Daily Commercial

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Title:
Daily Commercial
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Newspaper
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English
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Halifax Media Group
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Rod Dixon
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Leesburg, Floirda
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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AA00019282:00264


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Minimumc har ges apply Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living ar eas, L-shaped rooms and rooms ov er 300 sq .f t. ar e co ns id er ed 2 ar ea s. Baths ha lls, large wa lk-i n cl osets an d ar ea ru gs ar e pr ic ed sep ar ate ly Of fer do es no t in cl ud e pro tecto r. Re sident ial onl y. Ca nn ot be use d fo r re stor ati on ser vices. Mu st pr esen t coup on at time of ser vi ce Va lid at participating locations only Certain re striction s may apply Call for details.BEY OND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWO OD | UPHOLSTER Y | AIR DUCT728-1668 394-1739fla# CAC18 16 40 8 NETHERLANDS DEFEATS MEXICO IN STUNNER, SPORTS B1 INDEPENDENCE DAY: Mount Dora expands reworks show A3 BASEBALL: Lightning suffer 7-2 defeat by Squeeze B1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, June 30, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 181 4 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED C8 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS C8 DIVERSIONS C7 LEGALS C8 LIVING HEALTHY C1 NATION A5 SCOREBOARD B2 SPORTS B1 VOICES A9 WORLD A8 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A10. 92 / 74 Heavy evening T-storms. 50 DARA KAM The News Service of Florida HOLLYWOOD Hammering on a theme heard throughout the day, former President Bill Clinton warned Democrats they wont win critical races this fall if they dont gure out how to get voters to cast ballots. We have to be cre ative in how we reach people and how we get them to the polls, Clinton told a crowd of more than 1,500 sup porters who paid up to $250 to hear the former president speak Satur day night. If were go ing to preserve democ racy, real democracy, weve got to show up. About 130 million people typically vote in presidential elections, but 50 million of those stay home during the mid-term elections like this years a recipe for gridlock, Clinton told the party faithful gathered for their major fundraiser of the year at Clinton: Dems need to get voters to show up RYAN LUCAS Associated Press BAGHDAD The al-Qaida breakaway group that has seized much of northeastern Syria and huge tracts of neighboring Iraq formal ly declared the establish ment of a new Islamic state on Sunday and de manded allegiance from Muslims worldwide. The spokesman for the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, Abu Mohammed al-Adnani, made the announce ment in an audio Al-Qaida splinter declares new Islamic caliphate AP PHOTO Iraqi security forces hold up a ag of the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant they captured during an operation to regain control of Dallah Abbas, 35 miles northeast of Baghdad. In spite of the grousing, voters rarely fire lawmakers AP FILE PHOTO John Boehner, R-Ohio, center, announces a shufe in the GOP leadership after House Republicans voted to make Rep. Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., the new majority leader. PHOTO COURTESY OF FACEBOOK.COM Elizabeth Fechtel, shown with ABC Action News anchor Ashley Glass, lost her Miss Florida title after a judges revised score was detected. TOM MCNIFF Editor E lizabeth Fechtel, who lost her Miss Florida title last week when pageant orga nizers realized they had incor rectly tabulated the contes tants scores, wrote in a blog that she was devastated but is over the initial shock and feels empowered to charge forward. Fechtel learned Thursday night during a visit from Miss Florida Director Mary Sulli van that she would have to re linquish her crown to Victoria Cowen of Panama City. Sullivan explained to her that one of the judges had changed his mind while scoring rst and second place the night of the pageant. The judge reportedly changed his vote from Elizabeth to the rst runner-up, Cowen. Writing about the experience on Friday, Fechtel thanked sup porters for giving her a bold re minder of what really matters: the ability to touch lives and be touched in return. Though I am devastated to relinquish the job, I am a rm believer that God has a plan and a purpose, she wrote. Victoria Cowen will be a great titleholder and I hope you will all show her the recognition she deserves. There is one big idea that I would like to emphasize: I was Miss Florida for a glimpse, but more importantly, I have been Elizabeth Fechtel since day one. A title does not dene me. It opens doors, but it does not dictate who I am and where I am going. I would like to think of opportunities like this as stepping stones to my future. I cannot deny that this was one of the biggest steps I have come across, and I had become very comfortable and excited Fechtel devastated, but recovered from losing title Now that I have recovered from the initial shock, I feel surprisingly empowered. I recognize that the mistake in the balloting is less important than my choice on how to handle the recovery process. My choice is to charge forward and make a lasting impact on my community and country, as Elizabeth Fechtel. Elizabeth Fechtel SEE VOTERS | A2 SEE FECHTEL | A2 CONNIE CASS Associated Press WASHINGTON The U.S. Congress is wildly unpopular. In fact, two-thirds of Americans want their own House member booted. And the ultraconserva tive tea party movement is dog ging longtime Republican law makers. So incumbents are nervous about the upcoming November elections, right? No. Mostly theyre not. People talk about throwing the bums out, but voters keep send ing the same bunch back in. More than halfway through the party primaries, 293 House and Senate members have com pleted their quests for renomi nation during the primary sea son. The score: Incumbents 291, challengers 2. What about November, when Republicans and Democrats face off in the general election? It looks to be a dramatic mid term, all right, with Republicans, who are virtually certain to re tain control of the House, push ing to seize control of the Senate. That would give them the pow er to essentially kill President Barack Obamas legislative agen da for the remaining two years of his term. More incumbents will be vul nerable in the general election than the primaries. Still, the vast majority of sitting lawmakers are snug in their seats. Over the past ve decades, vot ers have routinely returned 9 of 10 incumbent candidates to the House. Senate races are a bit less predictable, but usually more SEE VOTERS | A2 SEE IRAQ | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 30, 2014 HOW TO REACH US JUNE 29 CASH 3 ............................................... 9-3-3 Afternoon .......................................... 9-1-5 PLAY 4 ............................................. 8-3-1-2 Afternoon ....................................... 3-5-7-8 FLORIDA LOTTERY JUNE 28 FANTASY 5 ......................... 12-20-21-28-31 FLORIDA LOTTO ............. 12-16-23-33-46-50 POWERBALL ...................... 8-12-34-43-569 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION STEVE SKAGGS publisher 352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com PAUL RYAN digital editor 352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. a glitzy seaside hotel in Hollywood. Clinton blasted Republican in cumbent Gov. Rick Scott for adopt ing policies that help the richest Floridians, like lowering corporate income taxes, and harm the poor est and working class families, such as not supporting a raise in the minimum wage. Its not easy for them to vote. They have to know that it matters, he said. He urged Democrats to reach out to voters who could benet from a turnaround in those policies. Explain, explain, explain and g ure out how to physically get peo ple to the polls, Clinton said in a 41-minute speech. Im telling you, if you can reach Floridas portion of those 50 million people you will have the darnedest celebration on election night you ever saw. Clinton illustrated his point by saying that Democrat Alex Sink should have won a special election to replace the late U.S. Rep. C.W. Bill Young in a Pinellas County congres sional district. Sink was defeated by Youngs onetime aide David Jolly. Alex Sink won the independent votes by almost twice the margin President Obama did. But the regis tered Democrats did not turn out, Clinton said, noting that Demo cratic Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe won his election because black vot er turnout matched that in the gen eral election. If they can do it, you can do it, Clinton said. The Clinton event raised $1.1 million topping previous earn ings for the annual Leadership Blue Gala fundraiser, formerly called the Jefferson-Jackson Din ner and nearly 1,600 supporters were expected to attend the event at the Westin Diplomat Resort & Spa, another historic high, accord ing to Florida Democratic Party Chairwoman Allison Tant. Party loyalists were united in their enthusiasm for ousting Scott from ofce if not in their sup port for his Democratic challeng ers, former Senate Minority Leader Nan Rich and onetime Republican Gov. Charlie Crist. Tant echoed the overarching top ic of the days caucus meetings the importance of getting Dem ocrats to the polls to prevent the horrendous possibility that Scott wins a second term. We are going to build the largest eld plan that the Florida Democrat ic Party has ever seen, she pledged. VOTERS FROM PAGE A1 about the growth it would bring. The reali ty is that the Lord works in unforeseen ways. My path was squared and lined up 24 hours ago. Fechtel went on to say that she felt stronger for the experience. Now that I have re covered from the initial shock, I feel surprisingly empowered. I recognize that the mistake in the balloting is less import ant than my choice on how to handle the recov ery process. My choice is to charge forward and make a lasting impact on my community and country, as Elizabeth Fechtel. Fechtel said she will continue to post to her blog, not as Miss Flor ida, but as a student at the University of Flor ida. This situation has only reminded me to live with a purpose and embrace the little things along my path. I can not wait to share the new, fresh experiences. I am sure there are still many questions, per haps even rumors, left unanswered let time do the talking. Fechtel, 20, is no stranger to pageants. She received her rst ti ara as Miss Leesburg in 2010, then was named Miss Orlandos Out standing Teen and Miss Floridas Outstanding Teen. She won her rst national title as Miss Americas Outstanding Teen for 2012, the sis ter program of the Miss America Organization. The UF junior was crowned Miss University of Florida at a pageant earlier this year, which earned her a spot in the Miss Florida Pageant and an $18,000 scholar ship as the winner. FECHTEL FROM PAGE A1 PHOTO COURTESY OF FACEBOOK.COM Elizabeth Fechtel, left, poses with Megan Cromwell during preliminary competition at the Miss Florida Pageant. than 80 percent of incumbents win. Why do these people keep win ning? Its harder for challengers to sell themselves to voters. Incumbents wield tremendous advantages. They raise big bucks from special interests, use their congressional ofces to send voters mass mail ings, build ties to businesses and advocacy groups in their districts, and benet from name recogni tion. They have staff members back home working to keep constituents happy. A Republican in a heavily Dem ocratic Maryland district, she was re-elected seven times, until her district boundaries were redrawn by Democrats to push her out in 2002. But often, the redistricting pro cess, which is known as gerryman dering and occurs every 10 years, favors incumbents. Political calcu lations have contributed to most districts becoming solidly Republi can or solidly Democratic. The gerrymandering is terrible, said Morella, now a professor at American University. Few districts are truly competitive anymore. Only about four dozen of the 435 House seats are considered in play this year, meaning either party might conceivably win them in November. Many of those are open seats, vacat ed by lawmakers who are retiring or seeking another ofce. In dozens of other cases in the House, only one of the two major parties will even have a name on the November ballot. In the Senate, about a dozen of the 36 seats up for election might be truly competitive. That could be enough for the Republicans, who need to take six seats to win control of the upper chamber. This year, Congress logged a con dence rating of 7 percent, the low est Gallup has measured for any in stitution, ever. People dont put much attachment to their own rep resentative anymore, either. An As sociated Press-GfK poll last month found that 65 percent of Ameri cans say their own House member should lose. Turnout is low in midterm elec tions, usually about 40 percent in the fall and often abysmal for pri maries. Voters may feel they lack true choice. Still, one shocker this primary season showed that establishment candidates can be ousted. A virtual unknown, Dave Brat, toppled House Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Virginia in a Repub lican primary an unexpected victory for the tea party, which has mostly struggled against well-orga nized establishment Republicans this election season. There just arent that many real races, said Larry Sabato, a veteran election forecaster at the Univer sity of Virginia. So even if people dont like their representative, they dont necessarily vote for the chal lenger from the other party, or vote at all. VOTERS FROM PAGE A1 statement posted online on the rst day of the Mus lim holy month of Ramadan. Muslim extremists have long dreamed of recreating the Is lamic state, or caliphate, that ruled over the Middle East, much of North Africa and be yond in various forms over the course of Islams 1,400year history. Al-Adnani declared the groups chief, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, as the new lead er, or caliph, and called on ji hadi groups everywhere, not just those in areas under the organizations control, to swear loyalty to al-Baghdadi and support him. The legality of all emirates, groups, states and organiza tions becomes null by the ex pansion of the caliphs author ity and the arrival of its troops to their areas, al-Adnani said. Listen to your caliph and obey him. Support your state, which grows every day. Al-Adnani loosely dened the Islamic states territory as running from northern Syr ia to the Iraqi province of Di yala a vast stretch of land straddling the border that is already largely under the Is lamic States control. He also said that with the establish ment of the caliphate, the group was changing its name to just the Islamic State, dropping the mention of Iraq and the Levant. It was unclear what imme diate impact the declaration would have on the ground in Syria and Iraq, though ex perts predicted it could her ald inghting among the Sun ni militants who have formed an alliance with the Islamic State in its blitz across north ern and western Iraq. Now the insurgents in Iraq have no excuse for working with ISIS if they were hop ing to share power with ISIS, said Aymenn al-Tamimi, an analyst who specializes in Is lamic militants in Iraq and Syria, using one of several ac ronyms for the Islamic State. The prospect of inghting in Iraq is increased for sure. The greatest impact, how ever, could be on the broader international jihadist move ment, in particular on the fu ture of al-Qaida. Founded by Osama bin Lad en, the group that carried out the Sept. 11 attacks on the U.S. has long carried the mantle of the international jihadi cause. But the Islamic State has man aged to do in Syria and Iraq what al-Qaida never has carve out a large swath of ter ritory in the heart of the Arab world and control it. IRAQ FROM PAGE A1 AP FILE PHOTO In this photo taken June 19, an al-Qaida-inspired militant stands guard at a checkpoint captured from the Iraqi Army outside Beiji renery, some 155 miles north of Baghdad, Iraq.

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Monday, June 30, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LAKE COUNTY Lake County Library System libraries to close for July 4 Lake County Library System li braries will close on Friday for the Independence Day holiday. Libraries include: Astor County Library, 54905 Alco Road; Cagan Crossings Community Library, 16729 Cagan Oaks, Clermont; Cooper Memorial Library, 2525 Oakley Seaver Drive, Clermont; East Lake County Library, 31340 County Road 437, Sorrento; Fruitland Park Library, 205 W Berckman St.; Helen Lehmann Memorial Library, 17435 Fifth St., Montverde; Lady Lake Public Library, 225 W Guava St.; Leesburg Public Library, 100 E Main St.; Marianne Beck Memorial Library, 112 W Central Ave., Howey-in-theHills; Marion Baysinger Memorial Library, 756 W. Broad St., Groveland; Minneola Schoolhouse Library, 100 S Main St.; Paisley County Library, 24954 County Road 42; City of Tavares Public Library, 314 N. New Hampshire Ave.; Umatilla Public Library, 412 Hateld Drive; W.T. Bland Public Library, 1995 N Donnelly St., Mount Dora. For information, go to www.my lakelibrary.org or call your local library. EUSTIS Lake Tech fall registration to begin on July 7 Lake Technical College will begin accepting students on July 7 for the fall term that begins Aug. 18, offering classes in Accounting Operations, Administrative Ofce Specialist, Air Conditioning, Refrigeration and many others in a new 232-hour program that begins Sept. 8, and meets Monday-Friday from 8:15 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. Several short-term, affordable classes are also offered and include: Private Investigator Class, Armed and Unarmed Security Classes D & G. For information on scholarships and registration, call the main cam pus admission ofce, 2001 Kurt St., in Eustis, at 352-742-6463, or go to www.laketech.org. TAVARES SBDC to offer class on business plan writing The Small Business Development Center (SBDC) at UCF-Lake County is offering a hands-on seminar to help entrepreneurs and business owners compose successful busi ness plans. Stan Austin, area manager and certied business analyst, will lead the classes. Registration is recommended as the course is popular and space is limited. The seminar will be offered from 6 to 9 p.m. July 11, Leesburg Community Center, 109 E. Dixie Ave.; from 6 to 9 p.m. July 25, North East Business Opportunity Center, 1520 S. Bay St., Eustis and from 6 to 9 p.m. Aug. 1, Lake-Sumter State College, 1250 N. Hancock Road, building 2, room 201, in Clermont. For information or to register, call Theresa Davis at 352-315-1846, email theresa.davis@bus.ucf.edu or go to www.sbdcorlando.com/ lakecounty. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com Mount Doras Freedom on the Waterfront event will be on July 3 this year and will feature a longer reworks show than in previous years, according to the citys Cultural and Special Events Coordina tor Chris Carson. The 25-minute reworks show, which will start at 9:15 p.m., was 17 minutes long in the past, Carson said. He said the longer re works show, with a larger budget and sponsorships, will allow for more effects and a broader nale. Mu sic played from two sound systems will accompany the reworks. All the different things that stand out all culmi nate together and you synchronize them into a minute-and-a-half or a minute-and-15-second nale and that caps off the show, and to do that show and add music to it is powerful, Carson said of the nale and how it is a collection of effects from the whole show. Mount Dora expands fireworks show Staff Report South Lake Hospitals Ob stetrics Department was honored by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) District XII (Florida) and the March of Dimes for re ducing the number of ear ly elective inductions and cesarean deliveries with a special recognition banner. The hospital recently met the criteria to qualify for this distinction, which in cludes achieving a rate for elective deliveries before 39 completed weeks of preg nancy of 5 percent or lower and having policies in place to prevent such deliveries. South Lake Hospital, in Clermont, was the only hospital in Lake County to receive this recognition. We are delighted to pres ent this commemorative banner to South Lake Hos pital for adhering to stan dards that directly bene t the health of babies, said Dr. Karen Harris, Chair of the Program Services Committee for the March of Dimes Florida Chapter. The last few weeks of preg nancy are extremely im portant for the babys brain and lung development, among other organs, so we want to commend this mo mentous achievement. Dr. Robert Yelverton, chair of ACOG District XII, said studies show that deliv eries scheduled for conve nience or other non-med ical reasons may increase harm to infants, and in crease health care costs. Along with this recogni tion, South Lake Hospital recently earned a ve-star rating in maternity care by Healthgrades, an online resource for nding hos pitals and physicians. The rating indicates outcomes are better than the nation al average and for mater nity care. This achievement is an CLERMONT Obstetrics department honored for reducing early elective deliveries SEE DELIVERY | A4 PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Father-daughter team Steve and Savannah Schwab competed in the annual American Radio Relay League Field Day on Saturday. BELOW: Emil Vandevelde makes his rst contact, an operator from the West Central Florida region. BOTTOM: Left to right, Steve Flynn, Frank Andres, Fred Fitle and Jay Boehme work on an antenna. Operators face off at Radio Field Day O perators from the Lake County Ama teur Radio Associ ation and the Lake County Amateur Radio Emergency Service take part in the annual Amer ican Radio Relay League Field Day, in which ham radio operators across the country try to contact as many different operators as possible in a 24hour period. The competition start ed at 2 p.m on Sat urday. The News Service of Florida Rep. Dane Eagle, R-Cape Coral, will perform 100 hours of commu nity service and receive a reckless driving citation under a court-ap proved settlement stemming from an April 21 arrest, his ofce an nounced Friday. Eagle was initially charged with driving under the inuence. In a re lease issued Friday, Eagle, 30, apol ogized for the embarrassment this whole ordeal has caused and said he remains committed to repre senting his Southwest Florida dis trict. As I have maintained through out, I did not drive under the inu ence, Eagle said in the release. I did, however, exercise poor judg ment that night, and in my careless ness I drove recklessly. The prose cutor agreed that reckless driving is the appropriate resolution, and the court has accepted that agreement. I take full responsibility for my ac tions and accept the penalties for the reckless driving sanction I have been issued. After being arrested, Eagle is sued a statement in which he dis puted being drunk. According to a probable-cause afdavit, Eagle was stopped by a Tallahassee police of cer after the vehicle he was driv ing exited a Taco Bell, nearly hit a median and a curb and ran a red light. The ofcer reported that Eagles vehicle emitted a strong odor of alcoholic beverage and that Ea gles eyes were bloodshot, watery, and glassy. At the time, Eagle denied drink ing alcohol, saying the odor came from friends who had been drink ing and were in the vehicle earlier. Eagle refused a roadside sobriety test, telling the ofcer he was good to get home, before being arrested, according to the report. Eagle also refused to provide a breath sample. While the arrest may have added a rough patch to his road to re-election, Eagle re mains the fundraising leader as three of Republicans, all from Cape Coral, are challenging him for the seat. Eagle collected $10,250.00 through the rst 20 days of June Rep. Eagle accepts reduced charge SEE EAGLE | A4 SEE FIREWORKS | A4

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 30, 2014 r f r f n r r rt n t r b b f f f f f n n f f t f f f t t f b Tr usted by hundreds of families for the care of their beloved pets!Staff on site 24/7. Day care available. Large air conditioned indoor play areas. State-of-the-art grooming studio. Grooming 7 days a week. 3 groomers on staff.352.253.005 9 10 83 7 U. S. Hw y. 44 1, Su it e 3, Leesburg (n ex t to Home Depot)www petlo dg e andspa.com NEW PA TI EN T SPEC IA LCo mp le te Ex am(D015 0)Di gi tal Xr ay s(D021 0)Cle an in g(D1 11 0)Or al Ca ncer Sc re en in g(D0 43 1)wi th Id en ta fi 3000*N on-I nsur ed Pa ti en ts Onl y. All maj or insur ances ac ce pted in cl udin g PPO & HM O pl ans.$59*D0 0275 6 and reported an over all total of $157,290. Meanwhile, Terry Bow en Cramer III has raised $13,773, and Jim Roach has reported $3,852 in donations. The third challenger, Brandon Ivey, has yet to le a nance report. CRIST FILES BRIEF BACKING CHALLENGE TO GAY MARRIAGE BAN Former Gov. Char lie Crist, who support ed a state Constitutional amendment banning gay marriage when it took ef fect, led a friend-ofthe-court brief on Fri day asking a federal court to strike down the consti tutional and other legal prohibitions of same-sex unions. Crist, a former Republican governor now running as a Demo crat to regain his old job, announced long ago that he had changed his mind on gay marriage. As a former Gover nor, Attorney Gener al and Commission er of Education for the State of Florida who has opposed extending full marriage equality to gay and lesbian fam ilies in the past, and, in fact, supported the con stitutional amendment challenged here, Char lie Crist is in a unique position to provide this Court with argument as to why the political process that produced Floridas discrimina tory marriage laws is not due the normal deference that Courts should apply to actions of the people in enact ing amendments to the Florida constitution and to their representatives in enacting Florida law, the brief says. In the brief, Crists at torneys argue that the ban on same-sex mar riages is rooted in preju dice toward gay couples. The evidence now known to be true is that discriminatory marriage laws like discrimina tion by government in any form undermine effective governance, they argue. Such laws produce a discrimination that is incompatible with the constitutional commit ment to equal treatment under the law. Crist is looking to intervene in a federal lawsuit chal lenging the act led by six gay couples and the Equality Florida Insti tute. SUNPASS RATES GOING UP ON MOST FLORIDA TOLL ROADS A little more change will be drawn from Sun Pass users traveling Floridas Turnpike and most of the states oth er toll roads starting at 1 a.m. Tuesday. A 1.5 percent increase is being enacted be cause of a 2007 state law that allows SunPass and toll-by-plate rates to be adjusted every year based on changes in the consumer price index. The change will result in fees going up an extra penny or two at most toll plazas. The cost of a trip the entire length of Flori das Turnpike, 309 miles from Wildwood to Flor ida City, will grow from $19.75 to $20.07 for SunPass customers, Turnpike spokeswoman Sonyha Rodriguez-Mill er said in an email. Cash rates, which are higher than those charged to SunPass us ers, are not going up at this time. The law allows cash rates to go up, also based on the CPI, once every ve years. The next cash rate change is set for 2017. For motorists who are billed when a pho to is taken of the vehi cles license plate as it travels through a toll ing location, toll-byplate, the same Wild wood-to-Florida City trip is rising from $24.77 to $24.85. The two increases are expected to generate between $8 million and $10 million a year. Toll revenues for scal year 2013 hit $755 million. The other turnpike system roads impacted by the change are: the Seminole Expressway, the Southern Connec tor, the Beachline Ex pressway West, the Polk Parkway, the I-4 Con nector, and the Daniel Webster Western Belt way Part C, in Central Florida; the Sawgrass Expressway in South east Florida; and the Veterans Expressway and the Suncoast Park way north of Tampa. Florida Department of Transportation-owned toll roads seeing a sim ilar increase are: Alliga tor Alley in South Flori da, Pinellas Bayway and Sunshine Skyway. EAGLE FROM PAGE A3 ongoing team effort that involves physicians, nursing and support staff, said Mary Beth Lewis-Boardman, MD, a local board-certied ob stetrics and gynecolo gy physician, who is af liated with South Lake Hospital and is a mem ber of ACOG. The obstetrics de partment is involved in several quality and ed ucational initiatives to ensure that South Lake Hospital is utilizing ev idenced-based best practices to provide safe care for women in the community. These include participa tion in the ACOG Flor ida Perinatal Quality Collaborative and the Florida Hospital Asso ciation Hospital En gagement Network. We are fortunate to have a dedicated group of highly trained OB/ GYN physicians, such as Dr. Lewis-Boardman, delivering at our Centre for Womens Health, said South Lake Hos pital president John Moore. The shared mission between the physicians and our team members to pro vide each and every pa tient with the very best care is what continues to allow our obstetrics department to excel. DELIVERY FROM PAGE A3 Associated Press MIAMI Florida re ligious leaders are call ing on Gov. Rick Scott and state ofcials to re store the civil rights of former felons. A group of cler gy and activists will lead a march through Opa-Locka on Sunday to highlight Floridas status as one of three states that permanent ly deny ex-offenders the right to vote unless re stored by the governor or a clemency board. Scott and the Re publican-led Cabi net undid automat ic restoration of rights for nonviolent ex-fel ons and tightened rules in 2011. They said of fenders should have to demonstrate they can live crime-free. But religious leaders and civil liberties activ ists say Floridas rules are the most restrictive in the nation and effec tively suppress the mi nority vote. Organizers of Sundays march say the state has the high est disenfranchisement rate in the country. Clergy: Restore felons voting rights The event will start at 5 p.m., with the na tional anthem and ceremony taking place at 6 p.m. in Elizabeth Evans Park. There will be a kids area in Simp son Cove and enter tainment and vendors in both Evans Park and the Palm Island Park. Part of the na ture boardwalk there will also be open for rework viewing. The parade will take place at 10 a.m. Friday. Rob English, the president of the Mount Dora Area Chamber of Com merce, said a lot of businesses normal ly close on the Fourth but will be open on the third. The think ing was before the reworks and after the reworks are nished, that people would be dispersed into town to the restaurants and the wine bars to en joy themselves ... and some shopping also too. There will be park ing and a shuttle for Thursday nights events at Mount Dora High School. The parade route can be found at mount dorareworks.com. SHOW FROM PAGE A3 Associated Press ORLANDO The Florida De partment of Children and Fam ilies has taken custody of a mothers 2-year-old son a day after the womans other child died from what she was says was a hit-and-run accident. WFTV-TV reports that DCF placed Maryanne Schwartzs child in custody following a hear ing on Sunday after signs of mal nourishment and bruising were observed on both of her children. Florida Highway Patrol is in vestigating the Friday death of Schwartzs 3-year-old daughter, Yeliani Schwartz-Ojeda, outside of an Orlando apartment com plex. Authorities say the child died after being admitted to the hospital with injuries that doc tors said were consistent with being struck by a car. Schwartz called 911 and told authorities her child was hit by a car in the parking lot. FHP investigating after 3-year-old struck, killed

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Bushnell rf TOM HAYS Associated Press NEW YORK Charles Joe Hynes broke onto the national scene in the 1980s as the special prosecutor appointed by then-Gov. Mario Cuomo to investigate a notori ous racial attack in How ard Beach, Queens. A recent wave of bad publicity an election defeat after six terms, the recent voiding of wrong ful convictions won on his watch and a corrup tion investigation into his use of criminal forfei ture funds is threaten ing Hynes legacy. Federal and state au thorities are investi gating allegations that Hynes funneled more than $200,000 in forfei ture money from drug and other criminal in vestigations into his failed re-election cam paign. The probe was prompted by a scathing report by the citys De partment of Investiga tion that concluded the misuse of funds could amount to larceny. Its a very depressing thing to see someone who had been a coura geous prosecutor have things come to an end like this, said Kenneth Sherrill, a retired poli tics professor at Hunt er College. You really have to ask, how could an old pro like Hynes screw up this badly? A lawyer for Hynes, Robert Schwartz, said his 79-year-old client stands by his record and denies any wrongdoing. He is a law-abiding prosecutor, a law-abiding citizen and a good man, Schwartz said Friday. One victim was chased onto a highway where he was killed by a car. I realized we were looking at more than a fatal combination of race and violence, Hynes wrote in a book about the case. We were looking at a trag edy. And that trage dy would consume the next year of my life. Hynes ended up win ning three convictions for manslaughter and persuaded a judge to impose stiff sentences. The fame fueled a victo ry in his rst run for dis trict attorney in 1989. The prosecutor earned a solid reputation, in part by pioneering pro grams that directed drug offenders into treatment programs and sought to reduce recidivism by helping parolees get housing and steady jobs. In the 2013 elec tion, he was endorsed by old-guard politicians like former Mayor David Dinkins and a former congressman, the Rev. Floyd Flake. But Hynes challeng ers were able to exploit a brewing scandal sparked by the dismissal of a man who was convicted of murder based on new evidence showing that a detective had coached a witness to pick him out of a lineup. Dozens of other cases are under re view amid allegations that his ofce used taint ed evidence to win other murder convictions. How did this hap pen on his watch? the eventual winner, Ken neth Thompson, asked during the campaign. Hynes left ofce with other baggage a pending $150 million lawsuit brought by a Brooklyn murder sus pect who accused his of ce of withholding ev idence and knowingly allowing false testimo ny. The suspects lawyers have alleged that the misconduct was so per vasive that Hynes had to have known about it. Things got worse this month with the disclo sure that the city had in vestigated Hynes use of forfeiture funds. The probe focused on 6,000 subpoenaed emails ex changed among Hynes, a judge, a consultant and others in the 18 months before the election. The Department of Investigation conclud ed that there was evi dence he was using his ofcial email account for campaigning. It also found the consultant on the books as work ing for the Brooklyn DA press ofce actually had been paid $200,000 to advise his campaign. In one email to the judge, Hynes attacked the accuracy of a news paper op-ed piece ti tled Dump Hynes. Re ferring to the editorials author, Hynes wrote, Lying is his thing. In another, he wrote the judge while preparing for a debate, asking, How does this look for an opening statement? AP FILE PHOTO In this Jan. 19, 1988 photo, Charles Hynes, right, special prosecutor in the Howard Beach trial, waits to add his comments as the Rev. Al Sharpton, left, speaks at a celebration of Martin Luther King Jr.s birthday in New York. Once high-flying prosecutor faces threat to his legacy

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Not valid on prior purchas es, phone or special orders, Trunk Shows or on belk.com. Cannot be redeemed for cash, credit or refund, used in combination with any other discount or coupon offer. All Belk Rewards card purchase s subject to credit approval. One offer per cardholder. Valid July 1, 2014. RED DOT: ***Limited exclusion s in Brighton, Eileen Fisher, Lilly Pulitzer, My Flat in London, Resort, Bridge Collection, Levis, Coach, designer and Michael Kors handbags, designer sunglasses and junior denim. Juniors total savings are 70-80% off. Fashion Accessories, Handbags, Small Leather Goods, Hosiery, Shoes, Ralph Lauren Kids, Home Store and Mens Tailored Clothing total savings are 60-75%. COUPONS NOT VALID ON RED DOTmor e time to liv e the dr ea m! 30-50% offSportsw ear from ND New Directions Ruby Rd., Kim Roger s & Alfred Dunner Orig. 24.00-65.0 0 Sale 15.9944.99Als o in pe tites & to da y s wo man. To day s wo man at sl ig ht ly hig her pric es. Impo rt ed 50% offVa n He usen spor t shir ts Orig. 50 .0 0 Sale 24 .99Impor ted 10999queenBil tmor e Fo r Yo ur Ho me 610th re ad co un t Fle xi-F it shee t se ts Fu ll -kin g Orig. 160 .0 0-20 0.0 0 Sale 104.99119 .99Impor ted DO UB LEBelkRewards Dol lars July 1-6, 2014* f n b CHRISTINA A. CASSIDY Associated Press ATLANTA Jason Carter, former President Jimmy Car ters grandson, stepped into the pulpit of South Columbus United Methodist Church for a Palm Sunday sermon and offered a message of Chris tian responsibility to the poor, with his phone in hand. How many of you have the Bible (app) on your phone? I bet all of you do, Carter said to laughs from the crowd. Worshippers listened as the Democrat running for Geor gia governor read from his phone a New Testament verse about the importance of things that are not seen. The technology has changed in the four decades since Jimmy Carter spoke openly about his religious beliefs while campaigning, rst for Georgia governor and then president. But the broader message of a shared faith remains the same. Religion offers a powerful connection with many in the South, considered the most religious part of the country. Some Democrats hoping to reverse Republican gains in Georgia and elsewhere are nding their faith can be a valuable way to reach voters. Religion can be a very per sonal matter, and candidates vary in how much they are willing to talk about their faith. In Kentucky, Democrat ic U.S. Sen. candidate Ali son Lundergan Grimes hasnt spoken much publicly about her Catholic upbringing. But in Georgia, U.S. Sen. candi date Michelle Nunn high lighted her faith in an early TV ad about her grandmother, whom she called Mama. I remember as a child, go ing to church with Mama, ev ery Sunday in Perry and learn ing how we live out our faith by helping others, Demo crat Nunn says as an image of her as a young child sitting in church ashes on the screen. Nunn, in an interview, said faith is a powerful bond shared by many. Raised Methodist, she attends church in Atlanta and is rais ing her two children in the Methodist faith. I think that faith is certain ly something that transcends political parties, Nunn said. The reason I decided to talk about it is because its an im portant part of who I am. Sometimes, candidates are even more direct in high lighting their religious be liefs. U.S. Sen. Mark Pryor of Ar kansas, one of the most vul nerable Democrats up for re-election this year, is trying to win over those who might disagree with his vote for the federal health care law but who might be willing to sup port someone who calls the Bible his compass. In a statewide TV ad late last year, Pryor said: The Bi ble teaches us no one has all the answers: only God does. And neither political party is always right. In the Kentucky race, Grimes is said to pray before campaign events and had a priest with the family on the night of the primary election, but she rarely mentions her faith during campaign stops. Its particularly interesting given that when her father, Jerry Lundergan, was chair man of Kentuckys Demo cratic Party, he pushed it to embrace religion, arguing Democrats should not let Re publicans dene themselves as the party of faith. For me, your actions speak louder than words, Grimes said in a recent interview. And while you may not hear it in my public comments, (my faith) is the underly ing tone I think that has kept this campaign on the ground of putting people instead of partisan politics rst. Nationally, Kentucky and Georgia may represent the Democrats best hopes to thwart a Republican plan to take control of the U.S. Sen ate. Both Grimes and Nunn are considered to be strong recruits who have already proved to be prolic fundrais ers. Religion could offer them an important way to expand their base of support and bring in more rural voters. For Democrats who are disadvantaged politically in the region, its one way for them to at least attempt to neutralize the impact or the advantage that religiosity has for the Republican Party, said Andra Gillespie, an Em ory University political sci ence professor. If you have a Democrat who can make credible claims of faith that might actually help to under mine support for the Repub lican candidate at least on the issue of, Does this per son share my values? Regardless of party aflia tion, the South has the high est concentration of people who identify themselves as religious. Gallup polling last year found that the most re ligious states in the country were in the South. Among those, 52 percent in Georgia said they were very religious, while 49 percent in Kentucky reported the same. A Gallup survey earlier this year found that Southern Democrats are much more likely to say religion is an im portant part of their daily life about 74 percent, com pared with 57 percent of Dem ocrats from outside the South. In Georgia, Carter, a 38-year-old state senator from Atlanta, is in a tough battle to oust Gov. Nathan Deal four years after Republi cans claimed every statewide ofce. Carter must pick up votes in rural Georgia, woo ing those who used to vote Democratic in state elections but have moved over to the GOP in the past two decades. When Carters grandfather ran for governor, he featured his faith prominently in cam paign literature, describing himself as a lifelong church man who taught the Bible to children of Navy families while at the U.S Naval Acade my. The younger Carter has so far kept discussion about his faith to church visits across the state in recent months. In an interview, Carter said he doesnt think about how faith affects his campaign but more about how it affects him personally. Its incredibly important to me personally, it drives who I am and it drives what I do and how I make deci sions, Carter said. People have to be authentic about who they are and where they come from. What people want in our political world is to understand where our leaders come from. Faith offers valuable connection for Southern Dems JOHN BAZEMORE / AP Georgia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jason Carter, left, sits with his grandparents Rosalynn and Jimmy Carter during a church service in Plains, Ga.

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Ex p. 07/31/2014 ERIC TUCKER Associated Press WASHINGTON The rst prosecution arising from the Beng hazi attacks is playing out in the federal court house blocks from both the White House and Capitol Hill, an appro priate setting for a case that has drawn stark lines between President Barack Obama and Re publicans in Congress. The criminal proceed ings could provide new insights into the 2012 at tacks that killed four Americans and will serve as the latest test of the U.S. legal systems ability to handle terrorism sus pects captured overseas. Unfolding during an election year, the case against alleged master mind Ahmed Abu Khat tala could help shape the legacies of Obama and Attorney General Eric Holder, and spill over into the potential 2016 presidential candidacy of Hillary Rodham Clinton. Untangling the law from the politics may prove especially chal lenging for the public, given how prominent the attacks on the diplo matic compound in the eastern Libyan city have become in U.S. political discourse. Whats going to mat ter to the public more than anything else is the result, and I think its going to only diffuse some of the ongoing Benghazi conspiracy theories if the Obama administration is going to be able to successful ly obtain a conviction in this case, said Ameri can University law pro fessor Stephen Vladeck, a national security law expert. Still, he said the case raises the same legal issues as past terror ism prosecutions and should not by itself be viewed as a referendum on the Obama adminis tration. The story of this case is not the story of the Obama administrations reaction to Benghazi, he added. The sto ry of this case is those who were responsible for Benghazi and those who need to be held ac countable for the four deaths that resulted. A 10-minute court ap pearance amid tight se curity Saturday was the American publics rst concrete sense of Abu Khatalla, the Libyan militant accused by the U.S. government of be ing a ringleader of at tacks on Sept. 11, 2012. U.S. special forces captured him in Libya during a nighttime raid two weeks ago, and he was transported to the U.S. aboard a Navy ship, where he was interrogat ed by federal agents. He was own by military he licopter to Washington. Prosecutors have yet to reveal details about their case, although the broad outlines are in a two-page indictment unsealed Saturday. He pleaded not guilty to a single conspiracy charge punishable by up to life in prison, but the Justice Department expects to bring addi tional charges soon that could be more substan tial and carry more dire consequences. For instance, a threecount criminal com plaint led last year and unsealed after his cap ture charged Abu Khat tala with killing a per son during an attack on a federal facility a crime that carries the death penalty. His capture revived a debate on how to treat suspected terrorists from foreign countries, as criminal defendants with the protections of the U.S. legal system or as enemy combat ants who should be in terrogated for intelli gence purposes and put through the military tri bunal process at Guan tanamo Bay, Cuba. If were doing to do this for everybody en gaged in terrorism around the world, wed better start building pris ons by the dozens, Rep. Mike Rogers, R-Mich., chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, said Sunday on CNNs State of the Union. He questioned the sheer expense, the manpower, the plan ning in preparing this criminal case. The Justice Depart ment considers that discussion moot. Though a 2009 plan to prosecute several Guan tanamo Bay detainees in New York City was abort ed because of political opposition, Holder has said successful terrorism cases in U.S. courts most recently the March conviction in New York of Osama bin Ladens son-in-law shows the civilian justice systems capability to handle such defendants. Experts say the Justice Department would not have embarked on Abu Khattalas capture and prosecution if it didnt feel comfortable after the case. Benghazi case unfolds against political backdrop JOSE LUIS MAGANA / AP U.S. Marshalls move outside the federal U.S. District Court in Washington Saturday, after security was heightened in anticipation of a possible court appearance by captured Libyan militant Ahmed Abu Khattala later in the day.

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 30, 2014 CR OW NS$399Eac h(3 or mor e per visit) D2751/ Re g $59 9 ea. Po rcel ain on non Pr ecious me ta l DENTURES$74 9Eac hD0 51 10 or D0 51 20DENT AL SA VIN GSTh e patie nt an d any oth er per son re spons ible for paym ent has the right to re fuse to pay cancel payme nt or be re imburs ed for paym ent for any other ser vices, ex aminat ion whic h is per for med as a re sult of and with in 72 hours of re spon ding to the ad ve rt is em en t fo r th e discounted fee or re duced fee ser vice or tr eatment. Fees may va ry due to comple xity of case This disc ount do es no t appl y to th ose patie nt s wi th den tal pla ns. Fee s ar e mi ni mal. PR IC ES ARE SU BJ ECT TO CHA NGE. LEESBUR GM T. DORASu nr is e De nt al Tr i-D ent al r ff nt bb f Consul tat ion and Seco nd Op in ion No Ch ar ge!n t t NEW PA TIENT SPEC IAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RA YS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EX AMINA TION BY DO CTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABS ENCE OF GUM DISEA SE ) D00 2409 DAVID MCHUGH Associated Press KIEV, Ukraine Ukrainian President Petro Poroshen ko tried to keep his peace plan to settle the conict with pro-Russian separat ists on track in a four-way phone call Sunday with Rus sian President Vladimir Putin and the leaders of France and Germany. The two-hour conversa tion came ahead of a Mon day deadline that European Union leaders set for Russia and the separatists to take steps to ease the violence, warning that otherwise they were ready at any time to impose further punitive measures. German Chancellor Ange la Merkel and French Presi dent Francois Hollande en couraged the Ukrainian and Russian presidents to work on meeting the EU condi tions, Hollandes ofce said in a statement. The EUs de mands included the return of three border checkpoints to Ukrainian control, veri cation of the cease-re by monitors from the Organiza tion for Security and Cooper ation in Europe, and talks to put Poroshenkos peace plan in place. The call was the latest in a series of discussions the four leaders have held in recent weeks in an effort to stop the ghting that has killed more than 400 people since April. A cease-re in place since June 20 has been shaky, with each side accusing the other of numerous violations. A statement issued by Poro shenkos ofce said he under lined Ukraines willingness to maintain the cease-re at least until Monday evening, but expressed concern about the situation, noting what he said were multiple violations of the truce by separatist ghters. He called on Putin to strengthen border con trols from the Russian side to stop what Ukraine says is the ow of weapons, ghters and mercenaries. The sides agreed that more talks among representatives of Ukraine, Russia and the separatists would convene very soon, Poroshenkos of ce said. A Kremlin statement said the four leaders discussed having OSCE monitors sta tioned at the border cross ing points. They also dis cussed issues resulting from Ukraines signing of a broad trade deal with the EU on Friday despite Russias ob jections. Russian ofcials have said Ukraines tariff-free trade arrangement with Rus sia may be withdrawn, but no trade sanctions have yet been announced. In another indication that tensions remain high, several hundred Ukrainian soldiers and activists gathered out side the presidential admin istration in Kiev on Sunday to demand that Poroshenko lift the cease-re and allow them to resume their ght. A presidential administra tion ofcial, Henadiy Zubko, promised to pass on their de mands to the president, but told them that the cease-re order would remain in effect until 10 p.m. Monday. Soldiers also addressed several thousand people who turned out for the tradition al Sunday rally on Indepen dence Square in central Kiev. Another EU condition was fullled late Saturday, when pro-Russia separatists re leased a second team of four OSCE observers who had been held captive in east ern Ukraine since the end of May. The rst team of four was freed last week. The free-trade pact that Ukraine signed with the EU was the very deal that the former Ukrainian president dumped under pressure from Moscow in November, fueling huge protests that eventually drove him from power. Moscow responded to those events by annexing the mainly Russian-speaking Crimean Peninsula in March, and the pro-Russia insurgen cy in eastern Ukraine broke out a month later. The United States and the EU have slapped travel bans and asset freezes on mem bers of Putins inner circle, and threatened to impose more crippling sanctions against entire sectors of Rus sias economy if the Kremlin fails to de-escalate the crisis. Ukraine president talks to Putin, Merkel, Hollande SERGEI CHUZAVKOV / AP People shout slogans during a rally in Independence Square in Kiev, Ukraine, on Sunday. ASHOK SHARMA Associated Press NEW DELHI Police in southern India de tained ve construction company ofcials Sun day as rescuers using gas cutters and shovels searched for dozens of workers believed bur ied in the rubble of a building that collapsed during monsoon rains. It was one of two week end building collaps es that killed at least 26 people. Nearly 90 contract workers were believed to have been in the basement of the 11-sto ry structure to collect their wages when it collapsed Saturday on the outskirts of Chen nai, the capital of Tam il Nadu state. Police said eight died on the spot and another seven succumbed to in juries in a hospital. An other 20 people have been pulled out alive. J. Jayalalitha, the states top elected of cial, visited the site on Sunday and said an other 40 people may still be trapped under the debris, according to the Press Trust of India news agency. Rescuers could hear feeble voices in the de bris, said T.S. Sridhar, the disaster manage ment agency commis sioner. Ofcials used gas cutters, iron rods and shovels after cranes lifted concrete blocks to get to the survivors. Removing debris is a major challenge. It may take two to three days to clear the rubble, said S.P. Selvam, who is head ing the rescue operation. Moderate to heavy rains hampered res cue efforts later Sunday, but these were continu ing, said police ofcer Pushpraj, who uses one name. George Fernandes, another police ofcer, said two directors, two engineers and one su pervisor of the con struction company, Prime Sristi, were de tained for questioning as authorities began in vestigating the collapse. Balaguru, one of the builders, said the struc ture collapsed possi bly due to the impact of lightning. Usually, once the construction gets over we install the equip ment to prevent the building from a thunder strike. It was nearing completion, the Press Trust of India news agency quoted Balagu ru, who uses one name, as saying. Earlier Saturday, 11 people died and one survivor was being treated in a hospital af ter a four-story, 50-yearold structure toppled in an area of New Delhi inhabited by the poor, said re service ofcer Praveer Haldiar. Most homes in that part of the capital were built without permis sion and using substan dard materials, police ofcer Madhur Verma said. 26 dead in India building collapses ARUN SANKAR / AP A rescuer, left checks his mobile phone as they search amid the rubble of a building that collapsed late Saturday during monsoon rains on the outskirts of Chennai, India, on Sunday. HYUNG-JIN KIM Associated Press SEOUL, South Korea North Ko rea said Friday that leader Kim Jong Un has guided the test launches of its newly developed precision guid ed missiles, in a possible reference to three short-range projectiles South Korean ofcials say the North red toward its waters a day earlier. South Korean defense ofcials said the projectiles red from an eastern port city Thursday ew about 190 ki lometers (120 miles) before harm lessly landing into the waters off its east coast. The exact type of those projectiles and the Norths intentions werent immediately known. The Norths state media said Fri day that the country tested what it calls cutting-edge ultra-precision tactical guided missiles and Kim watched the tests with top deputies and was satised with the results. There is virtually no way to inde pendently conrm whether North Korea has developed such high-tech missiles. North Korea has frequent ly bluffed and exaggerated about its military capability, and its army, though one of the worlds largest, is seen as running on outdated equip ment and short supplies amid the nations chronic economic prob lems, according to foreign analysts. Still, the impoverished North de votes much of its scarce resourc es to its missile and nuclear pro grams, which subsequently pose a serious threat to South Korea, Ja pan and tens of thousands of U.S. troops in the region. Outside ana lysts say North Korea has developed a handful of crude nuclear devic es and is working toward building a warhead small enough to mount on a long-range missile, although most experts say that goal may take years to achieve. The North didnt say when the latest launches took place or how many missiles were red, but they are likely the projectiles that Seoul says North Korea red Thursday as there have been no other such re ported rings by North Korea in re cent days. North Korea tests new precision-guided missiles DIAA HADID Associated Press IRBIL, Iraq Thou sands of Iraqi Chris tians ocked back to their homes in the north on Sunday, days after they ed villages under attack by Sunni Muslim extremists. Hundreds of peo ple packed into cars, jeeps and buses were crossing a checkpoint on their way back af ter ruling Kurdish forc es told them it was safe to return. The cluster of villages is in an area known as Hamdaniya, some 45 miles (75 kilometers) inside the border of the largely autonomous Kurdish-held region. It came under attack Wednesday by Sun ni insurgents near the northern city of Mosul, led by the al-Qaida in spired Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant. The Sunni insurgents red mortar shells on the outskirts of the vil lage, panicking thou sands of residents who thought extremists would overrun their villages. Christians in Iraq have warned that their an cient communitys sur vival is in danger since the Sunni insurgency seized swathes of north ern Iraq, including their ancient heartland of Ni nevah and Mosul. Community lead ers estimate there were some 1.5 million Chris tians in Iraq before the U.S.-led invasion in 2003. Since then, the countrys general vio lence and attacks tar geting Christians have caused over half the community to ee. Iraqi Christians return to villages HUSSEIN MALLA / AP Displaced Iraqi Christian families, who ed from the villages of Hamdaniya near the northern city of Mosul, gather outside a temporary shelter, in Irbil, Iraq, on Sunday.

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Monday, June 30, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A9 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 C ourage has always been a relative sort of thing. We consider it, reect ed through both our person al prisms of perspective and the evolving context of time. These days, someone like Ja son Collins, who announces his homosexuality to the sports world, is hailed as courageous, even though its much more like ly that a high-prole athlete who comes out will be heralded, not hounded. A Republican who supports gay marriage or a Democrat who declares herself to be pro-life are looked upon as heroic in some circles, and while they show a re freshing willingness to stray from the reservation, theyre not ex actly candidates for the Bronze Star. And then you have student jour nalists who have a problem with the word Redskin and ban any one from printing that scurrilous term in the school newspaper. Some call them courageous. Oth ers, like me, think that they need to take an AP course in humility. So, yes, the idea of courage has evolved over time, and I would suggest that its become cheap ened by our reduced standards of what is honorable, important and benecial to society. I cringe whenever a reader calls me brave for speaking my mind. Thats not bravery, its bravado. Theres a big difference. Fifty years ago, during a hot Southern summer in another place called Philadelphia, real courage found a home. It settled in the hearts and minds of all dif ferent types of people: young, not-so-young, Jews, priests and nuns, laborers and lawyers, men, women, children. Freedom Sum mer was a time when speak ing your mind, coming out for equality, attacking the bigot ry of acts and not merely offen sive words, and literally putting your body between the victims and the victimizers was com mon. I was 2 years old that summer, so I have no personal memories. Fortunately, I dont need them. Grainy black-and-white photo graphs; archival voice record ings; books about the murder of Chaney, Schwerner and Good man; documentaries all these things are artifacts that, far from being fossilized in media amber, bear striking witness to the bon re of righteous purpose. That courage did not die with the peo ple who had it. That courage turns 50 this year, and as long as we remember, it will remain im mortal. To a society that trumpets courage too easily, except for those instances when it should be noticed, as on the battleeld or in the seless heart of a rst responder, the type of bravery exhibited by the so-called Free dom Riders is hard to compre hend. Going down to Mississip pi to speak truth to corrupted power carried with it the possi bility of no return trip home, as two Jewish boys from New York found out when they were am bushed by the Klan, murdered and thrown into a ditch along side their black companion. That happened 50 years ago last week. The fact that it took four decades for anyone to actually pay for that crime is an example of how poisonous that climate was, and how deeply that poison seeped into the culture of the place. While we in this northern Phil adelphia cant pat ourselves on the back about our tolerance (because I heard the N-word an awful lot growing up in Logan and then Delaware County), the South was a place apart, a place where the Klan laid down the law at night and lled the ofces of power by day. Freedom Summer lasted for a season, but its repercussions were felt for many more. As Ive often mentioned in these pag es, my father took his own bus trip down to Mississippi, in June 1967. It was a time when a mov ie like In The Heat of the Night still felt like front-page news, and Martin Luther King was 10 months away from becom ing immortal. Ted Flowers had just gotten his law degree from Temple, and chose to break it in down south. Daddy registered voters, de fended indigents and went toeto-toe with caricatures of hu manity in bureaucratic town halls. He also had his own runin with the Klan, at night, com ing back from a diner dinner that included some great food and some uncomfortable glares. For tunately, a kid who grew up on the streets of West Philly was at least in this instance able to take care of himself. It was easy for those who didnt live shoulder to shoulder with Jim Crow to look at some of those Freedom Riders as trou blemakers. Daddy knew the truth, even three years on, and he wrote about it in the journal he kept: But the people who re ally impress me are the impov erished negro and the volunteer whites. They are not beatniks, or communists, or radicals. They are ne individuals, worthy of re spect. The young students down here for the summer go out into the remote rural areas and as sume considerable risks to help. I wish I had their courage. Courage is a precious com modity. Today, we have trou ble recognizing it. But there was once a summer when it was in abundant supply. Christine M. Flowers is a lawyer and columnist for the Philadelphia Dai ly News. Readers may send her email at cowers1961@gmail.com. OTHER VOICES Christine M. Flowers MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Real courage, and that summer of it B etter late than never, the American pub lic has been provided with a redacted version of a Justice Department memo offering a legal rationale for the targeting of Anwar Awlaki, the U.S.-born al-Qaida gure who was killed in a drone strike in Yemen in 2011. The document was made public Mon day after the Obama administration decid ed not to appeal a court order that it be dis closed. The basic legal rationale for targeting Awla ki has long been known. In fact, the U.S. 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals ordered the memos release precisely because so much of the ar gument has seeped into the public domain as the result of speeches by administration of cials and the publication last year of a 16page white paper. Still, the release of the actual 2010 memo prepared by Justice De partment ofcial David Barron (now a federal judge) is an important, if overdue, exercise in transparency. Is the memo persuasive? Only to a limited degree. It plausibly concludes that, under the Authorization for Use of Military Force passed by Congress after 9/11, the military or CIA may target a U.S. citizen abroad who has joined the enemy and whose activities pose a continued and imminent threat to Americans. But the memo doesnt precisely dene imminent, and other statements by administration of cials suggest that they are employing an omi nously elastic interpretation of that term. For example, the white paper said that the govern ment may target an American for death even in the absence of clear evidence that a specif ic attack on U.S. persons or interests will take place in the immediate future. Then there is the question of whether the government should try to capture a U.S. cit izen suspected of terrorism instead of killing him. The Barron memo approves of assassina tion when capture is not impossible but mere ly infeasible. That is too vague a standard. The version of the memo released by the appeals court Monday is missing several pag es that apparently contain evidence that Aw laki had ceased being merely a propagandist for al-Qaida and had participated in plan ning attacks. Now as before the release of the memo, Americans must take it on faith that Awlaki had to be killed. That isnt satisfactory. When Awlaki was killed, we argued that if the United States was going to engage in state-sponsored assassina tion of U.S. citizens, at the minimum it must explain in detail why someone has been tar geted. Welcome as the release of the Barron memo is, it doesnt meet that standard. Distributed by MCT Information Services. A VOICE Officially, why it was OK for the U.S. government to kill Awlaki Classic DOONESBURY 1975

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MIKE CORDER Associated Press FORTALEZA, Brazil Klaas Jan Huntelaar and Wesley Sneijder scored late goals Sunday to give the Netherlands a 2-1 victory over Mexico and a spot in the World Cup quarternals. Huntelaar, who came on as a 76th-minute substitute, scored the winning goal from the penalty spot deep in in jury time after Rafael Marquez brought down Arjen Robben in the area. You dont know when your chance will come, but it was today, and so you grab it with both hands, said Hunt elaar, who was making his rst appearance at this years World Cup. And it was fantastic. Giovani Dos Santos gave the Mexicans the lead in the 48th min ute, but Sneijder equal ized for the Dutch in the 88th. It was the rst time Sneijder, who scored ve goals at the last World Cup in South Af rica, has found the net in Brazil. Robben has already scored three goals for the Dutch at this years tournament, but after earning the late penal ty, he handed the ball to Huntelaar. Klaas is a great pen alty taker. He was fresh, had just come on and I had faith in him, Robben said. I asked him if he wanted to take it and he was very sure of himself. Huntelaar and Snei jder scored the goals at the hot and steamy Arena Castelao, but it was Netherlands coach Louis van Gaal that may just deserve the cred it for making a crucial tactical change during the second of two of cial cooling breaks. As he did earlier against Australia, the master tactician again switched his team around in the second half, changing from the more defensive 5-3-2 system to the tradition al Dutch attacking 4-3-3 formation. Yes, we escaped, Van Gaal said. But we showed that we could create more chanc es with 4-3-3, and the players handled this shift very well. Van Gaal said he made his critical switch during the second-half break, huddling with his players as they drank from bottles on the sideline. I moved to Plan B at the cooling break af ter (Mexico goalkeeper Guillermo) Ochoa made an amazing save, said Van Gaal, soon to be the manager at Manchester Unit ed. SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 30, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com GOLF: Rose wins title in playoff / B4 NATACHA PISANRENKO / AP Netherlands Klaas-Jan Huntelaar celebrates after scoring his sides second and decisive goal during the World Cup round of 16 soccer match against Mexico on Sunday at the Arena Castelao in Fortaleza, Brazil. The Netherlands won the match 2-1. LEO CORREA / AP Mexicos head coach Miguel Herrera celebrates the opening goal during the World Cup round of 16 soccer match against Netherlands on Sunday in Fortaleza, Brazil. Stunning Upset Huntelaars shot from penalty spot gives Netherlands 2-1 win over Mexico Today it was the man with the whistle who eliminated us from the World Cup. Miguel Herrera Mexico coach, on penalty shot goal that sealed teams defeat Rafael Nadal of Spain plays a return to Mikhail Kukushkin of Kazakhstan during their mens singles match on Saturday in London. BEN CURTIS / AP Big 4 around for Wimbledons Week 2, not so for women ZACHARY HANKLE Special to the Daily Commercial WINTER GARDEN The Leesburg Light ning saw their twogame winning streak snapped by Winter Garden on Saturday in the rst game of a dou bleheader at Winter Garden West Orange High School. Chaz Boyer scored on a sacrice y by Da mon Haecker to give the Squeeze a 2-1 win in walk-off fashion. The second game was not completed in time for this edition. Leesburg scored its lone run in the third in ning on a sacrice bunt by Garrett Suggs, which scored Brad Antchak, who opened the inning with an ineld hit. In the fth inning, Winter Garden scored when Zane Ancell raced ohm on ground out by Haecker. The Lightning had a chance to take the lead in the sixth inning with Shea Pierce on third base, but Pierce was thrown out at home by Squeeze centerelder Matt McLean on a y out by Brett Jones. Brandon Caples took the loss, his sec ond in six decisions this season. Pierce, Antchak and Igor Baez paced the Lightning with two hits apiece. Leesburg wraps up its series against the Squeeze at 1 p.m. to day in Winter Garden. GAIL BURTON / AP Tampa Bay Rays Ben Zobrist is safe at the plate on a double by Matt Joyce in the sixth inning on Sunday in Baltimore. DAVID GINSBURG AP Sports Writer BALTIMORE Matt Joyce homered twice, had a career-high ve hits and drove in four runs to power the Tampa Bay Rays past the Bal timore Orioles 12-7 Sunday. Tampa Bay totaled 11 extra base hits ve homers and six doubles. The Rays trailed 4-3 be fore Kevin Kiermaier and Logan Forsythe went deep during a seven-run sixth inning that sent many in the crowd of 32,665 scattering toward the exits. Joyce doubled in the rst inning, hit a solo shot in the third, singled in both the fth and sixth in nings and added a two-run drive in the seventh. His ve hits and 12 total bases tied club records. Lightning suffer 7-2 defeat by Squeeze DENNIS PASSA Associated Press LONDON The socalled Big 4 who have won 35 of 37 of the past Grand Slam singles ti tles Novak Djokov ic, Rafael Nadal, Andy Murray and Roger Fed erer are all around for the second week at Wimbledon, joined by the new major winner on the block, Australian Open champion Stan Wawrinka. The same cant be said on the womens side, where top-seeded and ve-time champion Serena Williams wont see any action at the All England Club in Week 2 except in doubles with her sister Venus, anoth er ve-time Wimbledon winner who is also out of singles. With Serena out and second-seeded Li Na also a third-round los er, it marks the rst time in the Open era that the top two womens seeds havent advanced to Wimbledons fourth round. Williams, who has 17 Grand Slam sin gles titles, hadnt been knocked out of Wimble don so soon since 2005, but has departed before the quarternals at four of the past ve majors. WTA founder Bil lie Jean King, winner of Joyce homers twice as Rays beat Orioles 12-7 SEE RAYS | B2 SEE TENNIS | B2 SEE UPSET | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 30, 2014 SUN mon tu es we d thurs fri Sa tLeesbur g LightningJune 29Jul y 5Winter GardenAW AY1pmCollege ParkHOME7pmCollege ParkHOME7pmCollege ParkAW AY7pmWinter ParkHOME6pmWinter ParkHOME7pm NASCAR Sprint Cup-Quaker State 400 Results Saturday At Kentucky Speedway Sparta, Ky. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (1) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 267 laps, 150 rating, 48 points. 2. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 267, 121.5, 43. 3. (7) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 267, 116.7, 41. 4. (14) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 267, 100.8, 40. 5. (29) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 267, 104.6, 39. 6. (3) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 267, 106.2, 38. 7. (5) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 267, 109.2, 37. 8. (20) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 267, 101.1, 36. 9. (2) Joey Logano, Ford, 267, 117.2, 36. 10. (25) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 267, 88.6, 34. 11. (13) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 267, 78.6, 33. 12. (9) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 267, 85.8, 32. 13. (27) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 267, 73.8, 31. 14. (24) Greg Bife, Ford, 267, 72.8, 30. 15. (12) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 267, 89.6, 29. 16. (16) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 267, 84.7, 28. 17. (23) Carl Edwards, Ford, 267, 65, 27. 18. (32) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 267, 66.7, 26. 19. (19) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 267, 63.6, 25. 20. (26) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 267, 57.4, 24. 21. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 267, 71.8, 23. 22. (15) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 266, 72.2, 22. 23. (11) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 266, 74.9, 21. 24. (28) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 266, 51.4, 20. 25. (21) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 266, 56.3, 19. 26. (17) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 266, 55.7, 18. 27. (31) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 265, 46.7, 17. 28. (30) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 264, 48.2, 16. 29. (34) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 263, 43.5, 15. 30. (41) David Gilliland, Ford, 263, 41.7, 14. 31. (36) David Ragan, Ford, 262, 38.7, 13. 32. (37) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 262, 35.9, 0. 33. (39) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 261, 33.7, 11. 34. (35) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 259, 36.9, 10. 35. (38) David Stremme, Chevrolet, 257, 32.7, 9. 36. (33) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 255, 27.5, 8. 37. (8) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 250, 69.5, 7. 38. (40) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 239, 27.9, 0. 39. (22) Aric Almirola, Ford, accident, 175, 67.8, 5. 40. (6) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, accident, 75, 66.1, 4. 41. (42) Mike Bliss, Toyota, transmission, 30, 27.4, 0. 42. (4) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, accident, 27, 46.6, 2. GOLF BMW International Open Leading Scores Sunday At Gut Larchenhof Golf Club Pulheim, Germany Purse: $2.72 million Yardage: 7,228; Par: 72 Final Fabrizio Zanotti 72-67-65-65 269 Gregory Havret 71-65-67-66 269 Rafa Cabrera-Bello 64-68-70-67 269 Henrik Stenson 68-68-66-67 269 Thongchai Jaidee 71-66-68-65 270 Simon Dyson 69-66-69-66 270 Jamie Donaldson 71-67-65-67 270 Danny Willett 64-68-71-68 271 Emiliano Grillo 66-66-70-69 271 Thomas Bjorn 70-66-66-69 271 Pablo Larrazabal 69-63-67-72 271 Sergio Garcia 71-66-70-65 272 Anthony Wall 69-69-68-66 272 Shane Lowry 67-68-70-67 272 Paul Waring 72-63-69-68 272 Romain Wattel 67-68-69-68 272 Alex Cejka 68-66-69-69 272 Alexander Levy 70-67-66-69 272 Oliver Fisher 72-66-65-69 272 Francesco Molinari 71-66-65-70 272 Richard Green 72-68-62-70 272 Senior Players Championship Scores Sunday At Fox Chapel Golf Club Pittsburgh Purse: $2.7 million Yardage: 6,696; Par: 70 Final x-won on second playoff hole x-Bernhard Langer (810), $405,000 65-64-66-70 265 Jeff Sluman (476), $237,600 69-67-64-65 265 Russ Cochran (388), $194,400 70-66-63-67 266 Kenny Perry (322), $160,650 70-63-65-69 267 Mark McNulty (256), $128,250 66-66-71-66 269 Mark Brooks (168), $83,700 66-67-71-66 270 Joe Durant (168), $83,700 64-68-67-71 270 Bill Glasson (168), $83,700 67-64-68-71 270 Jay Haas (168), $83,700 69-70-65-66 270 Mark OMeara (168), $83,700 67-66-69-68 270 Corey Pavin (168), $83,700 65-69-69-67 270 John Cook (0), $54,900 69-66-70-66 271 Bob Gilder (0), $54,900 70-69-69-63 271 John Riegger (0), $54,900 68-64-69-70 271 Michael Allen (0), $43,200 68-64-69-71 272 Marco Dawson (0), $43,200 66-68-68-70 272 David Frost (0), $43,200 64-71-68-69 272 Doug Garwood (0), $43,200 64-67-71-70 272 Colin Montgomerie (0), $43,200 69-69-66-68 272 Barry Lane (0), $34,290 66-69-68-70 273 Tom Lehman (0), $34,290 67-69-66-71 273 Bart Bryant (0), $27,765 65-70-71-68 274 Tom Byrum (0), $27,765 69-70-69-66 274 Dan Forsman (0), $27,765 69-69-69-67 274 Rocco Mediate (0), $27,765 67-70-69-68 274 Loren Roberts (0), $27,765 68-66-71-69 274 Kirk Triplett (0), $27,765 70-70-69-65 274 Tommy Armour III (0), $21,384 66-70-66-73 275 Jeff Brehaut (0), $21,384 70-68-67-70 275 Brad Bryant (0), $21,384 67-69-70-69 275 Larry Mize (0), $21,384 65-69-72-69 275 Steve Pate (0), $21,384 65-71-69-70 275 Billy Andrade (0), $18,225 67-71-66-72 276 Mike Goodes (0), $18,225 74-68-68-66 276 Wayne Levi (0), $15,863 71-67-68-71 277 Joey Sindelar (0), $15,863 70-73-68-66 277 Esteban Toledo (0), $15,863 71-66-68-72 277 Willie Wood (0), $15,863 70-72-68-67 277 Olin Browne (0), $13,230 65-71-71-71 278 Peter Fowler (0), $13,230 65-68-71-74 278 Steve Lowery (0), $13,230 70-73-68-67 278 Gene Sauers (0), $13,230 69-72-68-69 278 Peter Senior (0), $13,230 70-70-67-71 278 Bobby Clampett (0), $11,070 67-69-69-74 279 Joe Daley (0), $11,070 71-70-70-68 279 Wes Short, Jr. (0), $11,070 65-71-73-70 279 Brad Faxon (0), $9,450 68-72-66-74 280 John Inman (0), $9,450 70-68-71-71 280 Chien Soon Lu (0), $9,450 72-70-70-68 280 Jeff Hart (0), $8,370 69-71-72-69 281 Rick Fehr (0), $7,290 71-70-70-71 282 Dick Mast (0), $7,290 69-70-69-74 282 Bob Tway (0), $7,290 66-78-70-68 282 Steve Jones (0), $6,075 72-65-74-72 283 Jim Rutledge (0), $6,075 72-70-74-67 283 Rod Spittle (0), $6,075 69-73-71-70 283 Bruce Vaughan (0), $6,075 71-68-73-71 283 Scott Dunlap (0), $4,995 74-67-70-73 284 Morris Hatalsky (0), $4,995 70-71-71-72 284 Gene Jones (0), $4,995 69-72-68-75 284 Hal Sutton (0), $4,995 74-70-72-68 284 Joel Edwards (0), $4,050 74-71-71-70 286 Tom Pernice Jr. (0), $4,050 72-72-69-73 286 Mark Wiebe (0), $4,050 74-69-72-71 286 Roger Chapman (0), $2,992 73-70-72-72 287 Anders Forsbrand (0), $2,992 72-73-75-67 287 Jeff Freeman (0), $2,992 74-67-71-75 287 Fred Funk (0), $2,992 71-70-76-70 287 Sandy Lyle (0), $2,992 72-73-70-72 287 Peter Jacobsen (0), $2,376 73-71-73-71 288 David Eger (0), $2,133 73-68-76-73 290 Gary Hallberg (0), $2,133 70-75-75-70 290 Scott Simpson (0), $1,836 72-73-76-70 291 Duffy Waldorf (0), $1,836 71-76-74-70 291 Hale Irwin (0), $1,620 73-72-74-73 292 Mark Mouland (0), $1,620 71-75-71-75 292 Mike Reid (0), $1,458 76-71-73-73 293 Jim Gallagher, Jr. (0), $1,350 75-74-74-72 295 Tom Kite (0), $1,242 76-76-71-76 299 SOCCER World Cup Glance ROUND OF 16 Saturday, June 28 Game 49 At Belo Horizonte, Brazil Brazil 1, Chile 1, Brazil advanced 3-2 on penalty kicks Game 50 At Rio De Janeiro Colombia 2, Uruguay 0 Sunday, June 29 Game 51 At Fortaleza, Brazil Netherlands 2, Mexico 1 Game 52 At Recife, Brazil Costa Rica 1, Greece 1, Costa Rica advanced 5-3 on pen alty kicks June 30 Game 53 At Brasilia, Brazil France vs. Nigeria, 1600 GMT Game 54 At Porto Alegre, Brazil Germany vs. Algeria, 2000 GMT Tuesday, July 1 Game 55 At Sao Paulo Argentina vs. Switzerland, 1600 GMT Game 56 At Salvador, Brazil Belgium vs. United States, 2000 GMT QUARTERFINALS Friday, July 4 Game 57 At Fortaleza, Brazil Brazil vs. Colombia, 2000 GMT Game 58 At Rio De Janeiro Game 53 winner vs. Game 54 winner, 1600 GMT Saturday, July 5 Game 59 At Salvador, Brazil Netherlands vs. Game 52 winner, 2000 GMT Game 60 At Brasilia, Brazil Game 55 winner vs. Game 56 winner, 1600 GMT SEMIFINALS Tuesday, July 8 Game 61 At Belo Horizonte, Brazil Game 57 winner vs. Game 58 winner, 2000 GMT Wednesday, July 9 Game 62 At Sao Paulo Game 59 winner vs. Game 60 winner, 2000 GMT THIRD PLACE Saturday, July 12 Game 63 At Brasilia, Brazil Seminal losers, 2000 GMT FINAL Sunday, July 13 Game 64 At Rio De Janeiro Seminal winners, 1900 GMT Sundays Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League CLEVELAND INDIANS Recalled LHP TJ House from Co lumbus (IL). Optioned LHP Nick Hagadone to Columbus. OAKLAND ATHLETICS Recalled 1B Nate Freiman from Sacramento (PCL). Placed OF Josh Reddick on the 15day DL. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS Placed INF Chris Owings on the 15-day DL. Selected the contract of INF Nick Ahmed from Reno (PCL). Transferred INF Eric Chavez to the 60day DL. LOS ANGELES DODGERS Placed INF Justin Turner on the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Carlos Triunfel from Albuquer que (PCL). MIAMI MARLINS Reinstated OF Christian Yelich from the 15-day DL. Recalled LHP Dan Jennings from New Or leans (PCL). MILWAUKEE BREWERS Recalled INF Jeff Bianchi from Nashville (PCL). Assigned RHP Alfredo Figaro to Nashville. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS Recalled RHP Jorge Rondon from Memphis (PCL). Optioned RHP Eric Fornataro to Memphis. American Association AMARILLO SOX Signed INF Joe Weik and LHP Cameron Cuneo. Released LHP Eric Martinez. FARGO-MOORHEAD REDHAWKS Signed OF Dustin Rob inson. Can-Am League TROIS-RIVIERES AIGLES Released INF Travis Weaver. FOOTBALL Canadian Football League WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS Signed WR Romby Bryant and DB Troy Stoudermire. MOTORSPORTS INDYCAR Fined Marco Andretti $2,500 for failing to heed to an order from race control during the June 28 race at the Grand Prix of Houston. COLLEGE TEXAS TECH Dismissed freshman DB Nigel Bethel II from the team following an incident at a campus recre ation center. SCOREBOARD FCSL STANDINGS W L .Pct GB Sanford 14 7 .667 Winter Garden 13 9 .591 1.5 Winter Park 13 9 .591 1.5 Leesburg 9 9 .500 3.5 DeLand 7 13 .350 6.5 College Park 5 14 .263 8 SUNDAYS GAMES Winter Garden 7, Leesburg 2 WInter Park 6, DeLand 2, 1st game WInter Park 4, DeLand 1, 2nd game Sanford 4, College Park 3 (12) TODAYS GAMES None scheduled TUESDAYS GAMES College Park at Leesburg, 4 p.m. College Park at Leesburg, 7 p.m. Deland at Stanford, 7 p.m. Winter Park at Winter Garden, 7 p.m. TV 2 DAY MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7 p.m. ESPN, SUN Tampa Bay at N.Y. Yankees SOCCER Noon ESPN FIFA, World Cup, round of 16, France vs. Nigeria, at Brasilia, Brazil 4 p.m. ESPN FIFA, World Cup, round of 16, Germany vs. Algeria, at Porto Alegre, Brazil TENNIS 7 a.m. ESPN Wimbledon, fourth round, at London 8 a.m. ESPN2 Wimbledon, fourth round, at London 11:30 a.m. ESPNEWS Wimbledon, fourth round, at London Although the Orioles nally got Joyce out in the ninth with the outcome al ready decided, his 5-for6 performance upped his batting average 15 points to .274. Ben Zobrist also hom ered for the Rays, who took three of from Baltimore af ter starting the series with a 1-7 record against their AL East rivals. The 12 runs were Tampa Bays sec ond-most this season be hind a 16-run outburst on April 19 against the Yan kees. Alex Cobb (3-6) got the win despite giving up four runs and eight hits in ve innings. Manny Machado and Ryan Flaherty homered for the Orioles. Flaherty hit a three-run drive in the ninth to snap an 0-for-16 skid. The game turned in the seventh, when the Rays set season highs with sev en runs and seven hits. Af ter Kiermaier homered off Evan Meek (0-3), Joyce sin gled in a run and James Lo ney delivered a two-run double. Brandon Guyer followed with an RBI dou ble and Forsythe capped the barrage with a two-run homer off Brian Matusz. In the eighth, Joyce hit a shot to right to make it 12-4 and complete his third career two-homer game. Coming in, he had three home runs this sea son none since May 11. The 12 runs and 18 hits were the most allowed by Baltimore this season. Tampa Bay went up 1-0 in the rst inning when Desmond Jennings walked and scored on a double by Zobrist, who was thrown out trying to stretch it into a triple. After Joyce homered in the third, Nick Markakis doubled in the bottom half and came home on a twoout single by Steve Pearce. Machado put Baltimore up 3-2 with a two-run drive in the fourth. After Zobrist connected in the fth to tie it, Tampa Bay loaded the bases before Meek re placed starter Miguel Gon zalez and struck out For sythe. Gonzalez gave up three runs and eight hits in 4 2-3 innings, his shortest out ing in seven starts since May 5. Baltimore took the lead for the last time when Markakis scored on a passed ball to make it 4-3 in the sixth. NOTES: Tampa Bay faces the Yankees today. Rays RH Chris Archer will attempt to become the rst pitcher to win his rst ve games against the Yankees since Walter Johnson in 1907-08. ... Baltimore sends Ubaldo Jimenez to the mound in the opener of a four-game series against visiting Tex as. ... The Rays played a fth straight game without shortstop Yunel Escobar, who has a sore right shoul der. Id really like to move this thing along one way or the other, manager Joe Maddon said. ... Markakis became the eighth player in Orioles history to have at least nine seasons with 100 hits. RAYS FROM PAGE B1 eight Grand Slam singles titles in the Open era, says she recalls going through a similar streak in her career. Most denitely, King said Sunday near Wim bledon when announcing Singapore as the new site of the WTA season-ending championships in October. Everybody does. But I think there might be some underlying things happen ing to her, some things off the court, that are affecting her. Im sure she will work them out. On a sunny but blus tery middle Sunday tra ditionally an off-day at Wimbledon most of the players remaining in the singles draw held sessions at the nearby Aorangi Park practice courts. Federer and Murray were there at the same time, al though due to rain delays on Friday, Federer, like Na dal, wont play his fourthround match until Tuesday. Federer says hes amazed as anyone about the Big 4s ability to maintain such a stellar record in Grand Slam tournaments. I came through the ranks where it was normal for top guys to have a bad Slam, have maybe two bad Slams from time to time, but it barely happens anymore, Federer said. Its like such a shock when it does. I think Ive been sur prised how consistent Ive been personally, but even more so by everybody else who is just like normal to get to quarters, get to semis. Because I know how small the margins are. Djokovics chances of advancing might rest with his sore arm. He had an af ternoon training session Sunday to test his left arm and shoulder he injured in a nasty fall on Friday in his Centre Court win over Frances Gilles Simon. Djokovic lunged for a shot behind the baseline, tumbled on the grass and rolled over twice, his rack et ying from his hand. He thought he had dis located his shoulder, but from what Djokovic says, it looked a lot worse than it was. Luckily there is nothing damaged, he said. I just came from the doctors of ce, ultrasound. Im quite condent that it will not affect my physical state or regimen or daily routine. I think its going to be ne. Djokovic will play the third match on Centre Court on Monday against 14th-seeded Jo-Wilfried Tsonga. Alize Cornet, who scored the biggest upset of the tournament when she beat Serena Williams on Satur day, opens Mondays play on Centre against Canadi an Eugenie Bouchard, who is the only woman to ad vance to the seminals of both Grand Slam tourna ments this year. Defending champion Murray plays Kevin Ander son in the match follow ing. In third-round match es carried over due to Sat urdays rain suspensions, Wawrinka is up against Denis Istomin to start play on Court 2 while Felicia no Lopez plays American John Isner on Court 3. The only other thirdround mens match to be completed is nearly there Kei Nishikori of Japan and Italys Simone Bolelli are 3-3 in the fth set, with the win ner to play Canadian Milos Raonic on Tuesday. British tabloids will no doubt have fun with the back-to-back love matches on Court 1 on Monday. TENNIS FROM PAGE B1 That is a good way to take advan tage of those breaks. Ochoa had kept his team in the match with two great saves in the second half, but he was beaten by Sneijders powerful drive and guessed wrong when diving in an attempt to stop Huntelaars penalty. The Mexicans had conceded only one goal in three group matches and looked like they would keep an other clean sheet until the late col lapse. It was heartbreak again for Mex ico, which has now reached the second stage of the World Cup six straight times without winning. The last time the team made the quar ternals was when it hosted the tournament in 1986. After the nal whistle, the Mex ican players collapsed, distraught on the turf while many of their fans were in tears. Mexico coach Miguel Herrera blamed the referee for the loss, say ing Robben dived to earn the penalty. Today it was the man with the whistle who eliminated us from the World Cup, Herrera said. If a referee invents a penalty, youre out of the World Cup, Herre ra added. I hope they have a look at what happened and that this gen tleman goes home just like we are. It was the fourth straight win for the Netherlands at the World Cup after routing defending champion Spain 5-1 and beating Australia 3-2 and Chile 2-0 in Group B. The Dutch will next face Costa Rica in the quarternals on Satur day in Salvador. COSTA RICA 5, GREECE 3 IN SHOOTOUT RECIFE, Brazil Costa Rica beat Greece in a penalty shootout Sun day to reach the World Cup quar ternals for the rst time after de fending with 10 men for nearly an hour. Michael Umana scored the deci sive penalty as Costa Rica won the shootout 5-3 after the game ended 1-1 following extra time. Greeces Theofanis Gekas saw his penalty saved by Costa Rica goal keeper Keylor Navas for the only miss in the shootout. Costa Rica will play the Nether lands in the quarternals. Costa Rica had taken the lead ear ly in the second half through cap tain Bryan Ruiz but then had defend er Oscar Duarte sent off in the 66th minute with a second yellow card for a mistimed tackle on Jose Holebas. UPSET FROM PAGE B1 BEN CURTIS / AP Roger Federer of Switzerland plays a return to Santiago Giraldo of Colombia on Saturday during their mens singles match at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships in London.

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Monday, June 30, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Toronto 45 39 .536 4-6 L-3 23-21 22-18 New York 41 38 .519 1 1 5-5 L-1 18-19 23-19 Baltimore 42 39 .519 1 1 5-5 L-2 19-21 23-18 Boston 37 44 .457 6 6 4-6 W-1 20-19 17-25 Tampa Bay 35 49 .417 10 10 6-4 W-2 19-25 16-24 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 44 34 .564 8-2 L-1 19-19 25-15 Kansas City 42 39 .519 3 1 3-7 W-1 21-22 21-17 Cleveland 39 42 .481 6 4 3-7 L-1 23-15 16-27 Chicago 39 44 .470 7 5 4-6 W-3 21-18 18-26 Minnesota 37 43 .463 8 6 5-5 W-1 19-17 18-26 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 51 30 .630 8-2 W-4 24-15 27-15 Los Angeles 45 35 .563 5 7-3 L-1 26-14 19-21 Seattle 44 38 .537 7 7-3 W-1 21-22 23-16 Texas 37 44 .457 14 6 2-8 L-1 18-23 19-21 Houston 36 47 .434 16 8 4-6 W-1 20-23 16-24 NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 44 38 .537 7-3 W-4 20-18 24-20 Washington 43 38 .531 6-4 W-2 23-17 20-21 Miami 39 43 .476 5 5 3-7 L-4 25-21 14-22 New York 37 45 .451 7 7 5-5 L-1 17-21 20-24 Philadelphia 36 46 .439 8 8 2-8 L-4 18-27 18-19 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 51 33 .607 7-3 L-1 24-18 27-15 St. Louis 44 38 .537 6 5-5 L-1 23-17 21-21 Cincinnati 43 38 .531 6 8-2 W-5 19-18 24-20 Pittsburgh 42 40 .512 8 2 7-3 W-1 24-19 18-21 Chicago 34 46 .425 15 9 4-6 L-2 19-20 15-26 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY San Francisco 46 36 .561 3-7 L-4 24-21 22-15 Los Angeles 46 37 .554 7-3 W-1 20-21 26-16 Colorado 36 46 .439 10 8 2-8 W-1 20-19 16-27 Arizona 35 48 .422 11 9 5-5 W-2 15-30 20-18 San Diego 34 47 .420 11 9 5-5 L-3 19-23 15-24 SATURDAYS GAMES Chicago White Sox 4, Toronto 3 L.A. Angels 6, Kansas City 2 Texas 5, Minnesota 0 Tampa Bay 5, Baltimore 4 Detroit 4, Houston 3 Oakland 7, Miami 6, 14 innings Boston 2, N.Y. Yankees 1 Cleveland 5, Seattle 0 SATURDAYS GAMES Washington 3, Chicago Cubs 0, 1st game Washington 7, Chicago Cubs 2, 2nd game Atlanta 10, Philadelphia 3, 1st game Atlanta 5, Philadelphia 1, 2nd game N.Y. Mets 5, Pittsburgh 3 Milwaukee 7, Colorado 4 Oakland 7, Miami 6, 14 innings L.A. Dodgers 9, St. Louis 1 Cincinnati 7, San Francisco 3, 11 innings SUNDAYS GAMES Chicago White Sox 4, Toronto 0 Oakland 4, Miami 3 Tampa Bay 12, Baltimore 7 Houston 6, Detroit 4 Kansas City 5, L.A. Angels 4 Minnesota 3, Texas 2 Seattle 3, Cleveland 0 Boston at N.Y. Yankees, late SUNDAYS GAMES Oakland 4, Miami 3 Atlanta 3, Philadelphia 2 Pittsburgh 5, N.Y. Mets 2 Colorado 10, Milwaukee 4 Cincinnati 4, San Francisco 0 San Diego 2, Arizona 1 L.A. Dodgers 6, St. Louis 0 WILFREDO LEE / AP Miami Marlins Christian Yelich (21) is congratulated by Ed Lucas, left, and Garrett Jones, right, after Yelich tripled and scored on throwing error by Alberto Callaspo on Sunday in Miami. TODAYS GAMES Tampa Bay (Archer 4-5) at N.Y. Yankees (Phelps 3-4), 7:05 p.m. Texas (J.Saunders 0-4) at Baltimore (U.Jimenez 2-8), 7:05 p.m. Oakland (Kazmir 9-3) at Detroit (A.Sanchez 5-2), 7:08 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Arrieta 4-1) at Boston (Peavy 1-6), 7:10 p.m. Kansas City (Duffy 4-7) at Minnesota (Pino 0-1), 8:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (Richards 8-2) at Chicago White Sox (Noesi 2-5), 8:10 p.m. Seattle (Undecided) at Houston (McHugh 4-6), 8:10 p.m. Cleveland (Kluber 7-5) at L.A. Dodgers (Haren 7-4), 10:10 p.m. TODAYS GAMES Colorado (Flande 0-0) at Washington (Zimmermann 5-4), 7:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Arrieta 4-1) at Boston (Peavy 1-6), 7:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Z.Wheeler 3-8) at Atlanta (A.Wood 6-6), 7:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Latos 1-0) at San Diego (Hahn 3-1), 10:10 p.m. Cleveland (Kluber 7-5) at L.A. Dodgers (Haren 7-4), 10:10 p.m. AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Altuve, Houston, .343; Beltre, Texas, .333; VMartinez, Detroit, .323; Brantley, Cleveland, .321; Cano, Seattle, .316; MiCabrera, Detroit, .315; Trout, Los Angeles, .312. RUNS: Dozier, Minnesota, 60; Donaldson, Oakland, 55; Encarnacion, Toronto, 55; Kinsler, Detroit, 55; Bautista, Toronto, 54; Brantley, Cleveland, 54; Trout, Los Ange les, 53. RBI: NCruz, Baltimore, 66; Encarnacion, Toronto, 65; MiCabrera, Detroit, 64; JAbreu, Chicago, 63; Donaldson, Oakland, 60; Moss, Oakland, 59; Trout, Los Angeles, 59. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 113; MeCabrera, Toronto, 103; AJones, Baltimore, 100; Kinsler, Detroit, 100; Markakis, Baltimore, 99; VMartinez, Detroit, 95; Brantley, Cleve land, 94; MiCabrera, Detroit, 94; Cano, Seattle, 94. DOUBLES : MiCabrera, Detroit, 28; Kinsler, Detroit, 25; Altuve, Houston, 24; Pedroia, Boston, 23; EEscobar, Minnesota, 22; AGordon, Kansas City, 22. TRIPLES: Rios, Texas, 8; Bourn, Cleveland, 7; Eaton, Chicago, 6; Trout, Los Angeles, 5; Gardner, New York, 4. HOME RUNS: JAbreu, Chicago, 25; NCruz, Baltimore, 25; Encarnacion, Toronto, 25; VMartinez, Detroit, 20; Donaldson, Oakland, 18; Moss, Oakland, 18; Ortiz, Bos ton, 18; Trout, Los Angeles, 18. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 34; RDavis, Detroit, 21; Ellsbury, New York, 21; AEscobar, Kansas City, 20; An drus, Texas, 18; LMartin, Texas, 17; Reyes, Toronto, 16. PITCHING: Tanaka, New York, 11-3; Porcello, Detroit, 10-4; Buehrle, Toronto, 10-4; FHernandez, Seattle, 9-2; Scherzer, Detroit, 9-3; Kazmir, Oakland, 9-3; Lester, Bos ton, 9-7. ERA: Tanaka, New York, 2.10; FHernandez, Seattle, 2.24; Darvish, Texas, 2.42; Buehrle, Toronto, 2.52; Kazmir, Oakland, 2.66; Richards, Los Angeles, 2.76; Keuchel, Houston, 2.78. STRIKEOUTS: Price, Tampa Bay, 144; Scherzer, Detroit, 132; FHernandez, Seattle, 128; Darvish, Texas, 128; Tanaka, New York, 127; Kluber, Cleveland, 122; Lester, Boston, 115. SAVES: Holland, Kansas City, 23; Rodney, Seattle, 22; Perkins, Minnesota, 19; DavRobertson, New York, 18. NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Tulowitzki, Colorado, .348; Lucroy, Milwaukee, .336; MaAdams, St. Louis, .325; Stanton, Miami, .316; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, .314; Puig, Los Angeles, .311; Gennett, Milwaukee, .311. RUNS: Tulowitzki, Colorado, 61; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 59; Pence, San Francisco, 58; Stanton, Miami, 57; FFreeman, Atlanta, 55; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 53. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 60; Morneau, Colorado, 57; Gold schmidt, Arizona, 53; Howard, Philadelphia, 51; AdGon zalez, Los Angeles, 49; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 48; Mc Gehee, Miami, 48. HITS: Lucroy, Milwaukee, 99; DanMurphy, New York, 98; Stanton, Miami, 97; McGehee, Miami, 96; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 95; Pence, San Francisco, 95; CGomez, Mil waukee, 94. DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 28; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 27; Span, Washington, 25; SCastro, Chicago, 24; AMc Cutchen, Pittsburgh, 24; Utley, Philadelphia, 24; FFree man, Atlanta, 23. TRIPLES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 9; BCrawford, San Fran cisco, 8; Owings, Arizona, 5; Rendon, Washington, 5. HOME RUNS: Stanton, Miami, 21; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 18; Frazier, Cincinnati, 17; Rizzo, Chicago, 17; Gattis, At lanta, 16; JUpton, Atlanta, 16; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 15. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 40; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 34; Revere, Philadelphia, 23; EYoung, New York, 21; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 18; Blackmon, Colorado, 15; Segura, Milwaukee, 14. PITCHING: Simon, Cincinnati, 10-3; Wainwright, St. Louis, 10-4; Greinke, Los Angeles, 10-4; Lohse, Milwau kee, 9-2; Ryu, Los Angeles, 9-4; Bumgarner, San Fran cisco, 9-5; WPeralta, Milwaukee, 9-5. ERA: Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.88; Wainwright, St. Louis, 2.01; Beckett, Los Angeles, 2.11; HAlvarez, Miami, 2.32; Teheran, Atlanta, 2.34; Hudson, San Francisco, 2.62; Greinke, Los Angeles, 2.78. STRIKEOUTS: Strasburg, Washington, 123; Cueto, Cin cinnati, 122; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 114; Kennedy, San Diego, 111; Greinke, Los Angeles, 111. SAVES: FrRodriguez, Milwaukee, 27; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 24; Jansen, Los Angeles, 24; Kimbrel, Atlanta, 23. Athletics 4, Marlins 3 Oakland Miami ab r h bi ab r h bi Gentry cf 4 0 1 0 Yelich cf 4 1 1 0 Callasp 2b 4 1 1 0 RJhnsn lf 4 0 0 0 Cespds lf 4 1 1 0 Stanton rf 3 0 0 0 Dnldsn 3b 4 1 1 1 McGeh 3b 3 1 1 0 Freimn 1b 4 1 1 3 Lucas ss 4 0 1 0 Moss rf 4 0 1 0 JeBakr 1b 3 0 0 1 Punto ss 3 0 2 0 Solano 2b 4 0 0 0 Vogt c 3 0 0 0 Mathis c 3 0 1 0 Milone p 3 0 0 0 Heaney p 0 0 0 0 Abad p 0 0 0 0 Ozuna ph 1 1 1 1 Cook p 0 0 0 0 DJnngs p 0 0 0 0 Gregg p 0 0 0 0 GJones ph 1 0 1 0 Hatchr p 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 4 8 4 Totals 30 3 6 2 Oakland 000 004 000 4 Miami 100 001 100 3 ECallaspo (6). DPOakland 3, Miami 1. LOBOak land 2, Miami 4. 3BYelich (6). HRFreiman (1), Ozuna (14). SHeaney. SFJe.Baker. IP H R ER BB SO Oakland Milone W,6-3 7 4 3 2 2 3 Abad H,8 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 1 Cook S,1-1 1 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 2 Miami Heaney L,0-3 6 8 4 4 0 4 Da.Jennings 1 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Gregg 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Hatcher 1 0 0 0 0 1 PBVogt. UmpiresHome, Alan Porter; First, Joe West; Second, Marty Foster; Third, Rob Drake. T:48. A,917 (37,442). Rays 12, Orioles 7 Tampa Bay Baltimore ab r h bi ab r h bi DJnngs cf 3 2 1 0 Markks rf 4 2 2 0 CFigur ph-2b 1 0 0 0 Flahrty ss 1 1 1 3 Zobrist ss 6 2 3 2 Pearce lf-rf 5 0 2 1 Joyce lf-rf 6 3 5 4 A.Jones cf 3 0 1 0 Longori 3b 4 1 1 0 DYong rf-lf 2 0 1 0 Loney 1b 5 1 1 2 N.Cruz dh 4 0 1 0 Guyer dh 4 1 1 1 C.Davis 1b 3 0 0 0 Forsyth 2b-lf 4 1 2 2 CJosph 1b 1 0 0 0 JMolin c 5 0 2 0 JHardy ss 3 1 1 0 Kiermr rf-cf 5 1 2 1 Lough cf 1 0 0 0 Machd 3b 4 1 1 2 Schoop 2b 4 1 2 0 Hundly c 3 1 1 0 Totals 43 12 18 12 Totals 38 7 13 6 Tampa Bay 101 017 200 12 Baltimore 001 210 003 7 LOBTampa Bay 9, Baltimore 7. 2BDe.Jennings (18), Zobrist 2 (15), Joyce (17), Loney (19), Guyer (8), Markakis (15), Pearce (12). HRZobrist (6), Joyce 2 (5), Forsythe (2), Kiermaier (6), Flaherty (3), Mach ado (7). SBMarkakis (4). SC.Davis. IP H R ER BB SO Tampa Bay Cobb W,3-6 5 8 4 3 0 3 Boxberger 1 0 0 0 0 1 Yates 1 1 / 3 2 0 0 0 3 C.Ramos 1 1 / 3 3 3 3 2 2 Jo.Peralta 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Baltimore M.Gonzalez 4 2 / 3 8 3 3 4 2 Meek L,0-3 1 3 4 4 1 1 Matusz 2 1 / 3 7 5 5 0 2 Tom.Hunter 1 0 0 0 0 0 PBJ.Molina. BalkM.Gonzalez. UmpiresHome, Gabe Morales; First, Tony Randazzo; Second, David Rackley; Third, Jim Wolf. T:51. A,665 (45,971). Royals 5, Angels 4 Los Angeles Kansas City ab r h bi ab r h bi Calhon rf 5 2 2 1 L.Cain rf 5 0 4 2 Trout cf 2 1 1 0 Hosmer 1b 5 0 0 0 Pujols dh 4 0 1 0 BButler dh 3 0 0 0 JHmltn lf 3 0 1 1 AGordn lf 3 1 0 1 Aybar ss 4 1 1 1 S.Perez c 4 1 0 0 HKndrc 2b 4 0 0 0 Infante 2b 5 1 3 1 Cron 1b 4 0 0 0 Valenci 3b 2 1 2 1 Freese 3b 4 0 0 0 Mostks 3b 2 0 0 0 Conger c 4 0 2 0 AEscor ss 3 1 2 0 JDyson cf 3 0 0 0 Totals 34 4 8 3 Totals 35 5 11 5 Los Angeles 201 001 000 4 Kansas City 000 400 001 5 One out when winning run scored. EH.Kendrick (7), L.Cain (2), Hosmer (6). DPKansas City 2. LOBLos Angeles 6, Kansas City 12. 2BJ. Hamilton (8), L.Cain 3 (14), Infante (7). HRCalhoun (7), Aybar (6). CSA.Escobar (2). IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles C.Wilson 3 2 / 3 7 4 4 4 3 Cor.Rasmus 2 1 / 3 2 0 0 1 3 Jepsen 2 1 0 0 0 2 Grilli L,0-1 1 / 3 1 1 0 0 1 Kansas City Guthrie 6 2 / 3 8 4 2 2 4 K.Herrera 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 W.Davis 1 0 0 0 1 0 G.Holland W,1-2 1 0 0 0 0 2 HBPby Grilli (A.Gordon), by C.Wilson (S.Perez). UmpiresHome, Todd Tichenor; First, Clint Fagan; Second, Tim Timmons; Third, Tim Welke. T:31. A,803 (37,903). Twins 3, Rangers 2 Minnesota Texas ab r h bi ab r h bi Dozier 2b 4 0 0 0 Choo dh 4 1 1 0 Mauer 1b 4 0 1 1 Andrus ss 4 0 1 0 Parmel cf-lf 4 0 1 0 C.Pena 1b 3 0 0 0 Wlngh lf 4 0 2 0 Gimenz ph 1 0 0 0 Fuld pr-cf 0 1 0 0 ABeltre 3b 4 0 1 1 KMorls dh 4 0 1 1 Rios rf 4 0 1 0 KSuzuk pr-dh 0 0 0 0 LMartn cf 3 0 1 0 Arcia rf 4 0 0 0 Chirins c 3 1 3 1 EEscor 3b 4 1 1 0 Choice lf 3 0 0 0 Fryer c 3 0 0 0 Odor 2b 3 0 0 0 JPolnc ss 2 1 1 1 Flormn ss 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 3 7 3 Totals 32 2 8 2 Minnesota 002 000 001 3 Texas 100 010 000 2 DPMinnesota 3, Texas 1. LOBMinnesota 4, Texas 3. 2BWillingham (4), K.Morales (5), E.Escobar (23), J.Polanco (1). HRChirinos (7). CSParmelee (3). IP H R ER BB SO Minnesota Gibson W,7-6 8 8 2 2 0 3 Perkins S,20-23 1 0 0 0 0 3 Texas Lewis 6 5 2 2 0 8 Poreda 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 1 1 Rowen 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Cotts 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Soria L,1-3 1 2 1 1 0 3 UmpiresHome, Paul Nauert; First, John Tumpane; Second, James Hoye; Third, Bill Welke. T:39. A,779 (48,114). Astros 6, Tigers 4 Detroit Houston ab r h bi ab r h bi AJcksn cf 5 0 0 0 Altuve 2b 5 1 3 0 TrHntr rf 4 0 1 1 Springr rf 2 1 1 1 MiCarr 1b 4 0 0 0 Singltn 1b 4 0 1 2 VMrtnz dh 3 1 1 0 Guzmn dh 5 1 1 1 JMrtnz lf 4 1 2 0 MDmn 3b 4 1 3 0 Cstllns 3b 4 0 2 2 Hoes lf 3 0 1 2 Avila c 2 1 1 1 Villar ss 3 0 0 0 Kinsler ph 1 0 0 0 JCastro c 0 0 0 0 Holady c 0 0 0 0 Corprn c 4 0 3 0 Suarez ss 4 0 1 0 MGnzlz pr-ss 0 1 0 0 AnRmn 2b 2 1 1 0 Presley cf 3 1 1 0 RDavis ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 34 4 9 4 Totals 33 6 14 6 Detroit 001 010 020 4 Houston 301 001 01x 6 DPDetroit 3, Houston 2. LOBDetroit 6, Houston 10. 2BTor.Hunter (14), Altuve (25), Springer (8), M.Dominguez (13), Hoes (4), Corporan (2). 3B Castellanos (1). HRAvila (5). SBTor.Hunter (2), An.Romine (5), Altuve 2 (36), Springer (2). SPres ley. SFHoes. IP H R ER BB SO Detroit Smyly L,4-7 2 1 / 3 8 4 4 2 3 C.Smith 2 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 1 McCoy 2 3 1 1 2 1 B.Hardy 1 2 1 1 1 0 Houston Feldman W,4-5 6 7 2 2 1 4 D.Downs H,6 1 0 0 0 1 2 Veras H,1 2 / 3 2 2 2 1 0 Sipp S,1-1 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 2 Feldman pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. WPSmyly. UmpiresHome, Mark Ripperger; First, Lance Barks dale; Second, Kerwin Danley; Third, Gary Ceder strom. T:25. A,478 (42,060). Braves 3, Phillies 2 Atlanta Philadelphia ab r h bi ab r h bi BUpton cf 4 0 1 2 Revere cf 5 0 3 0 R.Pena 3b 4 0 0 0 Rollins ss 5 0 3 0 FFrmn 1b 4 0 1 0 Utley 2b 5 0 1 0 J.Upton lf 3 0 0 0 Howard 1b 3 0 0 0 Heywrd rf 3 0 0 0 Byrd rf 4 2 2 2 ASmns ss 4 0 1 0 Asche 3b 4 0 1 0 LaStell 2b 3 2 1 0 DBrwn lf 3 0 2 0 Laird c 4 0 2 1 K.Hill c 4 0 1 0 Harang p 3 1 1 0 DBchn p 2 0 0 0 Smmns p 0 0 0 0 DeFrts p 0 0 0 0 Doumit ph 1 0 0 0 Mayrry ph 1 0 0 0 Kimrel p 0 0 0 0 Diekmn p 0 0 0 0 Papeln p 0 0 0 0 CHrndz ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 33 3 7 3 Totals 37 2 13 2 Atlanta 020 100 000 3 Philadelphia 010 100 000 2 ERollins (7), De Fratus (1). DPAtlanta 2, Philadel phia 2. LOBAtlanta 8, Philadelphia 10. 2BLa Stella (6), Laird (6), Rollins (13). 3BB.Upton (4). HRByrd 2 (15). SBRollins (14). CSRevere (3). IP H R ER BB SO Atlanta Harang W,7-6 7 11 2 2 2 4 S.Simmons H,7 1 0 0 0 0 2 Kimbrel S,24-28 1 2 0 0 0 0 Philadelphia D.Buchanan L,4-4 5 5 3 3 5 4 De Fratus 1 1 0 0 0 1 Diekman 2 1 0 0 0 3 Papelbon 1 0 0 0 0 1 UmpiresHome, Ted Barrett; First, Will Little; Second, Alfonso Marquez; Third, Paul Schrieber. T:06. A,215 (43,651). White Sox 4, Blue Jays 0 Chicago Toronto ab r h bi ab r h bi Eaton cf 3 0 0 0 Reyes ss 4 0 2 0 GBckh 2b 4 1 1 0 Mstrnn lf 3 0 1 0 JAreu dh 4 0 1 1 JFrncs 3b 1 0 0 0 Viciedo lf 3 0 0 0 Encrnc dh 3 0 1 0 De Aza lf 0 0 0 0 DNavrr c 2 0 0 0 AlRmrz ss 4 0 2 0 Bautist ph 1 0 0 0 Konerk 1b 3 1 1 0 Thole c 1 0 0 0 Sierra rf 4 2 2 1 Glenn rf 3 0 0 0 Flowrs c 4 0 1 2 Gose ph 1 0 0 0 LeGarc 3b 4 0 0 0 Lind 1b 3 0 0 0 StTllsn 3b-2b 2 0 0 0 ClRsms cf 3 0 0 0 Kawsk 2b 2 0 0 0 Totals 33 4 8 4 Totals 30 0 4 0 Chicago 001 100 002 4 Toronto 000 000 000 0 DPChicago 1, Toronto 2. LOBChicago 5, Toronto 5. 2BG.Beckham (16), Al.Ramirez (13), Sierra (4), Reyes (17). HRSierra (2). IP H R ER BB SO Chicago Quintana W,5-7 7 3 0 0 2 7 Surkamp H,2 1 0 0 0 0 0 Petricka 1 1 0 0 0 1 Toronto Buehrle L,10-5 8 6 2 2 2 5 Santos 1 2 2 2 1 0 WPQuintana. UmpiresHome, Brian Knight; First, Fieldin Culbreth; Second, Manny Gonzalez; Third, Jim Reynolds. T:32. A,177 (49,282). Pirates 5, Mets 2 New York Pittsburgh ab r h bi ab r h bi EYong lf 4 0 2 0 GPolnc rf 3 0 0 0 Germn p 0 0 0 0 SMarte cf 4 1 1 0 Evelnd p 0 0 0 0 NWalkr 2b 4 1 1 0 BAreu ph 1 0 0 0 I.Davis 1b 4 0 2 2 Tejada ss 5 0 2 1 JHrrsn lf 4 2 1 0 DnMrp 2b 5 0 3 0 PAlvrz 3b 4 1 2 3 Grndrs rf 5 0 0 0 Mercer ss 3 0 0 0 Duda 1b 4 0 2 0 JuWlsn p 0 0 0 0 Campll 3b 4 0 2 0 Watson p 0 0 0 0 Lagars cf 4 1 1 0 JHughs p 0 0 0 0 dArnad c 3 1 1 0 Melncn p 0 0 0 0 Colon p 2 0 0 0 CStwrt c 3 0 1 0 CYoung ph-lf 2 0 0 1 Volquez p 1 0 0 0 Barmes ss 1 0 0 0 Totals 39 2 13 2 Totals 31 5 8 5 New York 000 000 002 2 Pittsburgh 300 200 00x 5 EVolquez (1), N.Walker (2). DPPittsburgh 1. LOB New York 11, Pittsburgh 4. 2BE.Young (8), Duda (17), dArnaud (4), N.Walker (9), J.Harrison (12), P.Al varez (9). HRP.Alvarez (13). SVolquez. IP H R ER BB SO New York Colon L,8-6 6 7 5 5 1 2 Germen 1 0 0 0 0 2 Eveland 1 1 0 0 0 1 Pittsburgh Volquez W,6-6 6 8 0 0 1 7 Ju.Wilson 1 1 0 0 0 1 Watson 1 0 0 0 0 1 J.Hughes 2 / 3 3 2 2 0 0 Melancon S,15-18 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 UmpiresHome, Scott Barry; First, Jeff Nelson; Sec ond, Laz Diaz; Third, Toby Basner. T:58. A,290 (38,362). Rockies 10, Brewers 4 Colorado Milwaukee ab r h bi ab r h bi Blckmn cf-lf 5 0 1 0 RWeks 2b 4 0 0 0 Barnes rf 5 0 1 0 Braun rf 4 2 2 1 Mornea 1b 3 1 1 1 Lucroy c 4 1 1 0 Hwkns p 0 0 0 0 Maldnd c 0 0 0 0 Tlwtzk ss 5 2 3 0 ArRmr 3b 1 1 0 0 Rutledg pr-ss 0 0 0 0 Overay 1b 0 0 0 0 Dickrsn lf 4 2 2 2 KDavis lf 2 0 0 2 Stubbs ph-cf 0 0 0 0 MrRynl 1b-3b 4 0 0 0 Rosario c-1b 5 2 2 1 Bianchi ss 4 0 0 0 RWhelr 3b 4 0 1 0 EHerrr cf 3 0 0 0 Kahnle p 0 0 0 0 Gallard p 2 0 1 0 McKnr ph-c 1 0 0 0 Grzlny p 1 0 0 0 LeMahi 2b 5 1 2 1 Kintzlr p 0 0 0 0 JDLRs p 3 1 1 0 Wang p 0 0 0 0 Culersn 3b 2 1 1 2 Totals 42 10 15 7 Totals 29 4 4 3 Colorado 311 030 020 10 Milwaukee 000 202 000 4 EAr.Ramirez (5), Lucroy (3). DPColorado 1. LOB Colorado 8, Milwaukee 3. 2BBarnes (10), Dickerson (13), Rosario (15), Braun (16), Lucroy (28). HRCul berson (2), Braun (11). SBAr.Ramirez 2 (3). SFMor neau, K.Davis. IP H R ER BB SO Colorado J.De La Rosa W,8-6 6 4 4 4 2 4 Kahnle 2 0 0 0 0 2 Hawkins 1 0 0 0 1 0 Milwaukee Gallardo L,5-5 5 10 8 5 1 3 Gorzelanny 2 1 0 0 0 2 Kintzler 2 / 3 4 2 2 0 0 Wang 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 1 1 UmpiresHome, CB Bucknor; First, Tripp Gibson; Sec ond, Dale Scott; Third, Dan Iassogna.

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 30, 2014 *Unless Otherwise Noted on the Schedule Yo u Make the CA LL !This We eks Leesburg Lightning ScheduleAlw ay s FREE Admission! Rainout Information 352-234-4489 Yo u Make the CA LL !June 30July 6This We eks Leesburg Lightning ScheduleAlw ay s FREE Admission! Game Times: 7pm We ekda ys Sun 5pm*THE PLA Y: With R2 on second, R1 on first and one out, the ba tter hits a ground ball to F5. The ball takes a bad hop and goes into F5 s shirt. F5 grabs the ball through his shirt (without taking it out) and runs to third base, stepping on it before R2 reaches the ba g. What s the ruling?Rainout Information 352-234-4489 Mon. 6/30 .......... Off DayTu es. 7/1 ................ College Park (home) Double Header**We d. 7/2 ............ College Park (aw ay) Thurs. 7/3 ............ College Park (home) Fri. 7/4 ............ Winter Park (home-6pm) Sat. 7/5 ............ Winter Park (home) Sun. 7/6 ............ Winter Park (aw ay-1pm) **4pm StartANSWER on Frida y July 6 This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule D003564 Mo nd ay Ju ne 30th at 5p m NASCAR GOLF GARY B. GRAVES Associated Press SPARTA, Ky. Brad Keselowski will have to ne-tune his victo ry celebrations after a shattered champagne bottle left him with a bloodied and ban daged right hand. The upside is he might get more chanc es to polish his postrace revelry as he pur sues his second Sprint Cup Series champion ship in three years. Already locked into the Chase with a Las Vegas victory and a sol id string of top-ves, Keselowski delivered his most dominant run at Kentucky Speed way. He started from the pole and led 199 of 267 laps en route to his second win this sea son. The Penske Rac ing driver heads to Daytona Internation al Speedway fourth in points and showing the form that carried him to the 2012 champion ship. Missing last years Chase also seems to have made Keselowski wiser Saturday night notwithstanding. I want to win anoth er championship, Ke selowski said after a roundabout journey between Victory Lane and the ineld care cen ter to receive four stitch es after striking the bot tle on the podium. I dont want to be a guy that contends for a championship ev ery three or four years. I want to do it each and every year and I know that opportunity is here, its present and I want to make the most of it. The exuberant 30-year-old joked that he was going through something of a mid life crisis, perhaps his way of stressing that he has to maximize his window of opportuni ty to win titles. That ur gency worked for him two years ago, when he won ve times with 23 top-10s and 13 topves to win the title. Keselowski has two fewer wins than at the same point in 2012 but is showing the same consistency. His sec ond Kentucky victo ry marked his ninth top-10 along with a se ries-best second tri umph at 1 1/2 miles, the distance of many Chase tracks. GRAND PRIX OF HOUSTON HOUSTON Si mon Pagenaud picked up his second win of the season with a vic tory Sunday in the sec ond race of the Grand Prix of Houston dou bleheader. The victory comes a day after Pagenaud started from the pole in the rst race but had an early spin and was lat er collected in Scott Dix ons crash to spoil his race. The Frenchman was the class of the eld Sunday and led rook ie teammate Mikhail Aleshin to the check ered ag for a 1-2 n ish for team owner Sam Schmidt. It was the Russian drivers rst career podium. Jack Hawksworth, another rookie, drove from last to third for his rst career podium. Keselowski hungry for yet another NASCAR championship JAMES CRISP / AP Brad Keselowski gives a thumbs-up with his bandaged hand after his victory in the NASCAR Sprint Cup series race on Saturday at Kentucky Speedway in Sparta, Ky. DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer BETHESDA, Md. Justin Rose got his mis take out of the way one hole early and won the Quicken Loans Nation al in a playoff Sunday over Shawn Stefani. Tied for the lead as he played the 18th hole at Congressional, Rose tried to hit through two trees left of the fair way and overturned the shot. It ran down a bank and into the water, and he had to hole a 15-foot bogey putt just to stay in the game. That proved to be the biggest shot he hit all day. Behind him, Stefani made bogey on the 17th and narrowly missed a birdie putt on the 18th to set up the rst play off in the eight-year his tory of this event. And then it was Stefani who essentially repeat ed Roses mistake on the rst extra hole at No. 18. After taking a drop because the grand stands blocked his view of the green, he wanted to play his low punch to the right side of the green. His shot also had too much turn and bounded into the wa ter. Rose hit the middle of the green from the fairway and two-putt ed for par. Stefani made double bogey. It was Roses rst win since the U.S. Open last summer at Merion, and it felt like he won anoth er U.S. Open as tough as Congressional played. With putting surfaces that had a brown tinge to them even before the leaders teed off, and thick rough all week, it was a far stronger test than when the Open was held in soggy con ditions in 2011. Congressional got its reputation back af ter the U.S. Open, Rose said. I really enjoy this type of golf and this type of test. I think it tested all of us. Im delighted. Rose and Stefani each closed with a 1-under 70 only six players broke par in the nal round and nished at 4-under 280. It was only the sec ond time this year that the winning score was higher than the 36-hole lead (6 under). That also happened at Tor rey Pines, which also hosted a U.S. Open. Despite his blun der on the 18th, Rose earned his second chance. He went 14 straight holes without making a bogey. Along with the 15-foot bogey putt he made on the 18th, he saved par on the 17th with an 8-foot putt. Patrick Reed could have used some of that gritty play. Reed, who started the nal round with a twoshot lead, didnt even nish in the top 10. He still had a two-shot lead at the turn, only to start the back nine with con secutive double bogeys on his way to a 41. He closed with a 77 and tied for 11th. Seven players had a share of the lead at one point in the nal round, and once Reed began his melt down, Rose took over. He made birdie on No. 11, the toughest hole all week at Congressio nal, and used a fairway metal to gouge out of deep rough and onto the 14th green to avoid dropping a shot. Rose overcomes late mistake at Congressional NICK WASS / AP Justin Rose poses with the trophy after he won the Quicken Loans National golf tournament on Sunday in Bethesda, Md. WILL GRAVES AP Sports Writer PITTSBURGH Ber nhard Langer made a short birdie putt on the second hole of a playoff with Jeff Sluman to win the Senior Players Cham pionship on Sunday. Langer appeared to be in trouble when his second shot on the par5 18th ended up in the rough short of the green. He hit a brilliant pitch to 5 feet and made the putt after Slumans birdie at tempt rolled just wide. The victory was the 56-year-old Langers third of the year and his third major title on the Champions Tour. The two-time Masters champion shot an evenpar 70 to nish at 15-un der 265 at Fox Chapel. Sluman had a bo gey-free 65 to match Langer, but narrow ly missed a birdie putt on the rst playoff hole that would have won it. Russ Cochran, who trailed by seven shots early in the nal round, had a 67 to nish third at 14 under. Defending champion Kenny Perry tied Langer for the lead heading into the back nine, but faded badly over the closing holes. Perrys 69 left him two shots out of the playoff. Langer nearly missed out on the playoff him self. He fought a balky putter much of the day only to hole a 35-foot birdie putt on the 17th that lifted him into a tie with Sluman. The nor mally reserved Ger man pumped his st in disbelief after the ball dropped into the cup. He parred 18 to match Sluman at 15 under and escaped one more time when Slumans bird ie attempt on the rst playoff hole missed. Sluman, the 1988 PGA champion, covered his hands in disbelief af ter the putt stayed out. Langer didnt let the re prieve go to waste, bird ieing the 18th on his third try to earn his rst major title on the 50-and-over circuit since the 2010 Senior British Open. LPGA ROGERS, Ark. Sta cy Lewis made a 7-foot birdie putt on the nal hole Sunday in the NW Arkansas Champi onship to nally win an ofcial event in her ad opted state. The top-ranked Lew is, the Texan who played at the nearby Universi ty of Arkansas, earned an unofcial win in the rain-shortened 2007 tournament as an am ateur. On Sunday, she closed with a 6-under 65 for a one-stroke vic tory. Lewis birdied three of her nal holes for her third LPGA Tour victo ry of the year and 11th overall. She nished at 12-under 201 at Pinna cle Country Club. Lydia Ko, Cristie Kerr and Angela Stanford tied for second. Ko nished with a 65, and Kerr and Stanford shot 67. Second-round lead er Michelle Wie shot a 73 to tie for eighth at 8 under. Langer defeats Sluman in playoff to win Senior Players Championship

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Living Healthy Send your health news to features @dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 30, 2014 SODEXO: Cafeteria workers regain health coverage / C3 Health check www.dailycommercial.com LARA SOLT / MCT Hannah Miller, 22 months, follows along with her mother, Stephanie Miller, during exercises at a Stroller Boot Camp class at Klyde Warren Park in Dallas earlier this month. LIZZIE JOHNSON MCT DALLAS Before they start lung ing and squatting and crunching, the 19 women tend to their babies. They hand them plastic cups lled with Cheerios and fruit. They ad just the sun visors on their identical black strollers and rock hesitant in fants back and forth. Then, they run. Lets get warmed up with a nice long trot, personal trainer and well ness coach Zac Mudd shouts across the lawn. Stroller wheels squeak as the line of moms and babies zip across the grass and onto the pavement, a blur of neon-colored Spandex, strollers and faint baby gurgles. The women make a lap of Klyde Warren Park and come hufng back to the starting point, immediately launching into a set of burpees. These ladies are a lot tougher than they let on, Mudd says, glanc ing down at his stopwatch. Most of them have some kind of exercise ex perience. Theyll come in CrossFit and 5K T-shirts. But its easy to fall into a slump, to get out of the rhythm of being healthy. Their schedule has been dedicated to taking care of a baby. The Stroller Boot Camp, spon sored by the YMCA, is a place where babies are welcome and strollers are used as a piece of exercise equip ment, just like yoga mats and resis tance bands. During a phase of a new moms life when everything is alien and differ ent her schedule, body and social groups the weekly Tuesday morn ing class is a safe place. Moms can focus on active recovery and con nect with women going through similar life milestones. Everyone is looking for the same goal, looking to get their abs back and get in shape, YMCA wellness coordinator Shelli Cheyney says. Some of the moms are a little bit depressed because they want to get back to the way they were before the baby. They can nd someone who is going through the same thing that they are. When Lara Neri, 40, came to Stroll er Boot Camp for the rst time six months ago, she was the only mom in attendance. Neri continued to make the trip every Tuesday with her dog and her four little ones, ranging in age from 6 months to 8 years. As summer neared, attendance at the camp doubled, then quadrupled. Boot camps for new moms fit baby into exercise routine Like mother, like daughter Its definitely growing. Its great because you can find something to do with your kids while you exercise. Ive tried workout videos, and they never work. The baby wont allow it. The second you get it started, they want to be picked up. Traditional gym environments can also be tough. The second your baby starts crying, you get pulled out of class. Lara Neri, Stroller Boot Camp member SEE CAMP | C2 Dr. Jeremy Williams takes Nora Resnicks blood pressure as part of a routine checkup for Resnick, who made the house call through the iPhone app, Medicast on June 19. ISAAC ARJONILLA MCT BERNARD J. WOLFSON MCT Marcus Welby, welcome to the 21st century. If the ctional Santa Moni ca doctor from the early 1970s were still plying his trade to day, patients would be able to nd him at the touch of a smartphone application. He would listen to their woes and conduct a quick triage over the phone, deciding wheth er the symptoms warranted a house call, an ER visit or noth ing at all. Medicast, a startup that launched in Miami last sum mer, offers exactly such an app and a network of doctors to go with it. The tiny com pany, which has big plans for nationwide expansion, just opened shop in Los Angeles earlier this month. And thats not TV ction. It is part of a growing trend in on-demand consumer ser vices, notably exemplied by Uber, the mobile-driven taxi request service that has pro voked the ire of cabdrivers around the globe. It is also the latest frontier in the burgeoning world of tele medicine a world in which medical test results can be transmitted over smartphones in a heartbeat and compa nies like Teladoc, MDLive and American Well connect Need a doctor? Take this app and call one to your door SEE APP | C2 THE VILLAGES Lake Medical to host prostate cancer support meeting Dr. Catherine Keller, M.D. of Lake Medical Imaging in Leesburg and The Villages will speak on detecting and tracking prostate cancer and other topics. The free meeting will be at 7 p.m. Wednesday at the Laurel Manor Rec reation Center, 1985 Laurel Manor Drive in The Villages. For information, call Dan Bard at 352-259-9433 or Tom Vajda at 352446-4194. LEESBURG Support meeting offered for blind/visually impaired Sponsored by New Vision for In dependence, this group offers re habilitation, education and support services to those with low vision or blindness and their families. The guest speaker is Brian Sweezea with the Lake County Su pervisor of Elections ofce, who will discuss technology for visually im paired voters, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., July 11 at the IHOP restaurant, 10332 U.S. Highway 441. For information about the group, call 352-435-5040. LAKE COUNTY AARP Smart Driver classes offered The AARP Driver Safety program helps participants rene their skills with a new six-hour curriculum. Upon completion of the course, Florida drivers age 50 or older may be eligible for insurance discounts. Cost is $15 for AARP members and $20 for non-members. Payment must be made by check to AARP. No cash or credit cards accepted. Classes will be: July 15 and 17 from 1 to 4 p.m., Harden-Pauli Fu neral Home, 1617 S. Bay St., Eustis, call 352-394-0250 to register; August 4 and 6, from 1 to 4 p.m., Leesburg Senior Center, 1211 Penn St., regis ter by calling 352-326-3540; August 4 and 6, from 9 a.m. to noon at the W.T. Bland Public Library,1995 N. Donnelly St., Mount Dora, register at 352-735-7180. LEESBURG LifeStream Receives Accreditation The Commission on Accredi tation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) International recently as sessed LifeStream Behavioral Cen ter in Leesburg, surveying the orga nizations conformance to standards demonstrating quality behavioral health care. Accreditation is based on the over all performance of the organization, and the highest accreditation that can be awarded is for a three-year peri od, which LifeStream achieved for the third consecutive review period with accreditation through June 2017. The CARF-accreditation means the organization has passed an indepth review and meets rigorous CARF guidelines for service and quality. For information, call 352-3157527 or go to www.lsbc.net.

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 30, 2014 GOLF CA RT ACCESSNow one doctor is helping local residents with back pain live more active, pain-free lives.Pa in le ss co nv enie nt, fastactingSole veproce dur e sho wn to be promising in a pilot stud y for 95 % of pat ien ts no w av ailable ex clusiv ely at Ethe re dge Chiro pra ctic .*Fruitland Park(352) 365-1191Th e Vi ll ag es(352) 750-1200*Pa tie nts in a pi lot stu dy sho wed a 20-p oint re duc tio n in VA S sc or e in as few as fo ur sess ions Go re nb er g M, Sc hif f E, Sc hw artz K, Ei zen ber g E: A no vel ima ge-guid ed, auto mat ic hi gh-in tensi ty ne uros timul ati on dev ice for th e tr eatm ent of nons pecif ic lo w bac k pa in. Pai n Re s Tr eat; 20 11;2 011; 1523 07. 14 Ner voma trix Lt d. All rig hts re ser ved. So leve is a re gist er ed tr ad emar k rf nnf tb D0020 88 Now, about 20 moms attend class every week. Its denitely growing, Neri says. Its great be cause you can nd something to do with your kids while you exercise. Ive tried workout videos, and they never work. The baby wont allow it. The sec ond you get it started, they want to be picked up. Traditional gym environments can also be tough. The second your baby starts crying, you get pulled out of class. Laura Lott, 28, a rst-time mom of 2-year-old Laney, attended the boot camp for the rst time on a breezy Tuesday. In the middle of a vigorous leg-lift set, Lott leans over to hand an apple to Laney, docilely watching from her stroller. Another mom wheels her baby off to the sidewalk, pulling out an Elmo diaper and changing him on the grass. I mean, look around, Lott says. We have a community of moms going through a similar leg of life. Its great to be here because of the adult in teraction. It helps us nd resources and tools, and its nice to chat with each other. The weekly boot camp helps women nd struc ture and create a schedule, to nd out they arent alone, Neri says. It helps combat that feeling you get where you are alone on an island watching the rest of the world move by, she says. Its important for emo tional and mental health. The endorphins help me cope. Postpartum depression and anxiety can hit you hard. It is so important for moms to exer cise, and not just for physical health. A cocktail of postpartum hormones and sleep deprivation can leave a mom feeling listless, iso lated and zombielike. Up to 70 percent of women experience baby blues in the weeks and months after giving birth, according to medical experts. Women are also likely to develop negative feelings about their post-baby body. Its all about becoming more condent, get ting on a schedule and getting support, said Dr. Sheila Chhutani, an OB/GYN at Texas Presbyteri an Hospital Dallas. It is very important for them to connect with other women. I have had a couple of moms who had no support systems and experi enced more signs of depression. CAMP FROM PAGE C1 LARA SOLT / MCT Audri Rojas, 15 months, enjoys a snack while her mother, Veronica Rojas, works out during a Stroller Boot Camp class at Klyde Warren Park in Dallas earlier this month. patients with doctors in video conferences or over the Internet. Unlike those compa nies, whose bread and butter is virtual consul tation, Medicast collects only if the doctor makes a house call in the esh. No visit, no charge. In a nod to the calmer, kinder era of house-call ing physicians it evokes, Medicast also makes its service available on the companys website. It even has an old-fash ioned 800 number for the luddites among us. We want to make it available to anyone, which is why we have all three options, said Sam Zebarjadi, Medicasts CEO and co-founder. At the same time, Ze barjadi said, Medicast is focused on the 30to 64-year-old market people with an afnity for technology and some in terest in tness and well ness. The company has only ve full-time employees Zebarjadi, two oth er co-founders and two marketing people. The company con tracts with its doctors 20 in Los Angeles and 5 in Miami so far, though Zebarjadi envisions the network growing to hun dreds of physicians. The company charges $249 for a home visit, and the doctor keeps $170 of it. In addition to the pa tient-doctor introduc tions, Medicast provides billing and other back-of ce services. Monthly payment plans are also available: $39 a month entitles you to two visits a year; for $75 you get four. Medicasts service is not generally covered by health insurance plans, but the doctors give pa tients receipts for pre scription drugs that might be covered. And some insurers will count the cost of the house calls against a patients de ductible for out-of-net work services. The company says it puts all doctors it con tracts with through rigor ous background checks and trains them in the best practices of house calls. People in need of medical services can consult the proles of on-call Medicast doc tors as well as reviews from previous patients and decide whether they want to request a consul tation. If they do, they are asked to enter their cred it card information. They will get a call from one of the doctors within a cou ple of minutes. If the doc tor decides a house call is in order, the credit card will be charged. What Medicast offers is a form of concierge medicine, in which pa tients agree to pay out of their own pockets for quicker access and lon ger visits with doctors. Zebarjadi thinks the company stands to prof it from the fact that many primary-care doctors are overburdened a sit uation likely to be exac erbated by millions of newly insured patients coming into the health care system under the Af fordable Care Act. APP FROM PAGE C1 MARY MACVEAN MCT When Jim Black leads people on a robust walk three times a week on the grounds of the 120-acre Saddleback Church in Lake For est, Calif., hes got powerful com pany: God. The several dozen people who join him have shown up with the same hopes that anyone brings to an exercise plan: They mean to lose weight, ditch inhalers, get stronger. But at Saddleback, theres a lot more going on. Pastor Rick Warren is using the power of his church, one of the biggest in the country, to impress upon his fol lowers that their bodies need the same care as their spirits. After two months on the Dan iel Plan, Black gave up his dia betes medication. He has given up wheat, dairy and sugar. He re cently bought a bicycle. In a year, he lost 90 pounds; his wife lost 40. Its that one scripture: My body is not my own, my body is on loan and someday Ill have to account for it, said Black, 48. I wanted to serve God at a higher level. And I wanted to be able to t in the seat of a roller coaster and buy one seat on the airplane instead of two. Despite a multibillion-dollar industry of programs and books and diet meals and meetings, the secular world has done a fairly lousy job at getting people to lose weight and get t. So why not turn to a higher power? One Sunday afternoon, 3,000 people came to a rally at Saddle back to hear about the Daniel Plan from Warren and others, in cluding two of its creators, Daniel Amen, a psychiatrist who belongs to Saddleback, and Dr. Mark Hy man, who has taken care of Bill and Hillary Clinton. If Jesus came to dinner, what would you feed him? Hyman asked the crowd. Would you give him a Big Mac, fries and a Coke? Would you feed him all the junk that we feed ourselves and our guests when they come to dinner? Or would you eat real food? Places of worship may call to mind ice cream socials or groan ing tables of fried chicken and potato salad more than they do workouts, but Warren is the lat est in a long line of people of faith connecting mind, body and spirit. After all, gluttony is one of the sev en deadly sins. They include the 19th Centu ry health reformer Sylvester Gra ham and, later, the Seventh-day Adventist Dr. John Harvey Kel logg. More recently, fundamental ist C.S. Lovetts Help Lord the Devil Wants Me Fat! sold close to 100,000 copies in two years af ter its release in 1977. Other books have included More of Jesus, Less of Me and Slim for Him. And Warren is not alone in us ing as inspiration the story of the prophet Daniel, who rejected the rich food and wine of King Nebu chadnezzar. Millions of American Chris tians have made a religious duty out of diet, R. Marie Grifth writes in her 2004 book Born Again Bodies. Fit bodies ostensibly signify tter souls, she said by phone. But they also can be used to support a male-dominated hi erarchy; the market is lucra tive, and its important to look at the underlying messages. Warren has an opportunity to change lives, Grifth said. Be cause of his name and his fame and how beloved and admired he is, his could really have a bigger impact. Dee Eastman, director of the Daniel Plan, said she doesnt look at it as a diet plan. Ultimately, we try to look to ward getting balance in health overall. And we think food plays a huge role in that, she said. This is going to sound extreme, but if you can cut out the white menac es white our and white sugar your palate changes and your cravings stop. You can actual ly start loving foods that love you back. Warren traces his inspiration for the plan to the day in 2010 that he baptized 827 adults and calculated that hed lifted more than 145,000 pounds. Not only were most of those believers over weight, Warren thought. But Im fat too! Im as out of shape as ev eryone else is! In a pilot rollout of the Dan iel Plan, more than 15,000 peo ple lost a collective quarter-mil lion pounds in a year, the church said. Plans are underway for a long-term tracking program for the plan, Eastman said. Christians embrace the Daniel Plan to change eating habits, lose weight ALLEN J. SCHABEN / MCT The congregation exercises in their seats during a rally for pastor Rick Warrens Daniel Plan at Saddleback Church in Lake Forest, Calif. The rally was designed to prompt people to employ his diet and tness program.

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Monday, June 30, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 rf n t b nnnYo ur Po diatr is t tr eats... CENTRALFLORI DAFOO TCARE, P. A.Dr Nic k Przysta wski, DPM www .Floridafoot.comD002301 RICHARD DREW / AP This May 31, 2012 le photo shows a display of various size cups and sugar cubes at a news conference at New Yorks City Hall. The New York Court of Appeals ruled Thursday, that the citys health department overstepped its bounds when it restricted the size of sodas. The court is siding with a lower court that overturned the 2012 ban. DAVID KLEPPER Associated Press The court largely ignored the merits of the ban in the 20-page ruling, but determined the citys Board of Health engaged in pol icy-making, and not simply health regulations, when it im posed the restrictions on restau rants, delis, movie theaters, sta diums and street cart vendors. The Board of Health engaged in law-making beyond its reg ulatory authority, the opin ion reads. ... It is clear that the Board of Health wrote the Por tion Cap Rule without benet of legislative guidance. The city had hoped Thursdays ruling would overturn a low er courts decision that blocked the restrictions after restaurants, theater owners, beverage com panies and small stores sued. We are pleased that the lower courts decisions were upheld, the American Beverage Associ ation said in a statement after the decision was handed down. The restrictions, if reinstated, would have created an uneven playing eld for thousands of small businesses in the city and limited New Yorkers freedom of choice. City Health Commission Mary T. Bassett said the administra tion of current Mayor Bill de Bla sio continues to look for ways to limit the pernicious effects of aggressive and predatory mar keting of sugary drinks and un healthy foods. Todays ruling does not change the fact that sugary drink consumption is a key driver of the obesity epidemic, and we will continue to look for ways to stem the twin epidemics of obe sity and type 2 diabetes, Bassett said. The case was decided 4-2, with the majority opinion written by Judge Eugene Piggott Jr. Piggott wrote that city health regulators appeared to carefully weigh the economic, social and health im plications of the ban a poli cy function that Piggott wrote was not the health boards to ex ercise. The two dissenting judg es wrote that they believe the Board of Health was within its rights to impose the ban, and that the judiciary shouldnt step into the middle of a debate over public health policy. The city hasnt said whether it plans to try to appeal. But its un likely that an appeal to the Su preme Court would be accept ed because the case centers on local government authority and legislation, not federal issues. Soda has been under re for years, with health advocates saying the sugary beverages are unique in their harmfulness be cause people dont realize how much high-fructose corn syrup theyre guzzling. The bad pub licity has helped lead to a steady decline in U.S. soda sales for nearly a decade. But other sug ary drinks such as sports drinks and energy drinks have been growing. To help curb consumption, lawmakers and health advocates around the country have pro posed soda taxes in recent years. None have succeeded, however, in part because of heavy cam paigning and lobbying from the beverage industry. In Califor nia, a measure that would have slapped a warning label on so das was recently defeated. In the meantime, Coke and Pepsi have also been rolling out smaller cans and bottles, some as small as 7.5 ounces. The idea is that people would be more willing to drink soda if they could control the portion sizes. The smaller sizes are also more protable for companies. Court wont reinstate New York Citys ban on big soda drinks RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR Associated Press Sodexos experience could serve as a cau tionary tale for oth er employers trying to pin benet reductions on Obamacare. The companys cutbacks fu eled a union organizing drive and campus pro tests. Julie Peterson, So dexos vice president for benets, said the com pany will make changes for next year to restore eligibility for many of those affected. We think that over all this is going to re sult in about the same number of employees being eligible as in the past, Peterson said. The latest shift grew out of a regular review of company policy, she added. Weve realized we can change the way we are determining eligibil ity and still remain com petitive in the market, Peterson explained. Among those who lost their coverage through Sodexo this year was Ju lie Pemberton, a cashier at Curry College, a liber al arts institution near Boston. Pemberton puts in more than 40 hours a week during the aca demic year. Shes pay ing over $200 a month more in premiums since she switched to a plan from the Massa chusetts health insur ance exchange. Im actually looking for a new apartment be cause this is just drain ing any savings I have, said Pemberton. I cant just keep paying and paying and paying. UNITE HERE, a labor union trying to organize Sodexo workers, said the companys initial cutback was facilitated by what it calls a loop hole in federal regula tions carrying out the health laws employer coverage requirement. The Obama admin istration responds that the employer, not the health care law, was to blame. French-owned So dexo is a multinational service company with U.S. headquarters in Maryland. It operates many college cafeterias and also provides oth er campus services. In January, Sodexo reclas sied some of its work ers as part-time by aver aging their hours over a 52-week calendar year. That affected about 5,000 of its 133,000 U.S. employees. Sodexo said it was acting to align itself with the health care law, which requires that em ployers with 50 or more workers offer coverage to those averaging at least 30 hours per week, or face nes. Company ofcial Pe terson said Thursday that for benets pur poses, the company will now credit campus employees during the summer break with the hours they would have worked during the aca demic year. The UNITE HERE union says federal rules require colleges and universities to essential ly do the same thing for their faculty employees. But those rules dont ap ply to contractor em ployees in cafeterias. There is nothing in there that says contract workers are protected, said union spokesman Ethan Snow. At least one college that examined the issue agreed with the cafeteria workers. Earlham Col lege in Richmond, Indi ana, recently amended its contract with Sodexo to require that the em ployees be offered cov erage. Sodexo cafeteria workers regain health coverage FENIT NIRAPPIL Associated Press SACRAMENTO, Calif. Californias chefs and bartenders can resume legally handling food with their bare hands un der a bill repealing an un popular regulation that is headed to the governor. The bill, AB2130, passed its nal legislative hurdle Thursday with a 32-0 vote in the state Sen ate. A law signed by Gov. Jerry Brown last year re quires restaurant em ployees to use gloves or utensils to handle food going straight to diners plates, from the rice in a sushi roll to the mint in a mojito. The prohibi tion, in place in 41 other states, has long been rec ommended by regula tors to curb the spread of foodborne illness. Though the original legislation attracted no opposition from lob bying groups or chain restaurants, indepen dent and high-end chefs and bartenders say they were caught off-guard by the rule. They say the ban disrupted well-es tablished hand-washing routines, generates un necessary waste of dis posable gloves and re stricts them in their craft. Sen. Kevin De Leon, D-Los Angeles, told law makers on Thursday that the ban would not have been approved had their concerns been raised. Assemblyman Rich ard Pan, D-Sacramen to, introduced AB2130 to repeal the law he orig inally authored as part of an update to the state food code. Pan, who is chairman of the health committee and a pe diatrician, said it be came apparent that local health inspectors were more stringent in grant ing exceptions than law makers intended. Inspectors are not sup posed to start slapping eateries with nes for bare-hand contact until July 1, which is when the bill takes effect if signed into law. Pan said hes not aban doning the regulation all together. He wants to re visit the prohibition, but make it more exible to meet the concerns of restaurateurs. Its not about wheth er you wear gloves or not, Pan said in an inter view with The Associated Press Its about how clean the surfaces (touching food) are. We need to have the conversation go back to, This is about food safety. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Pre vention found that work ers touching food pro vided the most common transmission pathway for food-originated noro virus outbreaks between 2001 and 2008, the most recent comprehensive review of data available. Repeal of ban on bare-hand contact with food OKd

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Hwy 44 1 Le esbu rg, FL 34 78 835 2.319.6768 As k Ab out our FR EE In -Hom e Design Consultation Wishing Yo u a Happy Independence Day!WELL PA Y YOUR SALES TA X!24-Mont hInterestFree Financing*Open 10-5 Friday 4thof July SA VE ON THE BR AN D NA ME S YO U KN OW AND TRU ST *minimum amount nanced $999, 25% deposit re quir ed WELL WELL WELL Aching Fe et?Step right into our of fi ce.We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Wa lk-Ins We lcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 We st Dixie Av enue Suite B|Leesburg, FL 34748352-435-7849 |Next to Dr Ta troDr Er ik Zimmer mannPo dia tr is tYo ur feet are in good hands with us! r f Mos tM aj or Insurances Ac cep te d D002348 POHLA SMITH MCT PITTSBURGH Is it possible that there are more chemicals being used in perfumes and sprays that are hurting more people than 10 or 20 years ago? That is denitely ac curate, said Merritt Fajt, an allergist who is a na tionally known physician at the University of Pitts burgh Asthma Institute at UP Medical Center and an assistant professor of medicine at Pitt. One reason that fra grant sensitivities are on the rise is that the use of fragrances is becoming a lot more prominent in this world and now there are about 500 differ ent fragrances and even more if you combine the different fragrances. Allegheny Health Net work allergist Deborah Gentile agreed that there are now four or ve hundred types of these chemicals. These newer chemicals are used in fra grances, perfume and air fresheners. Some of these chem icals may cause breath ing problems, irritation in the nose or chest, head aches, stomach aches, Dr. Gentile added. You can treat them, using al lergy medications like an tihistamines. Liz Sandhagen, 48, of Whitehall, Penn.,a pa tient of Dr. Gentiles part ner, David Skoner, said she has a list of allergens that includes household cleaners, scented can dles, perfume and smoke. I dont go places where there might be smoke and nobody comes to the house and smokes. There are no perfumes or co lognes in our house ei ther, she said. Sandha gen is treated monthly with a shot of Xolair. She said the allergy care she has received over 25 years has helped reduce the number of hospital stays she has needed for other medical problems. Its limited my hospi tal visits, she said, and I dont react to the stimu li like owers, perfumes. I can tolerate them a little bit better than I did. The growing popularity of fragrances has caused at least one person to have a terrible allergic re action that has no treat ment available yet. Hes Brandon Silk, 16, of Beth lehem, Penn. He has been terribly allergic to the Axe body spray others his age have been wearing since he was in the fth grade. One day (in the fth grade) he went into ana phylactic shock, said his mother, Rosa, who wrote a story to raise aware ness about his problem. He stayed for days in the hospital as doctors tried to gure out what was the cause. ... They came to the conclusion that it was something airborne that he must have been exposed to. Eventually he came home from the hospital, but the terrible prob lem continued. ... Every time he went to school he was sick with head aches, trouble breath ing, welts on his face and arms, blurred vi sion, stomach pains to the point where he had to be homebound for weeks at a time be fore he could go back to school. The physicians nev er were able to conclude what was causing Bran dons symptoms, but he gured it out himself. He walked into a school hall, felt the familiar al lergic reaction starting and at the same time recognized a scent. It was Axe body spray. In a recent interview with the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Bran dons mother said that one doctor got the list of Axes fragrance ingredi ents. But his work was of no help. That doctor in dicated there is no test ing for the chemicals, she said. She said she was not given the list, that the doctor was not allowed to pass it along because Axes content is considered proprietary information, or a trade secret. Brandon now does his school work at home to avoid encountering Axe fragrance at school. He also is seeing a Yale University occupation al and environmental medicine doctor, Car rie Redlich, who is pur suing an analysis of the Axe ingredients list for her patient. We will try to gure out what can we test on it and then go forward with a test for all of them, Rosa Silk said. I feel that she would be able to nd some sort of solution for Brandon. Brandons case is far more difcult than even the most highly allergic patients, said UPMCs Dr. Fajt, who has not seen the young man as a patient. The majority of pa tients we see with a true fragrance or perfume allergy get a dermati tis skin rash, she said. I would say that (Bran don) appears to be an extremely unique case. Dr. Fajt added, The new types of allergies are difcult to diagnose objectively because our traditional tests for al lergies focus on envi ronmental allergens trees, grasses so the traditional tests, blood or skin, have been de veloped to detect those type of agents. Aggressive allergies: When a rose may not smell so sweet DARRELL SAPP / MCT Elizabeth Sandhagen, of Whitehall Borough, Pa., talks after Dr. Deborah Gentile, who injected her with Xolair in Pittsburgh.

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Monday, June 30, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 RICHARD ASA MCT Was I nervous about becoming a dad for the rst time at age 40? You bet. But I was hardly the only guy intimidated by taking on what was by far the biggest responsi bility of my life noth ing else came close. When faced with rst-time fatherhood at 49, I didnt know wheth er to celebrate with Champagne or hem lock, author Len Filp pu quips in Prime Time Dads: 45 Rea sons to Embrace Mid life Fatherhood (Bright Lights Press). He wrote the book to sing the praises of being an old er dad once it became reality for him and he decided on Cham pagne. Filppu is now 63 and the father of two. Filppu, a former press secretary for the Jimmy Carter administration, is a funny guy with a hi larious book that has serious intentions. He makes the point, with a lighthearted approach, that we creaky older dads actually can make great fathers because weve sown our oats, gotten our egos fed, have enough maturity to be an equal partner in the care of a squirmy little bundle of joy that is, by nature, often un fathomable and always challenging. According to the Na tional Center for Health Statistics, birth rates per 1,000 men rose in 2012 from 2011 for men ages 35 to 49: up 2 percent for men ages 35 to 39 and 40 to 44, and 4 per cent for men ages 45 to 49. Rates remained un changed for men 50 and older. Rates declined for men under age 30. Ten years ago, birth rates for men ages 35 to 39 were more than 7 percent lower and for ages 40-44, 4 percent lower. To fully explain this trend would take a book, but a major rea son: like mother, like fa ther. According to the aforementioned 2012 study, birth rates in creased for women ages 35 to 44 and held steady for ages 45 to 49. Other reasons for em bracing parenthood later in life are more subjective, involving concepts such as matu rity and wisdom, which translate into a will ing acceptance of to days more diverse fa therhood roles, along with nancial security and a desire to leave a living legacy once oth er life goals often ca reer-related have been achieved. For after achieving professional success, some men realize they still havent climbed the Mount Everest of ac complishment: raising children, the proverbi al hardest job in the world. Men, it turns out, also have a biolog ical clock. Life stretches out in the 40s, says Kristi Walsh, a marriage and family therapist based in Ventura, Calif. Some of the basic tasks of so lidifying an identity and place in the world have occurred, and ones en ergy circles back around to home and fami ly. Dragons have been slain, and lands have been conquered. By 40, there is less to prove. And time to enjoy a different kind of re ward. Kids remind us to live in the moment and embrace the responsi bilities that add up to joy and selessness. Its turned out to be the best thing I ever did, Filppu says. I had wondered if I would have the stamina, if Id miss doing what I wanted when I wanted. Would I sit on bleachers at Little League games dozing and drooling like Homer Simpsons dad, while mumbling songs from Woodstock? Filppu admits now that he stereotyped himself, wielding an ageist bias toward him self. And none of his fears materialized. Older fathers say that what they might lack in pure physical stamina, which can be partial ly offset at the gym and with attention to nutri tion, is balanced with a large toolbox of expe rience, skills and psy chological attributes, as Filppu puts it, that helps their parenting hit the bulls-eye more often than not. Older new dads savor wisdom that comes with age MCT PHOTO Len Filppu, top left, author of Prime Time Dads, poses for a portrait with wife Lucy Filppu, son Arthur and daughter Dori.

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 30, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTS Comics www.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

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Monday, June 30, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 www.dailycommercial.com Diversions 352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puz zle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, June 30 the 181st day of 2014. There are 184 days left in the year. On this date : In 1908 the Tunguska Event took place in Russia as an asteroid exploded above Siberia, leaving 800 square miles of scorched or blowndown trees. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, June 30, 2014: This year you will active ly pursue a change on the home front. You might be eyeing a new addition or a different home, but you will go for what you want. You also are likely to receive a pay raise or promotion. If you are single, you will want to get very close to a po tential suitor, and you even might consider living togeth er. Dont push too hard to take a relationship to the next level; otherwise, your plans could backre. If you are attached, the two of you greet life from a far more dynamic perspective. As a couple, you spend many hours laughing and enjoying each other. LEO pushes you to achieve your goals. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You might feel out of sorts when you get up, but you could decide to blame it on everyone else. You have the ability to turn this situa tion around. Fatigue seems to mark a partnership. Each of you knows the others de fenses too well. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Observe a situation in volving your domestic life. Your ability to let go and al low others to do what they wish could be tested. Un derstand that people some times need to test their limits and ideas. Allow a roommate or family mem ber to go through that expe rience. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) It could be nearly im possible to deal with some ones negativity, as this per son affects your daily life. Maintain a positive focus, and allow your creativity to ourish. Brainstorming with others who have simi lar mind-sets can add to the possibilities. CANCER (June 21-July 22) You are likely to sit on any feelings that are uncom fortable. Be aware of your spending right now, as you easily could go overboard. Ultimately, you know that you do not want to deal with the consequences of overin dulging. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Listen carefully to some one elses ideas. You might have some questions that need to be claried. An un expected opportunity could come in from out of left eld. Think before you act, even if you feel good about it. Remember, there are al ways consequences! VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Much seems to be go ing on behind the scenes. For now, it is best to keep information you have to yourself. When a close as sociate or loved one surpris es you with the unexpected, you might wonder how you didnt see it coming. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You will want to consid er a friends offer that previ ously was not on the table. You also will want to have a long-overdue conversation. A problem could surround you and a loved one. Be more forthright, but dont lose your temper. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Youll succeed beyond your wildest dreams, as you nally will be able to move a work or health matter past a stagnant point. You are full of ideas. Work with them and brainstorm with others, and your course will be easier and more fruitful. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Someone could get angry if you dont fol low through as he or she would like you to. You have the ability to read between the lines, so make it OK to be more open and sponta neous. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) You might feel as if a loved one has pushed you hard the past few days. Resist telling this person off, and instead root out the real issue. The situation be comes much easier once you do. If you decide to take the lead in a project, you could be shocked by the re sults. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18) You might want to be more open with others. Your thinking is far-reaching, though you have a tendency to think youre always right. A conversation with some one could help you see oth er possibilities. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) A loved one might be pushing too hard to have the outcome he or she wants in a controversial dis cussion the two of you have been having. Observe the different approaches this person attempts, and main tain a sense of humor. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORY DEAR ABBY: At 2 p.m., July Fourth, I would love nothing better than for all Americans to stop briey and give our country a ring ... well, THREE rings to be ex act. On July 4, 1963, Pres ident John F. Kennedy proclaimed the ringing of bells nationwide with the words, Lets ring freedom bells! I was a White House aide then, and I vividly recall how exciting it was when bells rang across the nation coast to coast. Since then, many Amer icans have forgotten to keep the tradition going. Lets start again! From one American to another, I ask all cit izens to help me revive the ringing of bells at 2 p.m. this July Fourth in celebration of the adop tion of the Declaration of Independence. Its easy. Ring a bell, shake your keys, tap a glass or nd a bell-ringing app on your smartphone. It will give our country a much-needed sense of unity and connection to our past as one nation, one people. The Ironworkers, Sheet Metal Workers and Fireghters Inter national Unions of the AFL-CIO, The Nation al Cartoonists Society and Malmark Inc. have joined with No Greater Love in this special cel ebration of our freedom and the guardians who protect us our troops, reghters and police. Please, Abby, make your millions of readers aware of this effort. As inscribed on the Liber ty Bell, Let us proclaim liberty throughout the land unto all the inhab itants thereof. CAR MELLA LASPADA, FOUNDER, NO GREATER LOVE DEAR CARMELLA: Im glad to help. I agree that shared traditions are the glue that binds us together as a na tion. So readers, on July Fourth, take a mo ment to quietly reect on what this holiday is all about. Then make a joyful noise and thank God for his blessings on our country and the freedoms we enjoy to day. Thats the American spirit! DEAR ABBY: My ancee and I share a credit card that was opened under my name. I use it for gas and household or fami ly needs. She uses it for personal things such as buying dolls for her col lection. I was informed that I will no longer be able to use the card after the last statement we got. (I had spent more than $100 on gas for the month.) I feel I am using the card for the purpose for which it was intend ed. Buying things that arent for the family but for her personal enjoy ment wasnt our agree ment. Im not sure how to approach her about this without it becoming an argument. She has a spending problem. I recently found a job, so I contribute nan cially to the household. This is something that has been thrown in my face every time we talk about money. I want to see the statement so I can compare who spent how much on what, but when I ask to see it, she gets defensive. IN THE DARK IN MICHIGAN DEAR IN THE DARK: If the credit card is in your name, then you are re sponsible for anything that is purchased with it. The statements are addressed to you, and you have a right to see them. That your ancee is refusing to show them to you is a sure sign that she has something to hide. Thats why you must take the card away from her to ensure that she isnt putting you into a nancial hole you wont be able to dig yourself out of. And because the lady cant seem to con trol her spending, Im urging you to think long and hard before mar rying her, because after you do, you will be re sponsible for her debts. Dear Abby is written by Abi gail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her moth er, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAb by.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Let freedom ring from coast to coast this fourth of July JEANNE PHILLIPS DEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGAR BIGARS STARS Come Join Us on July 4th for Our Pa triotic Animal Pa ra de & Reptile Pr ogr am r fnt fbFa mily Fun at Fa mily Prices! Call for admission prices and hours. nn July 4th Summer Fun Animals on Parade! to Pe t & Fe ed r ff fn t b rf n ft bWo rking gallery of local artistsANTIQ UEDEA LERSWANTE D (352) 460-4806 r f ntb fa cebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburg D002326

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Minimumchargesapply.Cannotbecombinedwithothercouponsoroffers.Combinedlivingareas,L-shapedroomsandrooms ov er300sq.ft. ar econsidered2area s. Baths, halls,large wa lk-i n closetsan d arearu gsar epricedseparately. Offerdoes no t in clude protecto r. Residentialonl y. Cannotbeusedfor re stor ationser vices. Mu stpresen t couponattimeofservice Va lidatparticipatinglocationsonly.Certain re strictionsmayapply.Callfordetails.BEYONDCARPET CLEANINGCARPET|TILE&GROUT|HARDWOOD|UPHOLSTERY|AIRDUCT728-1668 394-1739fla#CAC18 1640 8 NETHERLANDS DEFEATS MEXICO IN STUNNER, SPORTS B1INDEPENDENCE DAY: Mount Dora expands reworks show, A3 BASEBALL: Lightning suffer 7-2 defeat by Squeeze, B1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, June 30, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 181 4 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED C8 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS C8 DIVERSIONS C7 LEGALS C8 LIVING HEALTHY C1 NATION A5 SCOREBOARD B2 SPORTS B1 VOICES A9 WORLD A8 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A10.92 / 74Heavy evening T-storms. 50 DARA KAMThe News Service of FloridaHOLLYWOOD Hammering on a theme heard throughout the day, former President Bill Clinton warned Democrats they wont win critical races this fall if they dont gure out how to get voters to cast ballots. We have to be creative in how we reach people and how we get them to the polls, Clinton told a crowd of more than 1,500 supporters who paid up to $250 to hear the former president speak Satur day night. If were go ing to preserve democ racy, real democracy, weve got to show up. About 130 million people typically vote in presidential elections, but 50 million of those stay home during the mid-term elections like this years a recipe for gridlock, Clinton told the party faithful gathered for their major fundraiser of the year at Clinton: Dems need to get voters to show up RYAN LUCASAssociated PressBAGHDAD The al-Qaida breakaway group that has seized much of northeastern Syria and huge tracts of neighboring Iraq formal ly declared the establish ment of a new Islamic state on Sunday and de manded allegiance from Muslims worldwide. The spokesman for the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, Abu Mohammed al-Adnani, made the announce ment in an audio Al-Qaida splinter declares new Islamic caliphate AP PHOTOIraqi security forces hold up a ag of the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant they captured during an operation to regain control of Dallah Abbas, 35 miles northeast of Baghdad.In spite of the grousing, voters rarely fire lawmakers AP FILE PHOTO John Boehner, R-Ohio, center, announces a shufe in the GOP leadership after House Republicans voted to make Rep. Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., the new majority leader. PHOTO COURTESY OF FACEBOOK.COM Elizabeth Fechtel, shown with ABC Action News anchor Ashley Glass, lost her Miss Florida title after a judges revised score was detected. TOM MCNIFFEditorElizabeth Fechtel, who lost her Miss Florida title last week when pageant orga nizers realized they had incor rectly tabulated the contes tants scores, wrote in a blog that she was devastated but is over the initial shock and feels empowered to charge forward. Fechtel learned Thursday night during a visit from Miss Florida Director Mary Sullivan that she would have to relinquish her crown to Victoria Cowen of Panama City. Sullivan explained to her that one of the judges had changed his mind while scoring rst and second place the night of the pageant. The judge reportedly changed his vote from Elizabeth to the rst runner-up, Cowen. Writing about the experience on Friday, Fechtel thanked supporters for giving her a bold reminder of what really matters: the ability to touch lives and be touched in return. Though I am devastated to relinquish the job, I am a rm believer that God has a plan and a purpose, she wrote. Victoria Cowen will be a great titleholder and I hope you will all show her the recognition she deserves. There is one big idea that I would like to emphasize: I was Miss Florida for a glimpse, but more importantly, I have been Elizabeth Fechtel since day one. A title does not dene me. It opens doors, but it does not dictate who I am and where I am going. I would like to think of opportunities like this as stepping stones to my future. I cannot deny that this was one of the biggest steps I have come across, and I had become very comfortable and excited Fechtel devastated, but recovered from losing titleNow that I have recovered from the initial shock, I feel surprisingly empowered. I recognize that the mistake in the balloting is less important than my choice on how to handle the recovery process. My choice is to charge forward and make a lasting impact on my community and country, as Elizabeth Fechtel.Elizabeth FechtelSEE VOTERS | A2SEE FECHTEL | A2 CONNIE CASSAssociated PressWASHINGTON The U.S. Congress is wildly unpopular. In fact, two-thirds of Americans want their own House member booted. And the ultraconserva tive tea party movement is dog ging longtime Republican lawmakers. So incumbents are nervous about the upcoming November elections, right? No. Mostly theyre not. People talk about throwing the bums out, but voters keep send ing the same bunch back in. More than halfway through the party primaries, 293 House and Senate members have com pleted their quests for renomi nation during the primary sea son. The score: Incumbents 291, challengers 2. What about November, when Republicans and Democrats face off in the general election? It looks to be a dramatic mid term, all right, with Republicans, who are virtually certain to re tain control of the House, push ing to seize control of the Senate. That would give them the pow er to essentially kill President Barack Obamas legislative agenda for the remaining two years of his term. More incumbents will be vul nerable in the general election than the primaries. Still, the vast majority of sitting lawmakers are snug in their seats. Over the past ve decades, vot ers have routinely returned 9 of 10 incumbent candidates to the House. Senate races are a bit less predictable, but usually more SEE VOTERS | A2SEE IRAQ | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 30, 2014 HOW TO REACH US JUNE 29CASH 3 . ............................................... 9-3-3 Afternoon . .......................................... 9-1-5 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 8-3-1-2 Afternoon . ....................................... 3-5-7-8FLORIDALOTTERY JUNE 28FANTASY 5 . ......................... 12-20-21-28-31 FLORIDA LOTTO . ............. 12-16-23-33-46-50 POWERBALL ...................... 8-12-34-43-569 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONSTEVE SKAGGS, publisher352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comPAUL RYAN, digital editor352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com.CALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. a glitzy seaside hotel in Hollywood. Clinton blasted Republican in cumbent Gov. Rick Scott for adopt ing policies that help the richest Floridians, like lowering corporate income taxes, and harm the poor est and working class families, such as not supporting a raise in the minimum wage. Its not easy for them to vote. They have to know that it matters, he said. He urged Democrats to reach out to voters who could benet from a turnaround in those policies. Explain, explain, explain and g ure out how to physically get peo ple to the polls, Clinton said in a 41-minute speech. Im telling you, if you can reach Floridas portion of those 50 million people you will have the darnedest celebration on election night you ever saw. Clinton illustrated his point by saying that Democrat Alex Sink should have won a special election to replace the late U.S. Rep. C.W. Bill Young in a Pinellas County congressional district. Sink was defeated by Youngs onetime aide David Jolly. Alex Sink won the independent votes by almost twice the margin President Obama did. But the regis tered Democrats did not turn out, Clinton said, noting that Demo cratic Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe won his election because black voter turnout matched that in the gen eral election. If they can do it, you can do it, Clinton said. The Clinton event raised $1.1 million topping previous earn ings for the annual Leadership Blue Gala fundraiser, formerly called the Jefferson-Jackson Dinner and nearly 1,600 supporters were expected to attend the event at the Westin Diplomat Resort & Spa, another historic high, according to Florida Democratic Party Chairwoman Allison Tant. Party loyalists were united in their enthusiasm for ousting Scott from ofce if not in their sup port for his Democratic challengers, former Senate Minority Leader Nan Rich and onetime Republican Gov. Charlie Crist. Tant echoed the overarching topic of the days caucus meetings the importance of getting Dem ocrats to the polls to prevent the horrendous possibility that Scott wins a second term. We are going to build the largest eld plan that the Florida Democratic Party has ever seen, she pledged. VOTERS FROM PAGE A1 about the growth it would bring. The reality is that the Lord works in unforeseen ways. My path was squared and lined up 24 hours ago. Fechtel went on to say that she felt stronger for the experience. Now that I have recovered from the initial shock, I feel surprisingly empowered. I recognize that the mistake in the balloting is less important than my choice on how to handle the recovery process. My choice is to charge forward and make a lasting impact on my community and country, as Elizabeth Fechtel. Fechtel said she will continue to post to her blog, not as Miss Flor ida, but as a student at the University of Flor ida. This situation has only reminded me to live with a purpose and embrace the little things along my path. I cannot wait to share the new, fresh experiences. I am sure there are still many questions, per haps even rumors, left unanswered let time do the talking. Fechtel, 20, is no stranger to pageants. She received her rst tiara as Miss Leesburg in 2010, then was named Miss Orlandos Outstanding Teen and Miss Floridas Outstanding Teen. She won her rst national title as Miss Americas Outstanding Teen for 2012, the sister program of the Miss America Organization. The UF junior was crowned Miss University of Florida at a pageant earlier this year, which earned her a spot in the Miss Florida Pageant and an $18,000 scholar ship as the winner. FECHTEL FROM PAGE A1 PHOTO COURTESY OF FACEBOOK.COM Elizabeth Fechtel, left, poses with Megan Cromwell during preliminary competition at the Miss Florida Pageant. than 80 percent of incumbents win. Why do these people keep win ning? Its harder for challengers to sell themselves to voters. Incumbents wield tremendous advantages. They raise big bucks from special interests, use their congressional ofces to send voters mass mail ings, build ties to businesses and advocacy groups in their districts, and benet from name recogni tion. They have staff members back home working to keep constituents happy. A Republican in a heavily Democratic Maryland district, she was re-elected seven times, until her district boundaries were redrawn by Democrats to push her out in 2002. But often, the redistricting pro cess, which is known as gerryman dering and occurs every 10 years, favors incumbents. Political calculations have contributed to most districts becoming solidly Republican or solidly Democratic. The gerrymandering is terrible, said Morella, now a professor at American University. Few districts are truly competitive anymore. Only about four dozen of the 435 House seats are considered in play this year, meaning either party might conceivably win them in November. Many of those are open seats, vacat ed by lawmakers who are retiring or seeking another ofce. In dozens of other cases in the House, only one of the two major parties will even have a name on the November ballot. In the Senate, about a dozen of the 36 seats up for election might be truly competitive. That could be enough for the Republicans, who need to take six seats to win control of the upper chamber. This year, Congress logged a con dence rating of 7 percent, the low est Gallup has measured for any in stitution, ever. People dont put much attachment to their own rep resentative anymore, either. An As sociated Press-GfK poll last month found that 65 percent of Ameri cans say their own House member should lose. Turnout is low in midterm elec tions, usually about 40 percent in the fall and often abysmal for primaries. Voters may feel they lack true choice. Still, one shocker this primary season showed that establishment candidates can be ousted. A virtual unknown, Dave Brat, toppled House Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Virginia in a Repub lican primary an unexpected victory for the tea party, which has mostly struggled against well-orga nized establishment Republicans this election season. There just arent that many real races, said Larry Sabato, a veteran election forecaster at the Univer sity of Virginia. So even if people dont like their representative, they dont necessarily vote for the chal lenger from the other party, or vote at all. VOTERS FROM PAGE A1 statement posted online on the rst day of the Mus lim holy month of Ramadan. Muslim extremists have long dreamed of recreating the Is lamic state, or caliphate, that ruled over the Middle East, much of North Africa and beyond in various forms over the course of Islams 1,400year history. Al-Adnani declared the groups chief, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, as the new lead er, or caliph, and called on ji hadi groups everywhere, not just those in areas under the organizations control, to swear loyalty to al-Baghdadi and support him. The legality of all emirates, groups, states and organiza tions becomes null by the ex pansion of the caliphs author ity and the arrival of its troops to their areas, al-Adnani said. Listen to your caliph and obey him. Support your state, which grows every day. Al-Adnani loosely dened the Islamic states territory as running from northern Syr ia to the Iraqi province of Di yala a vast stretch of land straddling the border that is already largely under the Is lamic States control. He also said that with the establishment of the caliphate, the group was changing its name to just the Islamic State, dropping the mention of Iraq and the Levant. It was unclear what imme diate impact the declaration would have on the ground in Syria and Iraq, though ex perts predicted it could her ald inghting among the Sun ni militants who have formed an alliance with the Islamic State in its blitz across north ern and western Iraq. Now the insurgents in Iraq have no excuse for working with ISIS if they were hop ing to share power with ISIS, said Aymenn al-Tamimi, an analyst who specializes in Is lamic militants in Iraq and Syria, using one of several ac ronyms for the Islamic State. The prospect of inghting in Iraq is increased for sure. The greatest impact, how ever, could be on the broader international jihadist move ment, in particular on the fu ture of al-Qaida. Founded by Osama bin Lad en, the group that carried out the Sept. 11 attacks on the U.S. has long carried the mantle of the international jihadi cause. But the Islamic State has managed to do in Syria and Iraq what al-Qaida never has carve out a large swath of ter ritory in the heart of the Arab world and control it. IRAQ FROM PAGE A1 AP FILE PHOTO In this photo taken June 19, an al-Qaida-inspired militant stands guard at a checkpoint captured from the Iraqi Army outside Beiji renery, some 155 miles north of Baghdad, Iraq.

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Monday, June 30, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LAKE COUNTY Lake County Library System libraries to close for July 4Lake County Library System libraries will close on Friday for the Independence Day holiday. Libraries include: Astor County Library, 54905 Alco Road; Cagan Crossings Community Library, 16729 Cagan Oaks, Clermont; Cooper Memorial Library, 2525 Oakley Seaver Drive, Clermont; East Lake County Library, 31340 County Road 437, Sorrento; Fruitland Park Library, 205 W Berckman St.; Helen Lehmann Memorial Library, 17435 Fifth St., Montverde; Lady Lake Public Library, 225 W Guava St.; Leesburg Public Library, 100 E Main St.; Marianne Beck Memorial Library, 112 W Central Ave., Howey-in-theHills; Marion Baysinger Memorial Library, 756 W. Broad St., Groveland; Minneola Schoolhouse Library, 100 S Main St.; Paisley County Library, 24954 County Road 42; City of Tavares Public Library, 314 N. New Hampshire Ave.; Umatilla Public Library, 412 Hateld Drive; W.T. Bland Public Library, 1995 N Donnelly St., Mount Dora. For information, go to www.my lakelibrary.org or call your local library.EUSTIS Lake Tech fall registration to begin on July 7Lake Technical College will begin accepting students on July 7 for the fall term that begins Aug. 18, offering classes in Accounting Operations, Administrative Ofce Specialist, Air Conditioning, Refrigeration and many others in a new 232-hour program that begins Sept. 8, and meets Monday-Friday from 8:15 / a.m. to 3:15 / p.m. Several short-term, affordable classes are also offered and include: Private Investigator Class, Armed and Unarmed Security Classes D & G. For information on scholarships and registration, call the main campus admission ofce, 2001 Kurt St., in Eustis, at 352-742-6463, or go to www.laketech.org.TAVARES SBDC to offer class on business plan writingThe Small Business Development Center (SBDC) at UCF-Lake County is offering a hands-on seminar to help entrepreneurs and business owners compose successful business plans. Stan Austin, area manager and certied business analyst, will lead the classes. Registration is recommended as the course is popular and space is limited. The seminar will be offered from 6 to 9 / p.m. July 11, Leesburg Community Center, 109 E. Dixie Ave.; from 6 to 9 / p.m. July 25, North East Business Opportunity Center, 1520 S. Bay St., Eustis and from 6 to 9 / p.m. Aug. 1, Lake-Sumter State College, 1250 N. Hancock Road, building 2, room 201, in Clermont. For information or to register, call Theresa Davis at 352-315-1846, email theresa.davis@bus.ucf.edu or go to www.sbdcorlando.com/ lakecounty.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comMount Doras Freedom on the Waterfront event will be on July 3 this year and will feature a longer reworks show than in previous years, according to the citys Cultural and Special Events Coordinator Chris Carson. The 25-minute reworks show, which will start at 9:15 / p.m., was 17 minutes long in the past, Carson said. He said the longer re works show, with a larger budget and sponsorships, will allow for more effects and a broader nale. Music played from two sound systems will accompany the reworks. All the different things that stand out all culmi nate together and you synchronize them into a minute-and-a-half or a minute-and-15-second nale and that caps off the show, and to do that show and add music to it is powerful, Carson said of the nale and how it is a collection of effects from the whole show.Mount Dora expands fireworks show Staff ReportSouth Lake Hospitals Obstetrics Department was honored by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) District XII (Florida) and the March of Dimes for reducing the number of ear ly elective inductions and cesarean deliveries with a special recognition banner. The hospital recently met the criteria to qualify for this distinction, which includes achieving a rate for elective deliveries before 39 completed weeks of pregnancy of 5 percent or lower and having policies in place to prevent such deliveries. South Lake Hospital, in Clermont, was the only hospital in Lake County to receive this recognition. We are delighted to pres ent this commemorative banner to South Lake Hospital for adhering to stan dards that directly benet the health of babies, said Dr. Karen Harris, Chair of the Program Services Committee for the March of Dimes Florida Chapter. The last few weeks of preg nancy are extremely im portant for the babys brain and lung development, among other organs, so we want to commend this mo mentous achievement. Dr. Robert Yelverton, chair of ACOG District XII, said studies show that deliv eries scheduled for convenience or other non-medical reasons may increase harm to infants, and in crease health care costs. Along with this recognition, South Lake Hospital recently earned a ve-star rating in maternity care by Healthgrades, an online resource for nding hospitals and physicians. The rating indicates outcomes are better than the nation al average and for mater nity care. This achievement is an CLERMONTObstetrics department honored for reducing early elective deliveriesSEE DELIVERY | A4 PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Father-daughter team Steve and Savannah Schwab competed in the annual American Radio Relay League Field Day on Saturday. BELOW: Emil Vandevelde makes his rst contact, an operator from the West Central Florida region. BOTTOM: Left to right, Steve Flynn, Frank Andres, Fred Fitle and Jay Boehme work on an antenna.Operators face off at Radio Field DayOperators from the Lake County Ama teur Radio Associ ation and the Lake County Amateur Radio Emergency Service take part in the annual Amer ican Radio Relay League Field Day, in which ham radio operators across the country try to contact as many different operators as possible in a 24hour period. The competition start ed at 2 p.m on Sat urday. The News Service of FloridaRep. Dane Eagle, R-Cape Coral, will perform 100 hours of community service and receive a reckless driving citation under a court-ap proved settlement stemming from an April 21 arrest, his ofce an nounced Friday. Eagle was initially charged with driving under the inuence. In a re lease issued Friday, Eagle, 30, apol ogized for the embarrassment this whole ordeal has caused and said he remains committed to representing his Southwest Florida dis trict. As I have maintained throughout, I did not drive under the inu ence, Eagle said in the release. I did, however, exercise poor judg ment that night, and in my careless ness I drove recklessly. The prosecutor agreed that reckless driving is the appropriate resolution, and the court has accepted that agreement. I take full responsibility for my actions and accept the penalties for the reckless driving sanction I have been issued. After being arrested, Eagle is sued a statement in which he dis puted being drunk. According to a probable-cause afdavit, Eagle was stopped by a Tallahassee police of cer after the vehicle he was driv ing exited a Taco Bell, nearly hit a median and a curb and ran a red light. The ofcer reported that Eagles vehicle emitted a strong odor of alcoholic beverage and that Eagles eyes were bloodshot, watery, and glassy. At the time, Eagle denied drinking alcohol, saying the odor came from friends who had been drinking and were in the vehicle earlier. Eagle refused a roadside sobriety test, telling the ofcer he was good to get home, before being arrested, according to the report. Eagle also refused to provide a breath sample. While the arrest may have added a rough patch to his road to re-election, Eagle re mains the fundraising leader as three of Republicans, all from Cape Coral, are challenging him for the seat. Eagle collected $10,250.00 through the rst 20 days of June Rep. Eagle accepts reduced chargeSEE EAGLE | A4SEE FIREWORKS | A4

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 30, 2014 r f r f n rr rt n t r b b f f f f f n n f f t f f f t t f b Tr ustedbyhundredsoffamilies forthecareoftheirbelovedpets!Staffonsite24/7.Daycareavailable. Largeairconditioned indoorplayareas. State-of-the-artgroomingstudio. Grooming7daysaweek. 3groomersonstaff.352.253.0059 1083 7 U.S. Hw y. 441,Suite 3, Leesburg (n ex t toHomeDepot)www petlodg e andspa.com NEW PA TI EN T SPEC IA LCo mp lete Ex am(D0150)-Di gi talXr ay s(D0210)-Cle an ing(D1 11 0)-Oral Ca ncer Sc re en ing(D0 43 1)wi th Id en ta fi 3000*Non-Insured Pa ti en tsOnl y. Allmaj or insurances ac cepted in cl udingPPO&HMO pl ans.$59*D00275 6 and reported an over all total of $157,290. Meanwhile, Terry Bow en Cramer III has raised $13,773, and Jim Roach has reported $3,852 in donations. The third challenger, Brandon Ivey, has yet to le a nance report.CRIST FILES BRIEF BACKING CHALLENGE TO GAY MARRIAGE BANFormer Gov. Char lie Crist, who support ed a state Constitutional amendment banning gay marriage when it took effect, led a friend-ofthe-court brief on Fri day asking a federal court to strike down the consti tutional and other legal prohibitions of same-sex unions. Crist, a former Republican governor now running as a Democrat to regain his old job, announced long ago that he had changed his mind on gay marriage. As a former Gover nor, Attorney Gener al and Commissioner of Education for the State of Florida who has opposed extending full marriage equality to gay and lesbian fam ilies in the past, and, in fact, supported the constitutional amendment challenged here, Char lie Crist is in a unique position to provide this Court with argument as to why the political process that produced Floridas discriminatory marriage laws is not due the normal deference that Courts should apply to actions of the people in enact ing amendments to the Florida constitution and to their representatives in enacting Florida law, the brief says. In the brief, Crists at torneys argue that the ban on same-sex mar riages is rooted in prejudice toward gay couples. The evidence now known to be true is that discriminatory marriage laws like discrimina tion by government in any form undermine effective governance, they argue. Such laws produce a discrimination that is incompatible with the constitutional commit ment to equal treatment under the law. Crist is looking to intervene in a federal lawsuit challenging the act led by six gay couples and the Equality Florida Insti tute.SUNPASS RATES GOING UP ON MOST FLORIDA TOLL ROADSA little more change will be drawn from Sun Pass users traveling Floridas Turnpike and most of the states oth er toll roads starting at 1 / a.m. Tuesday. A 1.5 percent increase is being enacted be cause of a 2007 state law that allows SunPass and toll-by-plate rates to be adjusted every year based on changes in the consumer price index. The change will result in fees going up an extra penny or two at most toll plazas. The cost of a trip the entire length of Floridas Turnpike, 309 miles from Wildwood to Flor ida City, will grow from $19.75 to $20.07 for SunPass customers, Turnpike spokeswoman Sonyha Rodriguez-Miller said in an email. Cash rates, which are higher than those charged to SunPass users, are not going up at this time. The law allows cash rates to go up, also based on the CPI, once every ve years. The next cash rate change is set for 2017. For motorists who are billed when a pho to is taken of the vehicles license plate as it travels through a toll ing location, toll-byplate, the same Wild wood-to-Florida City trip is rising from $24.77 to $24.85. The two increases are expected to generate between $8 million and $10 million a year. Toll revenues for scal year 2013 hit $755 million. The other turnpike system roads impacted by the change are: the Seminole Expressway, the Southern Connector, the Beachline Expressway West, the Polk Parkway, the I-4 Connector, and the Daniel Webster Western Beltway Part C, in Central Florida; the Sawgrass Expressway in South east Florida; and the Veterans Expressway and the Suncoast Parkway north of Tampa. Florida Department of Transportation-owned toll roads seeing a sim ilar increase are: Alliga tor Alley in South Florida, Pinellas Bayway and Sunshine Skyway. EAGLE FROM PAGE A3 ongoing team effort that involves physicians, nursing and support staff, said Mary Beth Lewis-Boardman, MD, a local board-certied obstetrics and gynecology physician, who is af liated with South Lake Hospital and is a member of ACOG. The obstetrics de partment is involved in several quality and educational initiatives to ensure that South Lake Hospital is utilizing evidenced-based best practices to provide safe care for women in the community. These include participation in the ACOG Flor ida Perinatal Quality Collaborative and the Florida Hospital Association Hospital En gagement Network. We are fortunate to have a dedicated group of highly trained OB/ GYN physicians, such as Dr. Lewis-Boardman, delivering at our Centre for Womens Health, said South Lake Hos pital president John Moore. The shared mission between the physicians and our team members to pro vide each and every patient with the very best care is what continues to allow our obstetrics department to excel. DELIVERY FROM PAGE A3 Associated PressMIAMI Florida re ligious leaders are call ing on Gov. Rick Scott and state ofcials to restore the civil rights of former felons. A group of cler gy and activists will lead a march through Opa-Locka on Sunday to highlight Floridas status as one of three states that permanently deny ex-offenders the right to vote unless re stored by the governor or a clemency board. Scott and the Re publican-led Cabinet undid automatic restoration of rights for nonviolent ex-fel ons and tightened rules in 2011. They said of fenders should have to demonstrate they can live crime-free. But religious leaders and civil liberties activists say Floridas rules are the most restrictive in the nation and effec tively suppress the minority vote. Organizers of Sundays march say the state has the highest disenfranchisement rate in the country.Clergy: Restore felons voting rights The event will start at 5 / p.m., with the na tional anthem and ceremony taking place at 6 / p.m. in Elizabeth Evans Park. There will be a kids area in Simp son Cove and enter tainment and vendors in both Evans Park and the Palm Island Park. Part of the na ture boardwalk there will also be open for rework viewing. The parade will take place at 10 / a.m. Friday. Rob English, the president of the Mount Dora Area Chamber of Com merce, said a lot of businesses normally close on the Fourth but will be open on the third. The thinking was before the reworks and after the reworks are nished, that people would be dispersed into town to the restaurants and the wine bars to en joy themselves ... and some shopping also too. There will be parking and a shuttle for Thursday nights events at Mount Dora High School. The parade route can be found at mount dorareworks.com. SHOW FROM PAGE A3 Associated PressORLANDO The Florida Department of Children and Families has taken custody of a mothers 2-year-old son a day after the womans other child died from what she was says was a hit-and-run accident. WFTV-TV reports that DCF placed Maryanne Schwartzs child in custody following a hear ing on Sunday after signs of mal nourishment and bruising were observed on both of her children. Florida Highway Patrol is in vestigating the Friday death of Schwartzs 3-year-old daughter, Yeliani Schwartz-Ojeda, outside of an Orlando apartment com plex. Authorities say the child died after being admitted to the hospital with injuries that doc tors said were consistent with being struck by a car. Schwartz called 911 and told authorities her child was hit by a car in the parking lot.FHP investigating after 3-year-old struck, killed

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A recent wave of bad publicity an election defeat after six terms, the recent voiding of wrongful convictions won on his watch and a corruption investigation into his use of criminal forfeiture funds is threaten ing Hynes legacy. Federal and state au thorities are investigating allegations that Hynes funneled more than $200,000 in forfeiture money from drug and other criminal in vestigations into his failed re-election campaign. The probe was prompted by a scathing report by the citys De partment of Investigation that concluded the misuse of funds could amount to larceny. Its a very depressing thing to see someone who had been a courageous prosecutor have things come to an end like this, said Kenneth Sherrill, a retired politics professor at Hunter College. You really have to ask, how could an old pro like Hynes screw up this badly? A lawyer for Hynes, Robert Schwartz, said his 79-year-old client stands by his record and denies any wrongdoing. He is a law-abiding prosecutor, a law-abiding citizen and a good man, Schwartz said Friday. One victim was chased onto a highway where he was killed by a car. I realized we were looking at more than a fatal combination of race and violence, Hynes wrote in a book about the case. We were looking at a trag edy. And that trage dy would consume the next year of my life. Hynes ended up winning three convictions for manslaughter and persuaded a judge to impose stiff sentences. The fame fueled a victo ry in his rst run for dis trict attorney in 1989. The prosecutor earned a solid reputation, in part by pioneering programs that directed drug offenders into treatment programs and sought to reduce recidivism by helping parolees get housing and steady jobs. In the 2013 elec tion, he was endorsed by old-guard politicians like former Mayor David Dinkins and a former congressman, the Rev. Floyd Flake. But Hynes challengers were able to exploit a brewing scandal sparked by the dismissal of a man who was convicted of murder based on new evidence showing that a detective had coached a witness to pick him out of a lineup. Dozens of other cases are under re view amid allegations that his ofce used taint ed evidence to win other murder convictions. How did this hap pen on his watch? the eventual winner, Ken neth Thompson, asked during the campaign. Hynes left ofce with other baggage a pending $150 million lawsuit brought by a Brooklyn murder sus pect who accused his of ce of withholding evidence and knowingly allowing false testimo ny. The suspects lawyers have alleged that the misconduct was so per vasive that Hynes had to have known about it. Things got worse this month with the disclosure that the city had investigated Hynes use of forfeiture funds. The probe focused on 6,000 subpoenaed emails ex changed among Hynes, a judge, a consultant and others in the 18 months before the election. The Department of Investigation concluded that there was evidence he was using his ofcial email account for campaigning. It also found the consultant on the books as work ing for the Brooklyn DA press ofce actually had been paid $200,000 to advise his campaign. In one email to the judge, Hynes attacked the accuracy of a news paper op-ed piece ti tled Dump Hynes. Referring to the editorials author, Hynes wrote, Lying is his thing. In another, he wrote the judge while preparing for a debate, asking, How does this look for an opening statement? AP FILE PHOTO In this Jan. 19, 1988 photo, Charles Hynes, right, special prosecutor in the Howard Beach trial, waits to add his comments as the Rev. Al Sharpton, left, speaks at a celebration of Martin Luther King Jr.s birthday in New York. Once high-flying prosecutor faces threat to his legacy

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CASSIDYAssociated PressATLANTA Jason Carter, former President Jimmy Car ters grandson, stepped into the pulpit of South Columbus United Methodist Church for a Palm Sunday sermon and offered a message of Chris tian responsibility to the poor, with his phone in hand. How many of you have the Bible (app) on your phone? I bet all of you do, Carter said to laughs from the crowd. Worshippers listened as the Democrat running for Geor gia governor read from his phone a New Testament verse about the importance of things that are not seen. The technology has changed in the four decades since Jimmy Carter spoke openly about his religious beliefs while campaigning, rst for Georgia governor and then president. But the broader message of a shared faith remains the same. Religion offers a powerful connection with many in the South, considered the most religious part of the country. Some Democrats hoping to reverse Republican gains in Georgia and elsewhere are nding their faith can be a valuable way to reach voters. Religion can be a very per sonal matter, and candidates vary in how much they are willing to talk about their faith. In Kentucky, Democratic U.S. Sen. candidate Ali son Lundergan Grimes hasnt spoken much publicly about her Catholic upbringing. But in Georgia, U.S. Sen. candidate Michelle Nunn high lighted her faith in an early TV ad about her grandmother, whom she called Mama. I remember as a child, go ing to church with Mama, ev ery Sunday in Perry and learning how we live out our faith by helping others, Democrat Nunn says as an image of her as a young child sitting in church ashes on the screen. Nunn, in an interview, said faith is a powerful bond shared by many. Raised Methodist, she attends church in Atlanta and is raising her two children in the Methodist faith. I think that faith is certain ly something that transcends political parties, Nunn said. The reason I decided to talk about it is because its an important part of who I am. Sometimes, candidates are even more direct in high lighting their religious beliefs. U.S. Sen. Mark Pryor of Ar kansas, one of the most vulnerable Democrats up for re-election this year, is trying to win over those who might disagree with his vote for the federal health care law but who might be willing to sup port someone who calls the Bible his compass. In a statewide TV ad late last year, Pryor said: The Bi ble teaches us no one has all the answers: only God does. And neither political party is always right. In the Kentucky race, Grimes is said to pray before campaign events and had a priest with the family on the night of the primary election, but she rarely mentions her faith during campaign stops. Its particularly interesting given that when her father, Jerry Lundergan, was chair man of Kentuckys Demo cratic Party, he pushed it to embrace religion, arguing Democrats should not let Re publicans dene themselves as the party of faith. For me, your actions speak louder than words, Grimes said in a recent interview. And while you may not hear it in my public comments, (my faith) is the underly ing tone I think that has kept this campaign on the ground of putting people instead of partisan politics rst. Nationally, Kentucky and Georgia may represent the Democrats best hopes to thwart a Republican plan to take control of the U.S. Sen ate. Both Grimes and Nunn are considered to be strong recruits who have already proved to be prolic fundrais ers. Religion could offer them an important way to expand their base of support and bring in more rural voters. For Democrats who are disadvantaged politically in the region, its one way for them to at least attempt to neutralize the impact or the advantage that religiosity has for the Republican Party, said Andra Gillespie, an Em ory University political science professor. If you have a Democrat who can make credible claims of faith that might actually help to under mine support for the Republican candidate at least on the issue of, Does this per son share my values? Regardless of party afliation, the South has the high est concentration of people who identify themselves as religious. Gallup polling last year found that the most religious states in the country were in the South. Among those, 52 percent in Georgia said they were very religious, while 49 percent in Kentucky reported the same. A Gallup survey earlier this year found that Southern Democrats are much more likely to say religion is an im portant part of their daily life about 74 percent, com pared with 57 percent of Dem ocrats from outside the South. In Georgia, Carter, a 38-year-old state senator from Atlanta, is in a tough battle to oust Gov. Nathan Deal four years after Republicans claimed every statewide ofce. Carter must pick up votes in rural Georgia, wooing those who used to vote Democratic in state elections but have moved over to the GOP in the past two decades. When Carters grandfather ran for governor, he featured his faith prominently in campaign literature, describing himself as a lifelong churchman who taught the Bible to children of Navy families while at the U.S Naval Acade my. The younger Carter has so far kept discussion about his faith to church visits across the state in recent months. In an interview, Carter said he doesnt think about how faith affects his campaign but more about how it affects him personally. Its incredibly important to me personally, it drives who I am and it drives what I do and how I make decisions, Carter said. People have to be authentic about who they are and where they come from. What people want in our political world is to understand where our leaders come from.Faith offers valuable connection for Southern Dems JOHN BAZEMORE / AP Georgia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jason Carter, left, sits with his grandparents Rosalynn and Jimmy Carter during a church service in Plains, Ga.

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Monday, June 30, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 365-6442ShoppesofLakeVillage(next to LakeSquareMall)PublixShoppingCenter I havesufferedwith teeth problemsallofmyadultlife. rfrnftb ftttt r tft rf ffft ftr t r t tr t t rfftftt ttfft frntfft trffb ftrft MOSTINSURANCESACCEPTEDFINANCING AV AILABLE*X-ray s notincluded.License # DN1438 9FREECONSUL TA TIONNewPatients$85 Va lueDr Va ziri & Staff www. LeadingDental.com r f ntbftf t f *X-Raysnotincluded.Thepatientandanyotherpersonresponsibleforpaymenthasarighttorefusetopay,cancelpaymentorbereimbursedforpaymentforanyotherservice, ex aminationor treatmentwhichisperformedasaresultofanwithin72hoursofrespondingtotheadvertisementfortreatment.Proudlycelebrating20YEARSinLeesburg. Proudly ce lebrating20YEARSinLeesburg.Exp.06/30/2014 D0 0259 5 ysnot in cluded. Ex p. 07/31/2014 ERIC TUCKERAssociated PressWASHINGTON The rst prosecution arising from the Benghazi attacks is playing out in the federal court house blocks from both the White House and Capitol Hill, an appropriate setting for a case that has drawn stark lines between President Barack Obama and Re publicans in Congress. The criminal proceed ings could provide new insights into the 2012 at tacks that killed four Americans and will serve as the latest test of the U.S. legal systems ability to handle terrorism suspects captured overseas. Unfolding during an election year, the case against alleged master mind Ahmed Abu Khattala could help shape the legacies of Obama and Attorney General Eric Holder, and spill over into the potential 2016 presidential candidacy of Hillary Rodham Clinton. Untangling the law from the politics may prove especially challenging for the public, given how prominent the attacks on the diplo matic compound in the eastern Libyan city have become in U.S. political discourse. Whats going to mat ter to the public more than anything else is the result, and I think its going to only diffuse some of the ongoing Benghazi conspiracy theories if the Obama administration is going to be able to successfully obtain a conviction in this case, said Ameri can University law pro fessor Stephen Vladeck, a national security law expert. Still, he said the case raises the same legal issues as past terror ism prosecutions and should not by itself be viewed as a referendum on the Obama administration. The story of this case is not the story of the Obama administrations reaction to Benghazi, he added. The sto ry of this case is those who were responsible for Benghazi and those who need to be held ac countable for the four deaths that resulted. A 10-minute court ap pearance amid tight security Saturday was the American publics rst concrete sense of Abu Khatalla, the Libyan militant accused by the U.S. government of being a ringleader of attacks on Sept. 11, 2012. U.S. special forces captured him in Libya during a nighttime raid two weeks ago, and he was transported to the U.S. aboard a Navy ship, where he was interrogated by federal agents. He was own by military he licopter to Washington. Prosecutors have yet to reveal details about their case, although the broad outlines are in a two-page indictment unsealed Saturday. He pleaded not guilty to a single conspiracy charge punishable by up to life in prison, but the Justice Department expects to bring additional charges soon that could be more substantial and carry more dire consequences. For instance, a threecount criminal complaint led last year and unsealed after his capture charged Abu Khattala with killing a per son during an attack on a federal facility a crime that carries the death penalty. His capture revived a debate on how to treat suspected terrorists from foreign countries, as criminal defendants with the protections of the U.S. legal system or as enemy combat ants who should be interrogated for intelligence purposes and put through the military tribunal process at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. If were doing to do this for everybody en gaged in terrorism around the world, wed better start building prisons by the dozens, Rep. Mike Rogers, R-Mich., chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, said Sunday on CNNs State of the Union. He questioned the sheer expense, the manpower, the plan ning in preparing this criminal case. The Justice Department considers that discussion moot. Though a 2009 plan to prosecute several Guan tanamo Bay detainees in New York City was aborted because of political opposition, Holder has said successful terrorism cases in U.S. courts most recently the March conviction in New York of Osama bin Ladens son-in-law shows the civilian justice systems capability to handle such defendants. Experts say the Justice Department would not have embarked on Abu Khattalas capture and prosecution if it didnt feel comfortable after the case. Benghazi case unfolds against political backdrop JOSE LUIS MAGANA / AP U.S. Marshalls move outside the federal U.S. District Court in Washington Saturday, after security was heightened in anticipation of a possible court appearance by captured Libyan militant Ahmed Abu Khattala later in the day.

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DORASunris e Dent al Tr i-D ental r ffnt bb fConsultation and Second Op inion No Ch arge!n t t NEW PA TIENTSPECIAL COMPLETESETOFX-RAYS(D0210) CLEANINGBYHYGIENIST(D110) EX AMINATIONBY DO CTOR(D0150) SECONDOPINION$49Reg.$155(INABSENCEOFGUMDISEASE ) D002409 DAVID MCHUGHAssociated PressKIEV, Ukraine Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko tried to keep his peace plan to settle the conict with pro-Russian separatists on track in a four-way phone call Sunday with Russian President Vladimir Putin and the leaders of France and Germany. The two-hour conversation came ahead of a Mon day deadline that European Union leaders set for Russia and the separatists to take steps to ease the violence, warning that otherwise they were ready at any time to impose further punitive measures. German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French Presi dent Francois Hollande encouraged the Ukrainian and Russian presidents to work on meeting the EU conditions, Hollandes ofce said in a statement. The EUs demands included the return of three border checkpoints to Ukrainian control, veri cation of the cease-re by monitors from the Organization for Security and Cooper ation in Europe, and talks to put Poroshenkos peace plan in place. The call was the latest in a series of discussions the four leaders have held in recent weeks in an effort to stop the ghting that has killed more than 400 people since April. A cease-re in place since June 20 has been shaky, with each side accusing the other of numerous violations. A statement issued by Poroshenkos ofce said he under lined Ukraines willingness to maintain the cease-re at least until Monday evening, but expressed concern about the situation, noting what he said were multiple violations of the truce by separatist ghters. He called on Putin to strengthen border con trols from the Russian side to stop what Ukraine says is the ow of weapons, ghters and mercenaries. The sides agreed that more talks among representatives of Ukraine, Russia and the separatists would convene very soon, Poroshenkos ofce said. A Kremlin statement said the four leaders discussed having OSCE monitors sta tioned at the border cross ing points. They also dis cussed issues resulting from Ukraines signing of a broad trade deal with the EU on Friday despite Russias ob jections. Russian ofcials have said Ukraines tariff-free trade arrangement with Russia may be withdrawn, but no trade sanctions have yet been announced. In another indication that tensions remain high, several hundred Ukrainian soldiers and activists gathered out side the presidential admin istration in Kiev on Sunday to demand that Poroshenko lift the cease-re and allow them to resume their ght. A presidential administration ofcial, Henadiy Zubko, promised to pass on their demands to the president, but told them that the cease-re order would remain in effect until 10 / p.m. Monday. Soldiers also addressed several thousand people who turned out for the tradition al Sunday rally on Independence Square in central Kiev. Another EU condition was fullled late Saturday, when pro-Russia separatists released a second team of four OSCE observers who had been held captive in east ern Ukraine since the end of May. The rst team of four was freed last week. The free-trade pact that Ukraine signed with the EU was the very deal that the former Ukrainian president dumped under pressure from Moscow in November, fueling huge protests that eventually drove him from power. Moscow responded to those events by annexing the mainly Russian-speaking Crimean Peninsula in March, and the pro-Russia insurgen cy in eastern Ukraine broke out a month later. The United States and the EU have slapped travel bans and asset freezes on mem bers of Putins inner circle, and threatened to impose more crippling sanctions against entire sectors of Rus sias economy if the Kremlin fails to de-escalate the crisis.Ukraine president talks to Putin, Merkel, Hollande SERGEI CHUZAVKOV / AP People shout slogans during a rally in Independence Square in Kiev, Ukraine, on Sunday. ASHOK SHARMAAssociated PressNEW DELHI Police in southern India de tained ve construction company ofcials Sun day as rescuers using gas cutters and shovels searched for dozens of workers believed bur ied in the rubble of a building that collapsed during monsoon rains. It was one of two weekend building collaps es that killed at least 26 people. Nearly 90 contract workers were believed to have been in the basement of the 11-sto ry structure to collect their wages when it collapsed Saturday on the outskirts of Chen nai, the capital of Tam il Nadu state. Police said eight died on the spot and another seven succumbed to in juries in a hospital. An other 20 people have been pulled out alive. J. Jayalalitha, the states top elected of cial, visited the site on Sunday and said an other 40 people may still be trapped under the debris, according to the Press Trust of India news agency. Rescuers could hear feeble voices in the de bris, said T.S. Sridhar, the disaster manage ment agency commissioner. Ofcials used gas cutters, iron rods and shovels after cranes lifted concrete blocks to get to the survivors. Removing debris is a major challenge. It may take two to three days to clear the rubble, said S.P. Selvam, who is head ing the rescue operation. Moderate to heavy rains hampered rescue efforts later Sunday, but these were continuing, said police ofcer Pushpraj, who uses one name. George Fernandes, another police ofcer, said two directors, two engineers and one su pervisor of the con struction company, Prime Sristi, were de tained for questioning as authorities began in vestigating the collapse. Balaguru, one of the builders, said the structure collapsed possibly due to the impact of lightning. Usually, once the construction gets over we install the equip ment to prevent the building from a thunder strike. It was nearing completion, the Press Trust of India news agency quoted Balagu ru, who uses one name, as saying. Earlier Saturday, 11 people died and one survivor was being treated in a hospital af ter a four-story, 50-yearold structure toppled in an area of New Delhi inhabited by the poor, said re service ofcer Praveer Haldiar. Most homes in that part of the capital were built without permission and using substandard materials, police ofcer Madhur Verma said.26 dead in India building collapses ARUN SANKAR / APA rescuer, left checks his mobile phone as they search amid the rubble of a building that collapsed late Saturday during monsoon rains on the outskirts of Chennai, India, on Sunday. HYUNG-JIN KIMAssociated PressSEOUL, South Korea North Ko rea said Friday that leader Kim Jong Un has guided the test launches of its newly developed precision guid ed missiles, in a possible reference to three short-range projectiles South Korean ofcials say the North red toward its waters a day earlier. South Korean defense ofcials said the projectiles red from an eastern port city Thursday ew about 190 kilometers (120 miles) before harm lessly landing into the waters off its east coast. The exact type of those projectiles and the Norths intentions werent immediately known. The Norths state media said Fri day that the country tested what it calls cutting-edge ultra-precision tactical guided missiles and Kim watched the tests with top deputies and was satised with the results. There is virtually no way to independently conrm whether North Korea has developed such high-tech missiles. North Korea has frequent ly bluffed and exaggerated about its military capability, and its army, though one of the worlds largest, is seen as running on outdated equip ment and short supplies amid the nations chronic economic problems, according to foreign analysts. Still, the impoverished North de votes much of its scarce resourc es to its missile and nuclear programs, which subsequently pose a serious threat to South Korea, Ja pan and tens of thousands of U.S. troops in the region. Outside analysts say North Korea has developed a handful of crude nuclear devices and is working toward building a warhead small enough to mount on a long-range missile, although most experts say that goal may take years to achieve. The North didnt say when the latest launches took place or how many missiles were red, but they are likely the projectiles that Seoul says North Korea red Thursday as there have been no other such re ported rings by North Korea in re cent days.North Korea tests new precision-guided missiles DIAA HADIDAssociated PressIRBIL, Iraq Thousands of Iraqi Chris tians ocked back to their homes in the north on Sunday, days after they ed villages under attack by Sunni Muslim extremists. Hundreds of peo ple packed into cars, jeeps and buses were crossing a checkpoint on their way back af ter ruling Kurdish forces told them it was safe to return. The cluster of villages is in an area known as Hamdaniya, some 45 miles (75 kilometers) inside the border of the largely autonomous Kurdish-held region. It came under attack Wednesday by Sunni insurgents near the northern city of Mosul, led by the al-Qaida inspired Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant. The Sunni insurgents red mortar shells on the outskirts of the vil lage, panicking thousands of residents who thought extremists would overrun their villages. Christians in Iraq have warned that their ancient communitys sur vival is in danger since the Sunni insurgency seized swathes of north ern Iraq, including their ancient heartland of Ni nevah and Mosul. Community leaders estimate there were some 1.5 million Christians in Iraq before the U.S.-led invasion in 2003. Since then, the countrys general violence and attacks tar geting Christians have caused over half the community to ee.Iraqi Christians return to villages HUSSEIN MALLA / AP Displaced Iraqi Christian families, who ed from the villages of Hamdaniya near the northern city of Mosul, gather outside a temporary shelter, in Irbil, Iraq, on Sunday.

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Monday, June 30, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A9 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 C ourage has always been a relative sort of thing. We consider it, reect ed through both our person al prisms of perspective and the evolving context of time. These days, someone like Jason Collins, who announces his homosexuality to the sports world, is hailed as courageous, even though its much more likely that a high-prole athlete who comes out will be heralded, not hounded. A Republican who supports gay marriage or a Democrat who declares herself to be pro-life are looked upon as heroic in some circles, and while they show a refreshing willingness to stray from the reservation, theyre not exactly candidates for the Bronze Star. And then you have student jour nalists who have a problem with the word Redskin and ban any one from printing that scurrilous term in the school newspaper. Some call them courageous. Others, like me, think that they need to take an AP course in humility. So, yes, the idea of courage has evolved over time, and I would suggest that its become cheapened by our reduced standards of what is honorable, important and benecial to society. I cringe whenever a reader calls me brave for speaking my mind. Thats not bravery, its bravado. Theres a big difference. Fifty years ago, during a hot Southern summer in another place called Philadelphia, real courage found a home. It settled in the hearts and minds of all different types of people: young, not-so-young, Jews, priests and nuns, laborers and lawyers, men, women, children. Freedom Summer was a time when speaking your mind, coming out for equality, attacking the bigotry of acts and not merely offensive words, and literally putting your body between the victims and the victimizers was common. I was 2 years old that summer, so I have no personal memories. Fortunately, I dont need them. Grainy black-and-white photographs; archival voice recordings; books about the murder of Chaney, Schwerner and Goodman; documentaries all these things are artifacts that, far from being fossilized in media amber, bear striking witness to the bonre of righteous purpose. That courage did not die with the people who had it. That courage turns 50 this year, and as long as we remember, it will remain immortal. To a society that trumpets courage too easily, except for those instances when it should be noticed, as on the battleeld or in the seless heart of a rst responder, the type of bravery exhibited by the so-called Freedom Riders is hard to comprehend. Going down to Mississippi to speak truth to corrupted power carried with it the possibility of no return trip home, as two Jewish boys from New York found out when they were ambushed by the Klan, murdered and thrown into a ditch alongside their black companion. That happened 50 years ago last week. The fact that it took four decades for anyone to actually pay for that crime is an example of how poisonous that climate was, and how deeply that poison seeped into the culture of the place. While we in this northern Philadelphia cant pat ourselves on the back about our tolerance (because I heard the N-word an awful lot growing up in Logan and then Delaware County), the South was a place apart, a place where the Klan laid down the law at night and lled the ofces of power by day. Freedom Summer lasted for a season, but its repercussions were felt for many more. As Ive often mentioned in these pages, my father took his own bus trip down to Mississippi, in June 1967. It was a time when a movie like In The Heat of the Night still felt like front-page news, and Martin Luther King was 10 months away from becoming immortal. Ted Flowers had just gotten his law degree from Temple, and chose to break it in down south. Daddy registered voters, defended indigents and went toeto-toe with caricatures of humanity in bureaucratic town halls. He also had his own runin with the Klan, at night, coming back from a diner dinner that included some great food and some uncomfortable glares. For tunately, a kid who grew up on the streets of West Philly was at least in this instance able to take care of himself. It was easy for those who didnt live shoulder to shoulder with Jim Crow to look at some of those Freedom Riders as troublemakers. Daddy knew the truth, even three years on, and he wrote about it in the journal he kept: But the people who really impress me are the impoverished negro and the volunteer whites. They are not beatniks, or communists, or radicals. They are ne individuals, worthy of respect. The young students down here for the summer go out into the remote rural areas and assume considerable risks to help. I wish I had their courage. Courage is a precious commodity. Today, we have trouble recognizing it. But there was once a summer when it was in abundant supply.Christine M. Flowers is a lawyer and columnist for the Philadelphia Daily News. Readers may send her email at cowers1961@gmail.com.OTHERVOICES Christine M. FlowersMCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Real courage, and that summer of it Better late than never, the American pub lic has been provided with a redacted version of a Justice Department memo offering a legal rationale for the targeting of Anwar Awlaki, the U.S.-born al-Qaida gure who was killed in a drone strike in Yemen in 2011. The document was made public Mon day after the Obama administration decid ed not to appeal a court order that it be dis closed. The basic legal rationale for targeting Awlaki has long been known. In fact, the U.S. 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals ordered the memos release precisely because so much of the ar gument has seeped into the public domain as the result of speeches by administration ofcials and the publication last year of a 16page white paper. Still, the release of the actual 2010 memo prepared by Justice Department ofcial David Barron (now a federal judge) is an important, if overdue, exercise in transparency. Is the memo persuasive? Only to a limited degree. It plausibly concludes that, under the Authorization for Use of Military Force passed by Congress after 9/11, the military or CIA may target a U.S. citizen abroad who has joined the enemy and whose activities pose a continued and imminent threat to Americans. But the memo doesnt precisely dene imminent, and other statements by administration of cials suggest that they are employing an omi nously elastic interpretation of that term. For example, the white paper said that the govern ment may target an American for death even in the absence of clear evidence that a specif ic attack on U.S. persons or interests will take place in the immediate future. Then there is the question of whether the government should try to capture a U.S. cit izen suspected of terrorism instead of killing him. The Barron memo approves of assassina tion when capture is not impossible but mere ly infeasible. That is too vague a standard. The version of the memo released by the appeals court Monday is missing several pages that apparently contain evidence that Awlaki had ceased being merely a propagandist for al-Qaida and had participated in planning attacks. Now as before the release of the memo, Americans must take it on faith that Awlaki had to be killed. That isnt satisfactory. When Awlaki was killed, we argued that if the United States was going to engage in state-sponsored assassination of U.S. citizens, at the minimum it must explain in detail why someone has been tar geted. Welcome as the release of the Barron memo is, it doesnt meet that standard.Distributed by MCT Information Services.AVOICEOfficially, why it was OK for the U.S. government to kill Awlaki Classic DOONESBURY 1975

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MIKE CORDERAssociated PressFORTALEZA, Brazil Klaas Jan Huntelaar and Wesley Sneijder scored late goals Sunday to give the Netherlands a 2-1 victory over Mexico and a spot in the World Cup quarternals. Huntelaar, who came on as a 76th-minute substitute, scored the winning goal from the penalty spot deep in in jury time after Rafael Marquez brought down Arjen Robben in the area. You dont know when your chance will come, but it was today, and so you grab it with both hands, said Hunt elaar, who was making his rst appearance at this years World Cup. And it was fantastic. Giovani Dos Santos gave the Mexicans the lead in the 48th min ute, but Sneijder equal ized for the Dutch in the 88th. It was the rst time Sneijder, who scored ve goals at the last World Cup in South Af rica, has found the net in Brazil. Robben has already scored three goals for the Dutch at this years tournament, but after earning the late penal ty, he handed the ball to Huntelaar. Klaas is a great penalty taker. He was fresh, had just come on and I had faith in him, Robben said. I asked him if he wanted to take it and he was very sure of himself. Huntelaar and Sneijder scored the goals at the hot and steamy Arena Castelao, but it was Netherlands coach Louis van Gaal that may just deserve the cred it for making a crucial tactical change during the second of two of cial cooling breaks. As he did earlier against Australia, the master tactician again switched his team around in the second half, changing from the more defensive 5-3-2 system to the traditional Dutch attacking 4-3-3 formation. Yes, we escaped, Van Gaal said. But we showed that we could create more chances with 4-3-3, and the players handled this shift very well. Van Gaal said he made his critical switch during the second-half break, huddling with his players as they drank from bottles on the sideline. I moved to Plan B at the cooling break after (Mexico goalkeeper Guillermo) Ochoa made an amazing save, said Van Gaal, soon to be the manager at Manchester United. SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 30, 2014www.dailycommercial.comGOLF: Rose wins title in playoff / B4 NATACHA PISANRENKO / AP Netherlands Klaas-Jan Huntelaar celebrates after scoring his sides second and decisive goal during the World Cup round of 16 soccer match against Mexico on Sunday at the Arena Castelao in Fortaleza, Brazil. The Netherlands won the match 2-1. LEO CORREA / AP Mexicos head coach Miguel Herrera celebrates the opening goal during the World Cup round of 16 soccer match against Netherlands on Sunday in Fortaleza, Brazil.Stunning UpsetHuntelaars shot from penalty spot gives Netherlands 2-1 win over MexicoToday it was the man with the whistle who eliminated us from the World Cup. Miguel HerreraMexico coach, on penalty shot goal that sealed teams defeat Rafael Nadal of Spain plays a return to Mikhail Kukushkin of Kazakhstan during their mens singles match on Saturday in London.BEN CURTIS / APBig 4 around for Wimbledons Week 2, not so for women ZACHARY HANKLESpecial to the Daily CommercialWINTER GARDEN The Leesburg Light ning saw their twogame winning streak snapped by Winter Garden on Saturday in the rst game of a dou bleheader at Winter Garden West Orange High School. Chaz Boyer scored on a sacrice y by Damon Haecker to give the Squeeze a 2-1 win in walk-off fashion. The second game was not completed in time for this edition. Leesburg scored its lone run in the third in ning on a sacrice bunt by Garrett Suggs, which scored Brad Antchak, who opened the inning with an ineld hit. In the fth inning, Winter Garden scored when Zane Ancell raced ohm on ground out by Haecker. The Lightning had a chance to take the lead in the sixth inning with Shea Pierce on third base, but Pierce was thrown out at home by Squeeze centerelder Matt McLean on a y out by Brett Jones. Brandon Caples took the loss, his second in six decisions this season. Pierce, Antchak and Igor Baez paced the Lightning with two hits apiece. Leesburg wraps up its series against the Squeeze at 1 / p .m. to day in Winter Garden. GAIL BURTON / AP Tampa Bay Rays Ben Zobrist is safe at the plate on a double by Matt Joyce in the sixth inning on Sunday in Baltimore. DAVID GINSBURGAP Sports WriterBALTIMORE Matt Joyce homered twice, had a career-high ve hits and drove in four runs to power the Tampa Bay Rays past the Bal timore Orioles 12-7 Sunday. Tampa Bay totaled 11 extra base hits ve homers and six doubles. The Rays trailed 4-3 be fore Kevin Kiermaier and Logan Forsythe went deep during a seven-run sixth inning that sent many in the crowd of 32,665 scattering toward the exits. Joyce doubled in the rst inning, hit a solo shot in the third, singled in both the fth and sixth in nings and added a two-run drive in the seventh. His ve hits and 12 total bases tied club records.Lightning suffer 7-2 defeat by Squeeze DENNIS PASSAAssociated PressLONDON The socalled Big 4 who have won 35 of 37 of the past Grand Slam singles titles Novak Djokov ic, Rafael Nadal, Andy Murray and Roger Fed erer are all around for the second week at Wimbledon, joined by the new major winner on the block, Australian Open champion Stan Wawrinka. The same cant be said on the womens side, where top-seeded and ve-time champion Serena Williams wont see any action at the All England Club in Week 2 except in doubles with her sister Venus, another ve-time Wimbledon winner who is also out of singles. With Serena out and second-seeded Li Na also a third-round los er, it marks the rst time in the Open era that the top two womens seeds havent advanced to Wimbledons fourth round. Williams, who has 17 Grand Slam singles titles, hadnt been knocked out of Wimbledon so soon since 2005, but has departed before the quarternals at four of the past ve majors. WTA founder Billie Jean King, winner of Joyce homers twice as Rays beat Orioles 12-7SEE RAYS | B2SEE TENNIS | B2SEE UPSET | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 30, 2014 SUNmon tu es we dthursfriSatLeesburgLightningJune29-July5WinterGardenAW AY1pmCollegeParkHOME7pmCollegeParkHOME7pmCollegeParkAW AY7pmWinterParkHOME6pmWinterParkHOME7pm NASCAR Sprint Cup-Quaker State 400 ResultsSaturday At Kentucky Speedway Sparta, Ky. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (1) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 267 laps, 150 rating, 48 points. 2. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 267, 121.5, 43. 3. (7) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 267, 116.7, 41. 4. (14) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 267, 100.8, 40. 5. (29) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 267, 104.6, 39. 6. (3) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 267, 106.2, 38. 7. (5) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 267, 109.2, 37. 8. (20) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 267, 101.1, 36. 9. (2) Joey Logano, Ford, 267, 117.2, 36. 10. (25) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 267, 88.6, 34. 11. (13) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 267, 78.6, 33. 12. (9) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 267, 85.8, 32. 13. (27) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 267, 73.8, 31. 14. (24) Greg Bife, Ford, 267, 72.8, 30. 15. (12) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 267, 89.6, 29. 16. (16) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 267, 84.7, 28. 17. (23) Carl Edwards, Ford, 267, 65, 27. 18. (32) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 267, 66.7, 26. 19. (19) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 267, 63.6, 25. 20. (26) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 267, 57.4, 24. 21. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 267, 71.8, 23. 22. (15) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 266, 72.2, 22. 23. (11) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 266, 74.9, 21. 24. (28) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 266, 51.4, 20. 25. (21) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 266, 56.3, 19. 26. (17) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 266, 55.7, 18. 27. (31) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 265, 46.7, 17. 28. (30) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 264, 48.2, 16. 29. (34) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 263, 43.5, 15. 30. (41) David Gilliland, Ford, 263, 41.7, 14. 31. (36) David Ragan, Ford, 262, 38.7, 13. 32. (37) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 262, 35.9, 0. 33. (39) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 261, 33.7, 11. 34. (35) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 259, 36.9, 10. 35. (38) David Stremme, Chevrolet, 257, 32.7, 9. 36. (33) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 255, 27.5, 8. 37. (8) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 250, 69.5, 7. 38. (40) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 239, 27.9, 0. 39. (22) Aric Almirola, Ford, accident, 175, 67.8, 5. 40. (6) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, accident, 75, 66.1, 4. 41. (42) Mike Bliss, Toyota, transmission, 30, 27.4, 0. 42. (4) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, accident, 27, 46.6, 2.GOLF BMW International Open Leading Scores Sunday At Gut Larchenhof Golf Club Pulheim, Germany Purse: $2.72 million Yardage: 7,228; Par: 72 Final Fabrizio Zanotti 72-67-65-65 269 Gregory Havret 71-65-67-66 269 Rafa Cabrera-Bello 64-68-70-67 269 Henrik Stenson 68-68-66-67 269 Thongchai Jaidee 71-66-68-65 270 Simon Dyson 69-66-69-66 270 Jamie Donaldson 71-67-65-67 270 Danny Willett 64-68-71-68 271 Emiliano Grillo 66-66-70-69 271 Thomas Bjorn 70-66-66-69 271 Pablo Larrazabal 69-63-67-72 271 Sergio Garcia 71-66-70-65 272 Anthony Wall 69-69-68-66 272 Shane Lowry 67-68-70-67 272 Paul Waring 72-63-69-68 272 Romain Wattel 67-68-69-68 272 Alex Cejka 68-66-69-69 272 Alexander Levy 70-67-66-69 272 Oliver Fisher 72-66-65-69 272 Francesco Molinari 71-66-65-70 272 Richard Green 72-68-62-70 272 Senior Players Championship Scores Sunday At Fox Chapel Golf Club Pittsburgh Purse: $2.7 million Yardage: 6,696; Par: 70 Final x-won on second playoff hole x-Bernhard Langer (810), $405,000 65-64-66-70 265 Jeff Sluman (476), $237,600 69-67-64-65 265 Russ Cochran (388), $194,400 70-66-63-67 266 Kenny Perry (322), $160,650 70-63-65-69 267 Mark McNulty (256), $128,250 66-66-71-66 269 Mark Brooks (168), $83,700 66-67-71-66 270 Joe Durant (168), $83,700 64-68-67-71 270 Bill Glasson (168), $83,700 67-64-68-71 270 Jay Haas (168), $83,700 69-70-65-66 270 Mark OMeara (168), $83,700 67-66-69-68 270 Corey Pavin (168), $83,700 65-69-69-67 270 John Cook (0), $54,900 69-66-70-66 271 Bob Gilder (0), $54,900 70-69-69-63 271 John Riegger (0), $54,900 68-64-69-70 271 Michael Allen (0), $43,200 68-64-69-71 272 Marco Dawson (0), $43,200 66-68-68-70 272 David Frost (0), $43,200 64-71-68-69 272 Doug Garwood (0), $43,200 64-67-71-70 272 Colin Montgomerie (0), $43,200 69-69-66-68 272 Barry Lane (0), $34,290 66-69-68-70 273 Tom Lehman (0), $34,290 67-69-66-71 273 Bart Bryant (0), $27,765 65-70-71-68 274 Tom Byrum (0), $27,765 69-70-69-66 274 Dan Forsman (0), $27,765 69-69-69-67 274 Rocco Mediate (0), $27,765 67-70-69-68 274 Loren Roberts (0), $27,765 68-66-71-69 274 Kirk Triplett (0), $27,765 70-70-69-65 274 Tommy Armour III (0), $21,384 66-70-66-73 275 Jeff Brehaut (0), $21,384 70-68-67-70 275 Brad Bryant (0), $21,384 67-69-70-69 275 Larry Mize (0), $21,384 65-69-72-69 275 Steve Pate (0), $21,384 65-71-69-70 275 Billy Andrade (0), $18,225 67-71-66-72 276 Mike Goodes (0), $18,225 74-68-68-66 276 Wayne Levi (0), $15,863 71-67-68-71 277 Joey Sindelar (0), $15,863 70-73-68-66 277 Esteban Toledo (0), $15,863 71-66-68-72 277 Willie Wood (0), $15,863 70-72-68-67 277 Olin Browne (0), $13,230 65-71-71-71 278 Peter Fowler (0), $13,230 65-68-71-74 278 Steve Lowery (0), $13,230 70-73-68-67 278 Gene Sauers (0), $13,230 69-72-68-69 278 Peter Senior (0), $13,230 70-70-67-71 278 Bobby Clampett (0), $11,070 67-69-69-74 279 Joe Daley (0), $11,070 71-70-70-68 279 Wes Short, Jr. (0), $11,070 65-71-73-70 279 Brad Faxon (0), $9,450 68-72-66-74 280 John Inman (0), $9,450 70-68-71-71 280 Chien Soon Lu (0), $9,450 72-70-70-68 280 Jeff Hart (0), $8,370 69-71-72-69 281 Rick Fehr (0), $7,290 71-70-70-71 282 Dick Mast (0), $7,290 69-70-69-74 282 Bob Tway (0), $7,290 66-78-70-68 282 Steve Jones (0), $6,075 72-65-74-72 283 Jim Rutledge (0), $6,075 72-70-74-67 283 Rod Spittle (0), $6,075 69-73-71-70 283 Bruce Vaughan (0), $6,075 71-68-73-71 283 Scott Dunlap (0), $4,995 74-67-70-73 284 Morris Hatalsky (0), $4,995 70-71-71-72 284 Gene Jones (0), $4,995 69-72-68-75 284 Hal Sutton (0), $4,995 74-70-72-68 284 Joel Edwards (0), $4,050 74-71-71-70 286 Tom Pernice Jr. (0), $4,050 72-72-69-73 286 Mark Wiebe (0), $4,050 74-69-72-71 286 Roger Chapman (0), $2,992 73-70-72-72 287 Anders Forsbrand (0), $2,992 72-73-75-67 287 Jeff Freeman (0), $2,992 74-67-71-75 287 Fred Funk (0), $2,992 71-70-76-70 287 Sandy Lyle (0), $2,992 72-73-70-72 287 Peter Jacobsen (0), $2,376 73-71-73-71 288 David Eger (0), $2,133 73-68-76-73 290 Gary Hallberg (0), $2,133 70-75-75-70 290 Scott Simpson (0), $1,836 72-73-76-70 291 Duffy Waldorf (0), $1,836 71-76-74-70 291 Hale Irwin (0), $1,620 73-72-74-73 292 Mark Mouland (0), $1,620 71-75-71-75 292 Mike Reid (0), $1,458 76-71-73-73 293 Jim Gallagher, Jr. (0), $1,350 75-74-74-72 295 Tom Kite (0), $1,242 76-76-71-76 299 SOCCERWorld Cup Glance ROUND OF 16 Saturday, June 28 Game 49 At Belo Horizonte, Brazil Brazil 1, Chile 1, Brazil advanced 3-2 on penalty kicks Game 50 At Rio De Janeiro Colombia 2, Uruguay 0 Sunday, June 29 Game 51 At Fortaleza, Brazil Netherlands 2, Mexico 1 Game 52 At Recife, Brazil Costa Rica 1, Greece 1, Costa Rica advanced 5-3 on penalty kicks June 30 Game 53 At Brasilia, Brazil France vs. Nigeria, 1600 GMT Game 54 At Porto Alegre, Brazil Germany vs. Algeria, 2000 GMT Tuesday, July 1 Game 55 At Sao Paulo Argentina vs. Switzerland, 1600 GMT Game 56 At Salvador, Brazil Belgium vs. United States, 2000 GMT QUARTERFINALS Friday, July 4 Game 57 At Fortaleza, Brazil Brazil vs. Colombia, 2000 GMT Game 58 At Rio De Janeiro Game 53 winner vs. Game 54 winner, 1600 GMT Saturday, July 5 Game 59 At Salvador, Brazil Netherlands vs. Game 52 winner, 2000 GMT Game 60 At Brasilia, Brazil Game 55 winner vs. Game 56 winner, 1600 GMT SEMIFINALS Tuesday, July 8 Game 61 At Belo Horizonte, Brazil Game 57 winner vs. Game 58 winner, 2000 GMT Wednesday, July 9 Game 62 At Sao Paulo Game 59 winner vs. Game 60 winner, 2000 GMT THIRD PLACE Saturday, July 12 Game 63 At Brasilia, Brazil Seminal losers, 2000 GMT FINAL Sunday, July 13 Game 64 At Rio De Janeiro Seminal winners, 1900 GMT Sundays Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League CLEVELAND INDIANS Recalled LHP TJ House from Columbus (IL). Optioned LHP Nick Hagadone to Columbus. OAKLAND ATHLETICS Recalled 1B Nate Freiman from Sacramento (PCL). Placed OF Josh Reddick on the 15day DL. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS Placed INF Chris Owings on the 15-day DL. Selected the contract of INF Nick Ahmed from Reno (PCL). Transferred INF Eric Chavez to the 60day DL. LOS ANGELES DODGERS Placed INF Justin Turner on the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Carlos Triunfel from Albuquer que (PCL). MIAMI MARLINS Reinstated OF Christian Yelich from the 15-day DL. Recalled LHP Dan Jennings from New Or leans (PCL). MILWAUKEE BREWERS Recalled INF Jeff Bianchi from Nashville (PCL). Assigned RHP Alfredo Figaro to Nashville. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS Recalled RHP Jorge Rondon from Memphis (PCL). Optioned RHP Eric Fornataro to Memphis. American Association AMARILLO SOX Signed INF Joe Weik and LHP Cameron Cuneo. Released LHP Eric Martinez. FARGO-MOORHEAD REDHAWKS Signed OF Dustin Robinson. Can-Am League TROIS-RIVIERES AIGLES Released INF Travis Weaver. FOOTBALL Canadian Football League WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS Signed WR Romby Bryant and DB Troy Stoudermire. MOTORSPORTS INDYCAR Fined Marco Andretti $2,500 for failing to heed to an order from race control during the June 28 race at the Grand Prix of Houston. COLLEGE TEXAS TECH Dismissed freshman DB Nigel Bethel II from the team following an incident at a campus recre ation center.SCOREBOARD FCSL STANDINGS W L .Pct GB Sanford 14 7 .667 Winter Garden 13 9 .591 1.5 Winter Park 13 9 .591 1.5 Leesburg 9 9 .500 3.5 DeLand 7 13 .350 6.5 College Park 5 14 .263 8 SUNDAYS GAMESWinter Garden 7, Leesburg 2 WInter Park 6, DeLand 2, 1st game WInter Park 4, DeLand 1, 2nd game Sanford 4, College Park 3 (12)TODAYS GAMESNone scheduledTUESDAYS GAMESCollege Park at Leesburg, 4 p.m. College Park at Leesburg, 7 p.m. Deland at Stanford, 7 p.m. Winter Park at Winter Garden, 7 p.m.TV2DAY MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7 p.m.ESPN, SUN Tampa Bay at N.Y. YankeesSOCCER NoonESPN FIFA, World Cup, round of 16, France vs. Nigeria, at Brasilia, Brazil4 p.m.ESPN FIFA, World Cup, round of 16, Germany vs. Algeria, at Porto Alegre, BrazilTENNIS 7 a.m.ESPN Wimbledon, fourth round, at London8 a.m.ESPN2 Wimbledon, fourth round, at London11:30 a.m.ESPNEWS Wimbledon, fourth round, at LondonAlthough the Orioles nally got Joyce out in the ninth with the outcome al ready decided, his 5-for6 performance upped his batting average 15 points to .274. Ben Zobrist also hom ered for the Rays, who took three of from Baltimore af ter starting the series with a 1-7 record against their AL East rivals. The 12 runs were Tampa Bays second-most this season be hind a 16-run outburst on April 19 against the Yankees. Alex Cobb (3-6) got the win despite giving up four runs and eight hits in ve innings. Manny Machado and Ryan Flaherty homered for the Orioles. Flaherty hit a three-run drive in the ninth to snap an 0-for-16 skid. The game turned in the seventh, when the Rays set season highs with sev en runs and seven hits. After Kiermaier homered off Evan Meek (0-3), Joyce sin gled in a run and James Loney delivered a two-run double. Brandon Guyer followed with an RBI double and Forsythe capped the barrage with a two-run homer off Brian Matusz. In the eighth, Joyce hit a shot to right to make it 12-4 and complete his third career two-homer game. Coming in, he had three home runs this season none since May 11. The 12 runs and 18 hits were the most allowed by Baltimore this season. Tampa Bay went up 1-0 in the rst inning when Desmond Jennings walked and scored on a double by Zobrist, who was thrown out trying to stretch it into a triple. After Joyce homered in the third, Nick Markakis doubled in the bottom half and came home on a twoout single by Steve Pearce. Machado put Baltimore up 3-2 with a two-run drive in the fourth. After Zobrist connected in the fth to tie it, Tampa Bay loaded the bases before Meek re placed starter Miguel Gon zalez and struck out For sythe. Gonzalez gave up three runs and eight hits in 4 2-3 innings, his shortest out ing in seven starts since May 5. Baltimore took the lead for the last time when Markakis scored on a passed ball to make it 4-3 in the sixth. NOTES: Tampa Bay faces the Yankees today. Rays RH Chris Archer will attempt to become the rst pitcher to win his rst ve games against the Yankees since Walter Johnson in 1907-08. ... Baltimore sends Ubaldo Jimenez to the mound in the opener of a four-game series against visiting Texas. ... The Rays played a fth straight game without shortstop Yunel Escobar, who has a sore right shoul der. Id really like to move this thing along one way or the other, manager Joe Maddon said. ... Markakis became the eighth player in Orioles history to have at least nine seasons with 100 hits. RAYS FROM PAGE B1 eight Grand Slam singles titles in the Open era, says she recalls going through a similar streak in her career. Most denitely, King said Sunday near Wimbledon when announcing Singapore as the new site of the WTA season-ending championships in October. Everybody does. But I think there might be some underlying things happening to her, some things off the court, that are affecting her. Im sure she will work them out. On a sunny but blus tery middle Sunday tra ditionally an off-day at Wimbledon most of the players remaining in the singles draw held sessions at the nearby Aorangi Park practice courts. Federer and Murray were there at the same time, although due to rain delays on Friday, Federer, like Nadal, wont play his fourthround match until Tuesday. Federer says hes amazed as anyone about the Big 4s ability to maintain such a stellar record in Grand Slam tournaments. I came through the ranks where it was normal for top guys to have a bad Slam, have maybe two bad Slams from time to time, but it barely happens anymore, Federer said. Its like such a shock when it does. I think Ive been sur prised how consistent Ive been personally, but even more so by everybody else who is just like normal to get to quarters, get to semis. Because I know how small the margins are. Djokovics chances of advancing might rest with his sore arm. He had an af ternoon training session Sunday to test his left arm and shoulder he injured in a nasty fall on Friday in his Centre Court win over Frances Gilles Simon. Djokovic lunged for a shot behind the baseline, tumbled on the grass and rolled over twice, his rack et ying from his hand. He thought he had dislocated his shoulder, but from what Djokovic says, it looked a lot worse than it was. Luckily there is nothing damaged, he said. I just came from the doctors ofce, ultrasound. Im quite condent that it will not affect my physical state or regimen or daily routine. I think its going to be ne. Djokovic will play the third match on Centre Court on Monday against 14th-seeded Jo-Wilfried Tsonga. Alize Cornet, who scored the biggest upset of the tournament when she beat Serena Williams on Satur day, opens Mondays play on Centre against Canadi an Eugenie Bouchard, who is the only woman to ad vance to the seminals of both Grand Slam tournaments this year. Defending champion Murray plays Kevin Ander son in the match follow ing. In third-round matches carried over due to Saturdays rain suspensions, Wawrinka is up against Denis Istomin to start play on Court 2 while Felicia no Lopez plays American John Isner on Court 3. The only other thirdround mens match to be completed is nearly there Kei Nishikori of Japan and Italys Simone Bolelli are 3-3 in the fth set, with the win ner to play Canadian Milos Raonic on Tuesday. British tabloids will no doubt have fun with the back-to-back love matches on Court 1 on Monday. TENNIS FROM PAGE B1 That is a good way to take advantage of those breaks. Ochoa had kept his team in the match with two great saves in the second half, but he was beaten by Sneijders powerful drive and guessed wrong when diving in an attempt to stop Huntelaars penalty. The Mexicans had conceded only one goal in three group matches and looked like they would keep an other clean sheet until the late col lapse. It was heartbreak again for Mex ico, which has now reached the second stage of the World Cup six straight times without winning. The last time the team made the quar ternals was when it hosted the tournament in 1986. After the nal whistle, the Mex ican players collapsed, distraught on the turf while many of their fans were in tears. Mexico coach Miguel Herrera blamed the referee for the loss, say ing Robben dived to earn the penalty. Today it was the man with the whistle who eliminated us from the World Cup, Herrera said. If a referee invents a penalty, youre out of the World Cup, Herre ra added. I hope they have a look at what happened and that this gen tleman goes home just like we are. It was the fourth straight win for the Netherlands at the World Cup after routing defending champion Spain 5-1 and beating Australia 3-2 and Chile 2-0 in Group B. The Dutch will next face Costa Rica in the quarternals on Satur day in Salvador.COSTA RICA 5, GREECE 3 IN SHOOTOUTRECIFE, Brazil Costa Rica beat Greece in a penalty shootout Sunday to reach the World Cup quar ternals for the rst time after de fending with 10 men for nearly an hour. Michael Umana scored the decisive penalty as Costa Rica won the shootout 5-3 after the game ended 1-1 following extra time. Greeces Theofanis Gekas saw his penalty saved by Costa Rica goalkeeper Keylor Navas for the only miss in the shootout. Costa Rica will play the Nether lands in the quarternals. Costa Rica had taken the lead ear ly in the second half through captain Bryan Ruiz but then had defender Oscar Duarte sent off in the 66th minute with a second yellow card for a mistimed tackle on Jose Holebas. UPSET FROM PAGE B1 BEN CURTIS / AP Roger Federer of Switzerland plays a return to Santiago Giraldo of Colombia on Saturday during their mens singles match at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships in London.

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Monday, June 30, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Toronto 45 39 .536 4-6 L-3 23-21 22-18 New York 41 38 .519 1 1 5-5 L-1 18-19 23-19 Baltimore 42 39 .519 1 1 5-5 L-2 19-21 23-18 Boston 37 44 .457 6 6 4-6 W-1 20-19 17-25 Tampa Bay 35 49 .417 10 10 6-4 W-2 19-25 16-24 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 44 34 .564 8-2 L-1 19-19 25-15 Kansas City 42 39 .519 3 1 3-7 W-1 21-22 21-17 Cleveland 39 42 .481 6 4 3-7 L-1 23-15 16-27 Chicago 39 44 .470 7 5 4-6 W-3 21-18 18-26 Minnesota 37 43 .463 8 6 5-5 W-1 19-17 18-26 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 51 30 .630 8-2 W-4 24-15 27-15 Los Angeles 45 35 .563 5 7-3 L-1 26-14 19-21 Seattle 44 38 .537 7 7-3 W-1 21-22 23-16 Texas 37 44 .457 14 6 2-8 L-1 18-23 19-21 Houston 36 47 .434 16 8 4-6 W-1 20-23 16-24 NATIONAL LEAGUEEAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 44 38 .537 7-3 W-4 20-18 24-20 Washington 43 38 .531 6-4 W-2 23-17 20-21 Miami 39 43 .476 5 5 3-7 L-4 25-21 14-22 New York 37 45 .451 7 7 5-5 L-1 17-21 20-24 Philadelphia 36 46 .439 8 8 2-8 L-4 18-27 18-19 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 51 33 .607 7-3 L-1 24-18 27-15 St. Louis 44 38 .537 6 5-5 L-1 23-17 21-21 Cincinnati 43 38 .531 6 8-2 W-5 19-18 24-20 Pittsburgh 42 40 .512 8 2 7-3 W-1 24-19 18-21 Chicago 34 46 .425 15 9 4-6 L-2 19-20 15-26 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY San Francisco 46 36 .561 3-7 L-4 24-21 22-15 Los Angeles 46 37 .554 7-3 W-1 20-21 26-16 Colorado 36 46 .439 10 8 2-8 W-1 20-19 16-27 Arizona 35 48 .422 11 9 5-5 W-2 15-30 20-18 San Diego 34 47 .420 11 9 5-5 L-3 19-23 15-24 SATURDAYS GAMESChicago White Sox 4, Toronto 3 L.A. Angels 6, Kansas City 2 Texas 5, Minnesota 0 Tampa Bay 5, Baltimore 4 Detroit 4, Houston 3 Oakland 7, Miami 6, 14 innings Boston 2, N.Y. Yankees 1 Cleveland 5, Seattle 0SATURDAYS GAMESWashington 3, Chicago Cubs 0, 1st game Washington 7, Chicago Cubs 2, 2nd game Atlanta 10, Philadelphia 3, 1st game Atlanta 5, Philadelphia 1, 2nd game N.Y. Mets 5, Pittsburgh 3 Milwaukee 7, Colorado 4 Oakland 7, Miami 6, 14 innings L.A. Dodgers 9, St. Louis 1 Cincinnati 7, San Francisco 3, 11 inningsSUNDAYS GAMESChicago White Sox 4, Toronto 0 Oakland 4, Miami 3 Tampa Bay 12, Baltimore 7 Houston 6, Detroit 4 Kansas City 5, L.A. Angels 4 Minnesota 3, Texas 2 Seattle 3, Cleveland 0 Boston at N.Y. Yankees, lateSUNDAYS GAMESOakland 4, Miami 3 Atlanta 3, Philadelphia 2 Pittsburgh 5, N.Y. Mets 2 Colorado 10, Milwaukee 4 Cincinnati 4, San Francisco 0 San Diego 2, Arizona 1 L.A. Dodgers 6, St. Louis 0 WILFREDO LEE / AP Miami Marlins Christian Yelich (21) is congratulated by Ed Lucas, left, and Garrett Jones, right, after Yelich tripled and scored on throwing error by Alberto Callaspo on Sunday in Miami.TODAYS GAMESTampa Bay (Archer 4-5) at N.Y. Yankees (Phelps 3-4), 7:05 p.m. Texas (J.Saunders 0-4) at Baltimore (U.Jimenez 2-8), 7:05 p.m. Oakland (Kazmir 9-3) at Detroit (A.Sanchez 5-2), 7:08 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Arrieta 4-1) at Boston (Peavy 1-6), 7:10 p.m. Kansas City (Duffy 4-7) at Minnesota (Pino 0-1), 8:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (Richards 8-2) at Chicago White Sox (Noesi 2-5), 8:10 p.m. Seattle (Undecided) at Houston (McHugh 4-6), 8:10 p.m. Cleveland (Kluber 7-5) at L.A. Dodgers (Haren 7-4), 10:10 p.m.TODAYS GAMESColorado (Flande 0-0) at Washington (Zimmermann 5-4), 7:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Arrieta 4-1) at Boston (Peavy 1-6), 7:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Z.Wheeler 3-8) at Atlanta (A.Wood 6-6), 7:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Latos 1-0) at San Diego (Hahn 3-1), 10:10 p.m. Cleveland (Kluber 7-5) at L.A. Dodgers (Haren 7-4), 10:10 p.m.AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Altuve, Houston, .343; Beltre, Texas, .333; VMartinez, Detroit, .323; Brantley, Cleveland, .321; Cano, Seattle, .316; MiCabrera, Detroit, .315; Trout, Los Angeles, .312. RUNS: Dozier, Minnesota, 60; Donaldson, Oakland, 55; Encarnacion, Toronto, 55; Kinsler, Detroit, 55; Bautista, Toronto, 54; Brantley, Cleveland, 54; Trout, Los Angeles, 53. RBI: NCruz, Baltimore, 66; Encarnacion, Toronto, 65; MiCabrera, Detroit, 64; JAbreu, Chicago, 63; Donaldson, Oakland, 60; Moss, Oakland, 59; Trout, Los Angeles, 59. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 113; MeCabrera, Toronto, 103; AJones, Baltimore, 100; Kinsler, Detroit, 100; Markakis, Baltimore, 99; VMartinez, Detroit, 95; Brantley, Cleve land, 94; MiCabrera, Detroit, 94; Cano, Seattle, 94. DOUBLES: MiCabrera, Detroit, 28; Kinsler, Detroit, 25; Altuve, Houston, 24; Pedroia, Boston, 23; EEscobar, Minnesota, 22; AGordon, Kansas City, 22. TRIPLES: Rios, Texas, 8; Bourn, Cleveland, 7; Eaton, Chicago, 6; Trout, Los Angeles, 5; Gardner, New York, 4. HOME RUNS: JAbreu, Chicago, 25; NCruz, Baltimore, 25; Encarnacion, Toronto, 25; VMartinez, Detroit, 20; Donaldson, Oakland, 18; Moss, Oakland, 18; Ortiz, Bos ton, 18; Trout, Los Angeles, 18. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 34; RDavis, Detroit, 21; Ellsbury, New York, 21; AEscobar, Kansas City, 20; Andrus, Texas, 18; LMartin, Texas, 17; Reyes, Toronto, 16. PITCHING: Tanaka, New York, 11-3; Porcello, Detroit, 10-4; Buehrle, Toronto, 10-4; FHernandez, Seattle, 9-2; Scherzer, Detroit, 9-3; Kazmir, Oakland, 9-3; Lester, Bos ton, 9-7. ERA: Tanaka, New York, 2.10; FHernandez, Seattle, 2.24; Darvish, Texas, 2.42; Buehrle, Toronto, 2.52; Kazmir, Oakland, 2.66; Richards, Los Angeles, 2.76; Keuchel, Houston, 2.78. STRIKEOUTS: Price, Tampa Bay, 144; Scherzer, Detroit, 132; FHernandez, Seattle, 128; Darvish, Texas, 128; Tanaka, New York, 127; Kluber, Cleveland, 122; Lester, Boston, 115. SAVES: Holland, Kansas City, 23; Rodney, Seattle, 22; Perkins, Minnesota, 19; DavRobertson, New York, 18.NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Tulowitzki, Colorado, .348; Lucroy, Milwaukee, .336; MaAdams, St. Louis, .325; Stanton, Miami, .316; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, .314; Puig, Los Angeles, .311; Gennett, Milwaukee, .311. RUNS: Tulowitzki, Colorado, 61; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 59; Pence, San Francisco, 58; Stanton, Miami, 57; FFreeman, Atlanta, 55; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 53. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 60; Morneau, Colorado, 57; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 53; Howard, Philadelphia, 51; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 49; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 48; McGehee, Miami, 48. HITS: Lucroy, Milwaukee, 99; DanMurphy, New York, 98; Stanton, Miami, 97; McGehee, Miami, 96; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 95; Pence, San Francisco, 95; CGomez, Mil waukee, 94. DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 28; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 27; Span, Washington, 25; SCastro, Chicago, 24; AMc Cutchen, Pittsburgh, 24; Utley, Philadelphia, 24; FFree man, Atlanta, 23. TRIPLES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 9; BCrawford, San Francisco, 8; Owings, Arizona, 5; Rendon, Washington, 5. HOME RUNS: Stanton, Miami, 21; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 18; Frazier, Cincinnati, 17; Rizzo, Chicago, 17; Gattis, At lanta, 16; JUpton, Atlanta, 16; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 15. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 40; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 34; Revere, Philadelphia, 23; EYoung, New York, 21; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 18; Blackmon, Colorado, 15; Segura, Milwaukee, 14. PITCHING: Simon, Cincinnati, 10-3; Wainwright, St. Louis, 10-4; Greinke, Los Angeles, 10-4; Lohse, Milwaukee, 9-2; Ryu, Los Angeles, 9-4; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 9-5; WPeralta, Milwaukee, 9-5. ERA: Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.88; Wainwright, St. Louis, 2.01; Beckett, Los Angeles, 2.11; HAlvarez, Miami, 2.32; Teheran, Atlanta, 2.34; Hudson, San Francisco, 2.62; Greinke, Los Angeles, 2.78. STRIKEOUTS: Strasburg, Washington, 123; Cueto, Cincinnati, 122; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 114; Kennedy, San Diego, 111; Greinke, Los Angeles, 111. SAVES: FrRodriguez, Milwaukee, 27; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 24; Jansen, Los Angeles, 24; Kimbrel, Atlanta, 23. Athletics 4, Marlins 3 Oakland Miami ab r h bi ab r h bi Gentry cf 4 0 1 0 Y elich cf 4 1 1 0 Callasp 2b 4 1 1 0 RJhnsn lf 4 0 0 0 Cespds lf 4 1 1 0 Stanton rf 3 0 0 0 Dnldsn 3b 4 1 1 1 McGeh 3b 3 1 1 0 Freimn 1b 4 1 1 3 Lucas ss 4 0 1 0 Moss rf 4 0 1 0 JeBakr 1b 3 0 0 1 Punto ss 3 0 2 0 Solano 2b 4 0 0 0 Vogt c 3 0 0 0 Mathis c 3 0 1 0 Milone p 3 0 0 0 Heane y p 0 0 0 0 Abad p 0 0 0 0 Ozuna ph 1 1 1 1 Cook p 0 0 0 0 DJnngs p 0 0 0 0 Gregg p 0 0 0 0 GJones ph 1 0 1 0 Hatchr p 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 4 8 4 T otals 30 3 6 2 Oakland 000 004 000 4 Miami 100 001 100 3 ECallaspo (6). DPOakland 3, Miami 1. LOBOakland 2, Miami 4. 3BYelich (6). HRFreiman (1), Ozuna (14). SHeaney. SFJe.Baker. IP H R ER BB SO Oakland Milone W,6-3 7 4 3 2 2 3 Abad H,8 2/3 1 0 0 0 1 Cook S,1-1 1 1/3 1 0 0 0 2 Miami Heaney L,0-3 6 8 4 4 0 4 Da.Jennings 1 2/3 0 0 0 0 1 Gregg 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Hatcher 1 0 0 0 0 1 PBVogt. UmpiresHome, Alan Porter; First, Joe West; Second, Marty Foster; Third, Rob Drake. T:48. A,917 (37,442). Rays 12, Orioles 7 T ampa Bay Baltimore ab r h bi ab r h bi DJnngs cf 3 2 1 0 Mar kks rf 4 2 2 0 CFigur ph-2b 1 0 0 0 Flahr ty ss 1 1 1 3 Zobrist ss 6 2 3 2 P earce lf-rf 5 0 2 1 Joyce lf-rf 6 3 5 4 A.Jones cf 3 0 1 0 Longori 3b 4 1 1 0 D Yong rf-lf 2 0 1 0 Loney 1b 5 1 1 2 N.Cr uz dh 4 0 1 0 Guyer dh 4 1 1 1 C.Da vis 1b 3 0 0 0 Forsyth 2b-lf 4 1 2 2 CJosph 1b 1 0 0 0 JMolin c 5 0 2 0 JHardy ss 3 1 1 0 Kiermr rf-cf 5 1 2 1 Lough cf 1 0 0 0 Machd 3b 4 1 1 2 Schoop 2b 4 1 2 0 Hundly c 3 1 1 0 Totals 43 12 18 12 T otals 38 7 13 6 Tampa Bay 101 017 200 12 Baltimore 001 210 003 7 LOBTampa Bay 9, Baltimore 7. 2BDe.Jennings (18), Zobrist 2 (15), Joyce (17), Loney (19), Guyer (8), Markakis (15), Pearce (12). HRZobrist (6), Joyce 2 (5), Forsythe (2), Kiermaier (6), Flaherty (3), Mach ado (7). SBMarkakis (4). SC.Davis. IP H R ER BB SO Tampa Bay Cobb W,3-6 5 8 4 3 0 3 Boxberger 1 0 0 0 0 1 Yates 1 1/3 2 0 0 0 3 C.Ramos 1 1/3 3 3 3 2 2 Jo.Peralta 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 Baltimore M.Gonzalez 4 2/3 8 3 3 4 2 Meek L,0-3 1 3 4 4 1 1 Matusz 2 1/3 7 5 5 0 2 Tom.Hunter 1 0 0 0 0 0 PBJ.Molina. BalkM.Gonzalez. UmpiresHome, Gabe Morales; First, Tony Randazzo; Second, David Rackley; Third, Jim Wolf. T:51. A,665 (45,971). Royals 5, Angels 4 Los Angeles Kansas City ab r h bi ab r h bi Calhon rf 5 2 2 1 L.Cain rf 5 0 4 2 Trout cf 2 1 1 0 Hosmer 1b 5 0 0 0 Pujols dh 4 0 1 0 BButler dh 3 0 0 0 JHmltn lf 3 0 1 1 A Gordn lf 3 1 0 1 Aybar ss 4 1 1 1 S.P erez c 4 1 0 0 HKndrc 2b 4 0 0 0 Infante 2b 5 1 3 1 Cron 1b 4 0 0 0 V alenci 3b 2 1 2 1 Freese 3b 4 0 0 0 Mostks 3b 2 0 0 0 Conger c 4 0 2 0 AEscor ss 3 1 2 0 JDyson cf 3 0 0 0 Totals 34 4 8 3 T otals 35 5 11 5 Los Angeles 201 001 000 4 Kansas City 000 400 001 5 One out when winning run scored. EH.Kendrick (7), L.Cain (2), Hosmer (6). DPKansas City 2. LOBLos Angeles 6, Kansas City 12. 2BJ. Hamilton (8), L.Cain 3 (14), Infante (7). HRCalhoun (7), Aybar (6). CSA.Escobar (2). IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles C.Wilson 3 2/3 7 4 4 4 3 Cor.Rasmus 2 1/3 2 0 0 1 3 Jepsen 2 1 0 0 0 2 Grilli L,0-1 1/3 1 1 0 0 1 Kansas City Guthrie 6 2/3 8 4 2 2 4 K.Herrera 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 W.Davis 1 0 0 0 1 0 G.Holland W,1-2 1 0 0 0 0 2 HBPby Grilli (A.Gordon), by C.Wilson (S.Perez). UmpiresHome, Todd Tichenor; First, Clint Fagan; Second, Tim Timmons; Third, Tim Welke. T:31. A,803 (37,903). Twins 3, Rangers 2 Minnesota T exas ab r h bi ab r h bi Dozier 2b 4 0 0 0 Choo dh 4 1 1 0 Mauer 1b 4 0 1 1 Andr us ss 4 0 1 0 Parmel cf-lf 4 0 1 0 C.P ena 1b 3 0 0 0 Wlngh lf 4 0 2 0 Gimenz ph 1 0 0 0 Fuld pr-cf 0 1 0 0 ABeltre 3b 4 0 1 1 KMorls dh 4 0 1 1 Rios rf 4 0 1 0 KSuzuk pr-dh 0 0 0 0 LMar tn cf 3 0 1 0 Arcia rf 4 0 0 0 Chirins c 3 1 3 1 EEscor 3b 4 1 1 0 Choice lf 3 0 0 0 Fryer c 3 0 0 0 Odor 2b 3 0 0 0 JPolnc ss 2 1 1 1 Flormn ss 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 3 7 3 T otals 32 2 8 2 Minnesota 002 000 001 3 Texas 100 010 000 2 DPMinnesota 3, Texas 1. LOBMinnesota 4, Texas 3. 2BWillingham (4), K.Morales (5), E.Escobar (23), J.Polanco (1). HRChirinos (7). CSParmelee (3). IP H R ER BB SO Minnesota Gibson W,7-6 8 8 2 2 0 3 Perkins S,20-23 1 0 0 0 0 3 Texas Lewis 6 5 2 2 0 8 Poreda 1 1/3 0 0 0 1 1 Rowen 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 Cotts 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Soria L,1-3 1 2 1 1 0 3 UmpiresHome, Paul Nauert; First, John Tumpane; Second, James Hoye; Third, Bill Welke. T:39. A,779 (48,114). Astros 6, Tigers 4 Detroit Houston ab r h bi ab r h bi AJcksn cf 5 0 0 0 Altuve 2b 5 1 3 0 TrHntr rf 4 0 1 1 Springr rf 2 1 1 1 MiCarr 1b 4 0 0 0 Singltn 1b 4 0 1 2 VMrtnz dh 3 1 1 0 Guzmn dh 5 1 1 1 JMrtnz lf 4 1 2 0 MDmn 3b 4 1 3 0 Cstllns 3b 4 0 2 2 Hoes lf 3 0 1 2 Avila c 2 1 1 1 V illar ss 3 0 0 0 Kinsler ph 1 0 0 0 JCastro c 0 0 0 0 Holady c 0 0 0 0 Cor prn c 4 0 3 0 Suarez ss 4 0 1 0 MGnzlz pr-ss 0 1 0 0 AnRmn 2b 2 1 1 0 Presle y cf 3 1 1 0 RDavis ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 34 4 9 4 T otals 33 6 14 6 Detroit 001 010 020 4 Houston 301 001 01x 6 DPDetroit 3, Houston 2. LOBDetroit 6, Houston 10. 2BTor.Hunter (14), Altuve (25), Springer (8), M.Dominguez (13), Hoes (4), Corporan (2). 3B Castellanos (1). HRAvila (5). SBTor.Hunter (2), An.Romine (5), Altuve 2 (36), Springer (2). SPres ley. SFHoes. IP H R ER BB SO Detroit Smyly L,4-7 2 1/3 8 4 4 2 3 C.Smith 2 2/3 1 0 0 0 1 McCoy 2 3 1 1 2 1 B.Hardy 1 2 1 1 1 0 Houston Feldman W,4-5 6 7 2 2 1 4 D.Downs H,6 1 0 0 0 1 2 Veras H,1 2/3 2 2 2 1 0 Sipp S,1-1 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 2 Feldman pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. WPSmyly. UmpiresHome, Mark Ripperger; First, Lance Barksdale; Second, Kerwin Danley; Third, Gary Ceder strom. T:25. A,478 (42,060). Braves 3, Phillies 2 Atlanta Philadelphia ab r h bi ab r h bi BUpton cf 4 0 1 2 Re vere cf 5 0 3 0 R.Pena 3b 4 0 0 0 Rollins ss 5 0 3 0 FFrmn 1b 4 0 1 0 Utle y 2b 5 0 1 0 J.Upton lf 3 0 0 0 How ard 1b 3 0 0 0 Heywrd rf 3 0 0 0 Byrd rf 4 2 2 2 ASmns ss 4 0 1 0 Asche 3b 4 0 1 0 LaStell 2b 3 2 1 0 DBrwn lf 3 0 2 0 Laird c 4 0 2 1 K.Hill c 4 0 1 0 Harang p 3 1 1 0 DBchn p 2 0 0 0 Smmns p 0 0 0 0 DeF rts p 0 0 0 0 Doumit ph 1 0 0 0 Ma yrry ph 1 0 0 0 Kimrel p 0 0 0 0 Diekmn p 0 0 0 0 P apeln p 0 0 0 0 CHr ndz ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 33 3 7 3 T otals 37 2 13 2 Atlanta 020 100 000 3 Philadelphia 010 100 000 2 ERollins (7), De Fratus (1). DPAtlanta 2, Philadelphia 2. LOBAtlanta 8, Philadelphia 10. 2BLa Stella (6), Laird (6), Rollins (13). 3BB.Upton (4). HRByrd 2 (15). SBRollins (14). CSRevere (3). IP H R ER BB SO Atlanta Harang W,7-6 7 11 2 2 2 4 S.Simmons H,7 1 0 0 0 0 2 Kimbrel S,24-28 1 2 0 0 0 0 Philadelphia D.Buchanan L,4-4 5 5 3 3 5 4 De Fratus 1 1 0 0 0 1 Diekman 2 1 0 0 0 3 Papelbon 1 0 0 0 0 1 UmpiresHome, Ted Barrett; First, Will Little; Second, Alfonso Marquez; Third, Paul Schrieber. T:06. A,215 (43,651). White Sox 4, Blue Jays 0 Chicago T oronto ab r h bi ab r h bi Eaton cf 3 0 0 0 Re yes ss 4 0 2 0 GBckh 2b 4 1 1 0 Mstr nn lf 3 0 1 0 JAreu dh 4 0 1 1 JF rncs 3b 1 0 0 0 Viciedo lf 3 0 0 0 Encr nc dh 3 0 1 0 De Aza lf 0 0 0 0 DNa vrr c 2 0 0 0 AlRmrz ss 4 0 2 0 Bautist ph 1 0 0 0 Konerk 1b 3 1 1 0 Thole c 1 0 0 0 Sierra rf 4 2 2 1 Glenn rf 3 0 0 0 Flowrs c 4 0 1 2 Gose ph 1 0 0 0 LeGarc 3b 4 0 0 0 Lind 1b 3 0 0 0 StTllsn 3b-2b 2 0 0 0 ClRsms cf 3 0 0 0 Ka wsk 2b 2 0 0 0 Totals 33 4 8 4 T otals 30 0 4 0 Chicago 001 100 002 4 Toronto 000 000 000 0 DPChicago 1, Toronto 2. LOBChicago 5, Toronto 5. 2BG.Beckham (16), Al.Ramirez (13), Sierra (4), Reyes (17). HRSierra (2). IP H R ER BB SO Chicago Quintana W,5-7 7 3 0 0 2 7 Surkamp H,2 1 0 0 0 0 0 Petricka 1 1 0 0 0 1 Toronto Buehrle L,10-5 8 6 2 2 2 5 Santos 1 2 2 2 1 0 WPQuintana. UmpiresHome, Brian Knight; First, Fieldin Culbreth; Second, Manny Gonzalez; Third, Jim Reynolds. T:32. A,177 (49,282). Pirates 5, Mets 2 Ne w York Pittsburgh ab r h bi ab r h bi EYong lf 4 0 2 0 GP olnc rf 3 0 0 0 Germn p 0 0 0 0 SMar te cf 4 1 1 0 Evelnd p 0 0 0 0 NW alkr 2b 4 1 1 0 BAreu ph 1 0 0 0 I.Da vis 1b 4 0 2 2 Tejada ss 5 0 2 1 JHr rsn lf 4 2 1 0 DnMrp 2b 5 0 3 0 P Alvrz 3b 4 1 2 3 Grndrs rf 5 0 0 0 Mercer ss 3 0 0 0 Duda 1b 4 0 2 0 JuWlsn p 0 0 0 0 Campll 3b 4 0 2 0 W atson p 0 0 0 0 Lagars cf 4 1 1 0 JHughs p 0 0 0 0 dArnad c 3 1 1 0 Melncn p 0 0 0 0 Colon p 2 0 0 0 CStwr t c 3 0 1 0 CYoung ph-lf 2 0 0 1 V olquez p 1 0 0 0 Barmes ss 1 0 0 0 Totals 39 2 13 2 T otals 31 5 8 5 New York 000 000 002 2 Pittsburgh 300 200 00x 5 EVolquez (1), N.Walker (2). DPPittsburgh 1. LOB New York 11, Pittsburgh 4. 2BE.Young (8), Duda (17), dArnaud (4), N.Walker (9), J.Harrison (12), P.Al varez (9). HRP.Alvarez (13). SVolquez. IP H R ER BB SO New York Colon L,8-6 6 7 5 5 1 2 Germen 1 0 0 0 0 2 Eveland 1 1 0 0 0 1 Pittsburgh Volquez W,6-6 6 8 0 0 1 7 Ju.Wilson 1 1 0 0 0 1 Watson 1 0 0 0 0 1 J.Hughes 2/3 3 2 2 0 0 Melancon S,15-18 1/3 1 0 0 0 0 UmpiresHome, Scott Barry; First, Jeff Nelson; Sec ond, Laz Diaz; Third, Toby Basner. T:58. A,290 (38,362). Rockies 10, Brewers 4 Colorado Milw aukee ab r h bi ab r h bi Blckmn cf-lf 5 0 1 0 R Weks 2b 4 0 0 0 Barnes rf 5 0 1 0 Braun rf 4 2 2 1 Mornea 1b 3 1 1 1 Lucro y c 4 1 1 0 Hwkns p 0 0 0 0 Maldnd c 0 0 0 0 Tlwtzk ss 5 2 3 0 ArRmr 3b 1 1 0 0 Rutledg pr-ss 0 0 0 0 Overa y 1b 0 0 0 0 Dickrsn lf 4 2 2 2 KDa vis lf 2 0 0 2 Stubbs ph-cf 0 0 0 0 MrRynl 1b-3b 4 0 0 0 Rosario c-1b 5 2 2 1 Bianchi ss 4 0 0 0 RWhelr 3b 4 0 1 0 EHer rr cf 3 0 0 0 Kahnle p 0 0 0 0 Gallard p 2 0 1 0 McKnr ph-c 1 0 0 0 Grzln y p 1 0 0 0 LeMahi 2b 5 1 2 1 Kintzlr p 0 0 0 0 JDLRs p 3 1 1 0 W ang p 0 0 0 0 Culersn 3b 2 1 1 2 Totals 42 10 15 7 T otals 29 4 4 3 Colorado 311 030 020 10 Milwaukee 000 202 000 4 EAr.Ramirez (5), Lucroy (3). DPColorado 1. LOB Colorado 8, Milwaukee 3. 2BBarnes (10), Dickerson (13), Rosario (15), Braun (16), Lucroy (28). HRCul berson (2), Braun (11). SBAr.Ramirez 2 (3). SFMorneau, K.Davis. IP H R ER BB SO Colorado J.De La Rosa W,8-6 6 4 4 4 2 4 Kahnle 2 0 0 0 0 2 Hawkins 1 0 0 0 1 0 Milwaukee Gallardo L,5-5 5 10 8 5 1 3 Gorzelanny 2 1 0 0 0 2 Kintzler 2/3 4 2 2 0 0 Wang 1 1/3 0 0 0 1 1 UmpiresHome, CB Bucknor; First, Tripp Gibson; Sec ond, Dale Scott; Third, Dan Iassogna.

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 30, 2014 *UnlessOtherwiseNotedontheSchedule Yo uMaketheCA LL !This We eksLeesburgLightningScheduleAlw ay sFREEAdmission! RainoutInformation 352-234-4489 Yo uMaketheCA LL !June30-July6This We eksLeesburgLightningScheduleAlw ay sFREEAdmission! GameTimes: 7pm We ekdays Sun5pm*THEPLAY:WithR2onsecond,R1onfirstandoneout, thebatterhitsagroundballtoF5.Theballtakesabad hopandgoesintoF5sshirt.F5grabstheballthrough hisshirt(withouttakingitout)andrunstothirdbase, steppingonitbeforeR2reachesthebag. Whatstheruling?RainoutInformation 352-234-4489 Mon.6/30..........OffDayTu es.7/1................CollegePark(home)DoubleHeader**We d.7/2............CollegePark(away) Thurs.7/3............CollegePark(home) Fri.7/4............WinterPark(home-6pm) Sat.7/5............WinterPark(home) Sun.7/6............WinterPark(away-1pm) **4pmStartANSWERonFriday July 6 This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule D003564 Mo nd ay Ju ne30th at 5pm NASCAR GOLF GARY B. GRAVESAssociated PressSPARTA, Ky. Brad Keselowski will have to ne-tune his victo ry celebrations after a shattered champagne bottle left him with a bloodied and bandaged right hand. The upside is he might get more chanc es to polish his postrace revelry as he pur sues his second Sprint Cup Series champion ship in three years. Already locked into the Chase with a Las Vegas victory and a sol id string of top-ves, Keselowski delivered his most dominant run at Kentucky Speed way. He started from the pole and led 199 of 267 laps en route to his second win this season. The Penske Racing driver heads to Daytona International Speedway fourth in points and showing the form that carried him to the 2012 championship. Missing last years Chase also seems to have made Keselowski wiser Saturday night notwithstanding. I want to win another championship, Ke selowski said after a roundabout journey between Victory Lane and the ineld care cen ter to receive four stitch es after striking the bot tle on the podium. I dont want to be a guy that contends for a championship ev ery three or four years. I want to do it each and every year and I know that opportunity is here, its present and I want to make the most of it. The exuberant 30-year-old joked that he was going through something of a midlife crisis, perhaps his way of stressing that he has to maximize his window of opportunity to win titles. That ur gency worked for him two years ago, when he won ve times with 23 top-10s and 13 topves to win the title. Keselowski has two fewer wins than at the same point in 2012 but is showing the same consistency. His second Kentucky victory marked his ninth top-10 along with a series-best second triumph at 1 1/2 miles, the distance of many Chase tracks.GRAND PRIX OF HOUSTON HOUSTON Si mon Pagenaud picked up his second win of the season with a vic tory Sunday in the sec ond race of the Grand Prix of Houston doubleheader. The victory comes a day after Pagenaud started from the pole in the rst race but had an early spin and was lat er collected in Scott Dixons crash to spoil his race. The Frenchman was the class of the eld Sunday and led rookie teammate Mikhail Aleshin to the checkered ag for a 1-2 nish for team owner Sam Schmidt. It was the Russian drivers rst career podium. Jack Hawksworth, another rookie, drove from last to third for his rst career podium. Keselowski hungry for yet another NASCAR championship JAMES CRISP / AP Brad Keselowski gives a thumbs-up with his bandaged hand after his victory in the NASCAR Sprint Cup series race on Saturday at Kentucky Speedway in Sparta, Ky. DOUG FERGUSONAP Golf WriterBETHESDA, Md. Justin Rose got his mis take out of the way one hole early and won the Quicken Loans Nation al in a playoff Sunday over Shawn Stefani. Tied for the lead as he played the 18th hole at Congressional, Rose tried to hit through two trees left of the fair way and overturned the shot. It ran down a bank and into the water, and he had to hole a 15-foot bogey putt just to stay in the game. That proved to be the biggest shot he hit all day. Behind him, Stefani made bogey on the 17th and narrowly missed a birdie putt on the 18th to set up the rst play off in the eight-year his tory of this event. And then it was Stefani who essentially repeat ed Roses mistake on the rst extra hole at No. 18. After taking a drop because the grandstands blocked his view of the green, he wanted to play his low punch to the right side of the green. His shot also had too much turn and bounded into the water. Rose hit the middle of the green from the fairway and two-putt ed for par. Stefani made double bogey. It was Roses rst win since the U.S. Open last summer at Merion, and it felt like he won another U.S. Open as tough as Congressional played. With putting surfaces that had a brown tinge to them even before the leaders teed off, and thick rough all week, it was a far stronger test than when the Open was held in soggy con ditions in 2011. Congressional got its reputation back after the U.S. Open, Rose said. I really enjoy this type of golf and this type of test. I think it tested all of us. Im delighted. Rose and Stefani each closed with a 1-under 70 only six players broke par in the nal round and nished at 4-under 280. It was only the sec ond time this year that the winning score was higher than the 36-hole lead (6 under). That also happened at Tor rey Pines, which also hosted a U.S. Open. Despite his blun der on the 18th, Rose earned his second chance. He went 14 straight holes without making a bogey. Along with the 15-foot bogey putt he made on the 18th, he saved par on the 17th with an 8-foot putt. Patrick Reed could have used some of that gritty play. Reed, who started the nal round with a twoshot lead, didnt even nish in the top 10. He still had a two-shot lead at the turn, only to start the back nine with con secutive double bogeys on his way to a 41. He closed with a 77 and tied for 11th. Seven players had a share of the lead at one point in the nal round, and once Reed began his meltdown, Rose took over. He made birdie on No. 11, the toughest hole all week at Congressional, and used a fairway metal to gouge out of deep rough and onto the 14th green to avoid dropping a shot.Rose overcomes late mistake at Congressional NICK WASS / AP Justin Rose poses with the trophy after he won the Quicken Loans National golf tournament on Sunday in Bethesda, Md. WILL GRAVESAP Sports WriterPITTSBURGH Ber nhard Langer made a short birdie putt on the second hole of a playoff with Jeff Sluman to win the Senior Players Championship on Sunday. Langer appeared to be in trouble when his second shot on the par5 18th ended up in the rough short of the green. He hit a brilliant pitch to 5 feet and made the putt after Slumans birdie attempt rolled just wide. The victory was the 56-year-old Langers third of the year and his third major title on the Champions Tour. The two-time Masters champion shot an evenpar 70 to nish at 15-under 265 at Fox Chapel. Sluman had a bogey-free 65 to match Langer, but narrowly missed a birdie putt on the rst playoff hole that would have won it. Russ Cochran, who trailed by seven shots early in the nal round, had a 67 to nish third at 14 under. Defending champion Kenny Perry tied Langer for the lead heading into the back nine, but faded badly over the closing holes. Perrys 69 left him two shots out of the playoff. Langer nearly missed out on the playoff him self. He fought a balky putter much of the day only to hole a 35-foot birdie putt on the 17th that lifted him into a tie with Sluman. The nor mally reserved Ger man pumped his st in disbelief after the ball dropped into the cup. He parred 18 to match Sluman at 15 under and escaped one more time when Slumans birdie attempt on the rst playoff hole missed. Sluman, the 1988 PGA champion, covered his hands in disbelief af ter the putt stayed out. Langer didnt let the re prieve go to waste, bird ieing the 18th on his third try to earn his rst major title on the 50-and-over circuit since the 2010 Senior British Open.LPGA ROGERS, Ark. Sta cy Lewis made a 7-foot birdie putt on the nal hole Sunday in the NW Arkansas Champi onship to nally win an ofcial event in her ad opted state. The top-ranked Lewis, the Texan who played at the nearby University of Arkansas, earned an unofcial win in the rain-shortened 2007 tournament as an amateur. On Sunday, she closed with a 6-under 65 for a one-stroke vic tory. Lewis birdied three of her nal holes for her third LPGA Tour victo ry of the year and 11th overall. She nished at 12-under 201 at Pinna cle Country Club. Lydia Ko, Cristie Kerr and Angela Stanford tied for second. Ko nished with a 65, and Kerr and Stanford shot 67. Second-round leader Michelle Wie shot a 73 to tie for eighth at 8 under.Langer defeats Sluman in playoff to win Senior Players Championship

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LivingHealthySend your health news to features@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 30, 2014SODEXO: Cafeteria workers regain health coverage / C3 Health check www.dailycommercial.com LARA SOLT / MCT Hannah Miller, 22 months, follows along with her mother, Stephanie Miller, during exercises at a Stroller Boot Camp class at Klyde Warren Park in Dallas earlier this month. LIZZIE JOHNSONMCTDALLAS Before they start lunging and squatting and crunching, the 19 women tend to their babies. They hand them plastic cups lled with Cheerios and fruit. They adjust the sun visors on their identical black strollers and rock hesitant in fants back and forth. Then, they run. Lets get warmed up with a nice long trot, personal trainer and well ness coach Zac Mudd shouts across the lawn. Stroller wheels squeak as the line of moms and babies zip across the grass and onto the pavement, a blur of neon-colored Spandex, strollers and faint baby gurgles. The women make a lap of Klyde Warren Park and come hufng back to the starting point, immediately launching into a set of burpees. These ladies are a lot tougher than they let on, Mudd says, glancing down at his stopwatch. Most of them have some kind of exercise ex perience. Theyll come in CrossFit and 5K T-shirts. But its easy to fall into a slump, to get out of the rhythm of being healthy. Their schedule has been dedicated to taking care of a baby. The Stroller Boot Camp, spon sored by the YMCA, is a place where babies are welcome and strollers are used as a piece of exercise equip ment, just like yoga mats and resis tance bands. During a phase of a new moms life when everything is alien and differ ent her schedule, body and social groups the weekly Tuesday morn ing class is a safe place. Moms can focus on active recovery and connect with women going through similar life milestones. Everyone is looking for the same goal, looking to get their abs back and get in shape, YMCA wellness coordinator Shelli Cheyney says. Some of the moms are a little bit depressed because they want to get back to the way they were before the baby. They can nd someone who is going through the same thing that they are. When Lara Neri, 40, came to Stroll er Boot Camp for the rst time six months ago, she was the only mom in attendance. Neri continued to make the trip every Tuesday with her dog and her four little ones, ranging in age from 6 months to 8 years. As summer neared, attendance at the camp doubled, then quadrupled. Boot camps for new moms fit baby into exercise routineLike mother, like daughterIts definitely growing. Its great because you can find something to do with your kids while you exercise. Ive tried workout videos, and they never work. The baby wont allow it. The second you get it started, they want to be picked up. Traditional gym environments can also be tough. The second your baby starts crying, you get pulled out of class.Lara Neri, Stroller Boot Camp memberSEE CAMP | C2 Dr. Jeremy Williams takes Nora Resnicks blood pressure as part of a routine checkup for Resnick, who made the house call through the iPhone app, Medicast on June 19.ISAAC ARJONILLA MCT BERNARD J. WOLFSONMCTMarcus Welby, welcome to the 21st century. If the ctional Santa Moni ca doctor from the early 1970s were still plying his trade to day, patients would be able to nd him at the touch of a smartphone application. He would listen to their woes and conduct a quick triage over the phone, deciding whether the symptoms warranted a house call, an ER visit or noth ing at all. Medicast, a startup that launched in Miami last sum mer, offers exactly such an app and a network of doctors to go with it. The tiny com pany, which has big plans for nationwide expansion, just opened shop in Los Angeles earlier this month. And thats not TV ction. It is part of a growing trend in on-demand consumer ser vices, notably exemplied by Uber, the mobile-driven taxi request service that has provoked the ire of cabdrivers around the globe. It is also the latest frontier in the burgeoning world of tele medicine a world in which medical test results can be transmitted over smartphones in a heartbeat and companies like Teladoc, MDLive and American Well connect Need a doctor? Take this app and call one to your doorSEE APP | C2 THE VILLAGES Lake Medical to host prostate cancer support meetingDr. Catherine Keller, M.D. of Lake Medical Imaging in Leesburg and The Villages will speak on detecting and tracking prostate cancer and other topics. The free meeting will be at 7 p.m. Wednesday at the Laurel Manor Rec reation Center, 1985 Laurel Manor Drive in The Villages. For information, call Dan Bard at 352-259-9433 or Tom Vajda at 352446-4194. LEESBURG Support meeting offered for blind/visually impairedSponsored by New Vision for In dependence, this group offers re habilitation, education and support services to those with low vision or blindness and their families. The guest speaker is Brian Sweezea with the Lake County Su pervisor of Elections ofce, who will discuss technology for visually im paired voters, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., July 11 at the IHOP restaurant, 10332 U.S. Highway 441. For information about the group, call 352-435-5040. LAKE COUNTY AARP Smart Driver classes offered The AARP Driver Safety program helps participants rene their skills with a new six-hour curriculum. Upon completion of the course, Florida drivers age 50 or older may be eligible for insurance discounts. Cost is $15 for AARP members and $20 for non-members. Payment must be made by check to AARP. No cash or credit cards accepted. Classes will be: July 15 and 17 from 1 to 4 p.m., Harden-Pauli Fu neral Home, 1617 S. Bay St., Eustis, call 352-394-0250 to register; August 4 and 6, from 1 to 4 p.m., Leesburg Senior Center, 1211 Penn St., register by calling 352-326-3540; August 4 and 6, from 9 a.m. to noon at the W.T. Bland Public Library,1995 N. Donnelly St., Mount Dora, register at 352-735-7180. LEESBURG LifeStream Receives AccreditationThe Commission on Accredi tation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) International recently assessed LifeStream Behavioral Cen ter in Leesburg, surveying the orga nizations conformance to standards demonstrating quality behavioral health care. Accreditation is based on the over all performance of the organization, and the highest accreditation that can be awarded is for a three-year peri od, which LifeStream achieved for the third consecutive review period with accreditation through June 2017. The CARF-accreditation means the organization has passed an indepth review and meets rigorous CARF guidelines for service and quality. For information, call 352-3157527 or go to www.lsbc.net.

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 30, 2014 GOLF CART ACCESSNow,onedoctorishelping localresidentswithback painlivemoreactive, pain-freelives.Pain less ,convenient, fast-actingSoleveprocedur e shownto be promisinginapilotstudyfor 95% of patien tsno w av ailable ex clusivelyatEthe re dge Chiro pra ctic.*FruitlandPark(352)365-1191TheVillages(352)750-1200*Patientsinapilotstu dy showeda20-point re ductionin VA Sscore inas fewas fo ur sessions Gore nbergM,SchiffE,Schwartz K,EizenbergE:Anovelimage-guided,automatic,high-intensityneurostimulation deviceforth etreatment of nonspecificlow backpain.PainRes Tr eat;2011;2011;152307.14Nervomatrix Lt d.All rights re served. So leveisa re gisteredtrademark rfnnftb D002088 Now, about 20 moms attend class every week. Its denitely growing, Neri says. Its great because you can nd something to do with your kids while you exercise. Ive tried workout videos, and they never work. The baby wont allow it. The sec ond you get it started, they want to be picked up. Traditional gym environments can also be tough. The second your baby starts crying, you get pulled out of class. Laura Lott, 28, a rst-time mom of 2-year-old Laney, attended the boot camp for the rst time on a breezy Tuesday. In the middle of a vigorous leg-lift set, Lott leans over to hand an apple to Laney, docilely watching from her stroller. Another mom wheels her baby off to the sidewalk, pulling out an Elmo diaper and changing him on the grass. I mean, look around, Lott says. We have a community of moms going through a similar leg of life. Its great to be here because of the adult in teraction. It helps us nd resources and tools, and its nice to chat with each other. The weekly boot camp helps women nd struc ture and create a schedule, to nd out they arent alone, Neri says. It helps combat that feeling you get where you are alone on an island watching the rest of the world move by, she says. Its important for emo tional and mental health. The endorphins help me cope. Postpartum depression and anxiety can hit you hard. It is so important for moms to exer cise, and not just for physical health. A cocktail of postpartum hormones and sleep deprivation can leave a mom feeling listless, iso lated and zombielike. Up to 70 percent of women experience baby blues in the weeks and months after giving birth, according to medical experts. Women are also likely to develop negative feelings about their post-baby body. Its all about becoming more condent, get ting on a schedule and getting support, said Dr. Sheila Chhutani, an OB/GYN at Texas Presbyteri an Hospital Dallas. It is very important for them to connect with other women. I have had a couple of moms who had no support systems and experi enced more signs of depression. CAMP FROM PAGE C1 LARA SOLT / MCT Audri Rojas, 15 months, enjoys a snack while her mother, Veronica Rojas, works out during a Stroller Boot Camp class at Klyde Warren Park in Dallas earlier this month. patients with doctors in video conferences or over the Internet. Unlike those compa nies, whose bread and butter is virtual consul tation, Medicast collects only if the doctor makes a house call in the esh. No visit, no charge. In a nod to the calmer, kinder era of house-calling physicians it evokes, Medicast also makes its service available on the companys website. It even has an old-fashioned 800 number for the luddites among us. We want to make it available to anyone, which is why we have all three options, said Sam Zebarjadi, Medicasts CEO and co-founder. At the same time, Ze barjadi said, Medicast is focused on the 30to 64-year-old market people with an afnity for technology and some interest in tness and well ness. The company has only ve full-time employees Zebarjadi, two oth er co-founders and two marketing people. The company contracts with its doctors 20 in Los Angeles and 5 in Miami so far, though Zebarjadi envisions the network growing to hundreds of physicians. The company charges $249 for a home visit, and the doctor keeps $170 of it. In addition to the patient-doctor introduc tions, Medicast provides billing and other back-of ce services. Monthly payment plans are also available: $39 a month entitles you to two visits a year; for $75 you get four. Medicasts service is not generally covered by health insurance plans, but the doctors give pa tients receipts for pre scription drugs that might be covered. And some insurers will count the cost of the house calls against a patients deductible for out-of-network services. The company says it puts all doctors it contracts with through rigor ous background checks and trains them in the best practices of house calls. People in need of medical services can consult the proles of on-call Medicast doc tors as well as reviews from previous patients and decide whether they want to request a consultation. If they do, they are asked to enter their cred it card information. They will get a call from one of the doctors within a couple of minutes. If the doctor decides a house call is in order, the credit card will be charged. What Medicast offers is a form of concierge medicine, in which pa tients agree to pay out of their own pockets for quicker access and longer visits with doctors. Zebarjadi thinks the company stands to profit from the fact that many primary-care doctors are overburdened a sit uation likely to be exacerbated by millions of newly insured patients coming into the health care system under the Af fordable Care Act. APP FROM PAGE C1 MARY MACVEANMCTWhen Jim Black leads people on a robust walk three times a week on the grounds of the 120-acre Saddleback Church in Lake For est, Calif., hes got powerful com pany: God. The several dozen people who join him have shown up with the same hopes that anyone brings to an exercise plan: They mean to lose weight, ditch inhalers, get stronger. But at Saddleback, theres a lot more going on. Pastor Rick Warren is using the power of his church, one of the biggest in the country, to impress upon his fol lowers that their bodies need the same care as their spirits. After two months on the Dan iel Plan, Black gave up his diabetes medication. He has given up wheat, dairy and sugar. He recently bought a bicycle. In a year, he lost 90 pounds; his wife lost 40. Its that one scripture: My body is not my own, my body is on loan and someday Ill have to account for it, said Black, 48. I wanted to serve God at a higher level. And I wanted to be able to t in the seat of a roller coaster and buy one seat on the airplane instead of two. Despite a multibillion-dollar industry of programs and books and diet meals and meetings, the secular world has done a fairly lousy job at getting people to lose weight and get t. So why not turn to a higher power? One Sunday afternoon, 3,000 people came to a rally at Saddleback to hear about the Daniel Plan from Warren and others, in cluding two of its creators, Daniel Amen, a psychiatrist who belongs to Saddleback, and Dr. Mark Hy man, who has taken care of Bill and Hillary Clinton. If Jesus came to dinner, what would you feed him? Hyman asked the crowd. Would you give him a Big Mac, fries and a Coke? Would you feed him all the junk that we feed ourselves and our guests when they come to dinner? Or would you eat real food? Places of worship may call to mind ice cream socials or groaning tables of fried chicken and potato salad more than they do workouts, but Warren is the latest in a long line of people of faith connecting mind, body and spirit. After all, gluttony is one of the sev en deadly sins. They include the 19th Centu ry health reformer Sylvester Gra ham and, later, the Seventh-day Adventist Dr. John Harvey Kellogg. More recently, fundamental ist C.S. Lovetts Help Lord the Devil Wants Me Fat! sold close to 100,000 copies in two years af ter its release in 1977. Other books have included More of Jesus, Less of Me and Slim for Him. And Warren is not alone in us ing as inspiration the story of the prophet Daniel, who rejected the rich food and wine of King Nebuchadnezzar. Millions of American Christians have made a religious duty out of diet, R. Marie Grifth writes in her 2004 book Born Again Bodies. Fit bodies ostensibly signify tter souls, she said by phone. But they also can be used to support a male-dominated hi erarchy; the market is lucra tive, and its important to look at the underlying messages. Warren has an opportunity to change lives, Grifth said. Because of his name and his fame and how beloved and admired he is, his could really have a bigger impact. Dee Eastman, director of the Daniel Plan, said she doesnt look at it as a diet plan. Ultimately, we try to look toward getting balance in health overall. And we think food plays a huge role in that, she said. This is going to sound extreme, but if you can cut out the white menac es white our and white sugar your palate changes and your cravings stop. You can actually start loving foods that love you back. Warren traces his inspiration for the plan to the day in 2010 that he baptized 827 adults and calculated that hed lifted more than 145,000 pounds. Not only were most of those believers over weight, Warren thought. But Im fat too! Im as out of shape as ev eryone else is! In a pilot rollout of the Dan iel Plan, more than 15,000 peo ple lost a collective quarter-mil lion pounds in a year, the church said. Plans are underway for a long-term tracking program for the plan, Eastman said.Christians embrace the Daniel Plan to change eating habits, lose weight ALLEN J. SCHABEN / MCT The congregation exercises in their seats during a rally for pastor Rick Warrens Daniel Plan at Saddleback Church in Lake Forest, Calif. The rally was designed to prompt people to employ his diet and tness program.

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Monday, June 30, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 rf n t b nnnYo ur Po diatristtreats... CENTRALFLORI DAFOOTCARE, P. A.Dr Nic k Przystawski,DPM www.Floridafoot.comD002301 RICHARD DREW / AP This May 31, 2012 le photo shows a display of various size cups and sugar cubes at a news conference at New Yorks City Hall. The New York Court of Appeals ruled Thursday, that the citys health department overstepped its bounds when it restricted the size of sodas. The court is siding with a lower court that overturned the 2012 ban. DAVID KLEPPERAssociated PressThe court largely ignored the merits of the ban in the 20-page ruling, but determined the citys Board of Health engaged in pol icy-making, and not simply health regulations, when it im posed the restrictions on restau rants, delis, movie theaters, stadiums and street cart vendors. The Board of Health engaged in law-making beyond its reg ulatory authority, the opin ion reads. ... It is clear that the Board of Health wrote the Por tion Cap Rule without benet of legislative guidance. The city had hoped Thursdays ruling would overturn a lower courts decision that blocked the restrictions after restaurants, theater owners, beverage com panies and small stores sued. We are pleased that the lower courts decisions were upheld, the American Beverage Associ ation said in a statement after the decision was handed down. The restrictions, if reinstated, would have created an uneven playing eld for thousands of small businesses in the city and limited New Yorkers freedom of choice. City Health Commission Mary T. Bassett said the administration of current Mayor Bill de Bla sio continues to look for ways to limit the pernicious effects of aggressive and predatory mar keting of sugary drinks and unhealthy foods. Todays ruling does not change the fact that sugary drink consumption is a key driver of the obesity epidemic, and we will continue to look for ways to stem the twin epidemics of obesity and type 2 diabetes, Bassett said. The case was decided 4-2, with the majority opinion written by Judge Eugene Piggott Jr. Piggott wrote that city health regulators appeared to carefully weigh the economic, social and health im plications of the ban a poli cy function that Piggott wrote was not the health boards to ex ercise. The two dissenting judges wrote that they believe the Board of Health was within its rights to impose the ban, and that the judiciary shouldnt step into the middle of a debate over public health policy. The city hasnt said whether it plans to try to appeal. But its un likely that an appeal to the Su preme Court would be accept ed because the case centers on local government authority and legislation, not federal issues. Soda has been under re for years, with health advocates saying the sugary beverages are unique in their harmfulness be cause people dont realize how much high-fructose corn syrup theyre guzzling. The bad pub licity has helped lead to a steady decline in U.S. soda sales for nearly a decade. But other sug ary drinks such as sports drinks and energy drinks have been growing. To help curb consumption, lawmakers and health advocates around the country have pro posed soda taxes in recent years. None have succeeded, however, in part because of heavy campaigning and lobbying from the beverage industry. In Califor nia, a measure that would have slapped a warning label on so das was recently defeated. In the meantime, Coke and Pepsi have also been rolling out smaller cans and bottles, some as small as 7.5 ounces. The idea is that people would be more willing to drink soda if they could control the portion sizes. The smaller sizes are also more protable for companies.Court wont reinstate New York Citys ban on big soda drinks RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVARAssociated PressSodexos experience could serve as a cautionary tale for oth er employers trying to pin benet reductions on Obamacare. The companys cutbacks fueled a union organizing drive and campus protests. Julie Peterson, So dexos vice president for benets, said the com pany will make changes for next year to restore eligibility for many of those affected. We think that over all this is going to re sult in about the same number of employees being eligible as in the past, Peterson said. The latest shift grew out of a regular review of company policy, she added. Weve realized we can change the way we are determining eligibility and still remain com petitive in the market, Peterson explained. Among those who lost their coverage through Sodexo this year was Ju lie Pemberton, a cashier at Curry College, a liber al arts institution near Boston. Pemberton puts in more than 40 hours a week during the aca demic year. Shes pay ing over $200 a month more in premiums since she switched to a plan from the Massa chusetts health insur ance exchange. Im actually looking for a new apartment be cause this is just drain ing any savings I have, said Pemberton. I cant just keep paying and paying and paying. UNITE HERE, a labor union trying to organize Sodexo workers, said the companys initial cutback was facilitated by what it calls a loop hole in federal regula tions carrying out the health laws employer coverage requirement. The Obama administration responds that the employer, not the health care law, was to blame. French-owned Sodexo is a multinational service company with U.S. headquarters in Maryland. It operates many college cafeterias and also provides other campus services. In January, Sodexo reclassied some of its workers as part-time by aver aging their hours over a 52-week calendar year. That affected about 5,000 of its 133,000 U.S. employees. Sodexo said it was acting to align itself with the health care law, which requires that employers with 50 or more workers offer coverage to those averaging at least 30 hours per week, or face nes. Company ofcial Peterson said Thursday that for benets pur poses, the company will now credit campus employees during the summer break with the hours they would have worked during the aca demic year. The UNITE HERE union says federal rules require colleges and universities to essentially do the same thing for their faculty employees. But those rules dont ap ply to contractor em ployees in cafeterias. There is nothing in there that says contract workers are protected, said union spokesman Ethan Snow. At least one college that examined the issue agreed with the cafeteria workers. Earlham College in Richmond, Indi ana, recently amended its contract with Sodexo to require that the em ployees be offered coverage.Sodexo cafeteria workers regain health coverage FENIT NIRAPPILAssociated PressSACRAMENTO, Calif. Californias chefs and bartenders can resume legally handling food with their bare hands under a bill repealing an un popular regulation that is headed to the governor. The bill, AB2130, passed its nal legislative hurdle Thursday with a 32-0 vote in the state Senate. A law signed by Gov. Jerry Brown last year re quires restaurant employees to use gloves or utensils to handle food going straight to diners plates, from the rice in a sushi roll to the mint in a mojito. The prohibition, in place in 41 other states, has long been recommended by regula tors to curb the spread of foodborne illness. Though the original legislation attracted no opposition from lob bying groups or chain restaurants, independent and high-end chefs and bartenders say they were caught off-guard by the rule. They say the ban disrupted well-es tablished hand-washing routines, generates unnecessary waste of dis posable gloves and re stricts them in their craft. Sen. Kevin De Leon, D-Los Angeles, told law makers on Thursday that the ban would not have been approved had their concerns been raised. Assemblyman Richard Pan, D-Sacramen to, introduced AB2130 to repeal the law he originally authored as part of an update to the state food code. Pan, who is chairman of the health committee and a pediatrician, said it be came apparent that local health inspectors were more stringent in grant ing exceptions than law makers intended. Inspectors are not sup posed to start slapping eateries with nes for bare-hand contact until July 1, which is when the bill takes effect if signed into law. Pan said hes not abandoning the regulation all together. He wants to re visit the prohibition, but make it more exible to meet the concerns of restaurateurs. Its not about whether you wear gloves or not, Pan said in an inter view with The Associated Press Its about how clean the surfaces (touching food) are. We need to have the conversation go back to, This is about food safety. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Pre vention found that work ers touching food provided the most common transmission pathway for food-originated noro virus outbreaks between 2001 and 2008, the most recent comprehensive review of data available.Repeal of ban on bare-hand contact with food OKd

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S.Hwy441 Leesburg, FL34 78835 2.319.6768 AskAbout ourFREE In-HomeDesign Consultation Wishing Yo uaHappyIndependenceDay!WELL PA YYOUR SALES TA X!24-MonthInterestFreeFinancing*Open10-5Friday, 4thofJuly SAVEONTHE BRAN D NA ME S YO U KNOWANDTRUST *minimumamountnanced$999,25%deposit re quired WELL WELL WELL Aching Fe et?Steprightintoourof fi ce.We specializeinquality medicalcareforall typesoffootproblems.Wa lk-Ins We lcome.Callnowtoschedule yourappointment. 923 We stDixie Av enueSuite B|Leesburg,FL34748352-435-7849|Nextto Dr Ta troDr Erik Zimmer mannPo dia tristYo urfeetareingoodhandswithus! rf Mos tM aj or Insurances Ac cep te d D002348 POHLA SMITHMCTPITTSBURGH Is it possible that there are more chemicals being used in perfumes and sprays that are hurting more people than 10 or 20 years ago? That is denitely ac curate, said Merritt Fajt, an allergist who is a na tionally known physician at the University of Pitts burgh Asthma Institute at UP Medical Center and an assistant professor of medicine at Pitt. One reason that fra grant sensitivities are on the rise is that the use of fragrances is becoming a lot more prominent in this world and now there are about 500 differ ent fragrances and even more if you combine the different fragrances. Allegheny Health Network allergist Deborah Gentile agreed that there are now four or ve hundred types of these chemicals. These newer chemicals are used in fra grances, perfume and air fresheners. Some of these chem icals may cause breathing problems, irritation in the nose or chest, head aches, stomach aches, Dr. Gentile added. You can treat them, using al lergy medications like an tihistamines. Liz Sandhagen, 48, of Whitehall, Penn.,a pa tient of Dr. Gentiles part ner, David Skoner, said she has a list of allergens that includes household cleaners, scented candles, perfume and smoke. I dont go places where there might be smoke and nobody comes to the house and smokes. There are no perfumes or colognes in our house either, she said. Sandhagen is treated monthly with a shot of Xolair. She said the allergy care she has received over 25 years has helped reduce the number of hospital stays she has needed for other medical problems. Its limited my hospi tal visits, she said, and I dont react to the stimu li like owers, perfumes. I can tolerate them a little bit better than I did. The growing popularity of fragrances has caused at least one person to have a terrible allergic reaction that has no treatment available yet. Hes Brandon Silk, 16, of Bethlehem, Penn. He has been terribly allergic to the Axe body spray others his age have been wearing since he was in the fth grade. One day (in the fth grade) he went into ana phylactic shock, said his mother, Rosa, who wrote a story to raise aware ness about his problem. He stayed for days in the hospital as doctors tried to gure out what was the cause. ... They came to the conclusion that it was something airborne that he must have been exposed to. Eventually he came home from the hospital, but the terrible problem continued. ... Every time he went to school he was sick with head aches, trouble breathing, welts on his face and arms, blurred vision, stomach pains to the point where he had to be homebound for weeks at a time be fore he could go back to school. The physicians never were able to conclude what was causing Bran dons symptoms, but he gured it out himself. He walked into a school hall, felt the familiar allergic reaction starting and at the same time recognized a scent. It was Axe body spray. In a recent interview with the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Brandons mother said that one doctor got the list of Axes fragrance ingredients. But his work was of no help. That doctor indicated there is no testing for the chemicals, she said. She said she was not given the list, that the doctor was not allowed to pass it along because Axes content is considered proprietary information, or a trade secret. Brandon now does his school work at home to avoid encountering Axe fragrance at school. He also is seeing a Yale University occupation al and environmental medicine doctor, Car rie Redlich, who is pur suing an analysis of the Axe ingredients list for her patient. We will try to gure out what can we test on it and then go forward with a test for all of them, Rosa Silk said. I feel that she would be able to nd some sort of solution for Brandon. Brandons case is far more difcult than even the most highly allergic patients, said UPMCs Dr. Fajt, who has not seen the young man as a patient. The majority of pa tients we see with a true fragrance or perfume allergy get a dermati tis skin rash, she said. I would say that (Brandon) appears to be an extremely unique case. Dr. Fajt added, The new types of allergies are difcult to diagnose objectively because our traditional tests for al lergies focus on envi ronmental allergens trees, grasses so the traditional tests, blood or skin, have been de veloped to detect those type of agents. Aggressive allergies: When a rose may not smell so sweet DARRELL SAPP / MCT Elizabeth Sandhagen, of Whitehall Borough, Pa., talks after Dr. Deborah Gentile, who injected her with Xolair in Pittsburgh.

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Monday, June 30, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 RICHARD ASAMCTWas I nervous about becoming a dad for the rst time at age 40? You bet. But I was hardly the only guy intimidated by taking on what was by far the biggest responsibility of my life noth ing else came close. When faced with rst-time fatherhood at 49, I didnt know whether to celebrate with Champagne or hemlock, author Len Filppu quips in Prime Time Dads: 45 Reasons to Embrace Mid life Fatherhood (Bright Lights Press). He wrote the book to sing the praises of being an older dad once it became reality for him and he decided on Cham pagne. Filppu is now 63 and the father of two. Filppu, a former press secretary for the Jimmy Carter administration, is a funny guy with a hi larious book that has serious intentions. He makes the point, with a lighthearted approach, that we creaky older dads actually can make great fathers because weve sown our oats, gotten our egos fed, have enough maturity to be an equal partner in the care of a squirmy little bundle of joy that is, by nature, often un fathomable and always challenging. According to the Na tional Center for Health Statistics, birth rates per 1,000 men rose in 2012 from 2011 for men ages 35 to 49: up 2 percent for men ages 35 to 39 and 40 to 44, and 4 per cent for men ages 45 to 49. Rates remained unchanged for men 50 and older. Rates declined for men under age 30. Ten years ago, birth rates for men ages 35 to 39 were more than 7 percent lower and for ages 40-44, 4 percent lower. To fully explain this trend would take a book, but a major rea son: like mother, like fa ther. According to the aforementioned 2012 study, birth rates in creased for women ages 35 to 44 and held steady for ages 45 to 49. Other reasons for em bracing parenthood later in life are more subjective, involving concepts such as maturity and wisdom, which translate into a will ing acceptance of to days more diverse fa therhood roles, along with nancial security and a desire to leave a living legacy once oth er life goals often ca reer-related have been achieved. For after achieving professional success, some men realize they still havent climbed the Mount Everest of ac complishment: raising children, the proverbial hardest job in the world. Men, it turns out, also have a biolog ical clock. Life stretches out in the 40s, says Kristi Walsh, a marriage and family therapist based in Ventura, Calif. Some of the basic tasks of so lidifying an identity and place in the world have occurred, and ones energy circles back around to home and fami ly. Dragons have been slain, and lands have been conquered. By 40, there is less to prove. And time to enjoy a different kind of reward. Kids remind us to live in the moment and embrace the responsi bilities that add up to joy and selessness. Its turned out to be the best thing I ever did, Filppu says. I had wondered if I would have the stamina, if Id miss doing what I wanted when I wanted. Would I sit on bleachers at Little League games dozing and drooling like Homer Simpsons dad, while mumbling songs from Woodstock? Filppu admits now that he stereotyped himself, wielding an ageist bias toward himself. And none of his fears materialized. Older fathers say that what they might lack in pure physical stamina, which can be partially offset at the gym and with attention to nutrition, is balanced with a large toolbox of experience, skills and psy chological attributes, as Filppu puts it, that helps their parenting hit the bulls-eye more often than not.Older new dads savor wisdom that comes with age MCT PHOTO Len Filppu, top left, author of Prime Time Dads, poses for a portrait with wife Lucy Filppu, son Arthur and daughter Dori.

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 30, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTSComicswww.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

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Monday, June 30, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 www.dailycommercial.comDiversions352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper.YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, June 30, the 181st day of 2014. There are 184 days left in the year. On this date: In 1908, the Tunguska Event took place in Russia as an asteroid exploded above Siberia, leaving 800 square miles of scorched or blowndown trees. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, June 30, 2014: This year you will actively pursue a change on the home front. You might be eyeing a new addition or a different home, but you will go for what you want. You also are likely to receive a pay raise or promotion. If you are single, you will want to get very close to a potential suitor, and you even might consider living together. Dont push too hard to take a relationship to the next level; otherwise, your plans could backre. If you are attached, the two of you greet life from a far more dynamic perspective. As a couple, you spend many hours laughing and enjoying each other. LEO pushes you to achieve your goals. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You might feel out of sorts when you get up, but you could decide to blame it on everyone else. You have the ability to turn this situation around. Fatigue seems to mark a partnership. Each of you knows the others defenses too well. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Observe a situation involving your domestic life. Your ability to let go and allow others to do what they wish could be tested. Understand that people sometimes need to test their limits and ideas. Allow a roommate or family member to go through that experience. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) It could be nearly impossible to deal with someones negativity, as this person affects your daily life. Maintain a positive focus, and allow your creativity to ourish. Brainstorming with others who have similar mind-sets can add to the possibilities. CANCER (June 21-July 22) You are likely to sit on any feelings that are uncomfortable. Be aware of your spending right now, as you easily could go overboard. Ultimately, you know that you do not want to deal with the consequences of overindulging. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Listen carefully to someone elses ideas. You might have some questions that need to be claried. An unexpected opportunity could come in from out of left eld. Think before you act, even if you feel good about it. Remember, there are always consequences! VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Much seems to be going on behind the scenes. For now, it is best to keep information you have to yourself. When a close associate or loved one surprises you with the unexpected, you might wonder how you didnt see it coming. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You will want to consider a friends offer that previously was not on the table. You also will want to have a long-overdue conversation. A problem could surround you and a loved one. Be more forthright, but dont lose your temper. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Youll succeed beyond your wildest dreams, as you nally will be able to move a work or health matter past a stagnant point. You are full of ideas. Work with them and brainstorm with others, and your course will be easier and more fruitful. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Someone could get angry if you dont follow through as he or she would like you to. You have the ability to read between the lines, so make it OK to be more open and spontaneous. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) You might feel as if a loved one has pushed you hard the past few days. Resist telling this person off, and instead root out the real issue. The situation becomes much easier once you do. If you decide to take the lead in a project, you could be shocked by the results. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18) You might want to be more open with others. Your thinking is far-reaching, though you have a tendency to think youre always right. A conversation with someone could help you see other possibilities. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) A loved one might be pushing too hard to have the outcome he or she wants in a controversial discussion the two of you have been having. Observe the different approaches this person attempts, and maintain a sense of humor. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORYDEAR ABBY: At 2 / p.m., July Fourth, I would love nothing better than for all Americans to stop briey and give our country a ring ... well, THREE rings to be exact. On July 4, 1963, President John F. Kennedy proclaimed the ringing of bells nationwide with the words, Lets ring freedom bells! I was a White House aide then, and I vividly recall how exciting it was when bells rang across the nation coast to coast. Since then, many Amer icans have forgotten to keep the tradition going. Lets start again! From one American to another, I ask all citizens to help me revive the ringing of bells at 2 / p.m. this July Fourth in celebration of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. Its easy. Ring a bell, shake your keys, tap a glass or nd a bell-ringing app on your smartphone. It will give our country a much-needed sense of unity and connection to our past as one nation, one people. The Ironworkers, Sheet Metal Workers and Fireghters Inter national Unions of the AFL-CIO, The National Cartoonists Society and Malmark Inc. have joined with No Greater Love in this special celebration of our freedom and the guardians who protect us our troops, reghters and police. Please, Abby, make your millions of readers aware of this effort. As inscribed on the Liber ty Bell, Let us proclaim liberty throughout the land unto all the inhabitants thereof. CARMELLA LASPADA, FOUNDER, NO GREATER LOVE DEAR CARMELLA: Im glad to help. I agree that shared traditions are the glue that binds us together as a nation. So readers, on July Fourth, take a moment to quietly reect on what this holiday is all about. Then make a joyful noise and thank God for his blessings on our country and the freedoms we enjoy today. Thats the American spirit! DEAR ABBY: My ancee and I share a credit card that was opened under my name. I use it for gas and household or family needs. She uses it for personal things such as buying dolls for her collection. I was informed that I will no longer be able to use the card after the last statement we got. (I had spent more than $100 on gas for the month.) I feel I am using the card for the purpose for which it was intended. Buying things that arent for the family but for her personal enjoy ment wasnt our agreement. Im not sure how to approach her about this without it becoming an argument. She has a spending problem. I recently found a job, so I contribute nancially to the household. This is something that has been thrown in my face every time we talk about money. I want to see the statement so I can compare who spent how much on what, but when I ask to see it, she gets defensive. IN THE DARK IN MICHIGAN DEAR IN THE DARK: If the credit card is in your name, then you are responsible for anything that is purchased with it. The statements are addressed to you, and you have a right to see them. That your ancee is refusing to show them to you is a sure sign that she has something to hide. Thats why you must take the card away from her to ensure that she isnt putting you into a nancial hole you wont be able to dig yourself out of. And because the lady cant seem to control her spending, Im urging you to think long and hard before mar rying her, because after you do, you will be responsible for her debts.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Let freedom ring from coast to coast this fourth of July JEANNE PHILLIPSDEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGARBIGARS STARS ComeJoinUson July4thforOur Pa trioticAnimal Pa ra de &ReptileProgram rfntfbFa milyFunat Fa milyPrices!Callforadmissionpricesandhours.nn July4th-SummerFun AnimalsonParade! to Pe t& Fe ed r fffnt b rf nftbWo rkinggalleryoflocalartistsANTIQUEDEA LERSWANTED (352)460-4806 rfntb fa cebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburg D002326

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