Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Newspaper
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Halifax Media Group
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Rod Dixon
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Leesburg, Floirda
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University of Florida
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BEST HOME COOKING FOOD & PRICES ON 441 381 E. Burleigh Blvd., Ta var es, FL rf ntb OPEN EVER Y DA Y 6:30AMto 10:30PMBEST BREAKF AST IN TOWN! b b b b Br e ak f ast Sp e ci a lsAll Br eakfast Specials Include Coffee or any Drink food wit h lar ge BREAKF AST LU NC H AN D DINNERAll Yo u Can Eat CatfishSunday Th ursday Any Omelet with Potatoes & Toast 3 Pa ncakes with Bacon or Ham or Sausage Waffel with Bacon or Ha m or Sa us ag e 3 Pc s of Fr ench To ast with Bacon or Ham or Sausage$599 DJOKOVIC, FEDERER ADVANCE AT WIMBLEDON, SPORTS B1 OBAMA: President celebrates cultural diversity, immigrants on Fourth of July A5 CAMPAIGN: Rick Scott visits The Villages to open ofce A3 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Saturday, July 5, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 186 5 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED C5 COMICS E6 CROSSWORDS C5 DIVERSIONS E5 LEGALS C5 FAITH C1 NATION A5 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 WORLD A6 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8. 88 / 73 Thunderstorms 50 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com Habitat for Humanity of Lake-Sumter is set ting a record this year by investing more than $1 million in new home construction in Lake County alone, and the local organization is also restructuring and expanding its base with corporate and regional ofces throughout the two counties. Kent Adcock, chief executive ofcer of Habitat for Humani ty of Lake-Sumter, said the local agency wants to be more responsive and in collaboration with the local com munities in the 1,700 square-mile service area that Habitat serves in its mission to pro vide sustainable home ownership for families earning from 30 to 80 percent of the area me dian income. The corporates back ofce moved its oper ations to its Spanish Springs location, 900 Main St., Suite 210, in The Villages this week, he said, site of Habitats human relations, pay roll, compliance and fund development. Adcock will be op erating out of The Vil lages, while also tak ing time about twice a week to travel and meet with staff at each of the regional ofces, includ ing the Domestic Glob al Village ofce in Eustis and the Golden Trian gle ofce, also in Eustis. The other ofces are in Groveland for South Lake, in Wildwood for North Lake and Sum ter and in The Villages for corporate, Adcock said. The South Lake and Wildwood ofces are awaiting the nal build-out and should be operational by the end of July. The CEO said The Vil lages was an ideal site THE VILLAGES Habitat restructuring and expanding DAILY COMMERCIAL FILE PHOTO Silhouetted against the late morning sun, Steve Gallant from Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, works on framing a Habitat for Humanity house in Lady Lake in February. EMERY P. DALESIO Associated Press KILL DEVIL HILLS, N.C. Proving far less damaging than feared, Hurricane Ar thur left tens of thousands of people without power Friday in a swipe at North Carolinas dangerously exposed Out er Banks, then brought lousy Fourth of July beach weather to the Northeast as it veered out to sea. The weather along the narrow barrier islands whose beaches draw hun dreds of thousands of tour ists every summer had already cleared by Fri day afternoon as Arthur scooted north and its out er bands scraped the Del aware and New Jersey shores. Forecasters predict ed the storm would weak en before its center moves over western Nova Scotia in Canada early Saturday. While state and local of cials worked to restore access to Hatteras Island and help those who had suffered storm and ood ing damage, the effects of the hurricane were most ly conned to that part of the state. Farther south, the beaches were once again packed with people soak ing up the sun. The North Carolina beaches are open for busi ness and theyre open for KIMBERLY HEFLING Associated Press WASHINGTON The troubled for-prot educa tion company Corinthi an Colleges Inc. and the Education Department reached an agreement late Thursday that has 85 of the companys 100-plus cam puses going up for sale, and 12 others closing. Corinthian owns Ever est College, Heald College and WyoTech schools. It serves about 72,000 stu dents in 26 states and On tario, Canada, and receives about $1.4 billion in feder al nancial student aid an nually. The highest concen trations of students are in California, Florida and Tex as. Students generally re ceive career training in ar eas such as auto mechanics or health care. MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millardives@dailycommercial.com The red-white-and-blue boom event of the summer launched in Lake County on Friday despite a few sprinkles of rain. Several Fourth of July activ ities started early Friday, in cluding an 8 a.m. Freedom Run 5k at Lake Sumter State College, South Lakes Fourth of July Festival at 9 a.m. and Mount Doras Independence Day Parade that kicked off at 10 a.m. well before many of the light showers started. Live bands, barbecue, ven dors, childrens games, dunk ing booths and other activi ties went on at the South Lake event in Lake David Park in Groveland as rain started to come down in the area. It doesnt look too bad, said Keith Hopper, as he pre pared to throw some balls at the dunking booth target. With a 40 percent chance of rain predicted for the day, many venues made some type of contingency plan. It didnt rain on Tavares pa rade, which started at 5 p.m. as civic agencies, pageant winners, horseback riders, law enforcement and Shri ners on go-carts zipped along downtown. At nearby Wooton Park, Ta varess holiday festivities con tinued with vendors, games For-profit college to sell most campuses Several area schools at risk North Carolina coast survives Hurricane Arthur SEE HABITAT | A2 SEE COLLEGE | A2 SEE ARTHUR | A2 Lightning win holiday baseball game in Leesburg. See Page B1 Fourth in Lake: parades, parties and patriotism PHOTOS BY MILLARD K. IVES AND LINDA CHARLTON / DAILY COMMERCIAL TOP LEFT: Colin Valentine, 4, marvels at the sight of his lit sparkler in front of Venetian Cove in Leesburg. TOP RIGHT: Spectators awaiting reworks line Venetian Cove. BOTTOM LEFT: People line up for carnival treats in Venetian Gardens. BOTTOM RIGHT: Groveland city council member Evelyn Wilson shows off patriotism. SEE FOURTH | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, July 5, 2014 HOW TO REACH US JULY 4 CASH 3 ............................................... 1-8-9 Afternoon .......................................... 4-5-5 PLAY 4 ............................................. 4-2-2-5 Afternoon ....................................... 9-9-7-0 FLORIDA LOTTERY JULY 3 FANTASY 5 ........................... 5-10-16-24-36 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION STEVE SKAGGS publisher 352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com PAUL RYAN digital editor 352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. for Habitats corporate operations. The Villages have been such strong and consistent supporters, both nan cially and with volunteers and this role strengthens that partnership, Adcock said. An open house and ribbon cutting of Habitats corporate ofce will be hosted 3-5 p.m. July 23, and the public is invited. Afliated with Habitat International, Adcock said Habitat of Lake-Sumter has 13 homes in various stages of comple tion, including six houses in Lady Lake. To donate, volunteer or serve with Habitat, call 483-0434 or send e-mail to frontdesk@habitatls.org. HABITAT FROM PAGE A1 Everest has two loca tions in Orlando, another in Melbourne and sever al in the Tampa Bay area. Daytona Beach is home to a WyoTech campus. Heald has no campuses in Florida, but began of fering online studies na tionwide in 2012. Jack Massimino, Co rinthians chairman and chief ofcer, praised the agreement in a state ment. This agreement allows our students to contin ue their education and helps minimize the per sonal and nancial issues that affect our 12,000 em ployees and their fam ilies, Massimino said. It also provides a blue print for allowing most of our campuses to contin ue serving their students and communities under new ownership. The company declined to identify the schools that will close. Ted Mitchell, the un dersecretary at the Edu cation Department, said the agreement will pro tect students futures and fulll the departments responsibilities to tax payers moving forward. Ensuring that Corin thian students are served well remains our rst and most important priority, and we will continue to work with Corinthian of cials and the indepen dent monitor on behalf of the best interests of students and taxpayers, Mitchell said. The department put Santa Ana, Califor nia-based Corinthian on heightened nancial monitoring last month with a 21-day waiting pe riod for federal funds. That came after Corinthi an failed to provide ad equate paperwork and comply with the depart ments requests to ad dress concerns about the companys practic es. The department said the concerns includ ed allegations of falsify ing job placement data used in marketing claims to prospective students, and allegations of altered grades and attendance. The sides earlier reached an initial agree ment that allowed the company to obtain an immediate $16 million in federal student aid funds to keep operating. But a more detailed plan was to be worked out that spelled out the future of the campuses. Under the terms of the agreement, the campus es will inform students of their options and each campus will have a plan that allows students to complete their program, if they choose to do so. The company has agreed to only use federal aid funds for daily operations and will hire an indepen dent monitor. Under a number of circumstanc es, students will be eligi ble for a refund paid for using a reserve fund of at least $30 million from Corinthians funds. The company faces multiple state and federal investigations. California Attorney General Kamala Harris has sought a court order that would force the company to stop ad vertising and to start tell ing prospective students that it is looking to sell or shut down its colleges. COLLEGE FROM PAGE A1 tourists, Gov. Pat McCro ry said. The umbrellas are going up as we speak right now. Arthur struck North Carolina as a Category 2 storm with winds of 100 mph late Thursday, taking about ve hours to move across the far eastern part of the state. At the height of the storm, more than 40,000 people lost power, and the rush of water from the ocean on one side and the sound on the other side buckled part of North Carolina Highway 12 in a spot on Hatteras Island that was breached in Hur ricane Irene in 2011. Doz ens of workers were head ing to x the highway, and the Department of Trans portation said it was con dent the road would re open Saturday as long as an underwater sonar test of a key bridge showed no problems. No injuries or deaths were reported. After praising emergency of cials and saying the state dodged a bullet, McCrory said he was heading to the beach himself for an In dependence Day parade in Southport. By Friday afternoon, the hurricane had weakened to a Category 1 storm with 80 mph winds. Its center was about 170 miles (270 km) south-southwest of Chatham, Massachusetts. While the Northeast wasnt expected to take a direct hit, the rain from Arthurs outer bands was disrupting the hol iday. Fireworks displays in New Jersey and Maine were postponed until lat er in the weekend. Tropi cal storm warnings were in effect for coastal areas as far north as Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Tropi cal storm watches and warnings were in effect for Nova Scotia and New Brunswick in southeast ern Canada. Still, the rst hurricane known to strike the U.S. on July 4 caused some frayed nerves on North Caroli nas Outer Banks a 200mile string of narrow bar rier islands with about 57,000 permanent resi dents and around 250,000 visitors on most summer weekends. A mandato ry evacuation was issued for the southern Outer Banks. But while most vis itors left, many residents stayed, accustomed to hurricanes that strike the area on average about ev ery four or ve years. Jesse and Carol Wray rode out the storm in their home in Salvo on North Carolina Highway 12. They said the island was under several feet of water at the height of the storm. The six-foot-tall lamp post at the end of their driveway was under wa ter except for its top, and that was after the sound a quarter-mile away reced ed several feet. Theres a lot of damage to a lot of houses around here, Wray said. Ev erything ooded out. All the businesses are ood ed, and there was a lot of wind damage. The bulk of the ood ing and other damage on Hatteras Island appeared to have happened in the islands midsection in the villages of Rodanthe and Salvo. Farther south in Buxton, Angela Tawes is eager for the road to re open, the ferries to re sume and tourists to re turn with their money. Were all just hold ing our breath and hop ing right now, said Tawes, whose family owns a gro cery store, Conners Su permarket. Arthur is the rst named storm of the Atlantic hur ricane season. It is the ear liest in the season a hurri cane has made landfall in North Carolina. McCrory said people in states to the north east should need to warn ings about Arthur, even if North Carolina came through better than ex pected. ARTHUR FROM PAGE A1 AP PHOTO This aerial photo provided by the U.S. Coast Guard shows ooding caused by Hurricane Arthur on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. and other activities. As at simi lar events throughout the county, American ags draped a lot of the park as well as attire on visitors. Branch and Dean was the featured musical act and played two onehour sets, which included The Dash and Glad Shes Not an An gel. Co-lead singer Marlon Dean said he was glad to spend his Fourth of July performing. This is what we do for a living, said Dean, who along with co-sing er Steve Branch, are Celebrity Am bassadors to the National Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. Eustis Red, White and Blue 4th of July Celebration was held at Ferran Park, which included a sea of white vendor tents. Like other public holiday celebrations across Lake County, a number of can didates were present, including school board candidate Nancy L. Muenzmay of Eustis. She was passing out campaign materials at her booth. Its a good way to gauge sup port, Muenzmay said. At Venetian Gardens in Leesburg, there were several free activities for families to enjoy, including a Leesburg Lightning baseball game against the Winter Park Diamond Dogs at Pat Thomas Stadium-Bud dy Lowe Field. There also was a concert with Nashville artist Ron ny McKinley to celebrate Americas 238th birthday. But as early as 4 p.m., many peo ple could be seen picnicking, play ing football and enjoying other activities along the nearby Vene tian Cove, and others were just sit ting and waiting for the 9:15 p.m., $25,000, 25-minute reworks show choreographed to music to hit the sky I know we are celebrating our independence, and what better way to celebrate than with re works, said 65-year-old Daniel Robinson, sitting in a chair along the cove. Some people got an early start on reworks. About 4:30 p.m., brothers Colin, 4, and James Valen tine, 8, and their cousin Aiden Ra sor, 6, could be seen ring off spar klers, smoke bombs and snappers in front of Venetian Cove. They are having fun, said Lind say Baldy, mother of the Valentine children, watching them play. Fireworks stands were in busi ness for the holiday, including a white Galaxy booth at the corner of County Road 33 and U.S. High way 27, just outside of Leesburg. Various reworks were for sale there including recrackers, mor tar shells and a $799 giant box of assorted reworks. James Wood, of Groveland, was sifting through the booth early Fri day as clouds hovered above. He had little concern about the rain. It always rains this time of the year, Wood said. FOURTH FROM PAGE A1

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Saturday, July 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LEESBURG New elementary principal to host meet-and-greet Newly appointed principal at Leesburg Elementary, Dr. Patrick Galatowitsch, will host a meet-andgreet event for the public at 5 p.m., on Tuesday at the school, 2229 South St. Formerly principal at Fern Creek Elementary in Orlando for the past ve years and an Orange County Public Schools administrator for the past 25 years, Galatowitsch is joining Lake County Schools for the 2014-2015 school year. For information, call the school at 352365-6308. LADY LAKE Uncle Donalds Farm hosts Wednesday Camp for kids Activities for this fun camp at Uncle Donalds Farm, 2713 Grifn Ave., in Lady Lake include handson experiences with farm animals, nature studies, brushing horses, games and more as they spend a day on the farm. Kids ages 6-14 can participate every Wednesday through Aug. 13 from 9:45 a.m. to 3 p.m. Cost for the camp is $25 per child per day and when you bring a sibling or friend admission is discounted. Kids need to bring a bag lunch. For reservations and information, call 352-753-2882. LEESBURG Foundation donates $10,000 for scholarships A $10,000 grant has been donated to Lake-Sumter State College by the Hans & Cay Jacobsen Foundation for the Johnson Scholars STEM Scholarship program, to fund schol arships for students majoring in science, technology, engineering and math. The Johnson Scholarship pro gram partnership is unique because it is a matching grant between local colleges, including LSSC and the University of Central Florida in Orlando. For information about LSSC pro grams, call 352-365-3518, or go to www.lssc.edu. MOUNT DORA Volunteers invited to combat invasive air potatoes Residents including chil dren are asked to assist in the release of leaf beetles, which tar get only the air potato vine at this event hosted by the Lake County Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area, at 9:30 a.m., on Friday at Palm Island Park, 411 S. Tremain St. No registration is necessary for the event. Participants should dress accordingly and activities and games will be provided for children after the event. Call Brooke Mofs, Lake County UF/IFAS extension agent, at 352343-4101, or email to Burnb48@u. edu. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com The 1,300-acre em ployment center being planned in Mount Dora has been named the Wolf Branch Innova tion District at Mount Dora. The marketing mate rial for the district was approved at the July 1 city council meeting, according to Planning and Development di rector Mark Reggentin. He said they were looking for a unique either physical, geo graphic, or historical marker to brand the area and, as we went through the options, the Wolf Branch name just kept coming up as something that cer tainly wasnt overused it sort of rose to the top as something to build around. A city council agen da states, in regards to Wolf Branch Creek, that This is unique in the fact that it is contained within the district and is a rare creek to sink hole connection that has some uniquely his torical lore. Reggentin said the innovation part of the name ts the type of in dustries that should come into the district. What were looking at is more cutting-edge type industries, either in terms of health care or education, and then the support facilities that would spin off of that, Reggentin said. So when you take a look at the mix of uses that were outlined in the market analysis, those were all sort of leading edge, innova tive type industries that t into this areaso MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millardives@dailycommercial.com Political reworks start ed early in Sumter County this morning. In an ofce packed with telephones, campaign signs, American ags, men in suits with ear pieces, and what seemed like hundreds of supporters, Gov. Rick Scott Friday morning kicked off the grand opening of his campaign ofce nestled in the heart of The Villages. The ofce is in the 900 block of Old Mill Run and di rectly across the street from Lake Sumter Landing, where Scott held a campaign ral ly in 2010. Telling the crowd it was a great place to spend the Fourth of July, Scott shook hands and posed for photographs with support ers. He gave a short cam paign speech, where he tout ed how much taxes had been cut and unemployment rates dropped during his stint in ofce. At one point, he led supporters in a chant of Lets Keep Working. He also stressed the need for government to stay out of peoples lives. This is not the govern ments country but our country, said Scott to a round of applause, stand ing a few feet from a paint ing of Abraham Lincoln, Ronald Reagan and other Republican presidents. The ofce will be staffed by Republican volunteers who will answer phones, dis tribute bumper stickers and posters and conduct oth er efforts to get Scott elected to his second term in his run against his presumed oppo nent, Democratic front-run ner and former Republican Gov. Charlie Crist. In the retirement com munity thats dominated by Republicans, Scott said it was an ideal place for a campaign ofce. Theres good grass root support here, Scott said. State Rep, Maureen OToole, R-Lady Lake, intro duced Scott to the crowd. After giving a speech, he spoke with more sup porters outside, includ ing Frank Cox, a member of the Republican Club of Sumter Landing. I cant think of a bet ter place to put an ofce in The Villages, Cox said. The Lake Sumter Land ing square, or The Square, as it is often re ferred to, has been the site of a number of visits by Re publican candidates, in cluding Sarah Palin, for mer presidential candidate Mitt Romney and running mate U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan. The ofce is the rst for Scott in The Villages and one of about 40 in the state, according to his press sec retary. Also in attendance was Sumter County Sheriff Bill Farmer and Sumter County Commissioner Don Burgess. This is so great for Sum ter County, Burgess said. The ofce hours will be 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday. MOUNT DORA Employment center gets new name CARLOS E. MEDINA Halifax Media Group Oxford Downs has start ed its state-mandated spate of quarter horse rac ing in south Marion Coun ty, which will continue through Thursday when the venue meets the regu latory minimum to operate a card room and simulcast wagering facility. The resumption of rac ing at the track, located off U.S. 301 on Southeast 177th Place near The Vil lages, renewed objections by some of the states horse racing associations, at least one of which has led for an injunction against the track. The track held one day of racing in April, also to meet regulatory require ments. The current 10day session of races began Tuesday. Its preposterous. The state of Florida never ceas es to amaze me, said Kent Stirling, president of the Florida Horsemens Benev olent and Protective Asso ciation. The association is part of the United Florida Horse men, which includes the Quarterhorse racing gets underway near The Villages HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO Riders cross the nish line during opening day of quarter horse racing at Oxford Downs. THE VILLAGES Gov. Scott speaks at campaign office launch PHOTOS BY MILLARD K. IVES / DAILY COMMERCIAL Gov. Rick Scott signs autographs for his supporters Friday morning as he opened his campaign ofce in The Villages. Gov. Rick Scott gives a speech Friday. BRANDON LARRABEE The News Service of Florida TALLAHASSEE Independence Day and the accompanying reworks shows werent technically supposed to get underway until Friday, but state government seemed to be on holiday for most of the week. Democrats got the party out of the way early with their annual fundrais ing soiree last Saturday, though they ditched the red (for obvious reasons) and white in their newly renamed Leadership Blue Gala. Gov. Rick Scott toured the state to thank veterans, an appropriate run-up to the holiday and a potential political boon to his re-election campaign. The capital city itself was largely quiet, with the highest prole event being the swearing-in ceremony for new Supreme Court Chief Justice Jorge Labarga, the rst Cuban-Amer ican to hold that position. If theres a reason Florida can go from voting for Barack Obama in 2008 to Scott in 2010 and then back to Obama in 2012 aside from po litical schizophrenia its turnout. SEE CENTER | A4 SEE RACING | A4 Politics heat up ahead of holiday SEE POLITICS | A4

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, July 5, 2014 thats where that moni ker came from. The Daily Commer cial previously reported that the district, located around State Road 46 and Round Lake Road, will be 1,300 acres with an estimated 730 acres for industrial relat ed activities, around 300 acres for ofces, around 100 acres for re tail, and the remaining acres being used for in stitutional usages, like educational institu tions or churches, and some limited residen tial space. Reggentin said they now will start working more closely with the Lake County Econom ic Development De partment as well as the Metro Orlando Eco nomic Development Commission to put the information out there. He said the market ing will be geared more toward site selectors, developers, and peo ple doing future spec ulation, and when the Wekiva Parkway is built they will be dealing with end users. Reggentin said the development of the dis trict will be driven by private development, which he believes will be motivated by the parkway construction taking place from 2017 to 2021. CENTER FROM PAGE A3 Ocala-based Florida Thoroughbred Breed ers and Owners Asso ciation and the Florida Quarter Horse Racing Association, which call the Oxford operation a front to open a card room. Its a phony baloney deal they are pulling off. They set up a dummy horsemens group made up of family members. Its a travesty, Stirling said. Despite the objec tions, the Division of Pa ri-mutuel Wagering has issued the required li censes and is overseeing the racing to make sure it adheres to state law. Tony Mendola, one of the owners of the track, said he is surprised by the mean-spirited accu sations about his opera tion, which he said is an honest effort to expand horse racing. I guess were just an easy target. There are a host a problems inside the entire industry that they should be focusing on rather than us. Were going to continue to act like gentlemen and do what we believe is right for the people involved, as well as the animals, Mendola said. Mendola is the rst to admit the facilities are lacking at the track. There is no clubhouse or permanent public re strooms. Concessions are limited to water and soda, and wagers are taken at a small mobile building. We didnt do any ag gressive advertising be cause we dont want the public believing this is our end product. Were not going to ever be come Churchill Downs, but there is a process to it, Mendola said. We have no revenue. Ev erything right now, the purses, the expenses come out of our pocket. After we start our card room and simulcast fa cility we will be able to have a real purse struc ture. The lack of facilities is what sparked the FT BOA to le for an injunc tion April 30, arguing that the county allowed the facility to open de spite not meeting any of the site plans that were initially submitted. A hearing on the matter is scheduled for Sept. 2. On Thursday, a letter from an attorney rep resenting the FTBOA was sent to the Marion County Board of Coun ty Commissioners de tailing the lack of facili ties and asking them to attend a performance to see for themselves. Lonny Powell, FTBOA executive vice president and CEO, was not im mediately available for comment Thursday. Mendola called the FTBOAs action frivo lous and said the facil ities were known to the county, which issued the permits to open. Construction on the clubhouse will begin in a few weeks, after nal permits are issued. The facility is expected to open in December, he said. The state requires a quarter horse permit holder to run at least 20 performances of rac ing, with eight races per performance. The track is holding two perfor mances per day to meet the requirement. Some of the hors es are racing twice per day, which is a frequen cy which is unheard of in recognized quarter horse racing, accord ing the FTBOAs attor neys letter to the com mission. Mendola said the rac es are 110-yard dashes and there are state and track veterinarians on the grounds. The safety of the jockeys and horses is paramount. We have had no incidents, he said. Many of the horses that race at the track are owned by people with ties to track ofcials and employees. The horse mens group, which rep resents horse owners and trainers, is a newly formed entity called the Central Florida Horse mens Association. Men dola led the articles of incorporation for the group with the state. Again, Mendola said, without revenue for purses, attracting hors es from other tracks is near impossible. The horses at the track are racing quarter horses that have raced at Hi aleah and Louisiana Downs. Weve had some seri ous inquiries, but right now the purses are not where they can make a commitment to send their horses, he said. We have some good horse racing and we want to put on good horse racing. We are moving toward that but, like any other track in the country, we cant do it without the revenue of the card room and si mulcasting. RACING FROM PAGE A3 The state requires a quarter horse permit holder to run at least 20 performances of racing, with eight races per performance. In presidential election years, just about every one who is politically in volved votes. In midterm years, the electorate tends to be older, whiter and more conservative. Democrats are hop ing to somehow turn that formula around this year, or at least lessen the swing, as they work to get former Gov. Charlie Crist his old job back and pro tect the gains in Congress and the Legislature that they made two years ago. That was also a theme when former President Bill Clinton spoke at the partys fundraising din ner Saturday night in Broward County. We have to be cre ative in how we reach people and how we get them to the polls, Clin ton told a crowd of more than 1,500 supporters who paid up to $250 to hear the former presi dent speak. If were go ing to preserve democ racy, real democracy, weve got to show up. Displaying his ency clopedic knowledge of politics, Clinton illus trated his point by saying that Democrat Alex Sink should have won a spe cial election earlier this year to replace the late U.S. Rep. C.W. Bill Young in a Pinellas County con gressional district. Sink was defeated by Youngs onetime aide David Jolly. Alex Sink won the in dependent votes by al most twice the margin President Obama did. But the registered Democrats did not turn out, Clinton said, noting that Demo cratic Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe won his elec tion because black voter turnout matched that in the general election. If they can do it, you can do it, Clinton said. The Clinton event raised $1.1 million top ping previous earnings for the annual Leader ship Blue Gala fundrais er, formerly called the Jefferson-Jackson Din ner and nearly 1,600 supporters were expect ed to attend the event at the Westin Diplomat Re sort & Spa, according to Florida Democratic Par ty Chairwoman Allison Tant. As far as the larger goal defeating Scott Tant promised that 2014 would feature the larg est eld plan that the Florida Democratic Party has ever seen. And U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, who also serves as the chairwoman of the Democratic National Committee, said the DNC has created a vast and sophisticated voter le. DEATH NOTICES Margie Hicks Margie Hicks, 77, of Leesburg, died Thurs day, July 3, 2014. Ar rangements by PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, Leesburg. James A. Perkins James A. Perkins, 84, of Leesburg, died Tues day, July 1, 2014. Ar rangements by PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, Leesburg. IN MEMORY POLITICS FROM PAGE A3 NIGEL COOK / DAYTONA BEACH NEWS-JOURNAL Marvin Sherzer, a certied music practitioner, plays for stroke patient Dan Mongosa at Florida Hospital Oceanside. SKYLAR SWISHER Halifax Media Group ORMOND BEACH Marvin Sherzer didnt touch the piano keys for more than four decades. Today, the 67-year-old certied music practitioner provides sooth ing sounds to patients recovering at Florida Hospital Oceanside af ter taking a 46-year hiatus from the instrument. Therapeutic music is played at the patients bedside to relieve pain and anxiety. We bring a human touch to a patient who is alone, Sherzer said. Hes in a strange environment. Hes overly concerned about his health. Without any pharmaceuti cal or any invasive procedures, we can bring him distraction, comfort and enrichment. The son of a musician who worked for Disney, Sherzer traded the piano for the pitching mound when he was a teenager grow ing up in Philadelphia. He played two years in the minor leagues and then went on to have a career in the insurance business. During that time, he never thought of the piano an instrument his father loved and he had learned as a child. Then his dad entered hospice in 2008. A musician played the harp during his fathers dying days, and it soothed him. When his moth er died a year later, Sherzer started taking lessons. Remembering the positive effect music had on his father in hospice, Sherzer studied to become a cer tied music practitioner. His role is more than entertainer. He plays music at the patients bedside spe cically tailored to the condition. Music has the power to relax and distract, Sherzer said What other modality can put a baby to sleep like Brahms Lulla by and inspire men during times of war? he said. On Thursday, Sherzer rolled his keyboard into a patient room on a cart. A thick binder lled with sheet music accompanied him. Sherzer works four days a week at Florida Hospital Oceanside, which serves patients recovering from strokes and traumatic injuries. Dan Mongosa, 50, rested in a bed still exhausted from a strenuous day of physical therapy. On June 2, Mongosa suffered a stroke that paralyzed his left side. He is ex pected to make a full recovery, but it will require a long period of ther apy. You going to warm up with Cho pin or Mozart? Mongosa asked. Sherzer started with Bach. Then he moved to Beethovens Fur Elise. He nished with The Blue Danube, a waltz written by Austri an composer Johann Strauss II. A typical session lasts about 30 min utes. Mongosa said the music made him forget he was in a hospital. In stead, the classical songs reminded him of watching gure skating on television during the Winter Olym pics with his wife. It puts you in a peaceful place, said Mongosa, an Edgewater res ident who works for Daytona Beach-based Teledyne Oil and Gas. You dont think about anything but the music. It makes the pain less noticeable. Sherzer is happy with his new job. While working in the insur ance business, customers never seemed happy to see him. Now, he watches worried looks turn to smiles. The biggest compliment Sherzer says he receives: A patient in pain falls asleep. Hospital music man hits healing note Associated Press FORT LAUDERDALE Fireght ers were called to a Fort Lauderdale home to rescue a pet parrot that had gotten itself stuck high up in a tree. The owner of the macaw named Sweetie called Fort Lauderdale Fire Rescue after the bird escaped the home and became stuck in the tree as a storm approached Thurs day afternoon. Deputy Fire Chief Timothy Heiser says that according to the owner, the bird can y around the house but it has trouble when ying higher in the trees outside. A ladder truck was called to the home, and a reghter climbed up to the bird. Heiser says that the bird was res cued unharmed after a few minutes, though Sweetie did bite the re ghters hand a few times. Firefighters rescue pet parrot stuck in tree

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Saturday, July 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 WILD WOOD CYCLER Y rfrnf rt Bikes for Ever y Te rain & Budget DARLENE SUPERVILLE Associated Press WASHINGTON Cel ebrating the ethnic di versity of America, Presi dent Barack Obama said more than two dozen for eign-born service mem bers who became U.S. cit izens at the White House on the Fourth of July are vivid reminders that wel coming immigrants is central to our way of life. He pleaded anew for new immigration pol icies, saying the vast range of backgrounds and experiences that has made America a melt ing pot for more than 200 years also makes the country stronger. He ar gued that the system must be retooled for the U.S. to remain the great est nation on earth. The basic idea of wel coming immigrants to our shores is central to our way of life, it is in our DNA, Obama said after the 25 service members representing 15 countries raised their right hands and pledged allegiance to the United States. From all these dif ferent strands, we make something new here in America. And thats why, if we want to keep at tracting the best and brightest from beyond our borders, were going to have to x our immi gration system, which is broken, he said. Pass common-sense immi gration reform. The immigration issue is earning renewed at tention because of the in ux to the U.S. of tens of thousands of unaccom panied children from Central America. Under U.S. law, they must be returned to their home countries, angering im migration advocates who already take issue with Obamas enforcement of deportations. They want Obama to allow the chil dren to stay. At the same time, Obama blames House Republicans for delaying action on legislation cov ering the millions already living in the U.S. illegally. A comprehensive mea sure the Senate passed last summer has been blocked by House leaders who also have done little to advance their own im migration proposals. Obama announced earlier this week that, as a result of inaction on Capitol Hill, he will pur sue non-legislative ways he can adjust U.S. im migration policy on his own. He scheduled a trip to Texas next week, mostly to raise mon ey for Democratic can didates, but plans not to visit the border. Im going to keep do ing everything I can to keep making our immi gration system smart er and more efcient, Obama said Friday. Across the country, more than 100 demon strators, most in support of immigrants, gathered again Friday outside a U.S. Border Patrol sta tion in Murrieta, Califor nia, where the agency in tends to process some of the immigrants who have ooded the Texas border with Mexico. Earlier this week a crowd of protesters blocked buses carrying women and children mi grants who were own in from overwhelmed Texas facilities. Later, Obama and his wife, Michelle, welcomed hundreds of service members and their fam ilies, including the new citizens, to an all-Amer ican barbecue on the South Lawn. Obama said that since the nations founding 238 years ago the U.S. has become the great est democratic, econom ic and military force the world has ever known and a beacon for others looking on from beyond its borders. TOM RAUM Associated Press WASHINGTON Unions representing government workers are expanding while or ganized labor has been shedding private sector members over the past half-century. A majority of union members today now have ties to a govern ment entity, at the feder al, state or local levels. Roughly 1-in-3 public sector workers is a union member, compared with about 1-in-15 for the pri vate sector workforce last year, according to the Bureau of Labor Sta tistics. Overall, 11.3 per cent of wage and sala ry workers in the United States are unionized, down from a peak of 35 percent during the mid1950s in the strong postWorld War II recovery. The typical union worker now is more like ly to be an educator, of ce worker or food or service industry employ ee rather than a con struction worker, au toworker, electrician or mechanic. Far more women than men are among the union-label ranks. In a blow to public sec tor unions, the Supreme Court ruled this week that thousands of health care workers in Illinois who are paid by the state cannot be required to pay fees that help cover a unions cost of collec tive bargaining. The justices said the practice violates the First Amendment rights of nonmembers who dis agree with stances taken by unions. The ruling was nar rowly drawn, but it could reverberate through the universe of unions that represent government workers. The case in volved home-care work ers for disabled people who are paid with Med icaid funds adminis tered by the state. Also in June, a Califor nia judge declared un constitutional the states teacher tenure, dismiss al and layoff laws. The judge ordered a stay of the decision, pending an appeal by the state and teachers union. The basic structure of the labor union move ment has changed, re ecting changes in the economy, said Ross Baker, a political science professor at Rutgers University. Manufac turing is a diminishing segment of the econ omy. Also, a lot of the manufacturing thats be ing done today is being done nonunion. Union members con tinue to be a powerful political force in politics, and Baker said he didnt see the role of unions di minishing. I just think the colors of the col lars are changing, Bak er said. Associated Press NEW YORK High-ranking chowhound Joey Jaws Chestnut dropped to one knee and proposed to his longtime girlfriend before Fri days annual hot dog eating contest, then packed away 61 franks and buns to hold onto his coveted mus tard yellow winners belt. The San Jose, California, resident fell far short of his record last year of 69 dogs and buns, but he still easily beat second-place nisher Matt Stonie, also of San Jose, who downed 56. Winning was the only option, the newly engaged champion said afterward. I wasnt going to taint today with a loss. Chestnut took a quick timeout be fore the annual Nathans Famous Fourth of July Hot Dog Eating Con test at Coney Island to make it of cial with his longtime girlfriend, Neslie Ricasa, who is also a compet itive eater. In the womens division, defend ing champion Sonya Black Widow Thomas lost her title to Miki Sudo. Associated Press LOS ANGELES The California Highway Pa trol said Friday it is in vestigating video of one of its ofcers straddling a woman and punching her in the head as she lay on the shoulder of a Los Angeles freeway. The woman had been walking on Interstate 10 west of downtown Los Angeles, endanger ing herself and people in trafc, and the of cer was trying to restrain her, CHP Assistant Chief Chris OQuinn said at a news conference. Passing Driver David Diaz recorded the Tues day incident and provid ed it to local TV stations. The ofcer is on ad ministrative leave while the patrol investigates. He has not been identi ed. OQuinn said the woman, who would not give her name, was un injured and is undergo ing psychiatric evalua tion. He said the ofcer was answering a report of a pedestrian on the free way. When he found the woman, she start ed walking down an offramp and then turned around, walked back onto the freeway and started wandering into lanes, OQuinn said. Thats when the inci dent occurred. OQuinn said the vid eo only shows a small part of what transpired. When the video be gins, the ofcer already is on top of the wom an and delivering blows. She can be seen wrig gling and trying to sit up. Obama: US always has been a nation of immigrants CHARLES DHARAPAK / AP President Barack Obama and rst lady Michelle Obama greet military families as they host an Independence Day celebration on the South Lawn at the White House in Washington on Friday. Unions representing govt workers are gaining SOURCE: Bureau of Labor Statistics APLabors declining mightThe number of unionized workers in the U.S. has been in decline for decades, now making up less than 12 percent of the workforce. UNION MEMBERSHIP 070314: Chart shows change in union membership as percentage of wage and salary earners; 2c x 3 inches; with all related stories; KSV; E T A 6 p.m. Editors Note: It is mandatory to include all sources that accompany this graphic when repurposing or editing it for publication 0 5 10 15 20 25 percent 0 10 20 30 40 percent Private Public 2013: 11.3% 1983: 20.1% 35.3% 6.7% Percentage of U.S. workers in unions 2013 union membership by sector Video shows cop punching woman on freeway Chestnut gets mustard yellow belt and fiancee

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, July 5, 2014 DAVID MCHUGH Associated Press KIEV, Ukraine Fighting in eastern Ukraine left at least nine Ukrainian soldiers dead Friday, as government troops pressed their offensive against pro-Russian insurgents using heavy artillery and combat jets and prospects of a truce appeared dim. Ukrainian President Pet ro Poroshenko said Ukraine was ready to conduct another round of talks between repre sentatives from Ukraine, Rus sia and the rebels on Saturday, but didnt name their venue. Two previous rounds of such negotiations held during a 10day cease-re have yielded no visible progress, but they brought the warring parties together for the rst time. Moscow strongly pushed for extending the truce and holding more talks in an ap parent hope to negotiate a settlement that would allow it to secure a degree of inu ence over the neighbor. The continuing ghting is putting more pressure on Russian President Vladimir Putin, who has been facing increas ingly angry nationalist de mands to send troops to help the insurgency a move that would inevitably trigger crip pling Western sanctions. Ukraines National Securi ty Council chief Andriy Paru biy said Friday that Rus sia was massing troops near the Ukrainian border and claimed that it let insurgents attack the Ukrainian border posts from its side. The state ments could not be inde pendently veried. The two neighbors, who share a 1,250-mile border that is unmarked and unguard ed outside of a few check points, have been trading claims and counterclaims ever since Ukraine began ghting pro-Russia separatists in April. The government said nine troops were killed and 13 oth ers were wounded in Fridays ghting in the east, according to the Interfax news agency. It did not elaborate on where or how the deaths occurred. Valentyn Nalyvaychenko, the head of Ukraines SBU se curity service, told journalists that over the past four days 20 Russian tanks or armored vehicles had illegally crossed the border to take part in the insurgency. Ukraine says Russia is arm ing and supporting the sepa ratists, a charge that Russia de nies. For its part, Moscow has repeatedly accused Ukrainian troops of ring shells that land ed on the Russian side and on one occasion last month hit a Russian border post, wound ing one customs ofcer. Rus sian border guards said 10 ar tillery shells ew from the Ukrainian side Friday, but no one was injured. It is nearly impossible to prove or dispel the claims from the opposing sides, since the ghting consists of inter mittent clashes between small units with no xed front line and it is deadly dangerous for journalists and other observ ers to travel around. Five jour nalists have been killed cov ering the conict and several teams of observers from the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe have been kidnapped by rebels. Russia has proposed host ing both OSCE observers and Ukrainian ofcers at its bor der checkpoints to prove it wasnt fueling the mutiny. The Russian Foreign Min istry on Friday accused Po roshenkos government of dragging its feet on hold ing another round of negoti ations to resume a truce and accused it of using cluster munitions against civilians. Parubiy said government forces were attacking rebel po sitions in eastern Ukraine with artillery and planes and that 17 villages had been recap tured since a unilateral ceasere expired Monday. He said Ukrainian forces now con trolled 23 of the 36 local re gions within the Donetsk and Luhansk provinces that have declared independence. RYAN LUCAS and QASSIM ABDUL-ZAHRA Associated Press BAGHDAD De spite mounting pres sure to step aside, Iraqs Nouri al-Maliki vowed Friday not to aban don his bid for anoth er term as prime minis ter and pledged to stay on until the Sunni mil itants who have over run much of the coun try are defeated. The sharp words are certain to prolong the political impasse grip ping Iraq, which is fac ing urgent demands for a new government that can hold the nation to gether in the face of an onslaught that threat ens to cleave it in three along ethnic and sec tarian lines. The offensive by mil itants who have swept across much of north ern and western Iraq since last month has been fueled in part by grievances among the countrys Sunni Muslim minority with al-Maliki and his Shiite-led gov ernment. Al-Maliki, a Shiite who has been prime minister since 2006, has been accused by former allies and others of monopolizing pow er and contributing to the crisis by failing to promote reconciliation with Sunnis. The U.S. has urged the formation of a more inclusive government but has not explicitly called for al-Maliki to bow out. In what has been seen as a rebuke of al-Maliki, Iraqs top Shiite cleric, Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, has pressed lawmakers to quickly form a new government that can confront the militant threat and unite the country. Lawmakers failed in their rst ses sion of parliament on Tuesday to make any progress. On Friday, al-Sis tani lamented the in ability of political lead ers to agree on a new prime minister and urged them to redou ble their efforts, a cler ic who represents him told worshippers in a sermon in the holy city of Karbala. Al-Malikis State of law bloc won the most parliamentary seats in April elections, which would traditional ly make him the lead ing candidate to head a new government. But al-Maliki failed to gain a majority in the leg islature, meaning he needs allies to form a government. That has set the stage for intense wrangling over the makeup of a coalition and, above all, who will be prime minister. Al-Maliki made clear on Friday his determi nation to stay on for a third consecutive term or at least until he has crushed the insur gency I will never give up the nomination for the post of prime minister, he said in a statement issued by his ofce. YOUSUR ALHLOU Associated Press JERUSALEM Israe li police clashed with rock-throwing Palestin ian protesters in Jerusa lem on Friday as thou sands mourned at the funeral for an Arab teen who Palestinians say was killed by Israeli ex tremists in a revenge at tack. Palestinian militants, meanwhile, red rock ets and mortars from the Gaza Strip into Isra el, and the Jewish state later carried out sever al airstrikes on what it described as Hamas terror targets in Gaza. There were no immedi ate reports of casualties. Also, the Israeli mil itary said its troops opened re after spot ting two Palestinians planting explosives near the Gaza border fence. An ambulance carried the body of 16-year-old Mohammed Abu Kh deir, wrapped in a Pal estinian ag and tradi tional headscarf, to a mosque in the east Je rusalem neighborhood where he lived. Then mourners carried the open casket through the crowd to a cemetery. During the proces sion, scores of masked Palestinians threw rocks at Israeli police on duty nearby, and they responded with stun grenades, spokes man Micky Rosenfeld said. He said more than 2,000 people attended the funeral. Rosenfeld said police also clashed with hun dreds of Palestinian pro testers in other neigh borhoods in the eastern part of the city, which has been rocked by vio lence since Abu Khdeirs burned body was found Wednesday in a forest after he was seized near his home. At least 13 Israeli of cers were injured by rock-throwers, with six taken to the hospital, police spokeswoman Luba Samri said. The Red Crescent said about 30 Palestinians were hurt by rubber bullets red by Israeli forces. Dozens of others were treated for tear gas inhalation. Police had beefed up security in and around Jerusalem as the funer al coincided with the rst Friday prayer ser vices of the Muslim fasting month of Ra madan. Tensions have been high since three Israe li teenagers, including one with U.S. citizen ship, were abducted in the West Bank on June 12, sparking a huge manhunt that ended with the gruesome dis covery of their bodies early this week. Israel has blamed Hamas for the abduc tion and murder of the teens and launched a crackdown on the Is lamic militant group in the West Bank, draw ing rocket attacks out of Gaza and Israeli air strikes in a near-daily cycle of retaliation. Hamas, which has ab ducted Israelis in the past, praised the kid napping of the teenag ers but did not take re sponsibility for it. Palestinians immedi ately accused Israeli ex tremists of killing Abu Khdeir in revenge for the deaths of the Israeli teens. Israeli police said they have not yet deter mined who killed the boy or why. The killing of the youngster was wide ly condemned by Is raeli leaders, including Prime Minister Benja min Netanyahu. We dont know yet the motives or the identities of the perpetrators, but we will. We will bring to justice the criminals re sponsible for this despi cable crime, whoever they may be, Netanya hu said Thursday. Mur der, riots, incitement, vigilantism they have no place in our democ racy. FRANK JORDANS Associated Press BERLIN Germany summoned the U.S. ambassador in Berlin on Friday following the arrest of a man reported to have spied for the United States, heightening friction between the two coun tries over alleged U.S. eavesdrop ping in Germany. U.S. Ambassador John B. Emer son was called in in connection with an investigation by the feder al prosecutor, the German Foreign Ministry said in a statement. The U.S. envoy was asked to help in the swift clarication of the case, it added. Federal prosecutors say a 31-year-old German man was ar rested Wednesday on suspicion of spying for foreign intelligence ser vices. They did not identify the sus pect or the intelligence services. German government spokesman Steffen Seibert told reporters that Chancellor Angela Merkel been personally informed of the arrest. He declined to comment on re ports by Der Spiegel magazine and the daily Sueddeutsche Zeitung that the man worked for Germa nys foreign intelligence service, known by its German acronym BND. The newspapers, which didnt identify their sources, said the man was suspected of passing on in formation about a German parlia mentary committee investigating the activities of U.S. and other in telligence agencies in Germany. He claimed to have worked with U.S. intelligence since 2012, they re ported. Seibert said members of the par liamentary panel had also been in formed of the arrest. Ukraine say its winning ground in rebellious east DMITRY LOVETSKY / AP Ukrainian government forces maneuver antiaircraft missile launchers Buk as they are transported north-west from Slavyansk, eastern Ukraine on Friday. Palestinians, Israeli police clash during teens funeral MAHMOUD ILLEAN / AP Palestinians throw rocks as they clash with Israeli security forces during the funeral of 16-year-old Mohammed Abu Khdeir in Jerusalem on Friday. Germany summons US envoy over spying accusations HANNIBAL HANSCHKE / AP In this picture taken Thursday, former NSA employee Thomas Drake arrives at the parliamentary NSA investigation committee in Berlin. German lawmakers began hearing expert testimony for a probe into the activities of foreign intelligence agencies in Germany. Iraqs al-Maliki signals his intent to stay in job

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Saturday, July 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 I saw an old pal Monday af ternoon. Instead of his usu al scruffy jeans and T-shirt, he was wearing a suit and tie. Hey, Bobby, I called out, whats with the stuffy threads? I have gone and incorporated myself, he said. I want to look like the boss. But why are you hugging yourself? I asked, still puzzled. Even bosses with a high regard for themselves dont usually go around cuddling themselves in self-affection. Because I am now a close ly held corporation, he said. As soon as the Supreme Court gives the all-clear to other for-prof it corporations, I will be a regu lar boss you know, telling my workers what is morally right ac cording to my own sincerely held religious beliefs and letting my arms dangle. Ah, yes, the Hobby Lobby case, the Supreme Court decision that struck a blow for religious liber ty. Bosses in closely held corpora tions are now at liberty to impose their religious beliefs on female employees concerning contra ception in their health care plans. As Bobby explained it, the gov ernment has no compelling in terest in insisting on wom ens health care options under Obamacare. Of course it doesnt, Bobby said, Who do these wom en think they are? They are not the boss of us. Of course, Justice Samuel Alito tried to make clear that the ma jority opinion was very specic. He insists that it does not say that for-prot corporations can opt out of any law (except tax laws) they judge incompatible with their sincerely held religious be liefs. What a sense of humor that Justice Alito has! How they must have laughed in law rms across the country as they began pre paring other lawsuits, realizing that the rationale used in this case could apply to Mammon Enterprises Inc. (Slogan: Our Prot, Your Loss, soon to be re worked as Our Prophet, Your Loss.) Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg noticed, too, and she wasnt laughing. Legal scholars, trained to pick up on nuances in the law others might miss, noted that she is a woman and that two other women on the court joined her in her angry dissent. For some reason, women dont like men or incorporated reli gious families telling them what to do. Typical! Well, they will just have to get used to it, because religious bosses rule! No wonder Bobby wants to be one. Actually, when it comes to sincerely held religious beliefs, I didnt realize he had any sincerity or beliefs until now. But thats the marvel of the law. If people in the form of a corpo ration declare they have sincere religious beliefs, the court must accept this. No questions asked! As it happens, nobody ques tions the sincerely held religious beliefs of the owners of Hobby Lobby and Conestoga Wood Spe cialties Corp., but the sincere and the insincere can expect to get a pass, which is the problem going forward. A slippery slope now beckons. We have already slid from the Citizens United decision, when a corporation was deemed a per son for purposes of campaign funding, to now considering a corporation a pious articial entity. Whats next for this cre ative legal idea that offends com mon sense and serves God and money? Maybe Mr. Corporation will go to a gay wedding and refuse to take photographs or bake the cake. Maybe Mrs. Corpora tion will re a worker who gets a divorce. Maybe Mrs. and Mrs. Corporation, proprietors of the Family Rest Motel, will refuse ac commodations to a couple who cant prove they are married. Maybe the Supreme Court will say this is all ne. Justice Alito suggests it cant happen, but who knows what might ensue when he and the boys get together on the slippery slope. Sure, in this case women can still get contraceptives if they want, but Americans have been put on notice: Your needs dont have a prayer when someone elses religion is the boss. This puts me in bad position. I go to church, although I am hardly sanctimonious enough to be anyones boss. Also recently, I wrote a column defending the Supreme Court decision allowing prayer in municipal meetings, which with some reservations I accepted in the spirit of tolerance and religious freedom. That was before corporations were deemed religious people and judged justied in making other peoples moral business their business. That goes too far and invites a backlash that will hurt all believers. By the way, my pal plans to be the boss of Bobbys Lobby, a mens store. Of course. Sadly for women, men rule. Reg Henry is deputy editorial-page editor for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Readers may email him at rhenry@post-gazette.com. OTHER VOICES Reg Henry MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Slippery slope lies ahead after court decision LETTERS TO THE EDITOR YOUR POINT OF VIEW W hatever you think of therapy designed to change peoples sexual orientation and we think its both harmful and insulting to gays and lesbians its not con stitutionally protected free speech. That was the correct conclusion of a federal appeals court decision upholding a California law prohibiting use of such therapy on minors. This week the Supreme Court rightly de clined to hear an appeal of that decision. In declining to review the ruling by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, the justices didnt set a national precedent. But their unwilling ness to take up this issue is likely to encourage additional states to pass laws against treating children and adolescents with conversion or reparative therapy. It will also be harder now for proponents of the therapy to argue, as they did in this case, that it is a form of free speech deserving of the strongest judicial protection. Many opposed enactment of the California law, not because they approved of conversion therapy for minors or anyone else but because they didnt believe legislators should be in the business of setting detailed rules for medical or psychiatric professionals. The preference would have been for the medical and psychological professions to lead the way in discouraging a form of treatment that is increasingly viewed as pointless and even dangerous. But whether the California law is wise is a different question from whether it violates the First Amendments free speech protec tions. On that issue, the 9th Circuit correct ly drew a distinction between expressing an opinion about conversion therapy and actu ally engaging in it with underage patients. Writing for the appeals court, Judge Susan P. Graber declined to subject the law to the strict scrutiny with which courts consider laws that abridge free speech. She concluded that the law regulates only treatment, while leav ing mental health providers free to discuss and recommend, or recommend against efforts to change sexual orientation. As this page has noted, a doctor has a right to express the opin ion that a banned drug would be helpful to his patients, but that doesnt mean he can violate the law by engaging in the speech of writing a prescription for that drug. The line between speech and conduct for 1st Amendment purposes is admitted ly sometimes blurry, but this law was aimed clearly at conduct. Even as it goes into effect, those who believe in conversion therapy can continue to evangelize for it. But they will be doing so to an increasingly skeptical public inside and outside the psychiatric profession. Provided by MCT Information Services. A VOICE A judicial no on gay conversion Classic DOONESBURY 1975

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, July 5, 2014 Thursday July 10that 5 PM

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2004 SUZUKI KA TA NAOnly$3,400 2005 YA MAHA V ST AR 650Only$3,995 2012 HOND A SHADOW 750Only$6,200 352-330-0047 rff nt bft nnf Cycles Cycles BUY HERE PAY HERE r f n tb r br r f f tb n b b b b rrr rr rrbr rb 1997HARLEY -DA VIDSON 883 H$3, 90 0 2003TRIUMPH SPEEDMASTER$3,7 00 2003HARLEY -DA VIDSON UL TRA CLASSIC$9, 50 0 SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, July 5, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com NBA: Cavaliers meet with LeBrons agent / B3 PHOTOS BY BEN CURTIS / AP TOP: Novak Djokovic runs as he plays a return to Grigor Dimitrov of Bulgaria during their mens singles seminal match at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships in Wimbledon, London, on Friday. BOTTOM: Roger Federer plays a return to Milos Raonic during their mens singles seminal STEPHEN WILSON Associated Press LONDON Roger Feder er and Novak Djokovic will meet for the Wimbledon ti tle after the old guard held off the new in the seminals Friday at the All England Club. Federer, chasing his record eighth Wimbledon champi onship, swept past Canadas Milos Raonic 6-4, 6-4, 6-4 to reach his 25th Grand Slam nal. Federer, who owns 17 ma jor titles, broke once in each set and won 61 of 80 points on serve to make it back to a Slam nal for the rst time since winning Wimbledon in 2012. The top-seeded Djokov ic ran off six of the nal sev en points in the tiebreaker to beat Grigor Dimitrov of Bul garia 6-4, 3-6, 7-6 (2), 7-6 (7) to advance to his third Wim bledon nal in four years. Its also Djokovics 14th Grand Slam nal and 10th in his last 13 majors. Djokov ic won the 2011 Wimbledon title and lost in last years nal to Andy Murray. The 32-year-old Federer will be playing in his ninth Wimbledon nal on Sun day. If he wins, he will hold the outright record for mens titles, which he current ly shares at seven with Pete Sampras and William Ren shaw. Federer would also be come the oldest mens Wim bledon champion since the Open era began in 1968. The Swiss great has slipped in the rankings the past two years and failed to get to any Grand Slam nals. This could represent his best chance for another major ti tle. Federer, who has lost only one set and been broken just once the whole tournament, was asked how much it would mean to lift the Wim bledon trophy once more. Djokovic, Federer in Wimbledon finals SEE WIMBLEDON | B2 TALES AZZONI Associated Press FORTALEZA, Brazil Brazil made its way into the World Cup seminals for the rst time in 12 years, with goals coming from defend ers Thiago Silva and David Luiz in a 2-1 win over Co lombia on Friday. Brazil, which had been eliminated in the quarter nals at the last two World Cups, will next play Germa ny on Tuesday in Belo Hor izonte. Silva gave Brazil the lead in the seventh minute, scoring with his left knee af ter a corner from Neymar passed through the Colom bian defense. He celebrat ed the goal by pointing to the emblem on his jersey and shouting, This is Bra zil, this is Brazil. Luiz added the second from a free kick in the 69th, sending a swerving longrange shot off the side of his foot into the top of the net. Colombia got one back in the 80th. James Rodri guez scored his tourna ment-leading sixth goal from the penalty spot after Brazil goalkeeper Julio Ce sar brought down substitute Carlos Bacca inside the area. MARK LONG Associated Press DAYTONA BEACH David Gilliland might have summed up Daytona qualifying best. Its uncontrolled chaos out there, Gilliland said Friday after landing the pole in a rain-short ened and somewhat hairy session that set the eld for the Coke Zero 400 on Saturday night at Daytona International Speedway. Gillilands top speed during a hectic, cat-andmouse qualifying session was 199.322 mph, earning him his third Sprint Cup pole and rst since landing the top spot for the 2007 Dayto na 500. All three of his poles have been at restric tor-plate races, with the rst one coming at Talla dega in 2006. Front Row Motorsports, our strong point is denitely speedway racing, said Gilliland, who nished third in the 2011 Daytona 500. It is something thats circled on our calendar from the start of the year. We put a lot of emphasis on it. The restrictor-plate tracks are good equalizers. Brazil holds off Colombia to reach semifinals; Germany in with shutout over France MANU FERNANDEZ / AP Brazils Neymar is fouled by Colombias Juan Zuniga during their World Cup quarternal soccer match at the Arena Castelao in Fortaleza, Brazil, on Friday. SEE WORLD CUP | B5 And then there were two ZACHARY HANKLE Special to the Daily Commercial Brad Antchak and Kameron Esthay com bined for six hits and four RBIs, and the Lightning scored four runs in the seventh, defeating the Di amond Dawgs, 7-1, on Fri day night at Pat Thom as Stadium-Buddy Lowe Field. Leesburgs offense col lected 11 hits, scoring a run apiece in the rst three innings to win its second straight game. The Lightning got on the board in the rst in ning when Igor Baez hit an RBI-single through the in eld to make it 1-0. Esthay scored on Shea Pierces sacrice y to extend the lead to 2-0. Brett Jones scored a run on Colby Lusignans elders choice to make it 3-0. The Diamond Dawgs only run came in the top of the fth on Orlando Ri veras RBI-double. Brandon Caples came in during the seventh inning to relieve Brett Jones, who allowed just the one run in 6 2/3 innings while strik ing out three and walking two. The Lightning blew the game open in the bot tom of the seventh with four runs. Esthay hit an RBI-single, followed by Antchaks bases-clearing double. Trey Norris came in to nish the game and secure the win for the Lightning, giving up a pair of hits while striking out a batter. The Lightning host Win ter Park tonight at 7. Ty ler Souris is set to pitch for Leesburg. Lightning scare off Dawgs with blowout win Gilliland lands pole for Coke Zero 400 at Daytona SEE DAYTONA | B5

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, July 5, 2014 SUN mon tu es we d thurs fri Sa tLeesbur g LightningJune 29Jul y 5Winter GardenAW AY1pmCollege ParkHOME7pmCollege ParkHOME7pmCollege ParkAW AY7pmWinter ParkHOME6pmWinter ParkHOME7pm TV 2 DAY AUTO RACING 2 p.m. NBCSN Formula One, qualifying for British Grand Prix, at Silverstone, England 7 p.m. NBCSN IndyCar, pole qualifying for Pocono 500, at Long Pond, Pa. 7:30 p.m. TNT NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Coke Zero 400, at Daytona Beach 11 p.m. ESPN2 NHRA, qualifying for Summit Racing Equipment Nationals, at Norwalk, Ohio CANADIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE 3 p.m. ESPN2 Saskatchewan at Toronto CYCLING 6 a.m. NBCSN Tour de France, stage 1, Leeds to Harrogate, England 2 p.m. NBC Tour de France, stage 1, Leeds to Harrogate, England GOLF 8 a.m. TGC European PGA Tour, Open de France, third round, at Paris 1 p.m. TGC PGA Tour, The Greenbrier Classic, third round, at White Sulphur Springs, W.Va. 3 p.m. CBS PGA Tour, The Greenbrier Classic, third round, at White Sulphur Springs, W.Va. TGC Web.com Tour, Nova Scotia Open, third round, at Halifax, Nova Scotia HORSE RACING 5 p.m. NBCSN Thoroughbreds, Belmont Oaks, at Elmont, N.Y. MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 2 p.m. FS-Florida Miami at St. Louis WGN Seattle at Chicago White Sox 4 p.m. FS1 Arizona at Atlanta SUN Tampa Bay at Detroit 7 p.m. FOX Regional coverage, Baltimore at Boston, S.F at San Diego, or Texas at N.Y. Mets 10 p.m. MLB Regional coverage, Toronto at Oakland or Houston at L.A. Angels MOTORSPORTS 3 p.m. NBC AMA Motocross, at Red Bud, Mich. 4 p.m. NBCSN AMA Motocross, at Red Bud, Mich. SOCCER Noon ABC FIFA, World Cup, quarternals, Argentina vs. Belgium, at Brasilia, Brazil 4 p.m. ESPN FIFA, World Cup, quarternals, Netherlands vs. Costa Rica, at Salvador, Brazil TENNIS 9 a.m. ESPN Wimbledon, womens championship, at London SCOREBOARD FCSL STANDINGS W L .Pct GB Sanford 16 9 .640 Winter Park 15 11 .577 1.5 Winter Garden 14 12 .538 2.5 Leesburg 12 10 .545 2.5 DeLand 9 15 .375 6.5 College Park 7 16 .304 8 FRIDAYS GAMES Leesburg 7, Winter Park 1 College Park 5, DeLand 3 Sanford 8, Winter Garden 4 TODAYS GAMES Winter Park at Leesburg, 7 p.m. College Park at DeLand, 7 p.m. Sanford at Winter Garden, 7 p.m. AUTO RACING Subway Firecracker 250 Lineup After Friday qualifying; race Friday At Daytona International Speedway Daytona Beach Lap length: 2.5 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (43) Dakoda Armstrong, Ford, 192.123. 2. (6) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 191.955. 3. (60) Chris Buescher, Ford, 191.836. 4. (16) Ryan Reed, Ford, 191.575. 5. (54) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 191.274. 6. (11) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 191.168. 7. (9) Chase Elliott, Chevrolet, 191.071. 8. (7) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 191.022. 9. (20) Darrell Wallace Jr., Toyota, 191.014. 10. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 190.63. 11. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 190.432. 12. (84) Chad Boat, Chevrolet, 189.998. 13. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 189.785. 14. (62) Brendan Gaughan, Chevrolet, 188.178. 15. (2) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 188.162. 16. (3) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 188.151. 17. (93) Mike Wallace, Dodge, 186.931. 18. (99) James Buescher, Toyota, 186.858. 19. (28) J.J. Yeley, Dodge, 186.834. 20. (80) Johnny Sauter, Toyota, 186.749. 21. (39) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, 186.71. 22. (74) Mike Harmon, Dodge, 186.648. 23. (70) Derrike Cope, Chevrolet, 186.174. 24. (17) Tanner Berryhill, Dodge, 185.812. 25. (01) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 185.414. 26. (31) Dylan Kwasniewski, Chevrolet, 185.414. 27. (25) John Wes Townley, Toyota, 185.239. 28. (29) Scott Lagasse Jr., Toyota, 185.166. 29. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 185.143. 30. (44) David Starr, Toyota, 185.143. 31. (98) David Ragan, Ford, 185.128. 32. (14) Eric McClure, Toyota, 185.086. 33. (55) Ross Chastain, Chevrolet, 185.086. 34. (87) Carlos Contreras, Chevrolet, 184.147. 35. (40) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 183.996. 36. (51) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 37. (23) Robert Richardson Jr., Chevrolet, Owner Points. 38. (52) Joey Gase, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 39. (4) Jeffrey Earnhardt, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 40. (97) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Past Champion. Failed to Qualify 41. (91) Benny Gordon, Toyota, 185.098. 42. (10) Blake Koch, Toyota, 185.067. 43. (76) Tommy Joe Martins, Dodge, 183.64. 44. (46) Matt DiBenedetto, Chevrolet, 183.031. 45. (85) Bobby Gerhart, Chevrolet, 182.771. GOLF The Greenrier Classic Friday At The Old White TPC White Sulphur Springs, W.Va. Purse: $6.5 million Yardage: 7,287; Par 70 Second Round a-denotes amateur Billy Hurley III 68-63 131 Kevin Chappell 67-65 132 Chris Stroud 66-66 132 Troy Matteson 72-61 133 Steve Stricker 66-68 134 Chris Kirk 65-69 134 Brice Garnett 68-66 134 Camilo Villegas 68-67 135 Jim Renner 65-70 135 Pat Perez 66-69 135 Bubba Watson 68-67 135 David Lingmerth 67-68 135 Luke Guthrie 67-69 136 Johnson Wagner 68-68 136 Angel Cabrera 68-68 136 J.B. Holmes 68-68 136 Keegan Bradley 67-69 136 David Hearn 68-68 136 Danny Lee 65-71 136 Bronson LaCassie 70-66 136 Joe Durant 65-71 136 Patrick Reed 67-69 136 Kevin Na 66-70 136 Charlie Beljan 67-69 136 Robert Allenby 67-70 137 George McNeill 70-67 137 Stephen Ames 69-68 137 Bud Cauley 69-68 137 Jason Bohn 65-72 137 Jonas Blixt 64-73 137 Tyrone Van Aswegen 67-70 137 Patrick Cantlay 69-68 137 Will Wilcox 68-69 137 Scott Gardiner 70-67 137 Greg Chalmers 69-69 138 Brendon Todd 71-67 138 Steven Bowditch 68-70 138 Matt Bettencourt 70-68 138 Cameron Tringale 72-66 138 Josh Teater 69-69 138 Andrew Loupe 69-69 138 Oliver Goss 70-68 138 Brendan Steele 70-68 138 David Toms 69-69 138 Michael Thompson 66-72 138 Charles Howell III 67-71 138 Justin Leonard 71-67 138 Troy Merritt 66-72 138 Tim Wilkinson 68-71 139 Chad Collins 66-73 139 Richard H. Lee 71-68 139 Ken Duke 72-67 139 Gary Woodland 69-70 139 Carl Pettersson 71-68 139 Tom Watson 71-68 139 Kyle Stanley 71-68 139 Brendon de Jonge 70-69 139 Steve Marino 69-70 139 Hudson Swafford 72-67 139 James Hahn 65-74 139 Gonzalo Fdez-Castano 68-71 139 Michael Putnam 67-72 139 Jeff Maggert 69-70 139 Bill Haas 69-70 139 Scott Stallings 70-69 139 Scott Langley 68-71 139 Heath Slocum 70-69 139 Trevor Immelman 69-70 139 Andres Romero 72-68 140 Jason Gore 70-70 140 Roberto Castro 72-68 140 Derek Ernst 71-69 140 Webb Simpson 71-69 140 Ted Potter, Jr. 70-70 140 Wes Roach 69-71 140 Jamie Lovemark 68-72 140 Shawn Stefani 73-67 140 Martin Flores 70-70 140 Mark Wilson 68-72 140 Sang-Moon Bae 66-74 140 J.J. Henry 70-70 140 Davis Love III 67-73 140 Scott Brown 72-68 140 D.A. Points 65-75 140 Woody Austin 68-72 140 John Daly 68-72 140 Andrew Svoboda 72-68 140 Robert Streb 68-72 140 Patrick Rodgers 65-75 140 Failed to make the cut Nick Watney 70-71 141 Justin Hicks 68-73 141 Bobby Wyatt 67-74 141 Chad Campbell 69-72 141 Marc Leishman 68-73 141 Ricky Barnes 68-73 141 Will MacKenzie 70-71 141 John Peterson 71-70 141 Jim Herman 68-73 141 John Huh 73-69 142 Vijay Singh 71-71 142 Jonathan Byrd 71-71 142 Daniel Chopra 71-71 142 Kevin Foley 72-70 142 Alex Aragon 70-72 142 Ben Curtis 67-75 142 Jhonattan Vegas 71-71 142 Scott McCarron 71-71 142 Edward Loar 72-70 142 Brian Harman 72-71 143 Chesson Hadley 75-68 143 Jeff Curl 73-70 143 Miguel Angel Carballo 73-70 143 Kevin Tway 69-74 143 Scott Verplank 75-68 143 Rory Sabbatini 72-71 143 Brad Fritsch 70-73 143 Benjamin Alvarado 71-72 143 Ben Martin 73-71 144 Morgan Hoffmann 70-74 144 John Rollins 75-69 144 Alex Prugh 71-73 144 Charlie Wi 74-70 144 William McGirt 73-71 144 Brian Davis 69-75 144 Stuart Appleby 73-71 144 Darren Clarke 71-73 144 Troy Kelly 69-75 144 Harrison Frazar 72-73 145 Kevin Kisner 70-75 145 Mike Weir 72-73 145 Jimmy Walker 70-75 145 Sean OHair 72-73 145 Spencer Levin 70-75 145 Doug LaBelle II 72-73 145 D.H. Lee 73-73 146 Y.E. Yang 75-71 146 James Driscoll 69-77 146 Peter Hanson 74-72 146 Tim Clark 73-74 147 Bryce Molder 72-76 148 Nick Faldo 71-77 148 Robert McClellan 73-75 148 Paul Goydos 73-75 148 Thorbjorn Olesen 73-75 148 Daniel Summerhays 75-74 149 Peter Malnati 75-74 149 Tommy Gainey 72-77 149 Nicholas Thompson 74-76 150 Brian Anania 73-77 150 K.J. Choi 74-76 150 Brian Agee 76-74 150 Tag Ridings 76-75 151 Neal Lancaster 73-80 153 Mikey Moyers 77-77 154 Rod Perry 78-80 158 SOCCER World Cup QUARTERFINALS Friday At Rio de Janeiro Germany 1, France 0 At Fortaleza, Brazil Brazil 2, Colombia 1 Today At Brasilia, Brazil Argentina vs. Belgium, Noon At Salvador, Brazil Netherlands vs. Costa Rica, 4 p.m. SEMIFINALS Tuesday, July 8 At Belo Horizonte, Brazil Brazil vs. Germany, 4 p.m. Wednesday, July 9 At Sao Paulo Netherlands-Costa Rica winner vs. Argenti na-Belgium winner, 4 p.m. THIRD PLACE Saturday, July 12 At Brasilia, Brazil Seminal losers, 4 p.m. CHAMPIONSHIP Sunday, July 13 At Rio de Janeiro Seminal winners, 3 p.m. TENNIS Wimbledon Mens Seminals: No. 1 Novak Djokovic beat No. 11 Grigor Dimitrov 6-4, 3-6, 7-6 (2), 7-6 (7); No. 4 Roger Federer beat No. 8 Milos Raonic 6-4, 6-4, 6-4. Sundays Mens Final: Djokovic vs. Federer. Todays Womens Singles Final: No. 6 Petra Kvitova vs. No. 13 Eugenie Bouchard. Saturdays Mens Doubles Final: No. 1 Bob and Mike Bryan vs. Vasek Pospisil and Jack Sock. Todays Womens Doubles Final: No. 2 Sara Errani and Roberta Vinci vs. No. 14 Timea Babos and Kristina Mladenovic. WIMBLEDON FROM PAGE B1 ANTHONY DEVLIN / AP Novak Djokovic stretches to reach a return to Grigor Dimitrov during their mens singles seminal match at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships at Wimbledon, London, on Friday. JOHN RABY Associated Press WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, W.Va. Billy Hurley III has been waiting for a breakthrough moment on the PGA Tour. On Independence Day, the former U.S. Navy ofcer might have set himself up for one this weekend in the Greenbrier Classic. Hurley shot a season-best 7-un der 63 on Friday to take the sec ond-round lead. Hurleys bogey-free round includ ed a chip-in from 29 feet on No. 4 in cool conditions before the wind picked up considerably late in his morning round. You know, anytime you play good, its great, right? Hurley said. Theres special days of the year for our country, and having served ... adds something to it. Its kind of pretty cool, I guess, to shoot 7 under on the 4th of July. Its a nice storyline. Then again, having military experience wasnt on his mind in jumping to the top of the leaderboard. I was just trying to keep getting the ball in the hole, he said. Hurley was at 9-under 131 at Old White TPC. Eleven players were within four shots of him. Kevin Chappell (65) and Chris Stroud (66) were a stroke back. Troy Matteson Troy Matteson had a 61 to vault into fourth place at 7 under. He has made the cut in all ve years of the Greenbrier Classic. Brice Garnett (66), Steve Stricker (68) and Chris Kirk (69) were anoth er stroke back at 6 under. Hurley graduated from Annapo lis in 2004 and spent ve years in the Navy. He playing golf sparingly while stationed in Hawaii and worked out as much as he could. Being mentally tough on the course comes easy for Hurley, whose missions included steering a Navy destroyer through the Suez Canal. Playing partner Chris Stroud said it was special for a former mili tary man to be leading the tourna ment and was amazed at how Hur ley could recapture his golf game. Theres a lot to be said about that, Stroud said. Hurley rejoined the PGA Tour this season and has three top 10 nish es so far, including a tie for eighth at Congressional last week. His best career nish is a tie for fourth in the AT&T National two years ago, also at Congressional. A solid ending at The Greenbrier resort would get him into the British Open later this month. Navy vet Hurley takes Greenbrier lead CHRIS TILLEY / AP Billy Hurley III tees off the ninth hole during the second round of the Greenbrier Classic at the Greenbrier Resort in White Sulphur Springs, W.Va., on Friday. A lot, he said. I must say Im unbelievably proud every time I can walk the grounds here and keep on playing this tournament. I know I dont have 10 left, so Ill try to enjoy it as much as I can. Clearly, the rst one was unbelievably special in 2003. And that I was able to play so successful for so many years here at Wim bledon has been an un believable thrill and that I get another chance to go through these kind of emotions is great. Federers dominance against the eighth-seed ed Raonic was total. Ra onic, the rst Canadian man to reach a Grand Slam seminal, had 17 aces but also had four double faults and con ceded seven break points. Federer was clin ical throughout and saved the only break point he faced. Federer holds a career 18-16 advantage against Djokovic, but this will be only their second meet ing in a major nal. Fed erer beat him for the U.S. Open title in 2007. Overall, Federer has a 6-5 edge in Grand Slam matches. Theyve faced each other only once be fore at Wimbledon, with Federer winning in four sets in the 2012 semi nals. We know each others games, said Djokov ic, who will move to No. 1 in the rankings with a victory, replacing Rafael Nadal. We played many matches on different oc casions. We played so many times in semi nals and nals of Grand Slams, different surfac es, big matches over the years. They were very exciting. And, of course, most of the matches we play against each other went the distance. So Im go ing to be, of course, physically ready and t to go the distance this time. The nal matchup means that one of the so-called Big Four in mens tennis Federer, Nadal, Djokovic or Andy Murray will walk away with a Grand Slam trophy for the 36th time in 38 majors. One of the four has won Wimbledon title the past 11 years, seven for Federer. Djokovic, who has lost in his last two major nals and three of the past four, is going for his sev enth Grand Slam title. Of course, there is plenty of motivation from my side to win this Grand Slam nal after losing last three out of four, he said. I want to try to get the title. It would mean a lot men tally for me. The 11th-seeded Dim itrov, with his girlfriend Maria Sharapova watch ing from his guest box on Centre Court, came in with a 10-match win ning streak and had been seeking to become the rst Bulgarian to advance to a major nal. He pushed Djokov ic to the limit but hurt his chances with eight double-faults includ ing three in a row in one game. The womens nal will be played Saturday, with 2011 champion Petra Kvitova of the Czech Re public facing 20-yearold Eugenie Bouch ard, the rst Canadian to play in a Grand Slam singles championship match. Of course, there is plenty of motivation from my side to win this Grand Slam final after losing last three out of four. I want to try to get the title. It would mean a lot mentally for me. Novak Djokovic

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Saturday, July 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 DENNIS PASSA Associated Press LONDON Billie Jean King believes Wimbledon finalists Petra Kvitova and Eugenie Bouchard are cre ating one of the most excit ing times in womens tennis in decades. King ought to know. She helped start the Womens Tennis Association more than 40 years ago. The 24-year-old Kvitova of the Czech Republic won the 2011 Wimbledon title. Shell face the 20-year-old Bouch ard, who will play in her and Canadas first Grand Slam final on Saturday. Theyre from a generation of fitter and stronger players who have closed the gap on power and belief with their older contemporaries, King said at a news conference during Wimbledon. They have definite ly caught up, King said. Women have more confi dence overall, Serena (Wil liams) is not in the same place as she was, shes a lit tle more vulnerable. The men have had their Top 4. Now weve got a lot of younger women who want to be here. They like the show time. Here are five things to know about the big show Saturday on Centre Court: 1) WHAT A YEAR: Bouchard was the only woman to have advanced to all three Grand Slam tournament semifi nals this year, and now shes taken it another step. Shes received support from her home country, prime min isters and mayors, along with The Big Bang Theo ry actor Jim Parsons. She finished 2013 ranked 32nd, and shes projected to im prove to No. 7 the high est ranking for a Canadi an woman by reaching the final. She would be the youngest Grand Slam cham pion since Maria Sharapova won the 2006 U.S. Open at 19. 2) ONLY MEETING: Kvitova and Bouchard have played just once. They faced off on hard courts in Toronto, with Kvitova an easy winner 6-3, 6-2. 3) NEW GENERATION: The fi nal Saturday is the first to feature two players born in the 1990s. Kvitova is the only player born in that de cade to win a Grand Slam her 2011 title here while Bouchard is the fourth play er born in the s to reach a Grand Slam final. The oth ers are French Open run ner-up Simona Halep (who lost to Bouchard in the semifinals) and former No. 1 Caroline Wozniacki, the 2009 U.S. Open runner-up. 4) KVITOVAS THOUGHTS: Bouchard is playing very solid game. Shes a very good mover. Shes nearby the base line. I think its very similar to my game. I beat her for the rst time last year, but its long time ago. This is totally different. So, I mean, I really have to be focusing on every thing and try to push her. 5) BOUCHARDS PLAN: She has good shots which are very powerful compared perhaps to opponents I played in the tournament. I think she will try to attack, but I will try to do the same thing. I think both of us will try to put pressure on each other. I think it will be im portant to start the points well on serve and on return. It will be the rst shots that decide the match. King holds court, excited by newcomers AP FILE PHOTO In this photo from Sept. 5, 2013, Billie Jean King speaks in front of a display at the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York. King believes Wimbledon nalists Petra Kvitova and Eugenie Bouchard are creating one of the most exciting times in womens tennis in decades. DAVID J. PHILLIP / AP Heat forward LeBron James gestures to the bench during the rst half in Game 5 of the NBA nals against the Spurs last month in San Antonio. DAVE CAMPBELL Associated Press NEW YORK The New York Yankees are no longer expecting CC Sabathia to return to their rotation this year, given the per sistence of inamma tion in his injured right knee. Asked Friday wheth er he believed Sabath ias season was over, manager Joe Girar di said: I think thats about fair to say. The six-time All-Star left-hander has been out with a degener ative cartilage prob lem in his right knee since mid-May, when his ERA reached a ca reer-high 5.28. The Yankees were targeting a post-All-Star-break return for Sabathia, who had begun a reha bilitation assignment. In his second start, Wednesday for Dou ble-A Trenton, Sabath ia was hit hard: ve hits, ve runs and one walk while striking out two in 3 2-3 innings. The next morning, the 33-year-old woke up with swelling in the joint. An MRI test on Thursday didnt reveal any new damage. Sa bathia will be exam ined on July 14 by Dr. James Andrews before the next step is deter mined, Girardi said, but microfracture sur gery is possible. Previ ously, Sabathia had an operation on the knee in October 2010 to re pair a small meniscus cartilage tear. The mi crofracture procedure requires far more re covery time, though. Thats a surgery a lot of players dont want to hear when they need to have it, Girardi said. The manager even acknowledged the pos sibility that Sabathia might have thrown his last pitch for the Yan kees, as dire of a sce nario that sounds like. I think its too ear ly to predict that, but whenever you have degenerative issues that cause surgery or things like that, theres always a little question there, Girardi said. Despite his 6-foot7, 285-pound frame, Sabathia has been re markably durable, log ging at least 28 starts and 180 innings ev ery season of his ca reer. He reached 230 innings or more in ve different years, in cluding in 2007 when he won the Ameri can League Cy Young Award for Cleveland. Sabathia is in his sixth season with the Yankees. He gave up 10 home runs in 46 in nings over his eight starts before landing on the disabled list on May 11. After signing a sev en-year, $161 million deal as a free agent pri or to the 2009 season, Sabathia had his con tract extended in 2011 by one year and $30 million. Making $23 million this season, Sabathia is scheduled to earn $23 million in 2015 and $25 mil lion in 2016. The Yan kees have a $25 million option on his deal for 2017 with a $5 million buyout. The Yankees have also been missing in jured starters Ivan Nova and Michael Pi neda, forcing them to go with a makeshift ro tation including Vidal Nuno, David Phelps and rookie Chase Whitley. Nova had sea son-ending elbow sur gery in April. Pineda has been out with a shoulder muscle prob lem and is not expect ed back until August. CCs return this year to Yankees now unlikely TOM WITHERS Associated Press CLEVELAND Four years after their messy breakup, the Cavaliers and LeB ron James are at least talking about a re union. Cavs ofcials met with James agent, Rich Paul, this week about the freeagent superstars possible return. The sides visited as James continued his family vacation, a person with knowl edge of the details told The Associated Press on Thursday night. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitive na ture of the talks. It was not immediately clear if owner Dan Gilbert was at the meeting. James recently opted out of the nal two years of his contract in Miami. The two-time NBA champion has gone to four straight nals with the Heat. How ever, after the team was throttled by San Antonio in this years nals, James said he would weigh his options this summer. One of them could be re-signing with the Cavs, the team he spent seven sea sons with before leaving in 2010 to join forces with Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh in South Florida. Wade and Bosh also opted out of their deals with Heat, raising speculation the Big Three could be headed in different directions. James decision to leave Cleveland Thursday was the four-year anniver sary of the teams last pitch to him prompted Gilbert to condemn him in a scathing letter to Cavs fans. The owner also told The AP he felt James had quit during games in the playoffs. ESPN has reported that Paul also met with repre sentatives for the Phoenix Suns, Hous ton Rockets and Dallas Mavericks. A photo of Mavericks owner Mark Cu ban in Cleveland circulated on Twitter, though he said he was there for a com mitment for his TV show, Shark Tank. While James has been out of the country with his wife, Savannah, and their two sons, Paul has been work ing on the four-time MVPs future. Un like four years ago, when teams ocked to Cleveland to make presentations to woo James, the courtship of him this time has been low key and rather busi ness-like. The Cavs have waited patiently for their chance to try and convince the Akron, Ohio, native to come home. In the past few weeks, the Cavs have hired new coach David Blatt, selected Kan sas swingman Andrew Wiggins with the No. 1 overall pick and gotten AllStar point guard Kyrie Irving to agree to a ve-year, $90 million contract exten sion. Now, theyre working on bringing back James, who has never ruled out the possibility of a return. Two years ago, James was asked if he could ever see himself playing for the Cavs again. I dont know. I think it would be great, he said. It would be fun to play in front of these fans again. I had a lot fun times in my seven years here. You cant predict the future and hopeful ly I continue to stay healthy. Im here as a Miami Heat player, and Im happy where I am now, but I dont rule that out in no sense. And if I decide to come back, hope fully the fans will accept me. Cleveland fans, most of them any way, have gotten over James infamous Decision, when he announced he was leaving on a nationally televised special. He was booed mercilessly in his rst games back with the Heat, but in recent years he has been received more favorably. Maybe thats because the Cavs havent been to the playoffs since he left and Clevelanders know he might be the only chance they have to see a championship in their lifetimes. Cleveland hasnt won a title in any of the major sports since 1964. If he were to come back, James could repair the damage he did to his image when he left. But that remains a big if. In having Paul meet with other teams, James could simply be putting on pressure for the Heat to upgrade their roster. Miami has been pursuing free agents and Yahoo Sports reported team president Pat Riley and coach Erik Spoelstra met in Los Angeles with Lak ers free agent Pau Gasol. Cavs meet with agent for James CHARLES ODUM AP Sports Writer ATLANTA The Atlanta Hawks have reached an agreement with small forward Thabo Sefolosha on a deal that leaves the team sufcient salary cap room for additional offsea son moves. The Hawks and Sefolosha have agreed to a three-year, $12 mil lion contract, a person with knowl edge of the deal said Friday. The per son spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because teams cant ofcially sign free agents until the NBA's moratorium on deals is lifted on Thursday. The agreement was rst reported by The Oklahoman newspaper. The deal with Sefolosha comes af ter the Hawks on Tuesday cleared more than $15 million in salary cap space by trading guard Lou Williams and the draft rights to center Lu cas Nogueira to Toronto for forward John Salmons. The Hawks could have about $11.5 million for addition al signings if they pay the $1 million buyout of Salmons $7 million salary. KAMAN AGREES TO DEAL WITH BLAZERS Free agent center Chris Kaman has agreed to a two-year deal with the Portland Trail Blazers. A person with knowledge of the ne gotiations conrmed the agreement, which cannot be formally announced until new contracts are nalized next Thursday. The deal, worth a reported $9.8 million, was rst reported Thurs day night by Yahoo! Sports. Kaman conrmed the deal with a post on his ofcial Twitter account. Portland is a great t for me, its a team that has done great things and has a lot of talent! Cant wait to get started in #RipCity, he posted. The burley 7-foot center has aver aged 11.7 points, 7.9 rebounds and 1.4 blocks over an 11-year NBA ca reer. He is expected to back up Rob in Lopez with the Blazers. Hawks, Sefolosha agree to 3-year deal

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, July 5, 2014 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Baltimore 46 39 .541 6-4 W-4 23-21 23-18 Toronto 47 41 .534 1 4-6 L-2 25-21 22-20 New York 43 42 .506 3 4 4-6 W-2 18-23 25-19 Boston 38 47 .447 8 9 4-6 L-3 20-22 18-25 Tampa Bay 38 50 .432 9 10 7-3 L-1 19-25 19-25 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 48 34 .585 8-2 W-4 23-19 25-15 Kansas City 44 40 .524 5 2 5-5 W-1 21-22 23-18 Cleveland 41 43 .488 8 5 4-6 W-2 23-15 18-28 Chicago 40 46 .465 10 7 5-5 W-1 22-20 18-26 Minnesota 38 47 .447 11 9 2-8 L-3 20-21 18-26 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 53 33 .616 6-4 W-2 26-15 27-18 Los Angeles 48 36 .571 4 7-3 W-1 27-14 21-22 Seattle 47 38 .553 5 8-2 W-4 21-22 26-16 Texas 37 48 .435 15 10 2-8 L-5 18-23 19-25 Houston 36 51 .414 17 12 3-7 L-4 20-26 16-25 NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 47 38 .553 9-1 W-7 23-18 24-20 Washington 46 39 .541 1 6-4 L-1 26-18 20-21 Miami 41 44 .482 6 5 4-6 L-1 27-22 14-22 New York 37 48 .435 10 9 3-7 L-4 17-21 20-27 Philadelphia 37 49 .430 10 9 2-8 L-1 18-27 19-22 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 51 35 .593 5-5 L-3 24-18 27-17 St. Louis 46 40 .535 5 5-5 W-2 23-17 23-23 Pittsburgh 45 41 .523 6 1 7-3 W-1 27-20 18-21 Cincinnati 43 41 .512 7 2 6-4 L-3 19-18 24-23 Chicago 38 46 .452 12 7 7-3 W-4 19-20 19-26 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Los Angeles 49 39 .557 7-3 W-1 22-23 27-16 San Francisco 47 39 .547 1 2-8 L-3 25-23 22-16 San Diego 39 47 .453 9 7 7-3 W-5 24-23 15-24 Colorado 36 50 .419 12 10 2-8 L-4 20-20 16-30 Arizona 36 51 .414 12 11 4-6 W-1 15-30 21-21 THURSDAYS GAMES Baltimore 5, Texas 2 Detroit 8, Tampa Bay 1 N.Y. Yankees 7, Minnesota 4 Oakland 4, Toronto 1 L.A. Angels 5, Houston 2 THURSDAYS GAMES St. Louis 7, San Francisco 2 Philadelphia 5, Miami 4 Arizona 10, Pittsburgh 2 L.A. Dodgers 3, Colorado 2 FRIDAYS GAMES Baltimore at Boston, ppd., rain N.Y. Yankees 6, Minnesota 5 Oakland 1, Toronto 0 (12 innings) Kansas City at Cleveland, late Tampa Bay at Detroit, late Seattle at Chicago White Sox, late Texas at N.Y. Mets, late Houston at L.A. Angels, late FRIDAYS GAMES Chicago Cubs 7, Washington 2 Pittsburgh 8, Philadelphia 2 San Diego 2, San Francisco 0 Milwaukee at Cincinnati, late Texas at N.Y. Mets, late Miami at St. Louis, late Arizona at Atlanta, late L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, late ALEX BRANDON / AP Nationals starting pitcher Tanner Roark throws during the rst inning against the Cubs at Nationals Park in Washington on Friday. TODAYS GAMES Baltimore (Mi.Gonzalez 4-5) at Boston (Lester 9-7), 1:05 p.m., 1st game N.Y. Yankees (Phelps 3-4) at Minnesota (Pino 0-2), 2:10 p.m. Seattle (F.Hernandez 10-2) at Chicago White Sox (Quintana 5-7), 2:10 p.m. Tampa Bay (Archer 4-5) at Detroit (A.Sanchez 5-2), 4:08 p.m. Kansas City (Guthrie 5-6) at Cleveland (House 0-2), 6:05 p.m. Baltimore (U.Jimenez 3-8) at Boston (Lackey 9-5), 7:15 p.m., 2nd game Texas (Lewis 5-5) at N.Y. Mets (B.Colon 8-6), 7:15 p.m. Houston (Feldman 4-5) at L.A. Angels (H.Santiago 0-7), 10:05 p.m. Toronto (Buehrle 10-5) at Oakland (Kazmir 9-3), 10:05 p.m. TODAYS GAMES Miami (Heaney 0-3) at St. Louis (S.Miller 7-7), 2:15 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 2-7) at Washington (G.Gonzalez 5-4), 4:05 p.m. Philadelphia (D.Buchanan 4-4) at Pittsburgh (Volquez 6-6), 4:05 p.m. Arizona (Bolsinger 1-4) at Atlanta (Harang 7-6), 4:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Haren 8-4) at Colorado (J.De La Rosa 8-6), 4:10 p.m. Milwaukee (Garza 5-5) at Cincinnati (Bailey 8-4), 4:10 p.m. San Francisco (Hudson 7-5) at San Diego (Despaigne 2-0), 7:15 p.m. Texas (Lewis 5-5) at N.Y. Mets (B.Colon 8-6), 7:15 p.m. AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Altuve, Houston, .347; Beltre, Texas, .335; VMartinez, Detroit, .327; Cano, Seattle, .323; Mi Cabrera, Detroit, .316; Trout, Los Angeles, .314; Brant ley, Cleveland, .312. RUNS: Dozier, Minnesota, 61; Kinsler, Detroit, 59; Don aldson, Oakland, 57; Encarnacion, Toronto, 57; Bautista, Toronto, 56; Brantley, Cleveland, 56. RBI: Encarnacion, Toronto, 69; NCruz, Baltimore, 68; JAbreu, Chicago, 67; MiCabrera, Detroit, 67; Moss, Oak land, 62; Trout, Los Angeles, 62; Donaldson, Oakland, 61. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 121; AJones, Baltimore, 107; MeCabrera, Toronto, 106; Kinsler, Detroit, 105; Marka kis, Baltimore, 104; Cano, Seattle, 101; MiCabrera, De troit, 100. DOUBLES: MiCabrera, Detroit, 32; Altuve, Houston, 26; Kinsler, Detroit, 25; AEscobar, Kansas City, 24; Pe droia, Boston, 24; Plouffe, Minnesota, 24; EEscobar, Minnesota, 23; AGordon, Kansas City, 23; Trout, Los Angeles, 23. TRIPLES: Rios, Texas, 8; Bourn, Cleveland, 7; Eaton, Chicago, 6; Gardner, New York, 5; Trout, Los Angeles, 5; JJones, Seattle, 4; Reddick, Oakland, 4. HOME RUNS: JAbreu, Chicago, 26; NCruz, Baltimore, 26; Encarnacion, Toronto, 26; VMartinez, Detroit, 21; Moss, Oakland, 19; Ortiz, Boston, 19; Trout, Los Angeles, 19. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 37; Ellsbury, New York, 23; RDavis, Detroit, 22; AEscobar, Kansas City, 20; An drus, Texas, 18; JJones, Seattle, 17; LMartin, Texas, 17. PITCHING: Tanaka, New York, 12-3; Porcello, Detroit, 11-4; FHernandez, Seattle, 10-2; Scherzer, Detroit, 103; Buehrle, Toronto, 10-5; Richards, Los Angeles, 9-2; Kazmir, Oakland, 9-3; Lackey, Boston, 9-5; Weaver, Los Angeles, 9-6; Lester, Boston, 9-7. ERA: FHernandez, Seattle, 2.10; Tanaka, New York, 2.27; Darvish, Texas, 2.42; Buehrle, Toronto, 2.50; Ka zmir, Oakland, 2.61; ASanchez, Detroit, 2.63. STRIKEOUTS: Price, Tampa Bay, 153; Scherzer, Detroit, 139; FHernandez, Seattle, 137; Tanaka, New York, 130; Darvish, Texas, 128; Kluber, Cleveland, 127. SAVES: Rodney, Seattle, 24; Holland, Kansas City, 23; Perkins, Minnesota, 20; DavRobertson, New York, 19. NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Tulowitzki, Colorado, .350; Lucroy, Milwaukee, .331; MaAdams, St. Louis, .318; Morneau, Colorado, .318; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, .315; Stanton, Miami, .313. RUNS: Tulowitzki, Colorado, 66; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 62; Pence, San Francisco, 60; Stanton, Miami, 60; Rendon, Washington, 57; FFreeman, Atlanta, 56; Rizzo, Chicago, 56. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 61; Morneau, Colorado, 59; Gold schmidt, Arizona, 55; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 53; Des mond, Washington, 51; Howard, Philadelphia, 51; SCastro, Chicago, 50; McGehee, Miami, 50. HITS: DanMurphy, New York, 104; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 101; McGehee, Miami, 101; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 100; Pence, San Francisco, 100; Stanton, Miami, 100; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 99; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 99. DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 30; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 29; SCastro, Chicago, 26; Span, Washington, 26; FFree man, Atlanta, 24; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 24. TRIPLES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 9; BCrawford, San Fran cisco, 8; Yelich, Miami, 6; Braun, Milwaukee, 5; Owings, Arizona, 5; Rendon, Washington, 5; Revere, Philadelphia, 5. HOME RUNS: Stanton, Miami, 21; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 18; Frazier, Cincinnati, 17; Rizzo, Chicago, 17; Byrd, Phila delphia, 16; Gattis, Atlanta, 16; JUpton, Atlanta, 16. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 40; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 35; Revere, Philadelphia, 24; EYoung, New York, 22; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 20; Rollins, Philadelphia, 16. PITCHING: Greinke, Los Angeles, 11-4; Wainwright, St. Louis, 11-4; Simon, Cincinnati, 10-3; Lohse, Milwaukee, 9-2; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 9-2; Ryu, Los Angeles, 9-4; WP eralta, Milwaukee, 9-5; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 9-6. ERA: Wainwright, St. Louis, 1.89; Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.99; Teheran, Atlanta, 2.29; HAlvarez, Miami, 2.33; Beckett, Los Angeles, 2.37; Hudson, San Francisco, 2.59. STRIKEOUTS : Strasburg, Washington, 131; Cueto, Cincin nati, 130; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 120; Greinke, Los Angeles, 119; Kennedy, San Diego, 116. SAVES: FrRodriguez, Milwaukee, 27; Kimbrel, Atlanta, 26; Jansen, Los Angeles, 26; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 25. Fridays games Cubs 7, Nationals 2 Chicago Washington ab r h bi ab r h bi Coghln lf 4 3 2 0 Span cf 4 0 1 0 Ruggin cf 5 2 3 2 Harper lf 4 0 0 0 Rizzo 1b 5 0 0 1 Werth rf 3 1 2 1 SCastro ss 5 0 2 2 LaRoch 1b 4 0 0 0 Valuen 3b 5 0 0 0 Zmrmn 3b 4 0 1 0 Schrhlt rf 4 1 2 0 Rendon 2b 4 1 1 0 JoBakr c 3 0 1 0 Dsmnd ss 4 0 1 0 Barney 2b 4 1 2 0 WRams c 3 0 1 1 Hamml p 3 0 1 1 Roark p 2 0 0 0 NRmrz p 0 0 0 0 McLoth ph 1 0 0 0 Strop p 0 0 0 0 Detwilr p 0 0 0 0 Olt ph 0 0 0 0 Barrett p 0 0 0 0 Sweeny ph 1 0 1 0 Blevins p 0 0 0 0 Schlittr p 0 0 0 0 Totals 39 7 14 6 Totals 33 2 7 2 Chicago 111 010 003 7 Washington 100 000 100 2 DPChicago 1, Washington 2. LOBChicago 7, Wash ington 6. 2BCoghlan (5), S.Castro (26), Sweeney (5), Span (26), Werth (17), Rendon (18). HRRug giano (4), Werth (8). IP H R ER BB SO Chicago Hammel W,8-5 6 5 2 2 2 7 N.Ramirez H,8 1 1 0 0 0 2 Strop H,10 1 1 0 0 0 1 Schlitter 1 0 0 0 0 0 Washington Roark L,7-6 7 9 4 4 1 5 Detwiler 1 1 / 3 2 1 1 0 0 Barrett 0 2 2 2 1 0 Blevins 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 1 Barrett pitched to 3 batters in the 9th. Hammel pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. UmpiresHome, Ted Barrett; First, Will Little; Second, Mike Everitt; Third, Paul Schrieber. T:54. A,274 (41,408). Pirates 8, Phillies 2 Philadelphia Pittsburgh ab r h bi ab r h bi Revere cf 3 1 1 0 GPolnc rf 3 2 1 0 Rollins ss 3 1 0 0 SMarte lf 4 0 1 0 Utley 2b 4 0 1 1 AMcCt cf 5 1 4 2 Howard 1b 3 0 0 0 NWalkr 2b 3 1 1 0 Byrd rf 4 0 0 0 RMartn c 4 2 2 1 Asche 3b 2 0 0 0 JHrrsn 3b 4 1 1 1 DeFrts p 0 0 0 0 GSnchz 1b 3 1 1 0 Rosnrg p 0 0 0 0 Mercer ss 4 0 2 4 DBrwn ph 1 0 0 0 Cole p 2 0 0 0 K.Hill c 3 0 0 0 Pimntl p 0 0 0 0 GwynJ lf 1 0 0 0 JHughs p 0 0 0 0 Mayrry ph-lf 1 0 0 0 PAlvrz ph 1 0 0 0 RHrndz p 2 0 0 0 JuWlsn p 0 0 0 0 CHrndz 3b 1 0 0 0 Worley ph 1 0 0 0 Watson p 0 0 0 0 JGomz p 0 0 0 0 Totals 28 2 2 1 Totals 34 8 13 8 Philadelphia 000 002 000 2 Pittsburgh 400 100 21x 8 EC.Hernandez (3). DPPhiladelphia 1, Pittsburgh 1. LOBPhiladelphia 4, Pittsburgh 9. 2BA.McCutchen 2 (26), Mercer (12). 3BA.McCutchen (3). SBRevere (25), S.Marte (21), A.McCutchen (13), J.Harrison (8). CSG.Polanco (2). IP H R ER BB SO Philadelphia R.Hernandez L,3-8 5 2 / 3 10 5 5 4 3 De Fratus 1 1 / 3 2 2 1 1 0 Rosenberg 1 1 1 1 2 0 Pittsburgh Cole W,7-4 5 1 0 0 1 5 Pimentel 0 1 2 2 3 0 J.Hughes H,5 1 0 0 0 0 1 Ju.Wilson H,12 1 0 0 0 0 0 Watson 1 0 0 0 0 0 J.Gomez 1 0 0 0 0 0 Pimentel pitched to 4 batters in the 6th. HBPby Cole (Gwynn Jr.). WPPimentel. UmpiresHome, CB Bucknor; First, Tripp Gibson; Sec ond, Dale Scott; Third, Dan Iassogna. T:13. A,977 (38,362). Athletics 1, Blue Jays 0, 12 innings Toronto Oakland ab r h bi ab r h bi Reyes ss 6 0 1 0 Crisp cf 3 0 1 0 MeCarr lf 5 0 1 0 Jaso dh 2 0 0 0 Bautist dh 5 0 1 0 Freimn ph-dh 2 0 1 0 Encrnc 1b 3 0 0 0 Cespds lf 4 0 0 0 DNavrr c 5 0 1 0 Moss 1b 4 0 0 0 Glenn rf 4 0 0 0 Callasp 1b 1 0 0 0 ClRsms ph-cf 1 0 0 0 Dnldsn 3b 5 0 1 0 StTllsn 3b 4 0 2 0 Vogt rf 3 0 1 0 Lind ph 1 0 0 0 Gentry pr-rf 2 0 0 0 JFrncs 3b 0 0 0 0 DNorrs c 3 1 0 0 Mstrnn cf-rf 5 0 1 0 Lowrie ss 4 0 0 0 Kawsk 2b 4 0 2 0 Punto 2b 5 0 1 0 Totals 43 0 9 0 Totals 38 1 5 0 Toronto 000 000 000 000 0 Oakland 000 000 000 001 1 One out when winning run scored. EMe.Cabrera (2), Lowrie (9). DPToronto 1, Oakland 2. LOBToronto 10, Oakland 10. 2BSt.Tolleson (6), Freiman (2), Donaldson (13), Punto (6). SBReyes (17), St.Tolleson (2), Crisp (14). SKawasaki. IP H R ER BB SO Toronto Stroman 7 3 0 0 3 7 Loup 1 1 0 0 1 1 McGowan 1 0 0 0 1 2 Cecil 1 / 3 0 0 0 1 0 Jenkins L,0-1 2 1 1 0 1 0 Oakland Milone 6 4 0 0 1 6 OFlaherty 1 1 0 0 0 0 Gregerson 1 1 0 0 0 0 Doolittle 1 1 0 0 0 1 Abad 1 1 0 0 0 0 Cook 1 0 0 0 1 0 Otero W,7-1 1 1 0 0 0 0 WPStroman. UmpiresHome, Vic Carapazza; First, Bill Miller; Sec ond, Gabe Morales; Third, Chad Fairchild. T:05. A,322 (35,067). Yankees 6, Twins 5 New York Minnesota ab r h bi ab r h bi Gardnr lf 4 2 1 0 Dozier 2b 5 1 1 1 BRorts 2b 5 2 4 1 KSuzuk c 5 0 2 0 Ellsury cf 4 0 1 2 Parmel lf-1b 5 0 0 0 Teixeir 1b 4 1 1 1 KMorls 1b 4 1 2 0 Beltran dh 3 0 0 1 Nunez pr-lf 0 1 0 0 ISuzuki rf 4 0 0 0 Arcia rf 2 1 1 1 Cervelli c 4 1 3 0 Plouffe 3b 4 0 1 1 KJhnsn 3b 4 0 0 0 Colaell dh 4 1 1 2 ZeWhlr 3b 0 0 0 0 EEscor ss 4 0 1 0 Ryan ss 3 0 0 1 Fuld cf 4 0 2 0 Totals 35 6 10 6 Totals 37 5 11 5 New York 330 000 000 6 Minnesota 112 000 010 5 LOBNew York 6, Minnesota 7. 2BB.Roberts 3 (14), Teixeira (6), Cervelli 2 (4), K.Suzuki (17). 3BGardner (6), B.Roberts (4), Arcia (2). HRDozier (16), Cola bello (5). SBNunez (2), Arcia (1). CSDozier (5). SFBeltran, Ryan. IP H R ER BB SO New York Whitley 3 8 4 4 1 4 Huff W,2-0 3 0 0 0 0 3 Warren H,14 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 Betances H,12 1 1 / 3 1 1 1 0 0 Dav.Robertson S,20-22 1 1 0 0 0 3 Minnesota Gibson L,7-7 2 6 6 5 1 0 Deduno 4 2 / 3 3 0 0 0 4 Thielbar 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Fien 1 1 0 0 0 2 Perkins 1 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby Betances (Arcia), by Deduno (Ellsbury). PBK.Suzuki. UmpiresHome, Joe West; First, Marty Foster; Sec ond, Rob Drake; Third, Alan Porter. T:17. A,952 (39,021). Late Thursday Angels 5, Astros 2 Houston Los Angeles ab r h bi ab r h bi Altuve 2b 5 1 3 0 Cowgill rf 3 0 0 0 JCastro c 4 0 2 1 Trout cf 4 1 2 0 Springr rf 4 0 1 1 Pujols 1b 4 0 1 0 Singltn 1b 3 0 0 0 JHmltn lf 4 0 0 0 MDmn 3b 4 0 0 0 HKndrc 2b 4 1 2 1 Carter dh 4 0 1 0 Aybar ss 4 1 1 0 Presley cf 4 0 1 0 Cron dh 2 1 1 1 KHrndz lf 3 0 0 0 Freese 3b 3 1 2 2 MGnzlz ss 2 1 0 0 JMcDnl 3b 0 0 0 0 Iannett c 1 0 0 1 Totals 33 2 8 2 Totals 29 5 9 5 Houston 002 000 000 2 Los Angeles 100 400 00x 5 DPHouston 3, Los Angeles 1. LOBHouston 8, Los Angeles 4. 2BAltuve (26), Carter (12), Presley (4), Trout (23), Freese (9). SBSpringer (4). SFIannetta. IP H R ER BB SO Houston Oberholtzer L,2-7 6 1 / 3 9 5 5 3 4 Veras 1 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 2 Los Angeles Shoemaker W,6-2 6 7 2 2 3 7 Jepsen H,8 1 0 0 0 0 1 Grilli H,2 1 1 0 0 0 1 J.Smith S,10-14 1 0 0 0 1 0 UmpiresHome, Paul Nauert; First, Angel Hernandez; Second, Adrian Johnson; Third, Larry Vanover. T:00. A,625 (45,483). Athletics 4, Blue Jays 1 Toronto Oakland ab r h bi ab r h bi Reyes ss 4 0 0 0 Jaso dh 4 1 1 1 MeCarr rf 3 0 0 0 Callasp 3b 3 0 0 1 Bautist dh 4 0 1 0 Cespds lf 4 0 0 0 Encrnc lf 4 1 1 0 Moss rf 2 1 1 0 Lind 1b 3 0 1 0 Lowrie ss 4 0 0 0 StTllsn ph 1 0 0 0 Vogt c 3 1 1 0 JFrncs 3b 3 0 0 0 Freimn 1b 2 0 1 1 Kawsk 2b 1 0 0 0 Sogard 2b 3 0 1 0 Gose cf 3 0 0 1 Gentry cf 3 1 1 0 Thole c 3 0 2 0 Totals 29 1 5 1 Totals 28 4 6 3 Toronto 010 000 000 1 Oakland 020 000 02x 4 EKawasaki (4). DPToronto 1, Oakland 3. LOBTo ronto 4, Oakland 4. 2BLind (16), Jaso (12), Moss (16), Vogt (2), Freiman (1). SFCallaspo. IP H R ER BB SO Toronto Dickey L,6-8 8 6 4 2 3 6 Oakland Gray W,8-3 7 4 1 1 3 5 Otero H,9 1 1 0 0 0 0 Doolittle S,12-15 1 0 0 0 0 2 WPGray. PBThole. UmpiresHome, Chad Fairchild; First, Vic Carapazza; Second, Bill Miller; Third, Gabe Morales. T:23. A,913 (35,067). Dodgers 3, Rockies 2 Los Angeles Colorado ab r h bi ab r h bi DGordn 2b 4 1 1 0 Blckmn rf 3 1 1 0 Puig rf 4 0 0 0 Stubbs cf 4 0 1 0 HRmrz ss 2 0 0 0 Mornea 1b 4 0 2 1 Arrrrn ss 0 0 0 0 Tlwtzk ss 4 0 1 0 AdGnzl 1b 4 0 1 1 Dickrsn lf 3 0 1 0 Kemp lf 3 1 0 0 Arenad 3b 4 0 0 0 VnSlyk cf 4 0 1 0 Rosario c 4 0 0 0 Uribe 3b 4 1 3 1 LeMahi 2b 4 1 2 0 A.Ellis c 3 0 0 1 FMorls p 1 0 0 0 Greink p 3 0 0 0 Rutledg ph 1 0 1 1 Ethier ph 1 0 0 0 Kahnle p 0 0 0 0 Jansen p 0 0 0 0 Barnes ph 1 0 0 0 Masset p 0 0 0 0 Hwkns p 0 0 0 0 RWhelr ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 32 3 6 3 Totals 34 2 9 2 Los Angeles 001 100 001 3 Colorado 000 010 010 2 EPuig (1). DPLos Angeles 2. LOBLos Angeles 6, Colorado 7. 2BVan Slyke (7), Uribe (12), Rutledge (6). 3BMorneau (2). SFA.Ellis. IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles Greinke W,11-4 8 9 2 1 2 8 Jansen S,26-29 1 0 0 0 0 1 Colorado F.Morales 5 4 2 1 2 4 Kahnle 2 1 0 0 0 1 Masset 1 0 0 0 0 0 Hawkins L,2-2 1 1 1 1 1 2 PBRosario. UmpiresHome, Brian ONora; First, Cory Blaser; Second, Pat Hoberg; Third, Jeff Kellogg. T:02. A,533 (50,480). Yankees 7, Twins 4 New York Minnesota ab r h bi ab r h bi Gardnr lf 4 0 1 1 Dozier 2b 4 1 2 0 Jeter ss 4 0 0 1 KSuzuk c 4 1 1 1 Ellsury cf 4 0 0 0 Parmel 1b 4 0 1 1 Teixeir 1b 4 1 2 0 KMorls dh 4 0 0 1 McCnn c 4 1 1 0 Wlngh lf 4 0 0 0 Beltran dh 4 1 1 3 Arcia rf 3 0 1 0 ISuzuki rf 3 1 2 0 Plouffe 3b 4 1 1 0 ZeWhlr 3b 4 2 2 1 EEscor ss 3 0 1 1 Ryan 2b 4 1 1 1 Fuld cf 3 1 2 0 Totals 35 7 10 7 Totals 33 4 9 4 New York 000 040 300 7 Minnesota 101 001 100 4 DPNew York 2, Minnesota 2. LOBNew York 2, Min nesota 3. 2BRyan (1), K.Suzuki (16), Parmelee (5), Plouffe (24). HRBeltran (9), Ze.Wheeler (1). IP H R ER BB SO New York Tanaka W,12-3 7 9 4 4 0 3 Betances H,11 1 0 0 0 0 2 Dav.Robertson S,19-21 1 0 0 0 1 3 Minnesota P.Hughes L,8-5 6 1 / 3 8 7 7 1 6 Duensing 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 Swarzak 2 1 0 0 0 2 UmpiresHome, Alan Porter; First, Joe West; Second, Marty Foster; Third, Rob Drake. T:36. A,714 (39,021). This Date In Baseball July 5 1904 The Philadelphia Phillies snapped the New York Giants 18-game winning streak with a 6-5 10-inning victory. 1935 Tony Cuccinello of the Dodgers and his brother Al for the Giants each hit home runs in the same game to mark the rst time in major league history that brothers on opposing teams con nected for homers. Brooklyn beat New York 14-4. 1937 Hal Trosky hit three home runs to pace the Cleveland Indians to a 14-4 victory over the St. Louis Browns in the opener of a doubleheader. 1937 Frank DeMaree of Chicago went 6-for-7 in the rst game of a doubleheader, in which the Cubs beat the St. Louis Cardinals 13-12 in 14 innings. DeMaree had three doubles and three singles. The Cubs won the second game 9-7 and DeMaree had two more singles. 1947 Larry Doby became the rst black to play in the American League. He struck out as a pinch-hitter as Cleveland lost 6-5 to the White Sox. 1961 Bill White hit three home runs and a double to power the St. Louis Cardinals to a 9-1 victory over the Los Angeles Dodgers. 1987 Mark McGwire became the rst rookie to hit 30 homers before the All-Star break and Jose Can seco homered twice, leading the Oakland Athletics to a 6-3 victory over the Boston Red Sox. 1991 The Colorado Rockies and the Florida Mar lins were given nal approval by baseball owners with a unanimous vote to join the NL in 1993. 1993 Rickey Henderson of the Oakland Athlet ics opened both games of a doubleheader with a homer to become the second player to accomplish the feat. Harry Hooper of the Boston Red Sox hom ered to start both games against Washington on May 30, 1913. 1998 Roger Clemens became the 11th pitcher in baseball history to notch 3,000th strikeouts. Clemens needed ve strikeouts to reach the 3,000 mark before Torontos game against the Tampa Bay Devil Rays.

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Saturday, July 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 rf nt b n nn r ff r fntb rtbr rf HARBOR HILLSGOLF SPECIAL4-SOME SPECIAL$10 0BRING A 4-SOME AND SA VE MONEYGOOD JUL Y 7-13, 2014Pe rfect Swing Golf Academyat Harbor Hills Country ClubJuly 11 & 12, 2014Join our e-mail cl ub today!To m Leimberger -PGA Class A (352)753-7711 Joe Redoutey-Master Club Fitter (352) 205-0217ACADEMY SCHEDULE rf n r tb n tn r n n b LUNCH INCLUDED EACH DA Y! CALL TO DA Y TO SIGN UP $399 per StudentLimit 12 per School LAURENT CIPRIANI / AP Britains Christopher Froome, front, rides with Spains David Lopez during a training ahead of the Tour de France cycling race in Leeds, Britain, on Friday. The Tour de France starts today in Leeds in and nishes in Paris on July 27. JAMEY KEATEN Associated Press LEEDS, England So your national team is out of the World Cup in Brazil, Wimbledon doesnt seem the same without Serena Wil liams or Rafael Nadal and your baseball team is slumping. This weekend, fans of many stripes could join die-hard cycling buffs and tune in to the start of the 101st Tour de France for that much needed sports x. Cyclings big event gets going Saturday through bucolic coun tryside in northern En gland, where ofcials have paid for the right to host it, hoping to draw tourists, capture media attention and feed the recent cycling craze among Britons. It could rst require getting over a nagging belief that, after Lance Armstrongs doping ex posure, the sport may still be dogged by drugs cheats. Cycling chiefs and experts general ly agree that the era of widespread doping is over, but few would claim to know that to days pack is fully clean. Drugs testers will con duct hundreds of blood and urine checks during the race. Bookmakers odds foresee a victory either by defending cham pion Chris Froome, a 29-year-old Ken yan-born Briton who leads Team Sky, or two-time champ Al berto Contador a 31-year-old Spaniard with Tinkoff-Saxo Bank to take home the yel low jersey when the race nishes on Paris Champs-Elysees on July 26. Few of the 198 riders on the 22 teams stand a realistic chance of win ning, based on recent performances, skill sets and team priorities. Most are domestiques who race above all to help their team leaders win. Vincenzo Nibali of Italy, plus Spaniards Al berto Valverde and Joa quin Rodriquez, stand an outside chance. Conceding homeroad advantage, Con tador said Friday that local hero Froome remains the favorite. The Briton, who suc ceeded Sky teammate and compatriot Brad ley Wiggins as Tour win ner, said: I dont think many Tour champions get to come back as de fending champions and can start in front of their home crowd. Five of the 21 stages end in summit nish es, which usually prom ise drama as the cream of the climbers rises to the top rst. In all, the riders will cover 2,277 miles of roads in En gland, France, Belgium and Spain. Aside from cobble stone treachery in Stage 5, the mountains most ly matter this year. For the rst time in 61 years, this Tour has only one long time tri al a race-against-theclock, where racers set off one-by-one down a starters ramp. It comes in Stage 20. Contador and Froome are among the best in both climb ing and time-trialing. This year marks the second time that the Tour de France is start ing in Britain, after a successful time in Lon don in 2007. Local of ficials use municipal funds to pay for the right to host the race in their cities, hoping for short-term tourism revenues plus a lon ger-term return from the international me dia spotlight. The Tours route changes every year. Af ter three stages in En gland, this 101st edi tion enters France on Tuesday. The riders will cover many of the same roads their fore bears covered since the race was first run in 1903. Among novelties this year: the first-ev er Chinese rider in the race, Cheng Ji, and 11 climbs in the eastern Vosges mountains though long, steep as cents await in the Alps and Pyrenees too. If turnout on En glish roads during the 2007 Tour de France is any precedent when millions lined up twoto three-people deep to watch the pack zip by expect big crowds again this year. Todays 118-mile rolling Stage 1 from Leeds to Harrogate is likely to favor sprint ers. The Tours green jersey goes to the best overall sprinter, one of many subplots to the overall title chase which includes pure climbers seeking the polka-dot jersey to be the best man in the mountains. Many of the Union Jack-waving specta tors will want Britains Mark Cavendish, per haps the best sprint er of his generation, to get his 26th career Tour stage victory in Harrogate, his moth ers hometown. If he does, hell wear the race leaders yellow jersey for the first time in his career a covet ed honor. Kate, the Duchess of Cornwall, will do the honors in bestow ing the prized shirt at the awards ceremo ny on Saturday, join ing Prince William and Prince Harry for a royal welcome for the French Republics best-known annual sporting event. Tour de France ready to set off in England Rodriguez tried to control the pace of the match at the Arena Cas telao, but it was Brazil that created most of the scoring chances as Co lombia goalkeeper Da vid Ospina had to make a series of saves in the rst half alone. The Colombians tried to pressure in the end after Rodriguezs pen alty, but Brazil held on with tough defending. This is a very tough moment for us, Co lombia coach Jose Pekerman said. We al ways had the dream of winning this match even though we knew Brazil would be a very tough opponent. We knew how decisive this was, and that any mis take would cost us. Colombia was com ing off four straight wins, playing some of the most impressive football of the tourna ment. And the Colombians, playing in the quarter nals for the rst time, had entered the match with an offensive team that had scored 11 goals, second only to the Netherlands. After not playing in the World Cup for so long, we were able to show the value of the Colombian football and the talent of some of our players, said Peker man, an Argentine. They showed great spirit and presence of mind. They came to play a great World Cup, not just to participate. There was a lot of talk about Rodriguez and Neymar before the match, but the 22-yearold forwards didnt re ally live up to expecta tions. Rodriguez scored the late penalty but was otherwise mostly in effective, as was Ney mar before he left on a stretcher after being hit on the back late in the match. The Brazilian star was apparently crying in pain as he was carried out of the eld. Silva was the crucial player for Brazil, but he will miss the match against Germany after getting his second yel low card of the tourna ment for trying to keep Ospina from putting the ball back in play. Colombia had a goal disallowed in the 66th minute for offside. Vet eran defender Mario Yepes found the net from close range after a scramble inside the penalty area but the linesman had already stopped play. Brazil is trying to be come the rst host to win the World Cup since France in 1998. At the last two World Cups, Brazil lost to the Netherlands in the quarternals in 2010 and to France in 2006. The team hadnt made it to the seminals since it won its fth world ti tle in South Korea and Japan in 2002. GERMANY 1, FRANCE 0 RIO DE JANEIRO It just wouldnt be the World Cup without Ger many in the seminals. Harnessing all their big-game experience, the Germans delivered a performance of ma turity and efciency to hold off France 1-0 on Friday and become the rst team to reach four straight seminals in the sports marquee tournament. Defender Mats Hum mels scored the winning goal in the 13th minute, outmuscling his marker at a free kick to glance a header in off the under side of the crossbar. Criticized for poor defending in earlier matches, Germany se lected a more robust lineup and restricted a at France team to only a handful of clear-cut opportunities in muggy conditions. There was not much in it, France coach Di dier Deschamps said. But, we dont have the international experi ence Germany has. While Frances young players slumped to the ground and some shed tears after the nal whis tle, the Germans soberly saluted all corners of the Maracana Stadium. One job done, nothing more. And next up for Ger many is a meeting with host nation Brazil, which beat Colombia 2-1 later Friday. It will be Germanys 13th appear ance in the seminals in 20 editions of the World Cup. DAVID VINCENT / AP Germanys Jerome Boateng, left, and Mats Hummels beat Frances Olivier Giroud to the ball during a World Cup quarternal match at the Maracana Stadium in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on Friday. WORLD CUP FROM PAGE B1 David Ragan and I both have good enough cars to win, and that is an ex citing feeling. Its something we dont have every week. The top 24 driv ers Friday in the rst knockout stage were supposed to advance to the next round, but rain prompted NASCAR to cancel the nal two sessions. Reed Sorenson qualied second, followed by Landon Cassill, Bobby La bonte and Jimmie Johnson. Dayto na 500 winner Dale Earnhardt Jr., who will attempt to be come the sixth drive to sweep both annu al races at NASCARs most famous track Saturday, was sev enth. All the talk during and after was about how the qualify ing session shook out. It was the rst time NASCARs new qualifying rules were used at Day tona, and it pro duced some hairy moments as groups of cars slowed to a crawl around the 2 1/2-mile super speedway. The small packs most of them formed by teammates were hoping to pull be hind bigger groups to produce fast laps. But no one was ea ger to lead the way. Its a mess, Earn hardt said. You have to be in the very back and try to get a big tow. I aint ever seen anything like it. Its the fun niest thing Ive ever seen. Risky, too. Sever al cars turned down pit road to get away from the disorder. But the most com mon concern was the speed differenc es, with some packs creeping along while others ran full speed. It was real ly wild and it was pretty dangerous, Matt Kenseth said. Theres car doing 80 and there were cars doing 200 and nobody wanted to go. Everybody want ed to be in the back of the pack and try to catch the front to get a (fast) lap, so it was pretty chaotic. DAYTONA FROM PAGE B1

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W hich phrase is more meaningful to you: holding fast to God or clinging to God? Let me ex plain why I asked. A lot has changed in the area of Bible study since I became a Christian 35 years ago. Computer and the In ternet are responsible for most changes. Years ago, I used a concor dance for word studies. The only one available was Strongs Concordance, which used the King James Version. Although it was my only option at the time, it made my study cum bersome. Later, a concordance was compiled using the New International Version. Today, thanks to comput ers and the Internet, I can use Biblegateway.com and other sites to do an exhaus tive word story with the push of a few keys. Usually I do word studies using the En glish Standard Version, but its possible to use several versions. For me, it has the readability of the New In ternational Version coupled with the accuracy of the New American Standard Version. Ive never been a fan of paraphrases or the King James Version, but they can be useful for in-depth Bi ble study. In days gone by, you needed a parallel Bible, which has more than one version, to study alternate verses. But today, I can com pare verses in up to ve dif ferent translations or para phrases at one time. Translations are more pure but they can also be inaccu rate. I prefer using ve transla tions the ESB, NIV, NASB, KJV and the New King James Version when comparing scriptures. I used them to compare Deuteronomy 30:19-20, Mo sess charge to the Israelites before Joshua was named his successor. The following is the ESV: I call heaven and earth to witness against you today, that I have set before you life and death, blessing and curse, proclaimed Mo ses. Therefore choose life, that you and your offspring may live, loving the Lord your God, obeying his voice and holding fast to him, for he is your life and length of days, that you may dwell in the land that the Lord swore to your fathers, to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob, to give them. The ESV uses holding fast while the NKJV uses cling. They mean primarily the same thing but when I picture a child not wanting to let go of his or her mother I picture him or her clinging. You might prefer holding fast. The NIV uses remain true to Him, while the NASB uses holding fast to Him and the KJV uses mayest cleave unto Him. Use the one that helps make the Bible more real and practical to you. The Bi ble is meant for the heart, not the intellect. Thats the truth Ill cling to. Rick Reed is a columnist who lives in Mount Dora. To reach him, call 3831458 or email ricoh007@aol.com Faith for Life www.dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 features@dailycommercial.com C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, July 5, 2014 SUNDAY FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH WELCOMES NEW PASTOR WITH RECEP TION: At 12:15 p.m., at the church, 439 E. Fifth Ave., in Mount Dora. Rev. Kim Uchimura will preach in services at 8:15, 9:30 and 11 a.m. Go to www.mt dorafumc.org for information. VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL AT SILVER LAKE COMMUNITY CHURCH: Sunday through July 10. Bible-learning ac tivities, music, games and a mis sion project for kids in India, from 6 to 8:45 p.m., ages 3-11 years, at the church, 34030 Radio Road in Lees burg. Call 352-742-0648 or go to www.silverlakeecc.org to register. O WONDROUS LOVE PERFORMED BY ACADEMY OF ARTS AT GRACE BI BLE BAPTIST CHURCH: At 10:30 a.m. Sunday. This professional Christian drama team from Taylors, S.C., has been performing since 1971. Free event. Call the church, 1703 Lewis Road, in Leesburg at 352-326-5738 for information. MONDAY FAIRWAY CHRISTIAN CHURCH SIN GLES FELLOWSHIP: At 11:30 a.m., Lu iginos Restaurant at Spanish Springs, in Lady Lake. Sign up at the HUB or call the church, 259 Avenida Los An gelos, The Villages, at 352-259-9305. JULY 12 FRED WARING REUNION CONCERT AT HOPE LUTHERAN CHURCH: At 7:30 p.m., 250 Avenida Los Angelos, The Villages. Fred Waring and the Penn sylvanians popularized choral mu sic. A group of former Pennsylva nians will gather for this event. Doors open at 7:15 p.m. Seating is firstcome, rst-served. Call the church at 352-750-2321 for details. JULY 19 UPWARD SPORTS GAME DAY CLINIC AND TAILGATE PARTY AT EMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH: Clinic for ag foot ball and cheerleading for K-fth grade from 9 a.m. to noon at the Canal Street eld across from Pat Thomas Stadium-Buddy Lowe Field in Lees burg. Tailgate party at 12:30 p.m. at the church, 1710 U.S. Highway 441 in Leesburg. Free food, inatables, face painting, classic car show and Chris tian music. To register, call 352-3231588 or email emmanuelchurch@em barqmail.com. JULY 21 GATEWAY TO GALILEE VACATION BI BLE SCHOOL: Through Friday from 9 a.m. to noon, for children in thirdfth grade, First United Methodist Church, 439 E. Fifth Ave., in Mount Dora. Register at www.mtdorafumc. org/children. JULY 23 VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL AT CENTRAL BAPTIST CHURCH: Hungry Games for children in fourth to sixth grade, at the church, 104 Perkins St., in Leesburg, July 23-27. Call 352-787-3966 to reg ister or for information. To place an item on the calendar, send an email to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. CHURCH CALENDAR RICK REED REFLECTIONS Use various translations to further your Bible study DIDI TANG Associated Press BEIJING Students and civil ser vants in Chinas Muslim northwest, where Beijing is enforcing a securi ty crackdown following deadly un rest, have been ordered to avoid taking part in traditional fasting during the Islamic holy month of Ramadan. Statements posted in the past sev eral days on websites of schools, government agencies and local par ty organizations in the Xinjiang re gion said the ban was aimed at pro tecting students wellbeing and preventing use of schools and gov ernment ofces to promote religion. Statements on the websites of local party organizations said members of the ofcially atheist ruling party also should avoid fasting. No teacher can participate in re ligious activities, instill religious thoughts in students or coerce stu dents into religious activities, said a statement on the website of the No. 3 Grade School in Ruoqiang County in Xinjiang. Similar bans have been imposed in the past on fasting for Ramadan, which began at sundown Saturday. But this year is unusually sensitive because Xinjiang is under tight se curity following attacks that the government blames on Muslim ex tremists with foreign terrorist ties. Violence has escalated in recent years in Xinjiang. The ruling par ty blames violent extremists that it says want independence, while members of the regions Uighur ethnic group complain that dis crimination and restrictions on re ligion, such as a ban on taking chil dren to mosques, are fueling anger at the ethnic Han Chinese majority. An attack on May 22 in the region al capital of Urumqi by four people who threw bombs in a vegetable market killed 43 people, includ ing the attackers. On June 22, police in Kashgar in the far west said they killed 13 assailants who drove into a police building and set off explo sives, injuring three ofcers. Authori ties have blamed two other attacks at train stations in Urumqi and in Chi nas southwest on Muslim extremists. The government responded with a crackdown that resulted in more than 380 arrests in one month and public rallies to announce sentences. The ruling party is wary of re ligious activities it worries might serve as a rallying point for opposi tion to one-party rule. Controls on worship are especially sensitive in Xinjiang and in neighboring Tibet, where religious faith plays a large role in local cultures. On Tuesday, authorities in some communities in Xinjiang held cel ebrations of the anniversary of the founding of the Communist Par ty and served food to test wheth er Muslim guests were fasting, according to Dilxat Raxit, spokes man in Germany for the rights group World Uyghur Congress. This will lead to more conicts if China uses coercive measures to rule and to challenge Uighur be liefs, said Dilxat Raxit in an email. The ruling party says religion and education should be kept separate and students should not be subject to religious inuences. That rule is rarely enforced for children of Han Chinese, who, if they have a reli gion, are mostly Buddhist, Daoist or Christian. Students shall not participate in religious activities; they shall not study scripts or read poems at script and choir classes; they shall not wear any religious emblems; and no parent or others can force students to have religious beliefs or partake in religious activities, said the statement on the website of the grade school in Ruoqiang County. A news portal run by the Chinese officials forbid fasting during holy month in Muslim northwest PHOTOS BY ANDY WONG / AP Chinese Muslims gather to break their fast during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan at the Niujie mosque, the oldest and largest mosque in Beijing, on Wednesday. Chinese Muslim men chat as they wait for the time to break their fast. Ramadan banned SEE RAMADAN | C3

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, July 5, 2014 Fo r in fo rm at io n on li st in g yo ur ch ur ch on th is pa ge ca ll th e Cl as si e d De pt at 352-314-3278Bearing a heavy weight togetherGe nesis Ps alm Ro mans Ma tthe w24:34-38, 45:10-17 7:15-24a 11:16-19, 42-49, 58-67So ng of So lomon 2:8-1325-30 C Liberty Baptist Church11043 Tr ue Life Wa y, Cler mont352-394-0708 Senior Pa stor Chris JohnsonSun. Svc 10:40am, Family Pr ay er Svc 6:00pmUnashamed Students Ser vice 6:00pm Sun. Bible Fello wship 9:30am We d. Bible Stud y 6:30pm, Kids 4 Tr uth Clubs 6:30pmGroups for all ages, Nurser y pro vided all ser viceswww .lbcc lermont.org E First United Methodist Church of EustisA Place wher e Yo u Matter 600 S. Gro ve Str eet, Eustis352-357-5830 Senior Pa stor Beth Fa rabeeCoffee and Fello wship 9:00am Contempor ar y Wo rship 9:30am Tr aditional Wo rship 11:00amLife Without Limits Ministries150 E. Bar nes Av enue Eustis352-399-2913 Bishop Robert DixonSunday Sc hool 9:00am Sunday Wo rship Ser vice 10:00am We dnesday Family Bible Stud y 7:00pmwww .lifewithout-limits.comSt. Thomas Episcopal Church317 S. Mar y St., Eustis (cor ner S. Mar y & Lemon St.)352-357-4358 Rev John W. Lipscomb III, RectorSunday Holy Euc harist Ser vices 8:00am & 10:30am Adult Sunday Sc hool 9:20am, Childr en s Chapel Thurs. Holy Euc harist & Healing Ser vice 10:00amwww .stthomaseustis.comUnitarian Universalist Congregation of Lake CountyEustis Wo man s Club Building 227 North Center Str eet, Eustis352-728-1631For July and August Sunday 10:30am-11:30am Discussion gr oup with brief ser viceFa cebook: www .f acebook.com/UUlakecoWe bsite:www .lakecountyuu.org Email: lakecountyuu@gmail.com F P Holy Tr inity Episcopal Church2201 Spring Lak e Road, Fruitland Park352-787-1500 Fa ther Te d KoellnSunday Ser vice 8:00am, 10:00am We dnesday Healing Ser vice 11:30amwww .holytrinityfp .comLIFE Church Assembly of God04001 Picciola Rd., Fruitland Park352-787-7962 Pa stor Rick We lborneSunday Deaf Impair ed 10:00am Sunday Evening 6:00pm We dnesday Pr ay er and Yo uth Ser vice 7:00pm Sunday Sc hool 9:00am We dnesday Bible Stud y 7:00pmPilgrims United Church of Christ (UCC)509 County Road 468, Fruitland Parkwww .pucc.info 352-365-2662 or ofce@pucc.infoRev Ronal K.F Nicholas, OSL, Pa stor Rev Camille F. Gianaris, Pa storal Assistant Sunday Wo rship 10:00am Contact us or visit our website for more info G Mt. Olive Missionar y Baptist Church15641 Stuc ky Loop Stuc ky (W est of Mascotte)352-429-3888 Rev Clarence L. Southall-P astorSunday Wo rship Ser vice 11:00am Sunday Sc hool 9:30am Bible Stud y-W ednesday 7:00pm Yo uth Bible Stud y-W ednesday 7:00pmZion Lutheran Church (ELCA)547 S. Main Av e. Gro veland352-429-2960 Pa stor Ken StoyerSunday Wo rship Ser vice 11:00am Adult Sunday Sc hool 9:30am L L Bethany Lutheran Church1334 Grifn Road, Leesbur g352-787-7275Sunday Ser vice 9:30am We dnesday Bible Stud y 10:00am Sunday Bible Stud y 8:30amEmmanuel Baptist Church of Leesburg1710 U. S. Hwy 441 E., Leesbur g352-323-1588 Pa stor Jeff CarneySunday Celebr ation Ser vice 10:30am We dnesday Men s Pr ay er Br eakfast 8:00am We dnesday Pr aise & Pr ay er 6:30pm Sunday Bible Stud y 9:15am We dnesday Epic Yo uth Ministr y 6:30pmwww .EmmanuelFL.comFaith Wo rldA United Pentecostal, Apostolic Chur ch 2205 W. Main Str eet, Leesbur g352-787-0510 Pa stor Tr ueman HurleySer vices Interpr eted for the Deaf Sunday Sc hool All Ages 10:00am Contempor ar y Pr aise & Wo rship 10:45am We dnesday Pr aise & Childr en Prog ra m 7:30pmwww .f aithworldupc.org Fa cebook: Fa ith Wo rld LeesburgFirst Baptist Leesburg220 N. 13th St., Leesbur g352-787-1005Sunday Ser vice 8:15am, 9:30am & 10:45am Sunday Bible Stud y 8:15am, 9:30am & 10:45am We dnesday Night Activities 6:00pmwww .fbc leesburg.orgFirst Church of Christ, Scientist, Leesburg13th & Line St., Leesbur g352-787-1921Sunday Ser vice 10:30am Sunday Sc hool 10:30am We dnesday Sc hool 3:30pmFirst Presbyterian Curch of Leesburg200 S. Lone Oak Dr ., Leesbur g352-787-5687Sunday Ser vice 10:00pm Sunday Sc hool 8:45amwww .rstpresleesburg.orgDisciples Making DisciplesGloria Dei Lutheran Church130 S. Lone Oak Drive Leesbur g352-787-3223Sunday Wo rship October -April 8:00am & 10:30am Sunday Wo rship May-September 9:15am Christian Education October -April 9:15amwww .gloriadeielca.netLakes and Hills Covenant ChurchRev Ken Folmsbee, PhD Pa storWo rship Ser vice 10:15am Bible Stud y 9:00am @ Wo men s Club of Leesbur g 700 S. 9th Str eet, Leesbur g Chur ch Ofce 106 S. Palm Av e. Ho wie-in-the-Hills352-552-0052 www .lakeshillsco venantchurch.orgLegacy Community ChurchLocated at Lak e Squar e Mall, Leesbur g (suite 331 ne xt to JCPenney)Pa stor Theo Bob-352-250-0156 Pa stor Buddy Wa lker -352-978-0509 Spanish Pa stor Luis Fuentes-352-552-1357Sunday Wo rship Ser vice 9:30am Legac y is a multicultur al, multir acial, gener ational, Christian Chur chwww .legac ycic.orgSt. Paul Roman Catholic Church(In union with the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orlando & The Va tican)1330 Sunshine Av enue Leesbur gWe ekday Masses M-F 8:30am Sacr ament of Penance Satur day 2:30-3:30pm (or by appointment) Satur day Masses 4:00 & 7:00pm (Spanish) Sunday Masses 7:00, 9:00, 11:00am, 12:30pm Ofce Hours M-F 8:00-12:00, 1:00-4:00Seventh Day Adventist508 S. Lone Oak Dr ., Leesbur g352-326-4109Wo rship Ser vice 9:30am Sabbath Sc hool Ser vice 11:00am We dnesday Pr ay er Meeting 7:00pmSolid Rock Evangelical Fellowship Evangelical Presbyterian ChurchLeesbur g Community Building 109 E. Dixie Av enue Leesbur g352-431-3944 Rev Dr John LodgeSunday Ser vice 9:30am Sunday Sc hool 10:45amwww .solidrockef.comThe Healing Place1012 W Main Str eet, Leesbur g352-617-0569 Fa cilitator: Phyllis GilbertSunday Ser vice and Kids Club 11:00am We dnesday Bible Stud y and Kids Club 6:00pm (Nursey open for all ser vices) Come as you ar e and lea ve differ ent! M New Life Presbyterian Church, PCA18237 E. Apshaw a Road, MinneolaMusic Ministries352-241-8181Sunday Sc hool 9:30am Sunday Wo rship 10:45am M D Congregational Church650 N. Donnelly St., Mount Dor a352-383-2285 Rev Dr Richard DonSunday 11:00am (Communion 1st Sunday of the month) Monday Bible Stud y 9:00am & 6:00pm130 yrs. of ser viceFirst Presbyterian Church of Mount Dora222 W. 6th Av enue at Ale xander Mt. Dor a352-383-9132Combined Summer Wo rship 10:00am Ever y Sunday June 8th-August 31stwww .fpcmtdora.orgSt. Philip Lutheran Church1050 Bo yd Drive Mt. Dor a352-383-5402 Pa stor Rev Dr Johan BerghSunday Ser vice 9:30am (Childcar e Pro vided) Fello wship 10:45amwww .stphiliplc.com O Corpus Christi Episcopal Church3430 County Road 470, Okahumpka352-787-8430Sunday Rite II Euc harist Ser vice 9:00am Rite I Euc harist Ser vice 11:30am Fello wship follo wing 9:00am ser vice and befor e 11:30am ser vice Thursday Mor ning Pr ay er 9:30amwww .corpuschristiepiscopal.org T All Saint s Roman Catholic Chapel11433 U. S. 441, River Plaza #11, Ta va re s407-391-8678 352-385-3880Sunday Latin Mass 8:00am & 10:00amFirst Baptist Church of Ta vares124 N. Joanna Av enue Ta va re s352-343-7131Sunday Contempor ar y Ser vice 8:30am Sunday Tr aditional Ser vice 11:00am & 6:00pm Sunday Bible Stud y (all ages) 10:00am We dnesday Fello wship Meal 5:00pm We dnesday Life University 6:15pm We dnesday Pr ay er Ser vice 6:15pm Pro viding dir ection for all gener ationswww .fbctav ares.comTa vares First United Methodist Church (UMC)Cor ner of Old 441 & SR 19, Ta va re s352-343-2761 Pa stor John BarhamTr aditional Ser vice 9:00am (Sanctuar y) Contempor ar y Cafe-Style 10:30am (Activity Center) Inquir er s Adult Sunday Sc hool 10:15am Tr eehouse Kids Chur ch 10:45amBar gain Box Thrift Stor e, Thurs-Sat 9am to 1pmwww .fumctav ares.com W Lighthouse Foundation Ministries International INC.11282 SR 471, We bster352-793-2631 Pa stor Pa tricia T. BurnhamSunday Ser vices 9:00am & 6:00pm Thursday Night 7:00pm 3r d Satur day Food Bask et Give-A-W aywww .lighthousefoundationministries.orgLinden Church of God4309 CR 772, We bsterPa stor Doyle D. GlassSunday Mor ning Wo rship 10:30am Sunday Evening Wo rship 6:00pm Sunday Sc hool 9:45am We dnesday Night (Family Tr aining Hour) 7:00pm W r Greater Piney Grove Baptist Church, Inc .112 Huey Str eet, Wildw ood352-748-1695 Rev Dann y L. McKenzie, Pa storSunday Sc hool 9:15am Mor ning Wo rship 10:30am We dnesday Night 6:30pm Join us this Sunday for a re lev ant message gr eat music and friendly people who ar e just lik e you. greaterpineygro vebaptist@centur ylink.net The Charlotte Mayfield Assisted Living Retir ement Community460 Newell Hill Rd., Leesburg352-365-6011Assisted Living, Independent Living, Day Stay Residency Combining Independence with Personal Care for over 40 yearsLicense # AL 7389 1127 W. Main St., LeesburgJohn W. Snyder President Dunstan & Son Plumbing Co., Inc .PLUMBINGREP AIR& REMODELIN GEst. 1922 CF C057100(352) 787-4771 KIAofLEESBU RG 35 2-36 5-1 22 8Come vis it our new locati on!www .Kiao fLees burg. com

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Saturday, July 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 ANDREA RODRIGUEZ Associated Press HAVANA Launched as a bulletin for Catholic lay people, Espacio La ical magazine became an unusually open and critical forum for de bate in Cuba, a rarity in a country where the state has controlled all media for ve decades. Now, the sudden de parture of its two long time editors may have endangered that status just as Cubas Roman Catholic Church and the Communist-run country embark on ma jor changes. First published in 2005, Espacio Laicals reections on faith and daily life were augment ed by articles about pol itics, economics and society. The magazine became a must-read for members of Cubas ac ademic and intellectu al elite some of them the very architects of President Raul Castros ongoing reforms, such as allowing limited pri vate enterprise and de centralizing state-run businesses. Espacio Laical gave room to opinions from different points of view, said Cuban analyst and former diplomat Car los Alzugaray, who has worked with the maga zine. It is something that is very needed today in Cuba, which is a public space for debate about the nations problems. But editors Roberto Veiga and Lenier Gonza lez resigned in early May, later conrming they quit because the maga zines content was con troversial in the ecclesi astical community. The magazines director, Gus tavo Andujar, said the editors left voluntarily. Published four times a year with a press run of just 4,500, Espacio Laical also has a web site that is likely seen by few in a country where Internet access is dif cult and costly. Its foot print is much smaller than publications like the Communist Par ty newspaper Granma published daily and dis tributed to the masses across the island. But its audience was inuential, and its arti cles provoked debate. In July 2013, Espacio Laical published a sup plement titled Cuba Dreamed, Cuba Possi ble, Cuba Future, out lining what the country should aspire to, in cluding freedom of ex pression, political as sociation and private economic rights. University of Havana religious historian En rique Lopez Oliva said that surely set off alarms both within the Catho lic community, which is divided over how much the church should in volve itself in politics, and for government and party ofcials, who say Raul Castros reforms do not contemplate change to Cubas single-party system. These points consti tute a platform for a po litical movement, Lopez Oliva said. They must have caused a certain amount of concern. After the reforms be gan in earnest in 2010, Espacio Laical pub lished analyses by economists such as Omar Everleny Perez and Pavel Vidal, who are associated with the government but have been relatively outspo ken in criticizing its programs. In one piece, they said there were not enough approved free-market activities for half a million laidoff state workers, and not enough white col lar jobs for an educated population. Other contributing writers have included academics, energy ex perts and sociologists both inside and out side of Cuba. Espacio Laical also organized gatherings with diverse participants including prominent Cuban ex ile businessman Carlos Saladriegas. Andujar told The Associated Press in an email interview that some aspects of Espa cio Laical wont change. But he also acknowl edged there will be more emphasis on top ics like the arts, scienc es and religious ethics, rather than an over whelming focus on eco nomics and politics. It is not desirable that other, very broad and important aspects of the cultural life of the country and the world nd comparatively little space, he said. The changes at the magazine come as the church gets ready for a major transition. Car dinal Jaime Ortega sub mitted his resigna tion in 2011 as bishops customarily do upon turning 75. The Vatican has not yet accepted it, but Ortega is widely assumed to be leaving soon. Relations were hos tile between the Catholic Church and the ofcially atheist state for decades after Cubas 1959 revo lution. It was Ortega that negotiated better ties, beginning the 1990s as Cuba removed referenc es to atheism in the con stitution and Pope John Paul II visited in 1998. Ortegas successor will be named by Pope Fran cis, a Jesuit seen as a re former keen on social is sues. Whoever takes his place as head of the Ha vana Archdiocese will have to chart his own course between empha sizing spiritual work and political involvement. Catholic authorities want further conces sions such as more ac cess to radio and TV airwaves, the return of more church proper ty and permission to begin some kind of re ligious education causes that could be helped by not antago nizing the government. The changes at the magazine, Lopez Oli va said, could be a shift toward being more cau tious in the political arena. Critical forum may end with Cuban magazine changes FRANKLIN REYES / AP Issues of the Roman Catholic magazine Espacio Laical exhibited for sale in a small shop in Old Havana, Cuba, on June 25. government of Yili in the northern reach es of Xinjiang said fast ing is detrimental to the physical wellbeing of young students, who should eat regularly. In the city of Bole, re tired teachers from the Wutubulage Middle School were called in to stand guard at mosques and prevent students from entering, accord ing to a statement on the municipal party committee website. Also in Bole, the Bozhou University of Radio and Television said on its website it held a meeting with working and retired mi nority teachers on the rst day of the Rama dan to remind them of the fasting ban. The forestry bureau in Xinjiangs Zhaosu county held an event the day before Rama dan at which party cad res signed a pledge they and their relatives would rmly resist fasting, according to a statement on the web site of the local party committee. The Moyu Weath er Bureau in the Hotan area said on its website that Muslim employees, both active and retired, were required to sign a letter promising not to fast. The commercial bu reau for Turpan, an oa sis town in the Taklam akan Desert, said in a statement that civil ser vants are strictly for bidden to fast or per form the Salat prayer ritual in a mosque. RAMADAN FROM PAGE C1 ANDREW DEMILLO Associated Press LITTLE ROCK, Ark. Candidates in the close ly watched Senate race in Arkansas sparred af ter Republican Rep. Tom Cotton said Dem ocratic Sen. Mark Pryor believes faith is some thing that only happens at 11 oclock on Sunday mornings. Pryor accused Cotton of attacking his faith. Im disappointed in Congressman Cottons deeply personal attack on me, Pryor said in a statement. He and I may disagree on issues, but for him to ques tion my faith is out of bounds. The two-term sena tor talks often about his faith and quotes from the Bible during cam paign appearances. He made his faith the cen terpiece of an ad last year: Im not ashamed to say that I believe in God, Pryor said in the spot, which showed him holding a Bible. And I believe in his word. Cotton, a freshman congressman, made the remarks in a tele vision interview Tues day when he was asked about Supreme Court ruling in the Hobby Lobby case that fam ily-owned companies dont have to provide insurance coverage for contraception. Hob by Lobby and Cones toga Wood Specialties objected to the require ment under the presi dents health care law on religious grounds. Cotton said the ruling showed the health care law infringed on Arkan sans liberties. Barack Obama and Mark Pryor think that faith is some thing that only happens at 11 oclock on Sunday mornings, Cotton told KNWA. Thats when we worship, but faith is what we live every sin gle day, and the govern ment shouldnt infringe on the rights of religious liberty. Later, Cotton said in a statement that his com ments were directed at the federal health law and not at Pryors faith. Senator Pryor is a man of faith and prac tices it with commend able openness, which I respect, but I wish he would respect Arkan sans right to practice our faith, Cotton said. The increasingly ex pensive race in Arkansas is closely watched be cause Republicans need to gain six seats in No vember to capture ma jority control of the Sen ate. Top-tier GOP targets are the Republican-lean ing Southern states Arkansas, Louisiana and North Carolina where Obama is unpopular and incumbent Democrat ic senators are struggling to hold onto their seats. Faith at issue in Arkansas Senate race AP FILE PHOTO Arkansas Republican Senate candidate, Rep. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., speaks in North Little Rock, Ark. SHERIF TAREK MCT Jewish and Muslim student groups at University of California at San Di ego had an idea they could work on together creating a campus din ing spot with both kosher and halal dishes. It was a small but meaningful col laboration amid tensions that have arisen from the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement, a glob al campaign that has sought to put economic and political pressure on Israel, in part, to protect Palestinian rights. I dont think anyone on our proj ect team thinks this will solve those disagreements, said Zev M. Hur witz of the Union of Jewish Students at UCSD. But we also think its pos sible to be progressive and produc tive on things like campus dining hall offerings. The students effort is one of sev eral in the UC system to create ko sher-halal dining spots most of which are still in the planning stag es. But Jewish and Muslim students said the opportunity to work togeth er has helped build understanding. Dialogue and coordination de nitely brings both communities clos er, said Jim Atkins, the executive di rector of Santa Cruz Hillel, which has been meeting with the UC campus Muslim Student Association. Kosher and halal orthodox methods of preparing food for Jews and Muslims, respectively are similar. Both generally forbid pork and require the ritual slaughter ing of animals to ensure thorough bleeding. Neither group typically eats birds of prey. Observant Jewish and Muslim stu dents have a difcult time living on some campuses because the avail able meal plans dont always have kosher or halal options. UCSD students want to have a fa cility in one of the dining halls that currently are being renovated. Hibah Khan, a member of the campus Muslim Students Associa tion, said the project hopes to create a kitchen with two separate spaces, one designated for kosher and the other for halal. If it happens, Khan said, Mus lim and Jewish students will de nitely be seeing each other more and hopefully this will lead to new friendships, if not familiar faces. Getting a kosher-halal dining area has proven difcult on other Cali fornia campuses. UCLA ofcials asked the groups to nd a joint vendor that could pro vide halal and kosher meat. But af ter three months of searching, they werent able to nd one. Eventually the Muslim and Jew ish student groups sought out sepa rate vendors, Yesilyurt said. There are currently kosher choices available on campus, but no halal meat options. Still, Yesilyurt said both groups got something out of the experience. We have made some close friends, he said. Jewish, Muslim students work together for dining options ANNE CUSACK / MCT Zev Hurwitz, right, and Jonah Saidian, second from right, both with the Union of Jewish Students, and Hibah Khan, left, and Yasin Ahmed, second from left, both with the Muslim Student Association at UC San Diego, talk during a meeting to discuss offering kosher and halal food at facilities on campus.

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D6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, July 5, 2014 rf fn tb bn n fb f r f r ntb bnn tb rf r nt bt r b n tb r nnn tb t b nb or bn b nb nn bbt r f r rf or ntb r nt t r f n tb r ntb bt tt t b t nn nn ntb t b tbn tbn ntb bn bn t tr or Ce rt ie d Pr e-Ow ne d r f ntb n bn n t b n b b bb f b t b r f ntb nbn n tb n b bb b f bt b b b b f b b b n b b f f f t 9145 So. Hwy 441 (Acr oss Fr om The Airpor t) MON-FRI 9 am-9 pm, SAT 9 am-8 pm SUN Noon 6 pm MON-FRI 7:00 am-6:00 pm SAT 8 am-5 pmHABLAMOS ESPAOL f JENKINS HYU NDAI of Leesburg rf nt bb t n t r f rr n t b f r r r b r f n n r r r b rr r r r rf b r r b rn r r rb r f r r b rn f r b r rn b n r n r b r brn rf brb nr b rn r nf f b r rn b r nr fr n nf f r r fr t n fr b r rn b f rf r fn t b n n n t n n n n n n r r n Gr ea t Se le ct io n of f n b r t t rffn tfn b rfn rfrn rfrn rffn tfn rfrn rfn r r r t rrf rn rn b rfn rfn rfn rffn rnr r r t rf tff rfrn rfn rrn rfn tr r r t t rfn rr rn tr rn r rn rfn rfn rffn b n n r rf nt b f t

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8626 U.S. Hwy 441 ~ Leesburg, FL 34788 Next to Leesburg International Airport 352.435.6131 SHOPFAMILYFURNITURE.COM Mon-Fri 9-6, Sat 10-6, Sun 12-5 SAVE ON THE BRAND NAMES YOU KNOW AND TRUST D004564 We'll Pay Your Sales Tax! 24-Month InterestFree Financing ** minimum amount nanced $999, 25% deposit re quir ed Held Over! E1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, July 5, 2014 URBAN GARDENING: Five keys to success / E2 www.dailycommercial.com Home & Garden 352-365-8203 features@dailycommercial.com BENJAMIN BENSCHNEIDER / MCT Stu Feldt has roots in Minnesota; the Prairie and Craftsman styles of architecture inuenced the design of his Seattle home, which is ringed with windows to draw light. Landscape design is by Martha Shapiro of Shapiro Ryan Design and installed by Alliance Landscape Services. REBECCA TEAGARDEN MCT C ontractor Stu Feldt is a stu dent of architecture. Lee Copeland designed my parents house, he says of the for mer dean of the University of Wash ington College of Architecture and Urban Planning (today known as the College of Built Environments). At 12 years old I fell in love with the process and wanted to be an architect. After college, though, I worked with a contractor and real ized that I liked the hands on. For years Feldt bought neglected houses, xed, sold and sent them on their way. But, today hes seat ed in the living room of the home he (W.S. Feldt General Contrac tor) built for his own family, 3,600 square feet, open and, well, other wise a little tricky to describe. But, no matter what you call it, its a keeper. Prairie style was the inuence, says Feldt, who has roots in Minne sota and admits to having stalked homes designed by George Grant Elmslie and Frank Lloyd Wright. Well, Prairie style and Craftsman. The Green and Green house in Pas adena (The Gamble House) really inspired me. I wouldnt really call it Midcentu ry Modern, he says of his familys View Ridge home, but thats where its going with the interiors. Anyway, the idea out front was low to the ground. True to the Prairie style of design, the home is banded with windows, the roof is hipped and low-pitched with wide eaves. Concrete porch supports are true to the genre, but in reality, I took those from a hotel we like in Hawaii. They did theirs in lava rock. Inside the cheerful Sunburst Or ange front door, the place skews contemporary. Glass (windows and sliders from Lowen), steel, cedar, concrete oors with mahogany cab inetry and paneling, the icy-glass balls of a Bocci chandelier dangling over the dining table. Interior de signer Kathleen Glossa stuck to the modern theme with furnishings and nishes at once warm, elegant and family friendly. Then, just to mix it up, there off the kitchen, is a family-sized nook. Modern in its execution (surround ed by glass), but rmly of Craftsman lineage. It has become the fami ly command center. No matter how many built-in desks and study areas Feldt put into the place, everybodys always here. It turns out that its the proverbi al kitchen table, he says. Feldt called upon architect David Norrie of Sandall Norrie Architects to put the pieces of his thoughts together into a cohesive design. Thats whats great about Dave, he studies how you live. The home serves its young fam ily well. Coaxing the indoors out is a large, covered patio with a prom inent concrete replace. We had a surprise party for Steph (Feldts wife) in late December, and people were still sitting out by the re at 1 a.m. That concrete radiates the heat so well. Meanwhile, the boys, Nathan, 11, and Spencer, 9, got themselves a very cool bit of grafti art on the walls over the beds featuring their Prairie home: The lineage is classic, the feel mostly modern SEE PRAIRIE | E2 KIM COOK Associated Press For many young people, a rst apart ment might be a cramped studio or just a bedroom in a shared living arrange ment. Juggling that rooms living, dining and sleeping spaces requires creativity. Take Meg Volk, a New York-based pro ducer and photographer who at 22 is a seasoned veteran of the tiny-home trenches: Shes on her third, under-300square-foot studio apartment. Find vertical space; think small and light; and when in doubt, do without, she advises. In my rst solo studio apartment, I had about 200 square feet and the op tion of a twin-size bed or a futon, she says. But she was lucky enough to have 10-foot ceilings. She built a sleeping loft with a porthole entrance and storage in the stairs. Was it claustrophobic? A little, but worth it, she says. Big tips for living in a small space SEE TIPS | E2 MICHAEL LOBIONDO / MCT Designer and home improvement expert Vicki Payne is host and producer of For Your Home and writes a column of the same name. VICKI PAYNE MCT A s a designer I am always looking for ways to make our homes more appealing and a true representa tive of our own personal style. On this holiday weekend I should be sharing ve ways to make your patio sparkle or offering tips on how to add a touch of the red, white and blue to your outdoor table setting. I dont think that would be the best use of my skills. Ive always been thrilled by the sight of the American ag ying from ag poles, draping porches and being waived by small children as they watch a parade. Its such a grand icon. Then it hit me like a ash from a holiday spar kler: I need to help decorate America. Sounds ambitious I know, but it is do able. How to decorate your home with American flags SEE PAYNE | E3 MAUREEN GILMER / MCT Foxgloves thrive in coastal communities where it makes a ne back of the border accent. MAUREEN GILMER MCT In the 18th century they called it dropsy. An old medical text ex plains the symptoms of this cardiac malady that caused such irreg ular or weak heartbeats that patients literally drowned in their own uids. The disease known as dropsy puffed their bodies into grotesque shapes, squeezed their lungs, and nally brought slow but inexo rable death. As the dis ease progressed, a wa ter liquid ltered into every available space and expanded it like a balloon. Sometimes the liquid quarts and gallons of it made arms and legs swell so that they were immov able. Sometimes it wa terlogged the lung cav ity and thereby made it impossible for the vic tim to breathe unless he sat bolt upright all day and all night. There was only one known treatment for dropsy that seemed to work on those aficted. Yardsmart: Ancient cure, modern medicine SEE YARD | E3

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E2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, July 5, 2014 2:00-4:30pm$2.00OFF Any Pa sta Dinner$1.00OFF Any Pa nini 9945 SE Hwy. 42, Summereld 42 4227/441SUMMERFIELD OCALATHE VILLAGES 1229 14th St., Leesburg27/441LEESBURGFRUITLAND PARK 441 HOURSMon-Sat 8 to 6 Sunday 9 to 5 rf nt b WE NEED n D004210 Tu es da y Ju ly 8th, 2014 at 3 PM names and a famil iar-looking seahawk type of bird. Theres a pass-through in the clos et connecting the rooms. Feldt had his boys in mind throughout the project. They were 2 and 4 when this pro cess started, he says. And with two young boys, youve gotta have tile in the bathroom; especially important around the toilet. Technically, the home was nished in 2009. (It took about two years to build. Contrac tors house, second pri ority; paying custom ers rst.) But almost ve years later a few nal tweaks (visible only to a professionals eye) remain. PRAIRIE FROM PAGE E1 JOE LAMPL MCT Growing plants, es pecially edibles in an urban environment such as an apartment deck or small patio can be a challenge. As much as we might like to have huge juicy homegrown tomatoes fresh from our bal cony, thats a tall or der with less than six hours each day of di rect sunlight. Having said that, its not im possible. But pick ing the right plants for your growing environ ment will have a lot to do with your garden ing success and happi ness level. Beyond that, there are other important considerations. These five tips to a produc tive urban garden should help add to the pleasure and success no matter where your garden grows. 1) Choose the best container While it is true that you can use just about anything as a contain er, it is important to give it some thought. No matter what con tainer you choose, it absolutely must have drainage holes. If it doesnt, drill some. Having a place for the water to drain out is very important. Some of the most readily available and practical container options are the following: Clay: Inexpensive but can dry out quick ly. Also prone to crack ing. Plastic: Holds moisture very well. There are some high er end plastic pots that come in really cool de signs and colors. A very good value and will last for years. Styrofoam: Mim ics the look of concrete or stone without the weight Wire baskets lined with coconut fiber: These are great, in expensive and reus able. They do tend to dry out in windy con ditions, so place them where you can water them easily. 2) Pick the right soil Not all soil is suitable for container or urban gardening. Here are considerations for the most common options youll face: Top soil: While better than backyard dirt, top soil is not en gineered for contain er and urban gardens. Its great for filling ar eas like raised beds or low spots in a yard, but thats about it. Dont fall for the cheap price. Youll pay for it in short order when your plants drown from saturated soil. Topsoil is great in the right place but an urban garden or con tainer is not the place. Garden soil: Typ ically labeled as such, garden soil is made for filling outdoor beds and areas where add ed bulk is needed. Its got a few more ingredi ents than straight top soil including slow re lease nutrients, but its still too heavy for con tainers. Container mix or potting soil: This is what you want. Its specifically made for containers. This soil is very lightweight, drains well and has slow release nutrients that keep plants fed throughout the sea son. 3) Plant selection Picking the right plant varieties is just as important as any thing else in the equa tion. There are many choices today bred specifically for small space gardening. Read the plant tag, snap the QR code, and look for key words in the plant name, such as patio, container, dwarf or urban. 4) Irrigation Irrigation is huge ly important but it doesnt mean you need to put your busy life on hold just to keep your thirsty plants alive. Plants growing in con tainers need extra at tention when it comes to watering as they dry out much faster. Its not uncommon during the summer to water every day. Fortunately there are simple solutions to put your watering duties on autopilot. If you have access to an outdoor spigot or wa ter supply, you can set up a simple drip ir rigation kit connect ed to battery-operated timer. For about $70, you can have every thing you need to keep up to five containers well watered no mat ter where you are. Oth er options are avail able from soda bottle feeders you can make yourself, to self-water ing container feeders for under $20. 5) Feeding Although most store bought soils today in clude slow release nu trients, its likely that you may eventual ly need to add sup plemental fertiliza tion periodically. Every time you water, youre leaching some of those nutrients out of the container. Depending on the soil, the sup plied nutrients will eventually become de pleted. An occasional feeding of a balanced liquid fertilizer twice a month works well to keep your plants grow ing strong. Five keys to urban gardening success JOE LAMPL / MCT Urban gardening can be successful, but there are ve key areas in order to achieve a healthy garden. While its nice to be able to sit up in bed, its even nicer to have room for a couch, media cen ter and side table. IKEA has embraced this mobile-renter de mographic with its P.S. collections. Now eight years running, the col lections feature pieces that are portable and in expensive but well-de signed. The Havet so fas have wheels; a stool has an embedded LED lamp. Peter Klinkert heads the retailers Special Collections. He says this years 50 pieces came out of collaborations between young interna tional designers and the IKEA in-house team. Small space doesnt always mean no space, Klinkert says. Buy furniture thats multifunctional, he ad vises: storage cubes that also work as coffee ta bles, or a dining table that offers storage, so it can be used as a work space. (www.ikea.com) Bookcases can be clunky and cumber some. Consider oating bookshelves that take advantage of wall space without taking up oor space. IKEAs Lack wall shelves come in a vari ety of colors, and theres also a corner shelving unit in the P.S. 2014 col lection that would max imize a dead space. Check out Umbras clever Conceal wall shelves that give you a steel bar on which to anchor a hardcover book; stack a few more, or add a small accesso ry, for a neat combina tion of wall storage and art. (www.umbra.com) Consider mirrored or clear acrylic pieces to give the illusion of more space. Overstocks got side tables and chairs priced a lot lower than high-end designer piec es. (www.overstock. com) A great coffee table can serve a lot of func tions. Entertaining, din ing and crafting can all happen at a decent ta ble in front of the sofa and television. Da nias got the cool Har wich oak-veneered ta ble: four stacked slabs, and the top two swivel. Two sturdy levels of elm veneer and steel create a workhorse piece in the Matson coffee table. (www.daniafurniture. com) Volk says her spac es seem bigger when she uses furniture with legs rather than piec es that squat solidly on the ground. Choos ing light-colored woods and fabrics also con tribute a sense of airi ness. If youre strapped for cash, consider TV trays for side tables, and park a bin or basket under neath for storage. Target sells them individually for around $10, or buy a set of four and use them in both the living room and bedroom. (www. target.com) For good deals, hit the sale sections at your fa vorite retailers; dents, torn wrapping and scratches often warrant heavier discounts, so keep checking in. (www. westelm.com; www.cb2. com; www.homegoods. com) One good thing about a small living space is that it doesnt take much to add a lot of punch. A peaceful palette may be just right, but if you love color and pattern, inex pensive textiles are easy to add. Buy a couple of yards of interesting cot ton, or use neat towels or cute baby blankets to cover seat cushions or throw pillows. You dont need sewing skills staple guns handle the job on furniture, while iron-on tack, Velcro, di aper pins or knots work on pillows. (www.joann. com ) A block-printed show er curtain can work in the bathroom or at the window, and be cheap er than drapes. (www. worldmarket.com) Check out www. apt2b.com for contem porary wall-art designs at good prices. Finally, exercise self-control when it comes to tchotchke dis plays and tempting but unnecessary gear. TIPS FROM PAGE E1

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Saturday, July 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL E3 352.357.9 964D00 2748 r f n t b t t t b b n r r b r b n b b b n t 4200 Hwy 19-A Mount Dor a 327 57 r fn THE LIFE YOUVE WA ITED YOUR WHOLE LIFE FOR! Something for Everyone!! Let Us Find Yo ur Dr eam Home!SEASONAL & LONGTERM RENT ALS AVA ILABLE rY APPT 25327 US Hwy 27 Ste. 202, Leesbur g, Fl. 34748(352) 326-3626 ~ (800) 234-7654www .P ALREAL TY .net ST AR T LIVING THE LIFE!SOLAR HEA TED POOL!Formal entr y, split 2/2, den, huge great room open to kitchen, tile & wood floors. PRIV ACY! 260 s #G4704832 GOLF COURSE FRONT AGE!2/2, family room open to KT & LR, screened lanai, large patio. BEAUTIFULL Y CUSTOMIZED! 160 s #G4700844 rrr f n t b r r f Here are my professional dec orating tips for making your home sparkle this Indepen dence Day. Decorators help create envi ronments that inspire and con vey a message. No better way to proudly incorporate and display the American ag and the sym bolic red, white and blue col ors than to paint your neighbor hood patriotic. Never underestimate the power of curb appeal. If you dont already own an American ag, I recommend that you get one. Surely we all can manage this simple decorating duty. You can nd them for $1.69 at any Staples store or at most hardware locations. It doesnt have to be a big ag mount ed on a post. It can be small and stapled on a stick. I recom mend spacing them 12 inches apart. The most impressive dis play Ive ever seen was at Wilm ington National Cemetery in Wilmington, N.C. Every road way was lined with 12-inchtall American ags ying from sticks. For those who dont have yards, perhaps a balcony can be the perfect place to create a wave of small American ags. Use white plastic zip ties to at tach them to your railing. If space allows, consider draping a larger American ag over your railing. Wouldnt it be spectacu lar if every tenant followed suit? With over 250 million regis tered cars in America, many of which will be on the road this holiday weekend, perhaps this is our best decorating opportu nity. Imagine if every car proud ly ew a ag from its antenna. It could make that long backup of trafc heading to the beach a little more tolerable. A well dec orated highway now thats what we need. So what do you say? Is it time for a little redecorating at your house? PAYNE FROM PAGE E1 It was a potion brewed around the rural parts of England by folk healers, usually women who treated those that could not afford a physician. After seeing the effects of such a potion on his patients, a young English physician, William Withering, sought to nd the efcacious ingre dients of the folk potions. While each recipe dif fered, the single common component was a plant called foxglove, botanically known as Dig italis purpurea. It grew in eld and fen and gar dens of England where its easily recognized by the tall ower stalks. Witherings effort transformed the medical arts by testing the plant and soon the active chemical was isolated and dubbed digox in. It has been used in medicine ever since to regulate heartbeat of man and animal. It may be the most efficacious of all the herbal ma teria medica due to cardiac glycosides and di goxin, the heart regulating component. This is the amazing history of a beautiful garden flower thats found in both cottage yards and highbrow manor houses. As a bed ding plant its been bred to be larger and offer more colors than the wildflowers of Wither ings day. Breeding of various species of Digi talis has resulted in striking hybrids. But now that you know the history of its use for dropsy, it becomes clear this is no plant to play with. In fact, one of its old common names is dead mans bells due to the po tential of fatal overdose. Beware of growing in yards with kids and pets that may find its velvety flowers appetizing. The leaves can be easily mistaken for the benign herb, comfrey. The curious common name, foxglove, was de rived from the tubular finger sized flowers. Foxes were thought to place the flowers on their feet to silence their steps when raiding the henhouse. Foxglove is among the most beautiful bed ding flowers you can buy either as a young ster or in full second year bloom. As a bien nial, foxglove has a two-year life cycle. If you buy young first-year seedlings which are the most affordable, they might bloom modestly or not at all so the roots can become estab lished the first summer. Then the foliage dies back to winter over. The second year it will literally explode into bloom with massive full sized stalks supported by mature roots. YARD FROM PAGE E1 MARY CAROL GARRITY MCT Im a sucker for senti ment. So for me, a beau tifully appointed home is more than a collec tion of well-chosen fur nishings. Its a tribute to who you are and what you hold dear, lled with the objects that help tell the story of your life. If you wander through my home, youll see trea sures here and there that have been passed down through my family, each a link to the people I love. These heirlooms of old are comingled with wonderful new pieces I have acquired, which will become the heir looms for future gener ations of Garritys. What about your home? Have you dot ted your decor with old or new heirlooms that brighten your spaces and pull at your heart strings? Here are four of my favorites to consid er: WELL CRAFTED FURNITURE Those of us who love antique furniture can be eternally thankful to the craftsmen of old who fashioned these piec es so well that they have stood up to the rigors of time and still look beau tiful. The take-away is: When something is well made, using high-quali ty materials, its a keeper for generations to come. Chances are, you have some pieces like this in your home, whether its a chair you inherited from your grandmother, an antique youve dis covered in a shop or a darling vintage piece you picked up for a song and refurbished. Put them front and cen ter in your decor. Some times people ask me if its OK to mix up differ ent styled furniture, like including an antique chest or chair in a room that features more con temporary decor, and the answer is an em phatic yes! My favor ite interior spaces are an eclectic assortment of different pieces that look as theyve evolved over time. When you purchase new furniture for your home, whether a sofa or a dining table or hutch, stop and ask yourself if this is the kind of time less, quality piece that you will be able to hand down in future years. While some pieces of furniture in your home will have a shorter lifes pan, like a trendy table or chair, the bigger piec es should last a lifetime (or two or three). My ad vice is to invest in the highest quality furniture you can afford. For ex ample, at Nell Hills, we carry upholstered furni ture that is so well made, from the kiln-dried hardwood frames to the hand-tied springs, that they will remain lovely through the years. INTRIGUING ARTWORK Your replace man tel, that place of hon or in your home, is the perfect spot to hang heirloom artwork. Art work doesnt have to have sentimental fam ily ties though it can to be an heirloom. Perhaps youve collect ed a few pieces by local artists or ner works from area galleries. If so, you have a timeless treasure worth pass ing down. Similarly, artwork doesnt have to be worth a lot to be an heirloom. Like the art from my parents home, it can simply be a lovely or intrigu ing piece that is spe cial to you. In my opin ion, that is all that is required to make it a timeless treasure. SENTIMENTAL PIECES AND COLLECTIONS My husband, Dan, and I really enjoy col lecting items from our childhood. In fact, we have become hogs about it. For example, we have a lovely porcelain cookie jar that was Dans great grandmothers. As ne and frail as it is, it was one of the few things to survive her early years as a pioneer, when the family lived in a dugout. I will always treasure this fragile testament to all Dans ancestors en dured, and survived, as they helped tame the West. Youll nd it show cased in a prominent, but safe, place in my home decor. Dan and I have been blessed to have received lots of wonderful heir looms from Dans moth er, like an old shaving mug, which I also dis play as part of the ev er-changing tableaux that polka-dot my home. Many of these pieces werent worth much when our ances tors purchased them, but now they are price less treasure to us. I dont consider myself the owner of these bits of family history, just the caretaker to keep them safe and honor them in my daily life, until its time to pass them on. Now its your turn. What sentimental piec es can you spotlight in your decor? It could be anything! Display old family photos, vintage linens or collections. We framed a calendar that used to hang in one of Dans ancestors stores. Are there pieces that are brand new that will be heirlooms in your fami lys future? I have a des sert server that is lled with little boxes Ive col lected through the years gifts for my descen dants. BEAUTIFUL SILVER AND CHINA Silver, china and crys tal are the quintessen tial heirlooms. And, they are marvelous additions to your everyday decor. Ive used gorgeous sil ver buffet covers in my lake house kitchen to help conceal the lessthan-lovely burners on my stove, and become an elegant focal point in this utilitarian spot. If you dont have piec es of china, silver or crystal that has been in your family for gener ations, no worries. Ac quire your own gor geous collection and showcase it in your homes displays. A sim ple silver tea service el evates the look of a side table, making it a visual heaven. Who cares if its brand new! I got hooked on silver trays when Dans mom gave me a few from her collection. Since then, Ive been adding new pieces, using these state ly beauties every sin gle day in my decorating and entertaining. When you think about it, many of the items that people in previous gen erations used to ll their home werent of great value when they pur chased them. Its only through the generations that these pieces have become costly. Case in point: depression glass. What lovely accents can you weave into your home right now, that dont set you back an arm and a leg, that will become the collectors item in the future? What items can you add to your decor to add charm to your everyday life and those who will come after? Those are the pieces you want to ll your home with. Style at Home: Heirlooms

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E4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, July 5, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTS Comics www.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

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Saturday, July 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL E5 Shark ys Va c n Sew700 N. Main St. Wildwood, Fl 34785352-330-2483sharkyssewnvac1@gmail.com www .sh arkyssew nvac. comAsk Al A Bobbin is a Bobbin!I re pair ed a sewing mac hine last week and just this week the lad y broug ht it bac k to me and said I just pic ke d this up last week and yo u SUPPOSEDL Y re pair ed it but it just ke eps jamming up and wo nt se w at all !!! !. I ass ur ed her it wa s pr obabl y just som eth ing simpl e so I to ok a look at it only to disco ver she had the wrong bobbin in it. The bobbi n wa s pur ch ased at a big box local cr aft and fabric pla ce As we inspected the bobbin we found it to ha ve a popular br and embossed on th e top of it and without ex act comp arison, side by side it appe ared to be the same as hers I pro cee ded to get the corr ect bo bbin and placed it into her mac hine and to her amazement it sewed perfect ly Yo u see not all bobbins ar e cr eated equal! Although her bobbin wa s clear plasti c, the re ar e many diffe re nt ki nds of bob bin s and man y diffe re nt shapes, heights and styles of bobbi ns An d YE S. .. it will affect yo ur mac hine good or bad. Yo u wo uldnt put a Vo lksw agen wheel on a For d 4X4 pic kup truc k, even though they ar e both round and called wheel s! Yo u wa nt to either tak e the mak e and model of your sewin g ma ch ine wit h you to pu rch ase bob bins or tak e a spar e bob bin with you or better ye t buy your bobbins from a re pu tabl e and kno wled geable sewing mac hine sto re because they wil l be able to hel p you muc h bet ter Also put ting the inco rr ect bobbin in your sew ing ma ch ine coul d ca us e da ma g e to it or at th e le a st en o ug h fr u st ra tion to caus e you to qu it se w in g or kic k the dog! (O .K., not kic k the poor dog!) And you should inspect your bobbins periodically to mak e sur e the ed ge s ar e no t ch ipped or cr ac ke d. If that be the case it will cause the top thr ead to hang on the ch ip or cr ac k and it will jam up Al so a lo t of time s people wil l drop a bob bin on the flo or (or the gr andkids or ch ildr en will) and it gets stepped on and it will not wo rk properly Most of us e xperienced, if you will, sewers ar e used to those good ole metal bobbins that used to last for ever and we kinda put those plastic bobbi ns in the same categor y and ar e shoc ke d when they dont even come close to holding up Hell o! O. K., We ll I do an yw ay So be sur e to inspect those bobbins so you can ha ve a GREA T time making those kids and gr andkids all those nice things. An d la st ly be sure to stop and tak e time to sho w the gr andkids and kids something about sewing Yo u may think they ar e not listeni ng or ar e not inter ested but re member ... Thats ho w we all lear ned ourselves. Thank God for mommas and gr an d-mommas! Until ne xt week, its my st or y an d I can tell it anyw ay I wa nt to! Sew what, ha v e fun. And Happ y Sewing! I repaired a sewing machine last week and just this week the lady brought it back to me and said I just picked this up last week and you SUPPOSEDL Y repaired it but it just keeps jamming up and wont sew at all!!!!. I assured her it was probably just something simple so I took a look at it only to discover she had the wrong bobbin in it. The bobbin was pur chased at a big box local craft and fabric place. As we inspected the bobbin we found it to have a popular brand embossed on the top of it and without exact comparison, side by side, it appeared to be the same as hers. I proceeded to get the correct bobbin and placed it into her machine and to her amazement it sewed per fectly Yo u see, not all bobbins are created equal! Although her bobbin was clear plastic, there are many different kinds of bobbins and many different shapes, heights and styles of bobbins. And YES it will affect your machine good or bad. Yo u wouldnt put a Vo lkswagen wheel on a Ford 4X4 pickup truck, even though they are both round and called wheels! Yo u want to either take the make and model of your sewing machine with you to pur chase bobbins or take a spare bobbin with you or better yet buy your bobbins from a reputable and knowledgeable sewing machine store because they will be able to help you much better Also, putting the incorrect bobbin in your sewing machine could cause damage to it or at the least enough frustration to cause you to quit sewing or kick the dog! (O.K., not kick the poor dog!) And you should inspect your bobbins periodically to make sure the edges are not chipped or cracked. If that be the case it will cause the top thread to hang on the chip or crack and it will jam up. Also a lot of times people will drop a bobbin on the floor (or the grandkids or children will) and it gets stepped on and it will not work properly Most of us experienced, if you will, sewers are used to those good ole metal bobbins that used to last forever and we kinda put those plastic bobbins in the same categor y and are shocked when they dont even come close to holding up. Hello! O.K., We ll I do anyway! So be sure to inspect those bobbins so you can have a GREA T time making those kids and grandkids all those nice things. And lastly be sure to stop and take time to show the grandkids and kids something about sewing. Yo u may think they are not listening or are not interested but remember. That s how we all learned ourselves. Thank God for mommas and grand-mommas! Until next week, it s my stor y and I can tell it anyway I want to! Sew what, have fun. And Happy Sewing! www.dailycommercial.com Diversions 352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puz zle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Saturday, July 5 the 186th day of 2014. There are 179 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in His tory : On July 5, 1954, Elvis Pres leys rst commercial record ing session took place at Sun Records in Memphis, Tennes see; the song he recorded was Thats All Right. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Saturday, July 5, 2014 : This year you will be quicker to let others know when your feelings are hurt. Your directness helps you with groups, communi ty commitments and even work. You often nd your self in situations where you are pushed to make a decision. If you are single, someone important could mosey into your life this year. The chemistry be tween you could be high. If you are attached, the two of you enjoy hanging out together. You will feel more indulgent than you have in years, if you can just go with the ow with your sig nicant other. LIBRA might seem easygoing, but he or she has quite a temper. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Youll want to wind down from recent celebra tions. The problem might be that others are still off carousing. You could nd it difcult to stop with all the upbeat smiles and party ing happening around you. Be careful with a close loved one. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You might have to make certain calls to cer tain people. You will feel a lot better once you do. Kick back and help others relax. You will see a prob lem in a different light as a result. Squeeze in a walk or some other form of ex ercise while you can. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You could become re sentful of someones need to be in control. Tension will build around your nances if you are not care ful. You seem to have the wit and personality to help lose the edge that others believe you have. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Your inner voice will encourage you to stay close to home and relax. You could be dealing with someone from a distance. You enjoy this persons calls, but you would like to visit with him or her more often. Why not schedule a mini-vacation together? LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You could nd yourself deep into conversations, which might cause you to lose track of time. Dont worry just enjoy it. You will be happy to hear someone elses news. A neighbor or cousin will seek you out, as he or she has some unusual infor mation. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Remain sensitive to a certain agreement that could cost you more than you initially anticipated. Be sure to clearly establish your limits, and others will honor them. Scheduling a fun get-together later in the summer will feel great. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You might opt for a summer sport this sum mer or a visit to someone you never see. Know that your attention means a lot to this person. Surprises seem to surround others. You might want to rethink a relationship. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Do what you feel, rath er than what you think you should do. You could pre vent a backre that way. If you start to feel angry or frustrated, do not lash out; instead, nd out what is really going on beneath the surface. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) You might want to see what is happening around you more clearly. A friend could invite you at the last minute to join him or her for a fun adventure. Do what feels right to you, and you cant go wrong. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) You could be more in touch with an old er relative than you re alize. This person would love it if you spent more time with him or her. Try to make that a possibility in stead of always making ex cuses. Do what feels right to you. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Reach out to someone at a distance. Your caring means much more than you realize to a person you rarely speak to. You might feel as if he or she does not make an adequate ef fort. Be direct in how you deal with an assertive in dividual. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Youll want to deal with one specic person directly, as he or she is pivotal to your well-being. You might not always get the answers you want, but this individual is as open as he or she can be. Allow yourself to be a little more vulnerable. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORY D EAR ABBY: My friends husband has been writ ing a novel for several years. He just self-pub lished it, and its avail able on Amazon. He gave me a copy, asked me to read it and en ter a great review on the Amazon page. The problem is the book is lled with misused and misspelled words, and there is missing punctuation. He even switched the names of two characters. (His wife, who is a perfec tionist, was his editor.) Aside from the fact that I dont want to n ish the book, I know he or my friend will ask me how I liked it. I dont want to lie because Im afraid if someone else brings these things to their attention, theyll know I didnt read it or think I should have told them. I know they will be embarrassed if I bring it to their atten tion. Frankly, I think its too late to say anything negative because the book has already been printed. I also dont want to cause hurt feel ings because I know how long he worked on this project and hes proud of it. How do I handle this? READER IN THE SOUTHWEST DEAR READER: Hes a friend, right? And youre only a reader, not a lit erary critic whose cred ibility will suffer if you dont point out ev ery aw. Find SOME THING you liked about the book and mention that on the Amazon page. You could call it a page turner because you had to turn from Page 1 to Page 2, didnt you? In a case like this, less is more. And remem ber, youre doing this in the capacity of being a friend, not an English teacher. DEAR ABBY: I have a friend whose son was involved in a shooting which ended in a death in her house. Should I send food, owers and a nice note in the mail or stand back and not intrude? I sent a text asking if she was OK and if I could do any thing for her family, but I dont know what else to do. We are more than acquaintances but less than great friends. UN SURE IN PENNSYLVANIA DEAR UNSURE: If the funeral has been held, your friend does not need owers. At a time like this, she could use some moral support. Call her and tell her you would like to bring some food over and ask what she may need. Then bring it to her, and be ready to listen if she wants to talk. Your presence and your car ing will be meaningful, because when a trag edy like this happens, people dont know what to say, which iso lates the person who is grieving. Dear Abby is written by Abi gail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was found ed by her mother, Pauline Phil lips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Friend has hard time finding a few kind words for bad book JEANNE PHILLIPS DEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGAR BIGARS STARS

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E6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, July 5, 2014 DEAN FOSDICK Associated Press Much of the creativi ty involved in crafting a cus tom-made beer starts with the plants you select. The modern palate pretty much demands some hops in beer, but beyond that, theres a lot of choices available, says Dennis Fisher, an organ ic farmer from Winterport, Maine. Fisher, who with his broth er Joe wrote a popular refer ence book for beginners, The Homebrewers Garden (Sto rey Publishing, 1998), says one of the most satisfying as pects of home brewing is pro ducing some or all of your own ingredients from scratch. Scratch brewing, the broth ers wrote, refers to the culti vation, preparation and use of hops, barley, malts and oth er non-barley grains, and ad juncts ranging from fruits to herbs to vegetables. Growing your own ingre dients ensures that the prod ucts are as organic, fresh and unique as possible. Home grown also is cheaper than store-bought, the Fishers say. The four basic ingredients needed for brewing are malt (malting provides the fer mented sugar that yeast feeds on to produce alcohol), hops (reduces spoilage and balanc es the sugars sweetness with a bitter avor), brewers yeast and water (about 90 percent of beers content). Hops are a particularly good (garden) choice because they thrive almost anywhere, says Dennis Fisher. They are also a great addition to a landscape big, attractive columns of greenery. If the water from your tap tastes good, then it also should taste good in the beer you make, Fisher says. But if its chlorinated, then you need to let it stand overnight to allow the chemicals to outgas be fore brewing with it. Adjuncts, in homebrew speak, are plants used to replace or complement hops to give beers distinctive avors, odors and colors. Just about any ower you can eat can be made into a beer, says Rebecca Kneen, an organic farmer and writer from Sorrento, British Colum bia, who wrote about backyard brewing in the new Ground breaking Food Gardens, By Niki Jabbour (Storey Publish ing). Its useful to experiment with them all though to de termine how much should be used and when they should be added, Kneen says. Some common and not so common home brewers gar den adjuncts include: Herbs: (Bittering) Sage, horehound, gentian, yarrow. (Flavoring) Juniper, rosemary, ginger, oregano, mint, thyme. (Aromatic) Lavender, lemon balm, chamomile. Flowers: Nasturtiums, wild roses, scented geranium leaves, daylilies and marigolds. Vegetables and fruits: Rhubarb, blackberries and el derberries, pumpkin, chili peppers, sorghum, apples. We like to add spruce tips to some beers, Fisher says. Its more of a wild-gathered than homegrown adjunct that in Colonial times was a hops substitute. For even greener beer, recy cle the brewing ingredients and their byproducts, Kneen says. You can compost them, feed them to pigs and sheep, put some into your chicken feed, she says. We use them heav ily as mulch ... The gray water (relatively clean wastewater) is used for irrigation on our pas tures. Thats the bulk of what comes out of our brewery. Hop to it: Plant what you need to brew beer AP FILE PHOTO This photo shows hop owers that are both ornamental and edible in a garden in Langley, Wash. Hops are an easy-to-grow perennial that greatly enhance a beers avor when picked fresh. AP PHOTO This photo shows louvered shutters that are very popular in American architecture. The shutters, which originally had movable slats, allowed air to circulate in the home. MELISSA KOSSLER DUTTON Associated Press Although glass and screens have eliminat ed the practical need for shutters, theyre still popular for decoration. They add another layer of thoughtful detailing to a house, says Ted Cleary, a landscape architect in Charlotte, N.C. But to get the right look, you still have to consider function when choosing and hanging shutters, ex perts say. Beauty in architecture, as with many objects, of ten stems from seeing a detail that illustrates its purpose, Cleary says. A pair of shutters can cost anywhere from $100 to more than $1,000. Some tips on choosing the right ones for your home: SIZE Originally, shutters were used to keep out weather, noise and ani mals; when closed, they had to cover the whole window. So shutter size is the most important thing to consider, says Lindsay Daniel, a Charlotte ar chitect, who agrees with Cleary that homeown ers must think function rst, not decoration. Make sure the shut ters meet and completely cover the window open ing. Otherwise, she says, the shutter looks like a stupid afterthought. This means that shut ters dont work on dou ble-width or picture windows, says Richard Taylor, an architect and president of RTA Studio in Dublin, Ohio. To my eye anyway, it looks ridic ulous, he says. And take care about their shape when hang ing shutters on arched windows, Cleary adds. Shutters are perfect ly legitimate on arched windows as long as the (closed) shutter covers it, he says. MATERIAL Shutters are primarily made of wood, compos ite material or vinyl. Vinyl shutters are typ ically mounted direct ly onto the side of the house, which means they break the rule about looking functional, Tay lor says. He prefers wood, which looks the most au thentic but does require regular maintenance, or composite products, a low-maintenance alter native. STYLES Louvered shutters, made with horizontally slated boards, are prob ably the most common style in America, Cleary says. When shutters served as the primary window covering, peo ple in hotter climates used louvered ones to allow fresh air into the house. Panel shutters have a traditional look. They are solid pieces that resem ble small doors, and are often inset with square or rectangle patterns. They were regularly used on Colonial-era homes in New England and were a good defense against snow and rain. Board and batten shut ters are made with three or four vertical boards of the same size connected with narrow horizontal boards. They have a rus tic appearance and were often used on country houses or barns. They are the easiest style for doit-yourselfers to make at home, Cleary says. HARDWARE Shutters look best when they are hung as though they are going to be opened and closed, Cleary says. That means using hinges and mount ing them onto the win dow casing not attach ing them to the house. Cleary also recom mends adding metal tie backs, sometimes called shutter dogs, to hold open shutters in place. The hardware, including shutter dogs and hinges, can cost up to $100 for a pair of shuttters. It looks a lot richer. Theres more depth to them when they are not pasted to the (house), he says. BE CONSISTENT Dont feel you have to put shutters on every window. Its better to have some windows without shutters than to put them on windows that are too wide for them. Dont use a shutter on one side of a window where a door or the cor ner of the house prevents you from adding its mate. Open and shut case: choosing and hanging the right shutters DEAN FOSDICK Associated Press Making a yard and a community more beau tiful begins at the curb. But that narrow space between sidewalk and street sometimes called a boulevard, me dian, hellstrip, parkway, verge or tree belt is a gardening challenge. For starters, its prob ably owned by the mu nicipality but falls to the homeowner to main tain. So the rst step in caring for it is to sort out what local rules allow. You need to go to the citys website if there are any questions about who owns what, said Evelyn Hadden, author of the new book Hell strip Gardening (Tim ber Press). The zoning laws should be posted online. Some cities have reg ulations where there can only be lawns there. Some say there cant be vegetables, but allow some kind of lawn alter native, she said. Some communities change their rules when people start growing gardens and the community gets behind them. Curb appeal can in crease property values for the whole neigh borhood, Hadden said. Curbside gardeners are pretty generous that way. Theyre working for the benet of every body. Even seedy-look ing parcels can become natural welcome mats when integrated with front yards. Curbside spaces are often heav ily trafcked, however, making them tough to cultivate. The ground is hard-packed, and plants can be crushed under foot. Gardening is tough at the curb



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BESTHOMECOOKING FOOD&PRICESON441 381E.BurleighBlvd., Ta vares,FL rf ntb OPENEVERYDAY 6:30AMto10:30PMBESTBREAKFASTINTOWN! b b bb Br e ak f ast Sp e ci a lsAllBreakfastSpecialsInclude CoffeeoranyDrink foodwit h large BREAKFAST, LUNC H AN DDINNERAll Yo u Can EatCatfishSunday Thursday AnyOmeletwith Potatoes&Toast 3PancakeswithBacon orHamorSausage WaffelwithBaconor HamorSausage 3PcsofFrench Toastwith BaconorHamor Sausage$599 DJOKOVIC, FEDERER ADVANCE AT WIMBLEDON, SPORTS B1OBAMA: President celebrates cultural diversity, immigrants on Fourth of July, A5 CAMPAIGN: Rick Scott visits The Villages to open ofce, A3 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Saturday, July 5, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 186 5 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED C5 COMICS E6 CROSSWORDS C5 DIVERSIONS E5 LEGALS C5 FAITH C1 NATION A5 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 WORLD A6 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8.88 / 73Thunderstorms 50 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comHabitat for Humanity of Lake-Sumter is set ting a record this year by investing more than $1 million in new home construction in Lake County alone, and the local organization is also restructuring and expanding its base with corporate and regional ofces throughout the two counties. Kent Adcock, chief executive ofcer of Habitat for Humani ty of Lake-Sumter, said the local agency wants to be more responsive and in collaboration with the local communities in the 1,700 square-mile service area that Habitat serves in its mission to provide sustainable home ownership for families earning from 30 to 80 percent of the area me dian income. The corporates back ofce moved its oper ations to its Spanish Springs location, 900 Main St., Suite 210, in The Villages this week, he said, site of Habitats human relations, pay roll, compliance and fund development. Adcock will be op erating out of The Vil lages, while also tak ing time about twice a week to travel and meet with staff at each of the regional ofces, including the Domestic Global Village ofce in Eustis and the Golden Trian gle ofce, also in Eustis. The other ofces are in Groveland for South Lake, in Wildwood for North Lake and Sum ter and in The Villages for corporate, Adcock said. The South Lake and Wildwood ofces are awaiting the nal build-out and should be operational by the end of July. The CEO said The Villages was an ideal site THE VILLAGES Habitat restructuring and expanding DAILY COMMERCIAL FILE PHOTO Silhouetted against the late morning sun, Steve Gallant from Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, works on framing a Habitat for Humanity house in Lady Lake in February. EMERY P. DALESIOAssociated PressKILL DEVIL HILLS, N.C. Proving far less damaging than feared, Hurricane Ar thur left tens of thousands of people without power Friday in a swipe at North Carolinas dangerously exposed Outer Banks, then brought lousy Fourth of July beach weather to the Northeast as it veered out to sea. The weather along the narrow barrier islands whose beaches draw hun dreds of thousands of tour ists every summer had already cleared by Fri day afternoon as Arthur scooted north and its out er bands scraped the Delaware and New Jersey shores. Forecasters predict ed the storm would weak en before its center moves over western Nova Scotia in Canada early Saturday. While state and local of cials worked to restore access to Hatteras Island and help those who had suffered storm and ooding damage, the effects of the hurricane were mostly conned to that part of the state. Farther south, the beaches were once again packed with people soaking up the sun. The North Carolina beaches are open for busi ness and theyre open for KIMBERLY HEFLINGAssociated PressWASHINGTON The troubled for-prot educa tion company Corinthian Colleges Inc. and the Education Department reached an agreement late Thursday that has 85 of the companys 100-plus cam puses going up for sale, and 12 others closing. Corinthian owns Ever est College, Heald College and WyoTech schools. It serves about 72,000 students in 26 states and On tario, Canada, and receives about $1.4 billion in feder al nancial student aid annually. The highest concentrations of students are in California, Florida and Tex as. Students generally re ceive career training in ar eas such as auto mechanics or health care. MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillardives@dailycommercial.comThe red-white-and-blue boom event of the summer launched in Lake County on Friday despite a few sprinkles of rain. Several Fourth of July activ ities started early Friday, including an 8 / a.m. F reedom Run 5k at Lake Sumter State College, South Lakes Fourth of July Festival at 9 / a.m. and Mount Doras Independence Day Parade that kicked off at 10 / a.m. w ell before many of the light showers started. Live bands, barbecue, ven dors, childrens games, dunk ing booths and other activities went on at the South Lake event in Lake David Park in Groveland as rain started to come down in the area. It doesnt look too bad, said Keith Hopper, as he pre pared to throw some balls at the dunking booth target. With a 40 percent chance of rain predicted for the day, many venues made some type of contingency plan. It didnt rain on Tavares pa rade, which started at 5 / p .m. as civic agencies, pageant winners, horseback riders, law enforcement and Shri ners on go-carts zipped along downtown. At nearby Wooton Park, Tavaress holiday festivities con tinued with vendors, games For-profit college to sell most campusesSeveral area schools at riskNorth Carolina coast survives Hurricane ArthurSEE HABITAT | A2SEE COLLEGE | A2SEE ARTHUR | A2 Lightning win holiday baseball game in Leesburg. See Page B1Fourth in Lake: parades, parties and patriotism PHOTOS BY MILLARD K. IVES AND LINDA CHARLTON / DAILY COMMERCIAL TOP LEFT: Colin Valentine, 4, marvels at the sight of his lit sparkler in front of Venetian Cove in Leesburg. TOP RIGHT: Spectators awaiting reworks line Venetian Cove. BOTTOM LEFT: People line up for carnival treats in Venetian Gardens. BOTTOM RIGHT: Groveland city council member Evelyn Wilson shows off patriotism. SEE FOURTH | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, July 5, 2014 HOW TO REACH US JULY 4CASH 3 . ............................................... 1-8-9 Afternoon . .......................................... 4-5-5 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 4-2-2-5 Afternoon . ....................................... 9-9-7-0FLORIDALOTTERY JULY 3FANTASY 5 . ........................... 5-10-16-24-36 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONSTEVE SKAGGS, publisher352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comPAUL RYAN, digital editor352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com.CALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com.for Habitats corporate operations. The Villages have been such strong and consistent supporters, both nan cially and with volunteers and this role strengthens that partnership, Adcock said. An open house and ribbon cutting of Habitats corporate ofce will be hosted 3-5 / p.m. July 23, and the public is invited. Afliated with Habitat International, Adcock said Habitat of Lake-Sumter has 13 homes in various stages of completion, including six houses in Lady Lake. To donate, volunteer or serve with Habitat, call 483-0434 or send e-mail to frontdesk@habitatls.org. HABITAT FROM PAGE A1 Everest has two loca tions in Orlando, another in Melbourne and sever al in the Tampa Bay area. Daytona Beach is home to a WyoTech campus. Heald has no campuses in Florida, but began offering online studies na tionwide in 2012. Jack Massimino, Corinthians chairman and chief ofcer, praised the agreement in a statement. This agreement allows our students to contin ue their education and helps minimize the per sonal and nancial issues that affect our 12,000 employees and their families, Massimino said. It also provides a blueprint for allowing most of our campuses to contin ue serving their students and communities under new ownership. The company declined to identify the schools that will close. Ted Mitchell, the undersecretary at the Education Department, said the agreement will pro tect students futures and fulll the departments responsibilities to taxpayers moving forward. Ensuring that Corinthian students are served well remains our rst and most important priority, and we will continue to work with Corinthian ofcials and the indepen dent monitor on behalf of the best interests of students and taxpayers, Mitchell said. The department put Santa Ana, Califor nia-based Corinthian on heightened nancial monitoring last month with a 21-day waiting pe riod for federal funds. That came after Corinthian failed to provide ad equate paperwork and comply with the departments requests to address concerns about the companys practices. The department said the concerns includ ed allegations of falsify ing job placement data used in marketing claims to prospective students, and allegations of altered grades and attendance. The sides earlier reached an initial agree ment that allowed the company to obtain an immediate $16 million in federal student aid funds to keep operating. But a more detailed plan was to be worked out that spelled out the future of the campuses. Under the terms of the agreement, the campuses will inform students of their options and each campus will have a plan that allows students to complete their program, if they choose to do so. The company has agreed to only use federal aid funds for daily operations and will hire an independent monitor. Under a number of circumstances, students will be eligi ble for a refund paid for using a reserve fund of at least $30 million from Corinthians funds. The company faces multiple state and federal investigations. California Attorney General Kamala Harris has sought a court order that would force the company to stop ad vertising and to start tell ing prospective students that it is looking to sell or shut down its colleges. COLLEGE FROM PAGE A1 tourists, Gov. Pat McCrory said. The umbrellas are going up as we speak right now. Arthur struck North Carolina as a Category 2 storm with winds of 100 mph late Thursday, taking about ve hours to move across the far eastern part of the state. At the height of the storm, more than 40,000 people lost power, and the rush of water from the ocean on one side and the sound on the other side buckled part of North Carolina Highway 12 in a spot on Hatteras Island that was breached in Hur ricane Irene in 2011. Doz ens of workers were head ing to x the highway, and the Department of Trans portation said it was condent the road would reopen Saturday as long as an underwater sonar test of a key bridge showed no problems. No injuries or deaths were reported. After praising emergency ofcials and saying the state dodged a bullet, McCrory said he was heading to the beach himself for an Independence Day parade in Southport. By Friday afternoon, the hurricane had weakened to a Category 1 storm with 80 mph winds. Its center was about 170 miles (270 km) south-southwest of Chatham, Massachusetts. While the Northeast wasnt expected to take a direct hit, the rain from Arthurs outer bands was disrupting the holiday. Fireworks displays in New Jersey and Maine were postponed until lat er in the weekend. Tropical storm warnings were in effect for coastal areas as far north as Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Tropical storm watches and warnings were in effect for Nova Scotia and New Brunswick in southeast ern Canada. Still, the rst hurricane known to strike the U.S. on July 4 caused some frayed nerves on North Carolinas Outer Banks a 200mile string of narrow bar rier islands with about 57,000 permanent residents and around 250,000 visitors on most summer weekends. A mandatory evacuation was issued for the southern Outer Banks. But while most vis itors left, many residents stayed, accustomed to hurricanes that strike the area on average about every four or ve years. Jesse and Carol Wray rode out the storm in their home in Salvo on North Carolina Highway 12. They said the island was under several feet of water at the height of the storm. The six-foot-tall lamp post at the end of their driveway was under wa ter except for its top, and that was after the sound a quarter-mile away receded several feet. Theres a lot of damage to a lot of houses around here, Wray said. Everything ooded out. All the businesses are ood ed, and there was a lot of wind damage. The bulk of the ooding and other damage on Hatteras Island appeared to have happened in the islands midsection in the villages of Rodanthe and Salvo. Farther south in Buxton, Angela Tawes is eager for the road to reopen, the ferries to resume and tourists to return with their money. Were all just holding our breath and hoping right now, said Tawes, whose family owns a grocery store, Conners Supermarket. Arthur is the rst named storm of the Atlantic hur ricane season. It is the ear liest in the season a hurri cane has made landfall in North Carolina. McCrory said people in states to the northeast should need to warn ings about Arthur, even if North Carolina came through better than ex pected. ARTHUR FROM PAGE A1 AP PHOTO This aerial photo provided by the U.S. Coast Guard shows ooding caused by Hurricane Arthur on the Outer Banks of North Carolina.and other activities. As at simi lar events throughout the county, American ags draped a lot of the park as well as attire on visitors. Branch and Dean was the featured musical act and played two onehour sets, which included The Dash and Glad Shes Not an An gel. Co-lead singer Marlon Dean said he was glad to spend his Fourth of July performing. This is what we do for a living, said Dean, who along with co-sing er Steve Branch, are Celebrity Am bassadors to the National Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. Eustis Red, White and Blue 4th of July Celebration was held at Ferran Park, which included a sea of white vendor tents. Like other public holiday celebrations across Lake County, a number of can didates were present, including school board candidate Nancy L. Muenzmay of Eustis. She was passing out campaign materials at her booth. Its a good way to gauge sup port, Muenzmay said. At Venetian Gardens in Leesburg, there were several free activities for families to enjoy, including a Leesburg Lightning baseball game against the Winter Park Diamond Dogs at Pat Thomas Stadium-Buddy Lowe Field. There also was a concert with Nashville artist Ron ny McKinley to celebrate Americas 238th birthday. But as early as 4 / p .m., many peo ple could be seen picnicking, play ing football and enjoying other activities along the nearby Vene tian Cove, and others were just sit ting and waiting for the 9:15 / p .m., $25,000, 25-minute reworks show choreographed to music to hit the sky I know we are celebrating our independence, and what better way to celebrate than with re works, said 65-year-old Daniel Robinson, sitting in a chair along the cove. Some people got an early start on reworks. About 4:30 / p .m., brothers Colin, 4, and James Valen tine, 8, and their cousin Aiden Rasor, 6, could be seen ring off spar klers, smoke bombs and snappers in front of Venetian Cove. They are having fun, said Lind say Baldy, mother of the Valentine children, watching them play. Fireworks stands were in busi ness for the holiday, including a white Galaxy booth at the corner of County Road 33 and U.S. High way 27, just outside of Leesburg. Various reworks were for sale there including recrackers, mor tar shells and a $799 giant box of assorted reworks. James Wood, of Groveland, was sifting through the booth early Fri day as clouds hovered above. He had little concern about the rain. It always rains this time of the year, Wood said. FOURTH FROM PAGE A1

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Saturday, July 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LEESBURG New elementary principal to host meet-and-greetNewly appointed principal at Leesburg Elementary, Dr. Patrick Galatowitsch, will host a meet-andgreet event for the public at 5 / p.m., on Tuesday at the school, 2229 South St. Formerly principal at Fern Creek Elementary in Orlando for the past ve years and an Orange County Public Schools administrator for the past 25 years, Galatowitsch is joining Lake County Schools for the 2014-2015 school year. For information, call the school at 352365-6308.LADY LAKE Uncle Donalds Farm hosts Wednesday Camp for kidsActivities for this fun camp at Uncle Donalds Farm, 2713 Grifn Ave., in Lady Lake include handson experiences with farm animals, nature studies, brushing horses, games and more as they spend a day on the farm. Kids ages 6-14 can participate every Wednesday through Aug. 13 from 9:45 / a.m. to 3 / p.m. Cost for the camp is $25 per child per day and when you bring a sibling or friend admission is discounted. Kids need to bring a bag lunch. For reservations and information, call 352-753-2882.LEESBURG Foundation donates $10,000 for scholarshipsA $10,000 grant has been donated to Lake-Sumter State College by the Hans & Cay Jacobsen Foundation for the Johnson Scholars STEM Scholarship program, to fund schol arships for students majoring in science, technology, engineering and math. The Johnson Scholarship program partnership is unique because it is a matching grant between local colleges, including LSSC and the University of Central Florida in Orlando. For information about LSSC programs, call 352-365-3518, or go to www.lssc.edu.MOUNT DORA Volunteers invited to combat invasive air potatoesResidents including children are asked to assist in the release of leaf beetles, which tar get only the air potato vine at this event hosted by the Lake County Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area, at 9:30 / a.m., on Friday at Palm Island Park, 411 S. Tremain St. No registration is necessary for the event. Participants should dress accordingly and activities and games will be provided for children after the event. Call Brooke Mofs, Lake County UF/IFAS extension agent, at 352343-4101, or email to Burnb48@u. edu.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comThe 1,300-acre employment center being planned in Mount Dora has been named the Wolf Branch Innovation District at Mount Dora. The marketing mate rial for the district was approved at the July 1 city council meeting, according to Planning and Development director Mark Reggentin. He said they were looking for a unique either physical, geographic, or historical marker to brand the area and, as we went through the options, the Wolf Branch name just kept coming up as something that cer tainly wasnt overused it sort of rose to the top as something to build around. A city council agen da states, in regards to Wolf Branch Creek, that This is unique in the fact that it is contained within the district and is a rare creek to sink hole connection that has some uniquely historical lore. Reggentin said the innovation part of the name ts the type of in dustries that should come into the district. What were looking at is more cutting-edge type industries, either in terms of health care or education, and then the support facilities that would spin off of that, Reggentin said. So when you take a look at the mix of uses that were outlined in the market analysis, those were all sort of leading edge, innova tive type industries that t into this areaso MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillardives@dailycommercial.comPolitical reworks start ed early in Sumter County this morning. In an ofce packed with telephones, campaign signs, American ags, men in suits with ear pieces, and what seemed like hundreds of supporters, Gov. Rick Scott Friday morning kicked off the grand opening of his campaign ofce nestled in the heart of The Villages. The ofce is in the 900 block of Old Mill Run and di rectly across the street from Lake Sumter Landing, where Scott held a campaign ral ly in 2010. Telling the crowd it was a great place to spend the Fourth of July, Scott shook hands and posed for photographs with support ers. He gave a short cam paign speech, where he touted how much taxes had been cut and unemployment rates dropped during his stint in ofce. At one point, he led supporters in a chant of Lets Keep Working. He also stressed the need for government to stay out of peoples lives. This is not the govern ments country but our country, said Scott to a round of applause, standing a few feet from a painting of Abraham Lincoln, Ronald Reagan and other Republican presidents. The ofce will be staffed by Republican volunteers who will answer phones, distribute bumper stickers and posters and conduct oth er efforts to get Scott elected to his second term in his run against his presumed opponent, Democratic front-runner and former Republican Gov. Charlie Crist. In the retirement community thats dominated by Republicans, Scott said it was an ideal place for a campaign ofce. Theres good grass root support here, Scott said. State Rep, Maureen OToole, R-Lady Lake, introduced Scott to the crowd. After giving a speech, he spoke with more sup porters outside, including Frank Cox, a member of the Republican Club of Sumter Landing. I cant think of a bet ter place to put an ofce in The Villages, Cox said. The Lake Sumter Landing square, or The Square, as it is often referred to, has been the site of a number of visits by Re publican candidates, including Sarah Palin, for mer presidential candidate Mitt Romney and running mate U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan. The ofce is the rst for Scott in The Villages and one of about 40 in the state, according to his press sec retary. Also in attendance was Sumter County Sheriff Bill Farmer and Sumter County Commissioner Don Burgess. This is so great for Sum ter County, Burgess said. The ofce hours will be 10 / a.m. to 8 / p .m. Monday through Saturday. MOUNT DORA Employment center gets new name CARLOS E. MEDINAHalifax Media GroupOxford Downs has started its state-mandated spate of quarter horse racing in south Marion Coun ty, which will continue through Thursday when the venue meets the regu latory minimum to operate a card room and simulcast wagering facility. The resumption of racing at the track, located off U.S. 301 on Southeast 177th Place near The Vil lages, renewed objections by some of the states horse racing associations, at least one of which has led for an injunction against the track. The track held one day of racing in April, also to meet regulatory requirements. The current 10day session of races began Tuesday. Its preposterous. The state of Florida never ceas es to amaze me, said Kent Stirling, president of the Florida Horsemens Benev olent and Protective Association. The association is part of the United Florida Horse men, which includes the Quarterhorse racing gets underway near The Villages HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO Riders cross the nish line during opening day of quarter horse racing at Oxford Downs. THE VILLAGESGov. Scott speaks at campaign office launch PHOTOS BY MILLARD K. IVES / DAILY COMMERCIAL Gov. Rick Scott signs autographs for his supporters Friday morning as he opened his campaign ofce in The Villages. Gov. Rick Scott gives a speech Friday. BRANDON LARRABEEThe News Service of FloridaTALLAHASSEE Independence Day and the accompanying reworks shows werent technically supposed to get underway until Friday, but state government seemed to be on holiday for most of the week. Democrats got the party out of the way early with their annual fundrais ing soiree last Saturday, though they ditched the red (for obvious reasons) and white in their newly renamed Leadership Blue Gala. Gov. Rick Scott toured the state to thank veterans, an appropriate run-up to the holiday and a potential political boon to his re-election campaign. The capital city itself was largely quiet, with the highest prole event being the swearing-in ceremony for new Supreme Court Chief Justice Jorge Labarga, the rst Cuban-Amer ican to hold that position. If theres a reason Florida can go from voting for Barack Obama in 2008 to Scott in 2010 and then back to Obama in 2012 aside from political schizophrenia its turnout. SEE CENTER | A4SEE RACING | A4Politics heat up ahead of holidaySEE POLITICS | A4

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, July 5, 2014 thats where that moni ker came from. The Daily Commer cial previously reported that the district, located around State Road 46 and Round Lake Road, will be 1,300 acres with an estimated 730 acres for industrial relat ed activities, around 300 acres for ofces, around 100 acres for retail, and the remaining acres being used for in stitutional usages, like educational institu tions or churches, and some limited residential space. Reggentin said they now will start working more closely with the Lake County Economic Development Department as well as the Metro Orlando Economic Development Commission to put the information out there. He said the market ing will be geared more toward site selectors, developers, and people doing future speculation, and when the Wekiva Parkway is built they will be dealing with end users. Reggentin said the development of the dis trict will be driven by private development, which he believes will be motivated by the parkway construction taking place from 2017 to 2021. CENTER FROM PAGE A3 Ocala-based Florida Thoroughbred Breeders and Owners Association and the Florida Quarter Horse Racing Association, which call the Oxford operation a front to open a card room. Its a phony baloney deal they are pulling off. They set up a dummy horsemens group made up of family members. Its a travesty, Stirling said. Despite the objec tions, the Division of Pari-mutuel Wagering has issued the required li censes and is overseeing the racing to make sure it adheres to state law. Tony Mendola, one of the owners of the track, said he is surprised by the mean-spirited accusations about his opera tion, which he said is an honest effort to expand horse racing. I guess were just an easy target. There are a host a problems inside the entire industry that they should be focusing on rather than us. Were going to continue to act like gentlemen and do what we believe is right for the people involved, as well as the animals, Mendola said. Mendola is the rst to admit the facilities are lacking at the track. There is no clubhouse or permanent public restrooms. Concessions are limited to water and soda, and wagers are taken at a small mobile building. We didnt do any aggressive advertising because we dont want the public believing this is our end product. Were not going to ever become Churchill Downs, but there is a process to it, Mendola said. We have no revenue. Everything right now, the purses, the expenses come out of our pocket. After we start our card room and simulcast fa cility we will be able to have a real purse structure. The lack of facilities is what sparked the FT BOA to le for an injunc tion April 30, arguing that the county allowed the facility to open de spite not meeting any of the site plans that were initially submitted. A hearing on the matter is scheduled for Sept. 2. On Thursday, a letter from an attorney rep resenting the FTBOA was sent to the Marion County Board of County Commissioners detailing the lack of facili ties and asking them to attend a performance to see for themselves. Lonny Powell, FTBOA executive vice president and CEO, was not immediately available for comment Thursday. Mendola called the FTBOAs action frivolous and said the facil ities were known to the county, which issued the permits to open. Construction on the clubhouse will begin in a few weeks, after nal permits are issued. The facility is expected to open in December, he said. The state requires a quarter horse permit holder to run at least 20 performances of racing, with eight races per performance. The track is holding two perfor mances per day to meet the requirement. Some of the hors es are racing twice per day, which is a frequen cy which is unheard of in recognized quarter horse racing, according the FTBOAs attor neys letter to the com mission. Mendola said the races are 110-yard dashes and there are state and track veterinarians on the grounds. The safety of the jockeys and horses is paramount. We have had no incidents, he said. Many of the horses that race at the track are owned by people with ties to track ofcials and employees. The horsemens group, which rep resents horse owners and trainers, is a newly formed entity called the Central Florida Horsemens Association. Mendola led the articles of incorporation for the group with the state. Again, Mendola said, without revenue for purses, attracting hors es from other tracks is near impossible. The horses at the track are racing quarter horses that have raced at Hi aleah and Louisiana Downs. Weve had some serious inquiries, but right now the purses are not where they can make a commitment to send their horses, he said. We have some good horse racing and we want to put on good horse racing. We are moving toward that but, like any other track in the country, we cant do it without the revenue of the card room and simulcasting. RACING FROM PAGE A3 The state requires a quarter horse permit holder to run at least 20 performances of racing, with eight races per performance. In presidential election years, just about every one who is politically in volved votes. In midterm years, the electorate tends to be older, whiter and more conservative. Democrats are hoping to somehow turn that formula around this year, or at least lessen the swing, as they work to get former Gov. Charlie Crist his old job back and protect the gains in Congress and the Legislature that they made two years ago. That was also a theme when former President Bill Clinton spoke at the partys fundraising dinner Saturday night in Broward County. We have to be creative in how we reach people and how we get them to the polls, Clinton told a crowd of more than 1,500 supporters who paid up to $250 to hear the former presi dent speak. If were go ing to preserve democracy, real democracy, weve got to show up. Displaying his ency clopedic knowledge of politics, Clinton illus trated his point by saying that Democrat Alex Sink should have won a spe cial election earlier this year to replace the late U.S. Rep. C.W. Bill Young in a Pinellas County con gressional district. Sink was defeated by Youngs onetime aide David Jolly. Alex Sink won the in dependent votes by almost twice the margin President Obama did. But the registered Democrats did not turn out, Clinton said, noting that Demo cratic Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe won his election because black voter turnout matched that in the general election. If they can do it, you can do it, Clinton said. The Clinton event raised $1.1 million topping previous earnings for the annual Leader ship Blue Gala fundrais er, formerly called the Jefferson-Jackson Din ner and nearly 1,600 supporters were expect ed to attend the event at the Westin Diplomat Resort & Spa, according to Florida Democratic Par ty Chairwoman Allison Tant. As far as the larger goal defeating Scott Tant promised that 2014 would feature the largest eld plan that the Florida Democratic Party has ever seen. And U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, who also serves as the chairwoman of the Democratic National Committee, said the DNC has created a vast and sophisticated voter le. DEATH NOTICESMargie HicksMargie Hicks, 77, of Leesburg, died Thursday, July 3, 2014. Ar rangements by PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, Leesburg.James A. PerkinsJames A. Perkins, 84, of Leesburg, died Tuesday, July 1, 2014. Ar rangements by PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, Leesburg.IN MEMORY POLITICS FROM PAGE A3 NIGEL COOK / DAYTONA BEACH NEWS-JOURNALMarvin Sherzer, a certied music practitioner, plays for stroke patient Dan Mongosa at Florida Hospital Oceanside. SKYLAR SWISHERHalifax Media GroupORMOND BEACH Marvin Sherzer didnt touch the piano keys for more than four decades. Today, the 67-year-old certied music practitioner provides sooth ing sounds to patients recovering at Florida Hospital Oceanside after taking a 46-year hiatus from the instrument. Therapeutic music is played at the patients bedside to relieve pain and anxiety. We bring a human touch to a patient who is alone, Sherzer said. Hes in a strange environment. Hes overly concerned about his health. Without any pharmaceuti cal or any invasive procedures, we can bring him distraction, comfort and enrichment. The son of a musician who worked for Disney, Sherzer traded the piano for the pitching mound when he was a teenager grow ing up in Philadelphia. He played two years in the minor leagues and then went on to have a career in the insurance business. During that time, he never thought of the piano an instrument his father loved and he had learned as a child. Then his dad entered hospice in 2008. A musician played the harp during his fathers dying days, and it soothed him. When his mother died a year later, Sherzer started taking lessons. Remembering the positive effect music had on his father in hospice, Sherzer studied to become a cer tied music practitioner. His role is more than entertainer. He plays music at the patients bedside spe cically tailored to the condition. Music has the power to relax and distract, Sherzer said What other modality can put a baby to sleep like Brahms Lulla by and inspire men during times of war? he said. On Thursday, Sherzer rolled his keyboard into a patient room on a cart. A thick binder lled with sheet music accompanied him. Sherzer works four days a week at Florida Hospital Oceanside, which serves patients recovering from strokes and traumatic injuries. Dan Mongosa, 50, rested in a bed still exhausted from a strenuous day of physical therapy. On June 2, Mongosa suffered a stroke that paralyzed his left side. He is ex pected to make a full recovery, but it will require a long period of ther apy. You going to warm up with Cho pin or Mozart? Mongosa asked. Sherzer started with Bach. Then he moved to Beethovens Fur Elise. He nished with The Blue Danube, a waltz written by Austri an composer Johann Strauss II. A typical session lasts about 30 min utes. Mongosa said the music made him forget he was in a hospital. In stead, the classical songs reminded him of watching gure skating on television during the Winter Olympics with his wife. It puts you in a peaceful place, said Mongosa, an Edgewater resident who works for Daytona Beach-based Teledyne Oil and Gas. You dont think about anything but the music. It makes the pain less noticeable. Sherzer is happy with his new job. While working in the insur ance business, customers never seemed happy to see him. Now, he watches worried looks turn to smiles. The biggest compliment Sherzer says he receives: A patient in pain falls asleep.Hospital music man hits healing note Associated PressFORT LAUDERDALE Fireght ers were called to a Fort Lauderdale home to rescue a pet parrot that had gotten itself stuck high up in a tree. The owner of the macaw named Sweetie called Fort Lauderdale Fire Rescue after the bird escaped the home and became stuck in the tree as a storm approached Thurs day afternoon. Deputy Fire Chief Timothy Heiser says that according to the owner, the bird can y around the house but it has trouble when ying higher in the trees outside. A ladder truck was called to the home, and a reghter climbed up to the bird. Heiser says that the bird was res cued unharmed after a few minutes, though Sweetie did bite the reghters hand a few times.Firefighters rescue pet parrot stuck in tree

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Saturday, July 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 WILDWOOD CYCLERY rfrnfrt BikesforEvery Te rain&Budget DARLENE SUPERVILLEAssociated PressWASHINGTON Cel ebrating the ethnic diversity of America, Presi dent Barack Obama said more than two dozen for eign-born service members who became U.S. cit izens at the White House on the Fourth of July are vivid reminders that welcoming immigrants is central to our way of life. He pleaded anew for new immigration policies, saying the vast range of backgrounds and experiences that has made America a melt ing pot for more than 200 years also makes the country stronger. He ar gued that the system must be retooled for the U.S. to remain the greatest nation on earth. The basic idea of wel coming immigrants to our shores is central to our way of life, it is in our DNA, Obama said after the 25 service members representing 15 countries raised their right hands and pledged allegiance to the United States. From all these dif ferent strands, we make something new here in America. And thats why, if we want to keep at tracting the best and brightest from beyond our borders, were going to have to x our immi gration system, which is broken, he said. Pass common-sense immi gration reform. The immigration issue is earning renewed at tention because of the inux to the U.S. of tens of thousands of unaccompanied children from Central America. Under U.S. law, they must be returned to their home countries, angering immigration advocates who already take issue with Obamas enforcement of deportations. They want Obama to allow the chil dren to stay. At the same time, Obama blames House Republicans for delaying action on legislation covering the millions already living in the U.S. illegally. A comprehensive mea sure the Senate passed last summer has been blocked by House leaders who also have done little to advance their own im migration proposals. Obama announced earlier this week that, as a result of inaction on Capitol Hill, he will pur sue non-legislative ways he can adjust U.S. immigration policy on his own. He scheduled a trip to Texas next week, mostly to raise money for Democratic candidates, but plans not to visit the border. Im going to keep doing everything I can to keep making our immigration system smarter and more efcient, Obama said Friday. Across the country, more than 100 demon strators, most in support of immigrants, gathered again Friday outside a U.S. Border Patrol sta tion in Murrieta, Califor nia, where the agency in tends to process some of the immigrants who have ooded the Texas border with Mexico. Earlier this week a crowd of protesters blocked buses carrying women and children mi grants who were own in from overwhelmed Texas facilities. Later, Obama and his wife, Michelle, welcomed hundreds of service members and their fam ilies, including the new citizens, to an all-Amer ican barbecue on the South Lawn. Obama said that since the nations founding 238 years ago the U.S. has become the great est democratic, econom ic and military force the world has ever known and a beacon for others looking on from beyond its borders. TOM RAUMAssociated PressWASHINGTON Unions representing government workers are expanding while or ganized labor has been shedding private sector members over the past half-century. A majority of union members today now have ties to a govern ment entity, at the feder al, state or local levels. Roughly 1-in-3 public sector workers is a union member, compared with about 1-in-15 for the private sector workforce last year, according to the Bureau of Labor Sta tistics. Overall, 11.3 per cent of wage and sala ry workers in the United States are unionized, down from a peak of 35 percent during the mid1950s in the strong postWorld War II recovery. The typical union worker now is more like ly to be an educator, of ce worker or food or service industry employ ee rather than a con struction worker, au toworker, electrician or mechanic. Far more women than men are among the union-label ranks. In a blow to public sector unions, the Supreme Court ruled this week that thousands of health care workers in Illinois who are paid by the state cannot be required to pay fees that help cover a unions cost of collective bargaining. The justices said the practice violates the First Amendment rights of nonmembers who dis agree with stances taken by unions. The ruling was nar rowly drawn, but it could reverberate through the universe of unions that represent government workers. The case in volved home-care workers for disabled people who are paid with Med icaid funds administered by the state. Also in June, a Califor nia judge declared unconstitutional the states teacher tenure, dismissal and layoff laws. The judge ordered a stay of the decision, pending an appeal by the state and teachers union. The basic structure of the labor union move ment has changed, reecting changes in the economy, said Ross Baker, a political science professor at Rutgers University. Manufacturing is a diminishing segment of the economy. Also, a lot of the manufacturing thats being done today is being done nonunion. Union members continue to be a powerful political force in politics, and Baker said he didnt see the role of unions di minishing. I just think the colors of the col lars are changing, Bak er said. Associated PressNEW YORK High-ranking chowhound Joey Jaws Chestnut dropped to one knee and proposed to his longtime girlfriend before Fridays annual hot dog eating contest, then packed away 61 franks and buns to hold onto his coveted mus tard yellow winners belt. The San Jose, California, resident fell far short of his record last year of 69 dogs and buns, but he still easily beat second-place nisher Matt Stonie, also of San Jose, who downed 56. Winning was the only option, the newly engaged champion said afterward. I wasnt going to taint today with a loss. Chestnut took a quick timeout be fore the annual Nathans Famous Fourth of July Hot Dog Eating Contest at Coney Island to make it ofcial with his longtime girlfriend, Neslie Ricasa, who is also a compet itive eater. In the womens division, defend ing champion Sonya Black Widow Thomas lost her title to Miki Sudo. Associated PressLOS ANGELES The California Highway Patrol said Friday it is investigating video of one of its ofcers straddling a woman and punching her in the head as she lay on the shoulder of a Los Angeles freeway. The woman had been walking on Interstate 10 west of downtown Los Angeles, endanger ing herself and people in trafc, and the of cer was trying to restrain her, CHP Assistant Chief Chris OQuinn said at a news conference. Passing Driver David Diaz recorded the Tues day incident and provided it to local TV stations. The ofcer is on ad ministrative leave while the patrol investigates. He has not been identi ed. OQuinn said the woman, who would not give her name, was un injured and is undergo ing psychiatric evalua tion. He said the ofcer was answering a report of a pedestrian on the freeway. When he found the woman, she start ed walking down an offramp and then turned around, walked back onto the freeway and started wandering into lanes, OQuinn said. Thats when the incident occurred. OQuinn said the vid eo only shows a small part of what transpired. When the video begins, the ofcer already is on top of the wom an and delivering blows. She can be seen wrig gling and trying to sit up. Obama: US always has been a nation of immigrants CHARLES DHARAPAK / AP President Barack Obama and rst lady Michelle Obama greet military families as they host an Independence Day celebration on the South Lawn at the White House in Washington on Friday.Unions representing govt workers are gaining SOURCE: Bureau of Labor Statistics APLabors declining mightThe number of unionized workers in the U.S. has been in decline for decades, now making up less than 12 percent of the workforce. UNION MEMBERSHIP 070314: Chart shows change in union membership as percentage of wage and salary earners; 2c x 3 inches; with all related stories; KSV; ETA 6 p.m. Editors Note: It is mandatory to include all sources that accompany this graphic when repurposing or editing it for publication 0 5 10 15 20 25 percent 0 10 20 30 40 percent Private Public 2013: 11.3% 1983: 20.1% 35.3% 6.7% Percentage of U.S. workers in unions 2013 union membership by sector Video shows cop punching woman on freeway Chestnut gets mustard yellow belt and fiancee

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, July 5, 2014 DAVID MCHUGHAssociated PressKIEV, Ukraine Fighting in eastern Ukraine left at least nine Ukrainian soldiers dead Friday, as government troops pressed their offensive against pro-Russian insurgents using heavy artillery and combat jets and prospects of a truce appeared dim. Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko said Ukraine was ready to conduct another round of talks between repre sentatives from Ukraine, Rus sia and the rebels on Saturday, but didnt name their venue. Two previous rounds of such negotiations held during a 10day cease-re have yielded no visible progress, but they brought the warring parties together for the rst time. Moscow strongly pushed for extending the truce and holding more talks in an ap parent hope to negotiate a settlement that would allow it to secure a degree of inu ence over the neighbor. The continuing ghting is putting more pressure on Russian President Vladimir Putin, who has been facing increasingly angry nationalist de mands to send troops to help the insurgency a move that would inevitably trigger crip pling Western sanctions. Ukraines National Security Council chief Andriy Paru biy said Friday that Rus sia was massing troops near the Ukrainian border and claimed that it let insurgents attack the Ukrainian border posts from its side. The state ments could not be inde pendently veried. The two neighbors, who share a 1,250-mile border that is unmarked and unguard ed outside of a few check points, have been trading claims and counterclaims ever since Ukraine began ghting pro-Russia separatists in April. The government said nine troops were killed and 13 others were wounded in Fridays ghting in the east, according to the Interfax news agency. It did not elaborate on where or how the deaths occurred. Valentyn Nalyvaychenko, the head of Ukraines SBU se curity service, told journalists that over the past four days 20 Russian tanks or armored vehicles had illegally crossed the border to take part in the insurgency. Ukraine says Russia is arm ing and supporting the separatists, a charge that Russia denies. For its part, Moscow has repeatedly accused Ukrainian troops of ring shells that landed on the Russian side and on one occasion last month hit a Russian border post, wound ing one customs ofcer. Rus sian border guards said 10 ar tillery shells ew from the Ukrainian side Friday, but no one was injured. It is nearly impossible to prove or dispel the claims from the opposing sides, since the ghting consists of inter mittent clashes between small units with no xed front line and it is deadly dangerous for journalists and other observers to travel around. Five jour nalists have been killed cov ering the conict and several teams of observers from the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe have been kidnapped by rebels. Russia has proposed host ing both OSCE observers and Ukrainian ofcers at its bor der checkpoints to prove it wasnt fueling the mutiny. The Russian Foreign Ministry on Friday accused Poroshenkos government of dragging its feet on hold ing another round of negotiations to resume a truce and accused it of using cluster munitions against civilians. Parubiy said government forces were attacking rebel po sitions in eastern Ukraine with artillery and planes and that 17 villages had been recap tured since a unilateral ceasere expired Monday. He said Ukrainian forces now controlled 23 of the 36 local re gions within the Donetsk and Luhansk provinces that have declared independence. RYAN LUCAS and QASSIM ABDUL-ZAHRAAssociated PressBAGHDAD Despite mounting pres sure to step aside, Iraqs Nouri al-Maliki vowed Friday not to aban don his bid for anoth er term as prime minis ter and pledged to stay on until the Sunni mil itants who have over run much of the coun try are defeated. The sharp words are certain to prolong the political impasse grip ping Iraq, which is fac ing urgent demands for a new government that can hold the nation to gether in the face of an onslaught that threatens to cleave it in three along ethnic and sec tarian lines. The offensive by mil itants who have swept across much of north ern and western Iraq since last month has been fueled in part by grievances among the countrys Sunni Muslim minority with al-Maliki and his Shiite-led government. Al-Maliki, a Shiite who has been prime minister since 2006, has been accused by former allies and others of monopolizing power and contributing to the crisis by failing to promote reconciliation with Sunnis. The U.S. has urged the formation of a more inclusive government but has not explicitly called for al-Maliki to bow out. In what has been seen as a rebuke of al-Maliki, Iraqs top Shiite cleric, Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, has pressed lawmakers to quickly form a new government that can confront the militant threat and unite the country. Lawmakers failed in their rst ses sion of parliament on Tuesday to make any progress. On Friday, al-Sistani lamented the inability of political lead ers to agree on a new prime minister and urged them to redou ble their efforts, a cler ic who represents him told worshippers in a sermon in the holy city of Karbala. Al-Malikis State of law bloc won the most parliamentary seats in April elections, which would traditionally make him the leading candidate to head a new government. But al-Maliki failed to gain a majority in the leg islature, meaning he needs allies to form a government. That has set the stage for intense wrangling over the makeup of a coalition and, above all, who will be prime minister. Al-Maliki made clear on Friday his determi nation to stay on for a third consecutive term or at least until he has crushed the insur gency I will never give up the nomination for the post of prime minister, he said in a statement issued by his ofce. YOUSUR ALHLOUAssociated PressJERUSALEM Israe li police clashed with rock-throwing Palestinian protesters in Jerusa lem on Friday as thou sands mourned at the funeral for an Arab teen who Palestinians say was killed by Israeli ex tremists in a revenge at tack. Palestinian militants, meanwhile, red rockets and mortars from the Gaza Strip into Isra el, and the Jewish state later carried out sever al airstrikes on what it described as Hamas terror targets in Gaza. There were no immediate reports of casualties. Also, the Israeli mil itary said its troops opened re after spotting two Palestinians planting explosives near the Gaza border fence. An ambulance carried the body of 16-year-old Mohammed Abu Kh deir, wrapped in a Pal estinian ag and traditional headscarf, to a mosque in the east Je rusalem neighborhood where he lived. Then mourners carried the open casket through the crowd to a cemetery. During the proces sion, scores of masked Palestinians threw rocks at Israeli police on duty nearby, and they responded with stun grenades, spokes man Micky Rosenfeld said. He said more than 2,000 people attended the funeral. Rosenfeld said police also clashed with hundreds of Palestinian pro testers in other neigh borhoods in the eastern part of the city, which has been rocked by vio lence since Abu Khdeirs burned body was found Wednesday in a forest after he was seized near his home. At least 13 Israeli ofcers were injured by rock-throwers, with six taken to the hospital, police spokeswoman Luba Samri said. The Red Crescent said about 30 Palestinians were hurt by rubber bullets red by Israeli forces. Dozens of others were treated for tear gas inhalation. Police had beefed up security in and around Jerusalem as the funer al coincided with the rst Friday prayer ser vices of the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan. Tensions have been high since three Israe li teenagers, including one with U.S. citizenship, were abducted in the West Bank on June 12, sparking a huge manhunt that ended with the gruesome dis covery of their bodies early this week. Israel has blamed Hamas for the abduc tion and murder of the teens and launched a crackdown on the Is lamic militant group in the West Bank, draw ing rocket attacks out of Gaza and Israeli air strikes in a near-daily cycle of retaliation. Hamas, which has ab ducted Israelis in the past, praised the kid napping of the teenagers but did not take re sponsibility for it. Palestinians immediately accused Israeli ex tremists of killing Abu Khdeir in revenge for the deaths of the Israeli teens. Israeli police said they have not yet deter mined who killed the boy or why. The killing of the youngster was widely condemned by Israeli leaders, including Prime Minister Benja min Netanyahu. We dont know yet the motives or the identities of the perpetrators, but we will. We will bring to justice the criminals re sponsible for this despi cable crime, whoever they may be, Netanyahu said Thursday. Mur der, riots, incitement, vigilantism they have no place in our democ racy. FRANK JORDANSAssociated PressBERLIN Germany summoned the U.S. ambassador in Berlin on Friday following the arrest of a man reported to have spied for the United States, heightening friction between the two coun tries over alleged U.S. eavesdrop ping in Germany. U.S. Ambassador John B. Emer son was called in in connection with an investigation by the feder al prosecutor, the German Foreign Ministry said in a statement. The U.S. envoy was asked to help in the swift clarication of the case, it added. Federal prosecutors say a 31-year-old German man was ar rested Wednesday on suspicion of spying for foreign intelligence ser vices. They did not identify the sus pect or the intelligence services. German government spokesman Steffen Seibert told reporters that Chancellor Angela Merkel been personally informed of the arrest. He declined to comment on reports by Der Spiegel magazine and the daily Sueddeutsche Zeitung that the man worked for Germa nys foreign intelligence service, known by its German acronym BND. The newspapers, which didnt identify their sources, said the man was suspected of passing on in formation about a German parliamentary committee investigating the activities of U.S. and other intelligence agencies in Germany. He claimed to have worked with U.S. intelligence since 2012, they re ported. Seibert said members of the par liamentary panel had also been in formed of the arrest.Ukraine say its winning ground in rebellious east DMITRY LOVETSKY / APUkrainian government forces maneuver antiaircraft missile launchers Buk as they are transported north-west from Slavyansk, eastern Ukraine on Friday. Palestinians, Israeli police clash during teens funeral MAHMOUD ILLEAN / AP Palestinians throw rocks as they clash with Israeli security forces during the funeral of 16-year-old Mohammed Abu Khdeir in Jerusalem on Friday.Germany summons US envoy over spying accusations HANNIBAL HANSCHKE / AP In this picture taken Thursday, former NSA employee Thomas Drake arrives at the parliamentary NSA investigation committee in Berlin. German lawmakers began hearing expert testimony for a probe into the activities of foreign intelligence agencies in Germany.Iraqs al-Maliki signals his intent to stay in job

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Saturday, July 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 I saw an old pal Monday af ternoon. Instead of his usu al scruffy jeans and T-shirt, he was wearing a suit and tie. Hey, Bobby, I called out, whats with the stuffy threads? I have gone and incorporated myself, he said. I want to look like the boss. But why are you hugging yourself? I asked, still puzzled. Even bosses with a high regard for themselves dont usually go around cuddling themselves in self-affection. Because I am now a closely held corporation, he said. As soon as the Supreme Court gives the all-clear to other for-profit corporations, I will be a regular boss you know, telling my workers what is morally right according to my own sincerely held religious beliefs and letting my arms dangle. Ah, yes, the Hobby Lobby case, the Supreme Court decision that struck a blow for religious liber ty. Bosses in closely held corporations are now at liberty to impose their religious beliefs on female employees concerning contraception in their health care plans. As Bobby explained it, the government has no compelling interest in insisting on womens health care options under Obamacare. Of course it doesnt, Bobby said, Who do these women think they are? They are not the boss of us. Of course, Justice Samuel Alito tried to make clear that the majority opinion was very specic. He insists that it does not say that for-prot corporations can opt out of any law (except tax laws) they judge incompatible with their sincerely held religious be liefs. What a sense of humor that Justice Alito has! How they must have laughed in law rms across the country as they began preparing other lawsuits, realizing that the rationale used in this case could apply to Mammon Enterprises Inc. (Slogan: Our Prot, Your Loss, soon to be reworked as Our Prophet, Your Loss.) Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg noticed, too, and she wasnt laughing. Legal scholars, trained to pick up on nuances in the law others might miss, noted that she is a woman and that two other women on the court joined her in her angry dissent. For some reason, women dont like men or incorporated religious families telling them what to do. Typical! Well, they will just have to get used to it, because religious bosses rule! No wonder Bobby wants to be one. Actually, when it comes to sincerely held religious beliefs, I didnt realize he had any sincerity or beliefs until now. But thats the marvel of the law. If people in the form of a corporation declare they have sincere religious beliefs, the court must accept this. No questions asked! As it happens, nobody questions the sincerely held religious beliefs of the owners of Hobby Lobby and Conestoga Wood Specialties Corp., but the sincere and the insincere can expect to get a pass, which is the problem going forward. A slippery slope now beckons. We have already slid from the Citizens United decision, when a corporation was deemed a per son for purposes of campaign funding, to now considering a corporation a pious articial entity. Whats next for this cre ative legal idea that offends common sense and serves God and money? Maybe Mr. Corporation will go to a gay wedding and refuse to take photographs or bake the cake. Maybe Mrs. Corporation will re a worker who gets a divorce. Maybe Mrs. and Mrs. Corporation, proprietors of the Family Rest Motel, will refuse accommodations to a couple who cant prove they are married. Maybe the Supreme Court will say this is all ne. Justice Alito suggests it cant happen, but who knows what might ensue when he and the boys get together on the slippery slope. Sure, in this case women can still get contraceptives if they want, but Americans have been put on notice: Your needs dont have a prayer when someone elses religion is the boss. This puts me in bad position. I go to church, although I am hardly sanctimonious enough to be anyones boss. Also recently, I wrote a column defending the Supreme Court decision allowing prayer in municipal meetings, which with some reservations I accepted in the spirit of tolerance and religious freedom. That was before corporations were deemed religious people and judged justied in making other peoples moral business their business. That goes too far and invites a backlash that will hurt all believers. By the way, my pal plans to be the boss of Bobbys Lobby, a mens store. Of course. Sadly for women, men rule.Reg Henry is deputy editorial-page editor for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Readers may email him at rhenry@post-gazette.com.OTHERVOICES Reg HenryMCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Slippery slope lies ahead after court decision LETTERS TO THE EDITOR YOUR POINT OF VIEW Whatever you think of therapy designed to change peoples sexual orientation and we think its both harmful and insulting to gays and lesbians its not con stitutionally protected free speech. That was the correct conclusion of a federal appeals court decision upholding a California law prohibiting use of such therapy on minors. This week the Supreme Court rightly de clined to hear an appeal of that decision. In declining to review the ruling by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, the justices didnt set a national precedent. But their unwilling ness to take up this issue is likely to encourage additional states to pass laws against treating children and adolescents with conversion or reparative therapy. It will also be harder now for proponents of the therapy to argue, as they did in this case, that it is a form of free speech deserving of the strongest judicial protection. Many opposed enactment of the California law, not because they approved of conversion therapy for minors or anyone else but because they didnt believe legislators should be in the business of setting detailed rules for medical or psychiatric professionals. The preference would have been for the medical and psychological professions to lead the way in discouraging a form of treatment that is increasingly viewed as pointless and even dangerous. But whether the California law is wise is a different question from whether it violates the First Amendments free speech protections. On that issue, the 9th Circuit correctly drew a distinction between expressing an opinion about conversion therapy and actually engaging in it with underage patients. Writing for the appeals court, Judge Susan P. Graber declined to subject the law to the strict scrutiny with which courts consider laws that abridge free speech. She concluded that the law regulates only treatment, while leav ing mental health providers free to discuss and recommend, or recommend against efforts to change sexual orientation. As this page has noted, a doctor has a right to express the opinion that a banned drug would be helpful to his patients, but that doesnt mean he can violate the law by engaging in the speech of writing a prescription for that drug. The line between speech and conduct for 1st Amendment purposes is admittedly sometimes blurry, but this law was aimed clearly at conduct. Even as it goes into effect, those who believe in conversion therapy can continue to evangelize for it. But they will be doing so to an increasingly skeptical public inside and outside the psychiatric profession.Provided by MCT Information Services.AVOICEA judicial no on gay conversion Classic DOONESBURY 1975

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, July 5, 2014 ThursdayJuly10that5PM

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2004SUZUKIKA TA NAOnly$3,400 2005 YA MAHAVSTAR650Only$3,995 2012HONDASHADOW750Only$6,200 352-330-0047 rffntbftnnf Cycles Cycles BUYHERE PAY HERErfn tbr brr ff tbnbb bb rrr rrrrbrrb 1997HARLEY-DAVIDSON883 H$3,900 2003TRIUMPHSPEEDMASTER$3,700 2003HARLEY-DAVIDSONULTRACLASSIC$9,500 SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, July 5, 2014www.dailycommercial.comNBA: Cavaliers meet with LeBrons agent / B3 PHOTOS BY BEN CURTIS / AP TOP: Novak Djokovic runs as he plays a return to Grigor Dimitrov of Bulgaria during their mens singles seminal match at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships in Wimbledon, London, on Friday. BOTTOM: Roger Federer plays a return to Milos Raonic during their mens singles seminal STEPHEN WILSONAssociated PressLONDON Roger Feder er and Novak Djokovic will meet for the Wimbledon title after the old guard held off the new in the seminals Friday at the All England Club. Federer, chasing his record eighth Wimbledon championship, swept past Canadas Milos Raonic 6-4, 6-4, 6-4 to reach his 25th Grand Slam nal. Federer, who owns 17 major titles, broke once in each set and won 61 of 80 points on serve to make it back to a Slam nal for the rst time since winning Wimbledon in 2012. The top-seeded Djokovic ran off six of the nal sev en points in the tiebreaker to beat Grigor Dimitrov of Bulgaria 6-4, 3-6, 7-6 (2), 7-6 (7) to advance to his third Wimbledon nal in four years. Its also Djokovics 14th Grand Slam nal and 10th in his last 13 majors. Djokovic won the 2011 Wimbledon title and lost in last years nal to Andy Murray. The 32-year-old Federer will be playing in his ninth Wimbledon nal on Sunday. If he wins, he will hold the outright record for mens titles, which he current ly shares at seven with Pete Sampras and William Ren shaw. Federer would also become the oldest mens Wimbledon champion since the Open era began in 1968. The Swiss great has slipped in the rankings the past two years and failed to get to any Grand Slam nals. This could represent his best chance for another major ti tle. Federer, who has lost only one set and been broken just once the whole tournament, was asked how much it would mean to lift the Wimbledon trophy once more. Djokovic, Federer in Wimbledon finals SEE WIMBLEDON | B2 TALES AZZONIAssociated PressFORTALEZA, Brazil Brazil made its way into the World Cup seminals for the rst time in 12 years, with goals coming from defenders Thiago Silva and David Luiz in a 2-1 win over Co lombia on Friday. Brazil, which had been eliminated in the quarter nals at the last two World Cups, will next play Germany on Tuesday in Belo Hor izonte. Silva gave Brazil the lead in the seventh minute, scoring with his left knee af ter a corner from Neymar passed through the Colombian defense. He celebrat ed the goal by pointing to the emblem on his jersey and shouting, This is Brazil, this is Brazil. Luiz added the second from a free kick in the 69th, sending a swerving longrange shot off the side of his foot into the top of the net. Colombia got one back in the 80th. James Rodri guez scored his tournament-leading sixth goal from the penalty spot after Brazil goalkeeper Julio Ce sar brought down substitute Carlos Bacca inside the area. MARK LONGAssociated PressDAYTONA BEACH David Gilliland might have summed up Daytona qualifying best. Its uncontrolled chaos out there, Gilliland said Friday after landing the pole in a rain-short ened and somewhat hairy session that set the eld for the Coke Zero 400 on Saturday night at Daytona International Speedway. Gillilands top speed during a hectic, cat-andmouse qualifying session was 199.322 mph, earning him his third Sprint Cup pole and rst since landing the top spot for the 2007 Daytona 500. All three of his poles have been at restric tor-plate races, with the rst one coming at Talladega in 2006. Front Row Motorsports, our strong point is denitely speedway racing, said Gilliland, who nished third in the 2011 Daytona 500. It is something thats circled on our calendar from the start of the year. We put a lot of emphasis on it. The restrictor-plate tracks are good equalizers. Brazil holds off Colombia to reach semifinals; Germany in with shutout over France MANU FERNANDEZ / AP Brazils Neymar is fouled by Colombias Juan Zuniga during their World Cup quarternal soccer match at the Arena Castelao in Fortaleza, Brazil, on Friday.SEE WORLD CUP | B5And then there were two ZACHARY HANKLESpecial to the Daily CommercialBrad Antchak and Kameron Esthay com bined for six hits and four RBIs, and the Lightning scored four runs in the seventh, defeating the Di amond Dawgs, 7-1, on Fri day night at Pat Thom as Stadium-Buddy Lowe Field. Leesburgs offense collected 11 hits, scoring a run apiece in the rst three innings to win its second straight game. The Lightning got on the board in the rst in ning when Igor Baez hit an RBI-single through the in eld to make it 1-0. Esthay scored on Shea Pierces sacrice y to extend the lead to 2-0. Brett Jones scored a run on Colby Lusignans elders choice to make it 3-0. The Diamond Dawgs only run came in the top of the fth on Orlando Ri veras RBI-double. Brandon Caples came in during the seventh inning to relieve Brett Jones, who allowed just the one run in 6 2/3 innings while strik ing out three and walking two. The Lightning blew the game open in the bot tom of the seventh with four runs. Esthay hit an RBI-single, followed by Antchaks bases-clearing double. Trey Norris came in to nish the game and secure the win for the Lightning, giving up a pair of hits while striking out a batter. The Lightning host Win ter Park tonight at 7. Ty ler Souris is set to pitch for Leesburg.Lightning scare off Dawgs with blowout winGilliland lands pole for Coke Zero 400 at DaytonaSEE DAYTONA | B5

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, July 5, 2014 SUNmon tu es we dthursfriSatLeesburgLightningJune29-July5WinterGardenAW AY1pmCollegeParkHOME7pmCollegeParkHOME7pmCollegeParkAW AY7pmWinterParkHOME6pmWinterParkHOME7pm TV2DAY AUTO RACING 2 p.m.NBCSN Formula One, qualifying for British Grand Prix, at Silverstone, England 7 p.m.NBCSN IndyCar, pole qualifying for Pocono 500, at Long Pond, Pa. 7:30 p.m.TNT NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Coke Zero 400, at Daytona Beach11 p.m.ESPN2 NHRA, qualifying for Summit Racing Equipment Nationals, at Norwalk, Ohio CANADIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE 3 p.m.ESPN2 Saskatchewan at TorontoCYCLING 6 a.m.NBCSN Tour de France, stage 1, Leeds to Harrogate, England2 p.m.NBC Tour de France, stage 1, Leeds to Harrogate, England GOLF 8 a.m.TGC European PGA Tour, Open de France, third round, at Paris1 p.m.TGC PGA Tour, The Greenbrier Classic, third round, at White Sulphur Springs, W.Va.3 p.m.CBS PGA Tour, The Greenbrier Classic, third round, at White Sulphur Springs, W.Va. TGC Web.com Tour, Nova Scotia Open, third round, at Halifax, Nova ScotiaHORSE RACING 5 p.m.NBCSN Thoroughbreds, Belmont Oaks, at Elmont, N.Y.MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 2 p.m.FS-Florida Miami at St. Louis WGN Seattle at Chicago White Sox4 p.m.FS1 Arizona at Atlanta SUN Tampa Bay at Detroit7 p.m.FOX Regional coverage, Baltimore at Boston, S.F at San Diego, or Texas at N.Y. Mets10 p.m.MLB Regional coverage, Toronto at Oakland or Houston at L.A. AngelsMOTORSPORTS 3 p.m.NBC AMA Motocross, at Red Bud, Mich.4 p.m.NBCSN AMA Motocross, at Red Bud, Mich.SOCCER NoonABC FIFA, World Cup, quarternals, Argentina vs. Belgium, at Brasilia, Brazil4 p.m.ESPN FIFA, World Cup, quarternals, Netherlands vs. Costa Rica, at Salvador, BrazilTENNIS 9 a.m.ESPN Wimbledon, womens championship, at LondonSCOREBOARD FCSL STANDINGS W L .Pct GB Sanford 16 9 .640 Winter Park 15 11 .577 1.5 Winter Garden 14 12 .538 2.5 Leesburg 12 10 .545 2.5 DeLand 9 15 .375 6.5 College Park 7 16 .304 8 FRIDAYS GAMESLeesburg 7, Winter Park 1 College Park 5, DeLand 3 Sanford 8, Winter Garden 4TODAYS GAMESWinter Park at Leesburg, 7 p.m. College Park at DeLand, 7 p.m. Sanford at Winter Garden, 7 p.m. AUTO RACING Subway Firecracker 250 Lineup After Friday qualifying; race Friday At Daytona International Speedway Daytona Beach Lap length: 2.5 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (43) Dakoda Armstrong, Ford, 192.123. 2. (6) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 191.955. 3. (60) Chris Buescher, Ford, 191.836. 4. (16) Ryan Reed, Ford, 191.575. 5. (54) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 191.274. 6. (11) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 191.168. 7. (9) Chase Elliott, Chevrolet, 191.071. 8. (7) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 191.022. 9. (20) Darrell Wallace Jr., Toyota, 191.014. 10. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 190.63. 11. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 190.432. 12. (84) Chad Boat, Chevrolet, 189.998. 13. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 189.785. 14. (62) Brendan Gaughan, Chevrolet, 188.178. 15. (2) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 188.162. 16. (3) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 188.151. 17. (93) Mike Wallace, Dodge, 186.931. 18. (99) James Buescher, Toyota, 186.858. 19. (28) J.J. Yeley, Dodge, 186.834. 20. (80) Johnny Sauter, Toyota, 186.749. 21. (39) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, 186.71. 22. (74) Mike Harmon, Dodge, 186.648. 23. (70) Derrike Cope, Chevrolet, 186.174. 24. (17) Tanner Berryhill, Dodge, 185.812. 25. (01) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 185.414. 26. (31) Dylan Kwasniewski, Chevrolet, 185.414. 27. (25) John Wes Townley, Toyota, 185.239. 28. (29) Scott Lagasse Jr., Toyota, 185.166. 29. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 185.143. 30. (44) David Starr, Toyota, 185.143. 31. (98) David Ragan, Ford, 185.128. 32. (14) Eric McClure, Toyota, 185.086. 33. (55) Ross Chastain, Chevrolet, 185.086. 34. (87) Carlos Contreras, Chevrolet, 184.147. 35. (40) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 183.996. 36. (51) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 37. (23) Robert Richardson Jr., Chevrolet, Owner Points. 38. (52) Joey Gase, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 39. (4) Jeffrey Earnhardt, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 40. (97) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Past Champion. Failed to Qualify 41. (91) Benny Gordon, Toyota, 185.098. 42. (10) Blake Koch, Toyota, 185.067. 43. (76) Tommy Joe Martins, Dodge, 183.64. 44. (46) Matt DiBenedetto, Chevrolet, 183.031. 45. (85) Bobby Gerhart, Chevrolet, 182.771.GOLF The Greenrier Classic Friday At The Old White TPC White Sulphur Springs, W.Va. Purse: $6.5 million Yardage: 7,287; Par 70 Second Round a-denotes amateur Billy Hurley III 68-63 131 Kevin Chappell 67-65 132 Chris Stroud 66-66 132 Troy Matteson 72-61 133 Steve Stricker 66-68 134 Chris Kirk 65-69 134 Brice Garnett 68-66 134 Camilo Villegas 68-67 135 Jim Renner 65-70 135 Pat Perez 66-69 135 Bubba Watson 68-67 135 David Lingmerth 67-68 135 Luke Guthrie 67-69 136 Johnson Wagner 68-68 136 Angel Cabrera 68-68 136 J.B. Holmes 68-68 136 Keegan Bradley 67-69 136 David Hearn 68-68 136 Danny Lee 65-71 136 Bronson LaCassie 70-66 136 Joe Durant 65-71 136 Patrick Reed 67-69 136 Kevin Na 66-70 136 Charlie Beljan 67-69 136 Robert Allenby 67-70 137 George McNeill 70-67 137 Stephen Ames 69-68 137 Bud Cauley 69-68 137 Jason Bohn 65-72 137 Jonas Blixt 64-73 137 Tyrone Van Aswegen 67-70 137 Patrick Cantlay 69-68 137 Will Wilcox 68-69 137 Scott Gardiner 70-67 137 Greg Chalmers 69-69 138 Brendon Todd 71-67 138 Steven Bowditch 68-70 138 Matt Bettencourt 70-68 138 Cameron Tringale 72-66 138 Josh Teater 69-69 138 Andrew Loupe 69-69 138 Oliver Goss 70-68 138 Brendan Steele 70-68 138 David Toms 69-69 138 Michael Thompson 66-72 138 Charles Howell III 67-71 138 Justin Leonard 71-67 138 Troy Merritt 66-72 138 Tim Wilkinson 68-71 139 Chad Collins 66-73 139 Richard H. Lee 71-68 139 Ken Duke 72-67 139 Gary Woodland 69-70 139 Carl Pettersson 71-68 139 Tom Watson 71-68 139 Kyle Stanley 71-68 139 Brendon de Jonge 70-69 139 Steve Marino 69-70 139 Hudson Swafford 72-67 139 James Hahn 65-74 139 Gonzalo Fdez-Castano 68-71 139 Michael Putnam 67-72 139 Jeff Maggert 69-70 139 Bill Haas 69-70 139 Scott Stallings 70-69 139 Scott Langley 68-71 139 Heath Slocum 70-69 139 Trevor Immelman 69-70 139 Andres Romero 72-68 140 Jason Gore 70-70 140 Roberto Castro 72-68 140 Derek Ernst 71-69 140 Webb Simpson 71-69 140 Ted Potter, Jr. 70-70 140 Wes Roach 69-71 140 Jamie Lovemark 68-72 140 Shawn Stefani 73-67 140 Martin Flores 70-70 140 Mark Wilson 68-72 140 Sang-Moon Bae 66-74 140 J.J. Henry 70-70 140 Davis Love III 67-73 140 Scott Brown 72-68 140 D.A. Points 65-75 140 Woody Austin 68-72 140 John Daly 68-72 140 Andrew Svoboda 72-68 140 Robert Streb 68-72 140 Patrick Rodgers 65-75 140 Failed to make the cut Nick Watney 70-71 141 Justin Hicks 68-73 141 Bobby Wyatt 67-74 141 Chad Campbell 69-72 141 Marc Leishman 68-73 141 Ricky Barnes 68-73 141 Will MacKenzie 70-71 141 John Peterson 71-70 141 Jim Herman 68-73 141 John Huh 73-69 142 Vijay Singh 71-71 142 Jonathan Byrd 71-71 142 Daniel Chopra 71-71 142 Kevin Foley 72-70 142 Alex Aragon 70-72 142 Ben Curtis 67-75 142 Jhonattan Vegas 71-71 142 Scott McCarron 71-71 142 Edward Loar 72-70 142 Brian Harman 72-71 143 Chesson Hadley 75-68 143 Jeff Curl 73-70 143 Miguel Angel Carballo 73-70 143 Kevin Tway 69-74 143 Scott Verplank 75-68 143 Rory Sabbatini 72-71 143 Brad Fritsch 70-73 143 Benjamin Alvarado 71-72 143 Ben Martin 73-71 144 Morgan Hoffmann 70-74 144 John Rollins 75-69 144 Alex Prugh 71-73 144 Charlie Wi 74-70 144 William McGirt 73-71 144 Brian Davis 69-75 144 Stuart Appleby 73-71 144 Darren Clarke 71-73 144 Troy Kelly 69-75 144 Harrison Frazar 72-73 145 Kevin Kisner 70-75 145 Mike Weir 72-73 145 Jimmy Walker 70-75 145 Sean OHair 72-73 145 Spencer Levin 70-75 145 Doug LaBelle II 72-73 145 D.H. Lee 73-73 146 Y.E. Yang 75-71 146 James Driscoll 69-77 146 Peter Hanson 74-72 146 Tim Clark 73-74 147 Bryce Molder 72-76 148 Nick Faldo 71-77 148 Robert McClellan 73-75 148 Paul Goydos 73-75 148 Thorbjorn Olesen 73-75 148 Daniel Summerhays 75-74 149 Peter Malnati 75-74 149 Tommy Gainey 72-77 149 Nicholas Thompson 74-76 150 Brian Anania 73-77 150 K.J. Choi 74-76 150 Brian Agee 76-74 150 Tag Ridings 76-75 151 Neal Lancaster 73-80 153 Mikey Moyers 77-77 154 Rod Perry 78-80 158 SOCCER World Cup QUARTERFINALS Friday At Rio de Janeiro Germany 1, France 0 At Fortaleza, Brazil Brazil 2, Colombia 1 Today At Brasilia, Brazil Argentina vs. Belgium, Noon At Salvador, Brazil Netherlands vs. Costa Rica, 4 p.m. SEMIFINALS Tuesday, July 8 At Belo Horizonte, Brazil Brazil vs. Germany, 4 p.m. Wednesday, July 9 At Sao Paulo Netherlands-Costa Rica winner vs. Argentina-Belgium winner, 4 p.m. THIRD PLACE Saturday, July 12 At Brasilia, Brazil Seminal losers, 4 p.m. CHAMPIONSHIP Sunday, July 13 At Rio de Janeiro Seminal winners, 3 p.m.TENNISWimbledon Mens Seminals: No. 1 Novak Djokovic beat No. 11 Grigor Dimitrov 6-4, 3-6, 7-6 (2), 7-6 (7); No. 4 Roger Federer beat No. 8 Milos Raonic 6-4, 6-4, 6-4. Sundays Mens Final: Djokovic vs. Federer. Todays Womens Singles Final: No. 6 Petra Kvitova vs. No. 13 Eugenie Bouchard. Saturdays Mens Doubles Final: No. 1 Bob and Mike Bryan vs. Vasek Pospisil and Jack Sock. Todays Womens Doubles Final: No. 2 Sara Errani and Roberta Vinci vs. No. 14 Timea Babos and Kristina Mladenovic. WIMBLEDONFROM PAGE B1 ANTHONY DEVLIN / AP Novak Djokovic stretches to reach a return to Grigor Dimitrov during their mens singles seminal match at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships at Wimbledon, London, on Friday. JOHN RABYAssociated PressWHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, W.Va. Billy Hurley III has been waiting for a breakthrough moment on the PGA Tour. On Independence Day, the former U.S. Navy ofcer might have set himself up for one this weekend in the Greenbrier Classic. Hurley shot a season-best 7-un der 63 on Friday to take the second-round lead. Hurleys bogey-free round included a chip-in from 29 feet on No. 4 in cool conditions before the wind picked up considerably late in his morning round. You know, anytime you play good, its great, right? Hurley said. Theres special days of the year for our country, and having served ... adds something to it. Its kind of pretty cool, I guess, to shoot 7 under on the 4th of July. Its a nice storyline. Then again, having military experience wasnt on his mind in jumping to the top of the leaderboard. I was just trying to keep getting the ball in the hole, he said. Hurley was at 9-under 131 at Old White TPC. Eleven players were within four shots of him. Kevin Chappell (65) and Chris Stroud (66) were a stroke back. Troy Matteson Troy Matteson had a 61 to vault into fourth place at 7 under. He has made the cut in all ve years of the Greenbrier Classic. Brice Garnett (66), Steve Stricker (68) and Chris Kirk (69) were anoth er stroke back at 6 under. Hurley graduated from Annapo lis in 2004 and spent ve years in the Navy. He playing golf sparingly while stationed in Hawaii and worked out as much as he could. Being mentally tough on the course comes easy for Hurley, whose missions included steering a Navy destroyer through the Suez Canal. Playing partner Chris Stroud said it was special for a former mili tary man to be leading the tourna ment and was amazed at how Hur ley could recapture his golf game. Theres a lot to be said about that, Stroud said. Hurley rejoined the PGA Tour this season and has three top 10 nishes so far, including a tie for eighth at Congressional last week. His best career nish is a tie for fourth in the AT&T National two years ago, also at Congressional. A solid ending at The Greenbrier resort would get him into the British Open later this month. Navy vet Hurley takes Greenbrier lead CHRIS TILLEY / AP Billy Hurley III tees off the ninth hole during the second round of the Greenbrier Classic at the Greenbrier Resort in White Sulphur Springs, W.Va., on Friday.A lot, he said. I must say Im unbelievably proud every time I can walk the grounds here and keep on playing this tournament. I know I dont have 10 left, so Ill try to enjoy it as much as I can. Clearly, the rst one was unbelievably special in 2003. And that I was able to play so successful for so many years here at Wimbledon has been an unbelievable thrill and that I get another chance to go through these kind of emotions is great. Federers dominance against the eighth-seed ed Raonic was total. Ra onic, the rst Canadian man to reach a Grand Slam seminal, had 17 aces but also had four double faults and con ceded seven break points. Federer was clinical throughout and saved the only break point he faced. Federer holds a career 18-16 advantage against Djokovic, but this will be only their second meet ing in a major nal. Fed erer beat him for the U.S. Open title in 2007. Overall, Federer has a 6-5 edge in Grand Slam matches. Theyve faced each other only once be fore at Wimbledon, with Federer winning in four sets in the 2012 semi nals. We know each others games, said Djokovic, who will move to No. 1 in the rankings with a victory, replacing Rafael Nadal. We played many matches on different occasions. We played so many times in seminals and nals of Grand Slams, different surfaces, big matches over the years. They were very exciting. And, of course, most of the matches we play against each other went the distance. So Im go ing to be, of course, physically ready and t to go the distance this time. The nal matchup means that one of the so-called Big Four in mens tennis Federer, Nadal, Djokovic or Andy Murray will walk away with a Grand Slam trophy for the 36th time in 38 majors. One of the four has won Wimbledon title the past 11 years, seven for Federer. Djokovic, who has lost in his last two major nals and three of the past four, is going for his seventh Grand Slam title. Of course, there is plenty of motivation from my side to win this Grand Slam nal after losing last three out of four, he said. I want to try to get the title. It would mean a lot men tally for me. The 11th-seeded Dimitrov, with his girlfriend Maria Sharapova watching from his guest box on Centre Court, came in with a 10-match win ning streak and had been seeking to become the rst Bulgarian to advance to a major nal. He pushed Djokovic to the limit but hurt his chances with eight double-faults includ ing three in a row in one game. The womens nal will be played Saturday, with 2011 champion Petra Kvitova of the Czech Re public facing 20-yearold Eugenie Bouch ard, the rst Canadian to play in a Grand Slam singles championship match. Of course, there is plenty of motivation from my side to win this Grand Slam final after losing last three out of four. I want to try to get the title. It would mean a lot mentally for me.Novak Djokovic

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Saturday, July 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 DENNIS PASSAAssociated PressLONDON Billie Jean King believes Wimbledon finalists Petra Kvitova and Eugenie Bouchard are creating one of the most excit ing times in womens tennis in decades. King ought to know. She helped start the Womens Tennis Association more than 40 years ago. The 24-year-old Kvitova of the Czech Republic won the 2011 Wimbledon title. Shell face the 20-year-old Bouch ard, who will play in her and Canadas first Grand Slam final on Saturday. Theyre from a generation of fitter and stronger players who have closed the gap on power and belief with their older contemporaries, King said at a news conference during Wimbledon. They have definitely caught up, King said. Women have more confi dence overall, Serena (Williams) is not in the same place as she was, shes a little more vulnerable. The men have had their Top 4. Now weve got a lot of younger women who want to be here. They like the show time. Here are five things to know about the big show Saturday on Centre Court: 1) WHAT A YEAR: Bouchard was the only woman to have advanced to all three Grand Slam tournament semifi nals this year, and now shes taken it another step. Shes received support from her home country, prime ministers and mayors, along with The Big Bang Theo ry actor Jim Parsons. She finished 2013 ranked 32nd, and shes projected to improve to No. 7 the highest ranking for a Canadian woman by reaching the final. She would be the youngest Grand Slam champion since Maria Sharapova won the 2006 U.S. Open at 19. 2) ONLY MEETING: Kvitova and Bouchard have played just once. They faced off on hard courts in Toronto, with Kvitova an easy winner 6-3, 6-2. 3) NEW GENERATION: The final Saturday is the first to feature two players born in the 1990s. Kvitova is the only player born in that de cade to win a Grand Slam her 2011 title here while Bouchard is the fourth play er born in the s to reach a Grand Slam final. The oth ers are French Open run ner-up Simona Halep (who lost to Bouchard in the semifinals) and former No. 1 Caroline Wozniacki, the 2009 U.S. Open runner-up. 4) KVITOVAS THOUGHTS: Bouchard is playing very solid game. Shes a very good mover. Shes nearby the base line. I think its very similar to my game. I beat her for the rst time last year, but its long time ago. This is totally different. So, I mean, I really have to be focusing on every thing and try to push her. 5) BOUCHARDS PLAN: She has good shots which are very powerful compared perhaps to opponents I played in the tournament. I think she will try to attack, but I will try to do the same thing. I think both of us will try to put pressure on each other. I think it will be im portant to start the points well on serve and on return. It will be the rst shots that decide the match.King holds court, excited by newcomers AP FILE PHOTO In this photo from Sept. 5, 2013, Billie Jean King speaks in front of a display at the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York. King believes Wimbledon nalists Petra Kvitova and Eugenie Bouchard are creating one of the most exciting times in womens tennis in decades. DAVID J. PHILLIP / AP Heat forward LeBron James gestures to the bench during the rst half in Game 5 of the NBA nals against the Spurs last month in San Antonio. DAVE CAMPBELLAssociated PressNEW YORK The New York Yankees are no longer expecting CC Sabathia to return to their rotation this year, given the per sistence of inamma tion in his injured right knee. Asked Friday whether he believed Sabath ias season was over, manager Joe Girar di said: I think thats about fair to say. The six-time All-Star left-hander has been out with a degener ative cartilage problem in his right knee since mid-May, when his ERA reached a career-high 5.28. The Yankees were targeting a post-All-Star-break return for Sabathia, who had begun a reha bilitation assignment. In his second start, Wednesday for Dou ble-A Trenton, Sabathia was hit hard: ve hits, ve runs and one walk while striking out two in 3 2-3 innings. The next morning, the 33-year-old woke up with swelling in the joint. An MRI test on Thursday didnt reveal any new damage. Sabathia will be examined on July 14 by Dr. James Andrews before the next step is deter mined, Girardi said, but microfracture sur gery is possible. Previ ously, Sabathia had an operation on the knee in October 2010 to re pair a small meniscus cartilage tear. The microfracture procedure requires far more re covery time, though. Thats a surgery a lot of players dont want to hear when they need to have it, Girardi said. The manager even acknowledged the possibility that Sabathia might have thrown his last pitch for the Yankees, as dire of a sce nario that sounds like. I think its too ear ly to predict that, but whenever you have degenerative issues that cause surgery or things like that, theres always a little question there, Girardi said. Despite his 6-foot7, 285-pound frame, Sabathia has been remarkably durable, logging at least 28 starts and 180 innings ev ery season of his ca reer. He reached 230 innings or more in ve different years, including in 2007 when he won the American League Cy Young Award for Cleveland. Sabathia is in his sixth season with the Yankees. He gave up 10 home runs in 46 innings over his eight starts before landing on the disabled list on May 11. After signing a sev en-year, $161 million deal as a free agent pri or to the 2009 season, Sabathia had his contract extended in 2011 by one year and $30 million. Making $23 million this season, Sabathia is scheduled to earn $23 million in 2015 and $25 million in 2016. The Yankees have a $25 million option on his deal for 2017 with a $5 million buyout. The Yankees have also been missing in jured starters Ivan Nova and Michael Pi neda, forcing them to go with a makeshift ro tation including Vidal Nuno, David Phelps and rookie Chase Whitley. Nova had season-ending elbow sur gery in April. Pineda has been out with a shoulder muscle problem and is not expect ed back until August.CCs return this year to Yankees now unlikely TOM WITHERSAssociated PressCLEVELAND Four years after their messy breakup, the Cavaliers and LeB ron James are at least talking about a re union. Cavs ofcials met with James agent, Rich Paul, this week about the freeagent superstars possible return. The sides visited as James continued his family vacation, a person with knowl edge of the details told The Associated Press on Thursday night. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitive na ture of the talks. It was not immediately clear if owner Dan Gilbert was at the meeting. James recently opted out of the nal two years of his contract in Miami. The two-time NBA champion has gone to four straight nals with the Heat. How ever, after the team was throttled by San Antonio in this years nals, James said he would weigh his options this summer. One of them could be re-signing with the Cavs, the team he spent seven sea sons with before leaving in 2010 to join forces with Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh in South Florida. Wade and Bosh also opted out of their deals with Heat, raising speculation the Big Three could be headed in different directions. James decision to leave Cleveland Thursday was the four-year anniver sary of the teams last pitch to him prompted Gilbert to condemn him in a scathing letter to Cavs fans. The owner also told The AP he felt James had quit during games in the playoffs. ESPN has reported that Paul also met with repre sentatives for the Phoenix Suns, Hous ton Rockets and Dallas Mavericks. A photo of Mavericks owner Mark Cuban in Cleveland circulated on Twitter, though he said he was there for a com mitment for his TV show, Shark Tank. While James has been out of the country with his wife, Savannah, and their two sons, Paul has been work ing on the four-time MVPs future. Un like four years ago, when teams ocked to Cleveland to make presentations to woo James, the courtship of him this time has been low key and rather busi ness-like. The Cavs have waited patiently for their chance to try and convince the Akron, Ohio, native to come home. In the past few weeks, the Cavs have hired new coach David Blatt, selected Kan sas swingman Andrew Wiggins with the No. 1 overall pick and gotten AllStar point guard Kyrie Irving to agree to a ve-year, $90 million contract exten sion. Now, theyre working on bringing back James, who has never ruled out the possibility of a return. Two years ago, James was asked if he could ever see himself playing for the Cavs again. I dont know. I think it would be great, he said. It would be fun to play in front of these fans again. I had a lot fun times in my seven years here. You cant predict the future and hopeful ly I continue to stay healthy. Im here as a Miami Heat player, and Im happy where I am now, but I dont rule that out in no sense. And if I decide to come back, hope fully the fans will accept me. Cleveland fans, most of them any way, have gotten over James infamous Decision, when he announced he was leaving on a nationally televised special. He was booed mercilessly in his rst games back with the Heat, but in recent years he has been received more favorably. Maybe thats because the Cavs havent been to the playoffs since he left and Clevelanders know he might be the only chance they have to see a championship in their lifetimes. Cleveland hasnt won a title in any of the major sports since 1964. If he were to come back, James could repair the damage he did to his image when he left. But that remains a big if. In having Paul meet with other teams, James could simply be putting on pressure for the Heat to upgrade their roster. Miami has been pursuing free agents and Yahoo Sports reported team president Pat Riley and coach Erik Spoelstra met in Los Angeles with Lak ers free agent Pau Gasol. Cavs meet with agent for James CHARLES ODUMAP Sports WriterATLANTA The Atlanta Hawks have reached an agreement with small forward Thabo Sefolosha on a deal that leaves the team sufcient salary cap room for additional offseason moves. The Hawks and Sefolosha have agreed to a three-year, $12 million contract, a person with knowl edge of the deal said Friday. The per son spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because teams cant ofcially sign free agents until the NBA's moratorium on deals is lifted on Thursday. The agreement was rst reported by The Oklahoman newspaper. The deal with Sefolosha comes af ter the Hawks on Tuesday cleared more than $15 million in salary cap space by trading guard Lou Williams and the draft rights to center Lu cas Nogueira to Toronto for forward John Salmons. The Hawks could have about $11.5 million for addition al signings if they pay the $1 million buyout of Salmons $7 million salary.KAMAN AGREES TO DEAL WITH BLAZERSFree agent center Chris Kaman has agreed to a two-year deal with the Portland Trail Blazers. A person with knowledge of the negotiations conrmed the agreement, which cannot be formally announced until new contracts are nalized next Thursday. The deal, worth a reported $9.8 million, was rst reported Thursday night by Yahoo! Sports. Kaman conrmed the deal with a post on his ofcial Twitter account. Portland is a great t for me, its a team that has done great things and has a lot of talent! Cant wait to get started in #RipCity, he posted. The burley 7-foot center has aver aged 11.7 points, 7.9 rebounds and 1.4 blocks over an 11-year NBA career. He is expected to back up Rob in Lopez with the Blazers.Hawks, Sefolosha agree to 3-year deal

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, July 5, 2014 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Baltimore 46 39 .541 6-4 W-4 23-21 23-18 Toronto 47 41 .534 1 4-6 L-2 25-21 22-20 New York 43 42 .506 3 4 4-6 W-2 18-23 25-19 Boston 38 47 .447 8 9 4-6 L-3 20-22 18-25 Tampa Bay 38 50 .432 9 10 7-3 L-1 19-25 19-25 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 48 34 .585 8-2 W-4 23-19 25-15 Kansas City 44 40 .524 5 2 5-5 W-1 21-22 23-18 Cleveland 41 43 .488 8 5 4-6 W-2 23-15 18-28 Chicago 40 46 .465 10 7 5-5 W-1 22-20 18-26 Minnesota 38 47 .447 11 9 2-8 L-3 20-21 18-26 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 53 33 .616 6-4 W-2 26-15 27-18 Los Angeles 48 36 .571 4 7-3 W-1 27-14 21-22 Seattle 47 38 .553 5 8-2 W-4 21-22 26-16 Texas 37 48 .435 15 10 2-8 L-5 18-23 19-25 Houston 36 51 .414 17 12 3-7 L-4 20-26 16-25 NATIONAL LEAGUEEAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 47 38 .553 9-1 W-7 23-18 24-20 Washington 46 39 .541 1 6-4 L-1 26-18 20-21 Miami 41 44 .482 6 5 4-6 L-1 27-22 14-22 New York 37 48 .435 10 9 3-7 L-4 17-21 20-27 Philadelphia 37 49 .430 10 9 2-8 L-1 18-27 19-22 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 51 35 .593 5-5 L-3 24-18 27-17 St. Louis 46 40 .535 5 5-5 W-2 23-17 23-23 Pittsburgh 45 41 .523 6 1 7-3 W-1 27-20 18-21 Cincinnati 43 41 .512 7 2 6-4 L-3 19-18 24-23 Chicago 38 46 .452 12 7 7-3 W-4 19-20 19-26 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Los Angeles 49 39 .557 7-3 W-1 22-23 27-16 San Francisco 47 39 .547 1 2-8 L-3 25-23 22-16 San Diego 39 47 .453 9 7 7-3 W-5 24-23 15-24 Colorado 36 50 .419 12 10 2-8 L-4 20-20 16-30 Arizona 36 51 .414 12 11 4-6 W-1 15-30 21-21 THURSDAYS GAMESBaltimore 5, Texas 2 Detroit 8, Tampa Bay 1 N.Y. Yankees 7, Minnesota 4 Oakland 4, Toronto 1 L.A. Angels 5, Houston 2THURSDAYS GAMESSt. Louis 7, San Francisco 2 Philadelphia 5, Miami 4 Arizona 10, Pittsburgh 2 L.A. Dodgers 3, Colorado 2FRIDAYS GAMESBaltimore at Boston, ppd., rain N.Y. Yankees 6, Minnesota 5 Oakland 1, Toronto 0 (12 innings) Kansas City at Cleveland, late Tampa Bay at Detroit, late Seattle at Chicago White Sox, late Texas at N.Y. Mets, late Houston at L.A. Angels, lateFRIDAYS GAMESChicago Cubs 7, Washington 2 Pittsburgh 8, Philadelphia 2 San Diego 2, San Francisco 0 Milwaukee at Cincinnati, late Texas at N.Y. Mets, late Miami at St. Louis, late Arizona at Atlanta, late L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, late ALEX BRANDON / AP Nationals starting pitcher Tanner Roark throws during the rst inning against the Cubs at Nationals Park in Washington on Friday. TODAYS GAMESBaltimore (Mi.Gonzalez 4-5) at Boston (Lester 9-7), 1:05 p.m., 1st game N.Y. Yankees (Phelps 3-4) at Minnesota (Pino 0-2), 2:10 p.m. Seattle (F.Hernandez 10-2) at Chicago White Sox (Quintana 5-7), 2:10 p.m. Tampa Bay (Archer 4-5) at Detroit (A.Sanchez 5-2), 4:08 p.m. Kansas City (Guthrie 5-6) at Cleveland (House 0-2), 6:05 p.m. Baltimore (U.Jimenez 3-8) at Boston (Lackey 9-5), 7:15 p.m., 2nd game Texas (Lewis 5-5) at N.Y. Mets (B.Colon 8-6), 7:15 p.m. Houston (Feldman 4-5) at L.A. Angels (H.Santiago 0-7), 10:05 p.m. Toronto (Buehrle 10-5) at Oakland (Kazmir 9-3), 10:05 p.m.TODAYS GAMESMiami (Heaney 0-3) at St. Louis (S.Miller 7-7), 2:15 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 2-7) at Washington (G.Gonzalez 5-4), 4:05 p.m. Philadelphia (D.Buchanan 4-4) at Pittsburgh (Volquez 6-6), 4:05 p.m. Arizona (Bolsinger 1-4) at Atlanta (Harang 7-6), 4:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Haren 8-4) at Colorado (J.De La Rosa 8-6), 4:10 p.m. Milwaukee (Garza 5-5) at Cincinnati (Bailey 8-4), 4:10 p.m. San Francisco (Hudson 7-5) at San Diego (Despaigne 2-0), 7:15 p.m. Texas (Lewis 5-5) at N.Y. Mets (B.Colon 8-6), 7:15 p.m.AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Altuve, Houston, .347; Beltre, Texas, .335; VMartinez, Detroit, .327; Cano, Seattle, .323; Mi Cabrera, Detroit, .316; Trout, Los Angeles, .314; Brant ley, Cleveland, .312. RUNS: Dozier, Minnesota, 61; Kinsler, Detroit, 59; Donaldson, Oakland, 57; Encarnacion, Toronto, 57; Bautista, Toronto, 56; Brantley, Cleveland, 56. RBI: Encarnacion, Toronto, 69; NCruz, Baltimore, 68; JAbreu, Chicago, 67; MiCabrera, Detroit, 67; Moss, Oakland, 62; Trout, Los Angeles, 62; Donaldson, Oakland, 61. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 121; AJones, Baltimore, 107; MeCabrera, Toronto, 106; Kinsler, Detroit, 105; Marka kis, Baltimore, 104; Cano, Seattle, 101; MiCabrera, Detroit, 100. DOUBLES: MiCabrera, Detroit, 32; Altuve, Houston, 26; Kinsler, Detroit, 25; AEscobar, Kansas City, 24; Pedroia, Boston, 24; Plouffe, Minnesota, 24; EEscobar, Minnesota, 23; AGordon, Kansas City, 23; Trout, Los Angeles, 23. TRIPLES: Rios, Texas, 8; Bourn, Cleveland, 7; Eaton, Chicago, 6; Gardner, New York, 5; Trout, Los Angeles, 5; JJones, Seattle, 4; Reddick, Oakland, 4. HOME RUNS: JAbreu, Chicago, 26; NCruz, Baltimore, 26; Encarnacion, Toronto, 26; VMartinez, Detroit, 21; Moss, Oakland, 19; Ortiz, Boston, 19; Trout, Los Angeles, 19. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 37; Ellsbury, New York, 23; RDavis, Detroit, 22; AEscobar, Kansas City, 20; An drus, Texas, 18; JJones, Seattle, 17; LMartin, Texas, 17. PITCHING: Tanaka, New York, 12-3; Porcello, Detroit, 11-4; FHernandez, Seattle, 10-2; Scherzer, Detroit, 103; Buehrle, Toronto, 10-5; Richards, Los Angeles, 9-2; Kazmir, Oakland, 9-3; Lackey, Boston, 9-5; Weaver, Los Angeles, 9-6; Lester, Boston, 9-7. ERA: FHernandez, Seattle, 2.10; Tanaka, New York, 2.27; Darvish, Texas, 2.42; Buehrle, Toronto, 2.50; Ka zmir, Oakland, 2.61; ASanchez, Detroit, 2.63. STRIKEOUTS: Price, Tampa Bay, 153; Scherzer, Detroit, 139; FHernandez, Seattle, 137; Tanaka, New York, 130; Darvish, Texas, 128; Kluber, Cleveland, 127. SAVES: Rodney, Seattle, 24; Holland, Kansas City, 23; Perkins, Minnesota, 20; DavRobertson, New York, 19. NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Tulowitzki, Colorado, .350; Lucroy, Milwaukee, .331; MaAdams, St. Louis, .318; Morneau, Colorado, .318; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, .315; Stanton, Miami, .313. RUNS: Tulowitzki, Colorado, 66; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 62; Pence, San Francisco, 60; Stanton, Miami, 60; Rendon, Washington, 57; FFreeman, Atlanta, 56; Rizzo, Chicago, 56. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 61; Morneau, Colorado, 59; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 55; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 53; Desmond, Washington, 51; Howard, Philadelphia, 51; SCastro, Chicago, 50; McGehee, Miami, 50. HITS: DanMurphy, New York, 104; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 101; McGehee, Miami, 101; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 100; Pence, San Francisco, 100; Stanton, Miami, 100; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 99; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 99. DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 30; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 29; SCastro, Chicago, 26; Span, Washington, 26; FFreeman, Atlanta, 24; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 24. TRIPLES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 9; BCrawford, San Francisco, 8; Yelich, Miami, 6; Braun, Milwaukee, 5; Owings, Arizona, 5; Rendon, Washington, 5; Revere, Philadelphia, 5. HOME RUNS: Stanton, Miami, 21; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 18; Frazier, Cincinnati, 17; Rizzo, Chicago, 17; Byrd, Philadelphia, 16; Gattis, Atlanta, 16; JUpton, Atlanta, 16. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 40; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 35; Revere, Philadelphia, 24; EYoung, New York, 22; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 20; Rollins, Philadelphia, 16. PITCHING: Greinke, Los Angeles, 11-4; Wainwright, St. Louis, 11-4; Simon, Cincinnati, 10-3; Lohse, Milwaukee, 9-2; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 9-2; Ryu, Los Angeles, 9-4; WPeralta, Milwaukee, 9-5; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 9-6. ERA: Wainwright, St. Louis, 1.89; Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.99; Teheran, Atlanta, 2.29; HAlvarez, Miami, 2.33; Beckett, Los Angeles, 2.37; Hudson, San Francisco, 2.59. STRIKEOUTS: Strasburg, Washington, 131; Cueto, Cincinnati, 130; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 120; Greinke, Los Angeles, 119; Kennedy, San Diego, 116. SAVES: FrRodriguez, Milwaukee, 27; Kimbrel, Atlanta, 26; Jansen, Los Angeles, 26; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 25. Fridays gamesCubs 7, Nationals 2 Chicago W ashington ab r h bi ab r h bi Coghln lf 4 3 2 0 Span cf 4 0 1 0 Ruggin cf 5 2 3 2 Har per lf 4 0 0 0 Rizzo 1b 5 0 0 1 W erth rf 3 1 2 1 SCastro ss 5 0 2 2 LaRoch 1b 4 0 0 0 Valuen 3b 5 0 0 0 Zmr mn 3b 4 0 1 0 Schrhlt rf 4 1 2 0 Rendon 2b 4 1 1 0 JoBakr c 3 0 1 0 Dsmnd ss 4 0 1 0 Barney 2b 4 1 2 0 WRams c 3 0 1 1 Hamml p 3 0 1 1 Roar k p 2 0 0 0 NRmrz p 0 0 0 0 McLoth ph 1 0 0 0 Strop p 0 0 0 0 Detwilr p 0 0 0 0 Olt ph 0 0 0 0 Bar rett p 0 0 0 0 Sweeny ph 1 0 1 0 Ble vins p 0 0 0 0 Schlittr p 0 0 0 0 Totals 39 7 14 6 T otals 33 2 7 2 Chicago 111 010 003 7 Washington 100 000 100 2 DPChicago 1, Washington 2. LOBChicago 7, Washington 6. 2BCoghlan (5), S.Castro (26), Sweeney (5), Span (26), Werth (17), Rendon (18). HRRuggiano (4), Werth (8). IP H R ER BB SO Chicago Hammel W,8-5 6 5 2 2 2 7 N.Ramirez H,8 1 1 0 0 0 2 Strop H,10 1 1 0 0 0 1 Schlitter 1 0 0 0 0 0 Washington Roark L,7-6 7 9 4 4 1 5 Detwiler 1 1/3 2 1 1 0 0 Barrett 0 2 2 2 1 0 Blevins 2/3 1 0 0 0 1 Barrett pitched to 3 batters in the 9th. Hammel pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. UmpiresHome, Ted Barrett; First, Will Little; Second, Mike Everitt; Third, Paul Schrieber. T:54. A,274 (41,408). Pirates 8, Phillies 2 Philadelphia Pittsburgh ab r h bi ab r h bi Revere cf 3 1 1 0 GP olnc rf 3 2 1 0 Rollins ss 3 1 0 0 SMar te lf 4 0 1 0 Utley 2b 4 0 1 1 AMcCt cf 5 1 4 2 Howard 1b 3 0 0 0 NW alkr 2b 3 1 1 0 Byrd rf 4 0 0 0 RMar tn c 4 2 2 1 Asche 3b 2 0 0 0 JHr rsn 3b 4 1 1 1 DeFrts p 0 0 0 0 GSnchz 1b 3 1 1 0 Rosnrg p 0 0 0 0 Mercer ss 4 0 2 4 DBrwn ph 1 0 0 0 Cole p 2 0 0 0 K.Hill c 3 0 0 0 Pimntl p 0 0 0 0 GwynJ lf 1 0 0 0 JHughs p 0 0 0 0 Mayrry ph-lf 1 0 0 0 P Alvrz ph 1 0 0 0 RHrndz p 2 0 0 0 JuWlsn p 0 0 0 0 CHrndz 3b 1 0 0 0 W orley ph 1 0 0 0 W atson p 0 0 0 0 JGomz p 0 0 0 0 Totals 28 2 2 1 T otals 34 8 13 8 Philadelphia 000 002 000 2 Pittsburgh 400 100 21x 8 EC.Hernandez (3). DPPhiladelphia 1, Pittsburgh 1. LOBPhiladelphia 4, Pittsburgh 9. 2BA.McCutchen 2 (26), Mercer (12). 3BA.McCutchen (3). SBRevere (25), S.Marte (21), A.McCutchen (13), J.Harrison (8). CSG.Polanco (2). IP H R ER BB SO Philadelphia R.Hernandez L,3-8 5 2/3 10 5 5 4 3 De Fratus 1 1/3 2 2 1 1 0 Rosenberg 1 1 1 1 2 0 Pittsburgh Cole W,7-4 5 1 0 0 1 5 Pimentel 0 1 2 2 3 0 J.Hughes H,5 1 0 0 0 0 1 Ju.Wilson H,12 1 0 0 0 0 0 Watson 1 0 0 0 0 0 J.Gomez 1 0 0 0 0 0 Pimentel pitched to 4 batters in the 6th. HBPby Cole (Gwynn Jr.). WPPimentel. UmpiresHome, CB Bucknor; First, Tripp Gibson; Sec ond, Dale Scott; Third, Dan Iassogna. T:13. A,977 (38,362). Athletics 1, Blue Jays 0, 12 innings Toronto Oakland ab r h bi ab r h bi Reyes ss 6 0 1 0 Crisp cf 3 0 1 0 MeCarr lf 5 0 1 0 Jaso dh 2 0 0 0 Bautist dh 5 0 1 0 Freimn ph-dh 2 0 1 0 Encrnc 1b 3 0 0 0 Cespds lf 4 0 0 0 DNavrr c 5 0 1 0 Moss 1b 4 0 0 0 Glenn rf 4 0 0 0 Callasp 1b 1 0 0 0 ClRsms ph-cf 1 0 0 0 Dnldsn 3b 5 0 1 0 StTllsn 3b 4 0 2 0 V ogt rf 3 0 1 0 Lind ph 1 0 0 0 Gentr y pr-rf 2 0 0 0 JFrncs 3b 0 0 0 0 DNor rs c 3 1 0 0 Mstrnn cf-rf 5 0 1 0 Lowrie ss 4 0 0 0 Kawsk 2b 4 0 2 0 Punto 2b 5 0 1 0 Totals 43 0 9 0 T otals 38 1 5 0 Toronto 000 000 000 000 0 Oakland 000 000 000 001 1 One out when winning run scored. EMe.Cabrera (2), Lowrie (9). DPToronto 1, Oakland 2. LOBToronto 10, Oakland 10. 2BSt.Tolleson (6), Freiman (2), Donaldson (13), Punto (6). SBReyes (17), St.Tolleson (2), Crisp (14). SKawasaki. IP H R ER BB SO Toronto Stroman 7 3 0 0 3 7 Loup 1 1 0 0 1 1 McGowan 1 0 0 0 1 2 Cecil 1/3 0 0 0 1 0 Jenkins L,0-1 2 1 1 0 1 0 Oakland Milone 6 4 0 0 1 6 OFlaherty 1 1 0 0 0 0 Gregerson 1 1 0 0 0 0 Doolittle 1 1 0 0 0 1 Abad 1 1 0 0 0 0 Cook 1 0 0 0 1 0 Otero W,7-1 1 1 0 0 0 0 WPStroman. UmpiresHome, Vic Carapazza; First, Bill Miller; Second, Gabe Morales; Third, Chad Fairchild. T:05. A,322 (35,067). Yankees 6, Twins 5 New York Minnesota ab r h bi ab r h bi Gardnr lf 4 2 1 0 Dozier 2b 5 1 1 1 BRorts 2b 5 2 4 1 KSuzuk c 5 0 2 0 Ellsury cf 4 0 1 2 P armel lf-1b 5 0 0 0 Teixeir 1b 4 1 1 1 KMor ls 1b 4 1 2 0 Beltran dh 3 0 0 1 Nunez pr-lf 0 1 0 0 ISuzuki rf 4 0 0 0 Arcia rf 2 1 1 1 Cervelli c 4 1 3 0 Plouffe 3b 4 0 1 1 KJhnsn 3b 4 0 0 0 Colaell dh 4 1 1 2 ZeWhlr 3b 0 0 0 0 EEscor ss 4 0 1 0 Ryan ss 3 0 0 1 Fuld cf 4 0 2 0 Totals 35 6 10 6 T otals 37 5 11 5 New York 330 000 000 6 Minnesota 112 000 010 5 LOBNew York 6, Minnesota 7. 2BB.Roberts 3 (14), Teixeira (6), Cervelli 2 (4), K.Suzuki (17). 3BGardner (6), B.Roberts (4), Arcia (2). HRDozier (16), Cola bello (5). SBNunez (2), Arcia (1). CSDozier (5). SFBeltran, Ryan. IP H R ER BB SO New York Whitley 3 8 4 4 1 4 Huff W,2-0 3 0 0 0 0 3 Warren H,14 2/3 1 0 0 0 0 Betances H,12 1 1/3 1 1 1 0 0 Dav.Robertson S,20-22 1 1 0 0 0 3 Minnesota Gibson L,7-7 2 6 6 5 1 0 Deduno 4 2/3 3 0 0 0 4 Thielbar 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Fien 1 1 0 0 0 2 Perkins 1 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby Betances (Arcia), by Deduno (Ellsbury). PBK.Suzuki. UmpiresHome, Joe West; First, Marty Foster; Second, Rob Drake; Third, Alan Porter. T:17. A,952 (39,021).Late ThursdayAngels 5, Astros 2 Houston Los Angeles ab r h bi ab r h bi Altuve 2b 5 1 3 0 Cowgill rf 3 0 0 0 JCastro c 4 0 2 1 T rout cf 4 1 2 0 Springr rf 4 0 1 1 Pujols 1b 4 0 1 0 Singltn 1b 3 0 0 0 JHmltn lf 4 0 0 0 MDmn 3b 4 0 0 0 HKndrc 2b 4 1 2 1 Carter dh 4 0 1 0 A ybar ss 4 1 1 0 Presley cf 4 0 1 0 Cron dh 2 1 1 1 KHrndz lf 3 0 0 0 F reese 3b 3 1 2 2 MGnzlz ss 2 1 0 0 JMcDnl 3b 0 0 0 0 Iannett c 1 0 0 1 Totals 33 2 8 2 T otals 29 5 9 5 Houston 002 000 000 2 Los Angeles 100 400 00x 5 DPHouston 3, Los Angeles 1. LOBHouston 8, Los Angeles 4. 2BAltuve (26), Carter (12), Presley (4), Trout (23), Freese (9). SBSpringer (4). SFIannetta. IP H R ER BB SO Houston Oberholtzer L,2-7 6 1/3 9 5 5 3 4 Veras 1 2/3 0 0 0 0 2 Los Angeles Shoemaker W,6-2 6 7 2 2 3 7 Jepsen H,8 1 0 0 0 0 1 Grilli H,2 1 1 0 0 0 1 J.Smith S,10-14 1 0 0 0 1 0 UmpiresHome, Paul Nauert; First, Angel Hernandez; Second, Adrian Johnson; Third, Larry Vanover. T:00. A,625 (45,483). Athletics 4, Blue Jays 1 Toronto Oakland ab r h bi ab r h bi Reyes ss 4 0 0 0 Jaso dh 4 1 1 1 MeCarr rf 3 0 0 0 Callasp 3b 3 0 0 1 Bautist dh 4 0 1 0 Cespds lf 4 0 0 0 Encrnc lf 4 1 1 0 Moss rf 2 1 1 0 Lind 1b 3 0 1 0 Lowrie ss 4 0 0 0 StTllsn ph 1 0 0 0 V ogt c 3 1 1 0 JFrncs 3b 3 0 0 0 F reimn 1b 2 0 1 1 Kawsk 2b 1 0 0 0 Sogard 2b 3 0 1 0 Gose cf 3 0 0 1 Gentr y cf 3 1 1 0 Thole c 3 0 2 0 Totals 29 1 5 1 T otals 28 4 6 3 Toronto 010 000 000 1 Oakland 020 000 02x 4 EKawasaki (4). DPToronto 1, Oakland 3. LOBToronto 4, Oakland 4. 2BLind (16), Jaso (12), Moss (16), Vogt (2), Freiman (1). SFCallaspo. IP H R ER BB SO Toronto Dickey L,6-8 8 6 4 2 3 6 Oakland Gray W,8-3 7 4 1 1 3 5 Otero H,9 1 1 0 0 0 0 Doolittle S,12-15 1 0 0 0 0 2 WPGray. PBThole. UmpiresHome, Chad Fairchild; First, Vic Carapazza; Second, Bill Miller; Third, Gabe Morales. T:23. A,913 (35,067). Dodgers 3, Rockies 2 Los Angeles Colorado ab r h bi ab r h bi DGordn 2b 4 1 1 0 Blckmn rf 3 1 1 0 Puig rf 4 0 0 0 Stubbs cf 4 0 1 0 HRmrz ss 2 0 0 0 Mornea 1b 4 0 2 1 Arrrrn ss 0 0 0 0 Tlwtzk ss 4 0 1 0 AdGnzl 1b 4 0 1 1 Dickr sn lf 3 0 1 0 Kemp lf 3 1 0 0 Arenad 3b 4 0 0 0 VnSlyk cf 4 0 1 0 Rosario c 4 0 0 0 Uribe 3b 4 1 3 1 LeMahi 2b 4 1 2 0 A.Ellis c 3 0 0 1 FMor ls p 1 0 0 0 Greink p 3 0 0 0 Rutledg ph 1 0 1 1 Ethier ph 1 0 0 0 Kahnle p 0 0 0 0 Jansen p 0 0 0 0 Bar nes ph 1 0 0 0 Masset p 0 0 0 0 Hwkns p 0 0 0 0 R Whelr ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 32 3 6 3 T otals 34 2 9 2 Los Angeles 001 100 001 3 Colorado 000 010 010 2 EPuig (1). DPLos Angeles 2. LOBLos Angeles 6, Colorado 7. 2BVan Slyke (7), Uribe (12), Rutledge (6). 3BMorneau (2). SFA.Ellis. IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles Greinke W,11-4 8 9 2 1 2 8 Jansen S,26-29 1 0 0 0 0 1 Colorado F.Morales 5 4 2 1 2 4 Kahnle 2 1 0 0 0 1 Masset 1 0 0 0 0 0 Hawkins L,2-2 1 1 1 1 1 2 PBRosario. UmpiresHome, Brian ONora; First, Cory Blaser; Second, Pat Hoberg; Third, Jeff Kellogg. T:02. A,533 (50,480). Yankees 7, Twins 4 New York Minnesota ab r h bi ab r h bi Gardnr lf 4 0 1 1 Dozier 2b 4 1 2 0 Jeter ss 4 0 0 1 KSuzuk c 4 1 1 1 Ellsury cf 4 0 0 0 P armel 1b 4 0 1 1 Teixeir 1b 4 1 2 0 KMorls dh 4 0 0 1 McCnn c 4 1 1 0 Wlngh lf 4 0 0 0 Beltran dh 4 1 1 3 Arcia rf 3 0 1 0 ISuzuki rf 3 1 2 0 Plouffe 3b 4 1 1 0 ZeWhlr 3b 4 2 2 1 EEscor ss 3 0 1 1 Ryan 2b 4 1 1 1 Fuld cf 3 1 2 0 Totals 35 7 10 7 T otals 33 4 9 4 New York 000 040 300 7 Minnesota 101 001 100 4 DPNew York 2, Minnesota 2. LOBNew York 2, Minnesota 3. 2BRyan (1), K.Suzuki (16), Parmelee (5), Plouffe (24). HRBeltran (9), Ze.Wheeler (1). IP H R ER BB SO New York Tanaka W,12-3 7 9 4 4 0 3 Betances H,11 1 0 0 0 0 2 Dav.Robertson S,19-21 1 0 0 0 1 3 Minnesota P.Hughes L,8-5 6 1/3 8 7 7 1 6 Duensing 2/3 1 0 0 0 0 Swarzak 2 1 0 0 0 2 UmpiresHome, Alan Porter; First, Joe West; Second, Marty Foster; Third, Rob Drake. T:36. A,714 (39,021).This Date In BaseballJuly 5 1904 The Philadelphia Phillies snapped the New York Giants 18-game winning streak with a 6-5 10-inning victory. 1935 Tony Cuccinello of the Dodgers and his brother Al for the Giants each hit home runs in the same game to mark the rst time in major league history that brothers on opposing teams con nected for homers. Brooklyn beat New York 14-4. 1937 Hal Trosky hit three home runs to pace the Cleveland Indians to a 14-4 victory over the St. Louis Browns in the opener of a doubleheader. 1937 Frank DeMaree of Chicago went 6-for-7 in the rst game of a doubleheader, in which the Cubs beat the St. Louis Cardinals 13-12 in 14 innings. DeMaree had three doubles and three singles. The Cubs won the second game 9-7 and DeMaree had two more singles. 1947 Larry Doby became the rst black to play in the American League. He struck out as a pinch-hitter as Cleveland lost 6-5 to the White Sox. 1961 Bill White hit three home runs and a double to power the St. Louis Cardinals to a 9-1 victory over the Los Angeles Dodgers. 1987 Mark McGwire became the rst rookie to hit 30 homers before the All-Star break and Jose Can seco homered twice, leading the Oakland Athletics to a 6-3 victory over the Boston Red Sox. 1991 The Colorado Rockies and the Florida Mar lins were given nal approval by baseball owners with a unanimous vote to join the NL in 1993. 1993 Rickey Henderson of the Oakland Athletics opened both games of a doubleheader with a homer to become the second player to accomplish the feat. Harry Hooper of the Boston Red Sox homered to start both games against Washington on May 30, 1913. 1998 Roger Clemens became the 11th pitcher in baseball history to notch 3,000th strikeouts. Clemens needed ve strikeouts to reach the 3,000 mark before Torontos game against the Tampa Bay Devil Rays.

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Saturday, July 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 rf ntb nnn rff rfntb rtbr rf HARBORHILLSGOLFSPECIAL4-SOMESPECIAL$100BRINGA4-SOMEANDSAVEMONEYGOODJULY7-13,2014Pe rfectSwingGolfAcademyatHarborHillsCountryClubJuly11&12,2014Joinoure-mail cl ubtoday!To mLeimberger-PGAClassA (352)753-7711 JoeRedoutey-MasterClubFitter (352)205-0217ACADEMYSCHEDULE rfnrtb n tn r nn b LUNCHINCLUDEDEACHDAY! CALL TO DAY TO SIGNUP $399perStudentLimit12perSchool LAURENT CIPRIANI / AP Britains Christopher Froome, front, rides with Spains David Lopez during a training ahead of the Tour de France cycling race in Leeds, Britain, on Friday. The Tour de France starts today in Leeds in and nishes in Paris on July 27. JAMEY KEATENAssociated PressLEEDS, England So your national team is out of the World Cup in Brazil, Wimbledon doesnt seem the same without Serena Williams or Rafael Nadal and your baseball team is slumping. This weekend, fans of many stripes could join die-hard cycling buffs and tune in to the start of the 101st Tour de France for that much needed sports x. Cyclings big event gets going Saturday through bucolic coun tryside in northern En gland, where ofcials have paid for the right to host it, hoping to draw tourists, capture media attention and feed the recent cycling craze among Britons. It could rst require getting over a nagging belief that, after Lance Armstrongs doping exposure, the sport may still be dogged by drugs cheats. Cycling chiefs and experts generally agree that the era of widespread doping is over, but few would claim to know that to days pack is fully clean. Drugs testers will conduct hundreds of blood and urine checks during the race. Bookmakers odds foresee a victory either by defending cham pion Chris Froome, a 29-year-old Kenyan-born Briton who leads Team Sky, or two-time champ Al berto Contador a 31-year-old Spaniard with Tinkoff-Saxo Bank to take home the yel low jersey when the race nishes on Paris Champs-Elysees on July 26. Few of the 198 riders on the 22 teams stand a realistic chance of winning, based on recent performances, skill sets and team priorities. Most are domestiques who race above all to help their team leaders win. Vincenzo Nibali of Italy, plus Spaniards Alberto Valverde and Joaquin Rodriquez, stand an outside chance. Conceding homeroad advantage, Con tador said Friday that local hero Froome remains the favorite. The Briton, who succeeded Sky teammate and compatriot Brad ley Wiggins as Tour winner, said: I dont think many Tour champions get to come back as defending champions and can start in front of their home crowd. Five of the 21 stages end in summit nish es, which usually prom ise drama as the cream of the climbers rises to the top rst. In all, the riders will cover 2,277 miles of roads in En gland, France, Belgium and Spain. Aside from cobblestone treachery in Stage 5, the mountains mostly matter this year. For the rst time in 61 years, this Tour has only one long time tri al a race-against-theclock, where racers set off one-by-one down a starters ramp. It comes in Stage 20. Contador and Froome are among the best in both climbing and time-trialing. This year marks the second time that the Tour de France is start ing in Britain, after a successful time in London in 2007. Local of ficials use municipal funds to pay for the right to host the race in their cities, hoping for short-term tourism revenues plus a lon ger-term return from the international media spotlight. The Tours route changes every year. Af ter three stages in En gland, this 101st edi tion enters France on Tuesday. The riders will cover many of the same roads their fore bears covered since the race was first run in 1903. Among novelties this year: the first-ev er Chinese rider in the race, Cheng Ji, and 11 climbs in the eastern Vosges mountains though long, steep ascents await in the Alps and Pyrenees too. If turnout on English roads during the 2007 Tour de France is any precedent when millions lined up twoto three-people deep to watch the pack zip by expect big crowds again this year. Todays 118-mile rolling Stage 1 from Leeds to Harrogate is likely to favor sprint ers. The Tours green jersey goes to the best overall sprinter, one of many subplots to the overall title chase which includes pure climbers seeking the polka-dot jersey to be the best man in the mountains. Many of the Union Jack-waving spectators will want Britains Mark Cavendish, per haps the best sprinter of his generation, to get his 26th career Tour stage victory in Harrogate, his mothers hometown. If he does, hell wear the race leaders yellow jersey for the first time in his career a covet ed honor. Kate, the Duchess of Cornwall, will do the honors in bestowing the prized shirt at the awards ceremony on Saturday, join ing Prince William and Prince Harry for a royal welcome for the French Republics best-known annual sporting event.Tour de France ready to set off in England Rodriguez tried to control the pace of the match at the Arena Cas telao, but it was Brazil that created most of the scoring chances as Co lombia goalkeeper David Ospina had to make a series of saves in the rst half alone. The Colombians tried to pressure in the end after Rodriguezs pen alty, but Brazil held on with tough defending. This is a very tough moment for us, Colombia coach Jose Pekerman said. We always had the dream of winning this match even though we knew Brazil would be a very tough opponent. We knew how decisive this was, and that any mis take would cost us. Colombia was coming off four straight wins, playing some of the most impressive football of the tournament. And the Colombians, playing in the quarter nals for the rst time, had entered the match with an offensive team that had scored 11 goals, second only to the Netherlands. After not playing in the World Cup for so long, we were able to show the value of the Colombian football and the talent of some of our players, said Peker man, an Argentine. They showed great spirit and presence of mind. They came to play a great World Cup, not just to participate. There was a lot of talk about Rodriguez and Neymar before the match, but the 22-yearold forwards didnt re ally live up to expectations. Rodriguez scored the late penalty but was otherwise mostly in effective, as was Ney mar before he left on a stretcher after being hit on the back late in the match. The Brazilian star was apparently crying in pain as he was carried out of the eld. Silva was the crucial player for Brazil, but he will miss the match against Germany after getting his second yellow card of the tourna ment for trying to keep Ospina from putting the ball back in play. Colombia had a goal disallowed in the 66th minute for offside. Vet eran defender Mario Yepes found the net from close range after a scramble inside the penalty area but the linesman had already stopped play. Brazil is trying to be come the rst host to win the World Cup since France in 1998. At the last two World Cups, Brazil lost to the Netherlands in the quarternals in 2010 and to France in 2006. The team hadnt made it to the seminals since it won its fth world ti tle in South Korea and Japan in 2002.GERMANY 1, FRANCE 0RIO DE JANEIRO It just wouldnt be the World Cup without Ger many in the seminals. Harnessing all their big-game experience, the Germans delivered a performance of maturity and efciency to hold off France 1-0 on Friday and become the rst team to reach four straight seminals in the sports marquee tournament. Defender Mats Hummels scored the winning goal in the 13th minute, outmuscling his marker at a free kick to glance a header in off the under side of the crossbar. Criticized for poor defending in earlier matches, Germany selected a more robust lineup and restricted a at France team to only a handful of clear-cut opportunities in muggy conditions. There was not much in it, France coach Didier Deschamps said. But, we dont have the international experi ence Germany has. While Frances young players slumped to the ground and some shed tears after the nal whistle, the Germans soberly saluted all corners of the Maracana Stadium. One job done, nothing more. And next up for Ger many is a meeting with host nation Brazil, which beat Colombia 2-1 later Friday. It will be Germanys 13th appear ance in the seminals in 20 editions of the World Cup. DAVID VINCENT / AP Germanys Jerome Boateng, left, and Mats Hummels beat Frances Olivier Giroud to the ball during a World Cup quarternal match at the Maracana Stadium in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on Friday. WORLD CUPFROM PAGE B1David Ragan and I both have good enough cars to win, and that is an ex citing feeling. Its something we dont have every week. The top 24 drivers Friday in the rst knockout stage were supposed to advance to the next round, but rain prompted NASCAR to cancel the nal two sessions. Reed Sorenson qualied second, followed by Landon Cassill, Bobby La bonte and Jimmie Johnson. Daytona 500 winner Dale Earnhardt Jr., who will attempt to be come the sixth drive to sweep both annual races at NASCARs most famous track Saturday, was seventh. All the talk during and after was about how the qualify ing session shook out. It was the rst time NASCARs new qualifying rules were used at Day tona, and it pro duced some hairy moments as groups of cars slowed to a crawl around the 2 1/2-mile super speedway. The small packs most of them formed by teammates were hoping to pull behind bigger groups to produce fast laps. But no one was ea ger to lead the way. Its a mess, Earnhardt said. You have to be in the very back and try to get a big tow. I aint ever seen anything like it. Its the fun niest thing Ive ever seen. Risky, too. Sever al cars turned down pit road to get away from the disorder. But the most common concern was the speed differenc es, with some packs creeping along while others ran full speed. It was real ly wild and it was pretty dangerous, Matt Kenseth said. Theres car doing 80 and there were cars doing 200 and nobody wanted to go. Everybody wanted to be in the back of the pack and try to catch the front to get a (fast) lap, so it was pretty chaotic. DAYTONAFROM PAGE B1

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Which phrase is more meaningful to you: holding fast to God or clinging to God? Let me ex plain why I asked. A lot has changed in the area of Bible study since I became a Christian 35 years ago. Computer and the Internet are responsible for most changes. Years ago, I used a concor dance for word studies. The only one available was Strongs Concordance, which used the King James Version. Although it was my only option at the time, it made my study cumbersome. Later, a concordance was compiled using the New International Version. Today, thanks to computers and the Internet, I can use Biblegateway.com and other sites to do an exhaustive word story with the push of a few keys. Usually I do word studies using the English Standard Version, but its possible to use several versions. For me, it has the readability of the New International Version coupled with the accuracy of the New American Standard Version. Ive never been a fan of paraphrases or the King James Version, but they can be useful for in-depth Bible study. In days gone by, you needed a parallel Bible, which has more than one version, to study alternate verses. But today, I can compare verses in up to ve different translations or paraphrases at one time. Translations are more pure but they can also be inaccurate. I prefer using ve translations the ESB, NIV, NASB, KJV and the New King James Version when comparing scriptures. I used them to compare Deuteronomy 30:19-20, Mosess charge to the Israelites before Joshua was named his successor. The following is the ESV: I call heaven and earth to witness against you today, that I have set before you life and death, blessing and curse, proclaimed Moses. Therefore choose life, that you and your offspring may live, loving the Lord your God, obeying his voice and holding fast to him, for he is your life and length of days, that you may dwell in the land that the Lord swore to your fathers, to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob, to give them. The ESV uses holding fast while the NKJV uses cling. They mean primarily the same thing but when I picture a child not wanting to let go of his or her mother I picture him or her clinging. You might prefer holding fast. The NIV uses remain true to Him, while the NASB uses holding fast to Him and the KJV uses mayest cleave unto Him. Use the one that helps make the Bible more real and practical to you. The Bible is meant for the heart, not the intellect. Thats the truth Ill cling to.Rick Reed is a columnist who lives in Mount Dora. To reach him, call 3831458 or email ricoh007@aol.comFaithforLife www.dailycommercial.com352-365-8203 features@dailycommercial.comC1DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, July 5, 2014 SUNDAYFIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH WELCOMES NEW PASTOR WITH RECEP -TION: At 12:15 p.m., at the church, 439 E. Fifth Ave., in Mount Dora. Rev. Kim Uchimura will preach in services at 8:15, 9:30 and 11 a.m. Go to www.mt -dorafumc.org for information. VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL AT SILVER LAKE COMMUNITY CHURCH: Sunday through July 10. Bible-learning ac -tivities, music, games and a mis-sion project for kids in India, from 6 to 8:45 p.m., ages 3-11 years, at the church, 34030 Radio Road in Lees -burg. Call 352-742-0648 or go to www.silverlakeecc.org to register. O WONDROUS LOVE PERFORMED BY ACADEMY OF ARTS AT GRACE BI -BLE BAPTIST CHURCH: At 10:30 a.m. Sunday. This professional Christian drama team from Taylors, S.C., has been performing since 1971. Free event. Call the church, 1703 Lewis Road, in Leesburg at 352-326-5738 for information. MONDAY FAIRWAY CHRISTIAN CHURCH SIN -GLES FELLOWSHIP: At 11:30 a.m., Lu-iginos Restaurant at Spanish Springs, in Lady Lake. Sign up at the HUB or call the church, 259 Avenida Los Angelos, The Villages, at 352-259-9305. JULY 12 FRED WARING REUNION CONCERT AT HOPE LUTHERAN CHURCH: At 7:30 p.m., 250 Avenida Los Angelos, The Villages. Fred Waring and the Penn-sylvanians popularized choral mu -sic. A group of former Pennsylva-nians will gather for this event. Doors open at 7:15 p.m. Seating is first-come, rst-served. Call the church at 352-750-2321 for details. JULY 19UPWARD SPORTS GAME DAY CLINIC AND TAILGATE PARTY AT EMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH: Clinic for ag foot -ball and cheerleading for K-fth grade from 9 a.m. to noon at the Canal Street eld across from Pat Thomas Stadium-Buddy Lowe Field in Lees -burg. Tailgate party at 12:30 p.m. at the church, 1710 U.S. Highway 441 in Leesburg. Free food, inatables, face painting, classic car show and Chris -tian music. To register, call 352-323-1588 or email emmanuelchurch@em -barqmail.com. JULY 21GATEWAY TO GALILEE VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL: Through Friday from 9 a.m. to noon, for children in third-fth grade, First United Methodist Church, 439 E. Fifth Ave., in Mount Dora. Register at www.mtdorafumc. org/children. JULY 23 VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL AT CENTRAL BAPTIST CHURCH: Hungry Games for children in fourth to sixth grade, at the church, 104 Perkins St., in Leesburg, July 23-27. Call 352-787-3966 to reg -ister or for information.To place an item on the calendar, send an email to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com.CHURCH CALENDAR RICK REEDREFLECTIONS Use various translations to further your Bible study DIDI TANGAssociated PressBEIJING Students and civil ser vants in Chinas Muslim northwest, where Beijing is enforcing a security crackdown following deadly un rest, have been ordered to avoid taking part in traditional fasting during the Islamic holy month of Ramadan. Statements posted in the past sev eral days on websites of schools, government agencies and local par ty organizations in the Xinjiang region said the ban was aimed at pro tecting students wellbeing and preventing use of schools and government ofces to promote religion. Statements on the websites of local party organizations said members of the ofcially atheist ruling party also should avoid fasting. No teacher can participate in re ligious activities, instill religious thoughts in students or coerce stu dents into religious activities, said a statement on the website of the No. 3 Grade School in Ruoqiang County in Xinjiang. Similar bans have been imposed in the past on fasting for Ramadan, which began at sundown Saturday. But this year is unusually sensitive because Xinjiang is under tight security following attacks that the government blames on Muslim extremists with foreign terrorist ties. Violence has escalated in recent years in Xinjiang. The ruling par ty blames violent extremists that it says want independence, while members of the regions Uighur ethnic group complain that discrimination and restrictions on religion, such as a ban on taking children to mosques, are fueling anger at the ethnic Han Chinese majority. An attack on May 22 in the regional capital of Urumqi by four people who threw bombs in a vegetable market killed 43 people, includ ing the attackers. On June 22, police in Kashgar in the far west said they killed 13 assailants who drove into a police building and set off explosives, injuring three ofcers. Authori ties have blamed two other attacks at train stations in Urumqi and in Chinas southwest on Muslim extremists. The government responded with a crackdown that resulted in more than 380 arrests in one month and public rallies to announce sentences. The ruling party is wary of re ligious activities it worries might serve as a rallying point for opposition to one-party rule. Controls on worship are especially sensitive in Xinjiang and in neighboring Tibet, where religious faith plays a large role in local cultures. On Tuesday, authorities in some communities in Xinjiang held cel ebrations of the anniversary of the founding of the Communist Par ty and served food to test wheth er Muslim guests were fasting, according to Dilxat Raxit, spokes man in Germany for the rights group World Uyghur Congress. This will lead to more conicts if China uses coercive measures to rule and to challenge Uighur be liefs, said Dilxat Raxit in an email. The ruling party says religion and education should be kept separate and students should not be subject to religious inuences. That rule is rarely enforced for children of Han Chinese, who, if they have a religion, are mostly Buddhist, Daoist or Christian. Students shall not participate in religious activities; they shall not study scripts or read poems at script and choir classes; they shall not wear any religious emblems; and no parent or others can force students to have religious beliefs or partake in religious activities, said the statement on the website of the grade school in Ruoqiang County. A news portal run by the Chinese officials forbid fasting during holy month in Muslim northwest PHOTOS BY ANDY WONG / AP Chinese Muslims gather to break their fast during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan at the Niujie mosque, the oldest and largest mosque in Beijing, on Wednesday. Chinese Muslim men chat as they wait for the time to break their fast.Ramadan bannedSEE RAMADAN | C3

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, July 5, 2014 Fo r in fo rm at ion on li st in g yo ur ch ur ch on th is pa ge ca ll th e Cl assied De pt. at 352-314-3278Bearingaheavy weighttogetherGe nesis Ps alm Ro mans Ma tthew24:34-38,45:10-177:15-24a11:16-19, 42-49,58-67So ngof So lomon2:8-1325-30 C LibertyBaptistChurch11043 Tr ueLife Wa y, Clermont352-394-0708 Senior Pa storChrisJohnsonSun.Svc.10:40am,FamilyPrayerSvc.6:00pmUnashamedStudentsService6:00pm Sun.BibleFellowship9:30am We d.BibleStudy6:30pm, Kids4 Tr uthClubs6:30pmGroupsforallages,Nurseryprovidedallserviceswww.lbcclermont.org E FirstUnitedMethodistChurch ofEustisA Placewhere Yo uMatter 600 S. GroveStreet,Eustis352-357-5830 Senior Pa storBeth Fa rabeeCoffeeandFellowship9:00am Contemporary Wo rship9:30am Tr aditional Wo rship11:00amLifeWithoutLimitsMinistries150E.Barnes Av enue,Eustis352-399-2913 BishopRobertDixonSundaySchool9:00am Sunday Wo rshipService10:00am We dnesdayFamilyBibleStudy7:00pmwww.lifewithout-limits.comSt.ThomasEpiscopalChurch317 S. MarySt.,Eustis(corner S. Mary&LemonSt.)352-357-4358 Rev.John W. LipscombIII,RectorSundayHolyEucharistServices 8:00am&10:30am AdultSundaySchool9:20am, ChildrensChapel Thurs.HolyEucharist&HealingService 10:00amwww.stthomaseustis.comUnitarianUniversalist CongregationofLakeCountyEustis Wo mansClubBuilding 227NorthCenterStreet,Eustis352-728-1631ForJulyandAugust Sunday10:30am-11:30am Discussion gr oupwithbriefserviceFa cebook:www.facebook.com/UUlakecoWe bsite:www.lakecountyuu.org Email:lakecountyuu@gmail.com F P Holy Tr inityEpiscopalChurch2201SpringLakeRoad,FruitlandPark352-787-1500 Fa ther Te dKoellnSundayService8:00am,10:00am We dnesdayHealingService11:30amwww.holytrinityfp.comLIFEChurchAssemblyofGod04001PicciolaRd.,FruitlandPark352-787-7962 Pa storRick We lborneSundayDeafImpaired10:00am SundayEvening6:00pm We dnesdayPrayerand Yo uthService7:00pm SundaySchool9:00am We dnesdayBibleStudy7:00pmPilgrimsUnitedChurchof Christ(UCC)509CountyRoad468,FruitlandParkwww.pucc.info 352-365-2662orofce@pucc.infoRev.RonalK.F.Nicholas,OSL, Pa stor Rev.Camille F. Gianaris, Pa storalAssistant Sunday Wo rship10:00am Contactusorvisitourwebsiteformoreinfo G Mt.OliveMissionary BaptistChurch15641Stuc ky Loop,Stuc ky (WestofMascotte)352-429-3888 Rev.ClarenceL.Southall-PastorSunday Wo rshipService11:00am SundaySchool9:30am BibleStudy-Wednesday7:00pm Yo uthBibleStudy-Wednesday7:00pmZionLutheranChurch(ELCA)547 S. Main Av e. ,Groveland352-429-2960 Pa storKenStoyerSunday Wo rshipService11:00am AdultSundaySchool9:30am L L BethanyLutheranChurch1334GrifnRoad,Leesburg352-787-7275SundayService9:30am We dnesdayBibleStudy10:00am SundayBibleStudy8:30amEmmanuelBaptistChurch ofLeesburg1710 U.S. Hwy.441E.,Leesburg352-323-1588 Pa storJeffCarneySundayCelebrationService10:30am We dnesdayMensPrayerBreakfast8:00am We dnesdayPraise&Prayer6:30pm SundayBibleStudy9:15am We dnesdayEpic Yo uthMinistry6:30pmwww.EmmanuelFL.comFaith Wo rldAUnitedPentecostal,ApostolicChur ch 2205 W. MainStreet,Leesburg352-787-0510 Pa stor Tr uemanHurleyServicesInterpretedfortheDeaf SundaySchoolAllAges10:00am ContemporaryPraise& Wo rship10:45am We dnesdayPraise&ChildrenProg ra m7:30pmwww.faithworldupc.org Fa cebook: Fa ith Wo rldLeesburgFirstBaptistLeesburg220 N. 13thSt.,Leesburg352-787-1005SundayService8:15am,9:30am &10:45am SundayBibleStudy8:15am, 9:30am&10:45am We dnesdayNightActivities6:00pmwww.fbcleesburg.orgFirstChurchofChrist, Scientist,Leesburg13th&LineSt.,Leesburg352-787-1921SundayService10:30am SundaySchool10:30am We dnesdaySchool3:30pmFirstPresbyterianCurch ofLeesburg200 S. LoneOakDr.,Leesburg352-787-5687SundayService10:00pm SundaySchool8:45amwww.rstpresleesburg.orgDisciplesMakingDisciplesGloriaDeiLutheranChurch130 S. LoneOakDrive,Leesburg352-787-3223Sunday Wo rshipOctober-April 8:00am&10:30am Sunday Wo rshipMay-September9:15am ChristianEducationOctober-April9:15amwww.gloriadeielca.netLakesandHillsCovenantChurchRev.KenFolmsbee,PhD, Pa storWo rshipService10:15am BibleStudy9:00am @ Wo mensClubofLeesburg 700 S. 9thStreet,Leesburg Chur ch Ofce 106 S. Palm Av e. ,Howie-in-the-Hills352-552-0052 www.lakeshillscovenantchurch.orgLegacyCommunityChurchLocatedatLakeSquareMall,Leesburg (suite331nexttoJCPenney)Pa storTheoBob-352-250-0156 Pa storBuddy Wa lker-352-978-0509 Spanish Pa storLuisFuentes-352-552-1357Sunday Wo rshipService9:30am Legacyisamulticultural,multiracial, generational,ChristianChur chwww.legacycic.orgSt.PaulRomanCatholicChurch(InunionwiththeRomanCatholicDioceseof Orlando&The Va tican)1330Sunshine Av enue,LeesburgWe ekdayMassesM-F8:30am SacramentofPenance Saturday2:30-3:30pm(or by appointment) SaturdayMasses4:00&7:00pm(Spanish) SundayMasses7:00,9:00,11:00am,12:30pm OfceHoursM-F8:00-12:00,1:00-4:00SeventhDayAdventist508 S. LoneOakDr.,Leesburg352-326-4109Wo rshipService9:30am SabbathSchoolService11:00am We dnesdayPrayerMeeting7:00pmSolidRockEvangelicalFellowship EvangelicalPresbyterianChurchLeesburgCommunityBuilding 109E.Dixie Av enue,Leesburg352-431-3944 Rev.Dr.JohnLodgeSundayService9:30am SundaySchool10:45amwww.solidrockef.comTheHealingPlace1012WMainStreet,Leesburg352-617-0569 Fa cilitator:PhyllisGilbertSundayServiceandKidsClub11:00am We dnesdayBibleStudyand KidsClub6:00pm (Nurseyopenforallservices) Comeasyouareandleavedifferent! M NewLifePresbyterianChurch, PCA18237E.ApshawaRoad,MinneolaMusicMinistries352-241-8181SundaySchool9:30am Sunday Wo rship10:45am M D CongregationalChurch650 N. DonnellySt.,MountDora352-383-2285 Rev.Dr.RichardDonSunday11:00am (Communion1stSundayofthemonth) MondayBibleStudy9:00am&6:00pm130yrs.ofserviceFirstPresbyterianChurch ofMountDora222 W. 6th Av enueatAlexander,Mt.Dora352-383-9132CombinedSummer Wo rship10:00am EverySundayJune8th-August31stwww.fpcmtdora.orgSt.PhilipLutheranChurch1050BoydDrive,Mt.Dora352-383-5402 Pa storRev.Dr.JohanBerghSundayService9:30am (ChildcareProvided) Fellowship10:45amwww.stphiliplc.com O CorpusChristiEpiscopal Church3430CountyRoad470,Okahumpka352-787-8430SundayRiteIIEucharistService9:00am RiteIEucharistService11:30am Fellowshipfollowing9:00amservice andbefore11:30amservice ThursdayMorningPrayer9:30amwww.corpuschristiepiscopal.org T AllSaintsRoman CatholicChapel11433 U.S. 441,RiverPlaza#11, Ta va re s407-391-8678 352-385-3880SundayLatinMass8:00am&10:00amFirstBaptistChurchof Ta vares124 N. Joanna Av enue, Ta va re s352-343-7131SundayContemporaryService8:30am Sunday Tr aditionalService 11:00am&6:00pm SundayBibleStudy(allages)10:00am We dnesdayFellowshipMeal5:00pm We dnesdayLifeUniversity6:15pm We dnesdayPrayerService6:15pm Providingdirectionforallgenerationswww.fbctavares.comTa varesFirstUnited MethodistChurch(UMC)CornerofOld441&SR19, Ta va re s352-343-2761 Pa storJohnBarhamTr aditionalService9:00am(Sanctuary) ContemporaryCafe-Style10:30am (ActivityCenter) Inquirer s AdultSundaySchool10:15am Tr eehouseKidsChur ch 10:45amBargainBoxThriftStor e, Thurs-Sat9amto1pmwww.fumctavares.com W LighthouseFoundation MinistriesInternationalINC.11282SR471, We bster352-793-2631 Pa stor Pa tricia T. BurnhamSundayServices9:00am&6:00pm ThursdayNight7:00pm 3rdSaturdayFoodBasketGive-A-Waywww.lighthousefoundationministries.orgLindenChurchofGod4309CR772, We bsterPa storDoyle D. GlassSundayMorning Wo rship10:30am SundayEvening Wo rship6:00pm SundaySchool9:45am We dnesdayNight(Family Tr ainingHour)7:00pm W r GreaterPineyGrove BaptistChurch,Inc.112HueyStreet,Wildwood352-748-1695 Rev.DannyL.McKenzie, Pa storSundaySchool9:15am Morning Wo rship10:30am We dnesdayNight6:30pm JoinusthisSundayfora re levant message, gr eatmusicandfriendly peoplewhoarejustlikeyou.greaterpineygrovebaptist@centurylink.net TheCharlotteMayfield AssistedLiving RetirementCommunity460NewellHillRd.,Leesburg352-365-6011AssistedLiving,IndependentLiving,DayStayResidency CombiningIndependencewithPersonalCareforover40yearsLicense#AL7389 1127 W. MainSt.,LeesburgJohn W. Snyder, President Dunstan&SonPlumbingCo.,Inc.PLUMBINGREPAIR&REMODELINGEst.1922CFC057100(352)787-4771 KIAofLEESBURG 352-365-1228Comevisitournewlocation!www.KiaofLeesburg.com

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Saturday, July 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 ANDREA RODRIGUEZAssociated PressHAVANA Launched as a bulletin for Catholic lay people, Espacio Laical magazine became an unusually open and critical forum for de bate in Cuba, a rarity in a country where the state has controlled all media for ve decades. Now, the sudden de parture of its two long time editors may have endangered that status just as Cubas Roman Catholic Church and the Communist-run country embark on major changes. First published in 2005, Espacio Laicals reections on faith and daily life were augmented by articles about pol itics, economics and society. The magazine became a must-read for members of Cubas academic and intellectual elite some of them the very architects of President Raul Castros ongoing reforms, such as allowing limited pri vate enterprise and de centralizing state-run businesses. Espacio Laical gave room to opinions from different points of view, said Cuban analyst and former diplomat Car los Alzugaray, who has worked with the maga zine. It is something that is very needed today in Cuba, which is a public space for debate about the nations problems. But editors Roberto Veiga and Lenier Gonza lez resigned in early May, later conrming they quit because the maga zines content was con troversial in the ecclesi astical community. The magazines director, Gustavo Andujar, said the editors left voluntarily. Published four times a year with a press run of just 4,500, Espacio Laical also has a website that is likely seen by few in a country where Internet access is difcult and costly. Its footprint is much smaller than publications like the Communist Par ty newspaper Granma, published daily and dis tributed to the masses across the island. But its audience was inuential, and its articles provoked debate. In July 2013, Espacio Laical published a sup plement titled Cuba Dreamed, Cuba Possible, Cuba Future, outlining what the country should aspire to, including freedom of expression, political as sociation and private economic rights. University of Havana religious historian En rique Lopez Oliva said that surely set off alarms both within the Catho lic community, which is divided over how much the church should involve itself in politics, and for government and party ofcials, who say Raul Castros reforms do not contemplate change to Cubas single-party system. These points consti tute a platform for a political movement, Lopez Oliva said. They must have caused a certain amount of concern. After the reforms began in earnest in 2010, Espacio Laical published analyses by economists such as Omar Everleny Perez and Pavel Vidal, who are associated with the government but have been relatively outspoken in criticizing its programs. In one piece, they said there were not enough approved free-market activities for half a million laidoff state workers, and not enough white col lar jobs for an educated population. Other contributing writers have included academics, energy experts and sociologists both inside and out side of Cuba. Espacio Laical also organized gatherings with diverse participants including prominent Cuban ex ile businessman Carlos Saladriegas. Andujar told The Associated Press in an email interview that some aspects of Espacio Laical wont change. But he also acknowledged there will be more emphasis on top ics like the arts, sciences and religious ethics, rather than an over whelming focus on economics and politics. It is not desirable that other, very broad and important aspects of the cultural life of the country and the world nd comparatively little space, he said. The changes at the magazine come as the church gets ready for a major transition. Car dinal Jaime Ortega sub mitted his resigna tion in 2011 as bishops customarily do upon turning 75. The Vatican has not yet accepted it, but Ortega is widely assumed to be leaving soon. Relations were hostile between the Catholic Church and the ofcially atheist state for decades after Cubas 1959 revo lution. It was Ortega that negotiated better ties, beginning the 1990s as Cuba removed referenc es to atheism in the con stitution and Pope John Paul II visited in 1998. Ortegas successor will be named by Pope Fran cis, a Jesuit seen as a re former keen on social is sues. Whoever takes his place as head of the Ha vana Archdiocese will have to chart his own course between empha sizing spiritual work and political involvement. Catholic authorities want further concessions such as more ac cess to radio and TV airwaves, the return of more church proper ty and permission to begin some kind of re ligious education causes that could be helped by not antago nizing the government. The changes at the magazine, Lopez Oli va said, could be a shift toward being more cau tious in the political arena.Critical forum may end with Cuban magazine changes FRANKLIN REYES / APIssues of the Roman Catholic magazine Espacio Laical exhibited for sale in a small shop in Old Havana, Cuba, on June 25. government of Yili in the northern reaches of Xinjiang said fast ing is detrimental to the physical wellbeing of young students, who should eat regularly. In the city of Bole, re tired teachers from the Wutubulage Middle School were called in to stand guard at mosques and prevent students from entering, accord ing to a statement on the municipal party committee website. Also in Bole, the Bozhou University of Radio and Television said on its website it held a meeting with working and retired mi nority teachers on the rst day of the Rama dan to remind them of the fasting ban. The forestry bureau in Xinjiangs Zhaosu county held an event the day before Rama dan at which party cad res signed a pledge they and their relatives would rmly resist fasting, according to a statement on the web site of the local party committee. The Moyu Weather Bureau in the Hotan area said on its website that Muslim employees, both active and retired, were required to sign a letter promising not to fast. The commercial bureau for Turpan, an oa sis town in the Taklam akan Desert, said in a statement that civil ser vants are strictly for bidden to fast or per form the Salat prayer ritual in a mosque. RAMADANFROM PAGE C1 ANDREW DEMILLOAssociated PressLITTLE ROCK, Ark. Candidates in the close ly watched Senate race in Arkansas sparred af ter Republican Rep. Tom Cotton said Democratic Sen. Mark Pryor believes faith is something that only happens at 11 oclock on Sunday mornings. Pryor accused Cotton of attacking his faith. Im disappointed in Congressman Cottons deeply personal attack on me, Pryor said in a statement. He and I may disagree on issues, but for him to ques tion my faith is out of bounds. The two-term sena tor talks often about his faith and quotes from the Bible during cam paign appearances. He made his faith the cen terpiece of an ad last year: Im not ashamed to say that I believe in God, Pryor said in the spot, which showed him holding a Bible. And I believe in his word. Cotton, a freshman congressman, made the remarks in a tele vision interview Tuesday when he was asked about Supreme Court ruling in the Hobby Lobby case that family-owned companies dont have to provide insurance coverage for contraception. Hobby Lobby and Conestoga Wood Specialties objected to the require ment under the presidents health care law on religious grounds. Cotton said the ruling showed the health care law infringed on Arkan sans liberties. Barack Obama and Mark Pryor think that faith is some thing that only happens at 11 oclock on Sunday mornings, Cotton told KNWA. Thats when we worship, but faith is what we live every single day, and the government shouldnt infringe on the rights of religious liberty. Later, Cotton said in a statement that his comments were directed at the federal health law and not at Pryors faith. Senator Pryor is a man of faith and prac tices it with commend able openness, which I respect, but I wish he would respect Arkan sans right to practice our faith, Cotton said. The increasingly ex pensive race in Arkansas is closely watched be cause Republicans need to gain six seats in No vember to capture majority control of the Sen ate. Top-tier GOP targets are the Republican-lean ing Southern states Arkansas, Louisiana and North Carolina where Obama is unpopular and incumbent Democratic senators are struggling to hold onto their seats.Faith at issue in Arkansas Senate race AP FILE PHOTO Arkansas Republican Senate candidate, Rep. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., speaks in North Little Rock, Ark. SHERIF TAREKMCTJewish and Muslim student groups at University of California at San Di ego had an idea they could work on together creating a campus din ing spot with both kosher and halal dishes. It was a small but meaningful collaboration amid tensions that have arisen from the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement, a glob al campaign that has sought to put economic and political pressure on Israel, in part, to protect Palestinian rights. I dont think anyone on our proj ect team thinks this will solve those disagreements, said Zev M. Hur witz of the Union of Jewish Students at UCSD. But we also think its possible to be progressive and productive on things like campus dining hall offerings. The students effort is one of sev eral in the UC system to create ko sher-halal dining spots most of which are still in the planning stag es. But Jewish and Muslim students said the opportunity to work togeth er has helped build understanding. Dialogue and coordination de nitely brings both communities clos er, said Jim Atkins, the executive di rector of Santa Cruz Hillel, which has been meeting with the UC campus Muslim Student Association. Kosher and halal orthodox methods of preparing food for Jews and Muslims, respectively are similar. Both generally forbid pork and require the ritual slaughter ing of animals to ensure thorough bleeding. Neither group typically eats birds of prey. Observant Jewish and Muslim students have a difcult time living on some campuses because the avail able meal plans dont always have kosher or halal options. UCSD students want to have a fa cility in one of the dining halls that currently are being renovated. Hibah Khan, a member of the campus Muslim Students Association, said the project hopes to create a kitchen with two separate spaces, one designated for kosher and the other for halal. If it happens, Khan said, Muslim and Jewish students will de nitely be seeing each other more and hopefully this will lead to new friendships, if not familiar faces. Getting a kosher-halal dining area has proven difcult on other Cali fornia campuses. UCLA ofcials asked the groups to nd a joint vendor that could pro vide halal and kosher meat. But after three months of searching, they werent able to nd one. Eventually the Muslim and Jewish student groups sought out separate vendors, Yesilyurt said. There are currently kosher choices available on campus, but no halal meat options. Still, Yesilyurt said both groups got something out of the experience. We have made some close friends, he said.Jewish, Muslim students work together for dining options ANNE CUSACK / MCT Zev Hurwitz, right, and Jonah Saidian, second from right, both with the Union of Jewish Students, and Hibah Khan, left, and Yasin Ahmed, second from left, both with the Muslim Student Association at UC San Diego, talk during a meeting to discuss offering kosher and halal food at facilities on campus.

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Saturday, July 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHER'S NOTICEFederal and State laws prohibit advertising expressing a discriminatory preference on the basis of race, age, sex, color, national origin, religion, handicap or marital status. The Daily Commercial will not knowingly accept advertisement for employment which is in violation of the law. Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance Employment Classifications are intended to announce bona de employment offers only. Employment advertising must disclose the specic nature of the work being offered. Some employment categories may charge fees. If any advertiser does not comply with these standards, please notify a Classied Sales Representative at 365-8245 or 365-8200.

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8626U.S.Hwy441~Leesburg,FL34788 NexttoLeesburgInternationalAirport 352.435.6131 SHOPFAMILYFURNITURE.COM Mon-Fri9-6,Sat10-6,Sun12-5 SAVEONTHEBRANDNAMESYOUKNOWANDTRUST D004564 We'llPayYour SalesTax! 24-MonthInterestFreeFinancing **minimumamountnanced$999,25%deposit re quired HeldOver! E1DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, July 5, 2014 URBAN GARDENING: Five keys to success / E2 www.dailycommercial.comHome&Garden352-365-8203 features@dailycommercial.com BENJAMIN BENSCHNEIDER / MCT Stu Feldt has roots in Minnesota; the Prairie and Craftsman styles of architecture inuenced the design of his Seattle home, which is ringed with windows to draw light. Landscape design is by Martha Shapiro of Shapiro Ryan Design and installed by Alliance Landscape Services. REBECCA TEAGARDENMCTContractor Stu Feldt is a stu dent of architecture. Lee Copeland designed my parents house, he says of the for mer dean of the University of Washington College of Architecture and Urban Planning (today known as the College of Built Environments). At 12 years old I fell in love with the process and wanted to be an architect. After college, though, I worked with a contractor and realized that I liked the hands on. For years Feldt bought neglected houses, xed, sold and sent them on their way. But, today hes seated in the living room of the home he (W.S. Feldt General Contractor) built for his own family, 3,600 square feet, open and, well, other wise a little tricky to describe. But, no matter what you call it, its a keeper. Prairie style was the inuence, says Feldt, who has roots in Minnesota and admits to having stalked homes designed by George Grant Elmslie and Frank Lloyd Wright. Well, Prairie style and Craftsman. The Green and Green house in Pasadena (The Gamble House) really inspired me. I wouldnt really call it Midcentury Modern, he says of his familys View Ridge home, but thats where its going with the interiors. Anyway, the idea out front was low to the ground. True to the Prairie style of design, the home is banded with windows, the roof is hipped and low-pitched with wide eaves. Concrete porch supports are true to the genre, but in reality, I took those from a hotel we like in Hawaii. They did theirs in lava rock. Inside the cheerful Sunburst Or ange front door, the place skews contemporary. Glass (windows and sliders from Lowen), steel, cedar, concrete oors with mahogany cab inetry and paneling, the icy-glass balls of a Bocci chandelier dangling over the dining table. Interior designer Kathleen Glossa stuck to the modern theme with furnishings and nishes at once warm, elegant and family friendly. Then, just to mix it up, there off the kitchen, is a family-sized nook. Modern in its execution (surrounded by glass), but rmly of Craftsman lineage. It has become the family command center. No matter how many built-in desks and study areas Feldt put into the place, everybodys always here. It turns out that its the proverbial kitchen table, he says. Feldt called upon architect David Norrie of Sandall Norrie Architects to put the pieces of his thoughts together into a cohesive design. Thats whats great about Dave, he studies how you live. The home serves its young family well. Coaxing the indoors out is a large, covered patio with a prominent concrete replace. We had a surprise party for Steph (Feldts wife) in late December, and people were still sitting out by the re at 1 / a.m. That concrete radiates the heat so well. Meanwhile, the boys, Nathan, 11, and Spencer, 9, got themselves a very cool bit of grafti art on the walls over the beds featuring their Prairie home: The lineage is classic, the feel mostly modern SEE PRAIRIE | E2 KIM COOKAssociated PressFor many young people, a rst apartment might be a cramped studio or just a bedroom in a shared living arrangement. Juggling that rooms living, dining and sleeping spaces requires creativity. Take Meg Volk, a New York-based producer and photographer who at 22 is a seasoned veteran of the tiny-home trenches: Shes on her third, under-300square-foot studio apartment. Find vertical space; think small and light; and when in doubt, do without, she advises. In my rst solo studio apartment, I had about 200 square feet and the op tion of a twin-size bed or a futon, she says. But she was lucky enough to have 10-foot ceilings. She built a sleeping loft with a porthole entrance and storage in the stairs. Was it claustrophobic? A little, but worth it, she says.Big tips for living in a small spaceSEE TIPS | E2 MICHAEL LOBIONDO / MCT Designer and home improvement expert Vicki Payne is host and producer of For Your Home and writes a column of the same name. VICKI PAYNEMCTAs a designer I am always looking for ways to make our homes more appealing and a true representa tive of our own personal style. On this holiday weekend I should be sharing ve ways to make your patio sparkle or offering tips on how to add a touch of the red, white and blue to your outdoor table setting. I dont think that would be the best use of my skills. Ive always been thrilled by the sight of the American ag ying from ag poles, draping porches and being waived by small children as they watch a parade. Its such a grand icon. Then it hit me like a ash from a holiday spar kler: I need to help decorate America. Sounds ambitious I know, but it is doable.How to decorate your home with American flagsSEE PAYNE | E3 MAUREEN GILMER / MCT Foxgloves thrive in coastal communities where it makes a ne back of the border accent. MAUREEN GILMERMCTIn the 18th century they called it dropsy. An old medical text ex plains the symptoms of this cardiac malady that caused such irregular or weak heartbeats that patients literally drowned in their own uids. The disease known as dropsy puffed their bodies into grotesque shapes, squeezed their lungs, and nally brought slow but inexo rable death. As the dis ease progressed, a wa ter liquid ltered into every available space and expanded it like a balloon. Sometimes the liquid quarts and gallons of it made arms and legs swell so that they were immovable. Sometimes it wa terlogged the lung cavity and thereby made it impossible for the victim to breathe unless he sat bolt upright all day and all night. There was only one known treatment for dropsy that seemed to work on those aficted. Yardsmart: Ancient cure, modern medicineSEE YARD | E3

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E2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, July 5, 2014 2:00-4:30pm$2.00OFFAny Pa staDinner$1.00OFFAny Pa nini 9945SEHwy.42,Summereld 42 4227/441SUMMERFIELD OCALATHEVILLAGES 122914thSt.,Leesburg27/441LEESBURGFRUITLAND PARK 441 HOURSMon-Sat 8to6 Sunday 9to5rf nt b WE NEEDn D004210 Tu es da y Ju ly 8th,2014 at 3PM names and a familiar-looking seahawk type of bird. Theres a pass-through in the closet connecting the rooms. Feldt had his boys in mind throughout the project. They were 2 and 4 when this process started, he says. And with two young boys, youve gotta have tile in the bathroom; especially important around the toilet. Technically, the home was nished in 2009. (It took about two years to build. Contractors house, second priority; paying customers rst.) But almost ve years later a few nal tweaks (visible only to a professionals eye) remain. PRAIRIE FROM PAGE E1 JOE LAMPLMCTGrowing plants, es pecially edibles in an urban environment such as an apartment deck or small patio can be a challenge. As much as we might like to have huge juicy homegrown tomatoes fresh from our bal cony, thats a tall or der with less than six hours each day of di rect sunlight. Having said that, its not im possible. But picking the right plants for your growing environment will have a lot to do with your gardening success and happiness level. Beyond that, there are other important considerations. These five tips to a produc tive urban garden should help add to the pleasure and success no matter where your garden grows. 1) Choose the best container While it is true that you can use just about anything as a contain er, it is important to give it some thought. No matter what con tainer you choose, it absolutely must have drainage holes. If it doesnt, drill some. Having a place for the water to drain out is very important. Some of the most readily available and practical container options are the following: %  en Clay: Inexpensive but can dry out quickly. Also prone to crack ing. %  en Plastic: Holds moisture very well. There are some high er end plastic pots that come in really cool de signs and colors. A very good value and will last for years. %  en Styrofoam: Mimics the look of concrete or stone without the weight %  en Wire baskets lined with coconut fiber: These are great, in expensive and reus able. They do tend to dry out in windy conditions, so place them where you can water them easily. 2) Pick the right soil Not all soil is suitable for container or urban gardening. Here are considerations for the most common options youll face: %  en Top soil: While better than backyard dirt, top soil is not engineered for container and urban gardens. Its great for filling ar eas like raised beds or low spots in a yard, but thats about it. Dont fall for the cheap price. Youll pay for it in short order when your plants drown from saturated soil. Topsoil is great in the right place but an urban garden or con tainer is not the place. %  en Garden soil: Typically labeled as such, garden soil is made for filling outdoor beds and areas where add ed bulk is needed. Its got a few more ingredi ents than straight topsoil including slow re lease nutrients, but its still too heavy for con tainers. %  en Container mix or potting soil: This is what you want. Its specifically made for containers. This soil is very lightweight, drains well and has slow release nutrients that keep plants fed throughout the season. 3) Plant selection Picking the right plant varieties is just as important as any thing else in the equation. There are many choices today bred specifically for small space gardening. Read the plant tag, snap the QR code, and look for key words in the plant name, such as patio, container, dwarf or urban. 4) Irrigation Irrigation is hugely important but it doesnt mean you need to put your busy life on hold just to keep your thirsty plants alive. Plants growing in con tainers need extra attention when it comes to watering as they dry out much faster. Its not uncommon during the summer to water every day. Fortunately there are simple solutions to put your watering duties on autopilot. If you have access to an outdoor spigot or water supply, you can set up a simple drip ir rigation kit connected to battery-operated timer. For about $70, you can have every thing you need to keep up to five containers well watered no mat ter where you are. Other options are avail able from soda bottle feeders you can make yourself, to self-water ing container feeders for under $20. 5) Feeding Although most store bought soils today include slow release nutrients, its likely that you may eventually need to add sup plemental fertilization periodically. Every time you water, youre leaching some of those nutrients out of the container. Depending on the soil, the sup plied nutrients will eventually become depleted. An occasional feeding of a balanced liquid fertilizer twice a month works well to keep your plants grow ing strong.Five keys to urban gardening success JOE LAMPL / MCT Urban gardening can be successful, but there are ve key areas in order to achieve a healthy garden. While its nice to be able to sit up in bed, its even nicer to have room for a couch, media cen ter and side table. IKEA has embraced this mobile-renter de mographic with its P.S. collections. Now eight years running, the collections feature pieces that are portable and inexpensive but well-de signed. The Havet so fas have wheels; a stool has an embedded LED lamp. Peter Klinkert heads the retailers Special Collections. He says this years 50 pieces came out of collaborations between young international designers and the IKEA in-house team. Small space doesnt always mean no space, Klinkert says. Buy furniture thats multifunctional, he ad vises: storage cubes that also work as coffee ta bles, or a dining table that offers storage, so it can be used as a work space. (www.ikea.com) Bookcases can be clunky and cumber some. Consider oating bookshelves that take advantage of wall space without taking up oor space. IKEAs Lack wall shelves come in a vari ety of colors, and theres also a corner shelving unit in the P.S. 2014 col lection that would maximize a dead space. Check out Umbras clever Conceal wall shelves that give you a steel bar on which to anchor a hardcover book; stack a few more, or add a small accessory, for a neat combina tion of wall storage and art. (www.umbra.com) Consider mirrored or clear acrylic pieces to give the illusion of more space. Overstocks got side tables and chairs priced a lot lower than high-end designer pieces. (www.overstock. com) A great coffee table can serve a lot of functions. Entertaining, dining and crafting can all happen at a decent ta ble in front of the sofa and television. Danias got the cool Har wich oak-veneered table: four stacked slabs, and the top two swivel. Two sturdy levels of elm veneer and steel create a workhorse piece in the Matson coffee table. (www.daniafurniture. com) Volk says her spac es seem bigger when she uses furniture with legs rather than piec es that squat solidly on the ground. Choosing light-colored woods and fabrics also contribute a sense of airi ness. If youre strapped for cash, consider TV trays for side tables, and park a bin or basket under neath for storage. Target sells them individually for around $10, or buy a set of four and use them in both the living room and bedroom. (www. target.com) For good deals, hit the sale sections at your favorite retailers; dents, torn wrapping and scratches often warrant heavier discounts, so keep checking in. (www. westelm.com; www.cb2. com; www.homegoods. com) One good thing about a small living space is that it doesnt take much to add a lot of punch. A peaceful palette may be just right, but if you love color and pattern, inexpensive textiles are easy to add. Buy a couple of yards of interesting cot ton, or use neat towels or cute baby blankets to cover seat cushions or throw pillows. You dont need sewing skills staple guns handle the job on furniture, while iron-on tack, Velcro, diaper pins or knots work on pillows. (www.joann. com ) A block-printed show er curtain can work in the bathroom or at the window, and be cheap er than drapes. (www. worldmarket.com) Check out www. apt2b.com for contemporary wall-art designs at good prices. Finally, exercise self-control when it comes to tchotchke displays and tempting but unnecessary gear. TIPS FROM PAGE E1

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Saturday, July 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL E3 352.357.9964D002748 rf n tbtt tb b n rr b rb n bb b n t 4200Hwy19-A MountDor a 32757 rfn THELIFEYOUVE WA ITEDYOURWHOLELIFEFOR! SomethingforEveryone!!LetUsFind Yo urDreamHome!SEASONAL&LONGTERMRENTALS AVA ILABLE rYAPPT. 25327USHwy.27Ste.202,Leesburg,Fl.34748(352)326-3626~(800)234-7654www .PALREAL TY .net STARTLIVINGTHELIFE!SOLARHEATED POOL!Formalentr y, split2/2, den,hugegreatroom opentokitchen,tile& woodfloors.PRIVACY! 260s#G4704832 GOLFCOURSE FRONTAGE!2/2,familyroomopen toKT&LR,screened lanai,largepatio.BEAUTIFULLYCUSTOMIZED! 160s#G4700844 rrr fntbr r f Here are my professional dec orating tips for making your home sparkle this Independence Day. Decorators help create environments that inspire and convey a message. No better way to proudly incorporate and display the American ag and the symbolic red, white and blue colors than to paint your neighbor hood patriotic. Never underestimate the power of curb appeal. If you dont already own an American ag, I recommend that you get one. Surely we all can manage this simple decorating duty. You can nd them for $1.69 at any Staples store or at most hardware locations. It doesnt have to be a big ag mounted on a post. It can be small and stapled on a stick. I recommend spacing them 12 inches apart. The most impressive display Ive ever seen was at Wilmington National Cemetery in Wilmington, N.C. Every roadway was lined with 12-inchtall American ags ying from sticks. For those who dont have yards, perhaps a balcony can be the perfect place to create a wave of small American ags. Use white plastic zip ties to attach them to your railing. If space allows, consider draping a larger American ag over your railing. Wouldnt it be spectacular if every tenant followed suit? With over 250 million registered cars in America, many of which will be on the road this holiday weekend, perhaps this is our best decorating opportunity. Imagine if every car proudly ew a ag from its antenna. It could make that long backup of trafc heading to the beach a little more tolerable. A well decorated highway now thats what we need. So what do you say? Is it time for a little redecorating at your house? PAYNE FROM PAGE E1 It was a potion brewed around the rural parts of England by folk healers, usually women who treated those that could not afford a physician. After seeing the effects of such a potion on his patients, a young English physician, William Withering, sought to nd the efcacious ingre dients of the folk potions. While each recipe dif fered, the single common component was a plant called foxglove, botanically known as Digitalis purpurea. It grew in eld and fen and gar dens of England where its easily recognized by the tall ower stalks. Witherings effort transformed the medical arts by testing the plant and soon the active chemical was isolated and dubbed digox in. It has been used in medicine ever since to regulate heartbeat of man and animal. It may be the most efficacious of all the herbal ma teria medica due to cardiac glycosides and di goxin, the heart regulating component. This is the amazing history of a beautiful garden flower thats found in both cottage yards and highbrow manor houses. As a bedding plant its been bred to be larger and offer more colors than the wildflowers of Wither ings day. Breeding of various species of Digi talis has resulted in striking hybrids. But now that you know the history of its use for dropsy, it becomes clear this is no plant to play with. In fact, one of its old common names is dead mans bells due to the po tential of fatal overdose. Beware of growing in yards with kids and pets that may find its velvety flowers appetizing. The leaves can be easily mistaken for the benign herb, comfrey. The curious common name, foxglove, was de rived from the tubular finger sized flowers. Foxes were thought to place the flowers on their feet to silence their steps when raiding the henhouse. Foxglove is among the most beautiful bed ding flowers you can buy either as a young ster or in full second year bloom. As a bien nial, foxglove has a two-year life cycle. If you buy young first-year seedlings which are the most affordable, they might bloom modestly or not at all so the roots can become established the first summer. Then the foliage dies back to winter over. The second year it will literally explode into bloom with massive full sized stalks supported by mature roots. YARD FROM PAGE E1 MARY CAROL GARRITYMCTIm a sucker for senti ment. So for me, a beautifully appointed home is more than a collection of well-chosen fur nishings. Its a tribute to who you are and what you hold dear, lled with the objects that help tell the story of your life. If you wander through my home, youll see treasures here and there that have been passed down through my family, each a link to the people I love. These heirlooms of old are comingled with wonderful new pieces I have acquired, which will become the heir looms for future gener ations of Garritys. What about your home? Have you dotted your decor with old or new heirlooms that brighten your spaces and pull at your heart strings? Here are four of my favorites to consider:WELL CRAFTED FURNITUREThose of us who love antique furniture can be eternally thankful to the craftsmen of old who fashioned these piec es so well that they have stood up to the rigors of time and still look beau tiful. The take-away is: When something is well made, using high-quali ty materials, its a keeper for generations to come. Chances are, you have some pieces like this in your home, whether its a chair you inherited from your grandmother, an antique youve dis covered in a shop or a darling vintage piece you picked up for a song and refurbished. Put them front and center in your decor. Sometimes people ask me if its OK to mix up differ ent styled furniture, like including an antique chest or chair in a room that features more con temporary decor, and the answer is an em phatic yes! My favor ite interior spaces are an eclectic assortment of different pieces that look as theyve evolved over time. When you purchase new furniture for your home, whether a sofa or a dining table or hutch, stop and ask yourself if this is the kind of time less, quality piece that you will be able to hand down in future years. While some pieces of furniture in your home will have a shorter lifes pan, like a trendy table or chair, the bigger pieces should last a lifetime (or two or three). My ad vice is to invest in the highest quality furniture you can afford. For example, at Nell Hills, we carry upholstered furniture that is so well made, from the kiln-dried hardwood frames to the hand-tied springs, that they will remain lovely through the years.INTRIGUING ARTWORKYour replace mantel, that place of hon or in your home, is the perfect spot to hang heirloom artwork. Artwork doesnt have to have sentimental fam ily ties though it can to be an heirloom. Perhaps youve collect ed a few pieces by local artists or ner works from area galleries. If so, you have a timeless treasure worth passing down. Similarly, artwork doesnt have to be worth a lot to be an heirloom. Like the art from my parents home, it can simply be a lovely or intriguing piece that is spe cial to you. In my opinion, that is all that is required to make it a timeless treasure.SENTIMENTAL PIECES AND COLLECTIONSMy husband, Dan, and I really enjoy collecting items from our childhood. In fact, we have become hogs about it. For example, we have a lovely porcelain cookie jar that was Dans great grandmothers. As ne and frail as it is, it was one of the few things to survive her early years as a pioneer, when the family lived in a dugout. I will always treasure this fragile testament to all Dans ancestors en dured, and survived, as they helped tame the West. Youll nd it show cased in a prominent, but safe, place in my home decor. Dan and I have been blessed to have received lots of wonderful heir looms from Dans mother, like an old shaving mug, which I also dis play as part of the ev er-changing tableaux that polka-dot my home. Many of these pieces werent worth much when our ancestors purchased them, but now they are priceless treasure to us. I dont consider myself the owner of these bits of family history, just the caretaker to keep them safe and honor them in my daily life, until its time to pass them on. Now its your turn. What sentimental pieces can you spotlight in your decor? It could be anything! Display old family photos, vintage linens or collections. We framed a calendar that used to hang in one of Dans ancestors stores. Are there pieces that are brand new that will be heirlooms in your fami lys future? I have a des sert server that is lled with little boxes Ive col lected through the years gifts for my descen dants.BEAUTIFUL SILVER AND CHINASilver, china and crys tal are the quintessential heirlooms. And, they are marvelous additions to your everyday decor. Ive used gorgeous sil ver buffet covers in my lake house kitchen to help conceal the lessthan-lovely burners on my stove, and become an elegant focal point in this utilitarian spot. If you dont have piec es of china, silver or crystal that has been in your family for gener ations, no worries. Ac quire your own gor geous collection and showcase it in your homes displays. A simple silver tea service el evates the look of a side table, making it a visual heaven. Who cares if its brand new! I got hooked on silver trays when Dans mom gave me a few from her collection. Since then, Ive been adding new pieces, using these stately beauties every single day in my decorating and entertaining. When you think about it, many of the items that people in previous generations used to ll their home werent of great value when they pur chased them. Its only through the generations that these pieces have become costly. Case in point: depression glass. What lovely accents can you weave into your home right now, that dont set you back an arm and a leg, that will become the collectors item in the future? What items can you add to your decor to add charm to your everyday life and those who will come after? Those are the pieces you want to ll your home with.Style at Home: Heirlooms

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E4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, July 5, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTSComicswww.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

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Saturday, July 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL E5 Sharkys Va cn Sew700N.MainSt.Wildwood,Fl34785352-330-2483sharkyssewnvac1@gmail.com www.sharkyssewnvac.comAsk Al ABobbinisaBobbin!I re paired a sewingmachinelastweekandjustthisweekthelad y broughtitbac k tomeandsaidIjustpic ke d thisuplastweekandyo u SUPPOSEDLY re paireditbutitjust ke epsjammingupand wo nt se w atall!!!!. I ass uredherit wa s probabl y justsomethingsimpl e so I took a lookatitonlytodiscovershehadthewrongbobbininit.Thebobbi n wa s pur ch asedat a bigboxlocalcraftandfabricplace Aswe inspectedthebobbinwefoundittohave a popularbrandembossed onth e topofitandwithout ex actcomparison,side by side it appeared tobethesameashers.I proceededtogetthecorrectbobbinand placeditintohermachineandtoheramazementitsewedperfectly Yo usee,notallbobbinsarecreatedequal!Althoughherbobbin wa s clearplastic, the re ar e manydiffere ntkindsofbobbins andmany diffe re ntshapes,heightsandstylesofbobbi ns An d YE S. ..itwillaffect yo urmachinegoodorbad. Yo u wo uldntputa Vo lkswagenwheel on a For d 4X4pickuptruck,eventhoughtheyar e bothroundandcalled wheels! Yo u wa nttoeithertak e themak e andmodelofyoursewin g ma ch inewit h youtopurch asebobbinsortak ea spar e bobbinwithyou orbetter ye t buyyourbobbinsfrom a re putable andknowledgeable sewingmachine sto re becausetheywil l beabletohelp youmuc h better Also put tingtheincorrectbobbininyoursewingma ch ine could caus e dama ge toitoratth e le a sten o ug h fr u st ra tiontocaus e youto quitse w in gorkickthedog!(O.K.,notkickthepoordog!) Andyoushouldinspectyourbobbinsperiodicallytomakesurethe edges ar e no t ch ippedorcrac ke d.Ifthatbethecaseitwillcausethe topthreadtohangonthe ch iporcrac k anditwilljamup .Alsoalot of times peoplewil l drop a bobbinonthe floor (orthe g r andkidsor ch ildrenwill)anditgetssteppedonanditwillnot wo rkproperly.Most ofusexperienced,ifyouwill,sewersar e usedtothosegoodole metalbobbinsthatusedtolastforeverandwekindaputthoseplastic bobbinsinthesamecategor y andar e shoc ke d whentheydonteven comeclosetoholdingup Hello! O. K., We ll I doanyway !So besur e to inspectthosebobbinssoyoucanhave a GREA T timemakingthose kidsand gr andkidsallthosenicethings. Andlast ly besuretostopandtak e timetosho w the gr andkidsand kidssomethingaboutsewing Yo u maythinktheyar e notlisteningor ar e notinterestedbut re member...Thatsho w wealllearnedourselves. ThankGodformommasand gr an d-mommas!Untilnextweek,itsmy stor y an dI cantellit anyway I wa ntto!Sewwhat,ha ve fun.AndHapp y Sewing! Irepairedasewingmachinelastweekandjustthisweekthelady broughtitbacktomeandsaidIjustpickedthisuplastweekand youSUPPOSEDLYrepaireditbutitjustkeepsjammingupandwont sewatall!!!!.Iassuredheritwasprobablyjustsomethingsimpleso Itookalookatitonlytodiscovershehadthewrongbobbininit.The bobbinwaspurchasedatabigboxlocalcraftandfabricplace.Aswe inspectedthebobbinwefoundittohaveapopularbrandembossedon thetopofitandwithoutexactcomparison,sidebyside,itappearedto bethesameashers.Iproceededtogetthecorrectbobbinandplaced itintohermachineandtoheramazementitsewedperfectly. Yo usee,notallbobbinsarecreatedequal!Althoughherbobbin wasclearplastic,therearemanydifferentkindsofbobbinsandmany differentshapes,heightsandstylesofbobbins.AndYESitwill affectyourmachinegoodorbad. Yo uwouldntputa Vo lkswagen wheelonaFord4X4pickuptruck,eventhoughtheyarebothround andcalledwheels! Yo uwanttoeithertakethemakeandmodelof yoursewingmachinewithyoutopurchasebobbinsortakeaspare bobbinwithyouorbetteryetbuyyourbobbinsfromareputableand knowledgeablesewingmachinestorebecausetheywillbeabletohelp youmuchbetter.Also,puttingtheincorrectbobbininyoursewing machinecouldcausedamagetoitorattheleastenoughfrustrationto causeyoutoquitsewingorkickthedog!(O.K.,notkickthepoordog!) Andyoushouldinspectyourbobbinsperiodicallytomakesure theedgesarenotchippedorcracked.Ifthatbethecaseitwillcause thetopthreadtohangonthechiporcrackanditwilljamup.Alsoa lotoftimespeoplewilldropabobbinonthefloor(orthegrandkidsor childrenwill)anditgetssteppedonanditwillnotworkproperly.Most ofusexperienced,ifyouwill,sewersareusedtothosegoodole metalbobbinsthatusedtolastforeverandwekindaputthoseplastic bobbinsinthesamecategoryandareshocked whentheydonteven comeclosetoholdingup.Hello!O.K., W e llIdoanyway!Sobesure toinspectthosebobbinssoyoucanhaveaGREATtimemakingthose kidsandgrandkidsallthosenicethings. Andlastly,besuretostopandtaketimetoshowthegrandkids andkidssomethingaboutsewing. Yo umaythinktheyarenotlistening orarenotinterestedbutremember.Thatshowwealllearned ourselves.ThankGodformommasandgrand-mommas!Untilnext week,itsmystoryandIcantellitanywayIwantto!Sewwhat,have fun.AndHappySewing! www.dailycommercial.comDiversions352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper.YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Saturday, July 5 the 186th day of 2014. There are 179 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On July 5, 1954, Elvis Presleys rst commercial recording session took place at Sun Records in Memphis, Tennessee; the song he recorded was Thats All Right. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Saturday, July 5, 2014: This year you will be quicker to let others know when your feelings are hurt. Your directness helps you with groups, community commitments and even work. You often nd yourself in situations where you are pushed to make a decision. If you are single, someone important could mosey into your life this year. The chemistry between you could be high. If you are attached, the two of you enjoy hanging out together. You will feel more indulgent than you have in years, if you can just go with the ow with your signicant other. LIBRA might seem easygoing, but he or she has quite a temper. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Youll want to wind down from recent celebrations. The problem might be that others are still off carousing. You could nd it difcult to stop with all the upbeat smiles and partying happening around you. Be careful with a close loved one. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You might have to make certain calls to certain people. You will feel a lot better once you do. Kick back and help others relax. You will see a problem in a different light as a result. Squeeze in a walk or some other form of exercise while you can. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You could become resentful of someones need to be in control. Tension will build around your nances if you are not careful. You seem to have the wit and personality to help lose the edge that others believe you have. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Your inner voice will encourage you to stay close to home and relax. You could be dealing with someone from a distance. You enjoy this persons calls, but you would like to visit with him or her more often. Why not schedule a mini-vacation together? LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You could nd yourself deep into conversations, which might cause you to lose track of time. Dont worry just enjoy it. You will be happy to hear someone elses news. A neighbor or cousin will seek you out, as he or she has some unusual information. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Remain sensitive to a certain agreement that could cost you more than you initially anticipated. Be sure to clearly establish your limits, and others will honor them. Scheduling a fun get-together later in the summer will feel great. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You might opt for a summer sport this summer or a visit to someone you never see. Know that your attention means a lot to this person. Surprises seem to surround others. You might want to rethink a relationship. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Do what you feel, rather than what you think you should do. You could prevent a backre that way. If you start to feel angry or frustrated, do not lash out; instead, nd out what is really going on beneath the surface. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) You might want to see what is happening around you more clearly. A friend could invite you at the last minute to join him or her for a fun adventure. Do what feels right to you, and you cant go wrong. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) You could be more in touch with an older relative than you realize. This person would love it if you spent more time with him or her. Try to make that a possibility instead of always making excuses. Do what feels right to you. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Reach out to someone at a distance. Your caring means much more than you realize to a person you rarely speak to. You might feel as if he or she does not make an adequate effort. Be direct in how you deal with an assertive individual. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Youll want to deal with one specic person directly, as he or she is pivotal to your well-being. You might not always get the answers you want, but this individual is as open as he or she can be. Allow yourself to be a little more vulnerable. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORYD EAR ABBY: My friends husband has been writing a novel for several years. He just self-published it, and its available on Amazon. He gave me a copy, asked me to read it and enter a great review on the Amazon page. The problem is the book is lled with misused and misspelled words, and there is missing punctuation. He even switched the names of two characters. (His wife, who is a perfectionist, was his editor.) Aside from the fact that I dont want to nish the book, I know he or my friend will ask me how I liked it. I dont want to lie because Im afraid if someone else brings these things to their attention, theyll know I didnt read it or think I should have told them. I know they will be embarrassed if I bring it to their attention. Frankly, I think its too late to say anything negative because the book has already been printed. I also dont want to cause hurt feelings because I know how long he worked on this project and hes proud of it. How do I handle this? READER IN THE SOUTHWEST DEAR READER: Hes a friend, right? And youre only a reader, not a literary critic whose credibility will suffer if you dont point out every aw. Find SOMETHING you liked about the book and mention that on the Amazon page. You could call it a page turner because you had to turn from Page 1 to Page 2, didnt you? In a case like this, less is more. And remember, youre doing this in the capacity of being a friend, not an English teacher. DEAR ABBY: I have a friend whose son was involved in a shooting which ended in a death in her house. Should I send food, owers and a nice note in the mail or stand back and not intrude? I sent a text asking if she was OK and if I could do any thing for her family, but I dont know what else to do. We are more than acquaintances but less than great friends. UNSURE IN PENNSYLVANIA DEAR UNSURE: If the funeral has been held, your friend does not need owers. At a time like this, she could use some moral support. Call her and tell her you would like to bring some food over and ask what she may need. Then bring it to her, and be ready to listen if she wants to talk. Your presence and your car ing will be meaningful, because when a tragedy like this happens, people dont know what to say, which isolates the person who is grieving.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Friend has hard time finding a few kind words for bad book JEANNE PHILLIPSDEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGARBIGARS STARS

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E6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, July 5, 2014 DEAN FOSDICKAssociated PressMuch of the creativity involved in crafting a cus tom-made beer starts with the plants you select. The modern palate pretty much demands some hops in beer, but beyond that, theres a lot of choices available, says Dennis Fisher, an organ ic farmer from Winterport, Maine. Fisher, who with his brother Joe wrote a popular refer ence book for beginners, The Homebrewers Garden (Storey Publishing, 1998), says one of the most satisfying as pects of home brewing is producing some or all of your own ingredients from scratch. Scratch brewing, the broth ers wrote, refers to the culti vation, preparation and use of hops, barley, malts and oth er non-barley grains, and ad juncts ranging from fruits to herbs to vegetables. Growing your own ingre dients ensures that the prod ucts are as organic, fresh and unique as possible. Home grown also is cheaper than store-bought, the Fishers say. The four basic ingredients needed for brewing are malt (malting provides the fer mented sugar that yeast feeds on to produce alcohol), hops (reduces spoilage and balanc es the sugars sweetness with a bitter avor), brewers yeast and water (about 90 percent of beers content). Hops are a particularly good (garden) choice because they thrive almost anywhere, says Dennis Fisher. They are also a great addition to a landscape big, attractive columns of greenery. If the water from your tap tastes good, then it also should taste good in the beer you make, Fisher says. But if its chlorinated, then you need to let it stand overnight to allow the chemicals to outgas be fore brewing with it. Adjuncts, in homebrew speak, are plants used to replace or complement hops to give beers distinctive avors, odors and colors. Just about any ower you can eat can be made into a beer, says Rebecca Kneen, an organic farmer and writer from Sorrento, British Columbia, who wrote about backyard brewing in the new Groundbreaking Food Gardens, By Niki Jabbour (Storey Publish ing). Its useful to experiment with them all though to de termine how much should be used and when they should be added, Kneen says. Some common and not so common home brewers gar den adjuncts include: %  en Herbs: (Bittering) Sage, horehound, gentian, yarrow. (Flavoring) Juniper, rosemary, ginger, oregano, mint, thyme. (Aromatic) Lavender, lemon balm, chamomile. %  en Flowers: Nasturtiums, wild roses, scented geranium leaves, daylilies and marigolds. %  en Vegetables and fruits: Rhubarb, blackberries and elderberries, pumpkin, chili peppers, sorghum, apples. We like to add spruce tips to some beers, Fisher says. Its more of a wild-gathered than homegrown adjunct that in Colonial times was a hops substitute. For even greener beer, recy cle the brewing ingredients and their byproducts, Kneen says. You can compost them, feed them to pigs and sheep, put some into your chicken feed, she says. We use them heav ily as mulch ... The gray water (relatively clean wastewater) is used for irrigation on our pas tures. Thats the bulk of what comes out of our brewery.Hop to it: Plant what you need to brew beer AP FILE PHOTO This photo shows hop owers that are both ornamental and edible in a garden in Langley, Wash. Hops are an easy-to-grow perennial that greatly enhance a beers avor when picked fresh. AP PHOTO This photo shows louvered shutters that are very popular in American architecture. The shutters, which originally had movable slats, allowed air to circulate in the home. MELISSA KOSSLER DUTTONAssociated PressAlthough glass and screens have eliminat ed the practical need for shutters, theyre still popular for decoration. They add another layer of thoughtful detailing to a house, says Ted Cleary, a landscape architect in Charlotte, N.C. But to get the right look, you still have to consider function when choosing and hanging shutters, experts say. Beauty in architecture, as with many objects, often stems from seeing a detail that illustrates its purpose, Cleary says. A pair of shutters can cost anywhere from $100 to more than $1,000. Some tips on choosing the right ones for your home:SIZEOriginally, shutters were used to keep out weather, noise and ani mals; when closed, they had to cover the whole window. So shutter size is the most important thing to consider, says Lindsay Daniel, a Charlotte ar chitect, who agrees with Cleary that homeowners must think function rst, not decoration. Make sure the shutters meet and completely cover the window opening. Otherwise, she says, the shutter looks like a stupid afterthought. This means that shut ters dont work on dou ble-width or picture windows, says Richard Taylor, an architect and president of RTA Studio in Dublin, Ohio. To my eye anyway, it looks ridiculous, he says. And take care about their shape when hang ing shutters on arched windows, Cleary adds. Shutters are perfectly legitimate on arched windows as long as the (closed) shutter covers it, he says.MATERIALShutters are primarily made of wood, compos ite material or vinyl. Vinyl shutters are typically mounted directly onto the side of the house, which means they break the rule about looking functional, Tay lor says. He prefers wood, which looks the most authentic but does require regular maintenance, or composite products, a low-maintenance alter native.STYLESLouvered shutters, made with horizontally slated boards, are probably the most common style in America, Cleary says. When shutters served as the primary window covering, peo ple in hotter climates used louvered ones to allow fresh air into the house. Panel shutters have a traditional look. They are solid pieces that resemble small doors, and are often inset with square or rectangle patterns. They were regularly used on Colonial-era homes in New England and were a good defense against snow and rain. Board and batten shut ters are made with three or four vertical boards of the same size connected with narrow horizontal boards. They have a rustic appearance and were often used on country houses or barns. They are the easiest style for doit-yourselfers to make at home, Cleary says.HARDWAREShutters look best when they are hung as though they are going to be opened and closed, Cleary says. That means using hinges and mount ing them onto the window casing not attaching them to the house. Cleary also recom mends adding metal tie backs, sometimes called shutter dogs, to hold open shutters in place. The hardware, including shutter dogs and hinges, can cost up to $100 for a pair of shuttters. It looks a lot richer. Theres more depth to them when they are not pasted to the (house), he says.BE CONSISTENTDont feel you have to put shutters on every window. Its better to have some windows without shutters than to put them on windows that are too wide for them. Dont use a shutter on one side of a window where a door or the cor ner of the house prevents you from adding its mate. Open and shut case: choosing and hanging the right shutters DEAN FOSDICKAssociated PressMaking a yard and a community more beau tiful begins at the curb. But that narrow space between sidewalk and street sometimes called a boulevard, median, hellstrip, parkway, verge or tree belt is a gardening challenge. For starters, its probably owned by the mu nicipality but falls to the homeowner to main tain. So the rst step in caring for it is to sort out what local rules allow. You need to go to the citys website if there are any questions about who owns what, said Evelyn Hadden, author of the new book Hellstrip Gardening (Timber Press). The zoning laws should be posted online. Some cities have reg ulations where there can only be lawns there. Some say there cant be vegetables, but allow some kind of lawn alter native, she said. Some communities change their rules when people start growing gardens and the community gets behind them. Curb appeal can in crease property values for the whole neighborhood, Hadden said. Curbside gardeners are pretty generous that way. Theyre working for the benet of every body. Even seedy-looking parcels can become natural welcome mats when integrated with front yards. Curbside spaces are often heavily trafcked, however, making them tough to cultivate. The ground is hard-packed, and plants can be crushed under foot. Gardening is tough at the curb