Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Newspaper
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English
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Halifax Media Group
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Rod Dixon
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Leesburg, Floirda
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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of ser vice. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT728-1668 394-1739fla#CAC1816408 ELECTIONS: Registration for Clermont City Council seats begins today A3 PAKISTAN: Army launches operation against foreign, local militants A8 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, June 16, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 167 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS C8 DIVERSIONS C7 LEGALS C8 LIVING HEALTHY C1 NATION A5 SCOREBOARD B2 SPORTS B1 VOICES A9 WORLD A8 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A10. 92 / 73 Sunny intervals, t-storm 50 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com Z ack Lucas is a good shot and he will have a chance to prove it with a .22 rie next week at the National 4-H Shooting Sports Invitational in Nebraska. The 17-year-old homeschooled student earned the chance to compete after plac ing second in the senior level of the recent 4-H State Shoot ing Competition in Hernando County. Lucas, of Fruitland Park, be gan shooting a .22 rie as part of his clubs 4-H project three years ago. He placed sixth at last years state event and was one of the Sunshine States top ve shooters invited to nation als this year. I plan to do my best and hopefully get Florida on the rst page of the score sheet, he said. For two of the events, Lucas will be judged on shooting the bulls eye target, and the other event will feature small silhou ettes of a turkey, hawk, hog and ram, ranging 1/8-inch to ve inches tall. Lucas will be shoot ing at the silhouettes from var ious distances, including 100 yards away. It is very tough, said Zacks dad, Bart. He will have 10 sil houettes per animal and 10 shots to get them. Zacks father, along with mom, Yvonne, and older brother, Drew, 23, will join him out west for na tionals, which runs June 24-29 at Heartland Public Shooting Park FRUITLAND PARK Teenager to show off shooting skills at 4-H nationals in Nebraska PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Zack Lucas, a 17 year-old on the Southern Traditions shooting club, practices at a private range in Fruitland Park, on June 9. Lucas will be competing in the National Shooting Sports Invitational in Grand Island, Neb. later this month. Bart Lucas, left, draws targets for his son Zack Lucas, right, during practice. Marksman in the making SEE RIFLE| A2 STEVE FUSSELL Special to the Daily Commercial City commissioners have approved a 99year interlocal agree ment between the city of Fruitland Park and Village Center Commu nity Development Dis trict to provide re pro tection to residents in The Villages of Fruit land Park, which is cur rently under develop ment to build 2,050 new homes. Under terms of the agreement, the city will pay the district $325,000 annually to provide its own re services. The agreement includes future cost increases linked to the U.S. Con sumer Price Index and a provision to amend or cancel the agreement if both parties consent. The city is not obligated to fund any additional services the district may provide its residents in the future. Community Devel opment Director Char lie Rector told commis sioners the agreement is a deal for the city. The annual payment is less than the pro jected cost to buy new equipment and hire, train, manage and pay FRUITLAND PARK City approves fire service deal with The Villages SEE SERVICES | A2 QASSIM ABDUL-ZAHRA and SAMEER N. YACOUB Associated Press BAGHDAD As the Iraqi government bol stered Baghdads de fenses Sunday, the Is lamic militant group that captured two major cities last week posted graphic photos that ap peared to show its ght ers massacring dozens of captured Iraqi sol diers. The pictures on a mil itant website appear to show masked ghters of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, or ISIL, loading the captives onto atbed trucks be fore forcing them to lie face-down in a shallow ditch with their arms tied behind their backs. The nal images show the bodies of the cap tives soaked in blood af ter being shot. The grisly images could further sharpen sectarian tensions as hundreds of Shiites heed a call from their most revered spiritual leader to take up arms against the Sunni militants who have swept across the north. ISIL has vowed to take the battle to Baghdad and cities further south housing revered Shiite shrines. While the city of seven million is not in any immediate danger of falling into the hands of the militants, Sundays bombings could raise tensions. Food prices in the city have risen, twofold in some cases, because of disruption to transport on the main road heading north from the capital. The government bol stered defenses around Baghdad Sunday, a day after hundreds of Shiite men paraded through the streets with arms in response to a call by Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani for Iraqis to Militant group posts images of mass killing in Iraq AP PHOTO This image posted on a militant website on Saturday appears to show militants from the al-Qaida-inspired Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant leading away captured Iraqi soldiers dressed in plain clothes after taking over a base in Tikrit, Iraq. SEE ISIL | A2 MARILYNN MARCHIONE AP Chief Medical Writer Scientists have made big progress on a bi onic pancreas to free some people with dia betes from the daily or deal of managing their disease. A wearable, experimental device passed a real-world test, constantly monitoring blood sugar and auto matically giving insu lin or a sugar-boosting drug as needed, doctors said Sunday. The device improved blood-sugar control more than standard monitors and insulin pumps did when test ed for ve days on 20 adults and 32 teens. Un like other articial pan creases in development that just correct high blood sugar, this one also can x too-low sug ar, mimicking what a natural pancreas does. The device was de veloped at Massachu setts General Hospital and Boston University. Results were featured Sunday at an Ameri can Diabetes Associa tion conference in San Francisco and were published online by the New England Journal of Medicine. Im very excited about it, said Dr. Betul Hatipo glu, an endocrinologist at Cleveland Clinic who Progress made on a bionic pancreas for Type 1 diabetics SEE DIABETES | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 16, 2014 defend their country. ISIL has vowed to at tack Baghdad but its ad vance to the south seems to have stalled in recent days. Thousands of Shi ites have also volunteered to join the ght against the ISIL, also in response to al-Sistanis call. Despite the added se curity, a string of ex plosions killed at least 15 people and wound ed more than 30 in the city, police and hospi tal officials said. One car bomb went off in the city center, killing 10 and wounding 21. After nightfall, another explo sion hit the area, killing two and wounding five. The third went off near a falafel shop in the citys sprawling Sadr City dis trict, killing three and wounding seven. Baghdad has seen an escalation in suicide and car bombings in recent months, mostly targeting Shiite neighborhoods or security forces. The po lice and hospital ofcials spoke on condition of an onymity because they were not authorized to speak to the media. Armed police, includ ing SWAT teams, were seen over the weekend manning checkpoints in Baghdad, searching vehi cles and checking drivers documents. Security was particularly tightened on the northern and western approaches of the city, the likely targets of any advance by ISIL ghters on the capital. The city looked gloomy on Sun day, with thin trafc and few shoppers in commer cial areas. At one popular park along the Tigris river, only a fraction of the thousands who usually head there were present on Sunday evening. In the commercial Karada district in central Bagh dad, many of the side walk hawkers who sell anything from shoes to toys and clothes were absent. The crisis in Iraq has prompted the Unit ed States to order an air craft carrier into the Per sian Gulf. It also laid out specic ways for Iraq to show it is forging the na tional unity necessary to gain assistance in its ght against the ISIL and other militants. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel on Saturday ordered the USS George H.W. Bush from the northern Arabian Sea as President Barack Obama considered possible military options for Iraq. Hagels press secretary, Rear Adm. John Kirby, said the move will give Obama additional exibility if military action were required to protect American citizens and interests in Iraq. Accompanying the carrier will be the guid ed-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea and the guided-missile destroyer USS Truxtun. The ships, which carry Tomahawk missiles that could reach Iraq, were expected to complete their move into the Persian Gulf by the end of the day. The Bushs ghter jets also could eas ily reach Iraq. In neighboring Iran, the acting commander of the Islamic Republics army ground forces, Gen. Ki omars Heidari, said Iran has increased its defenses along its western border with Iraq, though there was no immediate threat to the frontier. had no role in the work. Many pa tients have been frustrated waiting for a cure, so this is really a great new horizon for them, she said. The bionic pancreas is for Type 1 diabetes, the kind often found during childhood. About 5 percent of the 26 million Americans with diabetes have this type and cannot make insulin to turn food into en ergy. Sugar builds up in the blood, raising the risk for heart disease and many other problems. These people must check their blood and inject insulin sever al times a day or get it through a pocket-sized pump with a tube that goes under the skin. This would lift that burden off of their shoulders, Dr. Steven Rus sell, a diabetes specialist at Massa chusetts General, said of the bionic pancreas he helped design. It has three parts: two cell phone-sized pumps for insulin and sugar-raising glucagon, and an iPhone wired to a continuous glucose monitor. Three small nee dles go under the skin, usually in the belly, to connect patients to the components, which can be kept in a fanny pack or a pocket. Patients still have to prick their n gers to test blood sugar twice a day and make sure the monitor is accu rate, but the system takes care of giv ing insulin or glucagon as needed. Kristina Herndon said her 13-year-old son, Christopher, loved it when he tried it for the study, and felt pretty badly giving it back when it ended. Christopher has to check his blood sugar eight to 10 times a day and his family has to watch him closely in case it dips too low while he sleeps, which can cause seizures or even death. Its a disease that I think peo ple think is not a big deal but its tough. Its hard on a family, said Herndon, who lives in Newburyp ort, Massachusetts. Next steps: A study starts Monday in 40 adults who will use the device for 11 days. By fall, researchers hope to have a nextgeneration version combining all three components in one device to be tested in studies next year aimed at winning federal Food and Drug Administration approval. My goal is to have this device done by the time my kid, who has Type 1 diabetes, goes to college in about three years, said Ed Damia no, a biomedical engineer at Bos ton University. Two San Diego-based compa nies DexCom and Tandem Di abetes Care Inc. made compo nents of the version tested in the current study. Boston University and Massachusetts General own or have patents pending on the sys tem, and several researchers may someday get royalties. Medtronic, Johnson & Johnson and several other companies also are working on articial pancreas devices. The Boston groups work is excit ing and the results are compelling, but there still are practical chal lenges to bringing a device to mar ket, said Aaron Kowalski, who over sees grants by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation on articial pancreas development. Most people with diabetes want less devices in their lives, not more, so putting the components into a single automated system is key, he said. rst responders to provide services to 2,050 new homes at the same service lev el we now provide for the rest of the city, he explained. The annual payment will come from the citys share of future Lake County property taxes collected from residents in The Villages of Fruitland Park. The agreement was especially import ant to The Villages, which wants to pro vide identical services to all Villages res idents within ve different jurisdictions Lake, Sumter and Marion counties, Lady Lake and Fruitland Park. Commissioner John Gunter said he felt uncomfortable with the lengthy term of the agreement, but no other commis sioners shared his concern. The agree ment was approved unanimously with little discussion. The citys 2014 budget allocates $160,000 for re department operations serving about 1,500 homes in Fruitland Park. in Grand Island, Neb. An estimated 1,200 4-Hers will be competing in compound archery, recurve archery, air rie, .22 pistol, shotgun, muz zleloading and hunting skills. Lucas said there will be others from Flor ida and Lake County competing in the event. Im looking forward to just the whole experience of it, Lucas said. I probably shouldnt say this, but Im not exactly going expect ing to get rst place. Im going to experience the national competi tion and to meet people from all over the country. He is a good shot, Bart said of his son, marveling over his shoot ing ability. He never touched a gun before three years ago. Zacks dad has been shooting for years. If I practiced as much as him, I would whip him, Bart said grin ning. His son isnt so sure. He does better when he is sit ting down completely still and not moving, but I can whip him in a standing position and all of that, Lucas said. During nationals, the Lucas fam ily will be Zacks biggest supporters. Well be right behind him the whole time, Bart said of the com petition. This whole thing is for fun, and the big thing that 4-H pushes is meeting other kids doing like things. Lucas recalled when he rst picked up a .22 rie during a 4-H Club project. I like the concentration that it takes, being able to just focus on one thing, and being able to do that repetitively, he said. This has helped me concentrate when it matters and being able to put myself in a zone where I kind of block everything out, and it has helped me to see a goal and chase after the goal. One of my shooting coaches says to treat each shot as its own event and not worry about the last one or the next one. Zack remembers how his father believed 4-H would be something that he would enjoy. At rst I was a little hesitant be cause I was shy. I wasnt sure about the whole 4-H thing and I didnt know what it was, and I have grown to love it, and it has brought me out of my shell more and talking in front of people, he said. During his rst year in 4-H, he served as the club chaplain, fol lowed by vice president, and this past year he served as the club president of Southern Traditions 4-H Club, a group of about 40 members. It is really neat having that lead ership experience and knowing how to run a meeting, said Lucas, who also serves as treasurer on the 4-H county level. -H is lot more than what is perceived as. Its not just animals and it is a really good program that helps develop youths in many, many ways and one of the biggest is leadership being able to step up and lead. Bart said his has seen an amaz ing transformation in his son, all because of 4-H. He went into it knowing noth ing. He was a shy individual and now he has condence in him self and what he is doing, and he knows how to speak in front of people now, which is an art and a gift to be able to do that, Bart said, noting his son has also be come more active in projects with Heritage Community Church. The biggest change in him is that he has gone from being a fol lower to a being somebody who will step up and take the lead when he needs to, Bart said. As much as Lucas shooting skills would probably be sought after in law enforcement, Lucas dismissed the idea of becoming a sheriffs deputy. My mom would disapprove, Lucas said with a chuckle. So what are his career aspira tions? I want to become a youth pas tor, said the teen, who also in tends to share the joys and bene ts of 4-H. HOW TO REACH US JUNE 15 CASH 3 ............................................... 2-9-4 Afternoon .......................................... 8-3-9 PLAY 4 ............................................. 3-6-3-5 Afternoon ....................................... 2-4-3-9 FLORIDA LOTTERY JUNE 14 FANTASY 5 ........................... 5-22-30-33-35 FLORIDA LOTTO ................. 3-8-21-23-35-51 POWERBALL .................... 9-33-42-45-5430 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION STEVE SKAGGS publisher 352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com PAUL RYAN digital editor 352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Zack Lucas sets up steel targets at a private range in Fruitland Park on June 9. RIFLE FROM PAGE A1 SERVICES FROM PAGE A1 ISIL FROM PAGE A1 DIABETES FROM PAGE A1 My goal is to have this device done by the time my kid, who has Type 1 diabetes, goes to college. Ed Damiano, biomedical engineer

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Monday, June 16, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT TAVARES Nominations sought for the Womens Hall of Fame Outstanding Lake County women are being sought for consideration for induction into the Lake County Womens Hall of Fame. Nominees must have made sig nicant contributions to the im provement of life for citizens of Lake County in the eld of art, ag riculture, athletics, business, com munity service, environment, gov ernment, healthcare, humanities, philanthropy, science and/or edu cation, and must have been born in Lake County or lived here for at least 10 years. Nominees may be living or deceased. Nomination forms are avail able online at www.lakecounty. gov/whof or at the Board of County Commissioners ofce, room 316 of the Lake County Administration Building, 315 W. Main St. The dead line for 2014 nominations is Aug. 15. CLERMONT Cagan Crossings Community Library hosts hiring event The Cagan Crossings Community Library, 16729 Cagan Oaks, is host ing a hiring event from noon to 4 p.m., on Thursday with represen tatives from numerous businesses in attendance. This event is sponsored by Goodwill Industries of Central Florida Inc., through the Goodwill Job Connection Center at 1855 S. Grand Highway. For information, call 352-4047799, email cjcc@goodwillc.org or go to www.goodwillc.org. BUSHNELL Adult Education to offer online courses Sumter County Adult Education has a program that makes it easy to take high-quality, affordable online courses through a partnership with ed2go|GES, which allows students to enhance skills, prepare for a new ca reer or advance in an existing one in the six-week online courses. The next series of classes begins Wednesday with more than 100 courses available. For information or to register, call the Sumter Adult & Community Education at 352-748-1510, ext. 51200 or go to www.aec.sumter.k12. .us. TAVARES LakeXpress to give free rides on Thursday Lake Countys Public Transportation Division will partic ipate in the ninth annual National Dump the Pump Day by offering free rides for LakeXpress commuters on Thursday. Sponsored by the American Public Transportation Association, the 2014 National Dump the Pump Day en courages people to ride public trans portation instead of driving a car. For information about LakeXpress routes or services, call LakeXpress at 352-326-8637, the Lake County Public Transportation Division at 352-323-5733 or go to www.ridelak express.com. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Cameron Smith, 16, of Clermont, and Chris Nagy, 16, of Winter Park, will return from Chicago today after taking part in the Neill Advanced Sail ing Clinic. The clinics mission is to provide accom plished high school sailors with intense, high-quality sailing in struction by top colle giate coaches, accord ing to its website. This year it included coach es from Stanford, Dart mouth, Cornell and Georgetown. Before leaving, both Smith and Nagy said they were extremely excited about the opportunity. Smith said his moth er practically forced him into sailing when he was just 8 years old, but is thankful now because its what he wants to contin ue doing through high school, college and for as many years as possible. He helped form the Eu stis Sailing Club, a com posite high school sailing team made up of sailors from high schools across the state. Cameron was chosen by his peers as the captain and MVP of the team this year. I love the fact that you can propel yourself with no motors and that when youre out on the water, you have to gure out what to do in a variety of different situations, Smith said, adding that although sailing is often times thought of as a peaceful type of sport, the actual competitive side of it is rather exciting. Once you start racing, youre hooked. Cameron said his future sailing aspirations include sailing in college, being on the CLERMONT Teens selected for competitive sailing clinic in Chicago PHOTOS COURTESY OF CAMERON SMITH Cameron Smith, 16, has been sailing since the age of 8. Smith, left, and Chris Nagy were invited to take part in the Neill Advanced Sailing Clinic in Chicago. Gone with the winds SEE SAIL| A4 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Although people run ning for Clermonts City Council have from noon today until noon on Friday to le paperwork, the race has already began since a couple of candidates preled. The seats up for re-elec tion in Clermont are Seat 1, held by Rick Van Wagner; Seat 5, cur rently held by Tim Bates; and Seat 3, held by Hal Turville. According to city ofcials, Bates and VanWagner were the only candidates to pre-le. Bates is seeking re-election to Seat 5 but VanWagner is vying for the mayoral Seat 3, opposing Turville, who has been mayor for eight two-year terms. This race will also mark the rst time Turville has faced any opposition since 2004. Turville did not re turn repeated calls about whether he intends to seek re-election. No one has publicly announced their intention to run for Seat 1 held by VanWagner. In Clermont, if there are more than two candidates who qualify for any open seat, a primary election will be held. If that were the case this year, a prima ry election would be held on Aug. 26. If there is a clear winner after the primary election, CLERMONT Mayor picks up first challenger in 10 years TURVILLE SEE COUNCIL | A5 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com State Sen. Alan Hays, R-Umatilla, State Rep. Bry an Nelson, R-Apopka, and State Rep. Larry Metz, R-Groveland, are plan ning town hall meetings throughout Lake County. Hays and Nelson will have a town hall meeting togeth er at 7 p.m. on Tuesday at Eustis City Hall. Hays said it will be a recap of the legislative session, highlighting some of the bills and issues, and then will be opened up for ques tions. Nelson added that they will be giving an over view of the budget. This is a very informal opportunity for the peo ple to come and meet the legislatures and ask their questions and to hear our perspective on how things went through the session, Hays said. LAKE COUNTY State officials to hold town hall meetings SEE TOWN HALL | A5 Alfred Street from Car oline Street to St. Clair Abrams Avenue will be closed to through trafc be ginning Wednesday. Drivers in downtown Ta vares will be able to access the Lake County Govern ment Complex parking ga rage entrance on Sinclair Avenue via Main Street or Caroline Street, Elisha Pap pacoda, the countys public information ofcer, said in a press release. Alfred Street at the intersection of Sin clair Avenue will be open to through trafc, however, pe riodic closures should be TAVARES Alfred Street to close Wednesday SEE STREET | A4 TAMARA LUSH Associated Press TAMPA A man who killed his estranged wife and her son two years af ter he had been paroled for murdering his previous spouse is scheduled to be executed this week, more than two decades after he was sentenced to death. John Ruthell Hen ry, 63, is scheduled to die Wednesday for the 1985 stabbing death of his wife, Suzanne Henry, in Pas co County. Gov. Rick Scott signed Henrys death war rant for that murder. He also was convicted in Hillsborough County of stabbing Suzanne Hen rys 5-year-old son, Eu gene Christian, near Plant City, hours after Suzannes murder. Henry also previously pleaded no contest to sec ond-degree murder for fa tally stabbing his com mon-law wife, Patricia Roddy, in 1976. He served less than eight years in pris on and was released in 1983. He had been on parole for two years when he killed his wife and Eugene. Su zanne Henrys relatives told reporters she hadnt known about John Henrys previ ous killing when she mar ried him after his release. During his trial, prose cutors said Henry, an un employed bricklayer, went to Suzanne Henrys home three days before Christ mas to talk about buy ing a gift for the boy, who was Suzannes son from a prior relationship. They fought over Henry living with another woman and he stabbed her 13 times in the neck and face, kill ing her. He took Eugene and drove around for nine hours, sometimes smok ing crack cocaine, before killing the boy by stabbing him in the neck ve times. Hours later, Henry told a detective, he found him self wandering a eld. Henry tried to use an in sanity defense for killing his wife. Psychiatrists at the tri al testied that Henry had a low IQ, suffered from chronic paranoia and smoked crack cocaine. Henry told the therapists that he stabbed Eugene so he could rejoin his dead Man convicted of killing 3 scheduled for execution SEE EXECUTION | A5

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 16, 2014 CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) D002409 SAIL FROM PAGE A3 World Racing Team and starting a sailing club in south Lake County. Nagy said he was anx ious about seeing how he ranks against oth er sailors from across the country at the clin ic. He said what he loves most about sailing is the adrenaline charge. I like the feel of a nice fast boat on a windy day, Nagy said. The adrenaline you get from it is great. Its kind of like a trapeze and it makes me feel like whatever happens, happens. Nagys sailing aspira tions include sailing in college, participating in the TransPac race, a trans-Pacic race from California to Hawaii, and sailing for the rest of his life. I like the feel of a nice fast boat on a windy day. The adrenaline you get from it is great. Its kind of like a trapeze and it makes me feel like whatever happens, happens. Chris Nagy STREET FROM PAGE A3 expected as road work continues in the area. Detour signs will be posted to alert the pub lic, and motorists are asked to use caution, Pappacoda said. From Wednesday-July 7, drivers should also ex pect lane closures on Al fred Street from Disston Avenue to Dora Avenue. The road will remain open to trafc but drivers may experience delays. Once complete, the Alfred Street project will establish one-way directional trafc be tween State Road 19 and Disston Avenue. Alfred Street will be come a one-way route east and Caroline Street will become a one-way route west, according to the city of Tavares. This project will also result in road widening, additional turn lanes, new sidewalks and some landscaping. For more informa tion about the project, contact The Lake Coun ty Public Works Depart ment Road Operations Division at 352-483-9007.

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Monday, June 16, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 mother. He told them he had intended to kill him self but said he was unable to go through with it. During the trial, then-Pasco County detective Fay Wilber testied that he drove Henry to nd the boys body. When the boys two small feet were nally seen in the underbrush after dawn, Henry started crying, Wilber said, according to news reports. He was crying and he held on to me, the de tective said. In recent months, Henrys attorneys have ques tioned whether his client was mentally stable enough to comprehend his death sentence. In an appeal the Florida Supreme Court rejected last week, Henrys attorney, Baya Harrison III, wrote that Henrys abhorrent childhood, extensive per sonal and family mental health history, poor social adjustment, and lack of rational thinking and rea soning skills so impaired his adaptive functioning that he was actually performing at the level of a per son with an IQ of 70. LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679 COUNCIL FROM PAGE A3 that person would take the seat. If there is no clear winner, however, the top two candidates would move on to the general election in No vember. I am excited about this election, VanWag ner said during a fund raising reception for his campaign held at Graf ti Junktion in Cler mont earlier this week. I feel Clermont needs someone to take it to the next level and I want to be that guy. I feel like Clermont has so much poten tial, especially when it comes to our econo my, and if we put both hands on the wheel, we can make this city econ omy robust. In the neighboring town of Groveland, the qualifying period for the upcoming election also runs from noon to day until noon Friday. Grovelands seats up for re-election are Dis trict 1, the mayoral seat currently held by Tim Loucks; District 3, cur rently held by Dena Sweatt; and District 5, held by longtime coun cilman John Grifin. According to Grove lands city clerk, Loucks has pre-led and will be seeking election to the mayoral post. Although he was chosen in Nov. 2013 to take over former mayor Jim Gearharts seat after his resigna tion, this will be Loucks rst time seeking elec tion to that post. He wont be alone during campaign sea son, however, since for mer Mayor Mike Radzik has already turned in any paperwork for the District 1 seat as well. Sweatt also has preled for a seat, which she currently holds since she was chosen by council to ll Loucks seat when it was vacated. No one has pre-led for District 5, but any one wishing to run can do so by visiting City Hall and submitting their paperwork before noon on Friday, when qualifying ofcially closes. It is not known whether Grifn will seek re-election. In Mascotte, Seat 2, held by Louise Thomp son, and Seat 4, held by Brenda Brasher, are up for re-election, but qualifying is not until ei ther the second or third week in August, accord ing to the city clerk. Minneolas qualifying is from noon on Aug. 11 to noon on Aug. 15. At stake is Seat 2, held by Lisa Jones, and Seat 4, held by Kelly Price. Montverdes election, an annual caucus where residents can nominate people for open at-large seats on any given year, will be held at 6:45 p.m., on Aug. 12 at Town Hall. According to the towns clerk, there are two at large council seats currently held by Joe Wynkoop and Jim Peacock that are up for re-election. Nominees can choose to submit paperwork for a formal run. People wanting to seek election who were not nominat ed may also run with the proper paperwork and collected signatures. TOWN HALL FROM PAGE A3 Nelson said it is one thing to hear about it through the news me dia, and another to hear about it in person and be able to ask questions. Its nice to get a true insiders perspective on really how the bill passed, how it didnt pass, Nelson said. I think constituents get a lot out of it. He said they did a town hall together last year and he thought it was good to get a per spective from the house and from the senate. He added they also sit on different commit tees, which also makes it a good balance. Metz will be having a town hall meeting from 6 to 7 p.m. on June 23 at the Cagan Crossings Li brary. He will also have town hall meetings at the same times on June 30 at the Clermont City Center and on July 2 at the Leesburg Commu nity Center. Metz said he will re view the state budget, major pieces of legisla tion and legislation he sponsored. Every year we go to session for 60 days and its a very fast-paced environment, a lot of things are happening and of course we had a lot of good input before the session from our constituents, but I feel an obligation after ses sion is over to go back and report to them on what we did and did not accomplish, Metz said. He added they also send a newsletter and an e-newsletter to con stituents. He said it closes up the legislative cycle by reporting back to the bosses. Were just trying to basically report back to our constituents who are after all our bosses about the accomplish ments and things that we might not have been able to bring home completely, Metz said. EXECUTION FROM PAGE A3 TERENCE CHEA Associated Press MARE ISLAND, Calif. In drought-stricken California, young Chi nook salmon are hit ting the road, not the river, to get to the Pacif ic Ocean. Millions of six-monthold smolts are hitching rides in tanker trucks be cause Californias histor ic drought has deplet ed rivers and streams, making the annual mi gration to the ocean too dangerous for juvenile salmon. The drought con ditions have caused lower ows in the riv ers, warmer water tem peratures, and the sh that would normal ly be swimming down the rivers would be very susceptible to pre dation and thermal stress, said Kari Burr, shery biologist with the Fishery Foundation of California. California has been trucking hatcheryraised salmon for years to bypass river dams and giant pumps that funnel water to Southern California and Central Valley farms. But this year state and federal wildlife agen cies are trucking near ly 27 million smolts, about 50 percent more than normal, because of the drought, ac cording to the Califor nia Department of Fish and Wildlife. Each spring, the Coleman National Fish Hatchery usually re leases about 12 mil lion smolts into Bat tle Creek, a tributary of the Sacramento Riv er near Redding. But this year, it trucked 7.5 million of them to San Francisco Bay because the drought had made the 300-mile swim too perilous. Salmon migrate by truck during drought AP FILE PHOTO Andy Heap, left, and Brian Rodman herd young Chinook salmon down a holding tank where they were loaded into a tanker truck at the California Department of Fish and Games Nimbus Fish Hatchery in Rancho Cordova, Calif.

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HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi. North of K-Mart on Hwy. 441)(352) 347-0403/fx (352) 347-2034CDRX441@gmail.com KIMBERLY HEFLING Associated Press WASHINGTON Home-schooling mom Jenni White gave some of the loud est cheers when Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin signed legis lation to repeal the Common Core education standards. White, president of Restore Oklahoma Public Education, helped organize rallies, robo calls and letters to legislators encouraging the repeal. You name it. We had to do it, White said. We just had to do it out of a shoestring bud get out of our own accounts. In Oklahoma and else where, home-schooling par ents, often with their kids, are a frequent presence at legislative hearings and oth er political functions repre senting anti-Common Core forces. Sometimes, as in Whites case, they are even leading the opposition. Home-schooling parents can teach their kids what they choose, but many of these parents still have a big beef with the standards. Facebook groups such as Home Schooling With out Common Core, have popped up. A Home School Legal Defense Association produced video on the stan dards has been viewed on line hundreds of thousands of times. All parents should be con cerned about this. This is our children. To me, its not political, said Megan King of Lawrence, Kansas. She pulled two of her three sons out of their public elementa ry school, in part, because of the math standards, and she co-founded Kansans Against Common Core. The standards, adopted in more than 40 states and the District of Columbia, spell out what math and English skills public school students should master at each grade. They were pushed by gover nors concerned that too few graduates were ready for life after high school. Use of the standards has become a hot button issue in many states, and governors in Indiana and South Caro lina recently signed legisla tion repealing them. The is sue has pitted Chamber of Commerce-aligned Repub licans with grassroots con servatives, including many home-schooling parents. The Common Core effort was led by the states, but the Obama administration has offered incentives to those that adopted college and ca reer ready standards. That has led to charges of federal intrusion. The concern that the more education policy is central ized, the less control they have as citizens motivates many of these home-school ing parents, said Emmett McGroarty, director of education at the conservative American Principles Project. Some of these parents, like King, believe the standards are poorly designed. King said she believes the math stan dards are developmentally in appropriate for younger kids, not rigorous enough for old er students and too heavy on pushing informational text over literature. Other home-schoolers fear that as textbook publishers in corporate the standards, it will lead to a smaller num ber of non-Common Core based-textbooks, said White, from Luther, Oklahoma. She says she teaches her children using classically aligned texts. McGroarty said there is a concern that the ACT and the College Board, which owns the SAT, are moving toward aligning with the standards. That, he said, would leave home-schooling parents no choice other than to follow the standards if they want their kids to do well on the college entrance exams. An ACT ofcial said the company supports the Com mon Core standards, but the exam hasnt changed be cause of them. The College Board, which is revamping the SAT, has said the new ver sion of the exam isnt aligned to a single set of standards. Home-schooling parents rally against Common Core AMELIA C. WARDEN / AP Megan King works with her sons Joshua, 9, left, and Benjamin, 11, center, in her home in Lawrence, Kan on June 9. NICHOLAS RICCARDI and CHARLES BABINGTON Associated Press DENVER Re publican strength in this years House and Senate races could, strangely enough, hurt the partys presidential chances by stalling the changes in style and policy advocated after Mitt Romneys defeat in the 2012 presiden tial campaign. GOP ofcials and strategists say its hard to persuade party lead ers to adjust the polit ical recipe when they feel increasingly up beat about adding Sen ate control to their sol id House majority this fall. This optimism, nu merous GOP strategists say, makes looking past the partys loss of the popular vote in ve of the last six presidential elections easy. Its very difcult to make an argu ment for change and modernization when youre winning, said Joel Sawyer, a former South Carolina GOP ofcial who advis es campaigns in sev eral states. Citing the partys nationwide re liance on older white voters, Sawyer said, the GOP needs to start modernizing now to become relevant to younger voters and nonwhite voters. The partys dilemma was in sharp relief in a Denver public televi sion studio here, where four candidates gath ered for a Republican primary debate in the race to represent the deeply conservative, rural and exurban 4th Congressional District, which covers the east ern third of the state. All the candidates said they oppose gay marriage, want to re peal President Barack Obamas health care plan and object to al lowing people living in the country illegally to become citizens. Republicans midterm strength could be problem in 2016 AP FILE PHOTO Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus is seen at the RNC winter meeting in Washington. The front-runner in the Colorado race, Weld County District Attor ney Ken Buck, narrow ly lost a U.S. Senate race in 2010 because he was seen as too extreme on issues like abortion and immigration. Now he has been hit in ads by state Sen. Scott Renfroe for ip-opping on those two issues. Its one of the great ironies of Republican politics that we fall vic tim to, Buck said in an interview. Im very conservative on life, Im very conservative on immigration, but given enough money anyone can be attacked for not being pure enough. Renfroe said: We need candidates who will stand rmly for what they believe. Immigration was an issue singled out by a GOP-commissioned autopsy report last year that analyzed Rom neys loss to Obama. The report said Republicans must embrace compre hensive immigration re form Washington shorthand for legaliz ing the immigration sta tus of those living here illegally_to improve the GOPs strained relation ship with the fast-grow ing Hispanic and Asian electorate. The recommendations quickly hit resistance from congressional Re publicans who rely on primary voters strong ly opposed to amnes ty for immigrants living here illegally. KATHY MATHESON Associated Press PHILADELPHIA Passengers expressed re lief Sunday that Phila delphia-area commuter trains were back on track after a one-day strike threatened to disrupt work schedules for tens of thousands of commut ers in the coming week. Employees ended their walkout after Pres ident Barack Obama appointed an emer gency board to medi ate the contract dispute between the Southeast ern Pennsylvania Trans portation Authority and two of its unions. An arrivals-and-de partures board showed all regional rails running on time late Sunday morning at Suburban Station in downtown Philadelphia. By late evening, SEPTA spokes woman Jerri Wil liams said operations throughout the day had run well and she antici pated a good start to the workweek Monday. We anticipate the workweek will be like any other Monday with the trains operating on or close to schedule, Williams said. Riders relieved rail strike is over in Philadelphia AP FILE PHOTO A SEPTA regional train, the R7, rolls into 30th Street station in Philadelphia.

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 16, 2014 HARMONY UNITED PSYCHIATRIC CARE We are a full service psychiatry practice dedicated and experienced in working with psychiatric patients to maintain & improve their mental health Psychiatric Evaluation, Diagnosis & Management of: Adil A. Mohammed, M.D. Brenda S. Faiber, M.S., LMFT OUR SERVICES www.harmonyunitedhc.com We accept most insurances with special pricing for cash paying patients.Appointments available within 7 days REBECCA SANTANA and ASIF SHAHZAD Associated Press ISLAMABAD The Paki stani army Sunday launched a long-awaited operation against foreign and local mil itants in a tribal region near the Afghan border, hours af ter jets pounded insurgent hideouts in the countrys northwest, the army said. The move effectively ends the governments policy of trying to negotiate with Pa kistani Taliban militants in stead of using force to end the years of ghting that has killed tens of thousands of ci vilians and security forces. It comes a week after the mili tants laid siege to the coun trys largest airport in an at tack that shocked the country. The North Waziristan trib al area, where the operation is targeted, is one of the last areas in the tribal regions where the military has not launched a large operation. Militant groups including the Pakistani Taliban, al-Qa ida and the Haqqani network have long used the region as a base from which to attack both Pakistan and neighbor ing Afghanistan. Using North Waziristan as a base, these terrorists had waged a war against the state of Pakistan, military spokes man Gen. Asim Saleem Ba jwa said in a press release an nouncing the operation. The U.S. has pushed Pa kistan to clear out militants in North Waziristan because they often use it as a sanc tuary from which to attack NATO and Afghan troops. But Pakistan has said its troops were already too spread out across the northwest, and the military has also wanted political support from the ci vilian government to carry out an operation which will likely spark a bloody back lash across the country. On Sunday night, the defense minister aggressive ly supported the operation, but there were no comments from Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif. Now we have to ght this do or die war, Defense Minis ter Khawaja Muhammad Asif told Pakistans Dunya Televi sion. We will ght it till the end. There was no immediate information on how many troops were involved. The military said troops had been deployed along the borders to prevent militants from es caping, and within North Wa ziristan troops had cordoned off areas including the larg est cities of Mir Ali and Mi ranshah. Refugee camps have been established, the local popula tion is being told to approach designated areas so they can be evacuated and surrender points have been established at which militants can give up their weapons, the mili tary said. They also asked Af ghanistan to secure its side of the border. Pakistan army launches offensive against militants AP FILE PHOTO Pakistani Taliban patrol in their stronghold of Shawal in Pakistani tribal region of South Waziristan. JOSEF FEDERMAN Associated Press JERUSALEM Israels prime min ister on Sunday accused the Hamas militant group of kidnapping three Israeli teenagers who disappeared over the weekend, as the military arrested dozens of Palestinians and closed off West Bank roads in a fran tic search for the youths. The crisis escalated already height ened tensions between Israel and the new Palestinian government, which is headed by Western-backed Presi dent Mahmoud Abbas but backed by Hamas. Israel, which considers Hamas a terrorist group, has condemned the alliance and said it holds Abbas re sponsible for the teens safety. Hamas terrorists carried out Thursdays kidnapping of three Is raeli teenagers. We know that for a fact, Netanyahu said. Hamas deni als do not change this fact. Speaking in English, Netanya hu also tried to rally internation al opinion against the new Pales tinian government. His calls for the international community to shun the government have been ignored so far. Instead of abiding by his interna tional obligation to disarm Hamas, President Abbas has chosen to make Hamas his partner, he added. I be lieve that the dangers of that pact now should be abundantly clear to all. Israeli prime minister accuses Hamas militants of kidnapping missing teens FRANK BAJAK Associated Press BOGOTA, Colombia Juan Manuel San tos convincingly won re-election Sunday after Colombias tightest pres idential contest in years, an endorsement of his 18-month-old peace talks to end the West ern Hemispheres lon gest-running conict. Santos defeated rightwing challenger Oscar Ivan Zuluaga with 53 percent-to-47 percent of valid votes with 99.7 percent of precincts re porting. Zuluaga was backed by former two-term President Alvaro Uribe, who many consid ered the true challeng er. They accused Santos of selling Colombia out in slow-slogging Cu ba-based negotiations, and insisted Zulua ga would halt the talks unless the rebel Revo lutionary Armed Forc es of Colombia, known as the FARC, ceased all hostilities and some of its leaders accepted jail time. The outcome af rmed Santos posi tion that he has steered Colombia to a histor ic crossroads after a half-century of conict that claimed more than 200,000 lives, mostly civilians. Now were going to build this peace for which weve so long yearned, said Ivan Cepeda, a leading leftist lawmaker. The campaign was Andean nations dirtiest in years, and Uribe con tinued to allege wide spread fraud by the Santos camp right up to the closing of polls. But Zuluaga graciously con ceded defeat in front of his supporters less than an hour after the result became known. Santos win was a comeback of sorts Zuluaga nished rst in the elections rst round of ve candidates May 25. His 900,000-vote victory Sunday hinged in large part on win ning Bogota and mak ing major gains on the Caribbean coast, where his party machinery is strong. In the rst round, Santos nished third in the capital, the strong hold of defeated left ist candidate Clara Lo pez, who endorsed the president for the run off. Voter turnout rose somewhat, too, from 40 percent in the rst round to 47 percent Sunday, which was seen as favoring Santos. Santos re-elected Colombias president in peace vote SANTIAGO CORTEZ / AP Supporters of Colombias President Juan Manuel Santos show their hands with the word peace written on them as they celebrate his victory in the presidential runoff in Bogota, Colombia on Sunday.

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Monday, June 16, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A9 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 W ill women vote for Hillary Clinton in 2016? In Hillary Clinton, will young women see an inspira tional leader of indomitable for titude, imposing intelligence and insurmountable courage? Or will they reject her as mom, the one who just doesnt get it? Will women closer to Clin tons own age see her as one of our own: An indefatigable citi zen who has cleared away false notions about womens limited place in the world and pocketed her own pride without forfeit ing her dignity in order to help America and the world become freer from injustice, violence, poverty and disease? Or will we succumb to that ru inous standard of perfectionism that carries within the seeds of its own defeat? In other words, will women judge Clinton as not good enough because we think, secretly and reexively, we might be not good enough? Put it this way: Will women vot ers be more critical of Hillary Clin ton because of her gender or will women be more enthusiastic? Can we put Grandma in the White House? Grandma-to-be Clinton looks good on the cover of this weeks People magazine. The interview is chatty and personal. All the pictures are attering: Clinton is surrounded by a loving fam ily, posing casually with a cute dog on her lap, and her neck is circled by a chunky turquoise necklace so big it makes her head look as if its on a platter. It brings out her eyes. And if I were talking about a male politician, would I be writ ing about what he was wearing? Of course not. Not unless he wasnt wear ing much, a la Anthony Weiner, D-N.Y. Thats right. A male politi cian has to be naked and sexting for his appearance (and accesso ries, such as they are) to be wor thy of comment. When Sen. Larry Craig, R-Ida ho, was arrested at a Minnesota airport for lewd conduct in a mens restroom, for example, news reports mentioned that Craig was wearing dress pants with black dress shoes. I guess that counts as a description of Craigs outt, although person ally I think they should have re ported whether he was wearing matching socks. And just imagine if I were talking about the first-ev er male presidential candi date among a group of female opponents. Would I be ques tioning whether this one male candidate lets imagine hes been secretary of state and has earned his stripes could count on the mens vote? No, because men would be carrying him on their shoulders to Washington. How about if, every time a man voted for a male candidate, we ask whether he made that deci sion based on sex? Lets start that conversation. Actually, Im glad support for a female candidate by female voters is anything but automat ic, because, otherwise, Sarah Palin might be sitting far clos er to Washington, D.C., and able to see the presidency from her house. Unlike Palin, of course, Clinton will not have been pole-vault ed into prominence. And its not as if Clinton needs a cable TV se ries, more recognition or higher speaking fees. Clinton stands at the sum mit of her career, offering the vision, wisdom and perspec tive that can be gained only by making the kind of journey shes made through national and in ternational landscapes. Fear lessly attempting to untangle the knotted destinies of warring nations and irreconcilable ene mies, shes displayed uninch ing leadership. Vladimir Putin inadvertently awarded Clinton high praise in deed when he sniffed, Its bet ter not to argue with women. Every woman, in every coun try and throughout history, who has ever won an argument, small or large, has heard that line from the loser. Believe it or not, there are Americans who sound Putin-es que and think a woman should not be president. Ive come close enough to some vehement an ti-feminists to see the foam on their mouths as they attempt to form a coherent argument con cerning their position, but their points often betray the small big otries of a narrow life which they seek to make even more conn ing and conned. Well, thats my girlish way of looking at things. They regard Hillary Clinton as a troublemaker. So do I. Hillary Clintons smiling in People but you can see theres steel beneath that surface. Not stainless steel nobody is per fect but steel nonetheless. It goes with her eyes. Gina Barreca is an English professor at the University of Connecticut, a feminist schol ar who has written eight books, and a col umnist for the Hartford Courant. She can be reached through her www.ginabarreca.com. OTHER VOICES Gina Barreca MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Hillary Clinton world-class troublemaker F rom all the hand-wringing over soon-tobe-former House Majority Leader Eric Cantors astonishing defeat in a GOP pri mary Tuesday in Virginia, you might think he had been a conciliatory gure determined to keep the federal government on track even when it meant compromising on his con servative principles. That, he was not. So it strains credulity that some pundits and pols are predicting that Republicans will now be even less willing to strike deals with Demo crats, and that conservatives will be more in uential in the House. Its hard to imagine how Republicans in the House could have been less willing to strike deals, or how con servatives could be more inuential there. Granted, the House GOPs hardheaded ness has often been met by intransigence from Democrats in the Senate and the White House. Yet the pattern during Cantors tenure as ma jority leader has been clear: House Republi cans turned routine practices such as funding the government into a continual exercise in brinkmanship. They compromised only when the public backlash against Washington dys function became too erce to ignore. The political novice who defeated Cantor, Randolph-Macon College professor Dave Brat, attacked Cantor on a number of fronts, includ ing how little time he spent in the district and how much money he raised from special inter ests. Nevertheless, much of the political estab lishment has zoomed in on Brats criticism of Cantors support for immigration reform and bipartisan deals to raise the debt ceiling, ease across-the-board budget cuts and end a sixweek government shutdown. According to the conventional wisdom, the message from Vir ginias 7th District is that lawmakers move to ward the center at their own peril. But if primary voters were determined to root out centrists, Cantor was the wrong place to start. For much of the Republicans 3 1/2 years running the House, he has been the person conservatives counted on to stiffen the spine of Speaker John A. Boehner, R-Ohio. And the agenda that Cantor set for the House was almost relentlessly partisan, a conserva tive Republican wish list of measures to roll back programs, lift regulations and reverse administration policies. The paralysis in Washington is a reection of the nations political split, as more of the electorate moves toward the wings and away from the middle. What purists need to un derstand, though, is that much of the coun try disagrees strongly with their views and that in a divided government, neither side gets everything it wants, no matter how rm ly it digs in its heels. The deals Cantor reluc tantly supported were the messy product of a representative government whose constit uents can reach no consensus other than the need to keep the government operating. And his defeat changes nothing about that state of affairs, which is the signal governing chal lenge of our day. Distributed by MCT Information Services. A VOICE Hardly the fall of the House of Cantor Classic DOONESBURY 1975 Will women closer to Clintons own age see her as one of our own: An indefatigable citizen who has cleared away false notions about womens limited place in the world and pocketed her own pride without forfeiting her dignity in order to help America and the world become freer from injustice, violence, poverty and disease?

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 16, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com JULIO CORTEZ / AP United States Jozy Altidore, center, warms up with teammates in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The U.S. will play its opener in group G today against Ghana. Klinsmann sounds more confident on eve of opener BOB BRODBECK / AP Jimmie Johnson, holding his daughter Genevieve, stands with his wife Chandra Janway after winning the NASCAR Quicken Loans 400 auto race on Sunday at Michigan International Speedway in Brooklyn, Mich. ERIC GAY / AP Martin Kaymer, of Germany, holds up the trophy after wining the U.S. Open golf tournament on Sunday in Pinehurst, N.C. Wire-to-wire win DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer PINEHURST, N.C. Martin Kaymer re turned to the elite in golf with a U.S. Open victo ry that ranks among the best. A forgotten star for two years while build ing a complete game, Kaymer turned the toughest test of golf into a runaway at Pinehurst No. 2 on Sunday to be come only the seventh wire-to-wire winner in 114 years of the U.S. Open. Kaymer closed with a 1-under 69 the only player from the last eight groups to break par for an eightshot victory over Rickie Fowler and Erik Comp ton, the two-time heart transplant recipient and the only player who even remotely chal lenged the 29-year-old German. So dominant was Kaymer that no one got closer than four shots over the nal 48 holes. Only a late bogey kept Kaymer from join ing Tiger Woods and Rory McIlroy as the only players to nish a U.S. Open in double digits under par. He made a 15-foot par putt on the 18th hole, dropping his putter as the ball fell into the center of the cup, just like so many other putts this week. No one was catch ing Kaymer this week, Compton said, who closed with a 72 to earn earned a trip to the Masters next April. I was playing for second. I think we all were play ing for second. This U.S. Open really ended on Friday. Kaymer set the U.S. Open record with backto-back rounds of 65 to set the pace at 10-un der 130. He began Sun day with a ve-shot lead, and after a 10-foot par save on the second hole, Kaymer belted a driver on the 313-yard third hole. The ball landed on the front of the green and rolled to the back, setting up a two-putt birdie. He kind of killed the event in the rst two days, Henrik Stenson said. He went out and shot two 65s and left ev eryone in the dust. Fowler, in the nal group of a major for the rst time, fell back quickly on the fourth hole. He sent his third shot from a sandy path over the green and into some pine trees and had to make a 25-foot putt just to escape with double bogey. Fowler played even par the rest of the way for a 72. Compton birdied the eighth hole and got within four shots until he took bogey on the par-3 ninth, and NOAH TRISTER Associated Press BROOKLYN, Mich. Jimmie Johnson nally won a NASCAR Sprint Cup race at Michigan Internation al Speedway. The six-time series champion won Sun day for the rst time in 25 Cup starts at MIS, outlasting pole win ner Kevin Harvick by 1.214 seconds. It was Johnsons third victo ry in four races and the fth in a row for Chevrolet and Hen drick Motorsports. Jeff Gordon and Dale Earnhardt Jr. also have won for Chevy and Hendrick during the streak that doesnt count Jamie McMur rays win for Chevy in the Sprint All-Star race last month. Brad Keselowski n ished third Sunday af ter two straight run ner-up showings at Dover and Pocono. Paul Menard was fourth, followed by Kasey Kahne, Gordon and Earnhardt in the 400-mile, 200-lap race. Johnson had n ished in the top ve four times previously at Michigan, including Jimmie Johnson finally posts win at Michigan SEE NASCAR | B2 Germanys Martin Kaymer uses record start to post win in U.S. Open MATT YORK / AP Rickie Fowler hits out of the bunker on the seventh hole. ZACHARY HANKLE Special to the Daily Commercial ORLANDO When the weatherman nally cooperated, the Leesburg Lightning turned Fa thers Day into something pleasant. The Lightning completed Saturdays double header with the College Park Freedom on Sun day, winning the opener 5-1 and dropping the nightcap 6-5. The rst game, which began at Pat Thomas Stadium-Buddy Lowe Field before being sus pended after two innings due to rain and slop py eld conditions, ended at Orlando Bishop Moore. Colby Lusignan got the Lightning off to a quick start in the rst inning on Saturday with a two-run homer. Leesburg added three more runs in the sixth inning on hits by Joe Sabatini, Andrew Miller and Garrett Suggs. Sabatini, Miller and Kamer on Esthay, who reached on an error, scored for the Lightning. College Park scored its lone run in the fourth inning. RONALD BLUM Associated Press NATAL, Brazil Jurgen Klinsmann speaks with pragmatism. He books his airline tickets with hope. The U.S. coach caused a stir in the lead-up to soc cers championship when he said that I think for us now, talking about winning a World Cup is just not real istic. But on the eve of the Americans opener against Ghana, he revealed this: I booked my ight after the nal. The U.S. has never ad vanced after starting with a loss, and it is grouped with the 37th-ranked Black Stars along with No. 2 Germany and No. 4 Portugal. A two-day downpour has ooded some streets in this northeastern Brazilian beach town. While the skies started to clear a bit Sun day, the forecast was un settled for Monday nights game, when the Americans try to avenge losses to Gha na that knocked them out of the past two World Cups. Klinsmann sounded just like the U.S. Postal Service. Its raining. If its snow ing. If its what else? I think for us now, talking about winning a World Cup is just not realistic. Jurgen Klinsmann, US World Cup coach SEE USA | B2 Lightning earn split with College Park SEE SPLIT | B2 SEE OPEN | B2 Weve almost a German Grand Slam almost. I hope it will make Bernhard proud. Im sure it will make all of Germany proud. Martin Kayner on his victory in the U.S. Open

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 16, 2014 SUN mon tues wed thurs fri SatLeesburg LightningJune 15 21Deland Suns7p m@ College Park Freedom5p m@ Winter Park Diamond Dawgs7p m Winter Park Diamond Dawgs7p mWinter Park Diamond Dawgs7p m@ Deland Suns7p m NASCAR Sprint Cup-Quicken Loans 400 Results Sunday At Michigan International Speedway Brooklyn, Mich. Lap length: 2 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (7) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 200 laps, 130.7 rating, 47 points, $205,661. 2. (1) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 200, 135.1, 44, $196,118. 3. (6) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 200, 113.9, 42, $153,393. 4. (5) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 200, 105.8, 40, $136,349. 5. (13) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 200, 85.9, 40, $121,250. 6. (2) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 200, 117.2, 39, $140,526. 7. (3) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 200, 106.2, 38, $103,590. 8. (12) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 200, 89.7, 37, $121,460. 9. (9) Joey Logano, Ford, 200, 117.3, 36, $129,056. 10. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 200, 92, 34, $128,256. 11. (26) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 200, 94.1, 34, $126,473. 12. (11) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 200, 95.6, 33, $129,404. 13. (8) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 200, 96.8, 32, $91,090. 14. (21) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 200, 83.5, 31, $134,901. 15. (24) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 200, 77.6, 29, $98,715. 16. (17) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 200, 79.6, 28, $115,523. 17. (27) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 200, 68.1, 27, $96,365. 18. (28) Juan Pablo Montoya, Ford, 200, 72.4, 26, $84,265. 19. (23) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 200, 68.4, 0, $87,665. 20. (18) Greg Bife, Ford, 200, 68, 24, $129,415. 21. (37) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 199, 53.5, 23, $103,098. 22. (25) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 199, 60.6, 22, $100,773. 23. (22) Carl Edwards, Ford, 199, 57, 21, $101,865. 24. (31) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 199, 56.5, 20, $105,723. 25. (20) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 199, 61.5, 19, $112,685. 26. (32) David Gilliland, Ford, 198, 51.5, 18, $102,937. 27. (30) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 198, 51.7, 17, $120,915. 28. (42) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 198, 42.1, 16, $84,840. 29. (29) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 198, 61.2, 15, $92,640. 30. (19) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 197, 74.9, 15, $130,801. 31. (4) Aric Almirola, Ford, 197, 73.5, 13, $121,201. 32. (40) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 197, 36.6, 12, $82,315. 33. (38) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 197, 42.9, 11, $81,240. 34. (34) Brett Moftt, Toyota, 197, 44, 10, $89,140. 35. (39) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 197, 36.9, 0, $80,975. 36. (35) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 197, 30, 0, $80,920. 37. (16) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 196, 33.2, 7, $108,768. 38. (33) David Ragan, Ford, 196, 44.3, 6, $84,070. 39. (36) David Stremme, Chevrolet, 195, 29.9, 5, $72,070. 40. (41) Alex Bowman, Toyota, accident, 169, 33.9, 4, $68,070. 41. (14) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 169, 74.6, 3, $111,911. 42. (10) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 110, 25.5, 2, $92,145. 43. (43) Travis Kvapil, Ford, accident, 23, 28.8, 1, $56,570. Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 143.441 mph. Time of Race: 2 hours, 47 minutes, 19 sec onds. Margin of Victory: 1.214 seconds. Caution Flags: 8 for 36 laps. Lead Changes: 25 among 13 drivers. Lap Leaders: K.Harvick 1-18; J.Gordon 1942; B.Keselowski 43-44; J.Gordon 45-56; K.Harvick 57-74; J.Johnson 75-77; J.Logano 78-91; J.Johnson 92-104; K.Harvick 105-112; B.Keselowski 113; K.Harvick 114-118; B.Ke selowski 119; K.Harvick 120-126; J.Logano 127-141; K.Harvick 142-148; J.McMurray 149-151; J.Johnson 152-164; J.McMurray 165; D.Earnhardt Jr. 166; Ku.Busch 167-182; K.Kahne 183; K.Larson 184-185; A.Dillon 186-187; T.Stewart 188; M.Kenseth 189-190; J.Johnson 191-200. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): K.Harvick, 6 times for 63 laps; J.John son, 4 times for 39 laps; J.Gordon, 2 times for 36 laps; J.Logano, 2 times for 29 laps; Ku.Busch, 1 time for 16 laps; B.Keselowski, 3 times for 4 laps; J.McMurray, 2 times for 4 laps; K.Larson, 1 time for 2 laps; M.Kenseth, 1 time for 2 laps; A.Dillon, 1 time for 2 laps; K.Kahne, 1 time for 1 lap; D.Earnhardt Jr., 1 time for 1 lap; T.Stewart, 1 time for 1 lap. Wins: J.Johnson, 3; D.Earnhardt Jr., 2; K.Har vick, 2; J.Logano, 2; Ku.Busch, 1; Ky.Busch, 1; C.Edwards, 1; J.Gordon, 1; D.Hamlin, 1; Bra. Keselowski, 1. Top 12 in Points: 1. J.Gordon, 537; 2. J. Johnson, 522; 3. D.Earnhardt Jr., 514; 4. M.Kenseth, 513; 5. Bra.Keselowski, 490; 6. C.Edwards, 462; 7. J.Logano, 454; 8. K.Lar son, 454; 9. K.Harvick, 447; 10. Ky.Busch, 446; 11. R.Newman, 440; 12. D.Hamlin, 435. NASCAR Driver Rating Formula A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a race. The formula combines the following catego ries: Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Running Position While on Lead Lap, Average Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led Most Laps, Lead-Lap Finish. NBA Playoff Glance All Times EDT FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) San Antonio 3, Miami 1 Thursday, June 5: San Antonio 110, Miami 95 Sunday, June 8: Miami 98, San Antonio 96 Tuesday, June 10: San Antonio 111, Miami 92 Thursday, June 12: San Antonio 107, Mi ami 86 Sunday, June 15: Miami at San Antonio, late x-Tuesday, June 17: San Antonio at Miami, 9 p.m. x-Friday, June 20: Miami at San Antonio, 9 p.m. TENNIS WTA AEGON Classic Results Sunday At Edgbaston Priory Club Birmingham, England Purse: $710,000 (Premier) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles Championship Ana Ivanovic (1), Serbia, def. Barbora Zahla vova Strycova, Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-2. Doubles Championship Raquel Kops-Jones and Abigail Spears (3), United States, def. Ashleigh Barty and Casey Dellacqua (2), Australia, 7-6 (1), 6-1. ATP World Tour Gerry Weber Open Results Sunday At Gerry Weber Stadion Halle, Germany Purse: $1.1 million (WT250) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles Championship Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, def. Alejandro Falla, Colombia, 7-6 (2), 7-6 (3). Doubles Championship Andre Begemann, Germany, and Julian Knowle, Austria, def. Marco Chiudinelli and Roger Fed erer, Switzerland, 1-6, 7-5, 12-10. Topshelf Open Results Sunday At Autotron Rosmalen Den Bosch, Netherlands Purse: ATP, $658,000 (WT250); WTA, $250,000 (Intl.) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles Men First Round Jesse Huta Galung, Netherlands, def. Alek sandr Nedovyesov, Kazakhstan, 6-2, 1-0, retired. Dudi Sela, Israel, def. Benoit Paire, France, 6-4, 7-6 (2). Women First Round Magdalena Rybarikova, Slovakia, def. An-So phie Mestach, Belgium, 6-4, 6-4. Yvonne Meusburger, Austria, def. Kaia Kanepi, Estonia, 6-1, 6-2. Andrea Petkovic (5), Germany, def. Yanina Wickmayer, Belgium, 6-2, 6-4. Doubles Men First Round Marcel Granollers, Spain, and Jurgen Melzer (3), Austria, def. Nicholas Monroe, United States, and Vasek Pospisil, Canada, 6-4, 6-3. Women First Round Andreja Klepac, Slovenia, and Maria-Teresa Torro-Flor, Spain, def. Annika Beck, Germany, and Kurumi Nara, Japan, 6-7 (6), 6-2, 10-4. Marina Erakovic, New Zealand, and Arantxa Parra Santonja (4), Spain, def. Raluca Olaru, Romania, and Shahar Peer, Israel, 6-3, 6-2. Michaella Krajicek, Netherlands, and Kristina Mladenovic (3), France, def. Irina-Camelia Begu, Romania, and Vania King, United States, 3-6, 6-3, 10-8. ATP World Tour AEGON Championships Results Sunday At The Queens Club London Purse: $1.1 million (WT250) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles Championship Grigor Dimitrov (4), Bulgaria, def. Feliciano Lo pez (10), Spain, 6-7 (8), 7-6 (1), 7-6 (6). Doubles Championship Alexander Peya, Austria, and Bruno Soares (2), Brazil, def. Jamie Murray, Britain, and John Peers, Australia, 4-6, 7-6 (4), 10-4. Sundays Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League DETROIT TIGERS Optioned RHP Corey Knebel to Toledo (IL). Recalled LHP Blaine Hardy from Toledo. HOUSTON ASTROS Placed RHP Josh Fields on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Paul Clemens from Oklahoma City (PCL). MINNESOTA TWINS Placed 3B Trevor Plouffe on the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Pedro Florimon from Rochester (IL). NEW YORK YANKEES Assigned LHP Wade LeBlanc outright to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). OAKLAND ATHLETICS Traded OF Michael Taylor to the Chicago White Sox for RHP Jake Sanchez. TEXAS RANGERS Agreed to terms with LHP Shane McCain on a minor league contract. National League MIAMI MARLINS Sent LHP Brad Hand to New Orleans (PCL) for a rehab assignment. Placed RHP Nathan Eovaldi on paternity leave. Recalled RHP Sam Dyson from New Orleans. NEW YORK METS Acquired LHP Blake Taylor from Pittsburgh to complete an earlier trade, and assigned him to the GCL Mets. PITTSBURGH PIRATES Optioned INF Michael Martinez to Indianapolis (IL). Selected the con tract of RHP Vance Worley from Indianapolis. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS Optioned OF Randal Grichuk to Memphis (PCL). Selected the con tract of LHP Nick Greenwood from Memphis. Agreed to terms with LHP Austin Gomber and RHP Tyler Bray on minor league contracts. SAN DIEGO PADRES Placed RHP Nick Vin cent on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Thursday. Selected the contract of RHP Blaine Boyer from El Paso (PCL). American Association AMARILLO SOX Traded LHP Josh Spence to Windy City (Frontier) to complete an ear lier trade. GRAND PRAIRIE AIR HOGS Signed RHP Jason Jarvis. TV 2 DAY SCOREBOARD COLLEGE BASEBALL 3 p.m. ESPN2 World Series, Game 5, Texas vs. Louisville, at Omaha, Neb. 8 p.m. ESPN2 World Series, Game 6, UC Irvine vs. Vanderbilt, at Omaha, Neb. MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7:10 p.m. SUN Baltimore at Tampa Bay FS-Florida Chicago Cubs at Miami 8 p.m. ESPN N.Y. Mets at St. Louis SOCCER 11:30 a.m. ESPN FIFA, World Cup, Group G, Germany vs. Portugal, at Salvador, Brazil 2:30 p.m. ESPN FIFA, World Cup, Group F, Iran vs. Nigeria, at Curitiba, Brazil 5:30 p.m. ESPN FIFA, World Cup, Group G, Ghana vs. United States, at Natal, Brazil FCSL STANDINGS W L .Pct GB Winter Garden 7 3 .700 Winter Park 7 5 .585 1 Leesburg 4 3 .571 1.5 Sanford 5 4 .556 1.5 College Park 4 5 .444 2.5 DeLand 2 9 .182 5.5 SUNDAYS GAMES Leesburg 5,5 College Park 1,6 Sanford 6, DeLand 1 Winter Park 8, Winter Garden 4 TODAYS GAMES None scheduled TUESDAYS GAMES Leesburg at Winter Park, 7 p.m. Sanford at Winter Garden, 7 p.m. College Park at DeLand, 7 pm. a second-place showing in August 2011. He lost in Au gust 2012 when his engine faltered with six laps re maining. Johnson led after 164 laps Sunday before stop ping to pit and giving up the lead. He was back in front with about 10 laps to go following a cycle of pit stops by other drivers, and the No. 48 Chevy led by a comfortable margin down the stretch. Hendrick had four driv ers in the top seven. Johnson is trying for his seventh Cup title, which would tie the mark shared by Richard Petty and the late Dale Earnhardt. This was his 69th career victo ry, and hes the rst driver with three wins in 2014. There are now only four tracks on the current schedule where Johnson has never won Kentucky, Watkins Glen, Chicagoland and Homestead-Miami. Its the third time Hen drick has won ve straight races. The team accom plished the feat twice in 2007, including a six-race streak. Gordons sixth-place n ish was enough to keep him atop the points race, with Johnson moving up two spots to second. Ford had won the last three Cup races at Mich igan, with Joey Logano prevailing last August and Greg Bife winning twice before that. Keselowski couldnt extend that streak, and Logano nished ninth. It was a rough day for Roush Fenway Racing, which has a record 13 Cup victories at Michigan. Bif e nished 20th and Carl Edwards was 23rd. NASCAR FROM PAGE B1 thunder or lightning ... eld wet, eld dry, heat, humidity, whatever, he said Sunday. Were not worried about that stuff at all. A total of 3.11 inches of rain fell Friday and 2.95 more Saturday, accord ing to AccuWeathers An thony Sagliani, and by late Saturday night cars had to navigate at least 18 inches of standing water. Natals City Hall declared a ood alert and evacuated doz ens of residents as a pre caution in the Mae Luiza neighborhood in the citys west. Still, the eld appeared rm during workouts Sun day at the new Arena das Dunas, whose wavy, asym metrical exterior was de signed to resemble the nearby sand dunes of a city nearly as close to west Af rica (1,800 miles) as to the American base camp in Sao Paulo (1,400 miles). The forecast calls for a temperature of about 80 degrees (27 Celsius), high humidity Natal is 400 miles south of the equa tor and a slight chance of showers. The weather is what it is, and as players thats not something we can con trol, midelder Michael Bradley said. You get to this point, youre not wor ried about little details, about whether the wind is blowing, whether the sun is out. Thousands of U.S. fans are expected. The Amer ican Outlaws supporters group chartered two Boe ing 767s from Houston that brought 530 fans to Brazil, and the U.S. Soccer Federation said it sold its ofcial allotment of about 2,000 tickets. Ghana beat the Ameri cans by identical 2-1 scores in the nal group-stage game at Germany in 2006 and in the second round at South Africa four years ago. The U.S., appearing at its seventh straight World Cup and 10th overall, has never lost to a team three straight times in the tour nament. Its going to be like theyre coming for re venge, said Ghana cap tain Asamoah Gyan, whose overtime goal was the dif ference in the 2010 match. Teams that won their openers have advanced 85 percent of the time since the 32-nation format be gan in 1998. Just 9 percent of nations starting with a loss advanced, and 58 per cent of those beginning with draws reached the knockout rounds. This is just an awesome moment, because thats the biggest stage you can have, where you kind of want to show that you im proved, and nothing bet ter than against the team that beat you the last two World Cups, Klinsmann said. So this, as we men tioned before, is like start the whole World Cup with a nal. Ghana lost a shootout to Uruguay in the 2010 quar ternals. The Black Stars are the youngest of the 32 World Cup teams with an average age of 25 years, 6 months, according to FIFA, while the U.S. is the 12th-oldest at 27 years, 10 months. Now people back home believe we can do more, which puts pressure on the players, Gyan said. Barring late injuries, Tim Howard will be in goal, and Fabian Johnson g ures to start at right back, Geoff Cameron and Matt Besler in central defense and DaMarcus Beasley at left back. USA FROM PAGE B1 Brett Jones started on Saturday and pitched until the game was suspended. Brandon Caples stepped in on Sunday in relief of Jones and went 3 1/3 in nings to pick up the win. Caples surrendered three hits walked one and struck out two. Trey Norris pitched the nal 1 1/3 innings for Lees burg. Ben Richardson took the loss for the Freedom. In the nightcap, College Park bolted to a 5-0 lead in the rst inning against Lightning starter Tyler Souris, who lasted two in nings. That was it for the Freedom until the 10th inning as Kyle Schackne, Cody Crouse and Danny Miller delivered ve score less innings in relief. Leesburg chipped away at the Freedoms advan tage with three runs in the third, and solo runs in the seventh and ninth innings. Matt Menard had a three-run homer to pow er the Lightning rally. Menard had three hits in the game and Jones added two more. Brandan Keen scored the winning run for Col lege Park with one out in the ninth on single by Jake Sidwell off Frankie Ro mano. Justin Lawrence picked up the win for Col lege Park. With the doublehead er split, Leesburg goes into todays league-wide off date with a 4-3 record, while College Park is 4-5. The Lightning are back in action at 7 p.m. on Tues day against Winter Park at Alfond Stadium. Leesburg will host the Diamond Dawgs at 7 p.m. Wednes day before wrapping up the series at 7 p.m. Thurs day in Winter Park. SPLIT FROM PAGE B1 At Pinehurst Resort and Country Club, No. 2 Course Martin Kaymer 65-65-72-69 -9 Erik Compton 72-68-67-72 -1 Rickie Fowler 70-70-67-72 -1 Keegan Bradley 69-69-76-67 +1 Jason Day 73-68-72-68 +1 Brooks Koepka 70-68-72-71 +1 Dustin Johnson 69-69-70-73 +1 Henrik Stenson 69-69-70-73 +1 Adam Scott 73-67-73-69 +2 Jimmy Walker 70-72-71-69 +2 Brandt Snedeker 69-68-72-73 +2 Jim Furyk 73-70-73-67 +3 Marcel Siem 70-71-72-70 +3 Justin Rose 72-69-70-72 +3 Kevin Na 68-69-73-73 +3 Matt Kuchar 69-70-71-73 +3 Brendon Todd 69-67-79-69 +4 Ian Poulter 70-70-74-70 +4 J.B. Holmes 70-71-72-71 +4 Jordan Spieth 69-70-72-73 +4 Cody Gribble 72-72-72-69 +5 Steve Stricker 70-71-73-71 +5 Billy Horschel 75-68-73-70 +6 Aaron Baddeley 70-71-73-72 +6 Shiv Kapur 73-70-71-72 +6 Rory McIlroy 71-68-74-73 +6 Francesco Molinari 69-71-72-74 +6 Daniel Berger 72-71-78-66 +7 Graeme McDowell 68-74-75-70 +7 Kenny Perry 74-69-74-70 +7 Phil Mickelson 70-73-72-72 +7 Victor Dubuisson 70-72-70-75 +7 Brendon De Jonge 68-70-73-76 +7 Chris Kirk 71-68-72-76 +7 Patrick Reed 71-72-73-72 +8 Ernie Els 74-70-72-72 +8 Sergio Garcia 73-71-72-72 +8 Bill Haas 72-72-71-73 +8 Hideki Matsuyama 69-71-74-74 +8 Louis Oosthuizen 71-73-78-67 +9 Zac Blair 71-74-73-71 +9 Zach Johnson 71-74-72-72 +9 Lucas Bjerregaard 70-72-72-75 +9 Garth Mulroy 71-72-70-76 +9 Danny Willett 70-71-78-71 +10 Webb Simpson 71-72-73-74 +10 Retief Goosen 73-71-71-75 +10 a-Matthew Fitzpatrick 71-73-78-69 +11 Billy Hurley III 71-74-75-71 +11 Harris English 69-75-75-72 +11 Ryan Moore 76-68-71-76 +11 Seung-Yul Noh 70-72-76-74 +12 Gary Woodland 72-71-75-74 +12 Scott Langley 72-71-75-75 +13 Stewart Cink 72-72-74-75 +13 Fran Quinn 68-74-79-73 +14 Paul Casey 70-75-74-75 +14 Nicholas Lindheim 72-73-72-77 +14 Justin Leonard 75-70-75-75 +15 Russell Henley 70-74-82-71 +17 Kevin Tway 72-72-81-72 +17 Alex Cejka 73-71-77-76 +17 Kevin Stadler 77-68-78-75 +18 Clayton Rask 73-71-77-77 +18 Bo Van Pelt 72-72-75-79 +18 Boo Weekley 71-73-80-75 +19 Kaymer followed with an 8-iron to 4 feet for birdie. Kaymer nished at 9-under 271, the second-lowest score in U.S. Open history next to McIlroys 268 at Congressional in 2011. He won his second major the other was the 2010 PGA Champion ship at Whistling Straits in a threeman playoff and this one wasnt close. Martin was playing his own tour nament, Fowler said. Kaymer joined Seve Ballesteros, Ernie Els, Woods and McIlroy as the only players to win two majors and be No. 1 in the world before turning 30 since the world ranking began in 1986. He is the fourth European in the last ve years to win the U.S. Open, after Europeans had gone 40 years without this title. Its a rebirth for Kaymer, who reached No. 1 in the world in Feb ruary 2011, only to believe that he needed a more rounded game. His preferred shot was a fade. Kaymer spent two hard years, a lot of lonely hours on the range in Germany and his home in Scottsdale, Arizona. He fell as low as No. 63 in the world until going wire-to-wire (with ties) at The Players Championship, considered the strongest and deep est eld in golf. But the big payoff came at Pine hurst No. 2. I didnt make many mistakes the last two wins that I had in America especially this week, said Kay mer, who moves to No. 11 in the world. Kaymer has as many majors as Bernhard Langer, the two-time Masters champion and a mentor to Kaymer. Langer sent him text mes sages earlier in the week. Weve almost a German Grand Slam almost, Kaymer said. I hope it will make Bernhard proud. Im sure it will make all of Germa ny proud. The biggest challenge for Kay mer was tuning out the crowd, with enormous support for Fowler, who enjoys pop star qualities in Amer ica. The fans clapped when Kay mers ball bounded off the back of the green, and even when a superb shot from the native weeds on No. 4 rolled off the front of the green. OPEN FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, June 16, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Toronto 41 30 .577 4-6 W-1 20-17 21-13 Baltimore 35 33 .515 4 1 5-5 L-1 16-17 19-16 New York 35 33 .515 4 1 6-4 L-2 13-16 22-17 Boston 31 38 .449 9 5 4-6 L-2 17-19 14-19 Tampa Bay 27 43 .386 13 10 4-6 W-1 14-20 13-23 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 36 29 .554 5-5 W-2 18-16 18-13 Kansas City 36 32 .529 1 8-2 W-7 18-16 18-16 Cleveland 35 35 .500 3 2 5-5 W-2 21-11 14-24 Minnesota 32 35 .478 5 3 4-6 L-2 15-17 17-18 Chicago 33 37 .471 5 4 3-7 L-4 19-18 14-19 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 42 27 .609 5-5 W-2 19-13 23-14 Los Angeles 37 30 .552 4 7-3 W-1 20-14 17-16 Seattle 35 34 .507 7 1 4-6 W-1 15-20 20-14 Texas 34 35 .493 8 2 5-5 L-1 16-19 18-16 Houston 32 39 .451 11 5 6-4 L-1 17-20 15-19 NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 35 32 .522 4-6 L-1 19-15 16-17 Miami 35 33 .515 5-5 W-1 23-13 12-20 Washington 35 33 .515 5-5 L-4 19-15 16-18 New York 31 38 .449 5 5 3-7 W-1 16-20 15-18 Philadelphia 29 38 .433 6 6 5-5 L-1 16-21 13-17 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 41 29 .586 6-4 L-1 20-15 21-14 St. Louis 37 32 .536 3 7-3 W-3 19-14 18-18 Pittsburgh 34 35 .493 6 2 6-4 L-1 20-16 14-19 Cincinnati 33 35 .485 7 2 6-4 W-1 17-17 16-18 Chicago 28 39 .418 11 7 5-5 W-1 15-14 13-25 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY San Francisco 43 27 .614 4-6 L-3 23-15 20-12 Los Angeles 37 34 .521 6 6-4 L-1 15-20 22-14 Colorado 34 35 .493 8 2 6-4 W-5 19-14 15-21 San Diego 29 40 .420 13 7 3-7 L-1 16-19 13-21 Arizona 30 42 .417 14 7 4-6 W-1 12-24 18-18 SATURDAYS GAMES Kansas City 9, Chicago White Sox 1 Cleveland 3, Boston 2 Baltimore 3, Toronto 2 Detroit 12, Minnesota 9 Houston 7, Tampa Bay 3 L.A. Angels 11, Atlanta 6, 13 innings Oakland 5, N.Y. Yankees 1 Texas 4, Seattle 3 SATURDAYS GAMES Philadelphia 7, Chicago Cubs 4 Colorado 5, San Francisco 4 Pittsburgh 8, Miami 6 San Diego 5, N.Y. Mets 0 Milwaukee 4, Cincinnati 2 L.A. Angels 11, Atlanta 6, 13 innings St. Louis 4, Washington 1 L.A. Dodgers 6, Arizona 4 SUNDAYS GAMES Detroit 4, Minnesota 3 Cleveland 3, Boston 2, 11 innings Toronto 5, Baltimore 2 Kansas City 6, Chicago White Sox 3 Tampa Bay 4, Houston 3 Oakland 10, N.Y. Yankees 5 Seattle 5, Texas 1 L.A. Angels at Atlanta, late SUNDAYS GAMES Miami 3, Pittsburgh 2, 10 innings N.Y. Mets 3, San Diego 1 Chicago Cubs 3, Philadelphia 0 Cincinnati 13, Milwaukee 4 St. Louis 5, Washington 2 Colorado 8, San Francisco 7 Arizona 6, L.A. Dodgers 3 L.A. Angels at Atlanta, late TODAYS GAMES L.A. Angels (Weaver 7-5) at Cleveland (Bauer 1-3), 7:05 p.m. Kansas City (Vargas 6-2) at Detroit (Verlander 6-6), 7:08 p.m. Baltimore (W.Chen 7-2) at Tampa Bay (Odorizzi 2-7), 7:10 p.m. Minnesota (Correia 3-7) at Boston (R.De La Rosa 1-2), 7:10 p.m. Texas (Lewis 4-4) at Oakland (Pomeranz 5-3), 10:05 p.m. San Diego (T.Ross 6-5) at Seattle (C.Young 5-4), 10:10 p.m. TODAYS GAMES Chicago Cubs (Hammel 6-4) at Miami (Koehler 5-5), 7:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Hamels 2-3) at Atlanta (Teheran 6-4), 7:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (deGrom 0-3) at St. Louis (C.Martinez 0-3), 8:10 p.m. Milwaukee (W.Peralta 6-5) at Arizona (McCarthy 1-9), 9:40 p.m. Colorado (Matzek 1-0) at L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 7-3), 10:10 p.m. San Diego (T.Ross 6-5) at Seattle (C.Young 5-4), 10:10 p.m. AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Cano, Seattle, .331; VMartinez, Detroit, .329; Rios, Texas, .327; MiCabrera, Detroit, .325; Brantley, Cleve land, .319; Altuve, Houston, .319; Beltre, Texas, .316. RUNS: Dozier, Minnesota, 55; Donaldson, Oakland, 52; Bautista, Toronto, 51; Brantley, Cleveland, 48; Kinsler, Detroit, 44; Trout, Los Angeles, 44; MeCabrera, Toronto, 43; NCruz, Baltimore, 43; Encarnacion, Toronto, 43. RBI: MiCabrera, Detroit, 55; NCruz, Baltimore, 55; En carnacion, Toronto, 54; Moss, Oakland, 53. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 90; MeCabrera, Toronto, 86; Rios, Texas, 86; Markakis, Baltimore, 84; Brantley, Cleveland, 83; Cano, Seattle, 83; AJones, Baltimore, 82; AlRamirez, Chicago, 82. DOUBLES: MiCabrera, Detroit, 23; Plouffe, Minnesota, 22; Altuve, Houston, 21; Hosmer, Kansas City, 21; Pe droia, Boston, 21; EEscobar, Minnesota, 20; Kinsler, Detroit, 20. TRIPLES: Rios, Texas, 8; Bourn, Cleveland, 5; Trout, Los Angeles, 5; Gardner, New York, 4; 13 tied at 3. HOME RUNS: NCruz, Baltimore, 21; Encarnacion, To ronto, 20; JAbreu, Chicago, 19; Donaldson, Oakland, 17; VMartinez, Detroit, 17; Moss, Oakland, 16; Pujols, Los Angeles, 16. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 24; RDavis, Detroit, 18; Ellsbury, New York, 18; AEscobar, Kansas City, 17; Andrus, Texas, 16; LMartin, Texas, 15; Reyes, Toronto, 15. PITCHING: Tanaka, New York, 10-1; Buehrle, Toronto, 10-3; FHernandez, Seattle, 8-2; Kazmir, Oakland, 8-2; Scherzer, Detroit, 8-2; Keuchel, Houston, 8-3; Porcello, Detroit, 8-4; Lackey, Boston, 8-4. ERA: Tanaka, New York, 2.02; Kazmir, Oakland, 2.05; Darvish, Texas, 2.11; Buehrle, Toronto, 2.28; FHernan dez, Seattle, 2.29; Keuchel, Houston, 2.38; Richards, Los Angeles, 2.87. STRIKEOUTS: FHernandez, Seattle, 112; Price, Tampa Bay, 111; Scherzer, Detroit, 106; Kluber, Cleveland, 104; Tanaka, New York, 103; Darvish, Texas, 101; Lester, Boston, 99. SAVES: Holland, Kansas City, 19; Rodney, Seattle, 18; Perkins, Minnesota, 17; DavRobertson, New York, 16. NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Tulowitzki, Colorado, .355; Lucroy, Milwaukee, .333; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, .323; Puig, Los Angeles, .318; CGomez, Milwaukee, .310; Goldschmidt, Arizona, .309; Utley, Philadelphia, .308. RUNS: Tulowitzki, Colorado, 53; Pence, San Francisco, 51; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 50; Stanton, Miami, 48; CGo mez, Milwaukee, 45; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 44; Rizzo, Chicago, 44. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 54; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 50; Blackmon, Colorado, 44; Morse, San Francisco, 44; Tu lowitzki, Colorado, 43; Desmond, Washington, 42. HITS: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 85; DanMurphy, New York, 83; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 82; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 81; Pence, San Francisco, 81; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 78. DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 27; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 25; Utley, Philadelphia, 24; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 21; Byrd, Philadelphia, 19; CGomez, Milwaukee, 19. TRIPLES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 6; BCrawford, San Francisco, 5; Yelich, Miami, 5; Pollock, Arizona, 4. HOME RUNS: Stanton, Miami, 18; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 17; Gattis, Atlanta, 15; Frazier, Cincinnati, 14; Gold schmidt, Arizona, 14; JUpton, Atlanta, 14; Desmond, Washington, 13; Morse, San Francisco, 13 STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 36; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 25; Revere, Philadelphia, 18; EYoung, New York, 17; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 16; Bonifacio, Chicago, 13; ECabrera, San Diego, 13; Segura, Milwaukee, 13. PITCHING: Simon, Cincinnati, 9-3; Wainwright, St. Louis, 9-3; Greinke, Los Angeles, 8-3; Bumgarner, San Fran cisco, 8-4; 7 tied at 7. ERA: Hudson, San Francisco, 1.81; Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.85; Wainwright, St. Louis, 2.15; Beckett, Los Angeles, 2.35; Teheran, Atlanta, 2.41; Cashner, San Diego, 2.47; Niese, New York, 2.54. STRIKEOUTS: Strasburg, Washington, 113; Cueto, Cin cinnati, 109; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 95; Greinke, Los Angeles, 92; Kennedy, San Diego, 91; Wainwright, St. Louis, 91; Miley, Arizona, 85. SAVES: FrRodriguez, Milwaukee, 21; Romo, San Fran cisco, 20; Jansen, Los Angeles, 19; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 19; Kimbrel, Atlanta, 19; Street, San Diego, 18. PAUL SANCYA / AP Detroit Tigers Eugenio Suarez singles against the Minnesota Twins in the second inning on Sunday in Detroit. Tigers 4, Twins 3 Minnesota Detroit ab r h bi ab r h bi DSantn ss 5 0 0 0 Kinsler 2b 5 1 2 0 Mauer 1b 4 1 2 0 TrHntr rf 5 1 1 0 Dozier 2b 4 0 0 0 MiCarr 1b 4 0 1 0 Wlngh lf 4 1 1 1 VMrtnz dh 3 1 2 1 KMorls dh 4 1 1 1 JMrtnz lf 4 0 1 1 Flormn pr-dh 0 0 0 0 AJcksn cf 4 1 1 0 Arcia rf 2 0 0 0 Cstllns 3b 3 0 1 2 KSuzuk c 4 0 1 1 Avila c 2 0 0 0 Fuld cf 4 0 0 0 RDavis pr 0 0 0 0 EEscor 3b 4 0 2 0 Holady c 0 0 0 0 Suarez ss 4 0 1 0 Totals 35 3 7 3 Totals 34 4 10 4 Minnesota 000 003 000 3 Detroit 110 001 001 4 Two outs when winning run scored. EArcia (2). DPMinnesota 1. LOBMinnesota 9, De troit 11. 2BMauer (10), Willingham (3), E.Escobar (21), Kinsler (21), V.Martinez (17), Castellanos (13). 3BA.Jackson (3). SBR.Davis (19). SFJ.Martinez, Castellanos. IP H R ER BB SO Minnesota Nolasco 5 1 / 3 9 3 3 2 5 Burton 1 0 0 0 2 0 Guerrier 1 2 / 3 0 0 0 1 1 Fien L,3-3 2 / 3 1 1 0 0 0 Detroit Porcello 7 5 3 3 3 4 Chamberlain 1 0 0 0 1 2 Nathan W,3-2 1 2 0 0 0 0 WPChamberlain. UmpiresHome, Seth Buckminster; First, Manny Gon zalez; Second, Brian Knight; Third, Jim Reynolds. T:19. A,462 (41,681). Indians 3, Red Sox 2, 11 innings Cleveland Boston ab r h bi ab r h bi Bourn cf 6 0 0 0 Holt 3b 5 1 2 0 ACarer ss 5 0 0 0 Pedroia 2b 5 0 0 1 Brantly lf 4 1 2 1 D.Ortiz dh 5 0 1 1 Kipnis 2b 4 0 1 0 Napoli 1b 5 0 1 0 Chsnhll 3b 3 0 0 0 Nava lf 2 0 0 0 Aviles ph-3b 1 0 0 0 Przyns c 3 0 0 0 Swisher dh 5 1 1 1 Bogarts pr 0 0 0 0 DvMrp rf 4 1 0 0 D.Ross c 1 0 0 0 CSantn 1b 5 0 3 0 GSizmr rf 4 0 0 0 YGoms c 3 0 0 1 Drew ss 4 0 2 0 BrdlyJr cf 2 1 0 0 Totals 40 3 7 3 Totals 36 2 6 2 Cleveland 100 000 100 01 3 Boston 100 010 000 00 2 DPCleveland 1. LOBCleveland 10, Boston 8. 2BC. Santana (9). HRBrantley (11), Swisher (4). SBDrew (1). CSNava (1). SFY.Gomes. IP H R ER BB SO Cleveland Kluber 5 1 / 3 5 2 2 4 4 Rzepczynski 1 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 1 Shaw 1 0 0 0 0 1 Axford 2 / 3 0 0 0 3 2 Atchison 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Allen W,3-1 2 0 0 0 0 3 Boston Workman 6 5 2 2 2 7 Badenhop BS,1-2 1 0 0 0 0 0 A.Miller 1 0 0 0 0 3 Uehara 1 0 0 0 0 1 Breslow 1 0 0 0 2 1 Tazawa L,1-1 1 2 1 1 0 2 Workman pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. HBPby Workman (Y.Gomes). WPKluber, Axford, A.Miller. UmpiresHome, Chris Guccione; First, Eric Cooper; Second, Tom Hallion; Third, Sean Barber. T:03. A,356 (37,071). Mariners 5, Rangers 1 Texas Seattle ab r h bi ab r h bi LMartn cf 4 0 1 0 EnChvz rf 5 1 2 0 Andrus ss 4 0 1 0 J.Jones cf 3 0 1 0 Choo lf 4 0 0 0 Cano dh-2b 3 1 0 0 ABeltre 3b 4 0 0 0 Morrsn 1b 3 0 0 0 Rios rf 4 0 0 0 Buck 1b 1 0 1 0 Snyder 1b 3 1 2 1 Gillespi pr 0 1 0 0 Gimenz c 3 0 1 0 Furush p 0 0 0 0 Sardins 2b 3 0 1 0 Seager 3b 4 1 4 3 DMrph dh 3 0 0 0 Zunino c 4 1 1 0 Ackley lf 4 0 2 1 Blmqst 2b-1b 3 0 2 0 BMiller ss 3 0 0 1 Totals 32 1 6 1 Totals 33 5 13 5 Texas 010 000 000 1 Seattle 000 020 03x 5 DPTexas 2. LOBTexas 4, Seattle 8. 2BEn.Chavez (4), Seager 2 (15), Ackley (11). HRSnyder (1). CS Andrus (5), Seager (3). SBloomquist. SFB.Miller. IP H R ER BB SO Texas N.Martinez L,1-4 6 9 2 2 1 3 Ross Jr. 1 4 3 3 1 0 Rowen 1 0 0 0 0 0 Seattle Iwakuma W,5-3 8 6 1 1 0 6 Furbush 1 0 0 0 0 1 Ross Jr. pitched to 4 batters in the 8th. UmpiresHome, Phil Cuzzi; First, Gerry Davis; Sec ond, Quinn Wolcott; Third, Alfonso Marquez. T:46. A,196 (47,476). Royals 6, White Sox 3 Kansas City Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi JDyson cf 5 0 2 1 Eaton cf 4 1 3 0 Infante 2b 5 1 1 0 GBckh 2b 5 0 1 0 Hosmer 1b 5 1 1 2 Gillaspi 3b 4 0 1 0 BButler dh 2 1 1 0 JAreu 1b 4 0 2 0 AGordn lf 3 1 0 0 A.Dunn dh 5 1 1 0 S.Perez c 3 1 2 3 AlRmrz ss 5 1 2 0 L.Cain rf 4 0 0 0 Viciedo rf 5 0 0 0 Mostks 3b 2 1 1 0 De Aza lf 4 0 1 2 AEscor ss 3 0 0 0 Nieto c 3 0 1 0 Totals 32 6 8 6 Totals 39 3 12 2 Kansas City 203 100 000 6 Chicago 100 200 000 3 DPChicago 2. LOBKansas City 6, Chicago 13. 2BG.Beckham (12), Gillaspie (16), J.Abreu (15), De Aza (9). 3BEaton (4). HRHosmer (4), S.Perez (7). CSL.Cain (1). IP H R ER BB SO Kansas City Shields W,8-3 6 10 3 3 1 3 Bueno H,3 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 K.Herrera H,4 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 W.Davis H,12 1 0 0 0 2 1 G.Holland S,20-21 1 1 0 0 1 1 Chicago Rienzo L,4-4 6 6 6 6 4 3 Petricka 2 / 3 0 0 0 1 2 S.Downs 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Putnam 1 1 0 0 1 0 Belisario 1 1 0 0 0 1 HBPby Rienzo (B.Butler). WPG.Holland. Balk Shields. Blue Jays 5, Orioles 2 Toronto Baltimore ab r h bi ab r h bi Reyes ss 5 1 2 0 Markks rf 4 0 0 0 MeCarr lf 4 0 0 1 Machd 3b 4 0 0 0 Bautist rf 4 0 2 1 A.Jones cf 4 2 2 1 Encrnc 1b 5 2 3 0 N.Cruz lf 3 0 3 1 Lawrie 3b 5 1 0 0 Pearce 1b 4 0 0 0 DNavrr dh 4 0 3 2 DYong dh 4 0 1 0 Kratz c 3 0 0 0 JHardy ss 4 0 2 0 StTllsn 2b 4 0 0 1 Schoop 2b 4 0 1 0 Gose cf 4 1 2 0 Hundly c 4 0 0 0 Totals 38 5 12 5 Totals 35 2 9 2 Toronto 100 110 020 5 Baltimore 000 001 010 2 DPToronto 1. LOBToronto 9, Baltimore 7. 2B Reyes (14), Bautista (14), Encarnacion 2 (19), D.Na varro 2 (7), A.Jones (14), J.Hardy (16). HRA.Jones (11). SFMe.Cabrera. IP H R ER BB SO Toronto Happ W,6-3 6 7 1 1 0 6 McGowan H,6 1 2 / 3 1 1 1 1 2 Janssen S,12-14 1 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 2 Baltimore Tillman L,5-4 7 8 3 3 0 0 Tom.Hunter 2 / 3 2 2 2 2 0 McFarland 1 1 / 3 2 0 0 0 0 Happ pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. UmpiresHome, Jerry Layne; First, Adam Hamari; Second, Mike DiMuro; Third, Mike Estabrook. T:07. A,469 (45,971). Mets 3, Padres 1 San Diego New York ab r h bi ab r h bi Venale cf 2 0 0 0 Grndrs cf-rf 3 1 2 1 ECarer ss 3 0 0 0 DnMrp 2b 3 1 1 1 S.Smith rf 2 0 0 0 DWrght 3b 3 0 0 0 Headly 3b 3 0 0 0 BAreu rf 3 0 1 1 Quentin lf 3 1 1 0 Tejada ss 0 0 0 0 Alonso 1b 4 0 1 0 ABrwn lf 3 0 0 0 Rivera c 3 0 1 1 Black p 0 0 0 0 Qcknsh p 0 0 0 0 dnDkkr ph-cf 1 0 0 0 Stauffr p 0 0 0 0 Duda 1b 4 0 2 0 Denor ph 1 0 0 0 Flores ss 4 0 1 0 Petersn 2b 2 0 0 0 Mejia p 0 0 0 0 Amarst ph-2b 2 0 0 0 Recker c 3 1 0 0 Kenndy p 1 0 0 0 Matszk p 0 0 0 0 ATorrs p 0 0 0 0 CTorrs p 1 0 0 0 Grandl c 1 0 1 0 Campll lf 2 0 1 0 Totals 27 1 4 1 Totals 30 3 8 3 San Diego 010 000 000 1 New York 210 000 00x 3 DPNew York 2. LOBSan Diego 7, New York 11. 2BDan.Murphy (17), B.Abreu (9), Duda 2 (14). HR Granderson (9). SBVenable (3). SE.Cabrera, Ken nedy, C.Torres. SFDan.Murphy. IP H R ER BB SO San Diego Kennedy L,5-8 5 1 / 3 7 3 3 4 7 A.Torres 1 / 3 0 0 0 1 0 Quackenbush 1 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 2 Stauffer 1 0 0 0 1 1 New York Matsuzaka 1 0 0 0 2 0 C.Torres W,3-4 4 3 1 1 1 4 Black H,3 2 1 0 0 2 1 Mejia S,7-8 2 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby C.Torres (Quentin). WPKennedy. UmpiresHome, Tom Woodring; First, Scott Barry; Second, Mike Everitt; Third, Dan Bellino. T:15. A,987 (41,922). Cubs 3, Phillies 0 Chicago Philadelphia ab r h bi ab r h bi Valuen 3b 4 0 0 0 Revere cf 3 0 1 0 Ruggin lf 4 1 1 0 Rollins ss 4 0 1 0 Rizzo 1b 4 1 1 1 Utley 2b 4 0 0 0 SCastro ss 4 1 3 1 Byrd rf 4 0 0 0 Sweeny cf 4 0 1 0 Ruiz c 3 0 0 0 Schrhlt rf 4 0 1 1 DBrwn lf 4 0 0 0 Barney 2b 4 0 0 0 Mayrry 1b 2 0 0 0 Whitsd c 4 0 0 0 RCeden 3b 3 0 0 0 T.Wood p 3 0 1 0 ABrntt p 2 0 0 0 NRmrz p 0 0 0 0 CHrndz ph 1 0 1 0 Giles p 0 0 0 0 Totals 35 3 8 3 Totals 30 0 3 0 Chicago 101 001 000 3 Philadelphia 000 000 000 0 LOBChicago 5, Philadelphia 6. 2BS.Castro (19), Schierholtz (9). HRRizzo (14). SBS.Castro (2), Revere (19). IP H R ER BB SO Chicago T.Wood W,7-5 8 3 0 0 3 6 N.Ramirez S,3-3 1 0 0 0 0 0 Philadelphia A.Burnett L,4-6 8 8 3 3 0 4 Giles 1 0 0 0 0 2 WPA.Burnett. UmpiresHome, Kerwin Danley; First, Gary Ced erstrom; Second, Mark Ripperger; Third, Lance Barksdale. T:35. A,238 (43,651). Reds 13, Brewers 4 Cincinnati Milwaukee ab r h bi ab r h bi BHmltn cf 6 2 3 2 Gennett 2b 5 0 2 2 Frazier 3b-1b 6 1 2 4 Braun rf 5 0 0 0 Votto 1b 4 1 2 1 Lucroy c 4 1 2 1 Cingrn p 1 0 0 0 Maldnd c 1 0 0 0 Phillips 2b 4 1 2 3 CGomz cf 4 0 2 0 Bruce rf 5 1 1 0 ArRmr 3b 4 0 1 0 Ludwck lf 5 2 4 0 Overay 1b 0 0 0 0 Mesorc c 5 1 3 1 KDavis lf 3 1 1 0 Cozart ss 5 2 1 1 MrRynl 1b-3b 3 1 1 0 Leake p 2 0 0 0 Segura ss 3 1 0 0 Heisey ph 1 0 0 0 Estrad p 1 0 1 1 MParr p 0 0 0 0 Grzlny p 0 0 0 0 LeCure p 0 0 0 0 EHerrr ph 1 0 0 0 Schmkr ph 1 1 1 1 Kintzlr p 0 0 0 0 RSantg 3b 1 1 0 0 Wooten p 0 0 0 0 Fiers p 0 0 0 0 RWeks ph 1 0 0 0 Wang p 0 0 0 0 Totals 46 13 19 13 Totals 35 4 10 4 Cincinnati 300 020 053 13 Milwaukee 000 310 000 4 ESegura (10). DPCincinnati 2. LOBCincinnati 8, Milwaukee 8. 2BFrazier (15), Votto (11), Ludwick 3 (11), Gennett (16), C.Gomez (20), Mar.Reynolds (5). HRB.Hamilton (4), Frazier (15), Phillips (5), Lucroy (6). SBK.Davis (2). SFPhillips. IP H R ER BB SO Cincinnati Leake W,4-6 5 9 4 4 3 3 M.Parra H,9 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 LeCure H,9 1 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 Cingrani 2 0 0 0 1 0 Milwaukee Estrada L,5-4 5 8 5 5 0 3 Gorzelanny 1 1 0 0 0 0 Kintzler 1 1 0 0 0 2 Wooten 0 6 5 5 0 0 Fiers 1 0 0 0 1 1 Wang 1 3 3 1 0 1 Wooten pitched to 6 batters in the 8th. UmpiresHome, Doug Eddings; First, Cory Blaser; Second, Marvin Hudson; Third, Brian ONora. T:19. A,213 (41,900). Cardinals 5, Nationals 2 Washington St. Louis ab r h bi ab r h bi Rendon 3b 4 0 1 0 MCrpnt 3b 4 0 0 0 McLoth cf 4 0 1 0 Wong 2b 4 1 1 0 LaRoch ph 0 0 0 1 Hollidy lf 2 2 1 2 Werth rf 4 0 0 1 Craig rf 4 1 2 1 Zmrmn 1b 4 0 0 0 MAdms 1b 4 1 1 2 Hairstn lf 4 0 1 0 JhPerlt ss 4 0 2 0 Dsmnd ss 4 0 1 0 Jay cf 3 0 1 0 Espinos 2b 3 1 2 0 Rosnthl p 0 0 0 0 S.Leon c 4 1 1 0 T.Cruz c 3 0 1 0 Fister p 2 0 0 0 JGarci p 1 0 0 0 Frndsn ph 1 0 0 0 Motte p 0 0 0 0 Detwilr p 0 0 0 0 SFrmn p 0 0 0 0 RSorin p 0 0 0 0 Bourjos cf 0 0 0 0 Dobbs ph 1 0 1 0 Totals 35 2 8 2 Totals 29 5 9 5 Washington 000 010 001 2 St. Louis 021 010 10x 5 DPWashington 1. LOBWashington 10, St. Louis 6. 2BCraig (13). 3BWong (2). HRHolliday (5), Ma.Ad ams (6). SJ.Garcia 2. SFHolliday. IP H R ER BB SO Washington Fister L,5-2 6 7 4 4 2 2 Detwiler 1 1 1 1 1 1 R.Soriano 1 1 0 0 0 0 St. Louis J.Garcia W,3-0 7 5 1 1 2 6 Motte 1 0 0 0 0 2 S.Freeman 2 / 3 2 1 1 0 1 Rosenthal S,20-23 1 / 3 1 0 0 1 0 HBPby J.Garcia (Espinosa). WPJ.Garcia. UmpiresHome, Alan Porter; First, Joe West; Second, Marty Foster; Third, Rob Drake. T:40. A,325 (45,399).

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 16, 2014 Party In The PastureCome Celebrate 4th of July Weekend atRUTLAND MUDBOGFor more information call 352-303-6127Ocial Sponsor of Boggin For Boobies Breast Cancer FoundationAt CR 251 & SR 44 In Lake Panasuffkee, FL5 miles west of Wildwood off I-75 You Make the CA L L!June 1622This Weeks Leesburg Lightning ScheduleAlways FREE Admission! Rainout Information 352-234-4489 You Make the CA L L!This Weeks Leesburg Lightning ScheduleAlways FREE Admission! Game Times: 7pm Weekdays Sun 5pmTHE PLAY: B7 hits a deep line drive on which F9 appears to make a sensational catch. However, F9 is unable to stop before running into the fence. The balls pops out of his glove and goes over the fence. Whats the rueling? Rainout Information 352-234-4489 Mon. 6/16............no game Tues. 6/17............@ Winter Park Diamond DawgsWed. 6/18............Winter Park Diamond DawgsThurs. 6/19............@ Winter Park Diamond DawgsFri. 6/20............Deland SunsSat. 6/21............@ Deland SunsSun. 6/22............@ Deland Suns Answer on Friday Associated Press LE MANS, France Marcel Fassler, An dre Lotterer and Benoit Treluyer overcame tur bocharger problems to drive Audi to its 13th ti tle at the 24 Hours of Le Mans on Sunday. It was the trios third victory in the worlds most famous endur ance race. Their Audi No. 2 nished three laps ahead of Audi No. 1 driven by Lucas di Grassi, Marc Gene and defending champion Tom Kristensen. Audi has now won 10 of the last 11 races at Le Mans, including the last ve. We did like in 2011, Treluyer told Euros port. We stayed calm and attacked when we needed to. Andre (Lot terer) really put the pressure on Porsche at the right time. Sebastien Buemi, An thony Davidson and Nicolas Lapierre took third place at the wheel of Toyota No. 8, ve laps off the pace. Pole-sitter Kazuki Nakajimas Toy ota No. 7 retired in the 15th hour while lead ing because of an elec trical problem. It is heartbreaking, Nakajima told the Toy ota Racing website. Somehow I thought maybe we could make it this time and then this happens. AUTO RACING MLB Audi wins 13th title at LeMans DAVID EDME / AP Toyota TS040 Hybrid drivers Britain Anthony Davidson, left, Swizerland Sebastien Buemi, 2nd left, France Nicolas Lapierre, and Toyota team manager John Steeghs, right, hold their trophy third at the 82nd 24 hours Le Mans endurance race on Sunday in Le Mans, France. TENNIS BARRY WOOD Associated Press LONDON Grig or Dimitrov saved a match point to defeat Spanish left-hander Feliciano Lopez 6-7 (8), 7-6 (1), 7-6 (6) Sunday and win the grass court tournament at Queens Club, a warm-up event for Wimbledon. The fourth-seed ed Dimitrov is the rst Bulgarian to lift the ti tle, and also the rst player this year to win titles on three different surfaces after claiming victories in Acapulco on hardcourt and Bu charest on clay. At age 32, 10th-seed ed Lopez was attempt ing to become the oldest winner of the tournament since 33year old Tony Roche defeated John McEn roe in the 1978 nal, and to win his rst title since Eastbourne one year ago. Of course, Im real ly happy with the win, said Dimitrov. Obvious ly I knew what I had to do today out on the court, and Feli is one of those competitors that when it comes to fast surfaces, hes always very tricky. Down match point in the second set wasnt the coolest thing, but, you know, I just fought hard. I just left every thing out on the court. Dimitrov dropped only four points on serve in the rst set. Dimitrov saves match point against Lopez to gain victory in Queens final KRISTIE RIEKEN AP Sports Writer HOUSTON Hous ton starter Jarred Cosart made it through seven innings for the rst time in more than a month on Saturday against Tampa Bay. His performance in the 7-3 win was much more impressive considering he was battling a case of food poisoning and was ill in both the second and third innings. I felt terrible in the third inning, I thought: Im not going to make it, he said. But you keep pushing yourself. Its the competitive side. I didnt want to come out of the game. I didnt want to tax the bullpen and I guess I wasnt dying, so I was able to pitch. Cosart (6-5) allowed nine hits and three runs in his longest outing since May 5 for the win. Matt Dominguez broke out of a slump with two hits, including a three-run double in Houstons big third in ning to help the Astros to the victory. Dominguez was 1 for 12 in the rst three games of this home stand before singling in the second inning. The Astros led by one when he cleared the bases with his double in a ve-run third inning that made it 5-1. He obviously had a couple days there where he wasnt seeing the ball too good, manager Bo Porter said. I felt like he did a great job of mak ing them get the ball up today. The base-clear ing double was a huge hit at that moment of the game. Tampa Bay starter Chris Archer (3-4) was done in by an error and a lack of control in his shortest start this sea son. He allowed three hits and six runs one earned with three walks in three innings. The Astros got back on track after striking out a season-high 16 times in a 6-1 loss in the opener Friday night. Dexter Fowler had two RBIs and Marwin Gonzalez, who was ll ing in for the injured Jose Altuve, had three hits and scored twice. Matt Dominguezs double leads Astros to 7-3 win over Rays PATRIC SCHNEIDER / AP Tampa Bay Rays Evan Longoria, right, beats the tag by Houston Astros second baseman Marwin Gonzalez during the third inning on Sunday in Houston. Astros 7, Rays 3 Tampa Bay Houston ab r h bi ab r h bi DJnngs cf 5 0 1 0 Fowler cf 5 1 1 2 Kiermr rf 4 2 2 0 Springr rf 3 1 0 0 Longori 3b 4 1 2 3 Singltn 1b 2 1 0 0 Loney 1b 4 0 1 0 JCastro c 2 1 0 1 Zobrist 2b-lf 4 0 0 0 MDmn 3b 4 0 2 3 DeJess dh 2 0 1 0 Carter dh 4 0 0 0 SRdrgz ph-dh 1 0 1 0 Presley lf 3 1 0 0 Joyce lf 3 0 1 0 MGnzlz 2b 4 2 3 0 Forsyth ph-2b 1 0 0 0 Villar ss 4 0 1 0 YEscor ss 4 0 0 0 Hanign c 4 0 1 0 Totals 36 3 10 3 Totals 31 7 7 6 Tampa Bay 100 020 000 3 Houston 005 200 00x 7 EArcher (1). DPTampa Bay 1. LOBTampa Bay 7, Houston 6. 2BKiermaier 2 (7), Loney (16), Fowler (10), M.Dominguez (11), Ma.Gonzalez (4). HRLon goria (8). CSKiermaier (1). IP H R ER BB SO Tampa Bay Archer L,3-4 3 3 6 1 3 2 C.Ramos 3 3 1 1 0 4 Oviedo 1 0 0 0 2 0 Yates 1 1 0 0 0 1 Houston Cosart W,6-5 7 9 3 3 1 2 Sipp 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 1 Fields 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Zeid 1 0 0 0 0 0 Archer pitched to 1 batter in the 4th. HBPby Archer (Springer). WPArcher, Oviedo. UmpiresHome, Laz Diaz; First, Marcus Pattillo; Sec ond, Mark Carlson; Third, Jeff Nelson. T:39. A,264 (42,060). STEVEN WINE AP Sports Writer MIAMI Casey Mc Gehee completed his sacrice-y trot near rst base, then started toward the Miami Mar lins dugout and was met by the sight of the entire team gleefully sprinting toward him. McGehee, who has delivered plenty of clutch hits this season, started a celebration Sunday with an out. He tied the game in the eighth inning with a two-out, two-run dou ble, then drove home the winning run with a sacrice y in the 10th, and the Marlins averted a series sweep by beat ing the Pittsburgh Pi rates 3-2 Sunday. Miami earned its sixth walkoff win and broke a three-game losing streak. McGehee was glad to be at the center of the post game mob scene. Its one of those feel ings you cant really de scribe, he said. Its a special feeling because youve been grinding for however many in nings. Its a sudden relief theres nothing like it that I can imagine. The Marlins gave Mc Gehee a chance to re turn to the majors after he spent 2013 in Japan, and he has repeatedly rewarded their faith. He leads the majors with 30 hits with run ners in scoring posi tion, and hes batting .411 in those situations, often coming through after opponents pitch around slugger Gi ancarlo Stanton. Casey has gotten some huge hits for us, manager Mike Redmond said. I think hes grate ful for the chance he has been given here, and he has made the most of it. The Pirates had won four in a row and were on the verge of their rst three-game series sweep in Miami since 1993. McGehee paces Marlins past Pirates 3-2 on double, sacrifice fly Pittsburgh Miami ab r h bi ab r h bi Polanc rf 5 1 2 0 Furcal 2b 5 1 2 0 SMarte lf 4 0 1 1 Lucas pr 0 1 0 0 AMcCt cf 4 0 2 0 RJhnsn lf 4 0 0 0 I.Davis 1b 4 0 0 0 Stanton rf 4 0 1 0 RMartn c 3 1 1 0 McGeh 3b 4 0 3 3 PAlvrz 3b 4 0 1 0 GJones 1b 4 0 1 0 JHrrsn 2b 4 0 2 1 Ozuna cf 4 0 1 0 Barmes 2b 1 0 0 0 Hchvrr ss 3 0 1 0 Mercer ss 4 0 0 0 Mathis c 4 0 0 0 Worley p 3 0 0 0 HAlvrz p 2 0 0 0 Watson p 0 0 0 0 Hatchr p 0 0 0 0 Snider ph 1 0 0 0 JeBakr ph 1 1 1 0 JHughs p 0 0 0 0 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 Solano ph 1 0 0 0 ARams p 0 0 0 0 Totals 37 2 9 2 Totals 36 3 10 3 Pittsburgh 001 100 000 0 2 Miami 000 000 020 1 3 Two outs when winning run scored. EP.Alvarez (15). DPPittsburgh 1, Miami 2. LOB Pittsburgh 11, Miami 8. 2BS.Marte (13), McGehee (16), Hechavarria (9). SBA.McCutchen (9). SR. Johnson, Hechavarria. SFMcGehee. IP H R ER BB SO Pittsburgh Worley 7 5 0 0 0 5 Watson BS,3-3 1 3 2 2 0 2 J.Hughes L,3-2 1 2 / 3 2 1 1 1 1 Miami H.Alvarez 7 7 2 2 2 6 Hatcher 1 1 0 0 0 3 Cishek 1 0 0 0 0 0 A.Ramos W,4-0 1 1 0 0 3 1 HBPby H.Alvarez (R.Martin). WPJ.Hughes. UmpiresHome, Tim Welke; First, Todd Tichenor; Second, Clint Fagan; Third, Tim Timmons. ALAN DIAZ / AP Miami Marlins Casey McGehee (9) follows through on his game-tying double against the Pittsburgh Pirates in the eighth inning on Sunday in Miami.

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LAURAN NEERGAARD Associated Press W ASHINGTON In one of the most ambitious attempts yet to thwart Alzheimers disease, a major study got underway Monday to see if an experimental drug can protect healthy se niors whose brains harbor silent signs that theyre at risk. Scientists plan to even tually scan the brains of thousands of older volun teers in the U.S., Canada and Australia to nd those with a sticky build-up be lieved to play a key role in development of Alz heimers the rst time so many people without memory problems get the chance to learn the poten tially troubling news. Having lots of that gunky protein called be ta-amyloid doesnt guar antee someone will get sick. But the big question: Could intervening so ear ly make a difference for those who do? We have to get them at the stage when we can save their brains, said Dr. Reisa Sperling of Bos tons Brigham and Wom ens Hospital and Harvard Medical School, who is leading the huge effort to nd out. Researchers are just be ginning to recruit volun teers, and on Monday, a Rhode Island man was hooked up for an IV infu sion at Butler Hospital in Providence, the rst treat ed. Peter Bristol, 70, of Wakeeld, Rhode Island, gured he was at risk be cause his mother died of Alzheimers and his broth er has it. I felt I needed to be proactive in seeking what ever therapies might be available for myself in the coming years, said Bris tol, who said he was pre pared when a PET scan of his brain showed he har bored enough amyloid to qualify for the research. Just because I have it doesnt mean Im go ing to get Alzheimers, he stressed. But Bristol and his wife are going into the situation with our eyes Living Healthy Send your health news to features @dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 16, 2014 STUDY: Teens are drinking less, texting more / C2 Health check www.dailycommercial.com PHOTOS BY MICHAEL DWYER / AP Peter Bristol, of Wakeeld, R.I., center, watches as Denise Jerue, left, a research infusion nurse, disconnects his intravenous line while principal investigator, Dr. Stephen Sallowy, right, stands by, at Butler Hospital in Providence, R.I. Bristol, left, jokes with study co-ordinator, RN Diane Monast after receiving an intravenous infusion. Fighting back Scientists seeking seniors at risk of Alzheimers in bid to thwart disease MARIA CHENG Associated Press LONDON Women who often indulge their cravings for hamburg ers, steaks and other red meat may have a slight ly higher risk of breast cancer, a new study suggests. Doctors have long warned that a diet load ed with red meat is linked to cancers in cluding those of the co lon and pancreas, but there has been less ev idence for its role in breast cancer. In the new study, re searchers at Harvard University analyzed data from more than 88,000 women aged 26 to 45 who had lled in surveys in 1991. Their red meat intake varied from never or less than once a month, to six or more servings a day. Ini tial results of the study were rst published in 2006 and showed a pre liminary link between eating red meat and breast cancer after 12 years; the new research conrmed the earli er ndings with longer follow-up information, and analyzed other Study: Red meat possibly linked to breast cancer AP FILE PHOTO Women who often indulge their cravings for hamburgers, steaks and other red meat may have a slightly higher risk of breast cancer, a new study suggests. SEE ALZHEIMERS | C2 SEE STUDY | C5 LAKE COUNTY LIFE-Social Support Group to host luncheon LIFE, a social support group for the widowed, will host its monthly luncheon at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday at Golden Corral, 15810 U.S. Highway 441, Eustis. After lunch Paul Vincoli will entertain. The newest LIFE Luncheon will be at 11:30 a.m. Friday at North Lake Presbyterian Church, 975 Rolling Acres Road, behind Home Depot in Lady Lake. The meal will be prepared by the church staff. Cost is $12. An RSVP is needed by calling 352787-0403 or emailing rreed@beyers fhc.com. LADY LAKE Essential Tremor Support Group meeting scheduled Learn methods of coping, medi cations, helpful hints, support and understanding for you and your caregiver at 2 p.m. Wednesday at the St. Timothy Ministry Building, 1351 Paige Place. Call Ken Taylor at 352-787-3866 or email at kstaylor62@usa2net.net for information. LEESBURG Beginners American Sign Language class offered Deaf and Hearing Services of Lake and Sumter Counties will host a Beginners Sign Language class for interested parties. Classes begin on June 24 and run for six weeks from 6 to 8 p.m., at Deaf and Hearing Services ofces, 220 S. 9th St. Cost is $75. For information or to register, call 352-323-0757 or email ajohnson. DHS@gmail.com. LEESBURG Central Healthy Start annual meeting scheduled Central Healthy Start, with a mis sion to maintain a comprehensive healthcare system and support ser vices for women and their infants, will host its annual meeting at noon on June 26 at the Early Learning Coalition of Lake County, 1300 Citizens Blvd., No. 260. For information, call Heather Hollingsworth at 352-313-6500, ext. 119. LEESBURG Retired and Senior Volunteer Program seeking helpers Lake and Sumter County resi dents ages 55 and older who have a lifetime of experience to share and the desire to make a difference in the community can be an RSVP volunteer. Volunteers assist in tutoring ele mentary grade students, mentoring low-income high school students who are college bound, partici pate in after school educational/en richment programs, deliver meals, make telephone reassurance calls to home bound seniors and provide transportation for cancer patients. Those interested can call 352-3651995 to learn more.

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 16, 2014 NEW PATIENT SPECIALComplete Exam (D0150)Digital Xrays (D0210)Cleaning (D1110)Oral Cancer Screening (D0431)with Identafi 3000*Non-Insured Patients Only. All major insurances accepted including PPO & HMO plans.$59*D002756 Your Podiatrist treats... CENTRALFLORIDAFOOTCARE, P.A.Dr. Nick Przystawski, DPM www.Floridafoot.com AP PHOTO This undated photo by the Alzheimers Disease Cooperative Study shows Dr. Reisa Sperling Bostons Brigham and Womens Hospital. Sperling leads a major new study that is testing whether an experimental drug can protect healthy seniors whose brains harbor silent signs that theyre at risk. wide open. He wont know until the end of the so-called A4 Study it stands for Anti-Amyloid Treat ment in Asymptomatic Alzheimers wheth er he received monthly infusions of the exper imental medicine, Eli Lilly & Co.s solanezum ab, or a dummy drug. Solanezumab is de signed to help catch am yloid before it builds into the brain plaques that are a hallmark of Alzheimers. It failed in earlier studies to treat full-blown Alzheimers but it did appear to help slow mental decline in patients with mild disease, raising interest in testing it even earlier. Scientists now think Alzheimers begins rav aging the brain at least a decade before mem ory problems appear, much like heart dis ease is triggered by qui et cholesterol build-up. Many believe the best chance of preventing or at least slowing the dis ease requires interven ing, somehow, when people still appear healthy. The $140 million study, funded by the National Institutes of Health, Lilly and oth ers, will track if partic ipants memory and amyloid levels change over three years. Whether this partic ular drug works or not, the Alzheimers study is being watched close ly as a chance to learn more about how am yloid works and how people handle the un certainty of knowing its there. Amyloid we know is a huge risk factor, but someone can have a head full of amyloid and not decline men tally, Sperling said. We need to understand more about why some brains are resilient and some are not. Before any brain scans, interested 65to 85-year-olds will un dergo cognitive tests to make sure their memo ry is normal. Volunteers also must be willing to learn their amyloid lev els, and researchers can turn away those whose psychological assess ments suggest they may not cope well with the news. Sperling ex pects to screen more than 5,000 healthy se niors to nd the needed 1,000 participants, who will be monitored for anxiety or distress. It is breaking new ground, said Dr. Laurie Ryan of the NIHs Na tional Institute on Ag ing. We really do have to understand how that affects people. More than 35 million people worldwide have Alzheimers or simi lar dementia, including about 5 million in the U.S., numbers expect ed to rise rapidly as the baby boomers age. Alzheimers affects 1 in 9 people over age 65, and about a third of those 85 and older, ac cording to the Alzhei mers Association. Todays medications only temporarily ease some symptoms, and scientists dont even know exactly how the disease forms. A lead ing theory is that amy loid plaques kick off the disease but tangles of a second protein, named tau, speed up the brain destruction. As scientists shift their attention to the still healthy, a few stud ies are underway to try blocking Alzheimers in people genetically at risk to get a form of the disease that runs in their families. The A4 study widens the focus beyond a ge netic link. Like Bristol, the rst participant, some peo ple do want to know if theyre at risk, said Dr. Jason Karlawish, a bio ethicist at the Univer sity of Pennsylvania who helped design the studys psychological precautions. After all, many already get tested for Alzheimers-related genes. He calls the re search an opportuni ty to study the future of the way were going to think about, talk about and live with the risks of Alzheimers disease. ALZHEIMERS FROM PAGE C1 MIKE STOBBE Associated Press NEW YORK Amer ican teens are smok ing less, drinking less and ghting less. But theyre texting behind the wheel and spending a lot of time on video games and computers, according to the gov ernments latest study of worrisome behavior. Generally speak ing, the news is good. Most forms of drug use, weapons use and risky sex have been going down since the govern ment started doing the survey every two years in 1991. Teens are wear ing bicycle helmets and seat belts more, too. Overall, young peo ple have more healthy behaviors than they did 20 years ago, said Dr. Stephanie Zaza, who oversees the study at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The results come from a study of 13,000 U.S. high school students last spring. Participa tion was voluntary and required parental per mission, but responses were anonymous. Highlights of the study released Thurs day: SMOKING Fewer than 16 percent of the teens smoked a cigarette in the previ ous month the low est level since the gov ernment started doing the survey, when the rate was more than 27 percent. Another CDC study had already put the teen smoking rate below 16 percent, but experts tend to treat this surveys result as the of cial number. Its ter ric news for Ameri cas health, said Matt Myers, president of the Campaign for Tobac co-Free Kids. Even so, there are still about 2.7 million teens smoking, he said. The survey did not ask about electronic cigarettes, which have exploded in popularity in the past few years. Meanwhile, more than 23 percent of teens said they used mari juana in the previous month up from 15 percent in 1991. CDC ofcials said they could not tell whether mar ijuana or e-cigarettes have replaced tradi tional cigarettes among teens. FIGHTING Fights at school fell by half in the past 20 years. And there was a dra matic drop in kids re porting they had been in a ght anywhere in the preceding year about 25 percent, down from 33 percent two years earlier. The ad dition of more guards and other security mea sures may be a factor, said school violence ex pert Todd DeMitchell of the University of New Hampshire. TEXTING Among teen driv ers, 41 percent had tex ted or emailed behind the wheel in the previ ous month. That gure cant be compared to the 2011 survey, though, be cause the CDC changed the question this time. The latest survey gives texting-while-driving gures for 37 states ranging from 32 percent in Massachusetts to 61 percent in South Dakota. Study: Teens are drinking less, texting more AP FILE PHOTO A study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released Thursday found a surge in the number of kids who spent three or more hours on an average school day on screened electronics other than TV. SEE TEENS | C4

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Monday, June 16, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 JESSICA YADEGARAN MCT It can illuminate skin and hair. It can boost metabo lism. It can even aid in kill ing bacteria all while keeping you smelling like the tropics. Coconut oil, that goopy saturated fat, is having its moment in the superfood spotlight. Conventional thought used to consider coco nut oil unhealthy; now that research is proving otherwise, people are increasingly interested in reaping its benets. For starters, coconut oil fats contain metab olism-boosting medi um chain triglycerides (MCTs) and lauric acid, which has antimicro bial effects and may be able to increase good (HDL) cholesterol in the blood, according to re cent studies published by the National Insti tutes of Health. Practitioners of Ayurveda, the ancient Indian tradition of med icine, are particularly familiar with the effects of coconut oil. Coconut has been part of Indian food and culture for thousands of years and has a nat ural afnity to heal the body, says Jay Apte, a doctor of Ayurveda, which focuses on diet and balanced lifestyle to heal the body. But now that Dr. Oz and Deepak Chopra talk about it, more peo ple are listening, says Apte, who holds a mas ters degree in phar macology and sees pa tients at her Ayurveda and Panchakarma Cen ter in Mountain View, Calif. The National Insti tutes of Health studies should prompt more discussion in West ern medical circles. One, released in De cember, shows that vir gin coconut oil could help control cases of the stubborn Clostrid ium difcile, an anti biotic-resistant diar rhea usually acquired in a hospital. Another pilot study, published this year in the Journal of Alzheimers Disease looked at coconut oils potential to remove am yloid plaques that build up in the brain, causing damage to neural path ways. However, until a ran domized, double-blind clinical trial is conduct ed, it is not possible to know whether coconut oil has any benecial ef fect in battling Alzhei mers disease. Kim Wallingford Homes, of Alamo, Ca lif., wasnt looking for a cure-all, just a way to brighten her complex ion. A few years ago, she mustered up the courage to ask her Gua temalan house clean er how she managed to look so beautifully young. Her answer? Coconut oil. Homes had a tub of the stuff under her bathroom sink, so she dug her ngers into it and thought, This cant be right. Several tubs and dozens of com pliments later, she is a convert. I put it in my smooth ies to give me a boost, says Homes, now 59. I put it on toast instead of butter. I fry food in it. I use it all over my body to seal in moisture right after the shower. I think its given me radiance. Board-certied der matologist Janet H. Pry stowsky recommends coconut oil as a make up remover and cites a study published in the November-Decem ber 2008 edition of the journal Dermatitis that shows its effect on heal ing dermatitis. What intrigues the New York-based derma tologist most about co conut oil is its potential benets to the hair. She cited a study published in the March-April 2003 edition of the Journal of Cosmetic Science that examined damaged hair pretreated with mineral oil and coco nut oil. It found that the strands coated with co conut oil had a decrease in protein loss. I think, anecdotally, it can help dry, coarse or curly hair, too, she says. After hearing similar anecdotal chatter about oil pulling, the ancient practice of swishing oil in the mouth, Pleasant Hill chiropractic nu tritionist Gary Yaeger started researching and experimenting with co conut oil himself. Every morning, he and his wife, a den tal hygienist, chew up one tablespoon of the oil and swish it in their mouths for 20 minutes. The benets? They are numerous, he says, but depend on the person and their health, says Yaeger, who has been in practice for 20 years. People may notice teeth whitening and the antimicrobial element could help them get rid of chronic bad breath, he says. It has for me. Still, Yaeger and the American Dental Asso ciation, for that matter say that oil pulling is not a replacement for ossing and brushing teeth. If someone has a dental issue, I will send them straight to a den tist, because we want to get that looked at right away, he says. Apte, the Ayurveda expert, recommends oil pulling though usu ally with sesame oil, since it is high in cal cium to heal mouth sores, clean the tongue, and kill bacteria. Prac ticing it daily can also have a calming effect on the mind, she says. rrfntbftbn fbbtrrfntbftb tnbftftbttn401 North Blvd. West, Leesburg352.728.424217809 S.E. 109th Ave., Summerfield352.307.4200 rfntcentersleepmed@yahoo.comAlways tired & fatigued? Do you have strange dreams or morning headaches? Type 2 Diabetes? CHF/Heart Failure? TIA (Mini Stroke)? Arrhythmias? Body Mass Index >30, (Neck Circumference Male >17, Female >16)?Management of . .Call Today 352.460.0922 Procedures: Neurological rf GI ntb fnbn Female Wellness bfbn nnn Male Wellness tbntr Weight Loss Clinic FLU SHOTS AVAILABLEwww.mid-floridaprimarycare.comSleep is the Golden Chain that ties...Health & Our Bodies Together!Ravi P. Gupta, M.D.Cardiovascular r nn bf Endocrine Disorder n Breathing Problems fn b Musculoskeletal n Non-Invasive Cardiology t n ffft Dermatology r r rntt rftnn ntnn nn Pulmonary b b Musculoskeletal t b t Coconut oil has surprising health benefits DAN ROSENSTRAUCH / AP Various brands of coconut oil are used for cooking and health and beauty remedies are shown.

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 16, 2014 DRINKING Fewer teens said they drank alcohol. Drink ing of soda was down, too. About 35 per cent said they had had booze in the previous month, down from 39 percent in 2011. About 27 percent said they drank soda each day. That was only a slight change from 2011 but a sizable drop from 34 percent in 2007. SEX The proportion of teens who had sex in the previous three months held steady at about 34 percent from 2011. Among them, condom use was unchanged at about 60 percent. SUICIDE The percentage who attempted suicide in the previous year held steady at about 8 per cent. MEDIA USE TV viewing for three or more hours a day has stalled at around 32 percent since 2011. But in one of the largest jumps seen in the sur vey, there was a surge in the proportion of kids who spent three or more hours on an aver age school day on oth er kinds of recreation al screen time, such as playing video or com puter games or using a computer or smart phone for something other than schoolwork. That number rose to 41 percent, from 31 per cent in 2011. Health experts ad vise that teens get no more than two hours of recreational screen time a day, and that includes all screens including Xboxes, smartphones and tele visions. Although video-gam ing is up, particularly among teen boys, some researchers believe most of the screentime increase is due to social media use. And its probably not a good thing, they say. Through texts and social media, young people are doing more communicating and living in an online world in which its eas ier to think theyre the center of the universe, said Marina Krcmar, a Wake Forest University professor who studies teen screen time. TEENS FROM PAGE C2 MARNI JAMESON MCT ORLANDO Kim Ricci is lying on her back on a table with hair-thin needles stuck in the hollows of her ears, ve on each side. Several more puncture her wrists. Ricci, 50, says she was surprised when her doc tor suggested she get acupuncture to relieve the pain and discom fort she was experienc ing after her breast-can cer surgery. She was even more surprised when the therapy worked. While I cant say I thought of it as voodoo, I never thought it was a solution for me, the Orlando woman said. Though acupunc ture, meditation, mas sage and yoga are not typically what the doc tor orders, thats chang ing as more mainstream medical practitioners incorporate therapies once considered alter native into their con ventional practices. UF Health Cancer Center at Orlando Health started an integra tive-medicine program last year, and at the Uni versity of Floridas med ical school, a course in alternative medicine is about to become part of the curriculum. At the University of Central Floridas College of Med icine, students are learn ing how to make uncon ventional therapies part of conventional treat ment plans. It heartens me to see more doctors starting to treat the whole person rather than just cutting them and giving them medicine, said Diane Robinson, a neuropsy chologist and the pro gram director of inte grative medicine at the cancer center. Applications for alter native medicine reach far beyond cancer treat ment. Physicians from many elds who just a few years ago would have balked at the idea of in corporating therapies once considered mys tic into their treatment plans are now recom mending them to treat a range of ailments, in cluding headaches, pain, arthritis, stress and depression, said Dr. Irene Estores, an integrative-medicine physician who start ed UF Healths Integra tive Medicine Program a year ago. When Paula Duffy of Groveland, developed low thyroid, and her doctor put her on pre scription thyroid medi cation, the side effects were violent, she said. Though her dose was low, the 75-year-old woman had the shakes and her heart raced. About a month ago, she went to Estores, who prescribed botanical supplements, includ ing selenium and sea weed containing io dine. Duffy tolerates the combination well. I was so lucky to nd a doctor like her. I want to try everything rst thats not invasive, but regu lar doctors do not un derstand about supple ments, and few believe in meditation and yoga, said Duffy, a Brazilian native who has practiced yoga, meditation and tai chi for decades. That acceptance will likely increase as, across Florida, more medi cal students are being trained in the emerging eld of integrative med icine. This fall, Estores will teach a course on the subject to fourth-year UF medical students. Alternative medicine goes mainstream JACOB LANGSTON / MCT Kim Ricci relaxes with acupuncture needles in her ear while receiving a treatment at The Gynecologic Cancer Center in Orlando.

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Monday, June 16, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 Aching Feet? Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted types of breast cancer. Using a statistical model, scientists es timated that in wom en who ate the most amount of red meat, there were an extra 6.8 cases of breast cancer for every 1,000 wom en over 20 years of fol low-up. The research ers couldnt rule out the possibility that oth er factors might ex plain the apparent link between red meat and breast cancer. In developed coun tries, women have about a 12.5 percent chance of developing breast cancer. Scientists suspect proteins in red meat speed up cell division and tumor growth; chemicals such as ni trates in processed meats are already clas sied as probable car cinogens. The study was carried out mainly among edu cated, white American women, and research ers said the results were not necessarily appli cable to women of oth er races. It was paid for by the U.S. National In stitutes of Health and published online Tues day in the British jour nal, BMJ This underlines the importance of having a healthy diet, said Sal ly Greenbrook, a senior policy ofcer at the U.K. charity Breakthrough Breast Cancer, who was not part of the research. She said women should focus on reducing their chances of breast can cer by staying slim, and exercising and drinking in moderation. Greenbrook add ed that there wasnt yet enough proof about the dangers of red meat to change current preven tion guidelines. Others said diet is no toriously difcult to measure, and that the link between eating red meat and breast cancer appeared weak. Valerie Beral, a cancer expert at the University of Ox ford, pointed out that vegetarians dont have a lower risk of breast can cer than meat-eaters. Still, Mia Gaudet, di rector of genetic epide miology at the Ameri can Cancer Society, said it was plausible that red meat could somehow be connected to breast cancer and that wom ens eating habits in their 20s might be par ticularly signicant. Breasts are still de veloping and are more susceptible to carcin ogens before women have their rst full-term pregnancy, she said. Gaudet, who doesnt eat red meat herself, said the American Can cer Society recom mends people eat a plant-based diet. Its important to have a healthy lifestyle throughout your life and not just as you get older and more worried about cancer, she said. People should perhaps consider ordering a sal ad or a vegetarian op tion sometime. STUDY FROM PAGE C1 SEIZETHE DA Y SLOCAL AREANEWS.www .dailycommer cial.com

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 16, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! Classified IndexLegal Notices . . . . . .0001 Notices . . . . . . . . .1000 At Your Service . . . . .9000 Employment . . . . . .2000 Pets/Animals . . . . . .6865 Merchandise . . . . . .6000 Real Estate/For RENT . .3000 Real Estate/For SALE . . .4000 Recreation . . . . . . .7000 Transportation . . . . . .8000 DEADLINES For Insertion COPY DATE Friday Thursday, 5pm Saturday Friday, 3pm Sunday Friday, 5:00pm Monday Friday, 5:00pm Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pmCancellation for ads running Saturday must be made by 3pm Friday. Cancelations for Sunday & Monday must be made by 5:00pm Friday.ADJUSTMENTS department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. CHECK OUT OUR SPECIALS! PROFESSIONALSERVICE DIRECTORY$65FOR FIRST ADAND 2ND ADHALF OFF SPECIAL Ad must be non-commercial only with single item priced at $100 or less. Price must appear in ad. Two line maximum. Pets, animals, guns and ammo excluded. Some restrictions. Limit 1 per household per month. ONE FREE AD PER MONTH! 2 LINES/7 DAYS: CROSSWORD PUZZLE

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C10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 16, 2014 Psychic Services A/C Services Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Home Improvement Irrigation Services Sprinkler Repairsrfntbr rfff f rfffn tn b rfffn tnrrnr rrnbf Landscaping Services r fntbb Pet Grooming Services Legal Services Painting Services Shower Doors Service Enclosure Screening Window Services Handyman Services BOYDSYou call it, We haul it!352-460-7186Grading, Loading, etc. Marine Services Affordable Home Repair, LLCttf bbrbf tbbb nb 352-551-6073 Electrical Services Roofing Services To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact the Classified Department at (352) 314-3278. Tree Service Plumbing Services Land Clearing Services BrocksLAWN SERVICE nnt nnnnttfbf rffrntbfrfntbrfr Hauling Services rf rbrrff ff trf HAULING!nnn bbfntb b Concrete Services nff rfbt rnf ttnfb tbf Lawn Services nbt ft bfbrnf btrf nfb bbrtbbf LIC. INS.nrn nr LIC. INS.nrn nr bbrbff ttfrb brfb Home Improvement

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Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of service. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT728-1668 394-1739fla#CAC1816408 ELECTIONS: Registration for Clermont City Council seats begins today, A3 PAKISTAN: Army launches operation against foreign, local militants, A8 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, June 16, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 167 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS C8 DIVERSIONS C7 LEGALS C8 LIVING HEALTHY C1 NATION A5 SCOREBOARD B2 SPORTS B1 VOICES A9 WORLD A8 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A10.92 / 73Sunny intervals, t-storm50 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comZack Lucas is a good shot and he will have a chance to prove it with a .22 rie next week at the National 4-H Shooting Sports Invitational in Nebraska. The 17-year-old homeschooled student earned the chance to compete after placing second in the senior level of the recent 4-H State Shooting Competition in Hernando County. Lucas, of Fruitland Park, began shooting a .22 rie as part of his clubs 4-H project three years ago. He placed sixth at last years state event and was one of the Sunshine States top ve shooters invited to nationals this year. I plan to do my best and hopefully get Florida on the rst page of the score sheet, he said. For two of the events, Lucas will be judged on shooting the bulls eye target, and the other event will feature small silhouettes of a turkey, hawk, hog and ram, ranging 1/8-inch to ve inches tall. Lucas will be shooting at the silhouettes from var ious distances, including 100 yards away. It is very tough, said Zacks dad, Bart. He will have 10 silhouettes per animal and 10 shots to get them. Zacks father, along with mom, Yvonne, and older brother, Drew, 23, will join him out west for nationals, which runs June 24-29 at Heartland Public Shooting Park FRUITLAND PARKTeenager to show off shooting skills at 4-H nationals in Nebraska PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Zack Lucas, a 17 year-old on the Southern Traditions shooting club, practices at a private range in Fruitland Park, on June 9. Lucas will be competing in the National Shooting Sports Invitational in Grand Island, Neb. later this month. Bart Lucas, left, draws targets for his son Zack Lucas, right, during practice. Marksman in the makingSEE RIFLE| A2 STEVE FUSSELLSpecial to the Daily CommercialCity commissioners have approved a 99year interlocal agreement between the city of Fruitland Park and Village Center Community Development District to provide re pro tection to residents in The Villages of Fruitland Park, which is cur rently under development to build 2,050 new homes. Under terms of the agreement, the city will pay the district $325,000 annually to provide its own re services. The agreement includes future cost increases linked to the U.S. Con sumer Price Index and a provision to amend or cancel the agreement if both parties consent. The city is not obligated to fund any additional services the district may provide its residents in the future. Community Development Director Char lie Rector told commissioners the agreement is a deal for the city. The annual payment is less than the pro jected cost to buy new equipment and hire, train, manage and pay FRUITLAND PARKCity approves fire service deal with The VillagesSEE SERVICES | A2 QASSIM ABDUL-ZAHRA and SAMEER N. YACOUBAssociated PressBAGHDAD As the Iraqi government bolstered Baghdads de fenses Sunday, the Is lamic militant group that captured two major cities last week posted graphic photos that appeared to show its ghters massacring dozens of captured Iraqi sol diers. The pictures on a militant website appear to show masked ghters of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, or ISIL, loading the captives onto atbed trucks be fore forcing them to lie face-down in a shallow ditch with their arms tied behind their backs. The nal images show the bodies of the cap tives soaked in blood af ter being shot. The grisly images could further sharpen sectarian tensions as hundreds of Shiites heed a call from their most revered spiritual leader to take up arms against the Sunni militants who have swept across the north. ISIL has vowed to take the battle to Baghdad and cities further south housing revered Shiite shrines. While the city of seven million is not in any immediate danger of falling into the hands of the militants, Sundays bombings could raise tensions. Food prices in the city have risen, twofold in some cases, because of disruption to transport on the main road heading north from the capital. The government bolstered defenses around Baghdad Sunday, a day after hundreds of Shiite men paraded through the streets with arms in response to a call by Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani for Iraqis to Militant group posts images of mass killing in Iraq AP PHOTO This image posted on a militant website on Saturday appears to show militants from the al-Qaida-inspired Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant leading away captured Iraqi soldiers dressed in plain clothes after taking over a base in Tikrit, Iraq.SEE ISIL | A2 MARILYNN MARCHIONEAP Chief Medical WriterScientists have made big progress on a bi onic pancreas to free some people with diabetes from the daily or deal of managing their disease. A wearable, experimental device passed a real-world test, constantly monitoring blood sugar and automatically giving insulin or a sugar-boosting drug as needed, doctors said Sunday. The device improved blood-sugar control more than standard monitors and insulin pumps did when tested for ve days on 20 adults and 32 teens. Un like other articial pan creases in development that just correct high blood sugar, this one also can x too-low sugar, mimicking what a natural pancreas does. The device was de veloped at Massachusetts General Hospital and Boston University. Results were featured Sunday at an American Diabetes Associa tion conference in San Francisco and were published online by the New England Journal of Medicine. Im very excited about it, said Dr. Betul Hatipo glu, an endocrinologist at Cleveland Clinic who Progress made on a bionic pancreas for Type 1 diabeticsSEE DIABETES | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 16, 2014 defend their country. ISIL has vowed to at tack Baghdad but its ad vance to the south seems to have stalled in recent days. Thousands of Shiites have also volunteered to join the ght against the ISIL, also in response to al-Sistanis call. Despite the added se curity, a string of ex plosions killed at least 15 people and wound ed more than 30 in the city, police and hospital officials said. One car bomb went off in the city center, killing 10 and wounding 21. After nightfall, another explo sion hit the area, killing two and wounding five. The third went off near a falafel shop in the citys sprawling Sadr City district, killing three and wounding seven. Baghdad has seen an escalation in suicide and car bombings in recent months, mostly targeting Shiite neighborhoods or security forces. The police and hospital ofcials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to the media. Armed police, includ ing SWAT teams, were seen over the weekend manning checkpoints in Baghdad, searching vehi cles and checking drivers documents. Security was particularly tightened on the northern and western approaches of the city, the likely targets of any advance by ISIL ghters on the capital. The city looked gloomy on Sunday, with thin trafc and few shoppers in commer cial areas. At one popular park along the Tigris river, only a fraction of the thousands who usually head there were present on Sunday evening. In the commercial Karada district in central Baghdad, many of the side walk hawkers who sell anything from shoes to toys and clothes were absent. The crisis in Iraq has prompted the United States to order an air craft carrier into the Per sian Gulf. It also laid out specic ways for Iraq to show it is forging the na tional unity necessary to gain assistance in its ght against the ISIL and other militants. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel on Saturday ordered the USS George H.W. Bush from the northern Arabian Sea as President Barack Obama considered possible military options for Iraq. Hagels press secretary, Rear Adm. John Kirby, said the move will give Obama additional exibility if military action were required to protect American citizens and interests in Iraq. Accompanying the carrier will be the guid ed-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea and the guided-missile destroyer USS Truxtun. The ships, which carry Tomahawk missiles that could reach Iraq, were expected to complete their move into the Persian Gulf by the end of the day. The Bushs ghter jets also could eas ily reach Iraq. In neighboring Iran, the acting commander of the Islamic Republics army ground forces, Gen. Ki omars Heidari, said Iran has increased its defenses along its western border with Iraq, though there was no immediate threat to the frontier. had no role in the work. Many patients have been frustrated waiting for a cure, so this is really a great new horizon for them, she said. The bionic pancreas is for Type 1 diabetes, the kind often found during childhood. About 5 percent of the 26 million Americans with diabetes have this type and cannot make insulin to turn food into en ergy. Sugar builds up in the blood, raising the risk for heart disease and many other problems. These people must check their blood and inject insulin sever al times a day or get it through a pocket-sized pump with a tube that goes under the skin. This would lift that burden off of their shoulders, Dr. Steven Rus sell, a diabetes specialist at Massa chusetts General, said of the bionic pancreas he helped design. It has three parts: two cellphone-sized pumps for insulin and sugar-raising glucagon, and an iPhone wired to a continuous glucose monitor. Three small needles go under the skin, usually in the belly, to connect patients to the components, which can be kept in a fanny pack or a pocket. Patients still have to prick their ngers to test blood sugar twice a day and make sure the monitor is accu rate, but the system takes care of giv ing insulin or glucagon as needed. Kristina Herndon said her 13-year-old son, Christopher, loved it when he tried it for the study, and felt pretty badly giving it back when it ended. Christopher has to check his blood sugar eight to 10 times a day and his family has to watch him closely in case it dips too low while he sleeps, which can cause seizures or even death. Its a disease that I think peo ple think is not a big deal but its tough. Its hard on a family, said Herndon, who lives in Newburyport, Massachusetts. Next steps: A study starts Monday in 40 adults who will use the device for 11 days. By fall, researchers hope to have a nextgeneration version combining all three components in one device to be tested in studies next year aimed at winning federal Food and Drug Administration approval. My goal is to have this device done by the time my kid, who has Type 1 diabetes, goes to college in about three years, said Ed Damiano, a biomedical engineer at Bos ton University. Two San Diego-based companies DexCom and Tandem Di abetes Care Inc. made compo nents of the version tested in the current study. Boston University and Massachusetts General own or have patents pending on the sys tem, and several researchers may someday get royalties. Medtronic, Johnson & Johnson and several other companies also are working on articial pancreas devices. The Boston groups work is excit ing and the results are compelling, but there still are practical challenges to bringing a device to mar ket, said Aaron Kowalski, who over sees grants by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation on articial pancreas development. Most people with diabetes want less devices in their lives, not more, so putting the components into a single automated system is key, he said. rst responders to provide services to 2,050 new homes at the same service lev el we now provide for the rest of the city, he explained. The annual payment will come from the citys share of future Lake County property taxes collected from residents in The Villages of Fruitland Park. The agreement was especially important to The Villages, which wants to pro vide identical services to all Villages residents within ve different jurisdictions Lake, Sumter and Marion counties, Lady Lake and Fruitland Park. Commissioner John Gunter said he felt uncomfortable with the lengthy term of the agreement, but no other commissioners shared his concern. The agreement was approved unanimously with little discussion. The citys 2014 budget allocates $160,000 for re department operations serving about 1,500 homes in Fruitland Park. in Grand Island, Neb. An estimated 1,200 4-Hers will be competing in compound archery, recurve archery, air rie, .22 pistol, shotgun, muzzleloading and hunting skills. Lucas said there will be others from Flor ida and Lake County competing in the event. Im looking forward to just the whole experience of it, Lucas said. I probably shouldnt say this, but Im not exactly going expecting to get rst place. Im going to experience the national competition and to meet people from all over the country. He is a good shot, Bart said of his son, marveling over his shooting ability. He never touched a gun before three years ago. Zacks dad has been shooting for years. If I practiced as much as him, I would whip him, Bart said grinning. His son isnt so sure. He does better when he is sitting down completely still and not moving, but I can whip him in a standing position and all of that, Lucas said. During nationals, the Lucas family will be Zacks biggest supporters. Well be right behind him the whole time, Bart said of the competition. This whole thing is for fun, and the big thing that 4-H pushes is meeting other kids doing like things. Lucas recalled when he rst picked up a .22 rie during a 4-H Club project. I like the concentration that it takes, being able to just focus on one thing, and being able to do that repetitively, he said. This has helped me concentrate when it matters and being able to put myself in a zone where I kind of block everything out, and it has helped me to see a goal and chase after the goal. One of my shooting coaches says to treat each shot as its own event and not worry about the last one or the next one. Zack remembers how his father believed 4-H would be something that he would enjoy. At rst I was a little hesitant because I was shy. I wasnt sure about the whole 4-H thing and I didnt know what it was, and I have grown to love it, and it has brought me out of my shell more and talking in front of people, he said. During his rst year in 4-H, he served as the club chaplain, followed by vice president, and this past year he served as the club president of Southern Traditions 4-H Club, a group of about 40 members. It is really neat having that leadership experience and knowing how to run a meeting, said Lucas, who also serves as treasurer on the 4-H county level. -H is lot more than what is perceived as. Its not just animals and it is a really good program that helps develop youths in many, many ways and one of the biggest is leadership being able to step up and lead. Bart said his has seen an amazing transformation in his son, all because of 4-H. He went into it knowing nothing. He was a shy individual and now he has condence in himself and what he is doing, and he knows how to speak in front of people now, which is an art and a gift to be able to do that, Bart said, noting his son has also become more active in projects with Heritage Community Church. The biggest change in him is that he has gone from being a follower to a being somebody who will step up and take the lead when he needs to, Bart said. As much as Lucas shooting skills would probably be sought after in law enforcement, Lucas dismissed the idea of becoming a sheriffs deputy. My mom would disapprove, Lucas said with a chuckle. So what are his career aspirations? I want to become a youth pastor, said the teen, who also intends to share the joys and benets of 4-H. HOW TO REACH US JUNE 15CASH 3 . ............................................... 2-9-4 Afternoon . .......................................... 8-3-9 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 3-6-3-5 Afternoon . ....................................... 2-4-3-9FLORIDALOTTERY JUNE 14FANTASY 5 . ........................... 5-22-30-33-35 FLORIDA LOTTO . ................. 3-8-21-23-35-51 POWERBALL .................... 9-33-42-45-5430 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONSTEVE SKAGGS, publisher352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comPAUL RYAN, digital editor352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Zack Lucas sets up steel targets at a private range in Fruitland Park on June 9. RIFLEFROM PAGE A1 SERVICESFROM PAGE A1 ISILFROM PAGE A1 DIABETESFROM PAGE A1My goal is to have this device done by the time my kid, who has Type 1 diabetes, goes to college. Ed Damiano, biomedical engineer

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Monday, June 16, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT TAVARES Nominations sought for the Womens Hall of FameOutstanding Lake County women are being sought for consideration for induction into the Lake County Womens Hall of Fame. Nominees must have made signicant contributions to the improvement of life for citizens of Lake County in the eld of art, agriculture, athletics, business, community service, environment, government, healthcare, humanities, philanthropy, science and/or education, and must have been born in Lake County or lived here for at least 10 years. Nominees may be living or deceased. Nomination forms are available online at www.lakecounty. gov/whof or at the Board of County Commissioners ofce, room 316 of the Lake County Administration Building, 315 W. Main St. The deadline for 2014 nominations is Aug. 15.CLERMONT Cagan Crossings Community Library hosts hiring eventThe Cagan Crossings Community Library, 16729 Cagan Oaks, is hosting a hiring event from noon to 4 / p.m., on Thursday with represen tatives from numerous businesses in attendance. This event is sponsored by Goodwill Industries of Central Florida Inc., through the Goodwill Job Connection Center at 1855 S. Grand Highway. For information, call 352-4047799, email cjcc@goodwillc.org or go to www.goodwillc.org.BUSHNELL Adult Education to offer online coursesSumter County Adult Education has a program that makes it easy to take high-quality, affordable online courses through a partnership with ed2go|GES, which allows students to enhance skills, prepare for a new career or advance in an existing one in the six-week online courses. The next series of classes begins Wednesday with more than 100 courses available. For information or to register, call the Sumter Adult & Community Education at 352-748-1510, ext. 51200 or go to www.aec.sumter.k12. .us.TAVARES LakeXpress to give free rides on ThursdayLake Countys Public Transportation Division will participate in the ninth annual National Dump the Pump Day by offering free rides for LakeXpress commuters on Thursday. Sponsored by the American Public Transportation Association, the 2014 National Dump the Pump Day encourages people to ride public trans portation instead of driving a car. For information about LakeXpress routes or services, call LakeXpress at 352-326-8637, the Lake County Public Transportation Division at 352-323-5733 or go to www.ridelakexpress.com.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comCameron Smith, 16, of Clermont, and Chris Nagy, 16, of Winter Park, will return from Chicago today after taking part in the Neill Advanced Sail ing Clinic. The clinics mission is to provide accom plished high school sailors with intense, high-quality sailing instruction by top colle giate coaches, accord ing to its website. This year it included coach es from Stanford, Dart mouth, Cornell and Georgetown. Before leaving, both Smith and Nagy said they were extremely excited about the opportunity. Smith said his moth er practically forced him into sailing when he was just 8 years old, but is thankful now because its what he wants to contin ue doing through high school, college and for as many years as possible. He helped form the Eu stis Sailing Club, a composite high school sailing team made up of sailors from high schools across the state. Cameron was chosen by his peers as the captain and MVP of the team this year. I love the fact that you can propel yourself with no motors and that when youre out on the water, you have to gure out what to do in a variety of different situations, Smith said, adding that although sailing is often times thought of as a peaceful type of sport, the actual competitive side of it is rather exciting. Once you start racing, youre hooked. Cameron said his future sailing aspirations include sailing in college, being on the CLERMONTTeens selected for competitive sailing clinic in Chicago PHOTOS COURTESY OF CAMERON SMITH Cameron Smith, 16, has been sailing since the age of 8. Smith, left, and Chris Nagy were invited to take part in the Neill Advanced Sailing Clinic in Chicago.Gone with the windsSEE SAIL| A4 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comAlthough people running for Clermonts City Council have from noon today until noon on Friday to le paperwork, the race has already began since a couple of candidates preled. The seats up for re-elec tion in Clermont are Seat 1, held by Rick Van Wagner; Seat 5, cur rently held by Tim Bates; and Seat 3, held by Hal Turville. According to city ofcials, Bates and VanWagner were the only candidates to pre-le. Bates is seeking re-election to Seat 5 but VanWagner is vying for the mayoral Seat 3, opposing Turville, who has been mayor for eight two-year terms. This race will also mark the rst time Turville has faced any opposition since 2004. Turville did not re turn repeated calls about whether he intends to seek re-election. No one has publicly announced their intention to run for Seat 1 held by VanWagner. In Clermont, if there are more than two candidates who qualify for any open seat, a primary election will be held. If that were the case this year, a prima ry election would be held on Aug. 26. If there is a clear winner after the primary election, CLERMONTMayor picks up first challenger in 10 years TURVILLE SEE COUNCIL | A5 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comState Sen. Alan Hays, R-Umatilla, State Rep. Bry an Nelson, R-Apopka, and State Rep. Larry Metz, R-Groveland, are plan ning town hall meetings throughout Lake County. Hays and Nelson will have a town hall meeting together at 7 / p.m. on Tuesday at Eustis City Hall. Hays said it will be a recap of the legislative session, highlighting some of the bills and issues, and then will be opened up for ques tions. Nelson added that they will be giving an over view of the budget. This is a very informal opportunity for the peo ple to come and meet the legislatures and ask their questions and to hear our perspective on how things went through the session, Hays said.LAKE COUNTYState officials to hold town hall meetingsSEE TOWN HALL | A5Alfred Street from Car oline Street to St. Clair Abrams Avenue will be closed to through trafc be ginning Wednesday. Drivers in downtown Tavares will be able to access the Lake County Government Complex parking ga rage entrance on Sinclair Avenue via Main Street or Caroline Street, Elisha Pappacoda, the countys public information ofcer, said in a press release. Alfred Street at the intersection of Sinclair Avenue will be open to through trafc, however, periodic closures should be TAVARESAlfred Street to close WednesdaySEE STREET | A4 TAMARA LUSHAssociated PressTAMPA A man who killed his estranged wife and her son two years after he had been paroled for murdering his previous spouse is scheduled to be executed this week, more than two decades after he was sentenced to death. John Ruthell Henry, 63, is scheduled to die Wednesday for the 1985 stabbing death of his wife, Suzanne Henry, in Pas co County. Gov. Rick Scott signed Henrys death war rant for that murder. He also was convicted in Hillsborough County of stabbing Suzanne Henrys 5-year-old son, Eu gene Christian, near Plant City, hours after Suzannes murder. Henry also previously pleaded no contest to sec ond-degree murder for fa tally stabbing his com mon-law wife, Patricia Roddy, in 1976. He served less than eight years in pris on and was released in 1983. He had been on parole for two years when he killed his wife and Eugene. Su zanne Henrys relatives told reporters she hadnt known about John Henrys previ ous killing when she mar ried him after his release. During his trial, prosecutors said Henry, an un employed bricklayer, went to Suzanne Henrys home three days before Christ mas to talk about buy ing a gift for the boy, who was Suzannes son from a prior relationship. They fought over Henry living with another woman and he stabbed her 13 times in the neck and face, killing her. He took Eugene and drove around for nine hours, sometimes smok ing crack cocaine, before killing the boy by stabbing him in the neck ve times. Hours later, Henry told a detective, he found him self wandering a eld. Henry tried to use an in sanity defense for killing his wife. Psychiatrists at the trial testied that Henry had a low IQ, suffered from chronic paranoia and smoked crack cocaine. Henry told the therapists that he stabbed Eugene so he could rejoin his dead Man convicted of killing 3 scheduled for executionSEE EXECUTION | A5

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Monday, June 16, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 mother. He told them he had intended to kill him self but said he was unable to go through with it. During the trial, then-Pasco County detective Fay Wilber testied that he drove Henry to nd the boys body. When the boys two small feet were nally seen in the underbrush after dawn, Henry started crying, Wilber said, according to news reports. He was crying and he held on to me, the de tective said. In recent months, Henrys attorneys have ques tioned whether his client was mentally stable enough to comprehend his death sentence. In an appeal the Florida Supreme Court rejected last week, Henrys attorney, Baya Harrison III, wrote that Henrys abhorrent childhood, extensive per sonal and family mental health history, poor social adjustment, and lack of rational thinking and rea soning skills so impaired his adaptive functioning that he was actually performing at the level of a per son with an IQ of 70. LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679 COUNCILFROM PAGE A3that person would take the seat. If there is no clear winner, however, the top two candidates would move on to the general election in November. I am excited about this election, VanWagner said during a fundraising reception for his campaign held at Graf ti Junktion in Cler mont earlier this week. I feel Clermont needs someone to take it to the next level and I want to be that guy. I feel like Clermont has so much poten tial, especially when it comes to our econo my, and if we put both hands on the wheel, we can make this city econ omy robust. In the neighboring town of Groveland, the qualifying period for the upcoming election also runs from noon today until noon Friday. Grovelands seats up for re-election are District 1, the mayoral seat currently held by Tim Loucks; District 3, cur rently held by Dena Sweatt; and District 5, held by longtime councilman John Grifin. According to Grove lands city clerk, Loucks has pre-led and will be seeking election to the mayoral post. Although he was chosen in Nov. 2013 to take over former mayor Jim Gearharts seat after his resigna tion, this will be Loucks rst time seeking elec tion to that post. He wont be alone during campaign season, however, since for mer Mayor Mike Radzik has already turned in any paperwork for the District 1 seat as well. Sweatt also has preled for a seat, which she currently holds since she was chosen by council to ll Loucks seat when it was vacated. No one has pre-led for District 5, but any one wishing to run can do so by visiting City Hall and submitting their paperwork before noon on Friday, when qualifying ofcially closes. It is not known whether Grifn will seek re-election. In Mascotte, Seat 2, held by Louise Thompson, and Seat 4, held by Brenda Brasher, are up for re-election, but qualifying is not until either the second or third week in August, accord ing to the city clerk. Minneolas qualifying is from noon on Aug. 11 to noon on Aug. 15. At stake is Seat 2, held by Lisa Jones, and Seat 4, held by Kelly Price. Montverdes election, an annual caucus where residents can nominate people for open at-large seats on any given year, will be held at 6:45 / p .m., on Aug. 12 at Town Hall. According to the towns clerk, there are two at large council seats currently held by Joe Wynkoop and Jim Peacock that are up for re-election. Nominees can choose to submit paperwork for a formal run. People wanting to seek election who were not nominated may also run with the proper paperwork and collected signatures. TOWN HALLFROM PAGE A3Nelson said it is one thing to hear about it through the news media, and another to hear about it in person and be able to ask questions. Its nice to get a true insiders perspective on really how the bill passed, how it didnt pass, Nelson said. I think constituents get a lot out of it. He said they did a town hall together last year and he thought it was good to get a per spective from the house and from the senate. He added they also sit on different committees, which also makes it a good balance. Metz will be having a town hall meeting from 6 to 7 p.m. on June 23 at the Cagan Crossings Li brary. He will also have town hall meetings at the same times on June 30 at the Clermont City Center and on July 2 at the Leesburg Community Center. Metz said he will review the state budget, major pieces of legislation and legislation he sponsored. Every year we go to session for 60 days and its a very fast-paced environment, a lot of things are happening and of course we had a lot of good input before the session from our constituents, but I feel an obligation after ses sion is over to go back and report to them on what we did and did not accomplish, Metz said. He added they also send a newsletter and an e-newsletter to con stituents. He said it closes up the legislative cycle by reporting back to the bosses. Were just trying to basically report back to our constituents who are after all our bosses about the accomplishments and things that we might not have been able to bring home completely, Metz said. EXECUTIONFROM PAGE A3 TERENCE CHEAAssociated PressMARE ISLAND, Calif. In drought-stricken California, young Chinook salmon are hit ting the road, not the river, to get to the Pacif ic Ocean. Millions of six-monthold smolts are hitching rides in tanker trucks because Californias histor ic drought has depleted rivers and streams, making the annual migration to the ocean too dangerous for juvenile salmon. The drought conditions have caused lower ows in the rivers, warmer water temperatures, and the sh that would normal ly be swimming down the rivers would be very susceptible to predation and thermal stress, said Kari Burr, shery biologist with the Fishery Foundation of California. California has been trucking hatcheryraised salmon for years to bypass river dams and giant pumps that funnel water to Southern California and Central Valley farms. But this year state and federal wildlife agencies are trucking near ly 27 million smolts, about 50 percent more than normal, because of the drought, ac cording to the Califor nia Department of Fish and Wildlife. Each spring, the Coleman National Fish Hatchery usually releases about 12 mil lion smolts into Battle Creek, a tributary of the Sacramento Riv er near Redding. But this year, it trucked 7.5 million of them to San Francisco Bay because the drought had made the 300-mile swim too perilous.Salmon migrate by truck during drought AP FILE PHOTO Andy Heap, left, and Brian Rodman herd young Chinook salmon down a holding tank where they were loaded into a tanker truck at the California Department of Fish and Games Nimbus Fish Hatchery in Rancho Cordova, Calif.

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HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi. North of K-Mart on Hwy. 441)(352) 347-0403/fx (352) 347-2034CDRX441@gmail.com KIMBERLY HEFLINGAssociated PressWASHINGTON Home-schooling mom Jenni White gave some of the loud est cheers when Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin signed legis lation to repeal the Common Core education standards. White, president of Restore Oklahoma Public Education, helped organize rallies, robo calls and letters to legislators encouraging the repeal. You name it. We had to do it, White said. We just had to do it out of a shoestring bud get out of our own accounts. In Oklahoma and else where, home-schooling par ents, often with their kids, are a frequent presence at legislative hearings and other political functions representing anti-Common Core forces. Sometimes, as in Whites case, they are even leading the opposition. Home-schooling parents can teach their kids what they choose, but many of these parents still have a big beef with the standards. Facebook groups such as Home Schooling Without Common Core, have popped up. A Home School Legal Defense Association produced video on the stan dards has been viewed on line hundreds of thousands of times. All parents should be con cerned about this. This is our children. To me, its not political, said Megan King of Lawrence, Kansas. She pulled two of her three sons out of their public elementa ry school, in part, because of the math standards, and she co-founded Kansans Against Common Core. The standards, adopted in more than 40 states and the District of Columbia, spell out what math and English skills public school students should master at each grade. They were pushed by gover nors concerned that too few graduates were ready for life after high school. Use of the standards has become a hot button issue in many states, and governors in Indiana and South Carolina recently signed legislation repealing them. The issue has pitted Chamber of Commerce-aligned Republicans with grassroots con servatives, including many home-schooling parents. The Common Core effort was led by the states, but the Obama administration has offered incentives to those that adopted college and ca reer ready standards. That has led to charges of federal intrusion. The concern that the more education policy is central ized, the less control they have as citizens motivates many of these home-school ing parents, said Emmett McGroarty, director of education at the conservative American Principles Project. Some of these parents, like King, believe the standards are poorly designed. King said she believes the math stan dards are developmentally in appropriate for younger kids, not rigorous enough for older students and too heavy on pushing informational text over literature. Other home-schoolers fear that as textbook publishers incorporate the standards, it will lead to a smaller num ber of non-Common Core based-textbooks, said White, from Luther, Oklahoma. She says she teaches her children using classically aligned texts. McGroarty said there is a concern that the ACT and the College Board, which owns the SAT, are moving toward aligning with the standards. That, he said, would leave home-schooling parents no choice other than to follow the standards if they want their kids to do well on the college entrance exams. An ACT ofcial said the company supports the Common Core standards, but the exam hasnt changed because of them. The College Board, which is revamping the SAT, has said the new ver sion of the exam isnt aligned to a single set of standards.Home-schooling parents rally against Common Core AMELIA C. WARDEN / AP Megan King works with her sons Joshua, 9, left, and Benjamin, 11, center, in her home in Lawrence, Kan on June 9. NICHOLAS RICCARDI and CHARLES BABINGTONAssociated PressDENVER Republican strength in this years House and Senate races could, strangely enough, hurt the partys presidential chances by stalling the changes in style and policy advocated after Mitt Romneys defeat in the 2012 presiden tial campaign. GOP ofcials and strategists say its hard to persuade party lead ers to adjust the polit ical recipe when they feel increasingly up beat about adding Sen ate control to their sol id House majority this fall. This optimism, nu merous GOP strategists say, makes looking past the partys loss of the popular vote in ve of the last six presidential elections easy. Its very difcult to make an argu ment for change and modernization when youre winning, said Joel Sawyer, a former South Carolina GOP ofcial who advis es campaigns in sev eral states. Citing the partys nationwide reliance on older white voters, Sawyer said, the GOP needs to start modernizing now to become relevant to younger voters and nonwhite voters. The partys dilemma was in sharp relief in a Denver public television studio here, where four candidates gath ered for a Republican primary debate in the race to represent the deeply conservative, rural and exurban 4th Congressional District, which covers the eastern third of the state. All the candidates said they oppose gay marriage, want to repeal President Barack Obamas health care plan and object to al lowing people living in the country illegally to become citizens.Republicans midterm strength could be problem in 2016 AP FILE PHOTO Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus is seen at the RNC winter meeting in Washington.The front-runner in the Colorado race, Weld County District Attor ney Ken Buck, narrowly lost a U.S. Senate race in 2010 because he was seen as too extreme on issues like abortion and immigration. Now he has been hit in ads by state Sen. Scott Renfroe for ip-opping on those two issues. Its one of the great ironies of Republican politics that we fall victim to, Buck said in an interview. Im very conservative on life, Im very conservative on immigration, but given enough money anyone can be attacked for not being pure enough. Renfroe said: We need candidates who will stand rmly for what they believe. Immigration was an issue singled out by a GOP-commissioned autopsy report last year that analyzed Romneys loss to Obama. The report said Republicans must embrace comprehensive immigration re form Washington shorthand for legalizing the immigration status of those living here illegally_to improve the GOPs strained relation ship with the fast-grow ing Hispanic and Asian electorate. The recommendations quickly hit resistance from congressional Re publicans who rely on primary voters strong ly opposed to amnes ty for immigrants living here illegally. KATHY MATHESONAssociated PressPHILADELPHIA Passengers expressed relief Sunday that Phila delphia-area commuter trains were back on track after a one-day strike threatened to disrupt work schedules for tens of thousands of commuters in the coming week. Employees ended their walkout after President Barack Obama appointed an emer gency board to medi ate the contract dispute between the Southeast ern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority and two of its unions. An arrivals-and-departures board showed all regional rails running on time late Sunday morning at Suburban Station in downtown Philadelphia. By late evening, SEPTA spokeswoman Jerri Wil liams said operations throughout the day had run well and she antici pated a good start to the workweek Monday. We anticipate the workweek will be like any other Monday with the trains operating on or close to schedule, Williams said.Riders relieved rail strike is over in Philadelphia AP FILE PHOTO A SEPTA regional train, the R7, rolls into 30th Street station in Philadelphia.

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 16, 2014 HARMONY UNITED PSYCHIATRIC CARE We are a full service psychiatry practice dedicated and experienced in working with psychiatric patients to maintain & improve their mental health Psychiatric Evaluation, Diagnosis & Management of: Adil A. Mohammed, M.D. Brenda S. Faiber, M.S., LMFT OUR SERVICES www.harmonyunitedhc.com We accept most insurances with special pricing for cash paying patients.Appointments available within 7 days REBECCA SANTANA and ASIF SHAHZADAssociated PressISLAMABAD The Pakistani army Sunday launched a long-awaited operation against foreign and local militants in a tribal region near the Afghan border, hours af ter jets pounded insurgent hideouts in the countrys northwest, the army said. The move effectively ends the governments policy of trying to negotiate with Pa kistani Taliban militants in stead of using force to end the years of ghting that has killed tens of thousands of ci vilians and security forces. It comes a week after the mili tants laid siege to the coun trys largest airport in an at tack that shocked the country. The North Waziristan tribal area, where the operation is targeted, is one of the last areas in the tribal regions where the military has not launched a large operation. Militant groups including the Pakistani Taliban, al-Qa ida and the Haqqani network have long used the region as a base from which to attack both Pakistan and neighbor ing Afghanistan. Using North Waziristan as a base, these terrorists had waged a war against the state of Pakistan, military spokesman Gen. Asim Saleem Ba jwa said in a press release an nouncing the operation. The U.S. has pushed Pakistan to clear out militants in North Waziristan because they often use it as a sanc tuary from which to attack NATO and Afghan troops. But Pakistan has said its troops were already too spread out across the northwest, and the military has also wanted political support from the ci vilian government to carry out an operation which will likely spark a bloody back lash across the country. On Sunday night, the defense minister aggressive ly supported the operation, but there were no comments from Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif. Now we have to ght this do or die war, Defense Minis ter Khawaja Muhammad Asif told Pakistans Dunya Televi sion. We will ght it till the end. There was no immediate information on how many troops were involved. The military said troops had been deployed along the borders to prevent militants from es caping, and within North Waziristan troops had cordoned off areas including the largest cities of Mir Ali and Mi ranshah. Refugee camps have been established, the local popula tion is being told to approach designated areas so they can be evacuated and surrender points have been established at which militants can give up their weapons, the mili tary said. They also asked Afghanistan to secure its side of the border.Pakistan army launches offensive against militants AP FILE PHOTO Pakistani Taliban patrol in their stronghold of Shawal in Pakistani tribal region of South Waziristan. JOSEF FEDERMANAssociated PressJERUSALEM Israels prime minister on Sunday accused the Hamas militant group of kidnapping three Israeli teenagers who disappeared over the weekend, as the military arrested dozens of Palestinians and closed off West Bank roads in a fran tic search for the youths. The crisis escalated already heightened tensions between Israel and the new Palestinian government, which is headed by Western-backed Presi dent Mahmoud Abbas but backed by Hamas. Israel, which considers Hamas a terrorist group, has condemned the alliance and said it holds Abbas re sponsible for the teens safety. Hamas terrorists carried out Thursdays kidnapping of three Is raeli teenagers. We know that for a fact, Netanyahu said. Hamas deni als do not change this fact. Speaking in English, Netanyahu also tried to rally internation al opinion against the new Pales tinian government. His calls for the international community to shun the government have been ignored so far. Instead of abiding by his international obligation to disarm Hamas, President Abbas has chosen to make Hamas his partner, he added. I be lieve that the dangers of that pact now should be abundantly clear to all.Israeli prime minister accuses Hamas militants of kidnapping missing teens FRANK BAJAKAssociated PressBOGOTA, Colombia Juan Manuel San tos convincingly won re-election Sunday after Colombias tightest presidential contest in years, an endorsement of his 18-month-old peace talks to end the West ern Hemispheres longest-running conict. Santos defeated rightwing challenger Oscar Ivan Zuluaga with 53 percent-to-47 percent of valid votes with 99.7 percent of precincts re porting. Zuluaga was backed by former two-term President Alvaro Uribe, who many consid ered the true challeng er. They accused Santos of selling Colombia out in slow-slogging Cuba-based negotiations, and insisted Zulua ga would halt the talks unless the rebel Revolutionary Armed Forc es of Colombia, known as the FARC, ceased all hostilities and some of its leaders accepted jail time. The outcome af rmed Santos position that he has steered Colombia to a histor ic crossroads after a half-century of conict that claimed more than 200,000 lives, mostly civilians. Now were going to build this peace for which weve so long yearned, said Ivan Cepeda, a leading leftist lawmaker. The campaign was Andean nations dirtiest in years, and Uribe con tinued to allege wide spread fraud by the Santos camp right up to the closing of polls. But Zuluaga graciously con ceded defeat in front of his supporters less than an hour after the result became known. Santos win was a comeback of sorts Zuluaga nished rst in the elections rst round of ve candidates May 25. His 900,000-vote victory Sunday hinged in large part on win ning Bogota and mak ing major gains on the Caribbean coast, where his party machinery is strong. In the rst round, Santos nished third in the capital, the strong hold of defeated leftist candidate Clara Lopez, who endorsed the president for the run off. Voter turnout rose somewhat, too, from 40 percent in the rst round to 47 percent Sunday, which was seen as favoring Santos.Santos re-elected Colombias president in peace vote SANTIAGO CORTEZ / AP Supporters of Colombias President Juan Manuel Santos show their hands with the word peace written on them as they celebrate his victory in the presidential runoff in Bogota, Colombia on Sunday.

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Monday, June 16, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A9 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 W ill women vote for Hillary Clinton in 2016? In Hillary Clinton, will young women see an inspirational leader of indomitable for titude, imposing intelligence and insurmountable courage? Or will they reject her as mom, the one who just doesnt get it? Will women closer to Clintons own age see her as one of our own: An indefatigable citizen who has cleared away false notions about womens limited place in the world and pocketed her own pride without forfeiting her dignity in order to help America and the world become freer from injustice, violence, poverty and disease? Or will we succumb to that ruinous standard of perfectionism that carries within the seeds of its own defeat? In other words, will women judge Clinton as not good enough because we think, secretly and reexively, we might be not good enough? Put it this way: Will women voters be more critical of Hillary Clinton because of her gender or will women be more enthusiastic? Can we put Grandma in the White House? Grandma-to-be Clinton looks good on the cover of this weeks People magazine. The interview is chatty and personal. All the pictures are attering: Clinton is surrounded by a loving family, posing casually with a cute dog on her lap, and her neck is circled by a chunky turquoise necklace so big it makes her head look as if its on a platter. It brings out her eyes. And if I were talking about a male politician, would I be writing about what he was wearing? Of course not. Not unless he wasnt wear ing much, a la Anthony Weiner, D-N.Y. Thats right. A male politician has to be naked and sexting for his appearance (and accessories, such as they are) to be wor thy of comment. When Sen. Larry Craig, R-Idaho, was arrested at a Minnesota airport for lewd conduct in a mens restroom, for example, news reports mentioned that Craig was wearing dress pants with black dress shoes. I guess that counts as a description of Craigs outt, although personally I think they should have reported whether he was wearing matching socks. And just imagine if I were talking about the first-ever male presidential candidate among a group of female opponents. Would I be questioning whether this one male candidate lets imagine hes been secretary of state and has earned his stripes could count on the mens vote? No, because men would be carrying him on their shoulders to Washington. How about if, every time a man voted for a male candidate, we ask whether he made that decision based on sex? Lets start that conversation. Actually, Im glad support for a female candidate by female voters is anything but automatic, because, otherwise, Sarah Palin might be sitting far closer to Washington, D.C., and able to see the presidency from her house. Unlike Palin, of course, Clinton will not have been pole-vaulted into prominence. And its not as if Clinton needs a cable TV series, more recognition or higher speaking fees. Clinton stands at the summit of her career, offering the vision, wisdom and perspective that can be gained only by making the kind of journey shes made through national and international landscapes. Fear lessly attempting to untangle the knotted destinies of warring nations and irreconcilable enemies, shes displayed uninching leadership. Vladimir Putin inadvertently awarded Clinton high praise indeed when he sniffed, Its better not to argue with women. Every woman, in every country and throughout history, who has ever won an argument, small or large, has heard that line from the loser. Believe it or not, there are Americans who sound Putin-esque and think a woman should not be president. Ive come close enough to some vehement anti-feminists to see the foam on their mouths as they attempt to form a coherent argument concerning their position, but their points often betray the small bigotries of a narrow life which they seek to make even more conning and conned. Well, thats my girlish way of looking at things. They regard Hillary Clinton as a troublemaker. So do I. Hillary Clintons smiling in People, but you can see theres steel beneath that surface. Not stainless steel nobody is per fect but steel nonetheless. It goes with her eyes.Gina Barreca is an English professor at the University of Connecticut, a feminist scholar who has written eight books, and a columnist for the Hartford Courant. She can be reached through her www.ginabarreca.com.OTHERVOICES Gina BarrecaMCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Hillary Clinton world-class troublemaker From all the hand-wringing over soon-tobe-former House Majority Leader Eric Cantors astonishing defeat in a GOP pri mary Tuesday in Virginia, you might think he had been a conciliatory gure determined to keep the federal government on track even when it meant compromising on his con servative principles. That, he was not. So it strains credulity that some pundits and pols are predicting that Republicans will now be even less willing to strike deals with Demo crats, and that conservatives will be more in uential in the House. Its hard to imagine how Republicans in the House could have been less willing to strike deals, or how con servatives could be more inuential there. Granted, the House GOPs hardheadedness has often been met by intransigence from Democrats in the Senate and the White House. Yet the pattern during Cantors tenure as ma jority leader has been clear: House Republi cans turned routine practices such as funding the government into a continual exercise in brinkmanship. They compromised only when the public backlash against Washington dys function became too erce to ignore. The political novice who defeated Cantor, Randolph-Macon College professor Dave Brat, attacked Cantor on a number of fronts, includ ing how little time he spent in the district and how much money he raised from special inter ests. Nevertheless, much of the political estab lishment has zoomed in on Brats criticism of Cantors support for immigration reform and bipartisan deals to raise the debt ceiling, ease across-the-board budget cuts and end a sixweek government shutdown. According to the conventional wisdom, the message from Vir ginias 7th District is that lawmakers move to ward the center at their own peril. But if primary voters were determined to root out centrists, Cantor was the wrong place to start. For much of the Republicans 3 1/2 years running the House, he has been the person conservatives counted on to stiffen the spine of Speaker John A. Boehner, R-Ohio. And the agenda that Cantor set for the House was almost relentlessly partisan, a conservative Republican wish list of measures to roll back programs, lift regulations and reverse administration policies. The paralysis in Washington is a reection of the nations political split, as more of the electorate moves toward the wings and away from the middle. What purists need to understand, though, is that much of the country disagrees strongly with their views and that in a divided government, neither side gets everything it wants, no matter how rm ly it digs in its heels. The deals Cantor reluctantly supported were the messy product of a representative government whose constituents can reach no consensus other than the need to keep the government operating. And his defeat changes nothing about that state of affairs, which is the signal governing challenge of our day.Distributed by MCT Information Services.AVOICEHardly the fall of the House of Cantor Classic DOONESBURY 1975Will women closer to Clintons own age see her as one of our own: An indefatigable citizen who has cleared away false notions about womens limited place in the world and pocketed her own pride without forfeiting her dignity in order to help America and the world become freer from injustice, violence, poverty and disease?

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 16, 2014www.dailycommercial.com JULIO CORTEZ / AP United States Jozy Altidore, center, warms up with teammates in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The U.S. will play its opener in group G today against Ghana.Klinsmann sounds more confident on eve of opener BOB BRODBECK / AP Jimmie Johnson, holding his daughter Genevieve, stands with his wife Chandra Janway after winning the NASCAR Quicken Loans 400 auto race on Sunday at Michigan International Speedway in Brooklyn, Mich. ERIC GAY / AP Martin Kaymer, of Germany, holds up the trophy after wining the U.S. Open golf tournament on Sunday in Pinehurst, N.C. Wire-to-wire win DOUG FERGUSONAP Golf WriterPINEHURST, N.C. Martin Kaymer re turned to the elite in golf with a U.S. Open victo ry that ranks among the best. A forgotten star for two years while build ing a complete game, Kaymer turned the toughest test of golf into a runaway at Pinehurst No. 2 on Sunday to be come only the seventh wire-to-wire winner in 114 years of the U.S. Open. Kaymer closed with a 1-under 69 the only player from the last eight groups to break par for an eightshot victory over Rickie Fowler and Erik Compton, the two-time heart transplant recipient and the only player who even remotely challenged the 29-year-old German. So dominant was Kaymer that no one got closer than four shots over the nal 48 holes. Only a late bogey kept Kaymer from joining Tiger Woods and Rory McIlroy as the only players to nish a U.S. Open in double digits under par. He made a 15-foot par putt on the 18th hole, dropping his putter as the ball fell into the center of the cup, just like so many other putts this week. No one was catching Kaymer this week, Compton said, who closed with a 72 to earn earned a trip to the Masters next April. I was playing for second. I think we all were play ing for second. This U.S. Open really ended on Friday. Kaymer set the U.S. Open record with backto-back rounds of 65 to set the pace at 10-under 130. He began Sun day with a ve-shot lead, and after a 10-foot par save on the second hole, Kaymer belted a driver on the 313-yard third hole. The ball landed on the front of the green and rolled to the back, setting up a two-putt birdie. He kind of killed the event in the rst two days, Henrik Stenson said. He went out and shot two 65s and left ev eryone in the dust. Fowler, in the nal group of a major for the rst time, fell back quickly on the fourth hole. He sent his third shot from a sandy path over the green and into some pine trees and had to make a 25-foot putt just to escape with double bogey. Fowler played even par the rest of the way for a 72. Compton birdied the eighth hole and got within four shots until he took bogey on the par-3 ninth, and NOAH TRISTERAssociated PressBROOKLYN, Mich. Jimmie Johnson nally won a NASCAR Sprint Cup race at Michigan International Speedway. The six-time series champion won Sunday for the rst time in 25 Cup starts at MIS, outlasting pole winner Kevin Harvick by 1.214 seconds. It was Johnsons third victory in four races and the fth in a row for Chevrolet and Hendrick Motorsports. Jeff Gordon and Dale Earnhardt Jr. also have won for Chevy and Hendrick during the streak that doesnt count Jamie McMur rays win for Chevy in the Sprint All-Star race last month. Brad Keselowski nished third Sunday af ter two straight runner-up showings at Dover and Pocono. Paul Menard was fourth, followed by Kasey Kahne, Gordon and Earnhardt in the 400-mile, 200-lap race. Johnson had nished in the top ve four times previously at Michigan, including Jimmie Johnson finally posts win at MichiganSEE NASCAR | B2Germanys Martin Kaymer uses record start to post win in U.S. Open MATT YORK / AP Rickie Fowler hits out of the bunker on the seventh hole. ZACHARY HANKLESpecial to the Daily CommercialORLANDO When the weatherman nally cooperated, the Leesburg Lightning turned Fa thers Day into something pleasant. The Lightning completed Saturdays double header with the College Park Freedom on Sun day, winning the opener 5-1 and dropping the nightcap 6-5. The rst game, which began at Pat Thomas Stadium-Buddy Lowe Field before being sus pended after two innings due to rain and slop py eld conditions, ended at Orlando Bishop Moore. Colby Lusignan got the Lightning off to a quick start in the rst inning on Saturday with a two-run homer. Leesburg added three more runs in the sixth inning on hits by Joe Sabatini, Andrew Miller and Garrett Suggs. Sabatini, Miller and Kamer on Esthay, who reached on an error, scored for the Lightning. College Park scored its lone run in the fourth inning. RONALD BLUMAssociated PressNATAL, Brazil Jurgen Klinsmann speaks with pragmatism. He books his airline tickets with hope. The U.S. coach caused a stir in the lead-up to soc cers championship when he said that I think for us now, talking about winning a World Cup is just not real istic. But on the eve of the Americans opener against Ghana, he revealed this: I booked my ight after the nal. The U.S. has never advanced after starting with a loss, and it is grouped with the 37th-ranked Black Stars along with No. 2 Germany and No. 4 Portugal. A two-day downpour has ooded some streets in this northeastern Brazilian beach town. While the skies started to clear a bit Sun day, the forecast was un settled for Monday nights game, when the Americans try to avenge losses to Gha na that knocked them out of the past two World Cups. Klinsmann sounded just like the U.S. Postal Service. Its raining. If its snow ing. If its what else? I think for us now, talking about winning a World Cup is just not realistic.Jurgen Klinsmann,US World Cup coachSEE USA | B2Lightning earn split with College ParkSEE SPLIT | B2SEE OPEN | B2Weve almost a German Grand Slam almost. I hope it will make Bernhard proud. Im sure it will make all of Germany proud.Martin Kayneron his victory in the U.S. Open

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 16, 2014 SUN mon tues wed thurs fri SatLeesburg LightningJune 15-21Deland Suns7pm@ College Park Freedom5pm@ Winter Park Diamond Dawgs7pm Winter Park Diamond Dawgs7pmWinter Park Diamond Dawgs7pm@ Deland Suns7pm NASCAR Sprint Cup-Quicken Loans 400 ResultsSunday At Michigan International Speedway Brooklyn, Mich. Lap length: 2 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (7) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 200 laps, 130.7 rating, 47 points, $205,661. 2. (1) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 200, 135.1, 44, $196,118. 3. (6) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 200, 113.9, 42, $153,393. 4. (5) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 200, 105.8, 40, $136,349. 5. (13) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 200, 85.9, 40, $121,250. 6. (2) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 200, 117.2, 39, $140,526. 7. (3) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 200, 106.2, 38, $103,590. 8. (12) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 200, 89.7, 37, $121,460. 9. (9) Joey Logano, Ford, 200, 117.3, 36, $129,056. 10. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 200, 92, 34, $128,256. 11. (26) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 200, 94.1, 34, $126,473. 12. (11) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 200, 95.6, 33, $129,404. 13. (8) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 200, 96.8, 32, $91,090. 14. (21) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 200, 83.5, 31, $134,901. 15. (24) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 200, 77.6, 29, $98,715. 16. (17) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 200, 79.6, 28, $115,523. 17. (27) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 200, 68.1, 27, $96,365. 18. (28) Juan Pablo Montoya, Ford, 200, 72.4, 26, $84,265. 19. (23) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 200, 68.4, 0, $87,665. 20. (18) Greg Bife, Ford, 200, 68, 24, $129,415. 21. (37) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 199, 53.5, 23, $103,098. 22. (25) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 199, 60.6, 22, $100,773. 23. (22) Carl Edwards, Ford, 199, 57, 21, $101,865. 24. (31) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 199, 56.5, 20, $105,723. 25. (20) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 199, 61.5, 19, $112,685. 26. (32) David Gilliland, Ford, 198, 51.5, 18, $102,937. 27. (30) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 198, 51.7, 17, $120,915. 28. (42) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 198, 42.1, 16, $84,840. 29. (29) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 198, 61.2, 15, $92,640. 30. (19) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 197, 74.9, 15, $130,801. 31. (4) Aric Almirola, Ford, 197, 73.5, 13, $121,201. 32. (40) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 197, 36.6, 12, $82,315. 33. (38) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 197, 42.9, 11, $81,240. 34. (34) Brett Moftt, Toyota, 197, 44, 10, $89,140. 35. (39) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 197, 36.9, 0, $80,975. 36. (35) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 197, 30, 0, $80,920. 37. (16) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 196, 33.2, 7, $108,768. 38. (33) David Ragan, Ford, 196, 44.3, 6, $84,070. 39. (36) David Stremme, Chevrolet, 195, 29.9, 5, $72,070. 40. (41) Alex Bowman, Toyota, accident, 169, 33.9, 4, $68,070. 41. (14) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 169, 74.6, 3, $111,911. 42. (10) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 110, 25.5, 2, $92,145. 43. (43) Travis Kvapil, Ford, accident, 23, 28.8, 1, $56,570. Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 143.441 mph. Time of Race: 2 hours, 47 minutes, 19 sec onds. Margin of Victory: 1.214 seconds. Caution Flags: 8 for 36 laps. Lead Changes: 25 among 13 drivers. Lap Leaders: K.Harvick 1-18; J.Gordon 1942; B.Keselowski 43-44; J.Gordon 45-56; K.Harvick 57-74; J.Johnson 75-77; J.Logano 78-91; J.Johnson 92-104; K.Harvick 105-112; B.Keselowski 113; K.Harvick 114-118; B.Keselowski 119; K.Harvick 120-126; J.Logano 127-141; K.Harvick 142-148; J.McMurray 149-151; J.Johnson 152-164; J.McMurray 165; D.Earnhardt Jr. 166; Ku.Busch 167-182; K.Kahne 183; K.Larson 184-185; A.Dillon 186-187; T.Stewart 188; M.Kenseth 189-190; J.Johnson 191-200. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): K.Harvick, 6 times for 63 laps; J.Johnson, 4 times for 39 laps; J.Gordon, 2 times for 36 laps; J.Logano, 2 times for 29 laps; Ku.Busch, 1 time for 16 laps; B.Keselowski, 3 times for 4 laps; J.McMurray, 2 times for 4 laps; K.Larson, 1 time for 2 laps; M.Kenseth, 1 time for 2 laps; A.Dillon, 1 time for 2 laps; K.Kahne, 1 time for 1 lap; D.Earnhardt Jr., 1 time for 1 lap; T.Stewart, 1 time for 1 lap. Wins: J.Johnson, 3; D.Earnhardt Jr., 2; K.Har vick, 2; J.Logano, 2; Ku.Busch, 1; Ky.Busch, 1; C.Edwards, 1; J.Gordon, 1; D.Hamlin, 1; Bra. Keselowski, 1. Top 12 in Points: 1. J.Gordon, 537; 2. J. Johnson, 522; 3. D.Earnhardt Jr., 514; 4. M.Kenseth, 513; 5. Bra.Keselowski, 490; 6. C.Edwards, 462; 7. J.Logano, 454; 8. K.Lar son, 454; 9. K.Harvick, 447; 10. Ky.Busch, 446; 11. R.Newman, 440; 12. D.Hamlin, 435. NASCAR Driver Rating Formula A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a race. The formula combines the following categories: Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Running Position While on Lead Lap, Average Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led Most Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.NBA Playoff GlanceAll Times EDT FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) San Antonio 3, Miami 1 Thursday, June 5: San Antonio 110, Miami 95 Sunday, June 8: Miami 98, San Antonio 96 Tuesday, June 10: San Antonio 111, Miami 92 Thursday, June 12: San Antonio 107, Miami 86 Sunday, June 15: Miami at San Antonio, late x-Tuesday, June 17: San Antonio at Miami, 9 p.m. x-Friday, June 20: Miami at San Antonio, 9 p.m. TENNIS WTA AEGON Classic ResultsSunday At Edgbaston Priory Club Birmingham, England Purse: $710,000 (Premier) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles Championship Ana Ivanovic (1), Serbia, def. Barbora Zahla vova Strycova, Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-2. Doubles Championship Raquel Kops-Jones and Abigail Spears (3), United States, def. Ashleigh Barty and Casey Dellacqua (2), Australia, 7-6 (1), 6-1. ATP World Tour Gerry Weber Open ResultsSunday At Gerry Weber Stadion Halle, Germany Purse: $1.1 million (WT250) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles Championship Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, def. Alejandro Falla, Colombia, 7-6 (2), 7-6 (3). Doubles Championship Andre Begemann, Germany, and Julian Knowle, Austria, def. Marco Chiudinelli and Roger Federer, Switzerland, 1-6, 7-5, 12-10. Topshelf Open Results Sunday At Autotron Rosmalen Den Bosch, Netherlands Purse: ATP, $658,000 (WT250); WTA, $250,000 (Intl.) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles Men First Round Jesse Huta Galung, Netherlands, def. Aleksandr Nedovyesov, Kazakhstan, 6-2, 1-0, retired. Dudi Sela, Israel, def. Benoit Paire, France, 6-4, 7-6 (2). Women First Round Magdalena Rybarikova, Slovakia, def. An-Sophie Mestach, Belgium, 6-4, 6-4. Yvonne Meusburger, Austria, def. Kaia Kanepi, Estonia, 6-1, 6-2. Andrea Petkovic (5), Germany, def. Yanina Wickmayer, Belgium, 6-2, 6-4. Doubles Men First Round Marcel Granollers, Spain, and Jurgen Melzer (3), Austria, def. Nicholas Monroe, United States, and Vasek Pospisil, Canada, 6-4, 6-3. Women First Round Andreja Klepac, Slovenia, and Maria-Teresa Torro-Flor, Spain, def. Annika Beck, Germany, and Kurumi Nara, Japan, 6-7 (6), 6-2, 10-4. Marina Erakovic, New Zealand, and Arantxa Parra Santonja (4), Spain, def. Raluca Olaru, Romania, and Shahar Peer, Israel, 6-3, 6-2. Michaella Krajicek, Netherlands, and Kristina Mladenovic (3), France, def. Irina-Camelia Begu, Romania, and Vania King, United States, 3-6, 6-3, 10-8. ATP World Tour AEGON Championships ResultsSunday At The Queens Club London Purse: $1.1 million (WT250) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles Championship Grigor Dimitrov (4), Bulgaria, def. Feliciano Lo pez (10), Spain, 6-7 (8), 7-6 (1), 7-6 (6). Doubles Championship Alexander Peya, Austria, and Bruno Soares (2), Brazil, def. Jamie Murray, Britain, and John Peers, Australia, 4-6, 7-6 (4), 10-4. Sundays Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League DETROIT TIGERS Optioned RHP Corey Knebel to Toledo (IL). Recalled LHP Blaine Hardy from Toledo. HOUSTON ASTROS Placed RHP Josh Fields on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Paul Clemens from Oklahoma City (PCL). MINNESOTA TWINS Placed 3B Trevor Plouffe on the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Pedro Florimon from Rochester (IL). NEW YORK YANKEES Assigned LHP Wade LeBlanc outright to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). OAKLAND ATHLETICS Traded OF Michael Taylor to the Chicago White Sox for RHP Jake Sanchez. TEXAS RANGERS Agreed to terms with LHP Shane McCain on a minor league contract. National League MIAMI MARLINS Sent LHP Brad Hand to New Orleans (PCL) for a rehab assignment. Placed RHP Nathan Eovaldi on paternity leave. Recalled RHP Sam Dyson from New Orleans. NEW YORK METS Acquired LHP Blake Taylor from Pittsburgh to complete an earlier trade, and assigned him to the GCL Mets. PITTSBURGH PIRATES Optioned INF Michael Martinez to Indianapolis (IL). Selected the con tract of RHP Vance Worley from Indianapolis. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS Optioned OF Randal Grichuk to Memphis (PCL). Selected the contract of LHP Nick Greenwood from Memphis. Agreed to terms with LHP Austin Gomber and RHP Tyler Bray on minor league contracts. SAN DIEGO PADRES Placed RHP Nick Vincent on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Thursday. Selected the contract of RHP Blaine Boyer from El Paso (PCL). American Association AMARILLO SOX Traded LHP Josh Spence to Windy City (Frontier) to complete an earlier trade. GRAND PRAIRIE AIR HOGS Signed RHP Jason Jarvis.TV2DAY SCOREBOARD COLLEGE BASEBALL 3 p.m.ESPN2 World Series, Game 5, Texas vs. Louisville, at Omaha, Neb.8 p.m.ESPN2 World Series, Game 6, UC Irvine vs. Vanderbilt, at Omaha, Neb.MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7:10 p.m.SUN Baltimore at Tampa Bay FS-Florida Chicago Cubs at Miami8 p.m.ESPN N.Y. Mets at St. LouisSOCCER 11:30 a.m.ESPN FIFA, World Cup, Group G, Germany vs. Portugal, at Salvador, Brazil2:30 p.m.ESPN FIFA, World Cup, Group F, Iran vs. Nigeria, at Curitiba, Brazil5:30 p.m.ESPN FIFA, World Cup, Group G, Ghana vs. United States, at Natal, Brazil FCSL STANDINGS W L .Pct GB Winter Garden 7 3 .700 Winter Park 7 5 .585 1 Leesburg 4 3 .571 1.5 Sanford 5 4 .556 1.5 College Park 4 5 .444 2.5 DeLand 2 9 .182 5.5 SUNDAYS GAMESLeesburg 5,5 College Park 1,6 Sanford 6, DeLand 1 Winter Park 8, Winter Garden 4TODAYS GAMESNone scheduledTUESDAYS GAMESLeesburg at Winter Park, 7 p.m. Sanford at Winter Garden, 7 p.m. College Park at DeLand, 7 pm. a second-place showing in August 2011. He lost in Au gust 2012 when his engine faltered with six laps re maining. Johnson led after 164 laps Sunday before stopping to pit and giving up the lead. He was back in front with about 10 laps to go following a cycle of pit stops by other drivers, and the No. 48 Chevy led by a comfortable margin down the stretch. Hendrick had four drivers in the top seven. Johnson is trying for his seventh Cup title, which would tie the mark shared by Richard Petty and the late Dale Earnhardt. This was his 69th career victo ry, and hes the rst driver with three wins in 2014. There are now only four tracks on the current schedule where Johnson has never won Kentucky, Watkins Glen, Chicagoland and Homestead-Miami. Its the third time Hen drick has won ve straight races. The team accom plished the feat twice in 2007, including a six-race streak. Gordons sixth-place nish was enough to keep him atop the points race, with Johnson moving up two spots to second. Ford had won the last three Cup races at Michigan, with Joey Logano prevailing last August and Greg Bife winning twice before that. Keselowski couldnt extend that streak, and Logano nished ninth. It was a rough day for Roush Fenway Racing, which has a record 13 Cup victories at Michigan. Bif e nished 20th and Carl Edwards was 23rd. NASCAR FROM PAGE B1 thunder or lightning ... eld wet, eld dry, heat, humidity, whatever, he said Sunday. Were not worried about that stuff at all. A total of 3.11 inches of rain fell Friday and 2.95 more Saturday, according to AccuWeathers Anthony Sagliani, and by late Saturday night cars had to navigate at least 18 inches of standing water. Natals City Hall declared a ood alert and evacuated doz ens of residents as a precaution in the Mae Luiza neighborhood in the citys west. Still, the eld appeared rm during workouts Sunday at the new Arena das Dunas, whose wavy, asymmetrical exterior was designed to resemble the nearby sand dunes of a city nearly as close to west Africa (1,800 miles) as to the American base camp in Sao Paulo (1,400 miles). The forecast calls for a temperature of about 80 degrees (27 Celsius), high humidity Natal is 400 miles south of the equa tor and a slight chance of showers. The weather is what it is, and as players thats not something we can con trol, midelder Michael Bradley said. You get to this point, youre not wor ried about little details, about whether the wind is blowing, whether the sun is out. Thousands of U.S. fans are expected. The Amer ican Outlaws supporters group chartered two Boeing 767s from Houston that brought 530 fans to Brazil, and the U.S. Soccer Federation said it sold its ofcial allotment of about 2,000 tickets. Ghana beat the Ameri cans by identical 2-1 scores in the nal group-stage game at Germany in 2006 and in the second round at South Africa four years ago. The U.S., appearing at its seventh straight World Cup and 10th overall, has never lost to a team three straight times in the tour nament. Its going to be like theyre coming for revenge, said Ghana captain Asamoah Gyan, whose overtime goal was the dif ference in the 2010 match. Teams that won their openers have advanced 85 percent of the time since the 32-nation format be gan in 1998. Just 9 percent of nations starting with a loss advanced, and 58 per cent of those beginning with draws reached the knockout rounds. This is just an awesome moment, because thats the biggest stage you can have, where you kind of want to show that you improved, and nothing bet ter than against the team that beat you the last two World Cups, Klinsmann said. So this, as we mentioned before, is like start the whole World Cup with a nal. Ghana lost a shootout to Uruguay in the 2010 quar ternals. The Black Stars are the youngest of the 32 World Cup teams with an average age of 25 years, 6 months, according to FIFA, while the U.S. is the 12th-oldest at 27 years, 10 months. Now people back home believe we can do more, which puts pressure on the players, Gyan said. Barring late injuries, Tim Howard will be in goal, and Fabian Johnson gures to start at right back, Geoff Cameron and Matt Besler in central defense and DaMarcus Beasley at left back. USA FROM PAGE B1 Brett Jones started on Saturday and pitched until the game was suspended. Brandon Caples stepped in on Sunday in relief of Jones and went 3 1/3 in nings to pick up the win. Caples surrendered three hits walked one and struck out two. Trey Norris pitched the nal 1 1/3 innings for Lees burg. Ben Richardson took the loss for the Freedom. In the nightcap, College Park bolted to a 5-0 lead in the rst inning against Lightning starter Tyler Souris, who lasted two in nings. That was it for the Freedom until the 10th inning as Kyle Schackne, Cody Crouse and Danny Miller delivered ve scoreless innings in relief. Leesburg chipped away at the Freedoms advantage with three runs in the third, and solo runs in the seventh and ninth innings. Matt Menard had a three-run homer to pow er the Lightning rally. Menard had three hits in the game and Jones added two more. Brandan Keen scored the winning run for Col lege Park with one out in the ninth on single by Jake Sidwell off Frankie Romano. Justin Lawrence picked up the win for College Park. With the doubleheader split, Leesburg goes into todays league-wide off date with a 4-3 record, while College Park is 4-5. The Lightning are back in action at 7 / p .m. on Tues day against Winter Park at Alfond Stadium. Leesburg will host the Diamond Dawgs at 7 / p .m. Wednes day before wrapping up the series at 7 / p .m. Thurs day in Winter Park. SPLIT FROM PAGE B1 At Pinehurst Resort and Country Club, No. 2 Course Martin Kaymer 65-65-72-69 -9 Erik Compton 72-68-67-72 -1 Rickie Fowler 70-70-67-72 -1 Keegan Bradley 69-69-76-67 +1 Jason Day 73-68-72-68 +1 Brooks Koepka 70-68-72-71 +1 Dustin Johnson 69-69-70-73 +1 Henrik Stenson 69-69-70-73 +1 Adam Scott 73-67-73-69 +2 Jimmy Walker 70-72-71-69 +2 Brandt Snedeker 69-68-72-73 +2 Jim Furyk 73-70-73-67 +3 Marcel Siem 70-71-72-70 +3 Justin Rose 72-69-70-72 +3 Kevin Na 68-69-73-73 +3 Matt Kuchar 69-70-71-73 +3 Brendon Todd 69-67-79-69 +4 Ian Poulter 70-70-74-70 +4 J.B. Holmes 70-71-72-71 +4 Jordan Spieth 69-70-72-73 +4 Cody Gribble 72-72-72-69 +5 Steve Stricker 70-71-73-71 +5 Billy Horschel 75-68-73-70 +6 Aaron Baddeley 70-71-73-72 +6 Shiv Kapur 73-70-71-72 +6 Rory McIlroy 71-68-74-73 +6 Francesco Molinari 69-71-72-74 +6 Daniel Berger 72-71-78-66 +7 Graeme McDowell 68-74-75-70 +7 Kenny Perry 74-69-74-70 +7 Phil Mickelson 70-73-72-72 +7 Victor Dubuisson 70-72-70-75 +7 Brendon De Jonge 68-70-73-76 +7 Chris Kirk 71-68-72-76 +7 Patrick Reed 71-72-73-72 +8 Ernie Els 74-70-72-72 +8 Sergio Garcia 73-71-72-72 +8 Bill Haas 72-72-71-73 +8 Hideki Matsuyama 69-71-74-74 +8 Louis Oosthuizen 71-73-78-67 +9 Zac Blair 71-74-73-71 +9 Zach Johnson 71-74-72-72 +9 Lucas Bjerregaard 70-72-72-75 +9 Garth Mulroy 71-72-70-76 +9 Danny Willett 70-71-78-71 +10 Webb Simpson 71-72-73-74 +10 Retief Goosen 73-71-71-75 +10 a-Matthew Fitzpatrick 71-73-78-69 +11 Billy Hurley III 71-74-75-71 +11 Harris English 69-75-75-72 +11 Ryan Moore 76-68-71-76 +11 Seung-Yul Noh 70-72-76-74 +12 Gary Woodland 72-71-75-74 +12 Scott Langley 72-71-75-75 +13 Stewart Cink 72-72-74-75 +13 Fran Quinn 68-74-79-73 +14 Paul Casey 70-75-74-75 +14 Nicholas Lindheim 72-73-72-77 +14 Justin Leonard 75-70-75-75 +15 Russell Henley 70-74-82-71 +17 Kevin Tway 72-72-81-72 +17 Alex Cejka 73-71-77-76 +17 Kevin Stadler 77-68-78-75 +18 Clayton Rask 73-71-77-77 +18 Bo Van Pelt 72-72-75-79 +18 Boo Weekley 71-73-80-75 +19 Kaymer followed with an 8-iron to 4 feet for birdie. Kaymer nished at 9-under 271, the second-lowest score in U.S. Open history next to McIlroys 268 at Congressional in 2011. He won his second major the other was the 2010 PGA Championship at Whistling Straits in a threeman playoff and this one wasnt close. Martin was playing his own tour nament, Fowler said. Kaymer joined Seve Ballesteros, Ernie Els, Woods and McIlroy as the only players to win two majors and be No. 1 in the world before turning 30 since the world ranking began in 1986. He is the fourth European in the last ve years to win the U.S. Open, after Europeans had gone 40 years without this title. Its a rebirth for Kaymer, who reached No. 1 in the world in Feb ruary 2011, only to believe that he needed a more rounded game. His preferred shot was a fade. Kaymer spent two hard years, a lot of lonely hours on the range in Germany and his home in Scottsdale, Arizona. He fell as low as No. 63 in the world until going wire-to-wire (with ties) at The Players Championship, considered the strongest and deep est eld in golf. But the big payoff came at Pine hurst No. 2. I didnt make many mistakes the last two wins that I had in America especially this week, said Kay mer, who moves to No. 11 in the world. Kaymer has as many majors as Bernhard Langer, the two-time Masters champion and a mentor to Kaymer. Langer sent him text mes sages earlier in the week. Weve almost a German Grand Slam almost, Kaymer said. I hope it will make Bernhard proud. Im sure it will make all of Germa ny proud. The biggest challenge for Kay mer was tuning out the crowd, with enormous support for Fowler, who enjoys pop star qualities in Amer ica. The fans clapped when Kay mers ball bounded off the back of the green, and even when a superb shot from the native weeds on No. 4 rolled off the front of the green. OPEN FROM PAGE B1

PAGE 13

Monday, June 16, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Toronto 41 30 .577 4-6 W-1 20-17 21-13 Baltimore 35 33 .515 4 1 5-5 L-1 16-17 19-16 New York 35 33 .515 4 1 6-4 L-2 13-16 22-17 Boston 31 38 .449 9 5 4-6 L-2 17-19 14-19 Tampa Bay 27 43 .386 13 10 4-6 W-1 14-20 13-23 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 36 29 .554 5-5 W-2 18-16 18-13 Kansas City 36 32 .529 1 8-2 W-7 18-16 18-16 Cleveland 35 35 .500 3 2 5-5 W-2 21-11 14-24 Minnesota 32 35 .478 5 3 4-6 L-2 15-17 17-18 Chicago 33 37 .471 5 4 3-7 L-4 19-18 14-19 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 42 27 .609 5-5 W-2 19-13 23-14 Los Angeles 37 30 .552 4 7-3 W-1 20-14 17-16 Seattle 35 34 .507 7 1 4-6 W-1 15-20 20-14 Texas 34 35 .493 8 2 5-5 L-1 16-19 18-16 Houston 32 39 .451 11 5 6-4 L-1 17-20 15-19 NATIONAL LEAGUEEAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 35 32 .522 4-6 L-1 19-15 16-17 Miami 35 33 .515 5-5 W-1 23-13 12-20 Washington 35 33 .515 5-5 L-4 19-15 16-18 New York 31 38 .449 5 5 3-7 W-1 16-20 15-18 Philadelphia 29 38 .433 6 6 5-5 L-1 16-21 13-17 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 41 29 .586 6-4 L-1 20-15 21-14 St. Louis 37 32 .536 3 7-3 W-3 19-14 18-18 Pittsburgh 34 35 .493 6 2 6-4 L-1 20-16 14-19 Cincinnati 33 35 .485 7 2 6-4 W-1 17-17 16-18 Chicago 28 39 .418 11 7 5-5 W-1 15-14 13-25 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY San Francisco 43 27 .614 4-6 L-3 23-15 20-12 Los Angeles 37 34 .521 6 6-4 L-1 15-20 22-14 Colorado 34 35 .493 8 2 6-4 W-5 19-14 15-21 San Diego 29 40 .420 13 7 3-7 L-1 16-19 13-21 Arizona 30 42 .417 14 7 4-6 W-1 12-24 18-18 SATURDAYS GAMESKansas City 9, Chicago White Sox 1 Cleveland 3, Boston 2 Baltimore 3, Toronto 2 Detroit 12, Minnesota 9 Houston 7, Tampa Bay 3 L.A. Angels 11, Atlanta 6, 13 innings Oakland 5, N.Y. Yankees 1 Texas 4, Seattle 3SATURDAYS GAMESPhiladelphia 7, Chicago Cubs 4 Colorado 5, San Francisco 4 Pittsburgh 8, Miami 6 San Diego 5, N.Y. Mets 0 Milwaukee 4, Cincinnati 2 L.A. Angels 11, Atlanta 6, 13 innings St. Louis 4, Washington 1 L.A. Dodgers 6, Arizona 4SUNDAYS GAMESDetroit 4, Minnesota 3 Cleveland 3, Boston 2, 11 innings Toronto 5, Baltimore 2 Kansas City 6, Chicago White Sox 3 Tampa Bay 4, Houston 3 Oakland 10, N.Y. Yankees 5 Seattle 5, Texas 1 L.A. Angels at Atlanta, lateSUNDAYS GAMESMiami 3, Pittsburgh 2, 10 innings N.Y. Mets 3, San Diego 1 Chicago Cubs 3, Philadelphia 0 Cincinnati 13, Milwaukee 4 St. Louis 5, Washington 2 Colorado 8, San Francisco 7 Arizona 6, L.A. Dodgers 3 L.A. Angels at Atlanta, lateTODAYS GAMESL.A. Angels (Weaver 7-5) at Cleveland (Bauer 1-3), 7:05 p.m. Kansas City (Vargas 6-2) at Detroit (Verlander 6-6), 7:08 p.m. Baltimore (W.Chen 7-2) at Tampa Bay (Odorizzi 2-7), 7:10 p.m. Minnesota (Correia 3-7) at Boston (R.De La Rosa 1-2), 7:10 p.m. Texas (Lewis 4-4) at Oakland (Pomeranz 5-3), 10:05 p.m. San Diego (T.Ross 6-5) at Seattle (C.Young 5-4), 10:10 p.m.TODAYS GAMESChicago Cubs (Hammel 6-4) at Miami (Koehler 5-5), 7:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Hamels 2-3) at Atlanta (Teheran 6-4), 7:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (deGrom 0-3) at St. Louis (C.Martinez 0-3), 8:10 p.m. Milwaukee (W.Peralta 6-5) at Arizona (McCarthy 1-9), 9:40 p.m. Colorado (Matzek 1-0) at L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 7-3), 10:10 p.m. San Diego (T.Ross 6-5) at Seattle (C.Young 5-4), 10:10 p.m.AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Cano, Seattle, .331; VMartinez, Detroit, .329; Rios, Texas, .327; MiCabrera, Detroit, .325; Brantley, Cleve land, .319; Altuve, Houston, .319; Beltre, Texas, .316. RUNS: Dozier, Minnesota, 55; Donaldson, Oakland, 52; Bautista, Toronto, 51; Brantley, Cleveland, 48; Kinsler, Detroit, 44; Trout, Los Angeles, 44; MeCabrera, Toronto, 43; NCruz, Baltimore, 43; Encarnacion, Toronto, 43. RBI: MiCabrera, Detroit, 55; NCruz, Baltimore, 55; Encarnacion, Toronto, 54; Moss, Oakland, 53. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 90; MeCabrera, Toronto, 86; Rios, Texas, 86; Markakis, Baltimore, 84; Brantley, Cleveland, 83; Cano, Seattle, 83; AJones, Baltimore, 82; AlRamirez, Chicago, 82. DOUBLES: MiCabrera, Detroit, 23; Plouffe, Minnesota, 22; Altuve, Houston, 21; Hosmer, Kansas City, 21; Pe droia, Boston, 21; EEscobar, Minnesota, 20; Kinsler, Detroit, 20. TRIPLES: Rios, Texas, 8; Bourn, Cleveland, 5; Trout, Los Angeles, 5; Gardner, New York, 4; 13 tied at 3. HOME RUNS: NCruz, Baltimore, 21; Encarnacion, Toronto, 20; JAbreu, Chicago, 19; Donaldson, Oakland, 17; VMartinez, Detroit, 17; Moss, Oakland, 16; Pujols, Los Angeles, 16. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 24; RDavis, Detroit, 18; Ellsbury, New York, 18; AEscobar, Kansas City, 17; Andrus, Texas, 16; LMartin, Texas, 15; Reyes, Toronto, 15. PITCHING: Tanaka, New York, 10-1; Buehrle, Toronto, 10-3; FHernandez, Seattle, 8-2; Kazmir, Oakland, 8-2; Scherzer, Detroit, 8-2; Keuchel, Houston, 8-3; Porcello, Detroit, 8-4; Lackey, Boston, 8-4. ERA: Tanaka, New York, 2.02; Kazmir, Oakland, 2.05; Darvish, Texas, 2.11; Buehrle, Toronto, 2.28; FHernandez, Seattle, 2.29; Keuchel, Houston, 2.38; Richards, Los Angeles, 2.87. STRIKEOUTS: FHernandez, Seattle, 112; Price, Tampa Bay, 111; Scherzer, Detroit, 106; Kluber, Cleveland, 104; Tanaka, New York, 103; Darvish, Texas, 101; Lester, Boston, 99. SAVES: Holland, Kansas City, 19; Rodney, Seattle, 18; Perkins, Minnesota, 17; DavRobertson, New York, 16.NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Tulowitzki, Colorado, .355; Lucroy, Milwaukee, .333; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, .323; Puig, Los Angeles, .318; CGomez, Milwaukee, .310; Goldschmidt, Arizona, .309; Utley, Philadelphia, .308. RUNS: Tulowitzki, Colorado, 53; Pence, San Francisco, 51; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 50; Stanton, Miami, 48; CGomez, Milwaukee, 45; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 44; Rizzo, Chicago, 44. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 54; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 50; Blackmon, Colorado, 44; Morse, San Francisco, 44; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 43; Desmond, Washington, 42. HITS: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 85; DanMurphy, New York, 83; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 82; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 81; Pence, San Francisco, 81; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 78. DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 27; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 25; Utley, Philadelphia, 24; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 21; Byrd, Philadelphia, 19; CGomez, Milwaukee, 19. TRIPLES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 6; BCrawford, San Francisco, 5; Yelich, Miami, 5; Pollock, Arizona, 4. HOME RUNS: Stanton, Miami, 18; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 17; Gattis, Atlanta, 15; Frazier, Cincinnati, 14; Gold schmidt, Arizona, 14; JUpton, Atlanta, 14; Desmond, Washington, 13; Morse, San Francisco, 13 STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 36; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 25; Revere, Philadelphia, 18; EYoung, New York, 17; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 16; Bonifacio, Chicago, 13; ECabrera, San Diego, 13; Segura, Milwaukee, 13. PITCHING: Simon, Cincinnati, 9-3; Wainwright, St. Louis, 9-3; Greinke, Los Angeles, 8-3; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 8-4; 7 tied at 7. ERA: Hudson, San Francisco, 1.81; Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.85; Wainwright, St. Louis, 2.15; Beckett, Los Angeles, 2.35; Teheran, Atlanta, 2.41; Cashner, San Diego, 2.47; Niese, New York, 2.54. STRIKEOUTS: Strasburg, Washington, 113; Cueto, Cincinnati, 109; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 95; Greinke, Los Angeles, 92; Kennedy, San Diego, 91; Wainwright, St. Louis, 91; Miley, Arizona, 85. SAVES: FrRodriguez, Milwaukee, 21; Romo, San Francisco, 20; Jansen, Los Angeles, 19; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 19; Kimbrel, Atlanta, 19; Street, San Diego, 18. PAUL SANCYA / AP Detroit Tigers Eugenio Suarez singles against the Minnesota Twins in the second inning on Sunday in Detroit. Tigers 4, Twins 3 Minnesota Detroit ab r h bi ab r h bi DSantn ss 5 0 0 0 Kinsler 2b 5 1 2 0 Mauer 1b 4 1 2 0 T rHntr rf 5 1 1 0 Dozier 2b 4 0 0 0 MiCar r 1b 4 0 1 0 Wlngh lf 4 1 1 1 VMr tnz dh 3 1 2 1 KMorls dh 4 1 1 1 JMr tnz lf 4 0 1 1 Flormn pr-dh 0 0 0 0 AJcksn cf 4 1 1 0 Arcia rf 2 0 0 0 Cstllns 3b 3 0 1 2 KSuzuk c 4 0 1 1 A vila c 2 0 0 0 Fuld cf 4 0 0 0 RDa vis pr 0 0 0 0 EEscor 3b 4 0 2 0 Holady c 0 0 0 0 Suarez ss 4 0 1 0 Totals 35 3 7 3 T otals 34 4 10 4 Minnesota 000 003 000 3 Detroit 110 001 001 4 Two outs when winning run scored. EArcia (2). DPMinnesota 1. LOBMinnesota 9, De troit 11. 2BMauer (10), Willingham (3), E.Escobar (21), Kinsler (21), V.Martinez (17), Castellanos (13). 3BA.Jackson (3). SBR.Davis (19). SFJ.Martinez, Castellanos. IP H R ER BB SO Minnesota Nolasco 5 1/3 9 3 3 2 5 Burton 1 0 0 0 2 0 Guerrier 1 2/3 0 0 0 1 1 Fien L,3-3 2/3 1 1 0 0 0 Detroit Porcello 7 5 3 3 3 4 Chamberlain 1 0 0 0 1 2 Nathan W,3-2 1 2 0 0 0 0 WPChamberlain. UmpiresHome, Seth Buckminster; First, Manny Gonzalez; Second, Brian Knight; Third, Jim Reynolds. T:19. A,462 (41,681). Indians 3, Red Sox 2, 11 innings Cle veland Boston ab r h bi ab r h bi Bourn cf 6 0 0 0 Holt 3b 5 1 2 0 ACarer ss 5 0 0 0 Pedroia 2b 5 0 0 1 Brantly lf 4 1 2 1 D .Ortiz dh 5 0 1 1 Kipnis 2b 4 0 1 0 Napoli 1b 5 0 1 0 Chsnhll 3b 3 0 0 0 Na va lf 2 0 0 0 Aviles ph-3b 1 0 0 0 Przyns c 3 0 0 0 Swisher dh 5 1 1 1 Bogar ts pr 0 0 0 0 DvMrp rf 4 1 0 0 D .Ross c 1 0 0 0 CSantn 1b 5 0 3 0 GSizmr rf 4 0 0 0 YGoms c 3 0 0 1 Dre w ss 4 0 2 0 BrdlyJr cf 2 1 0 0 Totals 40 3 7 3 T otals 36 2 6 2 Cleveland 100 000 100 01 3 Boston 100 010 000 00 2 DPCleveland 1. LOBCleveland 10, Boston 8. 2BC. Santana (9). HRBrantley (11), Swisher (4). SBDrew (1). CSNava (1). SFY.Gomes. IP H R ER BB SO Cleveland Kluber 5 1/3 5 2 2 4 4 Rzepczynski 1 2/3 1 0 0 0 1 Shaw 1 0 0 0 0 1 Axford 2/3 0 0 0 3 2 Atchison 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Allen W,3-1 2 0 0 0 0 3 Boston Workman 6 5 2 2 2 7 Badenhop BS,1-2 1 0 0 0 0 0 A.Miller 1 0 0 0 0 3 Uehara 1 0 0 0 0 1 Breslow 1 0 0 0 2 1 Tazawa L,1-1 1 2 1 1 0 2 Workman pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. HBPby Workman (Y.Gomes). WPKluber, Axford, A.Miller. UmpiresHome, Chris Guccione; First, Eric Cooper; Second, Tom Hallion; Third, Sean Barber. T:03. A,356 (37,071). Mariners 5, Rangers 1 T exas Seattle ab r h bi ab r h bi LMartn cf 4 0 1 0 EnChvz rf 5 1 2 0 Andrus ss 4 0 1 0 J.Jones cf 3 0 1 0 Choo lf 4 0 0 0 Cano dh-2b 3 1 0 0 ABeltre 3b 4 0 0 0 Mor rsn 1b 3 0 0 0 Rios rf 4 0 0 0 Buck 1b 1 0 1 0 Snyder 1b 3 1 2 1 Gillespi pr 0 1 0 0 Gimenz c 3 0 1 0 Fur ush p 0 0 0 0 Sardins 2b 3 0 1 0 Seager 3b 4 1 4 3 DMrph dh 3 0 0 0 Zunino c 4 1 1 0 Ackle y lf 4 0 2 1 Blmqst 2b-1b 3 0 2 0 BMiller ss 3 0 0 1 Totals 32 1 6 1 T otals 33 5 13 5 Texas 010 000 000 1 Seattle 000 020 03x 5 DPTexas 2. LOBTexas 4, Seattle 8. 2BEn.Chavez (4), Seager 2 (15), Ackley (11). HRSnyder (1). CS Andrus (5), Seager (3). SBloomquist. SFB.Miller. IP H R ER BB SO Texas N.Martinez L,1-4 6 9 2 2 1 3 Ross Jr. 1 4 3 3 1 0 Rowen 1 0 0 0 0 0 Seattle Iwakuma W,5-3 8 6 1 1 0 6 Furbush 1 0 0 0 0 1 Ross Jr. pitched to 4 batters in the 8th. UmpiresHome, Phil Cuzzi; First, Gerry Davis; Sec ond, Quinn Wolcott; Third, Alfonso Marquez. T:46. A,196 (47,476). Royals 6, White Sox 3 Kansas City Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi JDyson cf 5 0 2 1 Eaton cf 4 1 3 0 Infante 2b 5 1 1 0 GBckh 2b 5 0 1 0 Hosmer 1b 5 1 1 2 Gillaspi 3b 4 0 1 0 BButler dh 2 1 1 0 JAreu 1b 4 0 2 0 AGordn lf 3 1 0 0 A.Dunn dh 5 1 1 0 S.Perez c 3 1 2 3 AlRmrz ss 5 1 2 0 L.Cain rf 4 0 0 0 V iciedo rf 5 0 0 0 Mostks 3b 2 1 1 0 De Aza lf 4 0 1 2 AEscor ss 3 0 0 0 Nieto c 3 0 1 0 Totals 32 6 8 6 T otals 39 3 12 2 Kansas City 203 100 000 6 Chicago 100 200 000 3 DPChicago 2. LOBKansas City 6, Chicago 13. 2BG.Beckham (12), Gillaspie (16), J.Abreu (15), De Aza (9). 3BEaton (4). HRHosmer (4), S.Perez (7). CSL.Cain (1). IP H R ER BB SO Kansas City Shields W,8-3 6 10 3 3 1 3 Bueno H,3 2/3 1 0 0 0 0 K.Herrera H,4 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 W.Davis H,12 1 0 0 0 2 1 G.Holland S,20-21 1 1 0 0 1 1 Chicago Rienzo L,4-4 6 6 6 6 4 3 Petricka 2/3 0 0 0 1 2 S.Downs 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Putnam 1 1 0 0 1 0 Belisario 1 1 0 0 0 1 HBPby Rienzo (B.Butler). WPG.Holland. Balk Shields. Blue Jays 5, Orioles 2 T oronto Baltimore ab r h bi ab r h bi Reyes ss 5 1 2 0 Mar kks rf 4 0 0 0 MeCarr lf 4 0 0 1 Machd 3b 4 0 0 0 Bautist rf 4 0 2 1 A.Jones cf 4 2 2 1 Encrnc 1b 5 2 3 0 N.Cr uz lf 3 0 3 1 Lawrie 3b 5 1 0 0 P earce 1b 4 0 0 0 DNavrr dh 4 0 3 2 D Yong dh 4 0 1 0 Kratz c 3 0 0 0 JHardy ss 4 0 2 0 StTllsn 2b 4 0 0 1 Schoop 2b 4 0 1 0 Gose cf 4 1 2 0 Hundly c 4 0 0 0 Totals 38 5 12 5 T otals 35 2 9 2 Toronto 100 110 020 5 Baltimore 000 001 010 2 DPToronto 1. LOBToronto 9, Baltimore 7. 2B Reyes (14), Bautista (14), Encarnacion 2 (19), D.Na varro 2 (7), A.Jones (14), J.Hardy (16). HRA.Jones (11). SFMe.Cabrera. IP H R ER BB SO Toronto Happ W,6-3 6 7 1 1 0 6 McGowan H,6 1 2/3 1 1 1 1 2 Janssen S,12-14 1 1/3 1 0 0 0 2 Baltimore Tillman L,5-4 7 8 3 3 0 0 Tom.Hunter 2/3 2 2 2 2 0 McFarland 1 1/3 2 0 0 0 0 Happ pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. UmpiresHome, Jerry Layne; First, Adam Hamari; Second, Mike DiMuro; Third, Mike Estabrook. T:07. A,469 (45,971). Mets 3, Padres 1 San Diego Ne w York ab r h bi ab r h bi Venale cf 2 0 0 0 Gr ndrs cf-rf 3 1 2 1 ECarer ss 3 0 0 0 DnMr p 2b 3 1 1 1 S.Smith rf 2 0 0 0 D Wrght 3b 3 0 0 0 Headly 3b 3 0 0 0 BAreu rf 3 0 1 1 Quentin lf 3 1 1 0 T ejada ss 0 0 0 0 Alonso 1b 4 0 1 0 ABrwn lf 3 0 0 0 Rivera c 3 0 1 1 Black p 0 0 0 0 Qcknsh p 0 0 0 0 dnDkkr ph-cf 1 0 0 0 Stauffr p 0 0 0 0 Duda 1b 4 0 2 0 Denor ph 1 0 0 0 Flores ss 4 0 1 0 Petersn 2b 2 0 0 0 Mejia p 0 0 0 0 Amarst ph-2b 2 0 0 0 Reck er c 3 1 0 0 Kenndy p 1 0 0 0 Matszk p 0 0 0 0 ATorrs p 0 0 0 0 CT orrs p 1 0 0 0 Grandl c 1 0 1 0 Campll lf 2 0 1 0 Totals 27 1 4 1 T otals 30 3 8 3 San Diego 010 000 000 1 New York 210 000 00x 3 DPNew York 2. LOBSan Diego 7, New York 11. 2BDan.Murphy (17), B.Abreu (9), Duda 2 (14). HR Granderson (9). SBVenable (3). SE.Cabrera, Ken nedy, C.Torres. SFDan.Murphy. IP H R ER BB SO San Diego Kennedy L,5-8 5 1/3 7 3 3 4 7 A.Torres 1/3 0 0 0 1 0 Quackenbush 1 1/3 1 0 0 0 2 Stauffer 1 0 0 0 1 1 New York Matsuzaka 1 0 0 0 2 0 C.Torres W,3-4 4 3 1 1 1 4 Black H,3 2 1 0 0 2 1 Mejia S,7-8 2 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby C.Torres (Quentin). WPKennedy. UmpiresHome, Tom Woodring; First, Scott Barry; Second, Mike Everitt; Third, Dan Bellino. T:15. A,987 (41,922). Cubs 3, Phillies 0 Chicago Philadelphia ab r h bi ab r h bi Valuen 3b 4 0 0 0 Re vere cf 3 0 1 0 Ruggin lf 4 1 1 0 Rollins ss 4 0 1 0 Rizzo 1b 4 1 1 1 Utle y 2b 4 0 0 0 SCastro ss 4 1 3 1 Byrd rf 4 0 0 0 Sweeny cf 4 0 1 0 Ruiz c 3 0 0 0 Schrhlt rf 4 0 1 1 DBrwn lf 4 0 0 0 Barney 2b 4 0 0 0 Ma yrry 1b 2 0 0 0 Whitsd c 4 0 0 0 RCeden 3b 3 0 0 0 T.Wood p 3 0 1 0 ABr ntt p 2 0 0 0 NRmrz p 0 0 0 0 CHr ndz ph 1 0 1 0 Giles p 0 0 0 0 Totals 35 3 8 3 T otals 30 0 3 0 Chicago 101 001 000 3 Philadelphia 000 000 000 0 LOBChicago 5, Philadelphia 6. 2BS.Castro (19), Schierholtz (9). HRRizzo (14). SBS.Castro (2), Revere (19). IP H R ER BB SO Chicago T.Wood W,7-5 8 3 0 0 3 6 N.Ramirez S,3-3 1 0 0 0 0 0 Philadelphia A.Burnett L,4-6 8 8 3 3 0 4 Giles 1 0 0 0 0 2 WPA.Burnett. UmpiresHome, Kerwin Danley; First, Gary Cederstrom; Second, Mark Ripperger; Third, Lance Barksdale. T:35. A,238 (43,651). Reds 13, Brewers 4 Cincinnati Milw aukee ab r h bi ab r h bi BHmltn cf 6 2 3 2 Gennett 2b 5 0 2 2 Frazier 3b-1b 6 1 2 4 Braun rf 5 0 0 0 Votto 1b 4 1 2 1 Lucro y c 4 1 2 1 Cingrn p 1 0 0 0 Maldnd c 1 0 0 0 Phillips 2b 4 1 2 3 CGomz cf 4 0 2 0 Bruce rf 5 1 1 0 ArRmr 3b 4 0 1 0 Ludwck lf 5 2 4 0 Overa y 1b 0 0 0 0 Mesorc c 5 1 3 1 KDa vis lf 3 1 1 0 Cozart ss 5 2 1 1 MrRynl 1b-3b 3 1 1 0 Leake p 2 0 0 0 Segura ss 3 1 0 0 Heisey ph 1 0 0 0 Estrad p 1 0 1 1 MParr p 0 0 0 0 Grzln y p 0 0 0 0 LeCure p 0 0 0 0 EHer rr ph 1 0 0 0 Schmkr ph 1 1 1 1 Kintzlr p 0 0 0 0 RSantg 3b 1 1 0 0 W ooten p 0 0 0 0 F iers p 0 0 0 0 R Weks ph 1 0 0 0 W ang p 0 0 0 0 Totals 46 13 19 13 T otals 35 4 10 4 Cincinnati 300 020 053 13 Milwaukee 000 310 000 4 ESegura (10). DPCincinnati 2. LOBCincinnati 8, Milwaukee 8. 2BFrazier (15), Votto (11), Ludwick 3 (11), Gennett (16), C.Gomez (20), Mar.Reynolds (5). HRB.Hamilton (4), Frazier (15), Phillips (5), Lucroy (6). SBK.Davis (2). SFPhillips. IP H R ER BB SO Cincinnati Leake W,4-6 5 9 4 4 3 3 M.Parra H,9 2/3 0 0 0 0 1 LeCure H,9 1 1/3 1 0 0 0 0 Cingrani 2 0 0 0 1 0 Milwaukee Estrada L,5-4 5 8 5 5 0 3 Gorzelanny 1 1 0 0 0 0 Kintzler 1 1 0 0 0 2 Wooten 0 6 5 5 0 0 Fiers 1 0 0 0 1 1 Wang 1 3 3 1 0 1 Wooten pitched to 6 batters in the 8th. UmpiresHome, Doug Eddings; First, Cory Blaser; Second, Marvin Hudson; Third, Brian ONora. T:19. A,213 (41,900). Cardinals 5, Nationals 2 W ashington St. Louis ab r h bi ab r h bi Rendon 3b 4 0 1 0 MCr pnt 3b 4 0 0 0 McLoth cf 4 0 1 0 W ong 2b 4 1 1 0 LaRoch ph 0 0 0 1 Hollidy lf 2 2 1 2 Werth rf 4 0 0 1 Craig rf 4 1 2 1 Zmrmn 1b 4 0 0 0 MAdms 1b 4 1 1 2 Hairstn lf 4 0 1 0 JhP erlt ss 4 0 2 0 Dsmnd ss 4 0 1 0 Ja y cf 3 0 1 0 Espinos 2b 3 1 2 0 Rosnthl p 0 0 0 0 S.Leon c 4 1 1 0 T .Cruz c 3 0 1 0 Fister p 2 0 0 0 JGarci p 1 0 0 0 Frndsn ph 1 0 0 0 Motte p 0 0 0 0 Detwilr p 0 0 0 0 SF rmn p 0 0 0 0 RSorin p 0 0 0 0 Bourjos cf 0 0 0 0 Dobbs ph 1 0 1 0 Totals 35 2 8 2 T otals 29 5 9 5 Washington 000 010 001 2 St. Louis 021 010 10x 5 DPWashington 1. LOBWashington 10, St. Louis 6. 2BCraig (13). 3BWong (2). HRHolliday (5), Ma.Adams (6). SJ.Garcia 2. SFHolliday. IP H R ER BB SO Washington Fister L,5-2 6 7 4 4 2 2 Detwiler 1 1 1 1 1 1 R.Soriano 1 1 0 0 0 0 St. Louis J.Garcia W,3-0 7 5 1 1 2 6 Motte 1 0 0 0 0 2 S.Freeman 2/3 2 1 1 0 1 Rosenthal S,20-23 1/3 1 0 0 1 0 HBPby J.Garcia (Espinosa). WPJ.Garcia. UmpiresHome, Alan Porter; First, Joe West; Second, Marty Foster; Third, Rob Drake. T:40. A,325 (45,399).

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 16, 2014 Party In The PastureCome Celebrate 4th of July Weekend atRUTLAND MUDBOGFor more information call 352-303-6127Ocial Sponsor of Boggin For Boobies Breast Cancer FoundationAt CR 251 & SR 44 In Lake Panasuffkee, FL5 miles west of Wildwood off I-75 You Make the CALL!June 16-22This Weeks Leesburg Lightning ScheduleAlways FREE Admission! Rainout Information 352-234-4489 You Make the CALL!This Weeks Leesburg Lightning ScheduleAlways FREE Admission! Game Times: 7pm Weekdays Sun 5pmTHE PLAY: B7 hits a deep line drive on which F9 appears to make a sensational catch. However, F9 is unable to stop before running into the fence. The balls pops out of his glove and goes over the fence. Whats the rueling? Rainout Information 352-234-4489 Mon. 6/16............no game Tues. 6/17............@ Winter Park Diamond DawgsWed. 6/18............Winter Park Diamond DawgsThurs. 6/19............@ Winter Park Diamond DawgsFri. 6/20............Deland SunsSat. 6/21............@ Deland SunsSun. 6/22............@ Deland Suns Answer on Friday Associated PressLE MANS, France Marcel Fassler, An dre Lotterer and Benoit Treluyer overcame tur bocharger problems to drive Audi to its 13th title at the 24 Hours of Le Mans on Sunday. It was the trios third victory in the worlds most famous endur ance race. Their Audi No. 2 nished three laps ahead of Audi No. 1 driven by Lucas di Grassi, Marc Gene and defending champion Tom Kristensen. Audi has now won 10 of the last 11 races at Le Mans, including the last ve. We did like in 2011, Treluyer told Euros port. We stayed calm and attacked when we needed to. Andre (Lotterer) really put the pressure on Porsche at the right time. Sebastien Buemi, Anthony Davidson and Nicolas Lapierre took third place at the wheel of Toyota No. 8, ve laps off the pace. Pole-sitter Kazuki Nakajimas Toy ota No. 7 retired in the 15th hour while lead ing because of an elec trical problem. It is heartbreaking, Nakajima told the Toy ota Racing website. Somehow I thought maybe we could make it this time and then this happens.AUTO RACING MLBAudi wins 13th title at LeMans DAVID EDME / AP Toyota TS040 Hybrid drivers Britain Anthony Davidson, left, Swizerland Sebastien Buemi, 2nd left, France Nicolas Lapierre, and Toyota team manager John Steeghs, right, hold their trophy third at the 82nd 24 hours Le Mans endurance race on Sunday in Le Mans, France. TENNIS BARRY WOODAssociated PressLONDON Grig or Dimitrov saved a match point to defeat Spanish left-hander Feliciano Lopez 6-7 (8), 7-6 (1), 7-6 (6) Sunday and win the grass court tournament at Queens Club, a warm-up event for Wimbledon. The fourth-seeded Dimitrov is the rst Bulgarian to lift the title, and also the rst player this year to win titles on three different surfaces after claiming victories in Acapulco on hardcourt and Bu charest on clay. At age 32, 10th-seed ed Lopez was attempt ing to become the oldest winner of the tournament since 33year old Tony Roche defeated John McEnroe in the 1978 nal, and to win his rst title since Eastbourne one year ago. Of course, Im real ly happy with the win, said Dimitrov. Obviously I knew what I had to do today out on the court, and Feli is one of those competitors that when it comes to fast surfaces, hes always very tricky. Down match point in the second set wasnt the coolest thing, but, you know, I just fought hard. I just left every thing out on the court. Dimitrov dropped only four points on serve in the rst set.Dimitrov saves match point against Lopez to gain victory in Queens final KRISTIE RIEKENAP Sports WriterHOUSTON Houston starter Jarred Cosart made it through seven innings for the rst time in more than a month on Saturday against Tampa Bay. His performance in the 7-3 win was much more impressive considering he was battling a case of food poisoning and was ill in both the second and third innings. I felt terrible in the third inning, I thought: Im not going to make it, he said. But you keep pushing yourself. Its the competitive side. I didnt want to come out of the game. I didnt want to tax the bullpen and I guess I wasnt dying, so I was able to pitch. Cosart (6-5) allowed nine hits and three runs in his longest outing since May 5 for the win. Matt Dominguez broke out of a slump with two hits, including a three-run double in Houstons big third inning to help the Astros to the victory. Dominguez was 1 for 12 in the rst three games of this home stand before singling in the second inning. The Astros led by one when he cleared the bases with his double in a ve-run third inning that made it 5-1. He obviously had a couple days there where he wasnt seeing the ball too good, manager Bo Porter said. I felt like he did a great job of making them get the ball up today. The base-clear ing double was a huge hit at that moment of the game. Tampa Bay starter Chris Archer (3-4) was done in by an error and a lack of control in his shortest start this sea son. He allowed three hits and six runs one earned with three walks in three innings. The Astros got back on track after striking out a season-high 16 times in a 6-1 loss in the opener Friday night. Dexter Fowler had two RBIs and Marwin Gonzalez, who was ll ing in for the injured Jose Altuve, had three hits and scored twice.Matt Dominguezs double leads Astros to 7-3 win over Rays PATRIC SCHNEIDER / AP Tampa Bay Rays Evan Longoria, right, beats the tag by Houston Astros second baseman Marwin Gonzalez during the third inning on Sunday in Houston. Astros 7, Rays 3 T ampa Bay Houston ab r h bi ab r h bi DJnngs cf 5 0 1 0 F owler cf 5 1 1 2 Kiermr rf 4 2 2 0 Springr rf 3 1 0 0 Longori 3b 4 1 2 3 Singltn 1b 2 1 0 0 Loney 1b 4 0 1 0 JCastro c 2 1 0 1 Zobrist 2b-lf 4 0 0 0 MDmn 3b 4 0 2 3 DeJess dh 2 0 1 0 Car ter dh 4 0 0 0 SRdrgz ph-dh 1 0 1 0 Presle y lf 3 1 0 0 Joyce lf 3 0 1 0 MGnzlz 2b 4 2 3 0 Forsyth ph-2b 1 0 0 0 V illar ss 4 0 1 0 YEscor ss 4 0 0 0 Hanign c 4 0 1 0 Totals 36 3 10 3 T otals 31 7 7 6 Tampa Bay 100 020 000 3 Houston 005 200 00x 7 EArcher (1). DPTampa Bay 1. LOBTampa Bay 7, Houston 6. 2BKiermaier 2 (7), Loney (16), Fowler (10), M.Dominguez (11), Ma.Gonzalez (4). HRLongoria (8). CSKiermaier (1). IP H R ER BB SO Tampa Bay Archer L,3-4 3 3 6 1 3 2 C.Ramos 3 3 1 1 0 4 Oviedo 1 0 0 0 2 0 Yates 1 1 0 0 0 1 Houston Cosart W,6-5 7 9 3 3 1 2 Sipp 2/3 1 0 0 0 1 Fields 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Zeid 1 0 0 0 0 0 Archer pitched to 1 batter in the 4th. HBPby Archer (Springer). WPArcher, Oviedo. UmpiresHome, Laz Diaz; First, Marcus Pattillo; Second, Mark Carlson; Third, Jeff Nelson. T:39. A,264 (42,060). STEVEN WINEAP Sports WriterMIAMI Casey McGehee completed his sacrice-y trot near rst base, then started toward the Miami Mar lins dugout and was met by the sight of the entire team gleefully sprinting toward him. McGehee, who has delivered plenty of clutch hits this season, started a celebration Sunday with an out. He tied the game in the eighth inning with a two-out, two-run double, then drove home the winning run with a sacrice y in the 10th, and the Marlins averted a series sweep by beating the Pittsburgh Pi rates 3-2 Sunday. Miami earned its sixth walkoff win and broke a three-game losing streak. McGehee was glad to be at the center of the post game mob scene. Its one of those feel ings you cant really describe, he said. Its a special feeling because youve been grinding for however many in nings. Its a sudden relief theres nothing like it that I can imagine. The Marlins gave Mc Gehee a chance to re turn to the majors after he spent 2013 in Japan, and he has repeatedly rewarded their faith. He leads the majors with 30 hits with run ners in scoring position, and hes batting .411 in those situations, often coming through after opponents pitch around slugger Giancarlo Stanton. Casey has gotten some huge hits for us, manager Mike Redmond said. I think hes grate ful for the chance he has been given here, and he has made the most of it. The Pirates had won four in a row and were on the verge of their rst three-game series sweep in Miami since 1993. McGehee paces Marlins past Pirates 3-2 on double, sacrifice fly Pittsburgh Miami ab r h bi ab r h bi Polanc rf 5 1 2 0 Furcal 2b 5 1 2 0 SMarte lf 4 0 1 1 Lucas pr 0 1 0 0 AMcCt cf 4 0 2 0 RJhnsn lf 4 0 0 0 I.Davis 1b 4 0 0 0 Stanton rf 4 0 1 0 RMartn c 3 1 1 0 McGeh 3b 4 0 3 3 PAlvrz 3b 4 0 1 0 GJones 1b 4 0 1 0 JHrrsn 2b 4 0 2 1 Ozuna cf 4 0 1 0 Barmes 2b 1 0 0 0 Hchvr r ss 3 0 1 0 Mercer ss 4 0 0 0 Mathis c 4 0 0 0 Worley p 3 0 0 0 HAlvrz p 2 0 0 0 Watson p 0 0 0 0 Hatchr p 0 0 0 0 Snider ph 1 0 0 0 JeBakr ph 1 1 1 0 JHughs p 0 0 0 0 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 Solano ph 1 0 0 0 ARams p 0 0 0 0 Totals 37 2 9 2 T otals 36 3 10 3 Pittsburgh 001 100 000 0 2 Miami 000 000 020 1 3 Two outs when winning run scored. EP.Alvarez (15). DPPittsburgh 1, Miami 2. LOB Pittsburgh 11, Miami 8. 2BS.Marte (13), McGehee (16), Hechavarria (9). SBA.McCutchen (9). SR. Johnson, Hechavarria. SFMcGehee. IP H R ER BB SO Pittsburgh Worley 7 5 0 0 0 5 Watson BS,3-3 1 3 2 2 0 2 J.Hughes L,3-2 1 2/3 2 1 1 1 1 Miami H.Alvarez 7 7 2 2 2 6 Hatcher 1 1 0 0 0 3 Cishek 1 0 0 0 0 0 A.Ramos W,4-0 1 1 0 0 3 1 HBPby H.Alvarez (R.Martin). WPJ.Hughes. UmpiresHome, Tim Welke; First, Todd Tichenor; Second, Clint Fagan; Third, Tim Timmons. ALAN DIAZ / AP Miami Marlins Casey McGehee (9) follows through on his game-tying double against the Pittsburgh Pirates in the eighth inning on Sunday in Miami.

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LAURAN NEERGAARDAssociated PressWASHINGTON In one of the most ambitious attempts yet to thwart Alzheimers disease, a major study got underway Monday to see if an experimental drug can protect healthy se niors whose brains harbor silent signs that theyre at risk. Scientists plan to eventually scan the brains of thousands of older volunteers in the U.S., Canada and Australia to nd those with a sticky build-up believed to play a key role in development of Alzheimers the rst time so many people without memory problems get the chance to learn the potentially troubling news. Having lots of that gunky protein called beta-amyloid doesnt guar antee someone will get sick. But the big question: Could intervening so ear ly make a difference for those who do? We have to get them at the stage when we can save their brains, said Dr. Reisa Sperling of Bostons Brigham and Womens Hospital and Harvard Medical School, who is leading the huge effort to nd out. Researchers are just beginning to recruit volunteers, and on Monday, a Rhode Island man was hooked up for an IV infusion at Butler Hospital in Providence, the rst treated. Peter Bristol, 70, of Wakeeld, Rhode Island, gured he was at risk because his mother died of Alzheimers and his brother has it. I felt I needed to be proactive in seeking whatever therapies might be available for myself in the coming years, said Bristol, who said he was prepared when a PET scan of his brain showed he har bored enough amyloid to qualify for the research. Just because I have it doesnt mean Im going to get Alzheimers, he stressed. But Bristol and his wife are going into the situation with our eyes LivingHealthySend your health news to features@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 16, 2014STUDY: Teens are drinking less, texting more / C2 Health check www.dailycommercial.com PHOTOS BY MICHAEL DWYER / AP Peter Bristol, of Wakeeld, R.I., center, watches as Denise Jerue, left, a research infusion nurse, disconnects his intravenous line while principal investigator, Dr. Stephen Sallowy, right, stands by, at Butler Hospital in Providence, R.I. Bristol, left, jokes with study co-ordinator, RN Diane Monast after receiving an intravenous infusion.Fighting backScientists seeking seniors at risk of Alzheimers in bid to thwart disease MARIA CHENGAssociated PressLONDON Women who often indulge their cravings for hamburgers, steaks and other red meat may have a slight ly higher risk of breast cancer, a new study suggests. Doctors have long warned that a diet load ed with red meat is linked to cancers including those of the colon and pancreas, but there has been less ev idence for its role in breast cancer. In the new study, re searchers at Harvard University analyzed data from more than 88,000 women aged 26 to 45 who had lled in surveys in 1991. Their red meat intake varied from never or less than once a month, to six or more servings a day. Ini tial results of the study were rst published in 2006 and showed a preliminary link between eating red meat and breast cancer after 12 years; the new research conrmed the earlier ndings with longer follow-up information, and analyzed other Study: Red meat possibly linked to breast cancer AP FILE PHOTO Women who often indulge their cravings for hamburgers, steaks and other red meat may have a slightly higher risk of breast cancer, a new study suggests.SEE ALZHEIMERS | C2SEE STUDY | C5 LAKE COUNTY LIFE-Social Support Group to host luncheonLIFE, a social support group for the widowed, will host its monthly luncheon at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday at Golden Corral, 15810 U.S. Highway 441, Eustis. After lunch Paul Vincoli will entertain. The newest LIFE Luncheon will be at 11:30 a.m. Friday at North Lake Presbyterian Church, 975 Rolling Acres Road, behind Home Depot in Lady Lake. The meal will be prepared by the church staff. Cost is $12. An RSVP is needed by calling 352787-0403 or emailing rreed@beyersfhc.com.LADY LAKE Essential Tremor Support Group meeting scheduledLearn methods of coping, medications, helpful hints, support and understanding for you and your caregiver at 2 p.m. Wednesday at the St. Timothy Ministry Building, 1351 Paige Place. Call Ken Taylor at 352-787-3866 or email at kstaylor62@usa2net.net for information. LEESBURG Beginners American Sign Language class offered Deaf and Hearing Services of Lake and Sumter Counties will host a Beginners Sign Language class for interested parties. Classes begin on June 24 and run for six weeks from 6 to 8 p.m., at Deaf and Hearing Services ofces, 220 S. 9th St. Cost is $75. For information or to register, call 352-323-0757 or email ajohnson. DHS@gmail.com. LEESBURG Central Healthy Start annual meeting scheduledCentral Healthy Start, with a mission to maintain a comprehensive healthcare system and support ser vices for women and their infants, will host its annual meeting at noon on June 26 at the Early Learning Coalition of Lake County, 1300 Citizens Blvd., No. 260. For information, call Heather Hollingsworth at 352-313-6500, ext. 119. LEESBURG Retired and Senior Volunteer Program seeking helpersLake and Sumter County residents ages 55 and older who have a lifetime of experience to share and the desire to make a difference in the community can be an RSVP volunteer. Volunteers assist in tutoring elementary grade students, mentoring low-income high school students who are college bound, participate in after school educational/enrichment programs, deliver meals, make telephone reassurance calls to home bound seniors and provide transportation for cancer patients. Those interested can call 352-3651995 to learn more.

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 16, 2014 NEW PATIENT SPECIALComplete Exam (D0150)Digital Xrays (D0210)Cleaning (D1110)Oral Cancer Screening (D0431)with Identafi 3000*Non-Insured Patients Only. All major insurances accepted including PPO & HMO plans.$59*D002756 Your Podiatrist treats... CENTRALFLORIDAFOOTCARE, P.A.Dr. Nick Przystawski, DPM www.Floridafoot.com AP PHOTO This undated photo by the Alzheimers Disease Cooperative Study shows Dr. Reisa Sperling Bostons Brigham and Womens Hospital. Sperling leads a major new study that is testing whether an experimental drug can protect healthy seniors whose brains harbor silent signs that theyre at risk.wide open. He wont know until the end of the so-called A4 Study it stands for Anti-Amyloid Treatment in Asymptomatic Alzheimers whether he received monthly infusions of the exper imental medicine, Eli Lilly & Co.s solanezumab, or a dummy drug. Solanezumab is designed to help catch amyloid before it builds into the brain plaques that are a hallmark of Alzheimers. It failed in earlier studies to treat full-blown Alzheimers but it did appear to help slow mental decline in patients with mild disease, raising interest in testing it even earlier. Scientists now think Alzheimers begins ravaging the brain at least a decade before memory problems appear, much like heart disease is triggered by quiet cholesterol build-up. Many believe the best chance of preventing or at least slowing the disease requires intervening, somehow, when people still appear healthy. The $140 million study, funded by the National Institutes of Health, Lilly and others, will track if participants memory and amyloid levels change over three years. Whether this particular drug works or not, the Alzheimers study is being watched closely as a chance to learn more about how amyloid works and how people handle the uncertainty of knowing its there. Amyloid we know is a huge risk factor, but someone can have a head full of amyloid and not decline mentally, Sperling said. We need to understand more about why some brains are resilient and some are not. Before any brain scans, interested 65to 85-year-olds will undergo cognitive tests to make sure their memory is normal. Volunteers also must be willing to learn their amyloid levels, and researchers can turn away those whose psychological assessments suggest they may not cope well with the news. Sperling expects to screen more than 5,000 healthy seniors to nd the needed 1,000 participants, who will be monitored for anxiety or distress. It is breaking new ground, said Dr. Laurie Ryan of the NIHs National Institute on Aging. We really do have to understand how that affects people. More than 35 million people worldwide have Alzheimers or similar dementia, including about 5 million in the U.S., numbers expected to rise rapidly as the baby boomers age. Alzheimers affects 1 in 9 people over age 65, and about a third of those 85 and older, according to the Alzheimers Association. Todays medications only temporarily ease some symptoms, and scientists dont even know exactly how the disease forms. A leading theory is that amy loid plaques kick off the disease but tangles of a second protein, named tau, speed up the brain destruction. As scientists shift their attention to the still healthy, a few studies are underway to try blocking Alzheimers in people genetically at risk to get a form of the disease that runs in their families. The A4 study widens the focus beyond a genetic link. Like Bristol, the rst participant, some people do want to know if theyre at risk, said Dr. Jason Karlawish, a bioethicist at the Univer sity of Pennsylvania who helped design the studys psychological precautions. After all, many already get tested for Alzheimers-related genes. He calls the research an opportunity to study the future of the way were going to think about, talk about and live with the risks of Alzheimers disease. ALZHEIMERS FROM PAGE C1 MIKE STOBBEAssociated PressNEW YORK Amer ican teens are smoking less, drinking less and ghting less. But theyre texting behind the wheel and spending a lot of time on video games and computers, according to the governments latest study of worrisome behavior. Generally speaking, the news is good. Most forms of drug use, weapons use and risky sex have been going down since the government started doing the survey every two years in 1991. Teens are wear ing bicycle helmets and seat belts more, too. Overall, young people have more healthy behaviors than they did 20 years ago, said Dr. Stephanie Zaza, who oversees the study at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The results come from a study of 13,000 U.S. high school students last spring. Participation was voluntary and required parental per mission, but responses were anonymous. Highlights of the study released Thursday:SMOKINGFewer than 16 percent of the teens smoked a cigarette in the previ ous month the lowest level since the gov ernment started doing the survey, when the rate was more than 27 percent. Another CDC study had already put the teen smoking rate below 16 percent, but experts tend to treat this surveys result as the of cial number. Its ter ric news for Americas health, said Matt Myers, president of the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. Even so, there are still about 2.7 million teens smoking, he said. The survey did not ask about electronic cigarettes, which have exploded in popularity in the past few years. Meanwhile, more than 23 percent of teens said they used marijuana in the previous month up from 15 percent in 1991. CDC ofcials said they could not tell whether mar ijuana or e-cigarettes have replaced tradi tional cigarettes among teens.FIGHTINGFights at school fell by half in the past 20 years. And there was a dra matic drop in kids re porting they had been in a ght anywhere in the preceding year about 25 percent, down from 33 percent two years earlier. The ad dition of more guards and other security measures may be a factor, said school violence expert Todd DeMitchell of the University of New Hampshire.TEXTINGAmong teen drivers, 41 percent had tex ted or emailed behind the wheel in the previ ous month. That gure cant be compared to the 2011 survey, though, be cause the CDC changed the question this time. The latest survey gives texting-while-driving gures for 37 states ranging from 32 percent in Massachusetts to 61 percent in South Dakota.Study: Teens are drinking less, texting more AP FILE PHOTO A study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released Thursday found a surge in the number of kids who spent three or more hours on an average school day on screened electronics other than TV.SEE TEENS | C4

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Monday, June 16, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 JESSICA YADEGARANMCTIt can illuminate skin and hair. It can boost metabolism. It can even aid in killing bacteria all while keeping you smelling like the tropics. Coconut oil, that goopy saturated fat, is having its moment in the superfood spotlight. Conventional thought used to consider coconut oil unhealthy; now that research is proving otherwise, people are increasingly interested in reaping its benets. For starters, coconut oil fats contain metab olism-boosting medium chain triglycerides (MCTs) and lauric acid, which has antimicro bial effects and may be able to increase good (HDL) cholesterol in the blood, according to re cent studies published by the National Institutes of Health. Practitioners of Ayurveda, the ancient Indian tradition of med icine, are particularly familiar with the effects of coconut oil. Coconut has been part of Indian food and culture for thousands of years and has a natural afnity to heal the body, says Jay Apte, a doctor of Ayurveda, which focuses on diet and balanced lifestyle to heal the body. But now that Dr. Oz and Deepak Chopra talk about it, more people are listening, says Apte, who holds a masters degree in phar macology and sees pa tients at her Ayurveda and Panchakarma Center in Mountain View, Calif. The National Insti tutes of Health studies should prompt more discussion in Western medical circles. One, released in December, shows that vir gin coconut oil could help control cases of the stubborn Clostridium difcile, an anti biotic-resistant diar rhea usually acquired in a hospital. Another pilot study, published this year in the Journal of Alzheimers Disease, looked at coconut oils potential to remove am yloid plaques that build up in the brain, causing damage to neural pathways. However, until a randomized, double-blind clinical trial is conducted, it is not possible to know whether coconut oil has any benecial effect in battling Alzhei mers disease. Kim Wallingford Homes, of Alamo, Ca lif., wasnt looking for a cure-all, just a way to brighten her complexion. A few years ago, she mustered up the courage to ask her Gua temalan house clean er how she managed to look so beautifully young. Her answer? Coconut oil. Homes had a tub of the stuff under her bathroom sink, so she dug her ngers into it and thought, This cant be right. Several tubs and dozens of com pliments later, she is a convert. I put it in my smooth ies to give me a boost, says Homes, now 59. I put it on toast instead of butter. I fry food in it. I use it all over my body to seal in moisture right after the shower. I think its given me radiance. Board-certied der matologist Janet H. Pry stowsky recommends coconut oil as a make up remover and cites a study published in the November-December 2008 edition of the journal Dermatitis that shows its effect on heal ing dermatitis. What intrigues the New York-based dermatologist most about co conut oil is its potential benets to the hair. She cited a study published in the March-April 2003 edition of the Journal of Cosmetic Science that examined damaged hair pretreated with mineral oil and coco nut oil. It found that the strands coated with coconut oil had a decrease in protein loss. I think, anecdotally, it can help dry, coarse or curly hair, too, she says. After hearing similar anecdotal chatter about oil pulling, the ancient practice of swishing oil in the mouth, Pleasant Hill chiropractic nutritionist Gary Yaeger started researching and experimenting with coconut oil himself. Every morning, he and his wife, a den tal hygienist, chew up one tablespoon of the oil and swish it in their mouths for 20 minutes. The benets? They are numerous, he says, but depend on the person and their health, says Yaeger, who has been in practice for 20 years. People may notice teeth whitening and the antimicrobial element could help them get rid of chronic bad breath, he says. It has for me. Still, Yaeger and the American Dental Association, for that matter say that oil pulling is not a replacement for ossing and brushing teeth. If someone has a dental issue, I will send them straight to a dentist, because we want to get that looked at right away, he says. Apte, the Ayurveda expert, recommends oil pulling though usu ally with sesame oil, since it is high in cal cium to heal mouth sores, clean the tongue, and kill bacteria. Prac ticing it daily can also have a calming effect on the mind, she says. rrfntbftbn fbbtrrfntbftb tnbftftbttn401 North Blvd. West, Leesburg352.728.424217809 S.E. 109th Ave., Summerfield352.307.4200 rfntcentersleepmed@yahoo.comAlways tired & fatigued? Do you have strange dreams or morning headaches? Type 2 Diabetes? CHF/Heart Failure? TIA (Mini Stroke)? Arrhythmias? Body Mass Index >30, (Neck Circumference Male >17, Female >16)?Management of . .Call Today 352.460.0922 Procedures: Neurological rf GI ntb fnbn Female Wellness bfbn nnn Male Wellness tbntr Weight Loss Clinic FLU SHOTS AVAILABLEwww.mid-floridaprimarycare.comSleep is the Golden Chain that ties...Health & Our Bodies Together!Ravi P. Gupta, M.D.Cardiovascular r nn bf Endocrine Disorder n Breathing Problems fn b Musculoskeletal n Non-Invasive Cardiology t n ffft Dermatology r r rntt rftnn ntnn nn Pulmonary b b Musculoskeletal t b t Coconut oil has surprising health benefits DAN ROSENSTRAUCH / AP Various brands of coconut oil are used for cooking and health and beauty remedies are shown.

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 16, 2014 DRINKINGFewer teens said they drank alcohol. Drinking of soda was down, too. About 35 per cent said they had had booze in the previous month, down from 39 percent in 2011. About 27 percent said they drank soda each day. That was only a slight change from 2011 but a sizable drop from 34 percent in 2007.SEXThe proportion of teens who had sex in the previous three months held steady at about 34 percent from 2011. Among them, condom use was unchanged at about 60 percent.SUICIDEThe percentage who attempted suicide in the previous year held steady at about 8 per cent.MEDIA USETV viewing for three or more hours a day has stalled at around 32 percent since 2011. But in one of the largest jumps seen in the sur vey, there was a surge in the proportion of kids who spent three or more hours on an aver age school day on oth er kinds of recreation al screen time, such as playing video or com puter games or using a computer or smart phone for something other than schoolwork. That number rose to 41 percent, from 31 per cent in 2011. Health experts advise that teens get no more than two hours of recreational screen time a day, and that includes all screens including Xboxes, smartphones and televisions. Although video-gaming is up, particularly among teen boys, some researchers believe most of the screentime increase is due to social media use. And its probably not a good thing, they say. Through texts and social media, young people are doing more communicating and living in an online world in which its easier to think theyre the center of the universe, said Marina Krcmar, a Wake Forest University professor who studies teen screen time. TEENS FROM PAGE C2 MARNI JAMESONMCTORLANDO Kim Ricci is lying on her back on a table with hair-thin needles stuck in the hollows of her ears, ve on each side. Several more puncture her wrists. Ricci, 50, says she was surprised when her doctor suggested she get acupuncture to relieve the pain and discom fort she was experienc ing after her breast-can cer surgery. She was even more surprised when the therapy worked. While I cant say I thought of it as voodoo, I never thought it was a solution for me, the Orlando woman said. Though acupuncture, meditation, massage and yoga are not typically what the doc tor orders, thats changing as more mainstream medical practitioners incorporate therapies once considered alter native into their con ventional practices. UF Health Cancer Center at Orlando Health started an integra tive-medicine program last year, and at the University of Floridas medical school, a course in alternative medicine is about to become part of the curriculum. At the University of Central Floridas College of Med icine, students are learn ing how to make uncon ventional therapies part of conventional treat ment plans. It heartens me to see more doctors starting to treat the whole person rather than just cutting them and giving them medicine, said Diane Robinson, a neuropsy chologist and the program director of inte grative medicine at the cancer center. Applications for alter native medicine reach far beyond cancer treatment. Physicians from many elds who just a few years ago would have balked at the idea of in corporating therapies once considered mystic into their treatment plans are now recom mending them to treat a range of ailments, in cluding headaches, pain, arthritis, stress and depression, said Dr. Irene Estores, an integrative-medicine physician who started UF Healths Integra tive Medicine Program a year ago. When Paula Duffy of Groveland, developed low thyroid, and her doctor put her on pre scription thyroid medication, the side effects were violent, she said. Though her dose was low, the 75-year-old woman had the shakes and her heart raced. About a month ago, she went to Estores, who prescribed botanical supplements, including selenium and seaweed containing iodine. Duffy tolerates the combination well. I was so lucky to nd a doctor like her. I want to try everything rst thats not invasive, but regular doctors do not un derstand about supple ments, and few believe in meditation and yoga, said Duffy, a Brazilian native who has practiced yoga, meditation and tai chi for decades. That acceptance will likely increase as, across Florida, more medical students are being trained in the emerging eld of integrative medicine. This fall, Estores will teach a course on the subject to fourth-year UF medical students.Alternative medicine goes mainstream JACOB LANGSTON / MCT Kim Ricci relaxes with acupuncture needles in her ear while receiving a treatment at The Gynecologic Cancer Center in Orlando.

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Monday, June 16, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 Aching Feet? Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted types of breast cancer. Using a statistical model, scientists es timated that in wom en who ate the most amount of red meat, there were an extra 6.8 cases of breast cancer for every 1,000 wom en over 20 years of follow-up. The researchers couldnt rule out the possibility that oth er factors might ex plain the apparent link between red meat and breast cancer. In developed countries, women have about a 12.5 percent chance of developing breast cancer. Scientists suspect proteins in red meat speed up cell division and tumor growth; chemicals such as nitrates in processed meats are already classied as probable car cinogens. The study was carried out mainly among educated, white American women, and researchers said the results were not necessarily applicable to women of oth er races. It was paid for by the U.S. National In stitutes of Health and published online Tuesday in the British jour nal, BMJ. This underlines the importance of having a healthy diet, said Sally Greenbrook, a senior policy ofcer at the U.K. charity Breakthrough Breast Cancer, who was not part of the research. She said women should focus on reducing their chances of breast can cer by staying slim, and exercising and drinking in moderation. Greenbrook added that there wasnt yet enough proof about the dangers of red meat to change current preven tion guidelines. Others said diet is no toriously difcult to measure, and that the link between eating red meat and breast cancer appeared weak. Valerie Beral, a cancer expert at the University of Oxford, pointed out that vegetarians dont have a lower risk of breast cancer than meat-eaters. Still, Mia Gaudet, director of genetic epidemiology at the Ameri can Cancer Society, said it was plausible that red meat could somehow be connected to breast cancer and that wom ens eating habits in their 20s might be par ticularly signicant. Breasts are still de veloping and are more susceptible to carcin ogens before women have their rst full-term pregnancy, she said. Gaudet, who doesnt eat red meat herself, said the American Can cer Society recom mends people eat a plant-based diet. Its important to have a healthy lifestyle throughout your life and not just as you get older and more worried about cancer, she said. People should perhaps consider ordering a sal ad or a vegetarian option sometime. STUDY FROM PAGE C1 SEIZETHE DA Y SLOCAL AREANEWS.www.dailycommercial.com

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 16, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! Classified IndexLegal Notices . . . . . .0001 Notices . . . . . . . . .1000 At Your Service . . . . .9000 Employment . . . . . .2000 Pets/Animals . . . . . .6865 Merchandise . . . . . .6000 Real Estate/For RENT . .3000 Real Estate/For SALE . . .4000 Recreation . . . . . . .7000 Transportation . . . . . .8000 DEADLINES For Insertion COPY DATE Friday Thursday, 5pm Saturday Friday, 3pm Sunday Friday, 5:00pm Monday Friday, 5:00pm Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pmCancellation for ads running Saturday must be made by 3pm Friday. Cancelations for Sunday & Monday must be made by 5:00pm Friday.ADJUSTMENTS department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. CHECK OUT OUR SPECIALS! PROFESSIONALSERVICE DIRECTORY$65FOR FIRST ADAND 2ND ADHALF OFF SPECIAL Ad must be non-commercial only with single item priced at $100 or less. Price must appear in ad. Two line maximum. Pets, animals, guns and ammo excluded. Some restrictions. Limit 1 per household per month. ONE FREE AD PER MONTH! 2 LINES/7 DAYS: CROSSWORD PUZZLE

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Monday, June 16, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C9 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX SEIZETHE DA Y SLOCAL AREANEWS.www.dailycommercial.com

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