Daily Commercial

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Title:
Daily Commercial
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Newspaper
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English
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Halifax Media Group
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Rod Dixon
Place of Publication:
Leesburg, Floirda
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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AA00019282:00258


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Minimumchargesapply.Cannotbecombinedwithothercouponsoroffers.Combinedlivingareas,L-shapedroomsandrooms ov er300sq.ft. ar econsidered2area s. Baths, halls,large wa lk-i n closetsan d arearu gsar epricedseparately. Offerdoes no t in clude protecto r. Residentialonl y. Cannotbeusedfor re stor ationser vices. Mu stpresen t couponattimeofservice Va lidatparticipatinglocationsonly.Certain re strictionsmayapply.Callfordetails.BEYONDCARPET CLEANINGCARPET|TILE&GROUT|HARDWOOD|UPHOLSTERY|AIRDUCT728-1668 394-1739fla#CAC18 1640 8 U.S. TIES PORTUGAL 2-2 IN WORLD CUP PLAY, SPORTS B1WEKIVA PARKWAY: Department of Transportation plans discussion, A3 LIVING HEALTHY: Electronic cigarette makers under re, C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, June 23, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 174 4 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED C9 COMICS C8 CROSSWORDS D4 DIVERSIONS C7 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 STATE/REGION A3 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A9 NATION A6 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A10.92 / 73Times of clouds and sun. 50 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comLeesburg native Elizabeth Fechtel, 20, will represent the Sunshine State in the Miss America Pageant in Atlan tic City, N.J., on Sept. 14 after winning the Miss Florida title Saturday night at the Mahaffey Theatre in St. Petersburg. I am feeling great exhausted but great, Fechtel said Sunday, following a jam-packed day of interviews, meetings and signing contracts of duties she will fulll throughout her reign. Im going to be traveling the state all summer making appearances and will be home for just a few days before heading to Miami to begin preparations for Miss America, she said. The daughter of Vince and Dixie Fechtel of Leesburg, the New Miss Florida said her platform in the Miss America or ganization will be preparing youth with life skills they can use once they have graduated high school. Financial literacy, entrepreneurship, work-related skills. I want to go in and teach them how to make decisions that are effective in the future, Fechtel said, noting among her college peers, she has found there has been a lack of education regarding credit card debt and student loans. She also wants to reach out to students at the elementary level to prepare them to think about their potential in the workforce. I want to work more with Junior Achievement, she added, noting its a viable program that she strongly supports. Elizabeth is no stranger to pageants. She received her rst tiara as Miss Leesburg in 2010, followed by being named Miss Orlandos Outstanding Teen, Miss Floridas Outstanding Teen and won her rst national title as Miss Americas Outstanding Leesburg native to compete in Miss America Pageant PHOTO COURTESY OF MISS FLORIDA PAGEANT Leesburg native Elizabeth Fechtel, 20, is crowned Miss Florida on Saturday.I am feeling great exhausted but great. Im going to be traveling the state all summer making appearances and will be home for just a few days before heading to Miami to begin preparations for Miss America.Elizabeth FechtelMiss Florida QASSIM ABDUL-ZAHRAAssociated PressBAGHDAD Sun ni militants on Sunday captured two bor der crossings, one along the frontier with Jordan and the other with Syr ia, security and military ofcials said, as they pressed on with their offensive in one of Iraqs most restive regions. The fall dealt Iraqs embattled Shiite prime minister a further blow and brought the war to the doorstep of Jordan, a key ally of the Unit ed States that also bor ders embattled Syria to its north. The blitz by the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant in Iraqs vast western desert take the al-Qaida-breakaway group closer to its dream of carving out a purist Islamic state straddling both Syria and Iraq. Controlling the bor ders with Syria will also help it supply fellow ghters in Syria with weaponry looted from Iraqi militants seize 2 more border crossings AP PHOTOMilitants from the al-Qaida-inspired Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) patrol in Fallujah, Iraq. Associated PressWASHINGTON President Barack Obama, in charting a new phase of American military engagement in Iraq, pledges that his war-weary country will not be dragged back into a lengthy conict or become ensnarled in mission creep. But recent U.S. military history is full of warning signs about the difculty of keeping even a limited mission from expanding Obamas test: Try to avoid mission creep in Iraq MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillardives@dailycommercial.comBig box stores, with their many aisles of mer chandise and aggressive shoplifting policies, account for the vast major ity of shoplifting reports. Walmart, Kohls, Tar get and other big box re tailers generate most of the shoplifting reports throughout Lake Coun ty, according to statistics from various area law en forcement agencies. In Clermont, 99 of the 105 reports of shoplifting this year have taken place in big box stores, accord ing to police. Of those 105 reports, 74 occurred at Walmart, followed by Home Depot with 10. The Walmart on Citrus Boulevard in Lake Coun ty has a distinct location. Its sits partly in Fruitland Park and partly in Lees burg. Fruitland Park Sgt. Beckie Sirolli said all 43 reports of retail thefts they received this year came from Walmart. The shoplifting problem at Walmart seems to be a nationwide issue. CNN reported in 2006 that police were making as many as six arrests a day at some Walmarts for retail theft, and the company announced it was moving away from its ze ro-tolerance policy on prosecuting shoplifters. It decided it would prosecute only those caught taking merchandise worth $25 or more.Big box stores a frequent target of shoplifters HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO The Walmart on State Road 200 is shown in Ocala.SEE THEFT | A2SEE IRAQ | A2SEE OBAMA | A2SEE PAGEANT | A10

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 23, 2014 HOW TO REACH US JUNE 22CASH 3 . ............................................... 9-9-9 Afternoon . .......................................... 6-4-0 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 6-7-0-9 Afternoon . ....................................... 6-5-2-2FLORIDALOTTERY JUNE 21FANTASY 5 . ........................... 5-12-17-24-29 FLORIDA LOTTO . ............... 8-18-31-34-36-47 POWERBALL ...................... 5-6-37-41-5426 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONSTEVE SKAGGS, publisher352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comPAUL RYAN, digital editor352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com.CALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. The New York Times re ported the change in pol icy, citing internal docu ments from Walmart that said it would only press charges against those be tween the ages of 18 and 64 who take at least $25 worth of goods. Former ly its policy was to press charges against anyone who took at least $3 in goods. Walmart is far from the only big box store to have problems with shoplifting in Lake County. Of the 142 shoplift ing incidents reported in Lady Lake since Jan 3, 2012, 62 came from Kohls. In a recent interview, Eustis police spokesman Robert Simken said they had had 67 retail theft re ports within the past year. His department does not keep statistics on indi vidual stores, but he said Bealls led the way for re tail theft reports. Simken added in light of the size of the Eus tis Police Department, they dont have any special units assigned to the store. However, we have a strong positive working relationship with the loss prevention ofcer with Bealls, which helps our efforts to reduce thefts, Simken said. Many law enforce ment ofcials attributed the high number of shoplifting reports at big box stores to the fact that those stores have large se curity staffs that aggres sively deal with shop lifters. Lady Lake Police Chief Chris McKinstry attributed Kohls high number to an aggressive loss prevention policy as well as their willingness to prosecute. Some stores never call us because they would rather let merchandise walk out than risk a lawsuit or court time, McK instry said. In fact, many big box stores rely on their on their own security teams. Big box retailers typically have manned cameras planted throughout the store as well as roaming undercover security per sonnel. We nd that the businesses with the most ag gressive loss prevention typically call us more of ten, McKinstry said. THEFT FROM PAGE A1 Iraqi warehouses, signicantly reinforcing its ability to battle beleaguered Syrian government forces. If they succeed in their quest, they could further unsettle the already volatile Middle East and serve as a magnet for Jihadists from across the world much like al-Qaida at tracted extremists in Taliban-ruled Afghanistan. The Iraqi ofcials said the militants of the Islamic State took over the Turaibil crossing with Jordan and the al-Walid crossing with Syr ia after government forces there pulled out. The ofcials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to the media. The capture of the two crossings follows the fall on Friday and Satur day of the towns of Qaim, Rawah, Anah and Rutba They are all in the Sunni dominated Anbar province, where the militants have since Jan uary controlled the city of Fallujah and parts of the provincial capital Ramadi. Rutba is on the main highway from Baghdad to the two border crossing and the capture has effec tively cut the Iraqi capitals main land route to Jordan. It is a key ar tery for passengers and goods and has been infrequently used in re cent months because of deteriorat ing security. Irans supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, said he was opposed to any U.S. intervention in the Iraqi crisis, accusing Washington of fomenting the unrest. His comments appeared to quash recent speculation that the two rivals might coop erate in addressing the shared threat posed by the Islamic extremists. The two crossings and the four towns are the rst seized in An bar since the Islamic State and its allies overran the city of Fallujah and parts of Ramadi. Government troops have not been able to dis lodge them after months of ghting. The capture of Rawah on the Eu phrates River and the nearby town of Anah appeared to be part of a march toward a key dam in the city of Haditha, the destruction of which would damage the countrys electri cal grid and cause major ooding. The dam was built in 1986. Iraqi military ofcials said more than 2,000 troops were quickly dis patched to the site of the Haditha dam to protect it. They spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to the media. Chief military spokesman, Lt. Gen. Qassim al-Moussawi, ac knowledged the fall of the Anbar towns, saying government forces had made a tactical retreat and planned to retake them. He pro vided no further details. There has been no ofcial comment on the capture of the al-Walid and Turaibil crossings. The Islamic State and allied mil itants have carved out a large efdom along the Iraqi-Syrian border. Al-Malikis Shiite-dominated government has struggled to push back against the Sunni militants, who have seized large swaths of the north since taking control of the second-largest city of Mosul on June 10. Iraq has requested U.S. airstrikes to help halt the advance, but Pres ident Barack Obama has yet to or der any. He has instead called on Iraqi leaders to form a more rep resentative government in thin ly-veiled criticism of al-Maliki. Khamenei on Sunday said he was opposed to any U.S. intervention in the country. We strongly oppose the inter vention of the U.S. and others in the domestic affairs of Iraq, Khamenei, who has the nal say over state policy, was quoted as saying by the IRNA state news agency, in his rst reaction to the crisis. The main dispute in Iraq is be tween those who want Iraq to join the U.S. camp and those who seek an independent Iraq, said Khame nei. The U.S. aims to bring its own blind followers to power. The U.S. has long accused Iran of meddling in Iraq, including organizing and backing Shiite militias following the 2003 invasion. Al-Maliki, who has led the country since 2006 and has not yet secured a third term after Aprils parliamentary elections, has increasingly turned to Iranian-backed Shiite militias and volunteers to bolster his beleaguered security forces. Thousands of Shiite militiamen paraded through Baghdad and other cities on Saturday, brandishing a massive arsenal in a show of force that promised to ramp up sectarian tensions. Al-Maliki has come under grow ing pressure to reach out to dis affected Kurds and Sunnis, with many blaming his failure to pro mote reconciliation for the coun trys worst crisis since the U.S. military withdrew in late 2011. Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, the most respected voice for Iraqs Shiite majority, on Friday joined calls for al-Maliki to reach out to the Kurdish and Sunni minorities. The U.S. has been drawn back into the conict. It is deploying up to 300 military advisers to join some 275 troops in and around Iraq to provide security and sup port for the U.S. Embassy and oth er American interests. IRAQ FROM PAGE A1 AP PHOTO Abu Rasool al-Kubaisi clears debris at his home after a bombing in Fallujah, Iraq, on Sunday.and extending. The prospect that this latest mis sion in Iraq could follow that pattern is particu larly risky for Obama, given that he has staked so much of his legacy on having brought Ameri cas long war there to a close. Already some of the White Houses closest allies worry that Obamas plan to send in 300 special operations forces to train the Iraqi military could be the rst step in pulling the U.S. back into Iraqs violent sectarian ght. I think that you have to be careful sending special forces because thats a number that has a tendency to grow, said House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi of California, one of Obamas staunchest supporters. Anna Galland, the ex ecutive director of the liberal group MoveOn. org, said even a limited mission is a dangerous and troubling development that threatens to lead to broader military engagement. Indeed, the U.S. has seen small operations escalate before. The wars that began in Iraq and Afghanistan in the last decade were intended to be combat missions from the start. Few people expected at the time that the Iraq war would drag on for more than eight years, the Afghan conict for more than a dozen years or that the U.S. troop presence in each country would peak above 100,000. Obama acknowledged the risks of mis sion creep when he out lined plans Thursday to help Iraq combat the Is lamic insurgency that has made gains with lighting speed and, ac cording to administration ofcials, poses a threat to U.S. interests. The Green Beret mili tary advisers set to ar rive soon in Iraq will join a previously announced contingent of 275 U.S. forces sent in the last week to se cure the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad and other American interests. The deployments mark a sharp shift for a president who over saw the full withdrawal of American forces from Iraq in late 2011 after Washington and Baghdad failed to reach an agreement to keep a few thousand troops in place. While Obama re peatedly has cited the end of the war as one of his chief achievements, his decision to return some troops to Iraq now raises the question of whether an asterisk ultimately may accompany that claim. Administration ofcials insist Obama does not intend to com mit the U.S. to anoth er lengthy war in Iraq or put American forces in combat roles. Signaling his reluctance to re-en gage, Obama also decided to hold off launching airstrikes, though he left the prospect of targeted strikes on the table. OBAMA FROM PAGE A1 AP PHOTO President Barack Obama answers questions on violence in Iraq during his meeting with Australian prime minister Tony Abbott on June 12 at the White House in Washington.Irans supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, said he was opposed to any U.S. intervention in the Iraqi crisis, accusing Washington of fomenting the unrest.

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Monday, June 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LEESBURG Cecil Clark Chevrolet celebrates 42 yearsCecil Clark Chevrolet, celebrating its 42nd year in business, invites the public to share in a Business After Hours event at the dealership, 8843 U.S. Highway 441, which is also touting a newly remodeled showroom, service write-up area and customer lounge. The Leesburg Area Chamber of Commerce is hosting the event on Thursday from 5:30 to 7 / p.m., with food and beverages catered by Vics Embers. To RSVP, call the dealership at 352-787-6888.TAVARES YMCA will host heart health lecture TuesdayA heart health lecture with car diologist, J. Henry Lesmes will be held at 9 / a.m. Tuesday at the Golden Triangle YMCA, 1465 David Walker Drive in Tavares, and is open to the public. The Partners in Health and Free Senior Program will offer helpful information on ensuring your heart is healthy. For information, call the YMCA at 352-343-1144 or email GoldenTriangleYMCA@cfymca.org.TAVARES Lake County library system seeks tutorsTutors are needed at Lake County libraries for those who struggle with reading and for those learning the English language. Training for interested volunteers will be conducted on July 8 in Tavares, with sessions teaching new volunteers how to coach adults one-on-one and in small groups, through the Lake County Adult Literacy Program designed to help adult learners improve their skills and meet goals. No previous experience is necessary. For information or to sign-up for the free training session, call Rachel Dellinger at 352-253-6183 or email RDellinger@lakeline.lib..us.COLEMAN Coleman airport to host fly-in and fundraiserThe Free Flight Airport, at 1511 Taylor Ave. in Coleman, is the place to be to celebrate Independence Day and raise money for local animals in need from 8 / a.m. to 1 / p.m. on July 5. A pancake breakfast at 8 / a.m., donated by EAA Chapter 534 in Leesburg, will start off the day. A chicken lunch will be offered at noon, and there will be numerous events throughout the day, including skydiving demos and chance drawings for airplane rides. Proceeds benet the local Humane Society/SPCA of Sumter County in Lake Panasoffkee. Donations for meals and pets will be accepted. For information, call Frank Arenas at 352-748-6629 or the Humane Society at 352-793-9117, or go to www.hsspca.org.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 Staff ReportThe Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) will hold a public infor mation meeting in Mount Dora on Tuesday about Wekiva Parkway Sections 3A and 3B in Lake County. The public meeting at the Mount Dora Commu nity Center is being held to review the latest preliminary design plans, FDOT spokesman Steve Olson said in a press release. The Wekiva Parkway project itself will connect State Road 429 to State Road 417, completing a 27-mile beltway around northwest metropolitan Orlando, according to the FDOTs project website. This estimated $1.6 billion project includes $500 mil lion of non-toll road improvements including: %  %  Provide an alternative to Interstate 4. %  %  Relieve State Road 46, U.S. Highway 441 and other local roads of trafc congestion between Or ange, Lake and Seminole counties. %  %  Improve safety to reduce vehicle crash fatalities, particularly on SR 46. %  %  Develop a transpor tation facility that minimizes impact on Wekiva River Basin resources, and that specically improves wildlife habitat connectivity between conservation lands and reduces vehicle-wildlife conicts. In Lake County, the FDOT website states the work will include: %  %  Widening 7 miles of SR 46 in Lake and Seminole counties. %  %  Rebuilding the US 441/SR 46 interchange in Mount Dora. %  %  Shifting the County Road 46A connection to SR 46 so wildlife can move more safely between hab itats. The work in Lake County FDOT plans Wekiva Parkway discussionNext school year every el ementary student in Lake County will start and end the school day at the same time. The same goes for mid dle and high school students as Lake County Schools standardize bell schedules for the 20142015 school year, accord ing to a press release from the district. The new bell schedule is: %  %  High school 7:20 / a.m. to 2:35 / p.m. %  %  Elementary school 8:25 / a.m. to 3:15 / p.m. %  %  Middle school 9:20 / a.m. to 4:10 / p.m. With many schools hav ing an independent bell schedule, it presented challenges for Transportation to ensure each student arrived at school on time, John Davis, Chief of Operations for Lake County Schools, said in the release. A uniform bell schedule was proposed as part of the High School Redesign opportunity outlined in the EngageLCS initiative. Through the $1.2 million grant-funded EngageLCS project, Lake County Schools is evaluating the best use of its existing nancial resources. The new bell schedule coupled with transi tioning high school sched ules from a block model (four periods a day) to a seven-period day will increase the instructional time for each high school class period by as much as 40 hours per year, the press release said. There are a lot of good things happening in our schools, but we have not ed some areas of concerns, Dr. David Chris tiansen, chief academic ofcer for Lake County Schools, said in the re lease. These changes will have a positive ef fect with student achieve ment, resource optimization, teacher support and meeting the needs of every student to ensure they are college and career ready upon graduation.Lake schools plan to synchronize bell scheduleSEE WEKIVA | A4 LINDA CHARLTONSpecial to the Daily CommercialJune is blackber ry time. The little wild berries have ripened in the woods, but the thornless type with the big ber ries are ready at area U-picks farms such as H&H Berry Farms. Located off CR 455, within sight of the Florida Turnpike, there is about an acre of berry bushes and vines at the farm. Shelli and Eric Ghezzi are pretty typical customers. We just live right around the corner, Eric said. The ber ries, theyre beautiful. Their blueber ries were great. We thought wed try the blackberries. The farm is owned by Richard and Debbie Hoffman. Richard Hoffman said the couple basically got into the blackberry business by MOUNT DORABlackberries are ripe for the picking AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comDesign work has begun on the third phase of the utility and streetscape project in downtown Mount Dora. BESH Engineering of Tavares has started the design work, Mount Dora Public Communications Ofcer Kelda Senior wrote in an email, and de signs are expected to be presented to the city council in September. The city council approved the $171,775 for design work with BESH at its June 3 meeting, according to Senior. Phase three is proposed for Don nelly Street from Fourth Avenue to Third Avenue and on Fourth Avenue from Alexander to Baker Street, ac cording to a city council agenda. Senior said those are the pro posed construction areas, but the PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Eric Ghezzi has just picked a at of tray of blackberries. BELOW: Dark-colored ripe blackberries are shown alongside red ones, which will be ripe in a few days. Phase three planning for downtown work begins THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comAfter a year and a half of issues with the Veterans Administration and concerns about being evicted, Korean War veteran Harold Wulf, 81, can now unpack his belongings and stay at his assisted living facility. It is excellent news for me. I am pleased by it and in knowing that I am going to be living here, said Wulf, who was featured in a Daily Commercial story on June 9 about his struggles with the VA. The next day, the veteran received ofcial ap proval, via a phone call from a VA representative in St. Petersburg, that his funds were forthcoming. Wulf had been waiting for an aid and attendance pension benet of TAVARESWulf gets VA funds, escapes evictionSEE WORK | A4SEE PICK | A4SEE FUNDS | A5

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 23, 2014 ABINGDONAUCTIONSLLC(AB-2985)rf(NexttoPatsPawn&Gun)(GPSADDRESS2301EASTMAINST.)352-508-5522 INLEESBURG1/2miWESToftheAIRPORTON441Info&Pictures@www.auctionmyestate.com RESTAURANTLIQUIDATION!WEDNESDAY,JUNE25th@10AMKATHYSCAF390WBurleighBlvd.,Tavares,FL32778 ENTIRECONTENTSINWHOLEORINPART!FURNITURE+MORE-SUNDAYJUNE29th@1PMDiningRoom,Kitchen,Sofas,Chairs,Rockers,Recliners,Chests,Dressers,Chairs,Dressers,Curios,Lamps,Rugs,Dcor&More!********************************************************************************************* D003179 RETURNOFLAKE COUNTYHONOR FLIGHTVETERANSPlease We lcomeArea Ve terans re turningfrom Wa shingtonDCwith aPatrioticHeroesHomecoming r f f fComegreetthe Ve terans.Bringchairsandafriend.We dnesday,June25th,20149:30pmAmericanLegionPost347,RollingAcresRd.&CR466,LadyLakeFormoreinformationcall: 352-432-1382 www.villageshonoright.org OBITUARIESCarl AnzelmoCarl Anzelmo, 102, Winter Haven, Florida formerly of Leesburg, FL passed away on June 20, 2014 in Winter Hav en, Florida. Mr. Anzelmo was born on May 1, 1912 in Chicago, Illinois to his parents Dominick and Josephine Anzelmo. He had worked for General Motors in the Electro Motor Divi sion. He moved to Leesburg in 2000 from Ev ergreen Park, IL and then to Winter Haven a year ago. He was a Past Master Mason belonging to the Englewood Lodge and the Oaklawn Lodge both in Illinois and a current member of the Leesburg Lodge #58. He is survived by his loving son: Donald C. Anzelmo (Carolyn) of Winter Haven, FL; a daughter: Josephine Messina of Leesburg, FL; two grandchildren: Dorothy Bandes (Brian) and Donald Anzelmo (Elizabeth); three great-grandchildren: Brian Bandes, Christo pher Bandes and Cynthia Bulow; a great great-granddaughter: Kenley Bandes. He was preceded in death by his loving wife Dorothy, granddaughter Carlyn and a great-grandson Greg. A Funeral Ser vice will be held on Saturday, June 28, 2014 at 11:00AM at Page-Theus Funeral Home, Lees burg, Florida with Entombment to follow at Hillcrest Memorial Gar dens, Leesburg, Florida. A Visitation will be held on Friday, June 27, 2014 from 3:00PM to 7:00PM at Page-Theus Funeral Home, Leesburg, Flor ida. Services entrusted to Page-Theus Fu neral Home, Leesburg, FL. On line condolences and memories may be shared by visiting www.pagetheusfuner alhome.com.DEATH NOTICESHelen G. CottrillHelen G. Cottrill, 91, of Leesburg died Friday, June 20, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg, Fl.IN MEMORYis divided into two sec tions, 3A and 3B. Olson said the Section 3A project limits are on SR 46 from east of Vista View Lane to east of Round Lake Road. The project consists of designing the widening and other nontolled improvements to 1.4 miles of SR 46 and Round Lake Road. Work will include designing medians and turn lanes, drainage, lighting, sign and pavement markings, utilities and other roadway features. Con struction is expected to begin in 2017 and con tinue for 18 months. The Section 3B proj ect consists of designing the US 441 yover inter change at SR 46, as well as road widening and other non-tolled im provements along SR 46 from west of US 441 to east of Vista View Lane in Mount Dora, accord ing to Olsen. Work will include designing roadway widening, bridges, trafc signals, medians and turn lanes, drainage, lighting, sign and pavement markings, utilities and other roadway features. Construction is expected to be gin in 2017 and take 24 months to complete. The meeting is scheduled from 6-8 / p .m. at the Community Center at 520 N. Baker St. Olson said the meeting is an informal open house where plans are avail able for review and proj ect staff will be available to address questions. Project information can be viewed at www. wekivaparkway.com or www.croads.com. WEKIVA FROM PAGE A3 city council will decide what will be construct ed after the designs are completed. Theyre (going to) design all of this and then bring it back to council and then council will decide what sec tions they want to actu ally construct, she said. It will be the same type of work that is go ing on currently. The whole down town infrastructure needs to be upgraded and replaced so obviously were just doing it in sections, Senior said. She said the work will always be in the sum mer to avoid the festival season. The work could take place next summer, but Senior could not say for sure as the designs still have to go to council before fund ing is approved. Phase three will be the last major part of the work, Senior said, adding they will probably need to do some smaller sections in the future. Senior said the proj ects expand and update the infrastructure and make the downtown more walkable. It goes beyond just simply beautication, its actually upgrading the infrastructure of our historic downtown so that its sustainable for years and years to come, Senior said. The second phase is currently taking place on Donnelly Street from Fourth to Fifth Avenue and on Third Avenue from Dora Drawdy Way to Baker Street, and in cludes water, sewer and stormwater upgrades and sidewalk renovations at a price not to ex ceed $3 million. Phase one was com pleted last summer and included work on a sec tion of Third Avenue, a part of Fifth Avenue, Alexander Street from Fourth to Third Avenue, the revamping of Sun set Park and the conver sion of Fourth Avenue from Alexander Street to Lake Dora into a pedestrian mall. WORK FROM PAGE A3 accident. They sold tangerines off their proper ty for quite a while and had been given some thorned blackberries, which Hoffman says his son and his sons friends were particularly fond of. Relatives in Texas sent Hoffman thornless blackberries on a number of occasions, but none of the plants did well. When Hoffman came across a thriving stand of thornless blackberries, he decided hed try some. Soon, Hoffman had more blackberries then he (or his son) could use. So the two took a couple of ats of ber ries to a local produce co-op. The berries were sold before the Hoffmans even put the berries down, when a woman saw them walking in. H&H also has a location in Sumterville, and there is a separate blackberry U-pick in Oxford. Back Road Berries near The Villages has about 4 1/2 acres of berries, according to co-owner Mary Beth Locke. As is true at H&H, the blackberry varieties at Back Road were developed at the University of Arkansas, with some varieties requiring as little as 300 chill hours. Thats 300 hours below 45 degrees, Locke says. In Florida thats a lot. Farmers at both H&H and Back Road Berries gure theres about two to three weeks left in the picking season weather permitting. Rain is the biggest threat. Doug McCormick of Blue Bayou Farms in Yalaha grows blackber ries, but his crop came in early and hes done for the season. Explaining what heavy rain will do to blackberries, he says, It lls the berries with water instead of sugar. The day after a rain, you might as well throw the berries away. The most recent year for which ofcial blackPICK FROM PAGE A3 LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL A tray of fresh-picked blackberries is shown. MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillardives@dailycommercial.comTavares residents may see their insurance rates lowered thanks to a drop in the citys re department Insurance Service Organization re suppression rate. Fire ofcials reported at their city council meeting this week that effective Sept. 1, the departments ISO rating will slide from 5 to 3 for Tavares estimat ed 5,000 residences and busi nesses. An ISO rating of 1 is the best. City ofcials cite the drop as resulting from a February evaluation of its: %  en Fire department equip ment, stafng, training and community risk reduction. %  en Emergency communications, including emergency reporting and dispatching. %  en Water supply and ow including inspections, testing of hydrants, alternative water supply and evaluation of available water for ghting res. To receive an ISO rating of Class 3 is a signicant achievement for a re department of our size, said Tavares Fire Chief Richard Keith, who coordinated the preparation for the Febru ary ISO inspection. Keith added the department has had an ISO rating of 5 at least since 2006 when he be came a reghter there. According to the ISO website, the organization collects infor mation on municipal re-protection efforts in communities throughout the country. ISO analyzes data using a Fire Suppression Rating Schedule and then assigns a Public Protection Classication from 1 to 10. Class 1 represents superior property re protection, and Class 10 in dicates that the areas re-sup pression program doesnt meet the minimum criteria. Joyce Ross, city spokeswoman, said the lower rating is im portant to residential and com mercial property owners (5,000 based on those connected to waterlines) because most U.S. insurers use the rating infor mation as part of their decision-making when issuing policies and determining premiums. Ross added Tavares residents are advised to contact the insur ance company that issues their homeowners or commercial building policy to see how the improved ISO rating may affect their coverage. According to Helen Vilissov, an administrative ofcer with the department, Clermont and Eustis have the only other re departments in the county with an ISO rating of 3. Leesburg Fire Department has an ISO rating of 2 and Grov eland and Mount Dora have a 4 rating, although the latter two also are expected to be lowered to Class 3 rating soon.Tavares Fire Department lowers fire suppression ratingberry production gures are available is 2012. In that year ,the USDA Census of Agriculture showed six acres of blackber ries harvested in Lake County and 22 acres harvested in Sumter County. Mary Beth Locke gures theres less than that now. Theres fewer blackberry farms now than there were a few years ago, she says. Theyre very difcult to maintain. They just require a tying and pruning throughout the year. We basically live with them. Before picking at any of the blackber ry locations, it is a good idea to check for hours and availability. H&H can be reached at 800-716-4740, or via their Facebook page. Back Road Ber ries can be reached via their Web site, www.backroadber ries.com, or by phone at 352-303-3213. Back Road is normally open every day but Monday, but is about to close for a few days for ripening. We have loads of red berries, Locke says. They just need a few days to ripen.We have loads of red berries. They just need a few days to ripen.Mary Beth LockeCo-owner of H&H Berry Farms

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Monday, June 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PA RK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904David Wa lkerDr. (InPublixPlaza)352-308-8318THEVILLAGES352-205-7804THEVILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679 CR OW NS$399Each(3ormorepervisit) D2751/ Re g $59 9 ea. Po rcelainonnon Pr eciousme ta l DENTURES$74 9EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SA VIN GSThepatientand anyotherperson re sponsibleforpaymenthastherightto re fusetopay cancelpaymentorbe re imbursed forpaymentforanyotherservices, ex aminationwhic h isperformedas a re sultofandwithin72hoursof re spondingtothe advertisemen t fo r th ediscountedfeeor re ducedfeeserviceortreatment.Feesmay va ry duetocomplexityofcase.This discount does notapplytothosepatients wi thdentalplans.Feesare mi nimal. PR ICESARESUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBUR GM T. DORASunris e Dent al Tr i-D ental r ffnt bb fConsultation and Second Op inion No Ch arge!n t t NEW PA TIENTSPECIAL COMPLETESETOFX-RAYS(D0210) CLEANINGBYHYGIENIST(D110) EX AMINATIONBY DO CTOR(D0150) SECONDOPINION$49Reg.$155(INABSENCEOFGUMDISEASE ) D002409 $1,758 for assistance in his everyday living needs at Grand Court in Tavares, while incur ring debt as he waited for the funds. We were led to believe that it was a slam dunk case and that it would be no time at all that it would be ap proved, Wulf said of the paperwork led in Janu ary 2013. A few months after he applied, some of the program guidelines were changed. I fell through the cracks, Wulf said, which forced him to reapply and go through more paperwork and a doctors approval in or der to qualify. Wulf received three months back pay from the VA last week, and he was even more pleased to work out nancial ar rangements with Grand Courts management that will allow him to stay at the assisted liv ing facility. They are just going all out to help. Im really happy, he said. Paul Wulf is glad that his father doesnt have to worry about being evicted, yet he believes the VA gave his father a bum deal. He said his father had to move into an assisted living facili ty before he could apply for the VA aid and attendance benet. The unfortunate part to this whole thing is the fact that the VA just washed its hands and says, Heres three months (back pay), Paul said. He only got the three months out of 16 months. In dollars, Dad is in the hole. He got a little over $5,000, so he is left $23,000 in debt. The father and sons advice to other veter ans and spouses inter ested in learning about the aid and attendance benet is to go to a per son who knows the pro gram well, has kept up with the changes and knows the law. Paul warns veterans to be watchful of annu ity salesmen disguising themselves as VA consultants ling the paperwork. The problem is that the VA has this benet set up in the worst pos sible fashion, because somebody should not be having to pay for (assisted living) before they can apply for it, Paul said. To actually expect somebody to pay for something that they cant afford with the hope of qualifying for it, that is just pitiful. It should be ready to start paying for them from day one. The whole thing that Dad went through would have been avoided if we could have applied for this and the benet had been ready for him, and then we move him into assisted living rath er than doing it the oth er way around. Paul believes there needs to be huge changes in the way the VA administers the aid and attendance pen sion benet. Luckily dad lives in a community where they really did look out for him and tried to help him as much as they could, Paul said of Grand Court. Dad would make as much of a payment as he could with his Social Security. According to the Veterans Administration website regarding aid and attendance, a vet eran would have to meet one of the following conditions to be considered: %  en You require the aid of another person in or der to perform personal functions required in everyday living, such as bathing, feeding, dressing, attending to the wants of nature, adjust ing prosthetic devic es or protecting your self from the hazards of your daily environment. %  en You are bedridden, in that your disability or disabilities requires that you remain in bed apart from any prescribed course of convales cence or treatment. %  en You are a patient in a nursing home due to mental or physical in capacity. %  en Your eyesight is limited to a corrected 5/200 visual acui ty or less in either eyes; or concentric contraction of the visual eld to 5 degrees or less. To learn more, go to www.benets.va.gov. FUNDS FROM PAGE A3 The unfortunate part to this whole thing is the fact that the VA just washed its hands and says, Heres three months (back pay). He only got the three months out of 16 months. In dollars, Dad is in the hole. He got a little over $5,000, so he is left $23,000 in debt.Paul Wulf PAUL ELIASAssociated PressSAN FRANCISCO Lawyers have been given the green light to scan the social media sites of jurors. The American Bar Association says its ethical for lawyers to scour online for public ly available musings of citizens called for jury service and even jurors in deliberations. But the ABA does warn lawyers against actively following or friending jurors or otherwise invading their private Internet areas. Though judges now universally admonish jurors to refrain from discussing trials on so cial media, the nationwide lawyers group for the rst time is ad dressing how deeply attorneys, their investigators and their con sultants can probe for information that might signal leanings of po tential jurors, or un earth juror misconduct during trials. Jurors online postings have disrupted many legal proceedings over the years, causing mistrials and special hearings over the ef fects of Facebook musings, tweets and blog writings about their tri al experiences. Lawyers and judges have also been wrangling over how far attorneys can go in assembling a jury with help from online research of jurors social media habits. Its like any other publicly available in formation, said Don ald Lundberg, an Indi anapolis, Ind., attorney who helped draft the ABAs opinion as an ethics committee member.ABA: Lawyers can scour jurors social media sites AP FILE PHOTO In this March 29, 2013 photo, Michael Steinberg, second from right, exits Manhattan federal court with his defense attorney Barry Berke in New York.

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 23, 2014 DAN SEWELLAssociated PressLEBANON, Ohio The twice-arrested heroin user listened nervous ly as the judge reviewed her record, then offered a deal he thinks could save her life. Youre not a criminal, youre an addict, Judge Robert Peeler told Cynthia Fugate. Something is driving you to use heroin that is beyond your control. Is that fair to say? Yes, sir, she replied quietly. Peeler, a common pleas court judge in southwest Ohios War ren County, is among a growing number of judges and corrections ofcials across the country trying to combat the fast-growing na tional heroin problem by ghting heroin nee dles with treatment nee dles. Peeler told Fugate he could order month ly injections of the opiate-blocking drug Vivitrol if she were willing. Im 30 years old. Ive overdosed four times, Fugate said, her voice quavering. I want to be clean. I really do. The shots, the judge said, could keep Fugate from winding up in a body bag. Peeler began researching the drug treatment shots last year after a young wom an died of a heroin over dose, at least the third heroin user who had stood before him in his courtroom who later died. Nationally, over dose deaths have risen 45 percent from 2006 to 2010. In Ohio, 680 peo ple died of heroin over doses in 2012, up 60 percent from the previous year. Vivitrol has its skep tics, with some question ing whether its effective enough to warrant the time and expense shots can cost about $1,000 each and sug gesting its a trendy, under-researched attempt at a quick x. Sheriff Richard Jones in neighboring Butler County has called Vivitrol in jails a waste of money, cit ing an earlier pilot pro gram in Warren County in which only three of 12 subjects completed the program and stayed off drugs. Peeler is among those who say the high toll of heroin-related deaths, crime and prison recid ivism make it worth try ing. To sit back and keep doing what weve been doing just isnt going to get it, Peeler said. I want to stop people from dying. The Warren County program is getting some $800,000 in state fund ing help for Vivitrol, and programs are also underway in dozens of other courts, jails and prisons in at least 21 states, from Cape Cod in Massachusetts to Lane County in Oregon. The programs are usually funded with grants, getting some help from drugmaker donations and discounts, and in surance usually will cover some shots. Vivitrol, made by Alk ermes PLC of Ireland, had been used for alco holism. But after a Rus sian study showed it could be effective for us ers of heroin, morphine and other opiate drugs with once-monthly injections, it was ap proved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in late 2010. Vivitrol uses naltrex one, an opioid receptor antagonist, to block her oins effects on the brain. Unlike the widely used methadone treatment, it doesnt require clinic visits and daily doses and is unlikely to lead to trading one dependen cy for another, as can happen with other treatments, advocates say. Effective for a month, it eases the daily tempta tion of people struggling to stay off heroin. Because Vivitrol is long lasting, it has special im portance for former her oin users leaving in carceration, said Mady Chalk, a former feder al ofcial on substance abuse who is now with Philadelphias Treatment Research Institute. Patients return to their community having been detoxed, their systems have been emp tied of the drugs; they return to environments that trigger all the things that one would ex pect, Chalk said. Many are unable to resist the urge to reuse heroin and dont realize they cant tolerate as strong a dose as before. The body simply cant handle it, and they die, Chalk said. Giving users an injec tion before they leave custody provides a months buffer to begin post-release counseling and to focus on rebuild ing their lives. Dr. Mark Willenbring, a former National Insti tute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism ofcial who founded Alltyr addiction treatment cen ter in St. Paul, Minne sota, thinks there is too little evidence of suc cess to consider Vivitrol a panacea. Its not a wonder drug, Wil lenbring recently told the Alcoholism & Drug Abuse Weekly. Peeler doesnt order shots for anyone who doesnt want them. In his courtroom the same day as Fugate, a male drug defendant declined, saying he be lieved the shots were dangerous there are potential risks including liver damage and suicidal depression and he didnt want to go through the therapy and probation requirements of the sentenc ing deal that potentially allows drug defendants to avoid a conviction on their record. But Sherry Moore be lieves the shots saved her. Not long after completing a nine-month sentence for heroin possession, she began using again. She told her probation ofcer she didnt know what to do, that she had already been through treatments. Im like, Im a mess, she recounted. None of it worked for me. The ofcer asked if she wanted to try Vivi trol. After a year of monthly injections, she said shes been drugfree since late 2012. She and other Vivitrol advocates emphasize that counseling and a strong will to overcome addiction are needed, too. Moore, 53, also credits her return to church. I think God helped me with it, she said. I think I would have died.Courts fight heroin scourge with drug injections PHOTOS BY AL BEHRMAN / AP ABOVE: Judge Robert Peeler tries a case involving heroin abuse in Warren County Common Pleas Court, on April 15, in Lebanon, Ohio. RIGHT: Twice-arrested heroin user Cynthia Fugate stands before Judge Peeler. Vivitrol, made by Alkermes PLC of Ireland, had been used for alcoholism. But after a Russian study showed it could be effective for users of heroin, morphine and other opiate drugs with once-monthly injections, it was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in late 2010. Vivitrol uses naltrexone, an opioid receptor antagonist, to block heroins effects on the brain. Unlike the widely used methadone treatment, it doesnt require clinic visits and daily doses and is unlikely to lead to trading one dependency for another, as can happen with other treatments, advocates say.

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Monday, June 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 GARANCE BURKEAssociated PressSAN FRANCISCO Already pilloried for long wait times for medical appoint ments, the beleaguered Department of Veterans Affairs has fallen short of anoth er commitment: to attend to the needs of the rising ranks of female veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan, many of them of child-bear ing age. Even the head of the VAs ofce of womens health ac knowledges that persistent shortcomings remain in car ing for the 390,000 female vets seen last year at its hos pitals and clinics despite an investment of more than $1.3 billion since 2008, in cluding the training of hundreds of medical profession als in the fundamentals of treating the female body. According to an Associat ed Press review of VA internal documents, inspector gener al reports and interviews: %  en Nationwide, nearly one in four VA hospitals does not have a fulltime gynecologist on staff. And about 140 of the 920 community-based clinics serving veterans in rural areas do not have a designat ed womens health provid er, despite the goal that every clinic would have one. %  en When community-based clinics refer veter ans to a nearby university or other private medical facil ity to be screened for breast cancer, more than half the time their mammogram re sults are not provided to patients within two weeks, as required under VA policy. %  en Female veterans have been placed on the VAs Electronic Wait List at a higher rate than male veterans. All new patients who cannot be schedule for an appointment in 90 days or less are placed on that wait list. %  en And according to a VA presentation last year, female veterans of child-bear ing age were far more likely to be given medications that can cause birth defects than were women being treated through a private HMO. Are there problems? Yes, said Dr. Patricia Hayes, the VAs chief consultant for womens health in an AP in terview. The good news for our health care system is that as the number of women in creases dramatically, we are going to continue to be able to adjust to these circum stances quickly. The 5.3 million male veter ans who used the VA system in scal year 2013 far out numbered female patients, but the number of women receiving care at VA has more than doubled since 2000. The tens of thousands of pre dominantly young, female veterans returning home has dramatically changed the VAs patient load, and the system has yet to fully catch up. Also, as the total veteran population continues to decrease, the female veteran population has been increas ing year after year, according to a 2013 VA report. All enrolled veterans can use what the VA describes as its comprehensive medical benets package, though certain benets may vary by individ ual and ailment, just like for medical care outside the VA system. The VA typically covers all female-specic medical needs, aside from abortions and in-vitro fertilization. The strategic initiatives, which sprang from recommendations issued six years ago to enhance womens health system-wide, have kick started research about women veterans experience of sexual harassment, assault or rape in a military setting; established working groups about how to build pros thetics for female soldiers; and even led to installation of womens restrooms at the more than 1,000 VA facilities. Yet enduring problems with the delivery of care for wom en veterans are surfacing now amid the growing criticism of the VAs handling of patient care nationwide and allegations of misconduct, lengthy wait times and potential unnecessary deaths. Used to treating the men who served in Vietnam, Korea or World War II, many of the VAs practitioners until a few years ago were unaccustomed to treating menopause or giv ing advice about birth control. The study on distribution of prescription medication that could cause birth de fects is illustrative of the lag ging awareness; one of every two women veterans has re ceived medication from a VA pharmacy that could cause birth defects, compared to one in every six women who received drugs care through a private health care system, said the studys author, Elea nor Bimla Schwarz, a senior medical expert on reproductive health with VA. Schwarz, who also directs womens health research at the University of Pittsburgh, pointed out that while she does not believe any of the vet erans surveyed were pregnant at the time, it is critical to keep in mind that many new female veterans are of child-bear ing age, a higher percentage are on medication than in the general population and the majority of these women are not on contraception. Hayes said the VA seeks to place a trained, designated womens provider in every facility and expects to install a one-stop health care model that allows wom en to go to one provider for a range of services, including annual physicals, mental health services, gynecological care and mammograms. Until that happens, however, some VA clinics have limited gender-specic health treat ments available for women. Female veterans are more likely than their male coun terparts to be referred outside the VA system for specialty care, Hayes acknowledged. Nearly one-third of all female patients received at least one day of treatment at a non-VA facility in scal year 2012, as compared to 15 percent of their male counterparts, according to the most recent data Hayes supplied.VA falls short on female medical issues RICHARD SHIRO / AP Army Sgt. LaQuisha Gallmon holds her 2-month-old Abbagayl, as her children Dallin, 8, and Angelicah, 5, sit in their home in Greenville, S.C.Even the head of the VAs office of womens health acknowledges that persistent shortcomings remain in caring for the 390,000 female vets seen last year at its hospitals and clinics.

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 23, 2014 ST AB IL IT Y He ll o If yo u re tu rn in g 65 or ar e re ad y to re ti re yo u shou ld kn ow th at Un it ed He al th ca re ha s mo re th an 30 ye ar s of Me di ca re ex pe ri en ce Ge t st ab ili ty fr om a co mp an y yo u ca n de pe nd on Un it ed He al th ca re Me di ca re Adv an tage pl an s ma y of fe r: $0 mon th ly pre mi um s fo r me di ca l an d Pa rt D co ve ra ge Pr oud ly se rv in g mor e th an 76 3, 000 memb er s in Fl or id a Ov er 12 ye ar s of service in Fl or ida LE AR N AS K EN ROLLMEDICAREYo u mu st co nt in ue to pa y yo ur Me di ca re Pa rt B pr em iu m. Th e be ne t in fo rm at ion pr o vi de d is a br ie fsu mm ar y, no ta co mp le te de sc ri pt ion of be ne t s. Fo r mo re in fo rm at ion co nt ac t th e pl an Li mi ta ti on s, co pa ym en ts an d re st ri ct ion s ma y ap pl y. Be net s, fo rm ul ar y, ph ar mac y ne tw ork pr ov id er ne tw ork pr em iu m an d/ or co -p ay me nt s/ co -i ns ur an ce ma y ch an ge on Janu ar y1 of ea ch yea r.Pla ns ar e in su re d thr ough Un it ed He al th ca re In su ra nc e Co mp an y an d it s af l ia te d co mp an ie s, a Me di ca re Adv an tage or ga ni za ti on wi th a Me di ca re co nt ra ct .Y0 06 6_ 13 10 04 _1 61 31 6_ FI NA L_ FL _L DC _0 61 6_ RO P Ac ce pt ed AD XC ME N0 00 _O VS P1 84 35 Ca ll to da y.If yo u re ne w to Me di ca re re ad y to reti re or lo si ng yo ur em p lo ye r pl an n d ou t ho w yo u ca n en ro ll to da y. 185 585 970 30 TT Y 71 18 a. m. 8 p. m. lo ca l ti me, 7 da ys a we ek He ll oU ni te dM ed ic ar e. co m LYNN BERRYAssociated PressMOSCOW Russian President Vladimir Putin publicly expressed support Sunday for Ukraines declaration of a cease-re in its battle against pro-Russian separatists and called on both sides to negoti ate a compromise. Putin said such a compromise must guarantee the rights of the Russian-speak ing residents of eastern Ukraine, who must feel like they are an integral part of their own coun try. Putins statement appeared to signal that he sees their future in Ukraine. Separatists in the eastern Donetsk and Luhansk regions have declared independence and asked to join Rus sia. Moscow has re buffed their appeals, but is seen by Ukraine and the West as active ly supporting the in surgency. Putins conciliatory words came as Russia began largescale military exercises and after NATO ac cused Russia of moving troops back toward the Ukrainian border. Putin appears de termined to keep up the pressure to force the Kiev government to give the eastern in dustrial regions more powers and to prevent Ukraine from moving too close to the European Union or NATO. But he also wants to avoid more punishing sanctions from the U.S. and particularly from the E.U., whose leaders will meet Friday in Brussels, and therefore needs to be seen as cooperating with efforts to de-esca late the conict. The Kremlin initially dismissed the peace plan that Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko laid out on Friday. But in a statement issued late Saturday, Putin said he welcomed the cease-re and Po roshenkos intention to take other concrete steps to reach a peace ful settlement. As part of his plan, Poroshenko suggested a decentralization of power to give the re gions more political authority. He also pro posed new local and parliamentary elections, and measures to protect the language rights of Russian speak ers in the east. Putin was more spe cic on Sunday, when he spoke publicly fol lowing ceremonies commemorating the Nazi invasion of the So viet Union on June 22, 1941. That President Po roshenko announced a truce is without a doubt an important part of a nal settlement, without which no agree ment can be reached, and there is no doubt that Russia will support this intention, but in the end the most im portant thing is a political process, Putin said. Putin discussed the cease-re on Sunday with German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Francois Hollande, Merkels ofce and the Kremlin said. After the Russian government too re ferred to the cease-re in positive terms, the interlocutors emphasized the need for all sides to abide by it now and for a political dialogue to be put in motion, Merkels ofce said in a state ment. Another topic of the conversation was the issue of securing the Ukrainian-Russian bor der. In Kiev, Poroshenko also addressed his na tion on the day on which Ukrainians and Rus sians mourn the mil lions who died during World War II. He called for peace, but urged his compatriots to stand strong and united. It was so during the violent struggle against the Nazis and it should be the same now, Po roshenko said. Facing a real threat, we must unite even more and secure our histor ical choice, defend our right to live freely on our land. Putin has appealed to both sides to halt all military operations and sit down at the negotiat ing table. It remained unclear whether the pro-Russia separatists would comply and how much pressure Russia would put on them to comply.Putin calls for compromise in Ukraine ALEXANDER ZEMLIANICHENKO / AP Russian President Vladimir Putin takes part in a wreath laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier outside Moscows Kremlin Wall, in Moscow, on Sunday. JUNG-YOON CHOI and YOUKYUNG LEEAssociated PressSEOUL, South Korea The military searched Sunday for an armed South Kore an soldier who ed after killing ve of his comrades and wound ing seven at an outpost near the North Korean border. The sergeant, identied only by his sur name, Yim, opened re Saturday night with his standard issue K2 assault rie at an outpost in Gangwon province, east of Seoul, accord ing to a Defense Ministry spokesman. He spoke on condition of anonymity because of department rules. Yim, who was sched uled to be discharged from the military in September, ed with his weapon, but it wasnt clear how much live ammunition he had, the ofcial said. Defense ofcial Kim Min-seok said Sunday at a televised brief ing that all the wound ed were expected to survive, although two were injured seriously. He said search oper ations were underway to quickly nd Yim, without elaborating. Park Cheol-yong, the head of Madal village, near the army division where the gunre took place, said he warned villagers to stay in their houses. Park Jin-soo, a pastor at a church in the vil lage, said that Sunday services would take place as usual despite the tension over the missing soldier and the shooting. Thousands of troops from the rival Koreas are squared off along the worlds most heavily armed border. There was no indica tion that North Korea was involved. Military hunts for South Korean soldier who killed 5 AHN YOUNG-JOON / APSouth Korean army soldiers search for a South Korean soldier who is on the run after a shooting incident in Goseong, South Korea, on Sunday.

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Monday, June 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A9 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 H ave you ever heard of be ing mercied out of a situ ation? When you know its over before its over, thats when the mer cy rule should apply. The term is entirely new to me and Ive become obsessed. I have a good friend whose daughter, despite being an excellent athlete herself, plays on a recreation softball team thats defeated by its opponents in comically extravagant ways. This team cant get a break; they end up with zero runs, and thats on a good day. Such games, she explained, are often shut down ear ly when the referees invoke the mercy rule. The mercy rule, which was once called the slaughter rule (gee, I wonder why they changed the name) allows the team with an insurmountable lead to accept its win with grace and grants the losing side some dignity as they leave the eld in defeat. As I understand it, when a disparity in talent or performance is obvious and the outcome is not in question, you can be mercied out of the untenable situation. If its 91-0, for example, the refer ees can invoke the mercy rule. Ive been on both ends of the mercy rule, explains Sam Ytuarte, a young stockbroker whos been involved with sports his entire life. And its like putting down a pet: You get the same result without prolonging the tor ture. Sam thinks the mercy rule is, well, merciful: Life is short. Spending an extra hour or two entirely annihilating the other team is basically pointless. In other words, when the eld of dreams turns into the slough of despond, you can rely on the mercy rule. Its sort of like the Kevorkian Clause. And thats when it occurred to me, like the light bulb going on over Bugs Bunnys head, that there are any number of situations in life where being mercied out would offer the ideal resolution. Consider, for example, the bad date. You both meant well: Like players from two teams, you agree to engage, to abide by cer tain formalities and to do your best. Yet no matter how level the playing eld, its occasionally clear right from the start that this is not a fair match (match as in World Cup, or cage, not as in Match.com). Wouldnt it be nice if both sides were permitted to exit without having to face either smug contempt or gratuitous humiliation? Surely it would be better for everyone involved if one person, or even a preternaturally astute server, could say, Obviously this is not working. Lets just mercy ourselves out of this, OK? You could then leave before any emotional hamstrings are pulled or the Achilles heel of the heart is permanently damaged. A person should be able to mercy out of diet and exercise regimes that produce misery without results. After a certain point, its also wise to accept your upper arms as your upper arms and mercy yourself out of aerial yoga. You might have more fun at meals if you mercy yourself out of eating only raw meat and legumes; perhaps you are destined not to be Paleo Girl no matter how many starches you avoid. Time is the one thing you can never get back; its not noble to waste it in the fruitless pursuit of a futile objective. Bonnie Jean said she should have been mercied out of algebra (Talk about slaughtered; I shouldve been permitted to take it another term). Iris wants to be mercied out of her husbands elaborately detailed directions (He draws me maps, but I just use the GPS). Chuck wants to be mercied out of numbingly ineffective committee meetings and mini-series where they keep adding characters just to confuse old people. John argues that those who attend the theater have always had the mercy rule: They call it intermission. Lets summon the mercy rule when fundraisers cost more than they make, when we know for a fact the quilt or the dissertation will never be nished, and when the friendship is more pain than pleasure. While the strain of mercy is not unqualied, it is possible to get out without giving up. Sometimes its a necessary call.Gina Barreca is an English professor at the University of Connecticut, a feminist scholar who has written eight books, and a columnist for the Hartford Courant. She can be reached through her www.ginabarreca.com.OTHERVOICES Gina BarrecaMCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Hate your date? Use the mercy rule Elon Musk is the kind of guy who proba bly spent his high school years asking, Why? or Why not? each time he ran up against conventional wisdom. He took that mind-set into the business world and became an acclaimed disruptor, most recently shaking up the auto world. On his blog last week, the chief executive ofcer of electric car maker Tesla Motors announced that he is opening up its electric car technology patents to competitors. This move may actually be more brilliant than bizarre. Conventional wisdom holds that no one gives away business secrets for fear of being trampled by a herd of imitators who didnt put in the same dollars or sweat and toil. But Musk says he created Tesla to make electric cars part of everyday life an idea that is still spinning its wheels in the muddy eld of patent litigation, customer tastes and expensive technology. Finding a lost ring in the Sahara would seem to be a far easier undertaking than disrupting decades-old global gasoline networks that extend from oil and gas exploration elds to gasoline stations to the family car. So Musk is trying a new calculation. Ending Teslas patent secrecy removes one barrier to innovation and mass affordable commercialization of electric cars. Yes, it is still all pie in the sky. But Musk also is betting that his approach could have the related benet of tackling the worlds energy, climate change and clean air challenges by slowing reliance on carbon-polluting cars. As Musk puts it, If we clear a path to the creation of compelling electric vehicles, but then lay intellectual property and mines behind us to inhibit others, we are acting in a manner contrary to that goal. As a matter of practical business, opening access to Teslas intellectual property could encourage companies to share the costs of erecting charging stations, create better, cheaper batteries and otherwise break dependence on fossil fuels. Dont expect the automotive industry to shift gears in unison, but Nissan, the maker of the all-electric Leaf, and BMW reportedly are already interested in Teslas quick-recharging technology. Admittedly, its less threatening to give away trade secrets when youve already made a for tune in other businesses and need to jumpstart the still minuscule electric car industry. What Musk is doing probably would not make a lot of sense for most companies. Still, underestimating Musk, whose quirky dreams also created the revolutionary online payment system PayPal and private space-ight company SpaceX, is itself a risky idea. Disruptors success is all about asking, Why not?Distributed by MCT Information Services.AVOICETeslas Elon Musk giving away trade secrets for potential profit Classic DOONESBURY 1975The mercy rule, which was once called the slaughter rule (gee, I wonder why they changed the name) allows the team with an insurmountable lead to accept its win with grace and grants the losing side some dignity as they leave the field in defeat. As I understand it, when a disparity in talent or performance is obvious and the outcome is not in question, you can be mercied out of the untenable situation. If its 91-0, for example, the referees can invoke the mercy rule.

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A10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 23, 2014 Teen for 2012, the sister program of the Miss America Organization. The University of Florida junior was crowned Miss University of Florida at a pageant earlier this year, which earned her a spot in the Miss Florida Pageant and an $18,000 scholarship as the winner. This is a hometown girl doing good, Dixie Fechtel of Leesburg said Sunday, reecting on her daughters big win against 49 other contestants. It was a surprise, fun and exciting. Were just so happy for her. During early judging at the state pageant last week, Elizabeth also won the preliminary talent competition for her dance to Pharrell Williams song, Happy. The talent (at the state level) was just incredible pianists, vocalists and it just kind of blew me away, so to see her win was an accomplishment, Dixie said. We were hoping she would make the top 10, and then when she got in the top ve, we thought, Thats nice. At least shell get some scholarship money. And then all of a sudden she is the winner. It was very exciting. The Fechtel family and friends are already talking about the Miss America Pageant. Im making plans to go to Atlantic City, Linda Watts, founder of the Miss Leesburg Scholarship Program, said Sunday, elated that one of her former Miss Leesburg titleholders will grace the stage in the Miss America Pageant. For her to go from Miss Leesburg to Miss America, I would love to be there, Watts said. I just think she is on her way (to winning the title). Just to look back at her through the years, she is special. She is beautiful inside and out. The Fechtel family credit Watts and the Miss Leesburg Scholarship Program for laying the foundation for Elizabeths community service work. The former Miss Florida graduated as an AP honor student and student body president at First Academy-Leesburg. She is currently majoring in political science with a minor in communications and entrepreneurship. PAGEANT FROM PAGE A1 BRAD MCCLENNY / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP Elizabeth Fechtel was crowned as the Miss University of Florida during the 2014 Miss University of Florida pageant, earning her spot in Saturdays Miss Florida Pageant. JOSH WOODAssociated PressTHEODORE ROOSEVELT NATIONAL PARK, N.D. After the last hints of sunset dip behind the hills, the North Dakota horizon comes alive with ickering or ange ames of a different kind natural gas ares. These tiny tongues of re burn bright against the dark prairie just beyond the boundar ies of Theodore Roosevelt National Park in the Badlands, where the man who later became the nations 26th pres ident sought solace after his wife and mother both died unexpectedly on the same day in 1884 in his native New York. Today, the resurgent American oil industry is tapping into this rugged landscape, so the vistas that soothed Roosevelts grief and helped instill his zeal for conservation now include oil rigs and ares used to burn off natural gas that comes to the surface. Oil development is strictly forbidden with in the park itself, but park ofcials worry that the ares, lights and noise from drilling just beyond the protected area are sullying the natural spaces cher ished by Roosevelt as a bespectacled young man in his mid-20s. Visitors know that the park experience is much more than waking up inside the borders and looking around, said Nick Lund, landscape conservation program manager at the Wash ington-based National Parks Conservation Association. Things that happen outside the park really affect the experience of visiting, both from a visitor stand point and from an envi ronmental standpoint. The park of more than 70,000 acres sits atop the Bakken shale, an oil-rich rock formation that for decades frustrated drillers who could not coax anything protable from the ground. But advances in hydraulic fracturing and directional drill ing have unlocked huge amounts of petroleum here. North Dakota is now the second-biggest oil producer in the U.S. after Texas. The parks landscape is a showcase for the states varied terrain. It has steep-sided barren buttes dropping into grassy valleys, as well as tall sandstone for mations and rock layers that reveal tens of millions of years of natural history. The wildlife includes bison and hors es, yipping prairie-dog colonies and elusive mountain lions. In this desolate, grim beauty, Roosevelt found solitude and built a cattle ranch. Later in life, he said he would not have become pres ident without the healing time spent in the Badlands. Societys footprint has drawn ever closer to the wilderness as trailer parks are established to house oil workers and tanker trucks carrying drilling chemicals and water crowd once lonely roads. During the day, it can be difcult to spot oil development in the dis tance. But at night, the ares and oil eld lights brighten the horizon. At times, park Super intendent Valerie Nay lor says, its possible to see 26 natural gas ares from the park. The gas is a byproduct of oil production and a valuable resource on its own. But with no sys tems in place to capture it, store it or transport it, some oil producers simply burn it off.Oil drilling threatens solitude of national park CHARLES REX ARBOGAS / AP Longhorn cattle wonder through the Theodore Roosevelt National Park, located in the Badlands of North Dakota.

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 23, 2014www.dailycommercial.comGOLF: Streelman birdies last seven to win / B4 MARK DIDTLERAssociated PressST. PETERSBURG Yunel Escobar drove in two runs during a three-run sixth inning and the Tampa Bay Rays beat the Houston Astors 5-2 on Sunday. Escobar hit a two-run single and Sean Rodriguez had an RBI grounder off Dallas Keuchel (85) to give the Rays a 4-2 lead in the sixth. The Rays are 8-18 over their past 26 games, including ve wins in seven games against AP FILE PHOTO Former UCLA basketball player Ed OBannon Jr. sits in his ofce in Henderson, Nev. Five years after the former UCLA star led his antitrust lawsuit against the NCAA, it is nally in a California courtroom. TIM DAHLBERGAssociated PressOAKLAND, Calif. They come calling with promises of a good education, a chance to play on television and some of the best facilities that money can buy. There may come a time, though, when recruiters chasing the best high school football and basketball players offer something else: a nice pay check to take with them as a parting gift when their college days are over. Football players could get several hundred thou sand dollars. Basketball players would do even better, perhaps becoming millionaires even if they never play a day in the NBA. Under some sce narios they could take the payments in lieu of what they would have gotten for tuition and room and board. They would be col lege employees of a sort, able to take classes if they wish or simply play sports. And the NCAA might still be able to take the high road and continue to run big-time college sports as amateur programs. Theres nothing inher ent in the word amateur ism that says increasing substantially the amount paid athletes would vio late the principle of am ateurism, said Stanford economics professor Roger Noll, who testied on behalf of the plaintiffs. Theres no reason to believe that. Its all theoretical, of course, based on models that may never come into play. But just what the fu ture of big-time college athletics may look like if the NCAA loses a land mark antitrust suit is be ginning to come into focus as attorneys rep resenting former UCLA SEE CASH | B2Escobar has 2 RBIs; Rays top Astros 5-2 College recruiters could come bearing prospect paychecks ASSOCIATED PRESS Carl Edwards sprays wine after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race on Sunday in Sonoma, Calif. JOHN BAZEMORE / AP Michelle Wie kisses the trophy after winning the U.S. Womens Open golf tournament on Sunday in Pinehurst, N.C. Wie holds off Lewis for win at US Womens Open DOUG FERGUSONAP Golf WriterPINEHURST, N.C. Michelle Wie nally de livered a performance worthy of the hype that has been heaped on her since she was a teenag er. Wie bounced back from a late mistake at Pinehurst No. 2 to bury a 25-foot birdie putt on the 17th hole, sending the 24-year-old from Hawaii to her rst ma jor championship Sunday, a two-shot victory over Stacy Lewis in the U.S. Womens Open. Wie closed with an even-par 70 and covered her mouth with her hand before thrust ing both arms in the air. Lewis, the No. 1 play er in womens golf, made her work for it. She made eight birdies to match the best score of the tournament with a 66, and then was on the practice range preparing for a playoff when her caddie told her Wie had made the sharp-breaking birdie putt on the 17th. Lewis returned to the 18th green to hug the winner after other play ers doused Wie with champagne. What a journey for Wie, who now has four career victories all in North America, the rst on the U.S. mainland and moved to the top of the LPGA money list af ter winning the biggest event in womens golf. She has been one of the biggest stars in womens golf since she was 13 and played in the nal group of a major. Her popular soared along with criticism when she competed against the men on the PGA Tour while still in high school and talked about wanting to play in the Masters. That seems like a life time ago. The 6-foot Wie is all grown up, a Stanford graduate, popular among pros of both genders and now a major champion. Oh my God, I cant believe this is happen ing, Wie said. BOB LEVERONE / AP Michelle Wie lines up a putt on the seventh hole during the nal round of the U.S. Womens Open golf tournament.SEE WIE | B2 JENNA FRYERAP Auto Racing WriterSONOMA, Calif. Carl Edwards made Roush Fenway Racing the unlikely organiza tion to end Hendrick Motorsports ve-race winning streak. Edwards stopped the Hendrick juggernaut with a win Sunday at Sonoma Raceway, the rst career victory for Edwards on a road course. The win came a week after Roush was shut out at Michigan, where the orga nization failed to put a car in the top 10 for the rst time since 2000. Edwards took the lead on a restart with 25 laps remaining and seemed to have the win wrapped up, but Jeff Gordon near ly chased him down on the nal lap. Gor don, a ve-time Sonoma winner, had one good look at Edwards and couldnt pull off the pass. Thats the best Ive got and it almost wasnt good enough, Edwards said. That last lap was ugly. I grew up watching Jeff Gor don do well here, so to have him in my mirror, that is very special. It wasnt a terrible day for the Hendrick Edwards races to first career road course winSEE RAYS | B2SEE NASCAR | B2 PAULO DUARTE / AP United States Clint Dempsey, center, runs to celebrate after scoring his sides second goal against Portugal on Sunday at Manaus, Brazil. CHRIS LEHOURITESAssociated PressMANAUS, Brazil Cristiano Ronaldo set up Varela for a late equaliz er on a hot and humid night in the jungle Sunday to give the Portugal a 2-2 draw with the United States and hope for a spot in the second round of the World Cup. Ronaldo, who has been playing de spite a left knee injury, sent in a cross in the fth minute of stoppage time and Varela scored with a diving head er in the last seconds of the match. Nani had scored rst for Portugal, shooting past a sprawling Tim Howard in the fth minute, but the Americans responded in the second half as Portu gal seemed to wilt in the stiing heat. Jermaine Jones made it 1-1 with a curling shot in the 64th minute after a cross from Graham Zusi made its way through the Portugal defense. Clint Dempsey, playing with a broken nose, then put the Americans ahead in the 81st. The United States captain used his stomach to direct the ball into the net from a cross by Zusi. The last-second draw denied the Portugal ties U.S. on late goalSEE SOCCER | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 23, 2014 SUN mon tues wed thurs fri SatLeesburg LightningJune 22-28DelandHOME5pmSanfordHOME7pmSanfordAWAY7pmSanfordAWAY7pmWinter GardenAWAY7pmWinter GardenAWAY7pm AUTO RACING NASCAR Sprint Cup-Toyota/Save Mart 350 ResultsSunday At Sonoma Raceway Sonoma, Calif. Lap length: 1.99 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (4) Carl Edwards, Ford, 110 laps, 119.9 rating, 47 points, $335,790. 2. (15) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 110, 119.1, 43, $238,266. 3. (17) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 110, 105.8, 41, $167,230. 4. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 110, 126, 41, $185,869. 5. (9) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 110, 93.6, 39, $147,344. 6. (30) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 110, 96.7, 38, $126,870. 7. (22) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 110, 111.8, 38, $157,431. 8. (23) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 110, 94.3, 37, $137,340. 9. (19) Greg Bife, Ford, 110, 86.2, 35, $143,820. 10. (25) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 110, 93, 35, $136,411. 11. (7) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 110, 92.1, 33, $107,785. 12. (5) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 110, 95, 32, $101,635. 13. (12) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 110, 82.3, 31, $129,543. 14. (8) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 110, 83.8, 30, $128,910. 15. (18) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 110, 82.4, 29, $123,643. 16. (10) Joey Logano, Ford, 110, 76.1, 29, $132,326. 17. (26) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 110, 65.3, 27, $141,596. 18. (11) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 110, 69.6, 26, $102,310. 19. (21) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 110, 66.2, 25, $127,743. 20. (6) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 110, 101.6, 25, $131,193. 21. (27) David Gilliland, Ford, 110, 61.1, 23, $116,068. 22. (13) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 110, 58.2, 22, $133,268. 23. (29) Aric Almirola, Ford, 110, 61.8, 21, $127,671. 24. (28) Michael McDowell, Ford, 110, 57.4, 20, $86,785. 25. (20) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 110, 60.4, 19, $134,701. 26. (16) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 110, 65.6, 18, $97,035. 27. (32) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 110, 49.2, 17, $88,385. 28. (3) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 110, 74.2, 16, $114,555. 29. (38) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 110, 44.7, 15, $101,643. 30. (42) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 110, 40.2, 14, $100,493. 31. (24) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 109, 58, 13, $122,485. 32. (40) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 109, 39.1, 12, $93,537. 33. (35) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 109, 39.6, 11, $91,880. 34. (39) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 109, 32, 0, $83,745. 35. (41) Boris Said, Ford, 109, 33.7, 9, $83,605. 36. (31) David Ragan, Ford, 109, 40.3, 8, $91,520. 37. (2) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 108, 103.5, 9, $89,983. 38. (43) Tomy Drissi, Toyota, 108, 25.9, 6, $85,850. 39. (36) Alex Kennedy, Chevrolet, rear gear, 104, 34.2, 5, $73,850. 40. (33) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 95, 32.5, 4, $69,850. 41. (34) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 91, 40.5, 3, $65,850. 42. (14) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, accident, 74, 67.5, 2, $110,986. 43. (37) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, engine, 29, 25.8, 0, $58,350.GOLF Irish Open Leading Scores Sunday At Fota Island Resort Cork, Ireland Purse: $2.71 million Yardage: 7,043; Par: 71 Final Mikko Ilonen, Finland 64-68-69-70 271 Edoardo Molinari, Italy 67-69-69-67 272 Kristoffer Broberg, Sweden 69-69-66-69 273 Matthew Baldwin, England 67-71-66-69 273 Danny Willett, England 73-66-63-71 273 Magnus A. Carlsson, Sweden 66-71-68-69 274 Graeme McDowell, Northern Ireland 68-66-69-71 274 Ross Fisher, England 68-72-70-65 205 Michael Hoey, Northern Ireland 68-71-70-66 275 Chris Wood, England 69-69-70-67 275 Richard Finch, England 68-72-67-68 275 Gary Stal, France 70-67-69-69 275 Gregory Bourdy, France 68-71-67-69 275 Marcel Siem, Germany 66-74-71-65 276 Matthew Nixon, England 70-65-74-67 276 Padraig Harrington, Ireland 69-67-71-69 276 Adam Gee, England 68-70-69-69 276 Gareth Maybin, Northern Ireland 71-65-69-71 276 Simon Khan, England 69-66-70-71 276 Fabrizio Zanotti, Paraguay 70-69-65-72 276 Roope Kakko, Finland 71-66-72-68 277 Ricardo Gonzalez, Argentina 69-70-68-70 277 Anders Hansen, Denmark 67-70-68-72 277 Romain Wattel, France 69-65-70-73 277 U.S. Womens Open Leading Scores Sunday At Pinehurst No. 2 Pinehurst, N.C. Purse: $4 million Yardage: 6,649; Par: 70 Michelle Wie, $720,000 68-68-72-70 278 Stacy Lewis, $432,000 67-73-74-66 280 Stephanie Meadow, $271,373 71-72-69-69 281 Amy Yang, $191,536 71-69-68-74 282 Meena Lee, $149,942 72-73-70-68 283 So Yeon Ryu, $149,942 69-74-70-70 283 Lexi Thompson, $113,582 71-68-74-71 284 Sakura Yokomine, $113,582 74-68-71-71 284 Pornanong Phatlum, $113,582 71-73-69-71 284 Catriona Matthew, $90,861 75-69-75-66 285 Jenny Shin, $90,861 74-70-73-68 285 a-Brooke Mackenzie Henderson, $0 71-73-72-69 285 Yueer Cindy Feng, $77,640 73-71-71-71 286 Na Yeon Choi, $77,640 71-70-71-74 286 Lydia Ko, $58,096 76-71-71-69 287 Shanshan Feng, $58,096 77-70-70-70 287 Brittany Lincicome, $58,096 77-70-69-71 287 Hee Young Park, $58,096 73-73-69-72 287 Paula Creamer, $58,096 70-72-72-73 287 Chella Choi, $58,096 75-70-69-73 287 Juli Inkster, $58,096 71-75-66-75 287 Julieta Granada, $40,327 75-71-74-68 288 Sandra Gal, $40,327 74-72-73-69 288 Karine Icher, $40,327 76-72-71-69 288 Azahara Munoz, $40,327 73-71-74-70 288 Brittany Lang, $40,327 73-75-69-71 288 a-Minjee Lee, $0 69-71-72-76 288 Eun Hee Ji, $32,708 71-75-75-68 289 Caroline Masson, $32,708 72-75-73-69 289 Candie Kung, $27,721 71-76-75-68 290 Angela Stanford, $27,721 71-72-77-70 290 I.K. Kim, $27,721 71-74-75-70 290 Mariajo Uribe, $27,721 72-70-76-72 290 Karrie Webb, $27,721 70-73-70-77 290 Yani Tseng, $23,555 77-71-74-69 291 Rikako Morita, $23,555 73-75-73-70 291 Ha Na Jang, $23,555 76-73-70-72 291 Jennifer Song, $20,090 74-72-77-69 292 Caroline Hedwall, $20,090 73-76-72-71 292 Mina Harigae, $20,090 71-74-74-73 292 Se Ri Pak, $20,090 76-69-74-73 292 SOCCERWorld Cup Glance GROUP A Monday, June 23 At Brasilia, Brazil Cameroon vs. Brazil, 4 p.m. At Recife, Brazil Croatia vs. Mexico, 4 p.m. GROUP B F riday, June 13 At Salvador, Brazil At Curitiba, Brazil Australia vs. Spain, 4 p.m. At Sao Paulo Netherlands vs. Chile, noon GROUP C Tuesday, June 24 At Fortaleza, Brazil Greece vs. Ivory Coast, 4 p.m. At Cuiaba, Brazil Japan vs. Colombia, 4 p.m. GROUP D Tuesday, June 24 At Belo Horizonte, Brazil Costa Rica vs. England, noon At Natal, Brazil Italy vs. Uruguay, noon GROUP E Wednesday, June 25 At Rio De Janeiro Ecuador vs. France, 4 p.m. At Manaus, Brazil Honduras vs. Switzerland, 4 p.m. GROUP F W ednesday, June 25 At Salvador, Brazil Bosnia-Herzegovina vs. Iran, noon At Porto Alegre, Brazil Nigeria vs. Argentina, noon GROUP G Sunday, June 22 At Manaus, Brazil United States vs. Portugal, 6 p.m. Thursday, June 26 At Brasilia, Brazil Portugal vs. Ghana, noon At Recife, Brazil United States vs. Germany, noon GMT GROUP H Thur sday, June 26 At Curitiba, Brazil Algeria vs. Russia, 4 p.m. At Sao Paulo South Korea vs. Belgium, 4 p.m.TV2DAY SCOREBOARD FCSL STANDINGS W L .Pct GB Sanford 10 5 .667 Winter Garden 9 7 .562 1.5 Winter Park 10 8 .556 1.5 Leesburg 5 6 .455 3 DeLand 6 9 .400 4 College Park 5 10 .333 5 SUNDAYS GAMESDeLand at Leesburg, DH, ccd., rain College Park 5, Winter Garden 4 Sanford 8, Winter Park 6TODAYS GAMESNo games scheduledTUESDAYS GAMESSanford at Leesburg, DH, 4, 7 p.m. Winter Park at College Park, 7 pm. Winter Garden at DeLand, 7 p.m. COLLEGE BASEBALL 8 p.m.ESPN World Series, nals, game 1, Virginia vs. Vanderbilt, at Omaha, Neb.GOLF 3:30 p.m.TGC PGA of America, Professional National Championship, second round, at Myrtle Beach, S.C.MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7:05 p.m.FS-Florida Miami at Philadelphia7:10 p.m.SUN Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay8 p.m.ESPN2 Washington at MilwaukeeSOCCER 11:30 a.m.ESPN FIFA, World Cup, Group B, Netherlands vs. Chile, at Sao Paulo ESPN2 FIFA, World Cup, Group B, Australia vs. Spain, at Curitiba, Brazil3:30 p.m.ESPN FIFA, World Cup, Group A, Croatia vs. Mexico, at Recife, Brazil ESPN2 FIFA, World Cup, Group A, Cameroon vs. Brazil, at Brasilia, BrazilTENNIS 7 a.m.ESPN Wimbledon, rst round, at London11:30 a.m.ESPNEWS Wimbledon, rst round, at London2 p.m.ESPN2 Wimbledon, rst round, at London basketball star Ed OBannon and others press their case in a feder al court trial. No one expects the current sys tem run by the NCAA to be com pletely blown up. But at a time when billions of dollars are ow ing into college sports there is lit tle dispute that players will get a bigger chunk of the pie. That may come as soon as next year when the ve major confer ences move to separate them selves from football programs that arent nearly as protable and give athletes more money and great er benets. Among the propos als is more money to cover the full cost of attending school and bet ter medical and travel benets. Whether the extra money will amount to covering laundry ex penses and date nights or comes to a much larger payment may depend on how successful OBan nons attorneys are in winning a ruling that the NCAA is acting il legally by not allowing players to prot off the use of their names, images and likenesses in televi sion broadcasts and videogames. If the plaintiffs win, the NCAA would still run athletics, but Di vision I basketball and Bowl Sub division football players would be allowed to band together to seek payment for the use of their names and images. Those payments would go into a trust fund, with players get ting equal shares when they leave school. University of San Francisco eco nomics professor Daniel Rascher testied that using something akin to the professional model where players get something close to the 55 percent of broadcast revenues NFL players currently receive a football player at Vanderbilt might get $325,000 over a ve-year peri od because of the lucrative television contracts in the Southeastern Conference. CASH FROM PAGE B1 It almost didnt. Just like her so much of her life, the path included a sharp twist no one saw coming. Wie started the nal round tied with Amy Yang, took the lead when Yang made double bogey on No. 2 and didnt let anyone catch her the rest of the day. In trouble on the tough fourth hole, she got up-and-down from 135 yards with a shot into 3 feet. Right when Lewis was making a big run, Wie answered by ripping a drive on the shortened par-5 10th and hitting a cut 8-iron into 10 feet for eagle and a four-shot lead. She had not made a bogey since the rst hole and then it all nearly unraveled. From a fairway bunker on the 16th, holding a three-shot lead, she stayed ag gressive and hit hy brid from the sand. After a three-minute search, the ball was found in a wiregrass bush that caused her to take a penalty drop behind her in the fairway. She chipped on to about 35 feet and rapped her bogey putt 5 feet past the hole. Miss it and she would be tied. Bent over in that table-top putting stance, she poured it in to avoid her rst three-putt of the week. Smiling as she left the green, even though her lead was down to one, Wie hit 8-iron safely on the 17th green and holed the tough birdie putt. She pumped her st, then slammed it twice in succession, a determination rarely seen when she was contending for majors nearly a decade ago as a teen prodigy. Obviously, there are moments of doubt in there, Wie said. But obviously, I had so many people surrounding me. They never lost faith in me. Thats pushed me forward. Wie nished at 2-under 278, the only player to beat par in the second week of championship golf at Pinehurst. Mar tin Kaymer won by eight shots last week at 9-under 271, the second-lowest score in U.S. Open history. Lewis got within one shot of the lead with a birdie on No. 13, and after two bo geys, kept her hopes alive by nishing with back-to-back birdies. I knew I needed to get out early and post some numbers and make Michelle Wie earn it, Lewis said. WIE FROM PAGE B1 Houston. Keuchel allowed ve runs and nine hits. Dexter Fowler put the Astros up 1-0 when he hit the rst pitch of the game from Erik Bedard into the lefteld seats. It was his ninth career leadoff homer and third this season. Bedard, who was with Houston last season, gave up two runs and seven hits in 5 1-3 innings. Juan Carlos Oviedo (32) got two outs in the sixth for the win. Joel Peralta pitched the ninth for his rst save. Rodriguez made it 5-2 on an eighth-inning sacrice y. Houston took a 2-1 lead in the third on Jose Al tuves single. Jonathan Villar opened the inning with a double, was awarded a steal of third after a replay challenge resulted in an out call being overturned and scored on the hit by Altuve. Altuve has 13 hits in his past 24 at-bats. The Rays tied it at 1 in the bottom of the rst on Evan Longorias single. Desmond Jennings was caught attempting to steal home with Longoria batting to end the third, a call that was conrmed by a re play review. After catcher Carlos Corporan threw the ball back to Keuchel, Jennings broke for the plate, but was tagged by Corpo ran after a return throw from Keuchel. RAYS FROM PAGE B1 organization, which had won every Sprint Cup Se ries race since Jeff Gordons victory at Kansas on May 10. Instead, HMS settled for all four of its drivers n ishing in the top seven. Gordon, the Sprint Cup Series points lead er, wound up second. He said he made one mistake in overdriving a turn with about ve laps to go that allowed Edwards to build a healthy lead. I just couldnt put enough pressure on him, Gordon said. I think had I put some more pressure on him, I saw him really strug gling with the (tire) grip level, but he did everything he needed to do. That last lap, I gave it my best effort and closed up on him and he didnt overdrive it. I was hoping he might slide up and Id get a run on him. Dale Earnhardt Jr. was third after rallying from an earlier incident that wrecked Matt Kenseth, and was apologetic on the radio and after the race. I tried to screw it up a couple times in the race, but I calmed down and was able to get a good nish, Earnhardt said after his career-best nish on a road course. I got into Matt, I jumped a curb and jumped into the air and just ran into him. Totally my fault. I hope hes not sore with me. Kasey Kahne bounced back from an early at tire to nish sixth and Jimmie Johnson was seventh. In all, Chevrolet drivers took spots two through seven as pole-sitter Jamie Mc Murray, using a Hendrick engine, nished fourth and Paul Menard was fth. Fords rounded out the top 10, led by Edwards, Marcos Ambrose eighth and Roush driver Greg Bif e was 10th. It was Edwards 23rd win of his career, the 135th Sprint Cup Series victory for car owner Jack Roush. NASCAR FROM PAGE B1 Americans a spot in the second round, but it kept Portugal alive in the tour nament. Obviously were disap pointed, but at the end of the day youve got to look at the positives, we got a point, Dempsey said. Its going down to the last game and hopefully we get the job done. The United States now has four points in Group G, the same as Germany. Both Portugal and Ghana have one point. The Amer icans will face Germany on Thursday in Recife, while Portugal takes on Ghana at the same time in Brasilia. Now we have to go out and beat Germany, thats what we have to do, U.S. coach Jurgen Klinsmann said. We have to play Ger many, we have one less day to recover, we played in the Amazon, they played on a place with less travel. We have to do it the tough way.ALGERIA 4, SOUTH KOREA 2PORTO ALEGRE, Brazil Islam Slimani scored one goal and set up two more as Algeria swept aside South Korea to become the rst African team to score four goals in a World Cup match. The result gives Alge ria its rst World Cup win since 1982 and moves it into second place in Group H with one match left to play, against Russia. Slimani opened the scoriThe loss for South Ko rea means it must now beat already-qualied Belgium and hope that other results go its way to progress to the knockout stages. Belgium leads with six points, Algeria now has three, while Russia and the South Koreans have one apiece.BELGIUM 1, RUSSIA 0RIO DE JANEIRO Teenage forward Divock Origi turned a listless Belgian performance into a late win over Russia, enough to qualify for the next round of the World Cup with two straight victories. Belgium barely contained a reinvigorated Russia for most of the match, yet struck with a blistering nal spurt of class and oppor tunism to turn a bad situa tion into a wild celebration for coach Marc Wilmots in the 88th minute and hugs all around at full time. It was not easy, but we never gave up, Wilmots said. After its dour 1-1 draw with South Korea, Russia produced the kind of spar kle and dominance that most had been expect ed more from Belgium in front of 73,819 increasingly restless fans at Ma racana stadium. SOCCER FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, June 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Toronto 42 35 .545 3-7 L-2 20-17 22-18 Baltimore 39 35 .527 1 6-4 W-2 16-17 23-18 New York 39 35 .527 1 6-4 L-2 17-18 22-17 Boston 35 41 .461 6 5 5-5 W-1 20-19 15-22 Tampa Bay 31 46 .403 11 9 6-4 W-2 18-23 13-23 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 40 32 .556 6-4 W-4 19-19 21-13 Kansas City 39 36 .520 2 6-4 L-4 18-19 21-17 Cleveland 37 39 .487 5 3 4-6 L-3 23-15 14-24 Minnesota 36 38 .486 5 3 5-5 W-4 19-17 17-21 Chicago 35 41 .461 7 5 2-8 L-4 21-18 14-23 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 47 29 .618 7-3 L-1 24-15 23-14 Los Angeles 40 33 .548 5 5-5 W-2 22-14 18-19 Seattle 40 36 .526 7 6-4 W-3 17-20 23-16 Texas 35 39 .473 11 4 4-6 L-4 16-19 19-20 Houston 33 44 .429 14 7 3-7 L-2 17-20 16-24 NATIONAL LEAGUEEAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Washington 39 35 .527 4-6 W-2 23-17 16-18 Atlanta 38 37 .507 1 2 4-6 L-2 20-18 18-19 Miami 37 38 .493 2 3 3-7 L-2 25-18 12-20 New York 35 41 .461 5 6 6-4 W-2 16-20 19-21 Philadelphia 34 40 .459 5 6 6-4 L-2 16-21 18-19 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 47 30 .610 7-3 W-4 20-15 27-15 St. Louis 41 35 .539 5 7-3 W-2 23-17 18-18 Cincinnati 37 37 .500 8 3 7-3 W-2 19-18 18-19 Pittsburgh 37 38 .493 9 3 6-4 W-2 21-18 16-20 Chicago 31 42 .425 14 8 5-5 L-2 16-16 15-26 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY San Francisco 45 30 .600 3-7 W-2 23-15 22-15 Los Angeles 42 35 .545 4 7-3 W-2 18-20 24-15 Colorado 34 41 .453 11 6 4-6 L-6 19-17 15-24 San Diego 32 44 .421 13 9 4-6 L-2 19-21 13-23 Arizona 32 47 .405 15 10 3-7 L-2 14-29 18-18 SATURDAYS GAMESBaltimore 6, N.Y. Yankees 1 Minnesota 4, Chicago White Sox 3 Seattle 2, Kansas City 1 Oakland 2, Boston 1, 10 innings Tampa Bay 8, Houston 0 Cincinnati 11, Toronto 1 Detroit 5, Cleveland 4, 10 innings L.A. Angels 3, Texas 2, 10 inningsSATURDAYS GAMESMilwaukee 9, Colorado 4 N.Y. Mets 4, Miami 0 St. Louis 4, Philadelphia 1 Cincinnati 11, Toronto 1 Washington 3, Atlanta 0 Pittsburgh 5, Chicago Cubs 3 L.A. Dodgers 4, San Diego 2 San Francisco 6, Arizona 4SUNDAYS GAMESDetroit 10, Cleveland 4 Cincinnati 4, Toronto 3 Tampa Bay 5, Houston 2 Baltimore 8, N.Y. Yankees 0 Minnesota 6, Chicago White Sox 5 Seattle 2, Kansas City 1 Boston 7, Oakland 6, 10 innings Texas at L.A. Angels, lateSUNDAYS GAMESDetroit 10, Cleveland 4 Cincinnati 4, Toronto 3 Tampa Bay 5, Houston 2 Baltimore 8, N.Y. Yankees 0 Minnesota 6, Chicago White Sox 5 Seattle 2, Kansas City 1 Boston 7, Oakland 6, 10 innings Texas at L.A. Angels, late MARK DUNCAN / AP Cleveland Indians shortstop Asdrubal Cabrera takes the throw to force Detroit Tigers Austin Jackson (14) at second base in the fth inning on Sunday in Cleveland.TODAYS GAMESChicago White Sox (Sale 6-1) at Baltimore (W.Chen 7-2), 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Whitley 3-0) at Toronto (Stroman 3-2), 7:07 p.m. Pittsburgh (Volquez 4-6) at Tampa Bay (Cobb 2-5), 7:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 9-3) at Kansas City (Guthrie 4-6), 8:10 p.m. Boston (Lackey 8-4) at Seattle (F.Hernandez 8-2), 10:10 p.m.TODAYS GAMESMiami (Eovaldi 4-3) at Philadelphia (R.Hernandez 3-5), 7:05 p.m. Pittsburgh (Volquez 4-6) at Tampa Bay (Cobb 2-5), 7:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Simon 10-3) at Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 2-6), 8:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 9-3) at Kansas City (Guthrie 4-6), 8:10 p.m. Washington (G.Gonzalez 3-4) at Milwaukee (Garza 4-4), 8:10 p.m. St. Louis (Lynn 7-5) at Colorado (Chacin 1-5), 8:40 p.m. San Diego (Cashner 2-6) at San Francisco (M.Cain 1-5), 10:15 p.m.AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Altuve, Houston, .336; Cano, Seattle, .332; VMartinez, Detroit, .331; Rios, Texas, .320; Brantley, Cleveland, .320; MiCabrera, Detroit, .320; KSuzuki, Minnesota, .313. RUNS: Dozier, Minnesota, 57; Donaldson, Oakland, 55; Bautista, Toronto, 54; Encarnacion, Toronto, 50; Brantley, Cleveland, 49; Trout, Los Angeles, 49; Kinsler, Detroit, 48. RBI: Encarnacion, Toronto, 62; NCruz, Baltimore, 60; MiCabrera, Detroit, 58; JAbreu, Chicago, 55; Donaldson, Oakland, 55; Moss, Oakland, 55; Trout, Los Angeles, 54. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 102; MeCabrera, Toronto, 94; Cano, Seattle, 91; Rios, Texas, 91; Markakis, Baltimore, 90; VMartinez, Detroit, 89; AJones, Baltimore, 88. DOUBLES: MiCabrera, Detroit, 26; Altuve, Houston, 23; Pedroia, Boston, 23; EEscobar, Minnesota, 22; Kinsler, Detroit, 22; Plouffe, Minnesota, 22; AGordon, Kansas City, 21; Hosmer, Kansas City, 21. TRIPLES: Rios, Texas, 8; Bourn, Cleveland, 5; Eaton, Chicago, 5; Trout, Los Angeles, 5; Gardner, New York, 4. HOME RUNS: NCruz, Baltimore, 23; Encarnacion, Toronto, 23; JAbreu, Chicago, 21; VMartinez, Detroit, 19; Donaldson, Oakland, 18; Moss, Oakland, 17; Ortiz, Bos ton, 16; Pujols, Los Angeles, 16; Trout, Los Angeles, 16. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 26; Ellsbury, New York, 21; RDavis, Detroit, 20; Andrus, Texas, 18; AEscobar, Kansas City, 18; LMartin, Texas, 17; Dozier, Minnesota, 15; Gardner, New York, 15; Reyes, Toronto, 15. PITCHING: Tanaka, New York, 11-1; Buehrle, Toronto, 10-4; Kazmir, Oakland, 9-2; Porcello, Detroit, 9-4; FHer nandez, Seattle, 8-2; Shields, Kansas City, 8-3; Scherzer, Detroit, 8-3; Keuchel, Houston, 8-4; Lackey, Boston, 8-4; Lester, Boston, 8-7. ERA: Tanaka, New York, 1.99; Kazmir, Oakland, 2.08; FHernandez, Seattle, 2.22; Buehrle, Toronto, 2.32; Dar vish, Texas, 2.39; Keuchel, Houston, 2.63; JChavez, Oakland, 2.71. STRIKEOUTS: Price, Tampa Bay, 133; FHernandez, Seattle, 122; Kluber, Cleveland, 114; Tanaka, New York, 113; Scherzer, Detroit, 111; Darvish, Texas, 109. SAVES: Holland, Kansas City, 21; Rodney, Seattle, 20; Perkins, Minnesota, 19; DavRobertson, New York, 17.NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Tulowitzki, Colorado, .362; Lucroy, Milwaukee, .333; Puig, Los Angeles, .321; MaAdams, St. Louis, .318; CGomez, Milwaukee, .318; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, .313; Gennett, Milwaukee, .311. RUNS: Tulowitzki, Colorado, 58; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 57; Pence, San Francisco, 55; Stanton, Miami, 51; FFreeman, Atlanta, 49; CGomez, Milwaukee, 49; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 48; Rizzo, Chicago, 48. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 57; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 52; Morneau, Colorado, 51; Howard, Philadelphia, 50; Desmond, Washington, 45; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 45; 6 tied at 44. HITS: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 92; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 90; DanMurphy, New York, 90; Pence, San Francisco, 88; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 88; CGomez, Milwaukee, 87; McGehee, Miami, 87. DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 28; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 26; Utley, Philadelphia, 24; SCastro, Chicago, 22; FFree man, Atlanta, 22; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 22. TRIPLES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 8; BCrawford, San Francisco, 6; Owings, Arizona, 5; Span, Washington, 5; Yelich, Miami, 5; 6 tied at 4. HOME RUNS: Stanton, Miami, 20; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 18; Frazier, Cincinnati, 16; Gattis, Atlanta, 16; Gold schmidt, Arizona, 15; Rizzo, Chicago, 15; Desmond, Wash ington, 14; Howard, Philadelphia, 14; JUpton, Atlanta, 14. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 39; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 31; Revere, Philadelphia, 20; EYoung, New York, 18; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 17; Blackmon, Colorado, 13; Bonifacio, Chicago, 13; ECabrera, San Diego, 13. PITCHING: Wainwright, St. Louis, 10-3; Simon, Cincin nati, 10-3; Greinke, Los Angeles, 9-3; Lohse, Milwaukee, 8-2; Ryu, Los Angeles, 8-3; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 8-4; WPeralta, Milwaukee, 8-5. ERA: Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.92; Wainwright, St. Louis, 2.08; Beckett, Los Angeles, 2.28; Cashner, San Diego, 2.36; HAlvarez, Miami, 2.39; Hudson, San Francisco, 2.39. STRIKEOUTS: Strasburg, Washington, 121; Cueto, Cincinnati, 111; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 104; Kennedy, San Diego, 103; Wainwright, St. Louis, 98. SAVES: FrRodriguez, Milwaukee, 24; Romo, San Francisco, 21; Jansen, Los Angeles, 21; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 21. Rays 5, Astros 2 Houston T ampa Bay ab r h bi ab r h bi Fowler cf 5 1 2 1 DJnngs cf 3 0 0 0 Altuve 2b 3 0 1 1 Zobrist rf-2b 2 2 1 0 Springr rf 2 0 0 0 Guyer lf 3 2 2 0 MDmn 3b 4 0 0 0 Longori 3b 4 1 3 1 Carter dh 4 0 1 0 Sands dh 3 0 0 0 Guzmn 1b 3 0 1 0 Kier mr ph-rf 0 0 0 0 Corprn c 4 0 1 0 YEscor ss 2 0 1 2 Grssmn lf 3 0 0 0 SRdrgz 1b 3 0 0 2 JCastro ph 1 0 0 0 F orsyth 2b 4 0 2 0 Villar ss 3 1 1 0 JoP erlt p 0 0 0 0 Singltn ph 1 0 0 0 JMolin c 3 0 0 0 Totals 33 2 7 2 T otals 27 5 9 5 Houston 101 000 000 2 Tampa Bay 100 003 01x 5 ESpringer (7). DPHouston 2, Tampa Bay 1. LOB Houston 8, Tampa Bay 6. 2BVillar (10), Zobrist (13). HRFowler (6). SBVillar (14). CSDe.Jennings (4). SKiermaier. SFS.Rodriguez. IP H R ER BB SO Houston Keuchel L,8-5 8 9 5 4 4 4 Tampa Bay Bedard 5 1/3 7 2 2 1 8 Oviedo W,3-2 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 Balfour H,2 1 0 0 0 1 2 McGee H,8 1 0 0 0 1 1 Jo.Peralta S,1-4 1 0 0 0 0 2 HBPby Keuchel (Guyer, De.Jennings), by Bedard (Springer). WPOviedo. UmpiresHome, Brian Knight; First, Seth Buckminster; Second, Fieldin Culbreth; Third, Manny Gonzalez. T:51. A,841 (31,042). Tigers 10, Indians 4 Detroit Cle veland ab r h bi ab r h bi Kinsler 2b 5 2 3 1 Bour n cf 3 2 1 0 Suarez ph-ss 1 0 0 0 A Carer ss 5 1 2 1 AJcksn cf 4 1 1 0 Brantly lf 5 0 3 3 MiCarr 1b 4 2 2 3 Kipnis 2b 5 0 0 0 D.Kelly ph-1b 1 0 0 0 CSantn 1b 4 0 1 0 VMrtnz dh 4 1 0 0 Chsnhll 3b 4 0 0 0 JMrtnz rf 4 1 1 2 Swisher dh 4 0 1 0 Cstllns 3b 4 2 2 2 DvMr p rf 4 0 0 0 Avila c 5 0 2 1 YGoms c 2 0 2 0 AnRmn ss-2b 5 1 1 1 K ottars c 2 1 1 0 RDavis lf 5 0 0 0 Totals 42 10 12 10 T otals 38 4 11 4 Detroit 101 071 000 10 Cleveland 000 010 003 4 EBourn (2), A.Cabrera (14), Chisenhall (10). LOB Detroit 9, Cleveland 9. 2BKinsler (23), J.Martinez (11), Castellanos 2 (17), Avila (12), Brantley 2 (19), Swisher (14). HRMi.Cabrera (13). SBKinsler (8). IP H R ER BB SO Detroit Scherzer W,9-3 6 6 1 1 2 8 B.Hardy 1 0 0 0 0 1 McCoy 1 1 0 0 0 1 C.Smith 1 4 3 3 0 2 Cleveland Tomlin L,4-5 4 8 8 5 2 5 Crockett 1/3 1 1 1 0 0 Axford 2/3 1 0 0 1 0 Carrasco 2 2/3 1 1 1 1 3 Lowe 2/3 1 0 0 0 1 Shaw 2/3 0 0 0 0 1 Tomlin pitched to 6 batters in the 5th. WPTomlin. UmpiresHome, Gabe Morales; First, Jerry Meals; Second, Chris Conroy; Third, Jordan Baker. T:44. A,023 (42,487). Twins 6, White Sox 5 Chicago Minnesota ab r h bi ab r h bi Eaton cf 4 0 1 0 DSantn ss 3 2 1 0 GBckh 2b 4 1 1 2 Dozier 2b 2 1 1 1 JAreu 1b 4 1 1 2 Mauer 1b 4 0 2 2 A.Dunn dh 4 0 0 0 Wlngh lf 3 0 0 2 AlRmrz ss 4 0 1 0 P armel lf 0 0 0 0 Gillaspi 3b 4 0 1 1 KMor ls dh 4 0 1 0 Sierra rf 3 1 1 0 Arcia rf 4 0 0 0 Viciedo ph 1 0 0 0 KSuzuk c 4 0 3 0 De Aza lf 4 1 2 0 EEscor 3b 4 1 1 0 Flowrs c 2 1 0 0 Fuld cf 3 2 2 1 Totals 34 5 8 5 T otals 31 6 11 6 Chicago 005 000 000 5 Minnesota 120 300 00x 6 ED.Santana (1). DPChicago 1, Minnesota 2. LOB Chicago 3, Minnesota 6. 2BG.Beckham (13), K.Su zuki (15), Fuld 2 (9). SBFuld (6). CSD.Santana (1). SFWillingham. IP H R ER BB SO Chicago Joh.Danks L,6-6 5 10 6 6 4 1 Petricka 2 0 0 0 0 2 S.Downs 1/3 1 0 0 0 1 Putnam 2/3 0 0 0 0 1 Minnesota P.Hughes W,8-3 5 8 5 5 1 4 Swarzak H,2 2 0 0 0 0 0 Fien H,13 1 0 0 0 0 0 Burton S,1-1 1 0 0 0 0 2 Joh.Danks pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. WPJoh.Danks. UmpiresHome, D.J. Reyburn; First, Mark Wegner; Second, Andy Fletcher; Third, Chris Segal. Orioles 8, Yankees 0 Baltimore Ne w York ab r h bi ab r h bi Markks rf 4 0 2 0 Gardnr lf 3 0 1 0 Pearce dh 4 0 2 0 Jeter ss 4 0 0 0 A.Jones cf 5 1 2 0 Ellsur y cf 3 0 1 0 N.Cruz lf 5 1 0 0 T eixeir 1b 3 0 0 0 C.Davis 1b 4 1 0 0 Ry an pr-2b 0 0 0 0 JHardy ss 4 2 2 3 McCnn c 4 0 0 0 Machd 3b 4 1 2 1 Beltran dh 3 0 0 0 Schoop 2b 4 1 1 2 KJhnsn 3b-1b 2 0 0 0 CJosph c 3 1 1 2 ASorin ph 1 0 0 0 Solarte 2b-3b 4 0 0 0 ISuzuki rf 3 0 2 0 Totals 37 8 12 8 T otals 30 0 4 0 Baltimore 010 000 241 8 New York 000 000 000 0 EC.Davis (2), Ke.Johnson (8), Solarte (6). DPBaltimore 1, New York 1. LOBBaltimore 6, New York 8. 2BJ.Hardy (17), Machado (7), Gardner (8), Ellsbury (16). HRSchoop (6), C.Joseph (1). SFC.Joseph. IP H R ER BB SO Baltimore Tillman W,6-4 7 4 0 0 4 2 McFarland 2 0 0 0 0 1 New York Tanaka L,11-2 7 6 3 3 1 6 Warren 1 4 4 4 1 0 Huff 1 2 1 1 1 1 HBPby McFarland (Teixeira). UmpiresHome, Tom Woodring; First, Chris Guccione; Second, Eric Cooper; Third, Tom Hallion. T:03. A,493 (49,642). Mets 11, Marlins 5 Ne w York Miami ab r h bi ab r h bi Grndrs rf 5 2 3 0 RJhnsn lf 5 1 1 1 DnMrp 2b 5 2 2 3 Lucas ss 4 0 0 0 DWrght 3b 4 1 2 1 Stanton rf 3 1 2 1 Duda 1b 4 1 3 0 Mr snck cf 1 0 0 0 Niwnhs cf 5 2 2 1 McGeh 3b 3 0 0 0 Tejada ss 4 1 2 1 Ozuna cf-rf 4 0 2 1 Recker c 4 1 2 2 JeBakr 1b 2 0 0 0 Niese p 2 1 0 1 Mor ris p 0 0 0 0 Campll ph 1 0 0 0 ARams p 0 0 0 0 CTorrs p 0 0 0 0 GJones ph 0 1 0 0 CYoung ph 1 0 0 0 Dietrch 2b 4 1 1 0 Germn p 0 0 0 0 Mathis c 4 1 1 0 EYong lf 4 0 1 2 DeSclfn p 1 0 0 0 JaT rnr p 0 0 0 0 Bour 1b 2 0 1 2 Totals 39 11 17 11 T otals 33 5 8 5 New York 022 300 400 11 Miami 000 003 002 5 DPNew York 1, Miami 1. LOBNew York 8, Miami 5. 2BGranderson (12), D.Wright (18), Nieuwenhuis 2 (4), Recker (6), R.Johnson (9), Dietrich (6), Mathis (1), Bour (1). HRDan.Murphy (6). SNiese, E.Young, Ja.Turner. SFD.Wright, Recker. IP H R ER BB SO New York Niese W,4-4 6 6 3 3 2 4 C.Torres 2 0 0 0 0 3 Germen 1 2 2 2 1 1 Miami DeSclafani L,1-2 3 2/3 7 7 7 2 1 Ja.Turner 3 7 4 4 1 2 Morris 1 1/3 3 0 0 0 2 A.Ramos 1 0 0 0 0 0 UmpiresHome, Pat Hoberg; First, Ed Hickox; Sec ond, Lance Barrett; Third, Ron Kulpa. T:09. A,613 (37,442). Nationals 4, Braves 1 Atlanta W ashington ab r h bi ab r h bi LaStell 2b 3 0 0 0 Span cf 4 0 2 1 BUpton cf 4 0 0 0 Rendon 3b 3 2 1 0 FFrmn 1b 4 1 2 0 W erth rf 4 1 1 0 Gattis c 3 0 0 0 LaRoch 1b 4 0 2 1 Heywrd rf 3 0 0 0 Zmr mn lf 3 0 0 1 J.Upton lf 4 0 1 1 Dsmnd ss 3 0 0 0 CJhnsn 3b 3 0 1 0 Espinos 2b 3 0 2 0 R.Pena 3b 1 0 0 0 S.Leon c 3 1 1 0 ASmns ss 4 0 0 0 Roar k p 1 0 0 0 ESantn p 2 0 0 0 Stmmn p 0 0 0 0 JSchafr ph 1 0 0 0 Dobbs ph 1 0 0 0 Smmns p 0 0 0 0 Clipprd p 0 0 0 0 Avilan p 0 0 0 0 RSorin p 0 0 0 0 Hale p 0 0 0 0 Totals 32 1 4 1 T otals 29 4 9 3 Atlanta 000 001 000 1 Washington 200 010 01x 4 EE.Santana (1), LaRoche (4). DPAtlanta 1. LOB Atlanta 7, Washington 4. 2BSpan (23), Rendon (15), Espinosa (10). CSEspinosa (1). SRoark. SFZimmerman. IP H R ER BB SO Atlanta E.Santana L,5-5 6 6 3 3 1 9 S.Simmons 1 2/3 2 1 1 0 0 Avilan 0 1 0 0 0 0 Hale 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Washington Roark W,7-4 5 1/3 4 1 1 3 3 Stammen H,3 1 2/3 0 0 0 0 1 Clippard H,17 1 0 0 0 0 0 R.Soriano S,17-19 1 0 0 0 0 3 Avilan pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. WPAvilan. UmpiresHome, Mark Carlson; First, Tim Welke; Second, Todd Tichenor; Third, Clint Fagan. T:54. A,473 (41,408). Pirates 2, Cubs 1 Pittsburgh Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi Polanc rf 3 0 0 0 Coghln lf 2 0 0 0 JHrrsn 2b 4 0 1 1 Castillo ph-c 1 0 0 0 AMcCt cf 4 0 1 0 Sw eeny cf 3 0 1 0 I.Davis 1b 3 0 2 0 Ruggin ph-lf 1 0 0 0 Mercer ss 4 0 0 0 Rizzo 1b 4 1 1 0 PAlvrz 3b 4 0 0 0 SCastro ss 4 0 1 0 Snider lf 3 1 2 1 V aluen 3b 4 0 0 0 Tabata ph-lf 1 0 0 0 Schrhlt rf 3 0 0 1 CStwrt c 3 1 0 0 JoBakr c 2 0 0 0 Cumptn p 2 0 0 0 Lak e ph-cf 2 0 1 0 Watson p 0 0 0 0 Bar ney 2b 3 0 1 0 Melncn p 0 0 0 0 Hamml p 2 0 1 0 NRmrz p 0 0 0 0 T .Wood ph 0 0 0 0 Russell p 0 0 0 0 Strop p 0 0 0 0 Totals 31 2 6 2 T otals 31 1 6 1 Pittsburgh 002 000 000 2 Chicago 000 000 001 1 DPPittsburgh 1. LOBPittsburgh 6, Chicago 6. HR Snider (4). SBPolanco (1), J.Harrison (5). CSMer cer (1). SCumpton, T.Wood. IP H R ER BB SO Pittsburgh Cumpton W,3-2 7 2 0 0 2 4 Watson H,19 1 2 0 0 0 2 Melancon S,12-15 1 2 1 1 0 1 Chicago Hammel L,6-5 7 6 2 2 1 6 N.Ramirez 1 0 0 0 2 0 Russell 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Strop 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 PBJo.Baker. UmpiresHome, James Hoye; First, Bill Welke; Sec ond, Bob Davidson; Third, John Tumpane. T:50. A,573 (41,072). Cardinals 5, Phillies 3 Philadelphia St. Louis ab r h bi ab r h bi Revere cf 4 0 0 0 MCr pnt 3b 4 0 1 0 Rollins ss 4 0 0 0 Hollidy lf 4 0 0 0 Utley 2b 4 0 0 0 MAdms 1b 4 1 2 0 Howard 1b 3 1 2 0 Craig rf 3 1 2 0 Mayrry rf 3 1 0 0 YMolin c 4 2 2 0 DBrwn lf 3 1 0 0 Ja y cf 4 1 2 1 Asche 3b 4 0 2 3 JhP erlt ss 3 0 2 2 Rupp c 3 0 0 0 M.Ellis 2b 3 0 1 2 Ruiz ph 1 0 0 0 CMr tnz p 1 0 0 0 Kndrck p 2 0 0 0 Grenwd p 0 0 0 0 CHrndz ph 1 0 1 0 Roinsn ph 1 0 0 0 Hollnds p 0 0 0 0 SF rmn p 0 0 0 0 DeFrts p 0 0 0 0 Neshek p 0 0 0 0 Giles p 0 0 0 0 Descals ph 1 0 0 0 Byrd ph 1 0 0 0 Rosnthl p 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 3 5 3 T otals 32 5 12 5 Philadelphia 030 000 000 3 St. Louis 000 401 00x 5 EJh.Peralta (8). LOBPhiladelphia 6, St. Louis 7. 2BAsche (9), Ma.Adams (17). CSM.Carpenter (1), Jh.Peralta (1). SM.Ellis, C.Martinez. IP H R ER BB SO Philadelphia K.Kendrick L,3-7 6 8 5 5 1 2 Hollands 2/3 2 0 0 0 0 De Fratus 1/3 2 0 0 0 1 Giles 1 0 0 0 1 2 St. Louis C.Martinez W,1-3 5 3 3 3 1 5 Greenwood H,1 1 0 0 0 1 1 S.Freeman H,4 1 2/3 1 0 0 0 3 Neshek H,9 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 Rosenthal S,22-25 1 1 0 0 0 1 HBPby C.Martinez (Mayberry). UmpiresHome, Angel Campos; First, Angel Hernandez; Second, Adrian Johnson; Third, Larry Vanover. T:54. A,484 (45,399). Reds 4, Blue Jays 3 T oronto Cincinnati ab r h bi ab r h bi Kawsk ss-2b 5 1 0 0 Schmkr cf-lf 2 0 0 0 MeCarr lf 4 1 2 0 F razier 3b 3 2 1 2 Bautist rf 1 0 1 0 V otto 1b 3 0 1 0 Reyes pr-ss 1 0 0 0 Phillips 2b 2 0 0 0 Encrnc 1b 4 1 2 1 RSantg ph-2b 2 0 0 0 ClRsms cf 4 0 2 2 Br uce rf 4 1 2 1 Lawrie 2b 0 0 0 0 Lud wck lf 4 0 2 0 StTllsn 2b-rf 3 0 0 0 A Chpm p 0 0 0 0 JFrncs 3b 4 0 0 0 B.P ena c 4 0 1 0 Thole c 3 0 0 0 Cozar t ss 4 0 1 0 Kratz ph 1 0 0 0 Cueto p 3 1 1 0 Dickey p 3 0 0 0 BHmltn cf 0 0 0 0 Santos p 0 0 0 0 DNavrr ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 34 3 7 3 T otals 31 4 9 3 Toronto 002 000 010 3 Cincinnati 100 120 00x 4 EEncarnacion (8), Votto (4), Cueto (1). DPToronto 1, Cincinnati 1. LOBToronto 7, Cincinnati 7. 2B Bruce (11), B.Pena (10). HREncarnacion (24), Fra zier (17). SBautista, Schumaker. IP H R ER BB SO Toronto Dickey L,6-6 7 2/3 9 4 3 2 7 Santos 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Cincinnati Cueto W,7-5 8 7 3 1 1 8 A.Chapman S,13-14 1 0 0 0 0 3 HBPby Dickey (Schumaker), by Cueto (Lawrie). UmpiresHome, Marty Foster; First, Rob Drake; Sec ond, Alan Porter; Third, Joe West. T:42. A,089 (42,319).

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 23, 2014 Yo uMaketheCA LL !June 48This We eksLeesburgLightningScheduleAlw ay sFREEAdmission! RainoutInformation 352-234-4489 Yo uMaketheCA LL !June 48This We eksLeesburgLightningScheduleAlw ay sFREEAdmission! GameTimes: 7pm We ekdays Sun5pmTHEPLAY:Basesloaded,twoouts.F7makesarunning catchonadeadsprinttowardstheleftfieldline.He continutestorunanother12stepsbeforerunninginto thefence,whichisonlyafewfeetbeyondthefoulline. Assoonasthefielderhitsthefence,theballfallstothe gound.Whatstheruling?RainoutInformation 352-234-4489 Mon.6/23..............OffDay Tu es.6/24..............Sanford(home) We d.6/25..............Sanford(away) Thurs.6/26..............Sanford(away) Fri.6/27..............WinterGarden(away) Sat.6/28..............WinterGarden(away) Sun.6/29..............WinterGarden(away)ANSWERonFriday This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule GOLF The Associated PressCROMWELL, Conn. Kevin Streelman birdied the last seven holes to win the Travelers Championship by a stroke at TPC River Highlands. Streelman shot his second straight 6-under 64 to nish at 15-under 265. He broke the tour record for consecutive closing birdies by a win ner of six set by Mike Souchak in the 1956 St. Paul Open. The 35-year-old Streelman also won the Tampa Bay Champi onship last season. He missed the cuts in his previous four starts on tour. Sergio Garcia and K.J. Choi tied for second. They each shot 67. Aaron Baddeley was fourth at 13 under after a 69.ENCOMPASS CHAMPIONSHIPGLENVIEW, Ill. Tom Lehman made a 12-foot birdie putt on the nal hole to win the Champions Tours Encompass Championship. The 55-year-old Lehman closed with a 2-un der 70 at North Shore and had a 15-under 201 total for his eighth se nior title and rst since 2012. He rebounded from bogeys on Nos. 13 and 14 his only dropped strokes of the week with birdies on Nos. 15 and 16, parred the par-3 17th and won on the par-4 18th. Michael Allen and Kirk Triplett tied for second, a stroke back. Allen shot 67, and Triplett had a 68.IRISH OPENCORK, Ireland Fin lands Mikko Ilonen completed a wire-towire victory in the Irish Open, shooting a 1-un der 70 to beat Italys Edoardo Molinari by a stroke. Ilonen nished at 13-under 271 at Fota Is land. He has four victo ries in 300 career Euro pean Tour starts. Molinari closed with a 67. Englands Matthew Fitzpatrick, the U.S. Amateur champion, had a 68 to tie for 29th at 5 under in his pro debut.AIR CAPITAL CLASSICWICHITA, Kan. Monday qualier Sebastian Cappelen won the Air Capital Classic for his rst Web.com Tour title, nishing with a 4-under 66 for a onestroke victory over Matt Weibring. Cappelen, from Denmark, had an 18-un der 262 total after open ing with rounds of 66, 65 and 65 at Crest view Country Club. The 24-year-old former Uni versity of Arkansas play er earned $108,000.FOUR WINDS INVITATIONALSOUTH BEND, Ind. Canadas Nicole Van dermade won the Four Winds Invitational for her rst Symetra Tour ti tle, closing with a 4-un der 68 for a one-stroke victory. Vandermade, from Brantford, Ontario, had a 12-under 204 total at Blackthorn Golf Club. MLB TENNIS AUTO RACING AP FILE PHOTO Marion Bartoli holds the trophy for her win at the 2013 All England Lawn Tennis Championships in Wimbledon. HOWARD FENDRICHAP Tennis WriterLONDON There they were, spread across the practice courts on the after noon before Wimbledon begins: past Grand Slam champions or former No. 1s Novak Djokovic, Stan Wawrinka, Petra Kvitova, Caroline Wozniacki and some who aspire to such heights Eug enie Bouchard, Milos Raonic, Ernests Gulbis. Djokovic, the 2011 winner at the All England Club and last years runner-up to Andy Murray, teasingly challenged Wozniacki to hit a serve into a white plastic bag he was holding (she missed, then joked about too much pres sure.) Kvitova tested her heavily wrapped upper right leg. Bouchard, a seminalist at the last two majors, worked on volleying. Notably absent was 2013 champion Marion Bartoli, the rst wom an in 17 years who de clined to try to de fend her Wimbledon title. Still, Bartoli held the traditional reigning champions pre-tour nament news confer ence Sunday, when she explained she has zero lingering doubts about retiring at age 28, less than two months after winning her only Grand Slam trophy and also showed precisely why she quit the sport. Tugging down the collar of her white top to reveal strips of blue tape providing support for her right shoulder, Bartoli said: Literally, I cant even lift my arm every morning. It was the same last year and didnt improve. ... So denitely no regrets at all. She has moved on to other pursuits TV commentary, launching a shoe line and de signing jewelry. ERIC WILLEMSENAssociated PressSPIELBERG, Austria Nico Rosberg held off a challenge from team mate Lewis Hamilton to win the Austrian GP on Sunday for the sixth 1-2 nish by Mercedes this season. It was Rosbergs third win of the year and sixth overall as he extend ed his lead in the drivers championship over Hamilton to 29 points. Valtteri Bottas came third for his rst career Formula One podium while Williams teammate Felipe Massa, who started from pole Posi tion, took fourth. Four-time Formula One champion Sebastian Vettel had an engine problem in the second lap and was doubled by the eld be fore quitting the race in the 36th on Red Bulls home circuit. Hamilton, who was ninth after qualifying, used a blistering start and earned four places from the start and won another place to work his way up to fourth in the opening lap. Rosberg immediately overtook Bottas but lost that position again shortly after the rst turn. Massa dropped from pole to fourth after the top-four had their rst pit stops.Rosberg holds off Hamilton in Austrian GPBartoli has no regrets for post-Wimbledon retirement decision STEVEN WINEAP Sports WriterMIAMI Daniel Murphy hit a three-run homer and the New York Mets matched a season high with 17 hits Sunday to beat the slumping Miami Mar lins 11-5. Jonathon Niese (4-4), who has been plagued by poor run support this year, won for the rst time since May 22. He allowed less than four earned runs for the 19th consecutive start, giving up three in six innings. Mets starters have an ERA of 1.74 over the past six games. Rookie Anthony DeSclafani (1-2), making his fourth major league start, gave up seven runs in 3 2/3 innings and departed with an ERA of 7.59.PIRATES 2, CUBS 1CHICAGO Brandon Cumpton pitched seven scoreless in nings, Travis Snider hit a solo homer and the Pittsburgh Pirates beat the Chicago Cubs 2-1 on Sunday. Cumpton (3-2) won his third straight decision as the Pirates won the last two games of the three-game series. Cumpton allowed just two hits and two walks while striking out four. The rookie righthander retired 13 of the rst 14 batters he faced. He allowed a walk to Nate Schier holtz in the fth inning, but rebounded by get ting John Baker to hit into an inning-ending double play. Ryan Sweeney reached on a single against Cumpton in the rst inning and the other hit was by Cubs starting pitcher Jason Hammel in the sixth.REDS 4, BLUE JAYS 3CINCINNATI Johnny Cueto pitched eight effective innings and the Cincin nati Reds beat Toronto 4-3 Sunday after Blue Jays stars Brett Lawrie and Jose Bautista exited early because of injuries. Lawrie sustained a broken right index n ger when he was hit by a pitch in the second. The team didnt im mediately announce how long the inelder would be out. Bautista left because of tightness in his left leg. The All-Star outelder had a single and a sacri ce bunt before leaving. Cueto (7-5) gave up three runs one earned and leads the NL with a 1.86 ERA. He gave up seven hits and struck out eight while winning his third straight start.ORIOLES 8, YANKEES 0 NEW YORK Chris Tillman tossed seven innings of four-hit ball and the Baltimore Orioles beat the New York Yankees 8-0 Sunday, handing Masahiro Tanaka his second major league loss. Jonathan Schoop homered off Tanaka for the second time and fellow rookie Caleb Joseph capped the scor ing with his rst career homer. J.J. Hardy hit a three-run double for the Orioles, who spoiled Old-Timers Day at Yankee Stadium and took two of three from their AL East rivals. After squandering a ninth-inning lead in Friday nights loss, Bal timore outhomered the Yankees 6-1 and outscored them 14-1 in the nal two games of the series.Mets tie season high with 17 hits, beat Marlins J. PAT CARTER / AP New York Mets Daniel Murphy smiles as he hits a threerun home run during the fourth inning against the Miami Marlins on Sunday in Miami. Streelman birdies last seven holes to win Travelers by a stroke FRED BECKHAM / AP Kevin Streelman holds the trophy after winning the Travelers Championship golf tournament on Sunday in Cromwell, Conn.

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Sovaldi, a new pill for hepatitis C, cures the liver-wasting disease in 9 of 10 patients, but treatment can cost more than $90,000. Leading medical societies recommend the drug as a rst-line treatment, and pa tients are clamoring for it. But insurance companies and state Medicaid programs are gagging on the price. In Oregon, ofcials propose to limit how many low-income patients can get Sovaldi. Yet if Sovaldi didnt exist, insurers would still be paying in the mid-to-high ve gures to treat the most com mon kind of hepatitis C, a new pricing survey indicates. Some of the older alternatives involve more side effects, and are less likely to provide cures. So whats a fair price? The cost of this break through drug is highlighting cracks in the U.S. health care system at a time of heightened budget concerns. The Obama administration has a huge political stake in controlling treatment costs, but its critics may cry rationing. People are going to want to try to dodge this hot pota to, says economist Douglas Holtz-Eakin. For insurers, theres a frus trating twist: For each mid dle-aged person they pay to cure with Sovaldi, any nancial benets from preventing liver failure are likely to ac crue to Medicare, not to them. More than 3 million Amer icans carry the hepatitis C vi rus, and many dont realize it. Its a public health concern since the disease can be transmitted by contact with infected blood, and sometimes through sexual activity. Health ofcials advise all baby boomers to get tested. The illness is complex, with distinct virus types requiring different treatments. While it progresses gradually, it can ultimately destroy the liv er, and transplants average $577,000. An estimated 15,000 people died from hepatitis C in the U.S. in 2007, when it sur passed AIDS as a cause of death. If its going to get me the medicine, Ill put my hand out there with a tin cup, said Stuart Rose, a hepatitis C pa tient in New York City. His fractures and bleed ing in the brain, and are considered highly effective at that. Theyre tested for how they with stand direct blows, so-called linear forces that can make the brain bump back and forth. The proposed new standard would add an additional test of how helmets perform when an impact also makes a players head sud denly spin, causing the brain to stretch and twist inside the skull as it changes direction. Scientists call that rota tional acceleration, and brain specialists say limiting both kinds of forces is important. Were plowing new ground here, Mike Ol iver, executive director of the National Op erating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment, told The Associated Press. The hope is that the standard might eventu ally spur safer helmet designs. I dont believe hel mets will ever be the sole solution for concussion, said Dr. Robert Cantu, a Boston University neu rologist, a leading sports concussion expert and vice president of the athletic equipment standards committee. But, it puts us on the road to developing helmets that will lessen the chance for concussion. Once the standard goes into effect, expected in about a year, it would apply only to new helmets. We dont foresee any need to replace all the helmets that exist with new and different hel mets, Oliver said. This is a rst step. Concern about concussions is growing amid headlines about former professional players who suffered long-term impairment after repeated blows to the head. Its not just football; concussions occur in a range of sports, from hockey and lacrosse to soccer and wrestling. Children and teens, with their still de veloping brains, appear at special risk. The Institute of Med icine, an independent organization that advises the government, warned last fall that too many young athletes still face a play-at-allcosts culture that discourages reporting the injury and staying on the sidelines until its healed. Although millions of U.S. children and teens play school or com munity sports, its not clear how many suf fer concussions, in part because many go undiagnosed. The Institute of Medicine said 250,000 people 19 and younger were treated in emergency rooms for concussions and other sportsor recreation-related brain injuries in 2009. Parents and coaches need to be prepared and educated about what the nature of this inju ry is, advised neuropsy chologist Gerard Gioia of Childrens National Medical Center in Washington and medical adviser to USA Football. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Preventions heads-up campaign teaches signs of concussion which may not appear right away and what steps to take. Symptoms include confusion, weakness, appearing dazed or stunned, lack of co ordination, mood or behavior changes and even a brief loss of con sciousness. Recent guidelines say anyone suspected of having a concussion should be taken out of play imme diately and not allowed back until cleared by a trained professional. Gioia helped turn that advice into the concussion recognition and response smartphone app to offer guidance on the eld. As for safety gear, last falls Institute of Medi cine report found little scientic evidence that current sports helmet designs reduce the risk of concussion. Indeed, football hel mets have gotten bigger and heavier in recent years but our concussion problem has not gotten better, said Dave Halstead, a sports biomechanics specialist at the University of Ten nessee and the South ern Impact Research Center testing laboratory who advises the athletic equipment standards committee. To test rotational ac celeration, labs will put helmets onto a crash test dummy-like head with a moveable neck. A machine then posi tions a ram to hit the head from different di rections, at different speeds and as if differ ent-sized players were behind the impact. Its about time, was the reaction from concussion researcher Steven P. Broglio of the University of Michigan and National Athletic Trainers Association. HELMETS FROM PAGE C1 AP FILE PHOTO This May 29 photo shows New Orleans Saints strong safety Kenny Vaccaro looking on during an NFL football minicamp in Metairie, La. Vaccaros rookie campaign was interrupted by concussions and cut short by an ankle injury. $1,000-a-pill Sovaldi jolts US health care system GILEAD SCIENCES / AP Sovaldi, a new pill for hepatitis C, cures the liver-wasting disease in 9 of 10 patients, but treatment can cost more than $90,000.SEE HEPATITIS | C3

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Monday, June 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 D002348 GOLF CART ACCESSNow,onedoctorishelping localresidentswithback painlivemoreactive, pain-freelives.Pain less ,convenient, fast-actingSoleveprocedur e shownto be promisinginapilotstudyfor 95% of patien tsno w av ailable ex clusivelyatEthe re dge Chiro pra ctic.*FruitlandPark(352)365-1191TheVillages(352)750-1200*Patientsinapilotstu dy showeda20-point re ductionin VA Sscore inas fewas fo ur sessions Gore nbergM,SchiffE,Schwartz K,EizenbergE:Anovelimage-guided,automatic,high-intensityneurostimulation deviceforth etreatment of nonspecificlow backpain.PainRes Tr eat;2011;2011;152307.14Nervomatrix Lt d.All rights re served. So leveisa re gisteredtrademark rfnnftb D002088 BOB DOHRAssociated PressWAUSAU, Wis. She doesnt receive a paycheck, Social Secu rity or vacation time, but Phoebe is a valued member of the ther apy team at Compass Counseling Wausau. Phoebes story is compelling, but she has to rely on others to tell it. Phoebe is a certied therapy dog at the out patient mental health and alcohol and other drug abuse clinic. Her calm disposition helps her owner, counselor Andy Cameron, work with his clients. But life wasnt always chew toys and treats for Phoebe. In July 2012, the shih tzu was found abandoned in a crate in a garage in Minnesota, left there by an evict ed tenant. A bag of food had been left in her cage, but time had passed perhaps as much as a month without anyone attending to the dog. Cameron said Phoebe had to be cut out of the enclosure because her hair was matted to the cage with feces; her eyes were scratched from the matted hair, she was aficted with an intestinal parasite, and her weight was down to 8 pounds. He learned about Phoebe and her plight through Compass weekend receptionist, Rhonda Singstock, who is president of Shih Tzu Rescue of Central Wisconsin. Singstock had received word of Phoebes condition through a Craig slist ad. She was very sick. We almost lost her, Singstock told Daily Herald Media. Singstock said Phoe be was used as a breed ing dog and accord ing to the veterinarian who spayed her, she likely was bred every time she was in heat. Her only job for most of her life was to pump out puppies for un scrupulous breeders and buyers. Basically, she was typical of a puppy mill dog even though she wasnt in a puppy mill, Singstock said. Today, Phoebe is up to a healthy 15 pounds and recently received ofcial certication as a therapy dog. Camer on said veterinarians think shes around 6 years old. Adopting a dog especially a small dog with myriad health problems wasnt part of Camerons plan in 2012. For one thing, he had always had big ger dogs like Labs and retrievers growing up. But he changed his mind when Singstock showed him a picture of Phoebe. I wasnt even looking to get a dog, but I was like, Oh, shes cute, lets meet her, Cameron said. And once you meet Phoebe, you got to have her. Cameron said the therapy dog idea blossomed once he real ized Phoebe had a su per calm demeanor. So I started bringing her in to work here and she just did a great job, so I eventually got her certied as a ther apy dog in April of this year, Cameron said. Now shes ofcial.Rescue dog now serving others as a therapy dogTXER ZHON KHA / APCounselor Andrew Cameron poses with his therapy dog, Phoebe, at his ofce in Wausau, Wis. Phoebe is a certied therapy dog at the outpatient mental health and alcohol and drug abuse clinic. Cameron said Phoebe helps with all types of clients, including those who are very anxious or who have head trauma. They kind of focus on Phoebe while theyre talking and it kind of gets them to open up a little bit. She also works well with teenage boys, said Cameron. Troubled teenage boys want to act all tough and then they start petting a little dog, and they kind of chill out a little bit on the tough-guy act, and we can start getting some stuff done, he said. Cameron said Phoebe has helped the rela tionship he has with his clients, but given her background, just giving her a good home has been really reward ing. Singstock said shes rescued more than 160 dogs since she started fostering in 2007, but most dont have the ca pacity to do what Phoe be does. After all she has gone through, she is just a remarkable little girl, Singstock said. I wasnt even looking to get a dog, but I was like, Oh, shes cute, lets meet her. And once you meet Phoebe, you got to have her. ... I started bringing her in to work here and she just did a great job, so I eventually got her certified as a therapy dog in April of this year. Now shes official.Andy CameronCounselor at Compass Counseling Wausaucompany, for example, sells that come in avors like Cherry Crush, Peach Schnapps and Pina Colada. Healy countered that the aver age age for consumers of his e-cigarettes is 51. Rockefeller was not swayed, bluntly admonishing both men and telling them: I am ashamed of you. I dont know how you sleep at night. About 2 percent of U.S. teenagers said theyd used an e-cigarette in the previous month, according to a survey done in 2012 and released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And about 7 percent said theyd tried an e-cigarette at least once in 2012, which translates to nearly 1.8 million. In April, the FDA proposed regulating e-cigarettes, banning sales to anyone under 18, adding warning labels and requiring agency approval for new products. But the FDA didnt immediately place mar keting restrictions on e-cigarette makers or a ban on fruit or candy avors, which are barred for use in regular The agency has left the door open to fur ther regulations, but says it wants more evidence before it rushes into more restrictions. CIGARETTE FROM PAGE C1 GILEAD SCIENCES / AP Sovaldi, a new pill for hepatitis C, cures the liver-wasting disease in 9 of 10 patients, but treatment can cost more than $90,000. insurance would pay only $4,000 a year for medications, but Rose was able to get assis tance from charitable foundations. He recent ly started taking Sovaldi. Until the drugs approval late last year, standard treatment for the most common type of the disease required daily pills and extended use of interferon, an injection that can produce debilitating ulike symptoms. Brain fog, said Rose. Taken once a day for 12 weeks, Sovaldi great ly reduces the length of interferon treatment, making things more tolerable for patients. Now, many more peo ple might want to try the cure. A similar drug, Olysio, also approved last year, is priced a bit lower. The nations largest care provider for chron ic hepatitis C, the feder al Veterans Administra tion, sees promise. With 175,000 patients, the VA has started more than 1,850 of them on Sovaldi. After 20 years in in fectious diseases, I never thought we would be in a position to cure this disease, said Dr. David Ross, head of the VAs program. By law, the VA gets drug discounts of over 40 percent. Will the agency break even by avoiding the diseases worst complications? Not necessarily, said Ross. If it leads to cost benets in the long run, thats gravy. Private insurers will probably introduce Sovaldi gradually. Not everybody is going to get this all at once, said former Medicare administrator Mark McClellan. Drug maker Gilead Sciences, Inc., reported Sovaldi sales of $2.3 bil lion worldwide in just the rst three months of this year. Gilead will not disclose its pricing methods, but vice president Gregg Alton said the drugs high cure rate makes it a real huge value. In many countries, the government sets drug prices. In the US, insurers negotiate with drug companies. Medi care is forbidden from bargaining, a situation that critics say saddles U.S. patients with high costs while subsidizing the rest of the world. HEPATITIS FROM PAGE C2

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 23, 2014 FrankJolley: Sportseditor.AlabamaCrimsonTidefan.Ye arsofplayingbasketball,baseballandothersports hastakenatollonFrankskneesbutnotonhisspirit. Thepassionforsportsstillburnsbrightlyinthisveteran sportsjournalist.Frankunderstandsthatsportsisabout morethanentertainment.Itsaboutshapingyoung people,buildingcharacter,teachinglifelessons.Itswhy Franklovescoveringsportsasmuchnowashedid playingthemasayoungster. PeoplelikeFrankdelivermorethanthe newstoLakeandSumtercounties. Theydelivercommitmenttoour youngpeople. AHalifaxMediaGroupCompany Nobody deliverslikewedo. rf n t b nnnYo ur Po diatristtreats... CENTRALFLORI DAFOOTCARE, P. A.Dr Nic k Przystawski,DPM www.Floridafoot.comD002301 STEPHEN OHLEMACHERAssociated PressWASHINGTON Budget cuts have forced the Social Security Administration to close dozens of eld ofces even as millions of baby boomers approach retirement, swamping the agency with applica tions for benets, a se nior agency ofcial told Congress Wednesday. Better Internet access and more online services are easing the transition, said Nancy Berryhill, the agencys deputy commissioner for operations. We are fully com mitted now and in the future to sustain ing a eld ofce struc ture that provides faceto-face service for those customers who need or prefer such service, Berryhill told the Sen ate Special Commit tee on Aging. We also understand, however, that customer expecta tions are evolving due to changes in technology, demographics and other factors. Senators appeared unconvinced. The fact of the mat ter is, millions of seniors and disabled Americans are not accustomed to doing business online, said Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, the top Re publican on the Aging Committee. Even as computer and broad band technologies become more widespread, the idea that the Social Security Administration can serve bene ciaries primarily online ignores the very real needs of the senior and disabled populations. The committee held a hearing Wednesday after issuing a bipartisan report showing that Social Security has closed 64 eld ofces since 2010, the largest num ber of closures in a veyear period in the agen cys history. In addition, the agen cy has closed 533 temporary mobile ofces that often serve remote areas. Hours have been reduced in the 1,245 eld ofces that are still open, the report said. As a result, seniors seeking information and help from the agen cy are facing increasingly long waits, in person and on the phone, the report said. They dont do any kind of analysis on what would happen to a community when their eld ofce closes, including guring out how the most vulnerable populations would make their way to the next-closest ofce, said Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., chairman of the Aging Committee. The closings come as applications for re tirement and disability benets are soaring, a trend that will continue as aging baby boomers approach retirement. More than 47 million people receive So cial Security retirement benets, nearly a 20 percent increase from a decade ago. About 11 million people receive Social Security disability benets, a 38 percent increase from a decade ago. The Social Securi ty Administration has been encouraging peo ple to access services online. The agency has upgraded its website in recent years, including secure connections to access condential information. People can apply for benets without ever visiting Social Security ofces. In 2013, nearly half of all retirement applica tions were led online, the report said. But the committee re port notes that many older Americans lack access to the Internet or might not be comfort able using it to apply for benets. Last year, more than 43 million people visit ed Social Security eld ofces. About 43 per cent of those seeking an appointment had to wait more than three weeks, up from just 10 percent the year before, the report said. About 10 percent of visitors to Social Security ofces are applying for benets, Berryhill said. The largest group, about 30 percent, are seeking new or replacement Social Security cards. Berryhill said Social Security ofcials do an nual reviews to deter mine whether ofces should be expanded, re duced or closed. Once we make the decision to consolidate an ofce, we discuss the changes with stakeholders, Berryhill said. We hold town hall meetings or other forums that al low the public to voice their concerns. We con tact key community leaders. Like many federal agencies, Social Securi ty has faced budget cuts in recent years. After two years of shrinking budgets, the agency got a 6 percent increase this year, to $11.8 billion. Social Security has cut its workforce by 11,000 employees over the past three years, Berryhill said. She said the agency saves an average of $4 million over the course of a decade for every eld ofce it closes. I can hire a lot of em ployees with $4 million, Berryhill said.Social Security closes offices as baby boomers age DAVID J. PHILLIP / AP A parking sign for the former Social Security Administration ofce is seen in Houston, on June 18.

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Monday, June 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 MARILYNN MARCHIONEAP Chief Medical WriterA bold new way to test cancer drugs start ed Monday in hundreds of hospitals around the U.S. In a medical version of speed dating, doctors will sort through multiple experimental drugs and match patients to the one most likely to succeed based on each persons unique tumor gene prole. Its a rst-of-a-kind experiment that brings together ve drug companies, the government, private foundations and advocacy groups. The idea came from the federal Food and Drug Administration, which has agreed to consider approving new medicines based on results from the study. Its goal is to speed new treatments to mar ket and give seriously ill patients more chances to nd something that will help. Instead of be ing tested for individ ual genes and trying to qualify for separate clinical trials testing single drugs, patients can enroll in this umbrella study, get full gene test ing and have access to many options at once. The study, called Lung-MAP, is for ad vanced cases of a com mon, hard-to-treat form of lung cancer squamous cell. Plans for similar studies for breast and colon cancer are in the works. For patients, it gives them their best chance for treatment of a dead ly disease, because ev eryone gets some type of therapy, said El len Sigal, chairwoman and founder of Friends of Cancer Research, a Washington-based research and advocacy group that helped plan and launch the study. Theres something for everyone, and well get answers faster on whether experimental drugs work, she said. Cancer medicines increasingly target specific gene mutations that are carried by smaller groups of patients. But researchers sometimes have to screen hundreds of patients to nd a few with the right mutation, making drug de velopment inefcient, expensive and slow. One of the leaders of the Lung-MAP study Dr. Roy Herbst, chief of medical oncology at the Yale Cancer Center said he once screened 100 patients to nd ve that might be eligible for a study, and ultimately was able to en roll two. Its just going to be impossible, in rare sub groups, for companies to nd enough people to try out a new medicine, said Dr. Richard Pazdur, cancer drugs chief at the FDA. He and others at the FDA suggested the Lung-MAP trial design to speed new treatments to mar ket and minimize the number of patients ex posed to ineffective therapies, he said. Everyone in the study will be screened for mu tations in more than 200 cancer-related genes, rather than a single mutation as in conventional studies. Then they will be assigned to one of ve groups based on what these tumor biomarkers show. Each group will test a particular experi mental medicine. Drugs can be added or sub tracted from the study as it goes on, based on how each performs. The initial round of testing involves Amgen, Genentech, Pzer, AstraZeneca PLC, and AstraZenecas global biologics partner, Med Immune. Up to 1,000 patients a year can be enrolled in the study. It will cost about $150 million. The National Cancer Institute is pay ing $25 million, and the rest will come from foundations, charities and others in the pub lic-private partnership. About 500 hospitals that are part of a large cancer treatment consortium around the country will take part, and some private groups want to join as well, Herbst said. Nothing like this has ever been done before, where such comprehensive testing will be done to match patients to experimental drugs, he said. Breyan Harris, a 33-year-old nurse from Sacramento, hopes to enroll. Shes a lifelong non-smoker who was diagnosed with lung cancer on June 3. Since then Ive pretty much been on the phone, seeing doctors, trying to gure out how do I get rid of this, she said. Harris expects to have one lung with a large tumor removed, but if it comes back in my other lung Im in real trouble, so nding a drug to attack any re maining, hidden cancer is crucial, she said. New study aims to rapidly test lung cancer drugs RICH PEDRONCELLI / AP Breyan Harris, a lifelong non-smoker who was recently diagnosed with lung cancer, posses at her home in Fair Oaks, Calif., on June 16.Cancer medicines increasingly target specific gene mutations that are carried by smaller groups of patients. But researchers sometimes have to screen hundreds of patients to find a few with the right mutation, making drug development inefficient, expensive and slow.

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Monday, June 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 rf nftbWo rkinggalleryoflocalartistsANTIQUEDEA LERSWANTED (352)460-4806 rfntb fa cebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburg D002326 D002307 www.dailycommercial.comDiversions352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper.YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, June 23, the 174th day of 2014. There are 191 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On June 23, 1314, during the First War of Scottish Independence, the two-day Battle of Bannockburn, resulting in victory for the forces of Robert the Bruce over the army of King Edward II, began near Stirling. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, June 23, 2014: This year you have the opportunity to blaze a new trail. You will show more appreciation and caring, as you will experience a high level of sensitivity toward others. Greater nancial security becomes possible with a promotion and/or pay raise. Use your additional income carefully. If you are single, you will meet someone in your daily travels who could become very important to you. This relationship could have a unique quality. If you are attached, the two of you spend a lot of time shooting the breeze together. You are likely to make a major purchase that will enhance the quality of your lives. TAURUS always seems stable. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You can push only so much and expect positive results. Ultimately, you could experience some negativity when trying to reach a nancial agreement. You might have to indulge in some wining and dining in order to persuade the involved parties to agree. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Your optimism might exhaust a partner and force you to rethink your direction. This person could become very difcult. Know that a smile can be more inuential than you realize. Try to be a little more subtle and a little less like a cheerleader. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Someones insecurities might be getting the best of you. You could feel down and somewhat tired by recent hassles. Venus enters your sign, which adds to your buoyancy and charisma. Follow your intuition with a difcult situation. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Youll be more grounded than usual, especially as you express your opinions in a meeting. Recognize that everyone hits a brick wall occasionally, but that doesnt mean you shouldnt test a different approach or a new idea. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Take a stand, and know that you might need to accept far more responsibility. How you deal with someone could radically change as you gain a sense of control. Stay grounded. Make a point to clearly communicate your thoughts to others. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You have the ability to see the big picture, whereas those around you might not. You could have difculty expressing why your priorities are so different, as a result. Honor your vision. When others see the results, they might strive to detach more often. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Deal directly with a friend who often gives you feedback. What this person suggests might seem lackluster or supercial. Be polite, but seek out other answers if need be. Pace yourself, especially if you are trying to get a lot done. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Others wont hesitate to challenge you. You might wonder about their strong approach, but rst recognize how you come off. Listen to what is being shared by a trusted loved one. Take an overview as you weigh the pros and cons. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Youll want to be more direct with someone, but at the moment you might not be as sure of yourself as you would like. Remain level-headed with someone you need to respond to. Youll want this person to understand where you are coming from. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Dont even consider doing anything except detaching from a hot issue. Your judgment might be off, and you could make a huge mistake. Stop and have a friendly little chat with someone you normally just nod or say hello to. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Stay close to home. If you work from home, you might consider establishing a stronger presence there. The results of giving yourself greater freedom will be spectacular, and it will give whatever you do an extra touch of excellence. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You might want to establish a stronger bond with someone in your life. It could be with a co-worker, neighbor or friend whom youve been too quick to say hi and bye to. A family member suddenly might change his or her tune. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORYDEAR ABBY: I fell in love with a boy when I was 12, deeply in love. We met at our county fair. We grew up together and have remained friends for 30 years. He married and had children, as did I. I am now divorced, but hes still married. Recently our friendship has grown into something more. He wants our relationship to continue, but hes afraid to leave his wife because of the kids. They have been together for 20 years. What do I do? Hes the love of my life. Any time I have with him is better than none. Its not that I dont know I deserve better, but he is unhappy, and I am miserable without him. What do I do? PRISONER OF PASSION IN VIRGINIA DEAR PRISONER: What you do depends upon your strength of char acter and what you want out of life. If you want to spend the foreseeable future as this mans side dish, then continue as you have been, a prisoner of passion with not much common sense. If you would like to have a stable life and nd a man who will make you No. 1 in his life, then you will have to call a halt to this affair and go through a period of withdrawal the same as people have to do with any addiction. It may not be pleasant, but I recommend it. DEAR ABBY: Im turning 75 soon, and enjoy ing retirement, good health and a comfortable lifestyle, which is why I have arranged a Celebration of My Life So Far. Im excited about it and eagerly anticipating more than 60 guests for cocktails and a sit-down dinner at a nearby hotel. Its not uncommon these days for a celebration of life to be held after someone dies. However, I prefer to have mine BEFORE I leave this Earth so I can celebrate along with my loved ones. I want to be there, especially since Im the one whos paying for it! What do you think of my idea? Would you enjoy partaking in such a special event? THINKING AHEAD IN NEW JERSEY DEAR THINKING AHEAD: I think its a terric idea. And yes, I would enjoy celebrating such a special event, if I were invited. When is this par ty? Ill be standing by my mailbox! DEAR ABBY: Why is it socially acceptable to refer to a grown woman as a girl, and yet it would never be appropriate to call a man a boy? BARBARA IN HUNTSVILLE, ALA. DEAR BARBARA: Im not sure whether all women would accept being called a girl. In fact, some would nd it condescending and offensive. If you call a man a boy, he could regard it as an assault on his masculinity. And yet, I have heard those terms used in the third person, as in, Whats my husband doing on Satur day? Hell be out play ing golf with the boys, while Ill be going to lunch with the girls. And I have never heard that it was offensive to either sex.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Love of womans life can be only a part-time passion JEANNE PHILLIPSDEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGARBIGARS STARS

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Monday, June 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C9

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Monday, June 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 23, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX

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Monday, June 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance rt t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital WELDERS / FABRICATORS Welders must be able to MIG, TIG aluminum. Fabricators must be able Call 352-460-0602 Mon Fri 11am 4pm Fax resume to 352-460-0763

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Mu st pr esen t coup on at time of ser vi ce Va lid at participating locations only Certain re striction s may apply Call for details.BEY OND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWO OD | UPHOLSTER Y | AIR DUCT728-1668 394-1739fla# CAC18 16 40 8 U.S. TIES PORTUGAL 2-2 IN WORLD CUP PLAY, SPORTS B1 WEKIVA PARKWAY: Department of Transportation plans discussion A3 LIVING HEALTHY: Electronic cigarette makers under re C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, June 23, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 174 4 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED C9 COMICS C8 CROSSWORDS D4 DIVERSIONS C7 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 STATE/REGION A3 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A9 NATION A6 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A10. 92 / 73 Times of clouds and sun. 50 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com L eesburg native Elizabeth Fechtel, 20, will represent the Sunshine State in the Miss America Pageant in Atlan tic City, N.J., on Sept. 14 after winning the Miss Florida title Saturday night at the Mahaffey Theatre in St. Petersburg. I am feeling great ex hausted but great, Fechtel said Sunday, following a jam-packed day of interviews, meetings and signing contracts of duties she will fulll throughout her reign. Im going to be traveling the state all summer making ap pearances and will be home for just a few days before heading to Miami to begin preparations for Miss America, she said. The daughter of Vince and Dixie Fechtel of Leesburg, the New Miss Florida said her plat form in the Miss America or ganization will be preparing youth with life skills they can use once they have graduated high school. Financial literacy, entrepre neurship, work-related skills. I want to go in and teach them how to make decisions that are effective in the future, Fech tel said, noting among her col lege peers, she has found there has been a lack of education re garding credit card debt and student loans. She also wants to reach out to students at the el ementary level to prepare them to think about their potential in the workforce. I want to work more with Ju nior Achievement, she added, noting its a viable program that she strongly supports. Elizabeth is no stranger to pageants. She received her rst tiara as Miss Leesburg in 2010, followed by being named Miss Orlandos Outstanding Teen, Miss Floridas Outstanding Teen and won her rst national title as Miss Americas Outstanding Leesburg native to compete in Miss America Pageant PHOTO COURTESY OF MISS FLORIDA PAGEANT Leesburg native Elizabeth Fechtel, 20, is crowned Miss Florida on Saturday. I am feeling great exhausted but great. Im going to be traveling the state all summer making appearances and will be home for just a few days before heading to Miami to begin preparations for Miss America. Elizabeth Fechtel Miss Florida QASSIM ABDUL-ZAHRA Associated Press BAGHDAD Sun ni militants on Sun day captured two bor der crossings, one along the frontier with Jordan and the other with Syr ia, security and military ofcials said, as they pressed on with their offensive in one of Iraqs most restive regions. The fall dealt Iraqs embattled Shiite prime minister a further blow and brought the war to the doorstep of Jordan, a key ally of the Unit ed States that also bor ders embattled Syria to its north. The blitz by the Is lamic State of Iraq and the Levant in Iraqs vast western desert take the al-Qaida-break away group closer to its dream of carving out a purist Islamic state straddling both Syria and Iraq. Controlling the bor ders with Syria will also help it supply fellow ghters in Syria with weaponry looted from Iraqi militants seize 2 more border crossings AP PHOTO Militants from the al-Qaida-inspired Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) patrol in Fallujah, Iraq. Associated Press WASHINGTON President Barack Obama, in charting a new phase of American military engagement in Iraq, pledges that his war-weary country will not be dragged back into a lengthy conict or become ensnarled in mission creep. But recent U.S. military history is full of warning signs about the difculty of keeping even a limited mission from expanding Obamas test: Try to avoid mission creep in Iraq MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millardives@dailycommercial.com Big box stores, with their many aisles of mer chandise and aggressive shoplifting policies, ac count for the vast major ity of shoplifting reports. Walmart, Kohls, Tar get and other big box re tailers generate most of the shoplifting reports throughout Lake Coun ty, according to statistics from various area law en forcement agencies. In Clermont, 99 of the 105 reports of shoplifting this year have taken place in big box stores, accord ing to police. Of those 105 reports, 74 occurred at Walmart, followed by Home Depot with 10. The Walmart on Citrus Boulevard in Lake Coun ty has a distinct location. Its sits partly in Fruitland Park and partly in Lees burg. Fruitland Park Sgt. Beckie Sirolli said all 43 reports of retail thefts they received this year came from Walmart. The shoplifting prob lem at Walmart seems to be a nationwide issue. CNN reported in 2006 that police were making as many as six arrests a day at some Walmarts for retail theft, and the com pany announced it was moving away from its ze ro-tolerance policy on prosecuting shoplifters. It decided it would pros ecute only those caught taking merchandise worth $25 or more. Big box stores a frequent target of shoplifters HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO The Walmart on State Road 200 is shown in Ocala. SEE THEFT | A2 SEE IRAQ | A2 SEE OBAMA | A2 SEE PAGEANT | A10

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 23, 2014 HOW TO REACH US JUNE 22 CASH 3 ............................................... 9-9-9 Afternoon .......................................... 6-4-0 PLAY 4 ............................................. 6-7-0-9 Afternoon ....................................... 6-5-2-2 FLORIDA LOTTERY JUNE 21 FANTASY 5 ........................... 5-12-17-24-29 FLORIDA LOTTO ............... 8-18-31-34-36-47 POWERBALL ...................... 5-6-37-41-5426 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION STEVE SKAGGS publisher 352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com PAUL RYAN digital editor 352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. The New York Times re ported the change in pol icy, citing internal docu ments from Walmart that said it would only press charges against those be tween the ages of 18 and 64 who take at least $25 worth of goods. Former ly its policy was to press charges against anyone who took at least $3 in goods. Walmart is far from the only big box store to have problems with shoplifting in Lake County. Of the 142 shoplift ing incidents reported in Lady Lake since Jan 3, 2012, 62 came from Kohls. In a recent interview, Eu stis police spokesman Robert Simken said they had had 67 retail theft re ports within the past year. His department does not keep statistics on indi vidual stores, but he said Bealls led the way for re tail theft reports. Simken added in light of the size of the Eus tis Police Department, they dont have any spe cial units assigned to the store. However, we have a strong positive working relationship with the loss prevention ofcer with Bealls, which helps our efforts to reduce thefts, Simken said. Many law enforce ment ofcials attribut ed the high number of shoplifting reports at big box stores to the fact that those stores have large se curity staffs that aggres sively deal with shop lifters. Lady Lake Police Chief Chris McKinstry at tributed Kohls high num ber to an aggressive loss prevention policy as well as their willingness to prosecute. Some stores never call us because they would rather let merchandise walk out than risk a law suit or court time, McK instry said. In fact, many big box stores rely on their on their own security teams. Big box retailers typical ly have manned cameras planted throughout the store as well as roaming undercover security per sonnel. We nd that the busi nesses with the most ag gressive loss prevention typically call us more of ten, McKinstry said. THEFT FROM PAGE A1 Iraqi warehouses, signicantly re inforcing its ability to battle belea guered Syrian government forces. If they succeed in their quest, they could further unsettle the already volatile Middle East and serve as a magnet for Jihadists from across the world much like al-Qaida at tracted extremists in Taliban-ruled Afghanistan. The Iraqi ofcials said the mili tants of the Islamic State took over the Turaibil crossing with Jordan and the al-Walid crossing with Syr ia after government forces there pulled out. The ofcials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to the media. The capture of the two crossings follows the fall on Friday and Satur day of the towns of Qaim, Rawah, Anah and Rutba They are all in the Sunni dominated Anbar province, where the militants have since Jan uary controlled the city of Fallujah and parts of the provincial capital Ramadi. Rutba is on the main highway from Baghdad to the two border crossing and the capture has effec tively cut the Iraqi capitals main land route to Jordan. It is a key ar tery for passengers and goods and has been infrequently used in re cent months because of deteriorat ing security. Irans supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, said he was opposed to any U.S. intervention in the Iraqi crisis, accusing Washington of fo menting the unrest. His comments appeared to quash recent specula tion that the two rivals might coop erate in addressing the shared threat posed by the Islamic extremists. The two crossings and the four towns are the rst seized in An bar since the Islamic State and its allies overran the city of Fallujah and parts of Ramadi. Government troops have not been able to dis lodge them after months of ghting. The capture of Rawah on the Eu phrates River and the nearby town of Anah appeared to be part of a march toward a key dam in the city of Haditha, the destruction of which would damage the countrys electri cal grid and cause major ooding. The dam was built in 1986. Iraqi military ofcials said more than 2,000 troops were quickly dis patched to the site of the Haditha dam to protect it. They spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to the media. Chief military spokesman, Lt. Gen. Qassim al-Moussawi, ac knowledged the fall of the Anbar towns, saying government forc es had made a tactical retreat and planned to retake them. He pro vided no further details. There has been no ofcial comment on the capture of the al-Walid and Turai bil crossings. The Islamic State and allied mil itants have carved out a large ef dom along the Iraqi-Syrian border. Al-Malikis Shiite-dominated government has struggled to push back against the Sunni militants, who have seized large swaths of the north since taking control of the second-largest city of Mosul on June 10. Iraq has requested U.S. airstrikes to help halt the advance, but Pres ident Barack Obama has yet to or der any. He has instead called on Iraqi leaders to form a more rep resentative government in thin ly-veiled criticism of al-Maliki. Khamenei on Sunday said he was opposed to any U.S. intervention in the country. We strongly oppose the inter vention of the U.S. and others in the domestic affairs of Iraq, Khame nei, who has the nal say over state policy, was quoted as saying by the IRNA state news agency, in his rst reaction to the crisis. The main dispute in Iraq is be tween those who want Iraq to join the U.S. camp and those who seek an independent Iraq, said Khame nei. The U.S. aims to bring its own blind followers to power. The U.S. has long accused Iran of meddling in Iraq, including orga nizing and backing Shiite militias following the 2003 invasion. Al-Maliki, who has led the country since 2006 and has not yet secured a third term after Aprils parlia mentary elections, has increasing ly turned to Iranian-backed Shiite militias and volunteers to bolster his beleaguered security forces. Thousands of Shiite militiamen paraded through Baghdad and oth er cities on Saturday, brandishing a massive arsenal in a show of force that promised to ramp up sectari an tensions. Al-Maliki has come under grow ing pressure to reach out to dis affected Kurds and Sunnis, with many blaming his failure to pro mote reconciliation for the coun trys worst crisis since the U.S. mili tary withdrew in late 2011. Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, the most respected voice for Iraqs Shiite majority, on Friday joined calls for al-Maliki to reach out to the Kurdish and Sunni minorities. The U.S. has been drawn back into the conict. It is deploying up to 300 military advisers to join some 275 troops in and around Iraq to provide security and sup port for the U.S. Embassy and oth er American interests. IRAQ FROM PAGE A1 AP PHOTO Abu Rasool al-Kubaisi clears debris at his home after a bombing in Fallujah, Iraq, on Sunday. and extending. The pros pect that this latest mis sion in Iraq could follow that pattern is particu larly risky for Obama, given that he has staked so much of his legacy on having brought Ameri cas long war there to a close. Already some of the White Houses clos est allies worry that Obamas plan to send in 300 special operations forces to train the Iraqi military could be the rst step in pulling the U.S. back into Iraqs vio lent sectarian ght. I think that you have to be careful sending special forces because thats a number that has a tendency to grow, said House Democratic lead er Nancy Pelosi of Cali fornia, one of Obamas staunchest supporters. Anna Galland, the ex ecutive director of the liberal group MoveOn. org, said even a limited mission is a dangerous and troubling develop ment that threatens to lead to broader military engagement. Indeed, the U.S. has seen small operations escalate before. The wars that began in Iraq and Afghanistan in the last decade were intended to be combat missions from the start. Few people expected at the time that the Iraq war would drag on for more than eight years, the Afghan conict for more than a dozen years or that the U.S. troop presence in each country would peak above 100,000. Obama acknowl edged the risks of mis sion creep when he out lined plans Thursday to help Iraq combat the Is lamic insurgency that has made gains with lighting speed and, ac cording to administra tion ofcials, poses a threat to U.S. interests. The Green Beret mili tary advisers set to ar rive soon in Iraq will join a previously an nounced contingent of 275 U.S. forces sent in the last week to se cure the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad and other American interests. The deployments mark a sharp shift for a president who over saw the full withdraw al of American forces from Iraq in late 2011 after Washington and Baghdad failed to reach an agreement to keep a few thousand troops in place. While Obama re peatedly has cited the end of the war as one of his chief achievements, his decision to return some troops to Iraq now raises the question of whether an asterisk ul timately may accompa ny that claim. Administration of cials insist Obama does not intend to com mit the U.S. to anoth er lengthy war in Iraq or put American forces in combat roles. Signaling his reluctance to re-en gage, Obama also decid ed to hold off launching airstrikes, though he left the prospect of targeted strikes on the table. OBAMA FROM PAGE A1 AP PHOTO President Barack Obama answers questions on violence in Iraq during his meeting with Australian prime minister Tony Abbott on June 12 at the White House in Washington. Irans supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, said he was opposed to any U.S. intervention in the Iraqi crisis, accusing Washington of fomenting the unrest.

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Monday, June 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LEESBURG Cecil Clark Chevrolet celebrates 42 years Cecil Clark Chevrolet, celebrating its 42nd year in business, invites the public to share in a Business After Hours event at the dealership, 8843 U.S. Highway 441, which is also touting a newly remodeled show room, service write-up area and customer lounge. The Leesburg Area Chamber of Commerce is hosting the event on Thursday from 5:30 to 7 p.m., with food and beverages catered by Vics Embers. To RSVP, call the dealership at 352-787-6888. TAVARES YMCA will host heart health lecture Tuesday A heart health lecture with car diologist, J. Henry Lesmes will be held at 9 a.m. Tuesday at the Golden Triangle YMCA, 1465 David Walker Drive in Tavares, and is open to the public. The Partners in Health and Free Senior Program will offer helpful in formation on ensuring your heart is healthy. For information, call the YMCA at 352-343-1144 or email GoldenTriangleYMCA@cfymca.org. TAVARES Lake County library system seeks tutors Tutors are needed at Lake County libraries for those who struggle with reading and for those learning the English language. Training for interested volun teers will be conducted on July 8 in Tavares, with sessions teaching new volunteers how to coach adults one-on-one and in small groups, through the Lake County Adult Literacy Program designed to help adult learners improve their skills and meet goals. No previous experience is necessary. For information or to sign-up for the free training session, call Rachel Dellinger at 352-253-6183 or email RDellinger@lakeline.lib..us. COLEMAN Coleman airport to host fly-in and fundraiser The Free Flight Airport, at 1511 Taylor Ave. in Coleman, is the place to be to celebrate Independence Day and raise money for local ani mals in need from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on July 5. A pancake breakfast at 8 a.m., donated by EAA Chapter 534 in Leesburg, will start off the day. A chicken lunch will be offered at noon, and there will be numerous events throughout the day, includ ing skydiving demos and chance drawings for airplane rides. Proceeds benet the local Humane Society/SPCA of Sumter County in Lake Panasoffkee. Donations for meals and pets will be accepted. For information, call Frank Arenas at 352-748-6629 or the Humane Society at 352-793-9117, or go to www.hsspca.org. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 Staff Report The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) will hold a public infor mation meeting in Mount Dora on Tuesday about Wekiva Parkway Sections 3A and 3B in Lake County. The public meeting at the Mount Dora Commu nity Center is being held to review the latest prelim inary design plans, FDOT spokesman Steve Olson said in a press release. The Wekiva Parkway project itself will connect State Road 429 to State Road 417, completing a 27-mile beltway around northwest metropolitan Orlando, according to the FDOTs project website. This estimated $1.6 billion project includes $500 mil lion of non-toll road im provements including: Provide an alternative to Interstate 4. Relieve State Road 46, U.S. Highway 441 and other local roads of trafc congestion between Or ange, Lake and Seminole counties. Improve safety to re duce vehicle crash fatali ties, particularly on SR 46. Develop a transpor tation facility that mini mizes impact on Wekiva River Basin resources, and that specically improves wildlife habitat connectiv ity between conservation lands and reduces vehi cle-wildlife conicts. In Lake County, the FDOT website states the work will include: Widening 7 miles of SR 46 in Lake and Semi nole counties. Rebuilding the US 441/SR 46 interchange in Mount Dora. Shifting the County Road 46A connection to SR 46 so wildlife can move more safely between hab itats. The work in Lake County FDOT plans Wekiva Parkway discussion Next school year every el ementary student in Lake County will start and end the school day at the same time. The same goes for mid dle and high school stu dents as Lake County Schools standardize bell schedules for the 20142015 school year, accord ing to a press release from the district. The new bell schedule is: High school 7:20 a.m. to 2:35 p.m. Elementary school 8:25 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. Middle school 9:20 a.m. to 4:10 p.m. With many schools hav ing an independent bell schedule, it presented challenges for Transporta tion to ensure each student arrived at school on time, John Davis, Chief of Op erations for Lake County Schools, said in the release. A uniform bell schedule was proposed as part of the High School Redesign opportunity outlined in the EngageLCS initiative. Through the $1.2 million grant-funded EngageLCS project, Lake County Schools is evaluating the best use of its existing nancial resources. The new bell schedule coupled with transi tioning high school sched ules from a block mod el (four periods a day) to a seven-period day will increase the instructional time for each high school class period by as much as 40 hours per year, the press release said. There are a lot of good things happening in our schools, but we have not ed some areas of con cerns, Dr. David Chris tiansen, chief academic ofcer for Lake Coun ty Schools, said in the re lease. These changes will have a positive ef fect with student achieve ment, resource optimiza tion, teacher support and meeting the needs of every student to ensure they are college and career ready upon graduation. Lake schools plan to synchronize bell schedule SEE WEKIVA | A4 LINDA CHARLTON Special to the Daily Commercial J une is blackber ry time. The little wild berries have ripened in the woods, but the thornless type with the big ber ries are ready at area U-picks farms such as H&H Berry Farms. Located off CR 455, within sight of the Florida Turnpike, there is about an acre of berry bushes and vines at the farm. Shelli and Eric Ghezzi are pretty typ ical customers. We just live right around the corner, Eric said. The ber ries, theyre beauti ful. Their blueber ries were great. We thought wed try the blackberries. The farm is owned by Richard and Deb bie Hoffman. Rich ard Hoffman said the couple basical ly got into the black berry business by MOUNT DORA Blackberries are ripe for the picking AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com Design work has begun on the third phase of the utility and street scape project in downtown Mount Dora. BESH Engineering of Tavares has started the design work, Mount Dora Public Communications Ofcer Kel da Senior wrote in an email, and de signs are expected to be presented to the city council in September. The city council approved the $171,775 for design work with BESH at its June 3 meeting, according to Senior. Phase three is proposed for Don nelly Street from Fourth Avenue to Third Avenue and on Fourth Avenue from Alexander to Baker Street, ac cording to a city council agenda. Senior said those are the pro posed construction areas, but the PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Eric Ghezzi has just picked a at of tray of blackberries. BELOW: Dark-colored ripe blackberries are shown alongside red ones, which will be ripe in a few days. Phase three planning for downtown work begins THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com After a year and a half of issues with the Veterans Administration and concerns about being evicted, Korean War veteran Harold Wulf, 81, can now unpack his belongings and stay at his assisted living facility. It is excellent news for me. I am pleased by it and in knowing that I am going to be living here, said Wulf, who was featured in a Daily Commercial story on June 9 about his struggles with the VA. The next day, the veteran received ofcial ap proval, via a phone call from a VA representative in St. Petersburg, that his funds were forthcoming. Wulf had been waiting for an aid and attendance pension benet of TAVARES Wulf gets VA funds, escapes eviction SEE WORK | A4 SEE PICK | A4 SEE FUNDS | A5

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 23, 2014 ABINGDON AUCTIONS LLC(AB-2985) rf(Next to Pats Pawn & Gun)(GPS ADDRESS 2301 EAST MAIN ST.)352-508-5522 IN LEESBURG 1/2 mi WEST of the AIRPORT ON 441Info & Pictures @ www.auctionmyestate.com RESTAURANT LIQUIDATION!WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25th @ 10AMKATHYS CAF390 W Burleigh Blvd., Tavares, FL 32778 ENTIRE CONTENTS IN WHOLE OR IN PART!FURNITURE+MORE SUNDAY JUNE 29th @ 1PMDining Room, Kitchen, Sofas, Chairs, Rockers, Recliners, Chests, Dressers, Chairs, Dressers, Curios, Lamps, Rugs, Dcor & More!********************************************************************************************* D003179 RETURN OF LAKE COUNTY HONOR FLIGHT VETERANSPlease We lcome Ar ea Ve ter ans re tur ning from Wa shington DC with a Patriotic Heroes Homecoming r f f f Come greet the Ve terans. Bring chairs and a friend.We dnesday June 25th, 2014 9:30pmAmerican Legion Post 347, Rolling Acr es Rd. & CR 466, Lad y Lak eFor mor e information call: 352-432-1382 www .villageshonoright.org OBITUARIES Carl Anzelmo Carl Anzelmo, 102, Winter Haven, Florida formerly of Leesburg, FL passed away on June 20, 2014 in Winter Hav en, Florida. Mr. Anzel mo was born on May 1, 1912 in Chicago, Illinois to his parents Domi nick and Josephine An zelmo. He had worked for General Motors in the Electro Motor Divi sion. He moved to Lees burg in 2000 from Ev ergreen Park, IL and then to Winter Haven a year ago. He was a Past Master Mason belong ing to the Englewood Lodge and the Oaklawn Lodge both in Illinois and a current member of the Leesburg Lodge #58. He is survived by his loving son: Donald C. Anzelmo (Carolyn) of Winter Haven, FL; a daughter: Josephine Messina of Leesburg, FL; two grandchildren: Dorothy Bandes (Bri an) and Donald Anzel mo (Elizabeth); three great-grandchildren: Brian Bandes, Christo pher Bandes and Cyn thia Bulow; a great great-granddaughter: Kenley Bandes. He was preceded in death by his loving wife Dorothy, granddaughter Carlyn and a great-grandson Greg. A Funeral Ser vice will be held on Sat urday, June 28, 2014 at 11:00AM at Page-Theus Funeral Home, Lees burg, Florida with En tombment to follow at Hillcrest Memorial Gar dens, Leesburg, Florida. A Visitation will be held on Friday, June 27, 2014 from 3:00PM to 7:00PM at Page-Theus Funeral Home, Leesburg, Flor ida. Services entrust ed to Page-Theus Fu neral Home, Leesburg, FL. On line condolenc es and memories may be shared by visiting www.pagetheusfuner alhome.com. DEATH NOTICES Helen G. Cottrill Helen G. Cottrill, 91, of Leesburg died Friday, June 20, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Lees burg, Fl. IN MEMORY is divided into two sec tions, 3A and 3B. Olson said the Section 3A project limits are on SR 46 from east of Vis ta View Lane to east of Round Lake Road. The project consists of designing the wid ening and other nontolled improvements to 1.4 miles of SR 46 and Round Lake Road. Work will include designing medians and turn lanes, drainage, lighting, sign and pavement mark ings, utilities and other roadway features. Con struction is expected to begin in 2017 and con tinue for 18 months. The Section 3B proj ect consists of designing the US 441 yover inter change at SR 46, as well as road widening and other non-tolled im provements along SR 46 from west of US 441 to east of Vista View Lane in Mount Dora, accord ing to Olsen. Work will include designing road way widening, bridges, trafc signals, medians and turn lanes, drain age, lighting, sign and pavement markings, utilities and other road way features. Construc tion is expected to be gin in 2017 and take 24 months to complete. The meeting is sched uled from 6-8 p.m. at the Community Center at 520 N. Baker St. Ol son said the meeting is an informal open house where plans are avail able for review and proj ect staff will be available to address questions. Project information can be viewed at www. wekivaparkway.com or www.croads.com. WEKIVA FROM PAGE A3 city council will decide what will be construct ed after the designs are completed. Theyre (going to) design all of this and then bring it back to council and then coun cil will decide what sec tions they want to actu ally construct, she said. It will be the same type of work that is go ing on currently. The whole down town infrastructure needs to be upgraded and replaced so obvi ously were just doing it in sections, Senior said. She said the work will always be in the sum mer to avoid the festival season. The work could take place next sum mer, but Senior could not say for sure as the designs still have to go to council before fund ing is approved. Phase three will be the last major part of the work, Senior said, add ing they will probably need to do some small er sections in the future. Senior said the proj ects expand and update the infrastructure and make the downtown more walkable. It goes beyond just simply beautication, its actually upgrading the infrastructure of our historic downtown so that its sustainable for years and years to come, Senior said. The second phase is currently taking place on Donnelly Street from Fourth to Fifth Avenue and on Third Avenue from Dora Drawdy Way to Baker Street, and in cludes water, sewer and stormwater upgrades and sidewalk renova tions at a price not to ex ceed $3 million. Phase one was com pleted last summer and included work on a sec tion of Third Avenue, a part of Fifth Avenue, Alexander Street from Fourth to Third Avenue, the revamping of Sun set Park and the conver sion of Fourth Avenue from Alexander Street to Lake Dora into a pe destrian mall. WORK FROM PAGE A3 accident. They sold tan gerines off their proper ty for quite a while and had been given some thorned blackberries, which Hoffman says his son and his sons friends were particularly fond of. Relatives in Texas sent Hoffman thorn less blackberries on a number of occasions, but none of the plants did well. When Hoffman came across a thriv ing stand of thornless blackberries, he decided hed try some. Soon, Hoffman had more blackberries then he (or his son) could use. So the two took a couple of ats of ber ries to a local produce co-op. The berries were sold before the Hoff mans even put the berries down, when a woman saw them walk ing in. H&H also has a lo cation in Sumterville, and there is a separate blackberry U-pick in Oxford. Back Road Berries near The Villages has about 4 1/2 acres of berries, according to co-owner Mary Beth Locke. As is true at H&H, the blackberry varieties at Back Road were developed at the University of Arkansas, with some varieties re quiring as little as 300 chill hours. Thats 300 hours be low 45 degrees, Locke says. In Florida thats a lot. Farmers at both H&H and Back Road Berries gure theres about two to three weeks left in the picking season weather permitting. Rain is the biggest threat. Doug McCormick of Blue Bayou Farms in Yalaha grows blackber ries, but his crop came in early and hes done for the season. Explaining what heavy rain will do to blackberries, he says, It lls the berries with water instead of sug ar. The day after a rain, you might as well throw the berries away. The most recent year for which ofcial black PICK FROM PAGE A3 LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL A tray of fresh-picked blackberries is shown. MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millardives@dailycommercial.com Tavares residents may see their insurance rates lowered thanks to a drop in the citys re department Insurance Service Organization re suppression rate. Fire ofcials reported at their city council meeting this week that effective Sept. 1, the de partments ISO rating will slide from 5 to 3 for Tavares estimat ed 5,000 residences and busi nesses. An ISO rating of 1 is the best. City ofcials cite the drop as resulting from a February eval uation of its: Fire department equip ment, stafng, training and community risk reduction. Emergency communica tions, including emergency re porting and dispatching. Water supply and ow including inspections, testing of hydrants, alternative water sup ply and evaluation of available water for ghting res. To receive an ISO rating of Class 3 is a signicant achieve ment for a re department of our size, said Tavares Fire Chief Richard Keith, who coordinated the preparation for the Febru ary ISO inspection. Keith added the department has had an ISO rating of 5 at least since 2006 when he be came a reghter there. According to the ISO website, the organization collects infor mation on municipal re-pro tection efforts in communities throughout the country. ISO analyzes data using a Fire Sup pression Rating Schedule and then assigns a Public Protection Classication from 1 to 10. Class 1 represents superior property re protection, and Class 10 in dicates that the areas re-sup pression program doesnt meet the minimum criteria. Joyce Ross, city spokeswom an, said the lower rating is im portant to residential and com mercial property owners (5,000 based on those connected to waterlines) because most U.S. insurers use the rating infor mation as part of their deci sion-making when issuing policies and determining pre miums. Ross added Tavares residents are advised to contact the insur ance company that issues their homeowners or commercial building policy to see how the improved ISO rating may affect their coverage. According to Helen Vilissov, an administrative ofcer with the department, Clermont and Eustis have the only other re departments in the county with an ISO rating of 3. Leesburg Fire Department has an ISO rating of 2 and Grov eland and Mount Dora have a 4 rating, although the latter two also are expected to be lowered to Class 3 rating soon. Tavares Fire Department lowers fire suppression rating berry production g ures are available is 2012. In that year ,the USDA Census of Ag riculture showed six acres of blackber ries harvested in Lake County and 22 acres harvested in Sumter County. Mary Beth Locke gures theres less than that now. Theres fewer blackberry farms now than there were a few years ago, she says. Theyre very difcult to maintain. They just require a tying and pruning throughout the year. We basically live with them. Before picking at any of the blackber ry locations, it is a good idea to check for hours and availability. H&H can be reached at 800-716-4740, or via their Facebook page. Back Road Ber ries can be reached via their Web site, www.backroadber ries.com, or by phone at 352-303-3213. Back Road is normal ly open every day but Monday, but is about to close for a few days for ripening. We have loads of red berries, Locke says. They just need a few days to ripen. We have loads of red berries. They just need a few days to ripen. Mary Beth Locke Co-owner of H&H Berry Farms

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Monday, June 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 LEESBURG/ FR UITLAND PA RK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Wa lker Dr (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679 CR OW NS$399Eac h(3 or mor e per visit) D2751/ Re g $59 9 ea. Po rcel ain on non Pr ecious me ta l DENTURES$74 9Eac hD0 51 10 or D0 51 20DENT AL SA VIN GSTh e patie nt an d any oth er per son re spons ible for paym ent has the right to re fuse to pay cancel payme nt or be re imburs ed for paym ent for any other ser vices, ex aminat ion whic h is per for med as a re sult of and with in 72 hours of re spon ding to the ad ve rt is em en t fo r th e discounted fee or re duced fee ser vice or tr eatment. Fees may va ry due to comple xity of case This disc ount do es no t appl y to th ose patie nt s wi th den tal pla ns. Fee s ar e mi ni mal. PR IC ES ARE SU BJ ECT TO CHA NGE. LEESBUR GM T. DORASu nr is e De nt al Tr i-D ent al r ff nt bb f Consul tat ion and Seco nd Op in ion No Ch ar ge!n t t NEW PA TIENT SPEC IAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RA YS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EX AMINA TION BY DO CTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABS ENCE OF GUM DISEA SE ) D00 2409 $1,758 for assistance in his everyday living needs at Grand Court in Tavares, while incur ring debt as he waited for the funds. We were led to be lieve that it was a slam dunk case and that it would be no time at all that it would be ap proved, Wulf said of the paperwork led in Janu ary 2013. A few months after he applied, some of the program guide lines were changed. I fell through the cracks, Wulf said, which forced him to re apply and go through more paperwork and a doctors approval in or der to qualify. Wulf received three months back pay from the VA last week, and he was even more pleased to work out nancial ar rangements with Grand Courts management that will allow him to stay at the assisted liv ing facility. They are just going all out to help. Im really happy, he said. Paul Wulf is glad that his father doesnt have to worry about being evicted, yet he believes the VA gave his father a bum deal. He said his father had to move into an assisted living facili ty before he could apply for the VA aid and atten dance benet. The unfortunate part to this whole thing is the fact that the VA just washed its hands and says, Heres three months (back pay), Paul said. He only got the three months out of 16 months. In dollars, Dad is in the hole. He got a little over $5,000, so he is left $23,000 in debt. The father and sons advice to other veter ans and spouses inter ested in learning about the aid and attendance benet is to go to a per son who knows the pro gram well, has kept up with the changes and knows the law. Paul warns veterans to be watchful of annu ity salesmen disguising themselves as VA con sultants ling the pa perwork. The problem is that the VA has this benet set up in the worst pos sible fashion, because somebody should not be having to pay for (assisted living) before they can apply for it, Paul said. To actually expect somebody to pay for something that they cant afford with the hope of qualifying for it, that is just pitiful. It should be ready to start paying for them from day one. The whole thing that Dad went through would have been avoided if we could have applied for this and the benet had been ready for him, and then we move him into assisted living rath er than doing it the oth er way around. Paul believes there needs to be huge changes in the way the VA administers the aid and attendance pen sion benet. Luckily dad lives in a community where they really did look out for him and tried to help him as much as they could, Paul said of Grand Court. Dad would make as much of a payment as he could with his Social Security. According to the Vet erans Administration website regarding aid and attendance, a vet eran would have to meet one of the follow ing conditions to be considered: You require the aid of another person in or der to perform person al functions required in everyday living, such as bathing, feeding, dress ing, attending to the wants of nature, adjust ing prosthetic devic es or protecting your self from the hazards of your daily environ ment. You are bedridden, in that your disability or disabilities requires that you remain in bed apart from any prescribed course of convales cence or treatment. You are a patient in a nursing home due to mental or physical in capacity. Your eyesight is limited to a correct ed 5/200 visual acui ty or less in either eyes; or concentric contrac tion of the visual eld to 5 degrees or less. To learn more, go to www.benets.va.gov. FUNDS FROM PAGE A3 The unfortunate part to this whole thing is the fact that the VA just washed its hands and says, Heres three months (back pay). He only got the three months out of 16 months. In dollars, Dad is in the hole. He got a little over $5,000, so he is left $23,000 in debt. Paul Wulf PAUL ELIAS Associated Press SAN FRANCISCO Lawyers have been giv en the green light to scan the social media sites of jurors. The American Bar Association says its ethical for lawyers to scour online for public ly available musings of citizens called for jury service and even ju rors in deliberations. But the ABA does warn lawyers against actively following or friending jurors or otherwise invading their private Internet areas. Though judges now universally admonish jurors to refrain from discussing trials on so cial media, the nation wide lawyers group for the rst time is ad dressing how deeply attorneys, their inves tigators and their con sultants can probe for information that might signal leanings of po tential jurors, or un earth juror misconduct during trials. Jurors online post ings have disrupted many legal proceedings over the years, causing mistrials and special hearings over the ef fects of Facebook mus ings, tweets and blog writings about their tri al experiences. Lawyers and judges have also been wrangling over how far attorneys can go in assembling a jury with help from online research of jurors so cial media habits. Its like any other publicly available in formation, said Don ald Lundberg, an Indi anapolis, Ind., attorney who helped draft the ABAs opinion as an eth ics committee member. ABA: Lawyers can scour jurors social media sites AP FILE PHOTO In this March 29, 2013 photo, Michael Steinberg, second from right, exits Manhattan federal court with his defense attorney Barry Berke in New York.

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 23, 2014 DAN SEWELL Associated Press LEBANON, Ohio The twice-arrested hero in user listened nervous ly as the judge reviewed her record, then offered a deal he thinks could save her life. Youre not a criminal, youre an addict, Judge Robert Peeler told Cyn thia Fugate. Something is driving you to use heroin that is beyond your control. Is that fair to say? Yes, sir, she replied quietly. Peeler, a common pleas court judge in southwest Ohios War ren County, is among a growing number of judges and correc tions ofcials across the country trying to com bat the fast-growing na tional heroin problem by ghting heroin nee dles with treatment nee dles. Peeler told Fugate he could order month ly injections of the opi ate-blocking drug Vivit rol if she were willing. Im 30 years old. Ive overdosed four times, Fugate said, her voice quavering. I want to be clean. I really do. The shots, the judge said, could keep Fugate from winding up in a body bag. Peeler began re searching the drug treatment shots last year after a young wom an died of a heroin over dose, at least the third heroin user who had stood before him in his courtroom who later died. Nationally, over dose deaths have risen 45 percent from 2006 to 2010. In Ohio, 680 peo ple died of heroin over doses in 2012, up 60 percent from the previ ous year. Vivitrol has its skep tics, with some question ing whether its effec tive enough to warrant the time and expense shots can cost about $1,000 each and sug gesting its a trendy, un der-researched attempt at a quick x. Sheriff Richard Jones in neigh boring Butler County has called Vivitrol in jails a waste of money, cit ing an earlier pilot pro gram in Warren County in which only three of 12 subjects completed the program and stayed off drugs. Peeler is among those who say the high toll of heroin-related deaths, crime and prison recid ivism make it worth try ing. To sit back and keep doing what weve been doing just isnt going to get it, Peeler said. I want to stop people from dying. The Warren County program is getting some $800,000 in state fund ing help for Vivitrol, and programs are also underway in dozens of other courts, jails and prisons in at least 21 states, from Cape Cod in Massachusetts to Lane County in Oregon. The programs are usu ally funded with grants, getting some help from drugmaker donations and discounts, and in surance usually will cover some shots. Vivitrol, made by Alk ermes PLC of Ireland, had been used for alco holism. But after a Rus sian study showed it could be effective for us ers of heroin, morphine and other opiate drugs with once-month ly injections, it was ap proved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administra tion in late 2010. Vivitrol uses naltrex one, an opioid receptor antagonist, to block her oins effects on the brain. Unlike the widely used methadone treatment, it doesnt require clin ic visits and daily doses and is unlikely to lead to trading one dependen cy for another, as can happen with other treat ments, advocates say. Effective for a month, it eases the daily tempta tion of people struggling to stay off heroin. Because Vivitrol is long lasting, it has special im portance for former her oin users leaving in carceration, said Mady Chalk, a former feder al ofcial on substance abuse who is now with Philadelphias Treatment Research Institute. Patients return to their community having been detoxed, their sys tems have been emp tied of the drugs; they return to environments that trigger all the things that one would ex pect, Chalk said. Many are unable to resist the urge to reuse heroin and dont realize they cant tolerate as strong a dose as before. The body simply cant handle it, and they die, Chalk said. Giving users an injec tion before they leave custody provides a months buffer to begin post-release counseling and to focus on rebuild ing their lives. Dr. Mark Willenbring, a former National Insti tute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism ofcial who founded Alltyr ad diction treatment cen ter in St. Paul, Minne sota, thinks there is too little evidence of suc cess to consider Vivit rol a panacea. Its not a wonder drug, Wil lenbring recently told the Alcoholism & Drug Abuse Weekly. Peeler doesnt order shots for anyone who doesnt want them. In his courtroom the same day as Fugate, a male drug defendant de clined, saying he be lieved the shots were dangerous there are potential risks includ ing liver damage and suicidal depression and he didnt want to go through the therapy and probation require ments of the sentenc ing deal that potentially allows drug defendants to avoid a conviction on their record. But Sherry Moore be lieves the shots saved her. Not long after com pleting a nine-month sentence for heroin possession, she began using again. She told her probation ofcer she didnt know what to do, that she had already been through treat ments. Im like, Im a mess, she recounted. None of it worked for me. The ofcer asked if she wanted to try Vivi trol. After a year of monthly injections, she said shes been drugfree since late 2012. She and other Vivi trol advocates em phasize that counsel ing and a strong will to overcome addiction are needed, too. Moore, 53, also credits her return to church. I think God helped me with it, she said. I think I would have died. Courts fight heroin scourge with drug injections PHOTOS BY AL BEHRMAN / AP ABOVE: Judge Robert Peeler tries a case involving heroin abuse in Warren County Common Pleas Court, on April 15, in Lebanon, Ohio. RIGHT: Twice-arrested heroin user Cynthia Fugate stands before Judge Peeler. Vivitrol, made by Alkermes PLC of Ireland, had been used for alcoholism. But after a Russian study showed it could be effective for users of heroin, morphine and other opiate drugs with once-monthly injections, it was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in late 2010. Vivitrol uses naltrexone, an opioid receptor antagonist, to block heroins effects on the brain. Unlike the widely used methadone treatment, it doesnt require clinic visits and daily doses and is unlikely to lead to trading one dependency for another, as can happen with other treatments, advocates say.

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Monday, June 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 GARANCE BURKE Associated Press SAN FRANCISCO Al ready pilloried for long wait times for medical appoint ments, the beleaguered De partment of Veterans Affairs has fallen short of anoth er commitment: to attend to the needs of the rising ranks of female veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan, many of them of child-bear ing age. Even the head of the VAs ofce of womens health ac knowledges that persistent shortcomings remain in car ing for the 390,000 female vets seen last year at its hos pitals and clinics despite an investment of more than $1.3 billion since 2008, in cluding the training of hun dreds of medical profession als in the fundamentals of treating the female body. According to an Associat ed Press review of VA internal documents, inspector gener al reports and interviews: Nationwide, nearly one in four VA hospitals does not have a fulltime gynecologist on staff. And about 140 of the 920 community-based clin ics serving veterans in rural areas do not have a designat ed womens health provid er, despite the goal that every clinic would have one. When communi ty-based clinics refer veter ans to a nearby university or other private medical facil ity to be screened for breast cancer, more than half the time their mammogram re sults are not provided to pa tients within two weeks, as required under VA policy. Female veterans have been placed on the VAs Elec tronic Wait List at a higher rate than male veterans. All new patients who cannot be schedule for an appointment in 90 days or less are placed on that wait list. And according to a VA presentation last year, fe male veterans of child-bear ing age were far more likely to be given medications that can cause birth defects than were women being treated through a private HMO. Are there problems? Yes, said Dr. Patricia Hayes, the VAs chief consultant for womens health in an AP in terview. The good news for our health care system is that as the number of women in creases dramatically, we are going to continue to be able to adjust to these circum stances quickly. The 5.3 million male veter ans who used the VA system in scal year 2013 far out numbered female patients, but the number of women receiving care at VA has more than doubled since 2000. The tens of thousands of pre dominantly young, female veterans returning home has dramatically changed the VAs patient load, and the system has yet to fully catch up. Also, as the total veteran population continues to de crease, the female veteran population has been increas ing year after year, according to a 2013 VA report. All enrolled veterans can use what the VA describes as its comprehensive medical ben ets package, though certain benets may vary by individ ual and ailment, just like for medical care outside the VA system. The VA typically cov ers all female-specic medical needs, aside from abortions and in-vitro fertilization. The strategic initiatives, which sprang from recom mendations issued six years ago to enhance womens health system-wide, have kick started research about women veterans experience of sexual harassment, assault or rape in a military setting; established working groups about how to build pros thetics for female soldiers; and even led to installation of womens restrooms at the more than 1,000 VA facilities. Yet enduring problems with the delivery of care for wom en veterans are surfacing now amid the growing crit icism of the VAs handling of patient care nationwide and allegations of misconduct, lengthy wait times and po tential unnecessary deaths. Used to treating the men who served in Vietnam, Korea or World War II, many of the VAs practitioners until a few years ago were unaccustomed to treating menopause or giv ing advice about birth control. The study on distribution of prescription medication that could cause birth de fects is illustrative of the lag ging awareness; one of every two women veterans has re ceived medication from a VA pharmacy that could cause birth defects, compared to one in every six women who received drugs care through a private health care system, said the studys author, Elea nor Bimla Schwarz, a senior medical expert on reproduc tive health with VA. Schwarz, who also directs womens health research at the University of Pittsburgh, pointed out that while she does not believe any of the vet erans surveyed were pregnant at the time, it is critical to keep in mind that many new female veterans are of child-bear ing age, a higher percentage are on medication than in the general population and the majority of these women are not on contraception. Hayes said the VA seeks to place a trained, designat ed womens provider in ev ery facility and expects to install a one-stop health care model that allows wom en to go to one provider for a range of services, includ ing annual physicals, mental health services, gynecologi cal care and mammograms. Until that happens, however, some VA clinics have limited gender-specic health treat ments available for women. Female veterans are more likely than their male coun terparts to be referred outside the VA system for specialty care, Hayes acknowledged. Nearly one-third of all female patients received at least one day of treatment at a non-VA facility in scal year 2012, as compared to 15 percent of their male counterparts, ac cording to the most recent data Hayes supplied. VA falls short on female medical issues RICHARD SHIRO / AP Army Sgt. LaQuisha Gallmon holds her 2-month-old Abbagayl, as her children Dallin, 8, and Angelicah, 5, sit in their home in Greenville, S.C. Even the head of the VAs office of womens health acknowledges that persistent shortcomings remain in caring for the 390,000 female vets seen last year at its hospitals and clinics.

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 23, 2014 ST AB IL IT Y He ll o If yo u re tu rn in g 65 or ar e re ad y to re ti re yo u sh ou ld kn ow th at Un it ed He al th ca re ha s mo re th an 30 ye ar s of Me di ca re ex pe ri en ce Ge t st ab ili ty fr om a co mp an y yo u ca n de pe nd on Un it ed He al th ca re Me di ca re Adv an ta ge pl an s ma y of fe r: $0 mon th ly pre mi um s fo r me di ca l an d Pa rt D co ve ra ge Pr oud ly se rv in g mor e th an 76 3, 000 me mb er s in Fl or id a Ov er 12 ye ar s of ser vic e in Fl or ida LE AR N AS K EN ROL LMEDICAREYo u mu st co nt in ue to pa y yo ur Me di ca re Pa rt B pr em iu m. Th e be ne t in fo rm at ion pr o vi de d is a br ie f su mm ar y, no t a co mp le te de sc ri pt ion of be ne t s. Fo r mo re in fo rm at ion co nt ac t th e pl an Li mi ta ti on s, co pa ym en ts an d re st ri ct ion s ma y ap pl y. Be ne t s, fo rm ul ar y, ph ar mac y ne tw ork pr ov id er ne tw ork pr em iu m an d/ or co -p ay me nt s/ co -i ns ur an ce ma y ch an ge on Ja nu ar y 1 of ea ch yea r.Pla ns ar e in su re d thr ou gh Un it ed He al th ca re In su ra nc e Co mp an y an d it s af l ia te d co mp an ie s, a Me di ca re Adv an ta ge or ga ni za ti on wi th a Me di ca re co nt ra ct .Y0 06 6_ 13 10 04 _1 61 31 6_ FI NA L_ FL _L DC _0 61 6_ RO P Ac ce pt ed AD XC ME N0 00 _O VS P1 84 35 Ca ll to da y.If yo u re ne w to Me di ca re re ad y to re ti re or lo si ng yo ur em p lo ye r pl an n d ou t ho w yo u ca n en ro ll to da y. 185 585 970 30 TT Y 71 18 a. m. 8 p. m. lo ca l ti me, 7 da ys a we ek He ll oU ni te dM ed ic ar e. co m LYNN BERRY Associated Press MOSCOW Russian President Vladimir Pu tin publicly expressed support Sunday for Ukraines declaration of a cease-re in its bat tle against pro-Russian separatists and called on both sides to negoti ate a compromise. Putin said such a compromise must guarantee the rights of the Russian-speak ing residents of eastern Ukraine, who must feel like they are an integral part of their own coun try. Putins statement appeared to signal that he sees their future in Ukraine. Separatists in the eastern Donetsk and Luhansk regions have declared independence and asked to join Rus sia. Moscow has re buffed their appeals, but is seen by Ukraine and the West as active ly supporting the in surgency. Putins con ciliatory words came as Russia began largescale military exercis es and after NATO ac cused Russia of moving troops back toward the Ukrainian border. Putin appears de termined to keep up the pressure to force the Kiev government to give the eastern in dustrial regions more powers and to prevent Ukraine from moving too close to the Europe an Union or NATO. But he also wants to avoid more punishing sanc tions from the U.S. and particularly from the E.U., whose leaders will meet Friday in Brussels, and therefore needs to be seen as cooperating with efforts to de-esca late the conict. The Kremlin initial ly dismissed the peace plan that Ukrainian President Petro Poros henko laid out on Fri day. But in a statement issued late Saturday, Putin said he welcomed the cease-re and Po roshenkos intention to take other concrete steps to reach a peace ful settlement. As part of his plan, Poroshenko suggest ed a decentralization of power to give the re gions more political au thority. He also pro posed new local and parliamentary elec tions, and measures to protect the language rights of Russian speak ers in the east. Putin was more spe cic on Sunday, when he spoke publicly fol lowing ceremonies commemorating the Nazi invasion of the So viet Union on June 22, 1941. That President Po roshenko announced a truce is without a doubt an important part of a nal settlement, with out which no agree ment can be reached, and there is no doubt that Russia will sup port this intention, but in the end the most im portant thing is a politi cal process, Putin said. Putin discussed the cease-re on Sunday with German Chancel lor Angela Merkel and French President Fran cois Hollande, Merkels ofce and the Kremlin said. After the Russian government too re ferred to the cease-re in positive terms, the in terlocutors emphasized the need for all sides to abide by it now and for a political dialogue to be put in motion, Merkels ofce said in a state ment. Another topic of the conversation was the issue of securing the Ukrainian-Russian bor der. In Kiev, Poroshenko also addressed his na tion on the day on which Ukrainians and Rus sians mourn the mil lions who died during World War II. He called for peace, but urged his compatriots to stand strong and united. It was so during the violent struggle against the Nazis and it should be the same now, Po roshenko said. Fac ing a real threat, we must unite even more and secure our histor ical choice, defend our right to live freely on our land. Putin has appealed to both sides to halt all military operations and sit down at the negotiat ing table. It remained unclear whether the pro-Russia separatists would com ply and how much pres sure Russia would put on them to comply. Putin calls for compromise in Ukraine ALEXANDER ZEMLIANICHENKO / AP Russian President Vladimir Putin takes part in a wreath laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier outside Moscows Kremlin Wall, in Moscow, on Sunday. JUNG-YOON CHOI and YOUKYUNG LEE Associated Press SEOUL, South Ko rea The military searched Sunday for an armed South Kore an soldier who ed af ter killing ve of his comrades and wound ing seven at an outpost near the North Korean border. The sergeant, iden tied only by his sur name, Yim, opened re Saturday night with his standard issue K2 as sault rie at an outpost in Gangwon province, east of Seoul, accord ing to a Defense Min istry spokesman. He spoke on condition of anonymity because of department rules. Yim, who was sched uled to be discharged from the military in September, ed with his weapon, but it wasnt clear how much live ammunition he had, the ofcial said. Defense ofcial Kim Min-seok said Sun day at a televised brief ing that all the wound ed were expected to survive, although two were injured serious ly. He said search oper ations were underway to quickly nd Yim, without elaborating. Park Cheol-yong, the head of Madal village, near the army division where the gunre took place, said he warned villagers to stay in their houses. Park Jin-soo, a pastor at a church in the vil lage, said that Sunday services would take place as usual despite the tension over the missing soldier and the shooting. Thousands of troops from the rival Koreas are squared off along the worlds most heavi ly armed border. There was no indica tion that North Korea was involved. Military hunts for South Korean soldier who killed 5 AHN YOUNG-JOON / AP South Korean army soldiers search for a South Korean soldier who is on the run after a shooting incident in Goseong, South Korea, on Sunday.

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Monday, June 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A9 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 H ave you ever heard of be ing mercied out of a situ ation? When you know its over before its over, thats when the mer cy rule should apply. The term is entirely new to me and Ive be come obsessed. I have a good friend whose daughter, despite being an ex cellent athlete herself, plays on a recreation softball team thats defeated by its opponents in comically extravagant ways. This team cant get a break; they end up with zero runs, and thats on a good day. Such games, she ex plained, are often shut down ear ly when the referees invoke the mercy rule. The mercy rule, which was once called the slaughter rule (gee, I wonder why they changed the name) allows the team with an insurmountable lead to ac cept its win with grace and grants the losing side some dig nity as they leave the eld in de feat. As I understand it, when a dis parity in talent or performance is obvious and the outcome is not in question, you can be mercied out of the untenable situation. If its 91-0, for example, the refer ees can invoke the mercy rule. Ive been on both ends of the mercy rule, explains Sam Ytu arte, a young stockbroker whos been involved with sports his entire life. And its like putting down a pet: You get the same re sult without prolonging the tor ture. Sam thinks the mercy rule is, well, merciful: Life is short. Spending an extra hour or two entirely annihilating the other team is basically pointless. In other words, when the eld of dreams turns into the slough of despond, you can rely on the mercy rule. Its sort of like the Kevorkian Clause. And thats when it occurred to me, like the light bulb going on over Bugs Bunnys head, that there are any number of situa tions in life where being mercied out would offer the ideal resolu tion. Consider, for example, the bad date. You both meant well: Like players from two teams, you agree to engage, to abide by cer tain formalities and to do your best. Yet no matter how level the playing eld, its occasionally clear right from the start that this is not a fair match (match as in World Cup, or cage, not as in Match.com). Wouldnt it be nice if both sides were permitted to exit without having to face either smug con tempt or gratuitous humiliation? Surely it would be better for ev eryone involved if one person, or even a preternaturally astute server, could say, Obviously this is not working. Lets just mercy ourselves out of this, OK? You could then leave before any emotional hamstrings are pulled or the Achilles heel of the heart is permanently damaged. A person should be able to mercy out of diet and exercise re gimes that produce misery with out results. After a certain point, its also wise to accept your up per arms as your upper arms and mercy yourself out of aerial yoga. You might have more fun at meals if you mercy yourself out of eating only raw meat and le gumes; perhaps you are destined not to be Paleo Girl no matter how many starches you avoid. Time is the one thing you can never get back; its not noble to waste it in the fruitless pursuit of a futile objective. Bonnie Jean said she should have been mercied out of alge bra (Talk about slaughtered; I shouldve been permitted to take it another term). Iris wants to be mercied out of her husbands elaborately detailed directions (He draws me maps, but I just use the GPS). Chuck wants to be mercied out of numbingly ineffective com mittee meetings and mini-se ries where they keep adding characters just to confuse old people. John argues that those who at tend the theater have always had the mercy rule: They call it in termission. Lets summon the mercy rule when fundraisers cost more than they make, when we know for a fact the quilt or the dissertation will never be nished, and when the friendship is more pain than pleasure. While the strain of mercy is not unqualied, it is possible to get out without giving up. Some times its a necessary call. Gina Barreca is an English professor at the University of Connecticut, a feminist schol ar who has written eight books, and a col umnist for the Hartford Courant. She can be reached through her www.ginabarreca.com. OTHER VOICES Gina Barreca MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Hate your date? Use the mercy rule E lon Musk is the kind of guy who proba bly spent his high school years asking, Why? or Why not? each time he ran up against conventional wisdom. He took that mind-set into the business world and became an acclaimed disruptor, most recently shaking up the auto world. On his blog last week, the chief executive ofcer of electric car maker Tesla Motors announced that he is opening up its electric car technolo gy patents to competitors. This move may actually be more brilliant than bizarre. Conventional wisdom holds that no one gives away business secrets for fear of being tram pled by a herd of imitators who didnt put in the same dollars or sweat and toil. But Musk says he created Tesla to make electric cars part of ev eryday life an idea that is still spinning its wheels in the muddy eld of patent litigation, customer tastes and expensive technology. Finding a lost ring in the Sahara would seem to be a far easier undertaking than dis rupting decades-old global gasoline networks that extend from oil and gas exploration elds to gasoline stations to the family car. So Musk is trying a new calculation. Ending Teslas patent secrecy removes one barrier to innovation and mass affordable commercial ization of electric cars. Yes, it is still all pie in the sky. But Musk also is betting that his ap proach could have the related benet of tack ling the worlds energy, climate change and clean air challenges by slowing reliance on carbon-polluting cars. As Musk puts it, If we clear a path to the creation of compelling electric vehicles, but then lay intellectual property and mines be hind us to inhibit others, we are acting in a manner contrary to that goal. As a matter of practical business, opening access to Teslas intellectual property could encourage companies to share the costs of erecting charging stations, create better, cheaper batteries and otherwise break de pendence on fossil fuels. Dont expect the au tomotive industry to shift gears in unison, but Nissan, the maker of the all-electric Leaf, and BMW reportedly are already interested in Tes las quick-recharging technology. Admittedly, its less threatening to give away trade secrets when youve already made a for tune in other businesses and need to jumpstart the still minuscule electric car indus try. What Musk is doing probably would not make a lot of sense for most companies. Still, underestimating Musk, whose quirky dreams also created the revolutionary online payment system PayPal and private space-ight company SpaceX, is itself a risky idea. Disrup tors success is all about asking, Why not? Distributed by MCT Information Services. A VOICE Teslas Elon Musk giving away trade secrets for potential profit Classic DOONESBURY 1975 The mercy rule, which was once called the slaughter rule (gee, I wonder why they changed the name) allows the team with an insurmountable lead to accept its win with grace and grants the losing side some dignity as they leave the field in defeat. As I understand it, when a disparity in talent or performance is obvious and the outcome is not in question, you can be mercied out of the untenable situation. If its 91-0, for example, the referees can invoke the mercy rule.

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A10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 23, 2014 Teen for 2012, the sister program of the Miss America Organization. The University of Florida ju nior was crowned Miss Universi ty of Florida at a pageant earlier this year, which earned her a spot in the Miss Florida Pageant and an $18,000 scholarship as the winner. This is a hometown girl do ing good, Dixie Fechtel of Lees burg said Sunday, reecting on her daughters big win against 49 other contestants. It was a surprise, fun and exciting. Were just so happy for her. During early judging at the state pageant last week, Elizabeth also won the preliminary talent compe tition for her dance to Pharrell Wil liams song, Happy. The talent (at the state level) was just incredible pianists, vocalists and it just kind of blew me away, so to see her win was an accom plishment, Dixie said. We were hoping she would make the top 10, and then when she got in the top ve, we thought, Thats nice. At least shell get some scholarship money. And then all of a sudden she is the winner. It was very excit ing. The Fechtel family and friends are already talking about the Miss America Pageant. Im making plans to go to Atlan tic City, Linda Watts, founder of the Miss Leesburg Scholarship Pro gram, said Sunday, elated that one of her former Miss Leesburg title holders will grace the stage in the Miss America Pageant. For her to go from Miss Leesburg to Miss America, I would love to be there, Watts said. I just think she is on her way (to winning the title). Just to look back at her through the years, she is special. She is beautiful inside and out. The Fechtel family credit Watts and the Miss Leesburg Scholarship Program for laying the foundation for Elizabeths community service work. The former Miss Florida graduat ed as an AP honor student and stu dent body president at First Acad emy-Leesburg. She is currently majoring in political science with a minor in communications and en trepreneurship. PAGEANT FROM PAGE A1 BRAD MCCLENNY / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP Elizabeth Fechtel was crowned as the Miss University of Florida during the 2014 Miss University of Florida pageant, earning her spot in Saturdays Miss Florida Pageant. JOSH WOOD Associated Press THEODORE ROOS EVELT NATIONAL PARK, N.D. After the last hints of sunset dip be hind the hills, the North Dakota horizon comes alive with ickering or ange ames of a different kind natural gas ares. These tiny tongues of re burn bright against the dark prairie just beyond the boundar ies of Theodore Roos evelt National Park in the Badlands, where the man who later became the nations 26th pres ident sought solace af ter his wife and mother both died unexpectedly on the same day in 1884 in his native New York. Today, the resurgent American oil industry is tapping into this rugged landscape, so the vistas that soothed Roosevelts grief and helped instill his zeal for conservation now include oil rigs and ares used to burn off natural gas that comes to the surface. Oil development is strictly forbidden with in the park itself, but park ofcials worry that the ares, lights and noise from drilling just beyond the protect ed area are sullying the natural spaces cher ished by Roosevelt as a bespectacled young man in his mid-20s. Visitors know that the park experience is much more than waking up inside the borders and looking around, said Nick Lund, landscape conservation program manager at the Wash ington-based National Parks Conservation As sociation. Things that happen outside the park really affect the expe rience of visiting, both from a visitor stand point and from an envi ronmental standpoint. The park of more than 70,000 acres sits atop the Bakken shale, an oil-rich rock forma tion that for decades frustrated drillers who could not coax anything protable from the ground. But advances in hydraulic fracturing and directional drill ing have unlocked huge amounts of petroleum here. North Dakota is now the second-biggest oil producer in the U.S. after Texas. The parks landscape is a showcase for the states varied terrain. It has steep-sided barren buttes dropping into grassy valleys, as well as tall sandstone for mations and rock layers that reveal tens of mil lions of years of natural history. The wildlife in cludes bison and hors es, yipping prairie-dog colonies and elusive mountain lions. In this desolate, grim beauty, Roosevelt found solitude and built a cattle ranch. Later in life, he said he would not have become pres ident without the heal ing time spent in the Badlands. Societys footprint has drawn ever closer to the wilderness as trailer parks are established to house oil workers and tanker trucks carrying drilling chemicals and water crowd once lone ly roads. During the day, it can be difcult to spot oil development in the dis tance. But at night, the ares and oil eld lights brighten the horizon. At times, park Super intendent Valerie Nay lor says, its possible to see 26 natural gas ares from the park. The gas is a byproduct of oil production and a valuable resource on its own. But with no sys tems in place to capture it, store it or transport it, some oil producers simply burn it off. Oil drilling threatens solitude of national park CHARLES REX ARBOGAS / AP Longhorn cattle wonder through the Theodore Roosevelt National Park, located in the Badlands of North Dakota.

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 23, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com GOLF: Streelman birdies last seven to win / B4 MARK DIDTLER Associated Press ST. PETERSBURG Yunel Escobar drove in two runs during a three-run sixth inning and the Tampa Bay Rays beat the Houston Astors 5-2 on Sunday. Escobar hit a two-run single and Sean Rodri guez had an RBI grounder off Dallas Keuchel (85) to give the Rays a 4-2 lead in the sixth. The Rays are 8-18 over their past 26 games, including ve wins in seven games against AP FILE PHOTO Former UCLA basketball player Ed OBannon Jr. sits in his ofce in Henderson, Nev. Five years after the former UCLA star led his antitrust lawsuit against the NCAA, it is nally in a California courtroom. TIM DAHLBERG Associated Press OAKLAND, Calif. They come calling with promises of a good edu cation, a chance to play on television and some of the best facilities that money can buy. There may come a time, though, when recruit ers chasing the best high school football and bas ketball players offer some thing else: a nice pay check to take with them as a parting gift when their college days are over. Football players could get several hundred thou sand dollars. Basketball players would do even better, perhaps becom ing millionaires even if they never play a day in the NBA. Under some sce narios they could take the payments in lieu of what they would have gotten for tuition and room and board. They would be col lege employees of a sort, able to take classes if they wish or simply play sports. And the NCAA might still be able to take the high road and continue to run big-time college sports as amateur programs. Theres nothing inher ent in the word amateur ism that says increasing substantially the amount paid athletes would vio late the principle of am ateurism, said Stanford economics professor Rog er Noll, who testied on behalf of the plaintiffs. Theres no reason to be lieve that. Its all theoretical, of course, based on models that may never come into play. But just what the fu ture of big-time college athletics may look like if the NCAA loses a land mark antitrust suit is be ginning to come into focus as attorneys rep resenting former UCLA SEE CASH | B2 Escobar has 2 RBIs; Rays top Astros 5-2 College recruiters could come bearing prospect paychecks ASSOCIATED PRESS Carl Edwards sprays wine after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race on Sunday in Sonoma, Calif. JOHN BAZEMORE / AP Michelle Wie kisses the trophy after winning the U.S. Womens Open golf tournament on Sunday in Pinehurst, N.C. Wie holds off Lewis for win at US Womens Open DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer PINEHURST, N.C. Michelle Wie nally de livered a performance worthy of the hype that has been heaped on her since she was a teenag er. Wie bounced back from a late mistake at Pinehurst No. 2 to bury a 25-foot birdie putt on the 17th hole, sending the 24-year-old from Hawaii to her rst ma jor championship Sun day, a two-shot victory over Stacy Lewis in the U.S. Womens Open. Wie closed with an even-par 70 and cov ered her mouth with her hand before thrust ing both arms in the air. Lewis, the No. 1 play er in womens golf, made her work for it. She made eight birdies to match the best score of the tournament with a 66, and then was on the practice range pre paring for a playoff when her caddie told her Wie had made the sharp-breaking birdie putt on the 17th. Lewis returned to the 18th green to hug the winner after other play ers doused Wie with champagne. What a journey for Wie, who now has four career victories all in North America, the rst on the U.S. mainland and moved to the top of the LPGA money list af ter winning the biggest event in womens golf. She has been one of the biggest stars in womens golf since she was 13 and played in the nal group of a ma jor. Her popular soared along with criticism when she competed against the men on the PGA Tour while still in high school and talked about wanting to play in the Masters. That seems like a life time ago. The 6-foot Wie is all grown up, a Stanford graduate, popular among pros of both genders and now a major champion. Oh my God, I cant believe this is happen ing, Wie said. BOB LEVERONE / AP Michelle Wie lines up a putt on the seventh hole during the nal round of the U.S. Womens Open golf tournament. SEE WIE | B2 JENNA FRYER AP Auto Racing Writer SONOMA, Calif. Carl Edwards made Roush Fenway Racing the unlikely organiza tion to end Hendrick Motorsports ve-race winning streak. Edwards stopped the Hendrick juggernaut with a win Sunday at Sonoma Raceway, the rst career victory for Edwards on a road course. The win came a week after Roush was shut out at Mich igan, where the orga nization failed to put a car in the top 10 for the rst time since 2000. Edwards took the lead on a restart with 25 laps remaining and seemed to have the win wrapped up, but Jeff Gordon near ly chased him down on the nal lap. Gor don, a ve-time Sono ma winner, had one good look at Edwards and couldnt pull off the pass. Thats the best Ive got and it almost wasnt good enough, Edwards said. That last lap was ugly. I grew up watching Jeff Gor don do well here, so to have him in my mirror, that is very special. It wasnt a terrible day for the Hendrick Edwards races to first career road course win SEE RAYS | B2 SEE NASCAR | B2 PAULO DUARTE / AP United States Clint Dempsey, center, runs to celebrate after scoring his sides second goal against Portugal on Sunday at Manaus, Brazil. CHRIS LEHOURITES Associated Press MANAUS, Brazil Cristiano Ron aldo set up Varela for a late equaliz er on a hot and humid night in the jungle Sunday to give the Portugal a 2-2 draw with the United States and hope for a spot in the second round of the World Cup. Ronaldo, who has been playing de spite a left knee injury, sent in a cross in the fth minute of stoppage time and Varela scored with a diving head er in the last seconds of the match. Nani had scored rst for Portugal, shooting past a sprawling Tim Howard in the fth minute, but the Americans responded in the second half as Portu gal seemed to wilt in the stiing heat. Jermaine Jones made it 1-1 with a curling shot in the 64th minute af ter a cross from Graham Zusi made its way through the Portugal defense. Clint Dempsey, playing with a bro ken nose, then put the Americans ahead in the 81st. The United States captain used his stomach to direct the ball into the net from a cross by Zusi. The last-second draw denied the Portugal ties U.S. on late goal SEE SOCCER | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 23, 2014 SUN mon tues wed thurs fri SatLeesburg LightningJune 2228DelandHOME5p mSanfordHOME7p mSanfordAWAY7p mSanfordAWAY7p mWinter GardenAWAY7p mWinter GardenAWAY7p m AUTO RACING NASCAR Sprint Cup-Toyota/Save Mart 350 Results Sunday At Sonoma Raceway Sonoma, Calif. Lap length: 1.99 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (4) Carl Edwards, Ford, 110 laps, 119.9 rating, 47 points, $335,790. 2. (15) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 110, 119.1, 43, $238,266. 3. (17) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 110, 105.8, 41, $167,230. 4. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 110, 126, 41, $185,869. 5. (9) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 110, 93.6, 39, $147,344. 6. (30) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 110, 96.7, 38, $126,870. 7. (22) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 110, 111.8, 38, $157,431. 8. (23) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 110, 94.3, 37, $137,340. 9. (19) Greg Bife, Ford, 110, 86.2, 35, $143,820. 10. (25) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 110, 93, 35, $136,411. 11. (7) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 110, 92.1, 33, $107,785. 12. (5) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 110, 95, 32, $101,635. 13. (12) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 110, 82.3, 31, $129,543. 14. (8) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 110, 83.8, 30, $128,910. 15. (18) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 110, 82.4, 29, $123,643. 16. (10) Joey Logano, Ford, 110, 76.1, 29, $132,326. 17. (26) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 110, 65.3, 27, $141,596. 18. (11) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 110, 69.6, 26, $102,310. 19. (21) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 110, 66.2, 25, $127,743. 20. (6) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 110, 101.6, 25, $131,193. 21. (27) David Gilliland, Ford, 110, 61.1, 23, $116,068. 22. (13) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 110, 58.2, 22, $133,268. 23. (29) Aric Almirola, Ford, 110, 61.8, 21, $127,671. 24. (28) Michael McDowell, Ford, 110, 57.4, 20, $86,785. 25. (20) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 110, 60.4, 19, $134,701. 26. (16) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 110, 65.6, 18, $97,035. 27. (32) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 110, 49.2, 17, $88,385. 28. (3) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 110, 74.2, 16, $114,555. 29. (38) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 110, 44.7, 15, $101,643. 30. (42) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 110, 40.2, 14, $100,493. 31. (24) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 109, 58, 13, $122,485. 32. (40) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 109, 39.1, 12, $93,537. 33. (35) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 109, 39.6, 11, $91,880. 34. (39) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 109, 32, 0, $83,745. 35. (41) Boris Said, Ford, 109, 33.7, 9, $83,605. 36. (31) David Ragan, Ford, 109, 40.3, 8, $91,520. 37. (2) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 108, 103.5, 9, $89,983. 38. (43) Tomy Drissi, Toyota, 108, 25.9, 6, $85,850. 39. (36) Alex Kennedy, Chevrolet, rear gear, 104, 34.2, 5, $73,850. 40. (33) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 95, 32.5, 4, $69,850. 41. (34) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 91, 40.5, 3, $65,850. 42. (14) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, accident, 74, 67.5, 2, $110,986. 43. (37) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, engine, 29, 25.8, 0, $58,350. GOLF Irish Open Leading Scores Sunday At Fota Island Resort Cork, Ireland Purse: $2.71 million Yardage: 7,043; Par: 71 Final Mikko Ilonen, Finland 64-68-69-70 271 Edoardo Molinari, Italy 67-69-69-67 272 Kristoffer Broberg, Sweden 69-69-66-69 273 Matthew Baldwin, England 67-71-66-69 273 Danny Willett, England 73-66-63-71 273 Magnus A. Carlsson, Sweden 66-71-68-69 274 Graeme McDowell, Northern Ireland 68-66-69-71 274 Ross Fisher, England 68-72-70-65 205 Michael Hoey, Northern Ireland 68-71-70-66 275 Chris Wood, England 69-69-70-67 275 Richard Finch, England 68-72-67-68 275 Gary Stal, France 70-67-69-69 275 Gregory Bourdy, France 68-71-67-69 275 Marcel Siem, Germany 66-74-71-65 276 Matthew Nixon, England 70-65-74-67 276 Padraig Harrington, Ireland 69-67-71-69 276 Adam Gee, England 68-70-69-69 276 Gareth Maybin, Northern Ireland 71-65-69-71 276 Simon Khan, England 69-66-70-71 276 Fabrizio Zanotti, Paraguay 70-69-65-72 276 Roope Kakko, Finland 71-66-72-68 277 Ricardo Gonzalez, Argentina 69-70-68-70 277 Anders Hansen, Denmark 67-70-68-72 277 Romain Wattel, France 69-65-70-73 277 U.S. Womens Open Leading Scores Sunday At Pinehurst No. 2 Pinehurst, N.C. Purse: $4 million Yardage: 6,649; Par: 70 Michelle Wie, $720,000 68-68-72-70 278 Stacy Lewis, $432,000 67-73-74-66 280 Stephanie Meadow, $271,373 71-72-69-69 281 Amy Yang, $191,536 71-69-68-74 282 Meena Lee, $149,942 72-73-70-68 283 So Yeon Ryu, $149,942 69-74-70-70 283 Lexi Thompson, $113,582 71-68-74-71 284 Sakura Yokomine, $113,582 74-68-71-71 284 Pornanong Phatlum, $113,582 71-73-69-71 284 Catriona Matthew, $90,861 75-69-75-66 285 Jenny Shin, $90,861 74-70-73-68 285 a-Brooke Mackenzie Henderson, $0 71-73-72-69 285 Yueer Cindy Feng, $77,640 73-71-71-71 286 Na Yeon Choi, $77,640 71-70-71-74 286 Lydia Ko, $58,096 76-71-71-69 287 Shanshan Feng, $58,096 77-70-70-70 287 Brittany Lincicome, $58,096 77-70-69-71 287 Hee Young Park, $58,096 73-73-69-72 287 Paula Creamer, $58,096 70-72-72-73 287 Chella Choi, $58,096 75-70-69-73 287 Juli Inkster, $58,096 71-75-66-75 287 Julieta Granada, $40,327 75-71-74-68 288 Sandra Gal, $40,327 74-72-73-69 288 Karine Icher, $40,327 76-72-71-69 288 Azahara Munoz, $40,327 73-71-74-70 288 Brittany Lang, $40,327 73-75-69-71 288 a-Minjee Lee, $0 69-71-72-76 288 Eun Hee Ji, $32,708 71-75-75-68 289 Caroline Masson, $32,708 72-75-73-69 289 Candie Kung, $27,721 71-76-75-68 290 Angela Stanford, $27,721 71-72-77-70 290 I.K. Kim, $27,721 71-74-75-70 290 Mariajo Uribe, $27,721 72-70-76-72 290 Karrie Webb, $27,721 70-73-70-77 290 Yani Tseng, $23,555 77-71-74-69 291 Rikako Morita, $23,555 73-75-73-70 291 Ha Na Jang, $23,555 76-73-70-72 291 Jennifer Song, $20,090 74-72-77-69 292 Caroline Hedwall, $20,090 73-76-72-71 292 Mina Harigae, $20,090 71-74-74-73 292 Se Ri Pak, $20,090 76-69-74-73 292 SOCCER World Cup Glance GROUP A Monday, June 23 At Brasilia, Brazil Cameroon vs. Brazil, 4 p.m. At Recife, Brazil Croatia vs. Mexico, 4 p.m. GROUP B Friday, June 13 At Salvador, Brazil At Curitiba, Brazil Australia vs. Spain, 4 p.m. At Sao Paulo Netherlands vs. Chile, noon GROUP C Tuesday, June 24 At Fortaleza, Brazil Greece vs. Ivory Coast, 4 p.m. At Cuiaba, Brazil Japan vs. Colombia, 4 p.m. GROUP D Tuesday, June 24 At Belo Horizonte, Brazil Costa Rica vs. England, noon At Natal, Brazil Italy vs. Uruguay, noon GROUP E Wednesday, June 25 At Rio De Janeiro Ecuador vs. France, 4 p.m. At Manaus, Brazil Honduras vs. Switzerland, 4 p.m. GROUP F Wednesday, June 25 At Salvador, Brazil Bosnia-Herzegovina vs. Iran, noon At Porto Alegre, Brazil Nigeria vs. Argentina, noon GROUP G Sunday, June 22 At Manaus, Brazil United States vs. Portugal, 6 p.m. Thursday, June 26 At Brasilia, Brazil Portugal vs. Ghana, noon At Recife, Brazil United States vs. Germany, noon GMT GROUP H Thursday, June 26 At Curitiba, Brazil Algeria vs. Russia, 4 p.m. At Sao Paulo South Korea vs. Belgium, 4 p.m. TV 2 DAY SCOREBOARD FCSL STANDINGS W L .Pct GB Sanford 10 5 .667 Winter Garden 9 7 .562 1.5 Winter Park 10 8 .556 1.5 Leesburg 5 6 .455 3 DeLand 6 9 .400 4 College Park 5 10 .333 5 SUNDAYS GAMES DeLand at Leesburg, DH, ccd., rain College Park 5, Winter Garden 4 Sanford 8, Winter Park 6 TODAYS GAMES No games scheduled TUESDAYS GAMES Sanford at Leesburg, DH, 4, 7 p.m. Winter Park at College Park, 7 pm. Winter Garden at DeLand, 7 p.m. COLLEGE BASEBALL 8 p.m. ESPN World Series, nals, game 1, Virginia vs. Vanderbilt, at Omaha, Neb. GOLF 3:30 p.m. TGC PGA of America, Professional National Championship, second round, at Myrtle Beach, S.C. MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7:05 p.m. FS-Florida Miami at Philadelphia 7:10 p.m. SUN Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay 8 p.m. ESPN2 Washington at Milwaukee SOCCER 11:30 a.m. ESPN FIFA, World Cup, Group B, Netherlands vs. Chile, at Sao Paulo ESPN2 FIFA, World Cup, Group B, Australia vs. Spain, at Curitiba, Brazil 3:30 p.m. ESPN FIFA, World Cup, Group A, Croatia vs. Mexico, at Recife, Brazil ESPN2 FIFA, World Cup, Group A, Cameroon vs. Brazil, at Brasilia, Brazil TENNIS 7 a.m. ESPN Wimbledon, rst round, at London 11:30 a.m. ESPNEWS Wimbledon, rst round, at London 2 p.m. ESPN2 Wimbledon, rst round, at London basketball star Ed OBannon and others press their case in a feder al court trial. No one expects the current sys tem run by the NCAA to be com pletely blown up. But at a time when billions of dollars are ow ing into college sports there is lit tle dispute that players will get a bigger chunk of the pie. That may come as soon as next year when the ve major confer ences move to separate them selves from football programs that arent nearly as protable and give athletes more money and great er benets. Among the propos als is more money to cover the full cost of attending school and bet ter medical and travel benets. Whether the extra money will amount to covering laundry ex penses and date nights or comes to a much larger payment may de pend on how successful OBan nons attorneys are in winning a ruling that the NCAA is acting il legally by not allowing players to prot off the use of their names, images and likenesses in televi sion broadcasts and videogames. If the plaintiffs win, the NCAA would still run athletics, but Di vision I basketball and Bowl Sub division football players would be allowed to band together to seek payment for the use of their names and images. Those payments would go into a trust fund, with players get ting equal shares when they leave school. University of San Francisco eco nomics professor Daniel Rascher testied that using something akin to the professional model where players get something close to the 55 percent of broadcast revenues NFL players currently receive a football player at Vanderbilt might get $325,000 over a ve-year peri od because of the lucrative televi sion contracts in the Southeastern Conference. CASH FROM PAGE B1 It almost didnt. Just like her so much of her life, the path included a sharp twist no one saw coming. Wie started the nal round tied with Amy Yang, took the lead when Yang made double bogey on No. 2 and didnt let anyone catch her the rest of the day. In trouble on the tough fourth hole, she got up-and-down from 135 yards with a shot into 3 feet. Right when Lewis was making a big run, Wie answered by ripping a drive on the short ened par-5 10th and hitting a cut 8-iron into 10 feet for eagle and a four-shot lead. She had not made a bogey since the rst hole and then it all nearly unraveled. From a fairway bunker on the 16th, holding a three-shot lead, she stayed ag gressive and hit hy brid from the sand. After a three-minute search, the ball was found in a wiregrass bush that caused her to take a penal ty drop behind her in the fairway. She chipped on to about 35 feet and rapped her bogey putt 5 feet past the hole. Miss it and she would be tied. Bent over in that table-top putting stance, she poured it in to avoid her rst three-putt of the week. Smiling as she left the green, even though her lead was down to one, Wie hit 8-iron safely on the 17th green and holed the tough birdie putt. She pumped her st, then slammed it twice in succession, a determination rare ly seen when she was contending for ma jors nearly a decade ago as a teen prodigy. Obviously, there are moments of doubt in there, Wie said. But obviously, I had so many peo ple surrounding me. They never lost faith in me. Thats pushed me forward. Wie nished at 2-under 278, the only player to beat par in the second week of championship golf at Pinehurst. Mar tin Kaymer won by eight shots last week at 9-under 271, the second-lowest score in U.S. Open history. Lewis got within one shot of the lead with a birdie on No. 13, and after two bo geys, kept her hopes alive by nishing with back-to-back birdies. I knew I needed to get out early and post some numbers and make Michelle Wie earn it, Lewis said. WIE FROM PAGE B1 Houston. Keuchel allowed ve runs and nine hits. Dexter Fowler put the As tros up 1-0 when he hit the rst pitch of the game from Erik Bedard into the lefteld seats. It was his ninth career leadoff homer and third this season. Bedard, who was with Houston last season, gave up two runs and seven hits in 5 1-3 innings. Juan Carlos Oviedo (32) got two outs in the sixth for the win. Joel Peralta pitched the ninth for his rst save. Rodriguez made it 5-2 on an eighth-inning sacrice y. Houston took a 2-1 lead in the third on Jose Al tuves single. Jonathan Vil lar opened the inning with a double, was awarded a steal of third after a replay challenge resulted in an out call being overturned and scored on the hit by Altuve. Altuve has 13 hits in his past 24 at-bats. The Rays tied it at 1 in the bottom of the rst on Evan Longorias single. Desmond Jennings was caught attempting to steal home with Longoria bat ting to end the third, a call that was conrmed by a re play review. After catcher Carlos Corporan threw the ball back to Keuchel, Jen nings broke for the plate, but was tagged by Corpo ran after a return throw from Keuchel. RAYS FROM PAGE B1 organization, which had won every Sprint Cup Se ries race since Jeff Gordons victory at Kansas on May 10. Instead, HMS settled for all four of its drivers n ishing in the top seven. Gordon, the Sprint Cup Series points lead er, wound up second. He said he made one mistake in overdriving a turn with about ve laps to go that allowed Edwards to build a healthy lead. I just couldnt put enough pressure on him, Gordon said. I think had I put some more pressure on him, I saw him really strug gling with the (tire) grip level, but he did everything he needed to do. That last lap, I gave it my best effort and closed up on him and he didnt overdrive it. I was hoping he might slide up and Id get a run on him. Dale Earnhardt Jr. was third after rallying from an earlier incident that wrecked Matt Kenseth, and was apologetic on the radio and after the race. I tried to screw it up a couple times in the race, but I calmed down and was able to get a good nish, Earnhardt said after his ca reer-best nish on a road course. I got into Matt, I jumped a curb and jumped into the air and just ran into him. Totally my fault. I hope hes not sore with me. Kasey Kahne bounced back from an early at tire to nish sixth and Jimmie Johnson was seventh. In all, Chevrolet drivers took spots two through sev en as pole-sitter Jamie Mc Murray, using a Hendrick engine, nished fourth and Paul Menard was fth. Fords rounded out the top 10, led by Edwards, Marcos Ambrose eighth and Roush driver Greg Bif e was 10th. It was Edwards 23rd win of his career, the 135th Sprint Cup Series victory for car owner Jack Roush. NASCAR FROM PAGE B1 Americans a spot in the second round, but it kept Portugal alive in the tour nament. Obviously were disap pointed, but at the end of the day youve got to look at the positives, we got a point, Dempsey said. Its going down to the last game and hopefully we get the job done. The United States now has four points in Group G, the same as Germany. Both Portugal and Ghana have one point. The Amer icans will face Germany on Thursday in Recife, while Portugal takes on Ghana at the same time in Brasilia. Now we have to go out and beat Germany, thats what we have to do, U.S. coach Jurgen Klinsmann said. We have to play Ger many, we have one less day to recover, we played in the Amazon, they played on a place with less travel. We have to do it the tough way. ALGERIA 4, SOUTH KOREA 2 PORTO ALEGRE, Brazil Islam Slimani scored one goal and set up two more as Algeria swept aside South Korea to become the rst African team to score four goals in a World Cup match. The result gives Alge ria its rst World Cup win since 1982 and moves it into second place in Group H with one match left to play, against Russia. Slimani opened the scoriThe loss for South Ko rea means it must now beat already-qualied Belgium and hope that other results go its way to progress to the knockout stages. Belgium leads with six points, Algeria now has three, while Russia and the South Koreans have one apiece. BELGIUM 1, RUSSIA 0 RIO DE JANEIRO Teen age forward Divock Ori gi turned a listless Belgian performance into a late win over Russia, enough to qualify for the next round of the World Cup with two straight victories. Belgium barely contained a reinvigorated Russia for most of the match, yet struck with a blistering nal spurt of class and oppor tunism to turn a bad situa tion into a wild celebration for coach Marc Wilmots in the 88th minute and hugs all around at full time. It was not easy, but we never gave up, Wilmots said. After its dour 1-1 draw with South Korea, Russia produced the kind of spar kle and dominance that most had been expect ed more from Belgium in front of 73,819 increas ingly restless fans at Ma racana stadium. SOCCER FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, June 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Toronto 42 35 .545 3-7 L-2 20-17 22-18 Baltimore 39 35 .527 1 6-4 W-2 16-17 23-18 New York 39 35 .527 1 6-4 L-2 17-18 22-17 Boston 35 41 .461 6 5 5-5 W-1 20-19 15-22 Tampa Bay 31 46 .403 11 9 6-4 W-2 18-23 13-23 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 40 32 .556 6-4 W-4 19-19 21-13 Kansas City 39 36 .520 2 6-4 L-4 18-19 21-17 Cleveland 37 39 .487 5 3 4-6 L-3 23-15 14-24 Minnesota 36 38 .486 5 3 5-5 W-4 19-17 17-21 Chicago 35 41 .461 7 5 2-8 L-4 21-18 14-23 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 47 29 .618 7-3 L-1 24-15 23-14 Los Angeles 40 33 .548 5 5-5 W-2 22-14 18-19 Seattle 40 36 .526 7 6-4 W-3 17-20 23-16 Texas 35 39 .473 11 4 4-6 L-4 16-19 19-20 Houston 33 44 .429 14 7 3-7 L-2 17-20 16-24 NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Washington 39 35 .527 4-6 W-2 23-17 16-18 Atlanta 38 37 .507 1 2 4-6 L-2 20-18 18-19 Miami 37 38 .493 2 3 3-7 L-2 25-18 12-20 New York 35 41 .461 5 6 6-4 W-2 16-20 19-21 Philadelphia 34 40 .459 5 6 6-4 L-2 16-21 18-19 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 47 30 .610 7-3 W-4 20-15 27-15 St. Louis 41 35 .539 5 7-3 W-2 23-17 18-18 Cincinnati 37 37 .500 8 3 7-3 W-2 19-18 18-19 Pittsburgh 37 38 .493 9 3 6-4 W-2 21-18 16-20 Chicago 31 42 .425 14 8 5-5 L-2 16-16 15-26 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY San Francisco 45 30 .600 3-7 W-2 23-15 22-15 Los Angeles 42 35 .545 4 7-3 W-2 18-20 24-15 Colorado 34 41 .453 11 6 4-6 L-6 19-17 15-24 San Diego 32 44 .421 13 9 4-6 L-2 19-21 13-23 Arizona 32 47 .405 15 10 3-7 L-2 14-29 18-18 SATURDAYS GAMES Baltimore 6, N.Y. Yankees 1 Minnesota 4, Chicago White Sox 3 Seattle 2, Kansas City 1 Oakland 2, Boston 1, 10 innings Tampa Bay 8, Houston 0 Cincinnati 11, Toronto 1 Detroit 5, Cleveland 4, 10 innings L.A. Angels 3, Texas 2, 10 innings SATURDAYS GAMES Milwaukee 9, Colorado 4 N.Y. Mets 4, Miami 0 St. Louis 4, Philadelphia 1 Cincinnati 11, Toronto 1 Washington 3, Atlanta 0 Pittsburgh 5, Chicago Cubs 3 L.A. Dodgers 4, San Diego 2 San Francisco 6, Arizona 4 SUNDAYS GAMES Detroit 10, Cleveland 4 Cincinnati 4, Toronto 3 Tampa Bay 5, Houston 2 Baltimore 8, N.Y. Yankees 0 Minnesota 6, Chicago White Sox 5 Seattle 2, Kansas City 1 Boston 7, Oakland 6, 10 innings Texas at L.A. Angels, late SUNDAYS GAMES Detroit 10, Cleveland 4 Cincinnati 4, Toronto 3 Tampa Bay 5, Houston 2 Baltimore 8, N.Y. Yankees 0 Minnesota 6, Chicago White Sox 5 Seattle 2, Kansas City 1 Boston 7, Oakland 6, 10 innings Texas at L.A. Angels, late MARK DUNCAN / AP Cleveland Indians shortstop Asdrubal Cabrera takes the throw to force Detroit Tigers Austin Jackson (14) at second base in the fth inning on Sunday in Cleveland. TODAYS GAMES Chicago White Sox (Sale 6-1) at Baltimore (W.Chen 7-2), 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Whitley 3-0) at Toronto (Stroman 3-2), 7:07 p.m. Pittsburgh (Volquez 4-6) at Tampa Bay (Cobb 2-5), 7:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 9-3) at Kansas City (Guthrie 4-6), 8:10 p.m. Boston (Lackey 8-4) at Seattle (F.Hernandez 8-2), 10:10 p.m. TODAYS GAMES Miami (Eovaldi 4-3) at Philadelphia (R.Hernandez 3-5), 7:05 p.m. Pittsburgh (Volquez 4-6) at Tampa Bay (Cobb 2-5), 7:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Simon 10-3) at Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 2-6), 8:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 9-3) at Kansas City (Guthrie 4-6), 8:10 p.m. Washington (G.Gonzalez 3-4) at Milwaukee (Garza 4-4), 8:10 p.m. St. Louis (Lynn 7-5) at Colorado (Chacin 1-5), 8:40 p.m. San Diego (Cashner 2-6) at San Francisco (M.Cain 1-5), 10:15 p.m. AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Altuve, Houston, .336; Cano, Seattle, .332; VMartinez, Detroit, .331; Rios, Texas, .320; Brantley, Cleveland, .320; MiCabrera, Detroit, .320; KSuzuki, Min nesota, .313. RUNS: Dozier, Minnesota, 57; Donaldson, Oakland, 55; Bautista, Toronto, 54; Encarnacion, Toronto, 50; Brantley, Cleveland, 49; Trout, Los Angeles, 49; Kinsler, Detroit, 48. RBI: Encarnacion, Toronto, 62; NCruz, Baltimore, 60; Mi Cabrera, Detroit, 58; JAbreu, Chicago, 55; Donaldson, Oakland, 55; Moss, Oakland, 55; Trout, Los Angeles, 54. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 102; MeCabrera, Toronto, 94; Cano, Seattle, 91; Rios, Texas, 91; Markakis, Baltimore, 90; VMartinez, Detroit, 89; AJones, Baltimore, 88. DOUBLES: MiCabrera, Detroit, 26; Altuve, Houston, 23; Pedroia, Boston, 23; EEscobar, Minnesota, 22; Kinsler, Detroit, 22; Plouffe, Minnesota, 22; AGordon, Kansas City, 21; Hosmer, Kansas City, 21. TRIPLES: Rios, Texas, 8; Bourn, Cleveland, 5; Eaton, Chicago, 5; Trout, Los Angeles, 5; Gardner, New York, 4. HOME RUNS: NCruz, Baltimore, 23; Encarnacion, To ronto, 23; JAbreu, Chicago, 21; VMartinez, Detroit, 19; Donaldson, Oakland, 18; Moss, Oakland, 17; Ortiz, Bos ton, 16; Pujols, Los Angeles, 16; Trout, Los Angeles, 16. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 26; Ellsbury, New York, 21; RDavis, Detroit, 20; Andrus, Texas, 18; AEsco bar, Kansas City, 18; LMartin, Texas, 17; Dozier, Minne sota, 15; Gardner, New York, 15; Reyes, Toronto, 15. PITCHING: Tanaka, New York, 11-1; Buehrle, Toronto, 10-4; Kazmir, Oakland, 9-2; Porcello, Detroit, 9-4; FHer nandez, Seattle, 8-2; Shields, Kansas City, 8-3; Scher zer, Detroit, 8-3; Keuchel, Houston, 8-4; Lackey, Boston, 8-4; Lester, Boston, 8-7. ERA: Tanaka, New York, 1.99; Kazmir, Oakland, 2.08; FHernandez, Seattle, 2.22; Buehrle, Toronto, 2.32; Dar vish, Texas, 2.39; Keuchel, Houston, 2.63; JChavez, Oakland, 2.71. STRIKEOUTS: Price, Tampa Bay, 133; FHernandez, Se attle, 122; Kluber, Cleveland, 114; Tanaka, New York, 113; Scherzer, Detroit, 111; Darvish, Texas, 109. SAVES: Holland, Kansas City, 21; Rodney, Seattle, 20; Perkins, Minnesota, 19; DavRobertson, New York, 17. NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Tulowitzki, Colorado, .362; Lucroy, Milwaukee, .333; Puig, Los Angeles, .321; MaAdams, St. Louis, .318; CGomez, Milwaukee, .318; AMcCutchen, Pitts burgh, .313; Gennett, Milwaukee, .311. RUNS: Tulowitzki, Colorado, 58; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 57; Pence, San Francisco, 55; Stanton, Miami, 51; FFreeman, Atlanta, 49; CGomez, Milwaukee, 49; MCar penter, St. Louis, 48; Rizzo, Chicago, 48. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 57; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 52; Mor neau, Colorado, 51; Howard, Philadelphia, 50; Desmond, Washington, 45; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 45; 6 tied at 44. HITS: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 92; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 90; DanMurphy, New York, 90; Pence, San Francisco, 88; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 88; CGomez, Milwaukee, 87; McGe hee, Miami, 87. DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 28; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 26; Utley, Philadelphia, 24; SCastro, Chicago, 22; FFree man, Atlanta, 22; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 22. TRIPLES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 8; BCrawford, San Francisco, 6; Owings, Arizona, 5; Span, Washington, 5; Yelich, Miami, 5; 6 tied at 4. HOME RUNS: Stanton, Miami, 20; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 18; Frazier, Cincinnati, 16; Gattis, Atlanta, 16; Gold schmidt, Arizona, 15; Rizzo, Chicago, 15; Desmond, Wash ington, 14; Howard, Philadelphia, 14; JUpton, Atlanta, 14. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 39; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 31; Revere, Philadelphia, 20; EYoung, New York, 18; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 17; Blackmon, Colorado, 13; Bonifacio, Chicago, 13; ECabrera, San Diego, 13. PITCHING: Wainwright, St. Louis, 10-3; Simon, Cincin nati, 10-3; Greinke, Los Angeles, 9-3; Lohse, Milwaukee, 8-2; Ryu, Los Angeles, 8-3; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 8-4; WPeralta, Milwaukee, 8-5. ERA: Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.92; Wainwright, St. Louis, 2.08; Beckett, Los Angeles, 2.28; Cashner, San Diego, 2.36; HAlvarez, Miami, 2.39; Hudson, San Francisco, 2.39. STRIKEOUTS: Strasburg, Washington, 121; Cueto, Cin cinnati, 111; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 104; Kennedy, San Diego, 103; Wainwright, St. Louis, 98. SAVES: FrRodriguez, Milwaukee, 24; Romo, San Francisco, 21; Jansen, Los Angeles, 21; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 21. Rays 5, Astros 2 Houston Tampa Bay ab r h bi ab r h bi Fowler cf 5 1 2 1 DJnngs cf 3 0 0 0 Altuve 2b 3 0 1 1 Zobrist rf-2b 2 2 1 0 Springr rf 2 0 0 0 Guyer lf 3 2 2 0 MDmn 3b 4 0 0 0 Longori 3b 4 1 3 1 Carter dh 4 0 1 0 Sands dh 3 0 0 0 Guzmn 1b 3 0 1 0 Kiermr ph-rf 0 0 0 0 Corprn c 4 0 1 0 YEscor ss 2 0 1 2 Grssmn lf 3 0 0 0 SRdrgz 1b 3 0 0 2 JCastro ph 1 0 0 0 Forsyth 2b 4 0 2 0 Villar ss 3 1 1 0 JoPerlt p 0 0 0 0 Singltn ph 1 0 0 0 JMolin c 3 0 0 0 Totals 33 2 7 2 Totals 27 5 9 5 Houston 101 000 000 2 Tampa Bay 100 003 01x 5 ESpringer (7). DPHouston 2, Tampa Bay 1. LOB Houston 8, Tampa Bay 6. 2BVillar (10), Zobrist (13). HRFowler (6). SBVillar (14). CSDe.Jennings (4). SKiermaier. SFS.Rodriguez. IP H R ER BB SO Houston Keuchel L,8-5 8 9 5 4 4 4 Tampa Bay Bedard 5 1 / 3 7 2 2 1 8 Oviedo W,3-2 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Balfour H,2 1 0 0 0 1 2 McGee H,8 1 0 0 0 1 1 Jo.Peralta S,1-4 1 0 0 0 0 2 HBPby Keuchel (Guyer, De.Jennings), by Bedard (Springer). WPOviedo. UmpiresHome, Brian Knight; First, Seth Buck minster; Second, Fieldin Culbreth; Third, Manny Gonzalez. T:51. A,841 (31,042). Tigers 10, Indians 4 Detroit Cleveland ab r h bi ab r h bi Kinsler 2b 5 2 3 1 Bourn cf 3 2 1 0 Suarez ph-ss 1 0 0 0 ACarer ss 5 1 2 1 AJcksn cf 4 1 1 0 Brantly lf 5 0 3 3 MiCarr 1b 4 2 2 3 Kipnis 2b 5 0 0 0 D.Kelly ph-1b 1 0 0 0 CSantn 1b 4 0 1 0 VMrtnz dh 4 1 0 0 Chsnhll 3b 4 0 0 0 JMrtnz rf 4 1 1 2 Swisher dh 4 0 1 0 Cstllns 3b 4 2 2 2 DvMrp rf 4 0 0 0 Avila c 5 0 2 1 YGoms c 2 0 2 0 AnRmn ss-2b 5 1 1 1 Kottars c 2 1 1 0 RDavis lf 5 0 0 0 Totals 42 10 12 10 Totals 38 4 11 4 Detroit 101 071 000 10 Cleveland 000 010 003 4 EBourn (2), A.Cabrera (14), Chisenhall (10). LOB Detroit 9, Cleveland 9. 2BKinsler (23), J.Martinez (11), Castellanos 2 (17), Avila (12), Brantley 2 (19), Swisher (14). HRMi.Cabrera (13). SBKinsler (8). IP H R ER BB SO Detroit Scherzer W,9-3 6 6 1 1 2 8 B.Hardy 1 0 0 0 0 1 McCoy 1 1 0 0 0 1 C.Smith 1 4 3 3 0 2 Cleveland Tomlin L,4-5 4 8 8 5 2 5 Crockett 1 / 3 1 1 1 0 0 Axford 2 / 3 1 0 0 1 0 Carrasco 2 2 / 3 1 1 1 1 3 Lowe 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 1 Shaw 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Tomlin pitched to 6 batters in the 5th. WPTomlin. UmpiresHome, Gabe Morales; First, Jerry Meals; Second, Chris Conroy; Third, Jordan Baker. T:44. A,023 (42,487). Twins 6, White Sox 5 Chicago Minnesota ab r h bi ab r h bi Eaton cf 4 0 1 0 DSantn ss 3 2 1 0 GBckh 2b 4 1 1 2 Dozier 2b 2 1 1 1 JAreu 1b 4 1 1 2 Mauer 1b 4 0 2 2 A.Dunn dh 4 0 0 0 Wlngh lf 3 0 0 2 AlRmrz ss 4 0 1 0 Parmel lf 0 0 0 0 Gillaspi 3b 4 0 1 1 KMorls dh 4 0 1 0 Sierra rf 3 1 1 0 Arcia rf 4 0 0 0 Viciedo ph 1 0 0 0 KSuzuk c 4 0 3 0 De Aza lf 4 1 2 0 EEscor 3b 4 1 1 0 Flowrs c 2 1 0 0 Fuld cf 3 2 2 1 Totals 34 5 8 5 Totals 31 6 11 6 Chicago 005 000 000 5 Minnesota 120 300 00x 6 ED.Santana (1). DPChicago 1, Minnesota 2. LOB Chicago 3, Minnesota 6. 2BG.Beckham (13), K.Su zuki (15), Fuld 2 (9). SBFuld (6). CSD.Santana (1). SFWillingham. IP H R ER BB SO Chicago Joh.Danks L,6-6 5 10 6 6 4 1 Petricka 2 0 0 0 0 2 S.Downs 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 1 Putnam 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Minnesota P.Hughes W,8-3 5 8 5 5 1 4 Swarzak H,2 2 0 0 0 0 0 Fien H,13 1 0 0 0 0 0 Burton S,1-1 1 0 0 0 0 2 Joh.Danks pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. WPJoh.Danks. UmpiresHome, D.J. Reyburn; First, Mark Wegner; Second, Andy Fletcher; Third, Chris Segal. Orioles 8, Yankees 0 Baltimore New York ab r h bi ab r h bi Markks rf 4 0 2 0 Gardnr lf 3 0 1 0 Pearce dh 4 0 2 0 Jeter ss 4 0 0 0 A.Jones cf 5 1 2 0 Ellsury cf 3 0 1 0 N.Cruz lf 5 1 0 0 Teixeir 1b 3 0 0 0 C.Davis 1b 4 1 0 0 Ryan pr-2b 0 0 0 0 JHardy ss 4 2 2 3 McCnn c 4 0 0 0 Machd 3b 4 1 2 1 Beltran dh 3 0 0 0 Schoop 2b 4 1 1 2 KJhnsn 3b-1b 2 0 0 0 CJosph c 3 1 1 2 ASorin ph 1 0 0 0 Solarte 2b-3b 4 0 0 0 ISuzuki rf 3 0 2 0 Totals 37 8 12 8 Totals 30 0 4 0 Baltimore 010 000 241 8 New York 000 000 000 0 EC.Davis (2), Ke.Johnson (8), Solarte (6). DPBalti more 1, New York 1. LOBBaltimore 6, New York 8. 2BJ.Hardy (17), Machado (7), Gardner (8), Ellsbury (16). HRSchoop (6), C.Joseph (1). SFC.Joseph. IP H R ER BB SO Baltimore Tillman W,6-4 7 4 0 0 4 2 McFarland 2 0 0 0 0 1 New York Tanaka L,11-2 7 6 3 3 1 6 Warren 1 4 4 4 1 0 Huff 1 2 1 1 1 1 HBPby McFarland (Teixeira). UmpiresHome, Tom Woodring; First, Chris Guccione; Second, Eric Cooper; Third, Tom Hallion. T:03. A,493 (49,642). Mets 11, Marlins 5 New York Miami ab r h bi ab r h bi Grndrs rf 5 2 3 0 RJhnsn lf 5 1 1 1 DnMrp 2b 5 2 2 3 Lucas ss 4 0 0 0 DWrght 3b 4 1 2 1 Stanton rf 3 1 2 1 Duda 1b 4 1 3 0 Mrsnck cf 1 0 0 0 Niwnhs cf 5 2 2 1 McGeh 3b 3 0 0 0 Tejada ss 4 1 2 1 Ozuna cf-rf 4 0 2 1 Recker c 4 1 2 2 JeBakr 1b 2 0 0 0 Niese p 2 1 0 1 Morris p 0 0 0 0 Campll ph 1 0 0 0 ARams p 0 0 0 0 CTorrs p 0 0 0 0 GJones ph 0 1 0 0 CYoung ph 1 0 0 0 Dietrch 2b 4 1 1 0 Germn p 0 0 0 0 Mathis c 4 1 1 0 EYong lf 4 0 1 2 DeSclfn p 1 0 0 0 JaTrnr p 0 0 0 0 Bour 1b 2 0 1 2 Totals 39 11 17 11 Totals 33 5 8 5 New York 022 300 400 11 Miami 000 003 002 5 DPNew York 1, Miami 1. LOBNew York 8, Miami 5. 2BGranderson (12), D.Wright (18), Nieuwenhuis 2 (4), Recker (6), R.Johnson (9), Dietrich (6), Mathis (1), Bour (1). HRDan.Murphy (6). SNiese, E.Young, Ja.Turner. SFD.Wright, Recker. IP H R ER BB SO New York Niese W,4-4 6 6 3 3 2 4 C.Torres 2 0 0 0 0 3 Germen 1 2 2 2 1 1 Miami DeSclafani L,1-2 3 2 / 3 7 7 7 2 1 Ja.Turner 3 7 4 4 1 2 Morris 1 1 / 3 3 0 0 0 2 A.Ramos 1 0 0 0 0 0 UmpiresHome, Pat Hoberg; First, Ed Hickox; Sec ond, Lance Barrett; Third, Ron Kulpa. T:09. A,613 (37,442). Nationals 4, Braves 1 Atlanta Washington ab r h bi ab r h bi LaStell 2b 3 0 0 0 Span cf 4 0 2 1 BUpton cf 4 0 0 0 Rendon 3b 3 2 1 0 FFrmn 1b 4 1 2 0 Werth rf 4 1 1 0 Gattis c 3 0 0 0 LaRoch 1b 4 0 2 1 Heywrd rf 3 0 0 0 Zmrmn lf 3 0 0 1 J.Upton lf 4 0 1 1 Dsmnd ss 3 0 0 0 CJhnsn 3b 3 0 1 0 Espinos 2b 3 0 2 0 R.Pena 3b 1 0 0 0 S.Leon c 3 1 1 0 ASmns ss 4 0 0 0 Roark p 1 0 0 0 ESantn p 2 0 0 0 Stmmn p 0 0 0 0 JSchafr ph 1 0 0 0 Dobbs ph 1 0 0 0 Smmns p 0 0 0 0 Clipprd p 0 0 0 0 Avilan p 0 0 0 0 RSorin p 0 0 0 0 Hale p 0 0 0 0 Totals 32 1 4 1 Totals 29 4 9 3 Atlanta 000 001 000 1 Washington 200 010 01x 4 EE.Santana (1), LaRoche (4). DPAtlanta 1. LOB Atlanta 7, Washington 4. 2BSpan (23), Rendon (15), Espinosa (10). CSEspinosa (1). SRoark. SFZimmerman. IP H R ER BB SO Atlanta E.Santana L,5-5 6 6 3 3 1 9 S.Simmons 1 2 / 3 2 1 1 0 0 Avilan 0 1 0 0 0 0 Hale 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Washington Roark W,7-4 5 1 / 3 4 1 1 3 3 Stammen H,3 1 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Clippard H,17 1 0 0 0 0 0 R.Soriano S,17-19 1 0 0 0 0 3 Avilan pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. WPAvilan. UmpiresHome, Mark Carlson; First, Tim Welke; Sec ond, Todd Tichenor; Third, Clint Fagan. T:54. A,473 (41,408). Pirates 2, Cubs 1 Pittsburgh Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi Polanc rf 3 0 0 0 Coghln lf 2 0 0 0 JHrrsn 2b 4 0 1 1 Castillo ph-c 1 0 0 0 AMcCt cf 4 0 1 0 Sweeny cf 3 0 1 0 I.Davis 1b 3 0 2 0 Ruggin ph-lf 1 0 0 0 Mercer ss 4 0 0 0 Rizzo 1b 4 1 1 0 PAlvrz 3b 4 0 0 0 SCastro ss 4 0 1 0 Snider lf 3 1 2 1 Valuen 3b 4 0 0 0 Tabata ph-lf 1 0 0 0 Schrhlt rf 3 0 0 1 CStwrt c 3 1 0 0 JoBakr c 2 0 0 0 Cumptn p 2 0 0 0 Lake ph-cf 2 0 1 0 Watson p 0 0 0 0 Barney 2b 3 0 1 0 Melncn p 0 0 0 0 Hamml p 2 0 1 0 NRmrz p 0 0 0 0 T.Wood ph 0 0 0 0 Russell p 0 0 0 0 Strop p 0 0 0 0 Totals 31 2 6 2 Totals 31 1 6 1 Pittsburgh 002 000 000 2 Chicago 000 000 001 1 DPPittsburgh 1. LOBPittsburgh 6, Chicago 6. HR Snider (4). SBPolanco (1), J.Harrison (5). CSMer cer (1). SCumpton, T.Wood. IP H R ER BB SO Pittsburgh Cumpton W,3-2 7 2 0 0 2 4 Watson H,19 1 2 0 0 0 2 Melancon S,12-15 1 2 1 1 0 1 Chicago Hammel L,6-5 7 6 2 2 1 6 N.Ramirez 1 0 0 0 2 0 Russell 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Strop 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 PBJo.Baker. UmpiresHome, James Hoye; First, Bill Welke; Sec ond, Bob Davidson; Third, John Tumpane. T:50. A,573 (41,072). Cardinals 5, Phillies 3 Philadelphia St. Louis ab r h bi ab r h bi Revere cf 4 0 0 0 MCrpnt 3b 4 0 1 0 Rollins ss 4 0 0 0 Hollidy lf 4 0 0 0 Utley 2b 4 0 0 0 MAdms 1b 4 1 2 0 Howard 1b 3 1 2 0 Craig rf 3 1 2 0 Mayrry rf 3 1 0 0 YMolin c 4 2 2 0 DBrwn lf 3 1 0 0 Jay cf 4 1 2 1 Asche 3b 4 0 2 3 JhPerlt ss 3 0 2 2 Rupp c 3 0 0 0 M.Ellis 2b 3 0 1 2 Ruiz ph 1 0 0 0 CMrtnz p 1 0 0 0 Kndrck p 2 0 0 0 Grenwd p 0 0 0 0 CHrndz ph 1 0 1 0 Roinsn ph 1 0 0 0 Hollnds p 0 0 0 0 SFrmn p 0 0 0 0 DeFrts p 0 0 0 0 Neshek p 0 0 0 0 Giles p 0 0 0 0 Descals ph 1 0 0 0 Byrd ph 1 0 0 0 Rosnthl p 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 3 5 3 Totals 32 5 12 5 Philadelphia 030 000 000 3 St. Louis 000 401 00x 5 EJh.Peralta (8). LOBPhiladelphia 6, St. Louis 7. 2BAsche (9), Ma.Adams (17). CSM.Carpenter (1), Jh.Peralta (1). SM.Ellis, C.Martinez. IP H R ER BB SO Philadelphia K.Kendrick L,3-7 6 8 5 5 1 2 Hollands 2 / 3 2 0 0 0 0 De Fratus 1 / 3 2 0 0 0 1 Giles 1 0 0 0 1 2 St. Louis C.Martinez W,1-3 5 3 3 3 1 5 Greenwood H,1 1 0 0 0 1 1 S.Freeman H,4 1 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 3 Neshek H,9 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Rosenthal S,22-25 1 1 0 0 0 1 HBPby C.Martinez (Mayberry). UmpiresHome, Angel Campos; First, Angel Hernan dez; Second, Adrian Johnson; Third, Larry Vanover. T:54. A,484 (45,399). Reds 4, Blue Jays 3 Toronto Cincinnati ab r h bi ab r h bi Kawsk ss-2b 5 1 0 0 Schmkr cf-lf 2 0 0 0 MeCarr lf 4 1 2 0 Frazier 3b 3 2 1 2 Bautist rf 1 0 1 0 Votto 1b 3 0 1 0 Reyes pr-ss 1 0 0 0 Phillips 2b 2 0 0 0 Encrnc 1b 4 1 2 1 RSantg ph-2b 2 0 0 0 ClRsms cf 4 0 2 2 Bruce rf 4 1 2 1 Lawrie 2b 0 0 0 0 Ludwck lf 4 0 2 0 StTllsn 2b-rf 3 0 0 0 AChpm p 0 0 0 0 JFrncs 3b 4 0 0 0 B.Pena c 4 0 1 0 Thole c 3 0 0 0 Cozart ss 4 0 1 0 Kratz ph 1 0 0 0 Cueto p 3 1 1 0 Dickey p 3 0 0 0 BHmltn cf 0 0 0 0 Santos p 0 0 0 0 DNavrr ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 34 3 7 3 Totals 31 4 9 3 Toronto 002 000 010 3 Cincinnati 100 120 00x 4 EEncarnacion (8), Votto (4), Cueto (1). DPToronto 1, Cincinnati 1. LOBToronto 7, Cincinnati 7. 2B Bruce (11), B.Pena (10). HREncarnacion (24), Fra zier (17). SBautista, Schumaker. IP H R ER BB SO Toronto Dickey L,6-6 7 2 / 3 9 4 3 2 7 Santos 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Cincinnati Cueto W,7-5 8 7 3 1 1 8 A.Chapman S,13-14 1 0 0 0 0 3 HBPby Dickey (Schumaker), by Cueto (Lawrie). UmpiresHome, Marty Foster; First, Rob Drake; Sec ond, Alan Porter; Third, Joe West. T:42. A,089 (42,319).

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 23, 2014 Yo u Make the CA LL !June 48This We eks Leesburg Lightning ScheduleAlw ay s FREE Admission! Rainout Information 352-234-4489 Yo u Make the CA LL !June 48This We eks Leesburg Lightning ScheduleAlw ay s FREE Admission! Game Times: 7pm We ekda ys Sun 5pmTHE PLA Y: Bases loaded, two outs. F7 makes a running ca tch on a dead sprint to wards the left field line. He continutes to run another 12 steps before running into the fence, which is only a few feet beyond the foul line. As soon as the fielder hits the fence, the ball falls to the gound. Wha t s the ruling?Rainout Information 352-234-4489 Mon. 6/23 .............. Off Day Tu es. 6/24 .............. Sanfor d (home) We d. 6/25 .............. Sanfor d (aw ay) Thurs. 6/26 .............. Sanfor d (aw ay) Fri. 6/27 .............. Winter Gar den (aw ay) Sat. 6/28 .............. Winter Gar den (aw ay) Sun. 6/29 .............. Winter Gar den (aw ay)ANSWER on Frida y This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule This We eks Leesburg Lightning Schedule GOLF The Associated Press CROMWELL, Conn. Kevin Streelman birdied the last seven holes to win the Trav elers Championship by a stroke at TPC River Highlands. Streelman shot his second straight 6-under 64 to nish at 15-under 265. He broke the tour record for consecutive closing birdies by a win ner of six set by Mike Souchak in the 1956 St. Paul Open. The 35-year-old Streelman also won the Tampa Bay Champi onship last season. He missed the cuts in his previous four starts on tour. Sergio Garcia and K.J. Choi tied for second. They each shot 67. Aaron Baddeley was fourth at 13 under after a 69. ENCOMPASS CHAMPIONSHIP GLENVIEW, Ill. Tom Lehman made a 12-foot birdie putt on the nal hole to win the Champions Tours En compass Champion ship. The 55-year-old Leh man closed with a 2-un der 70 at North Shore and had a 15-under 201 total for his eighth se nior title and rst since 2012. He rebounded from bogeys on Nos. 13 and 14 his only dropped strokes of the week with birdies on Nos. 15 and 16, parred the par-3 17th and won on the par-4 18th. Michael Allen and Kirk Triplett tied for sec ond, a stroke back. Al len shot 67, and Triplett had a 68. IRISH OPEN CORK, Ireland Fin lands Mikko Ilonen completed a wire-towire victory in the Irish Open, shooting a 1-un der 70 to beat Italys Edoardo Molinari by a stroke. Ilonen nished at 13-under 271 at Fota Is land. He has four victo ries in 300 career Euro pean Tour starts. Molinari closed with a 67. Englands Matthew Fitzpatrick, the U.S. Amateur champion, had a 68 to tie for 29th at 5 under in his pro debut. AIR CAPITAL CLASSIC WICHITA, Kan. Monday qualier Se bastian Cappelen won the Air Capital Classic for his rst Web.com Tour title, nishing with a 4-under 66 for a onestroke victory over Matt Weibring. Cappelen, from Den mark, had an 18-un der 262 total after open ing with rounds of 66, 65 and 65 at Crest view Country Club. The 24-year-old former Uni versity of Arkansas play er earned $108,000. FOUR WINDS INVITATIONAL SOUTH BEND, Ind. Canadas Nicole Van dermade won the Four Winds Invitational for her rst Symetra Tour ti tle, closing with a 4-un der 68 for a one-stroke victory. Vandermade, from Brantford, Ontario, had a 12-under 204 total at Blackthorn Golf Club. MLB TENNIS AUTO RACING AP FILE PHOTO Marion Bartoli holds the trophy for her win at the 2013 All England Lawn Tennis Championships in Wimbledon. HOWARD FENDRICH AP Tennis Writer LONDON There they were, spread across the practice courts on the after noon before Wimble don begins: past Grand Slam champions or former No. 1s Novak Djokovic, Stan Waw rinka, Petra Kvitova, Caroline Wozniacki and some who aspire to such heights Eug enie Bouchard, Milos Raonic, Ernests Gulbis. Djokovic, the 2011 winner at the All En gland Club and last years runner-up to Andy Murray, teasing ly challenged Wozni acki to hit a serve into a white plastic bag he was holding (she missed, then joked about too much pres sure.) Kvitova tested her heavily wrapped upper right leg. Bouch ard, a seminalist at the last two majors, worked on volleying. Notably absent was 2013 champion Marion Bartoli, the rst wom an in 17 years who de clined to try to de fend her Wimbledon title. Still, Bartoli held the traditional reigning champions pre-tour nament news confer ence Sunday, when she explained she has zero lingering doubts about retiring at age 28, less than two months after winning her only Grand Slam trophy and also showed precisely why she quit the sport. Tugging down the collar of her white top to reveal strips of blue tape providing support for her right shoulder, Bartoli said: Literal ly, I cant even lift my arm every morning. It was the same last year and didnt improve. ... So denitely no regrets at all. She has moved on to other pursuits TV commentary, launch ing a shoe line and de signing jewelry. ERIC WILLEMSEN Associated Press SPIELBERG, Austria Nico Rosberg held off a challenge from team mate Lewis Hamilton to win the Austrian GP on Sunday for the sixth 1-2 nish by Mercedes this season. It was Rosbergs third win of the year and sixth overall as he extend ed his lead in the driv ers championship over Hamilton to 29 points. Valtteri Bottas came third for his rst career Formula One podium while Williams team mate Felipe Massa, who started from pole Posi tion, took fourth. Four-time Formu la One champion Se bastian Vettel had an engine problem in the second lap and was doubled by the eld be fore quitting the race in the 36th on Red Bulls home circuit. Hamilton, who was ninth after qualifying, used a blistering start and earned four places from the start and won another place to work his way up to fourth in the opening lap. Rosberg immediate ly overtook Bottas but lost that position again shortly after the rst turn. Massa dropped from pole to fourth after the top-four had their rst pit stops. Rosberg holds off Hamilton in Austrian GP Bartoli has no regrets for post-Wimbledon retirement decision STEVEN WINE AP Sports Writer MIAMI Daniel Murphy hit a three-run homer and the New York Mets matched a season high with 17 hits Sunday to beat the slumping Miami Mar lins 11-5. Jonathon Niese (4-4), who has been plagued by poor run support this year, won for the rst time since May 22. He allowed less than four earned runs for the 19th consecutive start, giving up three in six innings. Mets starters have an ERA of 1.74 over the past six games. Rookie Anthony De Sclafani (1-2), making his fourth major league start, gave up seven runs in 3 2/3 innings and departed with an ERA of 7.59. PIRATES 2, CUBS 1 CHICAGO Bran don Cumpton pitched seven scoreless in nings, Travis Snider hit a solo homer and the Pittsburgh Pirates beat the Chicago Cubs 2-1 on Sunday. Cumpton (3-2) won his third straight deci sion as the Pirates won the last two games of the three-game series. Cumpton allowed just two hits and two walks while striking out four. The rookie righthander retired 13 of the rst 14 batters he faced. He allowed a walk to Nate Schier holtz in the fth inning, but rebounded by get ting John Baker to hit into an inning-ending double play. Ryan Sweeney reached on a single against Cumpton in the rst inning and the other hit was by Cubs starting pitcher Jason Hammel in the sixth. REDS 4, BLUE JAYS 3 CINCINNATI Johnny Cueto pitched eight effective in nings and the Cincin nati Reds beat Toronto 4-3 Sunday after Blue Jays stars Brett Lawrie and Jose Bautista exit ed early because of in juries. Lawrie sustained a broken right index n ger when he was hit by a pitch in the second. The team didnt im mediately announce how long the inelder would be out. Bautista left because of tightness in his left leg. The All-Star outelder had a single and a sacri ce bunt before leaving. Cueto (7-5) gave up three runs one earned and leads the NL with a 1.86 ERA. He gave up seven hits and struck out eight while winning his third straight start. ORIOLES 8, YANKEES 0 NEW YORK Chris Tillman tossed sev en innings of four-hit ball and the Baltimore Orioles beat the New York Yankees 8-0 Sun day, handing Masahiro Tanaka his second ma jor league loss. Jonathan Schoop homered off Tanaka for the second time and fellow rookie Caleb Jo seph capped the scor ing with his rst career homer. J.J. Hardy hit a three-run double for the Orioles, who spoiled Old-Timers Day at Yan kee Stadium and took two of three from their AL East rivals. After squandering a ninth-inning lead in Friday nights loss, Bal timore outhomered the Yankees 6-1 and outscored them 14-1 in the nal two games of the series. Mets tie season high with 17 hits, beat Marlins J. PAT CARTER / AP New York Mets Daniel Murphy smiles as he hits a threerun home run during the fourth inning against the Miami Marlins on Sunday in Miami. Streelman birdies last seven holes to win Travelers by a stroke FRED BECKHAM / AP Kevin Streelman holds the trophy after winning the Travelers Championship golf tournament on Sunday in Cromwell, Conn.

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Nort h of KMart on Hwy 44 1)(352 ) 34 7-0403 /f x (3 52) 34 7-2034CDRX441@ gmail.com rD002296 RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR Associated Press WASHINGTON Your money or your life? Sovaldi, a new pill for hepa titis C, cures the liver-wasting disease in 9 of 10 patients, but treatment can cost more than $90,000. Leading medical societ ies recommend the drug as a rst-line treatment, and pa tients are clamoring for it. But insurance companies and state Medicaid programs are gagging on the price. In Oregon, ofcials propose to limit how many low-income patients can get Sovaldi. Yet if Sovaldi didnt exist, insurers would still be paying in the mid-to-high ve g ures to treat the most com mon kind of hepatitis C, a new pricing survey indi cates. Some of the older al ternatives involve more side effects, and are less likely to provide cures. So whats a fair price? The cost of this break through drug is highlighting cracks in the U.S. health care system at a time of height ened budget concerns. The Obama administration has a huge political stake in con trolling treatment costs, but its critics may cry rationing. People are going to want to try to dodge this hot pota to, says economist Douglas Holtz-Eakin. For insurers, theres a frus trating twist: For each mid dle-aged person they pay to cure with Sovaldi, any nan cial benets from preventing liver failure are likely to ac crue to Medicare, not to them. More than 3 million Amer icans carry the hepatitis C vi rus, and many dont realize it. Its a public health con cern since the disease can be transmitted by contact with infected blood, and some times through sexual activi ty. Health ofcials advise all baby boomers to get tested. The illness is complex, with distinct virus types requiring different treatments. While it progresses gradually, it can ultimately destroy the liv er, and transplants average $577,000. An estimated 15,000 peo ple died from hepatitis C in the U.S. in 2007, when it sur passed AIDS as a cause of death. If its going to get me the medicine, Ill put my hand out there with a tin cup, said Stuart Rose, a hepatitis C pa tient in New York City. His fractures and bleed ing in the brain, and are considered highly effec tive at that. Theyre test ed for how they with stand direct blows, so-called linear forces that can make the brain bump back and forth. The proposed new standard would add an additional test of how helmets perform when an impact also makes a players head sud denly spin, causing the brain to stretch and twist inside the skull as it changes direction. Scientists call that rota tional acceleration, and brain specialists say limiting both kinds of forces is important. Were plowing new ground here, Mike Ol iver, executive direc tor of the National Op erating Committee on Standards for Athlet ic Equipment, told The Associated Press. The hope is that the standard might eventu ally spur safer helmet designs. I dont believe hel mets will ever be the sole solution for concussion, said Dr. Robert Cantu, a Boston University neu rologist, a leading sports concussion expert and vice president of the ath letic equipment stan dards committee. But, it puts us on the road to developing helmets that will lessen the chance for concussion. Once the standard goes into effect, ex pected in about a year, it would apply only to new helmets. We dont foresee any need to replace all the helmets that exist with new and different hel mets, Oliver said. This is a rst step. Concern about con cussions is growing amid headlines about former profession al players who suffered long-term impairment after repeated blows to the head. Its not just football; concus sions occur in a range of sports, from hockey and lacrosse to soccer and wrestling. Children and teens, with their still de veloping brains, appear at special risk. The Institute of Med icine, an independent organization that ad vises the government, warned last fall that too many young athletes still face a play-at-allcosts culture that dis courages reporting the injury and staying on the sidelines until its healed. Although millions of U.S. children and teens play school or com munity sports, its not clear how many suf fer concussions, in part because many go un diagnosed. The Insti tute of Medicine said 250,000 people 19 and younger were treated in emergency rooms for concussions and other sportsor recre ation-related brain in juries in 2009. Parents and coaches need to be prepared and educated about what the nature of this inju ry is, advised neuropsy chologist Gerard Gioia of Childrens National Medical Center in Wash ington and medical ad viser to USA Football. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Preventions heads-up campaign teaches signs of concussion which may not appear right away and what steps to take. Symptoms in clude confusion, weak ness, appearing dazed or stunned, lack of co ordination, mood or behavior changes and even a brief loss of con sciousness. Recent guidelines say anyone suspected of having a concussion should be taken out of play imme diately and not allowed back until cleared by a trained professional. Gioia helped turn that advice into the concus sion recognition and re sponse smartphone app to offer guidance on the eld. As for safety gear, last falls Institute of Medi cine report found little scientic evidence that current sports helmet designs reduce the risk of concussion. Indeed, football hel mets have gotten bigger and heavier in recent years but our concus sion problem has not gotten better, said Dave Halstead, a sports biomechanics specialist at the University of Ten nessee and the South ern Impact Research Center testing laborato ry who advises the ath letic equipment stan dards committee. To test rotational ac celeration, labs will put helmets onto a crash test dummy-like head with a moveable neck. A machine then posi tions a ram to hit the head from different di rections, at different speeds and as if differ ent-sized players were behind the impact. Its about time, was the reaction from con cussion researcher Ste ven P. Broglio of the University of Michigan and National Athletic Trainers Association. HELMETS FROM PAGE C1 AP FILE PHOTO This May 29 photo shows New Orleans Saints strong safety Kenny Vaccaro looking on during an NFL football minicamp in Metairie, La. Vaccaros rookie campaign was interrupted by concussions and cut short by an ankle injury. $1,000-a-pill Sovaldi jolts US health care system GILEAD SCIENCES / AP Sovaldi, a new pill for hepatitis C, cures the liver-wasting disease in 9 of 10 patients, but treatment can cost more than $90,000. SEE HEPATITIS | C3

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Monday, June 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 D002348 GOLF CA RT ACCESSNow one doctor is helping local residents with back pain live more active, pain-free lives.Pa in le ss co nv enie nt, fastactingSole veproce dur e sho wn to be promising in a pilot stud y for 95 % of pat ien ts no w av ailable ex clusiv ely at Ethe re dge Chiro pra ctic .*Fruitland Park(352) 365-1191Th e Vi ll ag es(352) 750-1200*Pa tie nts in a pi lot stu dy sho wed a 20-p oint re duc tio n in VA S sc or e in as few as fo ur sess ions Go re nb er g M, Sc hif f E, Sc hw artz K, Ei zen ber g E: A no vel ima ge-guid ed, auto mat ic hi gh-in tensi ty ne uros timul ati on dev ice for th e tr eatm ent of nons pecif ic lo w bac k pa in. Pai n Re s Tr eat; 20 11;2 011; 1523 07. 14 Ner voma trix Lt d. All rig hts re ser ved. So leve is a re gist er ed tr ad emar k rf nnf tb D0020 88 BOB DOHR Associated Press WAUSAU, Wis. She doesnt receive a paycheck, Social Secu rity or vacation time, but Phoebe is a valued member of the ther apy team at Compass Counseling Wausau. Phoebes story is compelling, but she has to rely on others to tell it. Phoebe is a certied therapy dog at the out patient mental health and alcohol and other drug abuse clinic. Her calm disposition helps her owner, counselor Andy Cameron, work with his clients. But life wasnt always chew toys and treats for Phoebe. In July 2012, the shih tzu was found aban doned in a crate in a garage in Minnesota, left there by an evict ed tenant. A bag of food had been left in her cage, but time had passed perhaps as much as a month without anyone at tending to the dog. Cameron said Phoe be had to be cut out of the enclosure because her hair was matted to the cage with feces; her eyes were scratched from the matted hair, she was aficted with an intestinal parasite, and her weight was down to 8 pounds. He learned about Phoebe and her plight through Compass weekend reception ist, Rhonda Singstock, who is president of Shih Tzu Rescue of Central Wisconsin. Singstock had received word of Phoebes con dition through a Craig slist ad. She was very sick. We almost lost her, Singstock told Daily Herald Media Singstock said Phoe be was used as a breed ing dog and accord ing to the veterinarian who spayed her, she likely was bred every time she was in heat. Her only job for most of her life was to pump out puppies for un scrupulous breeders and buyers. Basically, she was typical of a puppy mill dog even though she wasnt in a puppy mill, Singstock said. Today, Phoebe is up to a healthy 15 pounds and recently received ofcial certication as a therapy dog. Camer on said veterinarians think shes around 6 years old. Adopting a dog especially a small dog with myriad health problems wasnt part of Camerons plan in 2012. For one thing, he had always had big ger dogs like Labs and retrievers growing up. But he changed his mind when Singstock showed him a picture of Phoebe. I wasnt even look ing to get a dog, but I was like, Oh, shes cute, lets meet her, Cam eron said. And once you meet Phoebe, you got to have her. Cameron said the therapy dog idea blos somed once he real ized Phoebe had a su per calm demeanor. So I started bring ing her in to work here and she just did a great job, so I eventually got her certied as a ther apy dog in April of this year, Cameron said. Now shes ofcial. Rescue dog now serving others as a therapy dog TXER ZHON KHA / AP Counselor Andrew Cameron poses with his therapy dog, Phoebe, at his ofce in Wausau, Wis. Phoebe is a certied therapy dog at the outpatient mental health and alcohol and drug abuse clinic. Cameron said Phoebe helps with all types of clients, including those who are very anxious or who have head trauma. They kind of focus on Phoebe while theyre talking and it kind of gets them to open up a little bit. She also works well with teenage boys, said Cameron. Troubled teenage boys want to act all tough and then they start petting a little dog, and they kind of chill out a little bit on the tough-guy act, and we can start getting some stuff done, he said. Cameron said Phoe be has helped the rela tionship he has with his clients, but given her background, just giv ing her a good home has been really reward ing. Singstock said shes rescued more than 160 dogs since she started fostering in 2007, but most dont have the ca pacity to do what Phoe be does. After all she has gone through, she is just a remarkable little girl, Singstock said. I wasnt even looking to get a dog, but I was like, Oh, shes cute, lets meet her. And once you meet Phoebe, you got to have her. ... I started bringing her in to work here and she just did a great job, so I eventually got her certified as a therapy dog in April of this year. Now shes official. Andy Cameron Counselor at Compass Counseling Wausau company, for example, sells that come in a vors like Cherry Crush, Peach Schnapps and Pina Colada. Healy countered that the aver age age for consumers of his e-cigarettes is 51. Rockefeller was not swayed, bluntly ad monishing both men and telling them: I am ashamed of you. I dont know how you sleep at night. About 2 percent of U.S. teenagers said theyd used an e-cig arette in the previous month, according to a survey done in 2012 and released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And about 7 percent said theyd tried an e-cigarette at least once in 2012, which translates to nearly 1.8 million. In April, the FDA pro posed regulating e-cig arettes, banning sales to anyone under 18, adding warning labels and requiring agency approval for new prod ucts. But the FDA didnt immediately place mar keting restrictions on e-cigarette makers or a ban on fruit or can dy avors, which are barred for use in regu lar The agency has left the door open to fur ther regulations, but says it wants more evi dence before it rushes into more restrictions. CIGARETTE FROM PAGE C1 GILEAD SCIENCES / AP Sovaldi, a new pill for hepatitis C, cures the liver-wasting disease in 9 of 10 patients, but treatment can cost more than $90,000. insurance would pay only $4,000 a year for medications, but Rose was able to get assis tance from charitable foundations. He recent ly started taking Sovaldi. Until the drugs ap proval late last year, standard treatment for the most common type of the disease required daily pills and extend ed use of interferon, an injection that can pro duce debilitating ulike symptoms. Brain fog, said Rose. Taken once a day for 12 weeks, Sovaldi great ly reduces the length of interferon treatment, making things more tolerable for patients. Now, many more peo ple might want to try the cure. A similar drug, Olysio, also approved last year, is priced a bit lower. The nations largest care provider for chron ic hepatitis C, the feder al Veterans Administra tion, sees promise. With 175,000 patients, the VA has started more than 1,850 of them on Sovaldi. After 20 years in in fectious diseases, I nev er thought we would be in a position to cure this disease, said Dr. David Ross, head of the VAs program. By law, the VA gets drug discounts of over 40 percent. Will the agency break even by avoiding the diseases worst complications? Not necessarily, said Ross. If it leads to cost benets in the long run, thats gravy. Private insurers will probably introduce So valdi gradually. Not ev erybody is going to get this all at once, said former Medicare ad ministrator Mark Mc Clellan. Drug maker Gilead Sciences, Inc., reported Sovaldi sales of $2.3 bil lion worldwide in just the rst three months of this year. Gilead will not disclose its pricing methods, but vice pres ident Gregg Alton said the drugs high cure rate makes it a real huge value. In many countries, the government sets drug prices. In the US, insurers negotiate with drug companies. Medi care is forbidden from bargaining, a situation that critics say saddles U.S. patients with high costs while subsidizing the rest of the world. HEPATITIS FROM PAGE C2

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 23, 2014 Frank Jolley: Sports editor Alabama Crimson Tide fan.Ye ars of playing basketball, baseball and other sports has taken a toll on Frank s knees but not on his spirit. The passion for sports still bur ns brightly in this veteran sports jour nalist. Frank understands that sports is about mor e than entertainment. It s about shaping young people, building character teaching life lessons. It s why Frank loves covering sports as much now as he did playing them as a youngster People like Frank deliver mor e than the news to Lake and Sumter counties. They deliver commitment to our young people. A Halif ax Media Group Compan y Nobody deliverslike we do. rf n t b nnnYo ur Po diatr is t tr eats... CENTRALFLORI DAFOO TCARE, P. A.Dr Nic k Przysta wski, DPM www .Floridafoot.comD002301 STEPHEN OHLEMACHER Associated Press WASHINGTON Budget cuts have forced the Social Security Ad ministration to close dozens of eld ofces even as millions of baby boomers approach re tirement, swamping the agency with applica tions for benets, a se nior agency ofcial told Congress Wednesday. Better Internet ac cess and more online services are easing the transition, said Nancy Berryhill, the agencys deputy commissioner for operations. We are fully com mitted now and in the future to sustain ing a eld ofce struc ture that provides faceto-face service for those customers who need or prefer such service, Berryhill told the Sen ate Special Commit tee on Aging. We also understand, however, that customer expecta tions are evolving due to changes in technol ogy, demographics and other factors. Senators appeared unconvinced. The fact of the mat ter is, millions of seniors and disabled Americans are not accustomed to doing business online, said Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, the top Re publican on the Aging Committee. Even as computer and broad band technologies be come more widespread, the idea that the Social Security Administra tion can serve bene ciaries primarily online ignores the very real needs of the senior and disabled populations. The committee held a hearing Wednesday af ter issuing a bipartisan report showing that So cial Security has closed 64 eld ofces since 2010, the largest num ber of closures in a veyear period in the agen cys history. In addition, the agen cy has closed 533 tem porary mobile ofces that often serve remote areas. Hours have been reduced in the 1,245 eld ofces that are still open, the report said. As a result, seniors seeking information and help from the agen cy are facing increasing ly long waits, in person and on the phone, the report said. They dont do any kind of analysis on what would happen to a community when their eld ofce closes, including guring out how the most vulnera ble populations would make their way to the next-closest ofce, said Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., chairman of the Aging Committee. The closings come as applications for re tirement and disability benets are soaring, a trend that will continue as aging baby boomers approach retirement. More than 47 mil lion people receive So cial Security retirement benets, nearly a 20 percent increase from a decade ago. About 11 million people receive Social Security disabili ty benets, a 38 percent increase from a decade ago. The Social Securi ty Administration has been encouraging peo ple to access services online. The agency has upgraded its website in recent years, including secure connections to access condential in formation. People can apply for benets without ever visiting Social Security ofces. In 2013, nearly half of all retirement applica tions were led online, the report said. But the committee re port notes that many older Americans lack access to the Internet or might not be comfort able using it to apply for benets. Last year, more than 43 million people visit ed Social Security eld ofces. About 43 per cent of those seeking an appointment had to wait more than three weeks, up from just 10 percent the year before, the report said. About 10 percent of visitors to Social Secu rity ofces are applying for benets, Berryhill said. The largest group, about 30 percent, are seeking new or replace ment Social Security cards. Berryhill said Social Security ofcials do an nual reviews to deter mine whether ofces should be expanded, re duced or closed. Once we make the decision to consolidate an ofce, we discuss the changes with stakehold ers, Berryhill said. We hold town hall meetings or other forums that al low the public to voice their concerns. We con tact key community leaders. Like many federal agencies, Social Securi ty has faced budget cuts in recent years. After two years of shrinking budgets, the agency got a 6 percent increase this year, to $11.8 billion. Social Security has cut its workforce by 11,000 employees over the past three years, Berryhill said. She said the agency saves an average of $4 million over the course of a decade for every eld ofce it closes. I can hire a lot of em ployees with $4 mil lion, Berryhill said. Social Security closes offices as baby boomers age DAVID J. PHILLIP / AP A parking sign for the former Social Security Administration ofce is seen in Houston, on June 18.

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Monday, June 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 MARILYNN MARCHIONE AP Chief Medical Writer A bold new way to test cancer drugs start ed Monday in hundreds of hospitals around the U.S. In a medical version of speed dating, doctors will sort through multi ple experimental drugs and match patients to the one most likely to succeed based on each persons unique tumor gene prole. Its a rst-of-a-kind experiment that brings together ve drug com panies, the government, private foundations and advocacy groups. The idea came from the fed eral Food and Drug Ad ministration, which has agreed to consider ap proving new medicines based on results from the study. Its goal is to speed new treatments to mar ket and give seriously ill patients more chances to nd something that will help. Instead of be ing tested for individ ual genes and trying to qualify for separate clin ical trials testing sin gle drugs, patients can enroll in this umbrella study, get full gene test ing and have access to many options at once. The study, called Lung-MAP, is for ad vanced cases of a com mon, hard-to-treat form of lung cancer squamous cell. Plans for similar studies for breast and colon cancer are in the works. For patients, it gives them their best chance for treatment of a dead ly disease, because ev eryone gets some type of therapy, said El len Sigal, chairwoman and founder of Friends of Cancer Research, a Washington-based re search and advocacy group that helped plan and launch the study. Theres something for everyone, and well get answers faster on whether experimental drugs work, she said. Cancer medicines in creasingly target specif ic gene mutations that are carried by smaller groups of patients. But researchers sometimes have to screen hun dreds of patients to nd a few with the right mu tation, making drug de velopment inefcient, expensive and slow. One of the leaders of the Lung-MAP study Dr. Roy Herbst, chief of medical oncology at the Yale Cancer Center said he once screened 100 patients to nd ve that might be eligi ble for a study, and ulti mately was able to en roll two. Its just going to be impossible, in rare sub groups, for companies to nd enough people to try out a new med icine, said Dr. Richard Pazdur, cancer drugs chief at the FDA. He and others at the FDA sug gested the Lung-MAP trial design to speed new treatments to mar ket and minimize the number of patients ex posed to ineffective therapies, he said. Everyone in the study will be screened for mu tations in more than 200 cancer-related genes, rather than a single mu tation as in convention al studies. Then they will be as signed to one of ve groups based on what these tumor biomarkers show. Each group will test a particular experi mental medicine. Drugs can be added or sub tracted from the study as it goes on, based on how each performs. The initial round of testing involves Am gen, Genentech, Pzer, AstraZeneca PLC, and AstraZenecas global biologics partner, Med Immune. Up to 1,000 patients a year can be enrolled in the study. It will cost about $150 million. The National Cancer Institute is pay ing $25 million, and the rest will come from foundations, charities and others in the pub lic-private partnership. About 500 hospi tals that are part of a large cancer treatment consortium around the country will take part, and some private groups want to join as well, Herbst said. Nothing like this has ever been done before, where such compre hensive testing will be done to match patients to experimental drugs, he said. Breyan Harris, a 33-year-old nurse from Sacramento, hopes to enroll. Shes a lifelong non-smoker who was diagnosed with lung cancer on June 3. Since then Ive pret ty much been on the phone, seeing doctors, trying to gure out how do I get rid of this, she said. Harris expects to have one lung with a large tumor removed, but if it comes back in my other lung Im in real trouble, so nding a drug to attack any re maining, hidden cancer is crucial, she said. New study aims to rapidly test lung cancer drugs RICH PEDRONCELLI / AP Breyan Harris, a lifelong non-smoker who was recently diagnosed with lung cancer, posses at her home in Fair Oaks, Calif., on June 16. Cancer medicines increasingly target specific gene mutations that are carried by smaller groups of patients. But researchers sometimes have to screen hundreds of patients to find a few with the right mutation, making drug development inefficient, expensive and slow.

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Monday, June 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 rf n ft bWo rking gallery of local artistsANTIQ UEDEA LERSWANTE D (352) 460-4806 r f ntb fa cebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburg D002326 D002307 www.dailycommercial.com Diversions 352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puz zle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, June 23 the 174th day of 2014. There are 191 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in His tory: On June 23, 1314, during the First War of Scottish In dependence, the two-day Battle of Bannockburn, re sulting in victory for the forc es of Robert the Bruce over the army of King Edward II, began near Stirling. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, June 23, 2014 : This year you have the op portunity to blaze a new trail. You will show more apprecia tion and caring, as you will ex perience a high level of sen sitivity toward others. Greater nancial security becomes possible with a promotion and/or pay raise. Use your additional income carefully. If you are single, you will meet someone in your daily trav els who could become very important to you. This rela tionship could have a unique quality. If you are attached, the two of you spend a lot of time shooting the breeze to gether. You are likely to make a major purchase that will enhance the quality of your lives. TAURUS always seems stable. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You can push only so much and expect positive results. Ultimately, you could experi ence some negativity when trying to reach a nancial agreement. You might have to indulge in some wining and dining in order to persuade the involved parties to agree. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Your optimism might exhaust a partner and force you to re think your direction. This per son could become very dif cult. Know that a smile can be more inuential than you realize. Try to be a little more subtle and a little less like a cheerleader. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Someones insecurities might be getting the best of you. You could feel down and somewhat tired by recent has sles. Venus enters your sign, which adds to your buoyan cy and charisma. Follow your intuition with a difcult situ ation. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Youll be more grounded than usual, especially as you ex press your opinions in a meet ing. Recognize that everyone hits a brick wall occasional ly, but that doesnt mean you shouldnt test a different ap proach or a new idea. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Take a stand, and know that you might need to accept far more responsibility. How you deal with someone could rad ically change as you gain a sense of control. Stay ground ed. Make a point to clearly communicate your thoughts to others. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You have the ability to see the big picture, whereas those around you might not. You could have difculty express ing why your priorities are so different, as a result. Honor your vision. When others see the results, they might strive to detach more often. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Deal directly with a friend who often gives you feedback. What this person suggests might seem lackluster or su percial. Be polite, but seek out other answers if need be. Pace yourself, especial ly if you are trying to get a lot done. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Others wont hesitate to challenge you. You might wonder about their strong approach, but rst recog nize how you come off. Lis ten to what is being shared by a trusted loved one. Take an overview as you weigh the pros and cons. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Youll want to be more direct with someone, but at the moment you might not be as sure of yourself as you would like. Remain lev el-headed with someone you need to respond to. Youll want this person to under stand where you are coming from. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Dont even consider do ing anything except detaching from a hot issue. Your judg ment might be off, and you could make a huge mistake. Stop and have a friendly lit tle chat with someone you normally just nod or say hel lo to. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Stay close to home. If you work from home, you might consider establishing a stron ger presence there. The re sults of giving yourself greater freedom will be spectacular, and it will give whatever you do an extra touch of excel lence. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You might want to es tablish a stronger bond with someone in your life. It could be with a co-worker, neighbor or friend whom youve been too quick to say hi and bye to. A family member suddenly might change his or her tune. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORY DEAR ABBY: I fell in love with a boy when I was 12, deeply in love. We met at our coun ty fair. We grew up to gether and have re mained friends for 30 years. He married and had children, as did I. I am now divorced, but hes still married. Recently our friend ship has grown into something more. He wants our relationship to continue, but hes afraid to leave his wife because of the kids. They have been to gether for 20 years. What do I do? Hes the love of my life. Any time I have with him is better than none. Its not that I dont know I deserve better, but he is unhappy, and I am miserable without him. What do I do? PRIS ONER OF PASSION IN VIR GINIA DEAR PRISONER: What you do depends upon your strength of char acter and what you want out of life. If you want to spend the foreseeable future as this mans side dish, then continue as you have been, a prison er of passion with not much common sense. If you would like to have a stable life and nd a man who will make you No. 1 in his life, then you will have to call a halt to this af fair and go through a period of withdrawal the same as people have to do with any ad diction. It may not be pleasant, but I recom mend it. DEAR ABBY: Im turn ing 75 soon, and enjoy ing retirement, good health and a comfort able lifestyle, which is why I have arranged a Celebration of My Life So Far. Im excit ed about it and eagerly anticipating more than 60 guests for cocktails and a sit-down dinner at a nearby hotel. Its not uncommon these days for a cel ebration of life to be held after someone dies. However, I pre fer to have mine BE FORE I leave this Earth so I can celebrate along with my loved ones. I want to be there, espe cially since Im the one whos paying for it! What do you think of my idea? Would you enjoy partaking in such a special event? THINKING AHEAD IN NEW JERSEY DEAR THINKING AHEAD: I think its a terric idea. And yes, I would enjoy celebrating such a spe cial event, if I were in vited. When is this par ty? Ill be standing by my mailbox! DEAR ABBY: Why is it socially acceptable to refer to a grown wom an as a girl, and yet it would never be ap propriate to call a man a boy? BARBARA IN HUNTSVILLE, ALA. DEAR BARBARA: Im not sure whether all women would accept being called a girl. In fact, some would nd it condescending and offensive. If you call a man a boy, he could regard it as an assault on his masculinity. And yet, I have heard those terms used in the third person, as in, Whats my hus band doing on Satur day? Hell be out play ing golf with the boys, while Ill be going to lunch with the girls. And I have never heard that it was offensive to either sex. Dear Abby is written by Abi gail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was found ed by her mother, Pauline Phil lips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Love of womans life can be only a part-time passion JEANNE PHILLIPS DEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGAR BIGARS STARS

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Monday, June 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C9

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