Daily Commercial

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Daily Commercial
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Halifax Media Group
Publisher:
Rod Dixon
Place of Publication:
Leesburg, Floirda
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution.
System ID:
AA00019282:00244


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

NADAL TOPS DJOKOVIC IN FRENCH OPEN, SPORTS B1LYNX: Few options remain for Link 55 evening service, A3 LIVING HEALTHY: Why you should research before getting a tattoo, C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, June 9, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 159 4 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS A4 DIVERSIONS C7 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 STATE/REGION A3 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 WORLD A6 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8.91 / 76Party sunny with T-storms. 50 Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of service. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT728-1668 394-1739fla#CAC1816408 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comEustis city commission ers have turned down a $1.2 million offer for 200 acres eyed two years ago by BlueC hip Energy for a massive so lar farm. The now vacant land south of State Road 44 and east of Cardinal Lane was former ly a city spray eld. It sits adjacent to 210 acres that Ar thur H. Witte of Payson, Ill., bought at a BlueChip bank ruptcy auction last Septem ber for $1.2 million. Witte wants the spray eld parcel, too, but city ofcials think they can get a better price. Acting City Manager Dianne Kramer said there was a good deal of discussion about the proposed sale by Vice Mayor Albert Eckian, who thought the city could get more money for the spray eld because land values might increase with a Publix being built in the area and the Wekiva Parkway coming in. She said Eckian also did not like the fact that Wittes deposit was refundable. Witte had offered $1,186,750 with a $50,000 deposit and a 120-day due diligence period, according to Kramer. Kramer said Witte raised his offer from $1,150,000 after she emailed his realtor, saying she would recommend that the city make a counter-offer of an average of two appraisals it had done on the property. Witte previously made the city an offer for the property last year when real estate in vestor Daryl Carter was try ing to buy it, according to city documents, but when the commission decided to advertise for bids, neither party submitted one. Eustis had previously ap proved a contract with BlueChip to sell the spray eld City of Eustis denies sale of former spray field THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comA Korean War vet eran claims he is facing eviction from an assisted living facility because of red tape with the Veterans Administration. Harold Wulf, 81, moved into Grand Court in December 2012 after being told he met the qualications to receive $1,758 a month aid and attendance pension from the VA to help cover the cost of assistance in his everyday living needs, yet the money has never arrived. And now Im about to be evicted, he said. You had to come in here before you can collect, and now the VA wont pay, Wulf said. It appears that they are waiting for something to happen so that I will no longer be eligible for it. Either I get moved out of here or I die, and then Im off their list. He believes there are thousands of other wartime veterans like him who are over 65, disabled or need aid and assistance with daily living. Wulf and his son, Paul, received verbal approval from an Or lando VA doctor in Sep tember 2013 that the veteran met the program criteria. Wulf also has received many letters from the VA in Philadelphia, dating back to February 2013, where he was told his claim was under review and would be decided promptly. They obviously dont know what they are doing, and if they do know, they are keeping it a big secret, said Harold, who has become skeptical of the VA after the agency has come under re in recent weeks, following the deaths of veter ans waiting for medical care.TAVARESFacing evictionKorean War veteran in danger of losing housing due to VA red tape PHOTOS BY THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Harold Wulf, 81, a Korean War veteran, looks over numerous form letters from the Veterans Administration. He was qualied to receive a monthly pension for aid and attendance to stay at Grand Court, an assisted living facility in Tavares, yet the money never arrived. Wulf makes sure he has the Christmas decorations that were made by his late wife as he prepares to move out of Grand Court. CALVIN WOODWARDAssociated PressWASHINGTON Two American values collided in Sgt. Bowe Bergdahls calamity. One had to give. The one about never leaving a man behind prevailed. The one about never negotiating with terror ists got lost in the swirl ing dust storm of a U.S. helicopter retrieving the soldier from his Tal iban captors in a swap now provoking recriminations in Washington. Each ethos runs deep in the American con science, yet has been violated through history, notably in the age US values collided in Bergdahls predicament THOMAS ADAMSON and THEODORA TONGASAssociated PressLA FIERE, France Nearly 1,000 paratroopers dropped out of the sky in Normandy on Sunday but this time they did so in peace, in stead of to wrest western France from the Nazis as they did during World War II. Drawing huge crowds who braved hot weath er and lined the histor ic landing area at La Fi ere, the aerial spectacle re-enacted the drama of the Normandy landings and served to cap com memorations marking the 70th anniversary of D-Day. Among the planes fer rying paratroopers for the event was a restored C-47 US military trans port plane that dropped Allied troops on the vil lage of Sainte-Mere-Eglise a stones throw from La Fiere on June 6, 1944. And the pilots who originally ew it took the controls again last week, 70 years later, D-Day celebrations concluded with aerial re-enactment REMY DE LA MAUVINIERE / AP Paratroopers are dropped near the Normandy village of Sainte Mere Eglise, western France, during a mass air drop, on Sunday.SEE FIELD | A2SEE D-DAY | A2SEE VETERAN | A2SEE BERGDAHL | A2

PAGE 2

A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 9, 2014 HOW TO REACH US JUNE 8CASH 3 . ............................................... 8-1-8 Afternoon . .......................................... 5-8-6 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 3-3-6-7 Afternoon . ....................................... 2-7-7-4FLORIDALOTTERY JUNE 7FANTASY 5 . ........................... 2-19-21-30-35 FLORIDA LOTTO . ............. 17-19-25-29-47-52 POWERBALL .................. 28-30-35-58-5915 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONSTEVE SKAGGS, publisher352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comPAUL RYAN, digital editor352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com.CALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. property for $1.2 million, docu ments show. The company, how ever, did not close on the proper ty and had to surrender its $50,000 non-refundable deposit. Lake County Property Appraiser records show BlueChip bought the 210 acres adjacent to the spray eld property in March 2011 from Eagle Dunes II, LLC, for $1.15 million. The company was hoping to build a 410-acre solar farm in the Sorren to area, at the time one of the larg est in the state, before it ran into nancial difculties. The 210-acre parcel was sold to Witte by a court-appointed receiv er for BlueChip at an auction for $1.2 million. Witte declined comment when contacted by the Daily Commer cial. Federal farm subsidy records show he has been involved with corn, wheat, soybeans and sor ghum in three Illinois counties and one Missouri county. Besides the former BlueChip property, Witte and his wife LuAnn own 14 oth er properties in Eustis, Leesburg, Grand Island, Tavares, Fruitland Park, Mount Dora and Clermont, property records show. As for the spray eld property, the city spends $25,000 per year to mow the land, documents show. The property was used as a disposal site for the citys treated wastewater, but now the city uses much of that water for irrigation and does not use the spray eld much, according to Kramer. One issue with the property is that it has no direct public ac cess and an owner would need an easement through land owned by the city, Kramer said. The adjacent property to the east, owned by Witte, does have direct access on County Road 437. Thats why it would be valuable to somebody who owns the east ern piece, Kramer said of the spray eld property. FIELD FROM PAGE A1 remembering their experiences. Sunday saw dozens of veterans escorted down a sandy path to a special section to watch the show alongside thousands of spectators most of whom lined two sides of the eld. Others took shelter in the shade as the lack of wind caused the sun to beat down hard. Planes including the C-47 aircraft ew by loudly overhead sever al times, with two dozen military paratroopers from countries including the U.S., Britain, France and Germany jumping with each passage. They were scenes rem iniscent of the pivotal event, when around 15,000 Allied paratroopers were dropped in and around the village of Sainte-Mere-Eglise on D-Day. It became the rst to be liberated by the Al lies and remains one of the enduring symbols of the Normandy invasion. Veteran Julian Bud Rice, a C-47 pilot who participated in the air drops of Normandy on D-Day, watched the show. Its good to see 800 paratroopers jump here today, but the night that we came in, we had 800 airplanes with 10,000 paratroopers that we dropped that night, so it was a little more, he said. At the invitation of the French government, this restored Douglas C-47 known as Whiskey 7 ew for the festivities and released paratroopers as it did when it dropped troops behind enemy lines under German re. The plane has almost as a rich a story to tell as the pilots who ew it. Although the twin-prop Whiskey 7, so named because of its W-7 squadron marking, looks much the same today as it did on June 6, 1944. D-DAY FROM PAGE A1 REMY DE LA MAUVINIERE / AP Paratroopers prepare to land near the Normandy village of Sainte Mere Eglise, western France, during a mass air drop, on Sunday.My theory, based on what has happened out in Phoenix at the VA Hospital, I think that this is just a way for the VA to delay and hope that theyll have the per son who applied for benets pass away during that (waiting) period, said Paul, who works in the assisted living eld in Naples. They know that these people who are applying are going into assisted living and they are not going to be with them forever, he said. In the last week, we had three people in South Florida pass away while their claims were pending. The VA is off the hook and now they pay nothing. Genevieve Billia, public affairs specialist for the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs in Washington, D.C., said in an email to the Daily Commercial: To get the ball rolling and gure out what happened to Mr. Wulf, well need him to ll out this privacy waiver so we can access his les with his permission. Billia said 111,461 veterans received the Aid and Attendance (A&A) in 2012, and she provided the Veterans Administrations website about the program: www.benets. va.gov/pension/aid_attendance_housebound.asp. According to the website, the A&A increased monthly pension amount may be added to your monthly pension amount if you meet one of the following conditions: %  en You require the aid of another person in order to perform personal functions required in everyday living, such as bathing, feeding, dressing, attending to the wants of nature, adjusting prosthetic devices or protecting yourself from the hazards of your daily environment %  en You are bedridden, in that your disability or disabilities requires that you remain in bed apart from any prescribed course of convalescence or treatment %  en You are a patient in a nursing home due to mental or physical incapacity %  en Your eyesight is limited to a corrected 5/200 visu al acuity or less in both eyes; or concentric contraction of the visual eld to 5 degrees or less Paul Wulf said his father met the criteria of needing aid and assistance for bathing, dressing and other daily functions. He and his brother, Michael, have paid $17,000 to help cover their father living at Grand Court, but they can longer afford to do so. It is at a stage now to where it is critical, Paul said of his father facing eviction. As nice as Grand Court has been working with us, it has drained my brother and I out of funds to help Dad to be there. And that is another thing about this (A&A) benet. Dad had to go into assisted living that he cannot afford in order to qualify for the benet, and yet in order to apply, he has to be paying for it, so tell me how does that math add up? There is no question that the VA is acting with impurity. There is no accountability and some of the mistakes that were made are absolutely ridiculous. Paul believes his father would have received attention faster behind bars. We would have an easier time if dad was a felon and having him in prison getting benets there, Paul said. Any vet would have an easier time getting benets in a federal prison than they do getting it from the VA. It is just ridiculous. Kristin Puckett, manager of public relations and crisis management for Brookdale, the parent company of Grand Court, said they do not want to see Wulf leave the Tavares facility. We are saddened by Mr. Wulfs situation and regret that it looks like he will be unable to stay at our community unless appropriate approvals from the Veterans Administration (VA) become available soon, Puckett said in an email. Our associates have assisted him with lling out the paperwork required to receive assistance from the VA, worked to nd other nancial arrangements, and have been in contact with both him and his family on a regular basis to assist in resolving the situation, even if it required alter native housing. We know this is frustrating for him and we are hopeful for a positive resolution soon. Harold has his belongings packed. He knows that he will be expected to leave Grand Court any day now. I want the VA to approve what they said that I have coming to me, Wulf said. It would take the VA to say OK for me to be able to stay here. Without that, there is no chance. VETERAN FROM PAGE A1 of terrorism, where traditional standards of war fare, spying and negotiat ing are run through a hall of mirrors. Bergdahl and the ve Guantanamo detainees traded for his freedom were captives in an un declared, unconventional and open-ended war that never t neatly into the Geneva Conventions, U.S. military doctrine or slo gans about how to behave. THE SOLDIERS CREEDHistory is replete with extraordinary acts to bring home the lost and fallen. The U.S. Armys War rior Ethos and the Soldiers Creed both swear, I will never leave a fallen comrade, and all the services place a premium on returning the missing, captured and dead. Often this comes at great cost, as in the 1993 Black Hawk Down battle in Somalia in which 18 U.S. servicemen were killed in the attack on U.S. helicopters and the subsequent rescue attempt. As Pentagon spokes man Rear Adm. John F. Kirby put it: When youre in the Navy, and you go overboard, it doesnt matter if you were pushed, fell or jumped. Were going to turn the ship around and pick you up. Not always. When the Korean War ended in 1953, thousands of missing and dead American soldiers were left behind, as well as POWs, as U.S. forces re treated from North Korea. The Pentagon agency primarily responsible for survival training for cap tured troops and for help ing them back at home says the mission of bring ing them back is truly and uniquely an indelible part of the American way.ANOTHER AMERICAN WAYNever negotiate with terrorists or hostage-tak ers? Not quite never. The Sept. 11 attacks broke open the modern age of asymmetric warfare. Asymmetric dealmaking, diplomacy and national security went hand in hand with that. The old standards and slogans still had meaning but improvisation was required. Ways were found to deal with those who dont ght by the rules. As in Bergdahls case, where the government of Qatar served as go-between, in termediaries are usually involved to maintain a semblance of separation between two sides that arent really supposed to be talking to each other. The ethos against granting concessions of any kind to scoundrels gave rise to a patriotic ral lying cry a century ago in the time of President Ted dy Roosevelt and a Mo roccan plunderer who became known as the rst terrorist of the 1900s. After Ahmed ibn-Mu hammed Raisuli took Greek-American busi nessman Ion Perdicar is hostage for money and political inuence, the U.S. dispatched warships while Roosevelts secre tary of state demanded of Moroccos sultan: Perdicaris alive or Raisuli dead. The effect of that ultimatum was electrifying at home and, days later, Perdicaris was free. But it turned out the U.S. had quietly pressed for Raisulis ransom demands to be met, which they were. The U.S. appeared to be wielding Roosevelts big stick. Actually it spoke softly to a terrorist. BERGDAHL FROM PAGE A1 AP FILE PHOTO Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., goes to a closed-door brieng on June 4 at the Capitol in Washington about the Obama administrations decision to swap ve members of the Taliban for captive Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl.

PAGE 3

Monday, June 9, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT TAVARES Florida Hospital Waterman to offer Safe Sitter classesThe Safe Sitter course, nationally approved and recognized by the American Academy of Pediatrics, is designed to teach boys and girls ages 11-13 to condently and safely care for themselves and younger children while unsupervised. Safe Sitter certied instructors will lead this two-day program with two sessions available from 8:30 / a.m. to 4 / p.m., Thursday and Friday and June 26-27, teaching students how to administer rst aid, choking child rescue and CPR and how to manage their own babysitting business. Program tuition is $75 per student. Space is limited and registration is required by calling 352-253-3391.CLERMONT Local doctors participate in Mens Heath Road TripIn recognition of National Mens Health Week today through Sunday, Dr. Jamin Brahmbhatt and Dr. Sijo Prekattil from the PUR Clinic at South Lake Hospital will hit the road to spread the word about mens health issues for the rst-ever Drive for Mens Health, a 24-hour road trip from Florida to New York, kicking off at 8 / a.m., Thursday at South Lake Hospital, 1900 Don Wickham Drive. The duo will drive approximately 1,100 miles in an all-electric Tesla, stopping only to recharge the vehicle, hosting mens health events along the way. Funds raised will benet genetic research for chronic male conditions and educational scholarships. For information, go to www. Drive4MensHealth.com or call 407-833-9201.TAVARES Chicken University offers tips on farming poultryThe UF/IFAS Extension in Lake County will offer the popular Chicken University course from 6 to 8 / p.m. on Thursday at the Lake County Agricultural Center, 1951 Woodlea Rd. Megan Brew, extension agent, will lead the class offering information on poultry anatomy and biology, housing, egg production, predator protection and egg handling. Pre-registration is required at www.chickenuni.eventbrite.com. The class costs $5 and includes printed materials. Space is limited. For information, call 352-343-4101, ext. 2728 or email horsygrl@u.edu.TAVARES Grantsmanship Workshop offered by LSGNGet the Grant You Need is the theme at the Lake-Sumter Grantsmanship Network (LSGN) workshop from 9 / a.m. to 3 / p.m. on Thursday at the Lake County Agriculture Extension Ofce, 1951 Woodlea Drive. The interactive workshop will host ve speakers and sessions on new trends and tips on grant writing. Cost for the workshop is $5 for LSGN members and $25 for nonmembers. Lunch is provided. Registration is available at www. lsgn.org, 407-342-8876 or info@lsgn. org.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comLake County commis sioners on Tuesday will consider the few options left for restoring evening bus service for Link 55 in south Lake. County ofcials had hoped an agreement could be worked out with Polk County, but that must remain on hold until November when Polk has its own transportation referendum, according to county ofcials. There may be an op portunity to work with them, said Dottie Keedy, director of community services. That leaves the county with three short-term op tions: %  %  The county could get into the business of cross-county bus transportation, which ofcials weigh as unlikely and costly. %  %  The county could provide a van pool ser vice, but the cost would range between $490-560 per month, depending on the number of passengers. %  %  LYNX could provide the service at an increased cost of $53,000 per year. When the Link 55 route which runs from Cagan Crossings along U.S. High way 192 to downtown Kis simmee was reinstated Jan. 12, the service only of fered eight round trips in stead of the 16 that riders and Lake County ofcials LAKE COUNTYFew options for Link 55 evening service The rst day of summer is June 21 and Florida Department of Health ofc es in counties across Cen tral Florida are reminding families to take precau tions while swimming in warm freshwater bodies due to the threat posed by the amoeba Naegleria fowleri. Naegleria fowleri is a naturally occurring amoe ba that can be found in any body of fresh water, such as lakes, rivers, hot springs and poorly maintained and minimally chlori nated or un-chlorinated swimming pools, accord ing to a press release from the Florida Department of Health in Lake County. This amoeba can cause an infection known as primary amebic meningoencephalitis by traveling up the nose to the brain and spinal cord, the re lease stated. This generally happens during activities such as swimming, diving, waterskiing or wake boarding. There is an increased risk of infection by this organism in all freshwater areas in Florida, es pecially during hot summer months, Dr. Kevin M. Sherin, director of the De partment of Health in Or ange County, said in the release. Infections usually occur when it is hot for pro longed periods, causing higher water temperatures and lower water lev els, added Dr. Swannie Jett, health ofcer of the Department of Health in Seminole County. According to the release, some measures that might reduce risk of infection in clude: %  %  Avoiding water-related activities in bodies of warm freshwater, hot springs and thermally pol luted water such as water around power plants. %  %  Avoiding water-relat ed activities in warm fresh water during periods of high water temperature State health officials warn of freshwater amoeba MARGIE MENZELNews Service of FloridaWith schools now out, classrooms and playgrounds will empty for the summer but that will leave many Florida children hungry because they rely on free and reduced-cost school meals for breakfast and lunch. Food banks, nonprots and community groups are trying to pick up the slack, using federal funding to help deliver up to two meals per day to kids who other wise might go without. The need goes up dramatical ly in the summer, said Rebec ca Brislain, executive director of the Florida Association of Food Banks. We know that the need is Food program has multiple local sites BRENDAN FARRINGTONAssociated PressOn good days when her epileptic sei zures arent se vere, RayAnn Moseley laughs, sings, danc es, swims and practic es with the childrens choir at her church. She easily brings smiles to the people around her. On bad days, the 11-year-old wakes up in bloody sheets or lies down on the school oor and says nothing all day. When her seizures become particularly intense, she is rushed to the hospital. The images of those extremes collected in a collage helped per suade Florida lawmakers to support a bill that will soon allow parents to treat their epileptic children with marijuana that has a low amount of THC, the chemical that causes intoxication. What seemed improbable a few months ago is now about to become a law with the help of a severely epileptic girl whose story melted hearts. When we rst started this, people were like, Are you crazy? Its never going to pass, said RayAnns father, Peyton Moseley, who along with his wife, Holley, met with dozens of lawmakers showing them the photos of RayAnn. They could see the differ ence when shes having good days as opposed to when shes having bad days. It helped to really put a face on it. Even Gov. Rick Scott, who has rmly opposed medical mar ijuana, welcomed RayAnn into his ofce, hugged her and assured her parents he would sign the bill. Once Scott signs the bill, which passed the Legislature over whelmingly on the last day of this years legislative session, strains of marijuana with low amounts of THC and high amounts of cannabidiol, or CBD, which is used to treat seizures, will be legal in Florida for certain medical conditions. Still, a handful of House members raised concerns, including a lack of U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for the drugs use and the possibility that the bill will open the door for wider spread use of marijuana.Epileptic girl inspired medical marijuana bill PHOTOS BY MICHAEL SPOONEYBARGER / AP ABOVE: In this May 21 photo, Holley Moseley, 11, and her daughter RayAnn walk to the park in their neighborhood in Gulf Breeze. BELOW: RayAnn Moseley, who has cerebral palsy and is severely epileptic, works with teachers assistant Becky Goncher in her ESC class at Gulf Breeze Elementary School in Gulf Breeze. SEE LINK | A4SEE AMOEBA | A4SEE EPILEPTIC | A5 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comThe former Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurant was over charged $75,000 for its electri cal service for nearly 14 years because of a meter switch at its Lake Square Mall site, according to city ofcials, and now Leesburg plans to settle with KFC, Inc. for $65,000. City Attorney Fred Morrison recently told city commissioners that the issue would be on the agenda for todays 5:30 / p .m. city commission meeting. The rough numbers, we think, adding readjusted interest, the charges with the total liability of the city, is in excess of $100,000, Morrison said of what the possi ble sum could have been if the dispute had gone to court rather than the parties reaching a settlement agreement. Leesburg Finance Director LEESBURGKFC was overcharged $75,000 for electricitySEE FOOD | A4SEE KFC | A5

PAGE 4

A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 9, 2014 CROSSWORD PUZZLE DEATH NOTICESBetty M. JunkerBetty M. Junker, 94, of Leesburg, died Satur day, June 7, 2014. PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, Leesburg.IN MEMORYthought would be of fered. County ofcials were stumped when they re ceived a response from LYNX in December stating the company could offer only half the num ber of trips at an in creased cost of $16,000. The cost for the 16 round trips was origi nally $50,685. Furthermore, the bus service only offers four routes in the morn ing from 6 to 8 and four routes in the evening from 5 to 6:30. The ser vice ended two and a half hours earlier than the agreed upon time, upsetting many shift workers. LYNX ofcials said the change occurred because the Link 55 route was expanded into Os ceola County, adding 3 miles to the route. County commissioners approved a motion in January to work with LYNX ofcials to extend the evening bus service for Link 55. Matt Friedman, spokesman for LYNX, said the transportation organization is will ing to have a discussion with Lake County. It comes down to how much service do they want and how much are they going to fund, he said. There is a cost. The location of the route moved. The more time the bus spends on the road, the more miles it drives, the more it costs. Commissioner Tim Sullivan said it is a tough situation. It is a concern, he said. We only have so much money to go around. For what we were paying for a year ago, we are getting less service from LYNX. Commissioner Jimmy Conner agreed. We are kind of be tween a rock and a hard place, he said, explain ing he appreciated the riders who use the route to get to work every day. It is a bureaucracy and sometimes things dont work out the way you would like them to. As the county is weigh ing the costs to restore the service, there is a proposal for a new Lake Xpress route, begin ning at State Road 50 in Mascotte and running through Clermont and Groveland, before connecting with the LYNX route in Winter Garden. The service, at an estimated cost of $463,000 a year, would be paid for with FTA 5307 funds, from which Link 55 is funded. Commissioner Sean Parks said he did not support paying for a new route at this time. I see the importance of Link 55 and 204 that was started over seven years ago, he said. I am not going to support cutting those routes in favor of starting a new route that I am not sure is fully supported by the cities. Since January when the evening service for Link 55 was reduced, Celeste Clifford has been paying about $10 a day for a cab home. In one week alone, she can spend $50 or more on cab fare, and it has be gun to impact her budget signicantly. It is hard to save a penny, she said. If the service cannot be restored, Clifford suggested at least push ing the beginning of service back to later in the afternoon, so people can get home on the bus in the evening. Right now it is costing us three arms and legs, she said. LINK FROM PAGE A3 and low water levels. %  en Keeping your head out of the water, hold ing your nose shut or using nose clips when taking part in water-re lated activities in bod ies of warm freshwater such as lakes, rivers or hot springs. %  en Avoiding digging in or stirring up the sedi ment while taking part in water-related activities in shallow, warm freshwater areas. For information and to watch a public ser vice announcement about the dangers of amoeba infections, go to www.lakechd.com. AMOEBA FROM PAGE A3 there, and we hear that from our partner agencies, that they are running out of food because school is out, said Rachel Mohler, nutrition di rector at Second Har vest of the Big Bend food bank in Tallahas see. The state Department of Agriculture and Consumer Ser vices and the non prot Florida Impact are working together on Summer BreakSpot, a program that provides healthy food to kids at local sites and reconstructed school buses. Funding for the two-year-old Summer BreakSpot pro gram comes from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, funneled through the state agency. Last year, the program served 12 million meals to FOODFROM PAGE A3300,000 Florida chil dren, and the USDA reimbursed the state $29.5 million for them. Erin Gillespie, a spokeswoman for the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Ser vices, said the state and local partners school districts, nonprots and religious and community groups are try ing to expand the num ber of locations where kids can get nutritious meals and enrichment activities. The program has 3,400 locations state wide typically recreation centers and affordable housing sites so that its right there where the kids are, Gillespie said. A lot of these families dont have transportation, and theyre not go ing to drive across town to get a free lunch for the kids. The program also tar gets rural communities, where food worries for children can be common. According to the Summer BreakSpot website, summer foodorida.nutrislice. com, food sites local ly include: The Villages Elementary School, Lifestream Academy on Tally Road in Lees burg, Beverly Shores Elementary School, Mt. Calvary Baptist Church in Leesburg, Treadway Elementary School in Leesburg, Eu stis Elementary School, Lifestream Academy on Idewild Avenue in Eus tis, Nazarene Chruch/ YMCA in Tavares, Tava res Elementary School, Lake Hills School, Grassy Lake Elementary School, Minneola Elementary School, South Lake High School, Mascotte Elementary School, Webster Ele mentary School, Bush nell Elementary School, the Sumter Youth Cen ter near Bushnell, Lake Panasoffkee Elementary School, Wildwood Elementary School and the Sumter Youth Cen ter in Wildwood. According to last years Feeding Amer ica Map the Meal Gap study, 21.6 per cent of U.S. children are food-insecure, meaning their households are usually worried that the food will run out before they have money to buy more. In Florida, 25.5 per cent of children are food-insecure, about 1 in 4. And of the states nearly 2.7 million public-school students, just under 1.6 million are eligible for free and re duced-cost meals, ac cording to the Florida Hunger Data Center. Brislain said the economic recovery is ar riving more slowly in high-poverty areas. The folks that our food banks see are the rst affected by a tough economy and the last to recover, she said. Summer BreakSpot grew by 12 percent last year and is expected to increase again this year. Thats consistent with data showing participation in summer food programs increasing across the U.S. Accord ing to a report out June 2 from the Food Research and Action Center in Washington, D.C., nearly 3 million Amer ican children partici pated in summer nu trition programs in July 2013 an increase of 161,000 children, or 5.7 percent, from the year before. Florida exceeded all categories, relative to the national average, in growth, Debra Susie, chief executive ofcer of Florida Impact, said of the national report. Associated PressLAKELAND Two cats recently found dead in Central Florida appear to have been killed by a coyote. A geneticist with the University of Florida says DNA testing was specic for canids, a family of carnivores including dogs, foxes and other species. Two samples tested revealed a strong match with a coyote. The Tampa Tribune reports one cat appeared to have been cut in half behind the front legs in March. The back half of the cat was found about two blocks away the next day. In April, the front half of another cat was found about two blocks from its own ers home.Coyote responsible for cat deaths

PAGE 5

Monday, June 9, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 This could be the ri e shot that starts a massive avalanche, Rep. Dennis Baxley, R-Ocala, said after the vote. When I look at that I simply cant pull the trigger. The journey to passage began late last year when the Moseleys traveled from the Pensacola area to Colorado and talked to parents of epileptic children whose seizures have been reduced or eliminated after treating them with oil from a marijuana strain known as Charlottes Web, named for the epileptic girl it originally helped in 2012. They also talked to the Stanley brothers, marijuana growers who developed the strain, which is legal in Colorado. Thats when they decided to seek the treatments legalization in Florida, teaming up with two lobbyists and a publicist who donated their time. Simultaneously, conservative Panhandle Republican Rep. Matt Gaetz was being pressured by a Democratic colleague to support the idea of legalizing Char lottes Web. He was skeptical, but willing to listen. He set up a phone call with the Stanley brothers, who told him about the Moseleys. I was not on re for the issue until I got to meet the Moseleys, Gaetz said. Sharing the Moseleys story lit a re in me that I couldnt nd a way to put out until passing this bill. Part of that story is how RayAnn came into the Moseleys lives. RayAnns birth mother was a prostitute and drug user. She often didnt get the medication doctors prescribed to treat the seizures that have tormented her since birth. The state took custody of RayAnn when she was 2, but its not easy nding foster parents for a child with cerebral palsy and intractable epilepsy. They placed her at a hospital where Holly Moseley, a pediatric nurse, saw her in a crib covered with netting. We just connected. You just cant help but fall in love with those blue eyes, Moseley said. You could just see inside of her that need for love. Three days later, Moseley was off but couldnt help thinking about RayAnn stuck in a crib that looked like a cage. Christmas was approaching and she got permission to have RayAnn join her family for the holidays. She laughed the whole night there was just a big smile on her face, Moseley said. Right after Christmas, the Moseleys hired a lawyer and started a three-year ght to adopt RayAnn, whose birth mother resisted giving her up. The same month Moseley gave birth to her rst of two biological children, RayAnn became the couples adop tive daughter. On the good days, its fabulous, said her teacher, Angela Pettus. She is just so much fun, she is such a joy. She keeps us laughing, she keeps us enter tained. But on the bad days she can be angry and frustrated either by the side effects of her medications or when her seizures increase in intensity. She will go through spurts of extreme growth where shes getting things, things are starting to click. Shes doing great, shes reading, shes comprehending, shes doing math, Pettus said. Then shell go through a period of seizures and shell lose a lot of it and were back to square one again. Its hard to watch that in a child. Theres just a lot of intelligence in there, that if they could get her seizures under control and they could get her leveled out, her doors could be wide open, Pettus said. RayAnns cerebral palsy affects her ability to speak and, while her parents understand her, most people have a difcult time communicating with her. The Moseleys hope that could change with help from Charlottes Web. In the state of Colorado we do know that 85 percent of children who are using non-euphoric marijuana to control seizures and spasms have seen a 50 to 100 percent reduction in those seizures, Gaetz said. I imagine that theres this whole other inner being in RayAnn that hasnt come out yet that wants to come out, that just hasnt physically been able to come out. I just look really look forward to meeting her for the rst time pharmaceutical free, Peyton Moseley said. I dont think God has brought us this far for it not to work. EPILEPTIC FROM PAGE A3 William Spinelli said an agenda memo that the city had provided Central Flori da, KFC with electric utility services from 1999 to 2012, and that the error dates back to when the city installed two meters for KFC and Wendys. It appears the meters were crossed, Spinelli said in the memo. Basically, KFC electric meter was monitor ing Wendys electric utility usage, and Wendys electric meter was monitoring KFCs electric utility usage. He said the city has changed the electric utility meters a couple of times over the years, however, neither the city nor the restau rants realized what was going on until KFC ofcially closed in 2012. Spinelli said in the memo that it wasnt until the follow ing month after the closed KFC received a full months electric utility bill that the error was discovered. As a result of the error, the parties entered into negotiations for the amount owed and the terms of the settlement. Spinelli said under the terms of the agreement, no further claims will be as serted by KFC against the city for any sum paid by KFC prior to the date of the set tlement agreement. The citys attorney will be moving forward with negotiations with Wendys in order to recoup the losses from KFC, Spinelli said in the memo. The city commission is expected to approve the $65,000 settlement agreement with KFC, and Spinelli said in the memo that Leesburg does have sufcient funds to cover the cost from the scal year 2014 budget. KFC FROM PAGE A3 KEN THOMASAssociated PressWASHINGTON Hillary Rodham Clintons decision on seeking the White House again could stretch into 2015, and shes making no commitments about testify ing before a select congressional committee investigating the 2012 terrorist attacks in Benghazi, Libya. In an excerpt of an inter view with ABC News that aired Sunday, the former secretary of state said potential primary rivals are free to do whatever they choose to do on whatever timetable they decide. I just want to get through this year, travel around the country, sign books, help in the midterm elections in the fall and then take a deep breath and kind of go through my pluses and minuses, said Clinton. The former secretary of state remains the leading Democratic presidential contender in 2016. She said she would decide on running when it feels right for me to decide, adding she would be on the way to making a de cision by the end of the year. Asked by ABCs Diane Saw yer whether she would de cide by the end of the year, Clinton said, certainly not before then. Would her announcement stretch into next year? Clinton said she was not posi tive about next year. But the way I make decisions, thats probably likely. Some Democrats pri vately worry that if Clinton holds off on making a deci sion and then opts against running, potential candidates like Vice President Joe Biden, Maryland Gov. Martin OMalley and several Demo cratic senators would be at a disadvantage against Republicans who have been actively pursuing the White House. I just dont think thats a real concern, Clinton said.Clintons 2016 decision could come next year AP FILE PHOTO This June 2 photo shows Hillary Clinton during a meeting with community leaders in Denver.

PAGE 6

A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 9, 2014 RODNEY MUHUMUZAAssociated PressKAMPALA, Uganda Speak no Hebrew. Thats what Ugandan teachers repeatedly tell the South Sudanese teenagers transplanted here from Israel. But Hebrew is what they speak when they are not being watched; its the language they grew up with as migrants. Some 70 South Sudanese teenagers now call Kampala their home after they were deported from or voluntarily left Israel, which is trying to rid itself of tens of thousands of African migrants. In re cent years Africans have poured into Israel, causing friction with lo cals and alarming some authorities who say Is raels Jewish character is threatened by the presence of the Africans. After leaving Israel the teenagers spent a few months in their home country, South Sudan, where they struggled because of the threat of hunger, tropical dis eases and the countrys political tensions. They later were relocated to Uganda thanks mainly to the work of an Is raeli activist who has criticized his coun trys policy toward African migrants as Israels moment of shame. The 44-year-old activist, Rami Gudovitch, entered the lives of the teenagers as both father gure and friend, rst by trying to pre vent their impending deportations from Israel and then by nding families willing to sponsor their education in Africa. In December 2012 he put a group of them on a bus leav ing the South Sudanese capital of Juba for Kam pala, where the chil dren hoped to return to school and start afresh as refugees. Many of those now enrolled at a private boarding school in Kampala have Israe li benefactors who pay their tuition of about $1,000, charity for which they are grate ful but which doesnt cancel the memory of the country they called home for much of their life. They must adjust to a different culture and school system, often without the help of fam ily. Many students who should be one or two years away from taking college-entrance examinations are now stuck in lower grade school because their English is not adequate, a serious consequence of the transition from Isra el, where they were in structed in Hebrew. When they rst came here they had a lan guage barrier, said Alex Gumisiriza, a science teacher who heads aca demic programs at Trin ity School. But now they are catching up. Several of the teen agers who spoke to The Associated Press said they left Israel in 2011 or 2012 and lived in South Sudan before coming to Uganda. The move had effectively broken up their fam ilies, with many going months without seeing their parents. Although some said their parents had chosen to return to South Sudan in re sponse to growing an ti-refugee sentiment in Israel, many were deported. We were told that in Israel they didnt want refugees, that there were many refugees in the country, said Victoria James, a bub bly 16-year-old stu dent whose family lived in Tel Aviv. It was very bad. I was going to live in a country that I knew nothing about. James said she miss es her friends, who oc casionally chat with her on Facebook, and her teachers. Quite a few of the students said they miss Tel Avivs big malls, of which there are not many in Uganda. Oth ers recall the good bas ketball courts there. Many of the Afri can migrants pouring across Israels southern border with Egypt come from Eritrea and South Sudan, countries with a history of political vi olence and rights abus es. Israel has now built a fence along the bor der with Egypt, all but stopping the inux. It passed a law that allows for the migrants de tention and said it has a deal with an uniden tied country to host some of the Africans until they are able to re turn home. An Israeli ofcial told The Associated Press that Israel had begun sending dozens of African migrants to Ugan da in a voluntary depor tation campaign that Ugandan ofcials and refugee authorities insist they know nothing about. While there is no formal agreement with Uganda, the Israeli of cial said, Israel is pay ing up to $3,500 to each migrant who agreed to leave for Uganda. The ofcial spoke on condition of anonymity be cause he was not au thorized to speak to the media on this matter. Migrants and activists said the arrangement, which includes a one-way ticket and a stipend, is questionable because its unclear if theres an ofcial agreement with Uganda to secure their status. Gudovitch, the anti-deportation activist, said he was ashamed of Israels policy toward African migrants. Part of the Jewish tra dition is to accept refugees, he said. I think Israel should protect ref ugees because we have been refugees and we dont know the next time we shall be refugees. His group, an Israeli nonprot called Become, supports the South Sudanese students as part of its efforts to help vulnerable children in the worlds poorest parts. They are Israeli kids, Gudovitch said. For me these kids are representative of my country.After Israel, African kids start afresh in Uganda REBECCA VASSIE / AP In this April 9 photo, South Sudanese teenager Asunta Atoch, 16, left, who previously lived in Israel, listens to her friends talk about their time in the country, in a classroom at the Trinity boarding school where they now live in Kampala, Uganda.Some 70 South Sudanese teenagers now call Kampala their home after they were deported from or voluntarily left Israel, which is trying to rid itself of tens of thousands of African migrants. In recent years Africans have poured into Israel, causing friction with locals and alarming some authorities who say Israels Jewish character is threatened by the presence of the Africans.

PAGE 7

Monday, June 9, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 O n meeting Ukraines presi dent-elect, Petro Poroshen ko, in Warsaw on Wednes day, President Obama said the United States was absolutely committed to standing behind the Ukrainian people ... not just in the coming days ... but in the coming years. That commitment is important because Ukraine has become the symbol of whether Russia can get away with destabilizing its European neighbors. Poroshenko must not only reform a sinking economy but also combat armed pro-Russian militias that have grabbed chunks of eastern Ukraine. So Obama wasnt kidding when he said, The challenge now for the international community is to make sure that we are supporting Petros efforts. The ques tion is whether Washington and the European Union will rise to the challenge, which will become more acute in the coming weeks. Having just returned from Ukraine, I believe Poroshenko and the current Ukrainian government are nally ready to start the economic reforms so vital for the country. They understand that Ukraine will no longer tol erate the massive Russian-style corruption practiced by the pre vious president, Viktor Yanukovych, who stole billions before decamping to Russia in February. That was the message of the mid dle-class Euro-maidan revolution that lled Kievs Independence Square for months, and ultimately led to Yanukovychs exit. Ukraine has one-quarter of the Polish economy, even though we started at the same level 30 years ago, says Ukraines impressive minister of economic development, Pavlo Sheremeta (who has an MBA from Emory University in Atlanta). So it is absolutely under standable why people went out on the streets. If the president and parliament dont deliver by 2015, the people will be back. I would expect another maidan. People dont want to live like this. Russian meddling, however, makes it even harder for Ukraine to undertake the painful reforms necessary to get its economy on a solid footing. Moscow is play ing political games with the price of its gas, on which Ukraine depends; it practically doubled the price to Kiev after Yanukovych fell. And although it has recognized the results of the presidential elections, Moscow appears to be sending even more arms and men into eastern Ukraine to fur ther destabilize the region. The message to Poroshenko: return to our economic and political or bit or we will make it impossible for you to govern. The former president of the Kyiv School of Economics, the 42-year-old minister cites two urgent economic priorities: ghting corruption with much more energy and deregulating Ukraines economy from Russian-style controls. Like Russia, post-communist Ukraine witnessed a sell-off of key state-owned resources for a song to well-connected individuals, often former party members, the richest of whom became known as oligarchs. Several oligarchs are now serving as governors, and Poroshenko the chocolate billionaire is sometimes considered in their number. I asked Sheremeta how his country could reform if the oligarchs were still omnipresent. His reply: Poroshenko has promised to sell his assets and not use his wealth for economic gains while he serves as president. If wealthy individuals act as good servants of Ukraine and other players have equal access to markets and state resources, Sheremeta says, the reforms can move forward. This will be a stretch, but at least, unlike in Russia, Ukrainian ofcials recognize the problem and are trying to address it. As for Maa-style corruption and corrupt courts, Sheremeta says his government under stands the country cant develop further if it doesnt take care of these wrongs. Moreover, says the minister, the government also knows, given its geography, it has to deal with both the European Union and Russia. Both sides must understand that solutions of either-or cant be good for us. But an openness to Russia does not mean that Ukraine will abandon its efforts to implement rule of law or cease its efforts to join the European Union. It doesnt mean it will cling to a Russian-style economy with subsidies it cannot sustain. And it doesnt mean that Ukraine will, like Russia, clamp down on the civil society that went to the streets. On the contrary, says Sheremeta, It is absolutely vital that civil-society activists keep an eye on the economy. Indeed, groups of professionals who took part in the demonstrations are now lobbying for specic legislation to reform courts and the health system, and to devolve more powers to the regions. Sheremeta told me he is in regular touch with their leaders, who are notching some successes. Talking to the minister, it is pos sible to imagine that Ukraine could emulate Poland and become an economic success story over the next decade, in agriculture, IT, and industry were Moscow not so determined to prevent it. Helping them get there will require Western resolve.Trudy Rubin is a columnist and editorial-board member for the Philadelphia Inquirer. Readers may write to her at: Philadelphia Inquirer, P.O. Box 8263, Philadelphia, Pa. 19101, or by email at trubin@phillynews.com.OTHERVOICES Trudy RubinMCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Ukraine reform will need Western support Syrias elections Tuesday and President Bashar Assads victory in them were a bad joke, given the level of wreckage and continuing violence in the country, but American policy toward Syria continues to lag reality. The Syrian government claimed a 73 percent turnout of eligible voters in Tuesdays elections, with Assad having received 89 percent of the vote, against two other candidates in the race. The claimed outcome was better than Egypts late May noncontest, when 47 percent of Egyptians were claimed to have turned out to elect former Field Marshal Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, who led last years coup detat there, with 97 percent of the vote, against one opponent. The Syrian elections took place, of course, only in the part of the country that government forces control. They also took place minus the estimated 3 million Syrian refugees who have ed the country, 13 percent of the population, currently sheltering in Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Turkey and elsewhere, and the thousands of internally displaced Syrians in no position to vote. Nonetheless, the fact that Assads regime felt it could hold elections, and that it was fully condent that Assad would win a precondition to holding them was clear evidence that he will not be departing the scene anytime soon, pending a successful assassination attempt. In general, his and his regimes success can be attributed to the military success of his forces on the ground, even though signicant parts of the country remain beyond their control. This phenomenon is due to his forces ghting ability and armaments, but also to the support they have received from Hezbollah ghters from Lebanon, Iran, Iraqi exiles and Russia. U.S. policy across the now three years of the Syrian upheaval has remained out of synchronization with what has occurred on the ground. President Barack Obamas administration rst perceived the Syrian uprising as part of the Arab Spring and trumpeted Assads departure from power as necessary and imminent. The next chapter was the use of chemical weapons in the war, which prompted Washington to threaten military action. That under taking was neutered when Russia proposed, instead, that Syria be obliged to give up its chemical weapons, which it has more or less done. In the meantime, the United States pro vided humanitarian and (oxymoronic) nonle thal military aid to allegedly moderate rebels. Now, Mr. Obama is promising the Syrian rebels new, more lethal aid, as their defeat on the ground has become obvious, and prospects of a negotiated peace stand at zero. It doesnt matter a whole lot unless he belatedly takes America to war in Syria or provokes one or other of the par ties to the conict to initiate terrorist action in the United States for revenge.Distributed by MCT Information ServicesAVOICEUS policy on Syria continues out of step with reality Classic DOONESBURY 1974

PAGE 8

A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 9, 2014

PAGE 9

SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 9, 2014www.dailycommercial.comGOLF: Inbee Park wins with course record / B4 PHOTOS BY DARKO VOJINOVIC / AP Spains Rafael Nadal bites the trophy after winning the nal of the French Open tennis tournament against Serbias Novak Djokovic on Sunday at Roland Garros stadium, in Paris. Nadal won in four sets 3-6, 7-5, 6-2, 6-4. HOWARD FENDRICHAP Tennis WriterPARIS Trying to beat Rafael Nadal at the French Open is, without a doubt, the toughest task in tennis. In deed, must be among the greatest challenges in all of sports. The pressure he ap plies, from set to set, game to game, point to point, shot to shot. That bullwhip of a high-bouncing, topspin lefty forehand. Those quick-reex returns that help him break an opponents serve and his will. Doing what he does so well on the red clay of Roland Garros, a sur face and site he dom inates so completely, the No. 1-seeded Nadal wore down No. 2 Novak Djokovic 3-6, 5-7, 2-6, 6-4 Sunday to win his ninth French Open championship and fth in a row, both records. For me, Nadal said, playing here in Roland Garros is just unforgettable, forever. It is also his 14th Grand Slam title over all, tying the 28-yearold Spaniard with Pete Sampras for the second most by a man, behind only Roger Federers 17. That includes two tro phies for Nadal at Wim bledon and one apiece at the U.S. Open and Australian Open, prov ing he can beat the best on grass and hard courts, too. But its on the clay of Paris where Nadal reigns supreme: He has won 66 of his 67 career matches at the French Open. And since his only defeat, against Robin Soder ling in the fourth round in 2009, Nadal has won 35 consecutive matches at Roland Garros. Its not impossible, but its very, very dif cult to stay with Rafa in this court, throughout the whole match, on the highest level of perfor mance, said Djokovic, who was broken in the nal game of each set, including with an anticlimactic double-fault on match point after fans shouted during the Serbs service motion. Its normal that you have ups and downs. Nadal ensured that he, not Djokovic, will be ranked No. 1 on Monday. And in the pro cess, Nadal once again prevented six-time ma jor champion Djokovic from completing a ca reer Grand Slam. Sorry for him today. I Nadal tops Djokovic for ninth French Open title, 14th major Nadal returns the ball to Federer in the third set.US team confident as it heads to Brazil RONALD BLUMAssociated PressSAO PAULO The U.S. headed to Bra zil with boosted faith Sunday after going un defeated in its sendoff series for the rst time. Playing only its third match in nine months against a World Cup team, the U.S. defense appeared rmer in a 2-1 win over Nigeria following the decision to start both Jermaine Jones and Kyle Becker man in mideld. And Jozy Altidore broke a six-month scoreless streak for club and country with a pair of goals, including a ashy effort when he cut inside Super Eagles captain Joseph Yobo and slotted in a right-footed shot from 12 yards. This game gives us condence, but the MARK HUMPHREY / AP Ben Crane is congratulated after winning the St. Jude Classic golf tournament on Sunday, in Memphis, Tenn.Ben Crane wins St. Jude Classic for fifth PGA championship MIKE GROLL / AP Jimmie Johnson, left, congratulates Dale Earnhardt Jr. after Earnhardt won the Pocono 400 auto race at Pocono Raceway on Sunday in Long Pond, Pa. SEE OPEN | B2 DAN GELSTONAP Sports WriterLONG POND, Pa. Dale Earnhardt Jr. passed Brad Keselowski down the stretch to win a thrill er Sunday at Pocono Raceway. Earnhardt led only 11 laps but his No. 88 Chev rolet was the car to beat down the stretch, and he zipped past the dominant Keselowski, who Dale Jr. pulls away late for second win of seasonSEE NASCAR | B2 MARK DIDTLERAssociated PressST. PETERSBURG Felix Hernandez struck out a career-high 15 in seven innings before Endy Chavez keyed a ve-run ninth with a tiebreaking RBI single, leading the Seattle Mariners to a 5-0 victory over the Tampa Bay Rays on Sunday. James Jones had a two-run triple for the Mariners, who have won seven of eight. Hernandez had won his previous ve starts, which was two away from tying the team record held by Jamie Moyer (2003) and Scott Bankhead (1989), but the Mariners were held scoreless until the ninth by Chris Archer and three relievers. King Felix scattered four hits over seven in nings. After Brad Miller hit a two-out tri ple and Willie Bloomquist walked against Grant Balfour (0-2), the left-handed hitting Chavez slapped a twostrike single to left for a 1-0 lead. Jones had his triple before Kyle Seager added a tworun double. Yoervis Medina (3-1) King Felix fans 15 as Mariners top RaysSEE RAYS | B2 TERESA M. WALKERAP Sports WriterMEMPHIS, Tenn. Ben Crane estimates he slept less than three hours in a night spent praying and thanking God that his game nally has come back around. Then he played 30 holes Sunday in winning the St. Jude Classic for his rst PGA Tour title since 2011, setting off a celebration that included hugging his caddie and high-ving a reporter. Crane also choked back some tears as he looked at text messages lling his phone. Oh my gosh, it just keeps going, Crane said, looking at his phone. How many can a phone hold? This is so much fun Crane closed with a 3-over 73 for a one-stroke victo ry, going wire to wire for his fth career victory. Rain de lays forced him into the mar athon session Sunday at TPC Southwind, nishing 12 holes in the morning in a thirdround 69 to take a three-shot lead into the nal round. He two-putted for bogey on the nal hole to n ish at 10-under 270, days af ter failing to qualify for the U.S. Open. That marked a low point for the 38-year-old player who spent the past six months reworking his swing to protect his back wonder ing if his career was over. He spent time with a coach pic turing the right way to hit shots. Everything clicked Thursday with an opening 63. I did not expect the hole to open up like that and just start making putts from ev erywhere, Crane said. Just hit a lot of quality shots and SEE GOLF | B2 United Statess Jozy Altidore (17) moves the ball against Nigeria during the second half of an international friendly soccer match on Saturday in Jacksonville. The United States won 2-1. JOHN RAOUX / AP Its been a grind but at the end of the day, we accomplished everything we set out to do, and thats to get three wins. Thats really all that matters.Matt BeslerUS defenderSEE SOCCER |B2

PAGE 10

B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 9, 2014 Lightning game postponedThe scheduled gmae between the Leesburg Lightning and Sanford River Rats has been suspended after the rst inning with the Lightning holding a 3-1 lead. The game will be resumed at a time and date to be determined. NASCAR Sprint Cup-Pocono 400 ResultsSunday At Pocono Raceway Long Pond, Pa. Lap length: 2.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (8) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 160 laps, 120.9 rating, 47 points, $198,965. 2. (3) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 160, 143.3, 44, $213,783. 3. (2) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 160, 118.4, 42, $142,600. 4. (1) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 160, 107.2, 41, $137,500. 5. (14) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 160, 96, 40, $136,320. 6. (20) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 160, 97.8, 39, $150,851. 7. (15) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 160, 84.9, 37, $101,365. 8. (5) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 160, 114.8, 37, $132,251. 9. (17) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 160, 85.9, 35, $115,973. 10. (18) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 160, 81.5, 34, $121,029. 11. (19) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 160, 96.8, 33, $126,631. 12. (6) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 160, 86.6, 32, $129,481. 13. (12) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 160, 105.2, 32, $124,073. 14. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 160, 110.4, 30, $119,523. 15. (28) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 160, 68, 29, $118,815. 16. (13) Greg Bife, Ford, 160, 73.9, 28, $121,640. 17. (11) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 160, 73.7, 27, $125,601. 18. (32) David Ragan, Ford, 160, 55.8, 26, $106,523. 19. (9) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 160, 81.4, 26, $112,090. 20. (30) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 160, 58.6, 24, $97,048. 21. (21) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 160, 64.4, 23, $93,498. 22. (22) Aric Almirola, Ford, 160, 66.2, 22, $115,926. 23. (25) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 160, 60, 21, $98,298. 24. (29) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 160, 57.5, 20, $104,760. 25. (26) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 160, 52.6, 19, $124,826. 26. (23) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 160, 60.9, 18, $105,154. 27. (24) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 160, 65, 18, $95,312. 28. (35) David Gilliland, Ford, 160, 50.2, 16, $85,115. 29. (33) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 160, 44.2, 15, $74,465. 30. (40) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 159, 41.2, 14, $75,815. 31. (34) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 159, 41.4, 13, $74,165. 32. (41) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 159, 33.5, 12, $73,990. 33. (31) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 158, 41.6, 0, $73,790. 34. (36) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 158, 40.1, 10, $73,590. 35. (37) Josh Wise, Ford, 158, 35.3, 9, $73,440. 36. (39) Timmy Hill, Toyota, 158, 27.8, 8, $81,190. 37. (16) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 158, 55.9, 7, $81,004. 38. (38) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 157, 32, 0, $68,030. 39. (42) Alex Kennedy, Chevrolet, 156, 28.4, 5, $64,030. 40. (7) Joey Logano, Ford, engine, 150, 80.8, 4, $100,021. 41. (10) Carl Edwards, Ford, accident, 143, 73.1, 3, $75,030. 42. (27) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, accident, 142, 67.7, 2, $71,430. 43. (43) Dave Blaney, Ford, 142, 23.9, 1, $48,530.NBA Playoff GlanceAll Times EDT FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) San Antonio 1, Miami 0 Thursday, June 5: San Antonio 110, Miami 95 Sunday, June 8: Miami at San Antonio, late Tuesday, June 10: San Antonio at Miami, 9 p.m. Thursday, June 12: San Antonio at Miami, 9 p.m. x-Sunday, June 15: Miami at San Antonio, 8 p.m. x-Tuesday, June 17: San Antonio at Miami, 9 p.m. x-Friday, June 20: Miami at San Antonio, 9 p.m.NHL Playoff GlanceAll Times EDT FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) Los Angeles 2, N.Y. Rangers 0 Wednesday, June 4: Los Angeles 3, NY Rangers 2, OT Saturday, June 7: Los Angeles 5, NY Rangers 4, 2OT Monday, June 9: Los Angeles at NY Rangers, 8 p.m. Wednesday, June 11: Los Angeles at NY Rangers, 8 p.m. x-Friday, June 13: NY Rangers at Los Angeles, 8 p.m. x-Monday, June 16: Los Angeles at NY Rangers, 8 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 18: NY Rangers at Los Angeles, 8 p.m. French Open Results Sunday At Stade Roland Garros Paris Purse: $34.12 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Doubles Women Championship Hsieh Su-wei, Taiwan, and Peng Shuai (1), China, def. Sara Errani and Roberta Vinci (2), Italy, 6-4, 6-1. Legends Doubles Men Over 45 Championship John and Patrick McEnroe, United States, def. An dres Gomez, Ecuador, and Mark Woodforde, Australia, 4-6, 7-5, 10-7. Sundays Sports Transactions BASEBALLTV2DAYSCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED SUN mon tues wed thurs fri SatLeesburg LightningJune 8-14@ College Park Freedom7pmSanford River Rats5pmWinter Garden Squeeze7pm@ Winter Garden Squeeze7pmWinter Garden Squeeze7pmCollege Park Freedom7pm COLLEGE BASEBALL 1 p.m.ESPN2 NCAA Division I, playoffs, super regionals, game 3, College of Charleston at Texas Tech (if necessary)4 p.m.ESPN2 NCAA Division I, playoffs, super regionals, game 3, Maryland at Virginia (if necessary)7 p.m.ESPN2 NCAA Division I, playoffs, super regionals, game 3, Mississippi at Louisiana-Lafayette or Pepperdine at TCU (if necessary) ESPNU NCAA Division I, playoffs, super regionals, game 3, Mississippi at Louisiana-Lafayette or Pepperdine at TCU (if necessary)CYCLING 6 p.m.NBCSN Criterium du Dauphine, stage 2, Tarare to Pays dOlliergues-Col du Beal, France MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m.MLB, SUN Seattle at Tampa Bay7 p.m.ESPN L.A. Dodgers at CincinnatiNHL 8 p.m.NBCSN Stanley Cup nals, game 3, Los Angeles at N.Y. Rangers FedEx St. Jude Classic Leading ScoresSunday At TPC Southwind Memphis, Tenn. Purse: $5.8 million Yardage: 7,239; Par: 70 Final FedEx Cup points in parentheses Ben Crane (500), $1,044,000 63-65-69-73 -10 Troy Merritt (300), $626,400 67-66-67-71 -9 Matt Every (145), $301,600 69-68-65-70 -8 Carl Pettersson (145), $301,600 67-67-69-69 -8 Webb Simpson (145), $301,600 71-66-69-66 -8 James Hahn (86), $181,540 69-70-67-67 -7 Brian Harman (86), $181,540 69-65-67-72 -7 Billy Horschel (86), $181,540 67-68-68-70 -7 Ian Poulter (86), $181,540 69-68-72-64 -7 Andrew Svoboda (86), $181,540 69-66-68-70 -7 Phil Mickelson (68), $139,200 67-68-67-72 -6 Camilo Villegas (68), $139,200 68-64-71-71 -6 Rickie Fowler (56), $102,467 70-68-68-69 -5 Chesson Hadley (56), $102,467 67-69-72-67 -5 J.J. Henry (56), $102,467 66-70-71-68 -5 Ben Martin (56), $102,467 69-67-74-65 -5 Austin Cook, $102,467 67-73-65-70 -5 Ted Potter, Jr. (56), $102,467 68-67-70-70 -5 Tim Clark (50), $70,296 68-69-67-72 -4 Brooks Koepka, $70,296 67-70-72-67 -4 Peter Malnati (50), $70,296 65-68-70-73 -4 John Peterson (50), $70,296 69-68-73-66 -4 Will Wilcox (50), $70,296 70-67-68-71 -4 Jason Bohn (46), $49,445 67-68-70-72 -3 Paul Casey (46), $49,445 70-67-70-70 -3 Dustin Johnson (46), $49,445 68-67-75-67 -3 Graeme McDowell (46), $49,445 69-68-70-70 -3 Charles Howell III (42), $40,310 71-68-71-68 -2 Steve Marino (42), $40,310 69-70-68-71 -2 George McNeill (42), $40,310 69-69-73-67 -2 Charlie Wi (42), $40,310 68-71-69-70 -2 Ben Curtis (34), $28,842 70-69-71-69 -1 Tommy Gainey (34), $28,842 69-68-70-72 -1 Danny Lee (34), $28,842 72-67-67-73 -1 William McGirt (34), $28,842 73-66-74-66 -1 Ryan Palmer (34), $28,842 67-72-72-68 -1 Heath Slocum (34), $28,842 69-70-70-70 -1 Cameron Tringale (34), $28,842 68-70-70-71 -1 Jhonattan Vegas (34), $28,842 69-70-70-70 -1 Tim Wilkinson (34), $28,842 68-68-70-73 -1 Retief Goosen (34), $28,842 66-66-75-72 -1 Scott Stallings (34), $28,842 68-72-68-71 -1 Luke Guthrie (27), $20,300 67-72-70-71 E Davis Love III (27), $20,300 65-70-71-74 E Sean OHair (27), $20,300 69-70-70-71 E Chad Campbell (24), $16,443 70-68-71-72 +1 Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano (24), $16,443 67-70-71-73 +1 Robert Streb (24), $16,443 70-70-72-69 +1 Boo Weekley (24), $16,443 69-70-70-72 +1 Ryuji Imada (20), $14,268 71-69-71-71 +2 Kevin Kisner (20), $14,268 65-72-70-75 +2 John Rollins (20), $14,268 70-69-69-74 +2 Zach Johnson (15), $13,241 64-74-74-71 +3 Benjamin Alvarado (15), $13,241 68-72-70-73 +3 Stuart Appleby (15), $13,241 65-74-72-72 +3 Woody Austin (15), $13,241 68-71-72-72 +3 Miguel Angel Carballo (15), $13,241 68-70-74-71 +3 Stewart Cink (15), $13,241 70-66-75-72 +3 Jeff Overton (15), $13,241 68-71-72-72 +3 Freddie Jacobson (10), $12,644 67-71-73-73 +4 Martin Laird (10), $12,644 70-67-76-71 +4 Greg Owen (10), $12,644 70-70-70-74 +4 John Merrick (8), $12,354 70-68-77-70 +5 LPGA Manulife Financial Classic Leading Scores Sunday At Grey Silo Golf Course Waterloo, Ontario Purse: $1.5 million Yardage: 6,336; Par: 71 Final Inbee Park, $225,000 69-66-65-61 261 -23 Cristie Kerr, $136,903 67-69-65-63 264 -20 Shanshan Feng, $99,314 66-65-67-68 266 -18 Belen Mozo, $69,332 68-67-68-65 268 -16 Lydia Ko, $69,332 71-67-64-66 268 -16 Stacy Lewis, $46,471 69-69-68-63 269 -15 Michelle Wie, $46,471 65-67-68-69 269 -15 Chella Choi, $35,229 70-69-67-64 270 -14 Suzann Pettersen, $35,229 70-67-67-66 270 -14 Caroline Masson, $27,320 69-67-70-65 271 -13 So Yeon Ryu, $27,320 68-67-70-66 271 -13 Hee Young Park, $27,320 65-66-72-68 271 -13 Anna Nordqvist, $27,320 69-64-69-69 271 -13 Na Yeon Choi, $23,086 68-67-68-69 272 -12 Catriona Matthew, $19,638 71-67-70-65 273 -11 Line Vedel, $19,638 69-70-69-65 273 -11 Mirim Lee, $19,638 69-73-65-66 273 -11 Meena Lee, $19,638 70-67-68-68 273 -11 Angela Stanford, $19,638 71-67-67-68 273 -11 Austin Ernst, $16,340 69-69-70-66 274 -10 Julieta Granada, $16,340 72-69-67-66 274 -10 Marina Alex, $16,340 68-68-71-67 274 -10 Candie Kung, $16,340 70-68-65-71 274 -10 Karine Icher, $12,320 69-71-72-63 275 -9 Louise Friberg, $12,320 72-69-70-64 275 -9 Joanna Klatten, $12,320 70-70-70-65 275 -9 Jaye Marie Green, $12,320 70-68-70-67 275 -9 Paz Echeverria, $12,320 68-71-68-68 275 -9 Mi Jung Hur, $12,320 73-68-66-68 275 -9 Jennifer Johnson, $12,320 70-68-69-68 275 -9 Danielle Kang, $12,320 71-68-67-69 275 -9 Jennifer Rosales, $12,320 69-72-65-69 275 -9 Jee Young Lee, $12,320 68-68-69-70 275 -9 Thidapa Suwannapura, $12,320 72-66-67-70 275 -9 Gerina Piller, $9,032 73-70-69-64 276 -8 Alejandra Llaneza, $9,032 68-71-70-67 276 -8 Sue Kim, $9,032 71-70-67-68 276 -8 Anya Alvarez, $9,032 71-66-70-69 276 -8 Katie M. Burnett, $7,345 73-69-70-65 277 -7 Christel Boeljon, $7,345 75-68-66-68 277 -7 Jane Park, $7,345 70-68-71-68 277 -7 Kris Tamulis, $7,345 69-73-66-69 277 -7 Tiffany Joh, $7,345 72-68-67-70 277 -7 Xi Yu Lin, $7,345 67-67-71-72 277 -7 Giulia Molinaro, $5,921 71-70-70-67 278 -6 a-Brooke M. Henderson, 70-71-69-68 278 -6 Laura Davies, $5,921 71-71-67-69 278 -6 Haru Nomura, $5,921 68-70-71-69 278 -6 Morgan Pressel, $5,921 71-68-69-70 278 -6 Alena Sharp, $5,921 73-69-65-71 278 -6 P.K. Kongkraphan, $5,022 72-67-76-64 279 -5 Jacqui Concolino, $5,022 68-68-74-69 279 -5 Katie Futcher, $5,022 72-66-70-71 279 -5 Megan McChrystal, $5,022 70-71-66-72 279 -5 Jennifer Kirby, $4,422 71-70-69-70 280 -4 Ilhee Lee, $4,422 69-73-68-70 280 -4 Mi Hyang Lee, $4,422 70-71-68-71 280 -4 Kristy McPherson, $4,422 68-68-73-71 280 -4 Maria Hernandez, $3,663 72-71-69-69 281 -3 Brittany Lang, $3,663 72-71-69-69 281 -3 Moira Dunn, $3,663 68-71-72-70 281 -3 Pernilla Lindberg, $3,663 78-64-69-70 281 -3 Ji Young Oh, $3,663 72-68-71-70 281 -3 Jeong Jang, $3,663 70-72-68-71 281 -3 think he deserves to win this tournament, Na dal said. I am sure he will do it in the future. Djokovic had won their four most recent matches, including on clay in the best-ofthree-set nal at Rome last month, but beating Nadal in the best-of-ve format at the French Open is a whole other matter. Nadal also beat Djokovic in the 2012 nal, and the 2013 semi nals. In all, Nadal leads Djokovic 6-0 at the French Open, 9-3 at ma jor tournaments, and 23-19 in total. No other pair of men has played each other as often. For 3 1/2 hours Sun day, when the sky was crystal clear and the temperature touched 80 degrees), Djokov ic gave everything he had, even spitting up on court in the nal set. I played at the max imum of my power, my strength, and my capa bility, Djokovic said, but Rafa was the best player on the court. Using his backhand to great effect against Nadals forehand ear ly, Djokovic grabbed the rst set, and got to 5-all in the second. That is when everything changed. Knowing that overcoming a two-set hole might be too much even for him, Nadal raised his level, taking 20 of 26 points to claim that set and a 3-0 lead in the third. When a down-theline forehand winner ended the second set, Nadal leaped and shook both sts, his rst sign of real emo tion. Djokovic, mean while, was his usu al animated self. He rapped his knuckles on his temple. He chas tised himself aloud. He spiked his racket, drawing whistles from spectators. The momentum went (to) his side, Djokovic said. I started playing quite bad and didnt move as well. Struggled a little bit physically throughout that third set. OPEN FROM PAGE B1 had debris on his grille and a hot engine, with ve laps remaining in the 400-mile race. Ke selowski was second for the second straight race. Earnhardt won the Daytona 500 and now has multiple wins in a season for the rst time since 2004. Keselowski has a runner-up nish to go with his 95 laps led. Kurt Busch, Den ny Hamlin and rookie Kyle Larson round out the top ve. Earnhardt gives Hendrick Motorsports three straight wins, following back-toback victories by Jimmie Johnson. Johnson overcame a pit road mishap to nish sixth. I dont have much to do tomorrow, a grinning Earnhardt said. Tonights going to be a long one. Keselowski had the car to beat in his No. 2 Ford when a piece of trash stuck to his grille. He appeared to yield the lead to Earnhardt in an attempt to clean off the front grille and not lose time. He stalked Earnhardt down the stretch, but could nev er recover, losing his shot at his second win of the season. I was trying to make a move to clean it off, Keselowski said. I realized I made a mis take. His misjudgment worked out just ne for Earnhardt. NASCAR FROM PAGE B1 threw a scoreless eighth for the win. Hernandez reached 1,800 career strikeouts when he struck out Evan Longoria to end the third. Hernandez struck out six through three innings, and 11 though ve. This was the right-handers 29th dou ble-digit strikeout per formance, which moved him past Mark Langston into sole possession of second place on the Mariners career list. Rays starter Chris Ar cher gave up ve hits over 6 1/3 scoreless in nings. He is just 1-1 over his last ve starts de spite allowing just three runs in 31 innings. The Mariners loaded the bases with one out in the fth, but failed to score. Archer got a forceout at the plate af ter making a stumbling grab on Jones comebacker before left eld er Matt Joyce made a one-handed at the wall on Robinson Canos opposite-eld drive. Cano extended his road hitting streak to 17 games with a oneout ineld single in the eighth. NOTES: After Mon days game at Tampa Bay, the Mariners return home Tuesday night to open a threegame series with a ter ric pitching matchup. RHP Hisashi Iwakuma (4-2, 2.66 ERA) and RHP Masahiro Tanaka (9-1, 2.02 ERA), former teammates with Rakuten of Japans Pacic League, are the scheduled starters. Thats a match up that I would pay to see, Seattle manager Lloyd McClendon said. I think it will be a dandy. The Mariners will also honor Yankees SS Der ek Jeter, who is retiring. RAYS FROM PAGE B1 obviously built a nice lead to start out with. Troy Merritt was second after a 71. Webb Simpson (65), Matt Ev ery (70) and Carl Pettersson (69) were 8 un der, and Ian Poulter had a 64 to tie for sixth at 7 under. Merritt credited the best nish of his career to an improved short game. Ben played great, Merritt said. Hats off to him. Well deserved. Hes been struggling for a lit tle while. Very happy for Ben. Phil Mickelson, among those tuning up for the U.S. Open at Pinehurst, left winless in his 20th event since the British Open. He tied for 11th at 6 under after a 72. Consecutive birdies on Nos. 11 and 12 put Mick elson at 8 under. But he bogeyed the next two, including the par-3 14th where he hit a 7-iron into the water in front of the green. He still nished much better than his tie for 49th at Memorial last week after an early visit from FBI agents and lingering questions about an insider-trading inves tigation. The way I drove the ball last two rounds I had an opportunity to shoot really low, Mick elson said. My iron play was poor, and my putting was pathetic. Ill have to make some changes and to get ready for next week. But the game is not far off because Im driving the ball very well and putting it in play. Wind, thunderstorms, lightning and fog have delayed play each of the rst three days. With more storms forecast, players started the nal round almost immediately after concluding the third. They nished without single delay Sunday as the sun even came out as this tournament n ished its 57th year with out being shortened be cause of weather. GOLF FROM PAGE B1 whole send-off series should give us con dence, defender Matt Besler said Saturday night. Its been a grind but at the end of the day, we accomplished everything we set out to do, and thats to get three wins. Thats really all that matters. The Americans were scheduled to travel from Jacksonville, Florida, to Miami on Sunday, then board a commercial ight for the roughly ninehour trip to Sao Paulo, South Americas larg est city with a popula tion of about 11.3 mil lion. They will base at a downtown hotel. The Americans open on June 16 against Ghana, a team similar in style to Nigeria. Thats the reason why we played this game, to kind of hopefully see maybe some of the things that Ghana will do, Altidore said. Obviously, it wont be the same. But we hope we take the things that we did well today to the Gha na game and try to use that to our advantage. Going by FIFA rankings, the Americans Group G was the most difcult to come out of Decembers draw. But in the June rank ings, it became the second-toughest with Ger many (No. 2), Portugal (No. 4), the U.S. (No. 13) and Ghana (No. 37) adding to 56. Group D was slightly lower at 53, with Uruguay (No. 7), It aly (No. 8) and England (No. 10) and Costa Rica (No. 28). U.S. coach Jurgen Klinsmann knows de fense is a key for an American team that constantly went behind during the 2010 tournament. SOCCER FROM PAGE B1

PAGE 11

Monday, June 9, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Toronto 38 26 .594 6-4 L-2 19-15 19-11 Baltimore 31 30 .508 5 1 5-5 L-1 12-14 19-16 New York 31 31 .500 6 2 3-7 L-2 13-16 18-15 Boston 27 34 .443 9 5 5-5 L-5 15-17 12-17 Tampa Bay 24 40 .375 14 10 1-9 L-2 13-18 11-22 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 33 25 .569 4-6 W-2 16-14 17-11 Cleveland 32 31 .508 3 1 8-2 W-2 21-11 11-20 Kansas City 31 32 .492 4 2 6-4 W-2 16-16 15-16 Chicago 31 33 .484 5 3 4-6 L-3 17-14 14-19 Minnesota 29 32 .475 5 3 5-5 L-1 15-17 14-15 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 39 24 .619 7-3 W-1 17-12 22-12 Los Angeles 34 28 .548 4 5-5 W-3 18-13 16-15 Seattle 33 29 .532 5 7-3 W-2 14-15 19-14 Texas 31 32 .492 8 2 4-6 L-2 15-17 16-15 Houston 28 36 .438 11 6 6-4 W-1 14-18 14-18 NATIONAL LEAGUEEAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 32 29 .525 4-6 L-2 18-14 14-15 Washington 32 29 .525 7-3 W-1 19-15 13-14 Miami 33 30 .524 5-5 W-1 22-11 11-19 New York 28 35 .444 5 5 3-7 L-6 13-17 15-18 Philadelphia 25 36 .410 7 7 2-8 L-2 12-19 13-17 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 38 26 .594 6-4 W-2 19-13 19-13 St. Louis 33 31 .516 5 4-6 W-2 16-14 17-17 Cincinnati 29 32 .475 7 3 6-4 W-2 15-15 14-17 Pittsburgh 29 33 .468 8 3 6-4 L-2 17-15 12-18 Chicago 25 35 .417 11 6 6-4 L-1 15-14 10-21 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY San Francisco 42 21 .667 8-2 W-5 22-9 20-12 Los Angeles 33 31 .508 10 1 3-7 L-1 13-19 19-12 Colorado 29 33 .475 12 3 2-8 W-1 17-11 12-21 San Diego 28 35 .444 14 5 4-6 L-1 16-19 12-16 Arizona 28 37 .431 15 6 6-4 W-2 11-23 17-14 SATURDAYS GAMESSt. Louis 5, Toronto 0 Minnesota 8, Houston 0 Cleveland 8, Texas 3 Seattle 7, Tampa Bay 4 Detroit 8, Boston 6 Kansas City 8, N.Y. Yankees 4 Baltimore 6, Oakland 3 L.A. Angels 6, Chicago White Sox 5SATURDAYS GAMESSt. Louis 5, Toronto 0 Chicago Cubs 5, Miami 2 Milwaukee 9, Pittsburgh 3 Colorado 5, L.A. Dodgers 4, 10 innings Cincinnati 6, Philadelphia 5 San Francisco 5, N.Y. Mets 4 Arizona 4, Atlanta 3, 11 innings San Diego 4, Washington 3, 11 inningsSUNDAYS GAMESSt. Louis 5, Toronto 0 Oakland 11, Baltimore 1 Seattle 5, Tampa Bay 0 Houston 14, Minnesota 5 Kansas City 2, N.Y. Yankees 1 Cleveland 3, Texas 2 L.A. Angels 4, Chicago White Sox 2 Boston at Detroit, 8:07 p.m.SUNDAYS GAMESSt. Louis 5, Toronto 0 Cincinnati 4, Philadelphia 1 Milwaukee 1, Pittsburgh 0 Miami 4, Chicago Cubs 3 San Francisco 6, N.Y. Mets 4 Arizona 6, Atlanta 5 Washington 6, San Diego 0 L.A. Dodgers6, Colorado 1 (6)TODAYS GAMESSeattle (E.Ramirez 1-4) at Tampa Bay (Price 4-5), 1:10 p.m. Boston (Peavy 1-3) at Baltimore (B.Norris 4-5), 7:05 p.m. Minnesota (Nolasco 4-5) at Toronto (Dickey 6-4), 7:07 p.m. Cleveland (House 0-1) at Texas (N.Martinez 1-2), 8:05 p.m. Detroit (Porcello 8-3) at Chicago White Sox (Noesi 1-4), 8:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Nuno 1-2) at Kansas City (Vargas 5-2), 8:10 p.m. Houston (Cosart 4-5) at Arizona (Collmenter 4-2), 9:40 p.m. Oakland (J.Chavez 5-3) at L.A. Angels (Richards 5-2), 10:05 p.m.TODAYS GAMESChicago Cubs (E.Jackson 4-5) at Pittsburgh (Morton 2-7), 7:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Haren 5-4) at Cincinnati (Cingrani 2-6), 7:10 p.m. Atlanta (Floyd 0-2) at Colorado (Bergman 0-0), 8:40 p.m. Houston (Cosart 4-5) at Arizona (Collmenter 4-2), 9:40 p.m. Washington (Strasburg 5-4) at San Francisco (Vogelsong 4-2), 10:15 p.m.AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Cano, Seattle, .332; VMartinez, Detroit, .329; Rios, Texas, .328; MiCabrera, Detroit, .321; AlRamirez, Chicago, .321; Altuve, Houston, .315; Bautista, Toronto, .313. RUNS: Donaldson, Oakland, 51; Dozier, Minnesota, 50; Bautista, Toronto, 48; Kinsler, Detroit, 43; NCruz, Bal timore, 42; MeCabrera, Toronto, 41; Encarnacion, Toronto, 41. RBI: NCruz, Baltimore, 55; MiCabrera, Detroit, 51; Donaldson, Oakland, 50; Encarnacion, Toronto, 50; Moss, Oakland, 49; JAbreu, Chicago, 47; Bautista, Toronto, 44. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 84; MeCabrera, Toronto, 81; Rios, Texas, 79; Markakis, Baltimore, 78; AlRamirez, Chicago, 77; AJones, Baltimore, 76; Cano, Seattle, 75. DOUBLES: Plouffe, Minnesota, 22; MiCabrera, Detroit, 20; Hosmer, Kansas City, 20; Altuve, Houston, 19; Kins ler, Detroit, 19; Pedroia, Boston, 19; EEscobar, Minne sota, 18; AGordon, Kansas City, 18. TRIPLES: Rios, Texas, 6; Bourn, Cleveland, 5; Trout, Los Angeles, 5; 12 tied at 3. HOME RUNS: NCruz, Baltimore, 21; Encarnacion, Toronto, 19; JAbreu, Chicago, 17; Donaldson, Oakland, 17; Bautista, Toronto, 15; Moss, Oakland, 15; Pujols, Los Angeles, 15. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 21; Ellsbury, New York, 18; RDavis, Detroit, 16; AEscobar, Kansas City, 16; Andrus, Texas, 14; Gardner, New York, 14; Dozier, Minnesota, 13; LMartin, Texas, 13. PITCHING: Buehrle, Toronto, 10-2; Tanaka, New York, 9-1; FHernandez, Seattle, 8-1; Porcello, Detroit, 8-3; Scherzer, Detroit, 7-2; Keuchel, Houston, 7-3; Weaver, Los Angeles, 7-4. ERA: Tanaka, New York, 2.02; Buehrle, Toronto, 2.04; Darvish, Texas, 2.36; Kazmir, Oakland, 2.40; Keuchel, Houston, 2.50; FHernandez, Seattle, 2.57; Gray, Oakland, 2.83. STRIKEOUTS: Price, Tampa Bay, 101; Kluber, Cleveland, 99; Scherzer, Detroit, 98; Lester, Boston, 95; Tanaka, New York, 92; Darvish, Texas, 91; FHernandez, Seattle, 91. SAVES_Holland, Kansas City, 17; Rodney, Seattle, 17; Perkins, Minnesota, 16; DavRobertson, New York, 14. NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Tulowitzki, Colorado, .360; Puig, Los Angeles, .335; Lucroy, Milwaukee, .327; MaAdams, St. Louis, .325; Pagan, San Francisco, .323; Utley, Philadelphia, .319; CGomez, Milwaukee, .308. RUNS: Tulowitzki, Colorado, 50; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 46; Pence, San Francisco, 45; Stanton, Miami, 45; CGo mez, Milwaukee, 42; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 41; Rendon, Washington, 40. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 53; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 44; Morse, San Francisco, 42; Howard, Philadelphia, 41; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 41; Blackmon, Colorado, 40; Puig, Los Angeles, 40. HITS: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 76; DanMurphy, New York, 76; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 74; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 73; DWright, New York, 73; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 72; Pence, San Francisco, 72; Puig, Los Angeles, 72. DOUBLES: Utley, Philadelphia, 24; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 23; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 21; Byrd, Philadelphia, 18; Are nado, Colorado, 17; KDavis, Milwaukee, 17; CGomez, Milwaukee, 17; Phillips, Cincinnati, 17; HRamirez, Los Angeles, 17. TRIPLES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 6; Yelich, Miami, 5; Pollock, Arizona, 4; Rendon, Washington, 4. HOME RUNS: Stanton, Miami, 17; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 16; Frazier, Cincinnati, 13; Morse, San Francisco, 13; Reynolds, Milwaukee, 13; JUpton, Atlanta, 13. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 36; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 23; EYoung, New York, 17; Revere, Philadel phia, 16; Bonifacio, Chicago, 13; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 13; Blackmon, Colorado, 12; ECabrera, San Diego, 12. PITCHING: Greinke, Los Angeles, 8-2; Wainwright, St. Louis, 8-3; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 8-3; Simon, Cincin nati, 8-3; Ryu, Los Angeles, 7-2; Lohse, Milwaukee, 7-2. ERA: Teheran, Atlanta, 1.89; Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.97; Hudson, San Francisco, 1.97; Cashner, San Diego, 2.13; Wainwright, St. Louis, 2.31; Hammel, Chicago, 2.53. STRIKEOUTS: Strasburg, Washington, 101; Cueto, Cincinnati, 97; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 90. SAVES: Romo, San Francisco, 19; FrRodriguez, Milwaukee, 18; Street, San Diego, 18; Jansen, Los Angeles 17. Kimbrel, Atlanta, 16; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 16. Mariners 5, Rays 0 Seattle T ampa Bay ab r h bi ab r h bi EnChvz lf 5 1 2 1 DJnngs cf 3 0 1 0 J.Jones cf 5 1 2 2 Kier mr rf 4 0 1 0 Cano 2b 4 1 1 0 Longori 3b 4 0 0 0 Seager 3b 5 0 1 2 Lone y 1b 4 0 0 0 Zunino c 4 0 0 0 Zobrist 2b 4 0 1 0 Ackley dh 4 0 0 0 DeJess dh 2 0 1 0 Gillespi rf 4 0 2 0 Jo yce lf 3 0 0 0 BMiller ss 2 1 1 0 YEscor ss 3 0 0 0 Blmqst 1b 3 1 1 0 JMolin c 2 0 0 0 Smoak 1b 0 0 0 0 F orsyth ph 1 0 0 0 Solis c 0 0 0 0 Totals 36 5 10 5 T otals 30 0 4 0 Seattle 000 000 005 5 Tampa Bay 000 000 000 0 EZobrist (5). DPSeattle 1. LOBSeattle 9, Tampa Bay 5. 2BSeager (13), DeJesus (13). 3BJ.Jones (3), B.Miller (1). SBCano (5), De.Jennings (12), Zobrist (4). SB.Miller. IP H R ER BB SO Seattle F.Hernandez 7 4 0 0 1 15 Medina W,3-1 1 0 0 0 1 0 Leone 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Furbush 2/3 0 0 0 0 2 Tampa Bay Archer 6 1/3 5 0 0 1 2 McGee 2/3 0 0 0 0 1 Jo.Peralta 1 1 0 0 0 1 Balfour L,0-2 1 4 5 5 2 2 HBPby Archer (Zunino). WPF.Hernandez 2. UmpiresHome, Todd Tichenor; First, Clint Fagan; Second, Tim Timmons; Third, Tim Welke. T:10. A,158 (31,042). Royals 2, Yankees 1 Ne w York Kansas City ab r h bi ab r h bi Gardnr lf 5 0 2 0 Aoki rf 2 0 0 0 Jeter ss 4 0 0 0 Dyson cf 1 0 0 0 Ellsury cf 4 0 1 0 Infante 2b 3 0 1 0 Beltran dh 3 0 0 0 Hosmer 1b 3 0 0 0 McCnn c 4 0 0 0 BButler dh 3 0 0 0 Solarte 3b 4 1 2 0 A Gordn lf 2 0 0 0 ISuzuki rf 4 0 2 1 S.P erez c 3 1 1 0 BRorts 2b 3 0 1 0 L.Cain cf-rf 3 1 1 1 KJhnsn 1b 3 0 0 0 Mostks 3b 3 0 1 1 Teixeir ph 1 0 0 0 AEscor ss 3 0 1 0 Totals 35 1 8 1 T otals 26 2 5 2 New York 000 001 000 1 Kansas City 020 000 00x 2 DPNew York 3. LOBNew York 9, Kansas City 2. 2BEllsbury (15), Solarte (14), B.Roberts (8), L.Cain (8). 3BGardner (4). CSInfante (1). IP H R ER BB SO New York Kuroda L,4-4 7 5 2 2 2 3 Warren 1 0 0 0 0 0 Kansas City Shields W,7-3 6 6 1 0 2 8 Crow H,6 1 1 0 0 0 1 W.Davis H,10 1 0 0 0 0 2 G.Holland S,18-19 1 1 0 0 0 1 WPShields, G.Holland. PBS.Perez. UmpiresHome, Mike DiMuro; First, Mike Estabrook; Second, Bob Davidson; Third, Jerry Layne. T:48. A,614 (37,903). Angels 6, White Sox 5 Chicago Los Angeles ab r h bi ab r h bi Eaton cf 5 1 2 1 HKndrc 2b 4 1 1 0 GBckh 2b 3 0 1 1 T rout cf 3 1 1 4 Gillaspi 3b 4 0 2 0 Pujols 1b 4 0 0 0 JAreu 1b 4 0 0 0 F reese 3b 4 0 1 0 A.Dunn dh 4 1 1 1 JMcDnl 3b 0 0 0 0 AlRmrz ss 3 2 1 0 JHmltn lf 4 1 3 0 Viciedo rf 4 0 0 0 Cron dh 4 0 1 0 Sierra rf 0 0 0 0 A ybar ss 4 1 2 1 De Aza lf 3 1 2 2 Iannett c 4 1 1 1 Flowrs c 3 0 0 0 Cowgill rf 3 1 0 0 Totals 33 5 9 5 T otals 34 6 10 6 Chicago 002 102 000 5 Los Angeles 000 000 06x 6 EAl.Ramirez (6), Gillaspie (5), Aybar (5), Shoemaker (1). DPChicago 2, Los Angeles 2. LOBChicago 5, Los Angeles 5. 2BGillaspie (14), De Aza 2 (7), Aybar (17). HRA.Dunn (11), Trout (12). SBJ.Hamilton (2). SFlowers. SFDe Aza. IP H R ER BB SO Chicago Sale 7 7 5 4 1 6 Petricka L,0-1 1 3 1 1 0 1 Los Angeles Shoemaker 5 9 4 3 0 6 Morin 1 0 1 0 1 1 Cor.Rasmus W,1-0 2 0 0 0 1 3 Frieri S,9-11 1 0 0 0 0 2 Shoemaker pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Sale pitched to 5 batters in the 8th. UmpiresHome, Phil Cuzzi; First, Gerry Davis; Sec ond, Quinn Wolcott; Third, Greg Gibson. T:53. A,089 (45,483). Athletics 11, Orioles 1 Oakland Baltimore ab r h bi ab r h bi Jaso dh 6 1 2 4 Mar kks rf 3 0 1 0 Punto ss 3 1 2 2 Machd 3b 3 0 0 0 Dnldsn 3b 5 1 0 0 CJosph ph-1b 0 1 0 0 Sogard 2b 0 0 0 0 A.Jones cf 2 0 0 0 Moss lf 3 1 1 4 Lough cf 1 0 1 0 Cespds cf 5 0 2 0 N.Cr uz lf 3 0 1 0 Vogt rf-c 5 0 0 0 D Yong lf 1 0 1 0 DNorrs c 1 2 0 0 C.Da vis 1b-3b 3 0 0 1 Gentry rf 2 1 1 0 Hardy ss 3 0 0 0 Callasp 2b-3b 3 3 1 0 Flahr ty ss 1 0 0 0 Blanks 1b 2 1 1 1 P earce dh 4 0 2 0 Schoop 2b 4 0 0 0 Hundly c 4 0 0 0 Totals 35 11 10 11 T otals 32 1 6 1 Oakland 006 130 001 11 Baltimore 000 000 010 1 EHardy (6). DPOakland 1, Baltimore 3. LOBOakland 8, Baltimore 8. 2BJaso (8), Callaspo (7), Pearce (6). HRMoss (16). IP H R ER BB SO Oakland Kazmir W,7-2 7 4 0 0 2 7 Abad 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 Cook 1/3 2 1 1 2 0 Otero 1 0 0 0 0 0 Baltimore U.Jimenez L,2-7 2 1/3 2 6 6 5 2 Brach 2 4 4 4 5 0 McFarland 4 2/3 4 1 1 1 3 UmpiresHome, Adrian Johnson; First, Gabe Mo rales; Second, Larry Vanover; Third, Angel Hernandez. T:27. A,244 (45,971). Astros 14, Twins 5 Houston Minnesota ab r h bi ab r h bi Fowler cf 5 2 2 2 DSantn cf 5 0 1 0 Altuve 2b 3 0 1 1 Dozier 2b 2 2 1 0 Springr rf 3 2 1 1 Plouffe 3b 4 1 2 1 Singltn 1b 6 2 2 4 Wlngh lf 3 0 1 2 MDmn 3b 5 1 0 0 Arcia dh 4 0 0 0 Grssmn lf 3 3 2 0 Nunez rf 5 1 3 2 Carter dh 4 2 1 4 P armel 1b 5 0 1 0 Corprn c 4 1 1 1 Pinto c 4 0 1 0 Villar ss 5 1 3 1 EEscor ss 3 1 0 0 Totals 38 14 13 14 T otals 35 5 10 5 Houston 011 300 414 14 Minnesota 000 120 200 5 EPinto (5), Dozier (4). DPHouston 1, Minnesota 2. LOBHouston 9, Minnesota 11. 2BSingleton (1), Grossman (4), Dozier (11). HRFowler (4), Springer (12), Singleton (2), Carter (10), Nunez (2). SBAltuve 2 (23), Grossman (3). SFAltuve, Willingham. IP H R ER BB SO Houston McHugh 4 1/3 3 3 3 5 6 Fields 1 2/3 3 0 0 0 4 Farnsworth 1/3 2 2 2 2 0 D.Downs W,1-0 2 2/3 2 0 0 0 2 Minnesota Deduno L,2-4 3 3 5 5 4 1 Swarzak 3 3 0 0 2 2 Duensing 1 3 4 4 2 1 Fien 1 2 1 1 0 3 Perkins 1 2 4 0 0 2 Deduno pitched to 3 batters in the 4th. HBPby Perkins (Springer), by Deduno (Altuve, Carter). WPMcHugh. UmpiresHome, Ted Barrett; First, Paul Schrieber; Second, Will Little; Third, Alfonso Marquez. T:45. A,576 (39,021). Marlins 4, Cubs 3 Miami Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi Yelich lf 4 1 2 0 Bonifac 2b 4 0 3 0 Lucas 2b 5 0 1 0 Lak e cf 5 0 1 0 Stanton rf 3 1 0 0 Rizzo 1b 4 0 0 0 McGeh 3b 3 1 1 0 SCastro ss 5 1 1 0 GJones 1b 3 0 0 1 V aluen 3b 3 1 1 1 Ozuna cf 3 1 1 0 Schrhlt rf 4 0 1 2 Realmt c 4 0 1 1 Coghln lf 3 0 1 0 Morris p 0 0 0 0 JoBakr c 3 0 1 0 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 Ar rieta p 2 0 0 0 Hchvrr ss 4 0 1 1 Schlittr p 0 0 0 0 HAlvrz p 2 0 1 0 Bar ney ph 0 1 0 0 DJnngs p 0 0 0 0 Strop p 0 0 0 0 RJhnsn ph 1 0 0 0 Ruggin ph 1 0 0 0 ARams p 0 0 0 0 Grimm p 0 0 0 0 MDunn p 0 0 0 0 Mathis c 1 0 0 0 Totals 33 4 8 3 T otals 34 3 9 3 Miami 000 000 220 4 Chicago 000 002 100 3 EG.Jones (8), Coghlan (1). DPMiami 1, Chicago 1. LOBMiami 7, Chicago 10. 2BLake (10), S.Castro (17), Valbuena (14). 3BSchierholtz (3). SBYelich 2 (10). CSBonifacio (5). SBonifacio, Jo.Baker. SFG.Jones. IP H R ER BB SO Miami H.Alvarez 5 1/3 7 2 1 0 5 Da.Jennings 2/3 1 0 0 0 1 A.Ramos 2/3 1 1 1 1 1 M.Dunn W,5-3 2/3 0 0 0 2 1 Morris H,6 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 Cishek S,14-15 1 0 0 0 0 2 Chicago Arrieta 6 3 0 0 0 7 Schlitter BS,1-1 1 3 2 2 1 0 Strop L,0-3 BS,1-3 1 1 2 2 2 2 Grimm 1 1 0 0 0 1 HBPby A.Ramos (Barney), by Strop (Stanton). WPStrop. UmpiresHome, Marcus Pattillo; First, David Rackley; Second, Brian Gorman; Third, Tony Randazzo. T:18. A,134 (41,072). Reds 4, Phillies 1 Philadelphia Cincinnati ab r h bi ab r h bi Revere cf 3 1 1 0 BHmltn cf 4 1 1 2 Rollins ss 3 0 1 0 Schmkr lf 4 0 0 0 Utley 2b 3 0 0 1 Phillips 2b 3 0 1 0 Howard 1b 4 0 1 0 Br uce rf 3 0 1 0 Byrd rf 4 0 1 0 Mesorc c 3 0 0 0 DBrwn lf 4 0 1 0 F razier 3b 3 1 1 0 Ruiz c 4 0 1 0 Lutz 1b 3 0 0 0 CHrndz 3b 4 0 0 0 Cozar t ss 3 1 1 0 Buchnn p 2 0 0 0 Baile y p 3 1 1 2 GwynJ ph 0 0 0 0 A Chpm p 0 0 0 0 Bastrd p 0 0 0 0 Mayrry ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 32 1 6 1 T otals 29 4 6 4 Philadelphia 001 000 000 1 Cincinnati 000 040 00x 4 DPPhiladelphia 1. LOBPhiladelphia 8, Cincinnati 2. 2BCozart (10). HRB.Hamilton (2). SBRevere (17), Rollins (8). CSPhillips (3). SFUtley. IP H R ER BB SO Philadelphia Buchanan L,1-3 6 6 4 4 0 6 Bastardo 2 0 0 0 0 2 Cincinnati Bailey W,7-3 8 6 1 1 3 7 A.Chapman S,9-10 1 0 0 0 0 3 HBPby Buchanan (Phillips). WPBailey. UmpiresHome, Paul Nauert; First, Tom Hallion; Sec ond, Sean Barber; Third, Chris Guccione. T:40. A,222 (42,319). Brewers 1, Pirates 0 Milw aukee Pittsburgh ab r h bi ab r h bi Segura ss 4 0 0 0 JHr rsn rf 5 0 0 0 Braun rf 4 0 0 0 NW alkr 2b 2 0 0 0 Lucroy c 4 1 3 0 AMcCt cf 4 0 2 0 CGomz cf 4 0 1 0 GSnchz 1b 4 0 0 0 ArRmr 3b 3 0 0 1 RMar tn c 3 0 1 0 KDavis lf 3 0 0 0 CStwr t c 0 0 0 0 RWeks 2b 2 0 0 0 P Alvrz 3b 4 0 0 0 MrRynl 1b 3 0 0 0 SMar te lf 3 0 0 0 Gallard p 2 0 0 0 Mercer ss 3 0 1 0 Falu ph 1 0 0 0 I.Da vis ph 0 0 0 0 Wooten p 0 0 0 0 Bar mes pr 0 0 0 0 FrRdrg p 0 0 0 0 Lock e p 2 0 1 0 T abata ph 1 0 0 0 W atson p 0 0 0 0 Grilli p 0 0 0 0 Snider ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 30 1 4 1 T otals 32 0 5 0 Milwaukee 000 000 100 1 Pittsburgh 000 000 000 0 ESegura (8). DPMilwaukee 2. LOBMilwaukee 3, Pittsburgh 10. 2BLucroy 2 (23), A.McCutchen (17). SBLucroy (3), S.Marte (14). CSR.Weeks (2). IP H R ER BB SO Milwaukee Gallardo W,4-4 7 4 0 0 1 8 Wooten H,5 2/3 1 0 0 0 0 Fr.Rodriguez S,19-21 1 1/3 0 0 0 2 1 Pittsburgh Locke L,0-1 7 3 1 1 1 5 Watson 1 0 0 0 0 0 Grilli 1 1 0 0 0 0 HBPby Gallardo (N.Walker, R.Martin). UmpiresHome, Ed Hickox; First, Lance Barrett; Second, John Tumpane; Third, Mike Everitt. T:57. A,002 (38,362). Cardinals 5, Blue Jays 0 St. Louis T oronto ab r h bi ab r h bi MCrpnt 3b 5 1 2 2 Re yes ss 4 0 1 0 Tavers rf 4 0 1 0 MeCar r lf 3 0 0 0 Grichk ph-rf 1 0 0 0 Bautist rf 3 0 0 0 YMolin dh 3 0 1 0 Encr nc 1b 3 0 0 0 Craig 1b 4 0 1 0 La wrie 3b 4 0 0 0 JhPerlt ss 4 1 2 1 StTllsn 2b 2 0 1 0 Jay lf 4 1 1 0 Gose ph 1 0 0 0 M.Ellis 2b 4 1 1 0 DNa vrr dh 4 0 0 0 Bourjos cf 3 0 1 1 Kratz c 3 0 1 0 T.Cruz c 4 1 1 1 Lind ph 1 0 1 0 Pillar cf 3 0 0 0 JF rncs ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 36 5 11 5 T otals 32 0 4 0 St. Louis 041 000 000 5 Toronto 000 000 000 0 EM.Carpenter (8), St.Tolleson (2). DPToronto 1. LOBSt. Louis 6, Toronto 9. 2BJh.Peralta (16), T.Cruz (2). HRM.Carpenter (2), Jh.Peralta (10). MIKE CARLSON / AP Tampa Bay Rays Evan Longoria reacts after striking out to end the third inning of a baseball game against the Seattle Mariners on Sunday in St. Petersburg. The Rays lost 5-0.

PAGE 12

B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 9, 2014 the top spot in the world ranking to Stacy Lewis, Park nished at 23-un der 261 at Grey Silo for her 10th LPGA Tour ti tle and rst since the U.S. Womens Open. She had only one bogey in 72 holes on the fourth hole in the rst round. The 25-year-old South Korean star played the front nine in 5-under 31 and added birdies on Nos. 10, 12-14 and 18 to match the course re cord set last year by Hee Young Park. Park ended a 20-event tour winless streak. Last year, she swept the rst three majors and nished the season with six victories. You Make the CALL!June 9-15This Weeks Leesburg Lightning ScheduleAlways FREE Admission! Rainout Information 352-234-4489 You Make the CALL!This Weeks Leesburg Lightning ScheduleAlways FREE Admission! Game Times: 7pm Weekdays Sun 5pm Answer on FridayTHE PLAY: With R1 on first and R2 on second and no outs, B3 attempts a bunt. The bunt goes way high into the air, but neither F1 or F5 can field it. All three runners advance. The defensive coach argues that an infield fly should have been called.Rainout Information 352-234-4489 Mon. 6/9..............no game Tues. 6/10............Winter Garden SqueezeWed. 6/11............@ Winter Garden SqueezeThurs. 6/12............Winter Garden SqueezeFri. 6/13............@ College Park FreedomSat. 6/14............College Park FreedomSun. 6/15............@ College Park Freedom HORSE RACING BETH HARRISAP Racing WriterNEW YORK California Chrome went home to the West Coast on Sunday with a ban daged right front foot and no Triple Crown after bumping another horse leaving the Belmont Stakes start ing gate. Steve Coburn, who co-owns California Chome, was still smart ing, too. He was irked Bel mont winner Tonalist didnt run in either of the rst two legs of the Triple Crown. After the race, he complained others took the cow ards way out by skip ping the Derby and/or the Preakness. A day later, Coburn was unrepentant. Its not fair to these horses that are run ning to entertain these people in all three legs of the Triple Crown, he said. Its not fair to them to have some body just show up at the last minute and run. I may have gone off half-cocked yester day, but thats the way I feel. Under Coburns premise, there would have been just three horses in the $1.5 mil lion Belmont, making it unlikely the third-largest crowd of 102,199 would have shown up or that a record $19,105,877 would have been wagered ontrack. California Chrome, General a Rod and Ride On Curlin were the only horses to run in the Derby, Preakness and Belmont. General a Rod nished seventh and Ride On Curlin did not nish. Art Sherman, the 77-year-old trainer of California Chrome, distanced himself from Coburns comments. Horses arent cowards and the people ar ent cowards, he said. He was at the heat of the moment. Dont for get hes a fairly new owner. Sometimes your emotions get in front of you. He hasnt been in the game long and hasnt had any bad luck. Coburn and Per ry Martin named their racing operation Dumb Ass Partners, with Cal ifornia Chrome the lone horse in their stable. The chestnut colt has earned $3,317,800 this year and brought a six-race winning streak into the Belmont.GOLF NBA AP PHOTO Anjali Ranadive, left, daughter of Sacramento Kings owner Vivek Ranadive, chats with NBA Commissioner Adam Silver at the NBA lottery on May 20 in New York. TIM REYNOLDSAP Basketball WriterSAN ANTONIO In the rst NBA Finals game of his reign as the leagues commissioner, Adam Silver had to deal with a sweltering arena. Compared to what hes gone through in re cent weeks, that seemed like a breeze. Speaking to The Asso ciated Press on Friday at an NBA Cares event, Silver said hes thrilled that the leagues attention can be on the champi onship series between the Miami Heat and San Antonio Spurs and not, as it was for so much of the post season, on the off-thecourt matters involving the banishment of Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling and now the looming sale of that franchise. No question, Sil ver said. In fairness to all the players and the t eams, they worked so hard to get to this mo ment and a hot build ing is part of the com petition in essence. And all those other things that weve been talking about the last several weeks are not. Posing for photos with Spurs players, coach Gregg Popovich, gener al manger R.C. Buford and others, Silver was all smiles when the cer emonial red ribbon was cut at the leagues lat est Learn & Play Cen ter at a San Antonio elementary school. Its the 897th time that the league has been involved with opening a facility like that, and an other similar event will be held in Miami when the series shifts there next week. Silver made no prediction, other than say ing he thinks the HeatSpurs matchup could be a long series. Associated Press WATERLOO, Ontario Inbee Park won the Manulife Financial Clas sic on Sunday for her rst LPGA Tour title in more than 11 months, matching the course record with a 10-under 61 for a three-stroke victory over Cristie Kerr. A week after losing Silver: Pleased, proud with attention on FinalsCalifornia Chrome heads home GARRY JONES / AP California Chromes exercise rider Willie Delgado holds California Chrome as his hoof is checked after coming in fourth at the Belmont Stakes on Saturday in Elmont, N.Y. Inbee Park wins Manulife Financial Classic DAVID CHIDLEY / THE CANADIAN PRESS Inbee Park kisses the trophy after winning the Manulife Financial LPGA Classic on Sunda in Waterloo, Ontario.

PAGE 13

LivingHealthySend your health news to features@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 9, 2014DIABETES: Insurance-sponsored program getting results / C2 Health check www.dailycommercial.com LOUIS DELUCA / MCT ABOVE, BELOW: Tattoo artist Cody Biggs works on a tattoo on the arm of Adam Metzger in Dallas, on May 15. Experts advise making sure you are up to date on your immunizations, especially hepatitis and tetanus, before getting a tattoo. LIZZIE JOHNSONMCTDALLAS Thir teen needles are si multaneously zing ing in and out of Adam Metzgers shoulder. The 27-year-old is unrufed. He stares unblinkingly out the storefront window of Taboo Tattoo, a studio in the Bishop Arts District. To his right, Cody Biggs shades blue into a square of the Texas state ag. His movements are sure, even. The buzzing suddenly falls silent. Biggs pauses to dunk the handpiece into a thimble-sized plastic cup of ink, then turns back to his canvas. Metzgers shoulder is pink and puffy, weeping streams of ink and blood. How are you doing, buddy? Biggs asks, rubbing on ointment in counterclockwise circles. It doesnt feel good, man, Metzger responds. But Ive denitely felt worse pain. Plenty of people know what hes been through. As of 2012, one in ve adults had a tattoo, up from 14 percent in 2008, a Harris Interactive Poll found. And when safety standards are followed, tattoos are usually trouble-free. But tattoos can pose health risks that many people might not consider: Unsterilized tools or contaminated ink can lead to infection, scarring, blood-borne diseases and other, less-obvious issues. Its becoming much more common, but you still have to be careful, says Dr. Bryan Wasson, an internal medicine phy sician at Baylor Scott & White Medical Center at Irving, Texas. A tattoo is like a minor surgery. You clean and shave the skin like youre going to operate. You use surgical tools. There are dangers. So be careful in your selection. During the procedure, a gun with needles punctures the top layer of the skin, depositing pigment in a deeper layer called the dermis. As the skin heals, the ink remains trapped below the surface. When you get a tattoo, you bleed, said Dr. Donna Casey, an internal medical specialist at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital. Because you are bleeding, anything in contact with the tattoo bacteria, viruses can get into the Tattoo health risksWhy you should do your research before heading to the studio SEE RISKS | C4 NICOLE BRODEURMCTSEATTLE Julie Lewis remem bers every last detail. The moving box she was carrying, the phone call, the doctor on the line telling her, You better sit down. You may have HIV, he told her. A blood transfusion Lewis received in 1984 hadnt been tested for the virus; Washington state law didnt require it until the following year. And the person who gave her the blood had AIDS. So Lewis needed to be tested, along with her husband and three children, aged two, four and six. Days later, Lewis was the only one found to be HIV positive with three to ve years to live. Do you have a living will? the doctor asked her. And are your things in order? And Im 32. What 32-year-old has a living will? Thirty years since the fateful trans fusion, Lewis, now 55, is alive and well. She and her husband, Scott, are grandparents to two baby boys. And their son, Ryan, 26, is a Gram my-winning producer and multimillionaire, thanks to his partnership with longtime friend Ben Haggerty, also known as Macklemore. To celebrate her survival, and to help others do the same, Lewis has launched the 30/30 Project, an effort to build 30 medical centers worldwide, and sustain them for 30 years. Lewis has partnered with Construc tion for Change, a Seattle nonprot that will construct the new medical facilities, starting with one in Mala wi, where one in 10 adults have HIV or AIDS. Julie Lewis has worked for Construction for Change for the last three years. Another agency, Partners in Health, will staff each center with She turned a death sentence into a fulfilling life At first I was just trying to get by day to day and then I pretty much decided to be best friends with denial. I didnt know what to do with three to five years.Julie LewisSEE LIFE | C2 WILDWOOD Area 13 family care council meeting scheduledThe Area 13 Family Care Council will meet from 10 a.m. to noon today at the Wildwood Agency for Persons with Disabilities ofce, 1601 W. Gulf Atlantic Highway (State Road 44) in Wildwood, for those interested in development disabilities and their families. For information about the Family Care Council, go to www. FCCFlorida.org.LEESBURG Parkinsons Support Group meeting set for TuesdayThe Lake County Parkinsons Support Group will host a meeting from 1 to 3 p.m. Tuesday at the Lake Square Presbyterian Church, 10200 Morningside Dr., in Leesburg. Special guest for the meeting is Julie England, extension agent for the UF/Lake County Extension ofce, who will discuss what to eat and what not to eat. For information, call Dave or Pat Tribbey at 352-343-0376 or email Dtribbey108@comcast.net. TAVARES Cornerstone Hospice to celebrate 30 years ThursdayCornerstone Hospice will give the public the opportunity to meet the staff at the complex and tour the facility at this open house celebration from noon to 6 p.m., on Thursday at 2445 Lane Park Road. Light refreshments will be served and door prizes will be awarded to guests. For information, call 352-3431341 or go to www.cshospice.org. LAKE COUNTY LIFE-Social Support Group luncheons set for JuneThe Leesburg LIFE Luncheon will take place at 11:30 a.m. on Thursday at the Leesburg Community Center, 109 East Dixie Ave., in Leesburgs Venetian Gardens. Cost is $10. The LIFE Luncheon in Eustis will be held at 11:30 a.m. June 18 at Golden Corral, 15810 U.S. Highway 441. After lunch, Paul Vincoli will entertain. The newest LIFE Luncheon will be at 11:30 a.m. on June 20 at North Lake Presbyterian Church, 975 Rolling Acres Road, behind Home Depot in Lady Lake. The meal will be prepared by the church staff. Cost is $12. To RSVP, call 352-787-0403 or email rreed@beyersfhc.com.MOUNT DORA Brain Fitness Classes for Seniors to start July 14 Learn the steps to a healthy brain in an eight-week class on Mondays and Wednesdays beginning July 14 and running through Sept. 3. The classes will be from 10 a.m. to noon or 2 to 4 p.m., at the Brain Gym, 500 Waterman Ave., in Mount Dora.

PAGE 14

C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 9, 2014 Aching Feet? Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES Save Up To... 80% OFFPharmacy Prices!Generic MedicinesCialis20mg.24 count.....$89.95 Viagra100mg.20 count.....$65.95 Actonel35mg.12 count.....$69 RX REQUIRED CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi. North of K-Mart on Hwy. 441)(352) 347-0403/fx (352) 347-2034CDRX441@gmail.com HARMONY UNITED PSYCHIATRIC CARE We are a full service psychiatry practice dedicated and experienced in working with psychiatric patients to maintain & improve their mental health Psychiatric Evaluation, Diagnosis & Management of: Adil A. Mohammed, M.D. Brenda S. Faiber, M.S., LMFT OUR SERVICES www.harmonyunitedhc.com We accept most insurances with special pricing for cash paying patients.Appointments available within 7 days GOLF CART ACCESS Now, one doctor is helping local residents with back pain live more active, pain-free lives.Painless, convenient, fast-actingSoleveprocedure shown to be promising in a pilot study for 95% of patients now available exclusively at Etheredge Chiropractic.*Fruitland Park(352) 365-1191The Villages(352) 750-1200*Patients in a pilot study showed a 20-point reduction in VAS score in as few as four sessions. Gorenberg M, Schiff E, Schwartz K, Eizenberg E: A novel image-guided, automatic, high-intensity neurostimulation device for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. Pain Res Treat; 2011;2011;152307. Nervomatrix Ltd. All rights reserved. Soleve is a registered trademark D002088 health care providers. The effort ofcially kicked off last month, when Ryan Lewis produced a video in which he spoke for the rst time about his mothers condition, and asked for help from his fans to fund the 30/30 Proj ect. He directed them to an Indiegogo campaign that raised $160,000 enough to build the Ma lawi clinic. (Four other projects three in Kenya and one in Uganda are waiting for funding.) Julie Lewis, too, appeared in the video, speaking about her condition. She has come a long way since 1990, when she didnt tell anyone she was HIV positive. There were a lot of stories of discrimination and stigma, and we didnt want our kids to take that on, Lewis said. At rst I was just trying to get by day to day and then I pretty much de cided to be best friends with denial. I didnt know what to do with three to ve years. When you dont think you have a future, its really hard to make plans. A year after her diag nosis, NBA star Magic Johnson announced he, too, was HIV positive. I felt like he was one of my best friends, she said of Johnson. And if he can play in the NBA, then I can run around the block. She did that, and lift ed weights, and started to feel better well enough to talk about her condition with her children (Ryan was 6), then her friends. She signed up with an HIV/ AIDS speakers bureau that sent her to schools and universities to speak about her condi tion. People still say, Youre the AIDS lady, because I was the one who came to my kids classes with the scary HIV story. Ryan now has a giant red ribbon tattooed on his arm. But that was the only statement hes ever made about it. Nothing, even with the platform he has with Haggerty. He is not the person who is the main spokes person for his band, Lewis said of her son. Ben writes most of the lyrics, so most of their songs are Bens story. There really hasnt been a time when Ryan could speak about it. But as the anniver sary approached, We thought we needed to do something special, something meaningful, Julie Lewis said, adding that she and her hus band werent waiting for their son to reach a cer tain level of celebrity or wealth before kicking off the project. I knew I wanted to do this, she said. As a result of the vid eo launch, the Lewises have heard from all over: CEOs, Ellen DeGeneres, and Madonnas people, who reached out about partnering. The Broadway Cares nonprot has agreed to sponsor a pass the hat for the 30/30 Project at performances of Mothers & Sons through mid-July. If it all works out, 600,000 people will receive the kind of health care that saved Julie Lewis. Its the start of anoth er dream on the heel of a year that has shown them that dreams can be realized, and in a big way. LIFEFROM PAGE C1 BETTINA HANSEN / MCT Julie Lewis, mother of Ryan Lewis, started the 30/30 Project, which brings HIV-related services to needy people in far-off places. GUY BOULTONMCTDave Elmer remembers being irked at a health screening when a nurse told him in a nice way that he was a mess. She also forcefully encouraged him to enroll in a program offered at his local YMCA for people at risk of developing diabetes. Its the best thing thats ever happened to me, said Elmer, a certied public accountant who lives in Menomonee Falls, Wis. When he began the 16-week program, Elmer would get winded walking a few blocks. Six months later, he was taking sixmile walks, and he now walks two to six miles a day, ve or six times a week. His weight has fallen to 170 pounds from 217 pounds. His blood pressure and blood sugar are down. And he no longer is at risk for diabetes. My numbers are all within the normal range, Elmer said. Elmer is among more than 800 people in southeastern Wisconsin, and more than 19,500 nationwide, who have enrolled in the Diabetes Prevention Program offered by YMCA of the USA in partnership with the Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention and UnitedHealth Group. The program, launched in 2010, is an example of a prov en, cost-effective, scalable initiative that focuses on keeping peo ple healthy and, in the process, changes lives and helps slow the rise in health care costs. It also is an example of an ap proach to improving health that takes place in the community and not a doctors ofce. Nationally, if trends continue, an estimated 40 million adults could have diabetes by 2021, up from 28 million in 2011, according to an article in Health Affairs, a policy journal, by UnitedHealth Group doctors and executives. An estimated 100 million people could have prediabetes by then. YMCA of Metropolitan Milwaukee introduced the Dia betes Prevention Program in 2011. YMCA of Central Wauke sha County, in partnership with YMCA at Pabst Farms, and YMCA of Kettle Moraine, did the same last year. The response, so far, has been strong.Insurance-sponsored diabetes prevention program getting results RICK WOOD / MCT Vicki Olejnik moves in a water aerobics class at the Tri-County YMCA in Menomonee Falls, Wisc. on May 20. The course, for people with prediabetes, is being promoted by UnitedHealthcare. SEE DIABETES | C5

PAGE 15

Monday, June 9, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 rrfntbftbn fbbtrrfntbftb tnbftftbttn401 North Blvd. West, Leesburg352.728.424217809 S.E. 109th Ave., Summerfield352.307.4200 rfntcentersleepmed@yahoo.comAlways tired & fatigued? Do you have strange dreams or morning headaches? Type 2 Diabetes? CHF/Heart Failure? TIA (Mini Stroke)? Arrhythmias? Body Mass Index >30, (Neck Circumference Male >17, Female >16)?Management of . .Call Today 352.460.0922 Procedures: Neurological rf GI ntb fnbn Female Wellness bfbn nnn Male Wellness tbntr Weight Loss Clinic FLU SHOTS AVAILABLEwww.mid-floridaprimarycare.comSleep is the Golden Chain that ties...Health & Our Bodies Together!Ravi P. Gupta, M.D.Cardiovascular r nn bf Endocrine Disorder n Breathing Problems fn b Musculoskeletal n Non-Invasive Cardiology t n ffft Dermatology r r rntt rftnn ntnn nn Pulmonary b b Musculoskeletal t b t NEW PATIENT SPECIALComplete Exam (D0150)Digital Xrays (D0210)Cleaning (D1110)Oral Cancer Screening (D0431)with Identafi 3000*Non-Insured Patients Only. All major insurances accepted including PPO & HMO plans.$59*D002756 COURTNEY PERKESMCTKaitlyn Dobrow climbed a short staircase, her eyes xed on every step as she pushed and lifted one pros thetic leg in front of the other. Her parents also watched raptly, not unlike when she rst learned to walk as a baby. Its amazing the things we take for granted, her father, Don Dobrow, 60, said quietly as he watched her physical therapy session last week at Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center in Downey. Dobrow, 19, is slowly reclaiming pieces of her independence since her four limbs were amputated last year after she fell ill with a life-threatening case of bacterial meningitis. In addition to her legs, shes learning to use a prosthetic arm on her right side, which she customized with a leopard-print pattern. Her left arm, which was amputated just below her shoulder, will be addressed later. As she has throughout her recov ery, Dobrow, who lives in Hunting ton Beach, Calif., displays a matterof-fact, forward-looking attitude as she deals with the soreness, fatigue and frustration of learning to use her new limbs. I thought it was hard but youre going to have to get over it, Dobrow said. Its hard but I never thought its not going to happen because it kind of has to happen. One day in February 2013, Dobrow went to work and then to the gym. She felt sick that night and by the next day she was rushed to the hospital. Do brow had developed an infection that caused her blood to clot and dam age more than half her body with the equivalent of third-degree burns. She underwent 22 surgeries, including the amputations and skin grafting. She came home in October and therapists began working to prepare her highly sensitive, fragile skin for prosthesis. Late last year, she took her rst steps with support from an overhead harness to offset her body weight. Id get so excited I wanted to jump up and down and scream, said her mother, Kathi Dobrow, 58. Its like a rst for everything again. Don and I went from having raised our kids, to last year, it was like starting with an infant and raising her to adulthood. Dobrow, although happy about standing and walking again, has con tended with setbacks. After wear ing the legs at home, she developed a large blister on her right thigh that left her unable to wear her legs again for a month. With that blister I did sit-ups and shimmied back and forth on my bed to get the blood owing a little bit, she said. You have to be t to wear your prosthetics or you cant walk. She only recently started using the legs again and must regain her stamina. Then theres the matter of adapt ing to her new body mechanics and adjustments to her equipment. At rst I was really, really tall, even taller than I was before, Do brow said. Thats why I felt so giant. I hadnt stood in forever, plus I was like 3 inches higher. They shrunk me down to my normal height of 5 foot 7. When you lift up your leg and youre just on one leg it felt like youd just topple over. I dont want to say youre paralyzed because youre moving, but you have no feeling. Dobrows physical therapist, Julie Kasayama, said Dobrow will eventu ally learn to walk without watching her feet.Bacteria took her limbs, but woman progresses ANA VENEGAS / MCT Kaitlyn Dobrow puts on makeup using a new prosthetic arm in Downey, Calif., on May 22. Kaitlyn had her arms and legs amputated last year after suffering an infection and wears her prosthetics about two hours per day.At first I was really, really tall, even taller than I was before, Dobrow said. Thats why I felt so giant. I hadnt stood in forever, plus I was like 3 inches higher. They shrunk me down to my normal height of 5 foot 7.Kaitlyn Dobrow

PAGE 16

C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 9, 2014 wound and your entire body. Its like having a bite on your leg or a gigantic abrasion. Contaminated inks were the cause of an outbreak of serious infections in four states in late 2011 and early 2012. These infections were caused by a type of fast-growing bacteria that caused red, itchy bumps to severe sores requiring surgery. The 22 cases were associated with inks contaminated before distribution or just before tattooing. Ingredients in tattoo ink vary, but they can contain metals, powders or other organic compounds in a liquid base. Problems can range from allergic reactions to scarring and the formation of bumpy knots called granulomas, more common in people with darker skin. The long-term effects of ink are still unknown. We know that the ink will gain access to your bloodstream, Wasson says. I had a young gentleman come in, and he had a lymph node under his arm that was swollen. When we biopsied it, we found ink from his tattoo. We dont really know what happens internally. In rare cases, inks containing metallic pigments can cause swelling during magnetic resonance imaging, or MRIs. Tattoos are not an absolute contraindication for an MRI study, says Dr. Daihung Do, faculty director of der matologic surgery at Harvard Medical School and director of dermatologic surgery at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. Patients should notify their radiologist that they have a decorative or permanent tattoo so that the appropriate precautions can be taken. Tattoos can also prevent the early detection of skin cancer, says Peter Beitsch, a surgeon specializing in melanoma at Medical City Dallas Hospital. The ink can camouage changes in asymmetry, bor ders, color and diameter, the ABCDs of melanoma detection. This is important for fair-skinned or redheaded people, who already have a higher risk of developing skin cancers. Sometimes when you cover up moles, the ink from the tattoo will mask changes in the mole, he says. Its not common. But if you cover up enough moles, some of them are going to turn bad, into a lethal kind of skin cancer. Beitsch refers to the case of a 35-year-old man who got a large tattoo on his shoulder in honor of a brother who had died of leukemia. He did not catch changes in the mole and died of melanoma. Its tragic, Beitsch says. About half of mel anoma starts in pre-existing moles. Be aware that if you cover up a mole, you need to be paying attention to it. The Food and Drug Administration regulates tattoo ink but considers it a cosmetic and intervenes only when problems arise. The FDA has not actually approved any tattoo ink, and there is no specic requirement that explicitly says tattoo inks must be sterile. Tattoo inks are not highly regulated, Do says. Many of the pigments are industrial grade, and none are currently FDA-approved. Although tattooing has been practiced for thousands of years, there are few studies regarding their safety. Theresa Eisenman, a spokeswoman for the FDA, said this is because no sponsor has signed the required petition and provided the data needed to decide whether dye is safe for tattooing. The easiest and most important way to avoid becoming a tattoo horror story is to research the tattoo par lor and review personal health history ahead of time. Like anything, like ear piercings, you can develop other medical problems if it isnt at a clean place, Do says. It all depends on who does your tattoo and whether they are cleaning their instruments in a safe manner. If you go to the wrong place, it could be very easy to contract something. Medical experts also do not recommend tattoos for people with a history of allergies, diabetes, heart disease, skin disorders, immune system conditions, a history of infections or who are pregnant. For those with a family history of skin cancers, avoid areas that would cover up moles. Do your research, Metzger says. He stands in front of a mirror, examining the newly nished art on his arm. There are certain things everyone should check for, he says. Find a place and an artist you like. If you dont get a good vibe, maybe that shop is not the shop for you. Something I always look for is an autoclave machine. Disposables are OK, too. I want them to wear gloves; I want to hear that snap. If you are unsure about any part of the process, dont do it. Your Podiatrist treats... CENTRALFLORIDAFOOTCARE, P.A.Dr. Nick Przystawski, DPM www.Floridafoot.com LOUIS DELUCA / MCT Tattoo artist Cody Biggs loads ink in Dallas. RISKSFROM PAGE C1

PAGE 17

Monday, June 9, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 Roughly 300 people enrolled in 39 class es offered last year by the YMCA of Metropol itan Milwaukee, with the cost for 277 of them paid by their employer through UnitedHealthcare. This year, the YMCA hopes to enroll 455 people in 45 classes. The classes are of fered at Ys as well as workplaces and community sites. The 16-week course, which is followed by monthly meetings, includes information on diet and exercise. But more than anything else, the program sets out to change lifestyles in a way that is support ive and nonjudgmental. Vicki Olejnik, who is nearing the end of the program, initially thought that 16 weeks was a long time. Now Im kind of sor ry its almost over, she said. Olejnik, who has tried several diets over the years, has lost 24 pounds since the start of the program. Its surprisingly easy, she said. And I still can eat things I enjoy. People in the program keep track of what they eat but track fat grams instead of calories. I learned that how I was eating was all wrong, said Olejnik. And that is why I wasnt losing weight. Her blood sugar and cholesterol are down. And she has more energy. My daughter said, Gosh, Mom is like the Energizer Bunny, Olejnik said. Olejnik, who is 69 and works for Milwaukee County, was contacted by UnitedHealthcare after a health screening that is part of the coun tys wellness program. Olejniks mother and grandmother developed diabetes. And she knew her blood sugar was high. The program is an out growth of a study by the CDC and the National Institutes of Health that compared the effectiveness of a diabetes drug with a program to help people lose at least 7% of their weight through diet, exercise and individual counseling. The results, published in 2002, showed that the weight loss reduced the risk of developing dia betes by 58 percent over three years, compared with 31% for people who took the drug metformin. Researchers at Indiana University then modied the program and worked with the YMCA in Indianapolis to adopt the model for small groups. The CDC provided funding for a pilot pro gram at several YMCA sites. In 2010, UnitedHealth Group proposed taking the program nationwide and offering it as a benet in its health plans. Between one-third and two-thirds of the people with prediabetes are likely to devel op type 2 diabetes with in six years, compared with 5% of those with normal blood sugar. And the potential benets of preventing the disease are clear. According to the ar ticle in Health Affairs, an analysis of UnitedHealthcare claims data found: The average total an nual cost for an adult with employer cover age who was diagnosed with diabetes was $11,700 in 2009, com pared with $4,400 for an adult who did not have the disease. The average annu al cost for an adult with diabetes who developed complications was $20,700. Annual health care spending attributable to prediabetes or diabetes could rise from $206 billion in 2011 to $512 billion by 2021. Al most two-thirds of the cost would be incurred by Medicare and Med icaid because of the higher prevalence of the disease among peo ple covered by the pro grams. As of March 31, the program has held 2,477 classes in 41 states, and Y associations have trained 1,883 lifestyle coaches. Each year it contin ues to grow, said Ellie Duyser, a registered dietitian and director of the Diabetes Prevention Program for the YMCA of Metropolitan Mil waukee. Part educational, p art support group, the program sets realistic goals. This is about life-sustaining changes, Duy ser said. CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) D002409 DIABETESFROM PAGE C2 RICK WOOD / MCT Instructor Joannie Malek leads a water aerobics class at the Tri-County YMCA in Menomonee Falls, Wisc.

PAGE 18

C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 9, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTSComicswww.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

PAGE 19

Monday, June 9, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 Working gallery of local artistsANTIQUEDEALERSWANTED (352) 460-4806facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburg www.dailycommercial.comDiversions352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper.YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, June 9, the 160th day of 2014. There are 205 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On June 9, 1954, during the Senate-Army Hearings, Army special counsel Joseph N. Welch berated Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy, R-Wis., for verbally attacking a member of Welchs law rm, Fred Fisher, asking McCarthy: Have you no sense of decency, sir? At long last, have you left no sense of decency? HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, June 9, 2014: This year one might be hard-pressed to recognize the evanescent Gemini. You indulge and become more tuned in to your intuitive or psychic abilities. You also enjoy learning more about this facet of your personality. Communication ourishes this year. If you are single, you could date a lot, but you will know when you meet the right person. If you are attached, you will test out your seemingly new intuitive ability on your sweetie. You could have a lot of fun with experimenting with this. SCORPIO might be hard to work with. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Communication ourishes with a roommate or family member. You will want to have a discussion about what you want from your home life. Share some of your desires openly. You might be surprised at how fast one wish could be realized. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You could be pulled in two different directions. Though you often are aware of your similarities with others, right now youll see the differences. Share more of your thoughts, as you might want some feedback. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) If you listen to your sixth sense, you will get ahead both nancially and in your daily/work life. You intuitively seem to know which way to go and what to do. A boss might have a great idea, but the follow-through seems to be conicted. CANCER (June 21-July 22) What you feel might be more important than what you think today. You need to act spontaneously. You will understand the dynamics of your actions later. Following through on an established plan might not go as planned. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Work at home or make your ofce more comfortable. You will thrive in this environment and relax more easily. A partner might be acting in an odd way as he or she follows his or her intuition. Try to conrm important information. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Others might be elusive right now, but they probably dont mean to be. Some of the people surrounding you easily could be on a different track. Look around, and youll nd that nearly everyone seems to be daydreaming. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You could be taken aback by the fact that others cant see what you are experiencing. Worry less. You might not want to share exactly what is on your mind before you verify some information. A hunch could pay off. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You are energized, and youll express your creativity. Follow your sixth sense. You might feel a little insecure about listening to this inner voice, but by doing so, youll get great results. A new friend could be quite distracting. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Gather information, and explore new ideas. You might have a totally different take from anyone else. Honor a sense that you might not be ready to share just yet. A domestic issue might emerge from out of the blue. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) A meeting could be the inspiration for what needs to happen next. Sometimes your logic works against you. Follow your intuition with an important conversation, especially when dealing with key people in your life. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Be willing to take the lead, even if it makes you uncomfortable. You might feel as if you have too much to do, but youll have little choice. Be very careful when handling funds, as you might not be as focused as you might think you are. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You might not be hearing the whole story. Reach out to someone at a distance to get some feedback. Only then will you know what information you are missing. The facts you seek might be right in front of you. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORYDEAR ABBY: I accepted a request from my brother to watch his cats while he was across the country for a few months. During that time, one of them matured and started marking his territory all over my house. The dilemma was quickly taken care of with a trip to the vet, after permission from my brother. My brother now insists that because I accepted responsibility for the cats in every way in his absence that I shouldnt expect reimbursement for the professional carpet cleaner I rented or the vet bill I paid for neutering the cat. Am I out of line to expect to be paid back? We have agreed to abide by your response. CHRISTINA IN MARYLAND DEAR CHRISTINA: Tell your brother to start writing the check now. If hed had to board his cats while he was out of town, it would have cost him a lot more. You were kind to help him out, and he should be ashamed of himself for trying to stiff you. HISSS! DEAR ABBY: My sisterin-law is in a barber shop quartet. While I appreciate the artistic effort of what she does, listening to it bores me and I dont enjoy it. I feel like I must go to her recitals because she makes a point of inviting my husband and me. I have an ethical dilemma. Should I be honest with her and say I dont enjoy sitting through two to three hours of a capella songs? Or should I be true to MYSELF and admit Id rather stay home and catch up on my reading? What would you do, Abby? EARACHE IN IDAHO DEAR EARACHE: Id try to be tactful. Instead of saying you would rather stay home and catch up on your reading, say instead that you have different taste in music than she does, or that you have other plans. If this would make you feel guilty, consider putting in an appearance every once in a while. DEAR ABBY: My second wife died last year after 39 years of mar riage. She had a beautiful, unique sense of humor. Three weeks after her funeral, I was walking our dog on the day that would have been our anniversary. As I bent down to pick up the poop, I spotted a quarter on the ground. It was so tarnished with age I couldnt make out the date. But I remembered your pennies from heaven letters, so I picked it up. I hurried home to clean it to see if it was from the year we were married. I was amazed when I discovered it WAS from the year I was married but to my rst wife. Like I said, my late wife had a unique sense of humor ... SMILING IN NEW JERSEY DEAR SMILING: Im sor ry for your loss. Two things occur to me. The rst is that the quar ter was your reward for being a responsible dog owner. The second is that your late wife may have been trying to remind you that you had a love before her, and you may nd another one in the future.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Siblings are growling over cat-sitting charges JEANNE PHILLIPSDEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGARBIGARS STARS

PAGE 20

C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 9, 2014 Psychic Services A/C Services Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Home Improvement Irrigation Services Sprinkler Repairsrfntbr rfff f rfffn tn b rfffn tnrrnr rrnbf Landscaping Services r fntbb Pet Grooming Services Legal Services Painting Services Shower Doors Service Enclosure Screening Window Services Handyman Services BOYDSYou call it, We haul it!352-460-7186Grading, Loading, etc. Marine Services Affordable Home Repair, LLCttf bbrbf tbbb nb 352-551-6073 Electrical Services Roofing Services To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact the Classified Department at (352) 314-3278. Tree Service Plumbing Services Land Clearing Services BrocksLAWN SERVICE nnt nnnnttfbf rffrntbfrfntbrfr Hauling Services rf rbrrff ff trf HAULING!nnn bbfntb b Concrete Services nff rfbt rnf ttnfb tbf Lawn Services nbt ft bfbrnf btrf nfb bbrtbbf LIC. INS.nrn nr LIC. INS.nrn nr bbrbff ttfrb brfb Home Improvement

PAGE 21

Monday, June 9, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX

PAGE 22

D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 9, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX

PAGE 23

Monday, June 9, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance rt t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital

PAGE 24

D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 9, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr



PAGE 1

NADAL TOPS DJOKOVIC IN FRENCH OPEN SPORTS B1 LYNX: Few options remain for Link 55 evening service A3 LIVING HEALTHY: Why you should research before getting a tattoo C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, June 9, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 159 4 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS A4 DIVERSIONS C7 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 STATE/REGION A3 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 WORLD A6 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8. 91 / 76 Party sunny with T-storms. 50 Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of ser vice. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT728-1668 394-1739fla#CAC1816408 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com Eustis city commission ers have turned down a $1.2 million offer for 200 acres eyed two years ago by BlueC hip Energy for a massive so lar farm. The now vacant land south of State Road 44 and east of Cardinal Lane was former ly a city spray eld. It sits ad jacent to 210 acres that Ar thur H. Witte of Payson, Ill., bought at a BlueChip bank ruptcy auction last Septem ber for $1.2 million. Witte wants the spray eld parcel, too, but city ofcials think they can get a better price. Acting City Manager Di anne Kramer said there was a good deal of discussion about the proposed sale by Vice Mayor Albert Eckian, who thought the city could get more money for the spray eld because land values might increase with a Pub lix being built in the area and the Wekiva Parkway coming in. She said Eckian also did not like the fact that Wittes deposit was refundable. Witte had offered $1,186,750 with a $50,000 deposit and a 120-day due diligence period, accord ing to Kramer. Kramer said Witte raised his offer from $1,150,000 after she emailed his realtor, saying she would recommend that the city make a counter-offer of an average of two appraisals it had done on the property. Witte previously made the city an offer for the property last year when real estate in vestor Daryl Carter was try ing to buy it, according to city documents, but when the commission decided to ad vertise for bids, neither party submitted one. Eustis had previously ap proved a contract with Blue Chip to sell the spray eld City of Eustis denies sale of former spray field THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com A Korean War vet eran claims he is facing eviction from an assisted living facility because of red tape with the Veterans Administration. Harold Wulf, 81, moved into Grand Court in December 2012 after being told he met the qualications to receive $1,758 a month aid and atten dance pension from the VA to help cover the cost of assistance in his everyday living needs, yet the money has nev er arrived. And now Im about to be evicted, he said. You had to come in here before you can collect, and now the VA wont pay, Wulf said. It appears that they are waiting for some thing to happen so that I will no longer be eli gible for it. Either I get moved out of here or I die, and then Im off their list. He believes there are thousands of oth er wartime veterans like him who are over 65, disabled or need aid and assistance with daily living. Wulf and his son, Paul, received verbal approval from an Or lando VA doctor in Sep tember 2013 that the veteran met the pro gram criteria. Wulf also has received many let ters from the VA in Philadelphia, dating back to February 2013, where he was told his claim was under re view and would be decided promptly. They obvious ly dont know what they are doing, and if they do know, they are keeping it a big secret, said Harold, who has become skeptical of the VA after the agency has come under re in recent weeks, follow ing the deaths of veter ans waiting for medi cal care. TAVARES Facing eviction Korean War veteran in danger of losing housing due to VA red tape PHOTOS BY THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Harold Wulf, 81, a Korean War veteran, looks over numerous form letters from the Veterans Administration. He was qualied to receive a monthly pension for aid and attendance to stay at Grand Court, an assisted living facility in Tavares, yet the money never arrived. Wulf makes sure he has the Christmas decorations that were made by his late wife as he prepares to move out of Grand Court. CALVIN WOODWARD Associated Press WASHINGTON Two American values collided in Sgt. Bowe Bergdahls calamity. One had to give. The one about never leaving a man behind prevailed. The one about never negotiating with terror ists got lost in the swirl ing dust storm of a U.S. helicopter retrieving the soldier from his Tal iban captors in a swap now provoking recrim inations in Washington. Each ethos runs deep in the American con science, yet has been violated through his tory, notably in the age US values collided in Bergdahls predicament THOMAS ADAMSON and THEODORA TONGAS Associated Press LA FIERE, France Nearly 1,000 paratroop ers dropped out of the sky in Normandy on Sunday but this time they did so in peace, in stead of to wrest west ern France from the Na zis as they did during World War II. Drawing huge crowds who braved hot weath er and lined the histor ic landing area at La Fi ere, the aerial spectacle re-enacted the drama of the Normandy landings and served to cap com memorations marking the 70th anniversary of D-Day. Among the planes fer rying paratroopers for the event was a restored C-47 US military trans port plane that dropped Allied troops on the vil lage of Sainte-Mere-Eg lise a stones throw from La Fiere on June 6, 1944. And the pilots who originally ew it took the controls again last week, 70 years later, D-Day celebrations concluded with aerial re-enactment REMY DE LA MAUVINIERE / AP Paratroopers are dropped near the Normandy village of Sainte Mere Eglise, western France, during a mass air drop, on Sunday. SEE FIELD | A2 SEE D-DAY | A2 SEE VETERAN | A2 SEE BERGDAHL | A2

PAGE 2

A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 9, 2014 HOW TO REACH US JUNE 8 CASH 3 ............................................... 8-1-8 Afternoon .......................................... 5-8-6 PLAY 4 ............................................. 3-3-6-7 Afternoon ....................................... 2-7-7-4 FLORIDA LOTTERY JUNE 7 FANTASY 5 ........................... 2-19-21-30-35 FLORIDA LOTTO ............. 17-19-25-29-47-52 POWERBALL .................. 28-30-35-58-5915 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION STEVE SKAGGS publisher 352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com PAUL RYAN digital editor 352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. property for $1.2 million, docu ments show. The company, how ever, did not close on the proper ty and had to surrender its $50,000 non-refundable deposit. Lake County Property Appraiser records show BlueChip bought the 210 acres adjacent to the spray eld property in March 2011 from Eagle Dunes II, LLC, for $1.15 million. The company was hoping to build a 410-acre solar farm in the Sorren to area, at the time one of the larg est in the state, before it ran into nancial difculties. The 210-acre parcel was sold to Witte by a court-appointed receiv er for BlueChip at an auction for $1.2 million. Witte declined comment when contacted by the Daily Commer cial Federal farm subsidy records show he has been involved with corn, wheat, soybeans and sor ghum in three Illinois counties and one Missouri county. Besides the former BlueChip property, Witte and his wife LuAnn own 14 oth er properties in Eustis, Leesburg, Grand Island, Tavares, Fruitland Park, Mount Dora and Clermont, property records show. As for the spray eld property, the city spends $25,000 per year to mow the land, documents show. The property was used as a dispos al site for the citys treated waste water, but now the city uses much of that water for irrigation and does not use the spray eld much, ac cording to Kramer. One issue with the property is that it has no direct public ac cess and an owner would need an easement through land owned by the city, Kramer said. The adja cent property to the east, owned by Witte, does have direct access on County Road 437. Thats why it would be valuable to somebody who owns the east ern piece, Kramer said of the spray eld property. FIELD FROM PAGE A1 remembering their expe riences. Sunday saw dozens of veterans escorted down a sandy path to a special section to watch the show alongside thousands of spectators most of whom lined two sides of the eld. Others took shelter in the shade as the lack of wind caused the sun to beat down hard. Planes including the C-47 aircraft ew by loudly overhead sever al times, with two dozen military paratroopers from countries including the U.S., Britain, France and Germany jumping with each passage. They were scenes rem iniscent of the pivot al event, when around 15,000 Allied paratroop ers were dropped in and around the village of Sainte-Mere-Eglise on D-Day. It became the rst to be liberated by the Al lies and remains one of the enduring symbols of the Normandy invasion. Veteran Julian Bud Rice, a C-47 pilot who participated in the air drops of Normandy on D-Day, watched the show. Its good to see 800 paratroopers jump here today, but the night that we came in, we had 800 airplanes with 10,000 paratroopers that we dropped that night, so it was a little more, he said. At the invitation of the French government, this restored Douglas C-47 known as Whiskey 7 ew for the festivities and released paratroopers as it did when it dropped troops behind enemy lines under German re. The plane has almost as a rich a story to tell as the pilots who ew it. Although the twin-prop Whiskey 7, so named be cause of its W-7 squadron marking, looks much the same today as it did on June 6, 1944. D-DAY FROM PAGE A1 REMY DE LA MAUVINIERE / AP Paratroopers prepare to land near the Normandy village of Sainte Mere Eglise, western France, during a mass air drop, on Sunday. My theory, based on what has happened out in Phoe nix at the VA Hospital, I think that this is just a way for the VA to delay and hope that theyll have the per son who applied for benets pass away during that (wait ing) period, said Paul, who works in the assisted living eld in Naples. They know that these peo ple who are applying are go ing into assisted living and they are not going to be with them forever, he said. In the last week, we had three peo ple in South Florida pass away while their claims were pend ing. The VA is off the hook and now they pay nothing. Genevieve Billia, public af fairs specialist for the U.S. Department of Veterans Af fairs in Washington, D.C., said in an email to the Daily Commercial : To get the ball rolling and gure out what happened to Mr. Wulf, well need him to ll out this pri vacy waiver so we can access his les with his permission. Billia said 111,461 veterans received the Aid and Atten dance (A&A) in 2012, and she provided the Veterans Ad ministrations website about the program: www.benets. va.gov/pension/aid_atten dance_housebound.asp. According to the website, the A&A increased month ly pension amount may be added to your monthly pen sion amount if you meet one of the following conditions: You require the aid of another person in order to perform personal functions required in everyday liv ing, such as bathing, feed ing, dressing, attending to the wants of nature, ad justing prosthetic devices or protecting yourself from the hazards of your daily environment You are bedridden, in that your disability or dis abilities requires that you re main in bed apart from any prescribed course of conva lescence or treatment You are a patient in a nursing home due to mental or physical incapacity Your eyesight is limit ed to a corrected 5/200 visu al acuity or less in both eyes; or concentric contraction of the visual eld to 5 degrees or less Paul Wulf said his father met the criteria of needing aid and assistance for bath ing, dressing and other dai ly functions. He and his brother, Michael, have paid $17,000 to help cover their father living at Grand Court, but they can longer afford to do so. It is at a stage now to where it is critical, Paul said of his father facing eviction. As nice as Grand Court has been working with us, it has drained my brother and I out of funds to help Dad to be there. And that is another thing about this (A&A) benet. Dad had to go into assisted living that he cannot afford in order to qualify for the benet, and yet in order to apply, he has to be paying for it, so tell me how does that math add up? There is no question that the VA is acting with impurity. There is no accountability and some of the mistakes that were made are absolutely ridiculous. Paul believes his father would have received atten tion faster behind bars. We would have an easier time if dad was a felon and having him in prison getting benets there, Paul said. Any vet would have an eas ier time getting benets in a federal prison than they do getting it from the VA. It is just ridiculous. Kristin Puckett, manager of public relations and cri sis management for Brook dale, the parent company of Grand Court, said they do not want to see Wulf leave the Tavares facility. We are saddened by Mr. Wulfs situation and regret that it looks like he will be un able to stay at our community unless appropriate approvals from the Veterans Adminis tration (VA) become avail able soon, Puckett said in an email. Our associates have assisted him with lling out the paperwork required to re ceive assistance from the VA, worked to nd other nancial arrangements, and have been in contact with both him and his family on a regular basis to assist in resolving the situ ation, even if it required alter native housing. We know this is frustrating for him and we are hopeful for a positive reso lution soon. Harold has his belong ings packed. He knows that he will be expected to leave Grand Court any day now. I want the VA to approve what they said that I have coming to me, Wulf said. It would take the VA to say OK for me to be able to stay here. Without that, there is no chance. VETERAN FROM PAGE A1 of terrorism, where tradi tional standards of war fare, spying and negotiat ing are run through a hall of mirrors. Bergdahl and the ve Guantanamo detainees traded for his freedom were captives in an un declared, unconventional and open-ended war that never t neatly into the Geneva Conventions, U.S. military doctrine or slo gans about how to behave. THE SOLDIERS CREED History is replete with extraordinary acts to bring home the lost and fallen. The U.S. Armys War rior Ethos and the Soldiers Creed both swear, I will never leave a fallen com rade, and all the services place a premium on re turning the missing, cap tured and dead. Often this comes at great cost, as in the 1993 Black Hawk Down battle in Somalia in which 18 U.S. servicemen were killed in the attack on U.S. helicopters and the subse quent rescue attempt. As Pentagon spokes man Rear Adm. John F. Kirby put it: When youre in the Navy, and you go overboard, it doesnt mat ter if you were pushed, fell or jumped. Were going to turn the ship around and pick you up. Not always. When the Korean War ended in 1953, thousands of missing and dead American soldiers were left behind, as well as POWs, as U.S. forces re treated from North Korea. The Pentagon agency primarily responsible for survival training for cap tured troops and for help ing them back at home says the mission of bring ing them back is truly and uniquely an indelible part of the American way. ANOTHER AMERICAN WAY Never negotiate with terrorists or hostage-tak ers? Not quite never. The Sept. 11 attacks broke open the modern age of asymmetric warfare. Asymmetric dealmak ing, diplomacy and na tional security went hand in hand with that. The old standards and slogans still had meaning but improvi sation was required. Ways were found to deal with those who dont ght by the rules. As in Bergdahls case, where the government of Qatar served as go-between, in termediaries are usual ly involved to maintain a semblance of separation between two sides that arent really supposed to be talking to each other. The ethos against granting concessions of any kind to scoundrels gave rise to a patriotic ral lying cry a century ago in the time of President Ted dy Roosevelt and a Mo roccan plunderer who be came known as the rst terrorist of the 1900s. After Ahmed ibn-Mu hammed Raisuli took Greek-American busi nessman Ion Perdicar is hostage for money and political inuence, the U.S. dispatched warships while Roosevelts secre tary of state demanded of Moroccos sultan: Perdi caris alive or Raisuli dead. The effect of that ulti matum was electrifying at home and, days later, Perdicaris was free. But it turned out the U.S. had quietly pressed for Raisu lis ransom demands to be met, which they were. The U.S. appeared to be wielding Roosevelts big stick. Actually it spoke softly to a terrorist. BERGDAHL FROM PAGE A1 AP FILE PHOTO Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., goes to a closed-door brieng on June 4 at the Capitol in Washington about the Obama administrations decision to swap ve members of the Taliban for captive Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl.

PAGE 3

Monday, June 9, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT TAVARES Florida Hospital Waterman to offer Safe Sitter classes The Safe Sitter course, national ly approved and recognized by the American Academy of Pediatrics, is designed to teach boys and girls ages 11-13 to condently and safe ly care for themselves and younger children while unsupervised. Safe Sitter certied instructors will lead this two-day program with two sessions available from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Thursday and Friday and June 26-27, teaching students how to administer rst aid, choking child rescue and CPR and how to man age their own babysitting business. Program tuition is $75 per student. Space is limited and registration is required by calling 352-253-3391. CLERMONT Local doctors participate in Mens Heath Road Trip In recognition of National Mens Health Week today through Sunday, Dr. Jamin Brahmbhatt and Dr. Sijo Prekattil from the PUR Clinic at South Lake Hospital will hit the road to spread the word about mens health issues for the rst-ever Drive for Mens Health, a 24-hour road trip from Florida to New York, kicking off at 8 a.m., Thursday at South Lake Hospital, 1900 Don Wickham Drive. The duo will drive approximate ly 1,100 miles in an all-electric Tesla, stopping only to recharge the vehicle, hosting mens health events along the way. Funds raised will benet genetic research for chronic male conditions and educational scholarships. For information, go to www. Drive4MensHealth.com or call 407-833-9201. TAVARES Chicken University offers tips on farming poultry The UF/IFAS Extension in Lake County will offer the popular Chicken University course from 6 to 8 p.m. on Thursday at the Lake County Agricultural Center, 1951 Woodlea Rd. Megan Brew, extension agent, will lead the class offering information on poultry anatomy and biology, housing, egg production, predator protection and egg handling. Pre-registration is required at www.chickenuni.eventbrite.com. The class costs $5 and includes printed materials. Space is limited. For information, call 352-343-4101, ext. 2728 or email horsygrl@u.edu. TAVARES Grantsmanship Workshop offered by LSGN Get the Grant You Need is the theme at the Lake-Sumter Grantsmanship Network (LSGN) workshop from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Thursday at the Lake County Agriculture Extension Ofce, 1951 Woodlea Drive. The interactive workshop will host ve speakers and sessions on new trends and tips on grant writing. Cost for the workshop is $5 for LSGN members and $25 for non members. Lunch is provided. Registration is available at www. lsgn.org, 407-342-8876 or info@lsgn. org. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com Lake County commis sioners on Tuesday will consider the few options left for restoring evening bus service for Link 55 in south Lake. County ofcials had hoped an agreement could be worked out with Polk County, but that must remain on hold until No vember when Polk has its own transportation ref erendum, according to county ofcials. There may be an op portunity to work with them, said Dottie Keedy, director of community services. That leaves the county with three short-term op tions: The county could get into the business of cross-county bus trans portation, which of cials weigh as unlikely and costly. The county could provide a van pool ser vice, but the cost would range between $490-560 per month, depending on the number of passengers. LYNX could provide the service at an increased cost of $53,000 per year. When the Link 55 route which runs from Cagan Crossings along U.S. High way 192 to downtown Kis simmee was reinstated Jan. 12, the service only of fered eight round trips in stead of the 16 that riders and Lake County ofcials LAKE COUNTY Few options for Link 55 evening service The rst day of summer is June 21 and Florida De partment of Health ofc es in counties across Cen tral Florida are reminding families to take precau tions while swimming in warm freshwater bodies due to the threat posed by the amoeba Naegleria fowleri. Naegleria fowleri is a naturally occurring amoe ba that can be found in any body of fresh water, such as lakes, rivers, hot springs and poorly maintained and minimally chlori nated or un-chlorinated swimming pools, accord ing to a press release from the Florida Department of Health in Lake County. This amoeba can cause an infection known as pri mary amebic meningo encephalitis by traveling up the nose to the brain and spinal cord, the re lease stated. This generally happens during activities such as swimming, div ing, waterskiing or wake boarding. There is an increased risk of infection by this organism in all freshwa ter areas in Florida, es pecially during hot sum mer months, Dr. Kevin M. Sherin, director of the De partment of Health in Or ange County, said in the release. Infections usually oc cur when it is hot for pro longed periods, causing higher water tempera tures and lower water lev els, added Dr. Swannie Jett, health ofcer of the Department of Health in Seminole County. According to the release, some measures that might reduce risk of infection in clude: Avoiding water-re lated activities in bodies of warm freshwater, hot springs and thermally pol luted water such as water around power plants. Avoiding water-relat ed activities in warm fresh water during periods of high water temperature State health officials warn of freshwater amoeba MARGIE MENZEL News Service of Florida With schools now out, class rooms and playgrounds will empty for the summer but that will leave many Florida chil dren hungry because they rely on free and reduced-cost school meals for breakfast and lunch. Food banks, nonprots and community groups are trying to pick up the slack, using federal funding to help deliver up to two meals per day to kids who other wise might go without. The need goes up dramatical ly in the summer, said Rebec ca Brislain, executive director of the Florida Association of Food Banks. We know that the need is Food program has multiple local sites BRENDAN FARRINGTON Associated Press O n good days when her epileptic sei zures arent se vere, RayAnn Moseley laughs, sings, danc es, swims and practic es with the childrens choir at her church. She easily brings smiles to the people around her. On bad days, the 11-year-old wakes up in bloody sheets or lies down on the school oor and says nothing all day. When her sei zures become partic ularly intense, she is rushed to the hospital. The images of those extremes collected in a collage helped per suade Florida law makers to support a bill that will soon al low parents to treat their epileptic chil dren with marijuana that has a low amount of THC, the chemical that causes intoxica tion. What seemed im probable a few months ago is now about to be come a law with the help of a severely epi leptic girl whose story melted hearts. When we rst start ed this, people were like, Are you cra zy? Its never going to pass, said RayAnns father, Peyton Mose ley, who along with his wife, Holley, met with dozens of lawmakers showing them the pho tos of RayAnn. They could see the differ ence when shes having good days as opposed to when shes having bad days. It helped to really put a face on it. Even Gov. Rick Scott, who has rmly op posed medical mar ijuana, welcomed RayAnn into his ofce, hugged her and as sured her parents he would sign the bill. Once Scott signs the bill, which passed the Legislature over whelmingly on the last day of this years legis lative session, strains of marijuana with low amounts of THC and high amounts of can nabidiol, or CBD, which is used to treat seizures, will be legal in Florida for certain medical conditions. Still, a handful of House members raised concerns, includ ing a lack of U.S. Food and Drug Administra tion approval for the drugs use and the pos sibility that the bill will open the door for wid er spread use of mari juana. Epileptic girl inspired medical marijuana bill PHOTOS BY MICHAEL SPOONEYBARGER / AP ABOVE: In this May 21 photo, Holley Moseley, 11, and her daughter RayAnn walk to the park in their neighborhood in Gulf Breeze. BELOW: RayAnn Moseley, who has cerebral palsy and is severely epileptic, works with teachers assistant Becky Goncher in her ESC class at Gulf Breeze Elementary School in Gulf Breeze. SEE LINK | A4 SEE AMOEBA | A4 SEE EPILEPTIC | A5 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com The former Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurant was over charged $75,000 for its electri cal service for nearly 14 years because of a meter switch at its Lake Square Mall site, according to city ofcials, and now Lees burg plans to settle with KFC, Inc. for $65,000. City Attorney Fred Morrison recently told city commissioners that the issue would be on the agenda for todays 5:30 p.m. city commission meeting. The rough numbers, we think, adding readjusted interest, the charges with the total liability of the city, is in excess of $100,000, Morrison said of what the possi ble sum could have been if the dispute had gone to court rather than the parties reaching a set tlement agreement. Leesburg Finance Director LEESBURG KFC was overcharged $75,000 for electricity SEE FOOD | A4 SEE KFC | A5

PAGE 4

A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 9, 2014 CROSSWORD PUZZLE DEATH NOTICES Betty M. Junker Betty M. Junker, 94, of Leesburg, died Satur day, June 7, 2014. PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, Leesburg. IN MEMORY thought would be of fered. County ofcials were stumped when they re ceived a response from LYNX in December stat ing the company could offer only half the num ber of trips at an in creased cost of $16,000. The cost for the 16 round trips was origi nally $50,685. Furthermore, the bus service only offers four routes in the morn ing from 6 to 8 and four routes in the evening from 5 to 6:30. The ser vice ended two and a half hours earlier than the agreed upon time, upsetting many shift workers. LYNX ofcials said the change occurred be cause the Link 55 route was expanded into Os ceola County, adding 3 miles to the route. County commission ers approved a motion in January to work with LYNX ofcials to extend the evening bus service for Link 55. Matt Friedman, spokesman for LYNX, said the transportation organization is will ing to have a discussion with Lake County. It comes down to how much service do they want and how much are they going to fund, he said. There is a cost. The location of the route moved. The more time the bus spends on the road, the more miles it drives, the more it costs. Commissioner Tim Sullivan said it is a tough situation. It is a concern, he said. We only have so much money to go around. For what we were paying for a year ago, we are getting less service from LYNX. Commissioner Jimmy Conner agreed. We are kind of be tween a rock and a hard place, he said, explain ing he appreciated the riders who use the route to get to work every day. It is a bureaucracy and sometimes things dont work out the way you would like them to. As the county is weigh ing the costs to restore the service, there is a proposal for a new Lake Xpress route, begin ning at State Road 50 in Mascotte and running through Clermont and Groveland, before con necting with the LYNX route in Winter Garden. The service, at an esti mated cost of $463,000 a year, would be paid for with FTA 5307 funds, from which Link 55 is funded. Commissioner Sean Parks said he did not support paying for a new route at this time. I see the importance of Link 55 and 204 that was started over seven years ago, he said. I am not going to support cutting those routes in favor of starting a new route that I am not sure is fully supported by the cities. Since January when the evening service for Link 55 was reduced, Celeste Clifford has been paying about $10 a day for a cab home. In one week alone, she can spend $50 or more on cab fare, and it has be gun to impact her bud get signicantly. It is hard to save a penny, she said. If the service cannot be restored, Clifford suggested at least push ing the beginning of service back to later in the afternoon, so peo ple can get home on the bus in the evening. Right now it is cost ing us three arms and legs, she said. LINK FROM PAGE A3 and low water levels. Keeping your head out of the water, hold ing your nose shut or using nose clips when taking part in water-re lated activities in bod ies of warm freshwater such as lakes, rivers or hot springs. Avoiding digging in or stirring up the sedi ment while taking part in water-related activ ities in shallow, warm freshwater areas. For information and to watch a public ser vice announcement about the dangers of amoeba infections, go to www.lakechd.com. AMOEBA FROM PAGE A3 there, and we hear that from our partner agencies, that they are running out of food because school is out, said Rachel Mohler, nutrition di rector at Second Har vest of the Big Bend food bank in Tallahas see. The state Depart ment of Agriculture and Consumer Ser vices and the non prot Florida Impact are working togeth er on Summer Break Spot, a program that provides healthy food to kids at local sites and reconstructed school buses. Funding for the two-year-old Sum mer BreakSpot pro gram comes from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, funneled through the state agency. Last year, the program served 12 million meals to FOOD FROM PAGE A3 300,000 Florida chil dren, and the USDA reimbursed the state $29.5 million for them. Erin Gillespie, a spokeswoman for the Department of Agricul ture and Consumer Ser vices, said the state and local partners school districts, nonprots and religious and commu nity groups are try ing to expand the num ber of locations where kids can get nutritious meals and enrichment activities. The program has 3,400 locations state wide typically rec reation centers and af fordable housing sites so that its right there where the kids are, Gillespie said. A lot of these families dont have transporta tion, and theyre not go ing to drive across town to get a free lunch for the kids. The program also tar gets rural communities, where food worries for children can be com mon. According to the Summer BreakSpot website, summer foodorida.nutrislice. com, food sites local ly include: The Villag es Elementary School, Lifestream Academy on Tally Road in Lees burg, Beverly Shores Elementary School, Mt. Calvary Baptist Church in Leesburg, Treadway Elementary School in Leesburg, Eu stis Elementary School, Lifestream Academy on Idewild Avenue in Eus tis, Nazarene Chruch/ YMCA in Tavares, Tava res Elementary School, Lake Hills School, Grassy Lake Elementa ry School, Minneola El ementary School, South Lake High School, Mascotte Elementa ry School, Webster Ele mentary School, Bush nell Elementary School, the Sumter Youth Cen ter near Bushnell, Lake Panasoffkee Elementa ry School, Wildwood El ementary School and the Sumter Youth Cen ter in Wildwood. According to last years Feeding Amer ica Map the Meal Gap study, 21.6 per cent of U.S. children are food-insecure, mean ing their households are usually worried that the food will run out before they have money to buy more. In Florida, 25.5 per cent of children are food-insecure, about 1 in 4. And of the states nearly 2.7 million pub lic-school students, just under 1.6 million are el igible for free and re duced-cost meals, ac cording to the Florida Hunger Data Center. Brislain said the eco nomic recovery is ar riving more slowly in high-poverty areas. The folks that our food banks see are the rst affected by a tough economy and the last to recover, she said. Summer BreakSpot grew by 12 percent last year and is expected to increase again this year. Thats consistent with data showing partici pation in summer food programs increasing across the U.S. Accord ing to a report out June 2 from the Food Re search and Action Cen ter in Washington, D.C., nearly 3 million Amer ican children partici pated in summer nu trition programs in July 2013 an increase of 161,000 children, or 5.7 percent, from the year before. Florida exceeded all categories, relative to the national average, in growth, Debra Susie, chief executive ofcer of Florida Impact, said of the national report. Associated Press LAKELAND Two cats recently found dead in Central Florida appear to have been killed by a coyote. A geneticist with the University of Florida says DNA testing was specic for canids, a family of carnivores including dogs, foxes and other species. Two samples test ed revealed a strong match with a coyote. The Tampa Tribune reports one cat ap peared to have been cut in half behind the front legs in March. The back half of the cat was found about two blocks away the next day. In April, the front half of another cat was found about two blocks from its own ers home. Coyote responsible for cat deaths

PAGE 5

Monday, June 9, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 This could be the ri e shot that starts a massive avalanche, Rep. Dennis Baxley, R-Ocala, said after the vote. When I look at that I simply cant pull the trigger. The journey to pas sage began late last year when the Moseleys trav eled from the Pensaco la area to Colorado and talked to parents of ep ileptic children whose seizures have been re duced or eliminated af ter treating them with oil from a marijuana strain known as Charlottes Web, named for the ep ileptic girl it original ly helped in 2012. They also talked to the Stan ley brothers, marijuana growers who developed the strain, which is legal in Colorado. Thats when they de cided to seek the treat ments legalization in Florida, teaming up with two lobbyists and a pub licist who donated their time. Simultaneously, conservative Panhandle Republican Rep. Matt Gaetz was being pres sured by a Democratic colleague to support the idea of legalizing Char lottes Web. He was skep tical, but willing to lis ten. He set up a phone call with the Stanley brothers, who told him about the Moseleys. I was not on re for the issue until I got to meet the Moseleys, Gaetz said. Sharing the Moseleys story lit a re in me that I couldnt nd a way to put out until passing this bill. Part of that story is how RayAnn came into the Moseleys lives. RayAnns birth moth er was a prostitute and drug user. She often didnt get the medica tion doctors prescribed to treat the seizures that have tormented her since birth. The state took custody of RayAnn when she was 2, but its not easy nd ing foster parents for a child with cerebral pal sy and intractable epi lepsy. They placed her at a hospital where Hol ly Moseley, a pediatric nurse, saw her in a crib covered with netting. We just connected. You just cant help but fall in love with those blue eyes, Moseley said. You could just see inside of her that need for love. Three days later, Moseley was off but couldnt help thinking about RayAnn stuck in a crib that looked like a cage. Christmas was approaching and she got permission to have RayAnn join her family for the holidays. She laughed the whole night there was just a big smile on her face, Moseley said. Right after Christ mas, the Moseleys hired a lawyer and started a three-year ght to adopt RayAnn, whose birth mother resisted giving her up. The same month Moseley gave birth to her rst of two biologi cal children, RayAnn be came the couples adop tive daughter. On the good days, its fabulous, said her teacher, Angela Pettus. She is just so much fun, she is such a joy. She keeps us laugh ing, she keeps us enter tained. But on the bad days she can be angry and frustrated either by the side effects of her med ications or when her seizures increase in in tensity. She will go through spurts of extreme growth where shes getting things, things are start ing to click. Shes doing great, shes reading, shes comprehending, shes doing math, Pettus said. Then shell go through a period of seizures and shell lose a lot of it and were back to square one again. Its hard to watch that in a child. Theres just a lot of intelligence in there, that if they could get her seizures under con trol and they could get her leveled out, her doors could be wide open, Pettus said. RayAnns cerebral palsy affects her abili ty to speak and, while her parents understand her, most people have a difcult time com municating with her. The Moseleys hope that could change with help from Charlottes Web. In the state of Colo rado we do know that 85 percent of children who are using non-euphoric marijuana to control sei zures and spasms have seen a 50 to 100 percent reduction in those sei zures, Gaetz said. I imagine that theres this whole other in ner being in RayAnn that hasnt come out yet that wants to come out, that just hasnt physi cally been able to come out. I just look really look forward to meet ing her for the rst time pharmaceutical free, Peyton Moseley said. I dont think God has brought us this far for it not to work. EPILEPTIC FROM PAGE A3 William Spinelli said an agenda memo that the city had provided Central Flori da, KFC with electric utility services from 1999 to 2012, and that the error dates back to when the city installed two meters for KFC and Wendys. It appears the meters were crossed, Spinelli said in the memo. Basically, KFC electric meter was monitor ing Wendys electric utility usage, and Wendys electric meter was monitoring KFCs electric utility usage. He said the city has changed the electric utili ty meters a couple of times over the years, however, nei ther the city nor the restau rants realized what was go ing on until KFC ofcially closed in 2012. Spinelli said in the memo that it wasnt until the follow ing month after the closed KFC received a full months electric utility bill that the error was discovered. As a result of the error, the parties entered into negoti ations for the amount owed and the terms of the settle ment. Spinelli said under the terms of the agreement, no further claims will be as serted by KFC against the city for any sum paid by KFC prior to the date of the set tlement agreement. The citys attorney will be moving forward with ne gotiations with Wendys in order to recoup the losses from KFC, Spinelli said in the memo. The city commission is expected to approve the $65,000 settlement agree ment with KFC, and Spinelli said in the memo that Lees burg does have sufcient funds to cover the cost from the scal year 2014 budget. KFC FROM PAGE A3 KEN THOMAS Associated Press WASHINGTON Hillary Rodham Clintons decision on seeking the White House again could stretch into 2015, and shes making no commitments about testify ing before a select congres sional committee investigat ing the 2012 terrorist attacks in Benghazi, Libya. In an excerpt of an inter view with ABC News that aired Sunday, the former sec retary of state said potential primary rivals are free to do whatever they choose to do on whatever timetable they decide. I just want to get through this year, travel around the country, sign books, help in the midterm elections in the fall and then take a deep breath and kind of go through my pluses and mi nuses, said Clinton. The former secretary of state remains the leading Democratic presidential contender in 2016. She said she would decide on running when it feels right for me to decide, adding she would be on the way to making a de cision by the end of the year. Asked by ABCs Diane Saw yer whether she would de cide by the end of the year, Clinton said, certainly not before then. Would her announcement stretch into next year? Clin ton said she was not posi tive about next year. But the way I make decisions, thats probably likely. Some Democrats pri vately worry that if Clinton holds off on making a deci sion and then opts against running, potential candi dates like Vice President Joe Biden, Maryland Gov. Martin OMalley and several Demo cratic senators would be at a disadvantage against Repub licans who have been active ly pursuing the White House. I just dont think thats a real concern, Clinton said. Clintons 2016 decision could come next year AP FILE PHOTO This June 2 photo shows Hillary Clinton during a meeting with community leaders in Denver.

PAGE 6

A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 9, 2014 RODNEY MUHUMUZA Associated Press KAMPALA, Uganda Speak no Hebrew. Thats what Ugan dan teachers repeatedly tell the South Sudanese teenagers transplant ed here from Israel. But Hebrew is what they speak when they are not being watched; its the language they grew up with as migrants. Some 70 South Suda nese teenagers now call Kampala their home af ter they were deport ed from or voluntari ly left Israel, which is trying to rid itself of tens of thousands of Af rican migrants. In re cent years Africans have poured into Israel, causing friction with lo cals and alarming some authorities who say Is raels Jewish character is threatened by the pres ence of the Africans. After leaving Israel the teenagers spent a few months in their home country, South Sudan, where they struggled because of the threat of hunger, tropical dis eases and the countrys political tensions. They later were relocated to Uganda thanks main ly to the work of an Is raeli activist who has criticized his coun trys policy toward Afri can migrants as Israels moment of shame. The 44-year-old ac tivist, Rami Gudovitch, entered the lives of the teenagers as both fa ther gure and friend, rst by trying to pre vent their impending deportations from Is rael and then by nd ing families willing to sponsor their education in Africa. In Decem ber 2012 he put a group of them on a bus leav ing the South Sudanese capital of Juba for Kam pala, where the chil dren hoped to return to school and start afresh as refugees. Many of those now enrolled at a private boarding school in Kampala have Israe li benefactors who pay their tuition of about $1,000, charity for which they are grate ful but which doesnt cancel the memory of the country they called home for much of their life. They must adjust to a different culture and school system, often without the help of fam ily. Many students who should be one or two years away from taking college-entrance exam inations are now stuck in lower grade school because their English is not adequate, a se rious consequence of the transition from Isra el, where they were in structed in Hebrew. When they rst came here they had a lan guage barrier, said Alex Gumisiriza, a science teacher who heads aca demic programs at Trin ity School. But now they are catching up. Several of the teen agers who spoke to The Associated Press said they left Israel in 2011 or 2012 and lived in South Sudan before coming to Uganda. The move had effective ly broken up their fam ilies, with many going months without seeing their parents. Although some said their parents had chosen to return to South Sudan in re sponse to growing an ti-refugee sentiment in Israel, many were de ported. We were told that in Israel they didnt want refugees, that there were many refugees in the country, said Vic toria James, a bub bly 16-year-old stu dent whose family lived in Tel Aviv. It was very bad. I was going to live in a country that I knew nothing about. James said she miss es her friends, who oc casionally chat with her on Facebook, and her teachers. Quite a few of the students said they miss Tel Avivs big malls, of which there are not many in Uganda. Oth ers recall the good bas ketball courts there. Many of the Afri can migrants pouring across Israels southern border with Egypt come from Eritrea and South Sudan, countries with a history of political vi olence and rights abus es. Israel has now built a fence along the bor der with Egypt, all but stopping the inux. It passed a law that allows for the migrants de tention and said it has a deal with an uniden tied country to host some of the Africans until they are able to re turn home. An Israeli ofcial told The Associated Press that Israel had begun sending dozens of Afri can migrants to Ugan da in a voluntary depor tation campaign that Ugandan ofcials and refugee authorities in sist they know nothing about. While there is no formal agreement with Uganda, the Israeli of cial said, Israel is pay ing up to $3,500 to each migrant who agreed to leave for Uganda. The ofcial spoke on con dition of anonymity be cause he was not au thorized to speak to the media on this matter. Migrants and activ ists said the arrange ment, which includes a one-way ticket and a stipend, is questionable because its unclear if theres an ofcial agree ment with Uganda to secure their status. Gudovitch, the an ti-deportation activist, said he was ashamed of Israels policy toward African migrants. Part of the Jewish tra dition is to accept refu gees, he said. I think Israel should protect ref ugees because we have been refugees and we dont know the next time we shall be refugees. His group, an Israe li nonprot called Be come, supports the South Sudanese stu dents as part of its ef forts to help vulnerable children in the worlds poorest parts. They are Israeli kids, Gudovitch said. For me these kids are represen tative of my country. After Israel, African kids start afresh in Uganda REBECCA VASSIE / AP In this April 9 photo, South Sudanese teenager Asunta Atoch, 16, left, who previously lived in Israel, listens to her friends talk about their time in the country, in a classroom at the Trinity boarding school where they now live in Kampala, Uganda. Some 70 South Sudanese teenagers now call Kampala their home after they were deported from or voluntarily left Israel, which is trying to rid itself of tens of thousands of African migrants. In recent years Africans have poured into Israel, causing friction with locals and alarming some authorities who say Israels Jewish character is threatened by the presence of the Africans.

PAGE 7

Monday, June 9, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 O n meeting Ukraines presi dent-elect, Petro Poroshen ko, in Warsaw on Wednes day, President Obama said the United States was absolutely committed to standing behind the Ukrainian people ... not just in the coming days ... but in the coming years. That commitment is important because Ukraine has become the symbol of whether Russia can get away with destabilizing its European neighbors. Poroshen ko must not only reform a sink ing economy but also combat armed pro-Russian militias that have grabbed chunks of eastern Ukraine. So Obama wasnt kidding when he said, The challenge now for the international community is to make sure that we are sup porting Petros efforts. The ques tion is whether Washington and the European Union will rise to the challenge, which will become more acute in the coming weeks. Having just returned from Ukraine, I believe Poroshenko and the current Ukrainian gov ernment are nally ready to start the economic reforms so vital for the country. They understand that Ukraine will no longer tol erate the massive Russian-style corruption practiced by the pre vious president, Viktor Yanu kovych, who stole billions before decamping to Russia in February. That was the message of the mid dle-class Euro-maidan revolution that lled Kievs Independence Square for months, and ultimate ly led to Yanukovychs exit. Ukraine has one-quarter of the Polish economy, even though we started at the same level 30 years ago, says Ukraines impressive minister of economic develop ment, Pavlo Sheremeta (who has an MBA from Emory University in Atlanta). So it is absolutely under standable why people went out on the streets. If the president and parliament dont deliver by 2015, the people will be back. I would expect another maidan. People dont want to live like this. Russian meddling, however, makes it even harder for Ukraine to undertake the painful reforms necessary to get its economy on a solid footing. Moscow is play ing political games with the price of its gas, on which Ukraine de pends; it practically doubled the price to Kiev after Yanukovych fell. And although it has recog nized the results of the presiden tial elections, Moscow appears to be sending even more arms and men into eastern Ukraine to fur ther destabilize the region. The message to Poroshenko: return to our economic and political or bit or we will make it impossible for you to govern. The former president of the Kyiv School of Economics, the 42-year-old minister cites two urgent economic priorities: ghting corruption with much more energy and deregulating Ukraines economy from Rus sian-style controls. Like Russia, post-communist Ukraine witnessed a sell-off of key state-owned resources for a song to well-connected individuals, of ten former party members, the richest of whom became known as oligarchs. Several oligarchs are now serving as governors, and Poroshenko the chocolate bil lionaire is sometimes consid ered in their number. I asked Sheremeta how his country could reform if the oli garchs were still omnipres ent. His reply: Poroshenko has promised to sell his assets and not use his wealth for econom ic gains while he serves as presi dent. If wealthy individuals act as good servants of Ukraine and other players have equal access to markets and state re sources, Sheremeta says, the re forms can move forward. This will be a stretch, but at least, un like in Russia, Ukrainian ofcials recognize the problem and are trying to address it. As for Maa-style corruption and corrupt courts, Shereme ta says his government under stands the country cant develop further if it doesnt take care of these wrongs. Moreover, says the minister, the government also knows, giv en its geography, it has to deal with both the European Union and Russia. Both sides must un derstand that solutions of ei ther-or cant be good for us. But an openness to Russia does not mean that Ukraine will abandon its efforts to imple ment rule of law or cease its ef forts to join the European Union. It doesnt mean it will cling to a Russian-style economy with sub sidies it cannot sustain. And it doesnt mean that Ukraine will, like Russia, clamp down on the civil society that went to the streets. On the con trary, says Sheremeta, It is ab solutely vital that civil-soci ety activists keep an eye on the economy. Indeed, groups of professionals who took part in the demonstrations are now lob bying for specic legislation to reform courts and the health sys tem, and to devolve more powers to the regions. Sheremeta told me he is in regular touch with their leaders, who are notching some successes. Talking to the minister, it is pos sible to imagine that Ukraine could emulate Poland and be come an economic success sto ry over the next decade, in agri culture, IT, and industry were Moscow not so determined to prevent it. Helping them get there will require Western resolve. Trudy Rubin is a columnist and edi torial-board member for the Philadel phia Inquirer. Readers may write to her at: Philadelphia Inquirer, P.O. Box 8263, Philadelphia, Pa. 19101, or by email at trubin@phillynews.com. OTHER VOICES Trudy Rubin MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Ukraine reform will need Western support S yrias elections Tuesday and President Bashar Assads victory in them were a bad joke, given the level of wreckage and continuing violence in the country, but American policy toward Syria continues to lag reality. The Syrian government claimed a 73 percent turnout of eligible voters in Tuesdays elections, with Assad having received 89 percent of the vote, against two other candidates in the race. The claimed outcome was better than Egypts late May noncontest, when 47 percent of Egyp tians were claimed to have turned out to elect former Field Marshal Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, who led last years coup detat there, with 97 percent of the vote, against one opponent. The Syrian elections took place, of course, only in the part of the country that government forces control. They also took place minus the estimated 3 million Syrian refugees who have ed the country, 13 percent of the population, currently sheltering in Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Turkey and elsewhere, and the thousands of in ternally displaced Syrians in no position to vote. Nonetheless, the fact that Assads regime felt it could hold elections, and that it was ful ly condent that Assad would win a pre condition to holding them was clear evi dence that he will not be departing the scene anytime soon, pending a successful assas sination attempt. In general, his and his re gimes success can be attributed to the mili tary success of his forces on the ground, even though signicant parts of the country re main beyond their control. This phenome non is due to his forces ghting ability and armaments, but also to the support they have received from Hezbollah ghters from Leba non, Iran, Iraqi exiles and Russia. U.S. policy across the now three years of the Syrian upheaval has remained out of synchro nization with what has occurred on the ground. President Barack Obamas administration rst perceived the Syrian uprising as part of the Arab Spring and trumpeted Assads departure from power as necessary and imminent. The next chapter was the use of chemical weapons in the war, which prompted Wash ington to threaten military action. That under taking was neutered when Russia proposed, instead, that Syria be obliged to give up its chemical weapons, which it has more or less done. In the meantime, the United States pro vided humanitarian and (oxymoronic) nonle thal military aid to allegedly moderate rebels. Now, Mr. Obama is promising the Syrian reb els new, more lethal aid, as their defeat on the ground has become obvious, and prospects of a negotiated peace stand at zero. It doesnt matter a whole lot unless he belatedly takes America to war in Syria or provokes one or other of the par ties to the conict to initiate terrorist action in the United States for revenge. Distributed by MCT Information Services A VOICE US policy on Syria continues out of step with reality Classic DOONESBURY 1974

PAGE 8

A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 9, 2014

PAGE 9

SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 9, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com GOLF: Inbee Park wins with course record / B4 PHOTOS BY DARKO VOJINOVIC / AP Spains Rafael Nadal bites the trophy after winning the nal of the French Open tennis tournament against Serbias Novak Djokovic on Sunday at Roland Garros stadium, in Paris. Nadal won in four sets 3-6, 7-5, 6-2, 6-4. HOWARD FENDRICH AP Tennis Writer PARIS Trying to beat Rafael Nadal at the French Open is, with out a doubt, the tough est task in tennis. In deed, must be among the greatest challenges in all of sports. The pressure he ap plies, from set to set, game to game, point to point, shot to shot. That bullwhip of a high-bouncing, topspin lefty forehand. Those quick-reex returns that help him break an opponents serve and his will. Doing what he does so well on the red clay of Roland Garros, a sur face and site he dom inates so completely, the No. 1-seeded Nad al wore down No. 2 No vak Djokovic 3-6, 5-7, 2-6, 6-4 Sunday to win his ninth French Open championship and fth in a row, both records. For me, Nadal said, playing here in Roland Garros is just unforget table, forever. It is also his 14th Grand Slam title over all, tying the 28-yearold Spaniard with Pete Sampras for the second most by a man, behind only Roger Federers 17. That includes two tro phies for Nadal at Wim bledon and one apiece at the U.S. Open and Australian Open, prov ing he can beat the best on grass and hard courts, too. But its on the clay of Paris where Nadal reigns supreme: He has won 66 of his 67 career matches at the French Open. And since his only de feat, against Robin Soder ling in the fourth round in 2009, Nadal has won 35 consecutive matches at Roland Garros. Its not impossible, but its very, very dif cult to stay with Rafa in this court, throughout the whole match, on the highest level of perfor mance, said Djokovic, who was broken in the nal game of each set, including with an anti climactic double-fault on match point after fans shouted during the Serbs service motion. Its normal that you have ups and downs. Nadal ensured that he, not Djokovic, will be ranked No. 1 on Mon day. And in the pro cess, Nadal once again prevented six-time ma jor champion Djokovic from completing a ca reer Grand Slam. Sorry for him today. I Nadal tops Djokovic for ninth French Open title, 14th major Nadal returns the ball to Federer in the third set. US team confident as it heads to Brazil RONALD BLUM Associated Press SAO PAULO The U.S. headed to Bra zil with boosted faith Sunday after going un defeated in its sendoff series for the rst time. Playing only its third match in nine months against a World Cup team, the U.S. defense appeared rmer in a 2-1 win over Nigeria following the decision to start both Jermaine Jones and Kyle Becker man in mideld. And Jozy Altidore broke a six-month scoreless streak for club and country with a pair of goals, including a ashy effort when he cut inside Super Ea gles captain Joseph Yobo and slotted in a right-footed shot from 12 yards. This game gives us condence, but the MARK HUMPHREY / AP Ben Crane is congratulated after winning the St. Jude Classic golf tournament on Sunday, in Memphis, Tenn. Ben Crane wins St. Jude Classic for fifth PGA championship MIKE GROLL / AP Jimmie Johnson, left, congratulates Dale Earnhardt Jr. after Earnhardt won the Pocono 400 auto race at Pocono Raceway on Sunday in Long Pond, Pa. SEE OPEN | B2 DAN GELSTON AP Sports Writer LONG POND, Pa. Dale Earnhardt Jr. passed Brad Keselowski down the stretch to win a thrill er Sunday at Pocono Raceway. Earnhardt led only 11 laps but his No. 88 Chev rolet was the car to beat down the stretch, and he zipped past the dominant Keselowski, who Dale Jr. pulls away late for second win of season SEE NASCAR | B2 MARK DIDTLER Associated Press ST. PETERSBURG Felix Hernandez struck out a career-high 15 in seven innings before Endy Chavez keyed a ve-run ninth with a tiebreaking RBI sin gle, leading the Seat tle Mariners to a 5-0 victory over the Tampa Bay Rays on Sunday. James Jones had a two-run triple for the Mariners, who have won seven of eight. Hernandez had won his previous ve starts, which was two away from tying the team record held by Jamie Moyer (2003) and Scott Bankhead (1989), but the Mari ners were held score less until the ninth by Chris Archer and three relievers. King Felix scattered four hits over seven in nings. After Brad Mill er hit a two-out tri ple and Willie Bloom quist walked against Grant Balfour (0-2), the left-handed hitting Chavez slapped a twostrike single to left for a 1-0 lead. Jones had his triple before Kyle Seager added a tworun double. Yoervis Medina (3-1) King Felix fans 15 as Mariners top Rays SEE RAYS | B2 TERESA M. WALKER AP Sports Writer MEMPHIS, Tenn. Ben Crane estimates he slept less than three hours in a night spent praying and thanking God that his game nally has come back around. Then he played 30 holes Sunday in winning the St. Jude Classic for his rst PGA Tour title since 2011, setting off a celebration that includ ed hugging his caddie and high-ving a reporter. Crane also choked back some tears as he looked at text messages lling his phone. Oh my gosh, it just keeps going, Crane said, looking at his phone. How many can a phone hold? This is so much fun Crane closed with a 3-over 73 for a one-stroke victo ry, going wire to wire for his fth career victory. Rain de lays forced him into the mar athon session Sunday at TPC Southwind, nishing 12 holes in the morning in a thirdround 69 to take a three-shot lead into the nal round. He two-putted for bo gey on the nal hole to n ish at 10-under 270, days af ter failing to qualify for the U.S. Open. That marked a low point for the 38-year-old player who spent the past six months reworking his swing to protect his back wonder ing if his career was over. He spent time with a coach pic turing the right way to hit shots. Everything clicked Thurs day with an opening 63. I did not expect the hole to open up like that and just start making putts from ev erywhere, Crane said. Just hit a lot of quality shots and SEE GOLF | B2 United Statess Jozy Altidore (17) moves the ball against Nigeria during the second half of an international friendly soccer match on Saturday in Jacksonville. The United States won 2-1. JOHN RAOUX / AP Its been a grind but at the end of the day, we accomplished everything we set out to do, and thats to get three wins. Thats really all that matters. Matt Besler US defender SEE SOCCER | B2

PAGE 10

B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 9, 2014 Lightning game postponed The scheduled gmae between the Leesburg Lightning and Sanford River Rats has been suspended after the rst inning with the Lightning holding a 3-1 lead. The game will be resumed at a time and date to be determined. NASCAR Sprint Cup-Pocono 400 Results Sunday At Pocono Raceway Long Pond, Pa. Lap length: 2.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (8) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 160 laps, 120.9 rating, 47 points, $198,965. 2. (3) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 160, 143.3, 44, $213,783. 3. (2) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 160, 118.4, 42, $142,600. 4. (1) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 160, 107.2, 41, $137,500. 5. (14) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 160, 96, 40, $136,320. 6. (20) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 160, 97.8, 39, $150,851. 7. (15) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 160, 84.9, 37, $101,365. 8. (5) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 160, 114.8, 37, $132,251. 9. (17) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 160, 85.9, 35, $115,973. 10. (18) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 160, 81.5, 34, $121,029. 11. (19) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 160, 96.8, 33, $126,631. 12. (6) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 160, 86.6, 32, $129,481. 13. (12) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 160, 105.2, 32, $124,073. 14. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 160, 110.4, 30, $119,523. 15. (28) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 160, 68, 29, $118,815. 16. (13) Greg Bife, Ford, 160, 73.9, 28, $121,640. 17. (11) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 160, 73.7, 27, $125,601. 18. (32) David Ragan, Ford, 160, 55.8, 26, $106,523. 19. (9) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 160, 81.4, 26, $112,090. 20. (30) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 160, 58.6, 24, $97,048. 21. (21) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 160, 64.4, 23, $93,498. 22. (22) Aric Almirola, Ford, 160, 66.2, 22, $115,926. 23. (25) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 160, 60, 21, $98,298. 24. (29) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 160, 57.5, 20, $104,760. 25. (26) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 160, 52.6, 19, $124,826. 26. (23) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 160, 60.9, 18, $105,154. 27. (24) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 160, 65, 18, $95,312. 28. (35) David Gilliland, Ford, 160, 50.2, 16, $85,115. 29. (33) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 160, 44.2, 15, $74,465. 30. (40) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 159, 41.2, 14, $75,815. 31. (34) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 159, 41.4, 13, $74,165. 32. (41) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 159, 33.5, 12, $73,990. 33. (31) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 158, 41.6, 0, $73,790. 34. (36) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 158, 40.1, 10, $73,590. 35. (37) Josh Wise, Ford, 158, 35.3, 9, $73,440. 36. (39) Timmy Hill, Toyota, 158, 27.8, 8, $81,190. 37. (16) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 158, 55.9, 7, $81,004. 38. (38) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 157, 32, 0, $68,030. 39. (42) Alex Kennedy, Chevrolet, 156, 28.4, 5, $64,030. 40. (7) Joey Logano, Ford, engine, 150, 80.8, 4, $100,021. 41. (10) Carl Edwards, Ford, accident, 143, 73.1, 3, $75,030. 42. (27) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, accident, 142, 67.7, 2, $71,430. 43. (43) Dave Blaney, Ford, 142, 23.9, 1, $48,530. NBA Playoff Glance All Times EDT FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) San Antonio 1, Miami 0 Thursday, June 5: San Antonio 110, Miami 95 Sunday, June 8: Miami at San Antonio, late Tuesday, June 10: San Antonio at Miami, 9 p.m. Thursday, June 12: San Antonio at Miami, 9 p.m. x-Sunday, June 15: Miami at San Antonio, 8 p.m. x-Tuesday, June 17: San Antonio at Miami, 9 p.m. x-Friday, June 20: Miami at San Antonio, 9 p.m. NHL Playoff Glance All Times EDT FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) Los Angeles 2, N.Y. Rangers 0 Wednesday, June 4: Los Angeles 3, NY Rangers 2, OT Saturday, June 7: Los Angeles 5, NY Rangers 4, 2OT Monday, June 9: Los Angeles at NY Rangers, 8 p.m. Wednesday, June 11: Los Angeles at NY Rangers, 8 p.m. x-Friday, June 13: NY Rangers at Los Angeles, 8 p.m. x-Monday, June 16: Los Angeles at NY Rangers, 8 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 18: NY Rangers at Los Ange les, 8 p.m. French Open Results Sunday At Stade Roland Garros Paris Purse: $34.12 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Doubles Women Championship Hsieh Su-wei, Taiwan, and Peng Shuai (1), China, def. Sara Errani and Roberta Vinci (2), Italy, 6-4, 6-1. Legends Doubles Men Over 45 Championship John and Patrick McEnroe, United States, def. An dres Gomez, Ecuador, and Mark Woodforde, Austra lia, 4-6, 7-5, 10-7. Sundays Sports Transactions BASEBALL TV 2 DAY SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED SUN mon tues wed thurs fri SatLeesburg LightningJune 8 14@ College Park Freedom7p mSanford River Rats5p mWinter Garden Squeeze7p m@ Winter Garden Squeeze7p mWinter Garden Squeeze7p mCollege Park Freedom7p m COLLEGE BASEBALL 1 p.m. ESPN2 NCAA Division I, playoffs, super regionals, game 3, College of Charleston at Texas Tech (if necessary) 4 p.m. ESPN2 NCAA Division I, playoffs, super regionals, game 3, Maryland at Virginia (if necessary) 7 p.m. ESPN2 NCAA Division I, playoffs, super regionals, game 3, Mississippi at Louisi ana-Lafayette or Pepperdine at TCU (if necessary) ESPNU NCAA Division I, playoffs, super regionals, game 3, Mississippi at Louisi ana-Lafayette or Pepperdine at TCU (if necessary) CYCLING 6 p.m. NBCSN Criterium du Dauphine, stage 2, Tarare to Pays dOlliergues-Col du Beal, France MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m. MLB, SUN Seattle at Tampa Bay 7 p.m. ESPN L.A. Dodgers at Cincinnati NHL 8 p.m. NBCSN Stanley Cup nals, game 3, Los Angeles at N.Y. Rangers FedEx St. Jude Classic Leading Scores Sunday At TPC Southwind Memphis, Tenn. Purse: $5.8 million Yardage: 7,239; Par: 70 Final FedEx Cup points in parentheses Ben Crane (500), $1,044,000 63-65-69-73 -10 Troy Merritt (300), $626,400 67-66-67-71 -9 Matt Every (145), $301,600 69-68-65-70 -8 Carl Pettersson (145), $301,600 67-67-69-69 -8 Webb Simpson (145), $301,600 71-66-69-66 -8 James Hahn (86), $181,540 69-70-67-67 -7 Brian Harman (86), $181,540 69-65-67-72 -7 Billy Horschel (86), $181,540 67-68-68-70 -7 Ian Poulter (86), $181,540 69-68-72-64 -7 Andrew Svoboda (86), $181,540 69-66-68-70 -7 Phil Mickelson (68), $139,200 67-68-67-72 -6 Camilo Villegas (68), $139,200 68-64-71-71 -6 Rickie Fowler (56), $102,467 70-68-68-69 -5 Chesson Hadley (56), $102,467 67-69-72-67 -5 J.J. Henry (56), $102,467 66-70-71-68 -5 Ben Martin (56), $102,467 69-67-74-65 -5 Austin Cook, $102,467 67-73-65-70 -5 Ted Potter, Jr. (56), $102,467 68-67-70-70 -5 Tim Clark (50), $70,296 68-69-67-72 -4 Brooks Koepka, $70,296 67-70-72-67 -4 Peter Malnati (50), $70,296 65-68-70-73 -4 John Peterson (50), $70,296 69-68-73-66 -4 Will Wilcox (50), $70,296 70-67-68-71 -4 Jason Bohn (46), $49,445 67-68-70-72 -3 Paul Casey (46), $49,445 70-67-70-70 -3 Dustin Johnson (46), $49,445 68-67-75-67 -3 Graeme McDowell (46), $49,445 69-68-70-70 -3 Charles Howell III (42), $40,310 71-68-71-68 -2 Steve Marino (42), $40,310 69-70-68-71 -2 George McNeill (42), $40,310 69-69-73-67 -2 Charlie Wi (42), $40,310 68-71-69-70 -2 Ben Curtis (34), $28,842 70-69-71-69 -1 Tommy Gainey (34), $28,842 69-68-70-72 -1 Danny Lee (34), $28,842 72-67-67-73 -1 William McGirt (34), $28,842 73-66-74-66 -1 Ryan Palmer (34), $28,842 67-72-72-68 -1 Heath Slocum (34), $28,842 69-70-70-70 -1 Cameron Tringale (34), $28,842 68-70-70-71 -1 Jhonattan Vegas (34), $28,842 69-70-70-70 -1 Tim Wilkinson (34), $28,842 68-68-70-73 -1 Retief Goosen (34), $28,842 66-66-75-72 -1 Scott Stallings (34), $28,842 68-72-68-71 -1 Luke Guthrie (27), $20,300 67-72-70-71 E Davis Love III (27), $20,300 65-70-71-74 E Sean OHair (27), $20,300 69-70-70-71 E Chad Campbell (24), $16,443 70-68-71-72 +1 Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano (24), $16,443 67-70-71-73 +1 Robert Streb (24), $16,443 70-70-72-69 +1 Boo Weekley (24), $16,443 69-70-70-72 +1 Ryuji Imada (20), $14,268 71-69-71-71 +2 Kevin Kisner (20), $14,268 65-72-70-75 +2 John Rollins (20), $14,268 70-69-69-74 +2 Zach Johnson (15), $13,241 64-74-74-71 +3 Benjamin Alvarado (15), $13,241 68-72-70-73 +3 Stuart Appleby (15), $13,241 65-74-72-72 +3 Woody Austin (15), $13,241 68-71-72-72 +3 Miguel Angel Carballo (15), $13,241 68-70-74-71 +3 Stewart Cink (15), $13,241 70-66-75-72 +3 Jeff Overton (15), $13,241 68-71-72-72 +3 Freddie Jacobson (10), $12,644 67-71-73-73 +4 Martin Laird (10), $12,644 70-67-76-71 +4 Greg Owen (10), $12,644 70-70-70-74 +4 John Merrick (8), $12,354 70-68-77-70 +5 LPGA Manulife Financial Classic Leading Scores Sunday At Grey Silo Golf Course Waterloo, Ontario Purse: $1.5 million Yardage: 6,336; Par: 71 Final Inbee Park, $225,000 69-66-65-61 261 -23 Cristie Kerr, $136,903 67-69-65-63 264 -20 Shanshan Feng, $99,314 66-65-67-68 266 -18 Belen Mozo, $69,332 68-67-68-65 268 -16 Lydia Ko, $69,332 71-67-64-66 268 -16 Stacy Lewis, $46,471 69-69-68-63 269 -15 Michelle Wie, $46,471 65-67-68-69 269 -15 Chella Choi, $35,229 70-69-67-64 270 -14 Suzann Pettersen, $35,229 70-67-67-66 270 -14 Caroline Masson, $27,320 69-67-70-65 271 -13 So Yeon Ryu, $27,320 68-67-70-66 271 -13 Hee Young Park, $27,320 65-66-72-68 271 -13 Anna Nordqvist, $27,320 69-64-69-69 271 -13 Na Yeon Choi, $23,086 68-67-68-69 272 -12 Catriona Matthew, $19,638 71-67-70-65 273 -11 Line Vedel, $19,638 69-70-69-65 273 -11 Mirim Lee, $19,638 69-73-65-66 273 -11 Meena Lee, $19,638 70-67-68-68 273 -11 Angela Stanford, $19,638 71-67-67-68 273 -11 Austin Ernst, $16,340 69-69-70-66 274 -10 Julieta Granada, $16,340 72-69-67-66 274 -10 Marina Alex, $16,340 68-68-71-67 274 -10 Candie Kung, $16,340 70-68-65-71 274 -10 Karine Icher, $12,320 69-71-72-63 275 -9 Louise Friberg, $12,320 72-69-70-64 275 -9 Joanna Klatten, $12,320 70-70-70-65 275 -9 Jaye Marie Green, $12,320 70-68-70-67 275 -9 Paz Echeverria, $12,320 68-71-68-68 275 -9 Mi Jung Hur, $12,320 73-68-66-68 275 -9 Jennifer Johnson, $12,320 70-68-69-68 275 -9 Danielle Kang, $12,320 71-68-67-69 275 -9 Jennifer Rosales, $12,320 69-72-65-69 275 -9 Jee Young Lee, $12,320 68-68-69-70 275 -9 Thidapa Suwannapura, $12,320 72-66-67-70 275 -9 Gerina Piller, $9,032 73-70-69-64 276 -8 Alejandra Llaneza, $9,032 68-71-70-67 276 -8 Sue Kim, $9,032 71-70-67-68 276 -8 Anya Alvarez, $9,032 71-66-70-69 276 -8 Katie M. Burnett, $7,345 73-69-70-65 277 -7 Christel Boeljon, $7,345 75-68-66-68 277 -7 Jane Park, $7,345 70-68-71-68 277 -7 Kris Tamulis, $7,345 69-73-66-69 277 -7 Tiffany Joh, $7,345 72-68-67-70 277 -7 Xi Yu Lin, $7,345 67-67-71-72 277 -7 Giulia Molinaro, $5,921 71-70-70-67 278 -6 a-Brooke M. Henderson, 70-71-69-68 278 -6 Laura Davies, $5,921 71-71-67-69 278 -6 Haru Nomura, $5,921 68-70-71-69 278 -6 Morgan Pressel, $5,921 71-68-69-70 278 -6 Alena Sharp, $5,921 73-69-65-71 278 -6 P.K. Kongkraphan, $5,022 72-67-76-64 279 -5 Jacqui Concolino, $5,022 68-68-74-69 279 -5 Katie Futcher, $5,022 72-66-70-71 279 -5 Megan McChrystal, $5,022 70-71-66-72 279 -5 Jennifer Kirby, $4,422 71-70-69-70 280 -4 Ilhee Lee, $4,422 69-73-68-70 280 -4 Mi Hyang Lee, $4,422 70-71-68-71 280 -4 Kristy McPherson, $4,422 68-68-73-71 280 -4 Maria Hernandez, $3,663 72-71-69-69 281 -3 Brittany Lang, $3,663 72-71-69-69 281 -3 Moira Dunn, $3,663 68-71-72-70 281 -3 Pernilla Lindberg, $3,663 78-64-69-70 281 -3 Ji Young Oh, $3,663 72-68-71-70 281 -3 Jeong Jang, $3,663 70-72-68-71 281 -3 think he deserves to win this tournament, Na dal said. I am sure he will do it in the future. Djokovic had won their four most recent matches, including on clay in the best-ofthree-set nal at Rome last month, but beating Nadal in the best-of-ve format at the French Open is a whole other matter. Nadal also beat Djokovic in the 2012 nal, and the 2013 semi nals. In all, Nadal leads Djokovic 6-0 at the French Open, 9-3 at ma jor tournaments, and 23-19 in total. No other pair of men has played each other as often. For 3 1/2 hours Sun day, when the sky was crystal clear and the temperature touched 80 degrees), Djokov ic gave everything he had, even spitting up on court in the nal set. I played at the max imum of my power, my strength, and my capa bility, Djokovic said, but Rafa was the best player on the court. Using his backhand to great effect against Nadals forehand ear ly, Djokovic grabbed the rst set, and got to 5-all in the second. That is when everything changed. Knowing that overcoming a two-set hole might be too much even for him, Nadal raised his level, taking 20 of 26 points to claim that set and a 3-0 lead in the third. When a down-theline forehand win ner ended the second set, Nadal leaped and shook both sts, his rst sign of real emo tion. Djokovic, mean while, was his usu al animated self. He rapped his knuckles on his temple. He chas tised himself aloud. He spiked his racket, drawing whistles from spectators. The momentum went (to) his side, Djokovic said. I start ed playing quite bad and didnt move as well. Struggled a little bit physically throughout that third set. OPEN FROM PAGE B1 had debris on his grille and a hot engine, with ve laps remaining in the 400-mile race. Ke selowski was second for the second straight race. Earnhardt won the Daytona 500 and now has multiple wins in a season for the rst time since 2004. Keselowski has a runner-up nish to go with his 95 laps led. Kurt Busch, Den ny Hamlin and rookie Kyle Larson round out the top ve. Earnhardt gives Hendrick Motorsports three straight wins, following back-toback victories by Jim mie Johnson. Johnson overcame a pit road mishap to nish sixth. I dont have much to do tomorrow, a grin ning Earnhardt said. Tonights going to be a long one. Keselowski had the car to beat in his No. 2 Ford when a piece of trash stuck to his grille. He appeared to yield the lead to Earnhardt in an attempt to clean off the front grille and not lose time. He stalked Earnhardt down the stretch, but could nev er recover, losing his shot at his second win of the season. I was trying to make a move to clean it off, Keselowski said. I re alized I made a mis take. His misjudgment worked out just ne for Earnhardt. NASCAR FROM PAGE B1 threw a scoreless eighth for the win. Hernandez reached 1,800 career strike outs when he struck out Evan Longoria to end the third. Hernandez struck out six through three innings, and 11 though ve. This was the right-handers 29th dou ble-digit strikeout per formance, which moved him past Mark Langston into sole possession of second place on the Mariners career list. Rays starter Chris Ar cher gave up ve hits over 6 1/3 scoreless in nings. He is just 1-1 over his last ve starts de spite allowing just three runs in 31 innings. The Mariners loaded the bases with one out in the fth, but failed to score. Archer got a forceout at the plate af ter making a stumbling grab on Jones come backer before left eld er Matt Joyce made a one-handed at the wall on Robinson Canos op posite-eld drive. Cano extended his road hitting streak to 17 games with a oneout ineld single in the eighth. NOTES: After Mon days game at Tampa Bay, the Mariners re turn home Tuesday night to open a threegame series with a ter ric pitching matchup. RHP Hisashi Iwakuma (4-2, 2.66 ERA) and RHP Masahiro Tanaka (9-1, 2.02 ERA), former team mates with Rakuten of Japans Pacic League, are the scheduled start ers. Thats a match up that I would pay to see, Seattle manager Lloyd McClendon said. I think it will be a dandy. The Mariners will also honor Yankees SS Der ek Jeter, who is retiring. RAYS FROM PAGE B1 obviously built a nice lead to start out with. Troy Merritt was sec ond after a 71. Webb Simpson (65), Matt Ev ery (70) and Carl Pet tersson (69) were 8 un der, and Ian Poulter had a 64 to tie for sixth at 7 under. Merritt credited the best nish of his career to an improved short game. Ben played great, Merritt said. Hats off to him. Well deserved. Hes been struggling for a lit tle while. Very happy for Ben. Phil Mickelson, among those tuning up for the U.S. Open at Pinehurst, left winless in his 20th event since the British Open. He tied for 11th at 6 under after a 72. Consecutive birdies on Nos. 11 and 12 put Mick elson at 8 under. But he bogeyed the next two, including the par-3 14th where he hit a 7-iron into the water in front of the green. He still nished much better than his tie for 49th at Memorial last week after an early visit from FBI agents and lin gering questions about an insider-trading inves tigation. The way I drove the ball last two rounds I had an opportunity to shoot really low, Mick elson said. My iron play was poor, and my putting was pathetic. Ill have to make some changes and to get ready for next week. But the game is not far off because Im driving the ball very well and put ting it in play. Wind, thunderstorms, lightning and fog have delayed play each of the rst three days. With more storms forecast, players started the nal round almost immedi ately after concluding the third. They nished with out single delay Sunday as the sun even came out as this tournament n ished its 57th year with out being shortened be cause of weather. GOLF FROM PAGE B1 whole send-off series should give us con dence, defender Matt Besler said Saturday night. Its been a grind but at the end of the day, we accomplished everything we set out to do, and thats to get three wins. Thats real ly all that matters. The Americans were scheduled to trav el from Jacksonville, Florida, to Miami on Sunday, then board a commercial ight for the roughly nine hour trip to Sao Paulo, South Americas larg est city with a popula tion of about 11.3 mil lion. They will base at a downtown hotel. The Americans open on June 16 against Ghana, a team similar in style to Nigeria. Thats the rea son why we played this game, to kind of hopefully see maybe some of the things that Ghana will do, Alti dore said. Obviously, it wont be the same. But we hope we take the things that we did well today to the Gha na game and try to use that to our advantage. Going by FIFA rank ings, the Americans Group G was the most difcult to come out of Decembers draw. But in the June rank ings, it became the sec ond-toughest with Ger many (No. 2), Portugal (No. 4), the U.S. (No. 13) and Ghana (No. 37) adding to 56. Group D was slightly lower at 53, with Uruguay (No. 7), It aly (No. 8) and England (No. 10) and Costa Rica (No. 28). U.S. coach Jurgen Klinsmann knows de fense is a key for an American team that constantly went be hind during the 2010 tournament. SOCCER FROM PAGE B1

PAGE 11

Monday, June 9, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Toronto 38 26 .594 6-4 L-2 19-15 19-11 Baltimore 31 30 .508 5 1 5-5 L-1 12-14 19-16 New York 31 31 .500 6 2 3-7 L-2 13-16 18-15 Boston 27 34 .443 9 5 5-5 L-5 15-17 12-17 Tampa Bay 24 40 .375 14 10 1-9 L-2 13-18 11-22 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 33 25 .569 4-6 W-2 16-14 17-11 Cleveland 32 31 .508 3 1 8-2 W-2 21-11 11-20 Kansas City 31 32 .492 4 2 6-4 W-2 16-16 15-16 Chicago 31 33 .484 5 3 4-6 L-3 17-14 14-19 Minnesota 29 32 .475 5 3 5-5 L-1 15-17 14-15 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 39 24 .619 7-3 W-1 17-12 22-12 Los Angeles 34 28 .548 4 5-5 W-3 18-13 16-15 Seattle 33 29 .532 5 7-3 W-2 14-15 19-14 Texas 31 32 .492 8 2 4-6 L-2 15-17 16-15 Houston 28 36 .438 11 6 6-4 W-1 14-18 14-18 NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 32 29 .525 4-6 L-2 18-14 14-15 Washington 32 29 .525 7-3 W-1 19-15 13-14 Miami 33 30 .524 5-5 W-1 22-11 11-19 New York 28 35 .444 5 5 3-7 L-6 13-17 15-18 Philadelphia 25 36 .410 7 7 2-8 L-2 12-19 13-17 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 38 26 .594 6-4 W-2 19-13 19-13 St. Louis 33 31 .516 5 4-6 W-2 16-14 17-17 Cincinnati 29 32 .475 7 3 6-4 W-2 15-15 14-17 Pittsburgh 29 33 .468 8 3 6-4 L-2 17-15 12-18 Chicago 25 35 .417 11 6 6-4 L-1 15-14 10-21 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY San Francisco 42 21 .667 8-2 W-5 22-9 20-12 Los Angeles 33 31 .508 10 1 3-7 L-1 13-19 19-12 Colorado 29 33 .475 12 3 2-8 W-1 17-11 12-21 San Diego 28 35 .444 14 5 4-6 L-1 16-19 12-16 Arizona 28 37 .431 15 6 6-4 W-2 11-23 17-14 SATURDAYS GAMES St. Louis 5, Toronto 0 Minnesota 8, Houston 0 Cleveland 8, Texas 3 Seattle 7, Tampa Bay 4 Detroit 8, Boston 6 Kansas City 8, N.Y. Yankees 4 Baltimore 6, Oakland 3 L.A. Angels 6, Chicago White Sox 5 SATURDAYS GAMES St. Louis 5, Toronto 0 Chicago Cubs 5, Miami 2 Milwaukee 9, Pittsburgh 3 Colorado 5, L.A. Dodgers 4, 10 innings Cincinnati 6, Philadelphia 5 San Francisco 5, N.Y. Mets 4 Arizona 4, Atlanta 3, 11 innings San Diego 4, Washington 3, 11 innings SUNDAYS GAMES St. Louis 5, Toronto 0 Oakland 11, Baltimore 1 Seattle 5, Tampa Bay 0 Houston 14, Minnesota 5 Kansas City 2, N.Y. Yankees 1 Cleveland 3, Texas 2 L.A. Angels 4, Chicago White Sox 2 Boston at Detroit, 8:07 p.m. SUNDAYS GAMES St. Louis 5, Toronto 0 Cincinnati 4, Philadelphia 1 Milwaukee 1, Pittsburgh 0 Miami 4, Chicago Cubs 3 San Francisco 6, N.Y. Mets 4 Arizona 6, Atlanta 5 Washington 6, San Diego 0 L.A. Dodgers6, Colorado 1 (6) TODAYS GAMES Seattle (E.Ramirez 1-4) at Tampa Bay (Price 4-5), 1:10 p.m. Boston (Peavy 1-3) at Baltimore (B.Norris 4-5), 7:05 p.m. Minnesota (Nolasco 4-5) at Toronto (Dickey 6-4), 7:07 p.m. Cleveland (House 0-1) at Texas (N.Martinez 1-2), 8:05 p.m. Detroit (Porcello 8-3) at Chicago White Sox (Noesi 1-4), 8:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Nuno 1-2) at Kansas City (Vargas 5-2), 8:10 p.m. Houston (Cosart 4-5) at Arizona (Collmenter 4-2), 9:40 p.m. Oakland (J.Chavez 5-3) at L.A. Angels (Richards 5-2), 10:05 p.m. TODAYS GAMES Chicago Cubs (E.Jackson 4-5) at Pittsburgh (Morton 2-7), 7:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Haren 5-4) at Cincinnati (Cingrani 2-6), 7:10 p.m. Atlanta (Floyd 0-2) at Colorado (Bergman 0-0), 8:40 p.m. Houston (Cosart 4-5) at Arizona (Collmenter 4-2), 9:40 p.m. Washington (Strasburg 5-4) at San Francisco (Vogelsong 4-2), 10:15 p.m. AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Cano, Seattle, .332; VMartinez, Detroit, .329; Rios, Texas, .328; MiCabrera, Detroit, .321; AlRamirez, Chicago, .321; Altuve, Houston, .315; Bautista, Toronto, .313. RUNS : Donaldson, Oakland, 51; Dozier, Minnesota, 50; Bautista, Toronto, 48; Kinsler, Detroit, 43; NCruz, Bal timore, 42; MeCabrera, Toronto, 41; Encarnacion, To ronto, 41. RBI : NCruz, Baltimore, 55; MiCabrera, Detroit, 51; Don aldson, Oakland, 50; Encarnacion, Toronto, 50; Moss, Oakland, 49; JAbreu, Chicago, 47; Bautista, Toronto, 44. HITS : Altuve, Houston, 84; MeCabrera, Toronto, 81; Rios, Texas, 79; Markakis, Baltimore, 78; AlRamirez, Chicago, 77; AJones, Baltimore, 76; Cano, Seattle, 75. DOUBLES : Plouffe, Minnesota, 22; MiCabrera, Detroit, 20; Hosmer, Kansas City, 20; Altuve, Houston, 19; Kins ler, Detroit, 19; Pedroia, Boston, 19; EEscobar, Minne sota, 18; AGordon, Kansas City, 18. TRIPLES : Rios, Texas, 6; Bourn, Cleveland, 5; Trout, Los Angeles, 5; 12 tied at 3. HOME RUNS : NCruz, Baltimore, 21; Encarnacion, To ronto, 19; JAbreu, Chicago, 17; Donaldson, Oakland, 17; Bautista, Toronto, 15; Moss, Oakland, 15; Pujols, Los Angeles, 15. STOLEN BASES : Altuve, Houston, 21; Ellsbury, New York, 18; RDavis, Detroit, 16; AEscobar, Kansas City, 16; Andrus, Texas, 14; Gardner, New York, 14; Dozier, Min nesota, 13; LMartin, Texas, 13. PITCHING : Buehrle, Toronto, 10-2; Tanaka, New York, 9-1; FHernandez, Seattle, 8-1; Porcello, Detroit, 8-3; Scherzer, Detroit, 7-2; Keuchel, Houston, 7-3; Weaver, Los Angeles, 7-4. ERA : Tanaka, New York, 2.02; Buehrle, Toronto, 2.04; Darvish, Texas, 2.36; Kazmir, Oakland, 2.40; Keuchel, Houston, 2.50; FHernandez, Seattle, 2.57; Gray, Oak land, 2.83. STRIKEOUTS : Price, Tampa Bay, 101; Kluber, Cleveland, 99; Scherzer, Detroit, 98; Lester, Boston, 95; Tanaka, New York, 92; Darvish, Texas, 91; FHernandez, Seattle, 91. SAVES_Holland, Kansas City, 17; Rodney, Seattle, 17; Perkins, Minnesota, 16; DavRobertson, New York, 14. NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Tulowitzki, Colorado, .360; Puig, Los Angeles, .335; Lucroy, Milwaukee, .327; MaAdams, St. Louis, .325; Pagan, San Francisco, .323; Utley, Philadelphia, .319; CGomez, Milwaukee, .308. RUNS: Tulowitzki, Colorado, 50; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 46; Pence, San Francisco, 45; Stanton, Miami, 45; CGo mez, Milwaukee, 42; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 41; Rendon, Washington, 40. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 53; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 44; Morse, San Francisco, 42; Howard, Philadelphia, 41; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 41; Blackmon, Colorado, 40; Puig, Los Angeles, 40. HITS: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 76; DanMurphy, New York, 76; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 74; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 73; DWright, New York, 73; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 72; Pence, San Francisco, 72; Puig, Los Angeles, 72. DOUBLES: Utley, Philadelphia, 24; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 23; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 21; Byrd, Philadelphia, 18; Are nado, Colorado, 17; KDavis, Milwaukee, 17; CGomez, Milwaukee, 17; Phillips, Cincinnati, 17; HRamirez, Los Angeles, 17. TRIPLES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 6; Yelich, Miami, 5; Pollock, Arizona, 4; Rendon, Washington, 4. HOME RUNS: Stanton, Miami, 17; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 16; Frazier, Cincinnati, 13; Morse, San Francisco, 13; Reynolds, Milwaukee, 13; JUpton, Atlanta, 13. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 36; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 23; EYoung, New York, 17; Revere, Philadel phia, 16; Bonifacio, Chicago, 13; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 13; Blackmon, Colorado, 12; ECabrera, San Diego, 12. PITCHING: Greinke, Los Angeles, 8-2; Wainwright, St. Louis, 8-3; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 8-3; Simon, Cincin nati, 8-3; Ryu, Los Angeles, 7-2; Lohse, Milwaukee, 7-2. ERA: Teheran, Atlanta, 1.89; Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.97; Hudson, San Francisco, 1.97; Cashner, San Diego, 2.13; Wainwright, St. Louis, 2.31; Hammel, Chicago, 2.53. STRIKEOUTS: Strasburg, Washington, 101; Cueto, Cin cinnati, 97; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 90. SAVES: Romo, San Francisco, 19; FrRodriguez, Milwau kee, 18; Street, San Diego, 18; Jansen, Los Angeles 17. Kimbrel, Atlanta, 16; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 16. Mariners 5, Rays 0 Seattle Tampa Bay ab r h bi ab r h bi EnChvz lf 5 1 2 1 DJnngs cf 3 0 1 0 J.Jones cf 5 1 2 2 Kiermr rf 4 0 1 0 Cano 2b 4 1 1 0 Longori 3b 4 0 0 0 Seager 3b 5 0 1 2 Loney 1b 4 0 0 0 Zunino c 4 0 0 0 Zobrist 2b 4 0 1 0 Ackley dh 4 0 0 0 DeJess dh 2 0 1 0 Gillespi rf 4 0 2 0 Joyce lf 3 0 0 0 BMiller ss 2 1 1 0 YEscor ss 3 0 0 0 Blmqst 1b 3 1 1 0 JMolin c 2 0 0 0 Smoak 1b 0 0 0 0 Forsyth ph 1 0 0 0 Solis c 0 0 0 0 Totals 36 5 10 5 Totals 30 0 4 0 Seattle 000 000 005 5 Tampa Bay 000 000 000 0 EZobrist (5). DPSeattle 1. LOBSeattle 9, Tampa Bay 5. 2BSeager (13), DeJesus (13). 3BJ.Jones (3), B.Miller (1). SBCano (5), De.Jennings (12), Zo brist (4). SB.Miller. IP H R ER BB SO Seattle F.Hernandez 7 4 0 0 1 15 Medina W,3-1 1 0 0 0 1 0 Leone 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Furbush 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 2 Tampa Bay Archer 6 1 / 3 5 0 0 1 2 McGee 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Jo.Peralta 1 1 0 0 0 1 Balfour L,0-2 1 4 5 5 2 2 HBPby Archer (Zunino). WPF.Hernandez 2. UmpiresHome, Todd Tichenor; First, Clint Fagan; Second, Tim Timmons; Third, Tim Welke. T:10. A,158 (31,042). Royals 2, Yankees 1 New York Kansas City ab r h bi ab r h bi Gardnr lf 5 0 2 0 Aoki rf 2 0 0 0 Jeter ss 4 0 0 0 Dyson cf 1 0 0 0 Ellsury cf 4 0 1 0 Infante 2b 3 0 1 0 Beltran dh 3 0 0 0 Hosmer 1b 3 0 0 0 McCnn c 4 0 0 0 BButler dh 3 0 0 0 Solarte 3b 4 1 2 0 AGordn lf 2 0 0 0 ISuzuki rf 4 0 2 1 S.Perez c 3 1 1 0 BRorts 2b 3 0 1 0 L.Cain cf-rf 3 1 1 1 KJhnsn 1b 3 0 0 0 Mostks 3b 3 0 1 1 Teixeir ph 1 0 0 0 AEscor ss 3 0 1 0 Totals 35 1 8 1 Totals 26 2 5 2 New York 000 001 000 1 Kansas City 020 000 00x 2 DPNew York 3. LOBNew York 9, Kansas City 2. 2BEllsbury (15), Solarte (14), B.Roberts (8), L.Cain (8). 3BGardner (4). CSInfante (1). IP H R ER BB SO New York Kuroda L,4-4 7 5 2 2 2 3 Warren 1 0 0 0 0 0 Kansas City Shields W,7-3 6 6 1 0 2 8 Crow H,6 1 1 0 0 0 1 W.Davis H,10 1 0 0 0 0 2 G.Holland S,18-19 1 1 0 0 0 1 WPShields, G.Holland. PBS.Perez. UmpiresHome, Mike DiMuro; First, Mike Estabrook; Second, Bob Davidson; Third, Jerry Layne. T:48. A,614 (37,903). Angels 6, White Sox 5 Chicago Los Angeles ab r h bi ab r h bi Eaton cf 5 1 2 1 HKndrc 2b 4 1 1 0 GBckh 2b 3 0 1 1 Trout cf 3 1 1 4 Gillaspi 3b 4 0 2 0 Pujols 1b 4 0 0 0 JAreu 1b 4 0 0 0 Freese 3b 4 0 1 0 A.Dunn dh 4 1 1 1 JMcDnl 3b 0 0 0 0 AlRmrz ss 3 2 1 0 JHmltn lf 4 1 3 0 Viciedo rf 4 0 0 0 Cron dh 4 0 1 0 Sierra rf 0 0 0 0 Aybar ss 4 1 2 1 De Aza lf 3 1 2 2 Iannett c 4 1 1 1 Flowrs c 3 0 0 0 Cowgill rf 3 1 0 0 Totals 33 5 9 5 Totals 34 6 10 6 Chicago 002 102 000 5 Los Angeles 000 000 06x 6 EAl.Ramirez (6), Gillaspie (5), Aybar (5), Shoemaker (1). DPChicago 2, Los Angeles 2. LOBChicago 5, Los Angeles 5. 2BGillaspie (14), De Aza 2 (7), Aybar (17). HRA.Dunn (11), Trout (12). SBJ.Hamilton (2). SFlowers. SFDe Aza. IP H R ER BB SO Chicago Sale 7 7 5 4 1 6 Petricka L,0-1 1 3 1 1 0 1 Los Angeles Shoemaker 5 9 4 3 0 6 Morin 1 0 1 0 1 1 Cor.Rasmus W,1-0 2 0 0 0 1 3 Frieri S,9-11 1 0 0 0 0 2 Shoemaker pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Sale pitched to 5 batters in the 8th. UmpiresHome, Phil Cuzzi; First, Gerry Davis; Sec ond, Quinn Wolcott; Third, Greg Gibson. T:53. A,089 (45,483). Athletics 11, Orioles 1 Oakland Baltimore ab r h bi ab r h bi Jaso dh 6 1 2 4 Markks rf 3 0 1 0 Punto ss 3 1 2 2 Machd 3b 3 0 0 0 Dnldsn 3b 5 1 0 0 CJosph ph-1b 0 1 0 0 Sogard 2b 0 0 0 0 A.Jones cf 2 0 0 0 Moss lf 3 1 1 4 Lough cf 1 0 1 0 Cespds cf 5 0 2 0 N.Cruz lf 3 0 1 0 Vogt rf-c 5 0 0 0 DYong lf 1 0 1 0 DNorrs c 1 2 0 0 C.Davis 1b-3b 3 0 0 1 Gentry rf 2 1 1 0 Hardy ss 3 0 0 0 Callasp 2b-3b 3 3 1 0 Flahrty ss 1 0 0 0 Blanks 1b 2 1 1 1 Pearce dh 4 0 2 0 Schoop 2b 4 0 0 0 Hundly c 4 0 0 0 Totals 35 11 10 11 Totals 32 1 6 1 Oakland 006 130 001 11 Baltimore 000 000 010 1 EHardy (6). DPOakland 1, Baltimore 3. LOBOak land 8, Baltimore 8. 2BJaso (8), Callaspo (7), Pearce (6). HRMoss (16). IP H R ER BB SO Oakland Kazmir W,7-2 7 4 0 0 2 7 Abad 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Cook 1 / 3 2 1 1 2 0 Otero 1 0 0 0 0 0 Baltimore U.Jimenez L,2-7 2 1 / 3 2 6 6 5 2 Brach 2 4 4 4 5 0 McFarland 4 2 / 3 4 1 1 1 3 UmpiresHome, Adrian Johnson; First, Gabe Mo rales; Second, Larry Vanover; Third, Angel Her nandez. T:27. A,244 (45,971). Astros 14, Twins 5 Houston Minnesota ab r h bi ab r h bi Fowler cf 5 2 2 2 DSantn cf 5 0 1 0 Altuve 2b 3 0 1 1 Dozier 2b 2 2 1 0 Springr rf 3 2 1 1 Plouffe 3b 4 1 2 1 Singltn 1b 6 2 2 4 Wlngh lf 3 0 1 2 MDmn 3b 5 1 0 0 Arcia dh 4 0 0 0 Grssmn lf 3 3 2 0 Nunez rf 5 1 3 2 Carter dh 4 2 1 4 Parmel 1b 5 0 1 0 Corprn c 4 1 1 1 Pinto c 4 0 1 0 Villar ss 5 1 3 1 EEscor ss 3 1 0 0 Totals 38 14 13 14 Totals 35 5 10 5 Houston 011 300 414 14 Minnesota 000 120 200 5 EPinto (5), Dozier (4). DPHouston 1, Minnesota 2. LOBHouston 9, Minnesota 11. 2BSingleton (1), Grossman (4), Dozier (11). HRFowler (4), Springer (12), Singleton (2), Carter (10), Nunez (2). SBAltuve 2 (23), Grossman (3). SFAltuve, Willingham. IP H R ER BB SO Houston McHugh 4 1 / 3 3 3 3 5 6 Fields 1 2 / 3 3 0 0 0 4 Farnsworth 1 / 3 2 2 2 2 0 D.Downs W,1-0 2 2 / 3 2 0 0 0 2 Minnesota Deduno L,2-4 3 3 5 5 4 1 Swarzak 3 3 0 0 2 2 Duensing 1 3 4 4 2 1 Fien 1 2 1 1 0 3 Perkins 1 2 4 0 0 2 Deduno pitched to 3 batters in the 4th. HBPby Perkins (Springer), by Deduno (Altuve, Car ter). WPMcHugh. UmpiresHome, Ted Barrett; First, Paul Schrieber; Second, Will Little; Third, Alfonso Marquez. T:45. A,576 (39,021). Marlins 4, Cubs 3 Miami Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi Yelich lf 4 1 2 0 Bonifac 2b 4 0 3 0 Lucas 2b 5 0 1 0 Lake cf 5 0 1 0 Stanton rf 3 1 0 0 Rizzo 1b 4 0 0 0 McGeh 3b 3 1 1 0 SCastro ss 5 1 1 0 GJones 1b 3 0 0 1 Valuen 3b 3 1 1 1 Ozuna cf 3 1 1 0 Schrhlt rf 4 0 1 2 Realmt c 4 0 1 1 Coghln lf 3 0 1 0 Morris p 0 0 0 0 JoBakr c 3 0 1 0 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 Arrieta p 2 0 0 0 Hchvrr ss 4 0 1 1 Schlittr p 0 0 0 0 HAlvrz p 2 0 1 0 Barney ph 0 1 0 0 DJnngs p 0 0 0 0 Strop p 0 0 0 0 RJhnsn ph 1 0 0 0 Ruggin ph 1 0 0 0 ARams p 0 0 0 0 Grimm p 0 0 0 0 MDunn p 0 0 0 0 Mathis c 1 0 0 0 Totals 33 4 8 3 Totals 34 3 9 3 Miami 000 000 220 4 Chicago 000 002 100 3 EG.Jones (8), Coghlan (1). DPMiami 1, Chicago 1. LOBMiami 7, Chicago 10. 2BLake (10), S.Castro (17), Valbuena (14). 3BSchierholtz (3). SBYelich 2 (10). CSBonifacio (5). SBonifacio, Jo.Baker. SFG.Jones. IP H R ER BB SO Miami H.Alvarez 5 1 / 3 7 2 1 0 5 Da.Jennings 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 1 A.Ramos 2 / 3 1 1 1 1 1 M.Dunn W,5-3 2 / 3 0 0 0 2 1 Morris H,6 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Cishek S,14-15 1 0 0 0 0 2 Chicago Arrieta 6 3 0 0 0 7 Schlitter BS,1-1 1 3 2 2 1 0 Strop L,0-3 BS,1-3 1 1 2 2 2 2 Grimm 1 1 0 0 0 1 HBPby A.Ramos (Barney), by Strop (Stanton). WPStrop. UmpiresHome, Marcus Pattillo; First, David Rackley; Second, Brian Gorman; Third, Tony Randazzo. T:18. A,134 (41,072). Reds 4, Phillies 1 Philadelphia Cincinnati ab r h bi ab r h bi Revere cf 3 1 1 0 BHmltn cf 4 1 1 2 Rollins ss 3 0 1 0 Schmkr lf 4 0 0 0 Utley 2b 3 0 0 1 Phillips 2b 3 0 1 0 Howard 1b 4 0 1 0 Bruce rf 3 0 1 0 Byrd rf 4 0 1 0 Mesorc c 3 0 0 0 DBrwn lf 4 0 1 0 Frazier 3b 3 1 1 0 Ruiz c 4 0 1 0 Lutz 1b 3 0 0 0 CHrndz 3b 4 0 0 0 Cozart ss 3 1 1 0 Buchnn p 2 0 0 0 Bailey p 3 1 1 2 GwynJ ph 0 0 0 0 AChpm p 0 0 0 0 Bastrd p 0 0 0 0 Mayrry ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 32 1 6 1 Totals 29 4 6 4 Philadelphia 001 000 000 1 Cincinnati 000 040 00x 4 DPPhiladelphia 1. LOBPhiladelphia 8, Cincinnati 2. 2BCozart (10). HRB.Hamilton (2). SBRevere (17), Rollins (8). CSPhillips (3). SFUtley. IP H R ER BB SO Philadelphia Buchanan L,1-3 6 6 4 4 0 6 Bastardo 2 0 0 0 0 2 Cincinnati Bailey W,7-3 8 6 1 1 3 7 A.Chapman S,9-10 1 0 0 0 0 3 HBPby Buchanan (Phillips). WPBailey. UmpiresHome, Paul Nauert; First, Tom Hallion; Sec ond, Sean Barber; Third, Chris Guccione. T:40. A,222 (42,319). Brewers 1, Pirates 0 Milwaukee Pittsburgh ab r h bi ab r h bi Segura ss 4 0 0 0 JHrrsn rf 5 0 0 0 Braun rf 4 0 0 0 NWalkr 2b 2 0 0 0 Lucroy c 4 1 3 0 AMcCt cf 4 0 2 0 CGomz cf 4 0 1 0 GSnchz 1b 4 0 0 0 ArRmr 3b 3 0 0 1 RMartn c 3 0 1 0 KDavis lf 3 0 0 0 CStwrt c 0 0 0 0 RWeks 2b 2 0 0 0 PAlvrz 3b 4 0 0 0 MrRynl 1b 3 0 0 0 SMarte lf 3 0 0 0 Gallard p 2 0 0 0 Mercer ss 3 0 1 0 Falu ph 1 0 0 0 I.Davis ph 0 0 0 0 Wooten p 0 0 0 0 Barmes pr 0 0 0 0 FrRdrg p 0 0 0 0 Locke p 2 0 1 0 Tabata ph 1 0 0 0 Watson p 0 0 0 0 Grilli p 0 0 0 0 Snider ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 30 1 4 1 Totals 32 0 5 0 Milwaukee 000 000 100 1 Pittsburgh 000 000 000 0 ESegura (8). DPMilwaukee 2. LOBMilwaukee 3, Pittsburgh 10. 2BLucroy 2 (23), A.McCutchen (17). SBLucroy (3), S.Marte (14). CSR.Weeks (2). IP H R ER BB SO Milwaukee Gallardo W,4-4 7 4 0 0 1 8 Wooten H,5 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 Fr.Rodriguez S,19-21 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 2 1 Pittsburgh Locke L,0-1 7 3 1 1 1 5 Watson 1 0 0 0 0 0 Grilli 1 1 0 0 0 0 HBPby Gallardo (N.Walker, R.Martin). UmpiresHome, Ed Hickox; First, Lance Barrett; Sec ond, John Tumpane; Third, Mike Everitt. T:57. A,002 (38,362). Cardinals 5, Blue Jays 0 St. Louis Toronto ab r h bi ab r h bi MCrpnt 3b 5 1 2 2 Reyes ss 4 0 1 0 Tavers rf 4 0 1 0 MeCarr lf 3 0 0 0 Grichk ph-rf 1 0 0 0 Bautist rf 3 0 0 0 YMolin dh 3 0 1 0 Encrnc 1b 3 0 0 0 Craig 1b 4 0 1 0 Lawrie 3b 4 0 0 0 JhPerlt ss 4 1 2 1 StTllsn 2b 2 0 1 0 Jay lf 4 1 1 0 Gose ph 1 0 0 0 M.Ellis 2b 4 1 1 0 DNavrr dh 4 0 0 0 Bourjos cf 3 0 1 1 Kratz c 3 0 1 0 T.Cruz c 4 1 1 1 Lind ph 1 0 1 0 Pillar cf 3 0 0 0 JFrncs ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 36 5 11 5 Totals 32 0 4 0 St. Louis 041 000 000 5 Toronto 000 000 000 0 EM.Carpenter (8), St.Tolleson (2). DPToronto 1. LOBSt. Louis 6, Toronto 9. 2BJh.Peralta (16), T.Cruz (2). HRM.Carpenter (2), Jh.Peralta (10). MIKE CARLSON / AP Tampa Bay Rays Evan Longoria reacts after striking out to end the third inning of a baseball game against the Seattle Mariners on Sunday in St. Petersburg. The Rays lost 5-0.

PAGE 12

B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 9, 2014 the top spot in the world ranking to Stacy Lewis, Park nished at 23-un der 261 at Grey Silo for her 10th LPGA Tour ti tle and rst since the U.S. Womens Open. She had only one bogey in 72 holes on the fourth hole in the rst round. The 25-year-old South Korean star played the front nine in 5-under 31 and added birdies on Nos. 10, 12-14 and 18 to match the course re cord set last year by Hee Young Park. Park ended a 20-event tour winless streak. Last year, she swept the rst three majors and n ished the season with six victories. You Make the CA L L!June 9 15This Weeks Leesburg Lightning ScheduleAlways FREE Admission! Rainout Information 352-234-4489 You Make the CA L L!This Weeks Leesburg Lightning ScheduleAlways FREE Admission! Game Times: 7pm Weekdays Sun 5pm Answer on FridayTHE PLAY: With R1 on first and R2 on second and no outs, B3 attempts a bunt. The bunt goes way high into the air, but neither F1 or F5 can field it. All three runners advance. The defensive coach argues that an infield fly should have been called.Rainout Information 352-234-4489 Mon. 6/9..............no game Tues. 6/10............Winter Garden SqueezeWed. 6/11............@ Winter Garden SqueezeThurs. 6/12............Winter Garden SqueezeFri. 6/13............@ College Park FreedomSat. 6/14............College Park FreedomSun. 6/15............@ College Park Freedom HORSE RACING BETH HARRIS AP Racing Writer NEW YORK Cal ifornia Chrome went home to the West Coast on Sunday with a ban daged right front foot and no Triple Crown after bumping an other horse leaving the Belmont Stakes start ing gate. Steve Coburn, who co-owns California Chome, was still smart ing, too. He was irked Bel mont winner Tonalist didnt run in either of the rst two legs of the Triple Crown. After the race, he complained others took the cow ards way out by skip ping the Derby and/or the Preakness. A day later, Coburn was unrepentant. Its not fair to these horses that are run ning to entertain these people in all three legs of the Triple Crown, he said. Its not fair to them to have some body just show up at the last minute and run. I may have gone off half-cocked yester day, but thats the way I feel. Under Coburns premise, there would have been just three horses in the $1.5 mil lion Belmont, making it unlikely the third-larg est crowd of 102,199 would have shown up or that a record $19,105,877 would have been wagered ontrack. California Chrome, General a Rod and Ride On Curlin were the only horses to run in the Derby, Preakness and Belmont. General a Rod nished seventh and Ride On Curlin did not nish. Art Sherman, the 77-year-old trainer of California Chrome, dis tanced himself from Coburns comments. Horses arent cow ards and the people ar ent cowards, he said. He was at the heat of the moment. Dont for get hes a fairly new owner. Sometimes your emotions get in front of you. He hasnt been in the game long and hasnt had any bad luck. Coburn and Per ry Martin named their racing operation Dumb Ass Partners, with Cal ifornia Chrome the lone horse in their sta ble. The chestnut colt has earned $3,317,800 this year and brought a six-race winning streak into the Belmont. GOLF NBA AP PHOTO Anjali Ranadive, left, daughter of Sacramento Kings owner Vivek Ranadive, chats with NBA Commissioner Adam Silver at the NBA lottery on May 20 in New York. TIM REYNOLDS AP Basketball Writer SAN ANTONIO In the rst NBA Finals game of his reign as the leagues commissioner, Adam Silver had to deal with a sweltering arena. Compared to what hes gone through in re cent weeks, that seemed like a breeze. Speaking to The Asso ciated Press on Friday at an NBA Cares event, Sil ver said hes thrilled that the leagues attention can be on the champi onship series between the Miami Heat and San Antonio Spurs and not, as it was for so much of the post season, on the off-thecourt matters involving the banishment of Los Angeles Clippers own er Donald Sterling and now the looming sale of that franchise. No question, Sil ver said. In fairness to all the players and the t eams, they worked so hard to get to this mo ment and a hot build ing is part of the com petition in essence. And all those other things that weve been talking about the last several weeks are not. Posing for photos with Spurs players, coach Gregg Popovich, gener al manger R.C. Buford and others, Silver was all smiles when the cer emonial red ribbon was cut at the leagues lat est Learn & Play Cen ter at a San Antonio elementary school. Its the 897th time that the league has been in volved with opening a facility like that, and an other similar event will be held in Miami when the series shifts there next week. Silver made no pre diction, other than say ing he thinks the HeatSpurs matchup could be a long series. Associated Press WATERLOO, On tario Inbee Park won the Manu life Financial Clas sic on Sunday for her rst LPGA Tour ti tle in more than 11 months, matching the course record with a 10-under 61 for a three-stroke vic tory over Cristie Kerr. A week after losing Silver: Pleased, proud with attention on Finals California Chrome heads home GARRY JONES / AP California Chromes exercise rider Willie Delgado holds California Chrome as his hoof is checked after coming in fourth at the Belmont Stakes on Saturday in Elmont, N.Y. Inbee Park wins Manulife Financial Classic DAVID CHIDLEY / THE CANADIAN PRESS Inbee Park kisses the trophy after winning the Manulife Financial LPGA Classic on Sunda in Waterloo, Ontario.

PAGE 13

Living Healthy Send your health news to features @dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 9, 2014 DIABETES: Insurance-sponsored program getting results / C2 Health check www.dailycommercial.com LOUIS DELUCA / MCT ABOVE, BELOW: Tattoo artist Cody Biggs works on a tattoo on the arm of Adam Metzger in Dallas, on May 15. Experts advise making sure you are up to date on your immunizations, especially hepatitis and tetanus, before getting a tattoo. LIZZIE JOHNSON MCT D ALLAS Thir teen needles are si multaneously zing ing in and out of Adam Metzgers shoulder. The 27-year-old is un rufed. He stares unblink ingly out the storefront window of Taboo Tattoo, a studio in the Bishop Arts District. To his right, Cody Biggs shades blue into a square of the Texas state ag. His movements are sure, even. The buzzing suddenly falls silent. Biggs pauses to dunk the handpiece into a thimble-sized plastic cup of ink, then turns back to his canvas. Metzgers shoulder is pink and puffy, weeping streams of ink and blood. How are you doing, buddy? Biggs asks, rub bing on ointment in coun terclockwise circles. It doesnt feel good, man, Metzger responds. But Ive denitely felt worse pain. Plenty of people know what hes been through. As of 2012, one in ve adults had a tattoo, up from 14 percent in 2008, a Harris Interactive Poll found. And when safety standards are followed, tattoos are usu ally trouble-free. But tattoos can pose health risks that many peo ple might not consider: Unsterilized tools or contaminated ink can lead to infection, scarring, blood-borne diseases and other, less-obvious issues. Its becoming much more common, but you still have to be careful, says Dr. Bryan Wasson, an internal medicine phy sician at Baylor Scott & White Medical Center at Irving, Texas. A tattoo is like a minor surgery. You clean and shave the skin like youre going to operate. You use surgical tools. There are dangers. So be careful in your selec tion. During the procedure, a gun with needles punc tures the top layer of the skin, depositing pigment in a deeper layer called the dermis. As the skin heals, the ink remains trapped below the surface. When you get a tattoo, you bleed, said Dr. Donna Casey, an internal medical specialist at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital. Because you are bleed ing, anything in contact with the tattoo bacteria, viruses can get into the Tattoo health risks Why you should do your research before heading to the studio SEE RISKS | C4 NICOLE BRODEUR MCT SEATTLE Julie Lewis remem bers every last detail. The moving box she was carrying, the phone call, the doctor on the line telling her, You better sit down. You may have HIV, he told her. A blood transfusion Lewis received in 1984 hadnt been tested for the vi rus; Washington state law didnt re quire it until the following year. And the person who gave her the blood had AIDS. So Lewis needed to be tested, along with her husband and three children, aged two, four and six. Days later, Lewis was the only one found to be HIV positive with three to ve years to live. Do you have a living will? the doctor asked her. And are your things in order? And Im 32. What 32-year-old has a living will? Thirty years since the fateful trans fusion, Lewis, now 55, is alive and well. She and her husband, Scott, are grandparents to two baby boys. And their son, Ryan, 26, is a Gram my-winning producer and multimil lionaire, thanks to his partnership with longtime friend Ben Haggerty, also known as Macklemore. To celebrate her survival, and to help others do the same, Lewis has launched the 30/30 Project, an effort to build 30 medical centers world wide, and sustain them for 30 years. Lewis has partnered with Construc tion for Change, a Seattle nonprot that will construct the new medical facilities, starting with one in Mala wi, where one in 10 adults have HIV or AIDS. Julie Lewis has worked for Construction for Change for the last three years. Another agency, Partners in Health, will staff each center with She turned a death sentence into a fulfilling life At first I was just trying to get by day to day and then I pretty much decided to be best friends with denial. I didnt know what to do with three to five years. Julie Lewis SEE LIFE | C2 WILDWOOD Area 13 family care council meeting scheduled The Area 13 Family Care Council will meet from 10 a.m. to noon today at the Wildwood Agency for Persons with Disabilities ofce, 1601 W. Gulf Atlantic Highway (State Road 44) in Wildwood, for those interested in development disabilities and their families. For information about the Family Care Council, go to www. FCCFlorida.org. LEESBURG Parkinsons Support Group meeting set for Tuesday The Lake County Parkinsons Support Group will host a meeting from 1 to 3 p.m. Tuesday at the Lake Square Presbyterian Church, 10200 Morningside Dr., in Leesburg. Special guest for the meeting is Julie England, extension agent for the UF/Lake County Extension ofce, who will discuss what to eat and what not to eat. For information, call Dave or Pat Tribbey at 352-343-0376 or email Dtribbey108@comcast.net. TAVARES Cornerstone Hospice to celebrate 30 years Thursday Cornerstone Hospice will give the public the opportunity to meet the staff at the complex and tour the facility at this open house celebration from noon to 6 p.m., on Thursday at 2445 Lane Park Road. Light refreshments will be served and door prizes will be awarded to guests. For information, call 352-3431341 or go to www.cshospice.org. LAKE COUNTY LIFE-Social Support Group luncheons set for June The Leesburg LIFE Luncheon will take place at 11:30 a.m. on Thursday at the Leesburg Community Center, 109 East Dixie Ave., in Leesburgs Venetian Gardens. Cost is $10. The LIFE Luncheon in Eustis will be held at 11:30 a.m. June 18 at Golden Corral, 15810 U.S. Highway 441. After lunch, Paul Vincoli will entertain. The newest LIFE Luncheon will be at 11:30 a.m. on June 20 at North Lake Presbyterian Church, 975 Rolling Acres Road, behind Home Depot in Lady Lake. The meal will be prepared by the church staff. Cost is $12. To RSVP, call 352-787-0403 or email rreed@beyersfhc.com. MOUNT DORA Brain Fitness Classes for Seniors to start July 14 Learn the steps to a healthy brain in an eight-week class on Mondays and Wednesdays beginning July 14 and running through Sept. 3. The classes will be from 10 a.m. to noon or 2 to 4 p.m., at the Brain Gym, 500 Waterman Ave., in Mount Dora.

PAGE 14

C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 9, 2014 Aching Feet? Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES Save Up To... 80% OFFPharmacy Prices!Generic MedicinesCialis20mg.24 count.....$89.95 Viagra100mg.20 count.....$65.95 Actonel35mg.12 count.....$69 RX REQUIRED CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi. North of K-Mart on Hwy. 441)(352) 347-0403/fx (352) 347-2034CDRX441@gmail.com HARMONY UNITED PSYCHIATRIC CARE We are a full service psychiatry practice dedicated and experienced in working with psychiatric patients to maintain & improve their mental health Psychiatric Evaluation, Diagnosis & Management of: Adil A. Mohammed, M.D. Brenda S. Faiber, M.S., LMFT OUR SERVICES www.harmonyunitedhc.com We accept most insurances with special pricing for cash paying patients.Appointments available within 7 days GOLF CART ACCESS Now, one doctor is helping local residents with back pain live more active, pain-free lives.Painless, convenient, fast-actingSoleveprocedure shown to be promising in a pilot study for 95% of patients now available exclusively at Etheredge Chiropractic.*Fruitland Park(352) 365-1191The Villages(352) 750-1200*Patients in a pilot study showed a 20-point reduction in VAS score in as few as four sessions. Gorenberg M, Schiff E, Schwartz K, Eizenberg E: A novel image-guided, automatic, high-intensity neurostimulation device for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. Pain Res Treat; 2011;2011;152307. Nervomatrix Ltd. All rights reserved. Soleve is a registered trademark D002088 health care providers. The effort ofcially kicked off last month, when Ryan Lewis pro duced a video in which he spoke for the rst time about his mothers condition, and asked for help from his fans to fund the 30/30 Proj ect. He directed them to an Indiegogo campaign that raised $160,000 enough to build the Ma lawi clinic. (Four other projects three in Ken ya and one in Uganda are waiting for funding.) Julie Lewis, too, ap peared in the video, speaking about her condition. She has come a long way since 1990, when she didnt tell anyone she was HIV positive. There were a lot of stories of discrimina tion and stigma, and we didnt want our kids to take that on, Lewis said. At rst I was just trying to get by day to day and then I pretty much de cided to be best friends with denial. I didnt know what to do with three to ve years. When you dont think you have a future, its really hard to make plans. A year after her diag nosis, NBA star Magic Johnson announced he, too, was HIV positive. I felt like he was one of my best friends, she said of Johnson. And if he can play in the NBA, then I can run around the block. She did that, and lift ed weights, and start ed to feel better well enough to talk about her condition with her children (Ryan was 6), then her friends. She signed up with an HIV/ AIDS speakers bureau that sent her to schools and universities to speak about her condi tion. People still say, Youre the AIDS lady, because I was the one who came to my kids classes with the scary HIV story. Ryan now has a giant red ribbon tattooed on his arm. But that was the only statement hes ever made about it. Nothing, even with the platform he has with Haggerty. He is not the person who is the main spokes person for his band, Lewis said of her son. Ben writes most of the lyrics, so most of their songs are Bens story. There really hasnt been a time when Ryan could speak about it. But as the anniver sary approached, We thought we needed to do something special, something meaningful, Julie Lewis said, adding that she and her hus band werent waiting for their son to reach a cer tain level of celebrity or wealth before kicking off the project. I knew I wanted to do this, she said. As a result of the vid eo launch, the Lewis es have heard from all over: CEOs, Ellen DeGe neres, and Madonnas people, who reached out about partnering. The Broadway Cares nonprot has agreed to sponsor a pass the hat for the 30/30 Proj ect at performanc es of Mothers & Sons through mid-July. If it all works out, 600,000 people will re ceive the kind of health care that saved Julie Lewis. Its the start of anoth er dream on the heel of a year that has shown them that dreams can be realized, and in a big way. LIFE FROM PAGE C1 BETTINA HANSEN / MCT Julie Lewis, mother of Ryan Lewis, started the 30/30 Project, which brings HIV-related services to needy people in far-off places. GUY BOULTON MCT Dave Elmer remembers being irked at a health screening when a nurse told him in a nice way that he was a mess. She also forcefully encouraged him to enroll in a program of fered at his local YMCA for peo ple at risk of developing diabe tes. Its the best thing thats ever happened to me, said Elmer, a certied public accountant who lives in Menomonee Falls, Wis. When he began the 16-week program, Elmer would get wind ed walking a few blocks. Six months later, he was taking sixmile walks, and he now walks two to six miles a day, ve or six times a week. His weight has fallen to 170 pounds from 217 pounds. His blood pressure and blood sugar are down. And he no longer is at risk for diabetes. My numbers are all within the normal range, Elmer said. Elmer is among more than 800 people in southeastern Wiscon sin, and more than 19,500 na tionwide, who have enrolled in the Diabetes Prevention Program offered by YMCA of the USA in partnership with the Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention and UnitedHealth Group. The program, launched in 2010, is an example of a prov en, cost-effective, scalable initia tive that focuses on keeping peo ple healthy and, in the process, changes lives and helps slow the rise in health care costs. It also is an example of an ap proach to improving health that takes place in the community and not a doctors ofce. Nationally, if trends continue, an estimated 40 million adults could have diabetes by 2021, up from 28 million in 2011, accord ing to an article in Health Affairs, a policy journal, by UnitedHealth Group doctors and executives. An estimated 100 million people could have prediabetes by then. YMCA of Metropolitan Mil waukee introduced the Dia betes Prevention Program in 2011. YMCA of Central Wauke sha County, in partnership with YMCA at Pabst Farms, and YMCA of Kettle Moraine, did the same last year. The response, so far, has been strong. Insurance-sponsored diabetes prevention program getting results RICK WOOD / MCT Vicki Olejnik moves in a water aerobics class at the Tri-County YMCA in Menomonee Falls, Wisc. on May 20. The course, for people with prediabetes, is being promoted by UnitedHealthcare. SEE DIABETES | C5

PAGE 15

Monday, June 9, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 rrfntbftbn fbbtrrfntbftb tnbftftbttn401 North Blvd. West, Leesburg352.728.424217809 S.E. 109th Ave., Summerfield352.307.4200 rfntcentersleepmed@yahoo.comAlways tired & fatigued? Do you have strange dreams or morning headaches? Type 2 Diabetes? CHF/Heart Failure? TIA (Mini Stroke)? Arrhythmias? Body Mass Index >30, (Neck Circumference Male >17, Female >16)?Management of . .Call Today 352.460.0922 Procedures: Neurological rf GI ntb fnbn Female Wellness bfbn nnn Male Wellness tbntr Weight Loss Clinic FLU SHOTS AVAILABLEwww.mid-floridaprimarycare.comSleep is the Golden Chain that ties...Health & Our Bodies Together!Ravi P. Gupta, M.D.Cardiovascular r nn bf Endocrine Disorder n Breathing Problems fn b Musculoskeletal n Non-Invasive Cardiology t n ffft Dermatology r r rntt rftnn ntnn nn Pulmonary b b Musculoskeletal t b t NEW PATIENT SPECIALComplete Exam (D0150)Digital Xrays (D0210)Cleaning (D1110)Oral Cancer Screening (D0431)with Identafi 3000*Non-Insured Patients Only. All major insurances accepted including PPO & HMO plans.$59*D002756 COURTNEY PERKES MCT Kaitlyn Dobrow climbed a short staircase, her eyes xed on every step as she pushed and lifted one pros thetic leg in front of the other. Her parents also watched raptly, not unlike when she rst learned to walk as a baby. Its amazing the things we take for granted, her father, Don Dobrow, 60, said quietly as he watched her physi cal therapy session last week at Ran cho Los Amigos National Rehabilita tion Center in Downey. Dobrow, 19, is slowly reclaiming pieces of her independence since her four limbs were amputated last year after she fell ill with a life-threaten ing case of bacterial meningitis. In addition to her legs, shes learning to use a prosthetic arm on her right side, which she customized with a leopard-print pattern. Her left arm, which was amputated just below her shoulder, will be addressed later. As she has throughout her recov ery, Dobrow, who lives in Hunting ton Beach, Calif., displays a matterof-fact, forward-looking attitude as she deals with the soreness, fatigue and frustration of learning to use her new limbs. I thought it was hard but youre going to have to get over it, Dobrow said. Its hard but I never thought its not going to happen because it kind of has to happen. One day in February 2013, Dobrow went to work and then to the gym. She felt sick that night and by the next day she was rushed to the hospital. Do brow had developed an infection that caused her blood to clot and dam age more than half her body with the equivalent of third-degree burns. She underwent 22 surgeries, including the amputations and skin grafting. She came home in October and therapists began working to prepare her highly sensitive, fragile skin for prosthesis. Late last year, she took her rst steps with support from an overhead harness to offset her body weight. Id get so excite d I wanted to jump up and down and scream, said her mother, Kathi Dobrow, 58. Its like a rst for everything again. Don and I went from having raised our kids, to last year, it was like starting with an infant and raising her to adulthood. Dobrow, although happy about standing and walking again, has con tended with setbacks. After wear ing the legs at home, she developed a large blister on her right thigh that left her unable to wear her legs again for a month. With that blister I did sit-ups and shimmied back and forth on my bed to get the blood owing a little bit, she said. You have to be t to wear your prosthetics or you cant walk. She only recently started using the legs again and must regain her stami na. Then theres the matter of adapt ing to her new body mechanics and adjustments to her equipment. At rst I was really, really tall, even taller than I was before, Do brow said. Thats why I felt so giant. I hadnt stood in forever, plus I was like 3 inches higher. They shrunk me down to my normal height of 5 foot 7. When you lift up your leg and youre just on one leg it felt like youd just topple over. I dont want to say youre paralyzed because youre moving, but you have no feeling. Dobrows physical therapist, Julie Kasayama, said Dobrow will eventu ally learn to walk without watching her feet. Bacteria took her limbs, but woman progresses ANA VENEGAS / MCT Kaitlyn Dobrow puts on makeup using a new prosthetic arm in Downey, Calif., on May 22. Kaitlyn had her arms and legs amputated last year after suffering an infection and wears her prosthetics about two hours per day. At first I was really, really tall, even taller than I was before, Dobrow said. Thats why I felt so giant. I hadnt stood in forever, plus I was like 3 inches higher. They shrunk me down to my normal height of 5 foot 7. Kaitlyn Dobrow

PAGE 16

C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 9, 2014 wound and your entire body. Its like having a bite on your leg or a gi gantic abrasion. Contaminated inks were the cause of an outbreak of serious in fections in four states in late 2011 and early 2012. These infections were caused by a type of fast-growing bac teria that caused red, itchy bumps to severe sores requiring surgery. The 22 cases were as sociated with inks con taminated before dis tribution or just before tattooing. Ingredients in tattoo ink vary, but they can contain metals, pow ders or other organ ic compounds in a liq uid base. Problems can range from allergic re actions to scarring and the formation of bumpy knots called granulo mas, more common in people with darker skin. The long-term ef fects of ink are still un known. We know that the ink will gain access to your bloodstream, Wasson says. I had a young gentleman come in, and he had a lymph node under his arm that was swollen. When we biopsied it, we found ink from his tattoo. We dont really know what happens in ternally. In rare cases, inks containing metallic pig ments can cause swell ing during magnetic resonance imaging, or MRIs. Tattoos are not an absolute contraindica tion for an MRI study, says Dr. Daihung Do, faculty director of der matologic surgery at Harvard Medical School and director of dermatologic surgery at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Bos ton. Patients should notify their radiologist that they have a dec orative or permanent tattoo so that the ap propriate precautions can be taken. Tattoos can also pre vent the early detection of skin cancer, says Pe ter Beitsch, a surgeon specializing in melano ma at Medical City Dal las Hospital. The ink can camouage chang es in asymmetry, bor ders, color and diam eter, the ABCDs of melanoma detection. This is important for fair-skinned or red headed people, who al ready have a higher risk of developing skin can cers. Sometimes when you cover up moles, the ink from the tattoo will mask changes in the mole, he says. Its not common. But if you cover up enough moles, some of them are going to turn bad, into a lethal kind of skin cancer. Beitsch refers to the case of a 35-yea r-old man who got a large tattoo on his shoulder in honor of a brother who had died of leuke mia. He did not catch changes in the mole and died of melanoma. Its tragic, Beitsch says. About half of mel anoma starts in pre-ex isting moles. Be aware that if you cover up a mole, you need to be paying attention to it. The Food and Drug Administration regu lates tattoo ink but con siders it a cosmetic and intervenes only when problems arise. The FDA has not actual ly approved any tattoo ink, and there is no spe cic requirement that explicitly says tattoo inks must be sterile. Tattoo inks are not highly regulated, Do says. Many of the pig ments are industri al grade, and none are currently FDA-ap proved. Although tat tooing has been prac ticed for thousands of years, there are few studies regarding t heir safety. Theresa Eisenman, a spokeswoman for the FDA, said this is be cause no sponsor has signed the required pe tition and provided the data needed to decide whether dye is safe for tattooing. The easiest and most important way to avoid becoming a tattoo horror story is to research the tattoo par lor and review person al health history ahead of time. Like anything, like ear piercings, you can develop other medical problems if it isnt at a clean place, Do says. It all depends on who does your tattoo and whether they are clean ing their instruments in a safe manner. If you go to the wrong place, it could be very easy to contract something. Medical experts also do not recommend tat toos for people with a history of allergies, di abetes, heart disease, skin disorders, immune system conditions, a history of infections or who are pregnant. For those with a family his tory of skin cancers, avoid areas that would cover up moles. Do your research, Metzger says. He stands in front of a mirror, ex amining the newly n ished art on his arm. There are certain things everyone should check for, he says. Find a place and an artist you like. If you dont get a good vibe, maybe that shop is not the shop for you. Some thing I always look for is an autoclave ma chine. Disposables are OK, too. I want them to wear gloves; I want to hear that snap. If you are unsure about any part of the process, dont do it. Your Podiatrist treats... CENTRALFLORIDAFOOTCARE, P.A.Dr. Nick Przystawski, DPM www.Floridafoot.com LOUIS DELUCA / MCT Tattoo artist Cody Biggs loads ink in Dallas. RISKS FROM PAGE C1

PAGE 17

Monday, June 9, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 Roughly 300 people enrolled in 39 class es offered last year by the YMCA of Metropol itan Milwaukee, with the cost for 277 of them paid by their employer through UnitedHealth care. This year, the YMCA hopes to enroll 455 people in 45 classes. The classes are of fered at Ys as well as workplaces and com munity sites. The 16-week course, which is followed by monthly meetings, in cludes information on diet and exercise. But more than anything else, the program sets out to change lifestyles in a way that is support ive and nonjudgmental. Vicki Olejnik, who is nearing the end of the program, initially thought that 16 weeks was a long time. Now Im kind of sor ry its almost over, she said. Olejnik, who has tried several diets over the years, has lost 24 pounds since the start of the program. Its surprisingly easy, she said. And I still can eat things I enjoy. People in the program keep track of what they eat but track fat grams instead of calories. I learned that how I was eating was all wrong, said Olejnik. And that is why I wasnt losing weight. Her blood sugar and cholesterol are down. And she has more energy. My daughter said, Gosh, Mom is like the Energizer Bunny, Ole jnik said. Olejnik, who is 69 and works for Milwaukee County, was contacted by UnitedHealthcare af ter a health screening that is part of the coun tys wellness program. Olejniks mother and grandmother devel oped diabetes. And she knew her blood sugar was high. The program is an out growth of a study by the CDC and the National Institutes of Health that compared the effective ness of a diabetes drug with a program to help people lose at least 7% of their weight through diet, exercise and indi vidual counseling. The results, published in 2002, showed that the weight loss reduced the risk of developing dia betes by 58 percent over three years, compared with 31% for people who took the drug met formin. Researchers at In diana University then modied the program and worked with the YMCA in Indianapolis to adopt the model for small groups. The CDC provided funding for a pilot pro gram at several YMCA sites. In 2010, United Health Group proposed taking the program na tionwide and offering it as a benet in its health plans. Between one-third and two-thirds of the people with prediabe tes are likely to devel op type 2 diabetes with in six years, compared with 5% of those with normal blood sugar. And the potential ben ets of preventing the disease are clear. According to the ar ticle in Health Affairs, an analysis of United Healthcare claims data found: The average total an nual cost for an adult with employer cover age who was diagnosed with diabetes was $11,700 in 2009, com pared with $4,400 for an adult who did not have the disease. The average annu al cost for an adult with diabetes who devel oped complications was $20,700. Annual health care spending attributable to prediabetes or dia betes could rise from $206 billion in 2011 to $512 billion by 2021. Al most two-thirds of the cost would be incurred by Medicare and Med icaid because of the higher prevalence of the disease among peo ple covered by the pro grams. As of March 31, the program has held 2,477 classes in 41 states, and Y associations have trained 1,883 lifestyle coaches. Each year it contin ues to grow, said Ellie Duyser, a registered di etitian and director of the Diabetes Prevention Program for the YMCA of Metropolitan Mil waukee. Part educational, p art support group, the pro gram sets realistic goals. This is about life-sus taining changes, Duy ser said. CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) D002409 DIABETES FROM PAGE C2 RICK WOOD / MCT Instructor Joannie Malek leads a water aerobics class at the Tri-County YMCA in Menomonee Falls, Wisc.

PAGE 18

C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 9, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTS Comics www.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

PAGE 19

Monday, June 9, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 Working gallery of local artistsANTIQUEDEALERSWANTED (352) 460-4806facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburg www.dailycommercial.com Diversions 352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puz zle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, June 9 the 160th day of 2014. There are 205 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in His tory: On June 9, 1954, during the Senate-Army Hearings, Army special counsel Joseph N. Welch berated Sen. Jo seph R. McCarthy, R-Wis., for verbally attacking a member of Welchs law rm, Fred Fish er, asking McCarthy: Have you no sense of decency, sir? At long last, have you left no sense of decency? HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, June 9, 2014: This year one might be hard-pressed to recognize the evanescent Gemini. You indulge and become more tuned in to your intuitive or psychic abilities. You also enjoy learning more about this facet of your personali ty. Communication ourish es this year. If you are sin gle, you could date a lot, but you will know when you meet the right person. If you are attached, you will test out your seemingly new intuitive ability on your sweetie. You could have a lot of fun with experimenting with this. SCORPIO might be hard to work with. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Communication our ishes with a roommate or family member. You will want to have a discussion about what you want from your home life. Share some of your desires openly. You might be surprised at how fast one wish could be re alized. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You could be pulled in two different directions. Though you often are aware of your similarities with oth ers, right now youll see the differences. Share more of your thoughts, as you might want some feedback. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) If you listen to your sixth sense, you will get ahead both nancially and in your daily/work life. You intuitively seem to know which way to go and what to do. A boss might have a great idea, but the fol low-through seems to be conicted. CANCER (June 21-July 22) What you feel might be more important than what you think today. You need to act spontaneously. You will understand the dynam ics of your actions later. Fol lowing through on an estab lished plan might not go as planned. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Work at home or make your ofce more comfortable. You will thrive in this en vironment and relax more easily. A partner might be acting in an odd way as he or she follows his or her in tuition. Try to conrm im portant information. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Others might be elusive right now, but they probably dont mean to be. Some of the people surrounding you easily could be on a differ ent track. Look around, and youll nd that nearly every one seems to be daydream ing. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You could be taken aback by the fact that others cant see what you are experienc ing. Worry less. You might not want to share exactly what is on your mind before you verify some information. A hunch could pay off. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You are energized, and youll express your creativi ty. Follow your sixth sense. You might feel a little inse cure about listening to this inner voice, but by doing so, youll get great results. A new friend could be quite distracting. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Gather informa tion, and explore new ideas. You might have a totally dif ferent take from anyone else. Honor a sense that you might not be ready to share just yet. A domestic issue might emerge from out of the blue. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) A meeting could be the inspiration for what needs to happen next. Sometimes your logic works against you. Follow your in tuition with an important conversation, especially when dealing with key peo ple in your life. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Be willing to take the lead, even if it makes you uncomfortable. You might feel as if you have too much to do, but youll have lit tle choice. Be very care ful when handling funds, as you might not be as fo cused as you might think you are. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You might not be hear ing the whole story. Reach out to someone at a dis tance to get some feed back. Only then will you know what information you are missing. The facts you seek might be right in front of you. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORY DEAR ABBY: I accept ed a request from my brother to watch his cats while he was across the country for a few months. During that time, one of them matured and started marking his territory all over my house. The dilemma was quick ly taken care of with a trip to the vet, after permission from my brother. My brother now in sists that because I ac cepted responsibili ty for the cats in every way in his absence that I shouldnt expect reimbursement for the professional carpet cleaner I rented or the vet bill I paid for neu tering the cat. Am I out of line to expect to be paid back? We have agreed to abide by your re sponse. CHRISTINA IN MARYLAND DEAR CHRISTINA: Tell your brother to start writing the check now. If hed had to board his cats while he was out of town, it would have cost him a lot more. You were kind to help him out, and he should be ashamed of himself for trying to stiff you. HISSS! DEAR ABBY: My sisterin-law is in a barber shop quartet. While I appreciate the artistic effort of what she does, listening to it bores me and I dont enjoy it. I feel like I must go to her recitals because she makes a point of inviting my husband and me. I have an ethical di lemma. Should I be honest with her and say I dont enjoy sit ting through two to three hours of a capel la songs? Or should I be true to MYSELF and admit Id rather stay home and catch up on my reading? What would you do, Abby? EARACHE IN IDAHO DEAR EARACHE: Id try to be tactful. Instead of saying you would rath er stay home and catch up on your reading, say instead that you have different taste in music than she does, or that you have oth er plans. If this would make you feel guilty, consider putting in an appearance every once in a while. DEAR ABBY: My sec ond wife died last year after 39 years of mar riage. She had a beau tiful, unique sense of humor. Three weeks af ter her funeral, I was walking our dog on the day that would have been our anniversa ry. As I bent down to pick up the poop, I spotted a quarter on the ground. It was so tarnished with age I couldnt make out the date. But I remem bered your pennies from heaven letters, so I picked it up. I hurried home to clean it to see if it was from the year we were married. I was amazed when I discovered it WAS from the year I was married but to my rst wife. Like I said, my late wife had a unique sense of humor ... SMILING IN NEW JERSEY DEAR SMILING: Im sor ry for your loss. Two things occur to me. The rst is that the quar ter was your reward for being a responsible dog owner. The second is that your late wife may have been trying to remind you that you had a love before her, and you may nd another one in the fu ture. Dear Abby is written by Abi gail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was found ed by her mother, Pauline Phil lips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Siblings are growling over cat-sitting charges JEANNE PHILLIPS DEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGAR BIGARS STARS

PAGE 20

C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 9, 2014 Psychic Services A/C Services Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Home Improvement Irrigation Services Sprinkler Repairsrfntbr rfff f rfffn tn b rfffn tnrrnr rrnbf Landscaping Services r fntbb Pet Grooming Services Legal Services Painting Services Shower Doors Service Enclosure Screening Window Services Handyman Services BOYDSYou call it, We haul it!352-460-7186Grading, Loading, etc. Marine Services Affordable Home Repair, LLCttf bbrbf tbbb nb 352-551-6073 Electrical Services Roofing Services To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact the Classified Department at (352) 314-3278. Tree Service Plumbing Services Land Clearing Services BrocksLAWN SERVICE nnt nnnnttfbf rffrntbfrfntbrfr Hauling Services rf rbrrff ff trf HAULING!nnn bbfntb b Concrete Services nff rfbt rnf ttnfb tbf Lawn Services nbt ft bfbrnf btrf nfb bbrtbbf LIC. INS.nrn nr LIC. INS.nrn nr bbrbff ttfrb brfb Home Improvement

PAGE 21

Monday, June 9, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX

PAGE 22

D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 9, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX

PAGE 23

Monday, June 9, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance r t t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital

PAGE 24

D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 9, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr