game of the nal set. TENNIS FROM PAGE B1 Baltimores Matt Wieters, side lined by season-ending elbow sur gery on June 17, was elected to start at catcher and will be replaced by Minnesotas Kurt Suzuki, Kansas Citys Salvador Perez or Norris. Orioles bopper Nelson Cruz, tied for the major league home run lead with 27, was voted in by fans at des ignated hitter after serving a 50game suspension last year for vio lating baseballs drug agreement. Elected to the NL starting line up were Arizona rst baseman Paul Goldschmidt, Philadelphia second baseman Chase Utley, Colorado shortstop Troy Tulowitzki, Milwau kee third baseman Aramis Ramirez and St. Louis catcher Yadier Mo lina along with outelders Carlos Gomez of Milwaukee, Andrew Mc Cutchen of Pittsburgh and Yasiel Puig of the Los Angeles Dodgers. Top rookies Masahiro Tanaka of the Yankees and Jose Abreu of the Chicago White Sox were picked for the AL squad. Surprise selections included Pitts burgh utilityman Josh Harrison and left-hander Tony Watson, and St. Louis reliever Pat Neshek. Milwaukee closer Francisco Ro driguez made his fth All-Star team, his rst since 2009. Bautista, at 5.68 million, received the most votes for the second time in four years. Tulowitzki topped the NL at 5.35 million. Other players omitted despite strong credentials were Cincinnati pitcher Alfredo Simon, Seattle third baseman Kyle Seager and San Diego closer Huston Street, who had con verted 23 consecutive save chances before allowing a tying home run in the ninth Saturday. Milwaukee outelder Ryan Braun and Toronto outelder Melky Cabre ra, who like Cruz served lengthy drug-related suspensions, also were left out. The candidates in online voting for the nal AL spot are all pitchers: Houstons Dallas Keuchel, Cleve lands Corey Kluber, Los Angeles Garrett Richards, Detroits Rick Por cello and Chicagos Chris Sale. ALL-STARS FROM PAGE B1

PAGE 15

Monday, July 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Baltimore 48 40 .545 7-3 W-2 23-21 25-19 Toronto 47 43 .522 2 2 3-7 L-4 25-21 22-22 New York 44 43 .506 3 3 4-6 W-1 18-23 26-20 Tampa Bay 40 50 .444 9 9 8-2 W-2 19-25 21-25 Boston 39 49 .443 9 9 4-6 L-2 21-24 18-25 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 48 36 .571 6-4 L-2 23-21 25-15 Kansas City 45 42 .517 4 2 5-5 L-2 21-22 24-20 Cleveland 43 44 .494 6 4 6-4 W-2 25-16 18-28 Chicago 42 47 .472 8 6 6-4 W-1 24-21 18-26 Minnesota 39 48 .448 10 8 3-7 L-1 21-22 18-26 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 55 33 .625 7-3 W-4 28-15 27-18 Los Angeles 51 36 .586 3 7-3 W-4 30-14 21-22 Seattle 48 40 .545 7 6-4 L-1 21-22 27-18 Texas 38 50 .432 17 10 3-7 L-1 18-23 20-27 Houston 36 54 .400 20 13 2-8 L-7 20-26 16-28 NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 49 39 .557 9-1 L-1 25-19 24-20 Washington 48 39 .552 7-3 W-2 28-18 20-21 Miami 43 45 .489 6 5 4-6 W-2 27-22 16-23 New York 39 49 .443 10 9 3-7 W-1 19-22 20-27 Philadelphia 37 51 .420 12 11 1-9 L-3 18-27 19-24 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 52 37 .584 5-5 L-1 24-18 28-19 Pittsburgh 47 41 .534 4 1 8-2 W-3 29-20 18-21 St. Louis 47 42 .528 5 2 4-6 L-2 24-19 23-23 Cincinnati 45 42 .517 6 3 6-4 W-1 21-19 24-23 Chicago 38 48 .442 12 9 6-4 L-2 19-20 19-28 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Los Angeles 50 40 .556 6-4 L-1 22-23 28-17 San Francisco 48 39 .552 3-7 W-1 25-23 23-16 San Diego 39 48 .448 9 9 6-4 L-1 24-24 15-24 Colorado 37 51 .420 12 11 2-8 W-1 21-21 16-30 Arizona 37 53 .411 13 12 4-6 W-1 15-30 22-23 SATURDAYS GAMES Boston 3, Baltimore 2, 1st game Minnesota 2, N.Y. Yankees 1, 11 innings Seattle 3, Chicago White Sox 2, 14 innings Tampa Bay 7, Detroit 2 Cleveland 7, Kansas City 3 Baltimore 7, Boston 4, 2nd game Texas 5, N.Y. Mets 3 L.A. Angels 11, Houston 5 Oakland 5, Toronto 1 SATURDAYS GAMES Miami 6, St. Louis 5 Washington 13, Chicago Cubs 0 Pittsburgh 3, Philadelphia 2 Atlanta 10, Arizona 4 Colorado 8, L.A. Dodgers 7 Milwaukee 1, Cincinnati 0 San Francisco 5, San Diego 3, 10 innings Texas 5, N.Y. Mets 3 SUNDAYS GAMES Cleveland 4, Kansas City 1 N.Y. Mets 8, Texas 4 Baltimore 7, Boston 6, 12 innings N.Y. Yankees 9, Minnesota 7 Chicago White Sox 1, Seattle 0 L.A. Angels 6, Houston 1 Oakland 4, Toronto 2 Tampa Bay at Detroit, late SUNDAYS GAMES Cincinnati 4, Milwaukee 2 N.Y. Mets 8, Texas 4 Arizona 3, Atlanta 1 Washington 2, Chicago Cubs 1 Pittsburgh 6, Philadelphia 2 Miami 8, St. Louis 4 San Francisco5, San Diego 3 L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, late ALEX BRANDON / AP Washington Nationals third baseman Ryan Zimmerman throws a ball hit by Chicago Cubs Starlin Castro for the last out of the game on Sunday at Nationals Park in Washington. The Nationals won 2-1. TODAYS GAMES Baltimore (Tillman 7-4) at Washington (Strasburg 7-6), 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Undecided) at Cleveland (Masterson 4-5), 7:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Carroll 2-5) at Boston (Buchholz 3-4), 7:10 p.m. Kansas City (Shields 8-4) at Tampa Bay (Odorizzi 4-7), 7:10 p.m. Houston (Cosart 8-6) at Texas (Mikolas 0-0), 8:05 p.m. San Francisco (Vogelsong 5-5) at Oakland (J.Chavez 6-5), 10:05 p.m. Toronto (Happ 7-4) at L.A. Angels (Weaver 9-6), 10:05 p.m. Minnesota (Correia 4-10) at Seattle (Iwakuma 6-4), 10:10 p.m. TODAYS GAMES Baltimore (Tillman 7-4) at Washington (Strasburg 7-6), 7:05 p.m. Atlanta (Minor 2-5) at N.Y. Mets (Matsuzaka 3-3), 7:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (E.Jackson 5-8) at Cincinnati (Leake 6-7), 7:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Hamels 2-5) at Milwaukee (Estrada 7-5), 8:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Morton 5-9) at St. Louis (Wainwright 11-4), 8:15 p.m. San Diego (Kennedy 6-9) at Colorado (Matzek 1-2), 8:40 p.m. Miami (Koehler 6-6) at Arizona (C.Anderson 5-4), 9:40 p.m. San Francisco (Vogelsong 5-5) at Oakland (J.Chavez 6-5), 10:05 p.m. AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Altuve, Houston, .338; Beltre, Texas, .335; VMartinez, Detroit, .328; Cano, Seattle, .323; Brantley, Cleveland, .319; MiCabrera, Detroit, .311; AJones, Bal timore, .309. RUNS: Dozier, Minnesota, 62; Kinsler, Detroit, 60; Brant ley, Cleveland, 58; Donaldson, Oakland, 58; Encarna cion, Toronto, 57; Trout, Los Angeles, 57; Bautista, To ronto, 56. RBI: NCruz, Baltimore, 70; Encarnacion, Toronto, 70; JAbreu, Chicago, 69; MiCabrera, Detroit, 67; Trout, Los An geles, 63; Donaldson, Oakland, 62; Moss, Oakland, 62. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 121; AJones, Baltimore, 110; MeCabrera, Toronto, 109; Kinsler, Detroit, 107; Marka kis, Baltimore, 106; Cano, Seattle, 104; Brantley, Cleve land, 101; Rios, Texas, 101. DOUBLES: MiCabrera, Detroit, 32; Altuve, Houston, 26; Kinsler, Detroit, 26; AEscobar, Kansas City, 24; Pedroia, Boston, 24; Plouffe, Minnesota, 24; EEscobar, Minnesota, 23; AGordon, Kansas City, 23; Trout, Los Angeles, 23. TRIPLES: Rios, Texas, 8; Bourn, Cleveland, 7; Eaton, Chicago, 6; Gardner, New York, 6; Trout, Los Angeles, 5; JJones, Seattle, 4; Kiermaier, Tampa Bay, 4. HOME RUNS: JAbreu, Chicago, 27; NCruz, Baltimore, 27; Encarnacion, Toronto, 26; VMartinez, Detroit, 21; Trout, Los Angeles, 20; Donaldson, Oakland, 19; Moss, Oakland, 19; Ortiz, Boston, 19; Pujols, Los Angeles, 19. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 37; Ellsbury, New York, 23; RDavis, Detroit, 22; AEscobar, Kansas City, 21; An drus, Texas, 19; JJones, Seattle, 17; LMartin, Texas, 17. PITCHING: Tanaka, New York, 12-3; Porcello, Detroit, 11-4; FHernandez, Seattle, 10-2; Kazmir, Oakland, 10-3; Scherzer, Detroit, 10-3; Buehrle, Toronto, 10-6; Richards, Los Angeles, 9-2; Lackey, Boston, 9-6; Weaver, Los An geles, 9-6; Lester, Boston, 9-7. ERA: FHernandez, Seattle, 2.11; Tanaka, New York, 2.27; Kazmir, Oakland, 2.53; Buehrle, Toronto, 2.60; Darvish, Texas, 2.63; Lester, Boston, 2.73. STRIKEOUTS: Price, Tampa Bay, 153; FHernandez, Seat tle, 145; Scherzer, Detroit, 139; Darvish, Texas, 134. SAVES: Rodney, Seattle, 25; Holland, Kansas City, 23; Perkins, Minnesota, 20; DavRobertson, New York, 20. NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Tulowitzki, Colorado, .350; Lucroy, Milwau kee, .333; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, .322; MaAdams, St. Louis, .320; McGehee, Miami, .317; Morneau, Colorado, .314; Gennett, Milwaukee, .310. RUNS: Tulowitzki, Colorado, 66; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 63; Pence, San Francisco, 61; FFreeman, Atlanta, 60; Rendon, Washington, 60; Stanton, Miami, 60; Rizzo, Chicago, 56. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 62; Morneau, Colorado, 59; Gold schmidt, Arizona, 56; Desmond, Washington, 53; Ad Gonzalez, Los Angeles, 53; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 53; McGehee, Miami, 52. HITS: McGehee, Miami, 106; DanMurphy, New York, 105; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 104; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 104; Pence, San Francisco, 103; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 102; Stanton, Miami, 101. DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 32; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 30; SCastro, Chicago, 26; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 26; Span, Washington, 26; FFreeman, Atlanta, 25; Utley, Philadelphia, 24. TRIPLES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 9; BCrawford, San Francisco, 8; Yelich, Miami, 6; Braun, Milwaukee, 5; Ow ings, Arizona, 5; Rendon, Washington, 5. HOME RUNS: Stanton, Miami, 21; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 18; Byrd, Philadelphia, 17; Frazier, Cincinnati, 17; Rizzo, Chicago, 17; JUpton, Atlanta, 17; Gattis, Atlanta, 16. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 42; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 35; Revere, Philadelphia, 25; EYoung, New York, 22; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 21; Rollins, Philadelphia, 16. PITCHING: Simon, Cincinnati, 11-3; Wainwright, St. Louis, 11-4; Greinke, Los Angeles, 11-4; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 10-2; Lohse, Milwaukee, 9-3; Ryu, Los Angeles, 9-4; WP eralta, Milwaukee, 9-5; JDe La Rosa, Colorado, 9-6. ERA: Wainwright, St. Louis, 1.89; Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.99; Teheran, Atlanta, 2.29; HAlvarez, Miami, 2.33; Beckett, Los Angeles, 2.37; Hudson, San Francisco, 2.53; Greinke, Los Angeles, 2.66. STRIKEOUTS: Strasburg, Washington, 131; Cueto, Cin cinnati, 130; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 120; Greinke, Los Angeles, 119; Kennedy, San Diego, 116. SAVES: Kimbrel, Atlanta, 27; FrRodriguez, Milwaukee, 27; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 26; Jansen, Los Angeles, 26. Marlins 8, Cardinals 4 Miami St. Louis ab r h bi ab r h bi Yelich lf 5 2 2 0 MCrpnt 3b 4 0 0 0 Lucas 2b 6 0 1 0 Hollidy lf 3 0 0 0 Stanton rf 5 1 2 0 Bourjos ph-cf 2 1 2 0 McGeh 3b 4 2 2 1 MAdms 1b 5 1 4 1 Ozuna cf 4 0 2 2 Craig rf-lf 4 0 0 1 JeBakr 1b 4 1 2 2 YMolin c 2 0 0 0 Sltlmch c 4 1 1 3 T.Cruz ph-c 0 0 0 0 Hchvrr ss 5 0 1 0 Tavers cf-rf 4 0 0 0 HAlvrz p 4 1 3 0 Wong 2b 4 2 2 1 Bour ph 1 0 0 0 Descals ss 4 0 1 1 Gregg p 0 0 0 0 Gonzals p 1 0 0 0 DJnngs p 0 0 0 0 Maness p 1 0 1 0 Hatchr p 0 0 0 0 Grenwd p 0 0 0 0 Jay ph 1 0 0 0 Motte p 0 0 0 0 Choate p 0 0 0 0 M.Ellis ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 42 8 16 8 Totals 36 4 10 4 Miami 100 003 040 8 St. Louis 000 000 121 4 DPMiami 1, St. Louis 1. LOBMiami 14, St. Louis 8. 2BHechavarria (11), Bourjos (6), Ma.Adams (20), Descalso (5). HRSaltalamacchia (9), Wong (2). SB Ma.Adams (3). IP H R ER BB SO Miami H.Alvarez W,6-3 7 5 1 1 1 3 Gregg 2 / 3 2 2 2 1 0 Da.Jennings 1 / 3 2 1 1 0 1 Hatcher 1 1 0 0 0 0 St. Louis Gonzales L,0-2 4 2 / 3 7 1 1 5 5 Maness 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Greenwood 2 5 3 3 1 1 Motte 1 4 4 4 1 1 Choate 1 0 0 0 0 0 Da.Jennings pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. HBPby H.Alvarez (Y.Molina). WPGregg. UmpiresHome, Tim Timmons; First, Tim Welke; Sec ond, Todd Tichenor; Third, Clint Fagan. T:13. A,160 (45,399). Yankees 9, Twins 7 New York Minnesota ab r h bi ab r h bi Gardnr lf 3 1 0 0 Dozier 2b 5 1 1 0 Jeter ss 4 1 3 2 Nunez ss 5 1 2 0 Ellsury cf 5 2 2 4 Parmel 1b-cf 5 0 1 1 Teixeir 1b 5 0 2 1 Wlngh lf 3 1 0 0 McCnn c 5 0 1 1 Arcia rf 4 0 2 1 Beltran dh 4 0 0 0 KSuzuk c 5 1 1 0 BRorts 2b 4 1 1 0 Plouffe 3b 4 2 3 2 ISuzuki rf 4 2 3 0 Colaell dh 3 1 2 2 KJhnsn 3b 4 2 2 0 Fuld cf 3 0 1 0 ZeWhlr 3b 0 0 0 0 KMorls ph-1b 1 0 0 0 Totals 38 9 14 8 Totals 38 7 13 6 New York 240 300 000 9 Minnesota 000 400 111 7 EKe.Johnson (9), Kuroda (1). DPNew York 2, Min nesota 1. LOBNew York 5, Minnesota 8. 2BElls bury (18), McCann (9), K.Suzuki (18), Plouffe (25), Colabello (12). HREllsbury (5), Plouffe (6), Colabello (6). SFJeter. IP H R ER BB SO New York Kuroda W,6-6 5 2 / 3 7 4 4 2 3 Warren 1 1 / 3 2 1 1 1 2 Ji.Miller 1 1 1 1 1 0 Dav.Robertson S,21-23 1 3 1 1 0 2 Minnesota Nolasco L,5-7 2 7 6 6 1 0 Swarzak 3 4 3 3 0 1 Thielbar 2 1 0 0 1 0 Guerrier 2 2 0 0 0 0 WPKuroda. BalkSwarzak. UmpiresHome, Rob Drake; First, Alan Porter; Sec ond, Joe West; Third, Marty Foster. T:11. A,171 (39,021). Mets 8, Rangers 4 Texas New York ab r h bi ab r h bi Choo lf 5 0 1 0 Grndrs rf 2 2 0 0 Andrus ss 4 0 0 0 DnMrp 2b 4 0 1 1 Rios rf 5 1 1 1 DWrght 3b 4 0 0 0 ABeltre 3b 4 1 1 0 Duda 1b 3 1 1 1 LMartn cf 4 1 2 2 Niwnhs lf 2 3 1 1 Chirins c 4 1 1 1 Lagars cf 4 1 1 1 C.Pena 1b 3 0 1 0 Recker c 4 1 1 3 Poreda p 0 0 0 0 Tejada ss 3 0 2 1 Feliz p 0 0 0 0 ZaWhlr p 1 0 0 0 Odor 2b 4 0 1 0 Evelnd p 0 0 0 0 Tepsch p 2 0 1 0 Black p 0 0 0 0 Choice ph 1 0 1 0 EYong ph 1 0 0 0 Frasor p 0 0 0 0 Germn p 0 0 0 0 Gimenz ph-1b 1 0 0 0 Famili p 0 0 0 0 BAreu ph 1 0 0 0 Mejia p 0 0 0 0 Totals 37 4 10 4 Totals 29 8 7 8 Texas 000 100 030 4 New York 500 001 11x 8 DPTexas 1. LOBTexas 8, New York 4. 2BChoo (14), C.Pena (2), Odor (4), Dan.Murphy (20), Duda (18), Tejada (8). HRRios (4), L.Martin (4), Chirinos (9), Nieuwenhuis (2), Recker (3). SBNieuwenhuis (1), Lagares (2). CSDuda (2). SZa.Wheeler. IP H R ER BB SO Texas Tepesch L,3-4 6 5 6 6 4 4 Frasor 1 1 1 1 1 0 Poreda 0 0 1 1 1 0 Feliz 1 1 0 0 0 0 New York Za.Wheeler W,4-8 6 1 / 3 6 1 1 2 4 Eveland 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Black 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Germen 1 / 3 3 3 3 0 1 Familia H,7 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 1 Mejia 1 0 0 0 0 1 Poreda pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. UmpiresHome, Marvin Hudson; First, D.J. Reyburn; Second, Jim Joyce; Third, Doug Eddings. T:21. A,213 (41,922). Indians 4, Royals 1 Kansas City Cleveland ab r h bi ab r h bi L.Cain rf 4 0 1 0 Kipnis 2b 4 1 1 0 Hosmer 1b 4 0 1 0 ACarer ss 4 0 1 0 S.Perez c 4 0 0 0 Brantly cf 4 0 2 1 Ibanez lf 4 0 0 0 CSantn 1b 4 1 1 1 Valenci dh 4 0 0 0 Raburn rf 4 1 1 0 Mostks 3b 2 1 1 1 T.Holt rf 0 0 0 0 AEscor ss 3 0 0 0 Swisher dh 3 0 1 0 JDyson cf 3 0 1 0 YGoms c 4 1 2 2 C.Colon 2b 3 0 0 0 Chsnhll 3b 3 0 0 0 Aviles lf 3 0 1 0 Totals 31 1 4 1 Totals 33 4 10 4 Kansas City 000 010 000 1 Cleveland 030 010 00x 4 DPKansas City 1. LOBKansas City 4, Cleveland 6. 2BHosmer (22), Y.Gomes (12), Aviles (8). HRMous takas (10), C.Santana (13), Y.Gomes (10). SBJ. Dyson (14). IP H R ER BB SO Kansas City Duffy L,5-8 6 10 4 4 0 6 S.Downs 1 0 0 0 0 1 B.Chen 1 0 0 0 1 0 Cleveland Kluber W,8-6 8 1 / 3 4 1 1 1 10 Allen S,9-10 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 UmpiresHome, Eric Cooper; First, Tom Hallion; Sec ond, Angel Campos; Third, Chris Guccione. T:32. A,991 (42,487). Reds 4, Brewers 2 Milwaukee Cincinnati ab r h bi ab r h bi Gennett 2b 4 0 0 1 BHmltn cf 4 0 0 0 Segura ss 3 0 0 0 Frazier 1b 4 1 2 0 Lucroy c 4 0 0 0 Phillips 2b 3 1 2 0 CGomz cf 4 0 0 0 Bruce rf 4 2 1 3 ArRmr 3b 3 0 1 0 Ludwck lf 3 0 0 0 KDavis lf 3 0 0 0 Broxtn p 0 0 0 0 Overay 1b 3 0 0 0 Mesorc c 4 0 3 1 LSchfr rf 3 2 2 0 Cozart ss 3 0 1 0 Gallard p 2 0 0 0 RSantg 3b 3 0 0 0 RWeks ph 1 0 1 1 Latos p 3 0 0 0 WSmith p 0 0 0 0 Heisey lf 0 0 0 0 Totals 30 2 4 2 Totals 31 4 9 4 Milwaukee 000 001 010 2 Cincinnati 200 000 02x 4 LOBMilwaukee 2, Cincinnati 5. 2BL.Schafer (9). 3BL.Schafer (1). HRBruce (8). IP H R ER BB SO Milwaukee Gallardo 7 8 2 2 0 3 W.Smith L,1-2 1 1 2 2 1 1 Cincinnati Latos W,2-1 8 4 2 2 1 3 Broxton S,6-8 1 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby Gallardo (Ludwick). UmpiresHome, Jordan Baker; First, Jerry Meals; Second, Paul Emmel; Third, Chris Conroy. T:38. A,923 (42,319). Diamondbacks 3, Braves 1 Arizona Atlanta ab r h bi ab r h bi Inciart cf 3 0 0 0 BUpton cf 4 0 0 0 A.Hill 2b 4 0 0 0 ASmns ss 4 0 2 0 Gldsch 1b 3 1 2 2 FFrmn 1b 4 0 1 0 Prado 3b 4 1 1 0 J.Upton lf 2 1 0 0 DPerlt lf 4 0 1 0 Heywrd rf 4 0 0 0 C.Ross rf 2 0 0 0 CJhnsn 3b 4 0 1 1 EMrshl p 0 0 0 0 LaStell 2b 4 0 2 0 Ziegler p 0 0 0 0 Bthncrt c 4 0 1 0 Kschnc ph 0 0 0 0 A.Wood p 2 0 0 0 Evans ph 1 0 1 1 Uggla ph 0 0 0 0 A.Reed p 0 0 0 0 JWaldn p 0 0 0 0 Gswsch c 4 0 0 0 Varvar p 0 0 0 0 Ahmed ss 3 0 0 0 Avilan p 0 0 0 0 Miley p 1 1 0 0 Doumit ph 1 0 0 0 GParra rf 1 0 0 0 Totals 30 3 5 3 Totals 33 1 7 1 Arizona 002 000 001 3 Atlanta 000 100 000 1 EA.Wood (2). DPArizona 1, Atlanta 2. LOBArizona 4, Atlanta 8. 2BEvans (1). HRGoldschmidt (16). SBPrado (2). IP H R ER BB SO Arizona Miley W,4-6 6 2 / 3 5 1 1 1 8 E.Marshall H,11 1 / 3 0 0 0 1 1 Ziegler H,22 1 1 0 0 1 1 A.Reed S,20-24 1 1 0 0 0 1 Atlanta A.Wood L,6-7 7 3 2 2 3 2 J.Walden 1 0 0 0 1 1 Varvaro 2 / 3 1 1 1 0 2 Avilan 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 UmpiresHome, Toby Basner; First, Scott Barry; Sec ond, Jeff Nelson; Third, Laz Diaz. T:43. A,709 (49,586). Nationals 2, Cubs 1 Chicago Washington ab r h bi ab r h bi Sweeny lf 4 0 1 0 Span cf 4 2 2 0 Ruggin cf 4 0 2 0 Rendon 2b 4 0 0 0 Rizzo 1b 5 0 2 0 Werth rf 3 0 0 1 SCastro ss 4 0 0 1 LaRoch 1b 2 0 0 0 Valuen 3b 4 0 0 0 Zmrmn 3b 3 0 1 1 Schrhlt rf 4 0 1 0 Harper lf 3 0 0 0 JoBakr c 2 0 2 0 Dsmnd ss 3 0 2 0 Barney 2b 3 0 1 0 WRams c 3 0 2 0 Arrieta p 2 0 0 0 Zmrmn p 2 0 0 0 Coghln ph 1 1 1 0 Storen p 0 0 0 0 Schlittr p 0 0 0 0 Blevins p 0 0 0 0 Castillo ph 1 0 0 0 Hairstn ph 1 0 0 0 Strop p 0 0 0 0 Clipprd p 0 0 0 0 RSorin p 0 0 0 0 Totals 34 1 10 1 Totals 28 2 7 2 Chicago 000 000 100 1 Washington 100 000 01x 2 DPChicago 2. LOBChicago 12, Washington 6. 2B Ruggiano (10), Span 2 (28). SBSchierholtz (4). S Sweeney, Barney. SFS.Castro. IP H R ER BB SO Chicago Arrieta 6 4 1 1 3 5 Schlitter 1 1 0 0 0 0 Strop L,1-4 1 2 1 1 1 1 Washington Zimmermann 6 7 0 0 1 5 Storen BS,2-2 2 / 3 2 1 1 1 0 Blevins 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Clippard W,6-2 1 1 0 0 1 1 R.Soriano S,21-23 1 0 0 0 0 0 WPArrieta. UmpiresHome, Mike Everitt; First, Paul Schrieber; Second, Ted Barrett; Third, Will Little. T:12. A,941 (41,408). Pirates 6, Phillies 2 Philadelphia Pittsburgh ab r h bi ab r h bi Revere cf 4 0 1 0 GPolnc rf 4 0 0 0 CHrndz 2b 4 0 0 0 JHrrsn lf-3b 4 2 1 0 Rollins ss 4 1 0 0 AMcCt cf 4 2 2 1 Byrd rf 4 1 2 2 NWalkr 2b 3 1 1 1 Mayrry 1b 3 0 0 0 RMartn c 3 1 1 2 Asche 3b 3 0 1 0 I.Davis 1b 3 0 0 0 DBrwn lf 3 0 0 0 GSnchz ph-1b 0 0 0 0 Rupp c 2 0 0 0 PAlvrz 3b 2 0 0 0 Utley ph 1 0 0 0 SMarte lf 1 0 1 1 K.Hill c 0 0 0 0 Mercer ss 3 0 1 1 ABrntt p 1 0 0 0 Locke p 1 0 0 0 Howard ph 1 0 0 0 Mrtnz ph 0 0 0 0 DeFrts p 0 0 0 0 JHughs p 0 0 0 0 Diekmn p 0 0 0 0 Totals 30 2 4 2 Totals 28 6 7 6 Philadelphia 100 000 100 2 Pittsburgh 201 000 03x 6 EAsche (8), P.Alvarez (18). DPPittsburgh 2. LOB Philadelphia 2, Pittsburgh 7. 2BR.Martin (8). 3BJ. Harrison (4), A.McCutchen (4). HRByrd (18). SBN. Walker (2). SLocke 2. SFN.Walker, Mercer. IP H R ER BB SO Philadelphia A.Burnett L,5-8 7 5 3 3 2 7 De Fratus 0 1 2 1 0 0 Diekman 1 1 1 1 2 2 Pittsburgh Locke W,2-1 8 3 2 1 1 4 J.Hughes 1 1 0 0 0 0 De Fratus pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. HBPby Diekman (G.Sanchez). UmpiresHome, Dale Scott; First, Dan Iassogna; Second, CB Bucknor; Third, Tripp Gibson. T:43. A,408 (38,362). White Sox 1, Mariners 0 Seattle Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi EnChvz cf 3 0 0 0 Eaton cf 4 0 0 0 MSndrs rf 3 0 0 0 GBckh 2b 4 0 0 0 Cano 2b 3 0 0 0 Gillaspi 3b 0 1 0 0 Hart dh 3 0 1 0 LeGarc pr-3b 1 0 0 0 Seager 3b 4 0 0 0 JAreu 1b 4 0 1 0 Morrsn 1b 4 0 0 0 A.Dunn dh 1 0 0 0 Buck c 4 0 0 0 AlRmrz ss 3 0 0 0 Ackley lf 4 0 2 0 Viciedo rf 3 0 0 0 BMiller ss 4 0 2 0 Sierra rf 0 0 0 0 De Aza lf 3 0 0 0 Nieto c 3 0 1 0 Totals 32 0 5 0 Totals 26 1 2 0 Seattle 000 000 000 0 Chicago 100 000 00x 1 EG.Beckham (9). LOBSeattle 9, Chicago 9. 2BNi eto (4). SBCano (7). SEn.Chavez. IP H R ER BB SO Seattle T.Walker L,1-1 4 2 1 1 5 3 Leone 2 0 0 0 1 3 Maurer 2 0 0 0 1 2 Chicago Noesi W,3-6 6 2 / 3 5 0 0 2 5 Surkamp H,3 1 / 3 0 0 0 1 0 Petricka S,3-4 2 0 0 0 0 2 HBPby Leone (Gillaspie). WPT.Walker 2, Noesi. UmpiresHome, Lance Barrett; First, Ron Kulpa; Sec ond, Dana DeMuth; Third, Ed Hickox. T:50. A,370 (40,615).

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 7, 2014 GERALD IMRAY AP Sports Writer RIO DE JANEIRO Nigeria is not backing down after sacking its entire national football federation leadership, ignoring a FIFA direc tive and moving closer to a ban from interna tionals for the reigning African champion. A weekend meet ing of football and gov ernment ofcials in the capital Abuja endorsed the earlier sacking of Nigeria Football Feder ation President Aminu Maigari and his execu tive committee for not solving a player pay ment dispute during the World Cup. Ofcials said in a statement Sun day they were planning new elections. The NFF is now be ing led by an ofcial ap pointed by the sports minister. World body FIFA, which doesnt allow governments to inter fere in football affairs, said it would not recog nize Saturdays meet ing and has given Ni geria until Tuesday to reinstate Maigari or face sanctions. That would likely involve banning the countrys nation al team and clubs from playing in continental or international tourna ments, and could leave players like Chelseas John Obi Mikel and Liv erpools Victor Moses frozen out of next years African Cup in Moroc co, where Nigeria is due to defend its title. Maigari was also ar rested on his return from the World Cup in Brazil and delegates at the emergency meeting said they blamed him for embarrassing Nige ria at the tournament by not resolving the bo nus dispute. Nigeria reached the second round for the rst time since 1998 but had its campaign marred by the payment dispute, where play ers rebelled against the federation after not re ceiving their money for making the last 16 of the showcase. A statement from the meeting said Maigaris NFF had failed to ful ly and rmly resolve is sues of nance with the Super Eagles ahead of the championship. The ofcials also said they want an investiga tion into the nances of the NFF under Maigari. The temporary NFF administration said Sunday that the meet ing endorsing his ring was valid, opposing the stance of FIFA, which said the congress had no authority. Dont forget that in as much as we respect FIFAs law, we can not jettison our own law here, said Obinna Ogba, a delegate at the congress. Nigeria and Algeria progressed from their groups at the World Cup to give Africa two teams in the last 16 for the rst time. However, the con tinents reputation was also badly damaged as Nigeria, Cameroon and Ghana all had their tournaments under mined by disputes be tween players and of cials over money. Cameroon and Gha na, which both failed to win a game in Brazil, have ordered investiga tions into their World Cup embarrassments. Nigeria was tempo rarily banned by FIFA for government inter ference after the 2010 World Cup when the countrys president said he was withdrawing the team from internation al competition until it improved. DAN GELSTON AP Sports Writer LONG POND, Pa. Juan Pablo Montoya has won the IndyCar race at Pocono Race way, the highlight of a triumphant return to open wheel racing af ter seven years in NA SCAR. Helio Castroneves was second to make it a 1-2 nish Sunday for team owner Roger Penske. Montoya won for the rst time in the CART/IndyCar Series since 2000 and had his rst major victory since he won a road course race at Watkins Glen in NASCAR in 2010. With double points awarded in the 500mile races, Castroneves moved into a tie for the points lead with Team Penske teammate Will Power. Power was hit with a blocking penal ty on Castroneves late in the race and had to serve a drive through penalty, costing him a shot at racing for the win. He nished 10th. Carlos Munoz, Ryan Briscoe and Scott Dixon completed the top ve. Montoya, who won from the pole, took the lead for good when Tony Kanaan was forced to pit for fuel with four laps left. Montoya took it from there and con tinued to stamp himself a player in the champi onship hunt. As soon as we signed him, I knew he would be an asset for us, and a headache, Castro neves said. Montoya damaged his front wing when he connected with Power on a pass for the lead on the 167th lap. Pow ers penalty troubles continued at Pocono when he blocked Cas troneves on the 171st lap, effectively ending his shot at victory. Montoya, the 1999 CART champion and 2000 Indianapolis 500, winner took the check ered ag to the sight of hundreds of Colombi an fans waving the ag and cheering him on. Montoya wanted a competitive ride again after lackluster results driving for Chip Ganas si in NASCAR. He knew his open wheel return would have a learning curve: Montoya last ran in CART in 2000, then left Formula One mid way through the 2006 season for NASCAR. After only two top 10s in his rst seven starts, Montoya reeled off a third, second and sev enth in his past three. Now, he has a win needed to validate his open wheel comeback. Are you kidding? This guy is unbeliev able, Castroneves said. Coming back after 15 years to win a race, he did a great job. The 200-lap race was caution free for the rst 158 laps until Graham Rahal spun to bring out the yellow. The 158 con secutive laps of green ag racing to open a race was the longest stretch for a 500-mile race in IndyCar history. *Unless Otherwise Noted on the Schedule Yo u Make the CA LL !This We eks Leesburg Lightning ScheduleAlw ay s FREE Admission! Rainout Information 352-234-4489 Yo u Make the CA LL !July 713This We eks Leesburg Lightning ScheduleAlw ay s FREE Admission! Game Times: 7pm We ekda ys Sun 5pm*THE PLA Y: R2 is on second and R3 is on third with one out. B5 gets a hit to the outfield. R3 scores easily but R2 is out at home. B5 advancs to second on the thro w home. After all playing action stops and a mound conference occurs, F1 comes set and thro ws to first base, ap pealing tha t B5 missed first base. The base umpire ag reees. What s the ruling?Rainout Information 352-234-4489 Mon. 7/7 ................ Off Day Tu es. 7/8 ................ All-Star Game (at Sanfor d) We d. 7/9 ................ Off Day Thurs. 7/10 .............. Deland (aw ay) Fri. 7/11 .............. Deland (home) Sat. 7/12 .............. Winter Park (aw ay) Sun. 7/13 .............. Deland (home)ANSWER on Frida y This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule AUTO RACING HASSAN AMMAR / AP Nigerias Joseph Yobo, left, and Frances Mathieu Debuchy go for a header during the World Cup round of 16 soccer match between France and Nigeria. WORLD CUP BASEBALL R.B. FALLSTROM AP Sports Writer ST. LOUIS Hen derson Alvarez worked seven stingy innings and started the key ral ly with the rst of his career-best three hits, helping the Miami Mar lins beat the St. Lou is Cardinals 8-4 Sun day to take two of three from their spring train ing partners. Casey McGehee ex tended his hitting streak to a career-high 13 games with an RBI single in the rst. Mar cell Ozuna had a tworun single in a threerun sixth that made it 4-0, and Jarrod Salta lamacchias three-run homer off Jason Motte put Miami up 8-1 in the eighth. The rst two games of the series were decided by one run. The Marlins have won a franchise-re cord 10 straight games started by Alvarez (63), and they easily took the series nale despite stranding 14 runners. Alvarez is 4-0 with a 1.04 ERA during that stretch, allowing no more than two runs in any outing. Kolten Wong, just off the 15-day disabled list, homered in the seventh for the lone run against Alvarez. Matt Adams had a career-best four hits, including an RBI double. Cardinals rookie Mar co Gonzalez (0-2) al lowed a run in 4 2-3 in nings despite giving up seven hits and walk ing ve in his third ca reer start since being re called from Double-A Springeld. He yielded ve runs in each of his rst two starts. Alvarez struck out to end the second and then had a hit in three consecutive at-bats. MATT SLOCUM / AP Juan Pablo Montoya, second from left, hoists the trophy with Pocono Raceway president Brandon Igdalsky, second from right, after Montoya won the Pocono IndyCar 500 on Sunday, in Long Pond, Pa. Montoya victorious in IndyCar event at Pocono Raceway Are you kidding? This guy (Montoya) is unbelievable. Coming back after 15 years to win a race, he did a great job. Helio Castroneves, second-place nisher Nigeria heading fror FIFA ban over governmental interference TOM GANNAM / AP Miami Marlins Jarrod Saltalamacchia follows through on a three-run home run in the eighth inning against the St. Louis Cardinals on Sunday in St. Louis. Alvarez, Saltalamacchia lead the way as Marlins defeat Cardinals 8-4

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Living Healthy Send your health news to features @dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 7, 2014 STUDY: Questions UN strategies to save mothers / C6 Health check www.dailycommercial.com MARIA CHENG Associated Press O n a recent morn ing in London, Lara Thomson practiced spinning on benches, swinging from metal bars and balancing off raised ledges all elements of a daredevil discipline known as parkour. What was unusual about the scene is that Thomson is 79 and all of her class mates are over 60. They are members of a unique weekly class for se niors in a sport more com monly known for grav ity-defying jumps than helping people with ar thritis. Invented in the 1980s in France, parkour is a sport usually favored by extremely nimble people who move freely through any terrain using their own strength and exibili ty, often using urban envi ronments such as bench es, buildings and walls as a type of obstacle course. Its also known as free run ning. The London park our class of about a doz en students is taught by two instructors who have adapted the sports main elements to a level that can be handled even by those over 60 who have re placement joints or other medical conditions. I wondered whether it was a government plot to get rid of old people when I heard about the class, Thomson joked. She said she has balance problems and that the class helps her feel more condent about getting around. Be ing able to get outside and do silly things like hugging trees is great, she said, re ferring to a stretching ex ercise. While most tness class es aimed at seniors focus on calmer activities such as dance or yoga, experts say parkour is a reason able, if unorthodox, op tion. When I rst heard about this, I had a picture in my mind of elderly peo ple jumping off of walls and I thought there was no way this could be ap propriate, said Bruce Pa ton, a physical therapist who works with the elder ly at the Institute of Sport, Exercise and Health at Sporty seniors Class teaches parkour, known for daredevil youths, to the elderly PHOTOS BY LEFTERIS PITARAKIS / AP ABOVE: Elderly people participate in a unique weekly class for people over 60 called parkour, a ashy discipline usually known for its acrobatic running, climbing and gravity-defying jumps. BELOW: George Jackson, 85, an army veteran and former boxer swings on monkey bars as he participates at a parkour class for elderly people at a park in South London. LAURAN NEERGAARD Associated Press WASHINGTON Jon Sacker was near death, too sick for doctors to attempt the double lung transplant he so desperately needed. His only chance: An experimental machine that essentially works like dialysis for the lungs. But the device has not been ap proved by the Food and Drug Ad ministration and there were none in the country. It would take an over night race into Canada to retrieve a Hemolung. Sacker rapidly improved as the de vice cleansed his blood of carbon dioxide so much so that in midMarch, 20 days later, he got a trans plant after all. That machine is a lifesaver, Sack er said from the University of Pitts burgh Medical Center. Unapproved device buys time for new pair of lungs JOSEPH FREDERICK / AP This frame grab image from video shows Jon Sacker and his wife Sallie, in his room at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in Pittsburgh, discussing Sackers struggle to survive until a double lung transplant. SEE SENIORS | C2 SEE LUNGS | C5 SUMTERVILLE Cornerstone Hospice hosts training for volunteers Pet sitting, stafng fundraising events and ofce work are just some of the things that volunteers do at Cornerstone Hospice. Volunteer training will be offered for interested parties in two class es from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. July 15 and 22 at the Cornerstone Hospice building, 2294 County Road 526 in Sumterville. Pre-registration is required by calling 352-636-2604 or 352-7426895. LEESBURG New Dimensions to host meeting for visually impaired Sponsored by New Vision for Inde pendence, New Dimensions offers rehabilitation, education and sup port services to those with low vision or blindness and their families, and will host guest Brian Sweezea with the Lake County Supervisor of Elec tions ofce, who will discuss tech nology for visually impaired voters, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Friday at IHOP restaurant, 10332 U.S. High way 441 in Leesburg. For information, call 352-435-5040. LAKE COUNTY LIFE to host July group luncheons for widowed LIFE, a social support group for the widowed, will host three lun cheons in July at different locations, beginning with the Leesburg lun cheon at 11:30 a.m. on Thursday, at the Leesburg Community Center, 109 E. Dixie Ave., in Venetian Gar dens. Entertainment will be provid ed by DJ Bob Fowler. The Eustis LIFE luncheon will be at 11:30 a.m. July 16 at Golden Cor ral, 15810 U.S. Highway 441, in Eu stis. The third luncheon will be in Lady Lake at the North Lake Pres byterian Church at 11:30 a.m. July 18, at 975 Rolling Acres Road, where the meal will be prepared by church staff and DJ Bob Fowler will once again entertain. Luncheons cost $10 and an RSVP is needed by calling 352-787-0403 or emailing rreed@beyersfhc.com. LAKE COUNTY AARP to offer Smart Driver Safety classes The AARP Driver Safety program helps participants rene their skills in a six-hour class, and upon com pletion of the course Florida drivers age 50 or older may be eligible for insurance discounts. Cost is $15 for AARP members and $20 for non-members. Payment must be made by check to AARP. No cash or credit cards accepted. Classes will be: July 15 and 17 from 1 to 4 p.m., Harden-Pauli Fu neral Home, 1617 S. Bay St., Eustis, call 352-394-0250 to register; August 4 and 6, from 1 to 4 p.m., Leesburg Senior Center, 1211 Penn St., regis ter by calling 352-326-3540; August 4 and 6, from 9 a.m. to noon at the W.T. Bland Public Library, 1995 N. Donnelly St., Mount Dora, register at 352-735-7180.

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 7, 2014 University College Lon don. He is not connect ed to the program. But when you look at the things theyre doing, its actually quite gen tle and could increase their strength and exi bility to help them with their daily activities. Still, Paton said park our could potentially be dangerous for peo ple with serious heart problems and warned anyone with a joint re placement or muscle weakness should be careful. The parkour instruc tors said everyone who takes the class lls out a health form and they are particularly care ful to dissuade partic ipants from doing too much; several students have articial joints, ar thritis or a pacemaker. Every single tech nique in parkour can be changed so that any one can do it, said Jade Shaw, artistic direc tor of Parkour Dance, who teaches the class. The parkour sessions initially began as a pi lot project last year and Shaw is hoping to get more funding to expand it further. For now, the classes are free and held at a Tibetan Buddhist center in South London. I think its very ben ecial and Im hop ing well soon have a lot more older people bouncing around the parks, she said. David Terrace, a health and tness ex pert for the charity Age U.K., said any efforts to get older people more active should be wel comed. He said ad aptations have been made to other sports to help the elderly exer cise more, such as turn ing soccer into walk ing soccer and building customized boats to accommodate wheel chairs for sailing. Theres no age lim it for exercise, its just about the individual and what they feel com fortable doing, he said. At 85, George Jackson is the oldest participant in the London parkour class. I really enjoy it and wish I could do more, said Jackson, an army veteran and former boxer. I just sometimes forget how old I am and that I cant do certain things. He said he strug gles with a swollen an kle and knee but that the class has helped. 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Nort h of KMart on Hwy 44 1)(352 ) 34 7-0403 /f x (3 52) 34 7-2034CDRX441@ gmail.com rD004202 SENIORS FROM PAGE C1 LEFTERIS PITARAKIS / AP Elderly people stretch as they participate in a special parkour class at a park in south London. LINDSEY TANNER Associated Press CHICAGO Bone marrow transplants can reverse severe sick le cell disease in adults, a small study by govern ment scientists found, echoing results seen with a similar technique used in children. The researchers and others say the ndings show age need not be a barrier and that the technique may change practice for some adult patients when standard treatment fails. The transplant worked in 26 of 30 adults, and 15 of them were even able to stop taking drugs that pre vent rejection one year later. Were very pleased, said Dr. John Tisdale, the studys senior au thor and a senior inves tigator at the Nation al Institutes of Health. This is what we hoped for. The treatment is a modied version of bone marrow trans plants that have worked in kids. Donors are a brother or sister whose stem cell-rich bone marrow is a good match for the patient. Tisdale said doctors have avoided trying standard transplants in adults with severe sick le cell disease because the treatment is so tox ic. Children can often tolerate it because the disease typically hasnt taken as big a toll on their bodies, he said. The disease is de bilitating and often life-shortening; pa tients die on average in their 40s, Tisdale said. Thats one reason why the researchers decided to try the transplants in adults, with hopes that the technique could ex tend their lives. The treatment in volves using chemo therapy and radiation to destroy bone marrow before replacing it with healthy donor mar row cells. In children, bone marrow is com pletely wiped out. In the adult study, the re searchers only partial ly destroyed the bone marrow, requiring less donor marrow. That marrows healthy blood cells outlast sickle cells and eventually replace them. Sickle cell disease is a genetic condition that damages oxygen-car rying hemoglobin in red blood cells, caus ing them to form ab normal, sickle shapes that can block blood ow through the veins. It can cause anemia, pain and organ dam age. The disease affects about 100,000 Ameri cans, mostly blacks, and millions worldwide. Results from the adult study, involving pa tients aged 29 on av erage, were published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Med ical Association. The usual treatment hadnt worked, a drug called hydroxyurea, and they had transplants at an NIH research hospital in Bethesda, Maryland. The treatment failed to reverse sickle cell in four of the 30 patients and one died of a dis ease-related compli cation. Another pa tient died suddenly a few weeks ago an el derly man whose trans plant four years ago had been a success. Tisdale said that man had lived longer than the nor mal lifespan for sickle cell patients but that his death was unexpected and an autopsy was to be performed. The researchers are unsure why the tech nique didnt work for everyone but they note that most patients sur vived more than three years on average, and some patients from an early phase of the study have been off anti-re jection drugs for more than seven years. Tisdale said based on the latest results, adults with severe disease should be offered trans plants if drug treat ment doesnt work. One limitation is that few er than 1 out of 4 adults with sickle cell disease likely have siblings who would be a good match. But Tisdale said NIH scientists are studying whether relatives who arent as close a match would also be suitable donors. A JAMA editorial by blood specialists at Washington Universi ty in St. Louis said the study shows that lim iting the transplants to children should be re considered. These ndings of fer hope, Drs. Allison King and John DiPersio wrote in the editorial. Marrow transplants can reverse adult sickle cell NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH / AP Red blood cells in a patient with sickle cell disease are shown at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md.

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 7, 2014 NEW PATIENT SPECIALComplete Exam(D0150)Digital Xrays(D0210)Cleaning(D1110)Oral Cancer Screening(D0431)with Identa 3000*Non-Insured Patients Only. All major insurances accepted including PPO & HMO plans.$59* rf n t b nnnYo ur Po diatr is t tr eats... CENTRALFLORI DAFOO TCARE, P. A.Dr Nic k Przysta wski, DPM www .Floridafoot.comD004208 D004210 Tu es da y Ju ly 8th, 2014 at 3 PM JOHN CARLSON Associated Press MUNCIE, Ind. Theyre lush, beauti ful and ourishing, but gardens arent the only things thriving at Gold en Livingcenter nursing home these days. So are the Alzhei mers patients who tend them. It softens the ef fects of an institution al setting, said Laurie Lunsford, the facilitys interactive arts special ist who also oversees the gardening program. It is just a dream. It ex cites me so much to see them blossom. As she spoke, Lunsford was in the big ger of the two fenced gardens, this one fre quented by the midstage Alzheimers and dementia patients. The other, smaller garden, also completely fenced, is for the late-stage Alz heimers patients. Both, however, were peace ful, attractive places, verdant and colorful thanks to the profusion of plants, decorations and art the patients also help make, wheth er brightly colored bird houses or a wooden sign reading Bears To matoes. Family members and Master Garden ers of Delaware Coun ty have been instru mental in providing plants, mulch, work and more for the patients, Lunsford told The Star Press In the larger garden, 83-year-old Sue South worth, dressed in pink and looking resplen dent in a oppy straw sunhat decorated with fake red roses, was hap pily hoeing a raised po tato patch. This win ter, she admitted, being stuck inside had affect ed her adversely, lead ing her to become what she called down. Now? Getting out here real ly does it, Southworth said, brightly, motion ing toward her room. I look out the window to see what needs to be done, and Im out here. Shell work out here a couple hours a day, Lunsford said, noting the Alzheimers patients have taken ownership of these gardens where cherry tomato plants line fences, pale-green cabbage plants spread their elephant-ear leaves to the sun and a volunteer sunower al ready looks to be top ping 10 feet tall. This used to be taken care of by the grounds crew, she continued. Now we take care of it ourselves. Thats not to say there was much of a master plan involved, though. We used what we had and we just plopped them where we thought they would grow, Lunsford said. Meanwhile, the only thing that wasnt grow ing tall back here was the grass, thanks to res ident Glen Tapley. One glance and you knew he was no stranger to work. After a word or two, you also knew he was a man of faith, quickly intro ducing the Good Book into his conversation. Im 80 years old and Ive always worked, Ta pley said, recalling sum mers as a kid hoeing tobacco elds in his na tive Kentucky, where his father, a miner, walked him into a coal mine for the rst time at age 18. Turned out it was the last time, too. After 100 yards, Tapley reversed course and walked out, heading north for facto ry work instead. Now he mows the grass in the bigger gar den with a simple push mower, one powered only by his muscles He can tell you about every plant out here, Lunsford said. How it grows, what it needs. From the bigger gar den, which residents can visit unsupervised, to the smaller garden, which residents cant, was a quick walk. In the latter, which is attached to the late-stage Alzhei mers wing, going out side is coveted. I walk down that hall and they know its time to go outside, Lunsford said with a smile, add ing that volunteers will ing to just sit out there with the patients are needed. They follow me like the Pied Piper. Alzheimers patients blossom in centers gardens KURT HOSTETLER / AP Golden Livingcenter nursing home Alzheimers patient Forrest Smith uses two cabbage leaves to give himself elephant ears while walking in the garden in Muncie, Ind. LAURAN NEERGAARD Associated Press WASHINGTON No more dreaded pelvic exam? New guidelines say most healthy wom en can skip the yearly ritual. Routine pelvic exams dont benet women who have no symptoms of disease and who ar ent pregnant, and they can cause harm, the American College of Physicians said Monday as it recommended that doctors quit using them as a screening tool. Its part of a growing movement to evaluate whether many longtime medical practices are done more out of habit than necessity, and the guideline is sure to be controversial. Scientic evidence just doesnt support the benet of having a pelvic exam every year, said guideline coauthor Dr. Linda Humphrey of the Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Oregon Health & Science University. There will be women who are relieved, and there are women who really want to go in and talk with their doctor about it and will choose to continue this, she added. The recommenda tions arent binding to doctors or insurers. Indeed, a differ ent doctors group, the American College of Obstetricians and Gy necologists, still rec ommends yearly pelvic exams, even as it ac knowledges a lack of ev idence supporting, or refuting, them. Pelvic exams have long been considered part of a well-wom an visit, and some 62 million were performed in the United States in 2010, the latest avail able data. Heres what put the test under the micro scope: Pap smears that check for cervical can cer used to be done yearly but now are rec ommended only every three to ve years. So if women werent going through that test every year, did they still need the pelvic exam that traditionally accompa nied it? Pelvic exams are ap propriate for women with symptoms such as vaginal discharge, ab normal bleeding, pain, urinary problems or sexual dysfunction, the ACP said. And wom en should get their Pap smears on schedule but a Pap doesnt require the extra step of a man ual pelvic exam, it said. Most healthy women can skip pelvic exam

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Suit e 90, Or landoCa ll To ll Fr ee: 855.80 2.553 1 Sackers struggle high lights a critical void: There is no fully func tioning articial lung to buy time for someone awaiting a transplant, like patients who need a new heart can stay alive with an implanted heart pump or those with fail ing kidneys can turn to dialysis. It seems like it should be possible for the lung as well, said Dr. Andrea Harabin of the National Institutes of Health. NIH-funded re searchers are working to develop wearable respiratory assist de vices that could do the lungs two jobs sup plying oxygen and get ting rid of carbon diox ide without tethering patients to a bulky bed side machine. It has proven chal lenging. The lung is an amaz ing organ for gas ex change. Its not so easy to develop a mechani cal device that can es sentially replace the function of a lung, said bioengineer William Federspiel of Pitts Mc Gowan Institute for Re generative Medicine, who helped invent the bedside Hemolung and is working on these next-step devices. So when Sacker need ed an emergency x, Dr. Christian Bermudez, UPMCs chief of cardio thoracic transplants, gambled on the unap proved Hemolung. We had no other options, he said. Cystic brosis de stroyed Sackers own lungs. The Moore, Okla homa, man received his rst double lung trans plant in 2012. He thrived until a severe infection last fall damaged his new lungs, spurring re jection. By February, he needed another trans plant. The odds were long. Donated lungs are in such short supply that only 1,923 transplants were performed last year, just 80 of them re peats, according to the United Network for Or gan Sharing. Still, the Pittsburgh hospital, known for tackling tough cases, agreed to try only to have Sacker, 33, arrive too debilitated for an operation. A ventilator was providing adequate oxygen. But carbon di oxide had built to toxic levels in his body. When a ventilator isnt enough, todays re course is a decades-old technology so difcult that only certain hos pitals, including Pitts burgh, offer it. Called ECMO, it rests the lungs by draining blood from the body, oxygenating it and removing carbon dioxide, and then re turning it. Sacker was too sick to try. I didnt see any other alternative other than withdrawing support from this young man, Bermudez said. Then he remembered the Hemolung, invent ed by Pittsburgh engi neering colleagues as an alternative to ECMO. It was designed to treat patients with a differ ent lung disease, called COPD, during crises when their stiffened lungs retain too much carbon dioxide, Feder spiel said. The Hemolung re cently was approved in Europe and Canada; its maker is planning the stricter U.S. testing required by FDA. For Sacker to become the rst U.S. Hemolung pa tient, hospital safety of cials would have to agree and notify FDA. We had actually just almost decided to turn the ventilator off, be cause we were putting him through suffering, Sackers wife, Sallie, re called. Then the phone rang: The experiment was on. But Pittsburgh-based ALung Technologies Inc. couldnt get a device shipped for a few days. Doctors feared Sacker wouldnt live that long. Late at night, ALung CEO Peter DeComo tracked down a device in Toronto, and started driving. It took some ex plaining to get the unap proved medical device past U.S. border of cials. But the next day, Sacker was hooked up, and quickly improved. Federspiel, also an ALung co-founder, said researchers ultimate goal is a fully function ing, portable articial lung. Thousands each year suffer acute lung fail ure from trauma or dis ease that hits too sud denly to even consider transplant. Researchers like Grifth want to test if these experimental technologies could of fer them a better chance to heal than ventilators, which can further dam age lungs. Back in Pittsburgh, Sacker is slowly gaining strength with his sec ond set of transplant ed lungs. He doesnt re member the ght for his life; he was sedated through it. But his wife has told him how touch and go it was. You get a call at the last second about a de vice that has never been used here in the United States thats a mira cle, he said. LUNGS FROM PAGE C1 AP PHOTO Dr. Christian Bermudez of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center checks patient Jon Sacker, who was being treated with an experimental device called the Hemolung that acts like dialysis for lungs.

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, July 7, 2014 365-6442Shoppes of Lake Village(next to Lake Squar e Mall)Publix Shopping Center I have suffer ed with te eth problems all of my adult life. rf r nft b ft t tt r tft rf ff ft ft r t r t tr t t rf ft ft t t t f ft f r n t fft t rf f b ft r ft MOST INSURANCES ACCEPT EDFINANCING AV AILABLE*Xray s not in clu ded .Lic ense # DN1 438 9FREECONSUL TA TIONNew Patients$85 Va lueDr Va zi ri & St aff www. LeadingDental.com r f n tbf tf t f *X-Rays not inc luded. The patient and an y other person responsible fo r payment ha s a right to refuse to pay cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for an y other ser vice, ex amination or treatment which is performed as a result of an within 72 hour s of respo nding to the advertisement for treatme nt.Pr oudly cel ebrating20 YEARSin Leesbur g. Pr oud ly ce le br at ing20 YEARSin Leesbur g.Exp. 06 /30/20 14 D 0 03 57 9 ys not in clu de d. Ex p. 07/31/2014 MARIA CHENG Associated Press LONDON In the past decade, billions of dollars have been spent trying to save the lives of mothers in de veloping countries us ing strategies usu ally inexpensive drugs deemed essential by the U.N. health agency. Yet two large analyses of maternal health pro grams including one conducted by the U.N. itself report that the efforts appeared almost useless, raising troubling questions about why all that money was spent. While critics are call ing for the pricey glob al initiatives to be sig nicantly overhauled, the programs are still being implemented de spite little proof they work. The practices mainly involve things like ensuring women giving birth get cheap drugs such as magne sium sulphate to treat labor complications or pre-emptive antibiotics for those getting a ce sarean section. Even public health ofcials acknowledge they were taken aback by the studies. Nobody could have been more surprised than I was when we got the results, said Dr. Omrana Pasha of Aga Khan University in Pa kistan, who led a study of maternal health in terventions in six coun tries in Latin America, Africa and Asia. In clinical medicine, we would not prescribe a drug unless multi ple trials show that it works, she added. The FDA wont allow a drug to be marketed with out that evidence. But things are different in public health. At an international meeting of U.N. part ners starting Monday in South Africa, health of cials are getting ready to ask donors for even more money to pour into maternal health programs. Since 2009, the U.S. has invest ed more than $13 bil lion in maternal and child survival, hoping to save lives by supporting high-impact health interventions. According to the re search papers, includ ing one done in 30 coun tries that tracked more than 300,000 women, scientists found no link between the suppos edly life-saving inter ventions and the death rates of women giving birth. Areas that used the interventions didnt have better survival rates for mothers than areas that didnt. The two papers pub lished last year are the biggest to assess the ef fectiveness of mater nal health strategies, although smaller stud ies have previously sug gested the methods help. But they gained little traction, perhaps because there doesnt appear to be an easy x. Experts, meanwhile, are largely stumped as to why their methods failed to prevent deaths. We assume that if women get these things, they will be saved. But its too simple to say one plus one equals two, said Dr. Marleen Tem merman, director of WHOs maternal health department. She isnt convinced the interventions dont work. She suspects there were problems imple menting the strategies. Maybe the health fa cility has the medicine, but the man who has the key to the cupboard is gone, she suggested. Temmerman also said it would be dangerous if donors abruptly slashed their support for mater nal health initiatives. The message is not to stop investing, its to invest money more wisely, she said. Some experts said ex isting plans should be adjusted. These essential in terventions are im portant but they are not enough, said San drine Simon, a public health adviser at Doc tors of the World char ity. This is about more than buying the right medicines. But others said major changes were required to save more women. We need to be more honest and serious about past failures oth erwise we will keep making the same mis takes, said Bill Easter ly, an economist at New York University. Its not just the fault of coun tries receiving aid who arent implementing the technology properly, its the fault of Western aid agencies and donors who are not trying hard enough to get it right. Studies question UN strategies to save mothers AP FILE PHOTO Traditional birth attendant Magret Atieno assists Mary Wairimu into a position to give birth, during labor in the Korogocho neighborhood of Nairobi, Kenya.

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Monday, July 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 Phyllis Earnest. Ive had my Audibel hearing aids for ov er a year and I lo ve them! I have and will continue to denitely recommend friends and fa mily members. The staff is ver y knowledgeable and great to work with. June & William Wo rth. The ser vice that is given is ex cellent and we are treated like fa mily The ofce has a ver y friendly staff. John Lee. We have been ver y pleased with my Audibel hear ing devices and all the people and the ser vice. Ever yone in this ofce has always gone abo ve and beyond to help us and meet our needs. We are ver y happy with the aids and the ser vice. We would (and do) recommend Audibel to an y one of our friends.www .audibelnorthorida.comLEESBURG r ff r n rf tbr352-326-4079ex p. 6/30/14 exp. 7/11/14

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Monday, July 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C9 www.dailycommercial.com Diversions 352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puz zle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, July 7 the 188th day of 2014. There are 177 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in His tory : On July 7, 1865, four peo ple were hanged in Washing ton, D.C., for conspiring with John Wilkes Booth to assas sinate President Abraham Lincoln. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, July 7, 2014 : This year you manifest cre ativity and determination, though not necessarily to gether. If you are in an artis tic eld, you will see more ac knowledgment for your work. If you are single, you are like ly to have a very intense love life. If you are attached, you might discover that you have a new addition to the house. For some people, it might be a baby; for others, it could be a puppy, a new roommate or some other change involving your home. Watch a tenden cy to overspend. SCORPIO is also emotional like you, but does not reveal their feelings as easily. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You might have a lot to think about, as a friend might ex press a little too much consid eration for your comfort lev el. Your intuition comes into play. Could this person want to coax you in a certain direc tion? You might feel out of sync with others in general. One person could be particu larly demanding. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Defer to others and see a sit uation for what it is. A loved one or partner could be aloof and touchy. Understand what is going on with this person. Conversations move forward, allowing you to gain insight. You are overly cautious with funds. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Be aware of others needs and what they might require. Your feelings come forward, and you might be hesitant to pursue a certain path. Your sensitivity might be offended by anothers request. Be true to yourself no matter what goes down. CANCER (June 21-July 22) You might want to under stand more of what is moti vating those around you. They might be coming from a place of negativity, but you can help them turn it around to a more positive attitude. Tap into your creativity. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Make time for what you need and want to do. You might want to take a nap or have a discussion with a family mem ber or roommate. Sched ule time for a snooze or talk sometime during the day. Your instincts guide you with a do mestic or personal matter. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Return calls while balancing other matters and errands. You could be quite touched by a comment from some one you respect. Be more aware of what is happening within your immediate circle. You might want to share your thoughts with a dear friend, loved one or partner. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Curb a need to be overly pos sessive and demanding. You want situations to take the twists and turns you would like. You can only create so much, as you only have so much control. Be careful about spending. You easily could make a mistake. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You might go out of your way to ease another persons stress level. Your sensitivity to the moment and other peo ple allows for greater give-andtake. Be sure you want to pro ceed in your present chosen direction. If you opt to make a commitment, it will be like ly to occur, but it will demand endurance. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) You might want to see a situation move in a new direction think again. The ramications and what you would need to do could be more than what you are will ing to do. Investigate an un usually creative idea. Could it really work? CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Zero in on an objec tive outlined in a meeting. You might have a surprising re sponse to this goal. Discuss and debate all you need to in order to root out a problem. You nd that the obligations are far more serious than youd anticipated. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Notice that others look to you for advice and often ad mire your choices. Your unpre dictability throws many peo ple, as they dont understand you well. Often what looks ir rational to others is highly log ical. You have often thought out your seemingly impul sive actions. Consider shar ing your processing more of ten. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Read between the lines when someone makes what seems like an outra geous statement. Your feel ings might be involved, mak ing your detachment a must. What is being said probably has a deeper meaning than you are aware of and possibly has nothing to do with you. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORY DEAR ABBY: I am an ophthalmologist, and all too often I see pa tients who have al ready lost some of their vision because they waited too long to schedule an appoint ment for an eye exam. Many times the reason was limited insurance or they couldnt afford the co-pay. After helping nearly 1.8 million people, Eye Care America, a pub lic service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, con tinues to match eligible seniors in need with volunteer ophthalmol ogists who provide a medical eye exam and up to one year of care at no out-ofpocket cost to the pa tient. This July, as we cel ebrate our countrys independence, invite your readers to also celebrate their person al independence by getting regular eye ex ams, especially as they age. Many eye diseases develop later in life. In fact, one in six people age 65 and older has a vision impairment that cannot be corrected with glasses or contact lenses. Please help to save your readers from the falls, injuries, depres sion and social isola tion that are associat ed with vision loss and join me in spreading the word about Eye Care America. Thank you for your help. CHARLES P. WILKINSON, M.D., CHAIR, EYECARE AMERICA DEAR DR. WILKINSON: Youre welcome. But I am the one who should thank you and the oth er members of the American Academy of Ophthalmology for their generosity in of fering this program to seniors nationwide. Readers, this is im portant and I know the need is great. To nd out if you or your loved ones qualify for this program, visit www. eyecareamerica.org. (The online applica tion does not request nancial information.) DEAR ABBY: My inlaws are pressuring me to let them take our small children for over nights and trips around the city. Im extremely uncomfortable about it because I dont trust their supervision. They obviously love the kids, and Im happy theyre in our childrens lives as long as they come to our house to visit. There have been sev eral instances in which they made some ques tionable decisions with respect to supervising my little ones in pub lic. I have so far suc cessfully dodged their requests, but it will be impossible to do it for ever. If I tell them how I and their son feel, they will be hurt, espe cially because my par ents routinely watch the kids outside our home. Whats the best way to handle this with the least hurt feelings? ST. LOUIS MOMMY DEAR MOMMY: This is something you and your husband will have to discuss with his par ents TOGETHER. If you do it alone, you will forever be blamed for favoring your family over his. When the dis cussion happens, you should cite your rea sons for feeling the way you do. I cant prom ise there wont be hurt feelings, because there probably already are, but your childrens safety must come rst. Dear Abby is written by Abi gail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was found ed by her mother, Pauline Phil lips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Eligible seniors can sign up for free medical eye exam JEANNE PHILLIPS DEAR ABBY rf n ft bWo rking gallery of local artistsANTIQ UEDEA LERSWANTE D (352) 460-4806 r f ntb fa cebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburg D004572 Golf CarAccessible 50% 30% 30%

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Monday, July 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHER'S NOTICEFederal and State laws prohibit advertising expressing a discriminatory preference on the basis of race, age, sex, color, national origin, religion, handicap or marital status. The Daily Commercial will not knowingly accept advertisement for employment which is in violation of the law. Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance Employment Classifications are intended to announce bona de employment offers only. Employment advertising must disclose the specic nature of the work being offered. Some employment categories may charge fees. If any advertiser does not comply with these standards, please notify a Classied Sales Representative at 365-8245 or 365-8200.

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